WorldWideScience

Sample records for integrated palestinian-jewish schools

  1. Potential and Limitations of Multicultural Education in Conflict-Ridden Areas: Bilingual Palestinian-Jewish Schools in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekerman, Zvi

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, a new integrative bilingual multicultural educational initiative has been developed in Israel. Its main purpose is to offer dignity and equality to the two Israeli groups who have for the last 100 years denied each other's humanity: Palestinians and Jews. The research examines this attempt at encouraging each group to take pride…

  2. Facilitated Dialogues with Teachers in Conflict-Ridden Areas: In Search of Pedagogical Openings that Move beyond the Paralysing Effects of Perpetrator-Victim Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekerman, Zvi; Zembylas, Michalinos

    2010-01-01

    This paper shows some mechanisms as well as the paralysing implications of the perpetrator-victim positioning in the context of inservice education with Jewish- and Palestinian-Israeli teachers who teach in Palestinian-Jewish integrated schools. It examines how these teachers remain rooted in the hegemonic historical narratives of their own…

  3. Safety in Schools: An Integral Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gairin, Joaquin; Castro, Diego

    2011-01-01

    The present paper summarizes a research project into integral safety in schools. The aims of this particular research are, firstly, to evaluate the degree of integral safety in schools, secondly, to propose means for improving prevention and integral safety systems and thirdly, to identify the characteristics of safety culture. The field work was…

  4. MOOC Integration into Secondary School Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Hedieh; Evans, Rosemary; Federico, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    We investigated how high school students taking a university preparatory economics course would engage with the learning and assessment components of a Behavioural Economics MOOC that was integrated into their school-based course. Students were divided into two groups, MOOC-only, with no teacher support, and blended-mode, with weekly tutorials.…

  5. Integrated Management of Structural Pests in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Dept. of Public Health, Springfield.

    The state of Illinois is encouraging schools to better inspect and evaluate the causes of their pest infestation problems through use of the Integrated Pest Management (IPM) guidelines developed by the Illinois Department of Public Health. This guide reviews the philosophy and organization of an IPM program for structural pests in schools,…

  6. Rethinking School Bullying: Towards an Integrated Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Roz; Smith, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    What would make anti-bullying initiatives more successful? This book offers a new approach to the problem of school bullying. The question of what constitutes a useful theory of bullying is considered and suggestions are made as to how priorities for future research might be identified. The integrated, systemic model of school bullying introduced…

  7. Integrated Schools: Finding a New Path

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfield, Gary; Frankenberg, Erica; Siegel-Hawley, Genevieve

    2010-01-01

    Research shows that schools remain a powerful tool for shoring up individual opportunity and for attaining a thriving, multiracial democratic society. The authors point to social science evidence that demonstrates how segregated schooling limits the prospects of both minority and majority students and how integrated education can close the…

  8. Rural Elementary School Teachers' Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howley, Aimee; Wood, Lawrence; Hough, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Based on survey responses from more than 500 third-grade teachers, this study addressed three research questions relating to technology integration and its impact in rural elementary schools. The first analyses compared rural with non-rural teachers, revealing that the rural teachers had more positive attitudes toward technology integration. Then…

  9. Schools Integrate Dance into Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2010-01-01

    Photosynthesis may be an unlikely topic to inspire an opera or ballet, but in a 2nd grade classroom in Pikesville, Maryland, the children were asked to use dance to help them learn about that process. Small groups of pupils in this class at Fort Garrison Elementary School brainstormed to come up with dance movements to convey elements of…

  10. Technology Integration and Technology Leadership in Schools as Learning Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, Recep

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate technology integration in primary schools from the perspective of leadership in learning organizations. To that end, the study examines two groups: school administrators who play effective roles in technology integration in schools and computer teachers who are mainly responsible for schools' technology…

  11. SCHOOL INTEGRATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lioara-Bianca BUBOIU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The right to education is a fundamental right that should not be and can not be denied to any child regardless of his condition of normality or deviation from it. The historic route of educational policies regarding the children with disabilities experienced a positive evolution, from denying the possibility of attending a mainstream school, to current policies of integration and inclusion based on the idea of equal opportunities The rejection of what is considered atypical, unknown, strange, unusual, is the result of perpetuating stereotypes, prejudices regarding the disability, constituting signs of less advanced societies. Is the duty of society to accept children / people with disabilities as part of the reality that surrounds us, and try by all means not to turn a disable child into one normal child, but to normalize the conditions of his life, to give him the possibility to live the same social and school experiences that live any other typically child.

  12. Managing racial integration in South African public schools: In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper explores what racial integration is. Furthermore, it scrutinises how racial integration is currently managed in South African Public schools. The main argument of the paper defends a deliberative conception of managing racial integration in South African public schools. In light of this, there is some form of hope to ...

  13. Integrated Pest Management in Schools Program Brochure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our Nation's children spend a considerable amount of their time in schools, as do teachers and school support staff. EPA is working to reduce the risk that both children and employees experience from pests and pesticides in and around schools.

  14. Barriers to Asthma Management for School Nurses: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley Nadeau, Ellen; Toronto, Coleen E

    2016-04-01

    Childhood asthma is a growing health concern. Asthma is the most common chronic illness of childhood and a leading cause of emergency room visits, hospitalizations, and school absenteeism. School nurses play a valuable role in asthma management. The purpose of this integrative review is to examine barriers to asthma management for school nurses in the school setting. Findings revealed multiple barriers school nurses encounter in managing asthma. Six themes emerged that included lack of resources and support, insufficient time, communication challenges, limited knowledge, and lack of awareness of school nurses' expertise. Students, parents, primary care physicians, school administration, staff, and school nurses themselves all play a role in constructing barriers to asthma management. There is a need for school nurses and school nurse leaders to focus efforts to develop strategies to overcome barriers to ensure evidence-based, best practice management of asthma in the school setting. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Barriers to Asthma Management for School Nurses: An Integrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley Nadeau, Ellen; Toronto, Coleen E.

    2016-01-01

    Childhood asthma is a growing health concern. Asthma is the most common chronic illness of childhood and a leading cause of emergency room visits, hospitalizations, and school absenteeism. School nurses play a valuable role in asthma management. The purpose of this integrative review is to examine barriers to asthma management for school nurses in…

  16. Excluded from school: Autistic students’ experiences of school exclusion and subsequent re-integration into school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina Brede

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims All children have the right to receive an education and to be included in school. Yet young people on the autism spectrum, who are already vulnerable to poor health and social outcomes, are at increased risk of school exclusion. The current study sought to understand the key factors surrounding the school exclusion experiences of a group of autistic students with particularly complex needs, and their subsequent re-integration into education. Method We interviewed nine intellectually able students (eight male, one female; M age = 13.3 years, all with a diagnosis of autism and the majority with a history of demand avoidant behaviour. We also interviewed their parents and teaching staff about the students’ past and current school experiences. All students were currently being educated within an ‘Inclusive Learning Hub’, specially designed to re-integrate excluded, autistic students back into school, which was situated within a larger autism special school. Results Young people and their parents gave overwhelmingly negative accounts of the students’ previous school experiences. Children’s perceived unmet needs, as well as inappropriate approaches by previous school staff in dealing with children’s difficulties, were felt to cause decline in children’s mental health and behaviour and, ultimately, led to their exclusion from school. Four key factors for successful reintegration into school were identified, including (i making substantial adjustments to the physical environment, (ii promoting strong staff–student relationships, (iii understanding students’ specific needs, and (iv targeted efforts towards improving students’ wellbeing. Conclusion The culmination – and escalation – of challenges students experienced in the students’ previous placements could suggest that the educational journey to exclusion from school is an inevitable consequence for at least some autistic children, including those with

  17. School Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's IPM in schools grant program supports projects that include research, development, monitoring, public education, training, demonstrations, or studies to support recipients’ efforts to increase IPM adoption by public and tribal schools (K-12).

  18. Integrating School-Based and Therapeutic Conflict Management Models at School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Oosterlinck, Franky; Broekaert, Eric

    2003-01-01

    Explores the possibility of integrating school-based and therapeutic conflict management models, comparing two management models: a school-based conflict management program, "Teaching Students To Be Peacemakers"; and a therapeutic conflict management program, "Life Space Crisis Intervention." The paper concludes that integration might be possible…

  19. Integration of Leadership Styles of School Director

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovic, Nebojsa; Oljaca, Milka; Kostovic, Svetlana

    2012-01-01

    Management style can be defined as a special behavior of directors in the work process that affects the performance in an organization, in this case-school. Management style has two related meanings: first is behavior of directors to employees, second is directors' approach in school regarding management, participation of employees in decision…

  20. Integration of School Features into Taiwanese Elementary School New English Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Chin-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Elementary school English activation curriculum, an additional two culture classes, has been implemented only in New Taipei City in Taiwan starting from 2010, so only a few studies focus on it. This is a case study of an English teacher's integration of a school's features into the activation curriculum in a rural elementary school. This study…

  1. Urban School Choice and Integration: The Effect of Charter Schools in Little Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Gary W.; Jensen, Nathan C.; Kisida, Brian; Bowen, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    We examine the impact of charter schools on school integration in the Little Rock, Arkansas metropolitan area. We find that charters are less likely to be hyper-segregated than traditional public schools (TPS), but TPS have compositions more closely reflecting the region. However, differences in each case are slight. Using student-level data to…

  2. An Integrated Pest Management Tool for Evaluating Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Blake; Hurley, Janet; Merchant, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Having the ability to assess pest problems in schools is essential for a successful integrated pest management (IPM) program. However, such expertise can be costly and is not available to all school districts across the United States. The web-based IPM Calculator was developed to address this problem. By answering questions about the condition of…

  3. Integrating Neuropsychology and School Psychology: Potential and Pitfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantz, Paul B.; Plotts, Cynthia A.

    2014-01-01

    The neurological basis of learning disabilities (LD), and other handicapping conditions commonly found in school-age children, makes the integration of neuropsychology and school psychology plausible. However, there has been longstanding debate over the required level of education, training, supervision, and credentialing needed for the practice…

  4. Vertical Integration at Junior and Intermediate Levels. School Research Newsletter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklund, Inger, Ed.; Hanse, Mona-Britt, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a rapid growth of interest in Sweden in vertically integrated classes in compulsory schools, especially at junior high school and intermediate grade levels. This development is supported in various ways by the curriculum, partly because it puts more emphasis than previous curricula on the occurrence of teaching…

  5. Measuring School Principals' Support for ICT Integration in Palermo, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polizzi, Gabriella

    2011-01-01

    School principals play an important role in managing media and technology integration into school teaching since they can foster the use of information communication technologies (ICT) at a strategic level, even supporting the introduction of media literacy education activities into teaching. Starting from a review on the role of principals'…

  6. High school science fair and research integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalley, Simon; Shepherd, Karen; Reisch, Joan

    2017-01-01

    Research misconduct has become an important matter of concern in the scientific community. The extent to which such behavior occurs early in science education has received little attention. In the current study, using the web-based data collection program REDCap, we obtained responses to an anonymous and voluntary survey about science fair from 65 high school students who recently competed in the Dallas Regional Science and Engineering Fair and from 237 STEM-track, post-high school students (undergraduates, 1st year medical students, and 1st year biomedical graduate students) doing research at UT Southwestern Medical Center. Of the post-high school students, 24% had competed in science fair during their high school education. Science fair experience was similar overall for the local cohort of Dallas regional students and the more diverse state/national cohort of post-high school students. Only one student out of 122 reported research misconduct, in his case making up the data. Unexpectedly, post-high school students who did not participate in science fair anticipated that carrying out science fair would be much more difficult than actually was the case, and 22% of the post-high school students anticipated that science fair participants would resort to research misconduct to overcome obstacles. No gender-based differences between students’ science fair experiences or expectations were evident. PMID:28328976

  7. Integration of Character Values in School Culture at Elementary Schools in Jakarta, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arita - Marini

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Character values can be integrated not only in the classroom, but also in the school culture. Some teachers are not familiar with the ways of integrating these values in the school culture. The purpose of this study was to find out about implementation of character values integration in school culture at elementary schools in Jakarta. This research was conducted in Jakarta, the capital city of Indonesia. A quantitatively descriptive method was used for this study. Questionnaires related to integration of character values in school culture consists of religious, honesty, discipline, clean and healthy, tolerance, working ethos, and nationalism culture. A total of 63 principals from 63 elementary schools in Jakarta were involved in the study. The result showed that means of character values integration in religious, honesty, discipline, clean and healthy, tolerance, working ethos, and nationalism culture were achieved 13.40, 6.16, 17.71, 13.24, 11.81, 12.33, and 10.49 or 83.75 %, 68.44 %, 98.39 %, 88.27 %, 98.42 %, 94.85 %, and 95.36 % from theoretically maximum scores. This study concludes that character values has already been integrated effectively in religious, discipline, clean and healthy, tolerance, working ethos, and nationalism culture at 63 elementary schools in Jakarta.  On the other hand, integration of character values in honesty culture hasn’t been effective at 63 elementary schools in Jakarta.

  8. Teachers' Perceptions of Technology Integration in a Unified School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloodman, Suzette L.

    2014-01-01

    A unified school district (USD) continues to invest millions of dollars into its technology integration initiatives with minimal academic gains. Since teachers are essential to effective technology integration, the purpose of this phenomenological study was to analyze the perceptions of 13 teachers within the USD relative to how they could more…

  9. From All Walks of Life: New Hope for School Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlenberg, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Integrating our schools is a goal that many of us share. But some seem to have given up on the idea, as plans to boost racial diversity have come under attack, and as the fixation on test scores has narrowed some people's concept of a good education. There is, however, new hope: integration by socioeconomic status. It's a cost-effective, legally…

  10. A systemic model for differentiating school technology integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tel Amiel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available School technology integration rarely begins with school or educator choice. It is part of a wider context where external and internal factors have direct influence on the goals and tools that are adopted over time. The objective of this study is to investigate the systemic conditions that contribute or inhibit the development of different activities by teachers making use of new media. We compiled a list of well-known conditions for technology integration success and mapped these in the historical and culturally bound perspective of activity theory (cultural historical activity theory. We conducted a multiple case study analysis of four schools, public and private. The results point to unique and distinctive scenarios even when homogeneity would be expected, reinforcing the argument that material conditions do not determine pedagogical outcomes nor do they determine changes in practice. Beyond this, the study proposes a methodology that can help elicit tensions in technology integration, pointing to avenues for school development.

  11. The observation of biology implemented by integrated religion values in integrated Islamic school (Decriptive Study in X Integrated Senior Hight School Tasikmalaya)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurjanah, E.; Adisendjaja, Y. H.; Kusumastuti, M. N.

    2018-05-01

    The learning Integrated Religious value is one of the efforts to increase the motivation of learning and building the student character. This study aims to describe the application of Biology learning integrated religion values in Integrated Islamic School. Research methods used in this research is descriptive. Participants in this study involved the headmaster, headmaster of curriculum, biology teachers, boarding school teachers, the lead of boarding schools, and students. The instruments used are interview, observation and the student questionnaire about learning biology. The results showed that learning in X school consists of two curriculums, there was the curriculum of national education and curriculum of boarding school. The curriculum of national education referred to 2013 curriculum and boarding school curriculum referred to the curriculum of Salafi boarding school (Kitab Kuning). However, in its learning process not delivered integrated. The main obstacle to implementing the learning integrated religious values are 1) the background of general teacher education did not know of any connection between biology subject and subject that are studied in boarding school; 2) schools did not form the teaching team; 3) unavailability of materials integrated religious values.

  12. Recruiting middle school students into nursing: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Cheryl

    2017-10-27

    Middle school students interested in nursing need clarification of the nursing role. Students choose nursing as a career because they want to help others, yet they are often unaware of the need to for arduous secondary education preparation to become a nurse. Middle school students, if not properly exposed to the career during their formative years, may choose another career or not have enough time for adequate nursing school preparation. This integrative review examined seven studies from years 2007 to 2016, which utilized various recruitment strategies to increase the awareness of nursing as a career in middle school and address the need for academic rigor. Implications of the review: there is a need for collaboration between nurses and school counselors to design more robust longitudinal studies of middle school interventions for students interested in nursing as a career. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Integrating school-based and therapeutic conflict management models at schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Oosterlinck, Franky; Broekaert, Eric

    2003-08-01

    Including children with emotional and behavioral needs in mainstream school systems leads to growing concern about the increasing number of violent and nonviolent conflicts. Schools must adapt to this evolution and adopt a more therapeutic dimension. This paper explores the possibility of integrating school-based and therapeutic conflict management models and compares two management models: a school-based conflict management program. Teaching Students To Be Peacemakers; and a therapeutic conflict management program, Life Space Crisis Intervention. The authors conclude that integration might be possible, but depends on establishing a positive school atmosphere, the central position of the teacher, and collaborative and social learning for pupils. Further implementation of integrated conflict management models can be considered but must be underpinned by appropriate scientific research.

  14. Technology integrated teaching in Malaysian schools: GIS, a SWOT analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibah Lateh, vasugiammai muniandy

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Geographical Information System (GIS has been introduced and widely used in schools in various countries. The year 1990 onwards, the implementation of GIS in schools showed an increase. This is due to the drastic changes and reforms in the education system. Even though the name GIS suits well to the Geography subject, but it is widely integrated in various subjects such as History, Chemistry, Physics and Science. In Malaysia, GIS is common in fields such as risk management, architecture, town planning and municipal department. Anyhow, it is still unknown in the school education system. Even upper secondary students are not familiar with GIS. The Ministry of Education in Malaysia has been continuously reforming the education towards the aim of creating a society based on economic fundamentals and knowledge. The Master Plan for Educational Development with the aim of developing individual potential with well-integrated and balanced education is already on field. Recently, Malaysia invested 18 % of the annual national budget towards upgrading its education system. The computer in education program started in 1999. Three hundred and twenty two schools were chosen as ‘break a way’ from conventional teaching method towards technology integrated teaching. Projects such as New Primary School Curriculum (KBSR, Integrated Secondary School Curriculum (KBSM, Smart School Project, School Access Centre were introduced constantly. Teacher as the cogwheel of innovations in schools were given courses in aim to develop their ICT knowledge and skill. To this date, the technology integration in subjects is not equal and it disperses through subjects. Geography is one of the ‘dry’ subjects in schools with less technology which is not preferable among students. Geographical Information System (GIS is foremost the best Geographical Information Technology (GIT to be implied in geography subject. In Malaysian Education System, GIS is still exposed just in papers

  15. Achievement, School Integration, and Self-Efficacy in Single-Sex and Coeducational Parochial High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micucci, Kara Hanson

    2014-01-01

    A structural model for prior achievement, school integration, and self-efficacy was developed using Tinto's theory of student attrition and Bandura's self-efficacy theory. The model was tested and revised using a sample of 1,452 males and females from single-sex and coeducational parochial high schools. Results indicated that the theoretically…

  16. The Impact of a Technology Integration Academy on Instructional Technology Integration in a Texas School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, Karla

    2013-01-01

    This applied dissertation was designed to determine the impact of a technology integration professional development on high school teachers' technology integration and students' use of computers in core content areas. The District invested in technology for all classrooms, as well as 1:1 technology for all secondary students with an expectation…

  17. Pre-Eminent Curriculum in Islamic Basic School Integrated Comparative Studies in Islamic Basic School Integrated Al-Izzah Serang and Al-Hanif Cilegon, Banten, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauz, Anis; Hasbullah

    2016-01-01

    Compare to General SD (Primary school), the superiority of SD Islam Terpadu (Integrated Islamic Primary School) lies on the development of the curriculum and learning that is more emphasize on integrated curriculum and integrated learning. Curriculum model applied in Sekolah Dasar Islam Terpadu (SDIT) is integrated curriculum. This curriculum is…

  18. National Integration in Multicultural School Setting in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Abu Bakar; Alias, Norlidah; Siraj, Saedah

    2013-01-01

    Malaysia is a multicultural country constituting three major ethno-cultural groups, Malay and Bumiputera, Chinese and Indian. Owing to its diverse cultures attempts through a number of channels, politics, economics and social were made to bring about national integration. School is thought to be the most effective platform to bring about national…

  19. Evaluation Of Farmer Field School On Integrated Pest | Rustum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research is aimed to explore the quality of the program implementation of the Integrated Pest Management Field Farmer School (IPMFFS) (in Indonesian ... quantity (3) participate agricultural extension, (4) remedial practice, (5) insight development, (6) motivation establishment, (7) the readiness of the participants, ...

  20. Organizational Support of Technology Integration in One School in Lebanon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgheib, Rosine S.

    2013-01-01

    Technology has been at the center of heated debates in educational settings driving schools to compete for the best technological equipments. However, in Lebanon there is a lag in technology integration matching twenty first century advances. Several barriers related to teacher attitudes, lack of technical skills and organizational constraints to…

  1. Effect of integrated pest management farmer field school (IPMFFS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research aimed to explore the effect of the Integrated Pest Management Farmer Field School (IPMFFS), on farmer knowledge, farmer group's ability, process of adoption and diffusion of IPM in Jember district. The population of the research was 556 farmer groups consisting of 22.240 farmers engaged in the IPMFFS in ...

  2. Connecticut School Integration: Moving Forward as the Northeast Retreats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfield, Gary

    2015-01-01

    This report analyzes the data on changes in patterns of racial segregation and their education consequences over a quarter century, from l987 to 2012. It examines a major transition in the racial and ethnic composition of Connecticut and the changes in integration and segregation in the schools of the state and its urban communities and it…

  3. Family Integrants Obstructing Pupils' School Attendance and Girl ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study is hinged on finding out the family integrants obstructing pupils' school attendance, the girl – child education and proffering solution to it via counsellors' strategies. The samples were three hundred (300) parents and twenty (20) counsellors. This brought the total sample to three hundred and twenty (320).

  4. Economic School Integration: An Update. The Century Foundation Issue Brief Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlenberg, Richard D.

    In 2000, an Idea Brief asserted that the best way to improve education would be to give every schoolchild the opportunity to attend a middle class public school (economic school integration). This brief reviews recent research and policy developments regarding economic school integration, noting that school segregation based on socioeconomic…

  5. IMPLEMENTATIONS OF MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION AS A SCHOOL CULTURE AT KRIDA NUSANTARA INTEGRATED SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunani Sunani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The primary purpose of this study is to describe the implementation of multicultural education at Krida Nusantara integrated high school. The study focuses on four main points; the school policy, the implementation and the dominant factors that influence the policy, and the implementation results. A descriptive qualitative approach is taken in the study and the data is collected through interviews and case studies. The study concludes that the school's multicultural education policy is applied based on the school founding fathers’ philosophy, which emphasizes on merging nationalist and religious values. Those values are then implemented in form of academic and non-academic programs. Apart from that, students' plurality values that are embedded in their school life serve as the most influential factor in implementing the multicultural education policy.

  6. Social Representations of the Integrated High School Students about Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Jose Isnaldo de Lima; Voelzke, Marcos Rincon

    2017-07-01

    Astronomy issues are not always adequately handled in the formal education system, as well as, their dissemination in the media is often loaded with sensationalism. However, in this context the students are forming their explanations about it. Therefore, this work has the objective of identifying the possible social representations of students from the Integrated High School on the inductor term Astronomy. It is basically a descriptive research, therefore, a quali-qualitative approach was adopted. The procedures for obtaining the data occurred in the form of a survey, and they involved 653 subjects students from the Integrated High School. The results indicate that the surveyed students have social representations of the object Astronomy, which are based on elements from the formal education space, and also disclosed in the media. In addition, they demonstrate that the students have information about Astronomy, and a value judgment in relation to this science.

  7. Violence prevention in special education schools - an integrated practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihl, Patricia; Grytnes, Regine; Andersen, Lars Peter S

    2018-06-01

    Research has shown that employees in special education settings are at high risk for work-related threats and violence. Previous research has not yet been able to identify the essential components of training programs that offer protection from work-related threats and violence. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore how employees in special education schools deal with prevention of work-related threats and violence. Group interviews were conducted with 14 employees working at 5 special education schools. Results show that employees use a wide range of prevention strategies drawing on specific violence prevention techniques as well as professional pedagogical approaches. We propose that the prevention of threats and violence in special education schools can be understood as an integrated pedagogical practice operating on three interrelated levels. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The integrated approach to teaching programming in secondary school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martynyuk A.A.

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available the article considers an integrated approach to teaching programming with the use of technologies of computer modeling and 3D-graphics, allowing to improve the quality of education. It is shown that this method will allow you to systematize knowledge, improve the level of motivation through the inclusion of relevant technologies, to develop skills of project activities, to strengthen interdisciplinary connections, and promotes professional and personal self-determination of students of secondary school.

  9. The Artful Teacher: A Conceptual Model for Arts Integration in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemi, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses specific issues within arts-integration experiences in schools. Focusing on the relationship between positive emotions, learning, and the Arts, the article discusses empirical data that has been drawn from a research study, Making the Ordinary Extraordinary: Adopting Artfulness in Danish Schools. When schools integrate the…

  10. Institutional educational projects in Colombia facing school integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Caicedo Obando

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, more than before people talks about the importance to pay attention to the particularity, and this concept has had different conceptions: starting with the incapacity, concept understood like the feature which make a subject different from the others. Other concept is vulnerability which require special attention by the same society that has produced this. Education is one of the most important aspects in the attention. And what is happening inside the educative institutions is not the result of only one way to face and understand the situation that imply the subjects integration since the particularity many senses are assumed in relation with the conception of: subject, school, integration. For this reason, in this article the instrumental, strategic and complex senses are analysed. 

  11. Exploring School Nurse Interventions and Health and Education Outcomes: An Integrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Nakia C.; Oppewal, Sonda; Travers, Debbie

    2018-01-01

    School nurses intervene with students, parents, and school staff to advance the health and academic success of students. We conducted an integrative literature review of published research to describe the types of school nurse interventions and health and education outcome measures and to examine how school nurse interventions were linked to…

  12. A Comparative Analysis of the Integration of Faith and Learning between ACSI and ACCS Accredited Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Daniel Carl

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive quantitative study was to analyze and compare the integration of faith and learning occurring in Christian schools accredited by the Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI) and classical Christian schools accredited by the Association of Classical and Christian Schools (ACCS). ACSI represents the…

  13. The Junior High School Integrated Science: The Actual Teaching Process in the Perspective of an Ethnographer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adu-Gyamfi, Kenneth; Ampiah, Joseph Ghartey

    2016-01-01

    Science education at the Basic School (Primary and Junior High School) serves as the foundation upon which higher levels of science education are pivoted. This ethnographic study sought to investigate the teaching of Integrated Science at the Junior High School (JHS) level in the classrooms of two science teachers in two schools of differing…

  14. Bringing Wellness to Schools: Opportunities and Challenges to Mental Health Integration in School Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Karen; Guo, Sisi; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Roya; Puffer, Maryjane; Kataoka, Sheryl H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective School-based health centers (SBHCs) reduce mental health access-to-care barriers and improve educational outcomes for youth. This qualitative study evaluates the innovations and challenges of a unique network of SBHCs in a large, urban school district, as they attempt to integrate health, mental health, and educational services. Methods The 43 participants sampled included mental health providers, primary care providers, and care coordinators at 14 SBHCs. Semi-structured interviews with each participant were audio-recorded and transcribed. Themes were identified and coded using Atlas.ti 5.1, and collapsed into three domains: Operations, Partnership, and Engagement. Results Interviews revealed provider models ranging from single agencies offering both health and mental health services to co-located services. Sites with the Health Agency providing at least some mental health services reported more mental health screenings. Many sites utilized SBHC coordinators and coordination team meetings to facilitate relationships between schools and Health Agency and Community Mental Health Clinic providers. Partnership challenges included confidentiality policies and staff turnover. Participants also highlighted student and parent engagement, through culturally sensitive services, peer health advocates, and “drop-in” lunches. Conclusions Staffing and operational models are critical in the success of health-mental health-education integration. Among the provider models observed, the combined health and mental health provider model offered the most integrated services. Despite barriers, providers and schools have begun to implement novel solutions for operational problems and family engagement in mental health services. Implications for future SBHCs as an integrated model are described. PMID:27417895

  15. Predictors of School Garden Integration: Factors Critical to Gardening Success in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Kate Gardner; Burgermaster, Marissa; Jacquez, Raquel

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the level of integration of school gardens and identify factors that predict integration. 211 New York City schools completed a survey that collected demographic information and utilized the School Garden Integration Scale. A mean garden integration score was calculated, and multiple regression analysis was conducted to determine independent predictors of integration and assess relationships between individual integration characteristics and budget. The average integration score was 34.1 (of 57 points) and ranged from 8 to 53. Operating budget had significant influence on integration score, controlling for all other factors ( p integrated, as budget is a modifiable factor. When adequate funding is secured, a well-integrated garden may be established with proper planning and sound implementation.

  16. Astronomy: social background of students of the integrated high school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelzke, M. R.; Barbosa, J. I. L.

    2017-07-01

    Astronomy-related contents exist in almost all levels of basic education in Brazil and are also frequently disseminated through mass media. Thus, students form their own explanations about the phenomena studied by this science. Therefore, this work has the objective of identifying the possible social background of the Integrated High School students on the term Astronomy. It is a research of a basic nature, descriptive, and for that reason a quali-quantitative approach was adopted; the procedures to obtain the data were effected in the form of a survey. The results show that the tested students have a social background about the object Astronomy, which is on the one hand fortified by elements they have made or which is part of the experience lived by the respondents within the formal space of education, and on the other hand based on elements possibly disseminated through the mass media.

  17. Position of the American Dietetic Association: local support for nutrition integrity in schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Ethan A; Gordon, Ruth W

    2010-08-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association (ADA) that schools and communities have a shared responsibility to provide students with access to high-quality, affordable, nutritious foods and beverages. School-based nutrition services, including the provision of meals through the National School Lunch Program and the School Breakfast Program, are an integral part of the total education program. Strong wellness policies promote environments that enhance nutrition integrity and help students to develop lifelong healthy behaviors. ADA actively supported the 2004 and proposed 2010 Child Nutrition reauthorization which determines school nutrition policy. ADA believes that the Dietary Guidelines for Americans should serve as the foundation for all food and nutrition assistance programs and should apply to all foods and beverages sold or served to students during the school day. Local wellness policies are mandated by federal legislation for all school districts participating in the National School Lunch Program. These policies support nutrition integrity,including a healthy school environment. Nutrition integrity also requires coordinating nutrition education and promotion and funding research on program outcomes. Registered dietitians and dietetic technicians, registered, and other credentialed staff, are essential for nutrition integrity in schools to perform in policy-making, management, education, and community building roles. A healthy school environment can be achieved through adequate funding of school meals programs and through implementation and evaluation of strong local wellness policies.

  18. Information for Participants Implementing Integrated Pest Management in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parents, school faculty and staff, school administrators, and pest management professionals all have important roles in planning and implementing school IPM. Find out about these roles and resources available to help.

  19. Barriers to Implementing Treatment Integrity Procedures in School Psychology Research: Survey of Treatment Outcome Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanetti, Lisa M. Hagermoser; DiGennaro Reed, Florence D.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment integrity data are essential to drawing valid conclusions in treatment outcome studies. Such data, however, are not always included in peer-reviewed research articles in school psychology or related fields. To gain a better understanding of why treatment integrity data are lacking in the school psychology research, we surveyed the…

  20. Religious Justification, Elitist Outcome: Are Religious Schools Being Used to Avoid Integration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel Ben Shahar, Tammy; Berger, Eyal

    2018-01-01

    Despite ongoing efforts to promote ethnic, racial and socio-economic integration, segregation continues to challenge education administrators and legal scholars. Privileged parents seeking to avoid integration employ various strategies such as attending private schools or buying houses in neighbourhoods with good school. This paper offers a…

  1. Integrating the Social Teaching of the Church into Catholic Schools: Conversations in Excellence 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, Carol, Ed.; Haney, Regina M., Ed.; O'Keefe, Joseph M., Ed.

    This collection of essays deals with the integration of the social teaching of the Catholic Church into Catholic schools. The collection contains the following chapters: (1) "Focus of SPICE 2000: How To Integrate Jubilee Justice into Schools throughout the Millennium" (Carol Cimino; Regina Haney; Joseph O'Keefe); (2) "Model…

  2. The Integration of New Media in Schools: Comparing Policy with Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Nurzali

    2015-01-01

    Beyond policy, this paper investigates the actual practice related to the integration of new media in schools. Despite continuous government effort to integrate new media in schools, the use of digital technologies for teaching and learning in the classroom remains limited. This study suggests that, apart from the issue related to the state of…

  3. Leading Integrated Schools: A Study of the Multicultural Perspectives of Northern Irish Principals

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlynn, Claire

    2008-01-01

    This article is concerned with the sustained peace education initiative of integrated schooling and in particular with leadership responses to cultural diversity. Using a case study group of principals of integrated (mixed Catholic, Protestant and other) schools in Northern Ireland, the author explores how principals perceive and lead their…

  4. The relationship between technology leadership roles and profiles of school principals and technology integration in primary school classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa SAMANCIOĞLU; Murat BAĞLIBEL; Mahmut KALMAN; Mehmet SİNCAR

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between technology leadership behaviors of school principals and teachers’ level of technology integration, and to determine technology leadership profiles based on teacher views and examine their association with technology integration. The researchers administered two questionnaires to 352 teachers working at sixteen primary schools in a large city in southeastern Turkey. The results revealed a positive, but weak relationship bet...

  5. Rural School Math and Science Teachers' Technology Integration Familiarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalonde, Gilbert

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the significance of technology integration familiarization and the subsequent PD provided to rural middle school teachers with several opportunities to gain technological skills for technology use in rural middle school math and science classrooms. In order to explore the use of technology in rural schools, this study surveyed…

  6. Promoting Academic Achievement in the Middle School Classroom: Integrating Effective Study Skills Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Christin

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to discover what study skills are most useful for middle school students, as well as strategies for integrating study skills instruction into the four main content area classrooms (English, math, science, and social studies) at the middle school level. Twenty-nine in-service middle school teachers participated in the study by…

  7. The Complexity integrated-Instruments components media of IPA at Elementary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angreni Siska

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims at describing the complexity of Integrated Instrument Components media (CII in learning of science at Elementary schools in District Siulak Mukai and at Elementary schools in District Siulak. The research applied a descriptive method which included survey forms. Instruments used were observation sheets. The result of the research showed Integrated Instrument Components media (CII natural science that complexity at primary school district Siulak was more complex compared with that at primary school district Siulak Mukai. is better than from primary school district Mukai

  8. Can Indicators on School Websites Be Used to Determine the Level of ICT Integration and ICT Leadership in Schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maio-Taddeo, Carmel

    2007-01-01

    As schools continue to invest resources into the integration of Information Communication Technologies (ICTs), many are also utilizing the Internet as a medium for promoting and marketing their facilities and educational programs to prospective families. Tailored and personalised school websites provide a wide range of information for members of…

  9. Preparing prospective physics teachers to teach integrated science in junior high school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiyanto; Hartono; Nugroho, S. E.

    2018-03-01

    The physics education study program especially prepares its students to teach physics in senior high school, however in reality many its graduates have become science teachers in junior high school. Therefore introducing integrated science to prospective physics teachers is important, because based on the curriculum, science in the junior high school should be taught integratedly. This study analyzed integrated science teaching materials that developed by prospective physics teachers. Results from this study showed that majority of the integration materials that developed by the prospective physics teachers focused on topic with an overlapping concept or theme as connecting between two or three subjects.

  10. Successfully Integrating Climate Change Education into School System Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scallion, M.

    2017-12-01

    Maryland's Eastern Shore is threatened by climate change driven sea level rise. By working with school systems, rather than just with individual teachers, educators can gain access to an entire grade level of students, assuring that all students, regardless of socioeconomic background or prior coursework have an opportunity to explore the climate issue and be part of crafting community level solutions for their communities. We will address the benefits of working with school system partners to achieve a successful integration of in-school and outdoor learning by making teachers and administrators part of the process. We will explore how, through the Maryland and Delaware Climate Change Education, Assessment, and Research Project, teachers, content supervisors and informal educators worked together to create a climate curriculum with local context that effectively meets Common Core and Next Generation Science Standards. Over the course of several weeks during the year, students engage in a series of in-class and field activities directly correlated with their science curriculum. Wetlands and birds are used as examples of the local wildlife and habitat being impacted by climate change. Through these lessons led by Pickering Creek Audubon Center educators and strengthened by material covered by classroom teachers, students get a thorough introduction to the mechanism of climate change, local impacts of climate change on habitats and wildlife, and actions they can take as a community to mitigate the effects of climate change. The project concludes with a habitat and carbon stewardship project that gives students and teachers a sense of hope as they tackle this big issue on a local scale. We'll explore how the MADE-CLEAR Informal Climate Change Education (ICCE) Community of Practice supports Delaware and Maryland environmental educators in collaboratively learning and expanding their programming on the complex issue of climate change. Participants will learn how to

  11. Health Benefits of Integrated Pest Management in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    The following documents describe the health case for School IPM.They describe what IPM is, and then summarize currently available research pointing to how pest control via IPM makes for a healthier school environment.

  12. Sustainability and public health nutrition at school: assessing the integration of healthy and environmentally sustainable food initiatives in Vancouver schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Jennifer L; Velazquez, Cayley E; Ahmadi, Naseam; Chapman, Gwen E; Carten, Sarah; Edward, Joshua; Shulhan, Stephanie; Stephens, Teya; Rojas, Alejandro

    2015-09-01

    To describe the development and application of the School Food Environment Assessment Tools and a novel scoring system to assess the integration of healthy and environmentally sustainable food initiatives in elementary and secondary schools. The cross-sectional study included direct observations of physical food environments and interviews with key school personnel regarding food-related programmes and policies. A five-point scoring system was then developed to assess actions across six domains: (i) food gardens; (ii) composting systems; (iii) food preparation activities; (iv) food-related teaching and learning activities; and availability of (v) healthy food; and (vi) environmentally sustainable food. Vancouver, Canada. A purposive sample of public schools (n 33) from all six sectors of the Vancouver Board of Education. Schools scored highest in the areas of food garden and compost system development and use. Regular integration of food-related teaching and learning activities and hands-on food preparation experiences were also commonly reported. Most schools demonstrated rudimentary efforts to make healthy and environmentally sustainable food choices available, but in general scored lowest on these two domains. Moreover, no schools reported widespread initiatives fully supporting availability or integration of healthy or environmentally sustainable foods across campus. More work is needed in all areas to fully integrate programmes and policies that support healthy, environmentally sustainable food systems in Vancouver schools. The assessment tools and proposed indicators offer a practical approach for researchers, policy makers and school stakeholders to assess school food system environments, identify priority areas for intervention and track relevant changes over time.

  13. Role Integration through the Practice of Social Work with Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherardi, Stacy A; Whittlesey-Jerome, Wanda K.

    2018-01-01

    The current environment for school social work presents great challenges and great opportunities. Amid promising shifts in programs and policies, many school social workers feel marginalized. Despite sustained efforts at definition, the role of the school social worker remains unclear to many outside the field. More important, this role is often…

  14. Mini Technology Manual for Schools: An Introduction to Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grismore, Brian A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to assist school leaders in beginning or developing the use of educational technology within their school or district. The manual covers topics: 1) advantages of educational technology; 2) types of technology used for learning and teaching; 3) how to make good decisions about the use of technology in schools; 4) the…

  15. Through the Looking Glass: Examining Technology Integration in School Librarianship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Lucy Santos

    2014-01-01

    The school library profession has begun to develop a reputation for tech-savviness. Several school librarians are nationally recognized technology leaders and present at conferences where instructional technology is at the forefront. Unfortunately, while school librarians have done a wonderful job of marketing their technological expertise in the…

  16. Phenomenological Investigation of Elementary School Teachers Who Successfully Integrated Instructional Technology into the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Lori Raquel; Shepard, MaryFriend

    2011-01-01

    Technology integration in school curricula promotes student achievement, yet many teachers are not successfully integrating technology for learning. This phenomenological study explored the strategies of 10 elementary teachers in Georgia who overcame barriers to technology integration to successfully incorporate lessons within the public school…

  17. Possibilities of enhancing school students' well-being: Evaluation of the effectiveness of integrative teaching programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skuskovnika D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Integrative Teaching Programme in enhancing school students' well-being and in lowering their level of school's anxiety1. In total, 608 students with different kinds of learning difficulties (aged from 10 till 19 from 17 schools from different administrative districts of Latvia participated in the implementation of this project. Participants filled out a specially developed questionnaire at the beginning and at the end of one school year. Among other scales integrated in Student's Questionnaire, students filled in a School Anxiety scale and Student's well-beingscale. Results show, that after realization of the Integrative Teaching Programme, a significant decrease was found in the students' school's anxiety level, and significant increase in theirs' well-being level. Developed Integrative Teaching Programme is an effective tool for enhancing students' self-regulation ability, self-confidence, social competence etc. Development of these skills and interaction with teachers and classmates in creative, stimulating and free atmosphere can decrease school's anxiety and as result enchase students' subjective well-being which is a necessary step for integrating students with learning difficulties in normal school life.

  18. Understanding the school journey: integrating data on travel and environment

    OpenAIRE

    Colin Pooley; Duncan Whyatt; Marion Walker; Gemma Davies; Paul Coulton; Will Bamford

    2010-01-01

    Travel to and from school is a regular part of life for most children. Such movement can also have important social, economic, and environmental implications, both for individuals and for wider society. This paper uses innovative methods to examine the complexity of the school journey, and to relate it to exposure to air pollution and engagement with the environment through which children pass. Some thirty lower secondary school pupils used mobile-phone and global positioning system technolog...

  19. Comprehensive School Mental Health: An Integrated "School-Based Pathway to Care" Model for Canadian Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yifeng; Kutcher, Stan; Szumilas, Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    Adolescence is a critical period for the promotion of mental health and the treatment of mental disorders. Schools are well-positioned to address adolescent mental health. This paper describes a school mental health model, "School-Based Pathway to Care," for Canadian secondary schools that links schools with primary care providers and…

  20. Integrating Academic Interventions into Small Group Counseling in Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Sam; Kaffenberger, Carol J.

    2007-01-01

    Professional school counselors face the challenge of delivering guidance and counseling services to students while connecting to the educational mission of schools. This article is a summary and evaluation of a small group counseling program that targets academic issues while addressing personal/social issues with elementary-aged children. Results…

  1. EPA Releases Update to Popular School Integrated Pest Management Publication

    Science.gov (United States)

    An updated version reflects recent innovations in school IPM, provides links to new information, and has been redesigned into an easily printable format. It provides an overview of IPM and details the steps a school can follow to establish an IPM program.

  2. Beyond the curriculum: Integrating sustainability into business schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Painter-Morland, M.; Sabet, E.; Molthan-Hill, P.; Goworek, H.; de Leeuw, S.L.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper evaluates the ways in which European business schools are implementing sustainability and ethics into their curricula. Drawing on data gathered by a recent large study that the Academy of Business in Society conducted in cooperation with EFMD conducted, we map the approaches that schools

  3. Administrator Insights and Reflections: Technology Integration in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrett, Bryan; Murphy, Jennifer; Sullivan, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    There are numerous technology tools that educators utilize to support student learning. Often, technology is mandated from the top down with school administrators' responsible for overseeing the implementation. Innovative technological approaches to learning often meet resistance within schools. The pervasive culture in education is counteractive…

  4. School Integration Matters: Research-Based Strategies to Advance Equity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenberg, Erica, Ed.; Garces, Liliana M., Ed.; Hopkins, Megan, Ed.

    2016-01-01

    More than 60 years after the "Brown v. Board of Education" decision declared segregated schooling inherently unequal, this timely book sheds light on how and why U.S. schools are experiencing increasing segregation along racial, socioeconomic, and linguistic lines. It offers policy and programmatic alternatives for advancing equity and…

  5. National Association of School Psychologists Model for Comprehensive and Integrated School Psychological Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Psychology Review, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The mission of the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) is to represent school psychology and support school psychologists to enhance the learning and mental health of all children and youth. "School psychologists" provide effective services to help children and youth succeed academically, socially, behaviorally, and emotionally.…

  6. Is the Integration of Newcomers Mediated by the School?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Todisco

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The problems of schooling for foreigners can be devided into three issues: pupil education, adult training and university students. Each issue is different in terms of different problems and their presentation. Pupils are second or third generation foreigners; adults are normally first generation foreigners, while university students can belong either to the first, or to successive generations of foreigners. As regards pupils and students in school (from primary to secondary school, vocational, arts and music schools we wrongly suppose that their problems are on the attendant side, and almost always due to the poor language expertise. For this reason we speak of immigrants at school. But in reality also the school system has many delicate problems to face, such as the acceptance of newcomers, multicultural education, updating teachers, the relationship with the families of pupils, communication between foreign and native pupils, education results, dropout rates and so on. This is the reason it is better to say immigrants and school meaning that the relationship is two sided, and the schools also have responsibilities and tasks. The second question concerns adult training. The paper examines different issues concerning foreign adult attendance at school, the aims of such attendance, professional training and teaching in public or private institutions. The third question concerns foreign university students. In Italy the number of students has continuously decreased from the ’80s, but quite recently has grown again. This is due not only to an increase in students coming from abroad, but mainly due to foreign students in terms of citizenship who have been residents in Italy for many years and have, therefore, attended Italian schools. Another important matter in these last years is the rapid and continuous increase of female participation: while in the ’90s male attendance was about double compared to female attendance, today the number of

  7. Noncognitive Factors in an Elementary School-Wide Arts Integrated Model

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson Steele, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Pomaika‘i Elementary School has answered a call to improve education by providing content instruction through the arts. How does school wide arts integration in an elementary setting support students as they transition to middle school? This bounded case study examines the experiences of eight families through a series of interviews with students, parents, and teachers. It describes and explains learning through the arts within three overarching noncognitive factors: a) academic mindsets, or ...

  8. Integrating E-Books into Science Teaching by Preservice Elementary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ching-San

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to discuss the issues of integrating e-books into science teaching by preservice elementary school teachers. The study adopts both qualitative and quantitative research methods. In total, 24 preservice elementary school teachers participated in this study. The main sources of research data included e-books produced by preservice…

  9. An Innovative Model of Integrated Behavioral Health: School Psychologists in Pediatric Primary Care Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Carolyn D.; Hinojosa, Sara; Armstrong, Kathleen; Takagishi, Jennifer; Dabrow, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses an innovative example of integrated care in which doctoral level school psychology interns and residents worked alongside pediatric residents and pediatricians in the primary care settings to jointly provide services to patients. School psychologists specializing in pediatric health are uniquely trained to recognize and…

  10. Integrating ICT in Kenyan Secondary Schools: An Exploratory Case Study of a Professional Development Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondeur, Jo; Krug, Don; Bill, Mike; Smulders, Maaike; Zhu, Chang

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the introduction of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in Kenyan secondary schools. Specifically, it is a case study of four schools with no previous access to ICT. The professional development programme from which data for this study were drawn was designed to support teachers learning to integrate ICT in the…

  11. Technology in Education: Technology Integration into the School's Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, Bobby L., Jr.

    2017-01-01

    Integrating technology into the school's curriculum is a very contentious issue. However, it is an important issue that schools need to consider and assess. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between K-5th grade teachers' perceptions of proficiency of technology equipment, experience with technology in education, and…

  12. The Integration of Pedagogical Aspects in Environmental Management Systems in Selected South African Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanyimba, Alex; Richter, Barry; Raath, Schalk

    2015-01-01

    Environmental management systems implemented in schools are regarded by many as a mechanism for the integration of environmental matters in all the operational functions of the school. The links, however, between environmental management and curriculum practice have not been adequately addressed in the literature. This article reports on the…

  13. Integrating Emerging Technologies in Teaching Ugandan Traditional Dances in K-12 Schools in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabingo, Alfdaniels

    2015-01-01

    Schools in New York City have made attempts to embrace and support the strand of "making connections", which is laid out in the New York City Department of Dance blueprint for teaching and learning in dance for grades PreK-12. Accordingly, some schools have integrated Ugandan traditional dances into the dance curriculum, and dance…

  14. A Program of Integration for the University and the High School in the Field of Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, Reinaldo Calixto; Filho, Aricelso Maia Limaverde; Carneiro, Maria Tereza W. Dias; Godoy, Jose Marcus de Oliveira; Goulart, Mauricio Silveira; Guerchon, Jose

    This paper describes the Project for Integrating the University, the School, and Society (PIUES), developed as part of an effort to restructure the teaching of engineering at the Pontifical Catholic University in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. New courses for high school teachers were developed that focused on the debates over basic concepts in…

  15. Collaborative Digital Games as Mediation Tool to Foster Intercultural Integration in Primary Dutch Schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Paz Alencar (Amanda); T. de la Hera Conde-Pumpido (Teresa)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIn the Netherlands, the growing presence of immigrant children in schools has fueled scholarly interest in and concerns for examining the process of integration in school environments. The use of digital games has found to be an effective tool to reinforce teaching/learning practices.

  16. National Board Certified School Librarians' Leadership in Technology Integration: Results of a National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, Nancy; Mardis, Marcia A.; Johnston, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to address the lack of empirical knowledge about the school librarians' role in technology, the Institute for Museum and Library Services funded Project Leadership-in-Action (LIA) to study leadership practices of school librarians. This current grant project includes a survey of the technology integration practices of school…

  17. Organizational Effectiveness: Toward an Integrated Model for Schools of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Constance M.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Literature review on organizational effectiveness focuses on major assessment models: goal attainment, human relations, open systems, internal processes, culture, and life cycle. A review of studies of nursing school effectiveness is used to present an agenda for nursing research. (SK)

  18. EPA’s Approach for Integrated Pest Management in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Protection Agency vision is for all children to be covered by a verifiable and ongoing School IPM program. Learn about this mission and how EPA will work with partners to achieve it.

  19. Strategies for integrating mental health into schools via a multitiered system of support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Sharon Hoover; Sugai, George; Lever, Nancy; Connors, Elizabeth

    2015-04-01

    To fully realize the potential of mental health supports in academic settings, it is essential to consider how to effectively integrate the mental health and education systems and their respective resources, staffing, and structures. Historically, school mental health services have not effectively spanned a full continuum of care from mental health promotion to treatment, and several implementation and service challenges have evolved. After an overview of these challenges, best practices and strategies for school and community partners are reviewed to systematically integrate mental health interventions within a school's multitiered system of student support. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Benefits of Fine Art Integration into Mathematics in Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezovnik, Anja

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of the article is to research the effects of the integration of fine art content into mathematics on students at the primary school level. The theoretical part consists of the definition of arts integration into education, a discussion of the developmental process of creative mathematical thinking, an explanation of the position…

  1. Integrative Mixed Methods Data Analytic Strategies in Research on School Success in Challenging Circumstances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Eunice E.; McDougall, Douglas E.; Pollon, Dawn; Herbert, Monique; Russell, Pia

    2008-01-01

    There are both conceptual and practical challenges in dealing with data from mixed methods research studies. There is a need for discussion about various integrative strategies for mixed methods data analyses. This article illustrates integrative analytic strategies for a mixed methods study focusing on improving urban schools facing challenging…

  2. Seeing the System: Dynamics and Complexity of Technology Integration in Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Sarah K.; Thompson, Kate

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces system dynamics modeling to understand, visualize and explore technology integration in schools, through the development of a theoretical model of technology-related change in teachers' practice. Technology integration is a dynamic social practice, within the social system of education. It is difficult, if not nearly…

  3. An Integrated Approach to the Teaching of Operations Management in a Business School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ram B.; Ravinder, Handanhal; Peterson, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    The authors discuss a curriculum integration effort that a school of business piloted recently. This effort was aimed at integrating the core functions (finance, marketing, management, and operations) so that undergraduate students would better appreciate the full impact of functional decisions on each other and in achieving the corporation's…

  4. Integration of ICTs into the Basic Curriculum in Primary Schools in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Integration of ICTs into the Basic Curriculum in Primary Schools in Sénégal - Phase II ... for integrating ICTs at various stages of the teaching and learning process. ... première cohorte de chercheuses en science des changements climatiques.

  5. Art Integration as School Culture Change: A Cultural Ecosystem Approach to Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charland, William

    2011-01-01

    While much has been written about arts integration theory, and the various benefits of visual art in the curriculum, the literature is sparse regarding arts integration implementation, and the personal, professional, and school culture barriers to the persistence and dissemination of such interventions. Successful educational interventions are…

  6. A Motor-Skills Programme to Enhance Visual Motor Integration of Selected Pre-School Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Africa, Eileen K.; van Deventer, Karel J.

    2017-01-01

    Pre-schoolers are in a window period for motor skill development. Visual-motor integration (VMI) is the foundation for academic and sport skills. Therefore, it must develop before formal schooling. This study attempted to improve VMI skills. VMI skills were measured with the "Beery-Buktenica developmental test of visual-motor integration 6th…

  7. Effect of Integrated Feedback on Classroom Climate of Secondary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nilesh Kumar

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed at finding out the effect of Integrated feedback on Classroom climate of secondary school teachers. This research is experimental in nature. Non-equivalent control group design suggested by Stanley and Campbell (1963) was used for the experiment. Integrated feedback was treatment and independent variable, Classroom climate was…

  8. Psychiatry in the Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship: An Innovative, Year-Long Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, Todd; Bullock, Christopher; Gaufberg, Elizabeth; Albanese, Mark; Bonilla, Pedro; Dvorak, Ramona; Epelbaum, Claudia; Givon, Lior; Kueppenbender, Karsten; Joseph, Robert; Boyd, J. Wesley; Shtasel, Derri

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors present what is to their knowledge the first description of a model for longitudinal third-year medical student psychiatry education. Method: A longitudinal, integrated psychiatric curriculum was developed, implemented, and sustained within the Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship. Curriculum elements…

  9. Alcohol Prevention and School Students: Findings from an Australian 2-Year Trial of Integrated Harm Minimization School Drug Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midford, Richard; Ramsden, Robyn; Lester, Leanne; Cahill, Helen; Mitchell, Johanna; Foxcroft, David R.; Venning, Lynne

    2014-01-01

    The Drug Education in Victorian Schools program provided integrated education about licit and illicit drugs, employed a harm minimization approach that incorporated participatory, critical thinking and skill-based teaching methods, and engaged parental influence through home activities. A cluster-randomized, controlled trial of the program was…

  10. 25 CFR 39.132 - Can a school integrate Language Development programs into its regular instructional program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can a school integrate Language Development programs into... Language Development Programs § 39.132 Can a school integrate Language Development programs into its regular instructional program? A school may offer Language Development programs to students as part of its...

  11. Impact of Instructional Resources on Mathematics Performance of Learners with Dyscalculia in Integrated Primary Schools, Arusha City, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusta, Nyudule; Karugu, Geoffrey; Muthee, Jessica; Tekle, Tesfu

    2016-01-01

    Learners with dyscalculia in the integrated primary schools in Arusha have been performing poorly in the Primary School Leaving Examination (PSLE). Thus, the journal sought to investigate the impact of instructional resources on mathematics performance of learners with dyscalculia in integrated primary schools found in Arusha city, Tanzania. The…

  12. Teachers' Attitudes toward Technology Integration in a Kazakhstani Secondary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafina, Aliya

    2016-01-01

    The government of the Republic of Kazakhstan from 1997 started operating a systematic state policy for education. Many scholarly papers show that the success of the educational reform efforts depend not only on the ability of the government to supply all schools with ICT, but also on the ability to make teachers possess positive attitudes toward…

  13. The Integration of Traditional Greek Dance in Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartzonika, Eleftheria

    2013-01-01

    This paper researches the statutory educational regulations used as a foundation to introduce traditional Greek dance in the school curriculum and which transformed it into a taught subject with connections to the ideological-political and social conditions prevalent in Greece at the time. It particularly concerns the connection between the aims…

  14. Creating Cultures of Integrity: Ethics Education in UK Business Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Emma; Caulfield, Paul; Hibbert, Paul; Jennings, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Recent corporate scandals and responses by regulators have created an environment in which there is a heightened awareness of business ethics. This report presents a series of case studies exploring how the current curricula in UK business schools could be scoped differently to give new business leaders the tools required for strong ethical…

  15. Arts Integration as a Catalyst for High School Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Dorinne

    2008-01-01

    The director of a small career academy of the arts in a public high school reflects on the conflicting demands to establish a college-preparatory program adhering to state standards and to facilitate the personal growth, artistic discovery, and democratic empowerment of teens. By narrating experiences that go to the heart of philosophical discord,…

  16. An integrative model of risk for high school disordered eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Heather A; Smith, Gregory T

    2018-06-21

    Binge eating and purging behaviors are associated with significant harm and distress among adolescents. The process by which these behaviors develop (often in the high school years) is not fully understood. We tested the Acquired Preparedness (AP) model of risk involving transactions among biological, personality, and psychosocial factors to predict binge eating and purging behavior in a sample of 1,906 children assessed in the spring of 5th grade (the last year of elementary school), the fall of 6th grade (the first year of middle school), spring of 6th grade, and spring of 10th grade (second year of high school). Pubertal onset in spring of 5th grade predicted increases in negative urgency, but not negative affect, in the fall of 6th grade. Negative urgency in the fall of 6th grade predicted increases in expectancies for reinforcement from eating in the spring of 6th grade, which in turn predicted increases in binge eating behavior in the spring of 10th grade. Negative affect in the fall of 6th grade predicted increases in thinness expectancies in the spring of 6th grade, which in turn predicted increases in purging in the spring of 10th grade. Results demonstrate similarities and differences in the development of these two different bulimic behaviors. Intervention efforts targeting the risk factors evident in this model may prove fruitful in the treatment of eating disorders characterized by binge eating and purging. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Distributed Leadership of School Curriculum Change: An Integrative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasso, Wendy; Knight, Bruce Allen; Purnell, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Since its inception in 1999, the distributed leadership framework of Spillane, Halverson, and Diamond [2004. "Towards a Theory of Leadership Practice: A Distributed Perspective." "Journal of Curriculum Studies" 36 (1): 3-34. doi:10.1080/0022027032000106726] has supported research into leadership and change in schools. Whilst…

  18. Bringing Wellness to Schools: Opportunities for and Challenges to Mental Health Integration in School-Based Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Karen; Guo, Sisi; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Roya; Puffer, Maryjane; Kataoka, Sheryl H

    2016-12-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) reduce access barriers to mental health care and improve educational outcomes for youths. This qualitative study evaluated the innovations and challenges of a unique network of SBHCs in a large, urban school district as the centers attempted to integrate health, mental health, and educational services. The 43 participants sampled included mental health providers, primary care providers, and care coordinators at 14 SBHCs. Semistructured interviews with each participant were audio recorded and transcribed. Themes were identified and coded by using Atlas.ti 5.1 and collapsed into three domains: operations, partnership, and engagement. Interviews revealed provider models ranging from single agencies offering both primary care and mental health services to colocated services. Sites where the health agency provided at least some mental health services reported more mental health screenings. Many sites used SBHC wellness coordinators and coordination team meetings to facilitate relationships between schools and health agency and community mental health clinic providers. Partnership challenges included confidentiality policies and staff turnover. Participants also highlighted student and parent engagement through culturally sensitive services, peer health advocates, and "drop-in" lunches. Staffing and operational models are critical in the success of integrating primary care, mental health care, and education. Among the provider models observed, the combined primary care and mental health provider model offered the most integrated services. Despite barriers, providers and schools have begun to implement novel solutions to operational problems and family engagement in mental health services.

  19. The relationship between technology leadership roles and profiles of school principals and technology integration in primary school classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa SAMANCIOĞLU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between technology leadership behaviors of school principals and teachers’ level of technology integration, and to determine technology leadership profiles based on teacher views and examine their association with technology integration. The researchers administered two questionnaires to 352 teachers working at sixteen primary schools in a large city in southeastern Turkey. The results revealed a positive, but weak relationship between technology leadership and technology integration. Furthermore, it was concluded that there were positive but weak relationships among technology integration and human centeredness, communication and collaboration, vision and support sub-dimensions of technology leadership. Two technology leadership profiles (high-TLP=65.6% and low-TLP=34.4% were constructed as a result of cluster analysis. A statistically significant difference was detected between teachers’ technology integration perceptions which were categorized into two profiles. The paper concludes by suggestions for implications to strengthen the link between technology leadership and technology integration.

  20. Examining the Relationship among High-School Teachers' Technology Self-Efficacy, Attitudes towards Technology Integration, and Quality of Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Stacey

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative study explored the relationships among high-school teachers' (n = 74) technology self-efficacy, teachers' attitudes towards technology integration, and quality of teachers' technology integration into instruction. This study offered the unique perspectives of in-service high-school teachers as they have first-hand experience…

  1. Sustainable Environmental Education: Conditions and Characteristics Needed for a Successfully Integrated Program in Public Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieckenberg, Cara Rae

    This case study investigated what conditions and characteristics contributed to a successful environmental education program within elementary schools of a school district where environmental education was the mandate. While research does exist on practical application of environmental education within schools, little if any literature has been written or research conducted on schools actually implementing environmental education to study what contributes to the successful implementation of the program. To study this issue, 24 participants from a Midwestern school district were interviewed, six of whom were principals of each of the six elementary schools included in the study. All participants were identified as champions of environmental education integration within their buildings due to leadership positions held focused on environmental education. Analysis of the data collected via interviews revealed findings that hindered the implementation of environmental education, findings that facilitated the implementation of environmental education, and findings that indicated an environmental education-focused culture existed within the schools. Conditions and characteristics found to contribute to the success of these school's environmental education programs include: professional development opportunities, administrative support, peer leadership opportunities and guidance, passion with the content and for the environment, comfort and confidence with the content, ease of activities and events that contribute to the culture and student success. Keywords: environmental education, integration, leadership, teachers as leaders.

  2. The Integration of Mathematics in Middle School Science: Student and Teacher Impacts Related to Science Achievement and Attitudes Towards Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Luisa

    Contemporary research has suggested that in order for students to compete globally in the 21st century workplace, pedagogy must shift to include the integration of science and mathematics, where teachers effectively incorporate the two disciplines seamlessly. Mathematics facilitates a deeper understanding of science concepts and has been linked to improved student perception of the integration of science and mathematics. Although there is adequate literature to substantiate students' positive responses to integration in terms of attitudes, there has been little empirical data to support significant academic improvement when both disciplines are taught in an integrated method. This research study, conducted at several school districts on Long Island and New York City, New York, examined teachers' attitudes toward integration and students' attitudes about, and achievement on assessments in, an integrated 8th grade science classroom compared to students in a non-integrated classroom. An examination of these parameters was conducted to analyze the impact of the sizeable investment of time and resources needed to teach an integrated curriculum effectively. These resources included substantial teacher training, planning time, collaboration with colleagues, and administration of student assessments. The findings suggest that students had positive outcomes associated with experiencing an integrated science and mathematics curriculum, though these were only weakly correlated with teacher confidence in implementing the integrated model successfully. The positive outcomes included the ability of students to understand scientific concepts within a concrete mathematical framework, improved confidence in applying mathematics to scientific ideas, and increased agreement with the usefulness of mathematics in interpreting science concepts. Implications of these research findings may be of benefit to educators and policymakers looking to adapt integrated curricula in order to

  3. Integrating Expressive Therapies in School-Based Counseling: A Handbook for School Mental Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmiotto, Kimberley

    2013-01-01

    Research demonstrates that addressing mental health issues in children can yield both increased academic performance and better social-emotional skills. In the past, school-based mental health services for students have been implemented inconsistently and usually in combination with community partners. When school mental health interventions are…

  4. Intergroup Relations in Integrated Schools: A Glimpse inside Interdistrict Magnet Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bifulco, Robert; Buerger, Christian; Cobb, Casey

    2012-01-01

    The frequency and quality of intergroup contact within racially and ethnically diverse schools has potentially important implications for the achievement of desegregation goals. The analyses presented here use survey data to assess intergroup contact within a sample of ten interdistrict magnet schools in Connecticut. Findings indicate frequent…

  5. An experimental school prototype: Integrating 3rs (reduce, reuse & recycle) concept into architectural design

    OpenAIRE

    Kong Seng Yeap; Sreenivasaiah Purushothama Rao

    2012-01-01

    The authors conducted a design project to examine the use of school as an ecological learning hub for children. Specifically, this study explores the ecological innovations that transform physical environment into three-dimensional textbooks for environmental education. A series of design workshops were carried out to gain interdisciplinary input for ecological school design. The findings suggest to integrate the concept of 3Rs (Reduce, Reuse & Recycle) into the physical environment. As a res...

  6. Linguistic Integration of Middle School Immigrant Children in Czechia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kostelecká, Y.; Kostelecký, Tomáš; Jančařík, A.; Vodičková, K.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 2 (2015), s. 181-192 ISSN 0300-5402 Institutional support: RVO:68378025 Keywords : integration * children of immigrants * language acquisition Subject RIV: AM - Education http://dx.doi.org/10.14712/23361980.2015.97

  7. High School Engineering and Technology Education Integration through Design Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentzer, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    This study contextualized the use of the engineering design process by providing descriptions of how each element in a design process was integrated in an eleventh grade industry and engineering systems course. The guiding research question for this inquiry was: How do students engage in the engineering design process in a course where technology…

  8. Handwriting, visuomotor integration, and neurological condition at school age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoorn, Jessika F.; Maathuis, Carel G. B.; Peters, Lieke H. J.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2010-01-01

    Aim The study investigated the relationships between handwriting, visuomotor integration, and neurological condition. We paid particular attention to the presence of minor neurological dysfunction (MND). Method Participants were 200 children (131 males, 69 females; age range 8-13y) of whom 118

  9. Handwriting, Visuomotor Integration, and Neurological Condition at School Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoorn, Jessika F.; Maathuis, Carel G. B.; Peters, Lieke H. J.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The study investigated the relationships between handwriting, visuomotor integration, and neurological condition. We paid particular attention to the presence of minor neurological dysfunction (MND). Method : Participants were 200 children (131 males, 69 females; age range 8-13y) of whom 118 received mainstream education (mean age 10y 5mo, SD…

  10. A sustainability framework for mobile technology integration in schools: The case of resourceconstrained environments in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabila, J

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The application of mobile technology integration in schools has been widely researched. However, only a few studies have extensively examined the sustainability of mobile technology integration in resource-constrained environments. Diverse contexts...

  11. Arts Integration as Potentiality for Professional Development for School Teachers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Julie Borup

    This paper investigates the potentialities for professional development, when teachers work with integration of arts and academic subjects in the classroom. The idea of integrating arts and academic subjects can be seen as a way of experimenting with teaching. Experiments in the classroom as a way...... of creating new knowledge about teaching is very closely linked to ideas from action research approaches to development of both new practices and new knowledge. Therefore, we will draw on concepts from action research theory to explore how teachers learn and at the same time develop new knowledge when......: Experience, Exploration, and Experimentation. In this way, the action research approach has the possibility of creating not only new practices, but also to develop new theoretic understanding of the learning processes involved in creating change in a living practice as classroom teaching. As an empirical...

  12. Integrating addiction medicine training into medical school and residency curricula

    OpenAIRE

    Klimas, Jan; Rieb, Launette; Bury, Gerard; Muench, John; O?Toole, Thomas; Rieckman, Traci; Cullen, Walter

    2015-01-01

    peer-reviewed Background: The Affordable Care Act (2010) brings an opportunity to increase the integration of addiction treatment into the health care system. With the anticipated expansion of addiction care services in primary care, challenges, such as workforce training, can be expected. This presentation discusses challenges and opportunities for addiction medicine training of primary care professionals in Ireland, Canada and Portland, OR. Objectives: To explore ideas for integratin...

  13. Dental Student Academic Integrity in U.S. Dental Schools: Current Status and Recommendations for Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Bruce S; Knight, G William; Graham, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Cheating incidents in 2006-07 led U.S. dental schools to heighten their efforts to enhance the environment of academic integrity in their institutions. The aims of this study were to document the measures being used by U.S. dental schools to discourage student cheating, determine the current incidence of reported cheating, and make recommendations for enhancing a culture of integrity in dental education. In late 2014-early 2015, an online survey was distributed to academic deans of all 61 accredited U.S. dental schools that had four classes of dental students enrolled; 50 (82%) responded. Among measures used, 98% of respondents reported having policy statements regarding student academic integrity, 92% had an Honor Code, 96% provided student orientation to integrity policies, and most used proctoring of final exams (91%) and tests (93%). Regarding disciplinary processes, 27% reported their faculty members only rarely reported suspected cheating (though required in 76% of the schools), and 40% disseminated anonymous results of disciplinary hearings. A smaller number of schools (n=36) responded to the question about student cheating than to other questions; those results suggested that reported cheating had increased almost threefold since 1998. The authors recommend that schools add cheating case scenarios to professional ethics curricula; disseminate outcomes of cheating enforcement actions; have students sign a statement attesting to compliance with academic integrity policies at every testing activity; add curricular content on correct writing techniques to avoid plagiarism; require faculty to distribute retired test items; acquire examination-authoring software programs to enable faculty to generate new multiple-choice items and different versions of the same multiple-choice tests; avoid take-home exams when assessing independent student knowledge; and utilize student assessment methods directly relevant to clinical practice.

  14. Evaluation of semantic aspect of language in students of ordinary, integrated and special schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ghorbani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Children with severe and profound hearing loss have difficulties in communicating with others and educating at school. Effects of learning environment on children's language skills have been recently focused and educating those students in ordinary schools has been proposed. According to this view, we compared perception of antonyms and synonyms as a semantic aspect of language in students of ordinary, integrated and special schools.Methods: It was an analytic cross-sectional study. Three groups of students were enrolled: normal-hearing students of ordinary schools and hearing-loss students of integrated and specials schools. Each group consisted of 25 students in fifth grade of elementary schools in Tehran city. Two written tests were used. Subjects wrote synonyms and antonyms for each word in the tests.Results: Results denoted significant differences between scores of normal-hearing and hearing-loss students and also between hearing-loss students of integrated schools and hearing-loss students of special schools (p<0.05. In all three groups of the students, perception of antonyms was better than antonyms (p<0.001. Speech processing rate in normal-hearing students were higher than both groups of hearing-loss students (p<0.001.Conclusion: The differences between normal-hearing and hearing-loss students shows that similar to other language skills, perception of synonyms and antonyms as a semantic aspect of speech is related to the hearing conditions and type of education. Moreover, the differences between two groups of hearing-loss students represent that speech stimulants and interaction with normal-hearing children could improve semantic aspect of speech in hearing-loss students.

  15. Findings from the Harvard Medical School Cambridge Integrated Clerkship, a Year-Long Longitudinal Psychiatry Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Elisa; Hirsh, David; Gaufberg, Elizabeth; Griswold, Todd; Wesley Boyd, J

    2018-06-01

    The Harvard Medical School Cambridge Integrated Clerkship is a longitudinal integrated clerkship that has provided an alternative clinical model for medical education in psychiatry since its inception in 2004. This study was undertaken in an effort to better understand the student experience of the Cambridge Integrated Clerkship and how it may have impacted students' perceptions of and interest in psychiatry, as well as performance. Qualitative surveys were sent via e-mail to the first 11 student cohorts who had completed the Cambridge Integrated Clerkship (from 2004 to 2014) and for whom we had e-mail addresses (N = 100), and the free-text responses were coded thematically. All available standardized scoring data and residency match data for Cambridge Integrated Clerkship graduates were obtained. From 2006 to 2014, 12 out of 73 Cambridge Integrated Clerkship students who entered the match chose a psychiatry residency (16.4%), four times more than students in traditional clerkships at Harvard Medical School (3.8% of 1355 students) or the national average (4.1% of 146,066 US applicants). Thirty of the 100 surveyed Cambridge Integrated Clerkship graduates (30%) responded to the qualitative survey with free-text remarks on a number of themes. Cambridge Integrated Clerkship students compared positively to their classmates in terms of standardized test performance. Their fourfold higher match rate into psychiatry compared to other students raises intriguing questions as to what role a longitudinal clerkship might have played in developing interest in psychiatry as a career.

  16. AN INTEGRATIVE GROUP PSYCHOTHERAPY PROGRAM FOR CHILDREN. THE WIZARDING SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana Maria Popescu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important tendencies in child psychotherapy is the integration of various psychotherapeutic approaches and technical interventions belonging to different orientations. Based on the Harry Potter stories, the „Wizarding School” structured group therapy program is a 12-step integratively oriented program applicable in personal development, individual and group therapy for children aged 6 to 13 (at present being adapted for adult psychotherapy. The program takes place within a fairy tale, being therefore a type of informal hypnotic trance. The interventions are drawn from the lessons described in Harry Potter’s story at Hogwarts, based on the fundamental principles of child psychotherapy and including elements of play therapy, art therapy, hypnotherapy, cognitive- behavioural therapy, transactional analysis, supportive therapy, family therapy and person centred therapy. From a theoretical point of view the program is based on elements from a number of psychotherapeutic approaches, the main concept being that we need to create a therapeutic myth that is acceptable to a child. The program is not suitable for children with structural deficits, who have difficulties in making the difference between fantasy and reality.

  17. Pedagogical Factors Affecting Integration of Computers in Mathematics Instruction in Secondary Schools in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanjala, Martin M. S.; Aurah, Catherine M.; Symon, Koros C.

    2015-01-01

    The paper reports findings of a study which sought to examine the pedagogical factors that affect the integration of computers in mathematics instruction as perceived by teachers in secondary schools in Kenya. This study was based on the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). A descriptive survey design was used for this study. Stratified and simple…

  18. Prenatal to Preschool: An Integrated Approach to School Readiness for Native Hawaiian Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Hannah; And Others

    This report outlines the Pre-kindergarten Educational Program (PREP) of Kamehameha Schools Bishop Estate in Hawaii, an integrated early education program serving families with children from the prenatal stage through age 5. The paper first discusses the program's three components and how they adapt to developmental changes in children and…

  19. Teaching Basic Quantum Mechanics in Secondary School Using Concepts of Feynman Path Integrals Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanaro, Maria de los Angeles; Otero, Maria Rita; Arlego, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the teaching of basic quantum mechanics in high school. Rather than following the usual formalism, our approach is based on Feynman's path integral method. Our presentation makes use of simulation software and avoids sophisticated mathematical formalism. (Contains 3 figures.)

  20. Teacher Professional Development for Technology Integration in a Primary School Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shih-Hsiung

    2013-01-01

    Teacher professional development (TPD) can benefit teachers in classrooms. This study contributes to an understanding of TPD processes where there is sufficient technology integration through teacher participation in a school-based community. It assesses the effectiveness of TPD and its potential problems. Qualitative research methods are used to…

  1. Integrating Immigrant Children into Schools in Europe: Austria--National Description 2003-04

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eurydice, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The national contributions contained in this paper and on the Eurydice website formed the basis for the comparative study on the integration at school of immigrant children in Europe. Each contribution has exactly the same structure with four main sections entitled as follows: (1) National definitions and demographic context of immigration; (2)…

  2. Integrating Moral and Social Development within Middle School Social Studies: A Social Cognitive Domain Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucci, Larry; Creane, Michael W.; Powers, Deborah W.

    2015-01-01

    Eleven teachers and 254 urban middle-school students comprised the sample of this study examining the social and moral development outcomes of the integration of social cognitive domain theory within regular classroom instruction. Participating teachers were trained to construct and implement history lessons that stimulated students' moral…

  3. An Evaluation Model To Select an Integrated Learning System in a Large, Suburban School District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curlette, William L.; And Others

    The systematic evaluation process used in Georgia's DeKalb County School System to purchase comprehensive instructional software--an integrated learning system (ILS)--is described, and the decision-making model for selection is presented. Selection and implementation of an ILS were part of an instructional technology plan for the DeKalb schools…

  4. A Practical Guide to Management of Common Pests in Schools. Integrated Pest Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Dept. of Public Health, Springfield.

    This 3-part manual is designed to assist school officials understand the principles of Integrated Pest Management and aid them in implementing those principles into a comprehensive pest control program in their facilities. Developed for Illinois, this guide can be applied in part or in total to other areas of the country. Part 1 explains what an…

  5. Combining Identity and Integration: Comparative Analysis of Schools for Two Minority Groups in Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulyk, Volodymyr

    2013-01-01

    This article analyses school systems for two of Ukraine's minorities, the Hungarians and the Crimean Tatars with the aim of assessing their success in promoting ethnocultural identity and social integration of the minority youth. I demonstrate that the exclusive instruction in Hungarian ensures the reproduction of group language knowledge and…

  6. Developing an Integrative Play Therapy Group Model for Middle School Male Students to Address Bullying Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jakarla

    2016-01-01

    This research examines the systematic process of developing an integrative play therapy group model for middle school male students, ages 11-15 who participate in bullying behaviors. Play therapy approaches and evidence-based practices are documented as effective measures for addressing bullying behaviors with children and adolescents. This group…

  7. Perceptions of Teachers Regarding Technology Integration in Classrooms: A Comparative Analysis of Elite and Mediocre Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehra, Rida; Bilwani, Anam

    2016-01-01

    The primary purpose and objective of this study was to examine and compare the perceptions of teachers in elite and mediocre schools in Karachi. The secondary objectives included comparing the use of technology in classrooms by teachers and the challenges and barriers that they face in the integration of technology. This study was designed as a…

  8. The Effect of Technology Integration on High School Students' Literacy Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Kara

    2016-01-01

    This literature review presents a critical appraisal of current research on the role technology integration plays in high school students' literacy achievement. It identifies the gaps within the research through comprehensive analysis. The review develops an argument that the use of laptops in secondary English classrooms has a significant impact…

  9. Information Technology, Type II Classroom Integration, and the Limited Infrastructure in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddux, Cleborne D.; Johnson D. Lamont

    2006-01-01

    In this second special issue on Type II applications of information technology in education, the focus is on classroom integration. This editorial explores some possible explanations for the fact that information technology in schools has not fulfilled its considerable potential. One reason may be that individualized instruction is not part of the…

  10. Integration of Computers into the Medical School Curriculum: An Example from a Microbiology Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Mark W.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    While the use of computers has become widespread in recent years, a unified, integrated approach to their use in the medical school curriculum has not yet emerged. Describes a program at the University of New Mexico that will phase-in computerization of its curriculum beginning in the fall of 1993. (LZ)

  11. Technology Integration in EFL Classrooms: A Study of Qatari Independent Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaaban, Youmen; Ellili-Cherif, Maha

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of teachers' individual characteristics and perceptions of environmental factors on the extent of technology integration into EFL (English as a Foreign Language) classrooms. To this end, a national survey examining EFL teachers' perceptions was conducted at Qatari Independent Schools. A total of…

  12. Integration of ICTs into the Basic Curriculum in Primary Schools in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Integration of ICTs into the Basic Curriculum in Primary Schools in Sénégal - Phase ... Special journal issue highlights IDRC-supported findings on women's paid work ... A new website and resource library will help improve developing country ...

  13. Re-Structuring Preservice Teacher Education: Introducing the School-Community Integrated Learning (SCIL) Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Sue; Hudson, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Reviews into teacher education call for new models that develop preservice teachers' practical knowledge and skills. The study involved 9 mentor teachers and 14 mentees (final-year preservice teachers) working in a new teacher education model, the School-Community Integrated Learning (SCIL) pathway, and analysed data from a Likert survey with…

  14. Making a Literacy Plan: Developing an Integrated Curriculum That Meets Your School's Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, Annie

    2016-01-01

    Literacy does not happen in a single lesson or course. There are no shortcuts to gaining mastery over a skill set, whether it is reading literacy, information literacy and research skills, online literacy and digital citizenship, or visual literacy. School librarians dream about a perfect integrated curriculum: there is ample time for…

  15. Debating Life on Mars: The Knowledge Integration Environment (KIE) in Varied School Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shear, Linda

    Technology-enabled learning environments are beginning to come of age. Tools and frameworks are now available that have been shown to improve learning and are being deployed more widely in varied school settings. Teachers are now faced with the formidable challenge of integrating these promising new environments with the everyday context in which…

  16. Vertical integration in medical school : effect on the transition to postgraduate training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnen-Meijer, Marjo; ten Cate, Olle Th J.; van der Schaaf, Marieke; Borleffs, Jan C. C.

    Objectives Recently, many medical schools' curricula have been revised so that they represent vertically integrated (VI) curricula. Important changes include: the provision of earlier clinical experience; longer clerkships, and the fostering of increasing levels of responsibility. One of the aims of

  17. Integrating ICTs into the Environmental Science Primary School Classroom in Chegutu District, Zimbabwe: Problems and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadreck, Mandina

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated primary school teachers' perceptions of the barriers and challenges preventing them from integrating ICTs in the environmental science classroom. The study adopted a qualitative research approach that is in line with the phenomenological perspective as it sought to acquire knowledge through understanding the direct…

  18. The Integration of Children Dependent on Medical Technology into Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Jill A.

    2009-01-01

    Advances in medicine have increased the survival rates of children with complex medical conditions, including those who are dependent on technology such as ventilators and tracheostomies. The process of integrating children dependent on medical technology into public schools requires the collaboration of a multidisciplinary team to ensure that…

  19. Promoting of Thematic-Based Integrated Science Learning on the Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursitasari, Indarini Dwi; Nuryanti, Siti; Rede, Amran

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to explain the effect of thematic based integrated science learning to the student's critical thinking skills and character. One group pretest-posttest design is involving thirty students in one of the junior high school in the Palu city. A sample was taken using purposive sampling. Data of critical thinking skills…

  20. The Opinions of Middle School Mathematics Teachers on the Integration of Mathematics Course and Social Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turhan Turkkan, Buket; Karakus, Memet

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the opinions of middle school mathematics teachers on the integration of mathematics course and social issues. For this purpose, qualitative research method was used in this study. As for determining the participants of the research, criterion sampling among purposeful sampling methods was used. Being a…

  1. The possible social representations of astronomy by students from integrated high school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, J. I. L.; Voelzke, M. R.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we present the possible Social Representations, which students of the Integrated High School of the Federal Institute of Alagoas (IFAL) have on the term inductor Astronomy, as well as identifying how they were probably elaborated. Therefore, in agreement with Moscovici (2010) is used the Theory of Social Representations.

  2. Positive Impact of Integrating Histology and Physiology Teaching at a Medical School in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherer, Renslow; Wan, Yu; Dong, Hongmei; Cooper, Brian; Morgan, Ivy; Peng, Biwen; Liu, Jun; Wang, Lin; Xu, David

    2014-01-01

    To modernize its stagnant, traditional curriculum and pedagogy, the Medical School of Wuhan University in China adopted (with modifications) the University of Chicago's medical curriculum model. The reform effort in basic sciences was integrating histology and physiology into one course, increasing the two subjects' connection to clinical…

  3. Effectiveness of Word Solving: Integrating Morphological Problem-Solving within Comprehension Instruction for Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Amanda P.

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the effectiveness of integrating morphological instruction within comprehension strategy instruction. Participants were 203 students (N = 117 fifth-grade; 86 sixth-grade) from four urban schools who were randomly assigned to the intervention (N = 110; morphological problem-solving within comprehension strategy instruction) or…

  4. Faculty and student perceptions of academic integrity at U.S. and Canadian dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Kenneth G; Smith, Linda A; Henzi, David; Demps, Elaine

    2007-08-01

    The issues of cheating and plagiarism in educational settings have received a large amount of attention in recent years. The purpose of this study was to assess the degree to which academic integrity issues currently exist in the dental schools throughout the United States and Canada. An online survey was developed to gather data pertaining to this topic from two key groups in dental education: faculty and students. Responses were obtained from 1,153 students and 423 faculty members. The results of the survey clearly reveal that cheating is a significant problem in dental schools and that significant differences exist between students' and faculty members' perceptions of academic integrity. The challenge for dental schools is to identify effective strategies to prevent cheating opportunities and to implement and enforce effective means of dealing with specific examples of cheating.

  5. Culture and the School: The Degree of Educational Integration of Roma and Gypsies in the Peloponnese Region of Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiprianos, Pandelis; Daskalaki, Ivi; Stamelos, Georgios B.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the degree of integration of Roma and Gypsy children in formal education in the Peloponnese region of Greece. It is based on field research conducted by the University of Patras during the school year 2006/07 within the framework of the Greek Ministry of Education's "Integration of Roma children in school"…

  6. Technology-integrated Mathematics Education at the Secondary School Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdi Serin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The potential of technological devices to enrich learning and teaching of Mathematics has been widely recognized recently. This study is founded on a case study that investigates how technology-related Mathematics teaching can enhance learning of Mathematical topics. The findings indicate that when teachers integrate technology into their teaching practices, students’ learning of Mathematics is significantly promoted. It was seen that the use of effective presentations through technological devices highly motivated the students and improved their mathematics achievement. This highlights that the availability of technological devices, teacher beliefs, easy access to resources and most importantly teacher skills of using technological devices effectively are decisive factors that can provide learners better understanding of mathematical concepts.

  7. U.S. Dental Schools' Preparation for the Integrated National Board Dental Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Mai-Ly T; Cothron, Annaliese E; Lawson, Nathaniel C; Doherty, Eileen H

    2018-03-01

    An Integrated National Board Dental Examination (INBDE) combining basic, behavioral, and clinical sciences will be implemented in 2020 to replace the current two-part National Board Dental Examination required for all candidates who seek to practice dentistry in the U.S. The aims of this study were to determine how U.S. dental schools are preparing for implementation of the INBDE and to assess their top administrators' attitudes about the new exam. A total of 150 deans, academic deans, and other administrators at all 64 U.S. dental schools with graduating classes in 2016 were emailed a 19-question electronic survey. The survey questions addressed the respondents' level of support, perceived benefits and challenges, and planned preparation strategies for the INBDE. The individual response rate was 59%, representing 57 of the 64 schools. Approximately 60% of the respondents either agreed or strongly agreed that they support the integrated exam, while roughly 25% either somewhat or strongly disagreed. While most respondents (72%) reported that their institutions would be prepared for the INBDE, 74% reported that the merged exam created additional strain for their institutions. Respondents reported viewing content integration and clinical applicability as benefits of the INBDE, while required curriculum changes and student preparedness and stress were seen as challenges. Most of the respondents reported their schools were currently employing strategies to prepare for the INBDE including meetings with faculty and students and changes to curricula and course content. The beginning of the fourth year and the end of the third year were the most frequently reported times when schools planned to require students to take the INBDE, although almost half of the respondents did not yet know what it would be required at their school. Several schools were reconsidering using the boards as a passing requirement. This study found that support for the INBDE was not universal, but

  8. National standards in pathology education: developing competencies for integrated medical school curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadofsky, Moshe; Knollmann-Ritschel, Barbara; Conran, Richard M; Prystowsky, Michael B

    2014-03-01

    Medical school education has evolved from department-specific memorization of facts to an integrated curriculum presenting knowledge in a contextual manner across traditional disciplines, integrating information, improving retention, and facilitating application to clinical practice. Integration occurs throughout medical school using live data-sharing technologies, thereby providing the student with a framework for lifelong active learning. Incorporation of educational teams during medical school prepares students for team-based patient care, which is also required for pay-for-performance models used in accountable care organizations. To develop learning objectives for teaching pathology to medical students. Given the rapid expansion of basic science knowledge of human development, normal function, and pathobiology, it is neither possible nor desirable for faculty to teach, and students to retain, this vast amount of information. Courses teaching the essentials in context and engaging students in the learning process enable them to become lifelong learners. An appreciation of pathobiology and the role of laboratory medicine underlies the modern practice of medicine. As such, all medical students need to acquire 3 basic competencies in pathology: an understanding of disease mechanisms, integration of mechanisms into organ system pathology, and application of pathobiology to diagnostic medicine. We propose the development of 3 specific competencies in pathology to be implemented nationwide, aimed at disease mechanisms/processes, organ system pathology, and application to diagnostic medicine. Each competency will include learning objectives and a means to assess acquisition, integration, and application of knowledge. The learning objectives are designed to be a living document managed (curated) by a group of pathologists representing Liaison Committee on Medical Education-accredited medical schools nationally. Development of a coherent set of learning objectives will

  9. Integrating geriatrics into medical school: student journaling as an innovative strategy for evaluating curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shield, Renée R; Farrell, Timothy W; Nanda, Aman; Campbell, Susan E; Wetle, Terrie

    2012-02-01

    The Alpert Medical School of Brown University began to integrate geriatrics content into all preclerkship courses and key clerkship cases as part of a major medical school curriculum redesign in 2006. This study evaluates students' responses to geriatrics integration within the curriculum using journals kept by volunteer preclerkship and clerkship students between 2007 and 2010. The journals were used to assess the quality of curricular integration of geriatrics didactic and clinical content, to gather information for shaping the evolving curriculum, and to elicit students' responses about their professional development and caring for older adults. Student "journalers" wrote narrative reactions to and evaluations of aging-related content and exposure to older patients in response to written semistructured questions. An interdisciplinary team (including a health services researcher, gerontologist, medical anthropologist, and 2 geriatricians) used qualitative analysis to code the 405 journal entries. The team identified 10 themes within the following domains: (a) evaluation of efforts to integrate geriatrics within the medical school curriculum, (b) recognition and application of geriatrics principles, (c) student attitudes and cultural experiences regarding aging and the care of older patients, and (d) personal and professional development over time. Themes emerging within these domains reflect the effectiveness of geriatrics integration within the new curriculum as well as students' professional development. Journaling provides a novel and effective method for capturing medical students' responses to curricular content in real time, allowing for midcourse corrections and identifying key components of their professional development.

  10. An experimental school prototype: Integrating 3rs (reduce, reuse & recycle concept into architectural design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong Seng Yeap

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors conducted a design project to examine the use of school as an ecological learning hub for children. Specifically, this study explores the ecological innovations that transform physical environment into three-dimensional textbooks for environmental education. A series of design workshops were carried out to gain interdisciplinary input for ecological school design. The findings suggest to integrate the concept of 3Rs (Reduce, Reuse & Recycle into the physical environment. As a result, an experimental school prototype is developed. It represents a series of recommendations that are rendered by novel ideas through the amalgamation of architecture, ecology and education. These findings promote the development of sustainable and interactive learning spaces through cross-disciplinary investigations in school architecture. Designers and practitioners interested in educational facilities design would find this article useful.

  11. Integrating Technology in Teaching Students with Special Learning Needs in the SPED Schools in Baguio City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn L. Balmeo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Leading-edge creation and development of technologies including those for the children with special learning needs found common place in the educational system. Allowably, this study’s focal point engages in the integration of technologies in the educational environments where students with special learning needs are housed. Respondents include 53 teachers employed in the special education schools in Baguio City, who were to determine the availability and effectiveness of technology in their schools and the problems encountered in the integration of technologies. Results indicate that availability and effectiveness of technologies are at limited level and that there are problems encountered in technology integration. This is significant for the achievement of the aim of students with special learning needs for they would be guided appropriately in the development of their skills with the challenges of educational attainment and life itself

  12. Psychiatry in the Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship: an innovative, year-long program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, Todd; Bullock, Christopher; Gaufberg, Elizabeth; Albanese, Mark; Bonilla, Pedro; Dvorak, Ramona; Epelbaum, Claudia; Givon, Lior; Kueppenbender, Karsten; Joseph, Robert; Boyd, J Wesley; Shtasel, Derri

    2012-09-01

    The authors present what is to their knowledge the first description of a model for longitudinal third-year medical student psychiatry education. A longitudinal, integrated psychiatric curriculum was developed, implemented, and sustained within the Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship. Curriculum elements include longitudinal mentoring by attending physicians in an outpatient psychiatry clinic, exposure to the major psychotherapies, psychopharmacology training, acute psychiatry "immersion" experiences, and a variety of clinical and didactic teaching sessions. The longitudinal psychiatry curriculum has been sustained for 8 years to-date, providing effective learning as demonstrated by OSCE scores, NBME shelf exam scores, written work, and observed clinical work. The percentage of students in this clerkship choosing psychiatry as a residency specialty is significantly greater than those in traditional clerkships at Harvard Medical School and greater than the U.S. average. Longitudinal integrated clerkship experiences are effective and sustainable; they offer particular strengths and opportunities for psychiatry education, and may influence student choice of specialty.

  13. Barriers to the Integration and Adoption of iPads in Schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalid, Md. Saifuddin; Kilic, Gökce; Christoffersen, Jeanette

    2015-01-01

    iPad, with its Apple platform and interoperability-dependent material conditions, bring complex barriers in its adoption and integration in secondary education system as a learning tool. In the schools’ context, it is an emerging educational technology for its affordances supporting collaborative...... learning. This systematic literature review on the barriers to the integration of iPad in primary and secondary schools is based on 13 peer-reviewed and full-text articles. The paper discusses what are the challenges in using iPad as a learning tool in primary and secondary educational settings....... The identified barriers are discussed in three broad categories or stages of innovation process in an educational context: basic challenges with the tool, barriers to the integration of the iPad in a school setting, and barriers in the use of the iPad....

  14. Open pre-schools at integrated health services - A program theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agneta Abrahamsson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Family centres in Sweden are integrated services that reach all prospective parents and parents with children up to their sixth year, because of the co-location of the health service with the social service and the open pre-school. The personnel on the multi-professional site work together to meet the needs of the target group. The article explores a program theory focused on the open pre-schools at family centres.Method: A multi-case design is used and the sample consists of open pre-schools at six family centres. The hypothesis is based on previous research and evaluation data. It guides the data collection which is collected and analysed stepwise. Both parents and personnel are interviewed individually and in groups at each centre.Findings: The hypothesis was expanded to a program theory. The compliance of the professionals was the most significant element that explained why the open access service facilitated positive parenting. The professionals act in a compliant manner to meet the needs of the children and parents as well as in creating good conditions for social networking and learning amongst the parents. Conclusion: The compliance of the professionals in this program theory of open pre-schools at family centres can be a standard in integrated and open access services, whereas the organisation form can vary. The best way of increasing the number of integrative services is to support and encourage professionals that prefer to work in a compliant manner.

  15. Open pre-schools at integrated health services - A program theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agneta Abrahamsson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Family centres in Sweden are integrated services that reach all prospective parents and parents with children up to their sixth year, because of the co-location of the health service with the social service and the open pre-school. The personnel on the multi-professional site work together to meet the needs of the target group. The article explores a program theory focused on the open pre-schools at family centres. Method: A multi-case design is used and the sample consists of open pre-schools at six family centres. The hypothesis is based on previous research and evaluation data. It guides the data collection which is collected and analysed stepwise. Both parents and personnel are interviewed individually and in groups at each centre. Findings: The hypothesis was expanded to a program theory. The compliance of the professionals was the most significant element that explained why the open access service facilitated positive parenting. The professionals act in a compliant manner to meet the needs of the children and parents as well as in creating good conditions for social networking and learning amongst the parents. Conclusion: The compliance of the professionals in this program theory of open pre-schools at family centres can be a standard in integrated and open access services, whereas the organisation form can vary. The best way of increasing the number of integrative services is to support and encourage professionals that prefer to work in a compliant manner.

  16. An approach for integrating media education into everyday school-life and instruction at secondary school level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter SPANHEL

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The new media as a challenge for school education require to redefine its aims and methods. It is no longer sufficient to transmit knowledge and help young people to build up special competences. In addition and primarily they must learn to deal with unknown problems in the future, with uncertainty and insecurity, with an increasing lot of information, changing knowledge and truth and with the unknown. Therefore school must help students to build up flexible structures of operational thinking and orientation, abstract conceptual frames, phantasy and creativity and acquire the capability of learning to learn, to reorganize learning structures and knowledge and the ability for lifelong learning. within this context media in schools have two fundamental functions: they are instruments of teaching-learning-processes as well as subject matter helping students to acquire media competence. Our approach to integrated media education for secondary schools can be characterized as follows: It should imply all sorts of media, it should involve all teachers and embrace all subject matters (lessons. There should no longer be made a distinction between media education and computer literacy because of the integration of all media on the basis of ongoing digitalization. The different media with their specific capacities should be used naturally as a means of improving teaching and learning, as tools for problem-solving and coping with tasks, and as instruments of communication and self-reflexion, of documentation and formation, of expression and publicity. The realization of a sustainable media education is confronted with two difficulties: 1. Most teachers mostly are not trained for media education and they fear the great burden of this task. 2. Media education requires open forms and varying methods of instruction and specific media facilities must be at hand at any time and everywhere.

  17. Development of the GREEN (Garden Resources, Education, and Environment Nexus) Tool: An Evidence-Based Model for School Garden Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Kate Gardner; Koch, Pamela; Contento, Isobel

    2017-10-01

    Researchers have established the benefits of school gardens on students' academic achievement, dietary outcomes, physical activity, and psychosocial skills, yet limited research has been conducted about how school gardens become institutionalized and sustained. Our aim was to develop a tool that captures how gardens are effectively established, integrated, and sustained in schools. We conducted a sequential, exploratory, mixed-methods study. Participants were identified with the help of Grow To Learn, the organization coordinating the New York City school garden initiative, and recruited via e-mail. A stratified, purposeful sample of 21 New York City elementary and middle schools participated in this study throughout the 2013/2014 school year. The sample was stratified in their garden budgets and purposeful in that each of the schools' gardens were determined to be well integrated and sustained. The processes and strategies used by school gardeners to establish well-integrated school gardens were assessed via data collected from surveys, interviews, observations, and concept mapping. Descriptive statistics as well as multidimensional scaling and hierarchical cluster analysis were used to examine the survey and concept mapping data. Qualitative data analysis consisted of thematic coding, pattern matching, explanation building and cross-case synthesis. Nineteen components within four domains of school garden integration were found through the mixed-methods concept mapping analysis. When the analyses of other data were combined, relationships between domains and components emerged. These data resulted in the development of the GREEN (Garden Resources, Education, and Environment Nexus) Tool. When schools with integrated and sustained gardens were studied, patterns emerged about how gardeners achieve institutionalization through different combinations of critical components. These patterns are best described by the GREEN Tool, the first framework to identify how to

  18. Energy Smart Schools--Applied Research, Field Testing, and Technology Integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebiat Solomon; Robin Vieira; William L. Manz; Abby Vogen; Claudia Orlando; Kimberlie A. Schryer

    2004-12-01

    The National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) in conjunction with the California Energy Commission, the Energy Center of Wisconsin, the Florida Solar Energy Center, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, and the Ohio Department of Development's Office of Energy Efficiency conducted a four-year, cost-share project with the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to focus on energy efficiency and high-performance technologies in our nation's schools. NASEO was the program lead for the MOU-State Schools Working group, established in conjunction with the USDOE Memorandum of Understanding process for collaboration among state and federal energy research and demonstration offices and organizations. The MOU-State Schools Working Group included State Energy Offices and other state energy research organizations from all regions of the country. Through surveys and analyses, the Working Group determined the school-related energy priorities of the states and established a set of tasks to be accomplished, including the installation and evaluation of microturbines, advanced daylighting research, testing of schools and classrooms, and integrated school building technologies. The Energy Smart Schools project resulted in the adoption of advanced energy efficiency technologies in both the renovation of existing schools and building of new ones; the education of school administrators, architects, engineers, and manufacturers nationwide about the energy-saving, economic, and environmental benefits of energy efficiency technologies; and improved the learning environment for the nation's students through use of better temperature controls, improvements in air quality, and increased daylighting in classrooms. It also provided an opportunity for states to share and replicate successful projects to increase their energy efficiency while at the same time driving down their energy costs.

  19. Integrating Autism Care through a School-Based Intervention Model: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Dang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this pilot study is to determine the feasibility of monitoring the progress of children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD both in school and at home to promote a school-based integrated care model between parents, teachers, and medical providers. This is a prospective cohort study. To monitor progress, outcome measures were administered via an online platform developed for caregivers and teachers of children (n = 30 attending a school specializing in neurodevelopmental disorders and using an integrated medical and education program. Longitudinal analysis showed improvements in a novel scale, the Teacher Autism Progress Scale (TAPS, which was designed to measure key autism-related gains in a school environment (2.1-point improvement, p = 0.004, ES = 0.324. The TAPS showed a strong and statistically significant correlation, with improvement in aberrant behavior (r = −0.50; p = 0.008 and social responsiveness (r = −0.70; p < 0.001. The results also showed non-statistically significant improvements in aberrant behavior, social responsiveness, and quality of life over time at both school and home. To assess feasibility of ongoing progress measurement, we assessed missing data, which showed caregivers were more likely to miss surveys during summer. Results demonstrate the value and feasibility of online, longitudinal data collection in school to assist with individualized education planning and collaborative care for children with ASD. Lessons learned in this pilot will support school outcomes researchers in developing more efficacious, collaborative treatment plans between clinicians, caregivers, and teachers.

  20. Integration of Basic and Clinical Sciences: Faculty Perspectives at a U.S. Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hoeven, Dharini; van der Hoeven, Ransome; Zhu, Liang; Busaidy, Kamal; Quock, Ryan L

    2018-04-01

    Although dental education has traditionally been organized into basic sciences education (first and second years) and clinical education (third and fourth years), there has been growing interest in ways to better integrate the two to more effectively educate students and prepare them for practice. Since 2012, The University of Texas School of Dentistry at Houston (UTSD) has made it a priority to improve integration of basic and clinical sciences, with a focus to this point on integrating the basic sciences. The aim of this study was to determine the perspectives of basic and clinical science faculty members regarding basic and clinical sciences integration and the degree of integration currently occurring. In October 2016, all 227 faculty members (15 basic scientists and 212 clinicians) were invited to participate in an online survey. Of the 212 clinicians, 84 completed the clinician educator survey (response rate 40%). All 15 basic scientists completed the basic science educator survey (response rate 100%). The majority of basic and clinical respondents affirmed the value of integration (93.3%, 97.6%, respectively) and reported regular integration in their teaching (80%, 86.9%). There were no significant differences between basic scientists and clinicians on perceived importance (p=0.457) and comfort with integration (p=0.240), but the basic scientists were more likely to integrate (p=0.039) and collaborate (p=0.021) than the clinicians. There were no significant differences between generalist and specialist clinicians on importance (p=0.474) and degree (p=0.972) of integration in teaching and intent to collaborate (p=0.864), but the specialists reported feeling more comfortable presenting basic science information (p=0.033). Protected faculty time for collaborative efforts and a repository of integrated basic science and clinical examples for use in teaching and faculty development were recommended to improve integration. Although questions might be raised about

  1. Formation of the integrated system of the marketing information as the tool of perfection of marketing activity of innovative high school

    OpenAIRE

    D. Bogdanov

    2014-01-01

    The author proves necessity of formation of the integrated system of the marketing information of innovative high school, considers methodical aspects formation of the integrated system of the marketing information of innovative high school, develops structure of the integrated system of the marketing information of innovative high school X and makes recommendations about management of efficiency of the integrated system of the marketing information in innovative high school.

  2. Undergraduate medical student's perception about an integrated method of teaching at a medical school in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshal Sabane

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective In recent years, there has been a gradual but definitive shift in medical schools all over the globe to promote a more integrated way of teaching. Integration of medical disciplines promotes a holistic understanding of the medical curriculum in the students. This helps them better understand and appreciate the importance and role of each medical subject. Method The study was conducted among the 5th year Pre-clinical students. Questionnaire consisted of 4 questions on the level of integration, 5 questions on various aspects of the assessment and some questions which tested the level of awareness of the integrated method. Result Out of a total of 72 students present on the day of data collection, 65 participated in the study giving a response rate of 90.27 %. After primary data cleansing 4 questionnaires had to be omitted. Most of the students opined as “good” or “very good” for the questions on integration and its attributes. Only 27 (44 % were aware of integrated curriculum being taught in other medical schools in the gulf. Similar findings were observed regarding assessment related questions. Reduction in the number of block exams is unpopular among the students and only 6% have agreed for 3, 4, or 5 non-summative block assessments. Opinion regarding the help of integrated teaching in IFOM based OMSB entrance examination was mixed with a greater variance in the responses. 43% students have indicated that they would like to spend more time with PDCI. Conclusion The students of our institution seem to have a favourable opinion regarding the integrated system of teaching. The satisfaction with the conduct of examinations and its related variables is found to be high. A reduction in the number of block exams however is unpopular among the target group and they would appreciate a greater time allocation for subjects of PDCI and Pharmacology.

  3. Students' perceptions of vertical and horizontal integration in a discipline-based dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, T C; White, J G

    2017-05-01

    Integration is a key concern in discipline-based undergraduate dental curricula. Therefore, this study compared feedback on integration from students who participated in different instructional designs in a Comprehensive Patient Care course. The study was conducted at the University of Pretoria (2009-2011). Third-year cohorts (Cohorts A, B and C) participated in pre-clinical case-based learning, whilst fourth-year cohorts (Cohorts D and E) received didactic teaching in Comprehensive Patient Care. Cohorts A, D and E practised clinical Comprehensive Patient Care in a discipline-based clinic. Cohort B conducted their Comprehensive Patient Care patient examinations in a dedicated facility supervised by dedicated faculty responsible to teach integration. Students had to indicate on visual analogue scales whether the way they were taught at the school helped them to integrate knowledge from the same (horizontal integration) and preceding (vertical integration) year of study. The end-points of the scales were defined as 'definitely' and 'not at all'. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was employed to measure the differences between cohorts according to the year of study. Third-year case-based learning cohorts rated the horizontal integration close to 80/100 and vertical integration ranging from 64 to 71/100. In year four, Cohort B rated vertical and horizontal integration 9-15% higher (ANOVA, P horizontal integration 11-18% higher (ANOVA, P integration in the discipline-based undergraduate dental curriculum. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The Implementation Of Character Education Values In Integrated Physical Education Subject In Elementary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suherman Ayi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of this research emphasizes on the implementation of character building values through physical education learning in elementary school. The effort in developing this character building practice is essential to be done in order to tackle moral and character crises, which already occur in both individual and collective levels reflected in educational institution from elementary school to higher education. Hence, to form culture and national character, educational program and process are inseparable from environmental factor including the values of society, culture, and humanity. Physical education subject that is based on 2013 Curriculum has significant difference compared to the previous physical education subject. This is due to the fact that integrated physical education has its own uniqueness in terms of planning, systematic implementation, and instructional medium. This research aims at producing guidance in implementing character values integrated in physical education in elementary school. The method used in this research is research and development (R&D method, which includes preliminary research, model designing, limited trial, and extensive trial, as well as validation and dissemination. The findings of the research show that character values can be implemented in physical education in elementary schools in Sumedang Regency.

  5. Vertical integration in medical school: effect on the transition to postgraduate training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnen-Meijer, Marjo; ten Cate, Olle Th J; van der Schaaf, Marieke; Borleffs, Jan C C

    2010-03-01

    Recently, many medical schools' curricula have been revised so that they represent vertically integrated (VI) curricula. Important changes include: the provision of earlier clinical experience; longer clerkships, and the fostering of increasing levels of responsibility. One of the aims of vertical integration is to facilitate the transition to postgraduate training. The purpose of the present study is to determine whether a VI curriculum at medical school affects the transition to postgraduate training in a positive way. We carried out a questionnaire study among graduates of six medical schools in the Netherlands, who had followed either a VI or a non-VI curriculum. Items in the questionnaire focused on preparedness for work and postgraduate training, the time and number of applications required to be admitted to residency, and the process of making career choices. In comparison with those who have followed non-VI programmes, graduates of VI curricula appear to make definitive career choices earlier, need less time and fewer applications to obtain residency positions and feel more prepared for work and postgraduate training. The curriculum at medical school affects the transition to postgraduate training. Additional research is required to determine which components of the curriculum cause this effect and to specify under which conditions this effect occurs.

  6. Education and leisure: analyzing the Integrated School Program in Belo Horizonte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcília de Sousa Silva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to analyze the concepts of leisure and education that permeate the documents in the Integrated School Program in Belo Horizonte. The analysis was based on the Policy cycle approach and emphasized the contexts of influence and the policy text production. Thus, the formation of the political agenda, the Political Pedagogical Project Program and the Strategic Plan 2010-2030 BH were investigated. The policy context is not organized in a linear fashion; it is a process of groups of interest interaction. With the discourse of coping with school failure, revealed by the students’ yield and flow evaluation indices (approval, repetition and dropout, the Integrated School education documents announce education and leisure as forms of production, strengthening links between public and private. The right to education is restricted to children’s and youth’s access and permanence in school without creating a perspective of universalization and quality. The documents address the leisure with a simplistic view of construction and maintenance of equipment and the idea of activity

  7. The implementation of integrated entrepreneurship material on dress making teaching in vocational high school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawitri, Sicilia

    2018-03-01

    The aims of the research were: (1) To know the students' achievement in Dress Making Teaching by implementing Integrated Entrepreneur Material in Vocational High School, (2) The level of increasing of students' achievement in Dress Making Teaching by integrating Entrepreneurship Material in Vocational High School. By using experimental method this research was conducted in Magelang Vocational High School and applied pre-test post-test design. The samples in this research was XI grade of Fashion Technology Study Program. Observation sheet and documentation were used in this research as instruments. Data analyzed by using descriptive analyze and gain score. The result, there were: (1) students' achievement in Dress Making Teaching was high 88.6 and (2) the increasing of students' achievement was 0.61 it was medium category. The suggestion were: Integrated Entrepreneurship material can be applied in another subject matter, such as Men Wear, Tailoring, Children Wear, and The students who want to be a good entrepreneur, have to drill their skill in making dresses, and know about excellent service to the clients, marketing and make clients satisfaction.

  8. The Opinions of Middle School Mathematics Teachers on the Integration of Mathematics Course and Social Issues

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    Buket Turhan Turkkan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the opinions of middle school mathematics teachers on the integration of mathematics course and social issues. For this purpose, qualitative research method was used in this study. As for determining the participants of the research, criterion sampling among purposeful sampling methods was used. Being a middle school mathematics teacher as an occupation was considered as a criterion for determining the participants. The participants of the research consist of 13 middle school mathematics teachers in Turkey. So as to collect the research data, the semi-structured interview form created by the researchers was used. The data analysis was performed according to the content analysis, and Nvivo 10 program was used for the analysis. As a result of this study, the themes of the situation and methods of the integration of mathematics course and social issues, the attainment of democratic values in mathematics course and the ways of its attainment, gaining awareness of social justice and equality in mathematics course and the ways of its gaining, the activities performed by teachers for social issues in mathematics course and the teachers’ suggestions for the integration of mathematics course and social issues were reached and the results were discussed within this frame.

  9. Motivation and intention to integrate physical activity into daily school life: the JAM World Record event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazou, Spyridoula; Vlachopoulos, Symeon P

    2014-11-01

    Research on the motivation of stakeholders to integrate physical activity into daily school life is limited. The purpose was to examine the motivation of stakeholders to participate in a world record physical activity event and whether motivation was associated with future intention to use activity breaks during the daily school life and future participation in a similar event. After the 2012 JAM (Just-a-Minute) World Record event, 686 adults (591 women; 76.1% participated for children amotivation for participation in the next event were reported. Hierarchical regression analysis, controlling for age, gender, and occupation, showed that intrinsic forms of motivation positively predicted, whereas amotivation negatively predicted, future intention to participate in the event and use the activity breaks. Multivariate analyses of variance revealed that school-related participants were more intrinsically motivated and intended to use the activity breaks and repeat the event more than those who were not affiliated with a school. Nonschool participants reported higher extrinsic motivation and amotivation than school-related participants. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  10. Evolution of the New Pathway curriculum at Harvard Medical School: the new integrated curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienstag, Jules L

    2011-01-01

    In 1985, Harvard Medical School adopted a "New Pathway" curriculum, based on active, adult learning through problem-based, faculty-facilitated small-group tutorials designed to promote lifelong skills of self-directed learning. Despite the successful integration of clinically relevant material in basic science courses, the New Pathway goals were confined primarily to the preclinical years. In addition, the shifting balance in the delivery of health care from inpatient to ambulatory settings limited the richness of clinical education in clinical clerkships, creating obstacles for faculty in their traditional roles as teachers. In 2006, Harvard Medical School adopted a more integrated curriculum based on four principles that emerged after half a decade of self-reflection and planning: (1) integrate the teaching of basic/population science and clinical medicine throughout the entire student experience; (2) reestablish meaningful and intensive faculty-student interactions and reengage the faculty; (3) develop a new model of clinical education that offers longitudinal continuity of patient experience, cross-disciplinary curriculum, faculty mentoring, and student evaluation; and (4) provide opportunities for all students to pursue an in-depth, faculty-mentored scholarly project. These principles of our New Integrated Curriculum reflect our vision for a curriculum that fosters a partnership between students and faculty in the pursuit of scholarship and leadership.

  11. The School System and New Media – Reasons in Favour of Integration

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    M. Marković

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the education system reform which is currently underway in Serbia and in most countries of the region, considerable attention has been paid to modern media technologies. Although a whole decade has passed since the initiation of the reform there have been no significant developments regarding the school system computerisation, which resulted in raising the issue of integration and seeking valid arguments which indicate the key role of new media in the re-structuring of the school system. In that context, the basic goal of this paper is an analysis of primary research studies which suggest the reasons for the inte-gration of new media into the school system in order to set out the reform guidelines regarding the application of information and communication tech-nologies in formal education. The results of the analysis attest to a large num-ber of compelling reasons for implementing modern media technologies into the system of educational institutions. Among them one should distinguish the general reasons which deal with improving the quality of and bridging the gap between formal and informal education. The selected research studies state objective reasons such as rationality and cost-effectiveness, as well as peda-gogical reasons relating to the learning context innovation, presence of new knowledge sources provided by Internet resources, changes in the process of learning instigated by the development of e-learning and a higher motivation of the participants in the process of education. In the conclusion of this re-search the authors emphasise the necessity of integrating media technologies into the school system for the purposes of creating a modern coherent system founded on networking, communication and exchange.

  12. Pedagogy and Quality in Indian Slum School Settings: A Bernsteinian Analysis of Visual Representations in the Integrated Child Development Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla-Duggan, Rita

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses upon the micro level of the pre-school classroom, taking the example of the Indian Integrated Child Development Service (ICDS), and the discourse of "child-centred" pedagogy that is often associated with quality pre-schooling. Through an analysis of visual data, semi-structured and film elicitation interviews drawn…

  13. The Effects of Servant Leader and Integrity of Principal Performance in Catholic Senior High Schools in North Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malingkas, Melky; Senduk, Johanis Frans; Simandjuntak, Suddin; Binilang, Benny Blemy

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this research was to examine the effects of servant leader and integrity on principal performance in Catholic senior high schools in North Sulawesi, Indonesia. This quantitative research used questionnaire-gathered data from 75 teachers at 11 schools. The results of research show that the servant leader approach has significant positive…

  14. Experiences of Leaders in One Texas School District Integrating Social Media as a Communication Medium: Bounded Phenomenological Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Bradley D.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this bounded phenomenological case study was to investigate the experiences of leaders in one Texas school district integrating social media into communication practices. The participants in this study were twelve campus leaders, four district level leaders, and the superintendent of schools. The focus groups consisted of three…

  15. The School-Community Integrated Learning Pathway: Exploring a New Way to Prepare and Induct Final-Year Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Suzanne; Hudson, Peter; Adie, Lenore

    2015-01-01

    Universities and teacher employment bodies seek new, cost-effective ways for graduating classroom-ready teachers. This study involved 32 final-year preservice teachers in an innovative school--university partnership teacher education programme titled, the School-Community Integrated Learning (SCIL) pathway. Data were collected using a five-part…

  16. Linking Housing and School Integration Policy: What Federal, State and Local Governments Can Do. Issue Brief No. 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegeler, Philip

    2015-01-01

    This Issue Brief states that, in spite of the obvious "reciprocal relationship" between housing and school policy, government housing and education agencies have rarely collaborated to promote the common goals of racial and economic integration. Recent efforts to promote collaboration among housing and school agencies have focused on…

  17. Teachers' Stages of Concern for Media Literacy Education and the Integration of MLE in Chinese Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhu, Chang; Sang, Guoyuan

    2014-01-01

    Media literacy is an essential skill for living in the twenty-first century. School-based instruction is a critical part of media literacy education (MLE), while research on teachers' concerns and integration of MLE is not sufficient. The objective of this study is to investigate teachers' stages of concern (SoC), perceived need, school context,…

  18. Strengthening of Indonesia school of management in the 21st century through the implementation of school management system based information technology and communications integrated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, Wawan; Munir, Senen, Syamsul Hadi; Nugroho, Eddy Prasetyo; Wihardi, Yaya; Nugraha, Eki

    2017-05-01

    Indonesia strengthening school management through the implementation of School Management System Based Information Technology and Communications (SMS-ICT) is intended to improve the performance of schools to accommodate the complexities of management in a computerized system that is simple but comprehensive so that it aligns with the era of the 21st century. School Management System Based Information and Communication Technology-based standards developed 12 education, adapted from 8 national standards into the system components that support the characteristics of 21st century schools. Twelfth system components include curriculum, Personal Development, Recruitment of New Student Services and Student Development, Education Labor and Education, Infrastructure, Leadership, School Management, Financing, Evaluation, and Social Communications. Development of the system is done through the stages of systematically covering Need Assessment, System Design, System Development, Testing Limited, Reveiw and Improvement, Testing Expanded, Finalize, and Packaging. SMS-ICT has gained Copyright and had seminars both nationally and internationally, and have been published by national journals, and in a book chapter. SMS-ICT applied to several schools in districy/city of West Java is based on cooperation with the Education Department of West Java. Implementation of School Management System as strengthening school management Indonesia shows the essential matters of school management. SMS-ICT managed to bring changes not only bring substantial improvements to the school how it should be managed, but also change the mindset of school leaders and teachers in ways of thinking and acting more professional in carrying out their respective duties. SMS-ICT managed as a unified system of governance that is integrated schools overall strategic component in an integrated system that implements ICT that has the capacity to process data and information quickly, accurately and reliably. SMS-ICT as a

  19. Collaborative Care in Schools: Enhancing Integration and Impact in Youth Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Aaron R.; Whitaker, Kelly; French, William P.; Richardson, Laura P.; Wasse, Jessica Knaster; McCauley, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Collaborative Care is an innovative approach to integrated mental health service delivery that focuses on reducing access barriers, improving service quality, and lowering healthcare expenditures. A large body of evidence supports the effectiveness of Collaborative Care models with adults and, increasingly, for youth. Although existing studies examining these models for youth have focused exclusively on primary care, the education sector is also an appropriate analog for the accessibility that primary care offers to adults. Collaborative Care aligns closely with the practical realities of the education sector and may represent a strategy to achieve some of the objectives of increasingly popular multi-tiered systems of supports frameworks. Unfortunately, no resources exist to guide the application of Collaborative Care models in schools. Based on the existing evidence for Collaborative Care models, the current paper (1) provides a rationale for the adaptation of Collaborative Care models to improve mental health service accessibility and effectiveness in the education sector; (2) presents a preliminary Collaborative Care model for use in schools; and (3) describes avenues for research surrounding school-based Collaborative Care, including the currently funded Accessible, Collaborative Care for Effective School-based Services (ACCESS) project. PMID:28392832

  20. Integrating a relaxation response-based curriculum into a public high school in Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foret, Megan M; Scult, Matthew; Wilcher, Marilyn; Chudnofsky, Rana; Malloy, Laura; Hasheminejad, Nicole; Park, Elyse R

    2012-04-01

    Academic and societal pressures result in U.S. high school students feeling stressed. Stress management and relaxation interventions may help students increase resiliency to stress and overall well-being. The objectives of this study were to examine the feasibility (enrollment, participation and acceptability) and potential effectiveness (changes in perceived stress, anxiety, self-esteem, health-promoting behaviors, and locus of control) of a relaxation response (RR)-based curriculum integrated into the school day for high school students. The curriculum included didactic instruction, relaxation exercises, positive psychology, and cognitive restructuring. The intervention group showed significantly greater improvements in levels of perceived stress, state anxiety, and health-promoting behaviors when compared to the wait list control group. The intervention appeared most useful for girls in the intervention group. The results suggest that several modifications may increase the feasibility of using this potentially effective intervention in high schools. Copyright © 2011 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Student feedback about the integrated curriculum in a Caribbean medical school

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    P. Ravi Shankar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Xavier University School of Medicine adopted an integrated, organ system-based curriculum in January 2013. The present study was aimed at determining students’ perceptions of the integrated curriculum and related assessment methods. Methods: The study was conducted on first- to fourth-semester undergraduate medical students during March 2014. The students were informed of the study and subsequently invited to participate. Focus group discussions were conducted. The curriculum’s level of integration, different courses offered, teaching-learning methods employed, and the advantages and concerns relating to the curriculum were noted. The respondents also provided feedback about the assessment methods used. Deductive content analysis was used to analyze the data. Results: Twenty-two of the 68 students (32.2% participated in the study. The respondents expressed generally positive opinions. They felt that the curriculum prepared them well for licensing examinations and future practice. Problem-based learning sessions encouraged active learning and group work among students, thus, improving their understanding of the course material. The respondents felt that certain subjects were allocated a larger proportion of time during the sessions, as well as more questions during the integrated assessment. They also expressed an appreciation for medical humanities, and felt that sessions on the appraisal of literature needed modification. Their opinions about assessment of behavior, attitudes, and professionalism varied. Conclusion: Student opinion was positive, overall. Our findings would be of interest to other medical schools that have recently adopted an integrated curriculum or are in the process of doing so.

  2. Evaluating the validity of an integrity-based situational judgement test for medical school admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husbands, Adrian; Rodgerson, Mark J; Dowell, Jon; Patterson, Fiona

    2015-09-02

    While the construct of integrity has emerged as a front-runner amongst the desirable attributes to select for in medical school admissions, it is less clear how best to assess this characteristic. A potential solution lies in the use of Situational Judgement Tests (SJTs) which have gained popularity due to robust psychometric evidence and potential for large-scale administration. This study aims to explore the psychometric properties of an SJT designed to measure the construct of integrity. Ten SJT scenarios, each with five response stems were developed from critical incident interviews with academic and clinical staff. 200 of 520 (38.5 %) Multiple Mini Interview candidates at Dundee Medical School participated in the study during the 2012-2013 admissions cycle. Participants were asked to rate the appropriateness of each SJT response on a 4-point likert scale as well as complete the HEXACO personality inventory and a face validity questionnaire. Pearson's correlations and descriptive statistics were used to examine the associations between SJT score, HEXACO personality traits, pre-admissions measures namely academic and United Kingdom Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) scores, as well as acceptability. Cronbach's alpha reliability for the SJT was .64. Statistically significant correlations ranging from .16 to .36 (.22 to .53 disattenuated) were observed between SJT score and the honesty-humility (integrity), conscientiousness, extraversion and agreeableness dimensions of the HEXACO inventory. A significant correlation of .32 (.47 disattenuated) was observed between SJT and MMI scores and no significant relationship with the UKCAT. Participant reactions to the SJTs were generally positive. Initial findings are encouraging regarding the psychometric robustness of an integrity-based SJT for medical student selection, with significant associations found between the SJTs, integrity, other desirable personality traits and the MMI. The SJTs showed little or no redundancy with

  3. Implementing Digital Storytelling as a Technology Integration Approach with Primary School Children

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    Nuala Sweeney-Burt

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Irish educational policy acknowledges the importance of integrating technology meaningfully into teaching and learning at the primary level. Much remains to be done, however, in terms of developing, practically implementing and evaluating the use of technology in the Irish primary classroom. This paper describes a study on the use of a structured approach to digital storytelling as a tool for meaningful technology integration with children at primary level. In this study, the researcher developed a structured approach for implementing digital storytelling with primary school children, and collaborated with a class teacher in an Irish primary school to prepare to implement the approach. Multiple qualitative methods were used to evaluate the implementation, including interviews with the teacher, classroom observation, and focus group interviews with participating children. The results suggested that this structured approach to digital storytelling has the potential to be used successfully as a meaningful technology integration approach with this cohort. The findings also explored implications for the implementation of digital storytelling at primary level, and identified aspects on which further research should be undertaken to enhance and extend the approach that was used.

  4. The Benefits of Fine Art Integration into Mathematics in Primary School

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    Anja Brezovnik

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the article is to research the effects of the integration of fine art content into mathematics on students at the primary school level. The theoretical part consists of the definition of arts integration into education, a discussion of the developmental process of creative mathematical thinking, an explanation of the position of art and mathematics in education today, and a summary of the benefits of arts integration and its positive effects on students. The empirical part reports on the findings of a pedagogical experiment involving two different ways of teaching fifth-grade students: the control group was taught mathematics in a traditional way, while the experimental group was taught with the integration of fine art content into the mathematics lessons. At the end of the teaching periods, four mathematics tests were administered in order to determine the difference in knowledge between the control group and the experimental group. The results of our study confirmed the hypotheses, as we found positive effects of fine art integration into mathematics, with the experimental group achieving higher marks in the mathematics tests than the control group. Our results are consistent with the findings of previous research and studies, which have demonstrated and confirmed that long-term participation in fine art activities offers advantages related to mathematical reasoning, such as intrinsic motivation, visual imagination and reflection on how to generate creative ideas.

  5. Influence of Teacher Competency on Integration of ICT in Teaching and Learning in Public Secondary Schools in Machakos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Felistas Mbithe; Maithya, Redempta; Cheloti, Selpher K.

    2016-01-01

    This study was set to investigate the influence of teachers' competency on the integration of ICT in teaching and learning in public secondary schools in Machakos County. The study hypothesis was that: There is no significant relationship between teacher competency and the integration of ICT in teaching and learning. The study used a sample of…

  6. High Possibility Classrooms as a Pedagogical Framework for Technology Integration in Classrooms: An Inquiry in Two Australian Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how well teachers integrate digital technology in learning is the subject of considerable debate in education. High Possibility Classrooms (HPC) is a pedagogical framework drawn from research on exemplary teachers' knowledge of technology integration in Australian school classrooms. The framework is being used to support teachers who…

  7. Teacher Preparedness in the Implementation of the Integrated Business Studies Curriculum in Public Secondary Schools in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerotich, Florah; Kurgat, Susan J.; Kimutai, Chris K.

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper was to assess teacher preparedness in the implementation of the integrated Business Studies curriculum in public secondary schools in Kenya. Specifically, the study sought to: find out the level of preservice training of the Business Studies teachers implementing the integrated Business Studies curriculum and to find…

  8. Media Competence as an Integral Quality of a New Teacher for a New School

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    Ludmila A. Ivanova

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The proposed article considers the issue of social and cultural determinants having impact on qualitative alteration of requirements to teacher’s personality, media competence as an integral property of a new teacher for a new school. The main ideas of media education’s development are represented in the social-humanitarian context of realization of presidential initiatives “Our New School” which reflect subjective aspect of interpreting the category “media competence” in a wide social and cultural meaning.

  9. FORMATION OF THE HUMAN CAPITAL IN MODEL OF INTEGRATION OF HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE IN INDUSTRY

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    Sergey N. Mityakov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Analyzed the problems of reproduction of human resources in the scientific and educational cooperation and collaboration of university research with industry. Proposed a model integration high school science to industry of the region, including the internal and external levels. On the internal level, proposed a scheme of transfer technology in a technical university, where the formation of human capital is produced in two related areas: training of competitive labor market specialists with higher education, as well as consolidation in the universities of highly qualified personnel. On the external level, proposed creation of an integrated research and education production cluster, which brings together the personnel and technological capabilities of the industrial region.

  10. High School Mathematics Curriculum Development Integrated with Character Education Within Project Assessment as Spiral System Leveled

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    Siti Badriatul Munawaroh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research are: (1 description of characteristics and (2 validate thesenior hight school of mathematics syllabus integrated character education with the project assessment, (3 test the effectiveness of the learning material of function in class X. Testing procedure of syllabus and learning used research development of Borg & Gall (1987. The data were processed with descriptive analysis, statistical test t test and regression. The results obtained by the integration of the 10 characters on the senior hight school of mathematics syllabus show a valid syllabus by experts with an average score of 4 (both categories, the maximum score of 5. Test implementation on learning reach effective: (1 the percentage of learners achieve mastery learning by 89, 5%; (2 an increase of characters curiosity of learners of meeting 1 to 2, up to 3, up to 4 each score gain of 0.17; 0.30; 0.31; (3 the influence of the curiosity of students to the learning outcomes of 48.9%, (4 the average learning outcomes of students experimental class (77.2 is better than the control class (76.2. Thus, each character can bring a change in behavior according to the character programmed and observed in the learning process in focus. Coordination learning at every level stated in the syllabus.

  11. Canadian National Guidelines and Recommendations for Integrating Career Advising Into Medical School Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howse, Kelly; Harris, June; Dalgarno, Nancy

    2017-11-01

    Career planning, decision making about specialty choice, and preparation for residency matching are significant sources of stress for medical students. Attempts have been made to structure and formalize career advising by including it in accreditation standards. There is an expressed need for national guidelines on career advising for medical students. The Future of Medical Education in Canada Postgraduate (FMEC PG) Implementation Project was created to ensure Canadian medical trainees receive the best education possible. From this, a diverse sub-working group (SWG), representing different Canadian regions, was formed to review career advising processes across the country. The SWG developed, through a modified formal consensus methodology, a strategy for medical student career advising that is adaptable to all schools in alignment with existing accreditation standards. The SWG outlined five guiding principles and five essential elements for Canadian universities offering an MD degree with recommendations on how to integrate the elements into each school's career advising system. The five essential elements are a structured approach to career advising, information about available career options, elective guidance, preparation for residency applications, and social accountability. This Perspective endorses the view of the FMEC PG Implementation Project that national guidelines are important to ensure Canadian medical schools are consistently meeting accreditation standards by providing reliable and quality career advising to all medical students. The SWG's position, based on national and provincial feedback, is that these guidelines will stimulate discourse and action regarding the requirements and processes to carry out these recommendations nationwide and share across borders.

  12. School Integration Program in Chile: gaps and challenges for the implementation of an inclusive education program

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    Mauro Tamayo Rozas

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Constructing inclusive societies, leaving no one behind, it is an ethical obligation. Developing inclusive educational programs allows ensuring equal opportunities in one of the most critical stages of development. The aim of this study is to describe the implementation of the School Integration Program (SIP in its different dimensions and in different zones of Chile. A descriptive and cross-sectional study of the perception of SIP Coordinators was performed in public and subsidized schools at the country through a web-based survey. A simple random convenience sampling of schools was performed, obtaining 1742 answers from educational establishments with SIP. Higher level of implementation of the program was identified in areas related to interdisciplinary work and comprehensive training, curricular and institutional aspects. On the other hand, deficiencies were identified in the implementation of accessibility, development of reasonable adjustments and participation of the educational community. Likewise, there are differences between the zones of Chile, with the North zone having the least progress. Although there are results in the work team and institutional development, the development of objective conditions and participation is still a pending task in the implementation of the SIP.

  13. Gelingende Integration? Anmerkungen zur Studie von D. Katzenbach u.a. uber den Hamburger Schulversuch "Integrative Grundschule" in ZfPad. 45 (1999), S. 567-590 (Successful Integration? Remarks on the Study by D. Katzenbach et al. on the Hamburg School Experiment "Integrative Elementary School" in ZfPad. 45 (1999), S. 567-590).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeder, Peter Martin

    1999-01-01

    Critiques two normative premises that guide the researchers' interpretation of results from the Hamburg School Experiment, an empirical study that focused on mainstreaming elementary students diagnosed as needing special education: (1) integrating these children in normal classrooms is legitimated; and (2) social integration should not preclude…

  14. Evidence-based educational pathway for the integration of first aid training in school curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Buck, Emmy; Van Remoortel, Hans; Dieltjens, Tessa; Verstraeten, Hans; Clarysse, Matthieu; Moens, Olaf; Vandekerckhove, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    "Calling for help, performing first aid and providing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)" is part of the educational goals in secondary schools in Belgium (Flanders). However, for teachers it is not always clear at what age children can be taught which aspects of first aid. In addition, it is not clear what constitutes "performing first aid" and we strongly advocate that the first aid curriculum is broader than CPR training alone. To develop an evidence-based educational pathway to enable the integration of first aid into the school curriculum by defining the goals to be achieved for knowledge, skills and attitudes, for different age groups. Studies were identified through electronic databases research (The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase). We included studies on first aid education for children and adolescents up to 18 years old. A multidisciplinary expert panel formulated their practice experience and expert opinion and discussed the available evidence. We identified 5822 references and finally retained 30 studies (13 experimental and 17 observational studies), including studies concerning emergency call (7 studies), cardiopulmonary resuscitation (18 studies), AED (Automated External Defibrillator) use (6 studies), recovery position (5 studies), choking (2 studies), injuries (5 studies), and poisoning (2 studies). Recommendations (educational goals) were derived after carefully discussing the currently available evidence in the literature and balancing the skills and attitudes of children of different ages. An evidence-based educational pathway with educational goals concerning learning first aid for each age group was developed. This educational pathway can be used for the integration of first aid training in school curricula. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. READINESS Of ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS IN IMPLEMENTING CHARACTERS INTEGRATED LEARNING IN THE SCIENCE SUBJECT

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    N. Hindarto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many problems that arise in today's society are rooted in the issue of morality as a result of the marginalization of the values of character. To solve this problem, need to be enforced the values of good character on every member of the community, and the proper way is through the educational process, including through education in schools ranging from elementary education to higher education. To find out whether the teachers in elementary schools are ready to take this work, the research conducted to determine the readiness of teachers and the problems associated with its implementation. Through a questionnaire calculated in descriptive percentage on a sample of elementary school teachers who are spread in Semarang, Semarang District and Temanggung, it can be concluded that in teachers’ view it is very important to integrate the learning of characters in the lesson. However, they need guidance /examples to develop learning model with its features, which integrate the values of the characters in the science subject.Banyak persoalan yang timbul di masyarakat dewasa ini berakar pada persoalan moralitas sebagai akibat terpinggirkannya nilai-nilai karakter, Untuk mengatasi persoalan ini, perlu ditegakkan lagi nilai nilai karakter yang baik pada setiap anggota masyarakat, dan cara yang tepat adalah melalui proses pendidikan, di antaranya melalui pendidikan di sekolah mulai dari pendidikan dasar sampai pendidikan tinggi. Untuk mengetahui apakah para guru pada Sekolah Dasar siap mengemban tugas ini, maka diadakan penelitian untuk mengetahui kesiapan para guru dan masalah-masalah yang terkait dengan pelaksanaannya. Melalui angket yang kemudian diolah secara deskriptive persentasi pada sampel guru SD yang tersebar di Kota Semarang, Kabupaten Semarang dan Kabupaten Temanggung, dapat diketahui bahwa para guru menganggap sangat penting untuk mengintegrasikan pembelajaran karakter dalam matapelajaran IPA. Namun demikian mereka membutuhkan bimbingan

  16. Causes of blindness and visual impairment among students in integrated schools for the blind in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Jyoti Baba; Gnyawali, Subodh; Upadhyay, Madan Prasad

    2012-12-01

    To identify the causes of blindness and visual impairment among students in integrated schools for the blind in Nepal. A total of 778 students from all 67 integrated schools for the blind in Nepal were examined using the World Health Organization/Prevention of Blindness Eye Examination Record for Children with Blindness and Low Vision during the study period of 3 years. Among 831 students enrolled in the schools, 778 (93.6%) participated in the study. Mean age of students examined was 13.7 years, and the male to female ratio was 1.4:1. Among the students examined, 85.9% were blind, 10% had severe visual impairment and 4.1% were visually impaired. The cornea (22.8%) was the most common anatomical site of visual impairment, its most frequent cause being vitamin A deficiency, followed by the retina (18.4%) and lens (17.6%). Hereditary and childhood factors were responsible for visual loss in 27.9% and 22.0% of students, respectively. Etiology could not be determined in 46% of cases. Overall, 40.9% of students had avoidable causes of visual loss. Vision could be improved to a level better than 6/60 in 3.6% of students refracted. More than one third of students were visually impaired for potentially avoidable reasons, indicating lack of eye health awareness and eye care services in the community. The cause of visual impairment remained unknown in a large number of students, which indicates the need for introduction of modern diagnostic tools.

  17. Constructing the integral concept on the basis of the idea of accumulation: suggestion for a high school curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouropatov, Anatoli; Dreyfus, Tommy

    2013-07-01

    Students have a tendency to see integral calculus as a series of procedures with associated algorithms and many do not develop a conceptual grasp giving them the desirable versatility of thought. Thus, instead of a proceptual view of the symbols in integration, they have, at best, a process-oriented view. On the other hand, it is not surprising that many students find concepts such as the integral difficult when they are unable to experience these processes directly in the classroom. With a view towards improving this situation, constructing the integral concept on the basis of the idea of accumulation has been proposed (Educ Stud Math. 1994;26:229-274; Integral as accumulation: a didactical perspective for school mathematics; Thessaloniki: PME; 2009. p. 417-424). In this paper, we discuss a curriculum that is based on this idea and a design for curriculum materials that are intended to develop an improved cognitive base for a flexible proceptual understanding of the integral and integration in high school. The main focus is on how we (mathematics teachers and mathematics educators) might teach the integral concept in order to help high school students to construct meaningful knowledge alongside acquiring technical abilities.

  18. THE INTEGRATION OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY (ICT INTO PRIMARY SCHOOLS CURRICULUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaniyi Alaba Sofowora

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study is a critical overview of the efforts of the Nigerian government at integrating Information and Communication Technology (ICT into education. It also assessed the availability of these facilities and infrastructure as stated in the strategic ICT objectives. The study in addition investigated whether the sample used have the skills needed for ICT utilization and factors/challenges that affects the diffusion of ICT in education. This is with the ultimate view of providing empirical information on the extent of achieving the vision and objectives of the National policy for ICT in Nigeria. The study employed exploratory research design. Three hundred participants constituted the sample for this study. The sample was selected from ten schools using simple random sampling technique. While the schools were selected using stratified sampling technique, based on the Local Education Authority Area, school type and location. The research instrument is made up of a self-designed questionnaire on five point Likert Scale. They were derived from relevant literature and the research objectives and were validated by exerts from the Departments of Educational Technology, Educational Foundations and Counseling and ICT teachers in public schools in Ife for content validity. The reliability of the instrument was also determined using Pearson Moment Correlation. A correlation of 0.87 was found. The data was analyzed using One way analysis of Variance (ANOVA .The findings showed that ICT facilities are not universally available. It was also found that 10 years after the enactment of the Nigerian National ICT Policy, internet services are yet to be fully made available in all the government Institutions in Nigeria

  19. Integrating Vocational and General Education: A Rudolf Steiner School. Case Study of the Hibernia School, Herne, Federal Republic of Germany. UIE Case Studies 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rist, Georg; Schneider, Peter

    This study describes and analyzes the Hibernia School where the aim of curriculum articulation in its essential vertical and horizontal dimensions has been successfully converted into actual practice. (Curriculum articulation means the equal representation and integration of three major components--artistic, practical, and academic learning.)…

  20. Designing using Lego and Uno-Stacko: A Playful Architecture for an Integrated Kindergarten and Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthmainnah, K.; Aryanti, T.; Ardiansyah, A.

    2017-03-01

    The integrated kindergarten and elementary school is a public educational facility used for early age and elementary education. Designated for children at 4-12 years of age, the design should meet the standards and requirements, while considering children’s needs in their development phase. This paper discusses the design of an integrated kindergarten and elementary school using the playful theme. Design was explored using LEGO and UNO-STACKO to create spaces that accommodate material exploration for children. The design takes the play concept as a medium of child’s learning in order to improve their ability and awareness of the surrounding environment. The design translates the playful theme into imaginary dimension, constructive-deconstructive shapes, and glide circulations concept. The spatial pattern is applied by considering children’s behavior in the designated ages to trigger their creativity improvement. The design is expected to serve as a model of an integrated kindergarten and elementary school architecture.

  1. Integration of Engineering Education by High School Teachers to Meet Standards in the Physics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, Jennifer Anna

    In recent years there has been increasing interest in engineering education at the K-12 level, which has resulted in states adopting engineering standards as a part of their academic science standards. From a national perspective, the basis for research into engineering education at the K-12 level is the belief that it is of benefit to student learning, including to "improve student learning and achievement in science and mathematics; increase awareness of engineering and the work of engineers; boost youth interest in pursuing engineering as a career; and increase the technological literacy of all students" (National Research Council, 2009a, p. 1). The above has led to a need to understand how teachers are currently implementing engineering education in their classrooms. High school physics teachers have a history of implementing engineering design projects in their classrooms, thus providing an appropriate setting to look for evidence of quality engineering education at the high school level. Understanding the characteristics of quality engineering integration can inform curricular and professional development efforts for teachers asked to implement engineering in their classrooms. Thus, the question that guided this study is: How, and to what extent, do physics teachers represent quality engineering in a physics unit focused on engineering? A case study research design was implemented for this project. Three high school physics teachers were participants in this study focused on the integration of engineering education into the physics classroom. The data collected included observations, interviews, and classroom documents that were analyzed using the Framework for Quality K-12 Engineering Education (Moore, Glancy et al., 2013). The results provided information about the areas of the K-12 engineering framework addressed during these engineering design projects, and detailed the quality of these lesson components. The results indicate that all of the design

  2. Development of Integrative STEM Curriculum: A Multiple Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Teams in Two Pennsylvania High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider-Bertrand, Joey H.

    At the start of the 21st century, STEM education was a new priority in many schools as the focus shifted from separate disciplines to integrative STEM education. Unfortunately, there was limited research to offer guidance to practitioners (Brown, 2012; Honey, Pearson & Schweingruber, 2014). This qualitative, multiple case study explored the experiences of two multi-disciplinary teams of secondary teachers from Pennsylvania who developed and implemented integrative STEM curriculum. Four teachers from a rural high school and four teachers from a suburban high school participated in the study. A document review of integrative STEM curriculum and semi-structured interviews were conducted to learn about the curriculum development process and teachers' perceptions regarding conditions that support or hinder success. Individual and cross-case analyses were performed to establish findings and themes. Although the individual case themes varied slightly, the cross-case themes and assertions that emerged provided highly sought after guidance to practitioners and added to the limited body of research on integrative STEM education. This study found that current curriculum models do not fit integrative STEM curriculum, the development process is fluid, and substantial administrative support and resources are necessary to develop, implement, and sustain integrative STEM education programs. The results offered implications for all educators, as well as two examples of how teachers navigated the terrain of integrative STEM curriculum.

  3. A school excursion to a museum can promote physical activity in children by integrating movement into curricular activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Lærke; Kryger, Tine; Sidenius, Gry

    2017-01-01

    Since children spend a large proportion of their time in institutional settings such as schools, health promotion researchers have identified this as an important setting to promote physical activity (PA). Apart from physical education, PA could be integrated into the school curriculum in other...... consisted of an excursion day to a museum. While an increase in light physical activity and reduction in the amount of sedentary time was observed, students did not spend more time in moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) during the visit to the museum than on a regular school day. However, over the full excursion...... day, the students accumulated more MVPA. One school used active transportation to and from the museum, which contributed to significantly more MVPA compared to the other schools. An excursion to a museum significantly reduced sedentary time, but was in itself not sufficient to increase MVPA....

  4. A school excursion to a museum can promote physical activity in children by integrating movement into curricular activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Lærke; Kryger, Tine B; Sidenius, Gry

    2018-01-01

    day, the students accumulated more MVPA. One school used active transportation to and from the museum, which contributed to significantly more MVPA compared to the other schools. An excursion to a museum significantly reduced sedentary time, but was in itself not sufficient to increase MVPA.......Since children spend a large proportion of their time in institutional settings such as schools, health promotion researchers have identified this as an important setting to promote physical activity (PA). Apart from physical education, PA could be integrated into the school curriculum in other...... consisted of an excursion day to a museum. While an increase in light physical activity and reduction in the amount of sedentary time was observed, students did not spend more time in moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) during the visit to the museum than on a regular school day. However, over the full excursion...

  5. Culture and the school: The degree of educational integration of Roma and Gypsies in the Peloponnese region of Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiprianos, Pandelis; Daskalaki, Ivi; Stamelos, Georgios B.

    2012-10-01

    This article examines the degree of integration of Roma and Gypsy children in formal education in the Peloponnese region of Greece. It is based on field research conducted by the University of Patras during the school year 2006/07 within the framework of the Greek Ministry of Education's "Integration of Roma children in school" programme, funded by the European Union. Despite governmental incentives for poor families to enrol their school-aged children, school attendance of Roma and Gypsy children was found to decline from primary year one to primary year six, with hardly any of them entering secondary school at all. Besides looking at school attendance figures and Roma and Gypsy children's proficiency in reading, writing and numeracy, this paper also considers gender, family composition, living conditions and economic situation, as well as culturally constructed perceptions of childhood and a person's life cycle. The aim of this article is to highlight the contradictions and ambiguities involved in the process of incorporating Roma and Gypsy children in formal education, and to evaluate their school performance and assess their academic choices.

  6. Toward the Integration of Cultural Values and Alternative School Models: Challenges in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesky, Aimi Kono

    2013-01-01

    The project development school idea in Japan started in the late 1970s. Both public and private schools can become project schools. Public schools' districts and private schools' boards develop the project plan and submit the application to the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). Once approved, the project school…

  7. The merry-go-round of disadvantage: educational policy and integration in segregated schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruiter, D.

    2008-01-01

    Segregated schools are associated with problems. Educational disadvantage among pupils at these schools persists and these kinds of schools, more than other kinds of schools, are confronted the most with societal problems. Yet little is known about what actually happens at these schools. This

  8. Effect of integrated school-based nutrition education on optimal dietary practices and nutritional status of school adolescents in Southwest of Ethiopia: a quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamiru, Dessalegn; Argaw, Alemayehu; Gerbaba, Mulusew; Ayana, Girmay; Nigussie, Aderajew; Belachew, Tefera

    2016-12-15

    Malnutrition and infection are major barriers to educational access and achievement in low-income countries and also work in conjunction with each other in deteriorating wellness and productivity of school adolescents. A quasi-experimental design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of school-based nutrition education using a peer-led approach, health promotion through school media and health clubs. Data were collected at baseline, midline and end line from sampled participants. To account for the effect of time trend, the difference was measured using a repeated measure analysis. Variables that have p≤0.25 in the bivariate analyses were entered into multivariables to determine the independent effect of interventions. There is a significant difference in food variety between food secure and insecure households (pschools (pschools, which positively associated with male gender (AOR=4.13, CI: 2.38, 7.15) and having a middle-income family (AOR=2.93, CI: 1.92, 6.15). This study showed that by integrating a dietary intervention into school-based activities, there might be significant improvements in dietary intake of primary school adolescents. Therefore, school-based nutrition education programs should be a part of comprehensive school health programs to reach the students and potentially their families.

  9. Positive impact of integrating histology and physiology teaching at a medical school in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherer, Renslow; Wan, Yu; Dong, Hongmei; Cooper, Brian; Morgan, Ivy; Peng, Biwen; Liu, Jun; Wang, Lin; Xu, David

    2014-12-01

    To modernize its stagnant, traditional curriculum and pedagogy, the Medical School of Wuhan University in China adopted (with modifications) the University of Chicago's medical curriculum model. The reform effort in basic sciences was integrating histology and physiology into one course, increasing the two subjects' connection to clinical medicine, and applying new pedagogies and assessment methods. This study assessed the results of the reform by comparing the attitudes and academic achievements of students in the reform curriculum (n = 41) and their traditional curriculum peers (n = 182). An attitude survey was conducted to obtain students' views of their respective histology and physiology instruction. Survey items covered lectures, laboratory teaching, case analyses and small-group case discussions, assessment of students, and overall quality of the courses and instruction. A knowledge test consisting of questions from three sources was given to measure students' mastery of topics that they had learned. Results showed that reform curriculum students were rather satisfied with their course and new teaching methods in most cases. When these students' attitudes were compared with those of their traditional curriculum peers, several significant differences favoring the reform were identified regarding physiology teaching. No other significant difference was found for physiology or histology teaching. Reform curriculum students outperformed their peers on four of five subcategories of the knowledge test questions. These findings support the benefits of integration and state-of-the-art teaching methods. Our study may offer lessons to medical schools in China and other countries whose medical education is in need of change. Copyright © 2014 The American Physiological Society.

  10. Stress predictors in two Asian dental schools with an integrated curriculum and traditional curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T T T; Seki, N; Morio, I

    2018-05-01

    This study explored stress predictors and the role of instructional methods and institutional differences in perceived stress levels amongst students at two Asian dental schools. An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to undergraduate dental students at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), Japan and the University of Medicine and Pharmacy (UMP), Hochiminh City, Vietnam in 2016. Data concerning the students' demographic information and grades, and responses to the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and Dental Environment Stress questionnaire (DES) were collected. The questionnaires were prepared in English and translated into Japanese and Vietnamese following a forward-backward translation process. Altogether 684 students answered the questionnaire with a response rate of 97% for TMDU and 89% for UMP. The mean DES score of UMP students was significantly higher than TMDU (P stress scores in several areas than UMP preclinical students. Having dentistry as their first choice of educational programme was a significant stress predictor for Japanese students whilst the clinical practicum was a significant stress predictor for Vietnamese students. Previous academic performance was not a significant stress predictor for students at either dental school. Dental students of an integrated, active-learning curriculum reported lower stress levels than students of a traditional, discipline-based curriculum. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF INTEGRATED ELECTROCHEMISTRY TEACHING MATERIAL BASED CONTEXTUAL FOR VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL IN MACHINE ENGINEERING DEPARTEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiwik Widodo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The chemistry teaching at Vocational High School which tends to be theoretical and not directly connected to vocational lesson has caused students to have low interest, low motivation, and low achievement. The problem is becoming more complex due to limited time allotment and limited teaching materials. One of the efforts to solve the problem is by providing the relevant teaching material using contextual learning approach. The aims of this Research and Development (R&D research are: (1 to produce an appropriate chemistry teaching material on electrochemistry integrated with skill program subjects using Contextual approach for Vocational High School students of Machinery Engineering Department; (2 to know the feasibility of development result of teaching material. The development of the teaching material uses the 4D developmental model from Thiagarajan et al consisting of four phases namely Define, Design, Develop, and Desiminate. The dominate phase was not done. The scores of evaluation of the feasibility or the appropriateness of the product from the content expert are 88.75% (very feasible for the teachers’ book and 91.25% (very feasible for the students’ book. The expert on media gave 89.25% (very feasible for the teachers’ book and 89.9% (very feasible for the students’ book. The result of readability test shows that the teachers’ book is feasible (83.81% and the students’ book is very feasible (93.61%.

  12. Pioneering Integrated Education and Research Program in Graduate School of Engineering and its Inquiry by Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamino, Yoritoshi

    Department of Adaptive Machine Systems, Department of Materials and Manufucturing Science and Department of Business engineering have constructed the educational programs of consecutive system from master to doctor courses in graduate school of engineering, “Pioneering Integrated Education and Research Program (PP) ”, to produce volitional and original mind researchers with high abilities of research, internationality, leader, practice, management and economics by cooperation between them for reinforcement of their ordinary curriculums. This program consists of the basic PP for master course students and the international exchange PP, leadership pp and tie-up PP of company and University for Doctor course students. In 2005th the basic PP was given to the master course students and then their effectiveness of the PP was investigated by questionnaire. The results of questionnaire proved that the graduate school students improved their various abilities by the practical lesson in cooperation between companies and our Departments in the basic PP, and that the old boys after basic PP working in companies appreciated the advantages to business planning, original conception, finding solution, patents, discussion, report skills required in companies.

  13. Integrated schools, segregated curriculum: effects of within-school segregation on adolescent health behaviors and educational aspirations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsemann, Katrina M; Bell, Bethany A

    2010-09-01

    We examined the extent to which within-school segregation, as measured by unevenness in the distribution of Black and White adolescents across levels of the English curriculum (advanced placement-international baccalaureate-honors, general, remedial, or no English), was associated with smoking, drinking, and educational aspirations, which previous studies found are related to school racial/ethnic composition. We analyzed data from wave 1 of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, restricting our sample to non-Hispanic Blacks (n=2731) and Whites (n=4158) who from 1994 to 1995 attended high schools that enrolled Black and White students. White female students had higher predicted probabilities of smoking or drinking than did Black female students; the largest differences were in schools with high levels of within-school segregation. Black male students had higher predicted probabilities of high educational aspirations than did White male students in schools with low levels of within-school segregation; this association was attenuated for Black males attending schools with moderate or high levels of within-school segregation. Our results provide evidence that within-school segregation may influence both students' aspirations and their behaviors.

  14. Integrated learning in dentistry: baseline data and first evaluation at the Dental School of Basel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, K W; Schegg, R; Krastl, G; Amato, M; Weiger, R; Walter, C

    2008-08-01

    Integrated learning modules were introduced and baseline information was collected, in order to identify the expectations regarding e-learning. Furthermore, first formative evaluation of fourth-year dental students was conducted and the experience gained with summative online assessment was reported. Questionnaires designed by Infratest dimap (Berlin, Germany) were distributed to undergraduate students (n = 72) of the School of Dentistry. The fourth-year dental students went through a preliminary evaluation process. An online test was evaluated and compared with a traditional examination. Sixty-three questionnaires were returned. Sixty-five per cent of the students were already familiar with e-learning. All but one student owned at least one personal computer or laptop. Ninety-one per cent of the students expected positive effects from the integration of online modules. Enhanced flexibility regarding time and location as well as comfortable access to learning materials were mentioned most frequently. Ninety per cent of the students expected to achieve better results by finding it easier to understand learning materials produced with multimedia tools. Sixty per cent of the students feared technical complications when using an online platform. The online test was successfully performed. A formative evaluation process demonstrated agreement between expectations and first experiences with e-learning. Most students expect the quality of their studies to improve by implementation of e-learning. Students appreciating regularly updated learning materials particularly emphasise the importance of its visualisation. Online tests might be an option for student's self-performance rating.

  15. Horizontal and vertical integration of academic disciplines in the medical school curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidic, Branislav; Weitlauf, Harry M

    2002-05-01

    A rapid expansion of new scientific information and the introduction of new technology in operative and diagnostic medicine has marked the last several decades. Medical educators, because of and parallel to these developments, initiated a search for a more effective system of presenting core material to medical students. The new educational trends, although varying somewhat from one institution to another, concentrated on the following pedagogical shifts: 1) expansion of conceptual presentation of material at the expense of detail-oriented education; 2) amplification of an integrated approach, as opposed to subject-oriented instruction; 3) scheduling of elective courses to compliment required courses in the curriculum; and 4) institution of small group instruction (i.e., problem-based learning) to actively involve students in the educational process and to develop deductive reasoning based on clinical cases. The future pedagogical system in medical schools will most likely be a combination of "classical" presentation of material combined with concept-oriented, subject-integrated and small group instruction based on either hypothetical or real clinical cases. It is imperative for the success of the new curriculum, however, that certain criteria are satisfied: 1) reorganize basic science departments to determine course ownership; 2) establish a reward system for teaching faculty; and 3) establish new course objectives. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Strategy for integration of coastal culture in learning process of mathematics in junior high school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyitno, H.; Zaenuri; Florentinus, T. S.; Zakaria, E.

    2018-03-01

    Traditional life in the fishing family is part of the local culture. Many School-age children in the fishing family drop-outs due to lack of parents motivation and the environment was less supportive. The problems were: (1) How the strategy of integration of local culture in learning process of mathematics in Junior High School (JHS)? (2) How to prepare the Mathematics Student’s Book for grade 7 of JHS that based on coastal culture, that has an ISBN, has international level, applicable, and in accordance with the current curriculum? The purposes of this research were: (1) to obtain the strategy of integration of local culture in learning process of mathematics in JHS, through FGD between UNNES and UKM; (2) to obtain the experts validation, through Focus Group Discussion (FGD) between UNNES and UKM toward the draft of the Mathematics Student’s Book for grade 7 of JHS that based on coastal culture; (3) produces Mathematics Student’s Book for grade 7 SMP which based on coastal culture and has an ISBN, international, applicable, and in accordance with the curriculum. The research activity was a qualitative research, so that the research methods include: (1) data reduction, (2) display data, (3) data interpretation, and (4) conclusion/verification. The main activities of this research: drafting the Mathematics Student’s Book of Grade 7 which based on coastal culture; get the validation from international partners;conducting FGD at Education Faculty of Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia through the program of visiting lecturers for getting the Mathematics Student’s Book of grade 7 which based on coastal culture, registering for ISBN, and publishing the reasearch results in International seminar and International Journals. The results of this research were as follows. (1) Getting a good strategy for integration of local culture in learning process of mathematics in JHS. (2) Getting the Mathematics Student’s Book for grade 7 of JHS that based on coastal culture

  17. Integrating a WebQuest in the Primary School Curriculum Using Anchored Instruction: Effect on Learning Outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, P.C.J.; Droop, W.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2010-01-01

    Based on a literature review, a means for integrating WebQuests in day-to-day school activities is introduced using principles of Anchored Instruction. Following these ideas in an effect study, including 109 children in 4th, 5th and 6th grade, significant learning gains were found, with a large

  18. An Exploratory Study of the Factors Associated with Literacy Teachers' Integration of Technology: A Study of Lebanese Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaaban, Youmen; Moloney, Robyn

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore Lebanese teachers' perceptions of the factors determining their integration of technology into literacy classrooms. A quantitative survey examining literacy teachers' individual characteristics and their perceptions of contextual factors was conducted at Lebanese schools. The survey collected data on the…

  19. Literacy Integration of Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) in Elementary Schools: A Case Study of Collaborative Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Charlene A.

    2016-01-01

    Integration of educational technology in the context of e-books has experienced slow implementation in elementary schools, specifically in early literacy instruction. Technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) is a framework for metacognitive reflection on how the learning of subject matter can be facilitated through the use of…

  20. Integrating Immigrant Children into Schools in Europe: Belgium, German-Speaking Community--National Description 2003/04

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eurydice, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The national contributions contained in this paper and on the Eurydice website formed the basis for the comparative study on the integration at school of immigrant children in Europe. Each contribution has exactly the same structure with four main sections entitled as follows: (1) National definitions and demographic context of immigration; (2)…

  1. Safe Cockroach Control: A Guide to Setting Up an Integrated Pest Management Program within a School System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowles, Kathleen Letcher; And Others

    Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is a decision-making approach to pest control that has been used successfully on farms, city parks, offices, homes, and schools. IPM programs help individuals decide when treatments are necessary, where treatment would be most helpful, and what combinations of tactics would be most effective, safe, and inexpensive…

  2. Using Autobiographical Digital Storytelling for the Integration of a Foreign Student in the School Environment. A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokides, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Immigrant students face a multitude of problems, among which are poor social adaptation and school integration. On the other hand, although digital narrations are widely used in education, they are rarely used for aiding students or for the resolution of complex problems. This study exploits the potential of digital narrations towards this end, by…

  3. Integrating Sand Tray and Solution Focused Brief Counseling as a Model for Working with Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBrayer, Rachel H.; Chibbaro, Julia S.

    2012-01-01

    School counselors are master jugglers and must assume a variety of roles and tasks in order to be successful. Despite common misconceptions, Play Therapy is not for exclusive use with younger children. In fact, adolescents can also benefit from its unique properties. One integrated technique that could prove to be especially helpful with middle…

  4. Aesthetic Education of Primary School Pupils as an Integral Part of the National System of Continuous Art Education in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchai, Tetiana

    2014-01-01

    The article examines aesthetic education of primary school pupils as an integral part of the national system of continuous art education in Japan. One of the most important traditional means of aesthetic education in Japan, according to L. Tsaryova is considered nature. Analysis of the scientific literature by domestic and foreign scientists…

  5. Study of the Results in the Acquisition of Core Competencies in Schools That Integrate Primary Education and Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu Duran, Maria; Godall Castell, Pere; Amador Guillem, Miquel; Castro Morera, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this research was to carry out an exploratory study on how music education integrated into primary schooling (children from 6 to 12 years old) can help in acquiring the core competencies characteristic of this stage. The study was conducted by developing a validated instrument, pilot-tested for reliability, to assess the eight core…

  6. Integrating Information and Communication Technology in English Language Teaching: A Case Study of Selected Junior Secondary Schools in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafuraga, Mbizo; Moremi, Mbiganyi

    2017-01-01

    The paper discusses how Information and Communication Technology (ICT) could be integrated in the teaching of English Language in Botswana Junior Secondary Schools. It does so by exploring opportunities and challenges faced by teachers of English Language and the students they teach. Fifty five (55) teachers in eleven (11) Junior Secondary Schools…

  7. The Implementation of Integrated Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Instruction Using Robotics in the Middle School Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntemngwa, Celestin; Oliver, J. Steve

    2018-01-01

    The research study reported here was conducted to investigate the implementation of integrated STEM lessons within courses that have a single subject science focus. The purpose also included development of a pedagogical theory. This technology-based teaching was conceptualized by school administrators and teachers in order to provide middle school…

  8. Integration of Technology, Curriculum, and Professional Development for Advancing Middle School Mathematics: Three Large-Scale Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roschelle, Jeremy; Shechtman, Nicole; Tatar, Deborah; Hegedus, Stephen; Hopkins, Bill; Empson, Susan; Knudsen, Jennifer; Gallagher, Lawrence P.

    2010-01-01

    The authors present three studies (two randomized controlled experiments and one embedded quasi-experiment) designed to evaluate the impact of replacement units targeting student learning of advanced middle school mathematics. The studies evaluated the SimCalc approach, which integrates an interactive representational technology, paper curriculum,…

  9. Arts Integration: A Strategy to Improve Teaching and Learning, Promote Personal Competencies, and Turn Around Low-Performing Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscoe, Belinda; Wilson, Kirk

    2015-01-01

    This paper connects the dots between arts integration, students' personal competencies, and school turnaround. Its thesis is that by intertwining art forms and methods with content in all subject areas, students learn more about art and the other subjects and build their personal competencies for learning. The paper includes the story of an…

  10. Maintaining the Integrity of Public Education: A Comparative Analysis of School Autonomy in the United States and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keddie, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    This article takes a critical comparative approach to examining autonomous schooling in the United States and Australia. Amid the market imperatives currently driving education priorities, its focus is on how autonomy can be mobilized in ways that preserve the integrity of public education. Through reference to key debates and research about…

  11. Predictors of Information Technology Integration in Secondary Schools: Evidence from a Large Scale Study of More than 30,000 Students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khe Foon Hew

    Full Text Available The present study examined the predictors of information technology (IT integration in secondary school mathematics lessons. The predictors pertained to IT resource availability in schools, school contextual/institutional variables, accountability pressure faced by schools, subject culture in mathematics, and mathematics teachers' pedagogical beliefs and practices. Data from 32,256 secondary school students from 2,519 schools in 16 developed economies who participated in the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA 2012 were analyzed using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM. Results showed that after controlling for student-level (gender, prior academic achievement and socioeconomic status and school-level (class size, number of mathematics teachers variables, students in schools with more computers per student, with more IT resources, with higher levels of IT curricular expectations, with an explicit policy on the use of IT in mathematics, whose teachers believed in student-centered teaching-learning, and whose teachers provided more problem-solving activities in class reported higher levels of IT integration. On the other hand, students who studied in schools with more positive teacher-related school learning climate, and with more academically demanding parents reported lower levels of IT integration. Student-related school learning climate, principal leadership behaviors, schools' public posting of achievement data, tracking of school's achievement data by administrative authorities, and pedagogical and curricular differentiation in mathematics lessons were not related to levels of IT integration. Put together, the predictors explained a total of 15.90% of the school-level variance in levels of IT integration. In particular, school IT resource availability, and mathematics teachers' pedagogical beliefs and practices stood out as the most important determinants of IT integration in mathematics lessons.

  12. Predictors of Information Technology Integration in Secondary Schools: Evidence from a Large Scale Study of More than 30,000 Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hew, Khe Foon; Tan, Cheng Yong

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the predictors of information technology (IT) integration in secondary school mathematics lessons. The predictors pertained to IT resource availability in schools, school contextual/institutional variables, accountability pressure faced by schools, subject culture in mathematics, and mathematics teachers' pedagogical beliefs and practices. Data from 32,256 secondary school students from 2,519 schools in 16 developed economies who participated in the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2012 were analyzed using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM). Results showed that after controlling for student-level (gender, prior academic achievement and socioeconomic status) and school-level (class size, number of mathematics teachers) variables, students in schools with more computers per student, with more IT resources, with higher levels of IT curricular expectations, with an explicit policy on the use of IT in mathematics, whose teachers believed in student-centered teaching-learning, and whose teachers provided more problem-solving activities in class reported higher levels of IT integration. On the other hand, students who studied in schools with more positive teacher-related school learning climate, and with more academically demanding parents reported lower levels of IT integration. Student-related school learning climate, principal leadership behaviors, schools' public posting of achievement data, tracking of school's achievement data by administrative authorities, and pedagogical and curricular differentiation in mathematics lessons were not related to levels of IT integration. Put together, the predictors explained a total of 15.90% of the school-level variance in levels of IT integration. In particular, school IT resource availability, and mathematics teachers' pedagogical beliefs and practices stood out as the most important determinants of IT integration in mathematics lessons.

  13. The Impact an Integrated Workforce of a Rural Southwestern School District Has in the Making of a Blue Ribbon School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goolsby, Annie J.

    2013-01-01

    This study utilized a contemporary approach to qualitative research, the descriptive survey design, to discover whether a diverse workforce was a major influence in producing a rural Blue Ribbon School. The population represented the school systems of a county located in the West South Central region of the United States. In this study, the terms…

  14. How Visible and Integrated Are Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Families: A Survey of School Psychologists Regarding School Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Christa M.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined what elementary schools in New York State are doing to recognize lesbian gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) families in terms of curriculum, policies, and practices. One hundred and sixteen participants were recruited through the New York Association of School Psychologists email listserve and completed a brief online…

  15. Development of Contextual Mathematics teaching Material integrated related sciences and realistic for students grade xi senior high school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helma, H.; Mirna, M.; Edizon, E.

    2018-04-01

    Mathematics is often applied in physics, chemistry, economics, engineering, and others. Besides that, mathematics is also used in everyday life. Learning mathematics in school should be associated with other sciences and everyday life. In this way, the learning of mathematics is more realstic, interesting, and meaningful. Needs analysis shows that required contextual mathematics teaching materials integrated related sciences and realistic on learning mathematics. The purpose of research is to produce a valid and practical contextual mathematics teaching material integrated related sciences and realistic. This research is development research. The result of this research is a valid and practical contextual mathematics teaching material integrated related sciences and realistic produced

  16. We Can, We Know How. But Do We Want To? Teaching Attitudes towards ICT Based on the Level of Technology Integration in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sanmamed, Mercedes; Sangrà, Albert; Muñoz-Carril, Pablo-César

    2017-01-01

    Teachers' attitudes towards technology are crucial to foster its use in schools and to improve its educational affordances and this is still a topic for research. This article relates the attitudes school teachers have towards information and communication technologies (ICT) with the different levels of technology integration in schools. A…

  17. The elementary school musical as an authentic, integrated performing arts experience

    OpenAIRE

    Bespflug, Kevin Sean

    2009-01-01

    While musicals are often common arts activities in high schools in North America, little has been written about their place in elementary schools. This is surprising when many elementary schools, particularly independent schools, are starting to include them in their fine arts programming. This thesis looks carefully at the elementary school musical by first undertaking a review of literature connected to the staging of musicals. The research and writings of various theorists and educators ar...

  18. PRE-SCHOOL UPBRINGING OF CHILDREN WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DIFFICULTIES-CONDITION FOR SUCCESSFUL INTEGRATIONAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zora JACOVA

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Preschool upbringing of children with developmental difficulties is the first link in the system of education and upbringing and at the same time the utmost segment in the system of integrational rehabilitation.Initiating the process of preschool upbringing and adequate organized treatment at early age, permits support of the development and maximum usage of the remained capabilities of children with developmental difficulties.The newest world experiences show that the upbringing and educational integration of children with developmental difficulties as asegment of the social integration, should set the main conditions in the frames of upbringing education and rehabilitational continuity and support the minimal restrictive environment for their development.In the pre-school institutions that function on the territory of the Republic of Macedonia, an indifferent attitude towards the children with developmental difficulties is present, due to the uninformed educators for the characteristics and capabilities of these children and their believes for the negative influence of the children with developmental difficulties on the children without impairments, that implicates involvement of subsidery defectological education of present employed staff in the mainstream preschool institutions, also including defectologists in kindergartens for work with children with special difficulties in their development. Also, the data about the educator’s attitude in the mainstream preschool institutions is disturbing, so that they put the accent on the obligation for reducing of the program for work with handicapped children, not taking into consideration that subsidery, special forms and methods are needed beside the programs that are for the main stream group.The goal of our paper is to point out the need of involving of children with light developmental difficulties; the existence of special team in the preschool institutions when involving children with

  19. Integrated School of Ocean Sciences: Doctoral Education in Marine Sciences in Kiel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Nina; Basse, Wiebke; Prigge, Enno; Schelten, Christiane; Antia, Avan

    2016-04-01

    Marine research is a dynamic thematic focus in Kiel, Germany, uniting natural scientists, economists, lawyers, philosophers, artists and computing and medical scientists in frontier research on the scientific, economic and legal aspects of the seas. The contributing institutions are Kiel University, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel Institute for the World Economy and Muthesius University in Kiel. Marine science education in Kiel trains young scientists to investigate the role of the oceans in global change, risks arising from ocean usage and sustainable management of living and non-living marine resources. Basic fundamental research is supplemented with applied science in an international framework including partners from industry and public life. The Integrated School of Ocean Sciences (ISOS) established through the Cluster of Excellence "The Future Ocean", funded within the German Excellence Initiative, provides PhD candidates in marine sciences with interdisciplinary education outside of curricular courses. It supports the doctoral candidates through supplementary training, a framework of supervision, mentoring and mobility, the advisors through transparency and support of doctoral training in their research proposals and the contributing institutions by ensuring quality, innovation and excellence in marine doctoral education. All PhD candidates financed by the Helmholtz Research School for Ocean System Science and Technology (HOSST) and the Collaborative Research Centre 754 "Climate-biogeochemical interactions in the tropical ocean" (SFB 754) are enrolled at the ISOS and are integrated into the larger peer community. Over 150 PhD candidate members from 6 faculties form a large interdisciplinary network. At the ISOS, they sharpen their scientific profile, are challenged to think beyond their discipline and equip themselves for life after a PhD through early exposure to topics beyond research (e.g. social responsibility, public communication

  20. Student Perspectives on the Impact of an Undergraduate Work-Integrated Learning Program on Admission and Transition to Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Rachel; Bobrowski, Adam; Drost, Leah; Rowbottom, Leigha; Pretti, Judene; Soliman, Hany; Chan, Stephanie; Chow, Edward

    2018-05-05

    Work-integrated learning (WIL) is a form of education that integrates academic and workplace study. Such programs provide students the opportunity to concurrently develop cognitive and non-cognitive competencies. The purpose of this study is to explore which experiences and skills learned in a WIL placement are useful in applying to medical school and transitioning into the first year of a Doctor of Medicine program. All individuals who worked in the Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program (RRRP; WIL placement) since 2004 and had completed at least 1 year of medical school were invited to participate. Semi-formal interviews were conducted and transcribed. A thematic analysis was completed to identify recurring concepts, and quotes were selected to represent them. Of 39 eligible individuals, 14 agreed to participate (36%). Students identified the volume of work, achieving a work-life balance, and time management as challenges in first-year medical school. Five themes emerged regarding the impact of the RRRP on applying and transitioning to medical school: time management skills, mentorship opportunities, research experience, clinical experience, and career choice. WIL placements present a unique opportunity for undergraduate students interested in pursuing medicine to acquire skills and experiences that will help them succeed in applying and transitioning to medical school.

  1. Seismology in Schools an integrated approach to funding developing and implementing a coordinated programme for teachers and high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, T. A.; Jones, A. G.; Campbell, G.

    2010-12-01

    Statistics in Ireland show that physics at Advanced Level in Secondary Schools is declining in popularity and is the most likely subject to be cut first from the curriculum in a curriculum readjustment by school authorities. In an attempt to attract students to study Earth science and seismology the School of Cosmic Physics, DIAS embarked on an outreach programme in 2007 to promote Earth science, particularly seismology, in schools at both Primary and Secondary Levels. Since its inception, DIAS's Seismology in Schools programme has been very well received, with seismometers installed in over fifty schools across the State. Although this number may appear small, given that the population of Ireland is 4M this number of 1 per 80,000 compares favourably with the U.K. (70 in a population of 70M, 1 per 1M) and the U.S.A. (200 in a population of 300M, 1 per 1.5M) with an penetration of 15-20 times greater. The phenomenal success of our Seismology in Schools programme has been helped significantly by the support we have received from the British Geological Survey (BGS) and IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) in terms of hardware, software and advice. Similarly, the programme would be a pale reflection of what it is today if the Directors of the Educational Centres (ATECI, Association of Teacher's/Education Centres in Ireland) across Ireland had not become enthused and funded the purchase of 34 additional seismometers, and the Geological Survey of Ireland purchased a further six. Also, funding support from Discover Science and Engineering (DSE) was absolutely critical for us to roll out this hugely enlarged programme of 50 seismometers from the originally envisioned four. As this programme is an initiation into seismology for students, it is important to stress that the seismometer is not used in the schools as a professional recording instrument but helps students visualize what seismology and the recording of earthquakes comprises. Essential to the

  2. STEM Integration in Middle School Life Science: Student Learning and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzey, S. Selcen; Moore, Tamara J.; Harwell, Michael; Moreno, Mario

    2016-08-01

    In many countries around the world, there has been an increasing emphasis on improving science education. Recent reform efforts in the USA call for teachers to integrate scientific and engineering practices into science teaching; for example, science teachers are asked to provide learning experiences for students that apply crosscutting concepts (e.g., patterns, scale) and increase understanding of disciplinary core ideas (e.g., physical science, earth science). Engineering practices and engineering design are essential elements of this new vision of science teaching and learning. This paper presents a research study that evaluates the effects of an engineering design-based science curriculum on student learning and attitudes. Three middle school life science teachers and 275 seventh grade students participated in the study. Content assessments and attitude surveys were administered before and after the implementation of the curriculum unit. Statewide mathematics test proficiency scores were included in the data analysis as well. Results provide evidence of the positive effects of implementing the engineering design-based science unit on student attitudes and learning.

  3. Integrating Piano Keyboarding into the Elementary Classroom: Effects on Memory Skills and Sentiment Toward School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkiewicz, Henryk R.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discovered that the introduction of piano keyboarding into elementary school music instruction produced a positive effect regarding children's sentiment towards school. No discernible effect was revealed concerning memory skills. Includes statistical data and description of survey questionnaires. (MJP)

  4. Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emerek, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    Bidraget diskuterer de forskellige intergrationsopfattelse i Danmark - og hvad der kan forstås ved vellykket integration......Bidraget diskuterer de forskellige intergrationsopfattelse i Danmark - og hvad der kan forstås ved vellykket integration...

  5. Hold the Phone! High School Students' Perceptions of Mobile Phone Integration in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kevin; Muñoz, Marco A.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the survey responses of 628 high school students in a large urban school district to determine their perceptions of mobile phone use in the classroom. Findings indicated that the majority of students (90.7%) were using a variety of mobile phone features for school-related work. Student support for instructional uses of phones,…

  6. Integrating 6th Grade Geometry Standards into a Waldorf Methods Charter School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watterson, Ilie Alma

    2006-01-01

    Many Waldorf methods charter schools are opening up in California today. They are publicly funded schools bringing Waldorf methods into public education. In today's political climate all public schools must pass the state's bar of academic success measured by their Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). Because these scores are based largely on…

  7. The Integration of Counseling and Nursing Services into Schools: A Comparative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Erin; Troup, K. D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this comparative review was to examine the legislative evolution of school guidance and school nursing over the past century, in hopes of identifying reasons why guidance counselors have been more successful in compliance to recommended ratios than school nurses. A literature review was conducted including CINAHL, MEDLINE, ERIC and…

  8. Developing Digital Wisdom by Students and Teachers: The Impact of Integrating Tablet Computers on Learning and Pedagogy in an Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamir-Inbal, Tamar; Blau, Ina

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates a pilot of integrating tablet computers in the elementary education. The research questions address the impact of tablet integration on learning and pedagogy. This qualitative case study crosschecks non-participated observations on students who work with tablet PCs, the school staff reflection on the integration as…

  9. Using Common Sense to Effectively Integrate Security Technologies within a School's Security Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gree, M.W.

    1998-11-03

    Security technologies are not the answer to all school security problems. However, they can be an excellent tool for school administrators and security personnel when incorporated into a total security strategy involving personnel, procedures, and facility layout. Unfortunately, very few of the tougher security problems in schools have solutions that are affordable, effective, and acceptable. Like any other type of facility, a school's security staff must understand the strengths and limitations of the security measures they are cschools incorporate good security practices, which will rarely increase new building costs if included in the initial planning.

  10. An Integrated Analysis of School Students' Aspirations for STEM Careers: Which Student and School Factors Are Most Predictive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Kathryn; Gore, Jennifer; Smith, Max; Lloyd, Adam

    2018-01-01

    Declining enrolments in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines and a lack of interest in STEM careers are concerning at a time when society is becoming more reliant on complex technologies. We examine student aspirations for STEM careers by drawing on surveys conducted annually from 2012 to 2015. School students in…

  11. Incorporating Early Learning Strategies in the School Improvement Grants (SIG) Program: How Three Schools Integrated Early Childhood Strategies into School Turnaround Efforts to Improve Instruction for All Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors-Tadros, Lori; Dunn, Lenay; Martella, Jana; McCauley, Carlas

    2015-01-01

    A significant body of research shows that achievement gaps evident in persistently low-performing schools, in many instances, manifest prior to children entering kindergarten. High-quality early learning programs have proven to demonstrate positive effects on closing academic gaps both for individual children and in the aggregate for the school.…

  12. About a theoretical Background of Outdoor Education in High School : A practical approach to the Integrated Classes

    OpenAIRE

    佐藤, 豊; 佐野, 裕

    2004-01-01

    This study aims to consider the educational values and prospects of outdoor education at the Integrated Classes for high school in Japan. As it should be recognized that "the cultivation of the vitality for children to live" is the most important educational target of the New Japanese Government Curriculum Guidelines. The vitality for children to live is explained as the abilities to feel nature, to collaborate with others, to take initiative, and to take own risk, for example. It should be s...

  13. Smoking Prevention for Students: Findings From a Three-Year Program of Integrated Harm Minimization School Drug Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midford, Richard; Cahill, Helen; Lester, Leanne; Foxcroft, David R; Ramsden, Robyn; Venning, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of the Drug Education in Victorian Schools (DEVS) program on tobacco smoking. The program taught about licit and illicit drugs in an integrated manner over 2 years, with follow up in the third year. It focused on minimizing harm, rather than achieving abstinence, and employed participatory, critical-thinking and skill-based teaching methods. A cluster-randomized, controlled trial of the program was conducted with a student cohort during years 8 (13 years), 9 (14 years), and 10 (15 years). Twenty-one schools were randomly allocated to the DEVS program (14 schools, n = 1163), or their usual drug education program (7 schools, n = 589). One intervention school withdrew in year two. There was a greater increase in the intervention students' knowledge about drugs, including tobacco, in all 3 years. Intervention students talked more with their parents about smoking at the end of the 3-year program. They recalled receiving more education on smoking in all 3 years. Their consumption of cigarettes had not increased to the same extent as controls at the end of the program. Their change in smoking harms, relative to controls, was positive in all 3 years. There was no difference between groups in the proportionate increase of smokers, or in attitudes towards smoking, at any time. These findings indicate that a school program that teaches about all drugs in an integrated fashion, and focuses on minimizing harm, does not increase initiation into smoking, while providing strategies for reducing consumption and harm to those who choose to smoke.

  14. [Integrity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Rodríguez, Rafael Ángel

    2014-01-01

    To say that someone possesses integrity is to claim that that person is almost predictable about responses to specific situations, that he or she can prudentially judge and to act correctly. There is a closed interrelationship between integrity and autonomy, and the autonomy rests on the deeper moral claim of all humans to integrity of the person. Integrity has two senses of significance for medical ethic: one sense refers to the integrity of the person in the bodily, psychosocial and intellectual elements; and in the second sense, the integrity is the virtue. Another facet of integrity of the person is la integrity of values we cherish and espouse. The physician must be a person of integrity if the integrity of the patient is to be safeguarded. The autonomy has reduced the violations in the past, but the character and virtues of the physician are the ultimate safeguard of autonomy of patient. A field very important in medicine is the scientific research. It is the character of the investigator that determines the moral quality of research. The problem arises when legitimate self-interests are replaced by selfish, particularly when human subjects are involved. The final safeguard of moral quality of research is the character and conscience of the investigator. Teaching must be relevant in the scientific field, but the most effective way to teach virtue ethics is through the example of the a respected scientist.

  15. Integration of Environmental Issues in a Physics Course: 'Physics by Inquiry' High School Teachers' Integration Models and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimori, David Abiya

    As we approach the second quarter of the twenty-first century, one may predict that the environment will be among the dominant themes in the political and educational discourse. Over the past three decades, particular perspectives regarding the environment have begun to emerge: (i) realization by human beings that we not only live on earth and use its resources at an increasingly high rate but we also actually belong to the earth and the total ecology of all living systems, (ii) there are strong interactions among different components of the large and complex systems that make up our environment, and (iii) the rising human population and its impact on the environment is a great concern (Hughes & Mason, 2014). Studies have revealed that although the students do not have a deep understanding of environmental issues and lack environmental awareness and attitudes necessary for protecting the environment, they have great concern for the environment (Chapman & Sharma, 2001; Fien, Yencken, & Sykes, 2002). However, addressing environmental issues in the classroom and other disciplines has never been an easy job for teachers (Pennock & Bardwell, 1994; Edelson, 2007). Using multiple case studies, this study investigated how three purposefully selected physics teachers teaching a 'Physics by Inquiry' course integrated environmental topics and issues in their classroom. Particularly this study looked at what integration models and practices the three physics teachers employed in integrating environmental topics and issues in their classroom and what challenges the teachers faced while integrating environmental topics in their classrooms. Data collection methods including field notes taken from observations, teachers' interviews and a collection of artifacts and documents were used. The data were coded analyzed and organized into codes and categories guided by Fogarty (1991) models of curriculum integration and Ham and Sewing (1988) four categories of barriers to environmental

  16. Key steps for integrating a basic science throughout a medical school curriculum using an e-learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Eline Agnès; Franson, Kari Lanette

    2009-09-01

    Basic sciences can be integrated into the medical school curriculum via e-learning. The process of integrating a basic science in this manner resembles a curricular change. The change usually begins with an idea for using e-learning to teach a basic science and establishing the need for the innovation. In the planning phase, learning outcomes are formulated and a prototype of the program is developed based on the desired requirements. A realistic concept is formed after considering the limitations of the current institute. Next, a project team is assembled to develop the program and plan its integration. Incorporation of the e-learning program is facilitated by a well-developed and communicated integration plan. Various course coordinators are contacted to determine content of the e-learning program as well as establish assessment. Linking the e-learning program to existing course activities and thereby applying the basic science into the clinical context enhances the degree of integration. The success of the integration is demonstrated by a positive assessment of the program including favourable cost-benefit analysis and improved student performance. Lastly, when the program becomes institutionalised, continuously updating content and technology (when appropriate), and evaluating the integration contribute to the prolonged survival of the e-learning program.

  17. Integrating climate-smart rice agriculture into secondary-level curriculum: lessons from three high schools in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manalo, Jaime A; Balmeo, Katherine P; Berto, Jayson C; Saludez, Fredierick M; Villaflor, Jennifer D; Pagdanganan, Argie M

    2016-01-01

    Climate change (CC) is an urgent and highly relevant topic that must be integrated into the school curriculum. Literature on CC integration, however, is scarce, let alone literature on integrating climate-smart rice agriculture (CSRA). Bringing CSRA lessons into the classroom means the chance is higher that climate-smart technologies on rice will reach even the most far-flung areas of the Philippines, which stand to be among the most vulnerable as regards the negative impacts of CC. This paper shares experiences drawn from three high schools in the Philippines on integrating CSRA into their curriculum. The research centers on appropriate teaching tools/strategies, push and exogenous factors in CSRA integration, and the types of information that are likely to be shared by the students with their farmer-parents or other farmers in their communities. Surveys among participating students (n = 155) and three focus group discussions among key school officials were conducted. Different teaching methods and/or tools were found to be generally useful in various contexts. Photos and videos, however, emerged as the most effective tools across sites. The livelihood source of the students does have a bearing on the complexity of messages that they can convey. Students from rice-farming households can competently discuss even highly complex adaptation and mitigation information with their farmer-parents or other farmers. Thorough message-framing is necessary to maximize student involvement as well as to increase production of education-entertainment (edutainment) materials to be utilized in teaching. This study, in general, contributes to CC education by bringing in best-fit practices in teaching tools and strategies to mobilize students to act on urgent matters relating to the impacts of CC. It also advises on considering exogenous factors that might affect CC education by taking into account those that are equally capable of shaping students' perception and knowledge.

  18. The Integration of Mathematics in Middle School Science: Student and Teacher Impacts Related to Science Achievement and Attitudes towards Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary research has suggested that in order for students to compete globally in the 21st century workplace, pedagogy must shift to include the integration of science and mathematics, where teachers effectively incorporate the two disciplines seamlessly. Mathematics facilitates a deeper understanding of science concepts and has been linked to…

  19. Mathematics Teachers' Readiness to Integrate ICT in the Classroom: The Case of Elementary and Middle School Arab Teachers in Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimer F. Baya'a

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ICT integration in mathematics education provides mathematics teachers with integrative teaching methods that motivate students learning, support their independent learning and active participation in the discovery of mathematics concepts and topics, and, as a result, helps them have deeper understanding of the mathematical ideas. So, the integration of ICT in the teaching and learning of mathematics, as a result of ICT educational affordances, helps students have better achievement in mathematics. These potentialities of the ICT make its integration in the mathematics classroom a promising practice, but the success of this practice is dependent on various factors, among which are the following: teachers' perceptions of their ability in ICT, teachers' attitudes towards ICT contribution to the mathematics teaching, teachers' attitudes towards ICT contribution to students' mathematics learning, teachers' emotions towards the use of ICT in the mathematics classroom, teachers' feelings of self-esteem and control in the presence of ICT in the mathematics classroom, and teachers' intentions to actually integrate ICT in their teaching. The current research came to verify the readiness of Arab teachers in elementary and middle schools in Israel regarding the integration of ICT in the classroom, and hence its interest in the six above constructs. The research used a questionnaire that included statements related to each one of the above constructs. This questionnaire was administered to 475 Arab teachers in elementary and middle schools in the North, Center and Haifa regions in Israel. The research findings show that more than seventy percent of the participating teachers have positive perceptions of their competence in technology and technology integration in their teaching. Further, they have positive attitudes towards the integration of ICT in teaching and learning and of their self-esteem in the presence of technology, in addition to positive

  20. Integrating GIS in the Middle School Curriculum: Impacts on Diverse Students' Standardized Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Donna; Alibrandi, Marsha

    2013-01-01

    This case study conducted with 1,425 middle school students in Palm Beach County, Florida, included a treatment group receiving GIS instruction (256) and a control group without GIS instruction (1,169). Quantitative analyses on standardized test scores indicated that inclusion of GIS in middle school curriculum had a significant effect on student…

  1. Integrating the Wall Street Journal into a Business School Curriculum: A Success Story at Samford University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudon, David L.; Carson, Charles M.

    2008-01-01

    In the Spring of 2006 Samford University's School of Business made a decision to participate in The Wall Street Journal's Academic Partnership (AP) program beginning with the Fall semester of 2006. This paper examines School of Business student and faculty attitudes and usage of the WSJ that made for a successful implementation this past year.…

  2. Development of Examination Behaviour Inventory: An Integrity Measure for Prevention of Cheating in School Exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossai, Moses C.; Ethe, Nathaniel; Okwudei, Chukuka A.; Edougha, Dennis E.

    2014-01-01

    Cheating in examinations is an educational menace that has threatened the very essence of schooling in most countries of the world. Therefore, it has become imperative for researchers in education to seek alternative strategies for curbing it in order to restore the dignity of school examinations as an instrument for assessing actual educational…

  3. Enhancing the Middle in a New Zealand Secondary School: Integration, Experiential Learning, and Computer Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, C. J. Patrick; McKinnon, David H.

    2003-01-01

    New Zealand school education through the middle years appears to be in crisis. Sutton (2000) reports that students in the age range from 13-15 years (Years 9 and 10 of schooling) experience the crisis most poignantly. Their teachers increasingly say children in this age range are difficult to motivate, that they present them with their greatest…

  4. Assessment of Integrated Environmental Management in Public and Private Schools in the Copperbelt Province of Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makisa, Kaponda

    2016-01-01

    Copperbelt Province is one of the ten provinces of Zambia. It has public and private schools which have been faced with escalating levels of environmental problems due to growth in human population and economic growth. The environmental problems which are matters of concern in the schools include, unsound waste management, loss of vegetation…

  5. Biodiesel and Integrated STEM: Vertical Alignment of High School Biology/Biochemistry and Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Andrea C.; Breiner, Jonathan M.; Keiner, Jennifer; Behm, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the vertical alignment of two high school classes, biology and chemistry, around the core concept of biodiesel fuel production. High school teachers and university faculty members investigated biodiesel as it relates to societal impact through a National Science Foundation Research Experience for Teachers. Using an action…

  6. How are Leaders Integrating the Ideology of Globalisation in Primary School Contexts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Malini; Sood, Krishan

    2013-01-01

    This study carried out research focusing on diverse learners, such as pupils who have English as additional language (EAL) in primary schools in the Midlands, England. Essentially, we wanted to know how they are supported to become global learners. Therefore, questions were posed to school leaders on their understanding of the concept of…

  7. An Investigation of Curriculum Integration in a Vocational School Setting: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Tammy T.

    2013-01-01

    Employers are requiring that high schools give students the skills necessary for a changing 21st century global society. Entry-level employees are required to learn new skills quickly and to be able to communicate, solve problems, and work with technology. Twenty-first century skills need to be taught but schools also need to prepare students to…

  8. Integrating Physical Activity, Coach Collaboration, and Life Skill Development in Youth: School Counselors' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Laura; Cook, Amy; Scherer, Alexandra; Greenspan, Scott; Silva, Meghan Ray; Cadet, Melanie; Maki, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Given the social, emotional, and academic benefits of physical activity related to youth development (Hellison, 2011), coupled with the minimal research regarding how school counselors can use physical activity for life skill development, this article focuses on school counselors' beliefs about collaborating with coaches and using physical…

  9. An Evaluation of a School-Based Professional Development Program on Teachers' Efficacy for Technology Integration: Findings from an Initial Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoretz, Yvonne; Childress, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this program evaluation was to determine the impact of a school-based, job-embedded professional development program on elementary and middle school teacher efficacy for technology integration. Participant bi-weekly journal postings were analyzed using Grappling's "Technology and Learning Spectrum" (Porter, 2001) to…

  10. Predictors of Academic Performance and School Engagement--Integrating Persistence, Motivation and Study Skills Perspectives Using Person-Centered and Variable-Centered Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Paulo A. S.; Dias, Paulo; Vaz, Filipa Machado; Vaz, Joao Machado

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing need for the integration of various theoretical perspectives on academic performance, especially the theories on educational persistence, and motivational theories. Recent models of students' engagement with school incorporate different dimensions of students, family and school. However, some authors are arguing that academic…

  11. Exploring options for integrated nutrient management in semi-arid tropics using farmer field schools: a case study in Mbeere District, eastern Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onduru, D.D.; Preez, Du C.C.; Muchena, F.N.; Gachimbi, L.N.; Jager, de A.

    2008-01-01

    The farmer field school (FFS) approach was used in semi-arid eastern Kenya in the period 2002–2003 to explore technology options for addressing declining soil fertility and to institute learning processes on integrated nutrient management (INM).
    The farmer field school (FFS) approach was used in

  12. Integrating Reading and Writing Instruction in Middle and High School: The Role of Professional Development in Shaping Teacher Perceptions and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubet, Kristina J.; Southall, Gena

    2018-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which middle and high school English teachers integrate reading and writing instruction as complementary processes. Using qualitative research methods, researchers investigated the following: (a) Do middle and high school English teachers conceive of and enact the teaching of reading and writing as integrated…

  13. [Vocational Health Schools (ETSUS) in Brazil: regulation of the integration of teaching-service-administrative sustainability of ETSUS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Fabiano Tonaco; Garbin, Cléa Adas Saliba; Siqueira, Carlos Eduardo; Garbin, Artênio José Ísper; Rocha, Najara Barbosa da; Lolli, Luíz Fernando; Moimaz, Suzely Adas Saliba

    2012-04-01

    The scope of this study was to discuss the administrative sustainability of Brazil's Vocational Health Schools (ETSUS) based on the principle of teaching and service integration, which brings a new dimension to healthcare work as yet unregulated by Brazilian public administration. It was a qualitative study using case study methodology. The research involved a semi-structured questionnaire given to ETSUS managers addressing institutional, administrative, and work management aspects. The sample was composed of 6 ETSUS that belong to the Network of Vocational Health Schools (RET-SUS). The ETSUS showed centralized planning and management, and decentralized implementation of their core activities. The majority did not have administrative autonomy and relied heavily on funding from the federal government. According to ETSUS managers, the lack of regulation of teaching activities by civil servants weakens the management of ETSUS. The ETSUS have managerial problems related to teaching-service integration, which has to be regulated in order to guarantee the sustainability of these schools and avoid conflicts with Brazilian legislation.

  14. Pest Control in the School Environment:Adopting Integrated Pest Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about establishing a school IPM program, including developing an official IPM policy statement, setting roles for participants and pest management objectives, inspecting sites, setting action threshold, applying IPM strategies and evaluating results.

  15. Integrating International Business Law Concepts into a High School Business Law Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Cathleen J.; McDonald, Michael L.

    1998-01-01

    Outlines international business content for a high school business law curriculum: history of international business law, World Trade Organization, international disputes, contracts and sales, financing/banking, currency, taxation, intellectual property, transportation, and multinational corporations. Considers whether to teach international…

  16. Abecedarian School on Symmetries and Integrability of Difference Equations (ASIDE) & SIDE 12 International Conference Symmetries and Integrability of Difference Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Rebelo, Raphaël; Winternitz, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    This book shows how Lie group and integrability techniques, originally developed for differential equations, have been adapted to the case of difference equations. Difference equations are playing an increasingly important role in the natural sciences. Indeed, many phenomena are inherently discrete and thus naturally described by difference equations. More fundamentally, in subatomic physics, space-time may actually be discrete. Differential equations would then just be approximations of more basic discrete ones. Moreover, when using differential equations to analyze continuous processes, it is often necessary to resort to numerical methods. This always involves a discretization of the differential equations involved, thus replacing them by difference ones. Each of the nine peer-reviewed chapters in this volume serves as a self-contained treatment of a topic, containing introductory material as well as the latest research results and exercises. Each chapter is presented by one or more early career researchers...

  17. School Integration Partner Triangle in Educational and Cultural Activities of U.E.E. "Hilarion Alberto Viloria"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilmer José Pérez Rojas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to develop an action plan for the integration of the school triangle to educational and socio-cultural activities of the U. E. E. Hilarion Alberto Viloria. diagnosis, planning, implementation and evaluation: To achieve this objective the methodology proposed by Pérez (2000, in its four phases are discussed. It was concluded that teachers are the key element for social change in the paradigm shifts of education which will provide a number of opportunities to produce changes and transformations not only in organizational strategies, but values embedded in teaching practices. With regard to planning, taking into account the results obtained in the diagnosis, it became necessary to plan action plans grounded in the participation of social actors. Should promote the inclusion of securities ownership and sustainability among members of the school and community, social actors favoring a change in attitude conducive cultures of the good citizen towards sustainable lifestyles.

  18. Exploring “Speak-O-Rama” as a Public Speaking Module: A Pilot Study in an Islamic Integrated Primary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Iman Ahmad Bukhari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the pilot study in implementing a public speaking module for a primary school level. The module development was structured according to ASSURE Model with the Communicative Language Teaching (CLT as the basis used in designing the module activities.  One group of Year 4 students from an Islamic integrated school was selected and the research method employed was the quasi-experimental research with pre and post-tests as well as interviews with the English teachers on the students’ performance and self-confidence.  Students were also interviewed to identify their self confidence level before and after the implementation of the public speaking module. This research project is hoped to increase students’ oral proficiency along with increasing self-confidence in public speaking at a young age, and to propose the implementation of this module as reference in primary education.

  19. A school-randomized clinical trial of an integrated social-emotional learning and literacy intervention: impacts after 1 school year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephanie M; Brown, Joshua L; Hoglund, Wendy L G; Aber, J Lawrence

    2010-12-01

    To report experimental impacts of a universal, integrated school-based intervention in social-emotional learning and literacy development on change over 1 school year in 3rd-grade children's social-emotional, behavioral, and academic outcomes. This study employed a school-randomized, experimental design and included 942 3rd-grade children (49% boys; 45.6% Hispanic/Latino, 41.1% Black/African American, 4.7% non-Hispanic White, and 8.6% other racial/ethnic groups, including Asian, Pacific Islander, Native American) in 18 New York City public elementary schools. Data on children's social-cognitive processes (e.g., hostile attribution biases), behavioral symptomatology (e.g., conduct problems), and literacy skills and academic achievement (e.g., reading achievement) were collected in the fall and spring of 1 school year. There were main effects of the 4Rs Program after 1 year on only 2 of the 13 outcomes examined. These include children's self-reports of hostile attributional biases (Cohen's d = 0.20) and depression (d = 0.24). As expected based on program and developmental theory, there were impacts of the intervention for those children identified by teachers at baseline with the highest levels of aggression (d = 0.32-0.59) on 4 other outcomes: children's self-reports of aggressive fantasies, teacher reports of academic skills, reading achievement scaled scores, and children's attendance. This report of effects of the 4Rs intervention on individual children across domains of functioning after 1 school year represents an important first step in establishing a better understanding of what is achievable by a schoolwide intervention such as the 4Rs in its earliest stages of unfolding. The first-year impacts, combined with our knowledge of sustained and expanded effects after a second year, provide evidence that this intervention may be initiating positive developmental cascades both in the general population of students and among those at highest behavioral risk. (Psyc

  20. EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT SERVICES TO SCHOOL INTEGRATION AND ITS EVOLUTION TOWARDS INCLUSIVE EDUCATION. THE EXAMPLE OF THE PROVINCE OF VALLADOLID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Romero Ureña

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article recounts the evolution and contributions of support services to students with special educational needs created in the province of Valladolid as a result of school integration program. Part of the historical moment of the birth of them that gave them the property of innovators and pioneers and gave them the opportunity to go by themselves to give the answer that the educational community demanded. It analyzes the change to be operating in themselves and the need to approach them in an appropriate manner, at the current time that inclusive education has taken a step that requires rethinking the structure, organization and planning of them.

  1. Schools “seen from afar”: perceptions and reality. An investigation into the integration of foreign pupils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Di Rienzo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This survey follows a previous piece of research that was carried out in Casalecchio di Reno, in the province of Bologna during the academic year 2001/2002. The work concerned immigrant and Rom pupils and aimed to provide a general picture of how well they were fitting into to the school system. Following on from this first survey, Casalecchio town council has endorsed a further study to collect and analyse data and information regarding the experiences of foreign and /or Rom pupils and their social integration

  2. Bildung - Then and Now in Danish High School and University Teaching and How to Integrate Bildung into Modern University Teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mogens Nørgaard

    2010-01-01

    I the article the classical concept of Bildung as introduced by Humboldt and Kant is discussed and it is shown what impact Bildung has had in Danish high school and university teaching since 1800. Furthermore it is shown how Bildung in a new version, strictly connected to philosophy of science......, with great advantage can be integrated into modern university teaching, and some empirical results during the last three years at the Department of Economics giving the teory experimental evidence are mentioned....

  3. A teaching strategy for solving tasks integrating physics and artistic components in senior high school teacher’s training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brito, Raúl Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is aimed at describing the results of a study intended to find a solution to shortcomings in the training of teacher of Physics, particularly in relation to the acquisition of an artistic cultural insight as a result of the process of learning Physics, which naturally hinders the fulfillment of junior high school general goal. A teaching strategy, centered in solving tasks of physics and artistic integrating nature, is suggested to contribute to enlarge cultural understanding and illustrating science and art relationship.

  4. Integration оf Foreign Educational Technologies іn the Content of Program of Pre-School Education in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadiia Frolenkova

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Reveals the integration and implementation of foreign educational technologies in the content of educational programs of preschool education in Ukraine. The emphasis on the implementation of programs for the ideas of Waldorf education, Montessori programs, “SelfEsteem”, “Step by Step”, “Education for sustainable development for children of pre-school age”. It is proved that the integration of foreign educational technologies in the process of optimizing the scientific and methodological support preschool education content Ukraine simulated based priority, primarily oriented humanistic, pedagogical ideas and technologies.Key words: educational technologies, integration, educational program, content of preschool education, children of pre-school age.

  5. Math, Science, and Engineering Integration in a High School Engineering Course: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtorta, Clara G.; Berland, Leema K.

    2015-01-01

    Engineering in K-12 classrooms has been receiving expanding emphasis in the United States. The integration of science, mathematics, and engineering is a benefit and goal of K-12 engineering; however, current empirical research on the efficacy of K-12 science, mathematics, and engineering integration is limited. This study adds to this growing…

  6. An Investigation of Visual Contour Integration Ability in Relation to Writing Performance in Primary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Tsang, Cecilia W. P.; Wong, Agnes S. K.; Chan, Jackson Y.; Lee, Amos Y. T.; Lam, Miko C. Y.; Wong, C. W.; Lu, Zhonglin

    2012-01-01

    A previous study found a visual deficit in contour integration in English readers with dyslexia (Simmers & Bex, 2001). Visual contour integration may play an even more significant role in Chinese handwriting particularly due to its logographic presentation (Lam, Au, Leung, & Li-Tsang, 2011). The current study examined the relationship…

  7. Leading by Design: A Collaborative and Creative Leadership Framework for Dance Integration in P-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Alison E.; Hellenbrand, Leah; McShane-Hellenbrand, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the Mentorship, Integrated Curriculum, Collaboration, and Scholarship (MICCS) framework as an applicable model for transformative, creative, and curriculum-based K-12 dance education and arts integration. Developed and practiced by the authors--an artist/educator, a classroom teacher, and an arts education scholar and former…

  8. A Very "Prudent Integration": White Flight, School Segregation and the Depoliticization of (Anti-)Racism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Marta

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the contemporary legitimation of institutional racism resulting from the prevailing depoliticized framework of integration, which became prominent in the 1960s and is now hegemonic in political and academic debate in Europe. Integration has helped shift the focus to the supposed cultural "inadequacies" of ethnically…

  9. Finding of experience of the use of computer-integrated forms and methods of teaching in the process of preparation of future teachers of initial school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinopalnikova N.N.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Theoretically grounded and experimentally examined that one of the trends of future teachers training for the integrated activity is gaining experience in using the integrated organization forms of learning. It is realized in the process of specially organized student's learning and during their pedagogical practice. It was promoted by conducting the special course The integrated forms of learning organization in primary school with the use of interactive forms and methods of learning, fulfilling the aimed tasks while passing pedagogical practice.

  10. A Platform of Constructivist Learning in Practice: Computer Literacy Integrated into Elementary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Garcia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In Mexico, the conventional teaching approach, when applied specifically to elementary school, seems to fall short of attaining the overall quality objective. The main consequence of this problem is when teachers are not sure that their students really understand the dynamic nature of concepts and mechanism since an early age, particularly in elementary school. This paper presents a pedagogical/technological platform, based on constructivism ideas, as a means of making the learning process in elementary school more efficient and interesting. The constructivist platform presented here uses graphical simulators developed for Web 2.0 as a support tool, creating a teaching and learning environment in which practical experiments can be undertaken as each topic is introduced and explained.

  11. A case study of full integration of the arts into core subject area instruction in one East Texas secondary school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leysath, Maggie

    This exploratory phenomenological case study investigated the influence the full integration of the arts into core subject instruction has on classroom environment, student academic achievement, and student engagement as perceived by administrators, teachers, and students in one East Texas secondary school. Participant interviews were analyzed using Creswell's (2012) six-step method for analyzing phenomenological studies. The researcher implemented three learning activities in which ceramics learning objectives were fully integrated with chemistry learning objectives. The first activity combined clay properties and pottery wheel throwing with significant numbers. The second activity combined glaze formulation with moles. The third combined stoichiometry with the increased glaze formula for students to glaze the bowls they made. Findings suggest the full integration of art in core subject area instruction has numerous positive effects. Participants reported improved academic achievement for all students including reluctant learners. Students, teachers, and the administrator reported greater participation in the art integrated activities. Participants perceived a need for further training for teachers and administrators for greater success.

  12. Using Autobiographical Digital Storytelling for the Integration of a Foreign Student in the School Environment. A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Fokides

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Immigrant students face a multitude of problems, among which are poor social adaptation and school integration. On the other hand, although digital narrations are widely used in education, they are rarely used for aiding students or for the resolution of complex problems. This study exploits the potential of digital narrations towards this end, by examining how the development and presentation of an autobiographical digital narration can assist immigrant students in overcoming their adaptation difficulties. For that matter, a female student presenting substantial problems was selected as the study’s subject. Data was collected from all the participating parties (subject, teacher, classmates using a variety of tools, before, during, and after the intervention. It was found that through the digital narration she was able to externalize her thoughts and feelings and this, in turn, helped her in achieving a smoother integration in the school environment. In addition, the attitudes and perceptions of the other students for their foreign classmate were positively influenced. The intervention was short in duration and it did not require special settings. Hence, it can be easily applied and educators can consider using similar interventions. On the other hand, further research is recommended to establish the generalizability of the study’s findings.

  13. Filling the Gap: Integrating STEM into Career and Technical Education Middle School Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu-Rorrer, Ray

    2017-01-01

    The field of STEM education is an educational framework that has surged in application over the past decade. Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) is infused in nearly every facet of our society. Filling the gap of current research in middle school career and technical education (CTE) and STEM programs is important as traditional CTE…

  14. Initiating Preservice Education Majors in the Integration of Health Instruction in Middle Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin-Scherer, Roberta; Zaccone, Paula R.

    2004-01-01

    Losses to the workforce and drains on the national economy posed by illnesses, injuries, and environmental hazards dictate that schools operate to prevent, intervene, and help resolve these social and personal health issues. The costs to society for the medical care of children born to addicted and abusive parents, exposure to smoke and pollution,…

  15. Technology Integration in Third, Fourth and Fifth Grade Classrooms in a Florida School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Tiffani; Gaines, Trudi

    2015-01-01

    Third, fourth and fifth grade teachers have the potential to shape the way their students will begin to view and use technology. This study investigated the nature of technology usage among third, fourth and fifth grade teachers in a Florida school district as well as the relationship between the level of technology usage factors such as available…

  16. Parametric Pedagogy: Integrating Parametric CAD in Irish Post-Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarr, Oliver; Seery, Niall

    2011-01-01

    Technology education in Irish post-primary schools is undergoing significant change. In recent years the syllabi of all technology-related subjects have been revised. A new subject, Design and Communication Graphics, has replaced the traditional Technical Drawing subject. This new subject aims to develop students' spatial awareness and graphical…

  17. Minority Students' Psychological Adjustment in the School Context: An Integrative Review of Qualitative Research on Acculturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, Elena; Birman, Dina

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims at systematically analyzing the findings reported in qualitative research on acculturation and psychological adjustment in the school context. Content analysis was conducted using the deductively developed and inductively enriched system of categories. The results of the study provide insights into youths' acculturation and…

  18. Integrated Literacies in a Rural Kenyan Girls' Secondary School Journalism Club

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Maureen; Early, Margaret; Chemjor, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Our purpose in this paper is to foreground contextual issues in studies of situated writing practices. During a year-long case study in a rural Kenyan secondary school, we applied a number of ethnographic techniques to document how 32 girls (aged 14-18 years) used local cultural and digital resources (i.e., donated digital cameras, voice…

  19. Intervention Integrity in the Low Countries: Interventions Targeting Social-Emotional Behaviors in the School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taal, Margot; Ekels, Elles; van der Valk, Cindel; van der Molen, Maurits

    2017-01-01

    The current study presents a review of intervention studies conducted in the Low Countries (i.e., The Netherlands and Flanders) focusing on social-emotional behaviors in the school. The primary purpose of this review was to assess whether studies included an operational definition of the intervention under study and reported data on the…

  20. Collaborative Leadership Effects on School Improvement: Integrating Unidirectional- and Reciprocal-Effects Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Ronald H.; Hallinger, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Researchers have persisted in framing leadership as the driver for change and performance improvement in schools despite convincing theoretical commentary that proposes leadership as a process of reciprocal interaction. Although conceptualizing leadership as a reciprocal process offers leverage for understanding leadership effects on learning,…

  1. Exploring an Integrative Lens of Identity for a High School Mathematics Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kimi

    2016-01-01

    Driven largely by societal discourse regarding the underrepresentation of African American males pursuing science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) majors, careers and professions, it becomes salient to understand how African American males experience mathematics in K-12 public schools in relation to their mathematics identity…

  2. Rethinking Little Rock: The Cold War Politics of School Integration in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejong-Lambert, William

    2007-01-01

    Though the impact of the cold war on the civil rights movement continued long after the desegregation crisis in Little Rock, the timing of the events in Arkansas, particularly the events at Central High School, constituted a unique moment in the history of the cold war. Up until the fall of 1957, the Soviet Union had been perceived as less…

  3. School-External Factors in Finnish Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aro, Sophie; Mikkilä-Erdmann, Mirjamaija

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the English language competence of Finnish bilingual pupils and school-external factors such as parental expectations, home involvement, and exposure to English outside the classroom. Data on the pupils' language competence was collected from n?=?122 6th graders in bilingual education, and compared…

  4. Integrating Geographic Information Systems in Business School Curriculum: An Initial Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael A.; Arnette, Andrew N.

    2011-01-01

    Geographic information systems have experienced rapid growth and user adoption over the last four decades, due to an increasing value to the business community. However, business schools are not teaching geospatial concepts and the related location intelligence to their students. This curriculum decision seems completely at odds with business'…

  5. Children and videogames: leisure activities, aggression, social integration and school performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schie, Emil G.M.; van Schie, E.G.M.; Wiegman, O.

    1997-01-01

    A survey was conducted among 346 children from the 7th and 8th grade of 7 elementary schools to examine possible positive and negative effects of playing videogames. Analyses revealed that playing videogames did not appear to take place at the expense of children's other leisure activities, social

  6. The Interplay of School Readiness and Teacher Readiness for Educational Technology Integration: A Structural Equation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petko, Dominik; Prasse, Doreen; Cantieni, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    Decades of research have shown that technological change in schools depends on multiple interrelated factors. Structural equation models explaining the interplay of factors often suffer from high complexity and low coherence. To reduce complexity, a more robust structural equation model was built with data from a survey of 349 Swiss primary school…

  7. Field Test and Performance Verification: Integrated Active Desiccant Rooftop Hybrid System Installed in a School - Final Report: Phase 4A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, J

    2005-12-21

    This report summarizes the results of a field verification pilot site investigation that involved the installation of a hybrid integrated active desiccant/vapor-compression rooftop heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) unit at an elementary school in the Atlanta Georgia area. For years, the school had experienced serious humidity and indoor air quality (IAQ) problems that had resulted in occupant complaints and microbial (mold) remediation. The outdoor air louvers of the original HVAC units had been closed in an attempt to improve humidity control within the space. The existing vapor compression variable air volume system was replaced by the integrated active desiccant rooftop (IADR) system that was described in detail in an Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) report published in 2004 (Fischer and Sand 2004). The IADR system and all space conditions have been monitored remotely for more than a year. The hybrid system was able to maintain both the space temperature and humidity as desired while delivering the outdoor air ventilation rate required by American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers Standard 62. The performance level of the IADR unit and the overall system energy efficiency was measured and found to be very high. A comprehensive IAQ investigation was completed by the Georgia Tech Research Institute before and after the system retrofit. Before-and-after data resulting from this investigation confirmed a significant improvement in IAQ, humidity control, and occupant comfort. These observations were reported by building occupants and are echoed in a letter to ORNL from the school district energy manager. The IADR system was easily retrofitted in place of the original rooftop system using a custom curb adapter. All work was completed in-house by the school's maintenance staff over one weekend. A subsequent cost analysis completed for the school district by the design engineer of record concluded that the IADR

  8. CONSTRUCTION INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT OF HUMAN POTENTIAL HIGH SCHOOL ON THE BASIS OF EXPERT DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy N. Krymzin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In article offers the hierarchical system of creation the integrated indicator of personnel capacity in the higher educationinstitution, based on value judgment ofteachers. The integrated assessment of level of personnel potential is constructedon the basis of formation of a large gradation number, characterizing such system indicators, as personnel structure, reproduction of scientific and scientific and pedagogical shots and productivity ofresearch and educational and methodical activity of personnel structure.

  9. 'Integration'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olwig, Karen Fog

    2011-01-01

    , while the countries have adopted disparate policies and ideologies, differences in the actual treatment and attitudes towards immigrants and refugees in everyday life are less clear, due to parallel integration programmes based on strong similarities in the welfare systems and in cultural notions...... of equality in the three societies. Finally, it shows that family relations play a central role in immigrants’ and refugees’ establishment of a new life in the receiving societies, even though the welfare society takes on many of the social and economic functions of the family....

  10. Constructing "Authentic" Science: Results from a University/High School Collaboration Integrating Digital Storytelling and Social Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olitsky, Stacy; Becker, Elizabeth A.; Jayo, Ignacio; Vinogradov, Philip; Montcalmo, Joseph

    2018-02-01

    This study explores the implications of a redesign of a college course that entailed a new partnership between a college neuroscience classroom and a high school. In this course, the college students engaged in original research projects which included conducting brain surgery and behavioural tests on rats. They used digital storytelling and social networking to communicate with high school students and were visited by the students during the semester. The aims of the redesign were to align the course with science conducted in the field and to provide opportunities to disseminate scientific knowledge through emerging technologies. This study investigates the impact of these innovations on the college and high school students' perceptions of authentic science, including their relationship with science-centred communities. We found that these collaborative tools increased college students' perceptions that authentic science entailed communication with the general public, in addition to supporting prior perceptions of the importance of conducting experiments and presenting results to experts. In addition, the view of science as high-status knowledge was attenuated as students integrated non-formal communication practices into presentations, showing the backstage process of learning, incorporating music and youth discourse styles, and displaying emotional engagement. An impact of these hybrid presentation approaches was an increase in the high school students' perceptions of the accessibility of laboratory science. We discuss how the use of technologies that are familiar to youth, such as iPads, social networking sites, and multimedia presentations, has the potential to prioritize students' voices and promote a more inclusive view of science.

  11. Performance of two Vermont elementary school integrated energy conservation/solar energy retrofit projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, J.W. (Marlboro College, VT); Converse, A.O.

    1980-01-01

    Two Vermont elementary school energy conservation/passive solar energy retrofit projects are described. Both masonry buildings were insulated with polystyrene on the east, north and west exterior walls. The south walls of each building were converted to Trombe walls, and, in addition, a portion of the south wall of one building was fitted with a solar greenhouse. The construction details, the predicted performance, and some actual results are reported here.

  12. A New Approach to A Science Magnet School - Classroom and Museum Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Samuel

    2009-03-01

    The Pittsburgh Science & Technology Academy is a place where any student with an interest in science, technology, engineering or math can develop skills for a career in life sciences, environmental sciences, computing, or engineering. The Academy isn't just a new school. It's a new way to think about school. The curriculum is tailored to students who have a passion for science, technology, engineering or math. The environment is one of extraordinary support for students, parents, and faculty. And the Academy exists to provide opportunities, every day, for students to Dream. Discover. Design. That is, Academy students set goals and generate ideas, research and discover answers, and design real solutions for the kinds of real-world problems that they'll face after graduation. The Academy prepares students for their future, whether they go on to higher education or immediate employment. This talk will explain the unique features of the Pittsburgh Science & Technology Academy, lessons learned from its two-year design process, and the role that the Carnegie Museums have played and will continue to play as the school grows.

  13. Integrating Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Content Into Undergraduate Medical School Curricula: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequeira, Gina M; Chakraborti, Chayan; Panunti, Brandy A

    2012-01-01

    The lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community is a diverse, underserved, and often stigmatized group that faces many barriers to accessing quality healthcare. Not only are few practicing physicians knowledgeable about and sensitive to the needs of LGBT patients, but medical school curricula include limited LGBT-related content. Our goals were to use LGBT-related educational sessions to gauge undergraduate medical students' interest and their perceptions of relevance and to eventually incorporate this topic into the curriculum. We provided 4 educational sessions to preclinical medical students at the Tulane University School of Medicine: 3 optional, 1-hour didactic sessions and 1 standardized patient encounter. Following sessions 1-3, students completed electronic feedback forms; we then analyzed their responses thematically. THE THEMATIC ANALYSIS OF STUDENT RESPONSES IDENTIFIED KEY THEMES: a current lack of exposure to LGBT content, agreement that LGBT material is applicable to students' work as future physicians, and the relevance of including such information in the medical school curriculum. The study validated the underlying assumption that LGBT educational sessions are meaningful to and valued by medical students.

  14. Making a Math Teaching Aids of Junior High School Based on Scientific Approach Through an Integrated and Sustainable Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujiastuti, E.; Mashuri

    2017-04-01

    Not all of teachers of Mathematics in Junior High School (JHS) can design and create teaching aids. Moreover, if teaching aids should be designed so that it can be used in learning through scientific approaches. The problem: How to conduct an integrated and sustainable training that the math teacher of JHS, especially in Semarang can design and create teaching aids that can be presented to the scientific approach? The purpose of this study to find a way of integrated and continuous training so that the math teacher of JHS can design and create teaching aids that can be presented to the scientific approach. This article was based on research with a qualitative approach. Through trials activities of resulting of training model, Focus Group Discussions (FGD), interviews, and triangulation of the results of the research were: (1) Produced a training model of integrated and sustainable that the mathematics teacher of JHS can design and create teaching aids that can be presented to the scientific approach. (2) In training, there was the provision of material and workshop (3) There was a mentoring in the classroom. (4) Sustainability of the consultation. Our advice: (1) the trainer should be clever, (2) the training can be held at the holidays, while the assistance during the holiday season was over.

  15. Integration of children school age with ADHD in to a peer group

    OpenAIRE

    Zemanová, Hana

    2012-01-01

    This work is focussed on the integration of the children with ADHD into the peer group. Its target is to find out, if the integration proceeds and if it satisfies the children, the parents and the teachers. There's the issue of the ADHD, history of this term, the manifestations, the etiology, and the diagnostics by MKN-10 and DSM-IV and terminology explained. The applied part was realized through the use of the questionaries fullfiled bz the children with ADHD, their parents and the teachers ...

  16. The misappropriating of an innovation by Cameroonian learners: For a global and participative approach of the integration of ICTs in school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel BECHE

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article studies how Cameroonian learners misappropriate prescribed uses within the context of an innovation. The methodology used is based on sociology of uses and on interview. The obtained results show that learners dispose strategies to reform the integration of ICTs in school. To allow an adapted school innovation, this work proposes an approach which takes into account both the utility and the acceptability of computer.

  17. The Relationship between Social Cognitive Barriers and Technology Integration Frequency in a Northeastern School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Pauline

    2013-01-01

    Although federal and state departments of education have provided funding, programs, and policies to address barriers to technology integration, the frequency to which technology is used in classrooms for teaching and learning remains relatively unchanged. Without justification for continued funding, districts stand to lose a portion of their…

  18. Overcoming Pedagogical, Social/Cultural, and Attitudinal Barriers to Technology Integration in K-5 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durff, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Technology engages and increases academic achievement for K-5 students, but teachers face attitudinal, social/cultural, and pedagogical barriers when they integrate technology for student learning. Although some teachers overcome these barriers, it remains unclear how they do so. The purpose of this qualitative multiple case study was to analyze…

  19. Safer Schools: Achieving a Healthy Learning Environment through Integrated Pest Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003

    Integrated pest management (IPM) is a program of prevention, monitoring, and control that offers the opportunity to eliminate or drastically reduce hazardous pesticide use. IPM is intended to establish a program that uses cultural, mechanical, biological, and other non-toxic practices, and only introduces least-hazardous chemicals as a last…

  20. Integrating Computer-Assisted Language Learning in Saudi Schools: A Change Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alresheed, Saleh; Leask, Marilyn; Raiker, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Computer-assisted language learning (CALL) technology and pedagogy have gained recognition globally for their success in supporting second language acquisition (SLA). In Saudi Arabia, the government aims to provide most educational institutions with computers and networking for integrating CALL into classrooms. However, the recognition of CALL's…

  1. Teaching and Learning with Technology: Effectiveness of ICT Integration in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghavifekr, Simin; Rosdy, Wan Athirah Wan

    2015-01-01

    Integration of Information, Communication, and Technology (ICT) will assist teachers to the global requirement to replace traditional teaching methods with a technology-based teaching and learning tools and facilities. In Malaysia, ICT is considered as one of the main elements in transforming the country to the future development. The Ministry of…

  2. STEM Integration in Middle School Life Science: Student Learning and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzey, S. Selcen; Moore, Tamara J.; Harwell, Michael; Moreno, Mario

    2016-01-01

    In many countries around the world, there has been an increasing emphasis on improving science education. Recent reform efforts in the USA call for teachers to integrate scientific and engineering practices into science teaching; for example, science teachers are asked to provide learning experiences for students that apply crosscutting concepts…

  3. A Practicum in School Counseling: Using Reflective Journals as an Integral Component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, Sue A.; Waltman, Jean

    This paper contends that training in reflective process, a formal component of many teacher education programs, needs to occur also in counselor training programs, particularly in the practicum experience. A framework is proposed for reflective journaling as an integral component of the pre-service counseling practicum. The framework explains how…

  4. Content and Language Integrated Learning through an Online Game in Primary School: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dourda, Kyriaki; Bratitsis, Tharrenos; Griva, Eleni; Papadopoulou, Penelope

    2014-01-01

    In this paper an educational design proposal is presented which combines two well established teaching approaches, that of Game-based Learning (GBL) and Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL). The context of the proposal was the design of an educational geography computer game, utilizing QR Codes and Google Earth for teaching English…

  5. Integrating Botany with Chemistry & Art to Improve Elementary School Children's Awareness of Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çil, Emine

    2015-01-01

    Students need to be aware of plants in order to learn about, appreciate, care for, and protect them. However, research has found that many children are not aware of the plants in their environment. A way to address this issue might be integration of plants with various disciplines. I investigated the effectiveness of an instructional approach…

  6. Egyptian Art: An Integrated Curriculum Guide for the Intermediate and Middle School Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuerst, Ann Heidt, Ed.

    This curriculum guide offers instructional materials to integrate the study of ancient Egyptian art across the curriculum. It is designed to be used in coordination with a student field trip to a related exhibit at the San Diego (California) Museum of Man. Materials can be adapted for use independent of the exhibition. Designed for students and…

  7. Integrating Enterprise Systems Concepts in the B-School--A Regional University Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, C. Steven; Regan, Elizabeth A.; Everett, Donna R.; Green, David T.; Hunt, Darla; Becka, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    A quick look at today's business job postings and advertisements solidify that our future business graduates will be less likely to compete successfully or interview for the new corporate job openings without business process integration skills. Our credibility, reputation and visibility as an institution of higher learning is at stake--given that…

  8. Integrating Technology in Teaching Students with Special Learning Needs in the SPED Schools in Baguio City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmeo, Marilyn L.; Nimo, Erika Mae A.; Pagal, Aubrey M.; Puga, Stephanie C.; ArisDafQuiño; Sanwen, Jaleen L.

    2014-01-01

    Leading-edge creation and development of technologies including those for the children with special learning needs found common place in the educational system. Allowably, this study's focal point engages in the integration of technologies in the educational environments where students with special learning needs are housed. Respondents include 53…

  9. A Theoretical Framework for Integrating Creativity Development into Curriculum: The Case of a Korean Engineering School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Cheolil; Lee, Jihyun; Lee, Sunhee

    2014-01-01

    Existing approaches to developing creativity rely on the sporadic teaching of creative thinking techniques or the engagement of learners in a creativity-promoting environment. Such methods cannot develop students' creativity as fully as a multilateral approach that integrates creativity throughout a curriculum. The purpose of this study was to…

  10. Examination on ICT Integration into Special Education Schools for Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksal, Fahriye Altinay; Gazi, Zehra Altinay

    2015-01-01

    Information, communication and technology (ICT) is a bridge in fostering learning who have special needs in education. It becomes a medium of connecting their way of lives and their socialization within education life. Integration of ICT plays a great role in special education. Most of the developing countries pay attention to ICT practices in…

  11. Game-Based Learning in Teacher Education: A Strategy to Integrate Digital Games into Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, Nathalie; De Fraine, Biecke

    2012-01-01

    As educational technology is rapidly changing, greater emphasis has been placed on preparing the next generation of teachers for effective technology integration into the classrooms. In this article, the authors describe the design, implementation, and evaluation of a course on digital game-based learning (DGBL) developed for the preservice…

  12. Student Collaboration and School Educational Technology: Technology Integration Practices in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalise, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    With the onset of Web 2.0 and 3.0--the social and semantic webs--a next wave for integration of educational technology into the classroom is occurring. The aim of this paper is to show how some teachers are increasingly bringing collaboration and shared meaning-making through technology environments into learning environments (Evergreen Education…

  13. Integrating Information Literacy and Evidence-Based Medicine Content within a New School of Medicine Curriculum: Process and Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muellenbach, Joanne M; Houk, Kathryn M; E Thimons, Dana; Rodriguez, Bredny

    2018-01-01

    This column describes a process for integrating information literacy (IL) and evidence-based medicine (EBM) content within a new school of medicine curriculum. The project was a collaborative effort among health sciences librarians, curriculum deans, directors, and faculty. The health sciences librarians became members of the curriculum committees, developed a successful proposal for IL and EBM content within the curriculum, and were invited to become course instructors for Analytics in Medicine. As course instructors, the librarians worked with the other faculty instructors to design and deliver active learning class sessions based on a flipped classroom approach using a proprietary Information Mastery curriculum. Results of this collaboration may add to the knowledge base of attitudes and skills needed to practice as full faculty partners in curricular design and instruction.

  14. Dialogic and integrated approach to promote soils at different school levels: a Brazilian experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggler, Cristine Carole

    2017-04-01

    From ancient civilizations to present technological societies, soil is the material and immaterial ground of our existence. Soil is essential to life as are water, air and sun light. Nevertheless, it is overlooked and has its functions and importance not known and recognized by people. In formal education and in most school curricula, soil contents are not approached in the same way and intensity other environmental components are. In its essence, soils are an interdisciplinary subject, crossing over different disciplines. It has a great potential as unifying theme that links and synthesizes different contents and areas of knowledge, especially hard sciences as physics, chemistry and biology. Furthermore, soils are familiar and tangible to everyone, making them a meaningful subject that helps to build an efficient learning process. The challenge remains on how to bring such teaching-learning possibilities to formal education at all levels. Soil education deals with the significance of soil to people. What makes soil meaningful? What are the bases for effective learning about soil? The answers are very much related with subjective perceptions and life experiences carried by each individual. Those dimensions have been considered by the pedagogical approach based on Paulo Freire's socio constructivism which considers social inclusion, knowledge building, horizontal learning and collective action. This approach has been applied within the soil (science) education spaces of the Federal University of Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil, both with university students and basic education pupils. At the university an average of 200 students per semester follow a 60 hours Soil Genesis course. With primary and secondary schools the activities are developed through the Soil Education Programme (PES) of the Earth Sciences Museum. In the classes and activities, materials, methods and learning strategies are developed to stimulate involvement, dialogues and exchange of experiences and

  15. School violence in the eyes of the beholders: an integrative aggression-victimization perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskov-Peled, Ronit; Wolf, Yuval

    2002-10-01

    Five experiments explored, within the framework of functional measurement, the importance assigned by 3rd and 4th graders (n = 117) to expectations of potential perpetrators from their potential victims. Each participant was requested to imagine potential incidents of school violence where four familiar classmates were presented as protagonists (i.e., perpetrator and victim). An orderly manipulation of the combination of the level (high or low) of aggressiveness and susceptibility to victimization in each protagonist was made. The participants were informed whether or not the victim was about to deliver tangible rewards, display signs of suffering, or retaliate (2*2*2 = 8 conditions). For each potential incident, the participant estimated the likelihood that an attack will take place. The following order of importance was found: Reward > Retaliation > Suffering. Victim's aggressiveness was slightly effective. From an applied perspective, most notable is the tendency to lower the likelihood of violence when the educator knows about the incidents.

  16. Educating for integrated design at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture, KADK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leimand, Nini; Jerl Jensen, Mette; Vindum, Kjeld

    2017-01-01

    In August 2014, the structure and curriculum of KADK was re-organized. The bachelor study at the school of architecture is structured around six different subject fields, one for each semester: Settlement, Organisation, Materials, Aesthetics, Practices and Project. Every semester starts...... how to educate for applied construction at an academy of fine arts is a central issue for this paper. The course for 3th semester under the heading MATERIAL-assemblages, makes explorations and synthesis in models and material visualizations of building elements scale 1:1 and 1:10. The intention...... of the course is to examine the materials in their interaction as it unfolds in the building element. Materials interact not only with each other but also with the conditions they work under, thus the building element can be perceived as an assemblage. In order to be able to maneuver in such complex situations...

  17. The effect of integrating cooperative learning into 5E inquiry learning model on interpersonal skills of high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pholphuet, Preedaporn; Kanyaprasith, Kamonwan; Khumwong, Pinit; Praphairaksit, Nalena

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the effect of integrating cooperative learning into 5E inquiry learning model on interpersonal skills of high school students. Two 10th grade classrooms consisting of 63 students were obtained by purposive sampling then one was assigned as an experimental and the other as a control group. The cooperative learning was integrated into 5E inquiry model for the experimental group in addition to the normal 5E inquiry model in the control group. A 5-level rating scale questionnaire was used for data collection both before and after the experiment. Furthermore, a descriptive journal from each student was added to the study after the researchers realized a significant difference in the teamwork skill of each group. Data from questionnaires were analyzed using descriptive statistics and inferential statistics. The results showed that the experimental group had a significantly higher score of interpersonal skills when compared to the control group (ptime management, the outcome of the work, the process of the work and the attitude of the students. The students in the experimental group demonstrated more creative ideas and were more likely to listen to other student ideas. The students in experimental group were less competitive and were more open in sharing and helping others. In conclusion, the addition of cooperative learning in to the usual 5E inquiry learning, not only help the students to achieve the knowledge but also help develop good interpersonal skills.

  18. Understanding Middle School Students' Perceptions of Physics Using Girl-Friendly and Integrated STEM Strategies: A Gender Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dare, Emily Anna

    According to the American Physical Society, women accounted for only 20% of bachelor's degrees in the fields of physics and engineering in 2010. This low percentage is likely related to young girls' K-12 education experiences, particularly their experiences prior to high school, during which time young women's perceptions of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) and STEM careers are formed (Catsambis, 1995; Maltese & Tai, 2011; National Research Council, 2012; Sadler, Sonnert, Hazari, & Tai, 2012; Tai, Liu, Maltese, & Fan, 2006; Scantlebury, 2014; Sikora & Pokropek, 2012). There are no significant gender differences in academic achievement in middle school, yet young women have less positive attitudes towards careers in science than their male peers (Catsambis, 1995; Scantlebury, 2014). This suggests that the low female representation in certain STEM fields is a result of not their abilities, but their perceptions; for fields like physics where negative perceptions persist (Haussler & Hoffman, 2002; Labudde, Herzog, Neuenschander, Violi, & Gerber, 2000), it is clear that middle school is a critical time to intervene. This study examines the perceptions of 6th grade middle school students regarding physics and physics-related careers. A theoretical framework based on the literature of girl-friendly and integrated STEM strategies (Baker & Leary, 1995; Halpern et al., 2007; Haussler & Hoffman, 2000, 2002; Labudde et al., 2000; Moore et al., 2014b; Newbill & Cennamo, 2008; Rosser, 2000; Yanowitz, 2004) guided this work to understand how these instructional strategies may influence student's perceptions of physics for both girls and boys. The overarching goal of this work was to understand similarities and differences between girls' and boys' perceptions about physics and physics-related careers. This convergent parallel mixed-methods study uses a series of student surveys and focus group interviews to identify and understand these similarities and

  19. Educational outcomes of the Harvard Medical School-Cambridge integrated clerkship: a way forward for medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsh, David; Gaufberg, Elizabeth; Ogur, Barbara; Cohen, Pieter; Krupat, Edward; Cox, Malcolm; Pelletier, Stephen; Bor, David

    2012-05-01

    The authors report data from the Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship (CIC), a model of medical education in which students' entire third year consists of a longitudinal, integrated curriculum. The authors compare the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of students completing the CIC with those of students completing traditional third-year clerkships. The authors compared 27 students completing the first three years of the CIC (2004-2007) with 45 students completing clerkships at other Harvard teaching hospitals during the same period. At baseline, no significant between-group differences existed (Medical College Admission Test and Step 1 scores, second-year objective structured clinical examination [OSCE] performance, attitudes toward patient-centered care, and plans for future practice) in any year. The authors compared students' National Board of Medical Examiners Subject and Step 2 Clinical Knowledge scores, OSCE performance, perceptions of the learning environment, and attitudes toward patient-centeredness. CIC students performed as well as or better than their traditionally trained peers on measures of content knowledge and clinical skills. CIC students expressed higher satisfaction with the learning environment, more confidence in dealing with numerous domains of patient care, and a stronger sense of patient-centeredness. CIC students are at least as well as and in several ways better prepared than their peers. CIC students also demonstrate richer perspectives on the course of illness, more insight into social determinants of illness and recovery, and increased commitment to patients. These data suggest that longitudinal integrated clerkships offer students important intellectual, professional, and personal benefits.

  20. VET Students' Integration of Knowledge Engaged with in School-Based and Workplace-Based Learning Environments in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baartman, L. K. J.; Kilbrink, N.; de Bruijn, E.

    2018-01-01

    In vocational education, students learn in different school-based and workplace-based learning environments and engage with different types of knowledge in these environments. Students are expected to integrate these experiences and make meaning of them in relation to their own professional knowledge base. This study focuses both on…

  1. Are Schools Promoting Social and Economic Integration of Migrant and Ethnic Minorities? The Experiences of Some Young People of Ecuadorian Background in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ron-Balsera, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Although school is usually considered the most promising institution for the social and economic integration of young people of migration background, the educational outcomes of young people of Ecuadorian background signal a broken promise. Their families, peers, and teachers mediate the effect of the intersections of age, gender, class and…

  2. Visual Motor Integration as a Screener for Responders and Non-Responders in Preschool and Early School Years: Implications for Inclusive Assessment in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emam, Mahmoud Mohamed; Kazem, Ali Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Visual motor integration (VMI) is the ability of the eyes and hands to work together in smooth, efficient patterns. In Oman, there are few effective methods to assess VMI skills in children in inclusive settings. The current study investigated the performance of preschool and early school years responders and non-responders on a VMI test. The full…

  3. The Effects of Training and Performance Feedback during Behavioral Consultation on General Education Middle School Teachers' Integrity to Functional Analysis Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, Elizabeth L. W.; Waldron, Nancy; Conroy, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the integrity with which 3 general education middle school teachers implemented functional analyses (FA) of appropriate behavior for students who typically engaged in disruption. A 4-step model consistent with behavioral consultation was used to support the assessment process. All analyses were conducted during ongoing…

  4. An Investigation of the Relationship of ICT Training of Principals in ICT Integration in Management Public Secondary Schools: A Case of Nairobi County, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepkonga, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out whether there exists a relationship between ICT training of principals and ICT integration in management of public secondary schools in Kenya. Cross-sectional survey design was used in Nairobi County where quantitative research strategy was applied for the collection of data using questionnaires. The…

  5. Exploring Organisational Stratification and Technological Pedagogical Change: Cases of Technology Integration Specialists in Hong Kong International Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, David James

    2015-01-01

    An international school may make organisational choices that divide the school by curriculum, grade-level, language and location. This article explores how a school's organisational stratification impacts how the school supports changing teaching and learning practices through technology. The article draws from case data of technology integration…

  6. The Impact of Bullying in the Integral Development and Learning from the Perspective of Children in Preschool and School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Ester Morales-Ramírez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This article is part of a wider investigation about the impact of bullying on the integral development and learning of preschoolers and schoolchildren. An objective was designed to allow “analyzing the impact of bullying in the integral development of preschool and schoolchildren to promote prevention and intervention strategies to address this problem.” To achieve this, a study with a mixed approach, of exploratory and descriptive nature, was conducted to analyze the influence exerted in the learning and development of a child who experienced bullying. The information contained in the article only renders the answers related to the impact and provided by 857 children, namely: 237 preschoolers, 286 of the third grade and 334 of the fourth grade. We worked with these groups in order to detect if there were signs of bullying from preschool, and if there was any significant difference in the perception of this problem from students of the first and third cycle. We worked with 14 schools in the province of Heredia, Costa Rica, randomly selected, and coordinated with authorities and parents to obtain authorizations. To compile the information, a questionnaire was constructed, consisting of open and closed questions of yes and no answer. Also a semi-structured interview based on the designed questionnaire was applied to the children at the preschool level. The data were analyzed from a quantitative and qualitative perspective. This perspective included emerging categories elaborated from the answers provided by the children, to assure that their feelings and thoughts about bullying constitute an input to raise awareness of the prevailing need to prevent this problem and to address it in all the areas in which it is present. Among the most relevant results found, 229 students (26.7% reported having been harassed; of these, 198 (86.5% are actually suffering from bullying, since the time for suffering this harassment can vary from weeks to a year

  7. JOURNAL CLUB: Redefining the Radiology Curriculum in Medical School: Vertical Integration and Global Accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retrouvey, Michele; Trace, Anthony Paul; Goodmurphy, Craig W; Shaves, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    Radiology interconnects medical disciplines given that a working understanding of imaging is essential to clinicians of every specialty. Using online education, we created a globally accessible, web-based undergraduate medical radiology curriculum modeled after the National Medical Student Curriculum in Radiology program of the Alliance of Medical Student Educators in Radiology. Seventy-four radiology faculty-mentored video modules were produced, 50 of which were integrated into the 1st-year anatomy course. We administered tests to medical students before and after students saw the videos to assess the effectiveness of the modules. We surveyed students on their interests in pursuing radiology as a career before and after participating in this curriculum. On the preexamination questions, the mean score was 58.0%, which increased to 83.6% on the pair-matched imaging-related questions on the actual examination. Before participating in the new curriculum, 88% of students did not express an interest in radiology, and 9% were undecided about radiology as a future career. There was an increase in students who reported that they would definitely or most likely pursue a career in radiology (7%) after they had viewed the lectures. Radiology education is now available to a greater number of multidisciplinary learners worldwide. This project produced a comprehensive, globally accessible radiology curriculum in a self-paced, flexible learning format for new generations of physicians.

  8. Astronomy: Social Representations of the Integrated High School Students and Graduates in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, J. I. L.

    The topics related to Astronomy are spread through almost all levels of basic education in Brazil and are also disseminated through the mass media, activities that do not always occur in the proper way. However, their students form their explanations about the phenomena studied by Astronomy, that is, they begin to construct their opinions, their beliefs and their attitudes regarding this object or this situation. In this sense, this work was divided in two fronts, which have the following objectives: (1) To identify the social representations of Astronomy elaborated by students of Integrated secondary education and undergraduate students in Physics; (2) To verify to what extent the social representations developed by the investigated students are equivalent; (3) To Investigate if the social representations designed per undergraduate students in Physics about Astronomy undergo changes after these participate in a course on basic subjects of Astronomy, in comparison with those exposed before the mentioned event. On the first front there is a research of a basic nature, where the data were obtained through of survey, and analysed in accordance with the methodologies pertinent to Central Nucleus Theory, the second front deals with an investigation of an applied nature, and the data obtained were explored through statistical analyses. The results indicate that the researchers have been involved in social representations of the object Astronomy, which are based on elements of the formal education space, and also disclosed in the media, in addition, demonstrate that the students have information about Astronomy and a valuation position in relation to this Science. On the second front, the results indicate that there were changes in the social representations of the undergraduate students in Physics about the term inductor Astronomy, after the course, that is, several elements evoked before the course were replaced by others, which were worked during the event.

  9. Findings From the EASY Minds Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial: Evaluation of a Physical Activity Integration Program for Mathematics in Primary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Nicholas; Lubans, David R; Holmes, Kathryn; Morgan, Philip J

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the impact of a primary school-based physical activity (PA) integration program delivered by teachers on objectively measured PA and key educational outcomes. Ten classes from 8 Australian public schools were randomly allocated to treatment conditions. Teachers from the intervention group were taught to embed movement-based learning in their students' (n = 142) daily mathematics program in 3 lessons per week for 6 weeks. The control group (n = 98) continued its regular mathematics program. The primary outcome was accelerometer-determined PA across the school day. Linear mixed models were used to analyze treatment effects. Significant intervention effects were found for PA across the school day (adjusted mean difference 103 counts per minute [CPM], 95% confidence interval [CI], 36.5-169.7, P = .008). Intervention effects were also found for PA (168 CPM, 95% CI, 90.1-247.4, P = .008) and moderate-to-vigorous PA (2.6%, 95% CI, 0.9-4.4, P = .009) in mathematics lessons, sedentary time across the school day (-3.5%, 95% CI, -7.0 to -0.13, P = .044) and during mathematics (-8.2%, CI, -13.0 to -2.0, P = .010) and on-task behavior (13.8%, 95% CI, 4.0-23.6, P = .011)-but not for mathematics performance or attitude. Integrating movement across the primary mathematics syllabus is feasible and efficacious.

  10. Earthquakes, Cities, and Lifelines: lessons integrating tectonics, society, and engineering in middle school Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toke, N.; Johnson, A.; Nelson, K.

    2010-12-01

    Earthquakes are one of the most widely covered geologic processes by the media. As a result students, even at the middle school level, arrive in the classroom with preconceptions about the importance and hazards posed by earthquakes. Therefore earthquakes represent not only an attractive topic to engage students when introducing tectonics, but also a means to help students understand the relationships between geologic processes, society, and engineering solutions. Facilitating understanding of the fundamental connections between science and society is important for the preparation of future scientists and engineers as well as informed citizens. Here, we present a week-long lesson designed to be implemented in five one hour sessions with classes of ~30 students. It consists of two inquiry-based mapping investigations, motivational presentations, and short readings that describe fundamental models of plate tectonics, faults, and earthquakes. The readings also provide examples of engineering solutions such as the Alaskan oil pipeline which withstood multi-meter surface offset in the 2002 Denali Earthquake. The first inquiry-based investigation is a lesson on tectonic plates. Working in small groups, each group receives a different world map plotting both topography and one of the following data sets: GPS plate motion vectors, the locations and types of volcanoes, the location of types of earthquakes. Using these maps and an accompanying explanation of the data each group’s task is to map plate boundary locations. Each group then presents a ~10 minute summary of the type of data they used and their interpretation of the tectonic plates with a poster and their mapping results. Finally, the instructor will facilitate a class discussion about how the data types could be combined to understand more about plate boundaries. Using student interpretations of real data allows student misconceptions to become apparent. Throughout the exercise we record student preconceptions

  11. Integration of educational methods and physical settings: design guidelines for High/Scope methodology in pre-schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Izadpanah

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Quality design and appropriate space organization in preschool settings can support preschool children's educational activities. Although the relationship between the well-being and development of children and physical settings has been emphasized by many early childhood researchers, there is still a need for theoretical design guidelines that are geared towards the improvement of this issue. This research focuses on High/Scope education and aims to shape a theoretical guideline that raises teachers' awareness about the potential of learning spaces and guides them to improve the quality of the physical spaces. To create a theoretical framework, reliable sources are investigated in the light of High/Scope education and the requirements of pre-school children educational spaces. Physical space characteristics, the preschool child's requirements and High/Scope methodology identified design inputs, design considerations and recommendations that shape the final guideline for spatial arrangement in a High/Scope setting are integrated. Discussions and suggestions in this research benefit both designers and High/ Scope teaching staff. Results help High/Scope teaching staff increase the quality of a space in an educational setting without having an architectural background. The theoretical framework of the research allows designers to consider key features and users' possible activities in High/ Scope settings and shape their designs accordingly.

  12. A Study on Integrated Use of Turbulence Theory and Multi-Frame Leadership in School Leadership and Change

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng-Hung Chen

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to engage in an empirical investigation on school leaders’ comprehensive perspectives of adopting both turbulence theory and multi-frame leadership model on change and leadership within school settings. Applying the qualitative case study approach, workshops and focus group interviews were held involving five directors and three principals from different elementary schools, who graduated from the master program in school administration where the researcher serves, to discuss ...

  13. High School Mathematics Teachers' Levels of Achieving Technology Integration and In-Class Reflections: The Case of Mathematica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardiç, Mehmet Alper; Isleyen, Tevfik

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the levels of high school mathematics teachers in achieving mathematics instruction via computer algebra systems and the reflections of these practices in the classroom. Three high school mathematics teachers employed at different types of school participated in the study. In the beginning of this…

  14. How the Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child Model Works: Creating Greater Alignment, Integration, and Collaboration between Health and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Rachelle Johnsson; Meagher, Whitney; Slade, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child (WSCC) model calls for greater collaboration across the community, school, and health sectors to meet the needs and support the full potential of each child. This article reports on how 3 states and 2 local school districts have implemented aspects of the WSCC model through collaboration,…

  15. The Promise of Economic-Integration: Examining the Relationships among School Poverty, Individual Poverty, and Reasoning Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the relationships between school poverty status, family income status, and reasoning ability for the purpose of understanding the role of school poverty on reasoning skills. Cognitive ability scores of students attending mixed-poverty schools were compared to their counterparts attending institutions with low, high, and extreme…

  16. Reading Partridge's "The Goblet Club" as an Integral Part of a Secondary School's Anti-Bullying Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wet, Corene

    2017-01-01

    Notwithstanding legislation and individual schools' codes of conduct prohibiting bullying, bullying is an escalating problem in South African schools. It seems as if existing anti-bullying policies, programmes and intervention strategies are failing to address the scourge. Bibliotherapy has been identified as a way to strengthen schools' existing…

  17. The Piney Woods School: An Exploration of the Historically Black Boarding School Experience in Shaping Student Achievement, Cultural Esteem, and Collegiate Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander-Snow, Mia

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative case study explores the cultural impact the Piney Woods School, a historically Black independent boarding school, had on the social and academic experiences of four of its graduates in attendance at two traditionally White universities. The article discusses the collegiate experiences of four students: Samantha, Ira, Tony, and…

  18. Enhancing STEM Education through Cubesats: Using Satellite Integration as a Teaching Tool at a Non-Tech School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardes, S.; Cotten, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    University-based satellite programs have been successfully used as a platform for teaching STEM related fields, bringing tremendous benefits to graduate and undergraduate education. Considering their infrastructure and curricula, tech schools have traditionally been considered logical candidates for hosting such programs. More recently, with the dissemination of small satellites initiatives, non-tech schools have been presented the opportunity of developing satellite design and implementation programs. This work reports on the experiences and challenges associated with implementing a satellite program at the University of Georgia (UGA), a non-tech university. With funding from the Air Force Research Laboratory's (AFRL) University Nanosat Program (UNP) and NASA's Undergraduate Student Instrument Project (USIP) a team of undergraduates at UGA has recently been tasked with building two small satellites and helping to create a Small Satellite Research Laboratory (SSRL) at the university. Unique features of the satellite program at UGA include its team of students from a broad range of backgrounds and departments (Engineering, Computer Science, Art, Business, and Geography) and the previous exposure of many of these students to synergistic technologies, including arduino and unmanned aerial systems. We show how informal exposure to those technologies and willingness of students to focus on areas outside of their field of study can benefit from the implementation of satellite programs. In this regard, we report on methods and techniques used to find and recruit driven and knowledgeable students to work in a high paced field such as satellite system integration. We show how students and faculty from multiple departments have collaborated to reach a common, far reaching goal and describe our proposed methods to evaluate and measure educational goals based around SSRL and its projects. We also present the challenges associated with the lack of a developed engineering

  19. The readiness of teachers to integrate information and communication technology for learning in a selected school in the GautengOnline project.

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    This study is aimed at providing the reader with a detailed description of the readiness of teachers to integrate Information and Communication Technology (ICT) for learning in a selected school in the GautengOnline (GoL) Project, through qualitative research design that used various data collecting methods: Questionnaire, observations and interview. A large number of teachers showed some interest in using ICT learning but had difficulties on how to get started due to the lack of suitable ICT...

  20. Music plus Music Integration: A Model for Music Education Policy Reform That Reflects the Evolution and Success of Arts Integration Practices in 21st Century American Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scripp, Lawrence; Gilbert, Josh

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the special case of integrative teaching and learning in music as a model for 21st century music education policy reform based on the principles that have evolved out of arts integration research and practices over the past century and informed by the recent rising tide of evidence of music's impact on brain capacity and…

  1. The national management of public and Catholic schools in France: moving from a loosely coupled towards an integrated system?

    OpenAIRE

    Pons , Xavier; Van Zanten , Agnès; Da Costa , Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we analyse changes in the contemporary management of private Catholic schools under State contract in France since the 1980s. Writing from a ‘policy sociology’ perspective, we use data from previous studies on policy and on public and private schools as well as from an ongoing research project comparing policies of accountability in France and in Quebec. After presenting an outline of the constitutional, legal and institutional context in which public and religious schools op...

  2. Integration of the WJ IV, WISC-V, WISC-V Integrated, and WIAT-III into a School Neuropsychological Assessment Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    The Woodcock-Johnson-Fourth edition (WJ IV; Schrank, McGrew, & Mather, 2014a) and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fifth edition (WISC-V; Wechsler, 2014) are two of the major tests of cognitive abilities used in school psychology. The complete WJ IV battery includes the Woodcock-Johnson IV Tests of Cognitive Abilities (Schrank,…

  3. Graduates of an Historically Black Boarding School and Their Academic and Social Integration at Two Traditionally White Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander-Snow, Mia

    2010-01-01

    This naturalistic inquiry explored the cultural impact of a historically Black independent boarding school on the social and academic experiences of four of its graduates who attended two traditionally White universities. The study examined two primary questions: (a) What factors from the historically Black boarding school assisted or hindered…

  4. Improving Student Learning: A Strategic Planning Framework for an Integrated Student Information System in Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoma, Sylvester

    2010-01-01

    There is growing recognition that an electronic Student Information System (SIS) affects student learning. Given the strategic importance of SIS in supporting school administration and enhancing student performance, school districts are increasingly interested in acquiring the most effective and efficient Student Information Systems for their…

  5. The National Management of Public and Catholic Schools in France: Moving from a Loosely Coupled towards an Integrated System?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Xavier; van Zanten, Agnès; Da Costa, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we analyse changes in the contemporary management of private Catholic schools under State contract in France since the 1980s. Writing from a "policy sociology" perspective, we use data from previous studies on policy and on public and private schools as well as from an ongoing research project comparing policies of…

  6. Rationale and study protocol of the EASY Minds (Encouraging Activity to Stimulate Young Minds) program: cluster randomized controlled trial of a primary school-based physical activity integration program for mathematics

    OpenAIRE

    Riley, Nicholas; Lubans, David R; Holmes, Kathryn; Morgan, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    Background Novel strategies are required to increase school-based physical activity levels of children. Integrating physical activity in mathematics lessons may lead to improvements in students’ physical activity levels as well as enjoyment, engagement and learning. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of a curriculum-based physical activity integration program known as EASY Minds (Encouraging Activity to Stimulate Young Minds) on children’s daily school time physical activ...

  7. (SWASH-D for Worms: A pilot study investigating the differential impact of school- versus community-based integrated control programs for soil-transmitted helminths.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi E Clarke

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil-transmitted helminths (STH infect nearly 1.5 billion individuals globally, and contribute to poor physical and cognitive development in children. STH control programs typically consist of regular delivery of anthelminthic drugs, targeting school-aged children. Expanding STH control programs community-wide may improve STH control among school-aged children, and combining deworming with improvements to water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH may further reduce transmission. The (SWASH-D for Worms pilot study aims to compare the differential impact of integrated WASH and deworming programs when implemented at primary schools only versus when additionally implemented community-wide.A two-arm, non-randomized cluster intervention study was conducted. Six communities were identified by partner WASH agencies and enrolled in the study. All communities received a school-based WASH and deworming program, while three additionally received a community-based WASH and deworming program. STH infections were measured in school-aged children at baseline and six months after deworming. Over 90% of eligible children were recruited for the study, of whom 92.3% provided stool samples at baseline and 88.9% at follow-up. The school WASH intervention improved school sanitation, while the community WASH intervention reduced open defecation from 50.4% (95% CI 41.8-59.0 to 23.5% (95% CI 16.7-32.0. There was a trend towards reduced odds of N. americanus infection among children who received the community-wide intervention (OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.07-2.36, p = 0.32.This pilot study provides proof of principle for testing the hypothesis that community-wide STH control programs have a greater impact on STH infections among children than school-based programs, and supports the rationale for conducting a full-scale cluster randomized controlled trial. High recruitment and participation rates and successful implementation of school WASH programs demonstrate study feasibility and

  8. Teaching Marine Geoscience at Sea: Integrated Ocean Drilling Program's School of Rock Explores Cascadia Subduction Zone - Cores, Logs, and ACORKs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagan, M.; Collins, J.; Ludwig, K. A.; Slough, S.; Delaney, M. L.; Hovan, S. A.; Expedition 328 Scientists

    2010-12-01

    For twelve days this past September, seventeen formal and informal educators from the US, UK, and France joined six instructors and a small science party on the scientific drillship JOIDES Resolution for the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP)’s Cascadia ACORK Expedition. The educators were part of the annual “School of Rock (SOR)” education program. SOR is coordinated by the U.S. Implementing Organization (USIO) of IODP and is designed to engage participants in seagoing Earth systems research and education workshops onboard the JOIDES Resolution and on shore at the Gulf Coast Core Repository in Texas. The scientific objective of the Cascadia ACORK expedition was to install a new permanent hydrologic observatory at ODP Site 889 to provide long-term monitoring of the pressure at the frontal part of the Cascadia accretionary prism. This year’s SOR workshop focused on how cores, logs, and ACORKs shed light on the hydrology and geology of the Cascadia subduction zone in the Northeast Pacific. In addition to observing the deployment of the ACORK, the SOR participants conducted daily hands-on analyses of archived sediment and hard-rock cores with scientists and technicians who specialize in IODP research using the lab facilities on the ship. Throughout the expedition, participants engaged in different activities and lessons designed to explore the deep biosphere, methane hydrates, paleoceanography, sedimentology, biostratigraphy, seafloor spreading, and drilling technology. The workshop also provided participants with “C3” time; time to communicate their experience using the successful joidesresolution.org website and other tools, make connections to their prior knowledge and expertise, and to be creative in developing and planning new education and outreach activities based on their new knowledge and research. As part of participating in the expedition, participants committed to further developing and testing their education and outreach products after

  9. A Study on Integrated Use of Turbulence Theory and Multi-Frame Leadership in School Leadership and Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hung Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to engage in an empirical investigation on school leaders’ comprehensive perspectives of adopting both turbulence theory and multi-frame leadership model on change and leadership within school settings. Applying the qualitative case study approach, workshops and focus group interviews were held involving five directors and three principals from different elementary schools, who graduated from the master program in school administration where the researcher serves, to discuss and reflect upon the cross match of two theories as they may be applied to change and leadership. Accordingly, both theories’ practical application encompassed three advantages: “both theories interactively match with each other,” “both theories correspond to the authentic context of school leadership and change,” and “the matching matrix of both theories could serve as school leaders’ decision check list;” meanwhile, there were two issues that needed to be noticed and examined, including “the differentiation, definition and measurement of turbulence levels,” and “the subjective identification of turbulence levels.” This study concluded by proposing practical implications of applying theory into practice of school leadership and change.

  10. Evaluation Policy and Integral Education Program in the High School of Pernambuco State Education System: the limits of the centrality of evaluation in education policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine Ninive Pinto Silva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed at evaluating the results of the relationship between 1. The Educational Responsibility Policy; 2. The Evaluation Policy defined by the Pernambuco State Education System; and 3. The process of implementation of the Integral Education Program (PEI, Brazilian Portuguese abbreviation in High School Reference Institutions (EREMs, Brazilian Portuguese abbreviation and in the State Technical Schools (ETEs, Brazilian Portuguese abbreviation. Based on document and content analyses, a qualitative study was carried out whose data collection instruments were interviews with managers, teachers, students and technicians, along with questionnaires applied to the students. The theoretical background included Freitas (2012, Ravitch (2011, Algebaile (2009, among others. The results revealed that in the PEI implementation process, the evaluation through results is related to command-and-control strategies which broaden and intensify teachers‟ and students‟ school hours, working as a neoliberal and managerial laboratory in education. From this research perspective, the conclusion was that strategies such as increasing the years of study and the school hours disguise problems such as the crisis of structural unemployment and the reduction in investments provided for in social policies as a whole.

  11. Academic integrity and plagiarism: perceptions and experience of staff and students in a school of dentistry: a situational analysis of staff and student perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, P J; Hughes, C

    2012-02-01

    This project has investigated student and staff perceptions and experience of plagiarism in a large Australian dental school to develop a response to an external audit report. Workshops designed to enhance participants' understanding of plagiarism and to assist with practical ways to promote academic integrity within the school were provided to all students and staff. Anonymous surveys were used to investigate perceptions and experience of plagiarism and to assess the usefulness of the workshops. Most participants felt that plagiarism was not a problem in the school, but a significant number were undecided. The majority of participants reported that the guidelines for dealing with plagiarism were inadequate and most supported the mandatory use of text-matching software in all courses. High proportions of participants indicated that the workshops were useful and that they would consider improving their practice as a result. The study provided data that enhanced understanding of aspects of plagiarism highlighted in the report at the school level and identified areas in need of attention, such as refining and raising awareness of the guidelines and incorporation of text-matching software into courses, as well as cautions to be considered (how text-matching software is used) in planning responsive action. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Supported employment and education in comprehensive, integrated care for first episode psychosis: Effects on work, school, and disability income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenheck, Robert; Mueser, Kim T; Sint, Kyaw; Lin, Haiqun; Lynde, David W; Glynn, Shirley M; Robinson, Delbert G; Schooler, Nina R; Marcy, Patricia; Mohamed, Somaia; Kane, John M

    2017-04-01

    Participation in work and school are central objectives for first episode psychosis (FEP) programs, but evidence effectiveness has been mixed in studies not focused exclusively on supported employment and education (SEE). Requirements for current motivation to work or go to school limit the generalizability of such studies. FEP participants (N=404) at thirty-four community treatment clinics participated in a cluster randomized trial that compared usual Community Care (CC) to NAVIGATE, a comprehensive, team-based treatment program that included ≥5h of SEE services per week, , grounded in many of the principles of the Individual Placement and Support model of supported employment combined with supported education services. All study participants were offered SEE regardless of their initial interest in work or school. Monthly assessments over 24months recorded days of employment and attendance at school, days of participation in SEE, and both employment and public support income (including disability income). General Estimation Equation models were used to compare CC and NAVIGATE on work and school participation, employment and public support income, and the mediating effect of receiving ≥3 SEE visits on these outcomes. NAVIGATE treatment was associated with a greater increase in participation in work or school (p=0.0486) and this difference appeared to be mediated by SEE. No group differences were observed in earnings or public support payments. A comprehensive, team-based FEP treatment approach was associated with greater improvement in work or school participation, and this effect appears to be mediated, in part, by participation in SEE. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. THE EFFECTS OF FIXED-TERM EMPLOYMENT SPELLS ON THE INTEGRATION OF SCHOOL-LEAVERS ON THE LABOUR MARKET: EVIDENCE FROM FRANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana Calavrezo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the impact of fixed term employment spells (fixed-term contracts and temporary work on the integration on the labour market (translated by the transition to a permanent contract for French school-leavers. We study, at the same time, the impact of three categories of determinants on the schoolleavers' integration on the labour market: individual's features, a first fixed-term employment spell and a later fixed-term employment episode. More precisely, by taking into account the fixed-term employment spell duration, we identify four possible trajectories and we examine if fixed term employment is a "stepping-stone" to permanent employment. In order to control for possible endogeneity biases, trivariate probit models are implemented on a sample of 11 303 individuals obtained from the French "Generation 98" survey.

  14. Validity And Practicality of Experiment Integrated Guided Inquiry-Based Module on Topic of Colloidal Chemistry for Senior High School Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andromeda, A.; Lufri; Festiyed; Ellizar, E.; Iryani, I.; Guspatni, G.; Fitri, L.

    2018-04-01

    This Research & Development study aims to produce a valid and practical experiment integrated guided inquiry based module on topic of colloidal chemistry. 4D instructional design model was selected in this study. Limited trial of the product was conducted at SMAN 7 Padang. Instruments used were validity and practicality questionnaires. Validity and practicality data were analyzed using Kappa moment. Analysis of the data shows that Kappa moment for validity was 0.88 indicating a very high degree of validity. Kappa moments for the practicality from students and teachers were 0.89 and 0.95 respectively indicating high degree of practicality. Analysis on the module filled in by students shows that 91.37% students could correctly answer critical thinking, exercise, prelab, postlab and worksheet questions asked in the module. These findings indicate that the integrated guided inquiry based module on topic of colloidal chemistry was valid and practical for chemistry learning in senior high school.

  15. Student Learning Outcomes, Perceptions and Beliefs in the Context of Strengthening Research Integration into the First Year of Medical School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereijken, Mayke W. C.; van der Rijst, Roeland M.; van Driel, Jan H.; Dekker, Friedo W.

    2018-01-01

    Research integrated into undergraduate education is important in order for medical students to understand and value research for later clinical practice. Therefore, attempts are being made to strengthen the integration of research into teaching from the first year onwards. First-year students may interpret attempts made to strengthen research…

  16. Measuring Integrated Socioemotional Guidance at School: Factor Structure and Reliability of the Socioemotional Guidance Questionnaire (SEG-Q)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Karen; Struyf, Elke

    2013-01-01

    Socioemotional guidance of students has recently become an integral part of education, however no instrument exists to measure integrated socioemotional guidance. This study therefore examines the factor structure and reliability of the Socioemotional Guidance Questionnaire. Psychometric properties of the Socioemotional Guidance Questionnaire and…

  17. Evaluating the integration of cultural competence skills into health and physical assessment tools: a survey of Canadian schools of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chircop, Andrea; Edgecombe, Nancy; Hayward, Kathryn; Ducey-Gilbert, Cherie; Sheppard-Lemoine, Debbie

    2013-04-01

    Currently used audiovisual (AV) teaching tools to teach health and physical assessment reflect a Eurocentric bias using the biomedical model. The purpose of our study was to (a) identify commonly used AV teaching tools of Canadian schools of nursing and (b) evaluate the identified tools. A two-part descriptive quantitative method design was used. First, we surveyed schools of nursing across Canada. Second, the identified AV teaching tools were evaluated for content and modeling of cultural competence. The majority of the schools (67%) used publisher-produced videos associated with a physical assessment textbook. Major findings included minimal demonstration of negotiation with a client around cultural aspects of the interview including the need for an interpreter, modesty, and inclusion of support persons. Identification of culturally specific examples given during the videos was superficial and did not provide students with a comprehensive understanding of necessary culturally competent skills.

  18. Severe Multisensory Speech Integration Deficits in High-Functioning School-Aged Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Their Resolution During Early Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxe, John J.; Molholm, Sophie; Del Bene, Victor A.; Frey, Hans-Peter; Russo, Natalie N.; Blanco, Daniella; Saint-Amour, Dave; Ross, Lars A.

    2015-01-01

    Under noisy listening conditions, visualizing a speaker's articulations substantially improves speech intelligibility. This multisensory speech integration ability is crucial to effective communication, and the appropriate development of this capacity greatly impacts a child's ability to successfully navigate educational and social settings. Research shows that multisensory integration abilities continue developing late into childhood. The primary aim here was to track the development of these abilities in children with autism, since multisensory deficits are increasingly recognized as a component of the autism spectrum disorder (ASD) phenotype. The abilities of high-functioning ASD children (n = 84) to integrate seen and heard speech were assessed cross-sectionally, while environmental noise levels were systematically manipulated, comparing them with age-matched neurotypical children (n = 142). Severe integration deficits were uncovered in ASD, which were increasingly pronounced as background noise increased. These deficits were evident in school-aged ASD children (5–12 year olds), but were fully ameliorated in ASD children entering adolescence (13–15 year olds). The severity of multisensory deficits uncovered has important implications for educators and clinicians working in ASD. We consider the observation that the multisensory speech system recovers substantially in adolescence as an indication that it is likely amenable to intervention during earlier childhood, with potentially profound implications for the development of social communication abilities in ASD children. PMID:23985136

  19. Efficacy of integrated school based de-worming and prompt malaria treatment on helminths -Plasmodium falciparum co-infections: A 33 months follow up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadukura Vivian

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The geographical congruency in distribution of helminths and Plasmodium falciparum makes polyparasitism a common phenomenon in Sub Saharan Africa. The devastating effects of helminths-Plasmodium co-infections on primary school health have raised global interest for integrated control. However little is known on the feasibility, timing and efficacy of integrated helminths-Plasmodium control strategies. A study was conducted in Zimbabwe to evaluate the efficacy of repeated combined school based antihelminthic and prompt malaria treatment. Methods A cohort of primary schoolchildren (5-17 years received combined Praziquantel, albendazole treatment at baseline, and again during 6, 12 and 33 months follow up surveys and sustained prompt malaria treatment. Sustained prompt malaria treatment was carried out throughout the study period. Children's infection status with helminths, Plasmodium and helminths-Plasmodium co-infections was determined by parasitological examinations at baseline and at each treatment point. The prevalence of S. haematobium, S. mansoni, STH, malaria, helminths-Plasmodium co-infections and helminths infection intensities before and after treatment were analysed. Results Longitudinal data showed that two rounds of combined Praziquantel and albendazole treatment for schistosomiasis and STHs at 6 monthly intervals and sustained prompt malaria treatment significantly reduced the overall prevalence of S. haematobium, S. mansoni, hookworms and P. falciparum infection in primary schoolchildren by 73.5%, 70.8%, 67.3% and 58.8% respectively (p P. f + schistosomes, and P. f + STHs + schistosomes co-infections were reduced by 68.0%, 84.2%, and 90.7%, respectively. The absence of anti-helminthic treatment between the 12 mth and 33 mth follow-up surveys resulted in the sharp increase in STHs + schistosomes co-infection from 3.3% at 12 months follow up survey to 10.7%, slightly more than the baseline level (10.3% while other

  20. The Integration of Biodiversity Education in the Initial Education of Primary School Teachers: Four Comparative Case Studies from Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann-Matthies, Petra; Constantinou, Constantinos; Junge, Xenia; Kohler, Karlheinz; Mayer, Jurgen; Nagel, Ueli; Raper, George; Schule, Diane; Kadji-Beltran, Chrysanthi

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we present results from an international research study on biodiversity education in pre-service education of primary school teachers. The study was carried out between 2004-2006 in four teacher education institutions in Cyprus, England, Switzerland and Germany. We used document analyses and in-depth interviews with 27 teacher…

  1. Web 2.0 Integration into the Graduate Classroom: An Appreciative Inquiry into Prospective School Administrator Strengths and Leadership Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Raymond L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to advance the preparation of prospective school administrator students by extending the Web 2.0 application of blogging to discover students' strengths and successful leadership experiences. During the blogging process, students reflected on and responded to appreciative inquiry (AI) blog posts that…

  2. Developing a New Framework for Integration and Teaching of Computer Aided Architectural Design (CAAD) in Nigerian Schools of Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwakonye, Obioha; Alagbe, Oluwole; Oluwatayo, Adedapo; Alagbe, Taiye; Alalade, Gbenga

    2015-01-01

    As a result of globalization of digital technology, intellectual discourse on what constitutes the basic body of architectural knowledge to be imparted to future professionals has been on the increase. This digital revolution has brought to the fore the need to review the already overloaded architectural education curriculum of Nigerian schools of…

  3. ICT4RED 12 - Component implementation framework: A conceptual framework for integrating mobile technology into resource-constrained rural schools

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ford, M

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available ICT for Rural Education Development (ICT4RED) is a large-scale pilot that is testing the use of tablets in 26 deep rural schools in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. The aim is to develop a replicable framework that will enable evidence...

  4. Everyone Plays! A Review of Research on the Integration of Sports and Physical Activity in Out of School Time Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Policy Studies Associates, Inc., 2006

    2006-01-01

    A growing body of research attests to the value of high-quality out-of-school time (OST) programs in promoting positive youth development. These programs provide environments where young people can engage in academic enrichment, build meaningful relationships with responsible adults and peers, nurture new interests, and develop the social and life…

  5. Effects of ICT Integration in Management of Private Secondary Schools in Nairobi County, Kenya: Policy Options and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyier, Charles Richard; Odundo, Paul Amollo; Lilian, Ganira Khavugwi; Wangui, Kahiga Ruth

    2015-01-01

    The convergence between telecommunication, broadcasting multimedia and related technologies commonly known as Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), promises a fundamental change in educational management. ICT could be the missing tool in improving efficiency of private secondary schools to cope with rapidly changing world to…

  6. Treatment Integrity of School-Based Interventions with Children in the "Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis" 1991-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Laura Lee; Gresham, Frank M.; DiGennaro, Florence D.; Reed, Derek D.

    2007-01-01

    We reviewed all school-based experimental studies with individuals 0 to 18 years published in the "Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis" (JABA) between 1991 and 2005. A total of 142 articles (152 studies) that met review criteria were included. Nearly all (95%) of these experiments provided an operational definition of the independent variable,…

  7. Solar Fireworks - Integrating an Exhibit on Solar Physics and Space Science into the Science and Astronomy Curriculum of High-School and College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denker, C.; Wang, H.; Conod, K. D.; Wintemberg, T.; Calderon, I.

    2005-05-01

    Astronomers at The Newark Museum's Alice and Leonard Dreyfuss Planetarium teamed up with the New Jersey Institute of Technology's (NJIT) Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research (CSTR) and the Big Bear Solar Observatory in presenting Solar Fireworks. The exhibit opened on May 15, 2004 and features two exhibition kiosks with interactive touch screen displays, where students and other visitors can take "virtual tours" in the fields of solar physics, solar activity, Sun-Earth connection, and geo-sciences. Planetarium and museum visits are an integral part of the introductory physics and astronomy classes at NJIT and the exhibition has been integrated in the astronomy curriculum. For example, NJIT students of the Astronomy Club and regular astronomy courses were closely involved in the design and development of the exhibit. The exhibit is the latest addition to the long-running natural science exhibit "Dynamic Earth: Revealing Nature's Secrets" at the museum. More than 30,000 people per year attend various programs offered by the planetarium including public shows, more than a dozen programs for school groups, after school activities, portable planetarium outreach, outdoor sky watches, solar observing and other family events. More than 1,000 high school students visited the planetarium in 2004. The exhibit is accompanied by a yearly teacher workshop (the first one was held on October 18-20, 2004) to enhance the learning experience of classes visiting the Newark Museum. The planetarium and museum staff has been working with teachers of Newark high schools and has presented many workshops for educators on a wide range of topics from astronomy to zoology. At the conclusion of the exhibit in December 2005, the exhibit will go "on the road" and will be made available to schools or other museums. Finally, the exhibit will find its permanent home at the new office complex of CSTR at NJIT. Acknowledgements: Solar Fireworks was organized by The Newark Museum and the New Jersey

  8. Energy education at school. Integration of an interdisciplinary subject in school education and teacher training. Proceedings; Energiebildung fuer die Schule. Integration eines interdisziplinaeren Themas in Schulunterricht und Lehrerbildung. Tagungsband

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komorek, Michael; Niesel, Verena; Rebmann, Karin (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    This publication contains the proceedings of an expert symposium held in Oldenburg on 15/16 March 2010. It reflects the developments until then in the direction of a multiperspective view of the subject of sustainable power supply and energy use. This position-finding will help the project actors to follow the agreed goals and to incorporate them in teaching in general and vocational schools.

  9. Integrating mindfulness training in school health education to promote healthy behaviors in adolescents: Feasibility and preliminary effects on exercise and dietary habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmoirago-Blotcher, Elena; Druker, Susan; Frisard, Christine; Dunsiger, Shira I; Crawford, Sybil; Meleo-Meyer, Florence; Bock, Beth; Pbert, Lori

    2018-03-01

    Whether mindfulness training (MT) could improve healthy behaviors is unknown. This study sought to determine feasibility and acceptability of integrating MT into school-based health education (primary outcomes) and to explore its possible effects on healthy behaviors (exploratory outcomes). Two high schools in Massachusetts (2014-2015) were randomized to health education plus MT (HE-MT) (one session/week for 8 weeks) or to health education plus attention control (HE-AC). Dietary habits (24-h dietary recalls) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA/7-day recalls) were assessed at baseline, end of treatment (EOT), and 6 months thereafter. Quantile regression and linear mixed models were used, respectively, to estimate effects on MVPA and dietary outcomes adjusting for confounders. We recruited 53 9th graders (30 HEM, 23 HEAC; average age 14.5, 60% white, 59% female). Retention was 100% (EOT) and 96% (6 months); attendance was 96% (both conditions), with moderate-to-high satisfaction ratings. Among students with higher MVPA at baseline, MVPA was higher in HE-MT vs. HE-AC at both EOT (median difference = 81 min/week, p  = 0.005) and at 6 months ( p  = 0.004). Among males, median MVPA was higher (median difference = 99 min/week) in HE-MT vs. HEAC at both EOT ( p  = 0.056) and at 6 months ( p  = 0.04). No differences were noted in dietary habits. In sum, integrating school-based MT into health education was feasible and acceptable and had promising effects on MVPA among male and more active adolescents. These findings suggest that MT may improve healthy behaviors in adolescents and deserve to be reproduced in larger, rigorous studies.

  10. How Do School-Based Prevention Programs Impact Teachers? Findings from a Randomized Trial of an Integrated Classroom Management and Social-Emotional Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domitrovich, Celene E; Bradshaw, Catherine P; Berg, Juliette K; Pas, Elise T; Becker, Kimberly D; Musci, Rashelle; Embry, Dennis D; Ialongo, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    A number of classroom-based interventions have been developed to improve social and behavioral outcomes for students, yet few studies have examined how these programs impact the teachers who are implementing them. Impacts on teachers may affect students and therefore also serve as an important proximal outcome to examine. The current study draws upon data from a school-based randomized controlled trial testing the impact of two prevention programs. In one intervention condition, teachers were trained in the classroom behavior management program, PAX Good Behavior Game (PAX GBG). In a second intervention condition, teachers were trained to use an integrated program, referred to as PATHS to PAX, of the PAX GBG and a social and emotional learning curriculum called Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (PATHS©). This study aimed to determine whether both interventions positively impacted teachers, with a particular interest in the teachers' own beliefs and perceptions regarding self-efficacy, burnout, and social-emotional competence. The sample included 350 K-5 teachers across 27 schools (18 schools randomized to intervention, 9 to control). Multilevel latent growth curve analyses indicated that the PATHS to PAX condition generally demonstrated the most benefits to teachers, relative to both the control and PAX GBG conditions. These findings suggest that school-based preventive interventions can have a positive impact on teachers' beliefs and perceptions, particularly when the program includes a social-emotional component. Several possible mechanisms might account for the added benefit to teachers. Additional research is needed to better understand how these programs impact teachers, as well as students.

  11. An integrated 2-year clinical skills peer tutoring scheme in a UK-based medical school: perceptions of tutees and peer tutors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Background Several benefits of peer tutoring in medical school teaching have been described. However, there is a lack of research on the perceptions of peer tutoring, particularly from tutees who partake in a long-term clinical skills scheme integrated into the medical school curriculum. This study evaluates the opinions of preclinical tutees at the end of a 2-year peer-tutored clinical skills program and peer tutors themselves. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in a UK-based medical school that primarily utilizes peer tutoring for clinical skills teaching. A questionnaire was designed to assess the views of preclinical tutees and peer tutors. Likert scales were used to grade responses and comment boxes to collect qualitative data. Results Sixty-five questionnaires were collected (52 tutees, 13 peer tutors). Seventy-nine percent of students felt satisfied with their teaching, and 70% felt adequately prepared for clinical placements. Furthermore, 79% believed that peer tutoring is the most effective method for clinical skills teaching. When compared to faculty teaching, tutees preferred being taught by peer tutors (63%), felt more confident (73%), and were more willing to engage (77%). All peer tutors felt that teaching made them more confident in their Objective Structured Clinical Examination performance, and 91% agreed that being a tutor made them consider pursuing teaching in the future. Thematic analysis of qualitative data identified 3 themes regarding peer tutoring: a more comfortable environment (69%), a more personalized teaching approach (34%), and variation in content taught (14%). Conclusion Preclinical tutees prefer being taught clinical skills by peer tutors compared to faculty, with the peer tutors also benefitting. Studies such as this, looking at long-term schemes, further validate peer tutoring and may encourage more medical schools to adopt this method as an effective way of clinical skills teaching. PMID:29922105

  12. Integration of basic science and clinical medicine: the innovative approach of the cadaver biopsy project at the Boston University School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstein, Anna; Vaisman, Lev; Johnston-Cox, Hillary; Gallan, Alexander; Shaffer, Kitt; Vaughan, Deborah; O'Hara, Carl; Joseph, Lija

    2014-01-01

    Curricular integration has emerged as a consistent theme in medical education reform. Vertical integration of topics such as pathology offers the potential to bring basic science content into the clinical arena, but faculty/student acceptance and curricular design pose challenges for such integration. The authors describe the Cadaver Biopsy Project (CBP) at Boston University School of Medicine as a sustainable model of vertical integration. Faculty and select senior medical students obtained biopsies of cadavers during the first-year gross anatomy course (fall 2009) and used these to develop clinical cases for courses in histology (spring 2010), pathology (fall 2010-spring 2011), and radiology (fall 2011 or spring 2012), thereby linking students' first experiences in basic sciences with other basic science courses and later clinical courses. Project goals included engaging medical stu dents in applying basic science princi ples in all aspects of patient care as they acquire skills. The educational intervention used a patient (cadaver)-centered approach and small-group, collaborative, case-based learning. Through this project, the authors involved clinical and basic science faculty-plus senior medical students-in a collaborative project to design and implement an integrated curriculum through which students revisited, at several different points, the microscopic structure and pathophysiology of common diseases. Developing appropriate, measurable out comes for medical education initiatives, including the CBP, is challenging. Accumu lation of qualitative feedback from surveys will guide continuous improvement of the CBP. Documenting longer-term impact of the curricular innovation on test scores and other competency-based outcomes is an ultimate goal.

  13. Technology Integration in a Southern Inner-City School: Perspectives of In-service and Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-25

    researcher that: TECHNOLOGY IN AN INNER-CITY SCHOOL   11   Technology is wonderful in the classroom, especially for little kids . You can use...As far as writing, I can see that [hands-on vs. clicking; and hands-on is better]. We did not get to use the computer as much as kids do today. I...that teachers receive the training needed for them to implement the best instructional practices. Second, the pedagogical shift from traditional

  14. Integration of ICT, Drama, and Language for Development of Children's Communicative Competence: Case Study in a Primary School

    OpenAIRE

    Giedrė STRAKŠIENĖ; Dalia BAZIUKAITĖ

    2009-01-01

    The paper addresses the issue of unusual ICT tool application in the development of communicative competences during drama classes. It also presents the practical implementation of a case study method with the application of ICT tools. The case method was used for an interesting combination of acquiring communicative competences including drama skills by means of applying modern computer software. The target group was the 3rd form pupils of Klaipeda primary school. The activities planned to c...

  15. THE STRATEGY FOR CREATION OF THE MODERN CONCEPT OF INTEGRATIVE-HOLISTIC EDUCATION (A CASE STUDY OF MINING SCHOOLS OF THE URALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. K. Chapaev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The relevance of the problem under study is caused by the contradiction between the necessity of fundamentalization of education, raising it to the level of the requirements of integral human development and the deepening disintegration of all sides of his life, including vocational education.The aim of the present publication is philosophical and pedagogical reflection and development of mechanisms for mainstreaming integrative-holistic approach when building a hypothetical model of professional education, aimed at provision of strategic turn towards more balanced (dialectical approach to the traditional values of education. In particular, it concerns the experience of mining schools of the Urals.Methodology and research methods. A leading approach to the study of this problem is an integrative-holistic approach (PPI that can identify the holistic nature of the pedagogical system in which: a inter-transformation of cooperated parts occurs not at the expense of each other, but on behalf of each other part; b the existence of common points of contact between the cooperated components is complemented by the coexistence of the opposite, sometimes mutually exclusive sides of life; c the idea of the priority of the whole is in harmony with the idea of polycentrism.Results and scientific novelty. The study shows the failure of the monopoly of the prevailing doctrine of competence-based education as a means for the successful resolution of global problems of reintegration of human existence and therefore postulated the necessity of antinomization (diversification of education. The authors make the original hypothesis of the construction of the concept of vocational education on the basis of the reconstruction of experience of the mining schools of the Urals and prove the prospectivity of integrative-holistic strategy of reconstruction of educational experience in modern conditions. The system of technological and methodological support of

  16. PREREQUISITES FOR CALENDAR RITUALISM INTEGRATION TO THE PROCESS OF SPIRITUAL DEVELOPMENT OF STUDENTS OF MODERN SCHOOL OF MOUNTAIN REGIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violetta Lappo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The profit of involving calendar holidays in the process of school children bringing up is proved in the article. The author confirms that there are many good customs and rituals with deep bringing up content. Ethnic Hutsul traditions had symbolic meaning and contributed their moral bringing up. The number of examples about children's upbringing in Hutsul families is given here, which helps in training them to religious and secular traditions. It is also said about holiday rituals, where small Hutsul children were involved. A lot of Hutsul customs and rituals have already been forgotten. But the author appeals to their renascence. The author is sure of it because customs and rituals form upbringing tradition, which proved its effectiveness during many centuries. Partly, it is important to meet children to new traditions of modern mountain schools of Hutsulshchyna (Hutsulland to form true valuable orientation. Only this is the basis of the personality spiritual world. The author proposes to reveal the celebrations of ancient traditions such holidays as: Christmas, Easter, Trinity. During these holidays Hutsul people tried to do a lot of charity things, helping sick people, visiting ill, and making mention of the departed. That's why it is important that the modern pupils of mountain schools not only new, but followed public calendar traditions. It has to be not only following certain ritual actions, but it has to be the ability to the spiritual perception of Hutsul cultural heritage.

  17. Integrating the Teaching of Space Science, Planetary Exploration And Robotics In Elementary And Middle School with Mars Rover Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bering, E. A.; Ramsey, J.; Smith, H.; Boyko, B. S.; Peck, S.; Arcenaux, W. H.

    2005-05-01

    The present aerospace engineering and science workforce is ageing. It is not clear that the US education system will produce enough qualified replacements to meet the need in the near future. Unfortunately, by the time many students get to high school, it is often too late to get them pointed toward an engineering or science career. Since some college programs require 6 units of high school mathematics for admission, students need to begin consciously preparing for a science or engineering curriculum as early as 6th or 7th grade. The challenge for educators is to convince elementary school students that science and engineering are both exciting, relevant and accessible career paths. This paper describes a program designed to help provide some excitement and relevance. It is based on the task of developing a mobile robot or "Rover" to explore the surface of Mars. There are two components to the program, a curriculum unit and a contest. The curriculum unit is structured as a 6-week planetary science unit for elementary school (grades 3-5). It can also be used as a curriculum unit, enrichment program or extracurricular activity in grades 6-8 by increasing the expected level of scientific sophistication in the mission design. The second component is a citywide competition to select the most outstanding models that is held annually at a local college or University. Primary (Grades 3-5) and middle school (Grades 6-8) students interested in science and engineering will design and build of a model of a Mars Rover to carry out a specific science mission on the surface of Mars. The students will build the models as part of a 6-week Fall semester classroom-learning or homework project on Mars. The students will be given design criteria for a rover, and be required to do basic research on Mars that will determine the operational objectives and structural features of their rover. This module may be used as part of a class studying general science, earth science, solar system

  18. Integrating Mathematical Modeling for Undergraduate Pre-Service Science Education Learning and Instruction in Middle School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrejo, David; Robertson, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Computer-based mathematical modeling in physics is a process of constructing models of concepts and the relationships between them in the scientific characteristics of work. In this manner, computer-based modeling integrates the interactions of natural phenomenon through the use of models, which provide structure for theories and a base for…

  19. Do Mathematics and Reading Competencies Integrated into Career and Technical Education Courses Improve High School Student State Assessment Scores?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Kristin B.; Hernandez, Victor M.

    2015-01-01

    A quasi experimental study tested a contextual teaching and learning model for integrating reading and mathematics competencies through 13 introductory career and technical education (CTE) courses. The treatment group consisted of students in the 13 introductory courses taught by the CTE teachers who designed the units and the control group…

  20. Sull'Integrazione delle Strutture Numeriche nella Scuola dell'Obbligo (Integrating Numerical Structures in Mandatory School).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonotto, C.

    1995-01-01

    Attempted to verify knowledge regarding decimal and rational numbers in children ages 10-14. Discusses how pupils can receive and assimilate extensions of the number system from natural numbers to decimals and fractions and later can integrate this extension into a single and coherent numerical structure. (Author/MKR)

  1. THE INTEGRATION INTERACTION OF PEDAGOGICAL HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION AND SCHOOL IN DEVELOPMENT OF INNOVATIVE MODELS OF EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov Pavel Pavlovich

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to an actual problem of integration interaction of educational institutions of various levels. The concepts of integration and pedagogical interaction are analyzed; the features and the intrinsic characteristics which are showing in modern conditions of a development of education are marked out in this article. The question of mechanisms of realization of integration interaction is designated there. The distance interactive courses devoted to development of innovative models of education are offered as one of the possible mechanisms of realization of integration interaction of pedagogical higher education institution and establishments of the general education. The development of innovative models of education is considered in two directions: on the one hand, the role of pedagogical higher education institution in the spread of innovations and rendering the methodical help to teachers in their development is allocated; on the other hand, the way of integration interaction, in particular, the use of Moodle environment and Adobe Connect system, can be considered as innovative. Possibilities of Moodle ("Modular object-oriented dynamic learning environment" as environments of distance learning which is intended for development and placement of training and methodical materials in the Internet/the Intranet network and the organization of educational process on their basis, and also Adobe Connect as flexible system of the distributed training and communication with use of technologies of the web communications, allowing to provide a possibility of teaching, training and collaboration at any distance on the Internet are characterized in the article. The feature of the research is design and realization of distance learning on the basis of a Moodle environment and Adobe Connect system combination in online modes and offline, use of interactive models of occupations. The results of research received during training of teachers at

  2. THE STRATEGY FOR CREATION OF THE MODERN CONCEPT OF INTEGRATIVE-HOLISTIC EDUCATION (A CASE STUDY OF MINING SCHOOLS OF THE URALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. K. Chapaev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The relevance of the problem under study is caused by the contradiction between the necessity of fundamentalization of education, raising it to the level of the requirements of integral human development and the deepening disintegration of all sides of his life, including vocational education.The aim of the present publication is philosophical and pedagogical reflection and development of mechanisms for mainstreaming integrative-holistic approach when building a hypothetical model of professional education, aimed at provision of strategic turn towards more balanced (dialectical approach to the traditional values of education. In particular, it concerns the experience of mining schools of the Urals.Methods. A leading approach to the study of this problem is an integrativeholistic approach (PPI that can identify the holistic nature of the pedagogical system in which: a inter-transformation of cooperated parts occurs not at the expense of each other, but on behalf of each other part; b the existence of common points of contact between the cooperated components is complemented by the coexistence of the opposite, sometimes mutually exclusive sides of life; c the idea of the priority of the whole is in harmony with the idea of polycentrism.Results and scientific novelty. The study shows the failure of the monopoly of the prevailing doctrine of competence-based education as a means for the successful resolution of global problems of reintegration of human existence and therefore postulated the necessity of antinomization (diversification of education. The authors make the original hypothesis of the construction of the concept of vocational education on the basis of the reconstruction of experience of the mining schools of the Urals and prove the prospectivity of integrative-holistic strategy of reconstruction of educational experience in modern conditions. The system of technological and methodological support of the

  3. Advancing the Integration of Population Medicine into Medical Curricula at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University: A New Master's Degree Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Michael J; Feller, Edward; George, Paul; Borkan, Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Additional knowledge, attitudes and skills are required for the next generation of medical students as they expand the traditional focus on individual patients to include population-based health and scholarly investigation. The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University (AMS) is initiating a master's degree program as a key component of the new Primary Care-Population Medicine program at AMS leading to both a Doctorate in Medicine (MD) and Master of Science in Population Medicine (ScM) degrees in four years. The ScM is composed of a series of nine courses, integrated into the four-year MD curriculum, as well as a thesis. Additional attention will be given to leadership and quality improvement training. The goal is to produce graduates competent in the care of individual patients, panels, communities, and populations.

  4. Horizontal integration of OMIM across the medical school preclinical curriculum for early reinforcement of clinical genetics principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Adam C; Reader, Lauren; Hamosh, Ada; Bodurtha, Joann N

    2015-02-01

    With the relentless expansion of genetics into every field of medicine, stronger preclinical and clinical medical student education in genetics is needed. The explosion of genetic information cannot be addressed by simply adding content hours. We proposed that students be provided a tool to access accurate clinical information on genetic conditions and, through this tool, build life-long learning habits to carry them through their medical careers. Surveys conducted at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine revealed that medical students in all years lacked confidence when approaching genetic conditions and lacked a reliable resource for accurate genetic information. In response, the school created a horizontal thread that stretches across the first-year curriculum and is devoted to teaching students how to use Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) (http://omim.org) and the databases to which it links as a starting point for approaching genetic conditions. The thread improved the first-year students' confidence in clinical genetics concepts and encouraged use of OMIM as a primary source for genetic information. Most students showed confidence in OMIM as a learning tool and wanted to see the thread repeated in subsequent years. Incorporating OMIM into the preclinical curriculum improved students' confidence in clinical genetics concepts.

  5. An Integrative Approach to Burnout in Secondary School Teachers: Examining the Role of Student Disruptive Behaviour and Disciplinary Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Otero López, José Manuel; Santiago Mariño, María José; Godas Otero, Agustín; Castro Bolaño, María Cristina; Villardefrancos Pol, Estíbaliz; Ponte Fernández, Dolores

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine from an integrative approach to what extent occupational stressors when in combination with other variables that have accredited their explicative value in accounting for teacher distress in other domains (personal, psychosocial and outside the occupational sphere) contribute to predicting and/or explaining the different components of burnout. The sample consists in 1386 secondary education teachers. The statistical results obtained conf...

  6. The Concept Mastery in the Perspective of Gender of Junior High School Students on Eclipse Theme in Multiple Intelligences-based of Integrated Earth and Space Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liliawati, W.; Utama, J. A.; Mursydah, L. S.

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify gender-based concept mastery differences of junior high school students after the implementation of multiple intelligences-based integrated earth and space science learning. Pretest-posttest group design was employed to two different classes at one of junior high school on eclipse theme in Tasikmalaya West Java: one class for boys (14 students) and one class of girls (18 students). The two-class received same treatment. The instrument of concepts mastery used in this study was open-ended eight essay questions. Reliability test result of this instrument was 0.9 (category: high) while for validity test results were high and very high category. We used instruments of multiple intelligences identification and learning activity observation sheet for our analysis. The results showed that normalized N-gain of concept mastery for boys and girls were improved, respectively 0.39 and 0.65. Concept mastery for both classes differs significantly. The dominant multiple intelligences for boys were in kinesthetic while girls dominated in the rest of multiple intelligences. Therefor we concluded that the concept mastery was influenced by gender and student’s multiple intelligences. Based on this finding we suggested to considering the factor of gender and students’ multiple intelligences given in the learning activity.

  7. Impact on Social Change: Benefits and Barriers to School Culture and the Integration of M-Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen E. Smith

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines benefits and barriers of mtechnologyin its growing use in education through a surveyconducted at a Canadian teacher education institution(n=350. Topics included are the types of mobile technologydevices and how their uses have been rejected and acceptedas a socially-situated construct for learning in schools. Issuesfor new teachers range from the dollar cost of using thedevices to the cost of time in learning about these devices.The paper concludes with a central issue of why somedevices do not remain in the social construct but areadopted for short periods of time and do not last becausebarriers prevent their sustainability. The research for thispaper was supported in part by a grant from the ImperialOil Academy for the Learning of Mathematics, Science andTechnology.

  8. Integrating geoscience and Native American experiences through a multi-state geoscience field trip for high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, P. R.; Brown, L. M.; Spencer, M.; Sabatine, S.; Goetz, E. R.

    2012-12-01

    Lake Superior State University (LSSU) developed the GRANITE (Geological Reasoning And Natives Investigating The Earth) to engage high school students in the geosciences. The GRANITE program's target audience is Native American high school students and other populations underrepresented in the geosciences. Through the GRANITE program students undertake a variety of field and laboratory geosciences activities that culminates in a two week summer geoscience field experience during which they travel from Michigan to Wyoming. The sites students visit were selected because of their interesting and diverse geologic features and because in many cases they have special significance to Native American communities. Examples of the processes and localities studied by GRANITE students include igneous processes at Bear Butte, SD (Mato Paha) and Devil's Tower, WY (Mato Tipila); sedimentary processes in the Badlands, SD (Mako Sica) and Black Hills, SD (Paha Sapa); karst processes at Wind Cave, SD (Wasun Niye) and Vore Buffalo Jump; structural processes at Van Hise rock, WI and Dillon normal fault Badlands, SD; hydrologic and laucustrine processes along the Great Lakes and at the Fond du Lac Reservation, MN; fluvial processes along the Mississippi and Missouri rivers; geologic resources at the Homestake Mine, SD and Champion Mine, MI; and metamorphic processes at Pipestone, MN and Baraboo, WI. Through the GRANITE experience students develop an understanding of how geoscience is an important part of their lives, their communities and the world around them. The GRANITE program also promotes each student's growth and confidence to attend college and stresses the importance of taking challenging math and science courses in high school. Geoscience career opportunities are discussed at specific geologic localities and through general discussions. GRANITE students learn geosciences concepts and their application to Native communities and society in general through activities and

  9. The integration of school nutrition program into health promotion and prevention of lifestyle-related diseases in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Teiji

    2008-01-01

    After World War II, Japan has imported food from other countries to solve malnutrition, and then dietitians provided nutrition education to people for effective food utilization. Flour and skimmed milk imported from the United State were distributed to the school lunch program. Dietitians were trained to encourage the people to adapt western style dietary habits. The western style dietary habit issues have been brought since in 1980's as overeating and obesity have been considered as nation's health problems. In the 1990's, the prevention and treatment of lifestyle-related diseases became key objects for the nation. Government settled on "Healthy Japan 21" as a preventive policy of the lifestyle-related disease in 2000. In 2006, the middle survey for the effectiveness of the campaign was conducted, but it did not bring a good result as expected. The Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare made the "Japanese Food Guide Spinning Top" for practical and easy mean to improve eating habits. Dietitians are in the process of developing new nutrition education using this tool. In 2005, the nine specific targets' Basic Law on Dietary Education "Shoku-Iku" was enacted to promote childhood dietary education. The Ministry of Education and Science started the new education to become a teacher called "diet and nutrition teacher" on the professional education programs of registered dietitian in university. "Diet and nutrition teachers" have already started teaching in some schools. From now, the roles of dietitians are not only supervising food preparation and planning meals but also nutrition education as teachers.

  10. The importance of the natural and social resources in the function of the integrational and ambiental approach within the school function innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelković Slađana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In work, different possibilities are considered, which are offered by natural and social resources with the goal to change and modernize the teaching outside of the classroom in different environments. Modern teaching is based on the holistic, integrated approach in which the knowledge is viewed as a complete system in a constant process of transformation. Thus, the importance of the environment is asserted, the importance of the ambient in which the teaching process is being conducted. Authentic environment (natural and social resources in which the teaching is realized, outside of the classroom, creates possibilities for learning through active working methods, independent research, exploration and noticing the relationships and connections. Teaching in the authentic environment offers a series of advantages for both the students and teacher-partners in the process of constructing a knowledge system. Using the resources and modern complex integration approach within the existing educational practice can significantly influence the modernization and innovation of the educational process, and can make the school, as a basic educational institution, a more suitable and more attractive for the generations to come.

  11. An Attempt to Determine the Construct Validity of Measures Hypothesized to Represent an Orientation to Right, Left, or Integrated Hemispheric Brain Function for a Sample of Primary School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumbrower, Jule; And Others

    1981-01-01

    This study attempts to obtain evidence of the construct validity of pupil ability tests hypothesized to represent orientation to right, left, or integrated hemispheric function, and of teacher observation subscales intended to reveal behaviors in school setting that were hypothesized to portray preference for right or left brain function. (Author)

  12. Service Animals in School. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garret, Jennifer; Teskey, Carmen; Duncan, Kay; Strasser, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that registered school nurses (hereinafter referred to as school nurses) are integral to the team planning process necessary to successfully integrate "service animals" into schools. A request to bring a service animal into the school setting presents questions due to…

  13. 國民核心素養與高中課程發展The Development of Integration of Key Competence into the Senior High School Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    林永豐 Yung-Feng Lin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available 本研究旨在說明如何依據後期中等教育階段之核心素養,融入普通高中各學科 課程綱要,進而建構各學科課程之核心素養指標,以達成「K-12年級一貫課程綱要」的「核心素養」之「垂直銜接」與「水平統整」,並做為進一步擬訂「十二年一貫課程體系指引」之基礎。本研究透過文件分析與德懷術探討現行普通高中課程各學科與核心素養之對應關係,以瞭解如何將核心素養融入各學科課程中,達至學科課程與核心素養之課程統整。本研究結論有三,包括:一、普通高中各學科與核心素養的相關性高,應強化核心素養的培養與精進;二、普通高中各學科課綱中所列之核心能力與國民核心素養九個項目有對應之處,亦有不足之處;三、普通高中教育向來重視學科知能的教學,應調整為內容與能力兼具的課程取向。本研究建議:一、依據核心素養的理念,建議重新檢討並修正各科之課程目標與核心能力;二、宜進一步針對尚未分析之六科進行核心素養之分析;三、納入更多各學科專家與實務教師,討論並修正各科之核心素養等。This paper aims to elaborate how can the key competences for upper secondary education stage be integrated into the curriculum of senior high schools. Moreover, it is hoped that indicators of key competences in different subjects can be built up so that key competences for the K-12 grades curriculum could be established being both vertically coherent in different grades and horizontally integrated with other academic subjects. This study adopt document analysis and the Delphi technique as main research methods with particular focus on the relationship between key competences and main subjects in the senior high school curriculum. Three main conclusions are summarized as follows. First, there is a strong relationship between the key

  14. Test on the effectiveness of the sum over paths approach in favoring the construction of an integrated knowledge of quantum physics in high school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Malgieri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the results of a research-based teaching-learning sequence on introductory quantum physics based on Feynman’s sum over paths approach in the Italian high school. Our study focuses on students’ understanding of two founding ideas of quantum physics, wave particle duality and the uncertainty principle. In view of recent research reporting the fragmentation of students’ mental models of quantum concepts after initial instruction, we collected and analyzed data using the assessment tools provided by knowledge integration theory. Our results on the group of n=14 students who performed the final test indicate that the functional explanation of wave particle duality provided by the sum over paths approach may be effective in leading students to build consistent mental models of quantum objects, and in providing them with a unified perspective on both the photon and the electron. Results on the uncertainty principle are less clear cut, as the improvements over traditional instruction appear less significant. Given the low number of students in the sample, this work should be interpreted as a case study, and we do not attempt to draw definitive conclusions. However, our study suggests that (i the sum over paths approach may deserve more attention from researchers and educators as a possible route to introduce basic concepts of quantum physics in high school, and (ii more research should be focused not only on the correctness of students’ mental models on individual concepts, but also on the ability of students to connect different ideas and experiments related to quantum theory in an organized whole.

  15. INTEGRATED EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lioara-Bianca BUBOIU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Accepting and valuing people with disabilities is a key aspect of social policies promoted worldwide. The implementation of these policies aim normalize the lives of people with disabilities through full integration in the society to which they belong. Removing discrimination and social barriers equates to a maturing of the society, maturing translated by accepting diversity that surrounds us. Each person must be appreciated at its true value regardless of its condition of normality or deviation from it. Valuing individuals can be achieved only through a full acceptance in society, by assigning statuses and fulfilling social roles. School integration of children with special educational needs in mainstream education is a challenge and involves many aspects to be successful. It is the premise of social integration, the basis for future socio-professional insertion. Integrated education is the first step towards a world of equal opportunities, a world without discrimination.

  16. Growth and market integration in Amazonia: a comparison of growth indicators between Shuar, Shiwiar, and nonindigenous school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Aaron D; Pryor, George; Pozo, José; Tiwia, Washington; Sugiyama, Lawrence S

    2009-01-01

    We describe and compare the growth of three groups of juveniles, aged 0-18, who experience different degrees of market integration and acculturation in the Ecuadorian Amazon. These include 1,384 indigenous Shuar from the Upano Valley of Ecuador and surrounding areas, 570 nonindigenous colono (or colonist) children from the same area, and 42 Shiwiar from the interior of Ecuador. We use differences between these populations in National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) z-scores to assess the effects of changing subsistence patterns on Shuar growth and nutrition. Although, for all three groups, mean height-for-age z-scores were negative, Shuar z-scores were significantly lower than either colono or Shiwiar z-scores. Mean weight-for-age z-scores were also negative for Shuar and colono juveniles, while mean BMI-for-age and weight-for-height z-scores were greater than zero for all three groups. Using NHANES standards, 41% of male and 38% of female Shuar were classified as stunted, versus 16% of male and 20% of female colonos. Compared to Shuar, colonos were three times less likely to be stunted (OR = 0.33, P < 0.01) and Shiwiar were eight times less likely to be stunted (OR = 0.13, P = 0.01). These differences suggest that changes in diet have negatively affected Shuar growth and nutrition.

  17. Teaching-service integration and social impact in 50 years of public health history School of Dentistry of the “Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho”

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    Nemre Adas Saliba

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available To verify the projects and programs developed during the course of 50-year history of School of Dentistry Aracatuba of the “Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho” (State of São Paulo -Brazil, in the public health area, in agreement with the dental models of attendance and considering the background and the progress of the Public Health policies in Brazil, with the aim of reporting on the experience of integrating teaching-service, professional education and the social impact. A documentary research of a descriptive nature was conducted, by consulting the institutional files of the Dental Faculty, considering; official texts, reports, documents, databases and publications, with reference to the period from 1957 to 2007. The descriptive analysis demonstrated that the main actions developed were: Campaign for home filters, Campaign for construction of Wells and Sewages, Campaign for Fluoridation of the Araçatuba and Area Water Supply, Epidemiologic Surveys, Extramural Dental services, Extension projects; Attendance to pregnant women, the elderly and children, Oral cancer prevention program, Program for Heterogeneous Fluoride control, Creation of master’s degree program, Municipal health counselor training courses, Training of State of São Paulo Family Health Program community agents and teams, Advisory services to municipalities and production of didactic-pedagogic materials for health education. Several programs have been and are being developed, with successful health practices in the area, accompanying the progress of health policies and promoting professional education with integration of the university into the local health and community services.

  18. Achievement in Boys' Schools 2010-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Cathy; Berg, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    This report explores the achievement of school leavers from state and state-integrated boys' schools. The analysis from 2010 to 2012 shows school leavers from state boys' schools had higher qualifications than their male counterparts who attended state co-educational schools. The research was carried out for the Association of Boys' Schools of New…

  19. The Implementation of Integrated Natural Science Textbook of Junior High School be Charged on Character-based Shared Models to Improve the Competence of Learners' Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmiwati, S.; Ratnawulan; Yohandri

    2018-04-01

    The process of science learning can take place if there is an attempt to create an active learning atmosphere and can improve the knowledge competence of learners. One of the efforts made is to use learning resources. Textbooks are a learning resource used by learners. This study aims to describe the increase of knowledge’s competence of learners with integrated Natural Science (IPA) textbook of Junior High School (SMP) be charged on character-based shared model. The method used pre-test, post-test design with one group using the class as a research subject. Pre-test was given before treatment to measure student’s initial understanding of the problem, while the post-test was given to measure student’s final understanding.The subject of this research is students of class VII SMP N 13 Padang. Result of gain score is 0,73. The result showed competence student’s knowledge increased significantly and high categorized.

  20. A description of a staff development program: Preparing the elementary school classroom teacher to lead environmental field trips and to use an integrated subject approach to environmental education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egana, John Joseph

    This study of the Field Trip Specialist Program (FTS) described how a professional development plan fostered change in the traditional roles of third and fourth grade teachers. Teachers that volunteered were prepared to become interpretive guides for their class on environmental field trips, integrate their basic subject areas lessons into an environmental science context, and develop their self-perception as professional educators. This qualitative study made use of quantitative data and drew on information collected over four years from surveys, interviews, classroom observations, field trip and workshop observations, focus groups, journals and assessments performed in Florida. The FTS Program attracted teachers who thought it was important for all students to understand environmental issues, and these teachers believed in integrated instruction. These beliefs were inconsistent with many aspects of school culture. FTS invited the participation of these teachers and encouraged them to take control of the program by serving as instructors and program developers. Teachers described themselves as prepared to deliver the FTS Program with a high level of motivation and relevance. They also credited the program as beneficial in preparation for the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Tests (FCAT). Teachers reported that their responsibility as field trip leaders was the primary factor motivating them to provide conscientious presentation of pre- and post-field trip lessons and thorough integration of environmental topics in basic subject area instruction. Despite the impact of the field trip leadership factor, I could not find another program in the State of Florida that required teachers to lead their own field trips. Other influential factors specific to this program were: Voluntary participation, on-site field instruction, peer instructors and program developers, high quality and task specific materials, and pre- and post-assessments for students. Factors were identified

  1. Managing School Libraries in Elementary and Secondary Schools. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise.

    The school library has long been recognized as an integral part of any school system. It plays a vital role in the total instructional program at all grade levels, and provides students and teachers with access to the world of knowledge. The school library is not only a source of materials necessary to support the basic curriculum of the school,…

  2. Integrated Factors Correlating Undergraduate Academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Integrated Factors Correlating Undergraduate Academic Achievement in Bayelsa State, Nigeria. ... AFRREV IJAH: An International Journal of Arts and Humanities ... Thus, it is study investigated the integrated factors determining academic performance of students in public secondary schools in Bayelsa State, Nigeria.

  3. Integrating Forensic Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funkhouser, John; Deslich, Barbara J.

    2000-01-01

    Explains the implementation of forensic science in an integrated curriculum and discusses the advantages of this approach. Lists the forensic science course syllabi studied in three high schools. Discusses the unit on polymers in detail. (YDS)

  4. Integrative psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozarić-Kovacić, Dragica

    2008-09-01

    may say that both neuroscience and neurobiology offer yet another bridge for integration of different schools of thought and supports the importance of the developmental relational model during the developmental phases and relational process in psychotherapy in which the quality of therapeutic relationship is the primary healing process. Furthermore, the development of integrative psychotherapy in Croatia and the organization of the Croatian program, which is identical to the program of the European Association for Integrative Psychotherapy is shortly described.

  5. An Integrated Career Coaching and Time-Banking System Promoting Flexibility, Wellness, and Success: A Pilot Program at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassiotto, Magali; Simard, Caroline; Sandborg, Christy; Valantine, Hannah; Raymond, Jennifer

    2018-06-01

    Faculty in academic medicine experience multiple demands on their time at work and home, which can become a source of stress and dissatisfaction, compromising success. A taskforce convened to diagnose the state of work-life flexibility at Stanford University School of Medicine uncovered two major sources of conflict: work-life conflict, caused by juggling demands of career and home; and work-work conflict, caused by competing priorities of the research, teaching, and clinical missions combined with service and administrative tasks. Using human-centered design research principles, the 2013-2014 Academic Biomedical Career Customization (ABCC) pilot program incorporated two elements to mitigate work-life and work-work conflict: integrated career-life planning, coaching to create a customized plan to meet both career and life goals; and a time-banking system, recognizing behaviors that promote team success with benefits that mitigate work-life and work-work conflicts. A matched-sample pre-post evaluation survey found the two-part program increased perceptions of a culture of flexibility (P = .020), wellness (P = .013), understanding of professional development opportunities (P = .036), and institutional satisfaction (P = .020) among participants. In addition, analysis of research productivity indicated that over the two-year program, ABCC participants received 1.3 more awards, on average, compared with a matched set of nonparticipants, a funding difference of approximately $1.1 million per person. These results suggest it is possible to mitigate the effects of extreme time pressure on academic medicine faculty, even within existing institutional structures.

  6. Aptidão física relacionada à saúde de escolares de escola pública de tempo integral = Health-related physical fitness of integral time public school students

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    Edson Itaru Kaminagakura

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente estudo é avaliar os níveis de aptidão física relacionada à saúde de crianças de escola pública de tempo integral do município de Ponta Grossa, Estado do Paraná. A amostra constituiu de 104 crianças de 8 a 10 anos de idade, com 47 do sexo masculino e 57 do sexo feminino. A avaliação constituiu da bateria de testes motores PROESP-BR, com ênfase em qualidades físicas relacionadas à saúde como: flexibilidade no teste de sentar e alcançar, aptidão cardiorrespiratória no teste de corrida ou caminhada de nove minutos e resistência muscular localizada através de teste de abdominais. Acomposição corporal foi mensurada utilizando-se o índice de massa corporal (IMC. A amostra apresentou diferenças entre os sexos nos seguintes testes: flexibilidade, na faixa etária de oito anos; abdominal, nos grupos de oito e nove anos; e no teste de 9 minutos, nogrupo de 10 anos. O grupo feminino apresentou maiores características de sobrepeso, quando comparado ao masculino. Não foram verificadas diferenças estatisticamente significativas entre as idades. Os resultados observados não apresentaram níveis satisfatórios de aptidão física relacionada à saúde, revelando um risco aumentado a doenças crônicas não transmissíveis aos escolares.The objective of the present study is to evaluate health-related physical fitness level in children of integral time public school of Ponta Grossa city, in the state of Paraná. The sample constituted of 104 children of 8 to 10 years old, 47 male and 57 female. The evaluation constituted of the PROESP-BR motor test battery, with emphasis in healthrelated physical qualities like: sit-and-reach flexibility test, 9 minutes run or walk cardiorespiratory test and muscular resistance identified through abdominal test. Bodycomposition was assessed utilizing body mass index (BMI. Sample presented differences between sexes in the following tests: flexibility test, in eight age group

  7. Rationale and study protocol of the EASY Minds (Encouraging Activity to Stimulate Young Minds) program: cluster randomized controlled trial of a primary school-based physical activity integration program for mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Nicholas; Lubans, David R; Holmes, Kathryn; Morgan, Philip J

    2014-08-08

    Novel strategies are required to increase school-based physical activity levels of children. Integrating physical activity in mathematics lessons may lead to improvements in students' physical activity levels as well as enjoyment, engagement and learning. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of a curriculum-based physical activity integration program known as EASY Minds (Encouraging Activity to Stimulate Young Minds) on children's daily school time physical activity levels. Secondary aims include exploring the impact of EASY Minds on their engagement and 'on task' behaviour in mathematics. Grade 5/6 classes from eight public schools in New South Wales, Australia will be randomly allocated to intervention (n = 4) or control (n = 4) groups. Teachers from the intervention group will receive one day of professional development, a resource pack and asked to adapt their lessons to embed movement-based learning in their daily mathematics program in at least three lessons per week over a six week period. Intervention support will be provided via a weekly email and three lesson observations. The primary outcomes will be children's physical activity levels (accelerometry) across both the school day and during mathematics lessons (moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and sedentary time). Children's 'on-task' behaviour, enjoyment of mathematics and mathematics attainment will be assessed as secondary outcomes. A detailed process evaluation will be undertaken. EASY Minds is an innovative intervention that has the potential to improve key physical and academic outcomes for primary school aged children and help guide policy and practice regarding the teaching of mathematics. Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register ACTRN12613000637741 13/05/2013.

  8. Integration of Federal Bureau of Investigation and United States Secret Service/Department of Education Threat Assessment Models into a Conceptual Framework for Prevention of School Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustyniak, Kristine M.

    2005-01-01

    Professionals entered the 21st century with a heightened call to address school safety. Though notable contributions have been made to insure peaceful school communities through a wide range of primary and secondary prevention programs, research suggests that these programs are often an insufficient response to students who are at increased risk…

  9. Referents that support the Pedagogic Professional Performance Integral General Professor Secondary School, in the use of informatics in the teaching-learning process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Emilio Caro Betancourt

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This article approaches the theoretical referents that sustain the professional pedagogical behavior of the Entire General Professor of Secondary School, using computer science in the teaching learning process. Taking into account the introducti on of the scientific and technical developments (Computer science in education and the professional's role starting from the demands of the conceived model for Secondary School Education.

  10. Vocabulary Instruction and Mexican-American Bilingual Students: How Two High School Teachers Integrate Multiple Strategies to Build Word Consciousness in English Language Arts Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Lasisi

    2015-01-01

    Despite the significance of vocabulary knowledge to student learning, limited studies have examined English language arts (ELA) teachers' skills and practices that may be effective for building word consciousness in high school Mexican-American bilingual students. The research objective of the present study is to examine how two high school ELA…

  11. Homework in Different Types of Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, John Q.; Bennett, Albert

    This study found major differences among types of Chicago (Illinois) elementary schools in the amount and time that sixth grade students spent on homework, and that differences were related to the income level and prior student achievement in those schools. Ten magnet schools, 10 integrated schools and 10 primarily minority schools were chosen for…

  12. Learning the Rules of the Game: The Nature of Game and Classroom Supports When Using a Concept-Integrated Digital Physics Game in the Middle School Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Phillip Michael, Jr.

    Games in science education is emerging as a popular topic of scholarly inquiry. The National Research Council recently published a report detailing a research agenda for games and science education entitled Learning Science Through Computer Games and Simulations (2011). The report recommends moving beyond typical proof-of-concept studies into more exploratory and theoretically-based work to determine how best to integrate games into K-12 classrooms for learning , as well as how scaffolds from within the game and from outside the game (from peers and teachers) support the learning of applicable science. This study uses a mixed-methods, quasi-experimental design with an 8th grade class at an independent school in southern Connecticut to answer the following questions: 1. What is the nature of the supports for science content learning provided by the game, the peer, and the teacher, when the game is used in a classroom setting? 2. How do the learning gains in the peer support condition compare to the solo play condition, both qualitatively and quantitatively? The concept-integrated physics game SURGE (Scaffolding Understanding through Redesigning Games for Education) was selected for this study, as it was developed with an ear towards specific learning theories and prior work on student understandings of impulse, force, and vectors. Stimulated recall interviews and video observations served as the primary sources and major patterns emerged through the triangulation of data sources and qualitative analysis in the software QSR NVivo 9. The first pattern which emerged indicated that scaffolding from within the game and outside the game requires a pause in game action to be effective, unless that scaffolding is directly useful to the player in the moment of action. The second major pattern indicated that both amount and type of prior gaming experience has somewhat complex effects on both the uses of supports and learning outcomes. In general, a high correlation was found

  13. Managing Pests in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides basic information on integrated pest management in schools, including information on the components of an IPM program and guidance on how to get started. Includes identification and control of pests, educational resources, and contact information

  14. Pilot Project to Integrate Community and Clinical Level Systems to Address Health Disparities in the Prevention and Treatment of Obesity among Ethnic Minority Inner-City Middle School Students: Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Rieder

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective obesity prevention and treatment interventions are lacking in the United States, especially for impoverished minority youths at risk for health disparities, and especially in accessible community-based settings. We describe the launch and pilot implementation evaluation of the first year of the B’N Fit POWER initiative as a middle school-based comprehensive wellness program that integrates weight management programming into existing onsite preventive and clinical services. Consistent with the existing implementation science literature, we focused on both the organizational structures that facilitate communication and the development of trust among stakeholders, students, and families and the development of realistic and timely goals to implement and integrate all aspects of the program. New implementation and programming strategies were developed and tested to increase the proportion of students screened, support the linkage of students to care, and streamline the integration of program clinical and afterschool components into routine services already offered at the school. We report on our initial implementation activities using the Standards for Reporting Implementation Studies (StaRI framework using hybrid outcomes combining the Reach element from the RE-AIM framework with a newly conceptualized Wellness Cascade.

  15. International School Children's Health Needs: School Nurses' Views in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Annika; Clausson, Eva; Janlov, Ann-Christin

    2012-01-01

    Rapid globalization and the integration of national economies have contributed to the sharp rise in enrollment in international schools. How does this global nomadism affect international school children and their individual health needs? This study attempts to find an answer by interviewing 10 school nurses, with varying degrees of experience in…

  16. A Quasi-Experimental Control Group Design Study to Determine the Effect of Integrating Character Education into a High School Social Studies Curriculum through Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Russell L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to offer evidence for the development of student character through the integration of historical storytelling into a social studies classroom. A quasi-experimental study was conducted to determine the effect of character education through historical storytelling integrated into a United States history curriculum on…

  17. Integral or integrated marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davčik Nebojša

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Marketing theorists and experts try to develop business efficient organization and to get marketing performance at higher, business integrated level since its earliest beginnings. The core issue in this paperwork is the dialectic and practical approach dilemma should we develop integrated or integral marketing approach in the organization. The presented company cases as well as dialectic and functional explanations of this dilemma clearly shows that integrated marketing is narrower approach than integral marketing if we take as focal point new, unique and completed entity. In the integration the essence is in getting different parts together, which do not have to make necessary the new entity. The key elements in the definition of the integral marketing are necessity and holistic, e.g. necessity to develop new, holistic entity.

  18. Assessment of an Integrated Nutrition Communication Approach to Educate the School-Going Adolescent Girls Living in Urban Slums of Hyderabad, Telangana State, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, D. Raghunatha; Vijayapushpam, T.; Rao, N. Amulya; Dube, Anilkumar; Venkaiah, K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Consumption of right diet during the adolescent phase is a critical issue among the adolescent population as their eating behavior is significantly influenced by the peers. Therefore, a study was carried out to educate the school-going adolescent girls living in urban slums of Hyderabad, Telangana, India on right nutrition. Methods: The…

  19. The Impact of the Role of an Instructional Technology Facilitator on Teacher Efficacy in Classroom Technology Integration in Two Rural Public Schools in Northwestern North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Karri Campbell

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to contribute to a limited body of research on the impact of the role of the school-level instructional technology facilitator on teacher technology efficacy. This mixed-methods study involved the administration of a survey instrument designed to measure teacher technology efficacy, the Computer Technology Integration…

  20. Integrating Conceptions of Scaffolding and Co-Construction to Enhance Parental Involvement in the Pre-Nursery of a British International School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinn, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Whilst many practitioners value positive and effective working relationships with parents, enhancing home-school interactions can be complex, especially within highly diverse contexts. Within the UK, partnership working with parents is widely advocated. However, there may exist subtle, but crucial differences between interactions that…

  1. Perceived Factors Influencing High School Student Participation in an Integrated Statewide Dual Credit Program: An Examination of Program Success and Student Higher Education Selection Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touchstone, Allison J. L.

    2010-01-01

    Dual credit programs have become increasingly popular with 71% U.S. public high schools offering dual credit courses in 2002-2003. As this popularity has grown, so have concerns regarding academic rigor, course quality, parity with college courses, and effects on higher education. Determining actual dual credit course equivalent in higher…

  2. In One Voice: Aspiring and Practicing School Leaders Embrace the Need for a More Integrated Approach to Leadership Preparation and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago-Severson, Eleanor; Maslin-Ostrowski, Patricia; Hoffman, Alexander M.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the views of graduate students who are aspiring or practicing school leaders and faculty from two university degree granting leadership preparation programs. Drawn from a larger mixed methods study, the authors focus here on survey results that show how these groups rated the effectiveness of 14 potential curricular…

  3. How Is Gender Integrated in the Curricula of Dutch Medical Schools? A Quick-Scan on Gender Issues as an Instrument for Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonk, Petra; Mans, Linda J. L.; Lagro-Janssen, Toine L. M.

    2006-01-01

    Medical education has not taken on board the growing awareness of sex and gender differences. A nation-wide project to incorporate sex and gender in medical education aims to establish longitudinal gender and sex specific curricula in all Dutch medical schools that move beyond sex and gender differences in reproduction. A baseline assessment was…

  4. Test on the Effectiveness of the Sum over Paths Approach in Favoring the Construction of an Integrated Knowledge of Quantum Physics in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malgieri, Massimiliano; Onorato, Pasquale; De Ambrosis, Anna

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of a research-based teaching-learning sequence on introductory quantum physics based on Feynman's sum over paths approach in the Italian high school. Our study focuses on students' understanding of two founding ideas of quantum physics, wave particle duality and the uncertainty principle. In view of recent…

  5. Usages and Impacts of the Integration of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTS) in Elementary Classrooms: Case Study of Swedish Municipality Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahlin, Johannes S.; Tsertsidis, Antony; Islam, M. Sirajul

    2017-01-01

    During recent years, many schools have started to implement information and communication technologies (ICTs)-based learning devices (such as laptops, tablets, mobile phones, and active boards) in the classroom settings in order to increase learning outcomes. The aim of this study is to find which activities and outcomes are evident in the usages…

  6. Personal, Family and School Influences on Secondary Pupils' Feelings of Safety at School, in the School Surroundings and at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooij, Ton

    2012-01-01

    Different types of variables seem to influence school safety and a pupil's feelings of safety at school. The research question asks which risk and promotive variables should be integrated in a theoretical model to predict a pupil's feelings of safety at school, in the school surroundings and at home; what the outcomes are of an empirical check of…

  7. Fact Sheets on Pesticides in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Coalition against the Misuse of Pesticides, Washington, DC.

    This document consists of a collection of fact sheets about the use of pesticides in schools and how to reduce it. The sheets are: (1) "Alternatives to Using Pesticides in Schools: What Is Integrated Pest Management?"; (2) "Health Effects of 48 Commonly Used Pesticides in Schools"; (3) "The Schooling of State Pesticide…

  8. Scale & Care: Charter Schools & New Urbanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Michael P.; Anderson, R. John; DiGiovanni, Thomas G.

    The Charter School movement combined with New Urbanist designers have uncovered the importance of scale in creating school environments that are more responsive to the needs of children. This paper examines the possibilities for mutual benefit for school and community by integrating school-building into the new urbanist tool kit. The discussion…

  9. Scientist-teacher collaboration: Integration of real data from a coastal wetland into a high school life science ecology-based research project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Wendy L.

    Project G.R.O.W. is an ecology-based research project developed for high school biology students. The curriculum was designed based on how students learn and awareness of the nature of science and scientific practices so that students would design and carry out scientific investigations using real data from a local coastal wetland. This was a scientist-teacher collaboration between a CSULB biologist and high school biology teacher. Prior to implementing the three-week research project, students had multiple opportunities to practice building requisite skills via 55 lessons focusing on the nature of science, scientific practices, technology, Common Core State Standards of reading, writing, listening and speaking, and Next Generation Science Standards. Project G.R.O.W. culminated with student generated research papers and oral presentations. Outcomes reveal students struggle with constructing explanations and the use of Excel to create meaningful graphs. They showed gains in data organization, analysis, teamwork and aspects of the nature of science.

  10. A Storefront School: A Grassroots Approach to Educational Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Gary; Brown, David

    1996-01-01

    The Storefront School, a collaboration between Springfield Public Schools and Southwest Missouri State University, provides at-risk students with a holistic, integrated curriculum. The school features decentralized decision making, interagency cooperation, a community orientation, and mandatory family involvement. (SK)

  11. THE USE OF PEDAGOGICAL SYSTEM “SCHOOL IS THE JUNIOR ACADEMY OF SCIENCES” FOR THE INTEGRATION OF MEDIA EDUCATION INTO THE EDUCATIONAL PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Y. Bilous

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Actuality of the research presented in the article is confirmed by possibility of implementation of the tasks of Conception of introduction of media education in Ukraine, at the use of development and modernizations of the in Conception of introduction of media education in Ukraine, at the use of development and modernization of the pedagogical system «School-Minor Academy of Sciences».

  12. Integral-preserving integrators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaren, D I; Quispel, G R W

    2004-01-01

    Ordinary differential equations having a first integral may be solved numerically using one of several methods, with the integral preserved to machine accuracy. One such method is the discrete gradient method. It is shown here that the order of the method can be bootstrapped repeatedly to higher orders of accuracy. The method is illustrated using the Henon-Heiles system. (letter to the editor)

  13. Integration of Staff Development and Research: Description of the Staff Development Project in Progress for the School Year 1975-1976. Technical Report #62.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speidel, Gisela E.

    This report from the Kamehameha Early Education Program (KEEP) describes the 1975-76 KEEP staff development program, which was designed to integrate staff development and research. Specific purposes of the program were: (1) to develop the abilities of the teaching staff in teaching, consultation, and research; (2) to conduct pilot research in…

  14. Differential School Contextual Effects for Math and English: Integrating the Big-Fish-Little-Pond Effect and the Internal/External Frame of Reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Philip D.; Marsh, Herbert W.; Ludtke, Oliver; Trautwein, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    The internal/external frame of reference and the big-fish-little-pond effect are two major models of academic self-concept formation which have considerable theoretical and empirical support. Integrating the domain specific and compensatory processes of the internal/external frame of reference model with the big-fish-little-pond effect suggests a…

  15. Integrating Quality Improvement and Continuing Professional Development at an Academic Medical Center: A Partnership Between Practice Plan, Hospital, and Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Barbara; England, Dawn; Riley, William; Jacobs-Halsey, Ginny; Webb, Corinne; Daniels, Bobbi

    2016-01-01

    While quality improvement (QI) initiatives can be a highly effective means for improving health care delivery in academic medical centers (AMCs), many health care professionals are not formally trained in basic QI methodology, engaging clinicians in QI activities can be challenging, and there is often a lack of integration and coordination among QI functions (eg, Departments of Quality and Safety, Continuing Professional Development). In our AMC, we undertook a collaborative approach to achieve better vertical and horizontal integration of our QI education efforts. This article provides a case example describing our organizational context, what was done, and with what effect and makes our example and lessons learned available to others. We developed a new educational QI program that was jointly planned and implemented by a group comprising major QI stakeholders. This project was intended to create horizontal organizational linkages between continuing professional development, clinicians, the hospital, and QI department and produce QI activities that aligned with the strategic objectives of senior management. The group developed and implemented a curriculum based on Lean methodology and concepts from the Institute for Health Care Improvement Model for Improvement. Two cohorts (27 teams) completed the training and planned and implemented QI projects. All projects were aligned with organizational quality, safety, and patient experience goals. The majority of projects met their aim statements. This case description provides an example of successful horizontal integration of an AMCs' QI functions to disseminate knowledge and implement meaningful QI aligned with strategic objectives (vertical integration).

  16. Concept-guided development of technology in ‘traditional’ and ‘innovative’ schools: quantitative and qualitative differences in technology integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Koster, S.; Volman, M.; Kuiper, E.

    2017-01-01

    The integration of technology into the classroom remains a challenge for those involved. A concept-guided approach to the development of technology has been suggested as a way of meeting this challenge. This multiple case study was performed in the context of a project in which five elementary

  17. Foreign Language Competence and Content and Language Integrated Learning in Multilingual Schools in Catalonia: An "Ex Post Facto" Study Analysing the Results of State Key Competences Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coral, Josep; Lleixà, Teresa; Ventura, Carles

    2018-01-01

    The member states of the European Union have funded many initiatives supporting the teaching and learning of foreign languages. Content and language integrated learning is one of the experimental language programmes that have been introduced in Catalonia, in the north-east of Spain. The aims of this study are to analyse the results achieved by…

  18. A Review on Concept and Possibilities regarding to Teacher Leadership: −A study on the Identities of Teachers in Schools Integrating Elementary and Middle School Education (2)−

    OpenAIRE

    小柳, 和喜雄

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we are trying to think about the way that teachers who work in an environment beyond existing organizations, such as elementary and junior high school education, participate in the effort with awareness of the parties, clarify what they need to bear, and confidently think what they need to think about in order to work on practice. I first tried to find ideas and key concepts that could be effective while also exploring the research trends of doctoral thesis for teachers and tea...

  19. From Standards to Standard Practice: A Critical Look at the Perceptions and Process of Integrating the Next Generation Science Standards in the Nation's Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadante, Katie Lynn

    The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) are the culmination of reform efforts spanning more than three decades and are the first major reform movement in science education since Sputnik. When implementing these new standards, teachers are faced with many barriers. NGSS requires critical thinking, cross-curricular learning, and key changes in teaching, learning, and assessment. Implementation nationwide has been slow, due to sweeping changes, and controversial content within the standards. Resistance to implementation occurs in nearly all levels for these reasons. The purpose of this descriptive study was to determine the perceptions of in-service teachers of the NGSS Framework, to identify barriers that inhibit implementation, and to identify commonalities among teachers who have successfully implemented the Framework, as well as assist others who may do the same in the future. Teachers from public, private, and charter schools from across the United States participated in the study. Based upon teacher response, a three-stage action plan and series of necessary recommendations were developed to assist teachers and administrators in K-12 schools to develop plans to implement the NGSS.

  20. Music Therapy as an Integrative Tool for Pupils with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in the Music Classrooms at Elementary Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Acebes-de Pablo; David Carabias-Galindo

    2016-01-01

    Music Therapy, whose aim is to obtain benefits in people health in different aspects of life and in relation to various kinds of pathologies and diseases, is proposed in this research as a means of providing educational attention to children diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) through Music Education. Educational as well as therapeutic objectives were also considered, as the study focused on the integration of such children into mainstream classes. The methodology e...

  1. Examining the impact of integrating physical activity on fluid intelligence and academic performance in an elementary school setting: a preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Julian A; Einstein, Gilles; Hahn, Erin; Hooker, Steven P; Gross, Virginia P; Kravitz, Jen

    2010-05-01

    To examine the impact of integrating physical activity with elementary curricula on fluid intelligence and academic achievement. A random sample of 3rd grade teachers integrated physical activity into their core curricula approximately 30 minutes a day, 3 days a week from January 2008 to April 2008. Noninvasive fluid intelligence cognitive measures were used along with State-mandated academic achievement tests. Experimental Group children averaged close to 1200 pedometer steps per integration day, thus averaging 3600 steps per week. Children in the Experimental Group performed significantly better on the SPM Fluid Intelligence Test. Children in the Experimental Group also performed significantly better on the Social Studies State mandated academic achievement test. Experimental Group children also received higher scores on the English/Language Arts, Math and Science achievements tests, but were not statistically significant compared with Control Group children. Children classified in Fitnessgram's Healthy Fitness Zone for BMI earned lower scores on many of the SPM Fluid Intelligence components. This investigation provides evidence that movement can influence fluid intelligence and should be considered to promote cognitive development of elementary-age children. Equally compelling were the differences in SPM Fluid Intelligence Test scores for children who were distinguished by Fitnessgram's BMI cut points.

  2. Getting the picture: A mixed-methods inquiry into how visual representations are interpreted by students, incorporated within textbooks, and integrated into middle-school science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Victor Raymond

    Modern-day middle school science textbooks are heavily populated with colorful images, technical diagrams, and other forms of visual representations. These representations are commonly perceived by educators to be useful aids to support student learning of unfamiliar scientific ideas. However, as the number of representations in science textbooks has seemingly increased in recent decades, concerns have been voiced that many current of these representations are actually undermining instructional goals; they may be introducing substantial conceptual and interpretive difficulties for students. To date, very little empirical work has been done to examine how the representations used in instructional materials have changed, and what influences these changes exert on student understanding. Furthermore, there has also been limited attention given to the extent to which current representational-use routines in science classrooms may mitigate or limit interpretive difficulties. This dissertation seeks to do three things: First, it examines the nature of the relationship between published representations and students' reasoning about the natural world. Second, it considers the ways in which representations are used in textbooks and how that has changed over a span of five decades. Third, this dissertation provides an in-depth look into how middle school science classrooms naturally use these visual representations and what kinds of support are being provided. With respect to the three goals of this dissertation, three pools of data were collected and analyzed for this study. First, interview data was collected in which 32 middle school students interpreted and reasoned with a set of more and less problematic published textbook representations. Quantitative analyses of the interview data suggest that, counter to what has been anticipated in the literature, there were no significant differences in the conceptualizations of students in the different groups. An accompanying

  3. Integrating animals in the classroom: The attitudes and experiences of Australian school teachers toward animal-assisted interventions for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley P Smith

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of animals into school classrooms has been posited as a beneficial intervention for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD. Whilst evidence that animal-assisted interventions or activities can positively influence classroom behaviour and learning outcomes is emerging, little is known about the experiences and attitudes of those who implement it. We presented a series of open and close-ended questions via an online survey to Australian school teachers working with students on the autistic spectrum. Whether teachers had experienced companion animals in the classroom or not, companion animals were believed to provide a means for improving social skills and engagement within the classroom, as well as decreasing stress, anxiety, and the occurrence of problematic behaviours. Yet, despite an overall positive attitude, and 68% having had animals or pets in their classroom, only 16% of respondents had experience with ‘formal’ animal-assisted interventions. Explanations for why both formal and informal animal-assisted interventions were either not being adopted, or was not currently being considered, included a lack of knowledge, lack of support and resources, reactions of the student in relation to allergies and behaviour, and issues relating to animal welfare. It was also acknowledged that the evidence-base for animal-assisted interventions for students with ASD is currently lacking, and that such interventions were not suitable for all students, or all classroom situations. Moving forward, it is important that the inclusion of companion animals and more formal based animal intervention programs in classrooms be adequately designed and evaluated, because implementing or promoting time consuming and financially costly strategies without the evidence is problematic.

  4. Lamont-Doherty's Secondary School Field Research Program: Using Goal-Oriented Applied Research as a Means of Building Comprehensive and Integrated Scientific Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostick, B. C.; Newton, R.; Vincent, S.; Peteet, D. M.; Sambrotto, R.; Schlosser, P.; Corbett, E.

    2015-12-01

    Conventional instruction in science often proceeds from the general to the specific and from text to action. Fundamental terminologies, concepts, and ideas that are often abstract are taught first and only after such introductory processes can a student engage in research. Many students struggle to find relevance when presented information without context specific to their own experiences. This challenge is exacerbated for students whose social circles do not include adults who can validate scientific learning from their own experiences. Lamont-Doherty's Secondary School Field Research Program inverts the standard paradigm and places small groups of students in research projects where they begin by performing manageable tasks on complex applied research projects. These tasks are supplemented with informal mentoring and relevant articles (~1 per week). Quantitative metrics suggest the approach is highly successful—most participants report a dramatic increase in their enthusiasm for science, 100% attend college, and approximately 50% declare majors in science or technology. We use one project, the construction of a microbial battery, to illustrate this novel model of science learning and argue that it should be considered a best practice for project-based science education. The goal of this project was to build a rechargeable battery for a mobile phone based on a geochemical cycle, to generate and store electricity. The students, mostly from ethnic groups under-represented in the STEM fields, combined concepts and laboratory methods from biology, chemistry and physics to isolate photosynthetic bacteria from a natural salt marsh, and made an in situ device capable of powering a light bulb. The younger participants had been exposed to neither high school chemistry nor physics at the start of the project, yet they were able to use the project as a platform to deepen their science knowledge and their desire for increased participation in formal science education.

  5. Application of Student Book Based On Integrated Learning Model Of Networked Type With Heart Electrical Activity Theme For Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusnedi, G.; Ratnawulan, R.; Triana, L.

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of the use of Integrated Science IPA books Using Networked Learning Model of knowledge competence through improved learning outcomes obtained. The experimental design used is one group pre test post test design to know the results before and after being treated. The number of samples used is one class that is divided into two categories of initial ability to see the improvement of knowledge competence. The sample used was taken from the students of grade VIII SMPN 2 Sawahlunto, Indonesia. The results of this study indicate that most students have increased knowledge competence.

  6. Shanghai-School Theater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    SHANGHAl-SCHOOL Thea-ter has played an importantrole in modern Chinese cul-tural history.At the turn of the 20thcentury,when there were great so-cial changes.Chinese traditionaltheater extended itself to take inWestern cultural elements,causingchanges and developments in thestructure and form of traditionalChinese theater.Because this newtype.of theater started in shang-hai,it was named Shanghai-SchoolTheater.The fundaments of thetheatrical school emphasized the opening,integration and renovation of theatrlcal art.It actually tried tomodermize the traditional Chinesetheater.

  7. Norbert Elias in school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilliam, Laura

    This paper will bring Norbert Elias into the classrooms of two Danish schools and take a closer look at the ideas of civilized behavior that can be observed in these social settings. Whereas social interaction in Danish schools appears to have gone through the informalisation process described...... by Elias, the school still holds strong ideals of civilized behavior. The strong integration of the school class – which is both a necessity and a social ideal - indeed gives rise to an overriding focus on self-constraint and the behavior management of the individual child. This is influenced by the school...... demand on both children and teachers for fine-tuned sensitivity, exactly balanced behaviors and unsuppressed naturalness. Laura Gilliam, Associate Professor, Ph. D., Department of Education, Aarhus University....

  8. 原住民完全中學的實施現況與挑戰:以蘭嶼高級中學為例 The Implementation and the Challenges Involved in Indigenous Integrated Secondary Schools in Taiwan: A Case Study of Lan-Yu High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    張如慧Ju-Hui Chang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available 建立以原住民為主體,符合原住民需求的教育體系,是原住民社區本位教育的重要理念,而此理念亦納入我國的《原住民族教育法》中。本研究以全國第一所原住民完全中學―蘭嶼高級中學為例,進行個案研究,希望由原住民社區本位教育的理論觀點出發,瞭解在地師生及居民的經驗和想法,重新解讀該校在完全中學原訂目標上的實施現況,及其面臨的挑戰。研究時間為2007年8月至2008 年7月,蒐集資料的方法以師生和社區人士的訪談為主,並輔以部分時間的田野觀察。研究結果發現,蘭嶼成立完全中學的成效包括:提供最弱勢學生的升學和學習機會;透過完全中學經費的溢注,提高城鄉高中教育均衡發展的可能性;以及透過文化融入課程與相關活動,促進學校社區化等。然而因為社區和在地參與 仍有限,所以官方的政策或經費運用,無法完全符合當地真正的需求,更遑論激發社區對教育的主體性和能動性。 Indigenous community-based education argues that indigenous peoples are the subject of educational systems and institutions whose needs should be fulfilled. This concept is also reflected in Indigenous Education Law in Taiwan. This case study is based on the theory of indigenous community-based education and focuses on the first indigenous integrated secondary school in Taiwan, Lan-Yu High School, trying to understand the implementation of the school and the challenges it faced. The research was conducted from August 2007 to July 2008. Its data was collected through interviews with teachers, students, and community members, as well as by participant observation. The findings showed that the integrated secondary school improved educational equality for the most disadvantaged students, that the financial subsidies helped to promote balanced development of secondary education, and that

  9. Certified Schools

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Certified schools must provide specific information regarding the school, the nature and requirements of the educational program, location and contact information,...

  10. The Second Chance School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Eamonn

    2011-01-01

    Loughshore Educational Resource Centre is a religiously integrated, co-educational, special needs and secondary school situated in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Loughshore works with a wide clientele of pupils across the spectrum of need and ability from the metropolitan area of Belfast. It plays a vital role as an educational base for a multiplicity…

  11. Advances in integrated optics

    CERN Document Server

    Chester, A; Bertolotti, M

    1994-01-01

    This volwne contains the Proceedings of a two-week summer conference titled "Advances in Integrated Optics" held June 1-9, 1993, in Erice, Sicily. This was the 18th annual course organized by the International School of Quantum Electronics, under the auspices of the "Ettore Majorana" Centre for Scientific Culture. The term Integrated Optics signifies guided-wave optical circuits consisting of two or more devices on a single substrate. Since its inception in the late 1960's, Integrated Optics has evolved from a specialized research topic into a broad field of work, ranging from basic research through commercial applications. Today many devices are available on market while a big effort is devolved to research on integrated nonlinear optical devices. This conference was organized to provide a comprehensive survey of the frontiers of this technology, including fundamental concepts, nonlinear optical materials, devices both in the linear and nonlinear regimes, and selected applications. These Proceedings update a...

  12. Public School Desegregation and Education Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    Early federal court decisions in school desegregation placed little emphasis on public school facilities. Those early decisions focused primarily on requiring black and white students to attend the same schools and requiring the integration of teachers. What does the literature say about the relationship between student achievement and educational…

  13. Technology-Rich Schools Up Close

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Barbara B.; Schrum, Lynne

    2013-01-01

    This article observes that schools that use technology well have key commonalities, including a project-based curriculum and supportive, distributed leadership. The authors' research into tech-rich schools revealed that schools used three strategies to integrate technology successfully. They did so by establishing the vision and culture,…

  14. Children's Mental Health and School Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSocio, Janiece; Hootman, Janis

    2004-01-01

    An integrative review of literature was undertaken to examine the impact of children's mental health on their school success. The literature confirmed a confluence of problems associated with school performance and child and adolescent mental health. Poor academic functioning and inconsistent school attendance were identified as early signs of…

  15. Losing Ground: School Segregation in Massachuestts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayscue, Jennifer B.; Greenberg, Alyssa

    2013-01-01

    Though once a leader in school integration, Massachusetts has regressed over the last two decades as its students of color have experienced intensifying school segregation. This report investigates trends in school segregation in Massachusetts by examining concentration, exposure, and evenness measures by both race and class. First, the report…

  16. Creating the Total Quality Effective School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezotte, Lawrence W.

    This book shows how Deming's Total Quality Management (TQM) theory for organizational management can be integrated with the effective-schools literature. Part 1 compares the 14 principles of TQM with the tenets of effective-schools research. The second part develops a blueprint for creating the total quality effective school. The conceptual…

  17. [School nutrition and autonomy - challenges and opportunities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Najla Veloso Sampaio; Machado, Neila Maria Viçosa; Soares, Maria Cláudia Veiga; Pinto, Anelise Regina Royer

    2013-04-01

    This study seeks to emphasize school food as an important policy to promote student autonomy by means of food and nutrition education included in the curriculum, integrated with different actors and based on the standpoint of citizenship. It seeks to return to fundamental concepts in the context of school food reflecting on them through theoretical assumptions to identify possible strategies to promote citizenship and autonomy in school. The strategies involved food and nutrition education with the daily presence of quality and suitability in school meals, discussions on the various dimensions of food in the curriculum and integrating food in the pedagogical project extended to various areas of the education system. School food fosters the need for integration of actions, actors and the various social spaces interested in the food issue, such as ministries, education systems, departments and schools, so that they may tackle the demands of contemporary reality in an integrated, systematic, consistent and efficient manner.

  18. Interprofessional development in inclusive schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Britt Blaabjerg; Højholdt, Andy; Arndal, Lars Stubbe

    educators, both initiatives of which support the subject-oriented education at school. These changes have challenged the way [education/school] professionals work and how they see their own and each other's roles in the school system (EVA 2013). The changes have also increased the need for collaborative...... in the classroom.4. Changing teaching methods: Students with weak school affiliation or special needs would benefit from a change in teaching methods that takes some of the competencies possessed by child and youth educators and uses them in the classroom. As a further step, it is relevant to open up students......Recent political reforms in the Danish school system have lengthened the school day and integrated child and youth educators into aspects of the teaching programme as part of a common European strategy of inclusion. The school day now contains homework cafes and lessons with child and youth...

  19. Inquiry-Based Integrated Science Education: Implementation of Local Content “Soil Washing” Project To Improve Junior High School Students’ Environmental Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syifahayu

    2017-02-01

    The study was conducted based on teaching and learning problems led by conventional method that had been done in the process of learning science. It gave students lack opportunities to develop their competence and thinking skills. Consequently, the process of learning science was neglected. Students did not have opportunity to improve their critical attitude and creative thinking skills. To cope this problem, the study was conducted using Project-Based Learning model through inquiry-based science education about environment. The study also used an approach called Sains Lingkungan and Teknologi masyarakat - “Saling Temas” (Environmental science and Technology in Society) which promoted the local content in Lampung as a theme in integrated science teaching and learning. The study was a quasi-experimental with pretest-posttest control group design. Initially, the subjects were given a pre-test. The experimental group was given inquiry learning method while the control group was given conventional learning. After the learning process, the subjects of both groups were given post-test. Quantitative analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney U-test and also a qualitative descriptive. Based on the result, environmental literacy skills of students who get inquiry learning strategy, with project-based learning model on the theme soil washing, showed significant differences. The experimental group is better than the control group. Data analysis showed the p-value or sig. (2-tailed) is 0.000 <α = 0.05 with the average N-gain of experimental group is 34.72 and control group is 16.40. Besides, the learning process becomes more meaningful.

  20. Elements of Contemporary Integrated Science Curriculum: Impacts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper acknowledged the vital roles played by integration of ideas and established the progress brought about when science is taught as a unified whole through knowledge integration which birthed integrated science as a subject in Nigerian school curriculum. The efforts of interest groups at regional, national and ...