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Sample records for integrated mr-pet scanner

  1. MRI-assisted PET motion correction for neurologic studies in an integrated MR-PET scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Ciprian; Benner, Thomas; van der Kouwe, Andre; Byars, Larry; Hamm, Michael; Chonde, Daniel B; Michel, Christian J; El Fakhri, Georges; Schmand, Matthias; Sorensen, A Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Head motion is difficult to avoid in long PET studies, degrading the image quality and offsetting the benefit of using a high-resolution scanner. As a potential solution in an integrated MR-PET scanner, the simultaneously acquired MRI data can be used for motion tracking. In this work, a novel algorithm for data processing and rigid-body motion correction (MC) for the MRI-compatible BrainPET prototype scanner is described, and proof-of-principle phantom and human studies are presented. To account for motion, the PET prompt and random coincidences and sensitivity data for postnormalization were processed in the line-of-response (LOR) space according to the MRI-derived motion estimates. The processing time on the standard BrainPET workstation is approximately 16 s for each motion estimate. After rebinning in the sinogram space, the motion corrected data were summed, and the PET volume was reconstructed using the attenuation and scatter sinograms in the reference position. The accuracy of the MC algorithm was first tested using a Hoffman phantom. Next, human volunteer studies were performed, and motion estimates were obtained using 2 high-temporal-resolution MRI-based motion-tracking techniques. After accounting for the misalignment between the 2 scanners, perfectly coregistered MRI and PET volumes were reproducibly obtained. The MRI output gates inserted into the PET list-mode allow the temporal correlation of the 2 datasets within 0.2 ms. The Hoffman phantom volume reconstructed by processing the PET data in the LOR space was similar to the one obtained by processing the data using the standard methods and applying the MC in the image space, demonstrating the quantitative accuracy of the procedure. In human volunteer studies, motion estimates were obtained from echo planar imaging and cloverleaf navigator sequences every 3 s and 20 ms, respectively. Motion-deblurred PET images, with excellent delineation of specific brain structures, were obtained using these 2 MRI

  2. MR-assisted PET Motion Correction for eurological Studies in an Integrated MR-PET Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Ciprian; Benner, Thomas; van der Kouwe, Andre; Byars, Larry; Hamm, Michael; Chonde, Daniel B.; Michel, Christian J.; El Fakhri, Georges; Schmand, Matthias; Sorensen, A. Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Head motion is difficult to avoid in long PET studies, degrading the image quality and offsetting the benefit of using a high-resolution scanner. As a potential solution in an integrated MR-PET scanner, the simultaneously acquired MR data can be used for motion tracking. In this work, a novel data processing and rigid-body motion correction (MC) algorithm for the MR-compatible BrainPET prototype scanner is described and proof-of-principle phantom and human studies are presented. Methods To account for motion, the PET prompts and randoms coincidences as well as the sensitivity data are processed in the line or response (LOR) space according to the MR-derived motion estimates. After sinogram space rebinning, the corrected data are summed and the motion corrected PET volume is reconstructed from these sinograms and the attenuation and scatter sinograms in the reference position. The accuracy of the MC algorithm was first tested using a Hoffman phantom. Next, human volunteer studies were performed and motion estimates were obtained using two high temporal resolution MR-based motion tracking techniques. Results After accounting for the physical mismatch between the two scanners, perfectly co-registered MR and PET volumes are reproducibly obtained. The MR output gates inserted in to the PET list-mode allow the temporal correlation of the two data sets within 0.2 s. The Hoffman phantom volume reconstructed processing the PET data in the LOR space was similar to the one obtained processing the data using the standard methods and applying the MC in the image space, demonstrating the quantitative accuracy of the novel MC algorithm. In human volunteer studies, motion estimates were obtained from echo planar imaging and cloverleaf navigator sequences every 3 seconds and 20 ms, respectively. Substantially improved PET images with excellent delineation of specific brain structures were obtained after applying the MC using these MR-based estimates. Conclusion A novel MR-based MC

  3. Attenuation correction for hybrid MR/PET scanners: a comparison study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rota Kops, Elena [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Jülich (Germany); Ribeiro, Andre Santos [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Caldeira, Liliana [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Jülich (Germany); Hautzel, Hubertus [Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf (Germany); Lukas, Mathias [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Antoch, Gerald [Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf (Germany); Lerche, Christoph; Shah, Jon [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Jülich (Germany)

    2015-05-18

    Attenuation correction of PET data acquired in hybrid MR/PET scanners is still a challenge. Different methods have been adopted by several groups to obtain reliable attenuation maps (mu-maps). In this study we compare three methods: MGH, UCL, Neural-Network. The MGH method is based on an MR/CT template obtained with the SPM8 software. The UCL method uses a database of MR/CT pairs. Both generate mu-maps from MP-RAGE images. The feed-forward neural-network from Juelich (NN-Juelich) requires two UTE images; it generates segmented mu-maps. Data from eight subjects (S1-S8) measured in the Siemens 3T MR-BrainPET scanner were used. Corresponding CT images were acquired. The resulting mu-maps were compared against the CT-based mu-maps for each subject and method. Overlapped voxels and Dice similarity coefficients, D, for bone, soft-tissue and air regions, and relative differences images were calculated. The true positive (TP) recognized voxels for the whole head were 79.9% (NN-Juelich, S7) to 92.1% (UCL method, S1). D values of the bone were D=0.65 (NN-Juelich, S1) to D=0.87 (UCL method, S1). For S8 the MHG method failed (TP=76.4%; D=0.46 for bone). D values shared a common tendency in all subjects and methods to recognize soft-tissue as bone. The relative difference images showed a variation of -10.9% - +10.1%; for S8 and MHG method the values were -24.5% and +14.2%. A preliminary comparison of three methods for generation of mu-maps for MR/PET scanners is presented. The continuous methods (MGH, UCL) seem to generate reliable mu-maps, whilst the binary method seems to need further improvement. Future work will include more subjects, the reconstruction of corresponding PET data and their comparison.

  4. Attenuation correction for hybrid MR/PET scanners: a comparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rota Kops, Elena; Ribeiro, Andre Santos; Caldeira, Liliana; Hautzel, Hubertus; Lukas, Mathias; Antoch, Gerald; Lerche, Christoph; Shah, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Attenuation correction of PET data acquired in hybrid MR/PET scanners is still a challenge. Different methods have been adopted by several groups to obtain reliable attenuation maps (mu-maps). In this study we compare three methods: MGH, UCL, Neural-Network. The MGH method is based on an MR/CT template obtained with the SPM8 software. The UCL method uses a database of MR/CT pairs. Both generate mu-maps from MP-RAGE images. The feed-forward neural-network from Juelich (NN-Juelich) requires two UTE images; it generates segmented mu-maps. Data from eight subjects (S1-S8) measured in the Siemens 3T MR-BrainPET scanner were used. Corresponding CT images were acquired. The resulting mu-maps were compared against the CT-based mu-maps for each subject and method. Overlapped voxels and Dice similarity coefficients, D, for bone, soft-tissue and air regions, and relative differences images were calculated. The true positive (TP) recognized voxels for the whole head were 79.9% (NN-Juelich, S7) to 92.1% (UCL method, S1). D values of the bone were D=0.65 (NN-Juelich, S1) to D=0.87 (UCL method, S1). For S8 the MHG method failed (TP=76.4%; D=0.46 for bone). D values shared a common tendency in all subjects and methods to recognize soft-tissue as bone. The relative difference images showed a variation of -10.9% - +10.1%; for S8 and MHG method the values were -24.5% and +14.2%. A preliminary comparison of three methods for generation of mu-maps for MR/PET scanners is presented. The continuous methods (MGH, UCL) seem to generate reliable mu-maps, whilst the binary method seems to need further improvement. Future work will include more subjects, the reconstruction of corresponding PET data and their comparison.

  5. Multimodal imaging utilising integrated MR-PET for human brain tumour assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuner, Irene; Kaffanke, Joachim B.; Langen, Karl-Josef; Kops, Elena Rota; Tellmann, Lutz; Stoffels, Gabriele; Weirich, Christoph; Filss, Christian; Scheins, Juergen; Herzog, Hans; Shah, N. Jon

    2012-01-01

    The development of integrated magnetic resonance (MR)-positron emission tomography (PET) hybrid imaging opens up new horizons for imaging in neuro-oncology. In cerebral gliomas the definition of tumour extent may be difficult to ascertain using standard MR imaging (MRI) only. The differentiation of post-therapeutic scar tissue, tumour rests and tumour recurrence is challenging. The relationship to structures such as the pyramidal tract to the tumour mass influences the therapeutic neurosurgical approach. The diagnostic information may be enriched by sophisticated MR techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), multiple-volume proton MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and functional MRI (fMRI). Metabolic imaging with PET, especially using amino acid tracers such as 18 F-fluoroethyl-l-tyrosine (FET) or 11 C-l-methionine (MET) will indicate tumour extent and response to treatment. The new technologies comprising MR-PET hybrid systems have the advantage of providing comprehensive answers by a one-stop-job of 40-50 min. The combined approach provides data of different modalities using the same iso-centre, resulting in optimal spatial and temporal realignment. All images are acquired exactly under the same physiological conditions. We describe the imaging protocol in detail and provide patient examples for the different imaging modalities such as FET-PET, standard structural imaging (T1-weighted, T2-weighted, T1-weighted contrast agent enhanced), DTI, MRSI and fMRI. (orig.)

  6. Multimodal imaging utilising integrated MR-PET for human brain tumour assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuner, Irene [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, INM 4, Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University, Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Aachen (Germany); JARA-BRAIN-Translational Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Kaffanke, Joachim B. [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, INM 4, Juelich (Germany); MR-Transfer e.K., Wuppertal (Germany); Langen, Karl-Josef; Kops, Elena Rota; Tellmann, Lutz; Stoffels, Gabriele; Weirich, Christoph; Filss, Christian; Scheins, Juergen; Herzog, Hans [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, INM 4, Juelich (Germany); Shah, N. Jon [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, INM 4, Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University, Department of Neurology, Aachen (Germany); JARA-BRAIN-Translational Medicine, Aachen (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    The development of integrated magnetic resonance (MR)-positron emission tomography (PET) hybrid imaging opens up new horizons for imaging in neuro-oncology. In cerebral gliomas the definition of tumour extent may be difficult to ascertain using standard MR imaging (MRI) only. The differentiation of post-therapeutic scar tissue, tumour rests and tumour recurrence is challenging. The relationship to structures such as the pyramidal tract to the tumour mass influences the therapeutic neurosurgical approach. The diagnostic information may be enriched by sophisticated MR techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), multiple-volume proton MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and functional MRI (fMRI). Metabolic imaging with PET, especially using amino acid tracers such as {sup 18}F-fluoroethyl-l-tyrosine (FET) or {sup 11}C-l-methionine (MET) will indicate tumour extent and response to treatment. The new technologies comprising MR-PET hybrid systems have the advantage of providing comprehensive answers by a one-stop-job of 40-50 min. The combined approach provides data of different modalities using the same iso-centre, resulting in optimal spatial and temporal realignment. All images are acquired exactly under the same physiological conditions. We describe the imaging protocol in detail and provide patient examples for the different imaging modalities such as FET-PET, standard structural imaging (T1-weighted, T2-weighted, T1-weighted contrast agent enhanced), DTI, MRSI and fMRI. (orig.)

  7. Response assessment of stereotactic body radiation therapy using dynamic contrast-enhanced integrated MR-PET in non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Sen; Chen, Jenny Ling-Yu; Hsu, Feng-Ming; Huang, Jei-Yie; Ko, Wei-Chun; Chen, Yi-Chang; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Yen, Ruoh-Fang; Chang, Yeun-Chung

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the response in patients undergoing SBRT using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) integrated magnetic resonance positron emission tomography (MR-PET). Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is efficacious as a front-line local treatment for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We prospectively enrolled 19 lung tumors in 17 nonmetastatic NSCLC patients who were receiving SBRT as a primary treatment. They underwent DCE-integrated 3T MR-PET before and 6 weeks after SBRT. The following image parameters were analyzed: tumor size, standardized uptake value (SUV), apparent diffusion coefficient, K trans , k ep , v e , v p , and iAUC 60 . Chest computed tomography (CT) was performed at 3 months after SBRT. SBRT treatment led to tumor changes including significant decreases in the SUV max (-61%, P PET SUV max was correlated with the MR k ep mean (P = 0.002) and k ep SD (P 10 (P = 0.083). In patients with NSCLC who are receiving SBRT, DCE-integrated MR-PET can be used to evaluate the response after SBRT and to predict the local treatment outcome. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:191-199. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  8. Towards Implementing an MR-based PET Attenuation Correction Method for Neurological Studies on the MR-PET Brain Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Ciprian; van der Kouwe, Andre; Benner, Thomas; Michel, Christian J.; Hamm, Michael; Fenchel, Matthias; Fischl, Bruce; Rosen, Bruce; Schmand, Matthias; Sorensen, A. Gregory

    2013-01-01

    A number of factors have to be considered for implementing an accurate attenuation correction (AC) in a combined MR-PET scanner. In this work, some of these challenges were investigated and an AC method based entirely on the MR data obtained with a single dedicated sequence was developed and used for neurological studies performed with the MR-PET human brain scanner prototype. Methods The focus was on the bone/air segmentation problem, the bone linear attenuation coefficient selection and the RF coil positioning. The impact of these factors on the PET data quantification was studied in simulations and experimental measurements performed on the combined MR-PET scanner. A novel dual-echo ultra-short echo time (DUTE) MR sequence was proposed for head imaging. Simultaneous MR-PET data were acquired and the PET images reconstructed using the proposed MR-DUTE-based AC method were compared with the PET images reconstructed using a CT-based AC. Results Our data suggest that incorrectly accounting for the bone tissue attenuation can lead to large underestimations (>20%) of the radiotracer concentration in the cortex. Assigning a linear attenuation coefficient of 0.143 or 0.151 cm−1 to bone tissue appears to give the best trade-off between bias and variability in the resulting images. Not identifying the internal air cavities introduces large overestimations (>20%) in adjacent structures. Based on these results, the segmented CT AC method was established as the “silver standard” for the segmented MR-based AC method. Particular to an integrated MR-PET scanner, ignoring the RF coil attenuation can cause large underestimations (i.e. up to 50%) in the reconstructed images. Furthermore, the coil location in the PET field of view has to be accurately known. Good quality bone/air segmentation can be performed using the DUTE data. The PET images obtained using the MR-DUTE- and CT-based AC methods compare favorably in most of the brain structures. Conclusion An MR-DUTE-based AC

  9. Wavelet-based partial volume effect correction for simultaneous MR/PET of the carotid arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bini, Jason; Eldib, Mootaz [Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, NY, NY (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, The City College of New York, NY, NY (United States); Robson, Philip M; Fayad, Zahi A [Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, NY, NY (United States)

    2014-07-29

    Simultaneous MR/PET scanners allow for the exploration and development of novel PVE correction techniques without the challenges of coregistration of MR and PET. The development of a wavelet-based PVE correction method, to improve PET quantification, has proven successful in brain PET.{sup 2} We report here the first attempt to apply these methods to simultaneous MR/PET imaging of the carotid arteries.

  10. Wavelet-based partial volume effect correction for simultaneous MR/PET of the carotid arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bini, Jason; Eldib, Mootaz; Robson, Philip M; Fayad, Zahi A

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous MR/PET scanners allow for the exploration and development of novel PVE correction techniques without the challenges of coregistration of MR and PET. The development of a wavelet-based PVE correction method, to improve PET quantification, has proven successful in brain PET. 2 We report here the first attempt to apply these methods to simultaneous MR/PET imaging of the carotid arteries.

  11. Toward implementing an MRI-based PET attenuation-correction method for neurologic studies on the MR-PET brain prototype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Ciprian; van der Kouwe, Andre; Benner, Thomas; Michel, Christian J; Hamm, Michael; Fenchel, Matthias; Fischl, Bruce; Rosen, Bruce; Schmand, Matthias; Sorensen, A Gregory

    2010-09-01

    Several factors have to be considered for implementing an accurate attenuation-correction (AC) method in a combined MR-PET scanner. In this work, some of these challenges were investigated, and an AC method based entirely on the MRI data obtained with a single dedicated sequence was developed and used for neurologic studies performed with the MR-PET human brain scanner prototype. The focus was on the problem of bone-air segmentation, selection of the linear attenuation coefficient for bone, and positioning of the radiofrequency coil. The impact of these factors on PET data quantification was studied in simulations and experimental measurements performed on the combined MR-PET scanner. A novel dual-echo ultrashort echo time (DUTE) MRI sequence was proposed for head imaging. Simultaneous MR-PET data were acquired, and the PET images reconstructed using the proposed DUTE MRI-based AC method were compared with the PET images that had been reconstructed using a CT-based AC method. Our data suggest that incorrectly accounting for the bone tissue attenuation can lead to large underestimations (>20%) of the radiotracer concentration in the cortex. Assigning a linear attenuation coefficient of 0.143 or 0.151 cm(-1) to bone tissue appears to give the best trade-off between bias and variability in the resulting images. Not identifying the internal air cavities introduces large overestimations (>20%) in adjacent structures. On the basis of these results, the segmented CT AC method was established as the silver standard for the segmented MRI-based AC method. For an integrated MR-PET scanner, in particular, ignoring the radiofrequency coil attenuation can cause large underestimations (i.e.,

  12. A new PET detector concept for compact preclinical high-resolution hybrid MR-PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berneking, Arne; Gola, Alberto; Ferri, Alessandro; Finster, Felix; Rucatti, Daniele; Paternoster, Giovanni; Jon Shah, N.; Piemonte, Claudio; Lerche, Christoph

    2018-04-01

    This work presents a new PET detector concept for compact preclinical hybrid MR-PET. The detector concept is based on Linearly-Graded SiPM produced with current FBK RGB-HD technology. One 7.75 mm x 7.75 mm large sensor chip is coupled with optical grease to a black coated 8 mm x 8 mm large and 3 mm thick monolithic LYSO crystal. The readout is obtained from four readout channels with the linear encoding based on integrated resistors and the Center of Gravity approach. To characterize the new detector concept, the spatial and energy resolutions were measured. Therefore, the measurement setup was prepared to radiate a collimated beam to 25 different points perpendicular to the monolithic scintillator crystal. Starting in the center point of the crystal at 0 mm / 0 mm and sampling a grid with a pitch of 1.75 mm, all significant points of the detector were covered by the collimator beam. The measured intrinsic spatial resolution (FWHM) was 0.74 +/- 0.01 mm in x- and 0.69 +/- 0.01 mm in the y-direction at the center of the detector. At the same point, the measured energy resolution (FWHM) was 13.01 +/- 0.05 %. The mean intrinsic spatial resolution (FWHM) over the whole detector was 0.80 +/- 0.28 mm in x- and 0.72 +/- 0.19 mm in y-direction. The energy resolution (FWHM) of the detector was between 13 and 17.3 % with an average energy resolution of 15.7 +/- 1.0 %. Due to the reduced thickness, the sensitivity of this gamma detector is low but still higher than pixelated designs with the same thickness due to the monolithic crystals. Combining compact design, high spatial resolution, and high sensitivity, the detector concept is particularly suitable for applications where the scanner bore size is limited and high resolution is required - as is the case in small animal hybrid MR-PET.

  13. Initial experience on protocol optimization for integrated PET/MR%PET/MR一体机操作优化的初步经验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘家金; 陈英茂; 张雄伟; 富丽萍; 田嘉禾; 尹大一; 徐白萱

    2014-01-01

    目的 通过比较PET/CT和PET/MR,初步探索PET/MR一体机的操作流程和成像优化方案.方法 228例患者同日内接受PET/CT和PET/MR检查,通过6种不同MR序列与PET采集组合方案,比较图像质量的优劣,以在保证诊断信息基础上缩短患者扫描时间的原则分析判断,并初步确定最优PET/MR一体机采集方案.结果 PET/MR结果与PET/CT相近,但其操作流程和注意事项有独特之处;在6种方案中,以躯干和头部各有独立序列组合、兼顾各向同性结构显示与突出病灶特点的方案6效果最优;PET/MR比PET/CT更易产生伪影.结论 在优化方案基础上,PET/MR可获得与PET/CT一致的诊断级图像,但PET/MR采集时间长、伪影多,有待进一步完善.%Objective To investigate the optimal workflow and protocol for integrated PET/MR by comparison with PET/CT.Methods A total of 228 patients were enrolled in this study for PET/CT and PET/MR evaluation on the same day.Six PET/MR protocols with different MR sequences but the same PET acquisition protocol were investigated and the optimal protocol was identified based on image quality,acquisition time and diagnostic performance.Results PET/MR workflow was similar to PET/CT,however,some special issues needed to be considered for PET/MR.Among the 6 protocols,protocol No.6 outperformed others for body and head regions.Types of artifacts were found more often in PET/MR than in PET/CT.Conclusions By optimizing the protocol,PET/MR could achieve almost the same diagnostic performance as PET/CT.However,the issues of long acquisition time and artifacts on PET/MR need to be further improved.

  14. MR/PET quantification tools: Registration, segmentation, classification, and MR-based attenuation correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Baowei; Yang, Xiaofeng; Nye, Jonathon A.; Aarsvold, John N.; Raghunath, Nivedita; Cervo, Morgan; Stark, Rebecca; Meltzer, Carolyn C.; Votaw, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Combined MR/PET is a relatively new, hybrid imaging modality. A human MR/PET prototype system consisting of a Siemens 3T Trio MR and brain PET insert was installed and tested at our institution. Its present design does not offer measured attenuation correction (AC) using traditional transmission imaging. This study is the development of quantification tools including MR-based AC for quantification in combined MR/PET for brain imaging. Methods: The developed quantification tools include image registration, segmentation, classification, and MR-based AC. These components were integrated into a single scheme for processing MR/PET data. The segmentation method is multiscale and based on the Radon transform of brain MR images. It was developed to segment the skull on T1-weighted MR images. A modified fuzzy C-means classification scheme was developed to classify brain tissue into gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid. Classified tissue is assigned an attenuation coefficient so that AC factors can be generated. PET emission data are then reconstructed using a three-dimensional ordered sets expectation maximization method with the MR-based AC map. Ten subjects had separate MR and PET scans. The PET with [11C]PIB was acquired using a high-resolution research tomography (HRRT) PET. MR-based AC was compared with transmission (TX)-based AC on the HRRT. Seventeen volumes of interest were drawn manually on each subject image to compare the PET activities between the MR-based and TX-based AC methods. Results: For skull segmentation, the overlap ratio between our segmented results and the ground truth is 85.2 ± 2.6%. Attenuation correction results from the ten subjects show that the difference between the MR and TX-based methods was <6.5%. Conclusions: MR-based AC compared favorably with conventional transmission-based AC. Quantitative tools including registration, segmentation, classification, and MR-based AC have been developed for use in combined MR/PET

  15. MR/PET quantification tools: Registration, segmentation, classification, and MR-based attenuation correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fei, Baowei, E-mail: bfei@emory.edu [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, 1841 Clifton Road Northeast, Atlanta, Georgia 30329 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Emory University and Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Department of Mathematics and Computer Sciences, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Yang, Xiaofeng; Nye, Jonathon A.; Raghunath, Nivedita; Votaw, John R. [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30329 (United States); Aarsvold, John N. [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30329 (United States); Nuclear Medicine Service, Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Atlanta, Georgia 30033 (United States); Cervo, Morgan; Stark, Rebecca [The Medical Physics Graduate Program in the George W. Woodruff School, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Meltzer, Carolyn C. [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30329 (United States); Department of Neurology and Department of Psychiatry and Behavior Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Combined MR/PET is a relatively new, hybrid imaging modality. A human MR/PET prototype system consisting of a Siemens 3T Trio MR and brain PET insert was installed and tested at our institution. Its present design does not offer measured attenuation correction (AC) using traditional transmission imaging. This study is the development of quantification tools including MR-based AC for quantification in combined MR/PET for brain imaging. Methods: The developed quantification tools include image registration, segmentation, classification, and MR-based AC. These components were integrated into a single scheme for processing MR/PET data. The segmentation method is multiscale and based on the Radon transform of brain MR images. It was developed to segment the skull on T1-weighted MR images. A modified fuzzy C-means classification scheme was developed to classify brain tissue into gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid. Classified tissue is assigned an attenuation coefficient so that AC factors can be generated. PET emission data are then reconstructed using a three-dimensional ordered sets expectation maximization method with the MR-based AC map. Ten subjects had separate MR and PET scans. The PET with [{sup 11}C]PIB was acquired using a high-resolution research tomography (HRRT) PET. MR-based AC was compared with transmission (TX)-based AC on the HRRT. Seventeen volumes of interest were drawn manually on each subject image to compare the PET activities between the MR-based and TX-based AC methods. Results: For skull segmentation, the overlap ratio between our segmented results and the ground truth is 85.2 ± 2.6%. Attenuation correction results from the ten subjects show that the difference between the MR and TX-based methods was <6.5%. Conclusions: MR-based AC compared favorably with conventional transmission-based AC. Quantitative tools including registration, segmentation, classification, and MR-based AC have been developed for use in combined MR/PET.

  16. MR/PET quantification tools: Registration, segmentation, classification, and MR-based attenuation correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fei, Baowei; Yang, Xiaofeng; Nye, Jonathon A.; Raghunath, Nivedita; Votaw, John R.; Aarsvold, John N.; Cervo, Morgan; Stark, Rebecca; Meltzer, Carolyn C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Combined MR/PET is a relatively new, hybrid imaging modality. A human MR/PET prototype system consisting of a Siemens 3T Trio MR and brain PET insert was installed and tested at our institution. Its present design does not offer measured attenuation correction (AC) using traditional transmission imaging. This study is the development of quantification tools including MR-based AC for quantification in combined MR/PET for brain imaging. Methods: The developed quantification tools include image registration, segmentation, classification, and MR-based AC. These components were integrated into a single scheme for processing MR/PET data. The segmentation method is multiscale and based on the Radon transform of brain MR images. It was developed to segment the skull on T1-weighted MR images. A modified fuzzy C-means classification scheme was developed to classify brain tissue into gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid. Classified tissue is assigned an attenuation coefficient so that AC factors can be generated. PET emission data are then reconstructed using a three-dimensional ordered sets expectation maximization method with the MR-based AC map. Ten subjects had separate MR and PET scans. The PET with ["1"1C]PIB was acquired using a high-resolution research tomography (HRRT) PET. MR-based AC was compared with transmission (TX)-based AC on the HRRT. Seventeen volumes of interest were drawn manually on each subject image to compare the PET activities between the MR-based and TX-based AC methods. Results: For skull segmentation, the overlap ratio between our segmented results and the ground truth is 85.2 ± 2.6%. Attenuation correction results from the ten subjects show that the difference between the MR and TX-based methods was <6.5%. Conclusions: MR-based AC compared favorably with conventional transmission-based AC. Quantitative tools including registration, segmentation, classification, and MR-based AC have been developed for use in combined MR/PET.

  17. Value of new MR techniques in MR-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attenberger, U.I.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Quick, H.H.; Guimaraes, A.; Catalano, O.; Morelli, J.N.

    2013-01-01

    The unparalleled soft tissue contrast of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the functional information obtainable with 18-F fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) render MR-PET well-suited for oncological and psychiatric imaging. The lack of ionizing radiation with MRI also makes MR-PET a promising modality for oncology patients requiring frequent follow-up and pediatric patients. Lessons learned with PET computed tomography (CT) over the last few years do not directly translate to MR-PET. For example, in PET-CT the Hounsfield units derived from CT are used for attenuation correction (AC). As 511 keV photons emitted in PET examinations are attenuated by the patient's body CT data are converted directly to linear attenuation coefficients (LAC); however, proton density measured by MRI is not directly related to the radiodensity or LACs of biological tissue. Thus, direct conversion to LAC data is not possible making AC more challenging in simultaneous MRI-PET scanning. In addition to these constraints simultaneous MRI-PET acquisitions also improve on some solutions to well-known challenges of hybrid imaging techniques, such as limitations in motion correction. This article reports on initial clinical experiences with simultaneously acquired MRI-PET data, focusing on the potential benefits and limitations of MRI with respect to motion correction as well as metal and attenuation correction artefacts. (orig.) [de

  18. Value of new MR techniques in MR-PET; Stellenwert neuer MR-Techniken in der MR-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attenberger, U.I.; Schoenberg, S.O. [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim der Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer klinische Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Mannheim (Germany); Quick, H.H. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Institut fuer Medizinische Physik, Erlangen (Germany); Guimaraes, A. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Charlestown (United States); Catalano, O. [University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy); Morelli, J.N. [The Johns Hopkins Hospital, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore (United States)

    2013-12-15

    The unparalleled soft tissue contrast of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the functional information obtainable with 18-F fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) render MR-PET well-suited for oncological and psychiatric imaging. The lack of ionizing radiation with MRI also makes MR-PET a promising modality for oncology patients requiring frequent follow-up and pediatric patients. Lessons learned with PET computed tomography (CT) over the last few years do not directly translate to MR-PET. For example, in PET-CT the Hounsfield units derived from CT are used for attenuation correction (AC). As 511 keV photons emitted in PET examinations are attenuated by the patient's body CT data are converted directly to linear attenuation coefficients (LAC); however, proton density measured by MRI is not directly related to the radiodensity or LACs of biological tissue. Thus, direct conversion to LAC data is not possible making AC more challenging in simultaneous MRI-PET scanning. In addition to these constraints simultaneous MRI-PET acquisitions also improve on some solutions to well-known challenges of hybrid imaging techniques, such as limitations in motion correction. This article reports on initial clinical experiences with simultaneously acquired MRI-PET data, focusing on the potential benefits and limitations of MRI with respect to motion correction as well as metal and attenuation correction artefacts. (orig.) [German] Die klinische Implementierung der neuen Hybridtechnologie MR-Positronenemissionstomographie (MR-PET) bietet durch die Kombination aus hochaufloesender Morphologie, Funktion und Metabolismus bisher ungeahnte diagnostische Moeglichkeiten, die nicht nur fuer die Diagnose und die Verlaufskontrolle onkologischer und psychiatrischer Erkrankungen von hoher Bedeutung sind. Verglichen mit der PET-CT wird dies mit reduzierter Strahlenbelastung fuer den Patienten moeglich, was wiederum insbesondere fuer Patienten in der Tumornachsorge, die

  19. Value of a dixon-based MR/PET attenuation correction sequence for the localization and evaluation of PET-positive lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiber, Matthias; Holzapfel, Konstantin; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Martinez-Moeller, Axel; Souvatzoglou, Michael; Ziegler, Sibylle; Schwaiger, Markus; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Beer, Ambros J.; Pickhard, Anja; Loeffelbein, Dennys; Santi, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the potential contribution of Dixon-based MR imaging with a rapid low-resolution breath-hold sequence, which is a technique used for MR-based attenuation correction (AC) for MR/positron emission tomography (PET), was evaluated for anatomical correlation of PET-positive lesions on a 3T clinical scanner compared to low-dose CT. This technique is also used in a recently installed fully integrated whole-body MR/PET system. Thirty-five patients routinely scheduled for oncological staging underwent 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT and a 2-point Dixon 3-D volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) T1-weighted MR sequence on the same day. Two PET data sets reconstructed using attenuation maps from low-dose CT (PET AC C T ) or simulated MR-based segmentation (PET AC M R ) were evaluated for focal PET-positive lesions. The certainty for the correlation with anatomical structures was judged in the low-dose CT and Dixon-based MRI on a 4-point scale (0-3). In addition, the standardized uptake values (SUVs) for PET AC C T and PET AC M R were compared. Statistically, no significant difference could be found concerning anatomical localization for all 81 PET-positive lesions in low-dose CT compared to Dixon-based MR (mean 2.51 ± 0.85 and 2.37 ± 0.87, respectively; p = 0.1909). CT tended to be superior for small lymph nodes, bone metastases and pulmonary nodules, while Dixon-based MR proved advantageous for soft tissue pathologies like head/neck tumours and liver metastases. For the PET AC C T - and PET AC M R -based SUVs (mean 6.36 ± 4.47 and 6.31 ± 4.52, respectively) a nearly complete concordance with a highly significant correlation was found (r = 0.9975, p < 0.0001). Dixon-based MR imaging for MR AC allows for anatomical allocation of PET-positive lesions similar to low-dose CT in conventional PET/CT. Thus, this approach appears to be useful for future MR/PET for body regions not fully covered by diagnostic MRI due to potential time

  20. Wireless Handheld Scanners Integrated with Waste Tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Robert Stephen

    2000-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has embraced mobile wireless technology to help the disposition of hazardous and mixed radiological waste. The following paper describes one application the INEEL developed to increase the data accuracy and near-real time reporting requirements for waste management. With the continuous operational demands at the ''site'', it was difficult to sustain an accurate, up-to-date database required for regulatory compliance audits and reporting. Incorporating wireless mobile technology, the INEEL was able to increase the accuracy while reducing the data delay times previously encountered. Installation issues prolonged the project along with obstacles encountered with operations personnel. However, the success of this project was found in persistence and management support as well as the technology itself. Future wireless, mobile computing will continue at the INEEL for years to come based on a successful project that was able to integrate new technology to an existing waste management system with proven, increased data accuracy

  1. Hybrid MR-PET of brain tumours using amino acid PET and chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, N A; Lohmann, P; Fairney, J; Magill, A W; Oros Peusquens, A-M; Choi, C-H; Stirnberg, R; Stoffels, G; Galldiks, N; Golay, X; Langen, K-J; Jon Shah, N

    2018-06-01

    PET using radiolabelled amino acids has become a promising tool in the diagnostics of gliomas and brain metastasis. Current research is focused on the evaluation of amide proton transfer (APT) chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MR imaging for brain tumour imaging. In this hybrid MR-PET study, brain tumours were compared using 3D data derived from APT-CEST MRI and amino acid PET using O-(2- 18 F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ( 18 F-FET). Eight patients with gliomas were investigated simultaneously with 18 F-FET PET and APT-CEST MRI using a 3-T MR-BrainPET scanner. CEST imaging was based on a steady-state approach using a B 1 average power of 1μT. B 0 field inhomogeneities were corrected a Prametric images of magnetisation transfer ratio asymmetry (MTR asym ) and differences to the extrapolated semi-solid magnetisation transfer reference method, APT# and nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE#), were calculated. Statistical analysis of the tumour-to-brain ratio of the CEST data was performed against PET data using the non-parametric Wilcoxon test. A tumour-to-brain ratio derived from APT# and 18 F-FET presented no significant differences, and no correlation was found between APT# and 18 F-FET PET data. The distance between local hot spot APT# and 18 F-FET were different (average 20 ± 13 mm, range 4-45 mm). For the first time, CEST images were compared with 18 F-FET in a simultaneous MR-PET measurement. Imaging findings derived from 18 F-FET PET and APT CEST MRI seem to provide different biological information. The validation of these imaging findings by histological confirmation is necessary, ideally using stereotactic biopsy.

  2. Simultaneous trimodal MR-PET-EEG imaging for the investigation of resting state networks in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuner, Irene [RWTH Aachen (Germany); Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine - 4, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Mauler, Joerg; Arrubla, Jorge; Kops, Elena Rota; Tellmann, Lutz; Scheins, Jurgen; Herzog, Hans [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine - 4, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Langen, Karl Josef; Shah, Jon [RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2015-05-18

    Glucose is the principal source of energy for the brain and its relationship to neuronal activity are poorly understood. The human brain uses 80% of its energy for ongoing neural activity that occurs in isolation from any particular stimulus. A promising tool for the investigation of glucose metabolism and its relationship to neuronal activity is simultaneous trimodal MR-PET-EEG data imaging. We here demonstrate the first in vivo human trimodal data at 3T. In one session MR, FDG-PET and EEG data were recorded simultaneously at a 3T hybrid MR-BrainPET scanner (Siemens, Germany) equipped with a 32 channel MR-compatible EEG system (Brain Products, Germany) in 11 healthy volunteers (11 males, mean age: 25.2 years SD: 1.2). MR and EEG data acquisition MP-RAGE (TR = 2250 ms, TE= 3.03 ms, 176 sagittal slices. 1 mm, GRAPPA factor 2. MR-based attenuation correction of PET data via UTE: flip angle=15. Two different echo times TE1=0.07 and TE2=2.46 ms, TR=200 ms. EPI sequence (TR: 2.2 s, TE: 30 ms, FOV: 200 mm, 165 volumes, The subjects were requested to close their eyes and relax EEG data were recorded using a 32-channel MR compatible EEG system. App. 200 MBq/μmol FDG were injected, data were acquired in list mode and iteratively reconstructed with all necessary corrections into 153 slices with 256 x 256 voxels sized 1.25 mm{sup 3}. The trimodal approach, recording PET data, MR data and EEG data simultaneously was successful. The high neuronal activity of the structures within the default mode network occurs on the basis of a high glucose consumption rate within the default node network. The activity of the default mode is not tied to a special EEG frequency band.

  3. Simultaneous trimodal MR-PET-EEG imaging for the investigation of resting state networks in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuner, Irene; Mauler, Joerg; Arrubla, Jorge; Kops, Elena Rota; Tellmann, Lutz; Scheins, Jurgen; Herzog, Hans; Langen, Karl Josef; Shah, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is the principal source of energy for the brain and its relationship to neuronal activity are poorly understood. The human brain uses 80% of its energy for ongoing neural activity that occurs in isolation from any particular stimulus. A promising tool for the investigation of glucose metabolism and its relationship to neuronal activity is simultaneous trimodal MR-PET-EEG data imaging. We here demonstrate the first in vivo human trimodal data at 3T. In one session MR, FDG-PET and EEG data were recorded simultaneously at a 3T hybrid MR-BrainPET scanner (Siemens, Germany) equipped with a 32 channel MR-compatible EEG system (Brain Products, Germany) in 11 healthy volunteers (11 males, mean age: 25.2 years SD: 1.2). MR and EEG data acquisition MP-RAGE (TR = 2250 ms, TE= 3.03 ms, 176 sagittal slices. 1 mm, GRAPPA factor 2. MR-based attenuation correction of PET data via UTE: flip angle=15. Two different echo times TE1=0.07 and TE2=2.46 ms, TR=200 ms. EPI sequence (TR: 2.2 s, TE: 30 ms, FOV: 200 mm, 165 volumes, The subjects were requested to close their eyes and relax EEG data were recorded using a 32-channel MR compatible EEG system. App. 200 MBq/μmol FDG were injected, data were acquired in list mode and iteratively reconstructed with all necessary corrections into 153 slices with 256 x 256 voxels sized 1.25 mm 3 . The trimodal approach, recording PET data, MR data and EEG data simultaneously was successful. The high neuronal activity of the structures within the default mode network occurs on the basis of a high glucose consumption rate within the default node network. The activity of the default mode is not tied to a special EEG frequency band.

  4. 2D MEMS scanner integrating a position feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lani Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An integrated position sensor for a dual-axis electromagnetic tilting mirror is presented. This tilting mirror is composed of a silicon based mirror directly assembled on a silicon membrane supported by flexible beams. The position sensors are constituted by 4 Wheatstone bridges of piezoresistors which are fabricated by doping locally the flexible beams. A permanent magnet is attached to the membrane and the scanner is mounted above planar coils deposited on a ceramic substrate to achieve electromagnetic actuation. The performances of the piezoresistive sensors are evaluated by measuring the output signal of the piezoresistors as a function of the tilt of the mirror and the temperature. White light interferometry was performed for all measurement to measure the exact tilt angle. The minimum detectable angle with such sensors was 30μrad (around 13bits in the range of the minimum resolution of the interferometer. The tilt reproducibility was 0.0186%, obtained by measuring the tilt after repeated actuations with a coil current of 50mA during 30 min and the stability over time was 0.05% in 1h without actuation. The maximum measured tilt angle was 6° (mechanical limited by nonlinearity of the MEMS system.

  5. Bimodal MR-PET agent for quantitative pH imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frullano, Luca; Catana, Ciprian; Benner, Thomas; Sherry, A. Dean; Caravan, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Activatable or “smart” magnetic resonance contrast agents have relaxivities that depend on environmental factors such as pH or enzymatic activity, but the MR signal depends on relaxivity and agent concentration – two unknowns. A bimodal approach, incorporating a positron emitter, solves this problem. Simultaneous positron emission tomography (PET) and MR imaging with the biomodal, pH-responsive MR-PET agent GdDOTA-4AMP-F allows direct determination of both concentration (PET) and T1 (MRI), and hence pH. PMID:20191650

  6. A Two-Dimensional Micro Scanner Integrated with a Piezoelectric Actuator and Piezoresistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng You

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A compact two-dimensional micro scanner with small volume, large deflection angles and high frequency is presented and the two-dimensional laser scanning is achieved by specular reflection. To achieve large deflection angles, the micro scanner excited by a piezoelectric actuator operates in the resonance mode. The scanning frequencies and the maximum scanning angles of the two degrees of freedom are analyzed by modeling and simulation of the structure. For the deflection angle measurement, piezoresistors are integrated in the micro scanner. The appropriate directions and crystal orientations of the piezoresistors are designed to obtain the large piezoresistive coefficients for the high sensitivities. Wheatstone bridges are used to measure the deflection angles of each direction independently and precisely. The scanner is fabricated and packaged with the piezoelectric actuator and the piezoresistors detection circuits in a size of 28 mm×20 mm×18 mm. The experiment shows that the two scanning frequencies are 216.8 Hz and 464.8 Hz, respectively. By an actuation displacement of 10 μm, the scanning range of the two-dimensional micro scanner is above 26º × 23º. The deflection angle measurement sensitivities for two directions are 59 mV/deg and 30 mV/deg, respectively.

  7. A two-dimensional micro scanner integrated with a piezoelectric actuator and piezoresistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Gaofei; You, Zheng

    2009-01-01

    A compact two-dimensional micro scanner with small volume, large deflection angles and high frequency is presented and the two-dimensional laser scanning is achieved by specular reflection. To achieve large deflection angles, the micro scanner excited by a piezoelectric actuator operates in the resonance mode. The scanning frequencies and the maximum scanning angles of the two degrees of freedom are analyzed by modeling and simulation of the structure. For the deflection angle measurement, piezoresistors are integrated in the micro scanner. The appropriate directions and crystal orientations of the piezoresistors are designed to obtain the large piezoresistive coefficients for the high sensitivities. Wheatstone bridges are used to measure the deflection angles of each direction independently and precisely. The scanner is fabricated and packaged with the piezoelectric actuator and the piezoresistors detection circuits in a size of 28 mm×20 mm×18 mm. The experiment shows that the two scanning frequencies are 216.8 Hz and 464.8 Hz, respectively. By an actuation displacement of 10 μm, the scanning range of the two-dimensional micro scanner is above 26° × 23°. The deflection angle measurement sensitivities for two directions are 59 mV/deg and 30 mV/deg, respectively.

  8. Integrating Laser Scanner and Bim for Conservation and Reuse: "the Lyric Theatre of Milan"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utica, G.; Pinti, L.; Guzzoni, L.; Bonelli, S.; Brizzolari, A.

    2017-12-01

    The paper underlines the importance to apply a methodology that integrates the Building Information Modeling (BIM), Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) and the Laser Scanner tool in conservation and reuse projects. As it is known, the laser scanner technology provides a survey of the building object which is more accurate rather than that carried out using traditional methodologies. Today most existing buildings present their attributes in a dispersed way, stored and collected in paper documents, in sheets of equipment information, in file folders of maintenance records. In some cases, it is difficult to find updated technical documentation and the research of reliable data can be a cost and time-consuming process. Therefore, this new survey technology, embedded with BIM systems represents a valid tool to obtain a coherent picture of the building state. The following case consists in the conservation and reuse project of Milan Lyric Theatre, started in 2013 from the collaboration between the Milan Polytechnic and the Municipality. This project first attempts to integrate these new techniques which are already professional standards in many other countries such as the US, Norway, Finland, England and so on. Concerning the methodology, the choice has been to use BIM software for the structured analysis of the project, with the aim to define a single code of communication to develop a coherent documentation according to rules in a consistent manner and in tight schedules. This process provides the definition of an effective and efficient operating method that can be applied to other projects.

  9. Effect of MRI acoustic noise on cerebral fludeoxyglucose uptake in simultaneous MR-PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonde, Daniel B; Abolmaali, Nasreddin; Arabasz, Grae; Guimaraes, Alexander R; Catana, Ciprian

    2013-05-01

    Integrated scanners capable of simultaneous positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data acquisition are now available for human use. Although the scanners' manufacturers have made substantial efforts to understand and minimize the mutual electromagnetic interference between the 2 modalities, the potential physiological inference has not been evaluated. In this study, we have studied the influence of the acoustic noise produced by the magnetic resonance (MR) gradients on brain fludeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in the Siemens MR-BrainPET prototype. Although particular attention was paid to the primary auditory cortex (PAC), a brain-wide analysis was also performed. The effects of the MR on the PET count rate and image quantification were first investigated in phantoms. Next, 10 healthy volunteers underwent 2 simultaneous FDG-PET/MR scans in the supine position with the FDG injection occurring inside the MR-BrainPET, alternating between a "quiet" (control) environment in which no MR sequences were run during the FDG uptake phase (the first 40 minutes after radiotracer administration) and a "noisy" (test) environment in which MR sequences were run for the entire time. Cortical and subcortical regions of interest were derived from the high-resolution morphological MR data using FreeSurfer. The changes in the FDG uptake in the FreeSurfer-derived regions of interest between the 2 conditions were analyzed from parametric and static PET images, and on a voxel-by-voxel basis using SPM8 and FreeSurfer. Only minimal to no electromagnetic interference was observed for most of the MR sequences tested, with a maximum drop in count rate of 1.5% and a maximum change in the measured activity of 1.1% in the corresponding images. The region of interest-based analysis showed statistically significant increases in the right PAC in both the parametric (9.13% [4.73%]) and static (4.18% [2.87%]) images. The SPM8 analysis showed no statistically significant

  10. X-ray microtomography scanner using time-delay integration for elimination of ring artefacts in the reconstructed image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, G.R.; London Univ.; Elliott, J.C.; London Univ.

    1997-01-01

    Most X-ray microtomography scanners work on the same principle as third-generation medical CT scanners, that is, the same point in each projection is measured by the same detector element. This leads to ring artefacts in the reconstructed image if the X-ray sensitivities of the individual detector elements, after any analytical correction, are not all identical. We have developed an X-ray microtomography scanner which uses the time-delay integration method of imaging with a CCD detector to average the characteristics of all the detector elements in each linear projection together. This has the added advantage of allowing specimens which are larger than the detector and X-ray field to be scanned. The device also uses a novel mechanical stage to ''average out'' inhomogeneities in the X-ray field. The results show that ring artefacts in microtomographic images are eliminated using this technique. (orig.)

  11. Effect of MRI Acoustic Noise on Cerebral FDG Uptake in Simultaneous MR-PET Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolmaali, Nasreddin; Arabasz, Grae; Guimaraes, Alexander R.; Catana, Ciprian

    2013-01-01

    Integrated scanners capable of simultaneous PET and MRI data acquisition are now available for human use. Although the scanners’ manufacturers have made substantial efforts to understand and minimize the mutual electromagnetic interference between the two modalities, the potential physiological inference has not been evaluated. In this work, we have studied the influence of the acoustic noise produced by the MR gradients on brain FDG uptake in the Siemens MR-BrainPET prototype. While particular attention was paid to the primary auditory cortex (PAC), a brain-wide analysis was also performed. Methods The effects of the MR on the PET count rate and image quantification were first investigated in phantoms. Next, ten healthy volunteers underwent two simultaneous FDG-PET/MR scans in the supine position with the FDG injection occurring inside the MR-BrainPET, alternating between a “quiet” (control) environment in which no MR sequences were run during the FDG uptake phase (the first 40 minutes after radiotracer administration) and a “noisy” (test) case in which MR sequences were run for the entire time. Cortical and subcortical regions of interest (ROIs) were derived from the high-resolution morphological MR data using FreeSurfer. The changes in FDG uptake in the FreeSurfer-derived ROIs between the two conditions were analyzed from parametric and static PET images, and on a voxel-by-voxel basis using SPM8 and FreeSurfer. Results Only minimal to no electromagnetic interference was observed for most of the MR sequences tested, with a maximum drop in count rate of 1.5% and a maximum change in the measured activity of 1.1% in the corresponding images. The ROI-based analysis showed statistically significant increases in the right PAC in both the parametric (9.13±4.73%) and static (4.18±2.87%) images. SPM8 analysis showed no statistically significant clusters in any images when a p<0.05 (corrected) was used; however, a p<0.001 (uncorrected) resolved bilateral

  12. SU-F-I-58: Image Quality Comparisons of Different Motion Magnitudes and TR Values in MR-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrick, J; Thompson, R; Tavallaei, M; Drangova, M; Stodilka, R; Gaede, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to evaluate the accuracy and sensitivity of a respiratory-triggered MR-PET protocol in detecting four different sized lesions at two different magnitudes of motion, with two different TR values, using a novel PET-MR-CT compatible respiratory motion phantom. Methods: The eight-compartment torso phantom was setup adjacent to the motion stage, which moved four spherical compartments (28, 22, 17, 10 mm diameter) in two separate (1 and 2 cm) linear motion profiles, simulating a 3.5 second respiratory cycle. Scans were acquired on a 3T MR-PET system (Biograph mMR; Siemens Medical Solutions, Germany). MR measurements were taken with: 1) Respiratory-triggered T2-weighted turbo spin echo (BLADE) sequence in coronal orientation, and 2) Real-time balanced steady-state gradient echo sequence (TrueFISP) in coronal and sagittal planes. PET was acquired simultaneously with MR. Sphere geometries and motion profiles were measured and compared with ground truths for T2 BLADE-TSE acquisitions and real time TrueFISP images. PET quantification and geometry measurements were taken using standardized uptake values, voxel intensity plots and were compared with known values, and examined alongside MR-based attenuation maps. Contrast and signal-to-noise ratios were also compared for each of the acquisitions as functions of motion range and TR. Results: Comparison of lesion diameters indicate the respiratory triggered T2 BLADE-TSE was able to maintain geometry within −2 mm for 1 cm motion for both TR values, and within −3.1 mm for TR = 2000 ms at 2 cm motion. Sphere measurements in respiratory triggered PET images were accurate within +/− 5 mm for both ranges of motion for 28, 22, and 17 mm diameter spheres. Conclusion: Hybrid MR-PET systems show promise in imaging lung cancer in non-compliant patients, with their ability to acquire both modalities simultaneously. However, MR-based attenuation maps are still susceptible to motion derived artifacts and

  13. SU-F-I-58: Image Quality Comparisons of Different Motion Magnitudes and TR Values in MR-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick, J; Thompson, R [Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario (Canada); Tavallaei, M; Drangova, M [Robarts Research Institute, London, Canada, London, Ontario (Canada); Stodilka, R [Western University, Canada, London, Ontario (Canada); Gaede, S [London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to evaluate the accuracy and sensitivity of a respiratory-triggered MR-PET protocol in detecting four different sized lesions at two different magnitudes of motion, with two different TR values, using a novel PET-MR-CT compatible respiratory motion phantom. Methods: The eight-compartment torso phantom was setup adjacent to the motion stage, which moved four spherical compartments (28, 22, 17, 10 mm diameter) in two separate (1 and 2 cm) linear motion profiles, simulating a 3.5 second respiratory cycle. Scans were acquired on a 3T MR-PET system (Biograph mMR; Siemens Medical Solutions, Germany). MR measurements were taken with: 1) Respiratory-triggered T2-weighted turbo spin echo (BLADE) sequence in coronal orientation, and 2) Real-time balanced steady-state gradient echo sequence (TrueFISP) in coronal and sagittal planes. PET was acquired simultaneously with MR. Sphere geometries and motion profiles were measured and compared with ground truths for T2 BLADE-TSE acquisitions and real time TrueFISP images. PET quantification and geometry measurements were taken using standardized uptake values, voxel intensity plots and were compared with known values, and examined alongside MR-based attenuation maps. Contrast and signal-to-noise ratios were also compared for each of the acquisitions as functions of motion range and TR. Results: Comparison of lesion diameters indicate the respiratory triggered T2 BLADE-TSE was able to maintain geometry within −2 mm for 1 cm motion for both TR values, and within −3.1 mm for TR = 2000 ms at 2 cm motion. Sphere measurements in respiratory triggered PET images were accurate within +/− 5 mm for both ranges of motion for 28, 22, and 17 mm diameter spheres. Conclusion: Hybrid MR-PET systems show promise in imaging lung cancer in non-compliant patients, with their ability to acquire both modalities simultaneously. However, MR-based attenuation maps are still susceptible to motion derived artifacts and

  14. Image reconstruction of mMR PET data using the open source software STIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markiewicz, Pawel [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Thielemans, Kris [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Burgos, Ninon [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Manber, Richard [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Jiao, Jieqing [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Barnes, Anna [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Atkinson, David [Centre for Medical Imaging, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Arridge, Simon R [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Hutton, Brian F [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Ourselin, Sébastien [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Dementia Research Centre, University College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-29

    Simultaneous PET and MR acquisitions have now become possible with the new hybrid Biograph Molecular MR (mMR) scanner from Siemens. The purpose of this work is to create a platform for mMR 3D and 4D PET image reconstruction which would be freely accessible to the community as well as fully adjustable in order to obtain optimal images for a given research task in PET imaging. The proposed platform is envisaged to prove useful in developing novel and robust image bio-markers which could then be adapted for use on the mMR scanner.

  15. Image reconstruction of mMR PET data using the open source software STIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markiewicz, Pawel; Thielemans, Kris; Burgos, Ninon; Manber, Richard; Jiao, Jieqing; Barnes, Anna; Atkinson, David; Arridge, Simon R; Hutton, Brian F; Ourselin, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous PET and MR acquisitions have now become possible with the new hybrid Biograph Molecular MR (mMR) scanner from Siemens. The purpose of this work is to create a platform for mMR 3D and 4D PET image reconstruction which would be freely accessible to the community as well as fully adjustable in order to obtain optimal images for a given research task in PET imaging. The proposed platform is envisaged to prove useful in developing novel and robust image bio-markers which could then be adapted for use on the mMR scanner.

  16. Assessment of shielding integrity of Co-60 gamma irradiation-ray scanner at Aflao Border, Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agbemafo, Edwin Capacity

    2016-07-01

    This study examines the current state of the shielding integrity of the 38.7 TBq Co-60 gamma ray scanner with an average energy of 1.25 MeV operated by NICK TC Scan Limited, which has been in use for destination inspection at Aflao Border of Ghana, for the past six years, (2010-2016). The facility uses a high energy ionizing radiation in its operation; therefore continuous adequacy of the installed biological shielding is critical to the protection and safety of the workers and the general public. The workload of the facility has increased since its commissioning, requiring the review of the status of the installed shielding. Theoretical calculations for dose rates and barrier thicknesses based on tenth – value layer (TVL) concept and NCRP 151, 2005 recommendations, were done around the scanning facility using the current operational data. The results were then compared with the measured dose rates and the shielding thickness constituted during the commissioning stage, and international standards. Calculated dose rate at commissioning state ranges from 0.6μSv/hr to 2.4μSv/hr with an average dose rate of 1.43μSv/hr and that of the current operational state ranges from 1.1μSv/hr to 2.6μSv/hr with an average dose rate of 1.54μSv/hr, indicating an increase of 7.9%. Even though the dose rates were all below the recommended dose limit of 20μSvh"-"1 by NCRP, there has been an increase in dose to the staff and the general public. It has been observed that, the workload has increased three-fold from the commissioning stage to current operational state over the past six years. The assessment done on the installed shielding using the current operational data indicates that the shielding is inadequate in providing protection for the general public and the workers against X-ray radiation source of energy of at least 6MeV, and therefore the facility in its current state cannot be used to house a linear accelerator of energy up to 10MeV. (au)

  17. Field of view extension and truncation correction for MR-based human attenuation correction in simultaneous MR/PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumhagen, Jan O.; Ladebeck, Ralf; Fenchel, Matthias; Braun, Harald; Quick, Harald H.; Faul, David; Scheffler, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In quantitative PET imaging, it is critical to accurately measure and compensate for the attenuation of the photons absorbed in the tissue. While in PET/CT the linear attenuation coefficients can be easily determined from a low-dose CT-based transmission scan, in whole-body MR/PET the computation of the linear attenuation coefficients is based on the MR data. However, a constraint of the MR-based attenuation correction (AC) is the MR-inherent field-of-view (FoV) limitation due to static magnetic field (B 0 ) inhomogeneities and gradient nonlinearities. Therefore, the MR-based human AC map may be truncated or geometrically distorted toward the edges of the FoV and, consequently, the PET reconstruction with MR-based AC may be biased. This is especially of impact laterally where the patient arms rest beside the body and are not fully considered. Methods: A method is proposed to extend the MR FoV by determining an optimal readout gradient field which locally compensates B 0 inhomogeneities and gradient nonlinearities. This technique was used to reduce truncation in AC maps of 12 patients, and the impact on the PET quantification was analyzed and compared to truncated data without applying the FoV extension and additionally to an established approach of PET-based FoV extension. Results: The truncation artifacts in the MR-based AC maps were successfully reduced in all patients, and the mean body volume was thereby increased by 5.4%. In some cases large patient-dependent changes in SUV of up to 30% were observed in individual lesions when compared to the standard truncated attenuation map. Conclusions: The proposed technique successfully extends the MR FoV in MR-based attenuation correction and shows an improvement of PET quantification in whole-body MR/PET hybrid imaging. In comparison to the PET-based completion of the truncated body contour, the proposed method is also applicable to specialized PET tracers with little uptake in the arms and might reduce the

  18. MR-based field-of-view extension in MR/PET: B0 homogenization using gradient enhancement (HUGE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumhagen, Jan O; Ladebeck, Ralf; Fenchel, Matthias; Scheffler, Klaus

    2013-10-01

    In whole-body MR/PET, the human attenuation correction can be based on the MR data. However, an MR-based field-of-view (FoV) is limited due to physical restrictions such as B0 inhomogeneities and gradient nonlinearities. Therefore, for large patients, the MR image and the attenuation map might be truncated and the attenuation correction might be biased. The aim of this work is to explore extending the MR FoV through B0 homogenization using gradient enhancement in which an optimal readout gradient field is determined to locally compensate B0 inhomogeneities and gradient nonlinearities. A spin-echo-based sequence was developed that computes an optimal gradient for certain regions of interest, for example, the patient's arms. A significant distortion reduction was achieved outside the normal MR-based FoV. This FoV extension was achieved without any hardware modifications. In-plane distortions in a transaxially extended FoV of up to 600 mm were analyzed in phantom studies. In vivo measurements of the patient's arms lying outside the normal specified FoV were compared with and without the use of B0 homogenization using gradient enhancement. In summary, we designed a sequence that provides data for reducing the image distortions due to B0 inhomogeneities and gradient nonlinearities and used the data to extend the MR FoV. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Terrain Extraction by Integrating Terrestrial Laser Scanner Data and Spectral Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, C. L.; Halim, S.; Zulkepli, M.; Azwan, A. M.; Tang, W. L.; Chong, A. K.

    2015-10-01

    The extraction of true terrain points from unstructured laser point cloud data is an important process in order to produce an accurate digital terrain model (DTM). However, most of these spatial filtering methods just utilizing the geometrical data to discriminate the terrain points from nonterrain points. The point cloud filtering method also can be improved by using the spectral information available with some scanners. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of using the three-channel (red, green and blue) of the colour image captured from built-in digital camera which is available in some Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) for terrain extraction. In this study, the data acquisition was conducted at a mini replica landscape in Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Skudai campus using Leica ScanStation C10. The spectral information of the coloured point clouds from selected sample classes are extracted for spectral analysis. The coloured point clouds which within the corresponding preset spectral threshold are identified as that specific feature point from the dataset. This process of terrain extraction is done through using developed Matlab coding. Result demonstrates that a higher spectral resolution passive image is required in order to improve the output. This is because low quality of the colour images captured by the sensor contributes to the low separability in spectral reflectance. In conclusion, this study shows that, spectral information is capable to be used as a parameter for terrain extraction.

  20. Brain connectivity study of brain tumor patients using MR-PET data: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, Ana Carina; Ribeiro, Andre Santos; Oros-Peusquens, Ana Maria; Langen, Karl Josef; Shah, Jon; Ferreira, Hugo Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Brain activity results from anatomical and functional connections that can be disrupted or altered due to trauma or lesion. This work presents a first approach on the study of whole-brain connectivity of brain tumor patients using the Multimodal Imaging Brain Connectivity (MIBCA) toolbox. Two patients with glioblastoma lesions located in the left hemisphere (one in the motor cortex and the other in the temporal lobe) underwent simultaneous MRI and dynamic PET scans using a 3T MRI scanner with a BrainPET insert. The following data was acquired: T1-w MPRAGE (1x1x1mm 3 ), DTI (dir=30, b=0,800s/mm2, 2x2x2mm 3 ), and dynamic 18F-FET PET. The MIBCA toolbox was used to automatically pre-process MRI-PET data and to derive imaging and connectivity metrics from the multimodal data. Computed metrics included: cortical thickness from T1-w data; mean diffusivity (MD), fractional anisotropy (FA), node degree, clustering coefficient and pairwise ROI fibre tracking (structural connectivity) from DTI data; and standardized uptake value (SUV) from PET data. For all the metrics, the differences between left and right hemispherical structures were obtained, followed by a 25% threshold (except for SUV thresholded at 15%). Data was visualized in a connectogram, and both structural connectivity and metrics were studied in regions surrounding lesions. Preliminary results showed increased SUV values in regions surrounding the tumor for both patients. Patients also showed changes in structural connectivity involving these regions and also other more spatially distant regions such as the putamen and the pallidum, including decreased number of fibers between the subcortical structures themselves and with frontal regions. These findings suggest that the presence of a tumor may alter both local and more distant structural connections. Presently, a larger patient sample is being studied along with the inclusion of a control group to test the consistency of the findings.

  1. Brain connectivity study of brain tumor patients using MR-PET data: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Ana Carina [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences of the University of Lisbon (Portugal); Ribeiro, Andre Santos [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences of the University of Lisbon (Portugal); Centre for Neuropsychopharmacology, Division of Brain Sciences, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Oros-Peusquens, Ana Maria; Langen, Karl Josef; Shah, Jon [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine - 4, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Ferreira, Hugo Alexandre [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences of the University of Lisbon (Portugal)

    2015-05-18

    Brain activity results from anatomical and functional connections that can be disrupted or altered due to trauma or lesion. This work presents a first approach on the study of whole-brain connectivity of brain tumor patients using the Multimodal Imaging Brain Connectivity (MIBCA) toolbox. Two patients with glioblastoma lesions located in the left hemisphere (one in the motor cortex and the other in the temporal lobe) underwent simultaneous MRI and dynamic PET scans using a 3T MRI scanner with a BrainPET insert. The following data was acquired: T1-w MPRAGE (1x1x1mm{sup 3}), DTI (dir=30, b=0,800s/mm2, 2x2x2mm{sup 3}), and dynamic 18F-FET PET. The MIBCA toolbox was used to automatically pre-process MRI-PET data and to derive imaging and connectivity metrics from the multimodal data. Computed metrics included: cortical thickness from T1-w data; mean diffusivity (MD), fractional anisotropy (FA), node degree, clustering coefficient and pairwise ROI fibre tracking (structural connectivity) from DTI data; and standardized uptake value (SUV) from PET data. For all the metrics, the differences between left and right hemispherical structures were obtained, followed by a 25% threshold (except for SUV thresholded at 15%). Data was visualized in a connectogram, and both structural connectivity and metrics were studied in regions surrounding lesions. Preliminary results showed increased SUV values in regions surrounding the tumor for both patients. Patients also showed changes in structural connectivity involving these regions and also other more spatially distant regions such as the putamen and the pallidum, including decreased number of fibers between the subcortical structures themselves and with frontal regions. These findings suggest that the presence of a tumor may alter both local and more distant structural connections. Presently, a larger patient sample is being studied along with the inclusion of a control group to test the consistency of the findings.

  2. Gabor-domain optical coherence microscopy with integrated dual-axis MEMS scanner for fast 3D imaging and metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavesi, Cristina; Cogliati, Andrea; Hayes, Adam; Santhanam, Anand P.; Tankam, Patrice; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2015-10-01

    Fast, robust, nondestructive 3D imaging is needed for characterization of microscopic structures in industrial and clinical applications. A custom micro-electromechanical system (MEMS)-based 2D scanner system was developed to achieve 55 kHz A-scan acquisition in a Gabor-domain optical coherence microscopy (GD-OCM) instrument with a novel multilevel GPU architecture for high-speed imaging. GD-OCM yields high-definition volumetric imaging with dynamic depth of focusing through a bio-inspired liquid lens-based microscope design, which has no moving parts and is suitable for use in a manufacturing setting or in a medical environment. A dual-axis MEMS mirror was chosen to replace two single-axis galvanometer mirrors; as a result, the astigmatism caused by the mismatch between the optical pupil and the scanning location was eliminated and a 12x reduction in volume of the scanning system was achieved. Imaging at an invariant resolution of 2 μm was demonstrated throughout a volume of 1 × 1 × 0.6 mm3, acquired in less than 2 minutes. The MEMS-based scanner resulted in improved image quality, increased robustness and lighter weight of the system - all factors that are critical for on-field deployment. A custom integrated feedback system consisting of a laser diode and a position-sensing detector was developed to investigate the impact of the resonant frequency of the MEMS and the driving signal of the scanner on the movement of the mirror. Results on the metrology of manufactured materials and characterization of tissue samples with GD-OCM are presented.

  3. An industrial design solution for integrating NMR magnetic field sensors into an MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Michael; Lee, Yoojin; Nagy, Zoltan

    2018-08-01

    Neuroimaging research relies on the skills of increasingly multidisciplinary individuals and often requires the installation and use of additional home-built or third-party equipment. The purpose of the present work was the safe, ergonomic, durable, and aesthetically pleasing installation of magnetic field monitoring equipment into a scanner, while keeping the setup compatible with standard operating procedures. An extensive set of steps was required to design a 3D printed solution to install a magnetic field camera into the eight-channel head coil of a 3T MRI scanner. First, the outer surface of the plastic coil housing was recreated into a 3D model, and the installation of the magnetic field sensors around this 3D model was performed in a virtual environment. The 3D printed solution was then assembled and tested for safety, reproducible performance, and image quality. The 3D printed solution holds the probes in stable positions and guides the necessary cables in an organized fashion and away from the volunteer. Assembly is easy and the solution is ergonomic, durable, and safe. We did not find excessive heating in the 3D printed parts, nor in the electronics, that they help to incorporate. The material used interferes minimally with transmit B1+ field. The design met all of the boundary conditions for a durable, safe, cost-effective, attractive, and functional installation. This work will provide the basis for installing the magnetic field sensors into other available head coils, and for designing the experimental setup for projects with varying experimental requirements. Magn Reson Med 80:833-839, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  4. Time series changes of MR/PET image of brain glucose metabolism in healthy subjects and alzheimer disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarusawa, Ayaka; Nihei, Mitsuyo; Tanaka, Mika; Fukami, Tadanori; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Wu, Jin; Kawasaki, Keiichi; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Ishii, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Combination of morphological information by MRI and functional one by positron emission tomography (PET) was applied to quantitative evaluation of brain regional glucose metabolism in healthy subjects (HS) and Alzheimer disease patients (AD) and their individual aging changes were elucidated for ultimate purpose of computer-aided diagnosis. Subjects were: 5 AD patients (3M/2F, av. age 77.27 y), 14 ε4-carrying HS (EHS, 4M/10F, 71.3y) and 24 non-ε4-carrying HS (NEHS, 4M/20F, 70.21), where ε4 (apolipoprotein E type 4 gene allele)-carrying HS were reported to be prone to early AD and to tend to give increased brain atrophy incidence. Acquisitions of T1-weighted 3D MR and PET images were in 256 x 256 x(88-104) and x (90-100) voxels, respectively, with digitization level 16 bits, and were repeated 3 times in the time series of 21-38 months. Segmentation was performed with the MR imaging software SPM8 (Statistic Parametric Mapping: Metalab) to specify the regions of white/gray matters and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The binary MR and registered PET images were fused for comparison of glucose metabolism by SUVs (standardized uptake values) in gray matter of the three subject groups. Findings were: SUV in AD was markedly reduced; average time series changes per year were 0.11% in AD, -2.63% in EHS and 1.48% in NEHS; and statistical significance of the changes was between AD and NEHS, and between EHS and NEHS. Glucose metabolism by MR/PET can be thus used for a distinction of ε4-carrier and non-carrier in HS. (T.T.)

  5. Integration of ground-based laser scanner and aerial digital photogrammetry for topographic modelling of Vesuvio volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesci, Arianna; Fabris, Massimo; Conforti, Dario; Loddo, Fabiana; Baldi, Paolo; Anzidei, Marco

    2007-05-01

    This work deals with the integration of different surveying methodologies for the definition of very accurate Digital Terrain Models (DTM) and/or Digital Surface Models (DSM): in particular, the aerial digital photogrammetry and the terrestrial laser scanning were used to survey the Vesuvio volcano, allowing the total coverage of the internal cone and surroundings (the whole surveyed area was about 3 km × 3 km). The possibility to reach a very high precision, especially from the laser scanner data set, allowed a detailed description of the morphology of the volcano. The comparisons of models obtained in repeated surveys allow a detailed map of residuals providing a data set that can be used for detailed studies of the morphological evolution. Moreover, the reflectivity information, highly correlated to materials properties, allows for the measurement and quantification of some morphological variations in areas where structural discontinuities and displacements are present.

  6. High-voltage integrated linear regulator with current sinking capabilities for portable ultrasound scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pausas, Guifre Vendrell; Llimos Muntal, Pere; Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a high-voltage integrated regulator capable of sinking current for driving pulse-triggered level shifters in drivers for ultrasound applications. The regulator utilizes a new topology with a feedback loop and a current sinking circuit to satisfy the requirements of the portable....... The proposed design has been implemented in high-voltage 0.18 μm process whithin an area of 0.11 mm2 and it is suitable for system-on-chip integration due to its low component count and the fully integrated design....

  7. Scintillation scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrbrodt, A.W.; Mog, W.F.; Brunnett, C.J.

    1977-01-01

    A scintillation scanner having a visual image producing means coupled through a lost motion connection to the boom which supports the scintillation detector is described. The lost motion connection is adjustable to compensate for such delays as may occur between sensing and recording scintillations. 13 claims, 5 figures

  8. Diagnosing lung nodules on oncologic MR/PET imaging: Comparison of fast T1-weighted sequences and influence of image acquisition in inspiration and expiration breath-hold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwenzer, Nina F.; Seith, Ferdinand; Gatidis, Sergios; Brendle, Cornelia; Schmidt, Holger; Pfannenberg, Christina A; LaFougère, Christian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schraml, Christina [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    First, to investigate the diagnostic performance of fast T1-weighted sequences for lung nodule evaluation in oncologic magnetic resonance (MR)/positron emission tomography (PET). Second, to evaluate the influence of image acquisition in inspiration and expiration breath-hold on diagnostic performance. The study was approved by the local Institutional Review Board. PET/CT and MR/PET of 44 cancer patients were evaluated by 2 readers. PET/CT included lung computed tomography (CT) scans in inspiration and expiration (CTin, CTex). MR/PET included Dixon sequence for attenuation correction and fast T1-weighted volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences (volume interpolated breath-hold examination acquired in inspiration [VIBEin], volume interpolated breath-hold examination acquired in expiration [VIBEex]). Diagnostic performance was analyzed for lesion-, lobe-, and size-dependence. Diagnostic confidence was evaluated (4-point Likert-scale; 1 = high). Jackknife alternative free-response receiver-operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis was performed. Seventy-six pulmonary lesions were evaluated. Lesion-based detection rates were: CTex, 77.6%; VIBEin, 53.3%; VIBEex, 51.3%; and Dixon, 22.4%. Lobe-based detection rates were: CTex, 89.6%; VIBEin, 58.3%; VIBEex, 60.4%; and Dixon, 31.3%. In contrast to CT, inspiration versus expiration did not alter diagnostic performance in VIBE sequences. Diagnostic confidence was best for VIBEin and CTex and decreased in VIBEex and Dixon (1.2 ± 0.6; 1.2 ± 0.7; 1.5 ± 0.9; 1.7 ± 1.1, respectively). The JAFROC figure-of-merit of Dixon was significantly lower. All patients with malignant lesions were identified by CTex, VIBEin, and VIBEex, while 3 patients were false-negative in Dixon. Fast T1-weighted VIBE sequences allow for identification of patients with malignant pulmonary lesions. The Dixon sequence is not recommended for lung nodule evaluation in oncologic MR/PET patients. In contrast to CT, inspiration versus

  9. Diagnosing Lung Nodules on Oncologic MR/PET Imaging: Comparison of Fast T1-Weighted Sequences and Influence of Image Acquisition in Inspiration and Expiration Breath-Hold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwenzer, Nina F.; Seith, Ferdinand; Gatidis, Sergios [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Tuebingen, Tuebingen 72076 (Germany); Brendle, Cornelia [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Tuebingen, Tuebingen 72076 (Germany); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, University Hospital of Tuebingen, Tuebingen 72076 (Germany); Schmidt, Holger; Pfannenberg, Christina A. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Tuebingen, Tuebingen 72076 (Germany); Fougère, Christian la [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Tuebingen, Tuebingen 72076 (Germany); Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schraml, Christina [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Tuebingen, Tuebingen 72076 (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    First, to investigate the diagnostic performance of fast T1-weighted sequences for lung nodule evaluation in oncologic magnetic resonance (MR)/positron emission tomography (PET). Second, to evaluate the influence of image acquisition in inspiration and expiration breath-hold on diagnostic performance. The study was approved by the local Institutional Review Board. PET/CT and MR/PET of 44 cancer patients were evaluated by 2 readers. PET/CT included lung computed tomography (CT) scans in inspiration and expiration (CTin, CTex). MR/PET included Dixon sequence for attenuation correction and fast T1-weighted volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences (volume interpolated breath-hold examination acquired in inspiration [VIBEin], volume interpolated breath-hold examination acquired in expiration [VIBEex]). Diagnostic performance was analyzed for lesion-, lobe-, and size-dependence. Diagnostic confidence was evaluated (4-point Likert-scale; 1 = high). Jackknife alternative free-response receiver-operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis was performed. Seventy-six pulmonary lesions were evaluated. Lesion-based detection rates were: CTex, 77.6%; VIBEin, 53.3%; VIBEex, 51.3%; and Dixon, 22.4%. Lobe-based detection rates were: CTex, 89.6%; VIBEin, 58.3%; VIBEex, 60.4%; and Dixon, 31.3%. In contrast to CT, inspiration versus expiration did not alter diagnostic performance in VIBE sequences. Diagnostic confidence was best for VIBEin and CTex and decreased in VIBEex and Dixon (1.2 ± 0.6; 1.2 ± 0.7; 1.5 ± 0.9; 1.7 ± 1.1, respectively). The JAFROC figure-of-merit of Dixon was significantly lower. All patients with malignant lesions were identified by CTex, VIBEin, and VIBEex, while 3 patients were false-negative in Dixon. Fast T1-weighted VIBE sequences allow for identification of patients with malignant pulmonary lesions. The Dixon sequence is not recommended for lung nodule evaluation in oncologic MR/PET patients. In contrast to CT, inspiration versus

  10. Can a barcode scanner for blood collection improve patient identification integrity in the emergency department? A prospective before-and-after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spain, David; Crilly, Julia; Pierce, John; Steele, Michael; Scuffham, Paul; Keijzers, Gerben

    2015-02-01

    To describe the effect of interventions designed to improve patient identification (PI) during pathology collection in the ED. A prospective before-and-after intervention study was conducted between June 2009 and June 2010 in a regional ED in Queensland, Australia. Interventions aimed to improve PI and specimen labelling, and consisted of: (i) education alone; and (ii) education plus an armband scanner that voice-prompted collector behaviour. Main outcomes measured included: frequency of correct key behaviours (KBs) during specimen collection, pathology integrity errors and cost of interventions. Data from 282 ED pathology collections were analysed (before: n = 115, after with education: n = 95, after with education plus armband scanner: n = 72). KBs for PI and labelling improved significantly following education plus armband scanner use. Application of armbands before sample collection increased (36% vs 90%, P patient to state their name (25% vs 93%, P patient misidentification was detected in this small study. The annual costs for a hospital to adopt the education programme with and without the armband scanner were $104,045 and $5330 respectively. ED staff had poor behaviours for identifying patients and labelling pathology specimens before intervention. These safety behaviours were considered an assumed skill. Education alone improved critical KBs markedly that was further augmented by the armband scanner. The cost to adopt education alone is relatively low compared to the addition of armband scanner technology. © 2015 The Authors. Emergency Medicine Australasia published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  11. Online process monitoring at quasi-simultaneous laser transmission welding using a 3D-scanner with integrated pyrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmailzl, A.; Steger, S.; Dostalek, M.; Hierl, S.

    2016-03-01

    Quasi-simultaneous laser transmission welding is a well-known joining technique for thermoplastics and mainly used in the automotive as well as in the medical industry. For process control usually the so called set-path monitoring is used, where the weld is specified as "good" if the irradiation time is inside a defined confidence interval. However, the detection of small-sized gaps or thermal damaged zones is not possible with this technique. The analyzation of the weld seam temperature during welding offers the possibility to overcome this problem. In this approach a 3D-scanner is used instead of a scanner with flat-field optic. By using a pyrometer in combination with a 3D-scanner no color-corrected optic is needed in order to provide that laser- and detection-spot are concentric. Experimental studies on polyethylene T-joints have shown that the quality of the signal is adequate, despite the use of an optical setup with a long working distance and a small optical aperture. The effects on temperature are studied for defects like a gap in the joining zone. Therefore a notch was milled into the absorbent polymer. In case of producing housings for electronic parts the effect of an electrical wire between the joining partners is also investigated. Both defects can be identified by a local temperature deviation even at a feed rate of four meters per second. Furthermore a strategy for signal-processing is demonstrated. By this, remaining defects can be identified. Consequently an online detection of local defects is possible, which makes a dynamic process control feasible.

  12. CT with a CMOS flat panel detector integrated on the YAP-(S)PET scanner for in vivo small animal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Domenico, Giovanni; Cesca, Nicola; Zavattini, Guido; Auricchio, Natalia; Gambaccini, Mauro

    2007-01-01

    Several research groups are pursuing multimodality simultaneous functional and morphological imaging. In this line of research the high resolution YAP-(S)PET small animal integrated PET-SPECT imaging system, constructed by our group of medical physics at the University of Ferrara, is being upgraded with a computed tomography (CT). In this way it will be possible to perform in vivo molecular and genomic imaging studies on small animals (such as mice and rats) and at the same time obtain morphological information necessary for both attenuation correction and accurate localization of the region under investigation. We have take simultaneous PET-CT and SPECT-CT images of phantoms obtained with a single scanner

  13. Application of Terrestrial Laser Scanner with an Integrated Thermal Camera in Non-Destructive Evaluation of Concrete Surface of Hydrotechnical Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarek, Łukasz Dominik; Dobak, Paweł Józef; Kiełbasiński, Kamil

    2017-12-01

    The authors present possible applications of thermal data as an additional source of information on an object's behaviour during the technical assessment of the condition of a concrete surface. For the study one of the most recent propositions introduced by Zoller + Fröhlich company was used, which is an integration of a thermal camera with a terrestrial laser scanner. This solution enables an acquisition of geometric and spectral data on the surveyed object and also provides information on the surface's temperature in the selected points. A section of the dam's downstream concrete wall was selected as the subject of the study for which a number of scans were carried out and a number of thermal images were taken at different times of the day. The obtained thermal data was confronted with the acquired spectral information for the specified points. This made it possible to carry out broader analysis of the surface and an inspection of the revealed fissure. The thermal analysis of said fissure indicated that the temperature changes within it are slower, which may affect the way the concrete works and may require further elaboration by the appropriate experts. Through the integration of a thermal camera with a terrestrial laser scanner one can not only analyse changes of temperature in the discretely selected points but on the whole surface as well. Moreover, it is also possible to accurately determine the range and the area of the change affecting the surface. The authors note the limitations of the presented solution like, inter alia, the resolution of the thermal camera.

  14. Application of Terrestrial Laser Scanner with an Integrated Thermal Camera in Non-Destructive Evaluation of Concrete Surface of Hydrotechnical Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalska Maria

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors present possible applications of thermal data as an additional source of information on an object’s behaviour during the technical assessment of the condition of a concrete surface. For the study one of the most recent propositions introduced by Zoller + Fröhlich company was used, which is an integration of a thermal camera with a terrestrial laser scanner. This solution enables an acquisition of geometric and spectral data on the surveyed object and also provides information on the surface’s temperature in the selected points. A section of the dam’s downstream concrete wall was selected as the subject of the study for which a number of scans were carried out and a number of thermal images were taken at different times of the day. The obtained thermal data was confronted with the acquired spectral information for the specified points. This made it possible to carry out broader analysis of the surface and an inspection of the revealed fissure. The thermal analysis of said fissure indicated that the temperature changes within it are slower, which may affect the way the concrete works and may require further elaboration by the appropriate experts. Through the integration of a thermal camera with a terrestrial laser scanner one can not only analyse changes of temperature in the discretely selected points but on the whole surface as well. Moreover, it is also possible to accurately determine the range and the area of the change affecting the surface. The authors note the limitations of the presented solution like, inter alia, the resolution of the thermal camera.

  15. A segmented Hybrid Photon Detector with integrated auto-triggering front-end electronics for a PET scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Chesi, Enrico Guido; Joram, C; Mathot, S; Séguinot, Jacques; Weilhammer, P; Ciocia, F; De Leo, R; Nappi, E; Vilardi, I; Argentieri, A; Corsi, F; Dragone, A; Pasqua, D

    2006-01-01

    We describe the design, fabrication and test results of a segmented Hybrid Photon Detector with integrated auto-triggering front-end electronics. Both the photodetector and its VLSI readout electronics are custom designed and have been tailored to the requirements of a recently proposed novel geometrical concept of a Positron Emission Tomograph. Emphasis is put on the PET specific features of the device. The detector has been fabricated in the photocathode facility at CERN.

  16. Analysis and databasing software for integrated tomographic gamma scanner (TGS) and passive-active neutron (PAN) assay systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estep, R.J.; Melton, S.G.; Buenafe, C.

    2000-01-01

    The CTEN-FIT program, written for Windows 9x/NT in C++,performs databasing and analysis of combined thermal/epithermal neutron (CTEN) passive and active neutron assay data and integrates that with isotopics results and gamma-ray data from methods such as tomographic gamma scanning (TGS). The binary database is reflected in a companion Excel database that allows extensive customization via Visual Basic for Applications macros. Automated analysis options make the analysis of the data transparent to the assay system operator. Various record browsers and information displays simplify record keeping tasks

  17. An Integrated Monitoring System Through 3d Laser Scanner and Traditional Instruments for Load Test on Arch Bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pera, D.; Ferrando, I.

    2017-05-01

    The experimental campaign represents an example of how the careful design of the different test phases and the choice of the needed instrumentation are fundamental aspects to obtain a proper interpretation of the results, for future application on the real structures. Additionally, the present work represents a successful example of a combined monitoring system, integrating the traditional and innovative technical instrumentation for loading tests and geomatics survey techniques. The monitoring system has been designed with the aim of defining the load carrying capacity of a masonry arch bridge scaled model and to test the performances of a new retrofitting method. In particular, two different configuration have been considered: a first one with isolated arch and a second one with gravel fill on the arch.

  18. AN INTEGRATED MONITORING SYSTEM THROUGH 3D LASER SCANNER AND TRADITIONAL INSTRUMENTS FOR LOAD TEST ON ARCH BRIDGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pera

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The experimental campaign represents an example of how the careful design of the different test phases and the choice of the needed instrumentation are fundamental aspects to obtain a proper interpretation of the results, for future application on the real structures. Additionally, the present work represents a successful example of a combined monitoring system, integrating the traditional and innovative technical instrumentation for loading tests and geomatics survey techniques. The monitoring system has been designed with the aim of defining the load carrying capacity of a masonry arch bridge scaled model and to test the performances of a new retrofitting method. In particular, two different configuration have been considered: a first one with isolated arch and a second one with gravel fill on the arch.

  19. On the accuracy and reproducibility of a novel probabilistic atlas-based generation for calculation of head attenuation maps on integrated PET/MR scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kevin T; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Poynton, Clare B; Chonde, Daniel B; Catana, Ciprian

    2017-03-01

    To propose an MR-based method for generating continuous-valued head attenuation maps and to assess its accuracy and reproducibility. Demonstrating that novel MR-based photon attenuation correction methods are both accurate and reproducible is essential prior to using them routinely in research and clinical studies on integrated PET/MR scanners. Continuous-valued linear attenuation coefficient maps ("μ-maps") were generated by combining atlases that provided the prior probability of voxel positions belonging to a certain tissue class (air, soft tissue, or bone) and an MR intensity-based likelihood classifier to produce posterior probability maps of tissue classes. These probabilities were used as weights to generate the μ-maps. The accuracy of this probabilistic atlas-based continuous-valued μ-map ("PAC-map") generation method was assessed by calculating the voxel-wise absolute relative change (RC) between the MR-based and scaled CT-based attenuation-corrected PET images. To assess reproducibility, we performed pair-wise comparisons of the RC values obtained from the PET images reconstructed using the μ-maps generated from the data acquired at three time points. The proposed method produced continuous-valued μ-maps that qualitatively reflected the variable anatomy in patients with brain tumor and agreed well with the scaled CT-based μ-maps. The absolute RC comparing the resulting PET volumes was 1.76 ± 2.33 %, quantitatively demonstrating that the method is accurate. Additionally, we also showed that the method is highly reproducible, the mean RC value for the PET images reconstructed using the μ-maps obtained at the three visits being 0.65 ± 0.95 %. Accurate and highly reproducible continuous-valued head μ-maps can be generated from MR data using a probabilistic atlas-based approach.

  20. On the accuracy and reproducibility of a novel probabilistic atlas-based generation for calculation of head attenuation maps on integrated PET/MR scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Kevin T. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Charlestown, MA (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Catana, Ciprian [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Charlestown, MA (United States); Poynton, Clare B. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Charlestown, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Boston, MA (United States); University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Chonde, Daniel B. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Charlestown, MA (United States); Harvard University, Program in Biophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2017-03-15

    To propose an MR-based method for generating continuous-valued head attenuation maps and to assess its accuracy and reproducibility. Demonstrating that novel MR-based photon attenuation correction methods are both accurate and reproducible is essential prior to using them routinely in research and clinical studies on integrated PET/MR scanners. Continuous-valued linear attenuation coefficient maps (''μ-maps'') were generated by combining atlases that provided the prior probability of voxel positions belonging to a certain tissue class (air, soft tissue, or bone) and an MR intensity-based likelihood classifier to produce posterior probability maps of tissue classes. These probabilities were used as weights to generate the μ-maps. The accuracy of this probabilistic atlas-based continuous-valued μ-map (''PAC-map'') generation method was assessed by calculating the voxel-wise absolute relative change (RC) between the MR-based and scaled CT-based attenuation-corrected PET images. To assess reproducibility, we performed pair-wise comparisons of the RC values obtained from the PET images reconstructed using the μ-maps generated from the data acquired at three time points. The proposed method produced continuous-valued μ-maps that qualitatively reflected the variable anatomy in patients with brain tumor and agreed well with the scaled CT-based μ-maps. The absolute RC comparing the resulting PET volumes was 1.76 ± 2.33 %, quantitatively demonstrating that the method is accurate. Additionally, we also showed that the method is highly reproducible, the mean RC value for the PET images reconstructed using the μ-maps obtained at the three visits being 0.65 ± 0.95 %. Accurate and highly reproducible continuous-valued head μ-maps can be generated from MR data using a probabilistic atlas-based approach. (orig.)

  1. Twisting wire scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharibyan, V.; Delfs, A.; Koruptchenkov, I.; Noelle, D.; Tiessen, H.; Werner, M.; Wittenburg, K.

    2012-11-15

    A new type of 'two-in-one' wire scanner is proposed. Recent advances in linear motors' technology make it possible to combine translational and rotational movements. This will allow to scan the beam in two perpendicular directions using a single driving motor and a special fork attached to it. Vertical or horizontal mounting will help to escape problems associated with the 45 deg scanners. Test results of the translational part with linear motors is presented.

  2. Twisting wire scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharibyan, V.; Delfs, A.; Koruptchenkov, I.; Noelle, D.; Tiessen, H.; Werner, M.; Wittenburg, K.

    2012-11-01

    A new type of 'two-in-one' wire scanner is proposed. Recent advances in linear motors' technology make it possible to combine translational and rotational movements. This will allow to scan the beam in two perpendicular directions using a single driving motor and a special fork attached to it. Vertical or horizontal mounting will help to escape problems associated with the 45 deg scanners. Test results of the translational part with linear motors is presented.

  3. Design and Characterization of a Gradient-Transparent RF Copper Shield for PET Detector Modules in Hybrid MR-PET Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berneking, Arne; Trinchero, Riccardo; Ha, YongHyun; Finster, Felix; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Lerche, Christoph; Shah, Nadim Jon

    2017-05-01

    This paper focuses on the design and the characterization of a frequency-selective shield for positron emission tomography (PET) detector modules of hybrid magnetic resonance-PET scanners, where the shielding of the PET cassettes is located close to the observed object. The proposed shielding configuration is designed and optimized to guarantee a high shielding effectiveness (SE) of up to 60 dB for B1-fields at the Larmor frequency of 64 MHz, thus preventing interactions between the radio-frequency (RF) coil and PET electronics. On the other hand, the shield is transparent to the gradient fields with the consequence that eddy-current artifacts in the acquired EPI images are significantly reduced with respect to the standard solid-shield configuration. The frequency-selective behavior of the shield is characterized and validated via simulation studies with CST MICROWAVE STUDIO in the megahertz and kilohertz range. Bench measurements with an RF coil built in-house demonstrated the high SE at the Larmor frequency. Moreover, measurements on a 4-T human scanner confirmed the abolishment of eddy current artifact and also provided an understanding of where the eddy currents occur with respect to the sequence parameters. Simulations and measurements for the proposed shielding concept were compared with a solid copper shielding configuration.

  4. NMR-CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kose, Katsumi; Sato, Kozo; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Sato, Masataka.

    1983-01-01

    A brief explanation is made on the imaging methods for a practical diagnostic NMR-CT scanner : A whole-body NMR-CT scanner utilizing a resistive magnet has been developed by Toshiba in cooperation with the Institute for Solid State Physics, the University of Tokyo. Typical NMR-CT images of volunteers and patients obtained in the clinical experiments using this device are presented. Detailed specifications are also shown about the practical NMR-CTs which are to be put on the market after obtaining the government approval. (author)

  5. Ionization beam scanner

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1973-01-01

    Inner structure of an ionization beam scanner, a rather intricate piece of apparatus which permits one to measure the density distribution of the proton beam passing through it. On the outside of the tank wall there is the coil for the longitudinal magnetic field, on the inside, one can see the arrangement of electrodes creating a highly homogeneous transverse electric field.

  6. Scanner calibration revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pozhitkov Alexander E

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calibration of a microarray scanner is critical for accurate interpretation of microarray results. Shi et al. (BMC Bioinformatics, 2005, 6, Art. No. S11 Suppl. 2. reported usage of a Full Moon BioSystems slide for calibration. Inspired by the Shi et al. work, we have calibrated microarray scanners in our previous research. We were puzzled however, that most of the signal intensities from a biological sample fell below the sensitivity threshold level determined by the calibration slide. This conundrum led us to re-investigate the quality of calibration provided by the Full Moon BioSystems slide as well as the accuracy of the analysis performed by Shi et al. Methods Signal intensities were recorded on three different microarray scanners at various photomultiplier gain levels using the same calibration slide from Full Moon BioSystems. Data analysis was conducted on raw signal intensities without normalization or transformation of any kind. Weighted least-squares method was used to fit the data. Results We found that initial analysis performed by Shi et al. did not take into account autofluorescence of the Full Moon BioSystems slide, which led to a grossly distorted microarray scanner response. Our analysis revealed that a power-law function, which is explicitly accounting for the slide autofluorescence, perfectly described a relationship between signal intensities and fluorophore quantities. Conclusions Microarray scanners respond in a much less distorted fashion than was reported by Shi et al. Full Moon BioSystems calibration slides are inadequate for performing calibration. We recommend against using these slides.

  7. Whole body line scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berninger, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    A bar-shaped scintillator converts incident collimated gamma rays to light pulses which are detected by a row of photoelectric tubes positioned along the output face of the scintillator wherein each tube has a convexly curved photocathode disposed in close proximity to the scintillator. Electronic circuitry connected to the output of phototubes develops the scintillation event x-axis position coordinate electrical signal with good linearity and with substantial independence of the spacing between the scintillator and photocathodes so that the phototubes can be positioned as close to the scintillator as possible to obtain reduced distortion in the field of view and improved spatial resolution. A mechanical drive of the scanner results in an image of the gamma ray source being formed by sequencing the developed scintillation position coordinate signals in the y-axis dimension

  8. Errors in MR-based attenuation correction for brain imaging with PET/MR scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rota Kops, Elena; Herzog, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Attenuation correction of PET data acquired by hybrid MR/PET scanners remains a challenge, even if several methods for brain and whole-body measurements have been developed recently. A template-based attenuation correction for brain imaging proposed by our group is easy to handle and delivers reliable attenuation maps in a short time. However, some potential error sources are analyzed in this study. We investigated the choice of template reference head among all the available data (error A), and possible skull anomalies of the specific patient, such as discontinuities due to surgery (error B). Materials and methods: An anatomical MR measurement and a 2-bed-position transmission scan covering the whole head and neck region were performed in eight normal subjects (4 females, 4 males). Error A: Taking alternatively one of the eight heads as reference, eight different templates were created by nonlinearly registering the images to the reference and calculating the average. Eight patients (4 females, 4 males; 4 with brain lesions, 4 w/o brain lesions) were measured in the Siemens BrainPET/MR scanner. The eight templates were used to generate the patients' attenuation maps required for reconstruction. ROI and VOI atlas-based comparisons were performed employing all the reconstructed images. Error B: CT-based attenuation maps of two volunteers were manipulated by manually inserting several skull lesions and filling a nasal cavity. The corresponding attenuation coefficients were substituted with the water's coefficient (0.096/cm). Results: Error A: The mean SUVs over the eight templates pairs for all eight patients and all VOIs did not differ significantly one from each other. Standard deviations up to 1.24% were found. Error B: After reconstruction of the volunteers' BrainPET data with the CT-based attenuation maps without and with skull anomalies, a VOI-atlas analysis was performed revealing very little influence of the skull lesions (less than 3%), while the filled

  9. Errors in MR-based attenuation correction for brain imaging with PET/MR scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rota Kops, Elena; Herzog, Hans

    2013-02-01

    AimAttenuation correction of PET data acquired by hybrid MR/PET scanners remains a challenge, even if several methods for brain and whole-body measurements have been developed recently. A template-based attenuation correction for brain imaging proposed by our group is easy to handle and delivers reliable attenuation maps in a short time. However, some potential error sources are analyzed in this study. We investigated the choice of template reference head among all the available data (error A), and possible skull anomalies of the specific patient, such as discontinuities due to surgery (error B). Materials and methodsAn anatomical MR measurement and a 2-bed-position transmission scan covering the whole head and neck region were performed in eight normal subjects (4 females, 4 males). Error A: Taking alternatively one of the eight heads as reference, eight different templates were created by nonlinearly registering the images to the reference and calculating the average. Eight patients (4 females, 4 males; 4 with brain lesions, 4 w/o brain lesions) were measured in the Siemens BrainPET/MR scanner. The eight templates were used to generate the patients' attenuation maps required for reconstruction. ROI and VOI atlas-based comparisons were performed employing all the reconstructed images. Error B: CT-based attenuation maps of two volunteers were manipulated by manually inserting several skull lesions and filling a nasal cavity. The corresponding attenuation coefficients were substituted with the water's coefficient (0.096/cm). ResultsError A: The mean SUVs over the eight templates pairs for all eight patients and all VOIs did not differ significantly one from each other. Standard deviations up to 1.24% were found. Error B: After reconstruction of the volunteers' BrainPET data with the CT-based attenuation maps without and with skull anomalies, a VOI-atlas analysis was performed revealing very little influence of the skull lesions (less than 3%), while the filled nasal

  10. Coastal Zone Color Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B.

    1988-01-01

    The Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) spacecraft ocean color instrument is capable of measuring and mapping global ocean surface chlorophyll concentration. It is a scanning radiometer with multiband capability. With new electronics and some mechanical, and optical re-work, it probably can be made flight worthy. Some additional components of a second flight model are also available. An engineering study and further tests are necessary to determine exactly what effort is required to properly prepare the instrument for spaceflight and the nature of interfaces to prospective spacecraft. The CZCS provides operational instrument capability for monitoring of ocean productivity and currents. It could be a simple, low cost alternative to developing new instruments for ocean color imaging. Researchers have determined that with global ocean color data they can: specify quantitatively the role of oceans in the global carbon cycle and other major biogeochemical cycles; determine the magnitude and variability of annual primary production by marine phytoplankton on a global scale; understand the fate of fluvial nutrients and their possible affect on carbon budgets; elucidate the coupling mechanism between upwelling and large scale patterns in ocean basins; answer questions concerning the large scale distribution and timing of spring blooms in the global ocean; acquire a better understanding of the processes associated with mixing along the edge of eddies, coastal currents, western boundary currents, etc., and acquire global data on marine optical properties.

  11. Radiographic scanner apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wake, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    The preferred embodiment of this invention includes a hardware system, or processing means, which operates faster than software. Moreover the computer needed is less expensive and smaller. Radiographic scanner apparatus is described for measuring the intensity of radiation after passage through a planar region and for reconstructing a representation of the attenuation of radiation by the medium. There is a source which can be rotated, and detectors, the output from which forms a data line. The detectors are disposed opposite the planar region from the source to produce a succession of data lines corresponding to the succession of angular orientations of the source. There is a convolver means for convolving each of these data lines, with a filter function, and a means of processing the convolved data lines to create the representation of the radiation attenuation in the planar region. There is also apparatus to generate a succession of data lines indicating radiation attenuation along a determinable path with convolver means. (U.K.)

  12. The cobalt-60 container scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jigang, A.; Liye, Z.; Yisi, L.; Haifeng, W.; Zhifang, W.; Liqiang, W.; Yuanshi, Z.; Xincheng, X.; Furong, L.; Baozeng, G.; Chunfa, S.

    1997-01-01

    The Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) has successfully designed and constructed a container (cargo) scanner, which uses cobalt-60 of 100-300 Ci as radiation source. The following performances of the Cobalt-60 container scanner have been achieved at INET: a) IQI (Image Quality Indicator) - 2.5% behind 100 mm of steel; b) CI (Contrast Indicator) - 0.7% behind 100 mm of steel; c) SP (Steel Penetration) - 240 mm of steel; d) Maximum Dose per Scanning - 0.02mGy; e) Throughput - twenty 40-foot containers per hour. These performances are equal or similar to those of the accelerator scanners. Besides these nice enough inspection properties, the Cobalt-60 scanner possesses many other special features which are better than accelerator scanners: a) cheap price - it will be only or two tenths of the accelerator scanner's; b) low radiation intensity - the radiation protection problem is much easier to solve and a lot of money can be saved on the radiation shielding building; c) much smaller area for installation and operation; d) simple operation and convenient maintenance; e) high reliability and stability. The Cobalt-60 container (or cargo) scanner is satisfied for boundary customs, seaports, airports and railway stations etc. Because of the nice special features said above, it is more suitable to be applied widely. Its high properties and low price will make it have much better application prospects

  13. Side scanner for supermarkets: a new scanner design standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Charles K.; Cheng, J. K.

    1996-09-01

    High speed UPC bar code has become a standard mode of data capture for supermarkets in the US, Europe, and Japan. The influence of the ergonomics community on the design of the scanner is evident. During the past decade the ergonomic issues of cashier in check-outs has led to occupational hand-wrist cumulative trauma disorders, in most cases causing carpal tunnel syndrome, a permanent hand injury. In this paper, the design of a side scanner to resolve the issues is discussed. The complex optical module and the sensor for aforesaid side scanner is described. The ergonomic advantages offer the old counter mounted vertical scanner has been experimentally proved by the industrial funded study at an independent university.

  14. Feasible Dose Reduction in Routine Chest Computed Tomography Maintaining Constant Image Quality Using the Last Three Scanner Generations: From Filtered Back Projection to Sinogram-affirmed Iterative Reconstruction and Impact of the Novel Fully Integrated Detector Design Minimizing Electronic Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Ebner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The aim of the present study was to evaluate a dose reduction in contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography (CT by comparing the three latest generations of Siemens CT scanners used in clinical practice. We analyzed the amount of radiation used with filtered back projection (FBP and an iterative reconstruction (IR algorithm to yield the same image quality. Furthermore, the influence on the radiation dose of the most recent integrated circuit detector (ICD; Stellar detector, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany was investigated. Materials and Methods: 136 Patients were included. Scan parameters were set to a thorax routine: SOMATOM Sensation 64 (FBP, SOMATOM Definition Flash (IR, and SOMATOM Definition Edge (ICD and IR. Tube current was set constantly to the reference level of 100 mA automated tube current modulation using reference milliamperes. Care kV was used on the Flash and Edge scanner, while tube potential was individually selected between 100 and 140 kVp by the medical technologists at the SOMATOM Sensation. Quality assessment was performed on soft-tissue kernel reconstruction. Dose was represented by the dose length product. Results: Dose-length product (DLP with FBP for the average chest CT was 308 mGycm ± 99.6. In contrast, the DLP for the chest CT with IR algorithm was 196.8 mGycm ± 68.8 (P = 0.0001. Further decline in dose can be noted with IR and the ICD: DLP: 166.4 mGycm ± 54.5 (P = 0.033. The dose reduction compared to FBP was 36.1% with IR and 45.6% with IR/ICD. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR was favorable in the aorta, bone, and soft tissue for IR/ICD in combination compared to FBP (the P values ranged from 0.003 to 0.048. Overall contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR improved with declining DLP. Conclusion: The most recent technical developments, namely IR in combination with integrated circuit detectors, can significantly lower radiation dose in chest CT examinations.

  15. Nogle muligheder i scanner data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Hans Jørn

    2000-01-01

    I artiklen gives en diskussion af en række af de muligheder for effektivisering af marketingaktiviteter, der er til stede for såvel mærkevareudbyder som detaillist, ved udnyttelse af information fra scanner data......I artiklen gives en diskussion af en række af de muligheder for effektivisering af marketingaktiviteter, der er til stede for såvel mærkevareudbyder som detaillist, ved udnyttelse af information fra scanner data...

  16. Data Integration Acquired from Micro-Uav and Terrestrial Laser Scanner for the 3d Mapping of Jesuit Ruins of São Miguel das Missões

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, M. L. L.; da Rocha, R. S.; Ferraz, R. S.; Cruz, V. C.; Morador, L. Q.; Yamawaki, M. K.; Rodrigues, E. L. S.; Cole, J. O.; Mezzomo, W.

    2016-06-01

    The Jesuit Missions the Guaranis were one of the great examples of cultural, social, and scientific of the eighteenth century, which had its decline from successive wars that followed the exchange of territories domain occupied by Portugal and Spain with the Madrid Treaty of January 13, 1750. One of the great examples of this development is materialized in the ruins of 30 churches and villages that remain in a territory that now comprises part of Brazil, Argentina and Paraguay. These Churches, São Miguel das Missões is among the Brazilian ruins, the best preserved. The ruins of São Miguel das Missões were declared a UNESCO World Cultural Heritage in 1983 and the Institute of National Historical Heritage (IPHAN) is the Brazilian Federal agency that manages and maintains this heritage. In order to produce a geographic database to assist the IPHAN in the management of the Ruins of São Miguel das Missões it was proposed a three-dimensional mapping of these ruins never performed in this location before. The proposal is integrated data acquired from multiple sensors: two micro-UAV, an Asctec Falcon 8 (rotary wing) and a Sensefly e-Bee (fixed wing); photos from terrestrial cameras; two terrestrial LIDAR sensors, one Faro Focus 3D S-120 and Optec 3D-HD ILRIS. With this abundance of sensors has been possible to perform comparisons and integration of the acquired data, and produce a 3D reconstruction of the church with high completeness and accuracy (better than 25 mm), as can be seen in the presentation of this work.

  17. Performance of an improved first generation optical CT scanner for 3D dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, Xin; Wuu, Cheng-Shie; Adamovics, John

    2013-01-01

    Performance analysis of a modified 3D dosimetry optical scanner based on the first generation optical CT scanner OCTOPUS is presented. The system consists of PRESAGE™ dosimeters, the modified 3D scanner, and a new developed in-house user control panel written in Labview program which provides more flexibility to optimize mechanical control and data acquisition technique. The total scanning time has been significantly reduced from initial 8 h to ∼2 h by using the modified scanner. The functional performance of the modified scanner has been evaluated in terms of the mechanical integrity uncertainty of the data acquisition process. Optical density distribution comparison between the modified scanner, OCTOPUS and the treatment plan system has been studied. It has been demonstrated that the agreement between the modified scanner and treatment plans is comparable with that between the OCTOPUS and treatment plans. (note)

  18. A near-infrared confocal scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seungwoo; Yoo, Hongki

    2014-01-01

    In the semiconductor industry, manufacturing of three-dimensional (3D) packages or 3D integrated circuits is a high-performance technique that requires combining several functions in a small volume. Through-silicon vias, which are vertical electrical connections extending through a wafer, can be used to direct signals between stacked chips, thus increasing areal density by stacking and connecting multiple patterned chips. While defect detection is essential in the semiconductor manufacturing process, it is difficult to identify defects within a wafer or to monitor the bonding results between bonded surfaces because silicon and many other semiconductor materials are opaque to visible wavelengths. In this context, near-infrared (NIR) imaging is a promising non-destructive method to detect defects within silicon chips, to inspect bonding between chips and to monitor the chip alignment since NIR transmits through silicon. In addition, a confocal scanner provides high-contrast, optically-sectioned images of the specimen due to its ability to reject out-of-focus noise. In this study, we report an NIR confocal scanner that rapidly acquires high-resolution images with a large field of view through silicon. Two orthogonal line-scanning images can be acquired without rotating the system or the specimen by utilizing two orthogonally configured resonant scanning mirrors. This NIR confocal scanner can be efficiently used as an in-line inspection system when manufacturing semiconductor devices by rapidly detecting defects on and beneath the surface. (paper)

  19. Probabilistic atlas-based segmentation of combined T1-weighted and DUTE MRI for calculation of head attenuation maps in integrated PET/MRI scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poynton, Clare B; Chen, Kevin T; Chonde, Daniel B; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Gollub, Randy L; Gerstner, Elizabeth R; Batchelor, Tracy T; Catana, Ciprian

    2014-01-01

    We present a new MRI-based attenuation correction (AC) approach for integrated PET/MRI systems that combines both segmentation- and atlas-based methods by incorporating dual-echo ultra-short echo-time (DUTE) and T1-weighted (T1w) MRI data and a probabilistic atlas. Segmented atlases were constructed from CT training data using a leave-one-out framework and combined with T1w, DUTE, and CT data to train a classifier that computes the probability of air/soft tissue/bone at each voxel. This classifier was applied to segment the MRI of the subject of interest and attenuation maps (μ-maps) were generated by assigning specific linear attenuation coefficients (LACs) to each tissue class. The μ-maps generated with this "Atlas-T1w-DUTE" approach were compared to those obtained from DUTE data using a previously proposed method. For validation of the segmentation results, segmented CT μ-maps were considered to the "silver standard"; the segmentation accuracy was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively through calculation of the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Relative change (RC) maps between the CT and MRI-based attenuation corrected PET volumes were also calculated for a global voxel-wise assessment of the reconstruction results. The μ-maps obtained using the Atlas-T1w-DUTE classifier agreed well with those derived from CT; the mean DSCs for the Atlas-T1w-DUTE-based μ-maps across all subjects were higher than those for DUTE-based μ-maps; the atlas-based μ-maps also showed a lower percentage of misclassified voxels across all subjects. RC maps from the atlas-based technique also demonstrated improvement in the PET data compared to the DUTE method, both globally as well as regionally.

  20. Wire Scanner Motion Control Card

    CERN Document Server

    Forde, S E

    2006-01-01

    Scientists require a certain beam quality produced by the accelerator rings at CERN. The discovery potential of LHC is given by the reachable luminosity at its interaction points. The luminosity is maximized by minimizing the beam size. Therefore an accurate beam size measurement is required for optimizing the luminosity. The wire scanner performs very accurate profile measurements, but as it can not be used at full intensity in the LHC ring, it is used for calibrating other profile monitors. As the current wire scanner system, which is used in the present CERN accelerators, has not been made for the required specification of the LHC, a new design of a wire scanner motion control card is part of the LHC wire scanner project. The main functions of this card are to control the wire scanner motion and to acquire the position of the wire. In case of further upgrades at a later stage, it is required to allow an easy update of the firmware, hence the programmable features of FPGAs will be used for this purpose. The...

  1. Radiographic scanners and shutter mechanisms in CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braden, A.B.; Kuwik, J.J.; Taylor, S.K.; Covic, J.

    1981-01-01

    This patent claim relates especially to the design of a shutter mechanism in a CT scanner having a rotatable source of radiation and a series of stationary radiation detectors coplanar with the path of the source and spaced about the axis of rotation of the source, and only partially encircling the path of the source. (U.K.)

  2. Phosphor Scanner For Imaging X-Ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Hecht, Diana L.; Witherow, William K.

    1992-01-01

    Improved optoelectronic scanning apparatus generates digitized image of x-ray image recorded in phosphor. Scanning fiber-optic probe supplies laser light stimulating luminescence in areas of phosphor exposed to x rays. Luminescence passes through probe and fiber to integrating sphere and photomultiplier. Sensitivity and resolution exceed previously available scanners. Intended for use in x-ray crystallography, medical radiography, and molecular biology.

  3. Compensation strategies for PET scanners with unconventional scanner geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gundlich, B; Oehler, M

    2006-01-01

    The small animal PET scanner ClearPET®Neuro, developed at the Forschungszentrum Julich GmbH in cooperation with the Crystal Clear Collaboration (CERN), represents scanners with an unconventional geometry: due to axial and transaxial detector gaps ClearPet®Neuro delivers inhomogeneous sinograms with missing data. When filtered backprojection (FBP) or Fourier rebinning (FORE) are applied, strong geometrical artifacts appear in the images. In this contribution we present a method that takes the geometrical sensitivity into account and converts the measured sinograms into homogeneous and complete data. By this means artifactfree images are achieved using FBP or FORE. Besides an advantageous measurement setup that reduces inhomogeneities and data gaps in the sinograms, a modification of the measured sinograms is necessary. This modification includes two steps: a geometrical normalization and corrections for missing data. To normalize the measured sinograms, computed sinograms are used that describe the geometric...

  4. Dental impressions using 3D digital scanners: virtual becomes reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Nathan S; Aaronson, Heidi B

    2008-10-01

    The technologies that have made the use of three-dimensional (3D) digital scanners an integral part of many industries for decades have been improved and refined for application to dentistry. Since the introduction of the first dental impressioning digital scanner in the 1980s, development engineers at a number of companies have enhanced the technologies and created in-office scanners that are increasingly user-friendly and able to produce precisely fitting dental restorations. These systems are capable of capturing 3D virtual images of tooth preparations, from which restorations may be fabricated directly (ie, CAD/CAM systems) or fabricated indirectly (ie, dedicated impression scanning systems for the creation of accurate master models). The use of these products is increasing rapidly around the world and presents a paradigm shift in the way in which dental impressions are made. Several of the leading 3D dental digital scanning systems are presented and discussed in this article.

  5. Monte Carlo dose calibration in CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Poonam; Ramasubramanian, V.; Subbaiah, K.V.; Thayalan, K.

    2008-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) scanner is a high radiation imaging modality compared to radiography. The dose from a CT examination can vary greatly depending on the particular CT scanner used, the area of the body examined, and the operating parameters of the scan. CT is a major contributor to collective effective dose in diagnostic radiology. Apart from the clinical benefits, the widespread use of multislice scanner is increasing radiation level to patient in comparison with conventional CT scanner. So, it becomes necessary to increase awareness about the CT scanner. (author)

  6. Geometric calibration between PET scanner and structured light scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Hans Martin; Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2011-01-01

    Head movements degrade the image quality of high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) brain studies through blurring and artifacts. Manny image reconstruction methods allows for motion correction if the head position is tracked continuously during the study. Our method for motion tracking...... is a structured light scanner placed just above the patient tunnel on the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT, Siemens). It continuously registers point clouds of a part of the patient's face. The relative motion is estimated as the rigid transformation between frames. A geometric calibration between...

  7. Complete-arch accuracy of intraoral scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treesh, Joshua C; Liacouras, Peter C; Taft, Robert M; Brooks, Daniel I; Raiciulescu, Sorana; Ellert, Daniel O; Grant, Gerald T; Ye, Ling

    2018-04-30

    Intraoral scanners have shown varied results in complete-arch applications. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the complete-arch accuracy of 4 intraoral scanners based on trueness and precision measurements compared with a known reference (trueness) and with each other (precision). Four intraoral scanners were evaluated: CEREC Bluecam, CEREC Omnicam, TRIOS Color, and Carestream CS 3500. A complete-arch reference cast was created and printed using a 3-dimensional dental cast printer with photopolymer resin. The reference cast was digitized using a laboratory-based white light 3-dimensional scanner. The printed reference cast was scanned 10 times with each intraoral scanner. The digital standard tessellation language (STL) files from each scanner were then registered to the reference file and compared with differences in trueness and precision using a 3-dimensional modeling software. Additionally, scanning time was recorded for each scan performed. The Wilcoxon signed rank, Kruskal-Wallis, and Dunn tests were used to detect differences for trueness, precision, and scanning time (α=.05). Carestream CS 3500 had the lowest overall trueness and precision compared with Bluecam and TRIOS Color. The fourth scanner, Omnicam, had intermediate trueness and precision. All of the scanners tended to underestimate the size of the reference file, with exception of the Carestream CS 3500, which was more variable. Based on visual inspection of the color rendering of signed differences, the greatest amount of error tended to be in the posterior aspects of the arch, with local errors exceeding 100 μm for all scans. The single capture scanner Carestream CS 3500 had the overall longest scan times and was significantly slower than the continuous capture scanners TRIOS Color and Omnicam. Significant differences in both trueness and precision were found among the scanners. Scan times of the continuous capture scanners were faster than the single capture scanners

  8. Coastal Zone Color Scanner studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrod, J.

    1988-01-01

    Activities over the past year have included cooperative work with a summer faculty fellow using the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) imagery to study the effects of gradients in trophic resources on coral reefs in the Caribbean. Other research included characterization of ocean radiances specific to an acid-waste plume. Other activities include involvement in the quality control of imagery produced in the processing of the global CZCS data set, the collection of various other data global sets, and the subsequent data comparison and analysis.

  9. Gamma scanner conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swinth, K.L.

    1979-11-01

    The Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) will include several stations for the nondestructive examination of irradiated fuels. One of these stations will be the gamma scanner which will be employed to detect gamma radiation from the irradiated fuel pins. The conceptual design of the gamma scan station is described. The gamma scanner will use a Standard Exam Stage (SES) as a positioner and transport mechanism for the fuel pins which it will obtain from a magazine. A pin guide mechanism mounted on the face of the collimator will assure that the fuel pins remain in front of the collimator during scanning. The collimator has remotely adjustable tungsten slits and can be manually rotated to align the slit at various angles. A shielded detector cart located in the operating corridor holds an intrinsic germanium detector and associated sodium-iodide anticoincidence detector. The electronics associated with the counting system consist of standard NIM modules to process the detector signals and a stand-alone multichannel analyzer (MCA) for counting data accumulation. Data from the MCA are bussed to the station computer for analysis and storage on magnetic tape. The station computer controls the collimator, the MCA, a source positioner and the SES through CAMAC-based interface hardware. Most of the electronic hardware is commercially available but some interfaces will require development. Conceptual drawings are included for mechanical hardware that must be designed and fabricated

  10. In vivo cellular imaging with microscopes enabled by MEMS scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ra, Hyejun

    High-resolution optical imaging plays an important role in medical diagnosis and biomedical research. Confocal microscopy is a widely used imaging method for obtaining cellular and sub-cellular images of biological tissue in reflectance and fluorescence modes. Its characteristic optical sectioning capability also enables three-dimensional (3-D) image reconstruction. However, its use has mostly been limited to excised tissues due to the requirement of high numerical aperture (NA) lenses for cellular resolution. Microscope miniaturization can enable in vivo imaging to make possible early cancer diagnosis and biological studies in the innate environment. In this dissertation, microscope miniaturization for in vivo cellular imaging is presented. The dual-axes confocal (DAC) architecture overcomes limitations of the conventional single-axis confocal (SAC) architecture to allow for miniaturization with high resolution. A microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanner is the central imaging component that is key in miniaturization of the DAC architecture. The design, fabrication, and characterization of the two-dimensional (2-D) MEMS scanner are presented. The gimbaled MEMS scanner is fabricated on a double silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer and is actuated by self-aligned vertical electrostatic combdrives. The imaging performance of the MEMS scanner in a DAC configuration is shown in a breadboard microscope setup, where reflectance and fluorescence imaging is demonstrated. Then, the MEMS scanner is integrated into a miniature DAC microscope. The whole imaging system is integrated into a portable unit for research in small animal models of human biology and disease. In vivo 3-D imaging is demonstrated on mouse skin models showing gene transfer and siRNA silencing. The siRNA silencing process is sequentially imaged in one mouse over time.

  11. Experience with a fuel rod enrichment scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubik, R.N.; Pettus, W.G.

    1975-01-01

    This enrichment scanner views all fuel rods produced at B and W's Commercial Nuclear Fuel Plant. The scanner design is derived from the PAPAS System reported by R. A. Forster, H. D. Menlove, and their associates at Los Alamos. The spatial resolution of the system and smoothing of the data are discussed in detail. The cost-effectiveness of multi-detector versus single detector scanners of this general design is also discussed

  12. Long-Range WindScanner System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasiljevic, Nikola; Lea, Guillaume; Courtney, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The technical aspects of a multi-Doppler LiDAR instrument, the long-range WindScanner system, are presented accompanied by an overview of the results from several field campaigns. The long-range WindScanner system consists of three spatially-separated, scanning coherent Doppler LiDARs and a remote......-rangeWindScanner system measures the wind field by emitting and directing three laser beams to intersect, and then scanning the beam intersection over a region of interest. The long-range WindScanner system was developed to tackle the need for high-quality observations of wind fields on scales of modern wind turbine...

  13. Robotic Prostate Biopsy in Closed MRI Scanner

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fischer, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    .... This work enables prostate brachytherapy and biopsy procedures in standard high-field diagnostic MRI scanners through the development of a robotic needle placement device specifically designed...

  14. Transmitting Performance Evaluation of ASICs for CMUT-Based Portable Ultrasound Scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llimos Muntal, Pere; Diederichsen, Søren Elmin; Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger

    2017-01-01

    Portable ultrasound scanners (PUS) have, in recent years, raised a lot of attention, as they can potentially overcome some of the limitations of static scanners. However, PUS have a lot of design limitations including size and power consumption. These restrictions can compromise the image quality...... of the scanner. In order to overcome these restrictions, application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) are needed to implement the electronics. In this work, a comparative study of the transmitting performance of a capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) driven by a commercial generic ultrasound...

  15. Multi-parameter CAMAC compatible ADC scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Midttun, G J; Ingebretsen, F [Oslo Univ. (Norway). Fysisk Inst.; Johnsen, P J [Norsk Data A.S., Box 163, Oekern, Oslo 5, Norway

    1979-02-15

    A fast ADC scanner for multi-parameter nuclear physics experiments is described. The scanner is based on a standard CAMAC crate, and data from several different experiments can be handled simultaneously through a direct memory access (DMA) channel. The implementation on a PDP-7 computer is outlined.

  16. 3D whole body scanners revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Haar, F.B. ter

    2013-01-01

    An overview of whole body scanners in 1998 (H.A.M. Daanen, G.J. Van De Water. Whole body scanners, Displays 19 (1998) 111-120) shortly after they emerged to the market revealed that the systems were bulky, slow, expensive and low in resolution. This update shows that new developments in sensing and

  17. Experimental characterization of the Clear-PEM scanner spectrometric performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bugalho, R; Carrico, B; Ferreira, C S; Frade, M; Ferreira, M; Moura, R; Ortigao, C; Pinheiro, J F; Rodrigues, P; Rolo, I; Silva, J C; Trindade, A; Varela, J [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas (LIP), Av. Elias Garcia 14-1, 1000-149 Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: frade@lip.pt

    2009-10-15

    In the framework of the Clear-PEM project for the construction of a high-resolution and high-specificity scanner for breast cancer imaging, a Positron Emission Mammography tomograph has been developed and installed at the Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto hospital. The Clear-PEM scanner is mainly composed by two planar detector heads attached to a robotic arm, trigger/data acquisition electronics system and computing servers. The detector heads hold crystal matrices built from 2 x 2 x 20 mm{sup 3} LYSO:Ce crystals readout by Hamamatsu S8550 APD arrays. The APDs are optically coupled to both ends of the 6144 crystals in order to extract the DOI information for each detected event. Each one of 12288 APD's pixels is read and controlled by Application Specific Integrated Circuits water-cooled by an external cooling unit. The Clear-PEM frontend boards innovative design results in a unprecedented integration of the crystal matrices, APDs and ASICs, making Clear-PEM the PET scanner with the highest number of APD pixels ever integrated so far. In this paper, the scanner's main technical characteristics, calibration strategies and the first spectrometric performance evaluation in a clinical environment are presented. The first commissioning results show 99.7% active channels, which, after calibration, have inter-pixel and absolute gain distributions with dispersions of, respectively, 12.2% and 15.3%, demonstrating that despite the large number of channels, the system is uniform. The mean energy resolution at 511 keV is of 15.9%, with a 8.8% dispersion, and the mean C{sub DOI}{sup -1} is 5.9%/mm, with a 7.8% dispersion. The coincidence time resolution, at 511 keV, for a energy window between 400 and 600 keV, is 5.2 ns FWHM.

  18. Quality assurance of computed tomography scanner beams in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindskoug, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    The number of computed tomography (CT) scanners in diagnostic radiology is increasing, to the extent that they are now found in relatively small hospitals. These hospitals do not have local physicists available and so methods must be developed to allow quality assurance to be carried out at distant laboratories. Several different types of solid water phantoms are available with various built-in test objects that may supply sufficient information about the many parameters that must be checked. The dose distributions, however, are usually not so well considered, although the connection between image quality and absorbed dose must be known for optimal use of a CT scanner. By introducing thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) into a commercial phantom (RMI), it was possible to measure the absorbed dose profile and the line integral of the absorbed dose across the slit. The computer-guided readout of the TLDs gives the absorbed dose, the average dose and half maximum width, absorbed dose curve, and also the line integral of the peak. The only modification of the phantom was five holes, drilled at strategic positions, that did not influence the built-in test objects. This single measurement provides an appropriate monthly quality assurance check of the CT scanner with little extra effort. (author)

  19. A dedicated tool for PET scanner simulations using FLUKA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, P.G.; Boehlen, T.T.; Cerutti, F.; Chin, M.P.W.; Ferrari, A.; Mancini, C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Mairani, A.; Sala, Paola R.

    2013-06-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a well-established medical imaging technique. It is based on the detection of pairs of annihilation gamma rays from a beta+-emitting radionuclide, usually inoculated in the body via a biologically active molecule. Apart from its wide-spread use for clinical diagnosis, new applications are proposed. This includes notably the usage of PET for treatment monitoring of radiation therapy with protons and ions. PET is currently the only available technique for non-invasive monitoring of ion beam dose delivery, which was tested in several clinical pilot studies. For hadrontherapy, the distribution of positron emitters, produced by the ion beam, can be analyzed to verify the correct treatment delivery. The adaptation of previous PET scanners to new environments and the necessity of more precise diagnostics by better image quality triggered the development of new PET scanner designs. The use of Monte Carlo (MC) codes is essential in the early stages of the scanner design to simulate the transport of particles and nuclear interactions from therapeutic ion beams or radioisotopes and to predict radiation fields in tissues and radiation emerging from the patient. In particular, range verification using PET is based on the comparison of detected and simulated activity distributions. The accuracy of the MC code for the relevant physics processes is obviously essential for such applications. In this work we present new developments of the physics models with importance for PET monitoring and integrated tools for PET scanner simulations for FLUKA, a fully-integrated MC particle-transport code, which is widely used for an extended range of applications (accelerator shielding, detector and target design, calorimetry, activation, dosimetry, medical physics, radiobiology, ...). The developed tools include a PET scanner geometry builder and a dedicated scoring routine for coincident event determination. The geometry builder allows the efficient

  20. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements: LANSCE Facility Beam Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilpatrick, John D.; Batygin, Yuri K.; Gonzales, Fermin; Gruchalla, Michael E.; Kutac, Vincent G.; Martinez, Derwin; Sedillo, James Daniel; Pillai, Chandra; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio; Smith, Brian G.

    2012-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing Wire Scanner (WS) beam profile measurement systems. Three beam development tests have taken place to test the new wire scanners under beam conditions. These beam development tests have integrated the WS actuator, cable plant, electronics processors and associated software and have used H - beams of different beam energy and current conditions. In addition, the WS measurement-system beam tests verified actuator control systems for minimum profile bin repeatability and speed, checked for actuator backlash and positional stability, tested the replacement of simple broadband potentiometers with narrow band resolvers, and tested resolver use with National Instruments Compact Reconfigurable Input and Output (cRIO) Virtual Instrumentation. These beam tests also have verified how trans-impedance amplifiers react with various types of beam line background noise and how noise currents were not generated. This paper will describe these beam development tests and show some resulting data.

  1. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements: LANSCE Facility Beam Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilpatrick, John D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batygin, Yuri K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gonzales, Fermin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gruchalla, Michael E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kutac, Vincent G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Derwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pillai, Chandra [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Brian G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-15

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing Wire Scanner (WS) beam profile measurement systems. Three beam development tests have taken place to test the new wire scanners under beam conditions. These beam development tests have integrated the WS actuator, cable plant, electronics processors and associated software and have used H{sup -} beams of different beam energy and current conditions. In addition, the WS measurement-system beam tests verified actuator control systems for minimum profile bin repeatability and speed, checked for actuator backlash and positional stability, tested the replacement of simple broadband potentiometers with narrow band resolvers, and tested resolver use with National Instruments Compact Reconfigurable Input and Output (cRIO) Virtual Instrumentation. These beam tests also have verified how trans-impedance amplifiers react with various types of beam line background noise and how noise currents were not generated. This paper will describe these beam development tests and show some resulting data.

  2. Three-dimensional rectilinear scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neill, W.J.; Strange, D.R.; Miller, A.

    1976-01-01

    A rectilinear scanner for detecting radiation in a plurality of channels utilizing a collimator is described. Each of the channels receives information from a different portion of the collimator. Information separately received is separately messaged and later collated to present a common image. The information is processed by apparatus in a data processing system. This system has means for messaging analog signals corresponding to gamma radiation counts and converting such analog signals to digital signals. This system has means interfacing the digital signals into an address register that communicates directly via data busses to core memory of a central processing unit by cycle stealing and deriving clinically significant information by computation on the resultant digital data. This system has means for storing, retrieving, and displaying the resultant digital data and the resultant derivations therefrom collectively. This is done in such a manner as to allow time sequencing of the aforementioned operations such that the aforementioned operations can be interleaved on a real time basis. 13 claims, 44 figures

  3. Whole-body 35-GHz security scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Roger; Anderton, Rupert N.; Price, Sean; Sinclair, Gordon N.; Coward, Peter R.

    2004-08-01

    A 35GHz imager designed for Security Scanning has been previously demonstrated. That imager was based on a folded conical scan technology and was constructed from low cost materials such as expanded polystyrene and printed circuit board. In conjunction with an illumination chamber it was used to collect indoor imagery of people with weapons and contraband hidden under their clothing. That imager had a spot size of 20mm and covered a field of view of 20 x 10 degrees that partially covered the body of an adult from knees to shoulders. A new variant of this imager has been designed and constructed. It has a field of view of 36 x 18 degrees and is capable of covering the whole body of an adult. This was achieved by increasing the number of direct detection receivers from the 32 used in the previous design to 58, and by implementing an improved optical design. The optics consist of a front grid, a polarisation device which converts linear to circular polarisation and a rotating scanner. This new design uses high-density expanded polystyrene as a correcting element on the back of the front grid. This gives an added degree of freedom that allows the optical design to be diffraction limited over a very wide field of view. Obscuration by the receivers and associated components is minimised by integrating the post detection electronics at the receiver array.

  4. Product development of Indian cargo scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    A cargo scanner is required for nonintrusive screening of suspected cargo containers in trade, using high energy X-ray, to detect any mis-declarations, contraband goods concealment or hidden ammunition or explosives. The cargo scanners help authorities to process large number of suspected cargo with a high level of confidence with other additional benefit of faster clearance, minimised intrusive inspection and generating secured digital record of the process. BARC is in process of developing Indian Cargo Scanner with indigenous X-ray source. Proof of concept and conformance of the results to the international standards has been demonstrated in laboratory. Full scale equipment named as Portal scanner shall be demonstrated at Gamma field Trombay in year 2017. Subsequently the technology transfer may be done to a suitable Indian vendor

  5. A Cross-Platform Smartphone Brain Scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jakob Eg; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Stahlhut, Carsten

    We describe a smartphone brain scanner with a low-costwireless 14-channel Emotiv EEG neuroheadset interfacingwith multiple mobile devices. This personal informaticssystem enables minimally invasive and continuouscapturing of brain imaging data in natural settings. Thesystem applies an inverse...

  6. A new generation of PET scanners for small animal studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegyesi, G.; Imrek, J.; Kalinka, G.; Molnar, J.; Novak, D.; Valastyan, I.; Balkay, L.; Emri, M.; Kis, S.; Tron, L.

    2008-01-01

    processing algorithms, or the same method with different parameters. The miniPET-II small animal PET scanner consists of 12 independent detector modules. The inner diameter of the scanner is 206 mmm. On each module there is a segmented scintillator block (35 x 35 crystals of 1.27 mm x 1.27 mm x 12 mm) coupled to a Hamamatsu H9500 position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT) which detects the incoming gamma photons. The timing, energy and position signals of the PSPMT are digitized by four channel ADC running at 50 MHz, and analyzed by a Digital Signal Processing (DSP) block. The DSP block and a 'System-on-Module' embedded system are implemented in a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA, Virtex-4 FX12) based small piggyback card. The System-on-Module runs a custom embedded Linux operating system. This Linux provides a convenient platform for application development, debugging and for system integration. The collected data are sent to the computing cluster for further processing via a gigabit Ethernet link. The miniPETII detector module can also be used independently from the PET scanner as a general purpose physics measurement device

  7. Neurosurgical operating computerized tomographic scanner system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okudera, Hiroshi; Sugita, Kenichiro; Kobayashi, Shigeaki; Kimishima, Sakae; Yoshida, Hisashi.

    1988-01-01

    A neurosurgical operating computerized tomography scanner system is presented. This system has been developed for obtaining intra- and postoperative CT images in the operating room. A TCT-300 scanner (manufactured by the Toshiba Co., Tokyo) is placed in the operating room. The realization of a true intraoperative CT image requires certain improvements in the CT scanner and operating table. To adjust the axis of the co-ordinates of the motor system of the MST-7000 microsurgical operating table (manufactured by the Mizuho Ika Co., Tokyo) to the CT scanner, we have designed an interface and a precise motor system so that the computer of the CT scanner can directly control the movement of the operating table. Furthermore, a new head-fixation system has been designed for producing artifact-free intraoperative CT images. The head-pins of the head-fixation system are made of carbon-fiber bars and titanium tips. A simulation study of the total system in the operating room with the CT scanner, operating table, and head holder using a skull model yielded a degree of error similar to that in the phantom testing of the original scanner. Three patients underwent resection of a glial tumor using this system. Intraoperative CT scans taken after dural opening showed a bulging of the cortex, a shift in the central structure, and a displacement of the cortical subarachnoid spaces under the influence of gravity. With a contrast medium the edge of the surrounding brain after resection was enhanced and the residual tumor mass was demonstrated clearly. This system makes it possible to obtain a noninvasive intraoperative image in a situation where structural shifts are taking place. (author)

  8. MEMS temperature scanner: principles, advances, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Thomas; Saupe, Ray; Stock, Volker; Gessner, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Contactless measurement of temperatures has gained enormous significance in many application fields, ranging from climate protection over quality control to object recognition in public places or military objects. Thereby measurement of linear or spatially temperature distribution is often necessary. For this purposes mostly thermographic cameras or motor driven temperature scanners are used today. Both are relatively expensive and the motor drive devices are limited regarding to the scanning rate additionally. An economic alternative are temperature scanner devices based on micro mirrors. The micro mirror, attached in a simple optical setup, reflects the emitted radiation from the observed heat onto an adapted detector. A line scan of the target object is obtained by periodic deflection of the micro scanner. Planar temperature distribution will be achieved by perpendicularly moving the target object or the scanner device. Using Planck radiation law the temperature of the object is calculated. The device can be adapted to different temperature ranges and resolution by using different detectors - cooled or uncooled - and parameterized scanner parameters. With the basic configuration 40 spatially distributed measuring points can be determined with temperatures in a range from 350°C - 1000°C. The achieved miniaturization of such scanners permits the employment in complex plants with high building density or in direct proximity to the measuring point. The price advantage enables a lot of applications, especially new application in the low-price market segment This paper shows principle, setup and application of a temperature measurement system based on micro scanners working in the near infrared range. Packaging issues and measurement results will be discussed as well.

  9. A flexible and wearable terahertz scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, D.; Oda, S.; Kawano, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Imaging technologies based on terahertz (THz) waves have great potential for use in powerful non-invasive inspection methods. However, most real objects have various three-dimensional curvatures and existing THz technologies often encounter difficulties in imaging such configurations, which limits the useful range of THz imaging applications. Here, we report the development of a flexible and wearable THz scanner based on carbon nanotubes. We achieved room-temperature THz detection over a broad frequency band ranging from 0.14 to 39 THz and developed a portable THz scanner. Using this scanner, we performed THz imaging of samples concealed behind opaque objects, breakages and metal impurities of a bent film and multi-view scans of a syringe. We demonstrated a passive biometric THz scan of a human hand. Our results are expected to have considerable implications for non-destructive and non-contact inspections, such as medical examinations for the continuous monitoring of health conditions.

  10. Quality assurance of computed tomography (CT) scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankaran, A.; Sanu, K.K. . Email : a_sankaran@vsnl.com

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews the present status of research work and development of various test objects, phantoms and detector/instrumentation systems for quality assurance (QA) of computed tomography (CT) scanners, carried out in advanced countries, with emphasis on similar work done in this research centre. CT scanner is a complex equipment and routine quality control procedures are essential to the maintenance of image quality with optimum patient dose. Image quality can be ensured only through correlation between prospective monitoring of system components and tests of overall performance with standard phantoms. CT examinations contribute a large share to the population dose in advanced countries. The unique dosimetry problems in CT necessitate special techniques. This article describes a comprehensive kit developed indigenously for the following QA and type approval tests as well as for research studies on image quality/dosimetry on CT scanners

  11. Manually operated small envelope scanner system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sword, Charles Keith

    2017-04-18

    A scanner system and method for acquisition of position-based ultrasonic inspection data are described. The scanner system includes an inspection probe and a first non-contact linear encoder having a first sensor and a first scale to track inspection probe position. The first sensor is positioned to maintain a continuous non-contact interface between the first sensor and the first scale and to maintain a continuous alignment of the first sensor with the inspection probe. The scanner system may be used to acquire two-dimensional inspection probe position data by including a second non-contact linear encoder having a second sensor and a second scale, the second sensor positioned to maintain a continuous non-contact interface between the second sensor and the second scale and to maintain a continuous alignment of the second sensor with the first sensor.

  12. Multimodality Registration without a Dedicated Multimodality Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J. Beattie

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Multimodality scanners that allow the acquisition of both functional and structural image sets on a single system have recently become available for animal research use. Although the resultant registered functional/structural image sets can greatly enhance the interpretability of the functional data, the cost of multimodality systems can be prohibitive, and they are often limited to two modalities, which generally do not include magnetic resonance imaging. Using a thin plastic wrap to immobilize and fix a mouse or other small animal atop a removable bed, we are able to calculate registrations between all combinations of four different small animal imaging scanners (positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and computed tomography [CT] at our disposal, effectively equivalent to a quadruple-modality scanner. A comparison of serially acquired CT images, with intervening acquisitions on other scanners, demonstrates the ability of the proposed procedures to maintain the rigidity of an anesthetized mouse during transport between scanners. Movement of the bony structures of the mouse was estimated to be 0.62 mm. Soft tissue movement was predominantly the result of the filling (or emptying of the urinary bladder and thus largely constrained to this region. Phantom studies estimate the registration errors for all registration types to be less than 0.5 mm. Functional images using tracers targeted to known structures verify the accuracy of the functional to structural registrations. The procedures are easy to perform and produce robust and accurate results that rival those of dedicated multimodality scanners, but with more flexible registration combinations and while avoiding the expense and redundancy of multimodality systems.

  13. How flatbed scanners upset accurate film dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Battum, L. J.; Huizenga, H.; Verdaasdonk, R. M.; Heukelom, S.

    2016-01-01

    Film is an excellent dosimeter for verification of dose distributions due to its high spatial resolution. Irradiated film can be digitized with low-cost, transmission, flatbed scanners. However, a disadvantage is their lateral scan effect (LSE): a scanner readout change over its lateral scan axis. Although anisotropic light scattering was presented as the origin of the LSE, this paper presents an alternative cause. Hereto, LSE for two flatbed scanners (Epson 1680 Expression Pro and Epson 10000XL), and Gafchromic film (EBT, EBT2, EBT3) was investigated, focused on three effects: cross talk, optical path length and polarization. Cross talk was examined using triangular sheets of various optical densities. The optical path length effect was studied using absorptive and reflective neutral density filters with well-defined optical characteristics (OD range 0.2-2.0). Linear polarizer sheets were used to investigate light polarization on the CCD signal in absence and presence of (un)irradiated Gafchromic film. Film dose values ranged between 0.2 to 9 Gy, i.e. an optical density range between 0.25 to 1.1. Measurements were performed in the scanner’s transmission mode, with red-green-blue channels. LSE was found to depend on scanner construction and film type. Its magnitude depends on dose: for 9 Gy increasing up to 14% at maximum lateral position. Cross talk was only significant in high contrast regions, up to 2% for very small fields. The optical path length effect introduced by film on the scanner causes 3% for pixels in the extreme lateral position. Light polarization due to film and the scanner’s optical mirror system is the main contributor, different in magnitude for the red, green and blue channel. We concluded that any Gafchromic EBT type film scanned with a flatbed scanner will face these optical effects. Accurate dosimetry requires correction of LSE, therefore, determination of the LSE per color channel and dose delivered to the film.

  14. How flatbed scanners upset accurate film dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Battum, L J; Verdaasdonk, R M; Heukelom, S; Huizenga, H

    2016-01-01

    Film is an excellent dosimeter for verification of dose distributions due to its high spatial resolution. Irradiated film can be digitized with low-cost, transmission, flatbed scanners. However, a disadvantage is their lateral scan effect (LSE): a scanner readout change over its lateral scan axis. Although anisotropic light scattering was presented as the origin of the LSE, this paper presents an alternative cause. Hereto, LSE for two flatbed scanners (Epson 1680 Expression Pro and Epson 10000XL), and Gafchromic film (EBT, EBT2, EBT3) was investigated, focused on three effects: cross talk, optical path length and polarization. Cross talk was examined using triangular sheets of various optical densities. The optical path length effect was studied using absorptive and reflective neutral density filters with well-defined optical characteristics (OD range 0.2–2.0). Linear polarizer sheets were used to investigate light polarization on the CCD signal in absence and presence of (un)irradiated Gafchromic film. Film dose values ranged between 0.2 to 9 Gy, i.e. an optical density range between 0.25 to 1.1. Measurements were performed in the scanner’s transmission mode, with red–green–blue channels. LSE was found to depend on scanner construction and film type. Its magnitude depends on dose: for 9 Gy increasing up to 14% at maximum lateral position. Cross talk was only significant in high contrast regions, up to 2% for very small fields. The optical path length effect introduced by film on the scanner causes 3% for pixels in the extreme lateral position. Light polarization due to film and the scanner’s optical mirror system is the main contributor, different in magnitude for the red, green and blue channel. We concluded that any Gafchromic EBT type film scanned with a flatbed scanner will face these optical effects. Accurate dosimetry requires correction of LSE, therefore, determination of the LSE per color channel and dose delivered to the film. (paper)

  15. A simple scanner for Compton tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Cesareo, R; Brunetti, A; Golosio, B; Castellano, A

    2002-01-01

    A first generation CT-scanner was designed and constructed to carry out Compton images. This CT-scanner is composed of a 80 kV, 5 mA X-ray tube and a NaI(Tl) X-ray detector; the tube is strongly collimated, generating a X-ray beam of 2 mm diameter, whilst the detector is not collimated to collect Compton photons from the whole irradiated cylinder. The performances of the equipment were tested contemporaneous transmission and Compton images.

  16. Comparison of lesion detection and quantitation of tracer uptake between PET from a simultaneously acquiring whole-body PET/MR hybrid scanner and PET from PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesmueller, Marco; Schmidt, Daniela; Beck, Michael; Kuwert, Torsten; Gall, Carl C. von; Quick, Harald H.; Navalpakkam, Bharath; Lell, Michael M.; Uder, Michael; Ritt, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    PET/MR hybrid scanners have recently been introduced, but not yet validated. The aim of this study was to compare the PET components of a PET/CT hybrid system and of a simultaneous whole-body PET/MR hybrid system with regard to reproducibility of lesion detection and quantitation of tracer uptake. A total of 46 patients underwent a whole-body PET/CT scan 1 h after injection and an average of 88 min later a second scan using a hybrid PET/MR system. The radioactive tracers used were 18 F-deoxyglucose (FDG), 18 F-ethylcholine (FEC) and 68 Ga-DOTATATE (Ga-DOTATATE). The PET images from PET/CT (PET CT ) and from PET/MR (PET MR ) were analysed for tracer-positive lesions. Regional tracer uptake in these foci was quantified using volumes of interest, and maximal and average standardized uptake values (SUV max and SUV avg , respectively) were calculated. Of the 46 patients, 43 were eligible for comparison and statistical analysis. All lesions except one identified by PET CT were identified by PET MR (99.2 %). In 38 patients (88.4 %), the same number of foci were identified by PET CT and by PET MR . In four patients, more lesions were identified by PET MR than by PET CT , in one patient PET CT revealed an additional focus compared to PET MR . The mean SUV max and SUV avg of all lesions determined by PET MR were by 21 % and 11 % lower, respectively, than the values determined by PET CT (p CT and PET MR were minor, but statistically significant. Nevertheless, a more detailed study of the quantitative accuracy of PET MR and the factors governing it is needed to ultimately assess its accuracy in measuring tissue tracer concentrations. (orig.)

  17. Inter laboratory comparison of industrial CT scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, Jais Andreas Breusch; Cantatore, Angela; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    In this report results from an intercomparison of industrial CT scanners are presented. Three audit items, similar to common industrial parts, were selected for circulation: a single polymer part with complex geometry (Item 1), a simple geometry part made of two polymers (Item 2) and a miniature...

  18. Developments in holographic-based scanner designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, David M.

    1997-07-01

    Holographic-based scanning systems have been used for years in the high resolution prepress markets where monochromatic lasers are generally utilized. However, until recently, due to the dispersive properties of holographic optical elements (HOEs), along with the high cost associated with recording 'master' HOEs, holographic scanners have not been able to penetrate major scanning markets such as the laser printer and digital copier markets, low to mid-range imagesetter markets, and the non-contact inspection scanner market. Each of these markets has developed cost effective laser diode based solutions using conventional scanning approaches such as polygon/f-theta lens combinations. In order to penetrate these markets, holographic-based systems must exhibit low cost and immunity to wavelength shifts associated with laser diodes. This paper describes recent developments in the design of holographic scanners in which multiple HOEs, each possessing optical power, are used in conjunction with one curved mirror to passively correct focal plane position errors and spot size changes caused by the wavelength instability of laser diodes. This paper also describes recent advancements in low cost production of high quality HOEs and curved mirrors. Together these developments allow holographic scanners to be economically competitive alternatives to conventional devices in every segment of the laser scanning industry.

  19. A PET scanner developed by CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    This image shows a Position Emission Tomography (PET) scanner at the Hopital Cantonal Universitaire de Genève. Development of the multiwire proportional chamber at CERN in the mid-1970s was soon seen as a potential device for medical imaging. It is much more sensitive than previous devices and greatly reduced the dose of radiation received by the patient.

  20. Wire scanner software and firmware issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilpatrick, John Doug

    2008-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center facility presently has 110 slow wire scanning profile measurement instruments located along its various beam lines. These wire scanners were developed and have been operating for at least 30 years. While the wire scanners solved many problems to operate and have served the facility well they have increasingly suffered from several problems or limitations, such as maintenance and reliability problems, antiquated components, slow data acquisition, and etc. In order to refurbish these devices, these wire scanners will be replaced with newer versions. The replacement will consist of a completely new beam line actuator, new cables, new electronics and brand new software and firmware. This note describes the functions and modes of operation that LabVIEW VI software on the real time controller and FPGA LabVIEW firmware will be required. It will be especially interesting to understand the overall architecture of these LabVIEW VIs. While this note will endeavor to describe all of the requirements and issues for the wire scanners, undoubtedly, there will be missing details that will be added as time progresses.

  1. Learning and Teaching with a Computer Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planinsic, G.; Gregorcic, B.; Etkina, E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces the readers to simple inquiry-based activities (experiments with supporting questions) that one can do with a computer scanner to help students learn and apply the concepts of relative motion in 1 and 2D, vibrational motion and the Doppler effect. We also show how to use these activities to help students think like…

  2. Current segmented gamma-ray scanner technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjork, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    A new generation of segmented gamma-ray scanners has been developed at Los Alamos for scrap and waste measurements at the Savannah River Plant and the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. The new designs are highly automated and exhibit special features such as good segmentation and thorough shielding to improve performance

  3. Get Mobile – The Smartphone Brain Scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlhut, Carsten; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Petersen, Michael Kai

    This demonstration will provide live-interaction with a smartphone brain scanner consisting of a low-cost wireless 14-channel EEG headset (Emotiv Epoc) and a mobile device. With our system it is possible to perform real-time functional brain imaging on a smartphone device, including stimulus...

  4. Scanner and irradiation: optimization of protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchemin, J.; Martine-Rollet, B.; Lienart, S.; Mobailly, M.; Florin, J.P.; Beregi, J.P.; Puech, N.

    2006-01-01

    The irradiation of the patient or the personnel increased with the arrival of the multi-detector scanners. The objective of this work is to realize a didactic poster to inform and make sensitive on the irradiation with scan so that to propose solutions of protection. (N.C.)

  5. submitter Dynamical Models of a Wire Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Barjau, Ana; Dehning, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy of the beam profile measurements achievable by the current wire scanners at CERN is limited by the vibrations of their mechanical parts. In particular, the vibrations of the carbon wire represent the major source of wire position uncertainty which limits the beam profile measurement accuracy. In the coming years, due to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade, a wire traveling speed up to 20 $m s^{−1}$ and a position measurement accuracy of the order of 1 μm will be required. A new wire scanner design based on the understanding of the wire vibration origin is therefore needed. We present the models developed to understand the main causes of the wire vibrations observed in an existing wire scanner. The development and tuning of those models are based on measurements and tests performed on that CERN proton synchrotron (PS) scanner. The final model for the (wire + fork) system has six degrees-of-freedom (DOF). The wire equations contain three different excitation terms: inertia...

  6. Evaluation of Handheld Scanners for Automotive Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wadea Ameen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of generating a computerized geometric model for an existing part is known as Reverse Engineering (RE. It is a very useful technique in product development and plays a significant role in automotive, aerospace, and medical industries. In fact, it has been getting remarkable attention in manufacturing industries owing to its advanced data acquisition technologies. The process of RE is based on two primary steps: data acquisition (also known as scanning and data processing. To facilitate point data acquisition, a variety of scanning systems is available with different capabilities and limitations. Although the optical control of 3D scanners is fully developed, still several factors can affect the quality of the scanned data. As a result, the proper selection of scanning parameters, such as resolution, laser power, shutter time, etc., becomes very crucial. This kind of investigation can be very helpful and provide its users with guidelines to identify the appropriate factors. Moreover, it is worth noting that no single system is ideal in all applications. Accordingly, this work has compared two portable (handheld systems based on laser scanning and white light optical scanning for automotive applications. A car door containing a free-form surface has been used to achieve the above-mentioned goal. The design of experiments has been employed to determine the effects of different scanning parameters and optimize them. The capabilities and limitations have been identified by comparing the two scanners in terms of accuracy, scanning time, triangle numbers, ease of use, and portability. Then, the relationships between the system capabilities and the application requirements have been established. The results revealed that the laser scanner performed better than the white light scanner in terms of accuracy, while the white light scanner performed better in terms of acquisition speed and triangle numbers.

  7. Body scanners: are they dangerous for health?; Scanners corporels: dangereux pour la sante?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-07-01

    As there is a debate about the risk of cancer and of congenital malformation associated with the use of body scanners, notably in airports, this document recalls and comments the IAEA statement on this issue. According to a study performed by this international agency, the irradiation dose is very low. But the French IRSN is more prudent and recommends not to use X ray scanner, but to look for technologies which do not use ionizing radiation

  8. Occurrence and characteristics of mutual interference between LIDAR scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gunzung; Eom, Jeongsook; Park, Seonghyeon; Park, Yongwan

    2015-05-01

    The LIDAR scanner is at the heart of object detection of the self-driving car. Mutual interference between LIDAR scanners has not been regarded as a problem because the percentage of vehicles equipped with LIDAR scanners was very rare. With the growing number of autonomous vehicle equipped with LIDAR scanner operated close to each other at the same time, the LIDAR scanner may receive laser pulses from other LIDAR scanners. In this paper, three types of experiments and their results are shown, according to the arrangement of two LIDAR scanners. We will show the probability that any LIDAR scanner will interfere mutually by considering spatial and temporal overlaps. It will present some typical mutual interference scenario and report an analysis of the interference mechanism.

  9. 21 CFR 882.1925 - Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block. 882... Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic scanner calibration test block is a block of material with known properties used to calibrate ultrasonic scanning devices (e.g., the...

  10. Laser scanner 3D terrestri e mobile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Ciamba

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Recentemente si è svolto a Roma un evento dimostrativo per informare, professionisti e ricercatori del settore inerente il rilievo strumentale, sulle recenti innovazioni che riguardano i laser scanner 3d. Il mercato della strumentazione dedicata al rilevamento architettonico e dell'ambiente, offre molte possibilità di scelta. Oggi i principali marchi producono strumenti sempre più efficienti ed ideati per ambiti di applicazione specifici, permettendo ai professionisti, la giusta scelta in termini di prestazioni ed economia. A demonstration event was recently held in Rome with the aim to inform professionals and researchers on recent innovations on instrumental survey related to the 3d laser scanner. The market of instrumentation for architectural survey offers many possibilitiesof choice. Today the major brands produce instruments that are more efficient and designed for specific areas of application, allowing the right choice in terms of performance and economy.

  11. Laser scanner 3D terrestri e mobile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Ciamba

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Recentemente si è svolto a Roma un evento dimostrativo per informare, professionisti e ricercatori del settore inerente il rilievo strumentale, sulle recenti innovazioni che riguardano i laser scanner 3d. Il mercato della strumentazione dedicata al rilevamento architettonico e dell'ambiente, offre molte possibilità di scelta. Oggi i principali marchi producono strumenti sempre più efficienti ed ideati per ambiti di applicazione specifici, permettendo ai professionisti, la giusta scelta in termini di prestazioni ed economia.A demonstration event was recently held in Rome with the aim to inform professionals and researchers on recent innovations on instrumental survey related to the 3d laser scanner. The market of instrumentation for architectural survey offers many possibilitiesof choice. Today the major brands produce instruments that are more efficient and designed for specific areas of application, allowing the right choice in terms of performance and economy.

  12. Detector Position Estimation for PET Scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Larry; Miyaoka, Robert; Lewellen, Tom; Alessio, Adam; Kinahan, Paul

    2012-06-11

    Physical positioning of scintillation crystal detector blocks in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanners is not always exact. We test a proof of concept methodology for the determination of the six degrees of freedom for detector block positioning errors by utilizing a rotating point source over stepped axial intervals. To test our method, we created computer simulations of seven Micro Crystal Element Scanner (MiCES) PET systems with randomized positioning errors. The computer simulations show that our positioning algorithm can estimate the positions of the block detectors to an average of one-seventh of the crystal pitch tangentially, and one-third of the crystal pitch axially. Virtual acquisitions of a point source grid and a distributed phantom show that our algorithm improves both the quantitative and qualitative accuracy of the reconstructed objects. We believe this estimation algorithm is a practical and accurate method for determining the spatial positions of scintillation detector blocks.

  13. Detector position estimation for PET scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, Larry; Miyaoka, Robert; Lewellen, Tom; Alessio, Adam; Kinahan, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Physical positioning of scintillation crystal detector blocks in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanners is not always exact. We test a proof of concept methodology for the determination of the six degrees of freedom for detector block positioning errors by utilizing a rotating point source over stepped axial intervals. To test our method, we created computer simulations of seven Micro Crystal Element Scanner (MiCES) PET systems with randomized positioning errors. The computer simulations show that our positioning algorithm can estimate the positions of the block detectors to an average of one-seventh of the crystal pitch tangentially, and one-third of the crystal pitch axially. Virtual acquisitions of a point source grid and a distributed phantom show that our algorithm improves both the quantitative and qualitative accuracy of the reconstructed objects. We believe this estimation algorithm is a practical and accurate method for determining the spatial positions of scintillation detector blocks.

  14. Ghost signals in Allison emittance scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockli, Martin P.; Leitner, M.; Moehs, D.P.; Keller, R.; Welton, R.F.

    2004-01-01

    For over 20 years, Allison scanners have been used to measure emittances of low-energy ion beams. We show that scanning large trajectory angles produces ghost signals caused by the sampled beamlet impacting on an electric deflection plate. The ghost signal strength is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions, and their velocity, the ghost signals can have the opposite or the same polarity as the main beam signals. The ghost signals cause significant errors in the emittance estimates because they appear at large trajectory angles. These ghost signals often go undetected because they partly overlap with the real signals, are mostly below the 1% level, and often hide in the noise. A simple deflection plate modification is shown to reduce the ghost signal strength by over 99%

  15. Ghost Signals In Allison Emittance Scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockli, Martin P.; Leitner, M.; Keller, R.; Moehs, D.P.; Welton, R. F.

    2005-01-01

    For over 20 years, Allison scanners have been used to measure emittances of low-energy ion beams. We show that scanning large trajectory angles produces ghost signals caused by the sampled beamlet impacting on an electric deflection plate. The ghost signal strength is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions, and their velocity, the ghost signals can have the opposite or the same polarity as the main beam signals. The ghost signals cause significant errors in the emittance estimates because they appear at large trajectory angles. These ghost signals often go undetected because they partly overlap with the real signals, are mostly below the 1% level, and often hide in the noise. A simple deflection plate modification is shown to reduce the ghost signal strength by over 99%

  16. Development of high pressure pipe scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae H.; Lee, Jae C.; Moon, Soon S.; Eom, Heung S.; Choi, Yu R.

    1998-12-01

    This report describes an automatic ultrasonic scanning system for pressure pipe welds, which was developed in this project using recent advanced technologies on mobile robot and computer. The system consists of two modules: a robot scanner module which navigates and manipulates scanning devices, and a data acquisition module which generates ultrasonic signal and processes the data from the scanner. The robot has 4 magnetic wheels and 2 -axis manipulator on which ultrasonic transducer attached. The wheeled robot can navigate curved surface such as outer wall of circular pipes. Magnetic wheels were optimally designed through magnetic field analysis. Free surface sensing and line tracking control algorithm were developed and implemented, and the control devices and software can be used in practical inspection works. We expect our system can contribute to reduction of inspection time, performance enhancement, and effective management of inspection results

  17. Imaging Scanner Usage in Radiochemical Purity Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norhafizah Othman; Yahaya Talib; Wan Hamirul Bahrin Wan Kamal

    2011-01-01

    Imaging Scanner model BIOSCAN AR-2000 has been used in the radiochemical purity test for the product of Mo-99/ Tc-99m generator. Result from this test was produced directly where the percentage of pertechnetate was calculated based on width peak area by thin layer chromatography. This paperwork will explain the function, procedure, calibration of the instrument and discussed the advantages compared to the previous method. (author)

  18. Neurosurgical operating computerized tomographic scanner system. The CT scanner in the operating theater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okudera, Hiroshi; Sugita, Kenichiro; Kobayashi, Shigeaki; Kimishima, Sakae; Yoshida, Hisashi

    1988-12-01

    A neurosurgical operating computerized tomography scanner system is presented. This system has been developed for obtaining intra- and postoperative CT images in the operating room. A TCT-300 scanner (manufactured by the Toshiba Co., Tokyo) is placed in the operating room. The realization of a true intraoperative CT image requires certain improvements in the CT scanner and operating table. To adjust the axis of the co-ordinates of the motor system of the MST-7000 microsurgical operating table (manufactured by the Mizuho Ika Co., Tokyo) to the CT scanner, we have designed an interface and a precise motor system so that the computer of the CT scanner can directly control the movement of the operating table. Furthermore, a new head-fixation system has been designed for producing artifact-free intraoperative CT images. The head-pins of the head-fixation system are made of carbon-fiber bars and titanium tips. A simulation study of the total system in the operating room with the CT scanner, operating table, and head holder using a skull model yielded a degree of error similar to that in the phantom testing of the original scanner. Three patients underwent resection of a glial tumor using this system. Intraoperative CT scans taken after dural opening showed a bulging of the cortex, a shift in the central structure, and a displacement of the cortical subarachnoid spaces under the influence of gravity. With a contrast medium the edge of the surrounding brain after resection was enhanced and the residual tumor mass was demonstrated clearly. This system makes it possible to obtain a noninvasive intraoperative image in a situation where structural shifts are taking place.

  19. Laser measuring scanners and their accuracy limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Ryszard

    1993-09-01

    Scanning methods have gained the greater importance for some years now due to a short measuring time and wide range of application in flexible manufacturing processes. This paper is a summing up of the autho?s creative scientific work in the field of measuring scanners. The research conducted allowed to elaborate the optimal configurations of measuring systems based on the scanning method. An important part of the work was the analysis of a measuring scanner - as a transducer of an angle rotation into the linear displacement which resulted in obtaining its much higher accuracy and finally in working out a measuring scanner eliminating the use of an additional reference standard. The completion of the work is an attempt to determine an attainable accuracy limit of scanning measurement of both length and angle. Using a high stability deflector and a corrected scanning lens one can obtain the angle determination over 30 (or 2 mm) to an accuracy 0 (or 0 tm) when the measuring rate is 1000 Hz or the range d60 (4 mm) with accuracy 0 " (0 jim) and measurement frequency 6 Hz.

  20. The CT scanner as a therapy machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, K.S.; Norman, A.

    1990-01-01

    Many tumors in the brain and in other tissues can be delineated precisely in images obtained with a CT scanner. After the scan is obtained the patient is taken to another room for radiation therapy and is positioned in the beam with the aid of external markers, simulators or stereotactic devices. This procedure is time consuming and subject to error when precise localization of the beam is desired. The CT scanner itself, with the addition of the collimator, is capable of delivering radiation therapy with great precision without the need for external markers. The patient can be scanned and treated on the same table, the isocenter of the beam can be placed precisely in the center of the lesion, the beam can be restricted to just those planes in which the lesion appears, several arcs can be obtained by simply tilting the gantry, and the position of the patient in the beam can be monitored continuously during therapy. The authors describe the properties of the CTX, the CT scanner modified for therapy. (author). 6 refs.; 6 figs

  1. A scanner for single photon emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.B.; Cumpstey, D.E.; Evans, N.T.S.; Coleman, J.D.; Ettinger, K.V.; Mallard, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    The technique of single photon ECT has now been available for some eighteen years, but has yet still to be exploited fully. The difficulties of doing this lie in the need for gathering data of sufficiently good statistical accuracy in a reasonable counting time, in the uniformity of detector sensitivity, and in the means for correcting the image satisfactorily for photon attenuation within the body. The relative ease with which a general purpose gamma camera can be adapted to give rotation around the patient makes this an attractive practical approach to the problem. However, the sensitivity of gamma cameras over their field of view is by no means uniform, and their sensitivity is less good than that of purpose-designed scanners when no more than about ten sections through the body are required. There is therefore a need to assess the clinical usefulness of a whole body tomographic scanner of high sensitivity and uniformity. Such a machine is the Aberdeen Section Scanner Mark II described

  2. Impedance Characterisation of the SPS Wire Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2091911; Prof. Sillanpää, Mika

    As a beam diagnostic tool, the SPS wire scanner interacts with the proton bunches traversing the vacuum pipes of the Super Proton Synchrotron particle accelerator. Following the interaction, the bunches decelerate or experience momentum kicks off-axis and couple energy to the cavity walls, resonances and to the diagnostic tool, the scanning wire. The beam coupling impedance and, in particular, the beam induced heating of the wire motivate the characterisation and redesign of the SPS wire scanner. In this thesis, we characterise RF-wise the low frequency modes of the SPS wire scanner. These have the highest contribution to the impedance. We measure the cavity modes in terms of resonance frequency and quality factor by traditional measurement techniques and data analysis. We carry out a 4-port measurement to evaluate the beam coupling to the scanning wire, that yields the spectral heating power. If combined with the simulations, one is able to extract the beam coupling impedance and deduce the spectral dissipa...

  3. Scanner-based macroscopic color variation estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chunghui; Lai, Di; Zeise, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Flatbed scanners have been adopted successfully in the measurement of microscopic image artifacts, such as granularity and mottle, in print samples because of their capability of providing full color, high resolution images. Accurate macroscopic color measurement relies on the use of colorimeters or spectrophotometers to provide a surrogate for human vision. The very different color response characteristics of flatbed scanners from any standard colorimetric response limits the utility of a flatbed scanner as a macroscopic color measuring device. This metamerism constraint can be significantly relaxed if our objective is mainly to quantify the color variations within a printed page or between pages where a small bias in measured colors can be tolerated as long as the color distributions relative to the individual mean values is similar. Two scenarios when converting color from the device RGB color space to a standardized color space such as CIELab are studied in this paper, blind and semi-blind color transformation, depending on the availability of the black channel information. We will show that both approaches offer satisfactory results in quantifying macroscopic color variation across pages while the semi-blind color transformation further provides fairly accurate color prediction capability.

  4. Particle discrimination by an automatic scanner for nuclear emulsion plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinecke, W.; Fischer, B.E.

    1976-01-01

    An automatic scanner for nuclear emulsion plates has been improved by adding particle discrimination. By determination of the mean luminosity of tracks in darkfield illumination in addition to the track length a clear discrimination has been obtained, at least for lighter particles. The scanning speed of the original automatic scanner has not been reduced. The scanner works up to 200 times faster than a human scanner. Besides the particle discrimination the determination of the mean track luminosity led to a lower perturbation sensitivity with respect to a high background of accidentally developed silvergrains, scratches in emulsion etc. The reproducibility of the results obtained by the automatic scanner is better than 5%. (Auth.)

  5. Scanners for analytic print measurement: the devil in the details

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeise, Eric K.; Williams, Don; Burns, Peter D.; Kress, William C.

    2007-01-01

    Inexpensive and easy-to-use linear and area-array scanners have frequently substituted as colorimeters and densitometers for low-frequency (i.e., large area) hard copy image measurement. Increasingly, scanners are also being used for high spatial frequency, image microstructure measurements, which were previously reserved for high performance microdensitometers. In this paper we address characteristics of flatbed reflection scanners in the evaluation of print uniformity, geometric distortion, geometric repeatability and the influence of scanner MTF and noise on analytic measurements. Suggestions are made for the specification and evaluation of scanners to be used in print image quality standards that are being developed.

  6. The number and distribution of computerised tomography scanners in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semin, S.; Amato, Z.

    1999-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the number and distribution of CT scanners in Turkey. Our results show 173 CT scanners in Turkey in 1994, which equals 2.9 scanners per million people. All of the scanners are located in 45 cities, where 81 % of the population resides. The other 31 cities in Turkey have no scanners. Of the 173 scanners, 103 (59.6 %) are owned by the private sector and the other 70 are owned by the public sector. Of Turkey's CT scanners, 49.2 % are located in private health centres, 21.9 % in university hospitals, 16.7 % in Ministry of Health (MOH) hospitals, 10.4 % in private hospitals and 1.8 % in social security hospitals. (orig.)

  7. AN AUTOMATIC PROCEDURE FOR COMBINING DIGITAL IMAGES AND LASER SCANNER DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Moussa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Besides improving both the geometry and the visual quality of the model, the integration of close-range photogrammetry and terrestrial laser scanning techniques directs at filling gaps in laser scanner point clouds to avoid modeling errors, reconstructing more details in higher resolution and recovering simple structures with less geometric details. Thus, within this paper a flexible approach for the automatic combination of digital images and laser scanner data is presented. Our approach comprises two methods for data fusion. The first method starts by a marker-free registration of digital images based on a point-based environment model (PEM of a scene which stores the 3D laser scanner point clouds associated with intensity and RGB values. The PEM allows the extraction of accurate control information for the direct computation of absolute camera orientations with redundant information by means of accurate space resection methods. In order to use the computed relations between the digital images and the laser scanner data, an extended Helmert (seven-parameter transformation is introduced and its parameters are estimated. Precedent to that, in the second method, the local relative orientation parameters of the camera images are calculated by means of an optimized Structure and Motion (SaM reconstruction method. Then, using the determined transformation parameters results in having absolute oriented images in relation to the laser scanner data. With the resulting absolute orientations we have employed robust dense image reconstruction algorithms to create oriented dense image point clouds, which are automatically combined with the laser scanner data to form a complete detailed representation of a scene. Examples of different data sets are shown and experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the presented procedures.

  8. Recent micro-CT scanner developments at UGCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierick, Manuel, E-mail: Manuel.Dierick@UGent.be [UGCT-Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); XRE, X-Ray Engineering bvba, De Pintelaan 111, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Loo, Denis, E-mail: info@XRE.be [XRE, X-Ray Engineering bvba, De Pintelaan 111, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Masschaele, Bert [UGCT-Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); XRE, X-Ray Engineering bvba, De Pintelaan 111, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van den Bulcke, Jan [UGCT-Woodlab-UGent, Department of Forest and Water Management, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Acker, Joris, E-mail: Joris.VanAcker@UGent.be [UGCT-Woodlab-UGent, Department of Forest and Water Management, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Cnudde, Veerle, E-mail: Veerle.Cnudde@UGent.be [UGCT-SGIG, Department of Geology and Soil Science, Faculty of Sciences, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281, S8, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Hoorebeke, Luc, E-mail: Luc.VanHoorebeke@UGent.be [UGCT-Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes two X-ray micro-CT scanners which were recently developed to extend the experimental possibilities of microtomography research at the Centre for X-ray Tomography ( (www.ugct.ugent.be)) of the Ghent University (Belgium). The first scanner, called Nanowood, is a wide-range CT scanner with two X-ray sources (160 kV{sub max}) and two detectors, resolving features down to 0.4 μm in small samples, but allowing samples up to 35 cm to be scanned. This is a sample size range of 3 orders of magnitude, making this scanner well suited for imaging multi-scale materials such as wood, stone, etc. Besides the traditional cone-beam acquisition, Nanowood supports helical acquisition, and it can generate images with significant phase-contrast contributions. The second scanner, known as the Environmental micro-CT scanner (EMCT), is a gantry based micro-CT scanner with variable magnification for scanning objects which are not easy to rotate in a standard micro-CT scanner, for example because they are physically connected to external experimental hardware such as sensor wiring, tubing or others. This scanner resolves 5 μm features, covers a field-of-view of about 12 cm wide with an 80 cm vertical travel range. Both scanners will be extensively described and characterized, and their potential will be demonstrated with some key application results.

  9. Recent micro-CT scanner developments at UGCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierick, Manuel; Van Loo, Denis; Masschaele, Bert; Van den Bulcke, Jan; Van Acker, Joris; Cnudde, Veerle; Van Hoorebeke, Luc

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes two X-ray micro-CT scanners which were recently developed to extend the experimental possibilities of microtomography research at the Centre for X-ray Tomography ( (www.ugct.ugent.be)) of the Ghent University (Belgium). The first scanner, called Nanowood, is a wide-range CT scanner with two X-ray sources (160 kV max ) and two detectors, resolving features down to 0.4 μm in small samples, but allowing samples up to 35 cm to be scanned. This is a sample size range of 3 orders of magnitude, making this scanner well suited for imaging multi-scale materials such as wood, stone, etc. Besides the traditional cone-beam acquisition, Nanowood supports helical acquisition, and it can generate images with significant phase-contrast contributions. The second scanner, known as the Environmental micro-CT scanner (EMCT), is a gantry based micro-CT scanner with variable magnification for scanning objects which are not easy to rotate in a standard micro-CT scanner, for example because they are physically connected to external experimental hardware such as sensor wiring, tubing or others. This scanner resolves 5 μm features, covers a field-of-view of about 12 cm wide with an 80 cm vertical travel range. Both scanners will be extensively described and characterized, and their potential will be demonstrated with some key application results

  10. Recent advances in segmented gamma scanner analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprinkle, J.K. Jr.; Hsue, S.T.

    1987-01-01

    The segmented gamma scanner (SGS) is used in many facilities to assay low-density scrap and waste generated in the facilities. The procedures for using the SGS can cause a negative bias if the sample does not satisfy the assumptions made in the method. Some process samples do not comply with the assumptions. This paper discusses the effect of the presence of lumps on the SGS assay results, describes a method to detect the presence of lumps, and describes an approach to correct for the lumps. Other recent advances in SGS analysis are also discussed

  11. Fast wire scanner for intense electron beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Moore

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a cost-effective, fast rotating wire scanner for use in accelerators where high beam currents would otherwise melt even carbon wires. This new design uses a simple planetary gear setup to rotate a carbon wire, fixed at one end, through the beam at speeds in excess of 20  m/s. We present results from bench tests, as well as transverse beam profile measurements taken at Cornell’s high-brightness energy recovery linac photoinjector, for beam currents up to 35 mA.

  12. Custom Integrated Circuit Design for Portable Ultrasound Scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llimos Muntal, Pere

    plane and the signals received from each transmit burst area summed. Each receiving channel is required to individually amplify and delay its signal in order to correctly pre-beamform. The handheld probe delivers the data to a processing unit digitally, hence, analog to digital converters (ADCs......-sigma analog-to-digital converter (CTDS ADC) operating at a sampling frequency of 320 MHz, a SNR of 45 dB, occupying an area of 0.0175 mm2 and a power consumption of 0.594 mW. The CTDS ADC digitizes the signal before the pre-beamform summing is applied. The SNR of the ADC is directly linked to the picture...... quality of the imaging. However, the SNR is also related to the power consumption, creating a tradeoff between power and picture quality. The design approach will be to achieve the minimum SNR that generates an acceptable picture quality while using the minimum power possible. The ADC is implemented...

  13. Circumference estimation using 3D-whole body scanners and shadow scanner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.

    1998-01-01

    Clothing designers and manufacturers use traditional body dimensions as their basis. When 3D-whole body scanners are introduced to determine the body dimensions, a conversion has to be made, since scan determined circumference measures are slightly larger than the traditional values. This pilot

  14. 3D Laser Scanner for Underwater Manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Palomer

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, research in autonomous underwater manipulation has demonstrated simple applications like picking an object from the sea floor, turning a valve or plugging and unplugging a connector. These are fairly simple tasks compared with those already demonstrated by the mobile robotics community, which include, among others, safe arm motion within areas populated with a priori unknown obstacles or the recognition and location of objects based on their 3D model to grasp them. Kinect-like 3D sensors have contributed significantly to the advance of mobile manipulation providing 3D sensing capabilities in real-time at low cost. Unfortunately, the underwater robotics community is lacking a 3D sensor with similar capabilities to provide rich 3D information of the work space. In this paper, we present a new underwater 3D laser scanner and demonstrate its capabilities for underwater manipulation. In order to use this sensor in conjunction with manipulators, a calibration method to find the relative position between the manipulator and the 3D laser scanner is presented. Then, two different advanced underwater manipulation tasks beyond the state of the art are demonstrated using two different manipulation systems. First, an eight Degrees of Freedom (DoF fixed-base manipulator system is used to demonstrate arm motion within a work space populated with a priori unknown fixed obstacles. Next, an eight DoF free floating Underwater Vehicle-Manipulator System (UVMS is used to autonomously grasp an object from the bottom of a water tank.

  15. High-picture quality industrial CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, Takao; Nishide, Akihiko; Fujii, Masashi.

    1989-01-01

    Industrial X-ray-CT-scanners, which provide cross-sectional images of a tested sample without destroying it, are attracting attention as a new nondestructive inspection device. In 1982, Toshiba commenced the development of industrial CT scanners, and introduced the 'TOSCANER' -3000 and-4000 series. Now, the state of the art 'TOSCANER'-20000 series of CT systems has been developed incorporating the latest computer tomography and image processing technology, such as the T9506 image processor. One of the advantages of this system is its applicability to a wide range of X-ray energy . The 'TOSCANER'-20000 series can be utilized for inspecting castings and other materials with relatively low-transparency to X-rays, as well as ceramics, composite materials and other materials with high X-ray transparency. A further feature of the new system is its high-picture quality, with a high-spatial resolution resulting from a pixel size of 0.2x0.2(mm). (author)

  16. 3D Laser Scanner for Underwater Manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomer, Albert; Ridao, Pere; Youakim, Dina; Ribas, David; Forest, Josep; Petillot, Yvan

    2018-04-04

    Nowadays, research in autonomous underwater manipulation has demonstrated simple applications like picking an object from the sea floor, turning a valve or plugging and unplugging a connector. These are fairly simple tasks compared with those already demonstrated by the mobile robotics community, which include, among others, safe arm motion within areas populated with a priori unknown obstacles or the recognition and location of objects based on their 3D model to grasp them. Kinect-like 3D sensors have contributed significantly to the advance of mobile manipulation providing 3D sensing capabilities in real-time at low cost. Unfortunately, the underwater robotics community is lacking a 3D sensor with similar capabilities to provide rich 3D information of the work space. In this paper, we present a new underwater 3D laser scanner and demonstrate its capabilities for underwater manipulation. In order to use this sensor in conjunction with manipulators, a calibration method to find the relative position between the manipulator and the 3D laser scanner is presented. Then, two different advanced underwater manipulation tasks beyond the state of the art are demonstrated using two different manipulation systems. First, an eight Degrees of Freedom (DoF) fixed-base manipulator system is used to demonstrate arm motion within a work space populated with a priori unknown fixed obstacles. Next, an eight DoF free floating Underwater Vehicle-Manipulator System (UVMS) is used to autonomously grasp an object from the bottom of a water tank.

  17. Interferometric Laser Scanner for Direction Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady Kaloshin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we explore the potential capabilities of new laser scanning-based method for direction determination. The method for fully coherent beams is extended to the case when interference pattern is produced in the turbulent atmosphere by two partially coherent sources. The performed theoretical analysis identified the conditions under which stable pattern may form on extended paths of 0.5–10 km in length. We describe a method for selecting laser scanner parameters, ensuring the necessary operability range in the atmosphere for any possible turbulence characteristics. The method is based on analysis of the mean intensity of interference pattern, formed by two partially coherent sources of optical radiation. Visibility of interference pattern is estimated as a function of propagation pathlength, structure parameter of atmospheric turbulence, and spacing of radiation sources, producing the interference pattern. It is shown that, when atmospheric turbulences are moderately strong, the contrast of interference pattern of laser scanner may ensure its applicability at ranges up to 10 km.

  18. A 3D airborne ultrasound scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capineri, L.; Masotti, L.; Rocchi, S.

    1998-06-01

    This work investigates the feasibility of an ultrasound scanner designed to reconstruct three-dimensional profiles of objects in air. There are many industrial applications in which it is important to obtain quickly and accurately the digital reconstruction of solid objects with contactless methods. The final aim of this project was the profile reconstruction of shoe lasts in order to eliminate the mechanical tracers from the reproduction process of shoe prototypes. The feasibility of an ultrasonic scanner was investigated in laboratory conditions on wooden test objects with axial symmetry. A bistatic system based on five airborne polyvinylidenedifluoride (PVDF) transducers was mechanically moved to emulate a cylindrical array transducer that can host objects of maximum width and height 20 cm and 40 cm respectively. The object reconstruction was based on a simplified version of the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT): the time of flight (TOF) of the first in time echo for each receiving transducer was taken into account, a coarse spatial sampling of the ultrasonic field reflected on the array transducer was delivered and the reconstruction algorithm was based on the ellipsoidal backprojection. Measurements on a wooden cone section provided submillimetre accuracy in a controlled environment.

  19. Interferometric Laser Scanner for Direction Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaloshin, Gennady; Lukin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the potential capabilities of new laser scanning-based method for direction determination. The method for fully coherent beams is extended to the case when interference pattern is produced in the turbulent atmosphere by two partially coherent sources. The performed theoretical analysis identified the conditions under which stable pattern may form on extended paths of 0.5–10 km in length. We describe a method for selecting laser scanner parameters, ensuring the necessary operability range in the atmosphere for any possible turbulence characteristics. The method is based on analysis of the mean intensity of interference pattern, formed by two partially coherent sources of optical radiation. Visibility of interference pattern is estimated as a function of propagation pathlength, structure parameter of atmospheric turbulence, and spacing of radiation sources, producing the interference pattern. It is shown that, when atmospheric turbulences are moderately strong, the contrast of interference pattern of laser scanner may ensure its applicability at ranges up to 10 km. PMID:26805841

  20. Intracardiac ultrasound scanner using a micromachine (MEMS) actuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, J M; Bobbio, S M; Goodwin-Johansson, S; Smith, S W

    2000-01-01

    Catheter-based intracardiac ultrasound offers the potential for improved guidance of interventional cardiac procedures. The objective of this research is the development of catheter-based mechanical sector scanners incorporating high frequency ultrasound transducers operating at frequencies up to 20 MHz. The authors' current transducer assembly consists of a single 1.75 mm by 1.75 mm, 20 MHz, PZT element mounted on a 2 mm by 2 mm square, 75 mum thick polyimide table that pivots on 3-mum thick gold plated polyimide hinges. The hinges also serve as the electrical connections to the transducer. This table-mounted transducer is tilted using a miniature linear actuator to produce a sector scan. This linear actuator is an integrated force array (IFA), which is an example of a micromachine, i.e., a microelectromechanical system (MEMS). The IFA is a thin (2.2 mum) polyimide membrane, which consists of a network of hundreds of thousands of micron scale deformable capacitors made from pairs of metallized polyimide plates. IFAs contract with an applied voltage of 30-120 V and have been shown to produce strains as large as 20% and forces of up to 8 dynes. The prototype transducer and actuator assembly was fabricated and interfaced with a GagePCI analog to digital conversion board digitizing 12 bit samples at a rate of 100 MSamples/second housed in a personal computer to create a single channel ultrasound scanner. The deflection of the table transducer in a low viscosity insulating fluid (HFE 7100, 3M) is up to +/-10 degrees at scan rates of 10-60 Hz. Software has been developed to produce real-time sector scans on the PC monitor.

  1. Was the Scanner Calibration Slide used for its intended purpose?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zong Yaping

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the article, Scanner calibration revisited, BMC Bioinformatics 2010, 11:361, Dr. Pozhitkov used the Scanner Calibration Slide, a key product of Full Moon BioSystems to generate data in his study of microarray scanner PMT response and proposed a mathematic model for PMT response 1. In the end, the author concluded that "Full Moon BioSystems calibration slides are inadequate for performing calibration," and recommended "against using these slides." We found these conclusions are seriously flawed and misleading, and his recommendation against using the Scanner Calibration Slide was not properly supported.

  2. SCT-4800T whole body X-ray CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Yoshitaka; Sato, Yukio; Kuwahara, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    A whole body X-ray CT scanner, the SCT-4800T (trade name: INTELLECT series), has been developed. This system is the first CT scanner that is combined with general radiographic functions. The general radiographic functions include a patient couch with film casette and several tube support systems along with the CT scanner. This newly designed CT scanner also features a compact and light-weight gantry with a 700 mm diameter apperture and user-friendly operater's console. The SCT-4800T brings a new level of patient and operator comfort to the emergency radiology examination site. (author)

  3. Input Scanners: A Growing Impact In A Diverse Marketplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Kevin E.

    1989-08-01

    Just as newly invented photographic processes revolutionized the printing industry at the turn of the century, electronic imaging has affected almost every computer application today. To completely emulate traditionally mechanical means of information handling, computer based systems must be able to capture graphic images. Thus, there is a widespread need for the electronic camera, the digitizer, the input scanner. This paper will review how various types of input scanners are being used in many diverse applications. The following topics will be covered: - Historical overview of input scanners - New applications for scanners - Impact of scanning technology on select markets - Scanning systems issues

  4. Importance of professional qualification for operators of body scanners in prisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kühn, P.; Huhn, A.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The implantation of the personal search by body scanners is gradually being implanted in Brazilian prisons. The body scanner, if operated by a qualified professional, allows the observation of images, generated by X-rays, of the whole body avoiding the intimate search, which is questioned for being embarrassing to the visitors of the inmates. The use of X-rays without control of absorbed doses may endanger the health of operators of equipment and, in the case of prisons, also to visitors. Method: Exploratory and descriptive, based on national and international legislation on the subject, in order to analyze and identify suitable training for the operation of body scanners. Results: The study was composed of the Standards and Recommendations of the National and International Nuclear Energy Commission. The results although the legislation does not clearly identify professional training to operate scanners in prisons, a broad knowledge on ionizing radiation and radiological protection is of the utmost importance. Conclusion: The manipulation of equipment generating ionizing radiation must be performed by qualified and authorized professional, to guarantee the principles of radiological protection to whoever operates the equipment and the population that will possibly be submitted to the personal search in the prison units. Therefore, it is understood that professionals with adequate training and competence to ensure the integrity of the health of all are the professional of Radiological Techniques and these must prove their training with registration in the specific Class Council

  5. LANSCE-R WIRE-SCANNER ANALOG FRONT-END ELECTRONICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruchalla, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    A new AFE is being developed for the new LANSCE-R wire-scanner systems. The new AFE is implemented in a National Instruments Compact RIO (cRIO) module installed a BiRa 4U BiRIO cRIO chassis specifically designed to accommodate the cRIO crate and all the wire-scanner interface, control and motor-drive electronics. A single AFE module provides interface to both X and Y wire sensors using true DC coupled transimpedance amplifiers providing collection of the wire charge signals, real-time wire integrity verification using the normal dataacquisition system, and wire bias of 0V to +/-50V. The AFE system is designed to accommodate comparatively long macropulses (>1ms) with high PRF (>120Hz) without the need to provide timing signals. The basic AFE bandwidth is flat from true DC to 50kHz with a true first-order pole at 50kHz. Numeric integration in the cRIO FPGA provides real-time pulse-to-pulse numeric integration of the AFE signal to compute the total charge collected in each macropulse. This method of charge collection eliminates the need to provide synchronization signals to the wire-scanner AFE while providing the capability to accurately record the charge from long macropulses at high PRF.

  6. Scanner OPC signatures: automatic vendor-to-vendor OPE matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renwick, Stephen P.

    2009-03-01

    As 193nm lithography continues to be stretched and the k1 factor decreases, optical proximity correction (OPC) has become a vital part of the lithographer's tool kit. Unfortunately, as is now well known, the design variations of lithographic scanners from different vendors cause them to have slightly different optical-proximity effect (OPE) behavior, meaning that they print features through pitch in distinct ways. This in turn means that their response to OPC is not the same, and that an OPC solution designed for a scanner from Company 1 may or may not work properly on a scanner from Company 2. Since OPC is not inexpensive, that causes trouble for chipmakers using more than one brand of scanner. Clearly a scanner-matching procedure is needed to meet this challenge. Previously, automatic matching has only been reported for scanners of different tool generations from the same manufacturer. In contrast, scanners from different companies have been matched using expert tuning and adjustment techniques, frequently requiring laborious test exposures. Automatic matching between scanners from Company 1 and Company 2 has remained an unsettled problem. We have recently solved this problem and introduce a novel method to perform the automatic matching. The success in meeting this challenge required three enabling factors. First, we recognized the strongest drivers of OPE mismatch and are thereby able to reduce the information needed about a tool from another supplier to that information readily available from all modern scanners. Second, we developed a means of reliably identifying the scanners' optical signatures, minimizing dependence on process parameters that can cloud the issue. Third, we carefully employed standard statistical techniques, checking for robustness of the algorithms used and maximizing efficiency. The result is an automatic software system that can predict an OPC matching solution for scanners from different suppliers without requiring expert intervention.

  7. Computerized tomographic scanner with shaped radiation filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.W.; Walters, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    The invention comprises a shaped filter and a filter correction circuitry for computerized tomographic scanners. The shaped filter is a generally u-shaped block of filter material which is adapted to be mounted between the source of radiation and the scan circle. The u-shaped block has a parabolic recess. The filter material may be beryllium, aluminum, sulphur, calcium, titanium, erbium, copper, and compounds including oxides and alloys thereof. The filter correction circuit comprises a first filter correction profile adding circuit for adding a first scaler valve to each intensity valve in a data line. The data line is operated on by a beam hardness correction polynomial. After the beam hardness polynomial correction operation, a second filter correction circuit adds a second filter correction profile consisting of a table of scalor values, one corresponding to each intensity reading in the data line

  8. Development of scintillation materials for PET scanners

    CERN Document Server

    Korzhik, Mikhail; Annenkov, Alexander N; Borissevitch, Andrei; Dossovitski, Alexei; Missevitch, Oleg; Lecoq, Paul

    2007-01-01

    The growing demand on PET methodology for a variety of applications ranging from clinical use to fundamental studies triggers research and development of PET scanners providing better spatial resolution and sensitivity. These efforts are primarily focused on the development of advanced PET detector solutions and on the developments of new scintillation materials as well. However Lu containing scintillation materials introduced in the last century such as LSO, LYSO, LuAP, LuYAP crystals still remain the best PET species in spite of the recent developments of bright, fast but relatively low density lanthanum bromide scintillators. At the same time Lu based materials have several drawbacks which are high temperature of crystallization and relatively high cost compared to alkali-halide scintillation materials. Here we describe recent results in the development of new scintillation materials for PET application.

  9. Compact beamforming in medical ultrasound scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev

    2003-01-01

    for high-quality imaging is large, and compressing it leads to better compactness of the beamformers. The existing methods for compressing and recursive generation of focusing data, along with original work in the area, are presented in Chapter 4. The principles and the performance limitations...... quality is comparable to that of the very good scanners currently on the market. The performance results have been achieved with the use of a simple oversampled converter of second order. The use of a higher order oversampled converter will allow higher pulse frequency to be used while the high dynamic...... channels, and even more channels are necessary for 3-dimensional (3D) diagnostic imaging. On the other hand, there is a demand for inexpensive portable devices for use outside hospitals, in field conditions, where power consumption and compactness are important factors. The thesis starts...

  10. Upgraded airborne scanner for commercial remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sheng-Huei; Rubin, Tod D.

    1994-06-01

    Traditional commercial remote sensing has focused on the geologic market, with primary focus on mineral identification and mapping in the visible through short-wave infrared spectral regions (0.4 to 2.4 microns). Commercial remote sensing users now demand airborne scanning capabilities spanning the entire wavelength range from ultraviolet through thermal infrared (0.3 to 12 microns). This spectral range enables detection, identification, and mapping of objects and liquids on the earth's surface and gases in the air. Applications requiring this range of wavelengths include detection and mapping of oil spills, soil and water contamination, stressed vegetation, and renewable and non-renewable natural resources, and also change detection, natural hazard mitigation, emergency response, agricultural management, and urban planning. GER has designed and built a configurable scanner that acquires high resolution images in 63 selected wave bands in this broad wavelength range.

  11. A megavoltage CT scanner for radiotherapy verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D.G.; Swindell, W.; Morton, E.J.; Evans, P.M.; Xiao, Z.R.

    1992-01-01

    The authors have developed a system for generating megavoltage CT images immediately prior to the administration of external beam radiotherapy. The detector is based on the scanner of Simpson (Simpson et al 1982) - the major differences being a significant reduction in dose required for image formation, faster image formation and greater convenience of use in the clinical setting. Attention has been paid to the problem of ring artefacts in the images. Specifically, a Fourier-space filter has been applied to the sinogram data. After suitable detector calibration, it has been shown that the device operates close to its theoretical specification of 3 mm spatial resolution and a few percent contrast resolution. Ring artefacts continue to be a major source of image degradation. A number of clinical images are presented. (author)

  12. A clinical molecular scanner: the Melanie project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstrasser, D F; Appel, R D; Vargas, R; Perrier, R; Vurlod, J F; Ravier, F; Pasquali, C; Funk, M; Pellegrini, C; Muller, A F

    1991-01-01

    We developed an expert system to analyze and interpret protein maps. This system, Melanie (medical electrophoresis analysis interactive expert), can distinguish between normal and cirrhotic liver and identify various types of cancer on the basis of protein patterns in biopsy specimens. Our findings suggest that some diseases associated with toxic compounds or modifications of the human genome can be diagnosed by expert systems that analyze protein maps. The combination of protein mapping and computer analysis could result in a clinically useful "molecular scanner". The massive amount of information analyzed and stored in such studies requires new strategies, including centralized databases and image transmission over networks. Increased understanding of protein expression and regulation will enhance the importance of the human genome project in medicine and biology.

  13. Verification of a CT scanner using a miniature step gauge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantatore, Angela; Andreasen, J.L.; Carmignato, S.

    2011-01-01

    The work deals with performance verification of a CT scanner using a 42mm miniature replica step gauge developed for optical scanner verification. Errors quantification and optimization of CT system set-up in terms of resolution and measurement accuracy are fundamental for use of CT scanning...

  14. Quantitative Assay for Starch by Colorimetry Using a Desktop Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Kurt R.; Landmark, James D.; Stickle, Douglas F.

    2004-01-01

    The procedure to produce standard curve for starch concentration measurement by image analysis using a color scanner and computer for data acquisition and color analysis is described. Color analysis is performed by a Visual Basic program that measures red, green, and blue (RGB) color intensities for pixels within the scanner image.

  15. Vision Assisted Laser Scanner Navigation for Autonomous Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Christian; Andersen, Nils Axel; Ravn, Ole

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a navigation method based on road detection using both a laser scanner and a vision sensor. The method is to classify the surface in front of the robot into traversable segments (road) and obstacles using the laser scanner, this classifies the area just in front of the robot ...

  16. Radiation dosimetry of computed tomography x-ray scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poletti, J.L.; Williamson, B.D.P.; Le Heron, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the development and application of the methods employed in National Radiation Laboratory (NRL) surveys of computed tomography x-ray scanners (CT scanners). It includes descriptions of the phantoms and equipment used, discussion of the various dose parameters measured, the principles of the various dosimetry systems employed and some indication of the doses to occupationally exposed personnel

  17. Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emerek, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    Bidraget diskuterer de forskellige intergrationsopfattelse i Danmark - og hvad der kan forstås ved vellykket integration......Bidraget diskuterer de forskellige intergrationsopfattelse i Danmark - og hvad der kan forstås ved vellykket integration...

  18. Computer Tomography Scanners in Portugal (1990-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Crispim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of Computed Tomography (CT has increased every year since its introduction into medicine in 1972. Technological developments have made CT one of the most important imaging modalities in modern medicine. This importance is evidenced in the increasing demand and number of CT scanners installed in Portugal and worldwide. This review compiles the most recent national statistics from official publications on the number of CT scanners installed in Portugal and compares them with data available in international publications. We conclude that the number of CT scanners installed in Portugal exceeded the EU27 average by 61.5 % and the OECD average by 78.2 %, and that in 2011 there were 203 CT scanners installed in hospitals in Portugal, which equated to 19.23 CT scanners per million inhabitants.

  19. Comparison of Epson scanner quality for radiochromic film evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnawaf, Hani; Yu, Peter K N; Butson, Martin

    2012-09-06

    Epson Desktop scanners have been quoted as devices which match the characteristics required for the evaluation of radiation dose exposure by radiochromic films. Specifically, models such as the 10000XL have been used successfully for image analysis and are recommended by ISP for dosimetry purposes. This note investigates and compares the scanner characteristics of three Epson desktop scanner models including the Epson 10000XL, V700, and V330. Both of the latter are substantially cheaper models capable of A4 scanning. As the price variation between the V330 and the 10000XL is 20-fold (based on Australian recommended retail price), cost savings by using the cheaper scanners may be warranted based on results. By a direct comparison of scanner uniformity and reproducibility we can evaluate the accuracy of these scanners for radiochromic film dosimetry. Results have shown that all three scanners can produce adequate scanner uniformity and reproducibility, with the inexpensive V330 producing a standard deviation variation across its landscape direction of 0.7% and 1.2% in the portrait direction (reflection mode). This is compared to the V700 in reflection mode of 0.25% and 0.5% for landscape and portrait directions, respectively, and 0.5% and 0.8% for the 10000XL. In transmission mode, the V700 is comparable in reproducibility to the 10000XL for portrait and landscape mode, whilst the V330 is only capable of scanning in the landscape direction and produces a standard deviation in this direction of 1.0% compared to 0.6% (V700) and 0.25% (10000XL). Results have shown that the V700 and 10000XL are comparable scanners in quality and accuracy with the 10000XL obviously capable of imaging over an A3 area as opposed to an A4 area for the V700. The V330 scanner produced slightly lower accuracy and quality with uncertainties approximately twice as much as the other scanners. However, the results show that the V330 is still an adequate scanner and could be used for radiation

  20. [Integrity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Rodríguez, Rafael Ángel

    2014-01-01

    To say that someone possesses integrity is to claim that that person is almost predictable about responses to specific situations, that he or she can prudentially judge and to act correctly. There is a closed interrelationship between integrity and autonomy, and the autonomy rests on the deeper moral claim of all humans to integrity of the person. Integrity has two senses of significance for medical ethic: one sense refers to the integrity of the person in the bodily, psychosocial and intellectual elements; and in the second sense, the integrity is the virtue. Another facet of integrity of the person is la integrity of values we cherish and espouse. The physician must be a person of integrity if the integrity of the patient is to be safeguarded. The autonomy has reduced the violations in the past, but the character and virtues of the physician are the ultimate safeguard of autonomy of patient. A field very important in medicine is the scientific research. It is the character of the investigator that determines the moral quality of research. The problem arises when legitimate self-interests are replaced by selfish, particularly when human subjects are involved. The final safeguard of moral quality of research is the character and conscience of the investigator. Teaching must be relevant in the scientific field, but the most effective way to teach virtue ethics is through the example of the a respected scientist.

  1. Design of a high-precision fast wire scanner for the SPS at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Veness, R; Dehning, B; Emery, J; Herranz Alvarez, J; Koujili, M; Samuelsson, S; Sirvent, J-L

    2012-01-01

    Studies are going on of a new wire scanner concept. All moving parts are inside the beam vacuum and it is specified for use in all the machines across the CERN accelerator complex. Key components have been developed and tested. Work is now focussing on the installation of a prototype for test in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) accelerator. This article presents the specification of the device and constraints on the design for integration in the different accelerators at CERN. The design issues of the mechanical components are discussed and optimisation work shown. Finally, the prototype design, integrating the several components into the vacuum tank is presented.

  2. An ASIC implementation of digital front-end electronics for a high resolution PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newport, D.F.; Young, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    AN Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) has been designed and fabricated which implements many of the current functions found in the digital front-end electronics for a high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanner. The ASIC performs crystal selection, energy qualification, time correction, and event counting functions for block technology high resolution PET scanners. Digitized x and y position, event energy, and time information are used by the ASIC to determine block crystal number, qualify the event based on energy, and correct the event time. In addition, event counting and block dead time calculations are performed for system dead time corrections. A loadable sequencer for controlling the analog front-end electronics is also implemented. The ASIC is implemented in a 37,000 gate, 1.0 micron CMOS gate-array and is capable of handling 4 million events/second while reducing parts count, cost, and power consumption over current board-level designs

  3. Focal plane scanner with reciprocating spatial window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Chengye (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A focal plane scanner having a front objective lens, a spatial window for selectively passing a portion of the image therethrough, and a CCD array for receiving the passed portion of the image. All embodiments have a common feature whereby the spatial window and CCD array are mounted for simultaneous relative reciprocating movement with respect to the front objective lens, and the spatial window is mounted within the focal plane of the front objective. In a first embodiment, the spatial window is a slit and the CCD array is one-dimensional, and successive rows of the image in the focal plane of the front objective lens are passed to the CCD array by an image relay lens interposed between the slit and the CCD array. In a second embodiment, the spatial window is a slit, the CCD array is two-dimensional, and a prism-grating-prism optical spectrometer is interposed between the slit and the CCD array so as to cause the scanned row to be split into a plurality of spectral separations onto the CCD array. In a third embodiment, the CCD array is two-dimensional and the spatial window is a rectangular linear variable filter (LVF) window, so as to cause the scanned rows impinging on the LVF to be bandpass filtered into spectral components onto the CCD array through an image relay lens interposed between the LVF and the CCD array.

  4. Fast and High Accuracy Wire Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Koujili, M; Koopman, J; Ramos, D; Sapinski, M; De Freitas, J; Ait Amira, Y; Djerdir, A

    2009-01-01

    Scanning of a high intensity particle beam imposes challenging requirements on a Wire Scanner system. It is expected to reach a scanning speed of 20 m.s-1 with a position accuracy of the order of 1 μm. In addition a timing accuracy better than 1 millisecond is needed. The adopted solution consists of a fork holding a wire rotating by a maximum of 200°. Fork, rotor and angular position sensor are mounted on the same axis and located in a chamber connected to the beam vacuum. The requirements imply the design of a system with extremely low vibration, vacuum compatibility, radiation and temperature tolerance. The adopted solution consists of a rotary brushless synchronous motor with the permanent magnet rotor installed inside of the vacuum chamber and the stator installed outside. The accurate position sensor will be mounted on the rotary shaft inside of the vacuum chamber, has to resist a bake-out temperature of 200°C and ionizing radiation up to a dozen of kGy/year. A digital feedback controller allows maxi...

  5. APLIKASI INFO HALAL MENGGUNAKAN BARCODE SCANNER UNTUK SMARTPHONE ANDROID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beki Subeki

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract – In the production and trade of food products in the era of globalization, people are consuming, especially Muslims need to be given the knowledge, information and access to adequate in order to obtain the correct information about the halal status of products bought. The use of barcode scanners halal product information using the mobile platform is effective and useful for the public to find out information on a product. Barcode scanners can be read by optical scanners called barcode readers or scanned from an image by special software. In Indonesia, most mobile phones have the scanning software for 2D codes, and similar devices available via smartphone.   Keywords : Barcode Scanner, Mobile Platform, Halal Products, Smartphone     Abstrak - Dalam kegiatan produksi dan perdagangan produk pangan di era globalisasi ini, masyarakat yang mengkonsumsi, khususnya umat islam perlu diberikan pengetahuan tentang kehalalan produk, informasi dan akses yang memadai agar memperoleh informasi yang benar tentang status kehalalan produk yang dibelinya. Penggunaan barcode scanner informasi produk halal dengan menggunakan mobile platform dinilai cukup efektif dan berguna bagi masyarakat luas untuk mengetahui informasi sebuah produk. Barcode scanner dapat dibaca oleh pemindai optik yang disebut pembaca kode batang atau dipindai dari sebuah gambar oleh perangkat lunak khusus. Di Indonesia, kebanyakan telepon genggam memiliki perangkat lunak pemindai untuk kode 2D, dan perangkat sejenis tersedia melalui smartphone.   Kata Kunci: Barcode Scanner, Mobile Platform, Produk Halal, Smartphone

  6. The usefulness of the combined PET-CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Kyosan

    2003-01-01

    Recently, combined PET-CT scanners that simultaneously reveal both anatomical and metabolic images within the body have been developed. The Siemens Biograph was the first PET-CT used in Japan and was installed at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) at the end of March 2002. The Biograph system integrates Siemens PET (HR+) and spiral CT (SOMATOM Emotion Duo) technologies with a multimodality computer platform. The CT data obtained with PET-CT is also used for attenuation corrections of the PET images. The advantages of PET-CT for clinical use are much shorter study time for each patient, easy and precise alignment of the patient's lesion within the PET field of view, an increase in PET image quality due to the CT attenuation correction system which gives a higher spatial resolution and produces much less noise in the attenuation correction data, and an improvement in diagnostic accuracy provided by both functional and anatomic imaging. The Japanese government has not yet approved the marketing of PET-CT. We are continuing to investigate its usefulness. We expect that PET-CT will be a major diagnostic tool for oncology imaging in the near future. (authors)

  7. Restoration of Hyperspectral Push-Broom Scanner Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Conradsen, Knut

    1997-01-01

    Several effects combine to distort the multispectral data that are obtained from push-broom scanners. We develop an algorithm for restoration of such data, illustrated on images from the ROSIS scanner. In push-broom scanners variation between elements in the detector array results in a strong...... back into the original spectral space results in noise corrected variables. The noise components will now have been removed from the entire original data set by working on a smaller set of noise contaminated transformed variables only. The application of the above techniques results in a dramatic...

  8. NOAA-9 Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanner offsets determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avis, Lee M.; Paden, Jack; Lee, Robert B., III; Pandey, Dhirendra K.; Stassi, Joseph C.; Wilson, Robert S.; Tolson, Carol J.; Bolden, William C.

    1994-01-01

    The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) instruments are designed to measure the components of the radiative exchange between the Sun, Earth and space. ERBE is comprised of three spacecraft, each carrying a nearly identical set of radiometers: a three-channel narrow-field-of-view scanner, a two-channel wide-field-of-view (limb-to-limb) non-scanning radiometer, a two-channel medium field-of view (1000 km) non-scanning radiometer, and a solar monitor. Ground testing showed the scanners to be susceptible to self-generated and externally generated electromagnetic noise. This paper describes the pre-launch corrective measures taken and the post-launch corrections to the NOAA-9 scanner data. The NOAA-9 scanner has met the mission objectives in accuracy and precision, in part because of the pre-launch reductions of and post-launch data corrections for the electromagnetic noise.

  9. Landsat 1-5 Multispectral Scanner V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract: The Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS) was a sensor onboard Landsats 1 through 5 and acquired images of the Earth nearly continuously from July 1972 to...

  10. Design Optimization of a TOF, Breast PET Scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Eunsin; Werner, Matthew E.; Karp, Joel S.; Surti, Suleman

    2013-01-01

    A dedicated breast positron emission tomography (PET) scanner with limited angle geometry can provide flexibility in detector placement around the patient as well as the ability to combine it with other imaging modalities. A primary challenge of a stationary limited angle scanner is the reduced image quality due to artifacts present in the reconstructed image leading to a loss in quantitative information. Previously it has been shown that using time-of-flight (TOF) information in image recons...

  11. A fast ADC scanner for multiparameter nuclear physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midttun, G.; Ingebretsen, F.; Holt, K.; Skaali, B.

    1983-04-01

    A fast readout system for multiparameter experiments in nuclear physics is described. The central part of the CAMAC aquisition hardware is an ADC scanner module. The scanner incorporates a new arbitration logic and direct memory access for simultaneous transfer of singles and correlated data. Together with specially designed ADC interfaces the system can be set up for any configuration of singles and multiparameter events from 1 up to 15 ADC's in one crate

  12. A fast ADC scanner for multiparameter nuclear physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midttun, G.; Holt, K.; Ingebretsen, F.; Skaali, B.

    1983-01-01

    A fast readout system for multiparameter experiments in nuclear physics is described. The central part of the CAMAC aquisition hardware is an ADC scanner module. The scanner incorporates a new arbitration logic and direct memory access for simultaneous transfer of singles and correlated data. Together with specially designed ADC interfaces the system can be set up for any configurations of singles and multiparameter events from 1 up to 15 ADC's in one crate

  13. Utilization pattern of whole body computed tomography scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, Chul Ho; Lee, Sang Suk

    1986-01-01

    Computed tomography scanner (CT scanner) is one of the most expensive and sophisticated diagnostic tool and has already been utilized in many hospitals in Korea. The price as well as operating costs of CT scanner is so expensive as to regulate its installment by government even in the United States. In order to identify the efficient utilization of the CT scanner, the utilization pattern for CT scanning was analyzed at three general hospital in seoul. The results are as follows: 1. Five out of one thousand outpatients and five out of one hundred inpatients were CT scanned. 2. Eighty percent of patients who were scanned were those of inpatients of the hospitals where the scanned are installed. 3. Head standings constitute 45.6 percent of examinations, internal medicine 63.8 percent, and 38.5 percent neurosurgery respectively. 4. The rate of indication for CT scanning showed no statistically significant difference between insured and non-insured groups. 5. Computed tomography scanner units were operated 5.5 days a week in average and full operation rate was 79.5% in average. 6. The major diagnoses mode by head scanning were: hematoma (56.7%), infarction (12.6%), tumor (8.2%), and hydrocephalus (4.4%). 7. Number of patients taken CT Scanning was 43 persons a week in average for each whole body scanner unit

  14. Scanner qualification with IntenCD based reticle error correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elblinger, Yair; Finders, Jo; Demarteau, Marcel; Wismans, Onno; Minnaert Janssen, Ingrid; Duray, Frank; Ben Yishai, Michael; Mangan, Shmoolik; Cohen, Yaron; Parizat, Ziv; Attal, Shay; Polonsky, Netanel; Englard, Ilan

    2010-03-01

    Scanner introduction into the fab production environment is a challenging task. An efficient evaluation of scanner performance matrices during factory acceptance test (FAT) and later on during site acceptance test (SAT) is crucial for minimizing the cycle time for pre and post production-start activities. If done effectively, the matrices of base line performance established during the SAT are used as a reference for scanner performance and fleet matching monitoring and maintenance in the fab environment. Key elements which can influence the cycle time of the SAT, FAT and maintenance cycles are the imaging, process and mask characterizations involved with those cycles. Discrete mask measurement techniques are currently in use to create across-mask CDU maps. By subtracting these maps from their final wafer measurement CDU map counterparts, it is possible to assess the real scanner induced printed errors within certain limitations. The current discrete measurement methods are time consuming and some techniques also overlook mask based effects other than line width variations, such as transmission and phase variations, all of which influence the final printed CD variability. Applied Materials Aera2TM mask inspection tool with IntenCDTM technology can scan the mask at high speed, offer full mask coverage and accurate assessment of all masks induced source of errors simultaneously, making it beneficial for scanner qualifications and performance monitoring. In this paper we report on a study that was done to improve a scanner introduction and qualification process using the IntenCD application to map the mask induced CD non uniformity. We will present the results of six scanners in production and discuss the benefits of the new method.

  15. Quality assurance for MR stereotactic imaging for three Siemens scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozubikova, P.; Novotny, J. Jr.; Kulhova, K.; Mihalova, P.; Tamasova, J.; Veselsk, T.

    2014-01-01

    Quality assurance of stereotactic imaging, especially with MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), is a complex issue. It can be divided in the basic verification and commissioning of a particular new scanner or a new scanning MRI protocol that is being implemented into a clinical practice and the routine quality assurance performed for each single radiosurgical case. The aim of this study was geometric distortion assessment in MRI with a special PTGR (Physikalisch-Technische Gesellschaft fuer Radiologie - GmbH, Tuebingen, Germany) target phantom. PTGR phantom consists of 21 three-dimensional cross-hairs filled with contrast medium. Cross hairs are positioned at known Leksell coordinates with a precision of better than 0.1 mm and covering the whole stereotactic space. The phantom can be fixed in the Leksell stereotactic frame and thus stereotactic imaging procedures can be reproduced following exactly the same steps as for a real patient, including also the stereotactic image definition in the Leksell GammaPlan. Since the geometric position (stereotactic coordinates) of each cross-hair is known based on the construction of the phantom, it can be compared with the actual measured Leksell coordinates based on the stereotactic MRI. Deviations between expected and actual coordinates provide information about the level of distortion. The measured distortions proved satisfactory accuracy precision for stereotactic localization at 1.5 T Siemens Magnetom Avanto scanner, Siemens Magnetom Symphony scanner and 3T Siemens Magnetom Skyra scanner (Na Homolce Hospital, Prague). The mean distortion for these MR scanners for standard imaging protocol (T1 weighted 3D images) were 0.8 mm, 1.1 mm and 1.1 mm and maximum distortions were 1.3 mm, 1.9 mm and 2.2 mm, respectively.There was detected dependence of the distortions on the slice orientation and the type of imaging protocol. Image distortions are also property of each particular scanner, the worst distortion were observed for 3T

  16. Improved Scanners for Microscopic Hyperspectral Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Chengye

    2009-01-01

    Improved scanners to be incorporated into hyperspectral microscope-based imaging systems have been invented. Heretofore, in microscopic imaging, including spectral imaging, it has been customary to either move the specimen relative to the optical assembly that includes the microscope or else move the entire assembly relative to the specimen. It becomes extremely difficult to control such scanning when submicron translation increments are required, because the high magnification of the microscope enlarges all movements in the specimen image on the focal plane. To overcome this difficulty, in a system based on this invention, no attempt would be made to move either the specimen or the optical assembly. Instead, an objective lens would be moved within the assembly so as to cause translation of the image at the focal plane: the effect would be equivalent to scanning in the focal plane. The upper part of the figure depicts a generic proposed microscope-based hyperspectral imaging system incorporating the invention. The optical assembly of this system would include an objective lens (normally, a microscope objective lens) and a charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera. The objective lens would be mounted on a servomotor-driven translation stage, which would be capable of moving the lens in precisely controlled increments, relative to the camera, parallel to the focal-plane scan axis. The output of the CCD camera would be digitized and fed to a frame grabber in a computer. The computer would store the frame-grabber output for subsequent viewing and/or processing of images. The computer would contain a position-control interface board, through which it would control the servomotor. There are several versions of the invention. An essential feature common to all versions is that the stationary optical subassembly containing the camera would also contain a spatial window, at the focal plane of the objective lens, that would pass only a selected portion of the image. In one version

  17. Astrometric properties of the Tautenburg Plate Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunzendorf, Jens; Meusinger, Helmut

    The Tautenburg Plate Scanner (TPS) is an advanced plate-measuring machine run by the Thüringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg (Karl Schwarzschild Observatory), where the machine is housed. It is capable of digitising photographic plates up to 30 cm × 30 cm in size. In our poster, we reported on tests and preliminary results of its astrometric properties. The essential components of the TPS consist of an x-y table movable between an illumination system and a direct imaging system. A telecentric lens images the light transmitted through the photographic emulsion onto a CCD line of 6000 pixels of 10 µm square size each. All components are mounted on a massive air-bearing table. Scanning is performed in lanes of up to 55 mm width by moving the x-y table in a continuous drift-scan mode perpendicular to the CCD line. The analogue output from the CCD is digitised to 12 bit with a total signal/noise ratio of 1000 : 1, corresponding to a photographic density range of three. The pixel map is produced as a series of optionally overlapping lane scans. The pixel data are stored onto CD-ROM or DAT. A Tautenburg Schmidt plate 24 cm × 24 cm in size is digitised within 2.5 hours resulting in 1.3 GB of data. Subsequent high-level data processing is performed off-line on other computers. During the scanning process, the geometry of the optical components is kept fixed. The optimal focussing of the optics is performed prior to the scan. Due to the telecentric lens refocussing is not required. Therefore, the main source of astrometric errors (beside the emulsion itself) are mechanical imperfections in the drive system, which have to be divided into random and systematic ones. The r.m.s. repeatability over the whole plate as measured by repeated scans of the same plate is about 0.5 µm for each axis. The mean plate-to-plate accuracy of the object positions on two plates with the same epoch and the same plate centre has been determined to be about 1 µm. This accuracy is comparable to

  18. Design and operation of a portable scanner for high performance microchip capillary array electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, James R; Liu, Peng; Mathies, Richard A

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a compact, laser-induced fluorescence detection scanner, the multichannel capillary array electrophoresis portable scanner (McCAEPs) as a platform for electrophoretic detection and control of high-throughput, integrated microfluidic devices for genetic and other analyses. The instrument contains a confocal optical system with a rotary objective for detecting four different fluorescence signals, a pneumatic system consisting of two pressure/vacuum pumps and 28 individual addressable solenoid valves for control of on-chip microvalves and micropumps, four Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) temperature control systems, and four high voltage power supplies for electrophoresis. The detection limit of the instrument is ~20 pM for on-chip capillary electrophoresis of fluorescein dyes. To demonstrate the system performance for forensic short tandem repeat (STR) analysis, two experiments were conducted: (i) electrophoretic separation and detection of STR samples on a 96-lane microfabricated capillary array electrophoresis microchip. Fully resolved PowerPlex(®) 16 STR profiles amplified from 1 ng of 9947A female standard DNA were successfully obtained; (ii) nine-plex STR amplification, sample injection, separation, and fluorescence detection of 100-copy 9948 male standard DNA in a single integrated PCR- capillary electrophoresis microchip. These results demonstrate that the McCAEPs can be used as a versatile control and detection instrument that operates integrated microfluidic devices for high-performance forensic human identification.

  19. Miniaturized Fourier-plane fiber scanner for OCT endoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilches, Sergio; Kretschmer, Simon; Ataman, Çağlar; Zappe, Hans

    2017-01-01

    A forward-looking endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) probe featuring a Fourier-plane fiber scanner is designed, manufactured and characterized. In contrast to common image-plane fiber scanners, the Fourier-plane scanner is a telecentric arrangement that eliminates vignetting and spatial resolution variations across the image plane. To scan the OCT beam in a spiral pattern, a tubular piezoelectric actuator is used to resonate an optical fiber bearing a collimating GRIN lens at its tip. The free-end of the GRIN lens sits at the back focal plane of an objective lens, such that its rotation replicates the beam angles in the collimated region of a classical telecentric 4f optical system. Such an optical arrangement inherently has a low numerical aperture combined with a relatively large field-of-view, rendering it particularly useful for endoscopic OCT imaging. Furthermore, the optical train of the Fourier-plane scanner is shorter than that of a comparable image-plane scanner by one focal length of the objective lens, significantly shortening the final arrangement. As a result, enclosed within a 3D printed housing of 2.5 mm outer diameter and 15 mm total length, the developed probe is the most compact forward-looking endoscopic OCT imager to date. Due to its compact form factor and compatibility with real-time OCT imaging, the developed probe is also ideal for use in the working channel of flexible endoscopes as a potential optical biopsy tool. (paper)

  20. Miniaturized Fourier-plane fiber scanner for OCT endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilches, Sergio; Kretschmer, Simon; Ataman, Çağlar; Zappe, Hans

    2017-10-01

    A forward-looking endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) probe featuring a Fourier-plane fiber scanner is designed, manufactured and characterized. In contrast to common image-plane fiber scanners, the Fourier-plane scanner is a telecentric arrangement that eliminates vignetting and spatial resolution variations across the image plane. To scan the OCT beam in a spiral pattern, a tubular piezoelectric actuator is used to resonate an optical fiber bearing a collimating GRIN lens at its tip. The free-end of the GRIN lens sits at the back focal plane of an objective lens, such that its rotation replicates the beam angles in the collimated region of a classical telecentric 4f optical system. Such an optical arrangement inherently has a low numerical aperture combined with a relatively large field-of-view, rendering it particularly useful for endoscopic OCT imaging. Furthermore, the optical train of the Fourier-plane scanner is shorter than that of a comparable image-plane scanner by one focal length of the objective lens, significantly shortening the final arrangement. As a result, enclosed within a 3D printed housing of 2.5 mm outer diameter and 15 mm total length, the developed probe is the most compact forward-looking endoscopic OCT imager to date. Due to its compact form factor and compatibility with real-time OCT imaging, the developed probe is also ideal for use in the working channel of flexible endoscopes as a potential optical biopsy tool.

  1. Moths on the Flatbed Scanner: The Art of Joseph Scheer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen L. Buchmann

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available During the past decade a few artists and even fewer entomologists discovered flatbed scanning technology, using extreme resolution graphical arts scanners for acquiring high magnification digital images of plants, animals and inanimate objects. They are not just for trip receipts anymore. The special attributes of certain scanners, to image thick objects is discussed along with the technical features of the scanners including magnification, color depth and shadow detail. The work of pioneering scanner artist, Joseph Scheer from New York’s Alfred University is highlighted. Representative flatbed-scanned images of moths are illustrated along with techniques to produce them. Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described. Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture. The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

  2. Characterization of a Large, Low-Cost 3D Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Straub

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Imagery-based 3D scanning can be performed by scanners with multiple form factors, ranging from small and inexpensive scanners requiring manual movement around a stationary object to large freestanding (nearly instantaneous units. Small mobile units are problematic for use in scanning living creatures, which may be unwilling or unable to (or for the very young and animals, unaware of the need to hold a fixed position for an extended period of time. Alternately, very high cost scanners that can capture a complete scan within a few seconds are available, but they are cost prohibitive for some applications. This paper seeks to assess the performance of a large, low-cost 3D scanner, presented in prior work, which is able to concurrently capture imagery from all around an object. It provides the capabilities of the large, freestanding units at a price point akin to the smaller, mobile ones. This allows access to 3D scanning technology (particularly for applications requiring instantaneous imaging at a lower cost. Problematically, prior analysis of the scanner’s performance was extremely limited. This paper characterizes the efficacy of the scanner for scanning both inanimate objects and humans. Given the importance of lighting to visible light scanning systems, the scanner’s performance under multiple lighting configurations is evaluated, characterizing its sensitivity to lighting design.

  3. 'Integration'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olwig, Karen Fog

    2011-01-01

    , while the countries have adopted disparate policies and ideologies, differences in the actual treatment and attitudes towards immigrants and refugees in everyday life are less clear, due to parallel integration programmes based on strong similarities in the welfare systems and in cultural notions...... of equality in the three societies. Finally, it shows that family relations play a central role in immigrants’ and refugees’ establishment of a new life in the receiving societies, even though the welfare society takes on many of the social and economic functions of the family....

  4. Free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqoob, Z; Rizvi, A A; Riza, N A

    2001-12-10

    A wavelength-multiplexed optical scanning scheme is proposed for deflecting a free-space optical beam by selection of the wavelength of the light incident on a wavelength-dispersive optical element. With fast tunable lasers or optical filters, this scanner features microsecond domain scan setting speeds and large- diameter apertures of several centimeters or more for subdegree angular scans. Analysis performed indicates an optimum scan range for a given diffraction order and grating period. Limitations include beam-spreading effects based on the varying scanner aperture sizes and the instantaneous information bandwidth of the data-carrying laser beam.

  5. Cyclone: A laser scanner for mobile robot navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanjiv; West, Jay

    1991-09-01

    Researchers at Carnegie Mellon's Field Robotics Center have designed and implemented a scanning laser rangefinder. The device uses a commercially available time-of-flight ranging instrument that is capable of making up to 7200 measurements per second. The laser beam is reflected by a rotating mirror, producing up to a 360 degree view. Mounted on a robot vehicle, the scanner can be used to detect obstacles in the vehicle's path or to locate the robot on a map. This report discusses the motivation, design, and some applications of the scanner.

  6. Scanner baseliner monitoring and control in high volume manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samudrala, Pavan; Chung, Woong Jae; Aung, Nyan; Subramany, Lokesh; Gao, Haiyong; Gomez, Juan-Manuel

    2016-03-01

    We analyze performance of different customized models on baseliner overlay data and demonstrate the reduction in overlay residuals by ~10%. Smart Sampling sets were assessed and compared with the full wafer measurements. We found that performance of the grid can still be maintained by going to one-third of total sampling points, while reducing metrology time by 60%. We also demonstrate the feasibility of achieving time to time matching using scanner fleet manager and thus identify the tool drifts even when the tool monitoring controls are within spec limits. We also explore the scanner feedback constant variation with illumination sources.

  7. Development of the Shimadzu computed tomographic scanner SCT-200N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Hiroshi; Yamaoka, Nobuyuki; Saito, Masahiro

    1982-01-01

    The Shimadzu Computed Tomographic Scanner SCT-200N has been developed as an ideal CT scanner for diagnosing the head and spine. Due to the large aperture, moderate scan time and the Zoom Scan Mode, any part of the body can be scanned. High quality image can be obtained by adopting the precisely stabilized X-ray unit and densely packed array of 64-detectors. As for its operation, capability of computed radiography (CR) prior to patient positioning and real time reconstruction ensure efficient patient through-put. Details of the SCT-200N are described in this paper. (author)

  8. Isocount scintillation scanner with preset statistical data reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikebe, J.; Yamaguchi, H.; Nawa, O.A.

    1975-01-01

    A scintillation detector scans an object such as a live body along horizontal straight scanning lines in such a manner that the scintillation detector is stopped at a scanning point during the time interval T required for counting a predetermined number of N pulses. The rate R/sub N/ = N/T is then calculated and the output signal pulses the number of which represents the rate R or the corresponding output signal is used as the recording signal for forming the scintigram. In contrast to the usual scanner, the isocount scanner scans an object stepwise in order to gather data with statistically uniform reliability

  9. Building secure network by integrated technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Dehai; Xu Rongsheng; Liu Baoxu

    2000-01-01

    The author introduces a method which can realize the most powerful network security prevention by the network security integrated technologies such as firewall, realtime monitor, network scanner, Web detection and security, etc

  10. The feasibility of a scanner-independent technique to estimate organ dose from MDCT scans: Using CTDIvol to account for differences between scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, Adam C.; Zankl, Maria; DeMarco, John J.; Cagnon, Chris H.; Zhang Di; Angel, Erin; Cody, Dianna D.; Stevens, Donna M.; McCollough, Cynthia H.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Monte Carlo radiation transport techniques have made it possible to accurately estimate the radiation dose to radiosensitive organs in patient models from scans performed with modern multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) scanners. However, there is considerable variation in organ doses across scanners, even when similar acquisition conditions are used. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a technique to estimate organ doses that would be scanner independent. This was accomplished by assessing the ability of CTDI vol measurements to account for differences in MDCT scanners that lead to organ dose differences. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations of 64-slice MDCT scanners from each of the four major manufacturers were performed. An adult female patient model from the GSF family of voxelized phantoms was used in which all ICRP Publication 103 radiosensitive organs were identified. A 120 kVp, full-body helical scan with a pitch of 1 was simulated for each scanner using similar scan protocols across scanners. From each simulated scan, the radiation dose to each organ was obtained on a per mA s basis (mGy/mA s). In addition, CTDI vol values were obtained from each scanner for the selected scan parameters. Then, to demonstrate the feasibility of generating organ dose estimates from scanner-independent coefficients, the simulated organ dose values resulting from each scanner were normalized by the CTDI vol value for those acquisition conditions. Results: CTDI vol values across scanners showed considerable variation as the coefficient of variation (CoV) across scanners was 34.1%. The simulated patient scans also demonstrated considerable differences in organ dose values, which varied by up to a factor of approximately 2 between some of the scanners. The CoV across scanners for the simulated organ doses ranged from 26.7% (for the adrenals) to 37.7% (for the thyroid), with a mean CoV of 31.5% across all organs. However, when organ doses

  11. Teach Your Computer to Read: Scanners and Optical Character Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Jim

    1993-01-01

    Desktop scanners can be used with a software technology called optical character recognition (OCR) to convert the text on virtually any paper document into an electronic form. OCR offers educators new flexibility in incorporating text into tests, lesson plans, and other materials. (MLF)

  12. Feature-space transformation improves supervised segmentation across scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Opbroek, Annegreet; Achterberg, Hakim C.; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2015-01-01

    Image-segmentation techniques based on supervised classification generally perform well on the condition that training and test samples have the same feature distribution. However, if training and test images are acquired with different scanners or scanning parameters, their feature distributions...

  13. Free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqoob, Zahid; Riza, Nabeel A

    2002-09-10

    Experimental demonstration of a no-moving-parts free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner (W-MOS) is presented. With fast tunable lasers or optical filters and planar wavelength dispersive elements such as diffraction gratings, this microsecond-speed scanner enables large several-centimeter apertures for subdegree angular scans. The proposed W-MOS design incorporates a unique optical amplifier and variable optical attenuator combination that enables the calibration and modulation of the scanner response, leading to any desired scanned laser beam power shaping. The experimental setup uses a tunable laser centered at 1560 nm and a 600-grooves/mm blazed reflection grating to accomplish an angular scan of 12.92 degrees as the source is tuned over an 80-nm bandwidth. The values for calculated maximum optical beam divergance, required wavelength resolution, beam-pointing accuracy, and measured scanner insertion loss are 1.076 mrad, 0.172 nm, 0.06 mrad, and 4.88 dB, respectively.

  14. Sea surface temperature mapping using a thermal infrared scanner

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R; Pandya, R; Mathur, K.M.; Charyulu, R; Rao, L.V.G.

    1 metre water column below the sea surface. A thermal infrared scanner developed by the Space Applications Centre (ISRO), Ahmedabad was operated on board R.V. Gaveshani in April/May 1984 for mapping SST over the eastern Arabian Sea. SST values...

  15. The economic potential of CT scanners for hardwood sawmills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald G. Hodges; Walter C. Anderson; Charles W. McMillin

    1990-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that a knowledge of internal log defects prior to sawing could improve lumber value yields significantly. This study evaluated the potential economic returns from investments in computerized tomographic (CT) scanners to detect internal defects in hardwood logs at southern sawmills. The results indicate that such investments would be profitable...

  16. Benchmarking Advanced Control Algorithms for a Laser Scanner System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Ordys, A.W.; Smillie, I.

    1996-01-01

    The paper describes tests performed on the laser scanner system toassess feasibility of modern control techniques in achieving a requiredperformance in the trajectory following problem. The two methods tested areQTR H-infinity and Predictive Control. The results are ilustated ona simulation example....

  17. Scanner image methodology (SIM) to measure dimensions of leaves ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A scanner image methodology was used to determine plant dimensions, such as leaf area, length and width. The values obtained using SIM were compared with those recorded by the LI-COR leaf area meter. Bias, linearity, reproducibility and repeatability (R&R) were evaluated for SIM. Different groups of leaves were ...

  18. Algorithms for Coastal-Zone Color-Scanner Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Software for Nimbus-7 Coastal-Zone Color-Scanner (CZCS) derived products consists of set of scientific algorithms for extracting information from CZCS-gathered data. Software uses CZCS-generated Calibrated RadianceTemperature (CRT) tape as input and outputs computer-compatible tape and film product.

  19. Demonstration: A smartphone 3D functional brain scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlhut, Carsten; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Larsen, Jakob Eg

    We demonstrate a fully portable 3D real-time functional brain scanner consisting of a wireless 14-channel ‘Neuroheadset‘ (Emotiv EPOC) and a Nokia N900 smartphone. The novelty of our system is the ability to perform real-time functional brain imaging on a smartphone device, including stimulus...

  20. Design of active-neutron fuel rod scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, G.W.; Menlove, H.O.

    1996-01-01

    An active-neutron fuel rod scanner has been designed for the assay of fissile materials in mixed oxide fuel rods. A 252 Cf source is located at the center of the scanner very near the through hole for the fuel rods. Spontaneous fission neutrons from the californium are moderated and induce fissions within the passing fuel rod. The rod continues past a combined gamma-ray and neutron shield where delayed gamma rays above 1 MeV are detected. We used the Monte Carlo code MCNP to design the scanner and review optimum materials and geometries. An inhomogeneous beryllium, graphite, and polyethylene moderator has been designed that uses source neutrons much more efficiently than assay systems using polyethylene moderators. Layers of borated polyethylene and tungsten are used to shield the detectors. Large NaI(Tl) detectors were selected to measure the delayed gamma rays. The enrichment zones of a thermal reactor fuel pin could be measured to within 1% counting statistics for practical rod speeds. Applications of the rod scanner include accountability of fissile material for safeguards applications, quality control of the fissile content in a fuel rod, and the verification of reactivity potential for mixed oxide fuels. (orig.)

  1. Performance evaluation of a high resolution dedicated breast PET scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García Hernández, Trinitat, E-mail: mtrinitat@eresa.com; Vicedo González, Aurora; Brualla González, Luis; Granero Cabañero, Domingo [Department of Medical Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia 46014 (Spain); Ferrer Rebolleda, Jose; Sánchez Jurado, Raúl; Puig Cozar Santiago, Maria del [Department of Nuclear Medicine, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia 46014 (Spain); Roselló Ferrando, Joan [Department of Medical Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia 46014 (Spain); Department of Physiology, University of Valencia, Valencia 46010 (Spain)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: Early stage breast cancers may not be visible on a whole-body PET scan. To overcome whole-body PET limitations, several dedicated breast positron emission tomography (DbPET) systems have emerged nowadays aiming to improve spatial resolution. In this work the authors evaluate the performance of a high resolution dedicated breast PET scanner (Mammi-PET, Oncovision). Methods: Global status, uniformity, sensitivity, energy, and spatial resolution were measured. Spheres of different sizes (2.5, 4, 5, and 6 mm diameter) and various 18 fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) activity concentrations were randomly inserted in a gelatine breast phantom developed at our institution. Several lesion-to-background ratios (LBR) were simulated, 5:1, 10:1, 20:1, 30:1, and 50:1. Images were reconstructed using different voxel sizes. The ability of experienced reporters to detect spheres was tested as a function of acquisition time, LBR, sphere size, and matrix reconstruction voxel size. For comparison, phantoms were scanned in the DbPET camera and in a whole body PET (WB-PET). Two patients who just underwent WB-PET/CT exams were imaged with the DbPET system and the images were compared. Results: The measured absolute peak sensitivity was 2.0%. The energy resolution was 24.0% ± 1%. The integral and differential uniformity were 10% and 6% in the total field of view (FOV) and 9% and 5% in the central FOV, respectively. The measured spatial resolution was 2.0, 1.9, and 1.7 mm in the radial, tangential, and axial directions. The system exhibited very good detectability for spheres ≥4 mm and LBR ≥10 with a sphere detection of 100% when acquisition time was set >3 min/bed. For LBR = 5 and acquisition time of 7 min the detectability was 100% for spheres of 6 mm and 75% for spheres of 5, 4, and 2.5 mm. Lesion WB-PET detectability was only comparable to the DbPET camera for lesion sizes ≥5 mm when acquisition time was >3 min and LBR > 10. Conclusions: The DbPET has a good

  2. Performance evaluation of a high resolution dedicated breast PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García Hernández, Trinitat; Vicedo González, Aurora; Brualla González, Luis; Granero Cabañero, Domingo; Ferrer Rebolleda, Jose; Sánchez Jurado, Raúl; Puig Cozar Santiago, Maria del; Roselló Ferrando, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Early stage breast cancers may not be visible on a whole-body PET scan. To overcome whole-body PET limitations, several dedicated breast positron emission tomography (DbPET) systems have emerged nowadays aiming to improve spatial resolution. In this work the authors evaluate the performance of a high resolution dedicated breast PET scanner (Mammi-PET, Oncovision). Methods: Global status, uniformity, sensitivity, energy, and spatial resolution were measured. Spheres of different sizes (2.5, 4, 5, and 6 mm diameter) and various 18 fluorodeoxyglucose ("1"8F-FDG) activity concentrations were randomly inserted in a gelatine breast phantom developed at our institution. Several lesion-to-background ratios (LBR) were simulated, 5:1, 10:1, 20:1, 30:1, and 50:1. Images were reconstructed using different voxel sizes. The ability of experienced reporters to detect spheres was tested as a function of acquisition time, LBR, sphere size, and matrix reconstruction voxel size. For comparison, phantoms were scanned in the DbPET camera and in a whole body PET (WB-PET). Two patients who just underwent WB-PET/CT exams were imaged with the DbPET system and the images were compared. Results: The measured absolute peak sensitivity was 2.0%. The energy resolution was 24.0% ± 1%. The integral and differential uniformity were 10% and 6% in the total field of view (FOV) and 9% and 5% in the central FOV, respectively. The measured spatial resolution was 2.0, 1.9, and 1.7 mm in the radial, tangential, and axial directions. The system exhibited very good detectability for spheres ≥4 mm and LBR ≥10 with a sphere detection of 100% when acquisition time was set >3 min/bed. For LBR = 5 and acquisition time of 7 min the detectability was 100% for spheres of 6 mm and 75% for spheres of 5, 4, and 2.5 mm. Lesion WB-PET detectability was only comparable to the DbPET camera for lesion sizes ≥5 mm when acquisition time was >3 min and LBR > 10. Conclusions: The DbPET has a good performance

  3. Method for calibration of an axial tomographic scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparks, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    The method of calibrating an axial tomographic scanner including frame means having an opening therein in which an object to be examined is to be placed, source and detector means mounted on the frame means for directing one or more beams of penetrating radiation through the object from the source to the detector means, and means to rotate the scanner including the source and detector means about the object whereby a plurality of sets of data corresponding to the transmission or absorption by the object of a plurality of beams of penetrating radiation are collected; the calibration method comprising mounting calibration means supporting an adjustable centering member onto the frame means, positioning the adjustable centering member at approximately the center of rotation of the scanner, placing position-sensitive indicator means adjacent the approximately centered member, rotating the scanner and the calibration means mounted thereon at least one time and, if necessary, adjusting the positioning of the centering member until the centering member is coincident with the center of rotation of the scanner as determined by minimum deflection of the position-sensitive indicator means, rotating and translating the source and detector means and determining for each angular orientation of the frame means supporting the source and detector means the central position of each translational scan relative to the centered member and/or if a plurality of detectors are utilized with the detector means for each planar slice of the object being examined, the central position of each translational scan for each detector relative to the centered member

  4. NMR of geophysical drill cores with a mobile Halbach scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talnishnikh, E.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to a mobile NMR with an improved Halbach scanner. This is a lightweight tube-shaped magnet with sensitive volume larger and a homogeneity of the magnetic field higher than the previous prototype version. The improved Halbach scanner is used for analysis of water-saturated drill cores and plugs with diameters up to 60 mm. To provide the analysis, the standard 1D technique with the CPMG sequence as well as 2D correlation experiments were successfully applied and adapted to study properties of fluid-saturated sediments. Afterwards the Halbach scanner was calibrated to fast non-destructive measurements of porosity, relaxation time distributions, and estimation of permeability. These properties can be calculated directly from the NMR data using the developed methodology. Any independent measurements of these properties with other methods are not needed. One of the main results of this work is the development of a new NMR on-line core scanner for measurements of porosity in long cylindrical and semi cylindrical drill cores. Also dedicated software was written to operate the NMR on-line core scanner. The physical background of this work is the study of the diffusion influence on transverse relaxation. The diffusion effect in the presence of internal gradients in porous media was probed by 1D and 2D experiments. The transverse relaxation time distributions obtained from 1D and from 2D experiments are comparable but different in fine details. Two new methodologies were developed based on the results of this study. First is the methodology quantifying the influence of diffusion in the internal gradients of water-saturated sediments on transverse relaxation from 2D correlation experiments. The second one is the correction of the permeability estimation from the NMR data taking in account the influence of the diffusion. Furthermore, PFG NMR technique was used to study restricted diffusion in the same kind of samples. Preliminary results are reported

  5. NMR of geophysical drill cores with a mobile Halbach scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talnishnikh, E.

    2007-08-21

    This thesis is devoted to a mobile NMR with an improved Halbach scanner. This is a lightweight tube-shaped magnet with sensitive volume larger and a homogeneity of the magnetic field higher than the previous prototype version. The improved Halbach scanner is used for analysis of water-saturated drill cores and plugs with diameters up to 60 mm. To provide the analysis, the standard 1D technique with the CPMG sequence as well as 2D correlation experiments were successfully applied and adapted to study properties of fluid-saturated sediments. Afterwards the Halbach scanner was calibrated to fast non-destructive measurements of porosity, relaxation time distributions, and estimation of permeability. These properties can be calculated directly from the NMR data using the developed methodology. Any independent measurements of these properties with other methods are not needed. One of the main results of this work is the development of a new NMR on-line core scanner for measurements of porosity in long cylindrical and semi cylindrical drill cores. Also dedicated software was written to operate the NMR on-line core scanner. The physical background of this work is the study of the diffusion influence on transverse relaxation. The diffusion effect in the presence of internal gradients in porous media was probed by 1D and 2D experiments. The transverse relaxation time distributions obtained from 1D and from 2D experiments are comparable but different in fine details. Two new methodologies were developed based on the results of this study. First is the methodology quantifying the influence of diffusion in the internal gradients of water-saturated sediments on transverse relaxation from 2D correlation experiments. The second one is the correction of the permeability estimation from the NMR data taking in account the influence of the diffusion. Furthermore, PFG NMR technique was used to study restricted diffusion in the same kind of samples. Preliminary results are reported

  6. Navigated MRI-guided liver biopsies in a closed-bore scanner: experience in 52 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moche, Michael; Heinig, Susann; Garnov, Nikita; Fuchs, Jochen; Petersen, Tim-Ole; Seider, Daniel; Brandmaier, Philipp; Kahn, Thomas; Busse, Harald

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate clinical effectiveness and diagnostic efficiency of a navigation device for MR-guided biopsies of focal liver lesions in a closed-bore scanner. In 52 patients, 55 biopsies were performed. An add-on MR navigation system with optical instrument tracking was used for image guidance and biopsy device insertion outside the bore. Fast control imaging allowed visualization of the true needle position at any time. The biopsy workflow and procedure duration were recorded. Histological analysis and clinical course/outcome were used to calculate sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy. Fifty-four of 55 liver biopsies were performed successfully with the system. No major and four minor complications occurred. Mean tumour size was 23 ± 14 mm and the skin-to-target length ranged from 22 to 177 mm. In 39 cases, access path was double oblique. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy were 88 %, 100 % and 92 %, respectively. The mean procedure time was 51 ± 12 min, whereas the puncture itself lasted 16 ± 6 min. On average, four control scans were taken. Using this navigation device, biopsies of poorly visible and difficult accessible liver lesions could be performed safely and reliably in a closed-bore MRI scanner. The system can be easily implemented in clinical routine workflow. • Targeted liver biopsies could be reliably performed in a closed-bore MRI. • The navigation system allows for image guidance outside of the scanner bore. • Assisted MRI-guided biopsies are helpful for focal lesions with a difficult access. • Successful integration of the method in clinical workflow was shown. • Subsequent system installation in an existing MRI environment is feasible.

  7. Defense Commissaries: Issues Related to the Sale of Electronic Scanner Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    In response to your request that we review DeCA'S sale of scanner data and its implementation of category management, this report identifies DeCA'S total revenue from selling scanner data and compares license revenues...

  8. Laser Scanner Technology, Ground-Penetrating Radar and Augmented Reality for the Survey and Recovery of Artistic, Archaeological and Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrile, V.; Bilotta, G.; Meduri, G. M.; De Carlo, D.; Nunnari, A.

    2017-11-01

    In this study, using technologies such as laser scanner and GPR it was desired to see their potential in the cultural heritage. Also with regard to the processing part we are compared the results obtained by the various commercial software and algorithms developed and implemented in Matlab. Moreover, Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality allow integrating the real world with historical-artistic information, laser scanners and georadar (GPR) data and virtual objects, virtually enriching it with multimedia elements, graphic and textual information accessible through smartphones and tablets.

  9. Digital Data Matrix Scanner Developnent At Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Research at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has resulted in a system for reading hidden identification codes using a hand-held magnetic scanner. It's an invention that could help businesses improve inventory management, enhance safety, improve security, and aid in recall efforts if defects are discovered. Two-dimensional Data Matrix symbols consisting of letters and numbers permanently etched on items for identification and resembling a small checkerboard pattern are more efficient and reliable than traditional bar codes, and can store up to 100 times more information. A team led by Fred Schramm of the Marshall Center's Technology Transfer Department, in partnership with PRI,Torrance, California, has developed a hand-held device that can read this special type of coded symbols, even if covered by up to six layers of paint. Before this new technology was available, matrix symbols were read with optical scanners, and only if the codes were visible. This latest improvement in digital Data Matrix technologies offers greater flexibility for businesses and industries already using the marking system. Paint, inks, and pastes containing magnetic properties are applied in matrix symbol patterns to objects with two-dimensional codes, and the codes are read by a magnetic scanner, even after being covered with paint or other coatings. The ability to read hidden matrix symbols promises a wide range of benefits in a number of fields, including airlines, electronics, healthcare, and the automotive industry. Many industries would like to hide information on a part, so it can be read only by the party who put it there. For instance, the automotive industry uses direct parts marking for inventory control, but for aesthetic purposes the marks often need to be invisible. Symbols have been applied to a variety of materials, including metal, plastic, glass, paper, fabric and foam, on everything from electronic parts to pharmaceuticals to livestock. The portability of the hand

  10. Quantitative comparison of noise texture across CT scanners from different manufacturers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, Justin B.; Christianson, Olav; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively compare noise texture across computed tomography (CT) scanners from different manufacturers using the noise power spectrum (NPS). Methods: The American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom (Gammex 464, Gammex, Inc., Middleton, WI) was imaged on two scanners: Discovery CT 750HD (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI), and SOMATOM Definition Flash (Siemens Healthcare, Germany), using a consistent acquisition protocol (120 kVp, 0.625/0.6 mm slice thickness, 250 mAs, and 22 cm field of view). Images were reconstructed using filtered backprojection and a wide selection of reconstruction kernels. For each image set, the 2D NPS were estimated from the uniform section of the phantom. The 2D spectra were normalized by their integral value, radially averaged, and filtered by the human visual response function. A systematic kernel-by-kernel comparison across manufacturers was performed by computing the root mean square difference (RMSD) and the peak frequency difference (PFD) between the NPS from different kernels. GE and Siemens kernels were compared and kernel pairs that minimized the RMSD and |PFD| were identified. Results: The RMSD (|PFD|) values between the NPS of GE and Siemens kernels varied from 0.01 mm 2 (0.002 mm −1 ) to 0.29 mm 2 (0.74 mm −1 ). The GE kernels “Soft,”“Standard,”“Chest,” and “Lung” closely matched the Siemens kernels “B35f,”“B43f,”“B41f,” and “B80f” (RMSD 2 , |PFD| −1 , respectively). The GE “Bone,”“Bone+,” and “Edge” kernels all matched most closely with Siemens “B75f” kernel but with sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values up to 0.18 mm 2 and 0.41 mm −1 , respectively. These sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values corresponded to visually perceivable differences in the noise texture of the images. Conclusions: It is possible to use the NPS to quantitatively compare noise texture across CT systems. The degree to which similar texture across scanners could be achieved varies and is

  11. A Cost Effective Multi-Spectral Scanner for Natural Gas Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yudaya Sivathanu; Jongmook Lim; Vinoo Narayanan; Seonghyeon Park

    2005-12-07

    The objective of this project is to design, fabricate and demonstrate a cost effective, multi-spectral scanner for natural gas leak detection in transmission and distribution pipelines. During the first year of the project, a laboratory version of the multi-spectral scanner was designed, fabricated, and tested at EnUrga Inc. The multi-spectral scanner was also evaluated using a blind Department of Energy study at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center. The performance of the scanner was inconsistent during the blind study. However, most of the leaks were outside the view of the multi-spectral scanner that was developed during the first year of the project. Therefore, a definite evaluation of the capability of the scanner was not obtained. Despite the results, sufficient number of plumes was detected fully confirming the feasibility of the multi-spectral scanner. During the second year, the optical design of the scanner was changed to improve the sensitivity of the system. Laboratory tests show that the system can reliably detect small leaks (20 SCFH) at 30 to 50 feet. A prototype scanner was built and evaluated during the second year of the project. Only laboratory evaluations were completed during the second year. The laboratory evaluations show the feasibility of using the scanner to determine natural gas pipeline leaks. Further field evaluations and optimization of the scanner are required before commercialization of the scanner can be initiated.

  12. Addressing Spatial Variability of Surface-Layer Wind with Long-Range WindScanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Jacob; Vasiljevic, Nikola; Kelly, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    of the WindScanner data is high, although the fidelity of the estimated vertical velocity component is significantly limited by the elevation angles of the scanner heads. The system of long-range WindScanners presented in this paper is close to being fully operational, with the pilot study herein serving...

  13. Wireless Synchronization of a Multi-Pinhole Small Animal SPECT Collimation Device With a Clinical Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiFilippo, Frank P.; Patel, Sagar

    2009-06-01

    A multi-pinhole collimation device for small animal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) uses the gamma camera detectors of a standard clinical SPECT scanner. The collimator and animal bed move independently of the detectors, and therefore their motions must be synchronized. One approach is manual triggering of the SPECT acquisition simultaneously with a programmed motion sequence for the device. However, some data blurring and loss of image quality result, and true electronic synchronization is preferred. An off-the-shelf digital gyroscope with integrated Bluetooth interface provides a wireless solution to device synchronization. The sensor attaches to the SPECT gantry and reports its rotational speed to a notebook computer controlling the device. Software processes the rotation data in real-time, averaging the signal and issuing triggers while compensating for baseline drift. Motion commands are sent to the collimation device with minimal delay, within approximately 0.5 second of the start of SPECT gantry rotation. Test scans of a point source demonstrate an increase in true counts and a reduction in background counts compared to manual synchronization. The wireless rotation sensor provides robust synchronization of the collimation device with the clinical SPECT scanner and enhances image quality.

  14. A Continuous-Time Delta-Sigma ADC for Portable Ultrasound Scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llimos Muntal, Pere; Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger; Bruun, Erik

    2017-01-01

    A fully differential fourth-order 1-bit continuous-time delta-sigma ADC designed in a 65nm process for portable ultrasound scanners is presented in this paper. The circuit design, implementation and measurements on the fabricated die are shown. The loop filter consists of RC-integrators, programmable...... capacitor arrays, resistors and voltage feedback DACs. The quantizer contains a pulse generator, a high-speed clocked comparator and a pull-down clocked latch to ensure constant delay in the feedback loop. Using this implementation, a small and low-power solution required for portable ultrasound scanner...... applications is achieved. The converter has a supply voltage of 1.2V, a bandwidth of 10MHz and an oversampling ratio of 16 leading to an operating frequency of 320MHz. The design occupies a die area of 0.0175mm2. Simulations with extracted parasitics show a SNR of 45.2dB and a current consumption of 489 µ...

  15. Single-Layer Laser Scanner for Detection and Localization of Unmanned Swarm Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, T.; Nowak, S.; Matthaei, J.; Bestmann, U.

    2013-08-01

    In the presented work unmanned vehicles are used for an extra-terrestrial exploration mission. In this scenario a high factor of redundancy for all systems has to be considered. Defective sensors for instance cannot be repaired and any damage has to be compensated through an intelligent use of the remaining sensors and a robust data fusion. Therefore this work proposes the utilization of a singlelayer laser scanner, which is used for Simultaneous Localization And Mapping (SLAM) for the compensation of a defective relative positioning system. An Extended Kalman-Filter (EKF) with error states is used to perform the loosely coupled integration of the estimated states and the measured relative position in discrete updates. Subsequently the improvement of the navigation solution onboard an Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) can be estimated. The outcomes of a specifically developed simulation will be shown, delivering theoretic results for the proposed method. A flight test is done finally in order to prove the capability of the laser scanner to detect and locate an UAV.

  16. Analysis of image sharpness reproducibility on a novel engineered micro-CT scanner with variable geometry and embedded recalibration software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panetta, D; Belcari, N; Del Guerra, A; Bartolomei, A; Salvadori, P A

    2012-04-01

    This study investigates the reproducibility of the reconstructed image sharpness, after modifications of the geometry setup, for a variable magnification micro-CT (μCT) scanner. All the measurements were performed on a novel engineered μCT scanner for in vivo imaging of small animals (Xalt), which has been recently built at the Institute of Clinical Physiology of the National Research Council (IFC-CNR, Pisa, Italy), in partnership with the University of Pisa. The Xalt scanner is equipped with an integrated software for on-line geometric recalibration, which will be used throughout the experiments. In order to evaluate the losses of image quality due to modifications of the geometry setup, we have made 22 consecutive acquisitions by changing alternatively the system geometry between two different setups (Large FoV - LF, and High Resolution - HR). For each acquisition, the tomographic images have been reconstructed before and after the on-line geometric recalibration. For each reconstruction, the image sharpness was evaluated using two different figures of merit: (i) the percentage contrast on a small bar pattern of fixed frequency (f = 5.5 lp/mm for the LF setup and f = 10 lp/mm for the HR setup) and (ii) the image entropy. We have found that, due to the small-scale mechanical uncertainty (in the order of the voxel size), a recalibration is necessary for each geometric setup after repositioning of the system's components; the resolution losses due to the lack of recalibration are worse for the HR setup (voxel size = 18.4 μm). The integrated on-line recalibration algorithm of the Xalt scanner allowed to perform the recalibration quickly, by restoring the spatial resolution of the system to the reference resolution obtained after the initial (off-line) calibration. Copyright © 2011 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A new crystal whole-body scanner for positron emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostertag, H.; Kuebler, W.; Kubesch, R.; Lorenz, W.J.; Woerner, P.

    1980-01-01

    A multicrystal whole body scanner for positron emitters has been constructed. The annihilation quanta are measured in two opposing detector banks. Each detector bank consists of 64 NaI crystals of 1.5'' diameter x 3'' length. Directly opposing single detectors are in coincidence. The patient moves linearly between the stationary transverse detector banks. The scanning area of the system is 64 x 192 cm 2 . The spatial resolution is 2 cm at a sampling distance of 1 cm. The sensitivity is 6400 counts/s for a pure positron flood source with 1 μCi/cm 2 . The system is controlled by a microcomputer (DEC LSI-11). The scintigrams are shown on a display. Absolute activities can be calculated by mathematical comparison of consecutive emission and transmission scans. The design of the positron scanner and its capacibilities are described. Experimental and initial clinical results are presented. (author)

  18. Beam Dumping Ghost Signals in Electric Sweep Scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockli, M.P.; Leitner, M.; Keller, R.; Moehs, D.P.; Welton, R.F.

    2005-01-01

    Over the last 20 years many labs started to use Allison scanners to measure low-energy ion beam emittances. We show that large trajectory angles produce ghost signals due to the impact of the beamlet on the electric deflection plates. The strength of the ghost signal is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions and their velocity, ghost signals can have the opposite polarity as the main beam signals or the same polarity. These ghost signals are easily overlooked because they partly overlap the real signals, they are mostly below the 1% level, and they are often hidden in the noise. However, they cause significant errors in emittance estimates because they are associated with large trajectory angles. The strength of ghost signals, and the associated errors, can be drastically reduced with a simple modification of the deflection plates

  19. Beam dumping ghost signals in electric sweep scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockli, M.P.; SNS Project, Oak Ridge; Tennessee U.; Leitner, M.; LBL, Berkeley; Moehs, D.P.; Keller, R.; LBL, Berkeley; Welton, R.F.; SNS Project, Oak Ridge

    2004-01-01

    Over the last 20 years many labs started to use Allison scanners to measure loW--energy ion beam emittances. We show that large trajectory angles produce ghost signals due to the impact of the beamlet on the electric deflection plates. The strength of the ghost signal is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions and their velocity, ghost signals can have the opposite polarity as the main beam signals or the same polarity. These ghost signals are easily overlooked because they partly overlap the real signals, they are mostly below the 1% level, and they are often hidden in the noise. However, they cause significant errors in emittance estimates because they are associated with large trajectory angles. The strength of ghost signals, and the associated errors, can be drastically reduced with a simple modification of the deflection plates

  20. Linac beam core modeling from wire-scanner data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, A.G.

    1977-08-01

    This study introduces mathematical modeling of accelerator beams from data collected by wire scanners. Details about a beam core D(x,x',y,y') are examined in several situations: (a) for a discretization of the projection into xy-space, a maximum-entropy solution and a minimum-norm solution are developed and discussed, (b) for undiscretized xy-subspace, a two-dimensional Gaussian approximation D(x,.,y,.) = a exp [α(x-x 0 ) 2 + β(x-x 0 )(y-y 0 ) + γ(y-y 0 ) 2 ] is obtained by least squares, and (c) for four-dimensional space, the fit of a single Gaussian to data from a succession of wire scanners is investigated

  1. Shielding design for testing room of large container scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yisi; Miao Qitian; Zhou Liye

    1997-01-01

    Testing facility for large container scanner is a most advanced anti-smuggle tool. The X-ray scanning principle is adopted in this system. The X-ray was collimated a ted as a fan-shape beam. The accelerator only supplies the ray beam when the container is scanned. The irradiation time is less than one minute per test. The X-ray burst irradiation and highly collimated a ted scanning beam of this system is different from the common industrial irradiation accelerator. The shielding design of the 1:1 large container scanner introduced has better collimation level because of tri-collimation. The irradiation dose is less than 150 μGy per test, which is obviously lower than importations

  2. Robust Object Segmentation Using a Multi-Layer Laser Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Beomseong; Choi, Baehoon; Yoo, Minkyun; Kim, Hyunju; Kim, Euntai

    2014-01-01

    The major problem in an advanced driver assistance system (ADAS) is the proper use of sensor measurements and recognition of the surrounding environment. To this end, there are several types of sensors to consider, one of which is the laser scanner. In this paper, we propose a method to segment the measurement of the surrounding environment as obtained by a multi-layer laser scanner. In the segmentation, a full set of measurements is decomposed into several segments, each representing a single object. Sometimes a ghost is detected due to the ground or fog, and the ghost has to be eliminated to ensure the stability of the system. The proposed method is implemented on a real vehicle, and its performance is tested in a real-world environment. The experiments show that the proposed method demonstrates good performance in many real-life situations. PMID:25356645

  3. A Novel Atomic Force Microscope with Multi-Mode Scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Chun; Zhang, Haijun; Xu, Rui; Han, Xu; Wang, Shuying

    2016-01-01

    A new type of atomic force microscope (AFM) with multi-mode scanner is proposed. The AFM system provides more than four scanning modes using a specially designed scanner with three tube piezoelectric ceramics and three stack piezoelectric ceramics. Sample scanning of small range with high resolution can be realized by using tube piezos, meanwhile, large range scanning can be achieved by stack piezos. Furthermore, the combination with tube piezos and stack piezos not only realizes high-resolution scanning of small samples with large- scale fluctuation structure, but also achieves small range area-selecting scanning. Corresponding experiments are carried out in terms of four different scanning modes showing that the AFM is of reliable stability, high resolution and can be widely applied in the fields of micro/nano-technology. (paper)

  4. Enhanced methodology of focus control and monitoring on scanner tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Jen; Kim, Young Ki; Hao, Xueli; Gomez, Juan-Manuel; Tian, Ye; Kamalizadeh, Ferhad; Hanson, Justin K.

    2017-03-01

    As the demand of the technology node shrinks from 14nm to 7nm, the reliability of tool monitoring techniques in advanced semiconductor fabs to achieve high yield and quality becomes more critical. Tool health monitoring methods involve periodic sampling of moderately processed test wafers to detect for particles, defects, and tool stability in order to ensure proper tool health. For lithography TWINSCAN scanner tools, the requirements for overlay stability and focus control are very strict. Current scanner tool health monitoring methods include running BaseLiner to ensure proper tool stability on a periodic basis. The focus measurement on YIELDSTAR by real-time or library-based reconstruction of critical dimensions (CD) and side wall angle (SWA) has been demonstrated as an accurate metrology input to the control loop. The high accuracy and repeatability of the YIELDSTAR focus measurement provides a common reference of scanner setup and user process. In order to further improve the metrology and matching performance, Diffraction Based Focus (DBF) metrology enabling accurate, fast, and non-destructive focus acquisition, has been successfully utilized for focus monitoring/control of TWINSCAN NXT immersion scanners. The optimal DBF target was determined to have minimized dose crosstalk, dynamic precision, set-get residual, and lens aberration sensitivity. By exploiting this new measurement target design, 80% improvement in tool-to-tool matching, >16% improvement in run-to-run mean focus stability, and >32% improvement in focus uniformity have been demonstrated compared to the previous BaseLiner methodology. Matching control and monitoring on multiple illumination conditions, opens an avenue to significantly reduce Focus-Exposure Matrix (FEM) wafer exposure for new product/layer best focus (BF) setup.

  5. Automatic inventory of components by laser 3D scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Garcia, R.; Munoz Prieto, C.; Sarti Fernandez, F.

    2014-01-01

    One of the existing needs in nuclear decommissioning projects is to provide an inventory of components to be dismantled, which is available from its spatial location and elements that exist in your environment. The Laser scanner technology is a system of data acquisition that allows 3D models composed of millions of points, it's models with pinpoint accuracy and are available in a very short space of time. (Author)

  6. Concrete hardened characterization using table scanner and microtomography computed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.E.; Pessoa, J.R.; Assis, J.T. de; Dominguez, D.S.; Dias, L.A.; Santana, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes the use of image processing technologies to analyze hardened concrete samples obtained from table scanner and micro tomography. Techniques will be used to obtain numerical data on the distribution and geometry of aggregates and pores of the concrete, as well as their relative position. It is expected that the data obtained can produce information on the research of concrete pathologies such as AAR, and the freeze / thaw process. (author)

  7. Ultrasonic scanner for stainless steel weld inspections. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupperman, D. S.; Reimann, K. J.

    1978-09-01

    The large grain size and anisotropic nature of stainless steel weld metal make conventional ultrasonic testing very difficult. A technique is evaluated for minimizing the coherent ultrasonic noise in stainless steel weld metal. The method involves digitizing conventional ''A-scan'' traces and averaging them with a minicomputer. Results are presented for an ultrasonic scanner which interrogates a small volume of the weld metal while averaging the coherent ultrasonic noise.

  8. High efficiency conical scanner for earth resources applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, J. C.; Dumas, H. J., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a six-arm conical scanner which was selected to provide a continuous line-of-sight scan. Two versions of the instrument are considered. The two versions differ in their weight. The weight of the heavy version is 600 lbs. A light weight design which employs beryllium and aluminum optical components weighs only 350 lbs. A multiplexer and analog-to-digital converter are to be incorporated into the design. Questions of instrument performance are also discussed.

  9. Design of a laser scanner for a digital mammography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, J A; Taylor, J E

    1996-05-01

    We have developed a digital readout system for radiographic images using a scanning laser beam. In this system, electrostatic charge images on amorphous selenium (alpha-Se) plates are read out using photo-induced discharge (PID). We discuss the design requirements of a laser scanner for the PID system and describe its construction from commercially available components. The principles demonstrated can be adapted to a variety of digital imaging systems.

  10. Accuracy of five intraoral scanners compared to indirect digitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güth, Jan-Frederik; Runkel, Cornelius; Beuer, Florian; Stimmelmayr, Michael; Edelhoff, Daniel; Keul, Christine

    2017-06-01

    Direct and indirect digitalization offer two options for computer-aided design (CAD)/ computer-aided manufacturing (CAM)-generated restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of different intraoral scanners and compare them to the process of indirect digitalization. A titanium testing model was directly digitized 12 times with each intraoral scanner: (1) CS 3500 (CS), (2) Zfx Intrascan (ZFX), (3) CEREC AC Bluecam (BLU), (4) CEREC AC Omnicam (OC) and (5) True Definition (TD). As control, 12 polyether impressions were taken and the referring plaster casts were digitized indirectly with the D-810 laboratory scanner (CON). The accuracy (trueness/precision) of the datasets was evaluated by an analysing software (Geomagic Qualify 12.1) using a "best fit alignment" of the datasets with a highly accurate reference dataset of the testing model, received from industrial computed tomography. Direct digitalization using the TD showed the significant highest overall "trueness", followed by CS. Both performed better than CON. BLU, ZFX and OC showed higher differences from the reference dataset than CON. Regarding the overall "precision", the CS 3500 intraoral scanner and the True Definition showed the best performance. CON, BLU and OC resulted in significantly higher precision than ZFX did. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, the accuracy of the ascertained datasets was dependent on the scanning system. The direct digitalization was not superior to indirect digitalization for all tested systems. Regarding the accuracy, all tested intraoral scanning technologies seem to be able to reproduce a single quadrant within clinical acceptable accuracy. However, differences were detected between the tested systems.

  11. Wire scanner data analysis for the SSC Linac emittance measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, C.Y.; Hurd, J.W.; Sage, J.

    1993-07-01

    The wire scanners are designed in the SSC Linac for measurement of beam emittance at various locations. In order to obtain beam parameters from the scan signal, a data analysis program was developed that considers the problems of noise reduction, machine modeling, parameter fitting, and correction. This program is intended as a tool for Linac commissioning and also as part of the Linac control program. Some of the results from commissioning runs are presented

  12. Determining the surface roughness coefficient by 3D Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmen Fifer Bizjak

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, several test methods can be used in the laboratory to determine the roughness of rock joint surfaces.However, true roughness can be distorted and underestimated by the differences in the sampling interval of themeasurement methods. Thus, these measurement methods produce a dead zone and distorted roughness profiles.In this paper a new rock joint surface roughness measurement method is presented, with the use of a camera-typethree-dimensional (3D scanner as an alternative to current methods. For this study, the surfaces of ten samples oftuff were digitized by means of a 3D scanner, and the results were compared with the corresponding Rock JointCoefficient (JRC values. Up until now such 3D scanner have been mostly used in the automotive industry, whereastheir use for comparison with obtained JRC coefficient values in rock mechanics is presented here for the first time.The proposed new method is a faster, more precise and more accurate than other existing test methods, and is apromising technique for use in this area of study in the future.

  13. Erosion can't hide from laser scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstant, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    Particles of topsoil blown by wind will bounce along the soil surface and finally escape a field, leaving it less able to support crops. Water will wash away valuable topsoil and nutrients. And how rough the soil surface is influences whether the soil will erode. Until now, soil scientists have had no suitable technique to measure soil roughness - or microtopography - on the small scale. ARS soil scientists Joe M. Bradford and Chi-hua Huang, of the National Soil Erosion Research Laboratory in West Lafayette, Indiana, have developed a portable scanner that can. It measures the tiny ridges left in the soil by tilling or clods of soil particles that clump together naturally. What does the scanner do? It measures soil elevation by shining a low-power laser beam onto the surface and detecting the position of the laser spot reflected from the soil with a 35-mm camera. In place of film, the scanner camera uses electronic circuitry somewhat similar to that in a video camera to transmit the spot's position to a small computer about 30,000 times a minute. The laser and camera are mounted on the frame of a motor-driven carriage. The computer controls the carriage movement. At the end of a scan, a microtopographic map is stored in the computer. Scientists can analyze it immediately and can compare it to previous maps to see whether erosion has occurred

  14. Advanced optical 3D scanners using DMD technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenstermann, P.; Godding, R.; Hermstein, M.

    2017-02-01

    Optical 3D measurement techniques are state-of-the-art for highly precise, non-contact surface scanners - not only in industrial development, but also in near-production and even in-line configurations. The need for automated systems with very high accuracy and clear implementation of national precision standards is growing extremely due to expanding international quality guidelines, increasing production transparency and new concepts related to the demands of the fourth industrial revolution. The presentation gives an overview about the present technical concepts for optical 3D scanners and their benefit for customers and various different applications - not only in quality control, but also in design centers or in medical applications. The advantages of DMD-based systems will be discussed and compared to other approaches. Looking at today's 3D scanner market, there is a confusing amount of solutions varying from lowprice solutions to high end systems. Many of them are linked to a very special target group or to special applications. The article will clarify the differences of the approaches and will discuss some key features which are necessary to render optical measurement systems suitable for industrial environments. The paper will be completed by examples for DMDbased systems, e. g. RGB true-color systems with very high accuracy like the StereoScan neo of AICON 3D Systems. Typical applications and the benefits for customers using such systems are described.

  15. Evaluation of a LED-based flatbed document scanner for radiochromic film dosimetry in transmission mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lárraga-Gutiérrez, José Manuel; García-Garduño, Olivia Amanda; Treviño-Palacios, Carlos; Herrera-González, José Alfredo

    2018-03-01

    Flatbed scanners are the most frequently used reading instrument for radiochromic film dosimetry because its low cost, high spatial resolution, among other advantages. These scanners use a fluorescent lamp and a CCD array as light source and detector, respectively. Recently, manufacturers of flatbed scanners replaced the fluorescent lamp by light emission diodes (LED) as a light source. The goal of this work is to evaluate the performance of a commercial flatbed scanner with LED based source light for radiochromic film dosimetry. Film read out consistency, response uniformity, film-scanner sensitivity, long term stability and total dose uncertainty was evaluated. In overall, the performance of the LED flatbed scanner is comparable to that of a cold cathode fluorescent lamp (CCFL). There are important spectral differences between LED and CCFL lamps that results in a higher sensitivity of the LED scanner in the green channel. Total dose uncertainty, film response reproducibility and long-term stability of LED scanner are slightly better than those of the CCFL. However, the LED based scanner has a strong non-uniform response, up to 9%, that must be adequately corrected for radiotherapy dosimetry QA. The differences in light emission spectra between LED and CCFL lamps and its potential impact on film-scanner sensitivity suggest that the design of a dedicated flat-bed scanner with LEDs may improve sensitivity and dose uncertainty in radiochromic film dosimetry. Copyright © 2018 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Portable CT scanners for use on live trees and standing columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoe, M.; Tsao, J.W.; Yamada, H.; Nakamura, H.; Kogure, J.; Kawamura, H.; Isono, E.; Maeda, Y.; Matsumoto, S.

    1985-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a technique to reconstruct a crosssection of a test object from multiple projections obtained using e.g. x-rays. A large number of medical CT scanners and a few industrial CT scanners have been used. Most of these scanners are fixed installations. In contrast, we developed portable CT scanners for nondestructive testing of live trees and standing building columns in field environment. The resolution of these scanners is high enough to reveal details of annual rings of trees and timbers. The scanners have been useful in a wide range of applications. This paper presents two types of scanners with small and large apertures, a system for quick look of reconstruction and a few examples of applications

  17. Efficient system modeling for a small animal PET scanner with tapered DOI detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Mengxi; Zhou, Jian; Yang, Yongfeng; Qi, Jinyi; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    A prototype small animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for mouse brain imaging has been developed at UC Davis. The new scanner uses tapered detector arrays with depth of interaction (DOI) measurement. In this paper, we present an efficient system model for the tapered PET scanner using matrix factorization and a virtual scanner geometry. The factored system matrix mainly consists of two components: a sinogram blurring matrix and a geometrical matrix. The geometric matrix is based on a virtual scanner geometry. The sinogram blurring matrix is estimated by matrix factorization. We investigate the performance of different virtual scanner geometries. Both simulation study and real data experiments are performed in the fully 3D mode to study the image quality under different system models. The results indicate that the proposed matrix factorization can maintain image quality while substantially reduce the image reconstruction time and system matrix storage cost. The proposed method can be also applied to other PET scanners with DOI measurement. (paper)

  18. Does the Use of Body Scanners Discriminate Overweight Flight Passengers? The Effect of Body Scanners on Body Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Laib

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Whereas the introduction of body scanners at airports has been accompanied by critical voices raising concerns that body scanners might have a negative impact on different minority groups, it has not been investigated thus far whether they might also have negative impacts on the average flight passenger and if the provision of adequate information might attenuate such negative impacts. Using a pre/post-design the current study examines the effect of a body scan in a controlled laboratory setting on the explicit and implicit body image of normal-weight and overweight people as assessed by questionnaires and an Implicit Association Test. Half of the sample received an information sheet concerning body scanners before they were scanned. While there was a negative impact of the body scan on the implicit body image of overweight participants, there was a positive impact on their explicit body image. The negative effect of the body scan was unaffected by receiving information. This study demonstrates that body scans do not only have negative effects on certain minority groups but potentially on a large proportion of the general public which suggests a critical reconsideration of the control procedures at airports, the training of the airport staff who is in charge of these procedures and the information flight passengers get about these procedures.

  19. Multipurpose Pressure Vessel Scanner and Photon Doppler Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Tayera

    2015-01-01

    Critical flight hardware typically undergoes a series of nondestructive evaluation methods to screen for defects before it is integrated into the flight system. Conventionally, pressure vessels have been inspected for flaws using a technique known as fluorescent dye penetrant, which is biased to inspector interpretation. An alternate method known as eddy current is automated and can detect small cracks better than dye penetrant. A new multipurpose pressure vessel scanner has been developed to perform internal and external eddy current scanning, laser profilometry, and thickness mapping on pressure vessels. Before this system can be implemented throughout industry, a probability of detection (POD) study needs to be performed to validate the system’s eddy current crack/flaw capabilities. The POD sample set will consist of 6 flight-like metal pressure vessel liners with defects of known size. Preparation for the POD includes sample set fabrication, system operation, procedure development, and eddy current settings optimization. For this, collaborating with subject matter experts was required. This technical paper details the preparation activities leading up to the POD study currently scheduled for winter 2015/2016. Once validated, this system will be a proven innovation for increasing the safety and reliability of necessary flight hardware.Additionally, testing of frangible joint requires Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) and Digital Image Correlation instrumentation. There is often noise associated with PDV data, which necessitates a frequency modulation (FM) signal-to-noise pre-test. Generally, FM radio works by varying the carrier frequency and mixing it with a fixed frequency source, creating a beat frequency which is represented by audio frequency that can be heard between about 20 to 20,000 Hz. Similarly, PDV reflects a shifted frequency (a phenomenon known as the Doppler Effect) from a moving source and mixes it with a fixed source frequency, which results in

  20. Methods for CT automatic exposure control protocol translation between scanner platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, Sarah E; Seibert, J Anthony; Lamba, Ramit; Boone, John M

    2014-03-01

    An imaging facility with a diverse fleet of CT scanners faces considerable challenges when propagating CT protocols with consistent image quality and patient dose across scanner makes and models. Although some protocol parameters can comfortably remain constant among scanners (eg, tube voltage, gantry rotation time), the automatic exposure control (AEC) parameter, which selects the overall mA level during tube current modulation, is difficult to match among scanners, especially from different CT manufacturers. Objective methods for converting tube current modulation protocols among CT scanners were developed. Three CT scanners were investigated, a GE LightSpeed 16 scanner, a GE VCT scanner, and a Siemens Definition AS+ scanner. Translation of the AEC parameters such as noise index and quality reference mAs across CT scanners was specifically investigated. A variable-diameter poly(methyl methacrylate) phantom was imaged on the 3 scanners using a range of AEC parameters for each scanner. The phantom consisted of 5 cylindrical sections with diameters of 13, 16, 20, 25, and 32 cm. The protocol translation scheme was based on matching either the volumetric CT dose index or image noise (in Hounsfield units) between two different CT scanners. A series of analytic fit functions, corresponding to different patient sizes (phantom diameters), were developed from the measured CT data. These functions relate the AEC metric of the reference scanner, the GE LightSpeed 16 in this case, to the AEC metric of a secondary scanner. When translating protocols between different models of CT scanners (from the GE LightSpeed 16 reference scanner to the GE VCT system), the translation functions were linear. However, a power-law function was necessary to convert the AEC functions of the GE LightSpeed 16 reference scanner to the Siemens Definition AS+ secondary scanner, because of differences in the AEC functionality designed by these two companies. Protocol translation on the basis of

  1. Relationship between Security and Human Rights in Counter-Terrorism: A Case of Introducing Body Scanners in Civil Aviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prezelj Iztok

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Changes in security environment after the end of Cold War and 9/11 have strongly affected our security concepts and paradigms. In the field of counter-terrorism, a serious conceptual and practical debate on the relationship between security and human rights and freedoms has begun. The goal of this paper is to reflect on this complex relationship at the conceptual level and introduce the empirical debate on this relationship in the field of civil aviation (case of introducing body scanners. The paper’s results show that the concept of human security usefully integrates the care for human rights and security of individuals. The debate on the potential introduction of body scanners on the European airports was actually a debate on the ways of providing individual human security on the airports with simultaneous concern for other human rights. The output of this debate was a compromise: body scanners can be used at the discretion of individual airports and member states, but are not an obligatory measure on all European airports.

  2. SU-E-I-21: Dosimetric Characterization and Image Quality Evaluation of the AIRO Mobile CT Scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, V; Zhang, J; Bruner, A [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The AIRO Mobile CT system was recently introduced which overcomes the limitations from existing CT, CT fluoroscopy, and intraoperative O-arm. With an integrated table and a large diameter bore, the system is suitable for cranial, spine and trauma procedures, making it a highly versatile intraoperative imaging system. This study is to investigate radiation dose and image quality of the AIRO and compared with those from a routine CT scanner. Methods: Radiation dose was measured using a conventional 100mm pencil ionization chamber and CT polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA) body and head phantoms. Image quality was evaluated with a CATPHAN 500 phantom. Spatial resolution, low contrast resolution (CNR), Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), and Normalized Noise Power Spectrum (NNPS) were analyzed. Results: Under identical technique conditions, radiation dose (mGy/mAs) from the AIRO mobile CT system (AIRO) is higher than that from a 64 slice CT scanner. MTFs show that both Soft and Standard filters of the AIRO system lost resolution quickly compared to the Sensation 64 slice CT. With the Standard kernel, the spatial resolutions of the AIRO system are 3lp/cm and 4lp/cm for the body and head FOVs, respectively. NNPSs show low frequency noise due to ring-like artifacts. Due to a higher dose in terms of mGy/mAs at both head and body FOV, CNR of the AIRO system is higher than that of the Siemens scanner. However detectability of the low contrast objects is poorer in the AIRO due to the presence of ring artifacts in the location of the targets. Conclusion: For image guided surgery applications, the AIRO has some advantages over a routine CT scanner due to its versatility, large bore size, and acceptable image quality. Our evaluation of the physical performance helps its future improvements.

  3. Myocardium scintigraphy and coronaries scanner: results and respective contribution of these two examinations; Scintigraphie myocardique et scanner coronaire: resultats et apport respectif des deux examens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Songy, B.; Balestrini, V.; Sablayrolles, J.L.; Vigoni, F.; Lussato, D. [Centre cardiologique du Nord (CCN), Saint-Denis, (France); Faccio, F. [fondation San Geronimo, Santa Fe, (Argentina)

    2009-05-15

    The objective were to evaluate the results and the respective contribution of the myocardium scintigraphy and the coro-scanner. It exists an excellent correlation between a normal scanner and a normal scintigraphy (97%). 30% of patients having non tight stenosis at scanner and 60% of these ones having tight stenosis have a scintigraphy ischemia; An abnormal scanner, whatever be the the degree of stenosis must be completed by a test of myocardium ischemia. The actual limitations of the coro-scanner (64 gills) are in relation with its spatial resolution (quantification) and temporal resolution (right coronary). The choice of the diagnosis examination to realize in first intention must depend on the age and prevalence of the coronary disease. (N.C.)

  4. Deriving stable multi-parametric MRI radiomic signatures in the presence of inter-scanner variations: survival prediction of glioblastoma via imaging pattern analysis and machine learning techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Saima; Bakas, Spyridon; Akbari, Hamed; Shukla, Gaurav; Rozycki, Martin; Davatzikos, Christos

    2018-02-01

    There is mounting evidence that assessment of multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) profiles can noninvasively predict survival in many cancers, including glioblastoma. The clinical adoption of mpMRI as a prognostic biomarker, however, depends on its applicability in a multicenter setting, which is hampered by inter-scanner variations. This concept has not been addressed in existing studies. We developed a comprehensive set of within-patient normalized tumor features such as intensity profile, shape, volume, and tumor location, extracted from multicenter mpMRI of two large (npatients=353) cohorts, comprising the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP, npatients=252, nscanners=3) and The Cancer Imaging Archive (TCIA, npatients=101, nscanners=8). Inter-scanner harmonization was conducted by normalizing the tumor intensity profile, with that of the contralateral healthy tissue. The extracted features were integrated by support vector machines to derive survival predictors. The predictors' generalizability was evaluated within each cohort, by two cross-validation configurations: i) pooled/scanner-agnostic, and ii) across scanners (training in multiple scanners and testing in one). The median survival in each configuration was used as a cut-off to divide patients in long- and short-survivors. Accuracy (ACC) for predicting long- versus short-survivors, for these configurations was ACCpooled=79.06% and ACCpooled=84.7%, ACCacross=73.55% and ACCacross=74.76%, in HUP and TCIA datasets, respectively. The hazard ratio at 95% confidence interval was 3.87 (2.87-5.20, P<0.001) and 6.65 (3.57-12.36, P<0.001) for HUP and TCIA datasets, respectively. Our findings suggest that adequate data normalization coupled with machine learning classification allows robust prediction of survival estimates on mpMRI acquired by multiple scanners.

  5. Temperature dependence of APD-based PET scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keereman, Vincent; Van Holen, Roel; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Vanhove, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Solid state detectors such as avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are increasingly being used in PET detectors. One of the disadvantages of APDs is the strong decrease of their gain factor with increasing ambient temperature. The light yield of most scintillation crystals also decreases when ambient temperature is increased. Both effects lead to considerable temperature dependence of the performance of APD-based PET scanners. In this paper, the authors propose a model for this dependence and the performance of the LabPET8 APD-based small animal PET scanner is evaluated at different temperatures.Methods: The model proposes that the effect of increasing temperature on the energy histogram of an APD-based PET scanner is a compression of the histogram along the energy axis. The energy histogram of the LabPET system was acquired at 21 °C and 25 °C to verify the validity of this model. Using the proposed model, the effect of temperature on system sensitivity was simulated for different detector temperature coefficients and temperatures. Subsequently, the effect of short term and long term temperature changes on the peak sensitivity of the LabPET system was measured. The axial sensitivity profile was measured at 21 °C and 24 °C following the NEMA NU 4-2008 standard. System spatial resolution was also evaluated. Furthermore, scatter fraction, count losses and random coincidences were evaluated at different temperatures. Image quality was also investigated.Results: As predicted by the model, the photopeak energy at 25 °C is lower than at 21 °C with a shift of approximately 6% per °C. Simulations showed that this results in an approximately linear decrease of sensitivity when temperature is increased from 21 °C to 24 °C and energy thresholds are constant. Experimental evaluation of the peak sensitivity at different temperatures showed a strong linear correlation for short term (2.32 kcps/MBq/°C = 12%/°C, R = −0.95) and long term (1.92 kcps/MBq/°C = 10%/

  6. Quality control of some CT scanners in Khartoum state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousif, Ali Mohammed Ali

    2013-06-01

    This study conduced with the aim to evaluate the performance of three CT scanner in Khartoum-Sudan through extensive quality control measurements. Image quality was assessed using a CATPHAN 412 CT image quality phantom. Image quality parameters evaluated were: CT image noise, uniformity, CT number linearity, Low Contrast Resolution, High Contrast Resolution, measurements were performed in accordance with guidelines set out by the Institute of physical science and engineering in medicine (IPEM 91). Image quality parameters tested were within the apoplectic limit specified in the relevant CT guidelines. Measured slice thickness ranged between 9.66-10.5 mm for large slice and 5.25-5.88 for medium slice. The correlation coefficient (R) between the measured and the reference CT number was better than 0.99 for all CT scanners. High resolution for large slice was 7 L P/ cm and 8 L P/ cm for small slice. Low contrast resolution with 1.0% nominal level ranged between 2-3 mm diameter of disc for large slice and 4-7 mm diameter disc for small slice. The measured noise ranged between 1.4-3.4 HU for large slice and 2.92-4.08 HU for small slice. Uniformity ranged between 3.08 to 2.075 HU for large slice and 3.22 to 1.4 HU for small slice thickness. The results indicate that routine maintenance, service and calibration, as well as the frequent quality control of CT scanners play a key rote in achieving the best performance of the system. Since computed tomography (CT) contributes the most to the collective dose compared to other radiological examinations, it is a necessity for quality control and quality assurance programs to be established in each radiology department.(Author)

  7. Experimental developments in dedicated scanners for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damiani, Chiara

    2001-01-01

    The thesis describes a prototype of a new read out electronics developed for the YAPPET small animal PET tomograph at the Physics Laboratory of the University of Ferrara. The purpose of the new electronics was to make the YAPPET scanner easier to use and more suitable for duplication at other research institutes. The results of tests of the new electronics over a 3 year period are presented. The new electronics prototype attained the same performance as the present YAPPET electronics in energy, position, and time measurements. In addition, a significant improvement in count rate capability is now being studied. The second major component of this thesis is a description of the development of a new scanner prototype incorporating a PET detection system based on YAP:Ce scintillator matrix crystals and wave length shifting (WLS) fibers. Two ribbons of WLS fibers are mounted on the opposite sides of the scintillator matrix in order to read out the columns and the rows of the matrix and recognize the interaction point XY position. The thesis describes the investigation of the materials and methods to be used in this new design. The first tests with the new prototype detector are described in detail: the main result of these preliminary measurements is the evaluation of the light yield of the system which is a signal of about 10 photoelectrons on the detector for 511 keV photoelectric interactions. The new scanner design uses the YAPPET basic principles, but it should have improved performance with applicability to other fields such as scinti-mammography. Copies of this thesis can be obtained from the Department of Physics of the University of Pisa or the author

  8. Poster - 01: LabPET II Pixelated APD-Based PET Scanner for High-Resolution Preclinical Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecomte, Roger; Arpin, Louis; Beaudoin, Jean-François; Bergeron, Mélanie; Bouchard, Jonathan; Bouziri, Haithem; Cadorette, Jules; Gaudin, Émilie; Jürgensen, Nadia; Koua, Konin Calliste; Trépanier, Pierre-Yves Lauzier; Leroux, Jean-Daniel; Loignon-Houle, Francis; Njejimana, Larissa; Paillé, Maxime; Paulin, Caroline; Pepin, Catherine; Pratte, Jean-François; Samson, Arnaud; Thibaudeau, Christian [Université de Sherbrooke, Université de Sherbrooke, CIMS/CRCHUS, Université de Sherbrooke, Université de Sherbrooke, Université de Sherbrooke, CIMS/CRCHUS, Université de Sherbrooke, Université de Sherbrooke, 3IT, Université de Sherbrooke, Novalgo Inc., Université de Sherbrooke, Université de Sherbrooke, CIMS/CRCHUS, 3IT, Université de Sherbrooke, Université de Sherbrooke, Université de Sherbrooke, Université de Sherbrooke, 3IT, Université de Sherbrooke (Canada); and others

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: LabPET II is a new generation APD-based PET scanner designed to achieve sub-mm spatial resolution using truly pixelated detectors and highly integrated parallel front-end processing electronics. Methods: The basic element uses a 4×8 array of 1.12×1.12 mm{sup 2} Lu{sub 1.9}Y{sub 0.1}SiO{sub 5}:Ce (LYSO) scintillator pixels with one-to-one coupling to a 4×8 pixelated monolithic APD array mounted on a ceramic carrier. Four detector arrays are mounted on a daughter board carrying two flip-chip, 64-channel, mixed-signal, application-specific integrated circuits (ASIC) on the backside interfacing to two detector arrays each. Fully parallel signal processing was implemented in silico by encoding time and energy information using a dual-threshold Time-over-Threshold (ToT) scheme. The self-contained 128-channel detector module was designed as a generic component for ultra-high resolution PET imaging of small to medium-size animals. Results: Energy and timing performance were optimized by carefully setting ToT thresholds to minimize the noise/slope ratio. ToT spectra clearly show resolved 511 keV photopeak and Compton edge with ToT resolution well below 10%. After correction for nonlinear ToT response, energy resolution is typically 24±2% FWHM. Coincidence time resolution between opposing 128-channel modules is below 4 ns FWHM. Initial imaging results demonstrate that 0.8 mm hot spots of a Derenzo phantom can be resolved. Conclusion: A new generation PET scanner featuring truly pixelated detectors was developed and shown to achieve a spatial resolution approaching the physical limit of PET. Future plans are to integrate a small-bore dedicated mouse version of the scanner within a PET/CT platform.

  9. Comparative evaluation of ultrasound scanner accuracy in distance measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branca, F. P.; Sciuto, S. A.; Scorza, A.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the present study is to develop and compare two different automatic methods for accuracy evaluation in ultrasound phantom measurements on B-mode images: both of them give as a result the relative error e between measured distances, performed by 14 brand new ultrasound medical scanners, and nominal distances, among nylon wires embedded in a reference test object. The first method is based on a least squares estimation, while the second one applies the mean value of the same distance evaluated at different locations in ultrasound image (same distance method). Results for both of them are proposed and explained.

  10. Quality assurance for CT scanners and NMR imagers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.L.; Howarth, W.

    1986-01-01

    Quality Assurance is an essential part of management and the application of its disciplines to the purchase and use of CT and MR scanners is particularly important. The Purchaser and User have the leading role. They must take into account the need for a precise specification which will form part of the contract placed on the Supplier, the basis of acceptance and of maintenance of the equipment. The training of staff is also important. The Scientific and Technical Branch of the DHSS has a programme of work intended to help the Purchaser and User in this role. (author)

  11. Mapping of MAC Address with Moving WiFi Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arief Hidayat

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, Wifi is one of the most useful technologies that can be used for detecting and counting MAC Address. This paper described using of WiFi scanner which carried out seven times circulated the bus. The method used WiFi and GPS are to counting MAC address as raw data from the pedestrian smartphone, bus passenger or WiFi devices near from the bus as long as the bus going around the route. There are seven processes to make map WiFi data.

  12. A new electronic read-out for the YAPPET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damiani, C.; Ramusino, A.C.A. Cotta; Malaguti, R.; Guerra, A. Del; Domenico, G. Di; Zavattini, G.

    2002-01-01

    A small animal PET-SPECT scanner (YAPPET) prototype was built at the Physics Department of the Ferrara University and is presently being used at the Nuclear Medicine Department for radiopharmaceutical studies on rats. The first YAPPET prototype shows very good performances, but needs some improvements before it can be fully used for intensive radiopharmaceutical research. The main problem of the actual prototype is its heavy electronics, based on NIM and CAMAC standard modules. For this reason a new, compact read-out electronics was developed and tested. The results of a first series of tests made on the first prototype will be presented in the paper

  13. Computerized tomographic x-ray scanner system and gantry assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyd, D.P.; Lanzara, G.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a scanner assembly. It comprises: a support head, a C-shaped gantry, means for supporting the gantry in the support head for rotating movement, an x-ray source mounted on one side of the gantry for independent movement with respect to a detector array along the gantry, the x-ray source projecting x-rays across the gantry, and a detector array mounted on the other side of a gantry for independent movement with respect to the x-ray source along the gantry, the detector array serving to receive the projected x-rays

  14. A new electronic read-out for the YAPPET scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Damiani, C; Malaguti, R; Guerra, A D; Domenico, G D; Zavattini, G

    2002-01-01

    A small animal PET-SPECT scanner (YAPPET) prototype was built at the Physics Department of the Ferrara University and is presently being used at the Nuclear Medicine Department for radiopharmaceutical studies on rats. The first YAPPET prototype shows very good performances, but needs some improvements before it can be fully used for intensive radiopharmaceutical research. The main problem of the actual prototype is its heavy electronics, based on NIM and CAMAC standard modules. For this reason a new, compact read-out electronics was developed and tested. The results of a first series of tests made on the first prototype will be presented in the paper.

  15. Applicability of optical scanner method for fine root dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Tomonori; Ohashi, Mizue; Makita, Naoki; Khoon Kho, Lip; Katayama, Ayumi; Matsumoto, Kazuho; Ikeno, Hidetoshi

    2016-04-01

    Fine root dynamics is one of the important components in forest carbon cycling, as ~60 % of tree photosynthetic production can be allocated to root growth and metabolic activities. Various techniques have been developed for monitoring fine root biomass, production, mortality in order to understand carbon pools and fluxes resulting from fine roots dynamics. The minirhizotron method is now a widely used technique, in which a transparent tube is inserted into the soil and researchers count an increase and decrease of roots along the tube using images taken by a minirhizotron camera or minirhizotron video camera inside the tube. This method allows us to observe root behavior directly without destruction, but has several weaknesses; e.g., the difficulty of scaling up the results to stand level because of the small observation windows. Also, most of the image analysis are performed manually, which may yield insufficient quantitative and objective data. Recently, scanner method has been proposed, which can produce much bigger-size images (A4-size) with lower cost than those of the minirhizotron methods. However, laborious and time-consuming image analysis still limits the applicability of this method. In this study, therefore, we aimed to develop a new protocol for scanner image analysis to extract root behavior in soil. We evaluated applicability of this method in two ways; 1) the impact of different observers including root-study professionals, semi- and non-professionals on the detected results of root dynamics such as abundance, growth, and decomposition, and 2) the impact of window size on the results using a random sampling basis exercise. We applied our new protocol to analyze temporal changes of root behavior from sequential scanner images derived from a Bornean tropical forests. The results detected by the six observers showed considerable concordance in temporal changes in the abundance and the growth of fine roots but less in the decomposition. We also examined

  16. Coastal Zone Color Scanner data of rich coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrigley, R. C.; Klooster, S. A.

    1983-01-01

    Comparisons of chlorophyll concentrations and diffuse attenuation coefficients measured from ships off the central California coast were made with satellite derived estimates of the same parameters using data from the Coastal Zone Color Scanner. Very high chlorophyll concentrations were encountered in Monterey Bay. Although lower chlorophyll values acquired off Pt. Sur agreed satisfactorily with the satellite data, the high chlorophyll values departed markedly from agreement. Two possible causes for the disagreement are suggested. Comparison of diffuse attenuation coefficients from the same data sets showed closer agreement.

  17. Irradiation in helical scanner: doses estimation, parameters choice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordoliani, Y.S.; Boyer, B.; Jouan, E.; Beauvais, H.

    2001-01-01

    The new generation of helical scanners improves the diagnosis abilities and the service done to the patients. The rational use allows to give the patients a ratio benefit/risk far better than the almost medical examinations. It is particularly true for over sixty years old aged people, that have a null genetic risk and a practically null carcinogen risk; However, for young adults and children, it is necessary to banish any useless irradiation and limit exposure to the strict necessary for the diagnosis. It is necessary to develop a radiation protection culture, possible by the radiation doses index display and doses benchmarks knowledge. (N.C.)

  18. Compact implementation of dynamic receive apodization in ultrasound scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2004-01-01

    The image quality in medical ultrasound scanners is determined by several factors, one of which is the ability of the receive beamformer to change the aperture weighting function with depth and beam angle. In digital beamformers, precise dynamic apodization can be achieved by representing the fun...... operate at 129.82 MHz and occupies 1.28 million gates. Simulated in Matlab, a 64-channel beamformer provides gray scale image with around 55 dB dynamic range. The beamformed data can also be used for flow estimation....

  19. Construction of a ct scanner using heavy ions or protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, D.O.

    1981-01-01

    A computed tomography x-ray scanner, in which a monochromatic xray beam is generated by irradiating an x-ray producing target with high energy monoenergetic ions. The ion beam is preferably produced by a cyclotron. The x-ray beam is preferably rotated through an object to be scanned by angularly displacing the ion beam and target about the center axis of the object. A conventional x-ray detector array, a signal and data processor and imaging means are provided to convert detected x-ray absorption measurements into a two-dimensional visual image of the scanned object cross-section

  20. Estimating Daily Inflation Using Scanner Data: A Progress Report

    OpenAIRE

    Kota Watanabe; Tsutomu Watanabe

    2014-01-01

    We construct a Törnqvist daily price index using Japanese point of sale (POS) scanner data spanning from 1988 to 2013. We find the following. First, the POS based inflation rate tends to be about 0.5 percentage points lower than the CPI inflation rate, although the difference between the two varies over time. Second, the difference between the two measures is greatest from 1992 to 1994, when, following the burst of bubble economy in 1991, the POS inflation rate drops rapidly and turns negati...

  1. Computed tomography scanner applied to soil compaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaz, C.M.P.

    1989-11-01

    The soil compaction problem was studied using a first generation computed tomography scanner (CT). This apparatus gets images of soil cross sections samples, with resolution of a few millimeters. We performed the following laboratory and field experiments: basic experiments of equipment calibrations and resolutions studies; measurements of compacted soil thin layers; measurements of soil compaction caused by agricultural tools; stress-strain modelling in confined soil sample, with several moisture degree; characterizations of soil bulk density profile with samples collected in a hole (trench), comparing with a cone penetrometer technique. (author)

  2. A demonstration of wetland vegetation mapping in Florida from computer-processed satellite and aircraft multispectral scanner data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butera, M. K. (Principal Investigator)

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Major vegetative classes identified by the remote sensing technique were cypress swamp, pine, wetland grasses, salt grass, mixed mangrove, black mangrove, Brazilian pepper. Australian pine and melaleuca were not satisfactorily classified from LANDSAT. Aircraft scanners provided better resolution resulting in a classification of finer surface detail. An edge effect, created by the integration of diverse spectral responses within boundary elements of digital data, affected the wetlands classification. Accuracy classification for aircraft was 68% and for LANDSAT was 74%.

  3. Vacuum Enhanced X-Ray Florescent Scanner Allows On-The-Spot Chemical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center engineers have teamed with KeyMaster Technologies, Kennewick, Washington, to develop a portable vacuum analyzer that performs on-the-spot chemical analyses under field conditions, a task previously only possible in a chemical laboratory. The new capability is important not only to the aerospace industry, but holds potential for broad applications in any industry that depends on materials analysis, such as the automotive and pharmaceutical industries. Weighing in at a mere 4 pounds, the newly developed handheld vacuum X-ray fluorescent analyzer can identify and characterize a wide range of elements, and is capable of detecting chemical elements with low atomic numbers, such as sodium, aluminum and silicon. It is the only handheld product on the market with that capability. Aluminum alloy verification is of particular interest to NASA because vast amounts of high-strength aluminum alloys are used in the Space Shuttle propulsion system such as the External Tank, Main Engine, and Solid Rocket Boosters. This capability promises to be a boom to the aerospace community because of unique requirements, for instance, the need to analyze Space Shuttle propulsion systems on the launch pad. Those systems provide the awe-inspiring rocket power that propels the Space Shuttle from Earth into orbit in mere minutes. The scanner development also marks a major improvement in the quality assurance field, because screws, nuts, bolts, fasteners, and other items can now be evaluated upon receipt and rejected if found to be substandard. The same holds true for aluminum weld rods. The ability to validate the integrity of raw materials and partially finished products before adding value to them in the manufacturing process will be of benefit not only to businesses, but also to the consumer, who will have access to a higher value product at a cheaper price. Three vacuum X-ray scanners are already being used in the Space Shuttle Program. The External Tank Project

  4. Commissioning of a passive rod scanner at INB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junqueira, Fabio da Silva; Oliveira, Carlos A.; Palheiros, Franklin, E-mail: carlossilva@inb.gov.br, E-mail: franklin@inb.gov.br [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Resende, RJ (Brazil). Superintendencia de Engenharia do Combustivel; Fernandez, Pablo Jesus Piñer, E-mail: pineiro@tecnatom.es [Tecnatom, San Sebastian de los Reyes, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-07-01

    For the 21st reload for Angra 1, a shift from Standard to Advanced fuel design will be introduced, where the fuel assemblies under the new design will contain fuel rods with axial blanket, in line with ELETRONUCLEAR's requirement for a higher energy efficient reactor fuel. Additionally, fuel rods for Angra 2 and 3, using gadolinium type burnable poison, have to be submitted to inspections due to the demand for the same type of inspection, which cannot be certified at INB currently. In keeping with CNEN regulations, every fuel-assembly component must be inspected and certified by a qualified method. Nevertheless, INB lacks the means to perform the certification-required inspection aimed at determining the uranium enrichment and presence of gadolinium pellets inside the closed rods. Hence, the use is necessary of a scanner capable of inspecting differently enriched fuel rods and/or gadolinium pellets (axial blanket). This work aims to present the recent Passive Rod Scanner installed at INB with most advance technology in the area, making possible to completely fulfill Angra 1, 2 and 3 rods inspection at INB Resende site. (author)

  5. Scanners and drillers: Characterizing expert visual search through volumetric images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Trafton; Vo, Melissa Le-Hoa; Olwal, Alex; Jacobson, Francine; Seltzer, Steven E.; Wolfe, Jeremy M.

    2013-01-01

    Modern imaging methods like computed tomography (CT) generate 3-D volumes of image data. How do radiologists search through such images? Are certain strategies more efficient? Although there is a large literature devoted to understanding search in 2-D, relatively little is known about search in volumetric space. In recent years, with the ever-increasing popularity of volumetric medical imaging, this question has taken on increased importance as we try to understand, and ultimately reduce, errors in diagnostic radiology. In the current study, we asked 24 radiologists to search chest CTs for lung nodules that could indicate lung cancer. To search, radiologists scrolled up and down through a “stack” of 2-D chest CT “slices.” At each moment, we tracked eye movements in the 2-D image plane and coregistered eye position with the current slice. We used these data to create a 3-D representation of the eye movements through the image volume. Radiologists tended to follow one of two dominant search strategies: “drilling” and “scanning.” Drillers restrict eye movements to a small region of the lung while quickly scrolling through depth. Scanners move more slowly through depth and search an entire level of the lung before moving on to the next level in depth. Driller performance was superior to the scanners on a variety of metrics, including lung nodule detection rate, percentage of the lung covered, and the percentage of search errors where a nodule was never fixated. PMID:23922445

  6. Daily quality controls analysis of a CT scanner simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasques, Maira Milanelo; Santos, Gabriela R.; Furnari, Laura

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing technological developments, radiotherapy practices, which allow for better involvement of the tumor with the required therapeutic dose and minimize the complications of normal tissues, have become reality in several Radiotherapy services. The use of these resources in turn, was only possible due to the progress made in planning based on digital volumetric images of good quality, such as computed tomography (CT), which allow the correct delimitation of the tumor volume and critical structures. Specific tests for quality control in a CT scanner used in radiotherapy, named CT simulator, should be applied as part of the institutional Quality Assurance Program. This study presents the methodology used in the Instituto de Radiologia do Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo (HCFMUSP) for daily testing of the CT scanner simulator and the results obtained throughout more than two years. The experience gained in the period conducted showed that the tests are easy to perform and can be done in a few minutes by a trained professional. Data analysis showed good reproducibility, which allowed the tests could be performed less frequently, after 16 months of data collection. (author)

  7. Emittance scanner for intense low-energy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, P.W.; Sherman, J.D.; Holtkamp, D.B.

    1983-01-01

    An emittance scanner has been developed for use with low-energy H - ion beams to satisfy the following requirements: (1) angular resolution of +-1/2 mrad, (2) small errors from beam space charge, and (3) compact and simple design. The scanner consists of a 10-cm-long analyzer containing two slits and a pair of electric deflection plates driven by a +-500-V linear ramp generator. As the analyzer is mechanically driven across the beam, the front slit passes a thin ribbon of beam through the plates. The ion transit time is short compared with the ramp speed; therefore, the initial angle of the ions that pass through the rear slit is proportional to the instantaneous ramp voltage. The current through the rear slit then is proportional to the phase-space density d 2 i/dxdx'. The data are computer-analyzed to give, for example, rms emittance and phase-space density contours. Comparison of measured data with those calculated from a prepared (collimated) phase space is in good agreement

  8. Novel design of a parallax free Compton enhanced PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braem, A.; Chamizo, M.; Chesi, E.; Colonna, N.; Cusanno, F.; De Leo, R.; Garibaldi, F.; Joram, C.; Marrone, S.; Mathot, S.; Nappi, E.; Schoenahl, F.; Seguinot, J.; Weilhammer, P.; Zaidi, H.

    2004-01-01

    Molecular imaging by PET is a powerful tool in modern clinical practice for cancer diagnosis. Nevertheless, improvements are needed with respect to the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the technique for its application to specific human organs (breast, prostate, brain, etc.), and to small animals. Presently, commercial PET scanners do not detect the depth of interaction of photons in scintillators, which results in a not negligible parallax error. We describe here a novel concept of PET scanner design that provides full three-dimensional (3D) gamma reconstruction with high spatial resolution over the total detector volume, free of parallax errors. It uses matrices of long scintillators read at both ends by hybrid photon detectors. This so-called 3D axial concept also enhances the gamma detection efficiency since it allows one to reconstruct a significant fraction of Compton scattered events. In this note, we describe the concept, a possible design and the expected performance of this new PET device. We also report about first characterization measurements of 10 cm long YAP:Ce scintillation crystals

  9. A noble refractive optical scanner with linear response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mega, Yair J.; Lai, Zhenhua; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2013-03-01

    Many applications in various fields of science and engineering use steered optical beam systems. Currently, many methods utilize mirrors in order to steer the beam. However, this approach is an off-axis solution, which normally increases the total size of the system as well as its error and complexity. Other methods use a "Risely Prisms" based solution, which is on-axis solution, however it poses some difficulties from an engineering standpoint, and therefore isn't widely used. We present here a novel technique for steering a beam on its optical axis with a linear deflection response. We derived the formulation for the profile required of the refractive optical component necessary for preforming the beam steering. The functionality of the device was simulated analytically using Matlab, as well as using a ray-tracing software, Zemax, and showed agreement with the analytical model. An optical element was manufactured based on the proposed design and the device was tested. The results show agreement with our hypothesis. We also present some proposed geometries of the several other devices, all based on the same concept, which can be used for higher performance applications such as two-dimensional scanner, video rate scanner etc.

  10. Label-free tissue scanner for colorectal cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Mikhail E.; Sridharan, Shamira; Liang, Jon; Luo, Zelun; Han, Kevin; Macias, Virgilia; Shah, Anish; Patel, Roshan; Tangella, Krishnarao; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Guzman, Grace; Popescu, Gabriel

    2017-06-01

    The current practice of surgical pathology relies on external contrast agents to reveal tissue architecture, which is then qualitatively examined by a trained pathologist. The diagnosis is based on the comparison with standardized empirical, qualitative assessments of limited objectivity. We propose an approach to pathology based on interferometric imaging of "unstained" biopsies, which provides unique capabilities for quantitative diagnosis and automation. We developed a label-free tissue scanner based on "quantitative phase imaging," which maps out optical path length at each point in the field of view and, thus, yields images that are sensitive to the "nanoscale" tissue architecture. Unlike analysis of stained tissue, which is qualitative in nature and affected by color balance, staining strength and imaging conditions, optical path length measurements are intrinsically quantitative, i.e., images can be compared across different instruments and clinical sites. These critical features allow us to automate the diagnosis process. We paired our interferometric optical system with highly parallelized, dedicated software algorithms for data acquisition, allowing us to image at a throughput comparable to that of commercial tissue scanners while maintaining the nanoscale sensitivity to morphology. Based on the measured phase information, we implemented software tools for autofocusing during imaging, as well as image archiving and data access. To illustrate the potential of our technology for large volume pathology screening, we established an "intrinsic marker" for colorectal disease that detects tissue with dysplasia or colorectal cancer and flags specific areas for further examination, potentially improving the efficiency of existing pathology workflows.

  11. A Moving 3D Laser Scanner for Automated Underbridge Inspection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Tarabini

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent researches have proven that the underbridge geometry can be reconstructed by mounting a 3D laser scanner on a motorized cart travelling on a walkway located under the bridge. The walkway is moved by a truck and the accuracy of the bridge model depends on the accuracy of the trajectory of the scanning head with respect to a fixed reference system. In this paper, we describe a vision-based measurement system that can be used to identify the relative motion of the cart that moves the 3D laser scanner with respect to the walkway. The orientation of the walkway with respect to the bridge is determined using inclinometers and a camera that detect the position of a laser spot, while the position of the truck with respect to the bridge is measured using a conventional odometer. The accuracy of the proposed system was initially evaluated by numerical simulations and successively verified by experiments in laboratory conditions. The complete system has then been tested by comparing the geometry of buildings reconstructed using the proposed system with the geometry obtained with a static scan. Results showed that the error is less than 6 mm; given the satisfying quality of the point clouds obtained, it is also possible to detect small defects on the surface.

  12. Quality control of the Korle Bu rectilinear scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feli, S.K.; Tetteh, G.K.

    1993-01-01

    The attainment of high standards of efficiency and reliability in the practice of nuclear medicine requires an appropriate quality assurance programme. Routine monitoring of nuclear medicine instruments, using test procedures that provide check of the quality and reproducibility of instrument performance, aims at giving the user the confidence in the data collected and in updating the performance of the instrument. Quality control testing schedule for rectilinear scanners include weekly density calibration and monthly performance contrast enhancement and collimator evaluation. Discussion in this work is restricted to collimator evaluation which is required to be performed at the initial stages of installation as acceptance reference. However unlike the density, calibration and contrast enhancement, there is no documented work on this for the M800 Scintikart Scanner - a Hungarian Gamma Muvek system belonging to the Korle Bu Hospital, Accra. Tests of linearity of energy, relative sensitivity and resolution including energy and spatial resolutions were conducted in respect of collimator evaluation. In the linearity test it was ascertained that a nonlinear relationship exists between the centre of the window setting and the energy of the photopeak. The spectrometer was calibrated independently for each radionuclide and the position of Tc-99m obtained at 0.45 MeV on the MeV scale. In addition, the F272a13 Collimator offered a better resolution than the routinely used F272a136 collimator which has the highest sensitivity. (author). 10 refs.; 1 tab.; 10 figs

  13. Initial clinical test of a breast-PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Koren, Courtney; Schreiman, Judith S.; Majewski, Stan; Marano, Gary D.; Abraham, Jame; Kurian, Sobha; Hazard, Hannah; Filburn, Shannon

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this initial clinical study was to test a new positron emission/tomography imager and biopsy system (PEM/PET) in a small group of selected subjects to assess its clinical imaging capabilities. Specifically, the main task of this study is to determine whether the new system can successfully be used to produce images of known breast cancer and compare them to those acquired by standard techniques. The PEM/PET system consists of two pairs of rotating radiation detectors located beneath a patient table. The scanner has a spatial resolution of ∼2 mm in all three dimensions. The subjects consisted of five patients diagnosed with locally advanced breast cancer ranging in age from 40 to 55 years old scheduled for pre-treatment, conventional whole body PET imaging with F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). The primary lesions were at least 2 cm in diameter. The images from the PEM/PET system demonstrated that this system is capable of identifying some lesions not visible in standard mammograms. Furthermore, while the relatively large lesions imaged in this study where all visualised by a standard whole body PET/CT scanner, some of the morphology of the tumours (ductal infiltration, for example) was better defined with the PEM/PET system. Significantly, these images were obtained immediately following a standard whole body PET scan. The initial testing of the new PEM/PET system demonstrated that the new system is capable of producing good quality breast-PET images compared standard methods.

  14. X-ray backscatter imaging with a spiral scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossi, R.H.; Cline, J.L.; Friddell, K.D.

    1989-01-01

    X-ray backscatter imaging allows radiographic inspections to be performed with access to only one side of the object. A collimated beam of radiation striking an object will scatter x-rays by Compton scatter and x-ray fluorescence. A detector located on the source side of the part will measure the backscatter signal. By plotting signal strength as gray scale intensity vs. beam position on the object, an image of the object can be constructed. A novel approach to the motion of the collimated incident beam is a spiral scanner. The spiral scanner approach, described in this paper, can image an area of an object without the synchronized motion of the object or detector, required by other backscatter imaging techniques. X-ray backscatter is particularly useful for flaw detection in light element materials such as composites. The ease of operation and the ability to operate non-contact from one side of an object make x-ray backscatter imaging of increasing interest to industrial inspection problems

  15. Computed tomographic mammography using a conventional body scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C H; Nesbit, D E; Fisher, D R; Fritz, S L; Dwyer, S J; Templeton, A W; Lin, F; Jewell, W R

    1982-03-01

    The technique for computed tomographic (CT) examination of the breasts using a conventional body scanner is described, and experience with 67 patients is reported. In the diagnosis of both malignant and benign breast lesions, the results with a body scanner were equal to those of a dedicated CT/M mammographic unit. Although the CT study of the breast cannot replace conventional mammography in screening or in routine diagnostic workup, the unique capability of demonstrating both anatomic changes and increased iodide concentration in a cancer provides many advantages over conventional mammography. CT mammography appears to have the capability to detect breast cancers that are occult to other methods. Indications for a CT study of the breasts are: (1) clinically suspected breast cancer, especially with a mammographically occult lesion; (2) questionable mammographic findings, including microcalcifications, tumor shape, architectural distortion, and uncertain lesion location; and (3) evaluation of postbiopsy or postlumpectomy breast cancers when a primary irradiation therapy is contemplated. Breast CT also appears to be a valuable diagnostic tool in searching for a second primary breast cancer, follow-up study of postirradiation of breast cancer, followup study for postmastectomy patients, and screening procedure for genetically high-risk patients, especially those with dense breasts.

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of efficient data acquisition for an entire-body PET scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isnaini, Ismet; Obi, Takashi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Yoshida, Eiji, E-mail: rush@nirs.go.jp [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yamaya, Taiga [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Conventional PET scanners can image the whole body using many bed positions. On the other hand, an entire-body PET scanner with an extended axial FOV, which can trace whole-body uptake images at the same time and improve sensitivity dynamically, has been desired. The entire-body PET scanner would have to process a large amount of data effectively. As a result, the entire-body PET scanner has high dead time at a multiplex detector grouping process. Also, the entire-body PET scanner has many oblique line-of-responses. In this work, we study an efficient data acquisition for the entire-body PET scanner using the Monte Carlo simulation. The simulated entire-body PET scanner based on depth-of-interaction detectors has a 2016-mm axial field-of-view (FOV) and an 80-cm ring diameter. Since the entire-body PET scanner has higher single data loss than a conventional PET scanner at grouping circuits, the NECR of the entire-body PET scanner decreases. But, single data loss is mitigated by separating the axially arranged detector into multiple parts. Our choice of 3 groups of axially-arranged detectors has shown to increase the peak NECR by 41%. An appropriate choice of maximum ring difference (MRD) will also maintain the same high performance of sensitivity and high peak NECR while at the same time reduces the data size. The extremely-oblique line of response for large axial FOV does not contribute much to the performance of the scanner. The total sensitivity with full MRD increased only 15% than that with about half MRD. The peak NECR was saturated at about half MRD. The entire-body PET scanner promises to provide a large axial FOV and to have sufficient performance values without using the full data.

  17. Performance test of Si PIN photodiode line scanner for thermal neutron detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Totsuka, Daisuke, E-mail: totsuka@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Nihon Kessho Kogaku Co., Ltd., 810-5 Nobe-cho Tatebayashi, Gunma 374-0047 (Japan); Yanagida, Takayuki [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center (NICHe) 6-6-10 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Fukuda, Kentaro; Kawaguchi, Noriaki [Tokuyama Corp., 3 Shibuya Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-8383 (Japan); Fujimoto, Yutaka [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Pejchal, Jan [Institute of Physics AS CR, Cukrovarnicka 10, Prague 6, 162-53 (Czech Republic); Yokota, Yuui [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Yoshikawa, Akira [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); New Industry Creation Hatchery Center (NICHe) 6-6-10 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan)

    2011-12-11

    Thermal neutron imaging using Si PIN photodiode line scanner and Eu-doped LiCaAlF{sub 6} crystal scintillator has been developed. The pixel dimensions of photodiode are 1.18 mm (width) Multiplication-Sign 3.8 mm (length) with 0.4 mm gap and the module has 192 channels in linear array. The emission peaks of Eu-doped LiCaAlF{sub 6} after thermal neutron excitation are placed at 370 and 590 nm, and the corresponding photon sensitivities of photodiode are 0.04 and 0.34 A/W, respectively. Polished scintillator blocks with a size of 1.18 mm (width) Multiplication-Sign 3.8 mm (length) Multiplication-Sign 5.0 mm (thickness) were wrapped by several layers of Teflon tapes as a reflector and optically coupled to the photodiodes by silicone grease. JRR-3 MUSASI beam line emitting 13.5 meV thermal neutrons with the flux of 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} n/cm{sup 2} s was used for the imaging test. As a subject for imaging, a Cd plate was moved at the speed of 50 mm/s perpendicular to the thermal neutron beam. Analog integration time was set to be 416.6 {mu}s, then signals were converted by a delta-sigma A/D converter. After the image processing, we successfully obtained moving Cd plate image under thermal neutron irradiation using PIN photodiode line scanner coupled with Eu-doped LiCaAlF{sub 6} scintillator.

  18. Performance test of Si PIN photodiode line scanner for thermal neutron detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totsuka, Daisuke; Yanagida, Takayuki; Fukuda, Kentaro; Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Pejchal, Jan; Yokota, Yuui; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2011-01-01

    Thermal neutron imaging using Si PIN photodiode line scanner and Eu-doped LiCaAlF 6 crystal scintillator has been developed. The pixel dimensions of photodiode are 1.18 mm (width)×3.8 mm (length) with 0.4 mm gap and the module has 192 channels in linear array. The emission peaks of Eu-doped LiCaAlF 6 after thermal neutron excitation are placed at 370 and 590 nm, and the corresponding photon sensitivities of photodiode are 0.04 and 0.34 A/W, respectively. Polished scintillator blocks with a size of 1.18 mm (width)×3.8 mm (length)×5.0 mm (thickness) were wrapped by several layers of Teflon tapes as a reflector and optically coupled to the photodiodes by silicone grease. JRR-3 MUSASI beam line emitting 13.5 meV thermal neutrons with the flux of 8×10 5 n/cm 2 s was used for the imaging test. As a subject for imaging, a Cd plate was moved at the speed of 50 mm/s perpendicular to the thermal neutron beam. Analog integration time was set to be 416.6 μs, then signals were converted by a delta-sigma A/D converter. After the image processing, we successfully obtained moving Cd plate image under thermal neutron irradiation using PIN photodiode line scanner coupled with Eu-doped LiCaAlF 6 scintillator.

  19. Fast neutron radiography scanner for the detection of contraband in air cargo containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhardt, J.E.; Rainey, S.; Stevens, R.J.; Sowerby, B.D.; Tickner, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing need to rapidly scan bulk air cargo for contraband such as illicit drugs and explosives. The Commonwealth Science and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) have been working with Australian Customs Service to develop a scanner capable of directly scanning airfreight containers in 1-2 minutes without unpacking. The scanner combines fast neutron and gamma-ray radiography to provide high-resolution images that include information on material composition. A full-scale prototype scanner has been successfully tested in the laboratory and a commercial-scale scanner is due to be installed at Brisbane airport in 2005

  20. Fast neutron radiography scanner for the detection of contraband in air cargo containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhardt, J.E. [CSIRO Minerals, Private Mail Bag 5, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Rainey, S. [CSIRO Minerals, Private Mail Bag 5, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Stevens, R.J. [CSIRO Minerals, Private Mail Bag 5, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Sowerby, B.D. [CSIRO Minerals, Private Mail Bag 5, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)]. E-mail: brian.sowerby@csiro.au; Tickner, J.R. [CSIRO Minerals, Private Mail Bag 5, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2005-08-01

    There is a growing need to rapidly scan bulk air cargo for contraband such as illicit drugs and explosives. The Commonwealth Science and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) have been working with Australian Customs Service to develop a scanner capable of directly scanning airfreight containers in 1-2 minutes without unpacking. The scanner combines fast neutron and gamma-ray radiography to provide high-resolution images that include information on material composition. A full-scale prototype scanner has been successfully tested in the laboratory and a commercial-scale scanner is due to be installed at Brisbane airport in 2005.

  1. Ultra-High-Resolution Computed Tomography of the Lung: Image Quality of a Prototype Scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Muramatsu, Yukio; Gomi, Shiho; Suzuki, Masahiro; Nagasawa, Hirobumi; Kusumoto, Masahiko; Aso, Tomohiko; Muramatsu, Yoshihisa; Tsuchida, Takaaki; Tsuta, Koji; Maeshima, Akiko Miyagi; Tochigi, Naobumi; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; Sugihara, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The image noise and image quality of a prototype ultra-high-resolution computed tomography (U-HRCT) scanner was evaluated and compared with those of conventional high-resolution CT (C-HRCT) scanners. Materials and Methods: This study was approved by the institutional review board. A U-HRCT scanner prototype with 0.25 mm × 4 rows and operating at 120 mAs was used. The C-HRCT images were obtained using a 0.5 mm × 16 or 0.5 mm × 64 detector-row CT scanner operating at 150 mAs. Images fr...

  2. Imaging system models for small-bore DOI-PET scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hisashi; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Yamaya, Taiga; Murayama, Hideo; Kitamura, Keishi; Hasegawa, Tomoyuki; Suga, Mikio

    2006-01-01

    Depth-of-interaction (DOI) information, which improves resolution uniformity in the field of view (FOV), is expected to lead to high-sensitivity PET scanners with small-bore detector rings. We are developing small-bore PET scanners with DOI detectors arranged in hexagonal or overlapped tetragonal patterns for small animal imaging or mammography. It is necessary to optimize the imaging system model because these scanners exhibit irregular detector sampling. In this work, we compared two imaging system models: (a) a parallel sub-LOR model in which the detector response functions (DRFs) are assumed to be uniform along the line of responses (LORs) and (b) a sub-crystal model in which each crystal is divided into a set of smaller volumes. These two models were applied to the overlapped tetragonal scanner (FOV 38.1 mm in diameter) and the hexagonal scanner (FOV 85.2 mm in diameter) simulated by GATE. We showed that the resolution non-uniformity of system model (b) was improved by 40% compared with that of system model (a) in the overlapped tetragonal scanner and that the resolution non-uniformity of system model (a) was improved by 18% compared with that of system model (b) in the hexagonal scanner. These results indicate that system model (b) should be applied to the overlapped tetragonal scanner and system model (a) should be applied to the hexagonal scanner. (author)

  3. Multi-spectral optical scanners for commercial earth observation missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, Karin; Engel, Wolfgang; Berndt, Klaus

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, a number of commercial Earth observation missions have been initiated with the aim to gather data in the visible and near-infrared wavelength range. Some of these missions aim at medium resolution (5 to 10 m) multi-spectral imaging with the special background of daily revisiting. Typical applications aim at monitoring of farming area for growth control and harvest prediction, irrigation control, or disaster monitoring such as hail damage in farming, or flood survey. In order to arrive at profitable business plans for such missions, it is mandatory to establish the space segment, i.e. the spacecraft with their opto -electronic payloads, at minimum cost while guaranteeing maximum reliability for mission success. As multiple spacecraft are required for daily revisiting, the solutions are typically based on micro-satellites. This paper presents designs for multi-spectral opto-electric scanners for this type of missions. These designs are drive n by minimum mass and power budgets of microsatellites, and the need for minimum cost. As a consequence, it is mandatory to arrive at thermally robust, compact telescope designs. The paper gives a comparison between refractive, catadioptric, and TMA optics. For mirror designs, aluminium and Zerodur mirror technologies are briefly discussed. State-of-the art focal plane designs are presented. The paper also addresses the choice of detector technologies such as CCDs and CMOS Active Pixel Sensors. The electronics of the multi-spectral scanners represent the main design driver regarding power consumption, reliability, and (most often) cost. It can be subdivided into the detector drive electronics, analog and digital data processing chains, the data mass memory unit, formatting and down - linking units, payload control electronics, and local power supply. The paper gives overviews and trade-offs between data compression strategies and electronics solutions, mass memory unit designs, and data formatting approaches

  4. The accuracy of the CAD system using intraoral and extraoral scanners for designing of fixed dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Sakura; Shinya, Akikazu; Kuroda, Soichi; Gomi, Harunori

    2017-07-26

    The accuracy of prostheses affects clinical success and is, in turn, affected by the accuracy of the scanner and CAD programs. Thus, their accuracy is important. The first aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of an intraoral scanner with active triangulation (Cerec Omnicam), an intraoral scanner with a confocal laser (3Shape Trios), and an extraoral scanner with active triangulation (D810). The second aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of the digital crowns designed with two different scanner/CAD combinations. The accuracy of the intraoral scanners and extraoral scanner was clinically acceptable. Marginal and internal fit of the digital crowns fabricated using the intraoral scanner and CAD programs were inferior to those fabricated using the extraoral scanner and CAD programs.

  5. Accuracy of single-abutment digital cast obtained using intraoral and cast scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Jun; Jeong, Ii-Do; Park, Jin-Young; Jeon, Jin-Hun; Kim, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Woong-Chul

    2017-02-01

    Scanners are frequently used in the fabrication of dental prostheses. However, the accuracy of these scanners is variable, and little information is available. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the accuracy of cast scanners with that of intraoral scanners by using different image impression techniques. A poly(methyl methacrylate) master model was fabricated to replicate a maxillary first molar single-abutment tooth model. The master model was scanned with an accurate engineering scanner to obtain a true value (n=1) and with 2 intraoral scanners (CEREC Bluecam and CEREC Omnicam; n=6 each). The cast scanner scanned the master model and duplicated the dental stone cast from the master model (n=6). The trueness and precision of the data were measured using a 3-dimensional analysis program. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the different sets of scanning data, followed by a post hoc Mann-Whitney U test with a significance level modified by Bonferroni correction (α/6=.0083). The type 1 error level (α) was set at .05. The trueness value (root mean square: mean ±standard deviation) was 17.5 ±1.8 μm for the Bluecam, 13.8 ±1.4 μm for the Omnicam, 17.4 ±1.7 μm for cast scanner 1, and 12.3 ±0.1 μm for cast scanner 2. The differences between the Bluecam and the cast scanner 1 and between the Omnicam and the cast scanner 2 were not statistically significant (P>.0083), but a statistically significant difference was found between all the other pairs (POmnicam, 9.2 ±1.2 μm for cast scanner 1, and 6.9 ±2.6 μm for cast scanner 2. The differences between Bluecam and Omnicam and between Omnicam and cast scanner 1 were not statistically significant (P>.0083), but there was a statistically significant difference between all the other pairs (POmnicam in video image impression had better trueness than a cast scanner but with a similar level of precision. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by

  6. Ultra-High-Resolution Computed Tomography of the Lung: Image Quality of a Prototype Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Muramatsu, Yukio; Gomi, Shiho; Suzuki, Masahiro; Nagasawa, Hirobumi; Kusumoto, Masahiko; Aso, Tomohiko; Muramatsu, Yoshihisa; Tsuchida, Takaaki; Tsuta, Koji; Maeshima, Akiko Miyagi; Tochigi, Naobumi; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; Sugihara, Naoki; Tsukagoshi, Shinsuke; Saito, Yasuo; Kazama, Masahiro; Ashizawa, Kazuto; Awai, Kazuo; Honda, Osamu; Ishikawa, Hiroyuki; Koizumi, Naoya; Komoto, Daisuke; Moriya, Hiroshi; Oda, Seitaro; Oshiro, Yasuji; Yanagawa, Masahiro; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Asamura, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The image noise and image quality of a prototype ultra-high-resolution computed tomography (U-HRCT) scanner was evaluated and compared with those of conventional high-resolution CT (C-HRCT) scanners. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board. A U-HRCT scanner prototype with 0.25 mm x 4 rows and operating at 120 mAs was used. The C-HRCT images were obtained using a 0.5 mm x 16 or 0.5 mm x 64 detector-row CT scanner operating at 150 mAs. Images from both scanners were reconstructed at 0.1-mm intervals; the slice thickness was 0.25 mm for the U-HRCT scanner and 0.5 mm for the C-HRCT scanners. For both scanners, the display field of view was 80 mm. The image noise of each scanner was evaluated using a phantom. U-HRCT and C-HRCT images of 53 images selected from 37 lung nodules were then observed and graded using a 5-point score by 10 board-certified thoracic radiologists. The images were presented to the observers randomly and in a blinded manner. Results The image noise for U-HRCT (100.87 ± 0.51 Hounsfield units [HU]) was greater than that for C-HRCT (40.41 ± 0.52 HU; P < .0001). The image quality of U-HRCT was graded as superior to that of C-HRCT (P < .0001) for all of the following parameters that were examined: margins of subsolid and solid nodules, edges of solid components and pulmonary vessels in subsolid nodules, air bronchograms, pleural indentations, margins of pulmonary vessels, edges of bronchi, and interlobar fissures. Conclusion Despite a larger image noise, the prototype U-HRCT scanner had a significantly better image quality than the C-HRCT scanners. PMID:26352144

  7. Ultra-High-Resolution Computed Tomography of the Lung: Image Quality of a Prototype Scanner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryutaro Kakinuma

    Full Text Available The image noise and image quality of a prototype ultra-high-resolution computed tomography (U-HRCT scanner was evaluated and compared with those of conventional high-resolution CT (C-HRCT scanners.This study was approved by the institutional review board. A U-HRCT scanner prototype with 0.25 mm x 4 rows and operating at 120 mAs was used. The C-HRCT images were obtained using a 0.5 mm x 16 or 0.5 mm x 64 detector-row CT scanner operating at 150 mAs. Images from both scanners were reconstructed at 0.1-mm intervals; the slice thickness was 0.25 mm for the U-HRCT scanner and 0.5 mm for the C-HRCT scanners. For both scanners, the display field of view was 80 mm. The image noise of each scanner was evaluated using a phantom. U-HRCT and C-HRCT images of 53 images selected from 37 lung nodules were then observed and graded using a 5-point score by 10 board-certified thoracic radiologists. The images were presented to the observers randomly and in a blinded manner.The image noise for U-HRCT (100.87 ± 0.51 Hounsfield units [HU] was greater than that for C-HRCT (40.41 ± 0.52 HU; P < .0001. The image quality of U-HRCT was graded as superior to that of C-HRCT (P < .0001 for all of the following parameters that were examined: margins of subsolid and solid nodules, edges of solid components and pulmonary vessels in subsolid nodules, air bronchograms, pleural indentations, margins of pulmonary vessels, edges of bronchi, and interlobar fissures.Despite a larger image noise, the prototype U-HRCT scanner had a significantly better image quality than the C-HRCT scanners.

  8. Important considerations for radiochromic film dosimetry with flatbed CCD scanners and EBT GAFCHROMIC[reg] film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, Bart D.; Kozelka, Jakub; Ranade, Manisha K.; Li, Jonathan G.; Simon, William E.; Dempsey, James F.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we present three significant artifacts that have the potential to negatively impact the accuracy and precision of film dosimetry measurements made using GAFCHROMIC[reg] EBT radiochromic film when read out with CCD flatbed scanners. Films were scanned using three commonly employed instruments: a Macbeth TD932 spot densitometer, an Epson Expression 1680 CCD array scanner, and a Microtek ScanMaker i900 CCD array scanner. For the two scanners we assessed the variation in optical density (OD) of GAFCHROMIC EBT film with scanning bed position, angular rotation of the film with respect to the scan line direction, and temperature inside the scanner due to repeated scanning. Scanning uniform radiochromic films demonstrated a distinct bowing effect in profiles in the direction of the CCD array with a nonuniformity of up to 17%. Profiles along a direction orthogonal to the CCD array demonstrated a 7% variation. A strong angular dependence was found in measurements made with the flatbed scanners; the effect could not be reproduced with the spot densitometer. An IMRT quality assurance film was scanned twice rotating the film 90 deg. between the scans. For films scanned on the Epson scanner, up to 12% variation was observed in unirradiated EBT films rotated between 0 deg. and 90 deg. , which decreased to approximately 8% for EBT films irradiated to 300 cGy. Variations of up to 80% were observed for films scanned with the Microtek scanner. The scanners were found to significantly increase the film temperature with repeated scanning. Film temperature between 18 and 33 deg. C caused OD changes of approximately 7%. Considering these effects, we recommend adherence to a strict scanning protocol that includes: maintaining the orientation of films scanned on flatbed scanners, limiting scanning to the central portion of the scanner bed, and limiting the number of consecutive scans to minimize changes in OD caused by film heating

  9. Jefferson Lab IR demo FEL photocathode quantum efficiency scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Gubeli, J; Grippo, A; Jordan, K; Shinn, M; Siggins, T

    2001-01-01

    Jefferson Laboratory's Free Electron Laser (FEL) incorporates a cesiated gallium arsenide (GaAs) DC photocathode gun as its electron source. By using a set of scanning mirrors, the surface of the GaAs wafer is illuminated with a 543.5nm helium-neon laser. Measuring the current flow across the biased photocathode generates a quantum efficiency (QE) map of the 1-in. diameter wafer surface. The resulting QE map provides a very detailed picture of the efficiency of the wafer surface. By generating a QE map in a matter of minutes, the photocathode scanner has proven to be an exceptional tool in quickly determining sensitivity and availability of the photocathode for operation.

  10. Attenuation correction for the NIH ATLAS small animal PET scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Rutao; Liow, JeihSan; Seidel, Jurgen

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated two methods of attenuation correction for the NIH ATLAS small animal PET scanner: 1) a CT-based method that derives 511 keV attenuation coefficients (mu) by extrapolation from spatially registered CT images; and 2) an analytic method based on the body outline of emission images and an empirical mu. A specially fabricated attenuation calibration phantom with cylindrical inserts that mimic different body tissues was used to derive the relationship to convert CT values to (I for PET. The methods were applied to three test data sets: 1) a uniform cylinder phantom, 2) the attenuation calibration phantom, and 3) a mouse injected with left bracket **1**8F right bracket FDG. The CT-based attenuation correction factors were larger in non-uniform regions of the imaging subject, e.g. mouse head, than the analytic method. The two methods had similar correction factors for regions with uniform density and detectable emission source distributions.

  11. Clinical applications of a high quantum utilization scanner. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crandall, P.H.; Cassen, B.

    1973-04-01

    The clinical usefulness of a tomographic imaging process employing a fast rectilinear scanner consisted of a spherical-cap nest of seven individual detectors (3'' x 1 / 2 '' activated sodium iodide) collimated to a common focal point at 10 cm. Hydraulic drives permitted a fast rectilinear scan to be made and, when raised or lowered, at different planes. Patients with well-defined brain lesions were studied using /sup 99m/Tc-pertechnetate or 203 Hg-chlormerodrin as tracers by measuring three dimensions of their lesions and anatomical location at the time of operation. Brain maps were used to identify this location at operation and also the location of images traced from film density displays of a conventional radioisotopic scan, the tomographic scan, and cerebral angiograms. (U.S.)

  12. Analysis of pellet coating uniformity using a computer scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šibanc, Rok; Luštrik, Matevž; Dreu, Rok

    2017-11-30

    A fast method for pellet coating uniformity analysis, using a commercial computer scanner was developed. The analysis of the individual particle coating thicknesses was based on using a transparent orange colored coating layer deposited on white pellet cores. Besides the analysis of the coating thickness the information of pellet size and shape was obtained as well. Particle size dependent coating thickness and particle size independent coating variability was calculated by combining the information of coating thickness and pellet size. Decoupling coating thickness variation sources is unique to presented method. For each coating experiment around 10000 pellets were analyzed, giving results with a high statistical confidence. Proposed method was employed for the performance evaluation of classical Wurster and swirl enhanced Wurster coater operated at different gap settings and air flow rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Crop water-stress assessment using an airborne thermal scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, J. P.; Jackson, R. D.; Reginato, R. J.; Idso, S. B.; Goettelman, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    An airborne thermal scanner was used to measure the temperature of a wheat crop canopy in Phoenix, Arizona. The results indicate that canopy temperatures acquired about an hour and a half past solar noon were well correlated with presunrise plant water tension, a parameter directly related to plant growth and development. Pseudo-colored thermal images reading directly in stress degree days, a unit indicative of crop irrigation needs and yield potential, were produced. The aircraft data showed significant within-field canopy temperature variability, indicating the superiority of the synoptic view provided by aircraft over localized ground measurements. The standard deviation between airborne and ground-acquired canopy temperatures was 2 C or less.

  14. Parameters and design considerations for tomographic transmission scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pentlow, K.S.; Beattie, J.W.; Laughlin, J.S.

    1976-01-01

    The design of transverse axial transmission scanners for reconstruction tomography involves many interrelated parameters and conflicting requirements. We have investigated some of those parameters and their interactions and, where appropriate, attempted to optimize them. It is convenient to group the considerations under four headings: (1) Geometrical factors (basic configurations, rectilinear and fan geometry, moving detectors or static arrays, spatial response variations and field uniformity, and collimation); (2) Radiation energy and sources (Considerations here include transmission versus sensitivity, detector efficiency, collimator penetration, scattered radiation, patient dose, monochromatic versus polychromatic radiation and X-ray tubes versus radionuclide sources); (3) Detection systems (types of detector, detection modes and the rejection of scatter); and (4) Reconstruction mathematics and quantum noise. As a result of such considerations we have proposed a particular design which should have advantages in certain applications

  15. Development of radioactive source scanner based on PLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Guogui; Gao Xiang; Guo Hongli

    2013-01-01

    The radioactive radial uniformity of 68 Ge line radioactive sources is a critical quality parameter. The radioactive source scanner with linear scanning function is developed by making use of high-speed pulse counters, high-speed pulse output ports, and the powerful instruction system of Siemens S7-200 series programmable logic controller (PLC). A computer used as a host computer of the instrument communicate with. the PLC by point to point interface (PPI) protocol, The instrument with functions of data collection, transmission, displaying, saving, motion control and instrument parameter settings, can be used to measure the radioactive radial uniformity and total activity of line radioactive source. The advantages of Using the PLC to develop nuclear instrumentation are development speed, strong anti-interference ability, and low-cost. This paper mainly describes the control system implementation and feature of the instrument. (authors)

  16. Coastal Zone Color Scanner atmospheric correction algorithm - Multiple scattering effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Howard R.; Castano, Diego J.

    1987-01-01

    Errors due to multiple scattering which are expected to be encountered in application of the current Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) atmospheric correction algorithm are analyzed. The analysis is based on radiative transfer computations in model atmospheres, in which the aerosols and molecules are distributed vertically in an exponential manner, with most of the aerosol scattering located below the molecular scattering. A unique feature of the analysis is that it is carried out in scan coordinates rather than typical earth-sun coordinates, making it possible to determine the errors along typical CZCS scan lines. Information provided by the analysis makes it possible to judge the efficacy of the current algorithm with the current sensor and to estimate the impact of the algorithm-induced errors on a variety of applications.

  17. Cloud screening Coastal Zone Color Scanner images using channel 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, B. A.; Simpson, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    Clouds are removed from Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) data using channel 5. Instrumentation problems require pre-processing of channel 5 before an intelligent cloud-screening algorithm can be used. For example, at intervals of about 16 lines, the sensor records anomalously low radiances. Moreover, the calibration equation yields negative radiances when the sensor records zero counts, and pixels corrupted by electronic overshoot must also be excluded. The remaining pixels may then be used in conjunction with the procedure of Simpson and Humphrey to determine the CZCS cloud mask. These results plus in situ observations of phytoplankton pigment concentration show that pre-processing and proper cloud-screening of CZCS data are necessary for accurate satellite-derived pigment concentrations. This is especially true in the coastal margins, where pigment content is high and image distortion associated with electronic overshoot is also present. The pre-processing algorithm is critical to obtaining accurate global estimates of pigment from spacecraft data.

  18. High speed hydraulic scanner for deep x-ray lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milne, J.C.; Johnson, E.D.

    1997-07-01

    From their research and development in hard x-ray lithography, the authors have found that the conventional leadscrew driven scanner stages do not provide adequate scan speed or travel. These considerations have led the authors to develop a scanning system based on a long stroke hydraulic drive with 635 mm of travel and closed loop feedback to position the stage to better than 100 micrometers. The control of the device is through a PC with a custom LabView interface coupled to simple x-ray beam diagnostics. This configuration allows one to set a variety of scan parameters, including target dose, scan range, scan rates, and dose rate. Results from the prototype system at beamline X-27B are described as well as progress on a production version for the X-14B beamline

  19. Radiography and scanner: let us ask the right questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-07-01

    By answering simple questions, this document proposes a brief overview of radiographic and scanner-based examinations. It recalls that these both techniques use X rays, the cumulative dose of which could slightly increase a risk of cancer on a long term. It outlines that the benefits of these examinations are much more important that the related risks. It indicates the received dose (compared to a daily natural irradiation) for different kinds of examination and for different parts of the human body. It outlines the sensitivity of children to X rays, gives some recommendations regarding these examinations (they are not automatic; the doctor must explain why he chooses them, previous examinations and photos must be kept and brought with; the received dose must be specified in the examination report)

  20. Health physics aspects of the EMI computerized tomography brain scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villafana, T.; Scouras, J.; Kirkland, L.; McElroy, N.; Paras, P.

    1978-01-01

    The EMI computerized tomographic cranial scanner is one of the first radiological systems incorporating an on-line computer. The result is an increase in the ability to visualize such tissues as grey matter and white matter as well as blood pools and tumor volumes. This advance has already begun to revolutionize radiological practice. Because of the totally different configuration of this unit, concern has been expressed over the dosages received by the patient, consequently the health physics aspects of this unit have been studied. Specifically, doses received by the surface of head and interior brain points as well as by the lens of the eye and gonads are reported here. X-ray output, beam half-value layers and barrier shielding requirements are also reported and discussed. (author)

  1. High speed hydraulic scanner for deep x-ray lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milne, J.C.; Johnson, E.D.

    1997-07-01

    From their research and development in hard x-ray lithography, the authors have found that the conventional leadscrew driven scanner stages do not provide adequate scan speed or travel. These considerations have led the authors to develop a scanning system based on a long stroke hydraulic drive with 635 mm of travel and closed loop feedback to position the stage to better than 100 micrometers. The control of the device is through a PC with a custom LabView interface coupled to simple x-ray beam diagnostics. This configuration allows one to set a variety of scan parameters, including target dose, scan range, scan rates, and dose rate. Results from the prototype system at beamline X-27B are described as well as progress on a production version for the X-14B beamline.

  2. Use of ocean color scanner data in water quality mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorram, S.

    1981-01-01

    Remotely sensed data, in combination with in situ data, are used in assessing water quality parameters within the San Francisco Bay-Delta. The parameters include suspended solids, chlorophyll, and turbidity. Regression models are developed between each of the water quality parameter measurements and the Ocean Color Scanner (OCS) data. The models are then extended to the entire study area for mapping water quality parameters. The results include a series of color-coded maps, each pertaining to one of the water quality parameters, and the statistical analysis of the OCS data and regression models. It is found that concurrently collected OCS data and surface truth measurements are highly useful in mapping the selected water quality parameters and locating areas having relatively high biological activity. In addition, it is found to be virtually impossible, at least within this test site, to locate such areas on U-2 color and color-infrared photography.

  3. Optofluidic laser scanner based on a rotating liquid prism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Daniel; Lehmann, Lukas; Zappe, Hans

    2016-03-20

    We demonstrate an electrowetting-actuated optofluidic system based on a rotatable liquid prism implemented as a two-dimensional laser scanner. The system is fabricated through a novel technology using a patterned flexible polymeric foil on which a high density of electrodes is structured and which is subsequently inserted into a cylindrical housing. The resulting radial electrode array is used for electrowetting actuation of two fluids filled into the cylinder, which allows a controllable tilt and orientation of the planar liquid interface and thus represents a tunable rotating prism. Finite element simulations and subsequent experimental verification show that this highly planar and precisely positionable liquid/liquid interface may be actuated to a deflection angle of ±6.4°, with a standard deviation of ±0.18°, and rotated 360° about the vertical axis. Power consumption is limited to several microwatts, and switching times of several hundred milliseconds were determined.

  4. ARIES segmented gamma-ray scanner user manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biddle, R.S.; Sheppard, G.A.; Schneider, C.M.

    1998-01-01

    The segmented gamma-ray scatter (SGS) designated as Win SGS at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility has been installed and is intended for use in quantifying the radioisotope content of DOE-STD-3013-96 equivalent containers. The SGS features new software written in C and a new user interface that runs under Microsoft Windows trademark. The operation of the ARIES Segmented Gamma-ray Scanner is documented in this manual. It covers user instructions as well as hardware and software details. Additional information is found in the documentation for the commercially available components and modules that compose the SGS. The objective of the ARIES project is to demonstrate technology to dismantle plutonium pits from excess nuclear weapons, convert the plutonium to a metal ingot or an oxide powder, package the metal or oxide, and verify the contents of the package by nondestructive assay

  5. Software development for modeling positrons emission tomograph scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Igor Fagner

    2013-01-01

    The Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) is an international platform recognized and used to develop Computational Model Exposure (CME) in the context of Nuclear Medicine, although currently there are dedicated modules for applications in Radiotherapy and Computed Tomography (CT). GATE uses Monte Carlo (MC) methods, and has a scripting language of its own. The writing of scripts for simulation of a PET scanner in GATE involves a number of interrelated steps, and the accuracy of the simulation is dependent on the correct setup of the geometries involved, since the physical processes depend on them, as well as the modeling of electronic detectors in module Digitizer, for example. The manual implementation of this setup can be a source of errors, especially for users without experience in the field of simulations or without any previous knowledge of a programming language, and also due to the the fact that the modeling process in GATE still remains bounded to LINUX / UNIX based systems, an environment only familiar to a few. This becomes an obstacle for beginners and prevents the use of GATE by a larger number of users interested in optimizing their experiments and/or clinical protocols through a more accessible, fast and friendly application. The objective of this work is therefore to develop a user-friendly software for the modeling of Positron Emission Tomography called GUIGATE (Graphical User Interface for GATE), with specific modules dedicated to quality control in PET scanners. The results exhibit the features available in this first version of GUIGATE, present in a set of windows that allow users to create their input files, perform and display in real time the model and analyze its output file in a single environment, allowing so intuitively access the entire architecture of the GATE simulation and to CERN's data analyzer, the ROOT. (author)

  6. Effective dose range for dental cone beam computed tomography scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauwels, Ruben; Beinsberger, Jilke; Collaert, Bruno; Theodorakou, Chrysoula; Rogers, Jessica; Walker, Anne; Cockmartin, Lesley; Bosmans, Hilde; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Bogaerts, Ria; Horner, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the absorbed organ dose and effective dose for a wide range of cone beam computed tomography scanners, using different exposure protocols and geometries. Materials and methods: Two Alderson Radiation Therapy anthropomorphic phantoms were loaded with LiF detectors (TLD-100 and TLD-100H) which were evenly distributed throughout the head and neck, covering all radiosensitive organs. Measurements were performed on 14 CBCT devices: 3D Accuitomo 170, Galileos Comfort, i-CAT Next Generation, Iluma Elite, Kodak 9000 3D, Kodak 9500, NewTom VG, NewTom VGi, Pax-Uni3D, Picasso Trio, ProMax 3D, Scanora 3D, SkyView, Veraviewepocs 3D. Effective dose was calculated using the ICRP 103 (2007) tissue weighting factors. Results: Effective dose ranged between 19 and 368 μSv. The largest contributions to the effective dose were from the remainder tissues (37%), salivary glands (24%), and thyroid gland (21%). For all organs, there was a wide range of measured values apparent, due to differences in exposure factors, diameter and height of the primary beam, and positioning of the beam relative to the radiosensitive organs. Conclusions: The effective dose for different CBCT devices showed a 20-fold range. The results show that a distinction is needed between small-, medium-, and large-field CBCT scanners and protocols, as they are applied to different indication groups, the dose received being strongly related to field size. Furthermore, the dose should always be considered relative to technical and diagnostic image quality, seeing that image quality requirements also differ for patient groups. The results from the current study indicate that the optimisation of dose should be performed by an appropriate selection of exposure parameters and field size, depending on the diagnostic requirements.

  7. Absolute dosimetric characterization of Gafchromic EBT3 and HDv2 films using commercial flat-bed scanners and evaluation of the scanner response function variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S. N.; Revet, G.; Fuchs, J. [LULI-CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, CEA: Universite Paris-Saclay, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Sorbonne Universities, F-91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Institute of Applied Physics, 46 Ulyanov Street, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Gauthier, M.; Glenzer, S.; Propp, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Bazalova-Carter, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8P 5C2 (Canada); Bolanos, S. [LULI-CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, CEA: Universite Paris-Saclay, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Sorbonne Universities, F-91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Riquier, R. [LULI-CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, CEA: Universite Paris-Saclay, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Sorbonne Universities, F-91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Antici, P. [INRS-EMT, Varennes, J3X1S2 Québec (Canada); Morabito, A. [ELI-ALPS, ELI-HU non profit kft, Dugonics ter 13, H-6720, Szeged (Hungary); Starodubtsev, M. [Institute of Applied Physics, 46 Ulyanov Street, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    Radiochromic films (RCF) are commonly used in dosimetry for a wide range of radiation sources (electrons, protons, and photons) for medical, industrial, and scientific applications. They are multi-layered, which includes plastic substrate layers and sensitive layers that incorporate a radiation-sensitive dye. Quantitative dose can be retrieved by digitizing the film, provided that a prior calibration exists. Here, to calibrate the newly developed EBT3 and HDv2 RCFs from Gafchromic™, we used the Stanford Medical LINAC to deposit in the films various doses of 10 MeV photons, and by scanning the films using three independent EPSON Precision 2450 scanners, three independent EPSON V750 scanners, and two independent EPSON 11000XL scanners. The films were scanned in separate RGB channels, as well as in black and white, and film orientation was varied. We found that the green channel of the RGB scan and the grayscale channel are in fact quite consistent over the different models of the scanner, although this comes at the cost of a reduction in sensitivity (by a factor ∼2.5 compared to the red channel). To allow any user to extend the absolute calibration reported here to any other scanner, we furthermore provide a calibration curve of the EPSON 2450 scanner based on absolutely calibrated, commercially available, optical density filters.

  8. [Practicability of the mobile one-finger scanner Cross Match MV5 in fingerprinting of corpses: are mobile fingerprinting scanners suitable for use in mass disasters?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitmeier, Dirk; Landmesser, Britta; Schulz, Yvonne; Albrecht, Knut

    2008-01-01

    Dactyloscopy is a special field in the police records department and a suitable means for identifying unknown dead persons as well as solving crimes by taking fingerprints from living persons. Apart from the conventional methods of dactyloscopy, mobile and more compact instruments are to facilitate taking prints of fingertips and palms also at the scene of mass disasters. In the presented study, living persons and corpses were examined to find out the possible uses and limits of mobile one-finger scanners. The concrete issue of the investigation was whether the mobile one-finger scanner Cross Match MV5 is suitable for application in mass disasters. The device was used in 12 corpses aged 5 weeks to 76 years (mean postmortem interval 5.5 days) and in 28 living persons aged 6 weeks to 87 years. In summary, the scanner produced qualitatively good prints in all age groups of the living individuals. In the corpses, the prints were only partly evaluable. In particular, fingers and fingertips with soot blackening and livid discoloration were difficult to analyse. Postmortem rigidity also complicated the handling of the scanner. In fresh corpses, the scanner can be recommended without reservation. Even if the epidermis was detached, the scanner was able to produce evaluable prints of the dermis of the hypothenar.

  9. FormScanner: Open-Source Solution for Grading Multiple-Choice Exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Chadwick; Lo, Glenn; Young, Kaisa; Borsetta, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The multiple-choice exam remains a staple for many introductory physics courses. In the past, people have graded these by hand or even flaming needles. Today, one usually grades the exams with a form scanner that utilizes optical mark recognition (OMR). Several companies provide these scanners and particular forms, such as the eponymous…

  10. Validity and Repeatability of the Sizestream 3D Scanner and Poikos Modeling System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, T.E.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) body scanning becomes increasingly important in the medical, ergonomical and apparel industry. The SizeStream 3D body scanner is a 3D body scanner in the shape of a fitting room that can generate a 3D copy of the human body in a few seconds. The Poikos modeling system

  11. Application of intra-oral dental scanners in the digital workflow of implantology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Wicher J; Andriessen, Frank S; Wismeijer, Daniel; Ren, Yijin

    2012-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Intra-oral scanners will play a central role in digital dentistry in the near future. In this study the accuracy of three intra-oral scanners was compared. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A master model made of stone was fitted with three high precision manufactured PEEK cylinders and scanned

  12. Digitisation of electron microscope films: Six useful tests applied to three film scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, R.; Cattermole, D.; McMullan, G.; Scotcher, S.; Fordham, M.; Amos, W.B.; Faruqi, A.R.

    2007-01-01

    A series of simple tests have been used to measure the performance of flat-bed film scanners suitable for digitisation of electron micrographs. Two of the film scanners evaluated are commercially available and one has been constructed in the laboratory paying special attention to the needs of the electron microscopist. The tests may be useful for others

  13. Accuracy and reproducibility of the DAVID SLS-2 scanner in three-dimensional facial imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Jesper Jared; Darvann, Tron Andre; Pinholt, Else Marie

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: A prospective study was performed to test the accuracy and reproducibility of the DAVID-SLS-2 scanner (SLS-2) [DAVID Vision Systems GmbH], compared to the validated 3dMDtrio scanner (3dMD) [3dMD, LLC, Atlanta, GA, USA]. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The accuracy of the SLS-2 was determined thro...

  14. Scanner Uniformity improvements for radiochromic film analysis with matt reflectance backing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butson, M.; Yu, P.K.N.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: A simple and reproducible method for increasing desktop scanner uniformity for the analysis of radiochromic films is presented. Scanner uniformity, especially in the non-scan direction, for transmission scanning is well known to be problematic for radiochromic film analysis and normally corrections need to be applied. These corrections are dependant on scanner coordinates and dose level applied which complicates dosimetry procedures. This study has highlighted that using reflectance scanning in combination with a matt, white backing material instead of the conventional gloss scanner finish, substantial increases in the scanner uniformity can be achieved within 90% of the scanning area. Uniformity within ±I% over the scanning area for our epsonV700 scanner tested was found. This is compared to within ±3% for reflection scanning with the gloss backing material and within ±4% for transmission scanning. The matt backing material used was simply 5 layers of standard quality white printing paper (80 g/m It was found that 5 layers was the optimal result for backing material however most of the improvements were seen with a minimum of 3 layers. Above 5 layers, no extra benefit was seen. This may eliminate the need to perform scanner corrections for position on the desktop scanners for radiochromic film dosimetry. (author)

  15. Implementation of a versatile research data acquisition system using a commercially available medical ultrasound scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Pedersen, Mads Møller

    2012-01-01

    to the clinic. The system consists of a standard PC equipped with a camera link and an ultrasound scanner equipped with a research interface. The ultrasound scanner is an easy-to-use imaging device that is capable of generating high-quality images. In addition to supporting the acquisition of multiple data...

  16. Accuracy of four different digital intraoral scanners: effects of the presence of orthodontic brackets and wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoo-Ran; Park, Ji-Man; Chun, Youn-Sic; Lee, Kkot-Nim; Kim, Minji

    The objective of this study was to compare the accuracy of four different digital intraoral scanners and the effects of buccal brackets and orthodontic wire. For this study, three sets of models (Control model, BKT model with buccal bracket, and WBKT model with buccal bracket and orthodontic wire) were scanned using four different types of intraoral scanners: E4D dentist, iTero, Trios, and Zfx IntraScan. The mesiodistal width of the teeth, intercanine width, and intermolar width measured by four scanners were compared. Three-dimensional (3D) images of the brackets were taken using the four scanners. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA, independent t test, and post-hoc Tukey test at a significance level of P brackets and orthodontic wire. Comparison of 3D bracket images scanned by the four scanners showed differences in image distortion among the scanners. Bracket characteristics did not affect the 3D bracket images. The four intraoral scanners used in this study differed in accuracy. However, the results acquired by iTero and Trios were more reliable. Effects of buccal brackets and orthodontic wire on the 3D images taken by intraoral scanners were not clinically significant.

  17. Accuracy of automated volumetry of pulmonary nodules across different multislice CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Marco; Muehlenbruch, Georg; Mahnken, Andreas H.; Katoh, Markus; Guenther, Rolf W.; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Gietema, H.A.; Prokop, Mathias; Czech, Andre; Diederich, Stefan; Bakai, Annemarie; Salganicoff, Marcos

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of an automated volumetry software for phantom pulmonary nodules across various 16-slice multislice spiral CT (MSCT) scanners from different vendors. A lung phantom containing five different nodule categories (intraparenchymal, around a vessel, vessel attached, pleural, and attached to the pleura), with each category comprised of 7-9 nodules (total, n = 40) of varying sizes (diameter 3-10 mm; volume 6.62 mm 3 -525 mm 3 ), was scanned with four different 16-slice MSCT scanners (Siemens, GE, Philips, Toshiba). Routine and low-dose chest protocols with thin and thick collimations were applied. The data from all scanners were used for further analysis using a dedicated prototype volumetry software. Absolute percentage volume errors (APE) were calculated and compared. The mean APE for all nodules was 8.4% (±7.7%) for data acquired with the 16-slice Siemens scanner, 14.3% (±11.1%) for the GE scanner, 9.7% (±9.6%) for the Philips scanner and 7.5% (±7.2%) for the Toshiba scanner, respectively. The lowest APEs were found within the diameter size range of 5-10 mm and volumes >66 mm 3 . Nodule volumetry is accurate with a reasonable volume error in data from different scanner vendors. This may have an important impact for intraindividual follow-up studies. (orig.)

  18. Computer-aided analysis of digital dental impressions obtained from intraoral and extraoral scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohner, Lauren Oliveira Lima; De Luca Canto, Graziela; Marció, Bruno Silva; Laganá, Dalva Cruz; Sesma, Newton; Tortamano Neto, Pedro

    2017-11-01

    The internal and marginal adaptation of a computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) prosthesis relies on the quality of the 3-dimensional image. The quality of imaging systems requires evaluation. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the trueness of intraoral and extraoral scanners in scanning prepared teeth. Ten acrylic resin teeth to be used as a reference dataset were prepared according to standard guidelines and scanned with an industrial computed tomography system. Data were acquired with 4 scanner devices (n=10): the Trios intraoral scanner (TIS), the D250 extraoral scanner (DES), the Cerec Bluecam intraoral scanner (CBIS), and the Cerec InEosX5 extraoral scanner (CIES). For intraoral scanners, each tooth was digitized individually. Extraoral scanning was obtained from dental casts of each prepared tooth. The discrepancy between each scan and its respective reference model was obtained by deviation analysis (μm) and volume/area difference (μm). Statistical analysis was performed using linear models for repeated measurement factors test and 1-way ANOVA (α=.05). No significant differences in deviation values were found among scanners. For CBIS and CIES, the deviation was significantly higher (PDentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Application of intra-oral dental scanners in the digital workflow of implantology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, W.J.; Andriessen, F.S.; Wismeijer, D.; Ren, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Intra-oral scanners will play a central role in digital dentistry in the near future. In this study the accuracy of three intra-oral scanners was compared. Materials and methods: A master model made of stone was fitted with three high precision manufactured PEEK cylinders and scanned with three

  20. Evaluation of wedge-shaped phantoms for assessment of scanner display as a part of quality control of scanner performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, H.; Havlik, E.

    1981-01-01

    Image manipulation in modern rectilinear scanners comprises background subtraction and contrast enhancement facilities. It has been the aim of this investigation to develop simple quality assurance methods suitable for checking the function of these features on a routine basis. Several types of phantoms have been investigated: an absorption step wedge, an emission step wedge and an emission continuous wedge. The absorption step wedge when used with a usual gamma-camera checking source gave the least satisfactory results. The emission step wedge is best suited for test procedures for background subtraction of the colour printer display and for contrast enhancement of the photo display, whereas the emission continuous wedge gave best results in testing the contrast enhancement of the colour printer display. An evaluation of the relative merits of the phantoms indicates that the emission step wedge is best suited for quality assurance tests. (author)

  1. Out of lab calibration of a rotating 2D scanner for 3D mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Rainer; Böttcher, Lena; Jahrsdörfer, Maximilian; Maier, Johannes; Trommer, Malte; May, Stefan; Nüchter, Andreas

    2017-06-01

    Mapping is an essential task in mobile robotics. To fulfil advanced navigation and manipulation tasks a 3D representation of the environment is required. Applying stereo cameras or Time-of-flight cameras (TOF cameras) are one way to archive this requirement. Unfortunately, they suffer from drawbacks which makes it difficult to map properly. Therefore, costly 3D laser scanners are applied. An inexpensive way to build a 3D representation is to use a 2D laser scanner and rotate the scan plane around an additional axis. A 3D point cloud acquired with such a custom device consists of multiple 2D line scans. Therefore the scanner pose of each line scan need to be determined as well as parameters resulting from a calibration to generate a 3D point cloud. Using external sensor systems are a common method to determine these calibration parameters. This is costly and difficult when the robot needs to be calibrated outside the lab. Thus, this work presents a calibration method applied on a rotating 2D laser scanner. It uses a hardware setup to identify the required parameters for calibration. This hardware setup is light, small, and easy to transport. Hence, an out of lab calibration is possible. Additional a theoretical model was created to test the algorithm and analyse impact of the scanner accuracy. The hardware components of the 3D scanner system are an HOKUYO UTM-30LX-EW 2D laser scanner, a Dynamixel servo-motor, and a control unit. The calibration system consists of an hemisphere. In the inner of the hemisphere a circular plate is mounted. The algorithm needs to be provided with a dataset of a single rotation from the laser scanner. To achieve a proper calibration result the scanner needs to be located in the middle of the hemisphere. By means of geometric formulas the algorithms determine the individual deviations of the placed laser scanner. In order to minimize errors, the algorithm solves the formulas in an iterative process. First, the calibration algorithm was

  2. High-speed two-dimensional laser scanner based on Bragg gratings stored in photothermorefractive glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqoob, Zahid; Arain, Muzammil A; Riza, Nabeel A

    2003-09-10

    A high-speed free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner with high-speed wavelength selection coupled with narrowband volume Bragg gratings stored in photothermorefractive (PTR) glass is reported. The proposed scanner with no moving parts has a modular design with a wide angular scan range, accurate beam pointing, low scanner insertion loss, and two-dimensional beam scan capabilities. We present a complete analysis and design procedure for storing multiple tilted Bragg-grating structures in a single PTR glass volume (for normal incidence) in an optimal fashion. Because the scanner design is modular, many PTR glass volumes (each having multiple tilted Bragg-grating structures) can be stacked together, providing an efficient throughput with operations in both the visible and the infrared (IR) regions. A proof-of-concept experimental study is conducted with four Bragg gratings in independent PTR glass plates, and both visible and IR region scanner operations are demonstrated.

  3. The development of a mobile CT-scanner gantry for use in the operating room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okudera, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Shigeaki; Koike, Jouji; Harada, Takanobu; Kanemaru, Kei

    1989-01-01

    We report the development of a mobile CT-scanner gantry which uses a gantry platter. This system has been developed for use in the operating room. We designed a small lift to move the gantry unit of the scanner: the gantry carrier. The scanner gantry is fixed to the gantry carrier. A phantom test with a digitalized operating table worked well in the laboratory, and operating-room use showed that there was no deterioration in image quality. The mobile gantry system has been developed to increase the efficiency of the operating CT-scanner system. This system enables us to obtain CT images during surgery of immediately after surgery in the operating room, i.e., in cases that are not transferable to the radiological department. The operability is basically the same as that of a conventional mobile X-ray unit. Theoretically, this unit could be used with any CT scanner and in any operating room. (author)

  4. SU-E-P-11: Comparison of Image Quality and Radiation Dose Between Different Scanner System in Routine Abdomen CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, S; Wang, Y; Weng, H [Chiayi Chang Gung Memorial Hospital of The C.G.M.F, Puzi City, Chiayi County, Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of routine abdomen computed tomography exam with the automatic current modulation technique (ATCM) performed in two different brand 64-slice CT scanners in our site. Materials and Methods A retrospective review of routine abdomen CT exam performed with two scanners; scanner A and scanner B in our site. To calculate standard deviation of the portal hepatic level with a region of interest of 12.5 mm x 12.5mm represented to the image noise. The radiation dose was obtained from CT DICOM image information. Using Computed tomography dose index volume (CTDIv) to represented CT radiation dose. The patient data in this study were with normal weight (about 65–75 Kg). Results The standard deviation of Scanner A was smaller than scanner B, the scanner A might with better image quality than scanner B. On the other hand, the radiation dose of scanner A was higher than scanner B(about higher 50–60%) with ATCM. Both of them, the radiation dose was under diagnostic reference level. Conclusion The ATCM systems in modern CT scanners can contribute a significant reduction in radiation dose to the patient. But the reduction by ATCM systems from different CT scanner manufacturers has slightly variation. Whatever CT scanner we use, it is necessary to find the acceptable threshold of image quality with the minimum possible radiation exposure to the patient in agreement with the ALARA principle.

  5. SU-E-P-11: Comparison of Image Quality and Radiation Dose Between Different Scanner System in Routine Abdomen CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, S; Wang, Y; Weng, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of routine abdomen computed tomography exam with the automatic current modulation technique (ATCM) performed in two different brand 64-slice CT scanners in our site. Materials and Methods A retrospective review of routine abdomen CT exam performed with two scanners; scanner A and scanner B in our site. To calculate standard deviation of the portal hepatic level with a region of interest of 12.5 mm x 12.5mm represented to the image noise. The radiation dose was obtained from CT DICOM image information. Using Computed tomography dose index volume (CTDIv) to represented CT radiation dose. The patient data in this study were with normal weight (about 65–75 Kg). Results The standard deviation of Scanner A was smaller than scanner B, the scanner A might with better image quality than scanner B. On the other hand, the radiation dose of scanner A was higher than scanner B(about higher 50–60%) with ATCM. Both of them, the radiation dose was under diagnostic reference level. Conclusion The ATCM systems in modern CT scanners can contribute a significant reduction in radiation dose to the patient. But the reduction by ATCM systems from different CT scanner manufacturers has slightly variation. Whatever CT scanner we use, it is necessary to find the acceptable threshold of image quality with the minimum possible radiation exposure to the patient in agreement with the ALARA principle

  6. Potentials and limits of modern tomographic methods (CT, MR, PET) in molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hentschel, M.; Paul, D.; Moser, E.; Brink, I.

    2007-01-01

    The present survey gives an introduction into the basics of computed tomography, magnetic resonance tomography and positron emission tomography. The current potentials of these methods in relation to their temporal, spatial and contrast resolutions as well as their sensitivities within clinical routine and experimental studies (in vitro, ex vivo) will be presented. Computed tomography constitutes the anatomical reference method with well defined contrast, high spatial resolution but low sensitivity (10 -2 mol/l) for functional and molecular imaging. Magnetic resonance tomography represents the anatomical method for research with variable tissue contrast, physiological image information, highest spatial resolution but moderate sensitivity (10 -3 -10 -5 mol/l) for functional and molecular imaging. Positron emission tomography offers good suitability for molecular imaging due to highest sensitivity (10 -11 -10 -12 mol/l). However, the spatial resolution of positron emission tomography is low. (orig.)

  7. Use of Terrestrial Laser Scanner for Rigid Airport Pavement Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarella, Maurizio; D'Amico, Fabrizio; De Blasiis, Maria Rosaria; Di Benedetto, Alessandro; Fiani, Margherita

    2017-12-26

    The evaluation of the structural efficiency of airport infrastructures is a complex task. Faulting is one of the most important indicators of rigid pavement performance. The aim of our study is to provide a new method for faulting detection and computation on jointed concrete pavements. Nowadays, the assessment of faulting is performed with the use of laborious and time-consuming measurements that strongly hinder aircraft traffic. We proposed a field procedure for Terrestrial Laser Scanner data acquisition and a computation flow chart in order to identify and quantify the fault size at each joint of apron slabs. The total point cloud has been used to compute the least square plane fitting those points. The best-fit plane for each slab has been computed too. The attitude of each slab plane with respect to both the adjacent ones and the apron reference plane has been determined by the normal vectors to the surfaces. Faulting has been evaluated as the difference in elevation between the slab planes along chosen sections. For a more accurate evaluation of the faulting value, we have then considered a few strips of data covering rectangular areas of different sizes across the joints. The accuracy of the estimated quantities has been computed too.

  8. Application of 3D Laser Scanner to Forensic Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan-Seong; Jeon, Hong-Pil; Choi, Kwang-Soo; Kim, Jin-Pyo; Park, Nam-Kyu

    2018-05-01

    In the case of building collapses and overturned structures, a three-dimensional (3D) collapse or overturn model is required to reconstruct the accident. As construction sites become increasingly complex and large, 3D laser scanning is sometimes the best tool to accurately document and store the site conditions. This case report presents one case of a structure collapse and one case of an overturned crane reconstructed by a 3D laser scanner. In the case of structural collapse of a prefabricated shoring system, a 3D model reconstructed all the members successfully, a task that is nearly impossible using a scale such as a tape measure. The reconstructed prefabricated shoring system was verified through a structural analysis through comparison with the construction drawings to investigate faults in construction. In the case of the overturned crane, the jib angle and other major dimensions were successfully acquired through 3D laser scanning and used to estimate the working radius. As a result, the propriety of the working radius with the given lifting load was successfully determined. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  9. Use of Terrestrial Laser Scanner for Rigid Airport Pavement Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Barbarella

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of the structural efficiency of airport infrastructures is a complex task. Faulting is one of the most important indicators of rigid pavement performance. The aim of our study is to provide a new method for faulting detection and computation on jointed concrete pavements. Nowadays, the assessment of faulting is performed with the use of laborious and time-consuming measurements that strongly hinder aircraft traffic. We proposed a field procedure for Terrestrial Laser Scanner data acquisition and a computation flow chart in order to identify and quantify the fault size at each joint of apron slabs. The total point cloud has been used to compute the least square plane fitting those points. The best-fit plane for each slab has been computed too. The attitude of each slab plane with respect to both the adjacent ones and the apron reference plane has been determined by the normal vectors to the surfaces. Faulting has been evaluated as the difference in elevation between the slab planes along chosen sections. For a more accurate evaluation of the faulting value, we have then considered a few strips of data covering rectangular areas of different sizes across the joints. The accuracy of the estimated quantities has been computed too.

  10. Design of a portable CAT scanner for utility pole inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.H.

    1986-01-01

    Work is under way at the University of Missouri, Columbia (UMC) to design, build, and test a portable computerized axial tomography (CAT) device for the nondestructive, field imaging of wooden utility poles. CAT is a well-established medical technology that has recently been applied to a number of industrial applications. Wooden utility poles are prone to rot and decay at ground level; current techniques to assess this loss of strength are relatively primitive, i.e., tapping the pole (hitting the pole with a hammer) or boring into the pole for samples and then testing inside the bore hole with an electrical pulse device. The accuracy in identifying poles needing replacement using these techniques is ∼ 70%. Since the cost of replacing a pole ranges from hundreds to thousands of dollars, an accurate, nondestructive method is needed. CAT can accurately image a wooden utility pole (since the size, density, and atomic elements of a pole are similar to the human head to torso), as was confirmed by imaging poles using the UMC nuclear engineering EMI-1010 medical scanner. Detailed images have been produced showing the ring structure of the wood and voids due to rot or decay. Images approaching this quality have also been produced on living trees using semiportable systems by other researchers

  11. Performance evaluation and calibration of the neuro-pet scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sank, V.J.; Brooks, R.A.; Cascio, H.E.; Di Chiro, G.; Friauf, W.S.; Leighton, S.B.

    1983-01-01

    The Neuro-PET is a circular ring seven-slice positron emission tomograph designed for imaging human heads and small animals. The scanner uses 512 bismuth germanate detectors 8.25 mm wide packed tightly together in four layers to achieve high spatial resolution (6-7 mm FWHM) without the use of beam blockers. Because of the small 38 cm ring diameter, the sensitivity is also very high: 70,000 c/s per true slice with medium energy threshold (375 keV) for a 20 cm diameter phantom containing 1 μCi/cc of positron-emitting activity, according to a preliminary measurement. There are three switch-selectable thresholds, and the sensitivity will be higher in the low threshold setting. The Neuro-PET is calibrated with a round or elliptical phantom that approximates a patient's head; this method eliminates the effects of scatter and self-attenuation to first order. Further software corrections for these artifacts are made in the reconstruction program, which reduce the measured scatter to zero, as determined with a 5 cm cold spot. With a 1 cm cold spot, the apparent activity at the center of the cold spot is 18% of the surrounding activity, which is clearly a consequence of the limits of spatial resolution, rather than scatter. The Neuro-PET has been in clinical operation since June 1982, and approximately 30 patients have been scanned to date

  12. Rail Track Detection and Modelling in Mobile Laser Scanner Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Oude Elberink

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a method for detecting and modelling rails in mobile laser scanner data. The detection is based on the properties of the rail tracks and contact wires such as relative height, linearity and relative position with respect to other objects. Points classified as rail track are used in a 3D modelling algorithm. The modelling is done by first fitting a parametric model of a rail piece to the points along each track, and estimating the position and orientation parameters of each piece model. For each position and orientation parameter a smooth low-order Fourier curve is interpolated. Using all interpolated parameters a mesh model of the rail is reconstructed. The method is explained using two areas from a dataset acquired by a LYNX mobile mapping system in a mountainous area. Residuals between railway laser points and 3D models are in the range of 2 cm. It is concluded that a curve fitting algorithm is essential to reliably and accurately model the rail tracks by using the knowledge that railways are following a continuous and smooth path.

  13. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements for the LANSCE Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilpatrick, John D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gruchalla, Michael E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Derwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pillai, Chandra [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Brian G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-15

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing beam profile measurement systems, commonly known as Wire Scanners (WS). Using the principal of secondary electron emission, the WS measurement system moves a wire or fiber across an impinging particle beam, sampling a projected transverse-beam distribution. Because existing WS actuators and electronic components are either no longer manufactured or home-built with antiquated parts, a new WS beam profile measurement is being designed, fabricated, and tested. The goals for these new WS's include using off-the-shelf components while eliminating antiquated components, providing quick operation while allowing for easy maintainability, and tolerating external radioactivation. The WS measurement system consists of beam line actuators, a cable plant, an electronics processor chassis, and software located both in the electronics chassis (National Instruments LabVIEW) and in the Central Control Room (EPICS-based client software). This WS measurement system will measure Hand H{sup +} LANSCE-facility beams and will also measure less common beams. This paper describes these WS measurement systems.

  14. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements for the LANSCE Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilpatrick, John D.; Gruchalla, Michael E.; Martinez, Derwin; Pillai, Chandra; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio; Sedillo, James Daniel; Smith, Brian G.

    2012-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing beam profile measurement systems, commonly known as Wire Scanners (WS). Using the principal of secondary electron emission, the WS measurement system moves a wire or fiber across an impinging particle beam, sampling a projected transverse-beam distribution. Because existing WS actuators and electronic components are either no longer manufactured or home-built with antiquated parts, a new WS beam profile measurement is being designed, fabricated, and tested. The goals for these new WS's include using off-the-shelf components while eliminating antiquated components, providing quick operation while allowing for easy maintainability, and tolerating external radioactivation. The WS measurement system consists of beam line actuators, a cable plant, an electronics processor chassis, and software located both in the electronics chassis (National Instruments LabVIEW) and in the Central Control Room (EPICS-based client software). This WS measurement system will measure Hand H + LANSCE-facility beams and will also measure less common beams. This paper describes these WS measurement systems.

  15. Methods for registration laser scanner point clouds in forest stands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bienert, A.; Pech, K.; Maas, H.-G.

    2011-01-01

    Laser scanning is a fast and efficient 3-D measurement technique to capture surface points describing the geometry of a complex object in an accurate and reliable way. Besides airborne laser scanning, terrestrial laser scanning finds growing interest for forestry applications. These two different recording platforms show large differences in resolution, recording area and scan viewing direction. Using both datasets for a combined point cloud analysis may yield advantages because of their largely complementary information. In this paper, methods will be presented to automatically register airborne and terrestrial laser scanner point clouds of a forest stand. In a first step, tree detection is performed in both datasets in an automatic manner. In a second step, corresponding tree positions are determined using RANSAC. Finally, the geometric transformation is performed, divided in a coarse and fine registration. After a coarse registration, the fine registration is done in an iterative manner (ICP) using the point clouds itself. The methods are tested and validated with a dataset of a forest stand. The presented registration results provide accuracies which fulfill the forestry requirements [de

  16. Spatiotemporal matrix image formation for programmable ultrasound scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthon, Beatrice; Morichau-Beauchant, Pierre; Porée, Jonathan; Garofalakis, Anikitos; Tavitian, Bertrand; Tanter, Mickael; Provost, Jean

    2018-02-01

    As programmable ultrasound scanners become more common in research laboratories, it is increasingly important to develop robust software-based image formation algorithms that can be obtained in a straightforward fashion for different types of probes and sequences with a small risk of error during implementation. In this work, we argue that as the computational power keeps increasing, it is becoming practical to directly implement an approximation to the matrix operator linking reflector point targets to the corresponding radiofrequency signals via thoroughly validated and widely available simulations software. Once such a spatiotemporal forward-problem matrix is constructed, standard and thus highly optimized inversion procedures can be leveraged to achieve very high quality images in real time. Specifically, we show that spatiotemporal matrix image formation produces images of similar or enhanced quality when compared against standard delay-and-sum approaches in phantoms and in vivo, and show that this approach can be used to form images even when using non-conventional probe designs for which adapted image formation algorithms are not readily available.

  17. A radioisotope scanner for use in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawley, J.C.W.; Cronquist, A.G.; Veall, N.; Ajdukiewicz, A.B.; Bassett, N.

    1981-01-01

    A scanner was designed for use at the Medical Research Council Laboratories in The Gambia, in a research project on the epidemiology and treatment of hepatoma. The detector consists of a 40-cm long by 5-cm diameter sodium iodide crystal assembly with one photo-multiplier at each end moving sideways over the area to be scanned. A fork lift truck forms the main frame of the instrument with a yoke carrying the detector in place of the forks. This assembly can be raised and lowered by a manually operated hydraulic system and rotated to scan from above, below or beside the patient. The relatively thick detector can be used with indium-113 as well as technetium-99m. A small cabinet mounted on the fork lift truck houses the electronic circuits and carries the polaroid camera for recording the scans. Rechargeable batteries floating across a DC power supply buffer the instrument against the wide fluctuations in mains voltage and frequent power cuts that occur at Fajara. The instrument was designed and constructed at Harrow before shipment by sea to The Gambia, where it has been in use for about 18 months. (author)

  18. Intraoral Scanner Technologies: A Review to Make a Successful Impression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Richert

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To overcome difficulties associated with conventional techniques, impressions with IOS (intraoral scanner and CAD/CAM (computer-aided design and manufacturing technologies were developed for dental practice. The last decade has seen an increasing number of optical IOS devices, and these are based on different technologies; the choice of which may impact on clinical use. To allow informed choice before purchasing or renewing an IOS, this article summarizes first the technologies currently used (light projection, distance object determination, and reconstruction. In the second section, the clinical considerations of each strategy such as handling, learning curve, powdering, scanning paths, tracking, and mesh quality are discussed. The last section is dedicated to the accuracy of files and of the intermaxillary relationship registered with IOS as the rendering of files in the graphical user interface is often misleading. This overview leads to the conclusion that the current IOS is adapted for a common practice, although differences exist between the technologies employed. An important aspect highlighted in this review is the reduction in the volume of hardware which has led to an increase in the importance of software-based technologies.

  19. Inland wetland change detection using aircraft MSS [multispectral scanner] data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, J.R.; Ramsey, E.W.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.; Sharitz, R.R.; Christensen, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    Nontidal wetlands in a portion of the Savannah River swamp forest affected by reactor cooling water discharges were mapped using March 31, 1981 and April 29, 1985 high-resolution aircraft multispectral scanner (MSS) data. Due to the inherent distortion in the aircraft MSS data and the complex spectral characteristics of the wetland vegetation, it was necessary to implement multiple techniques in the registration and classification of the MSS imagery of the Pen Branch Delta on each date. In particular, it was necessary to use a piecewise-linear registration process over relatively small regions to perform image-to-image registration. When performing unsupervised classification, an iterative ''cluster busting'' technique was used, which simplified the cluster labeling process. These procedures allowed important wetland vegetation categories to be identified on each date. The multiple-date classification maps were then evaluated using a post-classification comparison technique yielding change classes that were of value in determining the extent of inland wetland change in this region

  20. Clinical applications of the imatron fast CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanford, W.

    1986-01-01

    Utilizing three imaging modes, Cine CT has proven satisfactory in the assessment of left ventricular mass and function including ejection fractions and abnormalities of wall motion. It is helpful in documenting pericardial constrictions, as well as in assessing intracavitary tumors and thrombi. In the lungs, it is used to document AV fistulae and to evaluate the vascularity of mediastinal masses and to exclude invasion or major thoracic vessels. It can be used, as in the conventional scanner, for needle directed lung and chest well biopsies. It is frequently used in a airway studies to differentiate fixed from physiologic constrictions and to assess tracheomalacia and bronchopulmonary dysplasias. It can be used to plan radiation ports in the treatment of breast carcinoma. In the abdomen, successful applications include its use in the assessment of renal blood flow and the evaluation of cavernous hemangiomas of the liver as well as in screening of possible aortic aneurysms. In orthopedics, Cine CT is used to evaluate patellofermoral tracking in subluxations of the patella and used to evaluate subluxations and dislocations of the radio-ulnar joint. Cine CT by virtue of its speed and satisfactory spatial resolution is a significant imaging modality for evaluating the beating heart. Other applications include the evaluation of aortic aneurysms and dissections, para-aortic mass lesions, airway obstructions and patellar tracking and forearm subluxations

  1. Improving scanner wafer alignment performance by target optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leray, Philippe; Jehoul, Christiane; Socha, Robert; Menchtchikov, Boris; Raghunathan, Sudhar; Kent, Eric; Schoonewelle, Hielke; Tinnemans, Patrick; Tuffy, Paul; Belen, Jun; Wise, Rich

    2016-03-01

    In the process nodes of 10nm and below, the patterning complexity along with the processing and materials required has resulted in a need to optimize alignment targets in order to achieve the required precision, accuracy and throughput performance. Recent industry publications on the metrology target optimization process have shown a move from the expensive and time consuming empirical methodologies, towards a faster computational approach. ASML's Design for Control (D4C) application, which is currently used to optimize YieldStar diffraction based overlay (DBO) metrology targets, has been extended to support the optimization of scanner wafer alignment targets. This allows the necessary process information and design methodology, used for DBO target designs, to be leveraged for the optimization of alignment targets. In this paper, we show how we applied this computational approach to wafer alignment target design. We verify the correlation between predictions and measurements for the key alignment performance metrics and finally show the potential alignment and overlay performance improvements that an optimized alignment target could achieve.

  2. Comparison of working efficiency of terrestrial laser scanner in day and night conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, A. E.; Kalkan, K.

    2013-10-01

    Terrestrial Laser Scanning is a popular and widely used technique to scan existing objects, document historical sites and items, and remodel them if and when needed. Their ability to collect thousands of point data per second makes them an invaluable tool in many areas from engineering to historical reconstruction. There are many scanners in the market with different technical specifications. One main technical specification of laser scanners is range and illumination. In this study, it is tested to be determined the optimal working times of a laser scanner and the scanners consistency with its specifications sheet. In order to conduct this work, series of GNSS measurements in Istanbul Technical University have been carried out, connected to the national reference network, to determine precise positions of target points and the scanner, which makes possible to define a precise distance between the scanner and targets. Those ground surveys has been used for calibration and registration purposes. Two different scan campaigns conducted at 12 am and 11 pm to compare working efficiency of laser scanner in different illumination conditions and targets are measured with a handheld spectro-radiometer in order to determine their reflective characteristics. The obtained results are compared and their accuracies have been analysed.

  3. Radiation safety concerns and diagnostic reference levels for computed tomography scanners in Tamil Nadu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingstone, Roshan S.; Dinakaran, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation safety in computed tomography (CT) scanners is of concern due its widespread use in the field of radiological imaging. This study intends to evaluate radiation doses imparted to patients undergoing thorax, abdomen and pelvic CT examinations and formulate regional diagnostic reference levels (DRL) in Tamil Nadu, South India. In-site CT dose measurement was performed in 127 CT scanners in Tamil Nadu for a period of 2 years as a part of the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB)-funded project. Out of the 127 CT scanners,13 were conventional; 53 single-slice helical scanners (SSHS); 44 multislice CT (MSCT) scanners; and 17 refurbished scanners. CT dose index (CTDI) was measured using a 32-cm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-body phantom in each CT scanner. Dose length product (DLP) for different anatomical regions was generated using CTDI values. The regional DRLs for thorax, abdomen and pelvis examinations were 557, 521 and 294 mGy cm, respectively. The mean effective dose was estimated using the DLP values and was found to be 8.04, 6.69 and 4.79 mSv for thorax, abdomen and pelvic CT examinations, respectively. The establishment of DRLs in this study is the first step towards optimization of CT doses in the Indian context. (author)

  4. Basic study of entire whole-body PET scanners based on the OpenPET geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Eiji, E-mail: rush@nirs.go.j [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yamaya, Taiga; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inadama, Naoko; Murayama, Hideo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2010-09-21

    A conventional PET scanner has a 15-25 cm axial field-of-view (FOV) and images a whole body using about six bed positions. An OpenPET geometry can extend the axial FOV with a limited number of detectors. The entire whole-body PET scanner must be able to process a large amount of data effectively. In this work, we study feasibility of the fully 3D entire whole-body PET scanner using the GATE simulation. The OpenPET has 12 block detector rings with the ring diameter of 840 mm and each block detector ring consists of 48 depth-of-interaction (DOI) detectors. The OpenPET has the axial length of 895.95 mm with five parts of 58.95 mm open gaps. The OpenPET has higher single data loss than a conventional PET scanner at grouping circuits. NECR of the OpenPET decreases by single data loss. But single data loss is mitigated by separating the axially arranged detector into two parts. Also, multiple coincidences are found to be important for the entire whole-body PET scanner. The entire whole-body PET scanner with the OpenPET geometry promises to provide a large axial FOV with the open space and to have sufficient performance values. But single data loss at the grouping circuits and multiple coincidences are limited to the peak noise equivalent count rate (NECR) for the entire whole-body PET scanner.

  5. Initial results of the quality control in 11 computed tomography scanners at Curitiba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodlulovich, S; Oliveira, L.; Jakubiak, R.R.; Miquelin, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the image quality of 11 scanners installed in public and private centers of Curitiba, Brazil. This sample represents 30% of the CT scanners in the city so far. The ACR CT accreditation phantom was used to verify the accomplishment of the scanners performance to the international quality requirements. The results indicate that efforts should be concentrated in the maintenance of the equipments and specific training of the technicians. Most of the scanners have showed some non-conformity. In 27,5% of the sample the positioning requirement wasn't accomplished. The CT number accuracy evaluation showed that in 72,3 % of the scanners the CT numbers were out of the tolerance range, reaching values 35% greater than the limit. The low contrast resolution criteria weren't accomplished in 9% of the scanners. The main concern is that there isn't a specific program to evaluate the image quality of the CT scanners neither to estimate the CT doses in the procedures. (author)

  6. Comparison of two intraoral scanners based on three-dimensional surface analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Min Lee

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This in vivo study evaluated the difference of two well-known intraoral scanners used in dentistry, namely iTero (Align Technology and TRIOS (3Shape. Methods Thirty-two participants underwent intraoral scans with TRIOS and iTero scanners, as well as conventional alginate impressions. The scans obtained with the two intraoral scanners were compared with each other and were also compared with the corresponding model scans by means of three-dimensional surface analysis. The average differences between the two intraoral scans on the surfaces were evaluated by color-mapping. The average differences in the three-dimensional direction between each intraoral scans and its corresponding model scan were calculated at all points on the surfaces. Results The average differences between the two intraoral scanners were 0.057 mm at the maxilla and 0.069 mm at the mandible. Color histograms showed that local deviations between the two scanners occurred in the posterior area. As for difference in the three-dimensional direction, there was no statistically significant difference between two scanners. Conclusions Although there were some deviations in visible inspection, there was no statistical significance between the two intraoral scanners.

  7. A Two-Phase Space Resection Model for Accurate Topographic Reconstruction from Lunar Imagery with PushbroomScanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuemiao; Zhang, Huaidong; Han, Guoqiang; Kwan, Kin Chung; Pang, Wai-Man; Fang, Jiaming; Zhao, Gansen

    2016-04-11

    Exterior orientation parameters' (EOP) estimation using space resection plays an important role in topographic reconstruction for push broom scanners. However, existing models of space resection are highly sensitive to errors in data. Unfortunately, for lunar imagery, the altitude data at the ground control points (GCPs) for space resection are error-prone. Thus, existing models fail to produce reliable EOPs. Motivated by a finding that for push broom scanners, angular rotations of EOPs can be estimated independent of the altitude data and only involving the geographic data at the GCPs, which are already provided, hence, we divide the modeling of space resection into two phases. Firstly, we estimate the angular rotations based on the reliable geographic data using our proposed mathematical model. Then, with the accurate angular rotations, the collinear equations for space resection are simplified into a linear problem, and the global optimal solution for the spatial position of EOPs can always be achieved. Moreover, a certainty term is integrated to penalize the unreliable altitude data for increasing the error tolerance. Experimental results evidence that our model can obtain more accurate EOPs and topographic maps not only for the simulated data, but also for the real data from Chang'E-1, compared to the existing space resection model.

  8. User needs elicitation via analytic hierarchy process (AHP). A case study on a Computed Tomography (CT) scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecchia, Leandro; Martin, Jennifer L; Ragozzino, Angela; Vanzanella, Carmela; Scognamiglio, Arturo; Mirarchi, Luciano; Morgan, Stephen P

    2013-01-05

    The rigorous elicitation of user needs is a crucial step for both medical device design and purchasing. However, user needs elicitation is often based on qualitative methods whose findings can be difficult to integrate into medical decision-making. This paper describes the application of AHP to elicit user needs for a new CT scanner for use in a public hospital. AHP was used to design a hierarchy of 12 needs for a new CT scanner, grouped into 4 homogenous categories, and to prepare a paper questionnaire to investigate the relative priorities of these. The questionnaire was completed by 5 senior clinicians working in a variety of clinical specialisations and departments in the same Italian public hospital. Although safety and performance were considered the most important issues, user needs changed according to clinical scenario. For elective surgery, the five most important needs were: spatial resolution, processing software, radiation dose, patient monitoring, and contrast medium. For emergency, the top five most important needs were: patient monitoring, radiation dose, contrast medium control, speed run, spatial resolution. AHP effectively supported user need elicitation, helping to develop an analytic and intelligible framework of decision-making. User needs varied according to working scenario (elective versus emergency medicine) more than clinical specialization. This method should be considered by practitioners involved in decisions about new medical technology, whether that be during device design or before deciding whether to allocate budgets for new medical devices according to clinical functions or according to hospital department.

  9. Contribution of micro-scanner in the preclinical study of hepatic and pancreatic cancer treatments in rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youssef Azer Akladios, Cherif

    2010-01-01

    Animal experimentation is an unavoidable step in preclinical studies and relies on small animals. In vivo imaging constitutes a precious tool giving information on anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, genetic, pharmacology, while saving cell and tissue integrities of investigated animals. It opens wide the scientific perspective in the field of biological development, physiopathology of diseases, as well as in oncology, from early diagnosis to cancer treatment. This thesis had demonstrated the relevance of micro-scanner in the longitudinal follow up and the management of ortho-topic models of hepatic and pancreatic carcinoma in the rat. For both of these cancers, known to be very poorly or even non curable, there is an urgent need of research on the bases of their onco-genesis as of investigation of the resulting new therapeutic routes. The results of our thesis suggest a role for micro-CT in the preclinical evaluation of their emerging therapies. As far as animal experiment is concerned, in vivo micro-scanner imaging permits, beside a reduction in the number of experimental animals, to establish new (imaging) end-points allowing experiment ending before any sign of animal suffering. It fulfils the main requirements of animal experiment. (author) [fr

  10. A Two-Phase Space Resection Model for Accurate Topographic Reconstruction from Lunar Imagery with PushbroomScanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuemiao Xu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Exterior orientation parameters’ (EOP estimation using space resection plays an important role in topographic reconstruction for push broom scanners. However, existing models of space resection are highly sensitive to errors in data. Unfortunately, for lunar imagery, the altitude data at the ground control points (GCPs for space resection are error-prone. Thus, existing models fail to produce reliable EOPs. Motivated by a finding that for push broom scanners, angular rotations of EOPs can be estimated independent of the altitude data and only involving the geographic data at the GCPs, which are already provided, hence, we divide the modeling of space resection into two phases. Firstly, we estimate the angular rotations based on the reliable geographic data using our proposed mathematical model. Then, with the accurate angular rotations, the collinear equations for space resection are simplified into a linear problem, and the global optimal solution for the spatial position of EOPs can always be achieved. Moreover, a certainty term is integrated to penalize the unreliable altitude data for increasing the error tolerance. Experimental results evidence that our model can obtain more accurate EOPs and topographic maps not only for the simulated data, but also for the real data from Chang’E-1, compared to the existing space resection model.

  11. Monitoring marginal erosion in hydroelectric reservoirs with terrestrial mobile laser scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. G. Tommaselli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Marginal erosions in reservoirs of hydroelectric plants have caused economic and environmental problems concerning hydroelectric power generation, reduction of productive areas and devaluing land parcels. The real extension and dynamics of these erosion processes are not well known for Brazilian reservoirs. To objectively assess these problems Unesp (Univ Estadual Paulista and Duke Energy are developing a joint project which aims at the monitoring the progression of some erosive processes and understanding the causes and the dynamics of this phenomenon. Mobile LASER scanning was considered the most suitable alternative for the challenges established in the project requirements. A MDL DynaScan Mobile LASER M150 scanner was selected which uses RTK for real time positioning integrated to an IMU, enabling instantaneous generation of georeferenced point clouds. Two different reservoirs were choose for monitoring: Chavantes (storage plant and Rosana (run-of-river plant, both in the Paranapanema River, border of São Paulo and Paraná States, Brazil. The monitoring areas are scanned quarterly and analysed with base on the point cloud, meshes, contours and cross sections. Cross sections are used to visualize and compute the rate and the dynamics of erosion. Some examples and quantitative results are presented along with an analysis of the proposed technique. Some recommendations to improve the field work and latter data processing are also introduced.

  12. 2D MEMS electrostatic cantilever waveguide scanner for potential image display application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Kebin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the current status of our micro-fabricated SU-8 2D electrostatic cantilever waveguide scanner. The current design utilizes a monolithically integrated electrostatic push-pull actuator. A 4.0 μm SU-8 rib waveguide design allows a relatively large core cross section (4μm in height and 20 μm in width to couple with existing optical fiber and a broad band single mode operation (λ= 0.7μm to 1.3μm with minimal transmission loss (85% to 87% output transmission efficiency with Gaussian beam profile input. A 2D scanning motion has been successfully demonstrated with two fundamental resonances found at 202 and 536 Hz in vertical and horizontal directions. A 130 μm and 19 μm, corresponding displacement and 0.062 and 0.009 rad field of view were observed at a +150V input. Beam divergence from the waveguide was corrected by a focusing GRIN lens and a 5μm beam diameter is observed at the focal plane. The transmission efficiency is low (~10% and cantilever is slightly under tensile residual stress due to inherent imperfection in the process and tooling in fabrication. However, 2D light scanning pattern was successfully demonstrated using 1-D push-pull actuation.

  13. MEMS scanner mirror based system for retina scanning and in eye projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woittennek, Franziska; Knobbe, Jens; Pügner, Tino; Dallmann, Hans-Georg; Schelinski, Uwe; Grüger, Heinrich

    2015-02-01

    Many applications could benefit from miniaturized systems to scan blood vessels behind the retina in the human eye, so called "retina scanning". This reaches from access control to sophisticated security applications and medical devices. High volume systems for consumer applications require low cost and a user friendly operation. For example this includes no need for removal of glasses and self-adjustment, in turn guidance of focus and point of attraction by simultaneous projection for the user. A new system has been designed based on the well-known resonantly driven 2-d scanner mirror of Fraunhofer IPMS. A combined NIR and VIS laser system illuminates the eye through an eye piece designed for an operating distance allowing the use of glasses and granting sufficient field of view. This usability feature was considered to be more important than highest miniaturization. The modulated VIS laser facilitates the projection of an image directly onto the retina. The backscattered light from the continuous NIR laser contains the information of the blood vessels and is detected by a highly sensitive photo diode. A demonstrational setup has been realized including readout and driving electronics. The laser power was adjusted to an eye-secure level. Additional security features were integrated. Test measurements revealed promising results. In a first demonstration application the detection of biometric pattern of the blood vessels was evaluated for issues authentication in.

  14. Attenuation of artifacts in EEG signals measured inside an MRI scanner using constrained independent component analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasheed, Tahir; Lee, Young-Koo; Lee, Soo Yeol; Kim, Tae-Seong

    2009-01-01

    Integration of electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic imaging (fMRI) resonance will allow analysis of the brain activities at superior temporal and spatial resolution. However simultaneous acquisition of EEG and fMRI is hindered by the enhancement of artifacts in EEG, the most prominent of which are ballistocardiogram (BCG) and electro-oculogram (EOG) artifacts. The situation gets even worse if the evoked potentials are measured inside MRI for their minute responses in comparison to the spontaneous brain responses. In this study, we propose a new method of attenuating these artifacts from the spontaneous and evoked EEG data acquired inside an MRI scanner using constrained independent component analysis with a priori information about the artifacts as constraints. With the proposed techniques of reference function generation for the BCG and EOG artifacts as constraints, our new approach performs significantly better than the averaged artifact subtraction (AAS) method. The proposed method could be an alternative to the conventional ICA method for artifact attenuation, with some advantages. As a performance measure we have achieved much improved normalized power spectrum ratios (INPS) for continuous EEG and correlation coefficient (cc) values with outside MRI visual evoked potentials for visual evoked EEG, as compared to those obtained with the AAS method. The results show that our new approach is more effective than the conventional methods, almost fully automatic, and no extra ECG signal measurements are involved

  15. The Mechatronic System Design Of Ultrasonic Scanner For Inservice Inspection Of Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handono, Khairul; Kristedjo, K.; Awwaluddin, M.; Shobary, Ihsan

    2018-02-01

    The mechatronic system design of ultrasonic scanner for inservices inspection of Research Reactor has been conducted. The requirement designed must be reliable operated, safety to personnel and equipments, ease of maintenance and operation, protection of equipment mechanically, interchangeability of equipments and addition of the several model of probe immersion ultrasonic tranducer. In order to achieve the above goals and obtain the desired results, a mechatronic design based on mechanical and electronic practical experiences will be needed. In this paper consist of the mechanical design and the system mechanical movement using stepper motor control. The criteria and the methods of designs of mechanical and electronic equipments of the system have been discussed and investigated. A mechanical and instrumentation control system drawing and requirement of design will be presented as the outcome of the design. The designed of mechanical system is consequently simulated by solidwork software. The intention of the above research is to create solutions in different ways of inservice inspection of integrity of Reactor.

  16. Computer-aided diagnosis of pneumoconiosis abnormalities extracted from chest radiographs scanned with a CCD scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Koji; Minami, Masahide; Nakamura, Munehiro

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a computer-aided diagnosis for pneumoconiosis radiographs obtained with a common charge-coupled devices (CCD) scanner. Since the current computer-aided diagnosis systems of pneumoconiosis are not practical for medical doctors due to high costs of usage for a special scanner, we propose a novel system which measures abnormalities of pneumoconiosis from lung images obtained with a common CCD scanner. Experimental results of discriminations between normal and abnormal cases for 56 right-lung images including 6 standard pneumoconiosis images have shown that the proposed abnormalities are well extracted according to the standards of pneumoconiosis categories. (author)

  17. Joint Calibration of 3d Laser Scanner and Digital Camera Based on Dlt Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, X.; Li, M.; Xing, L.; Liu, Y.

    2018-04-01

    Design a calibration target that can be scanned by 3D laser scanner while shot by digital camera, achieving point cloud and photos of a same target. A method to joint calibrate 3D laser scanner and digital camera based on Direct Linear Transformation algorithm was proposed. This method adds a distortion model of digital camera to traditional DLT algorithm, after repeating iteration, it can solve the inner and external position element of the camera as well as the joint calibration of 3D laser scanner and digital camera. It comes to prove that this method is reliable.

  18. Mechanical optimisation of a high-precision fast wire scanner at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Samuelsson, Sebastian; Veness, Raymond

    Wire scanners are instruments used to measure the transverse beam prole in particle accelerators by passing a thin wire through the particle beam. To avoid the issues of vacuum leakage through the bellows and wire failure related to current designs of wire scanners, a new concept for a wire scanner has been developed at CERN. This design has all moving parts inside the beam vacuum and has a nominal wire scanning speed of 20 m/s. The demands on the design associated with this together with the high precision requirements create a need for\

  19. Graph SLAM correction for single scanner MLS forest data under boreal forest canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukko, Antero; Kaijaluoto, Risto; Kaartinen, Harri; Lehtola, Ville V.; Jaakkola, Anttoni; Hyyppä, Juha

    2017-10-01

    Mobile laser scanning (MLS) provides kinematic means to collect three dimensional data from surroundings for various mapping and environmental analysis purposes. Vehicle based MLS has been used for road and urban asset surveys for about a decade. The equipment to derive the trajectory information for the point cloud generation from the laser data is almost without exception based on GNSS-IMU (Global Navigation Satellite System - Inertial Measurement Unit) technique. That is because of the GNSS ability to maintain global accuracy, and IMU to produce the attitude information needed to orientate the laser scanning and imaging sensor data. However, there are known challenges in maintaining accurate positioning when GNSS signal is weak or even absent over long periods of time. The duration of the signal loss affects the severity of degradation of the positioning solution depending on the quality/performance level of the IMU in use. The situation could be improved to a certain extent with higher performance IMUs, but increasing system expenses make such approach unsustainable in general. Another way to tackle the problem is to attach additional sensors to the system to overcome the degrading position accuracy: such that observe features from the environment to solve for short term system movements accurately enough to prevent the IMU solution to drift. This results in more complex system integration with need for more calibration and synchronization of multiple sensors into an operational approach. In this paper we study operation of an ATV (All -terrain vehicle) mounted, GNSS-IMU based single scanner MLS system in boreal forest conditions. The data generated by RoamerR2 system is targeted for generating 3D terrain and tree maps for optimizing harvester operations and forest inventory purposes at individual tree level. We investigate a process-flow and propose a graph optimization based method which uses data from a single scanner MLS for correcting the post

  20. The development, validation and application of a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner model for assessing organ doses to the pregnant patient and the fetus using Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, J.; Bednarz, B.; Caracappa, P. F.; Xu, X. G.

    2009-05-01

    The latest multiple-detector technologies have further increased the popularity of x-ray CT as a diagnostic imaging modality. There is a continuing need to assess the potential radiation risk associated with such rapidly evolving multi-detector CT (MDCT) modalities and scanning protocols. This need can be met by the use of CT source models that are integrated with patient computational phantoms for organ dose calculations. Based on this purpose, this work developed and validated an MDCT scanner using the Monte Carlo method, and meanwhile the pregnant patient phantoms were integrated into the MDCT scanner model for assessment of the dose to the fetus as well as doses to the organs or tissues of the pregnant patient phantom. A Monte Carlo code, MCNPX, was used to simulate the x-ray source including the energy spectrum, filter and scan trajectory. Detailed CT scanner components were specified using an iterative trial-and-error procedure for a GE LightSpeed CT scanner. The scanner model was validated by comparing simulated results against measured CTDI values and dose profiles reported in the literature. The source movement along the helical trajectory was simulated using the pitch of 0.9375 and 1.375, respectively. The validated scanner model was then integrated with phantoms of a pregnant patient in three different gestational periods to calculate organ doses. It was found that the dose to the fetus of the 3 month pregnant patient phantom was 0.13 mGy/100 mAs and 0.57 mGy/100 mAs from the chest and kidney scan, respectively. For the chest scan of the 6 month patient phantom and the 9 month patient phantom, the fetal doses were 0.21 mGy/100 mAs and 0.26 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. The paper also discusses how these fetal dose values can be used to evaluate imaging procedures and to assess risk using recommendations of the report from AAPM Task Group 36. This work demonstrates the ability of modeling and validating an MDCT scanner by the Monte Carlo method, as well as

  1. The development, validation and application of a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner model for assessing organ doses to the pregnant patient and the fetus using Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, J; Bednarz, B; Caracappa, P F; Xu, X G

    2009-01-01

    The latest multiple-detector technologies have further increased the popularity of x-ray CT as a diagnostic imaging modality. There is a continuing need to assess the potential radiation risk associated with such rapidly evolving multi-detector CT (MDCT) modalities and scanning protocols. This need can be met by the use of CT source models that are integrated with patient computational phantoms for organ dose calculations. Based on this purpose, this work developed and validated an MDCT scanner using the Monte Carlo method, and meanwhile the pregnant patient phantoms were integrated into the MDCT scanner model for assessment of the dose to the fetus as well as doses to the organs or tissues of the pregnant patient phantom. A Monte Carlo code, MCNPX, was used to simulate the x-ray source including the energy spectrum, filter and scan trajectory. Detailed CT scanner components were specified using an iterative trial-and-error procedure for a GE LightSpeed CT scanner. The scanner model was validated by comparing simulated results against measured CTDI values and dose profiles reported in the literature. The source movement along the helical trajectory was simulated using the pitch of 0.9375 and 1.375, respectively. The validated scanner model was then integrated with phantoms of a pregnant patient in three different gestational periods to calculate organ doses. It was found that the dose to the fetus of the 3 month pregnant patient phantom was 0.13 mGy/100 mAs and 0.57 mGy/100 mAs from the chest and kidney scan, respectively. For the chest scan of the 6 month patient phantom and the 9 month patient phantom, the fetal doses were 0.21 mGy/100 mAs and 0.26 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. The paper also discusses how these fetal dose values can be used to evaluate imaging procedures and to assess risk using recommendations of the report from AAPM Task Group 36. This work demonstrates the ability of modeling and validating an MDCT scanner by the Monte Carlo method, as well as

  2. Accuracy of complete-arch model using an intraoral video scanner: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Il-Do; Lee, Jae-Jun; Jeon, Jin-Hun; Kim, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Hae-Young; Kim, Woong-Chul

    2016-06-01

    Information on the accuracy of intraoral video scanners for long-span areas is limited. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the trueness and precision of an intraoral video scanner, an intraoral still image scanner, and a blue-light scanner for the production of digital impressions. Reference scan data were obtained by scanning a complete-arch model. An identical model was scanned 8 times using an intraoral video scanner (CEREC Omnicam; Sirona) and an intraoral still image scanner (CEREC Bluecam; Sirona), and stone casts made from conventional impressions of the same model were scanned 8 times with a blue-light scanner as a control (Identica Blue; Medit). Accuracy consists of trueness (the extent to which the scan data differ from the reference scan) and precision (the similarity of the data from multiple scans). To evaluate precision, 8 scans were superimposed using 3-dimensional analysis software; the reference scan data were then superimposed to determine the trueness. Differences were analyzed using 1-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey HSD tests (α=.05). Trueness in the video scanner group was not significantly different from that in the control group. However, the video scanner group showed significantly lower values than those of the still image scanner group for all variables (P<.05), except in tolerance range. The root mean square, standard deviations, and mean negative precision values for the video scanner group were significantly higher than those for the other groups (P<.05). Digital impressions obtained by the intraoral video scanner showed better accuracy for long-span areas than those captured by the still image scanner. However, the video scanner was less accurate than the laboratory scanner. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Towards the Experimental Assessment of the DQE in SPECT Scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountos, G. P.; Michail, C. M.

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to introduce the Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) systems using a flood source. A Tc-99m-based flood source (Eγ = 140 keV) consisting of a radiopharmaceutical solution of dithiothreitol (DTT, 10-3 M)/Tc-99m(III)-DMSA, 40 mCi/40 ml bound to the grains of an Agfa MammoRay HDR Medical X-ray film) was prepared in laboratory. The source was placed between two PMMA blocks and images were obtained by using the brain tomographic acquisition protocol (DatScan-brain). The Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) was evaluated using the Iterative 2D algorithm. All imaging experiments were performed in a Siemens e-Cam gamma camera. The Normalized Noise Power spectra (NNPS) were obtained from the sagittal views of the source. The higher MTF values were obtained for the Flash Iterative 2D with 24 iterations and 20 subsets. The noise levels of the SPECT reconstructed images, in terms of the NNPS, were found to increase as the number of iterations increase. The behavior of the DQE was influenced by both MTF and NNPS. As the number of iterations was increased, higher MTF values were obtained, however with a parallel, increase of magnitude in image noise, as depicted from the NNPS results. DQE values, which were influenced by both MTF and NNPS, were found higher when the number of iterations results in resolution saturation. The method presented here is novel and easy to implement, requiring materials commonly found in clinical practice and can be useful in the quality control of SPECT scanners.

  4. Status of computed tomography dosimetry for wide cone beam scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    International standardization in dosimetry is essential for the successful exploitation of radiation technology. To provide such standardization in diagnostic radiology, the IAEA published Code of Practice entitled Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology: An International Code of Practice (IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 457; 2007), which recommends procedures for calibration and dosimetric measurement both in standards dosimetry laboratories, especially Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs), and in clinical centres for radiology, as found in most hospitals. These standards address the main dosimetric methodologies needed in clinical diagnostic radiology, with the calibration of associated dosimetric equipment, including the measurement methodologies for computed tomography (CT). For some time now there has been a growing awareness that radiation dose originating from medical diagnostic procedures in radiology, is contributing an increasing proportion to the total population dose, with a large component coming from CT examinations. This is accompanied by rapid developments in CT technology, including the use of increasingly wide X ray scanning beams, which are presenting problems in dosimetry that currently cannot be adequately addressed by existing standards. This situation has received attention from a number of professional bodies, and institutions have proposed and are investigating new and adapted dosimetric models in order to find robust solutions to these problems that are critically affecting clinical application of CT dosimetry. In view of these concerns, and as a response to a recommendation from a coordinated research project that reviewed the implementation of IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 457, a meeting was held to review current dosimetric methodologies and to determine if a practical solution for dosimetry for wide X ray beam CT scanners was currently available. The meeting rapidly formed the view that there was an interim solution that

  5. Socio-economics on computed tomography (CT) scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niki, Ryu

    1983-01-01

    It was in 1975, only eight years ago, that a CT scanner was first introduced into Japan, which demonstrated enormous power in the early diagnosis of cephalic disease. Since then, CT has spread rapidly in spite of the initial high price of 200 million yen, and has attained 2,120 sets as of December, 1982. The rate of CT propagation in Japan is 18.5 sets per one million persons, or No. 1 in the world. However, its socio-economic investigation has only been done fragmentarily in Japan. In this report, the CT is investigated in three aspects of medical facilities, medical instrument manufacturers, and the medical fee of nation. In Japan, the CT installation has largely increased by 20 times in five years from 1977 to 1981, and has widely spread not only to medium to small scale hospitals but also to general clinics. In this report, the CT is investigated for the number in various facilities and prefectures, and the comparison of the state of use in USA and Japan. Since 1979, the products of domestic manufacturers were at advantage over foreign products in Japan, and Hitachi and Toshiba have been predominant among them. The fee for CT in Japan is only 1/5 as compared with that in the U.S. Setting extremely low fee like this may get into the danger to induce excessive inspection. The significant popularization of CT in Japan is much concerned with the features of Japanese medical care system as well as the medical technological characteristics of the CT. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  6. An image scanner for real time analysis of spark chamber images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesaroni, F.; Penso, G.; Locci, A.M.; Spano, M.A.

    1975-01-01

    The notes describes the semiautomatic scanning system at LNF for the analysis of spark chamber images. From the projection of the images on the scanner table, the trajectory in the real space is reconstructed

  7. Automatic Tree Data Removal Method for Topography Measurement Result Using Terrestrial Laser Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, H.; Chikatsu, H.

    2017-02-01

    Recently, laser scanning has been receiving greater attention as a useful tool for real-time 3D data acquisition, and various applications such as city modelling, DTM generation and 3D modelling of cultural heritage sites have been proposed. And, former digital data processing were demanded in the past digital archive techniques for cultural heritage sites. However, robust filtering method for distinguishing on- and off-terrain points by terrestrial laser scanner still have many issues. In the past investigation, former digital data processing using air-bone laser scanner were reported. Though, efficient tree removal methods from terrain points for the cultural heritage are not considered. In this paper, authors describe a new robust filtering method for cultural heritage using terrestrial laser scanner with "the echo digital processing technology" as latest data processing techniques of terrestrial laser scanner.

  8. The design of the detector and collimators for a hybrid scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vauramo, E.; Virjo, A.

    1977-01-01

    The hybrid scanner is a scanning device in which a long crystal with two or more photomultiplier (PM) tubes acts as a gamma camera along the crystal axis; the device acts as a linear scanner in a direction perpendicular to the crystal axis. A detailed analysis of the intrinsic resolution and uniformity is given for a two-PM-tube hybrid scanner (with one PM tube at each end) and the expressions derived should help the designer to choose the best crystal system. Collimation theory is discussed for the general hybrid scanner. Expressions and graphs are given to help in the design of a collimator with the best balance between the conflicting requirements of resolution, sensitivity, depth independence and freedom from artifacts (collimator holes may be seen in the image at high energy). Examples of practical collimators are given for energies of 80 to 140, 364, 511, 662 and 840 keV. (author)

  9. Symptoms and Cognitive Effects of Exposure to Magnetic Stray Fields of MRI Scanners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vocht, Frank Gérard de

    2006-01-01

    People working routinely with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems report a number of symptoms related to their presence in the inhomogeneous static magnetic fields (the stray field) surrounding these scanners. Experienced symptoms and neurobehavioral performance among engineers manufacturing

  10. The mechatronic design of a fast wire scanner in IHEP U-70 accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranov, V.T. [Institute for High Energy Physics in National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, Protvino 142281 (Russian Federation); Makhov, S.S. [Microprivod Ltd., Moscow 111123 (Russian Federation); Savin, D.A.; Terekhov, V.I. [Institute for High Energy Physics in National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, Protvino 142281 (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-11

    This paper presents the mechatronic design of a fast wire scanner based on a servomotor. The design of the wire scanner is motivated by the need to measure the transverse profile of the high power proton and carbon beams at the IHEP U-70 accelerator. This paper formulates the requirements to the fast wire scanner system for the high intensity proton beam at the U-70 accelerator. The results on the design of electro-mechanical device for the wire scanner with a wire traveling speed 10–20 m/s are presented. The solution consists in a brushless servomotor and standard motor control electronics. High radiation levels in the accelerator enclosure dictate the use of a resolver as the position feedback element.

  11. Improved quality of image got through whole-body CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asahina, Kiyotaka

    1980-01-01

    The quality of brain images taken with a whole-body CT scanner has so far been generally inferior in quality to those got through a CT scanner exclusively used for brains. In order to improve the whole-body CT scanner so as to get better brain image, its detection system has been made multichannel; the capacity of its X-ray tube, increased; and its software, innovated. As a result, the spatial resolution has been improved from 5.51 p/cm to 9.01 p/cm, the contrast resolution has been improved from 3.2 mm% to 1.5 mm%, with the noise maintained at 0.5%. In clinical examination, the image quality has been improved equally well for brains, abdomens and lungs. Especially high appreciation is given to the diagnosis information got through this new scanner. (author)

  12. A double-bent planar leaf flexure guide for a nano-scanner: experimental report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Jong-Moon; Lee, Young-Hyoung; Lee, Dong-Yeon

    2014-01-01

    We describe an experimental study on the double-bent leaf flexure-guided nano-scanner introduced in a previous paper [J. Korean Phy. Soc. 57, 1581 (2010)]. The optimally-designed nanoscanner was fabricated. Its performances were verified using a finite element analysis (FEA). The nano-scanner is actuated by a voice coil motor. Its characteristics were measured with a laser interferometer. The first resonant frequency is calculated as 17.1 Hz. The performances of the nano-scanner, including sine tracking capability, a multi-step response, and range of travel check were evaluated using various experimental procedures. Test results reveal that the scanner traveled over a 4.0 mm range and had good nano-precision (4 nm).

  13. Performance evaluation of 8 CT scanners for clinical use in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, I.; De Denaro, M.; Giribona, P.; Gicericin, C.; Bravar, D.

    1988-01-01

    In the past few years the use of CT scanners has widely spread in Italian care institutions. This methodology has thus become an important creates the need for an accurate study of the various aspects of the phenomenon, e.g. technological, diagnostic and economic. In order to evaluate the quality of the CT scanners used in our country, the majors suppliers of the Italian market were asked to provide us with a unit from their production. Six out of 7 companies complied with our request. A standard protocol was used to evaluate the performance of 8 CT scanners, currently used in Italy. The following parameters were evaluated: spatial resolution, contrast resolution, noise, slice thickness, uniformity, linearity and radiation dose. Five currently-used operating modalities were employed. The results allow an overall assessment of the performance of the 8 CT scanners

  14. SLAC Scanner Processor: a FASTBUS module for data collection and processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brafman, H.; Glanzman, T.; Lankford, A.J.; Olsen, J.; Paffrath, L.

    1984-10-01

    A new, general purpose, programmable FASTBUS module, the SLAC Scanner Processor (SSP), is introduced. Both hardware and software elements of SSP operation are discussed. The role of the SSP within the upgraded Mark II Detector at SLAC is described

  15. Effects of injected dose, BMI and scanner type on NECR and image noise in PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Tingting; Chang Guoping; Clark, John W Jr; Kohlmyer, Steve; Rohren, Eric; Mawlawi, Osama R

    2011-01-01

    Noise equivalent count rate (NECR) and image noise are two different but related metrics that have been used to predict and assess image quality, respectively. The aim of this study is to investigate, using patient studies, the relationships between injected dose (ID), body mass index (BMI) and scanner type on NECR and image noise measurements in PET imaging. Two groups of 90 patients each were imaged on a GE DSTE and a DRX PET/CT scanner, respectively. The patients in each group were divided into nine subgroups according to three BMI (20-24.9, 25-29.9, 30-45 kg m -2 ) and three ID (296-444, 444-555, 555-740 MBq) ranges, resulting in ten patients/subgroup. All PET data were acquired in 3D mode and reconstructed using the VuePoint HD (registered) fully 3D OSEM algorithm (2 iterations, 21(DRX) or 20 (DSTE) subsets). NECR and image noise measurements for bed positions covering the liver were calculated for each patient. NECR was calculated from the trues, randoms and scatter events recorded in the DICOM header of each patient study, while image noise was determined as the standard deviation of 50 non-neighboring voxels in the liver of each patient. A t-test compared the NECR and image noise for different scanners but with the same BMI and ID. An ANOVA test on the other hand was used to compare the results of patients with different BMI but the same ID and scanner type as well as different ID but the same BMI and scanner type. As expected the t-test showed a significant difference in NECR between the two scanners for all BMI and ID subgroups. However, contrary to what is expected no such findings were observed for image noise measurement. The ANOVA results showed a statistically significant difference in both NECR and image noise among the different BMI for each ID and scanner subgroup. However, there was no statistically significant difference in NECR and image noise across different ID for each BMI and scanner subgroup. Although the GE DRX PET/CT scanner has better

  16. Psychological Prices and Price Rigidity in Grocery Retailing: Analysis of German Scanner Data

    OpenAIRE

    Herrmann, Roland; Moeser, Anke

    2005-01-01

    A substantial degree of price rigidity has been reported for branded foods in various studies with scanner data. One possible explanation for price rigidity is the existence of psychological pricing points. We analyze to which extent psychological pricing plays a role in grocery retailing and whether it contributes to price rigidity of branded foods in Germany. Psychological pricing defined here as just-below-the-round-figure-pricing is empirically analyzed with scanner data of weekly prices ...

  17. Evaluation of PeneloPET Simulations of Biograph PET/CT Scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abushab, K. M.; Herraiz, J. L.; Vicente, E.; Cal-González, J.; España, S.; Vaquero, J. J.; Jakoby, B. W.; Udías, J. M.

    2016-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are widely used in positron emission tomography (PET) for optimizing detector design, acquisition protocols, and evaluating corrections and reconstruction methods. PeneloPET is a MC code based on PENELOPE, for PET simulations which considers detector geometry, acquisition electronics and materials, and source definitions. While PeneloPET has been successfully employed and validated with small animal PET scanners, it required a proper validation with clinical PET scanners including time-of-flight (TOF) information. For this purpose, we chose the family of Biograph PET/CT scanners: the Biograph True-Point (B-TP), Biograph True-Point with TrueV (B-TPTV) and the Biograph mCT. They have similar block detectors and electronics, but a different number of rings and configuration. Some effective parameters of the simulations, such as the dead-time and the size of the reflectors in the detectors, were adjusted to reproduce the sensitivity and noise equivalent count (NEC) rate of the B-TPTV scanner. These parameters were then used to make predictions of experimental results such as sensitivity, NEC rate, spatial resolution, and scatter fraction (SF), from all the Biograph scanners and some variations of them (energy windows and additional rings of detectors). Predictions agree with the measured values for the three scanners, within 7% (sensitivity and NEC rate) and 5% (SF). The resolution obtained for the B-TPTV is slightly better (10%) than the experimental values. In conclusion, we have shown that PeneloPET is suitable for simulating and investigating clinical systems with good accuracy and short computational time, though some effort tuning of a few parameters of the scanners modeled may be needed in case that the full details of the scanners studied are not available.

  18. Two-Dimensional Metrology with Flatbed Scanners at Room and Liquid Nitrogen Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grau Carles, A.; Grau Malonda, A. [CIEMAT. Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    We study the capability of the commercial flatbed scanner as a measuring instrument of two-coordinate sample both at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. We describes simple procedure to calibrate the scanner, and the most adequate standard configuration to carry out the measurements. To illustrate the procedure, we measure the relative positions of the conductors in a cross-section of a superconducting magnet of CERN. (Author) 8 refs.

  19. Two-Dimensional Metrology with Flatbed Scanners at Room and Liquid Nitrogen Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau Carles, A.; Grau Malonda, A.

    2000-01-01

    We study the capability of the commercial flatbed scanner as a measuring instrument of two-coordinate sample both at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. We describes simple procedure to calibrate the scanner, and the most adequate standard configuration to carry out the measurements. To illustrate the procedure, we measure the relative positions of the conductors in a cross-section of a superconducting magnet of CERN. (Author) 8 refs

  20. Development of Monte Carlo simulations to provide scanner-specific organ dose coefficients for contemporary CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Jan T. M.; Shrimpton, Paul C.

    2016-07-01

    The ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) CT patient dosimetry calculator is still used world-wide to estimate organ and effective doses (E) for computed tomography (CT) examinations, although the tool is based on Monte Carlo calculations reflecting practice in the early 1990’s. Subsequent developments in CT scanners, definitions of E, anthropomorphic phantoms, computers and radiation transport codes, have all fuelled an urgent need for updated organ dose conversion factors for contemporary CT. A new system for such simulations has been developed and satisfactorily tested. Benchmark comparisons of normalised organ doses presently derived for three old scanners (General Electric 9800, Philips Tomoscan LX and Siemens Somatom DRH) are within 5% of published values. Moreover, calculated normalised values of CT Dose Index for these scanners are in reasonable agreement (within measurement and computational uncertainties of  ±6% and  ±1%, respectively) with reported standard measurements. Organ dose coefficients calculated for a contemporary CT scanner (Siemens Somatom Sensation 16) demonstrate potential deviations by up to around 30% from the surrogate values presently assumed (through a scanner matching process) when using the ImPACT CT Dosimetry tool for newer scanners. Also, illustrative estimates of E for some typical examinations and a range of anthropomorphic phantoms demonstrate the significant differences (by some 10’s of percent) that can arise when changing from the previously adopted stylised mathematical phantom to the voxel phantoms presently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and when following the 2007 ICRP recommendations (updated from 1990) concerning tissue weighting factors. Further simulations with the validated dosimetry system will provide updated series of dose coefficients for a wide range of contemporary scanners.

  1. Integrated PET/MR breast cancer imaging: Attenuation correction and implementation of a 16-channel RF coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehmigen, Mark, E-mail: mark.oehmigen@uni-due.de; Lindemann, Maike E. [High Field and Hybrid MR Imaging, University Hospital Essen, Essen 45147 (Germany); Lanz, Titus [Rapid Biomedical GmbH, Rimpar 97222 (Germany); Kinner, Sonja [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, Essen 45147 (Germany); Quick, Harald H. [High Field and Hybrid MR Imaging, University Hospital Essen, Essen 45147, Germany and Erwin L. Hahn Institute for MR Imaging, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen 45141 (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: This study aims to develop, implement, and evaluate a 16-channel radiofrequency (RF) coil for integrated positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging of breast cancer. The RF coil is designed for optimized MR imaging performance and PET transparency and attenuation correction (AC) is applied for accurate PET quantification. Methods: A 16-channel breast array RF coil was designed for integrated PET/MR hybrid imaging of breast cancer lesions. The RF coil features a lightweight rigid design and is positioned with a spacer at a defined position on the patient table of an integrated PET/MR system. Attenuation correction is performed by generating and applying a dedicated 3D CT-based template attenuation map. Reposition accuracy of the RF coil on the system patient table while using the positioning frame was tested in repeated measurements using MR-visible markers. The MR, PET, and PET/MR imaging performances were systematically evaluated using modular breast phantoms. Attenuation correction of the RF coil was evaluated with difference measurements of the active breast phantoms filled with radiotracer in the PET detector with and without the RF coil in place, serving as a standard of reference measurement. The overall PET/MR imaging performance and PET quantification accuracy of the new 16-channel RF coil and its AC were then evaluated in first clinical examinations on ten patients with local breast cancer. Results: The RF breast array coil provides excellent signal-to-noise ratio and signal homogeneity across the volume of the breast phantoms in MR imaging and visualizes small structures in the phantoms down to 0.4 mm in plane. Difference measurements with PET revealed a global loss and thus attenuation of counts by 13% (mean value across the whole phantom volume) when the RF coil is placed in the PET detector. Local attenuation ranging from 0% in the middle of the phantoms up to 24% was detected in the peripheral regions of the phantoms at

  2. WindScanner.dk - a new Remote Sensing based Research Infrastructure for on- and offshore Wind Energy Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Torben

    obtained in planetary boundary layer turbulent flow have been acquired from both ground-based and wind turbine-integrated space by time and space synchronized scanning lidars. Results to date include: turbulent inflow over complex terrain scanned in a horizontal-vertical 2D scan plane, and 2-dimensional...... and 3-dimensional wind vector scan measurements obtained during various WindScanner boundary-layer field campaigns. A special designed `2D upwind rotor plane scanning SpinnerLidar', mounted in the rotating spinner, and able to provide the wind turbine control systems with detailed upwind feed......-forward inflow information, is also investigated as a provider of rotor plane inflow for accurate power curve measurements. The instrument development involves both a short range (10 -200 m) and a long-range (100 - 6000 m) synchronized 3D scanning wind lidar system....

  3. Note: A silicon-on-insulator microelectromechanical systems probe scanner for on-chip atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, Anthony G.; Maroufi, Mohammad; Moheimani, S. O. Reza, E-mail: Reza.Moheimani@newcastle.edu.au [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia)

    2015-04-15

    A new microelectromechanical systems-based 2-degree-of-freedom (DoF) scanner with an integrated cantilever for on-chip atomic force microscopy (AFM) is presented. The silicon cantilever features a layer of piezoelectric material to facilitate its use for tapping mode AFM and enable simultaneous deflection sensing. Electrostatic actuators and electrothermal sensors are used to accurately position the cantilever within the x-y plane. Experimental testing shows that the cantilever is able to be scanned over a 10 μm × 10 μm window and that the cantilever achieves a peak-to-peak deflection greater than 400 nm when excited at its resonance frequency of approximately 62 kHz.

  4. A multispectral scanner survey of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site and surrounding area, Golden, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewster, S.B. Jr.; Brickey, D.W.; Ross, S.L.; Shines, J.E.

    1997-04-01

    Aerial multispectral scanner imagery was collected of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in Golden, Colorado, on June 3, 5, 6, and 7, 1994, using a Daedalus AADS1268 multispectral scanner and coincident aerial color and color infrared photography. Flight altitudes were 4,500 feet (1372 meters) above ground level to match prior 1989 survey data; 2,000 feet (609 meters) above ground level for sitewide vegetation mapping; and 1,000 feet (304 meters) above ground level for selected areas of special interest. A multispectral survey was initiated to improve the existing vegetation classification map, to identify seeps and springs, and to generate ARC/INFO Geographic Information System compatible coverages of the vegetation and wetlands for the entire site including the buffer zone. The multispectral scanner imagery and coincident aerial photography were analyzed for the detection, identification, and mapping of vegetation and wetlands. The multispectral scanner data were processed digitally while the color and color infrared photography were manually photo-interpreted to define vegetation and wetlands. Several standard image enhancement techniques were applied to the multispectral scanner data to assist image interpretation. A seep enhancement was applied and a color composite consisting of multispectral scanner channels 11, 7, and 5 (thermal infrared, mid-infrared, and red bands, respectively) proved most useful for detecting seeps, seep zones, and springs. The predawn thermal infrared data were also useful in identifying and locating seeps. The remote sensing data, mapped wetlands, and ancillary Geographic Information System compatible data sets were spatially analyzed for seeps

  5. Design and evaluation of a low thermal electromotive force guarded scanner for resistance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Dean G.; Marshall, James A.; Marshall, Thomas A.; Dziuba, Ronald F.

    1999-06-01

    The design and testing of a low thermal electromotive force guarded scanner, developed to provide completely guarded switching when used with actively guarded resistance bridge networks, is described. The design provides a continuous guard circuit trace on the scanner circuit boards that surrounds the relay contacts and protects the measurement circuit from leakages to ground. Modification to the circuit boards and relays of the guarded scanner are explained. Several tests were developed to evaluate the guarding effectiveness, including isolating sections of the guard circuit to create a potential drop between the main and guard circuits. Calibration of standard resistors using the guarded scanner has shown relative differences less than 1×10-6, 30×10-6, and 150×10-6 for measurements made with and without the guarded scanner at nominal resistances of 1, 10, and 100 GΩ, respectively. The substitution method was used to significantly reduce the relative differences between channels to less than 0.5×10-6, 3×10-6, and 30×10-6 for nominal resistances of 1, 10, and 100 GΩ, respectively. Applications for the guarded scanner in automated direct current measurement systems are presented.

  6. The performance characteristics of the Philips Gemini PET/CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Keefe, G.J.; Papenfuss, A.T.; Scott, A.M.; Rowe, C.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre for PET at the ARMC is commissioning a next generation PET/CT scanner based on gadolinium silicic dioxide (GSO) crystal technology to replace the BGO crystal PET scanner that has been in operation since 1992. The Gemini PET/CT scanner is a fully 3D PET system which offers significantly increased resolution and sensitivity allowing wholebody scans in under 30 minutes. Until the late 90's, PET scanners were largely used with septa for neurological imaging and the performance characteristics of PET scanners were presented according to the NEMA-NU2-94 standard which specifically addresses the performance of PET scanners for neurological applications. PET is now largely used without septa for oncological imaging and as such, the NEMA-NU2-94 standard does not adequately reflect performance. The NEMA-NU2-2001 standard was designed to incorporate the effects of out-of-FOV activity and its contribution to performance by virtue of the increased scatter and randoms that result when performing wholebody scans without the use of septa. As part of the acceptance program of the Allegro/Gemini systems, the NEMA-NU2-2001 standard will be used to characterise the spatial resolution, sensitivity, randoms and scatter contributions and the Noise Equivalent Count rate (NECr). These results will be presented and compared with the ECAT 951/31R performance characteristics. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  7. Unsteady pressures on a blunt trailing edge measured with an embedded pressure scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Jonathan; Nikoueeyan, Pourya; Hind, Michael; Strike, John; Dahland, Matz; Keeter, Steven

    2017-11-01

    Development of direct-mount pressure scanners can decrease the pneumatic tubing length required to connect the measurement ports to the scanner manifold resulting in improved dynamic range for unsteady pressure measurements. In this work, the performance of a direct-mount pressure scanner for time-resolved pressure measurement is demonstrated in a well-established flow; the pressure fluctuations near the base of flat plate is considered. The additive manufactured model is instrumented with a pressure scanner and flush-mounted high-speed pressure transducers. The configuration of the ports on the model allows for side-by-side comparison of the pressures measured via embedded pneumatic tubing routed to a pressure scanner with that measured by high-speed transducers. Prior to testing, the dynamic response of each embedded pressure port is dynamically calibrated via an in-situ calibration technique. Pressure data is then acquired for fixed angle-of-attack and different dynamic pitching conditions. The dynamic range of the measurements acquired via direct-mount scanner will be compared to those acquired by the high speed transducers for both static and dynamic pitching configurations. The uncertainties associated with Weiner deconvolution are also quantified for the measurements.

  8. Large angle and high linearity two-dimensional laser scanner based on voice coil actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xin; Chen, Sihai; Chen, Wei; Yang, Minghui; Fu, Wen

    2011-10-01

    A large angle and high linearity two-dimensional laser scanner with an in-house ingenious deflection angle detecting system is developed based on voice coil actuators direct driving mechanism. The specially designed voice coil actuators make the steering mirror moving at a sufficiently large angle. Frequency sweep method based on virtual instruments is employed to achieve the natural frequency of the laser scanner. The response shows that the performance of the laser scanner is limited by the mechanical resonances. The closed-loop controller based on mathematical model is used to reduce the oscillation of the laser scanner at resonance frequency. To design a qualified controller, the model of the laser scanner is set up. The transfer function of the model is identified with MATLAB according to the tested data. After introducing of the controller, the nonlinearity decreases from 13.75% to 2.67% at 50 Hz. The laser scanner also has other advantages such as large deflection mirror, small mechanical structure, and high scanning speed.

  9. A rural CT scanner: evaluating the effect on local health care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkens, B.J.; Mowbray, R.D.; Creeden, L.; Engels, P.T.; Rothwell, D.M.; Chan, B.T.B.; Tu, K.

    2006-01-01

    The first small rural hospital in Ontario to propose a computed tomography (CT) scanner was in Walkerton, a town 160 km north of London. The Ontario Ministry of Health approved the proposal as a pilot project to evaluate the effect on local health care of a rural scanner. This evaluation study had 3 parts: a survey of physicians, a survey of patients, and an analysis of population CT scanning rates. The physicians in the area served by the scanner were asked about its impact on their care of their patients in a mailed questionnaire and in semistructured interviews. Scanner outpatients were given a questionnaire in which they rated the importance of its advantages. The analysis of scanning rates--the ratio of number of scans to estimated population--compared rates in the area with other Ontario rates before and after the scanner was introduced. The physicians reported that local CT allowed them to diagnose and treat patients sooner, closer to home, and with greater confidence. On average, 75% of the patients ranked faster and closer access as very important. Scanning rates in the area rose, although they did not match urban rates. The study confirms that the rural scanner changed the area's health care in significant ways and that it helped to narrow the gap between rural and urban service levels. We recommend that CT be expanded to other rural regions. (author)

  10. Inter-operator and inter-device agreement and reliability of the SEM Scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clendenin, Marta; Jaradeh, Kindah; Shamirian, Anasheh; Rhodes, Shannon L

    2015-02-01

    The SEM Scanner is a medical device designed for use by healthcare providers as part of pressure ulcer prevention programs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the inter-rater and inter-device agreement and reliability of the SEM Scanner. Thirty-one (31) volunteers free of pressure ulcers or broken skin at the sternum, sacrum, and heels were assessed with the SEM Scanner. Each of three operators utilized each of three devices to collect readings from four anatomical sites (sternum, sacrum, left and right heels) on each subject for a total of 108 readings per subject collected over approximately 30 min. For each combination of operator-device-anatomical site, three SEM readings were collected. Inter-operator and inter-device agreement and reliability were estimated. Over the course of this study, more than 3000 SEM Scanner readings were collected. Agreement between operators was good with mean differences ranging from -0.01 to 0.11. Inter-operator and inter-device reliability exceeded 0.80 at all anatomical sites assessed. The results of this study demonstrate the high reliability and good agreement of the SEM Scanner across different operators and different devices. Given the limitations of current methods to prevent and detect pressure ulcers, the SEM Scanner shows promise as an objective, reliable tool for assessing the presence or absence of pressure-induced tissue damage such as pressure ulcers. Copyright © 2015 Bruin Biometrics, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Active Damping of a Piezoelectric Tube Scanner using Self-Sensing Piezo Actuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, S.; Schitter, G.

    2010-01-01

    In most Atomic Force Microscopes (AFM), a piezoelectric tube scanner is used to position the sample underneath the measurement probe. Oscillations stemming from the weakly damped resonances of the tube scanner are a major source of image distortion, putting a limitation on the achievable imaging speed. This paper demonstrates active damping of these oscillations in multiple scanning axes without the need for additional position sensors. By connecting the tube scanner in a capacitive bridge circuit the scanner oscillations can be measured in both scanning axes, using the same piezo material as an actuator and sensor simultaneously. In order to compensate for circuit imbalance caused by hysteresis in the piezo element, an adaptive balancing circuit is used. The obtained measurement signal is used for feedback control, reducing the resonance peaks in both scanning axes by 18 dB and the cross-coupling at those frequencies by 30 dB. Experimental results demonstrate a significant reduction in scanner oscillations when applying the typical triangular scanning signals, as well as a strong reduction in coupling induced oscillations. Recorded AFM images show a considerable reduction in image distortion due to the proposed control method, enabling artifact free AFM imaging at a speed of 122 lines per second with a standard piezoelectric tube scanner. PMID:26412944

  12. Maximum likelihood positioning algorithm for high-resolution PET scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross-Weege, Nicolas; Schug, David; Hallen, Patrick; Schulz, Volkmar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET), lightsharing elements are incorporated into typical detector stacks to read out scintillator arrays in which one scintillator element (crystal) is smaller than the size of the readout channel. In order to identify the hit crystal by means of the measured light distribution, a positioning algorithm is required. One commonly applied positioning algorithm uses the center of gravity (COG) of the measured light distribution. The COG algorithm is limited in spatial resolution by noise and intercrystal Compton scatter. The purpose of this work is to develop a positioning algorithm which overcomes this limitation. Methods: The authors present a maximum likelihood (ML) algorithm which compares a set of expected light distributions given by probability density functions (PDFs) with the measured light distribution. Instead of modeling the PDFs by using an analytical model, the PDFs of the proposed ML algorithm are generated assuming a single-gamma-interaction model from measured data. The algorithm was evaluated with a hot-rod phantom measurement acquired with the preclinical HYPERION II D PET scanner. In order to assess the performance with respect to sensitivity, energy resolution, and image quality, the ML algorithm was compared to a COG algorithm which calculates the COG from a restricted set of channels. The authors studied the energy resolution of the ML and the COG algorithm regarding incomplete light distributions (missing channel information caused by detector dead time). Furthermore, the authors investigated the effects of using a filter based on the likelihood values on sensitivity, energy resolution, and image quality. Results: A sensitivity gain of up to 19% was demonstrated in comparison to the COG algorithm for the selected operation parameters. Energy resolution and image quality were on a similar level for both algorithms. Additionally, the authors demonstrated that the performance of the ML

  13. Coastal zone color scanner ``system calibration'': A retrospective examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Robert H.; Gordon, Howard R.

    1994-04-01

    During its lifetime the coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) produced approximately 66,000 images. These have been placed in an archive of "raw" radiance (sensor counts) in a subsampled format that is easily accessible. They have also been processed to form global fields, at reduced resolution, of normalized water-leaving radiance, phytoplankton pigments, and diffuse attenuation coefficient. Using this archive, we have tried to characterize some aspects of the "system calibration" for the 8-year lifetime of CZCS. Specifically, we have assumed that the sensitivity of the red band decayed in a simple manner similar to the well-known long-term degradation of the shorter-wavelength bands, and we examined the sensitivity of the green and yellow bands by computing the globally averaged water-leaving radiance, over 10-day periods, for all of the imagery. The results provide evidence that in addition to the long-term degradation, short-term (2 weeks to 1 month) variations in the radiometric sensitivity of these bands started in early fall 1981 and continued for the rest of the mission. In contrast, the data suggest the absence of such variations prior to August 1981. It is reasonable to believe that the sensitivity of the blue (and probably the red) band underwent such variations as well; however, our methodology cannot be used to study the other bands. Thus after these fluctuations began, the actual values of CZCS-estimated pigment concentrations at a given location should be viewed with skepticism; however, the global patterns of derived pigment concentration should be valid. Had an extensive set of surface measurements of water-leaving radiance, e.g., from moored buoys or drifters, been available during the CZCS mission, these fluctuations could have been removed from the data set, and this would have greatly increased its value. The lessons learned from CZCS, that is, the requirement of good radiometric calibration and stability and the necessity of "sea truth" stations

  14. Coastal zone color scanner 'system calibration': A retrospective examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Robert H.; Gordon, Howard R.

    1994-01-01

    During its lifetime the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) produced approximately 66,000 images. These have been placed in an archive of 'raw' radiance (sensor counts) in a subsampled format that is easily accessible. They have also been processed to form global fields, at reduced resolution, of normalized water-leaving radiance, phytoplankton pigments, and diffuse attenuation coefficient. Using this archive, we have tried to characterize some aspects of the 'system calibration' for the 8-year lifetime of CZCS. Specifically, we have assumed that the sensitivity of the red band decayed in a simple manner similar to the well-known long-term degradation of the shorter-wavelength bands, and we examined the sensitivity of the green and yellow bands by computing the globally averaged water-leaving radiance, over 10-day periods, for all of the imagery. The results provided evidence that in addition to the long-term degradation, short-term (2 weeks to 1 month) variations in the radiometric sensitivity of these bands started in early fall 1981 and continued for the rest of the mission. In contrast, the data suggested the absence of such variations prior to August 1981. It is reasonable to believe that the sensitivity of the blue (and probably the red) band underwent such variations as well; however our methodology cannot be used to study the other bands. Thus, after these fluctuations began, the actual values of CZCS - estimated pigment concentrations at a given location should be viewed with skepticism; however, the global patterns of derived pigment concentrations should be valid. Had an extensive set of surface measurements of water-leaving radiance, e.r., from moored buoyes or drifters, had been available during the CZCS mission, these fluctuations could have been removed from the data set, and this would have greatly increased its value. The lessons learned from CZCS that is, the requirement of good radiometric calibration and stability and the necessity of 'sea truth

  15. Global Positioning Radiometric Scanner System. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The US DOE continually seeks safer and more cost-effective technologies for use in decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of nuclear facilities. To this end, the Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the DOE OST sponsors the Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Projects (LSDDP). At these LSDDPs, developers and vendors of improved or innovative technologies showcase products that are potentially beneficial to the DOE projects and to others in the D and D community. Benefits sought include decreased health and safety risks to personnel and the environment, increased productivity, and decreased costs of operation. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) LSDDP generated a list of statements defining specific needs or problems where improved technology could be incorporated into ongoing D and D tasks. One of the stated needs was for developing technologies that would reduce costs and shorten DDOE/EM--0552DOE/EM--0552 and D schedules by providing radiological characterizations to meet the free-release criteria. The Global Positioning Radiometric Scanner (GPRS system shown in Figure 1) utilizes a detection system; a portable computer, a differential global positioning system (d-gps), and a four wheel drive vehicle. Once the survey data has been collected, a software program called GeoSofttrademark generates a graphical representation of the radiological contamination extent. Baseline technology involves gridding the area and hand surveying each grid. This demonstration investigated the associated costs and the required time to evaluate the radiological characterization data from the GPRS with respect to the baseline technology. The GPRS system performs in-situ, real-time analyses to identify the extent of radiological contamination. Benefits expected from using the new innovative technology (GPRS) include: Reduced labor hours associated with performing the survey; Increased number of survey data points; Reduced

  16. Two examples of indication specific radiation dose calculations in dental CBCT and Multidetector CT scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratis, Andreas; Zhang, Guozhi; Lopez-Rendon, Xochitl; Politis, Constantinus; Hermans, Robert; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Bogaerts, Ria; Shaheen, Eman; Bosmans, Hilde

    2017-09-01

    To calculate organ doses and estimate the effective dose for justification purposes in patients undergoing orthognathic treatment planning purposes and temporal bone imaging in dental cone beam CT (CBCT) and Multidetector CT (MDCT) scanners. The radiation dose to the ICRP reference male voxel phantom was calculated for dedicated orthognathic treatment planning acquisitions via Monte Carlo simulations in two dental CBCT scanners, Promax 3D Max (Planmeca, FI) and NewTom VGi evo (QR s.r.l, IT) and in Somatom Definition Flash (Siemens, DE) MDCT scanner. For temporal bone imaging, radiation doses were calculated via MC simulations for a CBCT protocol in NewTom 5G (QR s.r.l, IT) and with the use of a software tool (CT-expo) for Somatom Force (Siemens, DE). All procedures had been optimized at the acceptance tests of the devices. For orthognathic protocols, dental CBCT scanners deliver lower doses compared to MDCT scanners. The estimated effective dose (ED) was 0.32mSv for a normal resolution operation mode in Promax 3D Max, 0.27mSv in VGi-evo and 1.18mSv in the Somatom Definition Flash. For temporal bone protocols, the Somatom Force resulted in an estimated ED of 0.28mSv while for NewTom 5G the ED was 0.31 and 0.22mSv for monolateral and bilateral imaging respectively. Two clinical exams which are carried out with both a CBCT or a MDCT scanner were compared in terms of radiation dose. Dental CBCT scanners deliver lower doses for orthognathic patients whereas for temporal bone procedures the doses were similar. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Measurement properties and usability of non-contact scanners for measuring transtibial residual limb volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofman, Rianne; Beekman, Anna M; Emmelot, Cornelis H; Geertzen, Jan H B; Dijkstra, Pieter U

    2018-06-01

    Non-contact scanners may have potential for measurement of residual limb volume. Different non-contact scanners have been introduced during the last decades. Reliability and usability (practicality and user friendliness) should be assessed before introducing these systems in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to analyze the measurement properties and usability of four non-contact scanners (TT Design, Omega Scanner, BioSculptor Bioscanner, and Rodin4D Scanner). Quasi experimental. Nine (geometric and residual limb) models were measured on two occasions, each consisting of two sessions, thus in total 4 sessions. In each session, four observers used the four systems for volume measurement. Mean for each model, repeatability coefficients for each system, variance components, and their two-way interactions of measurement conditions were calculated. User satisfaction was evaluated with the Post-Study System Usability Questionnaire. Systematic differences between the systems were found in volume measurements. Most of the variances were explained by the model (97%), while error variance was 3%. Measurement system and the interaction between system and model explained 44% of the error variance. Repeatability coefficient of the systems ranged from 0.101 (Omega Scanner) to 0.131 L (Rodin4D). Differences in Post-Study System Usability Questionnaire scores between the systems were small and not significant. The systems were reliable in determining residual limb volume. Measurement systems and the interaction between system and residual limb model explained most of the error variances. The differences in repeatability coefficient and usability between the four CAD/CAM systems were small. Clinical relevance If accurate measurements of residual limb volume are required (in case of research), modern non-contact scanners should be taken in consideration nowadays.

  18. Survey of damage to 602 MR scanners after the Great East Japan Earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, Toshiharu; Yamaguchi-Sekino, Sachiko; Tsuchihashi, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    An earthquake of 9.0 magnitude, the largest in modern Japanese history, struck east Japan on March 11, 2011. We investigated hazards and observations related to magnetic resonance (MR) scanners in this earthquake to evaluate potential risks and consider further prevention or minimization of damage from and injury of patients in such large earthquakes. The investigation team funded by MHLW sent questionnaires to the 984 facilities with installed MR scanners in the 7 prefectures of east Japan (Iwate, Miyagi, Fukushima, Ibaraki, Chiba, Tokyo, Saitama) and collected 458 responses (46.6%) with information on 602 MR scanners (144 units≤0.5 tesla; 31 one-T units; 371 1.5-T units; and 56 units≥3 T). Significant differences in damage were observed between seismic scale 5 and 6 (χ 2 test, P<0.001 for all items of damage checked). The frequencies of typical damage were displacement of magnets (12.4%), failure of the chiller or air conditioning (9.6%), rapid decrease in liquid helium (8.4%), damage to magnet enclosure and its equipment (7.6%), damage to shielding of the MR scanner room (6.1%), damage to the quench duct (4.5%), breakage of devices anchoring system cabinets (4.4%), damage to the magnet base (3.9%), and flying of metal components (1.5%). Twelve facilities reported flooding by the subsequent tsunami, and quench was confirmed in 19 facilities. No fire damage was reported. It was confirmed that no one was severely injured in MR scanners, and base isolation of the building was very useful in completely preventing damage even at seismic scale 7. In the future, training for evacuation and establishment of a standard protocol for emergency shutdown of MR scanners, onsite checking by MR operators, and emergency power plant equipment to maintain chiller for MR scanners will further ensure MR safety in an earthquake. (author)

  19. Indirect identification and compensation of lateral scanner resonances in atomic force microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, D J; Youcef-Toumi, K; Fantner, G E

    2011-01-01

    Improving the imaging speed of atomic force microscopy (AFM) requires accurate nanopositioning at high speeds. However, high speed operation excites resonances in the AFM's mechanical scanner that can distort the image, and therefore typical users of commercial AFMs elect to operate microscopes at speeds below which scanner resonances are observed. Although traditional robust feedforward controllers and input shaping have proven effective at minimizing the influence of scanner distortions, the lack of direct measurement and use of model-based controllers have required disassembling the microscope to access lateral scanner motion with external sensors in order to perform a full system identification experiment, which places excessive demands on routine microscope operators. Further, since the lightly damped instrument dynamics often change from experiment to experiment, model-based controllers designed from offline system identification experiments must trade off high speed performance for robustness to modeling errors. This work represents a new way to automatically characterize the lateral scanner dynamics without addition of lateral sensors, and shape the commanded input signals in such a way that disturbing dynamics are not excited. Scanner coupling between the lateral and out-of-plane directions is exploited and used to build a minimal model of the scanner that is also sufficient to describe the nature of the distorting resonances. This model informs the design of an online input shaper used to suppress spectral components of the high speed command signals. The method presented is distinct from alternative approaches in that neither an information-complete system identification experiment nor microscope modification are required. Because the system identification is performed online immediately before imaging, no tradeoff of performance is required. This approach has enabled an increase in the scan rates of unmodified commercial AFMs from 1-4 lines s -1 to over

  20. PET/MRI for Preoperative Planning in Patients with Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft Jakobsen, Annika; Jensen, Karl Erik; L�fgren, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Clinical positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition protocols may improve the evaluation of soft tissue sarcomas (STS) prior to surgical planning. We examined two patients with lower extremity STS using a Siemens Biograph mMR PET/MRI scanner and the glucose...

  1. Quantitative PET imaging with the 3T MR-BrainPET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weirich, C.; Scheins, J.; Lohmann, P.; Tellmann, L.; Byars, L.; Michel, C.; Rota Kops, E.; Brenner, D.; Herzog, H.; Shah, N.J.

    2013-01-01

    The new hybrid imaging technology of MR-PET allows for simultaneous acquisition of versatile MRI contrasts and the quantitative metabolic imaging with PET. In order to achieve the quantification of PET images with minimal residual error the application of several corrections is crucial. In this work we present our results on quantification with the 3T MR BrainPET scanner

  2. A novel patterning control strategy based on real-time fingerprint recognition and adaptive wafer level scanner optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekli, Hakki Ergun; Nije, Jelle; Ypma, Alexander; Bastani, Vahid; Sonntag, Dag; Niesing, Henk; Zhang, Linmiao; Ullah, Zakir; Subramony, Venky; Somasundaram, Ravin; Susanto, William; Matsunobu, Masazumi; Johnson, Jeff; Tabery, Cyrus; Lin, Chenxi; Zou, Yi

    2018-03-01

    In addition to lithography process and equipment induced variations, processes like etching, annealing, film deposition and planarization exhibit variations, each having their own intrinsic characteristics and leaving an effect, a `fingerprint', on the wafers. With ever tighter requirements for CD and overlay, controlling these process induced variations is both increasingly important and increasingly challenging in advanced integrated circuit (IC) manufacturing. For example, the on-product overlay (OPO) requirement for future nodes is approaching process induced variance to become extremely small. Process variance control is seen as an bottleneck to further shrink which drives the need for more sophisticated process control strategies. In this context we developed a novel `computational process control strategy' which provides the capability of proactive control of each individual wafer with aim to maximize the yield, without introducing a significant impact on metrology requirements, cycle time or productivity. The complexity of the wafer process is approached by characterizing the full wafer stack building a fingerprint library containing key patterning performance parameters like Overlay, Focus, etc. Historical wafer metrology is decomposed into dominant fingerprints using Principal Component Analysis. By associating observed fingerprints with their origin e.g. process steps, tools and variables, we can give an inline assessment of the strength and origin of the fingerprints on every wafer. Once the fingerprint library is established, a wafer specific fingerprint correction recipes can be determined based on its processing history. Data science techniques are used in real-time to ensure that the library is adaptive. To realize this concept, ASML TWINSCAN scanners play a vital role with their on-board full wafer detection and exposure correction capabilities. High density metrology data is created by the scanner for each wafer and on every layer during the

  3. Quantitative image reconstruction for total-body PET imaging using the 2-meter long EXPLORER scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuezhu; Zhou, Jian; Cherry, Simon R.; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Qi, Jinyi

    2017-03-01

    The EXPLORER project aims to build a 2 meter long total-body PET scanner, which will provide extremely high sensitivity for imaging the entire human body. It will possess a range of capabilities currently unavailable to state-of-the-art clinical PET scanners with a limited axial field-of-view. The huge number of lines-of-response (LORs) of the EXPLORER poses a challenge to the data handling and image reconstruction. The objective of this study is to develop a quantitative image reconstruction method for the EXPLORER and compare its performance with current whole-body scanners. Fully 3D image reconstruction was performed using time-of-flight list-mode data with parallel computation. To recover the resolution loss caused by the parallax error between crystal pairs at a large axial ring difference or transaxial radial offset, we applied an image domain resolution model estimated from point source data. To evaluate the image quality, we conducted computer simulations using the SimSET Monte-Carlo toolkit and XCAT 2.0 anthropomorphic phantom to mimic a 20 min whole-body PET scan with an injection of 25 MBq 18F-FDG. We compare the performance of the EXPLORER with a current clinical scanner that has an axial FOV of 22 cm. The comparison results demonstrated superior image quality from the EXPLORER with a 6.9-fold reduction in noise standard deviation comparing with multi-bed imaging using the clinical scanner.

  4. A LabVIEW® based generic CT scanner control software platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierick, M; Van Loo, D; Masschaele, B; Boone, M; Van Hoorebeke, L

    2010-01-01

    UGCT, the Centre for X-ray tomography at Ghent University (Belgium) does research on X-ray tomography and its applications. This includes the development and construction of state-of-the-art CT scanners for scientific research. Because these scanners are built for very different purposes they differ considerably in their physical implementations. However, they all share common principle functionality. In this context a generic software platform was developed using LabVIEW® in order to provide the same interface and functionality on all scanners. This article describes the concept and features of this software, and its potential for tomography in a research setting. The core concept is to rigorously separate the abstract operation of a CT scanner from its actual physical configuration. This separation is achieved by implementing a sender-listener architecture. The advantages are that the resulting software platform is generic, scalable, highly efficient, easy to develop and to extend, and that it can be deployed on future scanners with minimal effort.

  5. Performance and limitations of positron emission tomography (PET) scanners for imaging very low activity sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedenberg, Melissa I; Badawi, Ramsey D; Tarantal, Alice F; Cherry, Simon R

    2014-02-01

    Emerging applications for positron emission tomography (PET) may require the ability to image very low activity source distributions in the body. The performance of clinical PET scanners in the regime where activity in the field of view is source in the NEMA scatter phantom), the BGO-based scanner significantly outperformed the LSO-based scanner. This was largely due to the effect of background counts emanating from naturally occurring but radioactive (176)Lu within the LSO detector material, which dominates the observed counting rate at the lowest activities. Increasing the lower energy threshold from 350 keV to 425 keV in an attempt to reduce this background did not significantly improve the measured NECR performance. The measured singles rate due to (176)Lu emissions within the scanner energy window was also found to be dependent on temperature, and to be affected by the operation of the CT component, making approaches to correct or compensate for the background more challenging. We conclude that for PET studies in a very low activity range, BGO-based scanners are likely to have better performance because of the lack of significant background. Copyright © 2013 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A sweep plate emittance scanner for high-power CW ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debiak, T.W.; Ng, Y.; Sredniawski, J.; Stasi, W.

    1996-01-01

    Sweep plate scanners are preferred for emittance measurement due to their versatility, simplicity, and precision. At the Advanced Technology and Development Center of Northrop Grumman, we have routinely used these devices for characterization of injector beams with less than 20 W/cm 2 average power density. To characterize higher power beams, like those required for production of tritium or for radioactive waste transmutation, the scanner pod and data collection algorithm must be redesigned due to the possibility of melting the scanner's protective front face or distorting the precision entrance knife edges. Among the methods we have used to mitigate these effects, one consists of drastically reducing the amount of time required for data collection. In this method, the emittance scanner pod traverses the beam in two passes, each requiring less than 0.5 second. In the first pass, the phase space limits of the beam are determined. In the second pass, data is collected primarily within the phase space region limits determined in the first pass. In this way, enough points are collected to assure that the precision of the measurement is high, even though the data collection time for each scan is less than 0.5 second. This paper will describe the layout of the scanner components, the data collection electronics and algorithm, and the data analysis. (author)

  7. Analysis of the Performance of a Laser Scanner for Predictive Automotive Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeisler, J.; Maas, H.-G.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we evaluate the use of a laser scanner for future advanced driver assistance systems. We focus on the important task of predicting the target vehicle for longitudinal ego vehicle control. Our motivation is to decrease the reaction time of existing systems during cut-in maneuvers of other traffic participants. A state-of-the-art laser scanner, the Ibeo Scala B2 R , is presented, providing its sensing characteristics and the subsequent high level object data output. We evaluate the performance of the scanner towards object tracking with the help of a GPS real time kinematics system on a test track. Two designed scenarios show phases with constant distance and velocity as well as dynamic motion of the vehicles. We provide the results for the error in position and velocity of the scanner and furthermore, review our algorithm for target vehicle prediction. Finally we show the potential of the laser scanner with the estimated error, that leads to a decrease of up to 40% in reaction time with best conditions.

  8. Preliminary assessment of the operating performance and calibration of rectilinear scanners and dose calibrators in Rio de Janeiro - Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, L.; Wegst, A.

    1983-01-01

    Thirty rectilinear scanners and ten dose calibrators were tested for a variety of operating conditions. The test for rectilinear scanners were based on image quality obtained with phantoms of the brain, liver (Williams phantom) and thyroid. The parameters investigated specifically for rectilinear scanners included those under direct control of the operator, such as proper setting of the focal distance, the velocity, the photopeak calibration, contrast correct collimator, line spacing, and background count. (E.G.) [pt

  9. Comprehensive MRI simulation methodology using a dedicated MRI scanner in radiation oncology for external beam radiation treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulson, Eric S.; Erickson, Beth; Schultz, Chris; Allen Li, X.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiation oncology is expanding rapidly, and more clinics are integrating MRI into their radiation therapy workflows. However, radiation therapy presents a new set of challenges and places additional constraints on MRI compared to diagnostic radiology that, if not properly addressed, can undermine the advantages MRI offers for radiation treatment planning (RTP). The authors introduce here strategies to manage several challenges of using MRI for virtual simulation in external beam RTP. Methods: A total of 810 clinical MRI simulation exams were performed using a dedicated MRI scanner for external beam RTP of brain, breast, cervix, head and neck, liver, pancreas, prostate, and sarcoma cancers. Patients were imaged in treatment position using MRI-optimal immobilization devices. Radiofrequency (RF) coil configurations and scan protocols were optimized based on RTP constraints. Off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity-induced geometric distortions were minimized or corrected prior to using images for RTP. A multidisciplinary MRI simulation guide, along with window width and level presets, was created to standardize use of MR images during RTP. A quality assurance program was implemented to maintain accuracy and repeatability of MRI simulation exams. Results: The combination of a large bore scanner, high field strength, and circumferentially wrapped, flexible phased array RF receive coils permitted acquisition of thin slice images with high contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and image intensity uniformity, while simultaneously accommodating patient setup and immobilization devices. Postprocessing corrections and alternative acquisition methods were required to reduce or correct off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity induced geometric distortions. Conclusions: The methodology described herein contains practical strategies the authors have implemented through lessons learned performing clinical MRI simulation exams. In

  10. Comprehensive MRI simulation methodology using a dedicated MRI scanner in radiation oncology for external beam radiation treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulson, Eric S., E-mail: epaulson@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 and Department of Radiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States); Erickson, Beth; Schultz, Chris; Allen Li, X. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiation oncology is expanding rapidly, and more clinics are integrating MRI into their radiation therapy workflows. However, radiation therapy presents a new set of challenges and places additional constraints on MRI compared to diagnostic radiology that, if not properly addressed, can undermine the advantages MRI offers for radiation treatment planning (RTP). The authors introduce here strategies to manage several challenges of using MRI for virtual simulation in external beam RTP. Methods: A total of 810 clinical MRI simulation exams were performed using a dedicated MRI scanner for external beam RTP of brain, breast, cervix, head and neck, liver, pancreas, prostate, and sarcoma cancers. Patients were imaged in treatment position using MRI-optimal immobilization devices. Radiofrequency (RF) coil configurations and scan protocols were optimized based on RTP constraints. Off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity-induced geometric distortions were minimized or corrected prior to using images for RTP. A multidisciplinary MRI simulation guide, along with window width and level presets, was created to standardize use of MR images during RTP. A quality assurance program was implemented to maintain accuracy and repeatability of MRI simulation exams. Results: The combination of a large bore scanner, high field strength, and circumferentially wrapped, flexible phased array RF receive coils permitted acquisition of thin slice images with high contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and image intensity uniformity, while simultaneously accommodating patient setup and immobilization devices. Postprocessing corrections and alternative acquisition methods were required to reduce or correct off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity induced geometric distortions. Conclusions: The methodology described herein contains practical strategies the authors have implemented through lessons learned performing clinical MRI simulation exams. In

  11. Evaluation of scattered radiation emitted from X-ray security scanners on occupational dose to airport personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalah, Entesar; Fakhry, Angham; Mukhtar, Asma; Al Salti, Farah; Bader, May; Khouri, Sara; Al-Zahmi, Reem

    2017-01-01

    Based on security issues and regulations airports are provided with luggage cargo scanners. These scanners utilize ionizing radiation that in principle present health risks toward humans. The study aims to investigate the amount of backscatter produced by passenger luggage and cargo toward airport personnel who are located at different distances from the scanners. To approach our investigation a Thermo Electron Radeye-G probe was used to quantify the backscattered radiation measured in terms of dose-rate emitted from airport scanners, Measurements were taken at the entrance and exit positions of the X-ray tunnel at three different distances (0, 50, and 100 cm) for two different scanners; both scanners include shielding curtains that reduce scattered radiation. Correlation was demonstrated using the Pearson coefficient test. Measurements confirmed an inverse relationship between dose rate and distance. An estimated occupational accumulative dose of 0.88 mSv/y, and 2.04 mSv/y were obtained for personnel working in inspection of carry-on, and cargo, respectively. Findings confirm that the projected dose of security and engineering staff are being well within dose limits. - Highlights: • Backscattered radiation emitted from the airport security scanners is estimated. • Inverse relation observed between backscattered radiation and scanners distance. • Occupational dose for personnel inspecting the scanners were up to 2.04 mSv/y. • The projected dose of security and engineering staff are well within dose limits.

  12. WindScanner.eu - a new Remote Sensing Research Infrastructure for On- and Offshore Wind Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Torben; Siggaard Knudsen, Søren; Sjöholm, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    will be disseminated throughout Europe to pilot European wind energy research centers. The new research infrastructure will become an open source infrastructure that also invites collaboration with wind energy related atmospheric scientists and wind energy industry overseas. Recent achievements with 3D Wind......A new remote sensing based research infrastructure for atmospheric boundary-layer wind and turbulence measurements named WindScanner have during the past three years been in its early phase of development at DTU Wind Energy in Denmark. During the forthcoming three years the technology......Scanners and spin-off innovation activity are described. The Danish WindScanner.dk research facility is build from new and fast-scanning remote sensing equipment spurred from achievements within fiber optics and telecommunication technologies. At the same time the wind energy society has demanded excessive 3D wind...

  13. Minimisation of the wire position uncertainties of the new CERN vacuum wire scanner

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069346; Barjau Condomines, A

    In the next years the luminosity of the LHC will be significantly increased. This will require a much higher accuracy of beam profile measurement than actually achievable by the current wire scanner. The new fast wire scanner is foreseen to measure small emittance beams throughout the LHC injector chain, which demands a wire travelling speed up to 20 ms-1 and position measurement accuracy of the order of a few microns. The vibrations of the mechanical parts of the system, and particularly the vibrations of the thin carbon wire, were identified as the major error sources of wire position uncertainty. Therefore the understanding of the wire vibrations is a high priority for the design and operation of the new device. This document presents the work performed to understand the main causes of the wire vibrations observed in one of the existing wire scanner and the new proposed design.

  14. Comparative Performance Analysis of Different Fingerprint Biometric Scanners for Patient Matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasiiti, Noah; Wawira, Judy; Purkayastha, Saptarshi; Were, Martin C

    2017-01-01

    Unique patient identification within health services is an operational challenge in healthcare settings. Use of key identifiers, such as patient names, hospital identification numbers, national ID, and birth date are often inadequate for ensuring unique patient identification. In addition approximate string comparator algorithms, such as distance-based algorithms, have proven suboptimal for improving patient matching, especially in low-resource settings. Biometric approaches may improve unique patient identification. However, before implementing the technology in a given setting, such as health care, the right scanners should be rigorously tested to identify an optimal package for the implementation. This study aimed to investigate the effects of factors such as resolution, template size, and scan capture area on the matching performance of different fingerprint scanners for use within health care settings. Performance analysis of eight different scanners was tested using the demo application distributed as part of the Neurotech Verifinger SDK 6.0.

  15. Detection of analyte binding to microarrays using gold nanoparticle labels and a desktop scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Anpan; Dufva, Martin; Belleville, Erik

    2003-01-01

    on gold nanoparticle labeled antibodies visualized by a commercial, office desktop flatbed scanner. Scanning electron microscopy studies showed that the signal from the flatbed scanner was proportional to the surface density of the bound antibody-gold conjugates, and that the flatbed scanner could detect...... six attomoles of antibody-gold conjugates. This detection system was used in a competitive immunoassay to measure the concentration of the pesticide metabolite 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM) in water samples. The results showed that the gold labeled antibodies functioned comparably with a fluorescent...... based immunoassay for detecting BAM in water. A qualitative immunoassay based on gold-labeled antibodies could determineif a water sample contained BAM above and below 60-70 ng L(-1), which is below the maximum allowed BAM concentration for drinking water (100 ng L(-1)) according to European Union...

  16. An Enhanced Rule-Based Web Scanner Based on Similarity Score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEE, M.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an enhanced rule-based web scanner in order to get better accuracy in detecting web vulnerabilities than the existing tools, which have relatively high false alarm rate when the web pages are installed in unconventional directory paths. Using the proposed matching method based on similarity score, the proposed scheme can determine whether two pages have the same vulnerabilities or not. With this method, the proposed scheme is able to figure out the target web pages are vulnerable by comparing them to the web pages that are known to have vulnerabilities. We show the proposed scanner reduces 12% false alarm rate compared to the existing well-known scanner through the performance evaluation via various experiments. The proposed scheme is especially helpful in detecting vulnerabilities of the web applications which come from well-known open-source web applications after small customization, which happens frequently in many small-sized companies.

  17. A stereotaxic frame and computer software for use with CT body scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.A.; Roberts, T.S.

    1979-01-01

    A prototype stereotaxic frame for use in conjunction with CT body scanners has been developed and is illustrated. Such a frame may be rigidly attached to the patient's cranium prior to CT scanning and kept attached until completion of the stereotaxic procedure. The frame produces landmarks in each CT slice which allow the CT scanner computer to calculate the spatial orientation of the slice with respect to the frame. Thus the computer may transfer information from the CT slice coordinate system to the frame coordinate system. Using this type of stereotaxic frame it is possible to complete the stereotaxic procedure either in the CT scanner or in the neurosurgery operating suite. In a series of 20 experiments with a target phantom the tip of the probe was placed at a target point with a mean error of 2.0 millimeters. (Auth.)

  18. Perancangan dan Pembuatan Alat Scanner 3D Menggunakan Sensor Kinect Xbox 360

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Armansyah

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Scanner 3D adalah teknologi yang digunakan untuk memindai objek nyata untuk mendapatkan bentuk, ukuran dan fitur lainnya agar menghasilkan gambar yang sangat akurat. Dalam perancangan alat scanner 3D sebelumnya, yaitu scanner 3D menggunakan sensor ultrasonik, infra merah, dan line laser. Maka dapat disimpulkan terdapat beberapa kekurangan yaitu masih terbatasnya objek yang di scan serta hasil scan yang belum akurat karena hanya menghasilkan garis-garis yang membentuk objek. Pada penelitian ini, penulis membuat scanner 3D dengan hasil akurasi yang tinggi. Scanner 3D yang dibuat adalah menggunakan sensor Kinect xbox 360. Cara kerja dari kinect yaitu dengan menggabungkan antara beberapa kamera, Color Cimos (VNA38209015 kamera ini berfungsi membantu dalam pengenalan objek dan fitur deteksi lainnya, serta kamera IR CMOS (VCA379C7130, dan IR Projector (OG12 yaitu sebagai depth sensor atau sensor kedalaman yang merupakan sebuah proyektor infrared dan sebuah sensor monochrome CMOS yang bekerja secara bersama-sama untuk melihat ruangan atau area dalam bentuk 3D tanpa memperdulikan kondisi cahaya. Untuk mengolah serta menampilkan hasil dari objek yang sudah di scan menggunakan aplikasi KScan3D. Kemudian untuk koneksi antara PC dengan media penggerak menggunakan Bluetooth HC-06. Setelah dilakukan pengujian didapatkan model gambar 3D dengan dengan hasil akurasi yang cukup tinggi. Kata Kunci: Bluetooth HC-06, Infra Merah, Line Laser, Kinect, KScan3D, Scanner 3D, Ultrasonik Abstract Scanner 3D is the technology used to scan real objects to get the form, size and other features in order to produce pictures that are very accurate. In the design of the appliance scanner 3D previously, namely scanner 3D using the ultrasonic sensor, infrared and laser line. It can be concluded there are some disadvantages that is still limited objects in the scan and the scans are not accurate because only produces lines that formed the object. In this research, author

  19. MCPT: A Monte Carlo code for simulation of photon transport in tomographic scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prettyman, T.H.; Gardner, R.P.; Verghese, K.

    1990-01-01

    MCPT is a special-purpose Monte Carlo code designed to simulate photon transport in tomographic scanners. Variance reduction schemes and sampling games present in MCPT were selected to characterize features common to most tomographic scanners. Combined splitting and biasing (CSB) games are used to systematically sample important detection pathways. An efficient splitting game is used to tally particle energy deposition in detection zones. The pulse height distribution of each detector can be found by convolving the calculated energy deposition distribution with the detector's resolution function. A general geometric modelling package, HERMETOR, is used to describe the geometry of the tomographic scanners and provide MCPT information needed for particle tracking. MCPT's modelling capabilites are described and preliminary experimental validation is presented. (orig.)

  20. Simple Methods for Scanner Drift Normalization Validated for Automatic Segmentation of Knee Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Erik Bjørnager

    2018-01-01

    Scanner drift is a well-known magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) artifact characterized by gradual signal degradation and scan intensity changes over time. In addition, hardware and software updates may imply abrupt changes in signal. The combined effects are particularly challenging for automatic...... image analysis methods used in longitudinal studies. The implication is increased measurement variation and a risk of bias in the estimations (e.g. in the volume change for a structure). We proposed two quite different approaches for scanner drift normalization and demonstrated the performance...... for segmentation of knee MRI using the fully automatic KneeIQ framework. The validation included a total of 1975 scans from both high-field and low-field MRI. The results demonstrated that the pre-processing method denoted Atlas Affine Normalization significantly removed scanner drift effects and ensured...

  1. A multispectral scanner survey of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Hanford Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewster, S.B. Jr.; Howard, M.E.; Shines, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    An airborne multispectral scanner survey of selected sites on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Hanford Reservation was performed in mid-November 1993. Aerial multispectral scanner and photography data were acquired coincidentally with the Big O experiment at both locations. To illustrate two potential applications, the multispectral scanner data were digitally enhanced to facilitate the detection of soil disturbance and evidence of surface water transport. The main conclusion of this study was that multispectral data acquired under these conditions can be useful for soil disturbance detection. The imagery did not prove as useful, however, for direct indications of surface water transport. It was possible to infer some water transport patterns from dry water beds, but only if surface indications were present

  2. Risks of exposure to ionizing and millimeter-wave radiation from airport whole-body scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulder, John E

    2012-06-01

    Considerable public concern has been expressed around the world about the radiation risks posed by the backscatter (ionizing radiation) and millimeter-wave (nonionizing radiation) whole-body scanners that have been deployed at many airports. The backscatter and millimeter-wave scanners currently deployed in the U.S. almost certainly pose negligible radiation risks if used as intended, but their safety is difficult-to-impossible to prove using publicly accessible data. The scanners are widely disliked and often feared, which is a problem made worse by what appears to be a veil of secrecy that covers their specifications and dosimetry. Therefore, for these and future similar technologies to gain wide acceptance, more openness is needed, as is independent review and regulation. Publicly accessible, and preferably peer-reviewed evidence is needed that the deployed units (not just the prototypes) meet widely-accepted safety standards. It is also critical that risk-perception issues be handled more competently.

  3. Thermo-mechanical design of a CW sweep plate emittance scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathke, J.; Peacock, M.; Sredniawski, J.

    1996-01-01

    A sweep plate emittance scanner for use with high power, continuous wave (CW) beams has been designed, fabricated and commissioned at Northrop Grumman. The design is capable of scanning beams of up to 20 kW beam power with a spot diameter as small as 2 cm. The scanner pod is mounted on a ball screw driven linear bearing table that is driven through the beam by a stepper motor at velocities up to 30 cm/sec. This paper presents the thermo-mechanical analysis of the pod moving through a gaussian beam and the details of the mechanical design of the pod and motion system. Analyses to determine scanner cooling schemes and structural materials are presented. (author)

  4. Radiation dose assessment in a 320-detector-row CT scanner used in cardiac imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goma, Carles; Ruiz, Agustin; Jornet, Nuria; Latorre, Artur; Pallerol, Rosa M.; Carrasco, Pablo; Eudaldo, Teresa; Ribas, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    measured dose profile data and the fitted Gaussian functions. The solid-state detector had no energy dependence--within the energy range of interest--and the analytical model succeeded in reproducing the absolute dose values obtained with the pencil ion chamber. For the case of large cone-beam single axial scans, the quantity that better characterizes the total energy imparted to the patient is the weighted dose profile integral (DPI w ). The DPI w can be easily determined from the two parameters that define the Gaussian functions: f(0) and σ. The authors found that the DLP underestimated the total energy imparted to the patient by more than 20%. The authors also found that the calculated CT dosimetric quantities were higher than those displayed on the scanner console. Conclusions: The authors described and validated a method to assess radiation dose in large cone-beam single axial scans. This method offers a simple and more accurate estimation of the total energy imparted to the patient, thus offering the possibility to update the bridge between CT dosimetry and the estimation of the effective dose for cone-beam CT examinations in radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiation therapy.

  5. Radiation dose assessment in a 320-detector-row CT scanner used in cardiac imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goma, Carles; Ruiz, Agustin; Jornet, Nuria; Latorre, Artur; Pallerol, Rosa M.; Carrasco, Pablo; Eudaldo, Teresa; Ribas, Montserrat [Servei de Radiofisica i Radioproteccio, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Sant Antoni Maria Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-03-15

    agreement between the measured dose profile data and the fitted Gaussian functions. The solid-state detector had no energy dependence--within the energy range of interest--and the analytical model succeeded in reproducing the absolute dose values obtained with the pencil ion chamber. For the case of large cone-beam single axial scans, the quantity that better characterizes the total energy imparted to the patient is the weighted dose profile integral (DPI{sub w}). The DPI{sub w} can be easily determined from the two parameters that define the Gaussian functions: f(0) and {sigma}. The authors found that the DLP underestimated the total energy imparted to the patient by more than 20%. The authors also found that the calculated CT dosimetric quantities were higher than those displayed on the scanner console. Conclusions: The authors described and validated a method to assess radiation dose in large cone-beam single axial scans. This method offers a simple and more accurate estimation of the total energy imparted to the patient, thus offering the possibility to update the bridge between CT dosimetry and the estimation of the effective dose for cone-beam CT examinations in radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiation therapy.

  6. Importance of professional qualification for operators of body scanners in prisons; Importância da habilitação profissional para operadores de escâneres corporais em presídios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kühn, P.; Huhn, A., E-mail: profpeterk@gmail.com [Instituto Federal de Santa Catarina (IFSC), Florianópolis, SC (Brazil). Mestrado Profissional em Proteção Radiológica

    2017-07-01

    Introduction: The implantation of the personal search by body scanners is gradually being implanted in Brazilian prisons. The body scanner, if operated by a qualified professional, allows the observation of images, generated by X-rays, of the whole body avoiding the intimate search, which is questioned for being embarrassing to the visitors of the inmates. The use of X-rays without control of absorbed doses may endanger the health of operators of equipment and, in the case of prisons, also to visitors. Method: Exploratory and descriptive, based on national and international legislation on the subject, in order to analyze and identify suitable training for the operation of body scanners. Results: The study was composed of the Standards and Recommendations of the National and International Nuclear Energy Commission. The results although the legislation does not clearly identify professional training to operate scanners in prisons, a broad knowledge on ionizing radiation and radiological protection is of the utmost importance. Conclusion: The manipulation of equipment generating ionizing radiation must be performed by qualified and authorized professional, to guarantee the principles of radiological protection to whoever operates the equipment and the population that will possibly be submitted to the personal search in the prison units. Therefore, it is understood that professionals with adequate training and competence to ensure the integrity of the health of all are the professional of Radiological Techniques and these must prove their training with registration in the specific Class Council.

  7. Monte Carlo modeling of a clinical PET scanner by using the GATE dedicated computer code; Modelagem Monte Carlo de um PET Scanner clinico utilizando o codigo dedicado GATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Igor Fagner; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Universidade de Pernambuco (UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Escola Politecnica; Vieira, Jose Wilson [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper demonstrates more possible detailed the GATE simulated architecture involved in the 4D modeling of a General Electric PET scanner, the Advance. So, it were used data present in the literature on the configuration of GE modelled PET. The obtained results which were the 3D components of PET creation, and the simulation of 4D phenomena as the source decay and the gantry whirl, exhibit the potential of tool in emission tomograph modelling

  8. Impacts of Intelligent Automated Quality Control on a Small Animal APD-Based Digital PET Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charest, Jonathan; Beaudoin, Jean-François; Bergeron, Mélanie; Cadorette, Jules; Arpin, Louis; Lecomte, Roger; Brunet, Charles-Antoine; Fontaine, Réjean

    2016-10-01

    Stable system performance is mandatory to warrant the accuracy and reliability of biological results relying on small animal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies. This simple requirement sets the ground for imposing routine quality control (QC) procedures to keep PET scanners at a reliable optimal performance level. However, such procedures can become burdensome to implement for scanner operators, especially taking into account the increasing number of data acquisition channels in newer generation PET scanners. In systems using pixel detectors to achieve enhanced spatial resolution and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the QC workload rapidly increases to unmanageable levels due to the number of independent channels involved. An artificial intelligence based QC system, referred to as Scanner Intelligent Diagnosis for Optimal Performance (SIDOP), was proposed to help reducing the QC workload by performing automatic channel fault detection and diagnosis. SIDOP consists of four high-level modules that employ machine learning methods to perform their tasks: Parameter Extraction, Channel Fault Detection, Fault Prioritization, and Fault Diagnosis. Ultimately, SIDOP submits a prioritized faulty channel list to the operator and proposes actions to correct them. To validate that SIDOP can perform QC procedures adequately, it was deployed on a LabPET™ scanner and multiple performance metrics were extracted. After multiple corrections on sub-optimal scanner settings, a 8.5% (with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of [7.6, 9.3]) improvement in the CNR, a 17.0% (CI: [15.3, 18.7]) decrease of the uniformity percentage standard deviation, and a 6.8% gain in global sensitivity were observed. These results confirm that SIDOP can indeed be of assistance in performing QC procedures and restore performance to optimal figures.

  9. Static field influences on transcranial magnetic stimulation: considerations for TMS in the scanner environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Jeffrey M; Jalinous, Reza; Cantarero, Gabriela L; Desmond, John E

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be combined with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to simultaneously manipulate and monitor human cortical responses. Although tremendous efforts have been directed at characterizing the impact of TMS on image acquisition, the influence of the scanner's static field on the TMS coil has received limited attention. The aim of this study was to characterize the influence of the scanner's static field on TMS. We hypothesized that spatial variations in the static field could account for TMS field variations in the scanner environment. Using an MRI-compatible TMS coil, we estimated TMS field strengths based on TMS-induced voltage changes measured in a search coil. We compared peak field strengths obtained with the TMS coil positioned at different locations (B0 field vs fringe field) and orientations in the static field. We also measured the scanner's static field to derive a field map to account for TMS field variations. TMS field strength scaled depending on coil location and orientation with respect to the static field. Larger TMS field variations were observed in fringe field regions near the gantry as compared to regions inside the bore or further removed from the bore. The scanner's static field also exhibited the greatest spatial variations in fringe field regions near the gantry. The scanner's static field influences TMS fields and spatial variations in the static field correlate with TMS field variations. Coil orientation changes in the B0 field did not result in substantial TMS field variations. TMS field variations can be minimized by delivering TMS in the bore or outside of the 0-70 cm region from the bore entrance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Methods and apparatus for laser beam scanners with different actuating mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Si-hai; Xiang, Si-hua; Wu, Xin; Dong, Shan; Xiao, Ding; Zheng, Xia-wei

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, 3 types of laser beam scanner are introduced. One is transmissive beam scanner, which is composed of convex and concave microlens arrays (MLAs). By moving the concave lens in the plane vertical to the optical axis, the incident beam can be deflected in two dimensions. Those two kinds of MLAs are fabricated by thermal reflow and replication process. A set of mechanical scanner frame is fabricated with the two MLAs assembling in it. The testing result shown that the beam deflection angles are 9.5° and 9.6°, in the 2 dimension(2D) with the scanning frequency of 2 HZ and 8 HZ, respectively. The second type of laser beam scanner is actuated by voice coil actuators (VCAs). Based on ANSOFT MAXWELL software, we have designed VCAs with small size and large force which have optimized properties. The model of VCAs is built using AutoCAD and is analyzed by Ansoft maxwell. According to the simulation results, high performance VCAs are fabricated and tested. The result is that the force of the VCAs is 6.39N/A, and the displacement is +/-2.5mm. A set up of beam scanner is fabricated and actuated by the designed VCAs. The testing result shown that the two dimensional scanning angle is 15° and 10° respectively at the frequency of 60HZ. The two dimensional scanning angle is 8.3° and 6° respectively at the frequency of 100HZ. The third type of scanner is actuated by amplified piezoelectric actuators (APAs). The scanning mirror is actuated by the piezoelectric (PZ) actuators with the scanning frequency of 700HZ, 250HZ and 87HZ respectively. The optical scanning angle is +/-0.5° at the three frequencies.

  11. MFP scanner diagnostics using a self-printed target to measure the modulation transfer function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weibao; Bauer, Peter; Wagner, Jerry; Allebach, Jan P.

    2014-01-01

    In the current market, reduction of warranty costs is an important avenue for improving profitability by manufacturers of printer products. Our goal is to develop an autonomous capability for diagnosis of printer and scanner caused defects with mid-range laser multifunction printers (MFPs), so as to reduce warranty costs. If the scanner unit of the MFP is not performing according to specification, this issue needs to be diagnosed. If there is a print quality issue, this can be diagnosed by printing a special test page that is resident in the firmware of the MFP unit, and then scanning it. However, the reliability of this process will be compromised if the scanner unit is defective. Thus, for both scanner and printer image quality issues, it is important to be able to properly evaluate the scanner performance. In this paper, we consider evaluation of the scanner performance by measuring its modulation transfer function (MTF). The MTF is a fundamental tool for assessing the performance of imaging systems. Several ways have been proposed to measure the MTF, all of which require a special target, for example a slanted-edge target. It is unacceptably expensive to ship every MFP with such a standard target, and to expect that the customer can keep track of it. To reduce this cost, in this paper, we develop new approach to this task. It is based on a self-printed slanted-edge target. Then, we propose algorithms to improve the results using a self-printed slanted-edge target. Finally, we present experimental results for MTF measurement using self-printed targets and compare them to the results obtained with standard targets.

  12. Digital data storage of core image using high resolution full color core scanner; Kokaizodo full color scanner wo mochiita core image no digital ka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, W; Ujo, S; Osato, K; Takasugi, S [Geothermal Energy Research and Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    This paper reports on digitization of core images by using a new type core scanner system. This system consists of a core scanner unit (equipped with a CCD camera), a personal computer and ancillary devices. This is a modification of the old type system, with measurable core length made to 100 cm/3 scans, and resolution enhanced to 5100 pixels/m (1024 pixels/m in the old type). The camera was changed to that of a color specification, and the A/D conversion was improved to 24-bit full color. As a result of carrying out a detail reproduction test on digital images of this core scanner, it was found that objects can be identified at a level of about the size of pixels constituting the image in the case when the best contrast is obtained between the objects and the background, and that in an evaluation test on visibility of concaves and convexes on core surface, reproducibility is not very good in large concaves and convexes. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Evaluation of radiation leakage of the scanner HCV-mobile of the port of Toamasina and the scanner THSCAN of the station of Soarano Antananarivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RAZAKARIMANANA, T.

    2011-01-01

    This work was performed at Madagascar-INSTN in collaboration with the GasyNet Company.In order to improve the use of X-rays scanners for control of containers at the SPAT Toamasina and the Soarano Antananarivo's station, the protection of workers and the public against the harmful effects of the ionizing radiation should be strengthen. According to the results obtained in two scanners (HCV-Mobile and THSCAN), the company GasyNet has a system of radiation protection appropriate, dose rates measured do not exceed the regulation standards.The use of devices for checking a leak radiations and the respect of three means of protection (time, distance, and screen) are the most effective means to protect the workers and public against the harmful effects of ionizing radiation emitted by scanners of x-ray. However, to avoid the incidents and accidents, it is necessary to respect and to apply the standards and the national regulations in force. [fr

  14. TomoMINT - the current status and future plan of MINT's computed tomography scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanesan Sinnakaruppan; Jaafar Abdullah

    2000-01-01

    TomoMINT, a second generation computed tomography scanner developed by MINT, is a powerful non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique for producing two-dimensional cross-sectional images of an object without physically sectioning it. Characteristics of the internal structure of an object such as dimensions, shape, internal defects, density and component distribution are readily available from the scan. Tomographs of wood, metal components and concrete slabs have been successfully obtained from TomoMINT. This paper deals with the current status and future development of this scanner. (author)

  15. Computerized literature reference system: use of an optical scanner and optical character recognition software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lossef, S V; Schwartz, L H

    1990-09-01

    A computerized reference system for radiology journal articles was developed by using an IBM-compatible personal computer with a hand-held optical scanner and optical character recognition software. This allows direct entry of scanned text from printed material into word processing or data-base files. Additionally, line diagrams and photographs of radiographs can be incorporated into these files. A text search and retrieval software program enables rapid searching for keywords in scanned documents. The hand scanner and software programs are commercially available, relatively inexpensive, and easily used. This permits construction of a personalized radiology literature file of readily accessible text and images requiring minimal typing or keystroke entry.

  16. Assessment of the impact of the scanner-related factors on brain morphometry analysis with Brainvisa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokouhi Mahsa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain morphometry is extensively used in cross-sectional studies. However, the difference in the estimated values of the morphometric measures between patients and healthy subjects may be small and hence overshadowed by the scanner-related variability, especially with multicentre and longitudinal studies. It is important therefore to investigate the variability and reliability of morphometric measurements between different scanners and different sessions of the same scanner. Methods We assessed the variability and reliability for the grey matter, white matter, cerebrospinal fluid and cerebral hemisphere volumes as well as the global sulcal index, sulcal surface and mean geodesic depth using Brainvisa. We used datasets obtained across multiple MR scanners at 1.5 T and 3 T from the same groups of 13 and 11 healthy volunteers, respectively. For each morphometric measure, we conducted ANOVA analysis and verified whether the estimated values were significantly different across different scanners or different sessions of the same scanner. The between-centre and between-visit reliabilities were estimated from their contribution to the total variance, using a random-effects ANOVA model. To estimate the main processes responsible for low reliability, the results of brain segmentation were compared to those obtained using FAST within FSL. Results In a considerable number of cases, the main effects of both centre and visit factors were found to be significant. Moreover, both between-centre and between-visit reliabilities ranged from poor to excellent for most morphometric measures. A comparison between segmentation using Brainvisa and FAST revealed that FAST improved the reliabilities for most cases, suggesting that morphometry could benefit from improving the bias correction. However, the results were still significantly different across different scanners or different visits. Conclusions Our results confirm that for morphometry

  17. Calibration between a Laser Range Scanner and an Industrial Robot Manipulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Timm; Andersen, Nils Axel; Ravn, Ole

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for findingthe transformation between a laser scanner and a robotmanipulator. We present the design of a flat calibration targetthat can easily fit between a laser scanner and a conveyor belt,making the method easily implementable in a manufacturingline.We prove...... that the method works by simulating a range ofdifferent orientations of the target, and performs an extensivenumerical evaluation of the targets design parameters to estab-lish the optimal values as well as the worst-case accuracy ofthe method...

  18. Scanner component and head development for confocal microscopy using moving mirror technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loney, Gregory C.

    1993-12-01

    One of the challenges in designing a confocal microscope is choosing the scan system configuration. The selection is based largely on the microscope application and involves a few distinct schemes. One scheme, moving mirror using galvanometer and resonant scanners, has been shown to offer an excellent solution exhibited by the large number of commercial systems which utilize them. Perceived shortcomings, such as slow image acquisition, are being dispelled due to the advent of large angle, high frequency resonant scanners. These newer devices offer near video rate performance at good scan efficiency.

  19. Evaluation of the performance of the YAP-(S)PET scanner and its application in neuroscience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belcari, Nicola; Guerra, Alberto Del; Bartoli, Antonietta; Bianchi, Daniele; Lazzarotti, Marco; Sensi, Luca; Menichetti, Luca; Lecchi, Michela; Erba, Paola A.; Mariani, Giuliano; Corsini, Giovanni U.; Sgado, Paola

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the performance evaluation of the small animal scanner YAP-(S)PET, both in PET and SPECT modalities following preliminary NEMA standards for small animal PET. Data are taken with a new version of the scanner that is installed at the IFC-CNR in Pisa (Italy) within the framework of the Center of Excellence AmbiSEN of the University of Pisa. This paper also reports some preliminary SPECT applications in neuroscience using 123 I-FP-CIT (DaTSCAN)

  20. Development of a portable computed tomographic scanner for on-line imaging of industrial piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaafar Abdullah; Mohd Arif Hamzah; Mohd Soyapi Mohd Yusof; Mohd Fitri Abdul Rahman; Fadil IsmaiI; Rasif Mohd Zain

    2003-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) technology is being increasingly developed for industrial application. This paper presents the development of a portable computed tomographic scanner for on?line imaging of industrial piping systems. The theoretical approach, the system hardware, the data acquisition system and the adopted algorithm for image reconstruction are discussed. The scanner has large potential to be used to determine the extent of corrosion under insulation (CUI), to detect blockages, to measure the thickness of deposit/materials built-up on the walls and to improve understanding of material flow in pipelines. (Author)

  1. Incorrectly placed gonad shields: Effect on CT automatic exposure correction from four different scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Weber Kusk, R.T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the influence of incorrectly placed gonad shields on radiation dose when performing abdominal CT with automatic exposure correction, using systems from different vendors. Methods and materials: An anthropomorphic phantom was scanned without gonad shields, and with gonad shields placed in two different positions relative to the scan range. Dose Length Product was recorded. mA distribution in the longitudinal direction was plotted. Mean dose was compared using the t-test. Results: Three scanners showed different increase in relative DLP according to shield position. Conclusion: Care must be taken when placing lead shielding at CT and characteristics of each scanner should be known to the operator

  2. A 10 MHz Bandwidth Continuous-Time Delta-Sigma Modulator for Portable Ultrasound Scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llimos Muntal, Pere; Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger; Bruun, Erik

    2016-01-01

    comparator and a pull-down clocked latch. The feedback signal is generated with voltage DACs based on transmission gates. Using this implementation, a small and low-power solution required for portable ultrasound scanner applications is achieved. The modulator has a bandwidth of 10 MHz with an oversampling......A fourth-order 1-bit continuous-time delta-sigma modulator designed in a 65 nm process for portable ultrasound scanners is presented in this paper. The loop filter consists of RCintegrators, with programmable capacitor arrays and resistors, and the quantizer is implemented with a high-speed clocked...

  3. The 3D laser scanner: a useful technique in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2012-01-01

    This 3-dimensional laser scanner allows the visualization of all the structures and equipment visible in a nuclear unit even contaminated. This device can be introduced in any place where its dimensions 60 cm * 20 cm (laser + tripod) permit it. The rotation of the head gives a field of view of 360 degrees in the horizontal plane and of 300 degrees in the vertical plane. The exposition time of the staff is reduced to the intervention times required to position the laser scanner and to recover it which reduces the personnel radiation dose. (A.C.)

  4. The simulation of a data acquisition system for a proposed high resolution PET scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotolo, C.; Larwill, M.; Chappa, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Ordonez, C. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The simulation of a specific data acquisition (DAQ) system architecture for a proposed high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanner is discussed. Stochastic processes are used extensively to model PET scanner signal timing and probable DAQ circuit limitations. Certain architectural parameters, along with stochastic parameters, are varied to quantatively study the resulting output under various conditions. The inclusion of the DAQ in the model represents a novel method of more complete simulations of tomograph designs, and could prove to be of pivotal importance in the optimization of such designs.

  5. The simulation of a data acquisition system for a proposed high resolution PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotolo, C.; Larwill, M.; Chappa, S.; Ordonez, C.

    1993-10-01

    The simulation of a specific data acquisition (DAQ) system architecture for a proposed high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanner is discussed. Stochastic processes are used extensively to model PET scanner signal timing and probable DAQ circuit limitations. Certain architectural parameters, along with stochastic parameters, are varied to quantatively study the resulting output under various conditions. The inclusion of the DAQ in the model represents a novel method of more complete simulations of tomograph designs, and could prove to be of pivotal importance in the optimization of such designs

  6. Il laser scanner nel panorama attuale della geomatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulvio Rinaudo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available LiDAR techniques as a new standard in Geomatic applications.Today, many applications fields can found a correct solution just by using LiDAR systems. The recent introduction of the full-wave form analysis both in terrestrial and aerial LiDAR equipment stretched out the accuracy and the application fields of this technology. Both acquisition systems and processing data software offer today a good integration between LiDAR and Digital Photogrammetry: the interpretation is more quick and the accuracy of the resulting 3D Models higher than in the past. In a few years new possibilities will come out from a different integration between LiDAR and Digital Photogrammetry: LiDAR data can be used as a good approximate starting point for the multi-image autocorrelation algorithms: the point clouds resulting from LiDAR and Photogrammetric correlations will solve in a professional way new application fields.

  7. SU-E-T-135: Investigation of Commercial-Grade Flatbed Scanners and a Medical- Grade Scanner for Radiochromic EBT Film Dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syh, J; Patel, B; Syh, J; Wu, H; Rosen, L; Durci, M; Katz, S; Sibata, C

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the characteristics of commercial-grade flatbed scanners and medical-grade scanners for radiochromic EBT film dosimetry. Performance aspects of a Vidar Dosimetry Pro Advantage (Red), Epson 750 Pro, Microtek ArtixScan 1800f, and Microtek ScanMaker 8700 scanner for EBT2 Gafchromic film were evaluated in the categories of repeatability, maximum distinguishable optical density (OD) differentiation, OD variance, and dose curve characteristics. OD step film by Stouffer Industries containing 31 steps ranging from 0.05 to 3.62 OD was used. EBT films were irradiated with dose ranging from 20 to 600 cGy in 6×6 cm 2 field sizes and analyzed 24 hours later using RIT113 and Tomotherapy Film Analyzer software. Scans were performed in transmissive mode, landscape orientation, 16-bit image. The mean and standard deviation Analog to Digital (A/D) scanner value was measured by selecting a 3×3 mm 2 uniform area in the central region of each OD step from a total of 20 scans performed over several weeks. Repeatability was determined from the variance of OD step 0.38. Maximum distinguishable OD was defined as the last OD step whose range of A/D values does not overlap with its neighboring step. Repeatability uncertainty ranged from 0.1% for Vidar to 4% for Epson. Average standard deviation of OD steps ranged from 0.21% for Vidar to 6.4% for ArtixScan 1800f. Maximum distinguishable optical density ranged from 3.38 for Vidar to 1.32 for ScanMaker 8700. A/D range of each OD step corresponds to a dose range. Dose ranges of OD steps varied from 1% for Vidar to 20% for ScanMaker 8700. The Vidar exhibited a dose curve that utilized a broader range of OD values than the other scanners. Vidar exhibited higher maximum distinguishable OD, smaller variance in repeatability, smaller A/D value deviation per OD step, and a shallower dose curve with respect to OD. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  8. Scanners for the quality contol of scintillating plastic fibres

    CERN Document Server

    Rodigues, Ana Barbara; Garnier, Francois; Giudici, Pierre-Ange; Greim, Roman; Hebler, Philip; Joram, Christian; Kirn, Thomas; Pierschel, Gerhard; Schateikis, Tobias; Stevens, Holger; Bachlechner, Andreas; Deckenhoff, Mirco; Karpinski, Waclaw; Kruse, Florian; Schultz Von Dratzig, Arndt; Schwering, Georg; Swientek, Krzysztof Piotr; Wlochal, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The use of scintillating plastic fibres in the SciFi tracker requires rigorous quality control. The fibre diameter and in particular local variations in form of bumps and necks have an impact on the regularity of the winding pattern and hence the spatial resolution. Defects in the fibre cladding lead to light losses and inter-fibre cross talk. Machines have been developed which allow scanning at high throughput of the fibre diameter and the integrity of the cladding. We describe the design principles and implementations of these machines and illustrate their performance. While these machines allow to identify and quantify performance issues of the prototype fibres, they will also play a major role during the series production of the SciFi tracker. If needed, the capacity of the machines allows scanning of the full production volume.

  9. Comparison of Single and Dual Polarized Envisat Asar Data with Laser Scanner Data of Saa Ice Freeboard in Fram Strait

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Leif Toudal; Kloster, Kjell; Hvidegaard, Sine Munk

    2005-01-01

    In this project we have produced co-registered datasets of laser scanner and ENVISAT ASAR AP data. A comparison of ENVISAT ASAR Alternate Polarization (AP) mode (HH+VV) backscatter coefficient values and polarization ratios with ice freeboard height measured with the KMS laser scanner is made. Th...

  10. Technology as an Occasion for Structuring: Evidence from Observations of CT Scanners and the Social Order of Radiology Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barley, Stephen R.

    1986-01-01

    New technologies such as the CT scanner are challenging traditional role relations among radiology workers and may be altering the organizational and occupational structure of radiological work. This paper expands recent sociological thought by showing how identical CT scanners occasion similar structuring processes and created divergent forms of…

  11. The Coude spectrograph and echelle scanner of the 2.7 m telescope at McDonald observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tull, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    The design of the Coude spectrograph of the 2.7 m McDonald telescope is discussed. A description is given of the Coude scanner which uses the spectrograph optics, the configuration of the large echelle and the computer scanner control and data systems.

  12. Evaluation and Testing of Several Free/Open Source Web Vulnerability Scanners

    OpenAIRE

    Suteva, Natasa; Zlatkovski, Dragi; Mileva, Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    Web Vulnerability Scanners (WVSs) are software tools for identifying vulnerabilities in web applications. There are commercial WVSs, free/open source WVSs, and some companies offer them as a Software-as-a-Service. In this paper, we test and evaluate six free/open source WVSs using the web application WackoPicko with many known vulnerabilities, primary for false negative rates.

  13. Rapid, high-accuracy detection of strabismus and amblyopia using the pediatric vision scanner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.E. Loudon (Sjoukje); C.A. Rook (Caitlin); D.S. Nassif (Deborah); N.V. Piskun (Nadya); D.G. Hunter (David)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPurpose. The Pediatric Vision Scanner (PVS) detects strabismus by identifying ocular fixation in both eyes simultaneously. This study was undertaken to assess the ability of the PVS to identify patients with amblyopia or strabismus, particularly anisometropic amblyopia with no measurable

  14. A comparison of the accuracy of intraoral scanners using an intraoral environment simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Nan; Lim, Young-Jun; Yi, Won-Jin; Han, Jung-Suk; Lee, Seung-Pyo

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to design an intraoral environment simulator and to assess the accuracy of two intraoral scanners using the simulator. A box-shaped intraoral environment simulator was designed to simulate two specific intraoral environments. The cast was scanned 10 times by Identica Blue (MEDIT, Seoul, South Korea), TRIOS (3Shape, Copenhagen, Denmark), and CS3500 (Carestream Dental, Georgia, USA) scanners in the two simulated groups. The distances between the left and right canines (D3), first molars (D6), second molars (D7), and the left canine and left second molar (D37) were measured. The distance data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test. The differences in intraoral environments were not statistically significant ( P >.05). Between intraoral scanners, statistically significant differences ( P Kruskal-Wallis test with regard to D3 and D6. No difference due to the intraoral environment was revealed. The simulator will contribute to the higher accuracy of intraoral scanners in the future.

  15. MIMO feed-forward design in wafer scanners using a gradient approximation-based algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heertjes, M.F.; Hennekens, D.W.T.; Steinbuch, M.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental demonstration is given of a data-based multi-input multi-output (MIMO) feed-forward control design applied to the motion systems of a wafer scanner. Atop a nominal single-input single-output (SISO) feed-forward controller, a MIMO controller is designed having a finite impulse

  16. Three-dimensional surface scanners compared with standard anthropometric measurements for head shape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaumont, C.A.A. (Caroline A.A.); Knoops, P.G.M. (Paul G.M.); Borghi, A. (Alessandro); Jeelani, N.U.O. (N.U. Owase); M.J. Koudstaal (Maarten); S. Schievano (Silvia); D.J. Dunaway (David); Rodriguez-Florez, N. (Naiara)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThree-dimensional (3D) surface imaging devices designed to capture and quantify craniofacial surface morphology are becoming more common in clinical environments. Such scanners overcome the limitations of two-dimensional photographs while avoiding the ionizing radiation of computed

  17. Three-dimensional surface scanners compared with standard anthropometric measurements for head shape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaumont, C.A.A. (Caroline A.A.); Knoops, P.G.M. (Paul G.M.); Borghi, A. (Alessandro); Jeelani, N.U.O. (N.U. Owase); M.J. Koudstaal (Maarten); S. Schievano (Silvia); D.J. Dunaway (David); Rodriguez-Florez, N. (Naiara)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThree-dimensional (3D) surface imaging devices designed to capture and quantify craniofacial surface morphology are becoming more common in clinical environments. Such scanners overcome the limitations of two-dimensional photographs while avoiding the ionizing radiation of computed

  18. Financing technical-medical activities. CT scanner example in France (1986)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, C.; Lefaure, C.; Fagnani, F.

    1988-01-01

    To analyze the french methods for financing technical-medical activities as CT scanners, and to assess if they can face, or not, the management constraints of such activities a financial simulation has been executed. First, current expenditures are totalized (including depreciations and financial charges) with variations according to the numer of examinations per year. Costs are classified especially according to fixed and variable charges: the weight of fixed charges, especially equipment charges, is the most significant. It's very high in yearly expenditures. Most, that involves a very fast decreasing cost with increasing number of procedures. Second, consequences of such accounts are analyzed: - on private CT scanners, Payed with a charge per examination whatever would be the factor's cost; - on public CT scanners, payed with an annual allowance; in this case charges equal receipts whatever would be the cost for a procedure. Third, a break point is defined; either the annual activity is higher: there would be an excedent; either it is lower: there would be a deficit. Then, those results are reported to CT-scanners activity's data in France (1986). After all, financing systems themselves, are discussed and a few hypothesis to explain those desadjustments between charges and their financing way are suggested [fr

  19. User-assisted Object Detection by Segment Based Similarity Measures in Mobile Laser Scanner Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Elberink, S.J.; Kemboi, B.J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a method that aims to find all instances of a certain object in Mobile Laser Scanner (MLS) data. In a userassisted approach, a sample segment of an object is selected, and all similar objects are to be found. By selecting samples from multiple classes, a classification can be

  20. Spatial resolution of the HRRT PET scanner using 3D-OSEM PSF reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Sibomana, Merence; Keller, Sune Høgild

    2009-01-01

    The spatial resolution of the Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) dedicated brain PET scanner installed at Copenhagen University Hospital (Rigshospitalet) was measured using a point-source phantom with high statistics. Further, it was demonstrated how the newly developed 3D-OSEM PSF...

  1. Comparison of H-infinity control and generalized predictive control for a laser scanner system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ordys, A.W.; Stoustrup, Jakob; Smillie, I.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes tests performed on a laser scanner system to assess the feasibility of H-infinity control and generalized predictive control design techniques in achieving a required performance in a trajectory folowing problem. The two methods are compared with respect to achieved scan times...

  2. A multispectral scanner survey of the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada. Date of survey: August 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewster, S.B. Jr.; Howard, M.E.; Shines, J.E.

    1994-08-01

    The Multispectral Remote Sensing Department of the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted an airborne multispectral scanner survey of a portion of the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada. The survey was conducted on August 21 and 22, 1993, using a Daedalus AADS1268 scanner and coincident aerial color photography. Flight altitudes were 5,000 feet (1,524 meters) above ground level for systematic coverage and 1,000 feet (304 meters) for selected areas of special interest. The multispectral scanner survey was initiated as part of an interim and limited investigation conducted to gather preliminary information regarding historical hazardous material release sites which could have environmental impacts. The overall investigation also includes an inventory of environmental restoration sites, a ground-based geophysical survey, and an aerial radiological survey. The multispectral scanner imagery and coincident aerial photography were analyzed for the detection, identification, and mapping of man-made soil disturbances. Several standard image enhancement techniques were applied to the data to assist image interpretation. A geologic ratio enhancement and a color composite consisting of AADS1268 channels 10, 7, and 9 (mid-infrared, red, and near-infrared spectral bands) proved most useful for detecting soil disturbances. A total of 358 disturbance sites were identified on the imagery and mapped using a geographic information system. Of these sites, 326 were located within the Tonopah Test Range while the remaining sites were present on the imagery but outside the site boundary. The mapped site locations are being used to support ongoing field investigations

  3. 2D X-ray scanner and its uses in laboratory reservoir characterization measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, D.; Doggett, K.

    1997-08-01

    X-ray techniques are used in petroleum laboratories for a variety of reservoir characterization measurements. This paper describes the configuration of a 2D X-ray scanner and many of the ways in which it simplifies and improves accuracy`s of laboratory measurements. Linear X-ray scanners are most often used to provide descriptions of fluid saturations within core plugs during flow tests. We configured our linear scanner for both horizontal and vertical movement. Samples can be scanned horizontally, vertically, or according to horizontal and vertical grids. X-ray measurements are fast, allowing measurements of two- and three-phase fluid saturations during both steady- and unsteady-state flow processes. Rock samples can be scanned while they are subjected to stress, pore pressure, and temperature conditions simulating those of a petroleum reservoir. Many types of measurements are possible by selecting appropriate X-ray power settings, dopes, filters, and collimator configurations. The scanner has been used for a variety of applications besides fluid saturation measurements. It is useful for measuring porosity distributions in rocks, concentrations of X-ray dopes within flow streams during tracer tests, gap widths in fracture flow cells, fluid interface levels in PVT cells and fluid separators, and other features and phenomena.

  4. Feasibility studies on the direct wire readout on wire scanners in electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markert, Michael

    2010-10-01

    This bachelor thesis deals essentially with the signal processing of a so-called wire scanner, a special monitor, which comes to application in the beam diagnostics of particle accelerators. In this direct wire readout the voltage signal, which is induced by the particle beam in the measurement wire of the wire scanner, shall be directly read out. The aim of this thesis is to show fundamental considerations and perform studies, which study, whether and how in the future by means of a suited data transmission as well as readout electronics conclusion on the most important parameters of the beam, like position and profile, are possible. The measurement system presented here is divided in three main components: Signal measurement, signal preparation, and signal stretching. A suited test facility was developed and is presented in detail, in which then all components, like for instance the transmission cables, the wire-scanner fork, and the developed measurement circuit, are studied, which are of importance for a faultless signal transmission and presentation. Extensive measurements on the single components, as well as calculations for the signal transmission on and in the wire scanner were performed, whereby a good agreement could be found. Thereafter a comparison and a selection of the component used in this project were made. Furthermore improvement proposals, new constructions, and outlooks are presented, which could be of importance in further works.

  5. Tangential scanning of hardwood logs: developing an industrial computer tomography scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nand K. Gupta; Daniel L. Schmoldt; Bruce Isaacson

    1999-01-01

    It is generally believed that noninvasive scanning of hardwood logs such as computer tomography (CT) scanning prior to initial breakdown will greatly improve the processing of logs into lumber. This belief, however, has not translated into rapid development and widespread installation of industrial CT scanners for log processing. The roadblock has been more operational...

  6. TOF-PET scanner configurations for quality assurance in proton therapy: a patient case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dendooven, Peter; Diblen, Faruk; Buitenhuis, H.J.T.; Oxley, D.C.; Biegun, A.K.; van der Borden, A.J.; Brandenburg, Sijtze; Cambraia Lopes, P.; van der Schaaf, A.; Schaart, D.R.; Vandenberghe, S.; van 't Veld, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    In order to determine the clinical benefit of positron emission tomography (PET) for dose delivery verification in proton therapy, we performed a patient case study comparing in-situ with in-room time-of-flight (TOF) PET. For the in-situ option, we consider both a (limited-angle) clinical scanner

  7. Modeling and Calibration of a Novel One-Mirror Galvanometric Laser Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengyi Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A laser stripe sensor has limited application when a point cloud of geometric samples on the surface of the object needs to be collected, so a galvanometric laser scanner is designed by using a one-mirror galvanometer element as its mechanical device to drive the laser stripe to sweep along the object. A novel mathematical model is derived for the proposed galvanometer laser scanner without any position assumptions and then a model-driven calibration procedure is proposed. Compared with available model-driven approaches, the influence of machining and assembly errors is considered in the proposed model. Meanwhile, a plane-constraint-based approach is proposed to extract a large number of calibration points effectively and accurately to calibrate the galvanometric laser scanner. Repeatability and accuracy of the galvanometric laser scanner are evaluated on the automobile production line to verify the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed calibration method. Experimental results show that the proposed calibration approach yields similar measurement performance compared with a look-up table calibration method.

  8. Pilot production of track etch membranes (TEMS) using heavy ion beam scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, J.P.; Surendran, P.; Sparrow, Hillary; Ninawe, N.G.; Bhagwat, P.V.; Acharya, N.; Kulshreshta, V.; Rajesh Kumar; Vijay, Y.K.; Kurup, M.B.

    2005-01-01

    Various methods for making TEMs were conducted at Pelletron Accelerator Facility. The technique for production using ion beam scattering was also established. This is an effort to make TEMs on pilot basis at BARC- TIFR Pelletron Accelerator using Heavy Ion Beam Scanner till large rolling mechanism is implemented

  9. Fabrication of malleable three-dimensional-printed customized bolus using three-dimensional scanner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Won Park

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional (3D-printed customized bolus (3D bolus can be used for radiotherapy application to irregular surfaces. However, bolus fabrication based on computed tomography (CT scans is complicated and also delivers unwanted irradiation. Consequently, we fabricated a bolus using a 3D scanner and evaluated its efficacy. The head of an Alderson Rando phantom was scanned with a 3D scanner. The 3D surface data were exported and reconstructed with Geomagic Design X software. A 3D bolus of 5-mm thickness designed to fit onto the nose was printed with the use of rubber-like printing material, and a radiotherapy plan was developed. We successfully fabricated the customized 3D bolus, and further, a CT simulation indicated an acceptable fit of the 3D bolus to the nose. There was no air gap between the bolus and the phantom surface. The percent depth dose (PDD curve of the phantom with the 3D bolus showed an enhanced surface dose when compared with that of the phantom without the bolus. The PDD of the 3D bolus was comparable with that of a commercial superflab bolus. The radiotherapy plan considering the 3D bolus showed improved target coverage when compared with that without the bolus. Thus, we successfully fabricated a customized 3D bolus for an irregular surface using a 3D scanner instead of a CT scanner.

  10. Inter-laboratory comparison of medical computed tomography (CT) scanners for industrial applications in the slaughterhouses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars Bager; Angel, Jais Andreas Breusch

    2013-01-01

    differences in CT performance. The presented Round Robin scheme has demonstrated its potential as such a method. The benefit of the phantom set is that it provides a convenient way of comparing volume determination between different CT scanners. The suggested phantoms are mimicking important carcass features...

  11. Developing patient-specific dose protocols for a CT scanner and exam using diagnostic reference levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, Keith J.

    2014-01-01

    The management of image quality and radiation dose during pediatric CT scanning is dependent on how well one manages the radiographic techniques as a function of the type of exam, type of CT scanner, and patient size. The CT scanner's display of expected CT dose index volume (CTDI vol ) after the projection scan provides the operator with a powerful tool prior to the patient scan to identify and manage appropriate CT techniques, provided the department has established appropriate diagnostic reference levels (DRLs). This paper provides a step-by-step process that allows the development of DRLs as a function of type of exam, of actual patient size and of the individual radiation output of each CT scanner in a department. Abdomen, pelvis, thorax and head scans are addressed. Patient sizes from newborns to large adults are discussed. The method addresses every CT scanner regardless of vendor, model or vintage. We cover adjustments to techniques to manage the impact of iterative reconstruction and provide a method to handle all available voltages other than 120 kV. This level of management of CT techniques is necessary to properly monitor radiation dose and image quality during pediatric CT scans. (orig.)

  12. Thin-layer scanner with a dot printer recorder for radiolabelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kralova, M.; Kysela, F.; Hradil, Z.

    1982-01-01

    A scanner combined with a matrix printer is described for automatic evaluation of thin-layer radiochromatographs of soft beta emitters such as 3 H, 14 C, and 32 P. Details of the device including block schemes and electrical schemes are given

  13. Radiation exposure and privacy concerns surrounding full-body scanners in airports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Accardo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Millions of people filter through airport security check points in the United States every year. These security checks, in response to the post 9/11 and 2009 “Underwear Bomber” terrorist threats, have become increasingly burdensome to the general public due to the wide spread deployment of “enhanced screening systems.” The enhanced screening systems that have generated the most controversy are the passenger “full-body scanners.” These systems enable airport security personnel to effectively detect contraband (often concealed under clothing without the physical contact necessitated by a strip search. The two types of full-body scanners (also known as Advanced Imaging Technology systems, used in airports in the United States and around the world are referred to as backscatter technology units and millimeter-wave technology units. Although their respective radiation emissions vary, both scanners serve the same purpose; that is, the detection of concealed metallic and non-metallic threats in the form of liquids, gels, plastics, etc. Although enhanced screening systems were deployed to further public safety efforts, they have also generated wide spread public concern. Specifically, these concerns address the potential of adverse health and privacy issues that may result from continued public exposure to full-body scanner systems.

  14. Kinematics of the orbital movement of a digital X-ray scanner of annular pipe seams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilchenko Rostislav

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The features of the kinematics of devices performing orbital displacements are considered. Different versions of the arrangement of mechanisms for the orbital movement of a digital radiographic scanner are compared. The load capacity of the support flexible joint of the mechanism was estimated.

  15. Performance of barcode scanner using peak detection with interference from LED lamps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deng, X.; Zijlstra, P.; Zhang, J.; Wu, Y.; Zhou, G.; Linnartz, J.-P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new model for barcode scanners that suffer from the interference of LED lamps, to quantify the system performance in terms of Timing Signal-to-Interference Ratio (TSIR), particularly as a function of modulation depth and frequency of the flicker in the LED lighting. Physical

  16. Comparison between effective radiation dose of CBCT and MSCT scanners for dentomaxillofacial applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loubele, M.; Bogaerts, R.; van Dijck, E.; Pauwels, R.; Vanheusden, S.; Seutens, P.; Marchal, G.; Sanderink, G.; Jacobs, R.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the effective dose levels of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for maxillofacial applications with those of multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT). Study design: The effective doses of 3 CBCT scanners were estimated (Accuitomo 3D®, i-CAT®, and NewTom 3G®) and compared to

  17. Precision of dosimetry-related measurements obtained on current multidetector computed tomography scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieu, Kelsey B.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Zhang, Di; Kim, Hyun J.; Cody, Dianna D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) intrascanner and interscanner variability has not been well characterized. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the within-run, between-run, and between-scanner precision of physical dosimetry-related measurements collected over the course of 1 yr on three different makes and models of multidetector row CT (MDCT) scanners. Methods: Physical measurements were collected using nine CT scanners (three scanners each of GE VCT, GE LightSpeed 16, and Siemens Sensation 64 CT). Measurements were made using various combinations of technical factors, including kVp, type of bowtie filter, and x-ray beam collimation, for several dosimetry-related quantities, including (a) free-in-air CT dose index (CTDI 100,air ); (b) calculated half-value layers and quarter-value layers; and (c) weighted CT dose index (CTDI w ) calculated from exposure measurements collected in both a 16 and 32 cm diameter CTDI phantom. Data collection was repeated at several different time intervals, ranging from seconds (for CTDI 100,air values) to weekly for 3 weeks and then quarterly or triannually for 1 yr. Precision of the data was quantified by the percent coefficient of variation (%CV). Results: The maximum relative precision error (maximum %CV value) across all dosimetry metrics, time periods, and scanners included in this study was 4.33%. The median observed %CV values for CTDI 100,air ranged from 0.05% to 0.19% over several seconds, 0.12%-0.52% over 1 week, and 0.58%-2.31% over 3-4 months. For CTDI w for a 16 and 32 cm CTDI phantom, respectively, the range of median %CVs was 0.38%-1.14% and 0.62%-1.23% in data gathered weekly for 3 weeks and 1.32%-2.79% and 0.84%-2.47% in data gathered quarterly or triannually for 1 yr. Conclusions: From a dosimetry perspective, the MDCT scanners tested in this study demonstrated a high degree of within-run, between-run, and between-scanner precision (with relative precision errors typically well under 5%).

  18. A new self-made digital slide scanner and microscope for imaging and quantification of fluorescent microspheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henning, William; Bjerglund Andersen, Julie; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A low-cost microscope slide scanner was constructed for the purpose of digital imaging of newborn piglet brain tissue and to quantify fluorescent microspheres in tissue. Methods: Using a standard digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera, fluorescent imaging of newborn piglet brain tissue......-field imaging was tested by adding light diffuser film. Results: Cost of the slide scanner was a fraction of the cost of a commercial slide scanner. The slide scanner was able to image a large number of tissue slides in a semiautomatic manner and provided a large field of view (FOV) of 101 mm2 combined...... and an automatic algorithm to detect fluorescent microspheres in tissue was developed and validated and showed an acceptable difference to “gold standard” manual counting. The slide scanner can be regarded as a low-cost alternative for researchers when digital slide imaging and quantification of fluorescent...

  19. Analog Gradient Beamformer for a Wireless Ultrasound Scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    di Ianni, Tommaso; Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Bagge, Jan Peter

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel beamformer architecture for a low-cost receiver front-end, and investigates if the image quality can be maintained. The system is oriented to the development of a hand-held wireless ultrasound probe based on Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming, and has the advant......This paper presents a novel beamformer architecture for a low-cost receiver front-end, and investigates if the image quality can be maintained. The system is oriented to the development of a hand-held wireless ultrasound probe based on Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming, and has...... the advantage of effectively reducing circuit complexity and power dissipation. The array of transducers is divided into sub-apertures, in which the signals from the single channels are aligned through a network of cascaded gradient delays, and summed in the analog domain before A/D conversion. The delay values...... are quantized to simplify the shifting unit, and a single A/D converter is needed for each sub-aperture yielding a compact, low-power architecture that can be integrated in a single chip. A simulation study was performed using a 3.75 MHz convex array, and the point spread function (PSF) for different...

  20. Accuracy of 3-dimensional curvilinear measurements on digital models with intraoral scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Spencer; Bonilla, Tammy; English, Jeryl D; Cozad, Benjamin; Akyalcin, Sercan

    2017-09-01

    Our objectives were to evaluate and compare the digital dental models generated from 2 commercial intraoral scanners with manual measurements when performing 3-dimensional surface measurements along a curved line (curvilinear). Dry mandibles (n = 61) with intact dentition were used. The mandibles were digitized using 2 chair-side intraoral scanners: Cadent iTero (Align Technology, San Jose, Calif) and Lythos Digital Impression system (Ormco, Orange, Calif). Digitized 3-dimensional models were converted to individual stereolithography files and used with commercial software to obtain the curvilinear measurements. Manual measurements were carried out directly on the mandibular teeth. Measurements were made on different locations on the dental arch in various directions. One-sample t tests and linear regression analyses were performed. To further graphically examine the accuracy between the different methods, Bland-Altman plots were computed. The level of significance was set at P 0.05). Bland-Altman analysis showed no fixed bias of 1 approach vs the other, and random errors were detected in all comparisons. Although the mean biases of the digital models obtained by the iTero and Lythos scanners, when compared with direct caliper measurements, were low, the comparison of the 2 intraoral scanners yielded the lowest mean bias. No comparison displayed statistical significance for the t scores; this indicated the absence of proportional bias in these comparisons. The intraoral scanners tested in this study produced digital dental models that were comparatively accurate when performing direct surface measurements along a curved line in 3 dimensions. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.