WorldWideScience

Sample records for integrated overland flow

  1. Integration of FULLSWOF2D and PeanoClaw: Adaptivity and Local Time-Stepping for Complex Overland Flows

    KAUST Repository

    Unterweger, K.; Wittmann, R.; Neumann, P.; Weinzierl, T.; Bungartz, H.-J.

    2015-01-01

    © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015. We propose to couple our adaptive mesh refinement software PeanoClaw with existing solvers for complex overland flows that are tailored to regular Cartesian meshes. This allows us to augment them

  2. Grain transport mechanics in shallow overland flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    A physical model based on continuum multiphase flow is described to represent saltating transport of grains in shallow overland flow. The two phase continuum flow of water and sediment considers coupled St.Venant type equations. The interactive cumulative effect of grains is incorporated by a disper...

  3. Integration of FULLSWOF2D and PeanoClaw: Adaptivity and Local Time-Stepping for Complex Overland Flows

    KAUST Repository

    Unterweger, K.

    2015-01-01

    © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015. We propose to couple our adaptive mesh refinement software PeanoClaw with existing solvers for complex overland flows that are tailored to regular Cartesian meshes. This allows us to augment them with spatial adaptivity and local time-stepping without altering the computational kernels. FullSWOF2D—Full Shallow Water Overland Flows—here is our software of choice though all paradigms hold for other solvers as well.We validate our hybrid simulation software in an artificial test scenario before we provide results for a large-scale flooding scenario of the Mecca region. The latter demonstrates that our coupling approach enables the simulation of complex “real-world” scenarios.

  4. Microrelief-Controlled Overland Flow Generation: Laboratory and Field Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng Chu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface microrelief affects overland flow generation and the related hydrologic processes. However, such influences vary depending on other factors such as rainfall characteristics, soil properties, and initial soil moisture conditions. Thus, in-depth research is needed to better understand and evaluate the combined effects of these factors on overland flow dynamics. The objective of this experimental study was to examine how surface microrelief, in conjunction with the factors of rainfall, soil, and initial moisture conditions, impacts overland flow generation and runoff processes in both laboratory and field settings. A series of overland flow experiments were conducted for rough and smooth surfaces that represented distinct microtopographic characteristics and the experimental data were analyzed and compared. Across different soil types and initial moisture conditions, both laboratory and field experiments demonstrated that a rough soil surface experienced a delayed initiation of runoff and featured a stepwise threshold flow pattern due to the microrelief-controlled puddle filling-spilling-merging dynamics. It was found from the field experiments that a smooth plot surface was more responsive to rainfall variations especially during an initial rainfall event. However, enhanced capability of overland flow generation and faster puddle connectivity of a rough field plot occurred during the subsequent rain events.

  5. FullSWOF: a software for overland flow simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Delestre, Olivier; Cordier, Stéphane; Darboux, Frédéric; Du, Mingxuan; James, Francois; Laguerre, Christian; Lucas, Carine; Planchon, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Overland flow on agricultural fields may have some undesirable effects such as soil erosion, flood and pollutant transport. To better understand this phenomenon and limit its consequences, we developed a code using state-of-the-art numerical methods: FullSWOF (Full Shallow Water equations for Overland Flow), an object oriented code written in C++. It has been made open-source and can be downloaded from http://www.univ-orleans.fr/mapmo/soft/FullSWOF/. The model is based on the classical system...

  6. Development of a New Design Procedure for Overland Flow System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-18

    reactor kinetics, a concept familiar to most environmental engi- neers. In the case of overland flow, the reactor is the soil surface where various physical...site during the entire study. Perforated plastic pipe was used to distri- bute wastewater along the top of each section, and a bed of crushed stone...particulate BOD. The soluble BOD is oxidized by microorganisms which are probably similar to the attached biomass found in trickling filters. However, some

  7. Solitary impulse wave run-up and overland flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, H.

    2013-04-01

    Impulse waves are generated by landslides, rockfalls or avalanches impacting a reservoir or natural lake. These long waves generated by the impulse transferred to the water body in combination with the usually short propagation distance within a lake lead to a large damage potential due to wave run-up or dam overtopping. Damages are then caused by (1) direct wave load on structures, (2) driftwood and float impact and (3) their deposits after water retreat. Major historic events occurred at Lituya Bay, Alaska, in 1958, or at the Vaiont Reservoir, Italy, in 1963. Recent events were observed at Lake Chehalis, Canada, or Lake Lucerne, Switzerland, both in 2007, or at the Lower Grindelwald proglacial lake, Switzerland, in 2009. Whereas previous VAW research aimed at the generation phase of landslide-generated impulse waves with a special focus on the wave characteristics, the current research concentrates on the opposite wave-shore interaction. A particular focus is given to the transition point from the shore slope to the horizontal plane where the orbital wave motion is transformed into a shore-parallel flow. As most literature relates only to plain wave run-up on a linearly-inclined plane and the few studies focussing on wave-induced overland flow are case studies considering only a specific bathymetry, currently no general conclusions on wave-induced overland flow can be drawn. The present study therefore intends to fill in this gap by physical modeling. Testing involved a new test-setup including a piston-type wave maker to generate solitary waves, and a smooth impermeable PVC shore of height w = 0.25 m with a connected horizontal overland flow portion. By varying the shore slope tanβ = 1/1.5, 1/2.5 and 1/5.0, the still water depth h = 0.16 - 0.24 m, and the relative wave height H/h = 0.1 -0.7, a wide range of basic parameters was covered. Overland flow depths and front velocities were measured along the shore using Ultrasonic Distance Sensors. Further, flow

  8. Solitary impulse wave run-up and overland flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, H.

    2013-04-15

    Impulse waves are generated by landslides, rockfalls or avalanches impacting a reservoir or natural lake. These long waves generated by the impulse transferred to the water body in combination with the usually short propagation distance within a lake lead to a large damage potential due to wave run-up or dam overtopping. Damages are then caused by (1) direct wave load on structures, (2) driftwood and float impact and (3) their deposits after water retreat. Major historic events occurred at Lituya Bay, Alaska, in 1958, or at the Vaiont Reservoir, Italy, in 1963. Recent events were observed at Lake Chehalis, Canada, or Lake Lucerne, Switzerland, both in 2007, or at the Lower Grindelwald proglacial lake, Switzerland, in 2009. Whereas previous VAW research aimed at the generation phase of landslide-generated impulse waves with a special focus on the wave characteristics, the current research concentrates on the opposite wave-shore interaction. A particular focus is given to the transition point from the shore slope to the horizontal plane where the orbital wave motion is transformed into a shore-parallel flow. As most literature relates only to plain wave run-up on a linearly-inclined plane and the few studies focussing on wave-induced overland flow are case studies considering only a specific bathymetry, currently no general conclusions on wave-induced overland flow can be drawn. The present study therefore intends to fill in this gap by physical modeling. Testing involved a new test-setup including a piston-type wave maker to generate solitary waves, and a smooth impermeable PVC shore of height w = 0.25 m with a connected horizontal overland flow portion. By varying the shore slope tanβ = 1/1.5, 1/2.5 and 1/5.0, the still water depth h = 0.16 - 0.24 m, and the relative wave height H/h = 0.1 -0.7, a wide range of basic parameters was covered. Overland flow depths and front velocities were measured along the shore using Ultrasonic Distance Sensors. Further, flow

  9. Influence of georeference for saturated excess overland flow modelling using 3D volumetric soft geo-objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izham, Mohamad Yusoff; Muhamad Uznir, Ujang; Alias, Abdul Rahman; Ayob, Katimon; Wan Ruslan, Ismail

    2011-04-01

    Existing 2D data structures are often insufficient for analysing the dynamism of saturation excess overland flow (SEOF) within a basin. Moreover, all stream networks and soil surface structures in GIS must be preserved within appropriate projection plane fitting techniques known as georeferencing. Inclusion of 3D volumetric structure of the current soft geo-objects simulation model would offer a substantial effort towards representing 3D soft geo-objects of SEOF dynamically within a basin by visualising saturated flow and overland flow volume. This research attempts to visualise the influence of a georeference system towards the dynamism of overland flow coverage and total overland flow volume generated from the SEOF process using VSG data structure. The data structure is driven by Green-Ampt methods and the Topographic Wetness Index (TWI). VSGs are analysed by focusing on spatial object preservation techniques of the conformal-based Malaysian Rectified Skew Orthomorphic (MRSO) and the equidistant-based Cassini-Soldner projection plane under the existing geodetic Malaysian Revised Triangulation 1948 (MRT48) and the newly implemented Geocentric Datum for Malaysia (GDM2000) datum. The simulated result visualises deformation of SEOF coverage under different georeference systems via its projection planes, which delineate dissimilar computation of SEOF areas and overland flow volumes. The integration of Georeference, 3D GIS and the saturation excess mechanism provides unifying evidence towards successful landslide and flood disaster management through envisioning the streamflow generating process (mainly SEOF) in a 3D environment.

  10. Adapting HYDRUS-1D to Simulate Overland Flow and Reactive Transport During Sheet Flow Deviations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, J.; Bradford, S. A.; Simunek, J.; Hartmann, A.

    2017-12-01

    The HYDRUS-1D code is a popular numerical model for solving the Richards equation for variably-saturated water flow and solute transport in porous media. This code was adapted to solve rather than the Richards equation for subsurface flow the diffusion wave equation for overland flow at the soil surface. The numerical results obtained by the new model produced an excellent agreement with the analytical solution of the kinematic wave equation. Model tests demonstrated its applicability to simulate the transport and fate of many different solutes, such as non-adsorbing tracers, nutrients, pesticides, and microbes. However, the diffusion wave or kinematic wave equations describe surface runoff as sheet flow with a uniform depth and velocity across the slope. In reality, overland water flow and transport processes are rarely uniform. Local soil topography, vegetation, and spatial soil heterogeneity control directions and magnitudes of water fluxes, and strongly influence runoff characteristics. There is increasing evidence that variations in soil surface characteristics influence the distribution of overland flow and transport of pollutants. These spatially varying surface characteristics are likely to generate non-equilibrium flow and transport processes. HYDRUS-1D includes a hierarchical series of models of increasing complexity to account for both physical equilibrium and non-equilibrium, e.g., dual-porosity and dual-permeability models, up to a dual-permeability model with immobile water. The same conceptualization as used for the subsurface was implemented to simulate non-equilibrium overland flow and transport at the soil surface. The developed model improves our ability to describe non-equilibrium overland flow and transport processes and to improves our understanding of factors that cause this behavior. The HYDRUS-1D overland flow and transport model was additionally also extended to simulate soil erosion. The HYDRUS-1D Soil Erosion Model has been verified by

  11. Modeling erosion and sedimentation coupled with hydrological and overland flow processes at the watershed scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongho; Ivanov, Valeriy Y.; Katopodes, Nikolaos D.

    2013-09-01

    A novel two-dimensional, physically based model of soil erosion and sediment transport coupled to models of hydrological and overland flow processes has been developed. The Hairsine-Rose formulation of erosion and deposition processes is used to account for size-selective sediment transport and differentiate bed material into original and deposited soil layers. The formulation is integrated within the framework of the hydrologic and hydrodynamic model tRIBS-OFM, Triangulated irregular network-based, Real-time Integrated Basin Simulator-Overland Flow Model. The integrated model explicitly couples the hydrodynamic formulation with the advection-dominated transport equations for sediment of multiple particle sizes. To solve the system of equations including both the Saint-Venant and the Hairsine-Rose equations, the finite volume method is employed based on Roe's approximate Riemann solver on an unstructured grid. The formulation yields space-time dynamics of flow, erosion, and sediment transport at fine scale. The integrated model has been successfully verified with analytical solutions and empirical data for two benchmark cases. Sensitivity tests to grid resolution and the number of used particle sizes have been carried out. The model has been validated at the catchment scale for the Lucky Hills watershed located in southeastern Arizona, USA, using 10 events for which catchment-scale streamflow and sediment yield data were available. Since the model is based on physical laws and explicitly uses multiple types of watershed information, satisfactory results were obtained. The spatial output has been analyzed and the driving role of topography in erosion processes has been discussed. It is expected that the integrated formulation of the model has the promise to reduce uncertainties associated with typical parameterizations of flow and erosion processes. A potential for more credible modeling of earth-surface processes is thus anticipated.

  12. Predicting the impact of land management decisions on overland flow generation: Implications for cesium migration in forested Fukushima watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siirila-Woodburn, Erica R.; Steefel, Carl I.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Birkholzer, Jens T.

    2018-03-01

    The effects of land use and land cover (LULC) change on environmental systems across the land surface's "critical zone" are highly uncertain, often making prediction and risk management decision difficult. In a series of numerical experiments with an integrated hydrologic model, overland flow generation is quantified for both present day and forest thinning scenarios. A typhoon storm event in a watershed near the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant is used as an example application in which the interplay between LULC change and overland flow generation is important given that sediment-bound radionuclides may cause secondary contamination via surface water transport. Results illustrate the nonlinearity of the integrated system spanning from the deep groundwater to the atmosphere, and provide quantitative tools when determining the tradeoffs of different risk-mitigation strategies.

  13. Formation and mechanics of granular waves in gravity and shallow overland flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sediment transport in overland flow is a highly complex process involving many properties relative to the flow regime characteristics, soil surface conditions, and type of sediment. From a practical standpoint, most sediment transport studies are concerned with developing relationships of rates of s...

  14. Experimental analysis of colloid capture by a cylindrical collector in laminar overland flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lei; Gao, Bin; Muñoz-Carpena, Rafael

    2011-09-15

    Although colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in water flow is a well-known contamination process, little research has been conducted to investigate the transport of colloidal particles through emergent vegetation in overland flow. In this work, a series of laboratory experiments were conducted to measure the single-collector contact efficiency (η(0)) of colloid capture by a simulated plant stem in laminar lateral flow. Fluorescent microspheres of various sizes were used as experimental colloids. The colloid suspensions were applied to a glass cylinder installed in a small size flow chamber at different flow rates. Two cylinder sizes were tested in the experiment and silicone grease was applied to the cylinder surface to make it favorable for colloid deposition. Our results showed that increases in flow rate and collector size reduced the value of η(0) and a minimum value of η(0) might exist for a colloid size. The experimental data were compared to theoretical predictions of different single-collector contact efficiency models. The results indicated that existing single-collector contact efficiency models underestimated the η(0) of colloid capture by the cylinders in laminar overland flow. A regression equation of η(0) as a function of collector Reynolds number (Re(c)) and Peclet number (N(Pe)) was developed and fit the experimental data very well (R(2) > 0.98). This regression equation can be used to help construct and refine mathematical models of colloid transport and filtration in laminar overland flow on vegetated surfaces.

  15. The influence of digital elevation model resolution on overland flow networks for modelling urban pluvial flooding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão, J P; Boonya-Aroonnet, S; Prodanović, D; Maksimović, C

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the developments towards the next generation of overland flow modelling of urban pluvial flooding. Using a detailed analysis of the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) the developed GIS tools can automatically generate surface drainage networks which consist of temporary ponds (floodable areas) and flow paths and link them with the underground network through inlets. For different commercially-available Rainfall-Runoff simulation models, the tool will generate the overland flow network needed to model the surface runoff and pluvial flooding accurately. In this paper the emphasis is placed on a sensitivity analysis of ponds and preferential overland flow paths creation. Different DEMs for three areas were considered in order to compare the results obtained. The DEMs considered were generated using different acquisition techniques and hence represent terrain with varying levels of resolution and accuracy. The results show that DEMs can be used to generate surface flow networks reliably. As expected, the quality of the surface network generated is highly dependent on the quality and resolution of the DEMs and successful representation of buildings and streets.

  16. Overland flow generation processes in sub-humid Mediterranean forest stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, A. J. D.; Ferreira, C. S. S.; Coelho, C. O. A.; Walsh, R. P. D.; Shakesby, R. A.

    2012-04-01

    Forest soils in north and central Portugal have suffered and continue to suffer major structural changes as a result of forest management techniques, such as clear-felling and as a result of wildfire and rip-ploughing, which is carried out to prepare the ground for planting tree seedlings. In soils that have undergone these changes, the characteristics tend to be different for coniferous plantations, where the root system tends to die when the trees are cut following fire and subsequently may be consumed by fire to form a macropore network, and other types of tree plantations where the root system remains alive and allows regrowth from the sawn tree stumps. Overland flow thresholds decrease sharply as a result of rip-ploughing and forest fires and increase following clear-felling. The time taken for trees to reach maturity after wildfire differs markedly betwen the two main species (Pinus pinaster Aiton and Eucalyptus globulus Labill.) stands. In this paper, overland flow is considered in relation to rainfall, throughfall and throughflow, both in terms of hydrology and hydrochemistry in an attempt to understand overland flow generation mechanisms for a variety of forest land uses (mature pine and eucalyptus, pine seedling regrowth and eucalyptus regrowth from tree stumps, eucalyptus plantations and burned pine). Overland flow generation processes change sharply, even within a single rainfall event, as reflected in the soil hydrological processes and the hydrochemical fingerprints. These effects result from the different contact times for water and soil, which cause differences in the absorption and exhudation processes for the two species

  17. Depression storage and infiltration effects on overland flow depth-velocity-friction at desert conditions: field plot results and model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Rossi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Water infiltration and overland flow are relevant in considering water partition among plant life forms, the sustainability of vegetation and the design of sustainable hydrological models and management. In arid and semi-arid regions, these processes present characteristic trends imposed by the prevailing physical conditions of the upper soil as evolved under water-limited climate. A set of plot-scale field experiments at the semi-arid Patagonian Monte (Argentina were performed in order to estimate the effect of depression storage areas and infiltration rates on depths, velocities and friction of overland flows. The micro-relief of undisturbed field plots was characterized at z-scale 1 mm through close-range stereo-photogrammetry and geo-statistical tools. The overland flow areas produced by controlled water inflows were video-recorded and the flow velocities were measured with image processing software. Antecedent and post-inflow moisture were measured, and texture, bulk density and physical properties of the upper soil were estimated based on soil core analyses. Field data were used to calibrate a physically-based, mass balanced, time explicit model of infiltration and overland flows. Modelling results reproduced the time series of observed flow areas, velocities and infiltration depths. Estimates of hydrodynamic parameters of overland flow (Reynolds-Froude numbers are informed. To our knowledge, the study here presented is novel in combining several aspects that previous studies do not address simultaneously: (1 overland flow and infiltration parameters were obtained in undisturbed field conditions; (2 field measurements of overland flow movement were coupled to a detailed analysis of soil microtopography at 1 mm depth scale; (3 the effect of depression storage areas in infiltration rates and depth-velocity friction of overland flows is addressed. Relevance of the results to other similar desert areas is justified by the accompanying

  18. Non-uniform overland flow-infiltration model for roadside swales

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Serrana, María; Gulliver, John S.; Nieber, John L.

    2017-09-01

    There is a need to quantify the hydrologic performance of vegetated roadside swales (drainage ditches) as stormwater control measures (SCMs). To quantify their infiltration performance in both the side slope and the channel of the swale, a model has been developed for coupling a Green-Ampt-Mein-Larson (GAML) infiltration submodel with kinematic wave submodels for both overland flow down the side slope and open channel flow for flow in the ditch. The coupled GAML submodel and overland flow submodel has been validated using data collected in twelve simulated runoff tests in three different highways located in the Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area, MN. The percentage of the total water infiltrated into the side slope is considerably greater than into the channel. Thus, the side slope of a roadside swale is the main component contributing to the loss of runoff by infiltration and the channel primarily conveys the water that runs off the side slope, for the typical design found in highways. Finally, as demonstrated in field observations and the model, the fraction of the runoff/rainfall infiltrated (Vi∗) into the roadside swale appears to increase with a dimensionless saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks∗), which is a function of the saturated hydraulic conductivity, rainfall intensity, and dimensions of the swale and contributing road surface. For design purposes, the relationship between Vi∗ and Ks∗ can provide a rough estimate of the fraction of runoff/rainfall infiltrated with the few essential parameters that appear to dominate the results.

  19. Chance-constrained overland flow modeling for improving conceptual distributed hydrologic simulations based on scaling representation of sub-daily rainfall variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jing-Cheng; Huang, Guohe; Huang, Yuefei; Zhang, Hua; Li, Zhong; Chen, Qiuwen

    2015-01-01

    Lack of hydrologic process representation at the short time-scale would lead to inadequate simulations in distributed hydrological modeling. Especially for complex mountainous watersheds, surface runoff simulations are significantly affected by the overland flow generation, which is closely related to the rainfall characteristics at a sub-time step. In this paper, the sub-daily variability of rainfall intensity was considered using a probability distribution, and a chance-constrained overland flow modeling approach was proposed to capture the generation of overland flow within conceptual distributed hydrologic simulations. The integrated modeling procedures were further demonstrated through a watershed of China Three Gorges Reservoir area, leading to an improved SLURP-TGR hydrologic model based on SLURP. Combined with rainfall thresholds determined to distinguish various magnitudes of daily rainfall totals, three levels of significance were simultaneously employed to examine the hydrologic-response simulation. Results showed that SLURP-TGR could enhance the model performance, and the deviation of runoff simulations was effectively controlled. However, rainfall thresholds were so crucial for reflecting the scaling effect of rainfall intensity that optimal levels of significance and rainfall threshold were 0.05 and 10 mm, respectively. As for the Xiangxi River watershed, the main runoff contribution came from interflow of the fast store. Although slight differences of overland flow simulations between SLURP and SLURP-TGR were derived, SLURP-TGR was found to help improve the simulation of peak flows, and would improve the overall modeling efficiency through adjusting runoff component simulations. Consequently, the developed modeling approach favors efficient representation of hydrological processes and would be expected to have a potential for wide applications. - Highlights: • We develop an improved hydrologic model considering the scaling effect of rainfall. • A

  20. Chance-constrained overland flow modeling for improving conceptual distributed hydrologic simulations based on scaling representation of sub-daily rainfall variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jing-Cheng [State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience & Engineering, Department of Hydraulic Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Huang, Guohe, E-mail: huang@iseis.org [Institute for Energy, Environment and Sustainable Communities, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 0A2 (Canada); Huang, Yuefei [State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience & Engineering, Department of Hydraulic Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang, Hua [College of Science and Engineering, Texas A& M University — Corpus Christi, Corpus Christi, TX 78412-5797 (United States); Li, Zhong [Institute for Energy, Environment and Sustainable Communities, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 0A2 (Canada); Chen, Qiuwen [Center for Eco-Environmental Research, Nanjing Hydraulics Research Institute, Nanjing 210029 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Lack of hydrologic process representation at the short time-scale would lead to inadequate simulations in distributed hydrological modeling. Especially for complex mountainous watersheds, surface runoff simulations are significantly affected by the overland flow generation, which is closely related to the rainfall characteristics at a sub-time step. In this paper, the sub-daily variability of rainfall intensity was considered using a probability distribution, and a chance-constrained overland flow modeling approach was proposed to capture the generation of overland flow within conceptual distributed hydrologic simulations. The integrated modeling procedures were further demonstrated through a watershed of China Three Gorges Reservoir area, leading to an improved SLURP-TGR hydrologic model based on SLURP. Combined with rainfall thresholds determined to distinguish various magnitudes of daily rainfall totals, three levels of significance were simultaneously employed to examine the hydrologic-response simulation. Results showed that SLURP-TGR could enhance the model performance, and the deviation of runoff simulations was effectively controlled. However, rainfall thresholds were so crucial for reflecting the scaling effect of rainfall intensity that optimal levels of significance and rainfall threshold were 0.05 and 10 mm, respectively. As for the Xiangxi River watershed, the main runoff contribution came from interflow of the fast store. Although slight differences of overland flow simulations between SLURP and SLURP-TGR were derived, SLURP-TGR was found to help improve the simulation of peak flows, and would improve the overall modeling efficiency through adjusting runoff component simulations. Consequently, the developed modeling approach favors efficient representation of hydrological processes and would be expected to have a potential for wide applications. - Highlights: • We develop an improved hydrologic model considering the scaling effect of rainfall. • A

  1. Chemical composition of overland flow produced on soils covered with vegetative ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.B. Bodí

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to ascertain the differences between the soluble elements of ash obtained under laboratory conditions and the dissolved in overland flow from soils covered with a layer of ash. The overland flow was obtained during series of rainfall simulations over soils covered with two different types of ash. This study indicates that the soluble elements released from ash can modify water quality increasing its pH, electrical conductivity and especially cation content. The nutrients solubilised are not necessarily the same as the elemental composition of ash itself. Runoff composition depends on the volume of water produced, on the solubility of the ash components and on the chemical interactions with water from rainfall and soil. After the first intense rain event, most of the elements are solubilised and lixiviated or washed out, however, some of them may increase in the runoff or soil water some weeks later due to chemical interactions with water from rainfall and soil nutrients.

  2. Assessing the quality of digital elevation models obtained from mini unmanned aerial vehicles for overland flow modelling in urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão, João P.; Moy de Vitry, Matthew; Scheidegger, Andreas; Rieckermann, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Precise and detailed digital elevation models (DEMs) are essential to accurately predict overland flow in urban areas. Unfortunately, traditional sources of DEM, such as airplane light detection and ranging (lidar) DEMs and point and contour maps, remain a bottleneck for detailed and reliable overland flow models, because the resulting DEMs are too coarse to provide DEMs of sufficient detail to inform urban overland flows. Interestingly, technological developments of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) suggest that they have matured enough to be a competitive alternative to satellites or airplanes. However, this has not been tested so far. In this study we therefore evaluated whether DEMs generated from UAV imagery are suitable for urban drainage overland flow modelling. Specifically, 14 UAV flights were conducted to assess the influence of four different flight parameters on the quality of generated DEMs: (i) flight altitude, (ii) image overlapping, (iii) camera pitch, and (iv) weather conditions. In addition, we compared the best-quality UAV DEM to a conventional lidar-based DEM. To evaluate both the quality of the UAV DEMs and the comparison to lidar-based DEMs, we performed regression analysis on several qualitative and quantitative metrics, such as elevation accuracy, quality of object representation (e.g. buildings, walls and trees) in the DEM, which were specifically tailored to assess overland flow modelling performance, using the flight parameters as explanatory variables. Our results suggested that, first, as expected, flight altitude influenced the DEM quality most, where lower flights produce better DEMs; in a similar fashion, overcast weather conditions are preferable, but weather conditions and other factors influence DEM quality much less. Second, we found that for urban overland flow modelling, the UAV DEMs performed competitively in comparison to a traditional lidar-based DEM. An important advantage of using UAVs to generate DEMs in urban areas is

  3. An efficient and stable hydrodynamic model with novel source term discretization schemes for overland flow and flood simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xilin; Liang, Qiuhua; Ming, Xiaodong; Hou, Jingming

    2017-05-01

    Numerical models solving the full 2-D shallow water equations (SWEs) have been increasingly used to simulate overland flows and better understand the transient flow dynamics of flash floods in a catchment. However, there still exist key challenges that have not yet been resolved for the development of fully dynamic overland flow models, related to (1) the difficulty of maintaining numerical stability and accuracy in the limit of disappearing water depth and (2) inaccurate estimation of velocities and discharges on slopes as a result of strong nonlinearity of friction terms. This paper aims to tackle these key research challenges and present a new numerical scheme for accurately and efficiently modeling large-scale transient overland flows over complex terrains. The proposed scheme features a novel surface reconstruction method (SRM) to correctly compute slope source terms and maintain numerical stability at small water depth, and a new implicit discretization method to handle the highly nonlinear friction terms. The resulting shallow water overland flow model is first validated against analytical and experimental test cases and then applied to simulate a hypothetic rainfall event in the 42 km2 Haltwhistle Burn, UK.

  4. Cation export by overland flow in a recently burnt forest area in north-central Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, A I; Serpa, D; Ferreira, R V; Rodríguez-Blanco, M L; Pinto, R; Nunes, M I; Cerqueira, M A; Keizer, J J

    2015-08-15

    The current fire regime in the Mediterranean Basin constitutes a serious threat to natural ecosystems because it drastically enhances surface runoff and soil erosion in the affected areas. Besides soil particles themselves, soil cations can be lost by fire-enhanced overland flow, increasing the risk of fertility loss of the typically shallow and nutrient poor Mediterranean soils. Although the importance of cations for land-use sustainability is widely recognized, cation losses by post-fire runoff have received little research attention. The present study aimed to address this research gap by assessing total exports of Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in a recently burnt forest area in north-central Portugal. These exports were compared for two types of planted forest (eucalypt vs. maritime pine plantations), two types of parent materials (schist vs. granite) and for two spatial scales (micro-plot vs. hill slope). The study sites were a eucalypt plantation on granite (BEG), a eucalypt plantation on schist (BES) and a maritime pine plantation on schist (BPS). Overland flow samples were collected during the first six months after the wildfire. Cation losses differed strikingly between the two forest types on schist, being higher at the eucalypt than pine site. This difference was evident at both spatial scales, and probably due to the extensive cover of a needle cast from the scorched pine crowns. The role of parent material in cation export was less straightforward as it varied with spatial scale. Cation losses were higher for the eucalypt plantation on schist than for that on granite at the micro-plot scale, whereas the reverse was observed at the hill slope scale. Finally, cation yields were higher at the micro-plot than slope scale, in agreement with the general notion of scaling-effect in runoff generation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Reforesting severely degraded grassland in the Lesser Himalaya of Nepal : Effects on soil hydraulic conductivity and overland flow production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghimire, C.P.; Bonell, Mike; Bruijnzeel, L. Adrian; Coles, Neil A.; Lubczynski, M.

    2013-01-01

    [1] Severely degraded hillslopes in the Lesser Himalaya challenge local communities as a result of the frequent occurrence of overland flow and erosion during the rainy season and water shortages during the dry season. Reforestation is often perceived as an effective way of restoring predisturbance

  6. Reforesting severely degraded grassland in the Lesser Himalaya of Central Nepal: effects on soil hydraulic conductivity and overland flow production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghimire, C.P.; Bonell, M.; Bruijnzeel, L.A.; Coles, N.A.; Lubczynski, M.W.

    2013-01-01

    Severely degraded hillslopes in the Lesser Himalaya challenge local communities as a result of the frequent occurrence of overland flow and erosion during the rainy season and water shortages during the dry season. Reforestation is often perceived as an effective way of restoring predisturbance

  7. The experimental study of hydrodynamic characteristics of the overland flow on a slope with three-dimensional Geomat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guang-yue; Sun, Guo-rui; Li, Jian-kang; Li, Jiong

    2018-02-01

    The hydrodynamic characteristics of the overland flow on a slope with a three-dimensional Geomat are studied for different rainfall intensities and slope gradients. The rainfall intensity is adjusted in the rainfall simulation system. It is shown that the velocity of the overland flow has a strong positive correlation with the slope length and the rainfall intensity, the scour depth decreases with the increase of the slope gradient for a given rainfall intensity, and the scour depth increases with the increase of the rainfall intensity for a given slope gradient, the overland flow starts with a transitional flow on the top and finishes with a turbulent flow on the bottom on the slope with the three-dimensional Geomat for different rainfall intensities and slope gradients, the resistance coefficient and the turbulent flow Reynolds number are in positively related logarithmic functions, the resistance coefficient and the slope gradient are in positively related power functions, and the trend becomes leveled with the increase of the rainfall intensity. This study provides some important theoretical insight for further studies of the hydrodynamic process of the erosion on the slope surface with a three-dimensional Geomat.

  8. Snowmelt-induced subsurface and overland flows in a hillslope in Noname Watershed, Laramie River Basin, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, T.; Ohara, N.

    2015-12-01

    Only few field observations have been implemented using surface and sub-surface trenches to investigate snowmelt-induced hillslope runoffs in mountainous regions. Hillslope trenches may be one of the most direct ways to measure subsurface and overland flow during winter and spring seasons. In July 2014, a 10 meter long trench was constructed with hand tools through glacial till on a south facing hillslope in the Noname Watershed, Medicine Bow National Forest, Wyoming, where heavy equipment and motorized vehicles were restricted. This trench measures subsurface and overland flow for a 610 square meters catchment which has an average slope of 25 degrees. This water-collecting trench is equipped with 4 soil-moisture and temperature sensors to detect the presence of unsaturated flow. Field observations from the trench showed that diurnal oscillation of snowmelt seemed to control the overland flow between the snow and soil surface. The water inputs to the hillslope, including rainfall, evaporation, and snowmelt rates, were estimated from the energy balance computations using the observed meteorological data at the site. Using the water input data, the lateral flow component through the deeper soil or weathered bedrock layer was also quantified by the mass balance in the catchment. This study provides one of key field activities for Wyoming Center for Environmental Hydrology and Geophysics (WyCEHG) project.

  9. Transport of veterinary antibiotics in overland flow following the application of slurry to arable land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Paul; Blackwell, Paul A; Boxall, Alistair B A

    2005-05-01

    The environment may be exposed to veterinary medicines administered to livestock due to the application of organic fertilisers to land. Slurry is often spread on to fields following the harvest of the previous crop. Despite recommendations to do so, the slurry may not be ploughed into the soil for some time. If precipitation occurs before incorporation then it is likely that the slurry and any antibiotic residues in the slurry will be transported towards surface waters in overland flow. This phenomenon has been investigated in a plot study and transport via 'tramlines' has been compared to that through crop stubble. Three veterinary antibiotics, from the tetracycline, sulphonamide and macrolide groups, were applied to the plots in pig slurry. Twenty four hours after the application the plots were irrigated. Following this the plots received natural rainfall. Sulphachloropyridazine was detected in runoff from the tramline plot at a peak concentration of 703.2 microgl(-1) and oxytetracycline at 71.7 microgl(-1). Peak concentrations from the plot that did not contain a tramline were lower at 415.5 and 32 microgl(-1), respectively. In contrast, tylosin was not detected at all. Mass losses of the compounds were also greater from the tramline plot due to greater runoff generation. These did not exceed 0.42% for sulphachloropyridazine and 0.07% for oxytetracycline however.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Rainfall Impact on Overland Flow Driven Erosion Processes and Flow Hydrodynamics on a Steep Hillslope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, P.; Xu, X.; Pan, C.; Hsu, K. L.; Yang, T.

    2016-12-01

    Few attempts have been made to investigate the quantitative effects of rainfall on overland flow driven erosion processes and flow hydrodynamics on steep hillslopes under field conditions. Field experiments were performed in flows for six inflow rates (q: 6-36 Lmin-1m-1) with and without rainfall (60 mm h-1) on a steep slope (26°) to investigate: (1) the quantitative effects of rainfall on runoff and sediment yield processes, and flow hydrodynamics; (2) the effect of interaction between rainfall and overland flow on soil loss. Results showed that the rainfall increased runoff coefficients and the fluctuation of temporal variations in runoff. The rainfall significantly increased soil loss (10.6-68.0%), but this increment declined as q increased. When the interrill erosion dominated (q=6 Lmin-1m-1), the increment in the rill erosion was 1.5 times that in the interrill erosion, and the effect of the interaction on soil loss was negative. When the rill erosion dominated (q=6-36 Lmin-1m-1), the increment in the interrill erosion was 1.7-8.8 times that in the rill erosion, and the effect of the interaction on soil loss became positive. The rainfall was conducive to the development of rills especially for low inflow rates. The rainfall always decreased interrill flow velocity, decreased rill flow velocity (q=6-24 Lmin-1m-1), and enhanced the spatial uniformity of the velocity distribution. Under rainfall disturbance, flow depth, Reynolds number (Re) and resistance were increased but Froude number was reduced, and lower Re was needed to transform a laminar flow to turbulent flow. The rainfall significantly increased flow shear stress (τ) and stream power (φ), with the most sensitive parameters to sediment yield being τ (R2=0.994) and φ (R2=0.993), respectively, for non-rainfall and rainfall conditions. Compared to non-rainfall conditions, there was a reduction in the critical hydrodynamic parameters of mean flow velocity, τ, and φ by the rainfall. These findings

  11. Reforesting severely degraded grassland in the Lesser Himalaya of Nepal: Effects on soil hydraulic conductivity and overland flow production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, Chandra Prasad; Bonell, Mike; Bruijnzeel, L. Adrian; Coles, Neil A.; Lubczynski, Maciek W.

    2013-12-01

    degraded hillslopes in the Lesser Himalaya challenge local communities as a result of the frequent occurrence of overland flow and erosion during the rainy season and water shortages during the dry season. Reforestation is often perceived as an effective way of restoring predisturbance hydrological conditions but heavy usage of reforested land in the region has been shown to hamper full recovery of soil hydraulic properties. This paper investigates the effect of reforestation and forest usage on field-saturated soil hydraulic conductivities (Kfs) near Dhulikhel, Central Nepal, by comparing degraded pasture, a footpath within the pasture, a 25 year old pine reforestation, and little disturbed natural forest. The hillslope hydrological implications of changes in Kfs with land-cover change were assessed via comparisons with measured rainfall intensities over different durations. High surface and near-surface Kfs in natural forest (82-232 mm h-1) rule out overland flow occurrence and favor vertical percolation. Conversely, corresponding Kfs for degraded pasture (18-39 mm h-1) and footpath (12-26 mm h-1) were conducive to overland flow generation during medium- to high-intensity storms and thus to local flash flooding. Pertinently, surface and near-surface Kfs in the heavily used pine forest remained similar to those for degraded pasture. Estimated monsoonal overland flow totals for degraded pasture, pine forest, and natural forest were 21.3%, 15.5%, and 2.5% of incident rainfall, respectively, reflecting the relative ranking of surface Kfs. Along with high water use by the pines, this lack of recovery of soil hydraulic properties under pine reforestation is shown to be a critical factor in the regionally observed decline in base flows following large-scale planting of pines and has important implications for regional forest management.

  12. High performance shallow water kernels for parallel overland flow simulations based on FullSWOF2D

    KAUST Repository

    Wittmann, Roland

    2017-01-25

    We describe code optimization and parallelization procedures applied to the sequential overland flow solver FullSWOF2D. Major difficulties when simulating overland flows comprise dealing with high resolution datasets of large scale areas which either cannot be computed on a single node either due to limited amount of memory or due to too many (time step) iterations resulting from the CFL condition. We address these issues in terms of two major contributions. First, we demonstrate a generic step-by-step transformation of the second order finite volume scheme in FullSWOF2D towards MPI parallelization. Second, the computational kernels are optimized by the use of templates and a portable vectorization approach. We discuss the load imbalance of the flux computation due to dry and wet cells and propose a solution using an efficient cell counting approach. Finally, scalability results are shown for different test scenarios along with a flood simulation benchmark using the Shaheen II supercomputer.

  13. Differences in overland flow, hydrophobicity and soil moisture dynamics between Mediterranean woodland types in a peri-urban catchment in Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, C. S. S.; Walsh, R. P. D.; Shakesby, R. A.; Keizer, J. J.; Soares, D.; González-Pelayo, O.; Coelho, C. O. A.; Ferreira, A. J. D.

    2016-02-01

    Forest hydrology has been widely investigated, but the impacts of different woodland types on hydrological processes within a peri-urban catchment mosaic are poorly understood. This paper investigates overland flow generation processes in three different types of woodland in a small (6.2 km2) catchment in central Portugal that has undergone strong urban development over the past 50 years. A semi-natural oak stand and a sparse eucalyptus stand on partly abandoned peri-urban land and a dense eucalyptus plantation were each instrumented with three 16 m2 runoff plots and 15 throughfall gauges, which were monitored at c. 1- to 2-week intervals over two hydrological years. In addition, surface soil moisture content (0-5 cm) and hydrophobicity (0-2 cm, 2-5 cm and 5-7 cm) were measured at the same time as overland flow and throughfall. Although all three woodland types produced relatively little overland flow (woodland types. This contrast in overland flow can be attributed to infiltration-excess processes operating in storms following dry antecedent weather when severe hydrophobicity was widespread in the dense eucalypt plantation, whereas it was of moderate and low severity and less widespread in the sparse eucalypt and oak woodlands, respectively. In contrast, under wet conditions greater (albeit still small) percentages of overland flow were produced in oak woodland than in the two eucalypt plantations; this was probably linked to saturation-excess overland flow being generated more readily at the oak site as a result of its shallower soil. Differences in water retention in surface depressions affected overland flow generation and downslope flow transport. Implications of the seasonal differentials in overland flow generation between the three distinct woodland types for the hydrological response of peri-urban catchments are addressed.

  14. Overland flow connectivity on planar patchy hillslopes - modified percolation theory approaches and combinatorial model of urns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezlobin, David; Pariente, Sarah; Lavee, Hanoch; Sachs, Eyal

    2017-04-01

    Source-sink systems are very common in hydrology; in particular, some land cover types often generate runoff (e.g. embedded rocks, bare soil) , while other obstruct it (e.g. vegetation, cracked soil). Surface runoff coefficients of patchy slopes/plots covered by runoff generating and obstructing covers (e.g., bare soil and vegetation) depend critically on the percentage cover (i.e. sources/sinks abundance) and decrease strongly with observation scale. The classic mathematical percolation theory provides a powerful apparatus for describing the runoff connectivity on patchy hillslopes, but it ignores strong effect of the overland flow directionality. To overcome this and other difficulties, modified percolation theory approaches can be considered, such as straight percolation (for the planar slopes), quasi-straight percolation and models with limited obstruction. These approaches may explain both the observed critical dependence of runoff coefficients on percentage cover and their scale decrease in systems with strong flow directionality (e.g. planar slopes). The contributing area increases sharply when the runoff generating percentage cover approaches the straight percolation threshold. This explains the strong increase of the surface runoff and erosion for relatively low values (normally less than 35%) of the obstructing cover (e.g., vegetation). Combinatorial models of urns with restricted occupancy can be applied for the analytic evaluation of meaningful straight percolation quantities, such as NOGA's (Non-Obstructed Generating Area) expected value and straight percolation probability. It is shown that the nature of the cover-related runoff scale decrease is combinatorial - the probability for the generated runoff to avoid obstruction in unit area decreases with scale for the non-trivial percentage cover values. The magnitude of the scale effect is found to be a skewed non-monotonous function of the percentage cover. It is shown that the cover-related scale

  15. Experimental validation of a 2D overland flow model using high resolution water depth and velocity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cea, L.; Legout, C.; Darboux, F.; Esteves, M.; Nord, G.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a validation of a two-dimensional overland flow model using empirical laboratory data. Unlike previous publications in which model performance is evaluated as the ability to predict an outlet hydrograph, we use high resolution 2D water depth and velocity data to analyze to what degree the model is able to reproduce the spatial distribution of these variables. Several overland flow conditions over two impervious surfaces of the order of one square meter with different micro and macro-roughness characteristics are studied. The first surface is a simplified representation of a sinusoidal terrain with three crests and furrows, while the second one is a mould of a real agricultural seedbed terrain. We analyze four different bed friction parameterizations and we show that the performance of formulations which consider the transition between laminar, smooth turbulent and rough turbulent flow do not improve the results obtained with Manning or Keulegan formulas for rough turbulent flow. The simulations performed show that using Keulegan formula with a physically-based definition of the bed roughness coefficient, a two-dimensional shallow water model is able to reproduce satisfactorily the flow hydrodynamics. It is shown that, even if the resolution of the topography data and numerical mesh are high enough to include all the small scale features of the bed surface, the roughness coefficient must account for the macro-roughness characteristics of the terrain in order to correctly reproduce the flow hydrodynamics.

  16. Spatiotemporal variability of hydrologic soil properties and the implications for overland flow and land management in a peri-urban Mediterranean catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, C. S. S.; Walsh, R. P. D.; Steenhuis, T. S.; Shakesby, R. A.; Nunes, J. P. N.; Coelho, C. O. A.; Ferreira, A. J. D.

    2015-06-01

    Planning of semi-urban developments is often hindered by a lack of knowledge on how changes in land-use affect catchment hydrological response. The temporal and spatial patterns of overland flow source areas and their connectivity in the landscape, particularly in a seasonal climate, remain comparatively poorly understood. This study investigates seasonal variations in factors influencing runoff response to rainfall in a peri-urban catchment in Portugal characterized by a mosaic of landscape units and a humid Mediterranean climate. Variations in surface soil moisture, hydrophobicity and infiltration capacity were measured in six different landscape units (defined by land-use on either sandstone or limestone) in nine monitoring campaigns at key times over a one-year period. Spatiotemporal patterns in overland flow mechanisms were found. Infiltration-excess overland flow was generated in rainfalls during the dry summer season in woodland on both sandstone and limestone and on agricultural soils on limestone due probably in large part to soil hydrophobicity. In wet periods, saturation overland flow occurred on urban and agricultural soils located in valley bottoms and on shallow soils upslope. Topography, water table rise and soil depth determined the location and extent of saturated areas. Overland flow generated in upslope source areas potentially can infiltrate in other landscape units downslope where infiltration capacity exceeds rainfall intensity. Hydrophilic urban and agricultural-sandstone soils were characterized by increased infiltration capacity during dry periods, while forest soils provided potential sinks for overland flow when hydrophilic in the winter wet season. Identifying the spatial and temporal variability of overland flow sources and sinks is an important step in understanding and modeling flow connectivity and catchment hydrologic response. Such information is important for land managers in order to improve urban planning to minimize flood risk.

  17. Application of the MacCormack scheme to overland flow routing for high-spatial resolution distributed hydrological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Nan, Zhuotong; Liang, Xu; Xu, Yi; Hernández, Felipe; Li, Lianxia

    2018-03-01

    Although process-based distributed hydrological models (PDHMs) are evolving rapidly over the last few decades, their extensive applications are still challenged by the computational expenses. This study attempted, for the first time, to apply the numerically efficient MacCormack algorithm to overland flow routing in a representative high-spatial resolution PDHM, i.e., the distributed hydrology-soil-vegetation model (DHSVM), in order to improve its computational efficiency. The analytical verification indicates that both the semi and full versions of the MacCormack schemes exhibit robust numerical stability and are more computationally efficient than the conventional explicit linear scheme. The full-version outperforms the semi-version in terms of simulation accuracy when a same time step is adopted. The semi-MacCormack scheme was implemented into DHSVM (version 3.1.2) to solve the kinematic wave equations for overland flow routing. The performance and practicality of the enhanced DHSVM-MacCormack model was assessed by performing two groups of modeling experiments in the Mercer Creek watershed, a small urban catchment near Bellevue, Washington. The experiments show that DHSVM-MacCormack can considerably improve the computational efficiency without compromising the simulation accuracy of the original DHSVM model. More specifically, with the same computational environment and model settings, the computational time required by DHSVM-MacCormack can be reduced to several dozen minutes for a simulation period of three months (in contrast with one day and a half by the original DHSVM model) without noticeable sacrifice of the accuracy. The MacCormack scheme proves to be applicable to overland flow routing in DHSVM, which implies that it can be coupled into other PHDMs for watershed routing to either significantly improve their computational efficiency or to make the kinematic wave routing for high resolution modeling computational feasible.

  18. SIPSON--simulation of interaction between pipe flow and surface overland flow in networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjević, S; Prodanović, D; Maksimović, C; Ivetić, M; Savić, D

    2005-01-01

    The new simulation model, named SIPSON, based on the Preissmann finite difference method and the conjugate gradient method, is presented in the paper. This model simulates conditions when the hydraulic capacity of a sewer system is exceeded, pipe flow is pressurized, the water flows out from the piped system to the streets, and the inlets cannot capture all the runoff. In the mathematical model, buried structures and pipelines, together with surface channels, make a horizontally and vertically looped network involving a complex interaction of flows. In this paper, special internal boundary conditions related to equivalent inlets are discussed. Procedures are described for the simulation of manhole cover loss, basement flooding, the representation of street geometry, and the distribution of runoff hydrographs between surface and underground networks. All these procedures are built into the simulation model. Relevant issues are illustrated on a set of examples, focusing on specific parameters and comparison with field measurements of flooding of the Motilal ki Chal catchment (Indore, India). Satisfactory agreement of observed and simulated hydrographs and maximum surface flooding levels is obtained. It is concluded that the presented approach is an improvement compared to the standard "virtual reservoir" approach commonly applied in most of the models.

  19. Overland flow connectivity in a forest plantation before and after tree thinning (Tochigi Prefecture, central Japan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Vicente, Manuel; Onda, Yuichi; Sun, Xinchao; Kato, Hiroaki; Gomi, Takashi; Hiraoka, Marino

    2016-04-01

    Overland flow connectivity is a key factor to understand the redistribution dynamics of sediments, nutrients, radiotracers, etc., in the different compartments at channel, hillslope and catchment scales. Human organization of landscape elements has a significant control on runoff and soil redistribution processes. Construction of trails, forest roads and firewalls influence runoff connectivity (RC) in forested catchments. In this study we simulated RC in two forested catchments, called K2 (19.3 ha) and K3 (13.6 ha), located on the Mount Karasawa, in the Tochigi Prefecture in central Japan. Forest plantation includes Japanese cypress and cedar and covers 59% of the total area. Native broad-leaved trees (28%) and mixed forest occupy the rest of the study area. We selected the Index of runoff and sediment Connectivity (IC) of Borselli et al. (2008) to simulate three temporal scenarios: i) Sc-2011, before tree thinning (TT); ii) Sc-2012 after TT in most part of the forest plantation in K2 (32% of the total area); and iii) Sc-2013 after TT in some areas of the K3 catchment, affecting 38% of the total area. The study areas were defined from the coalescence point (139⁰ 36' 04" E, 36⁰ 22' 03" N) of both catchments upslope. Elevation ranges from 75 to 287 m a.s.l. and the mean slope steepness is of 67 and 65% in K2 and K3. Three different high resolution DEM-LiDAR maps at 0.5 x 0.5 m of cell size were used to run the IC model in each scenario. The permanent streams in the study area have a total length of 2123 m. The mean C-RUSLE factor was of 0.0225 in Sc-2011 and 21% and 25% higher in Sc-2012 and Sc-2013. The total length of the landscape linear elements incremented from 2482 m in Sc-2011 to 3151 m in Sc-2012 and Sc-2013 due to the construction of new skid trails in K2. The mean RC in the study area was of -4.536 in Sc-2011 and increased 7.4% and 8.9% in the Sc-2012 and Sc-2013, respectively, due to the tree thinning operations and the construction of new skid trails

  20. Quantifying diffuse pathways for overland flow between the roads and streams of the mountain ash forests of central Victoria Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Patrick N. J.; Hairsine, Peter B.; Croke, Jacky C.; Takken, Ingrid

    2006-06-01

    Limiting connectivity between road runoff sources and stream networks is crucial for preservation of water quality in forested environments. Where flow is non-eroding, the length of hillslope available to accommodate volumes of discharged water is the key to restricting connectivity. Hairsine et al. ([2002], Hydrological Processes 16: 2311-2327) proposed a probabilistic model of diffuse overland flow that predicted the hillslope lengths required to infiltrate road discharge, based on the concept of volume to breakthrough (Vbt). This paper extends this analysis to a different forest environment with the aim of testing the portability of the Hairsine et al. ([2002]) model. The volume of flow required to travel overland to a distance of 5 and 10 m (Vbt5 and Vbt10) from drainage outlets was measured in deep, highly conductive mountain soils in the Upper Tyers catchment, Victoria, Australia. Rainfall, hydraulic conductivity and soil depths contrasted markedly with those in the Hairsine et al. ([2002]) study, and represent an extreme in Australian forests. Statistical analyses revealed the population of Vbt5 to be indistinguishable from that observed by Hairsine et al. ([2002]), indicating the model is valid for a range of forest soils. There was no significant correlation of sediment plume length with site characteristics such as slope, width of flow, or existence of incised pathways. It is suggested there are universal properties of pathways draining tracks and roads, with bioturbation acting to restore available pore spaces filled by antecedent plumes. Drain discharge design criteria may be developed for local conditions using the Hairsine et al. ([2002]) model, providing a robust tool for protection of water quality in the siting of new forest roads, and maintenance of exiting roads and tracks.

  1. Hydrological heterogeneity in Mediterranean reclaimed slopes: runoff and sediment yield at the patch and slope scales along a gradient of overland flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Merino-Martín

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydrological heterogeneity is recognized as a fundamental ecosystem attribute in drylands controlling the flux of water and energy through landscapes. Therefore, mosaics of runoff and sediment source patches and sinks are frequently identified in these dry environments. There is a remarkable scarcity of studies about hydrological spatial heterogeneity in restored slopes, where ecological succession and overland flow are interacting. We conducted field research to study the hydrological role of patches and slopes along an "overland flow gradient" (gradient of overland flow routing through the slopes caused by different amounts of run-on coming from upslope in three reclaimed mining slopes of Mediterranean-continental climate. We found that runoff generation and routing in non-rilled slopes showed a pattern of source and sink areas of runoff. Such hydrological microenvironments were associated with seven vegetation patches (characterized by plant community types and cover. Two types of sink patches were identified: shrub Genista scorpius patches could be considered as "deep sinks", while patches where the graminoids Brachypodium retusum and Lolium perenne dominate were classified as "surface sinks" or "runoff splays". A variety of source patches were also identified spanning from "extreme sources" (Medicago sativa patches; equivalent to bare soil to "poor sources" (areas scattered by dwarf-shrubs of Thymus vulgaris or herbaceous tussocks of Dactylis glomerata. Finally, we identified the volume of overland flow routing along the slope as a major controlling factor of "hydrological diversity" (heterogeneity of hydrological behaviours quantified as Shannon diversity index: when overland flow increases at the slope scale hydrological diversity diminishes.

  2. Short-term nitrogen losses by overland flow in a recently burnt forest area in north-central Portugal: A study at micro-plot scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, R V; Serpa, D; Machado, A I; Rodríguez-Blanco, M L; Santos, L F; Taboada-Castro, M T; Cerqueira, M A; Keizer, J J

    2016-12-01

    Over the past decades, wildfires have affected extensive areas of the Mediterranean region with negative impacts on the environment. Most of the studies on fire-affected areas have focused on sediment losses by overland flow, whereas few have addressed post-fire nutrient export. The present study aimed to address this research gap by assessing nitrogen (nitrate and total nitrogen) losses by overland flow in a recently burnt area in north-central Portugal. To this end, three burnt slopes were selected for their contrasting forest types (eucalypt vs. pine) and parent materials (granite vs. schist). The selected study sites were a eucalypt site on granite (BEG), a eucalypt site on schist (BES) and a maritime pine site on schist (BPS). Overland flow samples were collected during the first six months after the wildfire on a 1- to 2-weekly basis, after which this study had to be cancelled due to bench terracing of some of the sites. A peak in total nitrogen concentrations was observed in burnt areas immediately after the first post-fire rainfall event as a response to the erosion of the N-enriched ash layer. After this initial peak, smaller peaks were observed throughout the study period, mainly as a response to overland flow and/or erosion events. Nitrogen export differed strikingly between the two types of forests on schist, being higher at the eucalypt than at the pine site, due to the lack of a protective soil layer. Parent material did not play an important role on nitrogen export by overland flow since no significant differences were found between the eucalypt sites on granite and schist. The present study provides some insight into the differences in post-fire soil fertility losses between forest types and parent materials in the Mediterranean region, which is crucial information for defining post-fire land management measures to reduce soil degradation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of Small-scale Vegetation-related Roughness on Overland Flow and Infiltration in Semi-arid Grassland and Shrublands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, D.

    2012-12-01

    We studied the effects of small-scale roughness on overland flow/runoff and the spatial pattern of infiltration. Our semi-arid sites include a grassland and shrubland in Central New Mexico and a shrubland in the Eastern Mojave Desert. Vegetation exerts strong controls on small-scale surface roughness in the form of plant mounds and other microtopography such as depressions and rills. We quantified the effects of densely measured soil surface heterogeneity using model simulations of runoff and infiltration. Microtopographic roughness associated with vegetation patterns, on the scale of mm-cm's in height, has a larger effect on runoff and infiltration than spatially correlated saturated conductivity. The magnitude and pattern of the effect of roughness largely depends on the vegetation and landform type, and rainfall depth and intensity. In all cases, runoff and infiltration amount and patterns were most strongly affected by depression storage. In the grassland we studied in central New Mexico, soil surface roughness had a large effect on runoff and infiltration where vegetation mounds coalesced, forming large storage volumes that require filling and overtopping in order for overland flow to concentrate into runoff. Total discharge over rough surfaces was reduced 100-200% compared to simulations in which no surface roughness was accounted for. For shrublands, total discharge was reduced 30-40% by microtopography on gently sloping alluvial fans and only 10-20% on steep hillslopes. This difference is largely due to the lack of storage elements on steep slopes. For our sites, we found that overland flow can increase infiltration by up to 2.5 times the total rainfall by filling depressions. The redistribution of water via overland flow can affect up to 20% of an area but varies with vegetation type and landform. This infiltration augmentation by overland flow tends to occur near the edges of vegetation canopies where overland flow depths are deep and infiltration rates

  4. How is overland flow produced under intermittent rain? An analysis using plot-scale rainfall simulation on dryland soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkerley, David

    2018-01-01

    The characteristic intermittency of rainfall includes temporary cessations (hiatuses), as well as periods of very low intensity within more intense events. To understand how these characteristics of rainfall affect overland flow production, rainfall simulations involving repeated cycles of on-off intermittency were carried out on dryland soils in arid western New South Wales, Australia. Periods of rain (10 mm/h) and no-rain were applied in alternation with cycle times from 3 min to 25 min, in experiments lasting 1-1.5 h. Results showed that intermittency could delay the onset of runoff by more than 30 min, reduce the runoff ratio, reduce the peak runoff rate, and reduce the apparent event infiltration rate by 30-45%. When hiatuses in rainfall were longer than 15-20 min, runoff that had resulted from prior rain ceased completely before the recommencement of rain. Results demonstrate that if rainfall intermittency is not accounted for, estimates of infiltrability based on runoff plot data can be systematically in error. Despite the use of intermittent rain, the episodic occurrence of runoff could be predicted successfully by fitting multiple affine Horton infiltration equations, whose changing f0 and Kf coefficients, but uniform values of fc, reflected the redistribution of soil moisture and the change in the infiltrability f during hiatuses in rainfall. The value of fc varied little among the fitted equations, so constituting an affine set of relationships. This new approach provides an alternative to the use of steady-state methods that are common in rainfall simulation experiments and which typically yield only an estimate of fc. The new field results confirm that intermittency affects infiltration and runoff depths and timing at plot scale and on intra-event timescales. Additional work on other soil types, and at other spatial and temporal scales, is needed to test the generality of these findings.

  5. Short-time phosphorus losses by overland flow in burnt pine and eucalypt plantations in north-central Portugal: A study at micro-plot scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, R V; Serpa, D; Cerqueira, M A; Keizer, J J

    2016-05-01

    Over the past decades, wildfires have affected vast areas of Mediterranean ecosystems leading to a variety of negative on- and off-site environmental impacts. Research on fire-affected areas has given more attention to sediment losses by fire-enhanced overland flow than to nutrient exports, especially in the Mediterranean region. To address this knowledge gap for post-fire losses of phosphorus (P) by overland flow, a recently burnt forest area in north-central Portugal was selected and instrumented immediately after a wildfire. Three slopes were selected for their contrasting forest types (eucalypt vs. pine) and parent materials (granite vs. schist). The selected study sites were a eucalypt site on granite (BEG), a eucalypt site on schist (BES) and a maritime pine site on schist (BPS). Micro-plots were monitored over a period of six months, i.e. till the construction of terraces for reforestation obliged to the removal of the plots. During this 6-month period, overland flow samples were collected at 1- to 2-weekly intervals, depending on rainfall. Total P and PO4-P losses differed markedly between the two types of forests on schist, being lower at the pine site than at the eucalypt site, probably due to the presence of a protective layer of pine needle cast. Parent material did not play an important role in PO4-P losses by overland flow but it did in TP losses, with significantly lower values at the eucalypt site on granite than that on schist. These differences in TP losses can be attributed to the coarser texture of granite soils, typically promoting infiltration and decreasing runoff. The present findings provided further insights into the spatial and temporal patterns of post-fire soil nutrient losses in fire-prone forest types during the initial stages of the window-of-disturbance, which can be useful for defining post-fire emergency measures to reduce the risk of soil fertility losses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Testing of man-made overland-flow and wetlands systems for the treatment of discharged waters from oil and gas production operations in Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caswell, P.C.; Gelb, D.; Marinello, S.A.; Emerick, J.C.; Cohen, R.R.H.

    1992-01-01

    The quality of produced and discharged waters is of increasing concern as the overall quality of potable waters within many regions of the country becomes a critical issue. The impact of discharged waters on the downstream water quality, as well as the flora and fauna within a discharge zone, is dependent on the quality of the water ultimately released into the system. In many regions of the country, discharge permits are being re-evaluated and sometimes recalled due to the actual and perceived impact upon surface and subsurface waters, particularly those providing water utilized by the human population. The engineering, design and testing of a system to treat produced waters from oil operations in Wyoming is addressed in this study. This work was designed and performed by students and faculty in the Environmental Science and Engineering and Petroleum Engineering departments at the Colorado School of Mines. The system consists of overland flow units and a constructed wetlands unit. The system units can be independently evaluated. The water is drawn from active settling ponds above the test site. Produced waters are actively being discharged into the drainage basin. Waters flowing through the test units are likewise discharged after treatment. The system has been operational since June, 1991 and monthly sampling and testing will continue through March, 1992. Initial results having been very promising. Aeration, precipitation and bacterial activity in the overland flow and wetland units appears to nearly eliminate the sulfide problem present and significantly reduce the released radium concentration. These are the constituents of major concern although testing for other chemicals of concern, including hydrocarbon content is also analyzed

  7. A comparison using the caesium-137 technique of the relative importance of cultivation and overland flow on soil erosion in a steep semi-tropical sub-catchment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiranatha, A.S.; Rose, C.W.; Salama, M.S.

    2001-01-01

    The spatial pattern of net soil loss on 6 downslope transects in a small semi-tropical sub-catchment was measured in 1990-91 using the resident caesium-137 deficit technique. The sub-catchment consisted of 2 opposing hillslopes which shed water to an intermittent stream in the valley bottom of the sub-catchment. There were 3 transects on each of the opposing hillslopes, and measurement indicated net soil loss from all 6 transects. Furthermore, the spatial pattern of caesium- 37 deficit did not indicate the accumulation of soil expected due to the slope decrease toward the bottom of the valley. Possible explanations of this finding could be the effect of periodic flooding of the intermittent valley stream, or seepage-accelerated erosion. Pineapple cultivation in the sub-catchment since 1950 included intensive cultivation at 4-year intervals by downslope-moving rotary hoe. The paper develops a theoretical prediction of the spatial pattern of net soil loss expected due to such cultivation, as well as the expected pattern of soil loss due to overland flow on the hillslopes. The spatial patterns of soil loss due to these 2 different soil erosion mechanisms were then compared with the pattern of net soil loss indicated by caesium- 137 depletion to provide an assessment of their likely relative importance in contributing to soil loss. In the upper part of each hillslope, this comparison of spatial trends did not allow the dominant cause of soil erosion to be distinguished. Both the model of erosion due to cultivation and that due to hillside overland flow predicted soil accumulation in the lower valley sides where slope decreased. Neither model represented the net loss of such accumulated soil indicated by caesium- 137 deficit, and this loss possibly occurred during periodically observed flooding of the valley floor, or due to surface burial with caesium-137 depleted subsoil. Copyright (2001) CSIRO Publishing

  8. The current status on the selection and management of vegetation for slow rate and overland flow application systems to treat municipal wastewater in the North Central region of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.G. Brockway; T.M. Burton; J.H. Cooley; F.M. D' Itri; R.H. Dowdy; B.G. Ellis; L. Epstein; A.E. Erickson; J.E. Hook; L.W. Jacobs; S.N. Kerr; B.D. Knezek; E.A. Myers; A.J. Palazzo; S. Poloncsik; G.R. Safir; W.E. Sopper; J.C. Sutherland; M.B. Tesar; R.E. Thomas; D.H. Urie

    1981-01-01

    The 1977 Clean Water Amendments to Public Law 92-500 were enacted to strengthen the orignal policy of encouraging the utilization ofinnovative, alternative management techniques far the treatment and disposal of municipal wastewater. These alternative techniques include spray irigation and overland flow land treatment systems which can be used individual cr...

  9. Initial assessment of the infiltration and overland flow for different rainfall events in land constituted of sandstones of the Botucatu Formation (Guarani Aquifer), State of São Paulo, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuquette, Lázaro Valentin; Palma, Janaina Barrios; Pejon, Osni José

    2006-06-01

    This study was carried out in the Córrego do Vaçununga basin constituted of eolic sandstones of Botucatu Formation and residual unconsolidated materials (>90%), considered the most important unconfined aquifer in Brazil, in the city of Luiz Antonio, State of São Paulo, Brazil. Laboratory and in situ tests were performed to characterize the unconsolidated materials in terms of basic physical properties, potential infiltration rate, suction and hydraulic conductivity. The results for infiltration and overland flow depths were obtained according to Morel-Seytoux and Khanji (Water Resour Res 10(4):795-800, 1976) and Chu (Water Resour Res 14(3):461-466, 1978) adaptation of the Green and Ampt [J Agr Sci 4(Part 1):1-24, 1911] model for steady and transient rainfalls, respectively. Rainfall data were collected from January of 2000 to December of 2002, and 12 scenarios were defined considering the intensity and durations. Rather than high homogeneity in terms of the texture of unconsolidated materials, the infiltration and overland flow ratio depends on the type of land use and associated management practices. The results showed that rainfall with high intensity and short duration do not produce high overland flow ratio as we have observed for transient scenarios with long duration and low intensities.

  10. The fate of seeds in the soil: a review of the influence of overland flow on seed removal and its consequences for the vegetation of arid and semiarid patchy ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochet, E.

    2015-01-01

    Since seeds are the principle means by which plants move across the landscape, the final fate of seeds plays a fundamental role in the assemblage, functioning and dynamics of plant communities. Once seeds land on the soil surface after being dispersed from the parent plant, they can be moved horizontally by surface runoff. In arid and semiarid patchy ecosystems, where seeds are scattered into a very heterogeneous environment and intense rainfalls occur, the transport of seeds by runoff to new sites may be an opportunity for seeds to reach more favourable sites for seed germination and seedling survival. Although seed transport by runoff may be of vital importance for the recruitment of plants in these ecosystems, it has received little attention in the scientific literature, especially among soil scientists. The main goals of this review paper are (1) to offer an updated conceptual model of seed fate with a focus on seed destiny in and on the soil; (2) to review studies on seed fate in overland flow and the ecological implications seed transport by runoff has for the origin, spatial patterning and maintenance of patches in arid and semiarid patchy ecosystems; and finally (3) to point out directions for future research. This review shows that seed fate in overland flow may result either in the export of seeds from the system (seed loss) or in the spatial redistribution of seeds within the system through short-distance seed movements (seed displacement). Seed transport by runoff depends on rainfall, slope and soil characteristics. Susceptibility of seed removal varies highly between species and is mainly related to seed traits, including seed size, seed shape, presence of appendages, and ability of a seed to secrete mucilage. Although initially considered as a risk of seed loss, seed removal by runoff has recently been described as an ecological driver that shapes plant composition from the first phases of the plant life by favouring species with seeds able to resist

  11. Comparative Analyses between the Zero-Inertia and Fully Dynamic Models of the Shallow Water Equations for Unsteady Overland Flow Propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costanza Aricò

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The shallow water equations are a mathematical tool widely applied for the simulation of flow routing in rivers and floodplains, as well as for flood inundation mapping. The interest of many researchers has been focused on the study of simplified forms of the original set of equations. One of the most commonly applied simplifications consists of neglecting the inertial terms. The effects of such a choice on the outputs of the simulations of flooding events are controversial and are an important topic of debate. In the present paper, two numerical models recently proposed for the solution of the complete and zero-inertia forms of the shallow water equations, are applied to several unsteady flow routing scenarios. We simulate synthetic and laboratory scenarios of unsteady flow routing, starting from very simple geometries and gradually moving towards complex topographies. Unlike the studies of the range of validity of the zero-inertia model, based on a small perturbation of the linearized flow model, in unsteady flow propagation over irregular topographies, it is more difficult to specify criteria for the applicability of the simplified set of equations. In analyzing the role of the terms in the momentum equations, we try to understand the effect of neglecting the inertial terms in the zero-inertia formulation. We also analyze the computational costs.

  12. Jim Walter Resources installs new overland conveyor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiscor, S.

    2008-12-15

    Embarking on a major expansion plan, the company is constructing a new additional overland conveyor coal to a recently refurbished prep plant. Jim Walter Resources recently invested $20 million in a new 5-mile overland conveyor system to haul coal from the No.7 deep coal mine in Alabama to the No.5 coal preparation plant. The size of the No.7 mine was effectively doubled. The article describes how this expansion move was decided upon and describes the design and installation of the new conveyor which spans approximately 5 miles. 4 photos.

  13. Flow cytometry and integrated imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kachel

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available It is a serious problem to relate the results of a flow cytometric analysis of a marine sample to different species. Images of particles selectively triggered by the flow cytometric analysis and picked out from the flowing stream give a valuable additional information on the analyzed organisms. The technical principles and problems of triggered imaging in flow are discussed, as well as the positioning of the particles in the plane of focus, freezing the motion of the quickly moving objects and what kinds of light sources are suitable for pulsed illumination. The images have to be stored either by film or electronically. The features of camera targets and the memory requirements for storing the image data and the conditions for the triggering device are shown. A brief explanation of the features of three realized flow cytometric imaging (FCI systems is given: the Macro Flow Planktometer built within the EUROMAR MAROPT project, the Imaging Module of the European Plankton Analysis System, supported by the MAST II EurOPA project and the most recently developed FLUVO VI universal flow cytometer including HBO 100- and laser excitation for fluorescence and scatter, Coulter sizing as well as bright field and and phase contrast FCI.

  14. Integrated soft sensor model for flow control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aijälä, G; Lumley, D

    2006-01-01

    Tighter discharge permits often require wastewater treatment plants to maximize utilization of available facilities in order to cost-effectively reach these goals. Important aspects are minimizing internal disturbances and using available information in a smart way to improve plant performance. In this study, flow control throughout a large highly automated wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) was implemented in order to reduce internal disturbances and to provide a firm foundation for more advanced process control. A modular flow control system was constructed based on existing instrumentation and soft sensor flow models. Modules were constructed for every unit process in water treatment and integrated into a plant-wide model. The flow control system is used to automatically control recirculation flows and bypass flows at the plant. The system was also successful in making accurate flow estimations at points in the plant where it is not possible to have conventional flow meter instrumentation. The system provides fault detection for physical flow measuring devices. The module construction allows easy adaptation for new unit processes added to the treatment plant.

  15. A simple flow-concentration modelling method for integrating water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A simple flow-concentration modelling method for integrating water quality and ... flow requirements are assessed for maintenance low flow, drought low flow ... the instream concentrations of chemical constituents that will arise from different ...

  16. Atomistic Galois insertions for flow sensitive integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2017-01-01

    Several program verification techniques assist in showing that software adheres to the required security policies. Such policies may be sensitive to the flow of execution and the verification may be supported by combinations of type systems and Hoare logics. However, this requires user assistance...... and to obtain full automation we shall explore the over-approximating nature of static analysis. We demonstrate that the use of atomistic Galois insertions constitutes a stable framework in which to obtain sound and fully automatic enforcement of flow sensitive integrity. The framework is illustrated...

  17. Protection of uranium tailings impoundments against overland erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walters, W.H.; Skaggs, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    This study investigates the problems involved in designing protection methods to prevent erosion of a uranium tailings impoundment cover from rainfall and runoff (overland flow) processes. The study addresses the side slopes and top surface as separate elements. The side slopes are more subject to gully erosion and require absolute protection such as that provided by rock riprap. The flatter top surface needs much less protection (vegetation/rock combinations) but some estimate of erosion rates are needed to compare alternatives. A literature review indicated that, currently, procedures are not available for the design of rock riprap to prevent gully erosion. Therefore, rock protection on the side slope will have to be based upon engineering judgment determined by the particular site conditions. The Manning-kinetic equations (velocity and depth of runoff) were investigated as a possible aid to the design of gully erosion protection. Guidelines are suggested for the use of rock riprap to prevent gully erosion. Three mathematical models were used to compute erosion rates for the top surface of a hypothetical tailings impoundment. The results recommend that one or possibly both of the regression models could be used to evaluate preliminary protection designs for the top surface. A physical process simulation model should be used for the final design. 30 refs., 13 figs., 16 tabs

  18. Integrated Traffic Flow Management Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabbe, Shon R.; Sridhar, Banavar; Mukherjee, Avijit

    2009-01-01

    A generalized approach is proposed to support integrated traffic flow management decision making studies at both the U.S. national and regional levels. It can consider tradeoffs between alternative optimization and heuristic based models, strategic versus tactical flight controls, and system versus fleet preferences. Preliminary testing was accomplished by implementing thirteen unique traffic flow management models, which included all of the key components of the system and conducting 85, six-hour fast-time simulation experiments. These experiments considered variations in the strategic planning look-ahead times, the replanning intervals, and the types of traffic flow management control strategies. Initial testing indicates that longer strategic planning look-ahead times and re-planning intervals result in steadily decreasing levels of sector congestion for a fixed delay level. This applies when accurate estimates of the air traffic demand, airport capacities and airspace capacities are available. In general, the distribution of the delays amongst the users was found to be most equitable when scheduling flights using a heuristic scheduling algorithm, such as ration-by-distance. On the other hand, equity was the worst when using scheduling algorithms that took into account the number of seats aboard each flight. Though the scheduling algorithms were effective at alleviating sector congestion, the tactical rerouting algorithm was the primary control for avoiding en route weather hazards. Finally, the modeled levels of sector congestion, the number of weather incursions, and the total system delays, were found to be in fair agreement with the values that were operationally observed on both good and bad weather days.

  19. Environmental evaluation of the Federal Records Center in Overland, Missouri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persily, A.K.; Dols, W.S.; Nabinger, S.J.

    1992-08-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is studying the thermal and environmental performance of new federal office buildings for the Public Buildings Service of the General Services Administration (GSA). The project involves long-term performance monitoring starting before occupancy and extending into early occupancy in three new office buildings. The performance evaluation includes an assessment of the thermal integrity of the building envelope, long-term monitoring of ventilation system performance, and measurement of indoor levels of selected pollutants. This is the second report describing the study of the Federal Records Center in Overland, Missouri, and the report presents measurement results from preoccupancy to full occupancy. Ventilation rates ranged from 0.3 to 2.6 air changes per hour (ach) with the minimum levels being both the building design value of 0.8 ach and the recommended minimum in ASHRAE Standard 62-1989. The measured radon concentrations were 2 pCi/L or less on the sub-basement level, and less than or equal to 0.4 pCi/L on the other levels. Formaldehyde concentrations ranged from 0.03 to 0.07 ppm. Daily peak levels of carbon dioxide in the building were typically between 500 and 800 ppm. Maximum carbon monoxide levels were typically on the order of 1 to 2 ppm, essentially tracking outdoor levels induced by automobile traffic. There have been some occasions of elevated carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide levels in the building associated with unexplained episodic increases in the outdoor levels

  20. Reverse Flow Engine Core Having a Ducted Fan with Integrated Secondary Flow Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisska, Michael K. (Inventor); Princen, Norman H. (Inventor); Kuehn, Mark S. (Inventor); Cosentino, Gary B. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Secondary air flow is provided for a ducted fan having a reverse flow turbine engine core driving a fan blisk. The fan blisk incorporates a set of thrust fan blades extending from an outer hub and a set of integral secondary flow blades extending intermediate an inner hub and the outer hub. A nacelle provides an outer flow duct for the thrust fan blades and a secondary flow duct carries flow from the integral secondary flow blades as cooling air for components of the reverse flow turbine engine.

  1. Modeling Fate and Transport of Rotavirus in Surface Flow by Integrating WEPP and a Pathogen Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, R.; Kalita, P. K.; Davidson, P. C.; Kuhlenschmidt, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    More than 3.5 million people die each year from a water related diseases in this world. Every 20 seconds, a child dies from a water-related illness. Even in a developed country like the United States, there have been at least 1870 outbreaks associated with drinking water during the period of 1920 to 2002, causing 883,806 illnesses. Most of these outbreaks are resulted due to the presence of microbial pathogens in drinking water. Rotavirus infection has been recognized as the most common cause of diarrhea in young children throughout the world. Laboratory experiments conducted at the University of Illinois have demonstrated that recovery of rotavirus has been significantly affected by climatic and soil-surface conditions like slope, soil types, and ground cover. The objective of this study is to simulate the fate and transport of Rotavirus in overland and near-surface flow using a process-based model. In order to capture the dynamics of sediment-bound pathogens, the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) is coupled with the pathogen transport model. Transport of pathogens in overland flow can be simulated mathematically by including terms for the concentration of the pathogens in the liquid phase (in suspension or free-floating) and the solid phase (adsorbed to the fine solid particles like clay and silt). Advection, adsorption, and decay processes are considered. The mass balance equations are solved using numerical technique to predict spatial and temporal changes in pathogen concentrations in two phases. Outputs from WEPP simulations (flow velocity, depth, saturated conductivity and the soil particle fraction exiting in flow) are transferred as input for the pathogen transport model. Three soil types and three different surface cover conditions have been used in the experimental investigations. Results from these conditions have been used in calibrating and validating the simulation results. Bare surface conditions have produced very good agreement between

  2. Development of a Rational Design Procedure for Overland Flow Systems,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    entrap two mechanisms are responsible for removing par- and filter out particles. Data plotted in Figure 7 ticulate BOD. The soluble BOD is oxidized...4.-24 -44 FI r 01 * ’t N-..025 iu !,C Cc ’ ’V - ’ .. . V . . IL ~ ~ ’Vo o 00 0 0 0 0 zr- 25 j ~~ F APPENDIX B: ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES M- Enterococcus

  3. Boundary integral methods for unsaturated flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, M.J.; McTigue, D.F.

    1990-01-01

    Many large simulations may be required to assess the performance of Yucca Mountain as a possible site for the nations first high level nuclear waste repository. A boundary integral equation method (BIEM) is described for numerical analysis of quasilinear steady unsaturated flow in homogeneous material. The applicability of the exponential model for the dependence of hydraulic conductivity on pressure head is discussed briefly. This constitutive assumption is at the heart of the quasilinear transformation. Materials which display a wide distribution in pore-size are described reasonably well by the exponential. For materials with a narrow range in pore-size, the exponential is suitable over more limited ranges in pressure head. The numerical implementation of the BIEM is used to investigate the infiltration from a strip source to a water table. The net infiltration of moisture into a finite-depth layer is well-described by results for a semi-infinite layer if αD > 4, where α is the sorptive number and D is the depth to the water table. the distribution of moisture exhibits a similar dependence on αD. 11 refs., 4 figs.,

  4. Overland Transport of Rotavirus and the Effect of Soil Type and Vegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C. Davidson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil and vegetation are two critical factors for controlling the overland transport kinetics of pathogens in a natural environment. With livestock operations moving more towards concentrated animal operations, the need to dispose of a very large amount of manure in a localized area is becoming increasingly important. Animal manure contains a substantial amount of microbial pathogens, including rotavirus, which may pose a threat of contamination of water resources. This study examined the kinetics of rotavirus in overland transport, with an overall objective of optimizing the design of best management practices, especially vegetative filter strips. The overland transport of rotavirus was studied using three soil types (Catlin silt-loam, Darwin silty-clay, Alvin fine sandy-loam, spanning the entire spectrum of typical Illinois soil textures. A 20-min rainfall event was produced using a small-scale (1.07 m × 0.66 m laboratory rainfall simulator over a soil box measuring 0.610 m × 0.305 m. Each soil type was tested for rotavirus transport kinetics with bare surface conditions, as well as with Smooth Brome and Fescue vegetative covers. Surface runoff, near-surface runoff, soil cores, and vegetation were each analyzed for infective rotavirus particles using cell-culture infectivity assays. Results show that vegetation reduces the recovery of infective rotavirus particles in surface runoff by an average of 73%, in addition to delaying the time to peak recovery. The vegetation, in general, appeared to decrease the recovery of infective rotavirus particles in surface runoff by impeding surface flow and increasing the potential for infiltration into the soil profile.

  5. Vertical integration increases opportunities for patient flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radoccia, R A; Benvenuto, J A; Blancett, L

    1991-08-01

    New sources of patients will become more and more important in the next decade as hospitals continue to feel the squeeze of a competitive marketplace. Vertical integration, a distribution tool used in other industries, will be a significant tool for health care administrators. In the following article, the authors explain the vertical integration model that shows promise for other institutions.

  6. A Few Expanding Integrable Models, Hamiltonian Structures and Constrained Flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yufeng

    2011-01-01

    Two kinds of higher-dimensional Lie algebras and their loop algebras are introduced, for which a few expanding integrable models including the coupling integrable couplings of the Broer-Kaup (BK) hierarchy and the dispersive long wave (DLW) hierarchy as well as the TB hierarchy are obtained. From the reductions of the coupling integrable couplings, the corresponding coupled integrable couplings of the BK equation, the DLW equation, and the TB equation are obtained, respectively. Especially, the coupling integrable coupling of the TB equation reduces to a few integrable couplings of the well-known mKdV equation. The Hamiltonian structures of the coupling integrable couplings of the three kinds of soliton hierarchies are worked out, respectively, by employing the variational identity. Finally, we decompose the BK hierarchy of evolution equations into x-constrained flows and t n -constrained flows whose adjoint representations and the Lax pairs are given. (general)

  7. Two drastically different climate states on an Earth-like land planet with overland water recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalidindi, S.; Reick, C. H.; Raddatz, T.; Claussen, M.

    2017-12-01

    Prior studies have demonstrated that habitable areas on low-obliquity land planets are confined to the edges of frozen ice caps. Whether such dry planets can maintain long-lived liquid water is unclear. Leconte et al. 2013 argue that on such planets mechanisms like gravity driven ice flows and geothermal flux can maintain liquid water at the edges of thick ice caps and this water may flow back to the lower latitudes through rivers. However, there exists no modelling study which investigates the climate of an Earth-like land planet with an overland recycling mechanism bringing fresh water back from higher to lower latitudes. In our study, by using a comprehensive climate model ICON, we find that an Earth-like land planet with an overland recycling mechanism can exist in two drastically different climate states for the same set of boundary conditions and parameter values: A Cold and Wet (CW) state with dominant low-latitude precipitation and, a Hot and Dry (HD) state with only high-latitude precipitation. For perpetual equinox conditions, both climate states are stable below a certain threshold value of background soil albedo (α) while above that only the CW state is stable. Starting from the HD state and increasing α above the threshold causes an abrupt shift from the HD state to the CW state resulting in a sudden cooling of about 35°C globally which is of the order of the temperature difference between the present-day and the Snowball Earth state. In contrast to the Snowball Earth instability, we find that the sudden cooling in our study is driven by the cloud albedo feedback rather than the snow-albedo feedback. Also, when α in the CW state is reduced back to zero the land planet does not display a closed hysteresis. Our study also has implications for the habitability of Earth-like land planets. At the inner edge of the habitable zone, the higher cloud cover in the CW state cools the planet and may prevent the onset of a runaway greenhouse state. At the outer

  8. Structural integrated sensor and actuator systems for active flow control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Christian; Schwerter, Martin; Leester-Schädel, Monika; Wierach, Peter; Dietzel, Andreas; Sinapius, Michael

    2016-04-01

    An adaptive flow separation control system is designed and implemented as an essential part of a novel high-lift device for future aircraft. The system consists of MEMS pressure sensors to determine the flow conditions and adaptive lips to regulate the mass flow and the velocity of a wall near stream over the internally blown Coanda flap. By the oscillating lip the mass flow in the blowing slot changes dynamically, consequently the momentum exchange of the boundary layer over a high lift flap required mass flow can be reduced. These new compact and highly integrated systems provide a real-time monitoring and manipulation of the flow conditions. In this context the integration of pressure sensors into flow sensing airfoils of composite material is investigated. Mechanical and electrical properties of the integrated sensors are investigated under mechanical loads during tensile tests. The sensors contain a reference pressure chamber isolated to the ambient by a deformable membrane with integrated piezoresistors connected as a Wheatstone bridge, which outputs voltage signals depending on the ambient pressure. The composite material in which the sensors are embedded consists of 22 individual layers of unidirectional glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) prepreg. The results of the experiments are used for adapting the design of the sensors and the layout of the laminate to ensure an optimized flux of force in highly loaded structures primarily for future aeronautical applications. It can be shown that the pressure sensor withstands the embedding process into fiber composites with full functional capability and predictable behavior under stress.

  9. Integrable Flows for Starlike Curves in Centroaffine Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Calini

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We construct integrable hierarchies of flows for curves in centroaffine R^3 through a natural pre-symplectic structure on the space of closed unparametrized starlike curves. We show that the induced evolution equations for the differential invariants are closely connected with the Boussinesq hierarchy, and prove that the restricted hierarchy of flows on curves that project to conics in RP^2 induces the Kaup-Kuperschmidt hierarchy at the curvature level.

  10. The validity of flow approximations when simulating catchment-integrated flash floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bout, B.; Jetten, V. G.

    2018-01-01

    Within hydrological models, flow approximations are commonly used to reduce computation time. The validity of these approximations is strongly determined by flow height, flow velocity and the spatial resolution of the model. In this presentation, the validity and performance of the kinematic, diffusive and dynamic flow approximations are investigated for use in a catchment-based flood model. Particularly, the validity during flood events and for varying spatial resolutions is investigated. The OpenLISEM hydrological model is extended to implement both these flow approximations and channel flooding based on dynamic flow. The flow approximations are used to recreate measured discharge in three catchments, among which is the hydrograph of the 2003 flood event in the Fella river basin. Furthermore, spatial resolutions are varied for the flood simulation in order to investigate the influence of spatial resolution on these flow approximations. Results show that the kinematic, diffusive and dynamic flow approximation provide least to highest accuracy, respectively, in recreating measured discharge. Kinematic flow, which is commonly used in hydrological modelling, substantially over-estimates hydrological connectivity in the simulations with a spatial resolution of below 30 m. Since spatial resolutions of models have strongly increased over the past decades, usage of routed kinematic flow should be reconsidered. The combination of diffusive or dynamic overland flow and dynamic channel flooding provides high accuracy in recreating the 2003 Fella river flood event. Finally, in the case of flood events, spatial modelling of kinematic flow substantially over-estimates hydrological connectivity and flow concentration since pressure forces are removed, leading to significant errors.

  11. Integrated Surface/subsurface flow modeling in PFLOTRAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Painter, Scott L [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Understanding soil water, groundwater, and shallow surface water dynamics as an integrated hydrological system is critical for understanding the Earth’s critical zone, the thin outer layer at our planet’s surface where vegetation, soil, rock, and gases interact to regulate the environment. Computational tools that take this view of soil moisture and shallow surface flows as a single integrated system are typically referred to as integrated surface/subsurface hydrology models. We extend the open-source, highly parallel, subsurface flow and reactive transport simulator PFLOTRAN to accommodate surface flows. In contrast to most previous implementations, we do not represent a distinct surface system. Instead, the vertical gradient in hydraulic head at the land surface is neglected, which allows the surface flow system to be eliminated and incorporated directly into the subsurface system. This tight coupling approach leads to a robust capability and also greatly simplifies implementation in existing subsurface simulators such as PFLOTRAN. Successful comparisons to independent numerical solutions build confidence in the approximation and implementation. Example simulations of the Walker Branch and East Fork Poplar Creek watersheds near Oak Ridge, Tennessee demonstrate the robustness of the approach in geometrically complex applications. The lack of a robust integrated surface/subsurface hydrology capability had been a barrier to PFLOTRAN’s use in critical zone studies. This work addresses that capability gap, thus enabling PFLOTRAN as a community platform for building integrated models of the critical zone.

  12. Micro Coriolis mass flow sensor with integrated resistive pressure sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenesteijn, Jarno; Alveringh, Dennis; Schut, Thomas; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Sparreboom, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2017-01-01

    We report on novel resistive pressure sensors, integrated on-chip at the inlet- and outlet-channels of a micro Coriolis mass flow sensor. The pressure sensors can be used to measure the pressure drop over the Coriolis sensor which can be used to compensate pressure-dependent behaviour that might

  13. Resistive pressure sensors integrated with a Coriolis mass flow sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alveringh, Dennis; Schut, Thomas; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Sparreboom, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2017-01-01

    We report on a novel resistive pressure sensor that is completely integrated with a Coriolis mass flow sensor on one chip, without the need for extra fabrication steps or different materials. Two pressure sensors are placed in-line with the Coriolis sensor without requiring any changes to the fluid

  14. Integrative practices in hospitals and their impact on patient flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drupsteen, J.; van der Vaart, T.; van Donk, D.P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose - The aim of this paper is to investigate which integrative planning and control practices are used in hospitals and what their effects are on patient flow. Design/methodology/approach - The study is based on a three-hospital multi-case study carried out in The Netherlands. The main findings

  15. European Integration, Labour Market Dynamics and Migration Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinoia, Michela

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper has two objectives. Firstly, we wish to evaluate whether a greater economic integration has effects, and of what type, on migration flows from Central and Eastern Europe (New Member States of the EU, NMS towards the fifteen countries of the European Union (EU-15. Secondly, we wish to understand what effect the migration flows from the NMS have on the labour market of the receiving countries in the EU-15. The most suitable theoretical context that seems to summarise European labour market characteristics is that of the insider/outsider model by Layard, Nickell and Jackman (Layard et al., 1991. We have modified the above mentioned model by introducing two innovations. Firstly, we constructed three measures that act as a proxy for economic integration: the Intra Regional Trade Index (IRTI, Global Trade Index (GTI and Financial Market Integration (FMI. Then we placed the three indicators into the insider/outsider model to arrive at a modified version of Layard, Nickell and Jackman (Layard et al., 1991. The second innovative contribution was the introduction of an equation modelling migration flows. The creation of this equation is inspired by the neo-classical approach to migration theory (Harris-Todaro, 1970. The theoretical model, based on rational expectations, has been solved to find the equilibrium solution and the impact multipliers. We then carried out an empirical analysis, which involved estimating a Structural Vector Autoregression Model (SVAR. The aim of this estimation was to evaluate, on the one hand, the effect that greater European integration (a positive shock to the integration indicators has on migration flows, and, on the other, to measure the type of effect that migration flows could have on the labour market of the EU-15 countries, considered as a single entity. The results of our empirical evidence show that economic integration does generate significant effects on migration flows from the enlargement countries

  16. Monolithic integration of a micromachined piezoresistive flow sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dan; Zhao, Tao; Yang, Zhenchuan; Zhang, Dacheng

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a monolithic integrated piezoresistive flow sensor is presented, which was fabricated with an intermediate CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) MEMS (micro electro mechanical system) process compatible with integrated pressure sensors. Four symmetrically arranged silicon diaphragms with piezoresistors on them were used to sense the drag force induced by the input gas flow. A signal conditioning CMOS circuit with a temperature compensation module was designed and fabricated simultaneously on the same chip with an increase of the total chip area by only 35%. An extra step of boron implantation and annealing was inserted into the standard CMOS process to form the piezoresistors. KOH anisotropic etching from the backside and deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) from the front side were combined to realize the silicon diaphragms. The integrated flow sensor was packaged and tested. The testing results indicated that the addition of piezoresistor formation and structure releasing did not significantly change any of the circuitry characteristics. The measured sensor output has a quadratic relation with the input flow rate of the fluid as predicted. The tested resolution of the sensor is less than 0.1 L min −1 with a measurement range of 0.1–5 L min −1 and the sensitivity is better than 40 mV per (L min −1 ) with a measurement range of 4–5 L min −1 . The measured noise floor of the sensor is 21.7 µV rtHz −1 .

  17. Completely integrable 2D Lagrangian systems and related integrable geodesic flows on various manifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yehia, Hamad M

    2013-01-01

    In this study we have formulated a theorem that generates deformations of the natural integrable conservative systems in the plane into integrable systems on Riemannian and other manifolds by introducing additional parameters into their structures. The relation of explicit solutions of the new and the original dynamics to the corresponding Jacobi (Maupertuis) geodesic flow is clarified. For illustration, we apply the result to three concrete examples of the many available integrable systems in the literature. Complementary integrals in those systems are polynomial in velocity with degrees 3, 4 and 6, respectively. As a special case of the first deformed system, a new several-parameter family of integrable mechanical systems (and geodesic flows) on S 2 is constructed. (paper)

  18. Integrated Lateral Flow Device for Flow Control with Blood Separation and Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Betancur

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Lateral flow devices are versatile and serve a wide variety of purposes, including medical, agricultural, environmental, and military applications. Yet, the most promising opportunities of these devices for diagnosis might reside in point-of-care (POC applications. Disposable paper-based lateral flow strips have been of particular interest, because they utilize low-cost materials and do not require expensive fabrication instruments. However, there are constraints on tuning flow rates and immunoassays functionalization in papers, as well as technical challenges in sensors’ integration and concentration units for low-abundant molecular detection. In the present work, we demonstrated an integrated lateral flow device that applied the capillary forces with functionalized polymer-based microfluidics as a strategy to realize a portable, simplified, and self-powered lateral flow device (LFD. The polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS surface was rendered hydrophilic via functionalization with different concentrations of Pluronic F127. Controlled flow is a key variable for immunoassay-based applications for providing enough time for protein binding to antibodies. The flow rate of the integrated LFD was regulated by the combination of multiple factors, including Pluronic F127 functionalized surface properties and surface treatments of microchannels, resistance of the integrated flow resistor, the dimensions of the microstructures and the spacing between them in the capillary pump, the contact angles, and viscosity of the fluids. Various plasma flow rates were regulated and achieved in the whole device. The LFD combined the ability to separate high quality plasma from human whole blood by using a highly asymmetric plasma separation membrane, and created controlled and steady fluid flow using capillary forces produced by the interfacial tensions. Biomarker immunoglobulin G (IgG detection from plasma was demonstrated with a graphene nanoelectronic sensor integrated

  19. Transient flow analysis of integrated valve opening process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xinming; Qin, Benke; Bo, Hanliang, E-mail: bohl@tsinghua.edu.cn; Xu, Xingxing

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • The control rod hydraulic driving system (CRHDS) is a new type of built-in control rod drive technology and the integrated valve (IV) is the key control component. • The transient flow experiment induced by IV is conducted and the test results are analyzed to get its working mechanism. • The theoretical model of IV opening process is established and applied to get the changing rule of the transient flow characteristic parameters. - Abstract: The control rod hydraulic driving system (CRHDS) is a new type of built-in control rod drive technology and the IV is the key control component. The working principle of integrated valve (IV) is analyzed and the IV hydraulic experiment is conducted. There is transient flow phenomenon in the valve opening process. The theoretical model of IV opening process is established by the loop system control equations and boundary conditions. The valve opening boundary condition equation is established based on the IV three dimensional flow field analysis results and the dynamic analysis of the valve core movement. The model calculation results are in good agreement with the experimental results. On this basis, the model is used to analyze the transient flow under high temperature condition. The peak pressure head is consistent with the one under room temperature and the pressure fluctuation period is longer than the one under room temperature. Furthermore, the changing rule of pressure transients with the fluid and loop structure parameters is analyzed. The peak pressure increases with the flow rate and the peak pressure decreases with the increase of the valve opening time. The pressure fluctuation period increases with the loop pipe length and the fluctuation amplitude remains largely unchanged under different equilibrium pressure conditions. The research results lay the base for the vibration reduction analysis of the CRHDS.

  20. Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) Inundation for Categories 2 and 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The file geodatabase (fgdb) contains the Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) Maximum of Maximums (MOM) model for hurricane categories 2 and 4. The...

  1. AnalyzeHOLE: An Integrated Wellbore Flow Analysis Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith J. Halford

    2009-10-01

    Conventional interpretation of flow logs assumes that hydraulic conductivity is directly proportional to flow change with depth. However, well construction can significantly alter the expected relation between changes in fluid velocity and hydraulic conductivity. Strong hydraulic conductivity contrasts between lithologic intervals can be masked in continuously screened wells. Alternating intervals of screen and blank casing also can greatly complicate the relation between flow and hydraulic properties. More permeable units are not necessarily associated with rapid fluid-velocity increases. Thin, highly permeable units can be misinterpreted as thick and less permeable intervals or not identified at all. These conditions compromise standard flow-log interpretation because vertical flow fields are induced near the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE, an integrated wellbore analysis tool for simulating flow and transport in wells and aquifer systems, provides a better alternative for simulating and evaluating complex well-aquifer system interaction. A pumping well and adjacent aquifer system are simulated with an axisymmetric, radial geometry in a two-dimensional MODFLOW model. Hydraulic conductivities are distributed by depth and estimated with PEST by minimizing squared differences between simulated and measured flows and drawdowns. Hydraulic conductivity can vary within a lithology but variance is limited with regularization. Transmissivity of the simulated system also can be constrained to estimates from single-well, pumping tests. Water-quality changes in the pumping well are simulated with simple mixing models between zones of differing water quality. These zones are differentiated by backtracking thousands of particles from the well screens with MODPATH. An Excel spreadsheet is used to interface the various components of AnalyzeHOLE by (1) creating model input files, (2) executing MODFLOW, MODPATH, PEST, and supporting FORTRAN routines, and (3) importing and graphically

  2. GenFlow: generic flow for integration, management and analysis of molecular biology data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Katsumi Oikawa

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A large number of DNA sequencing projects all over the world have yielded a fantastic amount of data, whose analysis is, currently, a big challenge for computational biology. The limiting step in this task is the integration of large volumes of data stored in highly heterogeneous repositories of genomic and cDNA sequences, as well as gene expression results. Solving this problem requires automated analytical tools to optimize operations and efficiently generate knowledge. This paper presents an information flow model , called GenFlow, that can tackle this analytical task.

  3. The process flow and structure of an integrated stroke strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma F. van Bussel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the Canadian province of Alberta access and quality of stroke care were suboptimal, especially in remote areas. The government introduced the Alberta Provincial Stroke Strategy (APSS in 2005, an integrated strategy to improve access to stroke care, quality and efficiency which utilizes telehealth. Research question: What is the process flow and the structure of the care pathways of the APSS? Methodology: Information for this article was obtained using documentation, archival APSS records, interviews with experts, direct observation and participant observation. Results: The process flow is described. The APSS integrated evidence-based practice, multidisciplinary communication, and telestroke services. It includes regular quality evaluation and improvement. Conclusion: Access, efficiency and quality of care improved since the start of the APSS across many domains, through improvement of expertise and equipment in small hospitals, accessible consultation of stroke specialists using telestroke, enhancing preventive care, enhancing multidisciplinary collaboration, introducing uniform best practice protocols and bypass-protocols for the emergency medical services. Discussion: The APSS overcame substantial obstacles to decrease discrepancies and to deliver integrated higher quality care. Telestroke has proven itself to be safe and feasible. The APSS works efficiently, which is in line to other projects worldwide, and is, based on limited results, cost effective. Further research on cost-effectiveness is necessary.

  4. An integrated internal flow analysis for ramjet propulsion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Shih-Yang

    An integrated numerical analysis has been conducted to study the ramjet internal flowfield. Emphasis is placed on the establishment of a unified numerical scheme and accurate representation of the internal flow development. The theoretical model is based on the complete conservation equations of mass, momentum, energy, and species concentration, with consideration of finite-rate chemical reactions and variable properties. Turbulence closure is achieved using a low-Reynolds number k-epsilon two-equation model. A new computation procedure capable of treating time-accurate, chemically reacting flows over a wide range of Mach number was developed. This numerical scheme allows for a unified treatment of the entire flowfield in a ramjet engine, including both the supersonic inlet and the combustion chamber. The algorithm is based on scaling the pressure terms in the momentum equations and preconditioning the conservation equations to circumvent numerical difficulties at low Mach numbers. The resulting equations are solved using the lower-upper (LU) factorization method in a fully-coupled manner, with the incorporation of a flux-differencing upwind TVD scheme to achieve high-order spatial accuracy. The transient behavior of the modeled system is preserved through implementation of the dual time-stepping integration technique. Calculations have been carried out for the flowfield in a typical ramjet engine consisting of an axisymmetric mixed-compression supersonic inlet and a coaxial dump combustor. Distinguished shock structures in the forward section of the inlet were clearly captured. The boundary layer thickening and flow separation behind the terminal shock due to shock/boundary-layer interactions and inlet configuration were observed. The mutual coupling between the inlet and combustor was carefully examined. In particular, strong vortices arising from the inlet shock/acoustic and shock/boundary-layer interactions may convect downstream and affect the combustion

  5. Integrability and symmetry algebra associated with N=2 KP flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Sasanka; Sarma, Debojit

    2001-01-01

    We show the complete integrability of N=2 nonstandard KP flows establishing the bi-Hamiltonian structures. One of Hamiltonian structures is shown to be isomorphic to the nonlinear N=2 W ∞ algebra with the bosonic sector having W 1+∞ ·W ∞ structure. A consistent free field representation of the super conformal algebra is obtained. The bosonic generators are found to be an admixture of free fermions and free complex bosons, unlike the linear one. The fermionic generators become exponential in free fields, in general

  6. Integrated flux-flow oscillators for submillimeter wave receivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshelets, V.P.; Shchukin, A.V.; Shitov, S.V.; Filippenko, L.V.; Fischer, G.M.; Mygind, J.

    1994-01-01

    A superconducting Flux-Flow Oscillator (FFO) integrated on the same chip with a small Josephson junction detector has been experimentally investigated in the frequency range 100 - 450 GHz. Both the emitted power and the frequency of the FFO can be varied by adjusting the dc bias current and/or the applied dc magnetic field. Microwave powers as high as 0.3 μW have been measured at 375 GHz. The spectral width of the FFO is about 1 MHz as estimated from harmonic mixing experiments. Also a fully integrated superconducting submillimeter wave receiver using the FFO as local oscillator has been successfully tested. The circuit included coupling transformers, a superconducting variable attenuator and a detector junction with tuned-out capacitance. (orig.)

  7. Non-integrability of geodesic flow on certain algebraic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    This Letter addresses an open problem recently posed by V. Kozlov: a rigorous proof of the non-integrability of the geodesic flow on the cubic surface xyz=1. We prove this is the case using the Morales–Ramis theorem and Kovacic algorithm. We also consider some consequences and extensions of this result. -- Highlights: ► The behaviour of geodesics on surfaces defined by algebraic expressions is studied. ► The non-integrability of the geodesic equations is rigorously proved using differential Galois theory. ► Morales–Ramis theory and Kovacic's algorithm is used and the normal variational equation is of Fuchsian type. ► Some extensions and limitations are discussed.

  8. Integrating Flow, Form, and Function for Improved Environmental Water Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin Lane, Belize Arela

    Rivers are complex, dynamic natural systems. The performance of river ecosystem functions, such as habitat availability and sediment transport, depends on the interplay of hydrologic dynamics (flow) and geomorphic settings (form). However, most river restoration studies evaluate the role of either flow or form without regard for their dynamic interactions. Despite substantial recent interest in quantifying environmental water requirements to support integrated water management efforts, the absence of quantitative, transferable relationships between river flow, form, and ecosystem functions remains a major limitation. This research proposes a novel, process-driven methodology for evaluating river flow-form-function linkages in support of basin-scale environmental water management. This methodology utilizes publically available geospatial and time-series data and targeted field data collection to improve basic understanding of river systems with limited data and resource requirements. First, a hydrologic classification system is developed to characterize natural hydrologic variability across a highly altered, physio-climatically diverse landscape. Next, a statistical analysis is used to characterize reach-scale geomorphic variability and to investigate the utility of topographic variability attributes (TVAs, subreach-scale undulations in channel width and depth), alongside traditional reach-averaged attributes, for distinguishing dominant geomorphic forms and processes across a hydroscape. Finally, the interacting roles of flow (hydrologic regime, water year type, and hydrologic impairment) and form (channel morphology) are quantitatively evaluated with respect to ecosystem functions related to hydrogeomorphic processes, aquatic habitat, and riparian habitat. Synthetic river corridor generation is used to evaluate and isolate the role of distinct geomorphic attributes without the need for intensive topographic surveying. This three-part methodology was successfully

  9. An integrated approach to combating flow assurance problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abney, Laurence; Browne, Alan [Halliburton, Houston, TX (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Any upset to the internal pipe surface of a pipeline can significantly impact both pipeline through-put and energy requirements for maintaining design flow rates. Inefficient flow through pipelines can have a significant negative impact on operating expense (Opex) and the energy requirements necessary to maintain pipeline through-put. Effective flow maintenance helps ensure that Opex remains within budget, processing equipment life is extended and that excessive use of energy is minimized. A number of events can result in debris generation and deposition in a pipeline. Corrosion, hydrate formation, paraffin deposition, asphaltene deposition, development of 'black powder' and scale formation are the most common sources of pipeline debris. Generally, a combination of pigging and chemical treatments is used to remove debris; these two techniques are commonly used in isolation. Incorporation of specialized fluids with enhanced solid-transport capabilities, specialized dispersants, or specialized surfactants can improve the success of routine pigging operations. An array of alternative and often complementary remediation technologies can be used to effect the removal of deposits or even full restrictions from pipelines. These include the application of acids, specialized chemical products, and intrusive interventions techniques. This paper presents a review of methods of integrating existing technologies. (author)

  10. Simultaneous integrated optimal energy flow of electricity, gas, and heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabanpour-Haghighi, Amin; Seifi, Ali Reza

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Integration of electrical, natural gas, and district heating networks is studied. • Part-load performances of units are considered in modeling. • A modified teaching–learning based optimization is used to solve the problem. • Results show the advantages of the integrated optimization approach. - Abstract: In this paper, an integrated approach to optimize electrical, natural gas, and district heating networks simultaneously is studied. Several interdependencies between these infrastructures are considered in details including a nonlinear part-load performance for boilers and CHPs besides the valve-point effect for generators. A novel approach based on selecting an appropriate set of state-variables for the problem is proposed that eliminates the addition of any new variable to convert irregular equations into a regular set while the optimization problem is still solvable. As a large optimization problem, the optimal solution cannot be achieved by conventional mathematical techniques. Hence, it is better to use evolutionary algorithms instead. In this paper, the well-known modified teaching–learning based optimization algorithm is utilized to solve the multi-period optimal power flow problem of multi-carrier energy networks. The proposed scheme is implemented and applied to a typical multi-carrier energy network. Results are compared with some other conventional heuristic algorithms and the applicability and superiority of the proposed methodology is verified

  11. Integral Transport Analysis Results for Ions Flowing Through Neutral Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmert, Gilbert; Santarius, John

    2017-10-01

    Results of a computational model for the flow of energetic ions and neutrals through a background neutral gas will be presented. The method models reactions as creating a new source of ions or neutrals if the energy or charge state of the resulting particle is changed. For a given source boundary condition, the creation and annihilation of the various species is formulated as a 1-D Volterra integral equation that can quickly be solved numerically by finite differences. The present work focuses on multiple-pass, 1-D ion flow through neutral gas and a nearly transparent, concentric anode and cathode pair in spherical, cylindrical, or linear geometry. This has been implemented as a computer code for atomic (3He, 3He +, 3He + +) and molecular (D, D2, D-, D +, D2 +, D3 +) ion and neutral species, and applied to modeling inertial-electrostatic connement (IEC) devices. The code yields detailed energy spectra of the various ions and energetic neutral species. Calculations for several University of Wisconsin IEC and ion implantation devices will be presented. Research supported by US Dept. of Homeland Security Grant 2015-DN-077-ARI095, Dept. of Energy Grant DE-FG02-04ER54745, and the Grainger Foundation.

  12. Interspecific gene flow and maintenance of species integrity in oaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Gailing

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Oak species show a wide variation in morphological and physiological characters, and species boundaries between closely related species are often not clear-cut. Still, despite frequent interspecific gene flow, oaks maintain distinct morphological and physiological adaptations. In sympatric stands, spatial distribution of species with different ecological requirements is not random but constrained by soil and other microenvironmental factors. Pre-zygotic isolation (e.g. cross incompatibilities, asynchrony in flowering, pollen competition and post-zygotic isolation (divergent selection contribute to the maintenance of species integrity in sympatric oak stands. The antagonistic effects of interspecific gene flow and divergent selection are reflected in the low genetic differentiation between hybridizing oak species at most genomic regions interspersed by regions with signatures of divergent selection (outlier regions. In the near future, the availability of high-density genetic linkage maps anchored to scaffolds of a sequenced Q. robur genome will allow to characterize the underlying genes in these outlier regions and their putative role in reproductive isolation between species. Reciprocal transplant experiments of seedlings between parental environments can be used to characterize selection on outlier genes. High transferability of gene-based markers will enable comparative outlier screens in different oak species.

  13. State of art report for critical flow model to analyze a break flow in pressurizer of integral type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yeon Moon; Lee, D. J.; Yoon, J. H.; Kim, J. P.; Kim, H. Y

    1999-03-01

    At a critical flow condition, the flow rate can't exceed a maximum value for given upstream conditions and the limited flow rate is called as a critical flow rate. The phenomena of critical flow occur at the discharge of a single phase gas or subcooled water through nozzles and pipes. Among the previous researches on critical flow, many accurate correlations on pressure, temperature and flow rate are represented for the single phase gas. However, for the two phase critical flow, the results of previous work showed that there was a large discrepancy between the analytical and experimental data and the data were in agreement for the limited thermodynamic conditions. Thus, further studies are required to enhance the two phase critical flow model. In the integral reactor, the critical flows of nitrogen gas and subcooled water are expected for the break of gas cylinder pipeline connected to the pressurizer. It requires that the inlet shape of the pipe and the nitrogen gas effect should be considered for the critical flow of integral reactor. The nitrogen gas exist in the pressurizer may affect the flow rate of primary coolant, which has been considered only for a few previous researches. Thus, the evaluation of the effect of the nitrogen on the critical flow gas should be preceded for the proper analysis of the critical flow in the integral reactor. In this report, not only the essences of previous work on critical flow were investigated and summarized but also the effect of nitrogen gas and the inlet shape of the pipe on the critical flow were also investigated. (author)

  14. State of art report for critical flow model to analyze a break flow in pressurizer of integral type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Yeon Moon; Lee, D. J.; Yoon, J. H.; Kim, J. P.; Kim, H. Y.

    1999-03-01

    At a critical flow condition, the flow rate can't exceed a maximum value for given upstream conditions and the limited flow rate is called as a critical flow rate. The phenomena of critical flow occur at the discharge of a single phase gas or subcooled water through nozzles and pipes. Among the previous researches on critical flow, many accurate correlations on pressure, temperature and flow rate are represented for the single phase gas. However, for the two phase critical flow, the results of previous work showed that there was a large discrepancy between the analytical and experimental data and the data were in agreement for the limited thermodynamic conditions. Thus, further studies are required to enhance the two phase critical flow model. In the integral reactor, the critical flows of nitrogen gas and subcooled water are expected for the break of gas cylinder pipeline connected to the pressurizer. It requires that the inlet shape of the pipe and the nitrogen gas effect should be considered for the critical flow of integral reactor. The nitrogen gas exist in the pressurizer may affect the flow rate of primary coolant, which has been considered only for a few previous researches. Thus, the evaluation of the effect of the nitrogen on the critical flow gas should be preceded for the proper analysis of the critical flow in the integral reactor. In this report, not only the essences of previous work on critical flow were investigated and summarized but also the effect of nitrogen gas and the inlet shape of the pipe on the critical flow were also investigated. (author)

  15. Control Synthesis for the Flow-Based Microfluidic Large-Scale Integration Biochips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minhass, Wajid Hassan; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we are interested in flow-based microfluidic biochips, which are able to integrate the necessary functions for biochemical analysis on-chip. In these chips, the flow of liquid is manipulated using integrated microvalves. By combining severalmicrovalves, more complex units, such asmi......In this paper we are interested in flow-based microfluidic biochips, which are able to integrate the necessary functions for biochemical analysis on-chip. In these chips, the flow of liquid is manipulated using integrated microvalves. By combining severalmicrovalves, more complex units...

  16. Microfluidic devices and methods for integrated flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Nimisha [Goleta, CA; Singh, Anup K [Danville, CA

    2011-08-16

    Microfluidic devices and methods for flow cytometry are described. In described examples, various sample handling and preparation steps may be carried out within a same microfluidic device as flow cytometry steps. A combination of imaging and flow cytometry is described. In some examples, spiral microchannels serve as incubation chambers. Examples of automated sample handling and flow cytometry are described.

  17. An integrated micromechanical large particle in flow sorter (MILPIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuad, Nurul M.; Skommer, Joanna; Friedrich, Timo; Kaslin, Jan; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2015-06-01

    At present, the major hurdle to widespread deployment of zebrafish embryo and larvae in large-scale drug development projects is lack of enabling high-throughput analytical platforms. In order to spearhead drug discovery with the use of zebrafish as a model, platforms need to integrate automated pre-test sorting of organisms (to ensure quality control and standardization) and their in-test positioning (suitable for high-content imaging) with modules for flexible drug delivery. The major obstacle hampering sorting of millimetre sized particles such as zebrafish embryos on chip-based devices is their substantial diameter (above one millimetre), mass (above one milligram), which both lead to rapid gravitational-induced sedimentation and high inertial forces. Manual procedures associated with sorting hundreds of embryos are very monotonous and as such prone to significant analytical errors due to operator's fatigue. In this work, we present an innovative design of a micromechanical large particle in-flow sorter (MILPIS) capable of analysing, sorting and dispensing living zebrafish embryos for drug discovery applications. The system consisted of a microfluidic network, revolving micromechanical receptacle actuated by robotic servomotor and opto-electronic sensing module. The prototypes were fabricated in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) transparent thermoplastic using infrared laser micromachining. Elements of MILPIS were also fabricated in an optically transparent VisiJet resin using 3D stereolithography (SLA) processes (ProJet 7000HD, 3D Systems). The device operation was based on a rapidly revolving miniaturized mechanical receptacle. The latter function was to hold and position individual fish embryos for (i) interrogation, (ii) sorting decision-making and (iii) physical sorting..The system was designed to separate between fertilized (LIVE) and non-fertilized (DEAD) eggs, based on optical transparency using infrared (IR) emitters and receivers embedded in the system

  18. Flow units from integrated WFT and NMR data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasap, E.; Altunbay, M.; Georgi, D.

    1997-08-01

    Reliable and continuous permeability profiles are vital as both hard and soft data required for delineating reservoir architecture. They can improve the vertical resolution of seismic data, well-to-well stratigraphic correlations, and kriging between the well locations. In conditional simulations, permeability profiles are imposed as the conditioning data. Variograms, covariance functions and other geostatistical indicators are more reliable when based on good quality permeability data. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) logging and Wireline Formation Tests (WFT) separately generate a wealth of information, and their synthesis extends the value of this information further by providing continuous and accurate permeability profiles without increasing the cost. NMR and WFT data present a unique combination because WFTs provide discrete, in situ permeability based on fluid-flow, whilst NMR responds to the fluids in the pore space and yields effective porosity, pore-size distribution, bound and moveable fluid saturations, and permeability. The NMR permeability is derived from the T{sub 2}-distribution data. Several equations have been proposed to transform T{sub 2} data to permeability. Regardless of the transform model used, the NMR-derived permeabilities depend on interpretation parameters that may be rock specific. The objective of this study is to integrate WFT permeabilities with NMR-derived, T{sub 2} distribution-based permeabilities and thereby arrive at core quality, continuously measured permeability profiles. We outlined the procedures to integrate NMR and WFT data and applied the procedure to a field case. Finally, this study advocates the use of hydraulic unit concepts to extend the WFT-NMR derived, core quality permeabilities to uncored intervals or uncored wells.

  19. Overland movement in African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis: empirical dispersal data from within their native range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. André De Villiers

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Dispersal forms are an important component of the ecology of many animals, and reach particular importance for predicting ranges of invasive species. African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis move overland between water bodies, but all empirical studies are from invasive populations with none from their native southern Africa. Here we report on incidents of overland movement found through a capture-recapture study carried out over a three year period in Overstrand, South Africa. The maximum distance moved was 2.4 km with most of the 91 animals, representing 5% of the population, moving ∼150 m. We found no differences in distances moved by males and females, despite the former being smaller. Fewer males moved overland, but this was no different from the sex bias found in the population. In laboratory performance trials, we found that males outperformed females, in both distance moved and time to exhaustion, when corrected for size. Overland movement occurred throughout the year, but reached peaks in spring and early summer when temporary water bodies were drying. Despite permanent impoundments being located within the study area, we found no evidence for migrations of animals between temporary and permanent water bodies. Our study provides the first dispersal kernel for X. laevis and suggests that it is similar to many non-pipid anurans with respect to dispersal.

  20. Home | Trails of Hope: Overland Diaries and Letters, 1846-1869 | Digital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collections | HBLL BYU Harold B. Lee Library Collections Trails of Hope: Overland Diaries and Mormons--Religious Life Religious Life Women Browse Search Browse all Maps Interactive Maps These maps illustrations. Search Browse all Photographs and Illustrations Search Browse all Trail Guides Trails of Hope

  1. 78 FR 70580 - Apria Healthcare LLC, Billing Department, Overland Park, Kansas; Notice of Negative Determination...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-26

    ... responsibilities, and the assertion that the worker's separation was due to outsourcing to ``Emdeon and India... Reconsideration By application dated September 19, 2013, a former worker of Apria Healthcare LLC, Billing...), applicable to workers and former workers of Apria Healthcare LLC, Billing Department, Overland Park, Kansas...

  2. "I Fear the Consequences to Our Animals": Emigrants and Their Livestock on the Overland Trails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Diana L.

    2012-01-01

    The diaries, letters, and guidebooks written by the emigrants who crossed North America on the overland trails during the mid-nineteenth century reveal a new awareness of the animals that journeyed with them. Often written as advice to those who might follow them, the travelers worried about their animals in ways beyond what theologians and…

  3. AC field effect flow control of EOF in complex microfluidic systems with integrated electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wouden, E.J.; Pennathur, S.; van den Berg, Albert; Locascio, L.E.; Gaitan, M.; Paegel, B.M.; Ross, D.J.; Vreeland, W.N.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that positive net flow can be induced and controlled with relatively low potential due to the parallel alignment of the integrated channel electrodes. Therefore, we present a novel method to exquisitely control Electro Osmotic Flow (EOF) by using integrated electrodes

  4. Integrated Cantilever-Based Flow Sensors with Tunable Sensitivity for In-Line Monitoring of Flow Fluctuations in Microfluidic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Noeth

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available For devices such as bio-/chemical sensors in microfluidic systems, flow fluctuations result in noise in the sensor output. Here, we demonstrate in-line monitoring of flow fluctuations with a cantilever-like sensor integrated in a microfluidic channel. The cantilevers are fabricated in different materials (SU-8 and SiN and with different thicknesses. The integration of arrays of holes with different hole size and number of holes allows the modification of device sensitivity, theoretical detection limit and measurement range. For an average flow in the microliter range, the cantilever deflection is directly proportional to the flow rate fluctuations in the microfluidic channel. The SiN cantilevers show a detection limit below 1 nL/min and the thinnest SU-8 cantilevers a detection limit below 5 nL/min. Finally, the sensor is applied for in-line monitoring of flow fluctuations generated by external pumps connected to the microfluidic system.

  5. Integrated cantilever-based flow sensors with tunable sensitivity for in-line monitoring of flow fluctuations in microfluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noeth, Nadine-Nicole; Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Boisen, Anja

    2014-01-01

    For devices such as bio-/chemical sensors in microfluidic systems, flow fluctuations result in noise in the sensor output. Here, we demonstrate in-line monitoring of flow fluctuations with a cantilever-like sensor integrated in a microfluidic channel. The cantilevers are fabricated in different...... is directly proportional to the flow rate fluctuations in the microfluidic channel. The SiN cantilevers show a detection limit below 1 nL/min and the thinnest SU-8 cantilevers a detection limit below 5 nL/min. Finally, the sensor is applied for in-line monitoring of flow fluctuations generated by external...

  6. Experimental research and numerical simulation on flow resistance of integrated valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Wei; Bo Hanliang; Qin Benke

    2008-01-01

    The flow resistance of the integrated valve is one of the key parameters for the design of the control rod hydraulic drive system (CRHDS). Experimental research on the improved new integrated valve was performed, and the key data such as pressure difference, volume flow, resistance coefficient and flow coefficient of each flow channel were obtained. With the computational fluid dynamics software CFX, numerical simulation was executed to analyze the effect of Re on the flow resistance. On the basis of experimental and numerical results, fitting empirical formulas of resistance coefficient were obtained, which provide experimental and theoretical foundations for CRHDS's optimized design and theoretical analysis. (authors)

  7. AC-DC integrated load flow calculation for variable speed offshore wind farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Menghua; Chen, Zhe; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a sequential AC-DC integrated load flow algorithm for variable speed offshore wind farms. In this algorithm, the variable frequency and the control strategy of variable speed wind turbine systems are considered. In addition, the losses of wind turbine systems and the losses...... of converters are also integrated into the load flow algorithm. As a general algorithm, it can be applied to different types of wind farm configurations, and the load flow is related to the wind speed....

  8. Integral representation in the hodograph plane of compressible flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Erik Bent; Hsiao, G.C.

    2003-01-01

    Compressible flow is considered in the hodograph plane. The linearity of the equation determining the stream function is exploited to derive a representation formula involving boundary data only, and a fundamental solution to the adjoint equation. For subsonic flow, an efficient algorithm...

  9. Study on Gas-liquid Falling Film Flow in Internal Heat Integrated Distillation Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chong

    2017-10-01

    Gas-liquid internally heat integrated distillation column falling film flow with nonlinear characteristics, study on gas liquid falling film flow regulation control law, can reduce emissions of the distillation column, and it can improve the quality of products. According to the distribution of gas-liquid mass balance internally heat integrated distillation column independent region, distribution model of heat transfer coefficient of building internal heat integrated distillation tower is obtained liquid distillation falling film flow in the saturated vapour pressure of liquid water balance, using heat transfer equation and energy equation to balance the relationship between the circulating iterative gas-liquid falling film flow area, flow parameter information, at a given temperature, pressure conditions, gas-liquid flow falling film theory makes the optimal parameters to achieve the best fitting value with the measured values. The results show that the geometric gas-liquid internally heat integrated distillation column falling film flow heat exchange area and import column thermostat, the average temperature has significant. The positive correlation between the heat exchanger tube entrance due to temperature difference between inside and outside, the heat flux is larger, with the increase of internal heat integrated distillation column temperature, the slope decreases its temperature rise, which accurately describes the internal gas-liquid heat integrated distillation tower falling film flow regularity, take appropriate measures to promote the enhancement of heat transfer. It can enhance the overall efficiency of the heat exchanger.

  10. Integrable motion of a vortex dipole in an axisymmetric flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutyrin, G.G.; Perrot, X.; Carton, X.

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of a self-propelling vortex dipole, embedded in an external nondivergent flow with constant potential vorticity, is studied in an equivalent-barotropic model commonly used in geophysical, astrophysical and plasma studies. In addition to the conservation of the Hamiltonian for an arbitrary point vortex dipole, it is found that the angular momentum is also conserved when the external flow is axisymmetric. This reduces the original four degrees of freedom to only two, so that the solution is expressed in quadratures. In particular, the scattering of antisymmetric dipoles approaching from the infinity is analyzed in the presence of an axisymmetric oceanic flow typical for the vicinity of isolated seamounts

  11. Integral Optimization of Systematic Parameters of Flip-Flow Screens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟宏新

    2004-01-01

    The synthetic index Ks for evaluating flip-flow screens is proposed and systematically optimized in view of the whole system. A series of optimized values of relevant parameters are found and then compared with those of the current industrial specifications. The results show that the optimized value Ks approaches the one of those famous flip-flow screens in the world. Some new findings on geometric and kinematics parameters are useful for improving the flip-flow screens with a low Ks value, which is helpful in developing clean coal technology.

  12. GO-FLOW methodology. Basic concept and integrated analysis framework for its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    GO-FLOW methodology is a success oriented system analysis technique, and is capable of evaluating a large system with complex operational sequences. Recently an integrated analysis framework of the GO-FLOW has been developed for the safety evaluation of elevator systems by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism, Japanese Government. This paper describes (a) an Overview of the GO-FLOW methodology, (b) Procedure of treating a phased mission problem, (c) Common cause failure analysis, (d) Uncertainty analysis, and (e) Integrated analysis framework. The GO-FLOW methodology is a valuable and useful tool for system reliability analysis and has a wide range of applications. (author)

  13. Integral methods for shallow free-surface flows with separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watanabe, S.; Putkaradze, V.; Bohr, Tomas

    2003-01-01

    eddy and separated flow. Assuming a variable radial velocity profile as in Karman-Pohlhausen's method, we obtain a system of two ordinary differential equations for stationary states that can smoothly go through the jump. Solutions of the system are in good agreement with experiments. For the flow down...... an inclined plane we take a similar approach and derive a simple model in which the velocity profile is not restricted to a parabolic or self-similar form. Two types of solutions with large surface distortions are found: solitary, kink-like propagating fronts, obtained when the flow rate is suddenly changed......, and stationary jumps, obtained, for instance, behind a sluice gate. We then include time dependence in the model to study the stability of these waves. This allows us to distinguish between sub- and supercritical flows by calculating dispersion relations for wavelengths of the order of the width of the layer....

  14. The flow measurement methods for the primary system of integral reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.; Seo, J. K.; Lee, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    It is the common features of the integral reactors that the main components of the primary system are installed within the reactor vessel, and so there are no any flow pipes connecting the reactor coolant pumps or steam generators. Due to no any flow pipes, it is impossible to measure the differential pressure at the primary system of the integral reactors, and it also makes impossible measure the primary coolant flow rate. The objective of the study is to draw up the flow measurement methods for the primary system of integral reactors. As a result of the review, we have made a selection of the flow measurement method by pump speed, bt HBM, and by pump motor power as the flow measurement methods for the primary system of integral reactors. Peculiarly, we did not found out a precedent which the direct pump motor power-flow rate curve is used as the flow measurement method in the existing commercial nuclear power reactors. Therefore, to use this method for integral reactors, it is needed to bear the follow-up measures in mind. The follow-up measures is included in this report

  15. Integration of environmental flow assessment and freshwater conservation planning: a new era in catchment management

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nel, JL

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Integrated water resources management offers an ideal platform for addressing the goals of freshwater conservation and climate change adaptation. Environmental flow assessment and systematic conservation planning have evolved separately...

  16. Integrated pressure sensing using capacitive Coriolis mass flow sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alveringh, Dennis; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2017-01-01

    The cross-sectional shape of microchannels is, dependent on the fabrication method, never perfectly circular. Consequently, the channels deform with the pressure, which is a non-ideal effect in flow sensors, but may be used for pressure sensing. Multiple suspended channels with different lengths

  17. Integrated flow and temperature modeling at the catchment scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loinaz, Maria Christina; Davidsen, Hasse Kampp; Butts, Michael

    2013-01-01

    –groundwater dynamics affect stream temperature. A coupled surface water–groundwater and temperature model has therefore been developed to quantify the impacts of land management and water use on stream flow and temperatures. The model is applied to the simulation of stream temperature levels in a spring-fed stream...

  18. CrossFlow: integrating workflow management and electronic commerce

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffner, Y.; Ludwig, H.; Grefen, P.W.P.J.; Aberer, K.

    2001-01-01

    The CrossFlow architecture provides support for cross-organisational workflow management in dynamically established virtual enterprises. The creation of a business relationship between a service provider organisation performing a service on behalf of a consumer organisation can be made dynamic when

  19. CrossFlow: Integrating Workflow Management and Electronic Commerce

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffner, Y.; Ludwig, H.; Grefen, P.W.P.J.; Aberer, K.

    2001-01-01

    The CrossFlow1 architecture provides support for cross-organisational workflow management in dynamically established virtual enterprises. The creation of a business relationship between a service provider organisation performing a service on behalf of a consumer organisation can be made dynamic when

  20. A flow-through cell with integrated coulometric pH actuator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohm, S.; Olthuis, Wouter; Bergveld, Piet

    1998-01-01

    A flow-through cell with integrated coulometric actuator capable of controlling the pH of a flowing liquid is presented. The cell, consisting of a rectangular channel with a noble metal actuator electrode deposited on the bottom, enables the titration of a moving liquid without the need for pumps

  1. Integrated Power Flow and Short Circuit Calculation Method for Distribution Network with Inverter Based Distributed Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Shan; Tong, Xiangqian

    2016-01-01

    Power flow calculation and short circuit calculation are the basis of theoretical research for distribution network with inverter based distributed generation. The similarity of equivalent model for inverter based distributed generation during normal and fault conditions of distribution network and the differences between power flow and short circuit calculation are analyzed in this paper. Then an integrated power flow and short circuit calculation method for distribution network with inverte...

  2. Grain transport mechanics in shallow flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    A physical model based on continuum multiphase flow is described to represent saltating transport of grains in shallow overland flows. The two-phase continuum flow of water and sediment considers coupled St.Venant type equations. The interactive cumulative effect of grains is incorporated by a dispe...

  3. A boundary integral method for two-dimensional (non)-Newtonian drops in slow viscous flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toose, E.M.; Geurts, B.J.; Kuerten, J.G.M.

    1995-01-01

    A boundary integral method for the simulation of the time-dependent deformation of Newtonian or non-Newtonian drops suspended in a Newtonian fluid is developed. The boundary integral formulation for Stokes flow is used and the non-Newtonian stress is treated as a source term which yields an extra

  4. Analysis of nutrient flows in integrated intensive aquaculture systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, O.; Sereti, V.; Eding, E.H.; Verreth, J.A.J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper analyses nutrient conversions, which are taking place in integrated intensive aquaculture systems. In these systems fish is cultured next to other organisms, which are converting otherwise discharged nutrients into valuable products. These conversions are analyzed based on nitrogen and

  5. Spatial distribution of overland flow and sediment yield in semi-arid rangelands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarah, P.; Lavee, H.

    2009-01-01

    Feedbacks and mutual links exist among soil, vegetation and water; they enable co-evolution of these features within eco-geomorphic systems, These relations are fragile, especially in semi-arid areas where grazing is the main land use. The simples subdivision of the surface of many semi-arid rangelands is into a two-component mosaic pattern comprising shrub patches interspersed with open spaces, with the former acting s skinks for water and other resources, and the latter as sources. However close observations in areas under grazing in the northern Negev region of Israel suggested that the spatial patterns of surface components is more complicated, and that the open space between shrubs consists of two components: herbaceous areas, separated by trampling routes that support no vegetation. (Author)

  6. Built-In Data-Flow Integration Testing in Large-Scale Component-Based Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Éric; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Alberto; Gross, Hans-Gerhard

    Modern large-scale component-based applications and service ecosystems are built following a number of different component models and architectural styles, such as the data-flow architectural style. In this style, each building block receives data from a previous one in the flow and sends output data to other components. This organisation expresses information flows adequately, and also favours decoupling between the components, leading to easier maintenance and quicker evolution of the system. Integration testing is a major means to ensure the quality of large systems. Their size and complexity, together with the fact that they are developed and maintained by several stake holders, make Built-In Testing (BIT) an attractive approach to manage their integration testing. However, so far no technique has been proposed that combines BIT and data-flow integration testing. We have introduced the notion of a virtual component in order to realize such a combination. It permits to define the behaviour of several components assembled to process a flow of data, using BIT. Test-cases are defined in a way that they are simple to write and flexible to adapt. We present two implementations of our proposed virtual component integration testing technique, and we extend our previous proposal to detect and handle errors in the definition by the user. The evaluation of the virtual component testing approach suggests that more issues can be detected in systems with data-flows than through other integration testing approaches.

  7. EDDA 1.0: integrated simulation of debris flow erosion, deposition and property changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H. X.; Zhang, L. M.

    2015-03-01

    Debris flow material properties change during the initiation, transportation and deposition processes, which influences the runout characteristics of the debris flow. A quasi-three-dimensional depth-integrated numerical model, EDDA (Erosion-Deposition Debris flow Analysis), is presented in this paper to simulate debris flow erosion, deposition and induced material property changes. The model considers changes in debris flow density, yield stress and dynamic viscosity during the flow process. The yield stress of the debris flow mixture determined at limit equilibrium using the Mohr-Coulomb equation is applicable to clear water flow, hyper-concentrated flow and fully developed debris flow. To assure numerical stability and computational efficiency at the same time, an adaptive time stepping algorithm is developed to solve the governing differential equations. Four numerical tests are conducted to validate the model. The first two tests involve a one-dimensional debris flow with constant properties and a two-dimensional dam-break water flow. The last two tests involve erosion and deposition, and the movement of multi-directional debris flows. The changes in debris flow mass and properties due to either erosion or deposition are shown to affect the runout characteristics significantly. The model is also applied to simulate a large-scale debris flow in Xiaojiagou Ravine to test the performance of the model in catchment-scale simulations. The results suggest that the model estimates well the volume, inundated area, and runout distance of the debris flow. The model is intended for use as a module in a real-time debris flow warning system.

  8. Integrated Modeling of Groundwater and Surface Water Interactions in a Manmade Wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guobiao Huang Gour-Tsyh Yeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A manmade pilot wetland in south Florida, the Everglades Nutrient Removal (ENR project, was modeled with a physics-based integrated approach using WASH123D (Yeh et al. 2006. Storm water is routed into the treatment wetland for phosphorus removal by plant and sediment uptake. It overlies a highly permeable surficial groundwater aquifer. Strong surface water and groundwater interactions are a key component of the hydrologic processes. The site has extensive field measurement and monitoring tools that provide point scale and distributed data on surface water levels, groundwater levels, and the physical range of hydraulic parameters and hydrologic fluxes. Previous hydrologic and hydrodynamic modeling studies have treated seepage losses empirically by some simple regression equations and, only surface water flows are modeled in detail. Several years of operational data are available and were used in model historical matching and validation. The validity of a diffusion wave approximation for two-dimensional overland flow (in the region with very flat topography was also tested. The uniqueness of this modeling study is notable for (1 the point scale and distributed comparison of model results with observed data; (2 model parameters based on available field test data; and (3 water flows in the study area include two-dimensional overland flow, hydraulic structures/levees, three-dimensional subsurface flow and one-dimensional canal flow and their interactions. This study demonstrates the need and the utility of a physics-based modeling approach for strong surface water and groundwater interactions.

  9. arXiv Integrable flows between exact CFTs

    CERN Document Server

    Georgiou, George

    2017-11-14

    We explicitly construct families of integrable σ-model actions smoothly inter-polating between exact CFTs. In the ultraviolet the theory is the direct product of two current algebras at levels k$_{1}$ and k$_{2}$. In the infrared and for the case of two deformation matrices the CFT involves a coset CFT, whereas for a single matrix deformation it is given by the ultraviolet direct product theories but at levels k$_{1}$ and k$_{2}$ − k$_{1}$. For isotropic deformations we demonstrate integrability. In this case we also compute the exact beta-function for the deformation parameters using gravitational methods. This is shown to coincide with previous results obtained using perturbation theory and non-perturbative symmetries.

  10. Safety demonstration analyses on criticality for severe accident during overland transport of fresh nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Okuno, Hiroshi; Yamada, Kenji; Watanabe, Kouji; Nomura, Yasushi; Miyoshi, Yoshinori

    2005-01-01

    Criticality safety analysis was performed for transport packages of uranium dioxide powder or of fresh PWR fuel involved in a severe accident during overland transportation, and as a result, sub-criticality was confirmed against impact accident conditions such as loaded by a drop from high position to a concrete or asphalt surface, and fire accident conditions such as caused by collisions with an oil tank trailer carrying lots of inflammable material in open air, or with a commonly used two-ton-truck inside an unventilated tunnel. (author)

  11. Integration of power flow controlling devices and HVDC-systems into the optimal power flow; Integration von leistungsflusssteuernden Komponenten und HGUe-Systemen in die Leistungsflussoptimierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natemeyer, Hendrik; Scheufen, Martin; Roehder, Andreas; Schnettler, Armin [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Hochspannungstechnik (IFHT)

    2012-07-01

    An integration of High Voltage Direct Current Transmission Systems (HVDC) or Flexible AC Transmission Systems (FACTS) into power systems enables the possibility to actively influence and control the corresponding power flows in the electrical network. The systemic benefits are a more efficient utilization of existing transmission capacities and improved controllability in fault situations. This paper introduces methods of a coordinative control of such devices and their representation in stationary power flow calculations including the control in (n-1)-cases. This might be a useful tool for the network operation, especially in face of more frequently occurring fast system changes. Examples of a corresponding implementation and application are provided. (orig.)

  12. EDDA: integrated simulation of debris flow erosion, deposition and property changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H. X.; Zhang, L. M.

    2014-11-01

    Debris flow material properties change during the initiation, transportation and deposition processes, which influences the runout characteristics of the debris flow. A quasi-three-dimensional depth-integrated numerical model, EDDA, is presented in this paper to simulate debris flow erosion, deposition and induced material property changes. The model considers changes in debris flow density, yield stress and dynamic viscosity during the flow process. The yield stress of debris flow mixture is determined at limit equilibrium using the Mohr-Coulomb equation, which is applicable to clear water flow, hyper-concentrated flow and fully developed debris flow. To assure numerical stability and computational efficiency at the same time, a variable time stepping algorithm is developed to solve the governing differential equations. Four numerical tests are conducted to validate the model. The first two tests involve a one-dimensional dam-break water flow and a one-dimensional debris flow with constant properties. The last two tests involve erosion and deposition, and the movement of multi-directional debris flows. The changes in debris flow mass and properties due to either erosion or deposition are shown to affect the runout characteristics significantly. The model is also applied to simulate a large-scale debris flow in Xiaojiagou Ravine to test the performance of the model in catchment-scale simulations. The results suggest that the model estimates well the volume, inundated area, and runout distance of the debris flow. The model is intended for use as a module in a real-time debris flow warning system.

  13. An integrated methodology for characterizing flow and transport processes in fractured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yu-Shu

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the coupled processes involved in fluid and heat flow and chemical transport in the highly heterogeneous, unsaturated-zone (UZ) fractured rock of Yucca Mountain, we present an integrated modeling methodology. This approach integrates a wide variety of moisture, pneumatic, thermal, and geochemical isotopic field data into a comprehensive three-dimensional numerical model for modeling analyses. The results of field applications of the methodology show that moisture data, such as water potential and liquid saturation, are not sufficient to determine in situ percolation flux, whereas temperature and geochemical isotopic data provide better constraints to net infiltration rates and flow patterns. In addition, pneumatic data are found to be extremely valuable in estimating large-scale fracture permeability. The integration of hydrologic, pneumatic, temperature, and geochemical data into modeling analyses is thereby demonstrated to provide a practical modeling approach for characterizing flow and transport processes in complex fractured formations

  14. Transition flow ion transport via integral Boltzmann equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darcie, T.E.

    1983-10-01

    A new approach is developed to solve the Integral Boltzmann Equation for the evolving velocity distribution of a source of ions, undergoing electrostatic acceleration through a neutral gas target. The theory is applicable to arbitrarily strong electric fields, any ion/neutral mass ratio greater than unity, and is not limited to spatially isotropic gas targets. A hard sphere collision model is used, with a provision for inelasticity. Both axial and radial velocity distributions are calculated for applications where precollision radial velocities are negligible, as is the case for ion beam extractions from high pressure sources. Theoretical predictions are tested through an experiment in which an atmospheric pressure ion source is coupled to a high vacuum energy analyser. Excellent agreement results for configurations in which the radial velocity remains small. Velocity distributions are applied to predicting the efficiency of coupling an atmospheric pressure ion source to a quadrupole mass spectrometer and results clearly indicate the most desirable extracting configuration. A method is devised to calculate ion-molecule hard sphere collision cross sections for easily fragmented organic ions

  15. Dielectrophoresis microsystem with integrated flow cytometers for on-line monitoring of sorting efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Hansen, Ole; Petersen, Peter Kalsen

    2006-01-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) and flow cytometry are powerful technologies and widely applied in microfluidic systems for handling and measuring cells and particles. Here, we present a novel microchip with a DEP selective filter integrated with two microchip flow cytometers (FCs) for on-line monitoring...... of cell sorting processes. On the microchip, the DEP filter is integrated in a microfluidic channel network to sort yeast cells by positive DER The two FCs detection windows are set upstream and downstream of the DEP filter. When a cell passes through the detection windows, the light scattered by the cell...

  16. Analyzing Unsaturated Flow Patterns in Fractured Rock Using an Integrated Modeling Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y.S. Wu; G. Lu; K. Zhang; L. Pan; G.S. Bodvarsson

    2006-01-01

    Characterizing percolation patterns in unsaturated fractured rock has posed a greater challenge to modeling investigations than comparable saturated zone studies, because of the heterogeneous nature of unsaturated media and the great number of variables impacting unsaturated flow. This paper presents an integrated modeling methodology for quantitatively characterizing percolation patterns in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a proposed underground repository site for storing high-level radioactive waste. The modeling approach integrates a wide variety of moisture, pneumatic, thermal, and isotopic geochemical field data into a comprehensive three-dimensional numerical model for modeling analyses. It takes into account the coupled processes of fluid and heat flow and chemical isotopic transport in Yucca Mountain's highly heterogeneous, unsaturated fractured tuffs. Modeling results are examined against different types of field-measured data and then used to evaluate different hydrogeological conceptualizations and their results of flow patterns in the unsaturated zone. In particular, this model provides a much clearer understanding of percolation patterns and flow behavior through the unsaturated zone, both crucial issues in assessing repository performance. The integrated approach for quantifying Yucca Mountain's flow system is demonstrated to provide a practical modeling tool for characterizing flow and transport processes in complex subsurface systems

  17. Meteorological characteristics and overland precipitation impacts of atmospheric rivers affecting the West coast of North America based on eight years of SSM/I satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiman, P.J.; Ralph, F.M.; Wick, G.A.; Lundquist, J.D.; Dettinger, M.D.

    2008-01-01

    The pre-cold-frontal low-level jet within oceanic extratropical cyclones represents the lower-tropospheric component of a deeper corridor of concentrated water vapor transport in the cyclone warm sector. These corridors are referred to as atmospheric rivers (ARs) because they are narrow relative to their length scale and are responsible for most of the poleward water vapor transport at midlatitudes. This paper investigates landfalling ARs along adjacent north- and south-coast regions of western North America. Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/ I) satellite observations of long, narrow plumes of enhanced integrated water vapor (IWV) were used to detect ARs just offshore over the eastern Pacific from 1997 to 2005. The north coast experienced 301 AR days, while the south coast had only 115. Most ARs occurred during the warm season in the north and cool season in the south, despite the fact that the cool season is climatologically wettest for both regions. Composite SSM/I IWV analyses showed landfalling wintertime ARs extending northeastward from the tropical eastern Pacific, whereas the summertime composites were zonally oriented and, thus, did not originate from this region of the tropics. Companion SSM/I composites of daily rainfall showed significant orographic enhancement during the landfall of winter (but not summer) ARs. The NCEP-NCAR global reanalysis dataset and regional precipitation networks were used to assess composite synoptic characteristics and overland impacts of landfalling ARs. The ARs possess strong vertically integrated horizontal water vapor fluxes that, on average, impinge on the West Coast in the pre-cold-frontal environment in winter and post-cold-frontal environment in summer. Even though the IWV in the ARs is greater in summer, the vapor flux is stronger in winter due to much stronger flows associated with more intense storms. The landfall of ARs in winter and north-coast summer coincides with anomalous warmth, a trough offshore, and

  18. Integration of two-phase solid fluid equations in a catchment model for flashfloods, debris flows and shallow slope failures

    KAUST Repository

    Bout, B.; Lombardo, Luigi; van Westen, C.J.; Jetten, V.G.

    2018-01-01

    An integrated, modeling method for shallow landslides, debris flows and catchment hydrology is developed and presented in this paper. Existing two-phase debris flow equations and an adaptation on the infinite slope method are coupled with a full

  19. An Operator-Integration-Factor Splitting (OIFS) method for Incompressible Flows in Moving Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Saumil S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fischer, Paul F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Min, Misun [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tomboulides, Ananias G [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Aristotle Univ., Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2017-10-21

    In this paper, we present a characteristic-based numerical procedure for simulating incompressible flows in domains with moving boundaries. Our approach utilizes an operator-integration-factor splitting technique to help produce an effcient and stable numerical scheme. Using the spectral element method and an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation, we investigate flows where the convective acceleration effects are non-negligible. Several examples, ranging from laminar to turbulent flows, are considered. Comparisons with a standard, semi-implicit time-stepping procedure illustrate the improved performance of the scheme.

  20. 41 CFR 302-10.200 - What costs are allowable when a commercial carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... when a commercial carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water? 302-10.200 Section 302-10... carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water? Your agency will allow the following costs for... State or local law. (b) When transporting over water cost must include, but not limited to the cost of...

  1. Integrated LTCC pressure/flow/temperature multisensor for compressed air diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Yannick; Maeder, Thomas; Boutinard-Rouelle, Grégoire; Barras, Aurélie; Craquelin, Nicolas; Ryser, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We present a multisensor designed for industrial compressed air diagnostics and combining the measurement of pressure, flow, and temperature, integrated with the corresponding signal conditioning electronics in a single low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) package. The developed sensor may be soldered onto an integrated electro-fluidic platform by using standard surface mount device (SMD) technology, e.g., as a standard electronic component would be on a printed circuit board, obviating the need for both wires and tubes and thus paving the road towards low-cost integrated electro-fluidic systems. Several performance aspects of this device are presented and discussed, together with electronics design issues.

  2. Integrated LTCC Pressure/Flow/Temperature Multisensor for Compressed Air Diagnostics†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Yannick; Maeder, Thomas; Boutinard-Rouelle, Grégoire; Barras, Aurélie; Craquelin, Nicolas; Ryser, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We present a multisensor designed for industrial compressed air diagnostics and combining the measurement of pressure, flow, and temperature, integrated with the corresponding signal conditioning electronics in a single low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) package. The developed sensor may be soldered onto an integrated electro-fluidic platform by using standard surface mount device (SMD) technology, e.g., as a standard electronic component would be on a printed circuit board, obviating the need for both wires and tubes and thus paving the road towards low-cost integrated electro-fluidic systems. Several performance aspects of this device are presented and discussed, together with electronics design issues. PMID:22163518

  3. Human well-being values of environmental flows enhancing social equity in integrated water resources management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, K.S.

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation discusses how the importance of river flow-sustained ecosystems for local communities can be quantified for the purpose of balancing water supply and demand in Integrated Water Resources Management. Due to the development of water resources, for example through the construction of

  4. Miniaturized flow cytometer with 3D hydrodynamic particle focusing and integrated optical elements applying silicon photodiodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenauer, M.; Buchegger, W.; Finoulst, I.; Verhaert, P.D.E.M.; Vellekoop, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the design, realization and measurement results of a novel optofluidic system capable of performing absorbance-based flow cytometric analysis is presented. This miniaturized laboratory platform, fabricated using SU-8 on a silicon substrate, comprises integrated polymer-based

  5. A mixed spectral-integration model for neutral mean wind flow over hills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corbett, Jean-Francois; Ott, Søren; Landberg, Lars

    2008-01-01

    equations are solved spectrally horizontally and by numerical integration vertically. Non-dimensional solutions are stored in look-up tables for quick re-use. Model results are compared to measurements, as well as other authors' flow models in three test cases. The model is implemented and tested in two...

  6. Simulation of flow structure in the suction pipe of a hydroturbine by integral characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuibin, P.A.; Okulov, Valery; Pylev, I.M.

    2006-01-01

    Within the framework of a model of a twisted flow of an inviscid incompressible liquid, we solve the problem of determining the frequency and amplitude of oscillations caused by the precession of a helical vortex core in the suction tube of a hydroturbine from the specified integral characteristics...

  7. Fluidic separation in microstructured devices – concepts and their Integration into process flow networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vural - Gürsel, I.; Kockmann, N.; Hessel, V.

    2017-01-01

    FDA and pharmaceutical industry turn the vision of integrated end-to-end manufacturing currently into reality. Accordingly, besides the efforts to develop reactions in continuous flow, it is also essential to consider separation of reaction mixtures and purification of the desired product - and how

  8. Analysis of time integration methods for the compressible two-fluid model for pipe flow simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Sanderse (Benjamin); I. Eskerud Smith (Ivar); M.H.W. Hendrix (Maurice)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we analyse different time integration methods for the two-fluid model and propose the BDF2 method as the preferred choice to simulate transient compressible multiphase flow in pipelines. Compared to the prevailing Backward Euler method, the BDF2 scheme has a significantly

  9. Dynamic Optimal Energy Flow in the Integrated Natural Gas and Electrical Power Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Jiakun; Zeng, Qing; Ai, Xiaomeng

    2018-01-01

    . Simulation on the test case illustrates the success of the modelling and the beneficial roles of the power-to-gas are analyzed. The proposed model can be used in the decision support for both planning and operation of the coordinated natural gas and electrical power systems.......This work focuses on the optimal operation of the integrated gas and electrical power system with bi-directional energy conversion. Considering the different response times of the gas and power systems, the transient gas flow and steady- state power flow are combined to formulate the dynamic...... optimal energy flow in the integrated gas and power systems. With proper assumptions and simplifications, the problem is transformed into a single stage linear programming. And only a single stage linear programming is needed to obtain the optimal operation strategy for both gas and power systems...

  10. Computational analysis of integrated biosensing and shear flow in a microfluidic vascular model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jeremy F.; Young, Edmond W. K.; Simmons, Craig A.

    2017-11-01

    Fluid flow and flow-induced shear stress are critical components of the vascular microenvironment commonly studied using microfluidic cell culture models. Microfluidic vascular models mimicking the physiological microenvironment also offer great potential for incorporating on-chip biomolecular detection. In spite of this potential, however, there are few examples of such functionality. Detection of biomolecules released by cells under flow-induced shear stress is a significant challenge due to severe sample dilution caused by the fluid flow used to generate the shear stress, frequently to the extent where the analyte is no longer detectable. In this work, we developed a computational model of a vascular microfluidic cell culture model that integrates physiological shear flow and on-chip monitoring of cell-secreted factors. Applicable to multilayer device configurations, the computational model was applied to a bilayer configuration, which has been used in numerous cell culture applications including vascular models. Guidelines were established that allow cells to be subjected to a wide range of physiological shear stress while ensuring optimal rapid transport of analyte to the biosensor surface and minimized biosensor response times. These guidelines therefore enable the development of microfluidic vascular models that integrate cell-secreted factor detection while addressing flow constraints imposed by physiological shear stress. Ultimately, this work will result in the addition of valuable functionality to microfluidic cell culture models that further fulfill their potential as labs-on-chips.

  11. Integrated Modeling System for Analysis of Watershed Water Balance: A Case Study in the Tims Branch Watershed, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setegn, S. G.; Mahmoudi, M.; Lawrence, A.; Duque, N.

    2015-12-01

    The Applied Research Center at Florida International University (ARC-FIU) is supporting the soil and groundwater remediation efforts of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) by developing a surface water model to simulate the hydrology and the fate and transport of contaminants and sediment in the Tims Branch watershed. Hydrological models are useful tool in water and land resource development and decision-making for watershed management. Moreover, simulation of hydrological processes improves understanding of the environmental dynamics and helps to manage and protect water resources and the environment. MIKE SHE, an advanced integrated modeling system is used to simulate the hydrological processes of the Tim Branch watershed with the objective of developing an integrated modeling system to improve understanding of the physical, chemical and biological processes within the Tims Branch watershed. MIKE SHE simulates water flow in the entire land based phase of the hydrological cycle from rainfall to river flow, via various flow processes such as, overland flow, infiltration, evapotranspiration, and groundwater flow. In this study a MIKE SHE model is developed and applied to the Tim branch watershed to study the watershed response to storm events and understand the water balance of the watershed under different climatic and catchment characteristics. The preliminary result of the integrated model indicated that variation in the depth of overland flow highly depend on the amount and distribution of rainfall in the watershed. The ultimate goal of this project is to couple the MIKE SHE and MIKE 11 models to integrate the hydrological component in the land phase of hydrological cycle and stream flow process. The coupled MIKE SHE/MIKE 11 model will further be integrated with an Ecolab module to represent a range of water quality, contaminant transport, and ecological processes with respect to the stream, surface water and groundwater in the Tims

  12. Field-scale measurements for separation of catchment discharge into flow route contributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velde, Y. van der; Rozemeijer, J.C.; Rooij, G.H. de; Geer, F.C. van; Broers, H.P.

    2010-01-01

    Agricultural pollutants in catchments are transported toward the discharging stream through various flow routes such as tube drain flow, groundwater flow, interflow, and overland flow. Direct measurements of flow route contributions are difficult and often impossible. We developed a field-scale

  13. Field-Scale Measurements for Separation of Catchment Discharge into Flow Route Contributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velde, van der Y.; Rozemeijer, J.; Rooij, de G.H.; Geer, van F.C.; Broers, H.P.

    2010-01-01

    Agricultural pollutants in catchments are transported toward the discharging stream through various flow routes such as tube drain flow, groundwater flow, interflow, and overland flow. Direct measurements of flow route contributions are difficult and often impossible. We developed a field-scale

  14. Field-scale measurements for separation of catchment discharge into flow route contributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velde, Ype; Rozemeijer, Joachim C.; de Rooij, Gerrit H.; van Geer, Frans C.; Broers, Hans Peter

    Agricultural pollutants in catchments are transported toward the discharging stream through various flow routes such as tube drain flow, groundwater flow, interflow, and overland flow. Direct measurements of flow route contributions are difficult and often impossible. We developed a field-scale

  15. End-to-End Traffic Flow Modeling of the Integrated SCaN Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, K.-M.; Abraham, D. S.

    2012-05-01

    In this article, we describe the analysis and simulation effort of the end-to-end traffic flow for the Integrated Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Network. Using the network traffic derived for the 30-day period of July 2018 from the Space Communications Mission Model (SCMM), we generate the wide-area network (WAN) bandwidths of the ground links for different architecture options of the Integrated SCaN Network. We also develop a new analytical scheme to model the traffic flow and buffering mechanism of a store-and-forward network. It is found that the WAN bandwidth of the Integrated SCaN Network is an important differentiator of different architecture options, as the recurring circuit costs of certain architecture options can be prohibitively high.

  16. Categorization of flow conditions using Integral quantities for characterizing stagnation and recirculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, M.H.; Hwang, W.T.; Jeong, H.J.; Kim, E.H.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a method for categorizing an atmospheric flow condition of a site by using integral quantities for characterizing stagnation and recirculation. Authors have devised a method for categorizing flow conditions using distribution curves which represent the flow condition of the whole of Korea. It was found that the flow conditions for four nuclear power plant sites were good enough from a meteorological aspect. Among the four sites, Kori nuclear power plant site which is located at the south-eastern part of the Korean peninsular shows the best condition. Meteorological condition is the key factor for estimating the environmental effects of a nuclear facility. The devised method can be used for assessing the relative environmental risk of a nuclear facility with only meteorological data. And the devised categorization method can be used for choosing a suitable site for an industrial facility such as a nuclear power plant and a chemical complex. (author)

  17. Concentrated flow paths in riparian buffer zones of southern Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.C. Pankau; J.E. Schoonover; K.W.J. Willard; P.J. Edwards

    2012-01-01

    Riparian buffers in agricultural landscapes should be designed to trap pollutants in overland flow by slowing, filtering, and infiltrating surface runoff entering the buffer via sheet flow. However, observational evidence suggests that concentrated flow is prevalent from agricultural fields. Over time sediment can accumulate in riparian buffers forming berms that...

  18. Dynamic response characteristics of dual flow-path integrally bladed rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Joseph A.; Brown, Jeffrey M.; Scott-Emuakpor, Onome E.; Cross, Charles J.; Slater, Joseph C.

    2015-02-01

    New turbine engine designs requiring secondary flow compression often look to dual flow-path integrally bladed rotors (DFIBRs) since these stages have the ability to perform work on the secondary, or bypassed, flow-field. While analogous to traditional integrally bladed rotor stages, DFIBR designs have many differences that result in unique dynamic response characteristics that must be understood to avoid fatigue. This work investigates these characteristics using reduced-order models (ROMs) that incorporate mistuning through perturbations to blade frequencies. This work provides an alternative to computationally intensive geometric-mistuning approaches for DFIBRs by utilizing tuned blade mode reductions and substructure coupling in cyclic coordinates. Free and forced response results are compared to full finite element model (FEM) solutions to determine if any errors are related to the reduced-order model formulation reduction methods. It is shown that DFIBRs have many more frequency veering regions than their single flow-path integrally blade rotor (IBR) counterparts. Modal families are shown to transition between system, inner-blade, and outer-blade motion. Furthermore, findings illustrate that while mode localization of traditional IBRs is limited to a single or small subset of blades, DFIBRs can have modal energy localized to either an inner- or outer-blade set resulting in many blades responding above tuned levels. Lastly, ROM forced response predictions compare well to full FEM predictions for the two test cases shown.

  19. Integrated Power Flow and Short Circuit Calculation Method for Distribution Network with Inverter Based Distributed Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Power flow calculation and short circuit calculation are the basis of theoretical research for distribution network with inverter based distributed generation. The similarity of equivalent model for inverter based distributed generation during normal and fault conditions of distribution network and the differences between power flow and short circuit calculation are analyzed in this paper. Then an integrated power flow and short circuit calculation method for distribution network with inverter based distributed generation is proposed. The proposed method let the inverter based distributed generation be equivalent to Iθ bus, which makes it suitable to calculate the power flow of distribution network with a current limited inverter based distributed generation. And the low voltage ride through capability of inverter based distributed generation can be considered as well in this paper. Finally, some tests of power flow and short circuit current calculation are performed on a 33-bus distribution network. The calculated results from the proposed method in this paper are contrasted with those by the traditional method and the simulation method, whose results have verified the effectiveness of the integrated method suggested in this paper.

  20. A perspective for biomedical data integration: Design of databases for flow cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakoumentas John

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The integration of biomedical information is essential for tackling medical problems. We describe a data model in the domain of flow cytometry (FC allowing for massive management, analysis and integration with other laboratory and clinical information. The paper is concerned with the proper translation of the Flow Cytometry Standard (FCS into a relational database schema, in a way that facilitates end users at either doing research on FC or studying specific cases of patients undergone FC analysis Results The proposed database schema provides integration of data originating from diverse acquisition settings, organized in a way that allows syntactically simple queries that provide results significantly faster than the conventional implementations of the FCS standard. The proposed schema can potentially achieve up to 8 orders of magnitude reduction in query complexity and up to 2 orders of magnitude reduction in response time for data originating from flow cytometers that record 256 colours. This is mainly achieved by managing to maintain an almost constant number of data-mining procedures regardless of the size and complexity of the stored information. Conclusion It is evident that using single-file data storage standards for the design of databases without any structural transformations significantly limits the flexibility of databases. Analysis of the requirements of a specific domain for integration and massive data processing can provide the necessary schema modifications that will unlock the additional functionality of a relational database.

  1. Investigation of the integrity of u-bend tube bundles subjected to flow-induced vibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, M. [University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario (Canada); Riznic, J. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    Maintaining the integrity of nuclear steam generator (SG) tubes in CANDU reactors is a major safety issue since they maintain the physical barrier between the primary and secondary coolants. The integrity of these tubes can be compromised due to flow-induced vibrations in the form of fatigue and fretting wear damage. Wear is a result of the tube impacting and sliding against its loose supports, and it becomes more severe as the tube/support clearance increases. The vibration is caused by fluid flow around these tubes through turbulence and fluidelastic instability mechanisms. Supports are installed to stiffen the structure and to ensure safe and stable operation. The U-bend region is the most critical part since it is subjected to high cross flow. Therefore, special attention is paid to properly supporting this region. However, in some situations, tube support plates (TSP) located on the straight part of the tube may deteriorate to the point where extremely large clearances, or even total wastage of the supports, may result. One possible cause for such a situation is corrosion and/or excessive fretting wear. This loss of TSP may affect the rate of wear in the U-bend portion of the tube due to the increased flexibility in this region. The integrity could be seriously breached as result of a potential support loss. This paper addresses the flow-induced vibrations (FIV) aspect, consequences, and suggested remedies for support degradation. This analysis will include fretting wear producing parameters, such as impact force and normal work rate. Turbulence and fluidelastic instability (FEI) are considered to be the main excitation mechanisms. The investigation is conducted through a numerical simulation of the full Ubend tube bundles including modelling the variable flow distribution, flow excitation, impact, and friction at the supports. (author)

  2. A point implicit time integration technique for slow transient flow problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadioglu, Samet Y., E-mail: kadioglu@yildiz.edu.tr [Department of Mathematical Engineering, Yildiz Technical University, 34210 Davutpasa-Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey); Berry, Ray A., E-mail: ray.berry@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, MS 3840, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Martineau, Richard C. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, MS 3840, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • This new method does not require implicit iteration; instead it time advances the solutions in a similar spirit to explicit methods. • It is unconditionally stable, as a fully implicit method would be. • It exhibits the simplicity of implementation of an explicit method. • It is specifically designed for slow transient flow problems of long duration such as can occur inside nuclear reactor coolant systems. • Our findings indicate the new method can integrate slow transient problems very efficiently; and its implementation is very robust. - Abstract: We introduce a point implicit time integration technique for slow transient flow problems. The method treats the solution variables of interest (that can be located at cell centers, cell edges, or cell nodes) implicitly and the rest of the information related to same or other variables are handled explicitly. The method does not require implicit iteration; instead it time advances the solutions in a similar spirit to explicit methods, except it involves a few additional function(s) evaluation steps. Moreover, the method is unconditionally stable, as a fully implicit method would be. This new approach exhibits the simplicity of implementation of explicit methods and the stability of implicit methods. It is specifically designed for slow transient flow problems of long duration wherein one would like to perform time integrations with very large time steps. Because the method can be time inaccurate for fast transient problems, particularly with larger time steps, an appropriate solution strategy for a problem that evolves from a fast to a slow transient would be to integrate the fast transient with an explicit or semi-implicit technique and then switch to this point implicit method as soon as the time variation slows sufficiently. We have solved several test problems that result from scalar or systems of flow equations. Our findings indicate the new method can integrate slow transient problems very

  3. A point implicit time integration technique for slow transient flow problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadioglu, Samet Y.; Berry, Ray A.; Martineau, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This new method does not require implicit iteration; instead it time advances the solutions in a similar spirit to explicit methods. • It is unconditionally stable, as a fully implicit method would be. • It exhibits the simplicity of implementation of an explicit method. • It is specifically designed for slow transient flow problems of long duration such as can occur inside nuclear reactor coolant systems. • Our findings indicate the new method can integrate slow transient problems very efficiently; and its implementation is very robust. - Abstract: We introduce a point implicit time integration technique for slow transient flow problems. The method treats the solution variables of interest (that can be located at cell centers, cell edges, or cell nodes) implicitly and the rest of the information related to same or other variables are handled explicitly. The method does not require implicit iteration; instead it time advances the solutions in a similar spirit to explicit methods, except it involves a few additional function(s) evaluation steps. Moreover, the method is unconditionally stable, as a fully implicit method would be. This new approach exhibits the simplicity of implementation of explicit methods and the stability of implicit methods. It is specifically designed for slow transient flow problems of long duration wherein one would like to perform time integrations with very large time steps. Because the method can be time inaccurate for fast transient problems, particularly with larger time steps, an appropriate solution strategy for a problem that evolves from a fast to a slow transient would be to integrate the fast transient with an explicit or semi-implicit technique and then switch to this point implicit method as soon as the time variation slows sufficiently. We have solved several test problems that result from scalar or systems of flow equations. Our findings indicate the new method can integrate slow transient problems very

  4. Degenerate variational integrators for magnetic field line flow and guiding center trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, C. L.; Finn, J. M.; Burby, J. W.; Kraus, M.; Qin, H.; Tang, W. M.

    2018-05-01

    Symplectic integrators offer many benefits for numerically approximating solutions to Hamiltonian differential equations, including bounded energy error and the preservation of invariant sets. Two important Hamiltonian systems encountered in plasma physics—the flow of magnetic field lines and the guiding center motion of magnetized charged particles—resist symplectic integration by conventional means because the dynamics are most naturally formulated in non-canonical coordinates. New algorithms were recently developed using the variational integration formalism; however, those integrators were found to admit parasitic mode instabilities due to their multistep character. This work eliminates the multistep character, and therefore the parasitic mode instabilities via an adaptation of the variational integration formalism that we deem "degenerate variational integration." Both the magnetic field line and guiding center Lagrangians are degenerate in the sense that the resultant Euler-Lagrange equations are systems of first-order ordinary differential equations. We show that retaining the same degree of degeneracy when constructing discrete Lagrangians yields one-step variational integrators preserving a non-canonical symplectic structure. Numerical examples demonstrate the benefits of the new algorithms, including superior stability relative to the existing variational integrators for these systems and superior qualitative behavior relative to non-conservative algorithms.

  5. Integrated approach to model decomposed flow hydrograph using artificial neural network and conceptual techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ashu; Srinivasulu, Sanaga

    2006-02-01

    This paper presents the findings of a study aimed at decomposing a flow hydrograph into different segments based on physical concepts in a catchment, and modelling different segments using different technique viz. conceptual and artificial neural networks (ANNs). An integrated modelling framework is proposed capable of modelling infiltration, base flow, evapotranspiration, soil moisture accounting, and certain segments of the decomposed flow hydrograph using conceptual techniques and the complex, non-linear, and dynamic rainfall-runoff process using ANN technique. Specifically, five different multi-layer perceptron (MLP) and two self-organizing map (SOM) models have been developed. The rainfall and streamflow data derived from the Kentucky River catchment were employed to test the proposed methodology and develop all the models. The performance of all the models was evaluated using seven different standard statistical measures. The results obtained in this study indicate that (a) the rainfall-runoff relationship in a large catchment consists of at least three or four different mappings corresponding to different dynamics of the underlying physical processes, (b) an integrated approach that models the different segments of the decomposed flow hydrograph using different techniques is better than a single ANN in modelling the complex, dynamic, non-linear, and fragmented rainfall runoff process, (c) a simple model based on the concept of flow recession is better than an ANN to model the falling limb of a flow hydrograph, and (d) decomposing a flow hydrograph into the different segments corresponding to the different dynamics based on the physical concepts is better than using the soft decomposition employed using SOM.

  6. An integrated study to evaluate debris flow hazard in alpine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiranti, Davide; Crema, Stefano; Cavalli, Marco; Deangeli, Chiara

    2018-05-01

    Debris flows are among the most dangerous natural processes affecting the alpine environment due to their magnitude (volume of transported material) and the long runout. The presence of structures and infrastructures on alluvial fans can lead to severe problems in terms of interactions between debris flows and human activities. Risk mitigation in these areas requires identifying the magnitude, triggers, and propagation of debris flows. Here, we propose an integrated methodology to characterize these phenomena. The methodology consists of three complementary procedures. Firstly, we adopt a classification method based on the propensity of the catchment bedrocks to produce clayey-grained material. The classification allows us to identify the most likely rheology of the process. Secondly, we calculate a sediment connectivity index to estimate the topographic control on the possible coupling between the sediment source areas and the catchment channel network. This step allows for the assessment of the debris supply, which is most likely available for the channelized processes. Finally, with the data obtained in the previous steps, we modelled the propagation and depositional pattern of debris flows with a 3D code based on Cellular Automata. The results of the numerical runs allow us to identify the depositional patterns and the areas potentially involved in the flow processes. This integrated methodology is applied to a test-bed catchment located in Northwestern Alps. The results indicate that this approach can be regarded as a useful tool to estimate debris flow related potential hazard scenarios in an alpine environment in an expeditious way without possessing an exhaustive knowledge of the investigated catchment, including data on historical debris flow events.

  7. An Integrated Study to Evaluate Debris Flow Hazard in Alpine Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Tiranti

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Debris flows are among the most dangerous natural processes affecting the alpine environment due to their magnitude (volume of transported material and the long runout. The presence of structures and infrastructures on alluvial fans can lead to severe problems in terms of interactions between debris flows and human activities. Risk mitigation in these areas requires identifying the magnitude, triggers, and propagation of debris flows. Here, we propose an integrated methodology to characterize these phenomena. The methodology consists of three complementary procedures. Firstly, we adopt a classification method based on the propensity of the catchment bedrocks to produce clayey-grained material. The classification allows us to identify the most likely rheology of the process. Secondly, we calculate a sediment connectivity index to estimate the topographic control on the possible coupling between the sediment source areas and the catchment channel network. This step allows for the assessment of the debris supply, which is most likely available for the channelized processes. Finally, with the data obtained in the previous steps, we modeled the propagation and depositional pattern of debris flows with a 3D code based on Cellular Automata. The results of the numerical runs allow us to identify the depositional patterns and the areas potentially involved in the flow processes. This integrated methodology is applied to a test-bed catchment located in Northwestern Alps. The results indicate that this approach can be regarded as a useful tool to estimate debris flow related potential hazard scenarios in an alpine environment in an expeditious way without possessing an exhaustive knowledge of the investigated catchment, including data on historical debris flow events.

  8. Online Projective Integral with Proper Orthogonal Decomposition for Incompressible Flows Past NACA0012 Airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirod Sirisup

    2012-01-01

    the individual function of each POD mode used in the projective integration method. It is found that the first POD mode can capture basic flow behaviors but the overall dynamic is rather inaccurate. The second and the third POD modes assist the first mode by correcting magnitudes and phases of vorticity fields. However, adding the fifth POD mode in the model leads to some incorrect results in phase-shift forms for both drag and lift coefficients. This suggests the optimal number of POD modes to use in the projective integration method.

  9. Improving National Water Modeling: An Intercomparison of two High-Resolution, Continental Scale Models, CONUS-ParFlow and the National Water Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijerina, D.; Gochis, D.; Condon, L. E.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2017-12-01

    Development of integrated hydrology modeling systems that couple atmospheric, land surface, and subsurface flow is growing trend in hydrologic modeling. Using an integrated modeling framework, subsurface hydrologic processes, such as lateral flow and soil moisture redistribution, are represented in a single cohesive framework with surface processes like overland flow and evapotranspiration. There is a need for these more intricate models in comprehensive hydrologic forecasting and water management over large spatial areas, specifically the Continental US (CONUS). Currently, two high-resolution, coupled hydrologic modeling applications have been developed for this domain: CONUS-ParFlow built using the integrated hydrologic model ParFlow and the National Water Model that uses the NCAR Weather Research and Forecasting hydrological extension package (WRF-Hydro). Both ParFlow and WRF-Hydro include land surface models, overland flow, and take advantage of parallelization and high-performance computing (HPC) capabilities; however, they have different approaches to overland subsurface flow and groundwater-surface water interactions. Accurately representing large domains remains a challenge considering the difficult task of representing complex hydrologic processes, computational expense, and extensive data needs; both models have accomplished this, but have differences in approach and continue to be difficult to validate. A further exploration of effective methodology to accurately represent large-scale hydrology with integrated models is needed to advance this growing field. Here we compare the outputs of CONUS-ParFlow and the National Water Model to each other and with observations to study the performance of hyper-resolution models over large domains. Models were compared over a range of scales for major watersheds within the CONUS with a specific focus on the Mississippi, Ohio, and Colorado River basins. We use a novel set of approaches and analysis for this comparison

  10. Multiphase integral reacting flow computer code (ICOMFLO): User`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Petrick, M.

    1997-11-01

    A copyrighted computational fluid dynamics computer code, ICOMFLO, has been developed for the simulation of multiphase reacting flows. The code solves conservation equations for gaseous species and droplets (or solid particles) of various sizes. General conservation laws, expressed by elliptic type partial differential equations, are used in conjunction with rate equations governing the mass, momentum, enthalpy, species, turbulent kinetic energy, and turbulent dissipation. Associated phenomenological submodels of the code include integral combustion, two parameter turbulence, particle evaporation, and interfacial submodels. A newly developed integral combustion submodel replacing an Arrhenius type differential reaction submodel has been implemented to improve numerical convergence and enhance numerical stability. A two parameter turbulence submodel is modified for both gas and solid phases. An evaporation submodel treats not only droplet evaporation but size dispersion. Interfacial submodels use correlations to model interfacial momentum and energy transfer. The ICOMFLO code solves the governing equations in three steps. First, a staggered grid system is constructed in the flow domain. The staggered grid system defines gas velocity components on the surfaces of a control volume, while the other flow properties are defined at the volume center. A blocked cell technique is used to handle complex geometry. Then, the partial differential equations are integrated over each control volume and transformed into discrete difference equations. Finally, the difference equations are solved iteratively by using a modified SIMPLER algorithm. The results of the solution include gas flow properties (pressure, temperature, density, species concentration, velocity, and turbulence parameters) and particle flow properties (number density, temperature, velocity, and void fraction). The code has been used in many engineering applications, such as coal-fired combustors, air

  11. The Concept of EV’s Intelligent Integrated Station and Its Energy Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Da Xie; Haoxiang Chu; Yupu Lu; Chenghong Gu; Furong Li; Yu Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The increasing number of electric vehicles (EVs) connected to existing distribution networks as time-variant loads cause significant distortions in line current and voltage. A novel EV's intelligent integrated station (IIS) making full use of retired batteries is introduced in this paper to offer a potential solution for accommodating the charging demand of EVs. It proposes the concept of generalized energy in IIS, based on the energy/power flow between IIS and EVs, and between IIS and the po...

  12. Integral model of linear momentum for one-dimensional two-phase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Yu.A.; Sabaev, E.F.

    1976-01-01

    ''An integrated momentum model'' obtained by Meyer-Rose and widely applicable in calculations of dynamics of the thermal power systems is generalized for a case of flow of a vapour-liquid mixture with phase creep and pressure variation in the heated channel. Pressure distribution along the channel length is shown for a number of cases to be negligible. The obtained equations are found as well applicable in case pressure greatly though slowly varies in the system

  13. Flow control and routing techniques for integrated voice and data networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibe, O. C.

    1981-10-01

    We consider a model of integrated voice and data networks. In this model the network flow problem is formulated as a convex optimization problem. The objective function comprises two types of cost functions: the congestion cost functions, which limit the average input traffic to values compatible with the network conditions; and the rate limitation cost functions, which ensure that all conversations are fairly treated. A joint flow control and routing algorithm is constructed which determines the routes for each conversation, and effects flow control by setting voice packet lengths and data input rates in a manner that achieves optimal tradeoff between each user's satisfaction and the cost of network congestion. An additional congestion control protocol is specified which could be used in conjunction with the algorithm to make the latter respond more dynamically to network congestion.

  14. Numerical study on coolant flow distribution at the core inlet for an integral pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Lin; Peng, Min Jun; Xia, Genglei; Lv, Xing; Li, Ren [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Safety and Simulation Technology Laboratory, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin (China)

    2017-02-15

    When an integral pressurized water reactor is operated under low power conditions, once-through steam generator group operation strategy is applied. However, group operation strategy will cause nonuniform coolant flow distribution at the core inlet and lower plenum. To help coolant flow mix more uniformly, a flow mixing chamber (FMC) has been designed. In this paper, computational fluid dynamics methods have been used to investigate the coolant distribution by the effect of FMC. Velocity and temperature characteristics under different low power conditions and optimized FMC configuration have been analyzed. The results illustrate that the FMC can help improve the nonuniform coolant temperature distribution at the core inlet effectively; at the same time, the FMC will induce more resistance in the downcomer and lower plenum.

  15. CoreFlow: A computational platform for integration, analysis and modeling of complex biological data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasculescu, Adrian; Schoof, Erwin; Creixell, Pau

    2014-01-01

    between data generation, analysis and manuscript writing. CoreFlow is being released to the scientific community as an open-sourced software package complete with proteomics-specific examples, which include corrections for incomplete isotopic labeling of peptides (SILAC) or arginine-to-proline conversion......A major challenge in mass spectrometry and other large-scale applications is how to handle, integrate, and model the data that is produced. Given the speed at which technology advances and the need to keep pace with biological experiments, we designed a computational platform, CoreFlow, which...... provides programmers with a framework to manage data in real-time. It allows users to upload data into a relational database (MySQL), and to create custom scripts in high-level languages such as R, Python, or Perl for processing, correcting and modeling this data. CoreFlow organizes these scripts...

  16. In situ permeable flow sensors at the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration: Phase 2 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, S.

    1994-08-01

    A suite of In Situ Permeable Flow Sensors was deployed at the site of the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration to monitor the interaction between the groundwater flow regime and air injected into the saturated subsurface through a horizontal well. One of the goals of the experiment was to determine if a groundwater circulation system was induced by the air injection process. The data suggest that no such circulation system was established, perhaps due to the heterogeneous nature of the sediments through which the injected gas has to travel. The steady state and transient groundwater flow patterns observed suggest that the injected air followed high permeability pathways from the injection well to the water table. The preferential pathways through the essentially horizontal impermeable layers appear to have been created by drilling activities at the site

  17. Integrated LTCC Pressure/Flow/Temperature Multisensor for Compressed Air Diagnostics†

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Craquelin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a multisensor designed for industrial compressed air diagnostics and combining the measurement of pressure, flow, and temperature, integrated with the corresponding signal conditioning electronics in a single low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC package. The developed sensor may be soldered onto an integrated electro-fluidic platform by using standard surface mount device (SMD technology, e.g., as a standard electronic component would be on a printed circuit board, obviating the need for both wires and tubes and thus paving the road towards low-cost integrated electro-fluidic systems. Several performance aspects of this device are presented and discussed, together with electronics design issues.

  18. Integration of Research for an Exhaust Thermoelectric Generator and the Outer Flow Field of a Car

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, T.; Su, C. Q.; Deng, Y. D.; Wang, Y. P.

    2017-05-01

    The exhaust thermoelectric generator (TEG) can generate electric power from a car engine's waste heat. It is important to maintain a sufficient temperature difference across the thermoelectric modules. The radiator is connected to the cooling units of the thermoelectric modules and used to take away the heat from the TEG system. This paper focuses on the research for the integration of a TEG radiator and the flow field of the car chassis, aiming to cool the radiator by the high speed flow around the chassis. What is more, the TEG radiator is designed as a spoiler to optimize the flow field around the car chassis and even reduce the aerodynamic drag. Concentrating on the flow pressure of the radiator and the aerodynamic drag force, a sedan model with eight different schemes of radiator configurations are studied by computational fluid dynamics simulation. Finally, the simulation results indicate that a reasonable radiator configuration can not only generate high flow pressure to improve the cooling performance, which provides a better support for the TEG system, but also acts as a spoiler to reduce the aerodynamic drag force.

  19. Integrated Analysis of Flow, Form, and Function for River Management and Design Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, B. A. A.; Pasternack, G. B.; Sandoval Solis, S.

    2017-12-01

    Rivers are highly complex, dynamic systems that support numerous ecosystem functions including transporting sediment, modulating biogeochemical processes, and regulating habitat availability for native species. The extent and timing of these functions is largely controlled by the interplay of hydrologic dynamics (i.e. flow) and the shape and composition of the river corridor (i.e. form). This study applies synthetic channel design to the evaluation of river flow-form-function linkages, with the aim of evaluating these interactions across a range of flows and forms to inform process-driven management efforts with limited data and financial requirements. In an application to California's Mediterranean-montane streams, the interacting roles of channel form, water year type, and hydrologic impairment were evaluated across a suite of ecosystem functions related to hydrogeomorphic processes, aquatic habitat, and riparian habitat. Channel form acted as the dominant control on hydrogeomorphic processes considered, while water year type controlled salmonid habitat functions. Streamflow alteration for hydropower increased redd dewatering risk and altered aquatic habitat availability and riparian recruitment dynamics. Study results highlight critical tradeoffs in ecosystem function performance and emphasize the significance of spatiotemporal diversity of flow and form at multiple scales for maintaining river ecosystem integrity. The approach is broadly applicable and extensible to other systems and ecosystem functions, where findings can be used to characterize complex controls on river ecosystems, assess impacts of proposed flow and form alterations, and inform river restoration strategies.

  20. Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) Inundation for Categories 2 and 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    The file geodatabase (fgdb) contains the Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) Maximum of Maximums (MOM) model for hurricane categories 2 and 4. The EPA Office of Research & Development (ORD) modified the original model from NOAA to fit the model parameters for the Buzzards Bay region. The models show storm surge extent for the Mattapoisett area and therefore the flooding area was reduced to the study area. Areas of flooding that were not connected to the main water body were removed. The files in the geodatabase are:Cat2_SLR0_Int_Feet_dissolve_Mattapoisett: Current Category 2 hurricane with 0 ft sea level riseCat4_SLR0_Int_Feet_dissolve_Mattapoisett: Current Category 4 hurricane with 0 ft sea level riseCat4_SLR4_Int_Feet_dissolve_Mattapoisett: Future Category 4 hurricane with 4 feet sea level riseThe features support the Weather Ready Mattapoisett story map, which can be accessed via the following link:https://epa.maps.arcgis.com/apps/MapJournal/index.html?appid=1ff4f1d28a254cb689334799d94b74e2

  1. Modeling runoff and microbial overland transport with KINEROS2/STWIR model: Accuracy and uncertainty as affected by source of infiltration parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infiltration is important to modeling the overland transport of microorganisms in environmental waters. In watershed- and hillslope scale-models, infiltration is commonly described by simple equations relating infiltration rate to soil saturated conductivity and by empirical para...

  2. Development of Integrally Molded Bipolar Plates for All-Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsun Chang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available All-vanadium redox flow batteries (VRBs are potential energy storage systems for renewable power sources because of their flexible design, deep discharge capacity, quick response time, and long cycle life. To minimize the energy loss due to the shunt current, in a traditional design, a flow field is machined on two electrically insulated frames with a graphite plate in between. A traditional bipolar plate (BP of a VRB consists of many components, and thus, the assembly process is time consuming. In this study, an integrally molded BP is designed and fabricated to minimize the manufacturing cost. First, the effects of the mold design and injection parameters on frame formability were analyzed by simulation. Second, a new graphite plate design for integral molding was proposed, and finally, two integrally molded BPs were fabricated and compared. Results show that gate position significantly affects air traps and the maximum volume shrinkage occurs at the corners of a BP. The volume shrinkage can be reduced using a large graphite plate embedded within the frame.

  3. Experimental validation of TASS/SMR-S critical flow model for the integral reactor SMART

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Si Won; Ra, In Sik; Kim, Kun Yeup [ACT Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Young Jong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    An advanced integral PWR, SMART (System- Integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor) is being developed in KAERI. It has a compact size and a relatively small power rating (330MWt) compared to a conventional reactor. Because new concepts are applied to SMART, an experimental and analytical validation is necessary for the safety evaluation of SMART. The analytical safety validation is being accomplished by a safety analysis code for an integral reactor, TASS/SMR-S developed by KAERI. TASS/SMR-S uses a lumped parameter one dimensional node and path modeling for the thermal hydraulic calculation and it uses point kinetics for the reactor power calculation. It has models for a general usage such as a core heat transfer model, a wall heat structure model, a critical flow model, component models, and it also has many SMART specific models such as an once through helical coiled steam generator model, and a condensate heat transfer model. To ensure that the TASS/SMR-S code has the calculation capability for the safety evaluation of SMART, the code should be validated for the specific models with the separate effect test experimental results. In this study, TASS/SMR-S critical flow model is evaluated as compared with SMD (Super Moby Dick) experiment

  4. Integrating continuous stocks and flows into state-and-transition simulation models of landscape change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Colin J.; Sleeter, Benjamin M.; Frid, Leonardo; Fortin, Marie-Josée

    2018-01-01

    State-and-transition simulation models (STSMs) provide a general framework for forecasting landscape dynamics, including projections of both vegetation and land-use/land-cover (LULC) change. The STSM method divides a landscape into spatially-referenced cells and then simulates the state of each cell forward in time, as a discrete-time stochastic process using a Monte Carlo approach, in response to any number of possible transitions. A current limitation of the STSM method, however, is that all of the state variables must be discrete.Here we present a new approach for extending a STSM, in order to account for continuous state variables, called a state-and-transition simulation model with stocks and flows (STSM-SF). The STSM-SF method allows for any number of continuous stocks to be defined for every spatial cell in the STSM, along with a suite of continuous flows specifying the rates at which stock levels change over time. The change in the level of each stock is then simulated forward in time, for each spatial cell, as a discrete-time stochastic process. The method differs from the traditional systems dynamics approach to stock-flow modelling in that the stocks and flows can be spatially-explicit, and the flows can be expressed as a function of the STSM states and transitions.We demonstrate the STSM-SF method by integrating a spatially-explicit carbon (C) budget model with a STSM of LULC change for the state of Hawai'i, USA. In this example, continuous stocks are pools of terrestrial C, while the flows are the possible fluxes of C between these pools. Importantly, several of these C fluxes are triggered by corresponding LULC transitions in the STSM. Model outputs include changes in the spatial and temporal distribution of C pools and fluxes across the landscape in response to projected future changes in LULC over the next 50 years.The new STSM-SF method allows both discrete and continuous state variables to be integrated into a STSM, including interactions between

  5. Three-dimensional analyses of fluid flow and heat transfer for moderator integrity assessment in PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, S.-O.; Kim, M.; Kim, H.-J.

    2002-01-01

    A CANDU reactor has the unique features and the intrinsic safety related characteristics that distinguish it from other water-cooled thermal reactors. If there is the loss of coolant accident (LOCA) and a coincident failure of the emergency coolant injection (ECI) system, the heavy water moderator is continuously cooled, providing a heat sink for decay heat produced in the fuel. Therefore, it is one of major concerns to estimate the local subcooling of moderator inside the calandria vessel under postulated accident in CANDU safety analyses. The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), a regulatory body in Canada, categorized the integrity of moderator as a generic safety issue and recommended that a series of experimental works be performed to verify the safety evaluation codes for individual simulated condition of nuclear power plant, comparing with the results of three-dimensional experimental data. In this study, three-dimensional analyses of fluid flow and heat transfer have been performed to assess thermal-hydraulic characteristics for moderator simulation conducted by SPEL (Sheridan Park Experimental Laboratory) experimental facility. The parametric study has also carried out to investigate the effect of major parameters such as flowrate, temperature, and heat load generated from the heaters on the temperature and flow distribution inside the moderator. Three flow patterns have been identified in the moderator with flowrate, heat generation, or both. As the transition of fluid flow is progressed, it is found that the dimensionless numbers (Ar) and the ratio of buoyancy to inertia forces are constant. (author)

  6. Phase-locked Josephson flux flow local oscillator for sub-mm integrated receivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Jesper; Mahaini, C.; Dmitriev, P.

    2002-01-01

    The Josephson flux flow oscillator (FFO) has proven to be one of the best on-chip local oscillators for heterodyne detection in integrated sub-mm receivers based on SIS mixers. Nb-AlOx-Nb FFOs have been successfully tested from about 120 to 700 GHz (gap frequency of Nb) providing enough power...... to pump an SIS mixer (about 1 muW at 450 GHz). Both the frequency and the power of the FFO can be dc-tuned. Extensive measurements of the dependence of the free-running FFO linewidth on the differential resistances associated with both the bias current and the control-line current (applied magnetic field......) have been performed. The FFO line is Lorentzian both in the resonant regime, on Fiske steps (FSs), and on the flux flow step (FFS). This indicates that internal wide-band noise is dominant. A phenomenological noise model can account for the FFO linewidth dependence on experimental parameters...

  7. A study on flow distribution for integrated hybrid actuator by analysis of reed valve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Jang Mi; Kang, Seung Hwan; Ko, Han Seo [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Goo, Nam Seo; Li, Yong Zhe [Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Many studies have been conducted recently on an integrated hybrid actuator due to the increasing need for unmanned aircraft and guided weapons. In this study, flow distribution was analyzed for a reed valve which was used for flow regulation to improve the performance of the actuator. By using a Fluid structural interaction (FSI) technique with Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) having a moving mesh, numerical analysis was performed according to the thickness, shape and driving frequency of the reed valve. From the calculated results, the maximum performance of the reed valve was found at the valve thickness of 0.15 mm and the driving frequency of 250 Hz for a no-load state. The optimum thickness and shape for the valve for each driving frequency were also realized.

  8. Proposal of evaluation method of tsunami wave pressure using 2D depth-integrated flow simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimitsu, Tsuyoshi; Ooe, Kazuya; Kawasaki, Koji

    2012-01-01

    To design and construct land structures resistive to tsunami force, it is most essential to evaluate tsunami pressure quantitatively. The existing hydrostatic formula, in general, tended to underestimate tsunami wave pressure under the condition of inundation flow with large Froude number. Estimation method of tsunami pressure acting on a land structure was proposed using inundation depth and horizontal velocity at the front of the structure, which were calculated employing a 2D depth-integrated flow model based on the unstructured grid system. The comparison between the numerical and experimental results revealed that the proposed method could reasonably reproduce the vertical distribution of the maximum tsunami pressure as well as the time variation of the tsunami pressure exerting on the structure. (author)

  9. Simulating variable-density flows with time-consistent integration of Navier-Stokes equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaoyi; Pantano, Carlos

    2017-11-01

    In this talk, we present several features of a high-order semi-implicit variable-density low-Mach Navier-Stokes solver. A new formulation to solve pressure Poisson-like equation of variable-density flows is highlighted. With this formulation of the numerical method, we are able to solve all variables with a uniform order of accuracy in time (consistent with the time integrator being used). The solver is primarily designed to perform direct numerical simulations for turbulent premixed flames. Therefore, we also address other important elements, such as energy-stable boundary conditions, synthetic turbulence generation, and flame anchoring method. Numerical examples include classical non-reacting constant/variable-density flows, as well as turbulent premixed flames.

  10. New Love wave liquid sensor operating at 2 GHz using an integrated micro-flow channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assouar, M B; Kirsch, P; Alnot, P

    2009-01-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices based on waveguide modes with shear-horizontal polarization (Love modes) are very promising for sensor applications, especially in liquid media. We present here the realization of a 2 GHz operating frequency sensor based on the SiO 2 /36YX LiTaO 3 structure with an integrated PDMS micro-flow channel and using electron beam lithography to realize the submicronic interdigital transducers. Using our developed sensor operating at 2 GHz, we carried out alternate cycles of nitrogen and water circulating in the PDMS micro-flow channel. We measured an absolute sensitivity of −19 001 Hz mm 2  ng −1 due to the interaction of the sensor with water. This sensitivity is higher than that of other devices operating at lower frequencies. The detection mechanism, including gravimetric and permittivity effects at high frequency, will be discussed

  11. A MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF OPTIMIZATION OF THE VOLUME OF MATERIAL FLOWS IN GRAIN PROCESSING INTEGRATED PRODUCTION SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Baranovskaya T. P.; Loyko V. I.; Makarevich O. A.; Bogoslavskiy S. N.

    2014-01-01

    The article suggests a mathematical model of optimization of the volume of material flows: the model for the ideal conditions; the model for the working conditions; generalized model of determining the optimal input parameters. These models optimize such parameters of inventory management in technology-integrated grain production systems, as the number of cycles supply, the volume of the source material and financial flows. The study was carried out on the example of the integrated system of ...

  12. Using a Content Management System for Integrated Water Quantity, Quality and Instream Flows Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgholzer, R.; Brogan, C. O.; Scott, D.; Keys, T.

    2017-12-01

    With increased population and water demand, in-stream flows can become depleted by consumptive uses and dilution of permitted discharges may be compromised. Reduced flows downstream of water withdrawals may increase the violation rate of bacterial concentrations from direct deposition by livestock and wildlife. Water storage reservoirs are constructed and operated to insure more stable supplies for consumptive demands and dilution flows, however their use comes at the cost of increased evaporative losses, potential for thermal pollution, interrupted fish migration, and reduced flooding events that are critical to maintain habitat and water quality. Due to this complex interrelationship between water quantity, quality and instream habitat comprehensive multi-disciplinary models must be developed to insure long-term sustainability of water resources and to avoid conflicts between drinking water, food and energy production, and aquatic biota. The Commonwealth of Virginia funded the expansion of the Chesapeake Bay Program Phase 5 model to cover the entire state, and has been using this model to evaluate water supply permit and planning since 2009. This integrated modeling system combines a content management system (Drupal and PHP) for model input data and leverages the modularity of HSPF with the custom segmentation and parameterization routines programmed by modelers working with the Chesapeake Bay Program. The model has been applied to over 30 Virginia Water Permits, instream flows and aquatic habitat models and a Virginias 30 year water supply demand projections. Future versions will leverage the Bay Model auto-calibration routines for adding small-scale water supply and TMDL models, utilize climate change scenarios, and integrate Virginia's reservoir management modules into the Chesapeake Bay watershed model, feeding projected demand and operational changes back up to EPA models to improve the realism of future Bay-wide simulations.

  13. Integral linear momentum balance in combining flows for calculating the pressure drop coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollmann, A.

    1983-01-01

    Equations for calculating the loss coefficient in combining flows in tee functions are obtained by an integral linear momentum balance. It is a practice, when solving this type of problem, to neglect the pressure difference in the upstream location as well as the wall-fluid interaction in the lateral branch of the junction. In this work it is demonstrated the influence of the above parameters on the loss coefficient based on experimental values and by apropriate algebraic manipulation of the loss coefficient values published by previous investigators. (Author) [pt

  14. Diurnal measurement of equilibrium equivalent radon/thoron concentration using time integrated flow mode grab sampler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pant, P.; Kandari, T.; Ramola, R.C.; Semwal, C.P.; Prasad, M.

    2018-01-01

    The basic processes which influenced the concentration of radon and thoron decay products are- attachment, recoil and deposition and by the room specific parameters of radon exhalation and ventilation. The freshly formed decay products have a high diffusivities (especially in air) and ability to stick to surfaces. According to UNSCEAR 1977, radon daughters may be combined as the so called equilibrium equivalent concentration which is related to the potential alpha energy distribution concentration. In the present study an effort has been made to see the diurnal variation of radon and thoron progeny concentration using time integrated flow mode sampler

  15. Experimental study of flow friction characteristics of integral pin-fin tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Ming; Yan Changqi; Sun Licheng

    2007-01-01

    Friction characteristics of integral pin-fin tubes, through which lubricating-oil flowed vertically, were studied experimentally. Effects of the pitch, the height of fins and the machining direction on friction coefficient were analyzed. The experimental results showed that the friction coefficient of the integral pin-fro tube was obviously lager than that of smooth tube. Compared with other influential factors, the effect of the height of fins was dominant. Because the three-dimensional pin fin could disturb and destroy the boundary layer, when the Reynolds Number reached 200-300, the friction coefficient curve began to bend, that was, a turning point was appeared in the friction coefficient curve. (authors)

  16. Integrated Photoelectrochemical Solar Energy Conversion and Organic Redox Flow Battery Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Wenjie

    2016-09-21

    Building on regenerative photoelectrochemical solar cells and emerging electrochemical redox flow batteries (RFBs), more efficient, scalable, compact, and cost-effective hybrid energy conversion and storage devices could be realized. An integrated photoelectrochemical solar energy conversion and electrochemical storage device is developed by integrating regenerative silicon solar cells and 9,10-anthraquinone-2,7-disulfonic acid (AQDS)/1,2-benzoquinone-3,5-disulfonic acid (BQDS) RFBs. The device can be directly charged by solar light without external bias, and discharged like normal RFBs with an energy storage density of 1.15 Wh L−1 and a solar-to-output electricity efficiency (SOEE) of 1.7 % over many cycles. The concept exploits a previously undeveloped design connecting two major energy technologies and promises a general approach for storing solar energy electrochemically with high theoretical storage capacity and efficiency.

  17. Externally Phase-Locked Flux Flow Oscillator for Submm Integrated Receivers; Achievements and Limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koshelets, V. P.; Shitov, S. V.; Dmitriev, P. N.

    2003-01-01

    A Josephson Flux Flow Oscillator (FFO) is the most developed superconducting local oscillator for integration with an SIS mixer in a single-chip submm-wave receiver. Recently, using a new FFO design, a free-running linewidth less than or equal to10 MHz has been measured in the frequency range up...... to 712 GHz, limited only by the gap frequency of Nb. This enabled us to phase lock the FFO in the frequency range 500-712 GHz where continuous frequency tuning is possible; resulting in an absolute FFO phase noise as low as -80 dBc at 707 GHz. Comprehensive measurements of the FFO radiation linewidth...... have been performed using an integrated SIS harmonic mixer. The influence of FFO parameters on radiation linewidth, particularly the effect of the differential resistances associated both with the bias current and the applied magnetic field has been studied in order to further optimize the FFO design...

  18. Integrated Photoelectrochemical Solar Energy Conversion and Organic Redox Flow Battery Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjie; Fu, Hui-Chun; Li, Linsen; Cabán-Acevedo, Miguel; He, Jr-Hau; Jin, Song

    2016-10-10

    Building on regenerative photoelectrochemical solar cells and emerging electrochemical redox flow batteries (RFBs), more efficient, scalable, compact, and cost-effective hybrid energy conversion and storage devices could be realized. An integrated photoelectrochemical solar energy conversion and electrochemical storage device is developed by integrating regenerative silicon solar cells and 9,10-anthraquinone-2,7-disulfonic acid (AQDS)/1,2-benzoquinone-3,5-disulfonic acid (BQDS) RFBs. The device can be directly charged by solar light without external bias, and discharged like normal RFBs with an energy storage density of 1.15 Wh L -1 and a solar-to-output electricity efficiency (SOEE) of 1.7 % over many cycles. The concept exploits a previously undeveloped design connecting two major energy technologies and promises a general approach for storing solar energy electrochemically with high theoretical storage capacity and efficiency. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Intensified nitrogen and phosphorus removal in a novel electrolysis-integrated tidal flow constructed wetland system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Xinxin; Wu, Shubiao; Zhang, Yansheng; Dong, Renjie

    2014-08-01

    A novel electrolysis-integrated tidal flow constructed wetland (CW) system was developed in this study. The dynamics of intensified nitrogen and phosphorus removal and that of hydrogen sulphide control were evaluated. Ammonium removal of up to 80% was achieved with an inflow concentration of 60 mg/L in wetland systems with and without electrolysis integration. Effluent nitrate concentration decreased from 2 mg/L to less than 0.5 mg/L with the decrease in current intensity from 1.5 mA/cm(2) to 0.57 mA/cm(2) in the electrolysis-integrated wetland system, thus indicating that the current intensity of electrolysis plays an important role in nitrogen transformations. Phosphorus removal was significantly enhanced, exceeding 95% in the electrolysis-integrated CW system because of the in-situ formation of a ferric iron coagulant through the electro-dissolution of a sacrificial iron anode. Moreover, the electrolyzed wetland system effectively inhibits sulphide accumulation as a result of a sulphide precipitation coupled with ferrous-iron electro-dissolution and/or an inhibition of bacterial sulphate reduction under increased aerobic conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. An integrated approach for hazard assessment and mitigation of debris flows in the Italian Dolomites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasuto, Alessandro; Soldati, Mauro

    2004-07-01

    This paper shows the results of research on a debris flow occurring on 4 September 1997 in the territory of Cortina d'Ampezzo (Dolomites, Italy) where it caused a significant threat owing to the intense urban development, typical of several Alpine valleys. The event, which affected the talus fans at the foot of Mt. Pomagagnon near the village of Fiames, blocked the state road no. 51 "Alemagna" and, after sparing some houses, barred the course of the Torrent Boite and formed an impoundment. This debris flow aroused great concern among local authorities and the Belluno Civil Engineers Board; therefore, the construction of embankments for protecting the buildings threatened by the debris flow was started immediately. This area was studied in detail during this research in order to identify the hazard situations of the whole slope. The investigations made use of an integrated approach including historical, geomorphological, geostructural, meteorological, pedological, and forest-management aspects. Furthermore, assessments of the debris volumes potentially removable in the source area were carried out. The geomorphological evolution of the area was reconstructed, pinpointing the morphological changes occurring in the past 45 years. Taking into account the increased frequency and magnitude of recent events and considering the location of roads and buildings in the accumulation area, the risk conditions were analysed in order to identify a risk zonation and to propose mitigation measures.

  1. Description of internal flow problems by a boundary integral method with dipole panels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieg, R.; Hailfinger, G.

    1979-01-01

    In reactor safety studies the failure of single components is postulated or sudden accident loadings are assumed and the consequences are investigated. Often as a first consequence highly transient three dimensional flow problems occur. In contrast to classical flow problems, in most of the above cases the fluid velocities are relatively small whereas the accelerations assume high values. As a consequence both, viscosity effects and dynamic pressures which are proportional to the square of the fluid velocities are usually negligible. For cases, where the excitation times are considerably longer than the times necessary for a wave to traverse characteristic regions of the fluid field, also the fluid compressibility is negligible. Under these conditions boundary integral methods are an appropriate tool to deal with the problem. Flow singularities are distributed over the fluid boundaries in such a way that pressure and velocity fields are obtained which satisfy the boundary conditions. In order to facilitate the numerical treatment the fluid boundaries are approximated by a finite number of panels with uniform singularity distributions on each of them. Consequently the pressure and velocity field of the given problem may be obtained by superposition of the corresponding fields due to these panels with their singularity intensities as unknown factors. Then satisfying the boundary conditions in so many boundary points as panels have been introduced, yields a system of linear equations which in general allows for a unique determination of the unknown intensities. (orig./RW)

  2. Bats Use Path Integration Rather Than Acoustic Flow to Assess Flight Distance along Flyways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharon, Gal; Sadot, Meshi; Yovel, Yossi

    2017-12-04

    Navigation can be achieved using different strategies from simple beaconing to complex map-based movement [1-4]. Bats display remarkable navigation capabilities, ranging from nightly commutes of several kilometers and up to seasonal migrations over thousands of kilometers [5]. Many bats have been suggested to fly along fixed routes termed "flyways," when flying from their roost to their foraging sites [6]. Flyways commonly stretch along linear landscape elements such as tree lines, hedges, or rivers [7]. When flying along a flyway, bats must estimate the distance they have traveled in order to determine when to turn. This can be especially challenging when moving along a repetitive landscape. Some bats, like Kuhl's pipistrelles, which we studied here, have limited vision [8] and were suggested to rely on bio-sonar for navigation. These bats could therefore estimate distance using three main sensory-navigation strategies, all of which we have examined: acoustic flow, acoustic landmarks, or path integration. We trained bats to fly along a linear flyway and land on a platform. We then tested their behavior when the platform was removed under different manipulations, including changing the acoustic flow, moving the start point, and adding wind. We found that bats do not require acoustic flow, which was hypothesized to be important for their navigation [9-15], and that they can perform the task without landmarks. Our results suggest that Kuhl's pipistrelles use internal self-motion cues-also known as path integration-rather than external information to estimate flight distance for at least dozens of meters when navigating along linear flyways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dynamic modeling of Shell entrained flow gasifier in an integrated gasification combined cycle process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyeon-Hui; Lee, Jae-Chul; Joo, Yong-Jin; Oh, Min; Lee, Chang-Ha

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Detailed dynamic model for the Shell entrained flow gasifier was developed. • The model included sub-models of reactor, membrane wall, gas quench and slag flow. • The dynamics of each zone including membrane wall in the gasifier were analyzed. • Cold gas efficiency (81.82%), gas fraction and temperature agreed with Shell data. • The model could be used as part of the overall IGCC simulation. - Abstract: The Shell coal gasification system is a single-stage, up-flow, oxygen-blown gasifier which utilizes dry pulverized coal with an entrained flow mechanism. Moreover, it has a membrane wall structure and operates in the slagging mode. This work provides a detailed dynamic model of the 300 MW Shell gasifier developed for use as part of an overall IGCC (integrated gasification combined cycle) process simulation. The model consists of several sub-models, such as a volatilization zone, reaction zone, quench zone, slag zone, and membrane wall zone, including heat transfers between the wall layers and steam generation. The dynamic results were illustrated and the validation of the gasifier model was confirmed by comparing the results in the steady state with the reference data. The product gases (H 2 and CO) began to come out from the exit of the reaction zone within 0.5 s, and nucleate boiling heat transfer was dominant in the water zone of the membrane wall due to high heat fluxes. The steady state of the process was reached at nearly t = 500 s, and our simulation data for the steady state, such as the temperature and composition of the syngas, the cold gas efficiency (81.82%), and carbon conversion (near 1.0) were in good agreement with the reference data

  4. Reproduction of pressure field in ultrasonic-measurement-integrated simulation of blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funamoto, Kenichi; Hayase, Toshiyuki

    2013-07-01

    Ultrasonic-measurement-integrated (UMI) simulation of blood flow is used to analyze the velocity and pressure fields by applying feedback signals of artificial body forces based on differences of Doppler velocities between ultrasonic measurement and numerical simulation. Previous studies have revealed that UMI simulation accurately reproduces the velocity field of a target blood flow, but that the reproducibility of the pressure field is not necessarily satisfactory. In the present study, the reproduction of the pressure field by UMI simulation was investigated. The effect of feedback on the pressure field was first examined by theoretical analysis, and a pressure compensation method was devised. When the divergence of the feedback force vector was not zero, it influenced the pressure field in the UMI simulation while improving the computational accuracy of the velocity field. Hence, the correct pressure was estimated by adding pressure compensation to remove the deteriorating effect of the feedback. A numerical experiment was conducted dealing with the reproduction of a synthetic three-dimensional steady flow in a thoracic aneurysm to validate results of the theoretical analysis and the proposed pressure compensation method. The ability of the UMI simulation to reproduce the pressure field deteriorated with a large feedback gain. However, by properly compensating the effects of the feedback signals on the pressure, the error in the pressure field was reduced, exhibiting improvement of the computational accuracy. It is thus concluded that the UMI simulation with pressure compensation allows for the reproduction of both velocity and pressure fields of blood flow. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Integrated surface-subsurface water flow modelling of the Laxemar area. Application of the hydrological model ECOFLOW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokrut, Nikolay; Werner, Kent; Holmen, Johan

    2007-01-01

    /year, respectively), as well as the independently estimated long-term average (150-180 mm/year). Moreover, ECOFLOW computes groundwater recharge-discharge patterns that generally match the patterns identified using MIKE SHE; groundwater recharge occurs at topographic highs, whereas groundwater discharge occurs at streams, lakes and wetlands. Compared to MIKE SHE-MIKE 11, major advantages of the ECOFLOW model are (much) shorter run-times and fewer model parameters. Main ECOFLOW drawbacks include limitations in the handling of surface water (channel) and overland flow. Moreover, ECOFLOW uses MODFLOW to simulate groundwater flow, which implies that the well known 'dry cells' problem in MODLOW is a problem also in ECOFLOW. The study demonstrates that ECOFLOW has capability to produce more or less similar results as MIKE SHE-MIKE 11, and that ECOFLOW is a reliable tool for simulation of complex hydrologic systems. In particular, the relatively simple ECOFLOW model structure means that relatively fast simulations are possible even for long-term hydrologic runoff predictions, which usually require long run-times when more complex models are used for simulation of large and mid-scale catchments

  6. Integrated surface-subsurface water flow modelling of the Laxemar area. Application of the hydrological model ECOFLOW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokrut, Nikolay; Werner, Kent; Holmen, Johan [Golder Associates AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2007-01-15

    -186 mm/year, respectively), as well as the independently estimated long-term average (150-180 mm/year). Moreover, ECOFLOW computes groundwater recharge-discharge patterns that generally match the patterns identified using MIKE SHE; groundwater recharge occurs at topographic highs, whereas groundwater discharge occurs at streams, lakes and wetlands. Compared to MIKE SHE-MIKE 11, major advantages of the ECOFLOW model are (much) shorter run-times and fewer model parameters. Main ECOFLOW drawbacks include limitations in the handling of surface water (channel) and overland flow. Moreover, ECOFLOW uses MODFLOW to simulate groundwater flow, which implies that the well known 'dry cells' problem in MODLOW is a problem also in ECOFLOW. The study demonstrates that ECOFLOW has capability to produce more or less similar results as MIKE SHE-MIKE 11, and that ECOFLOW is a reliable tool for simulation of complex hydrologic systems. In particular, the relatively simple ECOFLOW model structure means that relatively fast simulations are possible even for long-term hydrologic runoff predictions, which usually require long run-times when more complex models are used for simulation of large and mid-scale catchments.

  7. CoreFlow: a computational platform for integration, analysis and modeling of complex biological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasculescu, Adrian; Schoof, Erwin M; Creixell, Pau; Zheng, Yong; Olhovsky, Marina; Tian, Ruijun; So, Jonathan; Vanderlaan, Rachel D; Pawson, Tony; Linding, Rune; Colwill, Karen

    2014-04-04

    A major challenge in mass spectrometry and other large-scale applications is how to handle, integrate, and model the data that is produced. Given the speed at which technology advances and the need to keep pace with biological experiments, we designed a computational platform, CoreFlow, which provides programmers with a framework to manage data in real-time. It allows users to upload data into a relational database (MySQL), and to create custom scripts in high-level languages such as R, Python, or Perl for processing, correcting and modeling this data. CoreFlow organizes these scripts into project-specific pipelines, tracks interdependencies between related tasks, and enables the generation of summary reports as well as publication-quality images. As a result, the gap between experimental and computational components of a typical large-scale biology project is reduced, decreasing the time between data generation, analysis and manuscript writing. CoreFlow is being released to the scientific community as an open-sourced software package complete with proteomics-specific examples, which include corrections for incomplete isotopic labeling of peptides (SILAC) or arginine-to-proline conversion, and modeling of multiple/selected reaction monitoring (MRM/SRM) results. CoreFlow was purposely designed as an environment for programmers to rapidly perform data analysis. These analyses are assembled into project-specific workflows that are readily shared with biologists to guide the next stages of experimentation. Its simple yet powerful interface provides a structure where scripts can be written and tested virtually simultaneously to shorten the life cycle of code development for a particular task. The scripts are exposed at every step so that a user can quickly see the relationships between the data, the assumptions that have been made, and the manipulations that have been performed. Since the scripts use commonly available programming languages, they can easily be

  8. Modelling of fluid flow in fractured porous media by the singular integral equations method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu, M.N.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis aims to develop a method for numerical modelling of fluid flow through fractured porous media and for determination of their effective permeability by taking advantage of recent results based on formulation of the problem by Singular Integral Equations. In parallel, it was also an occasion to continue on the theoretical development and to obtain new results in this area. The governing equations for flow in such materials are reviewed first and mass conservation at the fracture intersections is expressed explicitly. Using the theory of potential, the general potential solutions are proposed in the form of a singular integral equation that describes the steady-state flow in and around several fractures embedded in an infinite porous matrix under a far-field pressure condition. These solutions represent the pressure field in the whole body as functions of the infiltration in the fractures, which fully take into account the fracture interaction and intersections. Closed-form solutions for the fundamental problem of fluid flow around a single fracture are derived, which are considered as the benchmark problems to validate the numerical solutions. In particular, the solution obtained for the case of an elliptical disc-shaped crack obeying to the Poiseuille law has been compared to that obtained for ellipsoidal inclusions with Darcy law.The numerical programs have been developed based on the singular integral equations method to resolve the general potential equations. These allow modeling the fluid flow through a porous medium containing a great number of fractures. Besides, this formulation of the problem also allows obtaining a semi-analytical infiltration solution over a single fracture depending on the matrice permeability, the fracture conductivity and the fracture geometry. This result is the important key to up-scaling the effective permeability of a fractured porous medium by using different homogenisation schemes. The results obtained by the self

  9. An integrated Riverine Environmental Flow Decision Support System (REFDSS) to evaluate the ecological effects of alternative flow scenarios on river ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Kelly O.; Talbert, Colin B.; Cole, Jeffrey C.; Galbraith, Heather S.; Blakeslee, Carrie J.; Hanson, Leanne; Holmquist-Johnson, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    In regulated rivers, managers must evaluate competing flow release scenarios that attempt to balance both human and natural needs. Meeting these natural flow needs is complex due to the myriad of interacting physical and hydrological factors that affect ecosystems. Tools that synthesize the voluminous scientific data and models on these factors will facilitate management of these systems. Here, we present the Riverine Environmental Flow Decision Support System (REFDSS), a tool that enables evaluation of competing flow scenarios and other variables on instream habitat. We developed a REFDSS for the Upper Delaware River, USA, a system that is regulated by three headwater reservoirs. This version of the REFDSS has the ability to integrate any set of spatially explicit data and synthesizes modeled discharge for three competing management scenarios, flow-specific 2-D hydrodynamic modeled estimates of local hydrologic conditions (e.g., depth, velocity, shear stress, etc.) at a fine pixel-scale (1 m2), and habitat suitability criteria (HSC) for a variety of taxa. It contains all individual model outputs, computationally integrates these data, and outputs the amount of potentially available habitat for a suite of species of interest under each flow release scenario. Users have the flexibility to change the time period of interest and vary the HSC. The REFDSS was developed to enable side-by-side evaluation of different flow management scenarios and their effects on potential habitat availability, allowing managers to make informed decisions on the best flow scenarios. An exercise comparing two alternative flow scenarios to a baseline scenario for several key species is presented. The Upper Delaware REFDSS was robust to minor changes in HSC (± 10 %). The general REFDSS platform was developed as a user-friendly Windows desktop application that was designed to include other potential parameters of interest (e.g., temperature) and for transferability to other riverine systems.

  10. Equivalent Method of Integrated Power Generation System of Wind, Photovoltaic and Energy Storage in Power Flow Calculation and Transient Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The integrated power generation system of wind, photovoltaic (PV) and energy storage is composed of several wind turbines, PV units and energy storage units. The detailed model of integrated generation is not suitable for the large-scale powe.r system simulation because of the model's complexity and long computation time. An equivalent method for power flow calculation and transient simulation of the integrated generation system is proposed based on actual projects, so as to establish the foundation of such integrated system simulation and analysis.

  11. Use of integrity control and automatic start of reserve in a multi-channel temperature and flow rate control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strzalkowski, L.

    1975-01-01

    A way to increase reliability of process quantity control is control of the integrity of the control plants themselves. The possibilities of integrity control on control devices having simply duplicated control channels or working on the basis of the ''two-from-three'' principle are valued. A highly reliable integrity control is possible by use of test signals. For an appropriate control device, structure and function of the assemblies are described. The integrity control device may be used in the water coolant temperature and flow rate control system for all technological channels of the research reactor ''Maria''

  12. Active flow control insight gained from a modified integral boundary layer equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Avraham

    2016-11-01

    Active Flow Control (AFC) can alter the development of boundary layers with applications (e.g., reducing drag by separation delay or separating the boundary layers and enhancing vortex shedding to increase drag). Historically, significant effects of steady AFC methods were observed. Unsteady actuation is significantly more efficient than steady. Full-scale AFC tests were conducted with varying levels of success. While clearly relevant to industry, AFC implementation relies on expert knowledge with proven intuition and or costly and lengthy computational efforts. This situation hinders the use of AFC while simple, quick and reliable design method is absent. An updated form of the unsteady integral boundary layer (UIBL) equations, that include AFC terms (unsteady wall transpiration and body forces) can be used to assist in AFC analysis and design. With these equations and given a family of suitable velocity profiles, the momentum thickness can be calculated and matched with an outer, potential flow solution in 2D and 3D manner to create an AFC design tool, parallel to proven tools for airfoil design. Limiting cases of the UIBL equation can be used to analyze candidate AFC concepts in terms of their capability to modify the boundary layers development and system performance.

  13. An Integrated Design approach to Power Systems: from Power Flows to Electricity Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Subhonmesh

    Power system is at the brink of change. Engineering needs, economic forces and environmental factors are the main drivers of this change. The vision is to build a smart electrical grid and a smarter market mechanism around it to fulfill mandates on clean energy. Looking at engineering and economic issues in isolation is no longer an option today; it needs an integrated design approach. In this thesis, I shall revisit some of the classical questions on the engineering operation of power systems that deals with the nonconvexity of power flow equations. Then I shall explore some issues of the interaction of these power flow equations on the electricity markets to address the fundamental issue of market power in a deregulated market environment. Finally, motivated by the emergence of new storage technologies, I present an interesting result on the investment decision problem of placing storage over a power network. The goal of this study is to demonstrate that modern optimization and game theory can provide unique insights into this complex system. Some of the ideas carry over to applications beyond power systems.

  14. Thermal modeling of a greenhouse integrated to an aquifer coupled cavity flow heat exchanger system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sethi, V.P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana 141 008, Punjab (India); Sharma, S.K. [Energy Research Centre, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160 017, Punjab (India)

    2007-06-15

    A thermal model is developed for heating and cooling of an agricultural greenhouse integrated with an aquifer coupled cavity flow heat exchanger system (ACCFHES). The ACCFHES works on the principal of utilizing deep aquifer water available at the ground surface through an irrigation tube well already installed in every agricultural field at constant year-round temperature of 24 C. The analysis is based on the energy balance equations for different components of the greenhouse. Using the derived analytical expressions, a computer program is developed in C{sup ++} for computing the hourly greenhouse plant and room air temperature for various design and climatic parameters. Experimental validation of the developed model is carried out using the measured plant and room air temperature data of the greenhouse (in which capsicum is grown) for the winter and summer conditions of the year 2004-2005 at Chandigarh (31 N and 78 E), Punjab, India. It is observed that the predicted and measured values are in close agreement. Greenhouse room air and plant temperature is maintained 6-7 K and 5-6 K below ambient, respectively for an extreme summer day and 7-8 K and 5-6 K above ambient, respectively for an extreme winter night. Finally, parametric studies are conducted to observe the effect of various operating parameters such as mass of the plant, area of the plant, mass flow rate of the circulating air and area of the ACCFHES on the greenhouse room air and plant temperature. (author)

  15. Coupled hydrodynamic-structural analysis of an integral flowing sodium test loop in the TREAT reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeuch, W.R.; A-Moneim, M.T.

    1979-01-01

    A hydrodynamic-structural response analysis of the Mark-IICB loop was performed for the TREAT (Transient Reactor Test Facility) test AX-1. Test AX-1 is intended to provide information concerning the potential for a vapor explosion in an advanced-fueled LMFBR. The test will be conducted in TREAT with unirradiated uranium-carbide fuel pins in the Mark-IICB integral flowing sodium loop. Our analysis addressed the ability of the experimental hardware to maintain its containment integrity during the reference accident postulated for the test. Based on a thermal-hydraulics analysis and assumptions for fuel-coolant interaction in the test section, a pressure pulse of 144 MPa maximum pressure and pulse width of 1.32 ms has been calculated as the reference accident. The response of the test loop to the pressure transient was obtained with the ICEPEL and STRAW codes. Modelling of the test section was completed with STRAW and the remainder of the loop was modelled by ICEPEL

  16. Towards an integrated petrophysical tool for multiphase flow properties of core samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenormand, R. [Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France)

    1997-08-01

    This paper describes the first use of an Integrated Petrophysical Tool (IPT) on reservoir rock samples. The IPT simultaneously measures the following petrophysical properties: (1) Complete capillary pressure cycle: primary drainage, spontaneous and forced imbibitions, secondary drainage (the cycle leads to the wettability of the core by using the USBM index); End-points and parts of the relative permeability curves; Formation factor and resistivity index. The IPT is based on the steady-state injection of one fluid through the sample placed in a Hassler cell. The experiment leading to the whole Pc cycle on two reservoir sandstones consists of about 30 steps at various oil or water flow rates. It takes about four weeks and is operated at room conditions. Relative permeabilities are in line with standard steady-state measurements. Capillary pressures are in accordance with standard centrifuge measurements. There is no comparison for the resistivity index, but the results are in agreement with literature data. However, the accurate determination of saturation remains the main difficulty and some improvements are proposed. In conclusion, the Integrated Petrophysical Tool is as accurate as standard methods and has the advantage of providing the various parameters on the same sample and during a single experiment. The FIT is easy to use and can be automated. In addition, it can be operated in reservoir conditions.

  17. Development of a 3-D flow analysis computer program for integral reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, H. Y.; Lee, K. H.; Kim, H. K.; Whang, Y. D.; Kim, H. C.

    2003-01-01

    A 3-D computational fluid dynamics program TASS-3D is being developed for the flow analysis of primary coolant system consists of complex geometries such as SMART. A pre/post processor also is being developed to reduce the pre/post processing works such as a computational grid generation, set-up the analysis conditions and analysis of the calculated results. TASS-3D solver employs a non-orthogonal coordinate system and FVM based on the non-staggered grid system. The program includes the various models to simulate the physical phenomena expected to be occurred in the integral reactor and will be coupled with core dynamics code, core T/H code and the secondary system code modules. Currently, the application of TASS-3D is limited to the single phase of liquid, but the code will be further developed including 2-phase phenomena expected for the normal operation and the various transients of the integrator reactor in the next stage

  18. Maximizing biofuel production in a thermochemical biorefinery by adding electrolytic hydrogen and by integrating torrefaction with entrained flow gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lasse Røngaard

    2015-01-01

    double the biofuel production per biomass input by converting almost all of the carbon in the biomass feed to carbon stored in the biofuel product. Water or steam electrolysis can supply the hydrogen to the biorefinery and also the oxygen for the gasifier. This paper presents the design and thermodynamic...... analysis of two biorefineries integrating water electrolysis for the production of methanol. In both plants, torrefied woody biomass is supplied to an entrained flow gasifier, but in one of the plants, the torrefaction process occurs on-site, as it is integrated with the entrained flow gasification process....... The analysis shows that the biorefinery with integrated torrefaction has a higher biomass to methanol energy ratio (136% vs. 101%) as well as higher total energy efficiency (62% vs. 56%). By comparing with two identical biorefineries without electrolysis, it is concluded that the biorefinery with integrated...

  19. Simplified Monolithic Flow Cytometer Chip With Three-Dimensional Hydrodyanmic Focusing And Integrated Fiber-Free Optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Motosuke, Masahiro; Jensen, Thomas Glasdam; Zhuang, Guisheng

    2011-01-01

    A miniaturized flow cytometry incorporating both fluidic and optical systems has a great possibility for portable biochemical sensing or point-of-care diagnostics. This paper presents a simple microfluidic flow cytometer combining reliable 3D hydrodynamic focusing and optical detection without...... optical fibers in a monolithic architecture fabricated by a single photolithographic process. The vertical flow focusing is achieved by the optimized inlet geometry in a PDMS lid onto the substrate with detection channel and integrated optics. The simplified approach indicates the possibility...

  20. Cubic and quartic integrals for geodesic flow on 2-torus via a system of the hydrodynamic type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bialy, Misha; Mironov, Andrey E

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we deal with the classical question of the existence of polynomials in momenta integrals for geodesic flows on the 2-torus. For the quasilinear system on the coefficients of the polynomial integral, we investigate the region (so-called elliptic region) where two of the eigenvalues are complex conjugate. We show that for quartic integrals the other two eigenvalues are real and necessarily genuinely nonlinear. This observation, together with the property of the system to be rich (semi-Hamiltonian), enables us to classify elliptic regions completely. We prove that on these regions the integral is always reducible. The case of complex-conjugate eigenvalues for the system corresponding to the integral of degree 3 is done similarly. These results show that if new integrable examples exist, they can be found only within the region of hyperbolicity of the quasilinear system

  1. Scale effects of Hortonian overland flow and rainfall-runoff dynamics in a West African catena landscape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giesen, van de N.C.; Stomph, T.J.; Ridder, de N.

    2000-01-01

    Hortonian runoff was measured from plots with lengths of 1?25 and 12 m, and at watershed level for rainstorms during the 1996 rainy season in cental Côte d'Ivoire, Africa. A clear reduction in runoff coefficients was found with increasing slope lengths, giving order of magnitude differences between

  2. High performance shallow water kernels for parallel overland flow simulations based on FullSWOF2D

    KAUST Repository

    Wittmann, Roland; Bungartz, Hans-Joachim; Neumann, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    -by-step transformation of the second order finite volume scheme in FullSWOF2D towards MPI parallelization. Second, the computational kernels are optimized by the use of templates and a portable vectorization approach. We discuss the load imbalance of the flux computation

  3. Predicting the occurrence of channelized debris flow by an integrated cascading model: A case study of a small debris flow-prone catchment in Zhejiang Province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhen-lei; Xu, Yue-Ping; Sun, Hong-yue; Xie, Wei; Wu, Gang

    2018-05-01

    Excessive water in a channel is an important factor that triggers channelized debris flows. Floods and debris flows often occur in a cascading manner, and thus, calculating the amount of runoff accurately is important for predicting the occurrence of debris flows. In order to explore the runoff-rainfall relationship, we placed two measuring facilities at the outlet of a small, debris flow-prone headwater catchment to explore the hydrological response of the catchment. The runoff responses generally consisted of a rapid increase in runoff followed by a slower decrease. The peak runoff often occurred after the rainfall ended. The runoff discharge data were simulated by two different modeling approaches, i.e., the NAM model and the Hydrologic Engineering Center-Hydrologic Modeling System (HEC-HMS) model. The results showed that the NAM model performed better than the HEC-HMS model. The NAM model provided acceptable simulations, while the HEC-HMS model did not. Then, we coupled the calculated results of the NAM model with an empirically based debris flow initiation model to obtain a new integrated cascading disaster modeling system to provide improved disaster preparedness and hazard management. In this case study, we found that the coupled model could correctly predict the occurrence of debris flows. Furthermore, we evaluated the effect of the range of input parameter values on the hydrographical shape of the runoff. We also used the grey relational analysis to conduct a sensitivity analysis of the parameters of the model. This study highlighted the important connections between rainfall, hydrological processes, and debris flow, and it provides a useful prototype model system for operational forecasting of debris flows.

  4. Participatory scenario development for integrated assessment of nutrient flows in a Catalan river catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Caille

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Rivers in developed regions are under significant stress due to nutrient enrichment generated mainly by human activities. Excess nitrogen and phosphorus emissions are the product of complex dynamic systems influenced by various factors such as demographic, socio-economic and technological development. Using a Catalan river catchment, La Tordera (North-East of Spain, as a case study of an integrated and interdisciplinary environmental assessment of nutrient flows, we present and discuss the development of narrative socio-economic scenarios through a participatory process for the sustainable management of the anthropogenic sources of nutrients, nitrogen and phosphorus. In this context, scenarios are an appropriate tool to assist nutrient emissions modelling, and to assess impacts, possible pathways for socio-economic development and associated uncertainties. Evaluated against the 1993–2003 baseline period, scenarios target the 2030 horizon, i.e. through the implementation process of the Water Framework Directive (Directive 2000/60/EC. After a critical examination of the methodology used in the participatory development of socio-economic scenarios, we present four possible futures (or perspectives for the Catalan river catchment conceived by stakeholders invited to a workshop. Keys to the success of such a participatory process were trust, which enhanced openness, and disagreements, which fostered the group's creativity for scenario development. The translation of narrative socio-economic scenarios into meaningful nutrient emission scenarios is also discussed. By integrating findings of natural sciences and socio-economic analysis, we aim to assist decision makers and stakeholders in evaluating optimal management strategies for the anthropogenic sources of nitrogen and phosphorus.

  5. Synthesis of a drug-like focused library of trisubstituted pyrrolidines using integrated flow chemistry and batch methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Marcus; Baxendale, Ian R; Kuratli, Christoph; Ley, Steven V; Martin, Rainer E; Schneider, Josef

    2011-07-11

    A combination of flow and batch chemistries has been successfully applied to the assembly of a series of trisubstituted drug-like pyrrolidines. This study demonstrates the efficient preparation of a focused library of these pharmaceutically important structures using microreactor technologies, as well as classical parallel synthesis techniques, and thus exemplifies the impact of integrating innovative enabling tools within the drug discovery process.

  6. Exergy analysis of integrated photovoltaic thermal solar water heater under constant flow rate and constant collection temperature modes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiwari, A.; Dubey, Swapnil; Sandhu, G.S.; Sodha, M.S.; Anwar, S.I.

    2009-01-01

    In this communication, an analytical expression for the water temperature of an integrated photovoltaic thermal solar (IPVTS) water heater under constant flow rate hot water withdrawal has been obtained. Analysis is based on basic energy balance for hybrid flat plate collector and storage tank,

  7. Hybrid Approximate Dynamic Programming Approach for Dynamic Optimal Energy Flow in the Integrated Gas and Power Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shuai, Hang; Ai, Xiaomeng; Wen, Jinyu

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a hybrid approximate dynamic programming (ADP) approach for the multiple time-period optimal power flow in integrated gas and power systems. ADP successively solves Bellman's equation to make decisions according to the current state of the system. So, the updated near future...

  8. Homocoupling of aryl halides in flow: Space integration of lithiation and FeCl3 promoted homocoupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiichiro Nagaki

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of FeCl3 resulted in a fast homocoupling of aryllithiums, and this enabled its integration with the halogen–lithium exchange reaction of aryl halides in a flow microreactor. This system allows the homocoupling of two aryl halides bearing electrophilic functional groups, such as CN and NO2, in under a minute.

  9. A three-dimensional analyses of fluid flow and heat transfer for moderator integrity assessment in PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, K. H.; Lee, J. Y.; Yoo, S. O.; Kim, M. W.; Kim, H. J.

    2002-01-01

    Three-dimensional analyses of fluid flow and heat transfer has been performed in this study. The simulation of SPEL experimental work and comparison with experimental data has been carried out to verify the analyses models. Moreover, to verify the CANDU-6 reactor type, analyses of fluid flow and heat transfer in the calandria under the condition of steady state has been performed using FLUENT code, which is the conventional code for a three-dimensional analyses of fluid flow and heat transfer for moderator integrity assessment in PHWR thermal-hydraulics. It is found that the maximum temperature in the moderator is 347K (74 ), so that the moderator has the enough subcoolability to ensure the integrity of pressure tube during LOCA conditions

  10. Detection of concrete dam leakage using an integrated geophysical technique based on flow-field fitting method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qianwei; Lin, Fangpeng; Wang, Xiaoping; Feng, Deshan; Bayless, Richard C.

    2017-05-01

    An integrated geophysical investigation was performed at S dam located at Dadu basin in China to assess the condition of the dam curtain. The key methodology of the integrated technique used was flow-field fitting method, which allowed identification of the hydraulic connections between the dam foundation and surface water sources (upstream and downstream), and location of the anomalous leakage outlets in the dam foundation. Limitations of the flow-field fitting method were complemented with resistivity logging to identify the internal erosion which had not yet developed into seepage pathways. The results of the flow-field fitting method and resistivity logging were consistent when compared with data provided by seismic tomography, borehole television, water injection test, and rock quality designation.

  11. A CFD method to evaluate the integrated influence of leakage and bypass flows on the PBMR Reactor Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janse van Rensburg, J.J.; Kleingeld, M.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Research and analysis to identify and rank different leakage flow paths in a HTR. → Development of integrated CFD methodology for the prediction of leakage flows. → Development of a methodology to simulate flow resistances in above CFD model. → Validation of predicted flow results against different numerical methodology. → Illustration of the significant improvement achieved through this methodology. - Abstract: An area that has been identified as significantly important in the development of a High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is the prediction of leakage and bypass flows through such a reactor. It is therefore essential to understand the causes of bypass flows and to determine the effect on the predicted fuel and component temperatures. This paper discusses the identification of leakage flows that are applicable to the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (Pty) Ltd. (PBMR) design and the ranking of these leakage flows. The modeling methodology and results are also discussed. Similar to previous HTR's, it was found that leakage and bypass flows are important parameters to consider for safe and efficient operation of the PBMR. Through a focused approach, it is shown that PBMR is able to improve the understanding of this phenomenon and quantify the flows and subsequent influence on the operation of the system. This has resulted in a reduction of leakage and bypass from approximately 46% to 20%. The improved understanding of leakage and bypass flows allows PBMR to address this issue during the design phase of the project, which subsequently results in a vast improvement over historical HTR designs. This gives PBMR a distinct advantage over previous High Temperature Reactors.

  12. A coupled surface/subsurface flow model accounting for air entrapment and air pressure counterflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delfs, Jens Olaf; Wang, Wenqing; Kalbacher, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    wave) shallow flow and two-phase flow in a porous medium. The simultaneous mass transfer between the soil, overland, and atmosphere compartments is achieved by upgrading a fully established leakance concept for overland-soil liquid exchange to an air exchange flux between soil and atmosphere. In a new...... algorithm, leakances operate as a valve for gas pressure in a liquid-covered porous medium facilitating the simulation of air out-break events through the land surface. General criteria are stated to guarantee stability in a sequential iterative coupling algorithm and, in addition, for leakances to control...

  13. Integrated Microfluidic Membrane Transistor Utilizing Chemical Information for On-Chip Flow Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Philipp; Schreiter, Joerg; Haefner, Sebastian; Paschew, Georgi; Voigt, Andreas; Richter, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidics is a great enabling technology for biology, biotechnology, chemistry and general life sciences. Despite many promising predictions of its progress, microfluidics has not reached its full potential yet. To unleash this potential, we propose the use of intrinsically active hydrogels, which work as sensors and actuators at the same time, in microfluidic channel networks. These materials transfer a chemical input signal such as a substance concentration into a mechanical output. This way chemical information is processed and analyzed on the spot without the need for an external control unit. Inspired by the development electronics, our approach focuses on the development of single transistor-like components, which have the potential to be used in an integrated circuit technology. Here, we present membrane isolated chemical volume phase transition transistor (MIS-CVPT). The device is characterized in terms of the flow rate from source to drain, depending on the chemical concentration in the control channel, the source-drain pressure drop and the operating temperature. PMID:27571209

  14. Integrated Modelling on Flow and Water Quality Under the Impacts of Climate Change and Agricultural Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHI, J.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change is expected to have a significant impact on flooding in the UK, inducing more intense and prolonged storms. Frequent flooding due to climate change already exacerbates catchment water quality. Land use is another contributing factor to poor water quality. For example, the move to intensive farming could cause an increase in faecal coliforms entering the water courses. In an effort to understand better the effects on water quality from land use and climate change, the hydrological and estuarine processes are being modelled using SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool), linked to a 2-D hydrodynamic model DIVAST(Depth Integrated Velocity and Solute Transport). The coupled model is able to quantify how much of each pollutant from the catchment reaches the harbour and the impact on water quality within the harbour. The work is focused on the transportation and decay of faecal coliforms from agricultural runoff into the rivers Frome and Piddle in the UK. The impact from the agricultural land use and activities on the catchment river hydrology and water quality are evaluated. The coupled model calibration and validation showed the good model performance on flow and faecal coliform in the watershed and estuary.

  15. Integrated Microfluidic Membrane Transistor Utilizing Chemical Information for On-Chip Flow Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Philipp; Schreiter, Joerg; Haefner, Sebastian; Paschew, Georgi; Voigt, Andreas; Richter, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidics is a great enabling technology for biology, biotechnology, chemistry and general life sciences. Despite many promising predictions of its progress, microfluidics has not reached its full potential yet. To unleash this potential, we propose the use of intrinsically active hydrogels, which work as sensors and actuators at the same time, in microfluidic channel networks. These materials transfer a chemical input signal such as a substance concentration into a mechanical output. This way chemical information is processed and analyzed on the spot without the need for an external control unit. Inspired by the development electronics, our approach focuses on the development of single transistor-like components, which have the potential to be used in an integrated circuit technology. Here, we present membrane isolated chemical volume phase transition transistor (MIS-CVPT). The device is characterized in terms of the flow rate from source to drain, depending on the chemical concentration in the control channel, the source-drain pressure drop and the operating temperature.

  16. Application of macro material flow modeling to the decision making process for integrated waste management systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigil, S.A.; Holter, G.M.

    1995-04-01

    Computer models have been used for almost a decade to model and analyze various aspects of solid waste management Commercially available models exist for estimating the capital and operating costs of landfills, waste-to-energy facilities and compost systems and for optimizing system performance along a single dimension (e.g. cost or transportation distance). An alternative to the use of currently available models is the more flexible macro material flow modeling approach in which a macro scale or regional level approach is taken. Waste materials are tracked through the complete integrated waste management cycle from generation through recycling and reuse, and finally to ultimate disposal. Such an approach has been applied by the authors to two different applications. The STELLA simulation language (for Macintosh computers) was used to model the solid waste management system of Puerto Rico. The model incorporated population projections for all 78 municipalities in Puerto Rico from 1990 to 2010, solid waste generation factors, remaining life for the existing landfills, and projected startup time for new facilities. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has used the SimScript simulation language (for Windows computers) to model the management of solid and hazardous wastes produced during cleanup and remediation activities at the Hanford Nuclear Site

  17. The Concept of EV’s Intelligent Integrated Station and Its Energy Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Xie

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of electric vehicles (EVs connected to existing distribution networks as time-variant loads cause significant distortions in line current and voltage. A novel EV’s intelligent integrated station (IIS making full use of retired batteries is introduced in this paper to offer a potential solution for accommodating the charging demand of EVs. It proposes the concept of generalized energy in IIS, based on the energy/power flow between IIS and EVs, and between IIS and the power grid, to systematically evaluate the energy capacity of IIS. In order to derive a unique and satisfactory operation mode, information from both the grid (in terms of load level and IIS (in terms of its energy capacity and EVs battery charging/exchanging requests is merged. Then, based on the generalized energy of different systems, a novel charging/discharging control strategy is presented and whereby the operating status of the grid and energy capacity of IIS are monitored to make reasonable operation plans for IIS. Simulation results suggest that the proposed IIS offers peak load shifting when EV battery charging/exchanging requests are satisfied compared to existing charging stations.

  18. Assessment on the energy flow and carbon emissions of integrated steelmaking plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huachun He

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available China’s iron and steel industry has developed rapidly over the past two decades. The annual crude steel production is nearly half of the global production, and approximately 90% of the steel is produced via BF–BOF route that is energy-intensive. Based on the practice of integrated steelmaking plants, a material flow analysis model that includes three layers, i.e., material, ferrum, and energy, was constructed on process levels to analyze the energy consumption and carbon emissions according to the principle of mass conservation and the First Law of Thermodynamics. The result shows that the primary energy intensity and carbon emissions are 20.3 GJ/t and 0.46 tC/t crude steel, respectively, including coke and ancillary material’s preparation. These values are above the world’s average level of the BF–BOF route and could be regarded as a high-performance benchmark of steelmaking efficiency. However, the total energy consumption and carbon emission from steelmaking industry were approximately 13095 PJ and 300 MtC, respectively, on the best practice estimation in 2011, and are still large numbers for achieving the goal of reducing global warming. The potential carbon reduction will be limited if no significant changes are undertaken in the steel industry.

  19. Integration of Bromine and Cyanogen Bromide Generators for the Continuous-Flow Synthesis of Cyclic Guanidines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glotz, Gabriel; Lebl, René; Dallinger, Doris; Kappe, C Oliver

    2017-10-23

    A continuous-flow process for the in situ on-demand generation of cyanogen bromide (BrCN) from bromine and potassium cyanide that makes use of membrane-separation technology is described. In order to circumvent the handling, storage, and transportation of elemental bromine, a continuous bromine generator using bromate-bromide synproportionation can optionally be attached upstream. Monitoring and quantification of BrCN generation was enabled through the implementation of in-line FTIR technology. With the Br 2 and BrCN generators connected in series, 0.2 mmol BrCN per minute was produced, which corresponds to a 0.8 m solution of BrCN in dichloromethane. The modular Br 2 /BrCN generator was employed for the synthesis of a diverse set of biologically relevant five- and six-membered cyclic amidines and guanidines. The set-up can either be operated in a fully integrated continuous format or, where reactive crystallization is beneficial, in semi-batch mode. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Application of the Lion's integral to calculate heat transfer with the N2O4 turbulent flow in a tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovich, V.Yu.; Tverkovkin, B.E.; Nesterenko, V.B.

    1976-01-01

    When carrying out engineering calculation of heat transfer in the case of turbulent flow of non-equilibrium reacting gas in a tube, it is necessary to dispose of criterion dependence to calculate Nusselt number. As a rule, dependences obtained by empirical methods are not widely adopted. It is proposed that the integral of Lion type be used for the heat transfer calculation in the form of which an expression for Nusselt number has been written under the conditions of turbulent flow with a non-equilibrium chemical reaction. On calculating turbulent fluctuations Millionshchikov two-layer model is used. A simple approximation of source-discharge of the mass of mixture components is suggested for the sake of simplification of Lion integral. The proposed theoretical dependences for the heat transfer calculation when chemical reactions are available substantially extend the field of application of Lion integral and may be used designing equipment with a chemically reacting coolant

  1. Transient integral boundary layer method to calculate the translesional pressure drop and the fractional flow reserve in myocardial bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Möhlenkamp Stefan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pressure drop – flow relations in myocardial bridges and the assessment of vascular heart disease via fractional flow reserve (FFR have motivated many researchers the last decades. The aim of this study is to simulate several clinical conditions present in myocardial bridges to determine the flow reserve and consequently the clinical relevance of the disease. From a fluid mechanical point of view the pathophysiological situation in myocardial bridges involves fluid flow in a time dependent flow geometry, caused by contracting cardiac muscles overlying an intramural segment of the coronary artery. These flows mostly involve flow separation and secondary motions, which are difficult to calculate and analyse. Methods Because a three dimensional simulation of the haemodynamic conditions in myocardial bridges in a network of coronary arteries is time-consuming, we present a boundary layer model for the calculation of the pressure drop and flow separation. The approach is based on the assumption that the flow can be sufficiently well described by the interaction of an inviscid core and a viscous boundary layer. Under the assumption that the idealised flow through a constriction is given by near-equilibrium velocity profiles of the Falkner-Skan-Cooke (FSC family, the evolution of the boundary layer is obtained by the simultaneous solution of the Falkner-Skan equation and the transient von-Kármán integral momentum equation. Results The model was used to investigate the relative importance of several physical parameters present in myocardial bridges. Results have been obtained for steady and unsteady flow through vessels with 0 – 85% diameter stenosis. We compare two clinical relevant cases of a myocardial bridge in the middle segment of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD. The pressure derived FFR of fixed and dynamic lesions has shown that the flow is less affected in the dynamic case, because the distal

  2. River food webs: an integrative approach to bottom-up flow webs, top-down impact webs, and trophic position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benke, Arthur C

    2018-03-31

    The majority of food web studies are based on connectivity, top-down impacts, bottom-up flows, or trophic position (TP), and ecologists have argued for decades which is best. Rarely have any two been considered simultaneously. The present study uses a procedure that integrates the last three approaches based on taxon-specific secondary production and gut analyses. Ingestion flows are quantified to create a flow web and the same data are used to quantify TP for all taxa. An individual predator's impacts also are estimated using the ratio of its ingestion (I) of each prey to prey production (P) to create an I/P web. This procedure was applied to 41 invertebrate taxa inhabiting submerged woody habitat in a southeastern U.S. river. A complex flow web starting with five basal food resources had 462 flows >1 mg·m -2 ·yr -1 , providing far more information than a connectivity web. Total flows from basal resources to primary consumers/omnivores were dominated by allochthonous amorphous detritus and ranged from 1 to >50,000 mg·m -2 ·yr -1 . Most predator-prey flows were much lower (1,000  mg·m -2 ·yr -1 . The I/P web showed that 83% of individual predator impacts were weak (90%). Quantitative estimates of TP ranged from 2 to 3.7, contrasting sharply with seven integer-based trophic levels based on longest feeding chain. Traditional omnivores (TP = 2.4-2.9) played an important role by consuming more prey and exerting higher impacts on primary consumers than strict predators (TP ≥ 3). This study illustrates how simultaneous quantification of flow pathways, predator impacts, and TP together provide an integrated characterization of natural food webs. © 2018 by the Ecological Society of America.

  3. Internal-external flow integration for a thin ejector-flapped wing section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolard, H. W.

    1979-01-01

    Thin airfoil theories of an ejector flapped wing section are reviewed. The global matching of the external airfoil flow with the ejector internal flow and the overall ejector flapped wing section aerodynamic performance are examined. Mathematical models of the external and internal flows are presented. The delineation of the suction flow coefficient characteristics are discussed. The idealized lift performance of an ejector flapped wing relative to a jet augmented flapped wing are compared.

  4. Integrated water flow model and modflow-farm process: A comparison of theory, approaches, and features of two integrated hydrologic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogrul, Emin C.; Schmid, Wolfgang; Hanson, Randall T.; Kadir, Tariq; Chung, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Effective modeling of conjunctive use of surface and subsurface water resources requires simulation of land use-based root zone and surface flow processes as well as groundwater flows, streamflows, and their interactions. Recently, two computer models developed for this purpose, the Integrated Water Flow Model (IWFM) from the California Department of Water Resources and the MODFLOW with Farm Process (MF-FMP) from the US Geological Survey, have been applied to complex basins such as the Central Valley of California. As both IWFM and MFFMP are publicly available for download and can be applied to other basins, there is a need to objectively compare the main approaches and features used in both models. This paper compares the concepts, as well as the method and simulation features of each hydrologic model pertaining to groundwater, surface water, and landscape processes. The comparison is focused on the integrated simulation of water demand and supply, water use, and the flow between coupled hydrologic processes. The differences in the capabilities and features of these two models could affect the outcome and types of water resource problems that can be simulated.

  5. Miniaturized thermal flow sensor with planar-integrated sensor structures on semicircular surface channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Marcel; de Boer, Meint J.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2008-01-01

    A calorimetric miniaturized flow sensor was realized with a linear sensor response measured for water flow up to flow rates in the order of 300 nl min-1. A versatile technological concept is used to realize a sensor with a thermally isolated freely suspended silicon-rich silicon-nitride microchannel

  6. Integration and consistency testing of groundwater flow models with hydro-geochemistry in site investigations in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitkaenen, P.; Loefman, J.; Korkealaakso, J.; Koskinen, L.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Hautojaervi, A.; Aeikaes, T.

    1999-01-01

    In the assessment of the suitability and safety of a geological repository for radioactive waste the understanding of the fluid flow at a site is essential. In order to build confidence in the assessment of the hydrogeological performance of a site in various conditions, integration of hydrological and hydrogeochemical methods and studies provides the primary method for investigating the evolution that has taken place in the past, and for predicting future conditions at the potential disposal site. A systematic geochemical sampling campaign was started since the beginning of 1990's in the Finnish site investigation programme. This enabled the initiating of integration and evaluation of site scale hydrogeochemical and groundwater flow models. Hydrogeochemical information has been used to screen relevant external processes and variables for definition of the initial and boundary conditions in hydrological simulations. The results obtained from interpretation and modelling hydrogeochemical evolution have been employed in testing the hydrogeochemical consistency of conceptual flow models. Integration and testing of flow models with hydrogeochemical information are considered to improve significantly the hydrogeological understanding of a site and increases confidence in conceptual hydrogeological models. (author)

  7. Impact of DC link control strategies on the power-flow convergence of integrated AC–DC systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shagufta Khan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available For the power-flow solution of integrated AC–DC systems, five quantities are required to be solved per converter, against three independent equations available. These three equations consist of two basic converter equations and one DC network equation, corresponding to each converter. Thus, for solution, two additional equations are required. These two equations are derived from the control specifications adopted for the DC link. Depending on the application, several combinations of valid control specifications are possible. A set of valid control specifications constitutes a control strategy. It is observed that the control strategy adopted for the DC link strongly affects the power-flow convergence of integrated AC–DC systems. This paper investigates how different control strategies affect the power flow convergence of integrated AC–DC systems. Sequential method is used to solve the DC variables in the Newton Raphson (NR power flow model. Seven typical control strategies have been taken into consideration. This is validated by numerous case studies carried out with multiple DC links incorporated in the IEEE 118-bus and 300-bus test systems.

  8. Entrainment of bed material by Earth-surface mass flows: review and reformulation of depth-integrated theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Richard M.; Chaojun Ouyang,

    2015-01-01

    Earth-surface mass flows such as debris flows, rock avalanches, and dam-break floods can grow greatly in size and destructive potential by entraining bed material they encounter. Increasing use of depth-integrated mass- and momentum-conservation equations to model these erosive flows motivates a review of the underlying theory. Our review indicates that many existing models apply depth-integrated conservation principles incorrectly, leading to spurious inferences about the role of mass and momentum exchanges at flow-bed boundaries. Model discrepancies can be rectified by analyzing conservation of mass and momentum in a two-layer system consisting of a moving upper layer and static lower layer. Our analysis shows that erosion or deposition rates at the interface between layers must in general satisfy three jump conditions. These conditions impose constraints on valid erosion formulas, and they help determine the correct forms of depth-integrated conservation equations. Two of the three jump conditions are closely analogous to Rankine-Hugoniot conditions that describe the behavior of shocks in compressible gasses, and the third jump condition describes shear traction discontinuities that necessarily exist across eroding boundaries. Grain-fluid mixtures commonly behave as compressible materials as they undergo entrainment, because changes in bulk density occur as the mixtures mobilize and merge with an overriding flow. If no bulk density change occurs, then only the shear-traction jump condition applies. Even for this special case, however, accurate formulation of depth-integrated momentum equations requires a clear distinction between boundary shear tractions that exist in the presence or absence of bed erosion.

  9. Quantitative myocardial blood flow imaging with integrated time-of-flight PET-MR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kero, Tanja; Nordström, Jonny; Harms, Hendrik J; Sörensen, Jens; Ahlström, Håkan; Lubberink, Mark

    2017-12-01

    The use of integrated PET-MR offers new opportunities for comprehensive assessment of cardiac morphology and function. However, little is known on the quantitative accuracy of cardiac PET imaging with integrated time-of-flight PET-MR. The aim of the present work was to validate the GE Signa PET-MR scanner for quantitative cardiac PET perfusion imaging. Eleven patients (nine male; mean age 59 years; range 46-74 years) with known or suspected coronary artery disease underwent 15 O-water PET scans at rest and during adenosine-induced hyperaemia on a GE Discovery ST PET-CT and a GE Signa PET-MR scanner. PET-MR images were reconstructed using settings recommended by the manufacturer, including time-of-flight (TOF). Data were analysed semi-automatically using Cardiac VUer software, resulting in both parametric myocardial blood flow (MBF) images and segment-based MBF values. Correlation and agreement between PET-CT-based and PET-MR-based MBF values for all three coronary artery territories were assessed using regression analysis and intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC). In addition to the cardiac PET-MR reconstruction protocol as recommended by the manufacturer, comparisons were made using a PET-CT resolution-matched reconstruction protocol both without and with TOF to assess the effect of time-of-flight and reconstruction parameters on quantitative MBF values. Stress MBF data from one patient was excluded due to movement during the PET-CT scanning. Mean MBF values at rest and stress were (0.92 ± 0.12) and (2.74 ± 1.37) mL/g/min for PET-CT and (0.90 ± 0.23) and (2.65 ± 1.15) mL/g/min for PET-MR (p = 0.33 and p = 0.74). ICC between PET-CT-based and PET-MR-based regional MBF was 0.98. Image quality was improved with PET-MR as compared to PET-CT. ICC between PET-MR-based regional MBF with and without TOF and using different filter and reconstruction settings was 1.00. PET-MR-based MBF values correlated well with PET-CT-based MBF values and

  10. Development of a model to predict flow oscillations in low-flow sodium boiling. [Loss-of-Piping Integrity accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, A.E.; Griffith, P.

    1980-04-01

    Tests performed in a small scale water loop showed that voiding oscillations, similar to those observed in sodium, were present in water, as well. An analytical model, appropriate for either sodium or water, was developed and used to describe the water flow behavior. The experimental results indicate that water can be successfully employed as a sodium simulant, and further, that the condensation heat transfer coefficient varies significantly during the growth and collapse of vapor slugs during oscillations. It is this variation, combined with the temperature profile of the unheated zone above the heat source, which determines the oscillatory behavior of the system. The analytical program has produced a model which qualitatively does a good job in predicting the flow behavior in the wake experiment. The amplitude discrepancies are attributable to experimental uncertainties and model inadequacies. Several parameters (heat transfer coefficient, unheated zone temperature profile, mixing between hot and cold fluids during oscillations) are set by the user. Criteria for the comparison of water and sodium experiments have been developed.

  11. An integrable Hamiltonian hierarchy and its constrained flows with generalized Hamiltonian regular representations, as well as its expanding integrable system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yufeng

    2003-01-01

    A new subalgebra of loop algebra A-tilde 2 is first constructed. It follows that an isospectral problem is established. Using Tu-pattern gives rise to a new integrable hierarchy, which possesses bi-Hamiltonian structure. As its reduction cases, the well-known standard Schrodinger equation and MKdV equation are presented, respectively. Furthermore, by making use of bi-symmetry constraints, generalized Hamiltonian regular representations for the hierarchy are obtained. At last, we obtain an expanding integrable system of this hierarchy by applying a scalar transformation between two isospectral problems and constructing a five-dimensional loop algebra G-tilde. In particular, the expanding integrable models of Schrodinger equation and MKdV equation are presented, respectively

  12. VIRTUAL MODEL OF A ROLLER CONVEYOR INTEGRATED INTO A LOGISTIC FLOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POPESCU Adrian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article is presented, with the help of graphics, a logistic flow for palletizing and wrapping operations. The loaded pallets are transported by means of a roller conveyor. Creating the virtual model for the conveyer allows us to emphasize the compatibility elements between on the one hand the mechanical assemblies of the flow components and on the other hand the subassemblies of the conveyer structure. The paper has focused on the presentation of the conveyor specific assembly and how are placed the sensors on the mechanical structure of the conveyor. Finally, the main working phases are graphically presented within the flow, highlighting the loaded pallet positions in the flow.

  13. Integration of a turbine expander with an exothermic reactor loop--Flow sheet development and application to ammonia production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greeff, I.L.; Visser, J.A.; Ptasinski, K.J.; Janssen, F.J.J.G.

    2003-01-01

    This paper investigates the direct integration of a gas turbine power cycle with an ammonia synthesis loop. Such a loop represents a typical reactor-separator system with a recycle stream and cold separation of the product from the recycle loop. The hot reaction products are expanded directly instead of raising steam in a waste heat boiler to drive a steam turbine. Two new combined power and chemicals production flow sheets are developed for the process. The flow sheets are simulated using the flow sheet simulator AspenPlus (licensed by Aspen Technology, Inc.) and compared to a simulated conventional ammonia synthesis loop. The comparison is based on energy as well as exergy analysis. It was found that the pressure ratio over the turbine expander plays an important role in optimisation of an integrated system, specifically due to the process comprising an equilibrium reaction. The inlet temperature to the reactor changes with changing pressure ratio, which in turn determines the conversion and consequently the heat of reaction that is available to produce power. In terms of the minimum work requirement per kg of product a 75% improvement over the conventional process could be obtained. The work penalty due to refrigeration needed for separation was also accounted for. Furthermore this integrated flow sheet also resulted in a decrease in exergy loss and the loss was more evenly distributed between the various unit operations. A detailed exergy analysis over the various unit operations proved to be useful in explaining the overall differences in exergy loss between the flow sheets

  14. The role of a fish pond in optimizing nutrient flows in integrated agriculture-aquaculture farming systems

    OpenAIRE

    Nhan, D.K.

    2007-01-01

    In the Mekong delta, the Vietnamese government promoted integrated agriculture-aquaculture (IAA) farming systems as an example of sustainable agriculture. An important advantage of IAA-farming is the nutrient linkage between the pond and terrestrial components within a farm, which allows to improve resource use efficiency and income while reducing environmental impacts. This study monitored and analyzed water use in and nutrient flows through ponds that are part of an IAA-farming system. Th...

  15. Integrated risk management in a commercial market-maker bank using the 'cash flow at risk' approach

    OpenAIRE

    Voloshyn, Ihor; Voloshyn, Mykyta

    2013-01-01

    In this article, on the basis of the "cash flow at risk" approach, the system of the integrated (credit, market, operational and liquidity risks) risk management in a market-maker commercial bank is developed. This system guarantees reaching profitability, liquidity and coverage of banking risks and thus allows the fullest protection of the interests of depositors, creditors and shareholders of the bank providing its sustainable development.

  16. Determination of the hydraulic characteristics by means of integral parameters in a model of wetland with subsuperficial flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallejos, G.; Ponce Caballero, C.; Quintal Franco, C.; Mendez Novelo, R.

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the portions of plug flow and death zones using tracer tests by empiric models as Wolf-Resnick and Dispersion in evaluate bed-packed reactors with horizontal subsurface flow, as a model of a constructed wetland. In order to assess the hydraulic behavior of systems such as packed-bed reactors and constructed wetlands both of subsurface flow, it is necessary to study and evaluate them modifying some variables while others remain constant. As well it is important to use mathematical models to describe, as precise as possible, the different phenomenon inside the systems, in such a way that these models bring information in an integral way to predict the behavior of the systems. (Author)

  17. Integration of two-phase solid fluid equations in a catchment model for flashfloods, debris flows and shallow slope failures

    KAUST Repository

    Bout, B.

    2018-04-09

    An integrated, modeling method for shallow landslides, debris flows and catchment hydrology is developed and presented in this paper. Existing two-phase debris flow equations and an adaptation on the infinite slope method are coupled with a full hydrological catchment model. We test the approach on the 4 km2 Scaletta catchment, North-Eastern Sicily, where the 1-10-2009 convective storm caused debris flooding after 395 shallow landslides. Validation is done based on the landslide inventory and photographic evidence from the days after the event. Results show that the model can recreate the impact of both shallow landslides, debris flow runout, and debris floods with acceptable accuracy (91 percent inventory overlap with a 0.22 Cohens Kappa). General patterns in slope failure and runout are well-predicted, leading to a fully physically based prediction of rainfall induced debris flood behavior in the downstream areas, such as the creation of a debris fan at the coastal outlet.

  18. Integral Mindflow: A Process of Mindfulness-in-Flow to Enhance Individual and Organization Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacioppe, Ron Lewis

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the differences in mindfulness, meditation and flow and the conditions in which each occurs. It summarizes research that demonstrates positive benefits of these three for employee and organizational learning. While mindfulness focuses awareness on what is occurring in the moment, flow involves total immersion in…

  19. A Microfluidic Device with an Integrated Waveguide Beam Splitter for Velocity Measurements of Flowing Particles by Fourier Transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Kwok, Y.C.; Eijkel, J.C.T.

    2003-01-01

    A microfabricated capillary electrophoresis device for velocity measurements of flowing particles is presented. It consists of a 1 x 128 planar waveguide beam splitter monolithically integrated with an electrically insulated fluidic channel network for fluorescence excitation at multiple points...... optics. The integrated planar waveguide beam splitter was, furthermore, permanently connected to the light source by a glued-on optical fiber, to achieve a robust and alignment-free operation of the system. The velocity was measured using a Fourier transformation with a Shah function, since the response...... of the fight array was designed to approximate a square profile. Deviations from this response were observed as a result of the multimode nature of the integrated waveguides....

  20. Integration of enabling methods for the automated flow preparation of piperazine-2-carboxamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Ingham

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Here we describe the use of a new open-source software package and a Raspberry Pi® computer for the simultaneous control of multiple flow chemistry devices and its application to a machine-assisted, multi-step flow preparation of pyrazine-2-carboxamide – a component of Rifater®, used in the treatment of tuberculosis – and its reduced derivative piperazine-2-carboxamide.

  1. Integration of enabling methods for the automated flow preparation of piperazine-2-carboxamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, Richard J; Battilocchio, Claudio; Hawkins, Joel M; Ley, Steven V

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe the use of a new open-source software package and a Raspberry Pi(®) computer for the simultaneous control of multiple flow chemistry devices and its application to a machine-assisted, multi-step flow preparation of pyrazine-2-carboxamide - a component of Rifater(®), used in the treatment of tuberculosis - and its reduced derivative piperazine-2-carboxamide.

  2. A conceptual framework for the integration of flow theory and cognitive evaluation theory

    OpenAIRE

    Abuhamdeh, Sami

    2012-01-01

    Flow theory (Csikszentmihalyi, Beyond boredom and anxiety: Experiencing flow in work and play. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, 1975) and cognitive evaluation theory (Deci and Ryan, Intrinsic motivation and self-determination in human behaviour. Plenum, New York, 1985) have each inspired a large body of research dedicated to understanding why we enjoy doing what we enjoy doing. Although both theories ostensibly address the same category of behavior—namely, intrinsically motivated behavior—there ha...

  3. An integrated simulator of structure and anisotropic flow in gas diffusion layers with hydrophobic additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burganos, Vasilis N.; Skouras, Eugene D.; Kalarakis, Alexandros N.

    2017-10-01

    The lattice-Boltzmann (LB) method is used in this work to reproduce the controlled addition of binder and hydrophobicity-promoting agents, like polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), into gas diffusion layers (GDLs) and to predict flow permeabilities in the through- and in-plane directions. The present simulator manages to reproduce spreading of binder and hydrophobic additives, sequentially, into the neat fibrous layer using a two-phase flow model. Gas flow simulation is achieved by the same code, sidestepping the need for a post-processing flow code and avoiding the usual input/output and data interface problems that arise in other techniques. Compression effects on flow anisotropy of the impregnated GDL are also studied. The permeability predictions for different compression levels and for different binder or PTFE loadings are found to compare well with experimental data for commercial GDL products and with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions. Alternatively, the PTFE-impregnated structure is reproduced from Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images using an independent, purely geometrical approach. A comparison of the two approaches is made regarding their adequacy to reproduce correctly the main structural features of the GDL and to predict anisotropic flow permeabilities at different volume fractions of binder and hydrophobic additives.

  4. Safety demonstration analyses at JAERI for severe accident during overland transport of fresh nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Yasushi; Kitao, Kohichi; Karasawa, Kiyonori; Yamada, Kenji; Takahashi, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kohji; Okuno, Hiroshi; Miyoshi, Yoshinori

    2005-01-01

    It is expected in the near future that more and more fresh nuclear fuel will be transported in a variety of transport packages to cope with increasing demand from nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Accordingly, safety demonstration analyses are planned and conducted at JAERI under contract with the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry of Japan. These analyses are conducted in a four year plan from 2001 to 2004 to verify integrity of packaging against leakage of radioactive material in the case of a severe accident postulated to occur during transportation, for the purpose of gaining acceptance of such nuclear fuel activities. In order to create the accident scenarios, actual transportation routes were surveyed, accident or incident records were tracked, international radioactive material transport regulations such as IAEA rules were investigated and thus, accident conditions leading to mechanical damages and thermal failure were determined to characterize the scenarios. As a result, the worst-case conditions of run-off-the-road accidents were set up to define the impact against a concrete or asphalt surface. For fire accident scenarios to be set up, collisions were assumed to occur with an oil tanker carrying lots of inflammable material in open air, or with a commonly used two-ton-truck inside a tunnel without ventilation. Then the cask models were determined for these safety demonstration analyses to represent those commonly used for fresh nuclear fuel transported throughout Japan. Following the postulated accident scenarios, the mechanical damages were analyzed by using the general-purpose finite element code LS-DYNA with three-dimensional elements. It was found that leak tightness of the package be maintained even in the severe impact scenario. Then the thermal safety was analyzed by using the general-purpose finite element code ABAOUS with three-dimensional elements to describe cask geometry. As a result of the thermal analyses, the integrity of the containment

  5. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a “special divergence-free” (SDF) property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Feng and Shang [Numer. Math. 71, 451 (1995)], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Richardson and Finn [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 014004 (2012

  6. Integral Field Spectroscopy of Markarian 273: Mapping High-Velocity Gas Flows and an Off-Nucleus Seyfert 2 Nebula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colina; Arribas; Borne

    1999-12-10

    Integral field optical spectroscopy with the INTEGRAL fiber-based system is used to map the extended ionized regions and gas flows in Mrk 273, one of the closest ultraluminous infrared galaxies. The Hbeta and [O iii] lambda5007 maps show the presence of two distinct regions separated by 4&arcsec; (3.1 kpc) along position angle (P.A.) 240 degrees. The northeastern region coincides with the optical nucleus of the galaxy and shows the spectral characteristics of LINERs. The southwestern region is dominated by [O iii] emission and is classified as a Seyfert 2. Therefore, in the optical, Mrk 273 is an ultraluminous infrared galaxy with a LINER nucleus and an extended off-nucleus Seyfert 2 nebula. The kinematics of the [O iii] ionized gas shows (1) the presence of highly disturbed gas in the regions around the LINER nucleus, (2) a high-velocity gas flow with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 2.4x103 km s-1, and (3) quiescent gas in the outer regions (at 3 kpc). We hypothesize that the high-velocity flow is the starburst-driven superwind generated in an optically obscured nuclear starburst and that the quiescent gas is directly ionized by a nuclear source, similar to the ionization cones typically seen in Seyfert galaxies.

  7. Direct experimental visualization of the global Hamiltonian progression of two-dimensional Lagrangian flow topologies from integrable to chaotic state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baskan, O.; Clercx, H. J. H [Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Speetjens, M. F. M. [Energy Technology Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Metcalfe, G. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Melbourne, Victoria 3190 (Australia); Swinburne University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hawthorn VIC 3122 (Australia)

    2015-10-15

    Countless theoretical/numerical studies on transport and mixing in two-dimensional (2D) unsteady flows lean on the assumption that Hamiltonian mechanisms govern the Lagrangian dynamics of passive tracers. However, experimental studies specifically investigating said mechanisms are rare. Moreover, they typically concern local behavior in specific states (usually far away from the integrable state) and generally expose this indirectly by dye visualization. Laboratory experiments explicitly addressing the global Hamiltonian progression of the Lagrangian flow topology entirely from integrable to chaotic state, i.e., the fundamental route to efficient transport by chaotic advection, appear non-existent. This motivates our study on experimental visualization of this progression by direct measurement of Poincaré sections of passive tracer particles in a representative 2D time-periodic flow. This admits (i) accurate replication of the experimental initial conditions, facilitating true one-to-one comparison of simulated and measured behavior, and (ii) direct experimental investigation of the ensuing Lagrangian dynamics. The analysis reveals a close agreement between computations and observations and thus experimentally validates the full global Hamiltonian progression at a great level of detail.

  8. Direct experimental visualization of the global Hamiltonian progression of two-dimensional Lagrangian flow topologies from integrable to chaotic state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskan, O; Speetjens, M F M; Metcalfe, G; Clercx, H J H

    2015-10-01

    Countless theoretical/numerical studies on transport and mixing in two-dimensional (2D) unsteady flows lean on the assumption that Hamiltonian mechanisms govern the Lagrangian dynamics of passive tracers. However, experimental studies specifically investigating said mechanisms are rare. Moreover, they typically concern local behavior in specific states (usually far away from the integrable state) and generally expose this indirectly by dye visualization. Laboratory experiments explicitly addressing the global Hamiltonian progression of the Lagrangian flow topology entirely from integrable to chaotic state, i.e., the fundamental route to efficient transport by chaotic advection, appear non-existent. This motivates our study on experimental visualization of this progression by direct measurement of Poincaré sections of passive tracer particles in a representative 2D time-periodic flow. This admits (i) accurate replication of the experimental initial conditions, facilitating true one-to-one comparison of simulated and measured behavior, and (ii) direct experimental investigation of the ensuing Lagrangian dynamics. The analysis reveals a close agreement between computations and observations and thus experimentally validates the full global Hamiltonian progression at a great level of detail.

  9. Flow resistance interactions on hillslopes with heterogeneous attributes: Effects on runoff hydrograph characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    An improved modeling framework for capturing the effects of dynamic resistance to overland flow is developed for intensively managed landscapes. The framework builds on the WEPP model but it removes the limitations of the “equivalent” plane and static roughness assumption. The enhanced model therefo...

  10. One-way spatial integration of Navier-Stokes equations: stability of wall-bounded flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigas, Georgios; Colonius, Tim; Towne, Aaron; Beyar, Michael

    2016-11-01

    For three-dimensional flows, questions of stability, receptivity, secondary flows, and coherent structures require the solution of large partial-derivative eigenvalue problems. Reduced-order approximations are thus required for engineering prediction since these problems are often computationally intractable or prohibitively expensive. For spatially slowly evolving flows, such as jets and boundary layers, a regularization of the equations of motion sometimes permits a fast spatial marching procedure that results in a huge reduction in computational cost. Recently, a novel one-way spatial marching algorithm has been developed by Towne & Colonius. The new method overcomes the principle flaw observed in Parabolized Stability Equations (PSE), namely the ad hoc regularization that removes upstream propagating modes. The one-way method correctly parabolizes the flow equations based on estimating, in a computationally efficient way, the local spectrum in each cross-stream plane and an efficient spectral filter eliminates modes with upstream group velocity. Results from the application of the method to wall-bounded flows will be presented and compared with predictions from the full linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations and PSE.

  11. Integrating a dual-silicon photoelectrochemical cell into a redox flow battery for unassisted photocharging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, Shichao; Zong, Xu; Seger, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Solar rechargeable flow cells (SRFCs) provide an attractive approach for in situ capture and storage of intermittent solar energy via photoelectrochemical regeneration of discharged redox species for electricity generation. However, overall SFRC performance is restricted by inefficient photoelect......Solar rechargeable flow cells (SRFCs) provide an attractive approach for in situ capture and storage of intermittent solar energy via photoelectrochemical regeneration of discharged redox species for electricity generation. However, overall SFRC performance is restricted by inefficient...... photoelectrochemical reactions. Here we report an efficient SRFC based on a dual-silicon photoelectrochemical cell and a quinone/bromine redox flow battery for in situ solar energy conversion and storage. Using narrow bandgap silicon for efficient photon collection and fast redox couples for rapid interface charge...

  12. Computational Flow Modeling of a Simplified Integrated Tractor-Trailer Geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salari, K.; McWherter-Payne, M.

    2003-01-01

    For several years, Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have been part of a consortium funded by the Department of Energy to improve fuel efficiency of heavy vehicles such as Class 8 trucks through aerodynamic drag reduction. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of using the steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach to predict the flow field around heavy vehicles, with special emphasis on the base region of the trailer, and to compute the aerodynamic forces. In particular, Sandia's computational fluid dynamics code, SACCARA, was used to simulate the flow on a simplified model of a tractor-trailer vehicle. The results are presented and compared with NASA Ames experimental data to assess the predictive capability of RANS to model the flow field and predict the aerodynamic forces

  13. Generalized Energy Flow Analysis Considering Electricity Gas and Heat Subsystems in Local-Area Energy Systems Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqi Shi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available To alleviate environmental pollution and improve the efficient use of energy, energy systems integration (ESI—covering electric power systems, heat systems and natural gas systems—has become an important trend in energy utilization. The traditional power flow calculation method, with the object as the power system, will prove difficult in meeting the requirements of the coupled energy flow analysis. This paper proposes a generalized energy flow (GEF analysis method which is suitable for an ESI containing electricity, heat and gas subsystems. First, the models of electricity, heat, and natural gas networks in the ESI are established. In view of the complexity of the conventional method to solve the gas network including the compressor, an improved practical equivalent method was adopted based on different control modes. On this basis, a hybrid method combining homotopy and the Newton-Raphson algorithm was executed to compute the nonlinear equations of GEF, and the Jacobi matrix reflecting the coupling relationship of multi-energy was derived considering the grid connected mode and island modes of the power system in the ESI. Finally, the validity of the proposed method in multi-energy flow calculation and the analysis of interacting characteristics was verified using practical cases.

  14. Effect of warming and flow rate conditions of blood warmers on red blood cell integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, T G; Pruneau, D; Dorval, J; Thibault, L; Fisette, J-F; Bédard, S K; Jacques, A; Beauregard, P

    2016-11-01

    Fluid warmers are routinely used to reduce the risk of hypothermia and cardiac complications associated with the infusion of cold blood products. However, warming blood products could generate haemolysis. This study was undertaken to compare the impact of temperature of blood warmers on the per cent haemolysis of packed red blood cells (RBCs) heated at different flow rates as well as non-flow conditions. Infusion warmers used were calibrated at 41·5°C ± 0·5°C and 37·5°C ± 0·5°C. Cold RBC units stored at 4°C in AS-3 (n = 30), aged 30-39 days old, were divided into half units before being allocated under two different scenarios (i.e. infusion pump or syringe). Blood warmers were effective to warm cold RBCs to 37·5°C or 41·5°C when used in conjunction with an infusion pump at flow rate up to 600 ml/h. However, when the warmed blood was held in a syringe for various periods of time, such as may occur in neonatal transfusions, the final temperature was below the expected requirements with measurement as low as 33·1°C. Increasing the flow with an infusion pump increased haemolysis in RBCs from 0·2% to up to 2·1% at a flow rate of 600 ml/h regardless of the warming device used (P < 0·05). No relevant increase of haemolysis was observed using a syringe. The use of a blood warmer adjusted to 41·5°C is probably the best choice for reducing the risk of hypothermia for the patient without generating haemolysis. However, we should be cautious with the use of an infusion pump for RBC transfusion, particularly at high flow rates. © 2016 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  15. The Virtual Hospital: an IAIMS integrating continuing education into the work flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, M P; Galvin, J R; Erkonen, W E; Curry, D S; Flanagan, J R; D'Alessandro, D M; Lacey, D L; Wagner, J R

    1996-01-01

    Researchers at the University of Iowa are developing an integrated academic information management system (IAIMS) for use on the World Wide Web. The focus is on integrating continuing medical education (CME) into the clinicians' daily work and incorporating consumer health information into patients' life styles. Phase I of the project consists of loosely integrating patients' data, printed library information, and digital library information. Phase II consists of more tightly integrating the three types of information, and Phase III consists of awarding CME credits for reviewing educational, material at the point of patient care, when it has the most potential for improving outcomes. This IAIMS serves a statewide population. Its design and evolution have been heavily influenced by user-centered evaluation.

  16. Integration of Tactical Departure Scheduling and Traffic Flow Management, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In the ATM Select topic area of Integrated Arrival, Departure and Surface (IADS) planning, this proposal addresses Tactical Departure Scheduling (TDS), which is a...

  17. Investigation on two-phase flow instability in steam generator of integrated nuclear reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    In the pressure range of 3-18MPa,high pressure steam-water two-phase flow density wave instability in vertical upward parallel pipes with inner diameter of 12mm is studied experimentally.The oscillation curves of two-phase flow instability and the effects of several parameters on the oscillation threshold of the system are obtained.Based on the small pertubation linearization method and the stability principles of automatic control system,a mathematical model is developed to predict the characteristics of density wave instability threshold.The predictions of the model are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  18. Probabilistic Constrained Load Flow Considering Integration of Wind Power Generation and Electric Vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlachogiannis, Ioannis (John)

    2009-01-01

    A new formulation and solution of probabilistic constrained load flow (PCLF) problem suitable for modern power systems with wind power generation and electric vehicles (EV) demand or supply is represented. The developed stochastic model of EV demand/supply and the wind power generation model...... are incorporated into load flow studies. In the resulted PCLF formulation, discrete and continuous control parameters are engaged. Therefore, a hybrid learning automata system (HLAS) is developed to find the optimal offline control settings over a whole planning period of power system. The process of HLAS...

  19. Exploring the Intrinsic Motivation of Hedonic Information Systems Acceptance: Integrating Hedonic Theory and Flow with TAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhihuan

    Research on Information Systems (IS) acceptance is substantially focused on extrinsic motivation in workplaces, little is known about the underlying intrinsic motivations of Hedonic IS (HIS) acceptance. This paper proposes a hybrid HIS acceptance model which takes the unique characteristics of HIS and multiple identities of a HIS user into consideration by interacting Hedonic theory, Flow theory with Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). The model was empirically tested by a field survey. The result indicates that emotional responses, imaginal responses, and flow experience are three main contributions of HIS acceptance.

  20. Mantle Flow Across the Baikal Rift Constrained With Integrated Seismic Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, S.; Meier, T.; van der Hilst, R. D.

    2005-12-01

    The Baikal Rift is located at the boundary of the stable Siberian Craton and deforming central Mongolia. The origin of the late Cenozoic rifting and volcanism are debated, as is the mantle flow beneath the rift zone. Here we combine new evidence from azimuthally-anisotropic upper-mantle tomography and from a radially-anisotropic inversion of interstation surface-wave dispersion curves with previously published shear-wave-splitting measurements of azimuthal anisotropy across the rift (Gao et al. 1994). While our tomographic model maps isotropic and anisotropic shear-velocity heterogeneity globally, the inversion of interstation phase-velocity measurements produces a single, radially-anisotropic, shear-velocity profile that averages from the rift to 500 km SE of it. The precision and the broad band (8-340 s) of the Rayleigh and Love wave curves ensures high accuracy of the profile. Tomography and shear-wave splitting both give a NW-SE fast direction (perpendicular to the rift) in the vicinity of the rift, changing towards W-E a few hundred kilometers from it. Previously, this has been interpreted as evidence for mantle flow similar to that beneath mid-ocean ridges, with deeper vertical flow directly beneath the rift also proposed. Our radially anisotropic profile, however, shows that while strong anisotropy with SH waves faster than SV waves is present in the thin lithosphere and upper asthenosphere beneath and SE of the rift, no anisotropy is required below 110 km. The tomographic model shows thick cratonic lithosphere north of the rift. These observations suggest that instead of a flow diverging from the rift axis in NW and SE directions, the most likely pattern is the asthenospheric flow in SE direction from beneath the Siberian lithosphere and across the rift. Possible driving forces of the flow are large-scale lithospheric deformation in East Asia and the draining of asthenosphere at W-Pacific subduction zones; a plume beneath the Siberian craton also cannot be

  1. Architectural Synthesis of Flow-Based Microfluidic Large-Scale Integration Biochips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minhass, Wajid Hassan; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    ,we propose a top-down architectural synthesis methodology for the flow-based biochips. Starting from a given biochemical application and a microfluidic component library, we are interested in synthesizing a biochip architecture, i.e., performing component allocation from the library based on the biochemical....... By combining several microvalves, more complex units, such as micropumps, switches, mixers, and multiplexers, can be built. The manufacturing technology, soft lithography, used for the flow-based biochips is advancing faster than Moore's law, resulting in increased architectural complexity. However...... by synthesizing architectures for real-life applications as well as synthetic benchmarks....

  2. Microchip Flow Cytometer with Integrated Polymer Optical Elements for Measurement of Scattered Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhenyu; El-Ali, Jamil; Perch-Nielsen, Ivan Ryberg

    2004-01-01

    channels to form a complete microchip flow cytometer. All the optical elements, the microfluidic system, and the fiber-to-waveguide couplers were defined in one layer of polymer (SU-8, negative photoresist) by standard photolithography. With only one single mask procedure, all the fabrication and packaging...... processes can be finished in one day. Polystyrene beads were measured in the microchip flow cytometer, and three signals (forward scattering, large angle scattering and extinction) were measured simultaneously for each bead. The average intensities of the forward Scattered light and the incident light...

  3. A web GIS based integrated flood assessment modeling tool for coastal urban watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, A. T.; Mohanty, J.; Eldho, T. I.; Rao, E. P.; Mohan, B. K.

    2014-03-01

    Urban flooding has become an increasingly important issue in many parts of the world. In this study, an integrated flood assessment model (IFAM) is presented for the coastal urban flood simulation. A web based GIS framework has been adopted to organize the spatial datasets for the study area considered and to run the model within this framework. The integrated flood model consists of a mass balance based 1-D overland flow model, 1-D finite element based channel flow model based on diffusion wave approximation and a quasi 2-D raster flood inundation model based on the continuity equation. The model code is written in MATLAB and the application is integrated within a web GIS server product viz: Web Gram Server™ (WGS), developed at IIT Bombay, using Java, JSP and JQuery technologies. Its user interface is developed using open layers and the attribute data are stored in MySQL open source DBMS. The model is integrated within WGS and is called via Java script. The application has been demonstrated for two coastal urban watersheds of Navi Mumbai, India. Simulated flood extents for extreme rainfall event of 26 July, 2005 in the two urban watersheds of Navi Mumbai city are presented and discussed. The study demonstrates the effectiveness of the flood simulation tool in a web GIS environment to facilitate data access and visualization of GIS datasets and simulation results.

  4. "We Like to Listen to Stories about Fish": Integrating Indigenous Ecological and Scientific Knowledge to Inform Environmental Flow Assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue E. Jackson

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies that apply indigenous ecological knowledge to contemporary resource management problems are increasing globally; however, few of these studies have contributed to environmental water management. We interviewed three indigenous landowning groups in a tropical Australian catchment subject to increasing water resource development pressure and trialed tools to integrate indigenous and scientific knowledge of the biology and ecology of freshwater fish to assess their water requirements. The differences, similarities, and complementarities between the knowledge of fish held by indigenous people and scientists are discussed in the context of the changing socioeconomic circumstances experienced by indigenous communities of north Australia. In addition to eliciting indigenous knowledge that confirmed field fish survey results, the approach generated knowledge that was new to both science and indigenous participants, respectively. Indigenous knowledge influenced (1 the conceptual models developed by scientists to understand the flow ecology and (2 the structure of risk assessment tools designed to understand the vulnerability of particular fish to low-flow scenarios.

  5. An integrated workflow for stress and flow modelling using outcrop-derived discrete fracture networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisdom, Kevin; Nick, Hamid; Bertotti, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    stresssensitive fracture permeability and matrix flow to determine the full permeability tensor. The applicability of this workflow is illustrated using an outcropping carbonate pavement in the Potiguar basin in Brazil, from which 1082 fractures are digitised. The permeability tensor for a range of matrix...

  6. An integrated approach to the study of catastrophic debris-flows: geological hazard and human influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Ventisette, C.; Garfagnoli, F.; Ciampalini, A.; Battistini, A.; Gigli, G.; Moretti, S.; Casagli, N.

    2012-09-01

    On 1 October 2009, a prolonged and intense rainstorm triggered hundreds of landslides (predominantly debris flows) in an area of about 50 km2 in the north-eastern sector of Sicily (Italy). Debris flows swept the highest parts of many villages and passed over the SS114 state highway and the Messina-Catania railway, causing more than 30 fatalities. This region has a high relief, due to recent uplift. The peculiar geological and geomorphological framework represents one of the most common predisposing causes of rainstorm-triggered debris flows. This paper deals with the geological and hydro-geomorphological studies performed as a part of the post-disaster activities operated in collaboration with Civil Protection Authority, with the aim at examining landslides effects and mechanisms. The data were elaborated into a GIS platform, to evaluate the influence of urbanisation on the drainage pattern, and were correlated with the lithological and structural framework of the area. Our study points at the evaluation of the volume involved, the detection of triggering mechanisms and the precise reconstruction of the influence of urbanisation as fundamental tools for understanding the dynamics of catastrophic landslides. This kind of analysis, including all the desirable approaches for the correct management of debris flow should be the starting point for robust urban planning.

  7. Integrating a work-flow engine within a commercial SCADA to build end users applications in a scientific environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ounsy, M.; Pierre-Joseph Zephir, S.; Saintin, K.; Abeille, G.; Ley, E. de

    2012-01-01

    To build integrated high-level applications, SOLEIL is using an original component-oriented approach based on GlobalSCREEN, an industrial Java SCADA. The aim of this integrated development environment is to give SOLEIL's scientific and technical staff a way to develop GUI (Graphical User Interface) applications for external users of beamlines. These GUI applications must address the two following needs: monitoring and supervision of a control system and development and execution of automated processes (as beamline alignment, data collection and on-line data analysis). The first need is now completely answered through a rich set of Java graphical components based on the COMETE library and providing a high level of service for data logging, scanning and so on. To reach the same quality of service for process automation, a big effort has been made for more seamless integration of PASSERELLE, a work-flow engine with dedicated user-friendly interfaces for end users, packaged as JavaBeans in GlobalSCREEN components library. Starting with brief descriptions of software architecture of the PASSERELLE and GlobalSCREEN environments, we will then present the overall system integration design as well as the current status of deployment on SOLEIL beamlines. (authors)

  8. Methanol production via pressurized entrained flow biomass gasification – Techno-economic comparison of integrated vs. stand-alone production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Jim; Lundgren, Joakim; Marklund, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    The main objective with this work was to investigate techno-economically the opportunity for integrated gasification-based biomass-to-methanol production in an existing chemical pulp and paper mill. Three different system configurations using the pressurized entrained flow biomass gasification (PEBG) technology were studied, one stand-alone plant, one where the bark boiler in the mill was replaced by a PEBG unit and one with a co-integration of a black liquor gasifier operated in parallel with a PEBG unit. The cases were analysed in terms of overall energy efficiency (calculated as electricity-equivalents) and process economics. The economics was assessed under the current as well as possible future energy market conditions. An economic policy support was found to be necessary to make the methanol production competitive under all market scenarios. In a future energy market, integrating a PEBG unit to replace the bark boiler was the most beneficial case from an economic point of view. In this case the methanol production cost was reduced in the range of 11–18 Euro per MWh compared to the stand-alone case. The overall plant efficiency increased approximately 7%-units compared to the original operation of the mill and the non-integrated stand-alone case. In the case with co-integration of the two parallel gasifiers, an equal increase of the system efficiency was achieved, but the economic benefit was not as apparent. Under similar conditions as the current market and when methanol was sold to replace fossil gasoline, co-integration of the two parallel gasifiers was the best alternative based on received IRR. - Highlights: • Techno-economic results regarding integration of methanol synthesis processes in a pulp and paper mill are presented. • The overall energy efficiency increases in integrated methanol production systems compared to stand-alone production units. • The economics of the integrated system improves compared to stand-alone alternatives. • Tax

  9. Integrated flow reactor that combines high-shear mixing and microwave irradiation for biodiesel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choedkiatsakul, I.; Ngaosuwan, K.; Assabumrungrat, S.; Tabasso, S.; Cravotto, G.

    2015-01-01

    A new simple flow system which is made up of a multi-rotor high-shear mixer connected to a multimode microwave reactor has been assembled. This simple loop reactor has been successfully used in the NaOH-catalyzed transesterification of refined palm oil in methanol. Thanks to optimal mass/heat transfer, full conversion was achieved within 5 min (biodiesel yield of 99.80%). High-quality biodiesel was obtained that is in accordance with international specifications and analytical ASTM standards. The procedure's high efficiency and low energy consumption should pave the way for process scale up. - Highlights: • The combination of HSM-MW flow system for biodiesel production has been proposed. • Highly efficient mass and heat transfer in transesterification reaction. • The hybrid reactor enables a complete conversion in 5 min reaction time. • The new system halved the energy consumption of conventional processes

  10. Automating multistep flow synthesis: approach and challenges in integrating chemistry, machines and logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinmay A. Shukla

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of automation in the multistep flow synthesis is essential for transforming laboratory-scale chemistry into a reliable industrial process. In this review, we briefly introduce the role of automation based on its application in synthesis viz. auto sampling and inline monitoring, optimization and process control. Subsequently, we have critically reviewed a few multistep flow synthesis and suggested a possible control strategy to be implemented so that it helps to reliably transfer the laboratory-scale synthesis strategy to a pilot scale at its optimum conditions. Due to the vast literature in multistep synthesis, we have classified the literature and have identified the case studies based on few criteria viz. type of reaction, heating methods, processes involving in-line separation units, telescopic synthesis, processes involving in-line quenching and process with the smallest time scale of operation. This classification will cover the broader range in the multistep synthesis literature.

  11. Integrating a dual-silicon photoelectrochemical cell into a redox flow battery for unassisted photocharging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shichao; Zong, Xu; Seger, Brian; Pedersen, Thomas; Yao, Tingting; Ding, Chunmei; Shi, Jingying; Chen, Jian; Li, Can

    2016-05-04

    Solar rechargeable flow cells (SRFCs) provide an attractive approach for in situ capture and storage of intermittent solar energy via photoelectrochemical regeneration of discharged redox species for electricity generation. However, overall SFRC performance is restricted by inefficient photoelectrochemical reactions. Here we report an efficient SRFC based on a dual-silicon photoelectrochemical cell and a quinone/bromine redox flow battery for in situ solar energy conversion and storage. Using narrow bandgap silicon for efficient photon collection and fast redox couples for rapid interface charge injection, our device shows an optimal solar-to-chemical conversion efficiency of ∼5.9% and an overall photon-chemical-electricity energy conversion efficiency of ∼3.2%, which, to our knowledge, outperforms previously reported SRFCs. The proposed SRFC can be self-photocharged to 0.8 V and delivers a discharge capacity of 730 mAh l(-1). Our work may guide future designs for highly efficient solar rechargeable devices.

  12. Bi-Hamiltonian operators, integrable flows of curves using moving frames and geometric map equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anco, Stephen C

    2006-01-01

    Moving frames of various kinds are used to derive bi-Hamiltonian operators and associated hierarchies of multi-component soliton equations from group-invariant flows of non-stretching curves in constant-curvature manifolds and Lie-group manifolds. The hierarchy in the constant-curvature case consists of a vector mKdV equation coming from a parallel frame, a vector potential mKdV equation coming from a covariantly constant frame, and higher order counterparts generated by an underlying vector mKdV recursion operator. In the Lie-group case, the hierarchy comprises a group-invariant analogue of the vector NLS equation coming from a left-invariant frame, along with higher order counterparts generated by a recursion operator that is like a square root of the mKdV one. The corresponding respective curve flows are found to be given by geometric nonlinear PDEs, specifically mKdV and group-invariant analogues of Schroedinger maps. In all cases the hierarchies also contain variants of vector sine-Gordon equations arising from the kernel of the respective recursion operators. The geometric PDEs that describe the corresponding curve flows are shown to be wave maps

  13. Heterogeneous Pd catalysts as emulsifiers in Pickering emulsions for integrated multistep synthesis in flow chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebler, Katharina; Lichtenegger, Georg J; Maier, Manuel C; Park, Eun Sung; Gonzales-Groom, Renie; Binks, Bernard P; Gruber-Woelfler, Heidrun

    2018-01-01

    Within the "compartmentalised smart factory" approach of the ONE-FLOW project the implementation of different catalysts in "compartments" provided by Pickering emulsions and their application in continuous flow is targeted. We present here the development of heterogeneous Pd catalysts that are ready to be used in combination with biocatalysts for catalytic cascade synthesis of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). In particular, we focus on the application of the catalytic systems for Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions, which is the key step in the synthesis of the targeted APIs valsartan and sacubitril. An immobilised enzyme will accomplish the final product formation via hydrolysis. In order to create a large interfacial area for the catalytic reactions and to keep the reagents separated until required, the catalyst particles are used to stabilise Pickering emulsions of oil and water. A set of Ce-Sn-Pd oxides with the molecular formula Ce 0.99- x Sn x Pd 0.01 O 2-δ ( x = 0-0.99) has been prepared utilising a simple single-step solution combustion method. The high applicability of the catalysts for different functional groups and their minimal leaching behaviour is demonstrated with various Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions in batch as well as in continuous flow employing the so-called "plug & play reactor". Finally, we demonstrate the use of these particles as the sole emulsifier of oil-water emulsions for a range of oils.

  14. Integration of lyoplate based flow cytometry and computational analysis for standardized immunological biomarker discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Villanova

    Full Text Available Discovery of novel immune biomarkers for monitoring of disease prognosis and response to therapy in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases is an important unmet clinical need. Here, we establish a novel framework for immunological biomarker discovery, comparing a conventional (liquid flow cytometry platform (CFP and a unique lyoplate-based flow cytometry platform (LFP in combination with advanced computational data analysis. We demonstrate that LFP had higher sensitivity compared to CFP, with increased detection of cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-10 and activation markers (Foxp3 and CD25. Fluorescent intensity of cells stained with lyophilized antibodies was increased compared to cells stained with liquid antibodies. LFP, using a plate loader, allowed medium-throughput processing of samples with comparable intra- and inter-assay variability between platforms. Automated computational analysis identified novel immunophenotypes that were not detected with manual analysis. Our results establish a new flow cytometry platform for standardized and rapid immunological biomarker discovery with wide application to immune-mediated diseases.

  15. Integration of lyoplate based flow cytometry and computational analysis for standardized immunological biomarker discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanova, Federica; Di Meglio, Paola; Inokuma, Margaret; Aghaeepour, Nima; Perucha, Esperanza; Mollon, Jennifer; Nomura, Laurel; Hernandez-Fuentes, Maria; Cope, Andrew; Prevost, A Toby; Heck, Susanne; Maino, Vernon; Lord, Graham; Brinkman, Ryan R; Nestle, Frank O

    2013-01-01

    Discovery of novel immune biomarkers for monitoring of disease prognosis and response to therapy in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases is an important unmet clinical need. Here, we establish a novel framework for immunological biomarker discovery, comparing a conventional (liquid) flow cytometry platform (CFP) and a unique lyoplate-based flow cytometry platform (LFP) in combination with advanced computational data analysis. We demonstrate that LFP had higher sensitivity compared to CFP, with increased detection of cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-10) and activation markers (Foxp3 and CD25). Fluorescent intensity of cells stained with lyophilized antibodies was increased compared to cells stained with liquid antibodies. LFP, using a plate loader, allowed medium-throughput processing of samples with comparable intra- and inter-assay variability between platforms. Automated computational analysis identified novel immunophenotypes that were not detected with manual analysis. Our results establish a new flow cytometry platform for standardized and rapid immunological biomarker discovery with wide application to immune-mediated diseases.

  16. Bi-Hamiltonian operators, integrable flows of curves using moving frames and geometric map equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anco, Stephen C [Department of Mathematics, Brock University, St Catharines, ON (Canada)

    2006-03-03

    Moving frames of various kinds are used to derive bi-Hamiltonian operators and associated hierarchies of multi-component soliton equations from group-invariant flows of non-stretching curves in constant-curvature manifolds and Lie-group manifolds. The hierarchy in the constant-curvature case consists of a vector mKdV equation coming from a parallel frame, a vector potential mKdV equation coming from a covariantly constant frame, and higher order counterparts generated by an underlying vector mKdV recursion operator. In the Lie-group case, the hierarchy comprises a group-invariant analogue of the vector NLS equation coming from a left-invariant frame, along with higher order counterparts generated by a recursion operator that is like a square root of the mKdV one. The corresponding respective curve flows are found to be given by geometric nonlinear PDEs, specifically mKdV and group-invariant analogues of Schroedinger maps. In all cases the hierarchies also contain variants of vector sine-Gordon equations arising from the kernel of the respective recursion operators. The geometric PDEs that describe the corresponding curve flows are shown to be wave maps.

  17. Integrated Photoelectrochemical Solar Energy Conversion and Organic Redox Flow Battery Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Wenjie; Fu, Hui-chun; Li, Linsen; Cabá n-Acevedo, Miguel; He, Jr-Hau; Jin, Song

    2016-01-01

    photoelectrochemical solar energy conversion and electrochemical storage device is developed by integrating regenerative silicon solar cells and 9,10-anthraquinone-2,7-disulfonic acid (AQDS)/1,2-benzoquinone-3,5-disulfonic acid (BQDS) RFBs. The device can be directly

  18. Flow level performance approximations for elastic traffic integrated with prioritized stream traffic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malhotra, R.; Berg, J.L. van den

    2007-01-01

    Almost all traffic in todays networks can be classified as being either stream or elastic. The support of these two traffic types is possible either with a Differentiated (DiffServ) or an Integrated Services (IntServ) architecture. However, both DiffServ and IntServ rely on efficient scheduling

  19. Simulation of integrated surface-water/ground-water flow and salinity for a coastal wetland and adjacent estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, C.; Swain, E.; Wolfert, M.

    2005-01-01

    The SWIFT2D surface-water flow and transport code, which solves the St Venant equations in two dimensions, was coupled with the SEAWAT variable-density ground-water code to represent hydrologic processes in coastal wetlands and adjacent estuaries. A sequentially coupled time-lagged approach was implemented, based on a variable-density form of Darcy's Law, to couple the surface and subsurface systems. The integrated code also represents the advective transport of salt mass between the surface and subsurface. The integrated code was applied to the southern Everglades of Florida to quantify flow and salinity patterns and to evaluate effects of hydrologic processes. Model results confirm several important observations about the coastal wetland: (1) the coastal embankment separating the wetland from the estuary is overtopped only during tropical storms, (2) leakage between the surface and subsurface is locally important in the wetland, but submarine ground-water discharge does not contribute large quantities of freshwater to the estuary, and (3) coastal wetland salinities increase to near seawater values during the dry season, and the wetland flushes each year with the onset of the wet season. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Integral Method for the Assessment of U-RANS Effectiveness in Non-Equilibrium Flows and Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pond, Ian; Edabi, Alireza; Dubief, Yves; White, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    Reynolds Average Navier Stokes (RANS) modeling has established itself as a critical design tool in many engineering applications, thanks to its superior computational efficiency. The drawbacks of RANS models are well known, but not necessarily well understood: poor prediction of transition, non equilibrium flows, mixing and heat transfer, to name the ones relevant to our study. In the present study, we use a DNS of a reciprocating channel flow driven by an oscillating pressure gradient to test several low- and high-Reynolds RANS models. Temperature is introduced as a passive scalar to study heat transfer modeling. Low-Reynolds models manage to capture the overall physics of wall shear and heat flux well, yet with some phase discrepancies, whereas high Reynolds models fail. Under the microscope of the integral method for wall shear and wall heat flux, the qualitative agreement appears more serendipitous than driven by the ability of the models to capture the correct physics. The integral method is shown to be more insightful in the benchmarking of RANS models than the typical comparisons of statistical quantities. The authors acknowledges the support of NSF and DOE under grant NSF/DOE 1258697 (VT) and 1258702 (NH).

  1. Intelligent information data base of flow boiling characteristics in once-through steam generator for integrated type marine water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inasaka, Fujio; Nariai, Hideki

    1998-01-01

    Valuable experimental knowledge with flow boiling characteristics of the helical-coil type once-through steam generator was converted into an intelligent information data base program. The program was created as a windows application using the Visual Basic. Main functions of the program are as follows: (1) steady state flow boiling analysis of any helical-coil type once-through steam generator, (2) analysis and comparison with the experimental data, (3) reference and graph display of the steady state experimental data, (4) reference of the flow instability experimental data and display of the instability threshold correlated by each parameter, (5) summary of the experimental apparatus. (6) menu bar such as a help and print. In the steady state analysis, the region lengths of subcooled boiling, saturated boiling, and super-heating, and the temperature and pressure distributions etc. for secondary water calculated. Steady state analysis results agreed well with the experimental data, with the exception of the pressure drop at high mass velocity. The program will be useful for the design of not only the future integrated type marine water reactor but also the small sized water reactor with helical-coil type steam generator

  2. Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emerek, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    Bidraget diskuterer de forskellige intergrationsopfattelse i Danmark - og hvad der kan forstås ved vellykket integration......Bidraget diskuterer de forskellige intergrationsopfattelse i Danmark - og hvad der kan forstås ved vellykket integration...

  3. Integrated geophysical and hydrothermal models of flank degassing and fluid flow at Masaya Volcano, Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Ward E.; Pearson, S.C.P.; Kiyosugi, K.; Lehto, H.L.; Saballos, J.A.; Connor, C.B.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate geologic controls on circulation in the shallow hydrothermal system of Masaya volcano, Nicaragua, and their relationship to surface diffuse degassing. On a local scale (~250 m), relatively impermeable normal faults dipping at ~60° control the flowpath of water vapor and other gases in the vadose zone. These shallow normal faults are identified by modeling of a NE-SW trending magnetic anomaly of up to 2300 nT that corresponds to a topographic offset. Elevated SP and CO2 to the NW of the faults and an absence of CO2 to the SE suggest that these faults are barriers to flow. TOUGH2 numerical models of fluid circulation show enhanced flow through the footwalls of the faults, and corresponding increased mass flow and temperature at the surface (diffuse degassing zones). On a larger scale, TOUGH2 modeling suggests that groundwater convection may be occurring in a 3-4 km radial fracture zone transecting the entire flank of the volcano. Hot water rising uniformly into the base of the model at 1 x 10-5 kg/m2s results in convection that focuses heat and fluid and can explain the three distinct diffuse degassing zones distributed along the fracture. Our data and models suggest that the unusually active surface degassing zones at Masaya volcano can result purely from uniform heat and fluid flux at depth that is complicated by groundwater convection and permeability variations in the upper few km. Therefore isolating the effects of subsurface geology is vital when trying to interpret diffuse degassing in light of volcanic activity.

  4. Numerical simulation of liquid film flow on revolution surfaces with momentum integral method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottoni Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    The momentum integral method is applied in the frame of safety analysis of pressure water reactors under hypothetical loss of coolant accident (LOCA) conditions to simulate numerically film condensation, rewetting and vaporization on the inner surface of pressure water reactor containment. From the conservation equations of mass and momentum of a liquid film arising from condensation of steam upon the inner of the containment during a LOCA in a pressure water reactor plant, an integro-differential equation is derived, referring to an arbitrary axisymmetric surface of revolution. This equation describes the velocity distribution of the liquid film along a meridian of a surface of revolution. From the integro-differential equation and ordinary differential equation of first order for the film velocity is derived and integrated numerically. From the velocity distribution the film thickness distribution is obtained. The solution of the enthalpy equation for the liquid film yields the temperature distribution on the inner surface of the containment. (authors)

  5. Integration of scheduling and discrete event simulation systems to improve production flow planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenczyk, D.; Paprocka, I.; Kempa, W. M.; Grabowik, C.; Kalinowski, K.

    2016-08-01

    The increased availability of data and computer-aided technologies such as MRPI/II, ERP and MES system, allowing producers to be more adaptive to market dynamics and to improve production scheduling. Integration of production scheduling and computer modelling, simulation and visualization systems can be useful in the analysis of production system constraints related to the efficiency of manufacturing systems. A integration methodology based on semi-automatic model generation method for eliminating problems associated with complexity of the model and labour-intensive and time-consuming process of simulation model creation is proposed. Data mapping and data transformation techniques for the proposed method have been applied. This approach has been illustrated through examples of practical implementation of the proposed method using KbRS scheduling system and Enterprise Dynamics simulation system.

  6. An Integral Method and Its Application to Some Three-Dimensional Boundary-Layer Flows,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-07-18

    M. Scala Dr. H. Lew Mr. J. W. Faust A . Martellucci W. Daskin J. D. Cresswell J. B. Arnaiz L. A . Marshall J. Cassanto R. Hobbs C. Harris F. George P.O...RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT 18 JULY 1979 Approved for public release, distribution unlimited DTICEILECTE1 APR 2 5 1930,, A NAVAL SURFACE WEAPONS...TITLE (end Subtlle) S. TYPE OF REPORT A PERIOD COVERED I INVTEGRAL M.ETHOD AND ITS 4PPLICATION TO SSOME THREE-DIMENSIONAL BOUNDARY-LAYER FLOWS 6

  7. Integrated potentiometric detector for use in chip-based flow cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantra; Manz

    2000-07-01

    A new kind of potentiometric chip sensor for ion-selective electrodes (ISE) based on a solvent polymeric membrane is described. The chip sensor is designed to trap the organic cocktail inside the chip and to permit sample solution to flow past the membrane. The design allows the sensor to overcome technical problems of ruggedness and would therefore be ideal for industrial processes. The sensor performance for a Ba2+-ISE membrane based on a Vogtle ionophore showed electrochemical behavior similar to that observed in conventional electrodes and microelectrode arrangements.

  8. GSFLOW - Coupled Ground-Water and Surface-Water Flow Model Based on the Integration of the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) and the Modular Ground-Water Flow Model (MODFLOW-2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markstrom, Steven L.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Regan, R. Steven; Prudic, David E.; Barlow, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    The need to assess the effects of variability in climate, biota, geology, and human activities on water availability and flow requires the development of models that couple two or more components of the hydrologic cycle. An integrated hydrologic model called GSFLOW (Ground-water and Surface-water FLOW) was developed to simulate coupled ground-water and surface-water resources. The new model is based on the integration of the U.S. Geological Survey Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) and the U.S. Geological Survey Modular Ground-Water Flow Model (MODFLOW). Additional model components were developed, and existing components were modified, to facilitate integration of the models. Methods were developed to route flow among the PRMS Hydrologic Response Units (HRUs) and between the HRUs and the MODFLOW finite-difference cells. This report describes the organization, concepts, design, and mathematical formulation of all GSFLOW model components. An important aspect of the integrated model design is its ability to conserve water mass and to provide comprehensive water budgets for a location of interest. This report includes descriptions of how water budgets are calculated for the integrated model and for individual model components. GSFLOW provides a robust modeling system for simulating flow through the hydrologic cycle, while allowing for future enhancements to incorporate other simulation techniques.

  9. Transition towards improved regional wood flows by integrating material flux analysis and agent analysis. The case of Appenzell Ausserrhoden, Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binder, Claudia R.; Hofer, Christoph; Wiek, Arnim; Scholz, Roland W.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the integration of material flux analysis and agent analysis as the basis for a transition towards improved regional wood management in Appenzell Ausserrhoden (AR), a small Swiss canton located in the Pre-Alps of Switzerland. We present a wood flow analysis for forests, wood processing industries and consumption in AR, accounting for different wood products. We find that the forest is currently significantly underutilized although there are sizeable imports of wood and fuel to this small region. The underutilization of the forest contributes to a skewed age distribution, jeopardizing long-term sustainable development of the forest, as the fulfillment of its protective and production function are likely to be at risk. The wood resources, however, are capable of satisfying current wood demand among the population of AR and wood could even be exported. Underutilization has two main causes: first, wood prices are so low that harvesting trees is a money-losing proposition; second, consumer wood demand and the current supply from forest owners are not aligned. Furthermore, cultural values, lifestyle trends and traditions make an alignment of supply and demand difficult. Consensus and strategy building with the relevant stakeholders on the basis of the results obtained from the wood flow analysis and agent analysis is a reasonable next step to take. We conclude that wood flow analysis combined with agent analysis provide a useful and straightforward tool to be used as the basis of a transition process towards improved regional wood flows, which in turn should contribute to sustainable forest management

  10. Decoding Network Structure in On-Chip Integrated Flow Cells with Synchronization of Electrochemical Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yanxin; Kiss, István Z.

    2017-04-01

    The analysis of network interactions among dynamical units and the impact of the coupling on self-organized structures is a challenging task with implications in many biological and engineered systems. We explore the coupling topology that arises through the potential drops in a flow channel in a lab-on-chip device that accommodates chemical reactions on electrode arrays. The networks are revealed by analysis of the synchronization patterns with the use of an oscillatory chemical reaction (nickel electrodissolution) and are further confirmed by direct decoding using phase model analysis. In dual electrode configuration, a variety coupling schemes, (uni- or bidirectional positive or negative) were identified depending on the relative placement of the reference and counter electrodes (e.g., placed at the same or the opposite ends of the flow channel). With three electrodes, the network consists of a superposition of a localized (upstream) and global (all-to-all) coupling. With six electrodes, the unique, position dependent coupling topology resulted spatially organized partial synchronization such that there was a synchrony gradient along the quasi-one-dimensional spatial coordinate. The networked, electrode potential (current) spike generating electrochemical reactions hold potential for construction of an in-situ information processing unit to be used in electrochemical devices in sensors and batteries.

  11. Integral manifolding structure for fuel cell core having parallel gas flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herceg, Joseph E.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed herein are manifolding means for directing the fuel and oxidant gases to parallel flow passageways in a fuel cell core. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte and interconnect wall consists respectively of anode and cathode materials layered on the opposite sides of electrolyte material, or on the opposite sides of interconnect material. A core wall projects beyond the open ends of the defined core passageways and is disposed approximately midway between and parallel to the adjacent overlaying and underlying interconnect walls to define manifold chambers therebetween on opposite sides of the wall. Each electrolyte wall defining the flow passageways is shaped to blend into and be connected to this wall in order to redirect the corresponding fuel and oxidant passageways to the respective manifold chambers either above or below this intermediate wall. Inlet and outlet connections are made to these separate manifold chambers respectively, for carrying the fuel and oxidant gases to the core, and for carrying their reaction products away from the core.

  12. Gas removal in free-flow electrophoresis using an integrated nanoporous membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, Christin; Jochem, Georg F. W.; Glaeser, Petra; Nagl, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The performance of continuous microfluidic free-flow electrophoresis (μFFE) is often compromised by the formation of gaseous products caused by electrolysis of water. We show that this adverse effect can be overcome by employing a nanoporous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane attached to a μFFE system which results in efficient removal of any gases formed. The respective assembly was manufactured via laser cutting and lamination. The complete microfluidic FFE chips consist of five layers, viz. (a) two supporting layers, one made of an adhesive transfer foil and the other from poly(ethylene terephthalate), (b) a hydrophobic membrane, (c) a microfluidic structure in a layer of PTFE, and (d) a bottom glass slide. Such a platform warrants a stable flow of electric current over hours of operation at electric field strength of around 500 V∙cm -1 . This is in contrast to conventional FFE microchips where the current decreases to zero within a few minutes (using the same separation parameters). Micropreparative separation of a mixture of three fluorophores was successfully accomplished continuously over 3 h using this micro-FFE chip and was not accompanied by any disturbances caused by formation of gases. (author)

  13. Reconfigurable acquisition system with integrated optics for a portable flow cytometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirleis, Matthew A., E-mail: matthew.kirleis@nrl.navy.mil; Mathews, Scott A.; Verbarg, Jasenka; Erickson, Jeffrey S.; Piqué, Alberto [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Portable and inexpensive scientific instruments that are capable of performing point of care diagnostics are needed for applications such as disease detection and diagnosis in resource-poor settings, for water quality and food supply monitoring, and for biosurveillance activities in autonomous vehicles. In this paper, we describe the development of a compact flow cytometer built from three separate, customizable, and interchangeable modules. The instrument as configured in this work is being developed specifically for the detection of selected Centers for Disease Control (CDC) category B biothreat agents through a bead-based assay: E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella, Listeria, and Shigella. It has two-color excitation, three-color fluorescence and light scattering detection, embedded electronics, and capillary based flow. However, these attributes can be easily modified for other applications such as cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) counting. Proof of concept is demonstrated through a 6-plex bead assay with the results compared to a commercially available benchtop-sized instrument.

  14. Reconfigurable acquisition system with integrated optics for a portable flow cytometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirleis, Matthew A.; Mathews, Scott A.; Verbarg, Jasenka; Erickson, Jeffrey S.; Piqué, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Portable and inexpensive scientific instruments that are capable of performing point of care diagnostics are needed for applications such as disease detection and diagnosis in resource-poor settings, for water quality and food supply monitoring, and for biosurveillance activities in autonomous vehicles. In this paper, we describe the development of a compact flow cytometer built from three separate, customizable, and interchangeable modules. The instrument as configured in this work is being developed specifically for the detection of selected Centers for Disease Control (CDC) category B biothreat agents through a bead-based assay: E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella, Listeria, and Shigella. It has two-color excitation, three-color fluorescence and light scattering detection, embedded electronics, and capillary based flow. However, these attributes can be easily modified for other applications such as cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) counting. Proof of concept is demonstrated through a 6-plex bead assay with the results compared to a commercially available benchtop-sized instrument

  15. Reconfigurable acquisition system with integrated optics for a portable flow cytometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirleis, Matthew A; Mathews, Scott A; Verbarg, Jasenka; Erickson, Jeffrey S; Piqué, Alberto

    2013-11-01

    Portable and inexpensive scientific instruments that are capable of performing point of care diagnostics are needed for applications such as disease detection and diagnosis in resource-poor settings, for water quality and food supply monitoring, and for biosurveillance activities in autonomous vehicles. In this paper, we describe the development of a compact flow cytometer built from three separate, customizable, and interchangeable modules. The instrument as configured in this work is being developed specifically for the detection of selected Centers for Disease Control (CDC) category B biothreat agents through a bead-based assay: E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella, Listeria, and Shigella. It has two-color excitation, three-color fluorescence and light scattering detection, embedded electronics, and capillary based flow. However, these attributes can be easily modified for other applications such as cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) counting. Proof of concept is demonstrated through a 6-plex bead assay with the results compared to a commercially available benchtop-sized instrument.

  16. Groundwater and vadose Zone Integration Project Nuclear Material Mass Flow and Accountability on the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GRASHER, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a discussion of the accountable inventory of Hanford Site nuclear material (NM) over the operating period. This report does not provide judgments on impacts to the Hanford Site environs by the reported waste streams or inventory. The focus of this report is on the processes, facilities, and process streams that constituted the flow primarily of plutonium and uranium through the Hanford Site. The material balance reports (MBRS) are the basis of the NM accountable inventory maintained by each of the various contractors used by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors to operate the Hanford Site. The inventory was tracked in terms of a starting inventory, receipts, transfers, and ending inventory. The various components of the inventory are discussed as well as the uncertainty in the measurement values used to establish plant inventory and material transfers. The accountable NM inventory does not report all the NM on the Hanford Site and this difference is discussed relative to some representative nuclides. The composition and location of the current accountable inventory are provided, as well as the latest approved set (2000) of flow diagrams of the proposed disposition of the excess accountable NM inventory listed on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) web page

  17. A watershed model to integrate EO data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Eduardo; Chambel-Leitao, Pedro; Carina, Almeida; Brito, David; Cherif, Ines; Alexandridis, Thomas; Neves, Ramiro

    2013-04-01

    MOHID LAND is a open source watershed model developed by MARETEC and is part of the MOHID Framework. It integrates four mediums (or compartments): porous media, surface, rivers and atmosphere. The movement of water between these mediums are based on mass and momentum balance equations. The atmosphere medium is not explicity simulated. Instead, it's used as boundary condition to the model through meteorological properties: precipitation, solar radiation, wind speed/direction, relative humidity and air temperature. The surface medium includes the overland runoff and vegetation growth processes and is simulated using a 2D grid. The porous media includes both the unsaturated (soil) and saturated zones (aquifer) and is simulated using a 3D grid. The river flow is simulated through a 1D drainage network. All these mediums are linked through evapotranspiration and flow exchanges (infiltration, river-soil growndwater flow, surface-river overland flow). Besides the water movement, it is also possible to simulate water quality processes and solute/sediment transport. Model setup include the definition of the geometry and the properties of each one of its compartments. After the setup of the model, the only continuous input data that MOHID LAND requires are the atmosphere properties (boundary conditions) that can be provided as timeseries or spacial data. MOHID LAND has been adapted the last 4 years under FP7 and ESA projects to integrate Earth Observation (EO) data, both variable in time and in space. EO data can be used to calibrate/validate or as input/assimilation data to the model. The currently EO data used include LULC (Land Use Land Cover) maps, LAI (Leaf Area Index) maps, EVTP (Evapotranspiration) maps and SWC (Soil Water Content) maps. Model results are improved by the EO data, but the advantage of this integration is that the model can still run without the EO data. This means that model do not stop due to unavailability of EO data and can run on a forecast mode

  18. Dynamic Fluid Flow and Geomechanical Coupling to Assess the CO2 Storage Integrity in Faulted Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baroni A.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The SiteChar research on the Southern Adriatic Sea site focused on the investigation of the geomechanical and hydrodynamic behaviour of the storage complex in the case of CO2 injection in a reservoir consisting of fractured carbonate formations. Special attention was paid to the effects that natural faults and fractures might have on CO2 migration, and the effects that injection might have on the stability of faults. This assessment was originally performed via a hydro-geomechanical one-way coupling which relies on an adequate representation of faults in the model, allowing one to simulate fluid flow along the fault plane and inside faults as well as evolution of the stress state due to CO2 injection. The geological model was populated with petrophysical and geomechanical parameters derived either from laboratory measurements performed on samples from a reservoir analogue, or published literature. Since only sparse data were available, various scenarios were simulated to take into account the uncertainties in the fluid flow and geomechanical properties of the model: the different state of faults (i.e., open or closed and various in situ stress state, commonly named geostatic stresses as the earth’s crust deformation is assumed to be slow regarding the short-term study. Various fluid flow parameters were also considered, although only one set of petrophysical data corresponding to the most realistic ones is considered here. Faults modeled as volumetric elements behave as flow pathways for fluids when they are conductive. The injected CO2 migrates inside and through the Rovesti fault, which is located near the injection well. The fluid flow also induces overpressure in the faults. The overpressure in the Rovesti fault reaches 2.2 MPa while it reaches 4.4 MPa at the bottom hole of the injector. Extending to about 30 km, the pore pressure field reaches the Gondola fault located at 15 km from the injection zone but the overpressure does not exceed

  19. Flow cytometry application in the assessment of sperm DNA integrity of men with asthenozoospermia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Brodowska

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Sperm genomic integrity and ultrastructural features of ejaculated spermatozoa contributing to the assessment of gamete fertility potential in patients with asthenozoospermia are discussed. The proportion of TUNEL-positive cells was significantly higher in the semen of patients with low sperm motility (n=40; p<0.01 as compared to men with normal sperm motility (n=54. Sperm DNA fragmentation negatively correlated (n=94 with sperm motility, sperm concentration, and integrity of the sperm cellular membrane (HOS-test. Two categories of patients were distinguished: (1 patients (23 out of 94 subjects with < or = 4% of TUNEL-positive cells and (2 patients (71 subjects with 4% of TUNEL-positive cells. A significant difference was noted in the sperm motility and HOS-test results between patients from both groups. Large numbers of immature spermatozoa with extensive cytoplasmic retention, ultrastructural chromatin and midpiece abnormalities, and conglomerates containing sperm fragments were present more frequently in the semen of asthenozoospermic subjects with >4% of TUNEL-positive sperm cells. Low sperm motility seems to be accompanied by serious defects of gamete chromatin expressed as diminished sperm genomic integrity and abnormal DNA condensation and by defects of sperm midpiece. These abnormalities may reflect developmental failure during the spermatogenic remodeling process. The DNA fragmentation test may be considered as an additional assay for the evaluation of spermatozoa beside standard analysis and taken together with electron microscopy may help to determine the actual number of "healthy" spermatozoa thereby playing an important role during diagnosis and treatment of male infertility.

  20. Solution of wind integrated thermal generation system for environmental optimal power flow using hybrid algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambarish Panda

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A new evolutionary hybrid algorithm (HA has been proposed in this work for environmental optimal power flow (EOPF problem. The EOPF problem has been formulated in a nonlinear constrained multi objective optimization framework. Considering the intermittency of available wind power a cost model of the wind and thermal generation system is developed. Suitably formed objective function considering the operational cost, cost of emission, real power loss and cost of installation of FACTS devices for maintaining a stable voltage in the system has been optimized with HA and compared with particle swarm optimization algorithm (PSOA to prove its effectiveness. All the simulations are carried out in MATLAB/SIMULINK environment taking IEEE30 bus as the test system.

  1. [Integrity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Rodríguez, Rafael Ángel

    2014-01-01

    To say that someone possesses integrity is to claim that that person is almost predictable about responses to specific situations, that he or she can prudentially judge and to act correctly. There is a closed interrelationship between integrity and autonomy, and the autonomy rests on the deeper moral claim of all humans to integrity of the person. Integrity has two senses of significance for medical ethic: one sense refers to the integrity of the person in the bodily, psychosocial and intellectual elements; and in the second sense, the integrity is the virtue. Another facet of integrity of the person is la integrity of values we cherish and espouse. The physician must be a person of integrity if the integrity of the patient is to be safeguarded. The autonomy has reduced the violations in the past, but the character and virtues of the physician are the ultimate safeguard of autonomy of patient. A field very important in medicine is the scientific research. It is the character of the investigator that determines the moral quality of research. The problem arises when legitimate self-interests are replaced by selfish, particularly when human subjects are involved. The final safeguard of moral quality of research is the character and conscience of the investigator. Teaching must be relevant in the scientific field, but the most effective way to teach virtue ethics is through the example of the a respected scientist.

  2. Useful method to monitor the physiological effects of alcohol ingestion by combination of micro-integrated laser Doppler blood flow meter and arm-raising test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Wataru; Nogami, Hirofumi; Ito, Hiroki; Gotanda, Takeshi; Peng, Yao; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Furue, Masutaka; Higurashi, Eiji; Sawada, Renshi

    2012-10-01

    Alcohol has a variety of effects on the human body, affecting both the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system. We examined the peripheral blood flow of alcohol drinkers using a micro-integrated laser Doppler blood flow meter (micro-electromechanical system blood flow sensor). An increased heart rate and blood flow was recorded at the earlobe after alcohol ingestion, and we observed strong correlation between blood flow, heart rate, and breath alcohol content in light drinkers; but not heavy drinkers. We also found that the amplitude of pulse waves measured at the fingertip during an arm-raising test significantly decreased on alcohol consumption, regardless of the individual's alcohol tolerance. Our micro-electromechanical system blood flow sensor successfully detected various physiological changes in peripheral blood circulation induced by alcohol consumption.

  3. Development of the Hydrological-Ecological Integrated watershed Flow Model (HEIFLOW): an application to the Heihe River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Y.; Zheng, Y.; Zheng, C.; Han, F., Sr.

    2017-12-01

    Physically based and fully-distributed integrated hydrological models (IHMs) can quantitatively depict hydrological processes, both surface and subsurface, with sufficient spatial and temporal details. However, the complexity involved in pre-processing data and setting up models seriously hindered the wider application of IHMs in scientific research and management practice. This study introduces our design and development of Visual HEIFLOW, hereafter referred to as VHF, a comprehensive graphical data processing and modeling system for integrated hydrological simulation. The current version of VHF has been structured to accommodate an IHM named HEIFLOW (Hydrological-Ecological Integrated watershed-scale FLOW model). HEIFLOW is a model being developed by the authors, which has all typical elements of physically based and fully-distributed IHMs. It is based on GSFLOW, a representative integrated surface water-groundwater model developed by USGS. HEIFLOW provides several ecological modules that enable to simulate growth cycle of general vegetation and special plants (maize and populus euphratica). VHF incorporates and streamlines all key steps of the integrated modeling, and accommodates all types of GIS data necessary to hydrological simulation. It provides a GIS-based data processing framework to prepare an IHM for simulations, and has functionalities to flexibly display and modify model features (e.g., model grids, streams, boundary conditions, observational sites, etc.) and their associated data. It enables visualization and various spatio-temporal analyses of all model inputs and outputs at different scales (i.e., computing unit, sub-basin, basin, or user-defined spatial extent). The above system features, as well as many others, can significantly reduce the difficulty and time cost of building and using a complex IHM. The case study in the Heihe River Basin demonstrated the applicability of VHF for large scale integrated SW-GW modeling. Visualization and spatial

  4. An integrated model for reliability estimation of digital nuclear protection system based on fault tree and software control flow methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Man Cheol; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2000-01-01

    In the nuclear industry, the difficulty of proving the reliabilities of digital systems prohibits the widespread use of digital systems in various nuclear application such as plant protection system. Even though there exist a few models which are used to estimate the reliabilities of digital systems, we develop a new integrated model which is more realistic than the existing models. We divide the process of estimating the reliability of a digital system into two phases, a high-level phase and a low-level phase, and the boundary of two phases is the reliabilities of subsystems. We apply software control flow method to the low-level phase and fault tree analysis to the high-level phase. The application of the model to Dynamic Safety System(DDS) shows that the estimated reliability of the system is quite reasonable and realistic

  5. Invisibility and (mistreatment in the care of maltreatment in Integral Protection: the need for data governance and redirecting flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Christina Brito Lopes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available From the postulates of the doctrine of integral protection established by the Constitution of 1988 and the Statute of Children and Adolescents (Law 8.069 / 90, is intended to reflect on the concept and the issue of civil and criminal consequences of maltreatment as a species common family violence against children and adolescents. In addition to the theme from critical perspective analysis, the objective is to analyze flow deficiencies in the working dynamics of the responsible institutions (Guardianship Council, public security organs, public defender, prosecutors and judiciary as well as suggested better management and information technology for prevention, and the development of effective public policies and necessary for the treatment of the issue in accordance with the current law.

  6. An integrated model for reliability estimation of digital nuclear protection system based on fault tree and software control flow methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Man Cheol; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2000-01-01

    In nuclear industry, the difficulty of proving the reliabilities of digital systems prohibits the widespread use of digital systems in various nuclear application such as plant protection system. Even though there exist a few models which are used to estimate the reliabilities of digital systems, we develop a new integrated model which is more realistic than the existing models. We divide the process of estimating the reliability of a digital system into two phases, a high-level phase and a low-level phase, and the boundary of two phases is the reliabilities of subsystems. We apply software control flow method to the low-level phase and fault tree analysis to the high-level phase. The application of the model of dynamic safety system (DSS) shows that the estimated reliability of the system is quite reasonable and realistic. (author)

  7. Analysis of Hydrodynamics and Heat Transfer in a Thin Liquid Film Flowing over a Rotating Disk by Integral Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, S.; Cetegen, B. M.

    2005-01-01

    An integral analysis of hydrodynamics and heat transfer in a thin liquid film flowing over a rotating disk surface is presented for both constant temperature and constant heat flux boundary conditions. The model is found to capture the correct trends of the liquid film thickness variation over the disk surface and compare reasonably well with experimental results over the range of Reynolds and Rossby numbers covering both inertia and rotation dominated regimes. Nusselt number variation over the disk surface shows two types of behavior. At low rotation rates, the Nusselt number exhibits a radial decay with Nusselt number magnitudes increasing with higher inlet Reynolds number for both constant wall temperature and heat flux cases. At high rotation rates, the Nusselt number profiles exhibit a peak whose location advances radially outward with increasing film Reynolds number or inertia. The results also compare favorably with the full numerical simulation results from an earlier study as well as with the reported experimental results.

  8. System-Level Modeling and Synthesis Techniques for Flow-Based Microfluidic Very Large Scale Integration Biochips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minhass, Wajid Hassan

    Microfluidic biochips integrate different biochemical analysis functionalities on-chip and offer several advantages over the conventional biochemical laboratories. In this thesis, we focus on the flow-based biochips. The basic building block of such a chip is a valve which can be fabricated at very...... propose a framework for mapping the biochemical applications onto the mVLSI biochips, binding and scheduling the operations and performing fluid routing. A control synthesis framework for determining the exact valve activation sequence required to execute the application is also proposed. In order...... to reduce the macro-assembly around the chip and enhance chip scalability, we propose an approach for the biochip pin count minimization. We also propose a throughput maximization scheme for the cell culture mVLSI biochips, saving time and reducing costs. We have extensively evaluated the proposed...

  9. Inter-replicon Gene Flow Contributes to Transcriptional Integration in the Sinorhizobium meliloti Multipartite Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George C. diCenzo

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Integration of newly acquired genes into existing regulatory networks is necessary for successful horizontal gene transfer (HGT. Ten percent of bacterial species contain at least two DNA replicons over 300 kilobases in size, with the secondary replicons derived predominately through HGT. The Sinorhizobium meliloti genome is split between a 3.7 Mb chromosome, a 1.7 Mb chromid consisting largely of genes acquired through ancient HGT, and a 1.4 Mb megaplasmid consisting primarily of recently acquired genes. Here, RNA-sequencing is used to examine the transcriptional consequences of massive, synthetic genome reduction produced through the removal of the megaplasmid and/or the chromid. Removal of the pSymA megaplasmid influenced the transcription of only six genes. In contrast, removal of the chromid influenced expression of ∼8% of chromosomal genes and ∼4% of megaplasmid genes. This was mediated in part by the loss of the ETR DNA region whose presence on pSymB is due to a translocation from the chromosome. No obvious functional bias among the up-regulated genes was detected, although genes with putative homologs on the chromid were enriched. Down-regulated genes were enriched in motility and sensory transduction pathways. Four transcripts were examined further, and in each case the transcriptional change could be traced to loss of specific pSymB regions. In particularly, a chromosomal transporter was induced due to deletion of bdhA likely mediated through 3-hydroxybutyrate accumulation. These data provide new insights into the evolution of the multipartite bacterial genome, and more generally into the integration of horizontally acquired genes into the transcriptome.

  10. Application of Reservoir Flow Simulation Integrated with Geomechanics in Unconventional Tight Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Menglu; Chen, Shengnan; Mbia, Ernest; Chen, Zhangxing

    2018-01-01

    Multistage hydraulic fracturing techniques, combined with horizontal drilling, have enabled commercial production from the vast reserves of unconventional tight formations. During hydraulic fracturing, fracturing fluid and proppants are pumped into the reservoir matrix to create the hydraulic fractures. Understanding the propagation mechanism of hydraulic fractures is essential to estimate their properties, such as half-length. In addition, natural fractures are often present in tight formations, which might be activated during the fracturing process and contribute to the post-stimulation well production rates. In this study, reservoir simulation is integrated with rock geomechanics to predict the well post-stimulation productivities. Firstly, a reservoir geological model is built based on the field data collected from the Montney formation in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. The hydraulic fracturing process is then simulated through an integrated approach of fracturing fluid injection, rock geomechanics, and tensile failure criteria. In such a process, the reservoir pore pressure increases with a continuous injection of the fracturing fluid and proppants, decreasing the effective stress exerted on the rock matrix accordingly as the overburden pressure remains constant. Once the effective stress drops to a threshold value, tensile failure of the reservoir rock occurs, creating hydraulic fractures in the formation. The early production history of the stimulated well is history-matched to validate the predicted fracture geometries (e.g., half-length) generated from the fracturing simulation process. The effects of the natural fracture properties and well bottom-hole pressures on well productivity are also studied. It has been found that nearly 40% of hydraulic fractures propagate in the beginning stage (the pad step) of the fracturing schedule. In addition, well post-stimulation productivity will increase significantly if the natural fractures are propped or

  11. Inter-replicon Gene Flow Contributes to Transcriptional Integration in the Sinorhizobium meliloti Multipartite Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    diCenzo, George C; Wellappili, Deelaka; Golding, G Brian; Finan, Turlough M

    2018-05-04

    Integration of newly acquired genes into existing regulatory networks is necessary for successful horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Ten percent of bacterial species contain at least two DNA replicons over 300 kilobases in size, with the secondary replicons derived predominately through HGT. The Sinorhizobium meliloti genome is split between a 3.7 Mb chromosome, a 1.7 Mb chromid consisting largely of genes acquired through ancient HGT, and a 1.4 Mb megaplasmid consisting primarily of recently acquired genes. Here, RNA-sequencing is used to examine the transcriptional consequences of massive, synthetic genome reduction produced through the removal of the megaplasmid and/or the chromid. Removal of the pSymA megaplasmid influenced the transcription of only six genes. In contrast, removal of the chromid influenced expression of ∼8% of chromosomal genes and ∼4% of megaplasmid genes. This was mediated in part by the loss of the ETR DNA region whose presence on pSymB is due to a translocation from the chromosome. No obvious functional bias among the up-regulated genes was detected, although genes with putative homologs on the chromid were enriched. Down-regulated genes were enriched in motility and sensory transduction pathways. Four transcripts were examined further, and in each case the transcriptional change could be traced to loss of specific pSymB regions. In particularly, a chromosomal transporter was induced due to deletion of bdhA likely mediated through 3-hydroxybutyrate accumulation. These data provide new insights into the evolution of the multipartite bacterial genome, and more generally into the integration of horizontally acquired genes into the transcriptome. Copyright © 2018 diCenzo, et al.

  12. Integrating Disciplines, Sectors, and Societies to Improve the Definition and Implementation of Environmental Flows for Dammed Amazonian Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, D. A.; Livino, A.; Arias, M. E.; Crouch, T. D.; Anderson, E.; Marques, E.; Dutka-Gianelli, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Amazon River watershed is the world's largest river basin and provides US$30 billion/yr in ecosystem services to local populations, national societies, and humanity at large. The Amazon is also a relatively untapped source of hydroelectricity for Latin America, and construction of >30 large hydroelectric dams and >170 small dams is currently underway. Hydropower development will have a cascade of physical, ecological, and social effects at local to global scales. While Brazil has well-defined environmental impact assessment and mitigation programs, these efforts often fail to integrate data and knowledge across disciplines, sectors, and societies throughout the dam planning process. Resulting failures of science, policy, and management have had widespread environmental, economic, and social consequences, highlighting the need for an improved theoretical and practical framework for understanding the impacts of Amazon dams and guiding improved management that respects the needs and knowledge of diverse set of stakeholders. We present a conceptual framework that links four central goals: 1) connecting research in different disciplines (interdisciplinarity); 2) incorporating new knowledge into decision making (adaptive management); 3) including perspectives and participation of non-academic participants in knowledge generation (transdisciplinarity); and 4) extending the idea of environmental flows ("how much water does a river need?") to better consider human uses and users through the concept of fluvial anthropology ("how much water does a society need?"). We use this framework to identify opportunities for improved integration strategies within the (Brazilian) hydroelectric power plant planning and implementation "lifecycle." We applied this approach to the contentious Belo Monte dam, where compliance with regulatory requirements, including monitoring for environmental flows, exemplifies the opportunity for applying adaptive management, but also highlights an

  13. Purifying capability, enzyme activity, and nitrification potentials in December in integrated vertical flow constructed wetland with earthworms and different substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Defu; Gu, Jiaru; Li, Yingxue; Zhang, Yu; Howard, Alan; Guan, Yidong; Li, Jiuhai; Xu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The response of purifying capability, enzyme activity, nitrification potentials, and total number of bacteria in the rhizosphere in December to wetland plants, substrates, and earthworms was investigated in integrated vertical flow constructed wetlands (IVFCW). The removal efficiency of total nitrogen (TN), NH4-N, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and total phosphorus (TP) was increased when earthworms were added into IVFCW. A significantly average removal efficiency of N in IVFCW that employed river sand as substrate and in IVFCW that employed a mixture of river sand and Qing sand as substrate was not found. However, the average removal efficiency of P was higher in IVFCW with a mixture of river sand and Qing sand as substrate than in IVFCW with river sand as substrate. Invertase activity in December was higher in IVFCW that used a mixture of river sand and Qing sand as substrate than in IVFCW which used only river sand as substrate. However, urease activity, nitrification potential, and total number of bacteria in December was higher in IVFCW that employed river sand as substrate than in IVFCW with a mixture of river sand and Qing sand as substrate. The addition of earthworms into the integrated vertical flow constructed wetland increased the above-ground biomass, enzyme activity (catalase, urease, and invertase), nitrification potentials, and total number of bacteria in December. The above-ground biomass of wetland plants was significantly positively correlated with urease and nitrification potentials (p earthworms into IVFCW increased enzyme activity and nitrification potentials in December, which resulted in improving purifying capability.

  14. Low-flow CO₂ removal integrated into a renal-replacement circuit can reduce acidosis and decrease vasopressor requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Christian; Schriewer, Jens; John, Stefan; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Willam, Carsten

    2013-07-24

    Lung-protective ventilation in patients with ARDS and multiorgan failure, including renal failure, is often paralleled with a combined respiratory and metabolic acidosis. We assessed the effectiveness of a hollow-fiber gas exchanger integrated into a conventional renal-replacement circuit on CO₂ removal, acidosis, and hemodynamics. In ten ventilated critically ill patients with ARDS and AKI undergoing renal- and respiratory-replacement therapy, effects of low-flow CO₂ removal on respiratory acidosis compensation were tested by using a hollow-fiber gas exchanger added to the renal-replacement circuit. This was an observational study on safety, CO₂-removal capacity, effects on pH, ventilator settings, and hemodynamics. CO₂ elimination in the low-flow circuit was safe and was well tolerated by all patients. After 4 hours of treatment, a mean reduction of 17.3 mm Hg (-28.1%) pCO₂ was observed, in line with an increase in pH. In hemodynamically instable patients, low-flow CO₂ elimination was paralleled by hemodynamic improvement, with an average reduction of vasopressors of 65% in five of six catecholamine-dependent patients during the first 24 hours. Because no further catheters are needed, besides those for renal replacement, the implementation of a hollow-fiber gas exchanger in a renal circuit could be an attractive therapeutic tool with only a little additional trauma for patients with mild to moderate ARDS undergoing invasive ventilation with concomitant respiratory acidosis, as long as no severe oxygenation defects indicate ECMO therapy.

  15. Integration of continuous-flow sampling with microchip electrophoresis using poly(dimethylsiloxane)-based valves in a reversibly sealed device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Michelle W; Martin, R Scott

    2007-07-01

    Here we describe a reversibly sealed microchip device that incorporates poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-based valves for the rapid injection of analytes from a continuously flowing stream into a channel network for analysis with microchip electrophoresis. The microchip was reversibly sealed to a PDMS-coated glass substrate and microbore tubing was used for the introduction of gas and fluids to the microchip device. Two pneumatic valves were incorporated into the design and actuated on the order of hundreds of milliseconds, allowing analyte from a continuously flowing sampling stream to be injected into an electrophoresis separation channel. The device was characterized in terms of the valve actuation time and pushback voltage. It was also found that the addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) to the buffer system greatly increased the reproducibility of the injection scheme and enabled the analysis of amino acids derivatized with naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde/cyanide. Results from continuous injections of a 0.39 nL fluorescein plug into the optimized system showed that the injection process was reproducible (RSD of 0.7%, n = 10). Studies also showed that the device was capable of monitoring off-chip changes in concentration with a device lag time of 90 s. Finally, the ability of the device to rapidly monitor on-chip concentration changes was demonstrated by continually sampling from an analyte plug that was derivatized upstream from the electrophoresis/continuous flow interface. A reversibly sealed device of this type will be useful for the continuous monitoring and analysis of processes that occur either off-chip (such as microdialysis sampling) or on-chip from other integrated functions.

  16. Integral transformation of the Navier-Stokes equations for laminar flow in channels of arbitrary two-dimensional geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Guerrero, Jesus Salvador

    1995-01-01

    Laminar developing flow in channels of arbitrary geometry was studied by solving the Navier-Stokes equations in the stream function-only formulation through the Generalized Integral Transform Technique (GITT). The stream function is expanded in an infinite system based on eigenfunctions obtained by considering solely the diffusive terms of the original formulation. The Navier-Stokes equations are transformed into an infinite system of ordinary differential equations, by using the transformation and inversion formulae. For computational purposes, the infinite series is truncated, according to an automatic error control procedure. The ordinary differential is solved through well-established scientific subroutines from widely available mathematical libraries. The classical problem of developing flow between parallel-plates is analysed first, as for both uniform and irrotational inlet conditions. The effect of truncating the duct length in the accuracy of the obtained solution is studied. A convergence analysis of the results obtained by the GITT is performed and compared with results obtained by finite difference and finite element methods, for different values of Reynolds number. The problem of flow over a backward-facing step then follows. Comparisons with experimental results in the literature indicate an excellent agreement. The numerical co-validation was established for a test case, and perfect agreement is reached against results considered as benchmarks in the recent literature. The results were shown to be physically more reasonable than others obtained by purely numerical methods, in particular for situations where three-dimensional effects are identified. Finally, a test problem for an irregular by shoped duct was studied and compared against results found in the literature, with good agreement and excellent convergence rates for the stream function field along the whole channel, for different values of Reynolds number. (author)

  17. Experimental investigation of laminar flow of viscous oil through a circular tube having integral axial corrugation roughness and fitted with twisted tapes with oblique teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sagnik; Saha, Sujoy Kumar

    2015-08-01

    The experimental friction factor and Nusselt number data for laminar flow of viscous oil through a circular duct having integral axial corrugation roughness and fitted with twisted tapes with oblique teeth have been presented. Predictive friction factor and Nusselt number correlations have also been presented. The thermohydraulic performance has been evaluated. The major findings of this experimental investigation are that the twisted tapes with oblique teeth in combination with integral axial corrugation roughness perform significantly better than the individual enhancement technique acting alone for laminar flow through a circular duct up to a certain value of fin parameter.

  18. Influence of DC arc jets on flow fields analyzed by an integrated numerical model for a DC-RF hybrid plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jun Ho; Park, Jin Myung; Hong, Sang Hee

    2008-01-01

    The influence of DC arc jets on the flow fields in a hybrid plasma torch is numerically analyzed by an integrated direct current-radio frequency (DC-RF) plasma model based on magneto-hydrodynamic formulations. The calculated results reveal that the increase in DC arc gas flow rate raises the axial flow velocity along the central column of the DC-RF hybrid plasma together with the enhanced backflow streams in the peripheral wall region. The temperature profiles on the torch exit plane are little affected due to the reheating process of the central column by the combined RF plasma. Accordingly, the exit enthalpy emitted from the DC-RF hybrid torch can be concentrated to the central column of the plasma and controlled by adjusting the DC arc gas flow rate. The swirl in the sheath gas flow turns out to have the opposite effect on the DC arc gas flow rate. The swirling motion of the sheath gas can reduce the back flows near the induction tube wall as well as the axial velocities in the central column of the plasma. Accordingly, the swirl in the sheath gas flow can be used for the functional operation of the DC-RF hybrid plasma along with the DC arc gas flow rate to suppress the back flows at the wall region and to reduce the excessive interactions between the DC arc jet and the ambient RF plasmas. The effects of DC input current on the flow fields of hybrid plasma are similar to those of the DC arc gas flow rate, but the axial velocities for the higher current relatively quickly decay along the centerline. This is in contrast to the increase in the axial velocity remaining in proportion to the increase in the DC arc gas flow rate all the way up to the exit of the DC-RF hybrid plasma. Accordingly, the present integrated numerical analysis suggests that the hybrid plasma field profiles and the entrainment of ambient air from the torch exit are controllable by adjusting the DC arc gas flow rate, the DC input current and swirl in the sheath gas flow taking advantage of

  19. Integrated Lateral Flow Test Strip with Electrochemical Sensor for Quantification of Phosphorylated Cholinesterase: Biomarker of Exposure to Organophosphorus Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Dan; Wang, Jun; Wang, Limin; Lu, Donglai; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-02-08

    An integrated lateral flow test strip with electrochemical sensor (LFTSES) device with rapid, selective and sensitive response for quantification of exposure to organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and nerve agents has been developed. The principle of this approach is based on parallel measurements of post-exposure and baseline acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme activity, where reactivation of the phosphorylated AChE is exploited to enable measurement of total amount of AChE (including inhibited and active) which is used as a baseline for calculation of AChE inhibition. Quantitative measurement of phosphorylated adduct (OP-AChE) was realized by subtracting the active AChE from the total amount of AChE. The proposed LFTSES device integrates immunochromatographic test strip technology with electrochemical measurement using a disposable screen printed electrode which is located under the test zone. It shows linear response between AChE enzyme activity and enzyme concentration from 0.05 to 10 nM, with detection limit of 0.02 nM. Based on this reactivation approach, the LFTSES device has been successfully applied for in vitro red blood cells inhibition studies using chlorpyrifos oxon as a model OP agent. This approach not only eliminates the difficulty in screening of low-dose OP exposure because of individual variation of normal AChE values, but also avoids the problem in overlapping substrate specificity with cholinesterases and avoids potential interference from other electroactive species in biological samples. It is baseline free and thus provides a rapid, sensitive, selective and inexpensive tool for in-field and point-of-care assessment of exposures to OP pesticides and nerve agents.

  20. Research on the theory and methodology of integrating GIS and MAS and its application in simulating of pedestrians flows in a crowd's activity centre of Shanghai metropolitan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Miaolong; Chen, Peng

    2006-10-01

    Based on the development trend of research on urban morphology and its evolution from macro scale to micro scale, a new tight-coupling integrating method of GIS and MAS has been discussed briefly in this paper. After analyzing the characteristics and mechanism of pedestrian's flows in a crowds' activity center in a metropolitan, a prototype and mathematical expression of pedestrian's flows simulation have been put forward in the paper. A few key expressions and techniques for treating the specific behaviors of pedestrians flows, especially how the individuals of the flows make a decision to follow a original designed direction, how to make a decision whether stop or change his movement and select a new direction when the individuals meet a obstacle have been explored and discussed in detail. Using some tools provided by general GIS systems (such as ArcGIS 9) and a few specific programming languages, a new software system integrating GIS and MAS applicable for simulating pedestrians flows in a crowd activity centre has been developed successfully. Under the environment supported by the software system, as an applicable case, a dynamic evolution process of the pedestrian's flows (dispersed process for the spectators) in a crowds' activity center - The Shanghai Stadium has been simulated successfully. The successful simulating of a case of emergence when one or more exits emerge accidents will be very useful for managing and treating crowds' safety in a lot of assembling centers. At the end of the paper, some new research problems have been pointed out for the future.

  1. Integrated Nitrogen and Flow Modelling (INCA) in a Boreal River Basin Dominated by Forestry: Scenarios of Environmental Change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankinen, Katri; Lepistoe, Ahti; Granlund, Kirsti

    2004-01-01

    A new version (v1.7) of the Integrated Nitrogen in CAtchments model(INCA) was applied to the northern boreal Simojoki river basin (3160 km 2 ) in Finland. The INCA model is a semi-distributed, dynamic nitrogen (N) process model which simulates N transport and processes in catchments. The INCA model was applied to model flow and seasonal inorganic N dynamics of the river Simojoki basin over the period 1994-1996, and validated for two more years. Both calibration and validation of the model were successful. The model was able to simulate annual dynamics of inorganic N concentrations in the river. The effects of forest management and atmospheric deposition on inorganic N fluxes to the sea in 2010 were studied. Three scenarios were applied for forestry practices and two for deposition. The effects of forest cutting scenarios and atmospheric deposition scenarios on inorganic N flux to the sea were small. The combination of the maximum technically possible reduction of N deposition and a decrease of 100% in forest cutting and peat mining areas decreased NO 3 - -N flux by 6.0% and NH 4 + -N flux by 3.1%

  2. Extraction of diffuse correlation spectroscopy flow index by integration of Nth-order linear model with Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yu; Li, Ting; Chen, Lei; Lin, Yu; Toborek, Michal; Yu, Guoqiang

    2014-05-01

    Conventional semi-infinite solution for extracting blood flow index (BFI) from diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) measurements may cause errors in estimation of BFI (αDB) in tissues with small volume and large curvature. We proposed an algorithm integrating Nth-order linear model of autocorrelation function with the Monte Carlo simulation of photon migrations in tissue for the extraction of αDB. The volume and geometry of the measured tissue were incorporated in the Monte Carlo simulation, which overcome the semi-infinite restrictions. The algorithm was tested using computer simulations on four tissue models with varied volumes/geometries and applied on an in vivo stroke model of mouse. Computer simulations shows that the high-order (N ≥ 5) linear algorithm was more accurate in extracting αDB (errors values of errors in extracting αDB were similar to those reconstructed from the noise-free DCS data. In addition, the errors in extracting the relative changes of αDB using both linear algorithm and semi-infinite solution were fairly small (errors < ±2.0%) and did not rely on the tissue volume/geometry. The experimental results from the in vivo stroke mice agreed with those in simulations, demonstrating the robustness of the linear algorithm. DCS with the high-order linear algorithm shows the potential for the inter-subject comparison and longitudinal monitoring of absolute BFI in a variety of tissues/organs with different volumes/geometries.

  3. Raspberry Pi in-situ network monitoring system of groundwater flow and temperature integrated with OpenGeoSys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan-Hee; Lee, Cholwoo

    2016-04-01

    Raspberry Pi series is a low cost, smaller than credit-card sized computers that various operating systems such as linux and recently even Windows 10 are ported to run on. Thanks to massive production and rapid technology development, the price of various sensors that can be attached to Raspberry Pi has been dropping at an increasing speed. Therefore, the device can be an economic choice as a small portable computer to monitor temporal hydrogeological data in fields. In this study, we present a Raspberry Pi system that measures a flow rate, and temperature of groundwater at sites, stores them into mysql database, and produces interactive figures and tables such as google charts online or bokeh offline for further monitoring and analysis. Since all the data are to be monitored on internet, any computers or mobile devices can be good monitoring tools at convenience. The measured data are further integrated with OpenGeoSys, one of the hydrogeological models that is also ported to the Raspberry Pi series. This leads onsite hydrogeological modeling fed by temporal sensor data to meet various needs.

  4. Postpartum family planning integration with maternal, newborn and child health services: a cross-sectional analysis of client flow patterns in India and Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Devon; Pfitzer, Anne; Maly, Christina; Waka, Charles; Singh, Gajendra; Sanyal, Abanti

    2018-04-03

    Maternal, newborn and child health (MNCH) services represent opportunities to integrate postpartum family planning (PPFP). Objectives were to determine levels of MNCH-family planning (FP) integration and associations between integration, client characteristics and service delivery factors in facilities that received programmatic PPFP support. Cross-sectional client flow assessment conducted during May-July 2014, over 5 days at 10 purposively selected public sector facilities in India (4 hospitals) and Kenya (2 hospitals and 4 health centres). 2158 client visits tracked (1294 India; 864 Kenya). Women aged 18 or older accessing services while pregnant and/or with a child under 2 years. PPFP/postpartum intrauterine device-Bihar, India (2012-2013); Jharkhand, India (2009-2014); Embu, Kenya (2006-2010). Maternal, infant and young child nutrition/FP integration-Bondo, Kenya (2011-2014). Proportion of visits where clients received integrated MNCH-FP services, client characteristics as predictors of MNCH-FP integration and MNCH-FP integration as predictor of length of time spent at facility. Levels of MNCH-FP integration varied widely across facilities (5.3% to 63.0%), as did proportion of clients receiving MNCH-FP integrated services by service area. Clients travelling 30-59 min were half as likely to receive integrated services versus those travelling under 30 min (OR 0.5, 95% CI 0.4 to 0.7, Pintegration by MNCH service area. FP integration was highest in areas receiving specific support. Integration does not seem to impose an undue burden on clients in terms of time spent at the facility. Clients living furthest from facilities are least likely to receive integrated services. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Guidebook of the Western United States: Part B - The Overland Route, With a Side Trip to Yellowstone Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Willis Thomas; Stone, Ralph Walter; Gale, Hoyt Stoddard; ,

    1915-01-01

    country he looks out upon, not as so many square miles of territory represented on the map in a railroad folder by meaningless spaces, but rather as land - real estate, if you please - varying widely in present appearance because differing largely in its history and characterized by even greater variation in values because possessing diversified natural resources. One region may be such as to afford a livelihood for only a pastoral people; another may present opportunity for intensive agriculture; still another may contain hidden stores of mineral wealth that may attract large industrial development; and taken together these varied resources afford the promise of long-continued prosperity for this or that State. Items of interest in civic development or references to significant epochs in the record of discovery and settlement may be interspersed with explanations of mountain and valley or statements of geologic history. In a broad way, the story of the West is a unit, and every chapter should be told in order to meet fully the needs of the tourist who aims to understand all that he sees. To such a traveler-reader this series of guidebooks is addressed. To this interpretation of our own country the United States Geological Survey brings the accumulated data of decades of pioneering investigation, and the present contribution is only one type of return to the public which has supported this scientific work under the Federal Government. In preparing the description of the country traversed by the Overland Route the geographic and geologic information already published as well as unpublished material in the possession of the Geological Survey has been utilized, but to supplement this material Messrs. Lee, Stone, and Gale made a field examination of the entire route in 1914, Mr. Lee working between Omaha and Ogden, Mr. Stone between Ogden and Yellowstone, and Mr. Gale between Ogden and San Francisco. Information has been furnished by Profs. J. C. Merriam a

  6. A new model for turbidity current behavior based on integration of flow monitoring and precision coring in a submarine canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons, William O.; Sumner, Esther J.; Paull, Charles K.; Cartigny, Matthieu J.B.; Xu, Jingping; Maier, Katherine L.; Lorenson, Thomas; Talling, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    Submarine turbidity currents create some of the largest sediment accumulations on Earth, yet there are few direct measurements of these flows. Instead, most of our understanding of turbidity currents results from analyzing their deposits in the sedimentary record. However, the lack of direct flow measurements means that there is considerable debate regarding how to interpret flow properties from ancient deposits. This novel study combines detailed flow monitoring with unusually precisely located cores at different heights, and multiple locations, within the Monterey submarine canyon, offshore California, USA. Dating demonstrates that the cores include the time interval that flows were monitored in the canyon, albeit individual layers cannot be tied to specific flows. There is good correlation between grain sizes collected by traps within the flow and grain sizes measured in cores from similar heights on the canyon walls. Synthesis of flow and deposit data suggests that turbidity currents sourced from the upper reaches of Monterey Canyon comprise three flow phases. Initially, a thin (38–50 m) powerful flow in the upper canyon can transport, tilt, and break the most proximal moorings and deposit chaotic sands and gravel on the canyon floor. The initially thin flow front then thickens and deposits interbedded sands and silty muds on the canyon walls as much as 62 m above the canyon floor. Finally, the flow thickens along its length, thus lofting silty mud and depositing it at greater altitudes than the previous deposits and in excess of 70 m altitude.

  7. 'Integration'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olwig, Karen Fog

    2011-01-01

    , while the countries have adopted disparate policies and ideologies, differences in the actual treatment and attitudes towards immigrants and refugees in everyday life are less clear, due to parallel integration programmes based on strong similarities in the welfare systems and in cultural notions...... of equality in the three societies. Finally, it shows that family relations play a central role in immigrants’ and refugees’ establishment of a new life in the receiving societies, even though the welfare society takes on many of the social and economic functions of the family....

  8. Hydrologic conditions and terrestrial laser scanning of post-fire debris flows in the San Gabriel Mountains, CA, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Kevin M.; Hanshaw, M.N.; Howle, James F.; Kean, Jason W.; Staley, Dennis M.; Stock, Jonathan D.; Bawden, Gerald W.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate rainfall-runoff conditions that generate post-wildfire debris flows, we instrumented and surveyed steep, small watersheds along the tectonically active front of the San Gabriel Mountains, California. Fortuitously, we recorded runoff-generated debris-flows triggered by one spatially restricted convective event with 28 mm of rainfall falling over 62 minutes. Our rain gages, nested hillslope overland-flow sensors and soil-moisture probes, as well as a time series of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) revealed the effects of the storm. Hillslope overland-flow response, along two ~10-m long flow lines perpendicular to and originating from a drainage divide, displayed only a 10 to 20 minute delay from the onset of rainfall with accumulated totals of merely 5-10 mm. Depth-stratified soil-moisture probes displayed a greater time delay, roughly 20- 30 minutes, indicating that initial overland flow was Hortonian. Furthermore, a downstream channel-monitoring array recorded a pronounced discharge peak generated by the passage of a debris flow after 18 minutes of rainfall. At this time, only four of the eleven hillslope overlandflow sensors confirmed the presence of surface-water flow. Repeat TLS and detailed field mapping using GPS document how patterns of rainsplash, overland-flow scour, and rilling contributed to the generation of meter-scale debris flows. In response to a single small storm, the debris flows deposited irregular levees and lobate terminal snouts on hillslopes and caused widespread erosion of the valley axis with ground surface lowering exceeding 1.5 m.

  9. Using an equation based on flow stress to estimate structural integrity of annealed Type 304 stainless steel plate and pipes containing surface defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, W.G.; Place, T.A.

    1981-01-01

    An accurate assessment of the influence of defects on structural component integrity is needed. Generally accepted analytical techniques are not available for the very ductile materials used in many nuclear reactor components. Some results are presented from a test programme to obtain data by which to evaluate proposed models. Plate and pipe specimens containing surface flaws were fabricated from annealed Type 304 stainless steel and tested at room temperature. An evaluation of an empirical equation based on flow stress is presented. In essentially all instances the flow stress is not a constant but varies as a function of the size of the surface flaw. (author)

  10. Development of evaluation method on flow-induced vibration and corrosion of components in two-phase flow by coupled analysis. 1. Evaluation of effects of flow-induced vibration on structural material integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naitoh, Masanori; Uchida, Shunsuke; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Ninokata, Hisashi; Anahara, Naoki; Dosaki, Koji; Katono, Kenichi; Akiyama, Minoru; Saitoh, Hiroaki

    2007-01-01

    Problems in major components and structural materials in nuclear power plants have often been caused by flow induced vibration, corrosion and their overlapping effects. In order to establish safe and reliable plant operation, it is necessary to predict future problems for structural materials based on combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion and to mitigate them before they become serious issues for plant operation. An innovative method for flow induced vibration of structures in two phase flow by combined analyses of three dimensional flow dynamics and structures is to be introduced. (author)

  11. Effects of fire occurrence and recurrence on nitrogen and phosphorus losses by overland flow in maritime pine plantations in north-central Portugal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosseini, Mohammadreza; Geissen, Violette; González-Pelayo, Oscar; Serpa, Dalila; Machado, Ana Isabel; Ritsema, Coen; Keizer, Jan Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Wildfires have increased in Portugal in the recent decades, raising concerns about the long-term negative effects of fire recurrence on the environment. We studied the impacts of recurrent fires on the nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) content of mineral soil in the first year after a fire. Total

  12. Comment on "An Efficient and Stable Hydrodynamic Model With Novel Source Term Discretization Schemes for Overland Flow and Flood Simulations" by Xilin Xia et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinhua; Mao, Bing; Dong, Bingjiang

    2018-01-01

    Xia et al. (2017) proposed a novel, fully implicit method for the discretization of the bed friction terms for solving the shallow-water equations. The friction terms contain h-7/3 (h denotes water depth), which may be extremely large, introducing machine error when h approaches zero. To address this problem, Xia et al. (2017) introduces auxiliary variables (their equations (37) and (38)) so that h-4/3 rather than h-7/3 is calculated and solves a transformed equation (their equation (39)). The introduced auxiliary variables require extra storage. We implemented an analysis on the magnitude of the friction terms to find that these terms on the whole do not exceed the machine floating-point number precision, and thus we proposed a simple-to-implement technique by splitting h-7/3 into different parts of the friction terms to avoid introducing machine error. This technique does not need extra storage or to solve a transformed equation and thus is more efficient for simulations. We also showed that the surface reconstruction method proposed by Xia et al. (2017) may lead to predictions with spurious wiggles because the reconstructed Riemann states may misrepresent the water gravitational effect.

  13. Reply to Comment by Lu et al. on "An Efficient and Stable Hydrodynamic Model With Novel Source Term Discretization Schemes for Overland Flow and Flood Simulations"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xilin; Liang, Qiuhua; Ming, Xiaodong; Hou, Jingming

    2018-01-01

    This document addresses the comments raised by Lu et al. (2017). Lu et al. (2017) proposed an alternative numerical treatment for implementing the fully implicit friction discretization in Xia et al. (2017). The method by Lu et al. (2017) is also effective, but not necessarily easier to implement or more efficient. The numerical wiggles observed by Lu et al. (2017) do not affect the overall solution accuracy of the surface reconstruction method (SRM). SRM introduces an antidiffusion effect, which may also lead to more accurate numerical predictions than hydrostatic reconstruction (HR) but may be the cause of the numerical wiggles. As suggested by Lu et al. (2017), HR may perform equally well if fine enough grids are used, which has been investigated and recognized in the literature. However, the use of refined meshes in simulations will inevitably increase computational cost and the grid sizes as suggested are too small for real-world applications.

  14. Seamless integration of dose-response screening and flow chemistry: efficient generation of structure-activity relationship data of β-secretase (BACE1) inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Michael; Kuratli, Christoph; Martin, Rainer E; Hochstrasser, Remo; Wechsler, David; Enderle, Thilo; Alanine, Alexander I; Vogel, Horst

    2014-02-03

    Drug discovery is a multifaceted endeavor encompassing as its core element the generation of structure-activity relationship (SAR) data by repeated chemical synthesis and biological testing of tailored molecules. Herein, we report on the development of a flow-based biochemical assay and its seamless integration into a fully automated system comprising flow chemical synthesis, purification and in-line quantification of compound concentration. This novel synthesis-screening platform enables to obtain SAR data on b-secretase (BACE1) inhibitors at an unprecedented cycle time of only 1 h instead of several days. Full integration and automation of industrial processes have always led to productivity gains and cost reductions, and this work demonstrates how applying these concepts to SAR generation may lead to a more efficient drug discovery process. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. An Integrated Instrumentation System for Velocity, Concentration and Mass Flow Rate Measurement of Solid Particles Based on Electrostatic and Capacitance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The online and continuous measurement of velocity, concentration and mass flow rate of pneumatically conveyed solid particles for the high-efficiency utilization of energy and raw materials has become increasingly significant. In this paper, an integrated instrumentation system for the velocity, concentration and mass flow rate measurement of dense phase pneumatically conveyed solid particles based on electrostatic and capacitance sensorsis developed. The electrostatic sensors are used for particle mean velocity measurement in combination with the cross-correlation technique, while the capacitance sensor with helical surface-plate electrodes, which has relatively homogeneous sensitivity distribution, is employed for the measurement of particle concentration and its capacitance is measured by an electrostatic-immune AC-based circuit. The solid mass flow rate can be further calculated from the measured velocity and concentration. The developed instrumentation system for velocity and concentration measurement is verified and calibrated on a pulley rig and through static experiments, respectively. Finally the system is evaluated with glass beads on a gravity-fed rig. The experimental results demonstrate that the system is capable of the accurate solid mass flow rate measurement, and the relative error is within −3%–8% for glass bead mass flow rates ranging from 0.13 kg/s to 0.9 kg/s.

  16. Integrated light-sheet imaging and flow-based enquiry (iLIFE) system for 3D in-vivo imaging of multicellular organism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmi, Chelur K.; Padmanabhan, Sreedevi; Shirlekar, Kalyanee; Rajan, Kanhirodan; Manjithaya, Ravi; Singh, Varsha; Mondal, Partha Pratim

    2017-12-01

    We propose and demonstrate a light-sheet-based 3D interrogation system on a microfluidic platform for screening biological specimens during flow. To achieve this, a diffraction-limited light-sheet (with a large field-of-view) is employed to optically section the specimens flowing through the microfluidic channel. This necessitates optimization of the parameters for the illumination sub-system (illumination intensity, light-sheet width, and thickness), microfluidic specimen platform (channel-width and flow-rate), and detection sub-system (camera exposure time and frame rate). Once optimized, these parameters facilitate cross-sectional imaging and 3D reconstruction of biological specimens. The proposed integrated light-sheet imaging and flow-based enquiry (iLIFE) imaging technique enables single-shot sectional imaging of a range of specimens of varying dimensions, ranging from a single cell (HeLa cell) to a multicellular organism (C. elegans). 3D reconstruction of the entire C. elegans is achieved in real-time and with an exposure time of few hundred micro-seconds. A maximum likelihood technique is developed and optimized for the iLIFE imaging system. We observed an intracellular resolution for mitochondria-labeled HeLa cells, which demonstrates the dynamic resolution of the iLIFE system. The proposed technique is a step towards achieving flow-based 3D imaging. We expect potential applications in diverse fields such as structural biology and biophysics.

  17. Tolerance to air exposure of the New Zealand mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Hydrobiidae, Mollusca as a prerequisite to survival in overland translocations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Alonso

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Spreading throughout a new ecosystem is the last step of an exotic species to become invasive. In the case of invasive aquatic molluscs, tolerance to air exposure is one of the main mechanisms allowing overland translocation and spreading. The mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Hydrobiidae, Mollusca is native to New Zealand but it has spread worldwide, invading ecosystems in Europe, Australia, America and Asia. The aim of our study is to assess mudsnail tolerance to air exposure, which may contribute to the successful overland translocation of this species. We conducted a laboratory experiment with four levels of air exposure (9, 18, 24 and 36 hours in a controlled climatic chamber. Snails were placed for 60 seconds in a laboratory paper filter to remove surface snail water. Then they were placed back in empty vessels during the four periods of air exposure, except the control group, which was immediately returned to water. At the end of each period of air exposure all vessels were filled with water and the cumulative mortality was monitored after 24, 96, 168 and 264 hours of rehydration. The calculated Lethal Times (i.e. the time of air exposure (in hours necessary to cause the death of 50% (LT50 or 99% (LT99 of the population and their 95% confidence limits at 24, 96, 168 and 264 hours were 28.1 (25.2–31.9, 26.9 (24.2–30.1, 25.9 (23.4–28.9 and 25.9 (23.4–28.9 hours, respectively for LT50, and 49.6 (42.7–63.3, 45.6 (39.9–56.5, 43.2 (38.0–53.0 and 43.2 (38.0–53.0 hours, respectively for LT99. Therefore an air exposure time over 43 hours caused the death of all studied individuals during all monitoring periods. Extending the monitoring period beyond 24 hours did not significantly change lethal times. Therefore, we recommend exposing fishing tools or boats at open air during at least 53 hours as a low cost measure to control mudsnail spread in early stages of invasion.

  18. Develop High Efficiency Liquid-Feed PEM Electrolyzer Based on Integrated Flow Field (IFF) Structure, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Polymer electrolyte membrane water electrolysis units are currently designed to require active water flow and phase separation, or are based on a passive vapor...

  19. DEBRIS FLOW DISASTER MITIGATION THROUGH COMMUNITY-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENT MANAGEMENT (BEST PRACTICE IN MT. MERAPI AREA, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiko Otani

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Mt. Merapi is one of many active volcanoes in Indonesia which erupts frequently. The small eruption occurred nearly every year, whereas the big ones occurred at approximately once every five years. The eruption often produces impacts at both positive and negative view points, such as production of sediment as construction material and damage on infrastructures due to debris flow occurrences respectively. The eruption produces two types of disasters, i.e. primary disaster (such as ash fall, pyroclastic flow, and lava flow, and secondary disaster such as debris flow. This paper presents the long term effort on the development of community participation in the sand mining management as one of strategic disaster mitigation activities. The raising awareness of the community on the necessity of conducting proper sand mining management and its effect on reducing the risk due to debris flow disaster has shown the effectives of the approach being introduced. The local government acceptance on the presence of the community participation in the whole system of sediment management may involve further collaboration between the local government authority and community society in the future.

  20. The impacts of wind power integration on sub-daily variation in river flows downstream of hydroelectric dams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Jordan D; Patino-Echeverri, Dalia; Characklis, Gregory W

    2014-08-19

    Due to their operational flexibility, hydroelectric dams are ideal candidates to compensate for the intermittency and unpredictability of wind energy production. However, more coordinated use of wind and hydropower resources may exacerbate the impacts dams have on downstream environmental flows, that is, the timing and magnitude of water flows needed to sustain river ecosystems. In this paper, we examine the effects of increased (i.e., 5%, 15%, and 25%) wind market penetration on prices for electricity and reserves, and assess the potential for altered price dynamics to disrupt reservoir release schedules at a hydroelectric dam and cause more variable and unpredictable hourly flow patterns (measured in terms of the Richards-Baker Flashiness (RBF) index). Results show that the greatest potential for wind energy to impact downstream flows occurs at high (∼25%) wind market penetration, when the dam sells more reserves in order to exploit spikes in real-time electricity prices caused by negative wind forecast errors. Nonetheless, compared to the initial impacts of dam construction (and the dam's subsequent operation as a peaking resource under baseline conditions) the marginal effects of any increased wind market penetration on downstream flows are found to be relatively minor.

  1. 3. Workshop for IAEA ICSP on Integral PWR Design Natural Circulation Flow Stability and Thermo-hydraulic Coupling of Containment and Primary System during Accidents. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-04-01

    Most advanced nuclear power plant designs adopted several kinds of passive systems. Natural circulation is used as a key driving force for many passive systems and even for core heat removal during normal operation such as NuScale, CAREM, ESBWR and Indian AHWR designs. Simulation of natural circulation phenomena is very challenging since the driving force of it is weak compared to forced circulation and involves a coupling between primary system and containment for integral type reactor. The IAEA ICSP (International Collaborative Standard Problem) on 'Integral PWR Design Natural Circulation Flow Stability and Thermo-hydraulic Coupling of Containment and Primary System during Accidents' was proposed within the CRP on 'Natural Circulation Phenomena, Modelling, and Reliability of Passive Systems that utilize Natural Circulation'. Oregon State University (OSU) of USA offered to host this ICSP. This ICSP plans to conduct the following experiments and blind/open simulations with system codes: 1. Quasi-steady state operation with different core power levels: Conduct quasi-steady state operation with step-wise increase of core power level in order to observe single phase natural circulation flow according to power level. The experimental facility and operating conditions for an integral PWR will be used. 2. Thermo-hydraulic Coupling between Primary system and Containment: Conduct a loss of feedwater transient with subsequent ADS blowdown and long term cooling to determine the progression of a loss of feedwater transient by natural circulation through primary and containment systems. These tests would examine the blowdown phase as well as the long term cooling using sump natural circulation by coupling the primary to containment systems. This data could be used for the evaluation of system codes to determine if they model specific phenomena in an accurate manner. OSU completed planned two ICSP tests in July 2011 and real initial and boundary conditions measured from the

  2. Surface Runoff in Watershed Modeling—Turbulent or Laminar Flows?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E. Grismer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Determination of overland sheet flow depths, velocities and celerities across the hillslope in watershed modeling is important towards estimation of surface storage, travel times to streams and soil detachment rates. It requires careful characterization of the flow processes. Similarly, determination of the temporal variation of hillslope-riparian-stream hydrologic connectivity requires estimation of the shallow subsurface soil hydraulic conductivity and soil-water retention (i.e., drainable porosities parameters. Field rainfall and runoff simulation studies provide considerable information and insight into these processes; in particular, that sheet flows are likely laminar and that shallow hydraulic conductivities and storage can be determined from the plot studies. Here, using a 1 m by 2 m long runoff simulation flume, we found that for overland flow rates per unit width of roughly 30–60 mm2/s and bedslopes of 10%–66% with varying sand roughness depths that all flow depths were predicted by laminar flow equations alone and that equivalent Manning’s n values were depth dependent and quite small relative to those used in watershed modeling studies. Even for overland flow rates greater than those typically measured or modeled and using Manning’s n values of 0.30–0.35, often assumed in physical watershed model applications for relatively smooth surface conditions, the laminar flow velocities were 4–5 times greater, while the laminar flow depths were 4–5 times smaller. This observation suggests that travel times, surface storage volumes and surface shear stresses associated with erosion across the landscape would be poorly predicted using turbulent flow assumptions. Filling the flume with fine sand and conducting runoff studies, we were unable to produce sheet flow, but found that subsurface flows were onflow rate, soil depth and slope dependent and drainable porosities were only soil depth and slope dependent. Moreover, both the sand

  3. Integrating gene flow, crop biology, and farm management in on-farm conservation of avocado (Persea americana, Lauraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Kenneth; Desalle, Rob; Peters, Charles M; Benfey, Philip N

    2003-11-01

    Maintaining crop diversity on farms where cultivars can evolve is a conservation goal, but few tools are available to assess the long-term maintenance of genetic diversity on farms. One important issue for on-farm conservation is gene flow from crops with a narrow genetic base into related populations that are genetically diverse. In a case study of avocado (Persea americana var. americana) in one of its centers of diversity (San Jerónimo, Costa Rica), we used 10 DNA microsatellite markers in a parentage analysis to estimate gene flow from commercialized varieties into a traditional crop population. Five commercialized genotypes comprised nearly 40% of orchard trees, but they contributed only about 14.5% of the gametes to the youngest cohort of trees. Although commercialized varieties and the diverse population were often planted on the same farm, planting patterns appeared to keep the two types of trees separated on small scales, possibly explaining the limited gene flow. In a simulation that combined gene flow estimates, crop biology, and graft tree management, loss of allelic diversity was less than 10% over 150 yr, and selection was effective in retaining desirable alleles in the diverse subpopulation. Simulations also showed that, in addition to gene flow, managing the genetic makeup and life history traits of the invasive commercialized varieties could have a significant impact on genetic diversity in the target population. The results support the feasibility of on-farm crop conservation, but simulations also showed that higher levels of gene flow could lead to severe losses of genetic diversity even if farmers continue to plant diverse varieties.

  4. An Approach for Selection of Flow Regime and Models for Conservative Evaluation of a Vessel Integrity Monitoring System for Water-Cooled Vacuum Vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pointer, W. David; Ruggles, Arthur E.

    2003-01-01

    Thin-walled vacuum containment vessels cooled by circulating water jackets are often utilized in research and industrial applications where isolation of equipment or experiments from the influences of the surrounding environment is desirable. The development of leaks in these vessels can result in costly downtime for the facility. A Vessel Integrity Monitoring System (VIMS) is developed to detect leak formation and estimate the size of the leak to allow evaluation of the risk associated with continued operation. A wide range of leak configurations and fluid flow phenomena are considered in the evaluation of the rate at which a tracer gas dissolved in the cooling jacket water is transported into the vacuum vessel. A methodology is presented that uses basic fluid flow models and careful evaluation of their ranges of applicability to provide a conservative estimate of the transport rates for the tracer gas and hence the time required for the VIMS to detect a leak of a given size

  5. Development of an integrated MOX-scrap recycling flow-sheet by dry and wet routes using microwave heating techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallik, G K; Malav, R K; Karande, A P; Bhargava, V K; Kamath, H S [Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur (India)

    1999-01-01

    A simple, short and efficient scrap, recycling flow-sheet, which is exclusively based on microwave heating techniques and, includes both dry and wet routes, for (U,Pu)O{sub 2} fuel scrap recycling has been developed and evaluated. (author) 6 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Experimental Study of Single Phase Flow in a Closed-Loop Cooling System with Integrated Mini-Channel Heat Sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ma

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The flow and heat transfer characteristics of a closed-loop cooling system with a mini-channel heat sink for thermal management of electronics is studied experimentally. The heat sink is designed with corrugated fins to improve its heat dissipation capability. The experiments are performed using variable coolant volumetric flow rates and input heating powers. The experimental results show a high and reliable thermal performance using the heat sink with corrugated fins. The heat transfer capability is improved up to 30 W/cm2 when the base temperature is kept at a stable and acceptable level. Besides the heat transfer capability enhancement, the capability of the system to transfer heat for a long distance is also studied and a fast thermal response time to reach steady state is observed once the input heating power or the volume flow rate are varied. Under different input heat source powers and volumetric flow rates, our results suggest potential applications of the designed mini-channel heat sink in cooling microelectronics.

  7. Understanding controls on flow permanence in intermittent rivers to aid ecological research: integrating meteorology, geology and land cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intermittent rivers, those channels that periodically cease to flow, constitute over half of the total discharge of the global river network and will likely increase in their extent due to climatic shifts and/or water resources development. Burgeoning research on intermittent riv...

  8. Numerical Evaluation of the "Dual-Kernel Counter-flow" Matric Convolution Integral that Arises in Discrete/Continuous (D/C) Control Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Douglas D.

    2009-01-01

    Discrete/Continuous (D/C) control theory is a new generalized theory of discrete-time control that expands the concept of conventional (exact) discrete-time control to create a framework for design and implementation of discretetime control systems that include a continuous-time command function generator so that actuator commands need not be constant between control decisions, but can be more generally defined and implemented as functions that vary with time across sample period. Because the plant/control system construct contains two linear subsystems arranged in tandem, a novel dual-kernel counter-flow convolution integral appears in the formulation. As part of the D/C system design and implementation process, numerical evaluation of that integral over the sample period is required. Three fundamentally different evaluation methods and associated algorithms are derived for the constant-coefficient case. Numerical results are matched against three available examples that have closed-form solutions.

  9. Impact of flow routing on catchment area calculations, slope estimates, and numerical simulations of landscape development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelef, Eitan; Hilley, George E.

    2013-12-01

    Flow routing across real or modeled topography determines the modeled discharge and wetness index and thus plays a central role in predicting surface lowering rate, runoff generation, likelihood of slope failure, and transition from hillslope to channel forming processes. In this contribution, we compare commonly used flow-routing rules as well as a new routing rule, to commonly used benchmarks. We also compare results for different routing rules using Airborne Laser Swath Mapping (ALSM) topography to explore the impact of different flow-routing schemes on inferring the generation of saturation overland flow and the transition between hillslope to channel forming processes, as well as on location of saturation overland flow. Finally, we examined the impact of flow-routing and slope-calculation rules on modeled topography produced by Geomorphic Transport Law (GTL)-based simulations. We found that different rules produce substantive differences in the structure of the modeled topography and flow patterns over ALSM data. Our results highlight the impact of flow-routing and slope-calculation rules on modeled topography, as well as on calculated geomorphic metrics across real landscapes. As such, studies that use a variety of routing rules to analyze and simulate topography are necessary to determine those aspects that most strongly depend on a chosen routing rule.

  10. An exterior Poisson solver using fast direct methods and boundary integral equations with applications to nonlinear potential flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, D. P.; Woo, A. C.; Bussoletti, J. E.; Johnson, F. T.

    1986-01-01

    A general method is developed combining fast direct methods and boundary integral equation methods to solve Poisson's equation on irregular exterior regions. The method requires O(N log N) operations where N is the number of grid points. Error estimates are given that hold for regions with corners and other boundary irregularities. Computational results are given in the context of computational aerodynamics for a two-dimensional lifting airfoil. Solutions of boundary integral equations for lifting and nonlifting aerodynamic configurations using preconditioned conjugate gradient are examined for varying degrees of thinness.

  11. Integration of lateral flow and micro array technologies for multiplex immunoassay: application to the determination of drugs of abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taranova, Nadezhda A.; Byzova, Nadezhda A.; Zaiko, Viktoria V.; Starovoitova, Tatiana A.; Vengerov, Yury Yu.; Zherdev, Anatoly V.; Dzantiev, Boris B.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a lateral flow micro array that combines multi-spot immunochip technology and immunochromatography. It can serve as a tool for the simultaneous detection of multiple analytes. The test zone of the nitrocellulose support comprises a micro array spotted with up to 32 antigens that can capture labeled gold-antibodies after lateral flow. The detection limits and detectable concentration ranges of the assay were characterized. The method was applied to the determination of drugs of abuse (and their metabolites) in urine, specifically of morphine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, and benzoylecgonine. The assay format is rapid (10 min), and has both a low relative standard deviation ( -1 for drugs of abuse) are comparable to those of conventional single-analyte strip methods. (author)

  12. DEBRIS FLOW DISASTER MITIGATION THROUGH COMMUNITY-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENT MANAGEMENT (BEST PRACTICE IN MT. MERAPI AREA, INDONESIA)

    OpenAIRE

    Otani, Kazuhiko; Suharyanto, Suharyanto

    2015-01-01

    Mt. Merapi is one of many active volcanoes in Indonesia which erupts frequently. The small eruption occurred nearly every year, whereas the big ones occurred at approximately once every five years. The eruption often produces impacts at both positive and negative view points, such as production of sediment as construction material and damage on infrastructures due to debris flow occurrences respectively. The eruption produces two types of disasters, i.e. primary disaster (such as ash fall, py...

  13. Integration of Quantitative Positron Emission Tomography Absolute Myocardial Blood Flow Measurements in the Clinical Management of Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewirtz, Henry; Dilsizian, Vasken

    2016-05-31

    In the >40 years since planar myocardial imaging with(43)K-potassium was introduced into clinical research and management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), diagnosis and treatment have undergone profound scientific and technological changes. One such innovation is the current state-of-the-art hardware and software for positron emission tomography myocardial perfusion imaging, which has advanced it from a strictly research-oriented modality to a clinically valuable tool. This review traces the evolving role of quantitative positron emission tomography measurements of myocardial blood flow in the evaluation and management of patients with CAD. It presents methodology, currently or soon to be available, that offers a paradigm shift in CAD management. Heretofore, radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging has been primarily qualitative or at best semiquantitative in nature, assessing regional perfusion in relative terms. Thus, unlike so many facets of modern cardiovascular practice and CAD management, which depend, for example, on absolute values of key parameters such as arterial and left ventricular pressures, serum lipoprotein, and other biomarker levels, the absolute levels of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow have yet to be incorporated into routine clinical practice even in most positron emission tomography centers where the potential to do so exists. Accordingly, this review focuses on potential value added for improving clinical CAD practice by measuring the absolute level of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow. Physiological principles and imaging fundamentals necessary to understand how positron emission tomography makes robust, quantitative measurements of myocardial blood flow possible are highlighted. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. The role of a fish pond in optimizing nutrient flows in integrated agriculture-aquaculture farming systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nhan, D.K.

    2007-01-01

    In the Mekong delta, the Vietnamese government promoted integrated agriculture-aquaculture (IAA) farming systems as an example of sustainable agriculture. An important advantage of IAA-farming is the nutrient linkage between the pond and terrestrial components within a farm, which allows to

  15. Development and operation of an integrated sampling probe and gas analyzer for turbulent mixing studies in complex supersonic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiswall, John D.

    For many aerospace applications, mixing enhancement between co-flowing streams has been identified as a critical and enabling technology. Due to short fuel residence times in scramjet combustors, combustion is limited by the molecular mixing of hydrogen (fuel) and air. Determining the mixedness of fuel and air in these complex supersonic flowfields is critical to the advancement of novel injection schemes currently being developed at UTA in collaboration with NASA Langley and intended to be used on a future two-stage to orbit (~Mach 16) hypersonic air-breathing vehicle for space access. Expanding on previous work, an instrument has been designed, fabricated, and tested in order to measure mean concentrations of injected helium (a passive scalar used instead of hazardous hydrogen) and to quantitatively characterize the nature of the high-frequency concentration fluctuations encountered in the compressible, turbulent, and high-speed (up to Mach 3.5) complex flows associated with the new supersonic injection schemes. This important high-frequency data is not yet attainable when employing other techniques such as Laser Induced Fluorescence, Filtered Rayleigh Scattering or mass spectroscopy in the same complex supersonic flows. The probe operates by exploiting the difference between the thermodynamic properties of two species through independent massflow measurements and calibration. The probe samples isokinetically from the flowfield's area of interest and the helium concentration may be uniquely determined by hot-film anemometry and internally measured stagnation conditions. The final design has a diameter of 0.25" and is only 2.22" long. The overall accuracy of the probe is 3% in molar fraction of helium. The frequency response of mean concentration measurements is estimated at 103 Hz, while high-frequency hot-film measurements were conducted at 60 kHz. Additionally, the work presents an analysis of the probe's internal mixing effects and the effects of the spatial

  16. A scattering-based over-land rainfall retrieval algorithm for South Korea using GCOM-W1/AMSR-2 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Young-Joo; Shin, Hayan; Ban, Hyunju; Lee, Yang-Won; Park, Kyung-Ae; Cho, Jaeil; Park, No-Wook; Hong, Sungwook

    2017-08-01

    Heavy summer rainfall is a primary natural disaster affecting lives and properties in the Korean Peninsula. This study presents a satellite-based rainfall rate retrieval algorithm for the South Korea combining polarization-corrected temperature ( PCT) and scattering index ( SI) data from the 36.5 and 89.0 GHz channels of the Advanced microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR-2) onboard the Global Change Observation Mission (GCOM)-W1 satellite. The coefficients for the algorithm were obtained from spatial and temporal collocation data from the AMSR-2 and groundbased automatic weather station rain gauges from 1 July - 30 August during the years, 2012-2015. There were time delays of about 25 minutes between the AMSR-2 observations and the ground raingauge measurements. A new linearly-combined rainfall retrieval algorithm focused on heavy rain for the PCT and SI was validated using ground-based rainfall observations for the South Korea from 1 July - 30 August, 2016. The validation presented PCT and SI methods showed slightly improved results for rainfall > 5 mm h-1 compared to the current ASMR-2 level 2 data. The best bias and root mean square error (RMSE) for the PCT method at AMSR-2 36.5 GHz were 2.09 mm h-1 and 7.29 mm h-1, respectively, while the current official AMSR-2 rainfall rates show a larger bias and RMSE (4.80 mm h-1 and 9.35 mm h-1, respectively). This study provides a scatteringbased over-land rainfall retrieval algorithm for South Korea affected by stationary front rain and typhoons with the advantages of the previous PCT and SI methods to be applied to a variety of spaceborne passive microwave radiometers.

  17. Application of direct-injection detector integrated with the multi-pumping flow system to chemiluminescence determination of the total polyphenol index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalewajko-Sieliwoniuk, Edyta; Iwanowicz, Magdalena; Kalinowski, Sławomir; Kojło, Anatol

    2016-03-10

    In this work, we present a novel chemiluminescence (CL) method based on direct-injection detector (DID) integrated with the multi-pumping flow system (MPFS) to chemiluminescence determination of the total polyphenol index. In this flow system, the sample and the reagents are injected directly into the cone-shaped detection cell placed in front of the photomultiplier window. Such construction of the detection chamber allows for fast measurement of the CL signal in stopped-flow conditions immediately after mixing the reagents. The proposed DID-CL-MPFS method is based on the chemiluminescence of nanocolloidal manganese(IV)-hexametaphosphate-ethanol system. The application of ethanol as a sensitizer, eliminated the use of carcinogenic formaldehyde. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the chemiluminescence intensities are proportional to the concentration of gallic acid in the range from 5 to 350 ng mL(-1). The DID-CL-MPFS method offers a number of advantages, including low limit of detection (0.80 ng mL(-1)), high precision (RSD = 3.3%) and high sample throughput (144 samples h(-1)) as well as low consumption of reagents, energy and low waste generation. The proposed method has been successfully applied to determine the total polyphenol index (expressed as gallic acid equivalent) in a variety of plant-derived food samples (wine, tea, coffee, fruit and vegetable juices, herbs, spices). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Characteristic study of a novel compact Solar Thermal Facade (STF) with internally extruded pin–fin flow channel for building integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Jingchun; Zhang, Xingxing; Yang, Tong; Tang, Llewellyn; Cheshmehzangi, Ali; Wu, Yupeng; Huang, Guiqin; Zhong, Dan; Xu, Peng; Liu, Shengchun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel compact STF with internally extruded pin–fin flow channel is proposed. • Thermal performance of the STF is characterized in different operation modes. • This STF is with simple structure, low cost and high feasibility in building design. • Such STF can achieve better thermal performance as conventional ones. - Abstract: The fully building integrated Solar Thermal Facade (STF) systems can become potential solutions for aesthetics architectural design, as well as for the enhancement of energy efficiency and reduction of operational cost in the contemporary built environment. As a result, this article introduces a novel compact STF with internally extruded pin–fin flow channel that is particularly suitable for the building integration. A dedicated simulation model was developed on basis of the heat transfer and the flow mechanics. A prototype of this STF was fabricated and then it was tested under a series of controlled environmental conditions. The experimental validation illustrated a good agreement with the simulation results, indicating the established model was able to predict the STF’s thermal performance at a reasonable accuracy (i.e. mean deviation of less than 5.46%). The impacts of several operational parameters, i.e. equivalent solar radiation, air temperature, air velocity, water mass flow rate and inlet water temperature, on the STF thermal performance were then discussed respectively. Given the baseline testing condition, the collector efficiency factor F′ is almost 0.9930, leading to a relatively high nominal thermal efficiency at about 63.21%, which demonstrates such STF, with simpler structure, lower cost and higher feasibility in architectural design, can achieve an equivalent or better thermal performance than recent bionic STF or the conventional ones. It is also concluded that the thermal efficiency varies proportionally with solar radiation, air temperature, and mass flow rate of water, but oppositely to air

  19. Tight-coupling of groundwater flow and transport modelling engines with spatial databases and GIS technology: a new approach integrating Feflow and ArcGIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezio Crestaz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of groundwater flow and transport numerical models is generally a challenge, time-consuming and financially-demanding task, in charge to specialized modelers and consulting firms. At a later stage, within clearly stated limits of applicability, these models are often expected to be made available to less knowledgeable personnel to support/design and running of predictive simulations within more familiar environments than specialized simulation systems. GIS systems coupled with spatial databases appear to be ideal candidates to address problem above, due to their much wider diffusion and expertise availability. Current paper discusses the issue from a tight-coupling architecture perspective, aimed at integration of spatial databases, GIS and numerical simulation engines, addressing both observed and computed data management, retrieval and spatio-temporal analysis issues. Observed data can be migrated to the central database repository and then used to set up transient simulation conditions in the background, at run time, while limiting additional complexity and integrity failure risks as data duplication during data transfer through proprietary file formats. Similarly, simulation scenarios can be set up in a familiar GIS system and stored to spatial database for later reference. As numerical engine is tightly coupled with the GIS, simulations can be run within the environment and results themselves saved to the database. Further tasks, as spatio-temporal analysis (i.e. for postcalibration auditing scopes, cartography production and geovisualization, can then be addressed using traditional GIS tools. Benefits of such an approach include more effective data management practices, integration and availability of modeling facilities in a familiar environment, streamlining spatial analysis processes and geovisualization requirements for the non-modelers community. Major drawbacks include limited 3D and time-dependent support in

  20. Integrated parametric study of a hybrid-stabilized argon–water arc under subsonic, transonic and supersonic plasma flow regimes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jeništa, Jiří; Takana, H.; Nishiyama, H.; Bartlová, M.; Aubrecht, V.; Křenek, Petr; Hrabovský, Milan; Kavka, Tetyana; Sember, Viktor; Mašláni, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 43 (2011), s. 435204-435204 ISSN 0022-3727 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/2070 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : hybrid-stabilized electric arc * mass flow rate * net emission coefficients * partial characteristics * Mach number * shock diamonds Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.544, year: 2011 http://iopscience.iop.org/0022-3727/44/43/435204/pdf/0022-3727_44_43_435204.pdf

  1. Micro flow reactor chips with integrated luminescent chemosensors for spatially resolved on-line chemical reaction monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitlin, Leonid; Hoera, Christian; Meier, Robert J; Nagl, Stefan; Belder, Detlev

    2013-10-21

    Real-time chemical reaction monitoring in microfluidic environments is demonstrated using luminescent chemical sensors integrated in PDMS/glass-based microscale reactors. A fabrication procedure is presented that allows for straightforward integration of thin polymer layers with optical sensing functionality in microchannels of glass-PDMS chips of only 150 μm width and of 10 to 35 μm height. Sensor layers consisting of polystyrene and an oxygen-sensitive platinum porphyrin probe with film thicknesses of about 0.5 to 4 μm were generated by combining spin coating and abrasion techniques. Optimal coating procedures were developed and evaluated. The chip-integrated sensor layers were calibrated and investigated with respect to stability, reproducibility and response times. These microchips allowed observation of dissolved oxygen concentration in the range of 0 to over 40 mg L(-1) with a detection limit of 368 μg L(-1). The sensor layers were then used for observation of a model reaction, the oxidation of sulphite to sulphate in a microfluidic chemical reactor and could observe sulphite concentrations of less than 200 μM. Real-time on-line monitoring of this chemical reaction was realized at a fluorescence microscope setup with 405 nm LED excitation and CCD camera detection.

  2. Development of an integrated sampler based on direct 222Rn/220Rn progeny sensors in flow-mode for estimating unattached/attached progeny concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Rosaline; Sapra, B.K.; Mayya, Y.S.

    2009-01-01

    A flow-mode integrated sampler consisting of a wire-mesh and filter-paper array along with passive solid state nuclear track detectors has been developed for estimating unattached and attached fraction of 222 Rn/ 220 Rn progeny concentration. The essential element of this sampler is the direct 222 Rn/ 220 Rn progeny sensor (DRPS/DTPS), which is an absorber-mounted-LR115 type nuclear track detector that selectively registers the alpha particles emitted from the progeny deposited on its surface. During sampling at a specified flow-rate, the unattached progeny is captured on the wire-mesh; while the attached progeny gets transmitted and is captured on the filter-paper. The alpha particles emitted by the deposited progeny atoms are registered on the sensors placed at a specified distance facing the wire-mesh and the filter-paper, respectively. The various steps involved in the development of this flow-mode direct progeny sampler such as the optimization of the sampling rate and the distance between the sensor and the deposition substrate are discussed. The sensitivity factor of the DTPS-loaded sampler for 220 Rn progeny deposited on the wire-mesh and filter-paper is found to be 23.77 ± 0.64 (track cm -2 h -1 ) (Bq m -3 ) -1 and 22.30 ± 0.18 (track cm -2 h -1 ) (Bq m -3 ) -1 , respectively; while that of DRPS-loaded sampler for 222 Rn progeny deposition, is 3.03 ± 0.14 (track cm -2 h -1 ) (Bq m -3 ) -1 and 2.08 ± 0.07 (track cm -2 h -1 ) (Bq m -3 ) -1 , respectively. The highlight of this flow-mode sampler is its high sensitivity and that it utilizes the passive technique for estimating the unattached and attached progeny concentration, thus doing away with the alpha counting procedures.

  3. Study of turbine and guide vanes integration to enhance the performance of cross flow vertical axis wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Andreas; Tjahjana, Dominicus Danardono Dwi Prija; Santoso, Budi; Situmorang, Marcelinus Risky Clinton

    2018-02-01

    The main purpose of this study is to investigate the best configuration between guide vanes and cross flow vertical axis wind turbine with variation of several parameters including guide vanes tilt angle and the number of turbine and guide vane blades. The experimental test were conducted under various wind speed and directions for testing cross flow wind turbine, consisted of 8, 12 and 16 blades. Two types of guide vane were developed in this study, employing 20° and 60° tilt angle. Both of the two types of guide vane had three variations of blade numbers which had same blade numbers variations as the turbines. The result showed that the configurations between 60° guide vane with 16 blade numbers and turbine with 16 blade numbers had the best configurations. The result also showed that for certain configuration, guide vane was able to increase the power generated by the turbine significantly by 271.39% compared to the baseline configuration without using of guide vane.

  4. Quantitative relationship between coronary calcium content and coronary flow reserve as assessed by integrated PET/CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curillova, Zelmira [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); VA Boston Healthcare System, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, West Roxbury, MA (United States); Yaman, Bettina F.; Sitek, Arkadius; El Fakhri, Georges [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Dorbala, Sharmila [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Noninvasive Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Departments of Medicine (Cardiology) and Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Kwong, Raymond Y. [Harvard Medical School, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Noninvasive Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Departments of Medicine (Cardiology) and Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Royal Brompton Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Di Carli, Marcelo F. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Noninvasive Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Departments of Medicine (Cardiology) and Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Boston, MA (United States)

    2009-10-15

    To evaluate the relationship between coronary artery calcium (CAC) and coronary vasodilator function. We evaluated 136 patients without known coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing vasodilator stress {sup 82}Rb PET/CT and CAC scoring who showed normal myocardial perfusion. The CAC score, resting and hyperemic myocardial blood flow (MBF), coronary flow reserve (CFR) and coronary vascular resistance were analyzed. Global and regional CAC scores showed significant but weak inverse correlations with hyperemic MBF (r=-0.31 and r=-0.26, p{<=}0.0002 respectively) and CFR (r=-0.28 and r=-0.2, p{<=}0.001 respectively). With increasing CAC score, there was a modest stepwise decline in CFR on a per-patient basis (1.8{+-}0.5 vs 1.7{+-}0.5 vs 1.5{+-}0.4, p=0.048, with total CAC=0, 1-400 and >400, respectively) and on a per-vessel basis. In multivariable modeling only body mass index and CAC score were predictive of CFR. In patients with an intermediate likelihood of, but without overt, CAD, there is a statistically significant but weak inverse correlation between CAC content and coronary vasodilator function. The strength of this association weakens after adjusting CAC scores for age, gender and coronary risk factors. This suggests that CAC and coronary vasodilator function provide biologically different information regarding atherosclerosis. (orig.)

  5. An Integrated Workflow To Assess Technical and Biological Variability of Cell Population Frequencies in Human Peripheral Blood by Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burel, Julie G; Qian, Yu; Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia; Weiskopf, Daniela; Zapardiel-Gonzalo, Jose; Taplitz, Randy; Gilman, Robert H; Saito, Mayuko; de Silva, Aruna D; Vijayanand, Pandurangan; Scheuermann, Richard H; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern

    2017-02-15

    In the context of large-scale human system immunology studies, controlling for technical and biological variability is crucial to ensure that experimental data support research conclusions. In this study, we report on a universal workflow to evaluate both technical and biological variation in multiparameter flow cytometry, applied to the development of a 10-color panel to identify all major cell populations and T cell subsets in cryopreserved PBMC. Replicate runs from a control donation and comparison of different gating strategies assessed the technical variability associated with each cell population and permitted the calculation of a quality control score. Applying our panel to a large collection of PBMC samples, we found that most cell populations showed low intraindividual variability over time. In contrast, certain subpopulations such as CD56 T cells and Temra CD4 T cells were associated with high interindividual variability. Age but not gender had a significant effect on the frequency of several populations, with a drastic decrease in naive T cells observed in older donors. Ethnicity also influenced a significant proportion of immune cell population frequencies, emphasizing the need to account for these covariates in immune profiling studies. We also exemplify the usefulness of our workflow by identifying a novel cell-subset signature of latent tuberculosis infection. Thus, our study provides a universal workflow to establish and evaluate any flow cytometry panel in systems immunology studies. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  6. Quantitative relationship between coronary calcium content and coronary flow reserve as assessed by integrated PET/CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curillova, Zelmira; Yaman, Bettina F.; Sitek, Arkadius; El Fakhri, Georges; Dorbala, Sharmila; Kwong, Raymond Y.; Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos; Di Carli, Marcelo F.

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between coronary artery calcium (CAC) and coronary vasodilator function. We evaluated 136 patients without known coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing vasodilator stress 82 Rb PET/CT and CAC scoring who showed normal myocardial perfusion. The CAC score, resting and hyperemic myocardial blood flow (MBF), coronary flow reserve (CFR) and coronary vascular resistance were analyzed. Global and regional CAC scores showed significant but weak inverse correlations with hyperemic MBF (r=-0.31 and r=-0.26, p≤0.0002 respectively) and CFR (r=-0.28 and r=-0.2, p≤0.001 respectively). With increasing CAC score, there was a modest stepwise decline in CFR on a per-patient basis (1.8±0.5 vs 1.7±0.5 vs 1.5±0.4, p=0.048, with total CAC=0, 1-400 and >400, respectively) and on a per-vessel basis. In multivariable modeling only body mass index and CAC score were predictive of CFR. In patients with an intermediate likelihood of, but without overt, CAD, there is a statistically significant but weak inverse correlation between CAC content and coronary vasodilator function. The strength of this association weakens after adjusting CAC scores for age, gender and coronary risk factors. This suggests that CAC and coronary vasodilator function provide biologically different information regarding atherosclerosis. (orig.)

  7. Introduction to the Special Issue: Flows and practices – The politics of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM in southern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyla Mehta

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available For the past two decades, IWRM has been actively promoted by water experts as well as multilateral and bilateral donors who have considered it to be a crucial way to address global water management problems. IWRM has been incorporated into water laws, reforms and policies of southern African nations. This article introduces the special issue 'Flows and Practices: The Politics of IWRM in southern Africa'. It provides a conceptual framework to study: the flow of IWRM as an idea; its translation and articulation into new policies, institutions and allocation mechanisms, and the resulting practices and effects across multiple scales – global, regional, national and local. The empirical findings of the complexities of articulation and implementation of IWRM in South Africa, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, Tanzania and Uganda form the core of this special issue. We demonstrate how Africa has been a laboratory for IWRM experiments, while donors as well as a new cadre of water professionals and students have made IWRM their mission. The case studies reveal that IWRM may have resulted in an unwarranted policy focus on managing water instead of enlarging poor women’s and men’s access to water. The newly created institutional arrangements tended to centralise the power and control of the State and powerful users over water and failed to address historically rooted inequalities.

  8. Building Integrated Active Flow Control: Improving the Aerodynamic Performance of Tall Buildings Using Fluid-Based Aerodynamic Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menicovich, David

    By 2050 an estimated 9 billion people will inhabit planet earth and almost all the growth in the next 40 years will be in urban areas putting tremendous pressure on creating sustainable cities. The rapid increase in population, rise in land value and decrease in plot sizes in cities around the world positions tall or more importantly slender buildings as the best suited building typology to address the increasingly critical demand for space in this pressing urbanization trend. However, the majority of new tall building urban developments have not followed principles of environmental and/or sustainable design and incentives to innovate, both technological and economic, are urgently required. The biggest climatic challenge to the design, construction and performance of tall buildings is wind sensitivity. This challenge is further emphasized seeing two market driven trends: on one hand as urban population grows, land value rises while plot sizes decrease; on the other, more cost effective modular construction techniques are introducing much lighter tall building structures. The combination of the two suggests a potential increase in the slenderness ratio of tall buildings (typically less than 6:1 but stretching to 20:1 in the near future) where not-so-tall but much lighter buildings will be the bulk of new construction in densely populated cities, providing affordable housing in the face of fast urbanization but also introducing wind sensitivity which was previously the problem of a very limited number of super tall buildings to a much larger number of buildings and communities. The proposed research aims to investigate a novel approach to the interaction between tall buildings and their environment. Through this approach the research proposes a new relationship between buildings and the flows around, through and inside them, where buildings could adapt to better control and manage the air flow around them, and consequently produce significant opportunities to reduce

  9. Relative intensity of bilateral trade flows, regional integration, and trade performance: the case of Brazil, 1984-1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Valquiria da

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to identify the component of trade that results specifically from bilateral relations and evaluate how the creation of trading blocs affects trade relations between countries. The trirapport coefficient of the relative intensity of bilateral agricultural sector trade flows between Brazil and other countries from 1984 and 1998 is used in the evaluation. In general, the results show that relative trade intensity between Brazil and its non-MERCOSUL trade partners fell after their entry into regional trade agreements (extra-bloc effect. The intra-bloc effect (trade expansion is reflected by changes in trade intensity between Brazil and the other MERCOSUL members and changes in trade intensity between NAFTA members Mexico, Canada, and the United States.

  10. Local and integral ulrasonic gauges for two-phase flow instrumentation in nuclear reactor and safety technology. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chochlov, V.N.; Duncev, A.V.; Ivanov, V.V.; Kontelev, V.V.; Melnikov, V.I.; Stoppel, L.K.; Prasser, H.M.; Zippe, W.; Zschau, J.; Zboray, R.

    2000-11-01

    The present project was executed in the frame of a co-operation agreement between FZR and the scientific group of Prof. Melnikov of the technical University of Nishny Novgorod (TUNN) in the Russian Federation. It is part of the Federal Government's programme for the provision of advice for Eastern Europe on the building up of democracy and social market economy (TRANSFORM Programme). New methods of two-phase flow instrumentation were developed: Intrusive wave-guide probes can be used for local void fraction measurements. The new ultrasonic mesh sensors allow a fast two-phase flow visualisation with about 250 frames per second. Experiments carried out at the test loop in Rossendorf, but also the tests at the DESIRE facility in Delft have shown that both local wave-guide probes and ultrasonic mesh sensors can be successfully applied under the conditions of high pressure and temperature steam-water mixture, as well as in organic liquids and refrigerants. Furthermore, non-intrusive wave-guide sensors as well as density sensors based on the measurement of the wave propagation velocity in wave-guides immersed into the measuring liquid were developed and tested. In the present stage of the development, the non-intrusive sensors can rather be used for a qualitative gas respectively level detection than for void fraction measurements. The wave-guide density sensor was successfully demonstrated that it is able to measure densities of single-phase liquids. It requires further development of the electronic circuitry. The main innovation was achieved by the development of the ultrasonic mesh sensor, the resoluting capability of which is comparable to methods like electrical wire-mesh sensors and ultra-fast X-ray tomography, while the device itself is robust and low expensive. (orig.) [de

  11. PIV measurements of the turbulence integral length scale on cold combustion flow field of tangential firing boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wen-fei; Xie, Jing-xing; Gong, Zhi-jun; Li, Bao-wei [Inner Mongolia Univ. of Science and Technology, Baotou (China). Inner Mongolia Key Lab. for Utilization of Bayan Obo Multi-Metallic Resources: Elected State Key Lab.

    2013-07-01

    The process of the pulverized coal combustion in tangential firing boiler has prominent significance on improving boiler operation efficiency and reducing NO{sub X} emission. This paper aims at researching complex turbulent vortex coherent structure formed by the four corners jets in the burner zone, a cold experimental model of tangential firing boiler has been built. And by employing spatial correlation analysis method and PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) technique, the law of Vortex scale distribution on the three typical horizontal layers of the model based on the turbulent Integral Length Scale (ILS) has been researched. According to the correlation analysis of ILS and the temporal average velocity, it can be seen that the turbulent vortex scale distribution in the burner zone of the model is affected by both jet velocity and the position of wind layers, and is not linear with the variation of jet velocity. The vortex scale distribution of the upper primary air is significantly different from the others. Therefore, studying the ILS of turbulent vortex integral scale is instructive to high efficiency cleaning combustion of pulverized coal in theory.

  12. Integration of design and manufacturing in a virtual enterprise using enterprise rules, intelligent agents, STEP, and work flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, Charles R.; Aparicio, Manuel; Barry, J.; Durniak, Timothy; Lam, Herman; Ramnath, Rajiv

    1997-12-01

    An enterprise's ability to deliver new products quickly and efficiently to market is critical for competitive success. While manufactureres recognize the need for speed and flexibility to compete in this market place, companies do not have the time or capital to move to new automation technologies. The National Industrial Information Infrastructure Protocols Consortium's Solutions for MES Adaptable Replicable Technology (NIIIP SMART) subgroup is developing an information infrastructure to enable the integration and interoperation among Manufacturing Execution Systems (MES) and Enterprise Information Systems within an enterprise or among enterprises. The goal of these developments is an adaptable, affordable, reconfigurable, integratable manufacturing system. Key innovative aspects of NIIIP SMART are: (1) Design of an industry standard object model that represents the diverse aspects of MES. (2) Design of a distributed object network to support real-time information sharing. (3) Product data exchange based on STEP and EXPRESS (ISO 10303). (4) Application of workflow and knowledge management technologies to enact manufacturing and business procedures and policy. (5) Application of intelligent agents to support emergent factories. This paper illustrates how these technologies have been incorporated into the NIIIP SMART system architecture to enable the integration and interoperation of existing tools and future MES applications in a 'plug and play' environment.

  13. Continuous-flow system and monitoring tools for the dielectrophoretic integration of nanowires in light sensor arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, A García; Núñez, C García; Rodríguez, P; Shen, G; Kim, S M; Kung, P; Piqueras, J; Pau, J L

    2015-03-20

    Although nanowires (NWs) may improve the performance of many optoelectronic devices such as light emitters and photodetectors, the mass commercialization of these devices is limited by the difficult task of finding reliable and reproducible methods to integrate the NWs on foreign substrates. This work shows the fabrication of zinc oxide NWs photodetectors on conventional glass using transparent conductive electrodes to effectively integrate the NWs at specific locations by dielectrophoresis (DEP). The paper describes the careful preparation of NW dispersions by sedimentation and the dielectrophoretic alignment of NWs in a home-made system. This system includes an impedance technique for the assessment of the alignment quality in real time. Following this procedure, ultraviolet photodetectors based on the electrical contacts formed by the DEP process on the transparent electrodes are fabricated. This cost-effective mean of contacting NWs enables front-and back-illumination operation modes, the latter eliminating shadowing effects caused by the deposition of metals. The electro-optical characterization of the devices shows uniform responsivities in the order of 106 A W(-1) below 390 nm under both modes, as well as, time responses of a few seconds.

  14. Flow Resistance Interactions on Hillslopes With Heterogeneous Attributes: Effects on Runoff Hydrograph Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanicolaou, Athanasios N.; Abban, Benjamin K. B.; Dermisis, Dimitrios C.; Giannopoulos, Christos P.; Flanagan, Dennis C.; Frankenberger, James R.; Wacha, Kenneth M.

    2018-01-01

    An improved modeling framework for capturing the effects of space and time-variant resistance to overland flow is developed for intensively managed landscapes. The framework builds on the WEPP model but it removes the limitations of the "equivalent" plane and time-invariant roughness assumption. The enhanced model therefore accounts for spatiotemporal changes in flow resistance along a hillslope due to changes in roughness, in profile curvature, and downslope variability. The model is used to quantify the degree of influence—from individual soil grains to aggregates, "isolated roughness elements," and vegetation—on overland flow characteristics under different storm magnitudes, downslope gradients, and profile curvatures. It was found that the net effects of land use change from vegetation to a bare surface resulted in hydrograph peaks that were up to 133% larger. Changes in hillslope profile curvature instead resulted in peak runoff rate changes that were only up to 16%. The stream power concept is utilized to develop a taxonomy that relates the influence of grains, isolated roughness elements, and vegetation, on overland flow under different storm magnitudes and hillslope gradients. Critical storm magnitudes and hillslope gradients were found beyond which the effects of these landscape attributes on the peak stream power were negligible. The results also highlight weaknesses of the space/time-invariant flow resistance assumption and demonstrate that assumptions on landscape terrain characteristics exert a strong control both on the shape and magnitude of hydrographs, with deviations reaching 65% in the peak runoff when space/time-variant resistance effects are ignored in some cases.

  15. The Concept of Steam Pressure Control by Changing the Feedwater Flow during Heatup Operation for an Integral Reactor with a Once-Through Steam Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jae Kwang; Choi, Ki Yong; Kang, Han Ok; Kim, Young In; Yoon, Ju Hyeon; Zee, Sung Qunn

    2005-01-01

    The design features of a once-through steam generator (OTSG) for an integral reactor are significantly different from the commercial U-tube type steam generator from several aspects such as the general arrangement, size, operation conditions, and so on. Therefore a sufficient understanding of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the OTSG is essential for the design of the nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) and the power conversion system (PCS). It is also necessary to develop operation procedures complying to the unique design features of the OTSG of interest. The OTSG is sized to produce a sufficiently superheated steam during a normal power operation and therefore the secondary system can be simple relative to that of the other types of steam generators. For the plant adopting the OTSG, the steam pressure in the secondary circuit (tube side of the OTSG) is controlled to be constant during a normal power operation. Constant steam pressure is realized by regulating the control valve on the main steam line dedicated for this purpose. However during a heatup operation, at which the fluid state at the exit of the OTSG is a single phase hot water or two phases, it is not proper to use the control valve on the main steam line due to a control problem at low and multi-phase flow conditions and possibly an erosion problem. For these reasons, another dedicated line called a startup cooling line is used during a heatup condition. There may be several operational conditions for the secondary fluid required to pass through during heatup operation, depending on the design of the PCS. In general, there are two conditions: One is a condition for a vacuum operation for the condenser and another is an entry condition for a steam pressure control operation for an auxiliary power system. In this study, the concept of using a simple startup cooling line with a fixed flow resistance and changing the feedwater flow for the pressure control of the PCS during a heatup period are

  16. New insights on SOI Tunnel FETs with low-temperature process flow for CoolCube™ integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz Llorente, C.; Le Royer, C.; Batude, P.; Fenouillet-Beranger, C.; Martinie, S.; Lu, C.-M. V.; Allain, F.; Colinge, J.-P.; Cristoloveanu, S.; Ghibaudo, G.; Vinet, M.

    2018-06-01

    This paper reports the fabrication and electrical characterization of planar SOI Tunnel FETs (TFETs) made using a Low-Temperature (LT) process designed for 3D sequential integration. These proof-of-concept TFETs feature junctions obtained by Solid Phase Epitaxy Regrowth (SPER). Their electrical behavior is analyzed and compared to reference samples (regular process using High-Temperature junction formation, HT). Dual ID-VDS measurements verify that the TFET structures present Band-to-Band tunnelling (BTBT) carrier injection and not Schottky Barrier tunnelling. P-mode operating LT TFETs deliver an ON state current similar to that of the HT reference, opening the door towards optimized devices operating with very low threshold voltage VTH and low supply voltage VDD.

  17. Integrity management of deepwater subsea flow system; Gerenciamento de integridade de sistema de escoamento submarino em aguas profundas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza Junior, Helio A. de; Oliveira, Luiz F.S.; Cardoso, Cassia O.; Cabete, Ricardo; Matos, Barbara; Alvarenga, Tobias V. [Det Norske Veritas (DNV), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Wallace B. e; Bessa, Guilherme S.; Divenyi, Sandor; Gomes, Andre L.C [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Unidade de Negocios Rio

    2008-07-01

    Deep and ultra-deepwater Exploration and Production activities offshore Brazil have become a reality, corresponding nowadays to the majority of the national production. In order to make oil and gas production viable in this kind of environment, complex systems are used, requiring very strong investments, as well as equipment with high reliability requirements, to assure the benefits of the high productivity of the fields. The production flow systems comprise rigid and flexible pipelines, umbilicals and subsea equipment, to which high costs are associated regarding inspection, maintenance and intervention activities. Besides this, social claims through actions by regulatory agencies are getting stricter with time, as they increase their control of aspects related to safety and environmental impact aspects. In this scenario, PETROBRAS, through its Exploration and Production Business Unit in Rio de Janeiro (UN-RIO), signed a service contract with Det Norske Veritas (DNV). The development and application of specific methodologies for risk and reliability analysis, as well as the development of a specific software, are included in this project. (author)

  18. Commissioning Measurements and Experience Obtained from the Installation of a Fissile Mass Flow monitor in the URAL Electrochemical Integrated Plant (UEIP) in Novouralsk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March-Leuba, J.; Mastal, E.; Powell, D.; Sumner, J.; Uckan, T.; Vines, V.

    1999-01-01

    The Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) equipment sent earlier to the Ural Electrochemical Integrated Plant (UEIP) at Novouralsk, Russia, was installed and implemented successfully on February 2, 1999. The BDMS installation supports the highly enriched uranium (HEU) Transparency Implementation Program for material subject to monitoring under the HEU purchase agreement between the United States of America (USA) and the Russian Federation (RF). The BDMS consists of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fissile (uranium-235) Mass Flow Monitor (FMFM) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Enrichment Monitor (EM). Two BDMSs for monitoring the Main and Reserve HEU blending process lines were installed at UEIP. Independent operation of the FMFM Main and FMFM Reserve was successfully demonstrated for monitoring the fissile mass flow as well as the traceability of HEU to the product low enriched uranium. The FMFM systems failed when both systems were activated during the calibration phase due to a synchronization problem between the systems. This operational failure was caused by the presence of strong electromagnetic interference (EMI) in the blend point. The source-modulator shutter motion of the two FMFM systems was not being properly synchronized because of EMI producing a spurious signal on the synchronization cable connecting the two FMFM cabinets. The signature of this failure was successfully reproduced at ORNL after the visit. This unexpected problem was eliminated by a hardware modification and software improvements during a recent visit (June 9-11, 1999) to UEIP, and both systems are now operating as expected

  19. Fault-Related Controls on Upward Hydrothermal Flow: An Integrated Geological Study of the Têt Fault System, Eastern Pyrénées (France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Taillefer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The way faults control upward fluid flow in nonmagmatic hydrothermal systems in extensional context is still unclear. In the Eastern Pyrénées, an alignment of twenty-nine hot springs (29°C to 73°C, along the normal Têt fault, offers the opportunity to study this process. Using an integrated multiscale geological approach including mapping, remote sensing, and macro- and microscopic analyses of fault zones, we show that emergence is always located in crystalline rocks at gneiss-metasediments contacts, mostly in the Têt fault footwall. The hot springs distribution is related to high topographic reliefs, which are associated with fault throw and segmentation. In more detail, emergence localizes either (1 in brittle fault damage zones at the intersection between the Têt fault and subsidiary faults or (2 in ductile faults where dissolution cavities are observed along foliations, allowing juxtaposition of metasediments. Using these observations and 2D simple numerical simulation, we propose a hydrogeological model of upward hydrothermal flow. Meteoric fluids, infiltrated at high elevation in the fault footwall relief, get warmer at depth because of the geothermal gradient. Topography-related hydraulic gradient and buoyancy forces cause hot fluid rise along permeability anisotropies associated with lithological juxtapositions, fracture, and fault zone compositions.

  20. Operation and Power Flow Control of Multi-Terminal DC Networks for Grid Integration of Offshore Wind Farms Using Genetic Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Teixeira Pinto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available For achieving the European renewable electricity targets, a significant contribution is foreseen to come from offshore wind energy. Considering the large scale of the future planned offshore wind farms and the increasing distances to shore, grid integration through a transnational DC network is desirable for several reasons. This article investigates a nine-node DC grid connecting three northern European countries — namely UK, The Netherlands and Germany. The power-flow control inside the multi-terminal DC grid based on voltage-source converters is achieved through a novel method, called distributed voltage control (DVC. In this method, an optimal power flow (OPF is solved in order to minimize the transmission losses in the network. The main contribution of the paper is the utilization of a genetic algorithm (GA to solve the OPF problem while maintaining an N-1 security constraint. After describing main DC network component models, several case studies illustrate the dynamic behavior of the proposed control method.

  1. Achieve efficient nitrogen removal from real sewage in a plug-flow integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) reactor via partial nitritation/anammox pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yandong; Zhang, Liang; Cheng, Jun; Zhang, Shujun; Li, Baikun; Peng, Yongzhen

    2017-09-01

    This study tested the feasibility of plug-flow integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) reactor in applying sewage partial nitritation/anammox (PN/A) process. The IFAS reactor was fed with real pre-treated sewage (C/N ratio=1.3) and operated for 200days. High nitrogen removal efficiency of 82% was achieved with nitrogen removal rates of 0.097±0.019kgN/(m 3 ·d). Therefore, plug-flow IFAS reactor could be an alternative to applying sewage PN/A process. Besides, it was found that the stability of sewage PN/A process was significantly affected by residual ammonium. Nitrate accumulated in effluent and PN/A performance deteriorated when residual ammonium was below 1mg/L. On the contrary, long-term stable PN/A operation was achieved when residual ammonium was over 3mg/L. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Modeling of optimal energy flows for systems with close integration of sea water desalination and renewable energy sources: Case study for Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perković, Luka; Novosel, Tomislav; Pukšec, Tomislav; Ćosić, Boris; Mustafa, Manal; Krajačić, Goran; Duić, Neven

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new methodology for optimal management of energy systems is proposed. • Critical excess of electricity production is reduced by optimizing the energy flows. • At the same time, the curtailment from the RES can be decreased. - Abstract: This paper presents a new approach for modeling energy flows in complex energy systems with parallel supply of fresh water and electricity. Such systems consist of renewable energy sources (RES), desalination plant, conventional power plants and the residual brine storage which is used as energy storage. The presented method is treating energy vectors in the system as control variables to provide the optimal solution in terms of the lowest critical excess of electricity production (CEEP) and highest possible share of RES in the supply mix. The optimal solution for supplying the demands for fresh water and electricity is always found within the framework of model constraints which are derived from the physical limitations of the system. The presented method enables the optimization of energy flows for a larger period of time. This increases the role of energy storage when higher integration of RES in the supply mix. The method is tested on a hypothetical case of Jordan for different levels of installed wind and PV capacities, as well as different sizes of the brine storage. Results show that increasing the optimization horizon from one hour to 24 h can reduce the CEEP by 80% and allow the increase of RES in the supply mix by more than 5% without violating the CEEP threshold limit of 5%. The activity of the energy (brine) storage is crucial for achieving this goal.

  3. Development of N_2O-MTV for low-speed flow and in-situ deployment to an integral effect test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Matthieu A.; Burns, Ross A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Cadell, Seth R.; Woods, Brian G.; Bardet, Philippe M.

    2018-01-01

    A molecular tagging velocity (MTV) technique is developed to non-intrusively measure velocity in an integral effect test (IET) facility simulating a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear reactor in accident scenarios. In these scenarios, the velocities are expected to be low, on the order of 1 m/s or less, which forces special requirements on the MTV tracer selection. Nitrous oxide (N_2O) is identified as a suitable seed gas to generate NO tracers capable of probing the flow over a large range of pressure, temperature, and flow velocity. The performance of N_2O-MTV is assessed in the laboratory at temperature and pressure ranging from 295 to 781 K and 1 to 3 atm. MTV signal improves with a temperature increase, but decreases with a pressure increase. Velocity precision down to 0.004 m/s is achieved with a probe time of 40 ms at ambient pressure and temperature. Measurement precision is limited by tracer diffusion, and absorption of the tag laser beam by the seed gas. Processing by cross-correlation of single-shot images with high signal-to-noise ratio reference images improves the precision by about 10% compared to traditional single-shot image correlations. The instrument is then deployed to the IET facility. Challenges associated with heat, vibrations, safety, beam delivery, and imaging are addressed in order to successfully operate this sensitive instrument in-situ. Data are presented for an isothermal depressurized conduction cooldown. Velocity profiles from MTV reveal a complex flow transient driven by buoyancy, diffusion, and instability taking place over short (30 min) time scales at sub-meter per second speed. The precision of the in-situ results is estimated at 0.027, 0.0095, and 0.006 m/s for a probe time of 5, 15, and 35 ms, respectively.

  4. Integral transformation of the Navier-Stokes equations for laminar flow in channels of arbitrary two-dimensional geometry; Transformacao integral das equacoes de Navier-Stokes para escoamento laminar em canais de geometria bidimensional arbitraria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Guerrero, Jesus Salvador

    1996-12-31

    Laminar developing flow in channels of arbitrary geometry was studied by solving the Navier-Stokes equations in the stream function-only formulation through the Generalized Integral Transform Technique (GITT). The stream function is expanded in an infinite system based on eigenfunctions obtained by considering solely the diffusive terms of the original formulation. The Navier-Stokes equations are transformed into an infinite system of ordinary differential equations, by using the transformation and inversion formulae. For computational purposes, the infinite series is truncated, according to an automatic error control procedure. The ordinary differential is solved through well-established scientific subroutines from widely available mathematical libraries. The classical problem of developing flow between parallel-plates is analysed first, as for both uniform and irrotational inlet conditions. The effect of truncating the duct length in the accuracy of the obtained solution is studied. A convergence analysis of the results obtained by the GITT is performed and compared with results obtained by finite difference and finite element methods, for different values of Reynolds number. The problem of flow over a backward-facing step then follows. Comparisons with experimental results in the literature indicate an excellent agreement. The numerical co-validation was established for a test case, and perfect agreement is reached against results considered as benchmarks in the recent literature. The results were shown to be physically more reasonable than others obtained by purely numerical methods, in particular for situations where three-dimensional effects are identified. Finally, a test problem for an irregular by shoped duct was studied and compared against results found in the literature, with good agreement and excellent convergence rates for the stream function field along the whole channel, for different values of Reynolds number. (author) 78 refs., 24 figs., 14 tabs.

  5. Integral transformation of the Navier-Stokes equations for laminar flow in channels of arbitrary two-dimensional geometry; Transformacao integral das equacoes de Navier-Stokes para escoamento laminar em canais de geometria bidimensional arbitraria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Guerrero, Jesus Salvador

    1995-12-31

    Laminar developing flow in channels of arbitrary geometry was studied by solving the Navier-Stokes equations in the stream function-only formulation through the Generalized Integral Transform Technique (GITT). The stream function is expanded in an infinite system based on eigenfunctions obtained by considering solely the diffusive terms of the original formulation. The Navier-Stokes equations are transformed into an infinite system of ordinary differential equations, by using the transformation and inversion formulae. For computational purposes, the infinite series is truncated, according to an automatic error control procedure. The ordinary differential is solved through well-established scientific subroutines from widely available mathematical libraries. The classical problem of developing flow between parallel-plates is analysed first, as for both uniform and irrotational inlet conditions. The effect of truncating the duct length in the accuracy of the obtained solution is studied. A convergence analysis of the results obtained by the GITT is performed and compared with results obtained by finite difference and finite element methods, for different values of Reynolds number. The problem of flow over a backward-facing step then follows. Comparisons with experimental results in the literature indicate an excellent agreement. The numerical co-validation was established for a test case, and perfect agreement is reached against results considered as benchmarks in the recent literature. The results were shown to be physically more reasonable than others obtained by purely numerical methods, in particular for situations where three-dimensional effects are identified. Finally, a test problem for an irregular by shoped duct was studied and compared against results found in the literature, with good agreement and excellent convergence rates for the stream function field along the whole channel, for different values of Reynolds number. (author) 78 refs., 24 figs., 14 tabs.

  6. Recovery Act: An Integrated Experimental and Numerical Study: Developing a Reaction Transport Model that Couples Chemical Reactions of Mineral Dissolution/Precipitation with Spatial and Temporal Flow Variations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saar, Martin O. [ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Seyfried, Jr., William E. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Longmire, Ellen K. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-06-24

    A total of 12 publications and 23 abstracts were produced as a result of this study. In particular, the compilation of a thermodynamic database utilizing consistent, current thermodynamic data is a major step toward accurately modeling multi-phase fluid interactions with solids. Existing databases designed for aqueous fluids did not mesh well with existing solid phase databases. Addition of a second liquid phase (CO2) magnifies the inconsistencies between aqueous and solid thermodynamic databases. Overall, the combination of high temperature and pressure lab studies (task 1), using a purpose built apparatus, and solid characterization (task 2), using XRCT and more developed technologies, allowed observation of dissolution and precipitation processes under CO2 reservoir conditions. These observations were combined with results from PIV experiments on multi-phase fluids (task 3) in typical flow path geometries. The results of the tasks 1, 2, and 3 were compiled and integrated into numerical models utilizing Lattice-Boltzmann simulations (task 4) to realistically model the physical processes and were ultimately folded into TOUGH2 code for reservoir scale modeling (task 5). Compilation of the thermodynamic database assisted comparisons to PIV experiments (Task 3) and greatly improved Lattice Boltzmann (Task 4) and TOUGH2 simulations (Task 5). PIV (Task 3) and experimental apparatus (Task 1) have identified problem areas in TOUGHREACT code. Additional lab experiments and coding work has been integrated into an improved numerical modeling code.

  7. Gravitational field-flow fractionation integrated with chemiluminescence detection for a self-standing point-of-care compact device in bioanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casolari, S; Roda, B; Mirasoli, M; Zangheri, M; Patrono, D; Reschiglian, P; Roda, A

    2013-01-07

    A "Point-Of-Care-Testing" (POCT) system relies on portable and simply operated self-standing analytical devices. To fulfill diagnostic requirements, the POCT system should provide highly sensitive simultaneous detection of several biomarkers of the pathology of interest (multiplexing) in a short assay time. One of the main unsolved issues in POCT device development is the integration of pre-analytical sample preparation procedures in the miniaturized device. In this work, an integrated POCT system based on gravitational field-flow fractionation (GrFFF) and chemiluminescence (CL) detection is presented for the on-line sample pre-analytical treatment and/or clean-up and analysis of biological fluids. As a proof of principle for the new GrFFF-CL POCT system, the automatic on-line analysis of plasma alkaline phosphatase activity, a biomarker of obstructive liver diseases and bone disorders, starting from whole blood samples was developed. The GrFFF-CL POCT system was able to give quantitative results on blood samples from control and patients with low sample volume (0.5 μL) and reagent consumption, short analysis time (10 minutes), high reproducibility and with a linear range of 50-1400 IU L(-1). The system can be easily applied to on-line prepare plasma from whole blood for other clinical biomarkers and for other assay formats, based on immunoassay or DNA hybridization.

  8. iTOUGH2-IFC: An Integrated Flow Code in Support of Nagra's Probabilistic Safety Assessment: User's Guide and Model Description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finsterle, Stefan A.

    2009-01-01

    This document describes the development and use of the Integrated Flow Code (IFC), a numerical code and related model to be used for the simulation of time-dependent, two-phase flow in the near field and geosphere of a gas-generating nuclear waste repository system located in an initially fully water-saturated claystone (Opalinus Clay) in Switzerland. The development of the code and model was supported by the Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Nagra), Wettingen, Switzerland. Gas generation (mainly H 2 , but also CH 4 and CO 2 ) may affect repository performance by (1) compromising the engineered barriers through excessive pressure build-up, (2) displacing potentially contaminated pore water, (3) releasing radioactive gases (e.g., those containing 14 C and 3 H), (4) changing hydrogeologic properties of the engineered barrier system and the host rock, and (5) altering the groundwater flow field and thus radionuclide migration paths. The IFC aims at providing water and gas flow fields as the basis for the subsequent radionuclide transport simulations, which are performed by the radionuclide transport code (RTC). The IFC, RTC and a waste-dissolution and near-field transport model (STMAN) are part of the Integrated Radionuclide Release Code (IRRC), which integrates all safety-relevant features, events, and processes (FEPs). The IRRC is embedded into a Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) computational tool that (1) evaluates alternative conceptual models, scenarios, and disruptive events, and (2) performs Monte-Carlo sampling to account for parametric uncertainties. The preliminary probabilistic safety assessment concept and the role of the IFC are visualized in Figure 1. The IFC was developed based on Nagra's PSA concept. Specifically, as many phenomena as possible are to be directly simulated using a (simplified) process model, which is at the core of the IRRC model. Uncertainty evaluation (scenario uncertainty, conceptualization

  9. Waste flow analysis and life cycle assessment of integrated waste management systems as planning tools: Application to optimise the system of the City of Bologna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunesi, Simonetta; Baroni, Sergio; Boarini, Sandro

    2016-09-01

    The results of this case study are used to argue that waste management planning should follow a detailed process, adequately confronting the complexity of the waste management problems and the specificity of each urban area and of regional/national situations. To support the development or completion of integrated waste management systems, this article proposes a planning method based on: (1) the detailed analysis of waste flows and (2) the application of a life cycle assessment to compare alternative scenarios and optimise solutions. The evolution of the City of Bologna waste management system is used to show how this approach can be applied to assess which elements improve environmental performance. The assessment of the contribution of each waste management phase in the Bologna integrated waste management system has proven that the changes applied from 2013 to 2017 result in a significant improvement of the environmental performance mainly as a consequence of the optimised integration between materials and energy recovery: Global Warming Potential at 100 years (GWP100) diminishes from 21,949 to -11,169 t CO2-eq y(-1) and abiotic resources depletion from -403 to -520 t antimony-eq. y(-1) This study analyses at great detail the collection phase. Outcomes provide specific operational recommendations to policy makers, showing the: (a) relevance of the choice of the materials forming the bags for 'door to door' collection (for non-recycled low-density polyethylene bags 22 kg CO2-eq (tonne of waste)(-1)); (b) relatively low environmental impacts associated with underground tanks (3.9 kg CO2-eq (tonne of waste)(-1)); (c) relatively low impact of big street containers with respect to plastic bags (2.6 kg CO2-eq. (tonne of waste)(-1)). © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Lithospheric structure of southern Indian shield and adjoining oceans: integrated modelling of topography, gravity, geoid and heat flow data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Niraj; Zeyen, H.; Singh, A. P.; Singh, B.

    2013-07-01

    For the present 2-D lithospheric density modelling, we selected three geotransects of more than 1000 km in length each crossing the southern Indian shield, south of 16°N, in N-S and E-W directions. The model is based on the assumption of local isostatic equilibrium and is constrained by the topography, gravity and geoid anomalies, by geothermal data, and where available by seismic data. Our integrated modelling approach reveals a crustal configuration with the Moho depth varying from ˜40 km beneath the Dharwar Craton, and ˜39 km beneath the Southern Granulite Terrane to about 15-20 km beneath the adjoining oceans. The lithospheric thickness varies significantly along the three profiles from ˜70-100 km under the adjoining oceans to ˜130-135 km under the southern block of Southern Granulite Terrane including Sri Lanka and increasing gradually to ˜165-180 km beneath the northern block of Southern Granulite Terrane and the Dharwar Craton. This step-like lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) structure indicates a normal lithospheric thickness beneath the adjoining oceans, the northern block of Southern Granulite Terrane and the Dharwar Craton. The thin lithosphere below the southern block of Southern Granulite Terrane including Sri Lanka is, however, atypical considering its age. Our results suggest that the southern Indian shield as a whole cannot be supported isostatically only by thickened crust; a thin and hot lithosphere beneath the southern block of Southern Granulite Terrane including Sri Lanka is required to explain the high topography, gravity, geoid and crustal temperatures. The widespread thermal perturbation during Pan-African (550 Ma) metamorphism and the breakup of Gondwana during late Cretaceous are proposed as twin cause mechanism for the stretching and/or convective removal of the lower part of lithospheric mantle and its replacement by hotter and lighter asthenosphere in the southern block of Southern Granulite Terrane including Sri Lanka

  11. Runoff, sediment and nutrient exports from a Portuguese vineyard under integrated production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Carla; Abrantes, Nelson; Santos, Leisly; Serpa, Dalila; Keizer, Jacob; Ferreira, António

    2017-04-01

    to a 80-L tank. Overland flow was periodically (once per week, depending on rainfall pattern) quantified and sampled for suspended sediment (TSS) quantification and dissolved nutrient analyses: total phosphorus (TP), total nitrogen (TN) and nitrates (N-NO3). The study was performed from October 2012 until September 2014. Over the two years period, plot runoff coefficient ranged from 10.7% to 18.3%, but between monitoring periods it reached 46.4 - 57.1% during winter storms. Suspended sediment exports recorded 3.5-8.1 ton/ha/year. Nutrient losses in overland flow reached 0.7 - 3.4 Kg TP/ha/year, 3.1 - 11.1 Kg TN/ha/year and 0.3 - 0.5 Kg N- NO3/ha/year. Great export of sediments and nutrients are largely performed under storms in wettest conditions. These results highlight the great susceptibility of this kind of crops to land degradation and diffuse pollution, even with management practices concerned to minimize the environmental impacts, such as the ones involved in integrated production. Improved agricultural practices are required to mitigate land degradation and ensure long term crop sustainability in vineyards.

  12. Flow-based market coupling. A joint ETSO-EuroPEX proposal for cross-border congestion management and integration of electricity markets in Europe. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-09-01

    ETSO and EuroPEX have previously published separate proposals for congestion management and market operation across borders in Europe. ETSO has described a 'vision' in which Transmission System Operators (TSOs) would support trade between a variety of different markets by taking explicit account of the physical flows of electricity between them ('flow-based modelling'). EuroPEX has described 'Decentralized Market Coupling' as a method to integrate regional energy markets with cross-border congestion management. In most respects the ETSO and EuroPEX proposals are consistent and complementary. In particular, both organisations agree that market-based congestion management mechanisms should be used at all borders wherever possible, and that they should be co-ordinated to take account of the interdependence of physical flows. Furthermore, both ETSO and EuroPEX recognize that integrated markets are in general more efficient than separate ones, but accept that coupling of regional markets is the most realistic way of achieving efficiency benefits in the short and medium term. The commonalty between the ETSO and EuroPEX proposals has been noted by the 'Florence' Regulators' Forum, which has therefore encouraged ETSO and EuroPEX to work together to develop joint proposals. They have responded by setting up a Joint Working Group, which has produced this report to describe its progress to date. Currently, there exists a wide variety of organisational structures and operational practices in Europe. Consequently, ETSO and EuroPEX agreed at an early stage that, although a joint vision of a flow-based market coupling (FMC) model should be developed, it was equally important to identify how the current arrangements could evolve towards it in a series of practical steps. The work is not yet complete. This is an interim report designed to expose ideas at an early stage to enable Regulators, Users and other interested parties to join the debate and provide feedback. In particular

  13. Flow-based market coupling. A joint ETSO-EuroPEX proposal for cross-border congestion management and integration of electricity markets in Europe. Interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-09-01

    ETSO and EuroPEX have previously published separate proposals for congestion management and market operation across borders in Europe. ETSO has described a 'vision' in which Transmission System Operators (TSOs) would support trade between a variety of different markets by taking explicit account of the physical flows of electricity between them ('flow-based modelling'). EuroPEX has described 'Decentralized Market Coupling' as a method to integrate regional energy markets with cross-border congestion management. In most respects the ETSO and EuroPEX proposals are consistent and complementary. In particular, both organisations agree that market-based congestion management mechanisms should be used at all borders wherever possible, and that they should be co-ordinated to take account of the interdependence of physical flows. Furthermore, both ETSO and EuroPEX recognize that integrated markets are in general more efficient than separate ones, but accept that coupling of regional markets is the most realistic way of achieving efficiency benefits in the short and medium term. The commonalty between the ETSO and EuroPEX proposals has been noted by the 'Florence' Regulators' Forum, which has therefore encouraged ETSO and EuroPEX to work together to develop joint proposals. They have responded by setting up a Joint Working Group, which has produced this report to describe its progress to date. Currently, there exists a wide variety of organisational structures and operational practices in Europe. Consequently, ETSO and EuroPEX agreed at an early stage that, although a joint vision of a flow-based market coupling (FMC) model should be developed, it was equally important to identify how the current arrangements could evolve towards it in a series of practical steps. The work is not yet complete. This is an interim report designed to expose ideas at an early stage to enable Regulators, Users and other interested parties to join the

  14. Integrating terrestrial and marine records of the LGM in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica: implications for grounded ice expansion, ice flow, and deglaciation of the Ross Sea Embayment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, A. J.; Marchant, D. R.

    2017-12-01

    During the LGM, grounded glacier ice filled the Ross Embayment and deposited glacial drift on volcanic islands and peninsulas in McMurdo Sound, as well as along coastal regions of the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM), including the McMurdo Dry Valleys and Royal Society Range. The flow geometry and retreat history of this ice remains debated, with contrasting views yielding divergent implications for both the fundamental cause of Antarctic ice expansion as well as the interaction and behavior of ice derived from East and West Antarctica during late Quaternary time. We present terrestrial geomorphologic evidence that enables the reconstruction of former ice elevations, ice-flow paths, and ice-marginal environments in McMurdo Sound. Radiocarbon dates of fossil algae interbedded with ice-marginal sediments provide a coherent timeline for local ice retreat. These data are integrated with marine-sediment records and multi-beam data to reconstruct late glacial dynamics of grounded ice in McMurdo Sound and the western Ross Sea. The combined dataset suggest a dominance of ice flow toward the TAM in McMurdo Sound during all phases of glaciation, with thick, grounded ice at or near its maximum extent between 19.6 and 12.3 calibrated thousands of years before present (cal. ka). Our data show no significant advance of locally derived ice from the TAM into McMurdo Sound, consistent with the assertion that Late Pleistocene expansion of grounded ice in McMurdo Sound, and throughout the wider Ross Embayment, occurs in response to lower eustatic sea level and the resulting advance of marine-based outlet glaciers and ice streams (and perhaps also reduced oceanic heat flux), rather than local increases in precipitation and ice accumulation. Finally, when combined with allied data across the wider Ross Embayment, which show that widespread deglaciation outside McMurdo Sound did not commence until 13.1 ka, the implication is that retreat of grounded glacier ice in the Ross Embayment did

  15. The Environmental Burdens of Lead-Acid Batteries in China: Insights from an Integrated Material Flow Analysis and Life Cycle Assessment of Lead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Chen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Lead-acid batteries (LABs, a widely used energy storage equipment in cars and electric vehicles, are becoming serious problems due to their high environmental impact. In this study, an integrated method, combining material flow analysis with life cycle assessment, was developed to analyze the environmental emissions and burdens of lead in LABs. The environmental burdens from other materials in LABs were not included. The results indicated that the amount of primary lead used in LABs accounted for 77% of the total lead production in 2014 in China. The amount of discharged lead into the environment was 8.54 × 105 tonnes, which was mainly from raw material extraction (57.2%. The largest environmental burden was from the raw materials extraction and processing, which accounted for 81.7% of the total environmental burdens. The environmental burdens of the environmental toxicity potential, human toxicity potential-cancer, human toxicity potential-non-cancer, water footprint and land use accounted for more than 90% at this stage. Moreover, the environmental burdens from primary lead was much more serious than regenerated lead. On the basis of the results, main practical measures and policies were proposed to reduce the lead emissions and environmental burdens of LABs in China, namely establishing an effective LABs recycling system, enlarging the market share of the legal regenerated lead, regulating the production of regenerated lead, and avoiding the long-distance transportation of the waste LABs.

  16. Friction pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient of two-phase flow in helically coiled tube once-through steam generator for integrated type marine water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nariai, Hideki; Kobayashi, Michiyuki; Matsuoka, Takeshi.

    1982-01-01

    Two-phase friction pressure drop and heat transfer coefficients in a once-through steam generator with helically coiled tubes were investigated with the model test rig of an integrated type marine water reactor. As the dimensions of the heat transfer tubes and the thermal-fluid conditions are almost the same as those of real reactors, the data applicable directly to the real reactor design were obtained. As to the friction pressure drop, modified Kozeki's prediction which is based on the experimental data by Kozeki for coiled tubes, agreed the best with the experimental data. Modified Martinelli-Nelson's prediction which is based on Martinelli-Nelson's multiplier using Ito's equation for single-phase flow in coiled tube, agreed within 30%. The effect of coiled tube on the average heat transfer coefficients at boiling region were small, and the predictions for straight tube could also be applied to coiled tube. Schrock-Grossman's correlation agreed well with the experimental data at the pressures of lower than 3.5 MPa. It was suggested that dryout should be occurred at the quality of greater than 90% within the conditions of this report. (author)

  17. An integrated modeling framework for exploring flow regime and water quality changes with increasing biofuel crop production in the U.S. Corn Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaeger, Mary A.; Housh, Mashor; Cai, Ximing; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-12-01

    To better address the dynamic interactions between human and hydrologic systems, we develop an integrated modeling framework that employs a System of Systems optimization model to emulate human development decisions which are then incorporated into a watershed model to estimate the resulting hydrologic impacts. The two models are run interactively to simulate the coevolution of coupled human-nature systems, such that reciprocal feedbacks between hydrologic processes and human decisions (i.e., human impacts on critical low flows and hydrologic impacts on human decisions on land and water use) can be assessed. The framework is applied to a Midwestern U.S. agricultural watershed, in the context of proposed biofuels development. This operation is illustrated by projecting three possible future coevolution trajectories, two of which use dedicated biofuel crops to reduce annual watershed nitrate export while meeting ethanol production targets. Imposition of a primary external driver (biofuel mandate) combined with different secondary drivers (water quality targets) results in highly nonlinear and multiscale responses of both the human and hydrologic systems, including multiple tradeoffs, impacting the future coevolution of the system in complex, heterogeneous ways. The strength of the hydrologic response is sensitive to the magnitude of the secondary driver; 45% nitrate reduction target leads to noticeable impacts at the outlet, while a 30% reduction leads to noticeable impacts that are mainly local. The local responses are conditioned by previous human-hydrologic modifications and their spatial relationship to the new biofuel development, highlighting the importance of past coevolutionary history in predicting future trajectories of change.

  18. Autonomy and heteronomy. Integration and sustainability of essential flows in the built environment; Autonomie en heteronomie. Integratie en verduurzaming van essentiele stromen in de gebouwde omgeving

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Timmeren, A.

    2006-06-23

    The main research questions in this thesis are: (1) How can sustainable types of reuse and an environment-minded supply of the essential 'flows' of energy and sanitation be established in the built-up environment?; and (2) Is there an optimum scale, and what are the consequences for the built-up environment? Background questions are: (a) To what extent are the current technical (infra)structures decisive for the possibilities and impossibilities of 'sustainable development'? (b) Can the central or decentralized solution of the essential flows generate further processes of preservation at a higher scale level?; (c) Is there an optimal scale for autonomy per flow, and, if there is, what is this optimal scale?; (d) To what extent can user participation and involvement increase by solving sustainability issues?; (e) Should the various techniques for the optimisation of the flows be combined in a 'device' and can this be done, or should they be integrated separately into existing (infra)structures or buildings?. [Dutch] De methoden en technieken die worden toegepast bij de huidige essenti infrastructuren voor de energie- en sanitatievoorziening zijn te duiden als traditioneel en centralisatie- paradigma volgend. Er is sprake van schaalvergroting. Door de globalisering in combinatie met de liberalisatie van de energie- en (in mindere mate) vaste afvalmarkt is dit zelfs structureel. Er is toenemende heteronomie van essenti voorzieningen, vooral van energie en sanitatie. Stringente regelgeving maakt dit vaak onontkoombaar. Oplossingen voor nieuwe of bestaande problemen zijn daarbij als padafhankelijk en endogeen te karakteriseren. Er wordt slechts weinig gedaan aan de onderliggende milieuproblemen. Sterker nog, ook deze nieuwe oplossingen hebben vrijwel altijd onverwachte en onbedoelde neveneffecten, en kunnen opnieuw tot problemen leiden. Het besef dat andere, meer duurzame alternatieven gevonden kunnen worden door juist af te stappen van de

  19. Bioremediation potential, growth and biomass yield of the green seaweed, Ulva lactuca in an integrated marine aquaculture system at the Red Sea coast of Saudi Arabia at different stocking densities and effluent flow rates

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Hafedh, Yousef S.; Alam, Aftab; Buschmann, Alejandro H.

    2014-01-01

    Growth, production and biofiltration rates of seaweed, Ulva lactuca were investigated at two stocking densities (3 kg and 6 kg m-2) and two effluent flow rates (5.4 and 10.8 m3 day-1) to optimize an integrated mariculture system at Saudi Red Sea coast. effluents from fish-rearing tank, stocked with 200 kg fish (Oreochromis spilurus), fed to six seaweed tanks via sedimentation tank. Fish growth (weight gain 1.75 g fish day-1), net production (NP, 10.16 kg m-3) and survival (94.24%) were within acceptable limits. Ulva showed significantly higher (F = 62.62, d.f. 3, 35; P < 0.0001) specific growth rates at lower density compared with higher density and under high flow versus low flow (SGR = 5.78% vs. 2.55% at lower flow and 10.60% vs. 6.26% at higher flow). Biomass yield of Ulva at low- and high-stocking densities (111.11 and 83.2 g wet wt m-2 day-1, respectively) at low flow and (267.44 and 244.19 g wet wt m-2 day-1, respectively) at high flow show that high flow rate and lower density favoured growth. Removal rates of total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) (0.26-0.31 g m-2 day-1) and phosphate phosphorus (0.32-0.41 g m-2 day-1) by U. lactuca were not significantly different (F = 1.9, d.f. 3, 59; P = 0.1394 for TAN and F = 0.29, d.f. 3, 59; P = 0.8324 for phosphates) at both the flow rates and stocking densities. Results show that the effluent flow rate has significant impact over the performance of the seaweed than stocking density.

  20. Bioremediation potential, growth and biomass yield of the green seaweed, Ulva lactuca in an integrated marine aquaculture system at the Red Sea coast of Saudi Arabia at different stocking densities and effluent flow rates

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Hafedh, Yousef S.

    2014-03-19

    Growth, production and biofiltration rates of seaweed, Ulva lactuca were investigated at two stocking densities (3 kg and 6 kg m-2) and two effluent flow rates (5.4 and 10.8 m3 day-1) to optimize an integrated mariculture system at Saudi Red Sea coast. effluents from fish-rearing tank, stocked with 200 kg fish (Oreochromis spilurus), fed to six seaweed tanks via sedimentation tank. Fish growth (weight gain 1.75 g fish day-1), net production (NP, 10.16 kg m-3) and survival (94.24%) were within acceptable limits. Ulva showed significantly higher (F = 62.62, d.f. 3, 35; P < 0.0001) specific growth rates at lower density compared with higher density and under high flow versus low flow (SGR = 5.78% vs. 2.55% at lower flow and 10.60% vs. 6.26% at higher flow). Biomass yield of Ulva at low- and high-stocking densities (111.11 and 83.2 g wet wt m-2 day-1, respectively) at low flow and (267.44 and 244.19 g wet wt m-2 day-1, respectively) at high flow show that high flow rate and lower density favoured growth. Removal rates of total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) (0.26-0.31 g m-2 day-1) and phosphate phosphorus (0.32-0.41 g m-2 day-1) by U. lactuca were not significantly different (F = 1.9, d.f. 3, 59; P = 0.1394 for TAN and F = 0.29, d.f. 3, 59; P = 0.8324 for phosphates) at both the flow rates and stocking densities. Results show that the effluent flow rate has significant impact over the performance of the seaweed than stocking density.

  1. Channel Geometry and Flood Flows: Quantifying over-bank flow dynamics during high-flow events in North Carolina's floodplains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovette, J. P.; Duncan, J. M.; Vimal, S.; Band, L. E.

    2015-12-01

    Natural riparian areas play numerous roles in the maintenance and improvement of stream water quality. Both restoration of riparian areas and improvement of hydrologic connectivity to the stream are often key goals of river restoration projects. These management actions are designed to improve nutrient removal by slowing and treating overland flow delivered from uplands and by storing, treating, and slowly releasing streamwater from overbank inundation during flood events. A major question is how effective this storage of overbank flow is at treating streamwater based on the cumulative time stream discharge at a downstream location has spent in shallower, slower overbank flow. The North Carolina Floodplain Mapping Program maintains a detailed statewide Flood Risk Information System (FRIS) using HEC-RAS modeling, lidar, and detailed surveyed river cross-sections. FRIS provides extensive information regarding channel geometry on approximately 39,000 stream reaches (a slightly coarser spatial resolution than the NHD+v2 dataset) with tens of cross-sections for each reach. We use this FRIS data to calculate volume and discharge from floodplain riparian areas separately from in-channel flow during overbank events. Preliminary results suggest that a small percentage of total annual discharge interacts with the full floodplain extent along a stream reach due to the infrequency of overbank flow events. However, with the significantly different physical characteristics of the riparian area when compared to the channel itself, this overbank flow can provide unique services to water quality. Our project aims to use this information in conjunction with data from the USGS SPARROW program to target non-point source hotspots of Nitrogen and Phosphorus addition and removal. By better understanding the flow dynamics within riparian areas during high flow events, riparian restoration projects can be carried out with improved efficacy.

  2. Comparison of thermal, salt and dye tracing to estimate shallow flow velocities: Novel triple-tracer approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrantes, João R. C. B.; Moruzzi, Rodrigo B.; Silveira, Alexandre; de Lima, João L. M. P.

    2018-02-01

    The accurate measurement of shallow flow velocities is crucial to understand and model the dynamics of sediment and pollutant transport by overland flow. In this study, a novel triple-tracer approach was used to re-evaluate and compare the traditional and well established dye and salt tracer techniques with the more recent thermal tracer technique in estimating shallow flow velocities. For this purpose a triple tracer (i.e. dyed-salted-heated water) was used. Optical and infrared video cameras and an electrical conductivity sensor were used to detect the tracers in the flow. Leading edge and centroid velocities of the tracers were measured and the correction factors used to determine the actual mean flow velocities from tracer measured velocities were compared and investigated. Experiments were carried out for different flow discharges (32-1813 ml s-1) on smooth acrylic, sand, stones and synthetic grass bed surfaces with 0.8, 4.4 and 13.2% slopes. The results showed that thermal tracers can be used to estimate shallow flow velocities, since the three techniques yielded very similar results without significant differences between them. The main advantages of the thermal tracer were that the movement of the tracer along the measuring section was more easily visible than it was in the real image videos and that it was possible to measure space-averaged flow velocities instead of only one velocity value, with the salt tracer. The correction factors used to determine the actual mean velocity of overland flow varied directly with Reynolds and Froude numbers, flow velocity and slope and inversely with flow depth and bed roughness. In shallow flows, velocity estimation using tracers entails considerable uncertainty and caution must be taken with these measurements, especially in field studies where these variables vary appreciably in space and time.

  3. Measurement of the centrality and pseudorapidity dependence of the integrated elliptic flow in lead-lead collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=2.76$ TeV with the ATLAS detector.

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Sarah; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernat, Pauline; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia, Olga; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boutouil, Sara; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Branchini, Paolo; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Byszewski, Marcin; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chan, Kevin; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Charfeddine, Driss; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiefari, Giovanni; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christidi, Ilektra-Athanasia; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; De Zorzi, Guido; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Dwuznik, Michal; Dyndal, Mateusz; Ebke, Johannes; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Engelmann, Roderich; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Florez Bustos, Andres Carlos; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Glonti, George; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goeringer, Christian; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grout, Zara Jane; Grybel, Kai; Guan, Liang; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guttman, Nir; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageboeck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Heisterkamp, Simon; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Hengler, Christopher; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hofmann, Julia Isabell; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holmes, Tova Ray; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Ivarsson, Jenny; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Keller, John; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kitamura, Takumi; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; König, Sebastian; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laier, Heiko; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Le, Bao Tran; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeno, Mayuko; Maeno, Tadashi; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marques, Carlos; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Homero; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Meric, Nicolas; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Moeller, Victoria; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Thibaut; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Nanava, Gizo; Narayan, Rohin; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petteni, Michele; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pires, Sylvestre; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quilty, Donnchadha; Qureshi, Anum; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rao, Kanury; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodrigues, Luis; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Matthew; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savard, Pierre; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R. Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Christopher; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellers, Graham; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Sherwood, Peter; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sorin, Veronica; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soueid, Paul; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Stavina, Pavel; Steele, Genevieve; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tamsett, Matthew; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Topilin, Nikolai; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Tran, Huong Lan; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Triplett, Nathan; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virzi, Joseph; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watanabe, Ippei; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittig, Tobias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wright, Michael; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2014-08-13

    The integrated elliptic flow of charged particles produced in Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=2.76$ TeV has been measured with the ATLAS detector using data collected at the Large Hadron Collider. The anisotropy parameter, $v_2$, was measured in the pseudorapidity range $|\\eta|\\leq$ 2.5 with the event-plane method. In order to include tracks with very low transverse momentum $p_T$, thus reducing the uncertainty in $v_2$ integrated over $p_T$, a $1 \\mu b^{-1}$ data sample recorded without a magnetic field in the tracking detectors is used. The centrality dependence of the integrated $v_2$ is compared to other measurements obtained with higher $p_T$ thresholds. A weak pseudorapidity dependence of the integrated elliptic flow is observed for central collisions, and a small decrease when moving away from mid-rapidity is observed only in peripheral collisions. The integrated $v_2$ transformed to the rest frame of one of the colliding nuclei is compared to the lower-energy RHIC data.

  4. MODFLOW-2000, the U.S. Geological Survey Modular Ground-Water Model--Documentation of the SEAWAT-2000 Version with the Variable-Density Flow Process (VDF) and the Integrated MT3DMS Transport Process (IMT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, Christian D.; Shoemaker, W. Barclay; Guo, Weixing

    2003-01-01

    SEAWAT-2000 is the latest release of the SEAWAT computer program for simulation of three-dimensional, variable-density, transient ground-water flow in porous media. SEAWAT-2000 was designed by combining a modified version of MODFLOW-2000 and MT3DMS into a single computer program. The code was developed using the MODFLOW-2000 concept of a process, which is defined as ?part of the code that solves a fundamental equation by a specified numerical method.? SEAWAT-2000 contains all of the processes distributed with MODFLOW-2000 and also includes the Variable-Density Flow Process (as an alternative to the constant-density Ground-Water Flow Process) and the Integrated MT3DMS Transport Process. Processes may be active or inactive, depending on simulation objectives; however, not all processes are compatible. For example, the Sensitivity and Parameter Estimation Processes are not compatible with the Variable-Density Flow and Integrated MT3DMS Transport Processes. The SEAWAT-2000 computer code was tested with the common variable-density benchmark problems and also with problems representing evaporation from a salt lake and rotation of immiscible fluids.

  5. Impacto da integração regional sobre os fluxos mundiais de investimento direto estrangeiro The effects of regional integration on the world foreign direct investment flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina de Almeida Jorge

    2011-08-01

    feature of the global economy in the 90's. This process was characterized by several economic and political phenomena that deepened the integration of national economies to global economy. The growth of the world's foreign direct investment (FDI flows and the advance of regionalism are two of these phenomena interrelated by many reasons and mechanisms. This present paper aims to evaluate the impact of regional trading agreements over the world's FDI flows, based on the hypothesis that the trading arrangements, which traditionally generate trade, can also have investment creation and diversion effects. A gravity model was estimated for an unbalanced panel constituted by 71 countries for the period 1990-2003. We compared the results from several estimation methods recommended by recent literature like Poisson, pooled cross-section and fixed effects methods. Our results show that trade arrangements tend to increase FDI due to the raise of intra-regional investment and also to the increase of member countries' attractiveness. Nevertheless, even if the gravity model has shown to be adapted for the analysis of the relationship between FDI and regionalization, some methodological issues remain opened.

  6. Review of zonal flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, P.H.; Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.; Hahm, T.S.

    2004-10-01

    A comprehensive review of zonal flow phenomena in plasmas is presented. While the emphasis is on zonal flows in laboratory plasmas, zonal flows in nature are discussed as well. The review presents the status of theory, numerical simulation and experiments relevant to zonal flows. The emphasis is on developing an integrated understanding of the dynamics of drift wave - zonal flow turbulence by combining detailed studies of the generation of zonal flows by drift waves, the back-interaction of zonal flows on the drift waves, and the various feedback loops by which the system regulates and organizes itself. The implications of zonal flow phenomena for confinement in, and the phenomena of fusion devices are discussed. Special attention is given to the comparison of experiment with theory and to identifying direction for progress in future research. (author)

  7. Modelling of integrated effect of volumetric heating and magnetic field on tritium transport in a U-bend flow as applied to HCLL blanket concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valls, E.Mas de les; Batet, L.; Medina, V. de; Fradera, J.; Sedano, L.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → 3D transient CFD code based on OpenFOAM toolbox and accounting for MHD and thermal et al. effects. → Hydrodynamic instabilities caused by the jet (generated at the gap narrowing) are found at Reynolds 480. → Hartmann 1740 is able to stabilise the flow. → A heat deposition corresponding to Gr = 5.21 x 10 9 is sufficient for buoyancy to be predominant at the bend region. Flow becomes unstable. → Tritium permeation ratio cannot be accurately predicted due to major uncertainties in Sievert's coefficient. - Abstract: Under fusion reactor operational conditions, heat deposition might cause a complex buoyant liquid metal flow in the HCLL blanket, what has a direct influence on tritium permeation ratio. In order to characterise the nature of this flow, a simplified HCLL channel, including the U-bend near the reactor first wall, is analysed using a finite volume CFD code, based on OpenFOAM toolbox, following an electric potential based formulation. Code validation results for developed MHD flow and magneto-convective flow are exposed. The influence of the HCLL U-bend on the flow pattern is studied with the validated code, covering the range of possible Reynolds numbers in HCLL-ITER blanket, and considering either electrically insulating or perfectly conducting walls. It can be stated that, despite the very low velocities and the high Hartmann number, flow pattern is complex and unsteady vortices are formed by the action of buoyancy forces together with the influence of the U-bend. Through the analysis, the flow physics is decoupled in order to identify the exact origin of vortex formation. A simplified tritium transport analysis, considering tritium as a passive scalar, has been carried out including a study on boundary conditions influence and a sensitivity analysis of tritium permeation fluxes to diffusivity and solubility parameters. Results show the relevance of Sievert's coefficient uncertainties, which alters the permeation ratio by an order of

  8. Modelling of integrated effect of volumetric heating and magnetic field on tritium transport in a U-bend flow as applied to HCLL blanket concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valls, E.Mas de les, E-mail: elisabet.masdelesvalls@gits.ws [Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), Jordi Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Technology for Fusion (T4F) Research Group, GREENER, Dept. of Heat Engines (UPC) (Spain); Batet, L. [Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), Jordi Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Technology for Fusion (T4F) Research Group, GREENER, Dept. of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (UPC) (Spain); Medina, V. de [Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), Jordi Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Sediment Transport Research Group, Dept. of Engineering Hydraulic, Marine and Environmental Engineering (UPC) (Spain); Fradera, J. [Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), Jordi Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Technology for Fusion (T4F) Research Group, GREENER, Dept. of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (UPC) (Spain); Sedano, L. [EURATOM-CIEMAT Fusion Association, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > 3D transient CFD code based on OpenFOAM toolbox and accounting for MHD and thermal et al. effects. > Hydrodynamic instabilities caused by the jet (generated at the gap narrowing) are found at Reynolds 480. > Hartmann 1740 is able to stabilise the flow. > A heat deposition corresponding to Gr = 5.21 x 10{sup 9} is sufficient for buoyancy to be predominant at the bend region. Flow becomes unstable. > Tritium permeation ratio cannot be accurately predicted due to major uncertainties in Sievert's coefficient. - Abstract: Under fusion reactor operational conditions, heat deposition might cause a complex buoyant liquid metal flow in the HCLL blanket, what has a direct influence on tritium permeation ratio. In order to characterise the nature of this flow, a simplified HCLL channel, including the U-bend near the reactor first wall, is analysed using a finite volume CFD code, based on OpenFOAM toolbox, following an electric potential based formulation. Code validation results for developed MHD flow and magneto-convective flow are exposed. The influence of the HCLL U-bend on the flow pattern is studied with the validated code, covering the range of possible Reynolds numbers in HCLL-ITER blanket, and considering either electrically insulating or perfectly conducting walls. It can be stated that, despite the very low velocities and the high Hartmann number, flow pattern is complex and unsteady vortices are formed by the action of buoyancy forces together with the influence of the U-bend. Through the analysis, the flow physics is decoupled in order to identify the exact origin of vortex formation. A simplified tritium transport analysis, considering tritium as a passive scalar, has been carried out including a study on boundary conditions influence and a sensitivity analysis of tritium permeation fluxes to diffusivity and solubility parameters. Results show the relevance of Sievert's coefficient uncertainties, which alters the permeation ratio by an

  9. Pressure-driven one-step solid phase-based on-chip sample preparation on a microfabricated plastic device and integration with flow-through polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Hong Hanh; Trinh, Kieu The Loan; Lee, Nae Yoon

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we fabricate a monolithic poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) microdevice on which solid phase-based DNA preparation and flow-through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) units were functionally integrated for one-step sample preparation and amplification operated by pressure. Chelex resin, which is used as a solid support for DNA preparation, can capture denatured proteins but releases DNA, and the purified DNA can then be used as a template in a subsequent amplification process. Using the PMMA microdevices, DNA was successfully purified from both Escherichia coli and human hair sample, and the plasmid vector inserted in E. coli and the D1S80 locus in human genomic DNA were successfully amplified from on-chip purified E. coli and human hair samples. Furthermore, the integration potential of the proposed sample preparation and flow-through PCR units was successfully demonstrate on a monolithic PMMA microdevice with a seamless flow, which could pave the way for a pressure-driven, simple one-step sample preparation and amplification with greatly decreased manufacture cost and enhanced device disposability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Coupling of Processes and Data in PennState Integrated Hydrologic Modeling (PIHM) System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M.; Duffy, C.

    2007-12-01

    Full physical coupling, "natural" numerical coupling and parsimonious but accurate data coupling is needed to comprehensively and accurately capture the interaction between different components of a hydrologic continuum. Here we present a physically based, spatially distributed hydrologic model that incorporates all the three coupling strategies. Physical coupling of interception, snow melt, transpiration, overland flow, subsurface flow, river flow, macropore based infiltration and stormflow, flow through and over hydraulic structures likes weirs and dams, and evaporation from interception, ground and overland flow is performed. All the physically coupled components are numerically coupled through semi-discrete form of ordinary differential equations, that define each hydrologic process, using Finite-Volume based approach. The fully implicit solution methodology using CVODE solver solves for all the state variables simultaneously at each adaptive time steps thus providing robustness, stability and accuracy. The accurate data coupling is aided by use of constrained unstructured meshes, flexible data model and use of PIHMgis. The spatial adaptivity of decomposed domain and temporal adaptivity of the numerical solver facilitates capture of varied spatio-temporal scales that are inherent in hydrologic process interactions. The implementation of the model has been performed on a meso-scale Little-Juniata Watershed. Model results are validated by comparison of streamflow at multiple locations. We discuss some of the interesting hydrologic interactions between surface, subsurface and atmosphere witnessed during the year long simulation such as a) inverse relationship between evaporation from interception storage and transpiration b) relative influence of forcing (precipitation, temperature and radiation) and source (soil moisture and overland flow) on evaporation c) influence of local topography on gaining, loosing or "flow-through" behavior of river-aquifer interactions

  11. Accurate treatment of material interface dynamics in the calculation of one-dimensional two-phase flows by the integral method of characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Y.W.; Wiedermann, A.H.

    1984-01-01

    Accurate numerical methods for treating the junction and boundary conditions needed in the transient two-phase flows of a piping network were published earlier by us; the same methods are used to formulate the treatment of the material interface as a moving boundary. The method formulated is used in a computer program to calculate sample problems designed to test the numerical methods as to their ability and the accuracy limits for calculation of the transient two-phase flows in the piping network downstream of a PWR pressurizer. Independent exact analytical solutions for the sample problems are used as the basis of a critical evaluation of the proposed numerical methods. The evaluation revealed that the proposed boundary scheme indeed generates very accurate numerical results. However, in some extreme flow conditions, numerical difficulties were experienced that eventually led to numerical instability. This paper discusses further a special technique to overcome the difficulty

  12. Ramjets: Airframe integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerel, J.L.; Halswijk, W.

    2010-01-01

    These notes deal with the integration of a (sc)ramjet engine in either an axisymmetric or a waverider type of cruise missile configuration. The integration aspects relate to the integration of the external and internal flow paths in geometrical configurations that are being considered worldwide.

  13. Integrated modeling of groundwater-surface water interactions in a tile-drained agricultural field: The importance of directly measured flow route contributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozemeijer, J.C.; Velde, Y. van der; McLaren, R.G.; Geer, F.C. van; Broers, H.P.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of groundwater-surface water interaction is needed to evaluate and simulate water and solute transport in catchments. However, direct measurements of the contributions of different flow routes from specific surfaces within a catchment toward the surface water are rarely

  14. Deposits related to supercritical flows in glacifluvial deltas and subaqueous ice-contact fans: Integrating facies analysis and ground-penetrating radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Joerg; Sievers, Julian; Loewer, Markus; Igel, Jan; Winsemann, Jutta

    2017-04-01

    Bedforms related to supercritical flows have recently received much interest and the understanding of flow morphodynamics and depositional processes has been greatly advanced. However, outcrop studies of these bedforms are commonly hampered by their long wavelengths. Therefore, we combined outcrop-based facies analysis with extensive ground-penetrating radar (GPR) measurements. Different GPR antennas (200, 400 and 1500 MHz) were utilised to measure both long profiles and densely spaced grids in order to map the large-scale facies architecture and image the three-dimensional geometry of the deposits. The studied delta and subaqueous ice-contact fan successions were deposited within ice-dammed lakes, which formed along the margins of the Middle Pleistocene Scandinavian ice sheets across Northern Germany. These glacilacustrine depositional systems are characterised by high aggradation rates due to the rapid expansion and deceleration of high-energy sediment-laden flows, favouring the preservation of bedforms related to supercritical flows. In flow direction, delta foresets commonly display lenticular scours, which are 2 to 6 m wide and 0.15 to 0.5 m deep. Characteristically, scours are filled by upslope dipping backsets, consisting of pebbly sand. In a few cases, massive and deformed strata were observed, passing upflow into backsets. Across flow, scours are 2 to 3 m wide and typically display a concentric infill. The scour fills are commonly associated with subhorizontally or sinusoidal stratified pebbly sand. These facies types are interpreted as deposits of cyclic steps and antidunes, respectively, representing deposition from supercritical density flows, which formed during high meltwater discharge events or regressive slope failures (Winsemann et al., in review). The GPR-sections show that the scour fills form trains along the delta foresets, which can be traced for up to 15 m. The studied subaqueous ice-contact fan succession relates to the zone of flow

  15. SISTEMA DE PÓS - TRATAMENTO DE ESGOTO SANITÁRIO PELO MÉTODO DE ESCOAMENTO SUPERFICIAL PARA REMOÇÃO DE PATÓGENOS / SANITARY EFFLUENT POST-TREATMENT SYSTEM BY OVERLAND FLOW METHOD FOR PATHOGENS REMOVAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VERÔNICA C. MAGALHÃES

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se a remoção natural de protozoários e helmintos em um sistema pós-tratamento de efluentes de lagoa anaeróbia utilizando o escoamento superficial para a proposta de reúso do material, na Estação de Tratamento de Esgotos Graminha, Limeira, SP, Brasil. O efluente foi aplicado em uma rampa de 45 m de comprimento e 4,2 metros de largura com inclinação de 3,5%, coberta com grama Tifton 85 (Cynodon sp., a uma taxa de 0,20 m3/hm, coletando-se amostras de água a cada 15 dias ao longo de 10 meses, em 5 pontos de coleta. O ponto 01 foi estabelecido no início do lançamento do efluente e os demais a 10 metros de distância um do outro. As maiores concentrações de patógenosforam detectadas nos primeiros 10 metros da rampa de escoamento apontando que o processo é capaz de promover a remoção de patógenos e de viabilizar o reúso do efluente doméstico em determinadas atividades, como a de irrigação.Palavras-chaves: Esgoto Sanitário, pós-tratamento, patógenos, reúso de efluentes.

  16. SISTEMA DE PÓS - TRATAMENTO DE ESGOTO SANITÁRIO PELO MÉTODO DE ESCOAMENTO SUPERFICIAL PARA REMOÇÃO DE PATÓGENOS / SANITARY EFFLUENT POST-TREATMENT SYSTEM BY OVERLAND FLOW METHOD FOR PATHOGENS REMOVAL

    OpenAIRE

    VERÔNICA C. MAGALHÃES; MARTA S. G. PIRES; BRUNO CORAUCCI FILHO; RONALDO STEFANUTTI; URARA KAWAZOE

    2009-01-01

    Avaliou-se a remoção natural de protozoários e helmintos em um sistema pós-tratamento de efluentes de lagoa anaeróbia utilizando o escoamento superficial para a proposta de reúso do material, na Estação de Tratamento de Esgotos Graminha, Limeira, SP, Brasil. O efluente foi aplicado em uma rampa de 45 m de comprimento e 4,2 metros de largura com inclinação de 3,5%, coberta com grama Tifton 85 (Cynodon sp.), a uma taxa de 0,20 m3/hm, coletando-se amostras de água a cada 15 dias ao longo de 10 m...

  17. Wildfire impacts on the processes that generate debris flows in burned watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parise, M.; Cannon, S.H.

    2012-01-01

    Every year, and in many countries worldwide, wildfires cause significant damage and economic losses due to both the direct effects of the fires and the subsequent accelerated runoff, erosion, and debris flow. Wildfires can have profound effects on the hydrologic response of watersheds by changing the infiltration characteristics and erodibility of the soil, which leads to decreased rainfall infiltration, significantly increased overland flow and runoff in channels, and movement of soil. Debris-flow activity is among the most destructive consequences of these changes, often causing extensive damage to human infrastructure. Data from the Mediterranean area and Western United States of America help identify the primary processes that result in debris flows in recently burned areas. Two primary processes for the initiation of fire-related debris flows have been so far identified: (1) runoff-dominated erosion by surface overland flow; and (2) infiltration-triggered failure and mobilization of a discrete landslide mass. The first process is frequently documented immediately post-fire and leads to the generation of debris flows through progressive bulking of storm runoff with sediment eroded from the hillslopes and channels. As sediment is incorporated into water, runoff can convert to debris flow. The conversion to debris flow may be observed at a position within a drainage network that appears to be controlled by threshold values of upslope contributing area and its gradient. At these locations, sufficient eroded material has been incorporated, relative to the volume of contributing surface runoff, to generate debris flows. Debris flows have also been generated from burned basins in response to increased runoff by water cascading over a steep, bedrock cliff, and incorporating material from readily erodible colluvium or channel bed. Post-fire debris flows have also been generated by infiltration-triggered landslide failures which then mobilize into debris flows. However

  18. “To be without a home, like a rolling stone”: Anticipating the global management of forced migration flows and the social integration of asylum seekers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albu, Oana Brindusa

    The study investigates the practices of different forms of anticipatory knowledge of actors involved in the global management of forced migration flows in ‘migration hotspots’ (European Parliament, 2016). The study draws on an ongoing multi-sited study of professionals working in IGOs, NGOs......—all for estimating the movements and framing the choices, freedoms and rights of asylum seekers. The study shows how anticipatory practices constitute asylum seekers as ‘global problems’ which reinforce dominance relations of ‘vulnerability’ and remove individuals’ agency while providing them with life...

  19. Draft environmental impact statement on a proposed nuclear weapons nonproliferation policy concerning foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel: Volume 2, Appendix E, Evaluation of human health effects of overland transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This Appendix provides an overview of the approach used to assess the human health risks that may result from the overland transportation of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel. The Appendix includes discussion of the scope of the assessment, analytical methods used for the risk assessment (i.e., computer models), important assessment assumptions, determination of potential transportation routes, and presents the results of the assessment. In addition, to aid in the understanding and interpretation of the results, specific arm of uncertainty are described, with an emphasis an how the uncertainties may affect comparisons of the alternatives. he approach used in this Appendix is modeled after that used in the Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Draft Environmental Impact Statement (SNF ampersand INEL Draft EIS) (DOE, 1994b). The SNF ampersand INEL Draft EIS did not perform as detailed an analysis on the specific actions taken for foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel because of the breadth necessary to analyze the entire spent fuel management program. However, the fundamental assumptions used in this analysis are consistent with those used in the SNF ampersand INEL Draft EIS (DOE, 1994b), and the same computer codes and generic release and accident data are used. The risk assessment results are presented in this Appendix in terms of ''Per-shipment'' risk factors, as well as for the total risks associated with each alternative. Per-shipment risk factors provide an estimate of the risk from a single spent nuclear fuel shipment between a specific origin and destination. They are calculated for all possible origin and destination pairs for each spent nuclear fuel type. The total risks for a given alternative are found by multiplying the expected number of shipments by the appropriate per-shipment risk factors. This approach provides maximum flexibility for determining the risks for a large number of potential

  20. Flow Rate Measurement in Multiphase Flow Rig: Radiotracer and Conventional

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazrul Hizam Yusoff; Noraishah Othman; Nurliyana Abdullah; Amirul Syafiq Mohd Yunos; Rasif Mohd Zain; Roslan Yahya

    2015-01-01

    Applications of radiotracer technology are prevalent throughout oil refineries worldwide, and this industry is one of the main users and beneficiaries of the technology. Radioactive tracers have been used to a great extent in many applications i.e. flow rate measurement, RTD, plant integrity evaluation and enhancing oil production in oil fields. Chemical and petrochemical plants are generally continuously operating and technically complex where the radiotracer techniques are very competitive and largely applied for troubleshooting inspection and process analysis. Flow rate measurement is a typical application of radiotracers. For flow measurements, tracer data are important, rather than the RTD models. Research is going on in refining the existing methods for single phase flow measurement, and in developing new methods for multiphase flow without sampling. The tracer techniques for single phase flow measurements are recognized as ISO standards. This paper presents technical aspect of laboratory experiments, which have been carried out using Molybdenum-99 - Mo99 (radiotracer) to study and determine the flow rate of liquid in multiphase flow rig. The multiphase flow rig consists of 58.7 m long and 20 cm diameter pipeline that can accommodate about 0.296 m 3 of liquid. Tap water was used as liquid flow in pipeline and conventional flow meters were also installed at the flow rig. The flow rate results; radiotracer and conventional flow meter were compared. The total count method was applied for radiotracer technique and showed the comparable results with conventional flow meter. (author)

  1. Integration of Spatially Hydrological Modelling on Bentong Catchment, Pahang, Peninsular Malaysia Using Distributed GIS-based Rainfall Runoff Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosli, M.H.

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available With the advance of GIS technology, hydrology model can simulated at catchment wide scale. The objective is to integrate National Resource Conservation Service (NRCS Curve Number (CN with kinematic wave and manning’s equation using GIS to develop a simple GIS-based distributed model to simulate rainfall runoff in Bentong catchment. Model was built using Spatial Distributed Direct Hydrograph (SDDH concept and applying the time area (TA approach in presenting the predicted discharge hydrograph. The effective precipitation estimation was first calculated using the NRCS CN method. Then, the core maps that consists of digital elevation model (DEM, soil and land use map in grid. DEM was used to derive slope, flow direction and flow accumulation while soil and land use map used to derive roughness coefficient and CN. The overland velocity and channel velocity estimation derived from combination of kinematic wave theory with Manning’s equation. To capture the time frame, the travel time map was divided into isochrones in order to generate the TA histogram and finally. The creation of SDDH using the TA histogram which will lead to the estimation of travel time for the catchment. Simulated hydrograph was plotted together with the observed discharge for comparison. Six storm events used for model performance evaluation using statistical measure such as Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE, percent bias (PBIAS and coefficient of determination (R2;. SDDH model performed quite well as NSE gave result ranging from 0.55 to 0.68 with mean of 0.6. PBIAS indicate that the model slightly over predicted compared to observed hydrograph with result ranges from -46.71 (the most over predicted to +4.83 (the most under predicted with average of -20.73%. R2; ranges between 0.55 to 0.82 with mean of 0.67. When comparing the time to peak, (tp, min, and peak discharge, (pd, m3/s, results gave NSEtp 0.82, PBIAStp 0.65, R2tp 0.32, NSEpd 0.95, PBIASpd 14.49 and R2pd 0

  2. Work flow analysis of around-the-clock processing of blood culture samples and integrated MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis for the diagnosis of bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderhan, Wilhelm; Grundt, Alexander; Wörner, Stefan; Findeisen, Peter; Neumaier, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Because sepsis has a high mortality rate, rapid microbiological diagnosis is required to enable efficient therapy. The effectiveness of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis in reducing turnaround times (TATs) for blood culture (BC) pathogen identification when available in a 24-h hospital setting has not been determined. On the basis of data from a total number of 912 positive BCs collected within 140 consecutive days and work flow analyses of laboratory diagnostics, we evaluated different models to assess the TATs for batch-wise and for immediate response (real-time) MALDI-TOF MS pathogen identification of positive BC results during the night shifts. The results were compared to TATs from routine BC processing and biochemical identification performed during regular working hours. Continuous BC incubation together with batch-wise MALDI-TOF MS analysis enabled significant reductions of up to 58.7 h in the mean TATs for the reporting of the bacterial species. The TAT of batch-wise MALDI-TOF MS analysis was inferior by a mean of 4.9 h when compared to the model of the immediate work flow under ideal conditions with no constraints in staff availability. Together with continuous cultivation of BC, the 24-h availability of MALDI-TOF MS can reduce the TAT for microbial pathogen identification within a routine clinical laboratory setting. Batch-wise testing of positive BC loses a few hours compared to real-time identification but is still far superior to classical BC processing. Larger prospective studies are required to evaluate the contribution of rapid around-the-clock pathogen identification to medical decision-making for septicemic patients.

  3. Rotating flow

    CERN Document Server

    Childs, Peter R N

    2010-01-01

    Rotating flow is critically important across a wide range of scientific, engineering and product applications, providing design and modeling capability for diverse products such as jet engines, pumps and vacuum cleaners, as well as geophysical flows. Developed over the course of 20 years' research into rotating fluids and associated heat transfer at the University of Sussex Thermo-Fluid Mechanics Research Centre (TFMRC), Rotating Flow is an indispensable reference and resource for all those working within the gas turbine and rotating machinery industries. Traditional fluid and flow dynamics titles offer the essential background but generally include very sparse coverage of rotating flows-which is where this book comes in. Beginning with an accessible introduction to rotating flow, recognized expert Peter Childs takes you through fundamental equations, vorticity and vortices, rotating disc flow, flow around rotating cylinders and flow in rotating cavities, with an introduction to atmospheric and oceanic circul...

  4. Digital integrated control of a Mach 2.5 mixed-compression supersonic inlet and an augmented mixed-flow turbofan engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterton, P. G.; Arpasi, D. J.; Baumbick, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A digitally implemented integrated inlet-engine control system was designed and tested on a mixed-compression, axisymmetric, Mach 2.5, supersonic inlet with 45 percent internal supersonic area contraction and a TF30-P-3 augmented turbofan engine. The control matched engine airflow to available inlet airflow. By monitoring inlet terminal shock position and over-board bypass door command, the control adjusted engine speed so that in steady state, the shock would be at the desired location and the overboard bypass doors would be closed. During engine-induced transients, such as augmentor light-off and cutoff, the inlet operating point was momentarily changed to a more supercritical point to minimize unstarts. The digital control also provided automatic inlet restart. A variable inlet throat bleed control, based on throat Mach number, provided additional inlet stability margin.

  5. Flow visualization

    CERN Document Server

    Merzkirch, Wolfgang

    1974-01-01

    Flow Visualization describes the most widely used methods for visualizing flows. Flow visualization evaluates certain properties of a flow field directly accessible to visual perception. Organized into five chapters, this book first presents the methods that create a visible flow pattern that could be investigated by visual inspection, such as simple dye and density-sensitive visualization methods. It then deals with the application of electron beams and streaming birefringence. Optical methods for compressible flows, hydraulic analogy, and high-speed photography are discussed in other cha

  6. Hydraulic Characterization Activities in Support of the Shaft-Seals Fluid-Flow Modeling Integration into the WIPP EPA Compliance Certification Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowles, M.K.; Hurtado, L.D.; Dale, Tim

    1997-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a planned geologic repository for permanent disposal of transuranic waste generated by the U.S. Department of Energy. Disposal regions consist of panels and drifts mined from the bedded salt of the Salado Formation at a depth of approximately 650 m below the surface. This lithology is part of the 225 million year old Delaware Basin, and is geographically located in southeastern New Mexico. Four shafts service the facility needs for air intake, exhaust, waste handling, and salt handling. As the science advisor for the project, Sandia National Laboratories developed the WIPP shaft sealing system design. This design is a fundamental component of the application process for facility licensing, and has been found acceptable by stakeholders and regulatory agencies. The seal system design is founded on results obtained from laboratory and field experiments, numerical modeling, and engineering judgment. This paper describes a field test program to characterize the fluid flow properties in the WIPP shafts at representative seal locations. This work was conducted by Duke Engineering and Services under contract to Sandia National Laboratories in support of the seal system design

  7. Conceptual design of a He-cooled divertor with integrated flow and heat transfer promoters (PPCS subtask TW3-TRP-001-D2). Pt. 1. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norajitra, P.; Kruessmann, R.

    2004-04-01

    Within the framework of the EU power plant conceptual study (PPCS), helium-cooled modular divertor concepts with a flow promoter (HEMP as a pin array and HEMS as slot array version) have been investigated at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe since 2002. The design goal is to achieve a high heat flux performance of 15 MW/m 2 . In this summary of the detailed report, research areas related to the development of a helium-cooled divertor shall be addressed. Latest changes in thermohydraulic layout as well as current results of simulation calculations shall be presented exemplarily for the slot concept HEMS which has the crucial advantage of being easier to manufacture. The divertor construction resulting from the requirements as well as the design-related issues shall be discussed. Possible manufacturing processes for divertor components of tungsten are assessed. Chapters 7 and 8 have been completely revised comprising the latest results of the thermohydraulic layout and thermomechanical analyses. Calculation results have to be verified by experiments. For this purpose, a helium loop will be built at the Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia, in 2004. An outlook on an alternative multi-jet design (HEMJ) will be given at the end of this report. (orig.)

  8. Simultaneous nitrate reduction and acetaminophen oxidation using the continuous-flow chemical-less VUV process as an integrated advanced oxidation and reduction process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussavi, Gholamreza; Shekoohiyan, Sakine

    2016-11-15

    This work was aimed at investigating the performance of the continuous-flow VUV photoreactor as a novel chemical-less advanced process for simultaneously oxidizing acetaminophen (ACT) as a model of pharmaceuticals and reducing nitrate in a single reactor. Solution pH was an important parameter affecting the performance of VUV; the highest ACT oxidation and nitrate reduction attained at solution pH between 6 and 8. The ACT was oxidized mainly by HO while the aqueous electrons were the main working agents in the reduction of nitrate. The performance of VUV photoreactor improved with the increase of hydraulic retention time (HRT); the complete degradation of ACT and ∼99% reduction of nitrate with 100% N2 selectivity achieved at HRT of 80min. The VUV effluent concentrations of nitrite and ammonium at HRT of 80min were below the drinking water standards. The real water sample contaminated with the ACT and nitrate was efficiently treated in the VUV photoreactor. Therefore, the VUV photoreactor is a chemical-less advanced process in which both advanced oxidation and advanced reduction reactions are accomplished. This unique feature possesses VUV photoreactor as a promising method of treating water contaminated with both pharmaceutical and nitrate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Records of continental slope sediment flow morphodynamic responses to gradient and active faulting from integrated AUV and ROV data, offshore Palos Verdes, southern California Borderland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Katherine L.; Brothers, Daniel; Paull, Charles K.; McGann, Mary; Caress, David W.; Conrad, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Variations in seabed gradient are widely acknowledged to influence deep-water deposition, but are often difficult to measure in sufficient detail from both modern and ancient examples. On the continental slope offshore Los Angeles, California, autonomous underwater vehicle, remotely operated vehicle, and shipboard methods were used to collect a dense grid of high-resolution multibeam bathymetry, chirp sub-bottom profiles, and targeted sediment core samples that demonstrate the influence of seafloor gradient on sediment accumulation, depositional environment, grain size of deposits, and seafloor morphology. In this setting, restraining and releasing bends along the active right-lateral Palos Verdes Fault create and maintain variations in seafloor gradient. Holocene down-slope flows appear to have been generated by slope failure, primarily on the uppermost slope (~ 100–200 m water depth). Turbidity currents created a low relief (water depositional systems. These results help to bridge gaps in scale between existing deep-sea and experimental datasets and may provide constraints for future numerical modeling studies.

  10. The pharmacotherapy of the HeartMate II, a continuous flow left ventricular assist device, in patients with advanced heart failure: integration of disease, device, and drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Douglas L; Chambers, Rachel M; Schillig, Jessica M

    2010-10-01

    Advanced heart failure continues to be a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the US. Patients with advanced heart failure have a poor prognosis without cardiac transplantation. The use of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) as destination therapy for these patients is therefore expected to increase in the coming years as technology advances. The HeartMate II, a continuous flow implantable device, is currently the only LVAD that has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for destination therapy in patients with advanced heart failure. The pharmacotherapy associated with this device is very complex and, therefore, the need for expertly trained clinical pharmacists to care for this expanding patient population will also likely increase. Unfortunately, most pharmacists are unfamiliar with the effect of LVADs on the physiology and pharmacotherapy of a patient's heart failure. The purpose of this article is to give clinical pharmacists an introduction to the most common pharmacotherapeutic issues for patients with LVADs and present practical solutions for managing common drug therapy problems.

  11. Integral transformational coaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizer, W.A.J.; Nandram, S.S.

    2009-01-01

    In Chap. 12, Keizer and Nandram present the concept of Integral Transformational Coaching based on the concept of Flow and its effects on work performance. Integral Transformational Coaching is a method that prevents and cures unhealthy stress and burnout. They draw on some tried and tested

  12. Efeito da temperatura e taxa de cisalhamento nas propriedades de escoamento da polpa de Cupuaçu (T. grandiflorum Schum integral Effect of temperature and shear rate in the properties of whole flow Cupuassu pulp (Theobroma grandiflorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilvanete Maria Ferreira

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available O comportamento reológico da polpa de cupuaçu integral foi determinado na faixa de temperatura de 10 a 60ºC. Os efeitos da temperatura e da taxa de deformação foram avaliados por meio de testes em cisalhamento estacionário. As análises reológicas foram conduzidas num reômetro Thermo Haake RheoStress 1. Os reogramas foram descritos pelos modelos reológicos de Ostwald-de-Waelle e o de Herschel-Bulkley. As curvas de escoamento mais bem ajustadas pelo modelo de Ostwald-de-Waelle. O produto apresentou comportamento pseudoplástico, e o índice de comportamento de fluxo (n decresceu com o aumento da temperatura. O efeito da temperatura sobre a viscosidade aparente foi descrita por uma equação tipo Arrhenius e discutida em termos de energia de ativação. Essa energia aumentou com o aumento da taxa de deformação, sendo obtidos valores na faixa de 1 a 2 kcal/gmol.The rheological behavior of the entire cupuassu pulp was determined in the temperature range 10 - 60ºC. The effects of temperature and deformation rate were evaluated by means of shear flow tests. Rheometry analyses were conducted with a Thermo Haake RheoStress 1 system. Rheograms were described by models by Ostwald-of-Waelle and Herschel-Bulkley. The Ostwald-of-Waelle model successfully represented pulp flow behavior. The product presented shear-thinning behavior and the flow behavior index (n decreased with the increase of temperature. The effect of temperature on the apparent viscosity in cupuassu pulp was described by an Arrhenius equation and discussed in terms of activation energy. The increase in shear rate caused an energy increase, and values were obtained in the range of a line from 1 to 2 kcal/gmol.

  13. Microbial community stratification controlled by the subseafloor fluid flow and geothermal gradient at the Iheya North hydrothermal field in the Mid-Okinawa Trough (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 331).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Katsunori; Breuker, Anja; Schippers, Axel; Nishizawa, Manabu; Ijiri, Akira; Hirai, Miho; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Sunamura, Michinari; Urabe, Tetsuro; Nunoura, Takuro; Takai, Ken

    2014-10-01

    The impacts of lithologic structure and geothermal gradient on subseafloor microbial communities were investigated at a marginal site of the Iheya North hydrothermal field in the Mid-Okinawa Trough. Subsurface marine sediments composed of hemipelagic muds and volcaniclastic deposits were recovered through a depth of 151 m below the seafloor at site C0017 during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 331. Microbial communities inferred from 16S rRNA gene clone sequencing in low-temperature hemipelagic sediments were mainly composed of members of the Chloroflexi and deep-sea archaeal group. In contrast, 16S rRNA gene sequences of marine group I Thaumarchaeota dominated the microbial phylotype communities in the coarse-grained pumiceous gravels interbedded between the hemipelagic sediments. Based on the physical properties of sediments such as temperature and permeability, the porewater chemistry, and the microbial phylotype compositions, the shift in the physical properties of the sediments is suggested to induce a potential subseafloor recharging flow of oxygenated seawater in the permeable zone, leading to the generation of variable chemical environments and microbial communities in the subseafloor habitats. In addition, the deepest section of sediments under high-temperature conditions (∼90°C) harbored the sequences of an uncultivated archaeal lineage of hot water crenarchaeotic group IV that may be associated with the high-temperature hydrothermal fluid flow. These results indicate that the subseafloor microbial community compositions and functions at the marginal site of the hydrothermal field are highly affected by the complex fluid flow structure, such as recharging seawater and underlying hydrothermal fluids, coupled with the lithologic transition of sediments. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Integrated cryogenic sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juanarena, D.B.; Rao, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    Integrated cryogenic pressure-temperature, level-temperature, and flow-temperature sensors have several advantages over the conventional single parameter sensors. Such integrated sensors were not available until recently. Pressure Systems, Inc. (PSI) of Hampton, Virginia, has introduced precalibrated precision cryogenic pressure sensors at the Los Angeles Cryogenic Engineering Conference in 1989. Recently, PSI has successfully completed the development of integrated pressure-temperature and level-temperature sensors for use in the temperature range 1.5-375K. In this paper, performance characteristics of these integrated sensors are presented. Further, the effects of irradiation and magnetic fields on these integrated sensors are also reviewed

  15. Flow regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kh'yuitt, G.

    1980-01-01

    An introduction into the problem of two-phase flows is presented. Flow regimes arizing in two-phase flows are described, and classification of these regimes is given. Structures of vertical and horizontal two-phase flows and a method of their identification using regime maps are considered. The limits of this method application are discussed. The flooding phenomena and phenomena of direction change (flow reversal) of the flow and interrelation of these phenomena as well as transitions from slug regime to churn one and from churn one to annular one in vertical flows are described. Problems of phase transitions and equilibrium are discussed. Flow regimes in tubes where evaporating liquid is running, are described [ru

  16. Simultaneous nitrate reduction and acetaminophen oxidation using the continuous-flow chemical-less VUV process as an integrated advanced oxidation and reduction process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moussavi, Gholamreza, E-mail: moussavi@modares.ac.ir; Shekoohiyan, Sakine

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Simultaneous advanced oxidation and reduction processes were explored in VUV system. • Complete reduction of nitrate to N{sub 2} was achieved at the presence of acetaminophen. • Complete degradation of acetaminophen was achieved at the presence of nitrate. • Over 95% of acetaminophen was mineralized in the VUV photoreactor. • VUV is a chemical-less advanced process for treating water emerging contaminants. - Abstract: This work was aimed at investigating the performance of the continuous-flow VUV photoreactor as a novel chemical-less advanced process for simultaneously oxidizing acetaminophen (ACT) as a model of pharmaceuticals and reducing nitrate in a single reactor. Solution pH was an important parameter affecting the performance of VUV; the highest ACT oxidation and nitrate reduction attained at solution pH between 6 and 8. The ACT was oxidized mainly by HO· while the aqueous electrons were the main working agents in the reduction of nitrate. The performance of VUV photoreactor improved with the increase of hydraulic retention time (HRT); the complete degradation of ACT and ∼99% reduction of nitrate with 100% N{sub 2} selectivity achieved at HRT of 80 min. The VUV effluent concentrations of nitrite and ammonium at HRT of 80 min were below the drinking water standards. The real water sample contaminated with the ACT and nitrate was efficiently treated in the VUV photoreactor. Therefore, the VUV photoreactor is a chemical-less advanced process in which both advanced oxidation and advanced reduction reactions are accomplished. This unique feature possesses VUV photoreactor as a promising method of treating water contaminated with both pharmaceutical and nitrate.

  17. Simultaneous nitrate reduction and acetaminophen oxidation using the continuous-flow chemical-less VUV process as an integrated advanced oxidation and reduction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussavi, Gholamreza; Shekoohiyan, Sakine

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Simultaneous advanced oxidation and reduction processes were explored in VUV system. • Complete reduction of nitrate to N_2 was achieved at the presence of acetaminophen. • Complete degradation of acetaminophen was achieved at the presence of nitrate. • Over 95% of acetaminophen was mineralized in the VUV photoreactor. • VUV is a chemical-less advanced process for treating water emerging contaminants. - Abstract: This work was aimed at investigating the performance of the continuous-flow VUV photoreactor as a novel chemical-less advanced process for simultaneously oxidizing acetaminophen (ACT) as a model of pharmaceuticals and reducing nitrate in a single reactor. Solution pH was an important parameter affecting the performance of VUV; the highest ACT oxidation and nitrate reduction attained at solution pH between 6 and 8. The ACT was oxidized mainly by HO· while the aqueous electrons were the main working agents in the reduction of nitrate. The performance of VUV photoreactor improved with the increase of hydraulic retention time (HRT); the complete degradation of ACT and ∼99% reduction of nitrate with 100% N_2 selectivity achieved at HRT of 80 min. The VUV effluent concentrations of nitrite and ammonium at HRT of 80 min were below the drinking water standards. The real water sample contaminated with the ACT and nitrate was efficiently treated in the VUV photoreactor. Therefore, the VUV photoreactor is a chemical-less advanced process in which both advanced oxidation and advanced reduction reactions are accomplished. This unique feature possesses VUV photoreactor as a promising method of treating water contaminated with both pharmaceutical and nitrate.

  18. Micromachined pressure/flow-sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterbroek, R.E.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt; van den Berg, Albert

    1999-01-01

    The micromechanical equivalent of a differential pressure flow-sensor, well known in macro mechanics, is discussed. Two separate pressure sensors are used for the device, enabling to measure both, pressure as well as volume flow-rate. An integrated sensor with capacitive read-out as well as a

  19. Flow analysis of HANARO flow simulated test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yong-Chul; Cho, Yeong-Garp; Wu, Jong-Sub; Jun, Byung-Jin

    2002-01-01

    The HANARO, a multi-purpose research reactor of 30 MWth open-tank-in-pool type, has been under normal operation since its initial critical in February, 1995. Many experiments should be safely performed to activate the utilization of the NANARO. A flow simulated test facility is being developed for the endurance test of reactivity control units for extended life times and the verification of structural integrity of those experimental facilities prior to loading in the HANARO. This test facility is composed of three major parts; a half-core structure assembly, flow circulation system and support system. The half-core structure assembly is composed of plenum, grid plate, core channel with flow tubes, chimney and dummy pool. The flow channels are to be filled with flow orifices to simulate core channels. This test facility must simulate similar flow characteristics to the HANARO. This paper, therefore, describes an analytical analysis to study the flow behavior of the test facility. The computational flow analysis has been performed for the verification of flow structure and similarity of this test facility assuming that flow rates and pressure differences of the core channel are constant. The shapes of flow orifices were determined by the trial and error method based on the design requirements of core channel. The computer analysis program with standard k - ε turbulence model was applied to three-dimensional analysis. The results of flow simulation showed a similar flow characteristic with that of the HANARO and satisfied the design requirements of this test facility. The shape of flow orifices used in this numerical simulation can be adapted for manufacturing requirements. The flow rate and the pressure difference through core channel proved by this simulation can be used as the design requirements of the flow system. The analysis results will be verified with the results of the flow test after construction of the flow system. (author)

  20. Integrated turbomachine oxygen plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; DePuy, Richard Anthony; Muthaiah, Veerappan

    2014-06-17

    An integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes a turbomachine and an air separation unit. One or more compressor pathways flow compressed air from a compressor through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. An air separation unit is operably connected to the one or more compressor pathways and is configured to separate the compressed air into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air. A method of air separation in an integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes compressing a flow of air in a compressor of a turbomachine. The compressed flow of air is flowed through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander of the turbomachine to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. The compressed flow of air is directed to an air separation unit and is separated into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air.

  1. Identification of karst sinkholes in a forested karst landscape using airborne laser scanning data and water flow analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofierka, Jaroslav; Gallay, Michal; Bandura, Peter; Šašak, Ján

    2018-05-01

    Karst sinkholes (dolines) play an important role in a karst landscape by controlling infiltration of surficial water, air flow or spatial distribution of solar energy. These landforms also present a limiting factor for human activities in agriculture or construction. Therefore, mapping such geomorphological forms is vital for appropriate landscape management and planning. There are several mapping techniques available; however, their applicability can be reduced in densely forested areas with poor accessibility and visibility of the landforms. In such conditions, airborne laser scanning (ALS) provides means for efficient and accurate mapping of both land and landscape canopy surfaces. Taking the benefits of ALS into account, we present an innovative method for identification and evaluation of karst sinkholes based on numerical water flow modelling. The suggested method was compared to traditional techniques for sinkhole mapping which use topographic maps and digital terrain modelling. The approach based on simulation of a rainfall event very closely matched the reference datasets derived by manual inspection of the ALS digital elevation model and field surveys. However, our process-based approach provides advantage of assessing the magnitude how sinkholes influence concentration of overland water flow during extreme rainfall events. This was performed by calculating the volume of water accumulated in sinkholes during the simulated rainfall. In this way, the influence of particular sinkholes on underground geomorphological systems can be assessed. The method was demonstrated in a case study of Slovak Karst in the West Carpathians where extreme rainfalls or snow-thaw events occur annually. We identified three spatially contiguous groups of sinkholes with a different effect on overland flow concentration. These results are discussed in relation to the known underground hydrological systems.

  2. Integral or integrated marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davčik Nebojša

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Marketing theorists and experts try to develop business efficient organization and to get marketing performance at higher, business integrated level since its earliest beginnings. The core issue in this paperwork is the dialectic and practical approach dilemma should we develop integrated or integral marketing approach in the organization. The presented company cases as well as dialectic and functional explanations of this dilemma clearly shows that integrated marketing is narrower approach than integral marketing if we take as focal point new, unique and completed entity. In the integration the essence is in getting different parts together, which do not have to make necessary the new entity. The key elements in the definition of the integral marketing are necessity and holistic, e.g. necessity to develop new, holistic entity.

  3. UZ Flow Models and Submodels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y. Wu

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) flow models and submodels, as well as the flow fields that have been generated using the UZ flow model(s) of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In this report