WorldWideScience

Sample records for integrating desktop vr

  1. Cubby : Multiscreen Desktop VR Part III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djajadiningrat, J.P.; Gribnau, M.W.

    2000-01-01

    In this month's final episode of our 'Cubby: Multiscreen Desktop VR' trilogy we explain how you read the InputSprocket driver from part II, how you use it as input for the cameras from part I and how you calibrate the input device so that it leads to the correct head position.

  2. Cubby : Multiscreen Desktop VR Part II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gribnau, M.W.; Djajadiningrat, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    In this second part of our 'Cubby: Multiscreen Desktop VR' trilogy, we will introduce you to the art of creating a driver to read an Origin Instruments Dynasight input device. With the Dynasight, the position of the head of the user is established so that Cubby can display the correct images on its

  3. Virtualisation Devices for Student Learning: Comparison between Desktop-Based (Oculus Rift) and Mobile-Based (Gear VR) Virtual Reality in Medical and Health Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Christian; Stromberga, Zane; Stirling, Allan

    2017-01-01

    Consumer-grade virtual reality has recently become available for both desktop and mobile platforms and may redefine the way that students learn. However, the decision regarding which device to utilise within a curriculum is unclear. Desktop-based VR has considerably higher setup costs involved, whereas mobile-based VR cannot produce the quality of…

  4. CloVR: A virtual machine for automated and portable sequence analysis from the desktop using cloud computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Next-generation sequencing technologies have decentralized sequence acquisition, increasing the demand for new bioinformatics tools that are easy to use, portable across multiple platforms, and scalable for high-throughput applications. Cloud computing platforms provide on-demand access to computing infrastructure over the Internet and can be used in combination with custom built virtual machines to distribute pre-packaged with pre-configured software. Results We describe the Cloud Virtual Resource, CloVR, a new desktop application for push-button automated sequence analysis that can utilize cloud computing resources. CloVR is implemented as a single portable virtual machine (VM) that provides several automated analysis pipelines for microbial genomics, including 16S, whole genome and metagenome sequence analysis. The CloVR VM runs on a personal computer, utilizes local computer resources and requires minimal installation, addressing key challenges in deploying bioinformatics workflows. In addition CloVR supports use of remote cloud computing resources to improve performance for large-scale sequence processing. In a case study, we demonstrate the use of CloVR to automatically process next-generation sequencing data on multiple cloud computing platforms. Conclusion The CloVR VM and associated architecture lowers the barrier of entry for utilizing complex analysis protocols on both local single- and multi-core computers and cloud systems for high throughput data processing. PMID:21878105

  5. CloVR: a virtual machine for automated and portable sequence analysis from the desktop using cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiuoli, Samuel V; Matalka, Malcolm; Gussman, Aaron; Galens, Kevin; Vangala, Mahesh; Riley, David R; Arze, Cesar; White, James R; White, Owen; Fricke, W Florian

    2011-08-30

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have decentralized sequence acquisition, increasing the demand for new bioinformatics tools that are easy to use, portable across multiple platforms, and scalable for high-throughput applications. Cloud computing platforms provide on-demand access to computing infrastructure over the Internet and can be used in combination with custom built virtual machines to distribute pre-packaged with pre-configured software. We describe the Cloud Virtual Resource, CloVR, a new desktop application for push-button automated sequence analysis that can utilize cloud computing resources. CloVR is implemented as a single portable virtual machine (VM) that provides several automated analysis pipelines for microbial genomics, including 16S, whole genome and metagenome sequence analysis. The CloVR VM runs on a personal computer, utilizes local computer resources and requires minimal installation, addressing key challenges in deploying bioinformatics workflows. In addition CloVR supports use of remote cloud computing resources to improve performance for large-scale sequence processing. In a case study, we demonstrate the use of CloVR to automatically process next-generation sequencing data on multiple cloud computing platforms. The CloVR VM and associated architecture lowers the barrier of entry for utilizing complex analysis protocols on both local single- and multi-core computers and cloud systems for high throughput data processing.

  6. Economic Evaluation of Voice Recognition (VR) for the Clinician's Desktop at the Naval Hospital Roosevelt Roads

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    This thesis investigates the current status of VR technology, its use in support of Joint vision 2010, its use in the Healthcare environment and provides an analysis of the VR Pilot Project at NHRR...

  7. Scene Integration for Online VR Advertising Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kalochristianakis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a scene composition approach that allows the combinational use of standard three dimensional objects, called models, in order to create X3D scenes. The module is an integral part of a broader design aiming to construct large scale online advertising infrastructures that rely on virtual reality technologies. The architecture addresses a number of problems regarding remote rendering for low end devices and last but not least, the provision of scene composition and integration. Since viewers do not keep information regarding individual input models or scenes, composition requires the consideration of mechanisms that add state to viewing technologies. In terms of this work we extended a well-known, open source X3D authoring tool.

  8. Neuropsychological performance and integrated evaluation for disabled people using Virtual Reality: integrated VR profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccini, PierAntonio

    2002-01-01

    This chapter describes a Virtual Reality (VR) based innovative model of evaluation of the performance and potentiality of young mentally/psychically disabled subjects with learning difficulties. Using an immersive PC-based VR system, the study investigated the characteristics of 150 disabled subjects in the EU funded project "Horizon O.D.A.--Catania-1998--2000". The result is the definition of an individual neuropsychological "Integrated Profile", based on VR performance, that allows an objective functional benchmark between different subjects. This model can be used to investigate the possibility of job integration for mentally/psychically disabled subjects.

  9. Semantic document architecture for desktop data integration and management

    OpenAIRE

    Nesic, Sasa; Jazayeri, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, personal desktops have faced the problem of information overload due to increasing computational power, easy access to the Web and cheap data storage. Moreover, an increasing number of diverse end-user desktop applications have led to the problem of information fragmentation. Each desktop application has its own data, unaware of related and relevant data in other applications. In other words, personal desktops face a lack of interoperability of data managed by differ...

  10. Efficient Sustainable Operation Mechanism of Distributed Desktop Integration Storage Based on Virtualization with Ubiquitous Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Woo Kim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Following the rapid growth of ubiquitous computing, many jobs that were previously manual have now been automated. This automation has increased the amount of time available for leisure; diverse services are now being developed for this leisure time. In addition, the development of small and portable devices like smartphones, diverse Internet services can be used regardless of time and place. Studies regarding diverse virtualization are currently in progress. These studies aim to determine ways to efficiently store and process the big data generated by the multitude of devices and services in use. One topic of such studies is desktop storage virtualization, which integrates distributed desktop resources and provides these resources to users to integrate into distributed legacy desktops via virtualization. In the case of desktop storage virtualization, high availability of virtualization is necessary and important for providing reliability to users. Studies regarding hierarchical structures and resource integration are currently in progress. These studies aim to create efficient data distribution and storage for distributed desktops based on resource integration environments. However, studies regarding efficient responses to server faults occurring in desktop-based resource integration environments have been insufficient. This paper proposes a mechanism for the sustainable operation of desktop storage (SODS for high operational availability. It allows for the easy addition and removal of desktops in desktop-based integration environments. It also activates alternative servers when a fault occurs within a system.

  11. Laevo: A Temporal Desktop Interface for Integrated Knowledge Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeuris, Steven; Houben, Steven; Bardram, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Prior studies show that knowledge work is characterized by highly interlinked practices, including task, file and window management. However, existing personal information management tools primarily focus on a limited subset of knowledge work, forcing users to perform additional manual...... states and transitions of an activity. The life cycle is used to inform the design of Laevo, a temporal activity-centric desktop interface for personal knowledge work. Laevo allows users to structure work within dedicated workspaces, managed on a timeline. Through a centralized notification system which...... configuration work to integrate the different tools they use. In order to understand tool usage, we review literature on how users' activities are created and evolve over time as part of knowledge worker practices. From this we derive the activity life cycle, a conceptual framework describing the different...

  12. Potential Pedagogical Benefits and Limitations of Multimedia Integrated Desktop Video Conferencing Technology for Synchronous Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    drs Maurice Schols

    2009-01-01

    As multimedia gradually becomes more and more an integrated part of video conferencing systems, the use of multimedia integrated desktop video conferencing technology (MIDVCT) will open up new educational possibilities for synchronous learning. However, the possibilities and limitations of this

  13. Integrating Virtual Reality (VR) into traditional instructional design ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. OLIVER OSUAGWA

    2015-12-01

    Dec 1, 2015 ... this technology and presented how to integrat VR with traditional instructional ... training has forced organizations to adopt new .... skills in a safe, controlled environment ... phone charger battery pack [B] connected to.

  14. Integrating Virtual Reality (VR) into traditional instructional design ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most technical programs in Nigeria's tertiary institutions lack the desired laboratories to impact technical skills to the students. This has led to the production of pseudo-illustrates as graduates and this accounts for reasons why many employers are saying Nigerian graduates are not employable. Virtual Reality (VR) can ...

  15. Integration of a force feedback joystick with a VR system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, A C [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, S. Maria di Galeria, RM (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione

    1999-07-01

    The report shows the result carried out at the Robotics and Information Systems Division of ENEA (National Agency for New Technology, Energy and the Environment) in the Casaccia Centre (Rome). The study presents an approach to the problem of integrating force feedback with a complete real-time virtual environment system: in particular bulky computations for graphics or simulation require a decoupling of the haptic servo loop from the main application loop if high-quality forces are to be obtained. The control system has been developed for the force-feedback joystick Impulse 2000, from Immersion Co., and the integration of it to a virtual environment is presented here. Technical issues related to the development of control architectures for Internet-based exchange of haptic information, in a stable way are discussed. [Italian] Il presente rapporto descrive il lavoro eseguito nella divisione robotica e informatica del dipartimento innovazione dell'ENEA del centro ricerche della Casaccia (Roma): il sistema di controllo del dispositivo con ritorno di forza in un sistema RV (real-time virtual environment system) ed illustra l'approccio a questa problematica ed in particolare la lentezza di esecuzione del ciclo di calcoli per la resa delle immagini da parte del sistema grafico e del ciclio per la simulazione della dinamica di sistema. Viene descritto il sistema di controllo per il joystick con ritorno di forza Impulse 2000 (Immersion Co.) e la sua integrazione ad un ambiente virtuale. Sono inoltre discusse le problematiche connesse allo sviluppo di sistemi che consentano lo scambio dell'informazione tattile attraverso Internet.

  16. Integration of a force feedback joystick with a VR system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, A.C. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, S. Maria di Galeria, RM (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione

    1999-07-01

    The report shows the result carried out at the Robotics and Information Systems Division of ENEA (National Agency for New Technology, Energy and the Environment) in the Casaccia Centre (Rome). The study presents an approach to the problem of integrating force feedback with a complete real-time virtual environment system: in particular bulky computations for graphics or simulation require a decoupling of the haptic servo loop from the main application loop if high-quality forces are to be obtained. The control system has been developed for the force-feedback joystick Impulse 2000, from Immersion Co., and the integration of it to a virtual environment is presented here. Technical issues related to the development of control architectures for Internet-based exchange of haptic information, in a stable way are discussed. [Italian] Il presente rapporto descrive il lavoro eseguito nella divisione robotica e informatica del dipartimento innovazione dell'ENEA del centro ricerche della Casaccia (Roma): il sistema di controllo del dispositivo con ritorno di forza in un sistema RV (real-time virtual environment system) ed illustra l'approccio a questa problematica ed in particolare la lentezza di esecuzione del ciclo di calcoli per la resa delle immagini da parte del sistema grafico e del ciclio per la simulazione della dinamica di sistema. Viene descritto il sistema di controllo per il joystick con ritorno di forza Impulse 2000 (Immersion Co.) e la sua integrazione ad un ambiente virtuale. Sono inoltre discusse le problematiche connesse allo sviluppo di sistemi che consentano lo scambio dell'informazione tattile attraverso Internet.

  17. HTC Vive MeVisLab integration via OpenVR for medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, Jan; Gall, Markus; Wallner, Jürgen; Boechat, Pedro; Hann, Alexander; Li, Xing; Chen, Xiaojun; Schmalstieg, Dieter

    2017-01-01

    Virtual Reality, an immersive technology that replicates an environment via computer-simulated reality, gets a lot of attention in the entertainment industry. However, VR has also great potential in other areas, like the medical domain, Examples are intervention planning, training and simulation. This is especially of use in medical operations, where an aesthetic outcome is important, like for facial surgeries. Alas, importing medical data into Virtual Reality devices is not necessarily trivial, in particular, when a direct connection to a proprietary application is desired. Moreover, most researcher do not build their medical applications from scratch, but rather leverage platforms like MeVisLab, MITK, OsiriX or 3D Slicer. These platforms have in common that they use libraries like ITK and VTK, and provide a convenient graphical interface. However, ITK and VTK do not support Virtual Reality directly. In this study, the usage of a Virtual Reality device for medical data under the MeVisLab platform is presented. The OpenVR library is integrated into the MeVisLab platform, allowing a direct and uncomplicated usage of the head mounted display HTC Vive inside the MeVisLab platform. Medical data coming from other MeVisLab modules can directly be connected per drag-and-drop to the Virtual Reality module, rendering the data inside the HTC Vive for immersive virtual reality inspection.

  18. HTC Vive MeVisLab integration via OpenVR for medical applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Egger

    Full Text Available Virtual Reality, an immersive technology that replicates an environment via computer-simulated reality, gets a lot of attention in the entertainment industry. However, VR has also great potential in other areas, like the medical domain, Examples are intervention planning, training and simulation. This is especially of use in medical operations, where an aesthetic outcome is important, like for facial surgeries. Alas, importing medical data into Virtual Reality devices is not necessarily trivial, in particular, when a direct connection to a proprietary application is desired. Moreover, most researcher do not build their medical applications from scratch, but rather leverage platforms like MeVisLab, MITK, OsiriX or 3D Slicer. These platforms have in common that they use libraries like ITK and VTK, and provide a convenient graphical interface. However, ITK and VTK do not support Virtual Reality directly. In this study, the usage of a Virtual Reality device for medical data under the MeVisLab platform is presented. The OpenVR library is integrated into the MeVisLab platform, allowing a direct and uncomplicated usage of the head mounted display HTC Vive inside the MeVisLab platform. Medical data coming from other MeVisLab modules can directly be connected per drag-and-drop to the Virtual Reality module, rendering the data inside the HTC Vive for immersive virtual reality inspection.

  19. Semantic Desktop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauermann, Leo; Kiesel, Malte; Schumacher, Kinga; Bernardi, Ansgar

    In diesem Beitrag wird gezeigt, wie der Arbeitsplatz der Zukunft aussehen könnte und wo das Semantic Web neue Möglichkeiten eröffnet. Dazu werden Ansätze aus dem Bereich Semantic Web, Knowledge Representation, Desktop-Anwendungen und Visualisierung vorgestellt, die es uns ermöglichen, die bestehenden Daten eines Benutzers neu zu interpretieren und zu verwenden. Dabei bringt die Kombination von Semantic Web und Desktop Computern besondere Vorteile - ein Paradigma, das unter dem Titel Semantic Desktop bekannt ist. Die beschriebenen Möglichkeiten der Applikationsintegration sind aber nicht auf den Desktop beschränkt, sondern können genauso in Web-Anwendungen Verwendung finden.

  20. Use of Signaling to Integrate Desktop Virtual Reality and Online Learning Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Bucky J.; Antonenko, Pavlo D.

    2012-01-01

    Desktop virtual reality is an emerging educational technology that offers many potential benefits for learners in online learning contexts; however, a limited body of research is available that connects current multimedia learning techniques with these new forms of media. Because most formal online learning is delivered using learning management…

  1. Desktop Genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Hough, Soren H; Ajetunmobi, Ayokunmi; Brody, Leigh; Humphryes-Kirilov, Neil; Perello, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Desktop Genetics is a bioinformatics company building a gene-editing platform for personalized medicine. The company works with scientists around the world to design and execute state-of-the-art clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) experiments. Desktop Genetics feeds the lessons learned about experimental intent, single-guide RNA design and data from international genomics projects into a novel CRISPR artificial intelligence system. We believe that machine learni...

  2. 4'' + D VR technology for structural analysis and integrated maintenance of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, I. S.; Yoon, S. H.; Shim, K. W.; Yu, Y. H.; Suh, K. Y.

    2002-01-01

    There continues to be an increasing demand of electricity around the globe to fuel the industrial growth and to promote the human welfare. The economic activities have brought about richness in our material and cultural lives, in which process the electric power has been at the heart of the versatile energy sources. In order to timely and competitively respond to rapidly changing energy environment in the twenty-first century there is a growing need to build the advanced nuclear power plants in the unlimited K, which were confirmed by FTIR and 51 V Ncommissioning. One can then realistically evaluate their construction time and cost per varying methods and options available from the leading-edge technology. In particular a great deal of efforts have yet to be made for time- and cost-dependent plant simulation and dynamically coupled database construction in the VR space. The operator training and personnel education may also benefit from the VR technology. The present work is being proposed in the three-dimensional space and time plus cost coordinates, i.e. four plus dimensional (4 + D) coordinates. The 4 + D VR application will enable the nuclear industry to narrow the technological gap from the other leading industries that have long since been employing the VR engineering. The 4 + D technology will help nurture public understanding of the special discipline of nuclear power plants. The technology will also facilitate public access to the knowledge on the nuclear science and engineering which has so far been monopolized by the academia, national laboratories and the heavy industry. The 4 + D virtual design and construction will open up the new horizon for revitalization of the nuclear industry over the globe in the foreseeable future. Considering the long construction and operation time for the nuclear power plants, the preliminary VR simulation capability for the plants will supply the vital information not only for the actual design and construction of the

  3. Nuclear Plant Analyzer desktop workstation: An integrated interactive simulation, visualization and analysis tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beelman, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    The advanced, best-estimate, reactor thermal-hydraulic codes were originally developed as mainframe computer applications because of speed, precision, memory and mass storage requirements. However, the productivity of numerical reactor safety analysts has historically been hampered by mainframe dependence due to limited mainframe CPU allocation, accessibility and availability, poor mainframe job throughput, and delays in obtaining and difficulty comprehending printed numerical results. The Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA) was originally developed as a mainframe computer-graphics aid for reactor safety analysts in addressing the latter consideration. Rapid advances in microcomputer technology have since enabled the installation and execution of these reactor safety codes on desktop computers thereby eliminating mainframe dependence. The need for a complementary desktop graphics display generation and presentation capability, coupled with the need for software standardization and portability, has motivated the redesign of the NPA as a UNIX/X-Windows application suitable for both mainframe and microcomputer

  4. Desktop Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, Soren H; Ajetunmobi, Ayokunmi; Brody, Leigh; Humphryes-Kirilov, Neil; Perello, Edward

    2016-11-01

    Desktop Genetics is a bioinformatics company building a gene-editing platform for personalized medicine. The company works with scientists around the world to design and execute state-of-the-art clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) experiments. Desktop Genetics feeds the lessons learned about experimental intent, single-guide RNA design and data from international genomics projects into a novel CRISPR artificial intelligence system. We believe that machine learning techniques can transform this information into a cognitive therapeutic development tool that will revolutionize medicine.

  5. Desktop Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Milt

    1986-01-01

    Defines desktop publishing, describes microcomputer developments and software tools that make it possible, and discusses its use as an instructional tool to improve writing skills. Reasons why students' work should be published, examples of what to publish, and types of software and hardware to facilitate publishing are reviewed. (MBR)

  6. Application of Integration of HBIM and VR Technology to 3D Immersive Digital Management—Take Han Type Traditional Architecture as an Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-C. Lin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available HBIM technology makes great contributions to 3D digital preservation and management of the existing traditional architectures, and VR technology has also been gradually emphasized by 3D users in recent years, especially 3D immersive situation makes users more likely to experience the real space field. Taking Han type traditional architecture with relatively complex geometrical structure as an example, this research carries out digital preservation through HBIM technology and tries to switch to VR platform to allow users to enter 3D immersive scene for management and display. It is shown in the research results that the application of integration of HBIM and VR technology to Han type traditional architecture needs to consider 3D digital model of the architecture, and the number of polygon shall be controlled below about 2 million, which can make the operation in VR environment more smooth; the integration of two technologies can achieve the purpose of 3D immersive digital management, which can provide the humanized application close to the real experience for the display of subsequent management of ancient relics and architectural aesthetics.

  7. Pages from the Desktop: Desktop Publishing Today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Walt

    1994-01-01

    Discusses changes that have made desktop publishing appealing and reasonably priced. Hardware, software, and printer options for getting started and moving on, typeface developments, and the key characteristics of desktop publishing are described. The author's notes on 33 articles from the personal computing literature from January-March 1994 are…

  8. Desktop Publishing Made Simple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentling, Rose Mary

    1989-01-01

    The author discusses the types of computer hardware and software necessary to set up a desktop publishing system, both for use in educational administration and for instructional purposes. Classroom applications of desktop publishing are presented. The author also provides guidelines for preparing to teach desktop publishing. (CH)

  9. Nuclear plant analyzer desktop workstation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beelman, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    In 1983 the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) commissioned the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to develop a Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA). The NPA was envisioned as a graphical aid to assist reactor safety analysts in comprehending the results of thermal-hydraulic code calculations. The development was to proceed in three distinct phases culminating in a desktop reactor safety workstation. The desktop NPA is now complete. The desktop NPA is a microcomputer based reactor transient simulation, visualization and analysis tool developed at INEL to assist an analyst in evaluating the transient behavior of nuclear power plants by means of graphic displays. The NPA desktop workstation integrates advanced reactor simulation codes with online computer graphics allowing reactor plant transient simulation and graphical presentation of results. The graphics software, written exclusively in ANSI standard C and FORTRAN 77 and implemented over the UNIX/X-windows operating environment, is modular and is designed to interface to the NRC's suite of advanced thermal-hydraulic codes to the extent allowed by that code. Currently, full, interactive, desktop NPA capabilities are realized only with RELAP5

  10. VRLane: a desktop virtual safety management program for underground coal mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei; Chen, Jingzhu; Xiong, Wei; Zhang, Pengpeng; Wu, Daozheng

    2008-10-01

    VR technologies, which generate immersive, interactive, and three-dimensional (3D) environments, are seldom applied to coal mine safety work management. In this paper, a new method that combined the VR technologies with underground mine safety management system was explored. A desktop virtual safety management program for underground coal mine, called VRLane, was developed. The paper mainly concerned about the current research advance in VR, system design, key techniques and system application. Two important techniques were introduced in the paper. Firstly, an algorithm was designed and implemented, with which the 3D laneway models and equipment models can be built on the basis of the latest mine 2D drawings automatically, whereas common VR programs established 3D environment by using 3DS Max or the other 3D modeling software packages with which laneway models were built manually and laboriously. Secondly, VRLane realized system integration with underground industrial automation. VRLane not only described a realistic 3D laneway environment, but also described the status of the coal mining, with functions of displaying the run states and related parameters of equipment, per-alarming the abnormal mining events, and animating mine cars, mine workers, or long-wall shearers. The system, with advantages of cheap, dynamic, easy to maintenance, provided a useful tool for safety production management in coal mine.

  11. DYNALIGHT DESKTOP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mærsk-Møller, Hans Martin; Kjær, Katrine Heinsvig; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2018-01-01

    for energy and cost-efficient climate control strategies that do not compromise product quality. In this paper, we present a novel approach addressing dynamic control of supplemental light in greenhouses aiming to decrease electricity costs and energy consumption without loss in plant productivity. Our...... approach uses weather forecasts and electricity prices to compute energy and cost-efficient supplemental light plans, which fulfils the production goals of the grower. The approach is supported by a set of newly developed planning software, which interfaces with a greenhouse climate computer. The planning...... algorithm is based on a new plant physiological understanding that utilizes the natural plasticity in plants to irregular light periods. The results revealed that different light control strategies using three different set points of daily photosynthesis integral (DPI) compared to a control treatment...

  12. Applications and a three-dimensional desktop environment for an immersive virtual reality system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kageyama, Akira; Masada, Youhei

    2013-01-01

    We developed an application launcher called Multiverse for scientific visualizations in a CAVE-type virtual reality (VR) system. Multiverse can be regarded as a type of three-dimensional (3D) desktop environment. In Multiverse, a user in a CAVE room can browse multiple visualization applications with 3D icons and explore movies that float in the air. Touching one of the movies causes ''teleportation'' into the application's VR space. After analyzing the simulation data using the application, the user can jump back into Multiverse's VR desktop environment in the CAVE

  13. Desktop Publishing for Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucking, Robert; Mitchum, Nancy

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the fundamentals of desktop publishing for counselors, including hardware and software systems and peripherals. Notes by using desktop publishing, counselors can produce their own high-quality documents without the expense of commercial printers. Concludes computers present a way of streamlining the communications of a counseling…

  14. Subjects taught in VR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, Frans; van den Broek, Egon; Stam, Liesbeth M.; Abrahamse, E.L.; Luursema, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    This deliverable serves to reinstate a broad view on Virtual Reality (VR), capturing all its constituting disciplines. The core target of this report is to establish a foundation for an educational program where all disciplines subordinate to VR technology will converge. Over the past decade(s) the

  15. HBIM TO VR. SEMANTIC AWARENESS AND DATA ENRICHMENT INTEROPERABILITY FOR PARAMETRIC LIBRARIES OF HISTORICAL ARCHITECTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Quattrini

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently we assist to an increasing availability of HBIM models rich in geometric and informative terms. Instead, there is still a lack of researches implementing dedicated libraries, based on parametric intelligence and semantically aware, related to the architectural heritage. Additional challenges became from their portability in non-desktop environment (such as VR. The research article demonstrates the validity of a workflow applied to the architectural heritage, which starting from the semantic modeling reaches the visualization in a virtual reality environment, passing through the necessary phases of export, data migration and management. The three-dimensional modeling of the classical Doric order takes place in the BIM work environment and is configured as a necessary starting point for the implementation of data, parametric intelligences and definition of ontologies that exclusively qualify the model. The study also enables an effective method for data migration from the BIM model to databases integrated into VR technologies for AH. Furthermore, the process intends to propose a methodology, applicable in a return path, suited to the achievement of an appropriate data enrichment of each model and to the possibility of interaction in VR environment with the model.

  16. Linux Desktop Pocket Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Brickner, David

    2005-01-01

    While Mac OS X garners all the praise from pundits, and Windows XP attracts all the viruses, Linux is quietly being installed on millions of desktops every year. For programmers and system administrators, business users, and educators, desktop Linux is a breath of fresh air and a needed alternative to other operating systems. The Linux Desktop Pocket Guide is your introduction to using Linux on five of the most popular distributions: Fedora, Gentoo, Mandriva, SUSE, and Ubuntu. Despite what you may have heard, using Linux is not all that hard. Firefox and Konqueror can handle all your web bro

  17. Desktop grid computing

    CERN Document Server

    Cerin, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Desktop Grid Computing presents common techniques used in numerous models, algorithms, and tools developed during the last decade to implement desktop grid computing. These techniques enable the solution of many important sub-problems for middleware design, including scheduling, data management, security, load balancing, result certification, and fault tolerance. The book's first part covers the initial ideas and basic concepts of desktop grid computing. The second part explores challenging current and future problems. Each chapter presents the sub-problems, discusses theoretical and practical

  18. Desktop Publishing in Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisler, Steve

    1987-01-01

    Describes the components, costs, and capabilities of several desktop publishing systems, and examines their possible impact on work patterns within organizations. The text and graphics of the article were created using various microcomputer software packages. (CLB)

  19. VR plugin: a Virtual Reality plugin for unity applications

    OpenAIRE

    Troya Moreno, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Software development for Virtual Reality (VR) has been popularized in 2016, alongside products such as Unity 3D and Oculus, especially in fields such as video games, tourism, media and marketing. But software development for VR is complex because additional requirements must be added to software that are not normally required. Newcomers to the Decoroso Crespo Laboratory, who join new groups to develop VR software using Unity 3D as a development platform, find it difficult to integrate some of...

  20. Choosing the Right Desktop Publisher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiser, Leslie

    1988-01-01

    Investigates the many different desktop publishing packages available today. Lists the steps to desktop publishing. Suggests which package to use with specific hardware available. Compares several packages for IBM, Mac, and Apple II based systems. (MVL)

  1. Desktop Publishing in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Wendy; Layman, J.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the state of desktop publishing (DTP) in education today and describes the weaknesses of the systems available for use in the classroom. Highlights include document design and layout; text composition; graphics; word processing capabilities; a comparison of commercial and educational DTP packages; and skills required for DTP. (four…

  2. A Cross-Case Analysis of Gender Issues in Desktop Virtual Reality Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausburn, Lynna J.; Martens, Jon; Washington, Andre; Steele, Debra; Washburn, Earlene

    2009-01-01

    This study examined gender-related issues in using new desktop virtual reality (VR) technology as a learning tool in career and technical education (CTE). Using relevant literature, theory, and cross-case analysis of data and findings, the study compared and analyzed the outcomes of two recent studies conducted by a research team at Oklahoma State…

  3. Rhythmic interaction in VR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erkut, Cumhur

    2017-01-01

    Cinematic virtual reality is a new and relatively unexplored area in academia. While research in guiding the spectator's attention in this new medium has been conducted for some time, a focus on editing in conjunction with spectator orientation is only currently emerging. In this paper, we consid...... in rhythm perception, and complement it with applications in traditional editing. Through the notion of multimodal listening we provide guidelines that can be used in rhythmic and sonic interaction design in VR....

  4. Desk Congest Desktop Congesting Software for Desktop Clutter Congestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon A. Adepoju

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The computer desktop environment is a working environment which can be likened unto a users desk in homes and offices. Often times the computer desktop get cluttered with files either as shortcuts used for quick links files stored temporarily to be accessed later or just being dumped there for no vivid reasons. However previous researches have shown that cluttered desktop affects users productivity and getting these files organized is a laborious task for most users. To be able to conveniently alleviate the effect clutters have on users performances and productivity there is need for third party software that will help get the desktop environment organized in a logical and efficient manner. It is to this end that desktop decongesting software is being designed and implemented to help curb clutter problems which existing tools have only partially addressed. The system is designed using Visual Basic .Net and it proves to be effective in tackling desktop congestion problem.

  5. ADAM (Affordable Desktop Application Manager): a Unix desktop application manager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebana, M.; Marquina, M.; Ramos, R.

    1996-01-01

    ADAM stands for Affordable Desktop Application Manager. It is a GUI developed at CERN with the aim to ease access to applications. The motivation to develop ADAM came from the unavailability of environments like COSE/CDE and their heavy resource consumption. ADAM has proven to be user friendly: new users are able to customize it to their needs in few minutes. Groups of users may share through ADAM a common application environment. ADAM also integrates the Unix and the PC world. PC users can excess Unix applications in the same way as their usual Windows applications. This paper describes all the ADAM features, how they are used at CERN Public Services, and the future plans for ADAM. (author)

  6. Integrating VR and knowledge-based technologies to facilitate the development of operator training systems and scenarios to improve process safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shang, X.; Chung, P.W.H.; Vezzadini, L.; Loupos, K.; Hoekstra, W.

    2006-01-01

    Process safety can be regarded of paramount importance since any malfunction or mal-operation of a hazardous processing plant may lead to accidents that will cause damage to properties, injury to people and may even result in fatalities. This project investigates how Virtual Reality (VR) and

  7. A desktop PRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, B.J.; Weber, B.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports that Duke Power Company has completed full-scope PRAs for each of its nuclear stations - Oconee, McGuire and Catawba. These living PRAs are being maintained using desktop personal computers. Duke's PRA group now has powerful personal computer-based tools that have both decreased direct costs (computer analysis expenses) and increased group efficiency (less time to perform analyses). The shorter turnaround time has already resulted in direct savings through analyses provided in support of justification for continued station operation. Such savings are expected to continue with similar future support

  8. Common Sense Wordworking III: Desktop Publishing and Desktop Typesetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Walt

    1987-01-01

    Describes current desktop publishing packages available for microcomputers and discusses the disadvantages, especially in cost, for most personal computer users. Also described is a less expensive alternative technology--desktop typesetting--which meets the requirements of users who do not need elaborate techniques for combining text and graphics.…

  9. Usability Comparisons of Head-Mounted vs. Stereoscopic Desktop Displays in a Virtual Reality Environment with Pain Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xin; Gromala, Diane; Gupta, Dimple; Squire, Pam

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have shown that immersive Virtual Reality (VR) can serve as an unusually powerful pain control technique. However, research assessing the reported symptoms and negative effects of VR systems indicate that it is important to ascertain if these symptoms arise from the use of particular VR display devices, particularly for users who are deemed "at risk," such as chronic pain patients Moreover, these patients have specific and often complex needs and requirements, and because basic issues such as 'comfort' may trigger anxiety or panic attacks, it is important to examine basic questions of the feasibility of using VR displays. Therefore, this repeated-measured experiment was conducted with two VR displays: the Oculus Rift's head-mounted display (HMD) and Firsthand Technologies' immersive desktop display, DeepStream3D. The characteristics of these immersive desktop displays differ: one is worn, enabling patients to move their heads, while the other is peered into, allowing less head movement. To assess the severity of physical discomforts, 20 chronic pain patients tried both displays while watching a VR pain management demo in clinical settings. Results indicated that participants experienced higher levels of Simulator Sickness using the Oculus Rift HMD. However, results also indicated other preferences of the two VR displays among patients, including physical comfort levels and a sense of immersion. Few studies have been conducted that compare usability of specific VR devices specifically with chronic pain patients using a therapeutic virtual environment in pain clinics. Thus, the results may help clinicians and researchers to choose the most appropriate VR displays for chronic pain patients and guide VR designers to enhance the usability of VR displays for long-term pain management interventions.

  10. Microsoft Virtualization Master Microsoft Server, Desktop, Application, and Presentation Virtualization

    CERN Document Server

    Olzak, Thomas; Boomer, Jason; Keefer, Robert M

    2010-01-01

    Microsoft Virtualization helps you understand and implement the latest virtualization strategies available with Microsoft products. This book focuses on: Server Virtualization, Desktop Virtualization, Application Virtualization, and Presentation Virtualization. Whether you are managing Hyper-V, implementing desktop virtualization, or even migrating virtual machines, this book is packed with coverage on all aspects of these processes. Written by a talented team of Microsoft MVPs, Microsoft Virtualization is the leading resource for a full installation, migration, or integration of virtual syste

  11. Design and validation of a 3D virtual reality desktop system for sonographic length and volume measurements in early pregnancy evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baken, Leonie; van Gruting, Isabelle M A; Steegers, Eric A P; van der Spek, Peter J; Exalto, Niek; Koning, Anton H J

    2015-03-01

    To design and validate a desktop virtual reality (VR) system, for presentation and assessment of volumetric data, based on commercially off-the-shelf hardware as an alternative to a fully immersive CAVE-like I-Space VR system. We designed a desktop VR system, using a three-dimensional (3D) monitor and a six degrees-of-freedom tracking system. A personal computer uses the V-Scope (Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands) volume-rendering application, developed for the I-Space, to create a hologram of volumetric data. Inter- and intraobserver reliability for crown-rump length and embryonic volume measurements are investigated using Bland-Altman plots and intraclass correlation coefficients. Time required for the measurements was recorded. Comparing the I-Space and the desktop VR system, the mean difference for crown-rump length is -0.34% (limits of agreement -2.58-1.89, ±2.24%) and for embryonic volume -0.92% (limits of agreement -6.97-5.13, ±6.05%). Intra- and interobserver intraclass correlation coefficients of the desktop VR system were all >0.99. Measurement times were longer on the desktop VR system compared with the I-Space, but the differences were not statistically significant. A user-friendly desktop VR system can be put together using commercially off-the-shelf hardware at an acceptable price. This system provides a valid and reliable method for embryonic length and volume measurements and can be used in clinical practice. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Fatigue monitoring desktop guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, K.; Thomas, K.

    2012-01-01

    The development of a program for managing material aging (MMG) in the nuclear industry requires a new and different perspective. The classical method for MMG is cycle counting, which has been shown to have limited success. The classical method has been successful in satisfying the ductile condition per the America Society of Mechanical Engineers' (ASME) design criteria. However, the defined material failure mechanism has transformed from through-wall cracking and leakage (ASME) to crack initiation (NUREG-6909). This transformation is based on current industry experience with material degradation early in plant life and can be attributed to fabrication issues and environment concerns where cycle counting has been unsuccessful. This new perspective provides a different approach to cycle counting that incorporates all of the information about the material conditions. This approach goes beyond the consideration of a static analysis and includes a dynamic assessment of component health, which is required for operating plants. This health definition should consider fabrication, inspections, transient conditions and industry operating experience. In addition, this collection of information can be transparent to a broader audience that may not have a full understanding of the system design or the potential causes of early material degradation. This paper will present the key points that are needed for a successful fatigue monitoring desktop guide. (authors)

  13. Fatigue monitoring desktop guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, K. [InnoTech Engineering Solutions, LLC (United States); Thomas, K. [Nebraska Public Power District (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The development of a program for managing material aging (MMG) in the nuclear industry requires a new and different perspective. The classical method for MMG is cycle counting, which has been shown to have limited success. The classical method has been successful in satisfying the ductile condition per the America Society of Mechanical Engineers' (ASME) design criteria. However, the defined material failure mechanism has transformed from through-wall cracking and leakage (ASME) to crack initiation (NUREG-6909). This transformation is based on current industry experience with material degradation early in plant life and can be attributed to fabrication issues and environment concerns where cycle counting has been unsuccessful. This new perspective provides a different approach to cycle counting that incorporates all of the information about the material conditions. This approach goes beyond the consideration of a static analysis and includes a dynamic assessment of component health, which is required for operating plants. This health definition should consider fabrication, inspections, transient conditions and industry operating experience. In addition, this collection of information can be transparent to a broader audience that may not have a full understanding of the system design or the potential causes of early material degradation. This paper will present the key points that are needed for a successful fatigue monitoring desktop guide. (authors)

  14. Desktop publishing com o scribus

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Fabrício Riff; Uchôa, Kátia Cilene Amaral

    2015-01-01

    Este artigo apresenta um breve tutorial sobre Desktop Publishing, com ênfase no software livre Scribus, através da criação de um exemplo prático que explora algumas de suas principais funcionalidades.

  15. The desktop interface in intelligent tutoring systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudendistel, Stephen; Hua, Grace

    1987-01-01

    The interface between an Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS) and the person being tutored is critical to the success of the learning process. If the interface to the ITS is confusing or non-supportive of the tutored domain, the effectiveness of the instruction will be diminished or lost entirely. Consequently, the interface to an ITS should be highly integrated with the domain to provide a robust and semantically rich learning environment. In building an ITS for ZetaLISP on a LISP Machine, a Desktop Interface was designed to support a programming learning environment. Using the bitmapped display, windows, and mouse, three desktops were designed to support self-study and tutoring of ZetaLISP. Through organization, well-defined boundaries, and domain support facilities, the desktops provide substantial flexibility and power for the student and facilitate learning ZetaLISP programming while screening the student from the complex LISP Machine environment. The student can concentrate on learning ZetaLISP programming and not on how to operate the interface or a LISP Machine.

  16. The Point Lepreau Desktop Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLean, M.; Hogg, J.; Newman, H.

    1997-01-01

    The Point Lepreau Desktop Simulator runs plant process modeling software on a 266 MHz single CPU DEC Alpha computer. This same Alpha also runs the plant control computer software on an SSCI 125 emulator. An adjacent Pentium PC runs the simulator's Instructor Facility software, and communicates with the Alpha through an Ethernet. The Point Lepreau Desktop simulator is constructed to be as similar as possible to the Point Lepreau full scope training simulator. This minimizes total maintenance costs and enhances the benefits of the desktop simulator. Both simulators have the same modeling running on a single CPU in the same schedule of calculations. Both simulators have the same Instructor Facility capable of developing and executing the same lesson plans, doing the same monitoring and control of simulations, inserting all the same malfunctions, performing all the same overrides, capable of making and restoring all the same storepoints. Both simulators run the same plant control computer software - the same assembly language control programs as the power plant uses for reactor control, heat transport control, annunciation, etc. This is a higher degree of similarity between a desktop simulator and a full scope training simulator than previously reported for a computer controlled nuclear plant. The large quantity of control room hardware missing from the desktop simulator is replaced by software. The Instructor Facility panel override software of the training simulator provides the means by which devices (switches, controllers, windows, etc.) on the control room panels can be controlled and monitored in the desktop simulator. The CRT of the Alpha provides a mouse operated DCC keyboard mimic for controlling the plant control computer emulation. Two emulated RAMTEK display channels appear as windows for monitoring anything of interest on plant DCC displays, including one channel for annunciation. (author)

  17. Desktop Publishing: Changing Technology, Changing Occupations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Describes desktop publishing (DTP) and its place in corporations. Lists job titles of those working in desktop publishing and describes DTP as it is taught at secondary and postsecondary levels and by private trainers. (JOW)

  18. Making the Leap to Desktop Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleifer, Neal

    1986-01-01

    Describes one teacher's approach to desktop publishing. Explains how the Macintosh and LaserWriter were used in the publication of a school newspaper. Guidelines are offered to teachers for the establishment of a desktop publishing lab. (ML)

  19. Promises and Realities of Desktop Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Patricia A.; Craig, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    Examines the underlying assumptions of the rhetoric of desktop publishing promoters. Suggests four criteria to help educators provide insights into issues and challenges concerning desktop publishing technology that design students will face on the job. (MG)

  20. The Printout: Desktop Pulishing in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balajthy, Ernest; Link, Gordon

    1988-01-01

    Reviews software available to the classroom teacher for desktop publishing and describes specific classroom activities. Suggests using desktop publishing to produce large print texts for students with limited sight or for primary students.(NH)

  1. Desktop Virtualization: Applications and Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgman, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    As educational technology continues to rapidly become a vital part of a school district's infrastructure, desktop virtualization promises to provide cost-effective and education-enhancing solutions to school-based computer technology problems in school systems locally and abroad. This article outlines the history of and basic concepts behind…

  2. Desktop Publishing in the University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstyn, Joan N., Ed.

    Highlighting changes in the work of people within the university, this book presents nine essays that examine the effects of desktop publishing and electronic publishing on professors and students, librarians, and those who work at university presses and in publication departments. Essays in the book are: (1) "Introduction: The Promise of Desktop…

  3. A Course in Desktop Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerick, Nancy M.

    1992-01-01

    Describes "Promotional Publications," a required course for public relations majors, which teaches the basics of desktop publishing. Outlines how the course covers the preparation of publications used as communication tools in public relations, advertising, and organizations, with an emphasis upon design, layout, and technology. (MM)

  4. Desktop Publishing Choices: Making an Appropriate Decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Walt

    1991-01-01

    Discusses various choices available for desktop publishing systems. Four categories of software are described, including advanced word processing, graphics software, low-end desktop publishing, and mainstream desktop publishing; appropriate hardware is considered; and selection guidelines are offered, including current and future publishing needs,…

  5. Basics of Desktop Publishing. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeby, Ellen; Crummett, Jerrie

    This document contains teacher and student materials for a basic course in desktop publishing. Six units of instruction cover the following: (1) introduction to desktop publishing; (2) desktop publishing systems; (3) software; (4) type selection; (5) document design; and (6) layout. The teacher edition contains some or all of the following…

  6. Desktop aligner for fabrication of multilayer microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Yu, Zeta Tak For; Geraldo, Dalton; Weng, Shinuo; Alve, Nitesh; Dun, Wu; Kini, Akshay; Patel, Karan; Shu, Roberto; Zhang, Feng; Li, Gang; Jin, Qinghui; Fu, Jianping

    2015-07-01

    Multilayer assembly is a commonly used technique to construct multilayer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfluidic devices with complex 3D architecture and connectivity for large-scale microfluidic integration. Accurate alignment of structure features on different PDMS layers before their permanent bonding is critical in determining the yield and quality of assembled multilayer microfluidic devices. Herein, we report a custom-built desktop aligner capable of both local and global alignments of PDMS layers covering a broad size range. Two digital microscopes were incorporated into the aligner design to allow accurate global alignment of PDMS structures up to 4 in. in diameter. Both local and global alignment accuracies of the desktop aligner were determined to be about 20 μm cm(-1). To demonstrate its utility for fabrication of integrated multilayer PDMS microfluidic devices, we applied the desktop aligner to achieve accurate alignment of different functional PDMS layers in multilayer microfluidics including an organs-on-chips device as well as a microfluidic device integrated with vertical passages connecting channels located in different PDMS layers. Owing to its convenient operation, high accuracy, low cost, light weight, and portability, the desktop aligner is useful for microfluidic researchers to achieve rapid and accurate alignment for generating multilayer PDMS microfluidic devices.

  7. Digital video for the desktop

    CERN Document Server

    Pender, Ken

    1999-01-01

    Practical introduction to creating and editing high quality video on the desktop. Using examples from a variety of video applications, benefit from a professional's experience, step-by-step, through a series of workshops demonstrating a wide variety of techniques. These include producing short films, multimedia and internet presentations, animated graphics and special effects.The opportunities for the independent videomaker have never been greater - make sure you bring your understanding fully up to date with this invaluable guide.No prior knowledge of the technology is assumed, with explanati

  8. WebVR meets WebRTC: Towards 360-degree social VR experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunkel, S.; Prins, M.J.; Stokking, H.M.; Niamut, O.A.

    2017-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) and 360-degree video are reshaping the media landscape, creating a fertile business environment. During 2016 new 360-degree cameras and VR headsets entered the consumer market, distribution platforms are being established and new production studios are emerging. VR is evermore

  9. System Testing of Desktop and Web Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, James M.

    2011-01-01

    We want our students to experience system testing of both desktop and web applications, but the cost of professional system-testing tools is far too high. We evaluate several free tools and find that AutoIt makes an ideal educational system-testing tool. We show several examples of desktop and web testing with AutoIt, starting with simple…

  10. Desktop Publishing as a Learning Resources Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, David

    In late 1988, Midland College in Texas implemented a desktop publishing service to produce instructional aids and reduce and complement the workload of the campus print shop. The desktop service was placed in the Media Services Department of the Learning Resource Center (LRC) for three reasons: the LRC was already established as a campus-wide…

  11. Desktop Publishing for the Gifted/Talented.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Wayne

    1987-01-01

    Examines the nature of desktop publishing and how it can be used in the classroom for gifted/talented students. Characteristics and special needs of such students are identified, and it is argued that desktop publishing addresses those needs, particularly with regard to creativity. Twenty-six references are provided. (MES)

  12. Technical Writing Teachers and the Challenges of Desktop Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmbach, James

    1988-01-01

    Argues that technical writing teachers must understand desktop publishing. Discusses the strengths that technical writing teachers bring to desktop publishing, and the impact desktop publishing will have on technical writing courses and programs. (ARH)

  13. Instant Citrix XenDesktop 5 starter

    CERN Document Server

    Magdy, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. This easy-to-follow, hands-on guide shows you how to implement desktop virtualization with real life cases and step-by-step instructions. It is a tutorial with step-by-step instructions and adequate screenshots for the installation and administration of Citrix XenDesktop.If you are new to XenDesktop or are looking to build your skills in desktop virtualization, this is your step-by-step guide to learning Citrix XenDesktop. For those architects a

  14. Cloud Computing and Virtual Desktop Infrastructures in Afloat Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Gillette, Stefan E.

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenon of “cloud computing” has become ubiquitous among users of the Internet and many commercial applications. Yet, the U.S. Navy has conducted limited research in this nascent technology. This thesis explores the application and integration of cloud computing both at the shipboard level and in a multi-ship environment. A virtual desktop infrastructure, mirroring a shipboard environment, was built and analyzed in the Cloud Lab at the Naval Postgraduate School, which offers a potentia...

  15. Advanced operating technique using the VR database system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Il-Suk; Yoon, Sang-Hyuk; Suh, Kune Y.

    2003-01-01

    how the main functions work in general. Thus the 4 + D VR technology TM cannot be compared with the technology that simply enlarges the components. Besides it has a great effect of the information dissemination and the advertisement. Integrated maintenance of the nuclear plants with 4 + D VR technology TM is the manual which can totally replace the existing data. That is to say, it can actualize the minute details of the components and supply the perfect information about the product by combined flash, 2D photograph and text. Especially, if one applies the 4 + D VR technology TM to the complex assembly parts or machines, one can experience the effect clearly. Also if one performs the integrated maintenance of the nuclear plants with the 4 + D VR technology TM , one can reduce the work hours to the minimum, and maximize the effect of each component. (author)

  16. Integrasi pemrograman web pada pemrograman desktop sebagai alternatif fasilitas laporan dalam pengembangan program aplikasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardainis Mardainis

    2017-11-01

    work area located in one location only. While the web program in use is very dependent on the internet network that can connect between users. The choice of using a desktop program or a Web-based program is determined by its needs and implementation. If the implementation is for a single enterprise environment the program should use a desktop-based program. However, if the company has a separate location in some areas the use of web-based programs is more appropriate. But many programmers, especially beginners who are reluctant to use desktop programming because the report must use a special report maker application such as Crystal Report. The difficulty experienced to use this particular application is the unavailability of apps in the system so it needs to be held specifically. In making the report is sometimes considered a bit complicated because the report view must be manually setup. While in web-based programming language to display information can be directly made easily in the program itself without having to use additional applications. So making reports with web-based programs is easier. To avoid the difficulty of programmers in making reports about desktop programs, researchers integrate Web-based programs with desktop-based programming in order to facilitate reporting Researchers perform desktop-based integration with web-based programming to make reporting easier. Keywords: Desktop Programming, Implementation,Integration, Web Report.

  17. Kickstart VR at Warwick taster sessions

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Catherine; O'Toole, R. B. (Robert Bernard)

    2017-01-01

    An initial report on VR-enhanced seminars with staff and students. Held over 2 days in May 2017, these workshops provided a diverse group of staff and students at the University of Warwick with a valuable opportunity to experience and think about virtual reality. The VR phenomenon is at the top of its hype cycle (again), with significant breakthroughs having been made in technology and in the design of VR content. However, not many people in higher education have experienced what can be achie...

  18. Design Options for a Desktop Publishing Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Kenneth R.; Nelson, Sandra J.

    1992-01-01

    Offers recommendations for development of an undergraduate desktop publishing course. Discusses scholastic level and prerequisites, purpose and objectives, instructional resources and methodology, assignments and evaluation, and a general course outline. (SR)

  19. WebVR: an interactive web browser for virtual environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsoum, Emad; Kuester, Falko

    2005-03-01

    The pervasive nature of web-based content has lead to the development of applications and user interfaces that port between a broad range of operating systems and databases, while providing intuitive access to static and time-varying information. However, the integration of this vast resource into virtual environments has remained elusive. In this paper we present an implementation of a 3D Web Browser (WebVR) that enables the user to search the internet for arbitrary information and to seamlessly augment this information into virtual environments. WebVR provides access to the standard data input and query mechanisms offered by conventional web browsers, with the difference that it generates active texture-skins of the web contents that can be mapped onto arbitrary surfaces within the environment. Once mapped, the corresponding texture functions as a fully integrated web-browser that will respond to traditional events such as the selection of links or text input. As a result, any surface within the environment can be turned into a web-enabled resource that provides access to user-definable data. In order to leverage from the continuous advancement of browser technology and to support both static as well as streamed content, WebVR uses ActiveX controls to extract the desired texture skin from industry strength browsers, providing a unique mechanism for data fusion and extensibility.

  20. VMware Horizon 6 desktop virtualization solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Cartwright, Ryan; Langone, Jason; Leibovici, Andre

    2014-01-01

    If you are a desktop architect, solution provider, end-user consultant, virtualization engineer, or anyone who wants to learn how to plan and design the implementation of a virtual desktop solution based on Horizon 6, then this book is for you. An understanding of VMware vSphere fundamentals coupled with experience in the installation or administration of a VMware environment would be a plus during reading.

  1. An Immersive VR System for Sports Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Peng; Xu, Shuhong; Fong, Wee Teck; Chin, Ching Ling; Chua, Gim Guan; Huang, Zhiyong

    The development of new technologies has undoubtedly promoted the advances of modern education, among which Virtual Reality (VR) technologies have made the education more visually accessible for students. However, classroom education has been the focus of VR applications whereas not much research has been done in promoting sports education using VR technologies. In this paper, an immersive VR system is designed and implemented to create a more intuitive and visual way of teaching tennis. A scalable system architecture is proposed in addition to the hardware setup layout, which can be used for various immersive interactive applications such as architecture walkthroughs, military training simulations, other sports game simulations, interactive theaters, and telepresent exhibitions. Realistic interaction experience is achieved through accurate and robust hybrid tracking technology, while the virtual human opponent is animated in real time using shader-based skin deformation. Potential future extensions are also discussed to improve the teaching/learning experience.

  2. Mars Propellant Liquefaction Modeling in Thermal Desktop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Pooja; Hauser, Dan; Sutherlin, Steven

    2017-01-01

    NASAs current Mars architectures are assuming the production and storage of 23 tons of liquid oxygen on the surface of Mars over a duration of 500+ days. In order to do this in a mass efficient manner, an energy efficient refrigeration system will be required. Based on previous analysis NASA has decided to do all liquefaction in the propulsion vehicle storage tanks. In order to allow for transient Martian environmental effects, a propellant liquefaction and storage system for a Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) was modeled using Thermal Desktop. The model consisted of a propellant tank containing a broad area cooling loop heat exchanger integrated with a reverse turbo Brayton cryocooler. Cryocooler sizing and performance modeling was conducted using MAV diurnal heat loads and radiator rejection temperatures predicted from a previous thermal model of the MAV. A system was also sized and modeled using an alternative heat rejection system that relies on a forced convection heat exchanger. Cryocooler mass, input power, and heat rejection for both systems were estimated and compared against sizing based on non-transient sizing estimates.

  3. Introducing the CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System Desktop Application (HydroDesktop) and Open Development Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, D.; Kadlec, J.; Horsburgh, J. S.; Maidment, D. R.

    2009-12-01

    The Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Sciences (CUAHSI) Hydrologic Information System (HIS) project includes extensive development of data storage and delivery tools and standards including WaterML (a language for sharing hydrologic data sets via web services); and HIS Server (a software tool set for delivering WaterML from a server); These and other CUASHI HIS tools have been under development and deployment for several years and together, present a relatively complete software “stack” to support the consistent storage and delivery of hydrologic and other environmental observation data. This presentation describes the development of a new HIS software tool called “HydroDesktop” and the development of an online open source software development community to update and maintain the software. HydroDesktop is a local (i.e. not server-based) client side software tool that ultimately will run on multiple operating systems and will provide a highly usable level of access to HIS services. The software provides many key capabilities including data query, map-based visualization, data download, local data maintenance, editing, graphing, data export to selected model-specific data formats, linkage with integrated modeling systems such as OpenMI, and ultimately upload to HIS servers from the local desktop software. As the software is presently in the early stages of development, this presentation will focus on design approach and paradigm and is viewed as an opportunity to encourage participation in the open development community. Indeed, recognizing the value of community based code development as a means of ensuring end-user adoption, this project has adopted an “iterative” or “spiral” software development approach which will be described in this presentation.

  4. Desktop Publishing: A Brave New World and Publishing from the Desktop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lormand, Robert; Rowe, Jane J.

    1988-01-01

    The first of two articles presents basic selection criteria for desktop publishing software packages, including discussion of expectations, required equipment, training costs, publication size, desired software features, additional equipment needed, and quality control. The second provides a brief description of desktop publishing using the Apple…

  5. An industrial approach to design compelling VR and AR experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richir, Simon; Fuchs, Philippe; Lourdeaux, Domitile; Buche, Cédric; Querrec, Ronan

    2013-03-01

    The convergence of technologies currently observed in the field of VR, AR, robotics and consumer electronic reinforces the trend of new applications appearing every day. But when transferring knowledge acquired from research to businesses, research laboratories are often at a loss because of a lack of knowledge of the design and integration processes in creating an industrial scale product. In fact, the innovation approaches that take a good idea from the laboratory to a successful industrial product are often little known to researchers. The objective of this paper is to present the results of the work of several research teams that have finalized a working method for researchers and manufacturers that allow them to design virtual or augmented reality systems and enable their users to enjoy "a compelling VR experience". That approach, called "the I2I method", present 11 phases from "Establishing technological and competitive intelligence and industrial property" to "Improvements" through the "Definition of the Behavioral Interface, Virtual Environment and Behavioral Software Assistance". As a result of the experience gained by various research teams, this design approach benefits from contributions from current VR and AR research. Our objective is to validate and continuously move such multidisciplinary design team methods forward.

  6. Development of 3D VR plant digital information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Kune Y.; Ryu, Joong W.; Kang, Myung G.; Kim, H. Y.; Cho, J. G.; Kim, D. H.; Park, J. W.

    2006-07-01

    Currently, there are many ongoing efforts to shorten the plant refueling and maintenance outage durations, and it is expected to become more active as the time goes on. Improved training and education system are required for the personnel to perform efficient inspection on time. This work is focused on establishing virtual Nuclear Power Plant system which will help train the personnel to understand the system characteristics of the plant by creating navigation enabled 3D plant mockups. Furthermore, this project is aimed at constructing information management system over the whole plant area, by integrating safety related data and combining it with web based GUI technology, to make search and management activities easy. This project spans three years. The forst year was spent in 3D mockup modeling of most part of the plant, and prototyping the web based VR plant digital information system. Plant environment, buildings, reactor structure, steam generator, pressurizer, fuel assemblies, pressurizer safety valve, main steamline safety valve, reactor coolant system, main steamline system, auxiliary and main coolant supply system were modeled into 3D mockups. Control functions such as magnification, rotation, movement, transparency, location detection, cross-cut view, full screen toggle and screen capture were implemented to facilitate manipulation of and navigation through the VR mockups. It is expected that the VR plant will serve as an effective support system for power plant regulation and inspection

  7. PROSSEIA-VR: training in the virtual environments

    OpenAIRE

    Grave, Luís; Escaleira, Cristina; Marcos, Adérito

    2001-01-01

    The Virtual Reality (VR) field can provide a wide variety of industrial applications. We can find several examples in the automobile industry, where VR is used for tasks like design, wind tunnel simulators, assemble/disassemble, etc. However, all these applications are designed to be used by VR experts,or well trained personnel. This happens because the VR devices and the VR interaction metaphors are not yet well developed to fulfil the needs of an inexperienced user, like robustness, fail...

  8. Multimedia architectures: from desktop systems to portable appliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskaran, Vasudev; Konstantinides, Konstantinos; Natarajan, Balas R.

    1997-01-01

    Future desktop and portable computing systems will have as their core an integrated multimedia system. Such a system will seamlessly combine digital video, digital audio, computer animation, text, and graphics. Furthermore, such a system will allow for mixed-media creation, dissemination, and interactive access in real time. Multimedia architectures that need to support these functions have traditionally required special display and processing units for the different media types. This approach tends to be expensive and is inefficient in its use of silicon. Furthermore, such media-specific processing units are unable to cope with the fluid nature of the multimedia market wherein the needs and standards are changing and system manufacturers may demand a single component media engine across a range of products. This constraint has led to a shift towards providing a single-component multimedia specific computing engine that can be integrated easily within desktop systems, tethered consumer appliances, or portable appliances. In this paper, we review some of the recent architectural efforts in developing integrated media systems. We primarily focus on two efforts, namely the evolution of multimedia-capable general purpose processors and a more recent effort in developing single component mixed media co-processors. Design considerations that could facilitate the migration of these technologies to a portable integrated media system also are presented.

  9. Extensive utilization of training reactor VR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karel, Matejka; Lubomir, Sklenka

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes one of the main purposes of the VR-1 training reactor utilisation - i.e. extensive educational programme. The educational programme is intended for the training of university students (all technical universities in Czech Republic) and selected nuclear power plant personnel. At the present, students can go through more than 20 different experimental exercises. An attractive programme including demonstration of reactor operation is prepared also for high school students. Moreover, research and development works and information programmes proceed at the VR-1 reactor as well

  10. VR Medical Gamification for Training and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicola, Stelian; Virag, Ioan; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lăcrămioara

    2017-01-01

    The new virtual reality based medical applications is providing a better understanding of healthcare related subjects for both medical students and physicians. The work presented in this paper underlines gamification as a concept and uses VR as a new modality to study the human skeleton. The team proposes a mobile Android platform application based on Unity 5.4 editor and Google VR SDK. The results confirmed that the approach provides a more intuitive user experience during the learning process, concluding that the gamification of classical medical software provides an increased interactivity level for medical students during the study of the human skeleton.

  11. HCI Lessons From PlayStation VR

    OpenAIRE

    Habgood, Jacob; Wilson, David; Moore, David; Alapont, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    PlayStation VR has quickly built up a significant user-base of over a million headsets and its own ecosystem of games across a variety of genres. These games form part of a rapidly evolving testing ground for design solutions which can usefully inform HCI design for virtual reality. This paper reviews every PlayStation VR title released in the first three months of its lifecycle in order to identify emerging themes for locomotion. These themes are discussed with respect to the lessons learned...

  12. Neurocognitive sparing of desktop microbeam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazyar, Soha; Inscoe, Christina R; Benefield, Thad; Zhang, Lei; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Lee, Yueh Z

    2017-08-11

    Normal tissue toxicity is the dose-limiting side effect of radiotherapy. Spatial fractionation irradiation techniques, like microbeam radiotherapy (MRT), have shown promising results in sparing the normal brain tissue. Most MRT studies have been conducted at synchrotron facilities. With the aim to make this promising treatment more available, we have built the first desktop image-guided MRT device based on carbon nanotube x-ray technology. In the current study, our purpose was to evaluate the effects of MRT on the rodent normal brain tissue using our device and compare it with the effect of the integrated equivalent homogenous dose. Twenty-four, 8-week-old male C57BL/6 J mice were randomly assigned to three groups: MRT, broad-beam (BB) and sham. The hippocampal region was irradiated with two parallel microbeams in the MRT group (beam width = 300 μm, center-to-center = 900 μm, 160 kVp). The BB group received the equivalent integral dose in the same area of their brain. Rotarod, marble burying and open-field activity tests were done pre- and every month post-irradiation up until 8 months to evaluate the cognitive changes and potential irradiation side effects on normal brain tissue. The open-field activity test was substituted by Barnes maze test at 8th month. A multilevel model, random coefficients approach was used to evaluate the longitudinal and temporal differences among treatment groups. We found significant differences between BB group as compared to the microbeam-treated and sham mice in the number of buried marble and duration of the locomotion around the open-field arena than shams. Barnes maze revealed that BB mice had a lower capacity for spatial learning than MRT and shams. Mice in the BB group tend to gain weight at the slower pace than shams. No meaningful differences were found between MRT and sham up until 8-month follow-up using our measurements. Applying MRT with our newly developed prototype compact CNT-based image-guided MRT system

  13. Desktop Virtualization in Action: Simplicity Is Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, Dustin

    2010-01-01

    Discover how your institution can better manage and increase access to instructional applications and desktops while providing a blended learning environment. Receive practical insight into how academic computing virtualization can be leveraged to enhance education at your institution while lowering Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) and reducing the…

  14. Desktop publishing: a useful tool for scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindroth, J R; Cooper, G; Kent, R L

    1994-01-01

    Desktop publishing offers features that are not available in word processing programs. The process yields an impressive and professional-looking document that is legible and attractive. It is a simple but effective tool to enhance the quality and appearance of your work and perhaps also increase your productivity.

  15. Desktop Publishing: Things Gutenberg Never Taught You.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Joel P.; Renshaw, Debbie A.

    1989-01-01

    Provides a desktop publishing (DTP) overview, including: advantages and disadvantages; hardware and software requirements; and future development. Discusses cost-effectiveness, confidentiality, credibility, effects on volume of paper-based communication, and the need for training in layout and design which DTP creates. Includes a glossary of DTP…

  16. Thomas Jefferson, Page Design, and Desktop Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, James

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of page design for desktop publishing focuses on the importance of functional issues as opposed to aesthetic issues, and criticizes a previous article that stressed aesthetic issues. Topics discussed include balance, consistency in text structure, and how differences in layout affect the clarity of "The Declaration of…

  17. Basics of Desktop Publishing. Teacher Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeby, Ellen

    This color-coded teacher's guide contains curriculum materials designed to give students an awareness of various desktop publishing techniques before they determine their computer hardware and software needs. The guide contains six units, each of which includes some or all of the following basic components: objective sheet, suggested activities…

  18. Aquatic Habitats: Exploring Desktop Ponds. Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Katharine; Willard, Carolyn

    This book, for grades 2-6, is designed to provide students with a highly motivating and unique opportunity to investigate an aquatic habitat. Students set up, observe, study, and reflect upon their own "desktop ponds." Accessible plants and small animals used in these activities include Elodea, Tubifex worms, snails, mosquito larvae, and fish.…

  19. Immersive STEM: From Fulldome to VR Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    For more than 15 years, fulldome video technology has transformed planetariums worldwide, using data-driven visualizations to support science storytelling. Fulldome video shares significant technical infrastructure with emerging VR headset technologies, and these personalized VR experiences allow for new audiences and new experiences of an existing library of context—as well as affording new opportunities for fulldome producers to explore. At the California Academy of Sciences, we are translating assets for our planetarium shows into immersive experiences for a variety of HR headsets. We have adapted scenes from our four award-wining features—Fragile Planet (2008), Life: A Cosmic Story (2010), Earthquake: Evidence of a Restless Planet (2012), and Habitat Earth (2015)—to place viewers inside a virtual planetarium viewing the shows. Similarly, we have released two creative-commons mini-shows on various VR outlets. This presentation will also highlight content the Academy will make available from our upcoming 2016 planetarium show about asteroids, comets, and solar system origins, some of which has been formatted for a full four-pi-steradian perspective. The shared immersive environment of digital planetariums offers significant opportunities for education and affective engagement of STEM-hungry audiences—including students, families, and adults. With the advent of VR technologies, we can leverage the experience of fulldome producers and planetarium professionals to create personalized home experiences that allow new ways to experience their content.

  20. When VR really hits the streets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morie, Jacquelyn F.

    2014-02-01

    Immersive Virtual Reality (VR) technology, while popular in the late part of the 20th Century, seemed to disappear from public view as social media took its place and captured the attention of millions. Now that a new generation of entrepreneurs and crowd-sourced funding campaigns have arrived, perhaps virtual reality is poised for a resurgence.

  1. The Virtual Desktop: Options and Challenges in Selecting a Secure Desktop Infrastructure Based on Virtualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    the virtual desktop environment still functions for the users associated with it. Users can access the virtual desktop through the local network and...technologie de virtualisation du poste de travail peut contribuer à combler les besoins de partage de l’information sécuritaire au sein du MDN. Le... virtualisation . Il englobe un aperçu de la virtualisation d’un poste de travail, y compris un examen approfondi de deux architectures différentes : le

  2. Desktop Technology for Newspapers: Use of the Computer Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Howard Alan

    This work considers desktop publishing technology as a way used to paginate newspapers electronically, tracing the technology's development from the beginning of desktop publishing in the mid-1980s to the 1990s. The work emphasizes how desktop publishing technology is and can be used by weekly newspapers. It reports on a Pennsylvania weekly…

  3. Desktop war - data suppliers competing for bigger market share

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sword, M.

    1999-01-01

    The intense competition among suppliers of computerized data and computer software to the petroleum and natural gas industry in western Canada is discussed. It is estimated that the Canadian oil patch spends a large sum, about $ 400 million annually on geoscience information and related costs and industry is looking for ways to significantly reduce those costs. There is a need for integrated, desktop driven data sets. Sensing the determination of industry to reduce information acquisition costs, data providers are responding with major consolidation of data sets. The major evolution in the industry is on-line access to increase the speed of information delivery. Data vendors continue to integrate land, well, log, production and other data sets whether public or proprietary. The result is stronger foundations as platforms for interpretive software. Another development is the rise of the Internet and Intranets and the re-definition of the role of information technology departments in the industry as both of these are paving the way for electronic delivery of information and software tools to the desktop. Development of proprietary data sets, acquisition of competitors with complimentary data sets that enhances products and services are just some of the ways data vendors are using to get a bigger piece of the exploration and development pie

  4. D Virtual CH Interactive Information Systems for a Smart Web Browsing Experience for Desktop Pcs and Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scianna, A.; La Guardia, M.

    2018-05-01

    Recently, the diffusion of knowledge on Cultural Heritage (CH) has become an element of primary importance for its valorization. At the same time, the diffusion of surveys based on UAV Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) technologies and new methods of photogrammetric reconstruction have opened new possibilities for 3D CH representation. Furthermore the recent development of faster and more stable internet connections leads people to increase the use of mobile devices. In the light of all this, the importance of the development of Virtual Reality (VR) environments applied to CH is strategic for the diffusion of knowledge in a smart solution. In particular, the present work shows how, starting from a basic survey and the further photogrammetric reconstruction of a cultural good, is possible to built a 3D CH interactive information system useful for desktop and mobile devices. For this experimentation the Arab-Norman church of the Trinity of Delia (in Castelvetrano-Sicily-Italy) has been adopted as case study. The survey operations have been carried out considering different rapid methods of acquisition (UAV camera, SLR camera and smartphone camera). The web platform to publish the 3D information has been built using HTML5 markup language and WebGL JavaScript libraries (Three.js libraries). This work presents the construction of a 3D navigation system for a web-browsing of a virtual CH environment, with the integration of first person controls and 3D popup links. This contribution adds a further step to enrich the possibilities of open-source technologies applied to the world of CH valorization on web.

  5. 3D Virtual CH Interactive Information Systems for a smart web browsing experience for desktop PCs and mobile devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Scianna

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the diffusion of knowledge on Cultural Heritage (CH has become an element of primary importance for its valorization. At the same time, the diffusion of surveys based on UAV Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV technologies and new methods of photogrammetric reconstruction have opened new possibilities for 3D CH representation. Furthermore the recent development of faster and more stable internet connections leads people to increase the use of mobile devices. In the light of all this, the importance of the development of Virtual Reality (VR environments applied to CH is strategic for the diffusion of knowledge in a smart solution. In particular, the present work shows how, starting from a basic survey and the further photogrammetric reconstruction of a cultural good, is possible to built a 3D CH interactive information system useful for desktop and mobile devices. For this experimentation the Arab-Norman church of the Trinity of Delia (in Castelvetrano-Sicily-Italy has been adopted as case study. The survey operations have been carried out considering different rapid methods of acquisition (UAV camera, SLR camera and smartphone camera. The web platform to publish the 3D information has been built using HTML5 markup language and WebGL JavaScript libraries (Three.js libraries. This work presents the construction of a 3D navigation system for a web-browsing of a virtual CH environment, with the integration of first person controls and 3D popup links. This contribution adds a further step to enrich the possibilities of open-source technologies applied to the world of CH valorization on web.

  6. Marketing: A How-to Book for VR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, Jinny

    This guide, written for vocational rehabilitation (VR) agency policymakers and staff alike, deals with the concept of marketing from a VR perspective. Covered in the individual chapters of the guide are the meaning of the term marketing; a conceptual framework for marketing in a VR agency (product definition, target group definition, differential…

  7. Delivering an Alternative Medicine Resource to the User's Desktop via World Wide Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Wu, Gang; Marks, Ellen; Fan, Weiyu

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the design and implementation of a World Wide Web-based alternative medicine virtual resource. This homepage integrates regional, national, and international resources and delivers library services to the user's desktop. Goals, structure, and organizational schemes of the system are detailed, and design issues for building such a…

  8. SAMP: Application Messaging for Desktop and Web Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, M. B.; Boch, T.; Fay, J.; Fitzpatrick, M.; Paioro, L.

    2012-09-01

    SAMP, the Simple Application Messaging Protocol, is a technology which allows tools to communicate. It is deployed in a number of desktop astronomy applications including ds9, Aladin, TOPCAT, World Wide Telescope and numerous others, and makes it straightforward for a user to treat a selection of these tools as a loosely-integrated suite, combining the most powerful features of each. It has been widely used within Virtual Observatory contexts, but is equally suitable for non-VO use. Enabling SAMP communication from web-based content has long been desirable. An obvious use case is arranging for a click on a web page link to deliver an image, table or spectrum to a desktop viewer, but more sophisticated two-way interaction with rich internet applications would also be possible. Use from the web however presents some problems related to browser sandboxing. We explain how the SAMP Web Profile, introduced in version 1.3 of the SAMP protocol, addresses these issues, and discuss the resulting security implications.

  9. Development of a Virtual Reality (VR) system for nuclear security training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Yasuo; Hanai, Tasuku

    2014-01-01

    The Integrated Support Center for Nuclear nonproliferation and Nuclear Security (ISCN) under the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) began the development of Virtual Reality (VR) training system for the purpose of teaching trainees nuclear security. ISCN set up two VR training courses by 2013. One is for teaching a nuclear security system of nuclear plants. The VR training system allows trainees to have virtual experiences visiting a nuclear plant. Through these experiences, trainees are able to learn how physical protection systems work in the plant. The course focuses on learning fundamental knowledge and is suitable for trainees having little experiences in the field of nuclear security. The other is for teaching fundamental skills corresponding to a contingency plan in a Central Alarm Station (CAS) of nuclear power plant. Computers of the VR training system deploy an intrusion scenario in a virtual space. Trainees in a group sit in front of 3-D screens and play a role play game in a virtual CAS. Through the exercise, trainees are able to learn skills necessary to the contingency case of nuclear plants. In my presentation, I will introduce the two training courses, advantages and disadvantages of the VR training system, reactions of trainees and future plans. (author)

  10. MELCOR/VISOR PWR desktop simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With, Anka de; Wakker, Pieter

    2010-01-01

    Increasingly, there is a need for a learning support and training tool for nuclear engineers, utilities and students in order to broaden their understanding of advanced nuclear plant characteristics, dynamics, transients and safety features. Nuclear system analysis codes like ASTEC, RELAP5, RETRAN and MELCOR provide calculation results of and visualization tools can be used to graphically represent these results. However, for an efficient education and training a more interactive tool such as a simulator is needed. The simulator connects the graphical tool with the calculation tool in an interactive manner. A small number of desktop simulators exist [1-3]. The existing simulators are capable of representing different types of power plants and various accident conditions. However, they were found to be too general to be used as a reliable plant-specific accident analysis or training tool. A desktop simulator of the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) has been created under contract of the Dutch nuclear regulatory body (KFD). The desktop simulator is a software package that provides a close to real simulation of the Dutch nuclear power plant Borssele (KCB) and is used for training of the accident response. The simulator includes the majority of the power plant systems, necessary for the successful simulation of the KCB plant during normal operation, malfunctions and accident situations, and it has been successfully validated against the results of the safety evaluations from the KCB safety report. (orig.)

  11. Comparison of tuning methods for design of PID controller as an A VR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikh, S.A.; Ahmed, I.; Unar, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    The primary means of generator reactive power control is the generator-excitation Control, using Automatic Voltage Regulator (A VR). The role of A VR is to hold the terminal voltage magnitude of Synchronous generator at a specified level. This paper presents the design of a proportional integral-derivative (PID) controller as an A VR. The PID controller has been tuned by various tuning methods. From all methods, PID parameters are computed through various techniques i.e. Process-reaction curve, Closed-loop system, open-loop system gain margin and phase-margin specifications. From these methods, it has been found that Zhaung- Atherton method and Ho, Hang and Cao method are much superior to the conventional Ziegler-Nichols rules. The performance of the controller has been evaluated through Simulation Studies in MATLAB environment. It has been demonstrated that the PID controller, tuned with the said methods, yields highly satisfactory closed-loop performance. (author)

  12. New measuring and protection system at VR-1 training reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kropik, M.; Jurickova, M.

    2006-01-01

    The contribution describes the new measuring and protection system of the VR-1 training reactor. The measuring and protection system upgrade is an integral part of the reactor I and C upgrade. The new measuring and protection system of the VR-1 reactor consists of the operational power measuring and the independent power protection systems. Both systems measure the reactor power and power rate, initiate safety action if safety limits are exceeded and send data (power, power rate, status, etc.) to the reactor control system. The operational power measuring system is a full power range system that receives signal from a fission chamber. The signal is evaluated according to the reactor power either in the pulse or current mode. The current mode utilizes the DC current and Campbell techniques. The new independent power protection system operates in the two highest reactor power decades. It receives signals from a boron chamber and evaluates it in the pulse mode. Both systems are computer based. The operational power measuring and independent power protection systems are diverse - different types and location of chambers, completely different hardware, software algorithms for the power and power rate calculations, software development tools and teems for the software manufacturing. (author)

  13. The design of VR-CATS for power plant simulator using virtual reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. Y.; Yoo, H. J.; Lee, M. S.; Hong, J. H.; Lee, Y. K.

    2001-01-01

    In Hadong fossil power plant simulator project (1998. 1 ∼ 2000. 7), KEPRI applied virtual reality to the simulator. To provide more efficient operator training, KEPRI further developed the virtual reality technology into VR-CATS( Virtual Reality Computer Assistance Training System), a web-based multimedia training system with virtual reality technologies, in KNPEC-2 projects. By visualizing nuclear power plant system with stereoscopic 3-graphics in this project, VR-CATS enable trainee to navigate whole nuclear power plants including high radiation areas and other restricted areas. In addition, instructors can train the local operators to operate the local valves and other equipment in the local area of the plant. It aims at helping trainees understand system locations and system functions more easily. And, by reproducing main control room with stereoscopic 3-D graphics and linking it with P and ID, operating procedures, and plant components, Virtual panels maximize training effects. During the classroom training, the instructor can acess the stand-by host computer of the simulator through a network. This enables the instructor to can operate the simulator with only soft-panel. With the soft-panel, the instructor can activate any malfunction that he wants to instruct, show the trends of major parameters to the trainee and discuss with them. This desktop simulator function helps trainee to understand basic symptoms of the accidents. With CBT, operators can easily understand why some parameters are increasing or decreasing and what they should to mak the system stable. The VR-CATS for Uljin equips with much stronger and higher level virtual environment. First, all components of the virtual plant are linked with P and ID, ISO drawings, and engineering database. In addition, virtual MCR provides much immersive environment with such virtual reality equipment as HMD and data glove. Operators can also do collaboration work in the network through avatar, real

  14. Application of the V.R. technology to the 3D-CAD system for nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, Toshisada; Tanaka, Kazuo; Kasai, Yasusuke; Kimura, Katsumi; Nakakoshi, Tetsuhiro

    1993-01-01

    The technology of the V.R. (Virtual Reality) is expected to improve the interface between the human and the computer by reality and easiness. The application of the V.R. technology to the nuclear power plant will bring the wide-spread use of the computer in various fields such as plant planning, design, training, and operation. The combination of the 3D-CAD plant data and the V.R. technologies will be easy approach to realize these applications because the 3D-CAD data for nuclear plant is constructed in the design stage. The prototype system investigates the feasibility of V.R. technologies in the nuclear plant. The stereo-scopic device and the voice processing device has been integrated to 3D-CAD system by 1992. We confirmed that these devices have a good effect on the improvement of the interface between the man and the computer. (orig.)

  15. Training courses at VR-1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sklenka, L.; Kropik, M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes one of the main purposes of the VR-1 training reactor utilization - i.e. extensive educational program. The educational program is intended for the training of university students and selected nuclear power plant personnel. The training courses provide them experience in reactor and neutron physics, dosimetry, nuclear safety and operation of nuclear facilities. At present, the training course participants can go through more than 20 standard experimental exercises; particular exercises for special training can be prepared. Approximately 200 university students become familiar with the reactor (lectures, experiments, experimental and diploma works, etc.) every year. About 12 different faculties from Czech universities use the reactor. International co-operation with European universities in Germany, Hungary, Austria, Slovakia, Holland and UK is frequent. The VR-1 reactor takes also part in Eugene Wigner Course on Reactor Physics Experiments in the framework of European Nuclear Educational Network (ENEN) association. Recently, training courses for Bulgarian research reactor specialists supported by IAEA were carried out. An attractive program including demonstration of reactor operation is prepared also for high school students. Every year, more than 1500 high school students come to visit the reactor, as do many foreigner visitors. (author)

  16. Safety operation of training reactor VR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matejka, K.

    2001-01-01

    There are three nuclear research reactors in the Czech Republic in operation now: light water reactor LVR-15, maximum reactor power 10 MW t , owner and operator Nuclear Research Institute Rez; light water zero power reactor LR-0, maximum reactor power 5 kW t , owner and operator Nuclear Research Institute Rez and training reactor VR-1 Sparrow, maximum reactor power 5 kW t , owner and operate Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, CTU in Prague. The training reactor VR-1 Vrabec 'Sparrow', operated at the Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, was started up on December 3, 1990. Particularly it is designed for training the students of Czech universities, preparing the experts for the Czech nuclear programme, as well as for certain research work, and for information programmes in the nuclear programme, as well as for certain research work, and for information programmes in sphere of using the nuclear energy (public relations). (author)

  17. Key factors for a high-quality VR experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champel, Mary-Luc; Doré, Renaud; Mollet, Nicolas

    2017-09-01

    For many years, Virtual Reality has been presented as a promising technology that could deliver a truly new experience to users. The media and entertainment industry is now investigating the possibility to offer a video-based VR 360 experience. Nevertheless, there is a substantial risk that VR 360 could have the same fate as 3DTV if it cannot offer more than just being the next fad. The present paper aims at presenting the various quality factors required for a high-quality VR experience. More specifically, this paper will focus on the main three VR quality pillars: visual, audio and immersion.

  18. Design of a Virtual Reality System for Affect Analysis in Facial Expressions (VR-SAAFE); Application to Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekele, E; Bian, D; Peterman, J; Park, S; Sarkar, N

    2017-06-01

    Schizophrenia is a life-long, debilitating psychotic disorder with poor outcome that affects about 1% of the population. Although pharmacotherapy can alleviate some of the acute psychotic symptoms, residual social impairments present a significant barrier that prevents successful rehabilitation. With limited resources and access to social skills training opportunities, innovative technology has emerged as a potentially powerful tool for intervention. In this paper, we present a novel virtual reality (VR)-based system for understanding facial emotion processing impairments that may lead to poor social outcome in schizophrenia. We henceforth call it a VR System for Affect Analysis in Facial Expressions (VR-SAAFE). This system integrates a VR-based task presentation platform that can minutely control facial expressions of an avatar with or without accompanying verbal interaction, with an eye-tracker to quantitatively measure a participants real-time gaze and a set of physiological sensors to infer his/her affective states to allow in-depth understanding of the emotion recognition mechanism of patients with schizophrenia based on quantitative metrics. A usability study with 12 patients with schizophrenia and 12 healthy controls was conducted to examine processing of the emotional faces. Preliminary results indicated that there were significant differences in the way patients with schizophrenia processed and responded towards the emotional faces presented in the VR environment compared with healthy control participants. The preliminary results underscore the utility of such a VR-based system that enables precise and quantitative assessment of social skill deficits in patients with schizophrenia.

  19. Extensive utilization of training reactor VR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matejka, Karel; Sklenka, Lubomir

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The training reactor VR-1 Vrabec ('Sparrow'), operated at the Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, was started up on December 3, 1990. Particularly, it is designed and operated for training of students from Czech universities, preparing of experts for the Czech nuclear programme, as well as for certain research and development work, and for information programmes in the sphere of non-military nuclear energy use (public relation). The VR-1 training reactor is a pool-type light-water reactor based on enriched uranium with maximum thermal power 1kWth and short time period up to 5kW th . The moderator of neutrons is light demineralized water (H 2 O) that is also used as a reflector, a biological shielding, and a coolant. Heat is removed from the core with natural convection. The reactor core contains 14 to 18 fuel assemblies IRT-3M, depending on the geometric arrangement and kind of experiments to be performed in the reactor. The core is accommodated in a cylindrical stainless steel vessel - pool, which is filled with water. UR-70 control rods serve the reactor control and safe shutdown. Training of the VR-1 reactor provides students with experience in reactor and neutron physics, dosimetry, nuclear safety, and nuclear installation operation. Students from technical universities and from natural sciences universities come to the reactor for training. Approximately 200 university students are introduced to the reactor (lectures, experiments, experimental and diploma works, etc.) every year. About 12 different faculties from Czech universities use the reactor. International co-operation with European universities in Germany, Hungary, Austria, Slovakia, Holland and UK is frequent. Practical Course on Reactor Physics in Framework of European Nuclear Engineering Network has been newly introduced. Currently, students can try out more than 20 experimental exercises. Further training courses have been included

  20. Evaluating virtual hosted desktops for graphics-intensive astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, B. F.; Fluke, C. J.

    2018-04-01

    Visualisation of data is critical to understanding astronomical phenomena. Today, many instruments produce datasets that are too big to be downloaded to a local computer, yet many of the visualisation tools used by astronomers are deployed only on desktop computers. Cloud computing is increasingly used to provide a computation and simulation platform in astronomy, but it also offers great potential as a visualisation platform. Virtual hosted desktops, with graphics processing unit (GPU) acceleration, allow interactive, graphics-intensive desktop applications to operate co-located with astronomy datasets stored in remote data centres. By combining benchmarking and user experience testing, with a cohort of 20 astronomers, we investigate the viability of replacing physical desktop computers with virtual hosted desktops. In our work, we compare two Apple MacBook computers (one old and one new, representing hardware and opposite ends of the useful lifetime) with two virtual hosted desktops: one commercial (Amazon Web Services) and one in a private research cloud (the Australian NeCTAR Research Cloud). For two-dimensional image-based tasks and graphics-intensive three-dimensional operations - typical of astronomy visualisation workflows - we found that benchmarks do not necessarily provide the best indication of performance. When compared to typical laptop computers, virtual hosted desktops can provide a better user experience, even with lower performing graphics cards. We also found that virtual hosted desktops are equally simple to use, provide greater flexibility in choice of configuration, and may actually be a more cost-effective option for typical usage profiles.

  1. Exploring Graphic Design. A Short Course in Desktop Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, MLG

    This course in desktop publishing contains seven illustrated modules designed to meet the following objectives: (1) use a desktop publishing program to explore advanced topics in graphic design; (2) learn about typography and how to make design decisions on the use of typestyles; (3) learn basic principles in graphic communications and apply them…

  2. Desktop Publishing: A Powerful Tool for Advanced Composition Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Patricia

    1988-01-01

    Examines the advantages of using desktop publishing in advanced writing classes. Explains how desktop publishing can spur creativity, call attention to the interaction between words and pictures, encourage the social dimensions of computing and composing, and provide students with practical skills. (MM)

  3. Desktop Publishing in a PC-Based Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Harold A.

    1987-01-01

    Identifies, considers, and interrelates the functionality of hardware, firmware, and software types; discusses the relationship of input and output devices in the PC-based desktop publishing environment; and reports some of what has been experienced in three years of working intensively in/with desktop publishing devices and solutions. (MES)

  4. A NICE approach to managing large numbers of desktop PC's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, David

    1996-01-01

    The problems of managing desktop systems are far from resolved. As we deploy increasing numbers of systems, PC's Mackintoshes and UN*X Workstations. This paper will concentrate on the solution adopted at CERN for the management of the rapidly increasing numbers of desktop PC's in use in all parts of the laboratory. (author)

  5. Citrix XenApp 7.5 desktop virtualization solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Andy

    2014-01-01

    If you are a Citrix® engineer, a virtualization consultant, or an IT project manager with prior experience of using Citrix XenApp® and related technologies for desktop virtualization and want to further explore the power of XenApp® for flawless desktop virtualization, then this book is for you.

  6. Desktop supercomputer: what can it do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, A.; Degtyarev, A.; Korkhov, V.

    2017-12-01

    The paper addresses the issues of solving complex problems that require using supercomputers or multiprocessor clusters available for most researchers nowadays. Efficient distribution of high performance computing resources according to actual application needs has been a major research topic since high-performance computing (HPC) technologies became widely introduced. At the same time, comfortable and transparent access to these resources was a key user requirement. In this paper we discuss approaches to build a virtual private supercomputer available at user's desktop: a virtual computing environment tailored specifically for a target user with a particular target application. We describe and evaluate possibilities to create the virtual supercomputer based on light-weight virtualization technologies, and analyze the efficiency of our approach compared to traditional methods of HPC resource management.

  7. Desktop supercomputer: what can it do?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanov, A.; Degtyarev, A.; Korkhov, V.

    2017-01-01

    The paper addresses the issues of solving complex problems that require using supercomputers or multiprocessor clusters available for most researchers nowadays. Efficient distribution of high performance computing resources according to actual application needs has been a major research topic since high-performance computing (HPC) technologies became widely introduced. At the same time, comfortable and transparent access to these resources was a key user requirement. In this paper we discuss approaches to build a virtual private supercomputer available at user's desktop: a virtual computing environment tailored specifically for a target user with a particular target application. We describe and evaluate possibilities to create the virtual supercomputer based on light-weight virtualization technologies, and analyze the efficiency of our approach compared to traditional methods of HPC resource management.

  8. A VR-User Interface for Design by Features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coomans, M.K.D.; Timmermans, H.J.P.

    1998-01-01

    We present the design of a Virtual Reality based user interface (VR-UI). It is the interface for the VR-DIS system, a design application for the Building and Construction industry (VRDIS stands for Virtual Reality - Design Information System). The interface is characterised by a mixed representation

  9. Mobile VR in Education: From the Fringe to the Mainstream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the development of virtual reality (VR) use in education and the emergence of mobile VR based content creation and sharing as a platform for enabling learner-generated content and learner-generated contexts. The author argues that an ecology of resources that maps the user content creation and sharing affordances of mobile…

  10. Experimental Setup for Ultrasonic-Assisted Desktop Fused Deposition Modeling System

    OpenAIRE

    Maidin, S.; Muhamad, M. K.; Pei, Eujin

    2014-01-01

    Fused deposition modeling (FDM) is an additive manufacturing (AM) process that has been used in various manufacturing fields. However, the drawback of FDM is poor surface finish of part produced, leading to surface roughness and requires hand finishing. In this study, ultrasonic technology will be integrated into a desktop FDM system. Ultrasound has been applied in various conventional machining process and shows good machined surface finish. However, very little research regarding the applic...

  11. An application of desktop virtual reality to the hospitality industry

    OpenAIRE

    Horan, Patrick; McDonnell, Ciaran

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses research being carried out to produce real-time interactive Virtual Reality (VR) models of some areas of Tourism interest in Ireland. In particular, issues concerning the development of prototype VR models of an ancient Irish monastic village are described.

  12. New Desktop Virtual Reality Technology in Technical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausburn, Lynna J.; Ausburn, Floyd B.

    2008-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) that immerses users in a 3D environment through use of headwear, body suits, and data gloves has demonstrated effectiveness in technical and professional education. Immersive VR is highly engaging and appealing to technically skilled young Net Generation learners. However, technical difficulty and very high costs have kept…

  13. Analytical Hierarchy Process for the selection of strategic alternatives for introduction of infrastructure virtual desktop infrastructure in the university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina A. Makoviy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The task of choosing a strategy for implementing the virtual desktop infrastructure into the IT infrastructure of the university is considered. The infrastructure of virtual desktops is a technology that provides centralization of management of client workplaces, increase the service life of computers in classrooms. The analysis of strengths and weaknesses, threats and opportunities for introducing virtualization in the university. Alternatives to implementation based on the results of the pilot project have been developed. To obtain quantitative estimates in the SWOT - analysis of the pilot project, the analytical hierarchy process is used. The analysis of implementation of the pilot project by experts is carried out and the integral value of quantitative estimates of various alternatives is generated. The combination of the analytical hierarchy process and SWOT - analysis allows you to choose the optimal strategy for implementing desktop virtualization.

  14. LCCP Desktop Application v1.0 Engineering Reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beshr, Mohamed [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Aute, Vikrant [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2014-04-01

    This Life Cycle Climate Performance (LCCP) Desktop Application Engineering Reference is divided into three parts. The first part of the guide, consisting of the LCCP objective, literature review, and mathematical background, is presented in Sections 2-4. The second part of the guide (given in Sections 5-10) provides a description of the input data required by the LCCP desktop application, including each of the input pages (Application Information, Load Information, and Simulation Information) and details for interfacing the LCCP Desktop Application with the VapCyc and EnergyPlus simulation programs. The third part of the guide (given in Section 11) describes the various interfaces of the LCCP code.

  15. Desktop Publishing: The New Wave in Business Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huprich, Violet M.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the challenges of teaching desktop publishing (DTP); the industry is in flux with the software packages constantly being updated. Indicates that the demand for those with DTP skills is great. (JOW)

  16. Desktop Publishing: A New Frontier for Instructional Technologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Norman T.; Warner, James W.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses new possibilities that computers and laser printers offer instructional technologists. Includes a brief history of printed communications, a description of new technological advances referred to as "desktop publishing," and suggests the application of this technology to instructional tasks. (TW)

  17. Turbulence Visualization at the Terascale on Desktop PCs

    KAUST Repository

    Treib, M.; Burger, K.; Reichl, F.; Meneveau, C.; Szalay, A.; Westermann, R.

    2012-01-01

    is challenging on desktop computers. This is due to the extreme resolution of such fields, requiring memory and bandwidth capacities going beyond what is currently available. To overcome these limitations, we present a GPU system for feature-based turbulence

  18. Development of an automated desktop procedure for defining macro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-07-03

    break points' such as ... An automated desktop procedure was developed for computing statistically defensible, multiple change .... from source to mouth. .... the calculated value was less than the test statistic given in Owen.

  19. Perception Analysis of Desktop and Mobile Service Website

    OpenAIRE

    Khoiriyah, Rizqiyatul

    2016-01-01

    The research was conducted as a qualitative study of the website to deeper explore and examine the analysis of user perception of desktop and mobile website services. This research reviewed about user perception of desktop and mobile service website used by using qualitative methods adapted to WebQual and User Experience approach. This qualitative research refered to the theoretical reference written by Creswell (2014). The expected outcome is to know the user perceptions of the available ser...

  20. FORMED: Bringing Formal Methods to the Engineering Desktop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    FORMED: BRINGING FORMAL METHODS TO THE ENGINEERING DESKTOP BAE SYSTEMS FEBRUARY 2016 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE...This report is published in the interest of scientific and technical information exchange, and its publication does not constitute the Government’s...BRINGING FORMAL METHODS TO THE ENGINEERING DESKTOP 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8750-14-C-0024 5b. GRANT NUMBER N/A 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 63781D

  1. Adobe AIR, Bringing Rich Internet Applications to the Desktop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Vieriu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Rich Internet Applications are the new trend in software development today. Adobe AIR offers the possibility to create cross-platform desktop applications using popular Web technologies like HTML, JavaScript, Flash and Flex. This article is focused on presenting the advantages that this new environment has to offer for the web development community and how quickly you can develop a desktop application using Adobe AIR.

  2. Adobe AIR, Bringing Rich Internet Applications to the Desktop

    OpenAIRE

    Vieriu, Valentin; Tuican, Catalin

    2009-01-01

    Rich Internet Applications are the new trend in software development today. Adobe AIR offers the possibility to create cross-platform desktop applications using popular Web technologies like HTML, JavaScript, Flash and Flex. This article is focused on presenting the advantages that this new environment has to offer for the web development community and how quickly you can develop a desktop application using Adobe AIR.

  3. IMG/VR: a database of cultured and uncultured DNA Viruses and retroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez-Espino, David; Chen, I-Min A; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ratner, Anna; Chu, Ken; Szeto, Ernest; Pillay, Manoj; Huang, Jinghua; Markowitz, Victor M; Nielsen, Torben; Huntemann, Marcel; K Reddy, T B; Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; Sullivan, Matthew B; Campbell, Barbara J; Chen, Feng; McMahon, Katherine; Hallam, Steve J; Denef, Vincent; Cavicchioli, Ricardo; Caffrey, Sean M; Streit, Wolfgang R; Webster, John; Handley, Kim M; Salekdeh, Ghasem H; Tsesmetzis, Nicolas; Setubal, Joao C; Pope, Phillip B; Liu, Wen-Tso; Rivers, Adam R; Ivanova, Natalia N; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2017-01-04

    Viruses represent the most abundant life forms on the planet. Recent experimental and computational improvements have led to a dramatic increase in the number of viral genome sequences identified primarily from metagenomic samples. As a result of the expanding catalog of metagenomic viral sequences, there exists a need for a comprehensive computational platform integrating all these sequences with associated metadata and analytical tools. Here we present IMG/VR (https://img.jgi.doe.gov/vr/), the largest publicly available database of 3908 isolate reference DNA viruses with 264 413 computationally identified viral contigs from >6000 ecologically diverse metagenomic samples. Approximately half of the viral contigs are grouped into genetically distinct quasi-species clusters. Microbial hosts are predicted for 20 000 viral sequences, revealing nine microbial phyla previously unreported to be infected by viruses. Viral sequences can be queried using a variety of associated metadata, including habitat type and geographic location of the samples, or taxonomic classification according to hallmark viral genes. IMG/VR has a user-friendly interface that allows users to interrogate all integrated data and interact by comparing with external sequences, thus serving as an essential resource in the viral genomics community. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Real-time visualization of magnetic flux densities for transcranial magnetic stimulation on commodity and fully immersive VR systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalivarapu, Vijay K.; Serrate, Ciro; Hadimani, Ravi L.

    2017-05-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive procedure that uses time varying short pulses of magnetic fields to stimulate nerve cells in the brain. In this method, a magnetic field generator ("TMS coil") produces small electric fields in the region of the brain via electromagnetic induction. This technique can be used to excite or inhibit firing of neurons, which can then be used for treatment of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, stroke, migraine, and depression. It is however challenging to focus the induced electric field from TMS coils to smaller regions of the brain. Since electric and magnetic fields are governed by laws of electromagnetism, it is possible to numerically simulate and visualize these fields to accurately determine the site of maximum stimulation and also to develop TMS coils that can focus the fields on the targeted regions. However, current software to compute and visualize these fields are not real-time and can work for only one position/orientation of TMS coil, severely limiting their usage. This paper describes the development of an application that computes magnetic flux densities (h-fields) and visualizes their distribution for different TMS coil position/orientations in real-time using GPU shaders. The application is developed for desktop, commodity VR (HTC Vive), and fully immersive VR CAVETM systems, for use by researchers, scientists, and medical professionals to quickly and effectively view the distribution of h-fields from MRI brain scans.

  5. Mobile liquid VR system: a cost effective alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, R.; Harkins, R.; HPD, Inc., Naperville, IL)

    1985-01-01

    The need for cost effective alternatives to treat large volumes of liquid radwaste has never been more evident. As part of a continuing effort to introduce such alternatives, HPD, Inc., and Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc., have integrated two proven state-of-the-art technologies to offer a mobile liquid volume reduction system that satisfies nuclear industry requirements, with respect to liquid radwaste handling. This system optimizes proven technology by employing a crystallizer unit to concentrate the waste liquids to 50 weight percent solids, thereby reducing the volume to be solidified by factors of 40, while using only 20 percent of the energy required by conventional evaporative systems. In addition, the system employs a field proven cement solidification process which has been accepted in a Topical Report by the US NRC and which offers the highest waste to container volume ratios for stable waste forms in the industry. This volume reduction-solidification system is able to reduce over 7000 gallons of liquid waste per day to less than 30 cubic feet of 10CFR61 certified stable solidified waste for ultimate disposal or on-site storage. This document describes the GEODE System; its applicability; economics; volume reduction; scope of responsibility and experience. Major benefits include higher VR factors; assurance of continual regulatory compliance; and no capital investment

  6. Investigation Methodology of a Virtual Desktop Infrastructure for IoT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doowon Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing for IoT (Internet of Things has exhibited the greatest growth in the IT market in the recent past and this trend is expected to continue. Many companies are adopting a virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI for private cloud computing to reduce costs and enhance the efficiency of their servers. As a VDI is widely used, threats of cyber terror and invasion are also increasing. To minimize the damage, response procedure for cyber intrusion on a VDI should be systematized. Therefore, we propose an investigation methodology for VDI solutions in this paper. Here we focus on a virtual desktop infrastructure and introduce various desktop virtualization solutions that are widely used, such as VMware, Citrix, and Microsoft. In addition, we verify the integrity of the data acquired in order that the result of our proposed methodology is acceptable as evidence in a court of law. During the experiment, we observed an error: one of the commonly used digital forensic tools failed to mount a dynamically allocated virtual disk properly.

  7. A desktop 3D printer with dual extruders to produce customised electronic circuitry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Javaid; Onimowo, Dominic Adaoiza; Gohrabian, Mohammed; Sharma, Tinku; Shirvani, Hassan

    2018-03-01

    3D printing has opened new horizons for the manufacturing industry in general, and 3D printers have become the tools for technological advancements. There is a huge divide between the pricing of industrial and desktop 3D printers with the former being on the expensive side capable of producing excellent quality products and latter being on the low-cost side with moderate quality results. However, there is a larger room for improvements and enhancements for the desktop systems as compared to the industrial ones. In this paper, a desktop 3D printer called Prusa Mendel i2 has been modified and integrated with an additional extruder so that the system can work with dual extruders and produce bespoke electronic circuits. The communication between the two extruders has been established by making use of the In-Chip Serial Programming port on the Arduino Uno controlling the printer. The biggest challenge is to control the flow of electric paint (to be dispensed by the new extruder) and CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) analysis has been carried out to ascertain the optimal conditions for proper dispensing. The final product is a customised electronic circuit with the base of plastic (from the 3D printer's extruder) and electronic paint (from the additional extruder) properly dispensed to create a live circuit on a plastic platform. This low-cost enhancement to a desktop 3D printer can provide a new prospect to produce multiple material parts where the additional extruder can be filled with any material that can be properly dispensed from its nozzle.

  8. DEEP SPACE: High Resolution VR Platform for Multi-user Interactive Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuka, Daniela; Elias, Oliver; Martins, Ronald; Lindinger, Christopher; Pramböck, Andreas; Jalsovec, Andreas; Maresch, Pascal; Hörtner, Horst; Brandl, Peter

    DEEP SPACE is a large-scale platform for interactive, stereoscopic and high resolution content. The spatial and the system design of DEEP SPACE are facing constraints of CAVETM-like systems in respect to multi-user interactive storytelling. To be used as research platform and as public exhibition space for many people, DEEP SPACE is capable to process interactive, stereoscopic applications on two projection walls with a size of 16 by 9 meters and a resolution of four times 1080p (4K) each. The processed applications are ranging from Virtual Reality (VR)-environments to 3D-movies to computationally intensive 2D-productions. In this paper, we are describing DEEP SPACE as an experimental VR platform for multi-user interactive storytelling. We are focusing on the system design relevant for the platform, including the integration of the Apple iPod Touch technology as VR control, and a special case study that is demonstrating the research efforts in the field of multi-user interactive storytelling. The described case study, entitled "Papyrate's Island", provides a prototypical scenario of how physical drawings may impact on digital narratives. In this special case, DEEP SPACE helps us to explore the hypothesis that drawing, a primordial human creative skill, gives us access to entirely new creative possibilities in the domain of interactive storytelling.

  9. Perception Analysis of Desktop and Mobile Service Website

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizqiyatul Khoiriyah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The research was conducted as a qualitative study of the website to deeper explore and examine the analysis of user perception of desktop and mobile website services. This research reviewed about user perception of desktop and mobile service website used by using qualitative methods adapted to WebQual and User Experience approach. This qualitative research refered to the theoretical reference written by Creswell (2014. The expected outcome is to know the user perceptions of the available services and information in the website along with the possibility of desktop and mobile gap arising from differences in the two services. These results can be used as a service model on the website of the user experience.

  10. Life cycle assessment study of a Chinese desktop personal computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Huabo; Eugster, Martin; Hischier, Roland; Streicher-Porte, Martin; Li, Jinhui

    2009-02-15

    Associated with the tremendous prosperity in world electronic information and telecommunication industry, there continues to be an increasing awareness of the environmental impacts related to the accelerating mass production, electricity use, and waste management of electronic and electric products (e-products). China's importance as both a consumer and supplier of e-products has grown at an unprecedented pace in recent decade. Hence, this paper aims to describe the application of life cycle assessment (LCA) to investigate the environmental performance of Chinese e-products from a global level. A desktop personal computer system has been selected to carry out a detailed and modular LCA which follows the ISO 14040 series. The LCA is constructed by SimaPro software version 7.0 and expressed with the Eco-indicator'99 life cycle impact assessment method. For a sensitivity analysis of the overall LCA results, the so-called CML method is used in order to estimate the influence of the choice of the assessment method on the result. Life cycle inventory information is complied by ecoinvent 1.3 databases, combined with literature and field investigations on the present Chinese situation. The established LCA study shows that that the manufacturing and the use of such devices are of the highest environmental importance. In the manufacturing of such devices, the integrated circuits (ICs) and the Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) are those parts contributing most to the impact. As no other aspects are taken into account during the use phase, the impact is due to the way how the electricity is produced. The final process steps--i.e. the end of life phase--lead to a clear environmental benefit if a formal and modern, up-to-date technical system is assumed, like here in this study.

  11. Life cycle assessment study of a Chinese desktop personal computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Huabo; Eugster, Martin; Hischier, Roland; Streicher-Porte, Martin; Li Jinhui

    2009-01-01

    Associated with the tremendous prosperity in world electronic information and telecommunication industry, there continues to be an increasing awareness of the environmental impacts related to the accelerating mass production, electricity use, and waste management of electronic and electric products (e-products). China's importance as both a consumer and supplier of e-products has grown at an unprecedented pace in recent decade. Hence, this paper aims to describe the application of life cycle assessment (LCA) to investigate the environmental performance of Chinese e-products from a global level. A desktop personal computer system has been selected to carry out a detailed and modular LCA which follows the ISO 14040 series. The LCA is constructed by SimaPro software version 7.0 and expressed with the Eco-indicator'99 life cycle impact assessment method. For a sensitivity analysis of the overall LCA results, the so-called CML method is used in order to estimate the influence of the choice of the assessment method on the result. Life cycle inventory information is complied by ecoinvent 1.3 databases, combined with literature and field investigations on the present Chinese situation. The established LCA study shows that that the manufacturing and the use of such devices are of the highest environmental importance. In the manufacturing of such devices, the integrated circuits (ICs) and the Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) are those parts contributing most to the impact. As no other aspects are taken into account during the use phase, the impact is due to the way how the electricity is produced. The final process steps - i.e. the end of life phase - lead to a clear environmental benefit if a formal and modern, up-to-date technical system is assumed, like here in this study

  12. Augmented reality (AR and virtual reality (VR applied in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ta-Ko Huang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The OSCE is a reliable evaluation method to estimate the preclinical examination of dental students. The most ideal assessment for OSCE is used the augmented reality simulator to evaluate. This literature review investigated a recently developed in virtual reality (VR and augmented reality (AR starting of the dental history to the progress of the dental skill. As result of the lacking of technology, it needs to depend on other device increasing the success rate and decreasing the risk of the surgery. The development of tracking unit changed the surgical and educational way. Clinical surgery is based on mature education. VR and AR simultaneously affected the skill of the training lesson and navigation system. Widely, the VR and AR not only applied in the dental training lesson and surgery, but also improved all field in our life. Keywords: OSCE, Dental simulator, Augmented reality, Virtual reality, Dentistry

  13. Augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) applied in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ta-Ko; Yang, Chi-Hsun; Hsieh, Yu-Hsin; Wang, Jen-Chyan; Hung, Chun-Cheng

    2018-04-01

    The OSCE is a reliable evaluation method to estimate the preclinical examination of dental students. The most ideal assessment for OSCE is used the augmented reality simulator to evaluate. This literature review investigated a recently developed in virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) starting of the dental history to the progress of the dental skill. As result of the lacking of technology, it needs to depend on other device increasing the success rate and decreasing the risk of the surgery. The development of tracking unit changed the surgical and educational way. Clinical surgery is based on mature education. VR and AR simultaneously affected the skill of the training lesson and navigation system. Widely, the VR and AR not only applied in the dental training lesson and surgery, but also improved all field in our life. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  14. [VR and AR Applications in Medical Practice and Education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Min-Chai; Lin, Yu-Hsuan

    2017-12-01

    As technology advances, mobile devices have gradually turned into wearable devices. Furthermore, virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR), and mixed reality (MR) are being increasingly applied in medical fields such as medical education and training, surgical simulation, neurological rehabilitation, psychotherapy, and telemedicine. Research results demonstrate the ability of VR, AR, and MR to ameliorate the inconveniences that are often associated with traditional medical care, reduce incidents of medical malpractice caused by unskilled operations, and reduce the cost of medical education and training. What is more, the application of these technologies has enhanced the effectiveness of medical education and training, raised the level of diagnosis and treatment, improved the doctor-patient relationship, and boosted the efficiency of medical execution. The present study introduces VR, AR, and MR applications in medical practice and education with the aim of helping health professionals better understand the applications and use these technologies to improve the quality of medical care.

  15. Immersive Visual Data Analysis For Geoscience Using Commodity VR Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreylos, O.; Kellogg, L. H.

    2017-12-01

    Immersive visualization using virtual reality (VR) display technology offers tremendous benefits for the visual analysis of complex three-dimensional data like those commonly obtained from geophysical and geological observations and models. Unlike "traditional" visualization, which has to project 3D data onto a 2D screen for display, VR can side-step this projection and display 3D data directly, in a pseudo-holographic (head-tracked stereoscopic) form, and does therefore not suffer the distortions of relative positions, sizes, distances, and angles that are inherent in 2D projection. As a result, researchers can apply their spatial reasoning skills to virtual data in the same way they can to real objects or environments. The UC Davis W.M. Keck Center for Active Visualization in the Earth Sciences (KeckCAVES, http://keckcaves.org) has been developing VR methods for data analysis since 2005, but the high cost of VR displays has been preventing large-scale deployment and adoption of KeckCAVES technology. The recent emergence of high-quality commodity VR, spearheaded by the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive, has fundamentally changed the field. With KeckCAVES' foundational VR operating system, Vrui, now running natively on the HTC Vive, all KeckCAVES visualization software, including 3D Visualizer, LiDAR Viewer, Crusta, Nanotech Construction Kit, and ProtoShop, are now available to small labs, single researchers, and even home users. LiDAR Viewer and Crusta have been used for rapid response to geologic events including earthquakes and landslides, to visualize the impacts of sealevel rise, to investigate reconstructed paleooceanographic masses, and for exploration of the surface of Mars. The Nanotech Construction Kit is being used to explore the phases of carbon in Earth's deep interior, while ProtoShop can be used to construct and investigate protein structures.

  16. Building tomorrow's nuclear power plants with 4+D VR technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Il S.; Yoon, Sang H.; Shim, Kyu W.; Yu, Yong H.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2002-01-01

    There continues to be an increasing demand of electricity around the globe to fuel the industrial growth and to promote the human welfare. The economic activities have brought about richness in our material and cultural lives, in which process the electric power has been at the heart of the versatile energy sources. In order to timely and competitively respond to rapidly changing energy environment in the twenty-first century there is a growing need to build the advanced nuclear power plants in the unlimited workspace of virtual reality (VR) prior to commissioning. One can then realistically evaluate their construction time and cost per varying methods and options available from the leading-edge technology. In particular a great deal of efforts have yet to be made for time- and cost-dependent plant simulation and dynamically coupled database construction in the VR space. The operator training and personnel education may also benefit from the VR technology. The present work is being proposed in the three-dimensional space and time plus cost coordinates, i. e. four plus dimensional (4 + D) coordinates. The 4 + D VR application will enable the nuclear industry to narrow the technological gap from the other leading industries that have long since been employing the VR engineering. The 4 + D technology will help nurture public understanding of the special discipline of nuclear power plants. The technology will also facilitate public access to the knowledge on the nuclear science and engineering which has so far been monopolized by the academia, national laboratories and the heavy industry. The 4 + D virtual design and construction will open up the new horizon for revitalization of the nuclear industry over the globe in the foreseeable future. Considering the long construction and operation time for the nuclear power plants, the preliminary VR simulation capability for the plants will supply the vital information not only for the actual design and construction of the

  17. MedlinePlus® Everywhere: Access from Your Phone, Tablet or Desktop

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... responsivefull.html MedlinePlus® Everywhere: Access from Your Phone, Tablet or Desktop To use the sharing features on ... provide a consistent user experience from a desktop, tablet, or phone. All users, regardless of how they ...

  18. EPA Region 8, Memo on Desktop Printer Ink Cartridges Policy & Voluntary Printer Turn-in

    Science.gov (United States)

    This memo requests EPA Region 8 users to voluntarily turn-in their desktop printers and notifies users of the Region 8 policy to not provide maintenance or ink and toner cartridges for desktop printers.

  19. Designing for Communication: The Key to Successful Desktop Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCain, Ted D. E.

    Written for those who are new to design and page layout, this book focuses on providing novice desktop publishers with an understanding of communication, graphic design, typography, page layout, and page layout techniques. The book also discusses how people read, design as a consequence of understanding, and the principles of page layout. Chapters…

  20. Versatile Desktop Experiment Module (DEMo) on Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minerick, Adrienne R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines a new Desktop Experiment Module (DEMo) engineered for a chemical engineering junior-level Heat Transfer course. This new DEMo learning tool is versatile, fairly inexpensive, and portable such that it can be positioned on student desks throughout a classroom. The DEMo system can illustrate conduction of various materials,…

  1. Desk-top publishing using IBM-compatible computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grencis, P W

    1991-01-01

    This paper sets out to describe one Medical Illustration Departments' experience of the introduction of computers for desk-top publishing. In this particular case, after careful consideration of all the options open, an IBM-compatible system was installed rather than the often popular choice of an Apple Macintosh.

  2. Desktop Publishing on the Macintosh: A Software Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devan, Steve

    1987-01-01

    Discussion of factors to be considered in selecting desktop publishing software for the Macintosh microcomputer focuses on the two approaches to such software, i.e., batch and interactive, and three technical considerations, i.e., document, text, and graphics capabilities. Some new developments in graphics software are also briefly described. (MES)

  3. Desktop Publishing in the University: Current Progress, Future Visions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Thomas W.

    1989-01-01

    Discussion of the workflow involved in desktop publishing focuses on experiences at the College of Engineering at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Highlights include cost savings and productivity gains in page layout and composition; editing, translation, and revision issues; printing and distribution; and benefits to the reader. (LRW)

  4. What Desktop Publishing Can Teach Professional Writing Students about Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobberstein, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Points out that desktop publishing is a metatechnology that allows professional writing students access to the production phase of publishing, giving students hands-on practice in preparing text for printing and in learning how that preparation affects the visual meaning of documents. (SR)

  5. Warm Hearts/Cold Type: Desktop Publishing Arrives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Felix

    1991-01-01

    Describes desktop publishing (DTP) that may be suitable for community, activist, and nonprofit groups and discusses how it is changing written communication. Topics discussed include costs; laser printers; time savings; hardware and software selection; and guidelines to consider when establishing DTP capability. (LRW)

  6. A Real-World Project for a Desktop Publishing Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, James D.

    1994-01-01

    Describes a project in a desktop publishing course in which students work with nonprofit and campus organizations to design brochures that fulfill important needs. Discusses specific tools students use. Describes the brochure project, project criteria, clients, text and graphics for the project, how to evaluate the project, and guidelines for…

  7. Practical Downloading to Desktop Publishing: Enhancing the Delivery of Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danziger, Pamela N.

    This paper is addressed to librarians and information managers who, as one of the many activities they routinely perform, frequently publish information in such formats as newsletters, manuals, brochures, forms, presentations, or reports. It is argued that desktop publishing--a personal computer-based software package used to generate documents of…

  8. Using Desktop Publishing To Enhance the "Writing Process."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millman, Patricia G.; Clark, Margaret P.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the development of an instructional technology course at Fairmont State College (West Virginia) for education majors that included a teaching module combining steps of the writing process to provide for the interdisciplinary focus of writing across the curriculum. Discusses desktop publishing, the National Writing Project, and student…

  9. Stop the Presses! An Update on Desktop Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Robert

    1988-01-01

    Discusses educational applications of desktop publishing at the elementary, secondary, and college levels. Topics discussed include page design capabilities; hardware requirements; software; the production of school newsletters and newspapers; cost factors; writing improvement; university departmental publications; and college book publishing. A…

  10. Desktop Publishing: Its Impact on Community College Journalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzywacz-Gray, John; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Illustrates the kinds of copy that can be created on Apple Macintosh computers and laser printers. Shows font and type specification options. Discusses desktop publishing costs, potential problems, and computer compatibility. Considers the use of computers in college journalism in production, graphics, accounting, advertising, and promotion. (AYC)

  11. Visual attention for a desktop virtual environment with ambient scent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Schaik, M.G. van

    2013-01-01

    In the current study participants explored a desktop virtual environment (VE) representing a suburban neighborhood with signs of public disorder (neglect, vandalism and crime), while being exposed to either room air (control group), or subliminal levels of tar (unpleasant; typically associated with

  12. A Desktop Virtual Reality Earth Motion System in Astronomy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih Hung; Yang, Jie Chi; Shen, Sarah; Jeng, Ming Chang

    2007-01-01

    In this study, a desktop virtual reality earth motion system (DVREMS) is designed and developed to be applied in the classroom. The system is implemented to assist elementary school students to clarify earth motion concepts using virtual reality principles. A study was conducted to observe the influences of the proposed system in learning.…

  13. Hydropower Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop (RAPID) Toolkit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, Aaron L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-12-19

    Hydropower Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop (RAPID) Toolkit presentation from the WPTO FY14-FY16 Peer Review. The toolkit is aimed at regulatory agencies, consultants, project developers, the public, and any other party interested in learning more about the hydropower regulatory process.

  14. An Exercise in Desktop Publishing: Using the "Newsroom."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiteka, Sebastian F.

    This guide provides a description and step-by-step instructions for the use of "Newsroom," a desktop-publishing program for the Apple II series of microcomputers produced by Springboard Software Inc. Based on the 1984 version of the program, this two-hour exercise focuses on the design and production of a newsletter with text and…

  15. Input Devices and Interaction Techniques for VR-Enhanced Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Luigi; Pietro, Giuseppe De

    Virtual Reality (VR) technologies make it possible to reproduce faithfully real life events in computer-generated scenarios. This approach has the potential to simplify the way people solve problems, since they can take advantage of their real life experiences while interacting in synthetic worlds.

  16. The development of VR technology for nuclear industry applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Bum; Cho, Jai Wan; Lee, Nam Ho; Choi, Young Soo; Park, Soon Yong

    1998-01-01

    By searching the present condition of virtual reality technology of which researches were carried out not only abroad but also the country in nuclear power industry, we confirm the possibility of practical usage of VR in it. And as a fundamental research for applications of VR in nuclear power industry, gesture recognition for remote working and VR training system for severe working were performed. 1. A study on gesture recognition for remote working : The hand gesture recognition technology using visual signal and tactile magnetic sensor as a basic study for the introduction of task command and communication were performed. 2. A study on an construction of the virtual environment training system for the task in a severe condition: A construction of virtual reality training system for the tasks in a severe working condition was implemented. This system was intended to enhance the efficiency of actual tasks through advanced practicing the motion procedures those should be performed in a severe working condition where it is difficult to access for personnel. The motion information which is came from the sensors attached on trainers body was used for construction of the virtual environment through the computer graphic procedures. The VR training system has many merits relative to the conservative training method that was performed with mock-up which was made as the same size and shape as real component in nuclear power plant. (author). 27 refs., 21 tabs., 51 figs

  17. Desktop Publishing: Organizational Considerations for Adoption and Implementation. TDC Research Report No. 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Paul

    This report explores the implementation of desktop publishing in the Minnesota Extension Service (MES) and provides a framework for its implementation in other organizations. The document begins with historical background on the development of desktop publishing. Criteria for deciding whether to purchase a desktop publishing system, advantages and…

  18. DIaaS: Resource Management System for the Intra-Cloud with On-Premise Desktops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Woo Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Infrastructure as a service with desktops (DIaaS based on the extensible mark-up language (XML is herein proposed to utilize surplus resources. DIaaS is a traditional surplus-resource integrated management technology. It is designed to provide fast work distribution and computing services based on user service requests as well as storage services through desktop-based distributed computing and storage resource integration. DIaaS includes a nondisruptive resource service and an auto-scalable scheme to enhance the availability and scalability of intra-cloud computing resources. A performance evaluation of the proposed scheme measured the clustering performance time for surplus resource utilization. The results showed improvement in computing and storage services in a connection of at least two computers compared to the traditional method for high-availability measurement of nondisruptive services. Furthermore, an artificial server error environment was used to create a clustering delay for computing and storage services and for nondisruptive services. It was compared to the Hadoop distributed file system (HDFS.

  19. Virtual reality in experience marketing: An empirical study of the effects of immersive VR

    OpenAIRE

    Ebbesen, Marius; Ahsan, Sabeel

    2017-01-01

    Recent technological development has led virtual reality (VR) head mounted displays (HMD) to become commercially available to the mass market. Consumers have started to adopt the technology quickly, and forecasts for the VR industry are very promising for the upcoming years. However, little research has been conducted on the effects of exposure to immersive VR video through HMDs. Our aim for this thesis has been to investigate the effects of exposure to VR video and uncover the underlying mec...

  20. Virtual Reality Conferencing: Multi-user immersive VR experiences on the web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunkel, S.N.B.; Stokking, H.M.; Prins, M.J.; Stap, N. van der; Haar, F.B. ter; Niamut, O.A.

    2018-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) and 360-degree video are set to become part of the future social environment, enriching and enhancing the way we share experiences and collaborate remotely. While Social VR applications are getting more momentum, most services regarding Social VR focus on animated avatars. In

  1. Who Is Going to College? Predicting Education Training from Pre-VR Consumer Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Daniel L.; Wilson, Keith B.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship of receiving college and university training within the state vocational rehabilitation (VR) program to pre-VR consumer characteristics was investigated with a multiple direct logistic regression technique. A model containing 11 pre-VR characteristics predict the reception of college and university training for a multidisability…

  2. Full-scope nuclear training simulator -brought to the desktop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaPointe, D.J.; Manz, A.; Hall, G.S.

    1997-01-01

    RighTSTEP is a suite of simulation software which has been initially designed to facilitate upgrade of Ontario Hydro's full-scope simulators, but is also adaptable to a variety of other roles. it is presently being commissioned at Bruch A Training Simulator and has seen preliminary use in desktop and classroom roles. Because of the flexibility of the system, we anticipate it will see common use in the corporation for full-scope simulation roles. A key reason for developing RighTSTEP (Real Time Simulator Technology Extensible and Portable) was the need to modernize and upgrade the full-scope training simulator while protecting the investment in modelling code. This modelling code represents the end product of 18 years of evolution from the beginning of its development in 1979. Bringing this modelling code to a modern and more useful framework - the combination of simulator host, operating system, and simulator operating system - also could provide many spin-off benefits. The development (and first implementation) of the righTSTEP system was cited for saving the corporation 5.6M$ and was recognized by a corporate New Technology Award last year. The most important spin-off from this project has been the desktop version of the full-scope simulator. The desktop simulator uses essentially the same software as does its full-scope counterpart, and may be used for a variety of new purposes. Classroom and individual simulator training can now be easily accommodated since a desktop simulator is both affordable and relatively ease to use. Further, a wide group of people can be trained using the desktop simulator: by contrast the full-scope simulators were almost exclusively devoted to front-line operating staff. The desktop is finding increasing use in support of engineering applications, resulting from its easy accessibility, breadth of station systems represented, and tools for analysis and viewing. As further plant models are made available on the new simulator platform and

  3. Feasibility of Bioprinting with a Modified Desktop 3D Printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Todd A; Epstein, Casey J; Schwartz, John; Krush, Alex; Lagalante, Dan J; Mercadante, Kevin P; Zeltsman, David; Smith, Lee P; Grande, Daniel A

    2016-12-01

    Numerous studies have shown the capabilities of three-dimensional (3D) printing for use in the medical industry. At the time of this publication, basic home desktop 3D printer kits can cost as little as $300, whereas medical-specific 3D bioprinters can cost more than $300,000. The purpose of this study is to show how a commercially available desktop 3D printer could be modified to bioprint an engineered poly-l-lactic acid scaffold containing viable chondrocytes in a bioink. Our bioprinter was used to create a living 3D functional tissue-engineered cartilage scaffold. In this article, we detail the design, production, and calibration of this bioprinter. In addition, the bioprinted cells were tested for viability, proliferation, biochemistry, and gene expression; these tests showed that the cells survived the printing process, were able to continue dividing, and produce the extracellular matrix expected of chondrocytes.

  4. Comparing Web Applications with Desktop Applications: An Empirical Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pop, Paul

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, many desktop applications have been ported to the world wide web in order to reduce (multiplatform) development, distribution and maintenance costs. However, there is little data concerning the usability of web applications, and the impact of their usability on the total cost...... of developing and using such applications. In this paper we present a comparison of web and desktop applications from the usability point of view. The comparison is based on an empirical study that investigates the performance of a group of users on two calendaring applications: Yahoo!Calendar and Microsoft...... Calendar. The study shows that in the case of web applications the performance of the users is significantly reduced, mainly because of the restricted interaction mechanisms provided by current web browsers....

  5. Application of desktop computers in nuclear engineering education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, H.W. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Utilization of desktop computers in the academic environment is based on the same objectives as in the industrial environment - increased quality and efficiency. Desktop computers can be extremely useful teaching tools in two general areas: classroom demonstrations and homework assignments. Although differences in emphasis exist, tutorial programs share many characteristics with interactive software developed for the industrial environment. In the Reactor Design and Fuel Management course at the University of Maryland, several interactive tutorial programs provided by Energy analysis Software Service have been utilized. These programs have been designed to be sufficiently structured to permit an orderly, disciplined solution to the problem being solved, and yet be flexible enough to accommodate most problem solution options

  6. Atomized scan strategy for high definition for VR application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuping; Ran, Feng; Ji, Yuan; Chen, Wendong

    2017-10-01

    Silicon-based OLED (Organic Light Emitting Display) microdisplay technology begins to attract people's attention in the emerging VR and AR devices. The high display frame refresh rate is an important solution to alleviate the dizziness in VR applications. Traditional display circuit drivers use the analog method or the digital PWM method that follow the serial scan order from the first pixel to the last pixel by using the shift registers. This paper proposes a novel atomized scan strategy based on the digital fractal scan strategy using the pseudo-random scan order. It can be used to realize the high frame refresh rate with the moderate pixel clock frequency in the high definition OLED microdisplay. The linearity of the gray level is also improved compared with the Z fractal scan strategy.

  7. Augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) applied in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Ta-Ko Huang; Chi-Hsun Yang; Yu-Hsin Hsieh; Jen-Chyan Wang; Chun-Cheng Hung

    2018-01-01

    The OSCE is a reliable evaluation method to estimate the preclinical examination of dental students. The most ideal assessment for OSCE is used the augmented reality simulator to evaluate. This literature review investigated a recently developed in virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) starting of the dental history to the progress of the dental skill. As result of the lacking of technology, it needs to depend on other device increasing the success rate and decreasing the risk of th...

  8. HydroDesktop: An Open Source GIS-Based Platform for Hydrologic Data Discovery, Visualization, and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, D. P.; Kadlec, J.; Cao, Y.; Grover, D.; Horsburgh, J. S.; Whiteaker, T.; Goodall, J. L.; Valentine, D. W.

    2010-12-01

    A growing number of hydrologic information servers are being deployed by government agencies, university networks, and individual researchers using the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc. (CUAHSI) Hydrologic Information System (HIS). The CUAHSI HIS Project has developed a standard software stack, called HydroServer, for publishing hydrologic observations data. It includes the Observations Data Model (ODM) database and Water Data Service web services, which together enable publication of data on the Internet in a standard format called Water Markup Language (WaterML). Metadata describing available datasets hosted on these servers is compiled within a central metadata catalog called HIS Central at the San Diego Supercomputer Center and is searchable through a set of predefined web services based queries. Together, these servers and central catalog service comprise a federated HIS of a scale and comprehensiveness never previously available. This presentation will briefly review/introduce the CUAHSI HIS system with special focus on a new HIS software tool called "HydroDesktop" and the open source software development web portal, www.HydroDesktop.org, which supports community development and maintenance of the software. HydroDesktop is a client-side, desktop software application that acts as a search and discovery tool for exploring the distributed network of HydroServers, downloading specific data series, visualizing and summarizing data series and exporting these to formats needed for analysis by external software. HydroDesktop is based on the open source DotSpatial GIS developer toolkit which provides it with map-based data interaction and visualization, and a plug-in interface that can be used by third party developers and researchers to easily extend the software using Microsoft .NET programming languages. HydroDesktop plug-ins that are presently available or currently under development within the project and by third party

  9. [The VR, the Russian version of the nerve agent VX].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuquel, A-C; Dorandeu, F; Ceppa, F; Renard, C; Burnat, P

    2015-05-01

    A product of the arms race during the Cold War, the Russian VX, or VR, is an organophosphorus compound that is a structural isomer of the western VX compound (or A4), with which it shares a very high toxicity. It is much less studied and known than VX because the knowledge of its existence is relatively recent. A very low volatility and high resistance in the environment make it a persistent agent. Poisoning occurs mainly following penetration through skin and mucosa but vapour inhalation is a credible risk in some circumstances. The clinical presentation may be differed by several hours and despite the absence of signs and symptoms, the casualty should not be considered as contamination or intoxication-free. This agent has a long residence time in blood, a characteristics that clearly differentiates it from other compounds such as sarin. The protocols for antidote administration may thus have to be changed accordingly. The fact that VR poisoned individuals will less respond to the current oxime therapy used in France, the 2-PAM and that VR represents a higher threat than VX, being probably possessed by some proliferating states, justify the interest for this toxic product. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Acquisition of stereo panoramas for display in VR environments

    KAUST Repository

    Ainsworth, Richard A.

    2011-01-23

    Virtual reality systems are an excellent environment for stereo panorama displays. The acquisition and display methods described here combine high-resolution photography with surround vision and full stereo view in an immersive environment. This combination provides photographic stereo-panoramas for a variety of VR displays, including the StarCAVE, NexCAVE, and CORNEA. The zero parallax point used in conventional panorama photography is also the center of horizontal and vertical rotation when creating photographs for stereo panoramas. The two photographically created images are displayed on a cylinder or a sphere. The radius from the viewer to the image is set at approximately 20 feet, or at the object of major interest. A full stereo view is presented in all directions. The interocular distance, as seen from the viewer\\'s perspective, displaces the two spherical images horizontally. This presents correct stereo separation in whatever direction the viewer is looking, even up and down. Objects at infinity will move with the viewer, contributing to an immersive experience. Stereo panoramas created with this acquisition and display technique can be applied without modification to a large array of VR devices having different screen arrangements and different VR libraries.

  11. MediSim: A Prototype VR System for Training Medical First Responders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stansfield, S.; Shawver, D.; Sobel, A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents a prototype virtual reality (VR) system for training medical first responders. The initial application is to battlefield medicine and focuses on the training of medical corpsmen and other front-line personnel who might be called upon to provide emergency triage on the battlefield. The system is built upon Sandia`s multi-user, distributed VR platform and provides an interactive, immersive simulation capability. The user is represented by an Avatar and is able to manipulate his virtual instruments and carry out medical procedures. A dynamic casualty simulation provides realistic cues to the patient`s condition (e.g. changing blood pressure and pulse) and responds to the actions of the trainee (e.g. a change in the color of a patient`s skin may result from a check of the capillary refill rate). The current casualty simulation is of an injury resulting in a tension pneumothorax. This casualty model was developed by the University of Pennsylvania and integrated into the Sandia MediSim system.

  12. VR versus LF: towards the limitation-free 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, Tibor; Kara, Peter A.

    2017-06-01

    The evolution of 3D technologies shows a cyclical learning curve with a series of hypes and dead ends, with mistakes and consequences. 3D images contain significantly more information than the corresponding 2D ones. 3D display systems should be built on more pixels, or higher speed components. For true 3D, this factor is in the order of 100x, which is a real technological challenge. If not fulfilled, the capabilities of 3D systems will be compromised: headgears will be needed, or the viewers should be positioned or tracked, single-user devices, lack of parallax, missing cues, etc. The temptation is always there: why to provide all the information, just what the person absorbs that moment (subjective or objective visualization). Virtual Reality (VR) glasses have been around for more than two decades. With the latest technical improvements, VR became the next hype. 3D immersion was added as a new phenomenon; however, VR represents an isolated experience, and still requires headgears and a controlled environment. Augmented Reality (AR) in this sense is different. Will the VR/AR hype with the headgears be a dead end? While VR headsets may sell better than smart glasses or 3D TV glasses, also consider that using the technology may require a set of behavioral changes that the majority of people do not want to make. Displays and technologies that restrict viewers, or cause any discomfort will not be accepted on the long term. The newer wave of 3D is forecasted to 2018-2020, answering the need for unaided, limitation-free 3D experience. Light Field (LF) systems represent the next-generation in 3D. The HoloVizio system, having a capacity in the order of 100x, offers natural, restrictions-free 3D experience on a full field of view, enabling collaborative use for an unlimited number of viewers, even in a wider, immersive space. As a scalable technology, the display range goes from monitor-style units, through automotive 3D HUDs, screen-less solutions, up to cinema systems

  13. Fabrication of cerebral aneurysm simulator with a desktop 3D printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Gao, Qing; Du, Song; Chen, ZiChen; Fu, JianZhong; Chen, Bing; Liu, ZhenJie; He, Yong

    2017-05-17

    Now, more and more patients are suffering cerebral aneurysm. However, long training time limits the rapid growth of cerebrovascular neurosurgeons. Here we developed a novel cerebral aneurysm simulator which can be better represented the dynamic bulging process of cerebral aneurysm The proposed simulator features the integration of a hollow elastic vascular model, a skull model and a brain model, which can be affordably fabricated at the clinic (Fab@Clinic), under $25.00 each with the help of a low-cost desktop 3D printer. Moreover, the clinical blood flow and pulsation pressure similar to the human can be well simulated, which can be used to train the neurosurgical residents how to clip aneurysms more effectively.

  14. Desktop publishing and validation of custom near visual acuity charts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marran, Lynn; Liu, Lei; Lau, George

    2008-11-01

    Customized visual acuity (VA) assessment is an important part of basic and clinical vision research. Desktop computer based distance VA measurements have been utilized, and shown to be accurate and reliable, but computer based near VA measurements have not been attempted, mainly due to the limited spatial resolution of computer monitors. In this paper, we demonstrate how to use desktop publishing to create printed custom near VA charts. We created a set of six near VA charts in a logarithmic progression, 20/20 through 20/63, with multiple lines of the same acuity level, different letter arrangements in each line and a random noise background. This design allowed repeated measures of subjective accommodative amplitude without the potential artifact of familiarity of the optotypes. The background maintained a constant and spatial frequency rich peripheral stimulus for accommodation across the six different acuity levels. The paper describes in detail how pixel-wise accurate black and white bitmaps of Sloan optotypes were used to create the printed custom VA charts. At all acuity levels, the physical sizes of the printed custom optotypes deviated no more than 0.034 log units from that of the standard, satisfying the 0.05 log unit ISO criterion we used to demonstrate physical equivalence. Also, at all acuity levels, log unit differences in the mean target distance for which reliable recognition of letters first occurred for the printed custom optotypes compared to the standard were found to be below 0.05, satisfying the 0.05 log unit ISO criterion we used to demonstrate functional equivalence. It is possible to use desktop publishing to create custom near VA charts that are physically and functionally equivalent to standard VA charts produced by a commercial printing process.

  15. KinImmerse: Macromolecular VR for NMR ensembles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinson E Claire

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In molecular applications, virtual reality (VR and immersive virtual environments have generally been used and valued for the visual and interactive experience – to enhance intuition and communicate excitement – rather than as part of the actual research process. In contrast, this work develops a software infrastructure for research use and illustrates such use on a specific case. Methods The Syzygy open-source toolkit for VR software was used to write the KinImmerse program, which translates the molecular capabilities of the kinemage graphics format into software for display and manipulation in the DiVE (Duke immersive Virtual Environment or other VR system. KinImmerse is supported by the flexible display construction and editing features in the KiNG kinemage viewer and it implements new forms of user interaction in the DiVE. Results In addition to molecular visualizations and navigation, KinImmerse provides a set of research tools for manipulation, identification, co-centering of multiple models, free-form 3D annotation, and output of results. The molecular research test case analyzes the local neighborhood around an individual atom within an ensemble of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR models, enabling immersive visual comparison of the local conformation with the local NMR experimental data, including target curves for residual dipolar couplings (RDCs. Conclusion The promise of KinImmerse for production-level molecular research in the DiVE is shown by the locally co-centered RDC visualization developed there, which gave new insights now being pursued in wider data analysis.

  16. Effective Web and Desktop Retrieval with Enhanced Semantic Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoud, Amjad M.

    We describe the design and implementation of the NETBOOK prototype system for collecting, structuring and efficiently creating semantic vectors for concepts, noun phrases, and documents from a corpus of free full text ebooks available on the World Wide Web. Automatic generation of concept maps from correlated index terms and extracted noun phrases are used to build a powerful conceptual index of individual pages. To ensure scalabilty of our system, dimension reduction is performed using Random Projection [13]. Furthermore, we present a complete evaluation of the relative effectiveness of the NETBOOK system versus the Google Desktop [8].

  17. Desk-top computer assisted processing of thermoluminescent dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archer, B.R.; Glaze, S.A.; North, L.B.; Bushong, S.C.

    1977-01-01

    An accurate dosimetric system utilizing a desk-top computer and high sensitivity ribbon type TLDs has been developed. The system incorporates an exposure history file and procedures designed for constant spatial orientation of each dosimeter. Processing of information is performed by two computer programs. The first calculates relative response factors to insure that the corrected response of each TLD is identical following a given dose of radiation. The second program computes a calibration factor and uses it and the relative response factor to determine the actual dose registered by each TLD. (U.K.)

  18. Micro Tools with Pneumatic Actuators for Desktop Factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn HOXHOLD

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design, the simulation and the fabrication process of two novel pneumatically driven auxiliary micro tools that can be used to improve and to speed up assembling processes in desktop factories. The described micro systems are designed to function as centrifugal feeders for small glass balls or active clamping devices with small external dimensions. They are able to deliver more than six balls per second on demand to a gripper and align and clamp single chips in a fixed position.

  19. Desktop computer graphics for RMS/payload handling flight design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    A computer program, the Multi-Adaptive Drawings, Renderings and Similitudes (MADRAS) program, is discussed. The modeling program, written for a desktop computer system (the Hewlett-Packard 9845/C), is written in BASIC and uses modular construction of objects while generating both wire-frame and hidden-line drawings from any viewpoint. The dimensions and placement of objects are user definable. Once the hidden-line calculations are made for a particular viewpoint, the viewpoint may be rotated in pan, tilt, and roll without further hidden-line calculations. The use and results of this program are discussed.

  20. Bringing the medical library to the office desktop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, S R; Decker, G; Pletzke, C J

    1991-01-01

    This demonstration illustrates LRC Remote Computer Services- a dual operating system, multi-protocol system for delivering medical library services to the medical professional's desktop. A working model draws resources from CD-ROM and magnetic media file services, Novell and AppleTalk network protocol suites and gating, LAN and asynchronous (dial-in) access strategies, commercial applications for MS-DOS and Macintosh workstations and custom user interfaces. The demonstration includes a discussion of issues relevant to the delivery of said services, particularly with respect to maintenance, security, training/support, staffing, software licensing and costs.

  1. GyroVR: Simulating Inertia in Virtual Reality using Head Worn Flywheels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gugenheimer, Jan; Wolf, Dennis; Eiríksson, Eyþór Rúnar

    2016-01-01

    We present GyroVR, head worn flywheels designed to render inertia in Virtual Reality (VR. Motions such as flying, diving or floating in outer space generate kinesthetic forces onto our body which impede movement and are currently not represented in VR. We simulate those kinesthetic forces...... by attaching flywheels to the users head, leveraging the gyroscopic effect of resistance when changing the spinning axis of rotation. GyroVR is an ungrounded, wireless and self contained device allowing the user to freely move inside the virtual environment. The generic shape allows to attach it to different...... positions on the users body. We evaluated the impact of GyroVR onto different mounting positions on the head (back and front) in terms of immersion, enjoyment and simulator sickness. Our results show, that attaching GyroVR onto the users head (front of the Head Mounted Display (HMD)) resulted in the highest...

  2. 3d visualization of atomistic simulations on every desktop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peled, Dan; Silverman, Amihai; Adler, Joan

    2013-08-01

    Once upon a time, after making simulations, one had to go to a visualization center with fancy SGI machines to run a GL visualization and make a movie. More recently, OpenGL and its mesa clone have let us create 3D on simple desktops (or laptops), whether or not a Z-buffer card is present. Today, 3D a la Avatar is a commodity technique, presented in cinemas and sold for home TV. However, only a few special research centers have systems large enough for entire classes to view 3D, or special immersive facilities like visualization CAVEs or walls, and not everyone finds 3D immersion easy to view. For maximum physics with minimum effort a 3D system must come to each researcher and student. So how do we create 3D visualization cheaply on every desktop for atomistic simulations? After several months of attempts to select commodity equipment for a whole room system, we selected an approach that goes back a long time, even predating GL. The old concept of anaglyphic stereo relies on two images, slightly displaced, and viewed through colored glasses, or two squares of cellophane from a regular screen/projector or poster. We have added this capability to our AViz atomistic visualization code in its new, 6.1 version, which is RedHat, CentOS and Ubuntu compatible. Examples using data from our own research and that of other groups will be given.

  3. An ergonomic evaluation comparing desktop, notebook, and subnotebook computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeto, Grace P; Lee, Raymond

    2002-04-01

    To evaluate and compare the postures and movements of the cervical and upper thoracic spine, the typing performance, and workstation ergonomic factors when using a desktop, notebook, and subnotebook computers. Repeated-measures design. A motion analysis laboratory with an electromagnetic tracking device. A convenience sample of 21 university students between ages 20 and 24 years with no history of neck or shoulder discomfort. Each subject performed a standardized typing task by using each of the 3 computers. Measurements during the typing task were taken at set intervals. Cervical and thoracic spines adopted a more flexed posture in using the smaller-sized computers. There were significantly greater neck movements in using desktop computers when compared with the notebook and subnotebook computers. The viewing distances adopted by the subjects decreased as the computer size decreased. Typing performance and subjective rating of difficulty in using the keyboards were also significantly different among the 3 types of computers. Computer users need to consider the posture of the spine and potential risk of developing musculoskeletal discomfort in choosing computers. Copyright 2002 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

  4. MICA: desktop software for comprehensive searching of DNA databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glick Benjamin S

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular biologists work with DNA databases that often include entire genomes. A common requirement is to search a DNA database to find exact matches for a nondegenerate or partially degenerate query. The software programs available for such purposes are normally designed to run on remote servers, but an appealing alternative is to work with DNA databases stored on local computers. We describe a desktop software program termed MICA (K-Mer Indexing with Compact Arrays that allows large DNA databases to be searched efficiently using very little memory. Results MICA rapidly indexes a DNA database. On a Macintosh G5 computer, the complete human genome could be indexed in about 5 minutes. The indexing algorithm recognizes all 15 characters of the DNA alphabet and fully captures the information in any DNA sequence, yet for a typical sequence of length L, the index occupies only about 2L bytes. The index can be searched to return a complete list of exact matches for a nondegenerate or partially degenerate query of any length. A typical search of a long DNA sequence involves reading only a small fraction of the index into memory. As a result, searches are fast even when the available RAM is limited. Conclusion MICA is suitable as a search engine for desktop DNA analysis software.

  5. 3d visualization of atomistic simulations on every desktop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peled, Dan; Silverman, Amihai; Adler, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Once upon a time, after making simulations, one had to go to a visualization center with fancy SGI machines to run a GL visualization and make a movie. More recently, OpenGL and its mesa clone have let us create 3D on simple desktops (or laptops), whether or not a Z-buffer card is present. Today, 3D a la Avatar is a commodity technique, presented in cinemas and sold for home TV. However, only a few special research centers have systems large enough for entire classes to view 3D, or special immersive facilities like visualization CAVEs or walls, and not everyone finds 3D immersion easy to view. For maximum physics with minimum effort a 3D system must come to each researcher and student. So how do we create 3D visualization cheaply on every desktop for atomistic simulations? After several months of attempts to select commodity equipment for a whole room system, we selected an approach that goes back a long time, even predating GL. The old concept of anaglyphic stereo relies on two images, slightly displaced, and viewed through colored glasses, or two squares of cellophane from a regular screen/projector or poster. We have added this capability to our AViz atomistic visualization code in its new, 6.1 version, which is RedHat, CentOS and Ubuntu compatible. Examples using data from our own research and that of other groups will be given

  6. SERVICE HANDBOOK FOR THE DESKTOP SUPPORT CONTRACT WIH IT DIVISION

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    A Desktop Support Contract has been running since January 1999 to offer help to all users at CERN with problems that occur with their desktop computers. The contract is run conjointly by the Swedish Company WM-data and the Swiss company DCS.The contract is comprised of the Computing Helpdesk, a General Service for all parts of CERN and also Local Service for those divisions and groups that want faster response times and additional help with their specific computer environment.In order to describe what services are being offered, and also to give a better understanding of the structure of the contract, a Service Handbook has been created. The intended audience for the Service Handbook is everyone that is using the contract, i.e. users, managers and also the service staff inside the contract. In the handbook you will find what help you can get from the contract, how to get in touch with the contract, and also what response times you can expect. Since the computer environment at CERN is a never-changing entity, ...

  7. Virtual Reality: Developing a VR space for Academic activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaimaris, D.; Stylianidis, E.; Karanikolas, N.

    2014-05-01

    Virtual reality (VR) is extensively used in various applications; in industry, in academia, in business, and is becoming more and more affordable for end users from the financial point of view. At the same time, in academia and higher education more and more applications are developed, like in medicine, engineering, etc. and students are inquiring to be well-prepared for their professional life after their educational life cycle. Moreover, VR is providing the benefits having the possibility to improve skills but also to understand space as well. This paper presents the methodology used during a course, namely "Geoinformatics applications" at the School of Spatial Planning and Development (Eng.), Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, to create a virtual School space. The course design focuses on the methods and techniques to be used in order to develop the virtual environment. In addition the project aspires to become more and more effective for the students and provide a real virtual environment with useful information not only for the students but also for any citizen interested in the academic life at the School.

  8. Training and research on the nuclear reactor VR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matejka, K.

    1998-01-01

    The VR-1 training reactor is a light water reactor of the pool type using enriched uranium as the fuel. The moderator is demineralized light water, which also serves as the neutron reflector, biological shielding, and coolant. Heat evolved during the fission process is removed by natural convection. The reactor is used in the education of students in the field of reactor and neutron physics, dosimetry, nuclear safety, and instrumentation and control systems for nuclear facilities. Although primarily intended for students in various branches of technology (power engineering, nuclear engineering, physical engineering), this specialized facility is also used by students of faculties educating future natural scientists and teachers. Typical tasks trained at the VR-1 reactor include: measurement of delayed neutrons; examination of the effect of various materials on the reactivity of the reactor; measurement of the neutron flux density by various procedures; measurement of reactivity by various procedures; calibration of reactor control rods by various procedures; approaching the critical state; investigation of nuclear reactor dynamics; start-up, control and operation of a nuclear reactor; and investigation of the effect of a simulated nucleate boil on reactivity. In addition to the education of university-level students, training courses are also organized for specialists in the Czech nuclear programme

  9. Operation characteristics and conditions of training reactor VR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matejka, K.; Kolros, A.; Polach, S.; Sklenka, L.

    1994-01-01

    The first 3 years of operation of the VR-1 training reactor are reviewed. This period includes its physical start-up (preparation, implementation, results) and operation development as far as the current operating configuration of the reactor core. The physical start-up was commenced using a reactor core referred to as AZ A1, whose physical parameters had been verified by calculation and whose configuration was based on data tested experimentally on the SR-0 reactor at Vochov. The next operating core, labelled AZ A2, was already prepared during the test operation of the VR-1 reactor. Its configuration was such that both of the main horizontal channels, radial and tangential, could be employed. The configuration that followed, AZ A3, was an intermediate step before testing the graphite side reflector. The current reactor core, labelled AZ A3 G, was obtained by supplementing the previous core with a one-sided graphite side reflector. (Z.S.). 2 tabs., 11 figs., 2 refs

  10. Democratizing rendering for multiple viewers in surround VR systems

    KAUST Repository

    Schulze, Jürgen P.

    2012-03-01

    We present a new approach for how multiple users\\' views can be rendered in a surround virtual environment without using special multi-view hardware. It is based on the idea that different parts of the screen are often viewed by different users, so that they can be rendered from their own view point, or at least from a point closer to their view point than traditionally expected. The vast majority of 3D virtual reality systems are designed for one head-tracked user, and a number of passive viewers. Only the head tracked user gets to see the correct view of the scene, everybody else sees a distorted image. We reduce this problem by algorithmically democratizing the rendering view point among all tracked users. Researchers have proposed solutions for multiple tracked users, but most of them require major changes to the display hardware of the VR system, such as additional projectors or custom VR glasses. Our approach does not require additional hardware, except the ability to track each participating user. We propose three versions of our multi-viewer algorithm. Each of them balances image distortion and frame rate in different ways, making them more or less suitable for certain application scenarios. Our most sophisticated algorithm renders each pixel from its own, optimized camera perspective, which depends on all tracked users\\' head positions and orientations. © 2012 IEEE.

  11. Democratizing rendering for multiple viewers in surround VR systems

    KAUST Repository

    Schulze, Jü rgen P.; Acevedo-Feliz, Daniel; Mangan, John; Prudhomme, Andrew; Nguyen, Phi Khanh; Weber, Philip P.

    2012-01-01

    We present a new approach for how multiple users' views can be rendered in a surround virtual environment without using special multi-view hardware. It is based on the idea that different parts of the screen are often viewed by different users, so that they can be rendered from their own view point, or at least from a point closer to their view point than traditionally expected. The vast majority of 3D virtual reality systems are designed for one head-tracked user, and a number of passive viewers. Only the head tracked user gets to see the correct view of the scene, everybody else sees a distorted image. We reduce this problem by algorithmically democratizing the rendering view point among all tracked users. Researchers have proposed solutions for multiple tracked users, but most of them require major changes to the display hardware of the VR system, such as additional projectors or custom VR glasses. Our approach does not require additional hardware, except the ability to track each participating user. We propose three versions of our multi-viewer algorithm. Each of them balances image distortion and frame rate in different ways, making them more or less suitable for certain application scenarios. Our most sophisticated algorithm renders each pixel from its own, optimized camera perspective, which depends on all tracked users' head positions and orientations. © 2012 IEEE.

  12. 基于OpenStack的虚拟桌面Spice的应用%Based on OpenStack virtual desktop applications of Spice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余康; 张鹏; 唐攀

    2014-01-01

    针对目前开源云平台OpenStack采用的VNC虚拟桌面在实际应用中存在着鼠标重影、屏幕无法自适应等不足之处,本文提出了一种新的OpenStack整合开源虚拟桌面传输协议Spice的虚拟桌面方案,该方案解决了目前OpenStack采用VNC虚拟桌面的不足之处,Spice协议较VNC有更强大的功能,能够提供更好的最终用户体验。%Open source cloud platform it has used VNC exist in actual application of the virtual desktop mouse ghosting, screen can't adaptive deficiency, such as this paper proposes a new open source virtual desktop transfer protocol Spice it integration of virtual desktop solution, the solution to solve the current deficiencies of the virtual desktop, it USES the VNC Spice protocol a VNC has more powerful functions, can provide a better end user experience.

  13. Los Alamos radiation transport code system on desktop computing platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briesmeister, J.F.; Brinkley, F.W.; Clark, B.A.; West, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    The Los Alamos Radiation Transport Code System (LARTCS) consists of state-of-the-art Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates transport codes and data libraries. These codes were originally developed many years ago and have undergone continual improvement. With a large initial effort and continued vigilance, the codes are easily portable from one type of hardware to another. The performance of scientific work-stations (SWS) has evolved to the point that such platforms can be used routinely to perform sophisticated radiation transport calculations. As the personal computer (PC) performance approaches that of the SWS, the hardware options for desk-top radiation transport calculations expands considerably. The current status of the radiation transport codes within the LARTCS is described: MCNP, SABRINA, LAHET, ONEDANT, TWODANT, TWOHEX, and ONELD. Specifically, the authors discuss hardware systems on which the codes run and present code performance comparisons for various machines

  14. Desk-top microcomputer for lab-scale process control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overman, R.F.; Byrd, J.S.; Goosey, M.H.; Sand, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    A desk-top microcomputer was programmed to acquire the data from various process control sensors installed in a laboratory scale liquid-liquid extraction, pulse column facility. The parameters monitored included valve positions, gamma spectra, alpha radioactivity, temperature, pH, density, and flow rates. The program for the microcomputer is written in BASIC and requires about 31000 8-bit bytes of memory. All data is stored on floppy discs, and can be displayed or printed. Unexpected data values are brought to the process operator's attention via CRT display or print-out. The general organization of the program and a few subroutines unique to polling instruments are explained. Some of the data acquisition devices were designed and built at the Savannah River Laboratory. These include a pulse height analyzer, a data multiplexer, and a data acquisition instrument. A general description of the electronics design of these instruments is also given with emphasis placed on data formatting and bus addressing

  15. A Desktop Screen Sharing System based on Various Connection Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Yuya; Kawaguchi, Nobuo

    Recently it became very common to use information devices such as PCs during presentations and discussions. In these situations, a need arises for techniques that allow a smooth switch of presenters without changing cables, or an easy screen sharing in case of remote videoconferences. In this paper, we propose a desktop screen sharing system that can be used for such purposes and situations. For that, we designed an automatic control of connections in the VNC system that can be operated remotely over the network. We also suggested an interface that assigns a role such as “Screen sender" or “Screen receiver" to each terminal. In the proposed system, while sharing a screen between multiple terminals, one can easily display and browse the screen without having to understand how the others are connected. We also implemented a “role card" using contactless IC card, where roles are assigned only by placing the card in the IC reader.

  16. Direct Desktop Printed-Circuits-on-Paper Flexible Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi; He, Zhizhu; Gao, Yunxia; Liu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    There currently lacks of a way to directly write out electronics, just like printing pictures on paper by an office printer. Here we show a desktop printing of flexible circuits on paper via developing liquid metal ink and related working mechanisms. Through modifying adhesion of the ink, overcoming its high surface tension by dispensing machine and designing a brush like porous pinhead for printing alloy and identifying matched substrate materials among different papers, the slightly oxidized alloy ink was demonstrated to be flexibly printed on coated paper, which could compose various functional electronics and the concept of Printed-Circuits-on-Paper was thus presented. Further, RTV silicone rubber was adopted as isolating inks and packaging material to guarantee the functional stability of the circuit, which suggests an approach for printing 3D hybrid electro-mechanical device. The present work paved the way for a low cost and easygoing method in directly printing paper electronics.

  17. GRID : unlimited computing power on your desktop Conference MT17

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The Computational GRID is an analogy to the electrical power grid for computing resources. It decouples the provision of computing, data, and networking from its use, it allows large-scale pooling and sharing of resources distributed world-wide. Every computer, from a desktop to a mainframe or supercomputer, can provide computing power or data for the GRID. The final objective is to plug your computer into the wall and have direct access to huge computing resources immediately, just like plugging-in a lamp to get instant light. The GRID will facilitate world-wide scientific collaborations on an unprecedented scale. It will provide transparent access to major distributed resources of computer power, data, information, and collaborations.

  18. Visualization tool. 3DAVS and polarization-type VR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Yasuhiro; Ueshima, Yutaka

    2003-01-01

    In the visualization work of simulation data in every advanced research field, what is used most in the report or the presentation as a research result has still remained in the stages of the still picture or the 2-dimensional animation, in spite of recent abundance of various visualization software. With the recent progress of computational environment, however, more complicated phenomena can be so easily computed that the results are more needed to be comprehensible as well as intelligible. Therefore, it inevitably requires an animation rather than a still picture, or 3-dimensional display (virtual reality) rather than 2-dimensional one. In this report, two visualization tools, 3DAVS and Polarization-Type VR system are described as the data expression method after visualization processing. (author)

  19. Use of the VR-1 ''Vrabec'' training reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matejka, K.; Kolros, A.; Krops, S.; Polach, S.; Sklenka, L.

    1994-01-01

    An overview is presented of the extent and ways of using the VR-1 training reactor, which is operated by the Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague. A list and the characteristics of 16 problems developed for teaching purposes is given, and the 14 faculties and 2 research institutes participating in the teaching activities are listed. The reactor is used in the education and training of nuclear scientists and engineers. The instrumentation, experimental, handling and operating tools, as well as documentation and texts relating to the reactor are described. The following examples of the teaching activities are included: a guided visit to the operating reactor site, reactor dynamics study and delayed neutron measurement, training course, and the basic criticality experiment. Nuclear safety aspects (hypothetical accidents, quality control and system qualification demonstration, safety culture) are stressed during the education. The reactor department is involved in international cooperation projects. (J.B.). 3 refs

  20. Visual attention for a desktop virtual environment with ambient scent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eToet

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the current study participants explored a desktop virtual environment (VE representing a suburban neighborhood with signs of public disorder (neglect, vandalism and crime, while being exposed to either room air (control group, or subliminal levels of tar (unpleasant; typically associated with burned or waste material or freshly cut grass (pleasant; typically associated with natural or fresh material ambient odor. They reported all signs of disorder they noticed during their walk together with their associated emotional response. Based on recent evidence that odors reflexively direct visual attention to (either semantically or affectively congruent visual objects, we hypothesized that participants would notice more signs of disorder in the presence of ambient tar odor (since this odor may bias attention to unpleasant and negative features, and less signs of disorder in the presence of ambient grass odor (since this odor may bias visual attention towards the vegetation in the environment and away from the signs of disorder. Contrary to our expectations the results show that the presence of an ambient odor did not affect the participants’ visual attention for signs of disorder or their emotional response. We conclude that a closer affective, semantic or spatiotemporal link between the contents of a desktop VE and ambient scents may be required to effectively establish diagnostic associations that guide a user’s attention. In the absence of these direct links, ambient scent may be more diagnostic for the physical environment of the observer as a whole than for the particular items in that environment (or, in this case, items represented in the VE.

  1. Turbulence Visualization at the Terascale on Desktop PCs

    KAUST Repository

    Treib, M.

    2012-12-01

    Despite the ongoing efforts in turbulence research, the universal properties of the turbulence small-scale structure and the relationships between small-and large-scale turbulent motions are not yet fully understood. The visually guided exploration of turbulence features, including the interactive selection and simultaneous visualization of multiple features, can further progress our understanding of turbulence. Accomplishing this task for flow fields in which the full turbulence spectrum is well resolved is challenging on desktop computers. This is due to the extreme resolution of such fields, requiring memory and bandwidth capacities going beyond what is currently available. To overcome these limitations, we present a GPU system for feature-based turbulence visualization that works on a compressed flow field representation. We use a wavelet-based compression scheme including run-length and entropy encoding, which can be decoded on the GPU and embedded into brick-based volume ray-casting. This enables a drastic reduction of the data to be streamed from disk to GPU memory. Our system derives turbulence properties directly from the velocity gradient tensor, and it either renders these properties in turn or generates and renders scalar feature volumes. The quality and efficiency of the system is demonstrated in the visualization of two unsteady turbulence simulations, each comprising a spatio-temporal resolution of 10244. On a desktop computer, the system can visualize each time step in 5 seconds, and it achieves about three times this rate for the visualization of a scalar feature volume. © 1995-2012 IEEE.

  2. Visual attention for a desktop virtual environment with ambient scent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toet, Alexander; van Schaik, Martin G

    2013-01-01

    In the current study participants explored a desktop virtual environment (VE) representing a suburban neighborhood with signs of public disorder (neglect, vandalism, and crime), while being exposed to either room air (control group), or subliminal levels of tar (unpleasant; typically associated with burned or waste material) or freshly cut grass (pleasant; typically associated with natural or fresh material) ambient odor. They reported all signs of disorder they noticed during their walk together with their associated emotional response. Based on recent evidence that odors reflexively direct visual attention to (either semantically or affectively) congruent visual objects, we hypothesized that participants would notice more signs of disorder in the presence of ambient tar odor (since this odor may bias attention to unpleasant and negative features), and less signs of disorder in the presence of ambient grass odor (since this odor may bias visual attention toward the vegetation in the environment and away from the signs of disorder). Contrary to our expectations the results provide no indication that the presence of an ambient odor affected the participants' visual attention for signs of disorder or their emotional response. However, the paradigm used in present study does not allow us to draw any conclusions in this respect. We conclude that a closer affective, semantic, or spatiotemporal link between the contents of a desktop VE and ambient scents may be required to effectively establish diagnostic associations that guide a user's attention. In the absence of these direct links, ambient scent may be more diagnostic for the physical environment of the observer as a whole than for the particular items in that environment (or, in this case, items represented in the VE).

  3. New human machine interface for VR-1 training reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kropik, M.; Matejka, K.; Sklenka, L.; Chab, V.

    2002-01-01

    The contribution describes a new human machine interface that was installed at the VR-1 training reactor. The human machine interface update was completed in the summer 2001. The human machine interface enables to operate the training reactor. The interface was designed with respect to functional, ergonomic and aesthetic requirements. The interface is based on a personal computer equipped with two displays. One display enables alphanumeric communication between a reactor operator and the control and safety system of the nuclear reactor. Messages appear from the control system, the operator can write commands and send them there. The second display is a graphical one. It is possible to represent there the status of the reactor, principle parameters (as power, period), control rods' positions, the course of the reactor power. Furthermore, it is possible to set parameters, to show the active core configuration, to perform reactivity calculations, etc. The software for the new human machine interface was produced in the InTouch developing environment of the WonderWare Company. It is possible to switch the language of the interface between Czech and English because of many foreign students and visitors at the reactor. The former operator's desk was completely removed and superseded with a new one. Besides of the computer and the two displays, there are control buttons, indicators and individual numerical displays of instrumentation there. Utilised components guarantee high quality of the new equipment. Microcomputer based communication units with proper software were developed to connect the contemporary control and safety system with the personal computer of the human machine interface and the individual displays. New human machine interface at the VR-1 training reactor improves the safety and comfort of the reactor utilisation, facilitates experiments and training, and provides better support of foreign visitors.(author)

  4. MIST VR. A laparoscopic surgery procedures trainer and evaluator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, C; McCloy, R; Middlebrook, A; Chater, P; Wilson, M; Stone, R

    1997-01-01

    The key bimanual instrument tasks involved in laparoscopic surgery have been abstracted for use in a virtual reality surgical skills evaluator and trainer. The trainer uses two laparoscopic instruments mounted on a frame with position sensors which provide instrument movement data that is translated into interactive real time graphics on a PC (P133, 16 Mb RAM, graphics acceleration card). An accurately scaled operating volume of 10 cm3 is represented by a 3D cube on the computer screen. "Camera" position and size of target objects can be varied for different skill levels. Targets appear randomly within the operating volume according to the skill task and can be grasped and manipulated with the instruments. Accuracy and errors during the tasks and time to completion are logged. Mist VR has tutorial, training, examination, analysis and configuration modes. Six tasks have been selected and include combinations of instrument approach, target acquisition, target manipulation and placement, transfer between instruments, target contact with optional diathermy, and controlled instrument withdrawal/replacement. Tasks can be configured for varying degrees of difficulty and the configurations saved to a library for reuse. Specific task configurations can be assigned to individual students. In the examination mode the supervisor can select the tasks, repetitions and order and save to a specific file for that trainee. Progress can be assessed and there is the option for playback of the training session or examination. Data analyses permit overall, including task, and right or left hand performances to be quantified. Mist VR represents a significant advance over the subjective assessment of training performances with existing "plastic box" basic trainers.

  5. Generating Contextual Descriptions of Virtual Reality (VR) Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, D. M.; Zaman, C. H.; Sutherland, A.

    2017-12-01

    Virtual reality holds great potential for science communication, education, and research. However, interfaces for manipulating data and environments in virtual worlds are limited and idiosyncratic. Furthermore, speech and vision are the primary modalities by which humans collect information about the world, but the linking of visual and natural language domains is a relatively new pursuit in computer vision. Machine learning techniques have been shown to be effective at image and speech classification, as well as at describing images with language (Karpathy 2016), but have not yet been used to describe potential actions. We propose a technique for creating a library of possible context-specific actions associated with 3D objects in immersive virtual worlds based on a novel dataset generated natively in virtual reality containing speech, image, gaze, and acceleration data. We will discuss the design and execution of a user study in virtual reality that enabled the collection and the development of this dataset. We will also discuss the development of a hybrid machine learning algorithm linking vision data with environmental affordances in natural language. Our findings demonstrate that it is possible to develop a model which can generate interpretable verbal descriptions of possible actions associated with recognized 3D objects within immersive VR environments. This suggests promising applications for more intuitive user interfaces through voice interaction within 3D environments. It also demonstrates the potential to apply vast bodies of embodied and semantic knowledge to enrich user interaction within VR environments. This technology would allow for applications such as expert knowledge annotation of 3D environments, complex verbal data querying and object manipulation in virtual spaces, and computer-generated, dynamic 3D object affordances and functionality during simulations.

  6. Virtual Reality (VR) as a Source for Self-Efficacy in Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissim, Yonit; Weissblueth, Eyal

    2017-01-01

    The current study sought to explore the experiences of pre-service student teachers in a teaching unit in VR within a special course framework which was intended to enhance student-teacher's 21st century skills and growth processes. In particular, how their experiences working with VR affected their self-efficacy. The research population comprised…

  7. Verona Coding Definitions of Emotional Sequences (VR-CoDES): Conceptual framework and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccolo, Lidia Del; Finset, Arnstein; Mellblom, Anneli V; Figueiredo-Braga, Margarida; Korsvold, Live; Zhou, Yuefang; Zimmermann, Christa; Humphris, Gerald

    2017-12-01

    To discuss the theoretical and empirical framework of VR-CoDES and potential future direction in research based on the coding system. The paper is based on selective review of papers relevant to the construction and application of VR-CoDES. VR-CoDES system is rooted in patient-centered and biopsychosocial model of healthcare consultations and on a functional approach to emotion theory. According to the VR-CoDES, emotional interaction is studied in terms of sequences consisting of an eliciting event, an emotional expression by the patient and the immediate response by the clinician. The rationale for the emphasis on sequences, on detailed classification of cues and concerns, and on the choices of explicit vs. non-explicit responses and providing vs. reducing room for further disclosure, as basic categories of the clinician responses, is described. Results from research on VR-CoDES may help raise awareness of emotional sequences. Future directions in applying VR-CoDES in research may include studies on predicting patient and clinician behavior within the consultation, qualitative analyses of longer sequences including several VR-CoDES triads, and studies of effects of emotional communication on health outcomes. VR-CoDES may be applied to develop interventions to promote good handling of patients' emotions in healthcare encounters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. An Analysis of VR Technology Used in Immersive Simulations with a Serious Game Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menin, Aline; Torchelsen, Rafael; Nedel, Luciana

    2018-03-01

    Using virtual environments (VEs) is a safer and cost-effective alternative to executing dangerous tasks, such as training firefighters and industrial operators. Immersive virtual reality (VR) combined with game aspects have the potential to improve the user experience in the VE by increasing realism, engagement, and motivation. This article investigates the impact of VR technology on 46 immersive gamified simulations with serious purposes and classifies it towards a taxonomy. Our findings suggest that immersive VR improves simulation outcomes, such as increasing learning gain and knowledge retention and improving clinical outcomes for rehabilitation. However, it also has limitations such as motion sickness and restricted access to VR hardware. Our contributions are to provide a better understanding of the benefits and limitations of using VR in immersive simulations with serious purposes, to propose a taxonomy that classifies them, and to discuss whether methods and participants profiles influence results.

  9. A Personal Desktop Liquid-Metal Printer as a Pervasive Electronics Manufacturing Tool for Society in the Near Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It has long been a dream in the electronics industry to be able to write out electronics directly, as simply as printing a picture onto paper with an office printer. The first-ever prototype of a liquid-metal printer has been invented and demonstrated by our lab, bringing this goal a key step closer. As part of a continuous endeavor, this work is dedicated to significantly extending such technology to the consumer level by making a very practical desktop liquid-metal printer for society in the near future. Through the industrial design and technical optimization of a series of key technical issues such as working reliability, printing resolution, automatic control, human-machine interface design, software, hardware, and integration between software and hardware, a high-quality personal desktop liquid-metal printer that is ready for mass production in industry was fabricated. Its basic features and important technical mechanisms are explained in this paper, along with demonstrations of several possible consumer end-uses for making functional devices such as light-emitting diode (LED displays. This liquid-metal printer is an automatic, easy-to-use, and low-cost personal electronics manufacturing tool with many possible applications. This paper discusses important roles that the new machine may play for a group of emerging needs. The prospective future of this cutting-edge technology is outlined, along with a comparative interpretation of several historical printing methods. This desktop liquid-metal printer is expected to become a basic electronics manufacturing tool for a wide variety of emerging practices in the academic realm, in industry, and in education as well as for individual end-users in the near future.

  10. Replication Kits for the papers "Automated Usability Evaluation of Virtual Reality Applications" and "VR Interaction Modalities for the Evaluation of Technical Device Prototypes" submitted to the CHI 2018

    OpenAIRE

    Harms, Patrick; Holderied, Hanna

    2017-01-01

    This replication kit contains all necessary data to reproduce the setup and results of both papers 'Automated Usability Evaluation of Virtual Reality Applications' and 'VR Interaction Modalities for the Evaluation of Technical Device Prototypes' as submitted to the CHI 2018. It includes the Unity Projects that show a coffee machine and a copier scene (sometimes refered to as printer scene, as well, as it is an integrated device) that can be interacted with with the help of the four interactio...

  11. MultiSpec: A Desktop and Online Geospatial Image Data Processing Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biehl, L. L.; Hsu, W. K.; Maud, A. R. M.; Yeh, T. T.

    2017-12-01

    MultiSpec is an easy to learn and use, freeware image processing tool for interactively analyzing a broad spectrum of geospatial image data, with capabilities such as image display, unsupervised and supervised classification, feature extraction, feature enhancement, and several other functions. Originally developed for Macintosh and Windows desktop computers, it has a community of several thousand users worldwide, including researchers and educators, as a practical and robust solution for analyzing multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing data in several different file formats. More recently MultiSpec was adapted to run in the HUBzero collaboration platform so that it can be used within a web browser, allowing new user communities to be engaged through science gateways. MultiSpec Online has also been extended to interoperate with other components (e.g., data management) in HUBzero through integration with the geospatial data building blocks (GABBs) project. This integration enables a user to directly launch MultiSpec Online from data that is stored and/or shared in a HUBzero gateway and to save output data from MultiSpec Online to hub storage, allowing data sharing and multi-step workflows without having to move data between different systems. MultiSpec has also been used in K-12 classes for which one example is the GLOBE program (www.globe.gov) and in outreach material such as that provided by the USGS (eros.usgs.gov/educational-activities). MultiSpec Online now provides teachers with another way to use MultiSpec without having to install the desktop tool. Recently MultiSpec Online was used in a geospatial data session with 30-35 middle school students at the Turned Onto Technology and Leadership (TOTAL) Camp in the summers of 2016 and 2017 at Purdue University. The students worked on a flood mapping exercise using Landsat 5 data to learn about land remote sensing using supervised classification techniques. Online documentation is available for Multi

  12. Equipment for neutron measurements at VR-1 Sparrow training reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolros, Antonin; Huml, Ondrej; Kos, Josef

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The VR-1 Sparrow training reactor is the experimental nuclear facility especially employed for education and teaching of students from different technical universities in the Czech Republic and other countries. Since 2005 the uniform all-purpose devices EMK310 have been used for measurement at reactor laboratory with different type of gas filled neutron detectors. The neutron detection system are employed for reactivity measurement, control rod calibration, critical experiment, study of delayed neutrons, study of nuclear reactor dynamics and study of detection systems dead time. The small dimension isotropic detectors are especially used for measurement of thermal neutron flux distribution inside the reactor core. The EMK-310 is a high performance, portable, three-channel fast amplitude analyzer designed for counting applications. It was developed for nuclear applications and made in close co-operation with firm TEMA Ltd. The precise rack eliminates electromagnetic disturbance and contains the control unit and four modules. The modules of high voltage supply and amplifier for gas filled detectors or scintillation probes are used in basic configuration. Software is tailored specifically to the reactor measurement and allows full online control. For applications involving the study of signals that may vary with the time, example study of delayed neutrons or nuclear reactor dynamics, the EMK-310 provides a Multichannel Scaling (MCS) acquisition mode. MCS dwell time can be set from 2 ms. Now, the new generation of digital multichannel analyzers DA310 is introduced. They have similarly attributes as EMK310 but the output information of unipolar signals from detector is more complete. The pipeline A/D converter with field programmable gate array (FPGA) is the hearth of the DA310 device. The resolution is 12 bits (4096 channels); the sample frequency is 80 MHz. The application for the neutron noise analysis is supposed. The correction method for non linearity

  13. A Dose of Reality: Overcoming Usability Challenges\\ud in VR Head-Mounted Displays

    OpenAIRE

    McGill, M.; Boland, Daniel; Murray-Smith, Roderick; Brewster, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    We identify usability challenges facing consumers adopting\\ud Virtual Reality (VR) head-mounted displays (HMDs) in a survey\\ud of 108 VR HMD users. Users reported significant issues\\ud in interacting with, and being aware of their real-world\\ud context when using a HMD. Building upon existing work on\\ud blending real and virtual environments, we performed three\\ud design studies to address these usability concerns. In a typing\\ud study, we show that augmenting VR with a view of reality\\ud sig...

  14. The use of VR in the treatment of panic disorders and agoraphobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella, Cristina; Villa, Helena; García Palacios, Azucena; Quero, Soledad; Baños, Rosa M; Alcaniz, Mariano

    2004-01-01

    Panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA) is considered an important public health problem. The efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for PDA has been widely demonstrated. The American National Institute of Health recommended Cognitive-Behavioral programs as the treatment of choice for this disorder. This institution also recommended that researchers develop treatments whose mode of delivery increases the availability of these programs. Virtual Reality based treatments can help to achieve this goal. VR has several advantages compared with conventional techniques. One of the essential components to treat these disorders is exposure. In VR the therapist can control the feared situations at will and with a high degree of safety for the patient, as it is easier to grade the feared situations. Another advantage is that VR is more confidential because treatment takes place in the therapist's office. It is also less time consuming as it takes place in the therapist's office. Considering the wide number of situations and activities that agoraphobic patients use to avoid, VR can save time and money significantly. Another advantage in treating PDA using VR is the possibility of doing VR interoceptive. VR could be a more natural setting for interoceptive exposure than the consultation room because we can elicit bodily sensations while the patient is immerse in VR agoraphobic situations. Finally, we think that VR exposure can be a useful intermediate step for those patients who refuse in vivo exposure because the idea of facing the real agoraphobic situations is too aversive for them. In this chapter we offer the work done by our research team at the VEPSY-UPDATED project. We describe the VR program we have developed for the treatment of PDA and we summarize the efficacy and effectiveness data of a study where we compare a cognitive-behavioral program including VR for the exposure component with a standard cognitive-behavioral program including in vivo exposure and with a

  15. BDE-209 in the Australian Environment: Desktop review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    English, Karin; Toms, Leisa-Maree L.; Gallen, Christie; Mueller, Jochen F.

    2016-01-01

    The commercial polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardant mixture c-decaBDE is now being considered for listing on the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants. The aim of our study was to review the literature regarding the use and detection of BDE-209, a major component of c-decaBDE, in consumer products and provide a best estimate of goods that are likely to contain BDE-209 in Australia. This review is part of a larger study, which will include quantitative testing of items to assess for BDE-209. The findings of this desktop review will be used to determine which items should be prioritized for quantitative testing. We identified that electronics, particularly televisions, computers, small household appliances and power boards, were the items that were most likely to contain BDE-209 in Australia. Further testing of these items should include items of various ages. Several other items were identified as high priority for future testing, including transport vehicles, building materials and textiles in non-domestic settings. The findings from this study will aid in the development of appropriate policies, should listing of c-decaBDE on the Stockholm Convention and Australia’s ratification of that listing proceed.

  16. Analysis of helium-ion scattering with a desktop computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, J. W.

    1986-04-01

    This paper describes a program written in an enhanced BASIC language for a desktop computer, for simulating the energy spectra of high-energy helium ions scattered into two concurrent detectors (backward and glancing). The program is designed for 512-channel spectra from samples containing up to 8 elements and 55 user-defined layers. The program is intended to meet the needs of analyses in materials sciences, such as metallurgy, where more than a few elements may be present, where several elements may be near each other in the periodic table, and where relatively deep structure may be important. These conditions preclude the use of completely automatic procedures for obtaining the sample composition directly from the scattered ion spectrum. Therefore, efficient methods are needed for entering and editing large amounts of composition data, with many iterations and with much feedback of information from the computer to the user. The internal video screen is used exclusively for verbal and numeric communications between user and computer. The composition matrix is edited on screen with a two-dimension forms-fill-in text editor and with many automatic procedures, such as doubling the number of layers with appropriate interpolations and extrapolations. The control center of the program is a bank of 10 keys that initiate on-event branching of program flow. The experimental and calculated spectra, including those of individual elements if desired, are displayed on an external color monitor, with an optional inset plot of the depth concentration profiles of the elements in the sample.

  17. BDE-209 in the Australian Environment: Desktop review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    English, Karin, E-mail: k.english@uq.edu.au [School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Children’s Health and Environment Program, Child Health Research Centre, The University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Queensland Children’s Medical Research Institute, Children’s Health Research Centre, Brisbane (Australia); Toms, Leisa-Maree L. [School of Public Health and Social Work, and Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane (Australia); Gallen, Christie; Mueller, Jochen F. [The University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), Brisbane (Australia)

    2016-12-15

    The commercial polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardant mixture c-decaBDE is now being considered for listing on the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants. The aim of our study was to review the literature regarding the use and detection of BDE-209, a major component of c-decaBDE, in consumer products and provide a best estimate of goods that are likely to contain BDE-209 in Australia. This review is part of a larger study, which will include quantitative testing of items to assess for BDE-209. The findings of this desktop review will be used to determine which items should be prioritized for quantitative testing. We identified that electronics, particularly televisions, computers, small household appliances and power boards, were the items that were most likely to contain BDE-209 in Australia. Further testing of these items should include items of various ages. Several other items were identified as high priority for future testing, including transport vehicles, building materials and textiles in non-domestic settings. The findings from this study will aid in the development of appropriate policies, should listing of c-decaBDE on the Stockholm Convention and Australia’s ratification of that listing proceed.

  18. Nielsen PrimeLocation Web/Desktop: Assessing and GIS Mapping Market Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — Nielsen PrimeLocation Web and Desktop Software Licensed for Internal Use only: Pop-Facts Demographics Database, Geographic Mapping Data Layers, Geo-Coding locations.

  19. Big Memory Elegance: HyperCard Information Processing and Desktop Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitter, Gary G.; Gerson, Charles W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses hardware requirements, functions, and applications of five information processing and desktop publishing software packages for the Macintosh: HyperCard, PageMaker, Cricket Presents, Power Point, and Adobe illustrator. Benefits of these programs for schools are considered. (MES)

  20. A VM-shared desktop virtualization system based on OpenStack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xi; Zhu, Mingfa; Xiao, Limin; Jiang, Yuanjie

    2018-04-01

    With the increasing popularity of cloud computing, desktop virtualization is rising in recent years as a branch of virtualization technology. However, existing desktop virtualization systems are mostly designed as a one-to-one mode, which one VM can only be accessed by one user. Meanwhile, previous desktop virtualization systems perform weakly in terms of response time and cost saving. This paper proposes a novel VM-Shared desktop virtualization system based on OpenStack platform. The paper modified the connecting process and the display data transmission process of the remote display protocol SPICE to support VM-Shared function. On the other hand, we propose a server-push display mode to improve user interactive experience. The experimental results show that our system performs well in response time and achieves a low CPU consumption.

  1. Development of an automated desktop procedure for defining macro-reaches for river longitudinal profiles

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dollar, LH

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an automated desktop procedure for delineating river longitudinal profiles into macro-reaches for use in Ecological Reserve assessments and to aid freshwater ecosystem conservation planning. The procedure was developed for use...

  2. Development of Web-Based Remote Desktop to Provide Adaptive User Interfaces in Cloud Platform

    OpenAIRE

    Shuen-Tai Wang; Hsi-Ya Chang

    2014-01-01

    Cloud virtualization technologies are becoming more and more prevalent, cloud users usually encounter the problem of how to access to the virtualized remote desktops easily over the web without requiring the installation of special clients. To resolve this issue, we took advantage of the HTML5 technology and developed web-based remote desktop. It permits users to access the terminal which running in our cloud platform from anywhere. We implemented a sketch of web interfac...

  3. ACID Astronomical and Physics Cloud Interactive Desktop: A Prototype of VUI for CTA Science Gateway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimino, P.; Costa, A.; Becciani, U.; Vuerli, C.; Bandieramonte, M.; Petta, C.; Riggi, S.; Sciacca, E.; Vitello, F.; Pistagna, C.

    2014-05-01

    The Astronomical & Physics Cloud Interactive Desktop, developed for the prototype of CTA Science Gateway in Catania, Italy, allows to use many software packages without any installation on the local desktop. The users will be able to exploit, if applicable, the native Graphical User Interface (GUI) of the programs that are available in the ACID environment. For using interactively the remote programs, ACID exploits an "ad hoc" VNC-based User Interface (VUI).

  4. Unique Methodologies for Nano/Micro Manufacturing Job Training Via Desktop Supercomputer Modeling and Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimball, Clyde [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Karonis, Nicholas [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Lurio, Laurence [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Piot, Philippe [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Xiao, Zhili [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Glatz, Andreas [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Pohlman, Nicholas [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Hou, Minmei [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Demir, Veysel [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Song, Jie [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Duffin, Kirk [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Johns, Mitrick [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Sims, Thomas [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Yin, Yanbin [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States)

    2012-11-21

    This project establishes an initiative in high speed (Teraflop)/large-memory desktop supercomputing for modeling and simulation of dynamic processes important for energy and industrial applications. It provides a training ground for employment of current students in an emerging field with skills necessary to access the large supercomputing systems now present at DOE laboratories. It also provides a foundation for NIU faculty to quantum leap beyond their current small cluster facilities. The funding extends faculty and student capability to a new level of analytic skills with concomitant publication avenues. The components of the Hewlett Packard computer obtained by the DOE funds create a hybrid combination of a Graphics Processing System (12 GPU/Teraflops) and a Beowulf CPU system (144 CPU), the first expandable via the NIU GAEA system to ~60 Teraflops integrated with a 720 CPU Beowulf system. The software is based on access to the NVIDIA/CUDA library and the ability through MATLAB multiple licenses to create additional local programs. A number of existing programs are being transferred to the CPU Beowulf Cluster. Since the expertise necessary to create the parallel processing applications has recently been obtained at NIU, this effort for software development is in an early stage. The educational program has been initiated via formal tutorials and classroom curricula designed for the coming year. Specifically, the cost focus was on hardware acquisitions and appointment of graduate students for a wide range of applications in engineering, physics and computer science.

  5. NASA's Climate in a Box: Desktop Supercomputing for Open Scientific Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, G. S.; Seablom, M. S.; Lee, T. J.; McConaughy, G. R.; Syed, R.; Oloso, A.; Kemp, E. M.; Greenseid, J.; Smith, R.

    2009-12-01

    designed for Linux operating systems (OS), the arrival of the WindowsHPC 2008 OS provides the opportunity to evaluate the use of a new platform on which to develop and port climate and earth science models. In particular, we are evaluating Microsoft's Visual Studio Integrated Developer Environment to determine its appropriateness for the climate modeling community. In the initial phases of this project, we have ported GEOS-5, WRF, GISS ModelE, and GFS to Linux on a CX1 and are in the process of porting WRF and ModelE to WindowsHPC 2008. Initial tests on the CX1 Linux OS indicate favorable comparisons in terms of performance and consistency of scientific results when compared with experiments executed on NASA high end systems. As in the past, NASA's large clusters will continue to be an important part of our objectives. We envision a seamless environment in which an investigator performs model development and testing on a desktop system and can seamlessly transfer execution to supercomputer clusters for production.

  6. ST Elevation in Lead aVR and Its Association with Clinical Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eka Ginanjar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this case repots are to evaluate the role of ST elevation in aVR lead and to make analysis between both cases. There are some atypical electrocardiogram (ECG presentations which need prompt management in patient with ischemic clinical manifestation such as ST elevation in aVR lead. In this case study, we report a 68-year old woman with chief symptoms of shortness of breath and chest discomfort. She was diagnosed with cardiogenic shock, with Killip class IV, and TIMI score of 8. The second case is a 57-year-old man with typical chest pain at rest which could not be relieved with nitrate treatment. He was diagnosed with ST elevation in inferior and aVR lead, and occlusion in left circumflex artery (LCX. Both patients underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI. Subsequently, both cases presented remarkable clinical improvements and improved ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI in aVR lead.

  7. Utility of lead aVR for identifying the culprit lesion in acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kühl, Jørgen Tobias; Berg, Ronan M G

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lead aVR is a neglected, however, potentially useful tool in electrocardiography. Our aim was to evaluate its value in clinical practice, by reviewing existing literature regarding its utility for identifying the culprit lesion in acute myocardial infarction (AMI). METHODS: Based...... on a systematic search strategy, 16 studies were assessed with the intent to pool data; diagnostic test rates were calculated as key results. RESULTS: Five studies investigated if ST-segment elevation (STE) in aVR is valuable for the diagnosis of left main stem stenosis (LMS) in non-ST-segment AMI (NSTEMI......). The studies were too heterogeneous to pool, but the individual studies all showed that STE in aVR has a high negative predictive value (NPV) for LMS. Six studies evaluated if STE in aVR is valuable for distinguishing proximal from distal lesions in the left anterior descending artery (LAD) in anterior ST...

  8. The research for the design verification of nuclear power plant based on VR dynamic plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yong; Yu Xiao

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies a new method of design verification through the VR plant, in order to perform verification and validation the design of plant conform to the requirements of accident emergency. The VR dynamic plant is established by 3D design model and digital maps that composed of GIS system and indoor maps, and driven by the analyze data of design analyzer. The VR plant could present the operation conditions and accident conditions of power plant. This paper simulates the execution of accident procedures, the development of accidents, the evacuation planning of people and so on, based on VR dynamic plant, and ensure that the plant design will not cause bad effect. Besides design verification, simulated result also can be used for optimization of the accident emergency plan, the training of accident plan and emergency accident treatment. (author)

  9. ST segment elevation in lead aVR during exercise testing is associated with LAD stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neill, Johanne; Harbinson, Mark; Shannon, Heather J.; Morton, Amanda; Muir, Alison R.; Adgey, Jennifer A.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate, in patients with chest pain, the diagnostic value of ST elevation (STE) in lead aVR during stress testing prior to 99m Tc-sestamibi scanning correlating ischaemic territory with angiographic findings. Consecutive patients attending for 99m Tc-sestamibi myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) completed a treadmill protocol. Peak exercise ECGs were coded. STE ≥0.05 mV in lead aVR was considered significant. Gated perfusion images and findings at angiography were assessed. STE in lead aVR occurred in 25% (138/557) of the patients. More patients with STE in aVR had a reversible defect on imaging compared with those who had no STE in aVR (41%, 56/138 vs 27%, 114/419, p=0.003). Defects indicating a left anterior descending artery (LAD) culprit lesion were more common in the STE in aVR group (20%, 27/138 vs 9%, 39/419, p=0.001). There was a trend towards coronary artery stenosis (>70%) in a double vessel distribution involving the LAD in those patients who had STE in aVR compared with those who did not (22%, 8/37 vs 5%, 4/77, p=0.06). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that STE in aVR (OR 1.36, p=0.233) is not an independent predictor of inducible abnormality when adjusted for STD >0.1 mV (OR 1.69, p=0.026). However, using anterior wall defect as an end-point, STE in aVR (OR 2.77, p=0.008) was a predictor even after adjustment for STD (OR 1.43, p=0.281). STE in lead aVR during exercise does not diagnose more inducible abnormalities than STD alone. However, unlike STD, which is not predictive of a territory of ischaemia, STE in aVR may indicate an anterior wall defect. (orig.)

  10. Virtual Reality Training for Public Speaking—A QUEST-VR Framework Validation

    OpenAIRE

    Poeschl, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Good public speaking skills are essential in many professions as well as everyday life, but speech anxiety is a common problem. While it is established that public speaking training in virtual reality (VR) is effective, comprehensive studies on the underlying factors that contribute to this success are rare. The “quality evaluation of user-system interaction in virtual reality” framework for evaluation of VR applications is presented that includes system features, user factors, and moderating...

  11. NeuroVR: an open source virtual reality platform for clinical psychology and behavioral neurosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Giuseppe; Gaggioli, Andrea; Villani, Daniela; Preziosa, Alessandra; Morganti, Francesca; Corsi, Riccardo; Faletti, Gianluca; Vezzadini, Luca

    2007-01-01

    In the past decade, the use of virtual reality for clinical and research applications has become more widespread. However, the diffusion of this approach is still limited by three main issues: poor usability, lack of technical expertise among clinical professionals, and high costs. To address these challenges, we introduce NeuroVR (http://www.neurovr.org--http://www.neurotiv.org), a cost-free virtual reality platform based on open-source software, that allows non-expert users to adapt the content of a pre-designed virtual environment to meet the specific needs of the clinical or experimental setting. Using the NeuroVR Editor, the user can choose the appropriate psychological stimuli/stressors from a database of objects (both 2D and 3D) and videos, and easily place them into the virtual environment. The edited scene can then be visualized in the NeuroVR Player using either immersive or non-immersive displays. Currently, the NeuroVR library includes different virtual scenes (apartment, office, square, supermarket, park, classroom, etc.), covering two of the most studied clinical applications of VR: specific phobias and eating disorders. The NeuroVR Editor is based on Blender (http://www.blender.org), the open source, cross-platform suite of tools for 3D creation, and is available as a completely free resource. An interesting feature of the NeuroVR Editor is the possibility to add new objects to the database. This feature allows the therapist to enhance the patient's feeling of familiarity and intimacy with the virtual scene, i.e., by using photos or movies of objects/people that are part of the patient's daily life, thereby improving the efficacy of the exposure. The NeuroVR platform runs on standard personal computers with Microsoft Windows; the only requirement for the hardware is related to the graphics card, which must support OpenGL.

  12. CloVR-Comparative: automated, cloud-enabled comparative microbial genome sequence analysis pipeline

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Sonia; Arze, Cesar; Adkins, Ricky S.; Crabtree, Jonathan; Riley, David; Vangala, Mahesh; Galens, Kevin; Fraser, Claire M.; Tettelin, Herv?; White, Owen; Angiuoli, Samuel V.; Mahurkar, Anup; Fricke, W. Florian

    2017-01-01

    Background The benefit of increasing genomic sequence data to the scientific community depends on easy-to-use, scalable bioinformatics support. CloVR-Comparative combines commonly used bioinformatics tools into an intuitive, automated, and cloud-enabled analysis pipeline for comparative microbial genomics. Results CloVR-Comparative runs on annotated complete or draft genome sequences that are uploaded by the user or selected via a taxonomic tree-based user interface and downloaded from NCBI. ...

  13. Upgrade of VR-1 training reactor I and C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kropik, M.; Matejka, K.; Chab, V.

    2003-01-01

    The contribution describes the upgrade of the VR-1 training reactor I and C (Instrumentation and Control). The reactor was put into operation in the 1990, and its I and C seems to be obsolete now. The new I and C utilises the same digital technology as the old one. The upgrade has been done gradually during holidays in order not to disturb the reactor utilisation during teaching and training. The first stage consisted in the human-machine interface and the control room upgrade in 2001. A new operator's desk, displays, indicators and buttons were installed. Completely new software and communication interface to the present I and C were developed. During the second stage in 2002, new control rod drivers and safety circuits were installed. The rod motors were replaced and necessary mechanical changes on the control rod mechanism, induced by the utilisation of the new motor, were done. The new safety circuits utilise high quality relays with forced contacts to guarantee high reliability of their operation. The third stage, the control system upgrade is being carried out now. The new control system is based on an industrial PC mounted in a 19 inch crate. The operating system of the PC is the Microsoft Windows XP with the real time support RTX of the VentureCom Company. A large amount of work has been devoted to the software requirements to specify all dependencies, modes and permitted actions, safety measures, etc. The Department took an active part in the setting of software requirements and later in verification and validation of the software and the whole control system. Finally, a new protection system consisting of power measuring and power protection channels will be installed in 2004 or 2005. (author)

  14. New generation of 3D desktop computer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerjanc, Robert; Pastoor, Siegmund

    1997-05-01

    Today's computer interfaces use 2-D displays showing windows, icons and menus and support mouse interactions for handling programs and data files. The interface metaphor is that of a writing desk with (partly) overlapping sheets of documents placed on its top. Recent advances in the development of 3-D display technology give the opportunity to take the interface concept a radical stage further by breaking the design limits of the desktop metaphor. The major advantage of the envisioned 'application space' is, that it offers an additional, immediately perceptible dimension to clearly and constantly visualize the structure and current state of interrelations between documents, videos, application programs and networked systems. In this context, we describe the development of a visual operating system (VOS). Under VOS, applications appear as objects in 3-D space. Users can (graphically connect selected objects to enable communication between the respective applications. VOS includes a general concept of visual and object oriented programming for tasks ranging from, e.g., low-level programming up to high-level application configuration. In order to enable practical operation in an office or at home for many hours, the system should be very comfortable to use. Since typical 3-D equipment used, e.g., in virtual-reality applications (head-mounted displays, data gloves) is rather cumbersome and straining, we suggest to use off-head displays and contact-free interaction techniques. In this article, we introduce an autostereoscopic 3-D display and connected video based interaction techniques which allow viewpoint-depending imaging (by head tracking) and visually controlled modification of data objects and links (by gaze tracking, e.g., to pick, 3-D objects just by looking at them).

  15. VR-Cluster: Dynamic Migration for Resource Fragmentation Problem in Virtual Router Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianming Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Network virtualization technology is regarded as one of gradual schemes to network architecture evolution. With the development of network functions virtualization, operators make lots of effort to achieve router virtualization by using general servers. In order to ensure high performance, virtual router platform usually adopts a cluster of general servers, which can be also regarded as a special cloud computing environment. However, due to frequent creation and deletion of router instances, it may generate lots of resource fragmentation to prevent platform from establishing new router instances. In order to solve “resource fragmentation problem,” we firstly propose VR-Cluster, which introduces two extra function planes including switching plane and resource management plane. Switching plane is mainly used to support seamless migration of router instances without packet loss; resource management plane can dynamically move router instances from one server to another server by using VR-mapping algorithms. Besides, three VR-mapping algorithms including first-fit mapping algorithm, best-fit mapping algorithm, and worst-fit mapping algorithm are proposed based on VR-Cluster. At last, we establish VR-Cluster protosystem by using general X86 servers, evaluate its migration time, and further analyze advantages and disadvantages of our proposed VR-mapping algorithms to solve resource fragmentation problem.

  16. CloVR-Comparative: automated, cloud-enabled comparative microbial genome sequence analysis pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Sonia; Arze, Cesar; Adkins, Ricky S; Crabtree, Jonathan; Riley, David; Vangala, Mahesh; Galens, Kevin; Fraser, Claire M; Tettelin, Hervé; White, Owen; Angiuoli, Samuel V; Mahurkar, Anup; Fricke, W Florian

    2017-04-27

    The benefit of increasing genomic sequence data to the scientific community depends on easy-to-use, scalable bioinformatics support. CloVR-Comparative combines commonly used bioinformatics tools into an intuitive, automated, and cloud-enabled analysis pipeline for comparative microbial genomics. CloVR-Comparative runs on annotated complete or draft genome sequences that are uploaded by the user or selected via a taxonomic tree-based user interface and downloaded from NCBI. CloVR-Comparative runs reference-free multiple whole-genome alignments to determine unique, shared and core coding sequences (CDSs) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Output includes short summary reports and detailed text-based results files, graphical visualizations (phylogenetic trees, circular figures), and a database file linked to the Sybil comparative genome browser. Data up- and download, pipeline configuration and monitoring, and access to Sybil are managed through CloVR-Comparative web interface. CloVR-Comparative and Sybil are distributed as part of the CloVR virtual appliance, which runs on local computers or the Amazon EC2 cloud. Representative datasets (e.g. 40 draft and complete Escherichia coli genomes) are processed in genomics projects, while eliminating the need for on-site computational resources and expertise.

  17. AR Feels "Softer" than VR: Haptic Perception of Stiffness in Augmented versus Virtual Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffary, Yoren; Le Gouis, Benoit; Marchal, Maud; Argelaguet, Ferran; Arnaldi, Bruno; Lecuyer, Anatole

    2017-11-01

    Does it feel the same when you touch an object in Augmented Reality (AR) or in Virtual Reality (VR)? In this paper we study and compare the haptic perception of stiffness of a virtual object in two situations: (1) a purely virtual environment versus (2) a real and augmented environment. We have designed an experimental setup based on a Microsoft HoloLens and a haptic force-feedback device, enabling to press a virtual piston, and compare its stiffness successively in either Augmented Reality (the virtual piston is surrounded by several real objects all located inside a cardboard box) or in Virtual Reality (the same virtual piston is displayed in a fully virtual scene composed of the same other objects). We have conducted a psychophysical experiment with 12 participants. Our results show a surprising bias in perception between the two conditions. The virtual piston is on average perceived stiffer in the VR condition compared to the AR condition. For instance, when the piston had the same stiffness in AR and VR, participants would select the VR piston as the stiffer one in 60% of cases. This suggests a psychological effect as if objects in AR would feel "softer" than in pure VR. Taken together, our results open new perspectives on perception in AR versus VR, and pave the way to future studies aiming at characterizing potential perceptual biases.

  18. Efficiency Sustainability Resource Visual Simulator for Clustered Desktop Virtualization Based on Cloud Infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Hyuk Park

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Following IT innovations, manual operations have been automated, improving the overall quality of life. This has been possible because an organic topology has been formed among many diverse smart devices grafted onto real life. To provide services to these smart devices, enterprises or users use the cloud. Cloud services are divided into infrastructure as a service (IaaS, platform as a service (PaaS and software as a service (SaaS. SaaS is operated on PaaS, and PaaS is operated on IaaS. Since IaaS is the foundation of all services, algorithms for the efficient operation of virtualized resources are required. Among these algorithms, desktop resource virtualization is used for high resource availability when existing desktop PCs are unavailable. For this high resource availability, clustering for hierarchical structures is important. In addition, since many clustering algorithms show different percentages of the main resources depending on the desktop PC distribution rates and environments, selecting appropriate algorithms is very important. If diverse attempts are made to find algorithms suitable for the operating environments’ desktop resource virtualization, huge costs are incurred for the related power, time and labor. Therefore, in the present paper, a desktop resource virtualization clustering simulator (DRV-CS, a clustering simulator for selecting clusters of desktop virtualization clusters to be maintained sustainably, is proposed. The DRV-CS provides simulations, so that clustering algorithms can be selected and elements can be properly applied in different desktop PC environments through the DRV-CS.

  19. Testing the quality of images for permanent magnet desktop MRI systems using specially designed phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jianfeng; Wang, Guozhu; Min, Jiao; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Pengcheng

    2013-12-21

    Our aim was to measure the performance of desktop magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems using specially designed phantoms, by testing imaging parameters and analysing the imaging quality. We designed multifunction phantoms with diameters of 18 and 60 mm for desktop MRI scanners in accordance with the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) report no. 28. We scanned the phantoms with three permanent magnet 0.5 T desktop MRI systems, measured the MRI image parameters, and analysed imaging quality by comparing the data with the AAPM criteria and Chinese national standards. Image parameters included: resonance frequency, high contrast spatial resolution, low contrast object detectability, slice thickness, geometrical distortion, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and image uniformity. The image parameters of three desktop MRI machines could be measured using our specially designed phantoms, and most parameters were in line with MRI quality control criterion, including: resonance frequency, high contrast spatial resolution, low contrast object detectability, slice thickness, geometrical distortion, image uniformity and slice position accuracy. However, SNR was significantly lower than in some references. The imaging test and quality control are necessary for desktop MRI systems, and should be performed with the applicable phantom and corresponding standards.

  20. Testing the quality of images for permanent magnet desktop MRI systems using specially designed phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, Jianfeng; Wang, Guozhu; Min, Jiao; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Pengcheng

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to measure the performance of desktop magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems using specially designed phantoms, by testing imaging parameters and analysing the imaging quality. We designed multifunction phantoms with diameters of 18 and 60 mm for desktop MRI scanners in accordance with the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) report no. 28. We scanned the phantoms with three permanent magnet 0.5 T desktop MRI systems, measured the MRI image parameters, and analysed imaging quality by comparing the data with the AAPM criteria and Chinese national standards. Image parameters included: resonance frequency, high contrast spatial resolution, low contrast object detectability, slice thickness, geometrical distortion, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and image uniformity. The image parameters of three desktop MRI machines could be measured using our specially designed phantoms, and most parameters were in line with MRI quality control criterion, including: resonance frequency, high contrast spatial resolution, low contrast object detectability, slice thickness, geometrical distortion, image uniformity and slice position accuracy. However, SNR was significantly lower than in some references. The imaging test and quality control are necessary for desktop MRI systems, and should be performed with the applicable phantom and corresponding standards. (paper)

  1. Postural Control Disturbances Produced By Exposure to HMD and Dome Vr Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harm, D. L.; Taylor, L. C.

    2005-01-01

    Two critical and unresolved human factors issues in VR systems are: 1) potential "cybersickness", a form of motion sickness which is experienced in virtual worlds, and 2) maladaptive sensorimotor performance following exposure to VR systems. Interestingly, these aftereffects are often quite similar to adaptive sensorimotor responses observed in astronauts during and/or following space flight. Most astronauts and cosmonauts experience perceptual and sensorimotor disturbances during and following space flight. All astronauts exhibit decrements in postural control following space flight. It has been suggested that training in virtual reality (VR) may be an effective countermeasure for minimizing perceptual and/or sensorimotor disturbances. People adapt to consistent, sustained alterations of sensory input such as those produced by microgravity, and experimentally-produced stimulus rearrangements (e.g., reversing prisms, magnifying lenses, flight simulators, and VR systems). Adaptation is revealed by aftereffects including perceptual disturbances and sensorimotor control disturbances. The purpose of the current study was to compare disturbances in postural control produced by dome and head-mounted virtual environment displays. Individuals recovered from motion sickness and the detrimental effects of exposure to virtual reality on postural control within one hour. Sickness severity and initial decrements in postural equilibrium decreases over days, which suggests that subjects become dual-adapted over time. These findings provide some direction for developing training schedules for VR users that facilitate adaptation, and address safety concerns about aftereffects.

  2. An evaluation on CT image acquisition method for medical VR applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seong-wook; Ko, Junho; Yoo, Yon-sik; Kim, Yoonsang

    2017-02-01

    Recent medical virtual reality (VR) applications to minimize re-operations are being studied for improvements in surgical efficiency and reduction of operation error. The CT image acquisition method considering three-dimensional (3D) modeling for medical VR applications is important, because the realistic model is required for the actual human organ. However, the research for medical VR applications has focused on 3D modeling techniques and utilized 3D models. In addition, research on a CT image acquisition method considering 3D modeling has never been reported. The conventional CT image acquisition method involves scanning a limited area of the lesion for the diagnosis of doctors once or twice. However, the medical VR application is required to acquire the CT image considering patients' various postures and a wider area than the lesion. A wider area than the lesion is required because of the necessary process of comparing bilateral sides for dyskinesia diagnosis of the shoulder, pelvis, and leg. Moreover, patients' various postures are required due to the different effects on the musculoskeletal system. Therefore, in this paper, we perform a comparative experiment on the acquired CT images considering image area (unilateral/bilateral) and patients' postures (neutral/abducted). CT images are acquired from 10 patients for the experiments, and the acquired CT images are evaluated based on the length per pixel and the morphological deviation. Finally, by comparing the experiment results, we evaluate the CT image acquisition method for medical VR applications.

  3. Characterization of a novel Y2K-type dehydrin VrDhn1 from Vigna radiata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Hui; Peng, Po-Hsin; Ko, Chia-Yun; Markhart, Albert H; Lin, Tsai-Yun

    2012-05-01

    A novel dehydrin gene (VrDhn1) was isolated from an embryo cDNA library of Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek (mungbean) variety VC1973A. The intronless VrDhn1 gene encodes a protein belonging to the Y(2)K-type dehydrin family. VrDhn1 protein accumulated in embryos and cotyledons during seed maturation and disappeared 2 days after seed imbibition (DAI). The expression of VrDhn1 mRNA and accumulation of VrDhn1 protein were at high levels in mature seeds, but neither mRNA nor protein was detected in mungbean vegetative tissues under normal growth conditions. The VrDhn1 mRNA level was extremely high in mature seeds and decreased to ∼30% at 1 DAI, and was not detectable at ~7 DAI. Tissue dehydration, salinity and exogenous ABA markedly induced VrDhn1 transcripts in plants as measured by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). VrDhn1 protein was not detected using immunoblots in seedlings under stress treatments. In mature seeds or 1 DAI seedlings, VrDhn1 proteins were immunolocalized in the nucleus and cytoplasm. VrDhn1 exhibited low affinity for non-specific interaction with DNA using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs), and the exogenous addition of Zn(2+) or Ni(2+) stimulated interaction. The His-tagged VrDhn1 (30.17 kDa) protein showed a molecular mass of 63.1 kDa on gel filtration, suggesting a dimer form. This is the first report showing that a Y(2)K-type VrDhn1 enters the nucleus and interacts with DNA during seed maturation.

  4. Research and implementation of a Web-based remote desktop image monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Weijuan; Li Luofeng; Wang Chunhong

    2010-01-01

    It studied and implemented an ISS (Image Snapshot Server) system based on Web, using Java Web technology. The ISS system consisted of client web browser and server. The server part could be divided into three modules as the screen shots software, web server and Oracle database. Screen shots software intercepted the desktop environment of the remote monitored PC and sent these pictures to a Tomcat web server for displaying on the web at real time. At the same time, these pictures were also saved in an Oracle database. Through the web browser, monitor person can view the real-time and historical desktop pictures of the monitored PC during some period. It is very convenient for any user to monitor the desktop image of remote monitoring PC. (authors)

  5. The File Sync Algorithm of the ownCloud Desktop Clients

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The ownCloud desktop clients provide file syncing between desktop machines and the ownCloud server, available for the important desktop platforms. This presentation will give an overview of the sync algorithm used by the clients to provide a fast, reliable and robust syncing experience for the users. It will describe the phases a sync run will go through and how it is triggered. It also will provide an insight on the algorithms that decided if a file is uploaded, downloaded or even deleted on either on the local machine or in the cloud. Some examples of non obvious situations in file syncing will be described and discussed. As the ownCloud sync protocol is based on the open standard WebDAV the resulting challenges and the solutions will be illustrated. Finally a couple of frequently proposed enhancements will be reviewed and assed for the future development of the ownCloud server and syncing clients.

  6. Laptops vs. Desktops in a Google Groups Environment: A Study on Collaborative Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Lopes Abrantes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Current literature on m-learning refers to the lack of studies on real use of m-learning applications and how they can compete with current desktop counterparts. The study consists of an experiment involving one hundred and twelve students of higher education and a set of learning activities that they have to accomplish. This study has the main objective to validate if the students that use laptops or desktops are in the flow experience and which of them are more in the flow experience, when using Google Groups. The used approach is based on the flow experience introduced by [1]. It was possible to conclude that students have experienced the flow state both by students using laptops or desktops, but having the laptop students a more positive effect in the flow experience.

  7. Developing a Process Model for the Forensic Extraction of Information from Desktop Search Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Pavlic

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Desktop search applications can contain cached copies of files that were deleted from the file system. Forensic investigators see this as a potential source of evidence, as documents deleted by suspects may still exist in the cache. Whilst there have been attempts at recovering data collected by desktop search applications, there is no methodology governing the process, nor discussion on the most appropriate means to do so. This article seeks to address this issue by developing a process model that can be applied when developing an information extraction application for desktop search applications, discussing preferred methods and the limitations of each. This work represents a more structured approach than other forms of current research.

  8. [Teaching Desktop] Video Conferencing in a Collaborative and Problem Based Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Mouritzen, Per

    2013-01-01

    , teachers and assistant teachers wanted to find ways in the design for learning that enables the learners to acquire knowledge about the theories, models and concepts of the subject, as well as hands‐on competencies in a learning‐by‐doing manner. In particular we address the area of desktop video...... shows that the students experiment with various pedagogical situations, and that during the process of design, teaching, and reflection they acquire experiences at both a concrete specific and a general abstract level. The desktop video conference system creates challenges, with technical issues...

  9. The application of VR-GIS to decommissioning decision support system (DDSS) of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Bo

    2005-01-01

    Advanced management technique and Decision Support System (DSS) are needed to solve the problems of the nuclear reactor decommissioning decision-making. In this study, a kind of new DSS technique for nuclear reactor decommissioning is introduced. It is based on the Virtual Reality (VR) and Geography Information System (GIS), which combine with the scientific management method, operational research, cybernetics and behavior science. The proposed DDSS (Decommissioning Decision Support System) can provide decision-maker the real time 3-D virtual Environment, GIS information and background material of the decommissioning reactor, help to ascertain the decision-making target, modify the decision module and optimize the dismantling plan. The data from three modules (VR Environment Module, VR-DOSE Management Module and Route Layout GIS Module) are used to continuously update and show the statistic at the same time, and the final advice will be given to decision-maker. (authors)

  10. Interpretation of Simulations in Interactive VR Environments: Depth Perception in Cave and Panorama

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullins, Michael

    2006-01-01

     Virtual reality (VR) applications are transforming the way architecture is conceived and produced. By introducing an open and inclusive approach, they encourage a creative dialogue with the users of residential schemes and other buildings and allow competition juries a more thorough understanding...... of architectural concepts. Architects need to heed the dynamics set in motion by these technologies and especially of how laypersons interpret building forms and their simulations in interactive VR environments. The article presents a study which compares aspects of spatial perception in a physical environment...... contextual experience of the viewer, and that spatial ability is an important contributing factor. Results in the two virtual environments tested show consistent differences in how depth and shape are perceived, indicating that VR context is a significant variable in spatial representation. It is asserted...

  11. Variants of Phosphotriesterase for the Enhanced Detoxification of the Chemical Warfare Agent VR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigley, Andrew N; Mabanglo, Mark F; Harvey, Steven P; Raushel, Frank M

    2015-09-08

    The V-type organophosphorus nerve agents are among the most hazardous compounds known. Previous efforts to evolve the bacterial enzyme phosphotriesterase (PTE) for the hydrolytic decontamination of VX resulted in the identification of the variant L7ep-3a, which has a kcat value more than 2 orders of magnitude higher than that of wild-type PTE for the hydrolysis of VX. Because of the relatively small size of the O-ethyl, methylphosphonate center in VX, stereoselectivity is not a major concern. However, the Russian V-agent, VR, contains a larger O-isobutyl, methylphosphonate center, making stereoselectivity a significant issue since the SP-enantiomer is expected to be significantly more toxic than the RP-enantiomer. The three-dimensional structure of the L7ep-3a variant was determined to a resolution of 2.01 Å (PDB id: 4ZST ). The active site of the L7ep-3a mutant has revealed a network of hydrogen bonding interactions between Asp-301, Tyr-257, Gln-254, and the hydroxide that bridges the two metal ions. A series of new analogues that mimic VX and VR has helped to identify critical structural features for the development of new enzyme variants that are further enhanced for the catalytic detoxification of VR and VX. The best of these mutants has been shown to have a reversed stereochemical preference for the hydrolysis of VR-chiral center analogues. This mutant hydrolyzes the two enantiomers of VR 160- and 600-fold faster than wild-type PTE hydrolyzes the SP-enantiomer of VR.

  12. Bodiless Embodiment: A Descriptive Survey of Avatar Bodily Coherence in First-Wave Consumer VR Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, Dooley Joel

    This preliminary study surveys whether/which avatar body parts are visible in first-wave consumer virtual reality (VR) applications for the HTC Vive (n = 200). A simple coding schema for assessing avatar bodily coherence (ABC) is piloted and evaluated. Results provide a snapshot of ABC in popular...... high-end VR applications in Q3 2016. It is reported (Table 1) that 86.5% of sampled items feature fully invisible avatars, 9% depict hands only, and 4.5% feature a head, torso, or legs, but still with some degree of bodily incoherence. Findings suggest that users may experience a sense of ownership and...

  13. Luminescence dating of the lacustrine record of Vršac (Carpathian Basin, Serbia) - implications for a palaeoenvironmetal reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasen, N.; Zeeden, C.; Markovic, S.; Fischer, P.; Lehmkuhl, F.; Schulte, P.; Bösken, J.; Hambach, U.; Vött, A.

    2017-12-01

    The Carpathian Basin is one of the key areas to investigate the influence of the continental, Mediterranean and Atlantic climate interaction over Europe. The available Upper Pleistocene and Holocene geoarchives in the region are mainly loess-paleosol records. Long lacustrine records are sparse and do not always span the whole last glacial cycle. In the area around Vršac, we drilled a 10 m core to contribute to the palaeoenvironmental reconstruction of the Carpathian Basin. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) was used to find the best-suited drilling location. We applied luminescence and radiocarbon dating, because a robust chronology is important for the interpretation of the sedimentary record. Pulsed OSL measurements were carried out to identify the best sampling positions. We expect runoff from the catchment being the main source of the lacustrine sediments, because coarse fluvial input is absent. Knowledge about the depositional conditions is important in luminescence dating to evaluate partial bleaching prior to deposition, which may cause age overestimation. Therefore, we compared infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signals with post infrared infrared stimulated luminescence (pIRIR) signals, which bleach at different rates. Estimation of a representative water content has major influence on the age estimate, but remains challenging in luminescence dating. We measured the present day water content as well as the saturation water content, to account for variations over time. Luminescence and radiocarbon ages differ greatly from each other. According to the laboratory experiments, luminescence dating was reliable and we conclude that radiocarbon ages were underestimated because of an intrusion of younger organic material. The initial results demonstrated the potential of the drill core. Integrating more proxy data will be useful to enhance the importance of the geoarchive at Vršac for a better understanding of the last glacial cycle in the Carpathian

  14. Virtual Reality on a Desktop Hailed as New Tool in Distance Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2000-01-01

    Describes college and university educational applications of desktop virtual reality to provide a more human touch to interactive distance education programs and impress the brain with more vivid images. Critics suggest the technology is too costly and time consuming and may even distract students from the content of an online course. (DB)

  15. Multimodal Desktop Interaction: The Face –Object-Gesture–Voice Example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidakis, Nikolas; Vlasopoulos, Anastasios; Kounalakis, Tsampikos

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a natural user interface system based on multimodal human computer interaction, which operates as an intermediate module between the user and the operating system. The aim of this work is to demonstrate a multimodal system which gives users the ability to interact with desktop...

  16. Negotiation of Meaning in Desktop Videoconferencing-Supported Distance Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuping

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this research is to reveal the dynamics of focus on form in task completion via videoconferencing. This examination draws on current second language learning theories regarding effective language acquisition, research in Computer Mediated Communication (CMC) and empirical data from an evaluation of desktop videoconferencing-supported…

  17. Randomized Trial of Desktop Humidifier for Dry Eye Relief in Computer Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Michael T M; Chan, Evon; Ea, Linda; Kam, Clifford; Lu, Yvonne; Misra, Stuti L; Craig, Jennifer P

    2017-11-01

    Dry eye is a frequently reported problem among computer users. Low relative humidity environments are recognized to exacerbate signs and symptoms of dry eye, yet are common in offices of computer operators. Desktop USB-powered humidifiers are available commercially, but their efficacy for dry eye relief has not been established. This study aims to evaluate the potential for a desktop USB-powered humidifier to improve tear-film parameters, ocular surface characteristics, and subjective comfort of computer users. Forty-four computer users were enrolled in a prospective, masked, randomized crossover study. On separate days, participants were randomized to 1 hour of continuous computer use, with and without exposure to a desktop humidifier. Lipid-layer grade, noninvasive tear-film breakup time, and tear meniscus height were measured before and after computer use. Following the 1-hour period, participants reported whether ocular comfort was greater, equal, or lesser than that at baseline. The desktop humidifier effected a relative difference in humidity between the two environments of +5.4 ± 5.0% (P .05). However, a relative increase in the median noninvasive tear-film breakup time of +4.0 seconds was observed in the humidified environment (P computer use.Trial registration no: ACTRN12617000326392.

  18. Desktop Publishing: The Effects of Computerized Formats on Reading Speed and Comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knupfer, Nancy Nelson; McIsaac, Marina Stock

    1989-01-01

    Describes study that was conducted to determine the effects of two electronic text variables used in desktop publishing on undergraduate students' reading speed and comprehension. Research on text variables, graphic design, instructional text design, and computer screen design is discussed, and further studies are suggested. (22 references) (LRW)

  19. What's New in Software? Mastery of the Computer through Desktop Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedley, Carolyn N.; Ellsworth, Nancy J.

    1993-01-01

    Offers thoughts on the phenomenon of the underuse of classroom computers. Argues that desktop publishing is one way of overcoming the computer malaise occurring in schools, using the incentive of classroom reading and writing for mastery of many aspects of computer production, including writing, illustrating, reading, and publishing. (RS)

  20. Designing Design into an Advanced Desktop Publishing Course (A Teaching Tip).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Jim

    1995-01-01

    Describes an advanced desktop publishing course that combines instruction in a few advanced techniques for using software with extensive discussion of such design principles as consistency, proportion, asymmetry, appropriateness, contrast, and color. Describes computer hardware and software, class assignments, problems, and the rationale for such…

  1. Using Desktop Publishing in an Editing Class--The Lessons Learned and Students' Assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharp, Marty; Zimmerman, Don

    1992-01-01

    Reports students' perceptions of learning desktop publishing (DTP) systems. Finds that (1) students learned the foundations of DTP in under 60 hours of hands-on experience; (2) the incremental introduction of DTP functions and practice sessions before assignments were the most effective teaching strategy; and (3) use of DTP encouraged nonartistic…

  2. A Desktop Publishing Course: An Alternative to Internships for Rural Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammia, Madelyn

    1992-01-01

    Suggests that a course in desktop publishing can provide students at rural schools with experience equivalent to internships. Notes that the course provided students with real-world experience and benefited the university in terms of services and public relations. (RS)

  3. Digital Dome versus Desktop Display: Learning Outcome Assessments by Domain Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Jeffery

    2013-01-01

    In previous publications, the author reported that students learned about Egyptian architecture and society by playing an educational game based on a virtual representation of a temple. Students played the game in a digital dome or on a standard desktop computer, and (each) then recorded a video tour of the temple. Those who had used the dome…

  4. Using M@th Desktop Notebooks and Palettes in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonovits, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    This article explains the didactical design of M@th Desktop (MD), a teaching and learning software application for high schools and universities. The use of two types of MD resources is illustrated: notebooks and palettes, focusing on the topic of exponential functions. The handling of MD in a blended learning approach and the impact on the…

  5. Students' Beliefs about Mobile Devices vs. Desktop Computers in South Korea and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Eunmo; Mayer, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    College students in the United States and in South Korea completed a 28-item multidimensional scaling (MDS) questionnaire in which they rated the similarity of 28 pairs of multimedia learning materials on a 10-point scale (e.g., narrated animation on a mobile device Vs. movie clip on a desktop computer) and a 56-item semantic differential…

  6. Empirical Analysis of Server Consolidation and Desktop Virtualization in Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Rong Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical server transited to virtual server infrastructure (VSI and desktop device to virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI have the crucial problems of server consolidation, virtualization performance, virtual machine density, total cost of ownership (TCO, and return on investments (ROI. Besides, how to appropriately choose hypervisor for the desired server/desktop virtualization is really challenging, because a trade-off between virtualization performance and cost is a hard decision to make in the cloud. This paper introduces five hypervisors to establish the virtual environment and then gives a careful assessment based on C/P ratio that is derived from composite index, consolidation ratio, virtual machine density, TCO, and ROI. As a result, even though ESX server obtains the highest ROI and lowest TCO in server virtualization and Hyper-V R2 gains the best performance of virtual machine management; both of them however cost too much. Instead the best choice is Proxmox Virtual Environment (Proxmox VE because it not only saves the initial investment a lot to own a virtual server/desktop infrastructure, but also obtains the lowest C/P ratio.

  7. From Server to Desktop: Capital and Institutional Planning for Client/Server Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullig, Richard M.; Frey, Keith W.

    1994-01-01

    Beginning with a request for an enhanced system for decision/strategic planning support, the University of Chicago's biological sciences division has developed a range of administrative client/server tools, instituted a capital replacement plan for desktop technology, and created a planning and staffing approach enabling rapid introduction of new…

  8. Writing Essays on a Laptop or a Desktop Computer: Does It Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Guangming; Bridgeman, Brent

    2013-01-01

    To explore the potential effect of computer type on the Test of English as a Foreign Language-Internet-Based Test (TOEFL iBT) Writing Test, a sample of 444 international students was used. The students were randomly assigned to either a laptop or a desktop computer to write two TOEFL iBT practice essays in a simulated testing environment, followed…

  9. GTfold: Enabling parallel RNA secondary structure prediction on multi-core desktops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swenson, M Shel; Anderson, Joshua; Ash, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    achieved significant improvements in runtime, but their implementations were not portable from niche high-performance computers or easily accessible to most RNA researchers. With the increasing prevalence of multi-core desktop machines, a new parallel prediction program is needed to take full advantage...

  10. Surgical pathology report in the era of desktop publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillarisetti, S G

    1993-01-01

    Since it is believed that "a picture is worth a thousand words," incorporation of computer-generated line art was used as a adjunct to gross description in surgical pathology reporting in selected cases. The lack of an integrated software program was overcome by using commercially available graphic and word processing software. A library of drawings was developed over the last few years. Most time-consuming is the development of templates and the graphic library. With some effort it is possible to integrate graphics of high quality into surgical pathology reports.

  11. Implementing Virtual Reality Technology as an Effective Web Based Kiosk: Darulaman's Teacher Training College Tour (Ipda Vr Tour)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadzil, Azman

    2006-01-01

    At present, the development of Virtual Reality (VR) technology is expanding due to the importance and needs to use the 3D elements and 360 degrees panorama in expressing a clearer picture to consumers in various fields such as education, military, medicine, entertainment and so on. The web based VR kiosk project in Darulaman's Teacher Training…

  12. Molecular Analysis of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria Escherichia coli Strain VR50 Reveals Adaptation to the Urinary Tract by Gene Acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beatson, Scott A.; Ben Zakour, Nouri L.; Totsika, Makrina

    2015-01-01

    the evolution and molecular mechanisms that underpin ABU, the genome of the ABU E. coli strain VR50 was sequenced. Analysis of the complete genome indicated that it most resembles E. coli K-12, with the addition of a 94-kb genomic island (GI-VR50-pheV), eight prophages, and multiple plasmids. GI-VR50-pheV has...... a mosaic structure and contains genes encoding a number of UTI-associated virulence factors, namely, Afa (afimbrial adhesin), two autotransporter proteins (Ag43 and Sat), and aerobactin. We demonstrated that the presence of this island in VR50 confers its ability to colonize the murine bladder, as a VR50...... mutant with GI-VR50-pheV deleted was attenuated in a mouse model of UTI in vivo. We established that Afa is the island-encoded factor responsible for this phenotype using two independent deletion (Afa operon and AfaE adhesin) mutants. E. coli VR50afa and VR50afaE displayed significantly decreased ability...

  13. 20 CFR 411.410 - Does each referral from an EN to a State VR agency require its own agreement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... agency for services, although an EN and a State VR agency may want to enter into an individualized agreement to meet the needs of a single beneficiary. ...' Participation Agreements Between Employment Networks and State Vr Agencies § 411.410 Does each referral from an...

  14. VR-Smart Home, prototyping of a user centered design system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heidari Jozam, M.; Allameh, E.; Vries, de B.; Timmermans, H.J.P.; Masoud, M.; Andreev, S.; Balandin, S.; Yevgeni, Koucheryavy

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a prototype of a user centered design system for Smart Homes which lets users: (1) configure different interactive tasks, and (2) express activity specifications and preferences during the design process. The main objective of this paper is how to create and to implement VR

  15. Polymorphisms of CHAT but not TFAM or VR22 are Associated with Alzheimer Disease Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lili; Zhang, Yan; Deng, Jinghua; Yu, Wenbing; Yu, Yunxia

    2016-06-07

    BACKGROUND Alzheimer disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease that is one of the most prevalent health problems among seniors. The cause of AD has not yet been elucidated, but many risk factors have been identified that might contribute to the pathogenesis and prognosis of AD. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies involving CHAT, TFAM, and VR22 polymorphisms and AD susceptibility to further understand the pathogenesis of AD. MATERIAL AND METHODS PubMed/Medline, Embase, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar were searched for relevant articles. Rs1880676, rs2177369, rs3810950, and rs868750 of CHAT; rs1937 and rs2306604 of TFAM; and rs10997691 and rs7070570 of VR22 are studied in this meta-analysis. RESULTS A total of 51 case-control studies with 16 446 cases and 16 057 controls were enrolled. For CHAT, rs2177369 (G>A) in whites and rs3810950 (G>A) in Asians were found to be associated with AD susceptibility. No association was detected between rs1880676 and rs868750 and AD risk. For TFAM and VR22, no significant association was detected in studied single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). CONCLUSIONS Rs2177369 and rs3810950 of CHAT are associated with AD susceptibility, but rs1880676 and rs868750 are not. Rs1937 and rs2306604 of TFAM, and rs10997691 and rs7070570 of VR22 are not significantly associated with AD risk.

  16. Pengoperasian Beban Listrik Fase Tunggal Terkendali Melalui Minimum System Berbasis Mikrokontroler Dan Sensor Voice Recognition (Vr)

    OpenAIRE

    Goeritno, Arief; Ginting, Sandy Ferdiansyah; Yatim, Rakhmad

    2017-01-01

    Minimum system berbasis mikrokontroler dan sensor voice recognition (VR) sebagai pengendali aktuator telah digunakan untuk pengoperasian beban listrik fase tunggal. Minimum system adalah suatu sistem yang tersusun melalui 2 (dua) tahapan, yaitu (a) diagram rangkaian dan bentuk fisis board dan (b) pengawatan terintegrasi terhadap minimum system pada sistem mikrokontroler ATmega16. Keberadaan sistem mikrokontroler pada minimum system perlu program tertanam melalui pemrograman berbasis bahasa ...

  17. Development and Deployment of a Library of Industrially Focused Advanced Immersive VR Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Ian; Crosthwaite, Caroline; Norton, Christine; Balliu, Nicoleta; Tadé, Moses; Hoadley, Andrew; Shallcross, David; Barton, Geoff

    2008-01-01

    This work presents a unique education resource for both process engineering students and the industry workforce. The learning environment is based around spherical imagery of real operating plants coupled with interactive embedded activities and content. This Virtual Reality (VR) learning tool has been developed by applying aspects of relevant…

  18. Coding gaze tracking data with chromatic gradients for VR Exposure Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbelin, Bruno; Grillon, Helena; De Heras Ciechomski, Pablo

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a simple and intuitive way to represent the eye-tracking data gathered during immersive virtual reality exposure therapy sessions. Eye-tracking technology is used to observe gaze movements during vir- tual reality sessions and the gaze-map chromatic gradient coding allows to...... is fully compatible with different VR exposure systems and provides clinically meaningful data....

  19. VR Employment Outcomes of Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Decade in the Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alverson, Charlotte Y.; Yamamoto, Scott H.

    2018-01-01

    This study utilized hierarchical linear modeling analysis of a 10-year extant dataset from Rehabilitation Services Administration to investigate significant predictors of employment outcomes for vocational rehabilitation (VR) clients with autism. Predictor variables were gender, ethnicity, attained education level, IEP status in high school,…

  20. Cloning and functional characterization of the Rvi15 (Vr2) gene for apple scab resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, H.J.; Brinkhuis, J.; Burgh, van der S.; Schaart, J.; Groenwold, R.; Broggini, G.A.L.; Gessler, C.

    2014-01-01

    Apple scab, caused by Venturia inaequalis, is a serious disease of apple. Previously, the scab resistance Rvi15 (Vr2) from the accession GMAL 2473 was genetically mapped, and three candidate resistance genes were identified. Here, we report the cloning and functional characterization of these three

  1. Lowering the Barriers to Using Data: Enabling Desktop-based HPD Science through Virtual Environments and Web Data Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druken, K. A.; Trenham, C. E.; Steer, A.; Evans, B. J. K.; Richards, C. J.; Smillie, J.; Allen, C.; Pringle, S.; Wang, J.; Wyborn, L. A.

    2016-12-01

    The Australian National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) provides access to petascale data in climate, weather, Earth observations, and genomics, and terascale data in astronomy, geophysics, ecology and land use, as well as social sciences. The data is centralized in a closely integrated High Performance Computing (HPC), High Performance Data (HPD) and cloud facility. Despite this, there remain significant barriers for many users to find and access the data: simply hosting a large volume of data is not helpful if researchers are unable to find, access, and use the data for their particular need. Use cases demonstrate we need to support a diverse range of users who are increasingly crossing traditional research discipline boundaries. To support their varying experience, access needs and research workflows, NCI has implemented an integrated data platform providing a range of services that enable users to interact with our data holdings. These services include: - A GeoNetwork catalog built on standardized Data Management Plans to search collection metadata, and find relevant datasets; - Web data services to download or remotely access data via OPeNDAP, WMS, WCS and other protocols; - Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) built on a highly integrated on-site cloud with access to both the HPC peak machine and research data collections. The VDI is a fully featured environment allowing visualization, code development and analysis to take place in an interactive desktop environment; and - A Learning Management System (LMS) containing User Guides, Use Case examples and Jupyter Notebooks structured into courses, so that users can self-teach how to use these facilities with examples from our system across a range of disciplines. We will briefly present these components, and discuss how we engage with data custodians and consumers to develop standardized data structures and services that support the range of needs. We will also highlight some key developments that have

  2. Virtual Reality: Bringing the Awe of Our Science into The Classroom with VR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, R. E.; Turrin, M.; Frearson, N.; Boghosian, A.; Ferrini, V. L.; Simpson, F.

    2016-12-01

    The geosciences are rich in imagery, making them compelling material for immersive teaching experiences. We often work in remote locations, places where few others are able to travel. Flat 2 D images from the field have served explorers and scientists well from the lantern slides brought back from Antarctica to the images scientists and educators now use in powerpoint presentations. These images provide a backdrop to introduce the experience for formal classes and informal presentations. Our stories from the field bring the setting alive for the participants. The travelers presented and the audience passively listened. Immersive learning opportunities are much more powerful than lecturing. We have enlisted both VR and drone imagery to bring learners fully into the experience of science. A 360 VR image brings the viewer into the moment of discovery. Both have been shown to create an active learning setting fully under the learner's control; they explore at their own pace and following their own interest. This learning `sticks', becoming part of the participant's own unique experience in the space. We are building VR images of field experiences and VR data immersion experiences that will transport people into new locations, building a field experience that they can not only see but fully explore. Through VR we introduce new experiences that showcase our science, our careers and our collaborations. Users can spin the view up to see the helicopter landing in a remote field location by the ice. Spin to the right and see a colleague collecting a reading from instruments that have been pulled from the LC130 aircraft. Turn the view to the left and see the harsh windswept environment along the edge of an ice shelf. Look down and note that you feet are encased in snow boots to keep them warm and stable on the ice. The viewer is in the field as part of the science team. Learning in the classroom and through social media is now fully 360 and fully immersive.

  3. Emerging digital technologies come into the University: AR and VR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cabero Almenara

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A set of emerging technologies have been approaching university education in the last decade as it had not happened in previous times. Many of these technologies can be considered as disruptive, since they are transforming and improving the training scenarios. Among the technologies that are taking greater momentum and importance we find augmented reality and virtual reality, as evidenced by various reports Horizon and Edutrens. Although the research on the integration of these technologies is in an early stage, we can affirm that those carried out so far demonstrate the great benefits they incorporate into the teaching-learning process. Among these contributions we can highlight the improvement of the motivation, the satisfaction and the performance of the students. In this article we will cover the current state of the University regarding ICT integration, focusing on the technologies that have been bursting with greater force in recent times. In addition, we will focus on two of the technologies “augmented reality and virtual reality” that are experiencing more impact in recent years, showing evidences and mentioning their implementation in the university environment.

  4. Correlation between National Influenza Surveillance Data and Search Queries from Mobile Devices and Desktops in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Soo-Yong; Kim, Taerim; Seo, Dong-Woo; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Ryoo, Seung Mok; Lee, Yoon-Seon; Lee, Jae Ho; Kim, Won Young; Lim, Kyoung Soo

    2016-01-01

    Digital surveillance using internet search queries can improve both the sensitivity and timeliness of the detection of a health event, such as an influenza outbreak. While it has recently been estimated that the mobile search volume surpasses the desktop search volume and mobile search patterns differ from desktop search patterns, the previous digital surveillance systems did not distinguish mobile and desktop search queries. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of mobile and desktop search queries in terms of digital influenza surveillance. The study period was from September 6, 2010 through August 30, 2014, which consisted of four epidemiological years. Influenza-like illness (ILI) and virologic surveillance data from the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were used. A total of 210 combined queries from our previous survey work were used for this study. Mobile and desktop weekly search data were extracted from Naver, which is the largest search engine in Korea. Spearman's correlation analysis was used to examine the correlation of the mobile and desktop data with ILI and virologic data in Korea. We also performed lag correlation analysis. We observed that the influenza surveillance performance of mobile search queries matched or exceeded that of desktop search queries over time. The mean correlation coefficients of mobile search queries and the number of queries with an r-value of ≥ 0.7 equaled or became greater than those of desktop searches over the four epidemiological years. A lag correlation analysis of up to two weeks showed similar trends. Our study shows that mobile search queries for influenza surveillance have equaled or even become greater than desktop search queries over time. In the future development of influenza surveillance using search queries, the recognition of changing trend of mobile search data could be necessary.

  5. Desktop Severe Accident Graphic Simulator Module for CANDU6 : PSAIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. Y.; Song, Y. M.

    2015-01-01

    The ISAAC ((Integrated Severe Accident Analysis Code for CANDU Plant) code is a system level computer code capable of performing integral analyses of potential severe accident progressions in nuclear power plants, whose main purpose is to support a Level 2 probabilistic safety assessment or severe accident management strategy developments. The code has the capability to predict a severe accident progression by modeling the CANDU6- specific systems and the expected physical phenomena based on the current understanding of the unique accident progressions. The code models the sequence of accident progressions from a core heatup, pressure tube/calandria tube rupture after an uncovery from inside and outside, a relocation of the damaged fuel to the bottom of the calandria, debris behavior in the calandria, corium quenching after a debris relocation from the calandria to the calandria vault and an erosion of the calandria vault concrete floor, a hydrogen burn, and a reactor building failure. Along with the thermal hydraulics, the fission product behavior is also considered in the primary system as well as in the reactor building

  6. The desktop muon detector: A simple, physics-motivated machine- and electronics-shop project for university students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axani, S. N.; Conrad, J. M.; Kirby, C.

    2017-12-01

    This paper describes the construction of a desktop muon detector, an undergraduate-level physics project that develops machine-shop and electronics-shop technical skills. The desktop muon detector is a self-contained apparatus that employs a plastic scintillator as the detection medium and a silicon photomultiplier for light collection. This detector can be battery powered and is used in conjunction with the provided software. The total cost per detector is approximately 100. We describe physics experiments we have performed, and then suggest several other interesting measurements that are possible, with one or more desktop muon detectors.

  7. Collaborative Augmented Reality Environments: Integrating VR, Working Materials, and Distributed Work Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buscher, Monika; Christensen, Michael; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2000-01-01

    In this work, we present a new method for displaying stereo scenes, which speeds up the rendering time of complex geometry. We first discuss a scene splitting strategy, allowing us to partition objects to the distant background or the near foreground. Furthermore, wededuce a computation rule for ...

  8. Virtual Reality in Health System: Beyond Entertainment. A Mini-Review on the Efficacy of VR During Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirico, Andrea; Lucidi, Fabio; De Laurentiis, Michele; Milanese, Carla; Napoli, Alessandro; Giordano, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    Virtual reality (VR), a computer-generated virtual environment, has been increasingly used in the entertainment world becoming a very new evolving field, but VR technology has also found a variety of applications in the biomedical field. VR can offer to subjects a safe environment within which to carry on different interventions ranging from the rehabilitation of discharged patients directly at home, to the support of hospitalized patients during different procedures and also of oncological inpatient subjects. VR appears as a promising tool for support and monitoring treatments in cancer patients influencing psychological and physiological functions. The aim of this systematic review is to provide an overview of all the studies that used VR intervention on cancer patients and analyze their main findings. Nineteen studies across nearly a thousand articles were identified that explored effects of VR interventions on cancer patients. Although these studies varied greatly in setting and design, this review identified some overarching themes. Results found that VR improved patients' emotional well-being, and diminished cancer-related psychological symptoms. The studies explored various relevant variables including different types of settings (i.e., during chemotherapy, during pain procedures, during hospitalization). Here, we point to the need of a global and multi-disciplinary approach aimed at analyzing the effects of VR taking advantage of the new technology systems like biosensors as well as electroencephalogram monitoring pre, during, and after intervention. Devoting more attention to bio-physiological variables, standardized procedures, extending duration to longitudinal studies and adjusting for motion sickness related to VR treatment need to become standard of this research field. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Lactobacillus plantarum (VR1 isolated from an Ayurvedic medicine (Kutajarista ameliorates in vitro cellular damage caused by Aeromonas veronii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patole Milind S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lactobacillus plantarum is considered as a safe and effective probiotic microorganism. Among various sources of isolation, traditionally fermented foods are considered to be rich in Lactobacillus spp., which can be exploited for their probiotic attribute. Antibacterial property of L. plantarum has been demonstrated against various enteric pathogens in both in vitro and in vivo systems. This study was aimed at characterizing L. plantarum isolated from Kutajarista, an ayurvedic fermented biomedicine, and assessing its antagonistic property against a common enteropathogen Aeromonas veronii. Results We report the isolation of L. plantarum (VR1 from Kutajarista, and efficacy of its cell free supernatant (CFS in amelioration of cytotoxicity caused by Aeromonas veronii. On the part of probiotic attributes, VR1 was tolerant to pH 2, 0.3% bile salts and simulated gastric juice. Additionally, VR1 also exhibited adhesive property to human intestinal HT-29 cell line. Furthermore, CFS of VR1 was antibacterial to enteric pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Aeromonas veronii and clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa and E. coli. Detailed study regarding the effect of VR1 CFS on A. veronii cytotoxicity showed a significant decrease in vacuole formation and detrimental cellular changes in Vero cells. On the other hand, A. veronii CFS caused disruption of tight junction proteins ZO-1 and actin in MDCK cell line, which was prevented by pre-incubation with CFS of VR1. Conclusions This is the first study to report isolation of L. plantarum (VR1 from Kutajarista and characterisation for its probiotic attributes. Our study demonstrates the antagonistic property of VR1 to A. veronii and effect of VR1 CFS in reduction of cellular damage caused by A. veronii in both Vero and MDCK cell lines.

  10. A Five-Year Hedonic Price Breakdown for Desktop Personal Computer Attributes in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Manoel Martins Dias Fouto

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to identify the attributes that discriminate the prices of personal desktop computers. We employ the hedonic price method in evaluating such characteristics. This approach allows market prices to be expressed as a function, a set of attributes present in the products and services offered. Prices and characteristics of up to 3,779 desktop personal computers offered in the IT pages of one of the main Brazilian newspapers were collected from January 2003 to December 2007. Several specifications for the hedonic (multivariate linear regression were tested. In this particular study, the main attributes were found to be hard drive capacity, screen technology, main board brand, random memory size, microprocessor brand, video board memory, digital video and compact disk recording devices, screen size and microprocessor speed. These results highlight the novel contribution of this study: the manner and means in which hedonic price indexes may be estimated in Brazil.

  11. MDA-image: an environment of networked desktop computers for teleradiology/pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, M E; Richli, W R; Carrasco, C H; Wallace, S; Zimmerman, S O; Ayala, A G; Benjamin, R S; Chee, S; Wood, P; Daniels, P

    1991-04-01

    MDA-Image, a project of The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, is an environment of networked desktop computers for teleradiology/pathology. Radiographic film is digitized with a film scanner and histopathologic slides are digitized using a red, green, and blue (RGB) video camera connected to a microscope. Digitized images are stored on a data server connected to the institution's computer communication network (Ethernet) and can be displayed from authorized desktop computers connected to Ethernet. Images are digitized for cases presented at the Bone Tumor Management Conference, a multidisciplinary conference in which treatment options are discussed among clinicians, surgeons, radiologists, pathologists, radiotherapists, and medical oncologists. These radiographic and histologic images are shown on a large screen computer monitor during the conference. They are available for later review for follow-up or representation.

  12. Telemedicine in rural areas. Experience with medical desktop-conferencing via satellite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricke, J; Kleinholz, L; Hosten, N; Zendel, W; Lemke, A; Wielgus, W; Vöge, K H; Fleck, E; Marciniak, R; Felix, R

    1995-01-01

    Cooperation between physicians in hospitals in rural areas can be assisted by desktop-conferencing using a satellite link. For six weeks, medical desktop-conferencing was tested during daily clinical conferences between the Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin, and the Medical Academy, Wroclaw. The communications link was provided by the German Telekom satellite system MCS, which allowed temporary connections to be established on demand by manual dialling. Standard hardware and software were used for videoconferencing, as well as software for medical communication developed in the BERMED project. Digital data, such as computed tomography or magnetic resonance images, were transmitted by a digital data channel in parallel to the transmission of analogue video and audio signals. For conferences involving large groups of people, hardware modifications were required. These included the installation of a video projector, adaptation of the audio system with improved echo cancellation, and installation of extra microphones. Learning to use an unfamiliar communication medium proved to be uncomplicated for the participating physicians.

  13. VR-1 training reactor in use for twelve years to train experts for the Czech nuclear power sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matejka, K.; Sklenka, L.

    2003-01-01

    The VR-1 training reactor has been serving students of the Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, for more than 12 years now. The operation history of the reactor is highlighted. The major changes made at the VR-1 reactor are outlined and the main experimentally verified core configurations are shown. Some components of the new equipment installed on the VR-1 reactor are described in detail. The fields of application are shown: the reactor serves not only the training of university students within whole Czech Republic but also the training of specialists, research activities, and information programmes in the nuclear power domain. (P.A.)

  14. Increasing Open Source Software Integration on the Department of Defense Unclassified Desktop

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schearer, Steven A

    2008-01-01

    .... While some of this expenditure goes to fund special-purpose military software, much of it is absorbed by license fees for computer operating systems and general-purpose office automation applications...

  15. Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emerek, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    Bidraget diskuterer de forskellige intergrationsopfattelse i Danmark - og hvad der kan forstås ved vellykket integration......Bidraget diskuterer de forskellige intergrationsopfattelse i Danmark - og hvad der kan forstås ved vellykket integration...

  16. Fab the coming revolution on your desktop : from personal computers to personal fabrication

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenfeld, Neil

    2005-01-01

    What if you could someday put the manufacturing power of an automobile plant on your desktop? According to Neil Gershenfeld, the renowned MIT scientist and inventor, the next big thing is personal fabrication-the ability to design and produce your own products, in your own home, with a machine that combines consumer electronics and industrial tools. Personal fabricators are about to revolutionize the world just as personal computers did a generation ago, and Fab shows us how.

  17. A VBA Desktop Database for Proposal Processing at National Optical Astronomy Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christa L.

    National Optical Astronomy Observatories (NOAO) has developed a relational Microsoft Windows desktop database using Microsoft Access and the Microsoft Office programming language, Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). The database is used to track data relating to observing proposals from original receipt through the review process, scheduling, observing, and final statistical reporting. The database has automated proposal processing and distribution of information. It allows NOAO to collect and archive data so as to query and analyze information about our science programs in new ways.

  18. Reducing the Digital Divide among Children Who Received Desktop or Hybrid Computers for the Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gila Cohen Zilka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Researchers and policy makers have been exploring ways to reduce the digital divide. Parameters commonly used to examine the digital divide worldwide, as well as in this study, are: (a the digital divide in the accessibility and mobility of the ICT infrastructure and of the content infrastructure (e.g., sites used in school; and (b the digital divide in literacy skills. In the present study we examined the degree of effectiveness of receiving a desktop or hybrid computer for the home in reducing the digital divide among children of low socio-economic status aged 8-12 from various localities across Israel. The sample consisted of 1,248 respondents assessed in two measurements. As part of the mixed-method study, 128 children were also interviewed. Findings indicate that after the children received desktop or hybrid computers, changes occurred in their frequency of access, mobility, and computer literacy. Differences were found between the groups: hybrid computers reduce disparities and promote work with the computer and surfing the Internet more than do desktop computers. Narrowing the digital divide for this age group has many implications for the acquisition of skills and study habits, and consequently, for the realization of individual potential. The children spoke about self improvement as a result of exposure to the digital environment, about a sense of empowerment and of improvement in their advantage in the social fabric. Many children expressed a desire to continue their education and expand their knowledge of computer applications, the use of software, of games, and more. Therefore, if there is no computer in the home and it is necessary to decide between a desktop and a hybrid computer, a hybrid computer is preferable.

  19. Assessment of Two Desk-Top Computer Simulations Used to Train Tactical Decision Making (TDM) of Small Unit Infantry Leaders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beal, Scott A

    2007-01-01

    Fifty-two leaders in the Basic Non-Commissioned Officer Course (BNCOC) at Fort Benning, Georgia, participated in an assessment of two desk-top computer simulations used to train tactical decision making...

  20. The use of PC based VR in clinical medicine: the VREPAR projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, G; Bacchetta, M; Baruffi, M; Borgomainerio, E; Defrance, C; Gatti, F; Galimberti, C; Fontaneto, S; Marchi, S; Molinari, E; Nugues, P; Rinaldi, S; Rovetta, A; Ferretti, G S; Tonci, A; Wann, J; Vincelli, F

    1999-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) is an emerging technology that alters the way individuals interact with computers: a 3D computer-generated environment in which a person can move about and interact as if he actually was inside it. Given to the high computational power required to create virtual environments, these are usually developed on expensive high-end workstations. However, the significant advances in PC hardware that have been made over the last three years, are making PC-based VR a possible solution for clinical assessment and therapy. VREPAR - Virtual Reality Environments for Psychoneurophysiological Assessment and Rehabilitation - are two European Community funded projects (Telematics for health - HC 1053/HC 1055 - http://www.psicologia.net) that are trying to develop a modular PC-based virtual reality system for the medical market. The paper describes the rationale of the developed modules and the preliminary results obtained.

  1. Numerical investigation for combustion characteristics of vacuum residue (VR) in a test furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreedhara, S.; Huh, Kang Y.; Park, Hoyoung

    2007-01-01

    It has become inevitable to search for alternative fuels due to current worldwide energy crisis. In this paper combustion characteristics of vacuum residue (VR) is investigated numerically against experimental data in typical operating conditions of a furnace. Heat release reaction is modeled as sequential steps of devolatilization, simplified gas phase reaction and char oxidation as for pulverized coal. Thermal and fuel NO are predicted by the conditional moment closure (CMC) method for estimation of elementary reaction rates. It turns out that Sauter mean diameter (SMD) of VR droplets is a crucial parameter for better combustion efficiency and lower NO. Reasonable agreement is achieved for spatial distributions of major species, temperature and NO for all test cases with different fuel and steam flow rates

  2. Efficient Redundancy Techniques in Cloud and Desktop Grid Systems using MAP/G/c-type Queues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, Srinivas R.; Rumyantsev, Alexander

    2018-03-01

    Cloud computing is continuing to prove its flexibility and versatility in helping industries and businesses as well as academia as a way of providing needed computing capacity. As an important alternative to cloud computing, desktop grids allow to utilize the idle computer resources of an enterprise/community by means of distributed computing system, providing a more secure and controllable environment with lower operational expenses. Further, both cloud computing and desktop grids are meant to optimize limited resources and at the same time to decrease the expected latency for users. The crucial parameter for optimization both in cloud computing and in desktop grids is the level of redundancy (replication) for service requests/workunits. In this paper we study the optimal replication policies by considering three variations of Fork-Join systems in the context of a multi-server queueing system with a versatile point process for the arrivals. For services we consider phase type distributions as well as shifted exponential and Weibull. We use both analytical and simulation approach in our analysis and report some interesting qualitative results.

  3. Efficient Redundancy Techniques in Cloud and Desktop Grid Systems using MAP/G/c-type Queues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarthy Srinivas R.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is continuing to prove its flexibility and versatility in helping industries and businesses as well as academia as a way of providing needed computing capacity. As an important alternative to cloud computing, desktop grids allow to utilize the idle computer resources of an enterprise/community by means of distributed computing system, providing a more secure and controllable environment with lower operational expenses. Further, both cloud computing and desktop grids are meant to optimize limited resources and at the same time to decrease the expected latency for users. The crucial parameter for optimization both in cloud computing and in desktop grids is the level of redundancy (replication for service requests/workunits. In this paper we study the optimal replication policies by considering three variations of Fork-Join systems in the context of a multi-server queueing system with a versatile point process for the arrivals. For services we consider phase type distributions as well as shifted exponential and Weibull. We use both analytical and simulation approach in our analysis and report some interesting qualitative results.

  4. Realization of a Desktop Flight Simulation System for Motion-Cueing Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berkay Volkaner

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Parallel robotic mechanisms are generally used in flight simulators with a motion-cueing algorithm to create an unlimited motion feeling of a simulated medium in a bounded workspace of the simulator. A major problem in flight simulators is that the simulation has an unbounded space and the manipulator has a limited one. Using a washout filter in the motion-cueing algorithm overcomes this. In this study, a low-cost six degrees of freedom (DoF desktop parallel manipulator is used to test a classical motion-cueing algorithm; the algorithm's functionality is confirmed with a Simulink real-time environment. Translational accelerations and angular velocities of the simulated medium obtained from FlightGear flight simulation software are processed through a generated washout filter algorithm and the simulated medium's motion information is transmitted to the desktop parallel robotic mechanism as a set point for each leg. The major issues of this paper are designing a desktop simulation system, controlling the parallel manipulator, communicating between the flight simulation and the platform, designing a motion-cueing algorithm and determining the parameters of the washout filters.

  5. Development of a Desktop Simulator for APR1400 Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. B.

    2016-01-01

    It is essential for utilities to possess a full-scope simulator for operator training and operation test for operators. But it is very expensive and sometimes lack of fidelity if processes of developing the simulator and designing the plant are in parallel. It is due to the situation that simulator development stage sometimes precedes the plant design stage and modifications may occur to the design of the plant in construction stage. In an attempt to build a low cost and efficient simulator, a desktop simulator has been developed. This model is described herein. Using desktop simulators for training operators is an efficient method for familiarizing operators with their plant’s operation. A low cost and efficient desktop simulator for APR1400 has been developed, and brief features are introduced here. It is configured to mimic a full-scale simulator, and can be used for operators to be familiarized to their plant’s operation. Since the size of the simulator is small enough to be fit in a desk, it can be used in a classroom or in an office at any time. It can also be used to evaluate design changes or modifications of the plant before implementing them to the plant

  6. Development of a Desktop Simulator for APR1400 Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. B. [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    It is essential for utilities to possess a full-scope simulator for operator training and operation test for operators. But it is very expensive and sometimes lack of fidelity if processes of developing the simulator and designing the plant are in parallel. It is due to the situation that simulator development stage sometimes precedes the plant design stage and modifications may occur to the design of the plant in construction stage. In an attempt to build a low cost and efficient simulator, a desktop simulator has been developed. This model is described herein. Using desktop simulators for training operators is an efficient method for familiarizing operators with their plant’s operation. A low cost and efficient desktop simulator for APR1400 has been developed, and brief features are introduced here. It is configured to mimic a full-scale simulator, and can be used for operators to be familiarized to their plant’s operation. Since the size of the simulator is small enough to be fit in a desk, it can be used in a classroom or in an office at any time. It can also be used to evaluate design changes or modifications of the plant before implementing them to the plant.

  7. The application of diffraction grating in the design of virtual reality (VR) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiekang; Huang, Qitai; Guan, Min

    2017-10-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) products serve for human eyes ultimately, and the optical properties of VR optical systems must be consistent with the characteristic of human eyes. The monocular coaxial VR optical system is simulated in ZEMAX. A diffraction grating is added to the optical surface next to the eye, and the lights emitted from the diffraction grating are deflected, which can forming an asymmetrical field of view(FOV). Then the lateral chromatic aberration caused by the diffraction grating was corrected by the chromatic dispersion of the prism. Finally, the aspheric surface was added to further optimum design. During the optical design of the system, how to balance the dispersion of the diffraction grating and the prism is the main problem. The balance was achieved by adjusting the parameters of the grating and the prism constantly, and then using aspheric surfaces finally. In order to make the asymmetric FOV of the system consistent with the angle of the visual axis, and to ensure the stereo vision area clear, the smaller half FOV of monocular system is required to reach 30°. Eventually, a system with asymmetrical FOV of 30°+40° was designed. In addition, the aberration curve of the system was analyzed by ZEMAX, and the binocular FOV was calculated according to the principle of binocular overlap. The results show that the asymmetry of FOV of VR monocular optical system can fit to human eyes and the imaging quality match for the human visual characteristics. At the same time, the diffraction grating increases binocular FOV, which decreases the requirement for the design FOV of monocular system.

  8. Use of VR Technology and Passive Haptics for MANPADS Training System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    reach satisfactory technical performance like latency and frame rate, while generating the sensory stimuli needed for this type of training —visual...release. Distribution is unlimited. USE OF VR TECHNOLOGY AND PASSIVE HAPTICS FOR MANPADS TRAINING SYSTEM by Faisal Rashid September 2017...HAPTICS FOR MANPADS TRAINING SYSTEM 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Faisal Rashid 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval

  9. The segmentation of the HMD market: optics for smart glasses, smart eyewear, AR and VR headsets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Bernard; Saeedi, Ehsan; Brac-de-la-Perriere, Vincent

    2014-09-01

    This paper reviews the various optical technologies that have been developed to implement HMDs (Head Mounted Displays), both as AR (Augmented Reality) devices, VR (Virtual Reality) devices and more recently as smart glasses, smart eyewear or connected glasses. We review the typical requirements and optical performances of such devices and categorize them into distinct groups, which are suited for different (and constantly evolving) market segments, and analyze such market segmentation.

  10. MEDIATING COGNITIVE TRANSFORMATION WITH VR 3D SKETCHING DURING CONCEPTUAL ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Pour Rahimian

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Communications for information synchronization during the conceptual design phase require designers to employ more intuitive digital design tools. This paper presents findings of a feasibility study for using VR 3D sketching interface in order to replace current non-intuitive CAD tools. We used a sequential mixed method research methodology including a qualitative case study and a cognitive-based quantitative protocol analysis experiment. Foremost, the case study research was conducted in order to understand how novice designers make intuitive decisions. The case study documented the failure of conventional sketching methods in articulating complicated design ideas and shortcomings of current CAD tools in intuitive ideation. The case study’s findings then became the theoretical foundations for testing the feasibility of using VR 3D sketching interface during design. The latter phase of study evaluated the designers’ spatial cognition and collaboration at six different levels: "physical-actions", "perceptualactions", "functional-actions", "conceptual-actions", "cognitive synchronizations", and "gestures". The results and confirmed hypotheses showed that the utilized tangible 3D sketching interface improved novice designers’ cognitive and collaborative design activities. In summary this paper presents the influences of current external representation tools on designers’ cognition and collaboration as well as providing the necessary theoretical foundations for implementing VR 3D sketching interface. It contributes towards transforming conceptual architectural design phase from analogue to digital by proposing a new VR design interface. The paper proposes this transformation to fill in the existing gap between analogue conceptual architectural design process and remaining digital engineering parts of building design process hence expediting digital design process.

  11. Příprava VR prezentací z CAD modelů

    OpenAIRE

    Kudlvasr, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Title: Preparation of VR presentations from CAD models Author: Martin Kudlvasr Department: Dept. of Software and Computer Science Education, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague Supervisor: Prof.Ing. Jiří Žára, CSc. Supervisor's e-mail address: Abstract: Analysis of a specific problem in virtual engineering department in ŠKODA AUTO, a. s. company, concept of the problem solution and implementation of the solution. Virtual engineering department emp...

  12. No effect of ambient odor on the affective appraisal of a desktop virtual environment with signs of disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Toet

    Full Text Available Desktop virtual environments (VEs are increasingly deployed to study the effects of environmental qualities and interventions on human behavior and safety related concerns in built environments. For these applications it is essential that users appraise the affective qualities of the VE similar to those of its real world counterpart. Previous studies have shown that factors like simulated lighting, sound and dynamic elements all contribute to the affective appraisal of a desktop VE. Since ambient odor is known to affect the affective appraisal of real environments, and has been shown to increase the sense of presence in immersive VEs, it may also be an effective tool to tune the affective appraisal of desktop VEs. This study investigated if exposure to ambient odor can modulate the affective appraisal of a desktop VE with signs of public disorder.Participants explored a desktop VE representing a suburban neighborhood with signs of public disorder (neglect, vandalism and crime, while being exposed to either room air or subliminal levels of unpleasant (tar or pleasant (cut grass ambient odor. Whenever they encountered signs of disorder they reported their safety related concerns and associated affective feelings.Signs of crime in the desktop VE were associated with negative affective feelings and concerns for personal safety and personal property. However, there was no significant difference between reported safety related concerns and affective connotations in the control (no-odor and in each of the two ambient odor conditions.Ambient odor did not affect safety related concerns and affective connotations associated with signs of disorder in the desktop VE. Thus, semantic congruency between ambient odor and a desktop VE may not be sufficient to influence its affective appraisal, and a more realistic simulation in which simulated objects appear to emit scents may be required to achieve this goal.

  13. Study of dietary supplements compositions by neutron activation analysis at the VR-1 training reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanik, Milan; Rataj, Jan; Huml, Ondrej; Sklenka, Lubomir

    2017-11-01

    The VR-1 training reactor operated by the Czech Technical University in Prague is utilized mainly for education of students and training of various reactor staff; however, R&D is also carried out at the reactor. The experimental instrumentation of the reactor can be used for the irradiation experiments and neutron activation analysis. In this paper, the neutron activation analysis (NAA) is used for a study of dietary supplements containing the zinc (one of the essential trace elements for the human body). This analysis includes the dietary supplement pills of different brands; each brand is represented by several different batches of pills. All pills were irradiated together with the standard activation etalons in the vertical channel of the VR-1 reactor at the nominal power (80 W). Activated samples were investigated by the nuclear gamma-ray spectrometry technique employing the semiconductor HPGe detector. From resulting saturated activities, the amount of mineral element (Zn) in the pills was determined using the comparative NAA method. The results show clearly that the VR-1 training reactor is utilizable for neutron activation analysis experiments.

  14. Virtual Reality Training for Public Speaking—A QUEST-VR Framework Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Poeschl

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Good public speaking skills are essential in many professions as well as everyday life, but speech anxiety is a common problem. While it is established that public speaking training in virtual reality (VR is effective, comprehensive studies on the underlying factors that contribute to this success are rare. The “quality evaluation of user-system interaction in virtual reality” framework for evaluation of VR applications is presented that includes system features, user factors, and moderating variables. Based on this framework, variables that are postulated to influence the quality of a public speaking training application were selected for a first validation study. In a cross-sectional, repeated measures laboratory study [N = 36 undergraduate students; 36% men, 64% women, mean age = 26.42 years (SD = 3.42], the effects of task difficulty (independent variable, ability to concentrate, fear of public speaking, and social presence (covariates on public speaking performance (dependent variable in a virtual training scenario were analyzed, using stereoscopic visualization on a screen. The results indicate that the covariates moderate the effect of task difficulty on speech performance, turning it into a non-significant effect. Further interrelations are explored. The presenter’s reaction to the virtual agents in the audience shows a tendency of overlap of explained variance with task difficulty. This underlines the need for more studies dedicated to the interaction of contributing factors for determining the quality of VR public speaking applications.

  15. Design of a Physiology-Sensitive VR-Based Social Communication Platform for Children With Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriakose, Selvia; Lahiri, Uttama

    2017-08-01

    Individuals with autism are often characterized by impairments in communication, reciprocal social interaction and explicit expression of their affective states. In conventional techniques, a therapist adjusts the intervention paradigm by monitoring the affective state e.g., anxiety of these individuals for effective floor-time-therapy. Conventional techniques, though powerful, are observation-based and face resource limitations. Technology-assisted systems can provide a quantitative, individualized rehabilitation platform. Presently-available systems are designed primarily to chain learning via aspects of one's performance alone restricting individualization. Specifically, these systems are not sensitive to one's anxiety. Our presented work seeks to bridge this gap by developing a novel VR-based interactive system with Anxiety-Sensitive adaptive technology. Specifically, such a system is capable of objectively identifying and quantifying one's anxiety level from real-time biomarkers, along with performance metrics. In turn it can adaptively respond in an individualized manner to foster improved social communication skills. In our present research, we have used Virtual Reality (VR) to design a proof-of-concept application that exposes participants to social tasks of varying challenges. Results of a preliminary usability study indicate the potential of our VR-based Anxiety-Sensitive system to foster improved task performance, thereby serving as a potent complementary tool in the hands of therapist.

  16. Laser Beam and Resonator Calculations on Desktop Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumont, Jean-Luc

    There is a continuing interest in the design and calculation of laser resonators and optical beam propagation. In particular, recently, interest has increased in developing concepts such as one-sided unstable resonators, supergaussian reflectivity profiles, diode laser modes, beam quality concepts, mode competition, excess noise factors, and nonlinear Kerr lenses. To meet these calculation needs, I developed a general-purpose software package named PARAXIA ^{rm TM}, aimed at providing optical scientists and engineers with a set of powerful design and analysis tools that provide rapid and accurate results and are extremely easy to use. PARAXIA can handle separable paraxial optical systems in cartesian or cylindrical coordinates, including complex-valued and misaligned ray matrices, with full diffraction effects between apertures. It includes the following programs:. ABCD provides complex-valued ray-matrix and gaussian -mode analyses for arbitrary paraxial resonators and optical systems, including astigmatism and misalignment in each element. This program required that I generalize the theory of gaussian beam propagation to the case of an off-axis gaussian beam propagating through a misaligned, complex -valued ray matrix. FRESNEL uses FFT and FHT methods to propagate an arbitrary wavefront through an arbitrary paraxial optical system using Huygens' integral in rectangular or radial coordinates. The wavefront can be multiplied by an arbitrary mirror profile and/or saturable gain sheet on each successive propagation through the system. I used FRESNEL to design a one-sided negative-branch unstable resonator for a free -electron laser, and to show how a variable internal aperture influences the mode competition and beam quality in a stable cavity. VSOURCE implements the virtual source analysis to calculate eigenvalues and eigenmodes for unstable resonators with both circular and rectangular hard-edged mirrors (including misaligned rectangular systems). I used VSOURCE to

  17. [Integrity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Rodríguez, Rafael Ángel

    2014-01-01

    To say that someone possesses integrity is to claim that that person is almost predictable about responses to specific situations, that he or she can prudentially judge and to act correctly. There is a closed interrelationship between integrity and autonomy, and the autonomy rests on the deeper moral claim of all humans to integrity of the person. Integrity has two senses of significance for medical ethic: one sense refers to the integrity of the person in the bodily, psychosocial and intellectual elements; and in the second sense, the integrity is the virtue. Another facet of integrity of the person is la integrity of values we cherish and espouse. The physician must be a person of integrity if the integrity of the patient is to be safeguarded. The autonomy has reduced the violations in the past, but the character and virtues of the physician are the ultimate safeguard of autonomy of patient. A field very important in medicine is the scientific research. It is the character of the investigator that determines the moral quality of research. The problem arises when legitimate self-interests are replaced by selfish, particularly when human subjects are involved. The final safeguard of moral quality of research is the character and conscience of the investigator. Teaching must be relevant in the scientific field, but the most effective way to teach virtue ethics is through the example of the a respected scientist.

  18. Assessment of health-related quality of life in spine treatment: conversion from SF-36 to VR-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gornet, Matthew F; Copay, Anne G; Sorensen, Katrine M; Schranck, Francine W

    2018-02-28

    Health-related quality-of-life outcomes have been collected with the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) Short Form 36 (SF-36) survey. Boston University School of Public Health has developed algorithms for the conversion of SF-36 to Veterans RAND 12-Item Health Survey (VR-12) Physical Component Summary (PCS) and Mental Component Summary (MCS) scores. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the conversion of the SF-36 to VR-12 PCS and MCS scores. Preoperative and postoperative SF-36 were collected from patients who underwent lumbar or cervical surgery from a single surgeon between August 1998 and January 2013. Short Form 36 PCS and MCS scores were calculated following their original instructions. The SF-36 answers were then converted to VR-12 PCS and MCS scores following the algorithm provided by the Boston University School of Public Health. The mean score, preoperative to postoperative change, and proportions of patients who reach the minimum detectable change were compared between SF-36 and VR-12. A total of 1,968 patients (1,559 lumbar and 409 cervical) had completed preoperative and postoperative SF-36. The values of the SF-36 and VR-12 mean scores were extremely similar, with score differences ranging from 0.77 to 1.82. The preoperative to postoperative improvement was highly significant (p36 and VR-12 scores. The mean change scores were similar, with a difference of up to 0.93 for PCS and up to 0.37 for MCS. Minimum detectable change (MDC) values were almost identical for SF-36 and VR-12, with a difference of 0.12 for PCS and up to 0.41 for MCS. The proportions of patients whose change in score reached MDC were also nearly identical for SF-36 and VR-12. About 90% of the patients above SF-36 MDC were also above VR-12 MDC. The converted VR-12 scores, similar to the SF-36 scores, detect a significant postoperative improvement in PCS and MCS scores. The calculated MDC values and the proportions of patients whose score improvement reach MDC are similar for

  19. Evaluation of the user experience of "astronaut training device": an immersive, vr-based, motion-training system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Kang; Wang, Danli; Yang, Xinpan; Hu, Haichen; Liu, Yuqing; Zhu, Xiuqing

    2016-10-01

    To date, as the different application fields, most VR-based training systems have been different. Therefore, we should take the characteristics of application field into consideration and adopt different evaluation methods when evaluate the user experience of these training systems. In this paper, we propose a method to evaluate the user experience of virtual astronauts training system. Also, we design an experiment based on the proposed method. The proposed method takes learning performance as one of the evaluation dimensions, also combines with other evaluation dimensions such as: presence, immersion, pleasure, satisfaction and fatigue to evaluation user experience of the System. We collect subjective and objective data, the subjective data are mainly from questionnaire designed based on the evaluation dimensions and user interview conducted before and after the experiment. While the objective data are consisted of Electrocardiogram (ECG), reaction time, numbers of reaction error and the video data recorded during the experiment. For the analysis of data, we calculate the integrated score of each evaluation dimension by using factor analysis. In order to improve the credibility of the assessment, we use the ECG signal and reaction test data before and after experiment to validate the changes of fatigue during the experiment, and the typical behavioral features extracted from the experiment video to explain the result of subjective questionnaire. Experimental results show that the System has a better user experience and learning performance, but slight visual fatigue exists after experiment.

  20. Desktop analysis of potential impacts of visitor use: a case study for the highest park in the Southern Hemisphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Agustina; Pickering, Catherine; Gudes, Ori

    2015-03-01

    Nature-based tourism and recreation activities have a range of environmental impacts, but most protected area agencies have limited capacity to assess them. To prioritise where and what impacts to monitor and manage, we conducted a desktop assessment using Geographical Information Systems (GIS) by combining recreation ecology research with data on visitor usage and key environmental features for a popular protected area used for mountaineering and trekking, Aconcagua Provincial Park (2400-6962 m a.s.l.) in the Andes of Argentina. First, we integrated visitor data from permits with environmental data using GIS. We then identified key impact indicators for different activities based on the recreation ecology literature. Finally, we integrated this data to identify likely ecological impacts based on the types of activities, amount of use and altitudinal zones. Visitors only used 2% of the Park, but use was concentrated in areas of high conservation value including in alpine meadows and glacier lakes. Impacts on water resources were likely to be concentrated in campsites from the intermediate to the nival/glacial zones of the Park while impacts on terrestrial biodiversity were likely to be more severe in the low and intermediate alpine zones (2400-3800 m a.s.l.). These results highlight how visitor data can be used to identify priority areas for on-ground assessment of impacts in key locations. Improvements to the management of visitors in this Park involves more effective ways of dealing with water extraction and human waste in high altitude campsites and the impacts of hikers and pack animals in the low and intermediate alpine zones. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Outline of the Desktop Severe Accident Graphic Simulator Module for OPR-1000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S. Y.; Ahn, K. I. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    This paper introduce the desktop severe accident graphic simulator module (VMAAP) which is a window-based severe accident simulator using MAAP as its engine. The VMAAP is one of the submodules in SAMEX system (Severe Accident Management Support Expert System) which is a decision support system for use in a severe accident management following an incident at a nuclear power plant. The SAMEX system consists of four major modules as sub-systems: (a) Severe accident risk data base module (SARDB): stores the data of integrated severe accident analysis code results like MAAP and MELCOR for hundreds of high frequency scenarios for the reference plant; (b) Risk-informed severe accident risk data base management module (RI-SARD): provides a platform to identify the initiating event, determine plant status and equipment availability, diagnoses the status of the reactor core, reactor vessel and containment building, and predicts the plant behaviors; (c) Severe accident management simulator module (VMAAP): runs the MAAP4 code with user friendly graphic interface for input deck and output display; (d) On-line severe accident management guidance module (On-line SAMG); provides available accident management strategies with an electronic format. The role of VMAAP in SAMEX can be described as followings. SARDB contains the most of high frequency scenarios based on a level 2 probabilistic safety analysis. Therefore, there is good chance that a real accident sequence is similar to one of the data base cases. In such a case, RI-SARD can predict an accident progression by a scenario-base or symptom-base search depends on the available plant parameter information. Nevertheless, there still may be deviations or variations between the actual scenario and the data base scenario. The deviations can be decreased by using a real-time graphic accident simulator, VMAAP.. VMAAP is a MAAP4-based severe accident simulation model for OPR-1000 plant. It can simulate spectrum of physical processes

  2. Outline of the Desktop Severe Accident Graphic Simulator Module for OPR-1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. Y.; Ahn, K. I.

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduce the desktop severe accident graphic simulator module (VMAAP) which is a window-based severe accident simulator using MAAP as its engine. The VMAAP is one of the submodules in SAMEX system (Severe Accident Management Support Expert System) which is a decision support system for use in a severe accident management following an incident at a nuclear power plant. The SAMEX system consists of four major modules as sub-systems: (a) Severe accident risk data base module (SARDB): stores the data of integrated severe accident analysis code results like MAAP and MELCOR for hundreds of high frequency scenarios for the reference plant; (b) Risk-informed severe accident risk data base management module (RI-SARD): provides a platform to identify the initiating event, determine plant status and equipment availability, diagnoses the status of the reactor core, reactor vessel and containment building, and predicts the plant behaviors; (c) Severe accident management simulator module (VMAAP): runs the MAAP4 code with user friendly graphic interface for input deck and output display; (d) On-line severe accident management guidance module (On-line SAMG); provides available accident management strategies with an electronic format. The role of VMAAP in SAMEX can be described as followings. SARDB contains the most of high frequency scenarios based on a level 2 probabilistic safety analysis. Therefore, there is good chance that a real accident sequence is similar to one of the data base cases. In such a case, RI-SARD can predict an accident progression by a scenario-base or symptom-base search depends on the available plant parameter information. Nevertheless, there still may be deviations or variations between the actual scenario and the data base scenario. The deviations can be decreased by using a real-time graphic accident simulator, VMAAP.. VMAAP is a MAAP4-based severe accident simulation model for OPR-1000 plant. It can simulate spectrum of physical processes

  3. Using the computer-driven VR environment to promote experiences of natural world immersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Lisa A.

    2013-03-01

    In December, 2011, over 800 people experienced the exhibit, :"der"//pattern for a virtual environment, created for the fully immersive CAVETM at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. This exhibition took my nature-based photographic work and reinterpreted it for virtual reality (VR).Varied responses such as: "It's like a moment of joy," or "I had to see it twice," or "I'm still thinking about it weeks later" were common. Although an implied goal of my 2D artwork is to create a connection that makes viewers more aware of what it means to be a part of the natural world, these six VR environments opened up an unexpected area of inquiry that my 2D work has not. Even as the experience was mediated by machines, there was a softening at the interface between technology and human sensibility. Somehow, for some people, through the unlikely auspices of a computer-driven environment, the project spoke to a human essence that they connected with in a way that went beyond all expectations and felt completely out of my hands. Other interesting behaviors were noted: in some scenarios some spoke of intense anxiety, acrophobia, claustrophobia-even fear of death when the scene took them underground. These environments were believable enough to cause extreme responses and disorientation for some people; were fun, pleasant and wonder-filled for most; and were liberating, poetic and meditative for many others. The exhibition seemed to promote imaginative skills, creativity, emotional insight, and environmental sensitivity. It also revealed the CAVETM to be a powerful tool that can encourage uniquely productive experiences. Quite by accident, I watched as these nature-based environments revealed and articulated an essential relationship between the human spirit and the physical world. The CAVETM is certainly not a natural space, but there is clear potential to explore virtual environments as a path to better and deeper connections between people and nature. We've long associated contact

  4. Collection and analysis of environmental radiation data using a desktop computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gogolak, C.V.

    1982-04-01

    A portable instrumentation sytem using a Hewlett-Packard HP-9825 desktop computer for the collection and analysis of environmental radiation data is described. Procedures for the transmission of data between the HP-9825 and various nuclear counters are given together with a description of the necessary hardware and software. Complete programs for the analysis of Ge(Li) and NaI(Tl) gamma-ray spectra, high pressure ionization chamber monitor data, 86 Kr monitor data and air filter sample alpha particle activity measurements are presented. Some utility programs, intended to increase system flexibility, are included

  5. Computing on the Desktop: From Batch to Online in Two Large Danish Service Bureaus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anker Helms

    The advent of the personal computer is often hailed as the major step towards empowering the computer user. This step was indeed significant, but it was preceeded by a similar step some 10-15 years earlier: the advent of the video terminal or ”glass–TTY”. The video terminal invaded the desktop...... of many while collar workers and the workplace of many blue collar workers in the 1970s and 1980s. It replaced batch processing and facilitated direct, interactive access to computing services. This had a considerable impact on working conditions. This paper addresses this transition in two large Danish...

  6. Non-Grey Radiation Modeling using Thermal Desktop/Sindaworks TFAWS06-1009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kevin R.; Paine, Chris

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the non-grey radiation modeling capabilities of Cullimore and Ring's Thermal Desktop(Registered TradeMark) Version 4.8 SindaWorks software. The non-grey radiation analysis theory implemented by Sindaworks and the methodology used by the software are outlined. Representative results from a parametric trade study of a radiation shield comprised of a series of v-grooved shaped deployable panels is used to illustrate the capabilities of the SindaWorks non-grey radiation thermal analysis software using emissivities with temperature and wavelength dependency modeled via a Hagen-Rubens relationship.

  7. Is α‐T catenin (VR22) an Alzheimer's disease risk gene?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Lars; Mullin, Kristina; Parkinson, Michele; Hsiao, Monica; Moscarillo, Thomas J; Wagner, Steven L; Becker, K David; Velicelebi, Gonul; Blacker, Deborah; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2007-01-01

    Background Recently, conflicting reports have been published on the potential role of genetic variants in the α‐T catenin gene (VR22; CTNNA3) on the risk for Alzheimer's disease. In these papers, evidence for association is mostly observed in multiplex families with Alzheimer's disease, whereas case–control samples of sporadic Alzheimer's disease are predominantly negative. Methods After sequencing VR22 in multiplex families with Alzheimer's disease linked to chromosome 10q21, we identified a novel non‐synonymous (Ser596Asn; rs4548513) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). This and four non‐coding SNPs were assessed in two independent samples of families with Alzheimer's disease, one with 1439 subjects from 437 multiplex families with Alzheimer's disease and the other with 489 subjects from 217 discordant sibships. Results A weak association with the Ser596Asn SNP in the multiplex sample, predominantly in families with late‐onset Alzheimer's disease (p = 0.02), was observed. However, this association does not seem to contribute substantially to the chromosome 10 Alzheimer's disease linkage signal that we and others have reported previously. No evidence was found of association with any of the four additional SNPs tested in the multiplex families with Alzheimer's disease. Finally, the Ser596Asn change was not associated with the risk for Alzheimer's disease in the independent discordant sibship sample. Conclusions This is the first study to report evidence of an association between a potentially functional, non‐synonymous SNP in VR22 and the risk for Alzheimer's disease. As the underlying effects are probably small, and are only seen in families with multiple affected members, the population‐wide significance of this finding remains to be determined. PMID:17209133

  8. Construct validity of the LapVR virtual-reality surgical simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Naoki; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Chie; Ohashi, Norifumi; Nakayama, Goro; Koike, Masahiko; Nakao, Akimasa

    2011-02-01

    Laparoscopic surgery requires fundamental skills peculiar to endoscopic procedures such as eye-hand coordination. Acquisition of such skills prior to performing actual surgery is highly desirable for favorable outcome. Virtual-reality simulators have been developed for both surgical training and assessment of performance. The aim of the current study is to show construct validity of a novel simulator, LapVR (Immersion Medical, San Jose, CA, USA), for Japanese surgeons and surgical residents. Forty-four subjects were divided into the following three groups according to their experience in laparoscopic surgery: 14 residents (RE) with no experience in laparoscopic surgery, 14 junior surgeons (JR) with little experience, and 16 experienced surgeons (EX). All subjects executed "essential task 1" programmed in the LapVR, which consists of six tasks, resulting in automatic measurement of 100 parameters indicating various aspects of laparoscopic skills. Time required for each task tended to be inversely correlated with experience in laparoscopic surgery. For the peg transfer skill, statistically significant differences were observed between EX and RE in three parameters, including total time and average time taken to complete the procedure and path length for the nondominant hand. For the cutting skill, similar differences were observed between EX and RE in total time, number of unsuccessful cutting attempts, and path length for the nondominant hand. According to the programmed comprehensive evaluation, performance in terms of successful completion of the task and actual experience of the participants in laparoscopic surgery correlated significantly for the peg transfer (P=0.007) and cutting skills (P=0.026). The peg transfer and cutting skills could best distinguish between EX and RE. This study is the first to provide evidence that LapVR has construct validity to discriminate between novice and experienced laparoscopic surgeons.

  9. Extensive utilisation of VR-1 reactor for nuclear education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rataj, J.

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents utilisation of the VR-1 reactor for nuclear education and training at national and international level. VR-1 reactor has been operating by the Czech Technical University since December 1990. The reactor is a pool-type light water reactor based on enriched uranium (19.7% 235 U) with maximum thermal power 1kW and for short time period up to 5kW. The moderator of neutrons is light water, which is also used as a reflector, a biological shielding and a coolant. Heat is removed from the core by natural convection. The pool disposition of the reactor facilitates access to the core, setting and removing of various experimental samples and detectors, easy and safe handling of fuel assemblies. The reactor core can contain from 17 to 21 fuel assemblies IRT-4M, depending on the geometric arrangement and kind of experiments to be performed in the reactor. The reactor is equipped with several experimental devices; e.g. horizontal, radial and tangential channels used to take out a neutron beam, reactivity oscillator for dynamics study and bubble boiling simulator. The reactor has been used very efficiently especially for education and training of university students and NPP's specialists for more than 18 years. The VR-1 reactor is utilised within various national and international activities such as Czech Nuclear Education Network (CENEN), European Nuclear Education Network and also Eastern European Research Reactor Initiative (EERRI). The reactor is well equipped for education and training not only by the experimental facility itself but also by incessant development of training methods and improvement of education experiments. The education experiments can be combined into training courses attended by students according to their study specialization and knowledge level. The training programme is aimed to the reactor and neutron physics, dosimetry, nuclear safety, and control of nuclear installations. Every year, approximately 250 university students undergo

  10. Asynchronous teaching of psychomotor skills through VR annotations: evaluation in digital rectal examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissanen, Mikko J; Kume, Naoto; Kuroda, Yoshihiro; Kuroda, Tomohiro; Yoshimura, Koji; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    Many VR technology based training systems use expert's motion data as the training aid, but would not provide any short-cut to teaching medical skills that do not depend on exact motions. Earlier we presented Annotated Simulation Records (ASRs), which can be used to encapsulate experts' insight on psychomotor skills. Annotations made to behavioural parameters in training simulators enable asynchronous teaching instead of just motion training in a proactive way to the learner. We evaluated ASRs for asynchronous teaching of Digital Rectal Examination (DRE) with 3 urologists and 8 medical students. The ASRs were found more effective than motion-based training with verbal feedback.

  11. Application of the verona coding definitions of emotional sequences (VR-CoDES) on a pediatric data set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatne, Torun M; Finset, Arnstein; Ørnes, Knut; Ruland, Cornelia M

    2010-09-01

    Adult patients present concerns as defined in the Verona Coding Definitions of Emotional Sequences (VR-CoDES), but we do not know how children express their concerns during medical consultations. This study aimed to evaluate the applicability of VR-CoDES to pediatric oncology consultations. Twenty-eight pediatric consultations were coded with the Verona Coding Definitions of Emotional Sequences (VR-CoDES), and the material was also qualitatively analyzed for descriptive purposes. Five consultations were randomly selected for reliability testing and descriptive statistics were computed. Perfect inter-rater reliability for concerns and moderate reliability for cues were obtained. Cues and/or concerns were present in over half of the consultations. Cues were more frequent than concerns, with the majority of cues being verbal hints to hidden concerns or non-verbal cues. Intensity of expressions, limitations in vocabulary, commonality of statements, and complexity of the setting complicated the use of VR-CoDES. Child-specific cues; use of the imperative, cues about past experiences, and use of onomatopoeia were observed. Children with cancer express concerns during medical consultations. VR-CoDES is a reliable tool for coding concerns in pediatric data sets. For future applications in pediatric settings an appendix should be developed to incorporate the child-specific traits. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The use of the virtual reality Helmet Samsung gear VR as interaction interface of a radioactive waste repository simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Julio A. dos; Mól, Antônio C. de A.; Santo, André C. Do E., E-mail: julio_andrade11@hotmail.com [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Centro Universitário Carioca (UniCarioca), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Radioactive waste is all material resulting from human activity that contains elements that emit radiation that can generate risks to health and the environment. In this sense, they are very toxic also for those who perform the storage of radioactive waste in nuclear facilities. On the other hand, the virtual reality (VR) has been destined to the most diverse purposes, like simulations for educational systems, for military purposes as for diverse training. VR can be considered as the junction of three basic principles: immersion, interaction and involvement. Bases on these principles of VR, this work aimed to develop a simulator of a repository of nuclear tailings, for mobile computing, whose interaction interface will be through the Samsung Gear VR helmet. The simulator of the nuclear waste repository was developed in the unity 3D tool and the elements that make up the scenario in the 3D MAX program. In this work we tried to put virtual reality under scrutiny in conjunction with Gear VR, to help in the sensation of immersion, as well as, the possibility of interaction with joysticks. The purpose was to provide greater insight into the operating environment. (author)

  13. Review of Virtual Reality Technology Application in Fire and Medical Exercise for Development of VR based Radiological Emergency Exercise System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Sub Lee; Lee, Byung Il; Park, Seong Jun; Lee, Dewhey; Park, Younwon

    2016-01-01

    The article of Act on Physical Protection and Radiological Emergency (APPRE) was amended as a nuclear licensee shall formulate a radiological emergency exercise plan as prescribed by the Ordinance of the Prime minister and execute such plan with the approval of the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission (NSSC). Current radiological emergency exercise is basically conducting in the field. The field exercise essentially requires participation of mass population. Due to lack of time, cost, communication and participation, the field exercise necessarily causes several limitations in an aspect of effectiveness. The public participants often misunderstood the situation as real though it is just an exercise so several conflicts are occurring. Furthermore, the exercise program is too ideal to reflect the real accident situation. In this point of view, application of virtual reality (VR) technology is highlighted with its many advantages. VR technology is expected to resolve those existing problems. Our research team is currently developing VR based radiological emergency exercise system. In this paper, the advantages and actual application of VR based training were introduced. With those advantages and improvement of existing disadvantages, our VR based radiological emergency exercise system will be developed. Not only physical interactive features, but also interactive fail-considered real-like scenarios will be adopted in the system. The ultimate goal of the system is safe and perfect evacuation of residents in case of radioactive accident

  14. Review of Virtual Reality Technology Application in Fire and Medical Exercise for Development of VR based Radiological Emergency Exercise System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Sub Lee; Lee, Byung Il; Park, Seong Jun; Lee, Dewhey; Park, Younwon [BEES Inc., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The article of Act on Physical Protection and Radiological Emergency (APPRE) was amended as a nuclear licensee shall formulate a radiological emergency exercise plan as prescribed by the Ordinance of the Prime minister and execute such plan with the approval of the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission (NSSC). Current radiological emergency exercise is basically conducting in the field. The field exercise essentially requires participation of mass population. Due to lack of time, cost, communication and participation, the field exercise necessarily causes several limitations in an aspect of effectiveness. The public participants often misunderstood the situation as real though it is just an exercise so several conflicts are occurring. Furthermore, the exercise program is too ideal to reflect the real accident situation. In this point of view, application of virtual reality (VR) technology is highlighted with its many advantages. VR technology is expected to resolve those existing problems. Our research team is currently developing VR based radiological emergency exercise system. In this paper, the advantages and actual application of VR based training were introduced. With those advantages and improvement of existing disadvantages, our VR based radiological emergency exercise system will be developed. Not only physical interactive features, but also interactive fail-considered real-like scenarios will be adopted in the system. The ultimate goal of the system is safe and perfect evacuation of residents in case of radioactive accident.

  15. The use of the virtual reality Helmet Samsung gear VR as interaction interface of a radioactive waste repository simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Julio A. dos; Mól, Antônio C. de A.; Santo, André C. Do E.

    2017-01-01

    Radioactive waste is all material resulting from human activity that contains elements that emit radiation that can generate risks to health and the environment. In this sense, they are very toxic also for those who perform the storage of radioactive waste in nuclear facilities. On the other hand, the virtual reality (VR) has been destined to the most diverse purposes, like simulations for educational systems, for military purposes as for diverse training. VR can be considered as the junction of three basic principles: immersion, interaction and involvement. Bases on these principles of VR, this work aimed to develop a simulator of a repository of nuclear tailings, for mobile computing, whose interaction interface will be through the Samsung Gear VR helmet. The simulator of the nuclear waste repository was developed in the unity 3D tool and the elements that make up the scenario in the 3D MAX program. In this work we tried to put virtual reality under scrutiny in conjunction with Gear VR, to help in the sensation of immersion, as well as, the possibility of interaction with joysticks. The purpose was to provide greater insight into the operating environment. (author)

  16. Evaluation of RSDL, M291 SDK, 0.5 Bleach, 1% Soapy Water and SERPACWA: Part 11: Challenge with EA4243 (VR, Russian VX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    listed decontamination products in the haired guinea pig model following exposure to VR (Russian VX, EA4243). 15. SUBJECT TERMS decontamination...the efficacy of the barrier skin cream SERPACWA and the four listed decontamination products in the haired guinea pig model following exposure to VR...four listed decontamination products and SERPACWA in the haired guinea pig model following exposure to VR (Russian VX, EA4243, Soviet V-gas

  17. Accelerating phylogenetics computing on the desktop: experiments with executing UPGMA in programmable logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J P; Akella, S; Waddell, P H

    2004-01-01

    Having greater computational power on the desktop for processing taxa data sets has been a dream of biologists/statisticians involved in phylogenetics data analysis. Many existing algorithms have been highly optimized-one example being Felsenstein's PHYLIP code, written in C, for UPGMA and neighbor joining algorithms. However, the ability to process more than a few tens of taxa in a reasonable amount of time using conventional computers has not yielded a satisfactory speedup in data processing, making it difficult for phylogenetics practitioners to quickly explore data sets-such as might be done from a laptop computer. We discuss the application of custom computing techniques to phylogenetics. In particular, we apply this technology to speed up UPGMA algorithm execution by a factor of a hundred, against that of PHYLIP code running on the same PC. We report on these experiments and discuss how custom computing techniques can be used to not only accelerate phylogenetics algorithm performance on the desktop, but also on larger, high-performance computing engines, thus enabling the high-speed processing of data sets involving thousands of taxa.

  18. Fabrication of low cost soft tissue prostheses with the desktop 3D printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yong; Xue, Guang-huai; Fu, Jian-zhong

    2014-11-27

    Soft tissue prostheses such as artificial ear, eye and nose are widely used in the maxillofacial rehabilitation. In this report we demonstrate how to fabricate soft prostheses mold with a low cost desktop 3D printer. The fabrication method used is referred to as Scanning Printing Polishing Casting (SPPC). Firstly the anatomy is scanned with a 3D scanner, then a tissue casting mold is designed on computer and printed with a desktop 3D printer. Subsequently, a chemical polishing method is used to polish the casting mold by removing the staircase effect and acquiring a smooth surface. Finally, the last step is to cast medical grade silicone into the mold. After the silicone is cured, the fine soft prostheses can be removed from the mold. Utilizing the SPPC method, soft prostheses with smooth surface and complicated structure can be fabricated at a low cost. Accordingly, the total cost of fabricating ear prosthesis is about $30, which is much lower than the current soft prostheses fabrication methods.

  19. Effects of boundary-layer separation controllers on a desktop fume hood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rong Fung; Chen, Jia-Kun; Hsu, Ching Min; Hung, Shuo-Fu

    2016-10-02

    A desktop fume hood installed with an innovative design of flow boundary-layer separation controllers on the leading edges of the side plates, work surface, and corners was developed and characterized for its flow and containment leakage characteristics. The geometric features of the developed desktop fume hood included a rearward offset suction slot, two side plates, two side-plate boundary-layer separation controllers on the leading edges of the side plates, a slanted surface on the leading edge of the work surface, and two small triangular plates on the upper left and right corners of the hood face. The flow characteristics were examined using the laser-assisted smoke flow visualization technique. The containment leakages were measured by the tracer gas (sulphur hexafluoride) detection method on the hood face plane with a mannequin installed in front of the hood. The results of flow visualization showed that the smoke dispersions induced by the boundary-layer separations on the leading edges of the side plates and work surface, as well as the three-dimensional complex flows on the upper-left and -right corners of the hood face, were effectively alleviated by the boundary-layer separation controllers. The results of the tracer gas detection method with a mannequin standing in front of the hood showed that the leakage levels were negligibly small (≤0.003 ppm) at low face velocities (≥0.19 m/s).

  20. Definition of a VR-based protocol to treat social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, S; Klinger, E; Légeron, P; Lauer, F; Chemin, I; Nugues, P

    2003-08-01

    Social phobia is an anxiety disorder that is accessible to two forms of treatment yielding scientifically validated results: drugs and cognitive-behavioral therapies. Graded exposure to feared social situations is fundamental to obtain an improvement of the anxious symptoms. Traditionally, exposure therapies are done either in vivo or by imagining the situations. In vivo exposure is sometimes difficult to control and many patients have some difficulties in using imagination. Virtual reality (VR) seems to bring significant advantages. It allows exposures to numerous and varied situations. This paper reports the definition of a clinical protocol whose purpose is to assess the efficiency of a VR therapy compared to a CBT and to the absence of treatment for social phobic patients. It explains the illness' diagnosis and its usual treatments. It exposes all the architecture of the study, the assessment tools, the content and unfold of the therapy sessions. It finally reports first results of a clinical trial in a between-group design in 10 patients suffering from social phobia. The virtual environments used in the treatment reproduce four situations that social phobics feel the most threatening: performance, intimacy, scrutiny and assertiveness. With the help of the therapist, the patient learns adapted cognitions and behaviors with the aim of reducing her or his anxiety in the corresponding real situations. The novelty of our work is to address a group of situations that the phobic patient is most likely to experience and to treat patients according to a precise protocol.

  1. An interactive VR system based on full-body tracking and gesture recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xia; Sang, Xinzhu; Chen, Duo; Wang, Peng; Guo, Nan; Yan, Binbin; Wang, Kuiru

    2016-10-01

    Most current virtual reality (VR) interactions are realized with the hand-held input device which leads to a low degree of presence. There is other solutions using sensors like Leap Motion to recognize the gestures of users in order to interact in a more natural way, but the navigation in these systems is still a problem, because they fail to map the actual walking to virtual walking only with a partial body of the user represented in the synthetic environment. Therefore, we propose a system in which users can walk around in the virtual environment as a humanoid model, selecting menu items and manipulating with the virtual objects using natural hand gestures. With a Kinect depth camera, the system tracks the joints of the user, mapping them to a full virtual body which follows the move of the tracked user. The movements of the feet can be detected to determine whether the user is in walking state, so that the walking of model in the virtual world can be activated and stopped by means of animation control in Unity engine. This method frees the hands of users comparing to traditional navigation way using hand-held device. We use the point cloud data getting from Kinect depth camera to recognize the gestures of users, such as swiping, pressing and manipulating virtual objects. Combining the full body tracking and gestures recognition using Kinect, we achieve our interactive VR system in Unity engine with a high degree of presence.

  2. The German VR Simulation Realism Scale--psychometric construction for virtual reality applications with virtual humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeschl, Sandra; Doering, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Virtual training applications with high levels of immersion or fidelity (for example for social phobia treatment) produce high levels of presence and therefore belong to the most successful Virtual Reality developments. Whereas display and interaction fidelity (as sub-dimensions of immersion) and their influence on presence are well researched, realism of the displayed simulation depends on the specific application and is therefore difficult to measure. We propose to measure simulation realism by using a self-report questionnaire. The German VR Simulation Realism Scale for VR training applications was developed based on a translation of scene realism items from the Witmer-Singer-Presence Questionnaire. Items for realism of virtual humans (for example for social phobia training applications) were supplemented. A sample of N = 151 students rated simulation realism of a Fear of Public Speaking application. Four factors were derived by item- and principle component analysis (Varimax rotation), representing Scene Realism, Audience Behavior, Audience Appearance and Sound Realism. The scale developed can be used as a starting point for future research and measurement of simulation realism for applications including virtual humans.

  3. Novel 3D/VR interactive environment for MD simulations, visualization and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doblack, Benjamin N; Allis, Tim; Dávila, Lilian P

    2014-12-18

    The increasing development of computing (hardware and software) in the last decades has impacted scientific research in many fields including materials science, biology, chemistry and physics among many others. A new computational system for the accurate and fast simulation and 3D/VR visualization of nanostructures is presented here, using the open-source molecular dynamics (MD) computer program LAMMPS. This alternative computational method uses modern graphics processors, NVIDIA CUDA technology and specialized scientific codes to overcome processing speed barriers common to traditional computing methods. In conjunction with a virtual reality system used to model materials, this enhancement allows the addition of accelerated MD simulation capability. The motivation is to provide a novel research environment which simultaneously allows visualization, simulation, modeling and analysis. The research goal is to investigate the structure and properties of inorganic nanostructures (e.g., silica glass nanosprings) under different conditions using this innovative computational system. The work presented outlines a description of the 3D/VR Visualization System and basic components, an overview of important considerations such as the physical environment, details on the setup and use of the novel system, a general procedure for the accelerated MD enhancement, technical information, and relevant remarks. The impact of this work is the creation of a unique computational system combining nanoscale materials simulation, visualization and interactivity in a virtual environment, which is both a research and teaching instrument at UC Merced.

  4. Application of a renormalization-group treatment to the statistical associating fluid theory for potentials of variable range (SAFT-VR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Esther; Llovell, Felix; Vega, Lourdes F; Trusler, J P Martin; Galindo, Amparo

    2011-04-21

    An accurate prediction of phase behavior at conditions far and close to criticality cannot be accomplished by mean-field based theories that do not incorporate long-range density fluctuations. A treatment based on renormalization-group (RG) theory as developed by White and co-workers has proven to be very successful in improving the predictions of the critical region with different equations of state. The basis of the method is an iterative procedure to account for contributions to the free energy of density fluctuations of increasing wavelengths. The RG method has been combined with a number of versions of the statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT), by implementing White's earliest ideas with the improvements of Prausnitz and co-workers. Typically, this treatment involves two adjustable parameters: a cutoff wavelength L for density fluctuations and an average gradient of the wavelet function Φ. In this work, the SAFT-VR (variable range) equation of state is extended with a similar crossover treatment which, however, follows closely the most recent improvements introduced by White. The interpretation of White's latter developments allows us to establish a straightforward method which enables Φ to be evaluated; only the cutoff wavelength L then needs to be adjusted. The approach used here begins with an initial free energy incorporating only contributions from short-wavelength fluctuations, which are treated locally. The contribution from long-wavelength fluctuations is incorporated through an iterative procedure based on attractive interactions which incorporate the structure of the fluid following the ideas of perturbation theories and using a mapping that allows integration of the radial distribution function. Good agreement close and far from the critical region is obtained using a unique fitted parameter L that can be easily related to the range of the potential. In this way the thermodynamic properties of a square-well (SW) fluid are given by the same

  5. VR-SCOSMO: A smooth conductor-like screening model with charge-dependent radii for modeling chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuechler, Erich R; Giese, Timothy J; York, Darrin M

    2016-04-28

    To better represent the solvation effects observed along reaction pathways, and of ionic species in general, a charge-dependent variable-radii smooth conductor-like screening model (VR-SCOSMO) is developed. This model is implemented and parameterized with a third order density-functional tight binding quantum model, DFTB3/3OB-OPhyd, a quantum method which was developed for organic and biological compounds, utilizing a specific parameterization for phosphate hydrolysis reactions. Unlike most other applications with the DFTB3/3OB model, an auxiliary set of atomic multipoles is constructed from the underlying DFTB3 density matrix which is used to interact the solute with the solvent response surface. The resulting method is variational, produces smooth energies, and has analytic gradients. As a baseline, a conventional SCOSMO model with fixed radii is also parameterized. The SCOSMO and VR-SCOSMO models shown have comparable accuracy in reproducing neutral-molecule absolute solvation free energies; however, the VR-SCOSMO model is shown to reduce the mean unsigned errors (MUEs) of ionic compounds by half (about 2-3 kcal/mol). The VR-SCOSMO model presents similar accuracy as a charge-dependent Poisson-Boltzmann model introduced by Hou et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 6, 2303 (2010)]. VR-SCOSMO is then used to examine the hydrolysis of trimethylphosphate and seven other phosphoryl transesterification reactions with different leaving groups. Two-dimensional energy landscapes are constructed for these reactions and calculated barriers are compared to those obtained from ab initio polarizable continuum calculations and experiment. Results of the VR-SCOSMO model are in good agreement in both cases, capturing the rate-limiting reaction barrier and the nature of the transition state.

  6. Papel dos receptores VR1 hipocampais sobre a consolidação da memória

    OpenAIRE

    Bruna Pasqualini Genro

    2008-01-01

    Os receptores vanilóides VR1 estão presentes em grandes quantidades no sistema nervoso periférico (SNP) e têm sido amplamente estudados como integradores de estímulos nocivos. A detecção desse sistema vanilóide também no sistema nervoso central (SNC), leva ao questionamento de qual seria o papel fisiológico dos receptores VR1 localizados no encéfalo. No presente estudo, abordamos a função desses receptores no hipocampo, estrutura essencial para a formação de memórias aversivas. Foram estudado...

  7. VR-based training and assessment in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia: from error analysis to system design.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-01-01

    If VR-based medical training and assessment is to improve patient care and safety (i.e. a genuine health gain), it has to be based on clinically relevant measurement of performance. Metrics on errors are particularly useful for capturing and correcting undesired behaviors before they occur in the operating room. However, translating clinically relevant metrics and errors into meaningful system design is a challenging process. This paper discusses how an existing task and error analysis was translated into the system design of a VR-based training and assessment environment for Ultrasound Guided Regional Anesthesia (UGRA).

  8. 'Integration'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olwig, Karen Fog

    2011-01-01

    , while the countries have adopted disparate policies and ideologies, differences in the actual treatment and attitudes towards immigrants and refugees in everyday life are less clear, due to parallel integration programmes based on strong similarities in the welfare systems and in cultural notions...... of equality in the three societies. Finally, it shows that family relations play a central role in immigrants’ and refugees’ establishment of a new life in the receiving societies, even though the welfare society takes on many of the social and economic functions of the family....

  9. ST Elevation in aVR with Coexistent Multilead ST Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Cooper

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: An 80-year-old female with a history of Crohn’s disease presented to the emergency department with chest pain. She had two weeks of exertional chest pain that preceded an episode of chest pain immediately prior to arrival associated with diaphoresis. Her pain nearly completely resolved with sublingual nitroglycerin provided by pre-hospital personnel. She was hemodynamically stable with normal vital signs on arrival. An ECG was immediately obtained. Significant findings: The ECG shows ST-segment depressions in precordial leads V3 through V6, and limb leads I, II, and aVL, and 1 mm of ST-segment elevation in aVR. The initial troponin I was elevated at 1.37 ng/mL (upper limit of normal 0.40. Cardiology decided to delay catheterization until the next day when diffuse coronary disease was discovered (including 90% of the left circumflex stenosis, 60% proximal and 75% mid-left anterior descending stenosis, 75% third diagonal branch stenosis, and 90% posterior descending artery stenosis. The following day, the patient went to the operating room for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG. Discussion: Traditionally, lead aVR has not received attention when interpreting acutely ischemic changes on ECG, leading some to refer to it as “the forgotten lead.”1 Current guidelines acknowledge the significance of multilead ST depression with coexistent ST elevation in aVR, and this pattern has been identified as the strongest predictor of severe left main coronary artery and/or 3-vessel disease (LM/3VD.2-3 When this ECG pattern is recognized in patients with ischemic symptoms, the emergency physician should involve cardiology early. When managing patients with suspected LM/3VD, it is important to withhold dual anti-platelet therapy as CABG is likely to be indicated,1,3 and guidelines recommend discontinuing P2Y12 inhibitors like clopidogrel or ticagrelor at least 24 hours prior to urgent CABG.2

  10. Desktop Modeling and Simulation: Parsimonious, yet Effective Discrete-Event Simulation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, James R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates how quickly students can be trained to construct useful discrete-event simulation models using Excel The typical supply chain used by many large national retailers is described, and an Excel-based simulation model is constructed of it The set of programming and simulation skills required for development of that model are then determined we conclude that six hours of training are required to teach the skills to MBA students . The simulation presented here contains all fundamental functionallty of a simulation model, and so our result holds for any discrete-event simulation model. We argue therefore that Industry workers with the same technical skill set as students having completed one year in an MBA program can be quickly trained to construct simulation models. This result gives credence to the efficacy of Desktop Modeling and Simulation whereby simulation analyses can be quickly developed, run, and analyzed with widely available software, namely Excel.

  11. Desktop publishing and medical imaging: paper as hardcopy medium for digital images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denslow, S

    1994-08-01

    Desktop-publishing software and hardware has progressed to the point that many widely used word-processing programs are capable of printing high-quality digital images with many shades of gray from black to white. Accordingly, it should be relatively easy to print digital medical images on paper for reports, instructional materials, and in research notes. Components were assembled that were necessary for extracting image data from medical imaging devices and converting the data to a form usable by word-processing software. A system incorporating these components was implemented in a medical setting and has been operating for 18 months. The use of this system by medical staff has been monitored.

  12. Detection of analyte binding to microarrays using gold nanoparticle labels and a desktop scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Anpan; Dufva, Martin; Belleville, Erik

    2003-01-01

    on gold nanoparticle labeled antibodies visualized by a commercial, office desktop flatbed scanner. Scanning electron microscopy studies showed that the signal from the flatbed scanner was proportional to the surface density of the bound antibody-gold conjugates, and that the flatbed scanner could detect...... six attomoles of antibody-gold conjugates. This detection system was used in a competitive immunoassay to measure the concentration of the pesticide metabolite 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM) in water samples. The results showed that the gold labeled antibodies functioned comparably with a fluorescent...... based immunoassay for detecting BAM in water. A qualitative immunoassay based on gold-labeled antibodies could determineif a water sample contained BAM above and below 60-70 ng L(-1), which is below the maximum allowed BAM concentration for drinking water (100 ng L(-1)) according to European Union...

  13. Using the rear projection of the Socibot Desktop robot for creation of applications with facial expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gîlcă, G.; Bîzdoacă, N. G.; Diaconu, I.

    2016-08-01

    This article aims to implement some practical applications using the Socibot Desktop social robot. We mean to realize three applications: creating a speech sequence using the Kiosk menu of the browser interface, creating a program in the Virtual Robot browser interface and making a new guise to be loaded into the robot's memory in order to be projected onto it face. The first application is actually created in the Compose submenu that contains 5 file categories: audio, eyes, face, head, mood, this being helpful in the creation of the projected sequence. The second application is more complex, the completed program containing: audio files, speeches (can be created in over 20 languages), head movements, the robot's facial parameters function of each action units (AUs) of the facial muscles, its expressions and its line of sight. Last application aims to change the robot's appearance with the guise created by us. The guise was created in Adobe Photoshop and then loaded into the robot's memory.

  14. Expanding services in a shrinking economy: desktop document delivery in a dental school library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gushrowski, Barbara A

    2011-07-01

    How can library staff develop and promote a document delivery service and then expand the service to a wide audience? The setting is the library at the Indiana University School of Dentistry (IUSD), Indianapolis. A faculty survey and a citation analysis were conducted to determine potential use of the service. Volume of interlibrary loan transactions and staff and equipment capacity were also studied. IUSD Library staff created a desktop delivery service (DDSXpress) for faculty and then expanded the service to practicing dental professionals and graduate students. The number of faculty using DDSXpress remains consistent. The number of practicing dental professionals using the service is low. Graduate students have been quick to adopt the service. Through careful analysis of capacity and need for the service, staff successfully expanded document delivery service without incurring additional costs. Use of DDSXpress is continually monitored, and opportunities to market the service to practicing dental professionals are being investigated.

  15. Thermoelectric cooling of microelectronic circuits and waste heat electrical power generation in a desktop personal computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, C.A.; Shammas, N.Y.A.; Grainger, S.; Taylor, I.

    2011-01-01

    Thermoelectric cooling and micro-power generation from waste heat within a standard desktop computer has been demonstrated. A thermoelectric test system has been designed and constructed, with typical test results presented for thermoelectric cooling and micro-power generation when the computer is executing a number of different applications. A thermoelectric module, operating as a heat pump, can lower the operating temperature of the computer's microprocessor and graphics processor to temperatures below ambient conditions. A small amount of electrical power, typically in the micro-watt or milli-watt range, can be generated by a thermoelectric module attached to the outside of the computer's standard heat sink assembly, when a secondary heat sink is attached to the other side of the thermoelectric module. Maximum electrical power can be generated by the thermoelectric module when a water cooled heat sink is used as the secondary heat sink, as this produces the greatest temperature difference between both sides of the module.

  16. Working Inside The Box: An Example Of Google Desktop Search in a Forensic Examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy James LaTulippe

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Information and the technological advancements for which mankind develops with regards to its storage has increased tremendously over the past few decades. As the total amount of data stored rapidly increases in conjunction with the amount of widely available computer-driven devices being used, solutions are being developed to better harness this data. These types of advancements are continually assisting investigators and computer forensic examiners. One such application which houses copious amounts of fruitful data is the Google Desktop Search program. Coupled with tested and verified techniques, examiners can exploit the power of this application to cater to their investigative needs. Please find within a real world case example of these techniques and its subsequent outcome.

  17. FRAMEWORK PARA CONVERSÃO DE APLICATIVOS DELPHI DESKTOP EM APLICATIVOS ANDROID NATIVO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo da Silva Riquena

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available With the growing use of mobile devices by companies and organizations there is an increasing demand applications in production mobile platform. For certain companies, business success may depend on a mobile application which approaches the customers or improve the performance of internal processes. However, developing software for the mobile platform is an expensive process which takes time and resources. A framework to convert Delphi Desktop applications into native Android applications in an automatic way constitutes a useful tool for architects and software developers can contribute with the implementation phase of the application. Therefore, this work is based on methods and processes for software reengineering as the PRE / OO (Process of Reengineering Object Oriented, for automatic conversion of an application developed in Delphi environment in an application for Android mobile platform. At last, an experiment was performed with a real case to corroborate the goals.

  18. The CosmicWatch Desktop Muon Detector: a self-contained, pocket sized particle detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axani, S. N.; Frankiewicz, K.; Conrad, J. M.

    2018-03-01

    The CosmicWatch Desktop Muon Detector is a self-contained, hand-held cosmic ray muon detector that is valuable for astro/particle physics research applications and outreach. The material cost of each detector is under 100 and it takes a novice student approximately four hours to build their first detector. The detectors are powered via a USB connection and the data can either be recorded directly to a computer or to a microSD card. Arduino- and Python-based software is provided to operate the detector and an online application to plot the data in real-time. In this paper, we describe the various design features, evaluate the performance, and illustrate the detectors capabilities by providing several example measurements.

  19. Qualitative research ethics on the spot: Not only on the desktop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øye, Christine; Sørensen, Nelli Øvre; Glasdam, Stinne

    2016-06-01

    The increase in medical ethical regulations and bureaucracy handled by institutional review boards and healthcare institutions puts the researchers using qualitative methods in a challenging position. Based on three different cases from three different research studies, the article explores and discusses research ethical dilemmas. First, and especially, the article addresses the challenges for gatekeepers who influence the informant's decisions to participate in research. Second, the article addresses the challenges in following research ethical guidelines related to informed consent and doing no harm. Third, the article argues for the importance of having research ethical guidelines and review boards to question and discuss the possible ethical dilemmas that occur in qualitative research. Research ethics must be understood in qualitative research as relational, situational, and emerging. That is, that focus on ethical issues and dilemmas has to be paid attention on the spot and not only at the desktop. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. The Taverna workflow suite: designing and executing workflows of Web Services on the desktop, web or in the cloud

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolstencroft, K.; Haines, R.; Fellows, D.; Williams, A.; Withers, D.; Owen, S.; Soiland-Reyes, S.; Dunlop, I.; Nenadic, A.; Fisher, P.; Bhagat, J.; Belhajjame, K.; Bacall, F.; Hardisty, A.; Nieva de la Hidalga, A.; Balcazar Vargas, M.P.; Sufi, S.; Goble, C.

    2013-01-01

    The Taverna workflow tool suite (http://www.taverna.org.uk) is designed to combine distributed Web Services and/or local tools into complex analysis pipelines. These pipelines can be executed on local desktop machines or through larger infrastructure (such as supercomputers, Grids or cloud

  1. The Learner Characteristics, Features of Desktop 3D Virtual Reality Environments, and College Chemistry Instruction: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Zahira; Goetz, Ernest T.; Keeney-Kennicutt, Wendy; Kwok, Oi-man; Cifuentes, Lauren; Davis, Trina J.

    2012-01-01

    We examined a model of the impact of a 3D desktop virtual reality environment on the learner characteristics (i.e. perceptual and psychological variables) that can enhance chemistry-related learning achievements in an introductory college chemistry class. The relationships between the 3D virtual reality features and the chemistry learning test as…

  2. Improvements in fast-response flood modeling: desktop parallel computing and domain tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judi, David R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcpherson, Timothy N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burian, Steven J [UNIV. OF UTAH

    2009-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly important to have the ability to accurately forecast flooding, as flooding accounts for the most losses due to natural disasters in the world and the United States. Flood inundation modeling has been dominated by one-dimensional approaches. These models are computationally efficient and are considered by many engineers to produce reasonably accurate water surface profiles. However, because the profiles estimated in these models must be superimposed on digital elevation data to create a two-dimensional map, the result may be sensitive to the ability of the elevation data to capture relevant features (e.g. dikes/levees, roads, walls, etc...). Moreover, one-dimensional models do not explicitly represent the complex flow processes present in floodplains and urban environments and because two-dimensional models based on the shallow water equations have significantly greater ability to determine flow velocity and direction, the National Research Council (NRC) has recommended that two-dimensional models be used over one-dimensional models for flood inundation studies. This paper has shown that two-dimensional flood modeling computational time can be greatly reduced through the use of Java multithreading on multi-core computers which effectively provides a means for parallel computing on a desktop computer. In addition, this paper has shown that when desktop parallel computing is coupled with a domain tracking algorithm, significant computation time can be eliminated when computations are completed only on inundated cells. The drastic reduction in computational time shown here enhances the ability of two-dimensional flood inundation models to be used as a near-real time flood forecasting tool, engineering, design tool, or planning tool. Perhaps even of greater significance, the reduction in computation time makes the incorporation of risk and uncertainty/ensemble forecasting more feasible for flood inundation modeling (NRC 2000; Sayers et al

  3. Assessing soil erosion risk using RUSLE through a GIS open source desktop and web application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, L; Teodoro, A C; Gonçalves, J A; Soares, D; Cunha, M

    2016-06-01

    Soil erosion is a serious environmental problem. An estimation of the expected soil loss by water-caused erosion can be calculated considering the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE). Geographical Information Systems (GIS) provide different tools to create categorical maps of soil erosion risk which help to study the risk assessment of soil loss. The objective of this study was to develop a GIS open source application (in QGIS), using the RUSLE methodology for estimating erosion rate at the watershed scale (desktop application) and provide the same application via web access (web application). The applications developed allow one to generate all the maps necessary to evaluate the soil erosion risk. Several libraries and algorithms from SEXTANTE were used to develop these applications. These applications were tested in Montalegre municipality (Portugal). The maps involved in RUSLE method-soil erosivity factor, soil erodibility factor, topographic factor, cover management factor, and support practices-were created. The estimated mean value of the soil loss obtained was 220 ton km(-2) year(-1) ranged from 0.27 to 1283 ton km(-2) year(-1). The results indicated that most of the study area (80 %) is characterized by very low soil erosion level (soil erosion was higher than 962 ton km(-2) year(-1). It was also concluded that areas with high slope values and bare soil are related with high level of erosion and the higher the P and C values, the higher the soil erosion percentage. The RUSLE web and the desktop application are freely available.

  4. Economic analysis of cloud-based desktop virtualization implementation at a hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sooyoung; Kim, Seok; Kim, Taeki; Baek, Rong-Min; Suh, Chang Suk; Chung, Chin Youb; Hwang, Hee

    2012-10-30

    Cloud-based desktop virtualization infrastructure (VDI) is known as providing simplified management of application and desktop, efficient management of physical resources, and rapid service deployment, as well as connection to the computer environment at anytime, anywhere with any device. However, the economic validity of investing in the adoption of the system at a hospital has not been established. This study computed the actual investment cost of the hospital-wide VDI implementation at the 910-bed Seoul National University Bundang Hospital in Korea and the resulting effects (i.e., reductions in PC errors and difficulties, application and operating system update time, and account management time). Return on investment (ROI), net present value (NPV), and internal rate of return (IRR) indexes used for corporate investment decision-making were used for the economic analysis of VDI implementation. The results of five-year cost-benefit analysis given for 400 Virtual Machines (VMs; i.e., 1,100 users in the case of SNUBH) showed that the break-even point was reached in the fourth year of the investment. At that point, the ROI was 122.6%, the NPV was approximately US$192,000, and the IRR showed an investment validity of 10.8%. From our sensitivity analysis to changing the number of VMs (in terms of number of users), the greater the number of adopted VMs was the more investable the system was. This study confirms that the emerging VDI can have an economic impact on hospital information system (HIS) operation and utilization in a tertiary hospital setting.

  5. Attack Potential Evaluation in Desktop and Smartphone Fingerprint Sensors: Can They Be Attacked by Anyone?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Goicoechea-Telleria

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of biometrics keeps growing. Every day, we use biometric recognition to unlock our phones or to have access to places such as the gym or the office, so we rely on the security manufacturers offer when protecting our privileges and private life. It is well known that it is possible to hack into a fingerprint sensor using fake fingers made of Play-Doh and other easy-to-obtain materials but to what extent? Is this true for all users or only for specialists with a deep knowledge on biometrics? Are smartphone fingerprint sensors as reliable as desktop sensors? To answer these questions, we performed 3 separate evaluations. First, we evaluated 4 desktop fingerprint sensors of different technologies by attacking them with 7 different fake finger materials. All of them were successfully attacked by an experienced attacker. Secondly, we carried out a similar test on 5 smartphones with embedded sensors using the most successful materials, which also hacked the 5 sensors. Lastly, we gathered 15 simulated attackers with no background in biometrics to create fake fingers of several materials, and they had one week to attack the fingerprint sensors of the same 5 smartphones, with the starting point of a short video with the techniques to create them. All 5 smartphones were successfully attacked by an inexperienced attacker. This paper will provide the results achieved, as well as an analysis on the attack potential of every case. All results are given following the metrics of the standard ISO/IEC 30107-3.

  6. Emission of particulate matter from a desktop three-dimensional (3D) printer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jinghai; LeBouf, Ryan F.; Duling, Matthew G.; Nurkiewicz, Timothy; Chen, Bean T.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Virji, M. Abbas; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Desktop three-dimensional (3D) printers are becoming commonplace in business offices, public libraries, university labs and classrooms, and even private homes; however, these settings are generally not designed for exposure control. Prior experience with a variety of office equipment devices such as laser printers that emit ultrafine particles (UFP) suggests the need to characterize 3D printer emissions to enable reliable risk assessment. The aim of this study was to examine factors that influence particulate emissions from 3D printers and characterize their physical properties to inform risk assessment. Emissions were evaluated in a 0.5-m3 chamber and in a small room (32.7 m3) using real-time instrumentation to measure particle number, size distribution, mass, and surface area. Factors evaluated included filament composition and color, as well as the manufacturer-provided printer emissions control technologies while printing an object. Filament type significantly influenced emissions, with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) emitting larger particles than polylactic acid (PLA), which may have been the result of agglomeration. Geometric mean particle sizes and total particle (TP) number and mass emissions differed significantly among colors of a given filament type. Use of a cover on the printer reduced TP emissions by a factor of 2. Lung deposition calculations indicated a threefold higher PLA particle deposition in alveoli compared to ABS. Desktop 3D printers emit high levels of UFP, which are released into indoor environments where adequate ventilation may not be present to control emissions. Emissions in nonindustrial settings need to be reduced through the use of a hierarchy of controls, beginning with device design, followed by engineering controls (ventilation) and administrative controls such as choice of filament composition and color. PMID:27196745

  7. A Collaborative Digital Pathology System for Multi-Touch Mobile and Desktop Computing Platforms

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, W.

    2013-06-13

    Collaborative slide image viewing systems are becoming increasingly important in pathology applications such as telepathology and E-learning. Despite rapid advances in computing and imaging technology, current digital pathology systems have limited performance with respect to remote viewing of whole slide images on desktop or mobile computing devices. In this paper we present a novel digital pathology client-server system that supports collaborative viewing of multi-plane whole slide images over standard networks using multi-touch-enabled clients. Our system is built upon a standard HTTP web server and a MySQL database to allow multiple clients to exchange image and metadata concurrently. We introduce a domain-specific image-stack compression method that leverages real-time hardware decoding on mobile devices. It adaptively encodes image stacks in a decorrelated colour space to achieve extremely low bitrates (0.8 bpp) with very low loss of image quality. We evaluate the image quality of our compression method and the performance of our system for diagnosis with an in-depth user study. Collaborative slide image viewing systems are becoming increasingly important in pathology applications such as telepathology and E-learning. Despite rapid advances in computing and imaging technology, current digital pathology systems have limited performance with respect to remote viewing of whole slide images on desktop or mobile computing devices. In this paper we present a novel digital pathology client-server systems that supports collaborative viewing of multi-plane whole slide images over standard networks using multi-touch enabled clients. Our system is built upon a standard HTTP web server and a MySQL database to allow multiple clients to exchange image and metadata concurrently. © 2013 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. A Collaborative Digital Pathology System for Multi-Touch Mobile and Desktop Computing Platforms

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, W.; Schneider, J.; Hansen, A.; Lee, M.; Turney, S. G.; Faulkner-Jones, B. E.; Hecht, J. L.; Najarian, R.; Yee, E.; Lichtman, J. W.; Pfister, H.

    2013-01-01

    Collaborative slide image viewing systems are becoming increasingly important in pathology applications such as telepathology and E-learning. Despite rapid advances in computing and imaging technology, current digital pathology systems have limited performance with respect to remote viewing of whole slide images on desktop or mobile computing devices. In this paper we present a novel digital pathology client-server system that supports collaborative viewing of multi-plane whole slide images over standard networks using multi-touch-enabled clients. Our system is built upon a standard HTTP web server and a MySQL database to allow multiple clients to exchange image and metadata concurrently. We introduce a domain-specific image-stack compression method that leverages real-time hardware decoding on mobile devices. It adaptively encodes image stacks in a decorrelated colour space to achieve extremely low bitrates (0.8 bpp) with very low loss of image quality. We evaluate the image quality of our compression method and the performance of our system for diagnosis with an in-depth user study. Collaborative slide image viewing systems are becoming increasingly important in pathology applications such as telepathology and E-learning. Despite rapid advances in computing and imaging technology, current digital pathology systems have limited performance with respect to remote viewing of whole slide images on desktop or mobile computing devices. In this paper we present a novel digital pathology client-server systems that supports collaborative viewing of multi-plane whole slide images over standard networks using multi-touch enabled clients. Our system is built upon a standard HTTP web server and a MySQL database to allow multiple clients to exchange image and metadata concurrently. © 2013 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Emission of particulate matter from a desktop three-dimensional (3D) printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jinghai; LeBouf, Ryan F; Duling, Matthew G; Nurkiewicz, Timothy; Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Virji, M Abbas; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B

    2016-01-01

    Desktop three-dimensional (3D) printers are becoming commonplace in business offices, public libraries, university labs and classrooms, and even private homes; however, these settings are generally not designed for exposure control. Prior experience with a variety of office equipment devices such as laser printers that emit ultrafine particles (UFP) suggests the need to characterize 3D printer emissions to enable reliable risk assessment. The aim of this study was to examine factors that influence particulate emissions from 3D printers and characterize their physical properties to inform risk assessment. Emissions were evaluated in a 0.5-m(3) chamber and in a small room (32.7 m(3)) using real-time instrumentation to measure particle number, size distribution, mass, and surface area. Factors evaluated included filament composition and color, as well as the manufacturer-provided printer emissions control technologies while printing an object. Filament type significantly influenced emissions, with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) emitting larger particles than polylactic acid (PLA), which may have been the result of agglomeration. Geometric mean particle sizes and total particle (TP) number and mass emissions differed significantly among colors of a given filament type. Use of a cover on the printer reduced TP emissions by a factor of 2. Lung deposition calculations indicated a threefold higher PLA particle deposition in alveoli compared to ABS. Desktop 3D printers emit high levels of UFP, which are released into indoor environments where adequate ventilation may not be present to control emissions. Emissions in nonindustrial settings need to be reduced through the use of a hierarchy of controls, beginning with device design, followed by engineering controls (ventilation) and administrative controls such as choice of filament composition and color.

  10. Economic analysis of cloud-based desktop virtualization implementation at a hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo Sooyoung

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cloud-based desktop virtualization infrastructure (VDI is known as providing simplified management of application and desktop, efficient management of physical resources, and rapid service deployment, as well as connection to the computer environment at anytime, anywhere with anydevice. However, the economic validity of investing in the adoption of the system at a hospital has not been established. Methods This study computed the actual investment cost of the hospital-wide VDI implementation at the 910-bed Seoul National University Bundang Hospital in Korea and the resulting effects (i.e., reductions in PC errors and difficulties, application and operating system update time, and account management time. Return on investment (ROI, net present value (NPV, and internal rate of return (IRR indexes used for corporate investment decision-making were used for the economic analysis of VDI implementation. Results The results of five-year cost-benefit analysis given for 400 Virtual Machines (VMs; i.e., 1,100 users in the case of SNUBH showed that the break-even point was reached in the fourth year of the investment. At that point, the ROI was 122.6%, the NPV was approximately US$192,000, and the IRR showed an investment validity of 10.8%. From our sensitivity analysis to changing the number of VMs (in terms of number of users, the greater the number of adopted VMs was the more investable the system was. Conclusions This study confirms that the emerging VDI can have an economic impact on hospital information system (HIS operation and utilization in a tertiary hospital setting.

  11. Education and research at the VR-1 Vrabec training reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matejka, K.

    1993-01-01

    The results of 12 years' efforts devoted to the construction of the VR-1 ''Vrabec'' training reactor at the Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague and to establishing the training reactor department, as well as the contribution of the training reactor facility to the teaching and scientific activities of the Faculty are presented in a comprehensive manner. The thesis is divided into 2 parts: (i) preconditions, reactor construction and commissioning, and constituting the reactor department, and (ii) basic and comprehensive information concerning the current utilization of the reactor for the benefit of students from various university level institutions. The prospects of scientific activities of the department are also outlined. Attention is paid to selected nuclear safety aspects of the reactor during operation and teaching of students, as well as to its innovated digital control system whose implementation is planned. The results achieved are compared with the initial goals and with similar experience abroad. (P.A.)

  12. A VR Based Interactive Genetic Algorithm Framework For Design of Support Schemes to Deep Excavations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Riyu; Wu, Heng

    2002-01-01

    An interactive genetic algorithm (IGA) framework for the design of support schemes to deep excavations is proposed in this paper, in which virtual reality (VR) is used as an aid to the evaluation of design schemes that is performed interactively. The fitness of a scheme individual is evaluated by two steps. Firstly a fitness value is automatically assigned to a scheme individual according to the the estimated construction cost of the individual. And the human evaluation is introduced to modify the fitness value by taking into account other factors, such as the feasibility factor. The design scheme is composed of four basic categories, i. e., cantilever walls, reinforced soil walls, tieback systems and bracing systems, each of which is encoded by a binary string. To assist human evaluation, 3D models of design schemes are created and visualized in a virtual reality environment, providing designers with a reality sense of various schemes

  13. Gaze-Aware Streaming Solutions for the Next Generation of Mobile VR Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lungaro, Pietro; Sjoberg, Rickard; Valero, Alfredo Jose Fanghella; Mittal, Ashutosh; Tollmar, Konrad

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to content delivery for video streaming services. It exploits information from connected eye-trackers embedded in the next generation of VR Head Mounted Displays (HMDs). The proposed solution aims to deliver high visual quality, in real time, around the users' fixations points while lowering the quality everywhere else. The goal of the proposed approach is to substantially reduce the overall bandwidth requirements for supporting VR video experiences while delivering high levels of user perceived quality. The prerequisites to achieve these results are: (1) mechanisms that can cope with different degrees of latency in the system and (2) solutions that support fast adaptation of video quality in different parts of a frame, without requiring a large increase in bitrate. A novel codec configuration, capable of supporting near-instantaneous video quality adaptation in specific portions of a video frame, is presented. The proposed method exploits in-built properties of HEVC encoders and while it introduces a moderate amount of error, these errors are indetectable by users. Fast adaptation is the key to enable gaze-aware streaming and its reduction in bandwidth. A testbed implementing gaze-aware streaming, together with a prototype HMD with in-built eye tracker, is presented and was used for testing with real users. The studies quantified the bandwidth savings achievable by the proposed approach and characterize the relationships between Quality of Experience (QoE) and network latency. The results showed that up to 83% less bandwidth is required to deliver high QoE levels to the users, as compared to conventional solutions.

  14. A Study on Design-Oriented Demands of VR via ZMET-QFD Model for Industrial Design Education and Students' Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yo-Wen; Lee, An-Sheng; Liu, Shuo-Fang

    2016-01-01

    The difficulty of Virtual Reality application in industrial design education and learning is VR engineers cannot comprehend what the important functions or elements are for students. In addition, a general-purpose VR usually confuses the students and provides neither good manipulation means nor useful toolkits. To solve these problems, the…

  15. Effect of a Home-Based Virtual Reality Intervention for Children with Cerebral Palsy Using Super Pop VR Evaluation Metrics: A Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuping Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine whether Super Pop VR, a low-cost virtual reality (VR system, was a feasible system for documenting improvement in children with cerebral palsy (CP and whether a home-based VR intervention was effective. Methods. Three children with CP participated in this study and received an 8-week VR intervention (30 minutes × 5 sessions/week using the commercial EyeToy Play VR system. Reaching kinematics measured by Super Pop VR and two fine motor tools (Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency second edition, BOT-2, and Pediatric Motor Activity Log, PMAL were tested before, mid, and after intervention. Results. All children successfully completed the evaluations using the Super Pop VR system at home where 85% of the reaches collected were used to compute reaching kinematics, which is compatible with literature using expensive motion analysis systems. Only the child with hemiplegic CP and more impaired arm function improved the reaching kinematics and functional use of the affected hand after intervention. Conclusion. Super Pop VR proved to be a feasible evaluation tool in children with CP.

  16. Pilot Study of the Effects of Supraliminal Bipolar Primes on Occupational Educators' Viewing Time and Perceived Confidence with Desktop Virtual Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M. Scott

    2008-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) has been demonstrated to offer learning benefits over traditional instructional methods in many technical and occupational areas. However, in the framework of Rogers' innovation diffusion theory, adoption of VR in Career and Technical Education and occupational programs appears to be lagging. This study used experimental…

  17. Augmented van der Waals Equations of State: SAFT-VR versus Yukawa Based van der Waals Equation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nezbeda, Ivo; Melnyk, R.; Trokhymchuk, A.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 309, č. 2 (2011), s. 174-178 ISSN 0378-3812 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400720710 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : perturbation theory * SAFT-VR * augmented van der Waals Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.139, year: 2011

  18. Real Virtuality: A Code of Ethical ConductRecommendations for Good Scientific Practice and the Consumers of VR-Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eMadary

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to present a first list of ethical concerns that may arise from research and personal use of virtual reality (VR and related technology, and to offer concrete recommendations for minimizing those risks. Many of the recommendations call for focused research initiatives. In the first part of the article, we discuss the relevant evidence from psychology that motivates our concerns. In section 1.1, we cover some of the main results suggesting that one’s environment can influence one’s psychological states, as well as recent work on inducing illusions of embodiment. Then, in section 1.2, we go on to discuss recent evidence indicating that immersion in VR can have psychological effects that last after leaving the virtual environment. In the second part of the article we turn to the risks and recommendations. We begin, in section 2.1, with the research ethics of VR, covering six main topics: the limits of experimental environments, informed consent, clinical risks, dual-use, online research, and a general point about the limitations of a code of conduct for research. Then, in section 2.2, we turn to the risks of VR for the general public, covering four main topics: long-term immersion, neglect of the social and physical environment, risky content, and privacy. We offer concrete recommendations for each of these ten topics, summarized in Table 1.

  19. How is VR used to support training in industry? The INTUITION network of excellence working group on education and training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cobb, S.C.; Richir, S.; D'Cruz, M.; Klinger, E.; Day, A.; David, P.; Gardeux, F.; van den Broek, Egon; van der Voort, Mascha C.; Meijer, F.; Izkara, J.L.; Mavrikios, D.

    2008-01-01

    INTUITION is the European Network of Excellence on virtual reality and virtual environments applications for future workspaces. The purpose of the network is to gather expertise from partner members and determine the future research agenda for the development and use of virtual reality (VR)

  20. Feasibility of a pre-implantation fitting test for an implantable hearing aid using a VR (virtual reality) software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dammann, F.; Bode, A.; Heuschmid, M.; Schwaderer, E.; Schaich, M.; Seemann, M.; Claussen, C.D.; Maassen, M.; Zenner, H.P.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To prove the feasibility of a preoperative fitting test for an implantable hearing aid using a VR environment. Methods: A high-resolution spiral CT was performed after mastoidectomy in 10 temporal bone specimens. The bony structures were segmented and merged with the computer-aided design (CAD) data of the hearing aid in a VR environment. For each specimen a three-dimensional fitting test was carried out by three examiners determining the implantability of the hearing aid. The implantation simulation was compared with the real implantation procedure performed by an experienced ENT surgeon. Results: The used VR system enabled real-time 3D-visualisation and manipulation of CT- and CAD-data. All objects could be independently moved in all three dimensions. The VR fitting test corresponded closely with the real implantation. The implantability of the hearing aid was properly predicted by all three examiners. Conclusion: Merging CT and CAD data in a virtual reality environment bears high potential for the presurgical determination of the fit and mountability of medical implants in complex anatomical regions. (orig.) [de

  1. Coding patient emotional cues and concerns in medical consultations: the Verona coding definitions of emotional sequences (VR-CoDES).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, C.; Piccolo, L. del; Bensing, J.; Bergvik, S.; Haes, H. de; Eide, H.; Fletcher, I.; Goss, C.; Heaven, C.; Humphris, G.; Young-Mi, K.; Langewitz, W.; Meeuwesen, L.; Nuebling, M.; Rimondini, M.; Salmon, P.; Dulmen, S. van; Wissow, L.; Zandbelt, L.; Finset, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To present the Verona Coding Definitions of Emotional Sequences (VR-CoDES CC), a consensus based system for coding patient expressions of emotional distress in medical consultations, defined as Cues or Concerns. Methods: The system was developed by an international group of communication

  2. A National Research Agenda for Virtual Reality: Report by the National Research Council Committee on VR R&D

    OpenAIRE

    Pausch, Randy; Aviles, Walter; Durlach, Nathaniel; Robinett, Warren; Zyda, Michael

    1995-01-01

    In 1992, at the request of a consortium of federal agencies, the National Research Council established a committee to "recommand a national research and development agenda in the area of virtual reality" to set U.S. government R&D funding priorities for virtual reality (VR) for the next decade....

  3. Transfer validity of laparoscopic knot-tying training on a VR simulator to a realistic environment : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdaasdonk, E.G.G.; Dankelman, J.; Lange, J.F.; Stassen, L.P.S.

    2007-01-01

    Background- Laparoscopic suturing is one of the most difficult tasks in endoscopic surgery, requiring extensive training. The aim of this study was to determine the transfer validity of knot-tying training on a virtual-reality (VR) simulator to a realistic laparoscopic environment. Methods- Twenty

  4. Development of a VR training system of robotic peroral operation procedure for endoscopic surgery of digestive tracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Naoki; Hattori, Asaki; Tanoue, Kazuo; Ieiri, Satoshi; Konishi, Kozo; Tomikawa, Morimasa; Kenmotsu, Hajime; Hashizume, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    This report presents the development of a VR (virtual real) training system of robotic peroral operation procedure for endoscopic resection of gastric mucosa as the training is essential because the procedure differs from usual one hitherto. For VR operation space, used is reporters' sphere-filled organ model (SFM), which is deformed by and repels to, the outside force as a soft tissue rapidly in the real time. The deformation and repellence are computable. The SFM space is reconstructed to 3D of the inner environment of stomach using MRI data. The endoscope has, at the right and left side of its top, 2 arms of inner needle knife-equipped robotic forceps and is inserted perorally for operation. In VR, the forceps can grab the gastric mucosa, cut it with the knife to complete resection and carry the specimen out of the body. For the procedure training, the time required for hemostasis, bleeding volume, trace of the arms, intensity and direction of the outer force given are recorded, with which trainee's safety and degree of skill are evaluable in VR. Hydration step and clipping to close the wound are to be further added in the procedure. (T.T.)

  5. Face and Construct Validity of the SimSurgery SEP VR Simulator for Salpingectomy in Case of Ectopic Pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessel, M.; Buzink, S.N.; Schoot, B.C.; Jakimowicz, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To secure patient safety, skills needed for laparoscopy are preferably obtained in a non-patient setting. Therefore, we assessed face and construct validity of performance of a salpingectomy in case of ectopic pregnancy on the SimSurgery SEP VR simulator. Materials and Methods: Fifteen

  6. The effects of slice thickness and reconstructive parameters on VR image quality in multi-slice CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Zhenlong; Wang Qiang; Liu Caixia

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of slice thickness, reconstructive thickness and reconstructive interval on VR image quality in multi-slice CT, in order to select the best slice thickness and reconstructive parameters for the imaging. Methods: Multi-slice CT scan was applied on a rubber dinosaur model with different slice thickness. VR images were reconstructed with different reconstructive thickness and reconstructive interval. Five radiologists were invited to evaluate the quality of the images without knowing anything about the parameters. Results: The slice thickness, reconstructive thickness and reconstructive interval did have effects on VR image quality and the effective degree was different. The effective coefficients were V 1 =1413.033, V 2 =563.733, V 3 =390.533, respectively. The parameters interacted with the others (P<0.05). The smaller of those parameters, the better of the image quality. With a small slice thickness and a reconstructive slice equal to slice thickness, the image quality had no obvious difference when the reconstructive interval was 1/2, 1/3, 1/4 of the slice thickness. Conclusion: A relative small scan slice thickness, a reconstructive slice equal to slice thickness and a reconstructive interval 1/2 of the slice thickness should be selected for the best VR image quality. The image quality depends mostly on the slice thickness. (authors)

  7. The Relationship of ST Segment Changes in Lead aVR with Outcomes after Myocardial Infarction; a Cross Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Beyranvand

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Among the 12 leads studied in electrocardiography (ECG, lead aVR can be considered as the most forgotten part of it since no attention is paid to it as the mirror image of other leads. Therefore, the present study has been designed with the aim of evaluating the prevalence of ST segment changes in lead aVR and its relationship with the outcome of these patients.Methods: In this retrospective cross sectional study medical profiles of patients who had presented to emergency department with the final diagnosis of myocardial infarction (MI in a 4-year period were evaluated regarding changes of ST segment in lead aVR and its relationship with in-hospital mortality, the number of vessels involved, infarct location and cardiac ejection fraction.Results: 288 patients with the mean age of 59.00 ± 13.14 (18 – 91 were evaluated (79.2% male. 168 (58.3% patients had the mentioned changes (79.2% male. There was no significant relationship between presence of ST changes in lead aVR with infarct location (p = 0.976, number of vessels involved (p = 0.269 and ejection fraction on admission (p = 0.801. However, ST elevation ≥ 1 mv in lead aVR had a significant relationship with mortality (Odds = 7.72, 95% CI: 3.07 – 19.42, p < 0.001. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and positive and negative likelihood ratios of ST elevation ≥ 1 for prediction of in-hospital mortality were 41.66 (95% CI: 22.79 – 63.05, 91.53 (95% CI: 87.29 – 94.50, 31.25 (95% CI: 16.74 – 50.13, 94.44 (95% CI: 90.65 – 96.81, 0.45 (95% CI: 0.25 – 0.79, and 0.05 (95% CI: 0.03 – 0.09, respectively.Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, the prevalence of ST segment changes in lead aVR was estimated to be 58.3%. There was no significant relationship between these changes and the number of vessels involved in angiography, infarct location and cardiac ejection fraction. However, presence of ST elevation ≥ 1 in lead aVR

  8. Identifying Opportunities for Virtual Reality Simulation in Surgical Education: A Review of the Proceedings from the Innovation, Design, and Emerging Alliances in Surgery (IDEAS) Conference: VR Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olasky, Jaisa; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh; Seymour, Neal E.; Magee, J. Harvey; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Lin, Ming C.; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Brunt, L. Michael; Schwaitzberg, Steven D.; Cao, Caroline G. L.; De, Suvranu; Jones, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To conduct a review of the state of virtual reality (VR) simulation technology, to identify areas of surgical education that have the greatest potential to benefit from it, and to identify challenges to implementation. Background Data Simulation is an increasingly important part of surgical training. VR is a developing platform for using simulation to teach technical skills, behavioral skills, and entire procedures to trainees and practicing surgeons worldwide. Questions exist regarding the science behind the technology and most effective usage of VR simulation. A symposium was held to address these issues. Methods Engineers, educators, and surgeons held a conference in November 2013 both to review the background science behind simulation technology and to create guidelines for its use in teaching and credentialing trainees and surgeons in practice. Results Several technologic challenges were identified that must be overcome in order for VR simulation to be useful in surgery. Specific areas of student, resident, and practicing surgeon training and testing that would likely benefit from VR were identified: technical skills, team training and decision-making skills, and patient safety, such as in use of electrosurgical equipment. Conclusions VR simulation has the potential to become an essential piece of surgical education curriculum but depends heavily on the establishment of an agreed upon set of goals. Researchers and clinicians must collaborate to allocate funding toward projects that help achieve these goals. The recommendations outlined here should guide further study and implementation of VR simulation. PMID:25925424

  9. Identifying Opportunities for Virtual Reality Simulation in Surgical Education: A Review of the Proceedings from the Innovation, Design, and Emerging Alliances in Surgery (IDEAS) Conference: VR Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olasky, Jaisa; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh; Seymour, Neal E; Magee, J Harvey; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Lin, Ming C; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Brunt, L Michael; Schwaitzberg, Steven D; Cao, Caroline G L; De, Suvranu; Jones, Daniel B

    2015-10-01

    To conduct a review of the state of virtual reality (VR) simulation technology, to identify areas of surgical education that have the greatest potential to benefit from it, and to identify challenges to implementation. Simulation is an increasingly important part of surgical training. VR is a developing platform for using simulation to teach technical skills, behavioral skills, and entire procedures to trainees and practicing surgeons worldwide. Questions exist regarding the science behind the technology and most effective usage of VR simulation. A symposium was held to address these issues. Engineers, educators, and surgeons held a conference in November 2013 both to review the background science behind simulation technology and to create guidelines for its use in teaching and credentialing trainees and surgeons in practice. Several technologic challenges were identified that must be overcome in order for VR simulation to be useful in surgery. Specific areas of student, resident, and practicing surgeon training and testing that would likely benefit from VR were identified: technical skills, team training and decision-making skills, and patient safety, such as in use of electrosurgical equipment. VR simulation has the potential to become an essential piece of surgical education curriculum but depends heavily on the establishment of an agreed upon set of goals. Researchers and clinicians must collaborate to allocate funding toward projects that help achieve these goals. The recommendations outlined here should guide further study and implementation of VR simulation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Integration of the HTC Vive into the medical platform MeVisLab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, Jan; Gall, Markus; Wallner, Jürgen; de Almeida Germano Boechat, Pedro; Hann, Alexander; Li, Xing; Chen, Xiaojun; Schmalstieg, Dieter

    2017-03-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) is an immersive technology that replicates an environment via computer-simulated reality. VR gets a lot of attention in computer games but has also great potential in other areas, like the medical domain. Examples are planning, simulations and training of medical interventions, like for facial surgeries where an aesthetic outcome is important. However, importing medical data into VR devices is not trivial, especially when a direct connection and visualization from your own application is needed. Furthermore, most researcher don't build their medical applications from scratch, rather they use platforms, like MeVisLab, Slicer or MITK. The platforms have in common that they integrate and build upon on libraries like ITK and VTK, further providing a more convenient graphical interface to them for the user. In this contribution, we demonstrate the usage of a VR device for medical data under MeVisLab. Therefore, we integrated the OpenVR library into MeVisLab as an own module. This enables the direct and uncomplicated usage of head mounted displays, like the HTC Vive under MeVisLab. Summarized, medical data from other MeVisLab modules can directly be connected per drag-and-drop to our VR module and will be rendered inside the HTC Vive for an immersive inspection.

  11. Evaluation of usefulness and availability for orthopedic surgery using clavicle fracture model manufactured by desktop 3D printer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Wang Kyun

    2014-01-01

    Usefulness and clinical availability for surgery efficiency were evaluated by conducting pre-operative planning with a model manufactured by desktop 3D printer by using clavicle CT image. The patient-customized clavicle fracture model was manufactured by desktop 3D printer of FDM wire laminated processing method by converting the CT image into STL file in Open Source DICOM Viewer Osirix. Also, the model of the original shape before damaged was restored and manufactured by Mirror technique based on STL file of not fractured clavicle of the other side by using the symmetry feature of the human body. For the model, the position and size, degree of the fracture was equally printed out. Using the clavicle model directly manufactured with low cost and less time in Department of Radiology is considered to be useful because it can reduce secondary damage during surgery and increase surgery efficiency with Minimal invasive percutaneous plate osteosynthesis(MIPO)

  12. Evaluation of usefulness and availability for orthopedic surgery using clavicle fracture model manufactured by desktop 3D printer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Wang Kyun [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Cheongju Medical Center, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Usefulness and clinical availability for surgery efficiency were evaluated by conducting pre-operative planning with a model manufactured by desktop 3D printer by using clavicle CT image. The patient-customized clavicle fracture model was manufactured by desktop 3D printer of FDM wire laminated processing method by converting the CT image into STL file in Open Source DICOM Viewer Osirix. Also, the model of the original shape before damaged was restored and manufactured by Mirror technique based on STL file of not fractured clavicle of the other side by using the symmetry feature of the human body. For the model, the position and size, degree of the fracture was equally printed out. Using the clavicle model directly manufactured with low cost and less time in Department of Radiology is considered to be useful because it can reduce secondary damage during surgery and increase surgery efficiency with Minimal invasive percutaneous plate osteosynthesis(MIPO)

  13. Deep Unsupervised Learning on a Desktop PC: A Primer for Cognitive Scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testolin, Alberto; Stoianov, Ivilin; De Filippo De Grazia, Michele; Zorzi, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Deep belief networks hold great promise for the simulation of human cognition because they show how structured and abstract representations may emerge from probabilistic unsupervised learning. These networks build a hierarchy of progressively more complex distributed representations of the sensory data by fitting a hierarchical generative model. However, learning in deep networks typically requires big datasets and it can involve millions of connection weights, which implies that simulations on standard computers are unfeasible. Developing realistic, medium-to-large-scale learning models of cognition would therefore seem to require expertise in programing parallel-computing hardware, and this might explain why the use of this promising approach is still largely confined to the machine learning community. Here we show how simulations of deep unsupervised learning can be easily performed on a desktop PC by exploiting the processors of low cost graphic cards (graphic processor units) without any specific programing effort, thanks to the use of high-level programming routines (available in MATLAB or Python). We also show that even an entry-level graphic card can outperform a small high-performance computing cluster in terms of learning time and with no loss of learning quality. We therefore conclude that graphic card implementations pave the way for a widespread use of deep learning among cognitive scientists for modeling cognition and behavior.

  14. Deep unsupervised learning on a desktop PC: A primer for cognitive scientists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto eTestolin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Deep belief networks hold great promise for the simulation of human cognition because they show how structured and abstract representations may emerge from probabilistic unsupervised learning. These networks build a hierarchy of progressively more complex distributed representations of the sensory data by fitting a hierarchical generative model. However, learning in deep networks typically requires big datasets and it can involve millions of connection weights, which implies that simulations on standard computers are unfeasible. Developing realistic, medium-to-large-scale learning models of cognition would therefore seem to require expertise in programming parallel-computing hardware, and this might explain why the use of this promising approach is still largely confined to the machine learning community. Here we show how simulations of deep unsupervised learning can be easily performed on a desktop PC by exploiting the processors of low-cost graphic cards (GPUs without any specific programming effort, thanks to the use of high-level programming routines (available in MATLAB or Python. We also show that even an entry-level graphic card can outperform a small high-performance computing cluster in terms of learning time and with no loss of learning quality. We therefore conclude that graphic card implementations pave the way for a widespread use of deep learning among cognitive scientists for modeling cognition and behavior.

  15. Differences in typing forces, muscle activity, comfort, and typing performance among virtual, notebook, and desktop keyboards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Ho; Aulck, Lovenoor; Bartha, Michael C; Harper, Christy A; Johnson, Peter W

    2014-11-01

    The present study investigated whether there were physical exposure and typing productivity differences between a virtual keyboard with no tactile feedback and two conventional keyboards where key travel and tactile feedback are provided by mechanical switches under the keys. The key size and layout were same across all the keyboards. Typing forces; finger and shoulder muscle activity; self-reported comfort; and typing productivity were measured from 19 subjects while typing on a virtual (0 mm key travel), notebook (1.8 mm key travel), and desktop keyboard (4 mm key travel). When typing on the virtual keyboard, subjects typed with less force (p's typing forces and finger muscle activity came at the expense of a 60% reduction in typing productivity (p typing sessions or when typing productivity is at a premium, conventional keyboards with tactile feedback may be more suitable interface. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Development and deployment of a Desktop and Mobile application on grid for GPS studie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntumba, Patient; Lotoy, Vianney; Djungu, Saint Jean; Fleury, Rolland; Petitdidier, Monique; Gemünd, André; Schwichtenberg, Horst

    2013-04-01

    GPS networks for scientific studies are developed all other the world and large databases, regularly updated, like IGS are also available. Many GPS have been installed in West and Central Africa during AMMA (African Monsoon Multiplidisciplinary Analysis), IHY (International heliophysical Year)and many other projects since 2005. African scientists have been educated to use those data especially for meteorological and ionospheric studies. The annual variations of ionospheric parameters for a given station or map of a given region are very intensive computing. Then grid or cloud computing may be a solution to obtain results in a relatively short time. Real time At the University of Kinshasa the chosen solution is a grid of several PCs. It has been deployed by using Globus Toolkit on a Condor pool in order to support the processing of GPS data for ionospheric studies. To be user-friendly, graphical user interfaces(GUI) have been developed to help the user to prepare and submit jobs. One is a java GUI for desktop client, the other is an Android GUI for mobile client. The interest of a grid is the possibility to send a bunch of jobs with an adequate agent control in order to survey the job execution and result storage. After the feasibility study the grid will be extended to a larger number of PCs. Other solutions will be in parallel explored.

  17. Deep Unsupervised Learning on a Desktop PC: A Primer for Cognitive Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testolin, Alberto; Stoianov, Ivilin; De Filippo De Grazia, Michele; Zorzi, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Deep belief networks hold great promise for the simulation of human cognition because they show how structured and abstract representations may emerge from probabilistic unsupervised learning. These networks build a hierarchy of progressively more complex distributed representations of the sensory data by fitting a hierarchical generative model. However, learning in deep networks typically requires big datasets and it can involve millions of connection weights, which implies that simulations on standard computers are unfeasible. Developing realistic, medium-to-large-scale learning models of cognition would therefore seem to require expertise in programing parallel-computing hardware, and this might explain why the use of this promising approach is still largely confined to the machine learning community. Here we show how simulations of deep unsupervised learning can be easily performed on a desktop PC by exploiting the processors of low cost graphic cards (graphic processor units) without any specific programing effort, thanks to the use of high-level programming routines (available in MATLAB or Python). We also show that even an entry-level graphic card can outperform a small high-performance computing cluster in terms of learning time and with no loss of learning quality. We therefore conclude that graphic card implementations pave the way for a widespread use of deep learning among cognitive scientists for modeling cognition and behavior. PMID:23653617

  18. A Unified Algorithm for Virtual Desktops Placement in Distributed Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangtao Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Distributed cloud has been widely adopted to support service requests from dispersed regions, especially for large enterprise which requests virtual desktops for multiple geodistributed branch companies. The cloud service provider (CSP aims to deliver satisfactory services at the least cost. CSP selects proper data centers (DCs closer to the branch companies so as to shorten the response time to user request. At the same time, it also strives to cut cost considering both DC level and server level. At DC level, the expensive long distance inter-DC bandwidth consumption should be reduced and lower electricity price is sought. Inside each tree-like DC, servers are trying to be used as little as possible so as to save equipment cost and power. In nature, there is a noncooperative relation between the DC level and server level in the selection. To attain these objectives and capture the noncooperative relation, multiobjective bilevel programming is used to formulate the problem. Then a unified genetic algorithm is proposed to solve the problem which realizes the selection of DC and server simultaneously. The extensive simulation shows that the proposed algorithm outperforms baseline algorithm in both quality of service guaranteeing and cost saving.

  19. Interactive desktop analysis of high resolution simulations: application to turbulent plume dynamics and current sheet formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clyne, John; Mininni, Pablo; Norton, Alan; Rast, Mark

    2007-01-01

    The ever increasing processing capabilities of the supercomputers available to computational scientists today, combined with the need for higher and higher resolution computational grids, has resulted in deluges of simulation data. Yet the computational resources and tools required to make sense of these vast numerical outputs through subsequent analysis are often far from adequate, making such analysis of the data a painstaking, if not a hopeless, task. In this paper, we describe a new tool for the scientific investigation of massive computational datasets. This tool (VAPOR) employs data reduction, advanced visualization, and quantitative analysis operations to permit the interactive exploration of vast datasets using only a desktop PC equipped with a commodity graphics card. We describe VAPORs use in the study of two problems. The first, motivated by stellar envelope convection, investigates the hydrodynamic stability of compressible thermal starting plumes as they descend through a stratified layer of increasing density with depth. The second looks at current sheet formation in an incompressible helical magnetohydrodynamic flow to understand the early spontaneous development of quasi two-dimensional (2D) structures embedded within the 3D solution. Both of the problems were studied at sufficiently high spatial resolution, a grid of 504 2 by 2048 points for the first and 1536 3 points for the second, to overwhelm the interactive capabilities of typically available analysis resources

  20. CLOUD-BASED VS DESKTOP-BASED PROPERTY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS IN HOTEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa\tGULMEZ

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Even though keeping up with the modern developments in IT sector is crucial for the success and competitiveness of a hotel, it is usually very hard for new technologies to be accepted and implemented. This is the case with the cloud technology for which the opinions between hoteliers are divided on those who think that it is just another fashion trend, unnecessary to be taken into consideration and those that believe that it helps in performing daily operations more easily, leaving space for more interaction with guests both in virtual and real world. Usage of cloud technology in hotels is still in its beginning phase and hoteliers still have to learn more about its advantages and adequate usage for the benefit of overall hotel operating. On the example of hotel property management system (PMS and comparison between features of its older desktop-version and new web-based programs, this research aims at finding out at which stage and how effective is usage of cloud technology in hotels. For this, qualitative research with semi-structured interviews with hotel mangers that use one of these programs was conducted. Reasons for usage and advantages of each version are discussed.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of electrothermal atomization on a desktop personal computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Histen, Timothy E.; Güell, Oscar A.; Chavez, Iris A.; Holcombea, James A.

    1996-07-01

    Monte Carlo simulations have been applied to electrothermal atomization (ETA) using a tubular atomizer (e.g. graphite furnace) because of the complexity in the geometry, heating, molecular interactions, etc. The intense computational time needed to accurately model ETA often limited its effective implementation to the use of supercomputers. However, with the advent of more powerful desktop processors, this is no longer the case. A C-based program has been developed and can be used under Windows TM or DOS. With this program, basic parameters such as furnace dimensions, sample placement, furnace heating and kinetic parameters such as activation energies for desorption and adsorption can be varied to show the absorbance profile dependence on these parameters. Even data such as time-dependent spatial distribution of analyte inside the furnace can be collected. The DOS version also permits input of external temperaturetime data to permit comparison of simulated profiles with experimentally obtained absorbance data. The run-time versions are provided along with the source code. This article is an electronic publication in Spectrochimica Acta Electronica (SAE), the electronic section of Spectrochimica Acta Part B (SAB). The hardcopy text is accompanied by a diskette with a program (PC format), data files and text files.

  2. Low Cost Desktop Image Analysis Workstation With Enhanced Interactive User Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratib, Osman M.; Huang, H. K.

    1989-05-01

    A multimodality picture archiving and communication system (PACS) is in routine clinical use in the UCLA Radiology Department. Several types workstations are currently implemented for this PACS. Among them, the Apple Macintosh II personal computer was recently chosen to serve as a desktop workstation for display and analysis of radiological images. This personal computer was selected mainly because of its extremely friendly user-interface, its popularity among the academic and medical community and its low cost. In comparison to other microcomputer-based systems the Macintosh II offers the following advantages: the extreme standardization of its user interface, file system and networking, and the availability of a very large variety of commercial software packages. In the current configuration the Macintosh II operates as a stand-alone workstation where images are imported from a centralized PACS server through an Ethernet network using a standard TCP-IP protocol, and stored locally on magnetic disk. The use of high resolution screens (1024x768 pixels x 8bits) offer sufficient performance for image display and analysis. We focused our project on the design and implementation of a variety of image analysis algorithms ranging from automated structure and edge detection to sophisticated dynamic analysis of sequential images. Specific analysis programs were developed for ultrasound images, digitized angiograms, MRI and CT tomographic images and scintigraphic images.

  3. Immersive realities: articulating the shift from VR to mobile AR through artistic practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Todd; Cornish, Tracy; Berry, Rodney; DeFanti, Thomas A.

    2012-03-01

    Our contemporary imaginings of technological engagement with digital environments has transitioned from flying through Virtual Reality to mobile interactions with the physical world through personal media devices. Experiences technologically mediated through social interactivity within physical environments are now being preferenced over isolated environments such as CAVEs or HMDs. Examples of this trend can be seen in early tele-collaborative artworks which strove to use advanced networking to join multiple participants in shared virtual environments. Recent developments in mobile AR allow untethered access to such shared realities in places far removed from labs and home entertainment environments, and without the bulky and expensive technologies attached to our bodies that accompany most VR. This paper addresses the emerging trend favoring socially immersive artworks via mobile Augmented Reality rather than sensorially immersive Virtual Reality installations. With particular focus on AR as a mobile, locative technology, we will discuss how concepts of immersion and interactivity are evolving with this new medium. Immersion in context of mobile AR can be redefined to describe socially interactive experiences. Having distinctly different sensory, spatial and situational properties, mobile AR offers a new form for remixing elements from traditional virtual reality with physically based social experiences. This type of immersion offers a wide array of potential for mobile AR art forms. We are beginning to see examples of how artists can use mobile AR to create social immersive and interactive experiences.

  4. Assessment of executive functions in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder by NeuroVR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Paglia, Filippo; La Cascia, Caterina; Rizzo, Rosalinda; Riva, Giuseppe; La Barbera, Daniele

    2012-01-01

    Executive functions are often impaired in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). We used a Virtual Reality version of the Multiple Errand Test (VMET) - developed dusing the free NeuroVR software (http://www.neurovr.org) - to evaluate the executive functions in daily life in 10 OCD patients and 10 controls. It is performed in a shopping setting where there are items to be bought and information to be obtained. The execution time for the whole task was higher in patients with OCD compared to controls, suggesting that patients with OCD need more time in planning than controls. The same difference was found in the partial errors during the task. Furthermore, the mean rank for and for interpretation failures is higher for controls, while the values of divided attention and the of self correction seems to be lower in controls. We think that obsessive patients tend to work with greater diligence and observance of rules than controls. In conclusion, these results provide initial support for the feasibility of VMET as assessment tool of executive functions. Specifically, the significant correlation found between the VMET and the neuropsychological battery support the ecological validity of VMET as an instrument for the evaluation of executive functions in patients with OCD.

  5. The Art Gallery Test: A Preliminary Comparison between Traditional Neuropsychological and Ecological VR-Based Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Gamito

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Ecological validity should be the cornerstone of any assessment of cognitive functioning. For this purpose, we have developed a preliminary study to test the Art Gallery Test (AGT as an alternative to traditional neuropsychological testing. The AGT involves three visual search subtests displayed in a virtual reality (VR art gallery, designed to assess visual attention within an ecologically valid setting. To evaluate the relation between AGT and standard neuropsychological assessment scales, data were collected on a normative sample of healthy adults (n = 30. The measures consisted of concurrent paper-and-pencil neuropsychological measures [Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA, Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB, and Color Trails Test (CTT] along with the outcomes from the three subtests of the AGT. The results showed significant correlations between the AGT subtests describing different visual search exercises strategies with global and specific cognitive measures. Comparative visual search was associated with attention and cognitive flexibility (CTT; whereas visual searches involving pictograms correlated with global cognitive function (MoCA.

  6. Suppression of dynamic stall with a leading-edge slat on a VR-7 airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcalister, K. W.; Tung, C.

    1993-01-01

    The VR-7 airfoil was experimentally studied with and without a leading-edge slat at fixed angles of attack from 0 deg to 30 deg at Re = 200,000 and for unsteady pitching motions described by alpha equals alpha(sub m) + 10 deg(sin(wt)). The models were two dimensional, and the test was performed in a water tunnel at Ames Research Center. The unsteady conditions ranged over Re equals 100,000 to 250,000, k equals 0.001 to 0.2, and alpha(sub m) = 10 deg to 20 deg. Unsteady lift, drag, and pitching-moment measurements were obtained along with fluorescent-dye flow visualizations. The addition of the slat was found to delay the static-drag and static-moment stall by about 5 degrees and to eliminate completely the development of a dynamic-stall vortex during unsteady motions that reached angles as high as 25 degrees. In all of the unsteady cases studied, the slat caused a significant reduction in the force and moment hysteresis amplitudes. The reduced frequency was found to have the greatest effect on the results, whereas the Reynolds number had little effect on the behavior of either the basic or the slatted airfoil. The slat caused a slight drag penalty at low angles of attack, but generally increased the lift/drag ratio when averaged over the full cycle of oscillation.

  7. New digital control and power protection system of VR 1 training reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kropik, M.; Matejka, K.; Juoeickova, M.

    2005-01-01

    The contribution describes the new VR-1 training reactor control and power protection system at the Czech Technical University in Prague. The control system provides safety and control functions, calculates average values of the important variables and sends data and system status to the human-machine interface. The upgraded control system is based on a high quality industrial PC. The operating system of the PC is the Microsoft Windows XP with the real time support RTX of the VentureCom Company. The software was developed according to requirements in MS Visual C. The independent power protection system is a component of the reactor safety (protection) system with high quality and reliability requirements. The digital system is redundant; each channel evaluates the reactor power and the velocity of power changes and provides safety functions. The digital part of the channel is multiprocessor-based. The software was developed with respect to nuclear standards. The software design was coded in the C language regarding the NRC restrictions. Configuration management, verification and validation accompanied the software development. Both systems were thoroughly tested. Firstly, the non active tests were carried out. During these tests, the active core of the reactor was subcritical; the input signals were generated from HPIB and VXI controlled instruments to simulate different operational and safety events. The software for instruments control and tests evaluation utilized Agilent VEE development system. After the successful non active checking, the active tests followed. (author)

  8. The determination of neutron energy spectrum in reactor core C1 of reactor VR-1 Sparrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vins, M. [Department of Nuclear Reactors, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)], E-mail: vinsmiro@seznam.cz

    2008-07-15

    This contribution overviews neutron spectrum measurement, which was done on training reactor VR-1 Sparrow with a new nuclear fuel. Former nuclear fuel IRT-3M was changed for current nuclear fuel IRT-4M with lower enrichment of 235U (enrichment was reduced from former 36% to 20%) in terms of Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program. Neutron spectrum measurement was obtained by irradiation of activation foils at the end of pipe of rabit system and consecutive deconvolution of obtained saturated activities. Deconvolution was performed by computer iterative code SAND-II with 620 groups' structure. All gamma measurements were performed on Canberra HPGe. Activation foils were chosen according physical and nuclear parameters from the set of certificated foils. The Resulting differential flux at the end of pipe of rabit system agreed well with typical spectrum of light water reactor. Measurement of neutron spectrum has brought better knowledge about new reactor core C1 and improved methodology of activation measurement. (author)

  9. Does It Matter Whether One Takes a Test on an iPad or a Desktop Computer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Guangming

    2016-01-01

    To investigate possible iPad related mode effect, we tested 403 8th graders in Indiana, Maryland, and New Jersey under three mode conditions through random assignment: a desktop computer, an iPad alone, and an iPad with an external keyboard. All students had used an iPad or computer for six months or longer. The 2-hour test included reading, math,…

  10. Do small fish mean no voucher? Using a flatbed desktop scanner to document larval and small specimens before destructive analyses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalous, L.; Šlechtová, Věra; Petrtýl, M.; Kohout, Jan; Čech, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 4 (2010), s. 614-617 ISSN 0175-8659 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/06/1371; GA ČR GP206/09/P266 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Keywords : small fish * voucher * desktop scanner Subject RIV: GL - Fishing Impact factor: 0.945, year: 2010

  11. Implementation Issues of Virtual Desktop Infrastructure and Its Case Study for a Physician's Round at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Sooyoung; Kim, Seok; Kim, Taegi; Kim, Jon Soo; Baek, Rong-Min; Suh, Chang Suk; Chung, Chin Youb; Hwang, Hee

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The cloud computing-based virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) allows access to computing environments with no limitations in terms of time or place such that it can permit the rapid establishment of a mobile hospital environment. The objective of this study was to investigate the empirical issues to be considered when establishing a virtual mobile environment using VDI technology in a hospital setting and to examine the utility of the technology with an Apple iPad during a physici...

  12. GUIdock-VNC: using a graphical desktop sharing system to provide a browser-based interface for containerized software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Varun; Hung, Ling-Hong; Keswani, Jayant; Kristiyanto, Daniel; Lee, Sung Bong; Yeung, Ka Yee

    2017-04-01

    Software container technology such as Docker can be used to package and distribute bioinformatics workflows consisting of multiple software implementations and dependencies. However, Docker is a command line-based tool, and many bioinformatics pipelines consist of components that require a graphical user interface. We present a container tool called GUIdock-VNC that uses a graphical desktop sharing system to provide a browser-based interface for containerized software. GUIdock-VNC uses the Virtual Network Computing protocol to render the graphics within most commonly used browsers. We also present a minimal image builder that can add our proposed graphical desktop sharing system to any Docker packages, with the end result that any Docker packages can be run using a graphical desktop within a browser. In addition, GUIdock-VNC uses the Oauth2 authentication protocols when deployed on the cloud. As a proof-of-concept, we demonstrated the utility of GUIdock-noVNC in gene network inference. We benchmarked our container implementation on various operating systems and showed that our solution creates minimal overhead. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. Indiana Humanities Council Request for the Indianapolis Energy Conversion Inst. For Phase I of the Indianapolis Energy Conservation Res Initiative also called the smartDESKTOP Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, John B.

    2007-12-06

    The smartDESKTOP Initiative at the Indiana Humanities Council received critical support in building and delivering a digital desktop for Indiana educators through the Department of Energy Grant DE-FG02-06ER64282. During the project period September 2006 through October of 2007, the number of Indiana educators with accounts on the smartDESKTOP more than tripled from under 2,000 to more than 7,000 accounts. An external review of the project conducted for the purposes of understanding the impact of the service in Indiana schools revealed that the majority of respondents felt that using the smartDESKTOP did reduce the time they spent managing paper. The same study revealed the challenges of implementing a digital desktop meant to help teachers leverage technology to improve their teaching and ultimately student learning. The most significant outcome of this project is that the Indiana Department of Education expressed interest in assuming responsibility for sustaining this project. The transition of the smartDESKTOP to the Indiana Department of Education was effective on November 1, 2007.

  14. System dynamics applied to closed loop supply chains of desktops and laptops in Brazil: A perspective for social inclusion of waste pickers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghisolfi, Verônica; Diniz Chaves, Gisele de Lorena; Ribeiro Siman, Renato; Xavier, Lúcia Helena

    2017-02-01

    The structure of reverse logistics for waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) is essential to minimize the impacts of their improper disposal. In this context, the Brazilian Solid Waste Policy (BSWP) was a regulatory milestone in Brazil, submitting WEEE to the mandatory implementation of reverse logistics systems, involving the integration of waste pickers on the shared responsibility for the life cycle of products. This article aims to measure the impact of such legal incentives and the bargaining power obtained by the volume of collected waste on the effective formalization of waste pickers. The proposed model evaluates the sustainability of supply chains in terms of the use of raw materials due to disposal fees, collection, recycling and return of some materials from desktops and laptops using system dynamics methodology. The results show that even in the absence of bargaining power, the formalization of waste pickers occurs due to legal incentives. It is important to ensure the waste pickers cooperatives access to a minimum amount, which requires a level of protection against unfair competition with companies. Regarding the optimal level of environmental policies, even though the formalization time is long, it is still not enough to guarantee the formalization of waste picker cooperatives, which is dependent on their bargaining power. Steel is the material with the largest decrease in acquisition rate of raw material. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Physical and cognitive effects of virtual reality integrated training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Richard T; Watts, Kristopher P; Zhong, Peihan; Wei, Chen-Shuang

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the cognitive and physical impact of virtual reality (VR) integrated training versus traditional training methods in the domain of weld training. Weld training is very important in various industries and represents a complex skill set appropriate for advanced training intervention. As such, there has been a long search for the most successful and most cost-effective method for training new welders. Participants in this study were randomly assigned to one of two separate training courses taught by sanctioned American Welding Society certified welding instructors; the duration of each course was 2 weeks. After completing the training for a specific weld type, participants were given the opportunity to test for the corresponding certification. Participants were evaluated in terms of their cognitive and physical parameters, total training time exposure, and welding certification awards earned. Each of the four weld types taught in this study represented distinct levels of difficulty and required the development of specialized knowledge and skills. This study demonstrated that participants in the VR integrated training group (VR50) performed as well as, and in some cases, significantly outperformed, the traditional welding (TW) training group.The VR50 group was found to have a 41.6% increase in overall certifications earned compared with the TW group. VR technology is a valuable tool for the production of skilled welders in a shorter time and often with more highly developed skills than their traditionally trained counterparts. These findings strongly support the use ofVR integrated training in the welding industry.

  16. Generation of an infectious clone of VR-2332, a highly virulent North American type isolate of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H.S.; Liu, G.; Nielsen, Jens

    2003-01-01

    A full-length cDNA clone of the prototypical North American porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) isolate VR-2332 was assembled in the plasmid vector pOK(12). To rescue infectious virus, capped RNA was transcribed in vitro from the pOK(12) clone and transfected into BHK-21C...... cells. The supernatant from transfected monolayers were serially passaged on Marc-145 cells and porcine pulmonary alveolar macrophages. Infectious PRRSV was recovered on Marc-145 cells as well as porcine pulmonary macrophages; thus, the cloned virus exhibited the same cell tropism as the parental VR......-2332 strain. However, the cloned virus was clearly distinguishable from the parental VR-2332 strain by an engineered marker, a BstZ171 restriction site. The full-length cDNA clone had 11 nucleotide changes, 2 of which affected coding, compared to the parental VR-2332 strain. Additionally...

  17. IST BENOGO (IST – 2001-39184) Deliverable I-AAU-05-01: Role of sound in VR and Audio Visual Preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordahl, Rolf

    This Periodic Progres Report (PPR) document reports on the studies done in Aalborg University on December 2004 concerning role of sound in VR, audio-visual correlations and attention triggering. The report contains a description and evaluation of the experiments run, together with the analysis...... of the data captured by the head tracker, which provide valuable insights on the role of sound events in VR....

  18. Calibration of new I and C at VR-1 training reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kropik, Martin; Jurickova, Monika

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes a calibration of the new instrumentation and control (I and C) at the VR-1 training reactor in Prague. The I and C uses uncompensated fission chambers for the power measurement that operate in a pulse or a DC current and a Campbell regime, according to the reactor power. The pulse regime uses discrimination for the avoidance of gamma and noise influence of the measurement. The DC current regime employs a logarithmic amplifier to cover the whole reactor DC current power range with only one electronic circuit. The system computer calculates the real power from the logarithmic data. The Campbell regime is based on evaluation of the root mean square (RMS) value of the neutron noise. The calculated power from Campbell range is based on the square value of the RMS neutron noise data. All data for the power calculation are stored in computer flash memories. To set proper data there, it was necessary to carry out the calibration of the I and C. At first, the proper discrimination value was found while examining the spectrum of the neutron signal from the chamber. The constants for the DC current and Campbell calculations were determined from an independent reactor power measurement. The independent power measuring system that was used for the calibration was accomplished by a compensated current chamber with an electrometer. The calculated calibration constants were stored in the computer flash memories, and the calibrated system was again successfully compared with the independent power measuring system. Finally, proper gamma discrimination of the Campbell system was carefully checked.

  19. Validity of VR Technology on the Smartphone for the Study of Wind Park Soundscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhong YU

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The virtual reality of the landscape environment supplies a high level of realism of the real environment, and may improve the public awareness and acceptance of wind park projects. The soundscape around wind parks could have a strong influence on the acceptance and annoyance of wind parks. To explore this VR technology on realism and subjective responses toward different soundscapes of ambient wind parks, three different types of virtual reality on the smartphone tests were performed: aural only, visual only, and aural–visual combined. In total, 21 aural and visual combinations were presented to 40 participants. The aural and visual information used were of near wind park settings and rural spaces. Perceived annoyance levels and realism of the wind park environment were measured. Results indicated that most simulations were rated with relatively strong realism. Perceived realism was strongly correlated with light, color, and vegetation of the simulation. Most wind park landscapes were enthusiastically accepted by the participants. The addition of aural information was found to have a strong impact on whether the participant was annoyed. Furthermore, evaluation of the soundscape on a multidimensional scale revealed the key components influencing the individual’s annoyance by wind parks were the factors of “calmness/relaxation” and “naturality/pleasantness”. “Diversity” of the soundscape might correlate with perceived realism. Finally, the dynamic aural–visual stimuli using virtual reality technology could improve the environmental assessment of the wind park landscapes, and thus, provide a more comprehensible scientific decision than conventional tools. In addition, this study could improve the participatory planning process for more acceptable wind park landscapes.

  20. From the desktop to the grid: scalable bioinformatics via workflow conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Garza, Luis; Veit, Johannes; Szolek, Andras; Röttig, Marc; Aiche, Stephan; Gesing, Sandra; Reinert, Knut; Kohlbacher, Oliver

    2016-03-12

    Reproducibility is one of the tenets of the scientific method. Scientific experiments often comprise complex data flows, selection of adequate parameters, and analysis and visualization of intermediate and end results. Breaking down the complexity of such experiments into the joint collaboration of small, repeatable, well defined tasks, each with well defined inputs, parameters, and outputs, offers the immediate benefit of identifying bottlenecks, pinpoint sections which could benefit from parallelization, among others. Workflows rest upon the notion of splitting complex work into the joint effort of several manageable tasks. There are several engines that give users the ability to design and execute workflows. Each engine was created to address certain problems of a specific community, therefore each one has its advantages and shortcomings. Furthermore, not all features of all workflow engines are royalty-free -an aspect that could potentially drive away members of the scientific community. We have developed a set of tools that enables the scientific community to benefit from workflow interoperability. We developed a platform-free structured representation of parameters, inputs, outputs of command-line tools in so-called Common Tool Descriptor documents. We have also overcome the shortcomings and combined the features of two royalty-free workflow engines with a substantial user community: the Konstanz Information Miner, an engine which we see as a formidable workflow editor, and the Grid and User Support Environment, a web-based framework able to interact with several high-performance computing resources. We have thus created a free and highly accessible way to design workflows on a desktop computer and execute them on high-performance computing resources. Our work will not only reduce time spent on designing scientific workflows, but also make executing workflows on remote high-performance computing resources more accessible to technically inexperienced users. We

  1. IMIS desktop & smartphone software solutions for monitoring spacecrafts' payload from anywhere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroukh, J.; Queyrut, O.; Airaud, J.

    In the past years, the demand for satellite remote operations has increased guided by on one hand, the will to reduce operations cost (on-call operators out of business hours), and on the other hand, the development of cooperation space missions resulting in a world wide distribution of engineers and science team members. Only a few off-the-shelf solutions exist to fulfill the need of remote payload monitoring, and they mainly use proprietary devices. The recent advent of mobile technologies (laptops, smartphones and tablets) as well as the worldwide deployment of broadband networks (3G, Wi-Fi hotspots), has opened up a technical window that brings new options. As part of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission, the Centre National D'Etudes Spatiales (CNES, the French space agency) has developed a new software solution for monitoring spacecraft payloads. The Instrument Monitoring Interactive Software (IMIS) offers state-of-the-art operational features for payload monitoring, and can be accessed remotely. It was conceived as a generic tool that can be used for heterogeneous payloads and missions. IMIS was designed as a classical client/server architecture. The server is hosted at CNES and acts as a data provider while two different kinds of clients are available depending on the level of mobility required. The first one is a rich client application, built on Eclipse framework, which can be installed on usual operating systems and communicates with the server through the Internet. The second one is a smartphone application for any Android platform, connected to the server thanks to the mobile broadband network or a Wi-Fi connection. This second client is mainly devoted to on-call operations and thus only contains a subset of the IMIS functionalities. This paper describes the operational context, including security aspects, that led IMIS development, presents the selected software architecture and details the various features of both clients: the desktop and the sm

  2. Characterization of emissions from a desktop 3D printer and indoor air measurements in office settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinle, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Emissions from a desktop 3D printer based on fused deposition modeling (FDM) technology were measured in a test chamber and indoor air was monitored in office settings. Ultrafine aerosol (UFA) emissions were higher while printing a standard object with polylactic acid (PLA) than with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) polymer (2.1 × 10(9) vs. 2.4 × 10(8) particles/min). Prolonged use of the printer led to higher emission rates (factor 2 with PLA and 4 with ABS, measured after seven months of occasional use). UFA consisted mainly of volatile droplets, and some small (100-300 nm diameter) iron containing and soot-like particles were found. Emissions of inhalable and respirable dust were below the limit of detection (LOD) when measured gravimetrically, and only slightly higher than background when measured with an aerosol spectrometer. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) were in the range of 10 µg/min. Styrene accounted for more than 50% of total VOC emitted when printing with ABS; for PLA, methyl methacrylate (MMA, 37% of TVOC) was detected as the predominant compound. Two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), fluoranthene and pyrene, were observed in very low amounts. All other analyzed PAH, as well as inorganic gases and metal emissions except iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn), were below the LOD or did not differ from background without printing. A single 3D print (165 min) in a large, well-ventilated office did not significantly increase the UFA and VOC concentrations, whereas these were readily detectable in a small, unventilated room, with UFA concentrations increasing by 2,000 particles/cm(3) and MMA reaching a peak of 21 µg/m(3) and still being detectable in the room even 20 hr after printing.

  3. Integrating virtual reality applications in nuclear safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, Michael; Crete, Jean-Maurice; Pickett, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) tools have already been developed and deployed in the nuclear industry, including in nuclear power plant construction, project management, equipment and system design, and training. Recognized as powerful tools for, inter alia, integration of data, simulation of activities, design of facilities, validation of concepts and mission planning, their application in nuclear safeguards is still very limited. However, VR tools may eventually offer transformative potential for evolving the future safeguards system to be more fully information-driven. The paper focuses especially on applications in the area of training that have been underway in the Department of Safeguards of the International Atomic Energy Agency. It also outlines future applications envisioned for safeguards information and knowledge management, and information-analytic collaboration. The paper identifies some technical and programmatic pre-requisites for realizing the integrative potential of VR technologies. If developed with an orientation to integrating applications through compatible platforms, software, and models, virtual reality tools offer the long-term potential of becoming a real 'game changer,' enabling a qualitative leap in the efficiency and effectiveness of nuclear safeguards. The IAEA invites Member States, industry, and academia to make proposals as to how such integrating potential in the use of virtual reality technology for nuclear safeguards could be realized. (author)

  4. Characterization of chemical contaminants generated by a desktop fused deposition modeling 3-dimensional Printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; LeBouf, Ryan F; Yi, Jinghai; Ham, Jason; Nurkewicz, Timothy; Schwegler-Berry, Diane E; Chen, Bean T; Wells, J Raymond; Duling, Matthew G; Lawrence, Robert B; Martin, Stephen B; Johnson, Alyson R; Virji, M Abbas

    2017-07-01

    Printing devices are known to emit chemicals into the indoor atmosphere. Understanding factors that influence release of chemical contaminants from printers is necessary to develop effective exposure assessment and control strategies. In this study, a desktop fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3-dimensional (3-D) printer using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) or polylactic acid (PLA) filaments and two monochrome laser printers were evaluated in a 0.5 m 3 chamber. During printing, chamber air was monitored for vapors using a real-time photoionization detector (results expressed as isobutylene equivalents) to measure total volatile organic compound (TVOC) concentrations, evacuated canisters to identify specific VOCs by off-line gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis, and liquid bubblers to identify carbonyl compounds by GC-MS. Airborne particles were collected on filters for off-line analysis using scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive x-ray detector to identify elemental constituents. For 3-D printing, TVOC emission rates were influenced by a printer malfunction, filament type, and to a lesser extent, by filament color; however, rates were not influenced by the number of printer nozzles used or the manufacturer's provided cover. TVOC emission rates were significantly lower for the 3-D printer (49-3552 µg h -1 ) compared to the laser printers (5782-7735 µg h -1 ). A total of 14 VOCs were identified during 3-D printing that were not present during laser printing. 3-D printed objects continued to off-gas styrene, indicating potential for continued exposure after the print job is completed. Carbonyl reaction products were likely formed from emissions of the 3-D printer, including 4-oxopentanal. Ultrafine particles generated by the 3-D printer using ABS and a laser printer contained chromium. Consideration of the factors that influenced the release of chemical contaminants (including known and suspected asthmagens such as styrene and

  5. libLocation: acceso a dispositivos de localización para gvSIG Desktop y Mobile

    OpenAIRE

    Jordán Aldasorro, Juan G.; Planells Jiménez, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Inicialmente integrada en el piloto de gvSIG Mobile, la librería libLocation tiene como objetivo dotar a los proyectos gvSIG Desktop y gvSIG Mobile un acceso transparente a fuentes de localización. La librería se fundamenta en las especificaciones JSR-179 -API de localización para J2ME- y JSR-293 -API de localización para J2ME v2.0-, proporcionando una interfaz uniforme a diferentes fuentes de localización, mediante funciones de alto nivel. Asimismo, se extiende la funcionalida...

  6. Authenticity through VR-based documentation of cultural heritage. A theoretical approach based on conservation and documentation practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Muñoz Morcillo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The visualization of 3D reconstructed artifacts often requires significant computing resources. The implementation of an object in  a  virtual  reality  (VR  application  even necessitates the  reduction  of  the polygonal  mesh.  Consequently,  the communication and dissemination of “authentic” 3D reconstructions via immersive VR technologies has been a nearly impossible  feat for  many  researchers. However,  is the  issue really  computing resources,  or is it rather  the notion  of authenticity in an “auratic” sense, i.e., an excessive focus on physical evidence and survey data? In the present paper, we will discuss the authenticity requirements for virtual archaeology as set by the Seville Principles(2011, and we will analyse some limitations related to the current approaches. Furthermore, we will propose a pluralistic notion based on the contextualization of 3D objects in VR environments with synesthetic (i.e. multisensory information. This new notion of authenticity  relies  on  conservation meanings rather than  physical  features.  In line  with  this  approach,  two  case studies will be commented: the multimodal 3D-documentation of the Jupiter Column(2AD in Ladenburg, and the VR-based  re-enactment of  a  modern  work  of  art,  the  audio-kinetic  sculpture Kaleidophonic  Dog(1967  by  Stephan  von Huene. These two projects provide valuable data for a revision of the notion of authenticity in both virtual archaeology and art conservation.

  7. Population-based respiratory 4D motion atlas construction and its application for VR simulations of liver punctures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastmeyer, Andre; Wilms, Matthias; Handels, Heinz

    2018-03-01

    Virtual reality (VR) training simulators of liver needle insertion in the hepatic area of breathing virtual patients often need 4D image data acquisitions as a prerequisite. Here, first a population-based breathing virtual patient 4D atlas is built and second the requirement of a dose-relevant or expensive acquisition of a 4D CT or MRI data set for a new patient can be mitigated by warping the mean atlas motion. The breakthrough contribution of this work is the construction and reuse of population-based, learned 4D motion models.

  8. A Critical Review of the Use of Virtual Reality in Construction Engineering Education and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Wu, Peng; Wang, Jun; Chi, Hung-Lin; Wang, Xiangyu

    2018-06-08

    Virtual Reality (VR) has been rapidly recognized and implemented in construction engineering education and training (CEET) in recent years due to its benefits of providing an engaging and immersive environment. The objective of this review is to critically collect and analyze the VR applications in CEET, aiming at all VR-related journal papers published from 1997 to 2017. The review follows a three-stage analysis on VR technologies, applications and future directions through a systematic analysis. It is found that the VR technologies adopted for CEET evolve over time, from desktop-based VR, immersive VR, 3D game-based VR, to Building Information Modelling (BIM)-enabled VR. A sibling technology, Augmented Reality (AR), for CEET adoptions has also emerged in recent years. These technologies have been applied in architecture and design visualization, construction health and safety training, equipment and operational task training, as well as structural analysis. Future research directions, including the integration of VR with emerging education paradigms and visualization technologies, have also been provided. The findings are useful for both researchers and educators to usefully integrate VR in their education and training programs to improve the training performance.

  9. Uloga roditeljskih i vršnjačkih normi u objašnjenju negativnih međugrupnih stavova u adolescentnoj dobi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidija Ivandić

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cilj istraživanja bio je ispitati ulogu roditeljskih i vršnjačkih normi u objašnjenju negativnih međugrupnih stavova u adolescentnoj dobi te provjeriti kako taj odnos ovisi o općoj podložnosti roditeljskom i vršnjačkom utjecaju. U istraživanju je sudjelovalo 457 učenika srednjih škola s područja Grada Zagreba. Ispitivani su negativni međugrupni stavovi prema etničkoj grupi Roma, a korišten je upitnik koji je sadržavao Skalu modernog rasizma, Skalu socijalne distance (samoprocjene te procjene za roditelje i vršnjake, Skalu roditeljskog i vršnjačkog utjecaja te sociodemografska pitanja. Rezultati su pokazali da sudionici u prosjeku pokazuju visoko izražen negativni stav prema Romima na mjeri socijalne distance (pristali bi ići u isti razred s Romima, ali ne i da su prijatelji, rođaci ili romantični partneri te umjereno negativni stav na mjeri modernog rasizma. I roditeljska i vršnjačka norma značajno pridonose objašnjenju negativnog stava sudionika na mjeri socijalne distance (negativnija je norma povezana s većom distancom, pri čemu veći doprinos ima roditeljska nego vršnjačka norma. Kod modernih predrasuda doprinos je značajan samo za roditeljsku (ne i vršnjačku normu. Pretpostavka o moderatorskom efektu opće podložnosti roditeljskom/vršnjačkom utjecaju na odnos roditeljske/vršnjačke norme i stava nije potvrđena, što je moguće objasniti metodološkim čimbenicima. Rezultati ovog istraživanja upućuju na određeni doprinos unutargrupnih normi u stvaranju i održavanju negativnih međugrupnih stavova, no potrebna su daljnja istraživanja uz metodološki strože nacrte.

  10. Research on multi - channel interactive virtual assembly system for power equipment under the “VR+” era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yilong; Duan, Xitong; Wu, Lei; He, Jin; Xu, Wu

    2017-06-01

    With the development of the “VR+” era, the traditional virtual assembly system of power equipment has been unable to satisfy our growing needs. In this paper, based on the analysis of the traditional virtual assembly system of electric power equipment and the application of VR technology in the virtual assembly system of electric power equipment in our country, this paper puts forward the scheme of establishing the virtual assembly system of power equipment: At first, we should obtain the information of power equipment, then we should using OpenGL and multi texture technology to build 3D solid graphics library. After the completion of three-dimensional modeling, we can use the dynamic link library DLL package three-dimensional solid graphics generation program to realize the modularization of power equipment model library and power equipment model library generated hidden algorithm. After the establishment of 3D power equipment model database, we set up the virtual assembly system of 3D power equipment to separate the assembly operation of the power equipment from the space. At the same time, aiming at the deficiency of the traditional gesture recognition algorithm, we propose a gesture recognition algorithm based on improved PSO algorithm for BP neural network data glove. Finally, the virtual assembly system of power equipment can really achieve multi-channel interaction function.

  11. The use of immersive virtual reality (VR) to predict the occurrence 6 months later of paranoid thinking and posttraumatic stress symptoms assessed by self-report and interviewer methods: a study of individuals who have been physically assaulted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Daniel; Antley, Angus; Ehlers, Anke; Dunn, Graham; Thompson, Claire; Vorontsova, Natasha; Garety, Philippa; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Glucksman, Edward; Slater, Mel

    2014-09-01

    Presentation of social situations via immersive virtual reality (VR) has the potential to be an ecologically valid way of assessing psychiatric symptoms. In this study we assess the occurrence of paranoid thinking and of symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in response to a single neutral VR social environment as predictors of later psychiatric symptoms assessed by standard methods. One hundred six people entered an immersive VR social environment (a train ride), presented via a head-mounted display, 4 weeks after having attended hospital because of a physical assault. Paranoid thinking about the neutral computer-generated characters and the occurrence of PTSD symptoms in VR were assessed. Reactions in VR were then used to predict the occurrence 6 months later of symptoms of paranoia and PTSD, as assessed by standard interviewer and self-report methods. Responses to VR predicted the severity of paranoia and PTSD symptoms as assessed by standard measures 6 months later. The VR assessments also added predictive value to the baseline interviewer methods, especially for paranoia. Brief exposure to environments presented via virtual reality provides a symptom assessment with predictive ability over many months. VR assessment may be of particular benefit for difficult to assess problems, such as paranoia, that have no gold standard assessment method. In the future, VR environments may be used in the clinic to complement standard self-report and clinical interview methods. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. Integrative NMR for biomolecular research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Woonghee; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Dashti, Hesam; Eghbalnia, Hamid R.; Tonelli, Marco; Westler, William M.; Butcher, Samuel E.; Henzler-Wildman, Katherine A.; Markley, John L.

    2016-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful technique for determining structural and functional features of biomolecules in physiological solution as well as for observing their intermolecular interactions in real-time. However, complex steps associated with its practice have made the approach daunting for non-specialists. We introduce an NMR platform that makes biomolecular NMR spectroscopy much more accessible by integrating tools, databases, web services, and video tutorials that can be launched by simple installation of NMRFAM software packages or using a cross-platform virtual machine that can be run on any standard laptop or desktop computer. The software package can be downloaded freely from the NMRFAM software download page ( http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/download-packages.html http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/download_packages.html ), and detailed instructions are available from the Integrative NMR Video Tutorial page ( http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/integrative.html http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/integrative.html ).

  13. Integrative NMR for biomolecular research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woonghee, E-mail: whlee@nmrfam.wisc.edu; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Dashti, Hesam; Eghbalnia, Hamid R.; Tonelli, Marco; Westler, William M.; Butcher, Samuel E.; Henzler-Wildman, Katherine A.; Markley, John L., E-mail: markley@nmrfam.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison and Biochemistry Department (United States)

    2016-04-15

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful technique for determining structural and functional features of biomolecules in physiological solution as well as for observing their intermolecular interactions in real-time. However, complex steps associated with its practice have made the approach daunting for non-specialists. We introduce an NMR platform that makes biomolecular NMR spectroscopy much more accessible by integrating tools, databases, web services, and video tutorials that can be launched by simple installation of NMRFAM software packages or using a cross-platform virtual machine that can be run on any standard laptop or desktop computer. The software package can be downloaded freely from the NMRFAM software download page ( http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/download-packages.html http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/download{sub p}ackages.html ), and detailed instructions are available from the Integrative NMR Video Tutorial page ( http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/integrative.html http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/integrative.html ).

  14. The first critical experiment with a new type of fuel assemblies IRT-3M on the training reactor VR-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matejka, Karel; Sklenka, Lubomir

    1997-01-01

    The paper 'The first critical experiment with a new type of fuel assemblies IRT-3M on training reactor VR-1 presents basic information about the replacement of fuel on the reactor VR-1 run on FJFI CVUT in Prague. In spring 1997 the IRT-2M fuel type used till then was replaced by the IRT-3M type. When the fuel was replaced, no change in its enrichment was made, i.e. its level remained as 36% 235 U. The replacement itself was carried out in tight co-operation with the Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc., as related to the operation of the research reactor LVR-15. The fuel replacement on the VR-I reactor is a part of the international program RERTR (Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors) in which the Czech Republic participates. (author)

  15. On Recording the Unipolar ECG Limb Leads via the Wilson's vs the Goldberger's Terminals: aVR, aVL, and aVF Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E. Madias

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The augmented unipolar limb leads aVR, aVL, and aVF, introduced by Goldberger in 1942, are an integral part of the 12-lead ECG.1,2 Leads I, II, and III have 2 dedicated electrodes, but the other 9 leads have a single dedicated electrode, and another one constructed from the averaged inputs of multiple electrodes. This Viewpoint discusses whether an indifferent pole for the recording of unipolar limb leads is best provided by the Wilson's central terminal (WCT, or by inputs from 2 limb electrodes (Goldberger's central terminal (GCT, as done currently, and whether the latter have any advantages over the former. The term "unipolar", popularized by Wilson, is a misnomer, since no leads can be truly "unipolar", all requiring positive and negative poles. Thus the term unipolar is used herein in the quasi-unipolar sense, as when first introduced by Wilson and Goldberger, who also realized that such leads were not truly unipolar. The popularity of the unipolar leads reflected the quest of recording the ECG from various vantage points of the body, considering the limitations of the 3 bipolar leads, introduced by Einthoven,3 which register the difference of 2 ECG curves recorded at the 2 poles of these leads, and no variation in potential at each of these poles.4 In contrast the unipolar leads were thought to register such variation of absolute potential, something not really true. Initially the WCT was used to record the unipolar limb leads,5 but the amplitude was low, and the inscribed ECGs, then, and for many decades later,6 were thick-lined (≥2 mm (Figure 1.

  16. A new algorithm to build bridges between two patient-reported health outcome instruments: the MOS SF-36® and the VR-12 Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, Alfredo; Rogers, William; Qian, Shirley; Rothendler, James A; Kent, Erin E; Kazis, Lewis E

    2018-04-19

    To develop bridging algorithms to score the Veterans Rand-12 (VR-12) scales for comparability to those of the SF-36® for facilitating multi-cohort studies using data from the National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER) linked to Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (MHOS), and to provide a model for minimizing non-statistical error in pooled analyses stemming from changes to survey instruments over time. Observational study of MHOS cohorts 1-12 (1998-2011). We modeled 2-year follow-up SF-36 scale scores from cohorts 1-6 based on baseline SF-36 scores, age, and gender, yielding 100 clusters using Classification and Regression Trees. Within each cluster, we averaged follow-up SF-36 scores. Using the same cluster specifications, expected follow-up SF-36 scores, based on cohorts 1-6, were computed for cohorts 7-8 (where the VR-12 was the follow-up survey). We created a new criterion validity measure, termed "extensibility," calculated from the square root of the mean square difference between expected SF-36 scale averages and observed VR-12 item score from cohorts 7-8, weighted by cluster size. VR-12 items were rescored to minimize this quantity. Extensibility of rescored VR-12 items and scales was considerably improved from the "simple" scoring method for comparability to the SF-36 scales. The algorithms are appropriate across a wide range of potential subsamples within the MHOS and provide robust application for future studies that span the SF-36 and VR-12 eras. It is possible that these surveys in a different setting outside the MHOS, especially in younger age groups, could produce somewhat different results.

  17. A Public Database of Immersive VR Videos with Corresponding Ratings of Arousal, Valence, and Correlations between Head Movements and Self Report Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J. Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Virtual reality (VR has been proposed as a methodological tool to study the basic science of psychology and other fields. One key advantage of VR is that sharing of virtual content can lead to more robust replication and representative sampling. A database of standardized content will help fulfill this vision. There are two objectives to this study. First, we seek to establish and allow public access to a database of immersive VR video clips that can act as a potential resource for studies on emotion induction using virtual reality. Second, given the large sample size of participants needed to get reliable valence and arousal ratings for our video, we were able to explore the possible links between the head movements of the observer and the emotions he or she feels while viewing immersive VR. To accomplish our goals, we sourced for and tested 73 immersive VR clips which participants rated on valence and arousal dimensions using self-assessment manikins. We also tracked participants' rotational head movements as they watched the clips, allowing us to correlate head movements and affect. Based on past research, we predicted relationships between the standard deviation of head yaw and valence and arousal ratings. Results showed that the stimuli varied reasonably well along the dimensions of valence and arousal, with a slight underrepresentation of clips that are of negative valence and highly arousing. The standard deviation of yaw positively correlated with valence, while a significant positive relationship was found between head pitch and arousal. The immersive VR clips tested are available online as supplemental material.

  18. Sensitivity of UF-R, UF-VCh, UF-VR films used for soft x-ray (lambda=2+10A) detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aglitskij, E.V.; Bojko, V.A.; Kalinkina, T.A.

    1975-01-01

    The sensitometric characteristics of the following types of photographic film were measured in the range of wavelengths 2-10A: UF-R, UF-VCh, and UF-VR. It was demonstrated that UF-VR photographic film is four times as sensitive as UF-R film and 1.6 times as sensitive as UF-VCh film; it is also most suitable film for x-ray spectroscopy of multiply charged ions and for diagnosing high-temperature laser plasma

  19. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Amaral, Stephen V. [Alden Research Laboratory; Castro-Santos, Theodore [U.S. Geological Survey; Giza, Dan [Alden Research Laboratory; Haro, Alexander J. [U.S. Geological Survey; Hecker, George [Alden Research Laboratory; McMahon, Brian [Alden Research Laboratory; Perkins, Norman [Alden Research Laboratory; Pioppi, Nick [Alden Research Laboratory

    2012-12-31

    This collection of three reports describes desktop and laboratory flume studies that provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river environments. Behavioral responses to turbine exposure also are investigated to support assessment of the potential for disruptions to upstream and downstream movements of fish. The studies: (1) conducted an assessment of potential injury mechanisms using available data from studies with conventional hydro turbines; (2) developed theoretical models for predicting blade strike probabilities and mortality rates; and (3) performed flume testing with three turbine designs and several fish species and size groups in two laboratory flumes to estimate survival rates and document fish behavior. The project yielded three reports which this document comprises. The three constituent documents are addressed individually below Fish Passage Through Turbines: Application of Conventional Hydropower Data to Hydrokinetic Technologies Fish passing through the blade sweep of a hydrokinetic turbine experience a much less harsh physical environment than do fish entrained through conventional hydro turbines. The design and operation of conventional turbines results in high flow velocities, abrupt changes in flow direction, relatively high runner rotational and blade speeds, rapid and significant changes in pressure, and the need for various structures throughout the turbine passageway that can be impacted by fish. These conditions generally do not occur or are not significant factors for hydrokinetic turbines. Furthermore, compared to conventional hydro turbines, hydrokinetic turbines typically produce relatively minor changes in shear, turbulence, and pressure levels from ambient conditions in the surrounding environment. Injuries and mortality from mechanical injuries will be less as well, mainly due to low rotational speeds and

  20. SysBioCube: A Data Warehouse and Integrative Data Analysis Platform Facilitating Systems Biology Studies of Disorders of Military Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-18

    include interactive gene and methylation profiles, interactive heatmaps, cytoscape network views, integrative genomics viewer ( IGV ), and protein-protein...single chart. The website also provides an option to include multiple genes. Integrative Genomics Viewer ( IGV )1, is a high-performance desktop tool for

  1. Deposition of PEDOT: PSS Nanoparticles as a Conductive Microlayer Anode in OLEDs Device by Desktop Inkjet Printer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ummartyotin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple microfabrication technique for delivering macromolecules and patterning microelectrode arrays using desktop inkjet printer was described. Aqueous solution of nanoparticle of poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT doped with polystyrene sulfonic acid (PSS was prepared while its particle size, the surface tension, and the viscosity of the solution were adjusted to be suitable for deposition on a flexible cellulose nanocomposite substrate via inkjet printer. The statistical average of PEDOT: PSS particle size of 100 nm was observed. The microthickness, surface morphology, and electrical conductivity of the printed substrate were then characterized by profilometer, atomic force microscope (AFM, and four-point probe electrical measurement, respectively. The inkjet deposition of PEDOT: PSS was successfully carried out, whilst retained its transparency feature. Highly smooth surface (roughness ~23–44 nm was achieved.

  2. Effects of Desktop Virtual Reality Environment Training on State Anxiety and Vocational Identity Scores among Persons with Disabilities during Job Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Andre Lamont

    2013-01-01

    This study examined how desktop virtual reality environment training (DVRET) affected state anxiety and vocational identity of vocational rehabilitation services consumers during job placement/job readiness activities. It utilized a quantitative research model with a quasi-experimental pretest-posttest design plus some qualitative descriptive…

  3. Development, Implementation, and Analysis of Desktop-Scale Model Industrial Equipment and a Critical Thinking Rubric for Use in Chemical Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golter, Paul B.

    2011-01-01

    In order to address some of the challenges facing engineering education, namely the demand that students be better prepared to practice professional as well as technical skills, we have developed an intervention consisting of equipment, assessments and a novel pedagogy. The equipment consists of desktop-scale replicas of common industrial…

  4. The AstroVR Collaboratory, an On-line Multi-User Environment for Research in Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Buren, D.; Curtis, P.; Nichols, D. A.; Brundage, M.

    We describe our experiment with an on-line collaborative environment where users share the execution of programs and communicate via audio, video, and typed text. Collaborative environments represent the next step in computer-mediated conferencing, combining powerful compute engines, data persistence, shared applications, and teleconferencing tools. As proof of concept, we have implemented a shared image analysis tool, allowing geographically distinct users to analyze FITS images together. We anticipate that \\htmllink{AstroVR}{http://astrovr.ipac.caltech.edu:8888} and similar systems will become an important part of collaborative work in the next decade, including with applications in remote observing, spacecraft operations, on-line meetings, as well as and day-to-day research activities. The technology is generic and promises to find uses in business, medicine, government, and education.

  5. C__Users_HP Pro 2000_Desktop_EDITIONS FINALES D'AGRON

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP Pro 2000

    The method we use is the analysis of the value added to cocoa incorporated at every stage of its transformation ... value added is much more important as it further integrates the chain as well as gains associated marketing. ...... Porter M. 1990.

  6. Application of the Polytron 1000 VR for functional diagnosis and interventional examination of arteries of the lower extremity: First clinical results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kueffer, G.; Ziegler, L.; Hahn, D.

    1989-01-01

    The article reports the clinical experience gained with the POLYTRON-1000 VR system which has been used for all functional diagnostic tasks for detection of compression syndrome of the popliteal artery, and for diagnostic preparation and execution of atherectomy of pelvic and leg arteries with the Simpson catheter.

  7. ST-segment depression in aVR as a predictor of culprit artery in acute inferior wall ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Hafez el-neklawy

    2014-03-01

    Conclusions: ST depression in aVR is common in patients with LCX-related acute inferior myocardial infarction. The ST changes in this lead are associated with an excellent specificity and a good sensitivity in differentiating LCX from RCA as the IRA.

  8. Development of the Verona coding definitions of emotional sequences to code health providers' responses (VR-CoDES-P) to patient cues and concerns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    del Piccolo, Lidia; de Haes, Hanneke; Heaven, Cathy; Jansen, Jesse; Verheul, William; Bensing, Jozien; Bergvik, Svein; Deveugele, Myriam; Eide, Hilde; Fletcher, Ian; Goss, Claudia; Humphris, Gerry; Kim, Young-Mi; Langewitz, Wolf; Mazzi, Maria Angela; Mjaaland, Trond; Moretti, Francesca; Nübling, Matthias; Rimondini, Michela; Salmon, Peter; Sibbern, Tonje; Skre, Ingunn; van Dulmen, Sandra; Wissow, Larry; Young, Bridget; Zandbelt, Linda; Zimmermann, Christa; Finset, Arnstein

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To present a method to classify health provider responses to patient cues and concerns according to the VR-CoDES-CC (Del Piccolo et al. (2009) [2] and Zimmermann et al. (submitted for publication) [3]). The system permits sequence analysis and a detailed description of how providers

  9. Development of the Verona coding definitions of emotional sequences to code health providers' responses (VR-CoDES-P) to patient cues and concerns.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piccolo, L. del; Haes, H. de; Heaven, C.; Jansen, J.; Verheul, W.; Bensing, J.; Bergvik, S.; Deveugele, M.; Eide, H.; Fletcher, I.; Goss, C.; Humphris, G.; Young-Mi, K.; Langewitz, W.; Mazzi, M.A.; Mjaaland, T.; Moretti, F.; Nübling, M.; Rimondini, M.; Salmon, P.; Sibbern, T.; Skre, I.; Dulmen, S. van; Wissow, L.; Young, B.; Zandbelt, L.; Zimmermann, C.; Finset, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To present a method to classify health provider responses to patient cues and concerns according to the VR-CoDES-CC (Del Piccolo et al. (2009) [2] and Zimmermann et al. (submitted for publication) [3]). The system permits sequence analysis and a detailed description of how providers

  10. 20 CFR 411.582 - Can a State VR agency receive payment under the cost reimbursement payment system if a continuous...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the cost reimbursement payment system if a continuous 9-month period of substantial gainful activity... Systems § 411.582 Can a State VR agency receive payment under the cost reimbursement payment system if a... under the cost reimbursement payment system under subpart V of part 404 (or subpart V of part 416) of...

  11. 20 CFR 411.365 - How does a State VR agency notify us about its choice of a payment system for use when...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... its choice of a payment system for use when functioning as an EN? 411.365 Section 411.365 Employees... agency notify us about its choice of a payment system for use when functioning as an EN? (a) The State VR agency must send us a letter telling us which EN payment system it will use when it functions as an EN...

  12. Integration of laparoscopic virtual-reality simulation into gynaecology training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, C; Oestergaard, J; Larsen, C R

    2011-11-01

    Surgery carries the risk of serious harm, as well as benefit, to patients. For healthcare organisations, theatre time is an expensive commodity and litigation costs for surgical specialities are very high. Advanced laparoscopic surgery, now widely used in gynaecology for improved outcomes and reduced length of stay, involves longer operation times and a higher rate of complications for surgeons in training. Virtual-reality (VR) simulation is a relatively new training method that has the potential to promote surgical skill development before advancing to surgery on patients themselves. VR simulators have now been on the market for more than 10 years and, yet, few countries in the world have fully integrated VR simulation training into their gynaecology surgical training programmes. In this review, we aim to summarise the VR simulators currently available together with evidence of their effectiveness in gynaecology, to understand their limitations and to discuss their incorporation into national training curricula. © 2011 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology © 2011 RCOG.

  13. Exploring Learner Acceptance of the Use of Virtual Reality in Medical Education: A Case Study of Desktop and Projection-Based Display Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsiu-Mei; Liaw, Shu-Sheng; Lai, Chung-Min

    2016-01-01

    Advanced technologies have been widely applied in medical education, including human-patient simulators, immersive virtual reality Cave Automatic Virtual Environment systems, and video conferencing. Evaluating learner acceptance of such virtual reality (VR) learning environments is a critical issue for ensuring that such technologies are used to…

  14. Quantum GIS: il desktop GIS più potente, amichevole e libero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Dassau

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available QuantumGIS is a free and open source GISIt has an intuitive graphical interface, suitable also for first time GIS users, and thanks to the integration with other free software (e.g. GRASS, PostGIS, GDAL can read dozens of different formats, both raster and vector, link to OGC standard web services (WMS, WFS, SF and run complex analysis and modeling. Many plugins make it easy to extend its functionality. It is used throughout the world, by thousands of users, and its development is fast, with new functions continuously added.

  15. VR cooperative environments for the interpretation and reconstruction of the archaeological landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Pietroni

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The Internet 2.0 has diffused a new approach enhancing creativity, multimedia communication, information sharing, cooperation: millions of people in the world are expressing the will to interconnect, co-create digital contents and share experience in the cyberspace. The possibility to develop complex dynamics of interaction inside the virtual domain are determining new scenarios in the field of cultural transmission. In this paper two case studies will be presented: the “Integrated Technologies of robotics and virtual environment in archaeology” project (supported by the Italian Ministry of Research, and the “Virtual Rome” project, two virtual collaborative environments in the web for the interpretation, reconstruction and 3D exploration of archaeological contexts.

  16. Utilidad de la derivación aVR en la identificación de la arteria responsable en el infarto inferior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanina B. Castillo Costa

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available El ECG es el método más simple para el diagnóstico de infarto inferior (IAMinf; sin embargo, su utilidad disminuye para determinar el vaso responsable. Objetivos 1. Analizar la utilidad del desnivel del ST en aVR en la identificación de oclusión de las arterias coronaria derecha (CD o circunfleja (CX. 2. Evaluar la utilidad agregada a los criterios clásicos. Material y métodos Se incluyeron en el estudio 65 pacientes con IAMinf a quienes se les realizó una cinecoronariografía (CCG durante la internación. Se analizaron los criterios clásicos, así como el desnivel del ST en aVR: ?ST =?1 mm, ?ST =?1 mm o nivelado (isoST a 0,08 seg del punto J y se calcularon la sensibilidad (S, la especificidad (E, el valor predictivo positivo (VPP, el valor predictivo negativo (VPN y el likelihood ratio (LR. Se incluyó la derivación aVR en un análisis multivariado para determinar su valor agregado a los criterios clásicos. Resultados La CD fue responsable de la oclusión en 47 pacientes (72% y la CX en 18 (28%. Signos clásicos : CD : la relación del ?STD3/D2 =?1 se halló en 52 pacientes (91,5%; p = 0,001 e ?STD1-aVL =?1 mm en 34 (61%; p 1 en 13 pacientes (50%; p = 0,001 y ?STV5-V6 =?1 mm en 12 (44%; p < 0,001. Derivación aVR : CD : ?ST o isoST en 46 pacientes (81%; p < 0,001; CX : ?ST =?1 mm en 19 (56%; p < 0,001. En el análisis multivariado, el ?ST o isoST en aVR identificó a la CD (OR IC 95% 4,7 (1,1-19,8; p = 0,03, mientras que el ?ST aVR identificó a la CX. Se propone un algoritmo diagnóstico para CD que refleja el valor aditivo de aVR a la presencia de los signos clásicos: ?ST o isoST en aVR (VPP 94%; LR+: 2. Conclusión La derivación aVR es una herramienta útil para la identificación de la arteria responsable en el IAMinf, ya que brinda información diagnóstica adicional a los signos clásicos.

  17. Restriction enzyme analysis of the chloroplast DNA of Phaseolus vulgaris L. vr. Rio Negro Análise de restrição do DNA cloroplástico de Phaseolus vulgaris vr. Rio Negro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Echeverrigaray

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available The chloroplast DNA of Phaseolus vulgaris L. vr. Rio Negro was isola ted from chloroplasts obtained by descontiuous sucrose gradient centrifugation. The restriction analysis with the enzymes HindIII, EcoRI and BamHI and their combination, allowed to identified more than 20 fragments of 18 to 0.65kb. The size of Phaseolus vulgaris L. cp DNA was estimated in 140kb with the presence of a repeat sequence of about 22kb.O DNA cloroplástico do cultivar Rio Negro (Phaseolus vulgaris L. foi isolado a partir de cloroplastos obtidos por gradiente descontínuo de sacarose. A análise de restrição com as enzimas HindIII, EcoRI e BamHI e a combinação destas, permitiu a identificação de mais de 20 fragmentos na faixa de 18 a 0.65kb. O tamanho do cp DNA de Phaseolus vulgaris L. foi estimado em 140kb com a existência de sequências repetidas de aproximadamente 22kb.

  18. NASA Virtual Glovebox: An Immersive Virtual Desktop Environment for Training Astronauts in Life Science Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twombly, I. Alexander; Smith, Jeffrey; Bruyns, Cynthia; Montgomery, Kevin; Boyle, Richard

    2003-01-01

    The International Space Station will soon provide an unparalleled research facility for studying the near- and longer-term effects of microgravity on living systems. Using the Space Station Glovebox Facility - a compact, fully contained reach-in environment - astronauts will conduct technically challenging life sciences experiments. Virtual environment technologies are being developed at NASA Ames Research Center to help realize the scientific potential of this unique resource by facilitating the experimental hardware and protocol designs and by assisting the astronauts in training. The Virtual GloveboX (VGX) integrates high-fidelity graphics, force-feedback devices and real- time computer simulation engines to achieve an immersive training environment. Here, we describe the prototype VGX system, the distributed processing architecture used in the simulation environment, and modifications to the visualization pipeline required to accommodate the display configuration.

  19. ITER design, integration and assembly studies assisted by virtual reality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, D., E-mail: delphine.keller@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, F-13115 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Doceul, L.; Ferlay, F.; Jiolat, G. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Cordier, J.J.; Kuehn, I.; Manfreo, B.; Reich, J. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, F-13115 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► VR technologies applied to Fusion enable to better and faster understand integration issues. ► Problems are solved and validated on a numerical mock up. ► Integration and accessibility issues can be identified in the earliest design. ► VR technologies are very helpful for assembly and maintenance operation simulations. ► New tools for real time simulations of hands-on operations are currently under development. -- Abstract: In a project like ITER where schedule, resources and cost is continuously optimized, emphasis has to be put on developing long lead items first while keeping other designs very low in definition. Hence, at a particular stage of the project, several components have to coexist in the integrated system while handling different level of maturity. Therefore, all the difficulty consists in managing the interfaces between all these components and to minimize the risk of design changes on the most advanced components. As a future exploitant, ITER is in charge of managing these interfaces and to ensure that maintenance of especially safety important class components (SIC) is feasible. These operation and maintenance constraints have to be taken into account since the earliest design of the components itselves. In this context, CEA IRFM is taking the benefit of using its virtual reality (VR) platform and simulation tools to assist ITER Organization in improving the efficiency of the inconsistencies identification and the machine sub-system design optimization. Currently, two contracts are on-going: the first one concerns the cryostat and in-vessel components; the second one concerns the overall Tokamak (TKM) and diagnostic buildings. This paper describes how VR tools applied to fusion and especially to ITER can help design and Integration with taking into account assembly and maintenance requirements at early stage in the design of complex systems.

  20. ITER design, integration and assembly studies assisted by virtual reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, D.; Doceul, L.; Ferlay, F.; Jiolat, G.; Cordier, J.J.; Kuehn, I.; Manfreo, B.; Reich, J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► VR technologies applied to Fusion enable to better and faster understand integration issues. ► Problems are solved and validated on a numerical mock up. ► Integration and accessibility issues can be identified in the earliest design. ► VR technologies are very helpful for assembly and maintenance operation simulations. ► New tools for real time simulations of hands-on operations are currently under development. -- Abstract: In a project like ITER where schedule, resources and cost is continuously optimized, emphasis has to be put on developing long lead items first while keeping other designs very low in definition. Hence, at a particular stage of the project, several components have to coexist in the integrated system while handling different level of maturity. Therefore, all the difficulty consists in managing the interfaces between all these components and to minimize the risk of design changes on the most advanced components. As a future exploitant, ITER is in charge of managing these interfaces and to ensure that maintenance of especially safety important class components (SIC) is feasible. These operation and maintenance constraints have to be taken into account since the earliest design of the components itselves. In this context, CEA IRFM is taking the benefit of using its virtual reality (VR) platform and simulation tools to assist ITER Organization in improving the efficiency of the inconsistencies identification and the machine sub-system design optimization. Currently, two contracts are on-going: the first one concerns the cryostat and in-vessel components; the second one concerns the overall Tokamak (TKM) and diagnostic buildings. This paper describes how VR tools applied to fusion and especially to ITER can help design and Integration with taking into account assembly and maintenance requirements at early stage in the design of complex systems

  1. Human-machine interface for a VR-based medical imaging environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapichler, Christian; Haubner, Michael; Loesch, Andreas; Lang, Manfred K.; Englmeier, Karl-Hans

    1997-05-01

    Modern 3D scanning techniques like magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) produce high- quality images of the human anatomy. Virtual environments open new ways to display and to analyze those tomograms. Compared with today's inspection of 2D image sequences, physicians are empowered to recognize spatial coherencies and examine pathological regions more facile, diagnosis and therapy planning can be accelerated. For that purpose a powerful human-machine interface is required, which offers a variety of tools and features to enable both exploration and manipulation of the 3D data. Man-machine communication has to be intuitive and efficacious to avoid long accustoming times and to enhance familiarity with and acceptance of the interface. Hence, interaction capabilities in virtual worlds should be comparable to those in the real work to allow utilization of our natural experiences. In this paper the integration of hand gestures and visual focus, two important aspects in modern human-computer interaction, into a medical imaging environment is shown. With the presented human- machine interface, including virtual reality displaying and interaction techniques, radiologists can be supported in their work. Further, virtual environments can even alleviate communication between specialists from different fields or in educational and training applications.

  2. GLAM: Glycogen-derived Lactate Absorption Map for visual analysis of dense and sparse surface reconstructions of rodent brain structures on desktop systems and virtual environments

    KAUST Repository

    Agus, Marco; Boges, Daniya; Gagnon, Nicolas; Magistretti, Pierre J.; Hadwiger, Markus; Cali, Corrado

    2018-01-01

    Human brain accounts for about one hundred billion neurons, but they cannot work properly without ultrastructural and metabolic support. For this reason, mammalian brains host another type of cells called “glial cells”, whose role is to maintain proper conditions for efficient neuronal function. One type of glial cell, astrocytes, are involved in particular in the metabolic support of neurons, by feeding them with lactate, one byproduct of glucose metabolism that they can take up from blood vessels, and store it under another form, glycogen granules. These energy-storage molecules, whose morphology resembles to spheres with a diameter ranging 10–80 nanometers roughly, can be easily recognized using electron microscopy, the only technique whose resolution is high enough to resolve them. Understanding and quantifying their distribution is of particular relevance for neuroscientists, in order to understand where and when neurons use energy under this form. To answer this question, we developed a visualization technique, dubbed GLAM (Glycogen-derived Lactate Absorption Map), and customized for the analysis of the interaction of astrocytic glycogen on surrounding neurites in order to formulate hypotheses on the energy absorption mechanisms. The method integrates high-resolution surface reconstruction of neurites, astrocytes, and the energy sources in form of glycogen granules from different automated serial electron microscopy methods, like focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) or serial block face electron microscopy (SBEM), together with an absorption map computed as a radiance transfer mechanism. The resulting visual representation provides an immediate and comprehensible illustration of the areas in which the probability of lactate shuttling is higher. The computed dataset can be then explored and quantified in a 3D space, either using 3D modeling software or virtual reality environments. Domain scientists have evaluated the technique by

  3. GLAM: Glycogen-derived Lactate Absorption Map for visual analysis of dense and sparse surface reconstructions of rodent brain structures on desktop systems and virtual environments

    KAUST Repository

    Agus, Marco

    2018-05-21

    Human brain accounts for about one hundred billion neurons, but they cannot work properly without ultrastructural and metabolic support. For this reason, mammalian brains host another type of cells called “glial cells”, whose role is to maintain proper conditions for efficient neuronal function. One type of glial cell, astrocytes, are involved in particular in the metabolic support of neurons, by feeding them with lactate, one byproduct of glucose metabolism that they can take up from blood vessels, and store it under another form, glycogen granules. These energy-storage molecules, whose morphology resembles to spheres with a diameter ranging 10–80 nanometers roughly, can be easily recognized using electron microscopy, the only technique whose resolution is high enough to resolve them. Understanding and quantifying their distribution is of particular relevance for neuroscientists, in order to understand where and when neurons use energy under this form. To answer this question, we developed a visualization technique, dubbed GLAM (Glycogen-derived Lactate Absorption Map), and customized for the analysis of the interaction of astrocytic glycogen on surrounding neurites in order to formulate hypotheses on the energy absorption mechanisms. The method integrates high-resolution surface reconstruction of neurites, astrocytes, and the energy sources in form of glycogen granules from different automated serial electron microscopy methods, like focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) or serial block face electron microscopy (SBEM), together with an absorption map computed as a radiance transfer mechanism. The resulting visual representation provides an immediate and comprehensible illustration of the areas in which the probability of lactate shuttling is higher. The computed dataset can be then explored and quantified in a 3D space, either using 3D modeling software or virtual reality environments. Domain scientists have evaluated the technique by

  4. Desktop-Stereolithography 3D-Printing of a Poly(dimethylsiloxane)-Based Material with Sylgard-184 Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Nirveek; Parra-Cabrera, Cesar; Kim, Yong Tae; Kuo, Alexandra P; Folch, Albert

    2018-05-01

    The advantageous physiochemical properties of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) have made it an extremely useful material for prototyping in various technological, scientific, and clinical areas. However, PDMS molding is a manual procedure and requires tedious assembly steps, especially for 3D designs, thereby limiting its access and usability. On the other hand, automated digital manufacturing processes such as stereolithography (SL) enable true 3D design and fabrication. Here the formulation, characterization, and SL application of a 3D-printable PDMS resin (3DP-PDMS) based on commercially available PDMS-methacrylate macromers, a high-efficiency photoinitiator and a high-absorbance photosensitizer, is reported. Using a desktop SL-printer, optically transparent submillimeter structures and microfluidic channels are demonstrated. An optimized blend of PDMS-methacrylate macromers is also used to SL-print structures with mechanical properties similar to conventional thermally cured PDMS (Sylgard-184). Furthermore, it is shown that SL-printed 3DP-PDMS substrates can be rendered suitable for mammalian cell culture. The 3DP-PDMS resin enables assembly-free, automated, digital manufacturing of PDMS, which should facilitate the prototyping of devices for microfluidics, organ-on-chip platforms, soft robotics, flexible electronics, and sensors, among others. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Owgis 2.0: Open Source Java Application that Builds Web GIS Interfaces for Desktop Andmobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala Romero, O.; Chassignet, E.; Zavala-Hidalgo, J.; Pandav, H.; Velissariou, P.; Meyer-Baese, A.

    2016-12-01

    OWGIS is an open source Java and JavaScript application that builds easily configurable Web GIS sites for desktop and mobile devices. The current version of OWGIS generates mobile interfaces based on HTML5 technology and can be used to create mobile applications. The style of the generated websites can be modified using COMPASS, a well known CSS Authoring Framework. In addition, OWGIS uses several Open Geospatial Consortium standards to request datafrom the most common map servers, such as GeoServer. It is also able to request data from ncWMS servers, allowing the websites to display 4D data from NetCDF files. This application is configured by XML files that define which layers, geographic datasets, are displayed on the Web GIS sites. Among other features, OWGIS allows for animations; streamlines from vector data; virtual globe display; vertical profiles and vertical transects; different color palettes; the ability to download data; and display text in multiple languages. OWGIS users are mainly scientists in the oceanography, meteorology and climate fields.

  6. Design and construction of a desktop AC susceptometer using an Arduino and a Bluetooth for serial interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Israel; Ángel Hernández Cuevas, José; Trinidad Elizalde Galindo, José

    2018-05-01

    We designed and developed a desktop AC susceptometer for the characterization of materials. The system consists of a lock-in amplifier, an AC function generator, a couple of coils, a sample holder, a computer system with a designed software in freeware C++ code, and an Arduino card coupled to a Bluetooth module. The Arduino/Bluetooth serial interface allows the user to have a connection to almost any computer and thus avoids the problem of connectivity between the computer and the peripherals, such as the lock-in amplifier and the function generator. The Bluetooth transmitter/receiver used is a commercial device which is robust and fast. These new features reduce the size and increase the versatility of the susceptometer, for it can be used with a simple laptop. To test our instrument, we performed measurements on magnetic materials and show that the system is reliable at both room temperature and cryogenic temperatures (77 K). The instrument is suitable for any physics or engineering laboratory either for research or academic purposes.

  7. Velocity-Resolved LES (VR-LES) technique for simulating turbulent transport of high Schmidt number passive scalars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Siddhartha; Blanquart, Guillaume; P. K. Yeung Collaboration

    2011-11-01

    Accurate simulation of high Schmidt number scalar transport in turbulent flows is essential to studying pollutant dispersion, weather, and several oceanic phenomena. Batchelor's theory governs scalar transport in such flows, but requires further validation at high Schmidt and high Reynolds numbers. To this end, we use a new approach with the velocity field fully resolved, but the scalar field only partially resolved. The grid used is fine enough to resolve scales up to the viscous-convective subrange where the decaying slope of the scalar spectrum becomes constant. This places the cutoff wavenumber between the Kolmogorov scale and the Batchelor scale. The subgrid scale terms, which affect transport at the supergrid scales, are modeled under the assumption that velocity fluctuations are negligible beyond this cutoff wavenumber. To ascertain the validity of this technique, we performed a-priori testing on existing DNS data. This Velocity-Resolved LES (VR-LES) technique significantly reduces the computational cost of turbulent simulations of high Schmidt number scalars, and yet provides valuable information of the scalar spectrum in the viscous-convective subrange.

  8. Two-Color VR CCD Photometry of the Intermediate Polar 1RXS J062518.2+733433

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonggi Kim

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Results of 7 nights of CCD VR photometry of the intermediate polar 1RXS J062518.2 +733433 obtained at the Korean 1.8m telescope are reported. The corrected ephemeris for the orbital minimum is BJD (Orb.min = 2453023.6159 (42+0.1966431 (33 (E- 1735. The corrected ephemeris for the spin maximum is BJD (spin max = 2452893 .78477 (10+0.01374116815 (17 (E-15382 (cycle numbering corresponds to that of Staude et al.~2003. The variations of the shape of the individual spin variations are highly correlated in V and R. The phase of the spin maximum is found to be dependent on the orbital phase. The corresponding semi-amplitude of sinusoidal variations of phase is 0.11±0.03. This new phenomenon is explained by the changing viewing conditions of the accreting magnetic white dwarf, and should be checked in further observations this star and for other intermediate polars. To avoid influence of this effect on the analysis of the long-term spin period variations, the runs of at least one orbital period are recommended. Results of time series analysis are presented in tables.

  9. Influence of Force and Torque Feedback on Operator Performance in a VR-Based Suturing Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Santos-Carreras

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS has revolutionised surgical care, considerably improving the quality of many surgical procedures. Technological advances, particularly in robotic surgery systems, have reduced the complexity of such an approach, paving the way for even less invasive surgical trends. However, the fact that haptic feedback has been progressively lost through this transition is an issue that to date has not been solved. Whereas traditional open surgery provides full haptic feedback, the introduction of MIS has eliminated the possibility of direct palpation and tactile exploration. Nevertheless, these procedures still provide a certain amount of force feedback through the rigid laparoscopic tool. Many of the current telemanipulated robotic surgical systems in return do not provide full haptic feedback, which to a certain extent can be explained by the requirement of force sensors integrated into the tools of the slave robot and actuators in the surgeon’s master console. In view of the increased complexity and cost, the benefit of haptic feedback is open to dispute. Nevertheless, studies have shown the importance of haptic feedback, especially when visual feedback is unreliable or absent. In order to explore the importance of haptic feedback for the surgeon’s master console of a novel teleoperated robotic surgical system, we have identified a typical surgical task where performance could potentially be improved by haptic feedback, and investigate performance with and without this feedback. Two rounds of experiments are performed with 10 subjects, six of them with a medical background. Results show that feedback conditions, including force feedback, significantly improve task performance independently of the operator’s suturing experience. There is, however, no further significant improvement when torque feedback is added. Consequently, it is deduced that force feedback in translations improves subject

  10. Visual physics analysis-from desktop to physics analysis at your fingertips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretz, H-P; Erdmann, M; Fischer, R; Hinzmann, A; Klingebiel, D; Komm, M; Lingemann, J; Rieger, M; Müller, G; Steggemann, J; Winchen, T

    2012-01-01

    Visual Physics Analysis (VISPA) is an analysis environment with applications in high energy and astroparticle physics. Based on a data-flow-driven paradigm, it allows users to combine graphical steering with self-written C++ and Python modules. This contribution presents new concepts integrated in VISPA: layers, convenient analysis execution, and web-based physics analysis. While the convenient execution offers full flexibility to vary settings for the execution phase of an analysis, layers allow to create different views of the analysis already during its design phase. Thus, one application of layers is to define different stages of an analysis (e.g. event selection and statistical analysis). However, there are other use cases such as to independently optimize settings for different types of input data in order to guide all data through the same analysis flow. The new execution feature makes job submission to local clusters as well as the LHC Computing Grid possible directly from VISPA. Web-based physics analysis is realized in the VISPA-Web project, which represents a whole new way to design and execute analyses via a standard web browser.

  11. Using three-dimension virtual reality main control room for integrated system validation and human reliability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Chihwei; Cheng Tsungchieh

    2011-01-01

    This study proposes the performance assessment in three-dimension virtual reality (3D-VR) main control room (MCR). The assessment is conducted for integrated system validation (ISV) purposes, and also for human reliability analyses (HRA). This paper describes the latest developments in 3D-VR applications, designated for the familiarization with MCR, specially taking into account the ISV and HRA. The experiences in 3D-VR application, the benefits and advantages of use of VR in training and maintenances of MCR operators in the target NPP are equally presented in this paper. Results gathered from the performance measurement lead to hazard mitigation and reduces the risk of human error in the operation and maintenance of nuclear equipments. The latest developments in simulation techniques, including 3D presentation enhances the above mentioned benefits, brings the MCR simulators closer to reality. In the near future, this type of 3D solutions should be applied more and more often in the design of MCR simulators. The presented 3D-VR are related to the MCR in NPPs, but the concept of composition and navigation through the system's elements can be easily applied for the purpose of any type of technical equipment and shall contribute in a similar manner to hazard prevention. (author)

  12. The Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery and LapVR evaluation metrics may not correlate with operative performance in a novice cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigerwald, Sarah N.; Park, Jason; Hardy, Krista M.; Gillman, Lawrence; Vergis, Ashley S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Considerable resources have been invested in both low- and high-fidelity simulators in surgical training. The purpose of this study was to investigate if the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS, low-fidelity box trainer) and LapVR (high-fidelity virtual reality) training systems correlate with operative performance on the Global Operative Assessment of Laparoscopic Skills (GOALS) global rating scale using a porcine cholecystectomy model in a novice surgical group with minimal laparoscopic experience. Methods Fourteen postgraduate year 1 surgical residents with minimal laparoscopic experience performed tasks from the FLS program and the LapVR simulator as well as a live porcine laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Performance was evaluated using standardized FLS metrics, automatic computer evaluations, and a validated global rating scale. Results Overall, FLS score did not show an association with GOALS global rating scale score on the porcine cholecystectomy. None of the five LapVR task scores were significantly associated with GOALS score on the porcine cholecystectomy. Conclusions Neither the low-fidelity box trainer or the high-fidelity virtual simulator demonstrated significant correlation with GOALS operative scores. These findings offer caution against the use of these modalities for brief assessments of novice surgical trainees, especially for predictive or selection purposes. PMID:26641071

  13. The Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery and LapVR evaluation metrics may not correlate with operative performance in a novice cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah N. Steigerwald

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considerable resources have been invested in both low- and high-fidelity simulators in surgical training. The purpose of this study was to investigate if the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS, low-fidelity box trainer and LapVR (high-fidelity virtual reality training systems correlate with operative performance on the Global Operative Assessment of Laparoscopic Skills (GOALS global rating scale using a porcine cholecystectomy model in a novice surgical group with minimal laparoscopic experience. Methods: Fourteen postgraduate year 1 surgical residents with minimal laparoscopic experience performed tasks from the FLS program and the LapVR simulator as well as a live porcine laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Performance was evaluated using standardized FLS metrics, automatic computer evaluations, and a validated global rating scale. Results: Overall, FLS score did not show an association with GOALS global rating scale score on the porcine cholecystectomy. None of the five LapVR task scores were significantly associated with GOALS score on the porcine cholecystectomy. Conclusions: Neither the low-fidelity box trainer or the high-fidelity virtual simulator demonstrated significant correlation with GOALS operative scores. These findings offer caution against the use of these modalities for brief assessments of novice surgical trainees, especially for predictive or selection purposes.

  14. Implementation Issues of Virtual Desktop Infrastructure and Its Case Study for a Physician's Round at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sooyoung; Kim, Seok; Kim, Taegi; Kim, Jon Soo; Baek, Rong-Min; Suh, Chang Suk; Chung, Chin Youb; Hwang, Hee

    2012-12-01

    The cloud computing-based virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) allows access to computing environments with no limitations in terms of time or place such that it can permit the rapid establishment of a mobile hospital environment. The objective of this study was to investigate the empirical issues to be considered when establishing a virtual mobile environment using VDI technology in a hospital setting and to examine the utility of the technology with an Apple iPad during a physician's rounds as a case study. Empirical implementation issues were derived from a 910-bed tertiary national university hospital that recently launched a VDI system. During the physicians' rounds, we surveyed patient satisfaction levels with the VDI-based mobile consultation service with the iPad and the relationship between these levels of satisfaction and hospital revisits, hospital recommendations, and the hospital brand image. Thirty-five inpatients (including their next-of-kin) and seven physicians participated in the survey. Implementation issues pertaining to the VDI system arose with regard to the highly availability system architecture, wireless network infrastructure, and screen resolution of the system. Other issues were related to privacy and security, mobile device management, and user education. When the system was used in rounds, patients and their next-of-kin expressed high satisfaction levels, and a positive relationship was noted as regards patients' decisions to revisit the hospital and whether the use of the VDI system improved the brand image of the hospital. Mobile hospital environments have the potential to benefit both physicians and patients. The issues related to the implementation of VDI system discussed here should be examined in advance for its successful adoption and implementation.

  15. Virtual-reality-based attention assessment of ADHD: ClinicaVR: Classroom-CPT versus a traditional continuous performance test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neguț, Alexandra; Jurma, Anda Maria; David, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    Virtual-reality-based assessment may be a good alternative to classical or computerized neuropsychological assessment due to increased ecological validity. ClinicaVR: Classroom-CPT (VC) is a neuropsychological test embedded in virtual reality that is designed to assess attention deficits in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or other conditions associated with impaired attention. The present study aimed to (1) investigate the diagnostic validity of VC in comparison to a traditional continuous performance test (CPT), (2) explore the task difficulty of VC, (3) address the effect of distractors on the performance of ADHD participants and typically-developing (TD) controls, and (4) compare the two measures on cognitive absorption. A total of 33 children diagnosed with ADHD and 42 TD children, aged between 7 and 13 years, participated in the study and were tested with a traditional CPT or with VC, along with several cognitive measures and an adapted version of the Cognitive Absorption Scale. A mixed multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) revealed that the children with ADHD performed worse on correct responses had more commissions and omissions errors than the TD children, as well as slower target reaction times . The results showed significant differences between performance in the virtual environment and the traditional computerized one, with longer reaction times in virtual reality. The data analysis highlighted the negative influence of auditory distractors on attention performance in the case of the children with ADHD, but not for the TD children. Finally, the two measures did not differ on the cognitive absorption perceived by the children.

  16. Diamond as a solid state micro-fission chamber for thermal neutron detection at the VR-1 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomorski, Michal; Mer-Calfati, Christine [CEA-LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, 91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Foulon, Francois [CEA, National Institute for Nuclear Science and Technology, 91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Sklenka, Lubomir; Rataj, Jan; Bily, Tomas [Department of Nuclear Reactors,Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University, V. Holesovickach 2, 180 00 PRAHA 8 (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-01

    Diamond exhibits a combination of properties which makes it attractive for neutron detection in hostile conditions. In the particular case of detection in a nuclear reactor, it is resilient to radiation, exhibits a natural low sensitivity to gamma rays, and its small size (as compared with that of gas ionisation chambers) enables fluency monitoring with a high position resolution. We report here on the use of synthetic CVD diamond as a solid state micro-fission chamber with U-235 converting material for in-core thermal neutron monitoring. Two types of thin diamond detectors were developed for this application. The first type of detector is fabricated using thin diamond membrane obtained by etching low-cost commercially available single crystal CVD intrinsic diamond, so called 'optical grade' material. Starting from a few hundred of micrometre thick samples, the sample is sliced with a laser and then plasma etched down to a few tenths of micrometre. Here we report the result obtained with a 17 μm thick device. The detection surface of this detector is equal to 1 mm{sup 2}. Detectors with surfaces up to 1 cm{sup 2} can be fabricated with this technique. The second type of detector is fabricated by growing successively two thin films of diamond, by the microwave enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique, on HPHT single crystal diamond. A first, a film of boron doped (p+) single crystal diamond, a few microns thick, is deposited. Then a second film of intrinsic diamond with a thickness of a few tens of microns is deposited. This results in a P doped, Intrinsic, Metal structure (PIM) structure in which the intrinsic volume id the active part of the detector. Here we report the results obtained with a 20 μm thick intrinsic whose detection surface is equal to 0.5 mm{sup 2}, with the possibility to enlarge the surface of the detector up to 1 cm{sup 2}. These two types of detector were tested at the VR-1 research reactor at the Czech Technical University in

  17. Diamond as a solid state micro-fission chamber for thermal neutron detection at the VR-1 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomorski, Michal; Mer-Calfati, Christine; Foulon, Francois; Sklenka, Lubomir; Rataj, Jan; Bily, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Diamond exhibits a combination of properties which makes it attractive for neutron detection in hostile conditions. In the particular case of detection in a nuclear reactor, it is resilient to radiation, exhibits a natural low sensitivity to gamma rays, and its small size (as compared with that of gas ionisation chambers) enables fluency monitoring with a high position resolution. We report here on the use of synthetic CVD diamond as a solid state micro-fission chamber with U-235 converting material for in-core thermal neutron monitoring. Two types of thin diamond detectors were developed for this application. The first type of detector is fabricated using thin diamond membrane obtained by etching low-cost commercially available single crystal CVD intrinsic diamond, so called 'optical grade' material. Starting from a few hundred of micrometre thick samples, the sample is sliced with a laser and then plasma etched down to a few tenths of micrometre. Here we report the result obtained with a 17 μm thick device. The detection surface of this detector is equal to 1 mm 2 . Detectors with surfaces up to 1 cm 2 can be fabricated with this technique. The second type of detector is fabricated by growing successively two thin films of diamond, by the microwave enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique, on HPHT single crystal diamond. A first, a film of boron doped (p+) single crystal diamond, a few microns thick, is deposited. Then a second film of intrinsic diamond with a thickness of a few tens of microns is deposited. This results in a P doped, Intrinsic, Metal structure (PIM) structure in which the intrinsic volume id the active part of the detector. Here we report the results obtained with a 20 μm thick intrinsic whose detection surface is equal to 0.5 mm 2 , with the possibility to enlarge the surface of the detector up to 1 cm 2 . These two types of detector were tested at the VR-1 research reactor at the Czech Technical University in Prague. The

  18. Towards VR and AR

    KAUST Repository

    Su, Chen; Peng, Yifan; Zhong, Qing; Li, Haifeng; Wang, Rui; Heidrich, Wolfgang; Liu, Xu

    2016-01-01

    We present a 360° light field display to visualize 3D objects above the table-top screen, and provide a graspable and measurable virtual or augmented reality environment. The display is constructed by a spinning flat-plate deflected diffuser screen

  19. Facebook liker nu VR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Mads

    2017-01-01

    Facebooks ’Virtual Reality’ Spaces tegner en vision for fremtidens digitale kommunikation og samarbejde, men Facebooks fremtidsplaner varsler måske samtidig døden for smartphonen og andre skærm-baserede teknologier. Og hvorfor have en lille skærm i bukselommen, når man kan have en IMAX-biograf i ...

  20. Towards VR and AR

    KAUST Repository

    Su, Chen

    2016-11-28

    We present a 360° light field display to visualize 3D objects above the table-top screen, and provide a graspable and measurable virtual or augmented reality environment. The display is constructed by a spinning flat-plate deflected diffuser screen, a high-speed light field projector, and the user tracking and interaction components. A rearprojection light propagation is specially designed to reconstruct the light field. By calibrating this levitated light field to the physical dimension, and capturing user gestures, we enable multiple users mid-air interactions based on their virtual measurement perception.