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Sample records for intact mucus blankets

  1. Bronchial mucus transport

    van der Schans, Cees P.

    Effective clearance of inhaled particles requires mucus production and continuous mucus transport from the lower airways to the oropharynx. Mucus production takes place mainly in the peripheral airways. Mucus transport is achieved by the action of the ciliated cells that cover the inner surface of

  2. Chronic mucus hypersecretion

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Nepper-Christensen, Steen

    2005-01-01

    To investigate if chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH) can be used as a marker of asthma in young adults.......To investigate if chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH) can be used as a marker of asthma in young adults....

  3. Physiotherapy and bronchial mucus transport

    van der Schans, CP; Postma, DS; Koeter, GH; Rubin, BK

    Cough and expectoration of mucus are the best-known symptoms in patients with pulmonary disease, The most applied intervention for these symptoms is the use of chest physiotherapy to increase bronchial mucus transport and reduce retention of mucus in the airways, Chest physiotherapy interventions

  4. Bicarbonate diffusion through mucus.

    Livingston, E H; Miller, J; Engel, E

    1995-09-01

    The mucus layer overlying duodenal epithelium maintains a pH gradient against high luminal acid concentrations. Despite these adverse conditions, epithelial surface pH remains close to neutrality. The exact nature of the gradient-forming barrier remains unknown. The barrier consists of mucus into which HCO3- is secreted. Quantification of the ability of HCO3- to establish and maintain the gradient depends on accurate measurement of this ion's diffusion coefficient through mucus. We describe new experimental and mathematical methods for diffusion measurement and report diffusion coefficients for HCO3- diffusion through saline, 5% mucin solutions, and rat duodenal mucus. The diffusion coefficients were 20.2 +/- 0.10, 3.02 +/- 0.31, and 1.81 +/- 0.12 x 10(-6) cm2/s, respectively. Modeling of the mucobicarbonate layer with this latter value suggests that for conditions of high luminal acid strength the neutralization of acid by HCO3- occurs just above the epithelial surface. Under these conditions the model predicts that fluid convection toward the lumen could be important in maintaining the pH gradient. In support of this hypothesis we were able to demonstrate a net luminal fluid flux of 5 microliters.min-1.cm-2 after perfusion of 0.15 N HCl in the rat duodenum.

  5. Altering mucus rheology to "solidify" human mucus at the nanoscale.

    Samuel K Lai

    Full Text Available The ability of mucus to function as a protective barrier at mucosal surfaces rests on its viscous and elastic properties, which are not well understood at length scales relevant to pathogens and ultrafine environmental particles. Here we report that fresh, undiluted human cervicovaginal mucus (CVM transitions from an impermeable elastic barrier to non-adhesive objects sized 1 microm and larger to a highly permeable viscoelastic liquid to non-adhesive objects smaller than 500 nm in diameter. Addition of a nonionic detergent, present in vaginal gels, lubricants and condoms, caused CVM to behave as an impermeable elastic barrier to 200 and 500 nm particles, suggesting that the dissociation of hydrophobically-bundled mucin fibers created a finer elastic mucin mesh. Surprisingly, the macroscopic viscoelasticity, which is critical to proper mucus function, was unchanged. These findings provide important insight into the nanoscale structural and barrier properties of mucus, and how the penetration of foreign particles across mucus might be inhibited.

  6. Skin mucus of Cyprinus carpio inhibits cyprinid herpesvirus 3 binding to epidermal cells

    Raj Victor

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3 is the aetiological agent of a mortal and highly contagious disease in common and koi carp. The skin is the major portal of entry of CyHV-3 in carp after immersion in water containing the virus. In the present study, we used in vivo bioluminescence imaging to investigate the effect of skin mucus removal and skin epidermis lesion on CyHV-3 entry. Physical treatments inducing removal of the mucus up to complete erosion of the epidermis were applied on a defined area of carp skin just before inoculation by immersion in infectious water. CyHV-3 entry in carp was drastically enhanced on the area of the skin where the mucus was removed with or without associated epidermal lesion. To investigate whether skin mucus inhibits CyHV-3 binding to epidermal cells, tail fins with an intact mucus layer or without mucus were inoculated ex vivo. While electron microscopy examination revealed numerous viral particles bound on the fins inoculated after mucus removal, no particle could be detected after infection of mucus-covered fins. Finally, anti-CyHV-3 neutralising activity of mucus extract was tested in vitro. Incubation of CyHV-3 with mucus extract reduced its infectivity in a dose dependent manner. The present study demonstrates that skin mucus removal and epidermal lesions enhance CyHV-3 entry in carp. It highlights the role of fish skin mucus as an innate immune protection against viral epidermal entry.

  7. Skin mucus of Cyprinus carpio inhibits cyprinid herpesvirus 3 binding to epidermal cells

    2011-01-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) is the aetiological agent of a mortal and highly contagious disease in common and koi carp. The skin is the major portal of entry of CyHV-3 in carp after immersion in water containing the virus. In the present study, we used in vivo bioluminescence imaging to investigate the effect of skin mucus removal and skin epidermis lesion on CyHV-3 entry. Physical treatments inducing removal of the mucus up to complete erosion of the epidermis were applied on a defined area of carp skin just before inoculation by immersion in infectious water. CyHV-3 entry in carp was drastically enhanced on the area of the skin where the mucus was removed with or without associated epidermal lesion. To investigate whether skin mucus inhibits CyHV-3 binding to epidermal cells, tail fins with an intact mucus layer or without mucus were inoculated ex vivo. While electron microscopy examination revealed numerous viral particles bound on the fins inoculated after mucus removal, no particle could be detected after infection of mucus-covered fins. Finally, anti-CyHV-3 neutralising activity of mucus extract was tested in vitro. Incubation of CyHV-3 with mucus extract reduced its infectivity in a dose dependent manner. The present study demonstrates that skin mucus removal and epidermal lesions enhance CyHV-3 entry in carp. It highlights the role of fish skin mucus as an innate immune protection against viral epidermal entry. PMID:21816061

  8. Epidemiological studies in mucus hypersecretion

    Vestbo, Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    Respiratory mucus in epidemiology has mainly been studied using standardized questionnaires including questions on cough and phlegm. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) much controversy exists regarding the importance of mucus hypersecretion. From being the key element in the 'British...... hypothesis' it was reduced to being an innocent disorder in the 1980s but is now again recognized as a potential risk factor for an accelerated loss of lung function. Whereas early studies in mainly occupational cohorts showed no effect of chronic mucus hypersecretion on decline in lung function......, such an effect has been shown in subsequent studies on general population samples. Chronic mucus hypersecretion also increases risk of hospital admission which may be due to an increased risk of lower respiratory tract infection. In severe COPD this may explain the increased mortality associated...

  9. Does milk increase mucus production?

    Bartley, Jim; McGlashan, Susan Read

    2010-04-01

    Excessive milk consumption has a long association with increased respiratory tract mucus production and asthma. Such an association cannot be explained using a conventional allergic paradigm and there is limited medical evidence showing causality. In the human colon, beta-casomorphin-7 (beta-CM-7), an exorphin derived from the breakdown of A1 milk, stimulates mucus production from gut MUC5AC glands. In the presence of inflammation similar mucus overproduction from respiratory tract MUC5AC glands characterises many respiratory tract diseases. beta-CM-7 from the blood stream could stimulate the production and secretion of mucus production from these respiratory glands. Such a hypothesis could be tested in vitro using quantitative RT-PCR to show that the addition of beta-CM-7 into an incubation medium of respiratory goblet cells elicits an increase in MUC5AC mRNA and by identifying beta-CM-7 in the blood of asthmatic patients. This association may not necessarily be simply cause and effect as the person has to be consuming A1 milk, beta-CM-7 must pass into the systemic circulation and the tissues have to be actively inflamed. These prerequisites could explain why only a subgroup of the population, who have increased respiratory tract mucus production, find that many of their symptoms, including asthma, improve on a dairy elimination diet. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Breeding blanket for Demo

    Proust, E.; Giancarli, L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the main design features, their rationale, and the main critical issues for the development, of the four DEMO-relevant blanket concepts presently investigated within the framework of the European Test-Blanket Development Programme

  11. ITER convertible blanket evaluation

    Wong, C.P.C.; Cheng, E.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) convertible blankets were reviewed. Key design difficulties were identified. A new particle filter concept is introduced and key performance parameters estimated. Results show that this particle filter concept can satisfy all of the convertible blanket design requirements except the generic issue of Be blanket lifetime. If the convertible blanket is an acceptable approach for ITER operation, this particle filter option should be a strong candidate

  12. Mucus as a Barrier to Drug Delivery

    Bøgh, Marie; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2015-01-01

    Viscoelastic mucus lines all mucosal surfaces of the body and forms a potential barrier to mucosal drug delivery. Mucus is mainly composed of water and mucins; high-molecular weight glycoproteins forming an entangled network. Consequently, mucus forms a steric barrier and due to its negative charge...... barrier to drug delivery. Current knowledge of mucus characteristics and barrier properties, as achieved by state-of-the-art methodologies, is the topic of this MiniReview emphasizing the gastrointestinal mucus and an overall focus on oral drug delivery. Cell culture-based in vitro models are well......, studies of peptide and protein drug diffusion in and through mucus and studies of mucus-penetrating nanoparticles are included to illustrate the mucus as a potentially important barrier to obtain sufficient bioavailability of orally administered drugs, and thus an important parameter to address...

  13. Physiotherapy and bronchial mucus transport

    Schans, Cornelis Peter van der

    1991-01-01

    The use of physiotherapeutic techniques may increase mucus transport in patients with airways disease including COPD, asthma, cystic fibrosis and primary ciliary dyskinesia. The most effective parts of the treatment are probably forced expirations with open glottis and coughing. However, in patients

  14. Materials for breeding blankets

    Mattas, R.F.; Billone, M.C.

    1995-09-01

    There are several candidate concepts for tritium breeding blankets that make use of a number of special materials. These materials can be classified as Primary Blanket Materials, which have the greatest influence in determining the overall design and performance, and Secondary Blanket Materials, which have key functions in the operation of the blanket but are less important in establishing the overall design and performance. The issues associated with the blanket materials are specified and several examples of materials performance are given. Critical data needs are identified

  15. Materials for breeding blankets

    Mattas, R.F.; Billone, M.C.

    1996-01-01

    There are several candidate concepts for tritium breeding blankets that make use of a number of special materials. These materials can be classified as primary blanket materials, which have the greatest influence in determining the overall design and performance, and secondary blanket materials, which have key functions in the operation of the blanket but are less important in establishing the overall design and performance. The issues associated with the blanket materials are specified and several examples of materials performance are given. Critical data needs are identified. (orig.)

  16. Vaginal mucus from ewes treated with progestogen sponges affects quality of ram spermatozoa.

    Manes, Jorgelina; Ríos, Glenda; Fiorentino, María Andrea; Ungerfeld, Rodolfo

    2016-03-15

    The use of intravaginal sponges (IS) to synchronize estrous onset in ewes provokes vaginitis, an increase in the vaginal bacterial load, and growth of bacterial species that are not present during spontaneous estrous behavior. The objective of the study was to compare the functional sperm parameters after incubating it with mucus collected from the vagina of ewes during spontaneous estrus or estrous synchronized with IS. Pooled spermatozoa were co-incubated with: (1) vaginal mucus collected from ewes in spontaneous estrus; (2) vaginal mucus collected from ewes in estrus pretreated with progestogen-impregnated IS; (3) synthetic mucus; and (4) medium without mucus as a control group. Sperm samples were evaluated after incubating it for 30 and 90 minutes. The number of colony-forming units (CFUs/mL), pH, and osmolality were greater in the mucus collected from ewes treated with IS than from those untreated (P = 0.046; P ewes treated with IS than in the other three treatments both, 30 and 90 minutes after incubation (P = 0.0009 and P ewes treated with IS had a lower percentage of sperm with intact plasma membrane than all the other treatments (P ewes treated with IS than in the other three treatments (P ewes during their spontaneous estrus (P = 0.0005). The lowest percentages of sperm with acrosome damage were observed in sperm incubated with mucus collected from sheep in spontaneous estrus for 30 and 90 minutes (P ewes treated with IS than in the other three groups (P = 0.0005). The functionality and the viability of ram sperm is negatively affected by the cervical mucus of ewes pretreated with progestagen-impregnated IS used in estrous synchronization treatments. This may partially explain the decrease in conception rate obtained with treatments with IS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mirror reactor blankets

    Lee, J.D.; Barmore, W.L.; Bender, D.J.; Doggett, J.N.; Galloway, T.R.

    1976-01-01

    The general requirements of a breeding blanket for a mirror reactor are described. The following areas are discussed: (1) facility layout and blanket maintenance, (2) heat transfer and thermal conversion system, (3) materials, (4) tritium containment and removal, and (5) nuclear performance

  18. Fusion fuel blanket technology

    Hastings, I.J.; Gierszewski, P.

    1987-05-01

    The fusion blanket surrounds the burning hydrogen core of a fusion reactor. It is in this blanket that most of the energy released by the nuclear fusion of deuterium-tritium is converted into useful product, and where tritium fuel is produced to enable further operation of the reactor. As fusion research turns from present short-pulse physics experiments to long-burn engineering tests in the 1990's, energy removal and tritium production capabilities become important. This technology will involve new materials, conditions and processes with applications both to fusion and beyond. In this paper, we introduce features of proposed blanket designs and update and status of international research. In focusing on the Canadian blanket technology program, we discuss the aqueous lithium salt blanket concept, and the in-reactor tritium recovery test program

  19. Blanket testing in NET

    Chazalon, M.; Daenner, W.; Libin, B.

    1989-01-01

    The testing stages in NET for the performance assessment of the various breeding blanket concepts developed at the present time in Europe for DEMO (LiPb and ceramic blankets) and the requirements upon NET to perform these tests are reviewed. Typical locations available in NET for blanket testing are the central outboard segments and the horizontal ports of in-vessel sectors. These test positions will be connectable with external test loops. The number of test loops (helium, water, liquid metal) will be such that each major class of blankets can be tested in NET. The test positions, the boundary conditions and the external test loops are identified and the requirements for test blankets are summarized (author). 6

  20. Limitations on blanket performance

    Malang, S.

    1999-01-01

    The limitations on the performance of breeding blankets in a fusion power plant are evaluated. The breeding blankets will be key components of a plant and their limitations with regard to power density, thermal efficiency and lifetime could determine to a large degree the attractiveness of a power plant. The performance of two rather well known blanket concepts under development in the frame of the European Blanket Programme is assessed and their limitations are compared with more advanced (and more speculative) concepts. An important issue is the question of which material (structure, breeder, multiplier, coatings) will limit the performance and what improvement would be possible with a 'better' structural material. This evaluation is based on the premise that the performance of the power plant will be limited by the blankets (including first wall) and not by other components, e.g. divertors, or the plasma itself. However, the justness of this premise remains to be seen. It is shown that the different blanket concepts cover a large range of allowable power densities and achievable thermal efficiencies, and it is concluded that there is a high incentive to go for better performance in spite of possibly higher blanket cost. However, such high performance blankets are usually based on materials and technologies not yet developed and there is a rather high risk that the development could fail. Therefore, it is explained that a part of the development effort should be devoted to concepts where the materials and technologies are more or less in hand in order to ensure that blankets for a DEMO reactor can be developed and tested in a given time frame. (orig.)

  1. ITER shielding blanket

    Strebkov, Yu [ENTEK, Moscow (Russian Federation); Avsjannikov, A [ENTEK, Moscow (Russian Federation); Baryshev, M [NIAT, Moscow (Russian Federation); Blinov, Yu [ENTEK, Moscow (Russian Federation); Shatalov, G [KIAE, Moscow (Russian Federation); Vasiliev, N [KIAE, Moscow (Russian Federation); Vinnikov, A [ENTEK, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chernjagin, A [DYNAMICA, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-03-01

    A reference non-breeding blanket is under development now for the ITER Basic Performance Phase for the purpose of high reliability during the first stage of ITER operation. More severe operation modes are expected in this stage with first wall (FW) local heat loads up to 100-300Wcm{sup -2}. Integration of a blanket design with protective and start limiters requires new solutions to achieve high reliability, and possible use of beryllium as a protective material leads to technologies. The rigid shielding blanket concept was developed in Russia to satisfy the above-mentioned requirements. The concept is based on a copper alloy FW, austenitic stainless steel blanket structure, water cooling. Beryllium protection is integrated in the FW design. Fabrication technology and assembly procedure are described in parallel with the equipment used. (orig.).

  2. Tritium breeding blanket

    Smith, D.; Billone, M.; Gohar, Y.; Baker, C.; Mori, S.; Kuroda, T.; Maki, K.; Takatsu, H.; Yoshida, H.; Raffray, A.; Sviatoslavsky, I.; Simbolotti, G.; Shatalov, G.

    1991-01-01

    The terms of reference for ITER provide for incorporation of a tritium breeding blanket with a breeding ratio as close to unity as practical. A breeding blanket is required to assure an adequate supply of tritium to meet the program objectives. Based on specified design criteria, a ceramic breeder concept with water coolant and an austenitic steel structure has been selected as the first option and lithium-lead blanket concept has been chosen as an alternate option. The first wall, blanket, and shield are integrated into a single unit with separate cooling systems. The design makes extensive use of beryllium to enhance the tritium breeding ratio. The design goals with a tritium breeding ratio of 0.8--0.9 have been achieved and the R ampersand D requirements to qualify the design have been identified. 4 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Dual coolant blanket concept

    Malang, S.; Schleisiek, K.

    1994-11-01

    A self-cooled liquid metal breeder blanket with helium-cooled first wall ('Dual Coolant Blanket Concept') for a fusion DEMO reactor is described. This is one of the four blanket concepts under development in the frame of the European fusion technology program with the aim to select in 1995 the two most promising ones for further development. Described are the design of the blankets including the ancillary loop system and the results of the theoretical and experimental work in the fields of neutronics, magnetohydrodynamics, thermohydraulics, mechanical stresses, compatibility and purification of lead-lithium, tritium control, safety, reliability, and electrically insulating coatings. The remaining open questions and the required R and D programme are identified. (orig.) [de

  4. Blankets for thermonuclear device

    Maki, Koichi; Fukumoto, Hideshi.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To produce tritium more than consumed, through thermonuclear reaction. Constitution: The energy spectrum of neutron generated by neutron multiplying reaction in a neutron multiplying blanket and moderated neutrons has a large ratio in a low energy section. In the low-energy absorption region of stainless steel which is a material of cooling pipes constituting a neutron multiplying blanket cooling channel, the neutrons are absorbed, lessening the neutron multiplying effect. To prevent this, the neutron multiplying blanket cooling channel is covered with tritium breeding blankets, thereby enabling the production of a substantially great amount of tritium more than the amount of tritium to be consumed by the thermonuclear reaction by preventing neutron absorption by the component materials of the cooling channel, improving the tritium breeding ratio by 20 to 25 %, and increasing the efficiency of use of neutrons for tritium generation. (Horiuchi, T.)

  5. ITER blanket designs

    Gohar, Y.; Parker, R.; Rebut, P.H.

    1995-01-01

    The ITER first wall, blanket, and shield system is being designed to handle 1.5±0.3 GW of fusion power and 3 MWa m -2 average neutron fluence. In the basic performance phase of ITER operation, the shielding blanket uses austenitic steel structural material and water coolant. The first wall is made of bimetallic structure, austenitic steel and copper alloy, coated with beryllium and it is protected by beryllium bumper limiters. The choice of copper first wall is dictated by the surface heat flux values anticipated during ITER operation. The water coolant is used at low pressure and low temperature. A breeding blanket has been designed to satisfy the technical objectives of the Enhanced Performance Phase of ITER operation for the Test Program. The breeding blanket design is geometrically similar to the shielding blanket design except it is a self-cooled liquid lithium system with vanadium structural material. Self-healing electrical insulator (aluminum nitride) is used to reduce the MHD pressure drop in the system. Reactor relevancy, low tritium inventory, low activation material, low decay heat, and a tritium self-sufficiency goal are the main features of the breeding blanket design. (orig.)

  6. Imploding-liner reactor nucleonic studies: the LINUS blanket

    Dudziak, D.J.

    1977-09-01

    Scoping nucleonic studies have been performed for a small imploding-liner fusion reactor concept. Tritium breeding ratio and time-dependent energy deposition rates were the primary parameters of interest in the study. Alloys of Pb and LiPb were considered for the liquid liner (blanket), and tritium breeding was found to be more than adequate with blankets less than 1 m thick. However, neutron leakages into the solid cylinder block surrounding the liquid liner are generally quite high, so considerable effort was concentrated on minimizing these values. Time-dependent calculations reveal that 89% of the energy is deposited in the blanket within 2 μs. Thus, LINUS's blanket should remain intact for the requisite neutron and gamma-ray lifetimes

  7. Novel blanket design for ICTR's

    Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Conn, R.W.; Wolfer, W.G.; Larsen, E.N.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.

    1978-01-01

    A novel blanket design for ICTRs is described. This blanket is used in SOLASE, the conceptual laser fusion reactor of the University of Wisconsin. The blanket to be described offers numerous advantages, including low cost, low weight, low induced radioactivity levels, the potential for hands-on maintenance, modular construction, low pressure, ability to decouple first wall and blanket coolant temperatures, adequate breeding, low tritium inventory and leakage, and sufficiently long life

  8. Imaging of mucus clearance in the airways of living spontaneously breathing mice by optical coherence microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Pieper, Mario; Schulz-Hildebrandt, Hinnerk; Hüttmann, Gereon; König, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Mucus transport is essential to remove inhaled particles and pathogens from the lung. Impaired removal of mucus often results in worsening of lung diseases. To understand the mechanisms of mucus transport and to monitor the impact of therapeutic strategies, it is essential to visualize airways and mucus in living animals without disturbing transport processes by intubation or surgically opening the airways. We developed a custom-built optical coherence microscope (OCM) providing a lateral and axial resolution of approximately 1.5 µm with a field of view of 2 mm at up to 150 images/s. Images of the intact trachea and its mucus transport were recorded in anesthetized spontaneously breathing mice. NaCl solution (0.9% and 7%) or Lipopolysaccharide were applied intranasally. OCM resolved detailed structure of the trachea and enabled measuring the airway surface liquid (ASL) thickness through the tracheal wall. Without stimulation, the amount of ASL was only a few µm above the epithelium and remained constant. After intranasal application of 30 µl saline at different concentrations, an early fast cough-like fluid removal with velocities higher than 1 mm/s was observed that removed a high amount of liquid. The ASL thickness increased transiently and quickly returned to levels before stimulation. In contrast to saline, application of Lipopolysaccharide induced substantial mucus release and an additional slow mucus transport by ciliary beating (around 100 µm/s) towards the larynx was observed. In conclusion, OCM is appropriate unique tool to study mechanisms of mucus transport in the airways and effects of therapeutic interventions in living animals.

  9. Magnetoconvection in HCLL blankets

    Mistrangelo, C.; Buehler, L.

    2014-01-01

    In the present work we consider magneto-convective flows in one of the proposed European liquid metal blankets that will be tested in the experimental fusion reactor ITER. Here the PbLi alloy is used as breeder material and helium as coolant. In order to finalize the design of the helium cooled lead lithium (HCLL) blanket, studies are still required to fully understand the behavior of the electrically conducting breeder under the influence of the intense magnetic field that confines the fusion plasma and in case of non-uniform thermal conditions. Liquid metal HCLL blanket flows are expected to be mainly driven by buoyancy forces caused by non-isothermal operating conditions due to neutron volumetric heating and cooling of walls, since only a weak forced ow is foreseen for tritium extraction in external ancillary systems. Buoyancy can therefore become very important and modify the velocity distribution and related heat transfer performance of the blanket. The present numerical study aims at clarifying the influence of electromagnetic and thermal coupling of neighboring fluid domains on magneto-convective flows in geometries relevant for the HCLL blanket concept. According to the last design review two internal cooling plates subdivide the fluid domain into three slender flow regions, which are thermally and electrically coupled through common walls. First a uniform volumetric heat source is considered to identify the basic convective patterns that establish in the liquid metal. Results are then compared with those obtained by applying a realistic radial distribution of the power density as obtained from a neutronic analysis. Velocity and temperature distributions are discussed for various volumetric heat sources and magnetic field strengths.

  10. Occurrence of thraustochytrid fungi in corals and coral mucus

    Raghukumar, S.; Balasubramanian

    Occurrence of thraustochytrid fungi in corals, fresh coral mucus and floating and attached mucus detritus from the Lakshadweep Islands in the Arabian Sea was studied. Corallochytrium limacisporum Raghukumar, Thraustochytrium motivum Goldstein...

  11. Vocal Fold Mucus Aggregation in Persons with Voice Disorders

    Bonilha, Heather Shaw; White, Lisa; Kuckhahn, Kelsey; Gerlach, Terri Treman; Deliyski, Dimitar D.

    2012-01-01

    Mucus aggregation on the vocal folds is a common finding from laryngeal endoscopy. Patients with voice disorders report the presence of mucus aggregation. Patients also report that mucus aggregation causes them to clear their throat, a behavior believed to be harmful to vocal fold mucosa. Even though clinicians and patients report and discuss…

  12. Effects of Different Temperatures for Drying Cervical Mucus Smear ...

    The effects of different room temperatures for drying cervical mucus on crystallisation of fern-tree patterns was determined using cervical mucus smears from 60 women undergoing investigation for infertility at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital. Cervical mucus smears were dried in the oven at 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35C ...

  13. Blanket for thermonuclear device

    Ozawa, Yoshihiro; Uda, Tatsuhiko; Maki, Koichi.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention provides a blanket of a thermonuclear device which produces tritium fuels consumed in plasmas while converting neutrons generated in the plasmas into heat energy. That is, zirconium is coated to at least one of neutron breeder pebbles and breeder pebbles, to suppress reaction between them by being in direct contact with each other at a high temperature. Further, fins are attached to a cooling pipe at a pitch smaller than the diameter of both of the pebbles, to prevent direct contact at whole surface of the pebbles and the cooling pipe, which would lower a temperature excessively. The length of the fin is controlled to control the thickness of a helium gas gap. With such constitution, direct contact of neutron breeder pebbles and the breeder pebble which are to be filled and mixed, and tend to react at a high temperature, can be prevented. The temperature of the breeding blanket is reliably prevented from lowering below a tritium emitting temperature. The structure is simplified and the production is facilitated. (I.S.)

  14. Skin mucus proteins of lumpsucker (Cyclopterus lumpus

    Deepti Manjari Patel

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Fish skin mucus serves as a first line of defense against pathogens and external stressors. In this study the proteomic profile of lumpsucker skin mucus was characterized using 2D gels coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Mucosal proteins were identified by homology searches across the databases SwissProt, NCBInr and vertebrate EST. The identified proteins were clustered into ten groups based on their gene ontology biological process in PANTHER (www.patherdb.org. Calmodulin, cystatin-B, histone H2B, peroxiredoxin1, apolipoprotein A1, natterin-2, 14-3-3 protein, alfa enolase, pentraxin, warm temperature acclimation 65 kDa (WAP65kDa and heat shock proteins were identified. Several of the proteins are known to be involved in immune and/or stress responses. Proteomic profile established in this study could be a benchmark for differential proteomics studies.

  15. Clinical issues of mucus accumulation in COPD

    Osadnik CR

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Christian R Osadnik,1,2 Christine F McDonald,2,3 Anne E Holland2,4,51Department of Physiotherapy, Monash University, 2Institute for Breathing and Sleep, Austin Health, 3Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Austin Health, 4Department of Physiotherapy, La Trobe University, 5Department of Physiotherapy, Alfred Health, Melbourne, VIC, AustraliaWe wish to thank Ramos et al for presenting a succinct and up-to-date synthesis of the evidence relating to the important issue of mucus hypersecretion in COPD.1 The authors highlight the association of mucus hypersecretion with poor outcomes, including increased risk of exacerbations, hospitalization and mortality. These associations have led to interest in the potential benefits of mucus clearance techniques in COPD. As Ramos et al1 point out, although the physiological rationale for airway clearance techniques (ACTs in COPD is strong, clinical efficacy has historically been difficult to establish, perhaps due to the variety of techniques and outcomes that have been employed in small studies. We have recently synthesized this body of evidence in a Cochrane systematic review of ACTs for individuals with COPD. The review demonstrated ACTs are safe and meta-analysis showed they confer small beneficial effects on a limited range of important clinical outcomes, such as the need for and duration of ventilatory assistance during an acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD.2View original paper by Ramos and colleagues.

  16. Polymers in the gut compress the colonic mucus hydrogel.

    Datta, Sujit S; Preska Steinberg, Asher; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2016-06-28

    Colonic mucus is a key biological hydrogel that protects the gut from infection and physical damage and mediates host-microbe interactions and drug delivery. However, little is known about how its structure is influenced by materials it comes into contact with regularly. For example, the gut abounds in polymers such as dietary fibers or administered therapeutics, yet whether such polymers interact with the mucus hydrogel, and if so, how, remains unclear. Although several biological processes have been identified as potential regulators of mucus structure, the polymeric composition of the gut environment has been ignored. Here, we demonstrate that gut polymers do in fact regulate mucus hydrogel structure, and that polymer-mucus interactions can be described using a thermodynamic model based on Flory-Huggins solution theory. We found that both dietary and therapeutic polymers dramatically compressed murine colonic mucus ex vivo and in vivo. This behavior depended strongly on both polymer concentration and molecular weight, in agreement with the predictions of our thermodynamic model. Moreover, exposure to polymer-rich luminal fluid from germ-free mice strongly compressed the mucus hydrogel, whereas exposure to luminal fluid from specific-pathogen-free mice-whose microbiota degrade gut polymers-did not; this suggests that gut microbes modulate mucus structure by degrading polymers. These findings highlight the role of mucus as a responsive biomaterial, and reveal a mechanism of mucus restructuring that must be integrated into the design and interpretation of studies involving therapeutic polymers, dietary fibers, and fiber-degrading gut microbes.

  17. Cervical mucus properties stratify risk for preterm birth.

    Agatha S Critchfield

    Full Text Available Ascending infection from the colonized vagina to the normally sterile intrauterine cavity is a well-documented cause of preterm birth. The primary physical barrier to microbial ascension is the cervical canal, which is filled with a dense and protective mucus plug. Despite its central role in separating the vaginal from the intrauterine tract, the barrier properties of cervical mucus have not been studied in preterm birth.To study the protective function of the cervical mucus in preterm birth we performed a pilot case-control study to measure the viscoelasticity and permeability properties of mucus obtained from pregnant women at high-risk and low-risk for preterm birth. Using extensional and shear rheology we found that cervical mucus from women at high-risk for preterm birth was more extensible and forms significantly weaker gels compared to cervical mucus from women at low-risk of preterm birth. Moreover, permeability measurements using fluorescent microbeads show that high-risk mucus was more permeable compared with low-risk mucus.Our findings suggest that critical biophysical barrier properties of cervical mucus in women at high-risk for preterm birth are compromised compared to women with healthy pregnancy. We hypothesize that impaired barrier properties of cervical mucus could contribute to increased rates of intrauterine infection seen in women with preterm birth. We furthermore suggest that a robust association of spinnbarkeit and preterm birth could be an effectively exploited biomarker for preterm birth prediction.

  18. Disintegration of nano-embedded microparticles after deposition on mucus: A mechanistic study.

    Ruge, Christian A; Bohr, Adam; Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz; Nicolas, Valérie; Tsapis, Nicolas; Fattal, Elias

    2016-03-01

    The conversion of colloidal drug carriers/polymeric nanoparticles into dry microparticulate powders (e.g., by spray-drying) is a prominent approach to overcome the aerodynamic limitations of these formulations for delivery via inhalation. However, to what extent such nano-embedded microparticles disintegrate into individual/intact nanoparticles after contacting relevant physiological media has so far not been addressed. Polymeric nanoparticles were spray-dried into nano-embedded microparticles (NEMs) using different amounts of trehalose as embedding matrix excipient. Formulations were characterized and then evaluated for their disintegration behavior after aerosolization onto model mucus. Although a rapid and complete aqueous redispersion was observed for specific excipient/nanoparticle weight ratios (i.e., greater than 1/1), the same formulations revealed no disintegration after deposition onto a static mucus layer. Double-labeled NEMs powders (i.e., dual color staining of polymeric nanoparticles and trehalose) demonstrated rapid matrix dissolution, while the nanoparticle aggregates persisted. When deposited onto agitated mucus, however, sufficient disintegration of NEMs into individual polymeric nanoparticles was observed. These findings indicate that mechanical forces are necessary to overcome the attraction between individual nanoparticles found within the NEMs. Thus, it remains questionable whether the lung mechanics (e.g., breathing, mucociliary clearance) acting on these formulations will contribute to the overall disintegration process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Beryllium research on FFHR molten salt blanket

    Terai, T.; Tanaka, S.; Sze, D.-K.

    2000-01-01

    Force-free helical reactor, FFHR, is a demo-relevant heliotron-type D-T fusion reactor based on the great amount of R and D results obtained in the LHD project. Since 1993, collaboration works have made great progress in design studies of FFHR with standing on the major advantage of current-less steady operation with no dangerous plasma disruptions. There are two types of reference designs, FFHR-1 and FFHR-2, where molten Flibe (LiF-BeF2) is utilized as tritium breeder and coolant. In this paper, we present the outline of FFHR blanket design and some related R and D topics focusing on Be utilization. Beryllium is used as a neutron multiplier in the design and Be pebbles are placed in the front part of the tritium breeding zone. In a Flibe blanket, HF (TF) generated due to nuclear transmutation will be a problem because of its corrosive property. Though nickel-based alloys are thought to be intact in such a corrosive environment, FFHR blanket design does not adopt the alloys because of their induced radioactivity. The present candidate materials for the structure are low-activated ferritic steel (JLF-1), V-4Cr-4Ti, etc. They are capable to be corroded by HF in the operation condition, and Be is expected to work as a reducing agent in the system as well. Whether Be pebbles placed in a Flibe flow can work well or not is a very important matter. From this point, Be solubility in Flibe, reaction rate of the Redox reaction with TF in the liquid and on the surface of Be pebbles under irradiation, flowing behavior of Flibe through a Be pebble bed, etc. should be investigated. In 1997, in order to establish more practical and new data bases for advanced design works, we started a collaboration work of R and D on blanket engineering, where the Be research above mentioned is included. Preliminary dipping-test of Be sheets and in-situ tritium release experiment from Flibe with Be sheets have got started. (orig.)

  20. Blanket comparison and selection study. Volume II

    1983-10-01

    This volume contains extensive data for the following chapters: (1) solid breeder tritium recovery, (2) solid breeder blanket designs, (3) alternate blanket concept screening, and (4) safety analysis. The following appendices are also included: (1) blanket design guidelines, (2) power conversion systems, (3) helium-cooled, vanadium alloy structure blanket design, (4) high wall loading study, and (5) molten salt safety studies

  1. An evaluation of fast reactor blankets

    Oosterkamp, W.J.

    1974-01-01

    A comparative study of different types of fast reactor radial blankets is presented. Included are blankets of fertile material UO 2 , THO 2 and Th-metal blankets of pure reflectors C, BeO, Ni and combinations of reflecting and fertile blankets. The results for 1000MWe cores indicate that there is no incentive to use other than fertile blankets. The most favorable fertile material is thorium due to the prospective higher price of U-233

  2. A new paradigm in respiratory hygiene: modulating respiratory secretions to contain cough bioaerosol without affecting mucus clearance

    Bonilla Gloria

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several strategies and devices have been designed to protect health care providers from acquiring transmissible respiratory diseases while providing care. In modulating the physical characteristics of the respiratory secretions to minimize the aerosolization that facilitates transmission of airborne diseases, a fundamental premise is that the prototype drugs have no adverse effect on the first line of respiratory defense, clearance of mucus by ciliary action. Methods To assess and demonstrate the primary mechanism of our mucomodulators (XLs, we have built our evidence moving from basic laboratory studies to an ex-vivo model and then to an in-vivo large animal model. We exposed anesthetized dogs without hypersecretion to different dose concentrations of aerosolized XL "B", XL "D" and XL "S". We assessed: cardio-respiratory pattern, tracheal mucus clearance, airway patency, and mucus viscoelastic changes. Results Exposure of frog palate mucus to XLs did not affect the clearance of mucus by ciliary action. Dogs maintained normal cardio-respiratory pattern with XL administration. Tracheal mucociliary clearance in anesthetized dogs indicated a sustained 40% mean increase. Tracheal mucus showed increased filance, and there was no mucus retention in the airways. Conclusion The ex-vivo frog palate and the in-vivo mammalian models used in this study, appear to be appropriate and complement each other to better assess the effects that our mucomodulators exert on the mucociliary clearance defence mechanism. The physiological function of the mucociliary apparatus was not negatively affected in any of the two epithelial models. Airway mucus crosslinked by mucomodulators is better cleared from an intact airway and normally functioning respiratory system, either due to enhanced interaction with cilia or airflow-dependent mechanisms. Data obtained in this study allow us to assure that we have complied with the fundamental requirement

  3. Fusion blanket design and optimization techniques

    Gohar, Y.

    2005-01-01

    In fusion reactors, the blanket design and its characteristics have a major impact on the reactor performance, size, and economics. The selection and arrangement of the blanket materials, dimensions of the different blanket zones, and different requirements of the selected materials for a satisfactory performance are the main parameters, which define the blanket performance. These parameters translate to a large number of variables and design constraints, which need to be simultaneously considered in the blanket design process. This represents a major design challenge because of the lack of a comprehensive design tool capable of considering all these variables to define the optimum blanket design and satisfying all the design constraints for the adopted figure of merit and the blanket design criteria. The blanket design techniques of the First Wall/Blanket/Shield Design and Optimization System (BSDOS) have been developed to overcome this difficulty and to provide the state-of-the-art techniques and tools for performing blanket design and analysis. This report describes some of the BSDOS techniques and demonstrates its use. In addition, the use of the optimization technique of the BSDOS can result in a significant blanket performance enhancement and cost saving for the reactor design under consideration. In this report, examples are presented, which utilize an earlier version of the ITER solid breeder blanket design and a high power density self-cooled lithium blanket design for demonstrating some of the BSDOS blanket design techniques

  4. Experimental study of hypersecretion of mucus in the bronchial tree

    Reid, L

    1963-01-01

    Rats were exposed to 40 or 300 to 400 ppm SO/sub 2/ for 5 hr/day, 5 day/wk. Three-mo exposure to 40 ppm yielded no great change. At 300 to 400 ppm, considerable mucus was observed in many animals by the 4th wk. There was accompanying hypertrophy and hyperplasia of mucus-secreting goblet cells.

  5. Intestinal mucus protects Giardia lamblia from killing by human milk.

    Zenian, A J; Gillin, F D

    1987-02-01

    We have previously shown that nonimmune human milk kills Giardia lamblia trophozoites in vitro. Killing requires a bile salt and the activity of the milk bile salt-stimulated lipase. We now show that human small-intestinal mucus protects trophozoites from killing by milk. Parasite survival increased with mucus concentration, but protection was overcome during longer incubation times or with greater milk concentrations. Trophozoites preincubated with mucus and then washed were not protected. Protective activity was associated with non-mucin CsCl density gradient fractions. Moreover, it was heat-stable, non-dialyzable, and non-lipid. Whereas whole mucus inhibited milk lipolytic activity, protective mucus fractions did not inhibit the enzyme. Furthermore, mucus partially protected G. lamblia trophozoites against the toxicity of oleic acid, a fatty acid which is released from milk triglycerides by lipase. These studies show that mucus protects G. lamblia both by inhibiting lipase activity and by decreasing the toxicity of products of lipolysis. The ability of mucus to protect G. lamblia from toxic lipolytic products may help to promote intestinal colonization by this parasite.

  6. Status of fusion reactor blanket design

    Smith, D.L.; Sze, D.K.

    1986-02-01

    The recent Blanket Comparison and Selection Study (BCSS), which was a comprehensive evaluation of fusion reactor blanket design and the status of blanket technology, serves as an excellent basis for further development of blanket technology. This study provided an evaluation of over 130 blanket concepts for the reference case of electric power producing, DT fueled reactors in both Tokamak and Tandem Mirror (TMR) configurations. Based on a specific set of reactor operating parameters, the current understanding of materials and blanket technology, and a uniform evaluation methodology developed as part of the study, a limited number of concepts were identified that offer the greatest potential for making fusion an attractive energy source

  7. Chronic mucus hypersecretion in COPD and death from pulmonary infection

    Prescott, E; Lange, P; Vestbo, J

    1995-01-01

    The association of chronic mucus hypersecretion and mortality is a matter of debate. We wished to determine whether the relationship between chronic mucus hypersecretion and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-related mortality could be explained by proneness to pulmonary infection. We...... with pulmonary infection implicated (relative risk (RR) 3.5) but not of death without pulmonary infection (RR 0.9). We consider that subjects with COPD and chronic mucus hypersecretion are more likely to die from pulmonary infections than subjects without chronic mucus hypersecretion. This may explain the excess...... radiography, death was classified as either due to pulmonary infection (n = 38), other causes (n = 51), or unclassifiable (n = 12). Of subjects reporting chronic mucus hypersecretion at the initial examination, pulmonary infection was implicated in 54% of deaths, whereas this only occurred in 28% of subjects...

  8. Fusion blanket inherent safety assessment

    Sze, D.K.; Jung, J.; Cheng, E.T.

    1986-01-01

    Fusion has significant potential safety advantages. There is a strong incentive for designing fusion plants to ensure that inherent safety will be achieved. Accordingly, both the Tokamak Power Systems Studies and MINIMARS have identified inherent safety as a design goal. A necessary condition is for the blanket to maintain its configuration and integrity under all credible accident conditions. A main problem is caused by afterheat removal in an accident condition. In this regard, it is highly desirable to achieve the required level of protection of the plant capital investment and limitation of radioactivity release by systems that rely only on inherent properties of matter (e.g., thermal conductivity, specific heat, etc.) and without the use of active safety equipment. This paper assesses the conditions under which inherent safety is feasible. Three types of accident conditions are evaluated for two blankets. The blankets evaluated are a self cooled vanadium/lithium blanket and a self-cooled vanadium/Flibe blanket. The accident conditions evaluated are: (1) loss-of-flow accident; (2) loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA); and (3) partial loss-of-coolant accident

  9. The blanket interface to TSTA

    Clemmer, R.G.; Finn, P.A.; Grimm, T.L.; Sze, D.K.; Anderson, J.L.; Bartlit, J.R.; Naruse, Y.; Yoshida, H.

    1988-01-01

    The requirements of tritium technology are centered in three main areas, (1) fuel processing, (2) breeder tritium extraction, and (3) tritium containment. The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) now in operation at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is dedicated to developing and demonstrating the tritium technology for fuel processing and containment. TSTA is the only fusion fuel processing facility that can operate in a continuous closed-loop mode. The tritium throughput of TSTA is 1000 g/d. However, TSTA does not have a blanket interface system. The authors have initiated a study to define a Breeder Blanket Interface (BBIO) for TSTA. The first step of the work is to define the condition of the gaseous tritium stream from the blanket tritium recovery system. This report summarizes this part of the work for one particular blanket concept, i.e., a self-cooled lithium blanket. The total gas throughput, the hydrogen to tritium ratio, the corrosive chemicals, and the radionuclides are defined. Various methods of tritium recovery from liquid lithium were assessed: yttrium gettering, permeation windows, and molten salt extraction. The authors' evaluation concluded that the best method was molten salt extraction

  10. Blanket maintenance by remote means using the cassette blanket approach

    Werner, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    Induced radioactivity in the blanket and other parts of a fusion reactor close to the plasma zone will dictate remote assembly, disassembly, and maintenance procedures. Time will be of the essence in these procedures. They must be practicable and certain. This paper discusses the reduction of a complicated Tokamak reactor to a simpler assembly via the use of a vacuum building in which to house the reactor and the introduction in this new model of cassette blanket modules. The cassettes significantly simplify remote handling

  11. Blanket safety by GEMSAFE methodology

    Sawada, Tetsuo; Saito, Masaki

    2001-01-01

    General Methodology of Safety Analysis and Evaluation for Fusion Energy Systems (GEMSAFE) has been applied to a number of fusion system designs, such as R-tokamak, Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER), and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) designs in the both stages of Conceptual Design Activities (CDA) and Engineering Design Activities (EDA). Though the major objective of GEMSAFE is to reasonably select design basis events (DBEs) it is also useful to elucidate related safety functions as well as requirements to ensure its safety. In this paper, we apply the methodology to fusion systems with future tritium breeding blankets and make clear which points of the system should be of concern from safety ensuring point of view. In this context, we have obtained five DBEs that are related to the blanket system. We have also clarified the safety functions required to prevent accident propagations initiated by those blanket-specific DBEs. The outline of the methodology is also reviewed. (author)

  12. Development of blanket remote maintenance system

    Kakudate, Satoshi; Nakahira, Masataka; Oka, Kiyoshi; Taguchi, Kou

    1998-01-01

    ITER in-vessel components such as blankets are scheduled maintenance components, including complete shield blanket replacement for breeding blankets. In-vessel components are activated by 14 MeV neutrons, so blanket maintenance requires remote handling equipment and tools able to handle heavy payloads of about 4 tons within a positioning accuracy of 2 mm under intense gamma radiation. To facilitate remote maintenance, blankets are segmented into 730 modules and rail-mounted vehicle remote maintenance was developed. According to the ITER R and D program, critical technology related to blanket maintenance was developed extensively through joint efforts of the Japan, EU, and U.S. home teams. This paper summarizes current blanket maintenance technology conducted by the Japan Home Team, including development of full-scale remote handling equipment and tools for blanket maintenance. (author)

  13. Development of blanket remote maintenance system

    Kakudate, Satoshi; Nakahira, Masataka; Oka, Kiyoshi; Taguchi, Kou [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-04-01

    ITER in-vessel components such as blankets are scheduled maintenance components, including complete shield blanket replacement for breeding blankets. In-vessel components are activated by 14 MeV neutrons, so blanket maintenance requires remote handling equipment and tools able to handle heavy payloads of about 4 tons within a positioning accuracy of 2 mm under intense gamma radiation. To facilitate remote maintenance, blankets are segmented into 730 modules and rail-mounted vehicle remote maintenance was developed. According to the ITER R and D program, critical technology related to blanket maintenance was developed extensively through joint efforts of the Japan, EU, and U.S. home teams. This paper summarizes current blanket maintenance technology conducted by the Japan Home Team, including development of full-scale remote handling equipment and tools for blanket maintenance. (author)

  14. Concepts for fusion fuel production blankets

    Gierszewski, P.

    1986-06-01

    The fusion blanket surrounds the burning hydrogen core of the fusion reactor. It is in this blanket that most of the energy released by the DT fusion reaction is converted into useable product, and where tritium fuel is produced to enable further operation of the reactor. Blankets will involve new materials, conditions and processes. Several recent fusion blanket concepts are presented to illustrate the range of ideas

  15. Blanket Manufacturing Technologies : Thermomechanical Tests on HCLL Blanket Mocks Up

    Laffont, G.; Cachon, L.; Taraud, P.; Challet, F.; Rampal, G.; Salavy, J.F.

    2006-01-01

    In the Helium Cooled Lithium Lead (HCLL) Blanket concept, the lithium lead plays the double role of breeder and multiplier material, and the helium is used as coolant. The HCCL Blanket Module are made of steel boxes reinforced by stiffening plates. These stiffening plates form cells in which the breeder is slowly flowing. The power deposited in the breeder material is recovered by the breeder cooling units constituted by 5 parallel cooling plates. All the structures such as first wall, stiffening and cooling plates are cooled by helium. Due to the complex geometry of these parts and the high level of pressure and temperature loading, thermo-mechanical phenomena expected in the '' HCLL blanket concept '' have motivated the present study. The aim of this study, carried out in the frame of EFDA Work program, is to validate the manufacturing technologies of HCLL blanket module by testing small scale mock-up under breeder blanket representative operating conditions.The first step of this experimental program is the design and manufacturing of a relevant test section in the DIADEMO facility, which was recently upgraded with an He cooling loop (pressure of 80 bar, maximum temperature of 500 o C,flow rate of 30 g/s) taking the opportunity of synergies with the gas-cooled fission reactor R-and-D program. The second step will deal with the thermo-mechanical tests. This paper focuses on the program made to support the cooling plate mock up tests which will be carried out on the DIADEMO facility (CEA) by thermo-mechanical calculations in order to define the relevant test conditions and the experimental parameters to be monitored. (author)

  16. The viscoelastic properties of the cervical mucus plug

    Kjær Bastholm, Sara; Becher, Naja; Stubbe, Peter Reimer

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the viscoelastic properties of cervical mucus plugs (CMPs) shed during labor at term. Spontaneously shed cervical mucus plugs from healthy women in active labor, were tested. The viscoelastic properties of cervical mucus plugs were investigated...... with using frequency and stress sweep experiments within the linear viscoelastic region. Random-effects regression was used for statistical analysis. The CMPs are solid-like viscoelastic structures and the elastic modulus dominated the viscous modulus at all frequencies. These rheological characteristics...

  17. Breeding blankets for thermonuclear reactors

    Rocaboy, Alain.

    1982-06-01

    Materials with structures suitable for this purpose are studied. A bibliographic review of the main solid and liquid lithiated compounds is then presented. Erosion, dimensioning and maintenance problems associated with the limiter and the first wall of the reactor are studied from the point of view of the constraints they impose on the design of the blankets. Detailed studies of the main solid and liquid blanket concepts enable the best technological compromises to be determined for the indispensable functions of the blanket to be assured under acceptable conditions. Our analysis leads to four classes of solution, which cannot at this stage be considered as final recommendations, but which indicate what sort of solutions it is worthwhile exploring and comparing in order to be in a position to suggest a realistic blanket at the time when plasma control is sufficiently good for power reactors to be envisaged. Some considerations on the general architecture of the reactor are indicated. Energy storage with pulsed reactors is discussed in the appendix, and a first approach made to minimizing the total tritium recovery [fr

  18. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF ANTISPERM ANTIBODIES FOR SPERM - CERVICAL-MUCUS INTERACTION

    KREMER, J; JAGER, S

    An overview is presented of the effects of antisperm antibodies on the sperm - cervical mucus interaction. Antisperm IgA on spermatozoa or in cervical mucus can severely inhibit sperm penetration of cervical mucus and migration through it. Disturbance of the sperm - cervical mucus interaction is the

  19. Disruption problematics in segmented blanket concepts

    Crutzen, Y.; Fantechi, S.; Farfaletti-Casali, F.

    1994-01-01

    In Tokamaks, the hostile operating environment originated by plasma disruption events requires that the first wall/blanket/shield components sustain the large induced electromagnetic (EM) forces without significant structural deformation and within allowable material stresses. As a consequence there is a need to improve the safety features of the blanket design concepts satisfying the disruption problematics and to formulate guidelines on the required internal reinforcements of the blanket components. The present paper describes the recent investigations on blanket reinforcement systems needed in order to optimize the first-wall/blanket/shield structural design for next step and commercial fusion reactors in the context of ITER, DEMO and SEAFP activities

  20. Fusion reactor blanket-main design aspects

    Strebkov, Yu.; Sidorov, A.; Danilov, I.

    1994-01-01

    The main function of the fusion reactor blanket is ensuring tritium breeding and radiation shield. The blanket version depends on the reactor type (experimental, DEMO, commercial) and its parameters. Blanket operation conditions are defined with the heat flux, neutron load/fluence, cyclic operation, dynamic heating/force loading, MHD effects etc. DEMO/commercial blanket design is distinguished e.g. by rather high heat load and neutron fluence - up to 100 W/cm 2 and 7 MWa/m 2 accordingly. This conditions impose specific requirements for the materials, structure, maintenance of the blanket and its most loaded components - FW and limiter. The liquid Li-Pb eutectic is one of the possible breeder for different kinds of blanket in view of its advantages one of which is the blanket convertibility that allow to have shielding blanket (borated water) or breeding one (Li-Pb eutectic). Using Li-Pb eutectic for both ITER and DEMO blankets have been considered. In the conceptual ITER design the solid eutectic blanket was carried out. The liquid eutectic breeder/coolant is suggested also for the advanced (high parameter) blanket

  1. CFTR, Mucins, and Mucus Obstruction in Cystic Fibrosis

    Kreda, Silvia M.; Davis, C. William; Rose, Mary Callaghan

    2012-01-01

    Mucus pathology in cystic fibrosis (CF) has been known for as long as the disease has been recognized and is sometimes called mucoviscidosis. The disease is marked by mucus hyperproduction and plugging in many organs, which are usually most fatal in the airways of CF patients, once the problem of meconium ileus at birth is resolved. After the CF gene, CFTR, was cloned and its protein product identified as a cAMP-regulated Cl− channel, causal mechanisms underlying the strong mucus phenotype of the disease became obscure. Here we focus on mucin genes and polymeric mucin glycoproteins, examining their regulation and potential relationships to a dysfunctional cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Detailed examination of CFTR expression in organs and different cell types indicates that changes in CFTR expression do not always correlate with the severity of CF disease or mucus accumulation. Thus, the mucus hyperproduction that typifies CF does not appear to be a direct cause of a defective CFTR but, rather, to be a downstream consequence. In organs like the lung, up-regulation of mucin gene expression by inflammation results from chronic infection; however, in other instances and organs, the inflammation may have a non-infectious origin. The mucus plugging phenotype of the β-subunit of the epithelial Na+ channel (βENaC)-overexpressing mouse is proving to be an archetypal example of this kind of inflammation, with a dehydrated airway surface/concentrated mucus gel apparently providing the inflammatory stimulus. Data indicate that the luminal HCO3 − deficiency recently described for CF epithelia may also provide such a stimulus, perhaps by causing a mal-maturation of mucins as they are released onto luminal surfaces. In any event, the path between CFTR dysfunction and mucus hyperproduction has proven tortuous, and its unraveling continues to offer its own twists and turns, along with fascinating glimpses into biology. PMID:22951447

  2. Design study of blanket structure for tokamak experimental fusion reactor

    1979-11-01

    Design study of the blanket structure for JAERI Experimental Fusion Reactor (JXFR) has been carried out. Studied here were fabrication and testing of the blanket structure (blanket cells, blanket rings, piping and blanket modules), assembly and disassembly of the blanket module, and monitering and testing technique. Problems in design and fabrication of the blanket structure could be revealed. Research and development problems for the future were also disclosed. (author)

  3. FACTORS AFFECTING THE CERVICAL MUCUS CRYSTALLIZATION, THE SPERM SURVIVAL IN CERVICAL MUCUS, AND PREGNANCY RATES OF HOLSTEIN COWS

    Alena JEŽKOVÁ; Luděk STÁDNÍK; Mojmír VACEK; František LOUDA

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between calving year and season, parity, number of AI, day of lactation, milk production in the 1st 100 lactation days or diseases occurrence (retained placenta, endometritis or cysts), sperm motility (SM) during 30, 60 and 90 minutes of the cervical mucus survival test, cervical mucus crystallization (CMC) and their infl uence on days to fi rst insemination (interval), open days (SP), inseminations number for pregnancy (index), an...

  4. Muc5b Is the Major Polymeric Mucin in Mucus from Thoroughbred Horses With and Without Airway Mucus Accumulation

    Rousseau, Karine; Cardwell, Jacqueline M.; Humphrey, Emma; Newton, Richard; Knight, David; Clegg, Peter; Thornton, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Mucus accumulation is a feature of inflammatory airway disease in the horse and has been associated with reduced performance in racehorses. In this study, we have analysed the two major airways gel-forming mucins Muc5b and Muc5ac in respect of their site of synthesis, their biochemical properties, and their amounts in mucus from healthy horses and from horses with signs of airway mucus accumulation. Polyclonal antisera directed against equine Muc5b and Muc5ac were raised and characterised. Immunohistochemical staining of normal equine trachea showed that Muc5ac and Muc5b are produced by cells in the submucosal glands, as well as surface epithelial goblet cells. Western blotting after agarose gel electrophoresis of airway mucus from healthy horses, and horses with mucus accumulation, was used to determine the amounts of these two mucins in tracheal wash samples. The results showed that in healthy horses Muc5b was the predominant mucin with small amounts of Muc5ac. The amounts of Muc5b and Muc5ac were both dramatically increased in samples collected from horses with high mucus scores as determined visually at the time of endoscopy and that this increase also correlated with increase number of bacteria present in the sample. The change in amount of Muc5b and Muc5ac indicates that Muc5b remains the most abundant mucin in mucus. In summary, we have developed mucin specific polyclonal antibodies, which have allowed us to show that there is a significant increase in Muc5b and Muc5ac in mucus accumulated in equine airways and these increases correlated with the numbers of bacteria. PMID:21602926

  5. Muc5b is the major polymeric mucin in mucus from thoroughbred horses with and without airway mucus accumulation.

    Karine Rousseau

    Full Text Available Mucus accumulation is a feature of inflammatory airway disease in the horse and has been associated with reduced performance in racehorses. In this study, we have analysed the two major airways gel-forming mucins Muc5b and Muc5ac in respect of their site of synthesis, their biochemical properties, and their amounts in mucus from healthy horses and from horses with signs of airway mucus accumulation. Polyclonal antisera directed against equine Muc5b and Muc5ac were raised and characterised. Immunohistochemical staining of normal equine trachea showed that Muc5ac and Muc5b are produced by cells in the submucosal glands, as well as surface epithelial goblet cells. Western blotting after agarose gel electrophoresis of airway mucus from healthy horses, and horses with mucus accumulation, was used to determine the amounts of these two mucins in tracheal wash samples. The results showed that in healthy horses Muc5b was the predominant mucin with small amounts of Muc5ac. The amounts of Muc5b and Muc5ac were both dramatically increased in samples collected from horses with high mucus scores as determined visually at the time of endoscopy and that this increase also correlated with increase number of bacteria present in the sample. The change in amount of Muc5b and Muc5ac indicates that Muc5b remains the most abundant mucin in mucus. In summary, we have developed mucin specific polyclonal antibodies, which have allowed us to show that there is a significant increase in Muc5b and Muc5ac in mucus accumulated in equine airways and these increases correlated with the numbers of bacteria.

  6. Possible association of mucous blanket integrity with postirradiation colonization resistance

    Walker, R.I.; Brook, I.; Costerton, J.W.; MacVittie, T.; Myhal, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation-induced infections can be associated with changes in colonization potential of the intestine. Since the mucous blanket, which overlays the epithelium, is a major mucosal structure and is heavily colonized by microorganisms, we examined the status of the mucus after radiation and evaluated susceptibility to intestinal challenge with bacteria. A downward shift (2.5 X 10(8) cells/g to 5.3 X 10(5)) of total facultatively anaerobic bacteria of the ileum of C3HeB/FeJ mice was detected by 3 days post exposure to 10 Gy 60Co. Numbers of flora returned to normal by 11 days after radiation. Scanning electron microscopy was used to show that the loss of bacteria could be associated with major disruptions of the continuity of the mucous blanket. The pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa adhered to mouse mucous films used in in vitro assays. When irradiated mice were challenged orally with 1 X 10(5) P. aeruginosa on days 1, 2, or 3 after irradiation, a progressive increase in susceptibility was seen, but no animals died before Day 4 postirradiation. Sensitivity to subcutaneous (sc) challenge with Pseudomonas also increased by Day 3 and was probably due largely to the profound neutropenia observed. Immunoglobulin G (Gamimmune), which protected burned mice infected with Pseudomonas, was ineffectual in treatment of 7 or 10 Gy irradiated mice challenged either orally or sc with the organism. The ileal mucosal barrier was compromised after radiation in ways which could facilitate epithelial colonization, an event which combined with other immunological and physiological decrements in this model can compromise the effectiveness of therapeutic modalities

  7. Zoanthid mucus as new source of useful biologically active proteins.

    Guarnieri, Míriam Camargo; de Albuquerque Modesto, Jeanne Claíne; Pérez, Carlos Daniel; Ottaiano, Tatiana Fontes; Ferreira, Rodrigo da Silva; Batista, Fabrício Pereira; de Brito, Marlon Vilela; Campos, Ikaro Henrique Mendes Pinto; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela

    2018-03-01

    Palythoa caribaeorum is a very common colonial zoanthid in the coastal reefs of Brazil. It is known for its massive production of mucus, which is traditionally used in folk medicine by fishermen in northeastern Brazil. This study identified biologically active compounds in P. caribaerum mucus. Crude mucus was collected during low tides by the manual scraping of colonies; samples were maintained in an ice bath, homogenized, and centrifuged at 16,000 g for 1 h at 4 °C; the supernatant (mucus) was kept at -80 °C until use. The enzymatic (proteolytic and phospholipase A 2 ), inhibitory (metallo, cysteine and serine proteases), and hemagglutinating (human erythrocyte) activities were determined. The results showed high levels of cysteine and metallo proteases, intermediate levels of phosholipase A 2 , low levels of trypsin, and no elastase and chymotrypsin like activities. The mucus showed potent inhibitory activity on snake venom metalloproteases and cysteine proteinase papain. In addition, it showed agglutinating activity towards O + , B + , and A + erythrocyte types. The hemostatic results showed that the mucus prolongs the aPTT and PT, and strongly inhibited platelet aggregation induced by arachidonic acid, collagen, epinephrine, ADP, and thrombin. The antimicrobial activity was tested on 15 strains of bacteria and fungi through the radial diffusion assay in agar, and no activity was observed. Compounds in P. caribaeorum mucus were analyzed for the first time in this study, and our results show potential pharmacological activities in these compounds, which are relevant for use in physiopathological investigations. However, the demonstration of these activities indicates caution in the use of crude mucus in folk medicine. Furthermore, the present or absent activities identified in this mucus suggest that the studied P. caribaeorum colonies were in thermal stress conditions at the time of sample collection; these conditions may precede the bleaching

  8. (Photosynthesis in intact plants)

    1990-01-01

    Progress in the two years since the last renewal application has been excellent. We have made substantial contributions on both main fronts of the projects, and are particularly happy with the progress of our research on intact plants. The approach of basing our field work on a sound foundation of laboratory studies has enabled is to use methods which provide unambiguous assays of well characterized reactions. We have also made excellent progress in several laboratory studies which will have direct applications in future field work, and have introduced to the laboratory a range of molecular genetics techniques which will allow us to explore new options in the attempt to understand function at the level of molecular structure.

  9. Blanket comparison and selection study. Volume I

    1983-10-01

    The objectives of the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study (BCSS) can be stated as follows: (1) Define a small number (approx. 3) of blanket design concepts that should be the focus of the blanket R and D program. A design concept is defined by the selection of all materials (e.g., breeder, coolant, structure and multiplier) and other major characteristics that significantly influence the R and D requirements. (2) Identify and prioritize the critical issues for the leading blanket concepts. (3) Provide the technical input necessary to develop a blanket R and D program plan. Guidelines for prioritizing the R and D requirements include: (a) critical feasibility issues for the leading blanket concepts will receive the highest priority, and (b) for equally important feasibility issues, higher R and D priority will be given to those that require minimum cost and short time

  10. Design requirement on HYPER blanket fuel assembly

    Hwang, Woan; Lee, B. O.; Nam, C.; Ryu, W. S.; Lee, B. S.; Park, W. S.

    2000-07-01

    This document describes design requirements which are needed for designing the blanket assembly of the HYPER as design guidance. The blanket assembly of the HYPER consists of blanket fuel rods, mounting rail, spacer, upper nozzle with handling socket, bottom nozzle with mounting rail and skeleton structure. The blanket fuel rod consists of top end plug, bottom end plug with key way, blanket fuel slug, and cladding. In the assembly, the rods are in a triangular pitch array. This report contains functional requirements, performance and operational requirements, interfacing systems requirements, core restraint and interface requirements, design limits and strength requirements, system configuration and essential feature requirements, seismic requirements, structural requirements, environmental requirements, reliability and safety requirements, standard and codes, QA programs, and other requirements for the blanket fuel assembly of the HYPER

  11. DNA Supercoiling Regulates the Motility of Campylobacter jejuni and Is Altered by Growth in the Presence of Chicken Mucus

    Claire Shortt

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans, but relatively little is known about the global regulation of virulence factors during infection of chickens or humans. This study identified DNA supercoiling as playing a key role in regulating motility and flagellar protein production and found that this supercoiling-controlled regulon is induced by growth in chicken mucus. A direct correlation was observed between motility and resting DNA supercoiling levels in different strains of C. jejuni, and relaxation of DNA supercoiling resulted in decreased motility. Transcriptional analysis and Western immunoblotting revealed that a reduction in motility and DNA supercoiling affected the two-component regulatory system FlgRS and was associated with reduced FlgR expression, increased FlgS expression, and aberrant expression of flagellin subunits. Electron microscopy revealed that the flagellar structure remained intact. Growth in the presence of porcine mucin resulted in increased negative supercoiling, increased motility, increased FlgR expression, and reduced FlgS expression. Finally, this supercoiling-dependent regulon was shown to be induced by growth in chicken mucus, and the level of activation was dependent on the source of the mucus from within the chicken intestinal tract. In conclusion, this study reports for the first time the key role played by DNA supercoiling in regulating motility in C. jejuni and indicates that the induction of this supercoiling-induced regulon in response to mucus from different sources could play a critical role in regulating motility in vivo.

  12. Liquid metal cooled blanket concept for NET

    Malang, S.; Casal, V.; Arheidt, K.; Fischer, U.; Link, W.; Rust, K.

    1986-01-01

    A blanket concept for NET using liquid lithium-lead both as breeder material and as coolant is described. The need for inboard breeding is avoided by using beryllium as neutron multiplier in the outboard blanket. Novel flow channel inserts are employed in all poloidal ducts to reduce the MHD pressure drop. The concept offers a simple mechanical design and a higher tritium breeding ratio compared to water- and gas-cooled blankets. (author)

  13. Fusion blankets for high efficiency power cycles

    Powell, J.R.; Fillo, J.A.; Horn, F.L.; Lazareth, O.W.; Usher, J.L.

    1980-04-01

    Definitions are given of 10 generic blanket types and the specific blanket chosen to be analyzed in detail from each of the 10 types. Dimensions, compositions, energy depositions and breeding ratios (where applicable) are presented for each of the 10 designs. Ultimately, based largely on neutronics and thermal hyraulics results, breeding an nonbreeding blanket options are selected for further design analysis and integration with a suitable power conversion subsystem

  14. Low technology high tritium breeding blanket concept

    Gohar, Y.; Baker, C.C.; Smith, D.L.

    1987-10-01

    The main function of this low technology blanket is to produce the necessary tritium for INTOR operation with minimum first wall coverage. The INTOR first wall, blanket, and shield are constrained by the dimensions of the reference design and the protection criteria required for different reactor components and dose equivalent after shutdown in the reactor hall. It is assumed that the blanket operation at commercial power reactor conditions and the proper temperature for power generation can be sacrificed to achieve the highest possible tritium breeding ratio with minimum additional research and developments and minimal impact on reactor design and operation. A set of blanket evaluation criteria has been used to compare possible blanket concepts. Six areas: performance, operating requirements, impact on reactor design and operation, safety and environmental impact, technology assessment, and cost have been defined for the evaluation process. A water-cooled blanket was developed to operate with a low temperature and pressure. The developed blanket contains a 24 cm of beryllium and 6 cm of solid breeder both with a 0.8 density factor. This blanket provides a local tritium breeding ratio of ∼2.0. The water coolant is isolated from the breeder material by several zones which eliminates the tritium buildup in the water by permeation and reduces the changes for water-breeder interaction. This improves the safety and environmental aspects of the blanket and eliminates the costly process of the tritium recovery from the water. 12 refs., 13 tabs

  15. Complex rheological behaviors of loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) skin mucus

    Wang, Xiang; Su, Heng; Lv, Weiyang; Du, Miao; Song, Yihu; Zheng, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The functions and structures of biological mucus are closely linked to rheology. In this article, the skin mucus of loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) was proved to be a weak hydrogel susceptible to shear rate, time, and history, exhibiting: (i) Two-region breakdown of its gel structure during oscillatory strain sweep; (ii) rate-dependent thickening followed by three-region thinning with increased shear rate, and straight thinning with decreased shear rate; and (iii) time-dependent rheopexy at low shear rates, and thixotropy at high shear rates. An interesting correlation between the shear rate- and time-dependent rheological behaviors was also revealed, i.e., the rheopexy-thixotropy transition coincided with the first-second shear thinning region transition. Apart from rheology, a structure of colloidal network was observed in loach skin mucus using transmission electron microscopy. The complex rheology was speculated to result from inter- and intracolloid structural alterations. The unique rheology associated with the colloidal network structure, which has never been previously reported in vertebrate mucus, may play a key role in the functions (e.g., flow, reannealing, lubrication, and barrier) of the mucus

  16. Complex rheological behaviors of loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) skin mucus

    Wang, Xiang, E-mail: 11229036@zju.edu.cn; Su, Heng, E-mail: shtdyso@163.com; Lv, Weiyang, E-mail: 3090103369@zju.edu.cn; Du, Miao, E-mail: dumiao@zju.edu.cn; Song, Yihu, E-mail: s-yh0411@zju.edu.cn; Zheng, Qiang, E-mail: zhengqiang@zju.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Macromolecular Synthesis and Functionalization, Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2015-01-15

    The functions and structures of biological mucus are closely linked to rheology. In this article, the skin mucus of loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) was proved to be a weak hydrogel susceptible to shear rate, time, and history, exhibiting: (i) Two-region breakdown of its gel structure during oscillatory strain sweep; (ii) rate-dependent thickening followed by three-region thinning with increased shear rate, and straight thinning with decreased shear rate; and (iii) time-dependent rheopexy at low shear rates, and thixotropy at high shear rates. An interesting correlation between the shear rate- and time-dependent rheological behaviors was also revealed, i.e., the rheopexy-thixotropy transition coincided with the first-second shear thinning region transition. Apart from rheology, a structure of colloidal network was observed in loach skin mucus using transmission electron microscopy. The complex rheology was speculated to result from inter- and intracolloid structural alterations. The unique rheology associated with the colloidal network structure, which has never been previously reported in vertebrate mucus, may play a key role in the functions (e.g., flow, reannealing, lubrication, and barrier) of the mucus.

  17. Human intestinal mucus proteins isolated by transanal irrigation and proctosigmoidoscopy

    Paola Andrea Gómez Buitrago

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Human intestinal mucus essentially consists of a network of Mucin2 glycoproteins embedded in many lower molecular weight proteins. This paper contributes to the proteomic study of human intestinal mucus by comparing two sample collection methods (transanal irrigation and brush cytology during proctosigmoidoscopy and analysis techniques (electrophoresis and digestion in solution. The entire sample collection and treatment process is explained, including protein extraction, digestion and desalination and peptide characterisation using a nanoAcquity UPLC chromatograph coupled to an HDMS spectrometer equipped with a nanoESI source. Collecting mucus via transanal irrigation provided a larger sample volume and protein concentration from a single patient. The proctosigmoidoscopy sample could be analysed via digestion in solution after depleting albumin. The analysis indicates that a simple mucus lysis method can evaluate the electrophoresis and digestion in solution techniques. Studying human intestinal mucus complexes is important because they perform two essential survival functions for humans as the first biochemical and physical defences for the gastrointestinal tract and a habitat for intestinal microbiota, which are primarily hosted in the colon and exceeds the human genetic information and cell number 100- and 10-fold (1.

  18. [Mucoceles of the minor salivary glands. Extravasation mucoceles (mucus granulomas) and retention mucoceles (mucus retention cysts) (author's transl)].

    Seifert, G; Donath, K; von Gumberz, C

    1981-06-01

    360 cases of salivary glands cysts (= 6%) were collected in the Salivary Glands Register (Institute of Pathology, University of Hamburg) from 1965 until 1979 among a total of 5739 register cases. 273 cases of the cystic lesions (= 76%) were mucoceles of the minor salivary glands. The analysis of these 273 cases revealed the following results: 1. Two types of mucoceles can be morphologically distinguished: extravasation mucoceles and retention mucoceles. 2. The extravasation mucocele is in our material (240 cases = 88.7%) the most frequent type of mucocele. The term "extravasation mucocele" of the anglo-american literature is identical with the term "mucus granuloma" ("Schleimgranulom") introduced by Hamperl (1932). 3. The main signs of the mucus granulomas are: predominant location (79%) at the lower lip, age peak in the 2nd decade and more frequent occurrence (in 60%) in the male sex. 4. Three stages of development can be distinguished in the pathogenesis of the mucus granulomas: an initial stage (interstitial mucus lakes), a resorption stage (mucus granulomas with macrophages, foam cells and foreign bodies giant cells) and a terminal stage with the development of a pseudocyst (capsule of collagen tissue, no epithelial demarcation). 5. The retention mucocele (synonym: mucus retention cyst) is a rare type of mucocele (33 cases = 11.3%). The main signs are: nearly equal occurrence in all oral regions, age peak in the 8th decade, moderate predominance of the female sex. 6. The retention mucoceles contain viscous mucous material, possess always an epithelial demarcation of the cysts differentiated analogous to the different segments of the salivary duct system and show as a rule no inflammatory reaction compared with the extravasation mucoceles. 7. Microtraumas and mucus congestions play the important role in the development of the extravasation mucocele. The final formation depends on the amount of the overflowed mucus and the intensity of the mucus phagocytosis. 8

  19. Intestinal mucus accumulation in a child with acutemyeloblastic leukemia

    Namık Özbek

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal mucus accumulation is a very rare situation observed in some solid tumors, intestinal inflammation, mucosal hyperplasia, elevated intestinal pressure, and various other diseases. However, it has never been described in acute myeloblastic leukemia. The pathogenesis of intestinal mucus accumulation is still not clear. Here, we report a 14-year-old girl with acute myeloblastic leukemia and febrile neutropenia in addition to typhlitis. She was also immobilized due to joint contractures of the lower extremities and had intestinal mucus accumulation, which was, at first, misdiagnosed as intestinal parasitosis. We speculate that typhlitis, immobilization and decreased intestinal motility due to usage of antiemetic drugs might have been the potential etiologic factors in this case. However, its impact on prognosis of the primary disease is unknown.

  20. Mucus glycoprotein secretion by tracheal explants: effects of pollutants

    Last, J.A.; Kaizu, T.

    1980-01-01

    Tracheal slices incubated with radioactive precursors in tissue culture medium secrete labeled mucus glycoproteins into the culture medium. We have used an in vivtro approach, a combined method utilizing exposure to pneumotoxins in vivo coupled with quantitation of mucus secretion rates in vitro, to study the effects of inhaled pollutants on mucus biosynthesis by rat airways. In addition, we have purified the mucus glycoproteins secreted by rat tracheal explants in order to determine putative structural changes that might by the basis for the observed augmented secretion rates after exposure of rats to H2SO4 aerosols in combination with high ambient levels of ozone. After digestion with papain, mucus glycoproteins secreted by tracheal explants may be separated into five fractions by ion-exchange chromatography, with recovery in high yield, on columns of DEAE-cellulose. Each of these five fractions, one neutral and four acidic, migrates as a single unique spot upon cellulose acetate electrophoresis at pH values of 8.6 and 1.2. The neutral fraction, which is labeled with [3H] glucosamine, does not contain radioactivity when Na2 35SO4 is used as the precursor. Acidic fractions I to IV are all labeled with either 3H-glucosamine or Na2 35SO4 as precursor. Acidic fraction II contains sialic acid as the terminal sugar on its oligosaccharide side chains, based upon its chromatographic behavior on columns of wheat-germ agglutinin-Agarose. Treatment of this fraction with neuraminidase shifts its elution position in the gradient to a lower salt concentration, coincident with acidic fraction I. After removal of terminal sialic acid residues with either neuraminidase or low pH treatment, the resultant terminal sugar on the oligosaccharide side chains is fucose. These results are identical with those observed with mucus glycoproteins secreted by cultured human tracheal explants and purified by these same techniques

  1. Unique mechanism of Helicobacter pylori for colonizing the gastric mucus.

    Yoshiyama, H; Nakazawa, T

    2000-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a human gastric pathogen causing chronic infection. Urease and motility using flagella are essential factors for its colonization. Urease of H. pylori exists both on the surface and in the cytoplasm, and is involved in neutralizing gastric acid and in chemotactic motility. H. pylori senses the concentration gradients of urea in the gastric mucus layer, then moves toward the epithelial surface by chemotactic movement. The energy source for the flagella movement is the proton motive force. The hydrolysis of urea by the cytoplasmic urease possibly generates additional energy for the flagellar rotation in the mucus gel layer.

  2. (D,T) Driven thorium hybrid blankets

    Al-Kusayer, T.A.; Khan, S.; Sahin, S.

    1983-01-01

    Recently, a project has started, with the aim to establish the neutronic performance and the basic design of an experimental fusionfission (hybrid) reactor facility, called AYMAN, in cylinderical geometry. The fusion reactor will have to be simulated by a (D,T) neutron generator. Fissile and fertile fuel will have to surround the neutron generator as a cylinderical blanket to simulate the boundary conditions of the hybrid blanket in a proper way. This geometry is consistent with Tandem Mirror Hybrid Blanket design and with most of the ICF blanket designs. A similar experimental installation will become operational around 1984 at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, Switzerland known under the project LOTUS. Due to the limited dimensions of the experimental cavity of the LOTUS-hybrid reactor, the LOTUS blankets have to be designed in plane geometry. Also, the bulky form of the Haefely neutron generator of the LOTUS facility obliges one to design a blanket in the plane geometry. This results in a vacuum left boundary conditions for the LOTUS blanket. The importance of a reflecting left boundary condition on the overall neutronic performance of a hybrid blanket has been analyzed in previous work in detail

  3. Design and analysis of ITER shield blanket

    Ohmori, Junji; Hatano, Toshihisa; Ezato, Kouichiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment] [and others

    1998-12-01

    This report includes electromagnetic analyses for ITER shielding blanket modules, fabrication methods for the blanket modules and the back plate, the design and the fabrication methods for port limiter have been investigated. Studies on the runaway electron impact for Be armor have been also performed. (J.P.N.)

  4. Methods to enhance blanket power density

    Hsu, P.Y.; Miller, L.G.; Bohn, T.S.; Deis, G.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Masson, L.S.; Wessol, D.E.; Abdou, M.A.

    1982-06-01

    The overall objective of this task is to investigate the extent to which the power density in the FED/INTOR breeder blanket test modules can be enhanced by artificial means. Assuming a viable approach can be developed, it will allow advanced reactor blanket modules to be tested on FED/INTOR under representative conditions

  5. Design of ITER shielding blanket

    Furuya, Kazuyuki; Sato, Satoshi; Hatano, Toshihisa; Tokami, Ikuhide; Kitamura, Kazunori; Miura, Hidenori; Ito, Yutaka; Kuroda, Toshimasa; Takatsu, Hideyuki

    1997-05-01

    A mechanical configuration of ITER integrated primary first wall/shield blanket module were developed focusing on the welded attachment of its support leg to the back plate. A 100 mm x 150 mm space between the legs of adjacent modules was incorporated for the working space of welding/cutting tools. A concept of coolant branch pipe connection to accommodate deformation due to the leg welding and differential displacement of the module and the manifold/back plate during operation was introduced. Two-dimensional FEM analyses showed that thermal stresses in Cu-alloy (first wall) and stainless steel (first wall coolant tube and shield block) satisfied the stress criteria following ASME code for ITER BPP operation. On the other hand, three-dimensional FEM analyses for overall in-vessel structures exhibited excessive primary stresses in the back plate and its support structure to the vacuum vessel under VDE disruption load and marginal stresses in the support leg of module No.4. Fabrication procedure of the integrated primary first wall/shield blanket module was developed based on single step solid HIP for the joining of Cu-alloy/Cu-alloy, Cu-alloy/stainless steel, and stainless steel/stainless steel. (author)

  6. NET test blanket design and remote maintenance

    Holloway, C.; Hubert, P.

    1991-01-01

    The NET machine has three horizontal ports reserved for testing tritium breeding blanket designs during the physics phase and possibly five during the technology phase. The design of the ports and test blankets are modular to accept a range of blanket options, provide radiation shielding and allow routine replacement. Radiation levels during replacement or maintenance require that all operations must be carried out remotely. The paper describes the problems overcome in providing a port design which includes attachment to the vacuum vessel with double vacuum seals, an integrated cooled first wall and support guides for the test blanket module. The method selected to remotely replace the test module whilst controlling the spread of contamination is also adressed. The paper concludes that the provisions of a test blanket facility based on the NET machine design is feasible. (orig.)

  7. Classification Using Markov Blanket for Feature Selection

    Zeng, Yifeng; Luo, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Selecting relevant features is in demand when a large data set is of interest in a classification task. It produces a tractable number of features that are sufficient and possibly improve the classification performance. This paper studies a statistical method of Markov blanket induction algorithm...... for filtering features and then applies a classifier using the Markov blanket predictors. The Markov blanket contains a minimal subset of relevant features that yields optimal classification performance. We experimentally demonstrate the improved performance of several classifiers using a Markov blanket...... induction as a feature selection method. In addition, we point out an important assumption behind the Markov blanket induction algorithm and show its effect on the classification performance....

  8. Blanket materials for DT fusion reactors

    Smith, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the critical materials issues that must be considered in the development of a tritium breeding blanket for a tokamak fusion reactor that operates on the D-T-Li fuel cycle. The primary requirements of the blanket system are identified and the important criteria that must be considered in the development of blanket technology are summarized. The candidate materials are listed for the different blanket components, e.g., breeder, coolant, structure and neutron multiplier. Three blanket concepts that appear to offer the most potential are: (1) liquid-metal breeder/coolant, (2) liquid-metal breeder/separate coolant, and (3) solid breeder/separate coolant. The major uncertainties associated with each of the design concepts are discussed and the key materials R and D requirements for each concept are identified

  9. Bifidobacteria or Fiber Protects against Diet-Induced Microbiota-Mediated Colonic Mucus Deterioration

    Schroeder, Bjoern O; Birchenough, George M H; Ståhlman, Marcus

    2018-01-01

    that administration of Bifidobacterium longum was sufficient to restore mucus growth, whereas administration of the fiber inulin prevented increased mucus penetrability in WSD-fed mice. We hypothesize that the presence of distinct bacteria is crucial for proper mucus function. If confirmed in humans, these findings...

  10. Milk consumption and mucus production in children with asthma

    Thiara, Gurkaran; Goldman, Ran D.

    2012-01-01

    Question Many parents of children with asthma are becoming increasingly reluctant to add milk to their children’s diet because they believe it will worsen their children’s asthma owing to increased mucus secretion. Recognizing the importance of milk as part of a healthy diet in supporting growth and calcium consumption, is it advisable to restrict milk in the diet?

  11. Susceptibility to chronic mucus hypersecretion, a genome wide association study

    A.E. Dijkstra (Akkelies); J. Smolonska (Joanna); M. van den Berge (Maarten); C. Wijmenga (Ciska); P. Zanen (Pieter); M.A. Luinge (Marjan); I. Platteel (Inge); J.-W.J. Lammers (Jan-Willem); M. Dahlback (Magnus); K. Tosh (Kerrie); P.S. Hiemstra (Pieter); P.J. Sterk (Peter); M.E. Spira (Micha); J. Vestbo (Jorgen); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); M. Benn (Marianne); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); M. Dahl (Morten); W.M.M. Verschuren (W. M. Monique); H.S.J. Picavet (Susan); H.A. Smit (Henriëtte); M. Owsijewitsch (Michael); H.U. Kauczor (Hans); H.J. de Koning (Harry); E. Nizankowska-Mogilnicka (Eva); F. Mejza (Filip); P. Nastalek (Pawel); C.C. van Diemen (Cleo); M.H. Cho (Michael); E.K. Silverman (Edwin); R.O. Crapo (Robert); T.H. Beaty (Terri); D.J. Lomas (David John); A.B. Bakke (Arnold B.); A. Gulsvik (Amund); Y. Bossé (Yohan); M. Obeidat (Ma'en); D.W. Loth (Daan); L. Lahousse (Lies); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); A. Hofman (Albert); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); G.G. Brusselle (Guy); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); U. Brouwer (Uilke); G.H. Koppelman (Gerard); J.M. Vonk (Judith); M.C. Nawijn (Martijn); H.J.M. Groen (Henk); W. Timens (Wim); H.M. Boezen (Marike); D.S. Postma (Dirkje); B.Z. Alizadeh (Behrooz); R.A. de Boer (Rudolf); M. Bruinenberg (M.); L. Franke (Lude); P. van der Harst (Pim); H.L. Hillege (Hans); M.M. van der Klauw (Melanie); G. Navis (Gerjan); J. Ormel (Johan); J.G.M. Rosmalen (Judith); J.P.J. Slaets (Joris); H. Snieder (Harold); R.P. Stolk (Ronald); B. Wolffenbuttel (Bhr)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH) is associated with an increased frequency of respiratory infections, excess lung function decline, and increased hospitalisation and mortality rates in the general population. It is associated with smoking, but it is unknown why only a

  12. Bovine alpha-lactalbumin stimulates mucus metabolism in gastric mucosa.

    Ushida, Y; Shimokawa, Y; Toida, T; Matsui, H; Takase, M

    2007-02-01

    Bovine alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA), a major milk protein, exerts strong gastroprotective activity against rat experimental gastric ulcers induced by ethanol or stress. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying this activity, the influence of alpha-LA on gastric mucus metabolism was investigated in vitro and in vivo. For the in vitro study, RGM1 cells (a rat gastric epithelial cell line) were selected for observation of the direct activity of alpha-LA on gastric mucosal cells and cultured in the presence of either alpha-LA or ovalbumin (OVA), a reference protein showing no gastroprotective activity. Amounts of synthesized and secreted mucin, a major component of mucus, were determined using [3H]glucosamine as a tracer, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels in the culture medium were determined by RIA. For the in vivo study, the thickness of the mucus gel layer, a protective barrier for gastric mucosa, was evaluated histochemically in rat gastric mucosa. alpha-Lactalbumin (3 mg/mL) significantly stimulated mucin synthesis and secretion in RGM1 cells and also increased PGE2 levels in the culture medium. In contrast, OVA showed no enhancing effects under identical conditions. Neither indomethacin, a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, nor AH23848, a prostaglandin EP4 receptor antagonist, affected alpha-LA-induced enhancement of mucin synthesis and secretion. In vivo, oral administration of alpha-LA (300 mg/kg x 3 times/d x 7 d) increased the thickness of the mucus gel layer in rats. These results indicate that alpha-LA fortifies the mucus gel layer by stimulating mucin production and secretion in gastric mucus-producing cells, and that this enhancing effect is independent of endogenous PGE2. Comparison of the efficacy of alpha-LA with OVA suggests that the activities observed in RGM1 cells are closely related to the gastroprotective effects in rat gastric ulcer models. In conclusion, alpha-LA stimulates mucus metabolism, and this action may be responsible for its gastroprotective

  13. Fish mucus metabolome reveals fish life-history traits

    Reverter, M.; Sasal, P.; Banaigs, B.; Lecchini, D.; Lecellier, G.; Tapissier-Bontemps, N.

    2017-06-01

    Fish mucus has important biological and ecological roles such as defense against fish pathogens and chemical mediation among several species. A non-targeted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry metabolomic approach was developed to study gill mucus of eight butterflyfish species in Moorea (French Polynesia), and the influence of several fish traits (geographic site and reef habitat, species taxonomy, phylogeny, diet and parasitism levels) on the metabolic variability was investigated. A biphasic extraction yielding two fractions (polar and apolar) was used. Fish diet (obligate corallivorous, facultative corallivorous or omnivorous) arose as the main driver of the metabolic differences in the gill mucus in both fractions, accounting for 23% of the observed metabolic variability in the apolar fraction and 13% in the polar fraction. A partial least squares discriminant analysis allowed us to identify the metabolites (variable important in projection, VIP) driving the differences between fish with different diets (obligate corallivores, facultative corallivores and omnivorous). Using accurate mass data and fragmentation data, we identified some of these VIP as glycerophosphocholines, ceramides and fatty acids. Level of monogenean gill parasites was the second most important factor shaping the gill mucus metabolome, and it explained 10% of the metabolic variability in the polar fraction and 5% in the apolar fraction. A multiple regression tree revealed that the metabolic variability due to parasitism in the polar fraction was mainly due to differences between non-parasitized and parasitized fish. Phylogeny and butterflyfish species were factors contributing significantly to the metabolic variability of the apolar fraction (10 and 3%, respectively) but had a less pronounced effect in the polar fraction. Finally, geographic site and reef habitat of butterflyfish species did not influence the gill mucus metabolome of butterflyfishes.

  14. Convertible shielding to ceramic breeding blanket

    Furuya, Kazuyuki; Kurasawa, Toshimasa; Sato, Satoshi; Nakahira, Masataka; Togami, Ikuhide; Hashimoto, Toshiyuki; Takatsu, Hideyuki; Kuroda, Toshimasa.

    1995-05-01

    Four concepts have been studied for the ITER convertible blanket: 1)Layered concept 2)BIT(Breeder-Inside-Tube)concept 3)BOT(Breeder-Out of-Tube)concept 4)BOT/mixed concept. All concepts use ceramic breeder and beryllium neutron multiplier, both in the shape of small spherical pebbles, 316SS structure, and H 2 O coolant (inlet/outlet temperatures : 100/150degC, pressure : 2 MPa). During the BPP, only beryllium pebbles (the primary pebble in case of BOT/mixed concept) are filled in the blanket for shielding purpose. Then, before the EPP operation, breeder pebbles will be additionally inserted into the blanket. Among possible conversion methods, wet method by liquid flow seems expecting for high and homogeneous pebble packing. Preliminary 1-D neutronics calculation shows that the BOT/mixed concept has the highest breeding and shielding performance. However, final selection should be done by R and D's and more detail investigation on blanket characteristics and fabricability. Required R and D's are also listed. With these efforts, the convertible blanket can be developed. However, the following should be noted. Though many of above R and D's are also necessary even for non-convertible blanket, R and D's on convertibility will be one of the most difficult parts and need significant efforts. Besides the installation of convertible blanket with required structures and lines for conversion will make the ITER basic machine more complicated. (author)

  15. ARIES-IV Nested Shell Blanket Design

    Wong, C.P.C.; Redler, K.; Reis, E.E.; Will, R.; Cheng, E.; Hasan, C.M.; Sharafat, S.

    1993-11-01

    The ARIES-IV Nested Shell Blanket (NSB) Design is an alternate blanket concept of the ARIES-IV low activation helium-cooled reactor design. The reference design has the coolant routed in the poloidal direction and the inlet and outlet plena are located at the top and bottom of the torus. The NSB design has the high velocity coolant routed in the toroidal direction and the plena are located behind the blanket. This is of significance since the selected structural material is SiC-composite. The NSB is designed to have key high performance components with characteristic dimensions of no larger than 2 m. These components can be brazed to form the blanket module. For the diverter design, we eliminated the use of W as the divertor coating material by relying on the successful development of the gaseous divertor concept. The neutronics and thermal-hydraulic performance of both blanket concepts are similar. The selected blanket and divertor configurations can also meet all the projected structural, neutronics and thermal-hydraulics design limits and requirements. With the selected blanket and divertor materials, the design has a level of safety assurance rate of I (LSA-1), which indicates an inherently safe design

  16. On blanket concepts of the Helias reactor

    Wobig, H.; Harmeyer, E.; Herrnegger, F.; Kisslinger, J.

    1999-07-01

    The paper discusses various options for a blanket of the Helias reactor HSR22. The Helias reactor is an upgrade version of the Wendelstein 7-X device. The dimensions of the Helias reactor are: major radius 22 m, average plasma radius 1.8 m, magnetic field on axis 4.75 T, maximum field 10 T, number of field periods 5, fusion power 3000 MW. The minimum distance between plasma and coils is 1.5 m, leaving sufficient space for a blanket and shield. Three options of a breeding blanket are discussed taking into account the specific properties of the Helias configuration. Due to the large area of the first wall (2600 m 2 ) the average neutron power load on the first wall is below 1 MWm .2 , which has a strong impact on the blanket performance with respect to lifetime and cooling requirements. A comparison with a tokamak reactor shows that the lifetime of first wall components and blanket components in the Helias reactor is expected to be at least two times longer. The blanket concepts being discussed in the following are: the solid breeder concept (HCPB), the dual-coolant Pb-17Li blanket concept and the water-cooled Pb-17Li concept (WCLL). (orig.)

  17. Tritium transport analysis for CFETR WCSB blanket

    Zhao, Pinghui, E-mail: phzhao@mail.ustc.edu.cn; Yang, Wanli; Li, Yuanjie; Ge, Zhihao; Nie, Xingchen; Gao, Zhongping

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • A simplified tritium transport model for CFETR WCSB blanket was developed. • Tritium transport process in CFETR WCSB blanket was analyzed. • Sensitivity analyses of tritium transport parameters were carried out. - Abstract: Water Cooled Solid Breeder (WCSB) blanket was put forward as one of the breeding blanket candidate schemes for Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR). In this study, a simplified tritium transport model was developed. Based on the conceptual engineering design, neutronics and thermal-hydraulic analyses of CFETR WCSB blanket, tritium transport process was analyzed. The results show that high tritium concentration and inventory exist in primary water loop and total tritium losses exceed CFETR limits under current conditions. Conducted were sensitivity analyses of influential parameters, including tritium source, temperature, flow-rate capacity and surface condition. Tritium performance of WCSB blanket can be significantly improved under a smaller tritium impinging rate, a larger flow-rate capacity or a better surface condition. This work provides valuable reference for the enhancement of tritium transport behavior in CFETR WCSB blanket.

  18. ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMANCE SOLID WALL BLANKET CONCEPTS

    WONG, CPC; MALANG, S; NISHIO, S; RAFFRAY, R; SAGARA, S

    2002-01-01

    OAK A271 ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMANCE SOLID WALL BLANKET CONCEPTS. First wall and blanket (FW/blanket) design is a crucial element in the performance and acceptance of a fusion power plant. High temperature structural and breeding materials are needed for high thermal performance. A suitable combination of structural design with the selected materials is necessary for D-T fuel sufficiency. Whenever possible, low afterheat, low chemical reactivity and low activation materials are desired to achieve passive safety and minimize the amount of high-level waste. Of course the selected fusion FW/blanket design will have to match the operational scenarios of high performance plasma. The key characteristics of eight advanced high performance FW/blanket concepts are presented in this paper. Design configurations, performance characteristics, unique advantages and issues are summarized. All reviewed designs can satisfy most of the necessary design goals. For further development, in concert with the advancement in plasma control and scrape off layer physics, additional emphasis will be needed in the areas of first wall coating material selection, design of plasma stabilization coils, consideration of reactor startup and transient events. To validate the projected performance of the advanced FW/blanket concepts the critical element is the need for 14 MeV neutron irradiation facilities for the generation of necessary engineering design data and the prediction of FW/blanket components lifetime and availability

  19. ITER breeding blanket module design and analysis

    Kuroda, Toshimasa; Enoeda, Mikio; Kikuchi, Shigeto [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment] [and others

    1998-11-01

    The ITER breeding blanket employs a ceramic breeder and Be neutron multiplier both in small spherical pebble form. Radial-poloidal cooling panels are arranged in the blanket box to remove the nuclear heating in these materials and to reinforce the blanket structure. At the first wall, Be armor is bonded onto the stainless steel (SS) structure to provide a low Z plasma-compatible surface and to protect the first wall/blanket structure from the direct contact with the plasma during off-normal events. Thermo-mechanical analyses and investigation of fabrication procedure have been performed for this breeding blanket. To evaluate thermo-mechanical behavior of the pebble beds including the dependency of the effective thermal conductivity on stress, analysis methods have been preliminary established by the use of special calculation option of ABAQUS code, which are briefly summarized in this report. The structural response of the breeding blanket module under internal pressure of 4 MPa (in case of in-blanket LOCA) resulted in rather high stress in the blanket side (toroidal end) wall, thus addition of a stiffening rib or increase of the wall thickness will be needed. Two-dimensional elasto-plastic analyses have been performed for the Be/SS bonded interface at the first wall taking a fabrication process based on HIP bonding and thermal cycle due to pulsed plasma operation into account. The stress-strain hysteresis during these process and operation was clarified, and a procedure to assess and/or confirm the bonding integrity was also proposed. Fabrication sequence of the breeding blanket module was preliminarily developed based on the procedure to fabricate part by part and to assemble them one by one. (author)

  20. Beryllium R and D for blanket application

    Dalle Donne, M.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik; Longhurst, G.R. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls (United States); Kawamura, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1998-10-01

    The paper describes the main problems and the R and D for the beryllium to be used as neutron multiplier in blankets. As the four ITER partners propose to use beryllium in the form of pebbles for their DEMO relevant blankets (only the Russians consider the porous beryllium option as an alternative) and the ITER breeding blanket will use beryllium pebbles as well, the paper is mainly based on beryllium pebbles. Also the work on the chemical reactivity of fully dense and porous beryllium in contact with water steam is described, due to the safety importance of this point. (orig.) 29 refs.

  1. Beryllium R and D for blanket application

    Dalle Donne, M.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Kawamura, H.

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes the main problems and the R and D for the beryllium to be used as neutron multiplier in blankets. As the four ITER partners propose to use beryllium in the form of pebbles for their DEMO relevant blankets (only the Russians consider the porous beryllium option as an alternative) and the ITER breeding blanket will use beryllium pebbles as well, the paper is mainly based on beryllium pebbles. Also the work on the chemical reactivity of fully dense and porous beryllium in contact with water steam is described, due to the safety importance of this point. (orig.)

  2. Beryllium R&D for blanket application

    Donne, M. Dalle; Longhurst, G. R.; Kawamura, H.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F.

    1998-10-01

    The paper describes the main problems and the R&D for the beryllium to be used as neutron multiplier in blankets. As the four ITER partners propose to use beryllium in the form of pebbles for their DEMO relevant blankets (only the Russians consider the porous beryllium option as an alternative) and the ITER breeding blanket will use beryllium pebbles as well, the paper is mainly based on beryllium pebbles. Also the work on the chemical reactivity of fully dense and porous beryllium in contact with water steam is described, due to the safety importance of this point.

  3. Mechanical and thermal design of hybrid blankets

    Schultz, K.R.

    1978-01-01

    The thermal and mechanical aspects of hybrid reactor blanket design considerations are discussed. This paper is intended as a companion to that of J. D. Lee of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory on the nuclear aspects of hybrid reactor blanket design. The major design characteristics of hybrid reactor blankets are discussed with emphasis on the areas of difference between hybrid reactors and standard fusion or fission reactors. Specific examples are used to illustrate the design tradeoffs and choices that must be made in hybrid reactor design. These examples are drawn from the work on the Mirror Hybrid Reactor

  4. Benchmark calculations for fusion blanket development

    Sawan, M.E.; Cheng, E.T.

    1985-01-01

    Benchmark problems representing the leading fusion blanket concepts are presented. Benchmark calculations for self-cooled Li/sub 17/Pb/sub 83/ and helium-cooled blankets were performed. Multigroup data libraries generated from ENDF/B-IV and V files using the NJOY and AMPX processing codes with different weighting functions were used. The sensitivity of the TBR to group structure and weighting spectrum increases and Li enrichment decrease with up to 20% discrepancies for thin natural Li/sub 17/Pb/sub 83/ blankets

  5. Benchmark calculations for fusion blanket development

    Sawan, M.L.; Cheng, E.T.

    1986-01-01

    Benchmark problems representing the leading fusion blanket concepts are presented. Benchmark calculations for self-cooled Li 17 Pb 83 and helium-cooled blankets were performed. Multigroup data libraries generated from ENDF/B-IV and V files using the NJOY and AMPX processing codes with different weighting functions were used. The sensitivity of the tritium breeding ratio to group structure and weighting spectrum increases as the thickness and Li enrichment decrease with up to 20% discrepancies for thin natural Li 17 Pb 83 blankets. (author)

  6. Environmental considerations for alternative fusion reactor blankets

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Young, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    Comparisons of alternative fusion reactor blanket/coolant systems suggest that environmental considerations will enter strongly into selection of design and materials. Liquid blankets and coolants tend to maximize transport of radioactive corrosion products. Liquid lithium interacts strongly with tritium, minimizing permeation and escape of gaseous tritium in accidents. However, liquid lithium coolants tend to create large tritium inventories and have a large fire potential compared to flibe and solid blankets. Helium coolants minimize radiation transport, but do not have ability to bind the tritium in case of accidental releases. (auth)

  7. Pirenzepine block of ACh-induced mucus secretion in tracheal submucosal gland cells

    Farley, J.M.; Dwyer, T.M.

    1991-01-01

    Muscarinic stimulation of mucus secretion, as measured by the release of [ 3 H]glycoprotein, was studied in explants from the tracheal epithelium of weanling swine. The mucus glycoprotein secretion was transient, ceasing within the first 10 min of a continuous exposure to 100 μM ACh. Increasing the solutions' osmotic pressure did not alter basal mucus glycoprotein secretion. Mucus glycoprotein secretion was inhibited by 2-10 μM PZP, indicting that the M 3 muscarinic receptors mediate cholinergic stimulation of mucus production

  8. Workflow for the Targeted and Untargeted Detection of Small Metabolites in Fish Skin Mucus

    Lada Ivanova

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The skin mucus of fish is in permanent contact with the aquatic environment. Data from the analysis of the chemical composition of skin mucus could potentially be used for monitoring the health status of the fish. Knowledge about mucus composition or change in composition over time could also contribute to understanding the aetiology of certain diseases. The objective of the present study was the development of a workflow for non-invasive sampling of skin mucus from farmed salmon (Salmo salar for the targeted and untargeted detection of small metabolites. Skin mucus was either scraped off, wiped off using medical wipes, or the mucus’ water phase was absorbed using the same type of medical wipes that was used for the wiping method. Following a simple filtration step, the obtained mucus samples were subjected to hydrophilic interaction chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry. Post-acquisition processing included the targeted analysis of 86 small metabolites, of which up to 60 were detected in absorbed mucus. Untargeted analysis of the mucus samples from equally treated salmon revealed that the total variation of the metabolome was lowest in absorbed mucus and highest in the scraped mucus. Thus, future studies including small-molecule metabolomics of skin mucus in fish would benefit from a sampling regime employing absorption of the water phase in order to minimize the bias related to the sampling step. Furthermore, the absorption method is also a less invasive approach allowing for repetitive sampling within short time intervals.

  9. Review: BNL Tokamak graphite blanket design concepts

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    The BNL minimum activity graphite blanket designs are reviewed, and three are discussed in the context of an experimental power reactor (EPR) and commercial power reactor. Basically, the three designs employ a 30 cm or thicker graphite screen. Bremsstrahlung energy is deposited on the graphite surface and re-radiated away as thermal radiation. Fast neutrons are slowed down in the graphite, depositing most of their energy, which is then radiated to a secondary blanket with coolant tubes, as in types A and B, or removed by intermittent direct gas cooling (type C). In types A and B, radiation damage to the coolant tubes in the secondary blanket is reduced by one or two orders of magnitude, while in type C, the blanket is only cooled when the reactor is shut down, so that coolant cannot quench the plasma. (Auth.)

  10. Blanket design for imploding liner systems

    Schaffer, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    The blanket design comprises hot, molten, rotating liquid vortex systems suitable for rapidly compressing confined plasmas, in which stratified immiscible liquid layers having successively greater mass densities outwardly of the axis of rotation are provided

  11. APT target-blanket fabrication development

    Fisher, D.L.

    1997-06-13

    Concepts for producing tritium in an accelerator were translated into hardware for engineering studies of tritium generation, heat transfer, and effects of proton-neutron flux on materials. Small-scale target- blanket assemblies were fabricated and material samples prepared for these performance tests. Blanket assemblies utilize composite aluminum-lead modules, the two primary materials of the blanket. Several approaches are being investigated to produce large-scale assemblies, developing fabrication and assembly methods for their commercial manufacture. Small-scale target-blanket assemblies, designed and fabricated at the Savannah River Site, were place in Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) for irradiation. They were subjected to neutron flux for nine months during 1996-97. Coincident with this test was the development of production methods for large- scale modules. Increasing module size presented challenges that required new methods to be developed for fabrication and assembly. After development, these methods were demonstrated by fabricating and assembling two production-scale modules.

  12. Stress analysis of the tokamak engineering test breeder blanket

    Huang Zhongqi

    1992-01-01

    The design features of the hybrid reactor blanket and main parameters are presented. The stress analysis is performed by using computer codes SAP5p and SAP6 with the three kinds of blanket module loadings, i.e, the pressure of coolant, the blanket weight and the thermal loading. Numerical calculation results indicate that the stresses of the blanket are smaller than the allowable ones of the material, the blanket design is therefore reasonable

  13. The fusion blanket program at Chalk River

    Hastings, I.J.

    1986-03-01

    Work on the Fusion Blanket Program commenced at Chalk River in 1984 June. Co-funded by Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, the Program utilizes Chalk River expertise in instrumented irradiation testing, ceramics, tritium technology, materials testing and compound chemistry. This paper gives highlights of studies to date on lithium-based ceramics, leading contenders for the fusion blanket

  14. Advanced high performance solid wall blanket concepts

    Wong, C.P.C.; Malang, S.; Nishio, S.; Raffray, R.; Sagara, A.

    2002-01-01

    First wall and blanket (FW/blanket) design is a crucial element in the performance and acceptance of a fusion power plant. High temperature structural and breeding materials are needed for high thermal performance. A suitable combination of structural design with the selected materials is necessary for D-T fuel sufficiency. Whenever possible, low afterheat, low chemical reactivity and low activation materials are desired to achieve passive safety and minimize the amount of high-level waste. Of course the selected fusion FW/blanket design will have to match the operational scenarios of high performance plasma. The key characteristics of eight advanced high performance FW/blanket concepts are presented in this paper. Design configurations, performance characteristics, unique advantages and issues are summarized. All reviewed designs can satisfy most of the necessary design goals. For further development, in concert with the advancement in plasma control and scrape off layer physics, additional emphasis will be needed in the areas of first wall coating material selection, design of plasma stabilization coils, consideration of reactor startup and transient events. To validate the projected performance of the advanced FW/blanket concepts the critical element is the need for 14 MeV neutron irradiation facilities for the generation of necessary engineering design data and the prediction of FW/blanket components lifetime and availability

  15. Workshop on cold-blanket research

    1977-05-01

    The objective of the workshop was to identify and discuss cold-plasma blanket systems. In order to minimize the bombardment of the walls by hot neutrals the plasma should be impermeable. This requires a density edge-thickness product of nΔ > 10 15 cm -2 . An impermeable cold plasma-gas blanket surrounding a hot plasma core reduces the plasma wall/limiter interaction. Accumulation of impurities in this blanket can be expected. Fuelling from a blanket may be possible as shown by experimental results, though not fully explained by classical transport of neutrals. Refuelling of a reacting plasma had to be ensured by inward diffusion. Experimental studies of a cold impermeable plasma have been done on the tokamak-like Ringboog device. Simulation calculations for the next generation of large tokamaks using a particular transport model, indicate that the plasma edge profile can be controlled to reduce the production of sputtered impurities to an acceptable level. Impurity control requires a small fraction of the radial space to accomodate the cold-plasma layer. The problem of exhaust is, however, more complicated. If the cold-blanket scheme works as predicted in the model calculations, then α-particles generated by fusion will be transported to the cold outside layer. The Communities' experimental programme of research has been discussed in terms of the tokamaks which are available and planned. Two options present themselves for the continuation of cold-blanket research

  16. Liquid lithium blanket processing studies

    Talbot, J.B.; Clinton, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    The sorption of tritium on yttrium from flowing molten lithium and the subsequent release of tritium from yttrium for regeneration of the metal sorbent were investigated to evaluate the feasibility of such a tritium-recovery process for a fusion reactor blanket of liquid lithium. In initial experiments with the forced convection loop, yttrium samples were contacted with lithium at 300 0 C. A mass transfer coefficient of 2.5 x 10 - cm/sec, which is more than an order of magnitude less than the value measured in earlier static experiments, was determined for the flowing lithium system. Rates of tritium release from yttrium samples were measured to evaluate possible thermal regeneration of the sorbent. Values for diffusion coefficients at 505, 800, and 900 0 C were estimated to be 1.1 x 10 -13 , 4.9 x 10 -12 , and 9.3 x 10 -10 cm 2 /sec, respectively. Tritium release from yttrium was investigated at higher temperatures and with hydrogen added to the argon sweep gas to provide a reducing atmosphere

  17. Helicobacter pylori moves through mucus by reducing mucin viscoelasticity

    Celli, Jonathan P.; Turner, Bradley S.; Afdhal, Nezam H.; Keates, Sarah; Ghiran, Ionita; Kelly, Ciaran P.; Ewoldt, Randy H.; McKinley, Gareth H.; So, Peter; Erramilli, Shyamsunder; Bansil, Rama

    2009-01-01

    The ulcer-causing gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is the only bacterium known to colonize the harsh acidic environment of the human stomach. H. pylori survives in acidic conditions by producing urease, which catalyzes hydrolysis of urea to yield ammonia thus elevating the pH of its environment. However, the manner in which H. pylori is able to swim through the viscoelastic mucus gel that coats the stomach wall remains poorly understood. Previous rheology studies on gastric mucin, the key...

  18. The in vitro mucolytic effect of xylitol and dornase alfa on chronic rhinosinusitis mucus.

    Hardcastle, Tim; Jain, Ravi; Radcliff, Fiona; Waldvogel-Thurlow, Sharon; Zoing, Melissa; Biswas, Kristi; Douglas, Richard

    2017-09-01

    The overproduction and stagnation of purulent mucus impair mucociliary clearance and exacerbate the symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). There is a clinical need for effective topical mucolytic agents to facilitate removal of mucus and improve postoperative outcomes. The effects of xylitol (5%) and dornase alfa (1 mg/mL) on mucus and mucus crusts were investigated. Viscoelasticity and viscosity of wet mucus derived from 30 CRS patients was measured with a plate rheometer. Postoperative dried mucus crust dissolution was measured by examining peripheral transparency, central transparency, and border definition of treated crust samples from 17 CRS patients. Xylitol and dornase alfa reduced wet mucus viscoelasticity at a frequency of 0.1 Hz significantly more than the saline control. Treatments also produced significantly lower viscosities than saline at a shear rate of 10 and 100 seconds -1 . Xylitol and dornase alfa significantly decreased mucus crust border definition relative to saline. Xylitol and dornase alfa may be efficacious mucolytics, encouraging the breakdown of postoperative mucus crusts and the reduction of viscoelasticity and viscosity of wet mucus. In vivo study is required to evaluate the potential of these agents in treating recalcitrant CRS. © 2017 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  19. FACTORS AFFECTING THE CERVICAL MUCUS CRYSTALLIZATION, THE SPERM SURVIVAL IN CERVICAL MUCUS, AND PREGNANCY RATES OF HOLSTEIN COWS

    Alena JEŽKOVÁ

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between calving year and season, parity, number of AI, day of lactation, milk production in the 1st 100 lactation days or diseases occurrence (retained placenta, endometritis or cysts, sperm motility (SM during 30, 60 and 90 minutes of the cervical mucus survival test, cervical mucus crystallization (CMC and their infl uence on days to fi rst insemination (interval, open days (SP, inseminations number for pregnancy (index, and pregnancy rates (PR in Holstein cows (n=284. Signifi cant differences of interval, SP and index were detected also in relation to number of AI and day of lactation (P < 0.001. Cows without reproduction diseases (healthy had better results of interval, SP (P < 0.01, index and PR. Pregnancy rate of healthy cows was by 11.43% higher, but without statistical signifi cance. The higher results of PR (62.74% were discovered in relation to ferny-like crystallization of cervical mucus (P < 0.001. CMC affected results of cervical mucus survival test, the highest motility of sperms after the 60 and 90 minutes was assumed in the case of club moss – ferny (14.80% and 7.96% and ferny-like crystallization (13.82% and 8.47% with statistical signifi cance (P < 0.05. The choice of these characteristics and defi nition of their relations allows assuming their using for detailed study and determination of the cows´ biological ability to conceive, the one of the main components of effi ciency of cows´ reproduction.

  20. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Outcompetes Enterococcus faecium via Mucus-Binding Pili: Evidence for a Novel and Heterospecific Probiotic Mechanism.

    Tytgat, Hanne L P; Douillard, François P; Reunanen, Justus; Rasinkangas, Pia; Hendrickx, Antoni P A; Laine, Pia K; Paulin, Lars; Satokari, Reetta; de Vos, Willem M

    2016-10-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) have become a major nosocomial threat. Enterococcus faecium is of special concern, as it can easily acquire new antibiotic resistances and is an excellent colonizer of the human intestinal tract. Several clinical studies have explored the potential use of beneficial bacteria to weed out opportunistic pathogens. Specifically, the widely studied Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG has been applied successfully in the context of VRE infections. Here, we provide new insight into the molecular mechanism underlying the effects of this model probiotic on VRE decolonization. Both clinical VRE isolates and L. rhamnosus GG express pili on their cell walls, which are the key modulators of their highly efficient colonization of the intestinal mucosa. We found that one of the VRE pilus clusters shares considerable sequence similarity with the SpaCBA-SrtC1 pilus cluster of L. rhamnosus GG. Remarkable immunological and functional similarities were discovered between the mucus-binding pili of L. rhamnosus GG and those of the clinical E. faecium strain E1165, which was characterized at the genome level. Moreover, E. faecium strain E1165 bound efficiently to mucus, which may be prevented by the presence of the mucus-binding SpaC protein or antibodies against L. rhamnosus GG or SpaC. These results present experimental support for a novel probiotic mechanism, in which the mucus-binding pili of L. rhamnosus GG prevent the binding of a potential pathogen to the host. Hence, we provide a molecular basis for the further exploitation of L. rhamnosus GG and its pilins for prophylaxis and treatment of VRE infections. Concern about vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium causing nosocomial infections is rising globally. The arsenal of antibiotic strategies to treat these infections is nearly exhausted, and hence, new treatment strategies are urgently needed. Here, we provide molecular evidence to underpin reports of the successful clinical application of

  1. Test Blanket Working Group's recent activities

    Vetter, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    The ITER Test Blanket Working Group (TBWG) has continued its activities during the period of extension of the EDA with a revised charter on the co-ordination of the development work performed by the Parties and by the JCT leading to a co-ordinated test programme on ITER for a DEMO-relevant tritium breeding blanket. This follows earlier work carried out until July 1998, which formed part of the ITER Final Design Report (FDR), completed in 1998. Whilst the machine parameters for ITER-FEAT have been significantly revised compared to the FDR, testing of breeding blanket modules remains a main objective of the test programme and the development of a reactor-relevant breeding blanket to ensure tritium fuel self-sufficiency is recognized a key issue for fusion. Design work and R and D on breeding blanket concepts, including co-operation with the other Contacting Parties of the ITER-EDA for testing these concepts in ITER, are included in the work plans of the Parties

  2. Undefined role of mucus as a barrier in ocular drug delivery.

    Ruponen, Marika; Urtti, Arto

    2015-10-01

    Mucus layer covers the ocular surface, and soluble mucins are also present in the tear fluid. After topical ocular drug administration, the drugs and formulations may interact with mucus layer that may act as a barrier in ocular drug delivery. In this mini-review, we illustrate the mucin composition of the ocular surface and discuss the influence of mucus layer on ocular drug absorption. Based on the current knowledge the role of mucus barrier in drug delivery is still undefined. Furthermore, interactions with mucus may prolong the retention of drug formulations on the ocular surface. Mucus may decrease or increase ocular bioavailability depending on the magnitude of its role as barrier or retention site, respectively. Mechanistic studies are needed to clarify the role of mucin in ocular drug delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Coral mucus functions as an energy carrier and particle trap in the reef ecosystem

    Wild, C.; Huettel, M.; Klueter, A.

    2004-01-01

    Zooxanthellae, endosymbiotic algae of reef-building corals, substantially contribute to the high gross primary production of coral reefs(1), but corals exude up to half of the carbon assimilated by their zooxanthellae as mucus(2,3). Here we show that released coral mucus efficiently traps organic...... matter from the water column and rapidly carries energy and nutrients to the reef lagoon sediment, which acts as a biocatalytic mineralizing filter. In the Great Barrier Reef, the dominant genus of hard corals, Acropora, exudes up to 4.8 litres of mucus per square metre of reef area per day. Between 56......% and 80% of this mucus dissolves in the reef water, which is filtered through the lagoon sands. Here, coral mucus is degraded at a turnover rate of at least 7% per hour. Detached undissolved mucus traps suspended particles, increasing its initial organic carbon and nitrogen content by three orders...

  4. Mucus and Mucins: do they have a role in the inhibition of the human immunodeficiency virus?

    Mall, Anwar Suleman; Habte, Habtom; Mthembu, Yolanda; Peacocke, Julia; de Beer, Corena

    2017-01-01

    Background Mucins are large O-linked glycosylated proteins which give mucus their gel-forming properties. There are indications that mucus and mucins in saliva, breast milk and in the cervical plug inhibit the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) in an in vitro assay. Main body of abstract Crude mucus gels form continuous layers on the epithelial surfaces of the major internal tracts of the body and protect these epithelial surfaces against aggressive luminal factors such as hydrochloric acid...

  5. Novel Compounds from Shark and Stingray Epidermal Mucus With Antimicrobial Activity Against Wound Infection Pathogens

    2013-03-01

    Extraction with Enzymes Collaborators at Daemen College also tested papain and pepsin for their abilities to liberate proteins from the mucus...pellet. Papain is a cysteine protease and a common active ingredient in meat tenderizers. It is often used to dissociate cells in the first step of cell...various treatments with Papain and Pepsin. Lane 1: EDTA-DTT extract; Lane 2-4: Mucus pellet + Papain for 30, 40, and 60 min; Lane 5: Mucus pellet

  6. Adherence of bacteria to mucus collected from different parts of the reproductive tract of heifers and cows.

    Styková, E; Nemcová, R; Valocký, I; Novotný, F; Guba, P

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, we examined the adherence of indigenous vaginal bacteria, probiotic strains, and metritis pathogens to mucus collected from different parts of the reproductive tracts of heifers and cows and compared their adherence with the bacterial adherence to mucus collected from the stomach and large intestine of pigs. Most of the vaginal strains adhered to mucus collected from different parts of the reproductive tract and strongly adhered to gastric mucus, with the exception of Lactobacillus buchneri 24S8. Only Lactobacillus mucosae 29S8, Enterococcus faecium E21, and E. faecium EAC adhered to colonic mucus. Probiotic strains adhered strongly to mucus collected from the reproductive tract and gastric mucus but did not adhere to colonic mucus. Pathogenic strains were adherent to vaginal, uterine horn, and gastric mucus, except Escherichia coli O8:K88ab:H9 (65), Fusobacterium necrophorum, and Gardnerella vaginalis, which adhered to uterine cervix mucus. Only Kocuria kristinae and G. vaginalis adhered to uterine body mucus; E. coli O149:K88ac (EC) adhered to colonic mucus. The strains did not exhibit host specificity but rather strain specificity. The ability to adhere to mucus was a characteristic unique to each strain. To our knowledge, this is the first report regarding in vitro adherence of GRAS (Generally Regarded As Safe) lactobacilli isolated from different sources to mucus collected from different parts of the reproductive tract.

  7. First Wall, Blanket, Shield Engineering Technology Program

    Nygren, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Technology Program sponsored by the Office of Fusion Energy of DOE has the overall objective of providing engineering data that will define performance parameters for nuclear systems in advanced fusion reactors. The program comprises testing and the development of computational tools in four areas: (1) thermomechanical and thermal-hydraulic performance of first-wall component facsimiles with emphasis on surface heat loads; (2) thermomechanical and thermal-hydraulic performance of blanket and shield component facsimiles with emphasis on bulk heating; (3) electromagnetic effects in first wall, blanket, and shield component facsimiles with emphasis on transient field penetration and eddy-current effects; (4) assembly, maintenance and repair with emphasis on remote-handling techniques. This paper will focus on elements 2 and 4 above and, in keeping with the conference participation from both fusion and fission programs, will emphasize potential interfaces between fusion technology and experience in the fission industry

  8. European DEMO BOT solid breeder blanket

    Dalle Donne, M.

    1994-11-01

    The BOT (Breeder Outside Tube) Solid Breeder Blanket for a fusion DEMO reactor is presented. This is one of the four blanket concepts under development in the frame of the European fusion technology program with the aim to select in 1995 the two most promising ones for further development. In the paper the reference blanket design and external loops are described as well as the results of the theoretical and experimental work in the fields of neutronics, thermohydraulics, mechanical stresses, tritium control and extraction, development and irradiation of the ceramic breeder material, beryllium development, ferromagnetic forces caused by disruptions, safety and reliability. An outlook is given on the remaining open questions and on the required R and D program. (orig.) [de

  9. Fusion breeder sphere - PAC blanket design

    Sullivan, J.D.; Palmer, B.J.F.

    1987-11-01

    There is a considerable world-wide effort directed toward the production of materials for fusion reactors. Many ceramic fabrication groups are working on making lithium ceramics in a variety of forms, to be incorporated into the tritium breeding blanket which will surround the fusion reactor. Current blanket designs include ceramic in either monolithic or packed sphere bed (sphere-pac) forms. The major thrust at AECL is the production of lithium aluminate spheres to be incorporated in a sphere-pac bed. Contemporary studies on breeder blanket design offer little insight into the requirements on the sizes of the spheres. This study examined the parameters which determine the properties of pressure drop and coolant requirements. It was determined that an optimised sphere-pac bed would be composed of two diameters of spheres: 75 weight % at 3 mm and 25 weight % at 0.3 mm

  10. The requirements for processing tritium recovered from liquid lithium blankets: The blanket interface

    Clemmer, R.G.; Finn, P.A.; Greenwood, L.R.; Grimm, T.L.; Sze, D.K.; Bartlit, J.R.; Anderson, J.L.; Yoshida, H.; Naruse.

    1988-03-01

    We have initiated a study to define a blanket processing mockup for Tritium Systems Test Assembly. Initial evaluation of the requirements of the blanket processing system have been started. The first step of the work is to define the condition of the gaseous tritium stream from the blanket tritium recovery system. This report summarizes this part of the work for one particular blanket concept, i.e., a self-cooled lithium blanket. The total gas throughput, the hydrogen to tritium ratio, the corrosive chemicals, and the radionuclides are defined. The key discoveries are: the throughput of the blanket gas stream (including the helium carrier gas) is about two orders of magnitude higher than the plasma exhaust stream;the protium to tritium ratio is about 1, the deuterium to tritium ratio is about 0.003;the corrosion chemicals are dominated by halides;the radionuclides are dominated by C-14, P-32, and S-35;their is high level of nitrogen contamination in the blanket stream. 77 refs., 6 figs., 13 tabs

  11. Enzyme decorated drug carriers: Targeted swords to cleave and overcome the mucus barrier.

    Menzel, Claudia; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2018-01-15

    The use of mucus permeating drug carrier systems being able to overcome the mucus barrier can lead to a remarkable enhancement in bioavailability. One promising approach is the design of mucolytic enzyme decorated carrier systems (MECS). These systems include micro- and nanoparticles as well as self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS) decorated with mucin cleaving enzymes such as papain (PAP) or bromelain (BRO). MECS are able to cross the mucus barrier in a comparatively efficient manner by cleaving mucus substructures in front of them on their way to the epithelium. Thereby these enzymes hydrolyze peptide bonds of mucus glycoproteins forming tiny holes or passages through the mucus. In various in vitro and in vivo studies MECS proved to be superior in their mucus permeating properties over nanocarriers without enzyme decoration. PAP decorated nanoparticles, for instance, remained 3h after oral administration to an even 2.5-fold higher extend in rat small intestine than the corresponding undecorated nanoparticles permeating the intestinal mucus gel layer to a much lower degree. As MECS break up the mucus network only locally without destroying its overall protective barrier function, even long term treatments with such systems seem feasible. Within this review article we address different drug carrier systems decorated with various types of enzymes, their particular pros and cons and potential applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Mucus reduction promotes acetyl salicylic acid-induced small intestinal mucosal injury in rats.

    Suyama, Yosuke; Handa, Osamu; Naito, Yuji; Takayama, Shun; Mukai, Rieko; Ushiroda, Chihiro; Majima, Atsushi; Yasuda-Onozawa, Yuriko; Higashimura, Yasuki; Fukui, Akifumi; Dohi, Osamu; Okayama, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Naohisa; Katada, Kazuhiro; Kamada, Kazuhiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Konishi, Hideyuki; Itoh, Yoshito

    2018-03-25

    Acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) is a useful drug for the secondary prevention of cerebro-cardiovascular diseases, but it has adverse effects on the small intestinal mucosa. The pathogenesis and prophylaxis of ASA-induced small intestinal injury remain unclear. In this study, we focused on the intestinal mucus, as the gastrointestinal tract is covered by mucus, which exhibits protective effects against various gastrointestinal diseases. ASA was injected into the duodenum of rats, and small intestinal mucosal injury was evaluated using Evans blue dye. To investigate the importance of mucus, Polysorbate 80 (P80), an emulsifier, was used before ASA injection. In addition, rebamipide, a mucus secretion inducer in the small intestine, was used to suppress mucus reduction in the small intestine of P80-administered rats. The addition of P80 reduced the mucus and exacerbated the ASA-induced small intestinal mucosal injury. Rebamipide significantly suppressed P80-reduced small intestinal mucus and P80-increased intestinal mucosal lesions in ASA-injected rats, demonstrating that mucus is important for the protection against ASA-induced small intestinal mucosal injury. These results provide new insight into the mechanism of ASA-induced small intestinal mucosal injury. Mucus secretion-increasing therapy might be useful in preventing ASA-induced small intestinal mucosal injury. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Detection of Lsr2 gene of Mycobacterium leprae in nasal mucus

    Luiz Antonio Custodio

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, nasal mucus from patients with leprosy were analyzed by PCR using specific primers for Lsr2 gene of Mycobacterium leprae. The presence of Lsr2 gene in the nasal mucus was detected in 25.80% of patients with paucibacillari leprosy, and 23.07% of contacts. Despite the absence of clinical features in the contact individuals, it was possible to detect the presence of Lsr2 gene in the nasal mucus of these individuals. Therefore, PCR detection of M. leprae targeting Lsr2 gene using nasal mucus samples could contribute to early diagnosis of leprosy.

  14. LMFBR blanket physics project progress report No. 4

    Driscoll, M.J.; Lanning, D.D.; Kaplan, I.; Supple, A.T.

    1973-01-01

    During the period covered by the report, July 1, 1972, through June 30, 1973, work was devoted to completion of experimental measurements and data analysis on Blanket Mockup No. 3, a graphite-reflected blanket, and to initiation of experimental work on Blanket Mockup No. 4, a steel-reflected assembly designed to mock up a demonstration plant blanket. Work was also carried out on the analysis of a number of advanced blanket concepts, including the use of high-albedo reflectors, the use of thorium in place of uranium in the blanket region, and the ''parfait'' or completely internal blanket concept. Finally, methods development work was initiated to develop the capability for making gamma heating measurements in the blanket mockups. (U.S.)

  15. Epoxy blanket protects milled part during explosive forming

    1966-01-01

    Epoxy blanket protects chemically milled or machined sections of large, complex structural parts during explosive forming. The blanket uniformly covers all exposed surfaces and fills any voids to support and protect the entire part.

  16. Some new ideas for Tandem Mirror blankets

    Neef, W.S. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The Tandem Mirror Reactor, with its cylindrical central cell, has led to numerous blanket designs taking advantage of the simple geometry. Also many new applications for fusion neutrons are now being considered. To the pure fusion electricity producers and hybrids producing fissile fuel, we are adding studies of synthetic fuel producers and fission-suppressed hybrids. The three blanket concepts presented are new ideas and should be considered illustrative of the breadth of Livermore's application studies. They are not meant to imply fully analyzed designs

  17. Fusion blanket high-temperature heat transfer

    Fillo, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Deep penetration of 14 MeV neutrons makes two-temperature region blankets feasible. A relatively low-temperature (approx. 300 0 C) metallic structure is the vacuum/coolant pressure boundary, while the interior of the blanket, which is a simple packed bed of nonstructural material, operates at very high temperatures (>1000 0 C). The water-cooled shell structure is thermally insulated from the steam-cooled interior. High-temperature steam can dramatically increase the efficiency of electric power generation, as well as produce hydrogen and oxygen-based synthetic fuels at high-efficiency

  18. Tritium behaviour in ceramic breeder blankets

    Miller, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Tritium release from the candidate ceramic materials, Li 2 O, LiA10 2 , Li 2 SiO 3 , Li 4 SiO 4 and Li 2 ZrO 3 , is being investigated in many blanket programs. Factors that affect tritium release from the ceramic into the helium sweep gas stream include operating temperature, ceramic microstructure, tritium transport and solubility in the solid. A review is presented of the material properties studied and of the irradiation programs and the results are summarized. The ceramic breeder blanket concept is briefly reviewed

  19. The viscoelastic properties of the cervical mucus plug

    Bastholm, Sara K.; Becher, Naja; Stubbe, Peter Reimer

    2014-01-01

    labor. MethodsViscoelastic properties of CMPs were investigated with a dynamic oscillatory rheometer using frequency and stress sweep experiments within the linear viscoelastic region. Main outcome measuresThe rheological variables obtained were as follows: elastic modulus (G), viscous modulus (G......ObjectiveTo characterize the viscoelastic properties of cervical mucus plugs (CMPs) shed during labor at term. DesignExperimental research. SettingDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. Population/SampleSpontaneously shed CMPs from 18 healthy women in active...

  20. Intestinal mucus and juice glycoproteins have a liquid crystalline structure

    Denisova, E.A.; Lazarev, P.I.; Vazina, A.A.; Zheleznaya, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns have been obtained from the following components of canine gastrointestinal tract: (1) native small intestine mucus layer; (2) the precipitate of the flocks formed in the duodenal juice with decreasing pH; (3) concentrated solutions of glycoproteins isolated from the duodenal juice. The X-ray patterns consist of a large number of sharp reflections of spacings between about 100 and 4 A. Some reflections are common for all components studied. All the patterns are interpreted as arising from the glycoprotein molecules ordered into a liquid crystalline structure. (author)

  1. Fusion-reactor blanket and coolant material compatibility

    Jeppson, D.W.; Keough, R.F.

    1981-01-01

    Fusion reactor blanket and coolant compatibility tests are being conducted to aid in the selection and design of safe blanket and coolant systems for future fusion reactors. Results of scoping compatibility tests to date are reported for blanket material and water interactions at near operating temperatures. These tests indicate the quantitative hydrogen release, the maximum temperature and pressures produced and the rates of interactions for selected blanket materials

  2. Processing and waste disposal needs for fusion breeder blankets system

    Finn, P.A.; Vogler, S.

    1988-01-01

    We evaluated the waste disposal and recycling requirements for two types of fusion breeder blanket (solid and liquid). The goal was to determine if breeder blanket waste can be disposed of in shallow land burial, the least restrictive method under U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations. Described in this paper are the radionuclides expected in fusion blanket materials, plans for reprocessing and disposal of blanket components, and estimates for the operating costs involved in waste disposal. (orig.)

  3. Tritium inventory and permeation in liquid breeder blankets

    Reiter, F.

    1990-01-01

    This report reviews studies of the transport of hydrogen isotopes in the DEMO relevant water-cooled Pb-17Li blanket to be tested in NET and in a self-cooled blanket which uses Pb-17Li or Flibe as a liquid breeder material and V or Fe as a first wall material. The time dependences of tritium inventory and permeation in these blankets and of deuterium and tritium recycling in the self-cooled blanket are presented and discussed

  4. Mucus sugar content shapes the bacterial community structure in thermally stressed Acropora muricata

    Sonny T.M. Lee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that the chemical composition of a coral’s mucus can influence the associated bacterial community. However, information on this topic is rare, and non-existent for corals that are under thermal stress. This study therefore compared the carbohydrate composition of mucus in the coral Acropora muricata when subjected to increasing thermal stress from 26°C to 31°C, and determined whether this composition correlated with any changes in the bacterial community. Results showed that, at lower temperatures, the main components of mucus were N-acetyl glucosamine and C6 sugars, but these constituted a significantly lower proportion of the mucus in thermally-stressed corals. The change in the mucus composition coincided with a shift from a γ-Proteobacteria- to a Verrucomicrobiae- and α-Proteobacteria-dominated community in the coral mucus. Bacteria in the class Cyanobacteria also started to become prominent in the mucus when the coral was thermally stressed. The increase in the relative abundance of the Verrucomicrobiae at higher temperature was strongly associated with a change in the proportion of fucose, glucose and mannose in the mucus. Increase in the relative abundance of α-Proteobacteria were associated with GalNAc and glucose, while the drop in relative abundance of γ-Proteobacteria at high temperature coincided with changes in fucose and mannose. Cyanobacteria were highly associated with arabinose and xylose. Changes in mucus composition and the bacterial community in the mucus layer occurred at 29°C, which were prior to visual signs of coral bleaching at 31°C. A compositional change in the coral mucus, induced by thermal stress could therefore be a key factor leading to a shift in the associated bacterial community. This, in turn, has the potential to impact the physiological function of the coral holobiont.

  5. Milk consumption and mucus production in children with asthma.

    Thiara, Gurkaran; Goldman, Ran D

    2012-02-01

    Many parents of children with asthma are becoming increasingly reluctant to add milk to their children's diet because they believe it will worsen their children's asthma owing to increased mucus secretion. Recognizing the importance of milk as part of a healthy diet in supporting growth and calcium consumption, is it advisable to restrict milk in the diet? Dating back to the 12th century, milk has been proscribed for patients with asthma. However, to this very date studies have not been able to provide a definitive link for this recommendation. As there is a need for more conclusive evidence to determine the effect of milk among children with asthma and further understanding of mechanisms involved in mucus production, milk should not be eliminated or restricted. Health Canada recommends 2 servings of milk (0.5 L) a day for children 2 to 8 years of age and 3 to 4 servings of milk a day (0.75 to 1 L) for children 9 to 13 years of age for unrestricted healthy development.

  6. Post-secretory fate of host defence components in mucus.

    Salathe, Matthias; Forteza, Rosanna; Conner, Gregory E

    2002-01-01

    Airway mucus is a complex mixture of secretory products that provide a multifaceted defence against infection. Among many antimicrobial substances, mucus contains a peroxidase identical to milk lactoperoxidase (LPO) that is produced by goblet cells and submucosal glands. Airway secretions contain the substrates for LPO, namely thiocyanate and hydrogen peroxide, at concentrations sufficient for production of the biocidal compound hypothiocyanite, a fact confirmed by us in vitro. In vivo, inhibition of airway LPO in sheep significantly inhibits bacterial clearance, suggesting that the LPO system is a major contributor to host defences. Since secretory products including LPO are believed to be steadily removed by mucociliary clearance, their amount and availability on the surface is thought to be controlled solely by secretion. In contrast to this paradigm, new data suggest that LPO and other substances are retained at the ciliary border of the airway epithelium by binding to surface-associated hyaluronan, thereby providing an apical, fully active enzyme pool. Thus, hyaluronan, secreted from submucosal gland cells, plays a previously unrecognized pivotal role in mucosal host defence by retaining LPO and possibly other substances important for first line host defence at the apical surface 'ready for use' and protected from ciliary clearance.

  7. Smoking produced mucus and clearance of particulates in the lung

    Sterling, T.D.; Poland, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    Some studies of miners have shown a lesser relative lung-cancer risk for smokers than for nonsmokers. For example, experiments by Cross and associates with dogs have shown an apparent protective effect of cigarette smoke against radon-daughter and dust exposure. One reason for these changes may be the thickened mucus layer in the tracheobronchial region of smokers. Physiological changes in the lung due to smoking may decrease the effects of radioactive particles in cancers in the bronchial region by apparently promoting faster clearance, in that region, of radioactive particles and by decreasing the radiation dose through reduced penetration to the sensitive basal epithelial cells. Because of the short half-life of radon daughters, even if there is possible tobacco-related delay of particle clearance from the alveolar region it cannot affect radon clearance. Therefore, the possible mitigating effect of tobacco on radon-produced cancer appears to be limited to the tracheobronchial region. It would be of value to a number of occupations if the same changes in the lungs due to smoking could be produced in exposed workers in the absence of cigarette-smoking. Beta-carotene and vitamin A, which affect maintenance and secretion of the mucosal lining, appear to thicken mucus, thereby providing protection against radon-induced lung cancers that is similar to smoking-related changes in the lung

  8. INTOR first wall/blanket/shield activity

    Gohar, Y.; Billone, M.C.; Cha, Y.S.; Finn, P.A.; Hassanein, A.M.; Liu, Y.Y.; Majumdar, S.; Picologlou, B.F.; Smith, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The main emphasis of the INTOR first wall/blanket/shield (FWBS) during this period has been upon the tritium breeding issues. The objective is to develop a FWBS concept which produces the tritium requirement for INTOR operation and uses a small fraction of the first wall surface area. The FWBS is constrained by the dimensions of the reference design and the protection criteria required for different reactor components. The blanket extrapolation to commercial power reactor conditions and the proper temperature for power extraction have been sacrificed to achieve the highest possible local tritium breeding ratio (TBR). In addition, several other factors that have been considered in the blanket survey study include safety, reliability, lifetime fluence, number of burn cycles, simplicity, cost, and development issues. The implications of different tritium supply scenarios were discussed from the cost and availability for INTOR conditions. A wide variety of blanket options was explored in a preliminary way to determine feasibility and to see if they can satisfy the INTOR conditions. This survey and related issues are summarized in this report. Also discussed are material design requirements, thermal hydraulic considerations, structure analyses, tritium permeation through the first wall into the coolant, and tritium inventory

  9. Optimization of beryllium for fusion blanket applications

    Billone, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    The primary function of beryllium in a fusion reactor blanket is neutron multiplication to enhance tritium breeding. However, because heat, tritium and helium will be generated in and/or transported through beryllium and because the beryllium is in contact with other blanket materials, the thermal, mechanical, tritium/helium and compatibility properties of beryllium are important in blanket design. In particular, tritium retention during normal operation and release during overheating events are safety concerns. Accommodating beryllium thermal expansion and helium-induced swelling are important issues in ensuring adequate lifetime of the structural components adjacent to the beryllium. Likewise, chemical/metallurgical interactions between beryllium and structural components need to be considered in lifetime analysis. Under accident conditions the chemical interaction between beryllium and coolant and breeding materials may also become important. The performance of beryllium in fusion blanket applications depends on fabrication variables and operational parameters. First the properties database is reviewed to determine the state of knowledge of beryllium performance as a function of these variables. Several design calculations are then performed to indicate ranges of fabrication and operation variables that lead to optimum beryllium performance. Finally, areas for database expansion and improvement are highlighted based on the properties survey and the design sensitivity studies

  10. ITER driver blanket, European Community design

    Simbolotti, G.; Zampaglione, V.; Ferrari, M.; Gallina, M.; Mazzone, G.; Nardi, C.; Petrizzi, L.; Rado, V.; Violante, V.; Daenner, W.; Lorenzetto, P.; Gierszewski, P.; Grattarola, M.; Rosatelli, F.; Secolo, F.; Zacchia, F.; Caira, M.; Sorabella, L.

    1993-01-01

    Depending on the final decision on the operation time of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), the Driver Blanket might become a basic component of the machine with the main function of producing a significant fraction (close to 0.8) of the tritium required for the ITER operation, the remaining fraction being available from external supplies. The Driver Blanket is not required to provide reactor relevant performance in terms of tritium self-sufficiency. However, reactor relevant reliability and safety are mandatory requirements for this component in order not to significantly afftect the overall plant availability and to allow the ITER experimental program to be safely and successfully carried out. With the framework of the ITER Conceptual Design Activities (CDA, 1988-1990), a conceptual design of the ITER Driver Blanket has been carried out by ENEA Fusion Dept., in collaboration with ANSALDO S.p.A. and SRS S.r.l., and in close consultation with the NET Team and CFFTP (Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project). Such a design has been selected as EC (European Community) reference design for the ITER Driver Blanket. The status of the design at the end of CDA is reported in the present paper. (orig.)

  11. European blanket development for a demo reactor

    Giancarli, L.; Proust, E.; Anzidei, L.

    1994-01-01

    There are four breeding blanket concepts for a fusion DEMO reactor under development within the framework of the fusion technology programme of the European Union (EU). This paper describes the design of these concepts, the accompanying R + D programme and the status of the development. (authors). 8 figs., 1 tab

  12. A blanket design, apparatus, and fabrication techniques for the mass production of multilayer insulation blankets for the Superconducting Super Collider

    Gonczy, J.D.; Boroski, W.N.; Niemann, R.C.; Otavka, J.G.; Ruschman, M.K.; Schoo, C.J.

    1989-09-01

    The multilayer insulation (MLI) system for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) consists of full cryostat length assemblies of aluminized polyester film fabricated in the form of blankets and installed as blankets to the 4.5K cold mass and the 20K and 80K thermal radiation shields. Approximately 40,000 MLI blankets will be required in the 10,000 cryogenic devices comprising the SSC accelerator. Each blanket is nearly 17 meters long and 1.8 meters wide. This paper reports the blanket design, an apparatus, and the fabrication method used to mass produce pre-fabricated MLI blankets. Incorporated in the blanket design are techniques which automate quality control during installation of the MLI blankets in the SSC cryostat. The apparatus and blanket fabrication method insure consistency in the mass produced blankets by providing positive control of the dimensional parameters which contribute to the thermal performance of the MLI blanket. By virtue of the fabrication process, the MLI blankets have inherent features of dimensional stability three-dimensional uniformity, controlled layer density, layer-to-layer registration, interlayer cleanliness, and interlayer material to accommodate thermal contraction differences. 11 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  13. Targeted epigenetic editing of SPDEF reduces mucus production in lung epithelial cells

    Song, Juan; Cano-Rodriquez, David; Winkle, Melanie; Gjaltema, Rutger A. F.; Goubert, Desiree; Jurkowski, Tomasz P.; Heijink, Irene H.; Rots, Marianne G.; Hylkema, Machteld N.

    2017-01-01

    Airway mucus hypersecretion contributes to the morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic inflammatory lung diseases. Reducing mucus production is crucial for improving patients' quality of life. The transcription factor SAM-pointed domain-containing Ets-like factor (SPDEF) plays a critical

  14. Influence of earthworm mucus and amino acids on tomato seedling growth and cadmium accumulation

    Zhang Shujie [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Hu Feng, E-mail: fenghu@njau.edu.c [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Li Huixin; Li Xiuqiang [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China)

    2009-10-15

    The effects on the growth of tomato seedlings and cadmium accumulation of earthworm mucus and a solution of amino acids matching those in earthworm mucus was studied through a hydroponic experiment. The experiment included four treatments: 5 mg Cd L{sup -1} (CC), 5 mg Cd L{sup -1} + 100 mL L{sup -1} earthworm mucus (CE), 5 mg Cd L{sup -1} + 100 mL L{sup -1} amino acids solution (CA) and the control (CK). Results showed that, compared with CC treatment, either earthworm mucus or amino acids significantly increased tomato seedling growth and Cd accumulation but the increase was much higher in the CE treatment compared with the CA treatment. This may be due to earthworm mucus and amino acids significantly increasing the chlorophyll content, antioxidative enzyme activities, and essential microelement uptake and transport in the tomato seedlings. The much greater increase in the effect of earthworm mucus compared with amino acid treatments may be due to IAA-like substances in earthworm mucus. - Earthworm mucus increased tomato seedlings growth and Cd accumulation through increasing chlorophyll content, antioxidative enzyme activities, and essential microelement accumulation.

  15. Bronchial Mucus Properties in Lung Cancer: Relationship with Site of Lesion

    J Gustavo Zayas

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the biophysical properties of mucus from the left and right mainstem bronchi in patients undergoing diagnostic bronchoscopy because of a unilateral radiological abnormality. It was hypothesized that abnormalities in the properties of mucus would be greater on the side with the lesion and that this would be most obvious in patients with unilateral lung cancer.

  16. The role of mucus as an invisible cloak to transepithelial drug delivery by nanoparticles

    García-Díaz, María; Birch, Ditlev; Wan, Feng

    2018-01-01

    administration since a variety of parameters will influence the specific barrier properties of the mucus including the luminal fluids, the microbiota, the mucus composition and clearance rate, and the condition of the underlying epithelia. Besides, after administration, nanoparticles interact with the mucosal...

  17. Conception rate of artificially inseminated Holstein cows affected by cloudy vaginal mucus, under intense heat conditions

    Miguel Mellado

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to obtain prevalence estimates of cloudy vaginal mucus in artificially inseminated Holstein cows raised under intense heat, in order to assess the effect of meteorological conditions on its occurrence during estrus and to determine its effect on conception rate. In a first study, an association was established between the occurrence of cloudy vaginal mucus during estrus and the conception rate of inseminated cows (18,620 services, raised under intense heat (mean annual temperature of 22°C, at highly technified farms, in the arid region of northern Mexico. In a second study, data from these large dairy operations were used to assess the effect of meteorological conditions throughout the year on the occurrence of cloudy vaginal mucus during artificial insemination (76,899 estruses. The overall rate of estruses with cloudy vaginal mucus was 21.4% (16,470/76,899; 95% confidence interval = 21.1-21.7%. The conception rate of cows with clean vaginal mucus was higher than that of cows with abnormal mucus (30.6 vs. 22%. Prevalence of estruses with cloudy vaginal mucus was strongly dependent on high ambient temperature and markedly higher in May and June. Acceptable conception rates in high milk-yielding Holstein cows can only be obtained with cows showing clear and translucid mucus at artificial insemination.

  18. Preliminary Results on the Influence of Engineered Artificial Mucus Layer on Phonation

    Döllinger, Michael; Gröhn, Franziska; Berry, David A.; Eysholdt, Ulrich; Luegmair, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Previous studies have confirmed the influence of dehydration and an altered mucus (e.g., due to pathologies) on phonation. However, the underlying reasons for these influences are not fully understood. This study was a preliminary inquiry into the influences of mucus architecture and concentration on vocal fold oscillation. Method: Two…

  19. Influence of native catfish mucus on Flavobacterium columnare growth and proteolytic activity

    Flavobacterium columnare causes columnaris disease of farmed and wild freshwater fish. Skin mucus is an important factor in early stages of columnaris pathogenesis, albeit little studied. Our objectives were to 1) characterize the terminal glycosylation pattern (TGP) of catfish mucus, 2) determine t...

  20. Ductal Mucus Obstruction and Reduced Fluid Secretion Are Early Defects in Chronic Pancreatitis

    Anita Balázs

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Defective mucus production in the pancreas may be an important factor in the initiation and progression of chronic pancreatitis (CP, therefore we aimed to (i investigate the qualitative and quantitative changes of mucus both in human CP and in an experimental pancreatitis model and (ii to correlate the mucus phenotype with epithelial ion transport function.Design: Utilizing human tissue samples and a murine model of cerulein induced CP we measured pancreatic ductal mucus content by morphometric analysis and the relative expression of different mucins in health and disease. Pancreatic fluid secretion in CP model was measured in vivo by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP and in vitro on cultured pancreatic ducts. Time-changes of ductal secretory function were correlated to those of the mucin production.Results: We demonstrate increased mucus content in the small pancreatic ducts in CP. Secretory mucins MUC6 and MUC5B were upregulated in human, Muc6 in mouse CP. In vivo and in vitro fluid secretion was decreased in cerulein-induced CP. Analysis of time-course changes showed that impaired ductal ion transport is paralleled by increased Muc6 expression.Conclusion: Mucus accumulation in the small ducts is a combined effect of mucus hypersecretion and epithelial fluid secretion defect, which may lead to ductal obstruction. These results suggest that imbalance of mucus homeostasis may have an important role in the early-phase development of CP, which may have novel diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

  1. Effect of Xiaoqinglong decoction on mucus hypersecretion in the airways and cilia function in a murine model of asthma

    Mingyue Qi

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: XQL can attenuate cilia shortening, aid the clearance function of ciliated epithelial cells, and reduce mucus production in an OVA-induced asthma model in mice. XQL can inhibit mucus hypersecretion and could be a new type of pharmacotherapy.

  2. Packed-fluidized-bed blanket concept for a thorium-fueled commercial tokamak hybrid reactor

    Chi, J.W.H.; Miller, J.W.; Karbowski, J.S.; Chapin, D.L.; Kelly, J.L.

    1980-09-01

    A preliminary design of a thorium blanket was carried out as a part of the Commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (CTHR) study. A fixed fuel blanket concept was developed as the reference CTHR blanket with uranium carbide fuel and helium coolant. A fixed fuel blanket was initially evaluated for the thorium blanket study. Subsequently, a new type of hybrid blanket, a packed-fluidized bed (PFB), was conceived. The PFB blanket concept has a number of unique features that may solve some of the problems encountered in the design of tokamak hybrid reactor blankets. This report documents the thorium blanket study and describes the feasibility assessment of the PFB blanket concept

  3. Micro-configuration Observation of Porous Bioceramic for Sliding on Intestinal Mucus Film

    2005-01-01

    The microstructure of the prepared porous bioceramic material, including surface porosity and apparent contact area with the artificial mucus film are computed and analyzed. The surface micro-configurations of the porous material before and after sliding on the mucus ftlm are observed in 2D and 3 D by digital microscopy. We describe how much mucus enters and stays within different pores, and how the porous material with rough/porous surface contacts with the mucus film ( elastic surface/gel). The presented results illustrate that the material with different porous structure can lead to different mucus suction, surface scraping and changes of contact area and condition during sliding, which will be active for high friction of robotic endoscope with the intestinal wall for intestinal locomotion.

  4. The milk mucus belief: sensations associated with the belief and characteristics of believers.

    Arney, W K; Pinnock, C B

    1993-02-01

    The belief that milk produces mucus is widespread in the community and is associated with a significant reduction in milk consumption. Sensations associated with milk drinking were reported by otherwise healthy believers and non-believers in the milk-mucus effect (N = 169) in an unstructured interview, with further responses prompted about the duration, type and amount of milk causing the effect. The site predominantly affected was the throat, with sensations related to difficulty in swallowing and perceived thickness of mucus and salivary secretions, rather than excessive mucus production. The effect required only a small amount of milk and was reported to be of short duration. The chronic respiratory symptom history and dairy product intake of 130 of these subjects were also assessed. Milk-mucus believers were different from non-believers, reporting more respiratory symptoms and consuming less milk and dairy products. Symptoms consistent with the known effects of food allergy or intolerance were not reported.

  5. Blanket design study for a Commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (CTHR)

    Chapin, D.L.; Green, L.; Lee, A.Y.; Culbert, M.E.; Kelly, J.L.

    1979-09-01

    The results are presented of a study on two blanket design concepts for application in a Commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (CTHR). Both blankets operate on the U-Pu cycle and are designed to achieve tritium self-sufficiency while maximizing the fissile fuel production within thermal and mechanical design constraints. The two blanket concepts that were evaluated were: (1) a UC fueled, stainless steel clad and structure, helium cooled blanket; and (2) a UO 2 fueled, zircaloy clad, stainless steel structure, boiling water cooled blanket. Two different tritium breeding media, Li 2 O and LiH, were evaluated for use in both blanket concepts. The use of lead as a neutron multiplier or reflector and graphite as a reflector was also considered for both blankets

  6. Thermomechanical analysis of the DFLL test blanket module for ITER

    Chen Hongli; Wu Yican; Bai Yunqing

    2006-01-01

    The finite element code is used to simulate two kinds of blanket design structure, which are SLL (Quasi-Static Lithium Lead) and DLL (Dual-cooled Lithium Lead) blanket concepts for the Dual Functional Lithium Lead-Test Blanket Module (DFLL-TBM) submitted to the ITER test blanket working group. The temperature and stress distributions have been presented for the two kinds of blanket structure on the basis of the structural design, thermal-hydraulic design and neutronics analysis. Also the mechanical performance is presented for the high temperature component of blanket structure according to the ITER Structural Design Criteria (ISDC). The rationality and feasibility of the two kinds of blanket structure design of DFLL-TBM have been analyzed based on the above results which also acted as the theoretical base for further optimized analysis. (authors)

  7. Functional Characterization of a Mucus-Specific LPXTG Surface Adhesin from Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG ▿

    von Ossowski, Ingemar; Satokari, Reetta; Reunanen, Justus; Lebeer, Sarah; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C. J.; Vanderleyden, Jos; de Vos, Willem M.; Palva, Airi

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the wealth of clinical evidence supporting the health benefits of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in humans, there is still a lack of understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind its probiosis. Current knowledge suggests that the health-promoting effects of this probiotic strain might be partly dependent on its persistence in the intestine and adhesion to mucosal surfaces. Moreover, L. rhamnosus GG contains mucus-binding pili that might also explain the occupation of its ecological niche as a comparatively less stringent allochthonous intestine-dwelling bacterium. To uncover additional surface proteins involved in mucosal adhesion, we investigated the adherence properties of the only predicted protein (LGG_02337) in L. rhamnosus GG that exhibits homology with a known mucus-binding domain. We cloned a recombinant form of the gene for this putative mucus adhesin and established that the purified protein readily adheres to human intestinal mucus. We also showed that this mucus adhesin is visibly distributed throughout the cell surface and participates in the adhesive interaction between L. rhamnosus GG and mucus, although less prominently than the mucus-binding pili in this strain. Based on primary structural comparisons, we concluded that the current annotation of the LGG_02337 protein likely does not accurately reflect its predicted properties, and we propose that this mucus-specific adhesin be called the mucus-binding factor (MBF). Finally, we interpret our results to mean that L. rhamnosus GG MBF, as an active mucus-specific surface adhesin with a presumed ancillary involvement in pilus-mediated mucosal adhesion, plays a part in the adherent mechanisms during intestinal colonization by this probiotic. PMID:21602388

  8. Villous Adenoma of the Ureter with Manifestation of Mucus Hydroureteronephrosis

    Chi-Min Shih

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Ureteral tumor is prone to result in lumen obstruction. Villous adenoma is most frequently found in the colon and rectum, seldom in the urinary tract and even more rarely in the ureter or pelvis. Herein, we present a case of bilateral renal stones of more than 10 years' duration with the chief complaint of right flank pain. Obstruction of the right upper ureter with hydroureteronephrosis was observed on sonography, computed tomography and retrograde pyelography. Ureteroscopy revealed papillary tumor obstructing the upper third of the ureter and inducing hydroureteronephrosis with abundant mucoid content. The ureteral tumor proved to be villous adenoma by pathologic examination. It should be noted that ureteral villous adenoma may be related to previous enteric-type metaplastic mucosa or ureteritis glandularis, demonstrates profuse production of mucus, and may eventually undergo malignant transformation.

  9. Milk bioactive peptides and beta-casomorphins induce mucus release in rat jejunum.

    Trompette, Aurélien; Claustre, Jean; Caillon, Fabienne; Jourdan, Gérard; Chayvialle, Jean Alain; Plaisancié, Pascale

    2003-11-01

    Intestinal mucus is critically involved in the protection of the mucosa. An enzymatic casein hydrolysate and beta-casomorphin-7, a mu-opioid peptide generated in the intestine during bovine casein digestion, markedly induce mucus discharge. Because shorter mu-opioid peptides have been described, the effects of the opioid peptides in casein, beta-casomorphin-7, -6, -4, -4NH2 and -3, and of opioid neuropeptides met-enkephalin, dynorphin A and (D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,glycinol5)enkephalin (DAMGO) on intestinal mucus secretion were investigated. The experiments were conducted with isolated perfused rat jejunum. Mucus secretion under the influence of beta-casomorphins and opioid neuropeptides administered intraluminally or intra-arterially was evaluated using an ELISA for rat intestinal mucus. Luminal administration of beta-casomorphin-7 (1.2 x 10(-4) mol/L) provoked a mucus discharge (500% of controls) that was inhibited by naloxone, a specific opiate receptor antagonist. Luminal beta-casomorphin-6, -4 and -4NH2 did not modify basal mucus secretion, whereas intra-arterial administration of beta-casomorphin-4 (1.2 x 10(-6) mol/L) induced a mucus discharge. In contrast, intra-arterial administration of the nonopioid peptide beta-casomorphin-3 did not release mucus. Among the opioid neuropeptides, intra-arterial infusion of Met-enkephalin or dynorphin-A did not provoke mucus secretion. In contrast, beta-endorphin (1.2 x 10(-8) to 1.2 x 10(-6) mol/L) induced a dose-dependent release of mucus (maximal response at 500% of controls). DAMGO (1.2 x 10(-6) mol/L), a mu-receptor agonist, also evoked a potent mucus discharge. Our findings suggest that mu-opioid neuropeptides, as well as beta-casomorphins after absorption, modulate intestinal mucus discharge. Milk opioid-derived peptides may thus be involved in defense against noxious agents and could have dietary and health applications.

  10. iNOS-dependent increase in colonic mucus thickness in DSS-colitic rats.

    Olof Schreiber

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate colonic mucus thickness in vivo in health and during experimental inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: Colitis was induced with 5% DSS in drinking water for 8 days prior to experiment, when the descending colonic mucosa of anesthetized rats was studied using intravital microscopy. Mucus thickness was measured with micropipettes attached to a micromanipulator. To assess the contributions of NOS and prostaglandins in the regulation of colonic mucus thickness, the non-selective NOS-inhibitor L-NNA (10 mg/kg bolus followed by 3 mg/kg/h, the selective iNOS-inhibitor L-NIL (10 mg/kg bolus followed by 3 mg/kg/h and the non-selective COX-inhibitor diclofenac (5 mg/kg were administered intravenously prior to experiment. To further investigate the role of iNOS in the regulation of colonic mucus thickness, iNOS -/- mice were used. RESULTS: Colitic rats had a thicker firmly adherent mucus layer following 8 days of DSS treatment than untreated rats (88±2 µm vs 76±1 µm. During induction of colitis, the thickness of the colonic mucus layer initially decreased but was from day 3 significantly thicker than in untreated rats. Diclofenac reduced the mucus thickness similarly in colitic and untreated rats (-16±5 µm vs -14±2 µm. While L-NNA had no effect on colonic mucus thickness in DSS or untreated controls (+3±2 µm vs +3±1 µm, L-NIL reduced the mucus thickness significantly more in colitic rats than in controls (-33±4 µm vs -10±3 µm. The importance of iNOS in regulating the colonic mucus thickness was confirmed in iNOS-/- mice, which had thinner colonic mucus than wild-type mice (35±3 µm vs 50±2 µm, respectively. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry revealed increased levels of iNOS in the colonic surface epithelium following DSS treatment. CONCLUSION: Both prostaglandins and nitric oxide regulate basal colonic mucus thickness. During onset of colitis, the thickness of the mucus layer is initially reduced followed by an i

  11. HIP technologies for fusion reactor blankets fabrication

    Le Marois, G.; Federzoni, L.; Bucci, P.; Revirand, P.

    2000-01-01

    The benefit of HIP techniques applied to the fabrication of fusion internal components for higher performances, reliability and cost savings are emphasized. To demonstrate the potential of the techniques, design of new blankets concepts and mock-ups fabrication are currently performed by CEA. A coiled tube concept that allows cooling arrangement flexibility, strong reduction of the machining and number of welds is proposed for ITER IAM. Medium size mock-ups according to the WCLL breeding blanket concept have been manufactured. The fabrication of a large size mock-up is under progress. These activities are supported by numerical calculations to predict the deformations of the parts during HIP'ing. Finally, several HIP techniques issues have been identified and are discussed

  12. Blankets for fusion reactors : materials and neutronics

    Carvalho, S.H. de.

    1980-03-01

    The studies about Fusion Reactors have lead to several problems for which there is no general agreement about the best solution. Nevertheless, several points seem to be well defined, at least for the first generation of reactors. The fuel, for example, should be a mixture of deuterium and tritium. Therefore, the reactor should be able to generate the tritium to be burned and also to transform kinetic energy of the fusion neutrons into heat in a process similar to the fission reactors. The best materials for the composition of the blanket were first selected and then the neutronics for the proposed system was developed. The neutron flux in the blanket was calculated using the discrete ordinates transport code, ANISN. All the nuclides cross sections came from the DLC-28/CTR library, that processed the ENDF/B data, using the SUPERTOG Program. (Author) [pt

  13. Conceptual design of ITER shielding blanket

    Sato, Satoshi; Takatsu, Hideyuki; Kurasawa, Toshimasa

    1995-03-01

    The present report summarizes the design activities of the ITER first wall and shielding blanket conducted by the JA Home Team during this year (1994) in close contact with the JCT, and reported during the four Technical Meetings held at Garching ITER Co-center. These activities are based on the Task Agreement between the JCT and the JA Home Team. In the present report, a layered configuration composed of separate first walls, modular-type blanket modules and separate back plates has been proposed to realize reliable assembly and maintenance schemes as well as to realize reliable component designs under high surface heat loads, high neutron wall loading and electromagnetic loads during disruptions. Outline of the structural design, consideration on fabricability and maintainability, and the results of thermal, mechanical and electromagnetic analyses are described. (author)

  14. Flow balancing in liquid metal blankets

    Tillack, M.S.; Morley, N.B.

    1995-01-01

    Non-uniform flow distribution between parallel channels is one of the most serious concerns for self-cooled liquid metal blankets with electrically insulated walls. We show that uncertainties in flow distribution can be dramatically reduced by relatively simple design modifications. Several design features which impose flow uniformity by electrically coupling parallel channels are surveyed. Basic mechanisms for ''flow balancing'' are described, and a particular self-regulating concept using discrete passive electrodes is proposed for the US ITER advanced blanket concept. Scoping calculations suggest that this simple technique can be very powerful in equalizing the flow, even with massive insulator failures in individual channels. More detailed analyses and experimental verification will be required to demonstrate this concept for ITER. (orig.)

  15. Recent designs for advanced fusion reactor blankets

    Sze, D.K.

    1994-01-01

    A series of reactor design studies based on the Tokamak configuration have been carried out under the direction of Professor Robert Conn of UCLA. They are called ARIES-I through IV. The key mission of these studies is to evaluate the attractiveness of fusion assuming different degrees of advancement in either physics or engineering development. This paper discusses the directions and conclusions of the blanket and related engineering systems for those design studies. ARIES-1 investigated the use of SiC composite as the structural material to increase the blanket temperature and reduce the blanket activation. Li 2 ZrO 3 was used as the breeding material due to its high temperature stability and good tritium recovery characteristics. The ARIES-IV is a modification of ARIES-1. The plasma was in the second stability regime. Li 2 O was used as the breeding material to remove Zr. A gaseous divertor was used to replace the conventional divertor so that high Z divertor target is not required. The physics of ARIES-II was the same as ARIES-IV. The engineering design of the ARIES-II was based on a self-cooled lithium blanket with a V-alloy as the structural material. Even though it was assumed that the plasma was in the second stability regime, the plasma beta was still rather low (3.4%). The ARIES-III is an advanced fuel (D- 3 He) tokamak reactor. The reactor design assumed major advancement on the physics, with a plasma beta of 23.9%. A conventional structural material is acceptable due to the low neutron wall loading. From the radiation damage point of view, the first wall can last the life of the reactor, which is expected to be a major advantage from the engineering design and waste disposal point of view

  16. Heating facility for blanket and performance test

    Furuya, Kazuyuki; Kuroda, Toshimasa; Enoeda, Mikio; Sato, Satoshi; Hatano, Toshihisa; Takatsu, Hideyuki; Ohara, Yoshihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Hara, Shigemitsu

    1999-03-01

    A design and a fabrication of heating test facility for a mock-up of the blanket module to be installed in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) have been conducted to evaluate/demonstrate its heat removal performance and structural soundness under cyclic heat loads. To simulate surface heat flux to the blanket module, infrared heating method is adopted so as to heat large surface area uniformly. The infrared heater is used in vacuum environment (10{sup -4} Torr{approx}), and the lamps are cooled by air flowing through an annulus between the lamp and a cover tube made of quartz glass. Elastomer O rings (available to be used up to {approx}300degC) and used for vacuum seal at outer surface of the cover tube. To prevent excessive heating of the O ring, the end part of the cover tube is specially designed including the tube shape, flow path of air and gold coating on the surface of the cover tube to protect the O ring against thermal radiation from glowing tungsten filament. To examine the performance of the facility, steady state and cyclic operation of the infrared heater were conducted using a small-scaled shielding blanket mock-up as a test specimen. The important results are as follows: (1) Heat flux at the surface of the small-scaled mock-up measured by a calorimeter was {approx}0.2 MW/m{sup 2}. (2) A comparison of thermal analysis results and measured temperature responses showed that the small-scaled mock-up had good heat removal performance. (3) Steady state operation and cyclic operation with step response between the rated and zero powers of the infrared heater were successfully performed, and it was confirmed that this heating facility was well-prepared and available for the thermal cyclic test of a blanket module. (author)

  17. Conceptual design of Blanket Remote Handling System for CFETR

    Wei, Jianghua; Song, Yuntao; Pei, Kun; Zhao, Wenlong; Zhang, Yu; Cheng, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The concept for the blanket maintenance is carried out, including three sub-systems. • The basic maintenance procedure for blanket between VV and hot cell is carried out. • The primary kinematics study is used to verify the feasibility of BRHS. • Virtual reality is adopted as another approach to verify the concept design. - Abstract: The China Fusion Engineering Testing Reactor (CFETR), which is a new superconducting tokamak device being designed by China, has a mission to achieve a high duty time (0.3–0.5). To accomplish this great mission, the big modular blanket option has been adopted to achieve the high efficiency of the blanket maintenance. Considering this mission and the large and heavy blanket module, a novel conceptual blanket maintenance system for CFETR has been carried out by us over the past year. This paper presents the conceptual design of the Blanket Remote Handling System (BRHS), which mainly comprises the In-Vessel-Maintenance-System (IVMS), Lifting System and Blanket-Tool-Manipulator System (BTMS). The BRHS implements the extraction and replacement between in-vessel (the blanket module operation configuration location) and ex-vessel (inside of the vertical maintenance cask) by the collaboration of these three sub systems. What is more, this paper represents the blanket maintenance procedure between the docking station (between hot cell building and tokamak building) and inside the vacuum vessel, in tokamak building. Virtual reality technology is also used to verify and optimize our concept design.

  18. Conceptual design of Blanket Remote Handling System for CFETR

    Wei, Jianghua, E-mail: weijh@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Song, Yuntao, E-mail: songyt@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Pei, Kun; Zhao, Wenlong; Zhang, Yu; Cheng, Yong [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • The concept for the blanket maintenance is carried out, including three sub-systems. • The basic maintenance procedure for blanket between VV and hot cell is carried out. • The primary kinematics study is used to verify the feasibility of BRHS. • Virtual reality is adopted as another approach to verify the concept design. - Abstract: The China Fusion Engineering Testing Reactor (CFETR), which is a new superconducting tokamak device being designed by China, has a mission to achieve a high duty time (0.3–0.5). To accomplish this great mission, the big modular blanket option has been adopted to achieve the high efficiency of the blanket maintenance. Considering this mission and the large and heavy blanket module, a novel conceptual blanket maintenance system for CFETR has been carried out by us over the past year. This paper presents the conceptual design of the Blanket Remote Handling System (BRHS), which mainly comprises the In-Vessel-Maintenance-System (IVMS), Lifting System and Blanket-Tool-Manipulator System (BTMS). The BRHS implements the extraction and replacement between in-vessel (the blanket module operation configuration location) and ex-vessel (inside of the vertical maintenance cask) by the collaboration of these three sub systems. What is more, this paper represents the blanket maintenance procedure between the docking station (between hot cell building and tokamak building) and inside the vacuum vessel, in tokamak building. Virtual reality technology is also used to verify and optimize our concept design.

  19. Economic evaluation of the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study

    Waganer, L.M.

    1985-01-01

    The economic impact of employing the highly ranked blankets in the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study (BCSS) was evaluated in the context of both a tokamak and a tandem mirror power reactor (TMR). The economic evaluation criterion was determined to be the cost of electricity. The influencing factors that were considered are the direct cost of the blankets and related systems; the annual cost of blanket replacement; and the performance of the blanket, heat transfer, and energy conversion systems. The technical and cost bases for comparison were those of the STARFIRE and Mirror Advanced Reactor Study conceptual design power plants. The economic evaluation results indicated that the nitrate-salt-cooled blanket concept is an economically attractive concept for either reactor type. The water-cooled, solid breeder blanket is attractive for the tokamak and somewhat less attractive for the TMR. The helium-cooled, liquidlithium breeder blanket is the least economically desirable of higher ranked concepts. The remaining self-cooled liquid-metal and the helium-cooled blanket concepts represent moderately attractive concepts from an economic standpoint. These results are not in concert with those found in the other BCSS evaluation areas (engineering feasibility, safety, and research and development (R and D) requirements). The blankets faring well economically had generally lower cost components, lower pumping power requirements, and good power production capability. On the other hand, helium- and lithium-cooled systems were preferred from the standpoints of safety, engineering feasibility, and R and D requirements

  20. Reduced fertilization rates in older men when cervical mucus is suboptimal.

    Dunson, David B; Bigelow, Jamie L; Colombo, Bernardo

    2005-04-01

    Cervical mucus is vital in the regulation of sperm survival and transport through the reproductive tract. The goal of this study is to assess whether the lowered fertility for men in their late 30s and early 40s is related to the nature of cervical mucus on the day of intercourse. In a prospective study of 7 European family planning centers, 782 couples not using birth control recorded daily observations of intercourse and the nature of cervical mucus. Using data from 1,459 menstrual cycles, 342 ending in pregnancy, we estimate day-specific conception probabilities in relation to mucus and male and female age. On days where cervical mucus was not evident, intercourse for men in their late 30s and early 40s was 50% less likely to result in a clinical pregnancy, adjusting for intercourse timing and female age. As secretions become more conducive to sperm transport, the effect of male age diminishes steadily from 21% on days with damp secretions, to 11% on days with thick mucus, to only 4% on days with most fertile-type mucus. The effect of male age on fecundability can be minimized by timing intercourse on days with optimal secretions. II-2.

  1. Antibacterial properties of the skin mucus of the freshwater fishes, Rita rita and Channa punctatus.

    Kumari, U; Nigam, A K; Mitial, S; Mitial, A K

    2011-07-01

    The skin mucus of Rita rita and Channa punctatus was investigated to explore the possibilities of its antibacterial properties. Skin mucus was extracted in acidic solvents (0.1% trifluoroacetic acid and 3% acetic acid) and in triple distilled water (aqueous medium). The antibacterial activity of the mucus extracts was analyzed, using disc diffusion method, against five strains of bacteria--the Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Micrococcus luteus; and the Gram negative Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhi. In both Rita rita and Channa punctatus, the skin mucus extracted in acidic solvents as well as in aqueous medium show antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Micrococcus luteus. Nevertheless, the activity is higher in acidic solvents than that in aqueous medium. The acidic mucus extracts of Rita rita, show antibacterial activity against Salmonella typhi as well. The results suggest that fish skin mucus have bactericidal properties and thus play important role in the protection of fish against the invasion of pathogens. Fish skin mucus could thus be regarded as a potential source of novel antibacterial components.

  2. Tokamak blanket design study, final report

    1980-08-01

    A cylindrical module concept was developed, analyzed, and incorporated in a tokamak blanket system that includes piping systems, vacuum boundary sealing, and support structures. The design is based on the use of state-of-the-art structural materials (20% cold-worked type 316 stainless steel), lithium as the breeding material, and pressurized helium as the coolant. The module design consists of nested concentric cylinders (with an outer diameter of 10 cm) and features direct wall cooling by helium flowing between the outer (first-wall) cylinder and the inner (lithium-containing) cylinder. Each cylinder can withstand full coolant pressure, thus enhancing reliability. Results show that stainless steel is a viable material for a first wall subjected to a neutron wall loading of 4 MW/m 2 and a particle heat flux of 1 MW/m 2 . Lifetime analysis shows that the first-wall design meets the goal of operating at 20-min cycles with 95% duty for 100,000 cycles. To reduce system complexity, a larger 20-cm-diam module also was analyzed for incorporation in the blanket assembly. Reliability assessment indicates that it may be possible to double the module in size from 10 to 20 cm in diameter. With a modest increase in coolant pumping power, a blanket assembly comprising 20-cm-diam modules can still achieve 100,000 operating cycles - equivalent to a 3.6-year design lifetime - with only one or two helium coolant leaks into the plasma

  3. Nuclear Analysis of an ITER Blanket Module

    Chiovaro, P.; Di Maio, P. A.; Parrinello, V.

    2013-08-01

    ITER blanket system is the reactor's plasma-facing component, it is mainly devoted to provide the thermal and nuclear shielding of the Vacuum Vessel and external ITER components, being intended also to act as plasma limiter. It consists of 440 individual modules which are located in the inboard, upper and outboard regions of the reactor. In this paper attention has been focused on to a single outboard blanket module located in the equatorial zone, whose nuclear response under irradiation has been investigated following a numerical approach based on the Monte Carlo method and adopting the MCNP5 code. The main features of this blanket module nuclear behaviour have been determined, paying particular attention to energy and spatial distribution of the neutron flux and deposited nuclear power together with the spatial distribution of its volumetric density. Moreover, the neutronic damage of the structural material has also been investigated through the evaluation of displacement per atom and helium and hydrogen production rates. Finally, an activation analysis has been performed with FISPACT inventory code using, as input, the evaluated neutron spectrum to assess the module specific activity and contact dose rate after irradiation under a specific operating scenario.

  4. Tokamak blanket design study, final report

    1980-08-01

    A cylindrical module concept was developed, analyzed, and incorporated in a tokamak blanket system that includes piping systems, vacuum boundary sealing, and support structures. The design is based on the use of state-of-the-art structural materials (20% cold-worked type 316 stainless steel), lithium as the breeding material, and pressurized helium as the coolant. The module design consists of nested concentric cylinders (with an outer diameter of 10 cm) and features direct wall cooling by helium flowing between the outer (first-wall) cylinder and the inner (lithium-containing) cylinder. Each cylinder can withstand full coolant pressure, thus enhancing reliability. Results show that stainless steel is a viable material for a first wall subjected to a neutron wall loading of 4 MW/m/sup 2/ and a particle heat flux of 1 MW/m/sup 2/. Lifetime analysis shows that the first-wall design meets the goal of operating at 20-min cycles with 95% duty for 100,000 cycles. To reduce system complexity, a larger 20-cm-diam module also was analyzed for incorporation in the blanket assembly. Reliability assessment indicates that it may be possible to double the module in size from 10 to 20 cm in diameter. With a modest increase in coolant pumping power, a blanket assembly comprising 20-cm-diam modules can still achieve 100,000 operating cycles - equivalent to a 3.6-year design lifetime - with only one or two helium coolant leaks into the plasma.

  5. Diffusion-sensitive optical coherence tomography for real-time monitoring of mucus thinning treatments

    Blackmon, Richard L.; Kreda, Silvia M.; Sears, Patrick R.; Ostrowski, Lawrence E.; Hill, David B.; Chapman, Brian S.; Tracy, Joseph B.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2016-03-01

    Mucus hydration (wt%) has become an increasingly useful metric in real-time assessment of respiratory health in diseases like cystic fibrosis and COPD, with higher wt% indicative of diseased states. However, available in vivo rheological techniques are lacking. Gold nanorods (GNRs) are attractive biological probes whose diffusion through tissue is sensitive to the correlation length of comprising biopolymers. Through employment of dynamic light scattering theory on OCT signals from GNRs, we find that weakly-constrained GNR diffusion predictably decreases with increasing wt% (more disease-like) mucus. Previously, we determined this method is robust against mucus transport on human bronchial epithelial (hBE) air-liquid interface cultures (R2=0.976). Here we introduce diffusion-sensitive OCT (DS-OCT), where we collect M-mode image ensembles, from which we derive depth- and temporally-resolved GNR diffusion rates. DS-OCT allows for real-time monitoring of changing GNR diffusion as a result of topically applied mucus-thinning agents, enabling monitoring of the dynamics of mucus hydration never before seen. Cultured human airway epithelial cells (Calu-3 cell) with a layer of endogenous mucus were doped with topically deposited GNRs (80x22nm), and subsequently treated with hypertonic saline (HS) or isotonic saline (IS). DS-OCT provided imaging of the mucus thinning response up to a depth of 600μm with 4.65μm resolution, over a total of 8 minutes in increments of >=3 seconds. For both IS and HS conditions, DS-OCT captured changes in the pattern of mucus hydration over time. DS-OCT opens a new window into understanding mechanisms of mucus thinning during treatment, enabling real-time efficacy feedback needed to optimize and tailor treatments for individual patients.

  6. Comparison of different histological protocols for the preservation and quantification of the intestinal mucus layer in pigs

    Ilen Röhe

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The histological characterization of the intestinal mucus layer is important for many scientific experiments investigating the interaction between intestinal microbiota, mucosal immune response and intestinal mucus production. The aim of this study was to examine and compare different fixation protocols for displaying and quantifying the intestinal mucus layer in piglets and to test which histomorphological parameters may correlate with the determined mucus layer thickness. Jejunal and colonal tissue samples of weaned piglets (n=10 were either frozen in liquid nitrogen or chemically fixed using methacarn solution. The frozen tissue samples were cryosectioned and subsequently postfixed using three different postfixatives: paraformaldehyde vapor, neutrally buffered formalin solution and ethanol solution. After dehydration, methacarn fixed tissues were embedded in paraffin wax. Both sections of cryopreserved and methacarn fixed tissue samples were stained with Alcian blue (AB-PAS followed by the microscopically determination of the mucus layer thickness. Different pH values of the Alcian Blue staining solution and two mucus layer thickness measuring methods were compared. In addition, various histomorphological parameters of methacarn fixed tissue samples were evaluated including the number of goblet cells and the mucin staining area. Cryopreservation in combination with chemical postfixation led to mucus preservation in the colon of piglets allowing mucus thickness measurements. Mucus could be only partly preserved in cryosections of the jejunum impeding any quantitative description of the mucus layer thickness. The application of different postfixations, varying pH values of the AB solution and different mucus layer measuring methods led to comparable results regarding the mucus layer thickness. Methacarn fixation proved to be unsuitable for mucus depiction as only mucus patches were found in the jejunum or a detachment of the mucus layer from

  7. Comparison of different histological protocols for the preservation and quantification of the intestinal mucus layer in pigs.

    Röhe, Ilen; Hüttner, Friedrich Joseph; Plendl, Johanna; Drewes, Barbara; Zentek, Jürgen

    2018-02-05

    The histological characterization of the intestinal mucus layer is important for many scientific experiments investigating the interaction between intestinal microbiota, mucosal immune response and intestinal mucus production. The aim of this study was to examine and compare different fixation protocols for displaying and quantifying the intestinal mucus layer in piglets and to test which histomorphological parameters may correlate with the determined mucus layer thickness. Jejunal and colonal tissue samples of weaned piglets (n=10) were either frozen in liquid nitrogen or chemically fixed using methacarn solution. The frozen tissue samples were cryosectioned and subsequently postfixed using three different postfixatives: paraformaldehyde vapor, neutrally buffered formalin solution and ethanol solution. After dehydration, methacarn fixed tissues were embedded in paraffin wax. Both sections of cryopreserved and methacarn fixed tissue samples were stained with Alcian blue (AB)-PAS followed by the microscopically determination of the mucus layer thickness. Different pH values of the Alcian Blue staining solution and two mucus layer thickness measuring methods were compared. In addition, various histomorphological parameters of methacarn fixed tissue samples were evaluated including the number of goblet cells and the mucin staining area. Cryopreservation in combination with chemical postfixation led to mucus preservation in the colon of piglets allowing mucus thickness measurements. Mucus could be only partly preserved in cryosections of the jejunum impeding any quantitative description of the mucus layer thickness. The application of different postfixations, varying pH values of the AB solution and different mucus layer measuring methods led to comparable results regarding the mucus layer thickness. Methacarn fixation proved to be unsuitable for mucus depiction as only mucus patches were found in the jejunum or a detachment of the mucus layer from the epithelium was

  8. Static friction of porous bioceramic beta-TCP on intestinal mucus films.

    Wang, Xin-Yu; Han, Ying-Chao; Jiang, Xin; Dai, Hong-Lian; Li, Shi-Pu

    2006-09-01

    The static friction behavior between a porous bioceramic material and an intestinal mucus film was investigated in order to develop a new intestine robotic endoscope. Here, the friction couple is porous beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) and an artificial intestine mucus film. The effect of pore size of the beta-TCP material on the friction behavior is investigated. The results illustrated that in this friction system there is a relatively small normal force upon the intestinal mucus film of the intestine wall during locomotion. The maximum static friction force in this friction couple varies with the pore size of the porous beta-TCP material.

  9. Static friction of porous bioceramic β-TCP on intestinal mucus films

    Wang Xinyu; Han Yingchao; Jiang Xin; Dai Honglian; Li Shipu

    2006-01-01

    The static friction behavior between a porous bioceramic material and an intestinal mucus film was investigated in order to develop a new intestine robotic endoscope. Here, the friction couple is porous β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and an artificial intestine mucus film. The effect of pore size of the β-TCP material on the friction behavior is investigated. The results illustrated that in this friction system there is a relatively small normal force upon the intestinal mucus film of the intestine wall during locomotion. The maximum static friction force in this friction couple varies with the pore size of the porous β-TCP material

  10. Gastric mucus and mucuslike hydrogels: Thin film lubricating properties at soft interfaces

    Røn, Troels; Patil, Navin J.; Ajalloueian, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    to be superior at hydrophilic tribological interfaces compared to hydrophobic ones. Facile spreading of all mucus samples at hydrophilic steel–polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) interfaces allowed for the retainment of the lubricating films over a wide range of speed, slide/roll ratio, and external load. In contrast......, poor wetting at hydrophobic PDMS–PDMS interfaces led to depletion of the mucus samples from the interface with increasing speed. Among the different mucus models investigated in this study, fluid mixtures of commercially available porcine gastric mucin (PGM) and polyacrylic acid (PAA) displayed...

  11. Effect of Native Gastric Mucus on in vivo Hybridization Therapies Directed at Helicobacter pylori

    Santos, Rita S; Dakwar, George R; Xiong, Ranhua

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects more than 50% of the worldwide population. It is mostly found deep in the gastric mucus lining of the stomach, being a major cause of peptic ulcers and gastric adenocarcinoma. To face the increasing resistance of H. pylori to antibiotics, antimicrobial nucleic acid...... barriers-the highly viscoelastic gastric mucus and the bacterial cell envelope. We found that LNA/2'OMe is capable of diffusing rapidly through native, undiluted, gastric mucus isolated from porcine stomachs, without degradation. Moreover, although LNA/2'OMe hybridization was still successful without...

  12. Nuclear characteristics of D-D fusion reactor blankets

    Nakashima, Hideki; Ohta, Masao

    1978-01-01

    Fusion reactors operating on deuterium (D-D) cycle are considered to be of long range interest for their freedom from tritium breeding in the blanket. The present paper discusses the various possibilities of D-D fusion reactor blanket designs mainly from the standpoint of the nuclear characteristics. Neutronic and photonic calculations are based on presently available data to provide a basis of the optimal blanket design in D-D fusion reactors. It is found that it appears desirable to design a blanket with blanket/shield (BS) concept in D-D fusion reactors. The BS concept is designed to obtain reasonable shielding characteristics for superconducting magnet (SCM) by using shielding materials in the compact blanket. This concept will open the possibility of compact radiation shield design based on assured technology, and offer the advantage from the system economics point of view. (auth.)

  13. Neutronic optimization of solid breeder blankets for STARFIRE design

    Gohar, Y.; Abdou, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    Extensive neutronic tradeoff studies were carried out to define and optimize the neutronic performance of the different solid breeder options for the STARFIRE blanket design. A set of criteria were employed to select the potential blanket materials. The basic criteria include the neutronic performance, tritium-release characteristics, material compatibility, and chemical stability. Three blanket options were analyzed. The first option is based on separate zones for each basic blanket function where the neutron multiplier is kept in a separate zone. The second option is a heterogeneous blanket type with two tritium breeder zones. In the first zone the tritium breeder is assembled in a neutron multiplier matrix behind the first wall while the second zone has a neutron moderator matrix instead of the neutron multiplier. The third blanket option is similar to the second concept except the tritium breeder and the neutron multiplier form a homogeneous mixture

  14. Processing and waste disposal representative for fusion breeder blanket systems

    Finn, P.A.; Vogler, S.

    1987-01-01

    This study is an evaluation of the waste handling concepts applicable to fusion breeder systems. Its goal is to determine if breeder blanket waste can be disposed of in shallow land burial, the least restrictive method under US Nuclear Regulatory regulations. The radionuclides expected in the materials used in fusion reactor blankets are described, as are plans for reprocessing and disposal of the components of different breeder blankets. An estimate of the operating costs involved in waste disposal is made

  15. A review of fusion breeder blanket technology, part 1

    Jackson, D.P.; Selander, W.N.; Townes, B.M.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study of fusion breeder blanket technology. It reviews the role of the breeder blanket, the current understanding of the scientific and engineering bases of liquid metal and solid breeder blankets and the programs now underway internationally to resolve the uncertainities in current knowledge. In view of existing national expertise and experience, a solid breeder R and D program for Canada is recommended

  16. Electromagnetic analysis of ITER shield blanket under VDE

    Kang Weishan; Chen Jiming; Wu Jihong; Wang Mingxu

    2010-01-01

    Electromagnetic force and torque of ITER shield blanket system and their surrounding major component under vertical displacement event (VDE) were calculated with finite element method. ANSYS APDL was used to simulate the shape and magnitude of plasmas current dynamically in the VDE course, and external magnetic field was imposed, then the induced current distribution inside the all conductor including the blanket was obtained from the calculation. The force and torque for every blanket module was obtained to assess the safety of blanket system under VDE. (authors)

  17. Minimum thickness blanket-shield for fusion reactors

    Karni, Y.; Greenspan, E.

    1989-01-01

    A lower bound on the minimum thickness fusion reactor blankets can be designed to have, if they are to breed 1.267 tritons per fusion neutron, is identified by performing a systematic nucleonic optimization of over a dozen different blanket concepts which use either Be, Li 17 Pb 83 , W or Zr for neutron multiplication. It is found that Be offers minimum thickness blankets; that the blanket and shield (B/S) thickness of Li 17 Pb 83 based blankets which are supplemented by Li 2 O and/or TiH 2 are comparable to the thickness of Be based B/S; that of the Be based blankets, the aqueous self-cooled one offers one of the most compact B/S; and that a number of blanket concepts might enable the design of B/S which is approximately 12 cm and 39 cm thinner than the B/S thickness of, respectively, conventional self-cooled Li 17 Pb 83 and Li blankets. Aqueous self-cooled tungsten blankets could be useful for experimental fusion devices provided they are designed to be heterogeneous. (orig.)

  18. High molecular weight lectin isolated from the mucus of the giant African snail Achatina fulica.

    Ito, Shigeru; Shimizu, Masahiro; Nagatsuka, Maki; Kitajima, Seiji; Honda, Michiyo; Tsuchiya, Takahide; Kanzawa, Nobuyuki

    2011-01-01

    To understand better the host defense mechanisms of mollusks against pathogens, we examined the anti-microbial activity of mucus from the giant African snail Achatina fulica. Hemagglutination activity of the mucus secreted by the integument of snails inoculated with Escherichia coli was observed to increase and to cause hemagglutination of rabbit red blood cells. Purification of the snail mucus lectin by sequential column chromatography revealed that the relative molecular mass of the lectin was 350 kDa. The hemagglutination activity of the lectin was Ca(2+)-dependent and was inhibited by galactose. Growth arrest tests showed that the lectin did not inhibit bacterial growth, but did induce agglutination of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Tissue distribution analyses using a polyclonal antibody revealed that the lectin was expressed in the tissues of the mantle collar. The lectin isolated from the mucus of the snail appeared to contribute to its innate immunity.

  19. Cervical mucus and serum estradiol as predictors of response to progestin challenge.

    Rarick, L D; Shangold, M M; Ahmed, S W

    1990-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to assess the correlation between and relative predictive value of each of the following variables and progestin-induced withdrawal bleeding: cervical mucus appearance, serum E2 level, patient age, duration of amenorrhea, smoking and exercise habits, and body composition. Of 120 oligomenorrheic and amenorrheic women evaluated, only cervical mucus appearance and serum E2 level were significantly associated with response to progestin challenge. A multivariate logistical regression analysis showed cervical mucus to be the most predictive variable followed by serum E2 level. No absolute E2 level was found to discriminate between those who did and those who did not have withdrawal bleeding after progestin challenge. These data suggest that office examination of cervical mucus may be a useful indicator and guideline in planning therapy.

  20. Lectin histochemical aspects of mucus function in the oesophagus of the reticulated python (Python reticulatus).

    Meyer, W; Luz, S; Schnapper, A

    2009-08-01

    Using lectin histochemistry, the study characterizes basic functional aspects of the mucus produced by the oesophageal epithelium of the Reticulated python (Python reticulatus). Reaction staining varied as related to the two epithelium types present, containing goblet cells and ciliary cells. Remarkable intensities were achieved especially in the luminal mucus layer and the fine mucus covering the epithelial ciliary border for Con A (alpha-D-Man; alpha-D-Glc) as part of neutral glycoproteins, Limax flavus agglutinin (NeuNac = NeuNgc), emphasizing that water binding hyaluronan provides a hydrated interface conductive to the passage of material and UEA-I (alpha-L-Fuc), corroborating the view that fucose-rich highly viscous mucus is helpful against mechanical stress during prey transport.

  1. Conception rate of artificially inseminated Holstein cows affected by cloudy vaginal mucus, under intense heat conditions

    Miguel Mellado; Laura Maricela Lara; Francisco Gerardo Veliz; María Ángeles de Santiago; Leonel Avendaño-Reyes; Cesar Meza-Herrera; José Eduardo Garcia

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to obtain prevalence estimates of cloudy vaginal mucus in artificially inseminated Holstein cows raised under intense heat, in order to assess the effect of meteorological conditions on its occurrence during estrus and to determine its effect on conception rate. In a first study, an association was established between the occurrence of cloudy vaginal mucus during estrus and the conception rate of inseminated cows (18,620 services), raised under intense heat (mea...

  2. Strategies for Analyzing Data from Intact Groups.

    Cross, Lawrence H.; Lane, Carolyn E.

    Action research often necessitates the use of intact groups for the comparison of educational treatments or programs. This paper considers several analytical methods that might be used for such situations when pretest scores indicate that these intact groups differ significantly initially. The methods considered include gain score analysis of…

  3. Exploratory investigations of hypervelocity intact capture spectroscopy

    Tsou, P.; Griffiths, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    The ability to capture hypervelocity projectiles intact opens a new technique available for hypervelocity research. A determination of the reactions taking place between the projectile and the capture medium during the process of intact capture is extremely important to an understanding of the intact capture phenomenon, to improving the capture technique, and to developing a theory describing the phenomenon. The intact capture of hypervelocity projectiles by underdense media generates spectra, characteristic of the material species of projectile and capture medium involved. Initial exploratory results into real-time characterization of hypervelocity intact capture techniques by spectroscopy include ultra-violet and visible spectra obtained by use of reflecting gratings, transmitting gratings, and prisms, and recorded by photographic and electronic means. Spectrometry proved to be a valuable real-time diagnostic tool for hypervelocity intact capture events, offering understanding of the interactions of the projectile and the capture medium during the initial period and providing information not obtainable by other characterizations. Preliminary results and analyses of spectra produced by the intact capture of hypervelocity aluminum spheres in polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS), and polyurethane (PU) foams are presented. Included are tentative emission species identifications, as well as gray body temperatures produced in the intact capture process.

  4. Intact glycopeptide characterization using mass spectrometry

    Cao, Li; Qu, Yi; Zhang, Zhaorui; Wang, Zhe; Prykova, Iya; Wu, Si

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most prominent and extensively studied protein post-translational modifications. However, traditional proteomic studies at the peptide level (bottom-up) rarely characterize intact glycopeptides (glycosylated peptides without removing glycans), so no glycoprotein heterogeneity information is retained. Intact glycopeptide characterization, on the other hand, provides opportunities to simultaneously elucidate the glycan structure and the glycosylation site needed to r...

  5. Systematic methodology for estimating direct capital costs for blanket tritium processing systems

    Finn, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology developed for estimating the relative capital costs of blanket processing systems. The capital costs of the nine blanket concepts selected in the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study are presented and compared

  6. Structural materials for fusion reactor blanket systems

    Bloom, E.E.; Smith, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    Consideration of the required functions of the blanket and the general chemical, mechanical, and physical properties of candidate tritium breeding materials, coolants, structural materials, etc., leads to acceptable or compatible combinations of materials. The presently favored candidate structural materials are the austenitic stainless steels, martensitic steels, and vanadium alloys. The characteristics of these alloy systems which limit their application and potential performance as well as approaches to alloy development aimed at improving performance (temperature capability and lifetime) will be described. Progress towards understanding and improving the performance of structural materials has been substantial. It is possible to develop materials with acceptable properties for fusion applications

  7. About possible technologies of creation nanostructures blankets

    Blednova, Zh.M.; Chaevskij, M.I.; Rusinov, P.O.

    2008-01-01

    Possible technologies of formation nanostructures blankets are considered: a method of thermal carrying over of weights in the conditions of a high gradient of temperatures; the combined method including cathode-plasma nitriding in the conditions of low pressure and drawing of nitride of the titan in a uniform work cycle; the combined method including high-frequency ionic nitriding and drawing of carbide of chrome by pyrolysis chrome and organic of connections in plasma of the decaying category. Possibility of formation layered nanostructures layers is shown.

  8. ITER solid breeder blanket materials database

    Billone, M.C.; Dienst, W.; Noda, K.; Roux, N.

    1993-11-01

    The databases for solid breeder ceramics (Li 2 ,O, Li 4 SiO 4 , Li 2 ZrO 3 and LiAlO 2 ) and beryllium multiplier material are critically reviewed and evaluated. Emphasis is placed on physical, thermal, mechanical, chemical stability/compatibility, tritium, and radiation stability properties which are needed to assess the performance of these materials in a fusion reactor environment. Correlations are selected for design analysis and compared to the database. Areas for future research and development in blanket materials technology are highlighted and prioritized

  9. Recent designs for advanced fusion reactor blankets

    Sze, D.K.

    1994-06-01

    A series of reactor design studies based on the Tokamak configuration have been carried out under the direction of Professor Robert Conn of UCLA. They are called ARIES-1 through 4 and PULSAR 1 and 2. The key mission of these studies is to evaluate the attractiveness of fusion assuming different degrees of advancement in either physics or engineering development. Also, the requirements of engineering and physics systems for a pulsed reactor were evaluated by the PULSAR design studies. This paper discusses the directions and conclusions of the blanket and related engineering systems for those design studies

  10. Accumulation of dietary and aqueous cadmium into the epidermal mucus of the discus fish Symphysodon sp

    Maunder, Richard J.; Buckley, Jonathan; Val, Adalberto L.; Sloman, Katherine A.

    2011-01-01

    The discus fish Symphysodon sp. is an Amazonian cichlid with a unusual form of parental care where fry obligately feed from parental mucus for the first few weeks of life. Here, we investigated the possible impact of environmental cadmium on this species, particularly with respect to mucus contamination. We exposed groups of fish to cadmium either through their food (400 mg kg -1 ) or through the water (3 μg l -1 ) for 4 weeks, and measured tissue concentrations and ATPase activities at weekly intervals. Cadmium significantly accumulated in all tissues (except for muscle) after 7 days, and tissue concentrations increased until the end of the experiment. Significant alterations in ATPase activities of intestine and kidney were observed at day 7 and 14, but no alterations in gill ATPase activities occurred. The epidermal mucus showed a high accumulation of cadmium from both exposures, but particularly from the diet, indicating that dietary cadmium can be transferred from gut to mucus. Combining this data with approximations of fry bite volumes and bite frequencies, we constructed daily estimates of the cadmium that could potentially be consumed by newly hatched fry feeding on this mucus. These calculations suggest that feeding fry might consume up to 11 μg g -1 day -1 , and hence indicate that this species' dependency on parental mucus feeding of fry could make them particularly susceptible to cadmium contamination of their native habitat.

  11. Mucus: An Underestimated Gut Target for Environmental Pollutants and Food Additives.

    Gillois, Kévin; Lévêque, Mathilde; Théodorou, Vassilia; Robert, Hervé; Mercier-Bonin, Muriel

    2018-06-15

    Synthetic chemicals (environmental pollutants, food additives) are widely used for many industrial purposes and consumer-related applications, which implies, through manufactured products, diet, and environment, a repeated exposure of the general population with growing concern regarding health disorders. The gastrointestinal tract is the first physical and biological barrier against these compounds, and thus their first target. Mounting evidence indicates that the gut microbiota represents a major player in the toxicity of environmental pollutants and food additives; however, little is known on the toxicological relevance of the mucus/pollutant interplay, even though mucus is increasingly recognized as essential in gut homeostasis. Here, we aimed at describing how environmental pollutants (heavy metals, pesticides, and other persistent organic pollutants) and food additives (emulsifiers, nanomaterials) might interact with mucus and mucus-related microbial species; that is, “mucophilic” bacteria such as mucus degraders. This review highlights that intestinal mucus, either directly or through its crosstalk with the gut microbiota, is a key, yet underestimated gut player that must be considered for better risk assessment and management of environmental pollution.

  12. Accumulation of dietary and aqueous cadmium into the epidermal mucus of the discus fish Symphysodon sp

    Maunder, Richard J., E-mail: richard.maunder@astrazeneca.com [School of Marine Science and Engineering, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth, PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Buckley, Jonathan, E-mail: jonathan.buckley@plymouth.ac.uk [School of Marine Science and Engineering, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth, PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Val, Adalberto L., E-mail: dalval@inpa.gov.br [Department of Ecology, Laboratory of Ecophysiology and Molecular Evolution, INPA, Manaus (Brazil); Sloman, Katherine A., E-mail: katherine.sloman@uws.ac.uk [School of Science, University of the West of Scotland, Paisley, PA1 2BE, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-15

    The discus fish Symphysodon sp. is an Amazonian cichlid with a unusual form of parental care where fry obligately feed from parental mucus for the first few weeks of life. Here, we investigated the possible impact of environmental cadmium on this species, particularly with respect to mucus contamination. We exposed groups of fish to cadmium either through their food (400 mg kg{sup -1}) or through the water (3 {mu}g l{sup -1}) for 4 weeks, and measured tissue concentrations and ATPase activities at weekly intervals. Cadmium significantly accumulated in all tissues (except for muscle) after 7 days, and tissue concentrations increased until the end of the experiment. Significant alterations in ATPase activities of intestine and kidney were observed at day 7 and 14, but no alterations in gill ATPase activities occurred. The epidermal mucus showed a high accumulation of cadmium from both exposures, but particularly from the diet, indicating that dietary cadmium can be transferred from gut to mucus. Combining this data with approximations of fry bite volumes and bite frequencies, we constructed daily estimates of the cadmium that could potentially be consumed by newly hatched fry feeding on this mucus. These calculations suggest that feeding fry might consume up to 11 {mu}g g{sup -1} day{sup -1}, and hence indicate that this species' dependency on parental mucus feeding of fry could make them particularly susceptible to cadmium contamination of their native habitat.

  13. OligoG CF-5/20 normalizes cystic fibrosis mucus by chelating calcium.

    Ermund, Anna; Recktenwald, Christian V; Skjåk-Braek, Gudmund; Meiss, Lauren N; Onsøyen, Edvar; Rye, Philip D; Dessen, Arne; Myrset, Astrid Hilde; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2017-06-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether the guluronate (G) rich alginate OligoG CF-5/20 (OligoG) could detach cystic fibrosis (CF) mucus by calcium chelation, which is also required for normal mucin unfolding. Since bicarbonate secretion is impaired in CF, leading to insufficient mucin unfolding and thereby attached mucus, and since bicarbonate has the ability to bind calcium, we hypothesized that the calcium chelating property of OligoG would lead to detachment of CF mucus. Indeed, OligoG could compete with the N-terminus of the MUC2 mucin for calcium binding as shown by microscale thermophoresis. Further, effects on mucus thickness and attachment induced by OligoG and other alginate fractions of different length and composition were evaluated in explants of CF mouse ileum mounted in horizontal Ussing-type chambers. OligoG at 1.5% caused effective detachment of CF mucus and the most potent alginate fraction tested, the poly-G fraction of about 12 residues, had similar potency compared to OligoG whereas mannuronate-rich (M) polymers had minimal effect. In conclusion, OligoG binds calcium with appropriate affinity without any overt harmful effect on the tissue and can be exploited for treating mucus stagnation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Production of quorum-sensing signals by bacteria in the coral mucus layer

    Li, Jie; Kuang, Weiqi; Long, Lijuan; Zhang, Si

    2017-12-01

    Quorum sensing is an integral part of bacterial communication and interaction, but has not been well characterized in coral mucus microbiota. In this study, of 61 coral mucus isolates, five alphaproteobacteria and one Vibrio species were found to produce N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL), a quorum-sensing signal in bacteria. Eight gammaproteobacteria isolates were found to produce autoinducer-2 (AI-2) quorum-sensing signals along with two actinobacteria of the genus Rothia. Coral mucus is rich in the antioxidant dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), the concentration of which has been found to increase under heat stress. Neither AHL nor AI-2 activity was induced by DMSP in those coral mucus isolates that did not initially produce quorum-sensing signals. However, the AI-2 activities of one Rothia isolate (SCSIO 13017) from coral mucus and of Vibrio shilonii (DSM 13774 isolated from a bleached coral) were found to increase in response to 5 μM DMSP but decreased in response to 50 μM DMSP for the first time. These findings suggest that the production of quorum-sensing signals in the coral mucus microbiota may play a role in structuring the surface microbial community as they respond to environmental stress.

  15. Two-phase-flow cooling concept for fusion reactor blankets

    Bender, D.J.; Hoffman, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    The new two-phase heat transfer medium proposed is a mixture of potassium droplets and helium which permits blanket operation at hih temperature and low pressure, while maintaining acceptable pumping power requirements, coolant ducting size, and blanket structure fractions. A two-phase flow model is described. The helium pumping power and the primary heat transfer loop are discussed

  16. Overview of the TFTB lithium blanket module program

    Jassby, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The Lithium Blanket Module (LBM) is an ∼ 80-cm 3 module, representative of a helium-cooled lithium oxide fusion reactor blanket module. This paper summarizes the design, development, and construction of the LBM, and indicates the present status of the LBM program

  17. Remote handling demonstration of ITER blanket module replacement

    Kakudate, S.; Nakahira, M.; Oka, K.; Taguchi, K.; Obara, K.; Tada, E.; Shibanuma, K.; Tesini, A.; Haange, R.; Maisonnier, D.

    2001-01-01

    In ITER, the in-vessel components such as blanket are to be maintained or replaced remotely since they will be activated by 14 MeV neutrons, and a complete exchange of shielding blanket with breeding blanket is foreseen after the Basic Performance Phase. The blanket is segmented into about seven hundred modules to facilitate remote maintainability and allow individual module replacement. For this, the remote handing equipment for blanket maintenance is required to handle a module with a dead weight of about 4 tonne within a positioning accuracy of a few mm under intense gamma radiation. According to the ITER R and D program, a rail-mounted vehicle manipulator system was developed and the basic feasibility of this system was verified through prototype testing. Following this, development of full-scale remote handling equipment has been conducted as one of the ITER Seven R and D Projects aiming at a remote handling demonstration of the ITER blanket. As a result, the Blanket Test Platform (BTP) composed of the full-scale remote handling equipment has been completed and the first integrated performance test in March 1998 has shown that the fabricate remote handling equipment satisfies the main requirements of ITER blanket maintenance. (author)

  18. Accelerator driven heavy water blanket on circulating fuel

    Kazaritsky, V.D.; Blagovolin, P.P.; Mladov, V.R.; Okhlopkov, M.L.; Batyaev, V.F.; Stepanov, N.V.; Seliverstov, V.V.

    1997-01-01

    A conceptual design of a heavy water blanket with circulating fuel for an accelerator driven transmutation system is described. The hybrid system consists of a high-current linear accelerator of protons and 4 targets, each placed inside a subcritical blanket

  19. Achievements of element technology development for breeding blanket

    Enoeda, Mikio

    2005-03-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been performing the development of breeding blanket for fusion power plant, as a leading institute of the development of solid breeder blankets, according to the long-term R and D program of the blanket development established by the Fusion Council of Japan in 1999. This report is an overview of development plan, achievements of element technology development and future prospect and plan of the development of the solid breeding blanket in JAERI. In this report, the mission of the blanket development activity in JAERI, key issues and roadmap of the blanket development have been clarified. Then, achievements of the element technology development were summarized and showed that the development has progressed to enter the engineering testing phase. The specific development target and plan were clarified with bright prospect. Realization of the engineering test phase R and D and completion of ITER test blanket module testing program, with universities/NIFS cooperation, are most important steps in the development of breeding blanket of fusion power demonstration plant. (author)

  20. An assessment of the base blanket for ITER

    Raffray, A.R.; Abdou, M.A.; Ying, A.

    1991-01-01

    Ideally, the ITER base blanket would provide the necessary tritium for the reactor to be self-sufficient during operation, while having minimal impact on the overall reactor cost, reliability and safety. A solid breeder blanket has been developed in CDA phase in an attempt to achieve such objectives. The reference solid breeder base blanket configurations at the end of the CDA phase has many attractive features such as a tritium breeding ratio (TBR) of 0.8--0.9 and a reasonably low tritium inventory. However, some concerns regarding the risk, cost and benefit of the base blanket have been raised. These include uncertainties associated with the solid breeder thermal control and the potentially high cost of the amount of Be used to achieve high TBR and to provide the necessary thermal barrier between the high temperature solid breeder and low temperature coolant. This work addresses these concerns. The basis for the selection of a breeding blanket is first discussed in light of the incremental risk, cost and benefits relative to a non-breeding blanket. Key issues associated with the CDA breeding blanket configurations are then analyzed. Finally, alternative schemes that could enhance the attractiveness and flexibility of a breeding blanket are explored

  1. Objectives and status of EUROfusion DEMO blanket studies

    Boccaccini, L.V., E-mail: lorenzo.boccaccini@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Aiello, G.; Aubert, J. [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, SEMT, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bachmann, C. [EUROfusion, PPPT, Garching (Germany); Barrett, T. [CCFE, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Del Nevo, A. [ENEA CR Brasimone, 40032 Camugnano, BO (Italy); Demange, D. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Forest, L. [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, SEMT, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hernandez, F.; Norajitra, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Porempovic, G. [Fuziotech Engineering Ltd (Hungary); Rapisarda, D. [CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Sardain, P. [CEA/IRFM, 13115 Saint-Paul-lès-Durance (France); Utili, M. [ENEA CR Brasimone, 40032 Camugnano, BO (Italy); Vala, L. [Centrum výzkumu Řež, 250 68 Husinec-Řež (Czech Republic)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Short description of the new Breeding Blanket Project in the EUROfusion consortium for the design of the EU PPPT DEMO: objectives. • Presentation of the design approach used in the development of the Breeding Blanket design: requirements. • Breeding Blanket design; in particular the four blanket concepts included in the study are presented, recent results highlighted and the status discussed. • Auxiliary systems and related R&D programme: in particular the work areas addressed in the Project (Tritium Technology, Pb-Li and Solid Breeders Technology, First Wall Design and R&D, Manufacturing) are presented, recent results highlighted and the status discussed. - Abstract: The design of a DEMO reactor requires the design of a blanket system suitable of reliable T production and heat extraction for electricity production. In the frame of the EUROfusion Consortium activities, the Breeding Blanket Project has been constituted in 2014 with the goal to develop concepts of Breeding Blankets for the EU PPPT DEMO; this includes an integrated design and R&D programme with the goal to select after 2020 concepts on fusion plants for the engineering phase. The design activities are presently focalized around a pool of solid and liquid breeder blanket with helium, water and PbLi cooling. Development of tritium extraction and control technology, as well manufacturing and development of solid and PbLi breeders are part of the programme.

  2. 18 CFR 284.303 - OCS blanket certificates.

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false OCS blanket certificates. 284.303 Section 284.303 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... Pipelines on Behalf of Others § 284.303 OCS blanket certificates. Every OCS pipeline [as that term is...

  3. The TFTR lithium blanket module program

    Jassby, D.L.; Bertone, P.C.; Creedon, R.L.; File, J.; Graumann, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Lithium Blanket Module (LBM) is an approximately 80X80X80 cm cubic module, representative of a helium-cooled lithium oxide fusion reactor blanket module, that will be installed on the TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) in late 1986. The principal objective of the LBM Program is to perform a series of neutron transport and tritium-breeding measurements throughout the LBM when it is exposed to the TFTR toroidal fusion neutron source, and to compare these data with the predictions of Monte Carlo (MCNP) neutronics codes. The LBM consists of 920 2.5-cm diameter breeder rods constructed of lithium oxide (Li 2 O) pellets housed in thin-walled stainless steel tubes. Procedures for mass-producing 25,000 Li 2 O pellets with satisfactory reproducibility were developed using purified Li 2 O powder, and fabrication of all the breeder rods was completed in early 1985. Tritium assay methods were investigated experimentally using both small lithium metal samples and LBM-type pellets. This work demonstrated that the thermal extraction method will be satisfactory for accurate evaluation of the minute concentrations of tritium expected in the LBM pellets (0.1-1nCi/g)

  4. TMEM16A mediates the hypersecretion of mucus induced by Interleukin-13

    Lin, Jiachen; Jiang, Youfan; Li, Li; Liu, Yanan; Tang, Hui; Jiang, Depeng, E-mail: depengjiang@163.com

    2015-06-10

    Previous studies showed that the Ca{sup 2+}-activated Cl{sup −} channel (CaCC) was involved in the pathogenesis of mucus hypersecretion induced by Interleukin-13 (IL-13). However, the mechanisms underlying the process were unknown. Recently, transmembrane protein 16A (TMEM16A) was identified as the channel underlying the CaCC current. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether the TMEM16A channel is part of the mechanism underlying IL-13-induced mucus hypersecretion. We observed that both TMEM16A mRNA and protein expression were significantly up-regulated after treatment with IL-13 in human bronchial epithelial 16 (HBE 16) cells, which correlated with an increase in mucus production. Additionally, mucus hypersecretion in rat airways was induced by intratracheal instillation of IL-13 and similar increases were observed in the expression of TMEM16A mRNA and protein in the bronchial epithelium. Niflumic acid (NA), a selective antagonist of CaCC, markedly blocked IL-13-induced mucin (MUC) 5AC mRNA and protein production in vivo and in vitro. Further investigation with HBE16 cells revealed that TMEM16A overexpression clearly promoted mucus production, IκBα phosphorylation, and p65 accumulation in the nucleus. The loss of TMEM16A resulted in inhibition of mucus production, and the TMEM16A-mediated production of MUC5AC was significantly blocked by a nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) inhibitor. Therefore, the TMEM16A channel acts upstream of NF-κB in the regulation of mucus production. This is the first demonstration that the TMEM16A-NF-κB pathway is positively involved in IL-13-induced mucus production, which provides novel insight into the molecular mechanism of mucin overproduction. - Highlights: • TMEM16A acts as downstream events of IL-13 signaling pathway. • Established the link between TMEM16A and mucus hypersecretion. • NF-κB activation might be responsible for TMEM16A mediated mucus secretion.

  5. Neutronic design for the TFTR lithium blanket module

    Cheng, E.T.; Engholm, B.A.; Su, S.D.

    1981-01-01

    The preliminary design of a lithium blanket module (LBM) to be installed and tested in the TFTR has been performed under subcontract to PPPL and EPRI. The objectives of the LBM program are calculation and measurement of neutron fluences and tritium production in a breeding blanket module using state of art techniques, comparison of calculations with measurements, and acquisition of operational experience with a fusion reactor blanket module. The neutronic design of the LBM is one of the key areas of this program in which the LBM composition and geometry are optimized and the boundary material effects on the tritium production in the blanket module are explored. The concept of employing sintered Li/sub 2/O pellets in tubes is proposed for the blanket design

  6. MIT LMFBR blanket research project. Final summary report

    Driscoll, M.J.

    1983-08-01

    This is a final summary report on an experimental and analytical program for the investigation of LMFBR blanket characteristics carried out at MIT in the period 1969 to 1983. During this span of time, work was carried out on a wide range of subtasks, ranging from neutronic and photonic measurements in mockups of blankets using the Blanket Test Facility at the MIT Research Reactor, to analytic/numerical investigations of blanket design and economics. The main function of this report is to serve as a resource document which will permit ready reference to the more detailed topical reports and theses issued over the years on the various aspects of project activities. In addition, one aspect of work completed during the final year of the project, on doubly-heterogeneous blanket configurations, is documented for the record

  7. Axial blanket enrichment optimization of the NPP Krsko fuel

    Kromar, M.; Kurincic, B.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper optimal axial blanket enrichment of the NPP Krsko fuel is investigated. Since the optimization is dictated by economic categories that can significantly vary in time, two step approach is applied. In the first step simple relationship between the equivalent change in enrichment of axial blankets and central fuel region is established. The relationship is afterwards processed with economic criteria and constraints to obtain optimal axial blanket enrichment. In the analysis realistic NPP Krsko conditions are considered. Except for the fuel enrichment all other fuel characteristics are the same as in the fuel used in the few most recent cycles. A typical reload cycle after the plant power uprate is examined. Analysis has shown that the current blanket enrichment is close to the optimal. Blanket enrichment reduction results in an approximately 100 000 US$ savings per fuel cycle.(author)

  8. Neutron dosimetry for the TFTR Lithium-Blanket-Module program

    Harker, Y.D.; Tsang, F.Y.; Caffrey, A.J.; Homeyer, W.G.; Engholm, B.A.

    1981-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Lithium Blanket Module (LBM) program is a first-of-a-kind neutronics experiment involving a prototypical fusion reactor blanket module with a distributed neutron source from the plasma of the TFTR at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The objectives of the LBM program are: (1) to test the capabilities of neutron transport codes when applied to fusion test reactor blanket conditions, and (2) to obtain tritium breeding performance data on a typical design concept of a fusion-reactor blanket. This paper addresses the issues relative to the measurement of neutron fields in the LBM, presents the results of preliminary design studies concerning neutron measurements and also presents the results of blanket mockup experiments performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

  9. LMFBR Blanket Physics Project progress report No. 2

    Forbes, I.A.; Driscoll, M.J.; Rasmussen, N.C.; Lanning, D.D.; Kaplan, I.

    1971-01-01

    This is the second annual report of an experimental program for the investigation of the neutronics of benchmark mock-ups of LMFBR blankets. Work was devoted primarily to measurements on Blanket Mock-Up No. 2, a simulation of a typical large LMFBR radial blanket and its steel reflector. Activation traverses and neutron spectra were measured in the blanket; calculations of activities and spectra were made for comparison with the measured data. The heterogeneous self-shielding effect for 238 U capture was found to be the most important factor affecting the comparison. Optimization and economic studies were made which indicate that the use of a high-albedo reflector material such as BeO or graphite may improve blanket neutronics and economics

  10. Self-cooled liquid-metal blanket concept

    Malang, S.; Arheidt, K.; Barleon, L.

    1988-01-01

    A blanket concept for the Next European Torus (NET) where 83Pb-17Li serves both as breeder material and as coolant is described. The concept is based on the use of novel flow channel inserts for a decisive reduction of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drop and employs beryllium as neutron multiplier in order to avoid the need for breeding blankets at the inboard side of the torus. This study includes the design, neutronics, thermal hydraulics, stresses, MHDs, corrosion, tritium recovery, and safety of a self-cooled liquid-metal blanket. The results of the investigations indicate that the self-cooled blanket is an attractive alternative to other driver blanket concepts for NET and that it can be extrapolated to the conditions of a DEMO reactor

  11. Susceptibility to chronic mucus hypersecretion, a genome wide association study.

    Akkelies E Dijkstra

    Full Text Available Chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH is associated with an increased frequency of respiratory infections, excess lung function decline, and increased hospitalisation and mortality rates in the general population. It is associated with smoking, but it is unknown why only a minority of smokers develops CMH. A plausible explanation for this phenomenon is a predisposing genetic constitution. Therefore, we performed a genome wide association (GWA study of CMH in Caucasian populations.GWA analysis was performed in the NELSON-study using the Illumina 610 array, followed by replication and meta-analysis in 11 additional cohorts. In total 2,704 subjects with, and 7,624 subjects without CMH were included, all current or former heavy smokers (≥20 pack-years. Additional studies were performed to test the functional relevance of the most significant single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP.A strong association with CMH, consistent across all cohorts, was observed with rs6577641 (p = 4.25×10(-6, OR = 1.17, located in intron 9 of the special AT-rich sequence-binding protein 1 locus (SATB1 on chromosome 3. The risk allele (G was associated with higher mRNA expression of SATB1 (4.3×10(-9 in lung tissue. Presence of CMH was associated with increased SATB1 mRNA expression in bronchial biopsies from COPD patients. SATB1 expression was induced during differentiation of primary human bronchial epithelial cells in culture.Our findings, that SNP rs6577641 is associated with CMH in multiple cohorts and is a cis-eQTL for SATB1, together with our additional observation that SATB1 expression increases during epithelial differentiation provide suggestive evidence that SATB1 is a gene that affects CMH.

  12. Design and intestinal mucus penetration mechanism of core-shell nanocomplex.

    Zhang, Xin; Cheng, Hongbo; Dong, Wei; Zhang, Meixia; Liu, Qiaoyu; Wang, Xiuhua; Guan, Jian; Wu, Haiyang; Mao, Shirui

    2018-02-28

    The objective of this study was to design intestinal mucus-penetrating core-shell nanocomplex by functionally mimicking the surface of virus, which can be used as the carrier for peroral delivery of macromolecules, and further understand the influence of nanocomplex surface properties on the mucosal permeation capacity. Taking insulin as a model drug, the core was formed by the self-assembly among positively charged chitosan, insulin and negatively charged sodium tripolyphosphate, different types of alginates were used as the shell forming material. The nanocomplex was characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and FTIR. Nanocomplex movement in mucus was recorded using multiple particle tracking (MPT) method. Permeation and uptake of different nanocomplex were studied in rat intestine. It was demonstrated that alginate coating layer was successfully formed on the core and the core-shell nanocomplex showed a good physical stability and improved enzymatic degradation protection. The mucus penetration and MPT study showed that the mucus penetration capacity of the nanocomplex was surface charge and coating polymer structure dependent, nanocomplex with negative alginate coating had 1.6-2.5 times higher mucus penetration ability than that of positively charged chitosan-insulin nanocomplex. Moreover, the mucus penetration ability of the core-shell nanocomplex was alginate structure dependent, whereas alginate with lower G content and lower molecular weight showed the best permeation enhancing ability. The improvement of intestine permeation and intestinal villi uptake of the core-shell nanocomplex were further confirmed in rat intestine and multiple uptake mechanisms were involved in the transport process. In conclusion, core-shell nanocomplex composed of oppositely charged materials could provide a strategy to overcome the mucus barrier and enhance the mucosal permeability. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Biofilm formation by Salmonella spp. in catfish mucus extract under industrial conditions.

    Dhowlaghar, Nitin; De Abrew Abeysundara, Piumi; Nannapaneni, Ramakrishna; Schilling, Mark W; Chang, Sam; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Sharma, Chander S

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of strain and temperature on the growth and biofilm formation of Salmonella spp. in high and low concentrations of catfish mucus extract on different food-contact surfaces at 22 °C and 10 °C. The second objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of disinfectants at recommended concentrations and contact times for removing Salmonella biofilms cells on a stainless steel surface containing catfish mucus extract. Growth and biofilm formation of all Salmonella strains increased with higher concentrations of catfish mucus extract at both 10 °C and 22 °C. In 15 μg/ml of catfish mucus extract inoculated with 3 log CFU/ml, the biofilm levels of Salmonella on stainless steel surface reached to 3.5 log CFU/cm 2 at 10 °C or 5.5 log CFU/cm 2 at 22 °C in 7 days. In 375 μg/ml of catfish mucus extract inoculated with 3 log CFU/ml, the biofilm levels of Salmonella on the stainless steel surface reached 4.5 log CFU/cm 2 at 10 °C and 6.5 log CFU/cm 2 at 22 °C in 7 days. No differences were observed between Salmonella strains tested for biofilm formation in catfish mucus extract on the stainless steel surface. The biofilm formation by Salmonella Blockley (7175) in catfish mucus extract was less (P stainless steel, polyethylene and polyurethane surfaces. Salmonella biofilm cells were not detectable on the stainless steel surface after treatment with a mixture of disinfectants but were still present when single compound disinfectants were used. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Bioactive potency of epidermal mucus extracts from greasy grouper, Epinephelus tauvina (Forsskal, 1775

    Ganesh Manikantan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the bio-potency of epidermal mucus from Epinephelus tauvina. Methods: Mucus was extracted with acidic, organic and aqueous solvents. Protein, carbohydrate, lipid, amino acid and fatty acid content of mucus extracts were quantified by UV-spectrophotometer, high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatographymass spectrometer, respectively. Antimicrobial activity was tested against five human and fish pathogens by using agar well diffusion method. The molecular weight of peptides was determined using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The haemolytic activity of extracts was tested against chick, goat, cow and human red blood cell. Results: Protein contributed with maximum of 26.25% in crude mucus. Arginine was recorded maximum of (133.9 nmol/mL in crude mucus. 2,4,6-Decatrienoic acid and bis (a-chloroethyl sulfone were confirmed in organic extract. The antimicrobial activity of acidic extract was significant. Among the human pathogens, maximum zone of inhibition [(26.0 ± 0.3 mm] was observed against Proteus mirabilis. Whereas, among fish pathogens maximum zone of inhibition [(25.0 ± 0.1 mm] was observed against Vibrio parahemolyticus. The activity of other two extracts was not remarkable. The molecular weight of peptides ranged from 115.5– 37.1 kDa in acidic extract was determined. Chicken and goat blood were found to be highly vulnerable to the lysis. Conclusions: The whole mucus could be a promising source with numerous bioactivepotency. Consequently, this preliminary information suggested that mucus is a source of novel antimicrobial agents for fish and human health related applications.

  15. Toward the modeling of mucus draining from the human lung: role of the geometry of the airway tree

    Mauroy, Benjamin; Merckx, Jacques; Flaud, Patrice; Fausser, Christian; Pelca, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Mucociliary clearance and cough are the two main natural mucus draining methods in the bronchial tree. If they are affected by a pathology, they can become insufficient or even ineffective, then therapeutic draining of mucus plays a critical role to keep mucus levels in the lungs acceptable. The manipulations of physical therapists are known to be very efficient clinically but they are mostly empirical since the biophysical mechanisms involved in these manipulations have never been studied. We develop in this work a model of mucus clearance in idealized rigid human bronchial trees and focus our study on the interaction between (1) tree geometry, (2) mucus physical properties and (3) amplitude of flow rate in the tree. The mucus is considered as a Bingham fluid (gel-like) which is moved upward in the tree thanks to its viscous interaction with air flow. Our studies point out the important roles played both by the geometry and by the physical properties of mucus (yield stress and viscosity). More particularly, the yield stress has to be overcome to make mucus flow. Air flow rate and yield stress determine the maximal possible mucus thickness in each branch of the tree at equilibrium. This forms a specific distribution of mucus in the tree whose characteristics are strongly related to the multi-scaled structure of the tree. The behavior of any mucus distribution is then dependent on this distribution. Finally, our results indicate that increasing air flow rates ought to be more efficient to drain mucus out of the bronchial tree while minimizing patient discomfort

  16. Intact glycopeptide characterization using mass spectrometry.

    Cao, Li; Qu, Yi; Zhang, Zhaorui; Wang, Zhe; Prytkova, Iya; Wu, Si

    2016-05-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most prominent and extensively studied protein post-translational modifications. However, traditional proteomic studies at the peptide level (bottom-up) rarely characterize intact glycopeptides (glycosylated peptides without removing glycans), so no glycoprotein heterogeneity information is retained. Intact glycopeptide characterization, on the other hand, provides opportunities to simultaneously elucidate the glycan structure and the glycosylation site needed to reveal the actual biological function of protein glycosylation. Recently, significant improvements have been made in the characterization of intact glycopeptides, ranging from enrichment and separation, mass spectroscopy (MS) detection, to bioinformatics analysis. In this review, we recapitulated currently available intact glycopeptide characterization methods with respect to their advantages and limitations as well as their potential applications.

  17. U.S. technical report for the ITER blanket/shield: A. blanket: Topical report, July 1990--November 1990

    1995-01-01

    Three solid-breeder water-cooled blanket concepts have been developed for ITER based on a multilayer configuration. The primary difference among the concepts is in the fabricated form of breeder and multiplier. All the concepts have beryllium for neutron multiplication and solid-breeder temperature control. The blanket design does not use helium gaps or insulator material to control the solid breeder temperature. Lithium oxide (Li{sub 2}O) and lithium zirconate (Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}) are the primary and the backup breeder materials, respectively. The lithium-6 enrichment is 95%. The use of high lithium-6 enrichment reduces the solid breeder volume required in the blanket and consequently the total tritium inventory in the solid breeder material. Also, it increases the blanket capability to accommodate power variation. The multilayer blanket configuration can accommodate up to a factor of two change in the neutron wall loading without violating the different design guidelines. The blanket material forms are sintered products and packed bed of small pebbles. The first concept has a sintered product material (blocks) for both the beryllium multiplier and the solid breeder. The second concept, the common ITER blanket, uses a packed bed breeder and beryllium blocks. The last concept is similar to the first except for the first and the last beryllium zones. Two small layers of beryllium pebbles are located behind the first wall and the back of the last beryllium zone to reduce the total inventory of the beryllium material and to improve the blanket performance. The design philosophy adopted for the blanket is to produce the necessary tritium required for the ITER operation and to operate at power reactor conditions as much as possible. Also, the reliability and the safety aspects of the blanket are enhanced by using low-pressure water coolant and the separation of the tritium purge flow from the coolant system by several barriers.

  18. U.S. technical report for the ITER blanket/shield: A. blanket: Topical report, July 1990--November 1990

    1995-01-01

    Three solid-breeder water-cooled blanket concepts have been developed for ITER based on a multilayer configuration. The primary difference among the concepts is in the fabricated form of breeder and multiplier. All the concepts have beryllium for neutron multiplication and solid-breeder temperature control. The blanket design does not use helium gaps or insulator material to control the solid breeder temperature. Lithium oxide (Li 2 O) and lithium zirconate (Li 2 ZrO 3 ) are the primary and the backup breeder materials, respectively. The lithium-6 enrichment is 95%. The use of high lithium-6 enrichment reduces the solid breeder volume required in the blanket and consequently the total tritium inventory in the solid breeder material. Also, it increases the blanket capability to accommodate power variation. The multilayer blanket configuration can accommodate up to a factor of two change in the neutron wall loading without violating the different design guidelines. The blanket material forms are sintered products and packed bed of small pebbles. The first concept has a sintered product material (blocks) for both the beryllium multiplier and the solid breeder. The second concept, the common ITER blanket, uses a packed bed breeder and beryllium blocks. The last concept is similar to the first except for the first and the last beryllium zones. Two small layers of beryllium pebbles are located behind the first wall and the back of the last beryllium zone to reduce the total inventory of the beryllium material and to improve the blanket performance. The design philosophy adopted for the blanket is to produce the necessary tritium required for the ITER operation and to operate at power reactor conditions as much as possible. Also, the reliability and the safety aspects of the blanket are enhanced by using low-pressure water coolant and the separation of the tritium purge flow from the coolant system by several barriers

  19. Utilization of mucus from the coral Acropora palmata by the pathogen Serratia marcescens and by environmental and coral commensal bacteria.

    Krediet, Cory J; Ritchie, Kim B; Cohen, Matthew; Lipp, Erin K; Sutherland, Kathryn Patterson; Teplitski, Max

    2009-06-01

    In recent years, diseases of corals caused by opportunistic pathogens have become widespread. How opportunistic pathogens establish on coral surfaces, interact with native microbiota, and cause disease is not yet clear. This study compared the utilization of coral mucus by coral-associated commensal bacteria ("Photobacterium mandapamensis" and Halomonas meridiana) and by opportunistic Serratia marcescens pathogens. S. marcescens PDL100 (a pathogen associated with white pox disease of Acroporid corals) grew to higher population densities on components of mucus from the host coral. In an in vitro coculture on mucus from Acropora palmata, S. marcescens PDL100 isolates outgrew coral isolates. The white pox pathogen did not differ from other bacteria in growth on mucus from a nonhost coral, Montastraea faveolata. The ability of S. marcescens to cause disease in acroporid corals may be due, at least in part, to the ability of strain PDL100 to build to higher population numbers within the mucus surface layer of its acroporid host. During growth on mucus from A. palmata, similar glycosidase activities were present in coral commensal bacteria, in S. marcescens PDL100, and in environmental and human isolates of S. marcescens. The temporal regulation of these activities during growth on mucus, however, was distinct in the isolates. During early stages of growth on mucus, enzymatic activities in S. marcescens PDL100 were most similar to those in coral commensals. After overnight incubation on mucus, enzymatic activities in a white pox pathogen were most similar to those in pathogenic Serratia strains isolated from human mucosal surfaces.

  20. Immobilization of pseudorabies virus in porcine tracheal respiratory mucus revealed by single particle tracking.

    Xiaoyun Yang

    Full Text Available Pseudorabies virus (PRV initially replicates in the porcine upper respiratory tract. It easily invades the mucosae and submucosae for subsequent spread throughout the body via blood vessels and nervous system. In this context, PRV developed ingenious processes to overcome different barriers such as epithelial cells and the basement membrane. Another important but often overlooked barrier is the substantial mucus layer which coats the mucosae. However, little is known about how PRV particles interact with porcine respiratory mucus. We therefore measured the barrier properties of porcine tracheal respiratory mucus, and investigated the mobility of nanoparticles including PRV in this mucus. We developed an in vitro model utilizing single particle tracking microscopy. Firstly, the mucus pore size was evaluated with polyethylene glycol coupled (PEGylated nanoparticles and atomic force microscope. Secondly, the mobility of PRV in porcine tracheal respiratory mucus was examined and compared with that of negative, positive and PEGylated nanoparticles. The pore size of porcine tracheal respiratory mucus ranged from 80 to 1500 nm, with an average diameter of 455±240 nm. PRV (zeta potential: -31.8±1.5 mV experienced a severe obstruction in porcine tracheal respiratory mucus, diffusing 59-fold more slowly than in water. Similarly, the highly negatively (-49.8±0.6 mV and positively (36.7±1.1 mV charged nanoparticles were significantly trapped. In contrast, the nearly neutral, hydrophilic PEGylated nanoparticles (-9.6±0.8 mV diffused rapidly, with the majority of particles moving 50-fold faster than PRV. The mobility of the particles measured was found to be related but not correlated to their surface charge. Furthermore, PEGylated PRV (-13.8±0.9 mV was observed to diffuse 13-fold faster than native PRV. These findings clearly show that the mobility of PRV was significantly hindered in porcine tracheal respiratory mucus, and that the obstruction of PRV

  1. Neutronic study of fusion reactor blanket

    Barre, F.

    1983-06-01

    The problem of effective regeneration is a crucial issue for the fusion reactor, specially for the power reactor because of the conflicting requirements of heat removal and tritium breeding. For that, calculations are performed to evaluate blanket materials. Precise techniques are herein developed to improve the accuracy of the tritium production and the neutron and gamma transport calculations. Many configurations are studied with realistic breeder, structure, and coolant proportions. Accuracy of the results are evaluated from the sensitivity theory and uncertainty study using covariance matrices. At the end of this work, we presented the needs of nuclear data for fusion reactors and we give some advices for improving our knowledge of these data [fr

  2. Neutronic study of fusion reactor blanket

    Barre, F.

    1984-02-01

    The problem of effective regeneration is a crucial issue for the fusion reactor, specially for the power reactor because of the conflicting requirements of heat removal and tritium breeding. For that, calculations are performed to evaluate blanket materials. Precise techniques are herein developed to improve the accuracy of the tritium production and the neutron and gamma transport calculations. Many configurations are studied with realistic breeder, structure, and coolant proportions. Accuracy of the results are evaluated from the sensitivity theory and uncertainty study using covariance matricies. At the end of this work, we presented the needs of nuclear data for fusion reactors and we give some advices for improving our knowledge of these data [fr

  3. Development of advanced blanket materials for solid breeder blanket of fusion reactor

    Ishitsuka, E.

    2002-01-01

    Advanced solid breeding blanket design in the DEMO reactor requires the tritium breeder and neutron multiplier that can withstand the high temperature and high dose of neutron irradiation. Therefore, the development of such advanced blanket materials is indispensable. In this paper, the cooperation activities among JAERI, universities and industries in Japan on the development of these advanced materials are reported. Advanced tritium breeding material to prevent the grain growth in high temperature had to be developed because the tritium release behavior degraded by the grain growth. As one of such materials, TiO 2 -doped Li 2 TiO 3 has been studied, and TiO 2 -doped Li 2 TiO 3 pebbles was successfully fabricated. For the advanced neutron multiplier, the beryllium intermetallic compounds that have high melting point and good chemical stability have been studied. Some characterization of Be 12 Ti was studied. The pebble fabrication study for Be 12 Ti was also performed and Be 12 Ti pebbles were successfully fabricated. From these activities, the bright prospect to realize the DEMO blanket by the application of TiO 2 -doped Li 2 TiO 3 and beryllium intermetallic compounds was obtained. (author)

  4. Coral mucus fuels the sponge loop in warm- and cold-water coral reef ecosystems.

    Rix, Laura; de Goeij, Jasper M; Mueller, Christina E; Struck, Ulrich; Middelburg, Jack J; van Duyl, Fleur C; Al-Horani, Fuad A; Wild, Christian; Naumann, Malik S; van Oevelen, Dick

    2016-01-07

    Shallow warm-water and deep-sea cold-water corals engineer the coral reef framework and fertilize reef communities by releasing coral mucus, a source of reef dissolved organic matter (DOM). By transforming DOM into particulate detritus, sponges play a key role in transferring the energy and nutrients in DOM to higher trophic levels on Caribbean reefs via the so-called sponge loop. Coral mucus may be a major DOM source for the sponge loop, but mucus uptake by sponges has not been demonstrated. Here we used laboratory stable isotope tracer experiments to show the transfer of coral mucus into the bulk tissue and phospholipid fatty acids of the warm-water sponge Mycale fistulifera and cold-water sponge Hymedesmia coriacea, demonstrating a direct trophic link between corals and reef sponges. Furthermore, 21-40% of the mucus carbon and 32-39% of the nitrogen assimilated by the sponges was subsequently released as detritus, confirming a sponge loop on Red Sea warm-water and north Atlantic cold-water coral reefs. The presence of a sponge loop in two vastly different reef environments suggests it is a ubiquitous feature of reef ecosystems contributing to the high biogeochemical cycling that may enable coral reefs to thrive in nutrient-limited (warm-water) and energy-limited (cold-water) environments.

  5. Humoral immune response against native or 60Co irradiated venom and mucus from stingray Paratrygon aiereba

    Thomazi, Gabriela Ortega Coelho; Alves, Glaucie Jussilane; Aires, Raquel da Silva; Turibio, Thompson de Oliveira; Rocha, Andre Moreira; Spencer, Patrick Jack; Nascimento, Nanci do; Seibert, Carla Simone

    2015-01-01

    Poisonings and traumas caused by poisonous freshwater fish such as rays are considered a major public health problem and draw attention because of accidents involving these animals cause serious local symptoms and are disabling, keeping the victim away from work. The therapy of these cases is based only on the symptoms of patients, which implies in its low efficiency, causing suffering for the victims. This study aims to evaluate and compare the humoral immune response in animals inoculated with native or 60 Co irradiated Paratrygon aiereba venom and mucus. Ionizing radiation has proven to be an excellent tool to decrease the toxicity of venoms and isolated toxins. The mucus and venom samples of P. aiereba were irradiated using gamma rays from a 60 Co source. Animals models were immunized with the native or irradiated mucus or venom. The assays were conducted to assess the production of antibodies by the immunized animals using enzyme immunoassay and western blotting. Preliminary results show the production of antibodies by the immunized animals. The resulting sera were also checked for antigenic cross- reactivity between venom and mucus, demonstrating the potential of mucus as an antigen for serum production for the specific treatment for accidents by stingrays. However, it is essential to carry out further tests in order to verify the neutralization of the toxin by antibodies formed by animals. (author)

  6. Design analyses of self-cooled liquid metal blankets

    Gohar, Y.

    1986-12-01

    A trade-off study of liquid metal self-cooled blankets was carried out to define the performance of these blankets and to determine the potential to operate at the maximum possible values of the performance parameters. The main parameters considered during the course of the study were the tritium breeding ratio (TBR), the blanket energy multiplication factor, the energy fraction lost to the shield, the lithium-6 enrichment in the breeder material, the total blanket thickness, the reflector material selection, and the compositions of the different blanket zones. Also, a study was carried out to assess the impact of different reactor design choices on the reactor performance parameters. The design choices include the impurity control system (limiter or divertor), the material choice for the limiter, the elimination of tritium breeding from the inboard section of tokamak reactors, and the coolant choice for the nonbreeding inboard blanket. In addition, tritium breeding benchmark calculations were performed using different transport codes and nuclear data libraries. The importance of the TBR in the blanket design motivated the benchmark calculations

  7. Heat transfer problems in gas-cooled solid blankets

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    In all fusion reactors using the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle, a large fraction approximately 80 percent of the fusion energy will be released as approximately 14 MeV neutrons which must be slowed down in a relatively thick blanket surrounding the plasma, thereby, converting their kinetic energy to high temperature heat which can be continuously removed by a coolant stream and converted in part to electricity in a conventional power turbine. Because of the primary goal of achieving minimum radioactivity, to date Brookhaven blanket concepts have been restricted to the use of some form of solid lithium, with inert gas-cooling and in some design cases, water-cooling of the shell structure. Aluminum and graphite have been identified as very promising structural materials for fusion blankets, and conceptual designs based on these materials have been made. Depending on the thermal loading on the ''first'' wall which surrounds the plasma as well as blanket design, heat transfer problems may be noticeably different in gas-cooled solid blankets. Approaches to solution of heat removal problems as well as explanation of: (a) the after-heat problems in blankets; (b) tritium breeding in solids; and (c) materials selection for radiation shields relative to the minimum activity blanket efforts at Brookhaven are discussed

  8. Neutronics analysis for aqueous self-cooled fusion reactor blankets

    Varsamis, G.; Embrechts, M.J.; Jaffa, R.; Steiner, D.; Deutsch, L.; Gierszewski, P.

    1986-06-01

    The tritium breeding performance of several Aqueous Self-Cooled Blanket (ASCB) configurations for fusion reactors has been evaluated. The ASCB concept employs small amounts of lithium compound dissolved in light or heavy water to serve as both coolant and breeding medium. The inherent simplicity of this concept allows the development of blankets with minimal technological risk. The tritium breeding performance of the ASCB concept is a critical issue for this family of blankets. Contrary to conventional blanket designs there will be a significant contribution to the tritium breeding ratio (TBR) in the water coolant/breeder of duct shields, and the 3-D TBR will therefore be similar to the 1-D TBR. The tritium breeding performance of an ASCB for a MARS-like-tandem reactor and an ASCB based breeding-shield for the Next European Torus (NET) are assessed. Two design options for the MARS-like blanket are discussed. One design employs a vanadium first wall, and zircaloy for the structural material. The trade-offs between light water and heavy water cooling options for this zircaloy blanket are discussed. The second design option for MARS relies on the use of a vanadium alloy as the stuctural material, and heavy water as the coolant. It is demonstrated that both design options lead to low-activation blankets that allow class C burial. The breeder-shield for NET consists of a water-cooled stainless steel shield

  9. Preliminary study on lithium-salt aqueous solution blanket

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Naruse, Yuji; Yamaoka, Mitsuaki; Ohara, Atsushi; Ono, Kiyoshi; Kobayashi, Shigetada.

    1992-06-01

    Aqueous solution blanket using lithium salts such as LiNO 3 and LiOH have been studied in the US-TIBER program and ITER conceptual design activity. In the JAERI/LANL collaboration program for the joint operation of TSTA (Tritium Systems Test Assembly), preliminary design work of blanket tritium system for lithium ceramic blanket, aqueous solution blanket and liquid metal blanket, have been performed to investigate technical feasibility of tritium demonstration tests using the TSTA. Detail study of the aqueous solution blanket concept have not been performed in the Japanese fusion program, so that this study was carried out to investigate features of its concept and to evaluated its technical problems. The following are the major items studied in the present work: (i) Neutronics of tritium breeding ratio and shielding performance Lithium concentration, Li-60 enrichment, beryllium or lead, composition of structural material/beryllium/solution, heavy water, different lithium-salts (ii) Physicochemical properties of salts Solubility, corrosion characteristics and compatibility with structural materials, radiolysis (iii) Estimation of radiolysis in ITER aqueous solution blanket. (author)

  10. Overview of EU activities on DEMO liquid metal breeder blanket

    Giancarli, L.; Proust, E.; Malang, S.; Reimann, J.; Perujo, A.

    1994-01-01

    The present paper gives an overview of both design and experimental activities within the European Union (EU) concerning the development of liquid metal breeder blankets for DEMO. After several years of studies on breeding blankets, two blanket concepts are presently considered, both using the eutectic Pb-17Li: the dual-coolant concept and the water-cooled concept. The analysis of such concepts has permitted to identify the experimental areas where further data are required. Tritium control and MHD-issues are, at present, the activities on which is devoted the greatest effort within the EU. (authors). 4 figs., 4 tabs., 39 refs

  11. Availability analysis of the ITER blanket remote handling system

    Maruyama, Takahito; Noguchi, Yuto; Takeda, Nobukazu; Kakudate, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    The ITER blanket remote handling system (BRHS) is required to replace 440 blanket first wall panels in a two-year maintenance period. To investigate this capability, an availability analysis of the system was carried out. Following the analysis procedure defined by the ITER organization, the availability analysis consists of a functional analysis and a reliability block diagram analysis. In addition, three measures to improve availability were implemented: procurement of spare parts, in-vessel replacement of cameras, and simultaneous replacement of umbilical cables. The availability analysis confirmed those measures improve the availability and capability of the BRHS to replace 440 blanket first wall panels in two years. (author)

  12. Molten salt cooling/17Li-83Pb breeding blanket concept

    Sze, D.K.; Cheng, E.T.

    1985-02-01

    A description of a fusion breeding blanket concept using draw salt coolant and static 17 Li- 83 Pb is presented. 17 Li- 83 Pb has high breeding capability and low tritium solubility. Draw salt operates at low pressure and is inert to water. Corrosion, MHD, and tritium containment problems associated with the MARS design are alleviated because of the use of a static LiPb blanket. Blanket tritium recovery is by permeation toward the plasma. A direct contact steam generator is proposed to eliminate some generic problems associated with a tube shell steam generator

  13. Conceptual design of blanket structures for fusion experimental reactor (FER)

    1984-03-01

    Conceptual design study for in-vessel components including tritium breeding blanket of FER has been carried out. The objective of this study is to obtain the engineering and technological data for selecting the reactor concept and for its construction by investigating fully and broadly. The design work covers in-vessel components (such as tritium breeding blanket, first wall, shield, divertor and blanket test module), remote handling system and tritium system. The designs of those components and systems are accomplished in consideration of their accomodation to whole reactor system and problems for furthur study are clarified. (author)

  14. Demonstration Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (DTHR) blanket design study, December 1978

    1978-01-01

    This work represents only the second iteration of the conceptual design of a DTHR blanket; consequently, a number of issues important to a detailed blanket design have not yet been evaluated. The most critical issues identified are those of two-phase flow maldistribution, flow instabilities, flow stratification for horizontal radial inflow of boiling water, fuel rod vibrations, corrosion of clad and structural materials by high quality steam, fretting and cyclic loads. Approaches to minimizing these problems are discussed and experimental testing with flow mock-ups is recommended. These implications on a commercial blanket design are discussed and critical data needs are identified

  15. A Li-particulate blanket concept for ITER

    Wong, C.P.C.; Cheng, E.T.; Creedon, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    The Li-particulate blanket design concept the authors proposed for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) uses a dilute suspension of fine solid breeder particles in a carrier gas as the combined coolant and lithium breeder stream. This blanket concept has a simple mechanical and hydraulic configuration, low inventory of bred tritium, and simple tritium extraction system. Existing technology can be used to implement the design for ITER. The concept has the potential to be a highly reliable shield and blanket design for ITER with relatively low development and capital costs

  16. Cassette blanket and vacuum building: key elements in fusion reactor maintenance

    Werner, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    The integration of two concepts important to fusion power reactors is discussed. The first concept is the vacuum building which improves upon the current fusion reactor designs. The second concept, the use of the cassette blanket within the vacuum building environment, introduces four major improvements in blanket design: cassette blanket module, zoning concept, rectangular blanket concept, and internal tritium recovery

  17. Methodology for accident analyses of fusion breeder blankets and its application to helium-cooled pebble bed blanket

    Panayotov, Dobromir; Grief, Andrew; Merrill, Brad J.; Humrickhouse, Paul; Trow, Martin; Dillistone, Michael; Murgatroyd, Julian T.; Owen, Simon; Poitevin, Yves; Peers, Karen; Lyons, Alex; Heaton, Adam; Scott, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Test Blanket Systems (TBS) DEMO breeding blankets (BB) safety demonstration. • Comprehensive methodology for fusion breeding blanket accident analysis that addresses the specificity of the breeding blanket designs, materials, and phenomena. • Development of accident analysis specifications (AAS) via the use of phenomena identification and ranking tables (PIRT). • PIRT application to identify required physical models for BB accidents analysis, code assessment and selection. • Development of MELCOR and RELAP5 codes TBS models. • Qualification of the models via comparison with finite element calculations, code-tocode comparisons, and sensitivity studies. - Abstract: ‘Fusion for Energy’ (F4E) is designing, developing, and implementing the European Helium-Cooled Lead-Lithium (HCLL) and Helium-Cooled Pebble-Bed (HCPB) Test Blanket Systems (TBSs) for ITER (Nuclear Facility INB-174). Safety demonstration is an essential element for the integration of these TBSs into ITER and accident analysis is one of its critical components. A systematic approach to accident analysis has been developed under the F4E contract on TBS safety analyses. F4E technical requirements, together with Amec Foster Wheeler and INL efforts, have resulted in a comprehensive methodology for fusion breeding blanket accident analysis that addresses the specificity of the breeding blanket designs, materials, and phenomena while remaining consistent with the approach already applied to ITER accident analyses. The methodology phases are illustrated in the paper by its application to the EU HCPB TBS using both MELCOR and RELAP5 codes.

  18. Methodology for accident analyses of fusion breeder blankets and its application to helium-cooled pebble bed blanket

    Panayotov, Dobromir, E-mail: dobromir.panayotov@f4e.europa.eu [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Josep Pla, 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Barcelona E-08019 (Spain); Grief, Andrew [Amec Foster Wheeler, Booths Park, Chelford Road, Knutsford WA16 8QZ, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Merrill, Brad J.; Humrickhouse, Paul [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Trow, Martin; Dillistone, Michael; Murgatroyd, Julian T.; Owen, Simon [Amec Foster Wheeler, Booths Park, Chelford Road, Knutsford WA16 8QZ, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Poitevin, Yves [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Josep Pla, 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Barcelona E-08019 (Spain); Peers, Karen; Lyons, Alex; Heaton, Adam; Scott, Richard [Amec Foster Wheeler, Booths Park, Chelford Road, Knutsford WA16 8QZ, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Test Blanket Systems (TBS) DEMO breeding blankets (BB) safety demonstration. • Comprehensive methodology for fusion breeding blanket accident analysis that addresses the specificity of the breeding blanket designs, materials, and phenomena. • Development of accident analysis specifications (AAS) via the use of phenomena identification and ranking tables (PIRT). • PIRT application to identify required physical models for BB accidents analysis, code assessment and selection. • Development of MELCOR and RELAP5 codes TBS models. • Qualification of the models via comparison with finite element calculations, code-tocode comparisons, and sensitivity studies. - Abstract: ‘Fusion for Energy’ (F4E) is designing, developing, and implementing the European Helium-Cooled Lead-Lithium (HCLL) and Helium-Cooled Pebble-Bed (HCPB) Test Blanket Systems (TBSs) for ITER (Nuclear Facility INB-174). Safety demonstration is an essential element for the integration of these TBSs into ITER and accident analysis is one of its critical components. A systematic approach to accident analysis has been developed under the F4E contract on TBS safety analyses. F4E technical requirements, together with Amec Foster Wheeler and INL efforts, have resulted in a comprehensive methodology for fusion breeding blanket accident analysis that addresses the specificity of the breeding blanket designs, materials, and phenomena while remaining consistent with the approach already applied to ITER accident analyses. The methodology phases are illustrated in the paper by its application to the EU HCPB TBS using both MELCOR and RELAP5 codes.

  19. Evaluation of drug permeation under fed state conditions using mucus-covered Caco-2 cell epithelium

    Birch, Ditlev; Diedrichsen, Ragna G; Christophersen, Philip C

    2018-01-01

    The absence of a surface-lining mucus layer is a major pitfall for the Caco-2 epithelial model. However, this can be alleviated by applying biosimilar mucus (BM) to the apical surface of the cell monolayer, thereby constructing a mucosa mimicking in vivo conditions. This study aims to elucidate...... the influence of BM as a barrier towards exogenic compounds such as permeation enhancers, and components of fed state simulated intestinal fluid (FeSSIF). Caco-2 cell monolayers surface-lined with BM were exposed to several compounds with distinct physicochemical properties, and the cell viability...... and permeability of the cell monolayer was compared to that of cell monolayers without BM and well-established mucus-secreting epithelial models (HT29 monolayers and HT29/Caco-2 co-culture monolayers). Exposure of BM-covered cells to constituents from FeSSIF revealed that it comprised a strong, hydrophilic barrier...

  20. Mass entrapment and lysis of Mesodinium rubrum cells in mucus threads observed in cultures with Dinophysis

    Ojamäe, Karin; Hansen, Per Juel; Lips, Inga

    2016-01-01

    The entrapment and death of the ciliate Mesodinium rubrum in the mucus threads in cultures with Dinophysis is described and quantified. Feeding experiments with different concentrations and predator–prey ratios of Dinophysis acuta, Dinophysis acuminata and M. rubrum to study the motility loss...... and aggregate formation of the ciliates and the feeding behaviour of Dinophysis were carried out. In cultures of either Dinophysis species, the ciliates became entrapped in the mucus, which led to the formation of immobile aggregates of M. rubrum and subsequent cell lysis. The proportion of entrapped ciliates...... was influenced by the concentration of Dinophysis and the ratio of predator and prey in the cultures. At high cell concentrations of prey (136 cells mL−1) and predator (100 cells mL−1), a maximum of 17% of M. rubrum cells became immobile and went through cell lysis. Ciliates were observed trapped in the mucus...

  1. Attenuation of cigarette smoke-induced airway mucus production by hydrogen-rich saline in rats.

    Yunye Ning

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Over-production of mucus is an important pathophysiological feature in chronic airway disease such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and asthma. Cigarette smoking (CS is the leading cause of COPD. Oxidative stress plays a key role in CS-induced airway abnormal mucus production. Hydrogen protected cells and tissues against oxidative damage by scavenging hydroxyl radicals. In the present study we investigated the effect of hydrogen on CS-induced mucus production in rats. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: sham control, CS group, hydrogen-rich saline pretreatment group and hydrogen-rich saline control group. Lung morphology and tissue biochemical changes were determined by immunohistochemistry, Alcian Blue/periodic acid-Schiff staining, TUNEL, western blot and realtime RT-PCR. RESULTS: Hydrogen-rich saline pretreatment attenuated CS-induced mucus accumulation in the bronchiolar lumen, goblet cell hyperplasia, muc5ac over-expression and abnormal cell apoptosis in the airway epithelium as well as malondialdehyde increase in the BALF. The phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr1068 and Nrf2 up-regulation expression in the rat lungs challenged by CS exposure were also abrogated by hydrogen-rich saline. CONCLUSION: Hydrogen-rich saline pretreatment ameliorated CS-induced airway mucus production and airway epithelium damage in rats. The protective role of hydrogen on CS-exposed rat lungs was achieved at least partly by its free radical scavenging ability. This is the first report to demonstrate that intraperitoneal administration of hydrogen-rich saline protected rat airways against CS damage and it could be promising in treating abnormal airway mucus production in COPD.

  2. The Skin-Mucus Microbial Community of Farmed Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar)

    Minniti, Giusi; Hagen, Live Heldal; Porcellato, Davide; Jørgensen, Sven Martin; Pope, Phillip B.; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav

    2017-01-01

    The skin of the teleost is a flexible and scaled structure that protects the fish toward the external environment. The outermost surface of the skin is coated with mucus, which is believed to be colonized by a diverse bacterial community (commensal and/or opportunistic). Little is known about such communities and their role in fish welfare. In aquaculture, fish seem to be more susceptible to pathogens compared to wild fish. Indeed common fish farming practices may play important roles in promoting their vulnerability, possibly by causing changes to their microbiomes. In the present study, 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing was employed to analyze the composition of the farmed Salmo salar skin-mucus microbiome before and after netting and transfer. The composition of the bacterial community present in the rearing water was also investigated in order to evaluate its correlation with the community present on the fish skin. Our results reveal variability of the skin-mucus microbiome among the biological replicates before fish handling. On the contrary, after fish handling, the skin-mucus community exhibited structural similarity among the biological replicates and significant changes were observed in the bacterial composition compared to the fish analyzed prior to netting and transfer. Limited correlation was revealed between the skin-mucus microbiome and the bacterial community present in the rearing water. Finally, analysis of skin-mucus bacterial biomasses indicated low abundance for some samples, highlighting the need of caution when interpreting community data due to the possible contamination of water-residing bacteria. PMID:29104567

  3. The Skin-Mucus Microbial Community of Farmed Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar

    Giusi Minniti

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The skin of the teleost is a flexible and scaled structure that protects the fish toward the external environment. The outermost surface of the skin is coated with mucus, which is believed to be colonized by a diverse bacterial community (commensal and/or opportunistic. Little is known about such communities and their role in fish welfare. In aquaculture, fish seem to be more susceptible to pathogens compared to wild fish. Indeed common fish farming practices may play important roles in promoting their vulnerability, possibly by causing changes to their microbiomes. In the present study, 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing was employed to analyze the composition of the farmed Salmo salar skin-mucus microbiome before and after netting and transfer. The composition of the bacterial community present in the rearing water was also investigated in order to evaluate its correlation with the community present on the fish skin. Our results reveal variability of the skin-mucus microbiome among the biological replicates before fish handling. On the contrary, after fish handling, the skin-mucus community exhibited structural similarity among the biological replicates and significant changes were observed in the bacterial composition compared to the fish analyzed prior to netting and transfer. Limited correlation was revealed between the skin-mucus microbiome and the bacterial community present in the rearing water. Finally, analysis of skin-mucus bacterial biomasses indicated low abundance for some samples, highlighting the need of caution when interpreting community data due to the possible contamination of water-residing bacteria.

  4. Functional C1q is present in the skin mucus of Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baerii).

    Fan, Chunxin; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xuguang; Song, Jiakun

    2015-01-01

    The skin mucus of fish acts as the first line of self-protection against pathogens in the aquatic environment and comprises a number of innate immune components. However, the presence of the critical classical complement component C1q, which links the innate and adaptive immune systems of mammalians, has not been explored in a primitive actinopterygian fish. In this study, we report that C1q is present in the skin mucus of the Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baerii). The skin mucus was able to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli. The bacteriostatic activity of the skin mucus was reduced by heating and by pre-incubation with EDTA or mouse anti-human C1q antibody. We also detected C1q protein in skin mucus using the western blot procedure and isolated a cDNA that encodes the Siberian sturgeon C1qC, which had 44.7-51.4% identity with C1qCs in teleosts and tetrapods. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that Siberian sturgeon C1qC lies at the root of the actinopterygian branch and is separate from the tetrapod branch. The C1qC transcript was expressed in many tissues as well as in skin. Our data indicate that C1q is present in the skin mucus of the Siberian sturgeon to protect against water-borne bacteria, and the C1qC found in the sturgeon may represent the primitive form of teleost and tetrapod C1qCs. © 2014 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Optimization of up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor for ...

    Optimization of up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor for treatment of composite ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search ... Granules grown in the bottom part of UASB reactor were more compact and tense ...

  6. Electromagnetic effects involving a tokamak reactor first wall and blanket

    Turner, L.R.; Evans, K. Jr.; Gelbard, E.; Prater, R.

    1980-01-01

    Four electromagnetic effects experienced by the first wall and blanket of a tokamak reactor are considered. First, the first wall provides reduction of the growth rate of vertical axisymmetric instability and stabilization of low mode number interval kink modes. Second, if a rapid plasma disruption occurs, a current will be induced on the first wall, tending to maintain the field formerly produced by the plasma. Third, correction of plasma movement can begin on a time scale much faster than the L/R time of the first wall and blanket. Fourth, field changes, especially those from plasma disruption or from rapid discharge of a toroidal field coil, can cause substantial eddy current forces on elements of the first wall and blanket. These effects are considered specifically for the first wall and blanket of the STARFIRE commercial reactor design study

  7. Blanket options for high-efficiency fusion power

    Usher, J.L.; Lazareth, O.W.; Fillo, J.A.; Horn, F.L.; Powell, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The efficiencies of blankets for fusion reactors are usually in the range of 30 to 40%, limited by the operating temperatures (500 0 C) of conventional structural materials such as stainless steels. In this project two-zone blankets are proposed; these blankets consist of a low-temperature shell surrounding a high-temperature interior zone. A survey of nucleonics and thermal hydraulic parameters has led to a reference blanket design consisting of a water-cooled stainless steel shell around a BeO, ZrO 2 interior (cooled by argon) utilizing Li 2 O for tritium breeding. In this design, approximately 60% of the fusion energy is deposited in the high-temperature interior. The maximum argon temperature is 2230 0 C leading to an overall efficiency estimate of 55 to 60% for this reference case

  8. Fusion blankets for high-efficiency power cycles

    Usher, J.L.; Lazareth, O.W.; Fillo, J.A.; Horn, F.L.; Powell, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The efficiencies of blankets for fusion reactors are usually in the range of 30 to 40%, limited by the operating temperatures (500 0 C) of conventional structural materials such as stainless steels. In this project two-zone blankets are proposed; these blankets consist of a low-temperature shell surrounding a high-temperature interior zone. A survey of nucleonics and thermal hydraulic parameters has led to a reference blanket design consisting of a water-cooled stainless steel shell around a BeO, ZrO 2 interior (cooled by argon) utilizing Li 2 O for tritium breeding. In this design, approximately 60% of the fusion energy is deposited in the high-temperature interior. The maximum argon temperature is 2230 0 C leading to an overall efficiency estimate of 55 to 60% for this reference case

  9. Fusion blanket for high-efficiency power cycles

    Usher, J.L.; Powell, J.R.; Fillo, J.A.; Horn, F.L.; Lazareth, O.W.; Taussig, R.

    1980-01-01

    The efficiencies of blankets for fusion reactors are usually in the range of 30 to 40%, limited by the operating temperature (500 0 C) of conventional structural materials such as stainless steels. In this project two-zone blankets are proposed; these blankets consist of a low-temperature shell surrounding a high-temperature interior zone. A survey of nucleonics and thermal hydraulic parameters has led to a reference blanket design consisting of a water-cooled stainless steel shell around a BeO, ZrO 2 interior (cooled by Ar) utilizing Li 2 O for tritium breeding. In this design, approx. 60% of the fusion energy is deposited in the high-temperature interior. The maximum Ar temperature is 2230 0 C leading to an overall efficiency estimate of 55 to 60% for this reference case

  10. Fusion blankets for high-efficiency power cycles

    Usher, J.L.; Lazareth, O.W.; Fillo, J.A.; Horn, F.L.; Powell, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    The efficiencies of blankets for fusion reactors are usually in the range of 30 to 40%, limited by the operating temperatures (500 deg C) of conventional structural materials such as stainless steels. In this project 'two-zone' blankets are proposed; these blankets consist of a low-temperature shell surrounding a high-temperature interior zone. A survey of nucleonics and thermal hydraulic parameters has led to a reference blanket design consisting of a water-cooled stainless steel shell around a BeO, ZrO 2 interior (cooled by argon) utilizing Li 2 O for tritium breeding. In this design, approximately 60% of the fusion energy is deposited in the high-temperature interior. The maximum argon temperature is 2230 deg C leading to an overall efficiency estimate of 55 to 60% for this reference case. (author)

  11. Fusion-reactor blanket-material safety-compatibility studies

    Jeppson, D.W.; Muhlestein, L.D.; Keough, R.F.; Cohen, S.

    1982-11-01

    Blanket material selection for fusion reactors is strongly influenced by the desire to minimize safety and environmental concerns. Blanket material safety compatibility studies are being conducted to identify and characterize blanket-coolant-material interactions under postulated reactor accident conditions. Recently completed scoping compatibility tests indicate that : (1) ternary oxides (LiAlO 2 , Li 2 ZrO 3 , Li 2 SiO 3 , Li 4 SiO 4 and LiTiO 3 ) at postulated blanket operating temperatures are compatible with water coolant, while liquid lithium and Li 7 Pb 2 alloy reactions with water generate heat, aerosol and hydrogen; (2) lithium oxide and Li 17 Pb 83 alloy react mildly with water requiring special precautions to control hydrogen release; (3) liquid lithium reacts substantially, while Li 17 Pb 83 alloy reacts mildly with concrete to produce hydrogen; and (4) liquid lithium-air reactions present some major safety concerns

  12. Nuclear characteristics of D-D fusion reactor blankets, (1)

    Nakashima, Hideki; Ohta, Masao; Seki, Yasushi.

    1977-01-01

    Fusion reactors operating on the deuterium (D-D) cycle are considered promising for their freedom from tritium breeding in the blanket. In this paper, neutronic and photonic calculations are undertaken covering several blanket models of the D-D fusion reactor, using presently available data, with a view to comparing the nuclear characteristics of these models, in particular, the nuclear heating rates and their spatial distributions. Nine models are taken up for the study, embodying various combinations of coolant, blanket, structural and reflector materials. About 10 MeV is found to be a typical value for the total nuclear energy deposition per source neutron in the models considered here. The realization of high energy gain is contingent upon finding a favorable combination of blanket composition and configuration. The resulting implications on the thermal design aspect are briefly discussed. (auth.)

  13. Aqueous self-cooled blanket concepts for fusion reactors

    Varsamis, G.; Embrechts, M.J.; Steiner, D.; Deutsch, L.; Gierszewski, P.

    1987-01-01

    A novel aqueous self-cooled blanket (ASCB) concept has been proposed. The water coolant also serves as the tritium breeding medium by dissolving small amounts of lithium compound in the water. The tritium recovery requirements of the ASCB concept may be facilitated by the novel in-situ radiolytic tritium separation technique in development at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories. In this separation process deuterium gas is bubbled through the blanket coolant. Due to radiation induced processes, the equilibrium constant favors tritium migration to the deuterium gas stream. It is expected that the inherent simplicity of this design will result in a highly reliable, safe and economically attractive breeding blanket for fusion reactors. The available base of relevant information accumulated through water-cooled fission reactor programs should greatly facilitate the R and D effort required to validate the proposed blanket concept. Tests for tritium separation and corrosion compatibility show encouraging results for the feasibility of this concept

  14. Blast venting through blanket material in the HYLIFE ICF reactor

    Liu, J.C.; Peterson, P.F.; Schrock, V.E.

    1992-01-01

    This work presents a numerical study of blast venting through various blanket configurations in the HYLIFE ICF reactor design. The study uses TSUNAMI -- a multi-dimensional, high-resolution, shock capturing code -- to predict the momentum exchange and gas dynamics for blast venting in complex geometries. In addition, the study presents conservative predictions of wall loading by gas shock and impulse delivered to the protective liquid blanket. Configurations used in the study include both 2700 MJ and 350 MJ fusion yields per pulse for 5 meter and 3 meter radius reactor chambers. For the former, an annular jet array is used for the blanket geometry, while in the latter, both annular jet array as well as slab geometries are used. Results of the study indicate that blast venting and wall loading may be manageable in the HYLIFE-II design by a judicious choice of blanket configuration

  15. Application of vanadium alloys to a fusion reactor blanket

    Bethin, J.; Tobin, A. (Grumman Aerospace Corp., Bethpage, NY (USA). Research and Development Center)

    1984-05-01

    Vanadium and vanadium alloys are of interest in fusion reactor blanket applications due to their low induced radioactivity and outstanding elevated temperature mechanical properties during neutron irradiation. The major limitation to the use of vanadium is its sensitivity to oxygen impurities in the blanket environment, leading to oxygen embrittlement. A quantitative analysis was performed of the interaction of gaseous impurities in a helium coolant with vanadium and the V-15Cr-5Ti alloy under conditions expected in a fusion reactor blanket. It was shown that the use of unalloyed V would impose severe restrictions on the helium gas cleanup system due to excessive oxygen buildup and embrittlement of the metal. However, internal oxidation effects and the possibly lower terminal oxygen solubility in the alloy would impose much less severe cleanup constraints. It is suggested that V-15Cr-5Ti is a promising candidate for certain blanket applications and deserves further consideration.

  16. SPDEF is required for mouse pulmonary goblet cell differentiation and regulates a network of genes associated with mucus production

    Chen, G.; Korfhagen, T.R.; Xu, Y.; Kitzmiller, J.; Wert, S.E.; Maeda, Y.; Gregorieff, A.; Clevers, H.; Whitsett, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Various acute and chronic inflammatory stimuli increase the number and activity of pulmonary mucus-producing goblet cells, and goblet cell hyperplasia and excess mucus production are central to the pathogenesis of chronic pulmonary diseases. However, little is known about the transcriptional

  17. Interfacial dilational properties of tea polyphenols and milk proteins with gut epithelia and the role of mucus in nutrient adsorption.

    Guri, Anilda; Li, Yang; Corredig, Milena

    2015-12-01

    By interacting with nutrients, the mucus layer covering the intestinal epithelium may mediate absorption. This study aimed to determine possible interactions between epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), skim milk proteins or their complexes with human intestinal mucin films. The films were extracted from postconfluent monolayers of HT29-MTX, a human intestinal cell line, and a model system was created using drop shape tensiometry. The EGCG uptake tested in vitro on postconfluent Caco-2 cells or co-cultures of Caco-2/HT29-MTX (mucus producing) showed recovery of bioavailable EGCG only for Caco-2 cell monolayers, suggesting an effect of mucus on absorption. Interfacial dilational rheology was employed to characterize the properties of the interface mixed with mucus dispersion. Adsorption of polyphenols greatly enhanced the viscoelastic modulus of the mucus film, showing the presence of interactions between the nutrient molecules and mucus films. On the other hand, in situ digestion of milk proteins using trypsin showed higher surface activities as a result of protein unfolding and competitive adsorption of the hydrolyzed products. There was an increase of viscoelastic modulus over the drop ageing time for the mixed interfaces, indicating the formation of a stiffer interfacial network. These results bring new insights into the role of the mucus layer in nutrient absorption and the interactions of mucus and dairy products.

  18. Blanket of a hybrid thermonuclear reactor with liquid- metal cooling

    Terent'ev, I.K.; Fedorovich, E.P.; Paramonov, P.M.; Zhokhov, K.A.

    1982-01-01

    Blanket design of a hybrid thermopuclear reactor with a liquid metal coolant is described. To decrease MHD-resistance for uranium zone fuel elements a cylindrical shape is suggested and movement of liquid-metal coolant in fuel element packets is presumed to be in perpendicular to the magnetic field and fuel element axes direction. The first wall is cooled by water, blanket-by lithium-lead alloy

  19. Recent developments in fusion first wall, blanket, and shield technology

    Nygren, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    This brief overview of first wall, blanket and shield technology reviews the changes and trends in important design issues in first wall, blanket and shield design and related technology from the 1970's to the 1980's. The emphasis is on base technology rather than either systems engineering or materials development. The review is limited to the two primary confinement systems, tokamaks and mirrors, and production of electricity as the primary goal for development

  20. Evaluation of organic moderator/coolants for fusion breeder blankets

    Romero, J.B.

    1980-03-01

    Organic coolants have several attractive features for fusion breeder blanket design. Their apparent compatibility with lithium and their ideal physical and nuclear properties allows straight-forward, high performance designs. Radiolytic damage can be reduced to about the same order as comparable fission systems by using multiplier/stripper blanket designs. Tritium recovery from the organic should be straightforward, but additional data is needed to make a better assessment of the economics of the process

  1. Main features and potentialities of gas-blanket systems

    Lehnert, B.

    1977-02-01

    A review is given of the features and potentialities of cold-blanket systems, with respect to plasma equilibrium, stability, and reactor technology. The treatment is concentrated on quasi-steady magnetized plasmas confined at moderately high beta values. The cold-blanket concept has specific potentialities as a fusion reactor, e.g. in connection with the desired densities and dimensions of full-scale systems, refuelling, as well as ash and impurity removal, and stability. (author)

  2. Feasibility study of fusion breeding blanket concept employing graphite reflector

    Cho, Seungyon; Ahn, Mu-Young; Lee, Cheol Woo; Kim, Eung Seon; Park, Yi-Hyun; Lee, Youngmin; Lee, Dong Won

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A Helium-Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) breeding blanket concept adopts graphite as a reflector material by reducing the amount of beryllium multiplier. • Its feasibility was investigated in view point of the nuclear performance as well as material-related issues. • A nuclear analysis is performed under the fusion reactor condition to address the feasibility of graphite reflector in breeding blanket. • Also, the chemical stability of the graphite is investigated considering the chemical stability under accident conditions. • In conclusion, the adaptation of graphite reflector in breeding blanket is intrinsically safe and plausible under fusion reactor condition. - Abstract: To obtain high tritium breeding performance with limited blanket thickness, most of solid breeder blanket concepts employ a combination of lithium ceramic as a breeder and beryllium as a multiplier. In this case, considering that huge amount of beryllium are needed in fusion power plants, its handling difficulty and cost can be a major factor to be accounted for commercial use. Korea has proposed a Helium-Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) breeding blanket concept relevant to fusion power plants. Here, graphite is used as a reflector material by reducing the amount of beryllium multiplier. Its feasibility has been investigated in view point of the nuclear performance as well as material-related issues. In this paper, a nuclear analysis is performed under the fusion reactor condition to address the feasibility of graphite reflector in breeding blanket, considering tritium breeding capability and neutron shielding and activation aspects. Also, the chemical stability of the graphite is investigated considering the chemical stability under accident conditions, resulting in that the adaptation of graphite reflector in breeding blanket is intrinsically safe and plausible under fusion reactor condition.

  3. Feasibility study of fusion breeding blanket concept employing graphite reflector

    Cho, Seungyon, E-mail: sycho@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Mu-Young [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Cheol Woo; Kim, Eung Seon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yi-Hyun; Lee, Youngmin [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A Helium-Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) breeding blanket concept adopts graphite as a reflector material by reducing the amount of beryllium multiplier. • Its feasibility was investigated in view point of the nuclear performance as well as material-related issues. • A nuclear analysis is performed under the fusion reactor condition to address the feasibility of graphite reflector in breeding blanket. • Also, the chemical stability of the graphite is investigated considering the chemical stability under accident conditions. • In conclusion, the adaptation of graphite reflector in breeding blanket is intrinsically safe and plausible under fusion reactor condition. - Abstract: To obtain high tritium breeding performance with limited blanket thickness, most of solid breeder blanket concepts employ a combination of lithium ceramic as a breeder and beryllium as a multiplier. In this case, considering that huge amount of beryllium are needed in fusion power plants, its handling difficulty and cost can be a major factor to be accounted for commercial use. Korea has proposed a Helium-Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) breeding blanket concept relevant to fusion power plants. Here, graphite is used as a reflector material by reducing the amount of beryllium multiplier. Its feasibility has been investigated in view point of the nuclear performance as well as material-related issues. In this paper, a nuclear analysis is performed under the fusion reactor condition to address the feasibility of graphite reflector in breeding blanket, considering tritium breeding capability and neutron shielding and activation aspects. Also, the chemical stability of the graphite is investigated considering the chemical stability under accident conditions, resulting in that the adaptation of graphite reflector in breeding blanket is intrinsically safe and plausible under fusion reactor condition.

  4. Overview of first wall/blanket/shield technology

    Nygren, R.E.

    1983-04-01

    This brief overview of first wall, blanket, and shield technology focuses first on changes and trends in important design issues from the 1970's to the 1980's, then on current perceptions of critical issues in first wall, blanket, and shield design and related technology. The emphasis is on base technology rather than either systems engineering or materials development, on the two primary confinement systems, tokamaks and mirrors, and on production of electricity as the primary goal for development

  5. Applications of the Aqueous Self-Cooled Blanket concept

    Steiner, D.; Embrechts, M.J.; Varsamis, G.; Wrisley, K.; Deutch, L.; Gierszewski, P.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper a novel water-cooled blanket concept is examined. This concept, designated the Aqueous Self-Cooled Blanket (ASCB), employs water with small amounts of dissolved fertile compounds as both the coolant and the breeding medium. The ASCB concept is reviewed and its application in three different contexts is examined: (1) power reactors; (2) near-term devices such as NET; and (3) fusion-fission hybrids

  6. Progress on DEMO blanket attachment concept with keys and pins

    Vizvary, Zsolt; Iglesias, Daniel; Cooper, David; Crowe, Robert; Riccardo, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • DEMO blanket attachment system with keys and pins (without using bolts). • Blanket segments are preloaded by progressively designed springs. • Blanket back plate flexibility has a major impact on spring design. • Mechanical analysis of other components indicates no unresolvable issues. • Thermal analysis indicates acceptable temperatures for the support system. - Abstract: The blanket attachment has to cope with gravity, thermal and electromagnetic loads, also it has to be installed and serviced by remote handling. Pre-stressed components suffer from stress relaxation in irradiated environments such as DEMO. To circumvent this problem pre-stressed component should be either avoided or shielded, and where possible keys and pins should be used. This strategy has been proposed for the DEMO multi-module segments (MMS). The blanket segments are held by two tapered keys each, designed to allow thermal expansions while providing contact with the vacuum vessel and to resist the poloidal and radial moments the latter being dominant at 9.1 MNm inboard and 15 MNm outboard. On the top of the blanket segment there is a pin which provides vertical support. At the bottom another vertical support has to lock them in position after installation and manage the pre-load on the segments. The pre-load is required to deal with the electromagnetic loads during disruption. This is provided by a set of springs, which require shielding as they are preloaded. These are sized to cope with the force (3 MN inboard, 1.4 MN outboard) due to halo currents and the toroidal moment which can reverse. Calculations show that the flexibility of the blanket segment itself plays a significant role in defining the required support system. The blanket segment acts as a preloaded spring and it has to be part of the attachment design as well.

  7. Electrical connectors for blanket modules in ITER

    Poddubnyi, I., E-mail: poddubnyyii@nikiet.ru [Open Joint-Stock Company “N.A. Dollezhal Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering”, 107140, Malaya Krasnoselskaya Street 2/8, Moscow (Russian Federation); Khomiakov, S.; Kolganov, V. [Open Joint-Stock Company “N.A. Dollezhal Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering”, 107140, Malaya Krasnoselskaya Street 2/8, Moscow (Russian Federation); Sadakov, S.; Calcagno, B.; Chappuis, Ph.; Roccella, R.; Raffray, R. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St. Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Danilov, I.; Leshukov, A.; Strebkov, Y. [Open Joint-Stock Company “N.A. Dollezhal Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering”, 107140, Malaya Krasnoselskaya Street 2/8, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ulrickson, M. [Sandia National Laboratories MS-1129, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Analysis of static and cyclic strength for L-shaped and Z-shaped ES has been performed. • Analysis results do show that for L-shaped ES static and cyclic strength criteria are not satisfied. • Static and cyclic strength criteria are met well by ES with Z-shaped elastic elements. • ES with Z-shaped elastic elements has been adopted as a new baseline design for ITER. - Abstract: Blanket electrical connectors (E-straps, ES) are low-impedance electrical bridges crossing gaps between blanket modules (BMs) and vacuum vessel (VV). Similar ES are used between two parts on each BM: the first wall panel (FW) and shield block (SB). The main functions of E-straps are to: (a) conduct halo currents intercepting some rows of BM, (b) provide grounding paths for all BMs, and (c) operate as electrical shunts which protect water cooling pipes (branch pipes) from excessive halo and eddy currents. E-straps should be elastic enough to absorb 3-D imposed displacements of BM relative VV in a scale of ±2 mm and at the same time strong enough to not be damaged by EM loads. Each electrical strap is a package of flexible conductive sheets made of CuCrZr bronze. Halo current up to 137 kA and some components of eddy currents do pass through one E-strap for a few tens or hundreds milliseconds during the plasma vertical displacement events (VDE) and disruptions. These currents deposit Joule heat and cause rather high electromagnetic loads in a strong external magnetic field, reaching 9 T. A gradual failure of ES to conduct Halo and Eddy currents with low enough impedance gradually redistributes these currents into branch pipes and cause excessive EM loads. When branch pipes will be bent so much that will touch surrounding structures, the Joule heating in accidental electrical contact spots will cause local melting and may lead to a water leak. The paper presents and compares two design options of E-straps: with L-shaped and Z-shaped elastic elements. The latter option was

  8. Archaeal and Bacterial Communities Associated with the Surface Mucus of Caribbean Corals Differ in Their Degree of Host Specificity and Community Turnover Over Reefs

    Frade, P.R.; Roll, K.; Bergauer, K.; Herndl, G.

    2016-01-01

    Comparative studies on the distribution of archaeal versus bacterial communities associatedwith the surface mucus layer of corals have rarely taken place. It has thereforeremained enigmatic whether mucus-associated archaeal and bacterial communities exhibita similar specificity towards coral hosts

  9. Design and development of ceramic breeder demo blanket

    Enoeda, M.; Sato, S.; Hatano, T.

    2001-01-01

    Ceramic breeder blanket development has been widely conducted in Japan from fundamental researches to project-oriented engineering scaled development. A long term R and D program has been launched in JAERI since 1996 as a course of DEMO blanket development. The objectives of this program are to provide engineering data base and fabrication technologies of the DEMO blanket, aiming at module testing in ITER currently scheduled to start from the beginning of the ITER operation as a near-term target. Two types of DEMO blanket systems, water cooled blanket and helium cooled blanket, have been designed to be consistent with the SSTR (Steady State Tokamak Reactor) which is the reference DEMO reactor design in JAERI. Both of them utilize packed small pebbles of breeder Li 2 O or Li 2 TiO 3 as a candidate) and neutron multiplier (Be) and rely on the development of advanced structural materials (a reduced activation ferritic steel F82H) compatible with high temperature operation. (author)

  10. Design, Manufacture, and Experimental Serviceability Validation of ITER Blanket Components

    Leshukov, A. Yu.; Strebkov, Yu. S.; Sviridenko, M. N.; Safronov, V. M.; Putrik, A. B.

    2017-12-01

    In 2014, the Russian Federation and the ITER International Organization signed two Procurement Arrangements (PAs) for ITER blanket components: 1.6.P1ARF.01 "Blanket First Wall" of February 14, 2014, and 1.6.P3.RF.01 "Blanket Module Connections" of December 19, 2014. The first PA stipulates development, manufacture, testing, and delivery to the ITER site of 179 Enhanced Heat Flux (EHF) First Wall (FW) Panels intended for withstanding the heat flux from the plasma up to 4.7MW/m2. Two Russian institutions, NIIEFA (Efremov Institute) and NIKIET, are responsible for the implementation of this PA. NIIEFA manufactures plasma-facing components (PFCs) of the EHF FW panels and performs the final assembly and testing of the panels, and NIKIET manufactures FW beam structures, load-bearing structures of PFCs, and all elements of the panel attachment system. As for the second PA, NIKIET is the sole official supplier of flexible blanket supports, electrical insulation key pads (EIKPs), and blanket module/vacuum vessel electrical connectors. Joint activities of NIKIET and NIIEFA for implementing PA 1.6.P1ARF.01 are briefly described, and information on implementation of PA 1.6.P3.RF.01 is given. Results of the engineering design and research efforts in the scope of the above PAs in 2015-2016 are reported, and results of developing the technology for manufacturing ITER blanket components are presented.

  11. Stress analysis of blanket vessel for JAERI experimental fusion reactor

    Sako, K.; Minato, A.

    1979-01-01

    A blanket structure of JAERI Experimental Fusion Reactor (JXFR) consists of about 2,300 blanket cells with round cornered rectangular cross sections (twelve slightly different shapes) and is placed in a vacuum vessel. Each blanket vessel is a double-walled thin-shell structure made of Type 316 stainless steel with a spherical domed surface at the plasma side. Ribs for coolant channel are provided between inner and outer walls. The blanket cell contains Li 2 O pebbles and blocks for tritium breeding and stainless steel blocks for neutron reflection. A coolant is helium gas at 10 kgf/cm 2 (0.98 MPa) and its inlet and outlet temperatures are 300 0 C and 500 0 C. The maxima of heat flux and nuclear heating rate at the first wall are 12 W/cm 2 and 2 W/cc. A design philosophy of the blanket structure is based on high tritium breeding ratio and more effective shielding performance. The thin-shell vessel with a rectangular cross section satisfies the design philosophy. We have designed the blanket structure so that the adjacent vessels are mutually supporting in order to decrease the large deformation and stress due to internal pressure in case of the thin-shell vessel. (orig.)

  12. Studies on steps affecting tritium residence time in solid blanket

    Tanaka, Satoru

    1987-01-01

    For the self sustaining of CTR fuel cycle, the effective tritium recovery from blankets is essential. This means that not only tritium breeding ratio must be larger than 1.0, but also high recovering speed is required for the short residence time of tritium in blankets. Short residence time means that the tritium inventory in blankets is small. In this paper, the tritium residence time and tritium inventory in a solid blanket are modeled by considering the steps constituting tritium release. Some of these tritium migration processes were experimentally evaluated. The tritium migration steps in a solid blanket using sintered breeding materials consist of diffusion in grains, desorption at grain edges, diffusion and permeation through grain boundaries, desorption at particle edges, diffusion and percolation through interconnected pores to purging stream, and convective mass transfer to stream. Corresponding to these steps, diffusive, soluble, adsorbed and trapped tritium inventories and the tritium in gas phase are conceivable. The code named TTT was made for calculating these tritium inventories and the residence time of tritium. An example of the results of calculation is shown. The blanket is REPUTER-1, which is the conceptual design of a commercial reversed field pinch fusion reactor studied at the University of Tokyo. The experimental studies on the migration steps of tritium are reported. (Kako, I.)

  13. Transmutation blanket design for a Tokamak system

    Velasquez, Carlos E.; Barros, Graiciany de P.; Pereira, Claubia; Veloso, Maria A. Fortini; Costa, Antonella L.

    2011-01-01

    Sub-critical advanced reactor with a D-T fusion neutron source based on Tokamak technology is an innovative type of nuclear system. Due to the high quantity of neutrons produced by fusion reactions, it could be well spent in the transmutation process of the transuranic elements. Nevertheless, to achieve a successful transmutation, it is necessary to know the neutron fluence along the radial axis and its characteristics. In this work, it evaluated the neutron flux and interaction frequency along the radial axis changing the material of the first wall. W-alloy, beryllium and the combination of both were studied and regions more suitable to transmutation were determined. The results demonstrated that the better zone to place a transmutation blanket is limited by the heat sink and the shield block. Material arrangements W-alloy/W-alloy and W-alloy/Beryllium would be able to hold the requirements of high fluence and hardening spectrum needed to transuranic transmutation. The system was simulated using the MCNP5 code, the ITER Final Design Report, 2001, and the FENDL/MC-2.1 nuclear data library. (author)

  14. Biofilm formation by Salmonella spp. in catfish mucus extract under industrial conditions

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of strain and temperature on the growth and biofilm formation of Salmonella spp. in high and low concentrations of catfish mucus extract on different food-contact surfaces at 22°C and 10°C. The second objective of this study was to evaluate the...

  15. Effect of trefoil factors on the viscoelastic properties of mucus gels

    Thim, L; Madsen, F; Poulsen, S S

    2002-01-01

    Trefoil peptides (TFFs) are expressed and secreted in a tissue-specific manner in the gastrointestinal tract. Evidence of coexpression of trefoil peptides and mucins has been demonstrated in most mucus-producing cells in the gastrointestinal tract. The expression of trefoil peptides is up-regulat...

  16. In Vitro Microfluidic Models of Mucus-Like Obstructions in Small Airways

    Mulligan, Molly K.; Grotberg, James B.; Sznitman, Josué

    2012-11-01

    Liquid plugs can form in the lungs as a result of a host of different diseases, including cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The existence of such fluid obstructions have been found as far down in the bronchiole tree as the sixteenth generation, where bronchiole openings have diameters on the order of a hundred to a few hundred microns. Understanding the propagation of liquid plugs within the bifurcating branches of bronchiole airways is important because their presence in the lungs, and their rupture and break-up, can cause injury to the epithelial cells lining the airway walls as a result of high wall shear stresses. In particular, liquid plug rupture and break-up frequently occurs at airway bifurcations. Until present, however, experimental studies of liquid plugs have generally been restricted to Newtonian fluids that do not reflect the actual pseudoplastic properties of lung mucus. The present work attempts to uncover the propagation, rupture and break-up of mucus-like liquid plugs in the lower generations of the airway tree using microfluidic models. Our approach allows the dynamics of mucus-like plug break-up to be studied in real-time, in a one-to-one in vitro model, as a function of mucus rheology and bronchial tree geometry.

  17. Milk consumption does not lead to mucus production or occurrence of asthma.

    Wüthrich, Brunello; Schmid, Alexandra; Walther, Barbara; Sieber, Robert

    2005-12-01

    There is a belief among some members of the public that the consumption of milk and dairy products increases the production of mucus in the respiratory system. Therefore, some who believe in this effect renounce drinking milk. According to Australian studies, subjects perceived some parameters of mucus production to change after consumption of milk and soy-based beverages, but these effects were not specific to cows' milk because the soy-based milk drink with similar sensory characteristics produced the same changes. In individuals inoculated with the common cold virus, milk intake was not associated with increased nasal secretions, symptoms of cough, nose symptoms or congestion. Nevertheless, individuals who believe in the mucus and milk theory report more respiratory symptoms after drinking milk. In some types of alternative medicine, people with bronchial asthma, a chronic inflammatory disease of the lower respiratory tract, are advised not to eat so-called mucus-forming foods, especially all kinds of dairy products. According to different investigations the consumption of milk does not seem to exacerbate the symptoms of asthma and a relationship between milk consumption and the occurrence of asthma cannot be established. However, there are a few cases documented in which people with a cow's milk allergy presented with asthma-like symptoms.

  18. Description and comparative study of physico-chemical parameters of the teleost fish skin mucus.

    Guardiola, Francisco A; Cuartero, María; Del Mar Collado-González, María; Arizcún, Marta; Díaz Baños, F Guillermo; Meseguer, José; Cuesta, Alberto; Esteban, María A

    2015-01-01

    The study of mucosal surfaces, and in particular the fish skin and its secreted mucus, has been of great interest recently among immunologists. Measurement of the viscosity and other physico-chemical parameters (protein concentration, pH, conductivity, redox potential, osmolality and density) of the skin mucus can help to understand its biological functions. We have used five marine species of teleost: gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.), European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.), shi drum (Umbrina cirrosa L.), common dentex (Dentex dentex L.) and dusky grouper (Epinephelus marginatus L.), all of them with commercial interest in the aquaculture of the Mediterranean area. Mucus showed a direct shear- and temperature-dependent viscosity, with a non-Newtonian behavior, which differed however between two groups: one with higher viscosity (D. labrax, U. cirrosa, D. dentex) and the other with lower viscosity (S. aurata, E. marginatus). In addition, there was a clear interrelation between density and osmolality, as well as between density and temperature. Taking into account that high values of viscosity should improve the barrier effect against pathogens but low values of viscosity are needed for good locomotion characteristics, our results may help elucidate the relationship between physico-chemical and biological parameters of skin mucus, and disease susceptibility.

  19. Gallbladder contractility and mucus secretion after cholesterol feeding in the prairie dog

    Li, Y. F.; Moody, F. G.; Weisbrodt, N. W.; Zalewsky, C. A.; Coelho, J. C.; Senninger, N.; Gouma, D.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate changes in gallbladder contractility and mucus secretion in vitro during the early stages of gallstone formation in prairie dogs. Thirty-two animals were divided into five groups. Control animals were fed a trace cholesterol diet. Experimental animals were

  20. Trefoil factor peptide 3 is positively correlated with the viscoelastic properties of the cervical mucus plug

    Bastholm, Sara Kjær; Samson, Mie Hesselund; Becher, Naja

    2017-01-01

    The viscoelastic properties of the cervical mucus plug are considered essential for the occlusion of the cervical canal and thereby for protection against ascending infections during pregnancy. Factors controlling this property are virtually unknown. This study explores a possible role of trefoil...

  1. Dissecting the genetics of chronic mucus hypersecretion in smokers with and without COPD

    Dijkstra, Akkelies E.; Boezen, H. Marike; Van Den Berge, Maarten; Vonk, Judith M.; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Barr, R. Graham; Burkart, Kirsten M.; Manichaikul, Ani; Pottinger, Tess D.; Silverman, Edward K.; Cho, Michael H.; Crapo, James D.; Beaty, Terri H.; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Lomas, David A.; Bossé, Yohan; Nickle, David C.; Paré, Peter D.; De Koning, Harry J.; Lammers, Jan Willem; Zanen, Pieter; Smolonska, Joanna; Wijmenga, Ciska; Brandsma, Corry Anke; Groen, Harry J M; Postma, Dirkje S.; Alizadeh, B. Z.; De Boer, R. A.; Boezen, H. M.; Bruinenberg, M.; Franke, L.; Van Der Harst, P.; Hillege, H. L.; Van Der Klauw, M. M.; Navis, G.; Ormel, J.; Postma, D. S.; Rosmalen, J. G M; Slaets, J. P.; Snieder, H.; Stolk, R. P.; Wolffenbuttel, B. H R; Wijmenga, C.

    2015-01-01

    Smoking is a notorious risk factor for chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH). CMH frequently occurs in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The question arises whether the same single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are related to CMH in smokers with and without COPD. We performed two

  2. Scanning electron microscopy of Salmonella biofilms on various food-contact surfaces in catfish mucus

    The objective of this study was to determine the growth and survival of Salmonella enterica in the presence of high and low concentrations (375 µg/ml and 15 µg/ml) of catfish mucus extract at 10 °C and 22 °C for 63 days. The second objective of this study was to investigate the biofilm formation of ...

  3. Coral mucus fuels the sponge loop in warm- and cold-water coral reef ecosystems

    Rix, L.; de Goeij, J.M.; Mueller, C.E.; Struck, U.; Middelburg, J.J.; van Duyl, F.C.; Al-Horani, F.A.; Wild, C.; Naumann, M.S.; Van Oevelen, D.

    2016-01-01

    Shallow warm-water and deep-sea cold-water corals engineer the coral reef framework and fertilize reef communities by releasing coral mucus, a source of reef dissolved organic matter (DOM). By transforming DOM into particulate detritus, sponges play a key role in transferring the energy and

  4. Eosinophil cationic protein stimulates and major basic protein inhibits airway mucus secretion

    Lundgren, J D; Davey, R T; Lundgren, B

    1991-01-01

    Possible roles of eosinophil (EO) products in modulating the release of mucus from airway explants were investigated. Cell- and membrane-free lysates from purified human EOs (1 to 20 x 10(5)) caused a dose-dependent release of respiratory glycoconjugates (RGC) from cultured feline tracheal explants...

  5. The effect of N-acetyl-L-cysteine on the viscosity of ileal neobladder mucus.

    Schrier, B.P.; Lichtendonk, W.J.; Witjes, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) proved to be an effective mucolytic in pulmonary secretions. Our goal was to investigate the in vitro effect of NAC on viscosity of ileal neobladder mucus. The urine of a patient with an ileal neobladder was collected during the first 7 days postoperatively and stored in a

  6. The conductivity of cervical mucus as a predictor of ovulation in beef ...

    The conductivity of cervical mucus as a predictor of ovulation in beef cows synchronised with cloprostenol. C.T. McCabe, G.W. Sprowson, D.H. Holness. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online.

  7. Intacting Integrity in coping with health issues

    Jepsen, Stine Leegaard; Bastrup Jørgensen, Lene; Fridlund, Bengt

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a formal substantive theory (FST) on the multidimensional behavioral process of coping with health issues. Intacting integrity while coping with health issues emerged as the core category of this FST. People facing health issues strive to safeguard and keep...

  8. Epispadias in boys with an intact prepuce

    Bos, E. M. E.; Kuijper, C. F.; Chrzan, R. J.; Dik, P.; Klijn, A. J.; de Jong, T. P. V. M.

    2014-01-01

    To present an overview of the clinical presentation and pathological anatomy, and the results of surgical correction of 7 cases of epispadias with intact prepuce; a rare condition that has only occasionally been reported in literature. A retrospective search was performed in the surgical and

  9. HYDROCARBON VAPOR DIFFUSION IN INTACT CORE SLEEVES

    The diffusion of 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (TMP) and 2,2,5-trimethylhexane (TMH) vapors put of residually contaminated sandy soil from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) field research site at Traverse City, Michigan, was measured and modeled. The headspace of an intact ...

  10. Small Particles Intact Capture Experiment (SPICE)

    Nishioka, Ken-Ji; Carle, G. C.; Bunch, T. E.; Mendez, David J.; Ryder, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    The Small Particles Intact Capture Experiment (SPICE) will develop technologies and engineering techniques necessary to capture nearly intact, uncontaminated cosmic and interplanetary dust particles (IDP's). Successful capture of such particles will benefit the exobiology and planetary science communities by providing particulate samples that may have survived unaltered since the formation of the solar system. Characterization of these particles may contribute fundamental data to our knowledge of how these particles could have formed into our planet Earth and, perhaps, contributed to the beginnings of life. The term 'uncontaminated' means that captured cosmic and IDP particles are free of organic contamination from the capture process and the term 'nearly intact capture' means that their chemical and elemental components are not materially altered during capture. The key to capturing cosmic and IDP particles that are organic-contamination free and nearly intact is the capture medium. Initial screening of capture media included organic foams, multiple thin foil layers, and aerogel (a silica gel); but, with the exception of aerogel, the requirements of no contamination or nearly intact capture were not met. To ensure no contamination of particles in the capture process, high-purity aerogel was chosen. High-purity aerogel results in high clarity (visual clearness), a useful quality in detection and recovery of embedded captured particles from the aerogel. P. Tsou at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) originally described the use of aerogel for this purpose and reported laboratory test results. He has flown aerogel as a 'GAS-can Lid' payload on STS-47 and is evaluating the results. The Timeband Capture Cell Experiment (TICCE), a Eureca 1 experiment, is also flying aerogel and is scheduled for recovery in late April.

  11. Trade-off study of liquid metal self-cooled blankets

    Gohar, Y.

    1986-01-01

    A trade-off study of liquid metal self-cooled blankets was carried out to define the performance of these blankets and to determine the potential to operate at the maximum possible values of the performance parameters. The main parameters considered during the course of this study were the tritium breeding ratio (TBR), the blanket energy multiplication factor, the energy fraction lost to the shield, the lithium-6 enrichment in the breeder material, the total blanket thickness, the reflector material selection, and the compositions of the different blanket zones. The primary results of the study are as follows: a) the lithium-lead blanket achieves a higher TBR with a smaller blanket thickness relative to the lithium blanket; b) the lithium blanket generates more energy per fusion neutron relative to the lithium-lead blanket; c) among the possible reflector materials, the carbon reflector produces the highest TBR; d) the high-Z reflector materials (Mo, Cu, W, or steel) generate more energy per fusion neutron and produce smaller TBRs relative to the carbon reflector; e) lithium-6 enrichment is required for the lithium-lead blanket to reduce the total blanket thickness; and f) the energy deposition per fusion neutron reaches a saturation as the blanket thickness, the fraction of the high-Z material in the reflector, or the reflector zone thickness increases (this allows one to design the blanket for a specific TBR without reducing the energy production)

  12. Tethered by Self-Generated Flow: Mucus String Augmented Feeding Current Generation in Larval Oysters

    Jiang, H.; Wheeler, J.; Anderson, E.

    2016-02-01

    Marine zooplankton live in a nutritionally dilute environment. To survive, they must process an enormous volume of water relative to their own body volume for food. To achieve this, many zooplankters including copepods, invertebrate larvae, and protists create a feeding current to concentrate and transport food items to their food gathering structures. To enhance the efficiency of the feeding current, these zooplankters often rely on certain "tethering" mechanisms to retard their translational motion for producing a strong feeding current. The tethering force may include excess weight due to gravity, force from attachment to solid surfaces, and drag experienced by strategically placed morphological structures. Larval oysters are known from previous studies to release mucus strings during feeding, presumably for supplying a tethering force to enhance their feeding-current efficiency. But the underlying mechanism is unclear. In this study, we used a high-speed microscale imaging system (HSMIS) to observe the behavior of freely swimming and feeding larval oysters. We also used HSMIS to measure larval imposed feeding currents via a micro-particle image velocimetry (µPIV) technique. HSMIS allows observations along a vertically oriented focal plane in a relatively large water vessel with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions. Our high-speed videos show that a feeding larval oyster continuously released a long mucus string into its feeding current that flows downward; the feeding current subsequently dragged the mucus string downward. Analysis of our µPIV data combined with a hydrodynamic model further suggests that the drag force experienced by the mucus string in the feeding current contributes significantly to the tethering force required to generate the feeding current. Thus, mucus strings in larval oysters act as "anchors" in larval self-generated flow to actively tether the feeding larvae.

  13. The influence of mucus microstructure and rheology in H. pylori infection

    Rama eBansil

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The bacterium Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, has evolved to survive in the highly acidic environment of the stomach and colonize on the epithelial surface of the gastric mucosa. Its pathogenic effects are well known to cause gastritis, peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. In order to infect the stomach and establish colonies on the mucus epithelial surface, the bacterium has to move across the gel-like gastric mucus lining of the stomach under acidic conditions. In this review we address the question of how the bacterium gets past the protective mucus barrier from a biophysical perspective. We begin by reviewing the molecular structure of gastric mucin and discuss the current state of understanding concerning mucin polymerization and low pH induced gelation. We then focus on the viscoelasticity of mucin in view of its relevance to the transport of particles and bacteria across mucus, the key first step in H. pylori infection. The second part of the review focuses on the motility of H. pylori in mucin solutions and gels, and how infection with H. pylori in turn impacts the viscoelastic properties of mucin. We present recent microscopic results tracking the motion of H. pylori in mucin solutions and gels. We then discuss how the biochemical strategy of urea hydrolysis required for survival in the acid is also relevant to the mechanism that enables flagella driven swimming across the mucus gel layer. Other aspects of the influence of H. pylori infection such as, altering gastric mucin expression, its rate of production and its composition, and the influence of mucin on factors controlling H. pylori virulence and proliferation are briefly discussed with references to relevant literature.

  14. Breeding blanket development. Tritium release from breeder

    Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Nagao, Yoshiharu

    2006-01-01

    Engineering data on neutron irradiation performance of tritium breeders are needed to design the breeding blanket of fusion reactor. In this study, tritium release experiments of the breeders were carried out to examine the effects of various parameters (such as sweep gas flow rate, hydrogen content in sweep gas, irradiation temperature and thermal neutron flux) on tritium generation and release behavior. Lithium titanate (Li 2 TiO 3 ) is considered as a candidate tritium breeder in the blanket design of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). As for the shape of the breeder material, a small spherical form is preferred to reduce the thermal stress induced in the breeder. Li 2 TiO 3 pebbles of about 170g in total weight and with 0.3 and 2 mm in diameter were manufactured by a wet process, and an assembly packed with the binary Li 2 TiO 3 pebbles was irradiated in Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). The tritium was generated in the Li 2 TiO 3 pebble bed and released from the pebble bed, and was swept downstream using the sweep gas for on-line analysis of tritium content. Concentration of total tritium and gaseous tritium (HT or T 2 gas) released from the Li 2 TiO 3 pebble bed were measured by ionization chambers, and the ratio of (gaseous tritium)/(total tritium) was evaluated. The sweep gas flow rate was changed from 100 to 900cm 3 /min, and hydrogen content in the sweep gas was changed from 100 to 10000 ppm. Furthermore, thermal neutron flux was changed using a window made of hafnium (Hf) neutron absorber. The irradiation temperature at an outer region of the Li 2 TiO 3 pebble bed was held between 200 and 400degC. The main results of this experiment are summarized as follows. 1) When the temperature at the outside edge of the Li 2 TiO 3 pebble bed exceeded 100degC, the tritium release from the Li 2 TiO 3 pebble bed started. The ratio of the tritium release rate and the tritium generation rate (normalized tritium release rate: R/G) reached

  15. Effects of temperature, nutrients, organic matter and coral mucus on the survival of the coral pathogen, Serratia marcescens PDL100.

    Looney, Erin E; Sutherland, Kathryn P; Lipp, Erin K

    2010-09-01

    Serratia marcescens is an enteric bacterium that causes white pox disease in elkhorn coral, Acropora palmata; however, it remains unclear if the pathogenic strain has adapted to seawater or if it requires a host or reservoir for survival. To begin to address this fundamental issue, the persistence of strain PDL100 was compared among seawater and coral mucus microcosms. Median survival time across all conditions ranged from a low of 15 h in natural seawater [with a first-order decay constant (k) = -0.173] at 30°C to a maximum of 120 h in glucose-amended A. palmata mucus (k = -0.029) at 30°C. Among seawater and mucus microcosms, median survival time was significantly greater within Siderastrea siderea mucus compared with seawater or mucus of Montastraea faveolata or A. palmata (P palmata mucus (P < 0.0001). Increasing the temperature of seawater to 35°C resulted in a significantly slower decay than that observed at 30°C (P < 0.0001). The results of this study indicate that PDL100 is not well-adapted to marine water; however, survival can be improved by increasing temperature, the availability of coral mucus from S. siderea and most notably the presence of dissolved organic carbon. © 2010 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Nuclear Analyses of Indian LLCB Test Blanket System in ITER

    Swami, H. L.; Shaw, A. K.; Danani, C.; Chaudhuri, Paritosh

    2017-04-01

    Heading towards the Nuclear Fusion Reactor Program, India is developing Lead Lithium Ceramic Breeder (LLCB) tritium breeding blanket for its future fusion Reactor. A mock-up of the LLCB blanket is proposed to be tested in ITER equatorial port no.2, to ensure the overall performance of blanket in reactor relevant nuclear fusion environment. Nuclear analyses play an important role in LLCB Test Blanket System design & development. It is required for tritium breeding estimation, thermal-hydraulic design, coolants process design, radioactive waste management, equipment maintenance & replacement strategies and nuclear safety. The nuclear behaviour of LLCB test blanket module in ITER is predicated in terms of nuclear responses such as tritium production, nuclear heating, neutron fluxes and radiation damages. Radiation shielding capability of LLCB TBS inside and outside bio-shield was also assessed to fulfill ITER shielding requirements. In order to supports the rad-waste and safety assessment, nuclear activation analyses were carried out and radioactivity data were generated for LLCB TBS components. Nuclear analyses of LLCB TBS are performed using ITER recommended nuclear analyses codes (i.e. MCNP, EASY), nuclear cross section data libraries (i.e. FENDL 2.1, EAF) and neutronic model (ITER C-lite v.l). The paper describes a comprehensive nuclear performance of LLCB TBS in ITER.

  17. The transpiration cooled first wall and blanket concept

    Barleon, Leopold; Wong, Clement

    2002-01-01

    To achieve high thermal performance at high power density the EVOLVE concept was investigated under the APEX program. The EVOLVE W-alloy first wall and blanket concept proposes to use transpiration cooling of the first wall and boiling or vaporizing lithium (Li) in the blanket zone. Critical issues of this concept are: the Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure losses of the Li circuit, the evaporation through a capillary structure and the needed superheating of the Li at the first wall and blanket zones. Application of the transpiration concept to the blanket region results in the integrated transpiration cooling concept (ITCC) with either toroidal or poloidal first wall channels. For both orientations the routing of the liquid Li and the Li vapor has been modeled and the corresponding pressure losses have been calculated by varying the width of the supplying slot and the capillary diameter. The concept works when the sum of the active and passive pumping head is higher than the total system pressure losses and when the temperature at the inner side of the first wall does not override the superheating limit of the coolant. This cooling concept has been extended to the divertor design, and the removal of a surface heat flux of up to 10 MW/m 2 appears to be possible, but this paper will focus on the transpiration cooled first wall and blanket concept assessment

  18. Assessment of alkali metal coolants for the ITER blanket

    Natesan, K.; Reed, C.B.; Mattas, R.F.

    1994-01-01

    The blanket system is one of the most important components of a fusion reactor because it has a major impact on both the economics and safety of fusion energy. The primary functions of the blanket in a deuterium/tritium-fueled fusion reactor are to convert the fusion energy into sensible heat and to breed tritium for the fuel cycle. The Blanket Comparison and Selection Study, conducted earlier, described the overall comparative performance of different blanket concepts, including liquid metal, molten salt, water, and helium. This paper will discuss the ITER requirements for a self-cooled blanket concept with liquid lithium and for indirectly cooled concepts that use other alkali metals such as NaK. The paper will address the thermodynamics of interactions between the liquid metals (i.e., lithium and NaK) and structural materials (e.g., V-base alloys), together with associated corrosion/compatibility issues. Available experimental data will be used to assess the long-term performance of the first wall in a liquid metal environment

  19. Measurement of diffusive properties of intact rock

    Harvey, K B

    1996-12-01

    In the Postclosure Assessment of a Reference System for the Disposal of Canada`s Nuclear Fuel Waste (Goodwin et al. 1994) the disposal vault is assumed to be surrounded by a zone of intact rock, referred to as the `exclusion zone.` A sensitivity analysis of the relative effectiveness of the several engineered and natural barriers that contribute to the safety of the reference disposal system has shown that this zone of intact rock is the most effective of these barriers to the movement of radionuclides through the reference system. Peer review of the geosphere model used in the case study for the EIS (Environmental Impact Statement) of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program has identified the need to quantify the properties of the intact rock surrounding the disposal vault that would control the transport of radionuclides by diffusion. The Postclosure Assessment also identified the need for appropriate values of the free water diffusion coefficient (D{sub o}) for {sup 129}1 and {sup 14}C. The measurement of rock resistivity allows the calculation of the Formation Factor for a rock This review describes the Formation Factor, diffusivity, permeability, and porosity, and how these properties might be measured or inferred for insitu rock under the conditions that apply to the intact rock surrounding a potential disposal vault. The importance of measuring the intrinsic diffusion coefficient (D{sup i}) of diffusing species under solution salinities simulating those of groundwaters is emphasised, and a method of measurement is described that is independent of the diffusing medium, and which would be appropriate for measurements made in chemically complex media such as groundwaters. (author). 95 refs., 4 tabs., 39 figs.

  20. Measurement of diffusive properties of intact rock

    Harvey, K.B.

    1996-12-01

    In the Postclosure Assessment of a Reference System for the Disposal of Canada's Nuclear Fuel Waste (Goodwin et al. 1994) the disposal vault is assumed to be surrounded by a zone of intact rock, referred to as the 'exclusion zone.' A sensitivity analysis of the relative effectiveness of the several engineered and natural barriers that contribute to the safety of the reference disposal system has shown that this zone of intact rock is the most effective of these barriers to the movement of radionuclides through the reference system. Peer review of the geosphere model used in the case study for the EIS (Environmental Impact Statement) of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program has identified the need to quantify the properties of the intact rock surrounding the disposal vault that would control the transport of radionuclides by diffusion. The Postclosure Assessment also identified the need for appropriate values of the free water diffusion coefficient (D o ) for 129 1 and 14 C. The measurement of rock resistivity allows the calculation of the Formation Factor for a rock This review describes the Formation Factor, diffusivity, permeability, and porosity, and how these properties might be measured or inferred for insitu rock under the conditions that apply to the intact rock surrounding a potential disposal vault. The importance of measuring the intrinsic diffusion coefficient (D i ) of diffusing species under solution salinities simulating those of groundwaters is emphasised, and a method of measurement is described that is independent of the diffusing medium, and which would be appropriate for measurements made in chemically complex media such as groundwaters. (author). 95 refs., 4 tabs., 39 figs

  1. A search for mixotrophy and mucus trap production in Alexandrium spp. and the dynamics of mucus trap formation in Alexandrium pseudogonyaulax

    Blossom, Hannah Eva; Bædkel, Tina Dencker; Tillmann, Urban

    2017-01-01

    , such as speed and frequency of trap formation as well as what happens to the trap after the A. pseudogonyaulax cell detaches from it. The percentage of A. pseudogonyaulax cells producing a mucus trap and the number of prey cells caught increased with increasing prey concentration, whereas the physical size...... of the traps was independent of prey concentration. In one strain given an excess of prey, within 1 h over 90% of individual A. pseudogonyaulax cells had formed a trap, each containing an average of 45 prey cells. Individual A. pseudogonyaulax cells steadily produced traps and up to 5 traps were produced...

  2. Tritium transport in the water cooled Pb-17Li blanket concept of DEMO

    Reiter, F.; Tominetti, S.; Perujo, A.

    1992-01-01

    The code TIRP has been used to calculate the time dependence of tritium inventory and tritium permeation into the coolant and into the first wall boxes in the water cooled Pb-17Li blanket concept of DEMO. The calculations have been performed for the martensitic steel MANET and the austenitic steel AISI 316L as blanket structure materials, for water or helium cooling and for convective or no motion of the liquid breeder in the blanket. Tritium inventories are rather low in blankets with MANET structure and higher in those with AISI 316L structure. Tritium permeation rates are too high in both blankets. Further calculations on tritium inventory and permeation are therefore presented for blankets with TiC permeation barriers of 1 μm thickness on various surfaces of the blanket structure and for blankets with any permeation barriers in function of their thickness, tritium diffusivities, tritium surface recombination rates and atomic densities. These last calculations have been performed for a blanket with coatings on the outer surfaces of the blanket and with a tritium residence time of 10 4 s and for a blanket with coatings on both sides of the cooling tubes and stagnant Pb-17Li in the blanket. The second case for a blanket with MANET structure presents a very interesting solution for tritium recovery by permeation into and pumping from the first wall boxes. (orig.)

  3. Autism Spectrum Disorder and intact executive functioning.

    Ferrara, R; Ansermet, F; Massoni, F; Petrone, L; Onofri, E; Ricci, P; Archer, T; Ricci, S

    2016-01-01

    Earliest notions concerning autism (Autism Spectrum Disorders, ASD) describe the disturbance in executive functioning. Despite altered definition, executive functioning, expressed as higher cognitive skills required complex behaviors linked to the prefrontal cortex, are defective in autism. Specific difficulties in children presenting autism or verbal disabilities at executive functioning levels have been identified. Nevertheless, the developmental deficit of executive functioning in autism is highly diversified with huge individual variation and may even be absent. The aim of the present study to examine the current standing of intact executive functioning intact in ASD. Analysis of ASD populations, whether high-functioning, Asperger's or autism Broad Phenotype, studied over a range of executive functions including response inhibition, planning, cognitive flexibility, cognitive inhibition, and alerting networks indicates an absence of damage/impairment compared to the typically-developed normal control subjects. These findings of intact executive functioning in ASD subjects provide a strong foundation on which to construct applications for growth environments and the rehabilitation of autistic subjects.

  4. Proteomic profile of the skin mucus of farmed gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata).

    Jurado, Juan; Fuentes-Almagro, Carlos A; Guardiola, Francisco Antonio; Cuesta, Alberto; Esteban, Ma Ángeles; Prieto-Álamo, María-José

    2015-04-29

    Fish skin mucus is the first line of defense against infections and it discriminates between pathogenic and commensal bacterial strains. Mucus composition varies amongst fish species and is influenced by endogenous and exogenous factors. This study describes the first proteome map of the epidermal mucus of farmed gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata). We used an integrative proteomic approach by combining a label-free procedure (LC-MS/MS) with the classical 2-DE-PMF-MS/MS methodology. The identified mucosal proteins were clustered in four groups according to their biological functions. Structural proteins (actins, keratins, tubulins, tropomyosin, cofilin-2 and filamin-A) and metabolic proteins (ribosomal proteins, proteasomal subunits, NACA, VCP, histones, NDPK, transferrin, glycolytic enzymes, ATP synthase components, beta-globin, Apo-A1 and FABP7) were the best represented functional categories. We also found proteins involved in stress response (WAP65, HSPC70, Cu,Zn-SOD, and PRDX1 and PRDX2) and signal transduction (PP2A 65kDa regulatory subunit, 14-3-3 protein beta/alpha, tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein, RhoGDI and PEBP1). Most of the identified proteins address different aspects of the innate immune response. Additionally, we analyzed bacterial peptides identified in the skin mucus of healthy S. aurata. These results revealed that genera belonging to the Lactobacillales order constitute the most abundant microorganism populations in this habitat. This work shows that proteomic methods can be used to characterize fish skin mucus. Using a coupled approach of LC-MS/MS and a 2-DE-PMF-MS/MS, we have obtained the first comprehensive view of the skin mucosal proteome of S. aurata, a fish species that is economically relevant for Mediterranean aquaculture. We identified a panel of proteins involved in a variety of biological functions, particularly in the innate immune response. Furthermore, to our knowledge, this is the first time a

  5. Status of blanket design for RTO/RC ITER

    Yamada, M.; Ioki, K.; Cardella, A.; Elio, F.; Miki, N.

    2000-01-01

    Design has progressed on the FW/blanket for the RTO/RC (reduced technical objective/ reduced cost) ITER. The basic functions and structures are the same as for the 1998 ITER design. However, design and fabrication methods of the FW/blanket have been improved to achieve ∝ 50% reduction of the construction cost compared to that for the 1998 ITER design. Detailed blanket module designs with flat separable FW panels have been developed to reduce the fabrication cost and the future radioactive waste. Most of the R and D performed so far during the EDA (engineering design activity) is still applicable. Further cost reduction methods are also being investigated and additional R and D is being performed. (orig.)

  6. Computation Method Comparison for Th Based Seed-Blanket Cores

    Kolesnikov, S.; Galperin, A.; Shwageraus, E.

    2004-01-01

    This work compares two methods for calculating a given nuclear fuel cycle in the WASB configuration. Both methods use the ELCOS Code System (2-D transport code BOXER and 3-D nodal code SILWER) [4] are compared. In the first method, the cross-sections of the Seed and Blanket, needed for the 3-D nodal code are generated separately for each region by the 2-D transport code. In the second method, the cross-sections of the Seed and Blanket, needed for the 3-D nodal code are generated from Seed-Blanket Colorsets (Fig.1) calculated by the 2-D transport code. The evaluation of the error introduced by the first method is the main objective of the present study

  7. Neutronics design aspects of reference ARIES-I fusion blanket

    Cheng, E.T.

    1990-12-01

    A SiC composite blanket concept was recently conceived for a deuterium-tritium burning, 1000 MW(e) tokamak fusion reactor design, ARIES-I. SiC composite structural material was chosen due to its very low activation features. High blanket nuclear performance and thermal efficiency, adequate tritium breeding, and a low level of activation are important design requirements for the ARIES-I reactor. The major approaches, other than using SiC as structural material, in meeting these design requirements, are to employ beryllium, the only low activation neutron multiplying material, and isotopically tailored Li 2 ZrO 3 , a tritium breeding material stable at high temperature, as blanket materials. 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Direct LiT Electrolysis in a Metallic Fusion Blanket

    Olson, Luke [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-30

    A process that simplifies the extraction of tritium from molten lithium-based breeding blankets was developed. The process is based on the direct electrolysis of lithium tritide using a ceramic Li ion conductor that replaces the molten salt extraction step. Extraction of tritium in the form of lithium tritide in the blankets/targets of fusion/fission reactors is critical in order to maintain low concentrations. This is needed to decrease the potential tritium permeation to the surroundings and large releases from unforeseen accident scenarios. Extraction is complicated due to required low tritium concentration limits and because of the high affinity of tritium for the blanket. This work identified, developed and tested the use of ceramic lithium ion conductors capable of recovering hydrogen and deuterium through an electrolysis step at high temperatures.

  9. High temperature blankets for the production of synthetic fuels

    Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.; Fillo, J.; Makowitz, H.

    1977-01-01

    The application of very high temperature blankets to improved efficiency of electric power generation and production of H 2 and H 2 based synthetic fuels is described. The blanket modules have a low temperature (300 to 400 0 C) structure (SS, V, Al, etc.) which serves as the vacuum/coolant pressure boundary, and a hot (>1000 0 C) thermally insulated interior. Approximately 50 to 70% of the fusion energy is deposited in the hot interior because of deep penetration by high energy neutrons. Separate coolant circuits are used for the two temperature zones: water for the low temperature structure, and steam or He for the hot interior. Electric generation efficiencies of approximately 60% and H 2 production efficiencies of approximately 50 to 70%, depending on design, are projected for fusion reactors using these high temperature blankets

  10. Heating an aquaculture pond with a solar pool blanket

    Wisely, B; Holliday, J E; MacDonald, R E

    1982-01-01

    A floating solar blanket of laminated bubble plastic was used to heat a 0.11 ha seawater pond of 1.3 m depth. The covered pond maintained daily temperatures 6 to 9/sup 0/C above two controls. Local air temperatures averaged 14 to 19/sup 0/C. Oysters, prawns, seasquirts, and fish in the covered pond all survived. After three weeks, the blanket separated. This was the result of pond temperatures exceeding 30/sup 0/C, the maximum manufacturer's specification. Floating blankets fabricated to higher specifications would be useful for maintaining above-ambient temperatures in small ponds or tanks in temporary situations during cold winter months and might have a more permanent use.

  11. Solid breeder test blanket module design and analysis

    Ying, A. [University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1597 (United States)]. E-mail: ying@fusion.ucla.edu; Abdou, M. [University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1597 (United States); Calderoni, P. [University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1597 (United States); Sharafat, S. [University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1597 (United States); Youssef, M. [University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1597 (United States); An, Z. [University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1597 (United States); Abou-Sena, A. [University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1597 (United States); Kim, E. [University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1597 (United States); Reyes, S. [LANL, Livermore, CA (United States); Willms, S. [LANL, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kurtz, R. [PNNL, Richland, WA (United States)

    2006-02-15

    This paper presents the design and analysis for the US ITER solid breeder blanket test articles. Objectives of solid breeder blanket testing during the first phase of the ITER operation focus on exploration of fusion break-in phenomena and configuration scoping. Specific emphasis is placed on first wall structural response, evaluation of neutronic parameters, assessment of thermomechanical behavior and characterization of tritium release. The tests will be conducted with three unit cell arrays/sub-modules. The development approach includes: (1) design the unit cell/sub-module for low temperature operations and (2) refer to a reactor blanket design and use engineering scaling to reproduce key parameters under ITER wall loading conditions, so that phenomena under investigation can be measured at a reactor-like level.

  12. Direct LiT Electrolysis in a Metallic Fusion Blanket

    Olson, Luke

    2016-01-01

    A process that simplifies the extraction of tritium from molten lithium-based breeding blankets was developed. The process is based on the direct electrolysis of lithium tritide using a ceramic Li ion conductor that replaces the molten salt extraction step. Extraction of tritium in the form of lithium tritide in the blankets/targets of fusion/fission reactors is critical in order to maintain low concentrations. This is needed to decrease the potential tritium permeation to the surroundings and large releases from unforeseen accident scenarios. Extraction is complicated due to required low tritium concentration limits and because of the high affinity of tritium for the blanket. This work identified, developed and tested the use of ceramic lithium ion conductors capable of recovering hydrogen and deuterium through an electrolysis step at high temperatures.

  13. The evolution of US helium-cooled blankets

    Wong, C.P.C.; Schultz, K.R.; Cheng, E.T.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews and compares four helium-cooled fusion reactor blanket designs. These designs represent generic configurations of using helium to cool fusion reactor blankets that were studied over the past 20 years in the United States of America (US). These configurations are the pressurized module design, the pressurized tube design, the solid particulate and gas mixture design, and the nested shell design. Among these four designs, the nested shell design, which was invented for the ARIES study, is the simplest in configuration and has the least number of critical issues. Both metallic and ceramic-composite structural materials can be used for this design. It is believed that the nested shell design can be the most suitable blanket configuration for helium-cooled fusion power and experimental reactors. (orig.)

  14. Status of fusion reactor blanket evaluation studies in France

    Carre, F.; Chevereau, G.; Gervaise, F.; Proust, E.

    1985-03-01

    In the frame of recent CEA studies aiming at the evaluation and at the comparison of various candidate blanket concepts in moderate power conditions (Psub(n) approximately 2 MW/m 2 ), the present work examines the neutronic and thermomechanical performances of a water cooled Li 17 Pb 83 tubular blanket and those of a helium cooled canister blanket taking advantage of the excellent breeding capability of composite Beryllium/LiAlO 2 (85/15%) breeder elements. The purpose of the following discussion is to justify the impetus for these reference concepts and to summarize the state of their evaluation studies updated by the continuous assimilation of calculations and experiments in progress

  15. EU DEMO blanket concepts safety assessment. Final report of Working Group 6a of the Blanket Concept Selection Exercise

    Kleefeldt, K.; Porfiri, T.

    1996-06-01

    The European Union has been engaged since 1989 in a programme to develop tritium breeding blankets for application in a fusion power reactor. There are four blanket concepts under development. Two of them use lithium ceramics, the other two concepts employ an eutectic lead-lithium alloy (Pb-17Li) as breeder material. The two most promising concepts were to select in 1995 for further development. In order to prepare the selection, a Blanket Concept Selection Exercise (BCSE) has been inititated by the participating associations under the auspices of the European Commission. This BCSE has been performed in 14 working groups which, in a comparative evaluation of the four blanket concepts, addressed specific fields. The working group safety addressed the safety implications. This report describes the methodology adopted, the safety issues identified, their comparative evaluation for the four concepts, and the results and conclusions of the working group to be entered into the overall evaluation. There, the results from all 14 working groups have been combined to yield a final ranking as a basis for the selection. In summary, the safety assessment showed that the four European blanket concepts can be considered as equivalent in terms of the safety rating adopted, each concept, however, rendering safety concerns of different quality in different areas which are substantiated in this report. (orig.) [de

  16. Overview of the TFTR Lithium Blanket Module program

    Jassby, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The LBM (Lithium Blanket Module) is an approximately cubic module, about 80 cm on each side, with construction representative of a helium-cooled lithium oxide fusion reactor blanket module. Measurements of neutron transport and tritium breeding in the LBM will be made in irradiation programs first with a point-neutron source, and subsequently with the D-D and D-T fusion-neutron sources of the TFTR. This paper summarizes the objectives of the LBM program, the design, development and construction of the LBM, and progress in the experimental tests

  17. ITER blanket module shield block design and analysis

    Mitin, D.; Khomyakov, S.; Razmerov, A.; Strebkov, Yu.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the alternative design of the shield block cooling path for a typical ITER blanket module with a predominantly sequential flow circuit. A number of serious disadvantages have been observed for the reference design, where the parallel flow circuit is used, which is inherent in the majority of blanket modules. The paper discusses these disadvantages and demonstrates the benefit of the alternative design based on the detailed design and the technological, hydraulic, thermal, structural and strength analyses, conducted for module no. 17

  18. Progress and achievements of the ITER L-4 blanket project

    Daenner, W.; Toschi, R.; Cardella, A.

    1999-01-01

    The L-4 Blanket Project embraces the R and D of the ITER Shielding Blanket, and its main objective is the fabrication of prototype components. This paper summarises the main conclusions from the materials R and D and the development of technologies which were required for the prototype specifications and manufacturing. The main results of the ongoing testing activities, and of the component manufacture are outlined.The main objectives of the project have been achieved including improvements of the material properties and of joining technologies, which resulted in good component quality and high performance in qualification tests. (author)

  19. Ceramic BOT type blanket with poloidal helium cooling

    Cardella, A.; Daenenr, W.; Iseli, M.; Ferrari, M.; Gallina, M.; Rado, V.; Simbolotti, G.; Violante, V.

    1989-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the work done and results achieved over the past two years on the ceramic breeder BOT blanket with poloidal helium cooling. A conclusive remark on the brick/plate option described previously is followed by short descriptions of the low and high performance pebble bed options elaborated as alternatives for both NET and DEMO. The results show, togethre with those about the poloidal cooling of the First Wall, good prospects for this blanket type provided that the questions connected wiht an extensive use of beryllium find a satisfactor answer. (author). 5 refs.; 7 figs.; 1 tab

  20. Progress and achievements of the ITER L-4 blanket project

    Daenner, W.; Toschi, R.; Cardella, A.

    2001-01-01

    The L-4 Blanket Project embraces the R and D of the ITER Shielding Blanket, and its main objective is the fabrication of prototype components. This paper summarises the main conclusions from the materials R and D and the development of technologies which were required for the prototype specifications and manufacturing. The main results of the ongoing testing activities, and of the component manufacture are outlined. The main objectives of the project have been achieved including improvements of the material properties and of joining technologies, which resulted in good component quality and high performance in qualification tests. (author)

  1. Limiter and first wall of the fusion reactor blanket

    Danilov, I.; Skladnov, K.; Kolganov, V.

    1994-01-01

    Previous designing of the first wall and limiter has allowed to determine their possible embodiment depending on the parameters and operation conditions of the blanket. As a rule limiter is a separate structure located on the plasma facing surface of the blanket assembly. Possible versions of the limiter/FW which may be considered: (1) limiters with mechanical attachment of the protective part; (2) limiters with the attachment with brazing; (3) limiters with common/separate cooling system; (4) limiter as a substitute of the FW. Generally the FW/limiter structure includes protective shield and its cooling system which consist of protective coating, heat accumulator, conductive layer and attachment locks

  2. Ceramic sphere-pac breeder design for fusion blankets

    Gierszewski, P.J.; Sullivan, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Randomly packed beds of ceramic spheres are a practical approach to surrounding fusion plasmas with tritium-breeding material. This paper examines the general properties of sphere-pac beds for application in fusion breeder blankets. The design considerations and models are reviewed for packing, tritium breeding and recovery, thermal conductivity, purge-gas pressure drop, mechanical behavior and fabrication. The design correlations are compared against available fusion ceramic data. Specific conclusions are that ternary (three-size) beds are not attractive for fusion blankets, and that the fusion spheres should be as large as possible subject primarily to packing constraints. (orig.)

  3. An aqueous lithium salt blanket option for fusion power reactors

    Steiner, D.; Varsamis, G. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (USA). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics); Deutsch, L.; Rathke, J. (Grumman Corp., Bethpage, NY (USA). Advanced Energy Systems); Gierszewski, P. (Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project (CFFTP), Mississauga, ON (Canada))

    1989-04-01

    An aqueous lithium salt blanket (ALSB) concept is proposed which could be the basis for either a power reactor blanket or a test module in an engineering test reactor. The design is based on an austenitic stainless steel structure, a beryllium multiplier, and a salt breeder concentration of about 32 g LiNO/sub 3/ per 100 cm/sup 3/ of H/sub 2/O. To limit tritium release rates, the salt breeder solution is separated from the water coolant circuit. The overall tritium system cost for a 2400 MW (fusion power) reactor is estimated to be 180 million Dollar US87 installed. (orig.).

  4. Pulsed activation analyses of the ITER blanket design options considered in the blanket trade-off study

    Wang, Q.; Henderson, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    Pulsed activation calculations have been performed on two blanket options considered as part of the ITER home team blanket trade-off study. The objective was to compare the activity, afterheat and waste disposal rating (WDR) results of a composite blanket-shield design for the continuous operation approximation to a pulsed operation case to determine whether the differences are at most the duty factor as predicted by the two nuclide chain model. Up to a cooling period of 100 years, the pulsed activity and afterheat values were below the continuous oepration results and well within (except for one afterheat value) the maximum deviation predicted by the two nuclide chain model. No differences in the WDR values were noted as they are, to a large extent, based on long-lived nuclides which are insensitive to short-term changes in the operation history. (orig.)

  5. A methodology for accident analysis of fusion breeder blankets and its application to helium-cooled lead–lithium blanket

    Panayotov, Dobromir; Poitevin, Yves; Grief, Andrew; Trow, Martin; Dillistone, Michael

    2016-01-01

    'Fusion for Energy' (F4E) is designing, developing, and implementing the European Helium-Cooled Lead-Lithium (HCLL) and Helium-Cooled Pebble-Bed (HCPB) Test Blanket Systems (TBSs) for ITER (Nuclear Facility INB-174). Safety demonstration is an essential element for the integration of these TBSs into ITER and accident analysis is one of its critical components. A systematic approach to accident analysis has been developed under the F4E contract on TBS safety analyses. F4E technical requirements, together with Amec Foster Wheeler and INL efforts, have resulted in a comprehensive methodology for fusion breeding blanket accident analysis that addresses the specificity of the breeding blanket designs, materials, and phenomena while remaining consistent with the approach already applied to ITER accident analyses. Furthermore, the methodology phases are illustrated in the paper by its application to the EU HCLL TBS using both MELCOR and RELAP5 codes.

  6. Stable mucus-associated bacterial communities in bleached and healthy corals of Porites lobata from the Arabian Seas

    Hadaidi, Ghaida Ali Hassan; Rö thig, Till; Yum, Lauren; Ziegler, Maren; Arif, Chatchanit; Roder, Cornelia; Burt, John; Voolstra, Christian R.

    2017-01-01

    Coral reefs are subject to coral bleaching manifested by the loss of endosymbiotic algae from coral host tissue. Besides algae, corals associate with bacteria. In particular, bacteria residing in the surface mucus layer are thought to mediate coral

  7. Chemotactic Activity of Cyclophilin A in the Skin Mucus of Yellow Catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco) and Its Active Site for Chemotaxis

    Dawar, Farman Ullah; Tu, Jiagang; Xiong, Yang; Lan, Jiangfeng; Dong, Xing Xing; Liu, Xiaoling; Khattak, Muhammad Nasir Khan; Mei, Jie; Lin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Fish skin mucus is a dynamic barrier for invading pathogens with a variety of anti-microbial enzymes, including cyclophilin A (CypA), a multi-functional protein with peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) activity. Beside various other immunological functions, CypA induces leucocytes migration in vitro in teleost. In the current study, we have discovered several novel immune-relevant proteins in yellow catfish skin mucus by mass spectrometry (MS). The CypA present among them was further detected by Western blot. Moreover, the CypA present in the skin mucus displayed strong chemotactic activity for yellow catfish leucocytes. Interestingly, asparagine (like arginine in mammals) at position 69 was the critical site in yellow catfish CypA involved in leucocyte attraction. These novel efforts do not only highlight the enzymatic texture of skin mucus, but signify CypA to be targeted for anti-inflammatory therapeutics. PMID:27589721

  8. Chemotactic Activity of Cyclophilin A in the Skin Mucus of Yellow Catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco and Its Active Site for Chemotaxis

    Farman Ullah Dawar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fish skin mucus is a dynamic barrier for invading pathogens with a variety of anti-microbial enzymes, including cyclophilin A (CypA, a multi-functional protein with peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase activity. Beside various other immunological functions, CypA induces leucocytes migration in vitro in teleost. In the current study, we have discovered several novel immune-relevant proteins in yellow catfish skin mucus by mass spectrometry (MS. The CypA present among them was further detected by Western blot. Moreover, the CypA present in the skin mucus displayed strong chemotactic activity for yellow catfish leucocytes. Interestingly, asparagine (like arginine in mammals at position 69 was the critical site in yellow catfish CypA involved in leucocyte attraction. These novel efforts do not only highlight the enzymatic texture of skin mucus, but signify CypA to be targeted for anti-inflammatory therapeutics.

  9. High-attenuation mucus plugs on MDCT in a child with cystic fibrosis: potential cause and differential diagnosis

    Morozov, Andrey; Brown, Shanaree; Applegate, Kimberly E.; Howenstine, Michelle

    2007-01-01

    High-attenuation mucus plugging is a rare finding in both adults and children. When it occurs, the field of differential diagnoses is typically quite small and includes acute hemorrhage, aspiration of radiodense material, and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA). The last of these three diagnoses is the most difficult to make, although ABPA is more commonly seen in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) or asthma. ABPA is radiographically characterized by recurrent mucus plugging, atelectasis, and central bronchiectasis. Thus far, high-attenuation mucus plugs have only been reported in adults. We report a rare case of a child with CF who had high-attenuation mucus plugs and atelectasis that raised the possibility of ABPA. We discuss the differential diagnoses of this finding and the role of multidetector CT in these children. (orig.)

  10. High-attenuation mucus plugs on MDCT in a child with cystic fibrosis: potential cause and differential diagnosis

    Morozov, Andrey; Brown, Shanaree [Indiana University Medical School, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Applegate, Kimberly E. [Riley Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, Indiana University Medical Center, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Howenstine, Michelle [Riley Hospital for Children, Department of Pulmonology, Indiana University Medical Center, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2007-06-15

    High-attenuation mucus plugging is a rare finding in both adults and children. When it occurs, the field of differential diagnoses is typically quite small and includes acute hemorrhage, aspiration of radiodense material, and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA). The last of these three diagnoses is the most difficult to make, although ABPA is more commonly seen in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) or asthma. ABPA is radiographically characterized by recurrent mucus plugging, atelectasis, and central bronchiectasis. Thus far, high-attenuation mucus plugs have only been reported in adults. We report a rare case of a child with CF who had high-attenuation mucus plugs and atelectasis that raised the possibility of ABPA. We discuss the differential diagnoses of this finding and the role of multidetector CT in these children. (orig.)

  11. Hypersecretion of mucus glycoprotein by the gallbladder epithelium in experimental cholelithiasis.

    Lee, S P

    1981-07-01

    In three models of cholelithiasis (dihydrocholesterol-fed rabbits, cholesterol-cholic acid-fed mice, and Lincomycin-treated guinea pigs), the quantity and chemical composition of gallbladder epithelial mucin have been studied using (1) a spectrum of histochemical glycoprotein stains, and (2) biochemical extraction, purification and analysis of the carbohydrate components of epithelial mucin. Despite the diverse mechanism of stone induction and difference in stone composition, a common pattern of response by the epithelial mucin was observed in all three models. There was a quantitative increase in epithelial mucus production at a time before stones were formed and this increase persisted till stones were formed. There was no difference, qualitatively, between mucus produced by normal and stone-forming gallbladders.

  12. Oxytetracycline Inhibits Mucus Secretion and Inflammation in Human Airway Epithelial Cells.

    Shah, Said Ahmad; Ishinaga, Hajime; Takeuchi, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Oxytetracycline is a broad-spectrum antibiotic, but its nonantibacterial effects in the human respiratory tract are unknown. In this study, the effects of oxytetracycline on mucus secretion and inflammation were examined by PCR and ELISA in the human airway epithelial cell line NCI-H292. Oxytetracycline (10 μg/mL) significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced MUC5AC gene expression and MUC5AC protein levels in NCI-H292 cells. It also downregulated IL-8 and IL-1β gene expression and IL-1β protein levels. Our findings demonstrated that oxytetracycline suppressed mucus production and inflammation in human respiratory epithelial cells, providing further evidence for the usefulness of oxytetracycline for human airway inflammatory diseases. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Japanese contributions to the Japan-US workshop on blanket design/technology

    Tone, Tatsuzo; Seki, Yasushi; Minato, Akio; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Mori, Seiji; Kawasaki, Hiromitsu; Sumita, Kenji.

    1983-02-01

    This report describes Japanese papers presented at the Japan-US Workshop on Blanket Design/Technology which was held at Argonne National Laboratory, November 10 - 11, 1982. Overview of Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER), JAERI's activities related to first wall/blanket/shield, summary of FER blanket and its technology development issues and summary of activities at universities on fusion reactor blanket engineering are covered. (author)

  14. p38 MAPK and MMP-9 cooperatively regulate mucus overproduction in mice exposed to acrolein fog.

    Liu, Dai-Shun; Wang, Tao; Han, Su-Xia; Dong, Jia-Jia; Liao, Zeng-Lin; He, Guang-Ming; Chen, Lei; Chen, Ya-Juan; Xu, Dan; Hou, Yan; Li, Yan-Ping; Wen, Fu-Qiang

    2009-09-01

    To evaluate the role of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) on mice airway inflammation, mucus production and the possible cross-talk between p38 MAPK and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in mucin protein synthesis. Mice were exposed to 4.0 ppm of acrolein for 21 days with daily intraperitoneal injection of SB203580, a specific inhibitor of p38 MAPK. In control mice, sterile saline was administered instead. On days 7 and 21, mice were sacrificed to examine airway inflammation and mucus production by BALF cell counts, cytokine ELISA, and H&E and AB-PAS staining. The mRNA and protein levels of Muc5ac, p38 MAPK and MMP-9 in the lung were determined by RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting analysis. MMP-9 activity was measured by gelatin zymography. Both the numbers of inflammatory cells and mucus-secreting goblet cells were significantly increased in the airways of mice exposed to acrolein as compared to the control mice. Acrolein-increased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK was significantly reduced by SB203580. The airway inflammation and goblet cell hyperplasia after acrolein challenge were also attenuated by SB203580 administration. Moreover, SB203580 treatment decreased the acrolein-induced increase of Muc5ac and MMP-9 expression and MMP-9 activity in airway epithelium. The results indicate an important role of p38 MAPK in acrolein-induced airway inflammation and mucus hypersecretion in mice. The cooperation of p38 and MMP-9 may contribute to the mucin overproduction after inflammatory challenge.

  15. Relationship between milk intake and mucus production in adult volunteers challenged with rhinovirus-2.

    Pinnock, C B; Graham, N M; Mylvaganam, A; Douglas, R M

    1990-02-01

    In the first of three studies investigating the widely held belief that "milk produces mucus," 60 volunteers were challenged with rhinovirus-2, and daily respiratory symptoms and milk and dairy product intake records were kept over a 10-day period. Nasal secretion weights were obtained by weighing tissues collected and sealed immediately after use. Information was obtained on 51 subjects, yielding 510 person-days of observation. Subjects consumed zero to 11 glasses of milk per day (mean, 2.7; SE, 0.08), and secretion weights ranged from zero to 30.4 g/day (mean, 1.1; SE, 0.1). In response to an initial questionnaire, 27.5% reported the practice of reducing intake of milk or dairy products with a cold or named milk or dairy products as bad for colds. Of the latter group, 80% stated the reason as "producing more mucus/phlegm." Milk and dairy product intake was not associated with an increase in upper or lower respiratory tract symptoms of congestion or nasal secretion weight. A trend was observed for cough, when present, to be loose with increasing milk and dairy product intake; however, this effect was not statistically significant at the 5% level. Those who believe "milk makes mucus" or reduce milk intake with colds reported significantly more cough and congestion symptoms, but they did not produce higher levels of nasal secretions. We conclude that no statistically significant overall association can be detected between milk and dairy product intake and symptoms of mucus production in healthy adults, either asymptomatic or symptomatic, with rhinovirus infection.

  16. Novel Compounds From Shark and Stingray Epidermal Mucus With Antimicrobial Activity Against Wound Infection Pathogens

    2014-03-01

    consistency compared to mucus from any of the ray species. While this difference is difficult to describe, the terms “ gelatinous ” or “sticky” are...visualized using silver stain (Figure 3). As observed with the ray species, protein patterns for clearnose skates are consistent among individuals of the...three clearnose skates, Raja eglanteria, visualized with silver stain. Molecular weights of standard proteins are in kilodaltons (kD). 9

  17. Structural and molecular insights into novel surface-exposed mucus adhesins from Lactobacillus reuteri human strains.

    Etzold, Sabrina; MacKenzie, Donald A; Jeffers, Faye; Walshaw, John; Roos, Stefan; Hemmings, Andrew M; Juge, Nathalie

    2014-05-01

    The mucus layer covering the gastrointestinal tract is the first point of contact of the intestinal microbiota with the host. Cell surface macromolecules are critical for adherence of commensal bacteria to mucus but structural information is scarce. Here we report the first molecular and structural characterization of a novel cell-surface protein, Lar_0958 from Lactobacillus reuteri JCM 1112(T) , mediating adhesion of L. reuteri human strains to mucus. Lar_0958 is a modular protein of 133 kDa containing six repeat domains, an N-terminal signal sequence and a C-terminal anchoring motif (LPXTG). Lar_0958 homologues are expressed on the cell-surface of L. reuteri human strains, as shown by flow-cytometry and immunogold microscopy. Adhesion of human L. reuteri strains to mucus in vitro was significantly reduced in the presence of an anti-Lar_0958 antibody and Lar_0958 contribution to adhesion was further confirmed using a L. reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 lar_0958 KO mutant (6475-KO). The X-ray crystal structure of a single Lar_0958 repeat, determined at 1.5 Å resolution, revealed a divergent immunoglobulin (Ig)-like β-sandwich fold, sharing structural homology with the Ig-like inter-repeat domain of internalins of the food borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. These findings provide unique structural insights into cell-surface protein repeats involved in adhesion of Gram-positive bacteria to the intestine. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Preparation and characterization of mucus-penetrating papain/poly(acrylic acid) nanoparticles for oral drug delivery applications

    Müller, Christiane; Leithner, Katharina; Hauptstein, Sabine; Hintzen, Fabian; Salvenmoser, Willi; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Particle diffusion through the intestinal mucosal barrier is restricted by the viscoelastic and adhesive properties of the mucus gel layer, preventing their penetration to the underlying absorptive endothelial cells. To overcome this natural barrier, we developed nanoparticles which have a remarkable ability to cleave mucoglycoprotein substructures responsible for the structural and rheological properties of mucus. After rheological screening of various mucolytic proteases, nanoparticles composed of poly(acrylic acid) and papain were prepared and characterized regarding particle size and zeta potential. Analysis of nanoparticles showed mean diameters sub-200 nm (162.8–198.5 nm) and negative zeta potentials advancing the mobility in mucus gel. Using diffusion chamber studies and the rotating diffusion tubes method, we compared the transport rates of papain modified (PAPC) and unaltered poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) particles through freshly excised intestinal porcine mucus. Results of the diffusion assays demonstrated strongly enhanced permeation behavior of PAPC particles owing to local mucus disruption by papain. Improved transport rates, reduction in mucus viscosity and the retarded release of hydrophilic macromolecular compounds make proteolytic enzyme functionalized nanoparticles of substantial interest for improved targeted drug delivery at mucosal surfaces. Although cytotoxicity tests of the nanoparticles could not be performed, safety of papain and PAA was already verified making PAPC particles a promising candidate in the pharmaceutical field of research. The focus of the present study was the development of particles which penetrate the mucus barrier to approach the underlying epithelium. Improvements of particles that penetrate the mucus followed by cell uptake in this direction are ongoing.

  19. Association of tracheal mucus or blood and airway neutrophilia with racing performance in Thoroughbred horses in an Australian racing yard.

    Salz, R O; Ahern, B J; Boston, R; Begg, L M

    2016-04-01

    To determine the variation of tracheal mucus scores, tracheal blood scores and transendoscopic tracheal wash (TW) cytology in a population of Thoroughbred (TB) racehorses and assess their association with racing performance. A total of 220 endoscopic examinations were performed and TWs obtained from 155 TB racehorses. Samples were collected 60-120 min following gallop work. Tracheal mucus score, tracheal blood score and TW cytology were analysed and their association with racing performance assessed. Of the total examinations and samples, 194 from 135 horses fitted the criteria for inclusion. The overall prevalence of visible tracheal mucus was 2.5% (5/194) and of increased tracheal mucus was 0%. The prevalence of visible tracheal blood was 8.8% (17/194) and of increased tracheal blood was 4.6% (9/194). A total of 36% (70/194) of TWs contained elevated percentages of neutrophils and of these, 96% (67/70) occurred in the absence of any visible tracheal mucus. There was no significant association between tracheal mucus score or TW cytology and subsequent racing performance. There was a statistically significant association (P = 0.004) between increased tracheal blood scores and poor racing performance. Visible tracheal blood seen after strenuous exercise in clinically normal TB racehorses was a risk factor for poor racing performance, but the presence of airway neutrophilia was not. No horses in this study were found to have increased tracheal mucus, so the association of increased tracheal mucus with racing performance could not be assessed. © 2016 Australian Veterinary Association.

  20. Preparation and characterization of mucus-penetrating papain/poly(acrylic acid) nanoparticles for oral drug delivery applications

    Müller, Christiane; Leithner, Katharina; Hauptstein, Sabine; Hintzen, Fabian; Salvenmoser, Willi; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Particle diffusion through the intestinal mucosal barrier is restricted by the viscoelastic and adhesive properties of the mucus gel layer, preventing their penetration to the underlying absorptive endothelial cells. To overcome this natural barrier, we developed nanoparticles which have a remarkable ability to cleave mucoglycoprotein substructures responsible for the structural and rheological properties of mucus. After rheological screening of various mucolytic proteases, nanoparticles composed of poly(acrylic acid) and papain were prepared and characterized regarding particle size and zeta potential. Analysis of nanoparticles showed mean diameters sub-200 nm (162.8-198.5 nm) and negative zeta potentials advancing the mobility in mucus gel. Using diffusion chamber studies and the rotating diffusion tubes method, we compared the transport rates of papain modified (PAPC) and unaltered poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) particles through freshly excised intestinal porcine mucus. Results of the diffusion assays demonstrated strongly enhanced permeation behavior of PAPC particles owing to local mucus disruption by papain. Improved transport rates, reduction in mucus viscosity and the retarded release of hydrophilic macromolecular compounds make proteolytic enzyme functionalized nanoparticles of substantial interest for improved targeted drug delivery at mucosal surfaces. Although cytotoxicity tests of the nanoparticles could not be performed, safety of papain and PAA was already verified making PAPC particles a promising candidate in the pharmaceutical field of research. The focus of the present study was the development of particles which penetrate the mucus barrier to approach the underlying epithelium. Improvements of particles that penetrate the mucus followed by cell uptake in this direction are ongoing.

  1. Thiolated polymers: evidence for the formation of disulphide bonds with mucus glycoproteins.

    Leitner, Verena M; Walker, Greg F; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2003-09-01

    Disulphide bonds between thiolated polymers (thiomers) and cysteine-rich subdomains of mucus glycoproteins are supposed to be responsible for the enhanced mucoadhesive properties of thiomers. This study set out to provide evidence for these covalent interactions using poly(acrylic acid)-cysteine conjugates of 2 and 450 kDa (PAA2-Cys, PAA450-Cys) displaying 402.5-776.0 micromol thiol groups per gram polymer. The effect of the disulphide bond breaker cysteine on thiomer-mucin disulphide bonds was monitored by (1) mucoadhesion studies and (2) rheological studies. Furthermore, (3) diffusion studies and (4) gel filtration studies were performed with thiomer-mucus mixtures. The addition of cysteine significantly (Ppolymer. Gel filtration studies showed that PAA2-Cys was able to form disulphide bonds with mucin glycoproteins resulting in an altered elution profile of the mucin/PAA2-Cys mixture in comparison to mucin alone or mucin/PAA2 mixture. According to these results, the study provides evidence for the formation of covalent bonds between thiomer and mucus glycoproteins.

  2. Effect of sildenafil on acrolein-induced airway inflammation and mucus production in rats.

    Wang, T; Liu, Y; Chen, L; Wang, X; Hu, X-R; Feng, Y-L; Liu, D-S; Xu, D; Duan, Y-P; Lin, J; Ou, X-M; Wen, F-Q

    2009-05-01

    Airway inflammation with mucus overproduction is a distinguishing pathophysiological feature of many chronic respiratory diseases. Phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors have shown anti-inflammatory properties. In the present study, the effect of sildenafil, a potent inhibitor of PDE5 that selectively degrades cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP), on acrolein-induced inflammation and mucus production in rat airways was examined. Rats were exposed to acrolein for 14 and 28 days. Sildenafil or distilled saline was administered intragastrically prior to acrolein exposure. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was acquired for cell count and the detection of pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. Lung tissue was examined for cGMP content, nitric oxide (NO)-metabolite levels, histopathological lesion scores, goblet cell metaplasia and mucin production. The results suggested that sildenafil pretreatment reversed the significant decline of cGMP content in rat lungs induced by acrolein exposure, and suppressed the increase of lung NO metabolites, the BALF leukocyte influx and pro-inflammatory cytokine release. Moreover, sildenafil pretreatment reduced acrolein-induced Muc5ac mucin synthesis at both mRNA and protein levels, and attenuated airway inflammation, as well as epithelial hyperplasia and metaplasia. In conclusion, sildenafil could attenuate airway inflammation and mucus production in the rat model, possibly through the nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate pathway, and, thus, might have a therapeutic potential for chronic airway diseases.

  3. Role of commercial probiotic strains against human pathogen adhesion to intestinal mucus.

    Collado, M C; Meriluoto, J; Salminen, S

    2007-10-01

    The aims of this study present were to assess and to evaluate in vitro the abilities of commercial probiotic strains derived from fermented milk products and related sources currently marketed in European countries, to inhibit, compete and displace the adhesion of selected potential pathogens to immobilized human mucus. The adhesion was assessed by measuring the radioactivity of bacteria adhered to the human mucus. We tested 12 probiotic strains against eight selected pathogens. All strains tested were able to adhere to mucus. All probiotic strains tested were able to inhibit and displace (P<0.05) the adhesion of Bacteroides, Clostridium, Staphylococcus and Enterobacter. In addition, the abilities to inhibit and to displace adhered pathogens depended on both the probiotic and the pathogen strains tested suggesting that several complementary mechanisms are implied in the processes. Our results indicate the need for a case-by-case assessment in order to select strains with the ability to inhibit or displace a specific pathogen. Probiotics could be useful to correct deviations observed in intestinal microbiota associated with specific diseases and also, to prevent pathogen infections. The competitive exclusion properties of probiotics as well as their ability to displace and inhibit pathogens are the most importance for therapeutic manipulation of the enteric microbiota. The application of such strategies could contribute to expand the beneficial properties on human health against pathogen infection.

  4. Bacteroides in the infant gut consume milk oligosaccharides via mucus-utilization pathways.

    Marcobal, Angela; Barboza, Mariana; Sonnenburg, Erica D; Pudlo, Nicholas; Martens, Eric C; Desai, Prerak; Lebrilla, Carlito B; Weimer, Bart C; Mills, David A; German, J Bruce; Sonnenburg, Justin L

    2011-11-17

    Newborns are colonized with an intestinal microbiota shortly after birth, but the factors governing the retention and abundance of specific microbial lineages are unknown. Nursing infants consume human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) that pass undigested to the distal gut, where they may be digested by microbes. We determined that the prominent neonate gut residents, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and Bacteroides fragilis, induce the same genes during HMO consumption that are used to harvest host mucus glycans, which are structurally similar to HMOs. Lacto-N-neotetraose, a specific HMO component, selects for HMO-adapted species such as Bifidobacterium infantis, which cannot use mucus, and provides a selective advantage to B. infantis in vivo when biassociated with B. thetaiotaomicron in the gnotobiotic mouse gut. This indicates that the complex oligosaccharide mixture within HMOs attracts both mutualistic mucus-adapted species and HMO-adapted bifidobacteria to the infant intestine that likely facilitate both milk and future solid food digestion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The milk-mucus belief: sensory analysis comparing cow's milk and a soy placebo.

    Pinnock, C B; Arney, W K

    1993-02-01

    A questionnaire designed to measure the "milk mucus effect" was based on sensations and symptoms after drinking milk reported in interviews with 169 individuals, 70 of whom held the belief that milk produces mucus. This was used to measure responses in a randomized, double-blind trial of a flavoured UHT cow's milk drink, compared with a similarly flavoured and constituted UHT soy milk drink. The soy placebo was indistinguishable from cow's milk in a pretest of 185 individuals. Of 14 milk-mucus effect indicator variables, three showed significant increases after consumption of 300 ml of the test drink. These were "coating/lining over the mouth, throat or tongue" (39% increase), "need to swallow a lot" (31% increase) and "saliva thicker, harder to swallow than before" (42% increase). However, these increases occurred in both milk and placebo groups. It is concluded that the effect measured is not specific to cow's milk, but can be duplicated by a non-cow's milk drink with similar sensory characteristics.

  6. Detection of estrus in dairy cows by electrical measurements of vaginal mucus and by milk progesterone.

    Gartland, P; Schiavo, J; Hall, C E; Foote, R H; Scott, N R

    1976-05-01

    Electrical resistance (ohms) of mucus were analyzed in 20 postpartum Holstein cows by use of a probe inserted into the anterior vagina every other day for 30 days. Composite milk samples were taken on the same day, and progesterone was determined by radioimmunoassay. Cows were observed twice daily for standing estrus and reproductive organs palpated weekly per rectum (rectal palpation). Fifteen cows which were cycling showed increasing progesterone 6 to 7 days after the onset of estrus with values of 8.1 to 10.0 ng progesterone/ml milk on days 10 to 17. Concentrations had declined rapidly 2 days before onset of the next estrus. Progesterone in milk was affected by cow and by day of the cycle. Electrical resistance followed a similar cyclical pattern, but variability was large and only cows differed. The correlation between milk progesterone and mucus resistance was .22. Progesterone concentrations for four cows with follicular cysts fluctuated randomly with a mean of 2.6 ng/ml. Mean resistance of vaginal mucus was 44 omega for both cycling and cystic cows, indicating that a single measurement of electrical resistance every 2nd day was unreliable in distinguishing physiological states. One cow had high progesterone in milk on days 19 to 25 and was diagnosed pregnant by rectal palpation 3 wk later. Cows were not seen in estrus 28% of the time when milk progesterone and rectal palpation indicated they were in the follicular phase of the estrous cycle and were cycling.

  7. Antimicrobial and Anti-Proliferative Effects of Skin Mucus Derived from Dasyatis pastinaca (Linnaeus, 1758

    Virginia Fuochi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to chemotherapy occurs in various diseases (i.e., cancer and infection, and for this reason, both are very difficult to treat. Therefore, novel antimicrobial and chemotherapic drugs are needed for effective antibiotic therapy. The aim of the present study was to assess the antimicrobial and anti-proliferative effects of skin mucus derived from Dasyatis pastinaca (Linnaeus, 1758. Our results showed that skin mucus exhibited a significant and specific antibacterial activity against Gram-negative bacteria but not against Gram-positive bacteria. Furthermore, we also observed a significant antifungal activity against some strains of Candida spp. Concerning anti-proliferative activity, we showed that fish mucus was specifically toxic for acute leukemia cells (HL60 with an inhibition of proliferation in a dose dependent manner (about 52% at 1000 μg/mL of fish skin mucous, FSM. Moreover, we did not observe effects in healthy cells, in neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y, and multiple myeloma cell lines (MM1, U266. Finally, it exhibited strong expression and activity of chitinase which may be responsible, at least in part, for the aforementioned results.

  8. Characterization of gelatin/chitosan scaffold blended with aloe vera and snail mucus for biomedical purpose.

    López Angulo, Daniel Enrique; do Amaral Sobral, Paulo José

    2016-11-01

    Biologically active scaffolds used in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have been generating promising results in skin replacement. The present study aims to test the hypothesis that the incorporation of Aloe vera and snail mucus into scaffolds based on gelatin and chitosan could improve their structure, composition and biodegradability, with a potential effect on bioactivity. Homogeneous pore diameter as well as pore walls in the composite scaffold could be seen in the SEM image. The pores in the scaffolds were interconnected and their sizes ranged from 93 to 296μm. The addition of Aloe vera and snail mucus enlarged the mean pore size with increased porosity and caused changes in the pore architecture. The FTIR analysis has shown good affinity and interaction between the matrix and the Aloe, which may decrease water-binding sites, so this fact hindered the water absorption capacity of the material. The mechanical properties could explain the highest swelling capacity of the snail scaffold, because the high percentage of elongation could facilitate the entry of liquid in it, generating a matrix with plenty of fluid retention. The real innovation in the present work could be the use of these substances (Aloe and snail mucus) for tissue engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. How can we conserve intact tropical peatlands?

    Lawson, Ian; Roucoux, Katherine

    2017-04-01

    The scientific community has, for more than three decades, been expressing increasing alarm about the fate of peatlands in parts of Indonesia and Malaysia, where extensive land-use conversion and drainage for rice and oil palm have greatly compromised peatland hydrology, ecology, biological richness, and carbon storage. The discourse in the literature on these peatlands is now moving on from attempts to preserve the last remaining fragments of peat-swamp forest, towards discussion of how best to restore damaged ecosystems, and whether it is possible to manage plantations more 'sustainably'. It is becoming increasingly clear, however, that peatlands occur quite widely in other parts of the lowland tropics, including parts of Amazonia and the Congo Basin, and many of these peatlands can reasonably be described as 'intact': although few if any parts of the tropics are totally unaffected by human actions, the hydrology and functional ecology of these systems appear to be close to a 'natural' state. The question then arises as to what should be done with the knowledge of their existence. Here we analyse the arguments in favour of protecting intact peatlands, and the potential conflicts with other priorities such as economic development and social justice. We evaluate alternative mechanisms for protecting intact peatlands, focusing on the particular issues raised by peatlands as opposed to other kinds of tropical ecosystem. We identify ways in which natural science agendas can help to inform these arguments, using our own contributions in palaeoecology and carbon mapping as examples. Finally, we argue for a radical reconsideration of research agendas in tropical peatlands, highlighting the potential contribution of methodologies borrowed from the social sciences and humanities.

  10. Sorption of cesium in intact rock

    Puukko, E.

    2014-04-01

    The mass distribution coefficient K d is used in performance assessment (PA) to describe sorption of a radionuclide on rock. The R d is determined using crushed rock which causes uncertainty in converting the R d values to K d values for intact rock. This work describes a method to determine the equilibrium of sorption on intact rock. The rock types of the planned Olkiluoto waste disposal site were T-series mica gneiss (T-MGN), T-series tonalite granodiorite granite gneiss (T-TGG), P-series tonalite granodiorite granite gneiss (P-TGG) and pegmatitic granite (PGR). These rocks contain different amount of biotite which is the main sorbing mineral. The sorption of cesium on intact rock slices was studied by applying an electrical field to speed up migration of cesium into the rock. Cesium is in the solution as a noncomplex cation Cs + and it is sorbed by ion exchange. The tracer used in the experiments was 134 Cs. The experimental sorption on the intact rock is compared with values calculated using the in house cation exchange sorption model (HYRL model) in PHREEQC program. The observed sorption on T-MGN and T-TGG rocks was close to the calculated values. Two PGR samples were from a depth of 70 m and three samples were from a depth of 150 m. Cesium sorbed more than predicted on the two 70 m PGR samples. The sorption of Cs on the three 150 m PGR samples was small which was consistent with the calculations. The pegmatitic granite PGR has the smallest content of biotite of the four rock types. In the case of P-TGG rock the observed values of sorption were only half of the calculated values. Two kind of slices were cut from P-TGG drill core. The slices were against and to the direction of the foliation of the biotite rims. The sorption of cesium on P-TGG rock was same in both cases. The results indicated that there was no effect of the directions of the electric field and the foliation of biotite in the P-TGG rock. (orig.)

  11. Quantitative proteomic analysis of intact plastids.

    Shiraya, Takeshi; Kaneko, Kentaro; Mitsui, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Plastids are specialized cell organelles in plant cells that are differentiated into various forms including chloroplasts, chromoplasts, and amyloplasts, and fulfill important functions in maintaining the overall cell metabolism and sensing environmental factors such as sunlight. It is therefore important to grasp the mechanisms of differentiation and functional changes of plastids in order to enhance the understanding of vegetality. In this chapter, details of a method for the extraction of intact plastids that makes analysis possible while maintaining the plastid functions are provided; in addition, a quantitative shotgun method for analyzing the composition and changes in the content of proteins in plastids as a result of environmental impacts is described.

  12. Oxidation of molecular tritium by intact soils

    Sweet, C.W.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of environmental factors on the rate of oxidation of molecular tritium (T 2 ) to tritiated water (HTO) were determined for intact soils during field exposures. Maximum deposition velocities of approximately 0.03 cm/sec were measured for T 2 at low wind speeds for a variety of soils over a wide range of conditions. Deposition velocities were slightly inhibited in wet soils and at 0 0 C. In dry soils, oxidation of T 2 to HTO occurred deeper in the soil profile, but deposition velocities were unaffected

  13. Design requirement on KALIMER blanket fuel assembly duct

    Hwang, Woan; Kang, H. Y.; Nam, C.; Kim, J. O.

    1998-03-01

    This document describes design requirements which are needed for designing the blanket fuel assembly duct of the KALIMER as design guidance. The blanket fuel assembly duct of the KALIMER consists of fuel rods, mounting rail, nosepiece, duct with pad, handling socket with pad. Blanket fuel rod consists of top end plug, bottom end plug with solid ferritic-martensitic steel rod and key way blanket fuel slug, cladding, and wire wrap. In the assembly, the rods are in a triangular pitch array, and the rod bundle is attached to the nosepiece with mounting rails. The bottom end of the assembly duct is formed by a long nosepiece which provides the lower restraint function and the paths for coolant inlet. This report contains functional requirements, performance and operational requirements, interfacing systems requirements, core restraint and interface requirements, design limits and strength requirements, system configuration and essential feature requirements, seismic requirements, structural requirements, environmental requirements, reliability and safety requirements, standard and codes, QA programs, and other requirements. (author). 20 refs., 4 figs

  14. Summary of the target-blanket breakout group

    Capiello, M.; Bell, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States); Barthold, W.

    1995-10-01

    This breakout group discussed a number of topics and issues pertaining to target and blanket concepts for accelerator-driven systems. This major component area is one marked by a broad spectrum of technical approaches. It is therefore less defined than other major component areas such as the accelerator and is at an earlier stage of technical needs and task specification. The working group did reach a number of general conclusions and recommendations that are summarized. The Conference and the Target/Blanket Breakout Group provided a first opportunity for people working on a variety of missions and concepts to get together and exchange information. A number of subcritical systems applicable for a spectrum of missions were proposed at the Conference and discussed in the Breakout Group. Missions included plutonium disposition, energy production, waste destruction, isotope production, and neutron scattering. The Target/Blanket Breakout Group also defined areas where parameters and data should be addressed as target/blanket design activities become more detailed and sophisticated.

  15. Technical issues for beryllium use in fusion blanket applications

    McCarville, T.J.; Berwald, D.H.; Wolfer, W.; Fulton, F.J.; Lee, J.D.; Maninger, R.C.; Moir, R.W.; Beeston, J.M.; Miller, L.G.

    1985-01-01

    Beryllium is an excellent non-fissioning neutron multiplier for fusion breeder and fusion electric blanket applications. This report is a compilation of information related to the use of beryllium with primary emphasis on the fusion breeder application. Beryllium resources, production, fabrication, properties, radiation damage and activation are discussed. A new theoretical model for beryllium swelling is presented

  16. First-wall/blanket materials selection for STARFIRE tokamak reactor

    Smith, D.L.; Mattas, R.F.; Clemmer, R.G.; Davis, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    The development of the reference STARFIRE first-wall/blanket design involved numerous trade-offs in the materials selection process for the breeding material, coolant structure, neutron multiplier, and reflector. The major parameters and properties that impact materials selection and design criteria are reviewed

  17. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of low activity fusion blanket designs

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.; Yu, W.S.

    1977-01-01

    The heat transfer aspects of fusion blankets are considered where: (a) conduction and (b) boiling and condensation are the dominant heat transfer mechanisms. In some cases, unique heat transfer problems arise and additional heat transfer data and analyses may be required

  18. Fusion blanket testing in MFTF-α + T

    Kleefeldt, K.

    1985-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility-α + T (MFTF-α + T) is an upgraded version of the current MFTF-B test facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and is designed for near-term fusion-technology-integrated tests at a neutron flux of 2 MW/m 2 . Currently, the fusion community is screening blanket and related issues to determine which ones can be addressed using MFTF-α + T. In this work, the minimum testing needs to address these issues are identified for the liquid-metal-cooled blanket and the solid-breeder blanket. Based on the testing needs and on the MFTF-α + T capability, a test plan is proposed for three options; each option covers a six to seven year testing phase. The options reflect the unresolved question of whether to place the research and development (R and D) emphasis on liquid-metal or solid-breeder blankets. In each case, most of the issues discussed can be addressed to a reasonable extent in MFTF-α+T

  19. On the conditions of existence of cold-blanket systems

    Lehnert, B.

    1977-12-01

    An extende analysis of the partially ionized boundary layer of a magnetized plasma has been performed, leading to the following results: (i) In a first approximation the ion density at the inner ''edge'' of the layer becomes related to the wall-near neutral gas density, in a way being independent of the spatial distribution of the ionization rate. (ii) The particle and momentum balance equations, and the associated impermeability condition of the plasma with respect to neutral gas penetration, are not sufficient to specify a cold-blanket state, but have to be combined with considerations of the heat blance. This leads to lower and upper power input limits, thus defining conditions for the existence of a cold-blanket state. At decreasing beta values , or increasing radiation losses, there are situations where such a state cannot exist at all. (iii) It should become possible to fulfill the cold-blanket conditions in full-scale reactors as well as in certain model experiments. Probably these conditions can also be satisfied in large tokamaks like JET, and by fast gas injection in devices such as Alcator, but not in medium-size tokamaks being operated at moderately high ion densities. (iv) A strong ''boundary layer stabilization'' mechanism due to the joint viscosity-resistivity-pressure effects is available under cold-blanket conditions. (author)

  20. Performance evaluation on force control for ITER blanket installation

    Aburadani, A., E-mail: aburadani.atsushi@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Mukouyama 801-1, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Takeda, N.; Shigematsu, S.; Murakami, S.; Tanigawa, H.; Kakudate, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Mukouyama 801-1, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Nakahira, M.; Hamilton, D.; Tesini, A. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► It is crucial issues to avoid any jamming between the blanket modules and the keys. ► Force control for AC servo motor was developed to reduce excessive loads. ► This jam prevention force control method is directly measured and controlled by AC servo motor controllers. ► In the recent test, the module was passively positioned onto keys using the torque control method. -- Abstract: The most critical issue for the ITER blanket installation is to avoid any jamming between the blanket modules and the keys as a result of excessive loading during the module installation process. This is complicated by the limited clearance of 0.5 mm between the modules and the keys. To solve these technical issues, force control, such as controlling the torque for the AC servo motors, was developed to reduce excessive loads which may have an impact on the end-effector and to defer the forces acting on the groove of the blanket. This jam prevention force control method is directly measured and controlled by AC servo motor controllers. The AC servo motors are equipped to move the manipulator and end-effector during module installation.

  1. Performance evaluation on force control for ITER blanket installation

    Aburadani, A.; Takeda, N.; Shigematsu, S.; Murakami, S.; Tanigawa, H.; Kakudate, S.; Nakahira, M.; Hamilton, D.; Tesini, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► It is crucial issues to avoid any jamming between the blanket modules and the keys. ► Force control for AC servo motor was developed to reduce excessive loads. ► This jam prevention force control method is directly measured and controlled by AC servo motor controllers. ► In the recent test, the module was passively positioned onto keys using the torque control method. -- Abstract: The most critical issue for the ITER blanket installation is to avoid any jamming between the blanket modules and the keys as a result of excessive loading during the module installation process. This is complicated by the limited clearance of 0.5 mm between the modules and the keys. To solve these technical issues, force control, such as controlling the torque for the AC servo motors, was developed to reduce excessive loads which may have an impact on the end-effector and to defer the forces acting on the groove of the blanket. This jam prevention force control method is directly measured and controlled by AC servo motor controllers. The AC servo motors are equipped to move the manipulator and end-effector during module installation

  2. Tritium inventory in Li2ZrO3 blanket

    Nishikawa, M.; Baba, A.

    1998-01-01

    Recently, we have presented the way to estimate the tritium inventory in a solid breeder blanket considering effects of diffusion of tritium in the grain, absorption of water in the bulk of grain, and adsorption of water on the surface of grain, together with two types of isotope exchange reactions. It is reported in our previous paper that the estimated tritium inventory for a LiAlO 2 blanket agrees well with data observed in various in situ experiments when the effective diffusivity of tritium from the EXOTIC-6 experiment is used and that the better agreement is obtained when existence of some water vapor is assumed in the purge gas. The same way as used for a LiAlO 2 blanket is applied to a Li 2 ZrO 3 blanket in this study and the estimated tritium inventory shows a good agreement with data obtained in such in situ experiments as MOZART, EXOTIC-6 and TRINE experiments. (orig.)

  3. Examination of compression and resilience characteristics of fibrous insulation blankets

    Brislin, R.J.; Middleton, A.

    1979-08-01

    Load-deflection characteristics of alumina and alumino-silicate fibrous blankets were experimentally determined. Load retention and springback capability of combinations of these materials were measured in a 10,000-hour test at surface temperatures of 650 to 1000 0 C (1200 to 1832 0 F). Experimental results are presented and future testing plans are discussed

  4. Effects of buffer thickness on ATW blanket performances

    Yang, Won Sik

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary results of target and buffer design studies for a lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) cooled accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) system, aimed at maximizing the source importance while simultaneously reducing the irradiation damage to fuel. Using an 840 MWt LBE cooled ATW design, the effects of buffer thickness on the blanket performances have been studied. Varying the buffer thickness for a given blanket configuration, system performances have been estimated by a series of calculations using MCNPX and REBUS-3 codes. The effects of source importance change are studied by investigating the low-energy (< 20 MeV) neutron source distribution and the equilibrium cycle blanket performance parameters such as fuel inventory, discharge burnup, burnup reactivity loss, and peak fast fluence. As the irradiation damage to fuel, the displacements per atom (dpa), hydrogen production, and helium production rates are evaluated at the buffer and blanket interface where the peak fast fluence occurs. The results show that the damage rates and the source importance increase monotonically as the buffer thickness decreases. Based on a compromise between the competing objectives of increasing the source importance and reducing the damage rates, a buffer thickness of around 20 cm appears to be reasonable

  5. Effects of hydrolysed casein, intact casein and intact whey protein on energy expenditure and appetite regulation

    Bendtsen, Line Quist; Lorenzen, Janne Kunchel; Gomes, Sisse

    2014-01-01

    Casein and whey differ in amino acid composition and in the rate of absorption; however, the absorption rate of casein can be increased to mimic that of whey by exogenous hydrolysis. The objective of the present study was to compare the effects of hydrolysed casein (HC), intact casein (IC......) and intact whey (IW) on energy expenditure (EE) and appetite regulation, and thereby to investigate the influence of amino acid composition and the rate of absorption. In the present randomised cross-over study, twenty-four overweight and moderately obese young men and women consumed three isoenergetic...

  6. Mucus and Mucins: do they have a role in the inhibition of the human immunodeficiency virus?

    Mall, Anwar Suleman; Habte, Habtom; Mthembu, Yolanda; Peacocke, Julia; de Beer, Corena

    2017-10-06

    Mucins are large O-linked glycosylated proteins which give mucus their gel-forming properties. There are indications that mucus and mucins in saliva, breast milk and in the cervical plug inhibit the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) in an in vitro assay. Crude mucus gels form continuous layers on the epithelial surfaces of the major internal tracts of the body and protect these epithelial surfaces against aggressive luminal factors such as hydrochloric acid and pepsin proteolysis in the stomach lumen, the movement of hard faecal pellets in the colon at high pressure, the effects of shear against the vaginal epithelium during intercourse and the presence of foreign substances in the respiratory airways. Tumour-associated epitopes on mucins make them suitable as immune-targets on malignant epithelial cells, rendering mucins important as diagnostic and prognostic markers for various diseases, even influencing the design of mucin-based vaccines. Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest prevalence of HIV-AIDS in the world. The main points of viral transmission are via the vaginal epithelium during sexual intercourse and mother-to-child transmission during breast-feeding. There have been many studies showing that several body fluids have components that prevent the transmission of HIV-1 from infected to non-infected persons through various forms of contact. Crude saliva and its purified mucins, MUC5B and MUC7, and the purified mucins from breast milk, MUC1 and MUC4 and pregnancy plug cervical mucus (MUC2, MUC5AC, MUC5B and MUC6), inhibit HIV-1 in an in vitro assay. There are conflicting reports of whether crude breast-milk inhibits HIV-1 in an in vitro assay. However studies with a humanised BLT mouse show that breast-milk does inhibit HIV and that breast-feeding is still advisable even amongst HIV-positive women in under-resourced areas, preferably in conjunction with anti-retroviral treatment. These findings raise questions of how such a naturally occurring biological

  7. Far from superficial: microbial diversity associated with the skin and mucus of fish

    Cipriano, Rocco C.; Dove, Alistair; Cipriano, R.C.; Bruckner, A.W.; Shchelkunov, I.S.

    2011-01-01

    During horizontal or water-borne infection involving an obligate pathogen (e.g. – Aeromonas salmonicida, cause of furunculosis), the pathogen interacted with and influenced the microbial diversity of the dermal mucus of fish. Prior to infection, the prevalent bacterial flora cultured from juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) included Pseudomonas fluorescens, Comomonas terrigenia, Acinetobacter sp., Moraxella sp., Pseudomonas dimunita, Alcaligenes denitrificans, Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes, and Pseudomonas alcaligenes, Serratia liquefaciens, Aeromonas hydrophila, other motile Aeromonas spp., and Corynebacterium aquaticum. After A. salmonicida was initially detected in this population as an external mucus infection, Acinetobacter sp., Moraxella sp., C. terrigenia, P. fluorescens, and P. dimunita, Staphylococcus sp., and A. hydrophila, were also present in appreciable numbers. Within several weeks, however, the A. salmonicida infection amplified and composed 78% of the total flora in the mucus. Only P. dimunita (4%). P. fluorescens (2%), and C. terrigenia (1%) were cultured at that time and more than a third of these fish showed evidence of a systemic A. salmonicida infection within their kidneys. Eight weeks after oral oxytetracycline treatments, A. salmonicida was no longer isolated from the mucus or kidneys of any fish and glucose inert or other oxidative microbes (e.g., P. fluorescens, C. terrigenia, Acinetobacter sp., Moraxella sp.) were beginning to repopulate the external surface of the salmon in increasing frequency. Still present and composing fairly large percentages of the total flora were A. hydrophila, as well as Enterobacter sp., and P. putrefaciens. A normal microbial diversity was re-established as the fish recovered. In another investigation, reduced biological diversity was noted in the dermal mucus among smallmouth bass that were sampled from the Jackson River (Covington, VA). In these fish, A. hydrophila and P. putrefaciens were the two

  8. Xenopus egg cytoplasm with intact actin.

    Field, Christine M; Nguyen, Phuong A; Ishihara, Keisuke; Groen, Aaron C; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    We report optimized methods for preparing Xenopus egg extracts without cytochalasin D, that we term "actin-intact egg extract." These are undiluted egg cytoplasm that contains abundant organelles, and glycogen which supplies energy, and represents the least perturbed cell-free cytoplasm preparation we know of. We used this system to probe cell cycle regulation of actin and myosin-II dynamics (Field et al., 2011), and to reconstitute the large, interphase asters that organize early Xenopus embryos (Mitchison et al., 2012; Wühr, Tan, Parker, Detrich, & Mitchison, 2010). Actin-intact Xenopus egg extracts are useful for analysis of actin dynamics, and interaction of actin with other cytoplasmic systems, in a cell-free system that closely mimics egg physiology, and more generally for probing the biochemistry and biophysics of the egg, zygote, and early embryo. Detailed protocols are provided along with assays used to check cell cycle state and tips for handling and storing undiluted egg extracts. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of simulator for remote handling system of ITER blanket

    Takeda, Nobukazu; Kakudate, Satoshi; Nakanhira, Masataka; Matsumoto, Yasuhiro; Shibanuma, K.

    2007-01-01

    The maintenance activity in the ITER has to be performed remotely because 14 MeV neutron caused by fusion reaction induces activation of structural material and emission of gamma ray. In general, it is one of the most critical issues to avoid collision between the remote maintenance system and in-vessel components. Therefore, the visual information in the vacuum vessel is required strongly to understand arrangement of these devices and components. However, there is a limitation of arrangement of viewing cameras in the vessel because of high intensity of gamma ray. It is expected that enough numbers of cameras and lights are not available because of arrangement restriction. Furthermore, visibility of the interested area such as the contacting part is frequently disturbed by the devices and components, thus it is difficult to recognize relative position between the devices and components only by visual information even if enough cameras and lights are equipped. From these reasons, the simulator to recognize the positions of each devices and components is indispensable for remote handling systems in fusion reactors. The authors have been developed a simulator for the remote maintenance system of the ITER blanket using a general 3D robot simulation software ''ENVISION''. The simulator is connected to the control system of the manipulator which was developed as a part of the blanket maintenance system in the EDA and can reconstruct the positions of the manipulator and the blanket module using the position data of the motors through the LAN. In addition, it can provide virtual visual information, such as the connecting operation behind the blanket module with making the module transparent on the screen. It can be used also for checking the maintenance sequence before the actual operation. The developed simulator will be modified further adding other necessary functions and finally completed as a prototype of the actual simulator for the blanket remote handling system

  10. Remote handling assessment of attachment concepts for DEMO blanket segments

    Iglesias, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.iglesias@ccfe.ac.uk [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Bastow, Roger; Cooper, Dave; Crowe, Robert; Middleton-Gear, Dave [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Sibois, Romain [VTT, Technical Research Centre of Finland, Industrial Systems, ROViR, Tampere (Finland); Carloni, Dario [Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Vizvary, Zsolt; Crofts, Oliver [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Harman, Jon [EFDA Close Support Unit Garching, Boltzmannstaße 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Loving, Antony [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Challenges are identified for the remote handling of blanket segments’ attachments. • Two attachment design approaches are assessed for remote handling (RH) feasibility. • An alternative is proposed, which potentially simplifies and speeds-up RH operations. • Up to three different assemblies are proposed for the remote handling of the attachments. • Proposed integrated design of upper port is compatible with the attachment systems. - Abstract: The replacement strategy of the massive Multi-Module Blanket Segments (MMS) is a key driver in the design of several DEMO systems. These include the blankets themselves, the vacuum vessel (VV) and its ports and the Remote Maintenance System (RMS). Common challenges to any blanket attachment system have been identified, such as the need for applying a preload to the MMS manifold, the effects of the decay heat and several uncertainties related to permanent deformations when removing the blanket segments after service. The WP12 kinematics of the MMS in-vessel transportation was adapted to the requirements of each of the supports during 2013 and 2014 design activities. The RM equipment envisaged for handling attachments and earth connections may be composed of up to three different assemblies. An In-Vessel Mover at the divertor level handles the lower support and earth bonding, and could stabilize the MMS during transportation. A Shield Plug crane with a 6 DoF manipulator operates the upper attachment and earth straps. And a Vertical Maintenance Crane is responsible for the in-vessel MMS transportation and can handle the removable upper support pins. A final proposal is presented which can potentially reduce the number of required systems, at the same time that speeds-up the RMS global operations.

  11. Effects of buffer thickness on ATW blanket performance

    Yang, W. S.; Mercatali, L.; Taiwo, T. A.; Hill, R. N.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of target and buffer design studies for liquid metal cooled accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) systems, aimed at maximizing the source importance while simultaneously reducing the irradiation damage to fuel. Using 840 MWt liquid metal cooled ATW designs, the effects of buffer thickness on the blanket performance have been studied. Varying the buffer thickness for a given blanket configuration, system performance parameters have been estimated by a series of calculations using the MCNPX and REBUS-3 codes. The effects of source importance variation are studied by investigating the low-energy ( and lt; 20 MeV) neutron source distribution and the equilibrium cycle blanket performance parameters such as fuel inventory, discharge burnup, burnup reactivity loss, and peak fast fluence. For investigating irradiation damage to fuel, the displacements per atom (dpa), hydrogen production, and helium production rates are evaluated at the buffer and blanket interface where the peak fast fluence occurs. Results for the liquid-metal-cooled designs show that the damage rates and the source importance increase monotonically as the buffer thickness decreases. Based on a compromise between the competing objectives of increasing the source importance and reducing the damage rates, a buffer thickness of around 20 cm appears to be reasonable. Investigation of the impact of the proton beam energy on the target and buffer design shows that for a given blanket power level, a lower beam energy (0.6 GeV versus 1 GeV) results in a higher irradiation damage to the beam window. This trend occurs because of the increase in the beam intensity required to maintain the power level

  12. Evaluation of compost blankets for erosion control from disturbed lands.

    Bhattarai, Rabin; Kalita, Prasanta K; Yatsu, Shotaro; Howard, Heidi R; Svendsen, Niels G

    2011-03-01

    Soil erosion due to water and wind results in the loss of valuable top soil and causes land degradation and environmental quality problems. Site specific best management practices (BMP) are needed to curb erosion and sediment control and in turn, increase productivity of lands and sustain environmental quality. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of three different types of biodegradable erosion control blankets- fine compost, mulch, and 50-50 mixture of compost and mulch, for soil erosion control under field and laboratory-scale experiments. Quantitative analysis was conducted by comparing the sediment load in the runoff collected from sloped and tilled plots in the field and in the laboratory with the erosion control blankets. The field plots had an average slope of 3.5% and experiments were conducted under natural rainfall conditions, while the laboratory experiments were conducted at 4, 8 and 16% slopes under simulated rainfall conditions. Results obtained from the field experiments indicated that the 50-50 mixture of compost and mulch provides the best erosion control measures as compared to using either the compost or the mulch blanket alone. Laboratory results under simulated rains indicated that both mulch cover and the 50-50 mixture of mulch and compost cover provided better erosion control measures compared to using the compost alone. Although these results indicate that the 50-50 mixtures and the mulch in laboratory experiments are the best measures among the three erosion control blankets, all three types of blankets provide very effective erosion control measures from bare-soil surface. Results of this study can be used in controlling erosion and sediment from disturbed lands with compost mulch application. Testing different mixture ratios and types of mulch and composts, and their efficiencies in retaining various soil nutrients may provide more quantitative data for developing erosion control plans. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier

  13. Structural analysis under the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study

    Majumdar, S.

    1985-01-01

    Structural design procedures followed in the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study are briefly reviewed. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boilers and Pressure Vessels Code, Section III, Code Case N47 has been used as a design guide. Its relevance to fusion reactor applications, however, is open to question and needs to be evaluated in the future. The primary structural problem encountered in tokamak blanket designs is the high thermal stress due to surface heat flux, with fatigue being an additional concern for pulsed systems. The conflicting requirements of long erosion life and high surface heat flux capability imply that some form of stress relief in the first-wall region will be necessary. Simplified stress and fatigue crack growth analyses are presented to show that the use of orthogonally grooved first wall may be a potential solution for mitigating the thermal stress problem. A comparison of three structural alloys on the basis of both grooved and nongrooved first-wall designs is also presented. Other structural problems encountered in tokamak designs include stresses due to plasma disruptions, and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drop in liquid-metal-cooled systems. In particular, it is shown that the maximum stress in the side wall of a uniform duct generated by MHD pressure drop cannot be reduced by increasing the wall thickness or by decreasing the span. In contract to tokamak blankets, tandem mirror blankets are far less severely stressed because of a much lower surface heat flux, coolant pressure, and also because of their axisymmetric geometry. Both blankets, however, will require detailed structural dynamics analysis to verify their ability to withstand seismic loadings if the heavy 17Li-83Pb is used as a coolant

  14. Effects of Buffer Thickness on ATW Blanket Performance

    Yang, W.S.; Mercatali, L.; Taiwo, T.A.; Hill, R.N.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of target and buffer design studies for liquid metal cooled accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) systems, aimed at maximizing the source importance while simultaneously reducing the irradiation damage to fuel. Using 840 MWt liquid metal cooled ATW designs, the effects of buffer thickness on the blanket performance have been studied. Varying the buffer thickness for a given blanket configuration, system performance parameters have been estimated by a series of calculations using the MCNPX and REBUS-3 codes. The effects of source importance variation are studied by investigating the low-energy (< 20 MeV) neutron source distribution and the equilibrium cycle blanket performance parameters such as fuel inventory, discharge burnup, burnup reactivity loss, and peak fast fluence. For investigating irradiation damage to fuel, the displacements per atom (dpa), hydrogen production, and helium production rates are evaluated at the buffer and blanket interface where the peak fast fluence occurs. Results for the liquid-metal-cooled designs show that the damage rates and the source importance increase monotonically as the buffer thickness decreases. Based on a compromise between the competing objectives of increasing the source importance and reducing the damage rates, a buffer thickness of around 20 cm appears to be reasonable. Investigation of the impact of the proton beam energy on the target and buffer design shows that for a given blanket power level, a lower beam energy (0.6 GeV versus 1 GeV) results in a higher irradiation damage to the beam window. This trend occurs because of the increase in the beam intensity required to maintain the power level. (authors)

  15. Study on the temperature control mechanism of the tritium breeding blanket for CFETR

    Liu, Changle; Qiu, Yang; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Jianzhong; Li, Lei; Yao, Damao; Li, Guoqiang; Gao, Xiang; Wu, Songtao; Wan, Yuanxi

    2017-12-01

    The Chinese fusion engineering testing reactor (CFETR) will demonstrate tritium self- sufficiency using a tritium breeding blanket for the tritium fuel cycle. The temperature control mechanism (TCM) involves the tritium production of the breeding blanket and has an impact on tritium self-sufficiency. In this letter, the CFETR tritium target is addressed according to its missions. TCM research on the neutronics and thermal hydraulics issues for the CFETR blanket is presented. The key concerns regarding the blanket design for tritium production under temperature field control are depicted. A systematic theory on the TCM is established based on a multiplier blanket model. In particular, a closed-loop method is developed for the mechanism with universal function solutions, which is employed in the CFETR blanket design activity for tritium production. A tritium accumulation phenomenon is found close to the coolant in the blanket interior, which has a very important impact on current blanket concepts using water coolant inside the blanket. In addition, an optimal tritium breeding ratio (TBR) method based on the TCM is proposed, combined with thermal hydraulics and finite element technology. Meanwhile, the energy gain factor is adopted to estimate neutron heat deposition, which is a key parameter relating to the blanket TBR calculations, considering the structural factors. This work will benefit breeding blanket engineering for the CFETR reactor in the future.

  16. Preliminary analyses of neutronics schemes for three kinds waste transmutation blankets of fusion-fission hybrid

    Zhang Mingchun; Feng Kaiming; Li Zaixin; Zhao Fengchao

    2012-01-01

    The neutronics schemes of the helium-cooled waste transmutation blanket, sodium-cooled waste transmutation blanket and FLiBe-cooled waste transmutation blanket were preliminarily calculated and analysed by using the spheroidal tokamak (ST) plasma configuration. The neutronics properties of these blankets' were compared and analyzed. The results show that for the transmutation of "2"3"7Np, FLiBe-cooled waste transmutation blanket has the most superior transmutation performance. The calculation results of the helium-cooled waste transmutation blanket show that this transmutation blanket can run on a steady effective multiplication factor (k_e_f_f), steady power (P), and steady tritium production rate (TBR) state for a long operating time (9.62 years) by change "2"3"7Np's initial loading rate of the minor actinides (MA). (authors)

  17. Characterization of physico-chemical properties of cervical mucus in relation to parity and conception rate in Murrah buffaloes

    K. K. Verma

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To characterize the physico-chemical properties of estrual cervical mucus among different parities and analyse their association with conception rate in Murrah buffaloes. Materials and Methods: Cervical mucus was collected from the mid-cervix using sterile blue sheath before artificial insemination (AI in Murrah buffaloes (n=94 and examined for appearance (transparent/ translucent, consistency (thin/ moderate/ thick, Spinnbarkeit value, arborisation pattern (typical/ atypical/ nil, pH and electrical conductivity. Artificial insemination was carried out using frozen-thawed semen by recto-vaginal method and pregnancy was confirmed by per-rectal examination after 60 days of insemination. Furthermore, the conception rates were calculated and their relationship with physico-chemical properties of cervical mucus was studied. Results: Cervical mucus was clear and thin in 85.10% and 15.96 % of estrus periods, respectively. Typical arborisation pattern of cervical mucus was observed in 54.25% of the estruses. The Mean ± SEM of pH, electrical conductivity and Spinnbarkeit value of mucus were 7.82 ± 0.02, 14.00 ± 0.10 mS/cm and 14.18 ± 0.59 cm, respectively. Significantly (P< 0.05 higher conception rate (54.90% was observed in buffaloes inseminated with typical arborisation pattern of cervical mucus as compared to atypical arborisation pattern (20.00% and no conception was recorded in the estruses with nil arborisation pattern. Conclusion: The results of present investigation concluded that arborisation pattern has significant relationship with conception rate thus can be used as an important criteria to predict the right time of AI for improving conception rate in Murrah buffaloes.

  18. Protein methylation reactions in intact pea chloroplasts

    Niemi, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    Post-translational protein methylation was investigated in Pisum sativum chloroplasts. Intact pea chloroplasts were incubated with ( 3 H-methyl)-S-adenosylmethionine under various conditions. The chloroplasts were then separated into stromal and thylakoid fractions and analyzed for radioactivity transferred to protein. Light enhanced the magnitude of labeling in both fractions. One thylakoid polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 43 kDa was labeled only in the light. Several other thylakoid and stromal proteins were labeled in both light and dark-labeling conditions. Both base-labile methylation, carboxy-methylesters and base-stable groups, N-methylations were found. Further characterization of the methyl-transfer reactions will be presented

  19. A new infusion pathway intactness monitoring system.

    Ogawa, Hidekuni; Yonezawa, Yoshiharu; Maki, Hiromichi; Ninomiya, Ishio; Sata, Koji; Hamada, Shingo; Caldwell, W Morton

    2006-01-01

    A new infusion pathway monitoring system has been developed for hospital and home use. The system consists of linear integrated circuits and a low-power 8-bit single chip microcomputer which constantly monitors the infusion pathway intactness. An AC (alternating current) voltage is induced on the patient's body by electrostatic coupling from the normal 100 volt, 60 Hz AC power line wiring field in the patient's room. The induced AC voltage can be recorded by a main electrode wrapped around the infusion polyvinyl chloride tube. A reference electrode is wrapped on the electrode to monitor the AC voltage around the main electrode. If the injection needle or infusion tube becomes detached, then the system detects changes in the induced AC voltages and alerts the nursing station, via the nurse call system or PHS (personal handy phone system).

  20. Reconciling certification and intact forest landscape conservation.

    Kleinschroth, Fritz; Garcia, Claude; Ghazoul, Jaboury

    2018-05-29

    In 2014, the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) added a new criterion to its principles that requires protection of intact forest landscapes (IFLs). An IFL is an extensive area of forest that lacks roads and other signs of human activity as detected through remote sensing. In the Congo basin, our analysis of road networks in formally approved concessionary logging areas revealed greater loss of IFL in certified than in noncertified concessions. In areas of informal (i.e., nonregulated) extraction, road networks are known to be less detectable by remote sensing. Under the current definition of IFL, companies certified under FSC standards are likely to be penalized relative to the noncertified as well as the informal logging sector on account of their planned road networks, despite an otherwise better standard of forest management. This could ultimately undermine certification and its wider adoption, with implications for the future of sustainable forest management.

  1. Self-shielding characteristics of aqueous self-cooled blankets for next generation fusion devices

    Pelloni, S.; Cheng, E.T.; Embrechts, M.J.

    1987-11-01

    The present study examines self-shielding characteristics for two aqueous self-cooled tritium producing driver blankets for next generation fusion devices. The aqueous Self-Cooled Blanket concept (ASCB) is a very simple blanket concept that relies on just structural material and coolant. Lithium compounds are dissolved in water to provide for tritium production. An ASCB driver blanket would provide a low technology and low temperature environment for blanket test modules in a next generation fusion reactor. The primary functions of such a blanket would be shielding, energy removal and tritium production. One driver blanket considered in this study concept relates to the one proposed for the Next European Torus (NET), while the second concept is indicative for the inboard shield design for the Engineering Test Reactor proposed by the USA (TIBER II/ETR). The driver blanket for NET is based on stainless steel for the structural material and aqueous solution, while the inboard shielding blanket for TIBER II/ETR is based on a tungsten/aqueous solution combination. The purpose of this study is to investigate self-shielding and heterogeneity effects in aqueous self-cooled blankets. It is found that no significant gains in tritium breeding can be achieved in the stainless steel blanket if spatial and energy self-shielding effects are considered, and the heterogeneity effects are also insignificant. The tungsten blanket shows a 5 percent increase in tritium production in the shielding blanket when energy and spatial self-shielding effects are accounted for. However, the tungsten blanket shows a drastic increase in the tritium breeding ratio due to heterogeneity effects. (author) 17 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs

  2. Effect of guinea pig or monkey colonic mucus on Shigella aggregation and invasion of HeLa cells by Shigella flexneri 1b and 2a.

    Dinari, G; Hale, T L; Washington, O; Formal, S B

    1986-01-01

    The effects of guinea pig and rhesus monkey colonic mucus preparations on Shigella aggregation and invasion of HeLa cell monolayers by Shigella flexneri serotype 1b, 2a, and 5 strains were investigated. Guinea pig mucus caused agglutination of S. flexneri serotype 1b but not of S. flexneri serotype 2a or 5. Guinea pig mucus also inhibited HeLa cell invasion by S. flexneri serotypes 1b and 2a. Monkey mucus neither agglutinated any Shigella strain nor inhibited HeLa cell invasion.

  3. Antimicrobial proteins of Snail mucus (Achatina fulica against Streptococcus mutans and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    Herluinus Mafranenda DN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Achasin and mytimacin-AF are proteins of snail mucus (Achatina fulica which have antimicrobial activity. Snail mucus is suspected to have other proteins which have antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans the oral pathologic bacteria. Purpose: The study were aimed to characterize the proteins of snail mucus (Achatina fulica that have antimicrobial activities to Streptococcus mutans and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, and to compared the antimicrobial effect of achasin and mytimacin-AF. Methods: The sample of study was the mucus of snails which were taken from Yogyakarta Province. The isolation and characterization of protein were conducted by using SDS-PAGE method, electroelution, and dialysis. Nano drop test was conducted to determine protein concentration. The sensitivity test was conducted by using dilution test, and followed by spectrophotometry and paper disc diffusion tests. Results: The study showed that proteins successfully characterized from snail mucus (Achatina fulica were proteins with molecular weights of 83.67 kDa (achasin, 50.81 kDa, 15 kDa, 11.45 kDa (full amino acid sequence of mytimacin-AF and 9.7 kDa (mytimacin-AF. Based on the dilution test, Achasin had better antimicrobial activities against Streptococcus mutans, while mytimacin-AF had better antimicrobial activities against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. But the paper disc diffusion test result showed that Achasin had antimicrobial activities against Streptococcus mutans and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, while mytimacin-AF had no antimicrobial activities. Conclusion: The proteins with molecular weights of 50.81 kDa, 15 kDa, 11.45 kDa were considered as new antimicrobial proteins isolated from snail mucus. Achasin, had better antimicrobial activities against Streptococcus mutans, while mytimacin-AF had better antimicrobial activities against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

  4. Lactobacillus reuteri increases mucus thickness and ameliorates dextran sulphate sodium-induced colitis in mice.

    Ahl, D; Liu, H; Schreiber, O; Roos, S; Phillipson, M; Holm, L

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether two Lactobacillus reuteri strains (rat-derived R2LC and human-derived ATCC PTA 4659 (4659)) could protect mice against colitis, as well as delineate the mechanisms behind this protection. Mice were given L. reuteri R2LC or 4659 by gavage once daily for 14 days, and colitis was induced by addition of 3% DSS (dextran sulphate sodium) to drinking water for the last 7 days of this period. The severity of disease was assessed through clinical observations, histological evaluation and ELISA measurements of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and pro-inflammatory cytokines from colonic samples. Mucus thickness was measured in vivo with micropipettes, and tight junction protein expression was assessed using immunohistochemistry. Colitis severity was significantly reduced by L. reuteri R2LC or 4659 when evaluated both clinically and histologically. The inflammation markers MPO, IL-1β, IL-6 and mKC (mouse keratinocyte chemoattractant) were increased by DSS and significantly reduced by the L. reuteri strains. The firmly adherent mucus thickness was reduced by DSS, but significantly increased by L. reuteri in both control and DSS-treated mice. Expression of the tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1 was significantly increased in the bottom of the colonic crypts by L. reuteri R2LC. These results demonstrate that each of the two different L. reuteri strains, one human-derived and one-rat-derived, protects against colitis in mice. Mechanisms behind this protection could at least partly be explained by the increased mucus thickness as well as a tightened epithelium in the stem cell area of the crypts. © 2016 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Humoral immune response against native or {sup 60}Co irradiated venom and mucus from stingray Paratrygon aiereba

    Thomazi, Gabriela Ortega Coelho; Alves, Glaucie Jussilane; Aires, Raquel da Silva; Turibio, Thompson de Oliveira; Rocha, Andre Moreira; Spencer, Patrick Jack; Nascimento, Nanci do, E-mail: 0916@prof.itpacporto.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Seibert, Carla Simone, E-mail: carlaseibert@yahoo.com [Universidade Federal do Tocantins (UFT), Porto Nacional, TO (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Poisonings and traumas caused by poisonous freshwater fish such as rays are considered a major public health problem and draw attention because of accidents involving these animals cause serious local symptoms and are disabling, keeping the victim away from work. The therapy of these cases is based only on the symptoms of patients, which implies in its low efficiency, causing suffering for the victims. This study aims to evaluate and compare the humoral immune response in animals inoculated with native or {sup 60}Co irradiated Paratrygon aiereba venom and mucus. Ionizing radiation has proven to be an excellent tool to decrease the toxicity of venoms and isolated toxins. The mucus and venom samples of P. aiereba were irradiated using gamma rays from a {sup 60}Co source. Animals models were immunized with the native or irradiated mucus or venom. The assays were conducted to assess the production of antibodies by the immunized animals using enzyme immunoassay and western blotting. Preliminary results show the production of antibodies by the immunized animals. The resulting sera were also checked for antigenic cross- reactivity between venom and mucus, demonstrating the potential of mucus as an antigen for serum production for the specific treatment for accidents by stingrays. However, it is essential to carry out further tests in order to verify the neutralization of the toxin by antibodies formed by animals. (author)

  6. Bronchial Mucus as a Complex Fluid: Molecular Interactions and Influence of Nanostructured Particles on Rheological and Transport Properties

    Odziomek Marcin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Transport properties of bronchial mucus are investigated by two-stage experimental approach focused on: (a rheological properties and (b mass transfer rate through the stagnant layer of solutions of mucus components (mucine, DNA, proteins and simulated multi-component mucus. Studies were done using thermostated horizontal diffusion cells with sodium cromoglycate and carminic acid as transferred solutes. Rheological properties of tested liquids was studied by a rotational viscometer and a cone-plate rheometer (dynamic method. First part of the studies demonstrated that inter-molecular interactions in these complex liquids influence both rheological and permeability characteristics. Transfer rate is governed not only by mucus composition and concentration but also by hydrophobic/hydrophilic properties of transported molecules. Second part was focused on the properties of such a layer in presence of selected nanostructured particles (different nanoclays and graphene oxide which may be present in lungs after inhalation. It was shown that most of such particles increase visco-elasticity of the mucus and reduce the rate of mass transfer of model drugs. Measured effects may have adverse impact on health, since they will reduce mucociliary clearance in vivo and slow down drug penetration to the bronchial epithelium during inhalation therapy.

  7. Secretory IgA is Concentrated in the Outer Layer of Colonic Mucus along with Gut Bacteria

    Eric W. Rogier

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies of the secretory IgA (SIgA class comprise the first line of antigen-specific immune defense, preventing access of commensal and pathogenic microorganisms and their secreted products into the body proper. In addition to preventing infection, SIgA shapes the composition of the gut microbiome. SIgA is transported across intestinal epithelial cells into gut secretions by the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR. The epithelial surface is protected by a thick network of mucus, which is composed of a dense, sterile inner layer and a loose outer layer that is colonized by commensal bacteria. Immunofluorescence microscopy of mouse and human colon tissues demonstrated that the SIgA co-localizes with gut bacteria in the outer mucus layer. Using mice genetically deficient for pIgR and/or mucin-2 (Muc2, the major glycoprotein of intestinal mucus, we found that Muc2 but not SIgA was necessary for excluding gut bacteria from the inner mucus layer in the colon. Our findings support a model whereby SIgA is anchored in the outer layer of colonic mucus through combined interactions with mucin proteins and gut bacteria, thus providing immune protection against pathogens while maintaining a mutually beneficial relationship with commensals.

  8. APT 3He target/blanket. Topical report

    1995-03-01

    The 3 He target/blanket (T/B) preconceptual design for the 3/8-Goal facility is based on a 1000-MeV, 200-mA accelerator to produce a high-intensity proton beam that is expanded and then strikes one of two T/B modules. Each module consists of a centralized neutron source made of tungsten and lead, a proton beam backstop region made of zirconium and lead, and a moderator made of D 2 O. Helium-3 gas is circulated through the neutron source region and the blanket to create tritium through neutron capture. The gas is continually processed to extract the tritium with an online separation process

  9. Improved modules for the blanket of RTO/RC ITER

    Elio, F.; Ioki, K.; Cardella, A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes innovative design aspects that are considered to optimise the blanket modules for the reduced technical objective/reduced cost international thermonuclear experimental reactor. The blanket modules have a vertical straight profile facing the plasma, and the first wall is built in small and flat panels. Copper may be applied only in front of the first row of cooling passages. The radial cooling of the shield block avoids a complex by-pass at the back and opens up the possibility to use cast instead of forged steel. Slits in the shield block and in the first wall reduce the electromagnetic forces enough to allow the support of the modules on the vessel and the mechanical attachment of the first wall panels

  10. Experimental program for the Fast Breeder Blanket Facility, FBBF

    Ott, K.O.; Clikeman, F.M.; Johnson, R.H.; Borg, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    The work performed in the reporting period was primarily concerned with the development of the experimental program (Task A) and with the pre-analysis of future loadings and the impact upon the permanent loading of the two converter regions, which contain 4.8 percent enriched UO 2 rods. It appears necessary that a neutron poison (B 4 C) be placed in the converter (transformer) regions in order to hold, also for future loadings, the k/sub eff/ of a hypothetically flooded FBBF well below 1. Since it is planned to use the same welded converter regions for all experiments, the required B 4 C loading needs to be determined prior to the first blanket loading. Further the equipment needs have been identified (Task D), the 252 Cf-source has been requested on a loan basis (Task E). First discussions with ANL on blanket experiments have been initiated

  11. Blanket handling concepts for future fusion power plants

    Bogusch, E.; Gottfried, R.; Maisonnier, D.

    2003-01-01

    In the frame of the power plant conceptual studies (PPCS) launched by the European Commission, two main blanket handling concepts have been investigated with respect to engineering feasibility and the impact on the plant availability and on cost: the large module handling concept (LMHC) and the large sector handling concept (LSHC). The LMHC has been considered as the reference handling concept while the LSHC has been considered as an attractive alternative to the LMHC due to its potential of smaller replacement times and hence increasing the plant availability. Although no principle feasibility issue has been identified, a number of engineering issues have been highlighted for the LSHC that would require considerable efforts for their resolution. Since its availability of about 77% based on a replacement time for all the internals of about 4.2 months is slightly lower than for the LMHC, the LMHC remains the reference blanket replacement concept for a conceptual reactor

  12. Rapid thermal cycling of new technology solar array blanket coupons

    Scheiman, David A.; Smith, Bryan K.; Kurland, Richard M.; Mesch, Hans G.

    1990-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center is conducting thermal cycle testing of a new solar array blanket technologies. These technologies include test coupons for Space Station Freedom (SSF) and the advanced photovoltaic solar array (APSA). The objective of this testing is to demonstrate the durability or operational lifetime of the solar array interconnect design and blanket technology within a low earth orbit (LEO) or geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO) thermal cycling environment. Both the SSF and the APSA array survived all rapid thermal cycling with little or no degradation in peak performance. This testing includes an equivalent of 15 years in LEO for SSF test coupons and 30 years of GEO plus ten years of LEO for the APSA test coupon. It is concluded that both the parallel gap welding of the SSF interconnects and the soldering of the APSA interconnects are adequately designed to handle the thermal stresses of space environment temperature extremes.

  13. Structural performance of a graphite blanket in fusion reactors

    Wolfer, W.G.; Watson, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    Irradiation of graphite in a fusion reactor causes dimensional changes, enhanced creep, and changes in elastic properties and fracture strength. Temperature and flux gradients through the graphite blanket structure produce differential distortions and stress gradients. An inelastic stress analysis procedure is described which treats these variations of the graphite properties in a consistent manner as dictated by physical models for the radiation effects. Furthermore, the procedure follows the evolution of the stress and fracture strength distributions during the reactor operation as well as for possible shutdowns at any time. The lifetime of the graphite structure can be determined based on the failure criterion that the stress at any location exceeds one-half of the fracture strength. This procedure is applied to the most critical component of the blanket module in the SOLASE design

  14. Stability properties of cold blanket systems for current driven modes

    Ohlsson, D.

    1977-12-01

    The stability problem of the boundary regions of cold blanket systems with induced currents parallel to the lines of force is formulated. Particular interest is focused on two types of modes: first electrostatic modes driven by the combined effects of a transverse resistivity gradient due to a spatially non-uniform electron temperature and a longitudinal current, second electromagnetic kink like modes driven by the torque arising from a transverse current density gradient and magnetic field perturbations. It is found that the combination of various dissipative and neutral gas effects introduces strong stabilizing effects within specific parameter ranges. For particular steady-state models investigated it is shown that these effects become of importance in laboratory plasmas at relatively high densities, low temperatures and moderate magnetic field strengths. Stability diagrams based on specific steady-state cold plasma blanket models will be presented

  15. APT {sup 3}He target/blanket. Topical report

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    The {sup 3}He target/blanket (T/B) preconceptual design for the 3/8-Goal facility is based on a 1000-MeV, 200-mA accelerator to produce a high-intensity proton beam that is expanded and then strikes one of two T/B modules. Each module consists of a centralized neutron source made of tungsten and lead, a proton beam backstop region made of zirconium and lead, and a moderator made of D{sub 2}O. Helium-3 gas is circulated through the neutron source region and the blanket to create tritium through neutron capture. The gas is continually processed to extract the tritium with an online separation process.

  16. Engineering test station for TFTR blanket module experiments

    Jassby, D.L.; Leinoff, S.

    1979-12-01

    A conceptual design has been carried out for an Engineering Test Station (ETS) which will provide structural support and utilities/instrumentation services for blanket modules positioned adjacent to the vacuum vessel of the TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor). The ETS is supported independently from the Test Cell floor. The ETS module support platform is constructed of fiberglass to eliminate electromagnetic interaction with the pulsed tokamak fields. The ETS can hold blanket modules with dimensions up to 78 cm in width, 85 cm in height, and 105 cm in depth, and with a weight up to 4000 kg. Interfaces for all utility and instrumentation requirements are made via a shield plug in the TFTR igloo shielding. The modules are readily installed or removed by means of TFTR remote handling equipment

  17. RAMI analysis for DEMO HCPB blanket concept cooling system

    Dongiovanni, Danilo N., E-mail: danilo.dongiovanni@enea.it [ENEA, Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati (Italy); Pinna, Tonio [ENEA, Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati (Italy); Carloni, Dario [KIT, Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology (INR) – KIT (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • RAMI (reliability, availability, maintainability and inspectability) preliminary assessment for HCPB blanket concept cooling system. • Reliability block diagram (RBD) modeling and analysis for HCPB primary heat transfer system (PHTS), coolant purification system (CPS), pressure control system (PCS), and secondary cooling system. • Sensitivity analysis on system availability performance. • Failure models and repair models estimated on the base of data from the ENEA fusion component failure rate database (FCFRDB). - Abstract: A preliminary RAMI (reliability, availability, maintainability and inspectability) assessment for the HCPB (helium cooled pebble bed) blanket cooling system based on currently available design for DEMO fusion power plant is presented. The following sub-systems were considered in the analysis: blanket modules, primary cooling loop including pipework and steam generators lines, pressure control system (PCS), coolant purification system (CPS) and secondary cooling system. For PCS and CPS systems an extrapolation from ITER Test Blanket Module corresponding systems was used as reference design in the analysis. Helium cooled pebble bed (HCPB) system reliability block diagrams (RBD) models were implemented taking into account: system reliability-wise configuration, operating schedule currently foreseen for DEMO, maintenance schedule and plant evolution schedule as well as failure and corrective maintenance models. A simulation of plant activity was then performed on implemented RBDs to estimate plant availability performance on a mission time of 30 calendar years. The resulting availability performance was finally compared to availability goals previously proposed for DEMO plant by a panel of experts. The study suggests that inherent availability goals proposed for DEMO PHTS system and Tokamak auxiliaries are potentially achievable for the primary loop of the HCPB concept cooling system, but not for the secondary loop. A

  18. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 2

    1984-09-01

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li/sub 2/O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N/sub 2/) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concepts are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li/sub 2/O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concept are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue.

  19. Tritium breeding blanket device of D-T reactors

    Chevereau, G.

    1984-01-01

    This blanket device uses solid tritium breeding materials as those which include, in a known manner, near a neutron breeding plasma, a neutron multiplier medium and a tritium breeding medium, cooled by a cooling fluid circulation. This device is characterized by the fact that the association of the multiplier media and the tritium breeding media is realized by pellet alternated piling up of each of those both media, help in close contact on all their lateral surfaces [fr

  20. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 3

    1984-09-01

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li 2 O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N 2 ) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concept are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li 2 O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concepts are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue

  1. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 1

    1984-09-01

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li 2 O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N 2 ) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concept are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li 2 O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concept are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue

  2. Evaluation of US demo helium-cooled blanket options

    Wong, C.P.C.; McQuillan, B.W.; Schleicher, R.W.

    1995-10-01

    A He-V-Li blanket design was developed as a candidate for the U.S. fusion demonstration power plant. This paper presents an 18 MPa helium-cooled, lithium breeder, V-alloy design that can be coupled to the Brayton cycle with a gross efficiency of 46%. The critical issue of designing to high gas pressure and the compatibility between helium impurities and V-alloy are addressed

  3. Heat Loads Due To Small Penetrations In Multilayer Insulation Blankets

    Johnson, W. L.; Heckle, K. W.; E Fesmire, J.

    2017-12-01

    The main penetrations (supports and piping) through multilayer insulation systems for cryogenic tanks have been previously addressed by heat flow measurements. Smaller penetrations due to fasteners and attachments are now experimentally investigated. The use of small pins or plastic garment tag fasteners to ease the handling and construction of multilayer insulation (MLI) blankets goes back many years. While it has long been understood that penetrations and other discontinuities degrade the performance of the MLI blanket, quantification of this degradation has generally been lumped into gross performance multipliers (often called degradation factors or scale factors). Small penetrations contribute both solid conduction and radiation heat transfer paths through the blanket. The conduction is down the stem of the structural element itself while the radiation is through the hole formed during installation of the pin or fastener. Analytical models were developed in conjunction with MLI perforation theory and Fourier’s Law. Results of the analytical models are compared to experimental testing performed on a 10 layer MLI blanket with approximately 50 small plastic pins penetrating the test specimen. The pins were installed at ∼76-mm spacing inches in both directions to minimize the compounding of thermal effects due to localized compression or lateral heat transfer. The testing was performed using a liquid nitrogen boil-off calorimeter (Cryostat-100) with the standard boundary temperatures of 293 K and 78 K. Results show that the added radiation through the holes is much more significant than the conduction down the fastener. The results are shown to be in agreement with radiation theory for perforated films.

  4. New concepts for controlled fusion reactor blanket design

    Conn, R.W.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Avci, H.; El-Maghrabi, M.

    1975-01-01

    Several new concepts for fusion reactor blanket design based on the idea of shifting, or tailoring, the neutron spectrum incident on the first structural wall are presented. The spectral shifter is a nonstructural element which can be made of graphite, silicon carbide, or three dimensionally woven carbon fibers (and containing other materials as appropriate) placed between the neutron source and the first structural wall. The softened neutron spectrum incident on the structural components leads to lower gas production and atom displacement rates than in more standard fusion blanket designs. In turn, this results in longer anticipated lifetimes for the structural materials and can significantly reduce radioactivity and afterheat levels. In addition, the neutron spectrum in the first structural wall can be made to approach the flux shape in fast breeder reactors. Such spectral softening means that existing radiation facilities may be more profitably used to provide relevant materials radiation damage data for the structural materials in these fusion blanket designs. This general class of blanket concepts are referred to as internal spectral shifter and energy converter, or ISSEC concepts. These specific design concepts fall into three main categories: ISSEC/EB concepts based on utilizing existing designs which breed tritium behind the first structural wall; ISSEC/IB concepts based on breeding tritium inside the first vacuum wall; and ISSEC/Bu concepts based on using boron, carbon, and perhaps, beryllium to obtain an energy multiplier and converter design that does not attempt to breed tritium or utilize lithium. The detailed analyses relate specifically to the nuclear performance of ISSEC systems and to a discussion of materials radiation damage problems in the structural material.(U.S.)

  5. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 2

    1984-09-01

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li 2 O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N 2 ) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concepts are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li 2 O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concept are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue

  6. Choice of economical optimum blanket of hybrid reactors

    Blinkin, V L; Novikov, V M

    1981-01-01

    The economical effectiveness of symbiotic power systems depends on the choice of the correlation between energy production and fissile fuel production in blankets of controlled thermonuclear fusion reactor (CTR), what is investigated here. It is shown that the optimum value of this correlation essentially depends on the ratio between the specific costs for energy production in hybrid thermonuclear reactors and that in fission reactors as part of the symbiotic system.

  7. Development of insulating coatings for liquid metal blankets

    Malang, S.; Borgstedt, H.U.; Farnum, E.H.; Natesan, K.; Vitkovski, I.V.

    1994-07-01

    It is shown that self-cooled liquid metal blankets are feasible only with electrically insulating coatings at the duct walls. The requirements on the insulation properties are estimated by simple analytical models. Candidate insulator materials are selected based on insulating properties and thermodynamic consideration. Different fabrication technologies for insulating coatings are described. The status of the knowledge on the most crucial feasibility issue, the degradation of the resisivity under irradiation, is reviewed

  8. Li2O-pebble type tritium breeding blanket for fusion experimental reactor, 1

    Tone, Tatsuzo; Iida, Hiromasa; Tanaka, Yoshihisa

    1984-01-01

    The fusion experimental reactor is the next stage device in Japan, which is planned to be constructed following the critical plasma experimental device JT-60 being constructed at present. The breeding blanket installed in nuclear fusion reactors is one of most important structures, and it is required to satisfy the fundamental performance of producing and continuously recovering tritium as the nuclear fusion fuel, and other requirement in good coordination. The Li 2 O pebble type breeding blanket that Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. has examined is the concept for resolving the problems of the mass transfer and thermal stress cracking of Li 2 O, which are important in blanket design. In this paper, the concept and characteristics of this breeding blanket are discussed from the viewpoint of the breeding and continuous recovery of tritium, the ease of manufacture and the maintenance of soundness. The breeding blanket is composed of breeding region, tritium purge region, cooling region, plasma stabilizing conductors and blanket container. Li 2 O is excellent in its tritium breeding performance and heat conductivity. The functions required for the breeding blanket, the fundamental structure, the examples of breeding blanket concept, the selection of breeding blanket concept, the characteristics of Li 2 O pebble type blanket and its future prospect are described. (Kako, I.)

  9. Neutronic performance issues of the breeding blanket options for the European DEMO fusion power plant

    Fischer, U., E-mail: ulrich.fischer@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Bachmann, C. [EUROfusion—Programme Management Unit, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Jaboulay, J.-C. [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, SERMA, LPEC, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Moro, F. [ENEA, Dipartimento Fusione e tecnologie per la Sicurezza Nucleare, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Palermo, I. [Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Pereslavtsev, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Villari, R. [ENEA, Dipartimento Fusione e tecnologie per la Sicurezza Nucleare, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Breeder blanket concepts for DEMO—design features. • Neutronic characteristics of breeder blankets. • Evaluation of Tritium breeding potential. • Evaluation of shielding performance. - Abstract: This paper presents nuclear performance issues of the HCPB, HCLL, DCLL and WCLL breeder blankets, which are under development within the PPPT (Power Plant Physics and Technology) programme of EUROfusion, with the objective to assess the potential and suitability of the blankets for the application to DEMO. The assessment is based on the initial design versions of the blankets developed in 2014. The Tritium breeding potential is considered sufficient for all breeder blankets although the initial design versions of the HCPB, HCLL and DCLL blankets were shown to require further design improvements. Suitable measures have been proposed and proven to be sufficient to achieve the required Tritium Breeding Ratio (TBR) ≥ 1.10. The shielding performance was shown to be sufficient to protect the super-conducting toroidal field coil provided that efficient shielding material mixtures including WC or borated water are utilized. The WCLL blanket does not require the use of such shielding materials due to a very compact blanket support structure/manifold configuration which yet requires design verification. The vacuum vessel can be safely operated over the full anticipated DEMO lifetime of 6 full power years for all blanket concepts considered.

  10. Analysis of ER string test thermally instrumented interconnect 80-K MLI blanket

    Daly, E.; Pletzer, R.

    1992-04-01

    An 80-K Multi Layer Insulation (MLI) blanket in the interconnect region between magnets DD0019 and DD0027 in the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) ER string was instrumented with temperature sensors to obtain the steady-state temperature gradient through the blanket after string cooldown. A thermal model of the 80-K blanket assembly was constructed to analyze the steady-state temperature gradient data. Estimates of the heat flux through the 80-K MLI blanket assembly and predicted temperature gradients were calculated. The thermal behavior of the heavy polyethylene terapthalate (PET) cover layers separating the shield and inner blanket and inner and outer blankets was derived empirically from the data. The results of the analysis predict a heat flux of 0.363--0.453 W/m 2 based on the 11 sets of data. These flux values are 33--46% below the 80-K MLI blanket heat leak budget of 0.676 W/m 2 . The effective thermal resistance of the two heavy PET cover layers between the shield and inner blanket was found to be 2.1 times that of a single PET spacer layer, and the effective resistance of the two heavy PET cover layers between the inner blanket and outer blanket was found to be 7 times that of a single PET spacer layer. Based on these results, the 80-K MLI blanket assembly appears to be performing more than adequately to meet the 80-K static IR heat leak budget. However, these results should not be construed as a verification of the 80-K static IR heat leak, since no actual heat leak was measured. The results have been used to improve the empirically based model data in the 80-K MLI blanket thermal model, which has previously not included the effects of heavy PET cover layers on 80-K MLI blanket thermal performance

  11. Moving ring field-reversed mirror blanket design considerations

    Wong, C.P.C.; Cheng, E.T.; Creedon, L.; Kessel, C.; Norman, J.; Schultz, K.R.

    1981-01-01

    A blanket design for the Moving Ring Field-Reversed Mirror Reactor (MRFRM) is presented in this paper. The design emphasis is placed on minimizing the induced radioactivities in the first-wall, blanket and shield. To this end, aluminum-alloy was selected as the reference structural material, giving dose rates two weeks after shutdown that are 3 to 4 orders of magnitude lower than comparable steel structures. The aluminum first-wall is water-cooled and thermally insulated from the high temperature SiC-clad Li 2 O tritium breeding zone. A local tritium breeding ratio of 1.05 was obtained for the design. The tritium is extracted from the Li 2 O by the use of a small dry helium purge stream through the SiC tubes. About 1 ppM hydrogen is added to the helium purge stream to enhance the tritium recovery rate. Helium at 28 atmospheres pressure is circulated through the blanket and shield, with an outlet temperature of 850 0 C, which is coupled with an existing small size closed-cycle gas turbine (CCGT) power conversion system. The spatial and temporal variations of the first-wall temperature caused by the translational movement of the plasma rings along the axis of the cylindrical reactor were evaluated. The after-heat cooling problems of the first-wall were also considered

  12. Low cost, high yield IFE reactors: Revisiting Velikhov's vaporizing blankets

    Logan, B.G.

    1992-01-01

    The performance (efficiency and cost) of IFE reactors using MHD conversion is explored for target blanket shells of various materials vaporized and ionized by high fusion yields (5 to 500 GJ). A magnetized, prestressed reactor chamber concept is modeled together with previously developed models for the Compact Fusion Advanced Rankine II (CFARII) MHD Balance-of-Plant (BoP). Using conservative 1-D neutronics models, high fusion yields (20 to 80 GJ) are found necessary to heat Flibe, lithium, and lead-lithium blankets to MHD plasma temperatures, at initial solid thicknesses sufficient to capture most of the fusion yield. Advanced drivers/targets would need to be developed to achieve a ''Bang per Buck'' figure-of-merit approx-gt 20 to 40 joules yield per driver $ for this scheme to be competitive with these blanket materials. Alternatively, more realistic neutronics models and better materials such as lithium hydride may lower the minimum required yields substantially. The very low CFARII BoP costs (contributing only 3 mills/kWehr to CoE) allows this type of reactor, given sufficient advances that non-driver costs dominate, to ultimately produce electricity at a much lower cost than any current nuclear plant

  13. Comparison of inventory of tritium in various ceramic breeder blankets

    Nishikawa, M.; Beloglazov, S.; Nakashima, N.; Hashimoto, K.; Enoeda, M.

    2002-01-01

    It has been pointed out by the present authors that it is essential to understand such mass transfer steps as diffusion of tritium in the grain of breeder material, absorption of water vapor into bulk of the grain, and adsorption of water on surface of the grain, together with the isotope exchange reaction between hydrogen in purge gas and tritium on surface of breeder material and the isotope exchange reaction between water vapor in purge gas and tritium on surface, for estimation of the tritium inventory in a uniform ceramic breeder blanket under the steady-state condition. It has been also pointed out by the present authors that the water formation reaction on the surface of ceramic breeder materials at introduction of hydrogen can give effect on behavior of bred tritium and lithium transfer in blanket. The tritium inventory for various ceramic breeder blankets are compared in this study basing on adsorption capacity, absorption capacity, isotope exchange capacity, and isotope exchange reactions on the Li 2 O, LiAlO 2 , Li 2 ZrO 3 , Li 4 SiO 4 and Li 2 TiO 3 surface experimentally obtained by the present authors. Effect of each mass transfer steps on the shape of release curve of bred tritium at change of the operational conditions is also discussed from the observation at out pile experiment in KUR. (orig.)

  14. Space environment durability of beta cloth in LDEF thermal blankets

    Linton, Roger C.; Whitaker, Ann F.; Finckenor, Miria M.

    1993-01-01

    Beta cloth performance for use on long-term space vehicles such as Space Station Freedom (S.S. Freedom) requires resistance to the degrading effects of the space environment. The major issues are retention of thermal insulating properties through maintaining optical properties, preserving mechanical integrity, and generating minimal particulates for contamination-sensitive spacecraft surfaces and payloads. The longest in-flight test of beta cloth's durability was on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), where it was exposed to the space environment for 68 months. The LDEF contained 57 experiments which further defined the space environment and its effects on spacecraft materials. It was deployed into low-Earth orbit (LEO) in Apr. 1984 and retrieved Jan. 1990 by the space shuttle. Among the 10,000 plus material constituents and samples onboard were thermal control blankets of multilayer insulation with a beta cloth outer cover and Velcro attachments. These blankets were exposed to hard vacuum, thermal cycling, charged particles, meteoroid/debris impacts, ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and atomic oxygen (AO). Of these space environmental exposure elements, AO appears to have had the greatest effect on the beta cloth. The beta cloth analyzed in this report came from the MSFC Experiment S1005 (Transverse Flat-Plate Heat Pipe) tray oriented approximately 22 deg from the leading edge vector of the LDEF satellite. The location of the tray on LDEF and the placement of the beta cloth thermal blankets are shown. The specific space environment exposure conditions for this material are listed.

  15. Effect of blanket assembly shuffling on LMR neutronic performance

    Khalil, H.; Fujita, E.K.

    1987-01-01

    Neutronic analyses of advanced liquid-metal reactors (LMRs) have generally been performed with assemblies in different batches scatter-loaded but not shuffled among the core lattice positions between cycles. While this refueling approach minimizes refueling time, significant improvements in thermal performance are believed to be achievable by blanket assembly shuffling. These improvements, attributable to mitigation of the early-life overcooling of the blankets, include reductions in peak clad temperatures and in the temperature gradients responsible for thermal striping. Here the authors summarize results of a study performed to: (1) assess whether the anticipated gains in thermal performance can be realized without sacrificing core neutronic performance, particularly the burnup reactivity swing rho/sub bu/, which determines the rod ejection worth; (2) determine the effect of various blanket shuffling operations on reactor performance; and (3) determine whether shuffling strategies developed for an equilibrium (plutonium-fueled) core can be applied during the transition from an initial uranium-fueled core as is being considered in the US advanced LMR program

  16. Investigation of aqueous slurries as fusion reactor blankets

    Schuller, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    Numerical and experimental studies were carried out to assess the feasibility of using an aqueous slurry, with lithium in its solid component, to meet the tritium breeding, cooling, and shielding requirements of a controlled thermonuclear reactor (CTR). The numerical studies were designed to demonstrate the theoretical ability of a conceptual slurry blanket to breed adequate tritium to sustain the CTR. The experimental studies were designed to show that the tritium retention characteristics of likely solid components for the slurry were conducive to adequate tritium recovery without the need for isotopic separation. The numerical portion of this work consisted in part of using ANISN, a one-dimensional finite difference neutron transport code, to model the neutronic performance of the slurry blanket concept. The parameters governing tritium production and retention in a slurry were computed and used to modify the results of the ANISN computer runs. The numerical work demonstrated that the slurry blanket was only marginally capable of breeding sufficient tritium without the aid of a neutron multiplying region. The experimental portion of this work consisted of several neutron irradiation experiments, which were designed to determine the retention abilities of LiF particles

  17. NOEL: a no-leak fusion blanket concept

    Powell, J.R.; Yu, W.S.; Fillo, J.A.; Horn, F.L.; Makowitz, H.

    1980-01-01

    Analysis and tests of a no-leak fusion blanket concept (NOEL-NO External Leak) are described. Coolant cannot leak into the plasma chamber even if large through-cracks develop in the first wall. Blanket modules contain a two-phase material, A, that is solid (several cm thick) on the inside of the module shell, and liquid in the interior. The solid layer is maintained by imbedded tubes carrying a coolant, B, below the freezing point of A. Most of the 14-MeV neutron energy is deposited as heat in the module interior. The thermal energy flow from the module interior to the shell keeps the interior liquid. Pressure on the liquid A interior is greater than the pressure on B, so that B cannot leak out if failures occur in coolant tubes. Liquid A cannot leak into the plasma chamber through first wall cracks because of the intervening frozen layer. The thermal hydraulics and neutronics of NOEL blankets have been investigated for various metallic (e.g., Li, Pb 2 , LiPb, Pb) and fused salt choices for material A

  18. Neutronic investigation and activation calculation for CFETR HCCB blankets

    Shuling, XU; Mingzhun, LEI; Sumei, LIU; Kun, LU; Kun, XU; Kun, PEI

    2017-12-01

    The neutronic calculations and activation behavior of the proposed helium cooled ceramic breeder (HCCB) blanket were predicted for the Chinese Fusion Engineering Testing Reactor (CFETR) design model using the MCNP multi-particle transport code and its associated data library. The tritium self-sufficiency behavior of the HCCB blanket was assessed, addressing several important breeding-related arrangements inside the blankets. Two candidate first wall armor materials were considered to obtain a proper tritium breeding ratio (TBR). Presentations of other neutronic characteristics, including neutron flux, neutron-induced damages in terms of the accumulated dpa and helium production were also conducted. Activation, decay heat levels and contact dose rates of the components were calculated to estimate the neutron-induced radioactivity and personnel safety. The results indicate that neutron radiation is efficiently attenuated and slowed down by components placed between the plasma and toroidal field coil. The dominant nuclides and corresponding isotopes in the structural steel were discussed. A radioactivity comparison between pure beryllium and beryllium with specific impurities was also performed. After a millennium cooling time, the decay heat of all the concerned components and materials is less than 1 × 10-4 kW, and most associated in-vessel components qualify for recycling by remote handling. The results demonstrate that acceptable hands-on recycling and operation still require a further long waiting period to allow the activated products to decay.

  19. Measurements relevant to simulating subcriticality in ADS facilities with blanket

    Titarenko, Yu. E.; Batyaev, V.F.; Borovlev, S.P.; Gladkikh, N.G.; Igumnov, M.M.; Legostaev, V.O.; Karpikhin, E.I.; Konev, V.N.; Kushnerev, Yu.T.; Popkov, V.N.; Ryazhsky, V.I.; Spiridonov, V.G.; Chernyavsky, E.V.; Shvedov, O.V.

    2009-10-01

    The work presents the results of determining the blanket subcriticality for a zero-power heavy water reactor MAKET at the Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow. The blanket is hexagonal lattice made of 36 90%-enriched 235U fuel rods spaced 173mm apart. The subcriticality was varied from ∼0.3% to 5% by adjusting the heavy water level. The subcriticality values were calibrated using the dependence of reactivity on heavy water level. The pulsed neutron source technique was used to measure the temporal dependence of neutron field at different blanket points for the calibrated subcriticality values. The subciticality values obtained in terms of the 'inverse clock' formulae using the decay constants of the measured dependences proved to differ from the calibrated subcriticalities by not more than 7% at the average. The MCNP code-aided simulations of the experiment made has given the calibrated keff values at prescribed heavy water levels and led to the neutron field decay constants at given points, which differ on the average from their experimental values by not more than 7% too. (author)

  20. Progress in fusion reactors blanket analysis and evaluation at CEA

    Proust, E.; Gervaise, F.; Carre, F.; Chevereau, G.; Doutriaux, D.

    1986-09-01

    In the frame of the recent CEA studies aiming at the development, evaluation and comparison of solid breeder blanket concepts in view of their adaptation to NET, the evaluation of specific questions related to the first wall design, the present paper examines first the performances of a helium cooled toroidal blanket design for NET, based on innovative Beryllium/Ceramics breeder rod elements. Neutronic and thermo-mechanical optimisation converges on a concept featured by a breeding capability in excess of 1.2, a reasonnable pumping power of 1% and a narrow breeder temperature range (470+-30 deg C of the breeder), the latter being largely independent of the power level. This design proves naturally adapted to ceramic breeder assigned to very strict working conditions, and provides for any change in the thermal and heat transfer characteristics over the blanket lifetime. The final section of the paper is devoted to the evaluation of the heat load poloidal distribution and to the irradiation effects on first wall structural materials

  1. Thermo-mechanical characterization of ceramic pebbles for breeding blanket

    Lo Frano, Rosa, E-mail: rosa.lofrano@ing.unipi.it; Aquaro, Donato; Scaletti, Luca

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Experimental activities to characterize the Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}. • Compression tests of pebbles. • Experimental evaluation of thermal conductivity of pebbles bed at different temperatures. • Experimental test with/without compression load. - Abstract: An open issue for fusion power reactor is to design a suitable breeding blanket capable to produce the necessary quantity of the tritium and to transfer the energy of the nuclear fusion reaction to the coolant. The envisaged solution called Helium-Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) breeding blanket foresees the use of lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) or lithium metatitanate (Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}) pebble beds. The thermal mechanical properties of the candidate pebble bed materials are presently extensively investigated because they are critical for the feasibility and performances of the numerous conceptual designs which use a solid breeder. This study is aimed at the investigation of mechanical properties of the lithium orthosilicate and at the characterization of the main chemical, physical and thermo-mechanical properties taking into account the production technology. In doing that at the Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering (DICI) of the University of Pisa adequate experiments were carried out. The obtained results may contribute to characterize the material of the pebbles and to optimize the design of the envisaged fusion breeding blankets.

  2. Mirror hybrid reactor blanket and power conversion system conceptual design

    Schultz, K.R.; Backus, G.A.; Baxi, C.B.; Dee, J.B.; Estrine, E.A.; Rao, R.; Veca, A.R.

    1976-01-01

    The conceptual design of the blanket and power conversion system for a gas-cooled mirror hybrid fusion-fission reactor is presented. The designs of the fuel, blanket module and power conversion system are based on existing gas-cooled fission reactor technology that has been developed at General Atomic Company. The uranium silicide fuel is contained in Inconel-clad rods and is cooled by helium gas. The fuel is contained in 16 spherical segment modules which surround the fusion plasma. The hot helium is used to raise steam for a conventional steam cycle turbine generator. The details of the method of support for the massive blanket modules and helium ducts remain to be determined. Nevertheless, the conceptual design appears to be technically feasible with existing gas-cooled technology. A preliminary safety analysis shows that with the development of a satisfactory method of primary coolant circuit containment and support, the hybrid reactor could be licensed under existing Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations

  3. Corrosion characteristics of an aqueous self-cooled fusion blanket

    Bogaerts, W.F.; Embrechts, M.J.; Steiner, D.; Deutsch, L.; Jackson, D.

    1986-01-01

    A novel aqueous self-cooled blanket concept (ASCB) has recently been proposed. This blanket concept, as applied to a MARS-like tandem mirror reactor, consists of disks of spiraling tubes of Zircaloy-4 housed in a structural container of vanadium alloy (V-15 Ti-5 Cr). The Zircaloy tubes are cooled by a mixture of light and heavy water with 9 g of LiOH per 100 cm 3 of water dissolved in the coolant. A major issue for the feasibility of the integrated blanket coil concept is the chemical compatibility of the coolant and Zircaloy. Initial corrosion tests have been undertaken in order to resolve this question. Results clearly show that successful alloy heats can be prepared, for which corrosion problems will probably not be the limiting factor of the ASCB design concept. As is quite well known from fission engineering studies, small variations in the alloy compositions or in the metallurgical structure may, however, be able to cause significant alterations in the oxidation or corrosion rates. Further tests will be necessary to resolve the remaining uncertainties and to determine the behavior of successful alloy heats in the presence of trace impurities in order to address the sensitivity to localized corrosion phenomena such as pitting, stress corrosion cracking, and intergranular attack

  4. Method of operating water cooled reactor with blanket

    Suzuki, Katsuo.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the production amount of fissionable plutonium by increasing the burnup degree of blanket fuels in a water cooled reactor with blanket. Method: Incore insertion assemblies comprising water elimination rods, fertile material rods or burnable poison rods are inserted to those fuel assemblies at the central portion of the reactor core that are situated at the positions not inserted with control rods in the earlier half of the operation cycle, while the incore reactor insertion assemblies are withdrawn at the latter half of the operation cycle of a nuclear reactor. As a result, it is possible to increase the power share of the blanket fuels and increase the fuel burnup degree to thereby increase the production amount of fissionable plutonium. Furthermore, at the initial stage of the cycle, the excess reactivity of the reactor can be suppressed to decrease the reactivity control share on the control rod. At the final stage of the cycle, the excess reactivity of the reactor core can be increased to improve the cycle life. (Kamimura, M.)

  5. Comparison of Intact PTH and Bio-Intact PTH Assays Among Non-Dialysis Dependent Chronic Kidney Disease Patients.

    Einbinder, Yael; Benchetrit, Sydney; Golan, Eliezer; Zitman-Gal, Tali

    2017-09-01

    The third-generation bio-intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) (1-84) assay was designed to overcome problems associated with the detection of C-terminal fragments by the second-generation intact PTH assay. The two assays have been compared primarily among dialysis populations. The present study evaluated the correlations and differences between these two PTH assays among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 3 to 5 not yet on dialysis. Blood samples were collected from 98 patients with CKD stages 3 to 5. PTH concentrations were measured simultaneously by using the second-generation - PTH intact-STAT and third-generation bio-intact 1-84 PTH assays. Other serum biomarkers of bone mineral disorders were also assessed. CKD stage was calculated by using the CKD-Epidemiology Collaboration (EPI) formula. Serum bio-intact PTH concentrations were strongly correlated but significantly lower than the intact PTH concentrations (r=0.963, Pbio-intact PTH) positively correlated with urea (r=0.523, r=0.504; P=0.002, respectively), phosphorus (r=0.532, r=0.521; Pbio-intact PTH assay detected significantly lower PTH concentrations compared with intact PTH assay. Additional studies that correlate the diagnosis and management of CKD mineral and bone disorders with bone histomorphometric findings are needed to determine whether bio-intact PTH assay results are better surrogate markers in these early stages of CKD. © The Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine

  6. Pathophysiology of preterm labor with intact membranes.

    Talati, Asha N; Hackney, David N; Mesiano, Sam

    2017-11-01

    Preterm labor with intact membranes is a major cause of spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB). To prevent sPTB a clear understanding is needed of the hormonal interactions that initiate labor. The steroid hormone progesterone acting via its nuclear progesterone receptors (PRs) in uterine cells is essential for the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy and disruption of PR signaling (i.e., functional progesterone/PR withdrawal) is key trigger for labor. The process of parturition is also associated with inflammation within the uterine tissues and it is now generally accepted that inflammatory stimuli from multiple extrinsic and intrinsic sources induce labor. Recent studies suggest inflammatory stimuli induce labor by affecting PR transcriptional activity in uterine cells to cause functional progesterone/PR withdrawal. Advances in understanding the functional interaction of inflammatory load on the pregnancy uterus and progesterone/PR signaling is opening novel areas of research and may lead to rational therapeutic strategies to effectively prevent sPTB. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Excitons in intact cells of photosynthetic bacteria.

    Freiberg, Arvi; Pajusalu, Mihkel; Rätsep, Margus

    2013-09-26

    Live cells and regular crystals seem fundamentally incompatible. Still, effects characteristic to ideal crystals, such as coherent sharing of excitation, have been recently used in many studies to explain the behavior of several photosynthetic complexes, especially the inner workings of the light-harvesting apparatus of the oldest known photosynthetic organisms, the purple bacteria. To this date, there has been no concrete evidence that the same effects are instrumental in real living cells, leaving a possibility that this is an artifact of unnatural study conditions, not a real effect relevant to the biological operation of bacteria. Hereby, we demonstrate survival of collective coherent excitations (excitons) in intact cells of photosynthetic purple bacteria. This is done by using excitation anisotropy spectroscopy for tracking the temperature-dependent evolution of exciton bands in light-harvesting systems of increasing structural complexity. The temperature was gradually raised from 4.5 K to ambient temperature, and the complexity of the systems ranged from detergent-isolated complexes to complete bacterial cells. The results provide conclusive evidence that excitons are indeed one of the key elements contributing to the energetic and dynamic properties of photosynthetic organisms.

  8. Thermohydraulics design and thermomechanics analysis of two European breeder blanket concepts for DEMO. Pt. 1 and Pt. 2. Pt. 1: BOT helium cooled solid breeding blanket. Pt. 2: Dual coolant self-cooled liquid metal blanket

    Norajitra, P.

    1995-06-01

    Two different breeding blanket concepts are being elaborated at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe within the framework of the DEMO breeding blanket development, the concept of a helium cooled solid breeding blanket and the concept of a self-cooled liquid metal blanket. The breeder material used in the first concept is Li 4 SiO 4 as a pebble bed arranged separate from the beryllium pebble bed, which serves as multiplier. The breeder material zone is cooled by several toroidally-radially configurated helium cooling plates which, at the same time, act as reinforcements of the blanket structures. In the liquid metal blanket concept lead-lithium is used both as the breeder material and the coolant. It flows at low velocity in poloidal direction downwards and back in the blanket front zone. In both concepts the First Wall is cooled by helium gas. This report deals with the thermohydraulics design and thermomechanics analysis of the two blanket concepts. The performance data derived from the Monte-Carlo computations serve as a basis for the design calculations. The coolant inlet and outlet temperatures are chosen with the design criteria and the economics aspects taken into account. Uniform temperature distribution in the blanket structures can be achieved by suitable branching and routing of the coolant flows which contributes to reducing decisively the thermal stress. The computations were made using the ABAQUS computer code. The results obtained of the stresses have been evaluated using the ASME code. It can be demonstrated that all maximum values of temperature and stress are below the admissible limit. (orig.) [de

  9. Effect of chest physiotherapy on the removal of mucus in patients with cystic fibrosis

    Rossman, C.M.; Waldes, R.; Sampson, D.; Newhouse, M.T.

    1982-01-01

    We studied the effectiveness of some of the components of a physiotherapy regimen on the removal of mucus from the lungs of 6 subjects with cystic fibrosis. On 5 randomized study days, after inhalation of a 99 mTc-human serum albumin aerosol to label primarily the large airways, the removal of lung radioactivity was measured during 40 min of (a) spontaneous cough while at rest (control), (b) postural drainage, (c) postural drainage plus mechanical percussion, (d) combined maneuvers (postural drainage, deep breathing with vibrations, and percussion) administered by a physiotherapist, (e) directed vigorous cough. Measurements continued for an additional 2 h of quiet rest. Compared with the control day, all forms of intervention significantly improved the removal of mucus: cough (p less than 0.005), physiotherapy maneuvers (0.005 less than or equal to p less than 0.01), postural drainage (p less than 0.05), and postural drainage plus percussion (p less than 0.01). However, there was no significant difference between regimented cough alone and therapist-administered combined maneuvers, nor between postural drainage alone and with mechanical percussion. We conclude that in cystic fibrosis, vigorous, regimented cough sessions may be as effective as therapist-administered physiotherapy in removing pulmonary secretions. Postural drainage, although better than the control maneuver, was not as effective as cough and was not enhanced by mechanical percussion. Frequent, vigorous self-directed cough sessions are potentially as useful as more complex measures for effective bronchial toilet

  10. Metachronal waves in epithelium cilia to transport bronchial mucus in airways

    Favier, Julien; Sylvain, Chateau; D'Ortona, Umberto; Poncet, Sébastien

    2017-11-01

    Metachronal waves of beating cilia are an efficient mechanism to transport mucus in human airways. The numerical results we will present will shed new light on the understanding of chronic respiratory diseases, such as Asthma of COPD. A coupled lattice Boltzmann - Immersed Boundary is used to simulate the multiphase environment in which the cilia are immersed: a periciliary layer and the mucus layer. A purely hydrodynamical feedback of the fluids is taken into account, and a coupling parameter α is introduced, allowing the tuning of both the direction of the wave propagation, and the strength of the fluid feedback. The cilia, initially set in a random state, quickly synchronize with their immediate neighbors giving birth to metachronal waves. A comparative study of both antipleptic and sympleptic waves is performed by imposing the metachrony. Antiplectic waves are found to be the most efficient to transport and mix fluids compared to other random or synchronised cilia motions. The numerical results will be discussed and compared to experimental and clinical results obtained by collaborators, to progress on the understanding of the inner mechanisms of chronic respiratory diseases.

  11. Intracellular delivery of oligonucleotides in Helicobacter pylori by fusogenic liposomes in the presence of gastric mucus.

    Santos, Rita S; Dakwar, George R; Zagato, Elisa; Brans, Toon; Figueiredo, Céu; Raemdonck, Koen; Azevedo, Nuno F; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Braeckmans, Kevin

    2017-09-01

    The rising antimicrobial resistance contributes to 25000 annual deaths in Europe. This threat to the public health can only be tackled if novel antimicrobials are developed, combined with a more precise use of the currently available antibiotics through the implementation of fast, specific, diagnostic methods. Nucleic acid mimics (NAMs) that are able to hybridize intracellular bacterial RNA have the potential to become such a new class of antimicrobials and additionally could serve as specific detection probes. However, an essential requirement is that these NAMs should be delivered into the bacterial cytoplasm, which is a particular challenge given the fact that they are charged macromolecules. We consider these delivery challenges in relation to the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori, the most frequent chronic infection worldwide. In particular, we evaluate if cationic fusogenic liposomes are suitable carriers to deliver NAMs across the gastric mucus barrier and the bacterial envelope. Our study shows that DOTAP-DOPE liposomes post-PEGylated with DSPE-PEG (DSPE Lpx) can indeed successfully deliver NAMs into Helicobacter pylori, while offering protection to the NAMs from binding and inactivation in gastric mucus isolated from pigs. DSPE Lpx thus offer exciting new possibilities for in vivo diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of chest physiotherapy on the removal of mucus in patients with cystic fibrosis

    Rossman, C.M.; Waldes, R.; Sampson, D.; Newhouse, M.T.

    1982-07-01

    We studied the effectiveness of some of the components of a physiotherapy regimen on the removal of mucus from the lungs of 6 subjects with cystic fibrosis. On 5 randomized study days, after inhalation of a /sup 99/mTc-human serum albumin aerosol to label primarily the large airways, the removal of lung radioactivity was measured during 40 min of (a) spontaneous cough while at rest (control), (b) postural drainage, (c) postural drainage plus mechanical percussion, (d) combined maneuvers (postural drainage, deep breathing with vibrations, and percussion) administered by a physiotherapist, (e) directed vigorous cough. Measurements continued for an additional 2 h of quiet rest. Compared with the control day, all forms of intervention significantly improved the removal of mucus: cough (p less than 0.005), physiotherapy maneuvers (0.005 less than or equal to p less than 0.01), postural drainage (p less than 0.05), and postural drainage plus percussion (p less than 0.01). However, there was no significant difference between regimented cough alone and therapist-administered combined maneuvers, nor between postural drainage alone and with mechanical percussion. We conclude that in cystic fibrosis, vigorous, regimented cough sessions may be as effective as therapist-administered physiotherapy in removing pulmonary secretions. Postural drainage, although better than the control maneuver, was not as effective as cough and was not enhanced by mechanical percussion. Frequent, vigorous self-directed cough sessions are potentially as useful as more complex measures for effective bronchial toilet.

  13. Relationship between bovine fertility and the number of spermatozoa penetrating the cervical mucus within straws.

    Taş, Muzaffer; Bacinoglu, Suleyman; Cirit, Umüt; Ozdaş, Ozen Banu; Ak, Kemal

    2007-09-01

    In this study, by using a recently developed test technique, the relationship between the total spermatozoa number penetrating determined sites of bovine cervical mucus in straws and potential fertility of bulls, and other spermatological characteristics were investigated. Furthermore, we aimed to determine the effect on the test results, of two different incubation temperatures (37 and 41 degrees C) and two sperm penetration distance ranges (PDRs). Frozen semen samples of six Holstein bulls were used in the study. The bulls were divided into two fertility groups (high and low fertility) according to the "non-return rates" (NRR). For the penetration test, cervical mucus was drawn into transparent plastic straws and incubated with semen at 37 and 41 degrees C for 15 min. After the incubation, straws were frozen in liquid nitrogen vapour and stored at -20 degrees C. On the evaluation day, concentrations of spermatozoa penetrated to the PDRs, each of which was 2.5 mm, between 32.5 and 35 mm (first penetration distance range, PDR1), and 50 and 52.5 mm (second penetration distance range, PDR2) distance in the straws from the open end, were measured. When compared with the low fertility group, bulls from the high fertility group showed a higher number of spermatozoa at the determined PDRs, and a significant positive correlation was found between the total number of spermatozoa at the penetration distances and the NRR scores of the bulls.

  14. Assessment of adhesion properties of novel probiotic strains to human intestinal mucus.

    Ouwehand, A C; Tuomola, E M; Tölkkö, S; Salminen, S

    2001-02-28

    Potential new probiotic strains Lactobacillus brevis PELI, L. reuteri ING1, L. rhamnosus VTT E-800 and L. rhamnosus LC-705 were assessed for their adhesion properties using the human intestinal mucus model. The effect on the adhesion of exposure to acid and pepsin and to milk were tested to simulate gastric and food processing conditions, and the effect of different growth media on adhesion was tested. The properties of the four strains were compared to the well-investigated probiotic L. rhamnosus strain GG. Three of the tested strains showed significant adhesion properties in the mucus model, while L. brevis PELI had intermediate adhesion and L. rhamnosus LC-705 adhered poorly. Pretreatment with different milks decreased the adhesion and low pH and pepsin treatment reduced the adhesion of all tested strains except L. rhamnosus LC-705. No competitive exclusion of pathogenic Salmonella typhimurium or Escherichia coli SfaII was observed. The results indicate that major differences exist between tested proposed probiotic strains. The growth media and the food matrix significantly affect the adhesive ability of the tested strains. This has previously not been taken into account when selecting novel probiotic strains.

  15. Epidemiological survey of mucus extravasation phenomenon at an oral pathology referral center during a 43 year period

    Thâmara Manoela Marinho Bezerra

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Mucoceles are common benign pseudocystic lesions of the oral cavity; their main etiological factors are trauma and ductal obstruction. Two histological patterns are found: mucus retention phenomenon (MRP and mucus extravasation phenomenon (MEP. Mucus extravasation phenomenon is the more common histological subtype and it mainly affects the lower lip. The knowledge of its main clinical features and management is important to assist health professionals in clinical practice. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine the relative frequency and distribution of oral mucoceles in an oral pathology reference center. METHODS: Cross-sectional historical study that analyzed all cases pathologically diagnosed as mucus extravasation phenomenon by the department of anatomic pathology of an oral pathology referral center from June of 1970 to May of 2014, considering the clinical characteristics of the lesion and those relating to the patient. SPSS v. 20.0 software for Windows was used for descriptive analysis. RESULTS: During 43 years, 719 cases of mucus extravasation phenomenon (54.7% men and 45.3% women were registered, with the lower lip as the most commonly affected site (n = 484; 67.3%. The average age of patients was 20.8 years (SD ± 14.4 with a peak occurrence in the second decade of life. Most professionals had oral mucocele/ranula (n = 606; 84.3% as the initial clinical impression. CONCLUSION: Mucus extravasation phenomenon is a lesion that primarily affects young patients, affecting mainly the lower lip, and is commonly found in oral diagnostic services.

  16. Kaempferol Inhibits Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Associated Mucus Hypersecretion in Airway Epithelial Cells And Ovalbumin-Sensitized Mice.

    Park, Sin-Hye; Gong, Ju-Hyun; Choi, Yean-Jung; Kang, Min-Kyung; Kim, Yun-Ho; Kang, Young-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Mucus hypersecretion is an important pathological feature of chronic airway diseases, such as asthma and pulmonary diseases. MUC5AC is a major component of the mucus matrix forming family of mucins in the airways. The initiation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mediated stress responses contributes to the pathogenesis of airway diseases. The present study investigated that ER stress was responsible for airway mucus production and this effect was blocked by the flavonoid kaempferol. Oral administration of ≥10 mg/kg kaempferol suppressed mucus secretion and goblet cell hyperplasia observed in the bronchial airway and lung of BALB/c mice sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA). TGF-β and tunicamycin promoted MUC5AC induction after 72 h in human bronchial airway epithelial BEAS-2B cells, which was dampened by 20 μM kaempferol. Kaempferol inhibited tunicamycin-induced ER stress of airway epithelial cells through disturbing the activation of the ER transmembrane sensor ATF6 and IRE1α. Additionally, this compound demoted the induction of ER chaperones such as GRP78 and HSP70 and the splicing of XBP-1 mRNA by tunicamycin. The in vivo study further revealed that kaempferol attenuated the induction of XBP-1 and IRE1α in epithelial tissues of OVA-challenged mice. TGF-β and tunicamycin induced TRAF2 with JNK activation and such induction was deterred by kaempferol. The inhibition of JNK activation encumbered the XBP-1 mRNA splicing and MUC5AC induction by tunicamycin and TGF-β. These results demonstrate that kaempferol alleviated asthmatic mucus hypersecretion through blocking bronchial epithelial ER stress via the inhibition of IRE1α-TRAF2-JNK activation. Therefore, kaempferol may be a potential therapeutic agent targeting mucus hypersecretion-associated pulmonary diseases.

  17. ANSYS-MATLAB co-simulation of mucus flow distribution and clearance effectiveness of a new simulated cough device.

    Ren, Shuai; Shi, Yan; Cai, Maolin; Zhao, Hongmei; Zhang, Zhaozhi; Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas

    2018-03-05

    Coughing is an irritable reaction that protects the respiratory system from infection and improves mucus clearance. However, for the patients who cannot cough autonomously, an assisted cough device is essential for mucus clearance. Considering the low efficiency of current assisted cough devices, a new simulated cough device based on the pneumatic system is proposed in this paper. Given the uncertainty of airflow rates necessary to clear mucus from airways, the computational fluid dynamics Eulerian wall film model and cough efficiency (CE) were used in this study to simulate the cough process and evaluate cough effectiveness. The Ansys-Matlab co-simulation model was set up and verified through experimental studies using Newtonian fluids. Next, model simulations were performed using non-Newtonian fluids, and peak cough flow (PCF) and PCF duration time were analyzed to determine their influence on mucus clearance. CE growth rate (λ) was calculated to reflect the CE variation trend. From the numerical simulation results, we find that CE rises as PCF increases while the growth rate trends to slow as PCF increases; when PCF changes from 60 to 360 L/min, CE changes from 3.2% to 51.5% which is approximately 16 times the initial value. Meanwhile, keeping a long PCF duration time could greatly improve CE under the same cough expired volume and PCF. The results indicated that increasing the PCF and PCF duration time can improve the efficiency of mucus clearance. This paper provides a new approach and a research direction for control strategy in simulated cough devices for airway mucus clearance. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. DEMO relevance of the test blanket modules in ITER-Application to the European test blanket modules

    Magnani, E.; Gabriel, F.; Boccaccini, L.V.; Li-Puma, A.

    2010-01-01

    Test blanket module (TBM) testing programme in ITER as a support to DEMO design is a very important step on the road map to commercial fusion reactors although it is an ambitious task. Finding as much as possible DEMO relevant tests in view of the future DEMO blanket design is therefore a major goal since ITER and DEMO environment and loading conditions are different. To clarify and quantify the meaning of the DEMO relevance, criteria using a structural, functional and behavioural representation of the breeding blanket acting as a system are investigated. Then, a three-step strategy is proposed to carry out TBM DEMO relevant tests associated with a TBM design modification strategy. Key parameters should intensively be used as target for TBM characterization and numerical code validation. When assessing the relevance, on the other hand, not only the actual difference between DEMO and ITER values should be considered, but also whether the analyzed phenomena have a threshold and a range of applicability, as numerical simulations are usually permitted within these limits. The proposed methodology is at the end applied to the design of the HCLL TBM breeding unit configuration.

  19. Positive Youth Development, Life Satisfaction and Problem Behaviors of Adolescents in Intact and Non-Intact Families in Hong Kong

    Daniel Tan Lei Shek

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated whether Chinese adolescents living in intact and non-intact families differed in their positive development, life satisfaction, and risk behavior. A total of 3,328 Secondary 1 students responded to measures of positive youth development (such as resilience and psychosocial competencies, life satisfaction, and risk behavior (substance abuse, delinquency, Internet addiction, consumption of pornographic materials, self-harm, and behavioral intention to engage in problem behavior. Findings revealed that adolescents growing up in intact families reported higher levels of positive developmental outcomes and life satisfaction as compared with adolescents from non-intact families. Adolescents in non-intact families also reported higher levels of risk behaviors than those growing up in intact families.

  20. Continuous fine pattern formation by screen-offset printing using a silicone blanket

    Nomura, Ken-ichi; Kusaka, Yasuyuki; Ushijima, Hirobumi; Nagase, Kazuro; Ikedo, Hiroaki; Mitsui, Ryosuke; Takahashi, Seiya; Nakajima, Shin-ichiro; Iwata, Shiro

    2014-09-01

    Screen-offset printing combines screen-printing on a silicone blanket with transference of the print from the blanket to a substrate. The blanket absorbs organic solvents in the ink, and therefore, the ink does not disperse through the material. This prevents blurring and allows fine patterns with widths of a few tens of micrometres to be produced. However, continuous printing deteriorates the pattern’s shape, which may be a result of decay in the absorption abilities of the blanket. Thus, we have developed a new technique for refreshing the blanket by substituting high-boiling-point solvents present on the blanket surface with low-boiling-point solvents. We analyse the efficacy of this technique, and demonstrate continuous fine pattern formation for 100 screen-offset printing processes.

  1. Continuous fine pattern formation by screen-offset printing using a silicone blanket

    Nomura, Ken-ichi; Kusaka, Yasuyuki; Ushijima, Hirobumi; Nagase, Kazuro; Ikedo, Hiroaki; Mitsui, Ryosuke; Takahashi, Seiya; Nakajima, Shin-ichiro; Iwata, Shiro

    2014-01-01

    Screen-offset printing combines screen-printing on a silicone blanket with transference of the print from the blanket to a substrate. The blanket absorbs organic solvents in the ink, and therefore, the ink does not disperse through the material. This prevents blurring and allows fine patterns with widths of a few tens of micrometres to be produced. However, continuous printing deteriorates the pattern’s shape, which may be a result of decay in the absorption abilities of the blanket. Thus, we have developed a new technique for refreshing the blanket by substituting high-boiling-point solvents present on the blanket surface with low-boiling-point solvents. We analyse the efficacy of this technique, and demonstrate continuous fine pattern formation for 100 screen-offset printing processes. (paper)

  2. Applications of the aqueous self-cooled blanket (ASCB) concept to the Next European Torus (NET)

    Embrechts, M.J.; Bogaerts, W.; Cardella, A.; Chazalon, M.; Danner, W.; Dinner, P.; Libin, B.

    1987-01-01

    The Aqueous Self-Cooled Blanket Concept (ASCB) leads to a low-technology blanket design that relies on just structural material and coolant with small amounts of lithium compound dissolved in the coolant to provide for tritium production. The application of the ASCB concept in NET is being considered as a driver blanket that would operate at low temperature and low pressure and provide a reliable environment for machine operation during the technology phase. Shielding and tritium production are the primary objectives for such a low-technology blanket. Net tritium breeding is not a design requirement per se for a driver blanket for NET. A DEMO relevant ASCB based blanket test module with (local) tritium self-sufficiency and energy recovery as primary objectives might also be tested in NET if future developments confirm their viability

  3. Composite beryllium-ceramics breeder pin elements for a gas cooled solid blanket

    Carre, F.; Chevreau, G.; Gervaise, F.; Proust, E.

    1986-06-01

    Helium coolant have main advantages compared to water for solid blankets. But limitations exist too and the development of attractive helium cooled blankets based on breeder pin assemblies has been essentially made possible by the derivation from recent CEA neutronic studies of an optimized composite beryllium/ceramics breeder arrangement. Description of the proposed toroidal blanket layout for Net is made together with the analysis of its main performance. Merits of the considered composite Be/ceramics breeder elements are discussed

  4. Design and safety analysis of the helium cooled solid breeder blanket for CFETR

    Wang, Shuai; Zhou, Guangming; Lv, Zhongliang; Jin, Cheng; Chen, Hongli [University of Science and Technology of China, Anhui (China). School of Nuclear Science and Technology

    2016-05-15

    This paper reports the design and safety analysis results of the helium cooled solid breeder blanket of the Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR). Materials selection and basic structure of the blanket have been presented. Performance analysis including neutronics analysis and thermo-mechanical analysis has shown good results. And the safety analysis of the blanket under Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) conditions has been described. Results showed the current design can deal well with the selected accident scenarios.

  5. Reducing beryllium content in mixed bed solid-type breeder blankets

    Shimwell, J., E-mail: mail@jshimwell.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Lilley, S.; Morgan, L.; Packer, L.; Kovari, M.; Zheng, S. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); McMillan, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The ratio of breeder ceramic to neutron multiplier of breeder blankets was varied linearly with depth. • Blankets with varying composition were found to perform better than uniform composition breeder blankets. • It was also possible to reduce the amount of beryllium required by the blanket. - Abstract: Beryllium (Be) is a precious resource with many high value uses, the low energy threshold (n,2n) reaction makes Be an excellent neutron multiplier for use in fusion breeder blankets. Estimates of Be requirements and available resources suggest that this could represent a major supply difficulty for solid-type blanket concepts. Reducing the quantity of Be required by breeder blankets would help to alleviate the problem to some extent. In addition, it is important that the reduction in the Be quantity does not diminish the blanket's performance in key aspects such as the tritium breeding ratio (TBR), energy multiplication and peak nuclear heating. Mixed pebble bed designs allow for the multiplier fraction to be varied throughout the blanket. This neutronics study used MCNP 6 to investigate linear variations of the multiplier fraction in relation to blanket depth, in order to better utilise the important multiplying Be(n,2n) and breeding reactions. Blankets with a uniform multiplier fraction showed little scope for reduction in Be mass. Blankets with varying multiplier fractions were able to simultaneously use 10% less Be, increase the energy amplification by 1%, reduce the peak heating by 7% and maintaining a sufficient TBR when compared to the performance achievable using a uniform composition.

  6. Structural design study of tritium breeding blanket with a lead layer as a neutron multiplier

    Iida, Hiromasa; Kitamura, Kazunori; Minato, Akio; Sakamoto, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Takashi

    1980-12-01

    Thermal and structural design study of a tritium breeding blanket with a lead layer for a International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR) is carried out. Tube in shell type blanket with a lead layer is found to be promising. The volume fraction of structural material in the lead layer can be small enough to keep the neutron multiplication effect of lead. Reasonable value of shell effect is attainable due to lead layer in the front part of the blanket. (author)

  7. Previous 60-Co radiation from Paratrygon aiereba mucus induces the production of highly responsive antibodies and a better immune response in mice

    Thomazi, Gabriela Ortega Coelho; Alves, Glaucie Jussilane; Turíbio, Thompson de Oliveira; Rocha, André Moreira; Aires, Raquel da Silva; Jácome, Larissa Barros Silvestre; Spencer, Patrick Jack, E-mail: gabiortegacoelho@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Biotecnologia; Costa, Andrea da; Rodrigues, Jaqueline Pollizeli; Galisteo Júnior, Andrés Jimenez; Andrade Júnior, Heitor Franco de, E-mail: hfandrad@usp.br, E-mail: raquelaires@itpacporto.com.br [Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil). Laboratório de Protozoologia; Seibert, Carla Simone, E-mail: seibertcs@uft.edu.br [Universidade Federal do Tocantins (UFT), Porto Nacional, TO (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Wounds from stinging freshwater stingrays are painful, difficult to heal and cause extensive necrosis and systemic phenomena. The treatment is symptomatic, of low efficiency and there is no therapy, which causes more suffering to the injured. This study aimed to evaluate the immune response induced by the native or irradiated by 60-Co gamma from Paratrygon aiereba mucus. IPEN’s Committee on Ethics in the Use of Animals (n.º126/2013) and lanes captured under license from the Chico Mendes Institute for Biodiversity Conservation (n.º6781-1/2014) approved this research. For the assays, sera from Swiss mice previously immunized against native or irradiated mucus were used. The proliferation of splenic B cells in response to mucus was evaluated by the In Vitro Induced Antibody Production method and serum and splenic cytokines were also quantified. Our data demonstrate that the irradiated mucus of P. aiereba induces greater production of antibodies and more immunological memory in the mice. Spleen cells from animals immunized against irradiated mucus produced IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-10, and serum TNF-α (immunized group against irradiated mucus) and IL-6 and IL-17 (immunized group against native mucus). The results corroborate the use of ionizing radiation, with production of highly responsive antibodies and better immune response, besides proving that Paratrygon aiereba mucus is capable of stimulating cellular and humoral adaptive immune response, contributing to the continuity of associated investigations. (author)

  8. Role of endosymbiotic zooxanthellae and coral mucus in the adhesion of the coral-bleaching pathogen Vibrio shiloi to its host.

    Banin, E; Israely, T; Fine, M; Loya, Y; Rosenberg, E

    2001-05-15

    Vibrio shiloi, the causative agent of bleaching the coral Oculina patagonica in the Mediterranean Sea, adheres to its coral host by a beta-D-galactopyranoside-containing receptor on the coral surface. The receptor is present in the coral mucus, since V. shiloi adhered avidly to mucus-coated ELISA plates. Adhesion was inhibited by methyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside. Removal of the mucus from O. patagonica resulted in a delay in adhesion of V. shiloi to the coral, corresponding to regeneration of the mucus. DCMU inhibited the recovery of adhesion of the bacteria to the mucus-depleted corals, indicating that active photosynthesis by the endosymbiotic zooxanthellae was necessary for the synthesis or secretion of the receptor. Further evidence of the role of the zooxanthellae in producing the receptor came from a study of adhesion of V. shiloi to different species of corals. The bacteria failed to adhere to bleached corals and white (azooxanthellate) O. patagonica cave corals, both of which lacked the algae. In addition, V. shiloi adhered to two Mediterranean corals (Madracis and Cladocora) that contained zooxanthellae and did not adhere to two azooxanthellate Mediterranean corals (Phyllangia and Polycyathus). V. shiloi demonstrated positive chemotaxis towards the mucus of O. patagonica. The data demonstrate that endosymbiotic zooxanthellae contribute to the production of coral mucus and that V. shiloi infects only mucus-containing, zooxanthellate corals.

  9. Mucus interactions with liposomes encapsulating bioactives: Interfacial tensiometry and cellular uptake on Caco-2 and cocultures of Caco-2/HT29-MTX.

    Li, Yang; Arranz, Elena; Guri, Anilda; Corredig, Milena

    2017-02-01

    Structuring of delivery matrices in foods aquires careful designing for optimal delivery and subsiquent absorption of the beneficial compounds in the gut. There has been quite improvement in mimicking digestion and absorption in vitro but as of yet little is understood on mucus interference in nutrient absorption Therefore in this study interactions of human intestinal mucus with milk and soy phospholipids liposomes carring hydrophilic (epigallocatechin-3-gallate) or hydrophobic (β-carotene) bioactive molecules were investigated. Liposomes of about 100nm were obtained using microfluidization and their behaviour with the human intestinal mucus were evaluated using drop shape tensiometry. The chemistry of the liposomes (milk or soy) and the encapsulated bioactive structure can affect the viscoelastic behaviour of the complex itself. Empty or loaded liposomes were differently interacting with the mucus at the interface. Mucus-liposomes interactions were also studied using cell cultures, Caco-2 (without mucus) and cocultures Caco-2/HT29-MTX (mucus producing). The interaction of mucus layer with liposomes was at some extent aligned with rheological studies. This work demonstrated that delivery systems may interact with the mucosal surface of intestinal cells, and in vitro approaches allow for screening of such interactions. These highlights could help us in carefully designing the delivery systems and moreover choosing the right carrier and/or bioactive that does not jeopardize the optimal delivery of the bioactive structure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mucin dispersions as a model for the oromucosal mucus layer in in vitro and ex vivo buccal permeability studies of small molecules

    Marxen, Eva; Mosgaard, Mette Dalskov; Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge

    2017-01-01

    The mucus layer is believed to play a part in drug permeation across the oral mucosa. Human freeze-dried saliva (HFDS) and porcine gastric mucin (PGM) was evaluated as model for mucus layer per se or in conjunction with in vitro and ex vivo buccal permeability models. Four small molecules (nicoti...

  11. Effect of fish skin mucus on the soluble proteome of Vibrio salmonicida analysed by 2-D gel electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry.

    Raeder, Inger Lin Uttakleiv; Paulsen, Steinar M; Smalås, Arne O; Willassen, Nils Peder

    2007-01-01

    Vibrio salmonicida is the causative agent of cold-water vibriosis in farmed marine fish species. Adherence of pathogenic bacteria to mucosal surfaces is considered to be the first steps in the infective processes, and proteins involved are regarded as virulence factors. The global protein expression profile of V. salmonicida, grown with and without the presence of fish skin mucus in the synthetic media, was compared. Increased levels of proteins involved in motility, oxidative stress responses, and general stress responses were demonstrated as an effect of growth in the presence of mucus compared to non-mucus containing media. Enhanced levels of the flagellar proteins FlaC, FlaD and FlaE indicate increased motility capacity, while enhanced levels of the heat shock protein DnaK and the chaperonin GroEL indicate a general stress response. In addition, we observed that peroxidases, TPx.Grx and AhpC, involved in the oxidative stress responses, were induced by mucus proteins. The addition of mucus to the culture medium did not significantly alter the growth rate of V. salmonicida. An analysis of mucus proteins suggests that the mucus layer harbours a protein species that potentially possesses catalytic activity against DNA, and a protein with iron chelating activity. This study represents the first V. salmonicida proteomic analysis, and provides specific insight into the proteins necessary for the bacteria to challenge the skin mucus barrier of the fish.

  12. Previous 60-Co radiation from Paratrygon aiereba mucus induces the production of highly responsive antibodies and a better immune response in mice

    Thomazi, Gabriela Ortega Coelho; Alves, Glaucie Jussilane; Turíbio, Thompson de Oliveira; Rocha, André Moreira; Aires, Raquel da Silva; Jácome, Larissa Barros Silvestre; Spencer, Patrick Jack

    2017-01-01

    Wounds from stinging freshwater stingrays are painful, difficult to heal and cause extensive necrosis and systemic phenomena. The treatment is symptomatic, of low efficiency and there is no therapy, which causes more suffering to the injured. This study aimed to evaluate the immune response induced by the native or irradiated by 60-Co gamma from Paratrygon aiereba mucus. IPEN’s Committee on Ethics in the Use of Animals (n.º126/2013) and lanes captured under license from the Chico Mendes Institute for Biodiversity Conservation (n.º6781-1/2014) approved this research. For the assays, sera from Swiss mice previously immunized against native or irradiated mucus were used. The proliferation of splenic B cells in response to mucus was evaluated by the In Vitro Induced Antibody Production method and serum and splenic cytokines were also quantified. Our data demonstrate that the irradiated mucus of P. aiereba induces greater production of antibodies and more immunological memory in the mice. Spleen cells from animals immunized against irradiated mucus produced IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-10, and serum TNF-α (immunized group against irradiated mucus) and IL-6 and IL-17 (immunized group against native mucus). The results corroborate the use of ionizing radiation, with production of highly responsive antibodies and better immune response, besides proving that Paratrygon aiereba mucus is capable of stimulating cellular and humoral adaptive immune response, contributing to the continuity of associated investigations. (author)

  13. Preliminary conceptual design of the blanket and power conversion system for the Mirror Hybrid Reactor

    Schultz, K.R.; Culver, D.W.; Rao, S.B.; Rao, S.R.

    1978-01-01

    A conceptual design of a commercial Mirror Hybrid Reactor, optimized for 239 Pu production, has been completed. This design is the product of a joint effort by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and General Atomic Company, and follows directly from earlier work on the Mirror Hybrid. This paper describes the blanket and power conversion system of the reactor design. Included are descriptions of the prestressed concrete reactor vessel that supports the magnets and contains the blanket and power conversion system components, the blanket module design, the blanket fuel design, and the power conversion system

  14. A Feasible DEMO Blanket Concept Based on Water Cooled Solid Breeder

    Someya, Y.; Tobita, K.; Utoh, H.; Hoshino, K.; Asakura, N.; Nakamura, M.; Tanigawa, H.; Mikio, E.; Tanigawa, H.; Nakamichi, M.; Hoshino, T., E-mail: someya.yoji@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: JAEA has conducted the conceptual design study of blanket for a fusion DEMO reactor SlimCS. Considering DEMO specific requirements, we place emphasis on a blanket concept with durability to severe irradiation, ease of fabrication for mass production, operation temperature of blanket materials, and maintainability using remote handling equipment. This paper present a promising concept satisfying these requirements, which is characterized by minimized welding lines near the front, a simplified blanket interior consisting of cooling tubes and a mixed pebble bed of breeder and neutron multiplier, and approximately the same outlet temperature for all blanket modules. Neutronics calculation indicated that the blanket satisfies a self-sufficient production of tritium. An important finding is that little decrease is seen in tritium breeding ratio even when the gap between neighboring blanket modules is as wide as 0.03 m. This means that blanket modules can be arranged with such a significant clearance gap without sacrifice of tritium production, which will facilitate the access of remote handling equipment for replacement of the blanket modules and improve the access of diagnostics. (author)

  15. Structural effects on fusion reactor blankets due to liquid metals in magnetic fields

    Lehner, J.R.; Reich, M.; Powell, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    The transient stress distribution caused in the blanket structure when the plasma current suddenly switches off in a time short compared to the L/R decay time of the liquid metal blanket was studied. Poloidal field of the plasma will induce a current to flow in the liquid metal and blanket walls. Since the resistance of the liquid lithium will be much less than that of the metal walls, the current can be considered as flowing around the blanket near the cross section perimeter, but in the lithium

  16. Conceptual study on high performance blanket in a spherical tokamak fusion-driven transmuter

    Chen Yixue; Wu Yican

    2000-01-01

    A preliminary conceptual design on high performance dual-cooled blanket of fusion-driven transmuter is presented based on neutronic calculation. The dual-cooled system has some attractive advantages when utilized in transmutation of HLW (High Level Wastes). The calculation results show that this kind of blanket could safely transmute about 6 ton minor actinides (produced by 170 GW(e) Year PWRs approximately) and 0.4 ton fission products per year, and output 12 GW thermal power. In addition, the variation of power and critical factor of this blanket is relatively little during its 1-year operation period. This blanket is also tritium self-sustainable

  17. Design and fabrication methods of FW/blanket and vessel for ITER-FEAT

    Ioki, K. E-mail: iokik@itereu.de; Barabash, V.; Cardella, A.; Elio, F.; Kalinin, G.; Miki, N.; Onozuka, M.; Osaki, T.; Rozov, V.; Sannazzaro, G.; Utin, Y.; Yamada, M.; Yoshimura, H

    2001-11-01

    Design has progressed on the vacuum vessel and FW/blanket for ITER-FEAT. The basic functions and structures are the same as for the 1998 ITER design. Detailed blanket module designs of the radially cooled shield block with flat separable FW panels have been developed. The ITER blanket R and D program covers different materials and fabrication methods in order make a final selection based on the results. Separate manifolds have been designed and analysed for the blanket cooling. The vessel design with flexible support housings has been improved to minimise the number of continuous poloidal ribs. Most of the R and D performed so far during EDA are still applicable.

  18. Design and fabrication methods of FW/blanket and vessel for ITER-FEAT

    Ioki, K.; Barabash, V.; Cardella, A.; Elio, F.; Kalinin, G.; Miki, N.; Onozuka, M.; Osaki, T.; Rozov, V.; Sannazzaro, G.; Utin, Y.; Yamada, M.; Yoshimura, H.

    2001-01-01

    Design has progressed on the vacuum vessel and FW/blanket for ITER-FEAT. The basic functions and structures are the same as for the 1998 ITER design. Detailed blanket module designs of the radially cooled shield block with flat separable FW panels have been developed. The ITER blanket R and D program covers different materials and fabrication methods in order make a final selection based on the results. Separate manifolds have been designed and analysed for the blanket cooling. The vessel design with flexible support housings has been improved to minimise the number of continuous poloidal ribs. Most of the R and D performed so far during EDA are still applicable

  19. Breeding blanket design for ITER and prototype (DEMO) fusion reactors and breeding materials issues

    Takatsu, H; Enoeda, M [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Current status of the designs of the ITER breeding blanket and DEMO blankets is introduced placing emphasis on the breeding materials selection and related issues. The former design is based on the up-to-date design activities, as of October 1997, being performed jointly by Joint Central Team (JCT) and Home Teams (HT`s), while the latter is based on the DEMO blanket test module designs being proposed by each Party at the TBWG (Test Blanket Working Group) meetings. (J.P.N.)

  20. Conceptual design and analysis of the helium cooled solid breeder blanket for CFETR

    Chen, Hongli, E-mail: hlchen1@ustc.edu.cn; Li, Min; Lv, Zhongliang; Zhou, Guangming; Liu, Qianwen; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Xiaoliang; Zheng, Jie; Ye, Minyou

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A helium cooled solid blanket was proposed as a candidate blanket concept for CFETR. • Material selection, basic structure and gas flow scheme of the blanket were introduced. • A series of performance analyses for the blanket were summarized. - Abstract: To bridge the gap between ITER and DEMO and to realize the fusion energy in China, a fusion device Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) was proposed and is being designed mainly to demonstrate 50–200 MW fusion power, 30–50% duty time factor, tritium self-sustained. Because of the high demand of tritium production and the realistic engineering consideration, the design of tritium breeding blanket for CFETR is a challenging work and getting special attention. As a blanket candidate, a helium cooled solid breeder blanket has been designed with the emphasis on conservative design and realistic blanket technology. This paper introduces the basic blanket scheme, including the material selection, structural design, cooling scheme and purge gas flow path. In addition, some results of neutronics, thermal-hydraulic and stress analysis are presented.

  1. Calculations of tritium breeding ratio and inventory distributions of FEB blanket

    Deng Baiquan

    2001-01-01

    Based on the design features of FEB reactor blanket, the tritium breeding ratio and tritium concentrations in liquid lithium of each breeding zone have been calculated after 10 days full power operation for outboard blanket and one day operation for inboard blanket. The comparisons with the results calculated by Monte-Carlo code MORSE-CGT are made. Meanwhile the inventory in beryllium multiplier after one-year full power operation has also been estimated. An important conclusion has been drew the thermal hydraulic design should be careful to guarantee the blanket temperature should not rise as high as 680 degree C

  2. Isolation of intact elastin fibers devoid of microfibrils.

    Daamen, W.F.; Hafmans, T.G.M.; Veerkamp, J.H.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van

    2005-01-01

    Purification protocols for elastin generally result in greatly damaged elastin fibers and this likely influences the biological response. We here describe a novel protocol for the isolation of elastin whereby the fibers stay intact, and introduce the term "elastin fiber" for intact elastic fibers

  3. 50 CFR 622.38 - Landing fish intact.

    2010-10-01

    ... that is operating under the respective trip limits. Such cut-off fish also may be sold. A maximum of... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Landing fish intact. 622.38 Section 622.38... Landing fish intact. The operator of a vessel that fishes in the EEZ is responsible for ensuring that fish...

  4. Pebble bed blanket design for deuterium burning tandem mirror reactors

    Grotz, S.P.; Dhir, V.K.

    1983-01-01

    The UCLA tandem mirror reactor, SATYR, was developed around the capability of tandem mirrors with thermal barriers to burn deuterium at reasonable efficiency levels. The pebble bed concept has been incorporated into our blanket design for the following reasons: 1) Large area-to-volume ratio for purposes of heat removal; 2) Large volume of structure for high thermal capacity thus increasing the safety margin during off-normal incidents; 3) Relatively inexpensive manufacturing costs because of large acceptable tolerances and lack of exotic materials (i.e., lithium). A simplified stress analysis of the blanket module was performed to optimize and simplify the design. The pre-specified stress intensity limitations used were based upon a 30-year predicted lifetime for each module. Along with stress analysis of the vessel a detailed thermal hydraulic analysis of the pebble bed has been completed. Parameters affecting the pebble bed design are fluidization velocity, pressure drop, heat transfer coefficient, thermally induced stress in the spheres and spatial variation of the power density. Although reasonable gross thermal efficiencies of the 2 designs has been achieved (28% for H 2 O and 39% for He) the high net recirculating power fraction for heating and neutral beams results in relatively low net plant efficiencies (21% and 27%). The results show that a blanket can be designed with good thermal efficiency and a relative-ly simple configuration. However, application of this concept to the high Q deuterium-tritium fuel cycle would have difficulties resulting from the need for continuous removal of the tritium. (orig./HP)

  5. Tritium inventory and permeation in the ITER breeding blanket

    Violante, V.; Tosti, S.; Sibilia, C.; Felli, F.; Casadio, S.; Alvani, C.

    2000-01-01

    A model has allowed us to perform the analysis of the tritium inventory and permeation in the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) breeding blanket under the hypothesis of steady state conditions. Li 2 ZrO 3 (reference) and Li 2 TiO 3 (alternative) have been studied as breeding materials. The total breeder inventory assessed is 7.64 g for the Li 2 ZrO 3 at reference temperature. The model has also been used for a parametric analysis of the tritium permeation. At reference temperature and purge helium velocity of 0.01 m/s, the HT partial pressure is ranging from 10 to 30 Pa in the breeder and 1.5x10 -3 Pa in the beryllium. At 0.1 m/s of purge helium velocity, the HT partial pressure is reduced of one order by magnitude in the breeder and becomes 5x10 -5 Pa in the beryllium. The tritium permeation into the coolant for the whole blanket is ranging from 100 to 250 mCi per day for purge helium velocity of 0.01 m/s. The analysis of the tritium inventory and permeation for the alternative Li 2 TiO 3 breeding material has been carried out too. The tritium inventory in the breeder is in the range from 6 to 375 g larger than in Li 2 ZrO 3 by about a factor 5; the tritium permeation into coolant is comparable to the Li 2 ZrO 3 one. This analysis provides indications on the influence of the operating parameters on the tritium control in the ITER breeding blanket; particularly the control of the tritium inventory by the temperature and the tritium permeation by the purge gas velocity

  6. The current status of fusion reactor blanket thermodynamics

    Veleckis, E.; Yonco, R.M.; Maroni, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    The available thermodynamic information is reviewed for three categories of materials that meet essential criteria for use as breeding blankets in D-T fuelled fusion reactors: liquid lithium, solid lithium alloys, and lithium-containing ceramics. The leading candidate, liquid lithium, which also has potential for use as a coolant, has been studied more extensively than have the solid alloys or ceramics. Recent studies of liquid lithium have concentrated on its sorption characteristics for hydrogen isotopes and its interaction with common impurity elements. Hydrogen isotope sorption data (P-C-T relations, activity coefficients, Sieverts' constants, plateau pressures, isotope effects, free energies of formation, phase boundaries, etc.) are presented in a tabular form that can be conveniently used to extract thermodynamic information for the α-phases of the Li-LiH, Li-LiD and Li-LiT systems and to construct complete phase diagrams. Recent solubility data for Li 3 N, Li 2 O, and Li 2 C 2 in liquid lithium are discussed with emphasis on the prospects for removing these species by cold-trapping methods. Current studies on the sorption of hydrogen in solid lithium alloys (e.g. Li-Al and Li-Pb), made using a new technique (the hydrogen titration method), have shown that these alloys should lead to smaller blanket-tritium inventories than are attainable with liquid lithium and that the P-C-T relationships for hydrogen in Li-M alloys can be estimated from lithium activity data for these alloys. There is essentially no refined thermodynamic information on the prospective ceramic blanket materials. The kinetics of tritium release from these materials is briefly discussed. Research areas are pointed out where additional thermodynamic information is needed for all three material categories. (author)

  7. Detailed 3-D nuclear analysis of ITER outboard blanket modules

    Bohm, Tim; Davis, Andrew; Sawan, Mohamed; Marriott, Edward; Wilson, Paul; Ulrickson, Michael; Bullock, James

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Nuclear analysis was performed on detailed CAD models placed in a 40 degree model of ITER. • The regions examined include BM09, the upper ELM coil region (BM11–13), the neutral beam (NB) region (BM13–16), and BM18. • The results show that VV nuclear heating exceeds limits in the NB and upper ELM coil regions. • The results also show that the level of He production in parts of BM18 exceeds limits. • These calculations are being used to modify the design of the ITER blanket modules. - Abstract: In the ITER design, the blanket modules (BM) provide thermal and nuclear shielding for the vacuum vessel (VV), magnets, and other components. We used the CAD based DAG-MCNP5 transport code to analyze detailed models inserted into a 40 degree partially homogenized ITER global model. The regions analyzed include BM09, BM16 near the heating neutral beam injection (HNB) region, BM11–13 near the upper ELM coil region, and BM18. For the BM16 HNB region, the VV nuclear heating behind the NB region exceeds the design limit by up to 80%. For the BM11–13 region, the nuclear heating of the VV exceeds the design limit by up to 45%. For BM18, the results show that He production does not meet the limit necessary for re-welding. The results presented in this work are being used by the ITER Organization Blanket and Tokamak Integration groups to modify the BM design in the cases where limits are exceeded.

  8. Detailed 3-D nuclear analysis of ITER outboard blanket modules

    Bohm, Tim, E-mail: tdbohm@wisc.edu [Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Davis, Andrew; Sawan, Mohamed; Marriott, Edward; Wilson, Paul [Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Ulrickson, Michael; Bullock, James [Formerly, Fusion Technology, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Nuclear analysis was performed on detailed CAD models placed in a 40 degree model of ITER. • The regions examined include BM09, the upper ELM coil region (BM11–13), the neutral beam (NB) region (BM13–16), and BM18. • The results show that VV nuclear heating exceeds limits in the NB and upper ELM coil regions. • The results also show that the level of He production in parts of BM18 exceeds limits. • These calculations are being used to modify the design of the ITER blanket modules. - Abstract: In the ITER design, the blanket modules (BM) provide thermal and nuclear shielding for the vacuum vessel (VV), magnets, and other components. We used the CAD based DAG-MCNP5 transport code to analyze detailed models inserted into a 40 degree partially homogenized ITER global model. The regions analyzed include BM09, BM16 near the heating neutral beam injection (HNB) region, BM11–13 near the upper ELM coil region, and BM18. For the BM16 HNB region, the VV nuclear heating behind the NB region exceeds the design limit by up to 80%. For the BM11–13 region, the nuclear heating of the VV exceeds the design limit by up to 45%. For BM18, the results show that He production does not meet the limit necessary for re-welding. The results presented in this work are being used by the ITER Organization Blanket and Tokamak Integration groups to modify the BM design in the cases where limits are exceeded.

  9. Serum steroid levels in intact and endocrine ablated BALB/c nude mice and their intact littermates

    Brünner, N; Svenstrup, B; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1986-01-01

    An investigation was made of the serum steroid levels found in intact and endocrine ablated nude mice of both sexes and in their intact homozygous littermates. The results showed that nude mice have a normal steroidogenesis, but with decreased levels of circulating steroids compared to those...

  10. Modeling and experiments on tritium permeation in fusion reactor blankets

    Holland, D. F.; Longhurst, G. R.

    The determination of tritium loss from helium-cooled fusion breeding blankets are discussed. The issues are: (1) applicability of present models to permeation at low tritium pressures; (2) effectiveness of oxide layers in reducing permeation; (3) effectiveness of hydrogen addition as a means to lower tritium permeation; and (4) effectiveness of conversion to tritiated water and subsequent trapping to reduce permeation. Theoretical models applicable to these issues are discussed, and results of experiments in two areas are presented; permeation of mixtures of hydrogen isotopes and conversion to tritiated water.

  11. Modeling and experiments on tritium permeation in fusion reactor blankets

    Holland, D.F.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1985-01-01

    Issues are discussed that are critical in determining tritium loss from helium-cooled fusion breeding blankets. These issues are: (a) applicability of present models to permeation at low tritium pressures, (b) effectiveness of oxide layers in reducing permeation, (c) effectiveness of hydrogen addition as a means to lower tritium permeation, and (d) effectiveness of conversion to tritiated water and subsequent trapping as a means to reduce permeation. The paper discusses theoretical models applicable to these issues, and presents results of experiments in two areas: permeation of mixtures of hydrogen isotopes and conversion to tritiated water

  12. First wall fusion blanket temperature variation - slab geometry

    Fillo, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    The first wall of a fusion blanket is approximated by a slab, with the surface facing the plasma subjected to an applied heat flux, while the rear surface is convectively cooled. The relevant parameters affecting the heat transfer during the early phases of heating as well as for large times are established. Analytical solutions for the temperature variation with time and space are derived. Numerical calculations for an aluminum and stainless steel slab are performed for a wall loading of 1 MW(th)/m 2 . Both helium and water cooling are considered. (Auth.)

  13. Accelerator-driven molten-salt blankets: Physics issues

    Houts, M.G.; Beard, C.A.; Buksa, J.J.; Davidson, J.W.; Durkee, J.W.; Perry, R.T.; Poston, D.I.

    1994-01-01

    A number of nuclear physics issues concerning the Los Alamos molten-salt, accelerator-driven plutonium converter are discussed. General descriptions of several concepts using internal and external, moderation are presented. Burnup and salt processing requirement calculations are presented for four concepts, indicating that both the high power density externally moderated concept and an internally moderated concept achieve total plutonium burnups approaching 90% at salt processing rates of less than 2 m 3 per year. Beginning-of-life reactivity temperature coefficients and system kinetic response are also discussed. Future research should investigate the effect of changing blanket composition on operational and safety characteristics

  14. Thermalhydraulics of flowing particle-bed-type fusion reactor blankets

    Nietert, R.E.; Abdelk-Khalik, S.I.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted to determine the heat transfer characteristics of gravity-flowing particle beds using a special heat transfer loop. Glass microspheres were allowed to flow by gravity at controlled rates through an electrically heated stainless steel tubular test section. Values of the local and average convective heat transfer coefficient as a function of the average bed velocity, particle size and heat flux were determined. Such information is necessary for the design of gravity-flowing particle-bed type fusion reactor-blankets and associated tritium recovery systems. (orig.)

  15. Reddening and blanketing of RR-Lyrae stars, ch. 3

    Lub, J.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of metal line blanketing and interstellar reddening upon the colours of the RR-Lyrae Stars are discussed. Due to the faintness of these stars in the ultraviolet W channel (at lambda 3720 A) the photometry is in most cases reduced to a four-colour VBLU photometry, i.e. there are only three colour indices available for the determination of the four quantities: interstellar reddening, effective temperature, atmospheric pressure (or effective gravity), and metal line strength which determine the energy distribution that was measured

  16. Accelerator-driven molten-salt blankets: Physics issues

    Houts, M.G.; Beard, C.A.; Buksa, J.J.; Davidson, J.W.; Durkee, J.W.; Perry, R.T.; Poston, D.I.

    1994-01-01

    A number of nuclear physics issues concerning the Los Alamos molten-salt accelerator-driven plutonium converter are discussed. General descriptions of several concepts using internal and external moderation are presented. Burnup and salt processing requirement calculations are presented for four concepts, indicating that both the high power density externally moderated concept and an internally moderated concept achieve total plutonium burnups approaching 90% at salt processing rates of less than 2 m 3 per year. Beginning-of-life reactivity temperature coefficients and system kinetic response are also discussed. Future research should investigate the effect of changing blanket composition on operational and safety characteristics

  17. Conception of divertorless tokamak reactor with turbulent plasma blanket

    Nedospasov, A.V.; Tokar, M.Z.

    1980-01-01

    The results of the calculations presented here demonstrate that, with technically reasonable degree of the magnetic field stochastisation, the turbulent plasma blanket can take the place of a divertor. It performs the three main functions of the divertor: (a) the exhaust of the helium and unburned fuel; (b) weakening of the fast particle flux to the wall surface; and (c) essential reduction of the impurity content in the active zone of the reactor. Taking into account that plasma flows to the first wall along field lines, we may figuratively say that the first wall plays the role of a divertor in our conception. (orig.)

  18. Tritium Management In HCLL-PPCS Model AB Blanket

    Ricapito, I.; Aiello, A.; Benamati, G.; Utili, M.; Ciampichetti, A.; Zucchetti, M.

    2006-01-01

    One the main issues in the HCLL blanket development for a prototype fusion reactor is the technical feasibility of the bred tritium processing system. The basis of such concern lies in the very low tritium-Pb17Li Sieverts' constant, as measured by different scientists in the past years. In the PPCS reactor 650 g/d of tritium must be generated in the breeding blanket while less than 1 g/y of tritium has to be released to the environment through the secondary cooling circuit. As a consequence, CPS (Coolant Purification System) plays a fundamental role because it has to keep at an acceptable level the tritium partial pressure in the primary HCS (Helium Cooling Circuit) limiting, therefore, the tritium environmental release through leakage and permeation into the secondary cooling circuit. On the other hand, the He mass flow-rate to be processed by CPS is linear with the tritium permeation rate from the breeder into HCS. Therefore, with the above mentioned low Sieverts' constant values and the consequent high tritium partial pressure in the liquid metal, the possibility to keep acceptable the CPS capacity depends on a highly efficient and stable performance of tritium permeation barriers, to be applied not only on the blanket cooling plates but also on the steam generator walls. However, the experimental results on the tritium permeation barriers under relevant operative conditions were so far quite disappointing. The new data on the Sieverts' constant achieved at ENEA CR Brasimone, one order of magnitude higher than those founding the past, have a big impact in relaxing the above mentioned requirements for the tritium management in PPCS model AB reactor. Besides presenting and discussing these recent experimental results, an updated assessment of the tritium permeation rate from the liquid breeder into HCS through the cooling plates and from HCS into the environment through the steam generators is given in this paper. The consequent new constraints in terms of tritium

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic research in fusion blanket engineering and metallurgical processing

    Tokuhiro, A.

    1991-11-01

    A review of recent research activities in liquid metal magnetohydrodynamics (LM-MHDs) is presented in this article. Two major reserach areas are discussed. The first topic involves the thermomechanical design issues in a proposed tokamak fusion reactor. The primary concerns are in the magneto-thermal-hydraulic performance of a self-cooled liquid metal blanket. The second topic involves the application of MHD in material processing in the metallurgical and semiconductor industries. The two representative applications are electromagnetic stirring (EMS) of continuously cast steel and the Czochralski (CZ) method of crystal growth in the presence of a magnetic field. (author) 24 figs., 10 tabs., 136 refs

  20. Thermal and mechanical design of WITAMIR-I blanket

    Sze, D.K.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.

    1980-10-01

    The design philosophy of WITAMIR-I, a Wisconsin Tandem Mirror Reactor design study, uses the experience obtained from our previous tokamak studies and combines it with the unique features of the tandem mirror to obtain an attractive design of a TM power reactor. It is aimed at maximizing the strengths of the tandem mirror while mitigating its weaknesses. The end product should be a safe, reliable, maintainable and a relatively economic power reactor. The general description of the reactor, the plasma calculations, the magnet design, the neutronic calculations and the maintenance considerations are presented elsewhere. This paper presents the blanket design of this reactor study