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Sample records for insulin infusion influences

  1. Insulin appearance of subcutaneously infused insulin: influence of the basal rate pulse interval of the infusion pump.

    Birch, K; Hildebrandt, P; Jensen, B M; Kühl, C; Brange, J

    1985-05-01

    To compare the metabolic control and the pharmacokinetics of infused insulin using an insulin pump (Auto-Syringe AS 6C) which provides the basal rate in pulses every 2-10 min with a pump (Medix Syringe Driver 209) providing the basal rate in pulses every 15-60 min, 6 C-peptide negative diabetic patients received, in random order, identical, but individual, insulin treatment during one 4-day period using the Auto-Syringe pump and another 4-day period using the Medix pump. On the fourth day of each period, blood glucose and plasma-free insulin were estimated every 30 min for 7 hr and every 5 min for the next hour. Plasma-free insulin was significantly higher on 3 time points out of the 26 possible when using the Medix pump, but this was not reflected in the blood glucose concentrations which were similar in the 2 periods. The results indicate that, from a metabolic and pharmacokinetic point of view, insulin pumps working with larger intervals between the basal rate pulses are just as good as the more technically advanced and hence often more expensive pumps which provide the basal rate in more and smaller pulses.

  2. Absorption of subcutaneously infused insulin: influence of the basal rate pulse interval.

    Hildebrandt, P; Birch, K; Jensen, B M; Kühl, C; Brange, J

    1985-01-01

    Eight insulin-dependent diabetic patients were given two constant infusions (each 1 IU/h) of 125I-labeled insulin into the abdominal subcutaneous tissue for about 12 h. Insulin was infused in pulses into one side of the abdomen in 6-min intervals (by means of an Auto-Syringe pump) and in the other side of the abdomen, insulin was infused in 1-h intervals (by means of a Medix pump). The size of the subcutaneous depots was continuously measured by counting the radioactivity at the infusion sites. After starting the infusions, the two depots were built up to steady-state levels at the same time and of the same size (approximately 3 IU) and with similar absorption rates. Thus, during basal rate insulin infusion, identical insulin absorption kinetics was achieved, irrespective of a 10-fold difference in the pulse rate.

  3. Differential effects of insulin injections and insulin infusions on levels ...

    Studies have shown that while injections of insulin cause an increase in fat mass, infusions of insulin increase fat mass. The aim of this paper was to test the hypothesis that if an increase in glycogen is an indicator of an impending increase in adipose mass, then insulin infusions should not increase glycogen, while insulin ...

  4. Subcutaneous insulin infusion: change in basal infusion rate has no immediate effect on insulin absorption rate

    Hildebrandt, P.; Birch, K.; Jensen, B.M.; Kuehl, C.

    1986-01-01

    Eight insulin-dependent diabetic patients were simultaneously given subcutaneous infusions (1.12 IU/h each) of 125 I-labeled Actrapid insulin in each side of the abdominal wall. After 24 h of infusion, the size of the infused insulin depots was measured by external counting for 5 h. The basal infusion rate was then doubled in one side and halved in the other for the next 4 h. Finally, 1.12 IU/h of insulin was given in both sides of the abdominal wall for an additional 3 h. The changes in the size of the depots were measured, and the absorption rates for each hour were calculated. During the first 5 h of infusion, the depot size was almost constant (approximately 5 IU) with an absorption rate that equaled the infusion rate. Doubling the infusion rate led to a significant increase in depot size, but the absorption rate remained unchanged for the first 3 h, and only thereafter was a significant increase seen. When the infusion rate was reduced to the initial 1.12 IU/h, the absorption rate remained elevated during the next 3 h. Correspondingly, when the infusion rate was decreased, the depot size also decreased, but the absorption rate remained unchanged for the first 3 h. The results show that a change in the basal insulin infusion rate does not lead to any immediate change in the insulin absorption rate. This should be considered when planning an insulin-infusion program that includes alteration(s) in the basal-rate setting

  5. Determination of 24-hour insulin infusion pattern by an artificial endocrine pancreas for intravenous insulin infusion with a miniature pump

    Kølendorf, K; Christiansen, J S; Bojsen, J

    1981-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Intravenous insulin infusion with a glucose controlled insulin infusion system (GCIIS) is known to restore glucose homeostasis. A simpler approach to improve blood glucose regulation is preprogrammed intravenous insulin infusion with portable pumps without sensor-mediated feedback. We...... report a study designed to evaluate whether the preprogrammed insulin infusion pattern to be used in the miniature insulin infusion pump (MIIP) could be optimized by concomitant employment of the GCIIS for blood glucose control. Six juvenile-onset insulin-dependent diabetics (mean age 31 yrs) were...... studied. Mean blood glucose (MBG) was 6.2 mmol/l +/- 0.5 (SD) during glucose controlled infusion and 5.3 +/- 0.6 during the combined MIIP + GCIIS-day. The insulin requirements calculated from the s.c. regimen (56 U +/- 10 SD) were identical to the GCIIS-measured (51 U +/- 14) and to the amounts delivered...

  6. Effect of perioperative insulin infusion on surgical morbidity and mortality

    Gandhi, Gunjan Y; Murad, M Hassan; Flynn, Errol David

    2008-01-01

    To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the effect of perioperative insulin infusion on outcomes important to patients.......To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the effect of perioperative insulin infusion on outcomes important to patients....

  7. Effect of Insulin Infusion on Liver Protein Synthesis during Hemodialysis

    Reinhard, Mark; Frystyk, Jan; Jespersen, Bente

    2011-01-01

    Background Hemodialysis (HD) is a catabolic procedure that may contribute to the high frequency of protein-energy wasting among patients receiving maintenance HD. The present study investigated the additional effect of glucose and glucose-insulin infusion on liver protein synthesis during HD...... compared with a meal alone. Methods In a randomized cross-over study with three arms, 11 non-diabetic HD patients were assigned to receive a conventional HD session with either: • no treatment (NT) • IV infusion of glucose (G) • IV infusion of glucose-insulin (GI) During infusions blood glucose levels were...... maintained at 8.0-10.0 mmol/L by additional glucose infusion. Glucose and glucose-insulin infusions were commenced 2 h prior to HD and continued throughout the HD session. Fasting blood samples were collected at baseline before infusion and followed by the only meal allowed during the study. Results Blood...

  8. The effect of tubing dwell time on insulin adsorption during intravenous insulin infusions.

    Thompson, Cecilia D; Vital-Carona, Jessica; Faustino, E Vincent S

    2012-10-01

    Insulin adsorbs to plastic tubing, which decreases the concentration of an insulin solution delivered from an intravenous infusion set. Dwelling insulin within tubing before starting the infusion decreases adsorption but delays treatment initiation and wastes time in infusion preparation. The lack of data on dwell time effects results in wide variability in practice. We aim to determine the effect of dwell time on insulin concentration from intravenous infusion tubing. In this in vitro study, we used insulin solutions with concentrations of 0.1 unit/mL, 1 unit/mL, and 10 units/mL. Each solution dwelled in intravenous infusion sets for 0, 15, 30, or 60 min. After the dwell, we measured insulin concentrations from the solution bags and tubing. We repeated each insulin concentration-dwell time combination five times. Comparisons were performed using analyses of variance. For each of the three insulin concentrations, the mean insulin concentrations from the tubing were not significantly different between dwell times. Duration of dwell time did not affect insulin adsorption in polypropylene intravenous infusion sets. We recommend that following a 20-mL flush, insulin infusions can be started without any dwell time. Removal of dwell times may improve clinical practice by minimizing preparation time and will allow faster initiation of insulin infusion therapy.

  9. Insulin compatibility with polymer materials used in external pump infusion systems.

    Melberg, S G; Havelund, S; Villumsen, J; Brange, J

    1988-04-01

    In a study designed to mimic actual user conditions for external insulin pump infusion, the insulin quality after passage through the infusion set was assessed by various analytical methods, including high performance liquid chromatography. The two infusion sets tested consisted of, firstly, a polyvinylchloride/rubber syringe and a polyvinylchloride catheter sterilized by gamma irradiation and, secondly, a polyethylene/polypropylene syringe connected to a polyethylene catheter and sterilized by ethylene oxide. The insulin solution delivered through the PVC infusion set showed a reduction of preservative to less than 30% of the initial content and increased formation of chemical transformation products of insulin varying from twice the reference level during the first day to more than three times on the third day. By contrast, the polyethylene/polypropylene infusion system showed only a minor decrease in preservative content and no increase in chemical transformation. These effects were observed irrespective of the brand of insulin and were not affected by increase of the zinc content of the insulin solution. Investigation of the influence of the sterilization methods performed on polyvinylchloride and polyethylene catheters revealed that gamma irradiated polyvinylchloride catheters were markedly harmful to the insulin solution, whereas ethylene oxide sterilization did not influence the chemical stability of insulin.

  10. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in diabetes: patient populations, safety, efficacy, and pharmacoeconomics

    Pozzilli, Paolo; Battelino, Tadej; Danne, Thomas; Hovorka, Roman; Jarosz?Chobot, Przemyslawa; Renard, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Summary The level of glycaemic control necessary to achieve optimal short?term and long?term outcomes in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) typically requires intensified insulin therapy using multiple daily injections or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. For continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, the insulins of choice are the rapid?acting insulin analogues, insulin aspart, insulin lispro and insulin glulisine. The advantages of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion ...

  11. Effect of insulin pump infusion on comprehensive stress state of ...

    Effect of insulin pump infusion on comprehensive stress state of patients with diabetic ketoacidosis. ... Relevant diabetes-associated serum indices, oxidative stress and stress hormone levels were compared between the ... from 32 Countries:.

  12. Continuous intraperitoneal insulin infusion in patients with 'brittle' diabetes

    DeVries, J H; Eskes, S A; Snoek, Frank J

    2002-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the effects of continuous intraperitoneal insulin infusion (CIPII) using implantable pumps on glycaemic control and duration of hospital stay in poorly controlled 'brittle' Dutch diabetes patients, and to assess their current quality of life. METHODS: Thirty-three patients were...

  13. A review of the security of insulin pump infusion systems.

    Paul, Nathanael; Kohno, Tadayoshi; Klonoff, David C

    2011-11-01

    Insulin therapy has enabled patients with diabetes to maintain blood glucose control to lead healthier lives. Today, rather than injecting insulin manually using syringes, a patient can use a device such as an insulin pump to deliver insulin programmatically. This allows for more granular insulin delivery while attaining blood glucose control. Insulin pump system features have increasingly benefited patients, but the complexity of the resulting system has grown in parallel. As a result, security breaches that can negatively affect patient health are now possible. Rather than focus on the security of a single device, we concentrate on protecting the security of the entire system. In this article, we describe the security issues as they pertain to an insulin pump system that includes an embedded system of components, which include the insulin pump, continuous glucose management system, blood glucose monitor, and other associated devices (e.g., a mobile phone or personal computer). We detail not only the growing wireless communication threat in each system component, but also describe additional threats to the system (e.g., availability and integrity). Our goal is to help create a trustworthy infusion pump system that will ultimately strengthen pump safety, and we describe mitigating solutions to address identified security issues. © 2011 Diabetes Technology Society.

  14. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion versus multiple daily injections: the impact of baseline A1c

    Retnakaran, Ravi; Hochman, Jackie; DeVries, J. Hans; Hanaire-Broutin, Helene; Heine, Robert J.; Melki, Vincent; Zinman, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    Rapid-acting insulin analogs (insulin lispro and insulin aspart) have emerged as the meal insulin of choice in both multiple daily insulin injection (MDII) therapy and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) for type 1 diabetes. Thus, a comparison of efficacy between CSII and MDII should be

  15. Assessment of implantable infusion pumps for continuous infusion of human insulin in rats: potential for group housing

    Jensen, Vivi Flou Hjorth; Molck, Anne-Marie; Martensson, Martin

    2017-01-01

    compound in these studies, and a comparator model of persistent exposure by HI infusion from external pumps has recently been developed to support toxicological evaluation of long-acting insulin analogues. However, this model requires single housing of the animals. Developing an insulin-infusion model...... which allows group housing would therefore greatly improve animal welfare. The aim of the present study was to investigate the suitability of implantable infusion pumps for HI infusion in group-housed rats. Group housing of rats implanted with a battery-driven pump proved to be possible. Intravenous...... infusion of HI lowered blood glucose levels persistently for two weeks, providing a comparator model for use in two-week repeated-dose toxicity studies with new long-acting insulin analogues, which allows group housing, and thereby increasing animal welfare compared with an external infusion model....

  16. Cognitively impaired elderly exhibit insulin resistance and no memory improvement with infused insulin.

    Morris, Jill K; Vidoni, Eric D; Mahnken, Jonathan D; Montgomery, Robert N; Johnson, David K; Thyfault, John P; Burns, Jeffrey M

    2016-03-01

    Insulin resistance is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), although its role in AD etiology is unclear. We assessed insulin resistance using fasting and insulin-stimulated measures in 51 elderly subjects with no dementia (ND; n = 37) and with cognitive impairment (CI; n = 14). CI subjects exhibited either mild CI or AD. Fasting insulin resistance was measured using the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Insulin-stimulated glucose disposal was assessed using the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp to calculate glucose disposal rate into lean mass, the primary site of insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. Because insulin crosses the blood-brain barrier, we also assessed whether insulin infusion would improve verbal episodic memory compared to baseline. Different but equivalent versions of cognitive tests were administered in counterbalanced order in the basal and insulin-stimulated state. Groups did not differ in age or body mass index. Cognitively impaired subjects exhibited greater insulin resistance as measured at fasting (HOMA-IR; ND: 1.09 [1.1] vs. CI: 2.01 [2.3], p = 0.028) and during the hyperinsulinemic clamp (glucose disposal rate into lean mass; ND: 9.9 (4.5) vs. AD 7.2 (3.2), p = 0.040). Cognitively impaired subjects also exhibited higher fasting insulin compared to ND subjects, (CI: 8.7 [7.8] vs. ND: 4.2 [3.8] μU/mL; p = 0.023) and higher fasting amylin (CI: 24.1 [39.1] vs. 8.37 [14.2]; p = 0.050) with no difference in fasting glucose. Insulin infusion elicited a detrimental effect on one test of verbal episodic memory (Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test) in both groups (p insulin resistance was observed in cognitively impaired subjects compared to ND controls, insulin infusion did not improve memory. Furthermore, a significant correlation between HOMA-IR and glucose disposal rate was present only in ND (p = 0.0002) but not in cognitively impaired (p = 0.884) subjects, indicating potentially important

  17. Insulin glulisine compared to insulin aspart and to insulin lispro administered by continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in patients with type 1 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial

    van Bon, Arianne C.; Bode, Bruce W.; Sert-Langeron, Caroline; DeVries, J. Hans; Charpentier, Guillaume

    2011-01-01

    In a previous pilot study comparing insulin glulisine (GLU) with insulin aspart (ASP) administered by continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), GLU-treated patients did show a trend toward fewer catheter occlusions compared with ASP-treated patients. Here we performed a randomized open-label,

  18. Insulin secretion and cellular glucose metabolism after prolonged low-grade intralipid infusion in young men

    Jensen, Christine B; Storgaard, Heidi; Holst, Jens J

    2003-01-01

    We examined the simultaneous effects of a 24-h low-grade Intralipid infusion on peripheral glucose disposal, intracellular glucose partitioning and insulin secretion rates in twenty young men, by 2-step hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp [low insulin clamp (LI), 10 mU/m(2) x min; high insulin clamp...... Intralipid infusion. At LI, glucose oxidation decreased by 10%, whereas glucose disposal, glycolytic flux, glucose storage, and glucose production were not significantly altered. At HI, glucose disposal, and glucose oxidation decreased by 12% and 24%, respectively, during Intralipid infusion. Glycolytic flux......, glucose storage, and glucose production were unchanged. Insulin secretion rates increased in response to Intralipid infusion, but disposition indices (DI = insulin action.insulin secretion) were unchanged. In conclusion, a 24-h low-grade Intralipid infusion caused insulin resistance in the oxidative (but...

  19. Treatment of Severe Hypertriglyceridemia with Continuous Insulin Infusion

    Yesica Rodríguez Santana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe hypertriglyceridemia (SH represents a therapeutic emergency because of the possibility of developing cardiovascular events and hyperlipemic acute pancreatitis (PA. Most patients with SH suffer primary or genetic abnormality in lipid metabolism in combination with a precipitating factor such as uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, alcoholism, and drug intake. The standard treatment of hypertriglyceridemia (HTG with omega 3 fatty acids and fibrates, along with dietary changes, has no effect on an emergency situation. There are no clinical guidelines to SH, but therapy with insulin, heparin, a combination of both, plasmapheresis, or octreotide have been tested succesfully. We report the case of a 10-year-old girl with clinical acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis debut, along with incidental finding of an SH, who had a good outcome after treatment with insulin intravenous infusion.

  20. Refractory hyperglycaemia induced by glucose-insulin-potassium infusion in acute myocardial infarction

    Svilaas, Tone; van der Horst, I.C.C.; Nijsten, M.W.N.; Zijlstra, F.

    2006-01-01

    Background. Recent randomised clinical trials have not confirmed the beneficial effects of glucose-insulin-potassium (GIK) infusion observed in experimental models of myocardial ischaemia and infarction. Methods. We investigated glucose levels and insulin dose in 107 patients treated with

  1. The course of diabetic retinopathy during treatment with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion

    Hooymans, Johanna Martina Maria

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the effect of normalization of blood sugar regulation by continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) on the course of diabetic retinopathy in insulin-dependent (type I) diabetic patients. Zie: Summary

  2. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha infusion produced insulin resistance but no change in the incretin effect in healthy volunteers.

    Nielsen, Signe Tellerup; Lehrskov-Schmidt, Louise; Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Solomon, Thomas P J; Lehrskov-Schmidt, Lars; Holst, Jens Juul; Møller, Kirsten

    2013-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with peripheral insulin resistance, impaired incretin effect, and increased plasma levels of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Although TNF-α infusion at a dose that induces systemic inflammation in healthy volunteers has been demonstrated to induce peripheral insulin resistance, the influence of this cytokine on the incretin effect is unknown. We investigated whether systemic inflammation induced by TNF-α infusion in healthy volunteers alters the incretin hormone response to oral and intravenous glucose loads in a crossover study design with ten healthy male volunteers (mean age 24 years, mean body mass index 23.7 kg/m(2) ). The study consisted of four study days: days 1 and 2, 6-h infusion of saline; days 3 and 4, 6-h infusion of TNF-α; days 1 and 3, 4-h oral glucose tolerance test; and days 2 and 4, 4-h corresponding intravenous isoglycaemic glucose tolerance test. Glucose tolerance tests were initiated after 2 h of saline/TNF-α infusion. Plasma concentrations of TNF-α, interleukin 6, glucose, incretin hormones, and cortisol, and serum concentrations of C-peptide and insulin were measured throughout the study days. Insulin sensitivity was estimated by the Matsuda index and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Prehepatic insulin secretion rates were calculated. TNF-α infusion induced symptoms of systemic inflammation; increased plasma levels of cortisol, TNF-α, and interleukin 6; and increased the HOMA-IR. The secretion of incretin hormones as well as the incretin effect remained unchanged. In healthy young male volunteers, acute systemic inflammation induced by infusion of TNF-α is associated with insulin resistance with no change in the incretin effect. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Effect of Insulin Infusion on insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) during Hemodialysis

    Reinhard, Mark; Frystyk, Jan; Bjerre, Mette

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hemodialysis (HD) is a catabolic procedure probably contributing to the high frequency of protein-energy wasting among patients on maintenance HD. The aim was to investigate the effect of insulin infusion on insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) during HD compared with a meal alone...... infusion and followed by the only meal allowed during the study. Results: Data are presented as mean±SD. From baseline to end of HD session we observed an overall increase in both serum bioactive IGF-I (from 0.83±0.27 to 1.01±0.34 µg/L, p... in the change between the groups (p=0.43). Conclusion: A meal at the beginning of a HD session leads to an increase in bioactive IGF-I thereby assumingly counteracting the catabolic effects of HD. However, according to changes in bioactive IGF-I neither glucose nor glucose-insulin infusion during HD appear...

  4. Comparative Dose Accuracy of Durable and Patch Insulin Infusion Pumps

    Jahn, Luis G.; Capurro, Jorge J.; Levy, Brian L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: As all major insulin pump manufacturers comply with the international infusion pump standard EN 60601-2-24:1998, there may be a general assumption that all pumps are equal in insulin-delivery accuracy. This research investigates single-dose and averaged-dose accuracy of incremental basal deliveries for one patch model and three durable models of insulin pumps. Method: For each pump model, discrete single doses delivered during 0.5 U/h basal rate infusion over a 20 h period were measured using a time-stamped microgravimetric system. Dose accuracy was analyzed by comparing single doses and time-averaged doses to specific accuracy thresholds (±5% to ±30%). Results: The percentage of single doses delivered outside accuracy thresholds of ±5%, ±10%, and ±20% were as follows: Animas OneTouch® Ping® (43.2%, 14.3%, and 1.8%, respectively), Roche Accu-Chek® Combo (50.6%, 24.4%, and 5.5%), Medtronic Paradigm® RevelTM/VeoTM (54.2%, 26.7%, and 6.6%), and Insulet OmniPod® (79.1%, 60.5%, and 34.9%). For 30 min, 1 h, and 2 h averaging windows, the percentage of doses delivered outside a ±15% accuracy were as follows: OneTouch Ping (1.0%, 0.4%, and 0%, respectively), Accu-Chek Combo (4.2%, 3.5%, and 3.1%), Paradigm Revel/Veo (3.9%, 3.1%, and 2.2%), and OmniPod (33.9%, 19.9%, and 10.3%). Conclusions: This technical evaluation demonstrates significant differences in single-dose and averaged-dose accuracy among the insulin pumps tested. Differences in dose accuracy were most evident between the patch pump model and the group of durable pump models. Of the pumps studied, the Animas OneTouch Ping demonstrated the best single-dose and averaged-dose accuracy. Further research on the clinical relevance of these findings is warranted. PMID:23911184

  5. Evaluation of pharmacokinetic model designs for subcutaneous infusion of insulin aspart

    Mansell, Erin J.; Schmidt, Signe; Docherty, Paul D.

    2017-01-01

    Effective mathematical modelling of continuous subcutaneous infusion pharmacokinetics should aid understanding and control in insulin therapy. Thorough analysis of candidate model performance is important for selecting the appropriate models. Eight candidate models for insulin pharmacokinetics...... included a range of modelled behaviours, parameters and complexity. The models were compared using clinical data from subjects with type 1 diabetes with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. Performance of the models was compared through several analyses: R2 for goodness of fit; the Akaike Information...

  6. Effect of glucose-insulin-potassium infusion on thallium myocardial clearance

    Wilson, R.A.; Okada, R.D.; Strauss, H.W.; Pohost, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    Factors influencing the rate of 201 Tl clearance from the myocardium have not been clearly defined. This study determined the effect of an intravenous infusion of glucose-insulin-potassium (GIK) on the net 201 Tl clearance rates from myocardium with and without initial 201 Tl loading. Anesthetized open-chest dogs underwent 5 min of left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion and intravenous 201 Tl was injected and the occlusion released 5 min later. Thirty minutes after 201 Tl injection, 30 ml of either GIK (nine dogs) or saline (five dogs) was infused intravenously. The clearance rates of 201 Tl from the anterior wall (without initial 201 Tl loading) and from the posterior wall (with initial 201 Tl loading) were monitored with miniaturized cadmium telluride detectors placed on the myocardium. Calculation of net myocardial clearance rates was performed by linear regression analysis from serial 1 min counts. Compared with saline infusion, GIK increased the net clearance of 201 Tl from both myocardial regions with and without initial loading. The most marked change induced by GIK infusion was in the myocardial region without initial 201 Tl loading; a net increase in 201 Tl activity (72 +/- 42 cpm/30 min) was converted into a net loss (-594 +/- 228 cpm/30 min). There was no significant change in 201 Tl clearance after the saline infusion. Heart rate, aortic and left atrial pressure, sonomicrometer-measured transmural myocardial wall thickness, microsphere-determined myocardial blood flow, and blood glucose and potassium concentrations did not change significantly during GIK or saline infusions. Thus, GIK infusion appears to increase net 201 Tl clearance from myocardial zones with and without initial 201 Tl loading

  7. Food image-induced brain activation is not diminished by insulin infusion.

    Belfort-DeAguiar, R; Seo, D; Naik, S; Hwang, J; Lacadie, C; Schmidt, C; Constable, R T; Sinha, R; Sherwin, R

    2016-11-01

    The obesity epidemic appears to be driven in large part by our modern environment inundated by food cues, which may influence our desire to eat. Although insulin decreases food intake in both animals and humans, the effect of insulin on motivation for food in the presence of food cues is not known. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an intravenous insulin infusion on the brain response to visual food cues, hunger and food craving in non-obese human subjects. Thirty-four right-handed healthy non-obese subjects (19F/15M, age: 29±8 years.; BMI: 23.1±2.1 kg m -2 ) were divided in two groups matched by age and BMI; the insulin group (18 subjects) underwent a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic-clamp, and the control group (16 subjects) received an intravenous saline infusion, while viewing high and low-calorie food and non-food pictures during a functional MRI scan. Motivation for food was determined via analog scales for hunger, wanting and liking ratings. Food images induced brain responses in the hypothalamus, striatum, amygdala, insula, ventromedial prefrontal cortex (PFC), dorsolateral PFC and occipital lobe (whole brain correction, Pinsulin and saline infusion groups. Hunger ratings increased throughout the MRI scan and correlated with preference for high-calorie food pictures (r=0.70; Pbrain activity nor food cravings were affected by hyperinsulinemia or hormonal status (leptin and ghrelin levels) (P=NS). Our data demonstrate that visual food cues induce a strong response in motivation/reward and cognitive-executive control brain regions in non-obese subjects, but that these responses are not diminished by hyperinsulinemia per se. These findings suggest that our modern food cue saturated environment may be sufficient to overpower homeostatic hormonal signals, and thus contribute to the current obesity epidemic.

  8. Continuous intraperitoneal insulin infusion in the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus: Glycaemia and beyond

    van Dijk, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    Continuous intraperitoneal insulin infusion (CIPII) with an implantable pump is a last-resort treatment option for selected patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). As compared to the most commonly used forms of insulin administration -injections and an externally placed pump- which deliver insulin in the subcutaneous (SC) tissue, CIPII delivers the insulin in the intraperitoneal space. CIPII using an implantable pump is an unique treatment which has been available for more than 30 year...

  9. Psychopathology and Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion in Type 1 Diabetes

    Francesco Rotella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII is used as an option in patients with diabetes failing to multiple daily injections (MDI. Psychological factors may play a relevant role in the failure to attain therapeutic goals in patients on MDI. This could lead to an overrepresentation of psychopathology in patients treated with CSII. Methods. A consecutive series of 100 patients with type 1 diabetes was studied, collecting main clinical parameters and assessing psychopathology with the self-reported questionnaire Symptom Checklist 90-revised. Patients on CSII were then compared with those on MDI. Results. Of the 100 enrolled patients, 44 and 56 were on CSII and MDI, respectively. Among men, those on CSII were younger than those on MDI; conversely, no difference in age was observed in women. Women on CSII showed higher scores on most Symptom Checklist 90 subscales than those on MDI, whereas no differences were observed in men. Conclusion. Women with type 1 diabetes treated with CSII display higher levels of psychopathology than those on MDI. This is probably the consequence of the fact that patients selected for CSII are those failing to MDI. Higher levels of psychopathology could represent a limit for the attainment and maintenance of therapeutic goals with CSII.

  10. Associations between bolus infusion of hydrocortisone, glycemic variability and insulin infusion rate variability in critically Ill patients under moderate glycemic control

    van Hooijdonk, Roosmarijn T. M.; Binnekade, Jan M.; Bos, Lieuwe D. J.; Horn, Janneke; Juffermans, Nicole P.; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2015-01-01

    We retrospectively studied associations between bolus infusion of hydrocortisone and variability of the blood glucose level and changes in insulin rates in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. 'Glycemic variability' and 'insulin infusion rate variability' were calculated from and expressed as the

  11. Effect of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion on kidney function and size in IDDM patients

    Christensen, C K; Christiansen, J S; Schmitz, A

    1987-01-01

    insulin infusion (CSII) (n = 12) or unchanged conventional insulin treatment (CIT) (n = 12). GFR, RPF, and kidney volume were identical but significantly increased above normal values in the two groups at the start of the study. After 24 months of CSII treatment, significant reduction in GFR was seen...

  12. Insulin secretion and cellular glucose metabolism after prolonged low-grade intralipid infusion in young men

    Jensen, Christine B; Storgaard, Heidi; Holst, Jens Juul

    2003-01-01

    not in the nonoxidative) glucose metabolism in young healthy men. Moreover, insulin hypersecretion perfectly countered the free-fatty acid-induced insulin resistance. Future studies are needed to determine the role of a prolonged moderate lipid load in subjects at increased risk of developing diabetes.......We examined the simultaneous effects of a 24-h low-grade Intralipid infusion on peripheral glucose disposal, intracellular glucose partitioning and insulin secretion rates in twenty young men, by 2-step hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp [low insulin clamp (LI), 10 mU/m(2) x min; high insulin clamp...

  13. Efficacy and safety of an insulin infusion protocol in a surgical ICU.

    Taylor, Beth E; Schallom, Marilyn E; Sona, Carrie S; Buchman, Timothy G; Boyle, Walter A; Mazuski, John E; Schuerer, Douglas E; Thomas, James M; Kaiser, Christy; Huey, Way Y; Ward, Myrna R; Zack, Jeanne E; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2006-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is associated with complications in the surgical intensive care unit. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy and safety of nurse-driven insulin infusion protocols in lowering blood glucose (BG) in critical illness. All patients in a 24-bed surgical intensive care unit who required i.v. insulin infusions during 3 noncontiguous 6-month periods from 2002 to 2004 were evaluated. In the preintervention phase, 71 patients received a physician-initiated insulin infusion without a developed protocol. They were compared with 95 patients who received a nurse-driven insulin infusion protocol with a target BG of 120 to 150 mg/dL and to 119 patients who received a more stringent protocol with a target BG of 80 to 110 mg/dL. There was a stepwise decrease in average daily BG levels, from 190 to 163 to 132 mg/dL (p < 0.001). The less stringent protocol decreased the time to achieve a BG level < 150 mg/dL from 14.1 to 7.4 hours compared with physician-driven management (p < 0.05) resulting in similar time on an insulin infusion (53 versus 48 hours). The more intensive protocol brought BG levels < 150 mg/dL in 7.2 hours and < 111 mg/dL in 13.6 hours, but increased the length of time a patient was on an insulin infusion to 77 hours. The incidence of severe hypoglycemia (BG < 40 mg/dL) was statistically similar between the groups, ranging between 1.1% and 3.4%. Implementation of a nurse-driven protocol led to more rapid and more effective BG control in critically ill surgical patients compared with physician management. Tighter BG control can be obtained without a significant increase in hypoglycemia, although this is associated with increased time on an insulin infusion.

  14. Influence of circulating epinephrine on absorption of subcutaneously injected insulin

    Fernqvist, E.; Gunnarsson, R.; Linde, B.

    1988-01-01

    Effects of epinephrine (Epi) infusion on the absorption of subcutaneously injected 125I-labeled soluble human insulin (10 U) from the thigh or the abdomen were studied in 16 healthy subjects and from the thigh in 10 insulin-dependent diabetic (IDDM) patients. Epi was infused at 0.3 (high dose) or 0.1 (low dose; healthy subjects) nmol.kg-1.min-1 i.v., resulting in arterial plasma Epi levels of approximately 6 and 2 nM, respectively. Saline was infused on a control day. Insulin absorption was measured as disappearance of radioactivity from the injection site and as appearance of plasma immunoreactive insulin (IRI). Adipose tissue blood flow was measured with the 133Xe clearance technique. First-order disappearance rate constants of 125I from the thigh depot decreased approximately 40-50% during the high dose of Epi compared with control (P less than .001). The corresponding decrease from the abdominal depot was approximately 40% (P less than .001), whereas no significant change was found during the low Epi dose. IRI fell compared with control in all groups at the high Epi dose. The Epi-induced depression of insulin absorption occurred despite unaltered or even slightly increased subcutaneous blood flow. The results indicate that circulating Epi at levels seen during moderate physical stress depresses the absorption of soluble insulin from subcutaneous injection sites to an extent that might be important for glycemic control in IDDM patients. Furthermore, dissociation is found between changes in insulin absorption and subcutaneous blood flow during Epi infusion, suggesting that factors other than blood flow may also influence the absorption of subcutaneously injected insulin

  15. Responses of Blood Glucose, Insulin, Glucagon, and Fatty Acids to Intraruminal Infusion of Propionate in Hanwoo

    Y. K. Oh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to investigate the effects of intraruminal infusion of propionate on ruminal fermentation characteristics and blood hormones and metabolites in Hanwoo (Korean cattle steers. Four Hanwoo steers (average body wt. 270 kg, 13 month of age equipped with rumen cannula were infused into rumens with 0.0 M (Water, C, 0.5 M (37 g/L, T1, 1.0 M (74 g/L, T2 and 1.5 M (111 g/L, T3 of propionate for 1 hour per day and allotted by 4×4 Latin square design. On the 5th day of infusion, samples of rumen and blood were collected at 0, 60, 120, 180, and 300 min after intraruminal infusion of propionate. The concentrations of serum glucose and plasma glucagon were not affected (p>0.05 by intraruminal infusion of propionate. The serum insulin concentration at 60 min after infusion was significantly (p<0.05 higher in T3 than in C, while the concentration of non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA at 60 and 180 min after infusion was significantly (p<0.05 lower in the propionate treatments than in C. Hence, intraruminal infusion of propionate stimulates the secretion of insulin, and decreases serum NEFA concentration rather than the change of serum glucose concentration.

  16. Insulin production rate in normal man as an estimate for calibration of continuous intravenous insulin infusion in insulin-dependent diabetic patients.

    Waldhäusl, W K; Bratusch-Marrain, P R; Francesconi, M; Nowotny, P; Kiss, A

    1982-01-01

    This study examines the feasibility of deriving the 24-h insulin requirement of insulin-dependent diabetic patients who were devoid of any endogenous insulin release (IDD) from the insulin-production rate (IPR) of healthy man (basal, 17 mU/min; stimulated 1.35 U/12.5 g glucose). To this end, continuous intravenous insulin infusion (CIVII) was initiated at a precalculated rate of 41.2 +/- 4.6 (SD) U/24 h in IDD (N - 12). Blood glucose profiles were compared with those obtained during intermittent subcutaneous (s.c.) insulin therapy (IIT) and those of healthy controls (N = 7). Regular insulin (Hoechst CS) was infused with an adapted Mill Hill Infuser at a basal infusion rate of 1.6 U/h (6:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.), and of 0.8 U/h from 8:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. Preprandial insulin (3.2-6.4 U) was added for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Daily individual food intake totaled 7688 +/- 784 kJ (1836 +/- 187 kcal)/24 h including 184 +/- 37 g of glucose. Proper control of blood glucose (BG) (mean BG 105 +/- 10 mg/dl; mean amplitude of glycemic excursions 54 +/- 18 mg/dl; and 1 h postprandial BG levels not exceeding 160 mg/dl) and of plasma concentrations of beta-hydroxybutyrate and lactate was maintained by 41.4 +/- 4.4 U insulin/24 h. Although BG values only approximated the upper normal range as seen in healthy controls, they were well within the range reported by others during CIVII. Therefore, we conclude that in adult IDD completely devoid of endogenous insulin (1) the IPR of normal man can be used during CIVII as an estimate for the patient's minimal insulin requirement per 24 h, and (2) this approach allows for a blood glucose profile close to the upper range of a normal control group. Thus, deriving a patient's daily insulin dose from the insulin production rate of healthy man may add an additional experimental protocol which aids in making general calculations of a necessary insulin dose instead of using trial and error or a closed-loop insulin infusion system.

  17. Effect of insulin pump infusion on comprehensive stress state of ...

    a control group (120 cases), administered continuous intravenous insulin, and a ... oxidative stress and stress hormone levels were compared between the ... metabolic acidosis and ketonuria, as a result of .... This resulting energy insufficiency.

  18. Does overnight normalization of plasma glucose by insulin infusion affect assessment of glucose metabolism in Type 2 diabetes?

    Staehr, P; Højlund, Kurt; Hother-Nielsen, O

    2003-01-01

    AIMS: In order to perform euglycaemic clamp studies in Type 2 diabetic patients, plasma glucose must be reduced to normal levels. This can be done either (i) acutely during the clamp study using high-dose insulin infusion, or (ii) slowly overnight preceding the clamp study using a low-dose insulin...... infusion. We assessed whether the choice of either of these methods to obtain euglycaemia biases subsequent assessment of glucose metabolism and insulin action. METHODS: We studied seven obese Type 2 diabetic patients twice: once with (+ ON) and once without (- ON) prior overnight insulin infusion. Glucose...... turnover rates were quantified by adjusted primed-constant 3-3H-glucose infusions, and insulin action was assessed in 4-h euglycaemic, hyperinsulinaemic (40 mU m-2 min-1) clamp studies using labelled glucose infusates (Hot-GINF). RESULTS: Basal plasma glucose levels (mean +/- sd) were 5.5 +/- 0.5 and 10...

  19. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion versus multiple daily injections of insulin for pregnant women with diabetes.

    Farrar, Diane; Tuffnell, Derek J; West, Jane; West, Helen M

    2016-06-07

    Diabetes results in a rise in blood glucose above normal physiological levels; if untreated this may cause damage to many systems including the cardiovascular and renal systems. Pregnancy increases resistance to insulin action; for those women who have pre-gestational diabetes, this results in an increasing insulin requirement. There are several methods of administering insulin. Conventionally, insulin has been administered subcutaneously, formally referred to as intensive conventional treatment, but now more usually referred to as multiple daily injections (MDI). An alternative method of insulin administration is the continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion pump (CSII). To compare CSII with MDI of insulin for pregnant women with pre-existing and gestational diabetes. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 March 2016) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Randomised trials comparing CSII with MDI for pregnant women with diabetes. Three review authors independently assessed studies and two review authors extracted data. Disagreements were resolved through discussion with the third author. We assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We included five single-centre trials (undertaken in Italy) with 153 women and 154 pregnancies in this review.There were no clear differences in the primary outcomes reported between CSII and MDI in the included trials: caesarean section (risk ratio (RR) 1.09, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.66 to 1.77; three trials, 71 women, evidence graded very low), large-for-gestational age (RR 4.15, 95% CI 0.49 to 34.95; three trials, 73 infants; evidence graded very low), and perinatal mortality (RR 2.33, 95% CI 0.38 to 14.32; four trials, 83 infants, evidence graded very low). Other primary outcomes were not reported in these trials (hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, development of type 2 diabetes, composite outcome of serious neonatal outcomes, and neurosensory disability

  20. The regulatory system for diabetes mellitus: Modeling rates of glucose infusions and insulin injections

    Yang, Jin; Tang, Sanyi; Cheke, Robert A.

    2016-08-01

    Novel mathematical models with open and closed-loop control for type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus were developed to improve understanding of the glucose-insulin regulatory system. A hybrid impulsive glucose-insulin model with different frequencies of glucose infusions and insulin injections was analyzed, and the existence and uniqueness of the positive periodic solution for type 1 diabetes, which is globally asymptotically stable, was studied analytically. Moreover, permanence of the system for type 2 diabetes was demonstrated which showed that the glucose concentration level is uniformly bounded above and below. To investigate how to prevent hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia being caused by this system, we developed a model involving periodic intakes of glucose with insulin injections applied only when the blood glucose level reached a given critical glucose threshold. In addition, our numerical analysis revealed that the period, the frequency and the dose of glucose infusions and insulin injections are crucial for insulin therapies, and the results provide clinical strategies for insulin-administration practices.

  1. Lipid and insulin infusion-induced skeletal muscle insulin resistance is likely due to metabolic feedback and not changes in IRS-1, Akt, or AS160 phosphorylation.

    Hoy, Andrew J; Brandon, Amanda E; Turner, Nigel; Watt, Matthew J; Bruce, Clinton R; Cooney, Gregory J; Kraegen, Edward W

    2009-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by hyperlipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to investigate whether acute hyperlipidemia-induced insulin resistance in the presence of hyperinsulinemia was due to defective insulin signaling. Hyperinsulinemia (approximately 300 mU/l) with hyperlipidemia or glycerol (control) was produced in cannulated male Wistar rats for 0.5, 1 h, 3 h, or 5 h. The glucose infusion rate required to maintain euglycemia was significantly reduced by 3 h with lipid infusion and was further reduced after 5 h of infusion, with no difference in plasma insulin levels, indicating development of insulin resistance. Consistent with this finding, in vivo skeletal muscle glucose uptake (31%, P muscle diacylglyceride and ceramide content over the same time course. However, there was an increase in cumulative exposure to long-chain acyl-CoA (70%) with lipid infusion. Interestingly, although muscle pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 protein content was decreased in hyperinsulinemic glycerol-infused rats, this decrease was blunted in muscle from hyperinsulinemic lipid-infused rats. Decreased pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity was also observed in lipid- and insulin-infused animals (43%). Overall, these results suggest that acute reductions in muscle glucose metabolism in rats with hyperlipidemia and hyperinsulinemia are more likely a result of substrate competition than a significant early defect in insulin action or signaling.

  2. Glucose uptake and pulsatile insulin infusion: euglycaemic clamp and [3-3H]glucose studies in healthy subjects

    Schmitz, O.; Arnfred, J.; Hother Nielsen, O.; Beck-Nielsen, H.; Oerskov, H.

    1986-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that insulin has a greater effect on glucose metabolism when given as pulsatile than as continuous infusion, a 354-min euglycaemic clamp study was carried out in 8 healthy subjects. At random order soluble insulin was given intravenously either at a constant rate of 0.45mU/kg · min or in identical amounts in pulses of 1 1 / 2 to 2 1 / 4 min followed by intervals of 10 1 / 2 to 9 3 / 4 min. Average serum insulin levels were similar during the two infusion protocols, but pulsatile administration induced oscillations ranging between 15 and 62 μU/ml. Glucose uptake expressed as metabolic clearance rate (MCR) for glucose was significantly increased during pulsatile insulin delivery as compared with continuous administration (270-294 min: 8.7±0.7 vs 6.8±0.9 ml/kg · min, P 3 H]glucose infusion technique was suppressed to insignificant values. Finally, the effect of insulin on endogenous insulin secretion and lipolysis as assessed by changes in serum C-peptide and serum FFA was uninfluenced by the infusion mode. In conclusion, insulin infusion resulting in physiological serum insulin levels enhances glucose uptake in peripheral tissues in healthy subjects to a higher degree when given in a pulsed pattern mimicking that of the normal endocrine pancreas than when given as a continuous infusion. (author)

  3. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion preserves axonal function in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Kwai, Natalie; Arnold, Ria; Poynten, Ann M; Lin, Cindy S-Y; Kiernan, Matthew C; Krishnan, Arun V

    2015-02-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common and debilitating complication of diabetes mellitus. Although strict glycaemic control may reduce the risk of developing diabetic peripheral neuropathy, the neurological benefits of different insulin regimens remain relatively unknown. In the present study, 55 consecutive patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus underwent clinical neurological assessment. Subsequently, 41 non-neuropathic patients, 24 of whom were receiving multiple daily insulin injections (MDII) and 17 receiving continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), underwent nerve excitability testing, a technique that assesses axonal ion channel function and membrane potential in human nerves. Treatment groups were matched for glycaemic control, body mass index, disease duration and gender. Neurophysiological parameters were compared between treatment groups and those taken from age and sex-matched normal controls. Prominent differences in axonal function were noted between MDII-treated and CSII-treated patients. Specifically, MDII patients manifested prominent abnormalities when compared with normal controls in threshold electrotonus (TE) parameters including depolarizing TE(10-20ms), undershoot and hyperpolarizing TE (90-100 ms) (P type 1 diabetes is maintained within normal limits in patients treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and not with multiple daily insulin injections. This raises the possibility that CSII therapy may have neuroprotective potential in patients with type 1 diabetes. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. An observational study comparing continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) and insulin glargine in children with type 1 diabetes.

    Schiaffini, Riccardo; Ciampalini, Paolo; Spera, Sabrina; Cappa, Marco; Crinó, Antonino

    2005-01-01

    The advantages of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) or insulin glargine have been demonstrated both in adult and paediatric diabetic patients; however, as no data comparing these two approaches during childhood are available, we have examined the efficacy of these two intensive approaches. We retrospectively evaluated data from 36 diabetic children, who had changed their previous insulin regimen [with isophane insulin (NPH) at bedtime] because of HbA1c levels >8.0%. Twenty patients underwent CSII, while the other 16 (significantly younger for age) started insulin glargine at bedtime. At 6 and 12 months, CSII-treated patients showed a significant reduction in HbA1c values from 8.5 +/- 1.8 to 7.4 +/- 1.1% and to 7.6 +/- 1.2%, respectively. The insulin requirement significantly decreased from 0.93 +/- 0.2 IU/kg to 0.73 +/- 0.2 IU/kg of body weight and to 0.74 +/- 0.15 IU/kg of body weight, respectively, while no significant differences were observed for BMI SDS, fructosamine and severe hypoglycaemic events. The patients treated with glargine showed a small decline in HbA1c values from 8.9 +/- 1.7 to 8.3 +/- 0.9% (not significant) in the first 6 months of treatment and to 8.2 +/- 0.9% after 12 months. The basal insulin supplementation can be supplied effectively in children with type 1 diabetes by either CSII or insulin glargine. As previously reported for adults, it is confirmed that CSII is the best current intensive approach aimed to the improvement of glycaemic control.

  5. Effect of glucose and insulin infusion on the myocardial extraction of a radioiodinated methyl-substituted fatty acid

    Bianco, J.A.; Elmaleh, D.R.; Leppo, J.A.; King, M.A.; Moring, A.; Livni, E.; Espinoza, E.; Alpert, J.S.; Strauss, H.W.; Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston

    1986-01-01

    We investigated the one-way. An extraction of 14-iodophenyl-tetradecanoic acid (BMTDA) in the canine heart under fasting conditions and during infusion of glucose plus insulin in eight an esthetized greyhound dogs. Myocardial extraction measurements were made with dual tracer approach, using Tc-99m albumin as reference tracer. Prior to, and during, infusion of 10% glucose and 25 units of regular insulin, heart rate, blood pressure, plasma glucose, insulin and free fatty acid levels were measured. Myocardial blood flow was determined using Sn-113 and Ru-103 radioactive microspheres. The mean extraction fraction of BMTDA was 0.38+-SEM 0.06 at baseline and increased to 0.44+-0.06 during hyperglycemia plus insulin (P<0.025). Plasma glucose and insulin were higher during the infusion (P<0.01) while plasma free fatty acids significantly declined (P<0.01). There were no changes in hemodynamics or myocardial blood flow during the infusion. We conclude that glucose and insulin infusion result in increased first-pass extraction fraction of radioiodinated BMTDA unaccompanied by changes in coronary flow or hemodynamics, implying an insulin-mediated augmented transport of BMTDA. (orig.)

  6. Modelling the Effect of Exercise on Insulin Pharmacokinetics in "Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion" Treated Type 1 Diabetes Patients

    Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Juhl, Rune; Schmidt, Signe

    Introduction: The artificial pancreas is believed to ease the burden of constant management of type 1 diabetes for the patients substantially. An important aspect of the artificial pancreas development is the mathematical models used for control, prediction or simulation. A major challenge...... infusion (CSII) treated patients by modelling the absorption rate as a function of exercise. Methods: Three models are estimated from 17 data sequences. All of them are based on a linear three-compartment base model. The models are based on stochastic differential equations to allow noise to enter...... of the measurement variance. Conclusion: A model to predict the insulin appearance in plasma during exercise in CSII treated patients is identified. Further clinical studies are needed to confirm the increase in insulin plasma concentration during exercise in type 1 diabetes patients. These studies should include...

  7. Cost-effectiveness of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion versus multiple daily injections of insulin in Type 1 diabetes

    Roze, S.; Smith-Palmer, J.; Valentine, W.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) is increasingly used in clinical practice for the management of selected patients with Type 1 diabetes. Several cost-effectiveness studies comparing CSII vs. multiple insulin injections (MDI) have been reported. The aim was systematically...... to review these analyses and test the hypothesis that CSII is a cost-effective use of healthcare resources across settings. Methods: A literature review was performed using MEDLINE, Cochrane Library and other databases. No time limit or language restrictions were applied. After two rounds of screening, 11...... cost-effectiveness analyses were included in the final review, of which nine used the CORE Diabetes Model. A narrative synthesis was conducted and mean cost effectiveness calculated. Results: CSII was considered cost-effective vs. MDI in Type 1 diabetes in all 11 studies in 8 countries, with a mean (95...

  8. Insulin resistance in multiple tissues in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus on long-term continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy

    Donga, Esther; van Dijk, Marieke [Leiden Univ., LUMC; Hoogma, Roel P. L. M.; Corssmit, Eleonora P. M.; Romijn, Johannes A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether insulin resistance is present in lean patients with uncomplicated type 1 diabetes mellitus on long-term continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), compared with matched healthy controls. We studied eight patients (four men and four women) with

  9. Fasting and feeding variations of insulin requirements and insulin binding to erythrocytes at different times of the day in insulin dependent diabetics--assessed under the condition of glucose-controlled insulin infusion.

    Hung, C T; Beyer, J; Schulz, G

    1986-07-01

    Nine insulin-dependent diabetic patients were examined for insulin requirement, counterregulatory hormones, and receptor binding during their connection to glucose-controlled insulin infusion system. They were of 103% ideal body weight. A diet of 45% carbohydrate, 20% protein and 35% fat was divided into three meals and three snacks averaging the daily calorie intake of 1859 kcal. Following an equilibrating phase of 14 hours after the connection to the glucose-controlled insulin infusion system the blood samples were taken at 0800, 1200 and 1800. The insulin infusion rate increased at 0300 in the early morning from 0.128 mU/kg/min to 0.221 mU/kg/min (P less than 0.02). The postprandial insulin infusion rate jumped from 0.7 U/h (0700-0800) to 7.5 U/h (0800-0900). The calorie related and carbohydrate related insulin demands after breakfast were also highest and declined after lunch respectively (1.16 uU/kg/min kj vs. 0.61 uU/kg/min kj, P less than 0.05 and 236 mU/g CHO vs. 129 mU/g CHO and 143 mU/g CHO). Of the counterregulatory hormones the cortisol showed a significant diurnal rhythm to insulin demands. The insulin tracer binding was higher at 0800 before breakfast than that at 1200 before lunch (P less than 0.05). The increased binding could be better attributed to receptor concentration change than to affinity change. The cause of insulin relative insensitivity in the morning could be due to altered liver response to the cortisol peak in type 1 diabetics. The preserved variation of insulin binding in our patients might be referred to feeding.

  10. Insulin and GLP-1 infusions demonstrate the onset of adipose-specific insulin resistance in a large fasting mammal: potential glucogenic role for GLP-1.

    Viscarra, Jose A; Rodriguez, Ruben; Vazquez-Medina, Jose Pablo; Lee, Andrew; Tift, Michael S; Tavoni, Stephen K; Crocker, Daniel E; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2013-08-01

    Prolonged food deprivation increases lipid oxidation and utilization, which may contribute to the onset of the insulin resistance associated with fasting. Because insulin resistance promotes the preservation of glucose and oxidation of fat, it has been suggested to be an adaptive response to food deprivation. However, fasting mammals exhibit hypoinsulinemia, suggesting that the insulin resistance-like conditions they experience may actually result from reduced pancreatic sensitivity to glucose/capacity to secrete insulin. To determine whether fasting results in insulin resistance or in pancreatic dysfunction, we infused early- and late-fasted seals (naturally adapted to prolonged fasting) with insulin (0.065 U/kg), and a separate group of late-fasted seals with low (10 pM/kg) or high (100 pM/kg) dosages of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) immediately following a glucose bolus (0.5g/kg), and measured the systemic and cellular responses. Because GLP-1 facilitates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, these infusions provide a method to assess pancreatic insulin-secreting capacity. Insulin infusions increased the phosphorylation of insulin receptor and Akt in adipose and muscle of early and late fasted seals; however the timing of the signaling response was blunted in adipose of late fasted seals. Despite the dose-dependent increases in insulin and increased glucose clearance (high dose), both GLP-1 dosages produced increases in plasma cortisol and glucagon, which may have contributed to the glucogenic role of GLP-1. Results suggest that fasting induces adipose-specific insulin resistance in elephant seal pups, while maintaining skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity, and therefore suggests that the onset of insulin resistance in fasting mammals is an evolved response to cope with prolonged food deprivation.

  11. Glucose and insulin dynamics associated with continuous rate infusion of dextrose solution or dextrose solution and insulin in healthy and endotoxin-exposed horses.

    Han, Janet H; McKenzie, Harold C; McCutcheon, L Jill; Geor, Raymond J

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the effects of a continuous rate infusion (CRI) of dextrose solution or dextrose solution and insulin on glucose and insulin concentrations in healthy and endotoxin-exposed horses. 9 adult mares. During phase 1, treatments consisted of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (control group; n = 4) or 20% dextrose solution (group 1; 4) administered IV as a 360-minute CRI. During phase 2, treatments consisted of 360-minute CRIs of 20% dextrose solution and insulin administered simultaneously at 367.6 mg/kg/h (30 kcal/kg/d) and 0.07 U/kg/h, respectively, in healthy horses (group 2; n = 4) or horses administered 35 ng of lipopolysaccharide/kg, IV, 24 hours before starting the dextrose solution and insulin CRIs (group 3; 4). A balanced crossover study design was used in both phases. Blood samples were collected for measurement of plasma glucose and insulin concentrations. Infusion of dextrose solution alone resulted in hyperglycemia for most of the 360-minute CRI. Insulin concentration increased significantly in group 1, compared with that in the control group. Mean insulin concentration of group 2 was significantly higher throughout most of the infusion period, compared with concentrations of the control group and group 1. Mean glucose concentration did not differ significantly between groups 2 and 3. Insulin infusion at a rate of 0.07 U/kg/h was found to be effective for the prevention of hyperglycemia when administered concurrently with dextrose solution. This rate was considered to be safe because horses did not become hypoglycemic during infusions of dextrose solution.

  12. [The use of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) with personal insulin pumps in the treatment of children and adolescents with diabetes type 1].

    Jarosz-Chobot, Przemysława

    2004-01-01

    This paper sums up recently published researches on the continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) with the use of insulin pump in children and adolescents with diabetes type 1. Obtaining a balance in the organism metabolism in childhood and adolescence diabetology is nowadays one of the most important rules of the diabetes management in children. One of the modern ways to achieve that goal is the intensive insulin therapy model with use of the insulin pump. In this paper the advantages and disadvantages as well as the indications and contraindications for the CSII in children and adolescents with diabetes are widely discussed.

  13. Position Statement on the management of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII): The Italian Lazio experience.

    Maurizi, Anna R; Suraci, Concetta; Pitocco, Dario; Schiaffini, Riccardo; Tubili, Claudio; Morviducci, Lelio; Giordano, Renato; Manfrini, Silvia; Lauro, Davide; Frontoni, Simona; Pozzilli, Paolo; Buzzetti, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    This document has been developed by a group of Italian diabetologists with extensive experience in continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy to provide indications for the clinical management of CSII in diabetic patients (both type 1 and type 2) based on delivery mode operating in Italy. Although the potential benefits of pump therapy in achieving glycemic goals is now accepted, such results cannot be obtained without specific knowledge and skills being conveyed to patients during ad hoc educational training. To ensure that these new technologies reach their full effectiveness, as demonstrated theoretically and clinically, a careful assessment of the overall therapeutic and educational process is required, in both qualitative and quantitative terms. Therefore, to ensure the cost-effectiveness of insulin pump therapy and to justify reimbursement of therapy costs by the National Health System in Italy, in this article we present a model for diabetes and healthcare centers to follow that provides for different levels of expertise in the field of CSII therapy. This model will guarantee the provision of excellent care during insulin pump therapies, thus representing the basis for a successful outcome and expansion of this form of insulin treatment in patients with diabetes while also keeping costs under control. © 2015 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Islet Transplantation Provides Superior Glycemic Control With Less Hypoglycemia Compared With Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion or Multiple Daily Insulin Injections.

    Holmes-Walker, Deborah Jane; Gunton, Jenny E; Hawthorne, Wayne; Payk, Marlene; Anderson, Patricia; Donath, Susan; Loudovaris, Tom; Ward, Glenn M; Kay, Thomas Wh; OʼConnell, Philip J

    2017-06-01

    The aim was to compare efficacy of multiple daily injections (MDI), continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) and islet transplantation to reduce hypoglycemia and glycemic variability in type 1 diabetes subjects with severe hypoglycemia. This was a within-subject, paired comparison of MDI and CSII and CSII with 12 months postislet transplantation in 10 type 1 diabetes subjects referred with severe hypoglycemia, suitable for islet transplantation. Individuals were assessed with HbA1c, Edmonton Hypoglycemia Score (HYPOscore), continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and in 8 subjects measurements of glucose variability using standard deviation of glucose (SD glucose) from CGM and continuous overlapping net glycemic action using a 4 hour interval (CONGA4). After changing from MDI to CSII before transplantation, 10 subjects reduced median HYPOscore from 2028 to 1085 (P transplantation, there were significant reductions in all baseline parameters versus CSII, respectively, HbA1c (6.4% cf 8.2%), median HYPOscore (0 cf 1085), mean glucose (7.1 cf 8.6 mmol L), SD glucose (1.7 cf 3.2 mmol/L), and CONGA4 (1.6 cf 3.0). In subjects with severe hypoglycemia suitable for islet transplantation, CSII decreased hypoglycemia frequency and glycemic variability compared with MDI whereas islet transplantation resolved hypoglycemia and further improved glycemic variability regardless of insulin independence.

  15. Successful treatment of young infants presenting neonatal diabetes mellitus with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion before genetic diagnosis.

    Rabbone, Ivana; Barbetti, Fabrizio; Marigliano, Marco; Bonfanti, Riccardo; Piccinno, Elvira; Ortolani, Federica; Ignaccolo, Giovanna; Maffeis, Claudio; Confetto, Santino; Cerutti, Franco; Zanfardino, Angela; Iafusco, Dario

    2016-08-01

    Neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM) is defined as hyperglycemia and impaired insulin secretion with onset within 6 months of birth. While rare, NDM presents complex challenges regarding the management of glycemic control. The availability of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion pumps (CSII) in combination with continuous glucose monitoring systems (CGM) provides an opportunity to monitor glucose levels more closely and deliver insulin more safely. We report four cases of young infants with NDM successfully treated with CSII and CGM. Moreover, in two cases with Kir 6.2 mutation, we describe the use of CSII in switching therapy from insulin to sulfonylurea treatment. Insulin pump requirement for the 4 neonatal diabetes cases was the same regardless of disease pathogenesis and c-peptide levels. No dilution of insulin was needed. The use of an integrated CGM system helped in a more precise control of BG levels with the possibility of several modifications of insulin basal rates. Moreover, as showed in the first two case-reports, when the treatment was switched from insulin to glibenclamide, according to identification of Kir 6.2 mutation and diagnosis of NPDM, the CSII therapy demonstrated to be helpful in allowing gradual insulin suspension and progressive introduction of sulfonylurea. During the neonatal period, the use of CSII therapy is safe, more physiological, accurate and easier for the insulin administration management. Furthermore, CSII therapy is safe during the switch of therapy from insulin to glibenclamide for infants with permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus.

  16. Exercise Protects Against Defective Insulin Signaling and Insulin Resistance of Glucose Transport in Skeletal Muscle of Angiotensin II-Infused Rat

    Juthamard Surapongchai

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present study investigated the impact of voluntary exercise on insulin-stimulated glucose transport and the protein expression and phosphorylation status of the signaling molecules known to be involved in the glucose transport process in the soleus muscle as well as other cardiometabolic risks in a rat model with insulin resistance syndrome induced by chronic angiotensin II (ANGII infusion.Materials and Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to sedentary or voluntary wheel running (VWR groups. Following a 6-week period, rats in each group were subdivided and subcutaneously administered either normal saline or ANGII at 100 ng/kg/min for 14 days. Blood pressure, glucose tolerance, insulin-stimulated glucose transport and signaling proteins, including insulin receptor (IR, insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1, Akt, Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160, AMPKα, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK, p38 MAPK, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE, ANGII type 1 receptor (AT1R, ACE2, Mas receptor (MasR and oxidative stress marker in the soleus muscle, were evaluated.Results: Exercise protected against the insulin resistance of glucose transport and defective insulin signaling molecules in the soleus muscle; this effect was associated with a significant increase in AMPK Thr172 (43% and decreases in oxidative stress marker (31% and insulin-induced p38 MAPK Thr180/Tyr182 (45% and SAPK/JNK Thr183/Tyr185 (25%, without significant changes in expression of AT1R, AT2R, ACE, ACE2, and MasR when compared to the sedentary rats given ANGII infusion. At the systemic level, VWR significantly decreased body weight, fat weight, and systolic blood pressure as well as improved serum lipid profiles.Conclusion: Voluntary exercise can alleviate insulin resistance of glucose transport and impaired insulin signaling molecules in the soleus muscle and improve whole-body insulin sensitivity in rats chronically administered with ANGII.

  17. Effect of perioperative insulin infusion on surgical morbidity and mortality: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials.7

    Gandhi, G.Y.; Murad, M.H.; Flynn, D.N.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the effect of perioperative insulin infusion on outcomes important to patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We used 6 search strategies including an electronic database search of MEDLINE, EMBA...

  18. Treatment with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion is associated with lower arterial stiffness

    Vestergaard Rosenlund, Signe; Theilade, Simone; Hansen, Tine Willum

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the relationship between arterial stiffness and insulin treatment mode [continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) versus multiple daily injections (MDI)] in type 1 diabetes patients. METHODS: Cross-sectional study, from 2009 to 2011, including 601 Caucasian type 1...... diabetes patients, 58 and 543 treated with CSII and MDI, respectively. Arterial stiffness was measured as pulse wave velocity (PWV) (SphygmoCor, AtCor Medical). Adjustment included gender, age, diabetes duration, HbA1c, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, P-creatinine, urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER......-treated patients were 48 versus 57 % men, 51 ± 11 versus 54 ± 13 years old (mean ± SD), had 33 ± 12 versus 32 ± 16 years diabetes duration and HbA1c 7.8 ± 0.9 % (62 ± 10 mmol/mol) versus 8.0 ± 1.2 % (64 ± 13 mmol/mol) (P ≥ 0.08 for all). PWV was lower in CSII- versus MDI-treated patients (9.3 ± 2.8 vs. 10.4 ± 3...

  19. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy at Derby Teaching Hospitals: sustained benefits in glucose control.

    Anyanwagu, U; Olaoye, H; Jennings, P; Ashton-Cleary, S; Sugunendran, S; Hughes, D; Idris, I; Wilmot, E G

    2017-08-01

    In the short term, continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) has been associated with improved glycaemic control, reduced hypoglycaemia and improved quality of life (QOL). However, limited data are available on its long-term benefits, particularly in the UK. We aimed to assess the impact of CSII on longer term outcomes. Patient-level data were obtained for CSII users at Derby Teaching Hospitals, UK. Patient confidence and satisfaction questionnaires using the Likert scale were used to assess confidence in self-management. Comparative statistics were conducted using Pearson's chi-square and Student's t-tests. Some 258 CSII users were identified (60.1% female, mean age 43.9 ± 13.4 years). Overall, there was significant decrease in HbA 1c from 78 mmol/mol (9.3 ± 2.0%) at baseline, to 69 mmol/mol (8.5 ± 1.3%) at 6 months [mean difference (md): -0.64; 95% confidence interval (95% CI): -0.91 to -0.37; P quality of care received in the insulin pump service. CSII therapy led to a sustained long-term improvement in glycaemic control in addition to a reduction in self-reported hypoglycaemia. © 2017 Diabetes UK.

  20. The effect of glucagon infusion on kidney function in short-term insulin-dependent juvenile diabetics

    Parving, H H; Christiansen, J S; Noer, I

    1980-01-01

    Kidney function was studied in nine, metabolically well controlled, short-term insulin-dependent male diabetics before and during glucagon infusion of 4 to 5 and 8 to 10 ng/kg/min. Glomerular filtration rate, effective renal plasma flow (steady-state infusion technique, with urinary collections......, using 125I-iothalamate and 131I-iodohippurate), and urinary albumin and beta 2-microglobulin excretion rates were measured. The mean plasma glucagon concentration increased during infusion from 254 +/- 19 pg/ml to 440 +/- 31 pg/ml (low dose) and 730 +/- 52 pg/ml (high dose). Glomerular filtration rate...... increased in all subjects from 133 +/- 5 before the glucagon infusion to 141 +/- 4 with the low dose, and 148 +/- 7 ml/min/1.73 m2 with the high dose (p

  1. Factors influencing insulin secretion from encapsulated islets

    de Haan, BJ; Faas, MM; de Vos, P

    2003-01-01

    Adequate regulation of glucose levels by a microencapsulated pancreatic islet graft requires a minute-to-minute regulation of blood glucose. To design such a transplant, it is mandatory to have sufficient insight in factors influencing the kinetics of insulin secretion by encapsulated islets. The

  2. In silico evaluation of a control system and algorithm for automated insulin infusion in the ICU setting

    Olmos Pablo R

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is known that tight control of glucose in the Intensive Care Unit reduces morbidity and mortality not only in diabetic patients but also in those non-diabetics who become transiently hyperglycemic. Taking advantage of a recently marketed subcutaneous glucose sensor we designed an Automatic Insulin Infusion System (AIIS for inpatient treatment, and tested its stability under simulated clinical conditions. Methods The system included: reference glucose, glucose sensor, insulin and glucose infusion controllers and emergency infusion logic. We carried out computer simulations using Matlab/Simulink®, in both common and worst-case conditions. Results The system was capable of controlling glucose levels without entering in a phase of catastrophic instability, even under severe simulated challenges. Care was taken to include in all simulations the 5-10 minute delay of the subcutaneous glucose signal when compared to the real-time serum glucose signal, a well-known characteristic of all subcutaneous glucose sensors. Conclusions When tested in-Silico, a commercially available subcutaneous glucose sensor allowed the stable functioning of a proportional-derivative Automatic Insulin Infusion System, which was able to maintain glucose within acceptable limits when using a well-established glucose response model simulating a patient. Testing of the system in vivo using animal models is now warranted.

  3. [Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in children less than 6 years-old: long-term progress].

    Colino, Esmeralda; Martín Frías, María; Roldán, Belén; Álvarez, María Ángeles; Yelmo, Rosa; Barrio, Raquel

    2017-11-01

    The aims of the study are to evaluate the efficacy and safety of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) treatment in pre-school children with type I diabetes, and to assess whether the criteria of good metabolic control are achieved. A review was performed on the medical charts of patient's180mg/dl), and hypoglycaemia (<70mg/dl), mean blood glucose, standard deviation and coefficient of variation (SD/mean glucose ×100). Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS. HbA1c decreased from 6.9% (6.7-7.5) to 6.8% (6.4-7.1) after one year of CSII. Afterwards, it remained under 6.8% during the follow-up (median 5 years [3-6]). Prior to CSII, 74% of children had HbA1c levels < 7.5%. It increased to 96% after one year of CSII. Median blood glucose measurements /day was 10 (9-11). Total insulin dose did not change significantly. During the follow-up, there was one episode of DKA and one episode of HS. I/HC at breakfast were higher than at other meals (0.92 vs. 0.55, 0.6 and 0.5, respectively). CSII is effective and safe in pre-school children. It allows good metabolic control (based on Society for Paediatric and Adolescent Diabetes / American Diabetes Association criteria) to be achieved and maintained for long periods of time without an increase in adverse events. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. A mathematical model describing the glycemic response of diabetic patients to meal and i.v. infusion of insulin.

    Fabietti, P G; Calabrese, G; Iorio, M; Bistoni, S; Brunetti, P; Sarti, E; Benedetti, M M

    2001-10-01

    Nine type 1 diabetic patients were studied for 24 hours. During this period they were given three calibrated meals. The glycemia was feedback-controlled by means of an artificial pancreas. The blood concentration of glucose and the infusion speed of the insulin were measured every minute. The experimental data referring to each of the three meals were used to estimate the parameters of a mathematical model suitable for describing the glycemic response of diabetic patients at meals and at the i.v. infusion of exogenous insulin. From the estimate a marked dispersion of the parameters was found, both interindividual and intraindividual. Nevertheless the models thus obtained seem to be usable for the synthesis of a feedback controller, especially in view of creating a portable artificial pancreas that now seems possible owing to the realization (so far experimental) of sufficiently reliable glucose concentration sensors.

  5. Evaluation of an adult insulin infusion protocol at an academic medical center.

    Petrov, Katerina I; Burns, Tammy L; Drincic, Andjela

    2012-05-01

    Acknowledging evidence of possible detrimental effects of tightly controlled blood glucose levels, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and the American Diabetes Association published a consensus statement recommending less strict control for most diabetic patients. As a result of these recommendations, our academic center at Creighton University Medical Center revised its adult insulin infusion protocol to target blood glucose levels ranging from 120 to 180 mg/dL for regular (standard) glycemic control and 80 to 120 mg/dL for tight control; previous targets had ranged from 80 to 180 mg/dL and 70 to 110 mg/dL, respectively. The primary objective was to evaluate the time that blood glucose values were within the target range for patients receiving the new protocol, compared with patients receiving the previous protocol. Our study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of the revised protocol. Using a retrospective chart review, we collected data for 4 months from patients on the old insulin protocol (May to August 2009) and for 4 months from patients on the new protocol (September to December 2009). Secondary endpoints included the number of hypoglycemic episodes (blood glucose below 70 mg/dL) and severe hypoglycemic episodes (blood glucose 40 mg/dL or lower) experienced by patients receiving the new insulin protocol compared with those receiving the former protocol. Patient characteristics were similar at baseline. Blood glucose values stayed within the target range for a significantly shorter time with the new protocol than with the former protocol (44.6% vs. 56.8%, respectively; P protocol. No statistically significant differences in hypoglycemia were observed after the protocol was changed. Hypoglycemia occurred in 31% of the former-protocol patients compared with 18% of the revised-protocol patients. Severe hypoglycemia was experienced by 2.1% of patients on the old protocol and by 3.1% of patients on the new protocol. Rates of

  6. A low dose lipid infusion is sufficient to induce insulin resistance and a pro-inflammatory response in human subjects.

    Liang, Hanyu; Lum, Helen; Alvarez, Andrea; Garduno-Garcia, Jose de Jesus; Daniel, Benjamin J; Musi, Nicolas

    2018-01-01

    The root cause behind the low-grade inflammatory state seen in insulin resistant (obesity and type 2 diabetes) states is unclear. Insulin resistant subjects have elevations in plasma free fatty acids (FFA), which are ligands for the pro-inflammatory toll-like receptor (TLR)4 pathway. We tested the hypothesis that an experimental elevation in plasma FFA (within physiological levels) in lean individuals would upregulate TLR4 and activate downstream pathways (e.g., MAPK) in circulating monocytes. Twelve lean, normal glucose-tolerant subjects received a low dose (30 ml/h) 48 h lipid or saline infusion on two different occasions. Monocyte TLR4 protein level, MAPK phosphorylation, and expression of genes in the TLR pathway were determined before and after each infusion. The lipid infusion significantly increased monocyte TLR4 protein and phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAPK. Lipid-mediated increases in TLR4 and p38 phosphorylation directly correlated with reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity (M value). Lipid increased levels of multiple genes linked to inflammation, including several TLRs, CD180, MAP3K7, and CXCL10. Monocytes exposed in vivo to lipid infusion exhibited enhanced in vitro basal and LPS-stimulated IL-1β secretion. In lean subjects, a small increase in plasma FFA (as seen in insulin resistant subjects) is sufficient to upregulate TLR4 and stimulate inflammatory pathways (MAPK) in monocytes. Moreover, lipids prime monocytes to endotoxin. We provide proof-of-concept data in humans indicating that the low-grade inflammatory state characteristic of obesity and type 2 diabetes could be caused (at least partially) by pro-inflammatory monocytes activated by excess lipids present in these individuals.

  7. Effect of intravenous glucose infusion on renal function in normal man and in insulin-dependent diabetics

    Frandsen, M; Parving, H H; Christiansen, JS

    1981-01-01

    The effect of intravenous glucose infusion on glomerular filtration rate and renal plasma flow (constant infusion technique using 125I-iothalamate and 131I-hippuran) and on urinary excretion of albumin and beta-2-microglobulin were studied in ten normal subjects and seven metabolically well......-controlled insulin-dependent diabetics. Following glucose infusion in normal subjects (n = 10) blood glucose increased from 4.7 +/- 0.1 to 10.9 +/- 0.4 mmol/l (SEM) (p less than or equal to 0.01). Glomerular filtration rate increased from 116 +/- 2 to 123 +/- 3 ml/mi x 1.73 m2 (p less than or equal to 0.01), while...... no change in renal plasma flow was seen - 552 +/- 11 versus 553 +/- 18 ml/min x 1.73 m2. Volume expansion with intravenous saline infusion in six of the normal subjects induced no changes in blood glucose or kidney function. In seven strictly controlled insulin-dependent diabetics, blood glucose values were...

  8. Insulin secretion after short- and long-term low-grade free fatty acid infusion in men with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes

    Storgaard, Heidi; Jensen, Christine B; Vaag, Allan A

    2003-01-01

    We studied the effect of a low-grade short- and long-term 20% Intralipid infusion (0.4 mL(-1) x kg(-1) x h(-1)) on insulin secretion and insulin action in 15 elderly obese men; 7 glucose intolerant first-degree relatives of type 2 diabetic patients (impaired glucose tolerance [IGT] relatives) and 8...... healthy controls of similar age and body mass index (BMI). Intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) and a graded glucose infusion (dose-response test [DORE]) were performed to determine first phase insulin response and to explore the dose response relationship between glucose concentration and insulin...... secretion rates (ISR). ISR were calculated by deconvolution of plasma C-peptide concentrations. Insulin action was determined by performing a 120-minute hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. All tests were performed 3 times, preceded by 0, 2, or 24 hours Intralipid infusion. Disposition indices (DI) were...

  9. Assessment of quality of glycemic control in intensive care patients treated with an insulin infusion at a teaching hospital.

    Gauthier, Lyne; Ferguson, Jessica; Dubé, Anne-Isabelle; Nguyen, Patrick Viet-Quoc; Beauchesne, Marie-France; Boutin, Jean-Marie

    2014-04-01

    To describe the quality of glycemic control in patients in intensive care units (ICUs) treated with an intravenous (IV) insulin infusion at a teaching hospital. This retrospective study included patients admitted to the ICU and treated with an IV insulin infusion for at least 12 h between August 1 and November 30, 2011. Medical charts were reviewed. The primary quality indicator for glycemic control was the mean percent of blood glucose values per patient in the 6.1 to 8 mmol/L target range. A total of 351 patients were included; 61.5% of subjects had no known diabetes. Admissions were mainly for surgery (61.3%). The mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score was 16.8±7.3. The mean percent of blood glucose values per patient in the 6.1 to 8 mmol/L range was 35% for all subjects and 26.2% for patients with diabetes. If a target of 6.1 to 10 mmol/L was considered, those values became 63% and 54.6%. At least 1 episode of hyperglycemia (>10 mmol/L), hypoglycemia (quality of glycemic control in patients in the ICU at our hospital needs to be improved. A new computerized IV insulin protocol is currently being tested. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Improvement of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion on patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus by 3-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography.

    Luo, Hong-Xia; Zhou, Xiao-Ling; Kou, Hong-Ju; Ni, Xian-Wei; Wu, Qing; Zou, Chun-Peng; Wu, Dao-Zhu; Liu, Yong-Fang

    2018-03-01

    Three-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (3D-STE) was used to evaluate the improvement of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion on the left ventricular (LV) systolic function of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitu (T2DM). We recruited T2DM patients (38 cases, diabetic group) and healthy volunteers (35 cases, control group) to collect LV full volume imaging. TomTec software was used for calculating LV global longitudinal strain (LVGLS), global circumferential strain (LVGCS), peak twist (LVTW), peak apical rotation (LVPAR), ejection fraction (LVEF), and torsion (LVT). All indices were re-tested 2 weeks later after intensive treatment of insulin pump. LVGLS, LVGCS, LVTW and LVPAR in diabetic group were significantly decreased than control group. LVGLS and LVGCS in pre-treatment diabetic group were significantly increased than post-treatment. LVGLS, LVGCS, LVTW and LVPAR had correlations among control, pre-treatment and post-treatment diabetic groups. There were no significant differences in LVEDV, LVESV, LVEF, LVT and R-R. LV systolic function of patients with T2DM complicated with microangiopathy was improved after treatment of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. In addition, therapeutic effect could be accurately evaluated by 3D-STE which had vital clinical application.

  11. An observational 7-year study of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion for the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Papargyri, Panagiota; Ojeda Rodríguez, Sylvie; Corrales Hernández, Juan José; Mories Álvarez, María Teresa; Recio Córdova, José María; Delgado Gómez, Manuel; Sánchez Marcos, Ana Isabel; Iglesias López, Rosa Ana; Herrero Ruiz, Ana; Beaulieu Oriol, Myriam; Miralles García, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    This work reports the experience with use of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) in 112 type 1 diabetic patients followed up for 7 years and previously treated with multiple daily insulin injections (MDII). A retrospective, observational study in 112 patients with diabetes mellitus treated with CSII from 2005 to 2012, previously treated with MDII and receiving individualized diabetic education with a specific protocol. Variables analyzed included: prevalence of the different indications of pump treatment; mean annual HbA1c and fructosamine values before and after CSII treatment; and hypoglycemia frequency and symptoms. The most common reason for pump treatment was brittle diabetes (74.1%), followed by frequent or severe hypoglycemia or hypoglycemia unawareness (44.6%). Other indications were irregular food intake times for professional reasons (20.2%), dawn phenomenon (15.7%), pregnancy (12.3%), requirement of very low insulin doses (8.9%), and gestational diabetes (0.9%). HbA1c decreased by between 0.6% and 0.9%, and fructosamine by between 5.1% and 12.26%. Nine percent of patients experienced hypoglycemia weekly, 24% every two weeks, and 48% monthly. No hypoglycemia occurred in 19% of patients. Only 10% had neuroglycopenic symptoms. Hypoglycemia unawareness was found in 21%. Hypoglycemia was more common at treatment start, and its frequency rapidly decreased thereafter. CSII therapy provides a better glycemic control than MDII treatment. Specific patient training and fine adjustment of insulin infusion doses are required to prevent hypoglycemic episodes, which are the most common complications, mainly at the start of treatment. Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Blood Glucose, Insulin and Inorganic Phosphorus in Healthy and Ketotic Dairy Cows after Intravenous Infusion of Glucose Solution

    Radojica Djoković

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the degree of blood glucose utilization by peripheral tissue on the basis of changes in blood concentrations of glucose, insulin and inorganic phosphorus in healthy (n = 10 and ketotic cows (n = 10 after intravenous infusion of glucose solution. Blood samples were taken in both groups of examined cows at the following time intervals: just before (time 0 and 30, 60, 120, 180 and 240 min after intravenous infusion of a total of 500 ml of 50% of glucose solution. Glucose and insulin blood serum values in both groups of cows increased significantly within 30 and 60 min of the experiment (p p p < 0.05 in the blood value of inorganic phosphorus in ketotic cows compared to the healthy ones. This is linked with the active entry of glucose into the glucolytic pathway of peripheral tissues. It can thus be concluded that there is a higher degree of blood glucose utilization by peripheral tissues in ketotic cows.

  13. Diabetes Technology-Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Therapy and Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Adults: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline.

    Peters, Anne L; Ahmann, Andrew J; Battelino, Tadej; Evert, Alison; Hirsch, Irl B; Murad, M Hassan; Winter, William E; Wolpert, Howard

    2016-11-01

    To formulate clinical practice guidelines for the use of continuous glucose monitoring and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in adults with diabetes. The participants include an Endocrine Society-appointed Task Force of seven experts, a methodologist, and a medical writer. The American Association for Clinical Chemistry, the American Association of Diabetes Educators, and the European Society of Endocrinology co-sponsored this guideline. The Task Force developed this evidence-based guideline using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system to describe the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. The Task Force commissioned one systematic review and used the best available evidence from other published systematic reviews and individual studies. One group meeting, several conference calls, and e-mail communications enabled consensus. Committees and members of the Endocrine Society, the American Association for Clinical Chemistry, the American Association of Diabetes Educators, and the European Society of Endocrinology reviewed and commented on preliminary drafts of these guidelines. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and continuous glucose monitoring have an important role in the treatment of diabetes. Data from randomized controlled trials are limited on the use of medical devices, but existing studies support the use of diabetes technology for a wide variety of indications. This guideline presents a review of the literature and practice recommendations for appropriate device use.

  14. Quality of life and impact of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion for children and their parents

    Barnard, Katharine D.; Speight, Jane; Skinner, T. Chas

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to identify key components of quality of life (QoL) and assess the impact of insulin pump therapy on children/adolescents with type 1 diabetes and their parents. The Schedule for the Evaluation of Individualised Quality of Life (SEIQoL) interview was adapted to be (1) insulin pum...

  15. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy and multiple daily insulin injections in type 1 diabetes mellitus: a comparative overview and future horizons.

    Thabit, Hood; Hovorka, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy is currently accepted as a treatment strategy for type 1 diabetes. Transition from multiple daily injection therapy (MDI; including basal-bolus regimens) to CSII is based on expectations of better metabolic control and fewer hypoglycaemic events. Evidence to date has not been always conclusive. Evidence for CSII and MDI in terms of glycaemic control, hypoglycaemia and psychosocial outcomes is reviewed in the adult and paediatric population with type 1 diabetes. Findings from studies on threshold-based insulin pump suspension and predictive low glucose management (PLGM) are outlined. Limitations of current CSII application and future technological developments are discussed. Glycaemic control and quality of life (QOL) may be improved by CSII compared to MDI depending on baseline HbA1c and hypoglycaemia rates. Future studies are expected to provide evidence on clinical and cost effectiveness in those who will benefit the most. Training, structured education and support are important to benefit from CSII. Novel technological approaches linking continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and CSII may help mitigate against frequent hypoglycaemia in those at risk. Development of glucose-responsive automated closed-loop insulin delivery systems may reduce the burden of disease management and improve outcomes in type 1 diabetes.

  16. Insulin secretion and cellular glucose metabolism after prolonged low-grade intralipid infusion in young men

    Jensen, Christine B; Storgaard, Heidi; Holst, Jens Juul

    2003-01-01

    (HI), 40 mU/m(2) x min], 3-(3)H-glucose, indirect calorimetry, and iv glucose tolerance test. Free fatty acid concentrations were similar during basal steady state but 3.7- to 13-fold higher during clamps. P-glucagon increased and the insulin/glucagon ratio decreased at both LI and HI during...... not in the nonoxidative) glucose metabolism in young healthy men. Moreover, insulin hypersecretion perfectly countered the free-fatty acid-induced insulin resistance. Future studies are needed to determine the role of a prolonged moderate lipid load in subjects at increased risk of developing diabetes....

  17. Kinetics of intraperitoneally infused insulin in rats - Functional implications for the bioartificial pancreas

    de Vos, P; Vegter, D; de Haan, B.J; Strubbe, J.H.; Bruggink, J.E.; van Schilfgaarde, R

    Intraperitoneal transplantation of encapsulated islets can restore normoglycemia in diabetic recipients but not normal glucose tolerance nor normal insulin responses to a physiological stimulus. This study investigates whether the intraperitoneal implantation site as such contributes to the

  18. Use and Effectiveness of Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion (CSII) and Multiple Daily Insulin Injection Therapy (MIT) in Children, Adolescents and Young Adults with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Schiel, R; Burgard, D; Perenthaler, T; Stein, G; Kramer, G; Steveling, A

    2016-02-01

    Today continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) is frequently used in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The present cross-sectional trial aimed to document current practice, quality of diabetes control and incidence of acute complications in different age-groups under CSII vs. multiple daily insulin injection therapy (MIT). Moreover the survey analyzed socio-demographic backgrounds of the patients. A total of 901 patients (age 11.5±4.0, diabetes duration 4.0±3.6 years) was entered in the database. Clinical data, laboratory parameters and, using a standardized questionnaire, socio-demographic data were assessed. For age-related analyses patients were allocated to 4 groups: pre-school children (MIT. Patients with CSII vs. MIT had a longer diabetes duration, they used more frequently insulin analogues, performed more frequently blood-glucose self-tests and had a lower insulin dosage per kilogram body weight. In respect of HbA1c, the mean amplitude of blood-glucose excursions, but also of lipids, creatinine, microalbuminuria and blood pressure, there were no differences in neither age-group between patients with CSII and MIT. In patients with CSII and MIT, there was a tendency (pMIT there is an increase of HbA1c towards adolescence. It must also highlighted that CSII seems to be expansive and that CSII is more frequently used in patients with better educational levels and deriving from higher social classes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Effect of continuous subcutaneous insulin pump infusion on glucolipid metabolism as well as inflammation and oxidative stress in placenta of patients with GDM

    Liu Jie

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of continuous subcutaneous insulin pump infusion on glucolipid metabolism as well as inflammation and oxidative stress in placenta of patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. Methods: Patients with GDM who received insulin therapy between March 2013 and May 2016 were selected as the research subjects and randomly divided into multiple subcutaneous insulin injection (MSII group and continuous subcutaneous insulin pump infusion (CSII group. Before and after treatment, serum glucolipid metabolism as well as inflammation and oxidative stress inexes in placenta were determined respectively. Results: 2 weeks and 4 weeks after treatment, FBG, 1hPBG, 2hPBG, Chemerin, Vaspin and Visfatin levels of both groups of patients were significantly lower than those before treatment and FBG, 1hPBG, 2hPBG, Chemerin, Vaspin and Visfatin levels of CSII group were significantly lower than those of MSII group; after delivery, TNF-α, IL-6, ROS and AGEs levels in placenta of CSII group were significantly lower than those of MSII group. Conclusion: Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion can more effectively improve the glucolipid metabolism and inhibit the inflammation and oxidative stress in placenta of patients with GDM than multiple subcutaneous insulin injection.

  20. Young people with type 1 diabetes mellitus: Attitudes, perceptions, and experiences of diabetes management and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy.

    Perry, Lin; James, Steven; Steinbeck, Katharine; Dunbabin, Janet; Lowe, Julia

    2017-06-01

    Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII; insulin pump) use is increasing. However, there is little information about how this technology is used compared with other insulin delivery methods (ie, injections) by young people with type 1 diabetes mellitus in Australia. This study explored young people's attitudes, perceptions, and experiences with diabetes management comparing those using with those not using CSII, and proportions likely to transition to adult services requiring initiation and/or support for CSII use. A survey was undertaken of young people (aged 12 to 18 years) with type 1 diabetes mellitus and their parents/guardians living in Hunter New England, Australia, using a questionnaire designed to collect quantitative, descriptive, and demographic data. Most questions were based on previously developed and validated instruments. In total, 107 respondents returned partially or fully completed questionnaires. Respondents had positive attitudes and perceptions of their self-efficacy and diabetes management, but were moderately disturbed by their diabetes and reported experiencing suboptimal management outcomes. Patterns of associations were demonstrated between knowledge, attitudes, and experiences of diabetes modeled by regression analysis. There were no statistically significant differences in responses between users and nonusers of CSII. Over 40% indicated their intention to use the technology as adults. Opportunities for enhanced diabetes service support were clear, and CSII did not appear to be used to its full potential. Service redesign could enhance support for this young population using all preferred insulin delivery methods and should align to patients' goals and preferences to maximize service and patient gain. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Long-term effects of continuous subcutaneous infusion versus daily subcutaneous injections of growth hormone (GH) on the insulin-like growth factor system, insulin sensitivity, body composition, and bone and lipoprotein metabolism in GH-deficient adults

    Laursen, Torben; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Heickendorff, Lene

    2001-01-01

    injections (inj) in the evening as usual, and 7 received a continuous infusion (inf) of GH by means of a portable pump. The GH dose was kept unchanged before and during the study. Serum levels of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) tended to increase in the patients switched to constant infusion (from 175...... for 6 months are comparable with respect to the IGF-IGFBP axis, whereas intermittent exposure may be of importance for the lipolytic effect of GH. The data on insulin sensitivity and lipoproteins suggest that constant GH exposure is as safe as intermittent GH administration....

  2. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy for Type 1 diabetes mellitus in children.

    Mavinkurve, M; Quinn, A; O'Gorman, C S

    2016-05-01

    Continuous subcutaneous insulin pump therapy (CSII or pump therapy) is a well-recognised treatment option for Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in paediatrics. It is especially suited to children because it optimises control by improving flexibility across age-specific lifestyles. The NICE guidelines (2008) recognise that pump therapy is advantageous and that it should be utilised to deliver best practice. In Ireland, the National Clinical Program for Diabetes will increase the availability and uptake of CSII in children and thus more clinicians are likely to encounter children using CSII therapy. This is a narrative review which discusses the basic principles of pump therapy and focuses on aspects of practical management. Insulin pump management involves some basic yet important principles which optimise the care of diabetes in children. This review addresses the principles of insulin pump management in children which all health care professionals involved in caring for the child with diabetes, shoud be familiar with.

  3. The use of dextrose/insulin infusions during labour and delivery in women with gestational diabetes mellitus: Is there any point?

    Farrant, Maritza T; Williamson, Kathryn; Battin, Malcolm; Hague, William M; Rowan, Janet A

    2017-06-01

    We compared, in 733 women with gestational diabetes mellitus treated with metformin and/or insulin, rates of neonatal hypoglycaemia in those who had received a dextrose/insulin infusion during labour and prior to delivery (n = 132) with those who did not (n = 601). Women who had infusions were more likely to have been treated with insulin (87.1% vs 70.4%, P < 0.01) and have higher mean capillary glucose values (measured four times daily) in the two weeks prior to delivery (P < 0.01). They had lower mean (SD) glucose values in the 12 h prior to delivery (5.1 (1.1) mmol/L vs 5.4 (0.9) mmol/L, P < 0.01). There was no difference between the groups in rates of neonatal hypoglycaemia (glucose <2.6 mmol/L on two or more occasions), 15.9% versus 17.8%, P = 0.78, or of severe neonatal hypoglycaemia (one or more glucose <1.6 mmol/L), 8.3% versus 5.2%, P = 0.15. In the absence of randomised data comparing use of infusions with no infusions, these data are reassuring for clinicians who do not routinely use infusions. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  4. A cross-sectional international survey of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in 377 children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus from 10 countries

    Danne, T; Battelino, T; Kordonouri, O; Hanas, R; Klinkert, C; Ludvigsson, J; Barrio, R; Aebi, C; Gschwend, S; Mullis, PE; Schumacher, U; Zumsteg, U; Morandi, A; Rabbone, [No Value; Cherubini, [No Value; Toni, S; de Beaufort, C; Hindmarsh, P; Sumner, A; van Waarde, WM; van den Berg, N; Phillip, M

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To document current practices using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) by downloading electronically the 90-d pump data held within the pump memory and relating that to clinical data from children and adolescents in different pediatric diabetes centers from Europe and Israel.

  5. A web-based study of the relationship of duration of insulin pump infusion set use and fasting blood glucose level in adults with type 1 diabetes.

    Sampson Perrin, Alysa J; Guzzetta, Russell C; Miller, Kellee M; Foster, Nicole C; Lee, Anna; Lee, Joyce M; Block, Jennifer M; Beck, Roy W

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the impact of infusion set use duration on glycemic control, we conducted an Internet-based study using the T1D Exchange's online patient community, Glu ( myGlu.org ). For 14 days, 243 electronically consented adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D) entered online that day's fasting blood glucose (FBG) level, the prior day's total daily insulin (TDI) dose, and whether the infusion set was changed. Mean duration of infusion set use was 3.0 days. Mean FBG level was higher with each successive day of infusion set use, increasing from 126 mg/dL on Day 1 to 133 mg/dL on Day 3 to 147 mg/dL on Day 5 (P<0.001). TDI dose did not vary with increased duration of infusion set use. Internet-based data collection was used to rapidly conduct the study at low cost. The results indicate that FBG levels increase with each additional day of insulin pump infusion set use.

  6. Designing the modern pump: engineering aspects of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion software.

    Welsh, John B; Vargas, Steven; Williams, Gary; Moberg, Sheldon

    2010-06-01

    Insulin delivery systems attracted the efforts of biological, mechanical, electrical, and software engineers well before they were commercially viable. The introduction of the first commercial insulin pump in 1983 represents an enduring milestone in the history of diabetes management. Since then, pumps have become much more than motorized syringes and have assumed a central role in diabetes management by housing data on insulin delivery and glucose readings, assisting in bolus estimation, and interfacing smoothly with humans and compatible devices. Ensuring the integrity of the embedded software that controls these devices is critical to patient safety and regulatory compliance. As pumps and related devices evolve, software engineers will face challenges and opportunities in designing pumps that are safe, reliable, and feature-rich. The pumps and related systems must also satisfy end users, healthcare providers, and regulatory authorities. In particular, pumps that are combined with glucose sensors and appropriate algorithms will provide the basis for increasingly safe and precise automated insulin delivery-essential steps to developing a fully closed-loop system.

  7. Proportional Insulin Infusion in Closed-Loop Control of Blood Glucose

    Grasman, Johan; Callender, Hannah L.; Mensink, Marco; Pietropaolo, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    A differential equation model is formulated that describes the dynamics of glucose concentration in blood circulation. The model accounts for the intake of food, expenditure of calories and the control of glucose levels by insulin and glucagon. These and other hormones affect the blood glucose level

  8. Pre-exercise blood glucose affects glycemic variation of aerobic exercise in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion.

    Hu, Yun; Zhang, Dan-Feng; Dai, Lu; Li, Zheng; Li, Hui-Qin; Li, Feng-Fei; Liu, Bing-Li; Sun, Xiao-Juan; Ye, Lei; He, Ke; Ma, Jian-Hua

    2018-05-03

    Considering the insulin sensitivity may increase by exercise particularly in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), glycemic variation during exercise needs to be studied when the patients are treated with insulin. This study aimed to explore the influence factors of the efficacy and safety of aerobic exercise in patients with T2D treated with Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion (CSII). A total of 267 patients with T2D, treated with CSII, were included. Glycemic variations were assessed by continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). Patients were asked to complete 30 min aerobic exercise for at least one time during CGM. The patients were divided into effective and ineffective group by incremental glucose area under curve from 0 to 60 min after exercise (AUC 0-60 min ). The patients completed a total of 776 times of aerobic exercises. Blood glucose decreased fastest in the first 60 min of exercise. Pre-exercise blood glucose (PEBG) was negatively correlated with AUC 0-60 min (standardized β = -0.386, P AUC of blood glucose ≤ 4.4 mmol/L (standardized β = -0.078, P = 0.034), and was significantly higher in effective group than in ineffective group (P AUC 0-60 min during post-dinner was significantly higher than that during pre-lunch, post-lunch and pre-dinner (P  16.7 mmol/L. Post-dinner exercise decreases the blood glucose better than other periods of the day. ChiCTR-ONC-17010400, www.chictr.org.cn. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of treatment with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion versus multiple daily insulin injections with bolus calculator in patients with type 1 diabetes.

    Pérez-García, L; Goñi-Iriarte, M J; García-Mouriz, M

    2015-01-01

    A study of the glycemic control, quality of life, and fear and perception of hypoglycemia by comparing continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) group with multiple daily inyections (MDI) with bolus calculator group. This is a retrospective cohort study with following up during the first 12 months that CSII group (n=30) begins the use of "bolus wizard" and the MDI-calculator (n=30) group begins the use of the bolus calculator (Accu-Chek(®) Aviva Expert). HbA1c (3, 6 and 12 months). Questionnaires used: EsDQOL (quality of life), FH-15 (fear of hypoglycemia), and Clarke (perception of hypoglycemia). T Student and nonparametric tests. The average reduction in HbA1c during the study was significantly higher in CSII group (-0.56±0.84%) compared with the MDI group (0.097±0.94%), P=.028. The average basal insulin dose was significantly higher in the MDI group (at baseline, 6 and 12 months). No significant differences were found between the 2 treatment groups after analyzing the EsDQOL, FH-15 and Clarke questionnaires. In the CSII group, perceived quality of life assessed by the EsDQOL questionnaire was found to be better at the end of the study than at the beginning of using the insulin pump. The average reduction in HbA1c was significantly higher in the CSII group. In the CSII group, perceived quality of life was better at the end of the study than at the beginning. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Effectiveness of Multiple Daily Injections or Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion for Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in Clinical Practice

    Chun-xiu Gong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To determine whether multiple daily injections (MDIs or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII contributes to better glucose control in children with different type 1 diabetes duration. Methods. Subjects were grouped according to early (≤1 year after disease onset; 1A or late (1–3 years after onset; 2A MDIs/CSII treatment initiation. Corresponding control groups (1B, 2B received insulin injections twice daily. Results. HbA1c levels were consistently lower in group 1A than in group 1B (6 months (T2: 7.37% versus 8.21%; 12 months (T3: 7.61% versus 8.41%; 24/36 months (T4/T5: 7.61% versus 8.72%; all P<0.05, but were lower in group 2A than in group 2B only at T2 (8.36% versus 9.19%; P=0.04. Levels were lower in group 1A than in group 2A when disease duration was matched (7.61% versus 8.49%; P<0.05. Logistic regression revealed no correlation between HbA1c level and MDIs/CSII therapy. HbA1c levels were only negatively related to insulin dosage. Conclusions. Blood glucose control was better in patients receiving MDIs/CSII than in those receiving conventional treatment. Early MDIs/CSII initiation resulted in prolonged maintenance of low HbA1c levels compared with late initiation. MDIs/CSII therapy should be combined with comprehensive management.

  11. Insulin fibrillation: The influence and coordination of Zn2+

    Frankær, Christian Grundahl; Sønderby, Pernille; Bang, Maria Blanner

    2017-01-01

    fibrils has been debated for some years. We have therefore investigated the influence and binding geometry of zinc in fibrillated insulin using extended X-ray absorption fine-structure and X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy. The results were validated with fibre diffraction, Transmission...... Electron Microscopy and Thioflavin T fluorescence measurements. It is well-known that Zn2+ ions coordinate and stabilize the hexameric forms of insulin. However, this study is the first to show that zinc indeed binds to the insulin fibrils. Furthermore, zinc influences the kinetics and the morphology...... of the fibrils. It also shows that zinc coordinates to histidine residues in an environment, which is similar to the coordination seen in the insulin R6 hexamers, where three histidine residues and a chloride ion is coordinating the zinc....

  12. Fear of needles in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus on multiple daily injections and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion.

    Cemeroglu, Ayse Pinar; Can, Argun; Davis, Alan T; Cemeroglu, Ozlem; Kleis, Lora; Daniel, Maala S; Bustraan, Jessica; Koehler, Tracy J

    2015-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of fear of needles and its effect on glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) on multiple daily injections (MDI) or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII). Patients aged 6 to 17 years with T1DM on MDI or CSII (n = 150) were enrolled. All caregivers and patients aged ≥11 years completed a "Diabetes Fear of Injecting and Self-testing Questionnaire" (D-FISQ). Needle phobia was defined as a score ≥6 for fear of self-testing (FST), fear of injections (FI), and fear of infusion-site changes (FISC). Positive FST scores were noted in 10.0% and positive FI or FISC scores in 32.7% (caregivers' responses). Patients aged 6 to 10 years on CSII had greater fear (FISC) than those on MDI (FI) (P = .010). FST was inversely related to the number of daily blood sugar checks (P = .003). Patients with positive scores for FI/FISC or FST had significantly higher glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels than those without. An inverse association was noted between positive FI/FISC scores and age of the patient (P = .029). Based on patient responses, FST severity was directly related to the age of the patient (P = .013). Needle phobia is common in children with T1DM. Although FI/FISC are more common in younger children, especially in those on CSII, FST is more often encountered in older patients. Patients with a more intense fear of needles have higher HbA1c levels and less frequent blood sugar monitoring. Identifying these patients may help improve glycemic control.

  13. [Current status of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and continuous glucose monitoring systems in the Community of Madrid].

    Arranz Martín, Alfonso; Calle Pascual, Alfonso; Del Cañizo Gómez, Francisco Javier; González Albarrán, Olga; Lisbona Gil, Arturo; Botella Serrano, Marta; Pallardo Sánchez, Luis Felipe

    2015-04-01

    To analyze the available information about continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems in the public health care system of the Community of Madrid. A survey consisting of 31 items was sent to the 28 endocrinology department of the Madrid public hospitals. Items focused on CSII and CGM and included patients' registrations, as well as data regarding healthcare, administrative, and logistic aspects. Responses from a total of 20 hospitals where these procedures are used were received from March 2013 to May 2014. Data about pediatric patients were obtained from adult endocrinology departments, except for two hospitals which directly reported the information. A total of 1256 CSII pumps were recorded in the Madrid region, of which 1089 were used by adults, and the remaining 167 by pediatric patients. During 2013, 151 new CSII systems were implanted (12% of the total), while 14 pumps were withdrawn. Availability of human resources (medical assistance) and the number of staff practitioners experienced in management of these systems widely varied between hospitals. Eighty-five percent of hospitals used retrospective CGM systems, and 40% routinely placed them before starting an insulin pump. Thirteen hospitals (65%) used long-term, real-time CGM systems in selected cases (a total of 67 patients). Use of these technologies in diabetes is unequal between public health care hospitals in Madrid, and is still significantly lower as compared to other countries with similar incomes. However, there appears to be a trend to an increase in their use. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Circadian hormone profiles and insulin sensitivity in patients with Addison's disease: a comparison of continuous subcutaneous hydrocortisone infusion with conventional glucocorticoid replacement therapy.

    Björnsdottir, Sigridur; Øksnes, Marianne; Isaksson, Magnus; Methlie, Paal; Nilsen, Roy M; Hustad, Steinar; Kämpe, Olle; Hulting, Anna-Lena; Husebye, Eystein S; Løvås, Kristian; Nyström, Thomas; Bensing, Sophie

    2015-07-01

    Conventional glucocorticoid replacement therapy in patients with Addison's disease (AD) is unphysiological with possible adverse effects on mortality, morbidity and quality of life. The diurnal cortisol profile can likely be restored by continuous subcutaneous hydrocortisone infusion (CSHI). The aim of this study was to compare circadian hormone rhythms and insulin sensitivity in conventional thrice-daily regimen of glucocorticoid replacement therapy with CSHI treatment in patients with AD. An open, randomized, two-period, 12-week crossover multicentre trial in Norway and Sweden. Ten Norwegian patients were admitted for 24-h sampling of hormone profiles. Fifteen Swedish patients underwent euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp. Thrice-daily regimen of oral hydrocortisone (OHC) and CSHI treatment. We measured the circadian rhythm of cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-1, (IGF-1), IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), glucose, insulin and triglycerides during OHC and CSHI treatment. Euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp was used to assess insulin sensitivity. Continuous subcutaneous hydrocortisone infusion provided a more physiological circadian cortisol curve including a late-night cortisol surge. ACTH levels showed a near normal circadian variation for CSHI. CSHI prevented a continuous decrease in glucose during the night. No difference in insulin sensitivity was observed between the two treatment arms. Continuous subcutaneous hydrocortisone infusion replacement re-established a circadian cortisol rhythm and normalized the ACTH levels. Patients with CSHI replacement had a more stable night-time glucose level compared with OHC without compromising insulin sensitivity. Thus, restoring night-time cortisol levels might be advantageous for patients with AD. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Blood glucose response to rescue dextrose in hypoglycemic, critically ill patients receiving an insulin infusion.

    Murthy, Manasa S; Duby, Jeremiah J; Parker, Patricia L; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe P; Roach, Denise M; Louie, Erin L

    2015-08-01

    There is inadequate guidance for clinicians on selection of the optimal dextrose 50% (D50W) dose for hypoglycemia correction in critically ill patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the blood glucose (BG) response to D50W in critically ill patients. A retrospective analysis was conducted of critically ill patients who received D50W for hypoglycemia (BG 150 mg/dL), resulting in a 6.8% rate of overcorrection; 49% of hypoglycemic episodes (230/470) corrected to a BG >100 mg/dL. A multivariable GEE analysis showed a significantly higher BG response in participants with diabetes (0.002) but a lower response in those with recurrent hypoglycemia (P = 0.049). The response to D50W increased with increasinginsulin infusion rate (P = 0.022). Burn patients experienced a significantly larger BG response compared with cardiac, medical, neurosurgical, or surgical patients. The observed median effect of D50W on BG was approximately 4 mg/dL per gram of D50W administered. Application of these data may aid in rescue protocol development that may reduce glucose variability associated with hypoglycemic episodes and the correction. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Early mechanism of action of arterially infused ethanol: an experimental study on the influence of infusion speed

    Han, Joon Koo

    1988-01-01

    Abdominal aortography and histopathologic examination after absolute ethanol infusion at fast (0.4cc/sec) and slow speed (0.04cc/sec) were performed on 16 rats (2 controls. 7 fast infusion group. 7 slow infusion group). Angiographic and histopathologic findings were correlated and the findings of slow and fast infusion groups were studied. The results are as follows: 1. Histopathologic findings of the fast infusion group revealed wide area of glomerular and tubular collapses, obliteration of the free space between the Bowmann's capsule and glomerulus, sloughing and loss of the endothelium, fresh thrombi attached to the wall, and cleavage of the muscle layer of the arteries. 2. Angiographic findings of the fast infusion group revealed luminal irregularity, early obstruction of the aorta and the renal arteries, and delayed circulation time. 3. Histopathologic findings of the slow infusion group revealed degenerated, coalesced red blood cell packed in the glomeruli, focal areas of severe glomerular and tubular damage on relatively normal background, endothelial and muscular damage of the arteries. 4. Angiographic findings of the slow infusion group revealed focal perfusion defect of the kidney, delayed circulation time, and mild luminal irregularity, but there was no obstruction of the major arteries. 5. In conclusion, author believes that endothelial damage and thrombus formation from the damaged vessel wall, as well as direct cytotoxicity and in situ emboli formation play a significant role in the embolic effect of absolute ethanol.

  17. Casein infusion rate influences feed intake differently depending on metabolizable protein balance in dairy cows: A multilevel meta-analysis.

    Martineau, R; Ouellet, D R; Kebreab, E; Lapierre, H

    2016-04-01

    The effects of casein infusion have been investigated extensively in ruminant species. Its effect on responses in dry matter intake (DMI) has been reviewed and indicated no significant effect. The literature reviewed in the current meta-analysis is more extensive and limited to dairy cows fed ad libitum. A total of 51 studies were included in the meta-analysis and data were fitted to a multilevel model adjusting for the correlated nature of some studies. The effect size was the mean difference calculated by subtracting the means for the control from the casein-infused group. Overall, casein infusion [average of 333 g of dry matter (DM)/d; range: 91 to 1,092 g of DM/d] tended to increase responses in DMI by 0.18 kg/d (n=48 studies; 3 outliers). However, an interaction was observed between the casein infusion rate (IR) and the initial metabolizable protein (MP) balance [i.e., supply minus requirements (NRC, 2001)]. When control cows were in negative MP balance (n=27 studies), responses in DMI averaged 0.28 kg/d at mean MP balance (-264 g/d) and casein IR (336 g/d), and a 100g/d increment in the casein IR from its mean increased further responses by 0.14 kg/d (MP balance being constant), compared with cows not infused with casein. In contrast, when control cows were in positive MP balance (n=22 studies; 2 outliers), responses in DMI averaged -0.20 kg/d at mean casein IR (339 g/d), and a 100g/d increment in the casein IR from its mean further decreased responses by 0.33 kg/d, compared with cows not infused with casein. Responses in milk true protein yield at mean casein IR were greater (109 vs. 65 g/d) for cows in negative vs. positive MP balance, respectively, and the influence of the casein IR on responses was significant only for cows in negative MP balance. A 100g/d increment in the casein IR from its mean increased further responses in milk true protein yield by 25 g/d, compared with cows not infused with casein. Responses in blood urea concentration increased in

  18. Continuous insulin administration via complex central venous catheter infusion tubing is another risk factor for blood glucose imbalance. A retrospective study.

    Maury, Eric; Vitry, Paola; Galbois, Arnauld; Ait-Oufella, Hafid; Baudel, Jean-Luc; Guidet, Bertrand; Offenstadt, Georges

    2012-06-14

    We assessed the potential impact of infusion tubing on blood glucose imbalance in ICU patients given intensive insulin therapy (IIT). We compared the incidence of blood glucose imbalance in patients equipped, in a nonrandomized fashion, with either conventional tubing or with a multiport infusion device. We retrospectively analyzed the nursing files of 35 patients given IIT through the distal line of a double-lumen central venous catheter. A total of 1389 hours of IIT were analyzed for occurrence of hypoglycemic events [defined as arterial blood glucose below 90 mg/dL requiring discontinuation of insulin]. Twenty-one hypoglycemic events were noted (density of incidence 15 for 1000 hours of ITT). In 17 of these 21 events (81%), medication had been administered during the previous hour through the line connected to the distal lumen of the catheter. Conventional tubing use was associated with a higher density of incidence of hypoglycemic events than multiport infusion device use (23 vs. 2 for 1,000 hours of IIT; rate ratio = 11.5; 95% confidence interval, 2.71-48.8; p tubing carrying other medications can lead to the delivery of significant amounts of unscheduled products. Hypoglycaemia observed during IIT could be related to this phenomenon. The use of a multiport infusion device with a limited dead volume could limit hypoglycemia in patients on IIT.

  19. Influence of Flavonoids on Mechanism of Modulation of Insulin Secretion.

    Soares, Juliana Mikaelly Dias; Pereira Leal, Ana Ediléia Barbosa; Silva, Juliane Cabral; Almeida, Jackson R G S; de Oliveira, Helinando Pequeno

    2017-01-01

    The development of alternatives for insulin secretion control in vivo or in vitro represents an important aspect to be investigated. In this direction, natural products have been progressively explored with this aim. In particular, flavonoids are potential candidates to act as insulin secretagogue. To study the influence of flavonoid on overall modulation mechanisms of insulin secretion. The research was conducted in the following databases and platforms: PubMed, Scopus, ISI Web of Knowledge, SciELO, LILACS, and ScienceDirect, and the MeSH terms used for the search were flavonoids, flavones, islets of Langerhans, and insulin-secreting cells. Twelve articles were included and represent the basis of discussion on mechanisms of insulin secretion of flavonoids. Papers in ISI Web of Knowledge were in number of 1, Scopus 44, PubMed 264, ScienceDirect 511, and no papers from LILACS and SciELO databases. According to the literature, the majority of flavonoid subclasses can modulate insulin secretion through several pathways, in an indication that corresponding molecule is a potential candidate for active materials to be applied in the treatment of diabetes. The action of natural products on insulin secretion represents an important investigation topic due to their importance in the diabetes controlIn addition to their typical antioxidant properties, flavonoids contribute to the insulin secretionThe modulation of insulin secretion is induced by flavonoids according to different mechanisms. Abbreviations used: K ATP channels: ATP-sensitive K + channels, GLUT4: Glucose transporter 4, ERK1/2: Extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2, L-VDCCs: L-type voltage-dependent Ca +2 channels, GLUT1: Glucose transporter 1, AMPK: Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, PTP1B: Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, GLUT2: Glucose transporter 2, cAMP: Cyclic adenosine monophosphate, PKA: Protein kinase A, PTK: Protein tyrosine kinase, CaMK II: Ca 2+ /calmodulin

  20. Effects of intravenous glucose infusion and nutritional balance on serum concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids, glucose, insulin, and progesterone in nonlactating dairy cows.

    Vieira, F V R; Lopes, C N; Cappellozza, B I; Scarpa, A B; Cooke, R F; Vasconcelos, J L M

    2010-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate serum concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids, glucose, insulin, and progesterone in nonlactating dairy cows according to nutritional balance and glucose infusion. Ten nonlactating, ovariectomized Gir x Holstein cows were stratified by body weight (BW) and body condition score (BCS) on d -28 of the study, and randomly assigned to 1) negative nutrient balance (NB) or 2) positive nutrient balance (PB). From d -28 to d 0, cows were allocated according to nutritional treatment (5 cows/treatment) into 2 low-quality pastures with reduced forage availability. However, PB cows individually received, on average, 3 kg/cow per day (as-fed) of a concentrate during the study. All cows had an intravaginal progesterone releasing device inserted on d -14, which remained in cows until the end of the study. Cow BW and BCS were assessed again on d 0. On d 0, cows within nutritional treatment were randomly assigned to receive, in a crossover design containing 2 periods of 24h each, 1) intravenous glucose infusion (GLU; 0.5 g of glucose/kg of BW, as a 5% glucose solution administered, on average, at 32 mL/min over a 3-h period), or 2) intravenous saline infusion (SAL; 0.9% solution infused on average at 32 mL/min over a 3-h period). Prior to the beginning of each period, all cows were fasted for 12h. Blood samples were collected, relative to the beginning of the infusion, at -12 and -11.5h (beginning of fasting), and at -0.5, 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6h. Following the last blood collection of period 1, cows received (PB) or not (NB) concentrate and were returned to their respective pastures. Changes in BCS and BW were greater in NB cows compared with PB cows (-0.60 and -0.25+/-0.090 for BCS, respectively; -22.4 and 1.2+/-6.58 kg for BW, respectively). Cows receiving GLUC had greater glucose concentrations from 0.5 to 3h relative to infusion compared with SAL cows. Insulin concentrations were greater in PB cows assigned to GLUC compared

  1. Clinical value of Flash glucose monitoring in patients with type 1 diabetes treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion.

    Moreno-Fernandez, Jesus; Pazos-Couselo, Marcos; González-Rodriguez, Maria; Rozas, Pedro; Delgado, Manuel; Aguirre, Miguel; Garcia-Lopez, Jose Manuel

    2018-06-12

    To analyze the clinical impact of the Flash glucose monitoring system in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII). A 24-week retrospective cohort study in CSII-treated T1DM patients exposed (1:1) to the Flash glucose monitoring system vs. self-monitoring of capillary blood glucose (SMBG). The primary outcome was the difference in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels between both groups at the end of the study. Thirty-six patients with a mean age of 38.2 years (range 22-55) and a mean T1DM duration of 20.9±7.8 years, treated with CSII for 7.1±5.4 years, were enrolled into the study. At the end of the study, mean HbA1c levels improved in patients in the Flash group (7.1±0.7 vs. 7.8±1.0, p=0.04). Only the Flash group showed a significant decrease in HbA1c levels of -0.4% (95% CI, -0.6, -0.2; p=0.004) during follow-up. Flash patients captured 93.9% of data through 17.8±9.9 scans daily. In fact, the Flash cohort showed a three-fold increase in daily self-monitoring of glucose, while daily frequency of SMBG decreased during the study (-1.8 tests/24h (95% CI -3, -0.7; p=0.01). No safety issues related to Flash use were recorded. The Flash glucose monitoring system is a novel approach to improve blood glucose control in CSII-treated T1DM patients. Randomized controlled trials are needed to assess the effectiveness of this system in CSII-treated T1DM patients. Copyright © 2018 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Changes in Blood Values of Glucose, Insulin and Inorganic Phosphorus in Healthy and Ketotic Dairy Cows after Intravenous Infusion of Propionate Solution

    R. Djoković

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the degree of blood glucose utilization by peripheral tissue on the basis of changes in blood concentrations of glucose, insulin and inorganic phosphorus in healthy (n = 10 and ketotic cows (n = 10 after intravenous infusion of propionate solution. Blood samples were taken in both groups of examined cows at the following time intervals: just before (time 0 and 8, 30, 60, 120, 180, 240 and 480 min after the intravenous infusion of 1.84 mol l-1 solution of propionate in the amount of 1 ml kg-1 of body weight. Glucose and insulin blood serum values in both groups of cows increased significantly within 120 min of the experiment (p p p p < 0.05 in blood value of inorganic phosphorus in ketotic cows in comparison with healthy ones. This is linked with the active entry of glucose into glucolytic pathway of peripheral tissues. It can thus be concluded that there is a higher degree of blood glucose utilization by peripheral tissues in ketotic cows.

  3. The influence of GLP-1 on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion

    Kjems, Lise L; Holst, Jens Juul; Vølund, Aage

    2003-01-01

    . However, the dose-response relationship between GLP-1 and basal and glucose-stimulated prehepatic insulin secretion rate (ISR) is currently not known. Seven patients with type 2 diabetes and seven matched nondiabetic control subjects were studied. ISR was determined during a graded glucose infusion of 2...

  4. Influence of initial insulin dosage on blood glucose dynamics of children and adolescents with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Wang, Yi; Gong, Chunxiu; Cao, Bingyan; Meng, Xi; Wei, Liya; Wu, Di; Liang, Xuejun; Li, Wenjing; Liu, Min; Gu, Yi; Su, Chang

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the effect of initial insulin dosage on blood glucose (BG) dynamics, β-cell protection, and oxidative stress in type 1 diabetes mellitus. Sixty newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus patients were randomly assigned to continuous subcutaneous insulin infusions of 0.6 ± 0.2 IU/kg/d (group 1), 1.0 ± 0.2 IU/kg/d (group 2), or 1.4 ± 0.2 IU/kg/d (group 3) for 3 wk. BG was monitored continuously for the first 10 d and the last 2 d of wk 2 and 3. A total of 24-hour urinary 8-iso-PGF2α was assayed on days 8, 9, and 10. The occurrence and duration of the honeymoon period were recorded. Fasting C-peptide and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were assayed after 1, 6, and 12 months of insulin treatment. BG decreased to the target range by the end of wk 3 (group 1), wk 2 (group 2), or wk 1 (group 3). The actual insulin dosage over the 3 wk, frequency of hypoglycemia on wk 1 and 2, and median BG at the end of wk 1 differed significantly, but not 8-iso-PGF2α and the honeymoon period in the three groups. No severe hypoglycemia event was observed in any patient, but there was significant difference in the first occurrence of hypoglycemia. Differences in initial insulin dosage produced different BG dynamics in wk 1, equivalent BG dynamics on wk 2 and 3, but had no influence on short- and long-term BG control and honeymoon phase. The wide range of initial insulin dosage could be chosen if guided by BG monitoring. © 2016 The Authors. Pediatric Diabetes published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Infusion of butyrate affects plasma glucose, butyrate, and ß-hydroxybutyrate but not plasma insulin in lactating dairy cows

    The objective of this research was to investigate the effects on plasma metabolites and rumen measures when butyrate was infused into the rumen or abomasum of lactating cows. Jugular catheters were inserted into 5 ruminally fistulated Holstein cows (94.2 ± 26.3 days in milk [DIM]; 717 ± 45 kg body w...

  6. Influence of apolipoproteins on the association between lipids and insulin sensitivity

    Baldi, Simona; Bonnet, Fabrice; Laville, Martine

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated whether the association of insulin sensitivity with HDL cholesterol (HDL) and triglycerides is influenced by major plasma apolipoproteins, as suggested by recent experimental evidence....

  7. Will long acting insulin analogs influence the use of insulin pump therapy in type 1 diabetes?

    DeVries, J. Hans

    2005-01-01

    Insulin pump therapy enjoys a steadily growing number of users and is associated with an approximately 0.5% lower A1c as compared to flexible insulin injection therapy in type 1 diabetes patients. An important question is whether superiority of insulin pump therapy persists in the era of rapid

  8. The use of Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion (CSII): parental and professional perceptions of self-care mastery and autonomy in children and adolescents.

    Weissberg-Benchell, Jill; Goodman, Shirley S; Antisdel Lomaglio, Jeanne; Zebracki, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    To describe parent-perceived mastery of Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion (CSII) specific skills and level of autonomy for these tasks among youth with type 1 diabetes. One hundred and sixty-three parents of youth using CSII and 142 diabetes clinicians participated. Parents reported their child's mastery and autonomy of CSII-specific skills. Clinicians indicated the age at which 50% of their patients mastered these skills. Parents report CSII skill mastery between 10.9 and 12.8 years. Very few achieved skill mastery on all CSII-related tasks. Parent- and clinician-expectations for age of skill acquisition were consistent with one another. Parents shared CSII task responsibility with their children even after their children have attained skill mastery. The recent emphasis on maintaining parental involvement in diabetes care seems to have been translated into clinical practice. Parents remain involved in their child's CSII care even after they believe their child has mastered these skills.

  9. Studies on insulin receptor, 2. Studies on the influence of starvation and high fat diet on insulin receptor

    Sakai, Y [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1979-08-01

    The present study is to investigate an influence of starvation and high fat diet on insulin receptor of the plasma membrane by means of radioreceptor assay using /sup 125/I-labelled insulin. Male guinea pigs of Hartley strain were employed for the starvation study, and /sup 125/I-insulin binding capacity on the plasma membrane of the liver and kidney was determined at 24, 48 and 72 hours of the fast after the last meal. Male rats of Wistar strain were employed for the high fat study where the diet containing 35% of butter was fed ad libitum for 38 or 68 days. The animals were killed at the fast of 12 hours, and /sup 125/I-insulin binding capacity on the plasma membrane of the liver was determined. The results obtained are summarized as follows: 1) An increase in /sup 125/I-insulin binding capacity on the plasma membrane of the liver and kidney was observed by the starvation for 24 to 72 hours. 2) The mechanism of the increase by starvation was considered to be different by the organs; it was due to an increase in number of insulin receptor in the liver, and due to an increase in affinity of insulin receptor in the kidney. 3) In non-obese rats fed with high fat diet, the number of insulin receptor on the liver plasma membrane showed a decrease, and this observation clearly indicated that the decrease in number of the receptor did not depend on the obesity. 4) Obese rats also fed with high fat diet presented a decrease in number of insulin receptor without an elevation of insulin levels in the circulating blood. This indicated that at least in the obese rats fed with high fat diet, the decrease in number of the receptor was not due to hyperinsulinemia.

  10. [Influence of an infusion of 5- or 20% glucose solution on blood glucose and inorganic phosphate concentrations in dairy cows].

    Aldaek, T A A; Failing, K; Wehrend, A; Klymiuk, M C

    2011-01-01

    The study was performed to evaluate the influence of an intravenous infusion of 5% and 20% dextrose solution on the plasma concentration of glucose and inorganic phosphate in healthy, dairy cows. Ten healthy, lactating, nonpregnant 3 to 6 year-old Holstein-Friesian cows were included in this investigation. The daily milk yield was 20.3±2.7 liters. Blood plasma concentrations of inorganic phosphate and glucose were determined before, during, immediately and 60 minutes after infusion of 0.9% physiological saline, 5% or 20% dextrose solution. A statistically significant influence of dextrose infusion on blood glucose concentration was observed. After 20% dextrose infusion (200 g dextrose) the blood glucose concentration increased by approximately 13.26 mmol/l. The administration of 5% dextrose solution (50 g dextrose) yielded an increase of blood glucose concentration by 3.31 mmol/l. There was no significant correlation between plasma inorganic phosphate concentrations and infusion of 0.9% saline, 5% or 20% dextrose solution. Intravenous administration of 1000 ml of 5% or 20% dextrose solution does not induce a lasting plasma phosphate reduction and is suitable for elevating the blood glucose concentration.

  11. Assessment of use of specific features of subcutaneous insulin infusion systems and their relationship to metabolic control in patients with type 1 diabetes.

    Quirós, Carmen; Patrascioiu, Ioana; Giménez, Marga; Vinagre, Irene; Vidal, Mercè; Jansà, Margarita; Conget, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) have available several specific features of these devices. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between real use of them and the degree of glycemic control in patients using this therapy. Forty-four T1DM patients on CSII therapy with or without real-time continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) were included. Data from 14 consecutive days were retrospectively collected using the therapy management software CareLink Personal/Pro(®) and HbA1c measurement performed at that period. The relationship between the frequency of usie of specific features of insulin pumps (non-sensor augmented or sensor-augmented) and glycemic control was analyzed. Mean HbA1c in the group was 7.5 ± .8%. Mean daily number of boluses administered was 5.1 ± 1.8, with 75.4% of them being bolus wizards (BW). Daily number of boluses was significantly greater in patients with HbA1c 7.5% (5.3 ± 1.6 vs. 4.3 ± 1.6, P=.056). There was a trend to greater use of BW in patients with better control (82.8 ± 21.4% vs. 69.9 ± 29.1%, P=.106). HbA1c was lower in patients using CGM (n=8) as compared to those not using sensor-augmented pumps (7.6 ± .8 vs 7.1 ± .7, P=.067), but the difference was not statistically significant. More frequent use of BW appears to be associated to better metabolic control in patients with T1DM using pump therapy. In standard clinical practice, augmentation of insulin pump with CGM may be associated to improved glycemic control. Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Budget impact of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy in patients with type 1 diabetes who experience severe recurrent hypoglycemic episodes in Spain.

    Giménez, Marga; Elías, Isabel; Álvarez, María; Quirós, Carmen; Conget, Ignacio

    Hypoglycemia is one of the most common complications to achieve a good metabolic control, and has been listed by several scientific associations as a common indication to start treatment with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII). Use of CSII is still residual in Spain as compared to neighbouring countries, and cost of acquisition cost is one of the main reasons. This study estimates the budget impact of treatment with CSII, as compared to multiple daily insulin injections, of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus who experience recurrent severe hypoglycemia episodes from the National Healthcare System perspective. Budget impact was based on a retrospective, observational study evaluating the efficacy of CSII in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus conducted at Hospital Clínic i Universitari in Barcelona, where one of the main indications for switching to CSII were recurrent severe hypoglycemia episodes. The mean number of annual episodes was 1.33 in the two years prior to CSII start and 0.08 in the last two years of follow up (p=0.003). Costs of treatment and major hypoglycemic events over a four-year period were considered. Costs were taken from different Spanish data sources and expressed in € of 2016. Treatment with CSII increased costs by €9,509 per patient as compared to multiple daily insulin injections (€11,902-€2,393). Cost associated to severe hypoglycemic events decreased by €19,330 per patient treated with CSIII (€1,371-€20,701). Results suggest mean total savings of €9,821 per patient during the four-year study period. The higher costs associated to CSII therapy may be totally offset by the severe hypoglycemic events prevented. Copyright © 2017 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Insulin

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Insulin Share Tweet ... I start having side effects? What is my target blood sugar level? How often should I check ...

  14. Influence of insulin on beta-endorphin plasma levels in obese and normal weight subjects.

    Brunani, A; Pincelli, A I; Pasqualinotto, L; Tibaldi, A; Baldi, G; Scacchi, M; Fatti, L M; Cavagnini, F

    1996-08-01

    To establish the possible role of hyperinsulinemia in the elevation of plasma beta-endorphin (beta-EP) levels observed in obese patients after an oral glucose load. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. Two groups of six (age: 22-39 y, BMI: 30-48 kg/m2) and eight obese men (age: 18-37 y, BMI: 35-45 kg/m2), respectively, and five normal weight healthy men (age: 22-30 y, BMI 22-23 kg/m2). Glucose, insulin and beta-EP levels at baseline and every 30 min until 180 min during the OGTT; glucose, insulin, C-peptide and beta-EP concentrations at baseline and in steady state condition (i.e. during the last 30 min of insulin infusion) in the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp studies. In the six obese patients undergoing the OGTT a significant elevation of beta-EP plasma levels was observed between 60 and 90 min after glucose ingestion. In the clamp studies no significant differences in beta-EP plasma levels, blood glucose and serum insulin were observed between obese and normal weight subjects both at baseline and at steady state. A markedly diminished insulin sensitivity along with a lower inhibition of C-peptide during insulin infusion was observed in obese patients compared to control subjects. A rise in serum insulin levels unaccompanied by a concomitant increase in blood glucose concentration is unable to elicit a beta-EP response in obese patients.

  15. Measuring the influence of blood component infusion rate on recipient vital signs.

    Gehrie, E A; Hendrickson, J E; Tormey, C A

    2015-11-01

    One of the challenges surrounding blood component administration is the determination of an appropriate rate of infusion. There are very few evidence-based guidelines available to guide healthcare providers looking for a 'standard' infusion rate for red blood cells (RBCs), plasma or platelets (PLTs). Our objective was to determine the extent to which blood component infusion rates were associated with changes in transfusion recipient vital signs. We retrospectively examined records of 3496 component infusions (RBCs, n = 2359; PLTs, n = 478; plasma, n = 659) over a 1-year period at a 362-bed multispecialty hospital. The following data were collected for each transfusion: blood product volume and infusion time, recipient pre- and post-transfusion temperature, blood pressure and pulse rate, and hospital ward where transfusion occurred. Plasma (median 10.4 ml/min) was infused faster than PLTs (median 7.2 ml/min, P 20 ml/min) and clinically significant reported changes in vital signs. There does not appear to be a strong correlation between infusion rate and significant changes in recipient temperature, blood pressure or pulse rate. Based on these data, a reasonable rate for routine transfusion is 2-3 ml/min for RBCs and 7-10 ml/min for plasma and PLTs. Faster infusion rates (>20 ml/min) likely can be applied with close patient monitoring if there is a more urgent need for transfusion. © 2015 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  16. An experimental study on the influence of infusion speed on the early mechanism of embolic effect of arterially infused absolute Ethanol in the rat

    Han, Joon Koo; Kim, Woo Ho; Lee, Byung Hee; Park, Kil Sun; Park, Jae Hyung; Kim, Chu Wan; Han, Man Chung

    1990-01-01

    In order to clarify the early mechanism of action of the tissue necrosis induced by intraarterially infused absolute ethanol, abdominal aortography and histopathologic examination after absolute ethanol infusion into aorta at fast (0.4ml/sec) and slow speed (0.04ml/sec) were performed on 22 rats (2 controls, 7 in fast infusion group, 7 in slow infusion group, 3 in fast and 3 in slow infusion groups during aorta compression, respectively). Histopathologic features under the light and scanning electron microscope were correlated with the angiographic findings within 30 minutes after ethanol infusion. The results are as follows : 1. In fast infusion group, histopathologic examination of the kidney showed severe glomerular and tubular damage. Extensive damage on endothelial and medial layer was noted in arteries, and fresh thrombi originated from the damaged arterial wall were seen. 2. Angiographic findings in the fast infusion group were luminal irregularity and early obstruction of large arteries. And circulation time was prolonged. 3. In slow infusion group, histopathologic examination of the kidney showed focal area of severe glomerular and tubular damage on relatively normal background. Endothelial and muscular damage was noted in arteries, but the degree of the damage was less severe than that of the fast infusion group. 4. Angiographic findings in the slow infusion group were focal perfusion defect of the kidney, delayed circulation time, and mild luminal irregularity, but obstruction of the major arteries was not seen

  17. Bomba de infusão de insulina em diabetes melito tipo 1 Insulin pump therapy in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Raphael Del Roio Liberatore Jr.

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Rever a experiência com a utilização da bomba de infusão de insulina em crianças e adolescentes, a fim de orientar o pediatra quanto às suas indicações e complicações. FONTE DOS DADOS : Foi realizada revisão sistemática de artigos publicados em literatura que abordassem a utilização da bomba de infusão de insulina, suas indicações, complicações e resposta ao tratamento. Dessa forma, todos os artigos publicados entre 1995 e 2005 foram resgatados através do levantamento em banco de dados MEDLINE e LILACS. As palavras-chave utilizadas foram: insulin pumps, type 1 diabetes mellitus e diabetes mellitus. Foram separados os artigos que, além disso, versassem sobre o assunto na faixa etária descrita SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: O uso da bomba de infusão de insulina em pacientes com diabetes melito tipo 1 não é uma necessidade para todos os pacientes, visto que, com tratamentos intensivos, os resultados conseguidos são muito parecidos, em termos de hemoglobina glicada e de controle de complicações a médio e longo prazo. No entanto, a bomba permite um maior conforto ao paciente, no sentido de que ele não precisa ficar tão restrito a horários rígidos de refeição e pode levar uma vida com melhor qualidade. Um primeiro requisito para quem pretenda usar a bomba é adaptar-se a aparelhos conectados ao corpo e a ter uma rotina de monitorização glicêmica rigorosa, pois, sem isso, as vantagens da bomba serão anuladas. As complicações, com os avanços tecnológicos de que dispomos atualmente, são muito infreqüentes. O custo, no entanto, é maior que nos tratamentos convencionais. CONCLUSÃO: Com a evolução das bombas de infusão e dos monitores de glicemia, incluindo sistemas de monitorização contínua, abre-se caminho para as "bombas inteligentes", e estaremos com um verdadeiro "pâncreas artificial", que pode mesmo ser implantado no paciente, permitindo uma vida com todas as regalias de uma pessoa não diab

  18. The influences of fish infusion broth on the biogenic amines formation by lactic acid bacteria

    Esmeray Küley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influences of fish infusion decarboxylase broth (IDB on biogenic amines (BA formation by lactic acid bacteria (LAB were investigated. BA productions by single LAB strains were tested in five different fish (anchovy, mackerel, white shark, sardine and gilthead seabream IDB. The result of the study showed that significant differences in ammonia (AMN and BA production were observed among the LAB strains in fish IDB (p < 0.05. The highest AMN and TMA production by LAB strains were observed for white shark IDB. The all tested bacteria had decarboxylation activity in fish IDB. The uppermost accumulated amines by LAB strains were tyramine (TYM, dopamine, serotonin and spermidine. The maximum histamine production was observed in sardine (101.69 mg/L and mackerel (100.84 mg/L IDB by Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris and Pediococcus acidophilus, respectively. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis and Pediococcus acidophilus had a high TYM producing capability (2943 mg/L and 1157 mg/L in sardine IDB.

  19. Chemical stability of insulin. 3. Influence of excipients, formulation, and pH.

    Brange, J; Langkjaer, L

    1992-01-01

    The influence of auxiliary substances and pH on the chemical transformations of insulin in pharmaceutical formulation, including various hydrolytic and intermolecular cross-linking reactions, was studied. Bacteriostatic agents had a profound stabilizing effect--phenol > m-cresol > methylparaben--on deamidation as well as on insulin intermolecular cross-linking reactions. Of the isotonicity substances, NaCl generally had a stabilizing effect whereas glycerol and glucose led to increased chemical deterioration. Phenol and sodium chloride exerted their stabilizing effect through independent mechanisms. Zinc ions, in concentrations that promote association of insulin into hexamers, increase the stability, whereas higher zinc content had no further influence. Protamine gave rise to additional formation of covalent protamine-insulin products which increased with increasing protamine concentration. The impact of excipients on the chemical processes seems to be dictated mainly via an influence on the three-dimensional insulin structure. The effect of the physical state of the insulin on the chemical stability was also complex, suggesting an intricate dependence of intermolecular proximity of involved functional groups. At pH values below five and above eight, insulin degrades relatively fast. At acid pH, deamidation at residue A21 and covalent insulin dimerization dominates, whereas disulfide reactions leading to covalent polymerization and formation of A- and B-chains prevailed in alkaline medium. Structure-reactivity relationship is proposed to be a main determinant for the chemical transformation of insulin.

  20. Influence of Unweighting on Insulin Signal Transduction in Muscle

    Tischler, Marc E.

    2002-01-01

    Unweighting of the juvenile soleus muscle is characterized by an increased binding capacity for insulin relative to muscle mass due to sparing of the receptors during atrophy. Although carbohydrate metabolism and protein degradation in the unweighted muscle develop increased sensitivity to insulin in vivo, protein synthesis in vivo and system A amino acid transport in vitro do not appear to develop such an enhanced response. The long-term goal is to identify the precise nature of this apparent resistance in the insulin signal transduction pathway and to consider how reduced weight-bearing may elicit this effect, by evaluating specific components of the insulin signalling pathway. Because the insulin-signalling pathway has components in common with the signal transduction pathway for insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) and potentially other growth factors, the study could have important implications in the role of weight-bearing function on muscle growth and development. Since the insulin signalling pathway diverges following activation of insulin receptor tyrosine kinase, the immediate specific aims will be to study the receptor tyrosine kinase (IRTK) and those branches, which lead to phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) and of Shc protein. To achieve these broader objectives, we will test in situ, by intramuscular injection, the responses of glucose transport, system A amino acid transport and protein synthesis to insulin analogues for which the receptor has either a weaker or much stronger binding affinity compared to insulin. Studies will include: (1) estimation of the ED(sub 50) for each analogue for these three processes; (2) the effect of duration (one to four days) of unweighting on the response of each process to all analogues tested; (3) the effect of unweighting and the analogues on IRTK activity; and (4) the comparative effects of unweighting and analogue binding on the tyrosine phosphorylation of IRTK, IRS-1, and Shc protein.

  1. Changes in HbA1c and Weight Following Transition to Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Therapy in Adults With Type 1 Diabetes.

    Mehta, Sanjeev N; Andersen, Henrik Ullits; Abrahamson, Martin J; Wolpert, Howard A; Hommel, Eva E; McMullen, William; Ridderstråle, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Historically, intensive insulin therapy for type 1 diabetes (T1D) has improved glycemic control at the risk of adverse weight gain. The impact of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy (CSII) on weight in the current era remains unknown. We assessed changes in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and weight in adults with T1D transitioning to CSII at 2 diabetes centers in Denmark and the United States. Patients with T1D, aged ≥18 years, managed with multiple daily injections (MDI) who transitioned to CSII between 2002 and 2013 were identified using electronic health record data from the Steno Diabetes Center (n = 600) and Joslin Diabetes Center (n = 658). Changes in HbA1c and weight after 1 year was assessed overall and by baseline HbA1c cut points. Multivariate regression assessed correlates of HbA1c reduction. In adults with T1D transitioning to CSII, clinically significant HbA1c reductions were found in patients with baseline HbA1c 8.0-8.9% (Steno, -0.7%; Joslin, -0.4%) and baseline HbA1c ≥9.0% (Steno, -1.1%; Joslin, -0.9%) ( P HbA1c ≥9% at Steno (1.1 ± 0.3 kg, P HbA1c reduction was associated with higher HbA1c, older age, female sex at Steno ( R 2 = .28, P HbA1c at Joslin ( R 2 = .19, P HbA1c without a negative impact on weight 1 year after transitioning from MDI to CSII.

  2. Central infusion of leptin improves insulin resistance and suppresses beta-cell function, but not beta-cell mass, primarily through the sympathetic nervous system in a type 2 diabetic rat model.

    Park, Sunmin; Ahn, Il Sung; Kim, Da Sol

    2010-06-05

    We investigated whether hypothalamic leptin alters beta-cell function and mass directly via the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) or indirectly as the result of altered insulin resistant states. The 90% pancreatectomized male Sprague Dawley rats had sympathectomy into the pancreas by applying phenol into the descending aorta (SNSX) or its sham operation (Sham). Each group was divided into two sections, receiving either leptin at 300ng/kgbw/h or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) via intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion for 3h as a short-term study. After finishing the infusion study, ICV leptin (3mug/kg bw/day) or ICV aCSF (control) was infused in rats fed 30 energy % fat diets by osmotic pump for 4weeks. At the end of the long-term study, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and islet morphometry were analyzed. Acute ICV leptin administration in Sham rats, but not in SNSX rats, suppressed the first- and second-phase insulin secretion at hyperglycemic clamp by about 48% compared to the control. Regardless of SNSX, the 4-week administration of ICV leptin improved glucose tolerance during oral glucose tolerance tests and insulin sensitivity at hyperglycemic clamp, compared to the control, while it suppressed second-phase insulin secretion in Sham rats but not in SNSX rats. However, the pancreatic beta-cell area and mass were not affected by leptin and SNSX, though ICV leptin decreased individual beta-cell size and concomitantly increased beta-cell apoptosis in Sham rats. Leptin directly decreases insulin secretion capacity mainly through the activation of SNS without modulating pancreatic beta-cell mass.

  3. Co-infusion of autologous adipose tissue derived insulin-secreting mesenchymal stem cells and bone marrow derived hematopoietic stem cells: Viable therapy for type III.C. a diabetes mellitus

    Umang G Thakkar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Transition from acute pancreatitis to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM is a rare manifestation of primary hyperparathyroidism caused by parathyroid adenoma because of impaired glucose tolerance and suppresses insulin secretion. We report the case of a 26-year-old male with pancreatic diabetes caused by parathyroid adenoma induced chronic pancreatitis. He had serum C-peptide 0.12 ng/ml, glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody 5.0 IU/ml, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C 8.9%, and required 72 IU/day of biphasic-isophane insulin injection for uncontrolled hyperglycemia. We treated him with his own adipose tissue derived insulin-secreting mesenchymal stem-cells (IS-ADMSC along with his bone marrow derived hematopoietic stem cells (BM-HSC. Autologous IS-ADMSC + BM-HSC were infused into subcutaneous tissue, portal and thymic circulation without any conditioning. Over a follow-up of 27 months, the patient is maintaining fasting and postprandial blood sugar levels of 132 and 165 mg/dl, respectively, with HbA1C 6.8% and requiring 36 IU/day of biphasic-isophane insulin. Co-infusion of IS-ADMSC + BM-HSC offers a safe and viable therapy for type III.C.a Diabetes Mellitus.

  4. Influence of brewing conditions on taste components in Fuding white tea infusions.

    Zhang, Haihua; Li, Yulin; Lv, Yangjun; Jiang, Yulan; Pan, Junxian; Duan, Yuwei; Zhu, Yuejin; Zhang, Shikang

    2017-07-01

    White tea has received increasing attention of late as a result of its sweet taste and health benefits. During the brewing of white tea, many factors may affect the nutritional and sensory quality of the resulting infusions. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of various infusion conditions on the taste components of Fuding white tea, including infusion time, ratio of tea and water, number of brewing steps, and temperature. Brewing conditions had a strong effect on the taste compound profile and sensory characteristics. The catechin, caffeine, theanine and free amino acid contents generally increased with increasing infusion time and temperature. Conditions comprising an infusion time of 7 min, a brewing temperature of 100 °C, a tea and water ratio of 1:30 or 1:40, and a second brewing step, respectively, were shown to obtain the highest contents of most compounds. Regarding tea sensory evaluation, conditions comprising an infusion time of 3 min, a brewing temperature of 100 °C, a tea and water ratio of 1:50, and a first brewing step, resulted in the highest sensory score for comprehensive behavior of color, aroma and taste. The results of the present study reveal differences in the contents of various taste compounds, including catechins, caffeine, theanine and free amino acids, with respect to different brewing conditions, and sensory scores also varied with brewing conditions. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Quality of life in Danish children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion or multiple daily injections

    Birkebæk, Niels; Kristensen, Lene Juel; Mose, Anne

    2014-01-01

    ), and to investigate whether HRQoL assessments were influenced by treatment duration. METHODS: Participants were recruited through the Danish Registry for Diabetes in Childhood and Adolescence. A total of 700 children and adolescents (360 girls), 8-17 years, were included. Of these, 295 were treated with CSII (160......AIMS: The aims of the study were to compare health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in a National Danish population of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D) treated with either continuous subcutaneous insulin injection (CSII) or multiple daily insulin injections (MDI...... for more than one year) and 405 with MDI (238 for more than one year). Participants and their parents completed the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Diabetes and Generic Module. HbA1c was analyzed centrally. RESULTS: Parents reported children and adolescents on CSII for more than one year to have less...

  6. Comparison of the Effects of Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion and Add-On Therapy with Sitagliptin in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Heng Wan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To identify a new regimen to optimize treatment for patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (T2DM by short-term continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII alone. Methods. 60 patients with newly diagnosed T2DM were randomized into two groups (n=30 each and treated for 2 weeks with CSII alone (CSII group or with CSII plus sitagliptin (CSII + Sig group. The glycemic variability of the patients was measured using a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS for the last 72 hours. A standard meal test was performed before and after the interventions, and the levels of glycated albumin, fasting glucose, fasting C-peptide, postprandial 2 h blood glucose, and postprandial 2 h C-peptide were examined. Results. Compared with the CSII group, the indicators of glycemic variability, such as the mean amplitude of glycemic excursion (MAGE and the standard deviation of blood glucose (SDBG, were decreased significantly in the CSII + Sig group. The changes before and after treatment in the C-peptide reactivity index (ΔCPI and the secretory unit of islet in transplantation index (ΔSUIT indicated a significant improvement in the CSII + Sig group. Conclusions. Add-on therapy with sitagliptin may be an optimized treatment for patients with newly diagnosed T2DM compared with short-term CSII alone.

  7. THE INFLUENCE OF HELICHRYSUM ARENARIUM FLOWERS INFUSION ON MAST CELLS DEGRANULATION IN VITRO

    N. V. Karazhan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Helichrysum arenarium flowers are medical plant raw materials with a high concentration of flavonoids (2.5– 5.0%. As compounds of this group of biologically active substances often possess antiallergic activity, Helichrysum arenarium flowers are a potential antiallergic medicine. The aim is to study an antiallergic activity of Helichrysum arenarium flowers infusion on the model of mast cells degranulation in vitro. Materials and methods. Helichrysum arenarium flowers infusion was made in accordance with the requirements of the State Pharmacopoeia of the Republic of Belarus. Mast cells were obtained from the abdominal cavity of inbred mice weighing 20–25 g. Experimental animals were divided into three groups of 5 individuals in each. The intact group was not subjected to any manipulation for 14 days. The test group was sensitized with the epidermal allergen from the cat’s fur. The placebo group was subjected to the same manipulations as the test group, by phosphate buffered saline pH 7.4 for sensitization instead of the allergen. Results and discussion. The addition of Helichrysum arenarium flowers infusion to the mast cells of the intact group and the placebo group did not affect the percentage of the mast cells degranulation (p>0.05, indicating that the animals of the intact group and the placebo group did not have a hypersensitivity to the components of the medicine under investigation. In the presence of Helichrysum arenarium flowers the percentage of the mast cells degranulation of the test group decreased in comparison with the percentage of the mast cells degranulation in the presence of the allergen from 23.6±2.1% to 8.1–16.2% (p<0.05. Semi-effective concentration of Helichrysum arenarium flowers infusion was 1.33±0.04 mg / ml. The stabilizing effect on the mast cells degranulation of the Helichrysum arenarium flowers infusion was statistically significantly lower than the stabilizing effect of the Bidens tripartita herb

  8. Replacement of oxytocin bolus administration by infusion: influences on postpartum outcome.

    Löytved-Hardegg, Julia J; Brunner, Mirjam; Ries, Jean-Jacques; von Felten, Stefanie; Heugel, Christina; Lapaire, Olav; Voekt, Cora; Hösli, Irene

    2016-06-01

    Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) represents a leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. Giving oxytocin after birth reduces the risk for PPH. It has never been tested whether different methods of oxytocin administration affect the maternal outcome. This study aims to compare the infusion versus the bolus application of oxytocin after singleton vaginal delivery. This retrospective monocentre study compares the incidence of clinically relevant postpartum complications in women receiving 5 IE of oxytocin as a bolus or as a 100 ml-infusion over 5 min, given immediately after birth. Included were women delivering singletons vaginally at term. We used propensity score weighting to compare outcomes between women receiving bolus and infusion and to minimize the selection bias in this retrospective cohort. 1765 patients were included. Patient characteristics were balanced. We found no significant differences for the combined overall postpartum adverse outcome (the incidence of PPH, manual removal of the placenta and/or curettage). For the single outcomes, we observed a significantly higher frequency of manual removal of the placenta (Odds ratio 1.47, 95 % CI 1.02-2.13) and a slightly higher but clinically not relevant estimated blood loss (Relative effect 1.05, 95 % CI 1.01-1.10) in the infusion group. The data show a tendency towards more complications in the infusion group. It is related to a more frequent need for manual removal of the placenta.

  9. Epidemiological characterization of diabetic patients on therapy with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and continuous glucose monitoring in real time.

    Aristizábal, Natalia; Ramírez, Alex; Hincapié-García, Jaime; Laiton, Estefany; Aristizábal, Carolina; Cuesta, Diana; Monsalve, Claudia; Hincapié, Gloria; Zapata, Eliana; Abad, Verónica; Delgado, Maria-Rocio; Torres, José-Luis; Palacio, Andrés; Botero, José

    2015-11-01

    To describe baseline characteristics of diabetic patients who were started on insulin pump and real time continuous glucose monitor (CSII-rtCGM) in a specialized center in Medellin, Colombia. All patients with diabetes with complete data who were started on CSII-rtCGM between February 2010 and May 2014 were included. This is a descriptive analysis of the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. 141 of 174 patients attending the clinic were included. 90,1% had type 1diabetes (T1D). The average age of T1D patients at the beginning of therapy was 31,4 years (SD 14,1). 75.8% of patients had normal weight (BMI30). The median duration of T1D was 13 years (P25-P75=10.7-22.0). 14,2% of the patients were admitted at least once in the year preceding the start of CSII-rtCGM because of diabetes related complications. Mean A1c was 8.6%±1.46%. The main reasons for starting CSII-rtCGM were: poor glycemic control (50.2%); frequent hypoglycemia, nocturnal hypoglycemia, hypoglycemia related to exercise, asymptomatic hypoglycemia (30.2%); severe hypoglycemia (16.44%) and dawn phenomena (3.1%). Baseline characteristics of patients included in this study who were started on CSII-rtCGM are similar to those reported in the literature. The Clinic starts CSII-rtCGM mainly in T1D patients with poor glycemic control, frequent or severe hypoglycemia despite being on basal/bolus therapy. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of temperature and brewing time of nettle (Urtica dioica L.) infusions on vitamin C content

    Wolska, Jolanta; Czop, Michał; Jakubczyk, Karolina; Janda, Katarzyna

    Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica L.) can be found in temperate climate zones of Europe, Africa and America Nettle may be a source of nutritional ingredients, mineral salts, vitamins and antioxidants. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of temperature and brewing time Urtica dioica L. infusions from different parts of this plant on vitamin C (ascorbic acid) content. Infusions of nettle leaf, stem and root were prepared at room temperature, 50°C, 60°C, 70°C and 80°C for 10 minutes. Leaf infusions were also brewed for 5, 10, 15 and 20 minutes at initial water temperature of 60°C. The amount of vitamin C was determined by the spectrophotometric method. The best temperature of brewing nettle infusions, in terms of vitamin C concentration, is between 50 °C and 60 °C as it is sufficient to extract the substance, yet not high enough to destroy it. The optimal time of brewing appeared to be 10 minutes as the prolonged exposure to high temperature appeared to be detrimental for ascorbic acid as well.

  11. Influence of ondansetron on gastric sensorimotor responses to short duodenal acid infusion in healthy volunteers.

    Vanuytsel, T; Karamanolis, G; Van Oudenhove, L; Oudenhove, L V; Vos, R; Tack, J

    2011-03-01

    Duodenal acid infusion induces gastric relaxation and sensitization to distension in healthy volunteers. The acid-sensitive mechanism is still unknown. We hypothesized that 5HT(3)-blockade can inhibit the acid-induced duodenogastric sensorimotor reflex in healthy volunteers. Fourteen healthy volunteers were included in a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over trial. An infusion tube with attached pH-electrode was positioned in the duodenum and a barostat balloon was located in the gastric fundus. Proximal gastric volume and sensitivity to distension were assessed before and during duodenal acid infusion and after pretreatment with intravenous (i.v.) ondansetron (a 5HT(3)-receptor antagonist, 8 mg) or saline. An overall perception score (0-6) and an assessment of nine dyspeptic symptoms by visual analogue scales (VAS) were obtained. Results are given as mean ± SEM. Ondansetron had no effect on duodenal pH and on the acid-induced increase of proximal gastric volume (increase of 80 ± 20 vs 83 ± 15 mL after ondansetron and placebo; effect of acid acid infusion and gastric distension. 5HT(3)-receptors are involved in acid-induced duodenogastric sensitization, but not in the duodenogastric inhibitory motor reflex. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Single-dose infusion of sodium butyrate, but not lactose, increases plasma β-hydroxybutyrate and insulin in lactating dairy cows.

    Herrick, K J; Hippen, A R; Kalscheur, K F; Schingoethe, D J; Casper, D P; Moreland, S C; van Eys, J E

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have identified beneficial effects of butyrate on rumen development and intestinal health in preruminants. These encouraging findings led to further investigations related to butyrate supplementation in the mature ruminant. However, the effects of elevated butyrate concentrations on rumen metabolism have not been investigated, and consequently the maximum tolerable dosage rate of butyrate has not been established. Therefore, the first objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of a short-term increase in rumen butyrate concentration on key metabolic indicators. The second objective was to evaluate the source of butyrate, either directly dosed in the rumen or indirectly supplied via lactose fermentation in the rumen. Jugular catheters were inserted into 4 ruminally fistulated Holstein cows in a 4×4 Latin square with 3-d periods. On d 1 of each period, 1h after feeding, cows were ruminally dosed with 1 of 4 treatments: (1) 2L of water (CON), (2) 3.5g/kg of body weight (BW) of lactose (LAC), (3) 1g/kg of BW of butyrate (1GB), or (4) 2g/kg of BW of butyrate (2GB). Sodium butyrate was the source of butyrate, and NaCl was added to CON (1.34g/kg of BW), LAC (1.34g/kg of BW), and 1GB (0.67g/kg of BW) to provide equal amounts of sodium as the 2GB treatment. Serial plasma and rumen fluid samples were collected during d 1 of each period. Rumen fluid pH was greater in cows given the 1GB and 2GB treatments compared with the cows given the LAC treatment. Cows administered the 1GB and 2GB treatments had greater rumen butyrate concentrations compared with LAC. Those cows also had greater plasma butyrate concentrations compared with cows given the LAC treatment. Plasma β-hydroxybutyrate was greater and insulin tended to be greater for butyrate treatments compared with LAC. No difference in insulin was found between the 1GB and 2GB treatments. Based on plasma and rumen metabolites, singly infusing 3.5g/kg of BW of lactose into the rumen is not as effective

  13. An Audit of Clinical Practice in a Single Centre in Kuwait: Management of Children on Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion and Cardiovascular Risk Factors Screening.

    Omar, Dina; Alsanae, Hala; Al Khawari, Mona; Abdulrasoul, Majedah; Rahme, Zahraa; Al Refaei, Faisal; Behbehani, Kazem; Shaltout, Azza

    2017-01-01

    To audit the current clinical practice of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) for the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) in children and adolescents attending a single centre in Kuwait. A one year retrospective audit was performed in children and adolescents with T1D on CSII, who attended the paediatric diabetes clinic, Dasman Diabetes Institute during 2012. The primary outcome measure was glycaemic control as evidenced by glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) level and the secondary outcome measures were the frequency of monitoring of the risk for microvascular complications and occurrence of acute complications and adverse events. 58 children and adolescents (mean age ± SD: 12.6 ± 4.1 years) were included. Mean HbA1c at baseline was 8.8% (72.7 mmol/mol) and 8.9% (73.8 mmol/mol) at the end of a 12 months observation period. Children with poor control (HbA1c >9.5% (80 mmol/mol) had a significant 1.4% reduction in HbA1c compared with the overall reduction of 0.1% (p=0.7). Rate of screening for cardiovascular risk factors and for long term complications were well documented. However, there was underreporting of acute complications such as severe hypoglycaemia and diabetic ketoacidosis. Only 1.7% of patients discontinued the pump. There was no significant change in HbA1c values at the end of 12 months follow up. However, HbA1c values in poorly controlled children improved. CSII requires care by skilled health professionals as well as education and selection of motivated parents and children.

  14. Influence of Gut Microbiota on Subclinical Inflammation and Insulin Resistance

    Bruno Melo Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is the main condition that is correlated with the appearance of insulin resistance, which is the major link among its comorbidities, such as type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, and several types of cancer. Obesity affects a large number of individuals worldwide; it degrades human health and quality of life. Here, we review the role of the gut microbiota in the pathophysiology of obesity and type 2 diabetes, which is promoted by a bacterial diversity shift mediated by overnutrition. Whole bacteria, their products, and metabolites undergo increased translocation through the gut epithelium to the circulation due to degraded tight junctions and the consequent increase in intestinal permeability that culminates in inflammation and insulin resistance. Several strategies focusing on modulation of the gut microbiota (antibiotics, probiotics, and prebiotics are being experimentally employed in metabolic derangement in order to reduce intestinal permeability, increase the production of short chain fatty acids and anorectic gut hormones, and promote insulin sensitivity to counteract the inflammatory status and insulin resistance found in obese individuals.

  15. Influence of insulin on heat (450) protection by hexose sugars

    Sandifer, L.; Nagle, W.A.; Henle, K.J.; Moss, A.J. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Treatment of cultured cells with 100mM D-glucose and D-galactose confers protection against hyperthermia-induced cell death, but the mechanism is not known. The authors measured changes in cell survival and altered levels of intracellular sugar metabolites in Chinese hamster fibroblast (V79) cells. Cells were incubated at 37 0 for 1 or 5 hours prior to a 45 0 heating in balanced salts solution (BSS) with 2mM glutamine and varying concentrations of sugars in the presence and absence of insulin (10 gm/ml). Cells incubated at all sugar concentrations (5-125mM) with insulin showed a more rapid increase in survival: after 17 min. at 45 0 the survival with 125mM sugar plus insulin yielded a 4 fold increase after a 1 or 5 hour incubation. Longer incubation times were required for increased survival in the absence of insulin. The authors also observed increased survival, relative to cells heated in complete medium, for cells incubated in BSS with 2mM glutamine and no sugar. This suggests that glutamine metabolism may lead to an increase in cell heat resistance. These survival results will be related to intracellular changes in sugar metabolites, principally sugar phosphates

  16. Influence of health locus of control and fear of hypoglycaemia on glycaemic control and treatment satisfaction in people with Type 1 diabetes on insulin pump therapy.

    Indelicato, L; Mariano, V; Galasso, S; Boscari, F; Cipponeri, E; Negri, C; Frigo, A; Avogaro, A; Bonora, E; Trombetta, M; Bruttomesso, D

    2017-05-01

    To assess the influence of health locus of control and fear of hypoglycaemia on metabolic control and treatment satisfaction in people with Type 1 diabetes mellitus on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. People with Type 1 diabetes on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion for at least 1 year, sub-classified as an 'acceptable glucose control' group [HbA 1c ≤ 58 mmol/mol (7.5%)] and a 'suboptimum glucose control' group [HbA 1c > 58 mmol/mol (7.5%)], were consecutively enrolled in a multicentre cross-sectional study. Questionnaires were administered to assess health locus of control [Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC) scale, with internal and external subscales], fear of hypoglycaemia [Hypoglycaemia Fear Survey II (HFS-II)] and treatment satisfaction [Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (DTSQ)]. We enrolled 214 participants (mean ± sd age 43.4 ± 12.1 years). The suboptimum glucose control group (n = 127) had lower mean ± sd internal MHLC and DTSQ scores than the acceptable glucose control group (19.6 ± 5.2 vs 21.0 ± 5.0, P = 0.04 and 28.8 ± 4.8 vs 30.9 ± 4.5, P locus represents the most important locus of control pattern for achieving good metabolic control. © 2017 Diabetes UK.

  17. Infusion Extractor

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R.

    1988-01-01

    Apparatus and method of removing desirable constituents from an infusible material by infusion extraction, where a piston operating in a first chamber draws a solvent into the first chamber where it may be heated, and then moves the heated solvent into a second chamber containing the infusible material, and where infusion extraction takes place. The piston then moves the solvent containing the extract through a filter into the first chamber, leaving the extraction residue in the second chamber.

  18. Does aqueductal stenosis influence the lumbar infusion test in normal-pressure hydrocephalus?

    González-Martínez, Emilio Luis; Santamarta, David

    2016-12-01

    Late-onset idiopathic aqueductal stenosis may present with clinical features indistinct from idiopathic normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Moreover, aqueductal stenosis (AS) is not always detected by conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of this study was to compare the hydrodynamic pattern among NPH patients according to the patency of the aqueduct. Fifty-six consecutive lumbar infusion tests were performed in patients with NPH syndrome. Precipitating causes of hydrocephalus were excluded, and aqueductal patency was examined through high-resolution, T2-weighted 3D MRI. Patients were classified into two groups: non-patent aqueduct and patent aqueduct. Mean values of pressure and pulse amplitude were obtained from basal and plateau stages of infusion studies. Twelve of 56 patients with NPH-like symptoms presented with morphological AS (21.4 %). Patent aqueduct and non-patent aqueduct groups had similar values of mean opening lumbar pressure (8.2 vs. 8.1 mmHg), and mean opening pulse amplitude (3.1 vs. 2.9 mmHg). Mean pressure in the plateau stage (28.6 vs. 23.2 mmHg), and mean pulse amplitude in the plateau stage (12.5 vs. 10.6 mmHg) were higher in the patent aqueduct group. These differences were not statistically significant. Only Rout was significantly higher in the patent aqueduct group (13.6 vs. 10.1 mmHg/ml/min). One-third of NPH patients with AS presented Rout >12 mmHg/ml/min. No differences in mean pressure or pulse amplitude during basal and plateau epochs of the lumbar infusion test in NPH patients were detected, regardless of aqueductal patency. However, Rout was significantly higher in patients with patent aqueduct.

  19. Catheter Occlusion in Home Infusion: The Influence of Needleless Connector Design on Central Catheter Occlusion.

    Williams, Ann

    Thrombotic catheter occlusion is a common complication associated with central venous catheters (CVCs). A wide variety of needleless connectors that differ greatly in design and function are available for use with CVCs; however, there are a limited number of studies comparing the catheter occlusion rate associated with differently designed needleless connectors. This retrospective observational study compared occlusion rates associated with a split-septum neutral-displacement needleless connector versus those of a solid-surface neutral-reflux needleless connector in patients undergoing home infusion therapy. The neutral-reflux needleless connector was associated with a significant reduction in occlusion rate and thrombolytic use versus the neutral-displacement needleless connector.

  20. Infusion cisternography

    Magnaes, B.; Rootwelt, K.; Sjaastad, O.

    1976-01-01

    A source of error in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) infusion tests is leakage at the dural puncture site. The addition of a bolus of radionuclide to the infusion fluid was helpful in detecting the existence of leakage as shown by increased infusion pressure in six of eight patients studied with and without scintigraphic evidence of leakage. Comparison of CSF dynamics in 26 patients studied by infusion cisternography and conventional cisternography showed similar patterns, suggesting no alteration of CSF dynamics by the artificial CSF infusion. Combining the two tests, therefore, resulted in simple identification of the leakage and saved the patient time and discomfort

  1. Total body irradiation in bone marrow transplantation: the influence of fractionation and delay of marrow infusion

    Lichter, A.S.; Tracy, D.; Lam, W.C.; Order, S.E.

    1980-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) after total body irradiation (TBI) and cyclophosphamide is being employed increasingly in the therapy of end stage leukemia. Interstitial pneumonitis (IP) represents a major acute toxicity after allogeneic transplantation. A more rapid reconstitution of lymphoid organs and bone marrow post transplant may result in increased immune competence and hence fewer opportunistic pulmonary infections and IP. By delaying the infusion of marrow to 72 hr after TBI (1250 rad at 7.5 rad/min) instead of the customary 24 hr, we can demonstrate an increase in initial repopulation of thymus, spleen and bone marrow, with syngeneic transplants in Lewis rats. Interstitial pneumonitis may also be caused, in part, by the pulmonary toxicity of large single exposures of TBI. Clinical and laboratory data suggest that fractionated TBI may be less toxic to the lung. When fractionated TBI (625 rad x 2, 7.5 rad/min) is compared to single dose TBI (1250 rad, 7.5 rad/min), and increased initial repopulation of lymphoid organs is observed when fractionated therapy is employed. Delay in marrow infusion and fractionation of TBI exposure may have clinical advantages in patients who receive BMT

  2. Efficacy and safety of insulin pump treatment in adult T1DM patients--influence of age and social environment.

    Grzanka, Małgorzata; Matejko, Bartłomiej; Cyganek, Katarzyna; Kozek, Elżbieta; Małecki, Maciej T; Klupa, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) via personal insulin pump is a valuable therapeutic tool in T1DM patients. However, adherence to recommended CSII-related behaviours may be of concern to young adults with intensive, variable daily activities (students, young professionals). The aim of this observational study was to estimate treatment outcomes in young adult patients with T1DM, and compare them with older individuals. Overall, 140 adults with T1DM on CSII were examined, divided into 2 subgroups: 77 patients younger than 26 years of age (mean 20.6 years) and 63 older subjects (mean 39.0). We compared the glycaemic control in both groups of T1DM subjects and analyzed treatment attitudes to identify potentially modifiable behaviours influencing the efficacy of the treatment. The younger individuals were characterized by significantly worse treatment outcomes, compared to the older ones: the mean HbA1c levels were 7.6 ± 1.3% and 6.9±1.3% (p=0.00001), while the mean glucose levels based on glucometer downloads were 161±33.6 mg/dL and 136±21.8 mg/dL (p=0.00001), respectively. The frequency of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) was lower in younger individuals (5.3±2.1 vs. 7.0±2.8 daily, p=0.0005, respectively); they were also less frequently used advanced pump functions, e.g. the bolus calculator (48% vs. 67% users, p=0.0014, respectively). The efficacy of CSII treatment observed in young T1DM adults was worse than in older patients. The reason for this phenomenon remains unclear, it may be due simply to age-dependend behaviours, to social environment, or both.

  3. Influence of metformin and insulin on myocardial substrate oxidation under conditions encountered during cardiac surgery.

    Holmes, Cyonna; Powell, LaShondra; Clarke, Nicholas S; Jessen, Michael E; Peltz, Matthias

    2018-02-01

    The influence of diabetic therapies on myocardial substrate selection during cardiac surgery is unknown but may be important to ensure optimal surgical outcomes. We hypothesized that metformin and insulin alter myocardial substrate selection during cardiac surgery and may affect reperfusion cardiac function. Rat hearts (n = 8 per group) were evaluated under 3 metabolic conditions: normokalemia, cardioplegia, or bypass. Groups were perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer in the presence of no additives, metformin, insulin, or both insulin and metformin. Perfusion buffer containing physiologic concentrations of energetic substrates with different carbon-13 ( 13 C) labeling patterns were used to determine substrate oxidation preferences using 13 C magnetic resonance spectroscopy and glutamate isotopomer analysis. Rate pressure product and oxygen consumption were measured. Myocardial function was not different between groups. For normokalemia, ketone oxidation was reduced in the presence of insulin and the combination of metformin and insulin reduced fatty acid oxidation. Metformin reduced fatty acid and ketone oxidation during cardioplegia. Fatty acid oxidation was increased in the bypass group compared with all other conditions. Metformin and insulin affect substrate utilization and reduce fatty acid oxidation before reperfusion. These alterations in substrate oxidation did not affect myocardial function in otherwise normal hearts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Insulin fibrillation: The influence and coordination of Zn2+

    Frankær, Christian Grundahl; Sønderby, Pernille; Bang, Maria Blanner

    2017-01-01

    fibrils has been debated for some years. We have therefore investigated the influence and binding geometry of zinc in fibrillated insulin using extended X-ray absorption fine-structure and X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy. The results were validated with fibre diffraction, Transmission...

  5. Insulin is essential for in vitro chondrogenesis of mesenchymal progenitor cells and influences chondrogenesis in a dose-dependent manner.

    Mueller, Michael B; Blunk, Torsten; Appel, Bernhard; Maschke, Angelika; Goepferich, Achim; Zellner, Johannes; Englert, Carsten; Prantl, Lukas; Kujat, Richard; Nerlich, Michael; Angele, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Insulin is a commonly used additive in chondrogenic media for differentiating mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The indispensability of other bioactive factors like TGF-β or dexamethasone in these medium formulations has been shown, but the role of insulin is unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether insulin is essential for MSC chondrogenesis and if there is a dose-dependent effect of insulin on MSC chondrogenesis. We cultivated human MSCs in pellet culture in serum-free chondrogenic medium with insulin concentrations between 0 and 50 μg/ml and assessed the grade of chondrogenic differentiation by histological evaluation and determination of glycosaminoglycan (GAG), total collagen and DNA content. We further tested whether insulin can be delivered in an amount sufficient for MSC chondrogenesis via a drug delivery system in insulin-free medium. Chondrogenesis was not induced by standard chondrogenic medium without insulin and the expression of cartilage differentiation markers was dose-dependent at insulin concentrations between 0 and 10 μg/ml. An insulin concentration of 50 μg/ml had no additional effect compared with 10 μg/ml. Insulin was delivered by a release system into the cell culture under insulin-free conditions in an amount sufficient to induce chondrogenesis. Insulin is essential for MSC chondrogenesis in this system and chondrogenic differentiation is influenced by insulin in a dose-dependent manner. Insulin can be provided in a sufficient amount by a drug delivery system. Therefore, insulin is a suitable and inexpensive indicator substance for testing drug release systems in vitro.

  6. Influence of deposition and spray pattern of nasal powders on insulin bioavailability.

    Pringels, E; Callens, C; Vervaet, C; Dumont, F; Slegers, G; Foreman, P; Remon, J P

    2006-03-09

    The influence of the deposition pattern and spray characteristics of nasal powder formulations on the insulin bioavailability was investigated in rabbits. The formulations were prepared by freeze drying a dispersion containing a physical mixture of drum dried waxy maize starch (DDWM)/Carbopol 974P (90/10, w/w) or a spray-dried mixture of Amioca starch/Carbopol 974P (25/75, w/w). The deposition in the nasal cavity of rabbits and in a silicone human nose model after actuation of three nasal delivery devices (Monopowder, Pfeiffer and experimental system) was compared and related to the insulin bioavailability. Posterior deposition of the powder formulation in the nasal cavity lowered the insulin bioavailability. To study the spray pattern, the shape and cross-section of the emitted powder cloud were analysed. It was concluded that the powder bulk density of the formulation influenced the spray pattern. Consequently, powders of different bulk density were prepared by changing the solid fraction of the freeze dried dispersion and by changing the freezing rate during freeze drying. After nasal delivery of these powder formulations no influence of the powder bulk density and of the spray pattern on the insulin bioavailability was observed.

  7. Insulin Resistance Negatively Influences the Muscle-Dependent IGF-1-Bone Mass Relationship in Premenarcheal Girls.

    Kindler, J M; Pollock, N K; Laing, E M; Jenkins, N T; Oshri, A; Isales, C; Hamrick, M; Lewis, R D

    2016-01-01

    IGF-1 promotes bone growth directly and indirectly through its effects on skeletal muscle. Insulin and IGF-1 share a common cellular signaling process; thus, insulin resistance may influence the IGF-1-muscle-bone relationship. We sought to determine the effect of insulin resistance on the muscle-dependent relationship between IGF-1 and bone mass in premenarcheal girls. This was a cross-sectional study conducted at a university research center involving 147 girls ages 9 to 11 years. Glucose, insulin, and IGF-1 were measured from fasting blood samples. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated from glucose and insulin. Fat-free soft tissue (FFST) mass and bone mineral content (BMC) were measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Our primary outcome was BMC/height. In our path model, IGF-1 predicted FFST mass (b = 0.018; P = .001), which in turn predicted BMC/height (b = 0.960; P IGF-1 predicted BMC/height (b = 0.001; P = .002), but not after accounting for the mediator of this relationship, FFST mass. The HOMA-IR by IGF-1 interaction negatively predicted FFST mass (b = -0.044; P = .034). HOMA-IR had a significant and negative effect on the muscle-dependent relationship between IGF-1 and BMC/height (b = -0.151; P = .047). Lean body mass is an important intermediary factor in the IGF-1-bone relationship. For this reason, bone development may be compromised indirectly via suboptimal IGF-1-dependent muscle development in insulin-resistant children.

  8. Lack of relationship between 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase setpoint and insulin sensitivity in the basal state and after 24h of insulin infusion in healthy subjects and type 2 diabetic patients

    Kerstens, MN; Riemens, SC; Sluiter, WJ; Pratt, JJ; Wolthers, BG; Dullaart, RPF

    OBJECTIVES To test whether insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with an altered overall setpoint of the 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11 beta HSD) mediated cortisol to cortisone interconversion towards cortisol, and to evaluate whether changes in insulin sensitivity

  9. Gender differences in factors influencing insulin resistance in elderly hyperlipemic non-diabetic subjects

    Hrebícek Jirí

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increase in the prevalence of insulin resistance-related metabolic syndrome, a disorder that greatly increases the risk of diabetes, heart attack and stroke, is alarming. One of the most frequent and early symptoms of metabolic syndrome is hypertriglyceridemia. We examined the gender differences between various metabolic factors related to insulin resistance in elderly non-diabetic men and postmenopausal women of comparable age suffering from hypertriglyceridemia, and compared them with healthy subjects of equal age. Results The indexes of insulin resistance HOMA IR and QUICKI were significantly higher in both hyperlipemic men and women than in controls; 95% confidence limits of hyperlipemic subjects did not overlap with controls. In both normolipemic and hyperlipemic men and women serum leptin correlated significantly with insulin resistance, while HDL-cholesterol correlated inversely with HOMA-IR only in women (both normo- and hyperlipemic, and serum tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα only in hyperlipemic women. According to results of multiple regression analysis with HOMA-IR as a dependent variable, leptin played a significant role in determining insulin resistance in both genders, but – aside from leptin – triglycerides, TNFα and decreased HDL-cholesterol were significant determinants in women, while body mass index and decreased HDL-cholesterol were significant determinants in men. The coefficient of determination (R2 of HOMA IR by above mentioned metabolic variables was in women above 60%, in men only about 40%. Conclusion The significant role of serum leptin in determination of insulin resistance in both elderly men and postmenopausal women of equal age was confirmed. However, the study also revealed significant gender differences : in women a strong influence of triglycerides, TNFα and decreased HDL-cholesterol, in men only a mild role of BMI and decreased HDL-cholesterol.

  10. INFLUENCE OF HERBAL EXTRACTS ON METABOLIC DISTURBANCES IN DIABETES MELLITUS AND INSULIN RESISTANCE MODEL

    T. V. Yakimova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to assess the influence on metabolic processes of herbal extracts, used in diets with different fat content, in diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance model.Material and methods. The experiments were performing on 90 noninbred male albino rats. Diabetes mellitus was modeling with twice-repeated intraperitoneal streptozotocine (30 mg/kg injections. For the insulin resistance formation animals were fad meal with 30% fat content. Against the background rats were administering into the stomach nettle leafs (Urtica dioica L., 100 mg/kg, burdock roots (Arctium lappa L., 25 mg/kg extracts or intraperitoneal insulin preparation Actrapide HM Penfill (3 mg/kg daily during 10 days. During period of agents introduction one-half of animals continued to receive food with high fat content, the other half received diet with 8% fat content. The third rats group received only food with low fat content without extracts or insulin administration. In blood was measured the glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, creatinine, urea, uric acid content, in liver homogenates – glycogen, protein content, aminotransferases and glucose-6phosphatase activity, in muscle homogenates – glycogen and protein content.Results. After streptozotocine injections and diet with 30% fat content the blood glucose level became by 4.0–5.3 fold more than level of intact animals, increased the hemoglobin glycosylation, also creatinine, urea, uric acid blood content, in liver and muscle homogenates raised glycogen content, decreased protein quantity, in liver homogenates increased aminotranferases and glucose-6-phosphatase activity. In animals only feeding with 8% fat diminished hyperglycemia, creatinine blood retention, the liver glycogen content and recovered its protein resources. The nettle or burdock extracts administrating to animals that continued to receive high fat meal decreased the blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin and creatinine content, the liver

  11. Influence of functional nutrients on insulin resistance in horses with equine metabolic syndrome

    Krzysztof Marycz, Eberhard Moll and Jakub Grzesiak

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The obesity is a rising health problem both in veterinary and human medicine. In equine medicine excessive body weight is frequently related to insulin resistance and laminitis as is defined as equine metabolic syndrome (EMS. The dietetic management is considered as the crucial part of treatment strategy in the course of EMS. The main feeding recommendation is to administer the low energy diet in order to restore insulin efficiency and to lower body weight. In this study 14 horses of different breed, both sexes and different ages with diagnosed equine metabolic syndrome were fed, concurrently, with oats (3g/kg bw, hay (15g/kg bw and experimental dietary supplement containing selected herbs, aminoacids, butyric acid derivative, biotin and selected dietetic plant like artichoke. The influence of above dietary protocol on body weight, insulin level, and adipose tissue morphometry was investigated in horses from group A. Horses from group B fed only with oats (3g/kg bw and hay (15g/kg bw served as a control. Results of the experiment indicated that tested supplement could improve insulin efficiency and reduce body mass in experimental horses group.

  12. The influence of the polymorphism in apolipoprotein B codon 2488 on insulin and lipid levels in a Danish twin population

    Bentzen, J; Poulsen, P; Vaag, A

    2002-01-01

    on parameters associated with the insulin resistance syndrome in Danish twins. METHODS: The effect of the polymorphism on lipid, glucose and insulin measures was studied in 548 same sex twins aged 55-74 years. RESULTS: The codon 2488 polymorphism influenced fasting triglyceride levels, as well as insulin......, as measured at 120 min in an oral glucose tolerance test. Subjects with the genotype T2488T had 14% higher triglyceride levels (P = 0.02) and 31% higher insulin levels (P = 0.004) than subjects with genotype C2488C. In twins discordant for genotype, the T-allele was associated with higher levels......AIMS: The apolipoprotein B codon 2488 polymorphism has been associated with the metabolism of lipoproteins in subjects with Type 2 diabetes. However, no data are available on the influence of the polymorphism on insulin or glucose metabolism. This study examines the impact of the polymorphism...

  13. Neutral insulin solutions physically stabilized by addition of Zn2+.

    Brange, J; Havelund, S; Hommel, E; Sørensen, E; Kühl, C

    1986-01-01

    Commercial neutral insulin solutions, all of which contain 2-3 zinc atoms per hexameric unit of insulin, have a relatively limited physical stability when exposed to heat and movement, as for example in insulin infusion pumps. Physical stabilization of neutral insulin solutions has been obtained by addition of two extra Zn2+ per hexamer of insulin. This addition stabilizes porcine and human neutral solutions equally well and does not affect the chemical stability of the insulin. The stabilization is probably obtained by a further strengthening of the hexameric structure of insulin, so that the formation of insoluble insulin fibrils (via the dissociation into the insulin monomer or dimer) is impeded or prevented. The addition of an extra 2 Zn2+ has been shown to be without influence on the insulin immunogenicity in rabbits or on the rate of absorption after subcutaneous injection in diabetic patients. It is concluded that neutral insulin solution can be physically stabilized by addition of extra Zn2+ without affecting other qualities of the insulin preparation including chemical stability, immunogenicity, and duration of action after injection.

  14. Longitudinal infusion of a complex of insulin-like growth factor-I and IGF-binding protein-3 in five preterm infants: pharmacokinetics and short-term safety.

    Ley, David; Hansen-Pupp, Ingrid; Niklasson, Aimon; Domellöf, Magnus; Friberg, Lena E; Borg, Jan; Löfqvist, Chatarina; Hellgren, Gunnel; Smith, Lois E H; Hård, Anna-Lena; Hellström, Ann

    2013-01-01

    In preterm infants, low levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) are associated with impaired brain growth and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Treatment with IGF-I/IGFBP-3 may be beneficial for brain development and may decrease the prevalence of ROP. In a phase II pharmacokinetics and safety study, five infants (three girls) with a median (range) gestational age (GA) of 26 wk + 6 d (26 wk + 0 d to 27 wk + 2 d) and birth weight of 990 (900-1,212) g received continuous intravenous infusion of recombinant human (rh)IGF-I/rhIGFBP-3. Treatment was initiated during the first postnatal day and continued for a median (range) duration of 168 (47-168) h in dosages between 21 and 111 µg/kg/24 h. Treatment with rhIGF-I/rhIGFBP-3 was associated with higher serum IGF-I and IGFBP-3 concentrations (P model-predicted endogenous levels. Of 74 IGF-I samples measured during study drug infusion, 37 (50%) were within the target range, 4 (5%) were above, and 33 (45%) were below. The predicted dose of rhIGF-I/rhIGFBP-3 required to establish circulating levels of IGF-I within the intrauterine range in a 1,000 g infant was 75-100 µg/kg/24 h. No hypoglycemia or other adverse effects were recorded. In this study, continuous intravenous infusion of rhIGF-I/rhIGFBP-3 was effective in increasing serum concentrations of IGF-I and IGFBP-3, and was found to be safe.

  15. Influence of repeated infusion of capsaicin-contained red pepper sauce on esophageal secondary peristalsis in humans.

    Liu, T T; Yi, C H; Lei, W Y; Hung, X S; Yu, H C; Chen, C L

    2014-10-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 has been implicated as a target mediator for heartburn perception and modulation of esophageal secondary peristalsis. Our aim was to determine the effect of repeated esophageal infusion of capsaicin-contained red pepper sauce on heartburn perception and secondary peristalsis in healthy adults. Secondary peristalsis was performed with mid-esophageal injections of air in 15 healthy adults. Two separate protocols including esophageal infusion with saline and capsaicin-contained red pepper sauce and 2 consecutive sessions of capsaicin-contained red pepper sauce were randomly performed. After repeated infusion of capsaicin-contained red pepper sauce, the threshold volume to activate secondary peristalsis was significantly increased during slow (p sauce enhanced heartburn perception (p sauce infusion (p = 0.007). Acute infusion of capsaicin-contained red pepper sauce significantly increased pressure wave amplitudes of distal esophagus during slow (p = 0.003) and rapid air injections (p = 0.01), but repeated infusion of capsaicin-contained red pepper sauce significantly decreased pressure wave amplitude of distal esophagus during slow (p = 0.0005) and rapid air injections (p = 0.003). Repeated esophageal infusion of capsaicin appears to attenuate heartburn perception and inhibit distension-induced secondary peristalsis in healthy adults. These results suggest capsaicin-sensitive afferents in modulating sensorimotor function of secondary peristalsis in human esophagus. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Influence of water infusion of medicinal plants on larvae of Strongyloides papillosus (Nematoda, Strongyloididae

    A. A. Boyko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common nematodes of ruminants is Strongyloides papillosus (Wedl, 1856. Disease caused by these parasites brings economic losses to livestock operations. Therefore it is necessary to control their numbers. The eggs and three larval stages of S. papillosus live in the environment, while the fourth, fifth and mature individuals live in host organisms. Control of these parasites is necessary at all stages of development, including the free-living stage. An experiment on changes in the number strongiloids under the influence of environmental factors was carried out using aqueous extracts of medicinal plants. In the laboratory experiment we researched the effect on the survival of invasive and noninvasive types of S. papillosus larvae of 24 hours exposure at different doses to Artemisia absinthium Linnaeus, 1753, Artemisia annua Linnaeus, 1753, Echinacea purpurea (Linnaeus, 1753 Moench, 1794, Matricaria chamomilla Linnaeus, 1753, Tanacetum vulgare Linnaeus, 1753, Salvia sclarea Linnaeus, 1753, Levisticum officinale W.D.J. Koch, 1824, Petroselinum crispum (Miller, 1768 Nyman ex A.W. Hill, 1925. The death of 50% of S. papillosus invasive larvae was registered at 464 ± 192 mg/l concentration of aqueous extract of S. sclarea inflorescences. The greatest effect up-on the non-invasive larvae was caused by aqueous extracts of inflorescences of S. sclarea, M. chamomilla and seeds of P. crispum: at concentrations of 327 ± 186, 384 ± 155 and 935 ± 218 mg/l, respectively, 50% of non-invasive larvae died. According to the results of the research, we suggest further study of the nematocidal activity of combinations, contained in the aboveground parts, of clary sage (S. sclarea, camomile (M. chamomilla and seeds of parsley (P. crispum, and also experimental usage of these species in the fodder compound for cattle, sheep, goats and pigs on experimental farms.

  17. The influence of GLP-1 on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion: effects on beta-cell sensitivity in type 2 and nondiabetic subjects

    Kjems, Lise L; Holst, Jens J; Vølund, Aage

    2003-01-01

    . However, the dose-response relationship between GLP-1 and basal and glucose-stimulated prehepatic insulin secretion rate (ISR) is currently not known. Seven patients with type 2 diabetes and seven matched nondiabetic control subjects were studied. ISR was determined during a graded glucose infusion of 2...

  18. Factors Affecting Transfer of Pyrethroid Residues from Herbal Teas to Infusion and Influence of Physicochemical Properties of Pesticides

    Jin-Jing Xiao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The transfer of pesticide residues from herbal teas to their infusion is a subject of particular interest. In this study, a multi-residue analytical method for the determination of pyrethroids (fenpropathrin, beta-cypermethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, and fenvalerate in honeysuckle, chrysanthemum, wolfberry, and licorice and their infusion samples was validated. The transfer of pyrethroid residues from tea to infusion was investigated at different water temperatures, tea/water ratios, and infusion intervals/times. The results show that low amounts (0–6.70% of pyrethroids were transferred under the different tea brewing conditions examined, indicating that the infusion process reduced the pyrethroid content in the extracted liquid by over 90%. Similar results were obtained for the different tea varieties, and pesticides with high water solubility and low octanol–water partition coefficients (log Kow exhibited high transfer rates. Moreover, the estimated values of the exposure risk to the pyrethroids were in the range of 0.0022–0.33, indicating that the daily intake of the four pyrethroid residues from herbal tea can be regarded as safe. The present results can support the identification of suitable tea brewing conditions for significantly reducing the pesticide residue levels in the infusion.

  19. [Continuous insulin therapy versus multiple insulin injections in the management of type 1 diabetes: a longitutinal study].

    Ribeiro, Maria Estela Bellini; Del Roio Liberatore Junior, Raphael; Custodio, Rodrigo; Martinelli Junior, Carlos Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    To compare multiple doses of insulin and continuous insulin infusion therapy as treatment for type 1 diabetes melito. 40 patients with type 1 diabetes melito (21 female) with ages between 10 and 20 years (mean=14.2) and mean duration of diabetes of 7 years used multiple doses of insulin for at least 6 months and after that, continuous insulin infusion therapy for at least 6 months. Each one of the patients has used multiple doses of insulin and continuous insulin infusion therapy. For analysis of HbA1c, mean glycated hemoglobin levels (mHbA1c) were obtained during each treatment period (multiple doses of insulin and continuous insulin infusion therapy period). Although mHbA1c levels were lower during continuous insulin infusion therapy the difference was not statistically significant. During multiple doses of insulin, 14.2% had mHbA1c values below 7.5% vs. 35.71% while on continuous insulin infusion therapy; demonstrating better glycemic control with the use of continuous insulin infusion therapy. During multiple doses of insulin, 15-40 patients have severe hypoglycemic events versus 5-40 continuous insulin infusion therapy. No episodes of ketoacidosis events were recorded. This is the first study with this design comparing multiple doses of insulin and continuous insulin infusion therapy in Brazil showing no significant difference in HbA1c; hypoglycemic events were less frequent during continuous insulin infusion therapy than during multiple doses of insulin and the percentage of patients who achieved a HbA1c less than 7.5% was greater during continuous insulin infusion therapy than multiple doses of insulin therapy. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Lupanine Improves Glucose Homeostasis by Influencing KATP Channels and Insulin Gene Expression

    Mats Wiedemann

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The glucose-lowering effects of lupin seeds involve the combined action of several components. The present study investigates the influence of one of the main quinolizidine alkaloids, lupanine, on pancreatic beta cells and in an animal model of type-2 diabetes mellitus. In vitro studies were performed with insulin-secreting INS-1E cells or islets of C57BL/6 mice. In the in vivo experiments, hyperglycemia was induced in rats by injecting streptozotocin (65 mg/kg body weight. In the presence of 15 mmol/L glucose, insulin secretion was significantly elevated by 0.5 mmol/L lupanine, whereas the alkaloid did not stimulate insulin release with lower glucose concentrations. In islets treated with l-arginine, the potentiating effect of lupanine already occurred at 8 mmol/L glucose. Lupanine increased the expression of the Ins-1 gene. The potentiating effect on secretion was correlated to membrane depolarization and an increase in the frequency of Ca2+ action potentials. Determination of the current through ATP-dependent K+ channels (KATP channels revealed that lupanine directly inhibited the channel. The effect was dose-dependent but, even with a high lupanine concentration of 1 mmol/L or after a prolonged exposure time (12 h, the KATP channel block was incomplete. Oral administration of lupanine did not induce hypoglycemia. By contrast, lupanine improved glycemic control in response to an oral glucose tolerance test in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. In summary, lupanine acts as a positive modulator of insulin release obviously without a risk for hypoglycemic episodes.

  1. Amino acid infusion during anesthesia attenuates the surgery induced decline in IGF-1 and diminishes the "diabetes of injury"

    Eksborg Staffan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgery, commonly performed after an overnight fast, causes a postoperative decline in the anabolic and glucose lowering insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1. Clinical fasting studies have exhibited a positive correlation between IGF-1 and nitrogen balance during different conditions. A perioperative amino acid infusion changes nitrogen balance and might thereby influence serum IGF-1. We hypothesized that amino acid infusion would enhance IGF-1 and thereby might influence glucose homeostasis after surgery. In this study we examined two different regimes of perioperative amino acids infusion. Methods 24 females scheduled for abdominal hysterectomy were randomized into three groups; Ringer's solution infusion throughout anesthesia (Group B, amino acid infusion throughout anesthesia (Group C and amino acid infusion 1 hour before anesthesia and during 1.5 hrs of surgery (Group D. Six female volunteers, who were not operated, but received the same amino acids infusion after fasting, served as controls (Group A. Fasting levels of IGF-1, Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1, insulin and P-glucose were studied prior to, and four days following, operation. Homeostasis model assessment (HOMA was used as an index of insulin resistance. Non-parametric statistical methods were used. Results During the study the Ringer-group exhibited a decrease in IGF-1 and an increase in insulin and plasma glucose after surgery. Within the other groups there were no significant alterations over time after surgery, with the exception of a postoperative decrease in IGF-1 in group D. Group C had higher IGF-1 levels compared to group B on all days. Also, group D had higher IGF-1 levels than group B on day 2 – 4. From baseline to the first postoperative day there was a significant increase in HOMA and IGFBP-1 in groups B and C. These changes were not found in group D, in which insulin, glucose, HOMA and IGFBP-1 did not change. Amino acid

  2. Influence of the catheter-top-position upon the distribution pattern of continuous intra-arterially infused chemotherapeutic agent

    Ichinohe, Hyobu

    1980-01-01

    The whole body scanning showed the distribution pattern of infused drug in continuous intra-arterially infused chemotherapy by using a gamma camera and infused RI (sup(99m)Tc-MAA) from catheter. I measured the whole body scanning counts without shield (A) and with lead shield (B) on ROI and natural back ground counts (BG). Then I calculated the distribution ratio on ROI as following. [(A-B)/(A-BG)] x 100(%). It was easy to find a certain relation between the catheter-top-position and the distribution ratio. As a result of investigating data, there were about 4 catheter-top-positions in aorta. Case by case, we putted the catheter-top in better position and prevented technical side effects and measured roughly total dose on ROI. (author)

  3. Nutritional education and carbohydrate counting in children with type 1 diabetes treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion: the effects on dietary habits, body composition and glycometabolic control.

    Marigliano, Marco; Morandi, Anita; Maschio, Maddalena; Sabbion, Alberto; Contreas, Giovanna; Tomasselli, Francesca; Tommasi, Mara; Maffeis, Claudio

    2013-12-01

    Carbohydrate counting (CHC) in combination with nutritional education has been used to optimize the insulin dose in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). The aim of this study was to test the impact of CHC and nutritional education on changes in dietary habits, body composition and body fat distribution in children with T1D treated with insulin pumps (CSII). Twenty-five children with T1D and CSII were recruited and valuated at baseline and after 18 months of follow-up. They were trained in CHC and following standard nutrition education program (based on American Diabetes Association and International Society of Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes guidelines); clinical, biochemical and nutritional variables were measured. In the total population, body composition, body fat distribution and biochemical variables did not change, at follow-up; HbA1c was significantly reduced (8.50 ± 0.77 vs 7.92 ± 0.74 %; p nutritional education, does not affect dietary habits, body composition and body fat distribution in children with T1D treated with CSII. Moreover, the sub-group of subjects showing a significant improvement in glycometabolic control reported an increase in CHO intake and a reduction in fat and protein intake.

  4. Relationships between the pituitary-adrenal hormones, insulin, and glucose in middle-aged men: moderating influence of psychosocial stress.

    Keltikangas-Järvinen, L; Ravaja, N; Räikkönen, K; Hautanen, A; Adlercreutz, H

    1998-12-01

    We examined whether the relationships between the pituitary-adrenal hormones (corticotropin [ACTH) and cortisol), insulin, and glucose differ as a function of psychosocial stress defined in terms of vital exhaustion (VE) and depressive behavior (DB). The participants were 69 normotensive and 21 unmedicated borderline hypertensive (BH) middle-aged men whose work is stressful. Hormonal and metabolic variables were measured during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and the cortisol response to dexamethasone (DXM) suppression and intravenous ACTH stimulation was also measured. We found that the basal ACTH level during the OGTT was positively associated with the cortisol response to ACTH at 60 minutes, the fasting insulin level, and the insulin to glucose ratio among exhausted and high DB men, while the reverse was true for nonexhausted and low DB men. Also, a high cortisol response to ACTH, a low cortisol level during the OGTT, and a high ratio of these cortisol determinations (cortisol ratio) were associated with high fasting insulin and glucose levels, the summed insulin values, and the insulin to glucose ratio only among nonexhausted and low DB men; among exhausted and high DB men, these associations were less pronounced, absent, or in the opposite direction. The findings suggest that VE and DB have a moderating influence on the relationships among the hormonal and metabolic parameters studied. Psychosocial stress may affect the pituitary-adrenocortical system in complex ways, contributing thereby to insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk.

  5. Influence of detomidine and xylazine on spleen dimensions and on splenic response to epinephrine infusion in healthy adult horses.

    Deniau, Valérie; Depecker, Marianne; Bizon-Mercier, Céline; Couroucé-Malblanc, Anne

    2013-07-01

    To compare the changes in splenic length and thickness and in packed cell volume (PCV) following detomidine or xylazine administration and subsequent epinephrine infusion. Spleen relaxation occurs following xylazine or detomidine administration and interferes with subsequent splenic contractile response to epinephrine. Randomized non-blinded crossover experimental study. 6 healthy adult mares. The mares received an intravenous (IV) epinephrine infusion (1 μg kg(-1 ) minute(-1) over 5 minutes) one hour after IV administration of detomidine (0.01 mg kg(-1) ), xylazine (0.5 mg kg(-1) ) or no drug (control), with a withdrawal period of at least 7 days between experiments. The splenic length measured in two different axes, the splenic thickness, and the PCV were measured prior to sedation (T0), 30 minutes later, and at 5-minute intervals from the start of the epinephrine infusion (T1) until T1 + 40 minutes. Changes from base-line and between treatments were compared using a two-way anova for repeated measures. Significance was set at p detomidine administration compared to baseline. Epinephrine infusion resulted in a significant decrease in splenic length and thickness, and a significant increase in PCV, irrespective of prior treatment with detomidine or xylazine. Detomidine administration was followed by a sonographically detectable increase of splenic length. Neither detomidine nor xylazine interfered with the ability of the spleen to contract following subsequent administration of an epinephrine infusion given one hour later. Previous sedation with alpha-2 agonists does not preclude the efficiency of epinephrine as a medical treatment of left dorsal displacement of the large colon, but further investigations are required with other drug doses and different time intervals between administrations. © 2013 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia © 2013 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  6. Obese but not normal-weight women with polycystic ovary syndrome are characterized by metabolic and microvascular insulin resistance.

    Ketel, Iris J G; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Serné, Erik H; Korsen, Ted J M; Hompes, Peter G A; Smulders, Yvo M; de Jongh, Renate T; Homburg, Roy; Lambalk, Cornelis B

    2008-09-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and obesity are associated with diabetes and cardiovascular disease, but it is unclear to what extent PCOS contributes independently of obesity. The objective of the study was to investigate whether insulin sensitivity and insulin's effects on the microcirculation are impaired in normal-weight and obese women with PCOS. Thirty-five women with PCOS (19 normal weight and 16 obese) and 27 age- and body mass index-matched controls (14 normal weight and 13 obese) were included. Metabolic Insulin sensitivity (isoglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp) and microvascular insulin sensitivity [endothelium dependent (acetylcholine [ACh])] and endothelium-independent [sodium nitroprusside (SNP)] vasodilation with laser Doppler flowmetry was assessed at baseline and during hyperinsulinemia. Metabolic insulin sensitivity (M/I value) and the area under the response curves to ACh and SNP curves were measured to assess microcirculatory function at baseline and during insulin infusion (microvascular insulin sensitivity). Obese women were more insulin resistant than normal-weight women (P PCOS women were more resistant than obese controls (P = 0.02). In contrast, normal-weight women with PCOS had similar insulin sensitivity, compared with normal-weight women without PCOS. Baseline responses to ACh showed no difference in the four groups. ACh responses during insulin infusion were significantly greater in normal-weight PCOS and controls than in obese PCOS and controls. PCOS per se had no significant influence on ACh responses during insulin infusion. During hyperinsulinemia, SNP-dependent vasodilatation did not significantly increase, compared with baseline in the four groups. PCOS per se was not associated with impaired metabolic insulin sensitivity in normal-weight women but aggravates impairment of metabolic insulin sensitivity in obese women. In obese but not normal-weight women, microvascular and metabolic insulin sensitivity are decreased, independent

  7. Influence of endotoxin-induced sepsis on the requirements of propofol-fentanyl infusion rate in pigs

    Bollen, Peter; Nielsen, Bjørn J; Toft, Palle

    2007-01-01

    Endotoxin-induced sepsis in pigs is a recognized experimental model for the study of human septic shock. Generally, pigs are brought into general anaesthesia before sepsis is induced. It is our experience that drug dosages of propofol and fentanyl need to be reduced during endotoxin-induced sepsis......, in order to prevent respiratory and cardiovascular depression, but the scientific evidence for this observation is lacking. Therefore, we measured the consumption of propofol and fentanyl at equal level of anaesthesia in pigs with (n = 5) and without (n = 5) endotoxin-induced sepsis, using the cerebral...... state index (CSI) as measure of anaesthetic depth. Infusion rates of propofol (P endotoxin-induced sepsis had an infusion rate of 2.2 mg/kg/hr (S.D. 0.5) for propofol and 12 microg/kg/hr (S.D. 2) for fentanyl, whereas...

  8. Blood pressure and mesenteric blood flow in the rat during infusion of biogenic amines. Influence of a supralethal irradiation

    Timmermans, R.; Gerber, G.B.

    1979-01-01

    The action of biogenic amines (noradrenaline, dopamine), infused at different concentration into the aorta of the urethane anesthetized control and irradiated rats for 2 min., was followed on the basis of systemic blood pressure and mesenteric blood flow. The mesenteric blood flow was measured by means of an electromagnetic flow meter. The changes observed i.e. after dopamine an increase in pressure and flow, after noradrenaline an increase in pressure and a decrease in flow with an increase after infusion had been stopped, correspond to those obtained in larger animals. In many, but not in all cases, the response is proportional to the log of the concentration of the amine infused. Irradiation with 2 kR, i.e. a dose which causes the animals to die from the gastrointestinal syndrome after 3 days modified the response to dopamine and noradrenaline. The changes are, for noradrenaline, a greater pressure and a lower flow responses and for dopamine a greater pressure response at low and middle doses [fr

  9. Blood pressure and mesenteric blood flow in the rat during infusion of biogenic amines. Influence of a supralethal irradiation

    Timmermans, R; Gerber, G B [Centre d' Etude de l' Energie Nucleaire, Mol (Belgium)

    1978-01-01

    The action of biogenic amines (noradrenaline, dopamine), infused at different concentration into the aorta of the urethane anesthetized control and irradiated rats for 2 min., was followed on the basis of systemic blood pressure and mesenteric blood flow. The mesenteric blood flow was measured by means of an electromagnetic flow meter. The changes observed i.e. after dopamine an increase in pressure and flow, after noradrenaline an increase in pressure and a decrease in flow with an increase after infusion had been stopped, correspond to those obtained in larger animals. In many, but not in all cases, the response is proportional to the log of the concentration of the amine infused. Irradiation with 2 kR, i.e. a dose which causes the animals to die from the gastrointestinal syndrome after 3 days, modified the response to dopamine and noradrenaline. The changes are, for noradrenaline, a greater pressure and a lower flow responses and for dopamine a greater pressure response at low and middle doses.

  10. Insulin and the Brain

    Grosu Cristina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The brain represents an important site for the action of insulin. Besides the traditionally known importance in glucoregulation, insulin has significant neurotrophic properties and influences the brain activity: insulin influences eating behavior, regulates the storage of energy and several aspects concerning memory and knowledge. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinism could be associated with brain aging, vascular and metabolic pathologies. Elucidating the pathways and metabolism of brain insulin could have a major impact on future targeted therapies.

  11. Numerical and clinical precision of continuous glucose monitoring in Colombian patients treated with insulin infusion pump with automated suspension in hypoglycemia.

    Gómez, Ana M; Marín Sánchez, Alejandro; Muñoz, Oscar M; Colón Peña, Christian Alejandro

    2015-12-01

    Insulin pump therapy associated with continuous glucose monitoring has shown a positive clinical impact on diabetes control and reduction of hypoglycemia episodes. There are descriptions of the performance of this device in other populations, but its precision and accuracy in Colombia and Latin America are unknown, especially in the routine outpatient setting. Data from 33 type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients with sensor-augmented pump therapy with threshold suspend automation, MiniMed Paradigm® Veo™ (Medtronic, Northridge, California), managed at Hospital Universitario San Ignacio (Bogotá, Colombia) and receiving outpatient treatment, were analyzed. Simultaneous data from continuous glucose monitoring and capillary blood glucose were compared, and their precision and accuracy were calculating with different methods, including Clarke error grid. Analyses included 2,262 continuous glucose monitoring -reference paired glucose values. A mean absolute relative difference of 20.1% was found for all measurements, with a value higher than 23% for glucose levels ≤75mg/dL. Global compliance with the ISO criteria was 64.9%. It was higher for values >75mg/dl (68.3%, 1,308 of 1,916 readings), than for those ≤ 75mg/dl (49.4%, 171 of 346 readings). Clinical accuracy, as assessed by the Clarke error grid, showed that 91.77% of data were within the A and B zones (75.6% in hypoglycemia). A good numerical accuracy was found for continuous glucose monitoring in normo and hyperglycemia situations, with low precision in hypoglycemia. The clinical accuracy of the device was adequate, with no significant safety concerns for patients. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. INFLUENCE OF DIETARY FAT ON LEPTIN AND INSULIN IN MALE ALBINO RATS

    KASSAB, F.M.A.; ABDEL-KHALEK, L.G.; KAMAL, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Sixty male albino rats were arranged into 5 equal groups which were used in this study to investigate the relation between leptin and insulin hormones under high fat intake and to assess the role of fresh vegetable intake on minimizing dyslipidemia.The results denoted that dietary fat caused significant increase in the levels of blood glucose and leptin hormone with significant decrease in insulin concentration and with prolonged high fat intake, insulin level was increased. However, the increased leptin and glucose indicated that prolonged fatty diet may cause insulin resistance. Addition of green vegetables to the diet normalized to a great extent the level of cholesterol, triglycerides, VLDL, glucose and insulin

  13. Interaction between exogenous insulin, endogenous insulin, and glucose in type 2 diabetes patients.

    Janukonyté, Jurgita; Parkner, Tina; Bruun, Niels Henrik; Lauritzen, Torsten; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl; Laursen, Torben

    2015-05-01

    Little is known about the influence of exogenous insulin and actual glucose levels on the release of endogenous insulin in insulin-treated type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. This study investigated the interaction among serum endogenous insulin (s-EI), serum exogenous insulin aspart (s-IAsp), and blood glucose levels in an experimental short-term crossover design. Eight T2DM patients (63.52 years old; range, 49-69 years; mean body mass index, 28.8±3.8 kg/m(2)) were randomized to treatment with individual fixed doses of insulin aspart (0.5-1.5 IU/h) as a continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) during a 10-h period on two occasions with different duration of hyperglycemia: (1) transient hyperglycemia for 2 h (visit TH) and (2) continuous hyperglycemia for 12 h (visit CH). During steady state the variances of plasma glucose (p-glucose), s-IAsp, and s-EI were equal within visit TH and within visit CH, but variances were significantly higher during visit CH compared with visit TH. The s-IAsp reached lower levels at visit CH compared with visit TH (test for slope=1, P=0.005). The s-EI depended on p-glucose in a nonlinear fashion during the first 100 min of both visits when s-IAsp was undetectable (adjusted R(2)=0.9). A complex but statistically significant interaction among s-IAsp, s-EI, p-glucose, and patients was observed during measurable s-IAsp levels (adjusted R(2)=0.70). Endogenous and exogenous insulin showed higher variation during continuous hyperglycemia. Significantly lower levels of exogenous insulin were observed following CSII during continuous hyperglycemia compared with transient hyperglycemia. Endogenous insulin levels could in a complex way be explained by an individual interaction among p-glucose and serum exogenous insulin, if present.

  14. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation does not influence basal glucose metabolism or insulin sensitivity in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Lammers, Nicolette M; Sondermeijer, Brigitte M; Twickler, Th B Marcel; de Bie, Rob M; Ackermans, Mariëtte T; Fliers, Eric; Schuurman, P Richard; La Fleur, Susanne E; Serlie, Mireille J

    2014-01-01

    Animal studies have shown that central dopamine signaling influences glucose metabolism. As a first step to show this association in an experimental setting in humans, we studied whether deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), which modulates the basal ganglia circuitry, alters basal endogenous glucose production (EGP) or insulin sensitivity in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We studied 8 patients with PD treated with DBS STN, in the basal state and during a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp using a stable glucose isotope, in the stimulated and non-stimulated condition. We measured EGP, hepatic insulin sensitivity, peripheral insulin sensitivity (Rd), resting energy expenditure (REE), glucoregulatory hormones, and Parkinson symptoms, using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). Basal plasma glucose and EGP did not differ between the stimulated and non-stimulated condition. Hepatic insulin sensitivity was similar in both conditions and there were no significant differences in Rd and plasma glucoregulatory hormones between DBS on and DBS off. UPDRS was significantly higher in the non-stimulated condition. DBS of the STN in patients with PD does not influence basal EGP or insulin sensitivity. These results suggest that acute modulation of the motor basal ganglia circuitry does not affect glucose metabolism in humans.

  15. Lipid-induced insulin resistance does not impair insulin access to skeletal muscle

    Richey, Joyce M.; Castro, Ana Valeria B.; Broussard, Josiane L.; Ionut, Viorica; Bergman, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated plasma free fatty acids (FFA) induce insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Previously, we have shown that experimental insulin resistance induced by lipid infusion prevents the dispersion of insulin through the muscle, and we hypothesized that this would lead to an impairment of insulin moving from the plasma to the muscle interstitium. Thus, we infused lipid into our anesthetized canine model and measured the appearance of insulin in the lymph as a means to sample muscle interstitium under hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp conditions. Although lipid infusion lowered the glucose infusion rate and induced both peripheral and hepatic insulin resistance, we were unable to detect an impairment of insulin access to the lymph. Interestingly, despite a significant, 10-fold increase in plasma FFA, we detected little to no increase in free fatty acids or triglycerides in the lymph after lipid infusion. Thus, we conclude that experimental insulin resistance induced by lipid infusion does not reduce insulin access to skeletal muscle under clamp conditions. This would suggest that the peripheral insulin resistance is likely due to reduced cellular sensitivity to insulin in this model, and yet we did not detect a change in the tissue microenvironment that could contribute to cellular insulin resistance. PMID:25852002

  16. Age-dependent nongenetic influences of birth weight and adult body fat on insulin sensitivity in twins

    Monrad, Rikke Nygaard; Grunnet, Louise Groth; Rasmussen, Eva Lind

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesized a nongenetic influence of birth weight (BW) and twin and zygosity status on dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry determined adult total and regional body composition and a quantitative equal, although independent, importance of adult body composition and BW for insulin sensitivity....

  17. The effects of short term intravenous infusion of a soybean based lipid emulsion on some blood constituents in sheep: A preliminary study

    Hamid Akbari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of intravenous infusion of a soybean based lipid emulsion (Lipovenoes 10% on some blood constituents in sheep, a replicated 2 × 2 Latin square design experiment was conducted in four clinically healthy ewes. Lipid emulsion (LE group or normal saline (NS group was infused intravenously at a rate of 0.025 mL kg-1 per min for 6 hr and the concentrations of blood triglyceride, glucose, insulin, calcium, magnesium, phosphorous, sodium and potassium were measured before (baseline and then at timepoints 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 hr after infusion. Compared to the baseline values and/or NS infusion, LE infusion resulted in a significant increase in the concentrations of triglyceride (p 0.05. In conclusion, intravenous infusion of Lipovenoes temporarily influenced some blood constituents. Increased triglyceride concentrations were associated with an increase in HOMA-IR values indicating a state of insulin resistance. No remarkable adverse effect was observed following LE infusion and lipid based emulsions can be safely used in ruminants not suffering from extensive lipid mobilization.

  18. Microvascular function in pre-eclampsia is influenced by insulin resistance and an imbalance of angiogenic mediators.

    Ghosh, Anshuman; Freestone, Nicholas S; Anim-Nyame, Nicholas; Arrigoni, Francesca I F

    2017-04-01

    In preeclampsia, maternal microvascular function is disrupted and angiogenesis is dysfunctional. Insulin resistance that occurs in some pregnancies also pathologically affects microvascular function. We wished to examine the relationship of angiogenic mediators and insulin resistance on microvascular health in pregnancy. We performed a nested, case-control study of 16 women who developed preeclampsia with 17 normal pregnant controls. We hypothesized that the impaired microvascular blood flow in preeclamptic women associated with an increased ratio of the antiangiogenic factors; (s-endoglin [sEng] and soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 [sFlt-1]) and proangiogenic molecule (placental growth factor [PlGF]) could be influenced by insulin resistance. Serum samples taken after 28 weeks of gestation were measured for the angiogenic factors, insulin, and glucose alongside the inflammatory marker; tumor necrosis factor-α and endothelial activation, namely; soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and e-selectin. Maternal microvascular blood flow, measured by strain gauge plethysmography, correlated with ratios of pro- and antiangiogenic mediators independently of preeclampsia. Decreased microvascular function measured in preeclampsia strongly correlated with both the antiangiogenic factor (sFlt-1 + sEng): PlGF ratio and high levels of insulin resistance, and combining insulin resistance with antiangiogenic factor ratios further strengthened this relationship. In pregnancy, microvascular blood flow is strongly associated with perturbations in pro- and antiangiogenic mediators. In preeclampsia, the relationship of maternal microvascular dysfunction with antiangiogenic mediators is strengthened when combined with insulin resistance. © 2017 Kingston University. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  19. Does DNA Methylation of PPARGC1A Influence Insulin Action in First Degree Relatives of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes?

    Gillberg, Linn; Jacobsen, Stine; Ribel-Madsen, Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    and in muscle from individuals at risk of T2D. This study aimed to investigate DNA promoter methylation and gene expression of PPARGC1A in skeletal muscle from first degree relatives (FDR) of T2D patients, and to determine the association with insulin action as well as the influence of family relation. We...... genetic regulation to play a role. No significant effect of familiality on DNA methylation was found. Taken together, increased DNA methylation of the PPARGC1A promoter is unlikely to play a major causal role for the development of insulin resistance in FDR of patients with T2D....... included 124 Danish FDR of T2D patients from 46 different families. Skeletal muscle biopsies were excised from vastus lateralis and insulin action was assessed by oral glucose tolerance tests. DNA methylation and mRNA expression levels were measured using bisulfite sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR...

  20. The influence of the soil and plant natures and pollution on the radon and thoron alpha-activities inside various herbal infusions by using solid state nuclear track detectors

    Misdaq, M.A.; Nouh, F.A.; Bourzik, W.

    2001-01-01

    Uranium and thorium contents were determined in samples of various plants in the soils in which the plants were grown, and in herbal infusions made by boiling the plants in potable water, using CR-39 and LR-115 solid state nuclear track detectors. In addition, radon and thoron alpha-activities per unit volume inside the plants, soils and herbal infusions were measured. These measurements were completed by an investigation of the radon transfer between soils and plants and that between plants and herbal infusions, and also by the investigation of the influence of pollution due to different material dusts on the radon and thoron alpha activities inside the plants and their infusions. (author)

  1. Study of the influence of the soil and plant natures and pollution on the radon and thoron alpha activities inside various herbal infusions by using solid state nuclear track detectors

    Misdaq, M.A.; Ait nouh, F.; Bourzik, W.; Lamine, J.

    2000-01-01

    Different medicinal plant, spinach and cereal samples have been analysed by using neutron activation analysis and radiochemical separation. The solid state nuclear track detectors technique was utilized for uranium and thorium contents determination as well as for alpha, beta, and gamma dose rates evaluation in various geological and ceramic samples. In this study, uranium and thorium contents have been determined in different plant samples, soils in which they have been grown and in herbal infusions made by boiling the studied plants in potable water by using CR-39 and LR-115 solid state nuclear track detectors. Radon and thoron alpha activities per unit volume inside the plants, soils and herbal infusions studied have been evaluated. The radon transfers between soils and plants as well as between plants and herbal infusions have been investigated. The influence of pollution due to different material dusts on radon and thoron alpha activities inside the plants and their corresponding infusions has been studied. (author)

  2. Influence of Ringer’s lactated solution in continuous infusion and general anesthesia on hematocrit in dogs

    Rogério Luizari Guedes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of serum parameters during general anesthesia procedures are subject to variations due to differences in protocol, splenic storage, and by the instituted fluid therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the hematocrit changes promoted by controlled fluid therapy and general anesthesia. Six mongrel female dogs underwent an anesthetic protocol with acepromazine (0.03 mg kg-1 and tramadol (5 mg kg-1 for premedication, induction with propofol (3 mg kg-1, and maintained with isoflurane and mechanical ventilation for 120 minutes. After induction, they were infused with 10 ml kg hr-1 of Ringer’s lactate solution. Hematocrit measurements were performed from the start until 72 hours from anesthesia and evaluated statistically to check if there were significant changes over time. The fluid therapy, the acepromazine and propofol in the anesthetic protocol promotes a significant reduction of hematocrit up to four hours after general anesthesia.

  3. Insulin aspart pharmacokinetics

    Rasmussen, Christian Hove; Roge, Rikke Meldgaard; Ma, Zhulin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Insulin aspart (IAsp) is used by many diabetics as a meal-time insulin to control postprandial glucose levels. As is the case with many other insulin types, the pharmacokinetics (PK), and consequently the pharmacodynamics (PD), is associated with clinical variability, both between...... to investigate and quantify the properties of the subcutaneous depot. Data from Brange et al. (1990) are used to determine the effects of insulin chemistry in subcutis on the absorption rate. Intravenous (i.v.) bolus and infusion PK data for human insulin are used to understand and quantify the systemic...... distribution and elimination (Porksen et al., 1997; Sjostrand et al., 2002). PK and PD profiles for type 1 diabetics from Chen et al. (2005) are analyzed to demonstrate the effects of IAsp antibodies in terms of bound and unbound insulin. PK profiles from Thorisdottir et al. (2009) and Ma et al. (2012b...

  4. Gender discrimination in the influence of hyperglycemia and hyperosmolarity on rat aortic tissue responses to insulin.

    Wong, Nikki L; Achike, Francis I

    2010-08-09

    Hyperglycaemia initiates endothelial dysfunction causing diabetic macro- and micro-vasculopathy, the main causes of morbidity and mortality in diabetes mellitus. The vasculopathy exhibits gender peculiarities. We therefore explored gender differences in comparing the effects of hyperglycaemia (50 mM) per se with its hyperosmolar (50 mM) effects on vascular tissue responses to insulin. Endothelium-intact or denuded thoracic aortic rings from age-matched male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were incubated for 10 min or 6 h (acute versus chronic exposure) in normal, hyperglycaemic or hyperosmolar Krebs solution. Relaxant responses to insulin (6.9x10(-7)-6.9x10(-5) M) of the phenylephrine-contracted tissues were recorded. Endothelium denudation in both genders inhibited relaxation to insulin in all conditions, more significantly in female than in male tissues, suggesting the female response to insulin is more endothelium-dependent than the male. Acutely and chronically exposed normoglycemic endothelium-intact or -denuded tissues responded similarly to insulin. Chronic hyperglycemic or hyperosmolar exposure did not alter the endothelium-denuded tissue responses to insulin, whereas the responses of the endothelium-intact male and female hyperosmolar, and male hyperglycemic tissues were enhanced. The results show that insulin exerts an endothelium-dependent and independent relaxation with the female tissue responses more endothelium-dependent than the male. The data also suggest that hyperosmolarity per se enhances aortic tissue relaxant responses to insulin whereas hyperglycemia per se inhibits the same and more so in female than male tissues. These effects are endothelium-dependent. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Dual effect of insulin on plasma volume and transcapillary albumin transport

    Hilsted, J; Christensen, N J

    1992-01-01

    vascular dilatation and increased muscle sympathetic nerve activity during a euglycaemic glucose clamp. During similar conditions insulin increased the transcapillary escape rate of albumin and reduced plasma volume. Insulin has also an indirect effect on vascular permeability during hypoglycaemia, which...... is mediated by the increase in plasma adrenaline. Adrenaline infusion increased haematocrit and decreased plasma volume and intravascular albumin mass. In contrast to insulin adrenaline did not increase the transcapillary escape rate of albumin. Total autonomic blockade during insulin-induced hypoglycaemia...... abolished the increase in haematocrit, but did not influence the decrease in plasma volume and the increase in the transcapillary escape rate of albumin. Insulin administration may also increase urinary albumin excretion, and this effect was observed during a euglycaemic clamp. The mechanism of the increase...

  6. Skeletal muscle phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine respond to exercise and influence insulin sensitivity in men.

    Lee, Sindre; Norheim, Frode; Gulseth, Hanne L; Langleite, Torgrim M; Aker, Andreas; Gundersen, Thomas E; Holen, Torgeir; Birkeland, Kåre I; Drevon, Christian A

    2018-04-25

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) composition in skeletal muscle have been linked to insulin sensitivity. We evaluated the relationships between skeletal muscle PC:PE, physical exercise and insulin sensitivity. We performed lipidomics and measured PC and PE in m. vastus lateralis biopsies obtained from 13 normoglycemic normal weight men and 13 dysglycemic overweight men at rest, immediately after 45 min of cycling at 70% maximum oxygen uptake, and 2 h post-exercise, before as well as after 12 weeks of combined endurance- and strength-exercise intervention. Insulin sensitivity was monitored by euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. RNA-sequencing was performed on biopsies, and mitochondria and lipid droplets were quantified on electron microscopic images. Exercise intervention for 12 w enhanced insulin sensitivity by 33%, skeletal muscle levels of PC by 21%, PE by 42%, and reduced PC:PE by 16%. One bicycle session reduced PC:PE by 5%. PC:PE correlated negatively with insulin sensitivity (β = -1.6, P insulin sensitivity.

  7. Insulin Sensitivity and Glucose Homeostasis Can Be Influenced by Metabolic Acid Load

    Lucio Della Guardia

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent epidemiological findings suggest that high levels of dietary acid load can affect insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism. Consumption of high protein diets results in the over-production of metabolic acids which has been associated with the development of chronic metabolic disturbances. Mild metabolic acidosis has been shown to impair peripheral insulin action and several epidemiological findings suggest that metabolic acid load markers are associated with insulin resistance and impaired glycemic control through an interference intracellular insulin signaling pathways and translocation. In addition, higher incidence of diabetes, insulin resistance, or impaired glucose control have been found in subjects with elevated metabolic acid load markers. Hence, lowering dietary acid load may be relevant for improving glucose homeostasis and prevention of type 2 diabetes development on a long-term basis. However, limitations related to patient acid load estimation, nutritional determinants, and metabolic status considerably flaws available findings, and the lack of solid data on the background physiopathology contributes to the questionability of results. Furthermore, evidence from interventional studies is very limited and the trials carried out report no beneficial results following alkali supplementation. Available literature suggests that poor acid load control may contribute to impaired insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis, but it is not sufficiently supportive to fully elucidate the issue and additional well-designed studies are clearly needed.

  8. Direct vs. indirect pathway of hepatic glycogen synthesis as a function of glucose infusion rate

    Bagby, G.J.; Lang, C.H.; Johnson, J.L.; Blakesly, H.L.; Spitzer, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    This study was initiated to determine the influence of the rate of exogenous glucose administration on liver glycogen synthesis by the direct (glucose uptake and incorporation into glycogen) vs the indirect pathway (glucose degradation to 3-carbon intermediates, e.g., lactate, prior to incorporation into glycogen). Catheterized rats were fasted 2 days prior to receiving a 3 hr infusion of glucose at rates of 0 to 230 μmol/min/kg containing tracer [6- 3 H]- and [U- 14 C]-glucose. Plasma glucose (r = 0.80), insulin (r = 0.90) and lactate (r = 0.84) were correlated with glucose infusion rate. The rate of liver glycogen deposition (0.46 +/- 0.03 μmol/min/g) did not differ between a glucose infusion rate of 20 and 230 μmol/min/kg. At the lowest and highest glucose infusion rates hepatic glycogenesis accounted for 87 +/- 6 and 9 +/- 1% of the total glucose load, respectively. The percent contribution of the direct pathways to glycogen deposition ([ 3 H] specific activity in hepatic glycogen/[ 3 H] specific activity in plasma glucose) increased from 16 +/- 3 to 83 +/- 5% from lowest to highest glucose infusion rates (prevailing plasma glucose concentrations: 9 +/- 1 and 21 +/- 2 mM, respectively). The results indicate that the relative contribution of the direct and indirect pathways of glucogen synthesis are dependent upon the glucose load or plasma glucose concentration

  9. Humanin: a novel central regulator of peripheral insulin action.

    Radhika H Muzumdar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Decline in insulin action is a metabolic feature of aging and is involved in the development of age-related diseases including Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM and Alzheimer's disease (AD. A novel mitochondria-associated peptide, Humanin (HN, has a neuroprotective role against AD-related neurotoxicity. Considering the association between insulin resistance and AD, we investigated if HN influences insulin sensitivity.Using state of the art clamp technology, we examined the role of central and peripheral HN on insulin action. Continuous infusion of HN intra-cerebro-ventricularly significantly improved overall insulin sensitivity. The central effects of HN on insulin action were associated with activation of hypothalamic STAT-3 signaling; effects that were negated by co-inhibition of hypothalamic STAT-3. Peripheral intravenous infusions of novel and potent HN derivatives reproduced the insulin-sensitizing effects of central HN. Inhibition of hypothalamic STAT-3 completely negated the effects of IV HN analog on liver, suggesting that the hepatic actions of HN are centrally mediated. This is consistent with the lack of a direct effect of HN on primary hepatocytes. Furthermore, single treatment with a highly-potent HN analog significantly lowered blood glucose in Zucker diabetic fatty rats. Based upon the link of HN with two age-related diseases, we examined if there were age associated changes in HN levels. Indeed, the amount of detectable HN in hypothalamus, skeletal muscle, and cortex was decreased with age in rodents, and circulating levels of HN were decreased with age in humans and mice.We conclude that the decline in HN with age could play a role in the pathogenesis of age-related diseases including AD and T2DM. HN represents a novel link between T2DM and neurodegeneration and along with its analogues offers a potential therapeutic tool to improve insulin action and treat T2DM.

  10. The influence of short-term endurance training on the insulin blood level, binding, and degradation of 125I-insulin by erythrocyte receptors in patients after myocardial infarction.

    Dylewicz, P; Przywarska, I; Szcześniak, L; Rychlewski, T; Bieńkowska, S; Długiewicz, I; Wilk, M

    1999-01-01

    This study was directed toward establishing whether and to what extent, short-term endurance training influences the insulin blood level, and the binding and degradation of 125I-insulin by erythrocyte receptors in patients undergoing rehabilitation after myocardial infarction. The study was conducted in a group of 60 patients who had had myocardial infarction within the past 1.5 to 3 months and who did not have arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus. All the patients took a symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise test. Before and after the test, venous blood was collected to determine lactic acid and insulin blood levels as well as the binding and degradation of 125I-insulin. The study group was randomized into two subgroups. One subgroup entered into a 3-week in-patient rehabilitation course. The control group was discharged from the hospital and was given no recommendations for physical exercise. The same investigation was repeated 3 weeks later. In the patients (50%) with hyperinsulinemia (insulin resistance index, > 10 microIU/mL), which was detected during the first investigation, insulin blood level decreased from 23.9 +/- 4.4 to 15.0 +/- 1.9 microIU/mL (P endurance training period during rehabilitation after myocardial infarction reduces insulin resistance in patients with hyperinsulinemia.

  11. Glucokinase regulatory protein genetic variant interacts with omega-3 PUFA to influence insulin resistance and inflammation in metabolic syndrome.

    Pablo Perez-Martinez

    Full Text Available Glucokinase Regulatory Protein (GCKR plays a central role regulating both hepatic triglyceride and glucose metabolism. Fatty acids are key metabolic regulators, which interact with genetic factors and influence glucose metabolism and other metabolic traits. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA have been of considerable interest, due to their potential to reduce metabolic syndrome (MetS risk.To examine whether genetic variability at the GCKR gene locus was associated with the degree of insulin resistance, plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP and n-3 PUFA in MetS subjects.Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, HOMA-B, plasma concentrations of C-peptide, CRP, fatty acid composition and the GCKR rs1260326-P446L polymorphism, were determined in a cross-sectional analysis of 379 subjects with MetS participating in the LIPGENE dietary cohort.Among subjects with n-3 PUFA levels below the population median, carriers of the common C/C genotype had higher plasma concentrations of fasting insulin (P = 0.019, C-peptide (P = 0.004, HOMA-IR (P = 0.008 and CRP (P = 0.032 as compared with subjects carrying the minor T-allele (Leu446. In contrast, homozygous C/C carriers with n-3 PUFA levels above the median showed lower plasma concentrations of fasting insulin, peptide C, HOMA-IR and CRP, as compared with individuals with the T-allele.We have demonstrated a significant interaction between the GCKR rs1260326-P446L polymorphism and plasma n-3 PUFA levels modulating insulin resistance and inflammatory markers in MetS subjects. Further studies are needed to confirm this gene-diet interaction in the general population and whether targeted dietary recommendations can prevent MetS in genetically susceptible individuals.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00429195.

  12. Primary Hyperparathyroidism: The Influence of Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue on Bone Loss and of Osteocalcin on Insulin Resistance

    Maira L. Mendonça

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Bone marrow adipose tissue has been associated with low bone mineral density. However, no data exist regarding marrow adipose tissue in primary hyperparathyroidism, a disorder associated with bone loss in conditions of high bone turnover. The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between marrow adipose tissue, bone mass and parathyroid hormone. The influence of osteocalcin on the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance was also evaluated. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study conducted at a university hospital, involving 18 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT and 21 controls (CG. Bone mass was assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and marrow adipose tissue was assessed by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The biochemical evaluation included the determination of parathyroid hormone, osteocalcin, glucose and insulin levels. RESULTS: A negative association was found between the bone mass at the 1/3 radius and parathyroid hormone levels (r = -0.69; p<0.01. Marrow adipose tissue was not significantly increased in patients (CG = 32.8±11.2% vs PHPT = 38.6±12%. The serum levels of osteocalcin were higher in patients (CG = 8.6±3.6 ng/mL vs PHPT = 36.5±38.4 ng/mL; p<0.005, but no associations were observed between osteocalcin and insulin or between insulin and both marrow adipose tissue and bone mass. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the increment of adipogenesis in the bone marrow microenvironment under conditions of high bone turnover due to primary hyperparathyroidism is limited. Despite the increased serum levels of osteocalcin due to primary hyperparathyroidism, these patients tend to have impaired insulin sensitivity.

  13. The influence of sodium propionate on blood glucose, insulin and cortisol concentrations in calves of different ages

    Biljana Radojičić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of gluconeogenesis in ruminants is under the direct influence of insulin and glucocorticoid hormones. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of added Na-propionate on the neuroendocrine regulation of blood glucose in calves at three specific physiological periods: on exclusive milk nutrition; on mixed milk and forage nutrition; and with established ruminant digestion. The influence of Na-propionate on blood glucose, insulin and cortisol concentrations was examined in the same 20 female Holstein calves at different stages of forestomach development (15 days, 2 months, and 4 months of age of calves. Group 1 of calves (n = 10 received Na-propionate intravenously; group 2 (n = 10 received Na-propionate mixed in milk. Blood sampling was performed 1 and 3 h after Na-propionate administration. After i.v. administration of Na-propionate, a significant increase (P < 0.05 in blood glucose concentration was observed 1 h after administration only in calves aged 2 and 4 months; blood insulin concentration was significantly higher (P < 0.01 1 and 3 h after i.v. administration in 2-month-old calves; and cortisol concentration increased (P < 0.01 1 h after administration in each selected calf in all testing periods. Orally administered Na-propionate led to a significant increase (P < 0.01 of insulin concentration 1 and 3 h after administration in 15-day-old calves, and 3 h after administration in 2-month-old calves. Based on these results it could be assumed that i.v. and p.o. administration of Na-propionate affects the neuroendocrine regulation of glycaemia in calves of different age.

  14. Insulin resistance in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes: dissimilarities for glucose and intermediary metabolites

    Nijs, H. G.; Radder, J. K.; Poorthuis, B. J.; Krans, H. M.

    1990-01-01

    To study insulin action on intermediary metabolism in relation to glucose disposal in Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes, 29 patients and 15 control subjects underwent sequential euglycemic clamps (insulin infusion rates 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 5.0 mU.kg-1.min-1 in 2 hour periods). Dose-response curves

  15. Pressão arterial, respostas metabólicas e autonômicas à insulina e infusão de intralipid® em pacientes chagásicos Presión arterial, respuestas metabólicas y autonómicas a la insulina e infusión de intralipid® en pacientes chagásicos Blood pressure, metabolic and autonomic responses to insulin and intralipid® infusion in chagasic patients

    Claudia Cristina Soares Silva

    2012-03-01

    con la forma indefinida de la Enfermedad de Chagas y 12 voluntarios sanos. RESULTADOS: La presión arterial basal y la frecuencia cardíaca fueron similares en los dos grupos. Los niveles plasmáticos de noradrenalina estaban ligeramente más elevados en el grupo de pacientes chagásicos. Después del Test de Tolerancia a la Insulina (TTI, se produjo una ostensible disminución en la glucosa de los dos grupos. La Infusión de ILH trajo como consecuencia el aumento de la presión arterial en ambos grupos, pero no hubo ningún cambio significativo en la noradrenalina plasmática. El componente de Baja Frecuencia (BF, fue similar y aumentó de forma parecida en ambos grupos. El componente de Alta Frecuencia (AF se presentó con un menor nivel en el grupo chagásico. CONCLUSIONES: Los pacientes con una forma indeterminada de la Enfermedad de Chagas, presentaron un aumento en la actividad simpática al momento basal y una respuesta inadecuada a la insulina. También tuvieron un menor componente de alta frecuencia y de sensibilidad barorrefleja, que fue perjudicado en el momento basal y durante la infusión de intralipid® y heparina.BACKGROUND: Intralipid and heparin infusion results in increased blood pressure and autonomic abnormalities in normal and hypertensive individuals. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate insulin sensitivity and the impact of Intralipid and heparin (ILH infusion on hemodynamic, metabolic, and autonomic response in patients with the indeterminate form of Chagas' disease. METHODS: Twelve patients with the indeterminate form of Chagas' disease and 12 healthy volunteers were evaluated. RESULTS: Baseline blood pressure and heart rate were similar in both groups. Plasma noradrenaline levels were slightly increased in the Chagas' group. After insulin tolerance testing (ITT, a significant decline was noted in glucose in both groups. ILH infusion resulted in increased blood pressure in both groups, but there was no significant change in plasma noradrenaline. The low

  16. Influence of reductive diet and physical aerobic training on binding and degradation of 125J-insulin by erythrocyte receptors in children with simple obesity

    Szczesniak, L.; Rychlewski, T.; Kasprzak, Z.; Banaszak, F.

    1994-01-01

    Insuline resistance, expressed by lower insuline binding by receptors, is related to the obesity. Improvement of the binding was observed together with reduction of body weight and in result of physical exercise. In the work was investigated an influence of complex result of reductive diet at the level of 1300-1500 kcal and systematic half-an-hour aerobic exercise on binding and degradation of 125 J-insulin by erythrocyte receptors in children with simple obesity. The rest binding of insulin by erythrocyte receptors in obese children was compared with the result observed in the children having normal body weight. Results of these researches confirm that systematic physical exercise connected with reductive diet improves the indexes of lipid balance, increases efficiency of the organism, estimated by maximal oxygen absorption, decreases body weight and improves binding of 125 J-insulin to erythrocyte receptors. (authors)

  17. Iron and obesity status-associated insulin resistance influence circulating fibroblast-growth factor-23 concentrations.

    José Manuel Fernández-Real

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23 is known to be produced by the bone and linked to metabolic risk. We aimed to explore circulating FGF-23 in association with fatness and insulin sensitivity, atherosclerosis and bone mineral density (BMD. Circulating intact FGF-23 (iFGF-23 and C-terminal (CtFGF-23 concentrations (ELISA were measured in 133 middle aged men from the general population in association with insulin sensitivity (Cohort 1; and in association with fat mass and bone mineral density (DEXA and atherosclerosis (intima media thickness, IMT in 78 subjects (52 women with a wide range of adiposity (Cohort 2. Circulating iFGF-23 was also measured before and after weight loss. In all subjects as a whole, serum intact and C-terminal concentrations were linearly and positively associated with BMI. In cohort 1, both serum iFGF-23 and CtFGF-23 concentrations increased with insulin resistance. Serum creatinine contributed to iFGF-23 variance, while serum ferritin and insulin sensitivity (but not BMI, age or serum creatinine contributed to 17% of CtFGF-23 variance. In cohort 2, CtFGF-23 levels were higher in women vs. men, and increased with BMI, fat mass, fasting and post-load serum glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR and PTH, being negatively associated with circulating vitamin D and ferritin levels. The associations of CtFGF-23 with bone density in the radius, lumbar spine and carotid IMT were no longer significant after controlling for BMI. Weight loss led to decreased iFGF-23 concentrations. In summary, the associations of circulating FGF-23 concentration with parameters of glucose metabolism, bone density and atherosclerosis are dependent on iron and obesity status-associated insulin resistance.

  18. The zinc transporter ZNT3 co-localizes with insulin in INS-1E pancreatic beta cells and influences cell survival, insulin secretion capacity, and ZNT8 expression

    Smidt, Kamille; Larsen, Agnete; Brønden, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Zinc trafficking in pancreatic beta cells is tightly regulated by zinc transporting (ZNTs) proteins. The role of different ZNTs in the beta cells is currently being clarified. ZNT8 transports zinc into insulin granules and is critical for a correct insulin crystallization and storage in the granu......Zinc trafficking in pancreatic beta cells is tightly regulated by zinc transporting (ZNTs) proteins. The role of different ZNTs in the beta cells is currently being clarified. ZNT8 transports zinc into insulin granules and is critical for a correct insulin crystallization and storage...

  19. Effect of steel and teflon infusion catheters on subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow and infusion counter pressure in humans

    Højbjerre, Lise; Skov-Jensen, Camilla; Kaastrup, Peter

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Subcutaneous tissue is an important target for drug deposition or infusion. A local trauma may induce alterations in local microcirculation and diffusion barriers with consequences for drug bioavailability. We examined the influence of infusion catheters' wear time on local...... microcirculation and infusion counter pressure. METHODS: One steel catheter and one Teflon (Dupont, Wilmington, DE) catheter were inserted in subcutaneous, abdominal adipose tissue (SCAAT) in 10 healthy, lean men. The catheters were infused with isotonic saline at a rate of 10 microL/h for 48 h. Another steel...... catheter and a Teflon catheter were inserted contralateral to the previous catheters after 48 h. The infusion counter pressure was measured during a basal infusion rate followed by a bolus infusion. The measurements during a basal rate infusion were repeated after the bolus infusion. Adipose tissue blood...

  20. Influence of orlistat therapy on serum insulin level and morphological and functional parameters of peripheral arterial circulation in obese patients

    Hajduković Zoran

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Insulin resistance is related to accelerated atherosclerosis, whereas weight loss is associated with the increasing insulin sensitivity, the improvement of functional and the morphological parameters of arterial circulation, and the reduction of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The aim of our study was to evaluate the influence of orlistat treatment on serum insulin level and functional and morphologic parameters of peripheral arterial circulation. Methods. We conducted a prospective, randomized, double − blind, placebo − controlled study. Thirty patients with body mass index over 30 kg/m2 normotensive, nonsmokers, without clinically manifested cardiovascular disease or diabetes were randomly assigned either orlistat (120 mg, 3 times daily; n = 20 or placebo (n = 10 in a double − blind manner. All of the patients were on individually calculated hypocaloric diet. The follow-up period was 24 weeks. Arterial pressure, fasting serum glucose and insulin level, triglycerides, total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol were determined at the beginning, following 3 and 6 months. Also, the intima − media thickness of right superficial femoral artery and the mean blood flow velocity were determined with ultrasonography. Results. Inside the period of 3 and 6 months, there were the greater reductions of body mass index, arterial pressure, fasting glucose and insulin level, total cholesterol, low density lipoproteins, as well as the greater reductions of mean velocity blood flow and peripheral pulse pressure in the orlistat group vs the placebo group (p < 0.01. Greater reductions in the waist circumference and intima − media thickness were registered following 6 months in the orlistat vs the placebo group (p < 0.01. Conclusion. In the group of obese patients orlistat therapy reduced risk factors, serum insulin level and improved early arterial functional changes as assessed with the reductions of the mean

  1. Sympathoadrenal influence on glucose, FFA, and insulin levels in exercising rats

    Scheurink, A.J.W.; Steffens, A.B.; Bouritius, H.; Dreteler, G.H.; Bruntink, R.; Remie, R.; Zaagsma, J.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of sympathoadrenal manipulations on the exercise-induced alterations in blood glucose, plasma free fatty acids (FFA), and insulin were investigated in intact and adrenodemedullated rats. Exercise consisted of strenuous swimming against a countercurrent for 15 min. Before, during, and

  2. Influence of gamma-irradiation upon the chemical and biological properties of insulin

    Salemink, P J.M.; Kolkman-Roodbeen, J C; Gribnau, T C.J.; Janssen, P S.L.; Veen, A.J. van der

    1987-06-19

    Partially purified insulin preparations of bovine and porcine origin, were subjected to gamma-irradiation with doses ranging from 1.0 up to 25 kGy at 0/sup 0/C or ambient temperature. The susceptibility of insulin to the irradiation was determined by chromatography, electrophoresis and assay of the biological activity. The sterilizing effect of the gamma-irradiation was investigated for Bacillus pumilus as well as for artificial mixtures of lactose and several bacilli. It is concluded that the sterilizing dose for the investigated insulins was greater than or equal to 2.2 kGy. At doses up to 25 kGy at 0/sup 0/C no specific radiolytic products were detectable, whereas the biological activity was fully retained. The content of dimers and the content of related peptides appeared to increase gradually with the irradiation dose absorbed. No effects of long-term storage could be demonstrated on biological and chemical properties of insulin after 2.2, 4.5 and 7.5 kGy. 21 refs.; 4 figs.; 5 tabs.

  3. Dissociation between fat-induced in vivo insulin resistance and proximal insulin signaling in skeletal muscle in men at risk for type 2 diabetes

    Storgaard, Heidi; Jensen, Christine B; Björnholm, Marie

    2004-01-01

    The effect of short- (2 h) and long-term (24 h) low-grade Intralipid infusion on whole-body insulin action, cellular glucose metabolism, and proximal components of the insulin signal transduction cascade was studied in seven obese male glucose intolerant first degree relatives of type 2 diabetic...... h Intralipid infusion (0.4 ml.kg(-1).min(-1)). Insulin-stimulated glucose disposal decreased approximately 25% after short- and long-term fat infusion in both IGT relatives and controls. Glucose oxidation decreased and lipid oxidation increased after both short- and long-term fat infusion in both...... groups. Insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation was higher after long-term as compared with short-term fat infusion in control subjects. Short- or long-term infusion did not affect the absolute values of basal or insulin-stimulated insulin receptor substrate-1 tyrosine phosphorylation, tyrosine...

  4. Economic benefits of improved insulin stability in insulin pumps.

    Weiss, Richard C; van Amerongen, Derek; Bazalo, Gary; Aagren, Mark; Bouchard, Jonathan R

    2011-05-01

    Insulin pump users discard unused medication and infusion sets according to labeling and manufacturer's instructions. The stability labeling for insulin aspart (rDNA origin] (Novolog) was increased from two days to six. The associated savings was modeled from the perspective of a hypothetical one-million member health plan and the total United States population. The discarded insulin volume and the number of infusion sets used under a two-day stability scenario versus six were modeled. A mix of insulin pumps of various reservoir capacities with a range of daily insulin dosages was used. Average daily insulin dose was 65 units ranging from 10 to 150 units. Costs of discarded insulin aspart [rDNA origin] were calculated using WAC (Average Wholesale Price minus 16.67%). The cost of pump supplies was computed for the two-day scenario assuming a complete infusion set change, including reservoirs, every two days. Under the six-day scenario complete infusion sets were discarded every six days while cannulas at the insertion site were changed midway between complete changes. AWP of least expensive supplies was used to compute their costs. For the hypothetical health plan (1,182 pump users) the annual reduction in discarded insulin volume between scenarios was 19.8 million units. The corresponding cost reduction for the plan due to drug and supply savings was $3.4 million. From the U.S. population perspective, savings of over $1 billion were estimated. Using insulin that is stable for six days in pump reservoirs can yield substantial savings to health plans and other payers, including patients.

  5. Factors influencing insulin and glucagon secretion in lean and genetically obese mice

    Beloff-Chain, A.; Newman, M.E.; Mansford, K.R.L.

    1977-01-01

    The control of 125 I-labelled insulin and glucagon secretion from isolated pancreatic islets of lean and genetically obese mice has been compared. The enlarged islets of obese mouse pancreas and islets of obese mice maintained on a restricted diet manifested a greater response to glucose stimulation of insulin secretion than the lean mice islets. The glucagon content of the islets, the secretion of glucagon in a medium containing 150 mg% glucose and the stimulation of glucagon secretion by arginine did not differ significantly in the two groups. Adrenaline stimulated glucagon secretion in vitro from obese mice but not from lean mice. Antiinsulin serum injections into obese mice increased the plasma glucagon levels about twofold and had no effect on glucagon levels in lean mice, although the level of hyperglycaemia was the same in both groups. It is suggested that the suppression of glucagon release by glucose requires a higher concentration of insulin in the obese mouse pancreas than in lean mice. (orig./AJ) [de

  6. Factors influencing insulin and glucagon secretion in lean and genetically obese mice

    Beloff-Chain, A; Newman, M E; Mansford, K R.L. [Imperial Coll. of Science and Technology, London (UK). Dept. of Biochemistry

    1977-01-01

    The control of /sup 125/I-labelled insulin and glucagon secretion from isolated pancreatic islets of lean and genetically obese mice has been compared. The enlarged islets of obese mouse pancreas and islets of obese mice maintained on a restricted diet manifested a greater response to glucose stimulation of insulin secretion than the lean mice islets. The glucagon content of the islets, the secretion of glucagon in a medium containing 150 mg% glucose and the stimulation of glucagon secretion by arginine did not differ significantly in the two groups. Adrenaline stimulated glucagon secretion in vitro from obese mice but not from lean mice. Antiinsulin serum injections into obese mice increased the plasma glucagon levels about twofold and had no effect on glucagon levels in lean mice, although the level of hyperglycaemia was the same in both groups. It is suggested that the suppression of glucagon release by glucose requires a higher concentration of insulin in the obese mouse pancreas than in lean mice.

  7. Acute pain induces insulin resistance in humans

    Greisen, J.; Juhl, C.B.; Grøfte, Thorbjørn

    2001-01-01

    Background: Painful trauma results in a disturbed metabolic state with impaired insulin sensitivity, which is related to the magnitude of the trauma. The authors explored whether pain per se influences hepatic and extrahepatic actions of insulin. Methods: Ten healthy male volunteers underwent two...... randomly sequenced hyperinsulinemic–euglycemic (insulin infusion rate, 0.6 mU · kg-1 · min-1 for 180 min) clamp studies 4 weeks apart. Self-controlled painful electrical stimulation was applied to the abdominal skin for 30 min, to a pain intensity of 8 on a visual analog scale of 0–10, just before...... the clamp procedure (study P). In the other study, no pain was inflicted (study C). Results: Pain reduced whole-body insulin-stimulated glucose uptake from 6.37 ± 1.87 mg · kg-1 · min-1 (mean ± SD) in study C to 4.97 ± 1.38 mg · kg-1 · min-1 in study P (P

  8. FTO rs9939609 Does Not Interact with Physical Exercise but Influences Basal Insulin Metabolism in Brazilian Overweight and Obese Adolescents

    Gabrielle Araujo do Nascimento

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The rs9939609 SNP (T > A in FTO gene is associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. The present study aimed at verifying whether this SNP influenced biochemical outcomes of children and adolescents who are overweight/obese submitted to a program of physical exercise and also if there was influence on basal levels of these biochemical variables. Methods. The sample was composed by 432 children and adolescents grouped in three ways (obese, overweight, and normal weight; of these, 135 children and adoloescents who are obese and overweight were submitted to a physical exercise program for 12 weeks. All were genotyped by TaqMan SNP genotyping assay. Results. The children and adolescents who are overweight/obese and carriers of AA genotype had higher levels of insulin (p=0.03 and HOMA (p=0.007 and lower levels of glucose (p=0.003, but the SNP did not modulate the response to physical exercise. Conclusions. In our study, the rs9939609 AA genotype was associated with parameters related to insulin metabolism but did not interact with physical exercise.

  9. Insulin receptors

    Kahn, C.R.; Harrison, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on insulin receptors. Part A: Methods for the study of structure and function. Topics covered include: Method for purification and labeling of insulin receptors, the insulin receptor kinase, and insulin receptors on special tissues

  10. The Influence of Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus on Dental Caries and Salivary Flow

    Gupta, V. K.; Malhotra, Seema; Sharma, Vasuda; Hiremath, S. S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To assess whether or not there was any change in the dental caries and rate of salivary flow of patients with Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (IDDM) and the contribution of salivary flow to caries risk in IDDM. Setting. Department of Endocrinology, MS Ramaiah Hospital, Bangalore, India. Design. A comparative cross-sectional descriptive type. Materials and Methods. The sample consisted of two groups: 140 diabetic group (mean age 14.8 yr) and 140 nondiabetic group (mean age 13.7 ...

  11. Body mass index influences infliximab post-infusion levels and correlates with prospective loss of response to the drug in a cohort of inflammatory bowel disease patients under maintenance therapy with Infliximab.

    Franco Scaldaferri

    Full Text Available Infliximab is an effective treatment for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Studies differ regarding the influence of body mass index (BMI on the response to infliximab, with the majority of studies indicating that increased BMI may be associated with a poorer response to Infliximab. However, the pharmacokinetic mechanisms causing this have not yet been reported.Examine the correlation between BMI/immunosuppressant use with clinical response, trough and post-infusion levels of infliximab, tumour necrosis factor-α(TNF-α and anti-drug antibodies(ATI, and determine if these factors can predict future response.We collected serum from 24 patients receiving Infliximab before and 30 minutes following infusion. Clinical parameters were collected retrospectively and prospectively. ELISA measurements of infliximab, TNF-α and ATI were performed.We confirmed that patients with higher infliximab trough levels have a better response rate and that patients with an elevated BMI display a higher rate of loss of response (20%. Patients with a higher BMI had elevated post-infusion levels of infliximab. Additionally, the ratio of IFX/TNF-α trough levels correlated with clinical response to the following infusion.This study confirms that an elevated BMI is associated with a poorer response to infliximab. For the first time, we describe that a higher BMI correlates with higher post-infusion levels, however this does not correlate with a higher rate of response to the drug, suggesting that circulating drug levels do not correlate with tissue levels. Furthermore, in our small cohort of patients, we identified a possible predictive marker of future response to treatment which may be used to guide dose escalation and predict non-response to infliximab.

  12. Influence of Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 on Nuclear Maturation of Germinal Vesicle Mouse Oocytes

    R mahmoudi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: In vitro maturation and fertilization of oocytes play an important role in reproductive biotechnology. The aim of this study is to define the IGF-1 effect on in vitro maturation, fertilization and development of mice immature oocytes to 2-cells in TCM199 medium cultures. Methods: In this study 4 week old NMRI mice were used. Ovaries stimulation carried out using PMSG. GV oocytes with or without cumulus cells were isolated from ovaries and cultured in TCM199 in presence of 100 ng IGF-1 for 24hr.The oocytes (MII were inseminated with sperm in T6 medium for fertilization and development of 2-cells stage and they were investigated under inverted microscope. Data analysis was performed by using Chi- 2 test. Results: In cumulus cell group and in the presence of insulin-like growth factor fertilization of oocytes, forming embryos and the formation of 2-cells compared to the group without cumulus cells significantly increased (p < 0.05. Conclusion: As the results showed oocytes with cumulus cells in the presence of insulin-like growth factor enhances maturation, fertilization and embryonic development in 2-cells oocytes compared to group without cumulus cells TCM199.

  13. Influence of an oral contraceptive containing drospirenone on insulin sensitivity of healthy women.

    Cagnacci, Angelo; Piacenti, Ilaria; Zanin, Renata; Xholli, Anjeza; Tirelli, Alessandra

    2014-07-01

    Oral contraceptives (OCs) containing androgenic second and third generation progestins decrease insulin sensitivity (SI). In this study we investigated whether an oral contraceptive containing the anti-androgenic progestin drospirenone (DRSP) still alters SI. Lipid modifications were investigated as well. Eleven young healthy women were allocated to receive for 6 months ethinyl-estradiol (EE) 30μg plus DRSP (3mg). SI and glucose utilization independent of insulin (Sg) was investigated by the minimal model method. Lipid modifications were also analyzed. SI did not vary during EE/DRSP (from 3.72±2.62 to 3.29±2.93; p=0.73). Similarly, values of Sg did not vary (from 0.03±0.02 to 0.032±0.014; p=0.87). An increase was observed in HDL cholesterol (9.4±9.8mg/dl; p=0.05) and triglycerides (46.9±75.1mg/dl; p=0.046), with no modification in LDL cholesterol (-4.64±1.704mg/dl; p=0.6). EE/DRSP does not deteriorate SI. These results are reassuring for the long-term use of this association. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Influence of nutrient restriction and melatonin supplementation of pregnant ewes on maternal and fetal pancreatic digestive enzymes and insulin-containing clusters.

    Keomanivong, F E; Lemley, C O; Camacho, L E; Yunusova, R; Borowicz, P P; Caton, J S; Meyer, A M; Vonnahme, K A; Swanson, K C

    2016-03-01

    had more (Pewes. In summary, the maternal pancreas responded to nutrient restriction by decreasing pancreatic weight and activity of digestive enzymes while melatonin supplementation increased α-amylase content. Nutrient restriction decreased the number of pancreatic insulin-containing clusters in fetuses while melatonin supplementation did not influence insulin concentration. This indicated using melatonin as a therapeutic agent to mitigate reduced pancreatic function in the fetus due to maternal nutrient restriction may not be beneficial.

  15. Skeletal muscle phosphatidylcholine fatty acids and insulin sensitivity in normal humans.

    Clore, J N; Li, J; Gill, R; Gupta, S; Spencer, R; Azzam, A; Zuelzer, W; Rizzo, W B; Blackard, W G

    1998-10-01

    The fatty acid composition of skeletal muscle membrane phospholipids (PL) is known to influence insulin responsiveness in humans. However, the contribution of the major PL of the outer (phosphatidylcholine, PC) and inner (phosphatidylethanolamine, PE) layers of the sarcolemma to insulin sensitivity is not known. Fatty acid composition of PC and PE from biopsies of vastus lateralis from 27 normal men and women were correlated with insulin sensitivity determined by the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp technique at insulin infusion rates of 0.4, 1.0, and 10.0 mU . kg-1 . min-1. Significant variation in the half-maximal insulin concentration (ED50) was observed in the normal volunteers (range 24.0-146.0 microU/ml), which correlated directly with fasting plasma insulin (r = 0.75, P insulin sensitivity was observed in PE (NS). These studies suggest that the fatty acid composition of PC may be of particular importance in the relationship between fatty acids and insulin sensitivity in normal humans.

  16. Hyperglucagonemia during insulin deficiency accelerates protein catabolism

    Nair, K.S.; Halliday, D.; Matthews, D.E.; Welle, S.L.

    1987-01-01

    Hyperglucagonemia coexists with insulin deficiency or insulin resistance in many conditions where urinary nitrogen excretion is increased, but the precise role of glucagon in these conditions is controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of hyperglucagonemia on protein metabolism in insulin-deficient subjects. The authors used the stable isotope of an essential amino acid (L-[1- 13 C]leucine) as a tracer of in vivo protein metabolism. A combined deficiency of insulin and glucagon was induced by intravenous infusion of somatostatin. Hyperglucagonemia and hypoinsulinemia were induced by infusions of somatostatin and glucagon. When somatostatin alone was infused leucine flux increased, indicating a 6-17% increase in proteolysis. When somatostatin and glucagon were infused, leucine flux increased, indicating a 12-32% increase in proteolysis. The increase in leucine flux during the infusion of somatostatin and glucagon was higher than the increase during infusion of somatostatin alone. Somatostatin alone did not change leucine oxidation, whereas the somatostatin plus glucagon increased leucine oxidation 100%. They conclude that hyperglucagonemia accelerated proteolysis and leucine oxidation in insulin-deficient humans

  17. Insulin-dependent glucose metabolism in dairy cows with variable fat mobilization around calving.

    Weber, C; Schäff, C T; Kautzsch, U; Börner, S; Erdmann, S; Görs, S; Röntgen, M; Sauerwein, H; Bruckmaier, R M; Metges, C C; Kuhla, B; Hammon, H M

    2016-08-01

    Dairy cows undergo significant metabolic and endocrine changes during the transition from pregnancy to lactation, and impaired insulin action influences nutrient partitioning toward the fetus and the mammary gland. Because impaired insulin action during transition is thought to be related to elevated body condition and body fat mobilization, we hypothesized that over-conditioned cows with excessive body fat mobilization around calving may have impaired insulin metabolism compared with cows with low fat mobilization. Nineteen dairy cows were grouped according to their average concentration of total liver fat (LFC) after calving in low [LLFC; LFC 24.4% total fat/DM; n=10) fat-mobilizing cows. Blood samples were taken from wk 7 antepartum (ap) to wk 5 postpartum (pp) to determine plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, glucagon, and adiponectin. We applied euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic (EGHIC) and hyperglycemic clamps (HGC) in wk 5 ap and wk 3 pp to measure insulin responsiveness in peripheral tissue and pancreatic insulin secretion during the transition period. Before and during the pp EGHIC, [(13)C6] glucose was infused to determine the rate of glucose appearance (GlucRa) and glucose oxidation (GOx). Body condition, back fat thickness, and energy-corrected milk were greater, but energy balance was lower in HLFC than in LLFC. Plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, glucagon, and adiponectin decreased at calving, and this was followed by an immediate increase of glucagon and adiponectin after calving. Insulin concentrations ap were higher in HLFC than in LLFC cows, but the EGHIC indicated no differences in peripheral insulin responsiveness among cows ap and pp. However, GlucRa and GOx:GlucRa during the pp EGHIC were greater in HLFC than in LLFC cows. During HGC, pancreatic insulin secretion was lower, but the glucose infusion rate was higher pp than ap in both groups. Plasma concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids decreased during HGC and EGHIC, but in both

  18. Influence of insulin therapy on circulating ghrelin and insulin-like ghrelinowth factor-1(IGF-1) levels in children with type-1 diabetes mellitus

    Moawad, A.T.; Nassar, E.M.; Mostafa, A.M.; Mohammed, S.K.

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 1 (IDDM)is a chronic disease associated with alterations in the growth hormone/insulin -like growth factor (GH-IGF) system and ghrelin level which may lead to changes in metabolic control. This study aimed to evaluate the circulating levels of the gut-derived peptides (ghrelin and insulin-like growth factors (IGF s ) in children with IDDM and to link these two peptides with the glucose level in diabetic children at diagnoses and after insulin therapy. Design and methods: the studied group consisted of 30 newly diagnosed diabetic children (17 females and 13 males) diagnosed in paediatric diabetes unit, children's hospital, Ain shams university. Their age ranged from (6.2-11.8) years with mean of 10.10± 1.74 years. Twenty non diabetic healthy children matching in age and sex served as controls. Serum ghrelin was determined by enzyme linked immuno absorbanet assay (ELISA), while IGF-1 and insulin-like growth factors binding proteins -1 and 3 (IGFBP s ) were assessed by radioimmunoassay(RIA). Results: body mass index (BMI) in patients was significantly decreased in the diabetic group as compared to the healthy group at diagnosis. After insulin therapy BMI was significantly increase as compared to its value at diagnosis (p< 0.05) such increase was not significant on comparing to controls. Regarding blood glucose level there was very highly significant decrease in the level of HBAI (glycolated HB) in diabetic patients after insulin therapy (p<0.0001) than at diagnosis . The mean ghrelin level was highly significantly decreased in diabetic children at diagnosis and after insulin therapy as compared to controls (p<0.0001). No differences were found in the mean ghrelin levels in diabetic children at diagnosis or after insulin therapy.conclusions : the decrease in mean gherlin levels in this study at diagnosis and after therapy could reflect an attempt by the body to decrease the glucose level and thus may prevent hyperglycemia in diabetic patients

  19. A variant in CDKAL1 influences insulin response and risk of type 2 diabetes

    Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Reynisdottir, Inga

    2007-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study for type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Icelandic cases and controls, and we found that a previously described variant in the transcription factor 7-like 2 gene (TCF7L2) gene conferred the most significant risk. In addition to confirming two recently identified...... risk variants, we identified a variant in the CDKAL1 gene that was associated with T2D in individuals of European ancestry (allele-specific odds ratio (OR) = 1.20 (95% confidence interval, 1.13-1.27), P = 7.7 x 10(-9)) and individuals from Hong Kong of Han Chinese ancestry (OR = 1.25 (1.11-1.40), P = 0...... was approximately 20% lower than for heterozygotes or noncarriers, suggesting that this variant confers risk of T2D through reduced insulin secretion....

  20. [Influence of cryoglobulinemic syndrome and insulin resistance on the progression of liver cirrhosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C].

    Kondratiuk, L O; Bezrodna, O V; Kuliesh, O V

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the results of analysis of the frequency of detection of cryoglobulinemic syndrome (CGS) and insulin resistance (IR) in patients with HCV-associated liver cirrhosis (LC) depending on its stage. There were also evaluated clinical and laboratory features of the disease. The study involved 72 patients with chronic hepatitis C who were divided into 3 main groups according to the presence of LC. The I group included 32 patients with chronic hepatitis C without LC. The II group consisted of 19 patients with compensated HCV-associated LC and III group included 21 patients with decompensated LC. It was shown that terminal stages of the LC (class B-C by Child-Pugh) are characterized by more frequent presence of IR and CGS with more severe clinical picture, which may be caused not only by the influence of the hepatitis C virus (HCV), but also by the progression of LC.

  1. Physical capacity influences the response of insulin-like growth factor and its binding proteins to training

    Rosendal, Lars; Langberg, Henning; Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2002-01-01

    The influence of initial training status on the response of circulating insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and its binding proteins (IGFBP) to prolonged physical training was studied in young men. It was hypothesized that highly standardized training would result in more extensive changes...... in the circulating IGF system in untrained subjects because of lower fitness level. Seven untrained (UT) and 12 well-trained (WT) individuals performed 11 wk of intense physical training (2-4 h daily). Fasting serum samples were analyzed for total and free IGF-I and -II, for IGFBP-1 to -4, as well as for IGFBP-3...... proteolysis. Eleven weeks of physical training resulted in decreased levels of total IGF-I, free IGF-I, and IGFBP-4 in both the UT and WT groups. In the UT group, IGFBP-2 increased, IGFBP-3 decreased [from 4,255 +/- 410 (baseline) to 3,896 +/- 465 (SD) microg/l (week 4); P

  2. Effect of N-acetylcysteine on the accuracy of the prothrombin time assay of plasma coagulation factor II+VII+X activity in subjects infused with the drug. Influence of time and temperature

    Thorsen, Sixtus; Teisner, Ane; Jensen, Søren Astrup

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The prothrombin time (PT) assay of factor II+VII+X activity is an important predictor of liver damage in paracetamol poisoned patients. It complicates interpretation of results that the antidote, acetylcysteine (NAC) depresses this activity. The aim was to investigate if NAC influences...... to plasma in vitro decreased factor II+VII+X activity at 37 degrees C in a time-dependent manner. This effect was quenched at temperatures ... to a significant additional depression of factor II+VII+X activity in plasma from subjects infused with NAC during the first 3h of infusion indicating that it contained reactive NAC. The risk that this NAC interfered with the accuracy of the PT assay was considered minimal with samples stored below 24 degrees C...

  3. Effect of N-acetylcysteine on the accuracy of the prothrombin time assay of plasma coagulation factor II plus VII plus X activity in subjects infused with the drug. Influence of time and temperature

    Thorsen, S.; Teisner, A.; Jensen, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The prothrombin time (PT) assay of factor II+VII+X activity is an important predictor of liver damage in paracetamol poisoned patients. It complicates interpretation of results that the antidote, acetylcysteine (NAC) depresses this activity. The aim was to investigate if NAC influences...... added to plasma in vitro decreased factor II+VII+X activity at 37 degrees C in a time-dependent manner. This effect was quenched at temperatures 24 degrees C. Activity lost at 37 degrees C could partly be recovered by subsequent incubation at 5 or 20 degrees C. Incubation at 37 degrees C prior to assay...... led to a significant additional depression of factor II+VII+X activity in plasma from subjects infused with NAC during the first 3h of infusion indicating that it contained reactive NAC. The risk that this NAC interfered with the accuracy of the PT assay was considered minimal with samples stored...

  4. Pathophysiological mechanisms of insulin resistance

    Brands, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we studied pathophysiological mechanisms of insulin resistance in different conditions in humans, i.e. in obesity, during lipid infusions, after hypercaloric feeding, and glucocorticoid treatment. We focused on 3 important hypotheses that are suggested to be implicated in the

  5. Continuous-infusion adriamycin

    Benjamin, R.S.; Chawla, S.P.; Ewer, M.S.; Hortobagyi, G.N.

    1986-01-01

    This chapter discusses the diminished cardiotoxicity as well as diminished nausea and vomiting with continuous infusions of adriamycin to patients undergoing radiation therapy, particularly with infusions of 48 hours or longer, and best with 96-hour infusions, the longest duration that has been studied systematically. In breast cancer, data show that more adriamycin is better, but only for a selected subgroup of patients: those with complete remission. The diminished cardiotoxicity makes the use of adriamycin more attractive in the adjuvant situation, where increased safety will decrease the chances of long-term complications and make retreatment easy for cured patients who develop second malignancies

  6. Effects of intranasal insulin on endogenous glucose production in insulin-resistant men.

    Xiao, Changting; Dash, Satya; Stahel, Priska; Lewis, Gary F

    2018-03-14

    The effects of intranasal insulin on the regulation of endogenous glucose production (EGP) in individuals with insulin resistance were assessed in a single-blind, crossover study. Overweight or obese insulin-resistant men (n = 7; body mass index 35.4 ± 4.4 kg/m 2 , homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance 5.6 ± 1.6) received intranasal spray of either 40 IU insulin lispro or placebo in 2 randomized visits. Acute systemic spillover of intranasal insulin into the circulation was matched with a 30-minute intravenous infusion of insulin lispro in the nasal placebo arm. EGP was assessed under conditions of a pancreatic clamp with a primed, constant infusion of glucose tracer. Under these experimental conditions, compared with placebo, intranasal administration of insulin did not significantly affect plasma glucose concentrations, EGP or glucose disposal in overweight/obese, insulin-resistant men, in contrast to our previous study, in which an equivalent dose of intranasal insulin significantly suppressed EGP in lean, insulin-sensitive men. Insulin resistance is probably associated with impairment in centrally mediated insulin suppression of EGP. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Protein and fat meal content increase insulin requirement in children with type 1 diabetes – Role of duration of diabetes

    M. van der Hoogt

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Hyperglycaemia remains a challenge in type 1 diabetes since current regimes used to determine meal insulin requirements prove to be ineffective. This is particularly problematic for meals containing high amounts of protein and fat. We aimed to determine the post-prandial glycaemic response and total insulin need for mixed meals, using sensor-augmented insulin pumps in children with type 1 diabetes. Methods: Twenty-two children with type 1 diabetes, aged 4–17 years on insulin pump therapy completed this home-based, cross-over, randomised controlled trial. Two meals with identical carbohydrate content – one with low fat and protein (LFLP and one with high fat and protein (HFHP contents – were consumed using normal insulin boluses. Blood glucose monitoring was done for 10 h post-meal, with correction bolus insulin given two-hourly if required. Results: The HFHP meal required significantly more total insulin (3.48 vs. 2.7 units as a result of increased post-meal correction insulin requirement (1.2 vs. 0.15 units spread over a longer duration (6 vs. 3 h. The HFHP meals significantly increased the time spent above target glucose level. Duration of diabetes and total daily insulin use significantly influenced the post-prandial blood glucose response to the two meals. Conclusion: When consuming carbohydrate-based mixed meals, children with type 1 diabetes on insulin pump therapy, required significantly more insulin over a longer period of time than the insulin requirement calculated using current regimes. This additional amount required is influenced by the duration of diabetes and total daily insulin use. Keywords: Carbohydrate, Protein and fat, Type 1 diabetes, Glucose, Insulin infusion systems

  8. Insulin resistance and increased muscle cytokine levels in patients with mitochondrial myopathy.

    Rue, Nana; Vissing, John; Galbo, Henrik

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed to cause insulin resistance and that might stimulate cytokine production. The objective of the study was to elucidate the association between mitochondrial myopathy, insulin sensitivity, and cytokine levels in muscle. This was an experimental, controlled study in outpatients. Eight overnight-fasted patients (P) with various inherited mitochondrial myopathies and eight healthy subjects (C) matched for sex, age, weight, height, and physical activity participated in the study. The intervention included a 120-minute hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp. Another morning, microdialysis of both vastus lateralis muscles for 4 hours, including one-legged, knee extension exercise for 30 minutes, was performed. Glucose infusion rate during 90-120 minutes of insulin infusion was measured. Cytokine concentrations in dialysate were also measured. Muscle strength, percentage fat mass, and creatine kinase in plasma did not differ between groups. The maximal oxygen uptake was 21 ± 3 (SE) (P) and 36 ± 3(C) mL/kg·min (2P fatty acids and glycerol at 120 minutes were higher in P vs C (2P myopathies, insulin sensitivity of muscle, adipose tissue, and pancreatic A cells is reduced, supporting that mitochondrial function influences insulin action. Furthermore, a local, low-grade inflammation of potential clinical importance exists in the muscle of these patients.

  9. Influence of lifestyle habits, nutritional status and insulin resistance in NAFLD.

    Malavolti, Marcella; Battistini, Nino Carlo; Miglioli, Lucia; Bagni, Ilaria; Borelli, Luca; Marino, Mariano; Scaglioni, Federica; Bellentani, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with obesity, diabetes and insulin resistance (IR). The aim of our study was to assess the relationship between IR, anthropometry, lifestyle habits, resting energy expenditure (REE) and degree of fatty liver at ultrasound in 48 overweight patients with NAFLD as compared to 24 controls without fatty liver, matched for age. Nutritional status, alcohol intake and physical activity were assessed by skinfold thickness measurements, a 7-day diary, and SenseWear armband (SWA). REE was assessed by both SWA (REE-SWA) and a Vmax metabolic cart (REE-Vmax). Fatty liver was measured by US and the Doppler Power Index was calculated. IR was assessed using the HOMA index. There was significant correlation between waist circumference, HOMA, Doppler power index and fatty liver grade at US. Multivariate analysis showed that alteration of waist circumference, Doppler power index, and HOMA were the major significant predictors of fatty liver. Our data demonstrated a significant association between NAFLD and central adiposity and IR.

  10. Insulin signaling and dietary restriction differentially influence the decline of learning and memory with age.

    Amanda L Kauffman

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Of all the age-related declines, memory loss is one of the most devastating. While conditions that increase longevity have been identified, the effects of these longevity-promoting factors on learning and memory are unknown. Here we show that the C. elegans Insulin/IGF-1 receptor mutant daf-2 improves memory performance early in adulthood and maintains learning ability better with age but, surprisingly, demonstrates no extension in long-term memory with age. By contrast, eat-2 mutants, a model of Dietary Restriction (DR, exhibit impaired long-term memory in young adulthood but maintain this level of memory longer with age. We find that crh-1, the C. elegans homolog of the CREB transcription factor, is required for long-term associative memory, but not for learning or short-term memory. The expression of crh-1 declines with age and differs in the longevity mutants, and CREB expression and activity correlate with memory performance. Our results suggest that specific longevity treatments have acute and long-term effects on cognitive functions that decline with age through their regulation of rate-limiting genes required for learning and memory.

  11. The Influence of Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus on Dental Caries and Salivary Flow.

    Gupta, V K; Malhotra, Seema; Sharma, Vasuda; Hiremath, S S

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To assess whether or not there was any change in the dental caries and rate of salivary flow of patients with Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (IDDM) and the contribution of salivary flow to caries risk in IDDM. Setting. Department of Endocrinology, MS Ramaiah Hospital, Bangalore, India. Design. A comparative cross-sectional descriptive type. Materials and Methods. The sample consisted of two groups: 140 diabetic group (mean age 14.8 yr) and 140 nondiabetic group (mean age 13.7 yr). Dental caries by dmf(t) and dmf(s) indices for primary dentition and DMF(T) and DMF(S) indices was used in permanent dentition to assess the dental caries experience. Both stimulated and unstimulated salivary flow rate were assessed after collection of saliva. Results. In diabetic group 76% had carious lesion and in nondiabetic group 85.3% had carious lesion. Diabetics have lower mean DMFT, DMFS, dmft, and dmfs compared to the nondiabetic group. Diminished unstimulated and stimulated salivary flow rate in diabetic than nondiabetic group. Conclusions. The findings obtained conclude that even though there was reduced salivary flow rate in diabetic group the caries prevalence was low.

  12. The Influence of Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus on Dental Caries and Salivary Flow

    V. K. Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess whether or not there was any change in the dental caries and rate of salivary flow of patients with Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (IDDM and the contribution of salivary flow to caries risk in IDDM. Setting. Department of Endocrinology, MS Ramaiah Hospital, Bangalore, India. Design. A comparative cross-sectional descriptive type. Materials and Methods. The sample consisted of two groups: 140 diabetic group (mean age 14.8 yr and 140 nondiabetic group (mean age 13.7 yr. Dental caries by dmf(t and dmf(s indices for primary dentition and DMF(T and DMF(S indices was used in permanent dentition to assess the dental caries experience. Both stimulated and unstimulated salivary flow rate were assessed after collection of saliva. Results. In diabetic group 76% had carious lesion and in nondiabetic group 85.3% had carious lesion. Diabetics have lower mean DMFT, DMFS, dmft, and dmfs compared to the nondiabetic group. Diminished unstimulated and stimulated salivary flow rate in diabetic than nondiabetic group. Conclusions. The findings obtained conclude that even though there was reduced salivary flow rate in diabetic group the caries prevalence was low.

  13. Effect of N-acetylcysteine on the accuracy of the prothrombin time assay of plasma coagulation factor II+VII+X activity in subjects infused with the drug. Influence of time and temperature.

    Thorsen, Sixtus; Teisner, Ane; Jensen, Søren Astrup; Philips, Malou; Dalhoff, Kim; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    The prothrombin time (PT) assay of factor II+VII+X activity is an important predictor of liver damage in paracetamol poisoned patients. It complicates interpretation of results that the antidote, acetylcysteine (NAC) depresses this activity. The aim was to investigate if NAC influences the accuracy of the plasma PT assay. The accuracy of Nycotest PT was studied using plasma added NAC in vitro and plasma from subjects infused with NAC. The latter results were compared with those obtained by analysis of PT by CoaguChek S. Therapeutic NAC concentrations added to plasma in vitro decreased factor II+VII+X activity at 37 degrees C in a time-dependent manner. This effect was quenched at temperatures depression of factor II+VII+X activity in plasma from subjects infused with NAC during the first 3h of infusion indicating that it contained reactive NAC. The risk that this NAC interfered with the accuracy of the PT assay was considered minimal with samples stored below 24 degrees C. This was supported by similarity of results obtained by analysis of appropriately stored plasma and simultaneously drawn blood by CoaguChek S. Residual reactive NAC does not interfere with the accuracy of the PT assay of plasma stored below 24 degrees C, but NAC-induced loss in activity at 37 degrees C may be partly recovered during subsequent storage below 24 degrees C.

  14. New Insulin Delivery Recommendations.

    Frid, Anders H; Kreugel, Gillian; Grassi, Giorgio; Halimi, Serge; Hicks, Debbie; Hirsch, Laurence J; Smith, Mike J; Wellhoener, Regine; Bode, Bruce W; Hirsch, Irl B; Kalra, Sanjay; Ji, Linong; Strauss, Kenneth W

    2016-09-01

    Many primary care professionals manage injection or infusion therapies in patients with diabetes. Few published guidelines have been available to help such professionals and their patients manage these therapies. Herein, we present new, practical, and comprehensive recommendations for diabetes injections and infusions. These recommendations were informed by a large international survey of current practice and were written and vetted by 183 diabetes experts from 54 countries at the Forum for Injection Technique and Therapy: Expert Recommendations (FITTER) workshop held in Rome, Italy, in 2015. Recommendations are organized around the themes of anatomy, physiology, pathology, psychology, and technology. Key among the recommendations are that the shortest needles (currently the 4-mm pen and 6-mm syringe needles) are safe, effective, and less painful and should be the first-line choice in all patient categories; intramuscular injections should be avoided, especially with long-acting insulins, because severe hypoglycemia may result; lipohypertrophy is a frequent complication of therapy that distorts insulin absorption, and, therefore, injections and infusions should not be given into these lesions and correct site rotation will help prevent them; effective long-term therapy with insulin is critically dependent on addressing psychological hurdles upstream, even before insulin has been started; inappropriate disposal of used sharps poses a risk of infection with blood-borne pathogens; and mitigation is possible with proper training, effective disposal strategies, and the use of safety devices. Adherence to these new recommendations should lead to more effective therapies, improved outcomes, and lower costs for patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The influence of INS VNTR class III allele on auxological parameters, glucose, insulin, lipids, and adipocytokines secretion in prepubertal children born small for gestational age.

    Stawerska, Renata; Szałapska, Małgorzata; Borowiec, Maciej; Antosik, Karolina; Młynarski, Wojciech; Lewiński, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The insulin gene variable number of tandem repeats (INS VNTR) class III allele has been implicated in lower birth weight, obesity, and insulin resistance. We assessed its influence on birth weight in the Polish population and on the current body mass and metabolic profile in prepubertal children born small for gestational age (SGA). DNA for genotyping of INS VNTR was available for 123 subjects born SGA and 132 born appropriate for gestational age (AGA). We identified two alleles: class I and class III. Next, in 112 prepubertal (aged: 6.8 ± 1.38 years) SGA children, the auxological measurements, fasting serum C-peptide, triglycerides, cholesterol, ghrelin, leptin, adiponectin, resistin, cortisol, and insulin-like growth factor type I (IGF-I) concentrations, as well as glucose and insulin during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), were assessed and insulin resistance indices were calculated. The results were analysed depending on INS VNTR variants. The occurrence of individual INS VNTR variants were similar in the SGA and AGA groups. In prepubertal SGA children, we did not observe any statistical differences as regards birth weight, body mass, lipids, or adipocytokine concentrations among I/I, I/III, and III/III class groups. The concentration of insulin in 120' of OGTT was significantly higher in class III homozygous than in class I homozygous individuals. Variant INS VNTR class III was shown not to be associated in any essential way with birth weight in the Polish population. Among prepubertal SGA children, the presence of INS VNTR class III is related to higher insulin secretion during OGTT. (Endokrynol Pol 2016; 67 (6): 585-591).

  16. In Vivo Experimental Study of Noninvasive Insulin Microinjection through Hollow Si Microneedle Array

    Drago Resnik

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study of in vivo insulin delivery through microinjection by using hollow silicon microneedle array is presented. A case study was carried out on a healthy human subject in vivo to determine the influence of delivery parameters on drug transfer efficiency. As a microinjection device, a hollow microneedle array (13 × 13 mm2 having 100 microneedles (220 µm high, 130 µm-outer diameter and 50 µm-inner diameter was designed and fabricated using classical microfabrication techniques. The efficiency of the delivery process was first characterized using methylene blue and a saline solution. Based on these results, the transfer efficiency was found to be predominantly limited by the inability of viable epidermis to absorb and allow higher drug transport toward the capillary-rich region. Two types of fast-acting insulin were used to provide evidence of efficient delivery by hollow MNA to a human subject. By performing blood analyses, infusion of more-concentrated insulin (200 IU/mL, international units (IU exhibited similar blood glucose level drop (5–7% compared to insulin of standard concentration (100 IU/mL, however, significant increase of serum insulin (40–50% with respect to the preinfusion values was determined. This was additionally confirmed by a distinctive increase of insulin to C-peptide ratio as compared to preinfusion ratio. Moreover, we noticed that this route of administration mimics a multiple dose regimen, able to get a “steady state” for insulin plasma concentration.

  17. Xylitol prevents NEFA-induced insulin resistance in rats

    Kishore, P.; Kehlenbrink, S.; Hu, M.; Zhang, K.; Gutierrez-Juarez, R.; Koppaka, S.; El-Maghrabi, M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Increased NEFA levels, characteristic of type 2 diabetes mellitus, contribute to skeletal muscle insulin resistance. While NEFA-induced insulin resistance was formerly attributed to decreased glycolysis, it is likely that glucose transport is the rate-limiting defect. Recently, the plant-derived sugar alcohol xylitol has been shown to have favourable metabolic effects in various animal models. Furthermore, its derivative xylulose 5-phosphate may prevent NEFA-induced suppression of glycolysis. We therefore examined whether and how xylitol might prevent NEFA-induced insulin resistance. Methods We examined the ability of xylitol to prevent NEFA-induced insulin resistance. Sustained ~1.5-fold elevations in NEFA levels were induced with Intralipid/heparin infusions during 5 h euglycaemic–hyperinsulinaemic clamp studies in 24 conscious non-diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats, with or without infusion of xylitol. Results Intralipid infusion reduced peripheral glucose uptake by ~25%, predominantly through suppression of glycogen synthesis. Co-infusion of xylitol prevented the NEFA-induced decreases in both glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis. Although glycolysis was increased by xylitol infusion alone, there was minimal NEFA-induced suppression of glycolysis, which was not affected by co-infusion of xylitol. Conclusions/interpretation We conclude that xylitol prevented NEFA-induced insulin resistance, with favourable effects on glycogen synthesis accompanying the improved insulin-mediated glucose uptake. This suggests that this pentose sweetener has beneficial insulin-sensitising effects. PMID:22460760

  18. Evaluation of insulin secretion and action in New World camelids.

    Firshman, Anna M; Cebra, Christopher K; Schanbacher, Barbara J; Seaquist, Elizabeth R

    2013-01-01

    To measure and compare insulin secretion and sensitivity in healthy alpacas and llamas via glucose clamping techniques. 8 llamas and 8 alpacas. Hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamping (HEC) and hyperglycemic clamping (HGC) were performed on each camelid in a crossover design with a minimum 48-hour washout period between clamping procedures. The HEC technique was performed to measure insulin sensitivity. Insulin was infused IV at 6 mU/min/kg for 4 hours, and an IV infusion of glucose was adjusted to maintain blood glucose concentration at 150 mg/dL. Concentrations of blood glucose and plasma insulin were determined throughout. The HGC technique was performed to assess insulin secretion in response to exogenous glucose infusion. An IV infusion of glucose was administered to maintain blood glucose concentration at 320 mg/dL for 3 hours, and concentrations of blood glucose and plasma insulin were determined throughout. Alpacas and llamas were not significantly different with respect to whole-body insulin sensitivity during HEC or in pancreatic β-cell response during HGC. Alpacas and llamas had markedly lower insulin sensitivity during HEC and markedly lower pancreatic β-cell response during HGC, in comparison with many other species. New World camelids had lower glucose-induced insulin secretion and marked insulin resistance in comparison with other species. This likely contributes to the disorders of fat and glucose metabolism that are common to camelids.

  19. Local and systemic response to intramammary lipopolysaccharide challenge during long-term manipulated plasma glucose and insulin concentrations in dairy cows.

    Vernay, M C M B; Wellnitz, O; Kreipe, L; van Dorland, H A; Bruckmaier, R M

    2012-05-01

    The metabolic load during periods of high milk production in dairy cows causes a variety of changes of metabolite blood concentrations including dramatically decreased glucose levels. These changes supposedly impair the immune system. The goal of this study was, therefore, to evaluate adaptations of the cow's immune system in response to an intramammary lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation during a 3-d modification of plasma glucose and insulin induced by different clamp infusions. Seventeen midlactating dairy cows received a hypoglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp induced by insulin infusion (HypoG; n=5), a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp induced by insulin and glucose infusion (EuG; n=6), or infusion of saline solution (NaCl; n=6) for 56 h. At 48 h of infusion, 2 udder quarters were challenged with 200 μg of Escherichia coli LPS. At 48 h of infusion (immediately before LPS challenge), tumor necrosis factor α, lactoferrin, and serum amyloid A (SAA) mRNA abundance was increased in HypoG and Il-1β mRNA abundance was decreased in EuG. After LPS challenge, plasma glucose concentration did not decrease, although plasma insulin increased simultaneously in all groups either due to enhanced endogenous release (NaCl) or due to increased insulin infusion rate (HypoG; EuG). Plasma cortisol, rectal temperatures, and milk somatic cell count of challenged quarters increased, whereas plasma nonesterified fatty acid concentrations were similarly decreased across treatments. In mammary biopsies, increased mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor α, IL-1β, IL-8, and IL-10, and SAA were observed in LPS-treated quarters of all groups, with a more pronounced increase in IL-1β, IL-10, and SAA expression in EuG. Nuclear factor-κB mRNA expression was upregulated in NaCl and EuG but not in HypoG in response to LPS. Lactoferrin, toll-like receptor 4, and cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression was increased in LPS-treated quarters of EuG only, and 5-lipoxygenase mRNA expression was decreased

  20. Influence of Grand Multiparity on the Levels of Insulin, Glucose and HOMA-IR in Comparison with Nulliparity and Primiparity.

    Eldin Ahmed Abdelsalam, Kamal; Alobeid M Elamin, Abdelsamee

    2017-01-01

    It is to compare the levels of fasting glucose and insulin as well as insulin resistance in grand multiparas with primiparity and nulliparity. Fasting blood samples were collected from 100 non-pregnant ladies as control group, 100 primiparity pregnant women and 100 grand multiparity pregnant women. Glucose (FBS) and insulin (FSI) concentrations were measured by Hitachi 912 full automated Chemistry Analyzer (Roche Diagnostics, Germany) as manufacturer procedure. Insulin resistance was calculated following the formula: FBG (mg dL-1)×FSI (μU mL-1)/405. This study found a significant reduction in glucose level in primiparity when compared to control group but it was increased significantly in multiparity comparing to primiparity and control. Insulin level showed significant high concentrations in pregnant women and increased significantly in grand multiparas comparing to primiparas and controls. As a result of that, HOMA-IR was increased significantly by increasing of parity. Also, there was a significant increase in fasting insulin and a decrease in insulin sensitivity with parity with association to age and obesity. Grand multiparity is associated with an increased risk of subsequent clinical insulin resistance (HOMA-IR).

  1. A genome-wide approach accounting for body mass index identifies genetic variants influencing fasting glycemic traits and insulin resistance

    Manning, Alisa K.; Hivert, Marie-France; Scott, Robert A.; Grimsby, Jonna L.; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Chen, Han; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Prokopenko, Inga; Amin, Najaf; Barnes, Daniel; Cadby, Gemma; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ingelsson, Erik; Jackson, Anne U.; Johnson, Toby; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ladenvall, Claes; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lahti, Jari; Lecoeur, Cecile; Liu, Yongmei; Martinez-Larrad, Maria Teresa; Montasser, May E.; Navarro, Pau; Perry, John R. B.; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Salo, Perttu; Sattar, Naveed; Shungin, Dmitry; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Tanaka, Toshiko; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; An, Ping; de Andrade, Mariza; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Aspelund, Thor; Atalay, Mustafa; Aulchenko, Yurii; Balkau, Beverley; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Beilby, John P.; Bellis, Claire; Bergman, Richard N.; Blangero, John; Boban, Mladen; Kumari, Meena; Penninx, Brenda

    Recent genome-wide association studies have described many loci implicated in type 2 diabetes (T2D) pathophysiology and beta-cell dysfunction but have contributed little to the understanding of the genetic basis of insulin resistance. We hypothesized that genes implicated in insulin resistance

  2. A retrospective analysis of blood gases with two different insulin ...

    2015-12-20

    Dec 20, 2015 ... two different insulin infusion protocols in patients undergoing cardiovascular surgery. Niger J ... 2010 and 2014. Patients with Type 1 diabetes, chronic renal ..... Maletkovic J, Drexler A. Diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperglycemic.

  3. Insulin resistance influences weight loss in non-obese women who followed a home-based exercise program and slight caloric restriction.

    Mediano, Mauro Felippe Felix; Sichieri, Rosely

    2011-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of insulin resistance status on weight changes in non-obese women who followed a home-based exercise program and slight caloric restriction over a period of 12 months. Middle-aged (25-45 year), non-obese (body mass index of 23-29.9 kg/m(2)) women were randomly assigned to control (CG) or home-based exercise group (HB). The HB group received a booklet explaining the physical exercises to be practiced at home at least three times per week (40 min/session). Both groups were required to follow a small energy restriction of 100-300 calories per day. For the analysis, women were stratified in two groups according to baseline insulin sensitivity: NIR (non-insulin resistant; n = 121) and IR (insulin resistant; n = 64). Women classified as IR at baseline had greater weight loss after 12 months of follow-up (-1.6 kg vs. -1.1 kg; p = 0.01), and HB exercise helped to reduce weight only among NIR women (-1.5 vs. -0.7; p = 0.04); no differences were observed between intervention groups for IR women (-1.5 vs. -1.7; p = 0.24). There were no differences between IR and NIR groups for lipid profile after adjustment for weight changes. Insulin resistance facilitated weight loss, and home-based exercise promoted greater weight loss only in non-insulin resistance women. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Understanding Infusion Pumps.

    Mandel, Jeff E

    2018-04-01

    Infusion systems are complicated electromechanical systems that are used to deliver anesthetic drugs with moderate precision. Four types of systems are described-gravity feed, in-line piston, peristaltic, and syringe. These systems are subject to a number of failure modes-occlusion, disconnection, siphoning, infiltration, and air bubbles. The relative advantages of the various systems and some of the monitoring capabilities are discussed. A brief example of the use of an infusion system during anesthetic induction is presented. With understanding of the functioning of these systems, users may develop greater comfort.

  5. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose accumulation in the heart, brain and skeletal muscle of rats; the influence of time after injection, depressed lipid metabolism and glucose-insulin

    Kasalicky, J.; Konopkova, M.; Melichar, F.

    2001-01-01

    To study the effect of lipid depressing drugs on 18 FDG myocardial concentration. The changes of 18 FDG uptake in myocardium, brain and skeletal muscle of rats were compared as influenced by acipimox, tyloxapol and glucose with insulin. 5.55 MBq of 18 FDG were administered to Wistar rats. Control rats were killed 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes following intravenous injection and the radioactivity concentration (cpm/g of tissue) in relation to injected cpm was determined in a well crystal adjusted to 511 KeV in order to check the time of maximal 18 FDG tissue uptake. The radioactivity in myocardium, skeletal muscle and brain in intact animals was compared with that of rats treated with tyloxapol (tritton WR 1339, 125 mg intravenously immediately before 18 FDG injection), acipimox (nicotinic acid derivative, 25 mg by stomach cannula 15 minutes before 18 FDG), or glucose with insulin (intravenous injection of 0.04 g and 0.04 UI immediately before 18 FDG). The animals were killed 45 minutes following 18 FDG injection. Tyloxapol and acipimox significantly elevated myocardial 18 FDG concentration (tyloxapol +37% and acipimox +48%), but the increase in 18 FDG concentration after glucose and insulin was slight and insignificant. The changes in skeletal muscle after lipid depressing agents were quite contrasting; the decrease in 18 FDG concentration was -74% after tyloxapol and -44% following acipimox administration. The accumulation of 18 FDG in brain was not influenced markedly by the drugs used or by glucose with insulin. The highest 18 FDG uptake in myocardium could be achieved by depressing the lipid metabolism and not by administration of glucose with insulin only. A marked increase in glucose accumulation in myocardium is not possible without previous shift from the utilisation of fatty acids. This finding is fully in agreement with present knowledge about energetic metabolism of myocardium. (author)

  6. Validation of methods for measurement of insulin secretion in humans in vivo

    Kjems, L L; Christiansen, E; Vølund, A

    2000-01-01

    To detect and understand the changes in beta-cell function in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes, an accurate and precise estimation of prehepatic insulin secretion rate (ISR) is essential. There are two common methods to assess ISR, the deconvolution method (by Eaton and Polonsky)-considered th......To detect and understand the changes in beta-cell function in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes, an accurate and precise estimation of prehepatic insulin secretion rate (ISR) is essential. There are two common methods to assess ISR, the deconvolution method (by Eaton and Polonsky...... of these mathematical techniques for quantification of insulin secretion have been tested in dogs, but not in humans. In the present studies, we examined the validity of both methods to recover the known infusion rates of insulin and C-peptide mimicking ISR during an oral glucose tolerance test. ISR from both......, and a close agreement was found for the results of an oral glucose tolerance test. We also studied whether C-peptide kinetics are influenced by somatostatin infusion. The decay curves after bolus injection of exogenous biosynthetic human C-peptide, the kinetic parameters, and the metabolic clearance rate were...

  7. Nurse-led implementation of an insulin-infusion protocol in a general intensive care unit: improved glycaemic control with increased costs and risk of hypoglycaemia signals need for algorithm revision

    Bull Eva M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Strict glycaemic control (SGC has become a contentious issue in modern intensive care. Physicians and nurses are concerned about the increased workload due to SGC as well as causing harm through hypoglycaemia. The objective of our study was to evaluate our existing degree of glycaemic control, and to implement SGC safely in our ICU through a nurse-led implementation of an algorithm for intensive insulin-therapy. Methods The study took place in the adult general intensive care unit (11 beds of a 44-bed department of intensive care at a tertiary care university hospital. All patients admitted during the 32 months of the study were enrolled. We retrospectively analysed all arterial blood glucose (BG results from samples that were obtained over a period of 20 months prior to the implementation of SGC. We then introduced an algorithm for intensive insulin therapy; aiming for arterial blood-glucose at 4.4 – 6.1 mmol/L. Doctors and nurses were trained in the principles and potential benefits and risks of SGC. Consecutive statistical analyses of blood samples over a period of 12 months were used to assess performance, provide feedback and uncover incidences of hypoglycaemia. Results Median BG level was 6.6 mmol/L (interquartile range 5.6 to 7.7 mmol/L during the period prior to implementation of SGC (494 patients, and fell to 5.9 (IQR 5.1 to 7.0 mmol/L following introduction of the new algorithm (448 patients. The percentage of BG samples > 8 mmol/L was reduced from 19.2 % to 13.1 %. Before implementation of SGC, 33 % of samples were between 4.4 to 6.1 mmol/L and 12 patients (2.4 % had one or more episodes of severe hypoglycaemia ( Conclusion The retrospective part of the study indicated ample room for improvement. Through the implementation of SGC the fraction of samples within the new target range increased from 33% to 45.8%. There was also a significant increase in severe hypoglycaemic episodes. There continues to be potential

  8. Influence of insulin sensitivity and the TaqIB cholesteryl ester transfer protein gene polymorphism on plasma lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase and lipid transfer protein activities and their response to hyperinsulinemia in non-diabetic men

    S.C. Riemens; A. van Tol (Arie); B.K. Stulp; R.P.F. Dullaart (Robin)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractLecithin:cholesteryl acyl transferase (LCAT), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), and lipoprotein lipases are involved in high density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism. We evaluated the influence of insulin

  9. A genome-wide approach accounting for body mass index identifies genetic variants influencing fasting glycemic traits and insulin resistance

    Manning, Alisa K; Hivert, Marie-France; Scott, Robert A

    2012-01-01

    pathways might be uncovered by accounting for differences in body mass index (BMI) and potential interactions between BMI and genetic variants. We applied a joint meta-analysis approach to test associations with fasting insulin and glucose on a genome-wide scale. We present six previously unknown loci...... associated with fasting insulin at P triglyceride and lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels, suggesting a role for these loci...

  10. Infection of growing swine with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae — Effects on growth, serum metabolites, and insulin-like growth factor-I.

    Roberts, N. Elizabeth; Almond, Glen W.

    2003-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of concomitant infections with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae on growth performance, serum metabolite concentrations, and serum insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in growing pigs. Twenty-two barrows (10 weeks of age) were treated with either an intranasal administration of PRRSV and an intratracheal infusion of M. hyopneumoniae (treatment; n = 8) or a sham inoculation with medium (sham; n = 8), or w...

  11. Insulin Secretagogues

    ... than sulfonylureas. What are the side effects and disadvantages of insulin secretagogues? Both types of insulin-releasing ... help find the cause. Questions to ask your doctor What else can I do to keep my ...

  12. Influence of Adiposity, Physical Activity, Fitness, and Screen Time on Insulin Dynamics Over 2 Years in Children.

    Henderson, Mélanie; Benedetti, Andrea; Barnett, Tracie A; Mathieu, Marie-Eve; Deladoëy, Johnny; Gray-Donald, Katherine

    2016-03-01

    Despite extensive evidence showing that lifestyle habits play a critical role in preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes in adults, little is known regarding the impact of lifestyle habits on type 2 diabetes risk in childhood. To assess whether adiposity, fitness, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, and screen time predict insulin sensitivity or insulin secretion during a 2-year period in children with a family history of obesity. This is a prospective longitudinal cohort study of 630 children, having at least 1 obese parent, recruited from schools in Quebec, Canada, between July 2005 and December 2008 in the Quebec Adipose and Lifestyle Investigation in Youth (QUALITY) cohort. Children were assessed at baseline (ages 8-10 years) and 2 years later. Fitness was measured by peak oxygen consumption, percentage of body fat (adiposity) by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity using accelerometry, and screen time by average daily hours of self-reported television, video game, or computer use. Regression models were adjusted for age, sex, season, and pubertal stage. The current analysis was completed in October 2015. Insulin sensitivity was measured by the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance and an oral glucose tolerance test-based index (Matsuda insulin sensitivity index). Insulin secretion was measured using the area under the curve of insulin to glucose during the first 30 minutes of the oral glucose tolerance test and using the area under the curve of insulin to glucose over 2 hours. Of 630 children evaluated at baseline (mean [SD] age, 9.6 [0.9] years; 54.4% male; 56.2% normal weight, 19.2% overweight, and 22.7% obese), 564 were evaluated at 2-year follow-up. Adiposity and changes in adiposity were the central predictors of insulin dynamics over time. Every additional 1% of body fat at ages 8 to 10 years decreased insulin sensitivity by 2.9% (95% CI, -3.3% to -2.5%; P effect on adiposity levels

  13. Changes in serum metabolic hormone levels after glucose infusion during lactation cycles in Holstein cows

    Aliasghar Chalmeh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Negative energy balance can impair the metabolism of high producing dairy cows and supplying the glucose, as an energy source; can prevent the metabolic disorders in these animals. Hence, we hypothesized that bolus intravenous glucose administration may change the concentrations of metabolic hormones in order to prevent and control of metabolic dysfunctions of dairy cows. Twenty five multiparous Holstein dairy cows were divided to 5 equal groups containing early, mid and late lactations, far-off and close-up dry periods. All cows were received dextrose 50% intravenously at 500 mg/kg, 10 mL/kg/h. Blood samples were collected from all animals prior to and 1, 2, 3 and 4 after dextrose 50% infusion and sera were separated to determine glucose, triiodothyronine (T3, thyroxine (T4, serum free T3 (fT3, free T4 (fT4, cortisol and insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1. The decreasing pattern of T3 concentration was detected in all studied animals following intravenous glucose infusion (P<0.05. The significant increasing pattern of T4 levels was seen in early and mid lactation cows after glucose administration (P<0.05. The significant decreasing pattern of IGF-1 was detected in mid and late lactations and far-off dry groups (P<0.05. There were no significant alterations in fT3, fT4 and cortisol concentrations following glucose infusion in all experimental groups. In conclusion, bolus intravenous glucose infusion could influence the metabolic hormones in high producing Holstein dairy cows. Alterations of metabolic hormones following bolus intravenous glucose administration indicated that glucose is an important direct controller of metabolic interactions and responses in dairy cows during different physiological states.

  14. Subcutaneous infusion in palliative care: a focus on the neria soft 90 infusion set.

    Gabriel, Janice

    2014-11-01

    Subcutaneous administration of medications and/or fluids can play a crucial part in supporting patients at home and thereby avoiding the need for hospitalisation. It is an area of patient care that has received little attention compared with other types of parenteral therapies. However, it is an effective and safe route for continuous administration for individuals requiring palliative care. Technological advancements have led to improved subcutaneous infusion devices, such as fine-gauge cannulae with integral sharps protection, as well as integral hypoallergenic dressings. These design features not only help to increase patient comfort but also minimise the potential for needlestick injuries, as well as providing the health professional with one sterile package containing all of the components needed to establish subcutaneous infusion. However, technological developments alone are insufficient to improve patient outcomes. Knowledge of the individual patient, together with their diagnosis and intended treatment, will influence the choice of subcutaneous infusion device, with the overall aim of minimising the potential for complications and improving comfort. This paper provides an overview of subcutaneous infusion, including the importance of patient assessment and the education and training needs of health professionals, and then focuses on one specific subcutaneous infusion device: the neria soft 90 infusion set.

  15. Haemolysis following rapid experimental red blood cell transfusion--an evaluation of two infusion pumps

    Hansen, Tom Giedsing; Sprogøe-Jakobsen, U; Pedersen, C M

    1998-01-01

    The vast majority of infusion pumps used for rapid transfusion of large amounts of blood have never been properly examined regarding their influence on the quality of the red blood cells (RBCs) infused. In this study, we evaluated the effect of two different infusion pumps on the degree of RBC...

  16. Lipolytic response to glucose infusion in human subjects

    Wolfe, R.R.; Peters, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have determined the effect of various rates of glucose infusion on the rates of release of glycerol (R/sub a/ glycerol), free fatty acids (R/sub a/ FFA), and on energy metabolism in normal human volunteers. Plasma kinetics were determined with use of the stable isotopic tracers D-5-glycerol and [1- 13 C]palmitate, and energy metabolism was determined by indirect calorimetry. The effect of glucose infusion on R/sub a/ glycerol and R/sub a/ FFA was dose-dependent. At 4 mg x kg -1 x min -1 , both R/sub a/ glycerol and R/sub a/ FFA were suppressed; at 8 mg x kg -1 x min -1 , R/sub a/ FFA was even more depressed, but R/sub a/ glycerol was similar to the value during the 4 mg x kg -1 x min -1 infusion. At all infusion rates tested, the amount of potential energy available from the sum of the glucose infusion and endogenously mobilized fat was always greater than when no glucose was infused. Glucose decreased fat mobilization by both inhibiting lipolysis and stimulating reesterification, thus causing a significant increase in triglyceride-fatty acid substrate cycling within the adipose tissue. Plasma insulin was determined by radioimmunoassay

  17. Intranasal insulin influences the olfactory performance of patients with smell loss, dependent on the body mass index: A pilot study.

    Schöpf, V; Kollndorfer, K; Pollak, M; Mueller, C A; Freiherr, J

    2015-12-01

    The application of intranasal insulin in healthy humans has been linked to improved memory function, reduced food intake, and increased olfactory thresholds. There has also been some correlation between the morbidities associated with central nervous system (CNS) insulin resistance, such as type II diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer's disease, obesity, and impaired odour recognition. Given that impaired odour recognition is an important component of olfactory performance, mechanisms that govern these effects may account for impaired olfactory functions in anosmic patients. Ten patients with post-infectious olfactory loss received intranasal administration of 40 IU insulin or a placebo solution, as well as olfactory performance tests before and after administration. When administered insulin, patients exhibited an immediate performance improvement with regard to olfactory sensitivity and olfactory intensity ratings. In addition, more odours were correctly identified. Furthermore, an improvement in the odour identification task was detected in patients with higher body mass index. Results of this pilot study shed light on the link between cerebral insulin level and an impaired sense of smell. This research line might provide a better understanding of olfactory loss in relation to eating and dietary behavior, and could offer opportunities to develop faster therapeutic intervention for patients with olfactory dysfunction.

  18. A genome-wide approach accounting for body mass index identifies genetic variants influencing fasting glycemic traits and insulin resistance

    Manning, Alisa K.; Hivert, Marie-France; Scott, Robert A.; Grimsby, Jonna L.; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Chen, Han; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Prokopenko, Inga; Amin, Najaf; Barnes, Daniel; Cadby, Gemma; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ingelsson, Erik; Jackson, Anne U.; Johnson, Toby; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ladenvall, Claes; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lahti, Jari; Lecoeur, Cecile; Liu, Yongmei; Martinez-Larrad, Maria Teresa; Montasser, May E.; Navarro, Pau; Perry, John R. B.; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Salo, Perttu; Sattar, Naveed; Shungin, Dmitry; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Tanaka, Toshiko; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; An, Ping; de Andrade, Mariza; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Aspelund, Thor; Atalay, Mustafa; Aulchenko, Yurii; Balkau, Beverley; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Beilby, John P.; Bellis, Claire; Bergman, Richard N.; Blangero, John; Boban, Mladen; Boehnke, Michael; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Böttcher, Yvonne; Bouchard, Claude; Brunner, Eric; Budimir, Danijela; Campbell, Harry; Carlson, Olga; Chines, Peter S.; Clarke, Robert; Collins, Francis S.; Corbatón-Anchuelo, Arturo; Couper, David; de Faire, Ulf; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Dimitriou, Maria; Egan, Josephine M; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Erdos, Michael R.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Eury, Elodie; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ford, Ian; Forouhi, Nita G.; Fox, Caroline S; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Franks, Paul W; Frayling, Timothy M; Froguel, Philippe; Galan, Pilar; de Geus, Eco; Gigante, Bruna; Glazer, Nicole L.; Goel, Anuj; Groop, Leif; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hallmans, Göran; Hamsten, Anders; Hansson, Ola; Harris, Tamara B.; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Simon; Hercberg, Serge; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hingorani, Aroon; Hofman, Albert; Hui, Jennie; Hung, Joseph; Jarvelin, Marjo Riitta; Jhun, Min A.; Johnson, Paul C.D.; Jukema, J Wouter; Jula, Antti; Kao, W.H.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Kivimaki, Mika; Kolcic, Ivana; Kovacs, Peter; Kumari, Meena; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo; Lannfelt, Lars; Lathrop, G Mark; Launer, Lenore J.; Leander, Karin; Li, Guo; Lind, Lars; Lindstrom, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Luan, Jian’an; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Mägi, Reedik; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Marmot, Michael; Meneton, Pierre; Mohlke, Karen L.; Mooser, Vincent; Morken, Mario A.; Miljkovic, Iva; Narisu, Narisu; O’Connell, Jeff; Ong, Ken K.; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Palotie, Aarno; Pankow, James S.; Peden, John F.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Pehlic, Marina; Peltonen, Leena; Penninx, Brenda; Pericic, Marijana; Perola, Markus; Perusse, Louis; Peyser, Patricia A; Polasek, Ozren; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Province, Michael A.; Räikkönen, Katri; Rauramaa, Rainer; Rehnberg, Emil; Rice, Ken; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Saaristo, Timo; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Salomaa, Veikko; Savage, David B.; Saxena, Richa; Schwarz, Peter; Seedorf, Udo; Sennblad, Bengt; Serrano-Rios, Manuel; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sijbrands, Eric J.G.; Siscovick, David S.; Smit, Johannes H.; Small, Kerrin S.; Smith, Nicholas L.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Stančáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stumvoll, Michael; Sun, Yan V.; Swift, Amy J.; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Trompet, Stella; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Uusitupa, Matti; Vikström, Max; Vitart, Veronique; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Voight, Benjamin F.; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Waterworth, Dawn M; Watkins, Hugh; Wheeler, Eleanor; Widen, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H.; Willems, Sara M.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Wright, Alan F.; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Zelenika, Diana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zgaga, Lina; Wareham, Nicholas J.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Barroso, Ines; Watanabe, Richard M.; Florez, Jose C.; Dupuis, Josée; Meigs, James B.; Langenberg, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have described many loci implicated in type 2 diabetes (T2D) pathophysiology and beta-cell dysfunction, but contributed little to our understanding of the genetic basis of insulin resistance. We hypothesized that genes implicated in insulin resistance pathways may be uncovered by accounting for differences in body mass index (BMI) and potential interaction between BMI and genetic variants. We applied a novel joint meta-analytical approach to test associations with fasting insulin (FI) and glucose (FG) on a genome-wide scale. We present six previously unknown FI loci at P<5×10−8 in combined discovery and follow-up analyses of 52 studies comprising up to 96,496non-diabetic individuals. Risk variants were associated with higher triglyceride and lower HDL cholesterol levels, suggestive of a role for these FI loci in insulin resistance pathways. The localization of these additional loci will aid further characterization of the role of insulin resistance in T2D pathophysiology. PMID:22581228

  19. Insulin resistance in obesity can be reliably identified from fasting plasma insulin.

    ter Horst, K W; Gilijamse, P W; Koopman, K E; de Weijer, B A; Brands, M; Kootte, R S; Romijn, J A; Ackermans, M T; Nieuwdorp, M; Soeters, M R; Serlie, M J

    2015-12-01

    Insulin resistance is the major contributor to cardiometabolic complications of obesity. We aimed to (1) establish cutoff points for insulin resistance from euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps (EHCs), (2) identify insulin-resistant obese subjects and (3) predict insulin resistance from routinely measured variables. We assembled data from non-obese (n=112) and obese (n=100) men who underwent two-step EHCs using [6,6-(2)H2]glucose as tracer (insulin infusion dose 20 and 60 mU m(-2) min(-1), respectively). Reference ranges for hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity were calculated from healthy non-obese men. Based on these reference values, obese men with preserved insulin sensitivity or insulin resistance were identified. Cutoff points for insulin-mediated suppression of endogenous glucose production (EGP) and insulin-stimulated glucose disappearance rate (Rd) were 46.5% and 37.3 μmol kg(-)(1) min(-)(1), respectively. Most obese men (78%) had EGP suppression within the reference range, whereas only 12% of obese men had Rd within the reference range. Obese men with Rd obese men in age, body mass index (BMI), body composition, fasting glucose or cholesterol, but did have higher fasting insulin (110±49 vs 63±29 pmol l(-1), Pobese men could be identified with good sensitivity (80%) and specificity (75%) from fasting insulin >74 pmol l(-1). Most obese men have hepatic insulin sensitivity within the range of non-obese controls, but below-normal peripheral insulin sensitivity, that is, insulin resistance. Fasting insulin (>74 pmol l(-1) with current insulin immunoassay) may be used for identification of insulin-resistant (or metabolically unhealthy) obese men in research and clinical settings.

  20. THE INFLUENCE OF THYROID FUNCTION AND BONE TURNOVER ON LIPOPROTEIN PROFILE IN YOUNG PHYSICALLY ACTIVE MEN WITH DIFFERENT INSULIN SENSITIVITY

    A. Kęska

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity induces changes in the endocrine system. Previous data indicated that changes in insulin secretion and the tissue response to this hormone are very important for energy metabolism. It is believed that they are accompanied by changes in lipid metabolism, but factors contributing to this process are still disputed. The aim of this study was to assess interactions among insulin sensitivity, thyroid function, a bone turnover marker and serum lipid profile in young physically active men. Eighty-seven physical education students, aged 18-23 years, participated in the study. We measured serum levels of glucose, lipids, insulin, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH, osteocalcin and anthropometric parameters. Insulin sensitivity was determined using homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. The median value of HOMA-IR (1.344 was used to divide the study population into Group A (above the median and Group B (below the median. Men from both groups did not differ in anthropometric parameters or in daily physical activity. Triglycerides (TG, total cholesterol (TC and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C levels were higher in Group A (P<0.05. TSH and osteocalcin levels were similar in males with different HOMA-IR. Multiple regression analysis for TSH and osteocalcin showed that in Group A these hormones had no effect on plasma lipoproteins. However, in Group B they significantly determined the variation of plasma TC and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C levels (in about 28% and 29%, respectively. We concluded that TSH and osteocalcin are involved in determination of a more healthy lipid profile at a certain level of insulin sensitivity.

  1. Insulin resistance and β-cell function influence postprandial blood glucose levels in Japanese patients with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Kusunoki, Yoshiki; Katsuno, Tomoyuki; Nakae, Rie; Watanabe, Kahori; Ochi, Fumihiro; Tokuda, Masaru; Akagami, Takafumi; Miuchi, Masayuki; Miyagawa, Jun-ichiro; Namba, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) was to evaluate the relationship of insulin resistance and secretion to area-under-the-sensor glucose concentration-time curve from before to 120 min postmeal (CGM-AUC(0-120 min)) as determined with continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). Immunoreactive insulin and HbA1c were determined in 22 Japanese patients with GDM undergoing a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. Patients underwent CGM within 3 weeks of receiving a diagnosis of GDM. HbA1c (NGSP) was 5.5 ± 0.4%, BMI was 24.8 ± 5.3 kg/m(2), mean sensor glucose by CGM was 94.2 ± 10.3 mg/dL, standard deviation was 17.5 ± 4.4 mg/dL, and CGM-AUC(0-120 min) was 204.2 ± 23.8 h mg/dL. The insulin resistance indices the homeostasis model assessment ratio (HOMA-R), quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), and the Matsuda Index were correlated with CGM-AUC(0-120 min). The disposition index (DI), which was used to evaluate insulin secretion, was negatively correlated with CGM-AUC(0-120 min). Not only insulin resistance but also beta cell dysfunction contributes to postprandial hyperglycemia in Japanese patients with GDM.

  2. Insulin delivery route for the artificial pancreas: subcutaneous, intraperitoneal, or intravenous? Pros and cons.

    Renard, Eric

    2008-07-01

    Insulin delivery is a crucial component of a closed-loop system aiming at the development of an artificial pancreas. The intravenous route, which has been used in the bedside artificial pancreas model for 30 years, has clear advantages in terms of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, but cannot be used in any ambulatory system so far. Subcutaneous (SC) insulin infusion benefits from the broad expansion of insulin pump therapy that promoted the availability of constantly improving technology and fast-acting insulin analog use. However, persistent delays of insulin absorption and action, variability and shortterm stability of insulin infusion from SC-inserted catheters generate effectiveness and safety issues in view of an ambulatory, automated, glucose-controlled, artificial beta cell. Intraperitoneal insulin delivery, although still marginally used in diabetes care, may offer an interesting alternative because of its more-physiological plasma insulin profiles and sustained stability and reliability of insulin delivery.

  3. EFFECT OF INSULIN ON ENDOCRINE PANCREAS FUNCTION DURING LATE PREGNANCY IN THE RAT

    WIJKSTRA, S; MOES, H; SCHUILING, GA; KOITER, TR

    To partly or completely satisfy the increasing demand for insulin, pregnant rats were infused SC with human insulin (2.4 or 4.8 IU/day) from day 14 to day 20 of gestation. Cyclic control rats underwent the same procedure of 6 days of insulin-treatment. During the treatment all,stoups of rats were

  4. Insulin in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus reduces fat consumption in rats

    van Dijk, G; de Groote, C; Chavez, M; van der Werf, Y; Steffens, AB; Strubbe, JH

    1997-01-01

    Data are accumulating that insulin acting in the central nervous system is a physiological regulator of food intake and body weight, presumably via its effect in the hypothalamus. The present study investigated whether infusion of a small dose of insulin into two major hypothalamic insulin-binding

  5. Lipid induced insulin resistance affects women less than men and is not accompanied by inflammation or impaired proximal insulin signaling

    Høeg, Louise D; Sjøberg, Kim Anker; Jeppesen, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    than men. We therefore hypothesized that women would be less prone to lipid induced insulin resistance. Research and design methods: Insulin sensitivity of whole body and leg glucose disposal was studied in 16 young well matched healthy men and women infused with intralipid or saline for 7h. Muscle...... ratio was decreased by intralipid. Conclusion: Intralipid infusion causes less insulin resistance of muscle glucose uptake in women than in men. This insulin resistance is not due to decreased canonical insulin signaling, accumulation of lipid intermediates, inflammation or direct inhibition of glucose......AbstractObjective: We have previously shown that overnight fasted women have higher insulin stimulated whole body and leg glucose uptake despite a higher intramyocellular triacylglycerol concentration than men. Women also express higher muscle mRNA levels of proteins related to lipid metabolism...

  6. Normal insulin-stimulated endothelial function and impaired insulin-stimulated muscle glucose uptake in young adults with low birth weight

    Hermann, T S; Rask-Madsen, C; Ihlemann, N

    2003-01-01

    of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside in the forearm of fourteen 21-yr-old men with low birth weight and 16 controls of normal birth weight. Glucose uptake was measured during intraarterial insulin infusion. Dose-response studies were repeated during insulin infusion. The maximal blood flow during......Low birth weight has been linked to insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that insulin sensitivity of both muscle and vascular tissues were impaired in young men with low birth weight. Blood flow was measured by venous occlusion plethysmography during dose-response studies...... acetylcholine infusion was 14.1 +/- 2.7 and 14.4 +/- 2.1 [ml x (100 ml forearm)(-1) x min(-1)] in low and normal birth weight subjects, respectively. Insulin coinfusion increased acetylcholine-stimulated flow in both groups: 18.0 +/- 3.1 vs. 17.9 +/- 3.1 [ml x (100 ml forearm)(-1) x min(-1)], NS. Insulin...

  7. Influence of an acetate- and a lactate-based balanced infusion solution on acid base physiology and hemodynamics: an observational pilot study.

    Hofmann-Kiefer, Klaus F; Chappell, Daniel; Kammerer, Tobias; Jacob, Matthias; Paptistella, Michaela; Conzen, Peter; Rehm, Markus

    2012-07-06

    The current pilot study compares the impact of an intravenous infusion of Ringer's lactate to an acetate-based solution with regard to acid-base balance. The study design included the variables of the Stewart approach and focused on the effective strong ion difference. Because adverse hemodynamic effects have been reported when using acetate buffered solutions in hemodialysis, hemodynamics were also evaluated. Twenty-four women who had undergone abdominal gynecologic surgery and who had received either Ringer's lactate (Strong Ion Difference 28 mmol/L; n = 12) or an acetate-based solution (Strong Ion Difference 36.8 mmol/L; n = 12) according to an established clinical protocol and its precursor were included in the investigation. After induction of general anesthesia, a set of acid-base variables, hemodynamic values and serum electrolytes was measured three times during the next 120 minutes. Patients received a mean dose of 4,054 ± 450 ml of either one or the other of the solutions. In terms of mean arterial blood pressure and norepinephrine requirements there were no differences to observe between the study groups. pH and serum HCO3- concentration decreased slightly but significantly only with Ringer's lactate. In addition, the acetate-based solution kept the plasma effective strong ion difference more stable than Ringer's lactate. Both of the solutions provided hemodynamic stability. Concerning consistency of acid base parameters none of the solutions seemed to be inferior, either. Whether the slight advantages observed for the acetate-buffered solution in terms of stability of pH and plasma HCO3- are clinically relevant, needs to be investigated in a larger randomized controlled trial.

  8. L-rhamnose as a source of colonic propionate inhibits insulin secretion but does not influence measures of appetite or food intake.

    Darzi, Julia; Frost, Gary S; Swann, Jonathan R; Costabile, Adele; Robertson, M Denise

    2016-03-01

    Activation of free fatty acid receptor (FFAR)2 and FFAR3 via colonic short-chain fatty acids, particularly propionate, are postulated to explain observed inverse associations between dietary fiber intake and body weight. Propionate is reported as the predominant colonic fermentation product from l-rhamnose, a natural monosaccharide that resists digestion and absorption reaching the colon intact, while effects of long-chain inulin on appetite have not been extensively investigated. In this single-blind randomized crossover study, healthy unrestrained eaters (n = 13) ingested 25.5 g/d l-rhamnose, 22.4 g/d inulin or no supplement (control) alongside a standardized breakfast and lunch, following a 6-d run-in to investigate if appetite was inhibited. Postprandial qualitative appetite, breath hydrogen, and plasma glucose, insulin, triglycerides and non-esterified fatty acids were assessed for 420 min, then an ad libitum meal was provided. Significant treatment x time effects were found for postprandial insulin (P = 0.009) and non-esterified fatty acids (P = 0.046) with a significantly lower insulin response for l-rhamnose (P = 0.023) than control. No differences between treatments were found for quantitative and qualitative appetite measures, although significant treatment x time effects for meal desire (P = 0.008) and desire to eat sweet (P = 0.036) were found. Breath hydrogen was significantly higher with inulin (P = 0.001) and l-rhamnose (P = 0.009) than control, indicating colonic fermentation. These findings suggest l-rhamnose may inhibit postprandial insulin secretion, however neither l-rhamnose or inulin influenced appetite. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Insulin induces a shift in lipid and primary carbon metabolites in a model of fasting-induced insulin resistance

    Olmstead, Keedrian I.; La Frano, Michael R.; Fahrmann, Johannes; Grapov, Dmitry; Viscarra, Jose A.; Newman, John W.; Fiehn, Oliver; Crocker, Daniel E.; Filipp, Fabian V.; Ortiz, Rudy M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Prolonged fasting in northern elephant seals (NES) is characterized by a reliance on lipid metabolism, conservation of protein, and reduced plasma insulin. During early fasting, glucose infusion previously reduced plasma free fatty acids (FFA); however, during late-fasting, it induced an atypical elevation in FFA despite comparable increases in insulin during both periods suggestive of a dynamic shift in tissue responsiveness to glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Objective To better assess the contribution of insulin to this fasting-associated shift in substrate metabolism. Methods We compared the responses of plasma metabolites (amino acids (AA), FFA, endocannabinoids (EC), and primary carbon metabolites (PCM)) to an insulin infusion (65 mU/kg) in early- and late-fasted NES pups (n = 5/group). Plasma samples were collected prior to infusion (T0) and at 10, 30, 60, and 120 min post-infusion, and underwent untargeted and targeted metabolomics analyses utilizing a variety of GC-MS and LC-MS technologies. Results In early fasting, the majority (72%) of metabolite trajectories return to baseline levels within 2 h, but not in late fasting indicative of an increase in tissue sensitivity to insulin. In late-fasting, increases in FFA and ketone pools, coupled with decreases in AA and PCM, indicate a shift toward lipolysis, beta-oxidation, ketone metabolism, and decreased protein catabolism. Conversely, insulin increased PCM AUC in late fasting suggesting that gluconeogenic pathways are activated. Insulin also decreased FFA AUC between early and late fasting suggesting that insulin suppresses triglyceride hydrolysis. Conclusion Naturally adapted tolerance to prolonged fasting in these mammals is likely accomplished by suppressing insulin levels and activity, providing novel insight on the evolution of insulin during a condition of temporary, reversible insulin resistance. PMID:28757815

  10. The influence of laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy on weight loss, plasma ghrelin, insulin, glucose and lipids

    Hady Razak Hady

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the impact of laparoscopic gastric banding and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy on the concentration of ghrelin, insulin, glucose, triglycerides, total and HDL-cholesterol, as well as AST and ALT levels in plasma in patients with obesity. The research includes 200 patients operated using LAGB (34 men average age 37.0 ± 12.6 years and 66 women average age 39.18 ± 12.17 years and LSG (48 men average age 47.93 ± 9.24 years and 52 women, 19 ± 9.33 years. The percentage of effective weight loss, effective BMI loss, concentration of ghrelin, insulin, glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, ALT, AST and HOMA IR values was taken preoperatively and at 7th day, 1 month, 3 and 6 months after surgery. Both after LSG and after LAGB, statistically significant reduction in BMI, serum insulin, glucose and HOMA IR was noticed in comparison to the preoperative values. Post LAGB, patients showed an increase of ghrelin, while LSG proved ghrelin decreased. Correlations between glucose and BMI loss, and between insulin and BMI loss in both cases are more favorable in the LSG group. Lipid parameters, AST and ALT have undergone declines or  increases in the particular time points. Both techniques cause weight loss and this way lead to changes in the concentration of ghrelin, as well as to the improvement of insulin, glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides metabolism. They reduce metabolic syndrome and multiple comorbidities of obesity.

  11. Continuous Transversus Abdominis Plane Nerve Blocks: Does Varying Local Anesthetic Delivery Method-Automatic Repeated Bolus Versus Continuous Basal Infusion-Influence the Extent of Sensation to Cold?: A Randomized, Triple-Masked, Crossover Study in Volunteers.

    Khatibi, Bahareh; Said, Engy T; Sztain, Jacklynn F; Monahan, Amanda M; Gabriel, Rodney A; Furnish, Timothy J; Tran, Johnathan T; Donohue, Michael C; Ilfeld, Brian M

    2017-04-01

    administration technique (continuous basal versus hourly bolus) when using ropivacaine 0.2% and TAP catheters at 8 mL/h and 24 mL every 3 hours significantly influences the cutaneous effects after 6 hours of administration. Additional research is required to determine whether changing variables (eg, local anesthetic concentration, basal infusion rate, bolus dose volume, and/or interval) would provide different results.

  12. Dissociation of the effects of epinephrine and insulin on glucose and protein metabolism

    Castellino, P.; Luzi, L.; Del Prato, S.; DeFronzo, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    The separate and combined effects of insulin and epinephrine on leucine metabolism were examined in healthy young volunteers. Subjects participated in four experimental protocols: (1) euglycemic insulin clamp (+80 microU/ml), (2) epinephrine infusion (50 ng.kg-1.min-1) plus somatostatin with basal replacement of insulin and glucagon, (3) combined epinephrine (50 ng.kg-1.min-1) plus insulin (+80 microU/ml) infusion, and (4) epinephrine and somatostatin as in study 2 plus basal amino acid replacement. Studies were performed with a prime-continuous infusion of [1-14C]leucine and indirect calorimetry. Our results indicate that (1) hyperinsulinemia causes a generalized decrease in plasma amino acid concentrations, including leucine; (2) the reduction in plasma leucine concentration is primarily due to an inhibition of endogenous leucine flux; nonoxidative leucine disposal decreases after insulin infusion; (3) epinephrine, without change in plasma insulin concentration, reduces plasma amino acid levels; (4) combined epinephrine-insulin infusion causes a greater decrease in plasma amino levels than observed with either hormone alone; this is because of a greater inhibition of endogenous leucine flux; and (5) when basal amino acid concentrations are maintained constant with a balanced amino acid infusion, epinephrine inhibits the endogenous leucine flux. In conclusion, the present results do not provide support for the concept that epinephrine is a catabolic hormone with respect to amino acid-protein metabolism. In contrast, epinephrine markedly inhibits insulin-mediated glucose metabolism

  13. Thallium-201 infusion imaging

    Alazraki, N.; Kralios, A.; Wooten, W.W.

    1988-01-01

    To test the accuracy of Thallium-201 coronary artery infusion imaging of the earth during rapid changes in blood flow through a major coronary artery, the author performed a study in dogs correlating electromagnetic flow probe recordings with 201 Tl scintillation camera acquisitions. Hyperemic vascular response was produced experimentally in a major coronary artery by occlusion and release interventions which altered flow from baseline to zero during occlusion (20 seconds), followed by rapid flow increases approaching three times baseline immediately upon release of the occlusion. Flow returned to the baseline level within 60 seconds following release. Flow was also altered in a controlled fashion by other interventions. Recordings of Thallium uptake in the myocardium were displayed as a time histogram (counts per second squared vs time) which correlated very closely with electromagnetic flow probe recordings of flow (R=o.82-0.97). These experiments demonstrate a high degree of accuracy in Thallium infusion imaging to detect rapid changes in flow through a major coronary artery

  14. Overproduction of altered VLDL in an insulin-resistance rat model: Influence of SREBP-1c and PPAR-α.

    Lucero, Diego; Miksztowicz, Verónica; Macri, Vanesa; López, Gustavo H; Friedman, Silvia; Berg, Gabriela; Zago, Valeria; Schreier, Laura

    2015-01-01

    In insulin-resistance, VLDL presents alterations that increase its atherogenic potential. The mechanism by which insulin-resistance promotes the production of altered VLDL is still not completely understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c) and of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α), with the features of composition and size of VLDL in an insulin-resistance rat model induced by a sucrose rich diet (SRD). The study was conducted on 12 male Wistar rats (180g) receiving SRD (12 weeks) and 12 controls. Lipid profile, free fatty acids, glucose, and insulin were measured. Lipid content in liver and visceral fat were assessed. Isolated VLDL (d<1.006g/ml) was characterized by its chemical composition and size by HPLC. The respective hepatic expression of SREBP-1c and PPAR-α was determined (Western blot). As expected, SRD had elevated triglycerides (TG), free fatty acids and insulin levels, and decreased HDL-cholesterol (p<0.05), together with augmented hepatic and visceral fat (p<0.05). SRD showed higher VLDL total mass - with increased TG content - and predominance of large VLDL (p<0.05). SRD showed an increase in SREBP-1c (precursor and mature forms) and decreased PPAR-α expression (p<0.045). SREBP-1c forms were positively associated with VLDL total mass (p<0.04), VLDL-TG% (p<0.019), and large VLDL% (p<0.002). On the other hand, PPAR-α correlated negatively with VLDL total mass (p=0.05), VLDL-TG% (p=0.005), and large VLDL% (p=0.002). Insulin-resistance, by coordinated activation of SREBP-1c and reduction of PPAR-α, could promote the secretion of larger and TG over-enriched VLDL particles, with greater atherogenic capacity. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Insulin Pump Malfunction During Hospitalization: Two Case Reports.

    Faulds, Eileen R; Wyne, Kathleen L; Buschur, Elizabeth O; McDaniel, Jodi; Dungan, Kathleen

    2016-06-01

    Insulin pump malfunctions and failures continue to occur; however, more severe malfunctions such as the "runaway pump" phenomenon are rarely reported. This article describes two cases of pump malfunction in which pump users appear to have received an unsolicited bolus of insulin resulting in severe episodes of hypoglycemia during hospitalization. Both cases of insulin pump malfunction occurred in the inpatient setting at a large academic medical center in the United States. An analysis of the corresponding insulin pump downloads was performed. The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database was searched for similar cases involving Medtronic (Northridge, CA) insulin pumps using the terms "pump," "infusion," "insulin AND malfunction AND Medtronic." The two cases described show remarkable similarities, each demonstrating a severe hypoglycemic event preceded by an infusion site change followed by an alarm. In both cases a rapid spraying of insulin was reported. The insulin pump downloads validated much of the patients' and medical staff's descriptions of events. The FDA's MAUDE database search revealed 425 cases meeting our search term criteria. All cases were reviewed. Seven cases were identified involving independent movement of the reservoir piston. The cases detailed are the first to describe an insulin pump malfunction of this nature in the hospital setting involving unsolicited insulin boluses leading to severe hypoglycemia. The cases are particularly compelling in that they were witnessed by medical personnel. Providers and patients should receive instruction education on the recognition and management of insulin pump malfunction.

  16. Continuous Drug Infusion for Diabetes Therapy: A Closed-Loop Control System Design

    Jiming Chen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available While a typical way for diabetes therapy is discrete insulin infusion based on long-time interval measurement, in this paper, we design a closed-loop control system for continuous drug infusion to improve the traditional discrete methods and make diabetes therapy automatic in practice. By exploring the accumulative function of drug to insulin, a continuous injection model is proposed. Based on this model, proportional-integral-derivative (PID and fuzzy logic controllers are designed to tackle a control problem of the resulting highly nonlinear plant. Even with serious disturbance of glucose, such as nutrition absorption at meal time, the proposed scheme can perform well in simulation experiments.

  17. Influence of ripeness of banana on the blood glucose and insulin response in type 2 diabetic subjects.

    Hermansen, K; Rasmussen, O; Gregersen, S; Larsen, S

    1992-10-01

    Banana is a popular and tasty fruit which often is restricted in the diet prescribed for diabetic patients owing to the high content of free sugars. However, in under-ripe bananas starch constitutes 80-90% of the carbohydrate content, which as the banana ripens changes into free sugars. To study the effect of ripening on the postprandial blood glucose and insulin responses to banana, 10 type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic subjects consumed three meals, consisting of 120 g under-ripe banana, 120 g over-ripe banana or 40 g white bread on separate days. The mean postprandial blood glucose response area to white bread (181 +/- 45 mmol l-1 x 240 min) was significantly higher compared with under-ripe banana (62 +/- 17 mmol l-1 x 240 min: p alfa-amylase in humans.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Influence of dietary protein on postprandial blood glucose levels in individuals with Type 1 diabetes mellitus using intensive insulin therapy.

    Paterson, M A; Smart, C E M; Lopez, P E; McElduff, P; Attia, J; Morbey, C; King, B R

    2016-05-01

    To determine the effects of protein alone (independent of fat and carbohydrate) on postprandial glycaemia in individuals with Type 1 diabetes mellitus using intensive insulin therapy. Participants with Type 1 diabetes mellitus aged 7-40 years consumed six 150 ml whey isolate protein drinks [0 g (control), 12.5, 25, 50, 75 and 100] and two 150 ml glucose drinks (10 and 20 g) without insulin, in randomized order over 8 days, 4 h after the evening meal. Continuous glucose monitoring was used to assess postprandial glycaemia. Data were collected from 27 participants. Protein loads of 12.5 and 50 g did not result in significant postprandial glycaemic excursions compared with control (water) throughout the 300 min study period (P > 0.05). Protein loads of 75 and 100 g resulted in lower glycaemic excursions than control in the 60-120 min postprandial interval, but higher excursions in the 180-300 min interval. In comparison with 20 g glucose, the large protein loads resulted in significantly delayed and sustained glucose excursions, commencing at 180 min and continuing to 5 h. Seventy-five grams or more of protein alone significantly increases postprandial glycaemia from 3 to 5 h in people with Type 1 diabetes mellitus using intensive insulin therapy. The glycaemic profiles resulting from high protein loads differ significantly from the excursion from glucose in terms of time to peak glucose and duration of the glycaemic excursion. This research supports recommendations for insulin dosing for large amounts of protein. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Diabetes UK.

  19. Dietary approaches to stop hypertension influence on insulin receptor substrate-1gene expression: A randomized controlled clinical trial

    Marzieh Kafeshani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Insulin receptor substrate (IRS Type 1 is a main substrate for the insulin receptor, controls insulin signaling in skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and the vascular, so it is an important candidate gene for insulin resistance (IR. We aimed to compare the effects of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH and Usual Dietary Advices (UDA on IRS1 gene expression in women at risk for cardiovascular disease. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled clinical trial was performed in 44 women at risk for cardiovascular disease. Participants were randomly assigned to a UDA diet or the DASH diet. The DASH diet was rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat dairy products and low in saturated fat, total fat, cholesterol, refined grains, and sweets, with a total of 2400 mg/day sodium. The UDA diet was a regular diet with healthy dietary advice. Gene expression was assessed by the real-time polymerase chain reaction at the first of study and after 12 weeks. Independent sample t-test and paired-samples t-test were used to compare means of all variables within and between two groups respectively. Results: IRS1 gene expression was increased in DASH group compared with UDA diet (P = 0.00. Weight and waist circumference decreased in DASH group significantly compared to the UDA group (P < 0.05 but the results between the two groups showed no significant difference. Conclusion: DASH diet increased IRS1 gene expression and probably has beneficial effects on IR risks.

  20. Infusion's greenfield subsidiary in Poland

    Williams, C.; van Eerde, W.; The, D.

    2012-01-01

    The president of Infusion Development Corporation was reviewing the progress of the new subsidiary the company had set up 15 months earlier in Krakow, Poland. The purpose of the subsidiary was to work with other Infusion offices around the world to provide innovative software development services to

  1. Influence of High Aspect Ratio Vessel Cell Culture on TNF-Alpha, Insulin Secretion and Glucose Homeostasis in Pancreatic Islets of Langerhans from Wistar Furth Rats

    Tobin, Brian W.a; Leeper-Woodford, Sandra K.

    1999-01-01

    The present studies were carried out to determine the influence of a ground based microgravity paradigm, utilizing the High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) cell culture upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production of pancreatic islets of Langerhans. An additional aim was to elucidate alterations in insulin secretion and glucose utilization using the HARV low shear, gravity averaged vector, cell culture technique. Islets were isolated (1726 +/- 117, 150 micron islet equivalent units) from Wistar Furth rats and assigned to four treatment groups: 1) HARV, 2) HARV plus LPS, 3) static culture, 4) static culture plus LPS. Following 48 hours of culture, insulin concentration was increased in both HARV and static cultures (palpha (L929 cytotoxicity assay) and was measured at selected time points for 48 hours. TNF-alpha was significantly increased in LPS-induced HARV and static cultures, yet the increase was more pronounced in the static culture group (palpha is associated with a decreased insulin secretion is intriguing, both as it relates to in-flight investigations, and as it may provide insight into the pathophysiology of Type I and Type 11 diabetes. Glucose concentration in islet medium was lesser throughout the experiment in static cultures, suggesting a decreased reliance upon glucose as a metabolic substrate in the islets cultured in HARVS. In conclusion, the present studies demonstrate alterations in LPS induced TNF-alpha production of pancreatic islets of Langerhans, favoring a lesser TNF production in the microgravity HARV paradigm. Additionally, alterations in fuel homeostasis may be promulgated by HARV culture. The clinical and physiological significance of these observations remains to be determined.

  2. Effects of 7 days of exercise training on insulin sensitivity and responsiveness in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Kirwan, John P; Solomon, Thomas; Wojta, Daniel M

    2009-01-01

    sensitivity and responsiveness and 2) short-term exercise training results in improved suppression of hepatic glucose production by insulin. Fourteen obese patients with type 2 diabetes, age 64 +/- 2 yr, underwent a two-stage hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp procedure, first stage 40 mU.m(-2).min(-1) insulin......The objectives of this study were to determine whether 1) the improvement in insulin action induced by short-term exercise training in patients with type 2 diabetes is due to an improvement in insulin sensitivity, an improvement in insulin responsiveness, or a combination of improved insulin...... infusion, second stage 1,000 mU.m(-2).min(-1) insulin infusion, together with a [3-(3)H]glucose infusion, before and after 7 days of exercise. The training consisted of 30 min of cycling and 30 min of treadmill walking at approximately 70% of maximal aerobic capacity daily for 7 days. The exercise program...

  3. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy in type 1 diabetes ...

    2013-01-14

    Jan 14, 2013 ... Metabolism and Diabetes of South Africa (SEMDSA),. Paediatric and Adolescent ... lifestyle in terms of meal times and physical exercise. It: • Enhances the .... in continuing medical education activity relating to. CSII annually.

  4. Insulin infusion reduces hepatocyte growth factor in lean humans

    de Courten, Barbora; de Courten, Maximilian; Dougherty, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Plasma Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) is significantly elevated in obesity and may contribute to vascular disease, metabolic syndrome or cancer in obese individuals. The current studies were done to determine if hyperinsulinemia increases plasma HGF. MATERIALS/METHODS: Twenty-two parti...

  5. Intensive insulin therapy improves insulin sensitivity and mitochondrial function in severely burned children.

    Fram, Ricki Y; Cree, Melanie G; Wolfe, Robert R; Mlcak, Ronald P; Qian, Ting; Chinkes, David L; Herndon, David N

    2010-06-01

    To institute intensive insulin therapy protocol in an acute pediatric burn unit and study the mechanisms underlying its benefits. Prospective, randomized study. An acute pediatric burn unit in a tertiary teaching hospital. Children, 4-18 yrs old, with total body surface area burned > or =40% and who arrived within 1 wk after injury were enrolled in the study. Patients were randomized to one of two groups. Intensive insulin therapy maintained blood glucose levels between 80 and 110 mg/dL. Conventional insulin therapy maintained blood glucose patients were included in the data analysis consisting of resting energy expenditure, whole body and liver insulin sensitivity, and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function. Studies were performed at 7 days postburn (pretreatment) and at 21 days postburn (posttreatment). Resting energy expenditure significantly increased posttreatment (1476 +/- 124 to 1925 +/- 291 kcal/m(2) x day; p = .02) in conventional insulin therapy as compared with a decline in intensive insulin therapy. Glucose infusion rate was identical between groups before treatment (6.0 +/- 0.8 conventional insulin therapy vs. 6.8 +/- 0.9 mg/kg x min intensive insulin therapy; p = .5). Intensive insulin therapy displayed a significantly higher glucose clamp infusion rate posttreatment (9.1 +/- 1.3 intensive insulin therapy versus 4.8 +/- 0.6 mg/kg x min conventional insulin therapy, p = .005). Suppression of hepatic glucose release was significantly greater in the intensive insulin therapy after treatment compared with conventional insulin therapy (5.0 +/- 0.9 vs. 2.5 +/- 0.6 mg/kg x min; intensive insulin therapy vs. conventional insulin therapy; p = .03). States 3 and 4 mitochondrial oxidation of palmitate significantly improved in intensive insulin therapy (0.9 +/- 0.1 to 1.7 +/- 0.1 microm O(2)/CS/mg protein/min for state 3, p = .004; and 0.7 +/- 0.1 to 1.3 +/- 0.1 microm O(2)/CS/mg protein/min for state 4, p protocol improves insulin sensitivity and mitochondrial

  6. Biospectroscopy for studying the influences of anti-diabetic metals (V, Cr, Mo, and W) to the insulin signaling pathway

    Safitri, Anna; Levina, Aviva; Lee, Joonsup; Carter, Elizabeth A.; Lay, Peter A.

    2017-03-01

    The prevalence of diabetes, particularly with respect to type 2 diabetes, has reached epidemic proportions and continues to grow worldwide. One of the potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of type 2 diabetes involves the role of protein tyrosine phosphatases in the negative regulation of insulin signaling. The complexes of V(V/IV), Cr(III), W(VI), and Mo(VI), have all been proposed as possible drugs in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Anti-diabetic activities of V(V/IV), Cr(III), Mo(VI), and W(VI) compounds are likely to be based on similar mechanisms, which involve phosphorylation/dephosphorylation reactions in the glucose uptake and metabolism. In order to clearly understand biological activities and phosphorylation/dephosphorylation reactions involved in anti-diabetic actions of Cr(III), V(V/IV), Mo(VI), and W(VI) complexes, the current research involves the use of cultured insulin-sensitive cells treated with these compounds. These reactions were investigated through vibrational spectroscopy. Protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation induced conformational changes in secondary protein structure from α-helix to β-sheet, and these changes were detected by the IR spectra, which showed changes in the wavenumber and intensities of signals within the composite protein amide I band.

  7. Comparison of the influence of oral antidiabetic drug and combined with basal insulin treatment on diabetic control and micro-inflammatory state in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    Gang Wu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the influence of oral antidiabetic drug and combined with basal insulin treatment on diabetic control and micro-inflammatory state in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. Methods: From May 2014 to June 2015, 128 cases of Type 2 diabetes mellitus were recruited and divided randomly into two groups as observation group and control group. The observation group was given metformin (Glucophage, 0.25 tid plus basal insulin (glargine treatment, while the control group was given metformin (Glucophage, initial dose of 0.25 tid; the largest total dose of 2 g plus other non-euglycemic OADs necessarily for 6 months to adjust dose and control blood glucose at target. The diabetic control indexes, islet function and micro-inflammatory factors were detected and analyzed. Results: After 6 months of medication, the observation group showed significantly lower level of FPG, and HbA1cthan the control group. While AUCc-p, HOMA-β and HOMA-IR of the observation group showed significant difference compared to that of the control group after treatment. Also the microinflammatory indexes including hs-CRP, IGF-1, IL-6 and TNF-α of the observation group after treatment were significantly lower than the control group . Conclusions: Type 2 diabetes given metformin plus glargine not only could control and steady blood glucose, but also significant decrease the micro-inflammation state.

  8. Plasma amino acids and metabolic profiling of dairy cows in response to a bolus duodenal infusion of leucine.

    Sadri, Hassan; von Soosten, Dirk; Meyer, Ulrich; Kluess, Jeannette; Dänicke, Sven; Saremi, Behnam; Sauerwein, Helga

    2017-01-01

    Leucine (Leu), one of the three branch chain amino acids, acts as a signaling molecule in the regulation of overall amino acid (AA) and protein metabolism. Leucine is also considered to be a potent stimulus for the secretion of insulin from pancreatice β-cells. Our objective was to study the effects of a duodenal bolus infusion of Leu on insulin and glucagon secretion, on plasma AA concentrations, and to do a metabolomic profiling of dairy cows as compared to infusions with either glucose or saline. Six duodenum-fistulated Holstein cows were studied in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square design with 3 periods of 7 days, in which the treatments were applied at the end of each period. The treatments were duodenal bolus infusions of Leu (DIL; 0.15 g/kg body weight), glucose (DIG; at Leu equimolar dosage) or saline (SAL). On the day of infusion, the treatments were duodenally infused after 5 h of fasting. Blood samples were collected at -15, 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 75, 90, 120, 180, 210, 240 and 300 min relative to the start of infusion. Blood plasma was assayed for concentrations of insulin, glucagon, glucose and AA. The metabolome was also characterized in selected plasma samples (i.e. from 0, 50, and 120 min relative to the infusion). Body weight, feed intake, milk yield and milk composition were recorded throughout the experiment. The Leu infusion resulted in significant increases of Leu in plasma reaching 20 and 15-fold greater values than that in DIG and SAL, respectively. The elevation of plasma Leu concentrations after the infusion led to a significant decrease (Pcows were reduced (Pinsulin were not affected by Leu. In DIG, insulin and glucose concentrations peaked at 30-40 and 40-50 min after the infusion, respectively. Insulin concentrations were greater (Pcows were compared with the DIG and SAL cows at 50 and 120 min after the infusion. By using this analysis, several metabolites, mainly acylcarnitines, methionine sulfoxide and components from the

  9. [Mutation in the beta3-adrenergic receptor gene (Trp64Arg) does not influence insulin resistence, energy metabolism, fat distribution and lipid spectrum in young people. Pilot study].

    Bendlová, B; Mazura, I; Vcelák, J; Pelikánová, T; Kunesová, M; Hainer, V; Obenberger, J; Palyzová, D

    1999-05-01

    A missence mutation Trp64Arg in the beta3-adrenergic receptor gene is associated with obesity, insulin resistance, a lower metabolic rate and the earlier onset of NIDDM but the published results are controversial. We investigated the effect of this mutation on insulin resistance (euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp), on fat mass and fat distribution (anthropometry, bioimpedance, CT) and resting metabolic rate (indirect calorimetry), lipid spectrum and other metabolic disturbances in Czech juveniles recruited from juvenile hypertensives (H, n = 68) and controls (C, n = 81). The frequency of this mutation (determined by digestion of 210 bp PCR product with MvaI) was double in H than in C (14.7%, vs. 7.4%) and the carriers of Arg64 allele had sig. higher fasting glucose (H: p = 0.002. C: p = 0.025). Four Trp64/Arg64 and six Trp64/Trp64 men (age 23 +/- 4.2, vs. 22.5 +/- 1.9 y, BMI 26 +/- 5.5, vs. 22.9 +/- 5.1 kg/m2) took part in a detailed pilot study. But no signif. differences (Horn's method) in fasting glucose (4.6 +/- 0.6, vs. 4.9 +/- 0.4 mmol/l), in parameters of insulin resistance (M-value150-180 min. 9.1 +/- 1.1, vs. 8.9 +/- 1.5 mg glucose/kg.min(-1)), resting metabolic rate/lean body mass (RMR/kg LBM: 78.6 +/- 4.6, vs. 85.6 +/- 23.2 kJ/kg), lipid spectrum and other screened parameters were found. The lowest resting metabolic rate (RMR/kg LBM 55.4; 62.6 kJ/kg) was found in brothers (both C, Trp64/Trp64) who highly differ in body constitution (BMI 19.0 resp. 32.4 kg/m2). We suppose that in this case the energy metabolism is probably determined by other genetic loci and does not correlate with body fat mass. Our pilot study does not confirm the influence of Trp64Arg mutation in heterozygous carriers on insulin resistance, energy metabolism and lipid spectrum.

  10. Evaluation of propylene glycol and glycerol infusions as treatments for ketosis in dairy cows.

    Piantoni, P; Allen, M S

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate propylene glycol (PG) and glycerol (G) as potential treatments for ketosis, we conducted 2 experiments lasting 4 d each in which cows received one bolus infusion per day. Blood was collected before infusion, over 240min postinfusion, as well as 24 h postinfusion. Experiment 1 used 6 ruminally cannulated cows (26±7 d in milk) randomly assigned to 300-mL infusions of PG or G (both ≥99.5% pure) in a crossover design experiment with 2 periods. Within each period, cows were assigned randomly to infusion site sequence: abomasum (A)-cranial reticulorumen (R) or the reverse, R-A. Glucose precursors were infused into the R to simulate drenching and the A to prevent metabolism by ruminal microbes. Glycerol infused in the A increased plasma glucose concentration the most (15.8mg/dL), followed by PG infused in the R (12.6mg/dL), PG infused in the A (9.11mg/dL), and G infused in the R (7.3mg/dL). Infusion of PG into the R increased plasma insulin and insulin area under the curve (AUC) the most compared with all other treatments (7.88 vs. 2.13μIU/mL and 321 vs. 31.9min×μIU/mL, respectively). Overall, PG decreased plasma BHBA concentration after infusion (-6.46 vs. -4.55mg/dL) and increased BHBA AUC (-1,055 vs. -558min ×mg/dL) compared with G. Plasma NEFA responses were not different among treatments. Experiment 2 used 8 ruminally cannulated cows (22±5 d in milk) randomly assigned to treatment sequence in a Latin square design experiment balanced for carryover effects. Treatments were 300mL of PG, 300mL of G, 600mL of G (2G), and 300mL of PG + 300mL of G (GPG), all infused into the R. Treatment contrasts compared PG with each treatment containing glycerol (G, 2G, and GPG). Propylene glycol increased plasma glucose (14.0 vs. 5.35mg/dL) and insulin (7.59 vs. 1.11μIU/mL) concentrations compared with G, but only tended to increase glucose and insulin concentrations compared with 2G. Propylene glycol increased AUC for glucose (1,444 vs. 94.3mg/dL) and insulin (326

  11. Neurological toxicity after phenytoin infusion in a pediatric patient with epilepsy: influence of CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and ABCB1 genetic polymorphisms.

    Dorado, P; López-Torres, E; Peñas-Lledó, E M; Martínez-Antón, J; Llerena, A

    2013-08-01

    Pharmacogenetic studies have shown that genetic defects in drug-metabolizing enzymes encoded by CYP2C9, CYP2C19 genes and by the transporter ABCB1 gene can influence phenytoin (PTH) plasma levels and toxicity. The patient reported here is a 2-year-old girl with a medical history of cryptogenic (probably symptomatic) epilepsy, who had her first focal seizure with secondary generalization at 13 months of age. She initially received oral valproate treatment and three months later, she was prescribed an oral oxcarbazepine treatment. At 20 months of age, she was admitted to the Emergency Department because of generalized convulsive Status Epilepticus needing to be immediately treated with rectal diazepam (0.5 mg kg(-1)), intravenous diazepam (0.3 mg kg(-1)), and intravenous phenytoin with an initial-loading dose of 15 mg kg(-1). However, two hours after the initial-loading dose of PTH, the patient developed dizziness, nystagmus, ataxia and excessive sedation. Other potential causes of PTH toxicity were excluded such as drug interactions, decreased albumin or lab error. Therefore, to explain the neurological toxicity, PTH plasma levels and CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and ABCB1 genetic polymorphisms were analyzed. Initial plasma PTH levels were higher than expected (69 mg l(-1); normal range: 10-20 mg l(-1)), and the patient was homozygous for the CYP2C9*2 allele, heterozygous for the CYP2C19*4 allele and homozygous for the 3435C and 1236C ABCB1 alleles. Present findings support the previously established relationship between CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 genetic polymorphisms and the increased risk to develop PTH toxicity owing to high plasma concentrations. Nevertheless, although the association of these genes with PTH-induced adverse effects has been well-documented in adult populations, this is the first report examining the influence of these genetic polymorphisms on PTH plasma levels and toxicity in a pediatric patient.

  12. Studies on insulin receptor, 1

    Sakai, Yukio

    1979-01-01

    The present study was designed for the purpose of establishing a method of insulin radioreceptor assay using plasma membranes of guinea pigs as receptor sites. The results obtained are as follows: 1) Insulin receptor in the renal plasma membranes of guinea pigs showed a significantly high affinity to porcine insulin compared with that in the plasma membranes of guinea pig liver or rat kidney and liver. 2) In the insulin radioreceptor assay, an optimum condition was observed by the incubation at 4 0 C for 24 - 48 hours with 100 μg membrane protein of guinea pig kidney and 0.08 ng of 125 I-insulin. This assay method was specific for insulin and showed an accurate biological activity of insulin. 3) The recovery rate of insulin radioreceptor assay was 98.4% and dilution check up to 16 times did not influence on the result. An average of coefficient variation was 3.92% within assay. All of these results indicated the method to be satisfactory. 4) Glucose induced insulin release by perfusion method in isolated Langerhans islets of rats showed an identical pattern of reaction curves between radioreceptor assay and radioimmunoassay, although the values of radioreceptor assay was slightly low. 5) Insulin free serum produced by ultra filtration method was added to the standard assay medium. By this procedure, direct measurement of human serum by radioreceptor assay became possible. 6) The value of human serum insulin receptor binding activity by the radioreceptor assay showed a high correlation with that of insulin radioimmunoassay in sera of normal, borderline or diabetic type defined by glucose tolerance test. (author)

  13. Dietary Sodium Restriction Decreases Insulin Secretion Without Affecting Insulin Sensitivity in Humans

    Byrne, Loretta M.; Yu, Chang; Wang, Thomas J.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Interruption of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system prevents incident diabetes in high-risk individuals, although the mechanism remains unclear. Objective: To test the hypothesis that activation of the endogenous renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system or exogenous aldosterone impairs insulin secretion in humans. Design: We conducted a randomized, blinded crossover study of aldosterone vs vehicle and compared the effects of a low-sodium versus a high-sodium diet. Setting: Academic clinical research center. Participants: Healthy, nondiabetic, normotensive volunteers. Interventions: Infusion of exogenous aldosterone (0.7 μg/kg/h for 12.5 h) or vehicle during low or high sodium intake. Low sodium (20 mmol/d; n = 12) vs high sodium (160 mmol/d; n = 17) intake for 5–7 days. Main Outcome Measures: Change in acute insulin secretory response assessed during hyperglycemic clamps while in sodium balance during a low-sodium vs high-sodium diet during aldosterone vs vehicle. Results: A low-sodium diet increased endogenous aldosterone and plasma renin activity, and acute glucose-stimulated insulin (−16.0 ± 5.6%; P = .007) and C-peptide responses (−21.8 ± 8.4%; P = .014) were decreased, whereas the insulin sensitivity index was unchanged (−1.0 ± 10.7%; P = .98). Aldosterone infusion did not affect the acute insulin response (+1.8 ± 4.8%; P = .72) or insulin sensitivity index (+2.0 ± 8.8%; P = .78). Systolic blood pressure and serum potassium were similar during low and high sodium intake and during aldosterone infusion. Conclusions: Low dietary sodium intake reduces insulin secretion in humans, independent of insulin sensitivity. PMID:25029426

  14. Toxicological Effects during and following Persistent Insulin-Induced Hypoglycaemia in Healthy Euglycaemic Rats

    Jensen, Vivi F. H.; Molck, Anne-Marie; Berthelsen, Line O.

    2017-01-01

    the effects of persistent IIH and their reversibility in euglycaemic rats. Histopathological changes in insulin-infused animals included partly reversible axonal and reversible myofibre degeneration in peripheral nerve and skeletal muscle tissue, respectively, as well as reversible pancreatic islet atrophy...... and partly reversible increase in unilocular adipocytes in brown adipose tissue. Additionally, results suggested increased gluconeogenesis. The observed hyperphagia, the pancreatic, peripheral nerve and skeletal muscle changes were considered related to the hypoglycaemia. Cessation of insulin infusion...

  15. Effect of tumor necrosis factor-alpha infusion on the incretin effect in healthy volunteers

    Nielsen, Signe Tellerup; Lehrskov-Schmidt, Louise; Krogh-Madsen, Rikke

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with peripheral insulin resistance, impaired incretin effect, and increased plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Whereas TNF-α infusion at a dose that induces systemic inflammation in healthy volunteers has been demonstrated to induce...

  16. Responses to Starch Infusion on Milk Synthesis in Low Yield Lactating Dairy Cows

    Yang Zou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of starch infusion on production, metabolic parameters and relative mRNA abundance was investigated in low yield lactating cows from 86 days in milk. Six Holstein cows fitted with permanent ruminal cannulas were arranged into one of two complete 3×3 Latin squares and infused with a starch solution containing 800 grams starch for 16 days. The three treatments were: i ruminal and abomasal infusion with water (Control; ii ruminal infusion with cornstarch solution and abomasal infusion with water (Rumen; iii ruminal infusion with water and abomasal infusion with cornstarch solution (Abomasum. There were no significant differences (p>0.05 among the three treatments with low yield lactating cows in feed and energy intake, milk yield and composition, plasma metabolism, or even on gene expression. However, cows receiving starch through rumen performed better than directly through the abomasum during the glucose tolerance test procedure with a higher area under the curve (AUC; p = 0.08 and shorter half-time (t1/2; p = 0.11 of plasma insulin, therefore, it increased glucose disposal, which stated a lipid anabolism other than mobilization after energy supplementation. In conclusion, extra starch infusion at concentration of 800 g/d did not enhance energy supplies to the mammary gland and improve the lactating performance in low yield lactating cows.

  17. Relationships of plasma adiponectin level and adiponectin receptors 1 and 2 gene expression to insulin sensitivity and glucose and fat metabolism in monozygotic and dizygotic twins

    Storgaard, Heidi; Poulsen, Pernille; Ling, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    and muscle AdipoR1/R2 gene expression and the impact of these components on in vivo glucose and fat metabolism. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: Plasma adiponectin and muscle gene expression of AdipoR1/R2 were measured before and during insulin infusion in 89 young and 69 elderly monozygotic and dizygotic twins...... influenced by age, sex, abdominal obesity, and aerobic capacity. Intrapair correlations in monozygotic twins indicated a nongenetic influence of birth weight on plasma adiponectin and AdipoR2 expression. Nonoxidative glucose metabolism was associated with AdipoR1 and plasma adiponectin, in young and elderly...

  18. Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Recruits Muscle Microvasculature and Improves Insulin’s Metabolic Action in the Presence of Insulin Resistance

    Chai, Weidong; Zhang, Xingxing; Barrett, Eugene J.

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) acutely recruits muscle microvasculature, increases muscle delivery of insulin, and enhances muscle use of glucose, independent of its effect on insulin secretion. To examine whether GLP-1 modulates muscle microvascular and metabolic insulin responses in the setting of insulin resistance, we assessed muscle microvascular blood volume (MBV), flow velocity, and blood flow in control insulin-sensitive rats and rats made insulin-resistant acutely (systemic lipid infusion) or chronically (high-fat diet [HFD]) before and after a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp (3 mU/kg/min) with or without superimposed systemic GLP-1 infusion. Insulin significantly recruited muscle microvasculature and addition of GLP-1 further expanded muscle MBV and increased insulin-mediated glucose disposal. GLP-1 infusion potently recruited muscle microvasculature in the presence of either acute or chronic insulin resistance by increasing muscle MBV. This was associated with an increased muscle delivery of insulin and muscle interstitial oxygen saturation. Muscle insulin sensitivity was completely restored in the presence of systemic lipid infusion and significantly improved in rats fed an HFD. We conclude that GLP-1 infusion potently expands muscle microvascular surface area and improves insulin’s metabolic action in the insulin-resistant states. This may contribute to improved glycemic control seen in diabetic patients receiving incretin-based therapy. PMID:24658303

  19. A Review of Basal-Bolus Therapy Using Insulin Glargine and Insulin Lispro in the Management of Diabetes Mellitus.

    Candido, Riccardo; Wyne, Kathleen; Romoli, Ester

    2018-04-13

    Basal-bolus therapy (BBT) refers to the combination of a long-acting basal insulin with a rapid-acting insulin at mealtimes. Basal insulin glargine 100 U/mL and prandial insulin lispro have been available for many years and there is a substantial evidence base to support the efficacy and safety of these agents when they are used in BBT or basal-plus therapy for patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, T2DM). With the growing availability of alternative insulins for use in such regimens, it seems timely to review the data regarding BBT with insulin glargine 100 U/mL and insulin lispro. In patients with T1DM, BBT with insulin glargine plus insulin lispro provides similar or better glycemic control and leads to less nocturnal hypoglycemia compared to BBT using human insulin as the basal and/or prandial component, and generally provides similar glycemic control and rates of severe hypoglycemia to those achieved with insulin lispro administered by continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII). Studies evaluating BBT with insulin glargine plus insulin lispro in patients with T2DM also demonstrate the efficacy and safety of these insulins. Available data suggest that BBT with insulin glargine and insulin lispro provides similar levels of efficacy and safety in pediatric and adult populations with T1DM and in adult patients and those aged more than 65 years with T2DM. These insulin preparations also appear to be safe and effective for controlling T2DM in people of different ethnicities and in patients with T1DM or T2DM and comorbidities. Eli Lilly and Company.

  20. Conjoint regulation of glucagon concentrations via plasma insulin and glucose in dairy cows.

    Zarrin, M; Wellnitz, O; Bruckmaier, R M

    2015-04-01

    Insulin and glucagon are glucoregulatory hormones that contribute to glucose homeostasis. Plasma insulin is elevated during normoglycemia or hyperglycemia and acts as a suppressor of glucagon secretion. We have investigated if and how insulin and glucose contribute to the regulation of glucagon secretion through long term (48 h) elevated insulin concentrations during simultaneous hypoglycemia or euglycemia in mid-lactating dairy cows. Nineteen Holstein dairy cows were randomly assigned to 3 treatment groups: an intravenous insulin infusion (HypoG, n = 5) to decrease plasma glucose concentrations (2.5 mmol/L), a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp to study effects of insulin at simultaneously normal glucose concentrations (EuG, n = 6) and a 0.9% saline infusion (NaCl, n = 8). Plasma glucose was measured at 5-min intervals, and insulin and glucose infusion rates were adjusted accordingly. Area under the curve of hourly glucose, insulin, and glucagon concentrations on day 2 of infusion was evaluated by analysis of variance with treatments as fixed effect. Insulin infusion caused an increase of plasma insulin area under the curve (AUC)/h in HypoG (41.9 ± 8.1 mU/L) and EuG (57.8 ± 7.8 mU/L) compared with NaCl (13.9 ± 1.1 mU/L; P insulin infusion induces elevated glucagon concentrations during hypoglycemia, although the same insulin infusion reduces glucagon concentrations at simultaneously normal glucose concentrations. Thus, insulin does not generally have an inhibitory effect on glucagon concentrations. If simultaneously glucose is low and insulin is high, glucagon is upregulated to increase glucose availability. Therefore, insulin and glucose are conjoint regulatory factors of glucagon concentrations in dairy cows, and the plasma glucose status is the key factor to decide if its concentrations are increased or decreased. This regulatory effect can be important for the maintenance of glucose homeostasis if insulin secretion is upregulated by other factors than high

  1. Hyperinsulinism and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS): role of insulin clearance.

    Amato, M C; Vesco, R; Vigneri, E; Ciresi, A; Giordano, C

    2015-12-01

    Insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinism are the predominant metabolic defects in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). However, hyperinsulinism, as well as being compensatory, can also express a condition of reduced insulin clearance. Our aim was to evaluate the differences in insulin action and metabolism between women with PCOS (with normal glucose tolerance) and age- and BMI-matched women with prediabetes (without hyperandrogenism and ovulatory disorders). 22 women with PCOS and 21 age/BMI-matched women with prediabetes were subjected to a Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp and an Oral Glucose tolerance Test (OGTT). Insulin sensitivity was assessed by the glucose infusion rate during clamp (M value); insulin secretion by Insulinogenic index, Oral Disposition Index (DIo) and AUC(2h-insulin) during OGTT; and insulin clearance by the metabolic clearance rate of insulin (MCRI) during clamp. Women with PCOS showed significantly higher levels of AUC(2h-insulin) (p PCOS [420 (IQR 227-588) vs. 743 (IQR 597-888) ml m(-2) min(-1): p PCOS group, a strong independent inverse correlation was only observed between MCRI and AUC(2h-insulin) (PCOS: β:-0.878; p PCOS there is peripheral insulin sensitivity similar to that of women with prediabetes. What sets PCOS apart is the hyperinsulinism, today still simplistically defined "compensatory"; actually this is mainly related to decreased insulin clearance whose specific causes and dynamics have yet to be clarified.

  2. Effects of cortisol and dexamethasone on insulin signalling pathways in skeletal muscle of the ovine fetus during late gestation.

    Juanita K Jellyman

    Full Text Available Before birth, glucocorticoids retard growth, although the extent to which this is mediated by changes in insulin signalling pathways in the skeletal muscle of the fetus is unknown. The current study determined the effects of endogenous and synthetic glucocorticoid exposure on insulin signalling proteins in skeletal muscle of fetal sheep during late gestation. Experimental manipulation of fetal plasma glucocorticoid concentration was achieved by fetal cortisol infusion and maternal dexamethasone treatment. Cortisol infusion significantly increased muscle protein levels of Akt2 and phosphorylated Akt at Ser473, and decreased protein levels of phosphorylated forms of mTOR at Ser2448 and S6K at Thr389. Muscle GLUT4 protein expression was significantly higher in fetuses whose mothers were treated with dexamethasone compared to those treated with saline. There were no significant effects of glucocorticoid exposure on muscle protein abundance of IR-β, IGF-1R, PKCζ, Akt1, calpastatin or muscle glycogen content. The present study demonstrated that components of the insulin signalling pathway in skeletal muscle of the ovine fetus are influenced differentially by naturally occurring and synthetic glucocorticoids. These findings may provide a mechanism by which elevated concentrations of endogenous glucocorticoids retard fetal growth.

  3. Influence of Hypothyroidism on Separate Links of Metabolism, Structure and Function of the Heart in Insulin Resistance

    T.Yu. Yuzvenko

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The article presents research findings of reduced thyroid function impact on the background of insulin resistance on the specific links of metabolism, structure and function of the heart. It is found that in thyroid dysfunction, the main nosological form of myocardial lesion in female patients without concomitant cardiovascular disease is the development of metabolic endocrine cardiomyopathy. Feature of cardiac lesion is the absence of cardiosclerotic, myocardial and ischemic processes in hypothyroidism. Obscure clinical symptoms of the heart both in apparent and subclinical hypothyroidism are detected. Features of clinical, instrumental and laboratory changes in female patients with impaired thyroid function are a trend to systolic blood pressure increase, the absence of significant dyslipidemia, dysglycemia, and cardiocytolysis and hepatocytolysis. Thyroid hormone deficiency is associated with increased myocardial repolarization heterogeneity: subclinical hypothyroidism is accompanied by violation of repolarization processes and the development of electrical heterogeneity of ventricular myocardium, and in the apparent hypothyroidism changes are more linked with the violation of the homogeneity of the electrical impulse to the atria.

  4. Insulin Resistance

    Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech

    Insulin resistance (IR) is escalating with alarming pace and is no longer restricted to westernized countries. As a forerunner for some of the most serious threats to human health including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, and type 2-diabetes, the need for new treatment modalities...... interventions. We further show that improving the inflammatory toning, using fish oil as fat source, protects mice against diet induced obesity and -inflammation while preserving insulin sensitivity, even in the absence of free fatty acid receptor 4. Conversely, HFD-induced intestinal dysbiosis is associated...

  5. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN URIC ACID METABOLISM AND INSULIN RESISTANCE

    辻本, 伸宏; 金内, 雅夫; 尾崎, 博基; 藤田, 泰三; 中嶋, 民夫; 土肥, 和紘

    1998-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between uric acid (UA) metabolism and insulin resistance, serum creatinine concentration (Scr), serum UA concentration (SuA) and the urinary excretion of creatinine and UA were determined in 25 non-diabetic patients. Creatinine clearance (Ccr) and UA clearance/creatinine clearance ratio (CuA/Ccr) were also calculated. Insulin resistance was evaluated by the euglycemic glucose clamp tech- nique and expressed as the mean value of the glucose infusion rate (M-valu...

  6. Influence of adipocyte size and adipose depot on the in vitro lipolytic activity and insulin sensitivity of adipose tissue in dairy cows at the end of the dry period.

    De Koster, J; Van den Broeck, W; Hulpio, L; Claeys, E; Van Eetvelde, M; Hermans, K; Hostens, M; Fievez, V; Opsomer, G

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present research was to describe characteristics of adipose tissue lipolysis in dairy cows with a variable body condition score (BCS). Ten clinically healthy Holstein Friesian cows were selected based on BCS and euthanized 10 to 13 d before the expected parturition date. Immediately after euthanasia, adipose tissue samples were collected from subcutaneous and omental fat depots. In both depots, we observed an increase in adipocyte size with increasing BCS. Using an in vitro explant culture of subcutaneous and omental adipose tissue, we aimed to determine the influence of adipocyte size and localization of adipose depot on the lipolytic activity in basal conditions and after addition of isoproterenol (nonselective β-agonist) and insulin in different concentrations. Glycerol release in the medium was used as a measure for lipolytic activity. We observed that the basal lipolytic activity of subcutaneous and omental adipose tissue increased with adipocyte volume, meaning that larger fat cells have higher basal lipolytic activity independent of the location of the adipose depot. Dose-response curves were created between the concentration of isoproterenol or insulin and the amount of glycerol released. The shape of the dose-response curves is determined by the concentration of isoproterenol and insulin needed to elicit the half-maximal effect and the maximal amount of stimulated glycerol release or the maximal inhibitory effect of insulin. We observed that larger fat cells released more glycerol upon maximal stimulation with isoproterenol and this was more pronounced in subcutaneous adipose tissue. Additionally, larger fat cells had a higher sensitivity toward lipolytic signals. We observed a trend for larger adipocytes to be more resistant to the maximal antilipolytic effect of insulin. The insulin concentration needed to elicit the half-maximal inhibitory effect of insulin was within the physiological range of insulin and was not influenced by adipocyte

  7. Frequency and Circadian Timing of Eating May Influence Biomarkers of Inflammation and Insulin Resistance Associated with Breast Cancer Risk.

    Catherine R Marinac

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that there is interplay between the frequency and circadian timing of eating and metabolic health. We examined the associations of eating frequency and timing with metabolic and inflammatory biomarkers putatively associated with breast cancer risk in women participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination 2009-2010 Survey. Eating frequency and timing variables were calculated from 24-hour food records and included (1 proportion of calories consumed in the evening (5 pm-midnight, (2 number of eating episodes per day, and (3 nighttime fasting duration. Linear regression models examined each eating frequency and timing exposure variable with C-reactive protein (CRP concentrations and the Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR. Each 10 percent increase in the proportion of calories consumed in the evening was associated with a 3 percent increase in CRP. Conversely, eating one additional meal or snack per day was associated with an 8 percent reduction in CRP. There was a significant interaction between proportion of calories consumed in the evening and fasting duration with CRP (p = 0.02. A longer nighttime fasting duration was associated with an 8 percent lower CRP only among women who ate less than 30% of their total daily calories in the evening (p = 0.01. None of the eating frequency and timing variables were significantly associated with HOMA-IR. These findings suggest that eating more frequently, reducing evening energy intake, and fasting for longer nightly intervals may lower systemic inflammation and subsequently reduce breast cancer risk. Randomized trials are needed to validate these associations.

  8. Frequency and Circadian Timing of Eating May Influence Biomarkers of Inflammation and Insulin Resistance Associated with Breast Cancer Risk.

    Marinac, Catherine R; Sears, Dorothy D; Natarajan, Loki; Gallo, Linda C; Breen, Caitlin I; Patterson, Ruth E

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that there is interplay between the frequency and circadian timing of eating and metabolic health. We examined the associations of eating frequency and timing with metabolic and inflammatory biomarkers putatively associated with breast cancer risk in women participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination 2009-2010 Survey. Eating frequency and timing variables were calculated from 24-hour food records and included (1) proportion of calories consumed in the evening (5 pm-midnight), (2) number of eating episodes per day, and (3) nighttime fasting duration. Linear regression models examined each eating frequency and timing exposure variable with C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations and the Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR). Each 10 percent increase in the proportion of calories consumed in the evening was associated with a 3 percent increase in CRP. Conversely, eating one additional meal or snack per day was associated with an 8 percent reduction in CRP. There was a significant interaction between proportion of calories consumed in the evening and fasting duration with CRP (p = 0.02). A longer nighttime fasting duration was associated with an 8 percent lower CRP only among women who ate less than 30% of their total daily calories in the evening (p = 0.01). None of the eating frequency and timing variables were significantly associated with HOMA-IR. These findings suggest that eating more frequently, reducing evening energy intake, and fasting for longer nightly intervals may lower systemic inflammation and subsequently reduce breast cancer risk. Randomized trials are needed to validate these associations.

  9. Metabolic clearance of insulin from the cerebrospinal fluid in the anesthetized rat

    Manin, M.; Broer, Y.; Balage, M.; Rostene, W.; Grizard, J.

    1990-01-01

    Infusion of 125I-(Tyr A14)-insulin at tracer doses into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) resulted in a slow rate of increase in the CSF-labeled insulin during the first 2 hours with a plateau thereafter. Labeled insulin was cleared from the CSF at a higher rate than 3H-inulin, a marker of CSF bulk flow. The labeled insulin was mainly distributed in all the ventricular and periventricular brain regions. Small amounts of degraded insulin appeared in the CSF. Coinfusion with an excess of unlabeled insulin impaired the clearance and degradation of labeled insulin. It also inhibited the labeling in medial hypothalamus, olfactory bulbs and brain stem. In contrast, coinfusion of ribonuclease B (used to test the specificity of uptake) was without any effect. It was concluded that there is an active insulin intake from CSF into brain specific compartments that is presumably essential for the effects of insulin on brain function

  10. Large scale Full QM-MD investigation of small peptides and insulin adsorption on ideal and defective TiO2 (1 0 0) surfaces. Influence of peptide size on interfacial bonds

    Dubot, Pierre; Boisseau, Nicolas; Cenedese, Pierre

    2018-05-01

    Large biomolecule interaction with oxide surface has attracted a lot of attention because it drives behavior of implanted devices in the living body. To investigate the role of TiO2 surface structure on a large polypeptide (insulin) adsorption, we use a homemade mixed Molecular Dynamics-Full large scale Quantum Mechanics code. A specific re-parameterized (Ti) and globally convergent NDDO method fitted on high level ab initio method (coupled cluster CCSD(T) and DFT) allows us to safely describe the electronic structure of the whole insulin-TiO2 surface system (up to 4000 atoms). Looking specifically at carboxylate residues, we demonstrate in this work that specific interfacial bonds are obtained from the insulin/TiO2 system that are not observed in the case of smaller peptides (tripeptides, insulin segment chains with different configurations). We also demonstrate that a large part of the adsorption energy is compensated by insulin conformational energy changes and surface defects enhanced this trend. Large slab dimensions allow us to take into account surface defects that are actually beyond ab initio capabilities owing to size effect. These results highlight the influence of the surface structure on the conformation and therefore of the possible inactivity of an adsorbed polypeptides.

  11. Phenolic excipients of insulin formulations induce cell death, pro-inflammatory signaling and MCP-1 release

    Claudia Weber

    2015-01-01

    Insulin solutions displayed cytotoxic and pro-inflammatory potential caused by phenol or m-cresol. We speculate that during insulin pump therapy phenol and m-cresol might induce cell death and inflammatory reactions at the infusion site in vivo. Inflammation is perpetuated by release of MCP-1 by activated monocytic cells leading to enhanced recruitment of inflammatory cells. To minimize acute skin complications caused by phenol/m-cresol accumulation, a frequent change of infusion sets and rotation of the infusion site is recommended.

  12. Increased interaction with insulin receptor substrate 1, a novel abnormality in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes

    Caruso, Michael; Ma, Danjun; Msallaty, Zaher

    2014-01-01

    Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) is a key mediator of insulin signal transduction. Perturbations involving IRS1 complexes may lead to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Surprisingly little is known about the proteins that interact with IRS1 in humans under health...... in obesity and T2D in humans, provides new insights into the molecular mechanism of insulin resistance and identifies new targets for T2D drug development....... and disease conditions. We used a proteomic approach to assess IRS1 interaction partners in skeletal muscle from lean healthy control subjects (LCs), obese insulin-resistant nondiabetic control subjects (OCs), and participants with T2D before and after insulin infusion. We identified 113 novel endogenous IRS1...

  13. Effect of cortisol infusion patterns and castration on metabolic and immunological indices of stress response in cattle.

    Ting, S T L; Earley, B; Crowe, M A

    2004-05-01

    This study tested the hypotheses that: (1) either acute stress induced by Burdizzo castration, or cortisol infusion would modulate plasma glucose, insulin and growth hormone (GH) concentrations; and (2) immune modulation induced by cortisol would be dependent on the pattern, intensity and duration of circulating cortisol concentrations. Fifty 9.2-month-old Holstein x Friesian bulls (232 +/- 2.0 kg) were blocked by weight and randomly assigned to one of five treatments (n = 10 per treatment): (1) sham handled control; (2) Burdizzo castration; (3) hydrocortisone infusion to mimic the castration-induced secretion pattern of cortisol; (4) hourly pulse infusion of hydrocortisone; and (5) sustained infusion of hydrocortisone for 8h. Blood samples were collected intensively on day 0, and weekly from days 1 to 35. Castration acutely increased plasma cortisol, GH and haptoglobin concentrations, suppressed lymphocyte in vitro interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production, but had no effect on plasma glucose and insulin concentrations. Cortisol infusion to simulate the castration-induced secretion pattern of cortisol, and pulse infusion of cortisol did not suppress the IFN-gamma production. A sustained infusion of cortisol resulted in the transient suppression of IFN-gamma production. Moreover, the sustained cortisol infusion resulted in increased plasma glucose, insulin and GH concentrations. The overall 14-day feed intakes and 35-day growth rates were not affected by treatments. In conclusion, cortisol infusion to induce immune suppression in vivo occurred only at pharmacological doses. Within physiological ranges, cortisol was not associated with the suppression of immune function, indicating that during castration cortisol per se is not responsible for the suppression of in vitro IFN-gamma production.

  14. Vascular effects of intravenous intralipid and dextrose infusions in obese subjects.

    Gosmanov, Aidar R; Smiley, Dawn D; Peng, Limin; Siquiera, Joselita; Robalino, Gonzalo; Newton, Christopher; Umpierrez, Guillermo E

    2012-10-01

    Hyperglycemia and elevated free fatty acids (FFA) are implicated in the development of endothelial dysfunction. Infusion of soy-bean oil-based lipid emulsion (Intralipid®) increases FFA levels and results in elevation of blood pressure (BP) and endothelial dysfunction in obese healthy subjects. The effects of combined hyperglycemia and high FFA on BP, endothelial function and carbohydrate metabolism are not known. Twelve obese healthy subjects received four random, 8-h IV infusions of saline, Intralipid 40 mL/h, Dextrose 10% 40 mL/h, or combined Intralipid and dextrose. Plasma levels of FFA increased by 1.03±0.34 mmol/L (p=0.009) after Intralipid, but FFAs remained unchanged during saline, dextrose, and combined Intralipid and dextrose infusion. Plasma glucose and insulin concentrations significantly increased after dextrose and combined Intralipid and dextrose (all, pdextrose infusion had neutral effects on BP and FMD. The co-administration of lipid and dextrose decreased FMD by 2.4%±2.1% (p=0.002) from baseline, but did not significantly increase systolic or diastolic BP. Short-term Intralipid infusion significantly increased FFA and BP; in contrast, FFA and BP were unchanged during combined infusion of Intralipid and dextrose. Combined Intralipid and dextrose infusion resulted in endothelial dysfunction similar to Intralipid alone. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Glucagon infusion increases rate of purine synthesis de novo in rat liver

    Itakura, Mitsuo; Maeda, Noriaki; Tsuchiya, Masami; Yamashita, Kamejiro

    1987-01-01

    Based on the parallel increases of glucagon, the second peak of hepatic cAMP, and the rate of purine synthesis de novo in the prereplicative period in regenerating rate liver after a 70% hepatectomy, it was hypothesized that glucagon is responsible for the increased rate of purine synthesis de novo. To test this hypothesis, the effect of glucagon or dibutyryl cAMP infusion on the rate of purine synthesis de novo in rat liver was studied. Glucagon infusion but not insulin or glucose infusion increased the rate of purine synthesis de novo, which was assayed by [ 14 C]glycine or [ 14 C]formate incorporation, by 2.7- to 4.3-fold. Glucagon infusion increased cAMP concentrations by 4.9-fold and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate concentrations by 1.5-fold in liver but did not change the specific activity of amidophosphoribosyltransferase or purine ribonucleotide concentrations. Dibutyryl cAMP infusion also increased the rate of purine synthesis de novo by 2.2- to 4.0-fold. Because glucagon infusion increased the rate of purine synthesis de novo in the presence of unchanged purine ribonucleotide concentrations, it is concluded that glucagon after infusion or in animals after a 70% hepatectomy is playing an anabolic role to increase the rate of purine synthesis de novo by increasing cAMP and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate concentrations

  16. Effects of acute exposure to increased plasma branched-chain amino acid concentrations on insulin-mediated plasma glucose turnover in healthy young subjects.

    Everman, Sarah; Mandarino, Lawrence J; Carroll, Chad C; Katsanos, Christos S

    2015-01-01

    Plasma branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are inversely related to insulin sensitivity of glucose metabolism in humans. However, currently, it is not known whether there is a cause-and-effect relationship between increased plasma BCAA concentrations and decreased insulin sensitivity. To determine the effects of acute exposure to increased plasma BCAA concentrations on insulin-mediated plasma glucose turnover in humans. Ten healthy subjects were randomly assigned to an experiment where insulin was infused at 40 mU/m2/min (40U) during the second half of a 6-hour intravenous infusion of a BCAA mixture (i.e., BCAA; N = 5) to stimulate plasma glucose turnover or under the same conditions without BCAA infusion (Control; N = 5). In a separate experiment, seven healthy subjects were randomly assigned to receive insulin infusion at 80 mU/m2/min (80U) in association with the above BCAA infusion (N = 4) or under the same conditions without BCAA infusion (N = 3). Plasma glucose turnover was measured prior to and during insulin infusion. Insulin infusion completely suppressed the endogenous glucose production (EGP) across all groups. The percent suppression of EGP was not different between Control and BCAA in either the 40U or 80U experiments (P > 0.05). Insulin infusion stimulated whole-body glucose disposal rate (GDR) across all groups. However, the increase (%) in GDR was not different [median (1st quartile - 3rd quartile)] between Control and BCAA in either the 40U ([199 (167-278) vs. 186 (94-308)] or 80 U ([491 (414-548) vs. 478 (409-857)] experiments (P > 0.05). Likewise, insulin stimulated the glucose metabolic clearance in all experiments (P BCAA in either of the experiments (P > 0.05). Short-term exposure of young healthy subjects to increased plasma BCAA concentrations does not alter the insulin sensitivity of glucose metabolism.

  17. Effects of acute exposure to increased plasma branched-chain amino acid concentrations on insulin-mediated plasma glucose turnover in healthy young subjects.

    Sarah Everman

    Full Text Available Plasma branched-chain amino acids (BCAA are inversely related to insulin sensitivity of glucose metabolism in humans. However, currently, it is not known whether there is a cause-and-effect relationship between increased plasma BCAA concentrations and decreased insulin sensitivity.To determine the effects of acute exposure to increased plasma BCAA concentrations on insulin-mediated plasma glucose turnover in humans.Ten healthy subjects were randomly assigned to an experiment where insulin was infused at 40 mU/m2/min (40U during the second half of a 6-hour intravenous infusion of a BCAA mixture (i.e., BCAA; N = 5 to stimulate plasma glucose turnover or under the same conditions without BCAA infusion (Control; N = 5. In a separate experiment, seven healthy subjects were randomly assigned to receive insulin infusion at 80 mU/m2/min (80U in association with the above BCAA infusion (N = 4 or under the same conditions without BCAA infusion (N = 3. Plasma glucose turnover was measured prior to and during insulin infusion.Insulin infusion completely suppressed the endogenous glucose production (EGP across all groups. The percent suppression of EGP was not different between Control and BCAA in either the 40U or 80U experiments (P > 0.05. Insulin infusion stimulated whole-body glucose disposal rate (GDR across all groups. However, the increase (% in GDR was not different [median (1st quartile - 3rd quartile] between Control and BCAA in either the 40U ([199 (167-278 vs. 186 (94-308] or 80 U ([491 (414-548 vs. 478 (409-857] experiments (P > 0.05. Likewise, insulin stimulated the glucose metabolic clearance in all experiments (P 0.05.Short-term exposure of young healthy subjects to increased plasma BCAA concentrations does not alter the insulin sensitivity of glucose metabolism.

  18. Studies on insulin receptor, 2

    Sakai, Yukio

    1979-01-01

    The present study is to investigate an influence of starvation and high fat diet on insulin receptor of the plasma membrane by means of radioreceptor assay using 125 I-labelled insulin. Male guinea pigs of Hartley strain were employed for the starvation study, and 125 I-insulin binding capacity on the plasma membrane of the liver and kidney was determined at 24, 48 and 72 hours of the fast after the last meal. Male rats of Wistar strain were employed for the high fat study where the diet containing 35% of butter was fed ad libitum for 38 or 68 days. The animals were killed at the fast of 12 hours, and 125 I-insulin binding capacity on the plasma membrane of the liver was determined. The results obtained are summarized as follows: 1) An increase in 125 I-insulin binding capacity on the plasma membrane of the liver and kidney was observed by the starvation for 24 to 72 hours. 2) The mechanism of the increase by starvation was considered to be different by the organs; it was due to an increase in number of insulin receptor in the liver, and due to an increase in affinity of insulin receptor in the kidney. 3) In non-obese rats fed with high fat diet, the number of insulin receptor on the liver plasma membrane showed a decrease, and this observation clearly indicated that the decrease in number of the receptor did not depend on the obesity. 4) Obese rats also fed with high fat diet presented a decrease in number of insulin receptor without an elevation of insulin levels in the circulating blood. This indicated that at least in the obese rats fed with high fat diet, the decrease in number of the receptor was not due to hyperinsulinemia. (author)

  19. Polyethyleneglycol RIA (radioimmunoassay) insulin

    1988-01-01

    Insulin is a polypeptide hormone of M.W. 6,000 composed of two peptide chains, A and B, jointed by two cross-linked disulphide bonds and synthesized by the beta-cells of the islets of Langerhans of the pancreas. Insulin influences most of the metabolic functions of the body. Its best known action is to lower the blood glucose concentration by increasing the rate at which glucose is converted to glycogen in the liver and muscles and to fat in adipose tissue, by stimulating the rate of glucose metabolism and by depressing gluconeogenesis. Insulin stimulates the synthesis of proteins, DNA and RNA in cells generally, and promotes the uptake of aminoacids and their incorporation into muscle protein. It increases the uptake of glucose in adipose tissue and its conversion into fat and inhibits lipolysis. Insulin primary action is on the cell membrane, where it probably facilitates the transport of glucose and aminoacids into the cells. At the same time it may activate intracellular enzymes such as glycogen synthetase, concerned with glycogen synthesis. (Author) [es

  20. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation does not influence basal glucose metabolism or insulin sensitivity in patients with Parkinson's disease

    Lammers, Nicolette M.; Sondermeijer, Brigitte M.; Twickler, Th B. Marcel; de Bie, Rob M.; Ackermans, Mariëtte T.; Fliers, Eric; Schuurman, P. Richard; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Serlie, Mireille J.

    2014-01-01

    Animal studies have shown that central dopamine signaling influences glucose metabolism. As a first step to show this association in an experimental setting in humans, we studied whether deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), which modulates the basal ganglia circuitry,

  1. UK service level audit of insulin pump therapy in paediatrics.

    Ghatak, A; Paul, P; Hawcutt, D B; White, H D; Furlong, N J; Saunders, S; Morrison, G; Langridge, P; Weston, P J

    2015-12-01

    To conduct an audit of insulin pump therapy in the UK after the issue of guidelines for the use of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion by NICE in 2008 (Technology Appraisal 151). All centres in the UK, providing pump services to children and young people were invited to participate in an online audit. Audit metrics were aligned to NICE Technology Appraisal 151 and an electronic data collection tool was used. Of the 176 UK centres identified as providing pump services, 166 (94.3%) participated in the study. A total of 5094 children and young people were identified as using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (19% of all paediatric patients with Type 1 diabetes), with a median (range) of 16.9 (0.67-69.4)% per centre. Units had a median of 0.58 consultant sessions, 0.43 full-time equivalent diabetic specialist nurses, and 0.1 full-time equivalent dieticians delivering the pump service. The majority of this time was not formally funded. Families could access 24-h clinical and technical support (83% units), although the delivery varied between consultant, diabetic specialist nurse and company representatives. Only 53% of units ran, or accessed, structured education programmes for continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion use. Most units (86%) allowed continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion use for paediatric inpatients, but only 56% had written guidelines for this scenario. Nine percent of units had encountered funding refusal for a patient fulfilling NICE (Technology Appraisal 151) criteria. The number of children and young people on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy is consistent with numbers estimated by NICE. There is a worrying lack of funded healthcare professional time. The audit also identified gaps in the provision of structured education and absence of written inpatient guidelines. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  2. Proximity to Delivery Alters Insulin Sensitivity and Glucose Metabolism in Pregnant Mice.

    Musial, Barbara; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S; Vaughan, Owen R; Ozanne, Susan E; Voshol, Peter; Sferruzzi-Perri, Amanda N; Fowden, Abigail L

    2016-04-01

    In late pregnancy, maternal insulin resistance occurs to support fetal growth, but little is known about insulin-glucose dynamics close to delivery. This study measured insulin sensitivity in mice in late pregnancy at day 16 (D16) and near term at D19. Nonpregnant (NP) and pregnant mice were assessed for metabolite and hormone concentrations, body composition by DEXA, tissue insulin signaling protein abundance by Western blotting, glucose tolerance and utilization, and insulin sensitivity using acute insulin administration and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps with [(3)H]glucose infusion. Whole-body insulin resistance occurred in D16 pregnant dams in association with basal hyperinsulinemia, insulin-resistant endogenous glucose production, and downregulation of several proteins in hepatic and skeletal muscle insulin signaling pathways relative to NP and D19 values. Insulin resistance was less pronounced at D19, with restoration of NP insulin concentrations, improved hepatic insulin sensitivity, and increased abundance of hepatic insulin signaling proteins. At D16, insulin resistance at whole-body, tissue, and molecular levels will favor fetal glucose acquisition, while improved D19 hepatic insulin sensitivity will conserve glucose for maternal use in anticipation of lactation. Tissue sensitivity to insulin, therefore, alters differentially with proximity to delivery in pregnant mice, with implications for human and other species. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  3. Anti-insulin antibody test

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... Normally, there are no antibodies against insulin in your blood. ... different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or ...

  4. Sodium retention and insulin treatment in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    Nørgaard, K; Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    1994-01-01

    subcutaneously, contributes to the increased ENa. Three studies were performed. Study 1 was a cross-sectional study comprising 28 type 1 diabetic men (aged 18-35 years) with short-duration diabetes (diabetic complications, and 22 control subjects. Study 2 was a prospective study of 17...... subcutaneous insulin infusion for improvement of glycaemic control or to remain on conventional insulin treatment. In study 1, ENa was higher in short-duration type 1 diabetic men than in controls (3003 +/- 325 vs 2849 +/- 207 mEq/1.73 m2, P ...The hypothesis that total body exchangeable sodium (ENa) is elevated in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with short-duration diabetes and no signs of microangiopathy was tested. Also tested was whether peripheral hyperinsulinaemia, in terms of the amounts of insulin injected...

  5. Continuous infusion versus daily injections of growth hormone (GH) for 4 weeks in GH-deficient patients

    Laursen, Torben; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde; Jakobsen, Grethe

    1995-01-01

    effects with constant and pulsatile GH delivery. This study was carried out to compare the metabolic effects of longer term continuous infusion vs. daily injections of GH. Thirteen GH-deficient patients were studied in a cross-over design. The patients were randomized to receive GH as a continuous sc...... infusion by means of a portable pump for 1 month and as daily sc injections (at 1900 h) for another month. An average daily GH dosage (+/- SEM) of 3.15 +/- 0.27 IU was administered during both periods. Steady state 24-h profiles of GH, IGF-I, IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs), insulin, glucose, lipid.......35 (infusion); P infusion induced higher nighttime than daytime GH levels (P = 0.01), indicating a diurnal variation in the absorption or clearance of GH. Serum IGF-I levels (micrograms per L) were slightly higher (P infusion [312...

  6. intravenous infusion of chlorimipramine (anafranil)

    the already extensive outpatient facilities at Johannesburg. Hospital as well as the Tara Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital for long-term therapy. Technique of Chlorimipramine Infusion. Initially 1 ampoule of chlorimipramine 25 mg in 250 mg of 5°~ dextrose saline was administered intravenously at the rate of 60 drops per minute.

  7. Infusion of radionuclides throughout pregnancy

    Mountford-Lister, P.G.; Lambert, B.E.; Milner, A.C.; Kang, X.Z.

    1992-01-01

    This work is part of a long-term study to examine the cancer incidence in the offspring of mice exposed to 239 Pu or 147 Pm throughout pregnancy. The need to model the human intake scenario and the possibility of a critical period during uterine development necessitates constant availability of radionuclides throughout pregnancy. Various methods (multiple daily injections, infusion by external cannula and infusion by indwelling osmotic pump) have been examined and osmotic infusion pumps chosen. These pumps result in a near-constant blood concentration for up to 21 days. Part of the study is the estimation of dose to the critical haemopoietic tissues of the pup from a knowledge of the radionuclide distribution and kinetics. At present the distribution has been followed from birth to 180 days. Activity in the suckling pups at 7 days old is around 1 percent of the infused activity, though most of this is accounted for by the contents of the stomach and gastrointestinal tract. The liver and femur account for around 0.025 percent and 0.012 percent respectively per pup. Activity increases in both liver and femur during lactation after which both concentration and activity fall with time. Long-term studies with the pups of dams exposed to a range of 239 Pu concentrations between 0-70 kBq/kg are underway. Correlation of average organ dose with tumour incidence will be determined at completion of the life-span study. (Author) 39 refs., 5 tabs., 6 figs

  8. Improved vascularization of planar membrane diffusion devices following continuous infusion of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    Trivedi, N; Steil, G M; Colton, C K; Bonner-Weir, S; Weir, G C

    2000-01-01

    Improving blood vessel formation around an immunobarrier device should improve the survival of the encapsulated tissue. In the present study we investigated the formation of new blood vessels around a planar membrane diffusion device (the Baxter Theracyte System) undergoing a continuous infusion of vascular endothelial growth factor through the membranes and into the surrounding tissue. Each device (20 microl) had both an inner immunoisolation membrane and an outer vascularizing membrane. Human recombinant vascular endothelial growth factor-165 was infused at 100 ng/day (low dose: n = 6) and 500 ng/day (high dose: n = 7) for 10 days into devices implanted s.c. in Sprague-Dawley rats; noninfused devices transplanted for an identical period were used as controls (n = 5). Two days following the termination of VEGF infusion, devices were loaded with 20 microl of Lispro insulin (1 U/kg) and the kinetics of insulin release from the lumen of the device was assessed. Devices were then explanted and the number of blood vessels (capillary and noncapillary) was quantified using morphometry. High-dose vascular endothelial growth factor infusion resulted in two- to threefold more blood vessels around the device than that obtained with the noninfused devices and devices infused with low-dose vascular endothelial growth factor. This increase in the number of blood vessels was accompanied by a modest increase in insulin diffusion from the device in the high-dose vascular endothelial growth factor infusion group. We conclude that vascular endothelial growth factor can be used to improve blood vessel formation adjacent to planar membrane diffusion devices.

  9. Central insulin and macronutrient intake in the rat

    Chavez, M; Riedy, CA; VanDijk, G; Woods, SC; Riedy, Christine A.; Woods, Stephen C.

    1997-01-01

    When rats are maintained on a standard laboratory diet, the infusion of low doses of insulin into the cerebroventricular system causes a reduction of food intake and body weight. It was recently reported that, if rats are maintained on a high-fat diet (56% calories as fat), they are insensitive to

  10. A retrospective analysis of blood gases with two different insulin ...

    A retrospective analysis of blood gases with two different insulin infusion protocols in patients undergoing cardiovascular surgery. ... In this study, we aimed to look into the effect of glycemic control on arterial blood gas parameters, serum electrolytes, and hemoglobin (Hb). Materials and Methods: We collected data from ...

  11. Attenuation of insulin-evoked responses in brain networks controlling appetite and reward in insulin resistance: the cerebral basis for impaired control of food intake in metabolic syndrome?

    Anthony, Karen; Reed, Laurence J; Dunn, Joel T; Bingham, Emma; Hopkins, David; Marsden, Paul K; Amiel, Stephanie A

    2006-11-01

    The rising prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes is a global challenge. A possible mechanism linking insulin resistance and weight gain would be attenuation of insulin-evoked responses in brain areas relevant to eating in systemic insulin resistance. We measured brain glucose metabolism, using [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, in seven insulin-sensitive (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR] = 1.3) and seven insulin-resistant (HOMA-IR = 6.3) men, during suppression of endogenous insulin by somatostatin, with and without an insulin infusion that elevated insulin to 24.6 +/- 5.2 and 23.2 +/- 5.8 mU/l (P = 0.76), concentrations similar to fasting levels of the resistant subjects and approximately threefold above those of the insulin-sensitive subjects. Insulin-evoked change in global cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was reduced in insulin resistance (+7 vs. +17.4%, P = 0.033). Insulin was associated with increased metabolism in ventral striatum and prefrontal cortex and with decreased metabolism in right amygdala/hippocampus and cerebellar vermis (P reward. Diminishing the link be-tween control of food intake and energy balance may contribute to development of obesity in insulin resistance.

  12. Effects of intraperitoneal insulin versus subcutaneous insulin administration on sex hormone-binding globulin concentrations in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    M Boering

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims Elevated sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG concentrations have been described in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, probably due to low portal insulin concentrations. We aimed to investigate whether the route of insulin administration, continuous intraperitoneal insulin infusion (CIPII, or subcutaneous (SC, influences SHBG concentrations among T1DM patients. Methods Post hoc analysis of SHBG in samples derived from a randomized, open-labeled crossover trial was carried out in 20 T1DM patients: 50% males, mean age 43 (±13 years, diabetes duration 23 (±11 years, and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c 8.7 (±1.1 (72 (±12 mmol/mol. As secondary outcomes, testosterone, 17-β-estradiol, luteinizing hormone (LH, and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH were analyzed. Results Estimated mean change in SHBG was −10.3nmol/L (95% CI: −17.4, −3.2 during CIPII and 3.7nmol/L (95% CI: −12.0, 4.6 during SC insulin treatment. Taking the effect of treatment order into account, the difference in SHBG between therapies was −6.6nmol/L (95% CI: −17.5, 4.3; −12.7nmol/L (95% CI: −25.1, −0.4 for males and −1.7nmol/L (95% CI: −24.6, 21.1 for females, respectively. Among males, SHBG and testosterone concentrations changed significantly during CIPII; −15.8nmol/L (95% CI: −24.2, −7.5 and −8.3nmol/L (95% CI: −14.4, −2.2, respectively. The difference between CIPII and SC insulin treatment was also significant for change in FSH 1.2U/L (95% CI: 0.1, 2.2 among males. Conclusions SHBG concentrations decreased significantly during CIPII treatment. Moreover, the difference in change between CIPII and SC insulin therapy was significant for SHBG and FSH among males. These findings support the hypothesis that portal insulin administration influences circulating SHBG and sex steroids.

  13. Combining insulins for optimal blood glucose control in type 1 and 2 diabetes: focus on insulin glulisine

    Heather Ulrich

    2007-07-01

    lispro or RHI in type 1 or 2 DM and it has been shown to be as safe and effective when used in a continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII. In summary, insulin glulisine is a safe, effective, and well tolerated rapid-acting insulin analogue across all BMIs and a worthy option for prandial glucose control in type 1 or 2 DM.Keywords: glycemic control, glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, rapid-acting insulin analogues, type 1 diabetes mellitus, type 2 diabetes mellitus, insulin glulisine, body mass index (BMI

  14. Daily insulin requirement of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes: effect of age, gender, body mass index and mode of therapy.

    Wiegand, Susanna; Raile, Klemens; Reinehr, Thomas; Hofer, Sabine; Näke, Andrea; Rabl, Wolfgang; Holl, Reinhard W

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to generate insulin dose (ID) percentiles for children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) having the opportunity to assess this important parameter in relation to age and sex. Daily IDs per weight (ID/kg) were recorded in 22,177 patients with DM1 (3-25 years of age, DM1 duration of more than 2 years, 48% female) and ID percentiles (ID-Perc) were created statistically. The ID-Perc were compared between male and female, and between multiple insulin injection therapy (MIT) and continuous s.c. insulin infusion (CSII). A multivariate regression analysis was performed for ID in the third year of DM1 with ID/kg, body weight, age, gender, and insulin delivery regimen as variables. The 50th ID-Perc (P50) varied among 0.67 IU/kg (age 3 years), 0.93 IU/kg (13 years), and 0.70 IU/kg (23 years) increasing from early childhood to adolescence and decreasing toward adulthood. Highest P50 ID was found at 12 years in females (0.94 IU/kg) and at 14 years in males (0.92 IU/kg). Using ICT, the ID was significantly higher compared with CSII (P50: 0.94 IU/kg versus 0.79 IU/kg at 13 years). In multivariate regression analysis, ID was significantly (P>0.001) associated with age, gender, and insulin delivery regime. The ID-Perc were significantly different during various periods of childhood and were influenced by gender, body weight, and insulin injection regimes. Therefore, the presented data 1) provide evidence to interpret individual ID in children and adolescents with DM1 and 2) more specifically identify children with unusually high (insulin resistance and non-compliance) or low (MODY and persistent remission) insulin requirement.

  15. Evaluation of current trends and recent development in insulin therapy for management of diabetes mellitus.

    Nawaz, Muhammad Sarfraz; Shah, Kifayat Ullah; Khan, Tahir Mehmood; Rehman, Asim Ur; Rashid, Haroon Ur; Mahmood, Sajid; Khan, Shahzeb; Farrukh, Muhammad Junaid

    2017-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major health problem in developing countries. There are various insulin therapies to manage diabetes mellitus. This systematic review evaluates various insulin therapies for management of diabetes mellitus worldwide. This review also focuses on recent developments being explored for better management of diabetes mellitus. We reviewed a number of published articles from 2002 to 2016 to find out the appropriate management of diabetes mellitus. The paramount parameters of the selected studies include the insulin type & its dose, type of diabetes, duration and comparison of different insulin protocols. In addition, various newly developed approaches for insulin delivery with potential output have also been evaluated. A great variability was observed in managing diabetes mellitus through insulin therapy and the important controlling factors found for this therapy include; dose titration, duration of insulin use, type of insulin used and combination therapy of different insulin. A range of research articles on current trends and recent advances in insulin has been summarized, which led us to the conclusion that multiple daily insulin injections or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (insulin pump) is the best method to manage diabetes mellitus. In future perspectives, development of the oral and inhalant insulin would be a tremendous breakthrough in Insulin therapy. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. MONITORING TETESAN INFUS BERBASIS MIKROKONTROLER ATMEGA16

    Ardiyanto Iqbal Nugroho

    2015-09-01

    Penelitian ini menghasilkan suatu alat monitoring tetesan infus yang dapat memberikan informasi mengenai laju kecepatan tetesan dan kondisi cairan pada infus. Sistem yang secara realtime dimonitoring oleh perawat ini dapat mengurangi permasalahan yang timbul karena kelalaian petugas. Sehingga perawat tidak secara manual dalam mengatur kecepatan tetesan infus dan meningkatkan pelayanan kepada pasien.

  17. 21 CFR 880.5725 - Infusion pump.

    2010-04-01

    ... Infusion pump. (a) Identification. An infusion pump is a device used in a health care facility to pump fluids into a patient in a controlled manner. The device may use a piston pump, a roller pump, or a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Infusion pump. 880.5725 Section 880.5725 Food and...

  18. Full-length huntingtin levels modulate body weight by influencing insulin-like growth factor 1 expression

    Pouladi, Mahmoud A; Xie, Yuanyun; Skotte, Niels Henning

    2010-01-01

    of the IGF-1 pathway in mediating the effect of htt on body weight. IGF-1 expression was examined in transgenic mouse lines expressing different levels of FL wild-type (WT) htt (YAC18 mice), FL mutant htt (YAC128 and BACHD mice) and truncated mutant htt (shortstop mice). We demonstrate that htt influences...... body weight by modulating the IGF-1 pathway. Plasma IGF-1 levels correlate with body weight and htt levels in the transgenic YAC mice expressing human htt. The effect of htt on IGF-1 expression is independent of CAG size. No effect on body weight is observed in transgenic YAC mice expressing...... and decreases the body weight of YAC128 animals to WT levels. Furthermore, given the ubiquitous expression of IGF-1 within the central nervous system, we also examined the impact of FL htt levels on IGF-1 expression in different regions of the brain, including the striatum, cerebellum of YAC18, YAC128...

  19. Composition of antioxidants and amino acids in Stevia leaf infusions.

    Periche, Angela; Koutsidis, Georgios; Escriche, Isabel

    2014-03-01

    Stevia, a non-caloric natural sweetener with beneficial properties and considerable antioxidants and amino acids, is increasingly consumed as an infusion. This work evaluates the influence of the conditions (temperature: 50, 70 or 90 °C and time: 1, 5, 20 or 40 min) applied to obtain Stevia infusions, on antioxidants (total phenols, flavonoids and antioxidant activity) and amino acids. The total concentration of the eleven amino acids found was 11.70 mg/g in dried leaves and from 6.84 to 9.11 mg/g per gram of Stevia in infusions. However, infusions showed higher levels of certain amino acids (alanine, asparagine, leucine and proline), and greater values of the three antioxidant parameters in comparison with dry leaves. Temperature had more influence (minimum values at 50 °C and maximum at 90 °C) than time in the case of antioxidants. At 90 °C there were no important increases in the extraction of antioxidant compounds after 5 min; each gram of Stevia had 117 mg trolox (total antioxidant activity), 90 mg gallic acid (total phenols) and 56 mg catechin equivalents (flavonoids). Varying the temperature and time conditions no notable differences were observed in the concentrations of the majority of amino acids. However, the infusion treatment at 90 °C for 5 min was the best, as it gave the highest yield of 8 of the 11 amino acids. Therefore, with respect to the compounds analyzed in this study, the best way to obtain Stevia leaf infusions is the same as the domestic process, almost boiling water for a short time.

  20. Insulin increase in MAP kinase phosphorylation is shifted to early time-points by overexpressing APS, while Akt phosphorylation is not influenced.

    Onnockx, Sheela; Xie, Jingwei; Degraef, Chantal; Erneux, Christophe; Pirson, Isabelle

    2009-09-10

    Upon insulin stimulation, the adaptor protein APS is recruited to the insulin receptor and tyrosine phosphorylated. APS initiates the insulin-induced TC10 cascade which participates to GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism that governs APS and its SH2 and PH domains action on the insulin transduction cascade is not yet fully understood. Here, we show that APS co-immunoprecipitates with the class I PI 3-kinase regulatory subunit p85, through its SH2 domain but that APS does not modulate neither PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 levels nor Akt phosphorylation provoked by insulin. We have confirmed a previously described positive effect of APS overexpression on insulin-induced MAPK phosphorylation upregulation. Consequently, we analyzed the role of SH2 and PH domains of APS in the APS increased MAPK phosphorylation observed upon insulin stimulation and correlated this with the membrane localization of the protein. The effect observed on MAPK phosphorylation requires the intact PH binding domain of APS as well as its SH2 domain.

  1. Intranasal administration of insulin to the brain impacts cognitive function and peripheral metabolism.

    Ott, V; Benedict, C; Schultes, B; Born, J; Hallschmid, M

    2012-03-01

    In recent years, the central nervous system (CNS) has emerged as a principal site of insulin action. This notion is supported by studies in animals relying on intracerebroventricular insulin infusion and by experiments in humans that make use of the intranasal pathway of insulin administration to the brain. Employing neurobehavioural and metabolic measurements as well as functional imaging techniques, these studies have provided insight into a broad range of central and peripheral effects of brain insulin. The present review focuses on CNS effects of insulin administered via the intranasal route on cognition, in particular memory function, and whole-body energy homeostasis including glucose metabolism. Furthermore, evidence is reviewed that suggests a pathophysiological role of impaired brain insulin signaling in obesity and type 2 diabetes, which are hallmarked by peripheral and possibly central nervous insulin resistance, as well as in conditions such as Alzheimer's disease where CNS insulin resistance might contribute to cognitive dysfunction. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Insulin responsiveness of protein metabolism in vivo following bedrest in humans

    Shangraw, R.E.; Stuart, C.A.; Prince, M.J.; Peters, E.J.; Wolfe, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    To test the influence of bedrest on insulin regulation of leucine metabolism, six normal young men were subjected to a five-step hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp before and after 7 days of strict bedrest. A primed-constant infusion of [1- 13 C]leucine was used. Before bedrest, the basal rate of appearance (R a ) of intracellular leucine and leucine oxidation were 2.79±0.17 and 0.613±0.070 μmol·kg -1 ·min -1 , respectively. Insulin caused a dose-dependent reduction of the intracellular leucine R a and leucine oxidation to a minimum of 1.64±0.08 and 0.322±0.039 μmol·kg -1 ·min -1 , respectively, in nonbedrested subjects. Insulin also caused a dose-dependent reduction of plasma leucine concentration. After bedrest, subjects exhibited decreased glucose tolerance and increased endogenous insulin secretion, but basal and insulin-suppressed intracellular leucine R a and leucine oxidation rates were not different from control. Magnetic resonance imaging of the back and lower extremities revealed a 1-4% decrease in muscle volume and a 2-5% increase in fat volume secondary to bedrest. Bedrest also resulted in a negative nitrogen balance as compared with the control period. Thus because negative nitrogen balance and skeletal muscle atrophy occurred in six rested subjects in the absence of changes in the two indices of protein breakdown used in this study, it seems likely that muscle protein synthesis was inhibited

  3. TCPTP Regulates Insulin Signalling in AgRP Neurons to Coordinate Glucose Metabolism with Feeding.

    Dodd, Garron T; Lee-Young, Robert S; Brüning, Jens C; Tiganis, Tony

    2018-04-30

    Insulin regulates glucose metabolism by eliciting effects on peripheral tissues as well as the brain. Insulin receptor (IR) signalling inhibits AgRP-expressing neurons in the hypothalamus to contribute to the suppression of hepatic glucose production (HGP) by insulin, whereas AgRP neuronal activation attenuates brown adipose tissue (BAT) glucose uptake. The tyrosine phosphatase TCPTP suppresses IR signalling in AgRP neurons. Hypothalamic TCPTP is induced by fasting and degraded after feeding. Here we assessed the influence of TCPTP in AgRP neurons in the control of glucose metabolism. TCPTP deletion in AgRP neurons ( Agrp -Cre; Ptpn2 fl/fl ) enhanced insulin sensitivity as assessed by the increased glucose infusion rates and reduced HGP during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps, accompanied by increased [ 14 C]-2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake in BAT and browned white adipose tissue. TCPTP deficiency in AgRP neurons promoted the intracerebroventricular insulin-induced repression of hepatic gluconeogenesis in otherwise unresponsive food-restricted mice yet had no effect in fed/satiated mice where hypothalamic TCPTP levels are reduced. The improvement in glucose homeostasis in Agrp -Cre; Ptpn2 fl/fl mice was corrected by IR heterozygosity ( Agrp -Cre; Ptpn2 fl/fl ; Insr fl/+ ), causally linking the effects on glucose metabolism with the IR signalling in AgRP neurons. Our findings demonstrate that TCPTP controls IR signalling in AgRP neurons to coordinate HGP and brown/beige adipocyte glucose uptake in response to feeding/fasting. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  4. Brain insulin controls adipose tissue lipolysis and lipogenesis

    Scherer, Thomas; O’Hare, James; Diggs-Andrews, Kelly; Schweiger, Martina; Cheng, Bob; Lindtner, Claudia; Zielinski, Elizabeth; Vempati, Prashant; Su, Kai; Dighe, Shveta; Milsom, Thomas; Puchowicz, Michelle; Scheja, Ludger; Zechner, Rudolf; Fisher, Simon J.; Previs, Stephen F.; Buettner, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY White adipose tissue (WAT) dysfunction plays a key role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (DM2). Unrestrained WAT lipolysis results in increased fatty acid release leading to insulin resistance and lipotoxicity, while impaired de novo lipogenesis in WAT decreases the synthesis of insulin sensitizing fatty acid species like palmitoleate. Here we show that insulin infused into the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) of Sprague Dawley rats increases WAT lipogenic protein expression, and inactivates hormone sensitive lipase (Hsl) and suppresses lipolysis. Conversely, mice that lack the neuronal insulin receptor exhibit unrestrained lipolysis and decreased de novo lipogenesis in WAT. Thus, brain and in particular hypothalamic insulin action play a pivotal role in WAT functionality. PMID:21284985

  5. Stimulatory effect of insulin on glucose uptake by muscle involves the central nervous system in insulin-sensitive mice.

    Coomans, Claudia P; Biermasz, Nienke R; Geerling, Janine J; Guigas, Bruno; Rensen, Patrick C N; Havekes, Louis M; Romijn, Johannes A

    2011-12-01

    Insulin inhibits endogenous glucose production (EGP) and stimulates glucose uptake in peripheral tissues. Hypothalamic insulin signaling is required for the inhibitory effects of insulin on EGP. We examined the contribution of central insulin signaling on circulating insulin-stimulated tissue-specific glucose uptake. Tolbutamide, an inhibitor of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels (K(ATP) channels), or vehicle was infused into the lateral ventricle in the basal state and during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic conditions in postabsorptive, chow-fed C57Bl/6J mice and in postabsorptive C57Bl/6J mice with diet-induced obesity. Whole-body glucose uptake was measured by d-[(14)C]glucose kinetics and tissue-specific glucose uptake by 2-deoxy-d-[(3)H]glucose uptake. During clamp conditions, intracerebroventricular administration of tolbutamide impaired the ability of insulin to inhibit EGP by ∼20%. In addition, intracerebroventricular tolbutamide diminished insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in muscle (by ∼59%) but not in heart or adipose tissue. In contrast, in insulin-resistant mice with diet-induced obesity, intracerebroventricular tolbutamide did not alter the effects of insulin during clamp conditions on EGP or glucose uptake by muscle. Insulin stimulates glucose uptake in muscle in part through effects via K(ATP) channels in the central nervous system, in analogy with the inhibitory effects of insulin on EGP. High-fat diet-induced obesity abolished the central effects of insulin on liver and muscle. These observations stress the role of central insulin resistance in the pathophysiology of diet-induced insulin resistance.

  6. Aluminum bioavailability from tea infusion.

    Yokel, Robert A; Florence, Rebecca L

    2008-12-01

    The objective was to estimate oral Al bioavailability from tea infusion in the rat, using the tracer (26)Al. (26)Al citrate was injected into tea leaves. An infusion was prepared from the dried leaves and given intra-gastrically to rats which received concurrent intravenous (27)Al infusion. Oral Al bioavailability (F) was calculated from the area under the (26)Al, compared to (27)Al, serum concentration x time curves. Bioavailability from tea averaged 0.37%; not significantly different from water (F=0.3%), or basic sodium aluminum phosphate (SALP) in cheese (F=0.1-0.3%), but greater than acidic SALP in a biscuit (F=0.1%). Time to maximum serum (26)Al concentration was 1.25, 1.5, 8 and 4.8h, respectively. These results of oral Al bioavailability x daily consumption by the human suggest tea can provide a significant amount of the Al that reaches systemic circulation. This can allow distribution to its target organs of toxicity, the central nervous, skeletal and hematopoietic systems. Further testing of the hypothesis that Al contributes to Alzheimer's disease may be more warranted with studies focusing on total average daily food intake, including tea and other foods containing appreciable Al, than drinking water.

  7. Concentrated insulins: the new basal insulins

    Lamos EM

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth M Lamos,1 Lisa M Younk,2 Stephen N Davis3 1Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition, 2Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 3Department of Medicine, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, MD, USA Introduction: Insulin therapy plays a critical role in the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, there is still a need to find basal insulins with 24-hour coverage and reduced risk of hypoglycemia. Additionally, with increasing obesity and insulin resistance, the ability to provide clinically necessary high doses of insulin at low volume is also needed. Areas covered: This review highlights the published reports of the pharmacokinetic (PK and glucodynamic properties of concentrated insulins: Humulin-R U500, insulin degludec U200, and insulin glargine U300, describes the clinical efficacy, risk of hypoglycemic, and metabolic changes observed, and finally, discusses observations about the complexity of introducing a new generation of concentrated insulins to the therapeutic market. Conclusion: Humulin-R U500 has a similar onset but longer duration of action compared with U100 regular insulin. Insulin glargine U300 has differential PK/pharmacodynamic effects when compared with insulin glargine U100. In noninferiority studies, glycemic control with degludec U200 and glargine U300 is similar to insulin glargine U100 and nocturnal hypoglycemia is reduced. Concentrated formulations appear to behave as separate molecular entities when compared with earlier U100 insulin analog compounds. In the review of available published data, newer concentrated basal insulins may offer an advantage in terms of reduced intraindividual variability as well as reducing the injection burden in individuals requiring high-dose and large volume insulin therapy. Understanding the PK and pharmacodynamic properties of this new generation of insulins is critical to safe dosing, dispensing, and administration

  8. Anesthesia with propofol induces insulin resistance systemically in skeletal and cardiac muscles and liver of rats

    Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Fukushima, Yuji; Kaneki, Masao [Department of Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra, E-mail: jmartyn@partners.org [Department of Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Propofol, as a model anesthetic drug, induced whole body insulin resistance. ► Propofol anesthesia decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. ► Propofol decreased insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal and cardiac muscles. ► Propofol increased hepatic glucose output confirming hepatic insulin resistance. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia together with hepatic and muscle insulin resistance are common features in critically ill patients, and these changes are associated with enhanced inflammatory response, increased susceptibility to infection, muscle wasting, and worsened prognosis. Tight blood glucose control by intensive insulin treatment may reduce the morbidity and mortality in intensive care units. Although some anesthetics have been shown to cause insulin resistance, it remains unknown how and in which tissues insulin resistance is induced by anesthetics. Moreover, the effects of propofol, a clinically relevant intravenous anesthetic, also used in the intensive care unit for sedation, on insulin sensitivity have not yet been investigated. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study was performed in rats anesthetized with propofol and conscious unrestrained rats. To evaluate glucose uptake in tissues and hepatic glucose output [{sup 3}H]glucose and 2-deoxy[{sup 14}C]glucose were infused during the clamp study. Anesthesia with propofol induced a marked whole-body insulin resistance compared with conscious rats, as reflected by significantly decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. Insulin-stimulated tissue glucose uptake was decreased in skeletal muscle and heart, and hepatic glucose output was increased in propofol anesthetized rats. Anesthesia with propofol induces systemic insulin resistance along with decreases in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal and heart muscle and attenuation of the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose output in rats.

  9. Anesthesia with propofol induces insulin resistance systemically in skeletal and cardiac muscles and liver of rats

    Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Fukushima, Yuji; Kaneki, Masao; Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Propofol, as a model anesthetic drug, induced whole body insulin resistance. ► Propofol anesthesia decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. ► Propofol decreased insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal and cardiac muscles. ► Propofol increased hepatic glucose output confirming hepatic insulin resistance. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia together with hepatic and muscle insulin resistance are common features in critically ill patients, and these changes are associated with enhanced inflammatory response, increased susceptibility to infection, muscle wasting, and worsened prognosis. Tight blood glucose control by intensive insulin treatment may reduce the morbidity and mortality in intensive care units. Although some anesthetics have been shown to cause insulin resistance, it remains unknown how and in which tissues insulin resistance is induced by anesthetics. Moreover, the effects of propofol, a clinically relevant intravenous anesthetic, also used in the intensive care unit for sedation, on insulin sensitivity have not yet been investigated. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study was performed in rats anesthetized with propofol and conscious unrestrained rats. To evaluate glucose uptake in tissues and hepatic glucose output [ 3 H]glucose and 2-deoxy[ 14 C]glucose were infused during the clamp study. Anesthesia with propofol induced a marked whole-body insulin resistance compared with conscious rats, as reflected by significantly decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. Insulin-stimulated tissue glucose uptake was decreased in skeletal muscle and heart, and hepatic glucose output was increased in propofol anesthetized rats. Anesthesia with propofol induces systemic insulin resistance along with decreases in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal and heart muscle and attenuation of the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose output in rats

  10. Insulin resistance in therapeutic clinic

    Anna V. Pashentseva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Today an obesity became the global epidemic striking both children, and adults and represents one of the most important problems of health care worldwide. Excess accumulation of fatty tissue is resulted by insulin resistance and a compensatory hyperinsulinaemia which are the main predictors of development of a diabetes mellitus type 2. Insulin resistance is also one of key links of a pathogenesis of such diseases as cardiovascular pathology, not-alcoholic fatty liver disease, a polycystic ovary syndrome, gestational diabetes and many others. Depression of sensitivity of tissues to insulin can be physiological reaction of an organism to stress factors and pathological process. The endogenic reasons also take part in development of insulin resistance besides factors of the external environment. The role of genetic predisposition, a subclinical inflammation of fatty tissue, thyroid hormones, adipokines and vitamin D in formation of this pathological process is studied. As insulin resistance takes part in a pathogenesis of various diseases, methods of its diagnostics and correction are of great importance in therapeutic practice. At purpose of treatment it is worth giving preference to the drugs which are positively influencing sensitivity of tissues to insulin.

  11. Influence of The -202 A/C insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 promoter polymorphism on individual variation in height in Korean girls

    Min Ju Yi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available PurposeThe most common single nucleotide polymorphism in the IGFBP3 promoter region occurs at position -202. This polymorphic variation occurs frequently and may influence growth hormone responsiveness and somatic growth. However, the effects of IGFBP3 promoter polymorphism on growth in children are unknown.MethodsRestriction fragment length polymorphism-based genotyping of the -202 single nucleotide polymorphism was performed in 146 Korean girls aged between 15 and 16 years, who were selected randomly from the Seoul School Health Promotion Center. The participants were divided into 3 groups (tall, medium, and short according to the height percentile established from normal reference values for Korean children. The serum levels of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I and IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3 were then compared according to genotype.ResultsThe genotype distribution in the participants was 79 AA (54.1%, 60 AC (41.1%, and 7 CC (4.8%. The C allele frequency at the -202 IGFBP3 position was 25.4% in this group. The mean serum IGFBP-3 concentration in girls with the AA genotype was higher than that in girls with the AC genotype in the medium (P=0.047 and short (P=0.035 groups, respectively. There was no difference in the IGF-I to IGFBP-3 molar ratio between the AA and AC genotype groups (P=0.161.ConclusionIn conclusion, the -202 polymorphism in the IGFBP3 promoter region is assumed to affect the serum concentration of IGFBP-3 in children as well as in adults. However, it is unclear whether this affects physical development according to the concentration of IGFBP-3.

  12. Degludec insulin: A novel basal insulin

    Kalra, Sanjay; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalakrishnan; Baruah, Manash; Kalra, Bharti

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews a novel insulin analogue, degludec, which has the potential to emerge as an ideal basal insulin. It reviews the limitations of existing basal insulin and analogues, and highlights the need for a newer molecule. The paper discusses the potential advantages of degludec, while reviewing its pharmacologic and clinical studies done so far. The paper assesses the potential role of insulin degludec and degludec plus in clinical diabetes practice.

  13. A two-week reduction of ambulatory activity attenuates peripheral insulin sensitivity

    Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Thyfault, John P; Broholm, Christa

    2009-01-01

    after step reduction, with a post hoc analysis revealing the most pronounced effect after 4 h of insulin infusion. In addition, the two-week period induced a 7% decline in VO2max (ml/min; cardiovascular fitness). Lean mass of legs, but not arms and truck, decreased concurrently. Taken together, one...... possible biological cause for the public health problem of type 2 diabetes has been identified. Reduced ambulatory activity for two weeks in healthy, non-exercising young men significantly reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity, cardiovascular fitness, and lean leg mass. Key words: Inactivity, Insulin...... number of daily steps induced a significant reduction of 17% in the glucose infusion rate (GIR) during the clamp. This reduction was due to a decline in peripheral insulin sensitivity with no effect on hepatic endogenous glucose production. The insulin-stimulated ratio of pAkt(thr308)/total Akt decreased...

  14. The relationship between bone turnover and insulin sensitivity and secretion

    Frost, Morten; Balkau, Beverley; Hatunic, Mensud

    2018-01-01

    Bone metabolism appears to influence insulin secretion and sensitivity, and insulin promotes bone formation in animals, but similar evidence in humans is limited. The objectives of this study are to explore if bone turnover markers were associated with insulin secretion and sensitivity and to det...

  15. Use of a variable tracer infusion method to determine glucose turnover in humans

    Molina, J.M.; Baron, A.D.; Edelman, S.V.; Brechtel, G.; Wallace, P.; Olefsky, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    The single-compartment pool fraction model, when used with the hyperinsulinemic glucose clamp technique to measure rates of glucose turnover, sometimes underestimates true rates of glucose appearance (Ra) resulting in negative values for hepatic glucose output (HGO). We focused our attention on isotope discrimination and model error as possible explanations for this underestimation. We found no difference in [3-3H] glucose specific activity in samples obtained simultaneously from the femoral artery and vein (2,400 +/- 455 vs. 2,454 +/- 522 dpm/mg) in 6 men during a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp study where insulin was infused at 40 mU.m-2.min-1 for 3 h; therefore, isotope discrimination did not occur. We compared the ability of a constant (0.6 microCi/min) vs. variable tracer infusion method (tracer added to the glucose infusate) to measure non-steady-state Ra during hyperinsulinemic clamp studies. Plasma specific activity fell during the constant tracer infusion studies but did not change from base line during the variable tracer infusion studies. By maintaining a constant plasma specific activity the variable tracer infusion method eliminates uncertainty about changes in glucose pool size. This overcame modeling error and more accurately measures non-steady-state Ra (P less than 0.001 by analysis of variance vs. constant infusion method). In conclusion, underestimation of Ra determined isotopically during hyperinsulinemic clamp studies is largely due to modeling error that can be overcome by use of the variable tracer infusion method. This method allows more accurate determination of Ra and HGO under non-steady-state conditions

  16. Hypothalamic and Striatal Insulin Action Suppresses Endogenous Glucose Production and May Stimulate Glucose Uptake During Hyperinsulinemia in Lean but Not in Overweight Men.

    Heni, Martin; Wagner, Robert; Kullmann, Stephanie; Gancheva, Sofiya; Roden, Michael; Peter, Andreas; Stefan, Norbert; Preissl, Hubert; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Fritsche, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    Intranasal spray application facilitates insulin delivery to the human brain. Although brain insulin modulates peripheral metabolism, the mechanisms involved remain elusive. Twenty-one men underwent two hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps with d-[6,6- 2 H 2 ]glucose infusion to measure endogenous glucose production and glucose disappearance. On two separate days, participants received intranasal insulin or placebo. Insulin spillover into circulation after intranasal insulin application was mimicked by an intravenous insulin bolus on placebo day. On a different day, brain insulin sensitivity was assessed by functional MRI. Glucose infusion rates (GIRs) had to be increased more after nasal insulin than after placebo to maintain euglycemia in lean but not in overweight people. The increase in GIRs was associated with regional brain insulin action in hypothalamus and striatum. Suppression of endogenous glucose production by circulating insulin was more pronounced after administration of nasal insulin than after placebo. Furthermore, glucose uptake into tissue tended to be higher after nasal insulin application. No such effects were detected in overweight participants. By increasing insulin-mediated suppression of endogenous glucose production and stimulating peripheral glucose uptake, brain insulin may improve glucose metabolism during systemic hyperinsulinemia. Obese people appear to lack these mechanisms. Therefore, brain insulin resistance in obesity may have unfavorable consequences for whole-body glucose homeostasis. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  17. Influence of insulin sensitivity and secretion on glycated albumin and hemoglobin A1c in pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Pan, Jiemin; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Lei; Bao, Yuqian; Tao, Minfang; Jia, Weiping

    2013-06-01

    To examine the differential effects of insulin sensitivity and secretion on hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and glycated albumin (GA) at 24-32weeks of pregnancy in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). A cross-sectional, sequential case series study was performed in pregnant women with an abnormal 50-g oral glucose-screening test. Hemoglobin A1c and GA measurements were taken during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and beta-cell function (HOMA-%β), insulin sensitivity index (ISOGTT), and modified insulinogenic index were calculated to assess insulin sensitivity and secretory function. A total of 713 pregnant women were enrolled. The GDM group had lower ISOGTT and insulinogenic index scores, and a higher HOMA-IR score. Hemoglobin A1c was positively correlated with HOMA-IR. Glycated albumin was negatively correlated with insulinogenic index and HOMA-%β. Multiple regression analysis revealed that HbA1c was independently associated with diastolic pressure, 0- and 120-minute glucose, and HOMA-IR; GA was independently associated with 0- and 120-minute glucose. Compared with HbA1c, GA is more closely correlated with fasting and postprandial glucose, regardless of insulin resistance and blood pressure, and might be a better monitoring index in women with GDM. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Peripheral nerve function during hyperglycemic clamping in insulin-dependent diabetic patients

    Sindrup, S H; Ejlertsen, B; Gjessing, H

    1989-01-01

    The influence of hyperglycemia on peripheral nerve function was studied in 9 patients with long-term insulin-dependent diabetes. Blood glucose concentration was raised 13.5 +/- 0.5 mmol/l (mean +/- SEM) within 15 min and kept approximately 15 mmol/l over basal level for 120 min by intravenous...... glucose infusion. Hyperglycemia was accompanied by increased plasma osmolality. Sensory and motor nerve conduction and distal motor latency in the ulnar nerve were determined before, immediately after induction of hyperglycemia, and again after 120 min hyperglycemia. Distal (5th finger - wrist......) and proximal (wrist - elbow) sensory nerve conduction showed an insignificant increase as hyperglycemia was induced. During hyperglycemia mean distal sensory conduction decreased from 53.1 m/s to 50.4 m/s (P less than 0.05) and mean proximal sensory conduction decreased from 56.0 m/s to 54.2 m/s (P less than 0...

  19. Cardiovascular and metabolic effects of 48-h glucagon-like peptide-1 infusion in compensated chronic patients with heart failure

    Halbirk, Mads; Nørrelund, Helene; Møller, Niels

    2010-01-01

    effects of 48-h GLP-1 infusions in patients with congestive HF. In a randomized, double-blind crossover design, 20 patients without diabetes and with HF with ischemic heart disease, EF of 30 +/- 2%, New York Heart Association II and III (n = 14 and 6) received 48-h GLP-1 (0.7 pmol.kg(-1).min(-1......)) and placebo infusion. At 0 and 48 h, LVEF, diastolic function, tissue Doppler regional myocardial function, exercise testing, noninvasive cardiac output, and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were measured. Blood pressure, heart rate, and metabolic parameters were recorded. Fifteen patients completed...... patients. GLP-1 infusion increased circulating insulin levels and reduced plasma glucose concentration but had no major cardiovascular effects in patients without diabetes but with compensated HF. The impact of minor increases in heart rate and diastolic blood pressure during GLP-1 infusion requires...

  20. Infusing PDA technology into nursing education.

    White, Ann; Allen, Patricia; Goodwin, Linda; Breckinridge, Daya; Dowell, Jeffery; Garvy, Ryan

    2005-01-01

    Use of the personal digital assistant (PDA) has been infused into the accelerated baccalaureate program at Duke University to help prepare nursing students for professional practice. The authors provide an overview of the use of PDAs in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical setting. Technical aspects of PDA infusion and steps to ensure regulatory compliance are explored. Benefits of PDA use by both faculty and students in the program and challenges met with the infusion of this technology are also described.

  1. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibits insulin's stimulating effect on glucose uptake and endothelium-dependent vasodilation in humans

    Rask-Madsen, Christian; Domínguez, Helena; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inflammatory mechanisms could be involved in the pathogenesis of both insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. Therefore, we aimed at examining whether the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha inhibits insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and insulin....../or TNF-alpha were coinfused. During infusion of insulin alone for 20 minutes, forearm glucose uptake increased by 220+/-44%. This increase was completely inhibited during coinfusion of TNF-alpha (started 10 min before insulin) with a more pronounced inhibition of glucose extraction than of blood flow....... Furthermore, TNF-alpha inhibited the ACh forearm blood flow response (Palpha...

  2. Technology Infusion Challenges from a Decision Support Perspective

    Adumitroaie, V.; Weisbin, C. R.

    2009-01-01

    In a restricted science budget environment and increasingly numerous required technology developments, the technology investment decisions within NASA are objectively more and more difficult to make such that the end results are satisfying the technical objectives and all the organizational constraints. Under these conditions it is rationally desirable to build an investment portfolio, which has the highest possible technology infusion rate. Arguably the path to infusion is subject to many influencing factors, but here only the challenges associated with the very initial stages are addressed: defining the needs and the subsequent investment decision-support process. It is conceivable that decision consistency and possibly its quality suffer when the decision-making process has limited or no traceability. This paper presents a structured decision-support framework aiming to provide traceable, auditable, infusion- driven recommendations towards a selection process in which these recommendations are used as reference points in further discussions among stakeholders. In this framework addressing well-defined requirements, different measures of success can be defined based on traceability to specific selection criteria. As a direct result, even by using simplified decision models the likelihood of infusion can be probed and consequently improved.

  3. Angiotensin II Infusion Induces Marked Diaphragmatic Skeletal Muscle Atrophy

    Rezk, Bashir M.; Yoshida, Tadashi; Semprun-Prieto, Laura; Higashi, Yusuke; Sukhanov, Sergiy; Delafontaine, Patrice

    2012-01-01

    Advanced congestive heart failure (CHF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are characterized by increased angiotensin II (Ang II) levels and are often accompanied by significant skeletal muscle wasting that negatively impacts mortality and morbidity. Both CHF and CKD patients have respiratory muscle dysfunction, however the potential effects of Ang II on respiratory muscles are unknown. We investigated the effects of Ang II on diaphragm muscle in FVB mice. Ang II induced significant diaphragm muscle wasting (18.7±1.6% decrease in weight at one week) and reduction in fiber cross-sectional area. Expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligases atrogin-1 and muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF-1) and of the pro-apoptotic factor BAX was increased after 24 h of Ang II infusion (4.4±0.3 fold, 3.1±0.5 fold and 1.6±0.2 fold, respectively, compared to sham infused control) suggesting increased muscle protein degradation and apoptosis. In Ang II infused animals, there was significant regeneration of injured diaphragm muscles at 7 days as indicated by an increase in the number of myofibers with centralized nuclei and high expression of embryonic myosin heavy chain (E-MyHC, 11.2±3.3 fold increase) and of the satellite cell marker M-cadherin (59.2±22.2% increase). Furthermore, there was an increase in expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1, 1.8±0.3 fold increase) in Ang II infused diaphragm, suggesting the involvement of IGF-1 in diaphragm muscle regeneration. Bone-marrow transplantation experiments indicated that although there was recruitment of bone-marrow derived cells to the injured diaphragm in Ang II infused mice (267.0±74.6% increase), those cells did not express markers of muscle stem cells or regenerating myofibers. In conclusion, Ang II causes marked diaphragm muscle wasting, which may be important for the pathophysiology of respiratory muscle dysfunction and cachexia in conditions such as CHF and CKD. PMID:22276172

  4. Angiotensin II infusion induces marked diaphragmatic skeletal muscle atrophy.

    Bashir M Rezk

    Full Text Available Advanced congestive heart failure (CHF and chronic kidney disease (CKD are characterized by increased angiotensin II (Ang II levels and are often accompanied by significant skeletal muscle wasting that negatively impacts mortality and morbidity. Both CHF and CKD patients have respiratory muscle dysfunction, however the potential effects of Ang II on respiratory muscles are unknown. We investigated the effects of Ang II on diaphragm muscle in FVB mice. Ang II induced significant diaphragm muscle wasting (18.7±1.6% decrease in weight at one week and reduction in fiber cross-sectional area. Expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligases atrogin-1 and muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF-1 and of the pro-apoptotic factor BAX was increased after 24 h of Ang II infusion (4.4±0.3 fold, 3.1±0.5 fold and 1.6±0.2 fold, respectively, compared to sham infused control suggesting increased muscle protein degradation and apoptosis. In Ang II infused animals, there was significant regeneration of injured diaphragm muscles at 7 days as indicated by an increase in the number of myofibers with centralized nuclei and high expression of embryonic myosin heavy chain (E-MyHC, 11.2±3.3 fold increase and of the satellite cell marker M-cadherin (59.2±22.2% increase. Furthermore, there was an increase in expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1, 1.8±0.3 fold increase in Ang II infused diaphragm, suggesting the involvement of IGF-1 in diaphragm muscle regeneration. Bone-marrow transplantation experiments indicated that although there was recruitment of bone-marrow derived cells to the injured diaphragm in Ang II infused mice (267.0±74.6% increase, those cells did not express markers of muscle stem cells or regenerating myofibers. In conclusion, Ang II causes marked diaphragm muscle wasting, which may be important for the pathophysiology of respiratory muscle dysfunction and cachexia in conditions such as CHF and CKD.

  5. Infusion volume control and calculation using metronome and drop counter based intravenous infusion therapy helper.

    Park, Kyungnam; Lee, Jangyoung; Kim, Soo-Young; Kim, Jinwoo; Kim, Insoo; Choi, Seung Pill; Jeong, Sikyung; Hong, Sungyoup

    2013-06-01

    This study assessed the method of fluid infusion control using an IntraVenous Infusion Controller (IVIC). Four methods of infusion control (dial flow controller, IV set without correction, IV set with correction and IVIC correction) were used to measure the volume of each technique at two infusion rates. The infused fluid volume with a dial flow controller was significantly larger than other methods. The infused fluid volume was significantly smaller with an IV set without correction over time. Regarding the concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) of infused fluid volume in relation to a target volume, IVIC correction was shown to have the highest level of agreement. The flow rate measured in check mode showed a good agreement with the volume of collected fluid after passing through the IV system. Thus, an IVIC could assist in providing an accurate infusion control. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Intralipid decreases apolipoprotein M levels and insulin sensitivity in rats.

    Lu Zheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apolipoprotein M (ApoM is a constituent of high-density lipoproteins (HDL. It plays a crucial role in HDL-mediated reverse cholesterol transport. Insulin resistance is associated with decreased ApoM levels. AIMS: To assess the effects of increased free fatty acids (FFAs levels after short-term Intralipid infusion on insulin sensitivity and hepatic ApoM gene expression. METHODS: Adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD rats infused with 20% Intralipid solution for 6 h. Glucose infusion rates (GIR were determined by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp during Intralipid infusion and plasma FFA levels were measured by colorimetry. Rats were sacrificed after Intralipid treatment and livers were sampled. Human embryonic kidney 293T cells were transfected with a lentivirus mediated human apoM overexpression system. Goto-Kakizaki (GK rats were injected with the lentiviral vector and insulin tolerance was assessed. Gene expression was assessed by real-time RT-PCR and PCR array. RESULTS: Intralipid increased FFAs by 17.6 folds and GIR was decreased by 27.1% compared to the control group. ApoM gene expression was decreased by 40.4% after Intralipid infusion. PPARβ/δ expression was not changed by Intralipid. Whereas the mRNA levels of Acaca, Acox1, Akt1, V-raf murine sarcoma 3611 viral oncogene homolog, G6pc, Irs2, Ldlr, Map2k1, pyruvate kinase and RBC were significantly increased in rat liver after Intralipid infusion. The Mitogen-activated protein kinase 8 (MAPK8 was significantly down-regulated in 293T cells overexpressing ApoM. Overexpression of human ApoM in GK rats could enhance the glucose-lowering effect of exogenous insulin. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that Intralipid could decrease hepatic ApoM levels. ApoM overexpression may have a potential role in improving insulin resistance in vivo and modulating apoM expression might be a future therapeutic strategy against insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes.

  7. Evaluating the use of the Cleo 90 infusion set for patients on a palliative care unit.

    Schneider, Michael; Hoffmann, Martin; Lorenzl, Stefan

    2009-08-01

    Although the use of subcutaneous infusion is common in palliative care, problems can occur. Normally, butterfly needles are used; however, there are occasional issues with patients being able to walk around or with restless patients who suffer from delirium. In these cases, needles often dislocate; therefore, a small observational study was undertaken to evaluate the use of the Cleo 90 infusion set. The use of this needle system has been well established in diabetic patients who require continuous subcutaneous infusion of insulin, but has never been tested in a wider range of patients with other medications. In this 6-month study, 45 patients were identified for subcutaneous infusion and a total of 112 needles were used for this study, since we initially changed each site after 2 days to control the local site for adverse reactions. We have not observed any complications with drug combinations delivered via the attached tube and the needle, and have used up to five different drugs mixed together in a single syringe. Needles could be used for a mean time of 5 +/- 2 days (range 2-12 days). Local site reactions have been observed only with sodium chloride infusions, which were not delivered via a pump system. Reddening and induration of the skin occurred, but they were reversible after removing the needle. As this was a small study in only one unit, without standardization the results can only be observational. However, it has shown, for the first time, that the Cleo 90 needle can be safe and comfortable.

  8. Endocrine and metabolic effects of consuming fructose- and glucose-sweetened beverages with meals in obese men and women: influence of insulin resistance on plasma triglyceride responses.

    Teff, Karen L; Grudziak, Joanne; Townsend, Raymond R; Dunn, Tamara N; Grant, Ryan W; Adams, Sean H; Keim, Nancy L; Cummings, Bethany P; Stanhope, Kimber L; Havel, Peter J

    2009-05-01

    Compared with glucose-sweetened beverages, consumption of fructose-sweetened beverages with meals elevates postprandial plasma triglycerides and lowers 24-h insulin and leptin profiles in normal-weight women. The effects of fructose, compared with glucose, ingestion on metabolic profiles in obese subjects has not been studied. The objective of the study was to compare the effects of fructose- and glucose-sweetened beverages consumed with meals on hormones and metabolic substrates in obese subjects. The study had a within-subject design conducted in the clinical and translational research center. Participants included 17 obese men (n = 9) and women (n = 8), with a body mass index greater than 30 kg/m(2). Subjects were studied under two conditions involving ingestion of mixed nutrient meals with either glucose-sweetened beverages or fructose-sweetened beverages. The beverages provided 30% of total kilocalories. Blood samples were collected over 24 h. Area under the curve (24 h AUC) for glucose, lactate, insulin, leptin, ghrelin, uric acid, triglycerides (TGs), and free fatty acids was measured. Compared with glucose-sweetened beverages, fructose consumption was associated with lower AUCs for insulin (1052.6 +/- 135.1 vs. 549.2 +/- 79.7 muU/ml per 23 h, P glucose consumption. Increases of TGs were augmented in obese subjects with insulin resistance, suggesting that fructose consumption may exacerbate an already adverse metabolic profile present in many obese subjects.

  9. In vitro growth and maturation of isolated caprine preantral follicles: Influence of insulin and FSH concentration, culture dish, coculture, and oocyte size on meiotic resumption.

    Silva, G M; Brito, I R; Sales, A D; Aguiar, F L N; Duarte, A B G; Araújo, V R; Vieira, L A; Magalhães-Padilha, D M; Lima, L F; Alves, B G; Silveira, L B R; Lo Turco, E G; Rodrigues, A P; Campello, C C; Wheeler, M B; Figueiredo, J R

    2017-03-01

    The aims of this study were: (1) to evaluate the effect of different insulin concentrations, alone or in combination with either a fixed FSH concentration or increasing FSH concentrations on the in vitro culture of isolated caprine preantral follicles and (2) to analyze the efficiency of two IVM media and maturation culture systems (with or without coculture with in vivo grown oocytes) on the meiosis resumption. Secondary follicles were cultured for 18 days in a basic medium supplemented with low- or high-insulin concentration alone or with a fixed FSH concentration or with increasing FSH concentrations. Oocytes grown in vivo or in vitro were matured alone or cocultured. The high-insulin concentration associated with fixed FSH treatment had higher meiotic resumption rate (P media. In conclusion, a basic medium supplemented with 10-μg/mL insulin and 100-μg/mL FSH throughout the culture period improved meiotic resumption rate and produced MII oocytes from caprine preantral follicles cultured in vitro. The MII rate was similar between in vivo and in vitro grown oocytes ≥110 μm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Endothelin-1 exacerbates development of hypertension and atherosclerosis in modest insulin resistant syndrome

    Lin, Yan-Jie; Juan, Chi-Chang; Kwok, Ching-Fai; Hsu, Yung-Pei; Shih, Kuang-Chung; Chen, Chin-Chang; Ho, Low-Tone

    2015-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is known as potent vasoconstrictor, by virtue of its mitogenic effects, and may deteriorate the process of hypertension and atherosclerosis by aggravating hyperplasia and migration in VSMCs. Our previous study demonstrated that insulin infusion caused sequential induction of hyperinsulinemia, hyperendothelinemia, insulin resistance, and then hypertension in rats. However, the underlying mechanism of ET-1 interfere insulin signaling in VSMCs remains unclear. To characterize insulin signaling during modest insulin resistant syndrome, we established and monitored rats by feeding high fructose-diet (HFD) until high blood pressure and modest insulin resistance occurred. To explore the role of ET-1/ET A R during insulin resistance, ET A R expression, ET-1 binding, and insulin signaling were investigated in the HFD-fed rats and cultured A-10 VSMCs. Results showed that high blood pressure, tunica medial wall thickening, plasma ET-1 and insulin, and accompanied with modest insulin resistance without overweight and hyperglycemia occurred in early-stage HFD-fed rats. In the endothelium-denuded aorta from HFD-fed rats, ET A R expression, but not ET B R, and ET-1 binding in aorta were increased. Moreover, decreasing of insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation and increasing of insulin-induced ERK phosphorylation were observed in aorta during modest insulin resistance. Interestingly, in ET-1 pretreated VSMCs, the increment of insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation was decreased whereas the increment of insulin-induced ERK phosphorylation was increased. In addition, insulin potentiated ET-1-induced VSMCs migration and proliferation due to increasing ET-1 binding. ETAR antagonist reversed effects of ET-1 on insulin-induced signaling and VSMCs migration and proliferation. In summary, modest insulin resistance syndrome accompanied with hyperinsulinemia leading to the potentiation on ET-1-induced actions in aortic VSMCs. ET-1 via ET A R pathway suppressed insulin

  11. Studies of insulin resistance in congenital generalized lipodystrophy

    Søvik, O; Vestergaard, H; Trygstad, O

    1996-01-01

    suppressed lipid oxidation in the controls. It is concluded that patients with congenital generalized lipodystrophy may present severe insulin resistance with regard to hepatic glucose production as well as muscle glycogen synthesis and lipid oxidation. The results suggest a postreceptor defect in the action......, immunoreactive protein and mRNA levels. The patients had fasting hyperinsulinaemia, and the rate of total glucose disposal was severely impaired, primarily due to a decreased non-oxidative glucose metabolism. In the patient studied with muscle biopsy, the expected activation of glycogen synthase by insulin did...... not occur. In both patients there was severely increased hepatic glucose output in the basal state, suggesting a failure of insulin to suppress hepatic gluconeogenesis. During insulin infusion a substantially elevated rate of lipid oxidation remained in the patients, in contrast to the almost completely...

  12. Iontophoresis of monomeric insulin analogues in vitro: effects of insulin charge and skin pretreatment.

    Langkjaer, L; Brange, J; Grodsky, G M; Guy, R H

    1998-01-23

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of association state and net charge of human insulin analogues on the rate of iontophoretic transport across hairless mouse skin, and the effect of different skin pretreatments on said transport. No insulin flux was observed with anodal delivery probably because of degradation at the Ag/AgCl anode. The flux during cathodal iontophoresis through intact skin was insignificant for human hexameric insulin, and only low and variable fluxes were observed for monomeric insulins. Using stripped skin on the other hand, the fluxes of monomeric insulins with two extra negative charges were 50-100 times higher than that of hexameric human insulin. Introducing three additional charges led to a further 2-3-fold increase in flux. Wiping the skin gently with absolute alcohol prior to iontophoresis resulted in a 1000-fold increase in transdermal transport of insulin relative to that across untreated skin, i.e. to almost the same level as stripping the skin. The alcohol pretreatment reduced the electrical resistance of the skin, presumably by lipid extraction. In conclusion, monomeric insulin analogues with at least two extra negative charges can be iontophoretically delivered across hairless mouse skin, whereas insignificant flux is observed with human, hexameric insulin. Wiping the skin with absolute alcohol prior to iontophoresis gave substantially improved transdermal transport of monomeric insulins resulting in clinically relevant delivery rates for basal treatment.

  13. Alteration in insulin action

    Tanti, J F; Gual, P; Grémeaux, T

    2004-01-01

    Insulin resistance, when combined with impaired insulin secretion, contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance is characterised by a decrease in insulin effect on glucose transport in muscle and adipose tIssue. Tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS......-1) and its binding to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) are critical events in the insulin signalling cascade leading to insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Modification of IRS-1 by serine phosphorylation could be one of the mechanisms leading to a decrease in IRS-1 tyrosine...... to phosphorylate these serine residues have been identified. These exciting results suggest that serine phosphorylation of IRS-1 is a possible hallmark of insulin resistance in biologically insulin responsive cells or tIssues. Identifying the pathways by which "diabetogenic" factors activate IRS-1 kinases...

  14. Release of immunoreactive and radioactively prelabelled endogenous (pro-)insulin from isolated islets of rat pancreas in the presence of exogenous insulin

    Schatz, H [Giessen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Zentrum fuer Innere Medizin; Pfeiffer, E F

    1977-01-01

    To study the influence of insulin on its secretion, collagenase-isolated islets of rat pancreas were prelabelled with (/sup 3/H)leucine for 2 h. After washing the islets, (pro-)insulin release was stimulated by glucose in the presence or absence of exogenous insulin (up to 2.5 mu./ml. Hormone release was unchanged by the presence of exogenous insulin as judged by determination of both immunoreactive insulin and radioactivity incorporated into the proinsulin and insulin fractions of the medium. No direct feedback mechanism for insulin secretion was apparent from this study.

  15. Glucose transport and milk secretion during manipulated plasma insulin and glucose concentrations and during LPS-induced mastitis in dairy cows.

    Gross, J J; van Dorland, H A; Wellnitz, O; Bruckmaier, R M

    2015-08-01

    In dairy cows, glucose is essential as energy source and substrate for milk constituents. The objective of this study was to investigate effects of long-term manipulated glucose and insulin concentrations in combination with a LPS-induced mastitis on mRNA abundance of glucose transporters and factors involved in milk composition. Focusing on direct effects of insulin and glucose without influence of periparturient endocrine adaptations, 18 dairy cows (28 ± 6 weeks of lactation) were randomly assigned to one of three infusion treatments for 56 h (six animals each). Treatments included a hyperinsulinemic hypoglycaemic clamp (HypoG), a hyperinsulinemic euglycaemic clamp (EuG) and a control group (NaCl). After 48 h of infusions, an intramammary challenge with LPS from E. coli was performed and infusions continued for additional 8 h. Mammary gland biopsies were taken before, at 48 (before LPS challenge) and at 56 h (after LPS challenge) of infusion, and mRNA abundance of genes involved in mammary gland metabolism was measured by RT-qPCR. During the 48 h of infusions, mRNA abundance of glucose transporters GLUT1, 3, 4, 8, 12, SGLT1, 2) was not affected in HypoG, while they were downregulated in EuG. The mRNA abundance of alpha-lactalbumin, insulin-induced gene 1, κ-casein and acetyl-CoA carboxylase was downregulated in HypoG, but not affected in EuG. Contrary during the intramammary LPS challenge, most of the glucose transporters were downregulated in NaCl and HypoG, but not in EuG. The mRNA abundance of glucose transporters in the mammary gland seems not to be affected by a shortage of glucose, while enzymes and milk constituents directly depending on glucose as a substrate are immediately downregulated. During LPS-induced mastitis in combination with hypoglycaemia, mammary gland metabolism was more aligned to save glucose for the immune system compared to a situation without limited glucose availability during EuG. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal

  16. Infusing Systems Thinking into Career Counseling

    Ryan, Charles W.; Tomlin, James H.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the role of career counselors in infusing systems thinking into occupational advising. The authors conducted a qualitative review and analysis of selected literature on systems thinking and analyzed trends for adaptation to career counseling practice. This analysis suggests that career counselors need to infuse systems…

  17. The U.S. home infusion market.

    Monk-Tutor, M R

    1998-10-01

    Medicare legislation stimulated the development of home care services but also resulted in fragmentation of service components. In the 1980s, prospective pricing and diagnosis-related groups, and resulting pressures to reduce inpatient length of stay, prompted additional growth of the industry. Even so, in 1995 home care represented only 3% of total national expenditures on health care. The annual growth rate of the home infusion industry dropped from 64% in 1982-86 to 24% in 1986-93. While revenue per patient for home infusion is expected to decrease under managed care, an increasing number of patients will support continued market growth. The home infusion market is highly competitive, with only a few large national providers and many small local providers. In 1996, 29% of acute care hospitals provided or were developing a home care program. Community pharmacists' options in the home infusion area include independent services, partnerships, joint ventures, contracts with hospitals, and franchises. The home infusion market is being integrated into alternative sites, such as ambulatory infusion centers (AICs), as providers attempt to diversify to maintain managed care contracts. AICs provide infusion therapy and nursing to noninstitutionalized, nonhome-bound patients. Untapped sources for future growth of the infusion market include long-term-care facilities. More consistent studies of the home care market are needed. Despite slowed growth in recent years, home care has a strong market in the United States.

  18. The History of Target-Controlled Infusion

    Struys, Michel M. R. F.; De Smet, Tom; Glen, John (Iain) B.; Vereecke, Hugo E. M.; Absalom, Anthony R.; Schnider, Thomas W.

    Target-controlled infusion (TCI) is a technique of infusing IV drugs to achieve a user-defined predicted (target) drug concentration in a specific body compartment or tissue of interest. In this review, we describe the pharmacokinetic principles of TCI, the development of TCI systems, and technical

  19. Adiponectin inhibits insulin function in primary trophoblasts by PPARα-mediated ceramide synthesis.

    Aye, Irving L M H; Gao, Xiaoli; Weintraub, Susan T; Jansson, Thomas; Powell, Theresa L

    2014-04-01

    Maternal adiponectin (ADN) levels are inversely correlated with birth weight, and ADN infusion in pregnant mice down-regulates placental nutrient transporters and decreases fetal growth. In contrast to the insulin-sensitizing effects in adipose tissue and muscle, ADN inhibits insulin signaling in the placenta. However, the molecular mechanisms involved are unknown. We hypothesized that ADN inhibits insulin signaling and insulin-stimulated amino acid transport in primary human trophoblasts by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα)-mediated ceramide synthesis. Primary human term trophoblast cells were treated with ADN and/or insulin. ADN increased the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and PPARα. ADN inhibited insulin signaling and insulin-stimulated amino acid transport. This effect was dependent on PPARα, because activation of PPARα with an agonist (GW7647) inhibited insulin signaling and function, whereas PPARα-small interfering RNA reversed the effects of ADN on the insulin response. ADN increased ceramide synthase expression and stimulated ceramide production. C2-ceramide inhibited insulin signaling and function, whereas inhibition of ceramide synthase (with Fumonisin B1) reversed the effects of ADN on insulin signaling and amino acid transport. These findings are consistent with the model that maternal ADN limits fetal growth mediated by activation of placental PPARα and ceramide synthesis, which inhibits placental insulin signaling and amino acid transport, resulting in reduced fetal nutrient availability.

  20. Effect of iodination site on binding of radiolabeled ligand by insulin antibodies and insulin autoantibodies

    Diaz, J.L.; Wilkin, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    Four human insulins and four porcine insulins, each monoiodinated to the same specific activity at one of the four tyrosine residues (A14, A19, B16, B26) and purified by reversed-phase liquid chromatography, were tested in a radiobinding assay against a panel of insulin-antibody (IA)-positive sera from 10 insulin-treated diabetics and insulin-autoantibody-positive (IAA) sera from 10 nondiabetics. Of the 10 IAA-positive sera, five were fully cross reactive with both insulin species, and five were specific for human insulin. The rank order of binding of sera with the four ligands from each species was random for IA (mean rank values of 1.9 for A14, 2.0 for A19, 2.5 for B16, and 3.6 for B26 from a possible ranking range of 1 to 4), but more consistent for non-human-insulin-specific IAA (mean rank values 1.3 for A14, 3.8 for A19, 1.7 for B16, and 3.2 for B26 for labeled human insulins; 1.2 for A14, 4.0 for A19, 1.8 for B16, and 3.0 for B26 for labeled porcine insulins). The rank order of binding was virtually uniform for human-insulin-specific IAA (mean values 1.2 for A14, 3.0 for A19, 1.8 for B16, and 4.0 for B26). The influence of iodination site on the binding of labeled insulin appears to be dependent on the proximity of the labeled tyrosine to the antibody binding site and the clonal diversity, or restriction, of insulin-binding antibodies in the test serum. When IA and IAA are measured, the implications of this study regarding the choice of assay ligand may be important

  1. The impact of exercise training compared to caloric restriction on hepatic and peripheral insulin resistance in obesity.

    Coker, Robert H; Williams, Rick H; Yeo, Sophie E; Kortebein, Patrick M; Bodenner, Don L; Kern, Philip A; Evans, William J

    2009-11-01

    It has been difficult to distinguish the independent effects of caloric restriction versus exercise training on insulin resistance. Utilizing metabolic feeding and supervised exercise training, we examined the influence of caloric restriction vs. exercise training with and without weight loss on hepatic and peripheral insulin resistance. Thirty-four obese, older subjects were randomized to: caloric restriction with weight loss (CR), exercise training with weight loss (EWL), exercise training without weight loss (EX), or controls. Based on an equivalent caloric deficit in EWL and CR, we induced matched weight loss. Subjects in the EX group received caloric compensation. Combined with [6,6(2)H(2)]glucose, an octreotide, glucagon, multistage insulin infusion was performed to determine suppression of glucose production (SGP) and insulin-stimulated glucose disposal (ISGD). Computed tomography scans were performed to assess changes in fat distribution. Body weight decreased similarly in EWL and CR, and did not change in EX and controls. The reduction in visceral fat was significantly greater in EWL (-71 +/- 15 cm(2)) compared to CR and EX. The increase in SGP was also almost 3-fold greater (27 +/- 2%) in EWL. EWL and CR promoted similar improvements in ISGD [+2.5 +/- 0.4 and 2.4 +/- 0.9 mg x kg fat-free mass (FFM)(-1) x min(-1)], respectively. EWL promoted the most significant reduction in visceral fat and the greatest improvement in SGP. Equivalent increases in ISGD were noted in EWL and CR, whereas EX provided a modest improvement. Based on our results, EWL promoted the optimal intervention-based changes in body fat distribution and systemic insulin resistance.

  2. Insulin Resistance and Increased Muscle Cytokine Levels in Patients With Mitochondrial Myopathy

    Rue, Nana; Vissing, John; Galbo, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT: Mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed to cause insulin resistance and that might stimulate cytokine production. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to elucidate the association between mitochondrial myopathy, insulin sensitivity, and cytokine levels in muscle. DESIGN......: The intervention included a 120-minute hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp. Another morning, microdialysis of both vastus lateralis muscles for 4 hours, including one-legged, knee extension exercise for 30 minutes, was performed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Glucose infusion rate during 90-120 minutes of insulin infusion...... was measured. Cytokine concentrations in dialysate were also measured. RESULTS: Muscle strength, percentage fat mass, and creatine kinase in plasma did not differ between groups. The maximal oxygen uptake was 21 ± 3 (SE) (P) and 36 ± 3(C) mL/kg·min (2P insulin, C-peptide, and glucagon were higher...

  3. Human skeletal muscle ceramide content is not a major factor in muscle insulin sensitivity

    Skovbro, M; Baranowski, M; Skov-Jensen, C

    2008-01-01

    -hyperinsulinaemic clamp was performed for 120 and 90 min for step 1 and step 2, respectively. Muscle biopsies were obtained from vastus lateralis at baseline, and after steps 1 and 2. RESULTS: Glucose infusion rates increased in response to insulin infusion, and significant differences were present between groups (T2D......AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: In skeletal muscle, ceramides may be involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance through an attenuation of insulin signalling. This study investigated total skeletal muscle ceramide fatty acid content in participants exhibiting a wide range of insulin sensitivities. METHODS......: The middle-aged male participants (n=33) were matched for lean body mass and divided into four groups: type 2 diabetes (T2D, n=8), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT, n=9), healthy controls (CON, n=8) and endurance-trained (TR, n=8). A two step (28 and 80 mU m(-2) min(-1)) sequential euglycaemic...

  4. A 2-wk reduction of ambulatory activity attenuates peripheral insulin sensitivity

    Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Thyfault, John P; Broholm, Christa

    2010-01-01

    decreased after step reduction, with a post hoc analysis revealing the most pronounced effect after 4 h of insulin infusion. In addition, the 2-wk period induced a 7% decline in VO2 max (ml/min; cardiovascular fitness). Lean mass of legs, but not arms and trunk, decreased concurrently. Taken together, one...... possible biological cause for the public health problem of Type 2 diabetes has been identified. Reduced ambulatory activity for 2 wk in healthy, nonexercising young men significantly reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity, cardiovascular fitness, and lean leg mass........ A reduced number of daily steps induced a significant reduction of 17% in the glucose infusion rate (GIR) during the clamp. This reduction was due to a decline in peripheral insulin sensitivity with no effect on hepatic endogenous glucose production. The insulin-stimulated ratio of pAktthr308/total Akt...

  5. In vivo response of Mesocestoides vogae to human insulin.

    Canclini, L; Esteves, A

    2009-02-01

    Successful host invasion by parasitic helminths involves detection and appropriate response to a range of host-derived signals. Insulin signal response pathways are ancient and highly-conserved throughout the metazoans. However, very little is known about helminth insulin signalling and the potential role it may play in host-parasite interactions. The response of Mesocestoides vogae (Cestoda: Cyclophyllidea) larvae to human insulin was investigated, focusing on tyrosine-phosphorylation status, glucose content, survival and asexual reproduction rate. Parasite larvae were challenged with different levels of insulin for variable periods. The parameters tested were influenced by human insulin, and suggested a host-parasite molecular dialogue.

  6. Effects of water infusions on mechanical properties of carboniferous rocks

    Vavro, M; Chlebik, J

    1977-01-01

    Method of water infusion is used in the Ostrava-Karvina coal region in Czechoslovakia, where the roof of the extracted coal seam consists of thick rock layers (sandstone, Namurian B series) characterized by high resistance to compression, high coefficient of linear elasticity and high capacity of accumulating energy. When the resistance boundary is crossed and the rocks are disturbed this energy is suddenly released and transferred to the surrounding rock masses, coal seam and support system. On the basis of laboratory experiments the physico-mechanical and energy properties of carboniferous rocks together with calculation of their energy coefficient and other parameters are described and calculated. The results of research and theoretical solutions are presented. Practical use of water infusions to influence mechanical properties of sandstone in the roof of coal seams is described with the example of the Dukla coal mine. (5 refs.) (In Polish)

  7. Infusion and sampling site effects on two-pool model estimates of leucine metabolism

    Helland, S.J.; Grisdale-Helland, B.; Nissen, S.

    1988-01-01

    To assess the effect of site of isotope infusion on estimates of leucine metabolism infusions of alpha-[4,5-3H]ketoisocaproate (KIC) and [U- 14 C]leucine were made into the left or right ventricles of sheep and pigs. Blood was sampled from the opposite ventricle. In both species, left ventricular infusions resulted in significantly lower specific radioactivities (SA) of [ 14 C]leucine and [ 3 H]KIC. [ 14 C]KIC SA was found to be insensitive to infusion and sampling sites. [ 14 C]KIC was in addition found to be equal to the SA of [ 14 C]leucine only during the left heart infusions. Therefore, [ 14 C]KIC SA was used as the only estimate for [ 14 C]SA in the equations for the two-pool model. This model eliminated the influence of site of infusion and blood sampling on the estimates for leucine entry and reduced the impact on the estimates for proteolysis and oxidation. This two-pool model could not compensate for the underestimation of transamination reactions occurring during the traditional venous isotope infusion and arterial blood sampling

  8. Intensive insulin treatment improves forearm blood flow in critically ill patients: a randomized parallel design clinical trial.

    Žuran, Ivan; Poredos, Pavel; Skale, Rafael; Voga, Gorazd; Gabrscek, Lucija; Pareznik, Roman

    2009-01-01

    Intensive insulin treatment of critically ill patients was seen as a promising method of treatment, though recent studies showed that reducing the blood glucose level below 6 mmol/l had a detrimental outcome. The mechanisms of the effects of insulin in the critically ill are not completely understood. The purpose of the study was to test the hypothesis that intensive insulin treatment may influence forearm blood flow independently of global hemodynamic indicators. The study encompassed 29 patients of both sexes who were admitted to the intensive care unit due to sepsis and required artificial ventilation as the result of acute respiratory failure. 14 patients were randomly selected for intensive insulin treatment (Group 1; blood glucose concentration 4.4-6.1 mmol/l), and 15 were selected for conventional insulin treatment (Group 2; blood glucose level 7.0 mmol/l-11.0 mmol/l). At the start of the study (t0, beginning up to 48 hours after admittance and the commencement of artificial ventilation), at 2 hours (t1), 24 hours (t2), and 72 hours (t3) flow in the forearm was measured for 60 minutes using the strain-gauge plethysmography method. Student's t-test of independent samples was used for comparisons between the two groups, and Mann-Whitney's U-test where appropriate. Linear regression analysis and the Pearson correlation coefficient were used to determine the levels of correlation. The difference in 60-minute forearm flow at the start of the study (t0) was not statistically significant between groups, while at t2 and t3 significantly higher values were recorded in Group 1 (t2; Group 1: 420.6 +/- 188.8 ml/100 ml tissue; Group 2: 266.1 +/- 122.2 ml/100 ml tissue (95% CI 30.9-278.0, P = 0.02); t3; Group 1: 369.9 +/- 150.3 ml/100 ml tissue; Group 2: 272.6 +/- 85.7 ml/100 ml tissue (95% CI 5.4-190.0, P = 0.04). At t1 a trend towards significantly higher values in Group 1 was noted (P = 0.05). The level of forearm flow was related to the amount of insulin infusion (r

  9. The influence of puberty on vitamin D status in obese children and the possible relation between vitamin D deficiency and insulin resistance.

    Gutiérrez Medina, Sonsoles; Gavela-Pérez, Teresa; Domínguez-Garrido, María Nieves; Gutiérrez-Moreno, Elisa; Rovira, Adela; Garcés, Carmen; Soriano-Guillén, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Puberty can affect vitamin D levels. The goal of this study was to analyze the relation between vitamin D deficiency and puberty in obese Spanish children, along with the possible interrelation between vitamin D status and degree of insulin resistance. A cross-sectional study was carried out, in which clinical and biochemical data were gathered from 120 obese and 50 normal weight children between January 2011 and January 2013. Mean vitamin D levels were 19.5 and 31.6 ng/mL in obese pubertal and obese prepubertal children, respectively. About 75% of the obese pubertal subjects and 46% of the obese prepubertal subjects had vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D levels were significantly lower in pubescent subjects compared with pre-pubescent subjects in summer, fall, and winter. There was no apparent relation between vitamin D levels and homeostasis model assessment index for insulin resistence (expressed in standard deviation score for sex and Tanner stage) in either puberty or pre-puberty. Puberty may be a risk factor for the vitamin D deficiency commonly found in the obese child population. This deficiency is not associated with higher insulin resistance in obese pubertal children compared with obese prepubertal children.

  10. Influence of a mini-trampoline rebound exercise program on insulin resistance, lipid profile and central obesity in individuals with type 2 diabetes.

    Nuhu, Jibril M; Maharaj, Sonill S

    2018-04-01

    Exercises are important as an adjuvant for managing diabetes but due to fatigue and time constraints, individuals with diabetes may not engage in them. Jumping on a mini-trampoline referred to as rebound exercise is an aerobic activity used for exercise training benefits but only little research is available on its effects in diabetes. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of mini-trampoline rebound exercise on insulin resistance, lipid profile and central obesity in type 2 diabetics. Sixty non-insulin dependent type 2 diabetics (median age: 39.0 years, median body mass index: 25.2 kg/m2) recruited using convenience sampling were randomized to a rebound exercise group (N.=30) or a control group (N.=30). The control group read health magazines or watched television while the rebound exercise group jumped on a mini-trampoline at moderate intensity for 30 minutes three times per week for 12 weeks. Postrebound exercise, significant improvements in insulin resistance, lipid profile and waist circumference were noted when compared to the control (Ptrampoline rebound exercise is beneficial for individuals with type 2 diabetes and can serve as a useful exercise approach in the management of cardiovascular risk in diabetes.

  11. Giving an insulin injection

    ... hand. The bubbles will float to the top. Push the bubbles back into the insulin bottle, then pull back to ... hand. The bubbles will float to the top. Push the bubbles back into the insulin bottle, then pull back to ...

  12. Insulin Resistance and Prediabetes

    ... Your Baby is Born Monogenic Diabetes Insulin Resistance & Prediabetes Insulin resistance and prediabetes occur when your body ... will stay in the healthy range. What is prediabetes? Prediabetes means your blood glucose levels are higher ...

  13. Strontium-rubidium infusion pump with in-line dosimetry

    Barker, S.L.; Loberg, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    A strontium-rubidium infusion system is described which consists of: (a) means for generating rubidium 82 in a solution which can be infused into a patient; (b) means for infusing the solution into a patient; (c) means for measuring the radioactivity present in the solution as it is infused into the patient; and (d) means for controlling the means for infusing in response to the amount of radioactivity which has been infused into the patient

  14. Pharmacokinetics and toxicology of continuously infused nitroimidazoles

    Eifel, P.J.; Brown, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and toxicology of misonidazole (MISO) and SR-2508 given by continuous intraperitoneal infusion were studied in female C 3 H mice. The survival (time to death) of animals receiving continuous infusions of SR-2508 and MISO was compared and related to plasma concentration, rate of infusion and total amount of drug delivered. Brain and plasma concentrations were determined by HPLC. For SR-2508, plasma concentration was directly proportional to the infusion rate. However, as the infusion rate of MISO was doubled, the plasma concentration of MISO increased approximately 6-fold, reflecting a substantial increase in the apparent half-life. The brain/plasma concentration ratio in animals infused for up to 6 days with SR-2508 remained constant, at approximately 0.09. At plasma concentrations of 0.08-1.5 mM, animals receiving SR-2508 survived approximately 3 times as long as animals exposed to a comparable plasma concentration of MISO. Even at the lowest infusion rates employed in this study, the survival of mice receiving SR-2508 was much shorter than would have been predicted if the toxicity of these two drugs were solely related to the integral brain exposure. The low brain/plasma concentration ratio of SR-2508 was maintained throughout long continuous exposures

  15. The effect of glucagon on infusion cholangiography

    Evans, A.F.; Whitehouse, G.H.

    1979-01-01

    An assessment has been made of the effects of glucagon on biliary tract opacification during intravenous cholangiography. Two series of infusion cholangiograms were obtained at two investigating centres designated A and B. In series A, 41 patients had ioglycamide infusions at a rate of 0.2833 g min -1 over 1 h. In series B, 31 patients had ioglycamide infusions at a rate of 0.3886 g min -1 over 30 min. Radiographs were taken in both series immediately at the end of the infusion, 10 min later and 30 min after the infusion. Two mg of intravenous glucagon was injected into alternate cases in both series A and B immediately after the first radiograph was taken at the completion of the ioglycamide infusion. Two observers in each series then assessed the radiographic opacification of the biliary system without prior knowledge of which patients had received the glucagon. Delineation of the biliary system was considered better in both series in those patients who received glucagon when compared with the controls. Gallbladder opacification was definitely increased in series A in those receiving glucagon, and a similar tendency was shown in series B. The amount of contrast in the upper intestine was increased in series A in the glucagon group, but not in series B. It is concluded that glucagon improves visualisation of the biliary tract, especially the gallbladder at infusion cholangiography. (author)

  16. Postprandial changes in glucose oxidation and insulin sensitivity in metabolic syndrome: Influence of fibroblast growth factor 21 and vitamin D status.

    Pathak, Kaveri; Soares, Mario J; Zhao, Yun; James, Anthony P; Sherriff, Jillian L; Newsholme, Philip

    2017-05-01

    Metabolic inflexibility due to insulin resistance has been reported in metabolic syndrome (MetS). Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) and vitamin D status may improve insulin sensitivity. The aim of this study was to investigate glucose-induced thermogenesis and oxidation in MetS, and to examine whether changes in FGF21 or prevailing vitamin D status modulated defined metabolic parameters. Forty-eight overweight and obese older adults (14 men, 34 women; ages 51 ± 15 y) were studied. Resting metabolic rate (RMR) and respiratory quotient (RQ) were measured before and intermittently for 2 h after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The total area under the curve (TAUC) was calculated. Insulin sensitivity index (ISI) was determined as 10 4 /(insulin × glucose) for fasting and 2 h venous blood. Fat mass (FM) and fat free mass (FFM) were measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Participants were grouped by metabolic syndrome (MetS+ for disease presence; MetS- when no disease was present) and by median 25 hydroxyvitamin D (OHD) concentration as VD_low and VD_high. 25 OHD was also tested as a continuous variable. A parsimonious 2 × 2 analysis of variance included age, FM, FFM and MetS × sex interaction. Adjusted RMR was similar between groups but an interactive effect of MetS and sex was noted. Fasting RQ was significantly different between vitamin groups (VD_low: 0.835 ± 0.008 versus VD_high: 0.810 ± 0.008; P = 0.024) and fasting ISI was significantly greater in MetS- compared with MetS+ (P = 0.037). Postglucose increases in thermogenesis, RQ, and FGF21 were significant, but ISI decreased. Adjusted postprandial TAUC_RQ (VD_low: 1.71 ± 0.01; VD_high: 1.74 ± 0.001; P = 0.041) and ISI_2 h (VD_low: 35.41 ± 0.21; VD_high: 101.90 ± 0.21; P = 0.001) were significantly different. Adjusted FGF21 was similar across all comparisons before and after OGTT. Higher vitamin D status, but not FGF21, was associated with greater postprandial

  17. An Improved PID Algorithm Based on Insulin-on-Board Estimate for Blood Glucose Control with Type 1 Diabetes.

    Hu, Ruiqiang; Li, Chengwei

    2015-01-01

    Automated closed-loop insulin infusion therapy has been studied for many years. In closed-loop system, the control algorithm is the key technique of precise insulin infusion. The control algorithm needs to be designed and validated. In this paper, an improved PID algorithm based on insulin-on-board estimate is proposed and computer simulations are done using a combinational mathematical model of the dynamics of blood glucose-insulin regulation in the blood system. The simulation results demonstrate that the improved PID algorithm can perform well in different carbohydrate ingestion and different insulin sensitivity situations. Compared with the traditional PID algorithm, the control performance is improved obviously and hypoglycemia can be avoided. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed control algorithm, in silico testing is done using the UVa/Padova virtual patient software.

  18. Prolactin effect on the insulin content of albino rats in different physiological states

    Megahed, Y.M.; Abdel-Wahab, M.F.; El-Mougi, S.M.; El-Sayed, F.B.; Kuwait Univ.)

    1980-01-01

    The metabolic action of prolactin on insulin levels in plasma and pancreas has been studied. Prolactin was injected in a single dose or single daily doses on 4 successive days into albino rats in six different physiological states. Insulin was determined by radioimmunoassay using 125 I insulin. From the results it is concluded that prolactin injected i.p. influences the output of insulin and stimulates the pancreas to secrete insulin into the plasma. (author)

  19. Effects of niacin supplementation on the insulin resistance in Holstein cows during early lactation

    Talija Hristovska; Marko R. Cincović; Branislava Belić; Dragica Stojanović; Milanka Jezdimirović; Radojica Đoković; Bojan Toholj

    2017-01-01

    Insulin resistance in early lactation includes low glucose concentration, low insulin release and responsiveness and high lipolysis. Niacin is important antilipolytic agent and leads to increase glucose and insulin concentration. The objectives of this study were to determine the influence of niacin on the insulin resistance in cows during early lactation using the difference of value and regression analysis between blood non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA), glucose and insulin concentrations, r...

  20. Modern approach to basal-bolus therapy with glargine and glulisine insulin analoguesin various age groups

    Natalya Nikitichna Volevodz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available DCCT (Diabetes Control and Complications Trial study established that intensified insulin therapy in multiple daily injections (MDI or continuous insulin infusion (CSII regimens substantially reduce both development and progression of complications in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM as compared to conventional insulin therapy. Insulin analogues possess better pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics than unmodified human insulin agents. These characteristics are beneficial for management of diabetes mellitus, allowing better glycemic outcomes with lower incidence of hypoglycemia.Current review discusses specifics of therapy with glargine (Lantus? and glulisine (Apidra? insulin analogues. Authors analyzed available to date results from corresponding clinical trials in children, adolescents and adults. Pharmacoeconomic aspects and matters of dosage of glargine and glulisine are further addressed.

  1. Classifying insulin regimens

    Neu, A; Lange, K; Barrett, T

    2015-01-01

    Modern insulin regimens for the treatment of type 1 diabetes are highly individualized. The concept of an individually tailored medicine accounts for a broad variety of different insulin regimens applied. Despite clear recommendations for insulin management in children and adolescents with type 1...

  2. Glycosphingolipids and insulin resistance

    Langeveld, Mirjam; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk for insulin resistance, a state characterized by impaired responsiveness of liver, muscle and adipose tissue to insulin. One class of lipids involved in the development of insulin resistance are the (glyco)sphingolipids. Ceramide, the most simple

  3. Thrombolytic treatment for acute ischemic cerebral stroke: intraarterial urokinase infusion vs. intravenous heparin and urokinase infusion

    Ko, Gi Young; Suh, Dae Chul; Lee, Jae Hong; Kim, Jun Hyoung; Choi, Choong Gon; Lee, Ho Kyu; Lee, Myoung Chong

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and limitation of intra-arterial urokinase (IAUK) infusion for treatment of acute cerebral stroke. Twenty-seven acute cerebral stroke patients treated with IAUK infusion within six hours of stroke onset were reviewed. All patients showed normal initial brain findings on CT. In 21 patients, urokinase(5-15 x 10 5 IU) was administered through a microcatheter placed into or proximal to occluded segment. Mechanical disruption of thrombus by guidewire was performed in 17 patients. Angiographic and clinical responses and complications after IAUK infusion, were evaluated and the results were compared with those of intravenous heparin(N=19) and urokinase infusion(N=19). Complete or partial angiographic recanalization of occluded segment was found in 18 patients (67%), and neurologic improvement was followed in 14 patients(52%). The degree of improvement on the stroke scale score after IAUK infusion was statistically more significant(p<0.05) than that shown after intravenous heparin and urokinase infusion. Complications after IAUK infusion were large(15%) and small amount intracerebral hemorrhage(15%), contrast leakage into brain parenchyma(11%), and gastrointestinal bleeding(4%). Between the IAVK and the intravenous urokinase infusion group, differences in extent and types of complications were statistically insignificant, but were significantly higher in those two groups than in the intravenous heparin infusion group. IAUK infusion may be effective for the treatment of acute cerebral stroke

  4. Insulin structure and stability.

    Brange, J; Langkjoer, L

    1993-01-01

    Insulin is composed of 51 amino acids in two peptide chains (A and B) linked by two disulfide bonds. The three-dimensional structure of the insulin molecule (insulin monomer), essentially the same in solution and in solid phase, exists in two main conformations. These differ in the extent of helix in the B chain which is governed by the presence of phenol or its derivatives. In acid and neutral solutions, in concentrations relevant for pharmaceutical formulation, the insulin monomer assembles to dimers and at neutral pH, in the presence of zinc ions, further to hexamers. Many crystalline modifications of insulin have been identified but only those with the hexamer as the basic unit are utilized in preparations for therapy. The insulin hexamer forms a relatively stable unit but some flexibility remains within the individual molecules. The intrinsic flexibility at the ends of the B chain plays an important role in governing the physical and chemical stability of insulin. A variety of chemical changes of the primary structure (yielding insulin derivatives), and physical modifications of the secondary to quaternary structures (resulting in "denaturation," aggregation, and precipitation) are known to affect insulin and insulin preparations during storage and use (Fig. 8). The tendency of insulin to undergo structural transformation resulting in aggregation and formation of insoluble insulin fibrils has been one of the most intriguing and widely studied phenomena in relation to insulin stability. Although the exact mechanism of fibril formation is still obscure, it is now clear that the initial step is an exposure of certain hydrophobic residues, normally buried in the three-dimensional structure, to the surface of the insulin monomer. This requires displacement of the COOH-terminal B-chain residues from their normal position which can only be accomplished via monomerization of the insulin. Therefore, most methods stabilizing insulin against fibrillation share the

  5. Financial analysis for the infusion alliance.

    Perucca, Roxanne

    2010-01-01

    Providing high-quality, cost-efficient care is a major strategic initiative of every health care organization. Today's health care environment is transparent; very competitive; and focused upon providing exceptional service, safety, and quality. Establishing an infusion alliance facilitates the achievement of organizational strategic initiatives, that is, increases patient throughput, decreases length of stay, prevents the occurrence of infusion-related complications, enhances customer satisfaction, and provides greater cost-efficiency. This article will discuss how to develop a financial analysis that promotes value and enhances the financial outcomes of an infusion alliance.

  6. Krypton 81m infusion studies. Chapter 18

    Kaplan, E.; Mayron, L.W.; Friedman, A.M.; Gindler, J.E.

    1978-01-01

    A technique is described to give a continuous, constant-rate, intravascular infusion of 81 Krsup(m). Modifications of earlier generators included production of sodium-free 81 Rb, the use of a solution of commercial sterile isotonic non-ionic 5% dextrose-in-water as an eluant, the incorporation of a constant-rate infusion pump, and the miniaturization of the generator column and catheter system. Results are presented of studies of 81 Krsup(m) distribution in dogs, using both intravenous and intra-arterial infusion. (author)

  7. Insulin Regulates Hepatic Triglyceride Secretion and Lipid Content via Signaling in the Brain.

    Scherer, Thomas; Lindtner, Claudia; O'Hare, James; Hackl, Martina; Zielinski, Elizabeth; Freudenthaler, Angelika; Baumgartner-Parzer, Sabina; Tödter, Klaus; Heeren, Joerg; Krššák, Martin; Scheja, Ludger; Fürnsinn, Clemens; Buettner, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    Hepatic steatosis is common in obesity and insulin resistance and results from a net retention of lipids in the liver. A key mechanism to prevent steatosis is to increase secretion of triglycerides (TG) packaged as VLDLs. Insulin controls nutrient partitioning via signaling through its cognate receptor in peripheral target organs such as liver, muscle, and adipose tissue and via signaling in the central nervous system (CNS) to orchestrate organ cross talk. While hepatic insulin signaling is known to suppress VLDL production from the liver, it is unknown whether brain insulin signaling independently regulates hepatic VLDL secretion. Here, we show that in conscious, unrestrained male Sprague Dawley rats the infusion of insulin into the third ventricle acutely increased hepatic TG secretion. Chronic infusion of insulin into the CNS via osmotic minipumps reduced the hepatic lipid content as assessed by noninvasive (1)H-MRS and lipid profiling independent of changes in hepatic de novo lipogenesis and food intake. In mice that lack the insulin receptor in the brain, hepatic TG secretion was reduced compared with wild-type littermate controls. These studies identify brain insulin as an important permissive factor in hepatic VLDL secretion that protects against hepatic steatosis. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  8. Health-Related Quality of Life, Treatment Satisfaction, and Costs Associated With Intraperitoneal Versus Subcutaneous Insulin Administration in Type 1 Diabetes

    Logtenberg, Susan J.; Kleefstra, Nanne; Houweling, Sebastiaan T.; Groenier, Klaas H.; Gans, Reinold O.; Bilo, Henk J.

    OBJECTIVE - To investigate the effects of continuous intraperitoneal insulin infusion (CIPII) compared with subcutaneous insulin on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and treatment satisfaction, and to perform a cost analysis in type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - We used an

  9. Generic Safety Requirements for Developing Safe Insulin Pump Software

    Zhang, Yi; Jetley, Raoul; Jones, Paul L; Ray, Arnab

    2011-01-01

    Background The authors previously introduced a highly abstract generic insulin infusion pump (GIIP) model that identified common features and hazards shared by most insulin pumps on the market. The aim of this article is to extend our previous work on the GIIP model by articulating safety requirements that address the identified GIIP hazards. These safety requirements can be validated by manufacturers, and may ultimately serve as a safety reference for insulin pump software. Together, these two publications can serve as a basis for discussing insulin pump safety in the diabetes community. Methods In our previous work, we established a generic insulin pump architecture that abstracts functions common to many insulin pumps currently on the market and near-future pump designs. We then carried out a preliminary hazard analysis based on this architecture that included consultations with many domain experts. Further consultation with domain experts resulted in the safety requirements used in the modeling work presented in this article. Results Generic safety requirements for the GIIP model are presented, as appropriate, in parameterized format to accommodate clinical practices or specific insulin pump criteria important to safe device performance. Conclusions We believe that there is considerable value in having the diabetes, academic, and manufacturing communities consider and discuss these generic safety requirements. We hope that the communities will extend and revise them, make them more representative and comprehensive, experiment with them, and use them as a means for assessing the safety of insulin pump software designs. One potential use of these requirements is to integrate them into model-based engineering (MBE) software development methods. We believe, based on our experiences, that implementing safety requirements using MBE methods holds promise in reducing design/implementation flaws in insulin pump development and evolutionary processes, therefore improving

  10. [Changes in the secretion of somatotropin and insulin in hyperthyroidism].

    Cavagnini, F; Peracchi, M; Panerai, A E; Pinto, M

    1975-06-01

    Twenty hyperthyroid patients were investigated for growth hormone (GH) and immunoreactive insulin (IRI) secretion in response to insulin hypoglycaemia, arginine infusion and glucose-induced hyperglycaemia. GH response to either insulin hypoglycaemia or arginine infusion was significantly reduced in these patients compared with 20 normal subjects. Thyrotoxic patients also displayed an abnormal GH pattern after a 100 g oral glucose load: in fact, serum GH underwent a paradoxical increase in spite of abnormally high levels attained by blood glucose. IRI secretion was also clearly reduced in response to arginine infusion and moderately blunted after oral glucose. In a group of patients re-evaluated under euthyroid conditions, a fair increase of GH response to the provocative stimuli jointly with the restoration of a normal suppressibility of serum GH by glucose were noted; by contrast, no significant change of IRI response to arginine or glucose took place. Likewise, the impairment of glucose tolerance was not improved. These findings indicate that an impairment of GH and IRI secretion is present in hyperthyroidism. The possibility that a potentiation of the catecholamine effects caused by the thyroid hormones is involved in this alteration deserves consideration.

  11. Effect of insulin pump and continuous intravenous insulin on ketone body metabolism, blood gas indexes and stress state in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis

    Hui-Jin Shi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of insulin pump and continuous intravenous insulin on ketone body metabolism, blood gas indexes and stress state in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis. Methods: Patients with diabetic ketoacidosis who were treated in Meizhou Maternal and Child Heath Hospital between May 2014 and March 2017 were selected as the research subjects and randomly divided into the group A who received subcutaneous insulin infusion by insulin pump and the group B who received intravenous small-dose insulin injection by micropump. The indexes of ketone body, blood gas and stress were measured before and after treatment. Results: 12 h and 24 h after treatment, serum β-hydroxybutyrate, MDA, NE, ACTH and Cor contents of both groups of patients were significantly lower than those before treatment while pH, HCO3 - and base excess levels as well as serum SOD, GSH-Px, CAT and TAC contents were significantly higher than those before treatment, and serum β-hydroxybutyrate, MDA, NE, ACTH and Cor contents of group A were significantly lower than those of group B while pH, HCO3 - and base excess levels as well as serum SOD, GSH-Px, CAT and TAC contents were significantly higher than those of group B. Conclusion: Subcutaneous insulin infusion by insulin pump can improve ketone body metabolism, acidosis status and stress state in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis.

  12. Lipid metabolism disturbances contribute to insulin resistance and decrease insulin sensitivity by malathion exposure in Wistar rat.

    Lasram, Mohamed Montassar; Bouzid, Kahena; Douib, Ines Bini; Annabi, Alya; El Elj, Naziha; El Fazaa, Saloua; Abdelmoula, Jaouida; Gharbi, Najoua

    2015-04-01

    Several studies showed that organophosphorus pesticides disturb glucose homeostasis and can increase incidence of metabolic disorders and diabetes via insulin resistance. The current study investigates the influence of malathion on glucose metabolism regulation, in vivo, during subchronic exposure. Malathion was administered orally (200 mg/kg), once a day for 28 consecutive days. Plasma glucose, insulin and Glycated hemoglobin levels were significantly increased while hepatic glycogen content was decreased in intoxicated animals compared with the control group. Furthermore, there was a significant disturbance of lipid content in subchronic treated and post-treated rats deprived of malathion for one month. In addition, we used the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) to assess insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and pancreatic β-cell function (HOMA-β). Our results show that malathion increases insulin resistance biomarkers and decreases insulin sensitivity indices. Statistical analysis demonstrates that there was a positive and strong significant correlation between insulin level and insulin resistance indices, HOMA-IR, HOMA-β. Similarly, a negative and significant correlation was also found between insulin level and insulin sensitivity indices. For the first time, we demonstrate that malathion induces insulin resistance in vivo using homeostasis model assessment and these changes were detectable one month after the end of exposure. To explain insulin resistance induced by malathion we focus on lipid metabolism disturbances and their interaction with many proteins involved in insulin signaling pathways.

  13. Insulin and the Lung

    Singh, Suchita; Prakash, Y S; Linneberg, Allan

    2013-01-01

    , molecular understanding is necessary. Insulin resistance is a strong, independent risk factor for asthma development, but it is unknown whether a direct effect of insulin on the lung is involved. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding the effect of insulin on cellular components of the lung...... and highlights the molecular consequences of insulin-related metabolic signaling cascades that could adversely affect lung structure and function. Examples include airway smooth muscle proliferation and contractility and regulatory signaling networks that are associated with asthma. These aspects of insulin...

  14. Effects of 6-Weeks High-Intensity Interval Training in Schoolchildren with Insulin Resistance: Influence of Biological Maturation on Metabolic, Body Composition, Cardiovascular and Performance Non-responses

    Cristian Alvarez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous studies have observed significant heterogeneity in the magnitude of change in measures of metabolic response to exercise training. There are a lack of studies examining the prevalence of non-responders (NRs in children while considering other potential environmental factors involved such as biological maturation.Aim: To compare the effects and prevalence of NRs to improve the insulin resistance level (by HOMA-IR, as well as to other anthropometric, cardiovascular, and performance co-variables, between early (EM and normal maturation (NM in insulin-resistance schoolchildren after 6-weeks of HIIT.Methods: Sedentary children (age 11.4 ± 1.7 years were randomized to either HIIT-EM group (n = 12 or HIIT-NM group (n = 17. Fasting glucose (FGL, fasting insulin (FINS and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistant (HOMA-IR were assessed as the main outcomes, as well as the body composition [body mass, body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, and tricipital (TSF, suprailiac (SSF and abdominal skinfold (AbdSF], cardiovascular systolic (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP, and muscular performance [one-repetition maximum strength leg-extension (1RMLE and upper row (1RMUR tests] co-variables were assessed before and after intervention. Responders or NRs to training were defined as a change in the typical error method from baseline to follow-up for the main outcomes and co-variables.Results: There were no significant differences between groups in the prevalence of NRs based on FGL, FINS, and HOMA-IR. There were significant differences in NRs prevalence to decrease co-variables body mass (HIIT-EM 66.6% vs. HIIT-NM 35.2% and SBP (HIIT-EM 41.6% vs. HIIT-NM 70.5%. A high risk [based on odds ratios (OR] of NRs cases was detected for FGL, OR = 3.2 (0.2 to 5.6, and HOMA-IR, OR = 3.2 (0.2 to 6.0. Additionally, both HIIT-EM and HIIT-NM groups showed significant decreases (P < 0.05 in TSF, SSF, and AbdSF skinfold, and similar

  15. Interleukin-1β inhibits insulin signaling and prevents insulin-stimulated system A amino acid transport in primary human trophoblasts.

    Aye, Irving L M H; Jansson, Thomas; Powell, Theresa L

    2013-12-05

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) promotes insulin resistance in tissues such as liver and skeletal muscle; however the influence of IL-1β on placental insulin signaling is unknown. We recently reported increased IL-1β protein expression in placentas of obese mothers, which could contribute to insulin resistance. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that IL-1β inhibits insulin signaling and prevents insulin-stimulated amino acid transport in cultured primary human trophoblast (PHT) cells. Cultured trophoblasts isolated from term placentas were treated with physiological concentrations of IL-1β (10pg/ml) for 24h. IL-1β increased the phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) at Ser307 (inhibitory) and decreased total IRS-1 protein abundance but did not affect insulin receptor β expression. Furthermore, IL-1β inhibited insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of IRS-1 (Tyr612, activation site) and Akt (Thr308) and prevented insulin-stimulated increase in PI3K/p85 and Grb2 protein expression. IL-1β alone stimulated cRaf (Ser338), MEK (Ser221) and Erk1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204) phosphorylation. The inflammatory pathways nuclear factor kappa B and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, which are involved in insulin resistance, were also activated by IL-1β treatment. Moreover, IL-1β inhibited insulin-stimulated System A, but not System L amino acid uptake, indicating functional impairment of insulin signaling. In conclusion, IL-1β inhibited the insulin signaling pathway by inhibiting IRS-1 signaling and prevented insulin-stimulated System A transport, thereby promoting insulin resistance in cultured PHT cells. These findings indicate that conditions which lead to increased systemic maternal or placental IL-1β levels may attenuate the effects of maternal insulin on placental function and consequently fetal growth. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  16. Insulin aspart in diabetic pregnancy

    Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2008-01-01

    in insulin requirements during pregnancy necessitate short-acting insulins for postprandial control of hyperglycemia. The fast-acting insulin analogue insulin aspart has been tested in a large, randomized trial of pregnant women with Type 1 diabetes and offers benefits in control of postprandial...... hyperglycemia with a tendency towards fewer episodes of severe hypoglycemia compared with human insulin. Treatment with insulin aspart was associated with a tendency toward fewer fetal losses and preterm deliveries than treatment with human insulin. Insulin aspart could not be detected in the fetal circulation...... and no increase in insulin antibodies was found. Thus, the use of insulin aspart in pregnancy is regarded safe....

  17. Metformin and insulin receptors

    Vigneri, R.; Gullo, D.; Pezzino, V.

    1984-01-01

    The authors evaluated the effect of metformin (N,N-dimethylbiguanide), a biguanide known to be less toxic than phenformin, on insulin binding to its receptors, both in vitro and in vivo. Specific 125 I-insulin binding to cultured IM-9 human lymphocytes and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells was determined after preincubation with metformin. Specific 125 I-insulin binding to circulating monocytes was also evaluated in six controls, eight obese subjects, and six obese type II diabetic patients before and after a short-term treatment with metformin. Plasma insulin levels and blood glucose were also measured on both occasions. Metformin significantly increased insulin binding in vitro to both IM-9 lymphocytes and MCF-7 cells; the maximum increment was 47.1% and 38.0%, respectively. Metformin treatment significantly increased insulin binding in vivo to monocytes of obese subjects and diabetic patients. Scatchard analysis indicated that the increased binding was mainly due to an increase in receptor capacity. Insulin binding to monocytes of normal controls was unchanged after metformin as were insulin levels in all groups; blood glucose was significantly reduced after metformin only in diabetic patients. These data indicate that metformin increases insulin binding to its receptors in vitro and in vivo. The effect in vivo is observed in obese subjects and in obese type II diabetic patients, paralleling the clinical effectiveness of this antidiabetic agent, and is not due to receptor regulation by circulating insulin, since no variation in insulin levels was recorded

  18. Toward understanding insulin fibrillation.

    Brange, J; Andersen, L; Laursen, E D; Meyn, G; Rasmussen, E

    1997-05-01

    Formation of insulin fibrils is a physical process by which partially unfolded insulin molecules interact with each other to form linear aggregates. Shielding of hydrophobic domains is the main driving force for this process, but formation of intermolecular beta-sheet may further stabilize the fibrillar structure. Conformational displacement of the B-chain C-terminal with exposure of nonpolar, aliphatic core residues, including A2, A3, B11, and B15, plays a crucial role in the fibrillation process. Recent crystal analyses and molecular modeling studies have suggested that when insulin fibrillates this exposed domain interacts with a hydrophobic surface domain formed by the aliphatic residues A13, B6, B14, B17, and B18, normally buried when three insulin dimers form a hexamer. In rabbit immunization experiments, insulin fibrils did not elicit an increased immune response with respect to formation of IgG insulin antibodies when compared with native insulin. In contrast, the IgE response increased with increasing content of insulin in fibrillar form. Strategies and practical approaches to prevent insulin from forming fibrils are reviewed. Stabilization of the insulin hexameric structure and blockage of hydrophobic interfaces by addition of surfactants are the most effective means of counteracting insulin fibrillation.

  19. A new infusion pathway intactness monitoring system.

    Ogawa, Hidekuni; Yonezawa, Yoshiharu; Maki, Hiromichi; Ninomiya, Ishio; Sata, Koji; Hamada, Shingo; Caldwell, W Morton

    2006-01-01

    A new infusion pathway monitoring system has been developed for hospital and home use. The system consists of linear integrated circuits and a low-power 8-bit single chip microcomputer which constantly monitors the infusion pathway intactness. An AC (alternating current) voltage is induced on the patient's body by electrostatic coupling from the normal 100 volt, 60 Hz AC power line wiring field in the patient's room. The induced AC voltage can be recorded by a main electrode wrapped around the infusion polyvinyl chloride tube. A reference electrode is wrapped on the electrode to monitor the AC voltage around the main electrode. If the injection needle or infusion tube becomes detached, then the system detects changes in the induced AC voltages and alerts the nursing station, via the nurse call system or PHS (personal handy phone system).

  20. Effect of intravenous dexmedetomidine infusion on some ...

    Ahmed G. Yacout

    2011-12-17

    Dec 17, 2011 ... a Anaesthesia and Surgical Intensive Care Department, Faculty of Medicine, ... idine infusion in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery on stress .... the spinal cord, where drug activity attenuates nociceptive sig-.

  1. Carbon Nanotube Infused Launch Vehicle Structures

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For the past 5 years Orbital ATK has been investing in, prototyping, and testing carbon nanotube infused composite structures to evaluate their impact on launch...

  2. Proghrelin-derived peptides influence the secretion of insulin, glucagon, pancreatic polypeptide and somatostatin: a study on isolated islets from mouse and rat pancreas

    Qader, S.S.; Hakanson, R.; Lundquist, I.

    2008-01-01

    ghrelin, and to the 23-amino acid peptide obestatin, claimed to be a physiological opponent of acyl ghrelin. This study examines the effects of the proghrelin products, alone and in combinations, on the secretion of insulin, glucagon, pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and somatostatin from isolated islets...... times higher concentration than acyl ghrelin (corresponding to the ratio of the two peptides in circulation), desacyl ghrelin abolished the effects of acyl ghrelin but not those of obestatin. Acyl ghrelin and obestatin affected the secretion of glucagon, PP and somatostatin at physiologically relevant...

  3. Effects of 6-Weeks High-Intensity Interval Training in Schoolchildren with Insulin Resistance: Influence of Biological Maturation on Metabolic, Body Composition, Cardiovascular and Performance Non-responses

    Alvarez, Cristian; Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2017-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have observed significant heterogeneity in the magnitude of change in measures of metabolic response to exercise training. There are a lack of studies examining the prevalence of non-responders (NRs) in children while considering other potential environmental factors involved such as biological maturation. Aim: To compare the effects and prevalence of NRs to improve the insulin resistance level (by HOMA-IR), as well as to other anthropometric, cardiovascular, and performance co-variables, between early (EM) and normal maturation (NM) in insulin-resistance schoolchildren after 6-weeks of HIIT. Methods: Sedentary children (age 11.4 ± 1.7 years) were randomized to either HIIT-EM group (n = 12) or HIIT-NM group (n = 17). Fasting glucose (FGL), fasting insulin (FINS) and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistant (HOMA-IR) were assessed as the main outcomes, as well as the body composition [body mass, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and tricipital (TSF), suprailiac (SSF) and abdominal skinfold (AbdSF)], cardiovascular systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and muscular performance [one-repetition maximum strength leg-extension (1RMLE) and upper row (1RMUR) tests] co-variables were assessed before and after intervention. Responders or NRs to training were defined as a change in the typical error method from baseline to follow-up for the main outcomes and co-variables. Results: There were no significant differences between groups in the prevalence of NRs based on FGL, FINS, and HOMA-IR. There were significant differences in NRs prevalence to decrease co-variables body mass (HIIT-EM 66.6% vs. HIIT-NM 35.2%) and SBP (HIIT-EM 41.6% vs. HIIT-NM 70.5%). A high risk [based on odds ratios (OR)] of NRs cases was detected for FGL, OR = 3.2 (0.2 to 5.6), and HOMA-IR, OR = 3.2 (0.2 to 6.0). Additionally, both HIIT-EM and HIIT-NM groups showed significant decreases (P cardiovascular parameters can be playing a role in

  4. GENETIC VARIATION IN THE BETA-3-ADRENORECEPTOR GENE (TRP64ARG POLYMORPHISM) AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON ANTHROPOMETRIC PARAMETERS AND INSULIN RESISTANCE AFTER A HIGH PROTEIN/LOW CARBOHYDRATE VERSUS A STANDARD HYPOCALORIC DIET.

    de Luis, Daniel Antonio; Aller, Rocío; Izaola, Olatz; de la Fuente, Beatriz; Romero, Enrique

    2015-08-01

    the Trp64Arg variant in Beta receptor has been reported to be associated with increased body weight and insulin resistance Objective: the aim of our study was to investigate the influence of polymorphism (rs 4994) in Beta-3-adrenergic receptor gene on metabolic response and weight loss in a medium-term intervention study secondary's to a high protein/low carbohydrate vs. a standard hypocaloric diets (1000 kcal/day). a population of 284 obese subjects was analyzed in a randomized trial. A nutritional evaluation was performed at the beginning and at the end of a 9-month period in which subjects received 1 of 2 diets (diet HP: high protein/low carbohydrate vs diet S: standard diet). there were no significant differences between the positive effects (on weight, BMI, waist circumference, fat mass, systolic blood pressure and leptin levels) in either genotype group with both diets. With both diets and only in wild genotype (diet HP vs diet S), total cholesterol (-10.1 ± 3.9 mg/dl vs -10.1 ± 2.2 mg/dl;p>0.05), LDL cholesterol (-9.5 ± 2.1 mg/dl vs -8.5 ± 2.3 mg/dl;p>0.05) and triglycerides (-19.1 ± 2.1 mg/dl vs -14.3 ± 2.1 mg/dl;p>0.05) decreased. The improvement in these parameters was similar in subjects with diet HP than HS. With diet HP and only in wild genotype, insulin levels (-3.7 ± 1.9 UI/L;phypocaloric diets is the greatest in subjects with normal homozygous beta 3-AR gene. Improvement in total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose, insulin and HOMA-R levels is better than in the heterozygous group. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of niacin supplementation on the insulin resistance in Holstein cows during early lactation

    Talija Hristovska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance in early lactation includes low glucose concentration, low insulin release and responsiveness and high lipolysis. Niacin is important antilipolytic agent and leads to increase glucose and insulin concentration. The objectives of this study were to determine the influence of niacin on the insulin resistance in cows during early lactation using the difference of value and regression analysis between blood non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA, glucose and insulin concentrations, revised quantitative insulin sensitivity check index and glucose-to-insulin ratio. Niacin supplementation led to a decrease of NEFA concentration and an increase of glucose and insulin concentrations during the first three weeks after calving. Cows in the niacin group which were more resistant to insulin showed higher concentrations of non-esterified fatty acid in comparison with more sensitive cows from the same group, but still lower than the control. The regression analyses suggest the following characteristics of cows supplemented with niacin in comparison with the control group: the insulin response to glucose was more intense; the antilipolytic effect of insulin was lower; insulin efficiency expressed as glucose-to-insulin ratio increase with a decrease in NEFA. The metabolic changes due to niacin supplementation showed a dual influence on the insulin resistance in dairy cows during early lactation: decreased NEFA concentrations led to a decrease in the insulin resistance (due to an increase in insulin efficiency and insulin sensitivity index, but increased concentrations of insulin and glucose possibly caused an increase in the insulin resistance in dairy cows (due to lower insulin sensitivity index and possibly lower antilipolytic effects of insulin.

  6. Infusion Antihypoxants in Children with Critical Conditions

    Yu. S. Aleksandrovich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia and mitochondrial damage are a key component of the pathogenesis and tanatogenesis of a critical condition, suggesting the need for its prevention and maximally rapid elimination. Objective: to analyze the efficacy and safety of infusion antihypoxants used in critically ill children from the results of researches. Materials and methods. Available investigations dealing with infusion therapy in children and papers on the use of infusion antihypoxants in adults in 2005 to 2013 were sought in the medical databases PubMed and Cochrane Library with their free availability and analyzed. Results. The analysis included 70 trials. The pathophysiology and pathobiochemistry of hypoxia in critically ill children are given; the current principles of its correction by infusion therapy are considered in detail. Particular emphasis is placed on trials evaluating the efficacy and safety of succinic acid solutions in children. Main indications for and contraindications to their use are demonstrated. Conclusion. The use of Krebs cycle substrate-based infusion antihypoxants (malate, succinate is an effective and promising procedure for the intensive therapy and correction of hypoxia in both adults and children with critical conditions. Considering the fact that papers on the use of infusion antihypoxants in children are scanty, there is a need for further investigations. 

  7. Effect of sepsis on VLDL kinetics: responses in basal state and during glucose infusion

    Wolfe, R.R.; Shaw, J.H.; Durkot, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of gram-negative sepsis on the kinetics and oxidation of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) fatty acids was assessed in conscious dogs in the normal state and 24 h after infusion of live Escherichia coli. VLDL, labeled with [2- 3 H]glycerol and [1- 14 C]palmitic acid, was used to trace VLDL kinetics and oxidation, and [1- 13 C]palmitic acid bound to albumin was infused simultaneously to quantify kinetics and oxidation of free fatty acid (FFA) in plasma. Sepsis caused a fivefold increase in the rate of VLDL production (RaVLDL). In the control dogs, the direct oxidation of VLDL-fatty acids was not an important contributor to their overall energy metabolism, but in dogs with sepsis, 17% of the total rate of CO2 production could be accounted for by VLDL-fatty acid oxidation. When glucose was infused into dogs with insulin and glucagon levels clamped at basal levels (by means of infusion of somatostatin and replacement of the hormones), RaVLDL increased significantly in the control dogs, but it did not increase further in dogs with sepsis. The authors conclude that the increase in triglyceride concentration in fasting dogs with gram-negative sepsis is the result of an increase in VLDL production and that the fatty acids in VLDL can serve as an important source of energy in sepsis

  8. Insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation

    Yeom, Chul-gon; Kim, Dong-il; Park, Min-jung; Choi, Joo-hee [College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jieun; Wi, Anjin; Park, Whoashig [Jeollanamdo Forest Resources Research Institute, Naju 520-833 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Ho-jae [College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-741 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soo-hyun, E-mail: parksh@chonnam.ac.kr [College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-05

    Previously, we reported that CARM1 undergoes ubiquitination-dependent degradation in renal podocytes. It was also reported that CARM1 is necessary for fasting-induced hepatic gluconeogenesis. Based on these reports, we hypothesized that treatment with insulin, a hormone typically present under the ‘fed’ condition, would inhibit gluconeogenesis via CARM1 degradation. HepG2 cells, AML-12 cells, and rat primary hepatocytes were treated with insulin to confirm CARM1 downregulation. Surprisingly, insulin treatment increased CARM1 expression in all cell types examined. Furthermore, treatment with insulin increased histone 3 methylation at arginine 17 and 26 in HepG2 cells. To elucidate the role of insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation, the HA-CARM1 plasmid was transfected into HepG2 cells. CARM1 overexpression did not increase the expression of lipogenic proteins generally increased by insulin signaling. Moreover, CARM1 knockdown did not influence insulin sensitivity. Insulin is known to facilitate hepatic proliferation. Like insulin, CARM1 overexpression increased CDK2 and CDK4 expression. In addition, CARM1 knockdown reduced the number of insulin-induced G2/M phase cells. Moreover, GFP-CARM1 overexpression increased the number of G2/M phase cells. Based on these results, we concluded that insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation. These observations indicate that CARM1 plays an important role in liver pathophysiology. - Highlights: • Insulin treatment increases CARM1 expression in hepatocytes. • CARM1 overexpression does not increase the expression of lipogenic proteins. • CARM1 knockdown does not influence insulin sensitivity. • Insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation.

  9. Insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation

    Yeom, Chul-gon; Kim, Dong-il; Park, Min-jung; Choi, Joo-hee; Jeong, Jieun; Wi, Anjin; Park, Whoashig; Han, Ho-jae; Park, Soo-hyun

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we reported that CARM1 undergoes ubiquitination-dependent degradation in renal podocytes. It was also reported that CARM1 is necessary for fasting-induced hepatic gluconeogenesis. Based on these reports, we hypothesized that treatment with insulin, a hormone typically present under the ‘fed’ condition, would inhibit gluconeogenesis via CARM1 degradation. HepG2 cells, AML-12 cells, and rat primary hepatocytes were treated with insulin to confirm CARM1 downregulation. Surprisingly, insulin treatment increased CARM1 expression in all cell types examined. Furthermore, treatment with insulin increased histone 3 methylation at arginine 17 and 26 in HepG2 cells. To elucidate the role of insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation, the HA-CARM1 plasmid was transfected into HepG2 cells. CARM1 overexpression did not increase the expression of lipogenic proteins generally increased by insulin signaling. Moreover, CARM1 knockdown did not influence insulin sensitivity. Insulin is known to facilitate hepatic proliferation. Like insulin, CARM1 overexpression increased CDK2 and CDK4 expression. In addition, CARM1 knockdown reduced the number of insulin-induced G2/M phase cells. Moreover, GFP-CARM1 overexpression increased the number of G2/M phase cells. Based on these results, we concluded that insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation. These observations indicate that CARM1 plays an important role in liver pathophysiology. - Highlights: • Insulin treatment increases CARM1 expression in hepatocytes. • CARM1 overexpression does not increase the expression of lipogenic proteins. • CARM1 knockdown does not influence insulin sensitivity. • Insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation

  10. The adipose transcriptional response to insulin is determined by obesity, not insulin sensitivity

    Rydén, Mikael; Hrydziuszko, Olga; Mileti, Enrichetta

    2016-01-01

    Metabolically healthy obese subjects display preserved insulin sensitivity and a beneficial white adipose tissue gene expression pattern. However, this observation stems from fasting studies when insulin levels are low. We investigated adipose gene expression by 5'Cap-mRNA sequencing in 17 healthy...... non-obese (NO), 21 insulin-sensitive severely obese (ISO), and 30 insulin-resistant severely obese (IRO) subjects, before and 2 hr into a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. ISO and IRO subjects displayed a clear but globally similar transcriptional response to insulin, which differed from the small...... effects observed in NO subjects. In the obese, 231 genes were altered; 71 were enriched in ISO subjects (e.g., phosphorylation processes), and 52 were enriched in IRO subjects (e.g., cellular stimuli). Common cardio-metabolic risk factors and gender do not influence these findings. This study demonstrates...

  11. Effects of 6-Weeks High-Intensity Interval Training in Schoolchildren with Insulin Resistance: Influence of Biological Maturation on Metabolic, Body Composition, Cardiovascular and Performance Non-responses.

    Alvarez, Cristian; Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2017-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have observed significant heterogeneity in the magnitude of change in measures of metabolic response to exercise training. There are a lack of studies examining the prevalence of non-responders (NRs) in children while considering other potential environmental factors involved such as biological maturation. Aim: To compare the effects and prevalence of NRs to improve the insulin resistance level (by HOMA-IR), as well as to other anthropometric, cardiovascular, and performance co-variables, between early (EM) and normal maturation (NM) in insulin-resistance schoolchildren after 6-weeks of HIIT. Methods: Sedentary children (age 11.4 ± 1.7 years) were randomized to either HIIT-EM group ( n = 12) or HIIT-NM group ( n = 17). Fasting glucose (FGL), fasting insulin (FINS) and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistant (HOMA-IR) were assessed as the main outcomes, as well as the body composition [body mass, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and tricipital (TSF), suprailiac (SSF) and abdominal skinfold (AbdSF)], cardiovascular systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and muscular performance [one-repetition maximum strength leg-extension (1RM LE ) and upper row (1RM UR ) tests] co-variables were assessed before and after intervention. Responders or NRs to training were defined as a change in the typical error method from baseline to follow-up for the main outcomes and co-variables. Results: There were no significant differences between groups in the prevalence of NRs based on FGL, FINS, and HOMA-IR. There were significant differences in NRs prevalence to decrease co-variables body mass (HIIT-EM 66.6% vs. HIIT-NM 35.2%) and SBP (HIIT-EM 41.6% vs. HIIT-NM 70.5%). A high risk [based on odds ratios (OR)] of NRs cases was detected for FGL, OR = 3.2 (0.2 to 5.6), and HOMA-IR, OR = 3.2 (0.2 to 6.0). Additionally, both HIIT-EM and HIIT-NM groups showed significant decreases ( P HIIT-EM group showed significant decreases

  12. GLP-1 does not not acutely affect insulin sensitivity in healthy man

    Orskov, L; Holst, J J; Møller, J

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) (7-36 amide) may have the direct effect of increasing insulin sensitivity in healthy man. To evaluate this hypothesis we infused GLP-1 in seven lean healthy men during a hyper insulinaemic (0.8 mU.kg-1.min-1), euglycaemic (5 mmo...

  13. Caffeine's impairment of insulin-mediated glucose disposal cannot be solely attributed to adrenaline in humans

    Battram, D S; Graham, T E; Dela, F

    2007-01-01

    Caffeine (CAF) impedes insulin-mediated glucose disposal (IMGD) and increases plasma adrenaline concentrations ([ADR]; 0.6 nm). While the antagonism of ADR abolishes the CAF effect, infusion of ADR (0.75 nm) has no effect on IMGD. We have now examined CAF and ADR in concert to determine whether...

  14. Static output feedback ℋ ∞ control for a fractional-order glucose-insulin system

    N’ Doye, Ibrahima; Voos, Holger; Darouach, Mohamed; Schneider, Jochen G.

    2015-01-01

    disturbance. Numerical simulations are carried out to illustrate our proposed results and show that the nonlinear fractional-order glucose-insulin systems are, at least, as stable as their integer-order counterpart in the presence of exogenous glucose infusion

  15. Histopathological nerve and skeletal muscle changes in rats subjected to persistent insulin-induced hypoglycemia

    Jensen, Vivi Flou Hjorth; Mølck, Anne-Marie; Heydenreich, Annette

    2016-01-01

    femoris muscle tissue, as little is known about the response to persistent hypoglycemia in these tissues. Histopathologic changes in insulin-infused animals included axonal degeneration and myofibre degeneration. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show that persistent IIH provokes peripheral...

  16. Insulin signaling in various equine tissues under basal conditions and acute stimulation by intravenously injected insulin.

    Warnken, Tobias; Brehm, Ralph; Feige, Karsten; Huber, Korinna

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze key proteins of the equine insulin signaling cascade and their extent of phosphorylation in biopsies from muscle tissue (MT), liver tissue (LT), and nuchal AT, subcutaneous AT, and retroperitoneal adipose tissues. This was investigated under unstimulated (B1) and intravenously insulin stimulated (B2) conditions, which were achieved by injection of insulin (0.1 IU/kg bodyweight) and glucose (150 mg/kg bodyweight). Twelve warmblood horses aged 15 ± 6.8 yr (yr), weighing 559 ± 79 kg, and with a mean body condition score of 4.7 ± 1.5 were included in the study. Key proteins of the insulin signaling cascade were semiquantitatively determined using Western blotting. Furthermore, modulation of the cascade was assessed. The basal expression of the proteins was only slightly influenced during the experimental period. Insulin induced a high extent of phosphorylation of insulin receptor in LT (P < 0.01) but not in MT. Protein kinase B and mechanistic target of rapamycin expressed a higher extent of phosphorylation in all tissues in B2 biopsies. Adenosine monophosphate protein kinase, as a component related to insulin signaling, expressed enhanced phosphorylation in MT (P < 0.05) and adipose tissues (nuchal AT P < 0.05; SCAT P < 0.01; retroperitoneal adipose tissue P < 0.05), but not in LT at B2. Tissue-specific variations in the acute response of insulin signaling to intravenously injected insulin were observed. In conclusion, insulin sensitivity in healthy horses is based on a complex concerted action of different tissues by their variations in the molecular response to insulin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Insulin secretion and action in North Indian women during pregnancy.

    Arora, G P; Almgren, P; Thaman, R G; Pal, A; Groop, L; Vaag, A; Prasad, R B; Brøns, C

    2017-10-01

    The relative roles(s) of impaired insulin secretion vs. insulin resistance in the development of gestational diabetes mellitus depend upon multiple risk factors and diagnostic criteria. Here, we explored their relative contribution to gestational diabetes as defined by the WHO 1999 (GDM1999) and adapted WHO 2013 (GDM2013) criteria, excluding the 1-h glucose value, in a high-risk Indian population from Punjab. Insulin secretion (HOMA2-B) and insulin action (HOMA2-IR) were assessed in 4665 Indian women with or without gestational diabetes defined by the GDM1999 or adapted GDM2013 criteria. Gestational diabetes defined using both criteria was associated with decreased insulin secretion compared with pregnant women with normal glucose tolerance. Women with gestational diabetes defined by the adapted GDM2013, but not GDM1999 criteria, were more insulin resistant than pregnant women with normal glucose tolerance, and furthermore displayed lower insulin secretion than GDM1999 women. Urban habitat, illiteracy, high age and low BMI were independently associated with reduced insulin secretion, whereas Sikh religion, increasing age and BMI, as well as a family history of diabetes were independently associated with increased insulin resistance. Gestational diabetes risk factors influence insulin secretion and action in North Indian women in a differential manner. Gestational diabetes classified using the adapted GDM2013 compared with GDM1999 criteria is associated with more severe impairments of insulin secretion and action. © 2017 Diabetes UK.

  18. The insulin sensitizing effect of topiramate involves KATP channel activation in the central nervous system.

    Coomans, C P; Geerling, J J; van den Berg, S A A; van Diepen, H C; Garcia-Tardón, N; Thomas, A; Schröder-van der Elst, J P; Ouwens, D M; Pijl, H; Rensen, P C N; Havekes, L M; Guigas, B; Romijn, J A

    2013-10-01

    Topiramate improves insulin sensitivity, in addition to its antiepileptic action. However, the underlying mechanism is unknown. Therefore, the present study was aimed at investigating the mechanism of the insulin-sensitizing effect of topiramate both in vivo and in vitro. Male C57Bl/6J mice were fed a run-in high-fat diet for 6 weeks, before receiving topiramate or vehicle mixed in high-fat diet for an additional 6 weeks. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp. The extent to which the insulin sensitizing effects of topiramate were mediated through the CNS were determined by concomitant i.c.v. infusion of vehicle or tolbutamide, an inhibitor of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in neurons. The direct effects of topiramate on insulin signalling and glucose uptake were assessed in vivo and in cultured muscle cells. In hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp conditions, therapeutic plasma concentrations of topiramate (∼4 μg·mL(-1) ) improved insulin sensitivity (glucose infusion rate + 58%). Using 2-deoxy-D-[(3) H]glucose, we established that topiramate improved the insulin-mediated glucose uptake by heart (+92%), muscle (+116%) and adipose tissue (+586%). Upon i.c.v. tolbutamide, the insulin-sensitizing effect of topiramate was completely abrogated. Topiramate did not directly affect glucose uptake or insulin signalling neither in vivo nor in cultured muscle cells. In conclusion, topiramate stimulates insulin-mediated glucose uptake in vivo through the CNS. These observations illustrate the possibility of pharmacological modulation of peripheral insulin resistance through a target in the CNS. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. Insulin pump therapy in children with type 1 diabetes

    Szypowska, Agnieszka; Schwandt, Anke; Svensson, Jannet

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intensified insulin delivery using multiple daily injections (MDI) or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) is recommended in children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) to achieve good metabolic control. OBJECTIVE: To examine the frequency of pump usage in T1D children treated...... in SWEET (Better control in Paediatric and Adolescent diabeteS: Working to crEate CEnTers of Reference) centers and to compare metabolic control between patients treated with CSII vs MDI. METHODS: This study included 16 570 T1D children participating in the SWEET prospective, multicenter, standardized...... is offered by most Sweet centers. The differences between centers affect the frequency of use of modern technology. Despite the heterogeneity of centers, T1D children achieve relatively good metabolic control, especially those treated with insulin pumps and those of younger age....

  20. Effect of catecholamines and insulin on plasma volume and intravascular mass of albumin in man

    Hilsted, J; Christensen, N J; Larsen, S

    1989-01-01

    1. The effect of intravenous catecholamine infusions and of intravenous insulin on plasma volume and intravascular mass of albumin was investigated in healthy males. 2. Physiological doses of adrenaline (0.5 microgram/min and 3 microgram/min) increased peripheral venous packed cell volume...... significantly; intravenous noradrenaline at 0.5 microgram/min had no effect on packed cell volume, whereas packed cell volume increased significantly at 3 micrograms of noradrenaline/min. No significant change in packed cell volume was found during saline infusion. 3. During adrenaline infusion at 6 micrograms...... in packed cell volume, plasma volume, intravascular mass of albumin and transcapillary escape rate of albumin during hypoglycaemia may be explained by the combined actions of adrenaline and insulin....

  1. Insulin resistance in dairy cows.

    De Koster, Jenne D; Opsomer, Geert

    2013-07-01

    Glucose is the molecule that drives milk production, and insulin plays a pivotal role in the glucose metabolism of dairy cows. The effect of insulin on the glucose metabolism is regulated by the secretion of insulin by the pancreas and the insulin sensitivity of the skeletal muscles, the adipose tissue, and the liver. Insulin resistance may develop as part of physiologic (pregnancy and lactation) and pathologic processes, which may manifest as decreased insulin sensitivity or decreased insulin responsiveness. A good knowledge of the normal physiology of insulin is needed to measure the in vivo insulin resistance of dairy cows. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Changes in cardiac output and incidence of volume overload in cirrhotics receiving 20% albumin infusion.

    Shasthry, Saggere M; Kumar, Manoj; Khumuckham, Jelen S; Sarin, Shiv Kumar

    2017-08-01

    Patients with cirrhosis are prone to develop volume over load, have increased capillary permeability and latent or overt cardiomyopathy. Whether albumin infusion causes volume overload in cirrhotics has not been adequately studied. Ninety nine consecutive cirrhotic patients receiving 1gm per kg albumin infusion were evaluated for development of volume overload. Clinical, echocardiographic and haemodynamic changes were closely monitored during and after albumin infusion. Thirty (30.30%) patients developed volume overload. Patients with higher BMI (P=.003), lower CTP (P=.01) and MELD (P=.034) were more often associated with the development of volume overload. Though baseline diastolic dysfunction was present in 82.8% of the patients, it did not influence the development of volume overload or changes in the cardiac output. The cardiac output increased significantly after albumin infusion (4.9±1.554 L/min to 5.86±1.85 L/min, Palbumin infusion develop volume overload, specially, those with higher BMI and lower severity of liver disease. Cardiac output increases after albumin infusion, and, baseline diastolic dysfunction has little effect on the development of volume overload or changes in cardiac output. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Luminal uptake and intracellular transport of insulin in renal proximal tubules

    Hellfritzsch, M.; Christensen, E.I.; Sonne, O.

    1986-01-01

    It is generally accepted that proteins taken up from the renal tubular fluid are transported into lysosomes in proximal tubule cells. Recently, however, it has been postulated that insulin in isolated perfused rat kidneys did not accumulate in lysosomes but to a certain degree in the Golgi region. The present study was undertaken to investigate the intracellular handling of biologically unaltered insulin in rat renal proximal tubule cells. Rats were prepared for in vivo micropuncture and either a colloidal gold insulin complex or insulin monoiodinated in the A-14 position ( 125 I-insulin) was microinfused into proximal tubules. After 5, 10, 25 or 60 min the tubules were fixed by microinfusion of glutaraldehyde and processed for electron microscopy or electron microscope autoradiography. A qualitative analysis of tubules infused with colloidal gold insulin or 125 I-insulin showed that insulin was taken up by endocytosis and transported to lysosomes, and a quantitative autoradiographic analysis of the 125 I-insulin microinfused tubules showed that the grain density after five min was significantly increased for endocytic vacuoles and for lysosomes. After 60 min the grain density was still significant over lysosomes. The accumulation of grains was non-significant over all other areas analyzed at any time. This study shows that insulin is taken up from the luminal side of the proximal tubule by endocytosis and transported to the lysosomes. There was no significant transport to the Golgi region

  4. Flexibility in insulin prescription

    Sanjay Kalra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This communication explores the concept of flexibility, a propos insulin preparations and insulin regimes used in the management of type 2 diabetes. The flexibility of an insulin regime or preparation is defined as their ability to be injected at variable times, with variable injection-meal time gaps, in a dose frequency and quantum determined by shared decision making, with a minimal requirement of glucose monitoring and health professional consultation, with no compromise on safety, efficiency and tolerability. The relative flexibility of various basal, prandial and dual action insulins, as well as intensive regimes, is compared. The biopsychosocial model of health is used to assess the utility of different insulins while encouraging a philosophy of flexible insulin usage.

  5. Insulin sensitivity and albuminuria

    Pilz, Stefan; Rutters, Femke; Nijpels, Giel

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Accumulating evidence suggests an association between insulin sensitivity and albuminuria, which, even in the normal range, is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We evaluated whether insulin sensitivity is associated with albuminuria in healthy subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN...... AND METHODS: We investigated 1,415 healthy, nondiabetic participants (mean age 43.9 ± 8.3 years; 54.3% women) from the RISC (Relationship between Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular Disease) study, of whom 852 participated in a follow-up examination after 3 years. At baseline, insulin sensitivity...... was assessed by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps, expressed as the M/I value. Oral glucose tolerance test-based insulin sensitivity (OGIS), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) were determined at baseline and follow-up. RESULTS...

  6. Diabetes, insulin and exercise

    Richter, Erik; Galbo, H

    1986-01-01

    The metabolic and hormonal adaptations to single exercise sessions and to exercise training in normal man and in patients with insulin-dependent as well as non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus are reviewed. In insulin-dependent (type I) diabetes good metabolic control is best obtained...... by a regular pattern of life which will lead to a fairly constant demand for insulin from day to day. Exercise is by nature a perturbation that makes treatment of diabetes difficult: Muscle contractions per se tend to decrease the plasma glucose concentration whereas the exercise-induced response of the so......-called counter-regulatory hormones tend to increase plasma glucose by increasing hepatic glucose production and adipose tissue lipolysis. If the pre-exercise plasma insulin level is high, hypoglycaemia may develop during exercise whereas hyperglycaemia and ketosis may develop if pre-exercise plasma insulin...

  7. Genetic variation in the endocannabinoid degrading enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and their influence on weight loss and insulin resistance under a high monounsaturated fat hypocaloric diet.

    de Luis, Daniel; Aller, Rocio; Izaola, Olatz; Conde, Rosa; de la Fuente, Beatriz; Gonzalez Sagrado, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The C385A polymorphism of FAAH gene (rs324420C>A) has been associated with obesity. We investigate the role of this polymorphism on anthropometric and metabolic responses after an enriched monounsaturated fat hypocaloric diet. A sample of 95 obese individuals was analyzed at baseline and after 3 months of an enriched monounsaturated fat hypocaloric diet. Sixty two patients (65.3%) had the genotype C385C and 33 (34.7%) patients had C385A genotype (30 patients, 31.6%) or A358A (3 patients, 3.2%) (A carriers group). In subjects with C385C genotype, insulin (-1.9±5.3 mUI/l) and HOMA-R (-0.48±0.75 U) decreased. In A carriers subjects, the decreases in weight were 3.7±3.4 kg (decrease in C385C genotype group 4.4±3.6 kg), fat mass 2.7±3.2 kg (decrease in C385C genotype group 3.4±3.2 kg) and waist circumference 3.1±3.4cm (decrease in C385 genotype group 4.4±4.6 cm). These changes were significantly higher in the C385C genotype group than the A carriers subjects. After weight loss, noncarriers of the allele A385 of FAAH had an improvement on insulin and HOMA-R levels with an enriched monounsaturated fat hypocaloric diet. A better response of weight, fat mass and waist circumference was observed in C385 genotype subjects than A carriers participants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Bariatric surgery in morbidly obese insulin resistant humans normalises insulin signalling but not insulin-stimulated glucose disposal.

    Mimi Z Chen

    Full Text Available Weight-loss after bariatric surgery improves insulin sensitivity, but the underlying molecular mechanism is not clear. To ascertain the effect of bariatric surgery on insulin signalling, we examined glucose disposal and Akt activation in morbidly obese volunteers before and after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB, and compared this to lean volunteers.The hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp, at five infusion rates, was used to determine glucose disposal rates (GDR in eight morbidly obese (body mass index, BMI=47.3 ± 2.2 kg/m(2 patients, before and after RYGB, and in eight lean volunteers (BMI=20.7 ± 0.7 kg/m2. Biopsies of brachioradialis muscle, taken at fasting and insulin concentrations that induced half-maximal (GDR50 and maximal (GDR100 GDR in each subject, were used to examine the phosphorylation of Akt-Thr308, Akt-473, and pras40, in vivo biomarkers for Akt activity.Pre-operatively, insulin-stimulated GDR was lower in the obese compared to the lean individuals (P<0.001. Weight-loss of 29.9 ± 4 kg after surgery significantly improved GDR50 (P=0.004 but not GDR100 (P=0.3. These subjects still remained significantly more insulin resistant than the lean individuals (p<0.001. Weight loss increased insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle Akt-Thr308 and Akt-Ser473 phosphorylation, P=0.02 and P=0.03 respectively (MANCOVA, and Akt activity towards the substrate PRAS40 (P=0.003, MANCOVA, and in contrast to GDR, were fully normalised after the surgery (obese vs lean, P=0.6, P=0.35, P=0.46, respectively.Our data show that although Akt activity substantially improved after surgery, it did not lead to a full restoration of insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. This suggests that a major defect downstream of, or parallel to, Akt signalling remains after significant weight-loss.

  9. Insulin, cognition, and dementia

    Cholerton, Brenna; Baker, Laura D.; Craft, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive disorders of aging represent a serious threat to the social and economic welfare of current society. It is now widely recognized that pathology related to such conditions, particularly Alzheimer’s disease, likely begins years or decades prior to the onset of clinical dementia symptoms. This revelation has led researchers to consider candidate mechanisms precipitating the cascade of neuropathological events that eventually lead to clinical Alzheimer’s disease. Insulin, a hormone with potent effects in the brain, has recently received a great deal of attention for its potential beneficial and protective role in cognitive function. Insulin resistance, which refers to the reduced sensitivity of target tissues to the favorable effects of insulin, is related to multiple chronic conditions known to impact cognition and increase dementia risk. With insulin resistance-associated conditions reaching epidemic proportions, the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease and other cognitive disorders will continue to rise exponentially. Fortunately, these chronic insulin-related conditions are amenable to pharmacological intervention. As a result, novel therapeutic strategies that focus on increasing insulin sensitivity in the brain may be an important target for protecting or treating cognitive decline. The following review will highlight our current understanding of the role of insulin in brain, potential mechanisms underlying the link between insulin resistance and dementia, and current experimental therapeutic strategies aimed at improving cognitive function via modifying the brain’s insulin sensitivity. PMID:24070815

  10. Insulin and the brain.

    Derakhshan, Fatemeh; Toth, Cory

    2013-03-01

    Mainly known for its role in peripheral glucose homeostasis, insulin has also significant impact within the brain, functioning as a key neuromodulator in behavioral, cellular, biochemical and molecular studies. The brain is now regarded as an insulin-sensitive organ with widespread, yet selective, expression of the insulin receptor in the olfactory bulb, hypothalamus, hippocampus, cerebellum, amygdala and cerebral cortex. Insulin receptor signaling in the brain is important for neuronal development, glucoregulation, feeding behavior, body weight, and cognitive processes such as with attention, executive functioning, learning and memory. Emerging evidence has demonstrated insulin receptor signaling to be impaired in several neurological disorders. Moreover, insulin receptor signaling is recognized as important for dendritic outgrowth, neuronal survival, circuit development, synaptic plasticity and postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptor trafficking. We review the multiple roles of insulin in the brain, as well as its endogenous trafficking to the brain or its exogenous intervention. Although insulin can be directly targeted to the brain via intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intraparenchymal delivery, these invasive techniques are with significant risk, necessitating repeated surgical intervention and providing potential for systemic hypoglycemia. Another method, intranasal delivery, is a non-invasive, safe, and alternative approach which rapidly targets delivery of molecules to the brain while minimizing systemic exposure. Over the last decades, the delivery of intranasal insulin in animal models and human patients has evolved and expanded, permitting new hope for associated neurodegenerative and neurovascular disorders.

  11. Vocal fold submucosal infusion technique in phonomicrosurgery.

    Kass, E S; Hillman, R E; Zeitels, S M

    1996-05-01

    Phonomicrosurgery is optimized by maximally preserving the vocal fold's layered microstructure (laminae propriae). The technique of submucosal infusion of saline and epinephrine into the superficial lamina propria (SLP) was examined to delineate how, when, and why it was helpful toward this surgical goal. A retrospective review revealed that the submucosal infusion technique was used to enhance the surgery in 75 of 152 vocal fold procedures that were performed over the last 2 years. The vocal fold epithelium was noted to be adherent to the vocal ligament in 29 of the 75 cases: 19 from previous surgical scarring, 4 from cancer, 3 from sulcus vocalis, 2 from chronic hemorrhage, and 1 from radiotherapy. The submucosal infusion technique was most helpful when the vocal fold epithelium required resection and/or when extensive dissection in the SLP was necessary. The infusion enhanced the surgery by vasoconstriction of the microvasculature in the SLP, which improved visualization during cold-instrument tangential dissection. Improved visualization facilitated maximal preservation of the SLP, which is necessary for optimal pliability of the overlying epithelium. The infusion also improved the placement of incisions at the perimeter of benign, premalignant, and malignant lesions, and thereby helped preserve epithelium uninvolved by the disorder.

  12. Is cerebral oxygenation negatively affected by infusion of norepinephrine in healthy subjects?

    Brassard, P.; Seifert, T.; Secher, Niels H.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vasopressor agents are commonly used to increase mean arterial pressure (MAP) in order to secure a pressure gradient to perfuse vital organs. The influence of norepinephrine on cerebral oxygenation is not clear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the infusion of norep......BACKGROUND: Vasopressor agents are commonly used to increase mean arterial pressure (MAP) in order to secure a pressure gradient to perfuse vital organs. The influence of norepinephrine on cerebral oxygenation is not clear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the infusion...... of norepinephrine on cerebral oxygenation in healthy subjects. METHODS: Three doses of norepinephrine (0.05, 0.1, and 0.15 microg kg(-1) min(-1) for 20 min each) were infused in nine healthy subjects [six males; 26 (6) yr, mean (SD)]. MAP, cerebral oxygenation characterized by frontal lobe oxygenation (Sc(O2...

  13. Insulin increases phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins in human skeletal muscle in vivo

    Zhao, Xiaolu; Bak, Steffen; Pedersen, Andreas James Thestrup

    2014-01-01

    , we investigated the effect of insulin on the phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins in human skeletal muscle in vivo. Using a combination of TiO2 phosphopeptide-enrichment, HILIC fractionation, and LC−MS/MS, we compared the phosphoproteomes of isolated mitochondria from skeletal muscle samples...... obtained from healthy individuals before and after 4 h of insulin infusion. In total, we identified 207 phosphorylation sites in 95 mitochondrial proteins. Of these phosphorylation sites, 45% were identified in both basal and insulin-stimulated samples. Insulin caused a 2-fold increase in the number...... of different mitochondrial phosphopeptides (87 ± 7 vs 40 ± 7, p = 0.015) and phosphoproteins (46 ± 2 vs 26 ± 3, p = 0.005) identified in each mitochondrial preparation. Almost half of the mitochondrial phosphorylation sites (n = 94) were exclusively identified in the insulin-stimulated state and included...

  14. Implantable batteryless device for on-demand and pulsatile insulin administration

    Lee, Seung Ho; Lee, Young Bin; Kim, Byung Hwi; Lee, Cheol; Cho, Young Min; Kim, Se-Na; Park, Chun Gwon; Cho, Yong-Chan; Choy, Young Bin

    2017-04-01

    Many implantable systems have been designed for long-term, pulsatile delivery of insulin, but the lifetime of these devices is limited by the need for battery replacement and consequent replacement surgery. Here we propose a batteryless, fully implantable insulin pump that can be actuated by a magnetic field. The pump is prepared by simple-assembly of magnets and constituent units and comprises a drug reservoir and actuator equipped with a plunger and barrel, each assembled with a magnet. The plunger moves to noninvasively infuse insulin only when a magnetic field is applied on the exterior surface of the body. Here we show that the dose is easily controlled by varying the number of magnet applications. Also, pump implantation in diabetic rats results in profiles of insulin concentration and decreased blood glucose levels similar to those observed in rats treated with conventional subcutaneous insulin injections.

  15. Effect of gender on lipid-induced insulin resistance in obese subjects

    Vistisen, Bodil; Hellgren, Lars; Vadset, T.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: In obese subjects, chronically elevated plasma concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs) exert a marked risk to contract insulin resistance and subsequently type 2 diabetes. When NEFA is acutely increased due to i.v. infusion of lipid, glucose disposal during...... a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp is reduced. This effect has been explained by a NEFA-induced decrease in skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity caused by accumulation of the lipid intermediates Such as ceramide and diacylglycerol in the myocytes. However, neither the lipid-induced reduction of glucose disposal nor...... the clamp was similar in females and males (46+/-10 and 60+/-4%,, respectively, NS). However, whole-body insulin sensitivity as well as non-oxidative glucose disposal was higher in obese females compared with obese males both during lipid and saline infusion (P...

  16. Glucose turnover and hormonal changes during insulin-induced hypoglycemia in trained humans

    Kjær, Michael; Mikines, K J; Christensen, N J

    1984-01-01

    Eight athletes (T), studied the third morning after the last exercise session, and seven sedentary males (C) (maximal O2 consumption 65 +/- 4 vs. 49 +/- 4 (SE) ml X kg-1 X min-1, for T and C men, respectively) had insulin infused until plasma glucose, at an insulin level of 1,600 pmol X l-1, was 1...... +/- 6 mU X l-1), and pancreatic polypeptide (361 +/- 84 vs. 180 +/- 29 pmol X l-1) reached higher levels (P less than 0.05) and glucagon (28 +/- 3 vs. 47 +/- 10 pmol X l-1) lower levels in T than in C subjects. Blood pressures changed earlier in athletes during insulin infusion, and early recovery...

  17. Single-donor islet transplantation and long-term insulin independence in select patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Al-Adra, David P; Gill, Richdeep S; Imes, Sharleen; O'Gorman, Doug; Kin, Tatsuya; Axford, Sara J; Shi, Xinzhe; Senior, Peter A; Shapiro, A M James

    2014-11-15

    Islet transplantation is a recognized treatment option for select patients with type I diabetes mellitus. However, islet infusions from multiple donors are often required to achieve insulin independence. Ideally, insulin independence would be achieved routinely with only a single donor. Identification of factors associated with insulin independence after single-donor islet transplantation may help to select recipient-donor combinations with the highest probability of success. Subjects undergoing islet transplantation at a single center (Edmonton, Canada) between March 1999 and August 2013 were included. Recipient, donor, and transplant characteristics were collected and compared between recipients who became insulin independent after one islet transplantation and those who did not. Thirty-one patients achieved insulin independence after a single-donor islet transplantation, and 149 did not. Long-term insulin-free survival was not different between the groups. Factors significantly associated with single-donor success included recipient age, insulin requirement at baseline, donor weight, donor body mass index, islet transplant mass, and peritransplant heparin and insulin administration. On multivariate analysis, pretransplantation daily insulin requirements, the use of peritransplantation heparin and insulin infusions, and islet transplant mass remained significant. We have identified clinically relevant differences defining the achievement of insulin independence after single-donor transplantation. Based on these differences, a preoperative insulin requirement of less than 0.6 U/kg per day and receiving more than 5,646 islet equivalents (IEQ)/kg have a sensitivity of 84% and 71% and specificity of 50% and 50%, respectively, for insulin independence after single-donor islet transplantation. With ideal patient selection, this finding could potentially increase single-donor transplantation success and may be especially relevant for presensitized subjects or those who

  18. A new venous infusion pathway monitoring system.

    Maki, Hiromichi; Yonezawa, Yoshiharu; Ogawa, Hidekuni; Ninomiya, Ishio; Sata, Koji; Hamada, Shingo; Caldwell, W Morton

    2007-01-01

    A new infusion catheter pathway monitoring system employing linear integrated circuits and a low-power 8-bit single chip microcomputer has been developed for hospital and home use. The sensor consists of coaxial three-layer conductive tapes wrapped around the polyvinyl chloride infusion tube. The inner tape is the main electrode, which records an AC (alternating current) voltage induced on the patient's body by electrostatic coupling from the normal 100 volt, 60 Hz AC power line wiring field in the patient's room. The outside tape layer is a reference electrode to monitor the AC voltage around the main electrode. The center tape layer is connected to system ground and functions as a shield. The microcomputer calculates the ratio of the induced AC voltages recorded by the main and reference electrodes and if the ratio indicates a detached infusion, alerts the nursing station, via the nurse call system or low transmitting power mobile phone.

  19. Design of Infusion Schemes for Neuroreceptor Imaging

    Feng, Ling; Svarer, Claus; Madsen, Karine

    2016-01-01

    for bolus infusion (BI) or programmed infusion (PI) experiments. Steady-state quantitative measurements can be made with one short scan and venous blood samples. The GABAA receptor ligand [(11)C]Flumazenil (FMZ) was chosen for this purpose, as it lacks a suitable reference region. Methods. Five bolus [(11)C...... state was attained within 40 min, which was 8 min earlier than the optimal BI (B/I ratio = 55 min). Conclusions. The system can design both BI and PI schemes to attain steady state rapidly. For example, subjects can be [(11)C]FMZ-PET scanned after 40 min of tracer infusion for 40 min with venous...

  20. Forearm metabolism during infusion of adrenaline

    Simonsen, L; Stefl, B; Bülow, J

    2000-01-01

    Human skeletal muscle metabolism is often investigated by measurements of substrate fluxes across the forearm. To evaluate whether the two forearms give the same metabolic information, nine healthy subjects were studied in the fasted state and during infusion of adrenaline. Both arms were...... catheterized in a cubital vein in the retrograde direction. A femoral artery was catheterized for blood sampling, and a femoral vein for infusion of adrenaline. Forearm blood flow was measured by venous occlusion strain-gauge plethysmography. Forearm subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow was measured...... by the local 133Xe washout method. Metabolic fluxes were calculated as the product of forearm blood flow and a-v differences of metabolite concentrations. After baseline measurements, adrenaline was infused at a rate of 0.3 nmol kg-1 min-1. No difference in the metabolic information obtained in the fasting...

  1. Effect of prolonged intravenous glucose and essential amino acid infusion on nitrogen balance, muscle protein degradation and ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene expression in calves

    Scaife Jes R

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intravenous infusions of glucose and amino acids increase both nitrogen balance and muscle accretion. We hypothesised that co-infusion of glucose (to stimulate insulin and essential amino acids (EAA would act additively to improve nitrogen balance by decreasing muscle protein degradation in association with alterations in muscle expression of components of the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway. Methods We examined the effect of a 5 day intravenous infusions of saline, glucose, EAA and glucose + EAA, on urinary nitrogen excretion and muscle protein degradation. We carried out the study in 6 restrained calves since ruminants offer the advantage that muscle protein degradation can be assessed by excretion of 3 methyl-histidine and multiple muscle biopsies can be taken from the same animal. On the final day of infusion blood samples were taken for hormone and metabolite measurement and muscle biopsies for expression of ubiquitin, the 14-kDa E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme, and proteasome sub-units C2 and C8. Results On day 5 of glucose infusion, plasma glucose, insulin and IGF-1 concentrations were increased while urea nitrogen excretion and myofibrillar protein degradation was decreased. Co-infusion of glucose + EAA prevented the loss of urinary nitrogen observed with EAA infusions alone and enhanced the increase in plasma IGF-1 concentration but there was no synergistic effect of glucose + EAA on the decrease in myofibrillar protein degradation. Muscle mRNA expression of the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme, 14-kDa E2 and proteasome sub-unit C2 were significantly decreased, after glucose but not amino acid infusions, and there was no further response to the combined infusions of glucose + EAA. Conclusion Prolonged glucose infusion decreases myofibrillar protein degradation, prevents the excretion of infused EAA, and acts additively with EAA to increase plasma IGF-1 and improve net nitrogen balance. There was no evidence of

  2. Plasma adrenaline kinetics in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with and without autonomic neuropathy

    Dejgaard, A; Hilsted, J; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1989-01-01

    Plasma adrenaline kinetics (clearance, extraction across the forearm, initial plasma disappearance rate, mean sojourn time, volume of distribution) were studied in sixteen Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients during constant i.v. infusion of tritium labelled adrenaline. In patients with (n...... = 8) and without (n = 8) neuropathy forearm venous plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline concentrations as well as plasma clearance of adrenaline based on arterial sampling (1.7 vs 2.1 l/min) were not significantly different. The initial disappearance time (T 1/2) after the infusion of the tritium...... labelled adrenaline had been stopped was significantly prolonged in Type 1 diabetic patients with neuropathy compared to those without (after 20 min infusion 2.7 vs 2.2 min, p less than 0.02, after 75 min infusion 3.7 vs 2.9 min, p less than 0.05). The corresponding values for the mean sojourn time...

  3. Fifty Years of Insulin

    has since saved millions of lives throughout the world. The year 197I is the 50th anniversary of Banting's historic discovery. The story of insulin ... He found no evidence of injury. An impaired ... Prize in medicine for his discovery of insulin.

  4. Insulin regulates brain function, but how does it get there?

    Gray, Sarah M; Meijer, Rick I; Barrett, Eugene J

    2014-12-01

    We have learned over the last several decades that the brain is an important target for insulin action. Insulin in the central nervous system (CNS) affects feeding behavior and body energy stores, the metabolism of glucose and fats in the liver and adipose, and various aspects of memory and cognition. Insulin may even influence the development or progression of Alzheimer disease. Yet, a number of seemingly simple questions (e.g., What is the pathway for delivery of insulin to the brain? Is insulin's delivery to the brain mediated by the insulin receptor and is it a regulated process? Is brain insulin delivery affected by insulin resistance?) are unanswered. Here we briefly review accumulated findings affirming the importance of insulin as a CNS regulatory peptide, examine the current understanding of how peripheral insulin is delivered to the brain, and identify key gaps in the current understanding of this process. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  5. Insulin secretion and action in North Indian women during pregnancy

    Arora, G P; Almgren, P; Thaman, R G

    2017-01-01

    . RESULTS: Gestational diabetes defined using both criteria was associated with decreased insulin secretion compared with pregnant women with normal glucose tolerance. Women with gestational diabetes defined by the adapted GDM2013, but not GDM1999 criteria, were more insulin resistant than pregnant women......AIM: The relative roles(s) of impaired insulin secretion vs. insulin resistance in the development of gestational diabetes mellitus depend upon multiple risk factors and diagnostic criteria. Here, we explored their relative contribution to gestational diabetes as defined by the WHO 1999 (GDM1999...... independently associated with increased insulin resistance. CONCLUSIONS: Gestational diabetes risk factors influence insulin secretion and action in North Indian women in a differential manner. Gestational diabetes classified using the adapted GDM2013 compared with GDM1999 criteria is associated with more...

  6. Lifelong exercise and locally produced insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) have a modest influence on reducing age-related muscle wasting in mice.

    McMahon, C D; Chai, R; Radley-Crabb, H G; Watson, T; Matthews, K G; Sheard, P W; Soffe, Z; Grounds, M D; Shavlakadze, T

    2014-12-01

    The age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function is termed sarcopenia and has been attributed to a decline in concentrations of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). We hypothesized that constitutively expressed IGF-1 within skeletal muscles with or without exercise would prevent sarcopenia. Male transgenic mice that overexpress IGF-1 Ea in skeletal muscles were compared with wild-type littermates. Four-month-old mice were assigned to be sedentary, or had access to free-running wheels, until 18 or 28 months of age. In wild-type mice, the mass of the quadriceps muscles was reduced at 28 months and exercise prevented such loss, without affecting the diameter of myofibers. Conversely, increased IGF-1 alone was ineffective, whereas the combination of exercise and IGF-1 was additive in maintaining the diameter of myofibers in the quadriceps muscles. For other muscles, the combination of IGF-1 and exercise was variable and either increased or decreased the mass at 18 months of age, but was ineffective thereafter. Despite an increase in the diameter of myofibers, grip strength was not improved. In conclusion, our data show that exercise and IGF-1 have a modest effect on reducing aged-related wasting of skeletal muscle, but that there is no improvement in muscle function when assessed by grip strength. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Insulin Resistance of Puberty.

    Kelsey, Megan M; Zeitler, Philip S

    2016-07-01

    Puberty is a time of considerable metabolic and hormonal change. Notably, puberty is associated with a marked decrease in insulin sensitivity, on par with that seen during pregnancy. In otherwise healthy youth, there is a nadir in insulin sensitivity in mid-puberty, and then it recovers at puberty completion. However, there is evidence that insulin resistance (IR) does not resolve in youth who are obese going into puberty and may result in increased cardiometabolic risk. Little is known about the underlying pathophysiology of IR in puberty, and how it might contribute to increased disease risk (e.g., type 2 diabetes). In this review, we have outlined what is known about the IR in puberty in terms of pattern, potential underlying mechanisms and other mediating factors. We also outline other potentially related metabolic changes that occur during puberty, and effects of underlying insulin resistant states (e.g., obesity) on pubertal changes in insulin sensitivity.

  8. Hyperinsulinemia in the physiologic range is not superior to short-term fasting in suppressing insulin secretion in obese men.

    Pincelli, A I; Brunani, A; Caumo, A; Scacchi, M; Pasqualinotto, L; Tibaldi, A; Dubini, A; Bonadonna, S; Cavagnini, F

    2001-01-01

    The negative-feedback control exerted by plasma insulin on beta-cell insulin release in normal-weight and obese subjects is still a matter of debate. Subjects submitted to a euglycemic insulin clamp undergo a suppression of insulin secretion that is due to both the infused insulin and the 2- to 3-hour fast during the procedure. We elected to elucidate the role of physiologic hyperinsulinemia per se in the insulin negative autofeedback in obese men. Ten men with massive uncomplicated obesity (age, 18 to 37 years; body mass index [BMI], 41 +/- 1.15 kg/m2) and 6 normal-weight healthy men (age, 22 to 30 years; BMI, 22 +/- 0.28 kg/m2) underwent 2 studies in random order: (1) a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic glucose clamp with an insulin infusion rate of 1 mU/kg/min and (2) a control study with saline infusion. Serum C-peptide concentrations were significantly higher in obese versus control subjects at baseline (2.54 +/- 0.178 v 1.63 +/- 0.256 ng/mL, P < .05). Exogenous insulin infusion significantly suppressed serum C-peptide at steady state ([SS] last 30 minutes of insulin or saline infusion) in controls (mean of the last 4 measurements from 120 minutes to 150 minutes, 0.86 +/- 0.306 ng/mL, P < .05 vbaseline) but not in obese patients (2.03 +/- 0.26 ng/mL, nonsignificant [NS] v baseline). During the saline infusion studies, C-peptide levels slightly and similarly declined over time in both groups (2.71 +/- 0.350 at baseline v 2.31 +/- 0.300 ng/mL at SS in obese patients, NS, and 1.96 +/- 0.189 v 1.62 +/- 0.150 ng/mL in controls, NS). This study shows that in obese men hyperinsulinemia within the postprandial range is not superior to a 2.5-hour fast for the suppression of beta-cell activity, suggesting an impairment of the insulin negative autofeedback in this clinical condition.

  9. Insulin alone can lead to a withdrawal of meiotic arrest in the carp

    Meiotic arrest of oocyte in an Indian carp, Labeo rohita Ham. has been found for the first time to be withdrawn by insulin only. Addition of insulin to oocytes in vitro caused germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), one of the first visual markers to determine initiation of the final maturational process. Under the influence of insulin ...

  10. Efficacy and Safety of Rapid-Acting Insulin Analogs in Special Populations with Type 1 Diabetes or Gestational Diabetes

    Nørgaard, Kirsten; Sukumar, Nithya; Rafnsson, Snorri B

    2018-01-01

    Med, EMBASE and Cochrane Reviews were searched electronically, and their bibliographies examined to identify suitable studies for review and inclusion in a meta-analysis. Eligible studies were randomized controlled trials that reported data on relevant clinical outcomes. A different reviewer abstracted data...... concerns. Meta-analysis indicated severe hypoglycemic events were comparable for rapid-acting insulin analogs versus RHI (risk difference: 0.00 [95% confidence interval - 0.01; 0.01]). In the pregnancy group, insulin lispro and insulin aspart were safe and effective for both mother and fetus, with glycemic......INTRODUCTION: To assess the efficacy and safety of three available rapid-acting insulin analogs (insulins lispro, aspart and glulisine, respectively) in pregnant women, children/adolescents and people using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) with type 1 diabetes. METHODS: Pub...

  11. Corticosterone infused into the dorsal striatum selectively enhances memory consolidation of cued water-maze training

    Quirarte, Gina L.; Sofia Ledesma de la Teja, I.; Casillas, Miriam; Serafin, Norma; Prado-Alcala, Roberto A.; Roozendaal, Benno

    2009-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones enhance memory consolidation of hippocampus-dependent spatial/contextual learning, but little is known about their possible influence on the consolidation of procedural/implicit memory. Therefore, in this study we examined the effect of corticosterone (2, 5, or 10 ng) infused

  12. Effect of infusion bottle height on lens power after lens refilling with and without a plug

    Koopmans, SA; Terwee, T; Haitjema, HJ; Kooijman, AC; Barkhof, J

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of intraoperative infusion bottle height on the power of refilled pig lenses. Setting: Research Laboratory, Pharmacia Intraocular Lens Manufacturing Plant, Groningen, The Netherlands. Methods: This study comprised 2 groups of pig eyes. In 1 group, the lens was

  13. Insulin resistance and delayed clearance of peptide hormones in cirrhotic rat liver

    Shankar, T.P.; Drake, S.; Solomon, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    Clearance of porcine insulin, glucagon, and human growth hormone was measured in intact perfused cirrhotic and normal rat livers. Binding and degradation of 125 I-insulin by hepatocytes isolated from cirrhotic and normal livers were also studied. The half-lives (t/sub 1/2/) of immunoreactive insulin and glucagon were 14.0 +/- 3.1 and 9.6 +/- 2.1 min in normal livers and 26.0 +/- 6.1 and 25.0 +/- 7.1 min in cirrhotic livers. Insulin binding and degradation by hepatocytes from control and cirrhotic livers showed no significant differences. Intraportal insulin infusion in perfusion studies suppressed glucagon-stimulated increases in glucose output from control livers but failed to suppress glucose production by cirrhotic livers, suggesting the presence of hepatic insulin resistance in cirrhosis. Impaired clearance of insulin and glucagon by the intact cirrhotic liver and normal binding and degradation of insulin by isolated hepatocytes suggest that factors such as intrahepatic fibrosis and shunting and postbinding defects may be responsible for the impaired hormone clearance and hepatic insulin resistance

  14. Gastric emptying and timing of insulin injection in insulin-treated diabetics Using99m Te-sulfur colloid

    Sheta, M.; El-Borrolossy, H.; El-Tawil, A.

    1997-01-01

    Gastric emptying of 99m Tc labelled liquid and solid meals were studied in 112 long-standing insulin insulin treated diabetics to evaluate the relationship of gastroparesis to patients age, sex, gastrointestinal symptoms, diabetic neuropathic complication and glycemic control, and to evaluate the influence of gastric emptying and timing of insulin injection as modifying factors for blood glucose control aiming at objective optimization of timing of insulin injection for every individual patient using the proposed equation: time of insulin injection=onset of insulin action -solid lag time. Patients were classified into three group: A) no neuropathy; B) peripheral neuropathy; and C) peripheral and autonomic neuropathy and compared to healthy volunteers as controls. Diabetics showed statistically significant prolonged gastric lag time and T1/2 for both liquid and solid meals compared to those of controls

  15. RhoA, Rho kinase, JAK2, and STAT3 may be the intracellular determinants of longevity implicated in the progeric influence of obesity: Insulin, IGF-1, and leptin may all conspire to promote stem cell exhaustion.

    Tapia, Patrick C

    2006-01-01

    The aging process in higher mammals is increasingly being shown to feature a potentially substantial contribution from the longitudinal deterioration of normative stem cell dynamics seen with the passage of time. The precise mechanistic sequence producing this phenomenon is not entirely understood, but recent evidence has strongly implicated intracellular downstream effectors of endocrinologic pathways thought to be engaged by the obese state, specifically the insulin, IGF-1, and leptin signaling pathways. Among the intracellular effectors of these signals, a uniquely potent influence on stem cell dynamics may be attributable to Rho/ROCK, JAK kinase activity and STAT3 activity. In particular, it has already been shown that specific tyrosine kinase activities, such as that seen with Rho kinase, are presently thought to be associated with adverse health outcomes in numerous clinical contexts. Furthermore, the Rho GTPase is thought to be contributing to end-stage renal disease. However, in addition to its contribution to organ system dysfunction, the Rho/ROCK pathway has recently been shown to be activated by insulin and IGF-1, providing a tantalizing connection to nutrition and aging science. The JAK-STAT pathway, in contrast, has long been associated with pro-inflammatory cytokines, but has recently been implicated in leptin signaling as well. Importantly, JAK-STAT signaling has, similarly to Rho/ROCK signaling, been implicated as capable of accelerating stem cell proliferation. The implications of these recent determinations, in light of the recent finding of telomere attrition in humans associated with obesity, are that the intracellular determinants of aging may already be known, and the known common influence of these signaling elements on longitudinal stem cell dynamics is a pronounced induction of proliferation, an elevation that has been linked to the pathologic evolution of longitudinal organ-level dysfunction and the organismal-level physiologic decline

  16. Estrogen and insulin transport through the blood-brain barrier.

    May, Aaron A; Bedel, Nicholas D; Shen, Ling; Woods, Stephen C; Liu, Min

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is associated with insulin resistance and reduced transport of insulin through the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Reversal of high-fat diet-induced obesity (HFD-DIO) by dietary intervention improves the transport of insulin through the BBB and the sensitivity of insulin in the brain. Although both insulin and estrogen (E2), when given alone, reduce food intake and body weight via the brain, E2 actually renders the brain relatively insensitive to insulin's catabolic action. The objective of these studies was to determine if E2 influences the ability of insulin to be transported into the brain, since the receptors for both E2 and insulin are found in BBB endothelial cells. E2 (acute or chronic) was systemically administered to ovariectomized (OVX) female rats and male rats fed a chow or a high-fat diet. Food intake, body weight and other metabolic parameters were assessed along with insulin entry into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Acute E2 treatment in OVX female and male rats reduced body weight and food intake, and chronic E2 treatment prevented or partially reversed high-fat diet-induced obesity. However, none of these conditions increased insulin transport into the CNS; rather, chronic E2 treatment was associated less-effective insulin transport into the CNS relative to weight-matched controls. Thus, the reduction of brain insulin sensitivity by E2 is unlikely to be mediated by increasing the amount of insulin entering the CNS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Propofol Infusion Syndrome Heralded by ECG Changes

    Mijzen, Elsbeth J.; Jacobs, Bram; Aslan, Adnan; Rodgers, Michael G. G.

    2012-01-01

    Propofol infusion syndrome (PRIS) is well known, often associated with, lethal complication of sedation with propofol. PRIS seems to be associated with young age, traumatic brain injury (TBI), higher cumulative doses of propofol, and the concomitant use of catecholamines. Known manifestations of

  18. Comparison of infusion pumps calibration methods

    Batista, Elsa; Godinho, Isabel; do Céu Ferreira, Maria; Furtado, Andreia; Lucas, Peter; Silva, Claudia

    2017-12-01

    Nowadays, several types of infusion pump are commonly used for drug delivery, such as syringe pumps and peristaltic pumps. These instruments present different measuring features and capacities according to their use and therapeutic application. In order to ensure the metrological traceability of these flow and volume measuring equipment, it is necessary to use suitable calibration methods and standards. Two different calibration methods can be used to determine the flow error of infusion pumps. One is the gravimetric method, considered as a primary method, commonly used by National Metrology Institutes. The other calibration method, a secondary method, relies on an infusion device analyser (IDA) and is typically used by hospital maintenance offices. The suitability of the IDA calibration method was assessed by testing several infusion instruments at different flow rates using the gravimetric method. In addition, a measurement comparison between Portuguese Accredited Laboratories and hospital maintenance offices was performed under the coordination of the Portuguese Institute for Quality, the National Metrology Institute. The obtained results were directly related to the used calibration method and are presented in this paper. This work has been developed in the framework of the EURAMET projects EMRP MeDD and EMPIR 15SIP03.

  19. Infusing Functional Law into the Classroom.

    Frieman, Barry B.; Fine, Bobbie

    The court system touches the lives of many children in the school system, some through divorce, and others through their own illegal behavior. Principals and administrators need to infuse a functional knowledge of the legal system so that these children will be better able to cope and deal with life events that cause them to be placed in contact…

  20. Reaction between infusion water and methane

    Ettinger, I L

    1977-09-01

    This paper discusses the effect of infused water on the initial gas emission rate and on the pore structure of the coal. Water traps methane in micro-pores, so that lengthy periods are needed for the methane to penetrate large voids and cavities.

  1. Routine saline infusion sonohysterography prior to assisted ...

    53.85%), 8 (30.77%) and 4 (15.38%) respectively. The average duration of the procedure was 6 minutes with a range of 4-9 minutes. Saline infusion sonohysterography is a reliable, cost effective and safe diagnostic tool in the evaluation of the ...

  2. Glycemic increase induced by intravenous glucose infusion fails to affect hunger, appetite, or satiety following breakfast in healthy men.

    Schultes, Bernd; Panknin, Ann-Kristin; Hallschmid, Manfred; Jauch-Chara, Kamila; Wilms, Britta; de Courbière, Felix; Lehnert, Hendrik; Schmid, Sebastian M

    2016-10-01

    Meal-dependent fluctuations of blood glucose and corresponding endocrine signals such as insulin are thought to provide important regulatory input for central nervous processing of hunger and satiety. Since food intake also triggers the release of numerous gastrointestinal signals, the specific contribution of changes in blood glucose to appetite regulation in humans has remained unclear. Here we tested the hypothesis that inducing glycemic fluctuations by intravenous glucose infusion is associated with concurrent changes in hunger, appetite, and satiety. In a single blind, counter-balanced crossover study 15 healthy young men participated in two experimental conditions on two separate days. 500 ml of a solution containing 50 g glucose or 0.9% saline, respectively, was intravenously infused over a 1-h period followed by a 1-h observation period. One hour before start of the respective infusion subjects had a light breakfast (284 kcal). Blood glucose and serum insulin concentrations as well as self-rated feelings of hunger, appetite, satiety, and fullness were assessed during the entire experiment. Glucose as compared to saline infusion markedly increased glucose and insulin concentrations (peak glucose level: 9.7 ± 0.8 vs. 5.3 ± 0.3 mmol/l; t(14) = -5.159, p hunger, appetite satiety, and fullness did not differ from the control condition throughout the experiment. These findings clearly speak against the notion that fluctuations in glycemia and also insulinemia represent major signals in the short-term regulation of hunger and satiety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Metoprolol compared to carvedilol deteriorates insulin-stimulated endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes - a randomized study

    Raunsø Jakob

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim Studies of beta blockade in patients with type 2 diabetes have shown inferiority of metoprolol treatment compared to carvedilol on indices of insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of metoprolol versus carvedilol on endothelial function and insulin-stimulated endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes. Method 24 patients with type 2 diabetes were randomized to receive either 200 mg metoprolol succinate or 50 mg carvedilol daily. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation was assessed by using venous occlusion plethysmography with increasing doses of intra-arterial infusions of the agonist serotonin. Insulin-stimulated endothelial function was assessed after co-infusion of insulin for sixty minutes. Vaso-reactivity studies were done before and after the two-month treatment period. Results Insulin-stimulated endothelial function was deteriorated after treatment with metoprolol, the percentage change in forearm blood-flow was 60.19% ± 17.89 (at the highest serotonin dosages before treatment and -33.80% ± 23.38 after treatment (p = 0.007. Treatment with carvedilol did not change insulin-stimulated endothelial function. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation without insulin was not changed in either of the two treatment groups. Conclusion This study shows that vascular insulin sensitivity was preserved during treatment with carvedilol while blunted during treatment with metoprolol in patients with type 2 diabetes. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials NCT00497003

  4. Monomeric insulins and their experimental and clinical implications.

    Brange, J; Owens, D R; Kang, S; Vølund, A

    1990-09-01

    Due to the inherent pharmacokinetic properties of available insulins, normoglycemia is rarely, if ever, achieved in insulin-dependent diabetic patients without compromising their quality of life. Subcutaneous insulin absorption is influenced by many factors, among which the associated state of insulin (hexameric) in pharmaceutical formulation may be of importance. This review describes the development of a series of human insulin analogues with reduced tendency to self-association that, because of more rapid absorption, are better suited to meal-related therapy. DNA technology has made it possible to prepare insulins that remain dimeric or even monomeric at high concentration by introducing one or a few amino acid substitutions into human insulin. These analogues were characterized and used for elucidating the mechanisms involved in subcutaneous absorption and were investigated in preliminary clinical studies. Their relative receptor binding and in vitro potency (free-fat cell assay), ranging from 0.05 to 600% relative to human insulin, were strongly correlated (r = 0.97). In vivo, most of the analogues exhibited approximately 100% activity, explainable by a dominating receptor-mediated clearance. This was confirmed by clamp studies in which correlation between receptor binding and clearance was observed. Thus, an analogue with reduced binding and clearance gives higher circulating concentrations, counterbalancing the reduced potency at the cellular level. Absorption studies in pigs revealed a strong inverse correlation (r = 0.96) between the rate of subcutaneous absorption and the mean association state of the insulin analogues. These studies also demonstrated that monomeric insulins were absorbed three times faster than human insulin. In healthy subjects, rates of disappearance from subcutis were two to three times faster for dimeric and monomeric analogues than for human insulin. Concomitantly, a more rapid rise in plasma insulin concentration and an earlier

  5. Bronchial arterial infusion versus bronchial combined pulmonary arterial infusion for pulmonary metastatic tumors

    Dong Sheng; Dong Weihua; Jia Ningyang; Zhang Dianbo; Xiao Xiangsheng

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the pulmonary metastatic tumor response to different ways of transcatheter arterial infusion. Methods: Thirty-five patients with pulmonary metastatic tumors were randomized divided into two groups: 15 patients with 49 lesions treated with bronchial arterial infusion (BAI) and 20 patients with 65 lesions treated with bronchial arterial infusion (BM)combined with pulmonary arterial infusion (PAI). The therapeutic response was assessed by the WHO evaluation criteria. Results: The total effective rate(CR + PR) of BAI was 65.3% (32/49), PAI + BAI was 61.5%(40/65) showing no statistical difference. The median survival time of BAI was 9 mo, BAI + PAI was 11.5 mo, demonstrating no statistical significance. Conclusions: BAI should be the primary treatment for pulmonary metastatic tumor. (authors)

  6. Assessment of insulin action in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus using [6(14)C]glucose, [3(3)H]glucose, and [2(3)H]glucose. Differences in the apparent pattern of insulin resistance depending on the isotope used

    Bell, P.M.; Firth, R.G.; Rizza, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    To determine whether [2(3)H], [3(3)H], and [6(14)C]glucose provide an equivalent assessment of glucose turnover in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and nondiabetic man, glucose utilization rates were measured using a simultaneous infusion of these isotopes before and during hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps. In the nondiabetic subjects, glucose turnover rates determined with [6(14)C]glucose during insulin infusion were lower (P less than 0.02) than those determined with [2(3)H]glucose and higher (P less than 0.01) than those determined with [3(3)H]glucose. In IDDM, glucose turnover rates measured with [6(14)C]glucose during insulin infusion were lower (P less than 0.05) than those determined with [2(3)H]glucose, but were not different from those determined with [3(3)H]glucose. All three isotopes indicated the presence of insulin resistance. However, using [3(3)H]glucose led to the erroneous conclusion that glucose utilization was not significantly decreased at high insulin concentrations in the diabetic patients. [6(14)C] and [3(3)H]glucose but not [2(3)H]glucose indicated impairment in insulin-induced suppression of glucose production. These results indicate that tritiated isotopes do not necessarily equally reflect the pattern of glucose metabolism in diabetic and nondiabetic man

  7. Exploring pathway interactions in insulin resistant mouse liver

    Kelder, T.; Eijssen, L.; Kleemann, R.; Erk, M. van; Kooistra, T.; Evelo, C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Complex phenotypes such as insulin resistance involve different biological pathways that may interact and influence each other. Interpretation of related experimental data would be facilitated by identifying relevant pathway interactions in the context of the dataset.Results: We

  8. Studies on insulin secretion and insulin resistance in non-insulin-dependent diabetes in young Indians

    Naidoo, C.

    1986-01-01

    Patients with Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) have defects in insulin secretion and insulin action. In the discrete genetic syndrome of NIDDY (non-insulin-dependent diabetes in the young), the situation is less clear and these aspects is the subject of this thesis. This study included Indian pasients with three generation transmission of NIDDM via one parent. The insulin and C-peptide responses to oral and intravenous glucose in patients with NIDDY were studied. The insulin and glucose responses to non-glucose secretogogues glucagon, tolbutamide and arginine, in NIDDY were also investigated. The following aspects with regard to insulin resistance in NIDDY were examined: glucose and free fatty acid response to intravenous insulin administration, insulin binding to circulating erythrocytes and monocytes, 125 I-insulin binding to the solubilized erythrocyte membrane receptor and 125 I-insulin binding to fibroblasts in culture

  9. Studies on insulin secretion and insulin resistance in non-insulin-dependent diabetes in young Indians

    Naidoo, C

    1986-01-01

    Patients with Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) have defects in insulin secretion and insulin action. In the discrete genetic syndrome of NIDDY (non-insulin-dependent diabetes in the young), the situation is less clear and these aspects is the subject of this thesis. This study included Indian pasients with three generation transmission of NIDDM via one parent. The insulin and C-peptide responses to oral and intravenous glucose in patients with NIDDY were studied. The insulin and glucose responses to non-glucose secretogogues glucagon, tolbutamide and arginine, in NIDDY were also investigated. The following aspects with regard to insulin resistance in NIDDY were examined: glucose and free fatty acid response to intravenous insulin administration, insulin binding to circulating erythrocytes and monocytes, /sup 125/I-insulin binding to the solubilized erythrocyte membrane receptor and /sup 125/I-insulin binding to fibroblasts in culture.

  10. Antioxidant and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Activity of Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Litsea glaucescens Infusions Fermented with Kombucha Consortium.

    Gamboa-Gómez, Claudia I; González-Laredo, Rubén F; Gallegos-Infante, José Alberto; Pérez, Mş Del Mar Larrosa; Moreno-Jiménez, Martha R; Flores-Rueda, Ana G; Rocha-Guzmán, Nuria E

    2016-09-01

    Physicochemical properties, consumer acceptance, antioxidant and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of infusions and fermented beverages of Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Litsea glaucescens were compared. Among physicochemical parameters, only the pH of fermented beverages decreased compared with the unfermented infusions. No relevant changes were reported in consumer preference between infusions and fermented beverages. Phenolic profile measured by UPLC MS/MS analysis demonstrated significant concentration changes of these compounds in plant infusions and fermented beverages. Fermentation induced a decrease in the concentration required to stabilize 50% of DPPH radical ( i . e . lower IC 50 ). Additionally, it enhanced the antioxidant activity measured by the nitric oxide scavenging assay (14% of E. camaldulensis and 49% of L. glaucescens ); whereas relevant improvements in the fermented beverage were not observed in the lipid oxidation assay compared with unfermented infusions. The same behaviour was observed in the inhibitory activity of ACE; however, both infusions and fermented beverages had lower IC 50 than positive control (captopril). The present study demonstrated that fermentation has an influence on the concentration of phenolics and their potential bioactivity. E. camaldulensis and L. glaucescens can be considered as natural sources of biocompounds with antihypertensive potential used either as infusions or fermented beverages.

  11. Antioxidant and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Activity of Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Litsea glaucescens Infusions Fermented with Kombucha Consortium

    Claudia I. Gamboa-Gómez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicochemical properties, consumer acceptance, antioxidant and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory activities of infusions and fermented beverages of Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Litsea glaucescens were compared. Among physicochemical parameters, only the pH of fermented beverages decreased compared with the unfermented infusions. No relevant changes were reported in consumer preference between infusions and fermented beverages. Phenolic profi le measured by UPLC MS/MS analysis demonstrated significant concentration changes of these compounds in plant infusions and fermented beverages. Fermentation induced a decrease in the concentration required to stabilize 50 % of DPPH radical (i.e. lower IC50. Additionally, it enhanced the antioxidant activity measured by the nitric oxide scavenging assay (14 % of E. camaldulensis and 49 % of L. glaucescens; whereas relevant improvements in the fermented beverage were not observed in the lipid oxidation assay compared with unfermented infusions. The same behaviour was observed in the inhibitory activity of ACE; however, both infusions and fermented beverages had lower IC50 than positive control (captopril. The present study demonstrated that fermentation has an influence on the concentration of phenolics and their potential bioactivity. E. camaldulensis and L. glaucescens can be considered as natural sources of biocompounds with antihypertensive potential used either as infusions or fermented beverages.

  12. Local NSAID infusion inhibits satellite cell proliferation in human skeletal muscle after eccentric exercise

    Mikkelsen, U R; Langberg, H; Helmark, I C

    2009-01-01

    Despite the widespread consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), the influence of these drugs on muscle satellite cells is not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of a local NSAID infusion on satellite cells after unaccustomed eccentric...... exercise in vivo in human skeletal muscle. Eight young healthy males performed 200 maximal eccentric contractions with each leg. An NSAID was infused via a microdialysis catheter into the vastus lateralis muscle of one leg (NSAID leg) before, during, and for 4.5 h after exercise, with the other leg working...... cells (CD68(+) or CD16(+) cells) was not significantly increased in either of the legs 8 days after exercise and was unaffected by the NSAID. The main finding in the present study was that the NSAID infusion for 7.5 h during the exercise day suppressed the exercise-induced increase in the number...

  13. From frequency of use to social integration: The mediation of routinization and infusion in Tuenti community

    José L. Roldán

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study examines post-adoption behaviors (i.e., frequency of use, routinization and infusion and their effects on the sense of community in the domain of social network sites. In particular, this contribution formulates mediation hypotheses, which posit how frequency of use affects social integration via routinization and infusion. The data was collected from 278 users of Tuenti, a highly-popular social network site among the Spanish college student population during the period 2006–2012. Results from partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM show these sophisticated types of usage are interrelated in such a way that routinization and infusion (a fully mediate the effect of frequency of use on social integration; and (b exert significant influences on social integration, as an active sense of belongingness to a social network site. In order to attain social integration, it is therefore essential for managers to devise strategies to foster advanced post-adoption behaviors.

  14. Correlation of antioxidant activity of dried berry infusions with the polyphenols and selected microelements contents

    M. M. Bratu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidant activity was measured by ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP assay in seven types of infusions prepared from commercial dried berry fruit products: Rosa canina, Vaccinium vitis-idaea, Hiphophae rhamnoides, Hibiscus sabdariffa and three fruit mixtures. Total polyphenols (TP, total anthocyanins and the polyphenolic compounds were determined by HPLC equipped with diode array detector. To estimate the amount of elements released from fruits into the water extracts, levels of Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu in dried samples and in infusions were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The correlation between polyphenols content and the antioxidant activities and the microelements in the infusions and the antioxidant activities were estimated using the Pearson’s correlation test. The results showed a high, positive and significant correlation (r = 0.9465 between the FRAP values and TP content, meaning that the concentration of phenolic compounds may be a good indicator of the reducing capacity in the infusions. Correlations varied (positive, negative and weak between antioxidant and mineral extractability of berry infusions. Among the polyphenolic compounds, gallic acid contributed particularly to the antioxidant capacity of the studied samples (r = 0.563. The correlation of antioxidants, total polyphenols with mineral extractability showed the influence of antioxidant compound on mineral bioavailability.

  15. Comparison of the therapeutic effect between sodium bicarbonate and insulin on acute propafenone toxicity.

    Yi, Hwa Yeon; Lee, Jang Young; Lee, Won Suk; Sung, Won Young; Seo, Sang Won

    2014-10-01

    Unlike other sodium-channel-blocking antiarrhythmic agents, propafenone has β-blocking effects and calcium-channel-blocking effects. Yi et al recently studied insulin's treatment effect on acute propafenone toxicity in rats. However, because the degree of effectiveness of insulin compared to the previously known antidote sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) was not studied, the 2 treatment methods were compared for propafenone intoxication in rats. Rats received intravenous propafenone (36 mg/[kg h]) for 12 minutes. After the induction of toxicity, rats (n = 10 per group) received normal saline solution (NSS), NaHCO3, or insulin with glucose as treatment. Animals in the NSS, NaHCO3, and Insulin groups received an intravenous infusion of 36 mg/(kg h) propafenone until death occurred. For each animal, the mean arterial pressure (MAP, heart rate, PR interval, QRS duration, total hemoglobin, sodium, potassium, potential of hydrogen, bicarbonate, glucose, lactate, and central venous oxygen saturation (Scvo2) were measured and compared among the groups. Survival of the Insulin group was greater than that of the NSS group by log-rank test (P = .021). Sodium bicarbonate prevented the decline of MAP for 55 minutes. In comparison, insulin prevented the decline of MAP and heart rate, and the elongation of the PR interval and QRS duration for 55 minutes (P < .05). Propafenone toxicity led to decreased Ca(2+), potential of hydrogen, and Scvo2 and increased lactate levels. Insulin prevented the decrease of Ca(2+) and Scvo2, whereas NaHCO3 prevented the increase in lactate. Insulin treatment was more effective than NaHCO3 on acute propafenone toxicity in rat. Therefore, when propafenone-induced cardiotoxicity occurs, which is unresponsive to current treatment methods, glucose-insulin infusion may be considered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Suppression of Wnt1-induced mammary tumor growth and lower serum insulin in offspring exposed to maternal blueberry diet suggest early dietary influence on developmental programming

    Despite the well-accepted notion that early maternal influences persist beyond fetal life and may underlie many adult diseases, the risks imposed by the maternal environment on breast cancer development and underlying biological mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated whether earl...

  17. 75 FR 21641 - Infusion Pumps; Public Meeting; Request for Comments

    2010-04-26

    ...] Infusion Pumps; Public Meeting; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... announcing a public meeting regarding external infusion pumps.