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Sample records for insulin homeostatic model

  1. [Identification of cutoff points for Homeostatic Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance index in adolescents: systematic review].

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    Andrade, Maria Izabel Siqueira de; Oliveira, Juliana Souza; Leal, Vanessa Sá; Lima, Niedja Maria da Silva; Costa, Emília Chagas; Aquino, Nathalia Barbosa de; Lira, Pedro Israel Cabral de

    2016-06-01

    To identify cutoff points of the Homeostatic Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) index established for adolescents and discuss their applicability for the diagnosis of insulin resistance in Brazilian adolescents. A systematic review was performed in the PubMed, Lilacs and SciELO databases, using the following descriptors: "Adolescents", "insulin resistance" and "ROC curve". Original articles carried out with adolescents published between 2005 and 2015 in Portuguese, English or Spanish languages, which included the statistical analysis using ROC curve to determine the index cutoff (HOMA-IR) were included. A total of 184 articles were identified and after the study phases were applied, seven articles were selected for the review. All selected studies established their cutoffs using a ROC curve, with the lowest observed cutoff of 1.65 for girls and 1.95 for boys and the highest of 3.82 for girls and 5.22 for boys. Of the studies analyzed, one proposed external validity, recommending the use of the HOMA-IR cutoff >2.5 for both genders. The HOMA-IR index constitutes a reliable method for the detection of insulin resistance in adolescents, as long as it uses cutoffs that are more adequate for the reality of the study population, allowing early diagnosis of insulin resistance and enabling multidisciplinary interventions aiming at health promotion of this population. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Plasma vitamin D is associated with fasting insulin and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance in young adult males, but not females, of the Jerusalem Perinatal Study.

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    Moore, Amy; Hochner, Hagit; Sitlani, Colleen M; Williams, Michelle A; Hoofnagle, Andrew N; de Boer, Ian H; Kestenbaum, Bryan; Siscovick, David S; Friedlander, Yechiel; Enquobahrie, Daniel A

    2015-05-01

    To examine cross-sectional relationships between plasma vitamin D and cardiometabolic risk factors in young adults. Data were collected from interviews, physical examinations and biomarker measurements. Total plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) was measured using LC-tandem MS. Associations between 25(OH)D and cardiometabolic risk factors were modelled using weighted linear regression with robust estimates of standard errors. Individuals born in Jerusalem during 1974-1976. Participants of the Jerusalem Perinatal Study (n 1204) interviewed and examined at age 32 years. Participants were oversampled for low and high birth weight and for maternal pre-pregnancy obesity. Mean total 25(OH)D concentration among participants was 21·7 (sd 8·9) ng/ml. Among males, 25(OH)D was associated with homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (natural log-transformed, β=-0·011, P=0·004) after adjustment for BMI. However, these associations were not present among females (P for sex interaction=0·005). We found evidence for inverse associations of 25(OH)D with markers of insulin resistance among males, but not females, in a healthy, young adult Caucasian population. Prospective studies and studies conducted on other populations investigating sex-specific effects of vitamin D on cardiometabolic risk factors are warranted.

  3. Effects of Dioscorea esculenta and Eubacterium rectale on insulin receptor substrate 1 (Irs1 Expression in skeletal muscle and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR in diabetic rats

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    . Sunarti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Low expression of insulin receptor substrate 1 (Irs1 is associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM. This study was performed to evaluate the effects of Dioscorea esculenta and Eubacterium rectale on the Irs1 expression in the skeletal muscle and the homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR of diabetic rats. Twenty-five male Wistar rats were divided into five groups i.e. non diabetic rats Group 1; diabetic rats as Group 2; diabetic rats + D. esculenta as Group 3; diabetic rats + E.rectale as Group 4 and diabetic rats + both E. rectale and D. esculenta as Group 5. Rats were made diabetic with induction of intraperitoneally injection of nicotinamide and streptozotocin. After four weeks of the interventions, the blood and skeletal muscles were taken. The Irs1 expression was analyzed with immunohistochemical staining, plasma glucose levels was analyzed using a spectrophotometer, and insulin was analyzed using ELISA methods. All intervention groups reduced plasma glucose levels and HOMA-IRs (p<0.001 and increased Irs1 expression. The greatest reduction of  plasma glucose levels and increase of Irs1 expression in the skeletal muscle were found in Group 4, however, the lowest of HOMA-IR was seen in Group 5. These results suggested that D.esculenta, E.rectale, and the combination reduced plasma glucose levels and HOMA-IR by increasing Irs1 expression in skeletal muscle.

  4. Homeostatic role of heterosynaptic plasticity: Models and experiments

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    Marina eChistiakova

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Homosynaptic Hebbian-type plasticity provides a cellular mechanism of learning and refinement of connectivity during development in a variety of biological systems. In this review we argue that a complimentary form of plasticity - heterosynaptic plasticity - represents a necessary cellular component for homeostatic regulation of synaptic weights and neuronal activity. The required properties of a homeostatic mechanism which acutely constrains the runaway dynamics imposed by Hebbian associative plasticity have been well-articulated by theoretical and modeling studies. Such mechanism(s should robustly support the stability of operation of neuronal networks and synaptic competition, include changes at non-active synapses, and operate on a similar time scale to Hebbian-type plasticity. The experimentally observed properties of heterosynaptic plasticity have introduced it as a strong candidate to fulfill this homeostatic role. Subsequent modeling studies which incorporate heterosynaptic plasticity into model neurons with Hebbian synapses (utilizing an STDP learning rule have confirmed its ability to robustly provide stability and competition. In contrast, properties of homeostatic synaptic scaling, which is triggered by extreme and long lasting (hours and days changes of neuronal activity, do not fit two crucial requirements for a hypothetical homeostatic mechanism needed to provide stability of operation in the face of on-going synaptic changes driven by Hebbian-type learning rules. Both the trigger and the time scale of homeostatic synaptic scaling are fundamentally different from those of the Hebbian-type plasticity. We conclude that heterosynaptic plasticity, which is triggered by the same episodes of strong postsynaptic activity and operates on the same time scale as Hebbian-type associative plasticity, is ideally suited to serve homeostatic role during on-going synaptic plasticity.

  5. Selective insulin resistance in homeostatic and cognitive control brain areas in overweight and obese adults.

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    Kullmann, Stephanie; Heni, Martin; Veit, Ralf; Scheffler, Klaus; Machann, Jürgen; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Fritsche, Andreas; Preissl, Hubert

    2015-06-01

    Impaired brain insulin action has been linked to obesity, type 2 diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases. To date, the central nervous effects of insulin in obese humans still remain ill defined, and no study thus far has evaluated the specific brain areas affected by insulin resistance. In 25 healthy lean and 23 overweight/obese participants, we performed magnetic resonance imaging to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) before and 15 and 30 min after application of intranasal insulin or placebo. Additionally, participants explicitly rated pictures of high-caloric savory and sweet food 60 min after the spray for wanting and liking. In response to insulin compared with placebo, we found a significant CBF decrease in the hypothalamus in both lean and overweight/obese participants. The magnitude of this response correlated with visceral adipose tissue independent of other fat compartments. Furthermore, we observed a differential response in the lean compared with the overweight/obese group in the prefrontal cortex, resulting in an insulin-induced CBF reduction in lean participants only. This prefrontal cortex response significantly correlated with peripheral insulin sensitivity and eating behavior measures such as disinhibition and food craving. Behaviorally, we were able to observe a significant reduction for the wanting of sweet foods after insulin application in lean men only. Brain insulin action was selectively impaired in the prefrontal cortex in overweight and obese adults and in the hypothalamus in participants with high visceral adipose tissue, potentially promoting an altered homeostatic set point and reduced inhibitory control contributing to overeating behavior. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  6. Metformin reduces insulin resistance and the tendency toward ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ibrahim Eldaghayes

    2018-05-11

    May 11, 2018 ... insulin concentrations, in addition to urinary cortisol:creatinine ratio, Homeostatic Model Assessment (HOMA) for ... affecting the insulin synthesis and secretion of ... Likewise, no dog with increased Blood Urea Nitrogen.

  7. Homeostatic Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR): A Better Marker for Evaluating Insulin Resistance Than Fasting Insulin in Women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome.

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    Majid, Hafsa; Masood, Qamar; Khan, Aysha Habib

    2017-03-01

    To assess the utility of HOMA-IR in assessing insulin resistance in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and compare it with fasting insulin for assessing insulin resistance (IR). Observational study. Section of Clinical Chemistry, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from January 2009 to September 2012. Medical chart review of all women diagnosed with PCOS was performed. Of the 400 PCOS women reviewed, 91 met the inclusion criteria. Insulin resistance was assessed by calculating HOMA-IR using the formula (fasting glucose x fasting insulin)/405, taking normal value HOMA-IR of women was 3.1 ±1.7, respectively with IR in 69% (n=63) women, while hyperinsulinemia was present in 60% (n=55) women (fasting Insulin 18.5 ±5.8 µIU/ml). Hyperandrogenism was present in 53.8% (n=49), whereas 38.5% (n=35) women had primary infertility or subfertility, while 65.9% (n=60) had menstrual irregularities; and higher frequencies were observed in women with IR. Eight subjects with IR and endocrine abnormalities were missed by fasting insulin. Insulin resistance is common in PCOS and it is likely a pathogenic factor for development of PCOS. HOMAIR model performed better than hyperinsulinemia alone for diagnosing IR.

  8. Homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (homa-ir): a better marker for evaluating insulin resistance than fasting insulin in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majid, H.; Khan, A.H.; Masood, Q.

    2017-01-01

    To assess the utility of HOMA-IR in assessing insulin resistance in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and compare it with fasting insulin for assessing insulin resistance (IR). Study Design: Observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Section of Clinical Chemistry, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from January 2009 to September 2012. Methodology: Medical chart review of all women diagnosed with PCOS was performed. Of the 400 PCOS women reviewed, 91 met the inclusion criteria. Insulin resistance was assessed by calculating HOMA-IR using the formula (fasting glucose x fasting insulin)/405, taking normal value =12 micro IU/ml. Results: A total of 91 premenopausal women diagnosed with PCOS were included. Mean age was 30 +-5.5 years. Mean HOMA-IR of women was 3.1 +-1.7, respectively with IR in 69% (n=63) women, while hyperinsulinemia was present in 60% (n=55) women (fasting Insulin 18.5 +-5.8 micro IU/ml). Hyperandrogenism was present in 53.8% (n=49), whereas 38.5% (n=35) women had primary infertility or subfertility, while 65.9% (n=60) had menstrual irregularities; and higher frequencies were observed in women with IR. Eight subjects with IR and endocrine abnormalities were missed by fasting insulin. Conclusion: Insulin resistance is common in PCOS and it is likely a pathogenic factor for development of PCOS. HOMA-IR model performed better than hyperinsulinemia alone for diagnosing IR. (author)

  9. Effect of HCV on fasting glucose, fasting insulin and peripheral insulin resistance in first 5 years of infection.

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    Ahmed, Naeema; Rashid, Amir; Naveed, Abdul Khaliq; Bashir, Qudsia

    2016-02-01

    To assess the effects of hepatitis C virus infection in the first 5 years on fasting glucose, fasting insulin and peripheral insulin resistance. The case-control study was conducted at the Army Medical College, Rawalpindi, from December 2011 to November 2012, and comprised subjects recruited from a government hospital in Rawalpindi. The subjects included known cases of hepatitis C virus infection for at least 5 years, and normal healthy controls. Fasting blood samples of all the subjects were collected and analysed for serum fasting insulin and serum fasting glucose levels. Homeostatic model assessment-Insulin resistance was calculated SPSS 11 was used for statistical analysis. Of the 30 subjects, 20(66.6%) were cases, while 10(33.3%) were controls. Serum fasting glucose mean level in cases was 89.55±9.53 compared to 84.40±9.80 in the controls (p=0.188). The mean serum fasting insulin in controls was 7.52±3.23 and 6.79±3.30 in cases (p=0.567). Homeostatic model assessment-Insulin resistance level in controls was 1.60±0.76 and In the cases it was 1.49±0.74 (p=0.695). Peripheral insulin resistance and development of type 2 diabetes as a complication of hepatitis C virus infection was not likely at least within the first five years of infection.

  10. Effect of zinc supplementation on insulin resistance, energy and macronutrients intakes in pregnant women with impaired glucose tolerance.

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    Roshanravan, Neda; Alizadeh, Mohammad; Hedayati, Mehdi; Asghari-Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Mesri Alamdari, Naimeh; Anari, Farideh; Tarighat-Esfanjani, Ali

    2015-02-01

    Hyperglycemia and gestational diabetes mellitus are complications of pregnancy. Both mothers and newborns are typically at increased risk for complications. This study sought to determine effect of zinc supplementation on serum glucose levels, insulin resistance, energy and macronutrients intakes in pregnant women with impaired glucose tolerance. In this clinical trial 44 pregnant women with impaired glucose tolerance, from December 2012 -April 2013 were randomly divided into zinc (n=22) and placebo (n=22) groups and recived 30mg/day zinc gluconate and (n=22), and placebo for eight consecutive weeks respectively. Dietary food intake was estimated from 3-days diet records. Serum levels of zinc, fasting blood sugar, and insulin were measured by conventional methods. Also homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance was calculated. Serumlevels of fasting blood sugar, insulin and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance slightly decreased in zinc group, but these changes were not statistically significant. Serum zinc levels (P =0.012), energy (P=0.037), protein (P=0.019) and fat (P=0.017) intakes increased statistically significant in the zinc group after intervention but not in the placebo group. Oral supplementation with zinc could be effective in increasing serum zinc levels and energy intake with no effects on fasting blood sugar, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance and insulin levels.

  11. Waist-to-height ratio is as reliable as biochemical markers to discriminate pediatric insulin resistance.

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    Alvim, Rafael de Oliveira; Zaniqueli, Divanei; Neves, Felipe Silva; Pani, Virgilia Oliveira; Martins, Caroline Resende; Peçanha, Marcos Alves de Souza; Barbosa, Míriam Carmo Rodrigues; Faria, Eliane Rodrigues de; Mill, José Geraldo

    2018-05-07

    Given the importance of incorporating simple and low-cost tools into the pediatric clinical setting to provide screening for insulin resistance, the present study sought to investigate whether waist-to-height ratio is comparable to biochemical markers for the discrimination of insulin resistance in children and adolescents. This cross-sectional study involved students from nine public schools. In total, 296 children and adolescents of both sexes, aged 8-14 years, composed the sample. Waist-to-height ratio, triglycerides/glucose index, and triglycerides-to-HDL-C ratio were determined according to standard protocols. Insulin resistance was defined as homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance with cut-off point ≥3.16. Age, body mass index, frequency of overweight, waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio, insulin, glucose, homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance, triglycerides, triglycerides/glucose index, and triglycerides-to-HDL-C were higher among insulin-resistant boys and girls. Moderate correlation of all indicators (waist-to-height ratio, triglycerides/glucose index, and triglycerides-to-HDL-C ratio) with homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance was observed for both sexes. The areas under the receiver operational characteristic curves were similar between waist-to-height ratio and biochemical markers. The indicators provided similar discriminatory power for insulin resistance. However, taking into account the cost-benefit ratio, the authors suggest that waist-to-height ratio may be a useful tool to provide screening for insulin resistance in pediatric populations. Copyright © 2018 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Homeostatic Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR 2) in Mild Subclinical Hypothyroid Subjects.

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    Sengupta, Shreejita; Jaseem, T; Ambalavanan, Jayachidambaram; Hegde, Anupama

    2018-04-01

    Despite various studies with conflicting results, the effect of thyroid hormones on lipids and insulin levels in dysthyroidism is of great interest. This case control study was aimed to perceive the existence of IR and dyslipidemia in mild subclinical hypothyroid subjects (TSH ≤ 9.9 µIU/ml) as compared to their age and gender matched euthyroid controls. Basic demographic information like height, weight was recorded. Serum samples of all the subjects were assayed for thyroid profile, lipid profile, blood glucose, HbA1C and insulin. BMI and insulin resistance was calculated. Compared to controls patients with mild subclinical hypothyroidism demonstrated hyperinsulinemia and dyslipidemia observed by the higher LDL cholesterol. A significantly positive correlation was observed for HOMA-IR with TSH and LDL cholesterol. Hence, even in the mild subclinical hypothyroid state assessment of thyroid function should be combined with estimation of plasma glucose, insulin and serum lipids to monitor and prevent its associated effects.

  13. Empagliflozin decreases remnant-like particle cholesterol in type 2 diabetes patients with insulin resistance.

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    Hattori, Sachiko

    2017-11-28

    Remnant lipoproteins are thought to be atherogenic. Remnant-like particle cholesterol (RLP-C), which reflects the levels of various kinds of remnant lipoproteins in the blood, has a significant correlation with insulin resistance. In the present study, we measured the effect of empagliflozin (EMPA) on the levels of RLP-C, and investigated whether EMPA-mediated change in RLP-C is associated with a change in insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes patients who have insulin resistance. Patients were allocated to receive a placebo (n = 51) or EMPA (n = 58) as an add-on treatment. Fasting blood samples were collected before and 12 weeks after this intervention. EMPA significantly decreased glycated hemoglobin, bodyweight, systolic blood pressure, plasma triglycerides, liver transaminases and estimated glomerular filtration rate, and increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Furthermore, EMPA decreased RLP-C and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance. In the placebo group, there were no significant changes in these factors except for slight increases in liver transaminases. Multiple regression analysis showed that the change in homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (P = 0.0102) and the change in alanine aminotransferase (P = 0.0301) were significantly associated with the change in RLP-C in the EMPA group. The change in RLP-C significantly correlated with the change in homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.503, 95% confidence interval 0.199-0.719; P = 0.00241). EMPA decreases RLP-C levels, which is closely associated with amelioration of insulin sensitivity in diabetes patients who have insulin resistance. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Mechanisms of GABAergic Homeostatic Plasticity

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    Peter Wenner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Homeostatic plasticity ensures that appropriate levels of activity are maintained through compensatory adjustments in synaptic strength and cellular excitability. For instance, excitatory glutamatergic synapses are strengthened following activity blockade and weakened following increases in spiking activity. This form of plasticity has been described in a wide array of networks at several different stages of development, but most work and reviews have focussed on the excitatory inputs of excitatory neurons. Here we review homeostatic plasticity of GABAergic neurons and their synaptic connections. We propose a simplistic model for homeostatic plasticity of GABAergic components of the circuitry (GABAergic synapses onto excitatory neurons, excitatory connections onto GABAergic neurons, cellular excitability of GABAergic neurons: following chronic activity blockade there is a weakening of GABAergic inhibition, and following chronic increases in network activity there is a strengthening of GABAergic inhibition. Previous work on GABAergic homeostatic plasticity supports certain aspects of the model, but it is clear that the model cannot fully account for some results which do not appear to fit any simplistic rule. We consider potential reasons for these discrepancies.

  15. Detecting insulin resistance in polycystic ovary syndrome: purposes and pitfalls.

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    Legro, Richard S; Castracane, V Daniel; Kauffman, Robert P

    2004-02-01

    Approximately 50% to 70% of all women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have some degree of insulin resistance, and this hormone insensitivity probably contributes to the hyperandrogenism that is responsible for the signs and symptoms of PCOS. Although uncertainty exists, early detection and treatment of insulin resistance in this population could ultimately reduce the incidence or severity of diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. Even if that proves to be the case, there are still several problems with our current approach to insulin sensitivity assessment in PCOS, including the apparent lack of consensus on what defines PCOS and "normal" insulin sensitivity, ethnic and genetic variability, the presence of other factors contributing to insulin resistance such as obesity, stress, and aging, and concern about whether simplified models of insulin sensitivity have the precision to predict treatment needs, responses, and future morbidity. Although the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp technique is the gold standard for measuring insulin sensitivity, it is too expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive to be of practical use in an office setting. Homeostatic measurements (fasting glucose/insulin ratio or homeostatic model assessment [HOMA] value) and minimal model tests (particularly the oral glucose tolerance test [OGTT]) represent the easiest office-based assessments of insulin resistance in the PCOS patient. The OGTT is probably the best simple, office-based method to assess women with PCOS because it provides information about both insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. The diagnosis of glucose intolerance holds greater prognostic and treatment implications. All obese women with PCOS should be screened for the presence of insulin resistance by looking for other stigmata of the insulin resistance syndrome such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, central obesity, and glucose intolerance.

  16. Effects of intranasal insulin on endogenous glucose production in insulin-resistant men.

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    Xiao, Changting; Dash, Satya; Stahel, Priska; Lewis, Gary F

    2018-03-14

    The effects of intranasal insulin on the regulation of endogenous glucose production (EGP) in individuals with insulin resistance were assessed in a single-blind, crossover study. Overweight or obese insulin-resistant men (n = 7; body mass index 35.4 ± 4.4 kg/m 2 , homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance 5.6 ± 1.6) received intranasal spray of either 40 IU insulin lispro or placebo in 2 randomized visits. Acute systemic spillover of intranasal insulin into the circulation was matched with a 30-minute intravenous infusion of insulin lispro in the nasal placebo arm. EGP was assessed under conditions of a pancreatic clamp with a primed, constant infusion of glucose tracer. Under these experimental conditions, compared with placebo, intranasal administration of insulin did not significantly affect plasma glucose concentrations, EGP or glucose disposal in overweight/obese, insulin-resistant men, in contrast to our previous study, in which an equivalent dose of intranasal insulin significantly suppressed EGP in lean, insulin-sensitive men. Insulin resistance is probably associated with impairment in centrally mediated insulin suppression of EGP. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The effects of a 2 week modified high intensity interval training program on the homeostatic model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in adults with type 2 diabetes.

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    Shaban, N; Kenno, K A; Milne, K J

    2014-04-01

    High intensity interval training (HIIT) induces similar metabolic adaptations to traditional steady state aerobic exercise training. Until recently, most HIIT studies have examined maximum efforts in healthy populations. The current study aimed to examine the effects of a 2 week modified HIIT program on the homeostatic model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D). It was hypothesized that HIIT would improve HOMA-IR. Nine individuals with T2D (age=40.2±9.7 y; BMI=33.9±5.3; fasting plasma glucose [FPG]=8.7±2.9 mmol/L; HbA1C=7.3±1.2%; [mean±SD]) performed 6 individualized training sessions of HIIT (4x30 seconds at 100% of estimated maximum workload followed by 4 minutes of active rest) over 2 weeks. HOMA-IR was calculated from FPG and serum insulin and compared against a prior 2 week baseline period. Blood glucose was reduced immediately after each HIIT session (PHOMA-IR were unchanged after training. However, 6 of the 9 individuals exhibited reduced HOMA-IR values after the training period and there was a significant negative correlation between HOMA-IR value prior to training and change in HOMA-IR after HIIT. These observations tend to support the positive health benefits of HITT for individuals with T2D reported in recently published data using a modified HIIT protocol. However, they suggest that the magnitude of the disease should be assessed when examining the effects of exercise interventions in individuals with T2D.

  18. Emerging role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism.

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    Roh, Eun; Song, Do Kyeong; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-03-11

    Accumulated evidence from genetic animal models suggests that the brain, particularly the hypothalamus, has a key role in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism. The brain integrates multiple metabolic inputs from the periphery through nutrients, gut-derived satiety signals and adiposity-related hormones. The brain modulates various aspects of metabolism, such as food intake, energy expenditure, insulin secretion, hepatic glucose production and glucose/fatty acid metabolism in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Highly coordinated interactions between the brain and peripheral metabolic organs are critical for the maintenance of energy and glucose homeostasis. Defective crosstalk between the brain and peripheral organs contributes to the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Here we comprehensively review the above topics, discussing the main findings related to the role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism.

  19. Intranasal insulin modulates intrinsic reward and prefrontal circuitry of the human brain in lean women.

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    Kullmann, Stephanie; Frank, Sabine; Heni, Martin; Ketterer, Caroline; Veit, Ralf; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Fritsche, Andreas; Preissl, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that food consumption is controlled by a wide range of brain circuits outside of the homeostatic system. Activation in these brain circuits may override the homeostatic system and also contribute to the enormous increase of obesity. However, little is known about the influence of hormonal signals on the brain's non-homeostatic system. Thus, selective insulin action in the brain was investigated by using intranasal application. We performed 'resting-state' functional magnetic resonance imaging in 17 healthy lean female subjects to assess intrinsic brain activity by fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (fALFF) before, 30 and 90 min after application of intranasal insulin. Here, we showed that insulin modulates intrinsic brain activity in the hypothalamus and orbitofrontal cortex. Furthermore, we could show that the prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex response to insulin is associated with body mass index. This demonstrates that hormonal signals as insulin may reduce food intake by modifying the reward and prefrontal circuitry of the human brain, thereby potentially decreasing the rewarding properties of food. Due to the alarming increase in obesity worldwide, it is of great importance to identify neural mechanisms of interaction between the homeostatic and non-homeostatic system to generate new targets for obesity therapy. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Complement activation, endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance and chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, M.; Kistorp, C.; Hansen, T.K.

    2010-01-01

    CRP), endothelial activation (soluble E-selectin, sEsel)), endothelial damage/dysfunction (von Willebrand factor, vWf) and insulin resistance (IR) and prognosis in CHF remains unknown. Design. We investigated the association(s) between plasma sMAC, hsCRP, sEsel, vWf and IR (assessed by homeostatic model assessment...

  1. Plasma Amino Acids vs Conventional Predictors of Insulin Resistance Measured by the Hyperinsulinemic Clamp

    OpenAIRE

    Labonte, Cherise C.; Farsijani, Samaneh; Marliss, Errol B.; Gougeon, Réjeanne; Morais, José A.; Pereira, Sandra; Bassil, Maya; Winter, Aaron; Murphy, Jessica; Combs, Terry P.; Chevalier, Stéphanie

    2017-01-01

    Context: Specific plasma amino acid (AA) profiles including elevated postabsorptive branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) have been associated with insulin resistance (IR), mostly estimated by homeostatic model assessment. This study assessed the associations of postabsorptive AAs with IR directly measured by insulin-mediated glucose disposal and determined the quantitative value of AAs and conventional IR predictors. Design: Fifty-one healthy, 31 overweight or obese (Ow/Ob), and 52 men and wome...

  2. The incidence of metabolic syndrome in obese Czech children: the importance of early detection of insulin resistance using homeostatic indexes HOMA-IR and QUICKI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastucha, D; Filipčíková, R; Horáková, D; Radová, L; Marinov, Z; Malinčíková, J; Kocvrlich, M; Horák, S; Bezdičková, M; Dobiáš, M

    2013-01-01

    Common alimentary obesity frequently occurs on a polygenic basis as a typical lifestyle disorder in the developed countries. It is associated with characteristic complex metabolic changes, which are the cornerstones for future metabolic syndrome development. The aims of our study were 1) to determine the incidence of metabolic syndrome (based on the diagnostic criteria defined by the International Diabetes Federation for children and adolescents) in Czech obese children, 2) to evaluate the incidence of insulin resistance according to HOMA-IR and QUICKI homeostatic indexes in obese children with and without metabolic syndrome, and 3) to consider the diagnostic value of these indexes for the early detection of metabolic syndrome in obese children. We therefore performed anthropometric and laboratory examinations to determine the incidence of metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in the group of 274 children with obesity (128 boys and 146 girls) aged 9-17 years. Metabolic syndrome was found in 102 subjects (37 %). On the other hand, the presence of insulin resistance according to QUICKI HOMA-IR >3.16 in 53 % of obese subjects. This HOMA-IR limit was exceeded by 70 % children in the MS(+) group, but only by 43 % children in the MS(-) group (p<0.0001). However, a relatively high incidence of insulin resistance in obese children without metabolic syndrome raises a question whether the existing diagnostic criteria do not falsely exclude some cases of metabolic syndrome. On the basis of our results we suggest to pay a preventive attention also to obese children with insulin resistance even if they do not fulfill the actual diagnostic criteria for metabolic syndrome.

  3. Nasal insulin changes peripheral insulin sensitivity simultaneously with altered activity in homeostatic and reward-related human brain regions.

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    Heni, M; Kullmann, S; Ketterer, C; Guthoff, M; Linder, K; Wagner, R; Stingl, K T; Veit, R; Staiger, H; Häring, H-U; Preissl, H; Fritsche, A

    2012-06-01

    Impaired insulin sensitivity is a major factor leading to type 2 diabetes. Animal studies suggest that the brain is involved in the regulation of insulin sensitivity. We investigated whether insulin action in the human brain regulates peripheral insulin sensitivity and examined which brain areas are involved. Insulin and placebo were given intranasally. Plasma glucose, insulin and C-peptide were measured in 103 participants at 0, 30 and 60 min. A subgroup (n = 12) was also studied with functional MRI, and blood sampling at 0, 30 and 120 min. For each time-point, the HOMA of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated as an inverse estimate of peripheral insulin sensitivity. Plasma insulin increased and subsequently decreased. This excursion was accompanied by slightly decreased plasma glucose, resulting in an initially increased HOMA-IR. At 1 h after insulin spray, the HOMA-IR subsequently decreased and remained lower up to 120 min. An increase in hypothalamic activity was observed, which correlated with the increased HOMA-IR at 30 min post-spray. Activity in the putamen, right insula and orbitofrontal cortex correlated with the decreased HOMA-IR at 120 min post-spray. Central insulin action in specific brain areas, including the hypothalamus, may time-dependently regulate peripheral insulin sensitivity. This introduces a potential novel mechanism for the regulation of peripheral insulin sensitivity and underlines the importance of cerebral insulin action for the whole organism.

  4. Grizzly bears exhibit augmented insulin sensitivity while obese prior to a reversible insulin resistance during hibernation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, O Lynne; Jansen, Heiko T; Galbreath, Elizabeth; Morgenstern, Kurt; Gehring, Jamie Lauren; Rigano, Kimberly Scott; Lee, Jae; Gong, Jianhua; Shaywitz, Adam J; Vella, Chantal A; Robbins, Charles T; Corbit, Kevin C

    2014-08-05

    The confluence of obesity and diabetes as a worldwide epidemic necessitates the discovery of new therapies. Success in this endeavor requires translatable preclinical studies, which traditionally employ rodent models. As an alternative approach, we explored hibernation where obesity is a natural adaptation to survive months of fasting. Here we report that grizzly bears exhibit seasonal tripartite insulin responsiveness such that obese animals augment insulin sensitivity but only weeks later enter hibernation-specific insulin resistance (IR) and subsequently reinitiate responsiveness upon awakening. Preparation for hibernation is characterized by adiposity coupled to increased insulin sensitivity via modified PTEN/AKT signaling specifically in adipose tissue, suggesting a state of "healthy" obesity analogous to humans with PTEN haploinsufficiency. Collectively, we show that bears reversibly cope with homeostatic perturbations considered detrimental to humans and describe a mechanism whereby IR functions not as a late-stage metabolic adaptation to obesity, but rather a gatekeeper of the fed-fasting transition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Blueberries’ Impact on Insulin Resistance and Glucose Intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April J. Stull

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Blueberries are a rich source of polyphenols, which include anthocyanin bioactive compounds. Epidemiological evidence indicates that incorporating blueberries into the diet may lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM. These findings are supported by pre-clinical and clinical studies that have shown improvements in insulin resistance (i.e., increased insulin sensitivity after obese and insulin-resistant rodents or humans consumed blueberries. Insulin resistance was assessed by homeostatic model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, insulin tolerance tests, and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps. Additionally, the improvements in glucose tolerance after blueberry consumption were assessed by glucose tolerance tests. However, firm conclusions regarding the anti-diabetic effect of blueberries cannot be drawn due to the small number of existing clinical studies. Although the current evidence is promising, more long-term, randomized, and placebo-controlled trials are needed to establish the role of blueberries in preventing or delaying T2DM.

  6. Associations between insulin action and integrity of brain microstructure differ with familial longevity and with age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akintola, Abimbola A; van den Berg, Annette; van Buchem, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    [fasted glucose and glucose area-under-the-curve (AUC)], insulin resistance [fasted insulin, AUCinsulin, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)], and pancreatic Beta cell secretory capacity (insulinogenic index). 3 Tesla MRI and Magnetization Transfer (MT) imaging MT-ratio (MTR......-height in gray and white matter was inversely associated with AUCinsulin, fasted insulin, HOMA-IR and insulinogenic-index (all p 65 years): in younger controls, significantly stronger inverse associations were observed between MTR peak-height and fasted glucose......, AUCglucose, fasted insulin, AUCinsulin and HOMA-IR in gray matter; and for AUCglucose, fasted insulin and HOMA-IR in white matter (all P-interaction

  7. Insulin sensitivity affects corticolimbic brain responses to visual food cues in polycystic ovary syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaadi, Hanin M; Van Vugt, Dean A

    2015-11-01

    This study examined the effect of insulin sensitivity on the responsiveness of appetite regulatory brain regions to visual food cues. Nineteen participants diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) were divided into insulin-sensitive (n=8) and insulin-resistant (n=11) groups based on the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA2-IR). Subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while viewing food pictures following water or dextrose consumption. The corticolimbic blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) responses to high-calorie (HC) or low-calorie (LC) food pictures were compared within and between groups. BOLD responses to food pictures were reduced during a glucose challenge in numerous corticolimbic brain regions in insulin-sensitive but not insulin-resistant subjects. Furthermore, the degree of insulin resistance positively correlated with the corticolimbic BOLD response in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), anterior cingulate and ventral tegmental area (VTA) in response to HC pictures, and in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), mPFC, anterior cingulate, and insula in response to LC pictures following a glucose challenge. BOLD signal in the OFC, midbrain, hippocampus, and amygdala following a glucose challenge correlated with HOMA2-IR in response to HC-LC pictures. We conclude that the normal inhibition of corticolimbic brain responses to food pictures during a glucose challenge is compromised in insulin-resistant subjects. The increase in brain responsiveness to food pictures during postprandial hyperinsulinemia may lead to greater non-homeostatic eating and perpetuate obesity in insulin-resistant subjects.

  8. Active Inference, homeostatic regulation and adaptive behavioural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzulo, Giovanni; Rigoli, Francesco; Friston, Karl

    2015-11-01

    We review a theory of homeostatic regulation and adaptive behavioural control within the Active Inference framework. Our aim is to connect two research streams that are usually considered independently; namely, Active Inference and associative learning theories of animal behaviour. The former uses a probabilistic (Bayesian) formulation of perception and action, while the latter calls on multiple (Pavlovian, habitual, goal-directed) processes for homeostatic and behavioural control. We offer a synthesis these classical processes and cast them as successive hierarchical contextualisations of sensorimotor constructs, using the generative models that underpin Active Inference. This dissolves any apparent mechanistic distinction between the optimization processes that mediate classical control or learning. Furthermore, we generalize the scope of Active Inference by emphasizing interoceptive inference and homeostatic regulation. The ensuing homeostatic (or allostatic) perspective provides an intuitive explanation for how priors act as drives or goals to enslave action, and emphasises the embodied nature of inference. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Association between insulin resistance and low relative appendicular skeletal muscle mass: evidence from a cohort study in community-dwelling older men and women participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemán-Mateo, Heliodoro; López Teros, Miriam T; Ramírez, Fátima A; Astiazarán-García, Humberto

    2014-07-01

    It has been hypothesized that insulin resistance plays a role in the development of the loss of skeletal muscle; however, no cohort studies on insulin resistance and low relative appendicular skeletal muscle mass (ASM) have been published to date. Thus, we examined whether insulin resistance is associated with low relative ASM after a 4.6-year follow-up period among apparently healthy older men and women participants. This is a combined retrospective-prospective cohort study, which includes 147 community-dwelling older men and women participants. ASM was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry at baseline and follow-up. Participants with a relative change in ASM below the sex-specific 15th value were classified as the low relative ASM group. Homeostatic model assessment was used to quantify insulin resistance. Logistic regression calculated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for development of low relative ASM, adjusted for covariates. The loss of ASM in the low relative ASM and normal groups was -1.8kg and -0.35kg, respectively (p ≤ .05). The low relative ASM group was older and had higher insulin and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance values at baseline. The risk of developing low relative ASM at 4.6-year follow-up was 2.9 times higher (95% CI, 1.00-7.8; p = .04) among the participants with homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance levels more than 2.3. After adjusting for age, the risk increased to 3.9 times higher (95% CI, 1.3-11.5; p = .03). Insulin resistance was associated with low relative ASM at 4.6-year follow-up after accounting for several covariates in a cohort of apparently healthy, well-functioning young older men and women. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Advances in applied homeostatic modelling of the relationship between thyrotropin and free thyroxine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Hoermann

    Full Text Available The relationship between pituitary TSH and thyroid hormones is central to our understanding of thyroid physiology and thyroid function testing. Here, we generated distribution patterns by using validated tools of thyroid modelling.We simulated patterns of individual set points under various conditions, based on a homeostatic model of thyroid feedback control. These were compared with observed data points derived from clinical trials.A random mix of individual set points was reconstructed by simulative modelling with defined structural parameters. The pattern displayed by the cluster of hypothetical points resembled that observed in a natural control group. Moderate variation of the TSH-FT4 gradient over the functional range introduced further flexibility, implementing a scenario of adaptive set points. Such a scenario may be a realistic possibility for instance in treatment where relationships and equilibria between thyroid parameters are altered by various influences such as LT4 dose and conversion efficiency.We validated a physiologically based homeostatic model that permits simulative reconstruction of individual set points. This produced a pattern resembling the observed data under various conditions. Applied modelling, although still experimental at this stage, shows a potential to aid our physiological understanding of the interplay between TSH and thyroid hormones. It should eventually benefit personalised clinical decision making.

  11. Impact of anti-insulin antibodies on islet transplantation outcome: data from the GRAGIL Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lablanche, Sandrine; Borot, Sophie; Thaunat, Olivier; Bayle, Francois; Badet, Lionel; Morelon, Emmanuel; Thivolet, Charles; Wojtusciszyn, Anne; Frimat, Luc; Kessler, Laurence; Penfornis, Alfred; Brault, Coralie; Colin, Cyrille; Bosco, Domenico; Berney, Thierry; Benhamou, Pierre Y

    2014-08-27

    In patients with type 1 diabetes, insulin antibodies (IA), altering the pharmacokinetics of circulating insulin, might be associated with high glucose concentration, prolonged hypoglycemia, and higher insulin requirement. The impact of IA on islet transplantation has never been explored. Our aim was to evaluate islet transplantation results at 1 year according to the presence of IA. Our work is a retrospective, case-control study, comparing IA-negative and IA-positive patients among the cohort of patients with type 1 diabetes transplanted within the Swiss-French GRAGIL network between 2003 and 2010. Data about IA were available for 17 patients. Before islet transplantation, 10 patients (59%) were screened positive for IA. At 12 months after transplantation, IA-positive patients reached insulin independence less frequently than IA-negative patients (cumulative incidence of insulin independence, 22.2% vs. 71.4%; P=0.02); β score was ≥7 in 43% of IA-negative patients versus 0% in IA-positive patients (P=0.022). When comparing IA-positive patients with IA-negative patients, insulin dose was 0.15 U/kg (0.10-0.18 U/kg) versus 0.01 U/kg (0-0.09 U/kg) (P=0.2); HbA1c was 6.1% (5.8%-6.3%) versus 6.1% (5.9%-6.8%) (P=0.16); basal C-peptide level was 460 ρmol/L (350-510 ρmol/L) versus 265 ρmol/L (177-405 ρmol/L) (P=0.28); occurrence of hypoglycemia was 12.5% versus 16.5% (P=0.9); and homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance was 1.25 (1-2.4) versus 0.7 (0.52-0.92) (P=0.01). After islet transplantation, IA-positive patients achieved insulin independence less frequently, exhibiting lower β score and higher homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance compared with IA-negative patients. However, in both groups, islet transplantation restored good glycemic control and drastically reduced hypoglycemia and insulin requirements.

  12. Low-fat diet with omega-3 fatty acids increases plasma insulin-like growth factor concentration in healthy postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lindsay R; Kurzer, Mindy S; Thomas, William; Redmon, J Bruce; Raatz, Susan K

    2013-07-01

    The insulin-like growth factor pathway plays a central role in the normal and abnormal growth of tissues; however, nutritional determinants of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and its binding proteins in healthy individuals are not well defined. Three test diets-high-fat diet (40% energy as fat), low-fat diet (LF; 20% energy as fat), and a diet with low fat and high omega-3 fatty acid (LFn3; 23% energy as fat)--were tested in a randomized crossover designed controlled feeding trial in healthy postmenopausal women. Plasma IGF-I, IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), insulin, glucose, and ratio of IGF-I/IGFBP-3 concentrations were measured in response to diets. Insulin sensitivity was calculated using the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance We hypothesized that IGF-I, insulin, and glucose concentrations would decrease and IGFBP-3 concentration would increase in response to the low-fat diets. Eight weeks of the LFn3 diet increased circulating IGF-I (P diet increased IGFBP-3 (P = .04), resulting in trends toward an increased IGF-I/IGFBP-3 ratio with the LFn3 diet and a decreased IGF-I/IGFBP-3 ratio with the LF diet (P = .13 for both comparisons). No statistically significant differences were detected between treatments at baseline or 8 weeks for IGF-1, IGFBP-3, or the ratio of IGF-1/IGFBP-3. Insulin, glucose, and the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance were not altered by the interventions. Low-fat diet with high n-3 fatty acids may increase circulating IGF-I concentrations without adversely affecting insulin sensitivity in healthy individuals. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. A homeostatic-partly dynamic model for Cs-137 in trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frissel, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    To describe the uptake of Cs-137 (hereafter only called Cs) two types of models seem most promising: the simple concentration ratio model and the homeostatic model. The first one calculates the concentration of Cs in the vegetation from the Cs concentration in the soil by applying a multiplication factor which is often called a transfer factor. There is no dynamics in the system, the transfer factor or concentration ratio is a constant, which may depend on the ecological system under study. It is often applied to annual crops. The second type of model assumes that the Cs/K ratio in the soil determines the Cs/K ratio in the vegetation. Also this model is usually static. By taking into account variations of the Cs/K ratio in the soil with time - e.g. as caused by K fertilization - it can be extended into a dynamic model. (author)

  14. Fructose induced neurogenic hypertension mediated by overactivation of p38 MAPK to impair insulin signaling transduction caused central insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pei-Wen; Lin, Yu-Te; Ho, Wen-Yu; Lu, Pei-Jung; Chen, Hsin-Hung; Lai, Chi-Cheng; Sun, Gwo-Ching; Yeh, Tung-Chen; Hsiao, Michael; Tseng, Ching-Jiunn; Liu, Chun-Peng

    2017-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes are at a high risk of complications related to hypertension, and reports have indicated that insulin levels may be associated with blood pressure (BP). Fructose intake has recently been reported to promote insulin resistance and superoxide formation. The aim of this study is to investigate whether fructose intake can enhance superoxide generation and impair insulin signaling in the NTS and subsequently elevate BP in rats with fructose-induced hypertension. Treatment with fructose for 4 weeks increased the BP, serum fasting insulin, glucose, homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance, and triglyceride levels and reduced the serum direct high-density lipoprotein level in the fructose group. The Tempol treatment recovered the fructose-induced decrease in nitric oxide production in the NTS. Immunoblotting and immunofluorescence analyses further showed that fructose increased the p38- and fructose-induced phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1 S307 ) and suppressed Akt S473 and neuronal nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation. Similarly, fructose was able to impair insulin sensitivity and increase insulin levels in the NTS. Fructose intake also increased the production of superoxide in the NTS. The results of this study suggest that fructose might induce central insulin resistance and elevate BP by enhancing superoxide production and activating p38 phosphorylation in the NTS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Circadian and ultradian components of hunger in human non-homeostatic meal-to-meal eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuorinen, Elizabeth C; Borer, Katarina T

    2013-10-02

    A unifying physiological explanation of the urge to initiate eating is still not available as human hunger in meal-to-meal eating may not be under homeostatic control. We hypothesized that a central circadian and a gastrointestinal ultradian timing mechanism coordinate non-deprivation meal-to-meal eating. We examined hunger as a function of time of day, inter-meal (IM) energy expenditure (EE), and concentrations of proposed hunger-controlling hormones ghrelin, leptin, and insulin. In two crossover studies, 10 postmenopausal women, BMI 23-26 kg/m(2) engaged in exercise (EX) and sedentary (SED) trials. Weight maintenance meals were provided at 6h intervals with an ad libitum meal at 13 h in study 1 and 21 h snack in study 2. EE during IM intervals was measured by indirect calorimetry and included EX EE of 801 kcal in study 1, and 766-1,051 kcal in study 2. Hunger was assessed with a visual analog scale and blood was collected for hormonal determination. Hunger displayed a circadian variation with acrophase at 13 and 19 h and was unrelated to preceding EE. Hunger was suppressed by EX between 10 and 16 h and bore no relationship to either EE during preceding IM intervals or changes in leptin, insulin, and ghrelin; however leptin reflected IM energy changes and ghrelin and insulin, prandial events. During non-deprivation meal-to-meal eating, hunger appears to be under non-homeostatic central circadian control as it is unrelated to EE preceding meals or concentrations of proposed appetite-controlling hormones. Gastrointestinal meal processing appears to intermittently suppress this control and entrain an ultradian hunger pattern. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Central insulin action in energy and glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plum, Leona; Belgardt, Bengt F; Brüning, Jens C

    2006-07-01

    Insulin has pleiotropic biological effects in virtually all tissues. However, the relevance of insulin signaling in peripheral tissues has been studied far more extensively than its role in the brain. An evolving body of evidence indicates that in the brain, insulin is involved in multiple regulatory mechanisms including neuronal survival, learning, and memory, as well as in regulation of energy homeostasis and reproductive endocrinology. Here we review insulin's role as a central homeostatic signal with regard to energy and glucose homeostasis and discuss the mechanisms by which insulin communicates information about the body's energy status to the brain. Particular emphasis is placed on the controversial current debate about the similarities and differences between hypothalamic insulin and leptin signaling at the molecular level.

  17. Cognitively impaired elderly exhibit insulin resistance and no memory improvement with infused insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jill K; Vidoni, Eric D; Mahnken, Jonathan D; Montgomery, Robert N; Johnson, David K; Thyfault, John P; Burns, Jeffrey M

    2016-03-01

    Insulin resistance is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), although its role in AD etiology is unclear. We assessed insulin resistance using fasting and insulin-stimulated measures in 51 elderly subjects with no dementia (ND; n = 37) and with cognitive impairment (CI; n = 14). CI subjects exhibited either mild CI or AD. Fasting insulin resistance was measured using the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Insulin-stimulated glucose disposal was assessed using the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp to calculate glucose disposal rate into lean mass, the primary site of insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. Because insulin crosses the blood-brain barrier, we also assessed whether insulin infusion would improve verbal episodic memory compared to baseline. Different but equivalent versions of cognitive tests were administered in counterbalanced order in the basal and insulin-stimulated state. Groups did not differ in age or body mass index. Cognitively impaired subjects exhibited greater insulin resistance as measured at fasting (HOMA-IR; ND: 1.09 [1.1] vs. CI: 2.01 [2.3], p = 0.028) and during the hyperinsulinemic clamp (glucose disposal rate into lean mass; ND: 9.9 (4.5) vs. AD 7.2 (3.2), p = 0.040). Cognitively impaired subjects also exhibited higher fasting insulin compared to ND subjects, (CI: 8.7 [7.8] vs. ND: 4.2 [3.8] μU/mL; p = 0.023) and higher fasting amylin (CI: 24.1 [39.1] vs. 8.37 [14.2]; p = 0.050) with no difference in fasting glucose. Insulin infusion elicited a detrimental effect on one test of verbal episodic memory (Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test) in both groups (p insulin resistance was observed in cognitively impaired subjects compared to ND controls, insulin infusion did not improve memory. Furthermore, a significant correlation between HOMA-IR and glucose disposal rate was present only in ND (p = 0.0002) but not in cognitively impaired (p = 0.884) subjects, indicating potentially important

  18. Insulin resistance improvement by cinnamon powder in polycystic ovary syndrome: A randomized double-blind placebo controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajimonfarednejad, Mahdie; Nimrouzi, Majid; Heydari, Mojtaba; Zarshenas, Mohammad Mehdi; Raee, Mohammad Javad; Jahromi, Bahia Namavar

    2018-02-01

    Our aim is to assess the effect of cinnamon powder capsules on insulin resistance, anthropometric measurements, glucose and lipid profiles, and androgens of women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Out of 80 women that were diagnosed as PCOS by Rotterdam Criteria, 66 were enrolled in this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. All of the PCOS women were taking medroxy progesterone acetate 10 mg/day for the last 10 days of their menstrual cycles. The cases were randomly allocated to 2 groups. The women in the first group were treated by cinnamon powder capsules 1.5 g/day in 3 divided doses for 12 weeks and the second group by similar placebo capsules. Anthropometric measurements, fasting blood sugar, fasting insulin, blood glucose 2 hr after taking 75 g oral glucose, HbA1c, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance, triglyceride, and cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, and total) before and after the intervention were evaluated and compared as outcome measures. Fasting insulin (p = .024) and homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (p = .014) were reduced after 12 weeks in the cinnamon group compared with the placebo. There was also a significant decrease in low-density lipoprotein in cinnamon group (p = .004) as compared with baseline that caused significant difference with placebo (p = .049). However, changes in other outcome measurements did not lead to statistically significant difference with placebo. The present results suggest that complementary supplementation of cinnamon significantly reduced fasting insulin and insulin resistance in women with PCOS. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Glycated Hemoglobin, Fasting Insulin and the Metabolic Syndrome in Males. Cross-Sectional Analyses of the Aragon Workers' Health Study Baseline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravia, Gabriela; Civeira, Fernando; Hurtado-Roca, Yamilee; Andres, Eva; Leon, Montserrat; Pocovi, Miguel; Ordovas, Jose; Guallar, Eliseo; Fernandez-Ortiz, Antonio; Casasnovas, Jose Antonio; Laclaustra, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is currently used to diagnose diabetes mellitus, while insulin has been relegated to research. Both, however, may help understanding the metabolic syndrome and profiling patients. We examined the association of HbA1c and fasting insulin with clustering of metabolic syndrome criteria and insulin resistance as two essential characteristics of the metabolic syndrome. We used baseline data from 3200 non-diabetic male participants in the Aragon Workers' Health Study. We conducted analysis to estimate age-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) across tertiles of HbA1c and insulin. Fasting glucose and Homeostatic model assessment - Insulin Resistance were used as reference. Here we report the uppermost-to-lowest tertile ORs (95%CI). Mean age (SD) was 48.5 (8.8) years and 23% of participants had metabolic syndrome. The ORs for metabolic syndrome criteria tended to be higher across HbA1c than across glucose, except for high blood pressure. Insulin was associated with the criteria more strongly than HbA1c and similarly to Homeostatic model assessment - Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR). For metabolic syndrome, the OR of HbA1c was 2.68, of insulin, 11.36, of glucose, 7.03, and of HOMA-IR, 14.40. For the clustering of 2 or more non-glycemic criteria, the OR of HbA1c was 2.10, of insulin, 8.94, of glucose, 1.73, and of HOMA-IR, 7.83. All ORs were statistically significant. The areas under the receiver operating characteristics curves for metabolic syndrome were 0.670 (across HbA1c values) and 0.770 (across insulin values), and, for insulin resistance, 0.647 (HbA1c) and 0.995 (insulin). Among non-metabolic syndrome patients, a small insulin elevation identified risk factor clustering. HbA1c and specially insulin levels were associated with metabolic syndrome criteria, their clustering, and insulin resistance. Insulin could provide early information in subjects prone to develop metabolic syndrome.

  20. Resveratrol attenuates intermittent hypoxia-induced macrophage migration to visceral white adipose tissue and insulin resistance in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, Alba; Zhang, Shelley X L; Almendros, Isaac; Wang, Yang; Peris, Eduard; Qiao, Zhuanhong; Gozal, David

    2015-02-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia during sleep (IH), as occurs in sleep apnea, promotes systemic insulin resistance. Resveratrol (Resv) has been reported to ameliorate high-fat diet-induced obesity, inflammation, and insulin resistance. To examine the effect of Resv on IH-induced metabolic dysfunction, male mice were subjected to IH or room air conditions for 8 weeks and treated with either Resv or vehicle (Veh). Fasting plasma levels of glucose, insulin, and leptin were obtained, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance index levels were calculated, and insulin sensitivity tests (phosphorylated AKT [also known as protein kinase B]/total AKT) were performed in 2 visceral white adipose tissue (VWAT) depots (epididymal [Epi] and mesenteric [Mes]) along with flow cytometry assessments for VWAT macrophages and phenotypes (M1 and M2). IH-Veh and IH-Resv mice showed initial reductions in food intake with later recovery, with resultant lower body weights after 8 weeks but with IH-Resv showing better increases in body weight vs IH-Veh. IH-Veh and IH-Resv mice exhibited lower fasting glucose levels, but only IH-Veh had increased homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance index vs all 3 other groups. Leptin levels were preserved in IH-Veh but were significantly lower in IH-Resv. Reduced VWAT phosphorylated-AKT/AKT responses to insulin emerged in both Mes and Epi in IH-Veh but normalized in IH-Resv. Increases total macrophage counts and in M1 to M2 ratios occurred in IH-Veh Mes and Epi compared all other 3 groups. Thus, Resv ameliorates food intake and weight gain during IH exposures and markedly attenuates VWAT inflammation and insulin resistance, thereby providing a potentially useful adjunctive therapy for metabolic morbidity in the context of sleep apnea.

  1. Denervation-induced homeostatic dendritic plasticity in morphological granule cell models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann Cuntz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal death and subsequent denervation of target areas are major consequences of several neurological conditions such asischemia or neurodegeneration (Alzheimer's disease. The denervation-induced axonal loss results in reorganization of the dendritic tree of denervated neurons. The dendritic reorganization has been previously studied using entorhinal cortex lesion (ECL. ECL leads to shortening and loss of dendritic segments in the denervated outer molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. However, the functional importance of these long-term dendritic alterations is not yet understood and their impact on neuronal electrical properties remains unclear. Here we analyzed what happens to the electrotonic structure and excitability of dentate granule cells after lesion-induced alterations of their dendritic morphology, assuming all other parameters remain equal. We performed comparative electrotonic analysis in anatomically and biophysically realistic compartmental models of 3D-reconstructed healthy and denervated granule cells. Using the method of morphological modeling based on optimization principles minimizing the amount of wiring and maximizing synaptic democracy, we built artificial granule cells which replicate morphological features of their real counterparts. Our results show that somatofugal and somatopetal voltage attenuation in the passive cable model are strongly reduced in denervated granule cells. In line with these predictions, the attenuation both of simulated backpropagating action potentials and forward propagating EPSPs was significantly reduced in dendrites of denervated neurons. Intriguingly, the enhancement of action potential backpropagation occurred specifically in the denervated dendritic layers. Furthermore, simulations of synaptic f-I curves revealed a homeostatic increase of excitability in denervated granule cells. In summary, our morphological and compartmental modeling indicates that unless modified by changes of

  2. A model of insulin fibrils derived from the x-ray crystal structure of a monomeric insulin (despentapeptide insulin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brange, J; Dodson, G G; Edwards, D J; Holden, P H; Whittingham, J L

    1997-04-01

    The crystal structure of despentapeptide insulin, a monomeric insulin, has been refined at 1.3 A spacing and subsequently used to predict and model the organization in the insulin fibril. The model makes use of the contacts in the densely packed despentapeptide insulin crystal, and takes into account other experimental evidence, including binding studies with Congo red. The dimensions of this model fibril correspond well with those measured experimentally, and the monomer-monomer contacts within the fibril are in accordance with the known physical chemistry of insulin fibrils. Using this model, it may be possible to predict mutations in insulin that might alleviate problems associated with fibril formation during insulin therapy.

  3. Regulatory Coordination between Two Major Intracellular Homeostatic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dokladny, Karol; Zuhl, Micah Nathaniel; Mandell, Michael

    2013-01-01

    whether there are interactions between these homeostatic systems, one universally operational in all prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, and the other one (autophagy) is limited to eukaryotes. We found that heat shock response regulates autophagy. The interaction between the two systems was demonstrated......The eukaryotic cell depends on multitiered homeostatic systems ensuring maintenance of proteostasis, organellar integrity, function and turnover, and overall cellular viability. At the two opposite ends of the homeostatic system spectrum are heat shock response and autophagy. Here, we tested...... of the homeostatic systems in the eukaryotic cell....

  4. Stable Control of Firing Rate Mean and Variance by Dual Homeostatic Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Jonathan; Miller, Paul

    2017-12-01

    Homeostatic processes that provide negative feedback to regulate neuronal firing rates are essential for normal brain function. Indeed, multiple parameters of individual neurons, including the scale of afferent synapse strengths and the densities of specific ion channels, have been observed to change on homeostatic time scales to oppose the effects of chronic changes in synaptic input. This raises the question of whether these processes are controlled by a single slow feedback variable or multiple slow variables. A single homeostatic process providing negative feedback to a neuron's firing rate naturally maintains a stable homeostatic equilibrium with a characteristic mean firing rate; but the conditions under which multiple slow feedbacks produce a stable homeostatic equilibrium have not yet been explored. Here we study a highly general model of homeostatic firing rate control in which two slow variables provide negative feedback to drive a firing rate toward two different target rates. Using dynamical systems techniques, we show that such a control system can be used to stably maintain a neuron's characteristic firing rate mean and variance in the face of perturbations, and we derive conditions under which this happens. We also derive expressions that clarify the relationship between the homeostatic firing rate targets and the resulting stable firing rate mean and variance. We provide specific examples of neuronal systems that can be effectively regulated by dual homeostasis. One of these examples is a recurrent excitatory network, which a dual feedback system can robustly tune to serve as an integrator.

  5. High Prevalence of Dyslipidemia and Insulin Resistance in HIV-infected Prepubertal African Children on Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, Steve; Abdullah, Kameelah L; Haubrich, Richard; Cotton, Mark F; Browne, Sara H

    2016-01-01

    Data describing the true extent of antiretroviral therapy (ART)-induced dyslipidemia and insulin resistance in perinatally infected children on ART in Africa are sparse. Fasting total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides, insulin and glucose were performed on the first 100 of 190 pediatric ART clinic attendees. Diet assessment was performed by a trained dietician. Lipoatrophy was formally graded by consensus between 2 expert HIV pediatricians. Durations of previous ART exposures, clinical stage, pre-ART viral load, nadir and current CD4 were recorded. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was performed on a subset of 42 patients selected semi-randomly. Prevalences of insulin resistance, abnormal total cholesterol, LDL, HDL and triglyceride were 10%, 13%, 12%, 13% and 9%, respectively. Overall, 40% had at least 1 lipid abnormality or insulin resistance. Adjusted mean LDL cholesterol increased by 0.24 mmol/L for each additional year of cumulative lopinavir/r exposure (P = 0.03) after correcting for age, gender, body mass index, previous stavudine exposure, age at ART initiation, dietary fat and refined carbohydrate, whereas adjusted mean LDL cholesterol was 0.9 mmol/L higher in children exposed to efavirenz within the previous 6 months (P = 0.02). Adjusting for age, gender and ethnicity, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry revealed that greater trunk fat and lower peripheral subcutaneous fat were associated with elevated triglycerides but not with total cholesterol, LDL, HDL or homeostatic model assessment. Similarly, the presence of visually obvious lipoatrophy was associated with elevated triglycerides but not with total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, homeostatic model assessment or lactate. Prevalences of insulin resistance and dyslipidemia were high. Cumulative lopinavir is an independent risk factor for dyslipidemia, with efavirenz exposure having only transitory effect.

  6. A Glutamate Homeostat Controls the Presynaptic Inhibition of Neurotransmitter Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiling Li

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: We have interrogated the synaptic dialog that enables the bi-directional, homeostatic control of presynaptic efficacy at the glutamatergic Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ. We find that homeostatic depression and potentiation use disparate genetic, induction, and expression mechanisms. Specifically, homeostatic potentiation is achieved through reduced CaMKII activity postsynaptically and increased abundance of active zone material presynaptically at one of the two neuronal subtypes innervating the NMJ, while homeostatic depression occurs without alterations in CaMKII activity and is expressed at both neuronal subtypes. Furthermore, homeostatic depression is only induced through excess presynaptic glutamate release and operates with disregard to the postsynaptic response. We propose that two independent homeostats modulate presynaptic efficacy at the Drosophila NMJ: one is an intercellular signaling system that potentiates synaptic strength following diminished postsynaptic excitability, while the other adaptively modulates presynaptic glutamate release through an autocrine mechanism without feedback from the postsynaptic compartment. : Homeostatic mechanisms stabilize synaptic strength, but the signaling systems remain enigmatic. Li et al. suggest the existence of a homeostat operating at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction that responds to excess glutamate through an autocrine mechanism to adaptively inhibit presynaptic neurotransmitter release. This system parallels forms of plasticity at central synapses. Keywords: homeostatic synaptic plasticity, glutamate homeostasis, synaptic depression, Drosophila neuromuscular junction

  7. Effect of cholecalciferol and levo carnitine on plasma glucose, plasma insulin and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar, M. K.; Hussain, M. M.; Khan, M. A.; Ahmad, T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of combined and individual supplementation of cholecalciferol and levo carnitine on plasma glucose, plasma insulin and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic rats. Methods: The randomised controlled trial was conducted at the Department of Physiology, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi, between October 2010 and April 2011. It comprised 80 healthy Sprague Dawley rats who were divided into four groups (n = 20 each). Rats were fed high-fat diet for 2 weeks followed by an intraperitoneal injection of streptozocin to induce type 2 diabetes mellitus. Group I served as diabetic control; group II was given cholecalciferol; group III; levo carnitine; and group IV was administered cholecalciferol and levo carnitine together. After 6 days of supplementation, terminal intracardiac blood extraction was done and samples were analysed for fasting plasma glucose and plasma insulin. Insulin resistance was calculated by homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance. SPSS 17.0 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Fasting plasma glucose levels were significantly decreased (p <0.001) in the combined supplementation group compared to the diabetic control and individual supplementation groups. Combined supplementation showed a significant increase in fasting plasma insulin levels when compared with diabetic control and levo carnitine groups (p <0.001), and the effect of combined supplementation on ameliorating insulin resistance was significantly better (p <0.001) as compared to the individual supplementation of cholecalciferol and levo carnitine. Conclusions: The combined supplementation of cholecalciferol and levo carnitine for 6 days markedly improved the glycaemic control, insulin secretion and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic rats on high-fat diet. A prolonged supplementation by both the compounds along with caloric restriction may yield a more promising outcome. (author)

  8. Edible Bird’s Nest Prevents High Fat Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance in Rats

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    Zhang Yida

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Edible bird’s nest (EBN is used traditionally in many parts of Asia to improve wellbeing, but there are limited studies on its efficacy. We explored the potential use of EBN for prevention of high fat diet- (HFD- induced insulin resistance in rats. HFD was given to rats with or without simvastatin or EBN for 12 weeks. During the intervention period, weight measurements were recorded weekly. Blood samples were collected at the end of the intervention and oral glucose tolerance test conducted, after which the rats were sacrificed and their liver and adipose tissues collected for further studies. Serum adiponectin, leptin, F2-isoprostane, insulin, and lipid profile were estimated, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance computed. Effects of the different interventions on transcriptional regulation of insulin signaling genes were also evaluated. The results showed that HFD worsened metabolic indices and induced insulin resistance partly through transcriptional regulation of the insulin signaling genes. Additionally, simvastatin was able to prevent hypercholesterolemia but promoted insulin resistance similar to HFD. EBN, on the other hand, prevented the worsening of metabolic indices and transcriptional changes in insulin signaling genes due to HFD. The results suggest that EBN may be used as functional food to prevent insulin resistance.

  9. Homeostatic Agent for General Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Naoto

    2018-03-01

    One of the essential aspect in biological agents is dynamic stability. This aspect, called homeostasis, is widely discussed in ethology, neuroscience and during the early stages of artificial intelligence. Ashby's homeostats are general-purpose learning machines for stabilizing essential variables of the agent in the face of general environments. However, despite their generality, the original homeostats couldn't be scaled because they searched their parameters randomly. In this paper, first we re-define the objective of homeostats as the maximization of a multi-step survival probability from the view point of sequential decision theory and probabilistic theory. Then we show that this optimization problem can be treated by using reinforcement learning algorithms with special agent architectures and theoretically-derived intrinsic reward functions. Finally we empirically demonstrate that agents with our architecture automatically learn to survive in a given environment, including environments with visual stimuli. Our survival agents can learn to eat food, avoid poison and stabilize essential variables through theoretically-derived single intrinsic reward formulations.

  10. Modeling of hydronic radiant cooling of a thermally homeostatic building using a parametric cooling tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Peizheng; Wang, Lin-Shu; Guo, Nianhua

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Investigated cooling of thermally homeostatic buildings in 7 U.S. cities by modeling. • Natural energy is harnessed by cooling tower to extract heat for building cooling. • Systematically studied possibility and conditions of using cooling tower in buildings. • Diurnal ambient temperature amplitude is taken into account in cooling tower cooling. • Homeostatic building cooling is possible in locations with large ambient T amplitude. - Abstract: A case is made that while it is important to mitigate dissipative losses associated with heat dissipation and mechanical/electrical resistance for engineering efficiency gain, the “architect” of energy efficiency is the conception of best heat extraction frameworks—which determine the realm of possible efficiency. This precept is applied to building energy efficiency here. Following a proposed process assumption-based design method, which was used for determining the required thermal qualities of building thermal autonomy, this paper continues this line of investigation and applies heat extraction approach investigating the extent of building partial homeostasis and the possibility of full homeostasis by using cooling tower in one summer in seven selected U.S. cities. Cooling tower heat extraction is applied parametrically to hydronically activated radiant-surfaces model-buildings. Instead of sizing equipment as a function of design peak hourly temperature as it is done in heat balance design-approach of selecting HVAC equipment, it is shown that the conditions of using cooling tower depend on both “design-peak” daily-mean temperature and the distribution of diurnal range in hourly temperature (i.e., diurnal temperature amplitude). Our study indicates that homeostatic building with natural cooling (by cooling tower alone) is possible only in locations of special meso-scale climatic condition such as Sacramento, CA. In other locations the use of cooling tower alone can only achieve homeostasis

  11. Relationship between red cell membrane fatty acids and adipokines in individuals with varying insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Y; Lowy, C; Islam, S; Khan, F S; Swaminathan, R

    2011-06-01

    Plasma leptin and adiponectin, and membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition are implicated into the mechanism of insulin resistance but no clear pattern has emerged. Hence, this study examined these variables in subjects presenting to the diabetic clinic for a diagnostic glucose tolerance test. Body composition, glucose, glycated hemoglobin, insulin, leptin, adiponectin, and red cell and plasma phospholipid fatty acids were assessed from 42 normal and 28 impaired glucose tolerant subjects. Insulin sensitivity was determined by homeostatic model assessment. The plasma phosphatidylcholine fatty acid composition of the impaired glucose tolerant subjects was similar to that of normal subjects. However, the impaired glucose tolerant subjects had significantly lower linoleic (Pphosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine compared with the normal subjects. Moreover, red cell phosphatidylcholine docosahexaenoic acid correlated positively with adiponectin (r=0.290, Pinsulin (r=-0.335, Pinsulin resistance (r=-0.322, Pinsulin level whereas insulin was the only component that predicted the membrane fatty acids. We postulate that membrane phospholipids fatty acids have an indirect role in determining insulin concentration but insulin has a major role in determining membrane fatty acid composition.

  12. The Impact of Genetic Variants for Different Physiological Characterization of Type 2 Diabetes Loci on Gestational Insulin Signaling in Nondiabetic Pregnant Chinese Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shunyao; Liu, Yunqiang; Chen, Xiaojuan; Tan, Yuande; Mei, Jie; Song, Wenzhong; Gan, Lu; Wang, Hailian; Yin, Shi; Dong, Xianjue; Chi, Shu; Deng, Shaoping

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the impact of genetic variants on transiently upregulated gestational insulin signaling. We recruited 1152 unrelated nondiabetic pregnant Han Chinese women (age 28.5 ± 4.1 years; body mass index [BMI] 21.4 ± 2.6 kg/m(2)) and gave them oral glucose tolerance tests. Matsuda index of insulin sensitivity, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, indices of insulin disposition, early-phase insulin release, fasting state, and 0 to 120 minute's proinsulin to insulin conversion were used to dissect insulin physiological characterization. Several variants related to β-cell function were genotyped. The genetic impacts were analyzed using logistic regression under an additive model. By adjusting for maternal age, BMI, and the related interactions, the genetic variants in ABCC8, CDKAL1, CDKN2A, HNF1B, KCNJ11, and MTNR1B were detected to impact gestational insulin signaling through heterogeneous mechanisms; however, compared with that in nonpregnant metabolism, the genetic effects seem to be eminently and heavily influenced by maternal age and BMI, indicating possible particular mechanisms underlying gestational metabolism and diabetic pathogenesis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Brain natriuretic peptide and insulin resistance in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, F; Biggs, M L; Kizer, J R; Brutsaert, E F; de Filippi, C; Newman, A B; Kronmal, R A; Tracy, R P; Gottdiener, J S; Djoussé, L; de Boer, I H; Psaty, B M; Siscovick, D S; Mukamal, K J

    2017-02-01

    Higher levels of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) have been associated with a decreased risk of diabetes in adults, but whether BNP is related to insulin resistance in older adults has not been established. N-terminal of the pro hormone brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro BNP) was measured among Cardiovascular Health Study participants at the 1989-1990, 1992-1993 and 1996-1997 examinations. We calculated measures of insulin resistance [homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), Gutt index, Matsuda index] from fasting and 2-h concentrations of glucose and insulin among 3318 individuals with at least one measure of NT-proBNP and free of heart failure, coronary heart disease and chronic kidney disease, and not taking diabetes medication. We used generalized estimating equations to assess the cross-sectional association of NT-proBNP with measures of insulin resistance. Instrumental variable analysis with an allele score derived from nine genetic variants (single nucleotide polymorphisms) within or near the NPPA and NPPB loci was used to estimate an un-confounded association of NT-proBNP levels on insulin resistance. Lower NT-proBNP levels were associated with higher insulin resistance even after adjustment for BMI, waist circumference and other risk factors (P insulin resistance (P = 0.38; P = 0.01 for comparison with the association of measured levels of NT-proBNP). In older adults, lower NT-proBNP is associated with higher insulin resistance, even after adjustment for traditional risk factors. Because related genetic variants were not associated with insulin resistance, the causal nature of this association will require future study. © 2016 Diabetes UK.

  14. A homeostatic-partly dynamic model for 137Cs in trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frissel, M.

    1994-01-01

    A model has been developed to describe the behaviour of 137 Cs in trees. The core of the model is the assumption that 137 Cs/K ratio in soil determines the 137 Cs/K ratio in various parts of a tree. This is an equilibrium model but taking into account the time dependence of Cs/K ratio in the soil (caused by K-fertilization) it has been extended to a dynamic model. The model desribes a growing tree. Four compartments are considered: soil; easily accessible parts of the tree; woody parts difficult to access; fruits or leaves. The model is homeostatic, i.e. all 137 Cs concentrations and fluxes are controlled by K concentrations and fluxes, respectively. The addition of K-fertilizer to the soil manifests itself in an immediate change of the Cs/K ratio in the soil and in the easily accessible plant parts, but only slowly - in the woody parts. Also an excess of Cs in the woody part is only slowly released. Important processes are the discrimination between Cs and K and the luxurious consumption of K. The cycling of K in the system (throughput of K via falling leaves, branches, etc.) is also important. Furthermore, a good insight in accessibility of the various parts of the tree seems required, the division in only three compartments, as in the model is probably unsufficient. (author)

  15. Metformin reduces insulin resistance and the tendency toward hyperglycaemia and dyslipidaemia in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Daniel Miceli

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypercortisolism induces a state of insulin resistance that can occur concurrently with fasting hyperglycaemia, dyslipidaemia and diabetes mellitus. Metformin reduces hepatic glucose production and insulin resistance of the skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of metformin on the control of metabolic disorders of dogs with hyperadrenocorticism (HAC. Twenty-three dogs with HAC were randomly divided into two groups, consisting of a control group and a metformin group (10 mg metformin/kg/12 h. Both groups received the same treatment for HAC. At baseline and 3 months, blood glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides and insulin concentrations, in addition to urinary cortisol:creatinine ratio, Homeostatic Model Assessment (HOMA for insulin sensitivity and β-cell function were measured. Dogs treated with metformin showed significantly reduced glycaemia, cholesterolaemia and triglyceridaemia. They also presented reduced hyperinsulinism and insulin resistance, as well as improved pancreatic β-cell function. The implementation of metformin as an adjuvant therapy is effective for the normalisation of metabolic disorders of dogs with HAC.

  16. Homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance as a predictor of metabolic syndrome: Consequences of obesity in children and adolescents

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    Naglaa Fathy Barseem

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: HOMA-IR might be a reliable surrogate measure of insulin resistance and a strong predictor of type 2 diabetes in obese adolescents allowing the development of preventive measures and treatment when needed.

  17. Normocaloric Diet Restores Weight Gain and Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Mice

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    Giovanni Enrico Lombardo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available An increased incidence of obesity is registered worldwide, and its association with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes is closely related with increased morbidity and mortality for cardiovascular diseases. A major clinical problem in the management of obesity is the non-adherence or low adherence of patients to a hypo-caloric dietetic restriction. In this study we evaluated in obese mice the effects on insulin sensitivity of shifting from high-calorie foods to normal diet. Male C57BL/6JolaHsd mice (n=20 were fed with high fat diet for a 24 weeks period. Afterwards, body weight, energy and food intake were measured in all animals, together with parameters of insulin sensitivity by homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance and plasma glucose levels in response to insulin administration. Moreover, in half of these mice, Glut4 mRNA levels were measured in muscle at the end of the high fat treatment, whereas the rest of the animals (n=10 were shifted to normocaloric diet for 10 weeks, after which the same analyses were carried out. A significant reduction of body weight was found after the transition from high to normal fat diet, and this decrease correlated well with an improvement in insulin sensitivity. In fact, we found a reduction in serum insulin levels and the recovery of insulin responsiveness in terms of glucose disposal measured by insulin tolerance test and Glut4 mRNA and protein expression. These results indicate that obesity related insulin resistance may be rescued by shifting from high fat diet to normocaloric diet.

  18. Failure to increase insulin secretory capacity during pregnancy-induced insulin resistance is associated with ethnicity and gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mørkrid, Kjersti; Jenum, Anne K; Sletner, Line; Vårdal, Mari H; Waage, Christin W; Nakstad, Britt; Vangen, Siri; Birkeland, Kåre I

    2012-10-01

    To assess changes in insulin resistance and β-cell function in a multiethnic cohort of women in Oslo, Norway, from early to 28 weeks' gestation and 3 months post partum and relate the findings to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Population-based cohort study of 695 healthy pregnant women from Western Europe (41%), South Asia (25%), Middle East (15%), East Asia (6%) and elsewhere (13%). Blood samples and demographics were recorded at mean 15 (V1) and 28 (V2) weeks' gestation and 3 months post partum (V3). Universal screening was by 75 g oral glucose tolerance test at V2, GDM with modified IADPSG criteria (no 1-h measurement): fasting plasma glucose (PG) ≥5.1 or 2-h PG ≥8.5 mmol/l. Homeostatic model assessment (HOMA)-β (β-cell function) and HOMA-IR (insulin resistance) were calculated from fasting glucose and C-peptide. Characteristics were comparable across ethnic groups, except age (South Asians: younger, Pinsulin resistant than Western Europeans at V1. From V1 to V2, the increase in insulin resistance was similar across the ethnic groups, but the increase in β-cell function was significantly lower for the East and South Asians compared with Western Europeans. GDM women compared with non-GDM women were more insulin resistant at V1; from V1 to V2, their β-cell function increased significantly less and the percentage increase in β-cell function did not match the change in insulin resistance. Pregnant women from East Asia and South Asia were more insulin resistant and showed poorer HOMA-β-cell function than Western Europeans.

  19. Integrated model of insulin and glucose kinetics describing both hepatic glucose and pancreatic insulin regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlandsen, Mogens; Martinussen, Christoffer; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg

    2018-01-01

    AbstractBackground and objectives Modeling of glucose kinetics has to a large extent been based on models with plasma insulin as a known forcing function. Furthermore, population-based statistical methods for parameter estimation in these models have mainly addressed random inter-individual varia......AbstractBackground and objectives Modeling of glucose kinetics has to a large extent been based on models with plasma insulin as a known forcing function. Furthermore, population-based statistical methods for parameter estimation in these models have mainly addressed random inter......-individual variations and not intra-individual variations in the parameters. Here we present an integrated whole-body model of glucose and insulin kinetics which extends the well-known two-compartment glucose minimal model. The population-based estimation technique allow for quantification of both random inter......- and intra-individual variation in selected parameters using simultaneous data series on glucose and insulin. Methods We extend the two-compartment glucose model into a whole-body model for both glucose and insulin using a simple model for the pancreas compartment which includes feedback of glucose on both...

  20. Evaluation of chronic kidney disease patients for insulin resistance in tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, S.; Hayat, A.; Khan, S.A.; Ahmad, T.M.; Majeed, N.

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the patients of chronic kidney disease for insulin resistance. Study Design: Cross sectional observational study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted in the chemical pathology department of Army Medical College/Military Hospital Rawalpindi, from Nov 2016 to Apr 2017. Material and Methods: Fifty patients were recruited for this study with deranged renal functions and/or having any structural renal abnormality for more than 3 months. These patients did not have any history of diabetes and dialysis. Fifty ages matched healthy individuals were included as controls. Renal function tests, lipid profile, complete blood count, fasting plasma glucose and serum insulin levels were performed in all subjects. Insulin resistance was calculated by using homeostatic model for assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Results of this study were analyzed on SPSS version 23. Results: Fasting insulin levels were much higher in the patient with chronic kidney disease as compared to controls (p-value=0.001). HOMA-IR in cases was also significantly higher. Statistical comparison of lipid profile showed significant difference of only triglycerides level. Conclusion: HOMA-IR is markedly raised in the patients of chronic kidney disease. This indicates a significant association of chronic kidney disease with insulin resistance. (author)

  1. Emerging Links between Homeostatic Synaptic Plasticity and Neurological Disease

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    Dion eDickman

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Homeostatic signaling systems are ubiquitous forms of biological regulation, having been studied for hundreds of years in the context of diverse physiological processes including body temperature and osmotic balance. However, only recently has this concept been brought to the study of excitatory and inhibitory electrical activity that the nervous system uses to establish and maintain stable communication. Synapses are a primary target of neuronal regulation with a variety of studies over the past 15 years demonstrating that these cellular junctions are under bidirectional homeostatic control. Recent work from an array of diverse systems and approaches has revealed exciting new links between homeostatic synaptic plasticity and a variety of seemingly disparate neurological and psychiatric diseases. These include autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disabilities, schizophrenia, and Fragile X Syndrome. Although the molecular mechanisms through which defective homeostatic signaling may lead to disease pathogenesis remain unclear, rapid progress is likely to be made in the coming years using a powerful combination of genetic, imaging, electrophysiological, and next generation sequencing approaches. Importantly, understanding homeostatic synaptic plasticity at a cellular and molecular level may lead to developments in new therapeutic innovations to treat these diseases. In this review we will examine recent studies that demonstrate homeostatic control of postsynaptic protein translation, retrograde signaling, and presynaptic function that may contribute to the etiology of complex neurological and psychiatric diseases.

  2. Homeostatic and non-homeostatic appetite control along the spectrum of physical activity levels: An updated perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Kristine; Hopkins, Mark; Blundell, John; Finlayson, Graham

    2017-12-28

    The current obesogenic environment promotes physical inactivity and food consumption in excess of energy requirements, two important modifiable risk factors influencing energy balance. Habitual physical activity has been shown to impact not only energy expenditure, but also energy intake through mechanisms of appetite control. This review summarizes recent theory and evidence underpinning the role of physical activity in the homeostatic and non-homeostatic mechanisms controlling appetite. Energy intake along the spectrum of physical activity levels (inactive to highly active) appears to be J-shaped, with low levels of physical activity leading to dysregulated appetite and a mismatch between energy intake and expenditure. At higher levels, habitual physical activity influences homeostatic appetite control in a dual-process action by increasing the drive to eat through greater energy expenditure, but also by enhancing post-meal satiety, allowing energy intake to better match energy expenditure in response to hunger and satiety signals. There is clear presumptive evidence that physical activity energy expenditure can act as a drive (determinant) of energy intake. The influence of physical activity level on non-homeostatic appetite control is less clear, but low levels of physical activity may amplify hedonic states and behavioural traits favouring overconsumption indirectly through increased body fat. More evidence is required to understand the interaction between physical activity, appetite control and diet composition on passive overconsumption and energy balance. Furthermore, potential moderators of appetite control along the spectrum of physical activity, such as body composition, sex, and type, intensity and timing of physical activity, remain to be fully understood. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Infection with Soil-Transmitted Helminths Is Associated with Increased Insulin Sensitivity.

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    Aprilianto E Wiria

    Full Text Available Given that helminth infections have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity in animal studies, which may be explained by beneficial effects on energy balance or by a shift in the immune system to an anti-inflammatory profile, we investigated whether soil-transmitted helminth (STH-infected subjects are more insulin sensitive than STH-uninfected subjects.We performed a cross-sectional study on Flores island, Indonesia, an area with high prevalence of STH infections.From 646 adults, stool samples were screened for Trichuris trichiura by microscopy and for Ascaris lumbricoides, Necator americanus, Ancylostoma duodenale, and Strongyloides stercoralis by qPCR. No other helminth was found. We collected data on body mass index (BMI, kg/m2, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, fasting blood glucose (FBG, mmol/L, insulin (pmol/L, high sensitive C-reactive protein (ng/ml and Immunoglobulin E (IU/ml. The homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMAIR was calculated and regression models were used to assess the association between STH infection status and insulin resistance.424 (66% participants had at least one STH infection. STH infected participants had lower BMI (23.2 vs 22.5 kg/m2, p value = 0.03 and lower HOMAIR (0.97 vs 0.81, p value = 0.05. In an age-, sex- and BMI-adjusted model a significant association was seen between the number of infections and HOMAIR: for every additional infection with STH species, the HOMAIR decreased by 0.10 (p for linear trend 0.01. This effect was mainly accounted for by a decrease in insulin of 4.9 pmol/L for every infection (p for trend = 0.07.STH infections are associated with a modest improvement of insulin sensitivity, which is not accounted for by STH effects on BMI alone.

  4. Insulin resistance in pregnant women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome, and measures of body composition in offspring at birth and three years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnbogadóttir, Sara K; Glintborg, Dorte; Jensen, Tina K; Kyhl, Henriette B; Nohr, Ellen A; Andersen, Marianne

    2017-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is associated with obesity and insulin resistance in the non-pregnant state, but little is known about insulin sensitivity in the pregnant state. Our objective was to compare insulin resistance in pregnant women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome and explore the impact of polycystic ovary syndrome on body composition in offspring at birth and at three years of age. A prospective cohort study including 2548 live-born singleton mother-child pairs residing in Odense municipality, Denmark, during 2010-2013. Of the 2548 women, 241 (9.4%) had polycystic ovary syndrome. Homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance assessments were comparable in women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome. However, the subgroup of overweight women with polycystic ovary syndrome had significantly higher levels of homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance than overweight women without polycystic ovary syndrome (mean ± 2 SD): 4.4 (3.1) vs. 3.6 (3.4), p = 0.004. Maternal polycystic ovary syndrome did not affect offspring birthweight after accounting for age. However, polycystic ovary syndrome, adjusted for maternal body mass index, was associated with increased body mass index at three years of age (mean ± 2 SD): 16.0 (2.2) vs. 15.7 (2.1) kg/m 2 , p = 0.04. In our cohort, maternal polycystic ovary syndrome was not associated with insulin resistance after correcting for body mass index and was not an independent predictor of offspring birthweight. However, both polycystic ovary syndrome and high maternal body mass index may increase risk of childhood obesity at three years of age. © 2017 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  5. Integrating Hebbian and homeostatic plasticity: introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Kevin; Stryker, Michael

    2017-03-05

    Hebbian plasticity is widely considered to be the mechanism by which information can be coded and retained in neurons in the brain. Homeostatic plasticity moves the neuron back towards its original state following a perturbation, including perturbations produced by Hebbian plasticity. How then does homeostatic plasticity avoid erasing the Hebbian coded information? To understand how plasticity works in the brain, and therefore to understand learning, memory, sensory adaptation, development and recovery from injury, requires development of a theory of plasticity that integrates both forms of plasticity into a whole. In April 2016, a group of computational and experimental neuroscientists met in London at a discussion meeting hosted by the Royal Society to identify the critical questions in the field and to frame the research agenda for the next steps. Here, we provide a brief introduction to the papers arising from the meeting and highlight some of the themes to have emerged from the discussions.This article is part of the themed issue 'Integrating Hebbian and homeostatic plasticity'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  6. MODELS OF INSULIN RESISTANCE AND HEART FAILURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Mauricio; Kohli, Smita; Sabbah, Hani N.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of heart failure (HF) and diabetes mellitus is rapidly increasing and is associated with poor prognosis. In spite of the advances in therapy, HF remains a major health problem with high morbidity and mortality. When HF and diabetes coexist, clinical outcomes are significantly worse. The relationship between these two conditions has been studied in various experimental models. However, the mechanisms for this interrelationship are complex, incompletely understood, and have become a matter of considerable clinical and research interest. There are only few animal models that manifest both HF and diabetes. However, the translation of results from these models to human disease is limited and new models are needed to expand our current understanding of this clinical interaction. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of insulin signaling and insulin resistance, the clinical association between insulin resistance and HF and its proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms. Finally, we discuss available animal models of insulin resistance and HF and propose requirements for future new models. PMID:23456447

  7. Relationship of Adiposity and Insulin Resistance Mediated by Inflammation in a Group of Overweight and Obese Chilean Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leiva Laura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The mild chronic inflammatory state associated with obesity may be an important link between adiposity and insulin resistance (IR. In a sample of 137 overweight and obese Chilean adolescents, we assessed associations between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, IR and adiposity; explored sex differences; and evaluated whether hs-CRP mediated the relationship between adiposity and IR. Positive relationships between hs-CRP, IR and 2 measures of adiposity were found. Hs-CRP was associated with waist circumference (WC in boys and fat mass index (FMI in girls. Using path analysis, we found that hs-CRP mediated the relationship between adiposity (WC and FMI and the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR (p

  8. Serum acylated ghrelin is negatively correlated with the insulin resistance in the CODING study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyvand Amini

    Full Text Available Ghrelin is a 28-amino acid orexigenic peptide synthesized mainly in the stomach. Acute administration of ghrelin has been found to decrease insulin secretion. However, little data is available regarding whether ghrelin contributes to the long-term regulation of insulin resistance at the population level. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between circulating ghrelin and insulin resistance in a large population based study.A total of 2082 CODING study (Complex Diseases in the Newfoundland population: Environment and Genetics subjects were assessed. Subjects were of at least third generation Newfoundland descent, between the ages of 20 and 79 years, and had no serious metabolic, cardiovascular, or endocrine diseases. Ghrelin was measured with an Enzyme Immunoassay method. Insulin and fasting glucose were measured by Immulite 2500 autoanalyzer and Lx20 clinical chemistry analyzer, respectively. Homeostatic Model Assessment of β cell function (HOMA-β and Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR and Quantitative Insulin-sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI were used for measurement of insulin resistance.Partial correlation analyses showed a significant negative correlation between circulating ghrelin and insulin level and insulin resistance in the entire cohort and also in men and women separately. The aforementioned correlation was independent of age, percentage of trunk fat and HDL-cholesterol. According to menopausal status, only pre-menopausal women revealed negative correlations.Our results suggest that except for postmenopausal women, high circulating ghrelin level is associated with lower insulin resistance in the general population.

  9. [Evaluation of the nutritional status, insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk in a population of adolescents in the cities of Granada and Almeria (Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero Alonso, Miguel A; González-Jiménez, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    The first objective of this study was to evaluate the nutritional status and insulin resistance index in a population of adolescents as calculated by Homeostatic Model Assessment (HOMA). The second objective was to establish correlations between the nutritional status of the subjects, the possible existence of insulin resistance, and the risk of high blood pressure. POPULATION SAMPLE AND METHODOLOGY: The sample was composed of 1001 adolescents, 9-17 years of age, from 18 schools in the provinces of Granada and Almeria. Their nutritional status was determined by means of anthropometric evaluation. For the metabolic study, a blood sample was collected from each subject by venipuncture. An analysis was performed of the basal glucose and insulin levels as well as the Homeostatic Model Assessment- Insulin Resistance (HOMAIR) index. Also evaluated were the levels of glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), serum lipoprotein (a), and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs). Insulin resistance was calculated with the formula, proposed by Matthews et al. (1985) : HOMA-IR = (insulin[mmol/L] x glucose[mU/L])/22.5. The evaluation of the nutritional status of the subjects reflected a progressive increase in the values of anthropometric variables as the nutritional status of the subjects worsened. The results of this study showed, regardless of age and gender, 85.01% of the subjects were of normal weight, whereas 9.99% were overweight, and 4.99% were obese. The metabolic study reflected that in comparison to normal-weight and overweight students, obese students had significantly higher serum levels (p < 0,0001) of HbA1c, basal insulin, basal glycemia, basal NEFA, lipoprotein (a), and HOMA-IR. Obesity was found to be a serious health problem in the population of adolescents studied, especially given the high cardiovascular risk that is characteristic of this condition. As reflected in the results of this study, obesity led to the premature development of metabolic disorders, which generally

  10. Sleep duration and insulin resistance in healthy black and white adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Karen A; Dahl, Ronald E; Owens, Jane F; Lee, Laisze; Hall, Martica

    2012-10-01

    Poor sleep may play a role in insulin resistance and diabetes risk. Yet few studies of sleep and insulin resistance have focused on the important developmental period of adolescence. To address this gap, we examined the association of sleep and insulin resistance in healthy adolescents. Cross-sectional. Community setting in one high school. 245 (137 African Americans, 116 males) high school students. Participants provided a fasting blood draw and kept a sleep log and wore a wrist actigraph for one week during the school year. Participants' families were from low to middle class based on family Hollingshead scores. Total sleep time across the week averaged 7.4 h by diary and 6.4 h by actigraph; homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance ([HOMA-IR] unadjusted) averaged 4.13. Linear regression analyses adjusted for age, race, gender, body mass index, and waist circumference showed that the shorter the sleep, the higher the HOMA-IR, primarily due to sleep duration during the week. No evidence was found for long sleep being associated with elevated HOMA-IR. Fragmented sleep was not associated with HOMA-IR but was associated with glucose levels. Reduced sleep duration is associated with HOMA-IR in adolescence. Long sleep duration is not associated. Interventions to extend sleep duration may reduce diabetes risk in youth.

  11. The Usefulness of Homeostatic Measurement Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) for Detection of Glucose Intolerance in Thai Women of Reproductive Age with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongwananuruk, Thanyarat; Rattanachaiyanont, Manee; Leerasiri, Pichai; Indhavivadhana, Suchada; Techatraisak, Kitirat; Angsuwathana, Surasak; Tanmahasamut, Prasong; Dangrat, Chongdee

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To study the cut-off point of Homeostatic Measurement Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) as a screening test for detection of glucose intolerance in Thai women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Study Design. Cross-sectional study. Setting. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital. Subject. Two hundred and fifty Thai PCOS women who attended the Gynecologic Endocrinology Unit, during May 2007 to January 2009. Materials and Methods. The paitents were interviewed and examined for weight, height, waist circumference, and blood pressure. Venous blood samples were drawn twice, one at 12-hour fasting and the other at 2 hours after glucose loading. Results. The prevalence of glucose intolerance in Thai PCOS women was 20.0%. The mean of HOMA-IR was 3.53  ±  7.7. Area under an ROC curve for HOMA-IR for detecting glucose intolerance was 0.82. Using the cut-off value of HOMA-IR >2.0, there was sensitivity at 84.0%, specificity at 61.0%, positive predictive value at 35.0%, negative predictive value at 93.8%, and accuracy at 65.6%. Conclusion. HOMA-IR >2.0 was used for screening test for glucose intolerance in Thai PCOS women. If the result was positive, a specific test should be done to prove the diagnosis.

  12. Wherefore Art Thou, Homeo(stasis? Functional Diversity in Homeostatic Synaptic Plasticity

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    Bridget N. Queenan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Homeostatic plasticity has emerged as a fundamental regulatory principle that strives to maintain neuronal activity within optimal ranges by altering diverse aspects of neuronal function. Adaptation to network activity is often viewed as an essential negative feedback restraint that prevents runaway excitation or inhibition. However, the precise importance of these homeostatic functions is often theoretical rather than empirically derived. Moreover, a remarkable multiplicity of homeostatic adaptations has been observed. To clarify these issues, it may prove useful to ask: why do homeostatic mechanisms exist, what advantages do these adaptive responses confer on a given cell population, and why are there so many seemingly divergent effects? Here, we approach these questions by applying the principles of control theory to homeostatic synaptic plasticity of mammalian neurons and suggest that the varied responses observed may represent distinct functional classes of control mechanisms directed toward disparate physiological goals.

  13. Obese children and adolescents have elevated nighttime blood pressure independent of insulin resistance and arterial stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidt, Kristian N; Olsen, Michael H; Holm, Jens-Christian

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Insulin resistance has been related to elevated blood pressure (BP) in obese children and may adversely affect the vasculature by arterial stiffening. The objective was to investigate whether daytime and nighttime BP were elevated and related to insulin resistance and arterial stiffness...... in obese children and adolescents. METHODS: Ninety-two obese patients aged 10-18 years were compared with 49 healthy control individuals. Insulin resistance was measured as the homeostatic assessment model (HOMA), and arterial stiffness was measured as carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV). RESULTS......: Mean ± SD daytime systolic BP (SBP) (obese: 125±8.3mm Hg; control: 121±10.1mm Hg; P = 0.03) and nighttime SBP (obese: 108±10.7mm Hg; control: 102±8.2mm Hg; P = 0.0001) were higher in the obese group when compared with the control group. No difference was found in daytime diastolic BP (DBP), whereas...

  14. Homeostatic mechanisms in dopamine synthesis and release: a mathematical model

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    Nijhout H Frederik

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dopamine is a catecholamine that is used as a neurotransmitter both in the periphery and in the central nervous system. Dysfunction in various dopaminergic systems is known to be associated with various disorders, including schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, and Tourette's syndrome. Furthermore, microdialysis studies have shown that addictive drugs increase extracellular dopamine and brain imaging has shown a correlation between euphoria and psycho-stimulant-induced increases in extracellular dopamine 1. These consequences of dopamine dysfunction indicate the importance of maintaining dopamine functionality through homeostatic mechanisms that have been attributed to the delicate balance between synthesis, storage, release, metabolism, and reuptake. Methods We construct a mathematical model of dopamine synthesis, release, and reuptake and use it to study homeostasis in single dopaminergic neuron terminals. We investigate the substrate inhibition of tyrosine hydroxylase by tyrosine, the consequences of the rapid uptake of extracellular dopamine by the dopamine transporters, and the effects of the autoreceoptors on dopaminergic function. The main focus is to understand the regulation and control of synthesis and release and to explicate and interpret experimental findings. Results We show that the substrate inhibition of tyrosine hydroxylase by tyrosine stabilizes cytosolic and vesicular dopamine against changes in tyrosine availability due to meals. We find that the autoreceptors dampen the fluctuations in extracellular dopamine caused by changes in tyrosine hydroxylase expression and changes in the rate of firing. We show that short bursts of action potentials create significant dopamine signals against the background of tonic firing. We explain the observed time courses of extracellular dopamine responses to stimulation in wild type mice and mice that have genetically altered dopamine transporter densities and the observed

  15. Body composition using deuterated water, index of insulin resistance and cortisol levels in Costa Rican school in the metropolitan area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valverde Vindas, Allan Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Body composition in the Costa Rican child population is evaluated and analyzed to determine the relationship with the index of insulin resistance and serum cortisol levels. 113 children in the metropolitan area were studied using deuterium isotope techniques as reference method for overweight and obesity. Morning cortisol levels were determined by immunoassay techniques (ELISA). The insulin resistance index of 113 Costa Rican boys and girls is obtained by the homeostatic method and the relationship between body composition with index of insulin resistance or levels of cortisol [es

  16. Observations on the insulin-secretion function in the offsprings of patients with type II diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Shujie; Tian Xiaoping; Wu Yan

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the disturbance of insulin-secretion function in the offsprings of patients with type II diabetes. Methods: Blood sugar (with oxidase method) and insulin (with RIA) levels were measured after overnight fasting and repeatedly measured 2h after 75g glucose per oral in the following subjects: 1) Group A, 23 non-obese offsprings of type II diabetics 2) group B, 18 obese offsprings (BMI ≥25kg/m 2 ) and 3) 27 controls. Homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and β-cell function index (HCI) were calculated from the data (glucose and insulin levels) obtained. Results: For Group A subjects, the fasting blood sugar (FPG) levels were significantly higher and HBCI significantly lower than those in te controls (both P<0.05). For Group B obese subjects, in addition to the above two parameters (with HBCI P<0.01), 2h PG levels as well as HOMA-IR were also significantly higher (both P<0.05). Conclusion: Present study showed that in the offsprings of diabetics, HBCI was already lowered before definite impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) could be demonstrated, especially in the obese ones. (authors)

  17. Observations on the insulin-secretion function in the offsprings of patients with type II diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shujie, Xu; Xiaoping, Tian; Yan, Wu [The First People' s Hospital of Lianyungang (China)

    2004-10-01

    Objective: To investigate the disturbance of insulin-secretion function in the offsprings of patients with type II diabetes. Methods: Blood sugar (with oxidase method) and insulin (with RIA) levels were measured after overnight fasting and repeatedly measured 2h after 75g glucose per oral in the following subjects: 1) Group A, 23 non-obese offsprings of type II diabetics 2) group B, 18 obese offsprings (BMI {>=}25kg/m{sup 2} ) and 3) 27 controls. Homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and {beta}-cell function index (HCI) were calculated from the data (glucose and insulin levels) obtained. Results: For Group A subjects, the fasting blood sugar (FPG) levels were significantly higher and HBCI significantly lower than those in te controls (both P<0.05). For Group B obese subjects, in addition to the above two parameters (with HBCI P<0.01), 2h PG levels as well as HOMA-IR were also significantly higher (both P<0.05). Conclusion: Present study showed that in the offsprings of diabetics, HBCI was already lowered before definite impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) could be demonstrated, especially in the obese ones. (authors)

  18. Metaplasticity at CA1 Synapses by Homeostatic Control of Presynaptic Release Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cary Soares

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Hebbian and homeostatic forms of plasticity operate on different timescales to regulate synaptic strength. The degree of mechanistic overlap between these processes and their mutual influence are still incompletely understood. Here, we report that homeostatic synaptic strengthening induced by prolonged network inactivity compromised the ability of CA1 synapses to exhibit LTP. This effect could not be accounted for by an obvious deficit in the postsynaptic capacity for LTP expression, since neither the fraction of silent synapses nor the ability to induce LTP by two-photon glutamate uncaging were reduced by the homeostatic process. Rather, optical quantal analysis reveals that homeostatically strengthened synapses display a reduced capacity to maintain glutamate release fidelity during repetitive stimulation, ultimately impeding the induction, and thus expression, of LTP. By regulating the short-term dynamics of glutamate release, the homeostatic process thus influences key aspects of dynamic network function and exhibits features of metaplasticity. : Several forms of synaptic plasticity operating over distinct spatiotemporal scales have been described at hippocampal synapses. Whether these distinct plasticity mechanisms interact and influence one another remains incompletely understood. Here, Soares et al. show that homeostatic plasticity induced by network silencing influences short-term release dynamics and Hebbian plasticity rules at hippocampal synapses. Keywords: synapse, LTP, homeostatic plasticity, metaplasticity, iGluSNFR

  19. The effect of different doses of vitamin D supplementation on insulin resistance during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soheilykhah, Sedigheh; Mojibian, Mahdieh; Moghadam, Maryam Jannati; Shojaoddiny-Ardekani, Ahmad

    2013-04-01

    Low serum vitamin D levels are correlated with insulin resistance during pregnancy. We have assessed the effects of different doses of vitamin D on insulin resistance during pregnancy. A randomized clinical trial was done on 120 women with a gestational age of less than 12 weeks. The women were divided into three groups randomly. Group A received 200 IU vitamin D daily, group B 50,000 IU vitamin D monthly and group C 50,000 IU vitamin D every 2 weeks from 12 weeks of pregnancy until delivery. The serum levels of fasting blood sugar (FBS), insulin, calcium and 25-hydroxyvitamin D were measured before and after intervention. We used the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) as a surrogate measure of insulin resistance. The mean ± standard deviation of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D increased in group C from 7.3 ± 5.9 to 34.1 ± 11.5 ng/ml and in group B it increased from 7.3 ± 5.3 to 27.23 ± 10.7 ng/ml, but the level of vitamin D in group A increased from 8.3 ± 7.8 to 17.7 ± 9.3 ng/ml (p insulin and HOMA-IR before and after intervention in groups A and C were significant (p = 0.01, p = 0.02). This study has shown that supplementation of pregnant women with 50 000 IU vitamin D every 2 weeks improved insulin resistance significantly.

  20. Incorporating a Generic Model of Subcutaneous Insulin Absorption into the AIDA v4 Diabetes Simulator 3. Early Plasma Insulin Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Eldon D.; Tarín, Cristina; Bondia, Jorge; Teufel, Edgar; Deutsch, Tibor

    2009-01-01

    Introduction AIDA is an interactive educational diabetes simulator that has been available without charge via the Internet for over 12 years. Recent articles have described the incorporation of a novel generic model of insulin absorption into AIDA as a way of enhancing its capabilities. The basic model components to be integrated have been overviewed, with the aim being to provide simulations of regimens utilizing insulin analogues, as well as insulin doses greater than 40 IU (the current upper limit within the latest release of AIDA [v4.3a]). Some preliminary calculated insulin absorption results have also recently been described. Methods This article presents the first simulated plasma insulin profiles from the integration of the generic subcutaneous insulin absorption model, and the currently implemented model in AIDA for insulin disposition. Insulin absorption has been described by the physiologically based model of Tarín and colleagues. A single compartment modeling approach has been used to specify how absorbed insulin is distributed in, and eliminated from, the human body. To enable a numerical solution of the absorption model, a spherical subcutaneous depot for the injected insulin dose has been assumed and spatially discretized into shell compartments with homogeneous concentrations, having as its center the injection site. The number of these compartments will depend on the dose and type of insulin. Insulin inflow arises as the sum of contributions to the different shells. For this report the first bench testing of plasma insulin determinations has been done. Results Simulated plasma insulin profiles are provided for currently available insulin preparations, including a rapidly acting insulin analogue (e.g., lispro/Humalog or aspart/Novolog), a short-acting (regular) insulin preparation (e.g., Actrapid), intermediate-acting insulins (both Semilente and neutral protamine Hagedorn types), and a very long-acting insulin analogue (e.g., glargine/Lantus), as

  1. Optimization of biomathematical model predictions for cognitive performance impairment in individuals: accounting for unknown traits and uncertain states in homeostatic and circadian processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dongen, Hans P A; Mott, Christopher G; Huang, Jen-Kuang; Mollicone, Daniel J; McKenzie, Frederic D; Dinges, David F

    2007-09-01

    Current biomathematical models of fatigue and performance do not accurately predict cognitive performance for individuals with a priori unknown degrees of trait vulnerability to sleep loss, do not predict performance reliably when initial conditions are uncertain, and do not yield statistically valid estimates of prediction accuracy. These limitations diminish their usefulness for predicting the performance of individuals in operational environments. To overcome these 3 limitations, a novel modeling approach was developed, based on the expansion of a statistical technique called Bayesian forecasting. The expanded Bayesian forecasting procedure was implemented in the two-process model of sleep regulation, which has been used to predict performance on the basis of the combination of a sleep homeostatic process and a circadian process. Employing the two-process model with the Bayesian forecasting procedure to predict performance for individual subjects in the face of unknown traits and uncertain states entailed subject-specific optimization of 3 trait parameters (homeostatic build-up rate, circadian amplitude, and basal performance level) and 2 initial state parameters (initial homeostatic state and circadian phase angle). Prior information about the distribution of the trait parameters in the population at large was extracted from psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) performance measurements in 10 subjects who had participated in a laboratory experiment with 88 h of total sleep deprivation. The PVT performance data of 3 additional subjects in this experiment were set aside beforehand for use in prospective computer simulations. The simulations involved updating the subject-specific model parameters every time the next performance measurement became available, and then predicting performance 24 h ahead. Comparison of the predictions to the subjects' actual data revealed that as more data became available for the individuals at hand, the performance predictions became

  2. The role of insulin and glucagon in experimental obstructive jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J S; Ker, C G; Sheen, P C

    1999-01-01

    The oxidative phosphorylation of liver mitochondria is regulated by the amount of portal insulin available to the hepatocytes. Thus, hepatic energy is mediated by the values of blood sugar and insulin. Insulin and glucagon are the main fuel homeostats in the liver. This study was performed to investigate the concept of energy mediated by glucose, during the process of obstructive jaundice and its recovery. Experimental Wistar rats were studied, with bile duct tied for 4, 7 and 14 days respectively. The serum concentration and relative tissue concentration of insulin and glucagon were measured. And the common bile duct was tied for 4, 7 and 14 days, then relieved by time sequences for 4, 7 and 14 days. Serum concentration and relative tissue concentration of insulin and glucagon were also measured. When the common bile duct was tied for 4, 7, and 14 days respectively, the serum concentration and relative tissue concentration of insulin declined (p jaundice, more fuel is demanded to make up for the energy deficiency. In spite of surgical or non-surgical relief of obstructive jaundice, the energy reserve is still not sufficiently recovered. The recovery of the hepatic energy reserve takes longer than we expected.

  3. Differences in homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) values and insulin levels after vitamin D supplementation in healthy men: a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepper, S; Shahar, D R; Geva, D; Ish-Shalom, S

    2016-06-01

    Vitamin D is thought to play a role in glucose metabolism. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of vitamin D supplementation on markers of insulin sensitivity and inflammation in men without diabetes with vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency. In this 1-year double-blind randomized controlled trial, 130 men aged 20-65 years (mean age 47.52 ± 11.84 years) with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels HOMA-IR) values between groups. Levels of insulin and HOMA-IR values remained steady during the study period in the treatment group but increased by 16% in the control group (p = 0.038 and p = 0.048, respectively). Vitamin D supplementation administered for 12 months in healthy men maintained insulin levels and HOMA-IR values relative to the increase in the control group. Further studies are needed to establish the long-term effect of vitamin D supplementation on the risk of diabetes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Effects of daily consumption of synbiotic bread on insulin metabolism and serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein among diabetic patients: a double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajadadi-Ebrahimi, Maryam; Bahmani, Fereashteh; Shakeri, Hossein; Hadaegh, Haleh; Hijijafari, Mohammad; Abedi, Fatemeh; Asemi, Zatollah

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of daily consumption of synbiotic bread on the metabolic status of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial was performed in 81 diabetic patients. The subjects were randomly assigned to consumption of synbiotic (n = 27), probiotic (n = 27), or control bread (n = 27) for 8 weeks 3 times a day in a 40-gram package. The synbiotic bread contained Lactobacillus sporogenes (1 × 10(8) CFU) and 0.07 g inulin per 1 g. The probiotic bread contained L. sporogenes (1 × 10(8) CFU per 1 g). Fasting blood samples were taken at baseline and after an 8-week intervention for quantification of related factors. Consumption of the synbiotic bread resulted in a significant reduction in serum insulin levels (-3.2 ± 5.4 vs. -0.3 ± 3.4 and 0.6 ± 4.7 µIU/ml, respectively, p = 0.007), homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance scores (-1.5 ± 2.7 vs. -0.2 ± 1.6 and 0.4 ± 3.5, respectively, p = 0.03), and homeostatic model assessment-β-cell function (-7.2 ± 16.3 vs. -0.7 ± 10.8 and 0.7 ± 8.2, respectively, p = 0.04) compared to the probiotic and control breads. We did not find any significant effect of synbiotic bread consumption on fasting plasma glucose, the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index, or serum hs-CRP levels compared to other breads. Consumption of the synbiotic bread among diabetic patients had beneficial effects on insulin metabolism. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Continuous glucose monitoring, oral glucose tolerance, and insulin - glucose parameters in adolescents with simple obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Awwa, A; Soliman, A; Al-Ali, M; Yassin, M; De Sanctis, V

    2012-09-01

    In obese adolescents pancreatic beta-cells may not be able to cope with insulin resistance leading to hyperglycemia and type2 diabetes (T2DM To assess oral glucose tolerance, 72-h continuous blood glucose concentrations (CGM) and calculate homeostatic model assessment (HOMA), and the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) in 13 adolescents with simple obesity (BMI SDS=4 ± 1.06). OGTT performed in 13 obese adolescents (13.47 ± 3 years) revealed 3 cases (23%) with impaired fasting glucose (IFG: fasting glucose >5.6 mmol/L), 4 cases (30%) with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT: 2h blood glucose >7.8 continuous glucose monitoring system ( CGMS), IFG was detected in 4 cases, the maximum serum blood glucose (BG : 2h or more after meal) was >7.8 and 11.1 mmol/L (diabetes) in one case (7.6%). Five cases had a minimum BG recorded of 2.6 and QUICKI values obese adolescents, CGMS is superior to OGTT and HbA1C in detecting glycemic abnormalities, which appears to be secondary to insulin resistance.

  6. The Usefulness of Homeostatic Measurement Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR for Detection of Glucose Intolerance in Thai Women of Reproductive Age with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanyarat Wongwananuruk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To study the cut-off point of Homeostatic Measurement Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR as a screening test for detection of glucose intolerance in Thai women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS. Study Design. Cross-sectional study. Setting. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital. Subject. Two hundred and fifty Thai PCOS women who attended the Gynecologic Endocrinology Unit, during May 2007 to January 2009. Materials and Methods. The paitents were interviewed and examined for weight, height, waist circumference, and blood pressure. Venous blood samples were drawn twice, one at 12-hour fasting and the other at 2 hours after glucose loading. Results. The prevalence of glucose intolerance in Thai PCOS women was 20.0%. The mean of HOMA-IR was 3.53  ±  7.7. Area under an ROC curve for HOMA-IR for detecting glucose intolerance was 0.82. Using the cut-off value of HOMA-IR >2.0, there was sensitivity at 84.0%, specificity at 61.0%, positive predictive value at 35.0%, negative predictive value at 93.8%, and accuracy at 65.6%. Conclusion. HOMA-IR >2.0 was used for screening test for glucose intolerance in Thai PCOS women. If the result was positive, a specific test should be done to prove the diagnosis.

  7. Using Glucose Tolerance Tests to Model Insulin Secretion and Clearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Shannon

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the studies described in this paper is to develop theoretically and to validate experimentally mathematical compartment models which can be used to predict plasma insulin levels in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM. In the case of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM, the C-peptide levels in the plasma were measured as part of routine glucose tolerance tests in order to estimate the prehepatic insulin secretion rates. In the case of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM, a radioactive labelled insulin was used to measure the absorption rate of insulin after a subcutaneous injection of insulin. Both models gave close fits between theoretical estimates and experimental data, and, unlike other models, it is not necessary to seed these models with initial estimates.

  8. Problem communication (homeostatic structuring of information)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdanov, N I

    1982-01-01

    This paper investigates the fundamental connection of intellectual and homeostatic levels of treating information which appear in information structuring. The laws obtained can be applied to artificial intelligence in studies of communication and education. 4 references.

  9. Sex differences in the association between dietary restraint, insulin resistance and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastreboff, Ania M; Gaiser, Edward C; Gu, Peihua; Sinha, Rajita

    2014-04-01

    Restrained food consumption may alter metabolic function and contribute to eventual weight gain; however, sex differences in these relationships have not been assessed. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between restrained eating and insulin resistance and the influence of body mass index and sex on this relationship in a large community sample of both men and women. We hypothesized that restrained eating would be related to insulin resistance and this relationship would be influenced by sex and body mass index. In this cross-sectional, observational study, we studied 487 individuals from the community (men N = 222, women N = 265), who ranged from lean (body mass index 18.5-24.9 kg/m(2), N = 173), overweight (body mass index 25-29.9 kg/m(2), N = 159) to obese (body mass index >30 kg/m(2), N = 155) weight categories. We assessed restrained eating using the Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire and obtained fasting morning plasma insulin and glucose on all subjects. In men, but not in women, restrained eating was related to homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (p < 0.0001). Furthermore, HOMA-IR was significantly higher in men who were high- versus low-restrained eaters (p = 0.0006). This study is the first to report sex differences with regard to the relationship between restrained eating and insulin resistance. Our results suggest that high restrained eating is associated with insulin resistance in men but not in women. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Maternal Zinc Intakes and Homeostatic Adjustments during Pregnancy and Lactation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donangelo, Carmen Marino; King, Janet C.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc plays critical roles during embryogenesis, fetal growth, and milk secretion, which increase the zinc need for pregnancy and lactation. Increased needs can be met by increasing the dietary zinc intake, along with making homeostatic adjustments in zinc utilization. Potential homeostatic adjustments include changes in circulating zinc, increased zinc absorption, decreased zinc losses, and changes in whole body zinc kinetics. Although severe zinc deficiency during pregnancy has devastating effects, systematic reviews and meta-analysis of the effect of maternal zinc supplementation on pregnancy outcomes have consistently shown a limited benefit. We hypothesize, therefore, that zinc homeostatic adjustments during pregnancy and lactation improve zinc utilization sufficiently to provide the increased zinc needs in these stages and, therefore, mitigate immediate detrimental effects due to a low zinc intake. The specific questions addressed are the following: How is zinc utilization altered during pregnancy and lactation? Are those homeostatic adjustments influenced by maternal zinc status, dietary zinc, or zinc supplementation? These questions are addressed by critically reviewing results from published human studies on zinc homeostasis during pregnancy and lactation carried out in different populations worldwide. PMID:22852063

  11. Endocannabinoid modulation of homeostatic and non-homeostatic feeding circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Benjamin K; Cota, Daniela; Cristino, Luigia; Borgland, Stephanie L

    2017-09-15

    The endocannabinoid system has emerged as a key player in the control of eating. Endocannabinoids, including 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and anandamide (AEA), modulate neuronal activity via cannabinoid 1 receptors (CB1Rs) in multiple nuclei of the hypothalamus to induce or inhibit food intake depending on nutritional and hormonal status, suggesting that endocannabinoids may act in the hypothalamus to integrate different types of signals informing about the animal's energy needs. In the mesocorticolimbic system, (endo)cannabinoids modulate synaptic transmission to promote dopamine release in response to palatable food. In addition, (endo)cannabinoids act within the nucleus accumbens to increase food's hedonic impact; although this effect depends on activation of CB1Rs at excitatory, but not inhibitory inputs in the nucleus accumbens. While hyperactivation of the endocannabinoid system is typically associated with overeating and obesity, much evidence has emerged in recent years suggesting a more complicated system than first thought - endocannabinoids promote or suppress feeding depending on cell and input type, or modulation by various neuronal or hormonal signals. This review presents our latest knowledge of the endocannabinoid system in non-homeostatic and homeostatic feeding circuits. In particular, we discuss the functional role and cellular mechanism of action by endocannabinoids within the hypothalamus and mesocorticolimbic system, and how these are modulated by neuropeptide signals related to feeding. In light of recent advances and complexity in the field, we review cannabinoid-based therapeutic strategies for the treatment of obesity and how peripheral restriction of CB1R antagonists may provide a different mechanism of weight loss without the central adverse effects. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled "A New Dawn in Cannabinoid Neurobiology". Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Vitamin D deficiency and insulin resistance as risk factors for dyslipidemia in obese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Meltem; Bostan Gayret, Özlem; Hamilçıkan, Şahin; Can, Emrah; Yiğit, Özgu L

    2017-04-01

    Dyslipidemia is one of the major complications of obesity; vitamin D deficiency and insulin resistance are attending metabolic complications in dyslipidemic obese children. Objective. To determine if vitamin D deficiency and insulin resistance are risk factors for dyslipidemia in obese children. This study was conducted in the Department of Pediatrics at Bagcilar Training and Research Hospital in Istanbul, Turkey between 2014 and 2015. Obese patients whose age range was 8-14 were included in the study. The serum triglyceride, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, highdensity lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting glucose, insulin, alanine aminotransferase, vitamin D levels were measured; a liver ultrasonography was performed. Homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR), was used to calculate insulin resistance. 108 obese children were included; 39 (36.11%) had dyslipidemia. The average fasting blood glucose (88.74 ± 7.58 vs. 95.31 ± 6.82; p= 0.0001), insulin level (14.71 ± 12.44 vs. 24.39 ± 15.02; p= 0.0001) and alanine aminotransferase level (23.45 ± 11.18 vs. 30.4 ± 18.95; p= 0.018) were significantly higher in the children with dyslipidemia. In the dyslipidemic obese children, the average hepatosteatosis rate and HOMA-IR level were higher; 28 (71.9%) had hepatosteatosis, 37 (94.87%) had insulin resistance; the vitamin D levels were dyslipidemia. Obese children in our region exhibit low vitamin D and increased HOMA-IR levels, which are efficient risk factors of dyslipidemia.

  13. Human Homeostatic Control Matrix in Norm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander G. Kruglov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We undertook our research to study and systemize the relationship between hemodynamics and biochemical parameters of arterial and venous blood in healthy people. Hemodynamic and biochemical characteristics were obtained through a probe by using catheterization in various vascular areas (aorta, brain, heart, lungs, and liver. Correlation and factor analyses were conducted to study the relationship between the obtained characteristics of the regional and systemic blood flow. Due to the nature of the correlation analysis, the significant (p<0.05 relation signs (+, 0, - without regard to their power were considered. The obtained results suggested that there are sets of both intra-organ and system regulatory relationships between metabolic and hemodynamic characteristics. The complex of relationships among the studied parameters makes it possible to maintain the homeostatic equilibrium in the body. The psychophysiological control system includes the subsystems we described: 1 the cardiac-hepatic-pulmonary complex having properties of the metabolic and hemodynamic information field providing biological stability of the homeostasis; any significant imbalance of its elements triggers afferent information flows actualizing an afferent synthesis; 2 the mind forming gradient patterns of targeted behavior to eliminate metabolic imbalance, to achieve goals both as coded biological parameters and as the highest forms of behavior, to reach the ultimate goal: parametric, homeostatic equilibrium in the “biosphere” of the human body. By using the results of our research and the complex of dynamic relationships in human homeostasis, we built a homeostatic control matrix (HCM.

  14. Homeostatic proliferation fails to efficiently reactivate HIV-1 latently infected central memory CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Bosque

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Homeostatic proliferation ensures the longevity of central memory T-cells by inducing cell proliferation in the absence of cellular differentiation or activation. This process is governed mainly by IL-7. Central memory T-cells can also be stimulated via engagement of the T-cell receptor, leading to cell proliferation but also activation and differentiation. Using an in vitro model of HIV-1 latency, we have examined in detail the effects of homeostatic proliferation on latently infected central memory T cells. We have also used antigenic stimulation via anti-CD3/anti-CD28 antibodies and established a comparison with a homeostatic proliferation stimulus, to evaluate potential differences in how either treatment affects the dynamics of latent virus populations. First, we show that homeostatic proliferation, as induced by a combination of IL-2 plus IL-7, leads to partial reactivation of latent HIV-1 but is unable to reduce the size of the reservoir in vitro. Second, latently infected cells are able to homeostatically proliferate in the absence of viral reactivation or cell differentiation. These results indicate that IL-2 plus IL-7 may induce a detrimental effect by favoring the maintenance of the latent HIV-1 reservoir. On the other hand, antigenic stimulation efficiently reactivated latent HIV-1 in cultured central memory cells and led to depletion of the latently infected cells via virus-induced cell death.

  15. Homeostatic T Cell Expansion to Induce Anti-Tumor Autoimmunity in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baccala, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    ... that (a) homeostatic T-cell proliferation consistently elicits anti-tumor responses; (b) irradiation is more effective than Tcell depletion by antibodies in inducing anti-tumor responses mediated by homeostatic T-cell proliferation...

  16. An Adenosine-Mediated Glial-Neuronal Circuit for Homeostatic Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorness, Theresa E; Dale, Nicholas; Mettlach, Gabriel; Sonneborn, Alex; Sahin, Bogachan; Fienberg, Allen A; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Bibb, James A; Greene, Robert W

    2016-03-30

    Sleep homeostasis reflects a centrally mediated drive for sleep, which increases during waking and resolves during subsequent sleep. Here we demonstrate that mice deficient for glial adenosine kinase (AdK), the primary metabolizing enzyme for adenosine (Ado), exhibit enhanced expression of this homeostatic drive by three independent measures: (1) increased rebound of slow-wave activity; (2) increased consolidation of slow-wave sleep; and (3) increased time constant of slow-wave activity decay during an average slow-wave sleep episode, proposed and validated here as a new index for homeostatic sleep drive. Conversely, mice deficient for the neuronal adenosine A1 receptor exhibit significantly decreased sleep drive as judged by these same indices. Neuronal knock-out of AdK did not influence homeostatic sleep need. Together, these findings implicate a glial-neuronal circuit mediated by intercellular Ado, controlling expression of homeostatic sleep drive. Because AdK is tightly regulated by glial metabolic state, our findings suggest a functional link between cellular metabolism and sleep homeostasis. The work presented here provides evidence for an adenosine-mediated regulation of sleep in response to waking (i.e., homeostatic sleep need), requiring activation of neuronal adenosine A1 receptors and controlled by glial adenosine kinase. Adenosine kinase acts as a highly sensitive and important metabolic sensor of the glial ATP/ADP and AMP ratio directly controlling intracellular adenosine concentration. Glial equilibrative adenosine transporters reflect the intracellular concentration to the extracellular milieu to activate neuronal adenosine receptors. Thus, adenosine mediates a glial-neuronal circuit linking glial metabolic state to neural-expressed sleep homeostasis. This indicates a metabolically related function(s) for this glial-neuronal circuit in the buildup and resolution of our need to sleep and suggests potential therapeutic targets more directly related to

  17. Protein source in a high-protein diet modulates reductions in insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in fa/fa Zucker rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Jennifer L; Devassy, Jessay G; Wu, Yinghong; Zahradka, Peter; Taylor, Carla G; Aukema, Harold M

    2016-01-01

    High-protein diets are being promoted to reduce insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in metabolic syndrome. Therefore, the effect of protein source in high-protein diets on reducing insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis was examined. Fa/fa Zucker rats were provided normal-protein (15% of energy) casein, high-protein (35% of energy) casein, high-protein soy, or high-protein mixed diets with animal and plant proteins. The high-protein mixed diet reduced area under the curve for insulin during glucose tolerance testing, fasting serum insulin and free fatty acid concentrations, homeostatic model assessment index, insulin to glucose ratio, and pancreatic islet cell area. The high-protein mixed and the high-protein soy diets reduced hepatic lipid concentrations, liver to body weight ratio, and hepatic steatosis rating. These improvements were observed despite no differences in body weight, feed intake, or adiposity among high-protein diet groups. The high-protein casein diet had minimal benefits. A high-protein mixed diet was the most effective for modulating reductions in insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis independent of weight loss, indicating that the source of protein within a high-protein diet is critical for the management of these metabolic syndrome parameters. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  18. Homeostatic balance as an indicator of prolonged technogenic exposure in low dose range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpov, A.B.; Voronova, I.A.; Takhauov, R.M.; Semyonova, Yu.V.; Sherstoboev, E.Yu.; Udut, V.V.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Indication of changes induced by ionizing radiation starting up a wide range of pathologic reactions in the disease developments still poses a significant problem in radiation medicine. It mainly concerns exposure to low dose-rate ionizing radiation, since its effects are still open to question, and today any researcher acknowledges that radiation induced pathological changes can accumulate at both subclinical and prenosological stages and develop not only in exposed persons, but also in their offspring. The subject of this study was workers of reactor and radiochemical productions of Siberian Group of Chemical Enterprises (SGCE) exposed to external and combined (external and internal) radiation respectively. Two comparative groups were formed: reactor and radiochemical production workers. In the reactor production group of workers the cumulative dose of external γ-radiation was up to 300 mSv, in the radiochemical production group - up to 150 mSv. Age ranged from 40 to 50 years. The two groups were compared between each other. Above all, there were formed 'insider control' groups (workers of the same productions with zero doses) to assess the impact of radiation factor on central homeostatic mechanisms. These groups were created using pair technique in order to level somatic disorders influence on the parameters under study. Numbers of full and biochemical blood examinations, energy metabolism between cells, hormones of homeostasis by the adaptive hormone level - insulin and cortisol, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant protection systems, immune and vegetative systems were all analyzed. Analyses of the systems performed, it was found out that in persons having been exposed to long term occupational radiation there were significant changes indicating lipid peroxidation system activation, antioxidant protection system depression, as well as lowered energy metabolism. The higher external γ-doses the bigger these changes are. Results from the two groups of

  19. Evaluation of pharmacokinetic model designs for subcutaneous infusion of insulin aspart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansell, Erin J.; Schmidt, Signe; Docherty, Paul D.

    2017-01-01

    Effective mathematical modelling of continuous subcutaneous infusion pharmacokinetics should aid understanding and control in insulin therapy. Thorough analysis of candidate model performance is important for selecting the appropriate models. Eight candidate models for insulin pharmacokinetics...... included a range of modelled behaviours, parameters and complexity. The models were compared using clinical data from subjects with type 1 diabetes with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. Performance of the models was compared through several analyses: R2 for goodness of fit; the Akaike Information...

  20. Interaction of insulin-like growth factor-I and insulin resistance-related genetic variants with lifestyle factors on postmenopausal breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Su Yon; Ho, Gloria; Rohan, Thomas; Strickler, Howard; Bea, Jennifer; Papp, Jeanette; Sobel, Eric; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Crandall, Carolyn

    2017-07-01

    Genetic variants and traits in metabolic signaling pathways may interact with obesity, physical activity, and exogenous estrogen (E), influencing postmenopausal breast cancer risk, but these inter-related pathways are incompletely understood. We used 75 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes related to insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I)/insulin resistance (IR) traits and signaling pathways, and data from 1003 postmenopausal women in Women's Health Initiative Observation ancillary studies. Stratifying via obesity and lifestyle modifiers, we assessed the role of IGF-I/IR traits (fasting IGF-I, IGF-binding protein 3, insulin, glucose, and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance) in breast cancer risk as a mediator or influencing factor. Seven SNPs in IGF-I and INS genes were associated with breast cancer risk. These associations differed between non-obese/active and obese/inactive women and between exogenous E non-users and users. The mediation effects of IGF-I/IR traits on the relationship between these SNPs and cancer differed between strata, but only roughly 35% of the cancer risk due to the SNPs was mediated by traits. Similarly, carriers of 20 SNPs in PIK3R1, AKT1/2, and MAPK1 genes (signaling pathways-genetic variants) had different associations with breast cancer between strata, and the proportion of the SNP-cancer relationship explained by traits varied 45-50% between the strata. Our findings suggest that IGF-I/IR genetic variants interact with obesity and lifestyle factors, altering cancer risk partially through pathways other than IGF-I/IR traits. Unraveling gene-phenotype-lifestyle interactions will provide data on potential genetic targets in clinical trials for cancer prevention and intervention strategies to reduce breast cancer risk.

  1. Host homeostatic responses to alcohol-induced cellular stress in animal models of alcoholic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He Joe; Murray, Gary J; Jung, Mary Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Humans develop various clinical phenotypes of severe alcoholic liver disease, including alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis, generally after decades of heavy drinking. In such individuals, following each episode of drinking, their livers experience heightened intracellular and extracellular stresses that are closely associated with alcohol consumption and alcohol metabolism. This article focuses on the latest advances made in animal models on evolutionarily conserved homeostatic mechanisms for coping with and resolving these stress conditions. The mechanisms discussed include the stress-activated protein kinase JNK, energy regulator AMPK, autophagy and the inflammatory response. Over time, the host may respond variably to stress with protective mechanisms that are critical in determining an individual's vulnerability to developing severe alcoholic liver disease. A systematic review of these mechanisms and their temporal changes in animal models provides the basis for general conclusions, and raises questions for future studies. The relevance of these data to human conditions is also discussed.

  2. Maternal Zinc Intakes and Homeostatic Adjustments during Pregnancy and Lactation

    OpenAIRE

    Donangelo, Carmen Marino; King, Janet C.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc plays critical roles during embryogenesis, fetal growth, and milk secretion, which increase the zinc need for pregnancy and lactation. Increased needs can be met by increasing the dietary zinc intake, along with making homeostatic adjustments in zinc utilization. Potential homeostatic adjustments include changes in circulating zinc, increased zinc absorption, decreased zinc losses, and changes in whole body zinc kinetics. Although severe zinc deficiency during pregnancy has devastating e...

  3. Homeostatic structural plasticity can account for topology changes following deafferentation and focal stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butz, Markus; Steenbuck, Ines D; van Ooyen, Arjen

    2014-01-01

    After brain lesions caused by tumors or stroke, or after lasting loss of input (deafferentation), inter- and intra-regional brain networks respond with complex changes in topology. Not only areas directly affected by the lesion but also regions remote from the lesion may alter their connectivity-a phenomenon known as diaschisis. Changes in network topology after brain lesions can lead to cognitive decline and increasing functional disability. However, the principles governing changes in network topology are poorly understood. Here, we investigated whether homeostatic structural plasticity can account for changes in network topology after deafferentation and brain lesions. Homeostatic structural plasticity postulates that neurons aim to maintain a desired level of electrical activity by deleting synapses when neuronal activity is too high and by providing new synaptic contacts when activity is too low. Using our Model of Structural Plasticity, we explored how local changes in connectivity induced by a focal loss of input affected global network topology. In accordance with experimental and clinical data, we found that after partial deafferentation, the network as a whole became more random, although it maintained its small-world topology, while deafferentated neurons increased their betweenness centrality as they rewired and returned to the homeostatic range of activity. Furthermore, deafferentated neurons increased their global but decreased their local efficiency and got longer tailed degree distributions, indicating the emergence of hub neurons. Together, our results suggest that homeostatic structural plasticity may be an important driving force for lesion-induced network reorganization and that the increase in betweenness centrality of deafferentated areas may hold as a biomarker for brain repair.

  4. Association of leptin and insulin resistance in PCOS: A case-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namavar Jahromi, Bahia; Dabaghmanesh, Mohammad Hassan; Parsanezhad, Mohammad Ebrahim; Fatehpoor, Faranak

    2017-07-01

    Endocrine abnormalities related to polycystic ovary Syndrome (PCOS) are important problems. To compare serum leptin levels between infertile women with and without PCOS. To rank sensitivity of six indirect methods for detection of insulin resistance (IR) and to evaluate the association between leptin and IR in PCOS group. This Case-controlled study performed on 189 infertile women referred to Shiraz Mother and Child Hospital during 2012-2015. Ninety-nine PCOS cases according to Rotterdam criteria were compared to 90 cases without PCOS. Serum leptin, body mass index (BMI), several hormones, and their correlation coefficients with leptin were compared. IR in PCOS women was measured by indirect methods, including fasting blood sugar (FBS), fasting insulin (FI), glucose/insulin, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), and MacAuley index. Association between IR and leptin was evaluated. Independent sample t-test and Pearson's test were used. Infertile women with PCOS had higher BMI (26.47±3.62 vs. 24.82±5.18 kg/m 2 ) and serum leptin levels (41.79±187.89 vs. 19.38±12.57 ng/mL). Leptin showed significant association with weight and BMI in both groups (pPCOS group. HOMA-IR showed the highest rate of IR followed by FI and QUICKI methods. The mean leptin levels had positive association with IR assessed by HOMA-IR (pPCOS infertile women. HOMA-IR followed by FI and QUICKI is the most sensitive test for detection of IR.

  5. Gender difference and relationship of insulin resistance with microalbuminuria type-2 diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S.; Ahmad, A.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the relationship of insulin resistance with microalbuminuria in patients of type-2 Diabetes mellitus and observe gender difference if any. Study Design: A cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Diabetes Clinic of Combined Military Hospital, Malir Cantt, from April to August 2007. Methodology: One hundred and fifty five patients of type-2 Diabetes mellitus were included in the study who had either microalbuminuria or normo albuminuria. Body mass index, waist circumference and blood pressure were recorded. Fasting venous blood sample was collected for plasma glucose (FPG), serum insulin, total and HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, creatinine and HbA1c. Urine albumin excretion was determined using urine albumin to creatinine ratio. Insulin resistance was calculated from fasting plasma glucose and serum insulin levels, using homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Correlation and association testing was carried out with significance at p < 0.05. Results: Microalbuminuria was found to be significantly correlated with HOMA-IR (r = 0.33, p < 0.001), serum insulin (r = 0.28, p = < 0.001), body mass index (r = 0.18, p = 0.02) and waist circumference (r = 0.21, p = 0.008). This correlation was more significant in women (n = 85, r = 0.48, p = < 0.0001) as compared to men (n = 70, r = 0.14, p = 0.12). The correlation between HOMA-IR and urine albumin excretion remained highly significant (p = 0.001) after controlling for gender, age, duration of diabetes, waist circumference, hypertension, triglycerides and HbA1c. Conclusion: Urinary albumin excretion in patients of type-2 diabetes is strongly associated with insulin resistance and related cardiovascular risk factors. This association appears to be stronger in women than the men, in our population. (author)

  6. The triglyceride-glucose index, an insulin resistance marker in newborns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesteiro, Eva; Bastida, Sara; Barrios, Laura; Sánchez-Muniz, Francisco J

    2018-04-01

    The study aims to assess the utility of the triglyceride-glucose index (TyG) as a marker of insulin resistance (IR) in neonates. TyG and the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR) values were compared in 196 singleton, term normoweight and without distress newborns. A Decision Tree procedure (CHAID) was used to classify cases into groups or predict values of a dependent (Ln HOMA-IR) variable. Three nodes were drawn for TyG: ≤ 6.7, > 6.7-7.8 and > 7.8 (p glucose challenge test (p = 0.138) classifications nor by the TyG node* glucose challenge test and TyG node*gender interactions (p = 0.456 and p = 0.209, respectively). Glucose, HOMA-IR, and the triglyceride/HDL cholesterol ratio increased progressively from node 1 to 3 for TyG while QUICKI decreased. In conclusion, TyG appears to be a suitable tool for identifying IR at birth, justifying the further insulin determination in those neonates. TyG ≥ 7.8 is recommended as cut-off point in neonates. The need for a follow-up study to confirm the TyG as early IR marker is desirable. • HOMA-IR and the triglyceride-glucose index (TyG) show a high correlation. • The TyG has been used as an insulin resistance marker in adults. • This is the first study where TyG has been assessed in neonates. • TyG appears to be a suitable and cheap tool for identifying insulin resistance at birth.

  7. Bayesian model discrimination for glucose-insulin homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Emil; Brooks, Stephen P.; Højbjerre, Malene

    In this paper we analyse a set of experimental data on a number of healthy and diabetic patients and discuss a variety of models for describing the physiological processes involved in glucose absorption and insulin secretion within the human body. We adopt a Bayesian approach which facilitates...... as parameter uncertainty. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods are used, combining Metropolis Hastings, reversible jump and simulated tempering updates to provide rapidly mixing chains so as to provide robust inference. We demonstrate the methodology for both healthy and type II diabetic populations concluding...... that whilst both populations are well modelled by a common insulin model, their glucose dynamics differ considerably....

  8. Homeostatic regulation of memory systems and adaptive decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizumori, Sheri J Y; Jo, Yong Sang

    2013-11-01

    While it is clear that many brain areas process mnemonic information, understanding how their interactions result in continuously adaptive behaviors has been a challenge. A homeostatic-regulated prediction model of memory is presented that considers the existence of a single memory system that is based on a multilevel coordinated and integrated network (from cells to neural systems) that determines the extent to which events and outcomes occur as predicted. The "multiple memory systems of the brain" have in common output that signals errors in the prediction of events and/or their outcomes, although these signals differ in terms of what the error signal represents (e.g., hippocampus: context prediction errors vs. midbrain/striatum: reward prediction errors). The prefrontal cortex likely plays a pivotal role in the coordination of prediction analysis within and across prediction brain areas. By virtue of its widespread control and influence, and intrinsic working memory mechanisms. Thus, the prefrontal cortex supports the flexible processing needed to generate adaptive behaviors and predict future outcomes. It is proposed that prefrontal cortex continually and automatically produces adaptive responses according to homeostatic regulatory principles: prefrontal cortex may serve as a controller that is intrinsically driven to maintain in prediction areas an experience-dependent firing rate set point that ensures adaptive temporally and spatially resolved neural responses to future prediction errors. This same drive by prefrontal cortex may also restore set point firing rates after deviations (i.e. prediction errors) are detected. In this way, prefrontal cortex contributes to reducing uncertainty in prediction systems. An emergent outcome of this homeostatic view may be the flexible and adaptive control that prefrontal cortex is known to implement (i.e. working memory) in the most challenging of situations. Compromise to any of the prediction circuits should result in

  9. Effects of turtle oil on insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in insulin resistant cell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Jing; Tian Yaping; Guo Duo

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of turtle oil on insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in an insulin-resistant (IR) cell model which was established by the way of high concentration of insulin induction with HepG 2 cell in vitro culture. The IR cells were treated by turtle oil, the glucose consumption and 3 H-D-glucose incorporation rate in IR cells were detected by the way of glucose oxidase and 3 H-D-glucose incorporation assay respectively. The state of cell proliferation was tested by MTT method. The results showed that the incorporation rate of 3 H-D-glucose in IR cells was significantly lower than that in the control cells(P 3 H-D-glucose incorporation rate in either IR cells or control cells was increased with the increase of insulin concentration. Moreover, the 3 H-D-glucose incorporation rate of IR cells increased slower than that of control cells. The MTT assay showed that turtle oil can promote the proliferation of IR cell and control cell. The glucose uptake and glucose consumption in IR cell which treated with turtle oil was significantly increase than that in the control cells (P<0.05). Turtle oil can improve the insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in the IR cell model. (authors)

  10. Ovulation induction with myo-inositol alone and in combination with clomiphene citrate in polycystic ovarian syndrome patients with insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenov, Zdravko; Kolarov, Georgi; Gateva, Antoaneta; Carlomagno, Gianfranco; Genazzani, Alessandro D

    2015-02-01

    Insulin resistance plays a key role in the pathogenesis of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). One of the methods for correcting insulin resistance is using myo-inositol. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effectiveness of myo-inositol alone or in combination with clomiphene citrate for (1) induction of ovulation and (2) pregnancy rate in anovulatory women with PCOS and proven insulin resistance. This study included 50 anovulatory PCOS patients with insulin resistance. All of them received myo-inositolduring three spontaneous cycles. If patients remained anovulatory and/or no pregnancy was achieved, combination of myo-inositol and clomiphene citrate was used in the next three cycles. Ovulation and pregnancy rate, changes in body mass index (BMI) and homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) index and the rate of adverse events were assessed. After myo-inositol treatment, ovulation was present in 29 women (61.7%) and 18 (38.3%) were resistant. Of the ovulatory women, 11 became pregnant (37.9%). Of the 18 myo-inositol resistant patients after clomiphene treatment, 13 (72.2%) ovulated. Of the 13 ovulatory women, 6 (42.6%) became pregnant. During follow-up, a reduction of body mass index and HOMA index was also observed. Myo-inositol treatment ameliorates insulin resistance and body weight, and improves ovarian activity in PCOS patients.

  11. Effect of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 inhibitor on insulin resistance in streptozotocin-induced diabetic pregnant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Hua; Jin, Jun; Sun, Li-Zhou

    2018-06-21

    This paper aims to investigate the influence of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) inhibitor, darapladib, on insulin resistance (IR) in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic pregnant rats. The rat models were divided into Control (normal pregnancy), STZ + saline (STZ-induced diabetic pregnant rats), STZ + Low-dose and STZ + High-dose darapladib (STZ-induced diabetic pregnant rats treated with low-/high-dose darapladib) groups. Pathological changes were observed by Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and Immunohistochemistry staining. Lp-PLA2 levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). An automatic biochemical analyzer was used to measure the serum levels of biochemical indicators, and homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and insulin sensitivity index (ISI) were calculated. Western blot was applied to determine levels of inflammatory cytokines. Compared with Control group, rats in the STZ + saline group were significantly decreased in body weight, the number of embryo implantation, the number of insulin positive cells and pancreatic islet size as well as the islet endocrine cells, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C) level, but substantially increased in Lp-PLA2, low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C), fatty acids (FFA), serum total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG) levels. Moreover, the increased fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and HOMA-IR and inflammatory cytokines but decreased fasting insulin (FINS) and ISI were also found in diabetic pregnant rats. On the contrary, rats in the darapladib-treated groups were just opposite to the STZ + saline group, and STZ + High-dose group improved better than STZ + Low-dose group. Thus, darapladib can improve lipid metabolism, and enhance insulin sensitivity of diabetic pregnant rats by regulating inflammatory cytokines.

  12. Effect of daily consumption of probiotic yoghurt on insulin resistance in pregnant women: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asemi, Z; Samimi, M; Tabassi, Z; Naghibi Rad, M; Rahimi Foroushani, A; Khorammian, H; Esmaillzadeh, A

    2013-01-01

    Owing to excess body weight and increased secretion of inflammatory cytokines primarily during the third trimester, pregnancy is associated with elevated insulin resistance. To our knowledge, no report is available indicating the effects of probiotic yoghurt consumption on serum insulin levels in pregnant women. This study was designed to determine the effects of daily consumption of probiotic yoghurt on insulin resistance and serum insulin levels of Iranian pregnant women. In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 70 primigravida pregnant women with singleton pregnancy at their third trimester were participated. We randomly assigned participants to consume 200 g per day of conventional (n=33) or the probiotic group (n=37) for 9 weeks. The probiotic yoghurt was a commercially available product prepared with the starter cultures of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus, enriched with probiotic culture of two strains of lactobacilli (Lactobacillus acidophilus LA5) and bifidobacteria (Bifidobacterium animalis BB12) with a total of min 1 × 10⁷ colony-forming units. Fasting blood samples were taken at baseline and after 9-week intervention to measure fasting plasma glucose and serum insulin levels. Homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was used to calculate insulin resistance score. Although consumption of probiotic yogurt for 9 weeks did not affect serum insulin levels and HOMA-IR score, significant differences were found comparing changes in these variables between probiotic and conventional yogurts (changes from baseline in serum insulin levels: +1.2±1.2 vs +5.0±1.1 μIU/ml, respectively, P=0.02; and in HOMA-IR score: -0.2±0.3 vs 0.7±0.2, respectively, P=0.01). It is concluded that in contrast to conventional yogurt, daily consumption of probiotic yogurt for 9 weeks maintains serum insulin levels and might help pregnant women prevent developing insulin resistance.

  13. Preliminary evidence for obesity-associated insulin resistance in adolescents without elevations of inflammatory cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Jessica I

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To ascertain whether the associations between obesity, inflammation, and insulin resistance established in human adult studies are found among adolescents. Methods We contrasted 36 obese and 24 lean youth on fasting glucose, insulin levels, lipid profile, hemoglobin A1C, markers of hepatic function, white blood cell count, C-reactive protein (CRP and fibrinogen levels. The cytokines IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-4 and the adipokines leptin, resistin, and adiponectin were also compared between the two groups. The fasting glucose and insulin values were used to estimate the degree of insulin resistance with the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. T-tests and correlations were run to examine group differences and associations between groups. In addition, regression analyses were used to ascertain whether the markers of inflammation were predictive of the degree of insulin resistance. Results Although obese adolescents had clear evidence of insulin resistance, only CRP, fibrinogen and leptin were elevated; there were no group differences in pro- or anti-inflammatory cytokines nor adiponectin and resistin. Anthropometric measures of obesity and level of insulin resistance were highly correlated to the acute phase reactants CRP and fibrinogen; however, the degree of insulin resistance was not predicted by the pro- or anti-inflammatory cytokine markers. Obese adolescents had higher white blood cell counts. In addition they had higher circulating alanine aminotransferase concentrations and lower circulating albumin and total protein than lean adolescents, possibly as a result of hepatocyte damage from fatty liver. Conclusion Unlike rodent or adult studies, we found that wide-spread systemic inflammation is not necessarily associated with insulin resistance among adolescents. This finding does not support the current paradigm that the associations between obesity and insulin resistance are, to a

  14. Pretreatment cardiometabolic status in youth with early-onset psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten G.; Correll, Christoph U.; Rudå, Ditte

    2017-01-01

    ), insulin (P =.038), and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR; P =.025). Dyslipidemia was associated with significantly increased insulin (P =.041), HOMA-IR (P =.032), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P =.041). Previous antipsychotic exposure was not associated with increased...

  15. A Unifying Organ Model of Pancreatic Insulin Secretion.

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    Andrea De Gaetano

    Full Text Available The secretion of insulin by the pancreas has been the object of much attention over the past several decades. Insulin is known to be secreted by pancreatic β-cells in response to hyperglycemia: its blood concentrations however exhibit both high-frequency (period approx. 10 minutes and low-frequency oscillations (period approx. 1.5 hours. Furthermore, characteristic insulin secretory response to challenge maneuvers have been described, such as frequency entrainment upon sinusoidal glycemic stimulation; substantial insulin peaks following minimal glucose administration; progressively strengthened insulin secretion response after repeated administration of the same amount of glucose; insulin and glucose characteristic curves after Intra-Venous administration of glucose boli in healthy and pre-diabetic subjects as well as in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Previous modeling of β-cell physiology has been mainly directed to the intracellular chain of events giving rise to single-cell or cell-cluster hormone release oscillations, but the large size, long period and complex morphology of the diverse responses to whole-body glucose stimuli has not yet been coherently explained. Starting with the seminal work of Grodsky it was hypothesized that the population of pancreatic β-cells, possibly functionally aggregated in islets of Langerhans, could be viewed as a set of independent, similar, but not identical controllers (firing units with distributed functional parameters. The present work shows how a single model based on a population of independent islet controllers can reproduce very closely a diverse array of actually observed experimental results, with the same set of working parameters. The model's success in reproducing a diverse array of experiments implies that, in order to understand the macroscopic behaviour of the endocrine pancreas in regulating glycemia, there is no need to hypothesize intrapancreatic pacemakers, influences between different

  16. A role for homeostatic drive in the perpetuation of complex chronic illness: Gulf War Illness and chronic fatigue syndrome.

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    Travis J A Craddock

    Full Text Available A key component in the body's stress response, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis orchestrates changes across a broad range of major biological systems. Its dysfunction has been associated with numerous chronic diseases including Gulf War Illness (GWI and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS. Though tightly coupled with other components of endocrine and immune function, few models of HPA function account for these interactions. Here we extend conventional models of HPA function by including feed-forward and feedback interaction with sex hormone regulation and immune response. We use this multi-axis model to explore the role of homeostatic regulation in perpetuating chronic conditions, specifically GWI and CFS. An important obstacle in building these models across regulatory systems remains the scarcity of detailed human in vivo kinetic data as its collection can present significant health risks to subjects. We circumvented this using a discrete logic representation based solely on literature of physiological and biochemical connectivity to provide a qualitative description of system behavior. This connectivity model linked molecular variables across the HPA axis, hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis in men and women, as well as a simple immune network. Inclusion of these interactions produced multiple alternate homeostatic states and sexually dimorphic responses. Experimental data for endocrine-immune markers measured in male GWI subjects showed the greatest alignment with predictions of a naturally occurring alternate steady state presenting with hypercortisolism, low testosterone and a shift towards a Th1 immune response. In female CFS subjects, expression of these markers aligned with an alternate homeostatic state displaying hypocortisolism, high estradiol, and a shift towards an anti-inflammatory Th2 activation. These results support a role for homeostatic drive in perpetuating dysfunctional cortisol levels through persistent

  17. The Investigation of Insulin Resistance in Two Groups of Epileptic Patients Treated with Sodium Valproate and Carbamazepine

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    Mohammad Reza Najafi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Valproic acid (VPA is a widely used broad-spectrum antiepileptic drug for therapy of generalized and focal epilepsies. Cross-sectional studies have suggested that valproate treatment may be associated with hyperinsulinemia. We decided to investigate hyperinsulinemia as a health-threatening side effect of VPA in Iranian epileptic patients. Materials and Methods: Body mass index (BMI, lipid profile, fasting serum insulin, fasting blood glucose (FBS, and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR were measured in 30 VPA-treated epileptic patients and 30 controls (CBZ-treated. The Chi-square test, t-test, and Pearson correlation test were used. Results: BMI was higher in VPA group than in control group (25.7 ± 3.5 > 21.7 ± 4.1 (0.000 0.05. Conclusion: Despite the majority of previous studies that are against VPA and according to our study, VPA could be prescribed safely and it may not cause IR and its complications.

  18. Genetic variants and traits related to insulin-like growth factor-I and insulin resistance and their interaction with lifestyles on postmenopausal colorectal cancer risk.

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    Su Yon Jung

    Full Text Available Genetic variants and traits in metabolic signaling pathways may interact with lifestyle factors such as obesity, physical activity, and exogenous estrogen (E, influencing postmenopausal colorectal cancer (CRC risk, but these interrelated pathways are not fully understood. In this case-cohort study, we examined 33 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in genes related to insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I/ insulin resistance (IR traits and signaling pathways, using data from 704 postmenopausal women in Women's Health Initiative Observation ancillary studies. Stratifying by the lifestyle modifiers, we assessed the effects of IGF-I/IR traits (fasting total and free IGF-I, IGF binding protein-3, insulin, glucose, and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance on CRC risk as a mediator or influencing factor. Six SNPs in the INS, IGF-I, and IGFBP3 genes were associated with CRC risk, and those associations differed between non-obese/active and obese/inactive women and between E nonusers and users. Roughly 30% of the cancer risk due to the SNP was mediated by IGF-I/IR traits. Likewise, carriers of 11 SNPs in the IRS1 and AKT1/2 genes (signaling pathway-related genetic variants had different associations with CRC risk between strata, and the proportion of the SNP-cancer association explained by traits varied from 30% to 50%. Our findings suggest that IGF-I/IR genetic variants interact with obesity, physical activity, and exogenous E, altering postmenopausal CRC risk, through IGF-I/IR traits, but also through different pathways. Unraveling gene-phenotype-lifestyle interactions will provide data on potential genetic targets in clinical trials for cancer prevention and intervention strategies to reduce CRC risk.

  19. Association of insulin resistance with near peak bone mass in the femur and lumbar spine of Korean adults aged 25-35: The Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008-2010

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    Choo, Min Soo; Choi, Se Rin; Han, Jun Hyun; Lee, Seong Ho

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between insulin resistance and the bone mineral density (BMD) of femur and lumbar spine in Korean adults who are expected to exhibit near peak bone mass. Methods Data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008–2010 were analyzed. A total of 2,750 participants aged 25−35 years were included. Insulin resistance was assessed using a homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and serum fasting insulin. Results In a multivariate linear regression analysis, the HOMA-IR was significantly inversely associated with the BMD of the total hip (TH, β = −0.052, P = 0.002), femoral neck (FN, β = −0.072, Pinsulin was significantly inversely associated with the BMD of the TH (β = −0.055, P = 0.001), FN (β = −0.072, Pinsulin resistance may be independently and inversely associated with the near peak bone mass of the femur and lumbar spine. PMID:28704413

  20. Association of MEP1A gene variants with insulin metabolism in central European women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

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    Lam, Uyen D P; Lerchbaum, Elisabeth; Schweighofer, Natascha; Trummer, Olivia; Eberhard, Katharina; Genser, Bernd; Pieber, Thomas R; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara

    2014-03-10

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) shows not only hyperandrogenemia, hirsutism and fertility problems, but also metabolic disturbances including obesity, cardiovascular events and type-2 diabetes. Accumulating evidence suggests some degree of inflammation associated with prominent aspects of PCOS. We aimed to investigate the association of genetic variants 3'UTR rs17468190 (G/T) of the inflammation-associated gene MEP1A (GenBank ID: NM_005588.2) with metabolic disturbances in PCOS and healthy control women. Genetic variants rs17468190 (G/T) of MEP1A gene were analyzed in 576 PCOS women and 206 controls by using the Taqman fluorogenic 5'-exonuclease assay. This polymorphism was tested for association with anthropometric, metabolic, hormonal, and functional parameters of PCOS. There was a borderline significant difference in genotype distribution between PCOS and control women (p=0.046). In overweight/obese PCOS patients, the variants rs17468190 (G/T) in the MEP1A gene are associated with glucose and insulin metabolism. In a dominant model, the GG genotype of the MEP1A gene was more strongly associated with insulin metabolism in overweight/obese PCOS women (body mass index, BMI>25 kg/m(2)), than in GT+TT genotypes. The MEP1A GG-carriers showed a significantly increased homeostatic model assessment - insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (p=0.003), elevation of fasting insulin (p=0.004) and stimulated insulin (30 min, pdisease modification in PCOS. It might contribute to the abnormalities of glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity and serve as a diagnostic or therapeutic target gene for PCOS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Estimating Rate of Insulin Resistance in Patients with Preeclampsia Using HOMA-IR Index and Comparison with Nonpreeclampsia Pregnant Women

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    Farideh Rezaei Abhari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Women with preeclampsia, independent of obesity and glucose intolerance, exhibit insulin resistance during pregnancy. The purpose of the present study is to determine whether early diagnosis of insulin resistance during pregnancy can predict preeclampsia. Through a case-control study, 675 pregnant women were selected and their first trimester blood was taken. Their fasting blood glucose and insulin were also measured after diagnosis of preeclampsia by 20 weeks of pregnancy. Based on the experiments conducted on 675 women who were 20 weeks past their pregnancy, 375 cases with preeclampsia were selected and assigned to the case group. 35 other pregnant women were put in the control group. Diagnosis criteria for the participants included blood pressure above 140/90 and proteinuria above 300 mg or above +1. Both groups were matched according to age, parity, gestational age, and BMI. Homa-Irand rate of insulin resistance was calculated by HOMA-IR and patients were followed up. Homeostatic model assessments (HOMA-IR revealed that the average insulin resistance increased during pregnancy among both the case and control groups. There was a significant difference between insulin resistance of these two groups in both first trimester and third trimester and after developing preeclampsia (P < 0.001, P = 0.021. Insulin-resistance of the group with preeclampsia was higher in first trimester prior to diagnosis as well as the third trimester after diagnosis compared to natural pregnancy under similar conditions. Measurement of insulin resistance in first trimester may be useful in predicting the risk of preeclampsia.

  2. Estimating rate of insulin resistance in patients with preeclampsia using HOMA-IR index and comparison with nonpreeclampsia pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhari, Farideh Rezaei; Ghanbari Andarieh, Maryam; Farokhfar, Asadollah; Ahmady, Soleiman

    2014-01-01

    Women with preeclampsia, independent of obesity and glucose intolerance, exhibit insulin resistance during pregnancy. The purpose of the present study is to determine whether early diagnosis of insulin resistance during pregnancy can predict preeclampsia. Through a case-control study, 675 pregnant women were selected and their first trimester blood was taken. Their fasting blood glucose and insulin were also measured after diagnosis of preeclampsia by 20 weeks of pregnancy. Based on the experiments conducted on 675 women who were 20 weeks past their pregnancy, 375 cases with preeclampsia were selected and assigned to the case group. 35 other pregnant women were put in the control group. Diagnosis criteria for the participants included blood pressure above 140/90 and proteinuria above 300 mg or above +1. Both groups were matched according to age, parity, gestational age, and BMI. Homa-Irand rate of insulin resistance was calculated by HOMA-IR and patients were followed up. Homeostatic model assessments (HOMA-IR) revealed that the average insulin resistance increased during pregnancy among both the case and control groups. There was a significant difference between insulin resistance of these two groups in both first trimester and third trimester and after developing preeclampsia (P < 0.001, P = 0.021). Insulin-resistance of the group with preeclampsia was higher in first trimester prior to diagnosis as well as the third trimester after diagnosis compared to natural pregnancy under similar conditions. Measurement of insulin resistance in first trimester may be useful in predicting the risk of preeclampsia.

  3. Prediction of insulin resistance with anthropometric measures: lessons from a large adolescent population

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    Wedin WK

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available William K Wedin,1 Lizmer Diaz-Gimenez,1 Antonio J Convit1,21Department of Psychiatry, NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA; 2Nathan Kline Institute, Orangeburg, NY, USAObjective: The aim of this study was to describe the minimum number of anthropometric measures that will optimally predict insulin resistance (IR and to characterize the utility of these measures among obese and nonobese adolescents.Research design and methods: Six anthropometric measures (selected from three categories: central adiposity, weight, and body composition were measured from 1298 adolescents attending two New York City public high schools. Body composition was determined by bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA. The homeostatic model assessment of IR (HOMA-IR, based on fasting glucose and insulin concentrations, was used to estimate IR. Stepwise linear regression analyses were performed to predict HOMA-IR based on the six selected measures, while controlling for age.Results: The stepwise regression retained both waist circumference (WC and percentage of body fat (BF%. Notably, BMI was not retained. WC was a stronger predictor of HOMA-IR than BMI was. A regression model using solely WC performed best among the obese II group, while a model using solely BF% performed best among the lean group. Receiver operator characteristic curves showed the WC and BF% model to be more sensitive in detecting IR than BMI, but with less specificity.Conclusion: WC combined with BF% was the best predictor of HOMA-IR. This finding can be attributed partly to the ability of BF% to model HOMA-IR among leaner participants and to the ability of WC to model HOMA-IR among participants who are more obese. BMI was comparatively weak in predicting IR, suggesting that assessments that are more comprehensive and include body composition analysis could increase detection of IR during adolescence, especially among those who are lean, yet insulin-resistant.Keywords: BMI, bioelectrical impedance

  4. The Effect of Tianmai Xiaoke Pian on Insulin Resistance through PI3-K/AKT Signal Pathway

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    Nana Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the clinical setting, given the potential adverse effects of thiazolidinediones and biguanides, we often have difficulty in treatment that no other insulin sensitizers are available for use in type 2 diabetic mellitus (T2DM patients. Tianmai Xiaoke Pian (TMXKP is a traditional Chinese medicine tablet, which is comprised of chromium picolinate, Tianhuafen, Maidong, and Wuweizi. To understand its mechanism of action on insulin resistance, TMXKP (50 mg/kg orally was tested in T2DM rats (induced by a high-fat diet and streptozotocin. Eight weeks later, fasting blood glucose (FBG and oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT were performed. Area under the curve (AUC and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR were calculated, and PI3-K/AKT signal pathway-related genes and proteins were tested by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and western blot analysis in muscle, adipose, and liver tissues, respectively. TMXKP significantly reduced FBG, OGTT, AUC, and HOMA-IR in diabetic rats P<0.05. Furthermore, we also observed that TMXKP could significantly decrease IRS-1, IRS-2, PI3-K p85α, and AKT2 gene expression and also IRS-1, IRS-2, PI3-K, AKT2, and p-AKT2 protein expression levels P<0.05 in diabetic rats. These findings confirm that TMXKP can alleviate insulin resistance in T2DM rats through the PI3K/AKT pathway. Thus TMXKP appears to be a promising insulin sensitizer.

  5. Red wine polyphenols do not improve obesity-associated insulin resistance: A randomized controlled trial.

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    Woerdeman, Jorn; Del Rio, Daniele; Calani, Luca; Eringa, Etto C; Smulders, Yvo M; Serné, Erik H

    2018-01-01

    Preclinical studies have suggested that polyphenols extracted from red wine (RWPs) favourably affect insulin sensitivity, but there is controversy over whether RWPs exert similar effects in humans. The aim of the present study was to determine whether RWPs improve insulin sensitivity in obese volunteers. Obese (body mass index >30 kg/m 2 ) volunteers were randomly allocated to RWPs 600 mg/d (n = 14) or matched placebo (n = 15) in a double-blind parallel-arm study for 8 weeks. The participants were investigated at baseline and at the end of the study. Insulin sensitivity was determined using a hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp (M-value), a mixed-meal test (Matsuda index), and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). RWPs elicited no significant changes in M-value (RWP group: median [interquartile range; IQR] baseline 3.0 [2.4; 3.6]; end of study 3.3 [2.4; 4.8] vs placebo group: median [IQR] baseline 3.4 [2.8; 4.4]; end of study 2.9 [2.8; 5.9] mg/kg/min; P = .65), in Matsuda index (RWP group: median [IQR] baseline 3.3 [2.2; 4.8]; end of study 3.6 [2.4; 4.8] vs placebo group: median [IQR] baseline 4.0 [3.0; 6.0]; end of study 4.0 [3.0; 5.2]; P = .88), or in HOMA-IR. This study showed that 8 weeks of RWP supplementation did not improve insulin sensitivity in 29 obese volunteers. Our findings were not consistent with the hypothesis that RWPs ameliorate insulin resistance in human obesity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Plasma Taurine, Diabetes Genetic Predisposition, and Changes of Insulin Sensitivity in Response to Weight-Loss Diets.

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    Zheng, Yan; Ceglarek, Uta; Huang, Tao; Wang, Tiange; Heianza, Yoriko; Ma, Wenjie; Bray, George A; Thiery, Joachim; Sacks, Frank M; Qi, Lu

    2016-10-01

    Taurine metabolism disturbance is closely linked to obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes. Previous evidence suggested that the preventative effects of taurine on diabetes might be through regulating the expression levels of diabetes-related genes. We estimated whether blood taurine levels modified the overall genetic susceptibility to diabetes on improvement of insulin sensitivity in a randomized dietary trial. We genotyped 31 diabetes-associated variants to calculate a genetic risk score (GRS) and measured plasma taurine levels and glycemic traits among participants from the Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies (POUNDS Lost) trial. Seven-hundred eleven overweight or obese participants (age 30-70 y; 60% females) had genetic variants genotyped and blood taurine levels measured. Participants went on 2-year weight-loss diets, which were different in macronutrient composition. Improvements in glycemic traits were measured. We found that baseline taurine levels significantly modified the effects of diabetes GRS on changes in fasting glucose, insulin, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) during the 2-year diet intervention (P-interaction = .04, .01, .002, respectively), regardless of weight loss. High baseline taurine levels were associated with a less reduction in both glucose and HOMA-IR among the participants with the lowest tertile of diabetes GRS (both P = .02), and with a greater reduction in both insulin and HOMA-IR among those with the highest tertile of diabetes GRS (both P = .04). Our data suggest that blood taurine levels might differentially modulate the effects of diabetes-related genes on improvement of insulin sensitivity among overweight/obese patients on weight-loss diets.

  7. Neural responses to macronutrients: hedonic and homeostatic mechanisms.

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    Tulloch, Alastair J; Murray, Susan; Vaicekonyte, Regina; Avena, Nicole M

    2015-05-01

    The brain responds to macronutrients via intricate mechanisms. We review how the brain's neural systems implicated in homeostatic control of feeding and hedonic responses are influenced by the ingestion of specific types of food. We discuss how these neural systems are dysregulated in preclinical models of obesity. Findings from these studies can increase our understanding of overeating and, perhaps in some cases, the development of obesity. In addition, a greater understanding of the neural circuits affected by the consumption of specific macronutrients, and by obesity, might lead to new treatments and strategies for preventing unhealthy weight gain. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Model Predictive Control Algorithms for Pen and Pump Insulin Administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boiroux, Dimitri

    at mealtime, and the case where the insulin sensitivity increases during the night. This thesis consists of a summary report, glucose and insulin proles of the clinical studies and research papers submitted, peer-reviewed and/or published in the period September 2009 - September 2012....... of current closed-loop controllers. In this thesis, we present different control strategies based on Model Predictive Control (MPC) for an artificial pancreas. We use Nonlinear Model Predictive Control (NMPC) in order to determine the optimal insulin and blood glucose profiles. The optimal control problem...

  9. Polymorphisms in FFAR4 (GPR120 Gene Modulate Insulin Levels and Sensitivity after Fish Oil Supplementation

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    Bastien Vallée Marcotte

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to test whether FFAR4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are associated with glycemic control-related traits in humans following fish oil supplementation. A total of 210 participants were given 3 g/day of omega-3 (n-3 fatty acids (FA (1.9–2.2 g of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and 1.1 g of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA during six weeks. Biochemical parameters were taken before and after the supplementation. Using the HapMap database and the tagger procedure in Haploview, 12 tagging SNPs in FFAR4 were selected and then genotyped using TaqMan technology. Transcript expression levels were measured for 30 participants in peripheral mononuclear blood cells. DNA methylation levels were measured for 35 participants in leukocytes. In silico analyses were also performed. Four gene–diet interactions on fasting insulin levels and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR index values were found. rs17108973 explained a significant proportion of the variance of insulin levels (3.0% and HOMA-IR (2.03% index values. Splice site prediction was different depending on the allele for rs11187527. rs17108973 and rs17484310 had different affinity for transcription factors depending on the allele. n-3 FAs effectively improve insulin-related traits for major allele homozygotes of four FFAR4 SNPs as opposed to carriers of the minor alleles.

  10. Rare Mutations of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma: Frequencies and Relationship with Insulin Resistance and Diabetes Risk in the Mixed Ancestry Population from South Africa

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    Z. Vergotine

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Genetic variants in the nuclear transcription receptor, PPARG, are associated with cardiometabolic traits, but reports remain conflicting. We determined the frequency and the clinical relevance of PPARG SNPs in an African mixed ancestry population. Methods. In a cross-sectional study, 820 participants were genotyped for rs1800571, rs72551362, rs72551363, rs72551364, and rs3856806, using allele-specific TaqMan technology. The homeostatic model assessment of insulin (HOMA-IR, β-cells function (HOMA-B%, fasting insulin resistance index (FIRI, and the quantitative insulin-sensitivity check index (QUICKI were calculated. Results. No sequence variants were found except for the rs3856806. The frequency of the PPARG-His447His variant was 23.8% in the overall population group, with no difference by diabetes status (P=0.215. The His447His allele T was associated with none of the markers of insulin resistance overall and by diabetes status. In models adjusted for 2-hour insulin, the T allele was associated with lower prevalent diabetes risk (odds ratio 0.56 (95% CI 0.31–0.95. Conclusion. Our study confirms the almost zero occurrences of known rare PPARG SNPs and has shown for the first time in an African population that one of the common SNPs, His447His, may be protective against type 2 diabetes.

  11. Vitamin D and insulin resistance in postmenopausal Indian women

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    Niti Agarwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the association of the serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD level with markers of insulin resistance (IR in postmenopausal Indian women. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study, conducted at a Tertiary Care Hospital in New Delhi, India. Seventy one postmenopausal women (mean age 56.3 ± 7.6 years were enrolled. Exclusion criteria were known or newly detected diabetics, subjects with chronic renal failure, chronic liver disease or any other chronic inflammatory condition, chronic smokers and chronic alcoholics. Serum calcium (and albumin for calculating corrected calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase and 25-OHD were measured as parameters of calcium homeostasis. Fasting blood glucose (FBG, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, body mass index (BMI, fasting serum insulin, calculated glucose insulin ratio (GIR, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR were studied as parameters of IR. Data was then analyzed for statistical significance. Results: The mean serum 25-OHD level was 12.73 ± 7.63 ng/ml. The mean BMI was 27.78 ± 5.37 kg/m 2 . The mean calculated GIR was 13.14 ± 9.39 and HOMA-IR was 2.31 ± 1.70. Serum 25-OHD was inversely correlated with BMI (correlation coefficient −0.234, P value 0.050 and with HOMA-IR (correlation coefficient −0.237, P value 0.047. However, when 25-OHD was adjusted for BMI the correlation between 25-OHD and HOMA-IR lost its significance. No correlation was found between serum 25-OHD and any other parameters of IR studied. Conclusions: There is a significant negative linear correlation between 25-OHD and BMI. The significant negative linear correlation between 25-OHD and HOMA-IR was confounded by BMI. There is no correlation between 25-OHD and parameters of IR.

  12. Adipose tissue inflammation and reduced insulin sensitivity in ovariectomized mice occurs in the absence of increased adiposity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Potter, Victoria J; Strissel, Katherine J; Xie, Chen; Chang, Eugene; Bennett, Grace; Defuria, Jason; Obin, Martin S; Greenberg, Andrew S

    2012-09-01

    Menopause promotes central obesity, adipose tissue (AT) inflammation, and insulin resistance (IR). Both obesity and the loss of estrogen can activate innate and adaptive immune cells (macrophages, T cells). The respective impacts of weight gain and loss of ovarian hormones on AT inflammation and IR are poorly understood. Here we determined the temporal kinetics of fat accretion, AT inflammation, and IR over a 26-wk time course in ovariectomized (OVX) mice, a model of menopause. OVX and sham-operated (SHM) C57BL6 mice were fed a normal chow diet. Weight, body composition (magnetic resonance imaging), total and regional adiposity, activity, food intake, AT crown-like structures, biohumoral measures, and insulin sensitivity (insulin tolerance testing and homeostatic model assessment) were determined at wk 12, 20, and 26. Macrophages and T cells from perigonadal AT were immunophenotyped by fluorescence-associated cell sorting, and perigonadal adipose tissue (PGAT) gene expression was quantified by quantitative PCR. OVX mice (≈ 31 g) became fatter than SHM mice (≈ 26 g) by wk 12, but mice were equally insulin sensitive. PGAT of OVX mice contained more T cells but expressed higher levels of M2-MΦ (arginase-1) and T cell-regulatory (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4) genes. At wk 20, both OVX and SHM mice weighed approximately 35 g and were equally insulin sensitive with comparable amounts of PGAT and total body fat. OVX mice became less insulin sensitive than SHM mice by wk 26, coincident with the down-regulation of PGAT arginase-1 (-20-fold) and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (2-fold) and up-regulation of M1/Th1 genes CD11c (+2-fold), IL12p40 (+2-fold), and interferon-γ (+78-fold). Ovarian hormone loss in mice induces PGAT inflammation and IR by mechanisms that can be uncoupled from OVX-induced obesity.

  13. Modelling of glucose-insulin-glucagon pharmacodynamics in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Sabrina Lyngbye; Møller, Jan Kloppenborg; Haidar, A.

    The purpose is to build a simulation model of the glucoregulatory system in man. We estimate individual human parameters of a physiological glucose-insulin-glucagon model. We report posterior probability distributions and correlations of model parameters....

  14. The association of the triglyceride-to-HDL cholesterol ratio with insulin resistance in White European and South Asian men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Samiul A; Davies, Melanie J; Morris, Danielle H; Yates, Tom; Srinivasan, Balasubramanian Thiagarajan; Webb, David; Brady, Emer; Khunti, Kamlesh

    2012-01-01

    There is recent interest surrounding the use of the triglyceride-to-HDL cholesterol ratio as a surrogate marker of insulin resistance in clinical practice, as it may identify people at high risk of developing diabetes or its complications. However, it has been suggested using this lipid ratio may not be appropriate for measuring insulin resistance in African-Americans, particularly women. We investigated if this inconsistency extended to South Asian women in a UK multi-ethnic cohort of White Europeans and South Asians. Cross-sectional analysis was done of 729 participants from the ADDITION-Leicester study from 2005 to 2009. The association between tertiles of triglyceride-to-HDL cholesterol ratio to fasting insulin, homeostatic model of assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA1-IR), quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) and glucose: insulin ratio was examined with adjustment for confounding variables. Incremental tertiles of the triglyceride-to-HDL cholesterol ratio demonstrated a significant positive association with levels of fasting insulin, HOMA1-IR, glucose: insulin ratio and a negative association with QUICKI in White European men (n = 255) and women (n = 250) and South Asian men (n = 124) (all pAsian women (n = 100). A significant interaction was demonstrated between sex and triglyceride-to-HDL cholesterol ratio tertiles in South Asians only (pwomen, South Asian men and women respectively. The optimal cut-points for detecting insulin resistance were 0.9-1.7 in mmol/l (2.0-3.8 in mg/dl) for the triglyceride-to-HDL ratio. In South Asian women the triglyceride-to-HDL cholesterol ratio was not associated with insulin resistance; therefore there may be limitations in its use as a surrogate marker in this group.

  15. Pro-inflammatory adipocytokines, oxidative stress, insulin, Zn and Cu: Interrelations with obesity in Egyptian non-diabetic obese children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Salem A; Saad, Entsar A; Elsharkawy, Ashraf A; Attia, Zeinab R

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the inter-relationships between adipocytokines, oxidative stress, insulin, Zn and Cu and obesity among Egyptian obese non-diabetic children and adolescents. 72 obese children and adolescents of both sexes (5-17 years) were recruited for the study. 40 healthy normal non-obese persons of matched ages and sexes were used as control group. Lipid profile, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and leptin levels were measured. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) concentrations and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were estimated. Micronutrients (Zn and Cu) concentrations in addition to insulin and fasting blood sugar (FBS) levels were also evaluated. Estimation of insulin resistance (homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR)) was derived from FBS measurements. Significant elevations (Pobese individuals as compared with control group. Insulin and triglyceride levels were significantly increased in obese male children and HDL-cholesterol level was increased significantly in obese adolescent females compared to controls. However, total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels were significantly high in all obese cases as compared with controls. Insulin resistance was detected in 100% of the patients. We concluded that obesity with pro-inflammatory adipocytokines and hypozincemia together by many mechanisms participate in excessive oxidative stress and are highly associated with inflammation and the development of obesity-related complications. Obesity represents a critical risk factor for development of insulin resistance status. Copyright © 2015 Medical University of Bialystok. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  16. Different Criteria for the Definition of Insulin Resistance and Its Relation with Dyslipidemia in Overweight and Obese Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello, Elza Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Purpose to compare cut off points corrected for age and gender (COOP) with fixed cut off points (FCOP) for fasting plasma insulin and Homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) for the diagnosis of IR in obese children and adolescents and their correlation with dyslipidemia. Methods A multicenter, cross-sectional study including 383 subjects aged 7 to 18 years, evaluating fasting blood glucose, plasma insulin, and lipid profile. Subjects with high insulin levels and/or HOMA-IR were considered as having IR, based on two defining criteria: FCOP or CCOP. The frequency of metabolic abnormalities, the presence of IR, and the presence of dyslipidemia in relation to FCOP or CCOP were analyzed using Fisher and Mann-Whitney exact tests. Results Using HOMA-IR, IR was diagnosed in 155 (40.5%) and 215 (56.1%) patients and, using fasting insulin, 150 (39.2%) and 221 (57.7%), respectively applying FCOP and CCOP. The use of CCOP resulted in lower insulin and HOMA-IR values than FCOP. Dyslipidemia was not related to FCOP or CCOP. Blood glucose remained within normal limits in all patients with IR. There was no difference in the frequency of IR identified by plasma insulin or HOMA-IR, both for FCOP and CCOP. Conclusion The CCOP of plasma insulin or of HOMA-IR detected more cases of IR as compared to the FCOP, but were not associated with the frequency of dyslipidemia. As blood glucose has almost no fluctuation in this age group, even in the presence of IR, fasting plasma insulin detected the same cases of IR that would be detected by HOMA-IR. PMID:29383306

  17. Zinc Supplementation Does Not Alter Indicators of Insulin Secretion and Sensitivity in Black and White Female Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobene, Andrea J; Kindler, Joseph M; Jenkins, Nathan T; Pollock, Norman K; Laing, Emma M; Grider, Arthur; Lewis, Richard D

    2017-07-01

    Background: Zinc is a micronutrient involved in the production of, and peripheral sensitivity to, pancreatic β cell-derived insulin. To our knowledge, the effect of zinc supplementation on insulin outcomes, and potential risk of diabetes, in otherwise healthy children in the United States has not been investigated. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the influence of zinc supplementation on insulin outcomes in black and white girls in the early stages of adolescence. A secondary objective was to determine relations between baseline zinc concentrations and insulin outcomes. Methods: Healthy black and white girls aged 9-11 y were randomly assigned to daily supplementation of zinc (9 mg elemental Zn/d; n = 75; blacks: n = 35) or placebo ( n = 72; blacks: n = 32) for 4 wk. Fasting serum insulin, glucose, and C-peptide were assessed at baseline and at 4 wk. C-peptide and glucose values were used to calculate the computer model-derived homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA2-IR). Changes in outcome measures were compared by using repeated-measures, mixed-model ANOVA. Results: Baseline plasma zinc was not correlated with C-peptide ( r = -0.07), insulin ( r = -0.06), or HOMA2-IR ( r = -0.09) (all P > 0.05) after controlling for race and age. Treatment × time interactions for C-peptide and HOMA2-IR were not significant (both P > 0.05). Although the treatment × race × time interactions for C-peptide and HOMA2-IR were not significant (both P = 0.08), black girls who received the placebo experienced slight increases in C-peptide (15.7%) and HOMA2-IR (17.7%) ( P = 0.06). Conclusions: Four weeks of zinc supplementation had no effect on insulin outcomes in healthy black and white early-adolescent girls, although C-peptide and HOMA2-IR tended to increase in black girls who received placebo. Additional trials that are appropriately powered should further explore the effect of zinc on markers of diabetes risk, and whether race affects this

  18. The establishment of insulin resistance model in FL83B and L6 cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lanlan; Han, Jizhong; Li, Haoran; Liu, Mengmeng; Zeng, Bin

    2017-10-01

    The insulin resistance models of mouse liver epithelial and rat myoblasts cells were induced by three kinds of inducers: dexamethasone, high insulin and high glucose. The purpose is to select the optimal insulin resistance model, to provide a simple and reliable TR cell model for the study of the pathogenesis of TR and the improvement of TR drugs and functional foods. The MTT method is used for toxicity screening of three compounds, selecting security and suitable concentration. We performed a Glucose oxidase peroxidase (GOD-POD) method involving FL83B and L6 cell with dexamethasone, high insulin and high glucose-induced insulin resistance. Results suggested that FL83B cells with dexamethasone-induced (0.25uM) were established insulin resistance and L6 cells with high-glucose (30mM) and dexamethasone-induced (0.25uM) were established insulin resistance.

  19. Stromal cell regulation of homeostatic and inflammatory lymphoid organogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kain, Matthew J W; Owens, Benjamin M J

    2013-01-01

    Summary Secondary lymphoid organs function to increase the efficiency of interactions between rare, antigen-specific lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells, concentrating antigen and lymphocytes in a supportive environment that facilitates the initiation of an adaptive immune response. Homeostatic lymphoid tissue organogenesis proceeds via exquisitely controlled spatiotemporal interactions between haematopoietic lymphoid tissue inducer populations and multiple subsets of non-haematopoietic stromal cells. However, it is becoming clear that in a range of inflammatory contexts, ectopic or tertiary lymphoid tissues can develop inappropriately under pathological stress. Here we summarize the role of stromal cells in the development of homeostatic lymphoid tissue, and assess emerging evidence that suggests a critical role for stromal involvement in the tertiary lymphoid tissue development associated with chronic infections and inflammation. PMID:23621403

  20. Influence of Adiposity, Physical Activity, Fitness, and Screen Time on Insulin Dynamics Over 2 Years in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Mélanie; Benedetti, Andrea; Barnett, Tracie A; Mathieu, Marie-Eve; Deladoëy, Johnny; Gray-Donald, Katherine

    2016-03-01

    Despite extensive evidence showing that lifestyle habits play a critical role in preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes in adults, little is known regarding the impact of lifestyle habits on type 2 diabetes risk in childhood. To assess whether adiposity, fitness, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, and screen time predict insulin sensitivity or insulin secretion during a 2-year period in children with a family history of obesity. This is a prospective longitudinal cohort study of 630 children, having at least 1 obese parent, recruited from schools in Quebec, Canada, between July 2005 and December 2008 in the Quebec Adipose and Lifestyle Investigation in Youth (QUALITY) cohort. Children were assessed at baseline (ages 8-10 years) and 2 years later. Fitness was measured by peak oxygen consumption, percentage of body fat (adiposity) by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity using accelerometry, and screen time by average daily hours of self-reported television, video game, or computer use. Regression models were adjusted for age, sex, season, and pubertal stage. The current analysis was completed in October 2015. Insulin sensitivity was measured by the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance and an oral glucose tolerance test-based index (Matsuda insulin sensitivity index). Insulin secretion was measured using the area under the curve of insulin to glucose during the first 30 minutes of the oral glucose tolerance test and using the area under the curve of insulin to glucose over 2 hours. Of 630 children evaluated at baseline (mean [SD] age, 9.6 [0.9] years; 54.4% male; 56.2% normal weight, 19.2% overweight, and 22.7% obese), 564 were evaluated at 2-year follow-up. Adiposity and changes in adiposity were the central predictors of insulin dynamics over time. Every additional 1% of body fat at ages 8 to 10 years decreased insulin sensitivity by 2.9% (95% CI, -3.3% to -2.5%; P effect on adiposity levels

  1. A Prospective Cohort Study on IRS Gene Polymorphisms in Type 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Insulin resistance status was determined using the homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index. Results: IRS1 polymorphisms were associated with increased insulin resistance (X2 = 5.09, p = 0.023) in T2DM patients with severe/acute hyperglycemia. IRS2 polymorphisms were not associated with ...

  2. A Cerebellar Framework for Predictive Coding and Homeostatic Regulation in Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutter, Dennis J L G

    2016-02-01

    Depressive disorder is associated with abnormalities in the processing of reward and punishment signals and disturbances in homeostatic regulation. These abnormalities are proposed to impair error minimization routines for reducing uncertainty. Several lines of research point towards a role of the cerebellum in reward- and punishment-related predictive coding and homeostatic regulatory function in depressive disorder. Available functional and anatomical evidence suggests that in addition to the cortico-limbic networks, the cerebellum is part of the dysfunctional brain circuit in depressive disorder as well. It is proposed that impaired cerebellar function contributes to abnormalities in predictive coding and homeostatic dysregulation in depressive disorder. Further research on the role of the cerebellum in depressive disorder may further extend our knowledge on the functional and neural mechanisms of depressive disorder and development of novel antidepressant treatments strategies targeting the cerebellum.

  3. The homeostasis solution – Mechanical homeostasis in architecturally homeostatic buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lin-Shu; Ma, Peizheng

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Architectural homeostatic buildings (AHBs) make sense because of the laws of physics. • However, high efficiency can be obtained only with AHBs and equipment considered as systems. • Mechanical homeostasis facilitates AHB-equipment system synergy with heat extraction. • Entropically speaking a building needs neither energy nor a fixed amount of heat, but its homeostatic existence. • Homeostatic buildings can reduce building energy consumption from 80% to 90%. - Abstract: We already know, for energy-saving potential, the necessary architectural features in well-designed buildings: high performance building envelope, sufficient interior thermal mass, and hydronic-network activated radiant surfaces for cooling and heating. Buildings with these features may be referred to as architecturally homeostatic buildings (AHBs); such a building-system is thermally semi-autonomous in the sense that its temperature variation stays within a certain range even without conditioning equipment, and, with conditioning equipment in operation, its thermal regulation is handled by its hydronic heat-distribution-network for controlling the temperature level of the building. At the present time conventional HVAC equipment is used for maintaining the heat-distribution-network: this arrangement, however, has resulted in great energy saving only for AHBs with accessible natural water bodies. In operation of general AHBs, a case is made here for a new kind of mechanical equipment having the attribute of mechanical homeostasis (MH). MH is a new energy transformation concept in a triadic framework. Superlative energy efficiency is predicted as a result of combined improvements in higher triadCOPs and lower total (inducted + removed) heat rates—evincing existence of synergy in architectural and mechanical homeostasis, which together will be referred to as the homeostasis solution.

  4. A human model of dietary saturated fatty acid induced insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koska, Juraj; Ozias, Marlies K; Deer, James; Kurtz, Julie; Salbe, Arline D; Harman, S Mitchell; Reaven, Peter D

    2016-11-01

    Increased consumption of high-fat diets is associated with the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Current models to study the mechanisms of high-fat diet-induced IR in humans are limited by their long duration or low efficacy. In the present study we developed and characterized an acute dietary model of saturated fatty acid-enriched diet induced insulin resistance. High caloric diets enriched with saturated fatty acids (SFA) or carbohydrates (CARB) were evaluated in subjects with normal and impaired glucose tolerance (NGT or IGT). Both diets were compared to a standard eucaloric American Heart Association (AHA) control diet in a series of crossover studies. Whole body insulin resistance was estimated as steady state plasma glucose (SSPG) concentrations during the last 30min of a 3-h insulin suppression test. SSPG was increased after a 24-h SFA diet (by 83±74% vs. control, n=38) in the entire cohort, which was comprised of participants with NGT (92±82%, n=22) or IGT (65±55%, n=16) (all pinsulin resistance in both NGT and IGT subjects. Insulin resistance persisted overnight after the last SFA meal and was attenuated by one day of a healthy diet. This model offers opportunities for identifying early mechanisms and potential treatments of dietary saturated fat induced insulin resistance. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Mulberry (Morus alba L.) Fruit Extract Containing Anthocyanins Improves Glycemic Control and Insulin Sensitivity via Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase in Diabetic C57BL/Ksj-db/db Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyung Ha; Lee, Hyun Ah; Park, Mi Hwa; Han, Ji-Sook

    2016-08-01

    The effect of mulberry (Morus alba L.) fruit extract (MFE) on hyperglycemia and insulin sensitivity in an animal model of type 2 diabetes was evaluated. C57BL/Ksj-diabetic db/db mice were divided into three groups: diabetic control, rosiglitazone, and MFE groups. Blood glucose, plasma insulin, and intraperitoneal glucose were measured, and an insulin tolerance test was performed after MFE supplementation in db/db mice. In addition, the protein levels of various targets of insulin signaling were measured by western blotting. The blood levels of glucose and HbA1c were significantly lower in the MFE-supplemented group than in the diabetic control group. Moreover, glucose and insulin tolerance tests showed that MFE treatment increased insulin sensitivity. The homeostatic index of insulin resistance significantly decreased in the MFE-supplemented group relative to the diabetic control group. MFE supplementation significantly stimulated the levels of phosphorylated (p)-AMP-activated protein kinase (pAMPK) and p-Akt substrate of 160 kDa (pAS160) and enhanced the level of plasma membrane-glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) in skeletal muscles. Further, dietary MFE significantly increased pAMPK and decreased the levels of glucose 6-phosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in the liver. MFE may improve hyperglycemia and insulin sensitivity via activation of AMPK and AS160 in skeletal muscles and inhibition of gluconeogenesis in the liver.

  6. The regulatory system for diabetes mellitus: Modeling rates of glucose infusions and insulin injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin; Tang, Sanyi; Cheke, Robert A.

    2016-08-01

    Novel mathematical models with open and closed-loop control for type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus were developed to improve understanding of the glucose-insulin regulatory system. A hybrid impulsive glucose-insulin model with different frequencies of glucose infusions and insulin injections was analyzed, and the existence and uniqueness of the positive periodic solution for type 1 diabetes, which is globally asymptotically stable, was studied analytically. Moreover, permanence of the system for type 2 diabetes was demonstrated which showed that the glucose concentration level is uniformly bounded above and below. To investigate how to prevent hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia being caused by this system, we developed a model involving periodic intakes of glucose with insulin injections applied only when the blood glucose level reached a given critical glucose threshold. In addition, our numerical analysis revealed that the period, the frequency and the dose of glucose infusions and insulin injections are crucial for insulin therapies, and the results provide clinical strategies for insulin-administration practices.

  7. Prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance among obese children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robabeh Ghergherechi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Robabeh Ghergherechi1, Ali Tabrizi21Department of Pediatrics Endocrinology, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran; 2Students’ Research Committee, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IranPurpose: Obesity is one of the most important nutritional disorders in the world which has an obvious relationship with the incidence of metabolic diseases. Obesity prevalence has increased among children and adolescents during recent decades, leading to a rise in Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM II prevalence in these two age brackets. Hence, the aim of this study was to assess impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance, and gather metabolic findings in obese children and adolescents.Methods and materials: We studied 110 obese children and adolescents (body mass index > 95th percentile for age and gender 4–18 years of age referred to the endocrine clinic of the Children’s Hospital at Tabriz University in a descriptive cross-sectional study. ­Fasting glucose, insulin, and lipid profile in all subjects were determined. Oral glucose tolerance test after eating 75 g/kg glucose was performed. Homeostatic model assessment was used to ­estimate insulin resistance.Results: Impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance prevalence in 68 obese adolescents was 14.7% and 31.8%, respectively. Impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance was not seen in 23.8% of 42 obese children. No case of DM II was seen. There was a significant statistical difference in glucose (P = 0.003 and insulin (P < 0.001 level at minute 120 in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance compared to obese children and adolescents without impaired glucose tolerance. Rate of insulin resistance in patients with impaired glucose tolerance was greater and had a significant statistical difference (P = 0.03.Conclusion: Obesity has a close relationship with increased risk of impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance in children and adolescents. Oral glucose

  8. Assessment of insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance in lean women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovall, Dale William; Bailey, Amelia Purser; Pastore, Lisa M

    2011-01-01

    To analyze insulin resistance (IR) and determine the need for a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) for the identification of IR and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) in lean nondiabetic women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This was a cross-sectional analysis of treatment-naive women with PCOS who enrolled in a university-based clinical trial. Nondiabetic women with PCOS based on the Eunice Kennedy Shriven National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) definition, aged 18-43 years and weighing ≤113 kg, were evaluated. Glucose and insulin levels were assessed at times 0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after a 75-g glucose load. Lean was defined as body mass index (BMI) women was studied. The prevalence of IR was 0% among lean women vs. 21% among nonlean subjects based on fasting insulin I(0) and 40%-68% based on two different homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) cutoff points (p women with IR had a BMI ≥ 28. Controlling for age and race, BMI explained over 57% of the variation in insulin fasting (I(o)), glucose fasting/Io (G(o)/I(o)), the qualitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), and HOMA and was a highly significant predictor of these outcomes (p lean PCOS women had IGT based on a 2-hour OGTT, and no lean subjects had IGT based on their fasting blood glucose. Diabetes mellitus, IGT, and IR are far less common in young lean women with PCOS compared with obese women with PCOS. These data imply that it is unnecessary to routinely perform either IR testing or 2-hour OGTT in lean women with PCOS; however, greater subject accumulation is needed to determine if OGTT is necessary in lean women with PCOS. BMI is highly predictive of both insulin and glucose levels in women with PCOS.

  9. Early insulin sensitivity after restrictive bariatric surgery, inconsistency between HOMA-IR and steady-state plasma glucose levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dielen, Francois M H; Nijhuis, Jeroen; Rensen, Sander S M; Schaper, Nicolaas C; Wiebolt, Janneke; Koks, Afra; Prakken, Fred J; Buurman, Wim A; Greve, Jan Willem M

    2010-01-01

    The low-grade inflammatory condition present in morbid obesity is thought to play a causative role in the pathophysiology of insulin resistance (IR). Bariatric surgery fails to improve this inflammatory condition during the first months after surgery. Considering the close relation between inflammation and IR, we conducted a study in which insulin sensitivity was measured during the first months after bariatric surgery. Different methods to measure IR shortly after bariatric surgery have given inconsistent data. For example, the Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) levels have been reported to decrease rapidly after bariatric surgery, although clamp techniques have shown sustained insulin resistance. In the present study, we evaluated the use of steady-state plasma glucose (SSPG) levels to assess insulin sensitivity 2 months after bariatric surgery. Insulin sensitivity was measured using HOMA-IR and SSPG levels in 11 subjects before surgery and at 26% excess weight loss (approximately 2 months after restrictive bariatric surgery). The SSPG levels after 26% excess weight loss did not differ from the SSPG levels before surgery (14.3 +/- 5.4 versus 14.4 +/- 2.7 mmol/L). In contrast, the HOMA-IR values had decreased significantly (3.59 +/- 1.99 versus 2.09 +/- 1.02). During the first months after restrictive bariatric surgery, we observed a discrepancy between the HOMA-IR and SSPG levels. In contrast to the HOMA-IR values, the SSPG levels had not improved, which could be explained by the ongoing inflammatory state after bariatric surgery. These results suggest that during the first months after restrictive bariatric surgery, HOMA-IR might not be an adequate marker of insulin sensitivity. Copyright 2010 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of fasting plasma insulin concentration as an estimate of insulin action in nondiabetic individuals: comparison with the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Fahim; Okeke, QueenDenise; Reaven, Gerald M

    2014-04-01

    Insulin-mediated glucose disposal varies severalfold in apparently healthy individuals, and approximately one-third of the most insulin resistant of these individuals is at increased risk to develop various adverse clinical syndromes. Since direct measurements of insulin sensitivity are not practical in a clinical setting, several surrogate estimates of insulin action have been proposed, including fasting plasma insulin (FPI) concentration and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) calculated by a formula employing fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and FPI concentrations. The objective of this study was to compare FPI as an estimate of insulin-mediated glucose disposal with values generated by HOMA-IR in 758 apparently healthy nondiabetic individuals. Measurements were made of FPG, FPI, triglyceride (TG), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations, and insulin-mediated glucose uptake was quantified by determining steady-state plasma glucose (SSPG) concentration during the insulin suppression test. FPI and HOMA-IR were highly correlated (r = 0.98, P HOMA-IR (r = 0.64). Furthermore, the relationship between FPI and TG (r = 0.35) and HDL-C (r = -0.40) was comparable to that between HOMA-IR and TG (r = 0.39) and HDL-C (r = -0.41). In conclusion, FPI and HOMA-IR are highly correlated in nondiabetic individuals, with each estimate accounting for ~40% of the variability (variance) in a direct measure of insulin-mediated glucose disposal. Calculation of HOMA-IR does not provide a better surrogate estimate of insulin action, or of its associated dyslipidemia, than measurement of FPI.

  11. The Role of Insulin, Insulin Growth Factor, and Insulin-Degrading Enzyme in Brain Aging and Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Messier, Claude; Teutenberg, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Most brain insulin comes from the pancreas and is taken up by the brain by what appears to be a receptor-based carrier. Type 2 diabetes animal models associated with insulin resistance show reduced insulin brain uptake and content. Recent data point to changes in the insulin receptor cascade in obesity-related insulin resistance, suggesting that brain insulin receptors also become less sensitive to insulin, which could reduce synaptic plasticity. Insulin transport to the brain is reduced in a...

  12. A postsynaptic PI3K-cII dependent signaling controller for presynaptic homeostatic plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauswirth, Anna G; Ford, Kevin J; Wang, Tingting; Fetter, Richard D; Tong, Amy

    2018-01-01

    Presynaptic homeostatic plasticity stabilizes information transfer at synaptic connections in organisms ranging from insect to human. By analogy with principles of engineering and control theory, the molecular implementation of PHP is thought to require postsynaptic signaling modules that encode homeostatic sensors, a set point, and a controller that regulates transsynaptic negative feedback. The molecular basis for these postsynaptic, homeostatic signaling elements remains unknown. Here, an electrophysiology-based screen of the Drosophila kinome and phosphatome defines a postsynaptic signaling platform that includes a required function for PI3K-cII, PI3K-cIII and the small GTPase Rab11 during the rapid and sustained expression of PHP. We present evidence that PI3K-cII localizes to Golgi-derived, clathrin-positive vesicles and is necessary to generate an endosomal pool of PI(3)P that recruits Rab11 to recycling endosomal membranes. A morphologically distinct subdivision of this platform concentrates postsynaptically where we propose it functions as a homeostatic controller for retrograde, trans-synaptic signaling. PMID:29303480

  13. Rational Design of Glucose-Responsive Insulin Using Pharmacokinetic Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakh, Naveed A; Bisker, Gili; Lee, Michael A; Gong, Xun; Strano, Michael S

    2017-11-01

    A glucose responsive insulin (GRI) is a therapeutic that modulates its potency, concentration, or dosing of insulin in relation to a patient's dynamic glucose concentration, thereby approximating aspects of a normally functioning pancreas. Current GRI design lacks a theoretical basis on which to base fundamental design parameters such as glucose reactivity, dissociation constant or potency, and in vivo efficacy. In this work, an approach to mathematically model the relevant parameter space for effective GRIs is induced, and design rules for linking GRI performance to therapeutic benefit are developed. Well-developed pharmacokinetic models of human glucose and insulin metabolism coupled to a kinetic model representation of a freely circulating GRI are used to determine the desired kinetic parameters and dosing for optimal glycemic control. The model examines a subcutaneous dose of GRI with kinetic parameters in an optimal range that results in successful glycemic control within prescribed constraints over a 24 h period. Additionally, it is demonstrated that the modeling approach can find GRI parameters that enable stable glucose levels that persist through a skipped meal. The results provide a framework for exploring the parameter space of GRIs, potentially without extensive, iterative in vivo animal testing. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Tobacco Use, Insulin Resistance, and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: Results from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel J Keith

    Full Text Available Tobacco use is associated with insulin resistance and incident diabetes. Given the racial/ethnic differences in smoking patterns and incident type 2 diabetes our objective was to evaluate the association between tobacco use and insulin resistance (IR as well as incident type 2 diabetes mellitus in a contemporary multiethnic cohort.We studied 5,931 Multi- Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA participants who at baseline were free of type 2 diabetes (fasting glucose ≥7.0 mmol/l (126 mg/dl and/or use of insulin or oral hypoglycemic medications categorized by self-reported tobacco status and reclassified by urinary cotinine (available in 58% of participants as never, current or former tobacco users. The association between tobacco use, IR (fasting plasma glucose, insulin, and the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and incident diabetes over 10 years was evaluated using multivariable linear regression and Cox proportional hazards models, respectively. Mean age of the participants was 62 (±10 years, 46% were male, 41% Caucasian, 12% Chinese, 26% African American and 21% Hispanic/Latino. IR biomarkers did not significantly differ between current, former, and never cigarette users (P >0.10 but showed limited unadjusted differences for users of cigar, pipe and smokeless tobacco (All P <0.05. Fully adjusted models showed no association between dose or intensity of tobacco exposure and any index of IR. When stratified into participants that quit smoking vs. those who continued smoking during the 10-year study there was no difference in serum glucose levels or frequency of diabetes. In fully adjusted models, there was no significant difference in diabetes risk between former or current cigarette smokers compared to never smokers [HR (95% CI 1.02 (0.77,1.37 and 0.81 (0.52,1.26 respectively].In a contemporary multi-ethnic cohort, there was no independent association between tobacco use and IR or incident type 2 diabetes. The role

  15. Evidence for a novel functional role of astrocytes in the acute homeostatic response to high-fat diet intake in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckman, Laura B.; Thompson, Misty M.; Lippert, Rachel N.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Yull, Fiona E.; Ellacott, Kate L.J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Introduction of a high-fat diet to mice results in a period of voracious feeding, known as hyperphagia, before homeostatic mechanisms prevail to restore energy intake to an isocaloric level. Acute high-fat diet hyperphagia induces astrocyte activation in the rodent hypothalamus, suggesting a potential role of these cells in the homeostatic response to the diet. The objective of this study was to determine physiologic role of astrocytes in the acute homeostatic response to high-fat feeding. Methods We bred a transgenic mouse model with doxycycline-inducible inhibition of NFkappaB (NFκB) signaling in astrocytes to determine the effect of loss of NFκB-mediated astrocyte activation on acute high-fat hyperphagia. ELISA was used to measure the levels of markers of astrocyte activation, glial-fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and S100B, in the medial basal hypothalamus. Results Inhibition of NFκB signaling in astrocytes prevented acute high-fat diet-induced astrocyte activation and resulted in a 15% increase in caloric intake (P < 0.01) in the first 24 h after introduction of the diet. Conclusions These data reveal a novel homeostatic role for astrocytes in the acute physiologic regulation of food intake in response to high-fat feeding. PMID:25685690

  16. Mathematical model of glucose-insulin homeostasis in healthy rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombarte, Mercedes; Lupo, Maela; Campetelli, German; Basualdo, Marta; Rigalli, Alfredo

    2013-10-01

    According to the World Health Organization there are over 220 million people in the world with diabetes and 3.4 million people died in 2004 as a consequence of this pathology. Development of an artificial pancreas would allow to restore control of blood glucose by coupling an infusion pump to a continuous glucose sensor in the blood. The design of such a device requires the development and application of mathematical models which represent the gluco-regulatory system. Models developed by other research groups describe very well the gluco-regulatory system but have a large number of mathematical equations and require complex methodologies for the estimation of its parameters. In this work we propose a mathematical model to study the homeostasis of glucose and insulin in healthy rats. The proposed model consists of three differential equations and 8 parameters that describe the variation of: blood glucose concentration, blood insulin concentration and amount of glucose in the intestine. All parameters were obtained by setting functions to the values of glucose and insulin in blood obtained after oral glucose administration. In vivo and in silico validations were performed. Additionally, a qualitative analysis has been done to verify the aforementioned model. We have shown that this model has a single, biologically consistent equilibrium point. This model is a first step in the development of a mathematical model for the type I diabetic rat. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Aegeline inspired synthesis of novel β3-AR agonist improves insulin sensitivity in vitro and in vivo models of insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Sujith; Satish, Sabbu; Shankar, Kripa; Pandeti, Sukanya; Varshney, Salil; Srivastava, Ankita; Kumar, Durgesh; Gupta, Abhishek; Gupta, Sanchita; Choudhary, Rakhi; Balaramnavar, Vishal M; Narender, Tadigoppula; Gaikwad, Anil N

    2018-03-07

    In our drug discovery program of natural product, earlier we have reported Aegeline that is N-acylated-1-amino-2- alcohol, which was isolated from the leaves of Aeglemarmelos showed anti-hyperlipidemic activity for which the QSAR studies predicted the compound to be the β3-AR agonist, but the mechanism of its action was not elucidated. In our present study, we have evaluated the β3-AR activity of novel N-acyl-1-amino-3-arylopropanol synthetic mimics of aegeline and its beneficial effect in insulin resistance. In this study, we have proposed the novel pharmacophore model using reported molecules for antihyperlipidemic activity. The reported pharmacophore features were also compared with the newly developed pharmacophore model for the observed biological activity. Based on 3D pharmacophore modeling of known β3AR agonist, we screened 20 synthetic derivatives of Aegeline from the literature. From these, the top scoring compound 10C was used for further studies. The in-slico result was further validated in HEK293T cells co-trransfected with human β3-AR and CRE-Luciferase reporter plasmid for β3-AR activity.The most active compound was selected and β3-AR activity was further validated in white and brown adipocytes differentiated from human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Insulin resistance model developed in hMSC derived adipocytes was used to study the insulin sensitizing property. 8 week HFD fed C57BL6 mice was given 50 mg/Kg of the selected compound and metabolic phenotyping was done to evaluate its anti-diabetic effect. As predicted by in-silico 3D pharmacophore modeling, the compound 10C was found to be the most active and specific β3-AR agonist with EC 50 value of 447 nM. The compound 10C activated β3AR pathway, induced lipolysis, fatty acid oxidation and increased oxygen consumption rate (OCR) in human adipocytes. Compound 10C induced expression of brown adipocytes specific markers and reverted chronic insulin induced insulin resistance in white

  18. Changes of insulin resistance and β-cell function in women with gestational diabetes mellitus and normal pregnant women during mid- and late pregnant period: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun-Hui; Wu, Hui-Hua; Ding, Hong; Li, Yan; Wang, Zhen-Hua; Li, Feng; Zhang, Jian-Ping

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to observe insulin resistance and β-cell function changes among women diagnosed with gestational impaired glucose tolerance or gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in mid-pregnancy. Sixty-four pregnant women receiving prenatal care underwent an oral glucose tolerance test at 20-24 weeks of gestation and an insulin release test. The GDM group included 34 pregnant women diagnosed with gestational impaired glucose tolerance or GDM, and the subjects with normal blood glucose were the control group. Insulin resistance and islet β-cell function changes were observed with the oral glucose tolerance test and insulin release test. The homeostatic model assessment-β levels in late pregnancy were higher than those in mid-pregnancy for both groups, and the primary time effect was statistically significant. The early insulin secretion index (ΔI(30)/ΔG(30)) values in mid- and late pregnancy were lower in the GDM group. The values of the area under the curve of blood glucose in mid- and late pregnancy were higher in the GDM group than those in the control group. Insulin resistance was higher in GDM patients than in normal pregnant women. Insulin resistance was aggravated, and β-cell's ability to compensate for the increased insulin resistance by modulating insulin secretion was aggravated, as gestational week increased in women with gestational diabetes and normal pregnant women. Insulin resistance in women with GDM is higher than in pregnant women with normal metabolism of glucose. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2012 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  19. Anti-Mullerian hormone and insulin resistance in classic phenotype lean PCOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglar, Gamze Sinem; Kahyaoglu, Inci; Pabuccu, Recai; Demirtas, Selda; Seker, Rabia

    2013-10-01

    This study is designed to explore the correlation between AMH levels and IR in normal weight PCOS women. This prospective study was conducted on 55 patients, who were admitted to obstetrics and gynecology department of a university clinic. Study group was consisted of 34 patients diagnosed as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) according to the Rotterdam Criteria, whereas control group was consisted of 21 healthy volunteers without any features of clinical or biochemical hyperandrogenism, who had regular menstrual cycles. BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2) were considered overweight and obese and excluded. Blood samples were obtained during days 2-3 after spontaneous menses or progesterone-induced withdrawal bleeding after overnight fasting for at least 12 h. The weight, height, hip and waist circumferences of the patients were measured. Fasting insulin and glucose (FPG) levels were used for calculating different insulin resistance indexes (Homeostatic Model Assessment (HOMA-IR), Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI)). No significant difference was found between PCOS and control groups regarding the mean age, BMI, waist to hip ratio (WHR), mean values of FPG, FPG/insulin ratio and HOMA B (p > 0.05). AMH values were significantly higher in PCOS cases when compared with controls (4.7 vs. 3.4 ng/mL) (p PCOS cases when compared with controls. E2 levels were significantly lower and Total-T were significantly higher in PCOS patients. When PCOS cases are categorized according to the existence of IR, no difference in Total-T and AMH levels between both groups. Although not statistically significant, a negative correlation of AMH with HOMA-IR and a positive correlation with QUICKI index were found. Among the hormone parameters, AMH was found to be positively correlated with Total-T (r = 0.332, p = 0.013). Although the relation between AMH and androgen production is supported by current evidence, the mechanism underlying the relation between AMH and insulin

  20. Evidence for a novel functional role of astrocytes in the acute homeostatic response to high-fat diet intake in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckman, Laura B; Thompson, Misty M; Lippert, Rachel N; Blackwell, Timothy S; Yull, Fiona E; Ellacott, Kate L J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction of a high-fat diet to mice results in a period of voracious feeding, known as hyperphagia, before homeostatic mechanisms prevail to restore energy intake to an isocaloric level. Acute high-fat diet hyperphagia induces astrocyte activation in the rodent hypothalamus, suggesting a potential role of these cells in the homeostatic response to the diet. The objective of this study was to determine physiologic role of astrocytes in the acute homeostatic response to high-fat feeding. We bred a transgenic mouse model with doxycycline-inducible inhibition of NFkappaB (NFκB) signaling in astrocytes to determine the effect of loss of NFκB-mediated astrocyte activation on acute high-fat hyperphagia. ELISA was used to measure the levels of markers of astrocyte activation, glial-fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and S100B, in the medial basal hypothalamus. Inhibition of NFκB signaling in astrocytes prevented acute high-fat diet-induced astrocyte activation and resulted in a 15% increase in caloric intake (P fat feeding.

  1. Caenorhabditis elegans DAF-2 as a Model for Human Insulin Receptoropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Bulger

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human exome sequencing has dramatically increased the rate of identification of disease-associated polymorphisms. However, examining the functional consequences of those variants has created an analytic bottleneck. Insulin-like signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans has long provided a model to assess consequences of human insulin signaling mutations, but this has not been evaluated in the context of current genetic tools. We have exploited strains derived from the Million Mutation Project (MMP and gene editing to explore further the evolutionary relationships and conservation between the human and C. elegans insulin receptors. Of 40 MMP alleles analyzed in the C. elegans insulin-like receptor gene DAF-2, 35 exhibited insulin-like signaling indistinguishable from wild-type animals, indicating tolerated mutations. Five MMP alleles proved to be novel dauer-enhancing mutations, including one new allele in the previously uncharacterized C-terminus of DAF-2. CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing was used to confirm the phenotypic consequence of six of these DAF-2 mutations and to replicate an allelic series of known human disease mutations in a highly conserved tyrosine kinase active site residue, demonstrating the utility of C. elegans for directly modeling human disease. Our results illustrate the challenges associated with prediction of the phenotypic consequences of amino acid substitutions, the value of assaying mutant isoform function in vivo, and how recently developed tools and resources afford the opportunity to expand our understanding even of highly conserved regulatory modules such as insulin signaling. This approach may prove generally useful for modeling phenotypic consequences of candidate human pathogenic mutations in conserved signaling and developmental pathways.

  2. Bovine α-Lactalbumin Hydrolysates (α-LAH Ameliorate Adipose Insulin Resistance and Inflammation in High-Fat Diet-Fed C57BL/6J Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Gao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Obesity-induced adipose inflammation has been demonstrated to be a key cause of insulin resistance. Peptides derived from bovine α-lactalbumin have been shown to inhibit the activities of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE, scavenge 2,2′-azinobis [3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate] (ABTS+ radical and stimulate glucagon-like peptide-2 secretion. In the present study, the effects of bovine α-lactalbumin hydrolysates (α-LAH on adipose insulin resistance and inflammation induced by high-fat diet (HFD were investigated. The insulin resistance model was established by feeding C57BL/6J mice with HFD (60% kcal from fat for eight weeks. Then, the mice were fed with HFD and bovine α-LAH of different doses (100 mg/kg b.w., 200 mg/kg b.w. and 400 mg/kg b.w. for another 12 weeks to evaluate its protective effects against HFD-induced insulin resistance. The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT and intraperitoneal insulin tolerance test (ipITT were conducted after intervention with α-LAH for 10 weeks and 11 weeks, respectively. Results showed that bovine α-LAH significantly reduced body weight, blood glucose, serum insulin, and HOMA-IR (homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance levels, lowered the area-under-the-curve (AUC during OGTT and ipITT, and downregulated inflammation-related gene [tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1] expression in adipose tissues of HFD-fed C57BL/6J mice. Furthermore, bovine α-LAH also suppressed insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1 serine phosphorylation (Ser307, Ser612, enhanced protein kinase B (known as Akt phosphorylation, and inhibited the activation of inhibitor of kappaB kinase (IKK and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways in adipose tissues of HFD-fed C57BL/6J mice. These results suggested that bovine α-LAH could ameliorate adipose insulin resistance and inflammation through IKK and MAPK signaling

  3. Conditional RARα Knockout Mice Reveal Acute Requirement for Retinoic Acid and RARα in Homeostatic Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica eSarti

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available All-trans retinoic acid (RA plays important roles in brain development through regulating gene transcription. Recently, a novel postdevelopmental role of RA in mature brain was proposed. Specifically, RA rapidly enhanced excitatory synaptic transmission independent of transcriptional regulation. RA synthesis was induced when excitatory synaptic transmission was chronically blocked, and RA then activated dendritic protein synthesis and synaptic insertion of homomeric GluA1 AMPA receptors, thereby compensating for the loss of neuronal activity in a homeostatic fashion. This action of RA was suggested to be mediated by its canonical receptor RARα but no genetic evidence was available. Thus, we here tested the fundamental requirement of RARα in homeostatic plasticity using conditional RARα knockout mice, and additionally performed a structure-function analysis of RARα. We show that acutely deleting RARα in neurons eliminated RA’s effect on excitatory synaptic transmission, and inhibited activity blockade-induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity. By expressing various RARα rescue constructs in RARα knockout neurons, we found that the DNA-binding domain of RARα was dispensable for its role in regulating synaptic strength, further supporting the notion that RA and RARα act in a non-transcriptional manner in this context. By contrast, the ligand-binding domain (LBD and the mRNA-binding domain (F-domain are both necessary and sufficient for the function of RARα in homeostatic plasticity. Furthermore, we found that homeostatic regulation performed by the LBD/F domains leads to insertion of calcium-permeable AMPA receptors. Our results confirm with unequivocal genetic approaches that RA and RARα perform essential non-transcriptional functions in regulating synaptic strength, and establish a functional link between the various domains of RARα and their involvement in regulating protein synthesis and excitatory synaptic transmission during

  4. BACE1 Is Necessary for Experience-Dependent Homeostatic Synaptic Plasticity in Visual Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Petrus

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most common form of age-related dementia, which is thought to result from overproduction and/or reduced clearance of amyloid-beta (Aβ peptides. Studies over the past few decades suggest that Aβ is produced in an activity-dependent manner and has physiological relevance to normal brain functions. Similarly, physiological functions for β- and γ-secretases, the two key enzymes that produce Aβ by sequentially processing the amyloid precursor protein (APP, have been discovered over recent years. In particular, activity-dependent production of Aβ has been suggested to play a role in homeostatic regulation of excitatory synaptic function. There is accumulating evidence that activity-dependent immediate early gene Arc is an activity “sensor,” which acts upstream of Aβ production and triggers AMPA receptor endocytosis to homeostatically downregulate the strength of excitatory synaptic transmission. We previously reported that Arc is critical for sensory experience-dependent homeostatic reduction of excitatory synaptic transmission in the superficial layers of visual cortex. Here we demonstrate that mice lacking the major neuronal β-secretase, BACE1, exhibit a similar phenotype: stronger basal excitatory synaptic transmission and failure to adapt to changes in visual experience. Our results indicate that BACE1 plays an essential role in sensory experience-dependent homeostatic synaptic plasticity in the neocortex.

  5. Modelling the Effect of Exercise on Insulin Pharmacokinetics in "Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion" Treated Type 1 Diabetes Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Juhl, Rune; Schmidt, Signe

    Introduction: The artificial pancreas is believed to ease the burden of constant management of type 1 diabetes for the patients substantially. An important aspect of the artificial pancreas development is the mathematical models used for control, prediction or simulation. A major challenge...... infusion (CSII) treated patients by modelling the absorption rate as a function of exercise. Methods: Three models are estimated from 17 data sequences. All of them are based on a linear three-compartment base model. The models are based on stochastic differential equations to allow noise to enter...... of the measurement variance. Conclusion: A model to predict the insulin appearance in plasma during exercise in CSII treated patients is identified. Further clinical studies are needed to confirm the increase in insulin plasma concentration during exercise in type 1 diabetes patients. These studies should include...

  6. Caenorhabditis elegans DAF-2 as a Model for Human Insulin Receptoropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulger, David A; Fukushige, Tetsunari; Yun, Sijung; Semple, Robert K; Hanover, John A; Krause, Michael W

    2017-01-05

    Human exome sequencing has dramatically increased the rate of identification of disease-associated polymorphisms. However, examining the functional consequences of those variants has created an analytic bottleneck. Insulin-like signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans has long provided a model to assess consequences of human insulin signaling mutations, but this has not been evaluated in the context of current genetic tools. We have exploited strains derived from the Million Mutation Project (MMP) and gene editing to explore further the evolutionary relationships and conservation between the human and C. elegans insulin receptors. Of 40 MMP alleles analyzed in the C. elegans insulin-like receptor gene DAF-2, 35 exhibited insulin-like signaling indistinguishable from wild-type animals, indicating tolerated mutations. Five MMP alleles proved to be novel dauer-enhancing mutations, including one new allele in the previously uncharacterized C-terminus of DAF-2 CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing was used to confirm the phenotypic consequence of six of these DAF-2 mutations and to replicate an allelic series of known human disease mutations in a highly conserved tyrosine kinase active site residue, demonstrating the utility of C. elegans for directly modeling human disease. Our results illustrate the challenges associated with prediction of the phenotypic consequences of amino acid substitutions, the value of assaying mutant isoform function in vivo, and how recently developed tools and resources afford the opportunity to expand our understanding even of highly conserved regulatory modules such as insulin signaling. This approach may prove generally useful for modeling phenotypic consequences of candidate human pathogenic mutations in conserved signaling and developmental pathways. Copyright © 2017 Bulger et al.

  7. Mathematical modeling of the glucose-insulin system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palumbo, Pasquale; Ditlevsen, Susanne; Bertuzzi, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    of pancreatic insulin production, with a oarser/finer level of detail ranging over cellular and subcellular scales, to short-term organ/tissue models accounting for the intra-venous and the oral glucose tolerance tests as well as for the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp, to total-body, long-term diabetes...

  8. A Cross-Sectional Study of the Phenotypes of Obesity and Insulin Resistance in Adults with Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Real de Asua

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDespite the confluence of multiple cardiovascular risk factors, subclinical atherosclerotic damage and cardiovascular events remain extremely rare in adults with Down syndrome (DS. We aim to determine the prevalence of obesity and metabolic disorders in an adult cohort with DS and to compare our findings with adults without DS.MethodsCross-sectional study of 51 consecutively selected adults with DS living in the community and 51 healthy controls in an outpatient clinic of a tertiary care hospital in Madrid, Spain. Epidemiological data (age and gender, anthropometric data (body mass index and waist-to-height ratio, coexisting clinical conditions, and laboratory data (fasting glucose, insulin, glycated hemoglobin, creatinine, thyroid hormones, vitamins, and lipid profile were measured and compared between the groups.ResultsAdults with DS were significantly younger and more often men with a higher prevalence of overweight and obesity than controls. Their waist-to-height ratio was higher, and they more frequently had abdominal obesity. The results of an analysis adjusted for age and gender revealed no differences in fasting insulin levels, homeostatic model assessment indexes, or lipid profile between adults with DS and controls.ConclusionAdults with DS presented a high prevalence of overweight and obesity. However, we found no differences in lipid profile, prevalence of insulin resistance, or metabolic syndrome between adults with DS and controls.

  9. Synapse-specific and compartmentalized expression of presynaptic homeostatic potentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiling; Goel, Pragya; Chen, Catherine; Angajala, Varun; Chen, Xun

    2018-01-01

    Postsynaptic compartments can be specifically modulated during various forms of synaptic plasticity, but it is unclear whether this precision is shared at presynaptic terminals. Presynaptic homeostatic plasticity (PHP) stabilizes neurotransmission at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction, where a retrograde enhancement of presynaptic neurotransmitter release compensates for diminished postsynaptic receptor functionality. To test the specificity of PHP induction and expression, we have developed a genetic manipulation to reduce postsynaptic receptor expression at one of the two muscles innervated by a single motor neuron. We find that PHP can be induced and expressed at a subset of synapses, over both acute and chronic time scales, without influencing transmission at adjacent release sites. Further, homeostatic modulations to CaMKII, vesicle pools, and functional release sites are compartmentalized and do not spread to neighboring pre- or post-synaptic structures. Thus, both PHP induction and expression mechanisms are locally transmitted and restricted to specific synaptic compartments. PMID:29620520

  10. The Relationship between Changes in Weight Status and Insulin Resistance in Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evenson Kelly

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examined changes in insulin resistance (IR in 120 youth over two years. IR was quantified via homeostatic model (HOMA-IR, and weight status changes were quantified via body mass index (BMI. When all participants were considered, the mean HOMA-IR and BMI increased 13.4% and 1.65 units, respectively. Change in BMI z-score and percent change in HOMA-IR were moderately associated (. Follow-up analyses were performed for the following weight groups: NN (normal at baseline and two years later, NO (normal to overweight, ON (overweight to normal, and OO (overweight at both points. The NO group had a greater change in HOMA-IR (+50% compared to other groups: ON (8%, NN (+2%, and OO (0.1% (. The association between changes in BMI z-score and HOMA-IR was when only the NO and ON groups were included. These results reinforce the importance of preventing youth from becoming overweight to control IR.

  11. THE INFLUENCE OF THYROID FUNCTION AND BONE TURNOVER ON LIPOPROTEIN PROFILE IN YOUNG PHYSICALLY ACTIVE MEN WITH DIFFERENT INSULIN SENSITIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kęska

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity induces changes in the endocrine system. Previous data indicated that changes in insulin secretion and the tissue response to this hormone are very important for energy metabolism. It is believed that they are accompanied by changes in lipid metabolism, but factors contributing to this process are still disputed. The aim of this study was to assess interactions among insulin sensitivity, thyroid function, a bone turnover marker and serum lipid profile in young physically active men. Eighty-seven physical education students, aged 18-23 years, participated in the study. We measured serum levels of glucose, lipids, insulin, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH, osteocalcin and anthropometric parameters. Insulin sensitivity was determined using homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. The median value of HOMA-IR (1.344 was used to divide the study population into Group A (above the median and Group B (below the median. Men from both groups did not differ in anthropometric parameters or in daily physical activity. Triglycerides (TG, total cholesterol (TC and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C levels were higher in Group A (P<0.05. TSH and osteocalcin levels were similar in males with different HOMA-IR. Multiple regression analysis for TSH and osteocalcin showed that in Group A these hormones had no effect on plasma lipoproteins. However, in Group B they significantly determined the variation of plasma TC and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C levels (in about 28% and 29%, respectively. We concluded that TSH and osteocalcin are involved in determination of a more healthy lipid profile at a certain level of insulin sensitivity.

  12. The Effectiveness of Green Tea or Green Tea Extract on Insulin Resistance and Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyue Yu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Green tea or green tea extract (GT/GTE has been demonstrated to reduce insulin resistance and improve glycemic control. However, evidence for this health beneficial effect is inconsistent. This systematic review evaluated the effect of GT/GTE on insulin resistance and glycemic control in people with pre-diabetes/type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, AMED, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library were searched up to April 2017 for randomised controlled trials of participants with pre-diabetes or T2DM, where the intervention was GT/GTE. Meta-analysis was performed to assess the standardised mean difference (SMD in biomarkers of insulin resistance and glycemic control between GT/GTE and placebo groups. Six studies (n=382 were pooled into random-effects meta-analysis. Overall, no differences were found between GT/GTE and the placebo for glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c: SMD, −0.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], −0.86 to 0.23, homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR: SMD, 0.10; 95% CI, −0.17 to 0.38, fasting insulin (SMD, −0.25; 95% CI, −0.64 to 0.15, and fasting glucose (SMD, −0.10; 95% CI, −0.50 to 0.30. No evidence support the consumption of GT/GTE could reduce the levels of HbA1c, HOMA-IR, fasting insulin, or fasting glucose in people with pre-diabetes/T2DM. However, the studies included were small and of varying quality.

  13. Association of Insulin Resistance With Cerebral Glucose Uptake in Late Middle-Aged Adults at Risk for Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willette, Auriel A; Bendlin, Barbara B; Starks, Erika J; Birdsill, Alex C; Johnson, Sterling C; Christian, Bradley T; Okonkwo, Ozioma C; La Rue, Asenath; Hermann, Bruce P; Koscik, Rebecca L; Jonaitis, Erin M; Sager, Mark A; Asthana, Sanjay

    2015-09-01

    Converging evidence suggests that Alzheimer disease (AD) involves insulin signaling impairment. Patients with AD and individuals at risk for AD show reduced glucose metabolism, as indexed by fludeoxyglucose F 18-labeled positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). To determine whether insulin resistance predicts AD-like global and regional glucose metabolism deficits in late middle-aged participants at risk for AD and to examine whether insulin resistance-predicted variation in regional glucose metabolism is associated with worse cognitive performance. This population-based, cross-sectional study included 150 cognitively normal, late middle-aged (mean [SD] age, 60.7 [5.8] years) adults from the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention (WRAP) study, a general community sample enriched for AD parental history. Participants underwent cognitive testing, fasting blood draw, and FDG-PET at baseline. We used the homeostatic model assessment of peripheral insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Regression analysis tested the statistical effect of HOMA-IR on global glucose metabolism. We used a voxelwise analysis to determine whether HOMA-IR predicted regional glucose metabolism. Finally, predicted variation in regional glucose metabolism was regressed against cognitive factors. Covariates included age, sex, body mass index, apolipoprotein E ε4 genotype, AD parental history status, and a reference region used to normalize regional uptake. Regional glucose uptake determined using FDG-PET and neuropsychological factors. Higher HOMA-IR was associated with lower global glucose metabolism (β = -0.29; P factor scores. Our results show that insulin resistance, a prevalent and increasingly common condition in developed countries, is associated with significantly lower regional cerebral glucose metabolism, which in turn may predict worse memory performance. Midlife may be a critical period for initiating treatments to lower peripheral insulin resistance to maintain neural metabolism

  14. Improvement of insulin secretion in rat models of diabetes after ACEI/ARB therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Jingyan; Li Fengying; Liu Yun; Long Hongmei; Li Weiyi; Wang Xiao; Zhang Hongli; Li Guo; Luo Min

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of ACEI/ARB therapy on the secretion of insulin and glucagon as well as serum lipid peroxidation marker 8-iso PGF-2α levels in streptozoticin (STZ) induced diabetic rat models.Methods Twenty-four rat models of STZ induced diabetes were prepared (random blood sugar>16.7 mmol/L). Of which, 8 models were fed enalaprial 5mg/kg/d, 8 models were fed losartan 10μg/kg/d and 8 models left unterated. Fasting serum insulin,glucagon (with RIA) and 8-iso PGF-2α (with ELISA) levels were measured in these models and 8 control rats three weeks later. Intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) were performed in 12 rats (3 animals in each group) six weeks later. Results: Serum levels of insulin in the treated models were higher than those in the non-treated models but without significance (P>0.05). Serum levels of glucagon and 8-iso PGF-2α levels in the treated models were significantly lower than those in the non-treated models (P 6 x ) in the treated models. Conclusion: ACEI/ARB treatment could improve the secretion of insulin in rat models of diabetes, which might be beneficial for controlling the progression of the disease. This phenomenon is consistent with the result of clinical study. (authors)

  15. Serum AMH levels and insulin resistance in women with PCOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahmay, Sezai; Aydogan Mathyk, Begum; Sofiyeva, Nigar; Atakul, Nil; Azemi, Aslı; Erel, Tamer

    2018-05-01

    To compare the serum AMH levels between women with and without insulin resistance (IR) in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). 293 women with PCOS according to the Rotterdam criteria were enrolled into our study. Insulin resistance was diagnosed according to the Homeostatic model assessment insulin resistant (HOMA-IR) formula and the cut-off point was set to more than 2.5. Women were grouped according to the presence of insulin resistance (IR) (HOMA-IR ≥ 2.5). Serum AMH and other hormones were compared between the IR (+) and IR (-) groups. Additionally, AMH percentiles were (75) constructed; HOMA-IR and BMI values in women with/without IR were compared in different percentiles. Further, HOMA-IR, BMI and AMH values were measured across different PCOS phenotypes. The prevalence of IR was 45%. The prevalence of IR was 57% in women with BMI ≥ 25. Serum AMH levels were not significantly different among women with and without IR. Also, HOMA-IR values were not significant among different AMH percentiles. However, in each AMH percentile BMI were found to be higher in women with IR than in women without IR. The median HOMA-IR values were the highest in women with BMI ≥ 25 in both IR (+) and IR (-) groups. No significant difference was found among PCOS phenotypes in terms of HOMA-IR and BMI. Positive correlations were found between BMI, free testosterone and HOMA-IR. However, no correlation was found between AMH and HOMA-IR. The serum AMH levels between women with IR and without IR in PCOS were not significantly different. Also, we did not reveal a correlation between serum AMH levels and IR in women with PCOS. IR was not correlated with different PCOS phenotypes either. We found a positive correlation between BMI and IR. IR should be investigated in women with PCOS having a BMI ≥ 25, independent of their phenotype or AMH levels. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Social insect symbionts: evolution in homeostatic fortresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes, David P; Pierce, Naomi E; Boomsma, Jacobus J

    2008-01-01

    The massive environmentally buffered nests of some social insects can contain millions of individuals and a wide variety of parasites, commensals and mutualists. We suggest that the ways in which these homeostatic fortress environments affect the evolution of social insect symbionts are relevant...... in these nests. We hypothesize that biodiversity gradients in these hotspots might be less affected by abiotic latitudinal clines than gradients in neighboring 'control' habitats. We suggest several research lines to test these ideas....

  17. A comparison between the minimal model and the glucose clamp in the assessment of insulin sensitivity across the spectrum of glucose tolerance. Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, M F; Anderson, R L; Laws, A; Watanabe, R M; Kades, W W; Chen, Y D; Sands, R E; Pei, D; Savage, P J; Bergman, R N

    1994-09-01

    An insulin-modified frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIGTT) with minimal model analysis was compared with the glucose clamp in 11 subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 20 with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and 24 with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). The insulin sensitivity index (SI) was calculated from FSIGTT using 22- and 12-sample protocols (SI(22) and SI(12), respectively). Insulin sensitivity from the clamp was expressed as SI(clamp) and SIP(clamp). Minimal model parameters were similar when calculated with SI(22) and SI(12). SI could not be distinguished from 0 in approximately 50% of diabetic patients with either protocol. SI(22) correlated significantly with SI(clamp) in the whole group (r = 0.62), and in the NGT (r = 0.53), IGT (r = 0.48), and NIDDM (r = 0.41) groups (P SIP(clamp) were expressed in the same units, SI(22) was 66 +/- 5% (mean +/- SE) and 50 +/- 8% lower than SI(clamp) and SIP(clamp), respectively. Thus, minimal model analysis of the insulin-modified FSIGTT provides estimates of insulin sensitivity that correlate significantly with those from the glucose clamp. The correlation was weaker, however, in NIDDM. The insulin-modified FSIGTT can be used as a simple test for assessment of insulin sensitivity in population studies involving nondiabetic subjects. Additional studies are needed before using this test routinely in patients with NIDDM.

  18. Homeostatic modulation on unconscious hedonic responses to food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Wataru; Sawada, Reiko; Kubota, Yasutaka; Toichi, Motomi; Fushiki, Tohru

    2017-10-26

    Hedonic/affective responses to food play a critical role in eating behavior. Previous behavioral studies have shown that hedonic responses to food are elicited consciously and unconsciously. Although the studies also showed that hunger and satiation have a modulatory effect on conscious hedonic responses to food, the effect of these homeostatic states on unconscious hedonic responses to food remains unknown. We investigated unconscious hedonic responses to food in hungry and satiated participants using the subliminal affective priming paradigm. Food images or corresponding mosaic images were presented in the left or right peripheral visual field during 33 ms. Then photographs of target faces with emotionally neutral expressions were presented, and the participants evaluated their preference for the faces. Additionally, daily eating behaviors were assessed using questionnaires. Preference for the target faces was increased by food images relative to the mosaics in the hungry, but not the satiated, state. The difference in preference ratings between the food and mosaic conditions was positively correlated with the tendency for external eating in the hungry, but not the satiated, group. Our findings suggest that homeostatic states modulate unconscious hedonic responses to food and that this phenomenon is related to daily eating behaviors.

  19. Dietary patterns in Greenland and their relationship with type 2 diabetes mellitus and glucose intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Charlotte; Bjerregaard, Peter; Jørgensen, Marit Eika

    2013-01-01

    into normal glucose tolerance, IGT, IFG or T2DM. HOMA-IR (homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance index) and HOMA-β (homeostatic model assessment of β-cell function) were calculated. SUBJECTS: Data included 2374 Inuit, aged 18+ years. RESULTS: Participants with a traditional dietary pattern had higher...... fasting plasma glucose (mean 5·73 (95 % CI 5·68, 5·78) mmol/l, P HOMA-β (48·66 (95 % CI 46·86, 50·40), P

  20. Computer Simulation of Noise Effects of the Neighborhood of Stimulus Threshold for a Mathematical Model of Homeostatic Regulation of Sleep-Wake Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuyin Jin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The noise effects on a homeostatic regulation of sleep-wake cycles’ neuronal mathematical model determined by the hypocretin/orexin and the local glutamate interneurons spatiotemporal behaviors are studied within the neighborhood of stimulus threshold in this work; the neuronal noise added to the stimulus, the conductance, and the activation variable of the modulation function are investigated, respectively, based on a circadian input skewed in sine function. The computer simulation results suggested that the increased amplitude of external current input will lead to the fact that awakening time is advanced but the sleepy time remains the same; for the bigger conductance and modulation noise, the regulatory mechanism of the model sometimes will be collapsed and the coupled two neurons of the model show very irregular activities; the falling asleep or wake transform appears at nondeterminate time.

  1. Homeostatic theory of obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Health is regulated by homeostasis, a property of all living things. Homeostasis maintains equilibrium at set-points using feedback loops for optimum functioning of the organism. Imbalances in homeostasis causing overweight and obesity are evident in more than 1 billion people. In a new theory, homeostatic obesity imbalance is attributed to a hypothesized ‘Circle of Discontent’, a system of feedback loops linking weight gain, body dissatisfaction, negative affect and over-consumption. The Circle of Discontent theory is consistent with an extensive evidence base. A four-armed strategy to halt the obesity epidemic consists of (1) putting a stop to victim-blaming, stigma and discrimination; (2) devalorizing the thin-ideal; (3) reducing consumption of energy-dense, low-nutrient foods and drinks; and (4) improving access to plant-based diets. If fully implemented, interventions designed to restore homeostasis have the potential to halt the obesity epidemic. PMID:28070357

  2. Review Article

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    al developed a variety of mathematical equations based on fasting insulin .... found to predict and increase the risk of CKD in 12,728 ... Table 2: Mean Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) and/or Hazard Ratio (HR) in renal and non-renal .... example metformin, an efficient drug improving IR in the.

  3. Plasma levels of lysine, tyrosine, and valine during pregnancy are independent risk factors of insulin resistance and gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunmin; Park, Jin Young; Lee, Ju Hong; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2015-03-01

    This study compared plasma concentrations of amino acids in pregnant women with and without gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and identified the association between plasma amino acid levels and GDM, insulin resistance, and insulin secretion at 24-28 weeks of pregnancy. Circulating amino acid levels were evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography at 24-28 weeks of pregnancy in 25 non-GDM and 64 GDM women after adjusting for covariates such as maternal age, body mass index (BMI) before pregnancy, BMI and gestational age at screening GDM, and daily caloric intake. Backward stepwise logistic regression analysis was used to identify the predictors of developing GDM, and homeostatic model assessments for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and β-cell function (HOMA-B). Circulating levels of amino acids except threonine and tyrosine were significantly higher in GDM women than non-GDM women. Along with the intakes of energy, protein, and fat from animal sources, the intakes of each amino acid were significantly higher in the GDM group without a direct correlation to plasma amino acid levels. The variation in GDM development was explained by maternal age, diastolic blood pressure, and plasma lysine levels (R(2)=0.691). Height, BMI before pregnancy, systolic blood pressure, and plasma tyrosine and valine levels accounted for the variation in HOMA-IR (R(2)=0.589). The 53.3% variation of HOMA-B was explained by maternal age, BMI at GDM screening, plasma insulin level at 1 h during the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and plasma valine level. Circulating concentrations of lysine, tyrosine, and valine were independently and positively associated with GDM through modifying insulin resistance and secretion.

  4. Lipid-induced insulin resistance does not impair insulin access to skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, Joyce M.; Castro, Ana Valeria B.; Broussard, Josiane L.; Ionut, Viorica; Bergman, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated plasma free fatty acids (FFA) induce insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Previously, we have shown that experimental insulin resistance induced by lipid infusion prevents the dispersion of insulin through the muscle, and we hypothesized that this would lead to an impairment of insulin moving from the plasma to the muscle interstitium. Thus, we infused lipid into our anesthetized canine model and measured the appearance of insulin in the lymph as a means to sample muscle interstitium under hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp conditions. Although lipid infusion lowered the glucose infusion rate and induced both peripheral and hepatic insulin resistance, we were unable to detect an impairment of insulin access to the lymph. Interestingly, despite a significant, 10-fold increase in plasma FFA, we detected little to no increase in free fatty acids or triglycerides in the lymph after lipid infusion. Thus, we conclude that experimental insulin resistance induced by lipid infusion does not reduce insulin access to skeletal muscle under clamp conditions. This would suggest that the peripheral insulin resistance is likely due to reduced cellular sensitivity to insulin in this model, and yet we did not detect a change in the tissue microenvironment that could contribute to cellular insulin resistance. PMID:25852002

  5. Adrenal hyperandrogenism does not deteriorate insulin resistance and lipid profile in women with PCOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschou, Stavroula A; Palioura, Eleni; Ioannidis, Dimitrios; Anagnostis, Panagiotis; Panagiotakou, Argyro; Loi, Vasiliki; Karageorgos, Georgios; Goulis, Dimitrios G; Vryonidou, Andromachi

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of adrenal hyperandrogenism on insulin resistance and lipid profile in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). We studied 372 women with PCOS according to the NIH criteria. 232 age- and BMI-matched women served as controls in order to define adrenal hyperandrogenism (DHEA-S >95th percentile). Then, patients with PCOS were classified into two groups: with adrenal hyperandrogenism (PCOS-AH, n  = 108) and without adrenal hyperandrogenism (PCOS-NAH, n  = 264). Anthropometric measurements were recorded. Fasting plasma glucose, insulin, lipid profile, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and androgen (TT, Δ4A, DHEA-S) concentrations were assessed. Free androgen index (FAI) and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index were calculated. Women with PCOS-AH were younger than PCOS-NAH ( P   0.05). These metabolic parameters did not differ between the two groups even after correction for age. Women with PCOS-AH had lower SHBG (29.2 ± 13.8 vs 32.4 ± 11.8 nmol/L, P  = 0.025) and higher TT (1.0 ± 0.2 vs 0.8 ± 0.4 ng/mL, P  = 0.05) and Δ4A (3.9 ± 1.2 vs 3.4 ± 1.0 ng/mL, P  = 0.007) concentrations, as well as FAI (14.1 ± 8.0 vs 10.2 ± 5.0, P  PCOS and adrenal hyperandrogenism do not exhibit any deterioration in insulin resistance and lipid profile despite the higher degree of total androgens. © 2017 The authors.

  6. Association between markers of systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid profiles, and insulin resistance in pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zatollah Asemi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Increased levels of pro-inflammatory factors, markers of oxidative stress and lipid profiles are known to be associated with several complications. The aim of this study was to determine the association of markers of systemic inflammation, oxidative stress and lipid profiles with insulin resistance in pregnant women in Kashan, Iran. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, fasting plasma glucose (FPG, serum insulin, 8-oxo-7, 8-dihydroguanine (8-oxo-G, total cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL-cholesterol, and plasma total antioxidant capacity (TAC were measured among 89 primigravida singleton pregnant women aged 18-30 years at 24-28 weeks of gestation. Pearson’s correlation and multiple linear regressions were used to assess their relationships with homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. RESULTS: We found that among biochemical indicators of pregnant women, serum hs-CRP and total cholesterol levels were positively correlated with HOMA-IR (β = 0.05, P = 0.006 for hs-CRP and β = 0.006, P = 0.006 for total cholesterol. These associations remained significant even after mutual effect of other biochemical indicators were controlled (β = 0.04, P = 0.01 for hs-CRP and β = 0.007, P = 0.02 for total cholesterol. Further adjustment for body mass index made the association of hs-CRP and HOMA-IR disappeared; however, the relationship for total cholesterol remained statistically significant. CONCLUSION: Our findings showed that serum total cholesterol is independently correlated with HOMA-IR score. Further studies are needed to confirm our findings. Keywords: Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, Insulin Resistance, Pregnancy

  7. Effects of a 12-week exercise training on insulin sensitivity, quality of life, and depression status in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Huei Lin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exercise is one of the optimal and alternative treatments for type 2 diabetes (T2DM. Although the effect of a single bout of exercise on insulin sensitivity is reported to persist only for 2–3 days, effects remain unclear of a 12-week aerobic exercise training on insulin sensitivity, quality of life (QOL, and depression status over time as exercise training duration increases in patients with T2DM. Objectives: To investigate the effects over time in patients with T2DM of a 12-week aerobic exercise training on insulin sensitivity, QOL, and depression status. Materials and Methods: Purposive sampling was used to recruit 17 T2DM patients. Participants underwent a 12-week, supervised, moderate-intensity aerobic exercise training three times per week, 30 min per session. Outcome indicators including insulin sensitivity (measured by a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test [OGTT] and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance [HOMA-IR], QOL (Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36, and depression status (beck depression inventory scale were evaluated at baseline and at 4-week intervals. Results: A final 13 eligible participants completed the study. For every 4-week increase in duration of exercise training, there was an increase over time in insulin sensitivity, including a decrease over time in OGTT glucose area under the curve of 66.92 min/mmol/L. Glucose concentrations decreased over time at 60, 90, and 120 min after an oral glucose challenge. Further, the HOMA-IR decreased over time as the duration of exercise training increased. QOL and depression status improved significantly during the training. Conclusions: Moderate-intensity exercise training improves insulin sensitivity, QOL, and depression status in T2DM patients, particularly over time within a 12-week exercise training course.

  8. Economic benefits of improved insulin stability in insulin pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Richard C; van Amerongen, Derek; Bazalo, Gary; Aagren, Mark; Bouchard, Jonathan R

    2011-05-01

    Insulin pump users discard unused medication and infusion sets according to labeling and manufacturer's instructions. The stability labeling for insulin aspart (rDNA origin] (Novolog) was increased from two days to six. The associated savings was modeled from the perspective of a hypothetical one-million member health plan and the total United States population. The discarded insulin volume and the number of infusion sets used under a two-day stability scenario versus six were modeled. A mix of insulin pumps of various reservoir capacities with a range of daily insulin dosages was used. Average daily insulin dose was 65 units ranging from 10 to 150 units. Costs of discarded insulin aspart [rDNA origin] were calculated using WAC (Average Wholesale Price minus 16.67%). The cost of pump supplies was computed for the two-day scenario assuming a complete infusion set change, including reservoirs, every two days. Under the six-day scenario complete infusion sets were discarded every six days while cannulas at the insertion site were changed midway between complete changes. AWP of least expensive supplies was used to compute their costs. For the hypothetical health plan (1,182 pump users) the annual reduction in discarded insulin volume between scenarios was 19.8 million units. The corresponding cost reduction for the plan due to drug and supply savings was $3.4 million. From the U.S. population perspective, savings of over $1 billion were estimated. Using insulin that is stable for six days in pump reservoirs can yield substantial savings to health plans and other payers, including patients.

  9. Intrinsic factors rather than vitamin D deficiency are related to insulin resistance in lean women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, S; Eroglu, M; Selcuk, S; Turkgeldi, L; Kozali, S; Davutoglu, S; Muhcu, M

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the correlation between insulin resistance (IR) and serum 25-OH-Vit D concentrations and hormonal parameters in lean women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). 50 lean women with PCOS and 40 body mass index (BMI) matched controls were compared in terms of fasting insulin and glucose, homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), 25-OH-Vit D, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), total testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), triglycerides and Ferriman-Gallway (FG) scores. Correlation analyses were performed between HOMA-IR and metabolic and endocrine parameters. 30% of patients with PCOS demonstrated IR. Levels of 25-OH-Vit D, hsCRP, cholesterol, HDL, LDL, triglyceride and fasting glucose did not differ between the study and control groups. Fasting insulin, HOMA-IR, LH, total testosterone, and DHEA-S levels were higher in PCOS group. HOMA-IR was found to correlate with hs-CRP and total testosterone but not with 25-OH-Vit D levels in lean patients with PCOS. An association between 25-OH-Vit D levels and IR is not evident in lean women with PCOS. hs-CRP levels do not indicate to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in this population of patients. Because a strong association between hyperinsulinemia and hyperandrogenism exists in lean women with PCOS, it is advisable for this population of patients to be screened for metabolic disturbances, especially in whom chronic anovulation and hyperandrogenism are observed together.

  10. Propagation of Homeostatic Sleep Signals by Segregated Synaptic Microcircuits of the Drosophila Mushroom Body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitaraman, Divya; Aso, Yoshinori; Jin, Xin; Chen, Nan; Felix, Mario; Rubin, Gerald M; Nitabach, Michael N

    2015-11-16

    The Drosophila mushroom body (MB) is a key associative memory center that has also been implicated in the control of sleep. However, the identity of MB neurons underlying homeostatic sleep regulation, as well as the types of sleep signals generated by specific classes of MB neurons, has remained poorly understood. We recently identified two MB output neuron (MBON) classes whose axons convey sleep control signals from the MB to converge in the same downstream target region: a cholinergic sleep-promoting MBON class and a glutamatergic wake-promoting MBON class. Here, we deploy a combination of neurogenetic, behavioral, and physiological approaches to identify and mechanistically dissect sleep-controlling circuits of the MB. Our studies reveal the existence of two segregated excitatory synaptic microcircuits that propagate homeostatic sleep information from different populations of intrinsic MB "Kenyon cells" (KCs) to specific sleep-regulating MBONs: sleep-promoting KCs increase sleep by preferentially activating the cholinergic MBONs, while wake-promoting KCs decrease sleep by preferentially activating the glutamatergic MBONs. Importantly, activity of the sleep-promoting MB microcircuit is increased by sleep deprivation and is necessary for homeostatic rebound sleep (i.e., the increased sleep that occurs after, and in compensation for, sleep lost during deprivation). These studies reveal for the first time specific functional connections between subsets of KCs and particular MBONs and establish the identity of synaptic microcircuits underlying transmission of homeostatic sleep signals in the MB. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Role of Helicobacter pylori Seropositivity in Insulin Sensitivity, Beta Cell Function, and Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lou Rose Malamug

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection, for example, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, has been thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Our aim was to determine the role of H. pylori infection in glucose metabolism in an American cohort. We examined data from 4,136 non-Hispanic white (NHW, non-Hispanic black (NHB, and Mexican Americans (MA aged 18 and over from the NHANES 1999-2000 cohort. We calculated the odds ratios for states of glucose tolerance based on the H. pylori status. We calculated and compared homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and beta cell function (HOMA-B in subjects without diabetes based on the H. pylori status. The results were adjusted for age, body mass index (BMI, poverty index, education, alcohol consumption, tobacco use, and physical activity. The H. pylori status was not a risk factor for abnormal glucose tolerance. After adjustment for age and BMI and also adjustment for all covariates, no difference was found in either HOMA-IR or HOMA-B in all ethnic and gender groups except for a marginally significant difference in HOMA-IR in NHB females. H. pylori infection was not a risk factor for abnormal glucose tolerance, nor plays a major role in insulin resistance or beta cell dysfunction.

  12. The condition of homeostatic equilibrium in patients with newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis before treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Brazhenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The conducted studies indicate that before the beginning of antituberculous treatment TB patients with homeostatic equilibrium disorder depending on the phase state of the specific process in the lungs, the expression of the intoxication syndrome, the extent of lung tissue damage and the age of the patients. Increasing of BHE(body homeostatic equilibrium disfunction rate is followed by upraise of defective adaptive reactions. LLI indicators intend for BHE evaluation, H and R of the formed elements of the white bloodcellsintend to state the degree of BHE disfunction.

  13. Glucose intolerance, insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk factors in first degree relatives of women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Murat; Bukan, Neslihan; Ersoy, Reyhan; Karakoç, Ayhan; Yetkin, Ilhan; Ayvaz, Göksun; Cakir, Nuri; Arslan, Metin

    2005-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate insulin resistance (IR), glucose tolerance status and cardiovascular risk factors in first degree relatives of patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). A total of 120 family members [Mothers(PCOS) (n = 40), Fathers(PCOS) (n = 38), Sisters(PCOS) (n = 25) and Brothers(PCOS) (n = 17)] of 55 patients with PCOS and 75 unrelated healthy control subjects without a family history of diabetes or PCOS (four age- and weight-matched subgroups, i.e. Control(Mothers), Control(Fathers), Control(Sisters) and Control(Brothers)) were studied. IR was assessed by homeostatic model assessment (HOMA IR), log HOMA, insulin sensivity index (ISI), the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) and area under the curve for insulin during the oral glucose tolerance test (AUCI, AUCG) in with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) subjects and controls. Serum adiponectin, resistin, homocysteine and lipid levels were measured. The prevalence of any degree of glucose intolerance was 40% in Mothers(PCOS) and 52% in Fathers(PCOS). In total, six (15%) glucose tolerance disorders were identified in the Control(Mothers) and Control(Fathers) in first degree relatives of control subjects. The first degree relatives of PCOS patients had significantly higher serum fasting insulin, HOMA-IR, Log HOMA and AUCI levels in all subgroups than the control subjects. The control subjects had significantly elevated QUCKI, ISI levels and serum adiponectin levels compared to the first degree relatives of PCOS subjects in all subgroups. The serum Hcy and resistin levels increased significantly in both Fathers(PCOS) and Mothers(PCOS) groups but not Brothers(PCOS) and Sister(PCOS). The results of the present study support the finding that the first degree relatives of PCOS patients carry an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, as do PCOS patients.

  14. Serum Insulin, Glucose, Indices of Insulin Resistance, and Risk of Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argirion, Ilona; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Männistö, Satu; Albanes, Demetrius; Mondul, Alison M

    2017-10-01

    Background: Although insulin may increase the risk of some cancers, few studies have examined fasting serum insulin and lung cancer risk. Methods: We examined serum insulin, glucose, and indices of insulin resistance [insulin:glucose molar ratio and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)] and lung cancer risk using a case-cohort study within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study of Finnish men. A total of 196 cases and 395 subcohort members were included. Insulin and glucose were measured in fasting serum collected 5 to 12 years before diagnosis. Cox proportional hazards models were utilized to estimate the relative risk of lung cancer. Results: The average time between blood collection and lung cancer was 9.6 years. Fasting serum insulin levels were 8.7% higher in subcohort members than cases. After multivariable adjustment, men in the fourth quartile of insulin had a significantly higher risk of lung cancer than those in the first quartile [HR = 2.10; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.12-3.94]. A similar relationship was seen with HOMA-IR (HR = 1.83; 95% CI, 0.99-3.38). Risk was not strongly associated with glucose or the insulin:glucose molar ratio ( P trend = 0.55 and P trend = 0.27, respectively). Conclusions: Higher fasting serum insulin concentrations, as well as the presence of insulin resistance, appear to be associated with an elevated risk of lung cancer development. Impact: Although insulin is hypothesized to increase risk of some cancers, insulin and lung cancer remain understudied. Higher insulin levels and insulin resistance were associated with increased lung cancer risk. Although smoking cessation is the best method of lung cancer prevention, other lifestyle changes that affect insulin concentrations and sensitivity may reduce lung cancer risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(10); 1519-24. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Admission Glycaemia and Acute Insulin Resistance in Heart Failure Complicating Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Valente, Serafina; Chiostri, Marco; D'Alfonso, Maria Grazia; Spini, Valentina; Angelotti, Paola; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2015-11-01

    Few data are so far available on the relation between increased glucose values and insulin resistance and mortality at short-term in patients with acute heart failure (AHF). The present investigation, performed in 409 consecutive patients with AHF complicating acute coronary syndrome (ACS), was aimed at assessing the prognostic role of admission glycaemia and acute insulin resistance (as indicated by the Homeostatic Model Assessment - HOMA index) for death during Intensive Cardiac Care (ICCU) stay. Admission glucose tertiles were considered. In our series, diabetic patients accounted for the 33%. Patients in the third glucose tertiles exhibited the lowest LVEF (both on admission and at discharge), a higher use of mechanical ventilation, intra-aortic balloon pump and inotropic drugs and the highest in-ICCU mortality rate. In the overall population, hyperglycaemic patients (both diabetic and non diabetic) were 227 (227/409, 55.5%). Admission glycaemia was an independent predictor of in-ICCU mortality, together with admission LVEF and eGFR, while acute insulin resistance (as indicated by HOMA-index) was not associated with early death. The presence of admission hyperglycaemia in non-diabetic patients was independently associated with in-ICCU death while hyperglycaemia in diabetic patients was not. According to our results, hyperglycaemia is a common finding in patients with ACS complicated by AHF and it is an independent predictor of early death. Non-diabetic patients with hyperglycaemia are the subgroup with the highest risk of early death. Copyright © 2015 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Glucose homeostasis, insulin resistance and inflammatory biomarkers in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: Beneficial effects of supplementation with microalgae Chlorella vulgaris: A double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi-Mameghani, Mehrangiz; Sadeghi, Zahra; Abbasalizad Farhangi, Mahdieh; Vaghef-Mehrabany, Elnaz; Aliashrafi, Soodabeh

    2017-08-01

    Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) is reported to improve dyslipidemia and hypertension; however, its effect on inflammatory biomarkers and insulin resistance has not been noticed thus far. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) as a hepatic symptom of metabolic syndrome is strongly associated with insulin resistance and inflammation. In the current interventional trial, we aimed to study the effects of C. vulgaris supplementation on glucose homeostasis, insulin resistance and inflammatory biomarkers in patients with NAFLD. Seventy NAFLD patients confirmed by ultra-sonographic findings were randomly assigned into intervention group (four 300 mg tablets of C. vulgaris) or placebo group (four 300 mg tablets of placebos) for 8 weeks. Anthropometric measurements, liver enzymes, fasting serum glucose (FSG), insulin, high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were assessed and homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) score for insulin resistance was estimated before and after the intervention. Anthropometric measurements decreased significantly in both group (p vulgaris - treated group compared to placebo group. Serum concentrations of liver enzymes, FSG and hs-CRP also significantly decreased and serum insulin concentration and HOMA score increased significantly only in C. vulgaris-treated group (P vulgaris supplementation could be considered as an adjunctive therapy to decrease weight and improve glycemic status and reducing hs-CRP as well as improving liver function in patients with NAFLD. 201202233320N7. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  17. Metabolism and insulin signaling in common metabolic disorders and inherited insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    . These metabolic disorders are all characterized by reduced plasma adiponectin and insulin resistance in peripheral tissues. Quantitatively skeletal muscle is the major site of insulin resistance. Both low plasma adiponectin and insulin resistance contribute to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes...... described a novel syndrome characterized by postprandial hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia and insulin resistance. This syndrome is caused by a mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain of the insulin receptor gene (INSR). We have studied individuals with this mutation as a model of inherited insulin resistance....... Type 2 diabetes, obesity and PCOS are characterized by pronounced defects in the insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, in particular glycogen synthesis and to a lesser extent glucose oxidation, and the ability of insulin to suppress lipid oxidation. In inherited insulin resistance, however, only insulin...

  18. ON THE ROLE OF PERIOD-2 IN THE CIRCADIAN AND HOMEOSTATIC REGULATION OF SLEEP

    OpenAIRE

    La Spada, F.

    2013-01-01

    Humans spend one third of their life sleeping, then we could raise the basic question: Why do we sleep? Despite the fact that we still don't fully understand its function, we made much progress in understanding at different levels how sleep is regulated. One model suggests that sleep is regulated by two processes: a homeostatic process that tracks the need for sleep and by a circadian rhythm that determines the preferred time-of-day sleep occurs. At the molecular level circadian rhythms ar...

  19. Fasting serum insulin and the homeostasis model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in the monitoring of lifestyle interventions in obese persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogeser, Michael; König, Daniel; Frey, Ingrid; Predel, Hans-Georg; Parhofer, Klaus Georg; Berg, Aloys

    2007-09-01

    Lifestyle changes with increased physical activity and balanced energy intake are recognized as the principal interventions in obesity and insulin resistance. Only few prospective studies, however, have so far addressed the potential role of routine biochemical markers of insulin sensitivity in the monitoring of respective interventions. Fasting insulin and glucose was measured in 33 obese individuals undergoing a lifestyle modification program (MOBILIS) at baseline and after 1 year. The HOMA-IR index (homeostasis model of insulin resistance) was calculated as [fasting serum glucose*fasting serum insulin/22.5], with lower values indicating a higher degree of insulin sensitivity. While the median body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference decreased by 10% and 11%, respectively, the HOMA-IR index decreased in an over-proportional manner by 45% within 1 year (BMI baseline, median 35.7, interquartile range (IQR) 33.7-37.7; after 1 year, median 32.2, IQR 29.6-35.1. HOMA-IR baseline, median 2.9, IQR 1.5-4.6; after 1 year 1.6, IQR 0.9-2.7). In contrast to HOMA-IR and fasting serum insulin, no significant changes in fasting serum glucose were observed. Baseline and post-intervention HOMA-IR showed a high degree of inter-individual variation with eight individuals maintaining high HOMA-IR values despite weight loss after 1 year of intervention. Individual changes in the carbohydrate metabolism achieved by a lifestyle intervention program were displayed by fasting serum insulin concentrations and the HOMA-IR but not by fasting glucose measurement alone. Therefore, assessment of the HOMA-IR may help to individualize lifestyle interventions in obesity and to objectify improvements in insulin sensitivity after therapeutic lifestyle changes.

  20. Supplementary Table 1. Results of association test with CAPN10 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    maheswari velmurugan

    homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, PG- pre-prandial glucose, PPG- post-prandial glucose, ET- endometrial thickness, OV- ovarian volume, AFC- antral follicular count, * P <0.05. PARAMETERS. CASES-PCOS (n=169). CONTROLS ...

  1. The Relationship between Changes in Weight Status and Insulin Resistance in Youth

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    Kristin S. Ondrak

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined changes in insulin resistance (IR in 120 youth over two years. IR was quantified via homeostatic model (HOMA-IR, and weight status changes were quantified via body mass index (BMI. When all participants were considered, the mean HOMA-IR and BMI increased 13.4% and 1.65 units, respectively. Change in BMI z-score and percent change in HOMA-IR were moderately associated (r=0.39. Follow-up analyses were performed for the following weight groups: NN (normal at baseline and two years later, NO (normal to overweight, ON (overweight to normal, and OO (overweight at both points. The NO group had a greater change in HOMA-IR (+50% compared to other groups: ON (−8%, NN (+2%, and OO (−0.1% (P<.05. The association between changes in BMI z-score and HOMA-IR was r=0.49 when only the NO and ON groups were included. These results reinforce the importance of preventing youth from becoming overweight to control IR.

  2. Novel nuclear localization and potential function of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor/insulin receptor hybrid in corneal epithelial cells.

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    Yu-Chieh Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R and insulin receptor (INSR are highly homologous molecules, which can heterodimerize to form an IGF-1R/INSR hybrid (Hybrid-R. The presence and biological significance of the Hybrid-R in human corneal epithelium has not yet been established. In addition, while nuclear localization of IGF-1R was recently reported in cancer cells and human corneal epithelial cells, the function and profile of nuclear IGF-1R is unknown. In this study, we characterized the nuclear localization and function of the Hybrid-R and the role of IGF-1/IGF-1R and Hybrid-R signaling in the human corneal epithelium. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: IGF-1-mediated signaling and cell growth were examined in a human telomerized corneal epithelial (hTCEpi cell line using co-immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting and cell proliferation assays. The presence of Hybrid-R in hTCEpi and primary cultured human corneal epithelial cells was confirmed by immunofluorescence and reciprocal immunoprecipitation of whole cell lysates. We found that IGF-1 stimulated Akt and promoted cell growth through IGF-1R activation, which was independent of the Hybrid-R. The presence of Hybrid-R, but not IGF-1R/IGF-1R, was detected in nuclear extracts. Knockdown of INSR by small interfering RNA resulted in depletion of the INSR/INSR and preferential formation of Hybrid-R. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation sequencing assay with anti-IGF-1R or anti-INSR was subsequently performed to identify potential genomic targets responsible for critical homeostatic regulatory pathways. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: In contrast to previous reports on nuclear localized IGF-1R, this is the first report identifying the nuclear localization of Hybrid-R in an epithelial cell line. The identification of a nuclear Hybrid-R and novel genomic targets suggests that IGF-1R traffics to the nucleus as an IGF-1R/INSR heterotetrameric complex to regulate corneal epithelial homeostatic

  3. Unaltered Prion Pathogenesis in a Mouse Model of High-Fat Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance.

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    Caihong Zhu

    Full Text Available Epidemiological, clinical, and experimental animal studies suggest a strong correlation between insulin resistance and Alzheimer's disease. In fact, type-2 diabetes is considered an important risk factor of developing Alzheimer's disease. In addition, impaired insulin signaling in the Alzheimer's disease brain may promote Aβ production, impair Aβ clearance and induce tau hyperphosphorylation, thereby leading to deterioration of the disease. The pathological prion protein, PrPSc, deposits in the form of extracellular aggregates and leads to dementia, raising the question as to whether prion pathogenesis may also be affected by insulin resistance. We therefore established high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance in tga20 mice, which overexpress the prion protein. We then inoculated the insulin-resistant mice with prions. We found that insulin resistance in tga20 mice did not affect prion disease progression, PrPSc deposition, astrogliosis or microglial activation, and had no effect on survival. Our study demonstrates that in a mouse model, insulin resistance does not significantly contribute to prion pathogenesis.

  4. Insulin Resistance in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dineley, Kelly T; Jahrling, Jordan B; Denner, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Insulin is a key hormone regulating metabolism. Insulin binding to cell surface insulin receptors engages many signaling intermediates operating in parallel and in series to control glucose, energy, and lipids while also regulating mitogenesis and development. Perturbations in the function of any of these intermediates, which occur in a variety of diseases, cause reduced sensitivity to insulin and insulin resistance with consequent metabolic dysfunction. Chronic inflammation ensues which exacerbates compromised metabolic homeostasis. Since insulin has a key role in learning and memory as well as directly regulating ERK, a kinase required for the type of learning and memory compromised in early Alzheimer's disease (AD), insulin resistance has been identified as a major risk factor for the onset of AD. Animal models of AD or insulin resistance or both demonstrate that AD pathology and impaired insulin signaling form a reciprocal relationship. Of note are human and animal model studies geared toward improving insulin resistance that have led to the identification of the nuclear receptor and transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) as an intervention tool for early AD. Strategic targeting of alternate nodes within the insulin signaling network has revealed disease-stage therapeutic windows in animal models that coalesce with previous and ongoing clinical trial approaches. Thus, exploiting the connection between insulin resistance and AD provides powerful opportunities to delineate therapeutic interventions that slow or block the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:25237037

  5. Association between markers of systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid profiles, and insulin resistance in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asemi, Zatollah; Jazayeri, Shima; Najafi, Mohammad; Samimi, Mansooreh; Shidfar, Farzad; Tabassi, Zohreh; Shahaboddin, Mohamadesmaeil; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad

    2013-05-01

    Increased levels of pro-inflammatory factors, markers of oxidative stress and lipid profiles are known to be associated with several complications. The aim of this study was to determine the association of markers of systemic inflammation, oxidative stress and lipid profiles with insulin resistance in pregnant women in Kashan, Iran. In a cross-sectional study, serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), serum insulin, 8-oxo-7, 8-dihydroguanine (8-oxo-G), total cholesterol, triglyceride, High density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-cholesterol), and plasma total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were measured among 89 primigravida singleton pregnant women aged 18-30 years at 24-28 weeks of gestation. Pearson's correlation and multiple linear regressions were used to assess their relationships with homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). We found that among biochemical indicators of pregnant women, serum hs-CRP and total cholesterol levels were positively correlated with HOMA-IR (β = 0.05, P = 0.006 for hs-CRP and β = 0.006, P = 0.006 for total cholesterol). These associations remained significant even after mutual effect of other biochemical indicators were controlled (β = 0.04, P = 0.01 for hs-CRP and β = 0.007, P = 0.02 for total cholesterol). Further adjustment for body mass index made the association of hs-CRP and HOMA-IR disappeared; however, the relationship for total cholesterol remained statistically significant. Our findings showed that serum total cholesterol is independently correlated with HOMA-IR score. Further studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  6. [Role of visfatin in the pathogenesis of gestational diabetes mellitus and its relationship with insulin resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Yan; Liu, Suxin; Feng, Jing; Li, Hongyan; Fan, Yanli; Jin, Ying; Li, Li

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the role of visfatin in the pathogenesis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and its correlation with insulin resistance. The study recruited 58 pregnant women of 24 to 28 gestational weeks in People's Hospital of Hebei Province from January to June 2013. Among them, 30 were patients with GDM (GDM group), 28 had normal oral glucose tolerance test and was referred as healthy pregnancy group (NGT group). Fourteen age-matched female who were first-degree relatives (FDR1) of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients, and 27 healthy nonpregnant women with normal oral glucose tolerance test were referred as high-risk group and normal controls (NC), respectively. The fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 1 hour and 2 hours postprandial glucose levels were measured by glucose oxidase method. The fasting insulin (FIN) levels were measured by radioimmunoassay and the homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance index (HOMA- IR) was calculated. The levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerdes (TG), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) were determined. The visfatin levels were measured by ELISA. (1)The levels of FPG were significantly higher in GDM, FDR1 and NC group [(5.5 ± 0.7), (5.1 ±0.6), (5.2 ± 0.4)mmol/L] than that in NGT group [(4.5 ± 0.3) mmol/L], respectively (P 0.05). (5)The visfatin levels in NGT group were negatively correlated to the levels of FPG, HOMA-IR and TC (r = -0.38, -0.44, -0.47, respectively, P 0.05). While in NC group, the levels of visfatin were negatively correlated with FPG and 2 hours postprandial glucose(r = -0.48, -0.42, respectively, P insulin resistance.

  7. Homeostatic Control of the Thyroid Pituitary Axis: Perspectives for Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf eHoermann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The long-held concept of a proportional negative feedback control between the thyroid and pituitary gland requires reconsideration in the light of more recent studies. Homeostatic equilibria depend on dynamic interrelationships between thyroid hormones and pituitary thyrotropin (TSH. They display a high degree of individuality, thyroid-state-related hierarchy and adaptive conditionality. Molecular mechanisms involve multiple feedback loops on several levels of organization, different time scales and varying conditions of their optimum operation, including a proposed feedforward motif. This supports the concept of a dampened response and multistep regulation, making the interactions between TSH, FT4 and FT3 situational and mathematically more complex. As a homeostatically integrated parameter, TSH becomes neither normatively fixed nor a precise marker of euthyroidism. This is exemplified by the therapeutic situation with L-thyroxine (L-T4 where TSH levels defined for optimum health may not apply equivalently during treatment. In particular, an FT3-FT4 dissociation, discernible FT3-TSH disjoint and conversion inefficiency have been recognised in L-T4-treated athyreotic patients. In addition to regulating T4 production, TSH appears to play an essential role in maintaining T3 homeostasis by directly controlling deiodinase activity. While still allowing for tissue-specific variation this questions the currently assumed independence of the local T3 supply. Rather it integrates peripheral and central elements into an overarching control system. On L-T4 treatment, altered equilibria have been shown to give rise to lower circulating FT3 concentrations in the presence of normal serum TSH. While data on T3 in tissues are largely lacking in humans, rodent models suggest that the disequilibria may reflect widespread T3 deficiencies at the tissue level in various organs.As a consequence, the use of TSH, valuable though it is in many situations, should be

  8. Homeostatic Control of the Thyroid–Pituitary Axis: Perspectives for Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoermann, Rudolf; Midgley, John E. M.; Larisch, Rolf; Dietrich, Johannes W.

    2015-01-01

    The long-held concept of a proportional negative feedback control between the thyroid and pituitary glands requires reconsideration in the light of more recent studies. Homeostatic equilibria depend on dynamic inter-relationships between thyroid hormones and pituitary thyrotropin (TSH). They display a high degree of individuality, thyroid-state-related hierarchy, and adaptive conditionality. Molecular mechanisms involve multiple feedback loops on several levels of organization, different time scales, and varying conditions of their optimum operation, including a proposed feedforward motif. This supports the concept of a dampened response and multistep regulation, making the interactions between TSH, FT4, and FT3 situational and mathematically more complex. As a homeostatically integrated parameter, TSH becomes neither normatively fixed nor a precise marker of euthyroidism. This is exemplified by the therapeutic situation with l-thyroxine (l-T4) where TSH levels defined for optimum health may not apply equivalently during treatment. In particular, an FT3–FT4 dissociation, discernible FT3–TSH disjoint, and conversion inefficiency have been recognized in l-T4-treated athyreotic patients. In addition to regulating T4 production, TSH appears to play an essential role in maintaining T3 homeostasis by directly controlling deiodinase activity. While still allowing for tissue-specific variation, this questions the currently assumed independence of the local T3 supply. Rather it integrates peripheral and central elements into an overarching control system. On l-T4 treatment, altered equilibria have been shown to give rise to lower circulating FT3 concentrations in the presence of normal serum TSH. While data on T3 in tissues are largely lacking in humans, rodent models suggest that the disequilibria may reflect widespread T3 deficiencies at the tissue level in various organs. As a consequence, the use of TSH, valuable though it is in many situations, should be scaled

  9. A study on the altered glycemic and lipid parameters and prevalence of insulin resistance in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

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    Sangeetha Suresh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a hepatic disorder that develops in the absence of alcohol intake. Obesity and diabetes are considered risk factors for the development of fatty liver; however, whether fatty liver is the cause or consequence of these conditions is not yet clear. Insulin resistance (IR is found to be a common risk factor for the development of diabetes, obesity and fatty liver. Aims and Objectives: The aim and objective of this study is to determine the prevalence of undetected diabetes, dyslipidemia, and IR in subjects with NAFLD. Materials and Methods: In apparently healthy 100 subjects, with ultrasound diagnosis of fatty liver, fasting and postprandial blood sugar levels, fasting insulin levels, and fasting lipid profile were checked. IR value was estimated using homeostatic model assessment-IR formula. Appropriate statistical methods were adopted to analyze the data. Results: A total of 66 subjects out of the 100 had IR. It was noted that IR significantly correlated with raised fasting blood sugar and fasting plasma insulin values. There was no significant correlation between IR and lipid profile values. Conclusion: The chance of developing NAFLD was high if the subjects are having IR, or vice versa. There was an increased prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes in the subjects with NAFLD. Waist circumference, rather than body mass index, was found to be a strong predictor of central adiposity and IR.

  10. Plasma vitamin D is associated with fasting insulin and HOMA-IR in young adult males, but not females, of the Jerusalem Perinatal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Amy; Hochner, Hagit; Sitlani, Colleen M; Williams, Michelle A; Hoofnagle, Andrew N; de Boer, Ian H; Kestenbaum, Bryan; Siscovick, David S; Friedlander, Yechiel; Enquobahrie, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine cross-sectional relationships between plasma vitamin D and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in young adults. Design Data were collected from interviews, physical examinations, and biomarker measurements. Total plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) was measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Associations between 25[OH]D and CMR were modeled using weighted linear regression with robust standard error estimates. Setting Individuals born in Jerusalem during 1974-1976. Subjects Participants of the Jerusalem Perinatal Study (n = 1,204) interviewed and examined at age 32 years. Participants were oversampled for low and high birthweight and for maternal pre-pregnancy obesity. Results Mean total 25[OH]D concentration among participants was 21.7 ng/mL (SD 8.9). Among males, 25[OH]D was associated with Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) (natural log-transformed, β = -0.011, p = 0.004) after adjustment for body mass index. However, these associations were not present among females (p for sex interaction = 0.005). Conclusions We found evidence for inverse associations of 25[OH]D with markers of insulin resistance among males, but not females, in a health, young adult Caucasian population. Prospective studies and studies conducted on other populations investigating sex specific effects of vitamin D on CMR are warranted. PMID:25145881

  11. CDP-diacylglycerol synthetase coordinates cell growth and fat storage through phosphatidylinositol metabolism and the insulin pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Liu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During development, animals usually undergo a rapid growth phase followed by a homeostatic stage when growth has ceased. The increase in cell size and number during the growth phase requires a large amount of lipids; while in the static state, excess lipids are usually stored in adipose tissues in preparation for nutrient-limited conditions. How cells coordinate growth and fat storage is not fully understood. Through a genetic screen we identified Drosophila melanogaster CDP-diacylglycerol synthetase (CDS/CdsA, which diverts phosphatidic acid from triacylglycerol synthesis to phosphatidylinositol (PI synthesis and coordinates cell growth and fat storage. Loss of CdsA function causes significant accumulation of neutral lipids in many tissues along with reduced cell/organ size. These phenotypes can be traced back to reduced PI levels and, subsequently, low insulin pathway activity. Overexpressing CdsA rescues the fat storage and cell growth phenotypes of insulin pathway mutants, suggesting that CdsA coordinates cell/tissue growth and lipid storage through the insulin pathway. We also revealed that a DAG-to-PE route mediated by the choline/ethanolamine phosphotransferase Bbc may contribute to the growth of fat cells in CdsA RNAi.

  12. Designing peptide inhibitor of insulin receptor to induce diabetes mellitus type 2 in animal model Mus musculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permatasari, Galuh W; Utomo, Didik H; Widodo

    2016-10-01

    A designing peptide as agent for inducing diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM) in an animal model is challenging. The computational approach provides a sophisticated tool to design a functional peptide that may block the insulin receptor activity. The peptide that able to inhibit the binding between insulin and insulin receptor is a warrant for inducing T2DM. Therefore, we designed a potential peptide inhibitor of insulin receptor as an agent to generate T2DM animal model by bioinformatics approach. The peptide has been developed based on the structure of insulin receptor binding site of insulin and then modified it to obtain the best properties of half life, hydrophobicity, antigenicity, and stability binding into insulin receptor. The results showed that the modified peptide has characteristics 100h half-life, high-affinity -95.1±20, and high stability 28.17 in complex with the insulin receptor. Moreover, the modified peptide has molecular weight 4420.8g/Mol and has no antigenic regions. Based on the molecular dynamic simulation, the complex of modified peptide-insulin receptor is more stable than the commercial insulin receptor blocker. This study suggested that the modified peptide has the promising performance to block the insulin receptor activity that potentially induce diabetes mellitus type 2 in mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Association of PPARG Pro12Ala polymorphism with insulin sensitivity and body mass index in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldani, Dinka Pavicic; Skrgatic, Lana; Cerne, Jasmina Z; Ferk, Polonca; Simunic, Velimir; Gersak, Ksenija

    2014-03-01

    Insulin resistance is one of the key factors in the pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) plays a role in the regulation of insulin sensitivity. The aim of the present study was to establish a possible association of the PPARG Pro12Ala polymorphism with PCOS and its effect on family and personal history, as well as on the metabolic and endocrine parameters in PCOS patients. A total of 151 PCOS patients and 179 healthy women of reproductive age were enrolled. History, body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio and the presence of phenotypic hyperandrogenism were recorded. Hormonal, metabolic and biochemical profiles were assessed. A molecular analysis for the genetic polymorphism was performed. One third (29.8%) of the PCOS patients were found to be carriers of at least one variant of the Ala allele (X/Ala), while 70.2% carried two wild-type Pro alleles (Pro/Pro), with an equal distribution observed in the control group. The PCOS patients carrying the X/Ala alleles exhibited lower serum fasting insulin levels, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and BMI compared to Pro/Pro carriers. This finding was significant only in the lean PCOS group. The polymorphic genotype exerted no effect on history, hormonal and clinical hyperandrogenism, lipid status or C-reactive protein, leptin, adiponectin, resistin and ghrelin serum levels in women with PCOS. In conclusion, although the PPARG Pro12Ala polymorphism is not a major determinant of PCOS in the Croatian population, it may exert a positive effect on insulin sensitivity and BMI. As these associations were recorded exclusively in the lean group of patients with PCOS, this polymorphism potentially contributes to a protective role against hyperinsulinemia and obesity.

  14. Measurement and Correlation of Indices of Insulin Resistance in Patients on Peritoneal Dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King-Morris, Kelli R; Deger, Serpil Muge; Hung, Adriana M; Egbert, Phyllis Ann; Ellis, Charles D; Graves, Amy; Shintani, Ayumi; Ikizler, T Alp

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is common in maintenance dialysis patients and is associated with excess mortality. Hyperinsulinemic euglycemic glucose clamp (HEGC) is the gold standard for measuring IR. There are limited studies using HEGC for comparison to other indirect indices of IR in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients, nor have there been direct comparisons between patients receiving PD and those on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) with regard to severity of IR, methods of measurement, or factors associated with the development of IR. ♦ This is a cross-sectional, single-center study performed in 10 prevalent PD patients of median age 48 years (range 41 - 54); 50% were female and 60% were African American. Insulin resistance was assessed by HEGC (glucose disposal rate [GDR]), homeostatic model assessment of IR (HOMA-IR), HOMA-IR corrected by adiponectin (HOMA-AD), leptin adiponectin ratio (LAR), quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), McAuley's index, and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at each time point for a total of 18 studies. Retrospective analysis compared this cohort to 12 hemodialysis patients who had previously undergone similar testing. ♦ The median GDR was 6.4 mg/kg/min (interquartile range [IQR] 6.0, 7.8) in the PD cohort compared with the MHD group, which was 5.7 mg/kg/min (IQR 4.3, 6.6). For both the PD and MHD cohorts, the best predictors of GDR by HEGC after adjusting for age, gender, and body mass index (BMI), were HOMA-AD (PD: r = -0.69, p = 0.01; MHD: r = -0.78, p = 0.03) and LAR (PD: r = -0.68, p failed to have strong predictive value. Eight of 10 PD patients had at least 1 abnormal OGTT, demonstrating impaired glucose tolerance. ♦ Insulin resistance is highly prevalent in PD patients. The adipokine based formulas, HOMA-AD and LAR, correlated well in both the PD and MHD populations in predicting GDR by HEGC, outperforming HOMA-IR. The use of these novel markers could be considered for large-scale, epidemiological outcome

  15. A model to estimate insulin sensitivity in dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holtenius Kjell

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Impairment of the insulin regulation of energy metabolism is considered to be an etiologic key component for metabolic disturbances. Methods for studies of insulin sensitivity thus are highly topical. There are clear indications that reduced insulin sensitivity contributes to the metabolic disturbances that occurs especially among obese lactating cows. Direct measurements of insulin sensitivity are laborious and not suitable for epidemiological studies. We have therefore adopted an indirect method originally developed for humans to estimate insulin sensitivity in dairy cows. The method, "Revised Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index" (RQUICKI is based on plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin and free fatty acids (FFA and it generates good and linear correlations with different estimates of insulin sensitivity in human populations. We hypothesized that the RQUICKI method could be used as an index of insulin function in lactating dairy cows. We calculated RQUICKI in 237 apparently healthy dairy cows from 20 commercial herds. All cows included were in their first 15 weeks of lactation. RQUICKI was not affected by the homeorhetic adaptations in energy metabolism that occurred during the first 15 weeks of lactation. In a cohort of 24 experimental cows fed in order to obtain different body condition at parturition RQUICKI was lower in early lactation in cows with a high body condition score suggesting disturbed insulin function in obese cows. The results indicate that RQUICKI might be used to identify lactating cows with disturbed insulin function.

  16. Insulin deficiency exacerbates cerebral amyloidosis and behavioral deficits in an Alzheimer transgenic mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng Wei-Ping

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although increasing evidence has indicated that brain insulin dysfunction is a risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD, the underlying mechanisms by which insulin deficiency may impact the development of AD are still obscure. Using a streptozotocin (STZ-induced insulin deficient diabetic AD transgenic mouse model, we evaluated the effect of insulin deficiency on AD-like behavior and neuropathology. Results Our data showed that administration of STZ increased the level of blood glucose and reduced the level of serum insulin, and further decreased the phosphorylation levels of insulin receptors, and increased the activities of glycogen synthase kinase-3α/β and c-Jun N-terminal kinase in the APP/PS1 mouse brain. We further showed that STZ treatment promoted the processing of amyloid-β (Aβ precursor protein resulting in increased Aβ generation, neuritic plaque formation, and spatial memory deficits in transgenic mice. Conclusions Our present data indicate that there is a close link between insulin deficient diabetes and cerebral amyloidosis in the pathogenesis of AD.

  17. Fiber Intake and Insulin Resistance in 6374 Adults: The Role of Abdominal Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry A. Tucker

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional design was used to evaluate the relationship between fiber intake and insulin resistance, indexed using HOMA (homeostatic model assessment, in a National Health and Nutrition Examination Study (NHANES sample of 6374 U.S. adults. Another purpose was to test the influence of covariates on the association. A third aim was to compare HOMA levels between two groups based on the recommended intake of 14 g of fiber per 1000 kilocalories (kcal. Fiber intake was measured using a 24-h recall. With demographic variables controlled, results showed that HOMA differed across High, Moderate, and Low fiber categories (F = 5.4, p = 0.0072. Adjusting for the demographic variables, the possible misreporting of energy intake, smoking, and physical activity strengthened the relationship (F = 8.0, p = 0.0009, which remained significant after adjusting for body fat (F = 7.0, p = 0.0019 and body mass index (BMI (F = 4.9, p = 0.0108, with the other covariates. However, the fiber–HOMA relationship was eliminated after adjusting for waist circumference (F = 2.3, p = 0.1050. Dividing participants based on the recommended 14-g standard resulted in meaningful HOMA differences (F = 16.4, p = 0.0002, and the association was not eliminated after controlling for waist circumference. Apparently, adults with high fiber consumption have less insulin resistance than their counterparts. However, much of the association is due to differences in waist circumference, unless the recommended intake of fiber is attained.

  18. Remarks on models for estimating the carbohydrate to insulin ratio and insulin sensitivity in T1DM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tárnik, Marían; Bátora, Vladimír; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2015-01-01

    an integrator. This model maintains the benefits of the existing empirical models and allows simulation of a longer time period than the post-prandial period, i.e. the couple of hours following a meal. Furthermore, the new model proposed in this paper does not require any re-initialization before meals.......In this paper we estimate linear models for prediction of the interstitial glucose concentration in response to meals and bolus insulin. Parameters of these models can be directly used in simple bolus calculation rules. In contrast to models proposed in the literature, we present a model without...

  19. Development and validation of a prediction model for insulin-associated hypoglycemia in non-critically ill hospitalized adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathioudakis, Nestoras Nicolas; Everett, Estelle; Routh, Shuvodra; Pronovost, Peter J; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Golden, Sherita Hill; Saria, Suchi

    2018-01-01

    To develop and validate a multivariable prediction model for insulin-associated hypoglycemia in non-critically ill hospitalized adults. We collected pharmacologic, demographic, laboratory, and diagnostic data from 128 657 inpatient days in which at least 1 unit of subcutaneous insulin was administered in the absence of intravenous insulin, total parenteral nutrition, or insulin pump use (index days). These data were used to develop multivariable prediction models for biochemical and clinically significant hypoglycemia (blood glucose (BG) of ≤70 mg/dL and model development and validation, respectively. Using predictors of age, weight, admitting service, insulin doses, mean BG, nadir BG, BG coefficient of variation (CV BG ), diet status, type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease (CKD), liver disease, and digestive disease, our model achieved a c-statistic of 0.77 (95% CI 0.75 to 0.78), positive likelihood ratio (+LR) of 3.5 (95% CI 3.4 to 3.6) and negative likelihood ratio (-LR) of 0.32 (95% CI 0.30 to 0.35) for prediction of biochemical hypoglycemia. Using predictors of sex, weight, insulin doses, mean BG, nadir BG, CV BG , diet status, type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, CKD stage, and steroid use, our model achieved a c-statistic of 0.80 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.82), +LR of 3.8 (95% CI 3.7 to 4.0) and -LR of 0.2 (95% CI 0.2 to 0.3) for prediction of clinically significant hypoglycemia. Hospitalized patients at risk of insulin-associated hypoglycemia can be identified using validated prediction models, which may support the development of real-time preventive interventions.

  20. Relationship between Serum Lipids and Insulin Resistance among Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Rashidi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim:  Polycystic ovary syndrome is a common endocrine disorder that is associated with lipid disorders and obesity with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to determine the association between lipid profile and fasting blood sugar levels and insulin resistance among women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Methods: The present case-control study was conducted on 153 women with PCOS and 449 healthy women as controls. Data was extracted from data center of Diabetes Research Center of Ahvaz University of Medical Sciences including women from 4 cities of Khuzestan province (Ahwaz, Behbahan, Abadan, and Khorramshahr. Serum lipids, fasting blood sugar, and serum insulin levels along with Body Mass Index (BMI, Homeostatic Model Assessment Insulin Resistance (HOMA IR, Lipid Accumulation Product (LAP, and Body Adiposity Index in two groups were analyzed by independent t-tests, chi-square and Fisher exact test. Results:  The frequency of low HDL and high total cholesterol was higher in women with PCOS than control group (p =0.032, and p =0.001, respectively. No significant difference was seen between No two groups in the mean levels of total cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, fasting blood sugar, HOMA IR, LAP, and PA (p >0.05. In women with BMI30. In women with BMI>30, the mean triglyceride and glucose levels was higher in PCOS group than control group (p=0.029, and p=0.010. Conclusion:  In the present study, in obese women, triglyceride and fasting glucose levels were higher in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome than healthy women. In non-obese women, however, the total cholesterol level was higher in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome than healthy women.  

  1. Ovarian SAHA syndrome is associated with a more insulin-resistant profile and represents an independent risk factor for glucose abnormalities in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a prospective controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalamaga, Maria; Papadavid, Evangelia; Basios, Georgios; Vaggopoulos, Vassilios; Rigopoulos, Dimitrios; Kassanos, Dimitrios; Trakakis, Eftihios

    2013-12-01

    SAHA syndrome is characterized by the tetrad: seborrhea, acne, hirsutism, and androgenetic alopecia. No previous study has examined the prevalence of glucose abnormalities in ovarian SAHA and explored whether it may be an independent risk factor for glucose abnormalities. In a prospective controlled study, we investigated the spectrum of glucose abnormalities in ovarian SAHA and explored whether it is associated with a more insulin-resistant profile. In all, 316 patients with a diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) (56 with SAHA) and 102 age-matched healthy women were examined and underwent a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test. Serum glucose homeostasis parameters, hormones, and adipokines were determined. SAHA prevalence was 17.7% in patients with PCOS and predominance of the severe PCOS phenotype. Ovarian SAHA was independently associated with a more insulin-resistant profile (higher homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance score, lower quantitative insulin sensitivity check index [QUICKI] and MATSUDA indices, and relative hypoadiponectinemia), and represented an independent risk factor for glucose abnormalities regardless of anthropometric features, age, and PCOS phenotype. There was no performance of skin biopsies. The prompt recognition of SAHA syndrome in women with PCOS permits an earlier diagnosis and surveillance of metabolic abnormalities, especially in Mediterranean PCOS population exhibiting a lower prevalence of glucose abnormalities. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Selective Insulin Resistance in Adipocytes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shi-Xiong; Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H.; Fazakerley, Daniel J.; Ng, Yvonne; Pant, Himani; Li, Jia; Meoli, Christopher C.; Coster, Adelle C. F.; Stöckli, Jacqueline; James, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Aside from glucose metabolism, insulin regulates a variety of pathways in peripheral tissues. Under insulin-resistant conditions, it is well known that insulin-stimulated glucose uptake is impaired, and many studies attribute this to a defect in Akt signaling. Here we make use of several insulin resistance models, including insulin-resistant 3T3-L1 adipocytes and fat explants prepared from high fat-fed C57BL/6J and ob/ob mice, to comprehensively distinguish defective from unaffected aspects of insulin signaling and its downstream consequences in adipocytes. Defective regulation of glucose uptake was observed in all models of insulin resistance, whereas other major actions of insulin such as protein synthesis and anti-lipolysis were normal. This defect corresponded to a reduction in the maximum response to insulin. The pattern of change observed for phosphorylation in the Akt pathway was inconsistent with a simple defect at the level of Akt. The only Akt substrate that showed consistently reduced phosphorylation was the RabGAP AS160 that regulates GLUT4 translocation. We conclude that insulin resistance in adipose tissue is highly selective for glucose metabolism and likely involves a defect in one of the components regulating GLUT4 translocation to the cell surface in response to insulin. PMID:25720492

  3. Flaxseed oil supplementation manipulates correlations between serum individual mol % free fatty acid levels and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetics. Insulin resistance and percent remaining pancreatic β-cell function are unaffected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barre, D E; Mizier-Barre, K A; Griscti, O; Hafez, K

    2016-10-01

    Elevated total serum free fatty acids (FFAs) concentrations have been suggested, controversially, to enhance insulin resistance and decrease percent remaining β-cell function. However, concentrations of individual serum FFAs have never been published in terms of their relationship (correlation) to homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and percent remaining β-cell function (HOMA-%β) in the type 2 diabetics (T2Ds). Alpha-linolenic acid consumption has a negative correlation with the insulin resistance, which in turn is negatively correlated with the remaining β-cell function. The primary objective was to test the hypothesis that there would be different relationship (correlation) between the blood serum individual free FFA mol % levels and HOMA-IR and/or HOMA-%β in T2D. The secondary objective was to test the hypothesis that flaxseed oil, previously being shown to be ineffective in the glycemic control in T2Ds, may alter these correlations in a statistically significant manner as well as HOMA-IR and/or HOMA-%β. Patients were recruited via a newspaper advertisement and two physicians have been employed. All the patients came to visit one and three months later for a second visit. At the second visit, the subjects were randomly assigned (double blind) to flaxseed or safflower oil treatment for three months, until the third visit. Different statistically significant correlations or trends towards among some serum individual free FFA mol % levels and HOMA-IR and HOMA-%β, pre- and post-flaxseed and safflower oil supplementation were found. However, flaxseed oil had no impact on HOMA-IR or HOMA-%β despite statistically significant alterations in correlations compared to baseline HOMA-IR. The obtained data indicate that high doses of flaxseed oil have no statistically significant effect on HOMA-IR or HOMA-%β in T2Ds, probably due to the additive effects of negative and positive correlations.

  4. Depressive symptoms, insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in the RISC cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bot, M; Pouwer, F; De Jonge, P

    2013-01-01

    Sensitivity and Cardiovascular Disease Risk (RISC) study. Presence of significant depressive symptoms was defined as a Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) score ≥ 16. Standard oral glucose tolerance tests were performed. Insulin sensitivity was assessed with the oral glucose insulin......AIM: This study explored the association of depressive symptoms with indices of insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in a cohort of non-diabetic men and women aged 30 to 64 years. METHODS: The study population was derived from the 3-year follow-up of the Relationship between Insulin...... sensitivity (OGIS) index. Insulin secretion was estimated using three model-based parameters of insulin secretion (beta-cell glucose sensitivity, the potentiation factor ratio, and beta-cell rate sensitivity). RESULTS: A total of 162 out of 1027 participants (16%) had significant depressive symptoms. Having...

  5. Insulin resistance is associated with lower arterial blood flow and reduced cortical perfusion in cognitively asymptomatic middle-aged adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoscheidt, Siobhan M; Kellawan, J Mikhail; Berman, Sara E; Rivera-Rivera, Leonardo A; Krause, Rachel A; Oh, Jennifer M; Beeri, Michal S; Rowley, Howard A; Wieben, Oliver; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Asthana, Sanjay; Johnson, Sterling C; Schrage, William G

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is associated with poor cerebrovascular health and increased risk for dementia. Little is known about the unique effect of IR on both micro- and macrovascular flow particularly in midlife when interventions against dementia may be most effective. We examined the effect of IR as indexed by the Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) on cerebral blood flow in macro- and microvessels utilizing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) among cognitively asymptomatic middle-aged individuals. We hypothesized that higher HOMA-IR would be associated with reduced flow in macrovessels and lower cortical perfusion. One hundred and twenty cognitively asymptomatic middle-aged adults (57 ± 5 yrs) underwent fasting blood draw, phase contrast-vastly undersampled isotropic projection reconstruction (PC VIPR) MRI, and arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion. Higher HOMA-IR was associated with lower arterial blood flow, particularly within the internal carotid arteries (ICAs), and lower cerebral perfusion in several brain regions including frontal and temporal lobe regions. Higher blood flow in bilateral ICAs predicted greater cortical perfusion in individuals with lower HOMA-IR, a relationship not observed among those with higher HOMA-IR. Findings provide novel evidence for an uncoupling of macrovascular blood flow and microvascular perfusion among individuals with higher IR in midlife. PMID:27488909

  6. Comparison of Subcutaneous Regular Insulin and Lispro Insulin in Diabetics Receiving Continuous Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, Mamie C.; Strilka, Richard J.; Clemens, Michael S.; Armen, Scott B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Optimal management of non–critically ill patients with diabetes maintained on continuous enteral feeding (CEN) is poorly defined. Subcutaneous (SQ) lispro and SQ regular insulin were compared in a simulated type 1 and type 2 diabetic patient receiving CEN. Method: A glucose-insulin feedback mathematical model was employed to simulate type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients on CEN. Each patient received 25 SQ injections of regular insulin or insulin lispro, ranging from 0-6 U. Primary endpoints were the change in mean glucose concentration (MGC) and change in glucose variability (GV); hypoglycemic episodes were also reported. The model was first validated against patient data. Results: Both SQ insulin preparations linearly decreased MGC, however, SQ regular insulin decreased GV whereas SQ lispro tended to increase GV. Hourly glucose concentration measurements were needed to capture the increase in GV. In the type 2 diabetic patient, “rebound hyperglycemia” occurred after SQ lispro was rapidly metabolized. Although neither SQ insulin preparation caused hypoglycemia, SQ lispro significantly lowered MGC compared to SQ regular insulin. Thus, it may be more likely to cause hypoglycemia. Analyses of the detailed glucose concentration versus time data suggest that the inferior performance of lispro resulted from its shorter duration of action. Finally, the effects of both insulin preparations persisted beyond their duration of actions in the type 2 diabetic patient. Conclusions: Subcutaneous regular insulin may be the short-acting insulin preparation of choice for this subset of diabetic patients. Clinical trial is required before a definitive recommendation can be made. PMID:26134836

  7. Perfluoroalkyl substances and glycemic status in pregnant Danish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Richard Christian; Glintborg, Dorte; Timmermann, Clara Amalie Gade

    2018-01-01

    , insulin, C-peptide, homeostatic model of assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and beta cell function (HOMA-%β), and insulin sensitivity (Matsuda index) during the 2-h OGTT. RESULTS: In women with high risk for GDM, a two-fold increase in PFHxS concentration was significantly associated...... with increased fasting glucose, fasting insulin and HOMA-IR after adjusting for age, parity, educational level and pre-pregnancy BMI. Adjusting for the same confounders, a doubling in PFNA concentration was associated with higher fasting insulin and HOMA-%β. In women with low GDM risk, no associations were found...

  8. Homeostatic and Circadian Contribution to EEG and Molecular State Variables of Sleep Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curie, Thomas; Mongrain, Valérie; Dorsaz, Stéphane; Mang, Géraldine M.; Emmenegger, Yann; Franken, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Besides their well-established role in circadian rhythms, our findings that the forebrain expression of the clock-genes Per2 and Dbp increases and decreases, respectively, in relation to time spent awake suggest they also play a role in the homeostatic aspect of sleep regulation. Here, we determined whether time of day modulates the effects of elevated sleep pressure on clock-gene expression. Time of day effects were assessed also for recognized electrophysiological (EEG delta power) and molecular (Homer1a) markers of sleep homeostasis. Design: EEG and qPCR data were obtained for baseline and recovery from 6-h sleep deprivation starting at ZT0, -6, -12, or -18. Setting: Mouse sleep laboratory. Participants: Male mice. Interventions: Sleep deprivation. Results: The sleep-deprivation induced changes in Per2 and Dbp expression importantly varied with time of day, such that Per2 could even decrease during sleep deprivations occurring at the decreasing phase in baseline. Dbp showed similar, albeit opposite dynamics. These unexpected results could be reliably predicted assuming that these transcripts behave according to a driven damped harmonic oscillator. As expected, the sleep-wake distribution accounted for a large degree of the changes in EEG delta power and Homer1a. Nevertheless, the sleep deprivation-induced increase in delta power varied also with time of day with higher than expected levels when recovery sleep started at dark onset. Conclusions: Per2 and delta power are widely used as exclusive state variables of the circadian and homeostatic process, respectively. Our findings demonstrate a considerable cross-talk between these two processes. As Per2 in the brain responds to both sleep loss and time of day, this molecule is well positioned to keep track of and to anticipate homeostatic sleep need. Citation: Curie T; Mongrain V; Dorsaz S; Mang GM; Emmenegger Y; Franken P. Homeostatic and circadian contribution to EEG and molecular state

  9. Homeostatic and circadian contribution to EEG and molecular state variables of sleep regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curie, Thomas; Mongrain, Valérie; Dorsaz, Stéphane; Mang, Géraldine M; Emmenegger, Yann; Franken, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Besides their well-established role in circadian rhythms, our findings that the forebrain expression of the clock-genes Per2 and Dbp increases and decreases, respectively, in relation to time spent awake suggest they also play a role in the homeostatic aspect of sleep regulation. Here, we determined whether time of day modulates the effects of elevated sleep pressure on clock-gene expression. Time of day effects were assessed also for recognized electrophysiological (EEG delta power) and molecular (Homer1a) markers of sleep homeostasis. EEG and qPCR data were obtained for baseline and recovery from 6-h sleep deprivation starting at ZT0, -6, -12, or -18. Mouse sleep laboratory. Male mice. Sleep deprivation. The sleep-deprivation induced changes in Per2 and Dbp expression importantly varied with time of day, such that Per2 could even decrease during sleep deprivations occurring at the decreasing phase in baseline. Dbp showed similar, albeit opposite dynamics. These unexpected results could be reliably predicted assuming that these transcripts behave according to a driven damped harmonic oscillator. As expected, the sleep-wake distribution accounted for a large degree of the changes in EEG delta power and Homer1a. Nevertheless, the sleep deprivation-induced increase in delta power varied also with time of day with higher than expected levels when recovery sleep started at dark onset. Per2 and delta power are widely used as exclusive state variables of the circadian and homeostatic process, respectively. Our findings demonstrate a considerable cross-talk between these two processes. As Per2 in the brain responds to both sleep loss and time of day, this molecule is well positioned to keep track of and to anticipate homeostatic sleep need. Curie T; Mongrain V; Dorsaz S; Mang GM; Emmenegger Y; Franken P. Homeostatic and circadian contribution to EEG and molecular state variables of sleep regulation. SLEEP 2013;36(3):311-323.

  10. Binge Eating, Urine Free Cortisol, and Metabolic Characteristics in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    circumference, fasting insulin and glucose used to calculate the homeostatic model of insulin resistance ( HOMA - IR ), triglycerides and total cholesterol...resistance, or HOMA - IR ), serum triglycerides (mg/dL), serum cholesterol (total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and LDL cholesterol in mg/dL), and... HOMA - IR ), serum triglycerides (mg/dL), serum cholesterol (total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and LDL cholesterol in mg/dL), and systolic and diastolic

  11. Eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in whole blood are differentially and sex-specifically associated with cardiometabolic risk markers in 8-11-year-old danish children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Camilla T.; Eidner, Maj B.; Stark, Ken D.

    2014-01-01

    -day dietary records, physical activity by accelerometry and measured anthropometry, blood pressure, and heart rate. Blood samples were analyzed for whole blood fatty acid composition, cholesterols, triacylglycerol, insulin resistance by the homeostatic model of assessment (HOMA-IR), and inflammatory...

  12. Activity-Dependent Bidirectional Regulation of GAD Expression in a Homeostatic Fashion Is Mediated by BDNF-Dependent and Independent Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanno-Iijima, Yoko; Tanaka, Masami; Iijima, Takatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Homeostatic synaptic plasticity, or synaptic scaling, is a mechanism that tunes neuronal transmission to compensate for prolonged, excessive changes in neuronal activity. Both excitatory and inhibitory neurons undergo homeostatic changes based on synaptic transmission strength, which could effectively contribute to a fine-tuning of circuit activity. However, gene regulation that underlies homeostatic synaptic plasticity in GABAergic (GABA, gamma aminobutyric) neurons is still poorly understood. The present study demonstrated activity-dependent dynamic scaling in which NMDA-R (N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor) activity regulated the expression of GABA synthetic enzymes: glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 and 67 (GAD65 and GAD67). Results revealed that activity-regulated BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) release is necessary, but not sufficient, for activity-dependent up-scaling of these GAD isoforms. Bidirectional forms of activity-dependent GAD expression require both BDNF-dependent and BDNF-independent pathways, both triggered by NMDA-R activity. Additional results indicated that these two GAD genes differ in their responsiveness to chronic changes in neuronal activity, which could be partially caused by differential dependence on BDNF. In parallel to activity-dependent bidirectional scaling in GAD expression, the present study further observed that a chronic change in neuronal activity leads to an alteration in neurotransmitter release from GABAergic neurons in a homeostatic, bidirectional fashion. Therefore, the differential expression of GAD65 and 67 during prolonged changes in neuronal activity may be implicated in some aspects of bidirectional homeostatic plasticity within mature GABAergic presynapses. PMID:26241953

  13. Nutrient sensing and insulin signaling in neuropeptide-expressing immortalized, hypothalamic neurons: A cellular model of insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fick, Laura J; Belsham, Denise D

    2010-08-15

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus represent a significant global health crisis. These two interrelated diseases are typified by perturbed insulin signaling in the hypothalamus. Using novel hypothalamic cell lines, we have begun to elucidate the molecular and intracellular mechanisms involved in the hypothalamic control of energy homeostasis and insulin resistance. In this review, we present evidence of insulin and glucose signaling pathways that lead to changes in neuropeptide gene expression. We have identified some of the molecular mechanisms involved in the control of de novo hypothalamic insulin mRNA expression. And finally, we have defined key mechanisms involved in the etiology of cellular insulin resistance in hypothalamic neurons that may play a fundamental role in cases of high levels of insulin or saturated fatty acids, often linked to the exacerbation of obesity and diabetes.

  14. A model to estimate insulin sensitivity in dairy cows

    OpenAIRE

    Holtenius, Paul; Holtenius, Kjell

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Impairment of the insulin regulation of energy metabolism is considered to be an etiologic key component for metabolic disturbances. Methods for studies of insulin sensitivity thus are highly topical. There are clear indications that reduced insulin sensitivity contributes to the metabolic disturbances that occurs especially among obese lactating cows. Direct measurements of insulin sensitivity are laborious and not suitable for epidemiological studies. We have therefore adopted an i...

  15. The dependence of neuronal encoding efficiency on Hebbian plasticity and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faramarz eFaghihi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Synapses act as information filters by different molecular mechanisms including retrograde messenger that affect neuronal spiking activity. One of the well-known effects of retrograde messenger in presynaptic neurons is a change of the probability of neurotransmitter release. Hebbian learning describe a strengthening of a synapse between a presynaptic input onto a postsynaptic neuron when both pre- and postsynaptic neurons are coactive. In this work, a theory of homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release by retrograde messenger and Hebbian plasticity in neuronal encoding is presented. Encoding efficiency was measured for different synaptic conditions. In order to gain high encoding efficiency, the spiking pattern of a neuron should be dependent on the intensity of the input and show low levels of noise. In this work, we represent spiking trains as zeros and ones (corresponding to non-spike or spike in a time bin, respectively as words with length equal to three. Then the frequency of each word (here eight words is measured using spiking trains. These frequencies are used to measure neuronal efficiency in different conditions and for different parameter values. Results show that neurons that have synapses acting as band-pass filters show the highest efficiency to encode their input when both Hebbian mechanism and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release exist in synapses. Specifically, the integration of homeostatic regulation of feedback inhibition with Hebbian mechanism and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release in the synapses leads to even higher efficiency when high stimulus intensity is presented to the neurons. However, neurons with synapses acting as high-pass filters show no remarkable increase in encoding efficiency for all simulated synaptic plasticity mechanisms.

  16. Rivalry of homeostatic and sensory-evoked emotions: Dehydration attenuates olfactory disgust and its neural correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Lea; Friedrich, Hergen; Federspiel, Andrea; Jann, Kay; Morishima, Yosuke; Landis, Basile Nicolas; Wiest, Roland; Strik, Werner; Dierks, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Neural correlates have been described for emotions evoked by states of homeostatic imbalance (e.g. thirst, hunger, and breathlessness) and for emotions induced by external sensory stimulation (such as fear and disgust). However, the neurobiological mechanisms of their interaction, when they are experienced simultaneously, are still unknown. We investigated the interaction on the neurobiological and the perceptional level using subjective ratings, serum parameters, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in a situation of emotional rivalry, when both a homeostatic and a sensory-evoked emotion were experienced at the same time. Twenty highly dehydrated male subjects rated a disgusting odor as significantly less repulsive when they were thirsty. On the neurobiological level, we found that this reduction in subjective disgust during thirst was accompanied by a significantly reduced neural activity in the insular cortex, a brain area known to be considerably involved in processing of disgust. Furthermore, during the experience of disgust in the satiated condition, we observed a significant functional connectivity between brain areas responding to the disgusting odor, which was absent during the stimulation in the thirsty condition. These results suggest interference of conflicting emotions: an acute homeostatic imbalance can attenuate the experience of another emotion evoked by the sensory perception of a potentially harmful external agent. This finding offers novel insights with regard to the behavioral relevance of biologically different types of emotions, indicating that some types of emotions are more imperative for behavior than others. As a general principle, this modulatory effect during the conflict of homeostatic and sensory-evoked emotions may function to safeguard survival. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of intranasal insulin application on the hypothalamic BOLD response to glucose ingestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Opstal, Anna M.; Akintola, Abimbola A.; Elst, Marjan van der

    2017-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a crucial structure in the brain that responds to metabolic cues and regulates energy homeostasis. Patients with type 2 diabetes demonstrate a lack of hypothalamic neuronal response after glucose ingestion, which is suggested to be an underlying cause of the disease. In this s......The hypothalamus is a crucial structure in the brain that responds to metabolic cues and regulates energy homeostasis. Patients with type 2 diabetes demonstrate a lack of hypothalamic neuronal response after glucose ingestion, which is suggested to be an underlying cause of the disease...... effect. Our data provide proof of concept for future experiments testing the potential of intranasal application of insulin to ameliorate defective homeostatic control in patients with type 2 diabetes....

  18. Insulin secretion and insulin resistance in Korean women with gestational diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sae Jeong; Kim, Tae Nyun; Baik, Sei Hyun; Kim, Tae Sun; Lee, Kwan Woo; Nam, Moonsuk; Park, Yong Soo; Woo, Jeong-Teak; Kim, Young Seol; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2013-05-01

    The aim was to compare the insulin sensitivity and secretion index of pregnant Korean women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), gestational impaired glucose tolerance (GIGT; only one abnormal value according to the Carpenter and Coustan criteria), and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). A cross-sectional study was performed with 1,163 pregnant women with positive (1-hour plasma glucose ≥ 7.2 mmol/L) in a 50-g oral glucose challenge test (OGCT). The 100-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was used to stratify the participants into three groups: NGT (n = 588), GIGT (n = 294), and GDM (n = 281). The GDM group had higher homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and lower insulin sensitivity index (ISOGTT), quantitative insulin sensitivity check index, homeostasis model assessment for estimation of index β-cell secretion (HOMA-B), first and second phase insulin secretion, and insulin secretion-sensitivity index (ISSI) than the NGT group (p ≤ 0.001 for all). Moreover, the GIGT group had lower ISOGTT, HOMA-B, first and second phase insulin secretion, and ISSI than the NGT group (p insulin secretion status than the 3-hour abnormal levels group. Korean women with GDM show impairments of both insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. In addition, GIGT is associated with both β-cell dysfunction and insulin resistance.

  19. Nonlinear feedback drives homeostatic plasticity in H2O2 stress response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulev, Youlian; Morlot, Sandrine; Matifas, Audrey; Huang, Bo; Molin, Mikael; Toledano, Michel B; Charvin, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    Homeostatic systems that rely on genetic regulatory networks are intrinsically limited by the transcriptional response time, which may restrict a cell’s ability to adapt to unanticipated environmental challenges. To bypass this limitation, cells have evolved mechanisms whereby exposure to mild stress increases their resistance to subsequent threats. However, the mechanisms responsible for such adaptive homeostasis remain largely unknown. Here, we used live-cell imaging and microfluidics to investigate the adaptive response of budding yeast to temporally controlled H2O2 stress patterns. We demonstrate that acquisition of tolerance is a systems-level property resulting from nonlinearity of H2O2 scavenging by peroxiredoxins and our study reveals that this regulatory scheme induces a striking hormetic effect of extracellular H2O2 stress on replicative longevity. Our study thus provides a novel quantitative framework bridging the molecular architecture of a cellular homeostatic system to the emergence of nonintuitive adaptive properties. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23971.001 PMID:28418333

  20. Insulin induces a shift in lipid and primary carbon metabolites in a model of fasting-induced insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, Keedrian I.; La Frano, Michael R.; Fahrmann, Johannes; Grapov, Dmitry; Viscarra, Jose A.; Newman, John W.; Fiehn, Oliver; Crocker, Daniel E.; Filipp, Fabian V.; Ortiz, Rudy M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Prolonged fasting in northern elephant seals (NES) is characterized by a reliance on lipid metabolism, conservation of protein, and reduced plasma insulin. During early fasting, glucose infusion previously reduced plasma free fatty acids (FFA); however, during late-fasting, it induced an atypical elevation in FFA despite comparable increases in insulin during both periods suggestive of a dynamic shift in tissue responsiveness to glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Objective To better assess the contribution of insulin to this fasting-associated shift in substrate metabolism. Methods We compared the responses of plasma metabolites (amino acids (AA), FFA, endocannabinoids (EC), and primary carbon metabolites (PCM)) to an insulin infusion (65 mU/kg) in early- and late-fasted NES pups (n = 5/group). Plasma samples were collected prior to infusion (T0) and at 10, 30, 60, and 120 min post-infusion, and underwent untargeted and targeted metabolomics analyses utilizing a variety of GC-MS and LC-MS technologies. Results In early fasting, the majority (72%) of metabolite trajectories return to baseline levels within 2 h, but not in late fasting indicative of an increase in tissue sensitivity to insulin. In late-fasting, increases in FFA and ketone pools, coupled with decreases in AA and PCM, indicate a shift toward lipolysis, beta-oxidation, ketone metabolism, and decreased protein catabolism. Conversely, insulin increased PCM AUC in late fasting suggesting that gluconeogenic pathways are activated. Insulin also decreased FFA AUC between early and late fasting suggesting that insulin suppresses triglyceride hydrolysis. Conclusion Naturally adapted tolerance to prolonged fasting in these mammals is likely accomplished by suppressing insulin levels and activity, providing novel insight on the evolution of insulin during a condition of temporary, reversible insulin resistance. PMID:28757815

  1. Cross-Validation of a Glucose-Insulin-Glucagon Pharmacodynamics Model for Simulation using Data from Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Sabrina Lyngbye; Ranjan, Ajenthen; Møller, Jan Kloppenborg

    2017-01-01

    three PD model test fits in each of the seven subjects. Thus, we successfully validated the PD model by leave-one-out cross-validation in seven out of eight T1D patients. Conclusions: The PD model accurately simulates glucose excursions based on plasma insulin and glucagon concentrations. The reported...... for concentrations of glucagon, insulin, and glucose. We fitted pharmacokinetic (PK) models to insulin and glucagon data using maximum likelihood and maximum a posteriori estimation methods. Similarly, we fitted a pharmacodynamic (PD) model to glucose data. The PD model included multiplicative effects of insulin...... and glucagon on EGP. Bias and precision of PD model test fits were assessed by mean predictive error (MPE) and mean absolute predictive error (MAPE). Results: Assuming constant variables in a subject across nonoutlier visits and using thresholds of ±15% MPE and 20% MAPE, we accepted at least one and at most...

  2. Biochemical adaptations of mammalian hibernation: exploring squirrels as a perspective model for naturally induced reversible insulin resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, C-W.; Biggar, K.K.; Storey, K.B. [Carleton University, Department of Biology, Institute of Biochemistry, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2013-01-28

    An important disease among human metabolic disorders is type 2 diabetes mellitus. This disorder involves multiple physiological defects that result from high blood glucose content and eventually lead to the onset of insulin resistance. The combination of insulin resistance, increased glucose production, and decreased insulin secretion creates a diabetic metabolic environment that leads to a lifetime of management. Appropriate models are critical for the success of research. As such, a unique model providing insight into the mechanisms of reversible insulin resistance is mammalian hibernation. Hibernators, such as ground squirrels and bats, are excellent examples of animals exhibiting reversible insulin resistance, for which a rapid increase in body weight is required prior to entry into dormancy. Hibernator studies have shown differential regulation of specific molecular pathways involved in reversible resistance to insulin. The present review focuses on this growing area of research and the molecular mechanisms that regulate glucose homeostasis, and explores the roles of the Akt signaling pathway during hibernation. Here, we propose a link between hibernation, a well-documented response to periods of environmental stress, and reversible insulin resistance, potentially facilitated by key alterations in the Akt signaling network, PPAR-γ/PGC-1α regulation, and non-coding RNA expression. Coincidentally, many of the same pathways are frequently found to be dysregulated during insulin resistance in human type 2 diabetes. Hence, the molecular networks that may regulate reversible insulin resistance in hibernating mammals represent a novel approach by providing insight into medical treatment of insulin resistance in humans.

  3. Biochemical adaptations of mammalian hibernation: exploring squirrels as a perspective model for naturally induced reversible insulin resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C-W.; Biggar, K.K.; Storey, K.B.

    2013-01-01

    An important disease among human metabolic disorders is type 2 diabetes mellitus. This disorder involves multiple physiological defects that result from high blood glucose content and eventually lead to the onset of insulin resistance. The combination of insulin resistance, increased glucose production, and decreased insulin secretion creates a diabetic metabolic environment that leads to a lifetime of management. Appropriate models are critical for the success of research. As such, a unique model providing insight into the mechanisms of reversible insulin resistance is mammalian hibernation. Hibernators, such as ground squirrels and bats, are excellent examples of animals exhibiting reversible insulin resistance, for which a rapid increase in body weight is required prior to entry into dormancy. Hibernator studies have shown differential regulation of specific molecular pathways involved in reversible resistance to insulin. The present review focuses on this growing area of research and the molecular mechanisms that regulate glucose homeostasis, and explores the roles of the Akt signaling pathway during hibernation. Here, we propose a link between hibernation, a well-documented response to periods of environmental stress, and reversible insulin resistance, potentially facilitated by key alterations in the Akt signaling network, PPAR-γ/PGC-1α regulation, and non-coding RNA expression. Coincidentally, many of the same pathways are frequently found to be dysregulated during insulin resistance in human type 2 diabetes. Hence, the molecular networks that may regulate reversible insulin resistance in hibernating mammals represent a novel approach by providing insight into medical treatment of insulin resistance in humans

  4. Fundamental role of bistability in optimal homeostatic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guanyu

    2013-03-01

    Bistability is a fundamental phenomenon in nature and has a number of fine properties. However, these properties are consequences of bistability at the physiological level, which do not explain why it had to emerge during evolution. Using optimal homeostasis as the first principle and Pontryagin's Maximum Principle as the optimization approach, I find that bistability emerges as an indispensable control mechanism. Because the mathematical model is general and the result is independent of parameters, it is likely that most biological systems use bistability to control homeostasis. Glucose homeostasis represents a good example. It turns out that bistability is the only solution to a dilemma in glucose homeostasis: high insulin efficiency is required for rapid plasma glucose clearance, whereas an insulin sparing state is required to guarantee the brain's safety during fasting. This new perspective can illuminate studies on the twin epidemics of obesity and diabetes and the corresponding intervening strategies. For example, overnutrition and sedentary lifestyle may represent sudden environmental changes that cause the lose of optimality, which may contribute to the marked rise of obesity and diabetes in our generation.

  5. Flexibility in insulin prescription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This communication explores the concept of flexibility, a propos insulin preparations and insulin regimes used in the management of type 2 diabetes. The flexibility of an insulin regime or preparation is defined as their ability to be injected at variable times, with variable injection-meal time gaps, in a dose frequency and quantum determined by shared decision making, with a minimal requirement of glucose monitoring and health professional consultation, with no compromise on safety, efficiency and tolerability. The relative flexibility of various basal, prandial and dual action insulins, as well as intensive regimes, is compared. The biopsychosocial model of health is used to assess the utility of different insulins while encouraging a philosophy of flexible insulin usage.

  6. Growth of rhombohedral insulin crystals and in vitro modeling of their dissolution in the blood stream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanev, C.N.; Dimitrov, I.L.; Hodzhaoglu, F.V. [Rostislaw Kaischew Institute of Physical Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2011-02-15

    Insulin is the only protein that is secreted in a crystalline form in a human healthy body. To mimic the secretion process we used NaCl salting-out to growing tiny rhombohedral Zn-insulin crystals. The dissolution of the insulin crystals is of special interest for the therapeutical praxis, because the human body is supplied with the physiologically active monomers of the insulin through dissolution of the crystalline granules secreted in the pancreatic {beta}-cells. Sets of tiny rhombohedral Zn-insulin crystals, which resembled the granules secreted in the {beta}-cells, were subjected to dissolution in blood plasma and model solutions. The impacts of the solution composition, flow rate, pH and ionic strength on the insulin crystal dissolution were investigated. The effect of the blood plasma was determinant because it dissolved the rhombohedral Zn-insulin crystals almost instantly, while the effects of solution's physicochemical characteristics were of minor importance. In addition, we found that the presence of abundant zinc ions suppressed the dissolution of the insulin crystals. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Neutral dynamics and cell renewal of colonic crypts in homeostatic regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendrik, A. J.; Romanelli, L.; Rotondo, E.

    2018-05-01

    The self renewal process in colonic crypts is the object of several studies. We present here a new compartment model with the following characteristics: (a) we distinguish different classes of cells: stem cells, six generations of transit amplifying cells and the differentiated cells; (b) in order to take into account the monoclonal character of crypts in homeostatic regimes we include symmetric divisions of the stem cells. We first consider the dynamic differential equations that describe the evolution of the mean values of the populations, but the small observed value of the total number of cells involved plus the huge dispersion of experimental data found in the literature leads us to study the stochastic discrete process. This analysis allows us to study fluctuations, the neutral drift that leads to monoclonality, and the effects of the fixation of mutant clones.

  8. Insulin signaling misregulation underlies circadian and cognitive deficits in a Drosophila fragile X model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monyak, R E; Emerson, D; Schoenfeld, B P; Zheng, X; Chambers, D B; Rosenfelt, C; Langer, S; Hinchey, P; Choi, C H; McDonald, T V; Bolduc, F V; Sehgal, A; McBride, S M J; Jongens, T A

    2017-08-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is an undertreated neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by low intelligence quotent and a wide range of other symptoms including disordered sleep and autism. Although FXS is the most prevalent inherited cause of intellectual disability, its mechanistic underpinnings are not well understood. Using Drosophila as a model of FXS, we showed that select expression of dfmr1 in the insulin-producing cells (IPCs) of the brain was sufficient to restore normal circadian behavior and to rescue the memory deficits in the fragile X mutant fly. Examination of the insulin signaling (IS) pathway revealed elevated levels of Drosophila insulin-like peptide 2 (Dilp2) in the IPCs and elevated IS in the dfmr1 mutant brain. Consistent with a causal role for elevated IS in dfmr1 mutant phenotypes, the expression of dfmr1 specifically in the IPCs reduced IS, and genetic reduction of the insulin pathway also led to amelioration of circadian and memory defects. Furthermore, we showed that treatment with the FDA-approved drug metformin also rescued memory. Finally, we showed that reduction of IS is required at different time points to rescue circadian behavior and memory. Our results indicate that insulin misregulation underlies the circadian and cognitive phenotypes displayed by the Drosophila fragile X model, and thus reveal a metabolic pathway that can be targeted by new and already approved drugs to treat fragile X patients.

  9. Food image-induced brain activation is not diminished by insulin infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfort-DeAguiar, R; Seo, D; Naik, S; Hwang, J; Lacadie, C; Schmidt, C; Constable, R T; Sinha, R; Sherwin, R

    2016-11-01

    The obesity epidemic appears to be driven in large part by our modern environment inundated by food cues, which may influence our desire to eat. Although insulin decreases food intake in both animals and humans, the effect of insulin on motivation for food in the presence of food cues is not known. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an intravenous insulin infusion on the brain response to visual food cues, hunger and food craving in non-obese human subjects. Thirty-four right-handed healthy non-obese subjects (19F/15M, age: 29±8 years.; BMI: 23.1±2.1 kg m -2 ) were divided in two groups matched by age and BMI; the insulin group (18 subjects) underwent a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic-clamp, and the control group (16 subjects) received an intravenous saline infusion, while viewing high and low-calorie food and non-food pictures during a functional MRI scan. Motivation for food was determined via analog scales for hunger, wanting and liking ratings. Food images induced brain responses in the hypothalamus, striatum, amygdala, insula, ventromedial prefrontal cortex (PFC), dorsolateral PFC and occipital lobe (whole brain correction, Pinsulin and saline infusion groups. Hunger ratings increased throughout the MRI scan and correlated with preference for high-calorie food pictures (r=0.70; Pbrain activity nor food cravings were affected by hyperinsulinemia or hormonal status (leptin and ghrelin levels) (P=NS). Our data demonstrate that visual food cues induce a strong response in motivation/reward and cognitive-executive control brain regions in non-obese subjects, but that these responses are not diminished by hyperinsulinemia per se. These findings suggest that our modern food cue saturated environment may be sufficient to overpower homeostatic hormonal signals, and thus contribute to the current obesity epidemic.

  10. Central insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) restores whole-body insulin action in a model of age-related insulin resistance and IGF-1 decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Derek M; Farias Quipildor, Gabriela; Mao, Kai; Zhang, Xueying; Wan, Junxiang; Apontes, Pasha; Cohen, Pinchas; Barzilai, Nir

    2016-02-01

    Low insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling is associated with improved longevity, but is paradoxically linked with several age-related diseases in humans. Insulin-like growth factor-1 has proven to be particularly beneficial to the brain, where it confers protection against features of neuronal and cognitive decline. While aging is characterized by central insulin resistance in the face of hyperinsulinemia, the somatotropic axis markedly declines in older humans. Thus, we hypothesized that increasing IGF-1 in the brain may prove to be a novel therapeutic alternative to overcome central insulin resistance and restore whole-body insulin action in aging. Utilizing hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps, we show that old insulin-resistant rats with age-related declines in IGF-1 level demonstrate markedly improved whole-body insulin action, when treated with central IGF-1, as compared to central vehicle or insulin (P IGF-1, but not insulin, suppressed hepatic glucose production and increased glucose disposal rates in aging rats (P IGF-1 action in the brain and periphery provides a 'balance' between its beneficial and detrimental actions. Therefore, we propose that strategies aimed at 'tipping the balance' of IGF-1 action centrally are the optimal approach to achieve healthy aging and longevity in humans. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Toward understanding insulin fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brange, J; Andersen, L; Laursen, E D; Meyn, G; Rasmussen, E

    1997-05-01

    Formation of insulin fibrils is a physical process by which partially unfolded insulin molecules interact with each other to form linear aggregates. Shielding of hydrophobic domains is the main driving force for this process, but formation of intermolecular beta-sheet may further stabilize the fibrillar structure. Conformational displacement of the B-chain C-terminal with exposure of nonpolar, aliphatic core residues, including A2, A3, B11, and B15, plays a crucial role in the fibrillation process. Recent crystal analyses and molecular modeling studies have suggested that when insulin fibrillates this exposed domain interacts with a hydrophobic surface domain formed by the aliphatic residues A13, B6, B14, B17, and B18, normally buried when three insulin dimers form a hexamer. In rabbit immunization experiments, insulin fibrils did not elicit an increased immune response with respect to formation of IgG insulin antibodies when compared with native insulin. In contrast, the IgE response increased with increasing content of insulin in fibrillar form. Strategies and practical approaches to prevent insulin from forming fibrils are reviewed. Stabilization of the insulin hexameric structure and blockage of hydrophobic interfaces by addition of surfactants are the most effective means of counteracting insulin fibrillation.

  12. Evaluation of Apelin and Insulin Resistance in Patients with PCOS and Therapeutic Effect of Drospirenone-Ethinylestradiol Plus Metformin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xianchang; Wu, Xingguo; Zhou, Yan; Yu, Xinyan; Zhang, Wenjuan

    2015-08-28

    The aim of this study was to determine the relevance of apelin and insulin resistance (IR) with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and to assess the possible therapeutic effect of the combined therapy of drospirenone-ethinylestradiol (DRSP-EE) combined with metformin. Sixty-three PCOS patients and 40 non-PCOS infertile patients were recruited. The fasting serum levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone (T), prolactin (PRL), estradiol (E2), glucose (FBG), insulin (FINS), and apelin at the early follicular phase were measured. To further investigate the relation between apelin and IR, we treated the PCOS patients with DRSP-EE (1 tablet daily, 21 d/month) plus metformin (500 mg tid) for 3 months. All of the above indices were measured again after treatment. 1) Levels of apelin, LH, LH/FSH, T, and FINS, as well as homeostatic model assessment of IR (HOMA-IR) in PCOS patients, were significantly higher than in the control group before treatment. 2) These indices significantly decreased after treatment with DRSP-EE plus metformin. 3) Correlation analysis showed that apelin level was positively correlated with body mass index (BMI), FINS level, and HOMA-IR. Apelin level significantly increased in PCOS patients. The combined therapy of DRSP-EE plus metformin not only decreases IR, but also improves apelin level. This combination is a superior approach for PCOS treatment.

  13. Insulin sensitivity and albuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilz, Stefan; Rutters, Femke; Nijpels, Giel

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Accumulating evidence suggests an association between insulin sensitivity and albuminuria, which, even in the normal range, is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We evaluated whether insulin sensitivity is associated with albuminuria in healthy subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN...... AND METHODS: We investigated 1,415 healthy, nondiabetic participants (mean age 43.9 ± 8.3 years; 54.3% women) from the RISC (Relationship between Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular Disease) study, of whom 852 participated in a follow-up examination after 3 years. At baseline, insulin sensitivity...... was assessed by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps, expressed as the M/I value. Oral glucose tolerance test-based insulin sensitivity (OGIS), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) were determined at baseline and follow-up. RESULTS...

  14. Identification of individualised empirical models of carbohydrate and insulin effects on T1DM blood glucose dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cescon, Marzia; Johansson, Rolf; Renard, Eric; Maran, Alberto

    2014-07-01

    One of the main limiting factors in improving glucose control for type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) subjects is the lack of a precise description of meal and insulin intake effects on blood glucose. Knowing the magnitude and duration of such effects would be useful not only for patients and physicians, but also for the development of a controller targeting glycaemia regulation. Therefore, in this paper we focus on estimating low-complexity yet physiologically sound and individualised multi-input single-output (MISO) models of the glucose metabolism in T1DM able to reflect the basic dynamical features of the glucose-insulin metabolic system in response to a meal intake or an insulin injection. The models are continuous-time second-order transfer functions relating the amount of carbohydrate of a meal and the insulin units of the accordingly administered dose (inputs) to plasma glucose evolution (output) and consist of few parameters clinically relevant to be estimated. The estimation strategy is continuous-time data-driven system identification and exploits a database in which meals and insulin boluses are separated in time, allowing the unique identification of the model parameters.

  15. A Mechanistic Model of Intermittent Gastric Emptying and Glucose-Insulin Dynamics following a Meal Containing Milk Components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priska Stahel

    Full Text Available To support decision-making around diet selection choices to manage glycemia following a meal, a novel mechanistic model of intermittent gastric emptying and plasma glucose-insulin dynamics was developed. Model development was guided by postprandial timecourses of plasma glucose, insulin and the gastric emptying marker acetaminophen in infant calves fed meals of 2 or 4 L milk replacer. Assigning a fast, slow or zero first-order gastric emptying rate to each interval between plasma samples fit acetaminophen curves with prediction errors equal to 9% of the mean observed acetaminophen concentration. Those gastric emptying parameters were applied to glucose appearance in conjunction with minimal models of glucose disposal and insulin dynamics to describe postprandial glycemia and insulinemia. The final model contains 20 parameters, 8 of which can be obtained by direct measurement and 12 by fitting to observations. The minimal model of intestinal glucose delivery contains 2 gastric emptying parameters and a third parameter describing the time lag between emptying and appearance of glucose in plasma. Sensitivity analysis of the aggregate model revealed that gastric emptying rate influences area under the plasma insulin curve but has little effect on area under the plasma glucose curve. This result indicates that pancreatic responsiveness is influenced by gastric emptying rate as a consequence of the quasi-exponential relationship between plasma glucose concentration and pancreatic insulin release. The fitted aggregate model was able to reproduce the multiple postprandial rises and falls in plasma glucose concentration observed in calves consuming a normal-sized meal containing milk components.

  16. Evaluation of organ-specific glucose metabolism by 18F-FDG in insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) knockout mice as a model of insulin resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Chao; Nakamura, Akinobu; Minamimoto, Ryogo; Shinoda, Kazuaki; Tateishi, Ukihide; Terauchi, Yasuo; Inoue, Tomio; Goto, Atsuhi; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a physiological condition in which the body produces insulin but does not result in a sufficient biological effect. Insulin resistance is usually asymptomatic but is associated with health problems and is a factor in the metabolic syndrome. The aim of the present study is to clarify organ-specific insulin resistance in normal daily conditions using [ 18 F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([ 18 F]-FDG). The biodistribution of [ 18 F]-FDG was examined in insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) knockout mice, an animal model of skeletal muscle insulin resistance, and C57BL/6J (wild-type) mice with and without insulin loading. Mice received 0.5 MBq of [ 18 F]-FDG injected into the tail vein, immediately followed by nothing (control cohorts) or an intraperitoneal injection of 1.5 mU/g body weight of human insulin as an insulin loading test. Blood glucose concentrations for all of the experimental animals were assessed at 0, 20, 40, and 60 min post-injection. The mice were subsequently killed, and tissue was collected for evaluation of [ 18 F]-FDG biodistribution. The radioactivity of each organ was measured using a gamma counter. In the absence of insulin, the blood glucose concentrations of wild-type mice (132±26 mg/dl) and IRS-1 knockout mice (134±18 mg/dl) were not significantly different. Blood glucose concentrations decreased following insulin administration, with lower concentrations in wild-type mice than in knockout mice at 20, 40, and 60 min. A statistically significant difference in [ 18 F]-FDG uptake between wild-type mice and IRS-1 knockout mice was confirmed in the heart, abdominal muscle, and femoral muscle. With insulin loading, [ 18 F]-FDG uptake in the heart, back muscle, and abdominal muscle was significantly increased compared to without insulin loading in both wild-type mice and knockout mice. Our results showed that IR significantly affected [ 18 F]-FDG uptake in the heart in normal daily conditions. IR was associated with

  17. Lipid metabolism disturbances contribute to insulin resistance and decrease insulin sensitivity by malathion exposure in Wistar rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasram, Mohamed Montassar; Bouzid, Kahena; Douib, Ines Bini; Annabi, Alya; El Elj, Naziha; El Fazaa, Saloua; Abdelmoula, Jaouida; Gharbi, Najoua

    2015-04-01

    Several studies showed that organophosphorus pesticides disturb glucose homeostasis and can increase incidence of metabolic disorders and diabetes via insulin resistance. The current study investigates the influence of malathion on glucose metabolism regulation, in vivo, during subchronic exposure. Malathion was administered orally (200 mg/kg), once a day for 28 consecutive days. Plasma glucose, insulin and Glycated hemoglobin levels were significantly increased while hepatic glycogen content was decreased in intoxicated animals compared with the control group. Furthermore, there was a significant disturbance of lipid content in subchronic treated and post-treated rats deprived of malathion for one month. In addition, we used the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) to assess insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and pancreatic β-cell function (HOMA-β). Our results show that malathion increases insulin resistance biomarkers and decreases insulin sensitivity indices. Statistical analysis demonstrates that there was a positive and strong significant correlation between insulin level and insulin resistance indices, HOMA-IR, HOMA-β. Similarly, a negative and significant correlation was also found between insulin level and insulin sensitivity indices. For the first time, we demonstrate that malathion induces insulin resistance in vivo using homeostasis model assessment and these changes were detectable one month after the end of exposure. To explain insulin resistance induced by malathion we focus on lipid metabolism disturbances and their interaction with many proteins involved in insulin signaling pathways.

  18. Homeostatic study of the effects of sportswear color on the contest outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jian-Qin; Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Wu, Ren-Le; Ruan, Chang-Xiong; He, Li-Mei; Liu, Song-Hao

    2008-12-01

    There are effects of sportswear color on the contest outcome. It has been explained from the psychological and perceptual viewpoints, respectively. It was studied by integrating the homeostatic theory of exercise training and autonomic nervous model of color vision in this paper. It was found that the effects of sportswear color on the contest outcome depend on autonomic nervous homeostasis (ANH). Color can be classified into hot color such as red, orange and yellow and cold color such as green, blue and violet. If the athletes have been in ANH, there are no effects of sportswear color on the contest outcome. If the autonomic nervous system is far from ANH due to exercise induced fatigue, wearing cold color had no predominance for cold-hot matches, and wearing white had no predominance for white-color matches.

  19. Model of the Glucose-Insulin-Glucagon Dynamics after Subcutaneous Administration of a Glucagon Rescue Bolus in Healthy Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Sabrina Lyngbye; Møller, Jan Kloppenborg; Haidar, Ahmad

    In healthy individuals, insulin and glucagon work in a complex fashion to maintain blood glucose levels within a narrow range. This regulation is distorted in patients with diabetes. The hepatic glucose response due to an elevated glucagon level depends on the current insulin concentration and thus...... endogenous glucose production (EGP) can not be modelled without knowledge of the concentration of both hormones in plasma. Furthermore, literature suggests an upper limit to EGP irrespective of glucagon levels. We build a simulation model of the glucose-insulin-glucagon dynamics in man including saturation...... effect of EGP. Ten healthy subjects received a 1 mg subcutaneous (SC) glucagon bolus (GlucaGen®). Plasma samples were collected until 300 minutes post dose and analyzed for glucagon, insulin, and glucose concentrations. All observations were used to fit a physiological model of the glucose...

  20. An acute rat in vivo screening model to predict compounds that alter blood glucose and/or insulin regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brott, David A; Diamond, Melody; Campbell, Pam; Zuvich, Andy; Cheatham, Letitia; Bentley, Patricia; Gorko, Mary Ann; Fikes, James; Saye, JoAnne

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced glucose dysregulation and insulin resistance have been associated with weight gain and potential induction and/or exacerbation of diabetes mellitus in the clinic suggesting they may be safety biomarkers when developing antipsychotics. Glucose and insulin have also been suggested as potential efficacy biomarkers for some oncology compounds. The objective of this study was to qualify a medium throughput rat in vivo acute Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Test (IVGTT) for predicting compounds that will induce altered blood glucose and/or insulin levels. Acute and sub-chronic studies were performed to qualify an acute IVGTT model. Double cannulated male rats (Han-Wistar and Sprague-Dawley) were administered vehicle, olanzapine, aripiprazole or other compounds at t=-44min for acute studies and at time=-44min on the last day of dosing for sub-chronic studies, treated with dextrose (time=0min; i.v.) and blood collected using an automated Culex® system for glucose and insulin analysis (time=-45, -1, 2, 10, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 120, 150 and 180min). Olanzapine significantly increased glucose and insulin area under the curve (AUC) values while aripiprazole AUC values were similar to control, in both acute and sub-chronic studies. All atypical antipsychotics evaluated were consistent with literature references of clinical weight gain. As efficacy biomarkers, insulin AUC but not glucose AUC values were increased with a compound known to have insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) activity, compared to control treatment. These studies qualified the medium throughput acute IVGTT model to more quickly screen compounds for 1) safety - the potential to elicit glucose dysregulation and/or insulin resistance and 2) efficacy - as a surrogate for compounds affecting the glucose and/or insulin regulatory pathways. These data demonstrate that the same in vivo rat model and assays can be used to predict both clinical safety and efficacy of compounds. © 2013.

  1. Calcium phosphate-PEG-insulin-casein (CAPIC) particles as oral delivery systems for insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morçöl, T; Nagappan, P; Nerenbaum, L; Mitchell, A; Bell, S J D

    2004-06-11

    An oral delivery system for insulin was developed and functional activity was tested in a non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice model. Calcium phosphate particles containing insulin was synthesized in the presence of PEG-3350 and modified by aggregating the particles with caseins to obtain the calcium phosphate-PEG-insulin-casein (CAPIC) oral insulin delivery system. Single doses of CAPIC formulation were tested in NOD mice under fasting or fed conditions to evaluate the glycemic activity. The blood glucose levels were monitored every 1-2h for 12h following the treatments using an ACCU CHECK blood glucose monitoring system. Orally administered and subcutaneously injected free insulin solution served as controls in the study. Based on the results obtained we propose that: (1). the biological activity of insulin is preserved in CAPIC formulation; (2). insulin in CAPIC formulations, but not the free insulin, displays a prolonged hypoglycemic effect after oral administration to diabetic mice; (3). CAPIC formulation protects insulin from degradation while passing through the acidic environment of the GI track until it is released in the less acidic environment of the intestines where it can be absorbed in its biologically active form; (4). CAPIC formulation represents a new and unique oral delivery system for insulin and other macromolecules.

  2. Insulin-like activity in the retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, A.

    1986-01-01

    A number of studies have recently demonstrated that insulin or a homologous peptide may be synthesized outside the pancreas also. The present study was designed to investigate whether insulin-like activity exists in the retina, and if it exists, whether it is due to local synthesis of insulin or a similar peptide in the retina. To determine whether the insulin-like immunoreactivity in retinal glial cells is due to binding and uptake or local synthesis of insulin, a combined approach of immunocytochemistry and in situ DNA-RNA hybridization techniques was used on cultured rat retinal glial cells. Insulin-like immunoreactivity was demonstrated in the cytoplasma of these cells. In situ hybridization studies using labeled rat insulin cDNA indicated that these cells contain the mRNA necessary for de novo synthesis of insulin or a closely homologous peptide. Since human retinal cells have, as yet, not been conveniently grown in culture, an ocular tumor cell line, human Y79 retinoblastoma was used as a model to extend these investigations. The presence of insulin-like immunoreactivity as well as insulin-specific mRNA was demonstrated in this cell line. Light microscopic autoradiography following incubation of isolated rat retinal cells with 125 I-insulin showed the presence of insulin binding sites on the photoreceptors and amarcine cells. On the basis of these observations that rat retina glial cells, including Muller cells are sites of synthesis of insulin or a similar peptide, a model for the pathogenesis of dabetic retinopathy is proposed

  3. Fasting insulin, insulin resistance and risk of hypertension in the general population: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Han, Lili; Hu, Dayi

    2017-01-01

    Studies on the association of fasting insulin concentrations or insulin resistance with subsequent risk of hypertension have yielded conflicting results. To quantitatively assess the association of fasting insulin concentrations or homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) with incident hypertension in a general population by performing a meta-analysis. We searched the PubMed and Embase databases until August 31, 2016 for prospective observational studies investigating the elevated fasting insulin concentrations or HOMA-IR with subsequent risk of hypertension in the general population. Pooled risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of hypertension was calculated for the highest versus the lowest category of fasting insulin or HOMA-IR. Eleven studies involving 10,230 hypertension cases were identified from 55,059 participants. Meta-analysis showed that the pooled adjusted RR of hypertension was 1.54 (95% CI 1.34-1.76) for fasting insulin concentrations and 1.43 (95% CI 1.27-1.62) for HOMA-IR comparing the highest to the lowest category. Subgroup analysis results showed that the association of fasting insulin concentrations with subsequent risk of hypertension seemed more pronounced in women (RR 2.07; 95% CI 1.19-3.60) than in men (RR 1.48; 95% CI 1.17-1.88). This meta-analysis suggests that elevated fasting insulin concentrations or insulin resistance as estimated by homeostasis model assessment is independently associated with an exacerbated risk of hypertension in the general population. Early intervention of hyperinsulinemia or insulin resistance may help clinicians to identify the high risk of hypertensive population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. INFLUENCE OF HERBAL EXTRACTS ON METABOLIC DISTURBANCES IN DIABETES MELLITUS AND INSULIN RESISTANCE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Yakimova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to assess the influence on metabolic processes of herbal extracts, used in diets with different fat content, in diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance model.Material and methods. The experiments were performing on 90 noninbred male albino rats. Diabetes mellitus was modeling with twice-repeated intraperitoneal streptozotocine (30 mg/kg injections. For the insulin resistance formation animals were fad meal with 30% fat content. Against the background rats were administering into the stomach nettle leafs (Urtica dioica L., 100 mg/kg, burdock roots (Arctium lappa L., 25 mg/kg extracts or intraperitoneal insulin preparation Actrapide HM Penfill (3 mg/kg daily during 10 days. During period of agents introduction one-half of animals continued to receive food with high fat content, the other half received diet with 8% fat content. The third rats group received only food with low fat content without extracts or insulin administration. In blood was measured the glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, creatinine, urea, uric acid content, in liver homogenates – glycogen, protein content, aminotransferases and glucose-6phosphatase activity, in muscle homogenates – glycogen and protein content.Results. After streptozotocine injections and diet with 30% fat content the blood glucose level became by 4.0–5.3 fold more than level of intact animals, increased the hemoglobin glycosylation, also creatinine, urea, uric acid blood content, in liver and muscle homogenates raised glycogen content, decreased protein quantity, in liver homogenates increased aminotranferases and glucose-6-phosphatase activity. In animals only feeding with 8% fat diminished hyperglycemia, creatinine blood retention, the liver glycogen content and recovered its protein resources. The nettle or burdock extracts administrating to animals that continued to receive high fat meal decreased the blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin and creatinine content, the liver

  5. Explaining psychological insulin resistance in adults with non-insulin-treated type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmes-Truscott, Elizabeth; Skinner, Timothy Chas; Pouwer, F

    2016-01-01

    to the model. CONCLUSIONS: Psychological insulin resistance may reflect broader distress about diabetes and concerns about its treatment but not general beliefs about medicines, depression or anxiety. Reducing diabetes distress and current treatment concerns may improve attitudes towards insulin as a potential......AIMS: To investigate the contribution of general and diabetes-specific emotional wellbeing and beliefs about medicines in the prediction of insulin therapy appraisals in adults with non-insulin-treated type 2 diabetes. METHODS: The sample included Diabetes MILES-Australia cross-sectional survey...... diabetes medications (BMQ Specific); negative insulin therapy appraisals (ITAS); depression (PHQ-9); anxiety (GAD-7), and diabetes distress (DDS-17). Factors associated with ITAS Negative scores were examined using hierarchical multiple regressions. RESULTS: Twenty-two percent of the variance in ITAS...

  6. How can we measure insulin sensitivity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovorka, R.

    1999-01-01

    Insulin resistance is common in general population and prevalent in patients with obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Insulin sensitivity, reciprocal to insulin resistance, can be measured with a variety of experimental methods ranging from the 'gold' standard glucose clamp to the simple HOMA assessment. Each method has its merit and is applicable under different circumstances. Adoption of glucose tracers in the experimental protocols and more specifically in glucose clamp and minimal model allows hepatic vs. peripheral insulin sensitivity to be discriminated and estimated separately. The objective of this review is to give an account of the minimal modelling approach and provide summary information about other measurement methods together with information about reproducibility of the most popular methods, the minimal model and the glucose clamp techniques. (author)

  7. Comparison of Subcutaneous Regular Insulin and Lispro Insulin in Diabetics Receiving Continuous Nutrition: A Numerical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, Mamie C; Strilka, Richard J; Clemens, Michael S; Armen, Scott B

    2015-06-30

    Optimal management of non-critically ill patients with diabetes maintained on continuous enteral feeding (CEN) is poorly defined. Subcutaneous (SQ) lispro and SQ regular insulin were compared in a simulated type 1 and type 2 diabetic patient receiving CEN. A glucose-insulin feedback mathematical model was employed to simulate type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients on CEN. Each patient received 25 SQ injections of regular insulin or insulin lispro, ranging from 0-6 U. Primary endpoints were the change in mean glucose concentration (MGC) and change in glucose variability (GV); hypoglycemic episodes were also reported. The model was first validated against patient data. Both SQ insulin preparations linearly decreased MGC, however, SQ regular insulin decreased GV whereas SQ lispro tended to increase GV. Hourly glucose concentration measurements were needed to capture the increase in GV. In the type 2 diabetic patient, "rebound hyperglycemia" occurred after SQ lispro was rapidly metabolized. Although neither SQ insulin preparation caused hypoglycemia, SQ lispro significantly lowered MGC compared to SQ regular insulin. Thus, it may be more likely to cause hypoglycemia. Analyses of the detailed glucose concentration versus time data suggest that the inferior performance of lispro resulted from its shorter duration of action. Finally, the effects of both insulin preparations persisted beyond their duration of actions in the type 2 diabetic patient. Subcutaneous regular insulin may be the short-acting insulin preparation of choice for this subset of diabetic patients. Clinical trial is required before a definitive recommendation can be made. © 2015 Diabetes Technology Society.

  8. Concentrated insulins: the new basal insulins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamos EM

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth M Lamos,1 Lisa M Younk,2 Stephen N Davis3 1Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition, 2Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 3Department of Medicine, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, MD, USA Introduction: Insulin therapy plays a critical role in the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, there is still a need to find basal insulins with 24-hour coverage and reduced risk of hypoglycemia. Additionally, with increasing obesity and insulin resistance, the ability to provide clinically necessary high doses of insulin at low volume is also needed. Areas covered: This review highlights the published reports of the pharmacokinetic (PK and glucodynamic properties of concentrated insulins: Humulin-R U500, insulin degludec U200, and insulin glargine U300, describes the clinical efficacy, risk of hypoglycemic, and metabolic changes observed, and finally, discusses observations about the complexity of introducing a new generation of concentrated insulins to the therapeutic market. Conclusion: Humulin-R U500 has a similar onset but longer duration of action compared with U100 regular insulin. Insulin glargine U300 has differential PK/pharmacodynamic effects when compared with insulin glargine U100. In noninferiority studies, glycemic control with degludec U200 and glargine U300 is similar to insulin glargine U100 and nocturnal hypoglycemia is reduced. Concentrated formulations appear to behave as separate molecular entities when compared with earlier U100 insulin analog compounds. In the review of available published data, newer concentrated basal insulins may offer an advantage in terms of reduced intraindividual variability as well as reducing the injection burden in individuals requiring high-dose and large volume insulin therapy. Understanding the PK and pharmacodynamic properties of this new generation of insulins is critical to safe dosing, dispensing, and administration

  9. Metabolism and insulin signaling in common metabolic disorders and inherited insulin resistance.

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    Højlund, Kurt

    2014-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes, obesity and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are common metabolic disorders which are observed with increasing prevalences, and which are caused by a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors, including increased calorie intake and physical inactivity. These metabolic disorders are all characterized by reduced plasma adiponectin and insulin resistance in peripheral tissues. Quantitatively skeletal muscle is the major site of insulin resistance. Both low plasma adiponectin and insulin resistance contribute to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In several studies, we have investigated insulin action on glucose and lipid metabolism, and at the molecular level, insulin signaling to glucose transport and glycogen synthesis in skeletal muscle from healthy individuals and in obesity, PCOS and type 2 diabetes. Moreover, we have described a novel syndrome characterized by postprandial hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia and insulin resistance. This syndrome is caused by a mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain of the insulin receptor gene (INSR). We have studied individuals with this mutation as a model of inherited insulin resistance. Type 2 diabetes, obesity and PCOS are characterized by pronounced defects in the insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, in particular glycogen synthesis and to a lesser extent glucose oxidation, and the ability of insulin to suppress lipid oxidation. In inherited insulin resistance, however, only insulin action on glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis is impaired. This suggests that the defects in glucose and lipid oxidation in the common metabolic disorders are secondary to other factors. In young women with PCOS, the degree of insulin resistance was similar to that seen in middle-aged patients with type 2 diabetes. This supports the hypothesis of an unique pathogenesis of insulin resistance in PCOS. Insulin in physiological concentrations stimulates glucose uptake in human skeletal

  10. The effects of local insulin application to lumbar spinal fusions in a rat model.

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    Koerner, John D; Yalamanchili, Praveen; Munoz, William; Uko, Linda; Chaudhary, Saad B; Lin, Sheldon S; Vives, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    The rates of pseudoarthrosis after a single-level spinal fusion have been reported up to 35%, and the agents that increase the rate of fusion have an important role in decreasing pseudoarthrosis after spinal fusion. Previous studies have analyzed the effects of local insulin application to an autograft in a rat segmental defect model. Defects treated with a time-released insulin implant had significantly more new bone formation and greater quality of bone compared with controls based on histology and histomorphometry. A time-released insulin implant may have similar effects when applied in a lumbar spinal fusion model. This study analyzes the effects of a local time-released insulin implant applied to the fusion bed in a rat posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion model. Our hypothesis was twofold: first, a time-released insulin implant applied to the autograft bed in a rat posterolateral lumbar fusion will increase the rate of successful fusion and second, will alter the local environment of the fusion site by increasing the levels of local growth factors. Animal model (Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee approved) using 40 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Forty skeletally mature Sprague-Dawley rats weighing approximately 500 g each underwent posterolateral intertransverse lumbar fusions with iliac crest autograft from L4 to L5 using a Wiltse-type approach. After exposure of the transverse processes and high-speed burr decortication, a Linplant (Linshin Canada, Inc., ON, Canada) consisting of 95% microrecrystalized palmitic acid and 5% bovine insulin (experimental group) or a sham implant consisting of only palmitic acid (control group) was implanted on the fusion bed with iliac crest autograft. As per the manufacturer, the Linplant has a release rate of 2 U/day for a minimum of 40 days. The transverse processes and autograft beds of 10 animals from the experimental and 10 from the control group were harvested at Day 4 and analyzed for growth factors. The

  11. The antidiabetic action of camel milk in experimental type 2 diabetes mellitus: an overview on the changes in incretin hormones, insulin resistance, and inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korish, A A

    2014-06-01

    Folk medicine stories accredited the aptitude of camel milk (CMK) as a hypoglycemic agent and recent studies have confirmed this in the diabetic patients and experimental animals. However, the mechanism(s) by which CMK influences glucose homeostasis is yet unclear. The current study investigated the changes in the glucose homeostatic parameters, the incretin hormones, and the inflammatory cytokines in the CMK-treated diabetic animals. A model of type 2 diabetes mellitus was induced in rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin 40 mg/kg/day for 4 repeated doses. Camel milk treatment was administered for 8 weeks. The changes in glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glucose dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), glucose tolerance, fasting and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, insulin resistance (IR), TNF-α, TGF-β1, lipid profile, atherogenic index (AI), and body weight were investigated. The untreated diabetic animals showed hyperglycemia, increased HOMA-IR, hyperlipidemia, elevated AI, high serum incretins [GLP-1 and GIP], TNF-α, and TGF-β1 levels and weight loss as compared with the control group. Camel milk treatment to the diabetic animals resulted in significant lowered fasting glucose level, hypolipidemia, decreased HOMA-IR, recovery of insulin secretion, weight gain, and no mortality during the study. Additionally, CMK inhibits the diabetes-induced elevation in incretin hormones, TNF-α and TGF-β1 levels. The increase in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, decreased HOMA-IR, modulation of the secretion and/or the action of incretins, and the anti-inflammatory effect are anticipated mechanisms to the antidiabetic effect of CMK and suggest it as a valuable adjuvant antidiabetic therapy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. The dependence of neuronal encoding efficiency on Hebbian plasticity and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Faramarz; Moustafa, Ahmed A.

    2015-01-01

    Synapses act as information filters by different molecular mechanisms including retrograde messenger that affect neuronal spiking activity. One of the well-known effects of retrograde messenger in presynaptic neurons is a change of the probability of neurotransmitter release. Hebbian learning describe a strengthening of a synapse between a presynaptic input onto a postsynaptic neuron when both pre- and postsynaptic neurons are coactive. In this work, a theory of homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release by retrograde messenger and Hebbian plasticity in neuronal encoding is presented. Encoding efficiency was measured for different synaptic conditions. In order to gain high encoding efficiency, the spiking pattern of a neuron should be dependent on the intensity of the input and show low levels of noise. In this work, we represent spiking trains as zeros and ones (corresponding to non-spike or spike in a time bin, respectively) as words with length equal to three. Then the frequency of each word (here eight words) is measured using spiking trains. These frequencies are used to measure neuronal efficiency in different conditions and for different parameter values. Results show that neurons that have synapses acting as band-pass filters show the highest efficiency to encode their input when both Hebbian mechanism and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release exist in synapses. Specifically, the integration of homeostatic regulation of feedback inhibition with Hebbian mechanism and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release in the synapses leads to even higher efficiency when high stimulus intensity is presented to the neurons. However, neurons with synapses acting as high-pass filters show no remarkable increase in encoding efficiency for all simulated synaptic plasticity mechanisms. This study demonstrates the importance of cooperation of Hebbian mechanism with regulation of neurotransmitter release induced by rapid diffused retrograde

  13. Homeostatic maintenance via degradation and repair of elastic fibers under tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Calebe; Araújo, Ascanio D.; Oliveira, Cláudio L. N.; Imsirovic, Jasmin; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Andrade, José S.; Suki, Béla

    2016-06-01

    Cellular maintenance of the extracellular matrix requires an effective regulation that balances enzymatic degradation with the repair of collagen fibrils and fibers. Here, we investigate the long-term maintenance of elastic fibers under tension combined with diffusion of general degradative and regenerative particles associated with digestion and repair processes. Computational results show that homeostatic fiber stiffness can be achieved by assuming that cells periodically probe fiber stiffness to adjust the production and release of degradative and regenerative particles. However, this mechanism is unable to maintain a homogeneous fiber. To account for axial homogeneity, we introduce a robust control mechanism that is locally governed by how the binding affinity of particles is modulated by mechanical forces applied to the ends of the fiber. This model predicts diameter variations along the fiber that are in agreement with the axial distribution of collagen fibril diameters obtained from scanning electron microscopic images of normal rat thoracic aorta. The model predictions match the experiments only when the applied force on the fiber is in the range where the variance of local stiffness along the fiber takes a minimum value. Our model thus predicts that the biophysical properties of the fibers play an important role in the long-term regulatory maintenance of these fibers.

  14. Probing the mechanism of insulin fibril formation with insulin mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, L; Frokjaer, S; Brange, J; Uversky, V N; Fink, A L

    2001-07-27

    The molecular basis of insulin fibril formation was investigated by studying the structural properties and kinetics of fibril formation of 20 different human insulin mutants at both low pH (conditions favoring monomer/dimer) and at pH 7.4 (conditions favoring tetramer/hexamer). Small-angle X-ray scattering showed insulin to be monomeric in 20% acetic acid, 0.1 M NaCl, pH 2. The secondary structure of the mutants was assessed using far-UV circular dichroism, and the tertiary structure was determined using near-UV circular dichroism, quenching of intrinsic fluorescence by acrylamide and interactions with the hydrophobic probe 1-anilino-8-naphthalene-sulfonic acid (ANS). The kinetics of fibril formation were monitored with the fluorescent dye, Thioflavin T. The results indicate that the monomer is the state from which fibrils arise, thus under some conditions dissociation of hexamers may be rate limiting or partially rate limiting. The insulin mutants were found to retain substantial nativelike secondary and tertiary structure under all conditions studied. The results suggest that fibril formation of the insulin mutants is controlled by specific molecular interactions that are sensitive to variations in the primary structure. The observed effects of several mutations on the rate of fibril formation are inconsistent with a previously suggested model for fibrillation [Brange, J., Whittingham, J., Edwards, D., Youshang, Z., Wollmer, A., Brandenburg, D., Dodson, G., and Finch, J. (1997) Curr. Sci. 72, 470-476]. Two surfaces on the insulin monomer are identified as potential interacting sites in insulin fibrils, one consisting of the residues B10, B16, and B17 and the other consisting of at least the residues A8 and B25. The marked increase in the lag time for fibril formation with mutations to more polar residues, as well as mutations to charged residues, demonstrates the importance of both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions in the initial stages of fibrillation

  15. Association of insulin resistance with near peak bone mass in the femur and lumbar spine of Korean adults aged 25-35: The Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008-2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Soo Choo

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between insulin resistance and the bone mineral density (BMD of femur and lumbar spine in Korean adults who are expected to exhibit near peak bone mass.Data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008-2010 were analyzed. A total of 2,750 participants aged 25-35 years were included. Insulin resistance was assessed using a homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and serum fasting insulin.In a multivariate linear regression analysis, the HOMA-IR was significantly inversely associated with the BMD of the total hip (TH, β = -0.052, P = 0.002, femoral neck (FN, β = -0.072, P<0.001, femoral trochanter (FTr, β = -0.055, P = 0.003, femoral intertrochanter (FITr, β = -0.041, P = 0.015, and lumbar spine (LS, β = -0.063, P = 0.001 among all study subjects after adjustment for gender, age, height, weight, whole body fat mass percentage, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, vitamin D, smoking, alcohol intake, physical activity, education level, and household income in both genders as well as labor, the use of oral contraceptives, and age at menarche in females. The serum fasting insulin was significantly inversely associated with the BMD of the TH (β = -0.055, P = 0.001, FN (β = -0.072, P<0.001, FTr (β = -0.055, P = 0.003, FITr (β = -0.045, P = 0.009, and LS (β = -0.064, P = 0.001 among all subjects in a multivariate linear regression analysis.Our results suggest that insulin resistance may be independently and inversely associated with the near peak bone mass of the femur and lumbar spine.

  16. Alleviation of insulin resistance and liver damage by oral administration of Imm124-E is mediated by increased Tregs and associated with increased serum GLP-1 and adiponectin: results of a phase I/II clinical trial in NASH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizrahi M

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Meir Mizrahi,1 Yehudit Shabat,1 Ami Ben Ya'acov,1 Gadi Lalazar,1 Tomer Adar,1 Victor Wong,2 Brian Muller,2 Grant Rawlin,2 Yaron Ilan11Liver Unit, Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel; 2Immuron Limited, North Melbourne, AustraliaBackground: Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH is considered to be part of the nonalcoholic fatty liver disorders and its incidence is increasing. Imm124-E (Immuron Ltd, Melbourne, Australia, containing hyperimmune bovine colostrum, has been shown to exert an immunomodulatory effect and to alleviate target organ damage in animal models of NASH. The aim of our study was to determine the safety and efficacy of oral administration of Imm124-E to patients with insulin resistance and NASH.Methods: In an open-label trial, ten patients with biopsy-proven NASH and insulin resistance were orally treated with Imm124-E for 30 days.Results: Oral administration of Imm124-E was safe, and no side effects were noted. Alleviation of insulin resistance was reflected by significantly improved hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c values in all ten treated patients. For between five and eight responders, the following effects were noted: a decrease in fasting glucose levels; improved oral glucose tolerance test (OGGT and homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA scores; and alleviation in lipid profile. These effects were accompanied by increased serum levels of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1, adiponectin and T regulatory cells.Conclusion: Hyperimmune colostrum alleviates NASH.Keywords: NASH, anti-LPS, diabetes, adipokines, regulatory T cells

  17. Immunohistochemical expression of insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin in pancreatic islets of horses with and without insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newkirk, Kim M; Ehrensing, Gordon; Odoi, Agricola; Boston, Raymond C; Frank, Nicholas

    2018-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin expression within pancreatic islets of horses with and without insulin resistance. ANIMALS 10 insulin-resistant horses and 13 insulin-sensitive horses. PROCEDURES For each horse, food was withheld for at least 10 hours before a blood sample was collected for determination of serum insulin concentration. Horses with a serum insulin concentration horses with a serum insulin concentration > 20 μU/mL underwent a frequently sampled IV glucose tolerance test to determine sensitivity to insulin by minimal model analysis. Horses with a sensitivity to insulin horses were euthanized with a barbiturate overdose, and pancreatic specimens were harvested and immunohistochemically stained for determination of insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin expression in pancreatic islets. Islet hormone expression was compared between insulin-resistant and insulin-sensitive horses. RESULTS Cells expressing insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin made up approximately 62%, 12%, and 7%, respectively, of pancreatic islet cells in insulin-resistant horses and 64%, 18%, and 9%, respectively, of pancreatic islet cells in insulin-sensitive horses. Expression of insulin and somatostatin did not differ between insulin-resistant and insulin-sensitive horses, but the median percentage of glucagon-expressing cells in the islets of insulin-resistant horses was significantly less than that in insulin-sensitive horses. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that, in insulin-resistant horses, insulin secretion was not increased but glucagon production might be downregulated as a compensatory response to hyperinsulinemia.

  18. Behavioral and biochemical dissociation of arousal and homeostatic sleep need influenced by prior wakeful experience in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ayako; Sinton, Christopher M; Greene, Robert W; Yanagisawa, Masashi

    2013-06-18

    Sleep is regulated by homeostatic mechanisms, and the low-frequency power in the electroencephalogram (delta power) during non-rapid eye movement sleep reflects homeostatic sleep need. Additionally, sleep is limited by circadian and environmentally influenced arousal. Little is known, however, about the underlying neural substrates for sleep homeostasis and arousal and about the potential link between them. Here, we subjected C57BL/6 mice to 6 h of sleep deprivation using two different methods: gentle handling and continual cage change. Both groups were deprived of sleep to a similar extent (>99%), and, as expected, the delta power increase during recovery sleep was quantitatively similar in both groups. However, in a multiple sleep latency test, the cage change group showed significantly longer sleep latencies than the gentle handling group, indicating that the cage change group had a higher level of arousal despite the similar sleep loss. To investigate the possible biochemical correlates of these behavioral changes, we screened for arousal-related and sleep need-related phosphoprotein markers from the diencephalon. We found that the abundance of highly phosphorylated forms of dynamin 1, a presynaptic neuronal protein, was associated with sleep latency in the multiple sleep latency test. In contrast, the abundance of highly phosphorylated forms of N-myc downstream regulated gene 2, a glial protein, was increased in parallel with delta power. The changes of these protein species disappeared after 2 h of recovery sleep. These results suggest that homeostatic sleep need and arousal can be dissociated behaviorally and biochemically and that phosphorylated N-myc downstream regulated gene 2 and dynamin 1 may serve as markers of homeostatic sleep need and arousal, respectively.

  19. Insulin Signaling, Resistance, and the Metabolic Syndrome: Insights from Mouse Models to Disease Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shaodong

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a major underlying mechanism for the “metabolic syndrome”, which is also known as insulin resistance syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is increasing at an alarming rate, becoming a major public and clinical problem worldwide. Metabolic syndrome is represented by a group of interrelated disorders, including obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. It is also a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease and increased morbidity and mortality. Animal studies demonstrate that insulin and its signaling cascade normally control cell growth, metabolism and survival through activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and phosphotidylinositide-3-kinase (PI3K), of which activation of PI-3K-associated with insulin receptor substrate-1 and -2 (IRS1, 2) and subsequent Akt→Foxo1 phosphorylation cascade has a central role in control of nutrient homeostasis and organ survival. Inactivation of Akt and activation of Foxo1, through suppression IRS1 and IRS2 in different organs following hyperinsulinemia, metabolic inflammation, and over nutrition may provide the underlying mechanisms for metabolic syndrome in humans. Targeting the IRS→Akt→Foxo1 signaling cascade will likely provide a strategy for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of type 2 diabetes and its complications. This review discusses the basis of insulin signaling, insulin resistance in different mouse models, and how a deficiency of insulin signaling components in different organs contributes to the feature of the metabolic syndrome. Emphasis will be placed on the role of IRS1, IRS2, and associated signaling pathways that couple to Akt and the forkhead/winged helix transcription factor Foxo1. PMID:24281010

  20. Mathematical model of the glucose–insulin regulatory system: From the bursting electrical activity in pancreatic β-cells to the glucose dynamics in the whole body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kyungreem [College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hyuk [National Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, M.Y., E-mail: mychoi@snu.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Theoretical Physics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jinwoong, E-mail: jwkim@snu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Myung-Shik [Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, and School of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-01

    A theoretical approach to the glucose–insulin regulatory system is presented. By means of integrated mathematical modeling and extensive numerical simulations, we probe the cell-level dynamics of the membrane potential, intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration, and insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells, together with the whole-body level glucose–insulin dynamics in the liver, brain, muscle, and adipose tissues. In particular, the three oscillatory modes of insulin secretion are reproduced successfully. Such comprehensive mathematical modeling may provide a theoretical basis for the simultaneous assessment of the β-cell function and insulin resistance in clinical examination. -- Highlights: ► We present a mathematical model for the glucose–insulin regulatory system. ► This model combines the microscopic insulin secretion mechanism in a pancreatic β-cell and macroscopic glucose dynamics at the whole-body level. ► This work is expected to provide a theoretical basis for the simultaneous assessment of the β-cell function and insulin resistance in clinical examination.

  1. Mathematical model of the glucose–insulin regulatory system: From the bursting electrical activity in pancreatic β-cells to the glucose dynamics in the whole body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Kyungreem; Kang, Hyuk; Choi, M.Y.; Kim, Jinwoong; Lee, Myung-Shik

    2012-01-01

    A theoretical approach to the glucose–insulin regulatory system is presented. By means of integrated mathematical modeling and extensive numerical simulations, we probe the cell-level dynamics of the membrane potential, intracellular Ca 2+ concentration, and insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells, together with the whole-body level glucose–insulin dynamics in the liver, brain, muscle, and adipose tissues. In particular, the three oscillatory modes of insulin secretion are reproduced successfully. Such comprehensive mathematical modeling may provide a theoretical basis for the simultaneous assessment of the β-cell function and insulin resistance in clinical examination. -- Highlights: ► We present a mathematical model for the glucose–insulin regulatory system. ► This model combines the microscopic insulin secretion mechanism in a pancreatic β-cell and macroscopic glucose dynamics at the whole-body level. ► This work is expected to provide a theoretical basis for the simultaneous assessment of the β-cell function and insulin resistance in clinical examination.

  2. Turing mechanism for homeostatic control of synaptic density during C. elegans growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Heather A.; Bressloff, Paul C.

    2017-07-01

    We propose a mechanism for the homeostatic control of synapses along the ventral cord of Caenorhabditis elegans during development, based on a form of Turing pattern formation on a growing domain. C. elegans is an important animal model for understanding cellular mechanisms underlying learning and memory. Our mathematical model consists of two interacting chemical species, where one is passively diffusing and the other is actively trafficked by molecular motors, which switch between forward and backward moving states (bidirectional transport). This differs significantly from the standard mechanism for Turing pattern formation based on the interaction between fast and slow diffusing species. We derive evolution equations for the chemical concentrations on a slowly growing one-dimensional domain, and use numerical simulations to demonstrate the insertion of new concentration peaks as the length increases. Taking the passive component to be the protein kinase CaMKII and the active component to be the glutamate receptor GLR-1, we interpret the concentration peaks as sites of new synapses along the length of C. elegans, and thus show how the density of synaptic sites can be maintained.

  3. Insulin analogs with improved pharmacokinetic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brange; Vølund

    1999-02-01

    The aim of insulin replacement therapy is to normalize blood glucose in order to reduce the complications of diabetes. The pharmacokinetics of the traditional insulin preparations, however, do not match the profiles of physiological insulin secretion. The introduction of the rDNA technology 20 years ago opened new ways to create insulin analogs with altered properties. Fast-acting analogs are based on the idea that an insulin with less tendency to self-association than human insulin would be more readily absorbed into the systemic circulation. Protracted-acting analogs have been created to mimic the slow, steady rate of insulin secretion in the fasting state. The present paper provides a historical review of the efforts to change the physicochemical and pharmacological properties of insulin in order to improve insulin therapy. The available clinical studies of the new insulins are surveyed and show, together with modeling results, that new strategies for optimal basal-bolus treatment are required for utilization of the new fast-acting analogs.

  4. Insulin and the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derakhshan, Fatemeh; Toth, Cory

    2013-03-01

    Mainly known for its role in peripheral glucose homeostasis, insulin has also significant impact within the brain, functioning as a key neuromodulator in behavioral, cellular, biochemical and molecular studies. The brain is now regarded as an insulin-sensitive organ with widespread, yet selective, expression of the insulin receptor in the olfactory bulb, hypothalamus, hippocampus, cerebellum, amygdala and cerebral cortex. Insulin receptor signaling in the brain is important for neuronal development, glucoregulation, feeding behavior, body weight, and cognitive processes such as with attention, executive functioning, learning and memory. Emerging evidence has demonstrated insulin receptor signaling to be impaired in several neurological disorders. Moreover, insulin receptor signaling is recognized as important for dendritic outgrowth, neuronal survival, circuit development, synaptic plasticity and postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptor trafficking. We review the multiple roles of insulin in the brain, as well as its endogenous trafficking to the brain or its exogenous intervention. Although insulin can be directly targeted to the brain via intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intraparenchymal delivery, these invasive techniques are with significant risk, necessitating repeated surgical intervention and providing potential for systemic hypoglycemia. Another method, intranasal delivery, is a non-invasive, safe, and alternative approach which rapidly targets delivery of molecules to the brain while minimizing systemic exposure. Over the last decades, the delivery of intranasal insulin in animal models and human patients has evolved and expanded, permitting new hope for associated neurodegenerative and neurovascular disorders.

  5. Lipid accumulation product and triglycerides/glucose index are useful predictors of insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazidi, Mohsen; Kengne, Andre-Pascal; Katsiki, Niki; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Banach, Maciej

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the association of triglycerides/glucose index (TyG index), anthropometrically predicted visceral adipose tissue (apVAT), lipid accumulation product (LAP), visceral adiposity index (VAI) and triglycerides (TG):high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) ratio with insulin resistance (IR) in adult Americans. This study was based on data from three NHANES cycles (2005 to 2010). The TyG index was calculated as ln [TG×fasting glucose/2]. VAI was calculated using gender-specific formulas: men [waist circumference (WC)/39.68+(1.88×body mass index (BMI)]×(TG/1.03)×(1.31/HDL-C); women: [WC/36.58+(1.89×BMI)]×(TG/0.81)×(1.52/HDL-C). LAP index was calculated as [WC-65]×[TG] in men, and [WC-58]×[TG] in women. Correlation and regression analyses accounted for the complex sampling of database. A total of 18,318 subjects was included in this analysis [mean age 47.6Years]; 48.7% (n=8918) men]. The homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) had a significant positive correlation with the TyG index (r=0.502), LAP (r=0.551), apVAT (r=0.454), TG:HDL-C ratio (r=0.441) and VAI (r=451) (pindex is a simple, cheap and accurate although not perfect, surrogate marker of HOMA-diagnosed IR among adult Americans. Moreover, it has higher predictability than other screening tools which traditionally applied. Among the markers, apVAT had the highest specificity and the TG:HDL-C ratio had the highest sensitivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Insulin receptors in the mammary gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    Insulin binding studies were conducted using mammary membrane preparations to further the authors understanding of insulin's role in regulating mammary metabolism, particularly ruminant mammary metabolism. Specific objectives were to: (1) characterize insulin binding to bovine mammary microsomes and determine if the specificity and kinetics of binding indicate the presence of insulin receptors in bovine mammary gland; (2) examine and compare insulin binding by liver and mammary microsomes of the pig and dairy cow; (3) examine insulin binding to bovine milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) and evaluate this model's usefulness in assessing insulin receptor regulation in the mammary gland of the cow; (4) examine the effect of dietary fat in insulin binding by rat mammary and liver microsomes. The specificity and kinetics of 125 I-insulin binding of bovine mammary microsomes indicated the presence of insulin receptors in bovine mammary gland. Bovine liver and mammary microsomes specifically bound less 125 I-insulin than did the corresponding porcine microsomes, and mammary microsomes, regardless of species, specifically bound less 125 I-insulin than did liver microsomes. These differences in binding suggest differences in insulin responsiveness between pigs and cattle, as well as between the liver and mammary glands

  7. HCC development is associated to peripheral insulin resistance in a mouse model of NASH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Minicis, Samuele; Agostinelli, Laura; Rychlicki, Chiara; Sorice, Gian Pio; Saccomanno, Stefania; Candelaresi, Cinzia; Giaccari, Andrea; Trozzi, Luciano; Pierantonelli, Irene; Mingarelli, Eleonora; Marzioni, Marco; Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Gaggini, Melania; Benedetti, Antonio; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Guido, Maria; Svegliati-Baroni, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    NAFLD is the most common liver disease worldwide but it is the potential evolution to NASH and eventually to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), even in the absence of cirrhosis, that makes NAFLD of such clinical importance. we aimed to create a mouse model reproducing the pathological spectrum of NAFLD and to investigate the role of possible co-factors in promoting HCC. mice were treated with a choline-deficient L-amino-acid-defined-diet (CDAA) or its control (CSAA diet) and subjected to a low-dose i.p. injection of CCl4 or vehicle. Insulin resistance was measured by the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp method. Steatosis, fibrosis and HCC were evaluated by histological and molecular analysis. CDAA-treated mice showed peripheral insulin resistance at 1 month. At 1-3 months, extensive steatosis and fibrosis were observed in CDAA and CDAA+CCl4 groups. At 6 months, equal increase in steatosis and fibrosis was observed between the two groups, together with the appearance of tumor. At 9 months of treatment, the 100% of CDAA+CCl4 treated mice revealed tumor versus 40% of CDAA mice. Insulin-like Growth Factor-2 (IGF-2) and Osteopontin (SPP-1) were increased in CDAA mice versus CSAA. Furthermore, Immunostaining for p-AKT, p-c-Myc and Glypican-3 revealed increased positivity in the tumors. the CDAA model promotes the development of HCC from NAFLD-NASH in the presence of insulin resistance but in the absence of cirrhosis. Since this condition is increasingly recognized in humans, our study provides a model that may help understanding mechanisms of carcinogenesis in NAFLD.

  8. Quercetin Decreases Insulin Resistance in a Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Rat Model by Improving Inflammatory Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenzhi; Zhai, Dongxia; Zhang, Danying; Bai, Lingling; Yao, Ruipin; Yu, Jin; Cheng, Wen; Yu, Chaoqin

    2017-05-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a clinical feature of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Quercetin, derived from Chinese medicinal herbs such as hawthorn, has been proven practical in the management of IR in diabetes. However, whether quercetin could decrease IR in PCOS is unknown. This study aims to observe the therapeutic effect of quercetin on IR in a PCOS rat model and explore the underlying mechanism. An IR PCOS rat model was established by subcutaneous injection with dehydroepiandrosterone. The body weight, estrous cycle, and ovary morphology of the quercetin-treated rats were observed. Serum inflammatory cytokines were analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In ovarian tissues, the expression of key genes involved in the inflammatory signaling pathway was detected through Western blot, real-time polymerase chain reaction, or immunohistochemistry. The nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) was also observed by immunofluorescence. The estrous cycle recovery rate of the insulin-resistant PCOS model after quercetin treatment was 58.33%. Quercetin significantly reduced the levels of blood insulin, interleukin 1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor α. Quercetin also significantly decreased the granulosa cell nuclear translocation of NF-κB in the insulin-resistant PCOS rat model. The treatment inhibited the expression of inflammation-related genes, including the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunit p22phox, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, and Toll-like receptor 4, in ovarian tissue. Quercetin improved IR and demonstrated a favorable therapeutic effect on the PCOS rats. The underlying mechanism of quercetin potentially involves the inhibition of the Toll-like receptor/NF-κB signaling pathway and the improvement in the inflammatory microenvironment of the ovarian tissue of the PCOS rat model.

  9. The interaction of insulin, glucose, and insulin-glucose mixtures with a phospholipid monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigenobu, Hayato; McNamee, Cathy E

    2012-12-15

    We determined how glucose or insulin interacts with a phospholipid monolayer at the air/water interface and explained these mechanisms from a physico-chemical point of view. The 1,2-dipalmitoyl-2-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) monolayer at an air/water interface acted as a model membrane, which allowed the effect of the molecular packing density in the monolayer on the interactions to be determined. The interaction of glucose, insulin, and a mixture of glucose and insulin to the DPPC monolayer were investigated via surface pressure-area per molecule Langmuir isotherms and fluorescence microscopy. Glucose adsorbed to the underside of the DPPC monolayer, while insulin was able to penetrate through the monolayer when the phospholipid molecules were not densely packed. The presence of a mixture of insulin and glucose affected the molecular packing in the DPPC monolayer differently than the pure insulin or glucose solutions, and the glucose-insulin mixture was seen to be able to penetrate through the monolayer. These results indicated that glucose and insulin interact with one another, giving a material that may then transported through a pore in the monolayer or through the spaces between the molecules of the monolayer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cancer risk among insulin users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    But, Anna; De Bruin, Marie L.; Bazelier, Marloes T.

    2017-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: The aim of this work was to investigate the relationship between use of certain insulins and risk for cancer, when addressing the limitations and biases involved in previous studies. Methods: National Health Registries from Denmark (1996–2010), Finland (1996–2011), Norway (2005......–2010) and Sweden (2007–2012) and the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink database (1987–2013) were used to conduct a cohort study on new insulin users (N = 327,112). By using a common data model and semi-aggregate approach, we pooled individual-level records from five cohorts and applied Poisson regression...... models. For each of ten cancer sites studied, we estimated the rate ratios (RRs) by duration (≤0.5, 0.5–1, 1–2, 2–3, 3–4, 4–5, 5–6 and >6 years) of cumulative exposure to insulin glargine or insulin detemir relative to that of human insulin. Results: A total of 21,390 cancer cases occurred during a mean...

  11. Resveratrol ameliorates mitochondrial dysfunction but increases the risk of hypoglycemia following hemorrhagic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Widlund, Anne Lykkegaard; Wang, H.; Guan, Y.

    2014-01-01

    for glucose, insulin, corticosterone, total glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1), glucagon, and serum cytokine levels. The Homeostatic Model AssessmentYInsulin Resistance index was used to quantify insulin resistance. Results: RSV supplementation following HS significantly improved mitochondrial function...... resuscitation would ameliorate HS-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and improve hyperglycemia following acute blood loss. Methods: With the use a decompensated HS model, male Long-Evans rats (n = 6 per group) were resuscitated with lactated Ringer's solution with or without RSV (30 mg/kg) and were killed before.......2 mg/dL vs. 359.0 ± 79.5 mg/dL, p Model...

  12. Cinnamon extract improves insulin sensitivity in the brain and lowers liver fat in mouse models of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorius, Tina; Peter, Andreas; Schulz, Nadja; Drescher, Andrea; Bergheim, Ina; Machann, Jürgen; Schick, Fritz; Siegel-Axel, Dorothea; Schürmann, Annette; Weigert, Cora; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Hennige, Anita M

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of diabetic subjects with cinnamon demonstrated an improvement in blood glucose concentrations and insulin sensitivity but the underlying mechanisms remained unclear. This work intends to elucidate the impact of cinnamon effects on the brain by using isolated astrocytes, and an obese and diabetic mouse model. Cinnamon components (eugenol, cinnamaldehyde) were added to astrocytes and liver cells to measure insulin signaling and glycogen synthesis. Ob/ob mice were supplemented with extract from cinnamomum zeylanicum for 6 weeks and cortical brain activity, locomotion and energy expenditure were evaluated. Insulin action was determined in brain and liver tissues. Treatment of primary astrocytes with eugenol promoted glycogen synthesis, whereas the effect of cinnamaldehyde was attenuated. In terms of brain function in vivo, cinnamon extract improved insulin sensitivity and brain activity in ob/ob mice, and the insulin-stimulated locomotor activity was improved. In addition, fasting blood glucose levels and glucose tolerance were greatly improved in ob/ob mice due to cinnamon extracts, while insulin secretion was unaltered. This corresponded with lower triglyceride and increased liver glycogen content and improved insulin action in liver tissues. In vitro, Fao cells exposed to cinnamon exhibited no change in insulin action. Together, cinnamon extract improved insulin action in the brain as well as brain activity and locomotion. This specific effect may represent an important central feature of cinnamon in improving insulin action in the brain, and mediates metabolic alterations in the periphery to decrease liver fat and improve glucose homeostasis.

  13. Dihydrotestosterone deteriorates cardiac insulin signaling and glucose transport in the rat model of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepavčević, Snežana; Vojnović Milutinović, Danijela; Macut, Djuro; Žakula, Zorica; Nikolić, Marina; Božić-Antić, Ivana; Romić, Snježana; Bjekić-Macut, Jelica; Matić, Gordana; Korićanac, Goran

    2014-05-01

    It is supposed that women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are prone to develop cardiovascular disease as a consequence of multiple risk factors that are mostly related to the state of insulin resistance and consequent hyperinsulinemia. In the present study, we evaluated insulin signaling and glucose transporters (GLUT) in cardiac cells of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treated female rats as an animal model of PCOS. Expression of proteins involved in cardiac insulin signaling pathways and glucose transporters, as well as their phosphorylation or intracellular localization were studied by Western blot analysis in DHT-treated and control rats. Treatment with DHT resulted in increased body mass, absolute mass of the heart, elevated plasma insulin concentration, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. At the molecular level, DHT treatment did not change protein expression of cardiac insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate 1, while phosphorylation of the substrate at serine 307 was increased. Unexpectedly, although expression of downstream Akt kinase and its phosphorylation at threonine 308 were not altered, phosphorylation of Akt at serine 473 was increased in the heart of DHT-treated rats. In contrast, expression and phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2 were decreased. Plasma membrane contents of GLUT1 and GLUT4 were decreased, as well as the expression of GLUT4 in cardiac cells at the end of androgen treatment. The obtained results provide evidence for alterations in expression and especially in functional characteristics of insulin signaling molecules and glucose transporters in the heart of DHT-treated rats with PCOS, indicating impaired cardiac insulin action. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Insulin resistance in uremia: Insulin receptor kinase activity in liver and muscle from chronic uremic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecchin, F.; Ittoop, O.; Sinha, M.K.; Caro, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have studied the structure and function of the partially purified insulin receptors from liver and skeletal muscle in a rat model of severe chronic uremia. 125 I-insulin binding was higher in the liver from uremic rats when compared with ad libitum- and pair-fed controls. Furthermore, the ability of insulin to stimulate the autophosphorylation of the β-subunit and insulin receptor kinase activity using Glu 80 , Tyr 20 as exogenous phosphoacceptor was increased in the liver of the uremic animals. The structural characteristics of the receptors, as determined by electrophoretic mobilities of affinity labeled α-subunit and the phosphorylated β-subunit, were normal in uremia. 125 I-insulin binding and insulin receptor kinase activity were similar in the skeletal muscle from uremic and pair- and ad libitum-fed animals. Thus the data are supportive of the hypothesis that in liver and muscle of chronic uremic rats, insulin resistance is due to a defect(s) distal to the insulin receptor kinase

  15. Comparison of Insulin Resistance and β-Cell Dysfunction Between the Young and the Elderly in Normal Glucose Tolerance and Prediabetes Population: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G; Shi, L; Cai, L; Lin, W; Huang, H; Liang, J; Li, L; Lin, L; Tang, K; Chen, L; Lu, J; Bi, Y; Wang, W; Ning, G; Wen, J

    2017-02-01

    Insulin resistance and β-cell function are different between the young and elderly diabetes individuals, which are not well elaborated in the nondiabetic persons. The aims of this study were to compare insulin resistance and β-cell function between young and old adults from normal glucose tolerance (NGT) to prediabetes [which was subdivided into isolated impaired fasting glucose (i-IFG), isolated impaired glucose tolerance (i-IGT), and a combination of both (IFG/IGT)], and compare the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) in the above prediabetes subgroups between different age groups after 3 years. A total of 1 374 subjects aged below 40 or above 60 years old with NGT or prediabetes were finally included in this study. Insulin resistance and β-cell function from homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) and interactive, 24-variable homeostatic model of assessment (iHOMA2) were compared between different age groups. The rate of transition to diabetes between different age groups in all pre-diabetes subgroups was also compared. Compared with the old groups, young i-IFG and IFG/IGT groups exhibit higher log HOMA-IR and log HOMA2-S, whereas the young i-IGT groups experienced comparable log HOMA-IR and log HOMA2-S when compared with old i-IFG and IFG/IGT groups. Three prediabetes subgroups all had similar log HOMA-B and log HOMA2-B between different age groups. In addition, the prevalence of diabetes in young i-IFG was statistically higher than that in old i-IFG after 3 years. Age is negatively related to log HOMA2-B in both age groups. Considering an age-related deterioration of β-cell function, young i-IFG, young i-IGT, and young IFG/IGT all suffered a greater impairment in insulin secretion than the old groups. Young i-IFG and IFG/IGT have more severe insulin resistance than the old groups. In addition, young i-IFG characterized with a higher incidence of DM than the old i-IFG. These disparities highlight that the prevention to slow progression from prediabetes to

  16. Insulin resistance in HIV-infected youth is associated with decreased mitochondrial respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, Jody K; Miller, Tracie L; Wang, Jiajia; Jacobson, Denise L; Geffner, Mitchell E; Van Dyke, Russell B; Gerschenson, Mariana

    2017-01-02

    To identify relationships between insulin resistance (IR) and mitochondrial respiration in perinatally HIV-infected youth. Case-control study. Mitochondrial respiration was assessed in perinatally HIV-infected youth in Tanner stages 2-5, 25 youth with IR (IR+) and 50 without IR (IR-) who were enrolled in the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study. IR was defined as a homeostatic model of assessment for IR value at least 4.0. A novel, high-throughput oximetry method was used to evaluate cellular respiration in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Unadjusted and adjusted differences in mitochondrial respiration markers between IR+ and IR- were evaluated, as were correlations between mitochondrial respiration markers and biochemical measurements. IR+ and IR- youth were similar on age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Mean age was 16.5 and 15.6 years in IR+ and IR-, respectively. The IR+ group had significantly higher mean BMI and metabolic analytes (fasting glucose, insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides, and venous lactate and pyruvate) compared with the IR-. Mitochondrial respiration markers were, on average, lower in the IR+ compared with IR-, including basal respiration (417.5 vs. 597.5 pmol, P = 0.074), ATP production (11 513 vs. 15 202 pmol, P = 0.078), proton leak (584.6 vs. 790.0 pmol, P = 0.033), maximal respiration (1815 vs. 2399 pmol, P = 0.025), and spare respiration capacity (1162 vs. 2017 pmol, P = 0.032). Nonmitochondrial respiration did not differ by IR status. The results did not change when adjusted for age. HIV-infected youth with IR have lower mitochondrial respiration markers when compared to youth without IR. Disordered mitochondrial respiration may be a potential mechanism for IR in this population.

  17. HCC development is associated to peripheral insulin resistance in a mouse model of NASH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuele De Minicis

    Full Text Available NAFLD is the most common liver disease worldwide but it is the potential evolution to NASH and eventually to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, even in the absence of cirrhosis, that makes NAFLD of such clinical importance.we aimed to create a mouse model reproducing the pathological spectrum of NAFLD and to investigate the role of possible co-factors in promoting HCC.mice were treated with a choline-deficient L-amino-acid-defined-diet (CDAA or its control (CSAA diet and subjected to a low-dose i.p. injection of CCl4 or vehicle. Insulin resistance was measured by the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp method. Steatosis, fibrosis and HCC were evaluated by histological and molecular analysis.CDAA-treated mice showed peripheral insulin resistance at 1 month. At 1-3 months, extensive steatosis and fibrosis were observed in CDAA and CDAA+CCl4 groups. At 6 months, equal increase in steatosis and fibrosis was observed between the two groups, together with the appearance of tumor. At 9 months of treatment, the 100% of CDAA+CCl4 treated mice revealed tumor versus 40% of CDAA mice. Insulin-like Growth Factor-2 (IGF-2 and Osteopontin (SPP-1 were increased in CDAA mice versus CSAA. Furthermore, Immunostaining for p-AKT, p-c-Myc and Glypican-3 revealed increased positivity in the tumors.the CDAA model promotes the development of HCC from NAFLD-NASH in the presence of insulin resistance but in the absence of cirrhosis. Since this condition is increasingly recognized in humans, our study provides a model that may help understanding mechanisms of carcinogenesis in NAFLD.

  18. Autophagy downregulation contributes to insulin resistance mediated injury in insulin receptor knockout podocytes in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Xu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available It is unknown whether autophagy activity is altered in insulin resistant podocytes and whether autophagy could be a therapeutic target for diabetic nephropathy (DN. Here we used shRNA transfection to knockdown the insulin receptor (IR gene in cultured human immortalized podocytes as an in vitro insulin resistant model. Autophagy related proteins LC3, Beclin, and p62 as well as nephrin, a podocyte injury marker, were assessed using western blot and immunofluorescence staining. Our results show that autophagy is suppressed when podocytes lose insulin sensitivity and that treatment of rapamycin, an mTOR specific inhibitor, could attenuate insulin resistance induced podocytes injury via autophagy activation. The present study deepens our understanding of the role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of DN.

  19. Development of a transgenic mouse model to study the immunogenicity of recombinant human insulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torosantucci, Riccardo; Brinks, Vera; Kijanka, Grzegorz; Halim, Liem Andhyk; Sauerborn, Melody; Schellekens, Huub; Jiskoot, Wim

    2014-01-01

    Mouse models are commonly used to assess the immunogenicity of therapeutic proteins and to investigate the immunological processes leading to antidrug antibodies. The aim of this work was to develop a transgenic (TG) Balb/c mouse model for evaluating the immunogenicity of recombinant human insulin

  20. PEDIATRIC VISCERAL ADIPOSITY INDEX ADAPTATION CORRELATES WITH HOMA-IR, MATSUDA, AND TRANSAMINASES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, María José Garcés; Klünder, Miguel; Nieto, Nayely Garibay; Alvarenga, Juan Carlos López; Gil, Jenny Vilchis; Huerta, Samuel Flores; Siccha, Rosa Quispe; Hernandez, Joselin

    2018-03-01

    Visceral adiposity index (VAI) is a mathematical model associated with cardiometabolic risk in adults, but studies on children failed to support this association. Our group has proposed a pediatric VAI model using pediatric ranges, but it has not yet been evaluated and needs further adjustments. The objective of this study was to further adjust the proposed pediatric VAI by age, creating a new pediatric metabolic index (PMI), and assess the correlation of the PMI with insulin resistance indexes and hepatic enzymes. A cross-sectional design with data from 396 children (age 5 to 17 years) was analyzed with a generalized linear model to find the coefficients for triglycerides, high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol, and waist circumference-body mass index quotient. The model was constructed according to sex and age and designated PMI. A cross-validation analysis was performed and a receiver operating characteristic curve was used to determine cut-off points. Significant moderate correlation was found between PMI and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) ( r = 0.452; P = .003), Matsuda ( r = -0.366; P = .019), alanine aminotransferase ( r = 0.315, P = .045), and γ-glutamyltransferase ( r = 0.397; P = .010). A PMI score >1.7 was considered as risk. PMI correlates with HOMA-IR, Matsuda, and hepatic enzymes. It could be helpful for identifying children at risk for cardiometabolic diseases. ALT = alanine transaminase BMI = body mass index GGT = γ-glutamyltransferase HDL-C = high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol HOMA-IR = homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance hs-CRP = high sensitivity C-reactive protein ISI = insulin sensitivity index NAFLD = nonalcoholic fatty liver disease PMI = pediatric metabolic index QUICKI = quantitative insulin sensitivity check index ROC = receiver operating characteristic TG = triglyceride TNF-α = tumor necrosis factor-alpha VAI = visceral adiposity index VAT = visceral adipose tissue WC = waist circumference.

  1. Sleep homeostatic pressure and PER3 VNTR gene polymorphism influence antidepressant response to sleep deprivation in bipolar depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallaspezia, Sara; Locatelli, Clara; Lorenzi, Cristina; Pirovano, Adele; Colombo, Cristina; Benedetti, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Combined Total sleep deprivation (TSD) and light therapy (LT) cause a rapid improvement in bipolar depression which has been hypothesized to be paralleled by changes in sleep homeostasis. Recent studies showed that bipolar patients had lower changes of EEG theta power after sleep and responders to antidepressant TSD+LT slept less and showed a lower increase of EEG theta power then non-responders. A polymorphism in PER3 gene has been associated with diurnal preference, sleep structure and homeostatic response to sleep deprivation in healthy subjects. We hypothesized that the individual variability in the homeostatic response to TSD could be a correlate of antidepressant response and be influenced by genetic factors. We administered three TSD+LT cycles to bipolar depressed patients. Severity of depression was rated on Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Actigraphic recordings were performed in a group of patients. PER3 polymorphism influenced changes in total sleep time (F=2.24; p=0.024): while PER3(4/4) and PER3(4/5) patients showed a reduction in it after treatment, PER3(5/5) subjects showed an increase of about 40min, suggesting a higher homeostatic pressure. The same polymorphism influenced the change of depressive symptomatology during treatment (F=3.72; p=0.028). Sleep information was recorded till the day after the end of treatment: a longer period of observation could give more information about the possible maintenance of allostatic adaptation. A higher sleep homeostatic pressure reduced the antidepressant response to TSD+LT, while an allostatic adaptation to sleep loss was associated with better response. This process seems to be under genetic control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Insulin and insulin signaling play a critical role in fat induction of insulin resistance in mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Jie; Hong, Tao; Yang, Xuefeng; Mei, Shuang; Liu, Zhenqi; Liu, Hui-Yu

    2011-01-01

    The primary player that induces insulin resistance has not been established. Here, we studied whether or not fat can cause insulin resistance in the presence of insulin deficiency. Our results showed that high-fat diet (HFD) induced insulin resistance in C57BL/6 (B6) mice. The HFD-induced insulin resistance was prevented largely by the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced moderate insulin deficiency. The STZ-induced insulin deficiency prevented the HFD-induced ectopic fat accumulation and oxidative stress in liver and gastrocnemius. The STZ-induced insulin deficiency prevented the HFD- or insulin-induced increase in hepatic expression of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSL), which are necessary for fatty acid activation. HFD increased mitochondrial contents of long-chain acyl-CoAs, whereas it decreased mitochondrial ADP/ATP ratio, and these HFD-induced changes were prevented by the STZ-induced insulin deficiency. In cultured hepatocytes, we observed that expressions of ACSL1 and -5 were stimulated by insulin signaling. Results in cultured cells also showed that blunting insulin signaling by the PI3K inhibitor LY-294002 prevented fat accumulation, oxidative stress, and insulin resistance induced by the prolonged exposure to either insulin or oleate plus sera that normally contain insulin. Finally, knockdown of the insulin receptor prevented the oxidative stress and insulin resistance induced by the prolonged exposure to insulin or oleate plus sera. Together, our results show that insulin and insulin signaling are required for fat induction of insulin resistance in mice and cultured mouse hepatocytes. PMID:21586696

  3. Glycine Increases Insulin Sensitivity and Glutathione Biosynthesis and Protects against Oxidative Stress in a Model of Sucrose-Induced Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed El-Hafidi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and redox status play a central role in the link between insulin resistance (IR and lipotoxicity in metabolic syndrome. This mechanistic link may involve alterations in the glutathione redox state. We examined the effect of glycine supplementation to diet on glutathione biosynthesis, oxidative stress, IR, and insulin cell signaling in liver from sucrose-fed (SF rats characterized by IR and oxidative stress. Our hypothesis is that the correction of glutathione levels by glycine treatment leads to reduced oxidative stress, a mechanism associated with improved insulin signaling and IR. Glycine treatment decreases the levels of oxidative stress markers in liver from SF rats and increases the concentrations of glutathione (GSH and γ-glutamylcysteine and the amount of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS, a key enzyme of GSH biosynthesis in liver from SF rats. In liver from SF rats, glycine also decreases the insulin-induced phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (ISR-1 in serine residue and increases the phosphorylation of insulin receptor β-subunit (IR-β in tyrosine residue. Thus, supplementing diets with glycine to correct GSH deficiency and to reduce oxidative stress provides significant metabolic benefits to SF rats by improving insulin sensitivity.

  4. Studies on insulin secretion and insulin resistance in non-insulin-dependent diabetes in young Indians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naidoo, C.

    1986-01-01

    Patients with Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) have defects in insulin secretion and insulin action. In the discrete genetic syndrome of NIDDY (non-insulin-dependent diabetes in the young), the situation is less clear and these aspects is the subject of this thesis. This study included Indian pasients with three generation transmission of NIDDM via one parent. The insulin and C-peptide responses to oral and intravenous glucose in patients with NIDDY were studied. The insulin and glucose responses to non-glucose secretogogues glucagon, tolbutamide and arginine, in NIDDY were also investigated. The following aspects with regard to insulin resistance in NIDDY were examined: glucose and free fatty acid response to intravenous insulin administration, insulin binding to circulating erythrocytes and monocytes, 125 I-insulin binding to the solubilized erythrocyte membrane receptor and 125 I-insulin binding to fibroblasts in culture

  5. Studies on insulin secretion and insulin resistance in non-insulin-dependent diabetes in young Indians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidoo, C

    1986-01-01

    Patients with Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) have defects in insulin secretion and insulin action. In the discrete genetic syndrome of NIDDY (non-insulin-dependent diabetes in the young), the situation is less clear and these aspects is the subject of this thesis. This study included Indian pasients with three generation transmission of NIDDM via one parent. The insulin and C-peptide responses to oral and intravenous glucose in patients with NIDDY were studied. The insulin and glucose responses to non-glucose secretogogues glucagon, tolbutamide and arginine, in NIDDY were also investigated. The following aspects with regard to insulin resistance in NIDDY were examined: glucose and free fatty acid response to intravenous insulin administration, insulin binding to circulating erythrocytes and monocytes, /sup 125/I-insulin binding to the solubilized erythrocyte membrane receptor and /sup 125/I-insulin binding to fibroblasts in culture.

  6. Possible contribution of taurine to distorted glucagon secretion in intra-islet insulin deficiency: a metabolome analysis using a novel α-cell model of insulin-deficient diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megumi Bessho

    Full Text Available Glycemic instability is a serious problem in patients with insulin-deficient diabetes, and it may be due in part to abnormal endogenous glucagon secretion. However, the intracellular metabolic mechanism(s involved in the aberrant glucagon response under the condition of insulin deficiency has not yet been elucidated. To investigate the metabolic traits that underlie the distortion of glucagon secretion under insulin deficient conditions, we generated an αTC1-6 cell line with stable knockdown of the insulin receptor (IRKD, i.e., an in vitro α-cell model for insulin-deficient diabetes, which exhibits an abnormal glucagon response to glucose. A comprehensive metabolomic analysis of the IRKD αTC1-6 cells (IRKD cells revealed some candidate metabolites whose levels differed markedly compared to those in control αTC1-6 cells, but also which could affect the glucagon release in IRKD cells. Of these candidates, taurine was remarkably increased in the IRKD cells and was identified as a stimulator of glucagon in αTC1-6 cells. Taurine also paradoxically exaggerated the glucagon secretion at a high glucose concentration in IRKD cells and islets with IRKD. These results indicate that the metabolic alterations induced by IRKD in α-cells, especially the increase of taurine, may lead to the distorted glucagon response in IRKD cells, suggesting the importance of taurine in the paradoxical glucagon response and the resultant glucose instability in insulin-deficient diabetes.

  7. Differential modulation of global and local neural oscillations in REM sleep by homeostatic sleep regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bowon; Kocsis, Bernat; Hwang, Eunjin; Kim, Youngsoo; Strecker, Robert E; McCarley, Robert W; Choi, Jee Hyun

    2017-02-28

    Homeostatic rebound in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep normally occurs after acute sleep deprivation, but REM sleep rebound settles on a persistently elevated level despite continued accumulation of REM sleep debt during chronic sleep restriction (CSR). Using high-density EEG in mice, we studied how this pattern of global regulation is implemented in cortical regions with different functions and network architectures. We found that across all areas, slow oscillations repeated the behavioral pattern of persistent enhancement during CSR, whereas high-frequency oscillations showed progressive increases. This pattern followed a common rule despite marked topographic differences. The findings suggest that REM sleep slow oscillations may translate top-down homeostatic control to widely separated brain regions whereas fast oscillations synchronizing local neuronal ensembles escape this global command. These patterns of EEG oscillation changes are interpreted to reconcile two prevailing theories of the function of sleep, synaptic homeostasis and sleep dependent memory consolidation.

  8. Childhood craniopharyngioma: greater hypothalamic involvement before surgery is associated with higher homeostasis model insulin resistance index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivin, Christine; Busiah, Kanetee; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Recasens, Christophe; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Zerah, Michel; Sainte-Rose, Christian; Brauner, Raja

    2009-01-01

    Background Obesity seems to be linked to the hypothalamic involvement in craniopharyngioma. We evaluated the pre-surgery relationship between the degree of this involvement on magnetic resonance imaging and insulin resistance, as evaluated by the homeostasis model insulin resistance index (HOMA). As insulin-like growth factor 1, leptin, soluble leptin receptor (sOB-R) and ghrelin may also be involved, we compared their plasma concentrations and their link to weight change. Methods 27 children with craniopharyngioma were classified as either grade 0 (n = 7, no hypothalamic involvement), grade 1 (n = 8, compression without involvement), or grade 2 (n = 12, severe involvement). Results Despite having similar body mass indexes (BMI), the grade 2 patients had higher glucose, insulin and HOMA before surgery than the grade 0 (P = 0.02, craniopharyngioma before surgery seems to determine the degree of insulin resistance, regardless of the BMI. The pre-surgery HOMA values were correlated with the post-surgery weight gain. This suggests that obesity should be prevented by reducing inn secretion in those cases with hypothalamic involvement. PMID:19341477

  9. The fluctuation of blood glucose, insulin and glucagon concentrations before and after insulin therapy in type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Idam; Nasir, Zulfa

    2015-09-01

    A dynamical-systems model of plasma glucose, insulin and glucagon concentrations has been developed to investigate the effects of insulin therapy on blood glucose, insulin and glucagon regulations in type 1 diabetic patients. Simulation results show that the normal regulation of blood glucose concentration depends on insulin and glucagon concentrations. On type 1 diabetic case, the role of insulin on regulating blood glucose is not optimal because of the destruction of β cells in pancreas. These β cells destructions cause hyperglycemic episode affecting the whole body metabolism. To get over this, type 1 diabetic patients need insulin therapy to control the blood glucose level. This research has been done by using rapid acting insulin (lispro), long-acting insulin (glargine) and the combination between them to know the effects of insulin therapy on blood glucose, insulin and glucagon concentrations. Simulation results show that these different types of insulin have different effects on blood glucose concentration. Insulin therapy using lispro shows better blood glucose control after consumption of meals. Glargin gives better blood glucose control between meals and during sleep. Combination between lispro and glargine shows better glycemic control for whole day blood glucose level.

  10. Homeostatic plasticity and STDP: keeping a neuron's cool in a fluctuating world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alanna J Watt

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP offers a powerful means of forming and modifying neural circuits. Experimental and theoretical studies have demonstrated its potential usefulness for functions as varied as cortical map development, sharpening of sensory receptive fields, working memory, and associative learning. Even so, it is unlikely that STDP works alone. Unless changes in synaptic strength are coordinated across multiple synapses and with other neuronal properties, it is difficult to maintain the stability and functionality of neural circuits. Moreover, there are certain features of early postnatal development (e.g., rapid changes in sensory input that threaten neural circuit stability in ways that STDP may not be well placed to counter. These considerations have led researchers to investigate additional types of plasticity, complementary to STDP, that may serve to constrain synaptic weights and/or neuronal firing. These are collectively known as “homeostatic plasticity” and include schemes that control the total synaptic strength of a neuron, that modulate its intrinsic excitability as a function of average activity, or that make the ability of synapses to undergo Hebbian modification depend upon their history of use. In this article, we will review the experimental evidence for homeostatic forms of plasticity and consider how they might interact with STDP during development and learning & memory.

  11. Bio-responsive polymer hydrogels homeostatically regulate blood coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitz, Manfred F; Freudenberg, Uwe; Tsurkan, Mikhail V; Fischer, Marion; Beyrich, Theresa; Werner, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Bio-responsive polymer architectures can empower medical therapies by engaging molecular feedback-response mechanisms resembling the homeostatic adaptation of living tissues to varying environmental constraints. Here we show that a blood coagulation-responsive hydrogel system can deliver heparin in amounts triggered by the environmental levels of thrombin, the key enzyme of the coagulation cascade, which--in turn--becomes inactivated due to released heparin. The bio-responsive hydrogel quantitatively quenches blood coagulation over several hours in the presence of pro-coagulant stimuli and during repeated incubation with fresh, non-anticoagulated blood. These features enable the introduced material to provide sustainable, autoregulated anticoagulation, addressing a key challenge of many medical therapies. Beyond that, the explored concept may facilitate the development of materials that allow the effective and controlled application of drugs and biomolecules.

  12. Brain glucose sensing in homeostatic and hedonic regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbusch, Laura; Labouèbe, Gwenaël; Thorens, Bernard

    2015-09-01

    Glucose homeostasis as well as homeostatic and hedonic control of feeding is regulated by hormonal, neuronal, and nutrient-related cues. Glucose, besides its role as a source of metabolic energy, is an important signal controlling hormone secretion and neuronal activity, hence contributing to whole-body metabolic integration in coordination with feeding control. Brain glucose sensing plays a key, but insufficiently explored, role in these metabolic and behavioral controls, which when deregulated may contribute to the development of obesity and diabetes. The recent introduction of innovative transgenic, pharmacogenetic, and optogenetic techniques allows unprecedented analysis of the complexity of central glucose sensing at the molecular, cellular, and neuronal circuit levels, which will lead to a new understanding of the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Degludec insulin: A novel basal insulin

    OpenAIRE

    Kalra, Sanjay; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalakrishnan; Baruah, Manash; Kalra, Bharti

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews a novel insulin analogue, degludec, which has the potential to emerge as an ideal basal insulin. It reviews the limitations of existing basal insulin and analogues, and highlights the need for a newer molecule. The paper discusses the potential advantages of degludec, while reviewing its pharmacologic and clinical studies done so far. The paper assesses the potential role of insulin degludec and degludec plus in clinical diabetes practice.

  14. HLA-B*39:06 Efficiently Mediates Type 1 Diabetes in a Mouse Model Incorporating Reduced Thymic Insulin Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloss, Jennifer; Ali, Riyasat; Racine, Jeremy J; Chapman, Harold D; Serreze, David V; DiLorenzo, Teresa P

    2018-04-09

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is characterized by T cell-mediated destruction of the insulin-producing β cells of the pancreatic islets. Among the loci associated with T1D risk, those most predisposing are found in the MHC region. HLA-B*39:06 is the most predisposing class I MHC allele and is associated with an early age of onset. To establish an NOD mouse model for the study of HLA-B*39:06, we expressed it in the absence of murine class I MHC. HLA-B*39:06 was able to mediate the development of CD8 T cells, support lymphocytic infiltration of the islets, and confer T1D susceptibility. Because reduced thymic insulin expression is associated with impaired immunological tolerance to insulin and increased T1D risk in patients, we incorporated this in our model as well, finding that HLA-B*39:06-transgenic NOD mice with reduced thymic insulin expression have an earlier age of disease onset and a higher overall prevalence as compared with littermates with typical thymic insulin expression. This was despite virtually indistinguishable blood insulin levels, T cell subset percentages, and TCR Vβ family usage, confirming that reduced thymic insulin expression does not impact T cell development on a global scale. Rather, it will facilitate the thymic escape of insulin-reactive HLA-B*39:06-restricted T cells, which participate in β cell destruction. We also found that in mice expressing either HLA-B*39:06 or HLA-A*02:01 in the absence of murine class I MHC, HLA transgene identity alters TCR Vβ usage by CD8 T cells, demonstrating that some TCR Vβ families have a preference for particular class I MHC alleles. Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. Generic Safety Requirements for Developing Safe Insulin Pump Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Jetley, Raoul; Jones, Paul L; Ray, Arnab

    2011-01-01

    Background The authors previously introduced a highly abstract generic insulin infusion pump (GIIP) model that identified common features and hazards shared by most insulin pumps on the market. The aim of this article is to extend our previous work on the GIIP model by articulating safety requirements that address the identified GIIP hazards. These safety requirements can be validated by manufacturers, and may ultimately serve as a safety reference for insulin pump software. Together, these two publications can serve as a basis for discussing insulin pump safety in the diabetes community. Methods In our previous work, we established a generic insulin pump architecture that abstracts functions common to many insulin pumps currently on the market and near-future pump designs. We then carried out a preliminary hazard analysis based on this architecture that included consultations with many domain experts. Further consultation with domain experts resulted in the safety requirements used in the modeling work presented in this article. Results Generic safety requirements for the GIIP model are presented, as appropriate, in parameterized format to accommodate clinical practices or specific insulin pump criteria important to safe device performance. Conclusions We believe that there is considerable value in having the diabetes, academic, and manufacturing communities consider and discuss these generic safety requirements. We hope that the communities will extend and revise them, make them more representative and comprehensive, experiment with them, and use them as a means for assessing the safety of insulin pump software designs. One potential use of these requirements is to integrate them into model-based engineering (MBE) software development methods. We believe, based on our experiences, that implementing safety requirements using MBE methods holds promise in reducing design/implementation flaws in insulin pump development and evolutionary processes, therefore improving

  16. Mathematical model of the glucose-insulin regulatory system: From the bursting electrical activity in pancreatic β-cells to the glucose dynamics in the whole body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyungreem; Kang, Hyuk; Choi, M. Y.; Kim, Jinwoong; Lee, Myung-Shik

    2012-10-01

    A theoretical approach to the glucose-insulin regulatory system is presented. By means of integrated mathematical modeling and extensive numerical simulations, we probe the cell-level dynamics of the membrane potential, intracellular Ca2+ concentration, and insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells, together with the whole-body level glucose-insulin dynamics in the liver, brain, muscle, and adipose tissues. In particular, the three oscillatory modes of insulin secretion are reproduced successfully. Such comprehensive mathematical modeling may provide a theoretical basis for the simultaneous assessment of the β-cell function and insulin resistance in clinical examination.

  17. The ontogeny of insulin signaling in the preterm baboon model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Cynthia L; Liang, Hanyu; Joya-Galeana, Joaquin; DeFronzo, Ralph A; McCurnin, Donald; Musi, Nicolas

    2010-05-01

    Hyperglycemia, a prevalent condition in premature infants, is thought to be a consequence of incomplete suppression of endogenous glucose production and reduced insulin-stimulated glucose disposal in peripheral tissues. However, the molecular basis for these conditions remains unclear. To test the hypothesis that the insulin transduction pathway is underdeveloped with prematurity, fetal baboons were delivered, anesthetized, and euthanized at 125 d gestational age (GA), 140 d GA, or near term at 175 d GA. Vastus lateralis muscle and liver tissues were obtained, and protein content of insulin signaling molecules [insulin receptor (IR)-beta, IR substate-1, p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Akt, and AS160] and glucose transporters (GLUT)-1 and GLUT4 was measured by Western blotting. Muscle from 125 d GA baboons had markedly reduced GLUT1 protein content (16% of 140 d GA and 9% of 175 d GA fetuses). GLUT4 and AS160 also were severely reduced in 125 d GA fetal muscle (43% of 175 d GA and 35% of 175 d GA, respectively). In contrast, the protein content of IR-beta, IR substate-1, and Akt was elevated by 1.7-, 5.2-, and 1.9-fold, respectively, in muscle from 125 d GA baboons when compared with 175 d GA fetuses. No differences were found in the content of insulin signaling proteins in liver. In conclusion, significant gestational differences exist in the protein content of several insulin signaling proteins in the muscle of fetal baboons. Reduced muscle content of key glucose transport-regulating proteins (GLUT1, GLUT4, AS160) could play a role in the pathogenesis of neonatal hyperglycemia and reduced insulin-stimulated glucose disposal.

  18. Insulin secretion and insulin action in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: which defect is primary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaven, G M

    1984-01-01

    Defects in both insulin secretion and insulin action exist in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). The loss of the acute plasma insulin response to intravenous glucose is seen in patients with relatively mild degrees of fasting hyperglycemia, but patients with severe fasting hyperglycemia also demonstrate absolute hypoinsulinemia in response to an oral glucose challenge. In contrast, day-long circulating insulin levels are within normal limits even in severely hyperglycemic patients with NIDDM. The relationship between NIDDM and insulin action in NIDDM is less complex, and is a characteristic feature of the syndrome. This metabolic defect is independent of obesity, and the severity of the resistance to insulin-stimulated glucose uptake increases with magnitude of hyperglycemia. Control of hyperglycemia with exogenous insulin ameliorates the degree of insulin resistance, and reduction of insulin resistance with weight loss in obese patients with NIDDM leads to an enhanced insulin response. Since neither therapeutic intervention is capable of restoring all metabolic abnormalities to normal, these observations do not tell us which of these two defects is primarily responsible for the development of NIDDM. Similarly, the observation that most patients with impaired glucose tolerance are hyperinsulinemic and insulin resistant does not prove that insulin resistance is the primary defect in NIDDM. In conclusion, reduction in both insulin secretion and action is seen in patients with NIDDM, and the relationship between these two metabolic abnormalities is very complex.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Quercetin suppresses insulin receptor signaling through inhibition of the insulin ligand–receptor binding and therefore impairs cancer cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Feng [Department of Gastroenterology, The Tenth People’s Hospital of Shanghai, Tongji University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Yang, Yong, E-mail: yyang@houstonmethodist.org [Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2014-10-03

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Quercetin inhibits insulin ligand–receptor interactions. • Quercetin reduces downstream insulin receptor signaling. • Quercetin blocks insulin induced glucose uptake. • Quercetin suppresses insulin stimulated cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. - Abstract: Although the flavonoid quercetin is known to inhibit activation of insulin receptor signaling, the inhibitory mechanism is largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that quercetin suppresses insulin induced dimerization of the insulin receptor (IR) through interfering with ligand–receptor interactions, which reduces the phosphorylation of IR and Akt. This inhibitory effect further inhibits insulin stimulated glucose uptake due to decreased cell membrane translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), resulting in impaired cancer cell proliferation. The effect of quercetin in inhibiting tumor growth was also evident in an in vivo model, indicating a potential future application for quercetin in the treatment of cancers.

  20. Quercetin suppresses insulin receptor signaling through inhibition of the insulin ligand–receptor binding and therefore impairs cancer cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Feng; Yang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Quercetin inhibits insulin ligand–receptor interactions. • Quercetin reduces downstream insulin receptor signaling. • Quercetin blocks insulin induced glucose uptake. • Quercetin suppresses insulin stimulated cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. - Abstract: Although the flavonoid quercetin is known to inhibit activation of insulin receptor signaling, the inhibitory mechanism is largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that quercetin suppresses insulin induced dimerization of the insulin receptor (IR) through interfering with ligand–receptor interactions, which reduces the phosphorylation of IR and Akt. This inhibitory effect further inhibits insulin stimulated glucose uptake due to decreased cell membrane translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), resulting in impaired cancer cell proliferation. The effect of quercetin in inhibiting tumor growth was also evident in an in vivo model, indicating a potential future application for quercetin in the treatment of cancers

  1. Chitosan nanofibers for transbuccal insulin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancina, Michael G; Shankar, Roopa Kanakatti; Yang, Hu

    2017-05-01

    In this work, they aimed at producing chitosan based nanofiber mats capable of delivering insulin via the buccal mucosa. Chitosan was electrospun into nanofibers using poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) as a carrier molecule in various feed ratios. The mechanical properties and degradation kinetics of the fibers were measured. Insulin release rates were determined in vitro using an ELISA assay. The bioactivity of released insulin was measured in terms of Akt activation in pre-adipocytes. Insulin permeation across the buccal mucosa was measured in an ex-vivo porcine transbuccal model. Fiber morphology, mechanical properties, and in vitro stability were dependent on PEO feed ratio. Lower PEO content blends produced smaller diameter fibers with significantly faster insulin release kinetics. Insulin showed no reduction in bioactivity due to electrospinning. Buccal permeation of insulin facilitated by high chitosan content blends was significantly higher than that of free insulin. Taken together, the work demonstrates that chitosan-based nanofibers have the potential to serve as a transbuccal insulin delivery vehicle. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1252-1259, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The changes in levels of C-P and insulin in glucose tolerance test in rats with experimental non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xinqiu; Lei Ming

    2001-01-01

    The changes in levels of C-P and insulin were investigated in the GT test in rats with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. In order to establish a model of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), the authors injected rats with small dose streptozocoi (i.v.). Two weeks after the injection, the rats developed impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Then, they were fed with high energy diet for eight weeks to form NIDDM. The results showed that the highest peak time of C-P and insulin in NIDDM was remarkably later than that in normal subjects, the highest peak time was in two hours (P < 0.05). The data suggest that level of C-P could accurately respond to level of insulin, and this experimental non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus model is ideal

  3. Veganism and its relationship with insulin resistance and intramyocellular lipid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, L M; Bell, J D; So, P-W; Dornhorst, A; Frost, G S

    2005-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that dietary factors in the vegan diet lead to improved insulin sensitivity and lower intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) storage. Case-control study. Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, London, UK. A total of 24 vegans and 25 omnivores participated in this study; three vegan subjects could not be matched therefore the matched results are shown for 21 vegans and 25 omnivores. The subjects were matched for gender, age and body mass index (BMI). Full anthropometry, 7-day dietary assessment and physical activity levels were obtained. Insulin sensitivity (%S) and beta-cell function (%B) were determined using the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA). IMCL levels were determined using in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy; total body fat content was assessed by bioelectrical impedance. There was no difference between the groups in sex, age, BMI, waist measurement, percentage body fat, activity levels and energy intake. Vegans had a significantly lower systolic blood pressure (-11.0 mmHg, CI -20.6 to -1.3, P=0.027) and higher dietary intake of carbohydrate (10.7%, CI 6.8-14.5, P<0.001), nonstarch polysaccharides (20.7 g, CI 15.8-25.6, P<0.001) and polyunsaturated fat (2.8%, CI 1.0-4.6, P=0.003), with a significantly lower glycaemic index (-3.7, CI -6.7 to -0.7, P=0.01). Also, vegans had lower fasting plasma triacylglycerol (-0.7 mmol/l, CI -0.9 to -0.4, P<0.001) and glucose (-0.4 mmol/l, CI -0.7 to -0.09, P=0.05) concentrations. There was no significant difference in HOMA %S but there was with HOMA %B (32.1%, CI 10.3-53.9, P=0.005), while IMCL levels were significantly lower in the soleus muscle (-9.7, CI -16.2 to -3.3, P=0.01). Vegans have a food intake and a biochemical profile that will be expected to be cardioprotective, with lower IMCL accumulation and beta-cell protective.

  4. Mixed model of dietary fat effect on postprandial glucose-insulin metabolism from carbohydrates in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto Noguchi, Claudia Cecilia; Kunikane, Noriaki; Hashimoto, Shogo; Furutani, Eiko

    2015-08-01

    In this study we introduce an extension of a previously developed model of glucose-insulin metabolism in type 1 diabetes (T1D) from carbohydrates that includes the effect of dietary fat on postprandial glycemia. We include two compartments that represent plasma triglyceride and nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentration, in addition to a mathematical representation of delayed gastric emptying and insulin resistance, which are the most well-known effects of dietary fat metabolism. Simulation results show that postprandial glucose as well as lipid levels in our model approximates clinical data from T1D patients.

  5. A mathematical model of insulin resistance in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braatz, Elise M; Coleman, Randolph A

    2015-06-01

    This paper introduces a mathematical model representing the biochemical interactions between insulin signaling and Parkinson's disease. The model can be used to examine the changes that occur over the course of the disease as well as identify which processes would be the most effective targets for treatment. The model is mathematized using biochemical systems theory (BST). It incorporates a treatment strategy that includes several experimental drugs along with current treatments. In the past, BST models of neurodegeneration have used power law analysis and simulation (PLAS) to model the system. This paper recommends the use of MATLAB instead. MATLAB allows for more flexibility in both the model itself and in data analysis. Previous BST analyses of neurodegeneration began treatment at disease onset. As shown in this model, the outcomes of delayed, realistic treatment and full treatment at disease onset are significantly different. The delayed treatment strategy is an important development in BST modeling of neurodegeneration. It emphasizes the importance of early diagnosis, and allows for a more accurate representation of disease and treatment interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Prediction of clamp-derived insulin sensitivity from the oral glucose insulin sensitivity index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tura, Andrea; Chemello, Gaetano; Szendroedi, Julia

    2018-01-01

    that underwent both a clamp and an OGTT or meal test, thereby allowing calculation of both the M value and OGIS. The population was divided into a training and a validation cohort (n = 359 and n = 154, respectively). After a stepwise selection approach, the best model for M value prediction was applied......AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp is the gold-standard method for measuring insulin sensitivity, but is less suitable for large clinical trials. Thus, several indices have been developed for evaluating insulin sensitivity from the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). However......, most of them yield values different from those obtained by the clamp method. The aim of this study was to develop a new index to predict clamp-derived insulin sensitivity (M value) from the OGTT-derived oral glucose insulin sensitivity index (OGIS). METHODS: We analysed datasets of people...

  7. Insulin degludec versus insulin glargine in insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinman, Bernard; Philis-Tsimikas, Athena; Cariou, Bertrand

    2012-01-01

    To compare ultra-long-acting insulin degludec with glargine for efficacy and safety in insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs).......To compare ultra-long-acting insulin degludec with glargine for efficacy and safety in insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs)....

  8. Insulin induces a shift in lipid and primary carbon metabolites in a model of fasting-induced insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peripheral insulin resistance shifts metabolic fuel use away from carbohydrates, and towards lipids, and is most commonly associated with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, regulated insulin resistance is an evolved mechanism to preserve glucose for the brain in conditions of high demand or carbohy...

  9. The Relationship of Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Insulin Resistance among Nondiabetic Canadians: A Longitudinal Analysis of Participants of a Preventive Health Program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truong-Minh Pham

    Full Text Available Observational and intervention studies have revealed inconsistent findings with respect to the relationship between vitamin D and insulin resistance. No intervention studies have been conducted in community samples whereas this may be particularly relevant to the primary prevention of type 2 diabetes (T2D and cardiovascular disease (CVD. In the present study we examined whether temporal improvements in vitamin D status, measured as serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OHD], reduce the risk of insulin resistance among individuals without T2D. We accessed and analyzed data from 5730 nondiabetic participants with repeated measures of serum 25(OHD who enrolled in a preventive health program. We used the homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and applied logistic regression to quantify the independent contribution of baseline serum 25(OHD and temporal increases in 25(OHD on HOMA-IR. The median time between baseline and follow up was 1.1 year. On average serum 25(OHD concentrations increased from 89 nanomoles per liter (nmol/L at baseline to 122 nmol/L at follow up. Univariate analyses showed that relative to participants with baseline serum 25(OHD less than 50 nmol/L, participants with baseline concentrations of "50-<75", "75-<100", "100-<125", and ≥125 nmol/L were 0.76 (95% confidence intervals: 0.61-0.95, 0.54 (0.43-0.69, 0.48 (0.36-0.64 and 0.36 (0.27-0.49 times as likely to have insulin resistance at follow up, respectively. More importantly, relative to participants without temporal increases in 25(OHD, those with increases in serum 25(OHD of "<25", "25-<50", "50-<75", "≥75" nmol/L were 0.92 (0.72-1.17, 0.86 (0.65-1.13, 0.66 (0.47-0.93, and 0.74 (0.55-0.99 times as likely to have insulin resistance at follow up, respectively. In the subgroup of participants without insulin resistance at baseline, this was 0.96 (0.72-1.27, 0.78 (0.56-1.10, 0.66 (0.44-0.99, and 0.67 (0.48-0.94, respectively. These observations suggest that

  10. Defective insulin signaling pathway and increased glycogen synthase kinase-3 activity in the brain of diabetic mice: parallels with Alzheimer's disease and correction by insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolivalt, C G; Lee, C A; Beiswenger, K K; Smith, J L; Orlov, M; Torrance, M A; Masliah, E

    2008-11-15

    We have evaluated the effect of peripheral insulin deficiency on brain insulin pathway activity in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes, the parallels with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and the effect of treatment with insulin. Nine weeks of insulin-deficient diabetes significantly impaired the learning capacity of mice, significantly reduced insulin-degrading enzyme protein expression, and significantly reduced phosphorylation of the insulin-receptor and AKT. Phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) was also significantly decreased, indicating increased GSK3 activity. This evidence of reduced insulin signaling was associated with a concomitant increase in tau phosphorylation and amyloid beta protein levels. Changes in phosphorylation levels of insulin receptor, GSK3, and tau were not observed in the brain of db/db mice, a model of type 2 diabetes, after a similar duration (8 weeks) of diabetes. Treatment with insulin from onset of diabetes partially restored the phosphorylation of insulin receptor and of GSK3, partially reduced the level of phosphorylated tau in the brain, and partially improved learning ability in insulin-deficient diabetic mice. Our data indicate that mice with systemic insulin deficiency display evidence of reduced insulin signaling pathway activity in the brain that is associated with biochemical and behavioral features of AD and that it can be corrected by insulin treatment.

  11. Does the active use of nutrition labeling reduce the risk of diabetes mellitus? Results of insulin resistance using Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyu-Tae; Kim, Seung Ju; Kim, Dong Jun; Kim, Sun Jung

    2018-05-29

    In 1995, nutrition labeling became mandatory in South Korea. These regulations help consumers make reasonable choices when purchasing food based on nutritional value by providing the nutritional properties of processed foods. We investigated the association between perceptions about nutrition labeling and insulin resistance (IR) in people with no diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (DM). This study used data from the sixth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES VI-3 in 2015, n=2931). We used multiple regression analysis to investigate the relationship between perceptions about nutrition labeling and the homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). 75.2% of participants were aware of nutrition labeling and 24.8% of participants checked nutrition labeling and actively used the information. "Actively checked and used the nutrition labeling" was inversely associated with HOMA-IR scores (check nutrition facts and make labeling-dependent purchase decisions: β=-0.108, p=0.0164). These associations were more significant in people who were obese or paid more attention to their health. High levels of perceptions about nutrition labeling and active use of such information could have positive effects on reducing IR and preventing DM. Therefore, it is necessary to improve public perception for effective implementation of healthcare programs. Copyright © 2018 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Experimental evaluation and computational modeling of the effects of encapsulation on the time-profile of glucose-stimulated insulin release of pancreatic islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, Peter; Cechin, Sirlene R; Weaver, Jessica D; Stabler, Cherie L

    2015-03-28

    In type 1 diabetic patients, who have lost their ability to produce insulin, transplantation of pancreatic islet cells can normalize metabolic control in a manner that is not achievable with exogenous insulin. To be successful, this procedure has to address the problems caused by the immune and autoimmune responses to the graft. Islet encapsulation using various techniques and materials has been and is being extensively explored as a possible approach. Within this framework, it is of considerable interest to characterize the effect encapsulation has on the insulin response of pancreatic islets. To improve our ability to quantitatively describe the glucose-stimulated insulin release (GSIR) of pancreatic islets in general and of micro-encapsulated islets in particular, we performed dynamic perifusion experiments with frequent sampling. We used unencapsulated and microencapsulated murine islets in parallel and fitted the results with a complex local concentration-based finite element method (FEM) computational model. The high-resolution dynamic perifusion experiments allowed good characterization of the first-phase and second-phase insulin secretion, and we observed a slightly delayed and blunted first-phase insulin response for microencapsulated islets when compared to free islets. Insulin secretion profiles of both free and encapsulated islets could be fitted well by a COMSOL Multiphysics model that couples hormone secretion and nutrient consumption kinetics with diffusive and convective transport. This model, which was further validated and calibrated here, can be used for arbitrary geometries and glucose stimulation sequences and is well suited for the quantitative characterization of the insulin response of cultured, perifused, transplanted, or encapsulated islets. The present high-resolution GSIR experiments allowed for direct characterization of the effect microencapsulation has on the time-profile of insulin secretion. The multiphysics model, further validated

  13. Associations between school meal-induced dietary changes and metabolic syndrome markers in 8–11-year-old Danish children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Camilla T.; Ritz, Christian; Dalskov, Stine Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We recently showed that provision of Nordic school meals rich in fish, vegetables and potatoes and with reduced intakes of fat improved blood pressure, insulin resistance assessed by the homeostatic model (HOMA-IR), and plasma triacylglycerol despite increasing waist circumference....... Results: After adjustment for multiple testing, whole-blood DHA was negatively associated with HOMA-IR (P

  14. Insulin sensitivity deteriorates after short-term lifestyle intervention in the insulin sensitive phenotype of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilardini, Luisa; Vallone, Luciana; Cottafava, Raffaella; Redaelli, Gabriella; Croci, Marina; Conti, Antonio; Pasqualinotto, Lucia; Invitti, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effects of a 3-month lifestyle intervention on insulin sensitivity and its related cardiometabolic factors in obese patients. Anthropometry, body composition, oral glucose tolerance test, lipids, alanine aminotransferase, insulin sensitivity (insulinogenic index (ISI), homeostasis model assessment, β-cell performance (disposition index)) were evaluated in 263 obese women and 93 obese men before and after 3 months of hypocaloric low fat/high protein diet associated with physical activity 30 min/day. Patients were divided into 3 groups according to the intervention-induced ISI changes: group 1 (decrease), group 2 (stability) and group 3 (increase). Insulin sensitivity and the disposition index were significantly higher before the intervention in group 1 than in group 3. BMI, waist circumference, and fat mass significantly decreased in groups 1 and 3 in both sexes. β-cell performance decreased in group 1 and increased in group 3. Metabolic variables improved in group 3, whereas glucose levels increased in women of group 1. The post-intervention insulin sensitivity was lower in group 1 than in group 3. Lifestyle intervention induces changes in insulin sensitivity and metabolic factors that depend on the pre-intervention degree of insulin sensitivity. Weight loss leads to metabolic benefits in insulin-resistant, obese patients, whereas it may paradoxically worsen the metabolic conditions in the insulin-sensitive phenotype of obesity. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  15. Parameters of glucose metabolism and the aging brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akintola, Abimbola A; van den Berg, Annette; Altmann-Schneider, Irmhild

    2015-01-01

    Given the concurrent, escalating epidemic of diabetes mellitus and neurodegenerative diseases, two age-related disorders, we aimed to understand the relation between parameters of glucose metabolism and indices of pathology in the aging brain. From the Leiden Longevity Study, 132 participants (mean...... age 66 years) underwent a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test to assess glucose tolerance (fasted and area under the curve (AUC) glucose), insulin sensitivity (fasted and AUC insulin and homeostatic model assessment of insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IS)) and insulin secretion (insulinogenic index). 3-T brain...... significant associations were found for white matter. Thus, while higher glucose was associated with macro-structural damage, impaired insulin action was associated more strongly with reduced micro-structural brain parenchymal homogeneity. These findings offer some insight into the association between...

  16. Insulin resistance and maximal oxygen uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seibaek, Marie; Vestergaard, Henrik; Burchardt, Hans

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes, coronary atherosclerosis, and physical fitness all correlate with insulin resistance, but the relative importance of each component is unknown. HYPOTHESIS: This study was undertaken to determine the relationship between insulin resistance, maximal oxygen uptake......, and the presence of either diabetes or ischemic heart disease. METHODS: The study population comprised 33 patients with and without diabetes and ischemic heart disease. Insulin resistance was measured by a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp; maximal oxygen uptake was measured during a bicycle exercise test. RESULTS......: There was a strong correlation between maximal oxygen uptake and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (r = 0.7, p = 0.001), and maximal oxygen uptake was the only factor of importance for determining insulin sensitivity in a model, which also included the presence of diabetes and ischemic heart disease. CONCLUSION...

  17. Phase-locking regions in a forced model of slow insulin and glucose oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturis, Jeppe; Knudsen, Carsten; O'Meara, Niall M.

    1995-01-01

    We present a detailed numerical investigation of the phase-locking regions in a forced model of slow oscillations in human insulin secretion and blood glucose concentration. The bifurcation structures of period 2pi and 4pi tongues are mapped out and found to be qualitatively identical to those...

  18. Phase-locking regions in a forced model of slow insulin and glucose oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturis, J.; Knudsen, C.; O'Meara, N.M.

    1996-01-01

    We present a detailed numerical investigation of the phase-locking regions in a forced model of slow oscillations in human insulin secretion and blood glucose concentration. The bifurcation structures of period 2pi and 4pi tongues are mapped out and found to be qualitatively identical to those...

  19. The anti-obesity effects of the dietary combination of fermented red ginseng with levan in high fat diet mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jin sun; Lee, Seung Ri; Hwang, Keum Taek; Ji, Geun Eog

    2014-04-01

    In this study, to evaluate the anti-obesity effects of fermented red ginseng (FG), levan (L), and their combination (FGL), we investigated their effects on the weights of body, liver and white adipose tissue, lipid profiles, and biomarkers for insulin resistance in high fat diet (HFD)-induced obese C57BL/6J male mice. Furthermore, the levels of leptin in the serum were measured. FG (150 mg/kg/d), L (100 mg/kg/d), and FGL (150 mg/kg/d of FG plus 100 mg/kg/d of L) were administered orally to mice daily for 11 weeks. After 11 weeks feeding, FGL showed significantly lower body weight and fat mass with decreasing food efficiency ratio than the HFD control mice. In addition, the FGL group was significantly lower in the levels of total cholesterol and fasting blood glucose and score of the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance. Furthermore, FGL decreased serum leptin levels compared to the HFD control group. Taken together, FGL showed a significant anti-obesity effect in HFD-induced obese mice and prevent insulin and leptin resistance. FGL may be potentially useful for the prevention of obesity. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. EGb761, an extract of Ginkgo biloba leaves, reduces insulin resistance in a high-fat-fed mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-na Cong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available EGb761, a standardized and well-defined product extract of Ginkgo biloba leaves, has beneficial effects on the treatment of multiple diseases, including diabetes and dyslipidemia. However, it is still unclear whether EGb761 can increase insulin sensitivity. The objectives of the present study are to evaluate the effects of EGb761 on insulin sensitivity in an obese and insulin-resistant mouse model, established through chronic feeding of C57BL/6J mice with a high-fat diet (HFD, and to explore potential mechanisms. Mice fed with HFD for 18 weeks (starting from 4 weeks of age developed obesity, dyslipidemia (as indicated by biochemical measurements of blood glucose, triglyceride (TG, total cholesterol (TC, and free fatty acids (FFA, and insulin resistance (as determined by the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR index, compared to control mice fed with a standard laboratory chow. Oral treatment of the HFD-fed mice with EGb761, at low (100 mg/kg, medium (200 mg/kg, or high (400 mg/kg doses, via oral gavage (once daily for 8 weeks (starting from 26 weeks of age dose-dependently enhanced glucose tolerance in OGTT, and decreased both the insulin levels (by 29%, 55%, and 70%, respectively, and the HOMA-IR index values (by 50%, 69%, and 80%, respectively. EGb761 treatment also ameliorated HFD-induced obesity, dyslipidemia, and liver injury, as indicated by decreases in body weight (by 4%, 11%, and 16%, respectively, blood TC levels (by 23%, 32%, and 37%, respectively, blood TG levels (by 17%, 23%, and 33%, respectively, blood FAA levels (by 35%, 38%, and 46%, respectively, and liver index (liver weight/body weight values (by 12.8%, 25%, and 28%, respectively in the low, medium, and high EGb761 dose groups, respectively. In further mechanism studies, EGb761 was found to protect hepatic insulin receptor β and insulin receptor substrate 1 from HFD-induced degradation, and to keep the AMP

  1. Mechanisms for greater insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in normal and insulin-resistant skeletal muscle after acute exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced skeletal muscle and whole body insulin sensitivity can persist for up to 24–48 h after one exercise session. This review focuses on potential mechanisms for greater postexercise and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (ISGU) by muscle in individuals with normal or reduced insulin sensitivity. A model is proposed for the processes underlying this improvement; i.e., triggers initiate events that activate subsequent memory elements, which store information that is relayed to mediators, which translate memory into action by controlling an end effector that directly executes increased insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Several candidates are potential triggers or memory elements, but none have been conclusively verified. Regarding potential mediators in both normal and insulin-resistant individuals, elevated postexercise ISGU with a physiological insulin dose coincides with greater Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160) phosphorylation without improved proximal insulin signaling at steps from insulin receptor binding to Akt activity. Causality remains to be established between greater AS160 phosphorylation and improved ISGU. The end effector for normal individuals is increased GLUT4 translocation, but this remains untested for insulin-resistant individuals postexercise. Following exercise, insulin-resistant individuals can attain ISGU values similar to nonexercising healthy controls, but after a comparable exercise protocol performed by both groups, ISGU for the insulin-resistant group has been consistently reported to be below postexercise values for the healthy group. Further research is required to fully understand the mechanisms underlying the improved postexercise ISGU in individuals with normal or subnormal insulin sensitivity and to explain the disparity between these groups after similar exercise. PMID:26487009

  2. Insulin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, C.R.; Harrison, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on insulin receptors. Part A: Methods for the study of structure and function. Topics covered include: Method for purification and labeling of insulin receptors, the insulin receptor kinase, and insulin receptors on special tissues

  3. Associations between depressive symptoms and insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriaanse, M C; Dekker, J M; Nijpels, G

    2006-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The association between depression and insulin resistance has been investigated in only a few studies, with contradictory results reported. The aim of this study was to determine whether the association between symptoms of depression and insulin resistance varies across glucose...... established type 2 diabetes mellitus. Main outcome measures were insulin resistance defined by the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and symptoms of depression using the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). RESULTS: In the total sample, we found a weak.......942). The association between depressive symptoms and insulin resistance was similar for men and women. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: We found only weak associations between depressive symptoms and insulin resistance, which did not differ among different glucose metabolism subgroups or between men and women....

  4. Rapid development of cardiac dysfunction in a canine model of insulin resistance and moderate obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Josiane L; Nelson, Michael D; Kolka, Cathryn M; Bediako, Isaac Asare; Paszkiewicz, Rebecca L; Smith, Laura; Szczepaniak, Edward W; Stefanovski, Darko; Szczepaniak, Lidia S; Bergman, Richard N

    2016-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of obesity and diabetes continues to rise at an alarming rate. A major cause of the morbidity and mortality associated with obesity and diabetes is heart disease, yet the mechanisms that lead to cardiovascular complications remain unclear. We performed cardiac MRI to assess left ventricular morphology and function during the development of moderate obesity and insulin resistance in a well-established canine model (n = 26). To assess the influence of dietary fat composition, we randomised animals to a traditional lard diet (rich in saturated and monounsaturated fat; n = 12), a salmon oil diet (rich in polyunsaturated fat; n = 8) or a control diet (n = 6). High-fat feeding with lard increased body weight and fasting insulin and markedly reduced insulin sensitivity. Lard feeding also significantly reduced left ventricular function, evidenced by a worsening of circumferential strain and impairment in left ventricular torsion. High-fat feeding with salmon oil increased body weight; however, salmon oil feeding did not impair insulin sensitivity or cardiac function. These data emphasise the importance of dietary fat composition on both metabolic and cardiac function, and have important implications for the relationship between diet and health.

  5. Childhood craniopharyngioma: greater hypothalamic involvement before surgery is associated with higher homeostasis model insulin resistance index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sainte-Rose Christian

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity seems to be linked to the hypothalamic involvement in craniopharyngioma. We evaluated the pre-surgery relationship between the degree of this involvement on magnetic resonance imaging and insulin resistance, as evaluated by the homeostasis model insulin resistance index (HOMA. As insulin-like growth factor 1, leptin, soluble leptin receptor (sOB-R and ghrelin may also be involved, we compared their plasma concentrations and their link to weight change. Methods 27 children with craniopharyngioma were classified as either grade 0 (n = 7, no hypothalamic involvement, grade 1 (n = 8, compression without involvement, or grade 2 (n = 12, severe involvement. Results Despite having similar body mass indexes (BMI, the grade 2 patients had higher glucose, insulin and HOMA before surgery than the grade 0 (P = 0.02, The data for the whole population before and 6–18 months after surgery showed increases in BMI (P Conclusion The hypothalamic involvement by the craniopharyngioma before surgery seems to determine the degree of insulin resistance, regardless of the BMI. The pre-surgery HOMA values were correlated with the post-surgery weight gain. This suggests that obesity should be prevented by reducing inn secretion in those cases with hypothalamic involvement.

  6. Validation of HOMA-IR in a model of insulin-resistance induced by a high-fat diet in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Luciana C; Elkfury, Jessica L; Jornada, Manoela N; Foletto, Kelly C; Bertoluci, Marcello C

    2016-04-01

    Objective The present study aimed to validate homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in relation to the insulin tolerance test (ITT) in a model of insulin-resistance in Wistar rats induced by a 19-week high-fat diet. Materials and methods A total of 30 male Wistar rats weighing 200-300 g were allocated into a high-fat diet group (HFD) (55% fat-enriched chow, ad lib, n = 15) and a standard-diet group (CD) standard chow, ad lib, n = 15), for 19 weeks. ITT was determined at baseline and in the 19th week. HOMA-IR was determined between the 18-19th week in three different days and the mean was considered for analysis. Area under the curve (AUC-ITT) of the blood glucose excursion along 120 minutes after intra-peritoneal insulin injection was determined and correlated with the corresponding fasting values for HOMA-IR. Results AUC-ITT and HOMA-IR were significantly greater after 19th week in HFD compared to CD (p HOMA-IR was strongly correlated (Pearson's) with AUC-ITT r = 0.637; p HOMA-IR and AUC-ITT showed similar sensitivity and specificity. Conclusion HOMA-IR is a valid measure to determine insulin-resistance in Wistar rats. Arch Endocrinol Metab. 2016;60(2):138-42.

  7. Interacting with the Human Insulin Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kidmose, Rune Thomas; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    2016-01-01

    Insulin is an essential regulator of glucose homeostasis. In this issue of Structure, Croll et al. (2016) reports a significantly improved model of the Fab-complexed IR ectodomain refined against a dataset extending to 3.3 Å.......Insulin is an essential regulator of glucose homeostasis. In this issue of Structure, Croll et al. (2016) reports a significantly improved model of the Fab-complexed IR ectodomain refined against a dataset extending to 3.3 Å....

  8. Improved insulin sensitivity after exercise: focus on insulin signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøsig, Christian; Richter, Erik

    2009-01-01

    After a single bout of exercise, the ability of insulin to stimulate glucose uptake is markedly improved locally in the previously active muscles. This makes exercise a potent stimulus counteracting insulin resistance characterizing type 2 diabetes (T2D). It is believed that at least part...... of the mechanism relates to an improved ability of insulin to stimulate translocation of glucose transporters (GLUT4) to the muscle membrane after exercise. How this is accomplished is still unclear; however, an obvious possibility is that exercise interacts with the insulin signaling pathway to GLUT4...... translocation allowing for a more potent insulin response. Parallel to unraveling of the insulin signaling cascade, this has been investigated within the past 25 years. Reviewing existing studies clearly indicates that improved insulin action can occur independent of interactions with proximal insulin signaling...

  9. In vivo characterization of insulin uptake by dog renal cortical epithelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whiteside, C.I.; Lumsden, C.J.; Silverman, M.

    1988-01-01

    In vivo 125I-labeled insulin uptake by dog renal tubular epithelium was studied using the single-pass multiple indicator dilution (MID) method and analyzed by a computer-assisted model of transcapillary exchange and substrate-cell interaction. Anesthetized dogs received an intrarenal arterial bolus of multiple tracers: [3H]dextran greater than 70 kDa (plasma reference), [14C]inulin (extracellular reference), and 125I-insulin. Rapid serial sampling of the renal venous and urine outflows was performed. The renal venous outflow curves of 125I-insulin fell below [14C]inulin implying postglomerular extraction and antiluminal membrane (ALM) uptake. The fractional urine recovery of 125I-insulin was less than 0.03, indicating luminal tubular uptake of filtered hormone. After intravenous infusion of unlabeled insulin, repeat MID runs with tracer revealed saturable ALM uptake as evidenced by the 125I-insulin renal venous outflow curves approaching [14C]inulin. Luminal tubular uptake was unchanged and therefore unsaturable. The 125I-insulin renal venous data were studied using three mathematical models, incorporating postglomerular reversible binding, irreversible binding or transport. The best fit was obtained using the transport model. The modeling analysis is consistent with either uptake into a virtual epithelial membrane space (i.e., insulin never enters the cell but binds to or is distributed along the ALM) or insulin actually enters the intracellular compartment. In vivo uptake of 125I-insulin ALM is characterized by a Km of 15.44 nM

  10. Impaired insulin secretion in the spontaneous diabetes rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, K; Toyota, T; Kakizaki, M; Kudo, M; Takebe, K; Goto, Y

    1982-08-01

    Dynamics of insulin and glucagon secretion were investigated by using a new model of spontaneous diabetes rats produced by the repetition of selective breeding in our laboratories. The perfusion experiments of the pancreas showed that the early phase of insulin secretion to continuous stimulation with glucose was specifically impaired, although the response of the early phase to arginine was preserved. The glucose-induced insulin secretion in the nineth generation (F8) which had a more remarkably impaired glucose tolerance was more reduced than in the sixth generation (F5). No significant difference of glucagon secretion in response to arginine or norepinephrine was noted between the diabetes rats and control ones. The present data indicate that the defective insulin secretion is a primary derangement in a diabetic state of the spontaneous diabetes rat. This defect in the early phase of glucose-induced insulin secretion suggests the specific impairment of the recognition of glucose by the pancreatic beta-cells. The spontaneous diabetes rats are very useful as a model of disease for investigating pathophysiology of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus.

  11. Acupuncture Alters Expression of Insulin Signaling Related Molecules and Improves Insulin Resistance in OLETF Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Yu Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine effect of acupuncture on insulin resistance in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF rats and to evaluate expression of insulin signaling components. Rats were divided into three groups: Sprague-Dawley (SD rats, OLETF rats, and acupuncture+OLETF rats. Acupuncture was subcutaneously applied to Neiguan (PC6, Zusanli (ST36, and Sanyinjiao (SP6; in contrast, acupuncture to Shenshu (BL23 was administered perpendicularly. For Neiguan (PC6 and Zusanli (ST36, needles were connected to an electroacupuncture (EA apparatus. Fasting blood glucose (FPG was measured by glucose oxidase method. Plasma fasting insulin (FINS and serum C peptide (C-P were determined by ELISA. Protein and mRNA expressions of insulin signaling molecules were determined by Western blot and real-time RT-PCR, respectively. OLETF rats exhibit increased levels of FPG, FINS, C-P, and homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, which were effectively decreased by acupuncture treatment. mRNA expressions of several insulin signaling related molecules IRS1, IRS2, Akt2, aPKCζ, and GLUT4 were decreased in OLETF rats compared to SD controls. Expression of these molecules was restored back to normal levels upon acupuncture administration. PI3K-p85α was increased in OLETF rats; this increase was also reversed by acupuncture treatment. Acupuncture improves insulin resistance in OLETF rats, possibly via regulating expression of key insulin signaling related molecules.

  12. Simulation-Based Evaluation of Dose-Titration Algorithms for Rapid-Acting Insulin in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Inadequately Controlled on Basal Insulin and Oral Antihyperglycemic Medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaosu; Chien, Jenny Y; Johnson, Jennal; Malone, James; Sinha, Vikram

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this prospective, model-based simulation approach was to evaluate the impact of various rapid-acting mealtime insulin dose-titration algorithms on glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c]). Seven stepwise, glucose-driven insulin dose-titration algorithms were evaluated with a model-based simulation approach by using insulin lispro. Pre-meal blood glucose readings were used to adjust insulin lispro doses. Two control dosing algorithms were included for comparison: no insulin lispro (basal insulin+metformin only) or insulin lispro with fixed doses without titration. Of the seven dosing algorithms assessed, daily adjustment of insulin lispro dose, when glucose targets were met at pre-breakfast, pre-lunch, and pre-dinner, sequentially, demonstrated greater HbA1c reduction at 24 weeks, compared with the other dosing algorithms. Hypoglycemic rates were comparable among the dosing algorithms except for higher rates with the insulin lispro fixed-dose scenario (no titration), as expected. The inferior HbA1c response for the "basal plus metformin only" arm supports the additional glycemic benefit with prandial insulin lispro. Our model-based simulations support a simplified dosing algorithm that does not include carbohydrate counting, but that includes glucose targets for daily dose adjustment to maintain glycemic control with a low risk of hypoglycemia.

  13. The Association Between IGF-I and Insulin Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrich, Nele; Thuesen, Betina; Jørgensen, Torben

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVEIGF-I has an almost 50% amino acid sequence homology with insulin and elicits nearly the same hypoglycemic response. Studies showed that low and high IGF-I levels are related to impaired glucose tolerance and to a higher risk of type 2 diabetes. The aim of the current study was to evaluate...... the association between IGF-I level and insulin resistance in a Danish general population.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODSIncluded were 3,354 adults, aged 19-72 years, from the cross-sectional Health2006 study. The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was used as the index to estimate insulin...... with intermediate (Q3) IGF-I levels. These associations remained statistically significant after the exclusion of subjects with type 2 diabetes and by using the updated computer HOMA2-IR model.CONCLUSIONSLow- and high-normal IGF-I levels are both related to insulin resistance. The biological mechanism...

  14. Optimal cut-off of homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) for the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome: third national surveillance of risk factors of non-communicable diseases in Iran (SuRFNCD-2007).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteghamati, Alireza; Ashraf, Haleh; Khalilzadeh, Omid; Zandieh, Ali; Nakhjavani, Manouchehr; Rashidi, Armin; Haghazali, Mehrdad; Asgari, Fereshteh

    2010-04-07

    We have recently determined the optimal cut-off of the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance for the diagnosis of insulin resistance (IR) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in non-diabetic residents of Tehran, the capital of Iran. The aim of the present study is to establish the optimal cut-off at the national level in the Iranian population with and without diabetes. Data of the third National Surveillance of Risk Factors of Non-Communicable Diseases, available for 3,071 adult Iranian individuals aging 25-64 years were analyzed. MetS was defined according to the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATPIII) and International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. HOMA-IR cut-offs from the 50th to the 95th percentile were calculated and sensitivity, specificity, and positive likelihood ratio for MetS diagnosis were determined. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of HOMA-IR for MetS diagnosis were depicted, and the optimal cut-offs were determined by two different methods: Youden index, and the shortest distance from the top left corner of the curve. The area under the curve (AUC) (95%CI) was 0.650 (0.631-0.670) for IDF-defined MetS and 0.683 (0.664-0.703) with the ATPIII definition. The optimal HOMA-IR cut-off for the diagnosis of IDF- and ATPIII-defined MetS in non-diabetic individuals was 1.775 (sensitivity: 57.3%, specificity: 65.3%, with ATPIII; sensitivity: 55.9%, specificity: 64.7%, with IDF). The optimal cut-offs in diabetic individuals were 3.875 (sensitivity: 49.7%, specificity: 69.6%) and 4.325 (sensitivity: 45.4%, specificity: 69.0%) for ATPIII- and IDF-defined MetS, respectively. We determined the optimal HOMA-IR cut-off points for the diagnosis of MetS in the Iranian population with and without diabetes.

  15. Cancer risk among insulin users: comparing analogues with human insulin in the CARING five-country cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    But, Anna; De Bruin, Marie L; Bazelier, Marloes T; Hjellvik, Vidar; Andersen, Morten; Auvinen, Anssi; Starup-Linde, Jakob; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Furu, Kari; de Vries, Frank; Karlstad, Øystein; Ekström, Nils; Haukka, Jari

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the relationship between use of certain insulins and risk for cancer, when addressing the limitations and biases involved in previous studies. National Health Registries from Denmark (1996-2010), Finland (1996-2011), Norway (2005-2010) and Sweden (2007-2012) and the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink database (1987-2013) were used to conduct a cohort study on new insulin users (N = 327,112). By using a common data model and semi-aggregate approach, we pooled individual-level records from five cohorts and applied Poisson regression models. For each of ten cancer sites studied, we estimated the rate ratios (RRs) by duration (≤0.5, 0.5-1, 1-2, 2-3, 3-4, 4-5, 5-6 and >6 years) of cumulative exposure to insulin glargine or insulin detemir relative to that of human insulin. A total of 21,390 cancer cases occurred during a mean follow-up of 4.6 years. No trend with cumulative treatment time for insulin glargine relative to human insulin was observed in risk for any of the ten studied cancer types. Of the 136 associations tested in the main analysis, only a few increased and decreased risks were found: among women, a higher risk was observed for colorectal (RR 1.54, 95% CI 1.06, 2.25) and endometrial cancer (RR 1.78, 95% CI 1.07, 2.94) for ≤0.5 years of treatment and for malignant melanoma for 2-3 years (RR 1.92, 95% CI 1.02, 3.61) and 4-5 years (RR 3.55, 95% CI 1.68, 7.47]); among men, a lower risk was observed for pancreatic cancer for 2-3 years (RR 0.34, 95% CI 0.17, 0.66) and for liver cancer for 3-4 years (RR 0.36, 95% CI 0.14, 0.94) and >6 years (RR 0.22, 95% CI 0.05, 0.92). Comparisons of insulin detemir with human insulin also showed no consistent differences. The present multi-country study found no evidence of consistent differences in risk for ten cancers for insulin glargine or insulin detemir use compared with human insulin, at follow-up exceeding 5 years.

  16. Higher fetal insulin resistance in Chinese pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus and correlation with maternal insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiuwei; Huang, Ruiping; Yu, Bin; Cao, Fang; Wang, Huiyan; Zhang, Ming; Wang, Xinhong; Zhang, Bin; Zhou, Hong; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) on fetal insulin resistance or β-cell function in Chinese pregnant women with GDM. Maternal fasting blood and venous cord blood samples (reflecting fetal condition) were collected in 65 well-controlled Chinese GDM mothers (only given dietary intervention) and 83 control subjects. The insulin, glucose and proinsulin concentrations of both maternal and cord blood samples were measured, and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and the proinsulin-to-insulin ratios (an indicator of fetal β-cell function) were calculated in maternal and cord blood respectively. Both maternal and fetal levels of insulin, proinsulin and HOMA-IR but not proinsulin-to-insulin ratios were significantly higher in the GDM group than in the control group (maternal insulin, 24.8 vs. 15.4 µU/mL, P = 0.004, proinsulin, 23.3 vs. 16.2 pmol/L, P = 0.005, and HOMA-IR, 5.5 vs. 3.5, P = 0.041, respectively; fetal: insulin, 15.1 vs. 7.9 µU/mL, Pinsulin ratios was significantly correlated to maternal HOMA-IR (r = 0.307, P = 0.019), in the pregnant women with GDM. Fetal insulin resistance was higher in Chinese pregnant women with GDM than control subjects, and correlated with maternal insulin resistance.

  17. Effects of insulin therapy on weight gain and fat distribution in the HF/HS-STZ rat model of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsø, Søs; Damgaard, J; Fels, J J

    2015-01-01

    insulin on fat distribution in the high-fat/high-sucrose fed rat treated with streptozotocin (HF/HS-STZ) rat model of type 2 diabetes. We also examined effects of insulin therapy on circulating CVD markers, including adiponectin, triglycerides (TGs), total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein......-density lipoprotein (HDL) and adiponectin levels were elevated (Ptype 2 diabetes, we find that insulin therapy modulates fat distribution. Specifically, our data show that insulin has a relatively positive effect on CVD-associated parameters......BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Insulin therapy is required for many patients with the obesity-related disorder type 2 diabetes, but is also associated with weight gain. The specific location of adipose tissue location matters to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. We investigated effects of exogenous...

  18. Insulin resistance is associated with a poor response to intravenous thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleja, Ana I; García-Bermejo, Pablo; Cortijo, Elisa; Bustamante, Rosa; Rojo Martínez, Esther; González Sarmiento, Enrique; Fernández-Herranz, Rosa; Arenillas, Juan F

    2011-11-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) may not only increase stroke risk, but could also contribute to aggravate stroke prognosis. Mainly through a derangement in endogenous fibrinolysis, IR could affect the response to intravenous thrombolysis, currently the only therapy proved to be efficacious for acute ischemic stroke. We hypothesized that high IR is associated with more persistent arterial occlusions and poorer long-term outcome after stroke thrombolysis. We performed a prospective, observational, longitudinal study in consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients presenting with middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion who received intravenous thrombolysis. Patients with acute hyperglycemia (≥155 mg/dL) receiving insulin were excluded. IR was determined during admission by the homeostatic model assessment index (HOMA-IR). Poor long-term outcome, as defined by a day 90 modified Rankin scale score ≥ 3, was considered the primary outcome variable. Transcranial Duplex-assessed resistance to MCA recanalization and symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation were considered secondary end points. A total of 109 thrombolysed MCA ischemic stroke patients were included (43.1% women, mean age 71 years). The HOMA-IR was higher in the group of patients with poor outcome (P = 0.02). The probability of good outcome decreased gradually with increasing HOMA-IR tertiles (80.6%, 1st tertile; 71.4%, 2nd tertile; and 55.3%, upper tertile). A HOMA-IR in the upper tertile was independently associated with poor outcome when compared with the lower tertile (odds ratio [OR] 8.54 [95% CI 1.67-43.55]; P = 0.01) and was associated with more persistent MCA occlusions (OR 8.2 [1.23-54.44]; P = 0.029). High IR may be associated with more persistent arterial occlusions and worse long-term outcome after acute ischemic stroke thrombolysis.

  19. A cross-sectional study to assess any possible linkage of C/T polymorphism in CYP17A1 gene with insulin resistance in non-obese women with polycystic ovarian syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ushasi Banerjee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Insulin resistance (IR is a major confounding factor in polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS irrespective of obesity. Its exact mechanism remains elusive till now. C/T polymorphism in the -34 promoter region of the CYP17 gene is inconsistently attributed to elucidate the mechanism of IR and its link to hyperandrogenemia in obese PCOS patients. In the present study we aimed to evaluate any association of this polymorphism with IR in non-obese women with PCOS. Methods: Polymorphism study was performed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP analysis of the Msp A1 digest of the PCR product of the target gene in 75 PCOS cases against 73 age and BMI matched control women. Serum testosterone, BMI and HOMA-IR (homeostatic model of assessment-insulin resistance were analyzed by standard techniques. A realistic cut-off value for the HOMA-IR was obtained through receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve for exploring any possible link between IR and T/C polymorphism in the case group. Results: Significant increases in serum testosterone and HOMA-IR values were observed among the case group (P<0.001 without any significant elevation in BMI and FBG compared to controls. Cut-off value for IR in the PCOS patients was 1.40 against a maximum sensitivity of 0.83 and a minimum false positivity of 0.13. The analysis revealed an inconclusive link between the C/T polymorphic distribution and insulin resistant case subjects. Interpretation & conclusions: The results showed that CYP17A1 gene was not conclusively linked to either IR or its associated increased androgen secretion in non-obese women with PCOS. We propose that an increased sensitivity of insulin on the ovarian cells may be the predominant reason for the clinical effects and symptoms of androgen excess observed in non-obese PCOS patients in our region.

  20. Predictive tools for designing new insulins and treatment regimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klim, Søren

    The thesis deals with the development of "Predictive tools for designing new insulins and treatments regimens" and consists of two parts: A model based approach for bridging properties of new insulin analogues from glucose clamp experiments to meal tolerance tests (MTT) and a second part that des......The thesis deals with the development of "Predictive tools for designing new insulins and treatments regimens" and consists of two parts: A model based approach for bridging properties of new insulin analogues from glucose clamp experiments to meal tolerance tests (MTT) and a second part...... that describes an implemented software program able to handle stochastic differential equations (SDEs) with mixed effects. The thesis is supplemented with scientific papers published during the PhD. Developing an insulin analogue from candidate molecule to a clinical drug consists of a development programme...... and efficacy are investigated. Numerous methods are used to quantify dose and efficacy in Phase II - especially of interest is the 24-hour meal tolerance test as it tries to portray near normal living conditions. Part I describes an integrated model for insulin and glucose which is aimed at simulating 24-hour...

  1. Insulin resistance and β-cell function in Colombian mestizo and Embera-Chamí populations and their relation with adiposity degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro-Gomez, María Antonieta; Naranjo-González, Andrés; Parra-Marín, María Victoria; Gallego-Lopera, Natalia; Valencia, Diana María; Rúa-Molina, Diana Carolina; Rosique-Gracia, Javier; García-Pineda, Andres Felipe; Gómez-Isaza, Luis Felipe; Pizano-Ramírez, Norman Diego; Arcos, Edgar Gerardo; Villegas-Perrasse, Alberto; Duque-Botero, Julieta; Bedoya-Berrío, Gabriel

    2017-04-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a condition favored by metabolic and endocrine changes experienced by adipose tissue in the context of obesity. The prevalence and the presentation of both IR and obesity vary among the populations, and may be affected by ancestral genetic composition among other factors. The aim of this study was to compare the presence of IR and obesity in Amerindians of the Embera-Chamí ethnicity and Colombian mestizo population. A sample of 630 individuals, 471 mestizos and 159 Amerindians of the Embera-Chamí ethnicity, from the general population of Colombia were studied. For each participant, anthropometric and biochemical measurements, as well as blood pressure and the Homeostatic Model Assessment (HOMA) of IR and β-cell function (%B) were recorded. These values were compared between the two populations. While prevalence of central obesity was similar in both populations (48.7% and 42.6% in the mestizo and Embera groups respectively; p=0.148), body mass index (BMI) values suggested a higher prevalence of overweight in the Embera than in mestizo population (43.4% Embera, 31.8% mestizo; p=0.027). Despite the similarities in the prevalence of HOMA-IR and HOMA-%B status between both populations, the Embera population had a significantly greater pancreatic β-cell function, higher insulin levels, and better glucose control, across BMI and central obesity categories, than the mestizo population. There are differences in aspects related to energy metabolism between the samples of the mestizo and Amerindian populations analyzed. Copyright © 2017 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. [Comparative analysis of insulin glargine vs. insulin detemir: A cost-minimization study applicable to Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragozo, Argemiro; Puerta, María Fernanda; Misas, Juan Diego

    2015-01-01

    More than 90% of subjects diagnosed with diabetes mellitus present with type 2, which is recognized for peripheral insulin resistance. To determine the costs of achieving glycemic target with the use of basal insulin analogs, insulin glargine (IG) once a day vs. insulin detemir (ID) once or twice a day, with a cost minimization model built from a third-party payer perspective in Colombia. A systematic review of comparative clinical trials between IG and ID in patients with insulin-resistant type 2 diabetes was performed to determine data of use, effectiveness and frequency of and adverse events. The goal of glycemic control (effectiveness measure) was defined as HbA1c=7%. The costs of insulin were extracted from the Integrated System of Medication Prices 2012 (Ministerio de Salud y Protección Social de Colombia) and the IMS Consulting Group mobile average cost for the past year as of December, 2012. Sensitivity analyses were performed via Montecarlo simulations for dose and medication costs (insulin). Five publications met inclusion criteria. The range of the difference between insulin doses was 3.2 IU to 33 IU. The percentage of patients requiring two ID doses was 12.6-100%. There were no significant differences in hypoglycemic events. For both retail and institutional channels, there was a higher differential cost between IG vs. ID favoring IG in 4 and 5 studies, respectively. For the retail channel only one study showed the opposite results. As only medication costs are considered, differences in insulin units between IG and ID result in a differential cost in favor of IG that makes it a cost/effective alternative.

  3. Effect of High Fat and High Sugar Diet on Glucose Tolerance, Insulin Response to Glucose Load and Insulin Sensitivity in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    岡﨑, 悟

    1987-01-01

    To investigate the precipitating effects of the westernized diet on diabetes mellitus, glucose tolerance and insulin response to oral glucose load (1.5g/kg body weight) and insulin sensitivity to exogenous insulin (0.2U/kg) were studied in rats fed an experimental diet for 8 weeks. Four experimental diets were used : low fat-no sugar diet (energy ratio of 10% fat, 70% starch, a model of the traditional Japanese diet), high fat-high sugar diet (40% fat, 20% starch, 20% sugar, a model of the we...

  4. The surgical treatment of type II diabetes mellitus: changes in HOMA Insulin resistance in the first year following laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantyne, Garth H; Wasielewski, Annette; Saunders, John K

    2009-09-01

    Bariatric operations significantly improve glucose metabolism, decrease insulin resistance, and lead to clinical resolution of type II diabetes mellitus in many patients. The mechanisms that achieve these clinical outcomes, however, remain ill defined. Moreover, the relative impact of various operations on insulin resistance remains vigorously contested. Consequently, the purpose of this study was to compare directly the impact of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) on hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels and insulin resistance in comparable groups of morbidly obese patients. Data were entered prospectively into our bariatric surgery database and reviewed retrospectively. Patients selected operations. Principle outcome variables were percent excess weight loss (%EWL), HbA1c, and homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA IR). The number of follow-up visits for 111 LAGB patients was 263 with a median of 162 days (17-1,016) and 291 follow-up visits for 104 LRYGB patients for a median of 150 days (8-1,191). Preoperative height, weight, body mass index, age, sex, race, comorbidities, fasting glucose, insulin, HbA1c, and HOMA IR were similar for both groups. In particular, the number of patients who were diabetics and those receiving insulin and other hypoglycemic agents were similar among the two groups. The LAGB patients lost significantly less weight than the LRYGB patients (24.6% compared to 44.0% EWL). LAGB reduced HbA1c from 5.8% (2-13.8) to 5.6% (0.3-12.3). LRYGB reduced HbA1c from 5.9% (2.0-12.3) to 5.4% (0.1-9.8). LAGB reduced HOMA IR from 3.6 (0.8-39.2) to 2.3 (0-55) and LRYGB reduced HOMA IR from 4.4 (0.6-56.5) to 1.4 (0.3-15.2). Postoperative HOMA IR correlated best with %EWL. Indeed, regression equations were essentially identical for LAGB and LRYGB for drop in %EWL versus postoperative HOMA IR. Percent excess weight loss significantly predicts postoperative insulin resistance (HOMA IR

  5. Vitamin K2 alleviates type 2 diabetes in rats by induction of osteocalcin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Atef G; Mohamed, Randa H; Shalaby, Sally M; Abd El Motteleb, Dalia M

    2018-03-01

    The biological mechanisms behind the association between vitamin K (Vit K) and glucose metabolism are uncertain. We aimed to analyze the expression of insulin 1 (Ins 1), insulin 2 (Ins 2) and cyclin D2, the expression of adiponectin and UCP-1 . In addition, we aimed to estimate the doses of Vit K2 able to affect various aspects of glucose and energy metabolism in type 2 diabetes. Thirty adult male rats were allocated equally into five groups: control group, diabetes mellitus group, and groups 3, 4, and 5, which received Vit K 2 at three daily dose levels (10, 15, and 30 mg/kg, respectively) for 8 wk. At the end of the study, blood samples were collected to quantify total osteocalcin, fasting plasma glucose, fasting insulin, and relevant variables. The expression of OC, Ins 1, Ins 2, cyclin D2, adiponectin, UCP-1 genes was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. After administration of Vit K 2 , a dose-dependent decrease in fasting plasma glucose, hemoglobin A1c and homeostatic model assessment method insulin resistance, and a dose-dependent increase in fasting insulin and homeostatic model assessment method β cell function levels, when compared with diabetes mellitus rats, were detected. There was significant upregulation of OC, Ins 1, Ins 2, or cyclin D2 gene expression in the three treated groups in a dose-dependent manner when compared with the diabetic rats. However, expression of adiponectin and UCP-1 were significantly increased at the highest dose (30 mg/kg daily) only. Vit K 2 administration could improve glycemic status in type 2 diabetic rats by induction of OC gene expression. Osteocalcin could increase β-cell proliferation, energy expenditure, and adiponectin expression. Different concentrations of Vit K 2 were required to affect glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Treating Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus with a Rapid-Acting Analog Insulin Regimen vs. Regular Human Insulin in Germany: A Long-Term Cost-Effectiveness Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, William J; Van Brunt, Kate; Boye, Kristina S; Pollock, Richard F

    2018-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cost effectiveness of rapid-acting analog insulin relative to regular human insulin in adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus in Germany. The PRIME Diabetes Model, a patient-level, discrete event simulation model, was used to project long-term clinical and cost outcomes for patients with type 1 diabetes from the perspective of a German healthcare payer. Simulated patients had a mean age of 21.5 years, duration of diabetes of 8.6 years, and baseline glycosylated hemoglobin of 7.39%. Regular human insulin and rapid-acting analog insulin regimens reduced glycosylated hemoglobin by 0.312 and 0.402%, respectively. Compared with human insulin, hypoglycemia rate ratios with rapid-acting analog insulin were 0.51 (non-severe nocturnal) and 0.80 (severe). No differences in non-severe diurnal hypoglycemia were modeled. Discount rates of 3% were applied to future costs and clinical benefits accrued over the 50-year time horizon. In the base-case analysis, rapid-acting analog insulin was associated with an improvement in quality-adjusted life expectancy of 1.01 quality-adjusted life-years per patient (12.54 vs. 11.53 quality-adjusted life-years). Rapid-acting analog insulin was also associated with an increase in direct costs of €4490, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of €4427 per quality-adjusted life-year gained vs. human insulin. Sensitivity analyses showed that the base case was driven predominantly by differences in hypoglycemia; abolishing these differences reduced incremental quality-adjusted life expectancy to 0.07 quality-adjusted life-years, yielding an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of €74,622 per quality-adjusted life-year gained. Rapid-acting analog insulin is associated with beneficial outcomes in patients with type 1 diabetes and is likely to be considered cost effective in the German setting vs. regular human insulin.

  7. Perbedaan Pengaruh Pemberian Insulin dan Ekstrak Zingiber officinale Terhadap Berat Badan Lahir Anak Rattus Norvegicus Model Diabetes Melitus Pragestasional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratih Mega Septiasari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes during pregnancy can be divided into pregestational diabetes and gestational diabetes. The risk of fetal Diabetes Mellitus pregestational (DMpG patients can be either macrosomia or low birth weight. The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in the administration effect of insulin and Zingiber officinale extract on birth weight of Rattus norvegicus pregestational diabetes mellitus model. This research is an experimental research using post test only control group design. Samples contained 30 pregnant Rattus norvegicus and divided into 5 groups, where K0 (negative control group and K1 (positive control group given aquadest 1cc, K2 given insulin 1IU, K3 given ginger extract 500mg/ kg BW, K4 given insulin 1IU and ginger extract 500mg/ kg BW. Treatment was administered during the first 16 days of pregnancy. On the 17th day, the rats were terminated and then the birth weight was measured with the scale. Data analysis using One-way ANOVA test followed by Tamhane test. The results showed that there was a difference of birth weight in the insulin treatment group and ginger extract treatment group (p-value = 0,037 < α =0,05. The conclusion of this study was Zingiber officinale can be used as a single therapy or combination with insulin of Rattus norvegicus pregestational diabetes mellitus model.

  8. Bovine and human insulin adsorption at lipid monolayers: a comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Sergio; Pandey, Ravindra; Rzeznicka, Izabela; Lu, Hao; Bonn, Mischa; Weidner, Tobias

    2015-07-01

    Insulin is a widely used peptide in protein research and it is utilised as a model peptide to understand the mechanics of fibril formation, which is believed to be the cause of diseases such as Alzheimer and Creutzfeld-Jakob syndrome. Insulin has been used as a model system due to its biomedical relevance, small size and relatively simple tertiary structure. The adsorption of insu lin on a variety of surfaces has become the focus of numerous studies lately. These works have helped in elucidating the consequence of surface/protein hydrophilic/hydrophobic interaction in terms of protein refolding and aggregation. Unfortunately, such model surfaces differ significantly from physiological surfaces. Here we spectroscopically investigate the adsorption of insulin at lipid monolayers, to further our understanding of the interaction of insulin with biological surfaces. In particular we study the effect of minor mutations of insulin’s primary amino acid sequence on its interaction with 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DPPG) model lipid layers. We probe the structure of bovine and human insulin at the lipid/water interface using sum frequency generation spectroscopy (SFG). The SFG experiments are complemented with XPS analysis of Langmuir-Schaefer deposited lipid/insulin films. We find that bovine and human insulin, even though very similar in sequence, show a substantially different behavior when interacting with lipid films.

  9. [Comparison between basal insulin glargine and NPH insulin in patients with diabetes type 1 on conventional intensive insulin therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesić, Milica; Zivić, Sasa; Radenković, Sasa; Velojić, Milena; Dimić, Dragan; Antić, Slobodan

    2007-04-01

    Insulin glargine is a long-acting insulin analog that mimics normal basal insulin secretion without pronounced peaks. The aim of this study was to compare insulin glargine with isophane insulin (NPH insulin) for basal insulin supply in patients with type 1 diabetes. A total of 48 type 1 diabetics on long term conventional intensive insulin therapy (IT) were randomized to three different regimens of basal insulin substitution: 1. continuation of NPH insulin once daily at bedtime with more intensive selfmonitoring (n = 15); 2. NPH insulin twice daily (n = 15); 3. insulin glargine once daily (n = 18). Meal time insulin aspart was continued in all groups. Fasting blood glucose (FBG) was lower in the glargine group (7.30+/-0.98 mmol/1) than in the twice daily NPH group (7.47+/-1.06 mmol/1), but without significant difference. FBG was significantly higher in the once daily NPH group (8.44+/-0.85 mmol/l; p < 0.05). HbAlc after 3 months did not change in the once daily NPH group, but decreased in the glargine group (from 7.72+/-0.86% to 6.87+/-0.50%), as well as in the twice daily NPH group (from 7.80+/-0.83% to 7.01+/-0.63%). Total daily insulin doses were similar in all groups but only in the glargine group there was an increase of basal and decrease of meal related insulin doses. The frequency of mild hypoglycemia was significantly lower in the glargine group (6.56+/-2.09) than in both NPH groups (9.0+/-1.65 in twice daily NPH group and 8.13+/-1.30 in other NPH group) (episodes/patients-month, p < 0.05). Basal insulin supplementation in type 1 diabetes mellitus with either twice daily NPH insulin or glargine can result in similar glycemic control when combined with meal time insulin aspart. However, with glargine regimen FBG, HbAlc and frequency of hypoglycemic event are lower. These facts contribute to better patients satisfaction with insulin glargine versus NPH insulin in IIT in type 1 diabetics.

  10. Insulin as a model to teach three-dimensional structure of proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Batista Teixeira da Rocha

    2018-02-01

    Proteins are the most ubiquitous macromolecules found in the living cells and have innumerous physiological functions. Therefore, it is fundamental to build a solid knowledge about the proteins three dimensional structure to better understand the living state. The hierarchical structure of proteins is usually studied in the undergraduate discipline of Biochemistry. Here we described pedagogical interventions designed to increase the preservice teacher chemistry students’ knowledge about protein structure. The activities were made using alternative and cheap materials to encourage the application of these simple methodologies by the future teachers in the secondary school. From the primary structure of insulin chains, students had to construct a three-dimensional structure of insulin. After the activities, the students highlighted an improvement of their previous knowledge about proteins structure. The construction of a tridimensional model together with other activities seems to be an efficient way to promote the learning about the structure of proteins to undergraduate students. The methodology used was inexpensiveness and simple and it can be used both in the university and in the high-school.

  11. Pharmacodynamic/Pharmacogenomic Modeling of Insulin Resistance Genes in Rat Muscle After Methylprednisolone Treatment: Exploring Regulatory Signaling Cascades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenling Yao

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Corticosteroids (CS effects on insulin resistance related genes in rat skeletal muscle were studied. In our acute study, adrenalectomized (ADX rats were given single doses of 50 mg/kg methylprednisolone (MPL intravenously. In our chronic study, ADX rats were implanted with Alzet mini-pumps giving zero-order release rates of 0.3 mg/kg/h MPL and sacrificed at various times up to 7 days. Total RNA was extracted from gastrocnemius muscles and hybridized to Affymetrix GeneChips. Data mining and literature searches identified 6 insulin resistance related genes which exhibited complex regulatory pathways. Insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1, uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoenzyme 4 (PDK4, fatty acid translocase (FAT and glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT dynamic profiles were modeled with mutual effects by calculated nuclear drug-receptor complex (DR(N and transcription factors. The oscillatory feature of endothelin-1 (ET-1 expression was depicted by a negative feedback loop. These integrated models provide test- able quantitative hypotheses for these regulatory cascades.

  12. Subcutaneous insulin absorption explained by insulin's physicochemical properties. Evidence from absorption studies of soluble human insulin and insulin analogues in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S; Brange, J; Burch, A; Vølund, A; Owens, D R

    1991-11-01

    To study the influence of molecular aggregation on rates of subcutaneous insulin absorption and to attempt to elucidate the mechanism of absorption of conventional soluble human insulin in humans. Seven healthy male volunteers aged 22-43 yr and not receiving any drugs comprised the study. This study consisted of a single-blind randomized comparison of equimolar dosages of 125I-labeled forms of soluble hexameric 2 Zn2+ human insulin and human insulin analogues with differing association states at pharmaceutical concentrations (AspB10, dimeric; AspB28, mixture of monomers and dimers; AspB9, GluB27, monomeric). After an overnight fast and a basal period of 1 h, 0.6 nmol/kg of either 125I-labeled human soluble insulin (Actrapid HM U-100) or 125I-labeled analogue was injected subcutaneously on 4 separate days 1 wk apart. Absorption was assessed by measurement of residual radioactivity at the injection site by external gamma-counting. The mean +/- SE initial fractional disappearance rates for the four preparations were 20.7 +/- 1.9 (hexameric soluble human insulin), 44.4 +/- 2.5 (dimeric analogue AspB10), 50.6 +/- 3.9 (analogue AspB28), and 67.4 +/- 7.4%/h (monomeric analogue AspB9, GluB27). Absorption of the dimeric analogue was significantly faster than that of hexameric human insulin (P less than 0.001); absorption of monomeric insulin analogue AspB9, GluB27 was significantly faster than that of dimeric analogue AspB10 (P less than 0.01). There was an inverse linear correlation between association state and the initial fractional disappearance rates (r = -0.98, P less than 0.02). Analysis of the disappearance data on a log linear scale showed that only the monomeric analogue had a monoexponential course throughout. Two phases in the rates of absorption were identified for the dimer and three for hexameric human insulin. The fractional disappearance rates (%/h) calculated by log linear regression analysis were monomer 73.3 +/- 6.8; dimer 44.4 +/- 2.5 from 0 to 2 h and

  13. Insulin receptor internalization defect in an insulin-resistant mouse melanoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androlewicz, M.J.; Straus, D.S.; Brandenburg, D.F.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies from this laboratory demonstrated that the PG19 mouse melanoma cell line does not exhibit a biological response to insulin, whereas melanoma x mouse embryo fibroblast hybrids do respond to insulin. To investigate the molecular basis of the insulin resistance of the PG19 melanoma cells, insulin receptors from the insulin-resistant melanoma cells and insulin-sensitive fibroblast x melanoma hybrid cells were analyzed by the technique of photoaffinity labeling using the photoprobe 125 I-NAPA-DP-insulin. Photolabeled insulin receptors from the two cell types have identical molecular weights as determined by SDS gel electrophoresis under reducing and nonreducing conditions, indicating that the receptors on the two cell lines are structurally similar. Insulin receptor internalization studies revealed that the hybrid cells internalize receptors to a high degree at 37 degree C, whereas the melanoma cells internalize receptors to a very low degree or not at all. The correlation between ability to internalize insulin receptors and sensitivity to insulin action in this system suggests that uptake of the insulin-receptor complex may be required for insulin action in these cells. Insulin receptors from the two cell lines autophosphorylate in a similar insulin-dependent manner both in vitro and in intact cells, indicating that insulin receptors on the melanoma and hybrid cells have functional tyrosine protein kinase activity. Therefore, the block in insulin action in the PG19 melanoma cells appears to reside at a step beyond insulin-stimulated receptor autophosphorylation

  14. Reduced Circulating Insulin Enhances Insulin Sensitivity in Old Mice and Extends Lifespan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M. Templeman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The causal relationships between insulin levels, insulin resistance, and longevity are not fully elucidated. Genetic downregulation of insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (Igf1 signaling components can extend invertebrate and mammalian lifespan, but insulin resistance, a natural form of decreased insulin signaling, is associated with greater risk of age-related disease in mammals. We compared Ins2+/− mice to Ins2+/+ littermate controls, on a genetically stable Ins1 null background. Proteomic and transcriptomic analyses of livers from 25-week-old mice suggested potential for healthier aging and altered insulin sensitivity in Ins2+/− mice. Halving Ins2 lowered circulating insulin by 25%–34% in aged female mice, without altering Igf1 or circulating Igf1. Remarkably, decreased insulin led to lower fasting glucose and improved insulin sensitivity in aged mice. Moreover, lowered insulin caused significant lifespan extension, observed across two diverse diets. Our study indicates that elevated insulin contributes to age-dependent insulin resistance and that limiting basal insulin levels can extend lifespan.

  15. Reduced Circulating Insulin Enhances Insulin Sensitivity in Old Mice and Extends Lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeman, Nicole M; Flibotte, Stephane; Chik, Jenny H L; Sinha, Sunita; Lim, Gareth E; Foster, Leonard J; Nislow, Corey; Johnson, James D

    2017-07-11

    The causal relationships between insulin levels, insulin resistance, and longevity are not fully elucidated. Genetic downregulation of insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (Igf1) signaling components can extend invertebrate and mammalian lifespan, but insulin resistance, a natural form of decreased insulin signaling, is associated with greater risk of age-related disease in mammals. We compared Ins2 +/- mice to Ins2 +/+ littermate controls, on a genetically stable Ins1 null background. Proteomic and transcriptomic analyses of livers from 25-week-old mice suggested potential for healthier aging and altered insulin sensitivity in Ins2 +/- mice. Halving Ins2 lowered circulating insulin by 25%-34% in aged female mice, without altering Igf1 or circulating Igf1. Remarkably, decreased insulin led to lower fasting glucose and improved insulin sensitivity in aged mice. Moreover, lowered insulin caused significant lifespan extension, observed across two diverse diets. Our study indicates that elevated insulin contributes to age-dependent insulin resistance and that limiting basal insulin levels can extend lifespan. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia associated with insulin antibodies caused by exogenous insulin analog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ting Su

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Insulin antibodies (IA associated with exogenous insulin administration seldom caused hypoglycemia and had different characteristics from insulin autoantibodies (IAA found in insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS, which was first described by Dr Hirata in 1970. The characteristic of IAS is the presence of insulin-binding autoantibodies and related fasting or late postprandial hypoglycemia. Here, we report a patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus under insulin glargine and insulin aspart treatment who developed recurrent spontaneous post-absorptive hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia with the cause probably being insulin antibodies induced by exogenous injected insulin. Examinations of serial sera disclosed a high titre of insulin antibodies (33%, normal <5%, high insulin concentration (111.9 IU/mL and undetectable C-peptide when hypoglycemia occurred. An oral glucose tolerance test revealed persistent high serum levels of total insulin and undetectable C-peptide. Image studies of the pancreas were unremarkable, which excluded the diagnosis of insulinoma. The patient does not take any of the medications containing sulfhydryl compounds, which had been reported to cause IAS. After administering oral prednisolone for 3 weeks, hypoglycemic episodes markedly improved, and he was discharged smoothly.

  17. Comparison between basal insulin glargine and NPH insulin in patients with diabetes type 1 on conventional intensive insulin therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Milica

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Insulin glargine is a long-acting insulin analog that mimics normal basal insulin secretion without pronounced peaks. The aim of this study was to compare insulin glargine with isophane insulin (NPH insulin for basal insulin supply in patients with type 1 diabetes. Methods. A total of 48 type 1 diabetics on long term conventional intensive insulin therapy (IIT were randomized to three different regimens of basal insulin substitution: 1. continuation of NPH insulin once daily at bedtime with more intensive selfmonitoring (n = 15; 2. NPH insulin twice daily (n = 15; 3. insulin glargine once daily (n = 18. Meal time insulin aspart was continued in all groups. Results. Fasting blood glucose (FBG was lower in the glargine group (7.30±0.98 mmol/l than in the twice daily NPH group (7.47±1.06 mmol/l, but without significant difference. FBG was significantly higher in the once daily NPH group (8.44±0.85 mmol/l; p < 0.05. HbA1c after 3 months did not change in the once daily NPH group, but decreased in the glargine group (from 7.72±0.86% to 6.87±0.50%, as well as in the twice daily NPH group (from 7.80±0.83% to 7.01±0.63%. Total daily insulin doses were similar in all groups but only in the glargine group there was an increase of basal and decrease of meal related insulin doses. The frequency of mild hypoglycemia was significantly lower in the glargine group (6.56±2.09 than in both NPH groups (9.0±1.65 in twice daily NPH group and 8.13±1.30 in other NPH group (episodes/patients-month, p < 0.05. Conclusion. Basal insulin supplementation in type 1 diabetes mellitus with either twice daily NPH insulin or glargine can result in similar glycemic control when combined with meal time insulin aspart. However, with glargine regimen FBG, HbA1c and frequency of hypoglycemic event are lower. These facts contribute to better patients satisfaction with insulin glargine versus NPH insulin in IIT in type 1 diabetics.

  18. Model of the Glucose-Insulin-Glucagon Dynamics after Subcutaneous Administration of a Glucagon Rescue Bolus in Healthy Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Wendt, Sabrina Lyngbye; Møller, Jan Kloppenborg; Haidar, Ahmad; Bysted, Britta V.; Knudsen, Carsten B.; Madsen, Henrik; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2016-01-01

    In healthy individuals, insulin and glucagon work in a complex fashion to maintain blood glucose levels within a narrow range. This regulation is distorted in patients with diabetes. The hepatic glucose response due to an elevated glucagon level depends on the current insulin concentration and thus endogenous glucose production (EGP) can not be modelled without knowledge of the concentration of both hormones in plasma. Furthermore, literature suggests an upper limit to EGP irrespective of glu...

  19. Homeostatic Presynaptic Plasticity Is Specifically Regulated by P/Q-type Ca2+ Channels at Mammalian Hippocampal Synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander F. Jeans

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VGCC represent the principal source of Ca2+ ions driving evoked neurotransmitter release at presynaptic boutons. In mammals, presynaptic Ca2+ influx is mediated mainly via P/Q-type and N-type VGCC, which differ in their properties. Changes in their relative contributions tune neurotransmission both during development and in Hebbian plasticity. However, whether this represents a functional motif also present in other forms of activity-dependent regulation is unknown. Here, we study the role of VGCC in homeostatic plasticity (HSP in mammalian hippocampal neurons using optical techniques. We find that changes in evoked Ca2+ currents specifically through P/Q-type, but not N-type, VGCC mediate bidirectional homeostatic regulation of both neurotransmitter release efficacy and the size of the major synaptic vesicle pools. Selective dependence of HSP on P/Q-type VGCC in mammalian terminals has important implications for phenotypes associated with P/Q-type channelopathies, including migraine and epilepsy.

  20. Homeostatic regulation of excitatory synapses on striatal medium spiny neurons expressing the D2 dopamine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Dominic; Giguère, Nicolas; Loustalot, Fabien; Bourque, Marie-Josée; Ducrot, Charles; El Mestikawy, Salah; Trudeau, Louis-Éric

    2016-05-01

    Striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) are contacted by glutamatergic axon terminals originating from cortex, thalamus and other regions. The striatum is also innervated by dopaminergic (DAergic) terminals, some of which release glutamate as a co-transmitter. Despite evidence for functional DA release at birth in the striatum, the role of DA in the establishment of striatal circuitry is unclear. In light of recent work suggesting activity-dependent homeostatic regulation of glutamatergic terminals on MSNs expressing the D2 DA receptor (D2-MSNs), we used primary co-cultures to test the hypothesis that stimulation of DA and glutamate receptors regulates the homeostasis of glutamatergic synapses on MSNs. Co-culture of D2-MSNs with mesencephalic DA neurons or with cortical neurons produced an increase in spines and functional glutamate synapses expressing VGLUT2 or VGLUT1, respectively. The density of VGLUT2-positive terminals was reduced by the conditional knockout of this gene from DA neurons. In the presence of both mesencephalic and cortical neurons, the density of synapses reached the same total, compatible with the possibility of a homeostatic mechanism capping excitatory synaptic density. Blockade of D2 receptors increased the density of cortical and mesencephalic glutamatergic terminals, without changing MSN spine density or mEPSC frequency. Combined blockade of AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptors increased the density of cortical terminals and decreased that of mesencephalic VGLUT2-positive terminals, with no net change in total excitatory terminal density or in mEPSC frequency. These results suggest that DA and glutamate signaling regulate excitatory inputs to striatal D2-MSNs at both the pre- and postsynaptic level, under the influence of a homeostatic mechanism controlling functional output of the circuit.

  1. Tau hyperphosphorylation induces oligomeric insulin accumulation and insulin resistance in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Patricia; Sandebring-Matton, Anna; Merino-Serrais, Paula; Parrado-Fernandez, Cristina; Rabano, Alberto; Winblad, Bengt; Ávila, Jesús; Ferrer, Isidre; Cedazo-Minguez, Angel

    2017-12-01

    Insulin signalling deficiencies and insulin resistance have been directly linked to the progression of neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease. However, to date little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms or insulin state and distribution in the brain under pathological conditions. Here, we report that insulin is accumulated and retained as oligomers in hyperphosphorylated tau-bearing neurons in Alzheimer's disease and in several of the most prevalent human tauopathies. The intraneuronal accumulation of insulin is directly dependent on tau hyperphosphorylation, and follows the tauopathy progression. Furthermore, cells accumulating insulin show signs of insulin resistance and decreased insulin receptor levels. These results suggest that insulin retention in hyperphosphorylated tau-bearing neurons is a causative factor for the insulin resistance observed in tauopathies, and describe a novel neuropathological concept with important therapeutic implications. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Intranasal insulin treatment of an experimental model of moderate traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabazon, Fiona; Wilson, Colin M; Jaiswal, Shalini; Reed, John; Frey, William H; Byrnes, Kimberly R

    2017-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in learning and memory dysfunction. Cognitive deficits result from cellular and metabolic dysfunction after injury, including decreased cerebral glucose uptake and inflammation. This study assessed the ability of intranasal insulin to increase cerebral glucose uptake after injury, reduce lesion volume, improve memory and learning function and reduce inflammation. Adult male rats received a controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury followed by intranasal insulin or saline treatment daily for 14 days. PET imaging of [18F]-FDG uptake was performed at baseline and at 48 h and 10 days post-injury and MRI on days three and nine post injury. Motor function was tested with the beam walking test. Memory function was assessed with Morris water maze. Intranasal insulin after CCI significantly improved several outcomes compared to saline. Insulin-treated animals performed better on beam walk and demonstrated significantly improved memory. A significant increase in [18F]-FDG uptake was observed in the hippocampus. Intranasal insulin also resulted in a significant decrease in hippocampus lesion volume and significantly less microglial immunolabeling in the hippocampus. These data show that intranasal insulin improves memory, increases cerebral glucose uptake and decreases neuroinflammation and hippocampal lesion volume, and may therefore be a viable therapy for TBI.

  3. Direct effects of FGF21 on glucose uptake in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mashili, Fredirick L; Austin, Reginald L; Deshmukh, Atul S

    2011-01-01

    21 were determined in normal glucose tolerant (n = 40) and type 2 diabetic (T2D; n = 40) subjects. We determined whether FGF21 has direct effects on glucose metabolism in cultured myotubes (n = 8) and extensor digitorum longus skeletal muscle. RESULTS: Serum FGF21 levels increased 20% in T2D versus...... normal glucose tolerant subjects (p muscle mRNA expression was unaltered. Fasting insulin, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), waist circumference, and body mass index (BMI) significantly correlated with serum FGF21 levels in T2D (p ... and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in human myotubes, coincident with increased glucose transporter 1 mRNA, and enhanced glucose transporter 1 abundance at the plasma membrane. In isolated extensor digitorum longus muscle, FGF21 potentiated insulin-stimulated glucose transport, without altering...

  4. Effects and prevalence of nonresponders after 12 weeks of high-intensity interval or resistance training in women with insulin resistance: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Cristian; Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2017-04-01

    Our aim was to investigate the effects and prevalence of nonresponders (NR) to high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and resistance training (RT) in women with insulin resistance on cardiometabolic health parameters. Sedentary overweight/obese insulin-resistant women (age = 33.5 ± 6.5 yr; body mass index = 29.9 ± 3.7 kg/m 2 ) were randomly assigned to a triweekly HIIT program (HIIT; n = 18) or resistance training (RT; n = 17). Anthropometry (body mass, fat mass, muscle mass, waist circumference, and skinfold thickness), cardiovascular (blood pressure), metabolic [fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and homeostatic model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)], as well as muscle strength, and endurance performance covariables were measured before and after 12 wk in both intervention groups. The interindividual variability to exercise training of the subjects was categorized as responders and NR using as cut points two times the typical error of measurement in mean outcomes. After intervention, significant reduction in waist circumference, skinfold thicknesses, fat mass, blood pressure, fasting glucose, insulin, and HOMA-IR ( P HIIT and RT group, respectively. Both HIIT and RT groups exhibited a significant decrease in the endurance performance, whereas only RT exhibited increased muscle strength. Significant differences in the NR prevalence between the HIIT and RT groups were identified for a decrease in fat mass (HIIT 33.3% vs. RT 70.5%; P = 0.028), muscle mass (HIIT 100% vs. RT 52.9%; P = 0.001), and tricipital skinfold (HIIT 5.5% vs. RT 29.4%; P HIIT and RT groups (55.5% vs. 94.1; P = 0.009). However, there were no differences in the NR prevalence between HIIT and RT for decreasing fasting glucose. Twelve weeks of HIIT and RT have similar effects and NR prevalence to improve glucose control variables; however, there is different NR prevalence in other anthropometric, cardiovascular, strength, and endurance performance measurements in insulin-resistant women. These

  5. Anti-insulin antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... Normally, there are no antibodies against insulin in your blood. ... different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or ...

  6. Cerebral insulin, insulin signaling pathway, and brain angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yi; Zhang, Le; Hu, Zhiping

    2016-01-01

    Insulin performs unique non-metabolic functions within the brain. Broadly speaking, two major areas of these functions are those related to brain endothelial cells and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) function, and those related to behavioral effects, like cognition in disease states (Alzheimer's disease, AD) and in health. Recent studies showed that both these functions are associated with brain angiogenesis. These findings raise interesting questions such as how they are linked to each other and whether modifying brain angiogenesis by targeting certain insulin signaling pathways could be an effective strategy to treat dementia as in AD, or even to help secure healthy longevity. The two canonical downstream pathways involved in mediating the insulin signaling pathway, the phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K), and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, in the brain are supposed to be similar to those in the periphery. PI3K and MAPK pathways play important roles in angiogenesis. Both are involved in stimulating hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) in angiogenesis and could be activated by the insulin signaling pathway. This suggests that PI3K and MAPK pathways might act as cross-talk between the insulin signaling pathway and the angiogenesis pathway in brain. But the cerebral insulin, insulin signaling pathway, and the detailed mechanism in the connection of insulin signaling pathway, brain angiogenesis pathway, and healthy aging or dementias are still mostly not clear and need further studies.

  7. Insulin resistance in obesity can be reliably identified from fasting plasma insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Horst, K W; Gilijamse, P W; Koopman, K E; de Weijer, B A; Brands, M; Kootte, R S; Romijn, J A; Ackermans, M T; Nieuwdorp, M; Soeters, M R; Serlie, M J

    2015-12-01

    Insulin resistance is the major contributor to cardiometabolic complications of obesity. We aimed to (1) establish cutoff points for insulin resistance from euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps (EHCs), (2) identify insulin-resistant obese subjects and (3) predict insulin resistance from routinely measured variables. We assembled data from non-obese (n=112) and obese (n=100) men who underwent two-step EHCs using [6,6-(2)H2]glucose as tracer (insulin infusion dose 20 and 60 mU m(-2) min(-1), respectively). Reference ranges for hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity were calculated from healthy non-obese men. Based on these reference values, obese men with preserved insulin sensitivity or insulin resistance were identified. Cutoff points for insulin-mediated suppression of endogenous glucose production (EGP) and insulin-stimulated glucose disappearance rate (Rd) were 46.5% and 37.3 μmol kg(-)(1) min(-)(1), respectively. Most obese men (78%) had EGP suppression within the reference range, whereas only 12% of obese men had Rd within the reference range. Obese men with Rd obese men in age, body mass index (BMI), body composition, fasting glucose or cholesterol, but did have higher fasting insulin (110±49 vs 63±29 pmol l(-1), Pobese men could be identified with good sensitivity (80%) and specificity (75%) from fasting insulin >74 pmol l(-1). Most obese men have hepatic insulin sensitivity within the range of non-obese controls, but below-normal peripheral insulin sensitivity, that is, insulin resistance. Fasting insulin (>74 pmol l(-1) with current insulin immunoassay) may be used for identification of insulin-resistant (or metabolically unhealthy) obese men in research and clinical settings.

  8. Higher fetal insulin resistance in Chinese pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus and correlation with maternal insulin resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuwei Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM on fetal insulin resistance or β-cell function in Chinese pregnant women with GDM. MEASUREMENTS: Maternal fasting blood and venous cord blood samples (reflecting fetal condition were collected in 65 well-controlled Chinese GDM mothers (only given dietary intervention and 83 control subjects. The insulin, glucose and proinsulin concentrations of both maternal and cord blood samples were measured, and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and the proinsulin-to-insulin ratios (an indicator of fetal β-cell function were calculated in maternal and cord blood respectively. RESULTS: Both maternal and fetal levels of insulin, proinsulin and HOMA-IR but not proinsulin-to-insulin ratios were significantly higher in the GDM group than in the control group (maternal insulin, 24.8 vs. 15.4 µU/mL, P = 0.004, proinsulin, 23.3 vs. 16.2 pmol/L, P = 0.005, and HOMA-IR, 5.5 vs. 3.5, P = 0.041, respectively; fetal: insulin, 15.1 vs. 7.9 µU/mL, P<0.001, proinsulin, 25.8 vs. 15.1 pmol/L, P = 0.015, and HOMA-IR, 2.8 vs. 1.4, P = 0.017, respectively. Fetal HOMA-IR but not proinsulin-to-insulin ratios was significantly correlated to maternal HOMA-IR (r = 0.307, P = 0.019, in the pregnant women with GDM. CONCLUSIONS: Fetal insulin resistance was higher in Chinese pregnant women with GDM than control subjects, and correlated with maternal insulin resistance.

  9. Exercise, Insulin Absorption Rates, and Artificial Pancreas Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Spencer; Hinshaw, Ling; Basu, Rita; Basu, Ananda; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2016-11-01

    Type 1 Diabetes is characterized by an inability of a person to endogenously produce the hormone insulin. Because of this, insulin must be injected - usually subcutaneously. The size of the injected dose and the rate at which the dose reaches the circulatory system have a profound effect on the ability to control glucose excursions, and therefore control of diabetes. However, insulin absorption rates via subcutaneous injection are variable and depend on a number of factors including tissue perfusion, physical activity (vasodilation, increased capillary throughput), and other tissue geometric and physical properties. Exercise may also have a sizeable effect on the rate of insulin absorption, which can potentially lead to dangerous glucose levels. Insulin-dosing algorithms, as implemented in an artificial pancreas controller, should account accurately for absorption rate variability and exercise effects on insulin absorption. The aforementioned factors affecting insulin absorption will be discussed within the context of both fluid mechanics and data driven modeling approaches.

  10. Absence of down-regulation of the insulin receptor by insulin. A possible mechanism of insulin resistance in the rat.

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, A P; Flint, D J

    1983-01-01

    Insulin resistance occurs in rat adipocytes during pregnancy and lactation despite increased or normal insulin binding respectively; this suggests that a post-receptor defect exists. The possibility has been examined that, although insulin binding occurs normally, internalization of insulin or its receptor may be impaired in these states. Insulin produced a dose-dependent reduction in the number of insulin receptors on adipocytes from virgin rats maintained in culture medium, probably due to ...

  11. Insulin versus Lipid Emulsion in a Rabbit Model of Severe Propranolol Toxicity: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyn Harvey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective. Beta-blocker overdose may result in intractable cardiovascular collapse despite conventional antidotal treatments. High dose insulin/glucose (ING, and more recently intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE, have been proposed as potentially beneficial therapies in beta blocker intoxication. We compare efficacy of the novel antidotes ING, with ILE, in a rabbit model of combined enteric/intravenous propranolol toxicity. Methods. Sedated, mechanically ventilated and invasively monitored New Zealand White rabbits underwent mini-laparotomy and enterostomy formation with 40 mg/kg propranolol instilled into the proximal small bowel. At 30 minutes propranolol infusion was commenced at 4 mg/kg/hr and continued to a target mean arterial pressure (MAP of 50% baseline MAP. Animals were resuscitated with insulin at 3 U/kg plus 0.5 g/kg glucose (ING group, or 10 mL/kg 20% Intralipid (ILE group. Results. Rate pressure product (RPP; RPP = heart rate × mean arterial pressure was greatest in the ING group at 60 minutes (P<.05. A trend toward greater heart rate was observed in the ING group (P=.06. No difference was observed in survival between groups (4/5 ING versus 2/5 ILE; P=.524. Conclusions. High dose insulin resulted in greater rate pressure product compared with lipid emulsion in this rabbit model of severe enteric/intravenous propranolol toxicity.

  12. Clinical use of the co-formulation of insulin degludec and insulin aspart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, A; Awata, T; Bain, S C

    2016-01-01

    (HbA1c ) to current modern insulins, but with lower risk of nocturnal hypoglycaemia. In prior insulin users, glycaemic control was achieved with lower or equal insulin doses vs. other basal+meal-time or premix insulin regimens. In insulin-naïve patients with T2DM, IDegAsp can be started once or twice...... a simpler insulin regimen than other available basal-bolus or premix-based insulin regimens, with stable daytime basal coverage, a lower rate of hypoglycaemia and some flexibility in injection timing compared with premix insulins....

  13. Third Exposure to a Reduced Carbohydrate Meal Lowers Evening Postprandial Insulin and GIP Responses and HOMA-IR Estimate of Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Po-Ju; Borer, Katarina T

    2016-01-01

    Postprandial hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance increase the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease mortality. Postprandial hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia also occur in metabolically healthy subjects consuming high-carbohydrate diets particularly after evening meals and when carbohydrate loads follow acute exercise. We hypothesized the involvement of dietary carbohydrate load, especially when timed after exercise, and mediation by the glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) in this phenomenon, as this incretin promotes insulin secretion after carbohydrate intake in insulin-sensitive, but not in insulin-resistant states. Four groups of eight metabolically healthy weight-matched postmenopausal women were provided with three isocaloric meals (a pre-trial meal and two meals during the trial day) containing either 30% or 60% carbohydrate, with and without two-hours of moderate-intensity exercise before the last two meals. Plasma glucose, insulin, glucagon, GIP, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), free fatty acids (FFAs), and D-3-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were measured during 4-h postprandial periods and 3-h exercise periods, and their areas under the curve (AUCs) were analyzed by mixed-model ANOVA, and insulin resistance during fasting and meal tolerance tests within each diet was estimated using homeostasis-model assessment (HOMA-IR). The third low-carbohydrate meal, but not the high-carbohydrate meal, reduced: (1) evening insulin AUC by 39% without exercise and by 31% after exercise; (2) GIP AUC by 48% without exercise and by 45% after exercise, and (3) evening insulin resistance by 37% without exercise and by 24% after exercise. Pre-meal exercise did not alter insulin-, GIP- and HOMA-IR- lowering effects of low-carbohydrate diet, but exacerbated evening hyperglycemia. Evening postprandial insulin and GIP responses and insulin resistance declined by over 30% after three meals that limited daily carbohydrate intake to

  14. Insulin-like growth factor 1, liver enzymes, and insulin resistance in patients with PCOS and hirsutism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakir, Evrim; Topaloğlu, Oya; Çolak Bozkurt, Nujen; Karbek Bayraktar, Başak; Güngüneş, Aşkın; Sayki Arslan, Müyesser; Öztürk Ünsal, İlknur; Tutal, Esra; Uçan, Bekir; Delıbaşi, Tuncay

    2014-01-01

    Hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance are commonly seen in patients with hirsutism and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and are associated with cardiovascular disease risk. However, it is not yet known whether insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and alanine transaminase (ALT) produced by the liver play roles in hyperinsulinemia and subclinical atherosclerotic process in patients with PCOS and idiopathic hirsutism (IH). This was a prospective case-controlled study. The study population consisted of 25 reproductive-age PCOS women, 33 women with IH, and 25 control subjects. Mean IGF-I levels and median ALT levels were higher in patients with IH and PCOS than controls, but these differences were not statistically significant. The participants who had a homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) greater than 2.7 had significantly higher IGF-1 and ALT levels. ALT levels were positively correlated with body mass index, FG, insulin and HOMA-IR. The study illustrated that IGF-1 and ALT levels were significantly higher in patients with increased insulin resistance. Due to short disease duration in younger participants, we did not observe any correlation between IGF-1 and hyperinsulinemia. These findings suggest that increased hepatic production of IGF-I and ALT might be an early indicator of insulin resistance in hirsutism.

  15. Enhanced Inflammation without Impairment of Insulin Signaling in the Visceral Adipose Tissue of 5α-Dihydrotestosterone-Induced Animal Model of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milutinović, Danijela Vojnović; Nikolić, Marina; Veličković, Nataša; Djordjevic, Ana; Bursać, Biljana; Nestorov, Jelena; Teofilović, Ana; Antić, Ivana Božić; Macut, Jelica Bjekić; Zidane, Abdulbaset Shirif; Matić, Gordana; Macut, Djuro

    2017-09-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is a heterogeneous endocrine and metabolic disorder associated with abdominal obesity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. Since abdominal obesity is characterized by low-grade inflammation, the aim of the study was to investigate whether visceral adipose tissue inflammation linked to abdominal obesity and dyslipidemia could lead to impaired insulin sensitivity in the animal model of polycystic ovary syndrome.Female Wistar rats were treated with nonaromatizable 5α-dihydrotestosterone pellets in order to induce reproductive and metabolic characteristics of polycystic ovary syndrome. Glucose, triglycerides, non-esterified fatty acids and insulin were determined in blood plasma. Visceral adipose tissue inflammation was evaluated by the nuclear factor kappa B intracellular distribution, macrophage migration inhibitory factor protein level, as well as TNFα, IL6 and IL1β mRNA levels. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test and homeostasis model assessment index, and through analysis of insulin signaling pathway in the visceral adipose tissue.Dihydrotestosterone treatment led to increased body weight, abdominal obesity and elevated triglycerides and non-esterified fatty acids, which were accompanied by the activation of nuclear factor kappa B and increase in macrophage migration inhibitory factor, IL6 and IL1β levels in the visceral adipose tissue. In parallel, insulin sensitivity was affected in 5α-dihydrotestosterone-treated animals only at the systemic and not at the level of visceral adipose tissue.The results showed that abdominal obesity and dyslipidemia in the animal model of polycystic ovary syndrome were accompanied with low-grade inflammation in the visceral adipose tissue. However, these metabolic disturbances did not result in decreased tissue insulin sensitivity. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Environmental factors and dam characteristics associated with insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in newborn Holstein calves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamal, M.M.; Van Eetvelde, M.; Bogaert, H.; Hostens, M.; Vandaele, L.; Shamsuddin, M.; Opsomer, G.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The objective of the present retrospective cohort study was to evaluate potential associations between environmental factors and dam characteristics, including level of milk production during gestation, and insulin traits in newborn Holstein calves. Birth weight and gestational age of the calves at delivery were determined. On the next day, heart girth, wither height and diagonal length of both the calves and their dams were measured. Parity, body condition score and age at calving were recorded for all dams. For the cows, days open before last gestation, lactation length (LL), lenght of dry period (DP) and calving interval were also calculated. The magnitude and shape of the lactation curve both quantified using the MilkBot model based on monthly milk weights, were used to calculate the amount of milk produced during gestation. Using the same procedure, cumulative milk production from conception to drying off (MGEST) was calculated. A blood sample was collected from all calves (n=481; 169 born to heifers and 312 born to cows) at least 5 h after a milk meal on day 3 of life to measure basal glucose and insulin levels. In addition, an intravenous glucose-stimulated insulin secretion test was performed in a subset of the calves (n=316). After descriptive analysis, generalized linear mixed models were used to identify factors that were significantly associated with the major insulin traits (Insb, basal insulin level; QUICKI, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index; AIR, acute insulin response; DI, disposition index) of the newborn calves. The overall average birth weight of the calves was 42.7 ± 5.92 kg. The insulin traits were significantly associated with MGEST (P=0.076) and longer DP (P=0.034). The QUICKI was estimated to be lower in calves born to the cows having passed a higher MGEST (P=0.030) and longer DP (P=0.058). Moreover, the AIR (P=0.009) and DI (P=0.049) were estimated to be lower in male compared with female calves. Furthermore, the AIR

  17. Psychological insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes patients regarding oral antidiabetes treatment, subcutaneous insulin injections, or inhaled insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrak, Frank; Herpertz, Stephan; Stridde, Elmar; Pfützner, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    "Psychological insulin resistance" (PIR) is an obstacle to insulin treatment in type 2 diabetes, and patients' expectations regarding alternative ways of insulin delivery are poorly understood. PIR and beliefs regarding treatment alternatives were analyzed in patients with type 2 diabetes (n=532; mean glycated hemoglobin, 68±12 mmol/mol [8.34±1.5%]) comparing oral antidiabetes treatment, subcutaneous insulin injections, or inhaled insulin. Questionnaires were used to assess barriers to insulin treatment (BIT), generic and diabetes-specific quality of life (Short Form 36 and Problem Areas in Diabetes, German version), diabetes knowledge, locus of control (Questionnaire for the Assessment of Diabetes-Specific Locus of Control, in German), coping styles (Freiburg Questionnaire of Illness Coping, 15-Items Short Form), self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, German version), and mental disorders (Patient Health Questionnaire, German version). Patients discussed treatment optimization options with a physician and were asked to make a choice about future diabetes therapy options in a two-step treatment choice scenario. Step 1 included oral antidiabetes drugs or subcutaneous insulin injection (SCI). Step 2 included an additional treatment alternative of inhaled insulin (INH). Subgroups were analyzed according to their treatment choice. Most patients perceived their own diabetes-related behavior as active, problem-focused, internally controlled, and oriented toward their doctors' recommendations, although their diabetes knowledge was limited. In Step 1, rejection of the recommended insulin was 82%, and in Step 2, it was 57%. Fear of hypoglycemia was the most important barrier to insulin treatment. Patients choosing INH (versus SCI) scored higher regarding fear of injection, expected hardship from insulin therapy, and BIT-Sumscore. The acceptance of insulin is very low in type 2 diabetes patients. The option to inhale insulin increases the acceptability for some but

  18. A longitudinal study of serum insulin and insulin resistance as predictors of weight and body fat gain in African American and Caucasian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedaka, N M; Olsen, C H; Yannai, L E; Stutzman, W E; Krause, A J; Sherafat-Kazemzadeh, R; Condarco, T A; Brady, S M; Demidowich, A P; Reynolds, J C; Yanovski, S Z; Hubbard, V S; Yanovski, J A

    2017-01-01

    The influence of insulin and insulin resistance (IR) on children's weight and fat gain is unclear. To evaluate insulin and IR as predictors of weight and body fat gain in children at high risk for adult obesity. We hypothesized that baseline IR would be positively associated with follow-up body mass index (BMI) and fat mass. Two hundred and forty-nine healthy African American and Caucasian children aged 6-12 years at high risk for adult obesity because of early-onset childhood overweight and/or parental overweight were followed for up to 15 years with repeated BMI and fat mass measurements. We examined baseline serum insulin and homeostasis model of assessment-IR (HOMA-IR) as predictors of follow-up BMI Z-score and fat mass by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in mixed model longitudinal analyses accounting for baseline body composition, pubertal stage, sociodemographic factors and follow-up interval. At baseline, 39% were obese (BMI⩾95th percentile for age/sex). Data from 1335 annual visits were examined. Children were followed for an average of 7.2±4.3 years, with a maximum follow-up of 15 years. After accounting for covariates, neither baseline insulin nor HOMA-IR was significantly associated with follow-up BMI (Ps>0.26), BMIz score (Ps>0.22), fat mass (Ps>0.78) or fat mass percentage (Ps>0.71). In all models, baseline BMI (Pfat mass (Pfat (Pfat mass. In models restricted to children without obesity at baseline, some but not all models had significant interaction terms between body adiposity and insulinemia/HOMA-IR that suggested less gain in mass among those with greater insulin or IR. The opposite was found in some models restricted to children with obesity at baseline. In middle childhood, BMI and fat mass, but not insulin or IR, are strong predictors of children's gains in BMI and fat mass during adolescence.

  19. Environmental arsenic as a disruptor of insulin signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, David S.; Devesa, Vicenta; Hernandez-Zavala, Araceli; Adair, Blakely M.; Walton, Felecia S.; Drobnâ, Zuzana; Thomas, David J.; Styblo, Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    Previous laboratory studies have shown that exposures to inorganic As (iAs) disrupt insulin production or glucose metabolism in cellular and animal models. Epidemiological evidence has also linked chronic human exposures to iAs to an increased risk of diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disease characterized by impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. We have recently shown that arsenite and its methylated metabolites inhibit insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in cultured adipocytes by di...

  20. Postreceptor defects causing insulin resistance in normoinsulinemic non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolinder, J.; Ostman, J.; Arner, P.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanisms of the diminished hypoglycemic response to insulin in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) with normal levels of circulating plasma insulin were investigated. Specific binding of mono- 125 I (Tyr A14)-insulin to isolated adipocytes and effects of insulin (5--10,000 microunits/ml) on glucose oxidation and lipolysis were determined simultaneously in subcutaneous adipose tissue of seven healthy subjects of normal weight and seven untreated NIDDM patients with normal plasma insulin levels. The two groups were matched for age, sex, and body weight. Insulin binding, measured in terms of receptor number and affinity, was normal in NIDDM, the total number of receptors averaging 350,000 per cell. Neither sensitivity nor the maximum antilipolytic effect of insulin was altered in NIDDM patients as compared with control subjects; the insulin concentration producing half the maximum effect (ED50) was 10 microunits/ml. As regards the effect of insulin on glucose oxidation, for the control subjects ED50 was 30 microunits/ml, whereas in NIDDM patients, insulin exerted no stimulatory effect. The results obtained suggest that the effect of insulin on glucose utilization in normoinsulinemic NIDDM may be diminished in spite of normal insulin binding to receptors. The resistance may be due solely to postreceptor defects, and does not involve antilipolysis

  1. Selenite exacerbates hepatic insulin resistance in mouse model of type 2 diabetes through oxidative stress-mediated JNK pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jun, E-mail: hustzhj@hust.edu.cn; Xu, Gang; Bai, Zhaoshuai; Li, Kaicheng; Yan, Junyan; Li, Fen; Ma, Shuai; Xu, Huibi; Huang, Kaixun, E-mail: hxxzrf@hust.edu.cn

    2015-12-15

    Recent evidence suggests a potential pro-diabetic effect of selenite treatment in type 2 diabetics; however, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here we investigated the effects and the underlying mechanisms of selenite treatment in a nongenetic mouse model of type 2 diabetes. High-fat diet (HFD)/streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice were orally gavaged with selenite at 0.5 or 2.0 mg/kg body weight/day or vehicle for 4 weeks. High-dose selenite treatment significantly elevated fasting plasma insulin levels and insulin resistance index, in parallel with impaired glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance and pyruvate tolerance. High-dose selenite treatment also attenuated hepatic IRS1/Akt/FoxO1 signaling and pyruvate kinase gene expressions, but elevated the gene expressions of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxyl kinase (PEPCK), glucose 6-phosphatase (G6Pase), peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) and selenoprotein P (SelP) in the liver. Furthermore, high-dose selenite treatment caused significant increases in MDA contents, protein carbonyl contents, and a decrease in GSH/GSSG ratio in the liver, concurrent with enhanced ASK1/MKK4/JNK signaling. Taken together, these findings suggest that high-dose selenite treatment exacerbates hepatic insulin resistance in mouse model of type 2 diabetes, at least in part through oxidative stress-mediated JNK pathway, providing new mechanistic insights into the pro-diabetic effect of selenite in type 2 diabetes. - Highlights: • Selenite exacerbates hepatic insulin resistance in HFD/STZ-induced diabetic mice. • Selenite elevates hepatic gluconeogenesis and reduces glycolysis in diabetic mice. • Selenite exacerbates hepatic oxidative stress and triggers JNK signaling pathway. • Selenite elevates hepatic selenoprotein P expression in diabetic mice.

  2. Selenite exacerbates hepatic insulin resistance in mouse model of type 2 diabetes through oxidative stress-mediated JNK pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Jun; Xu, Gang; Bai, Zhaoshuai; Li, Kaicheng; Yan, Junyan; Li, Fen; Ma, Shuai; Xu, Huibi; Huang, Kaixun

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests a potential pro-diabetic effect of selenite treatment in type 2 diabetics; however, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here we investigated the effects and the underlying mechanisms of selenite treatment in a nongenetic mouse model of type 2 diabetes. High-fat diet (HFD)/streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice were orally gavaged with selenite at 0.5 or 2.0 mg/kg body weight/day or vehicle for 4 weeks. High-dose selenite treatment significantly elevated fasting plasma insulin levels and insulin resistance index, in parallel with impaired glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance and pyruvate tolerance. High-dose selenite treatment also attenuated hepatic IRS1/Akt/FoxO1 signaling and pyruvate kinase gene expressions, but elevated the gene expressions of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxyl kinase (PEPCK), glucose 6-phosphatase (G6Pase), peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) and selenoprotein P (SelP) in the liver. Furthermore, high-dose selenite treatment caused significant increases in MDA contents, protein carbonyl contents, and a decrease in GSH/GSSG ratio in the liver, concurrent with enhanced ASK1/MKK4/JNK signaling. Taken together, these findings suggest that high-dose selenite treatment exacerbates hepatic insulin resistance in mouse model of type 2 diabetes, at least in part through oxidative stress-mediated JNK pathway, providing new mechanistic insights into the pro-diabetic effect of selenite in type 2 diabetes. - Highlights: • Selenite exacerbates hepatic insulin resistance in HFD/STZ-induced diabetic mice. • Selenite elevates hepatic gluconeogenesis and reduces glycolysis in diabetic mice. • Selenite exacerbates hepatic oxidative stress and triggers JNK signaling pathway. • Selenite elevates hepatic selenoprotein P expression in diabetic mice.

  3. Differential effects of insulin injections and insulin infusions on levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies have shown that while injections of insulin cause an increase in fat mass, infusions of insulin increase fat mass. The aim of this paper was to test the hypothesis that if an increase in glycogen is an indicator of an impending increase in adipose mass, then insulin infusions should not increase glycogen, while insulin ...

  4. Resistência à insulina e síndrome metabólica em pacientes ambulatoriais com transtorno do humor bipolar Insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome in outpatients with bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Alves Gomes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: O transtorno bipolar (TB está associado a uma significativa morbi-mortalidade por causas metabólicas. Existem poucos dados sobre a prevalência de resistência à insulina (RI e sua relação com a síndrome metabólica (SM em pacientes com TB. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a prevalência de RI e SM em pacientes bipolares ambulatoriais e identificar os parâmetros clínicos associados à RI. MÉTODO: Estudo transversal em 65 pacientes com TB diagnosticados pelos critérios do DSM-IV-TR, avaliados de forma consecutiva no Programa de Transtorno Bipolar do Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Brasil. RI foi diagnosticada utilizando o homeostatic model assessment - insulin resistance (HOMA-IR e a SM foi diagnosticada utilizando três definições diferentes: do National Cholesterol Educational Program - Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III; do NCEP-ATP III modificado e da International Diabetes Federation (IDF. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de RI foi 43,1% (mulheres 40%, homens 44,4%. A prevalência de SM definida pelo NCEP ATP III foi 32,3%, pelo NCEP ATP III foi 40% e pela IDF foi 41,5%. Os critérios do NCEP ATP III modificado demonstrou a melhor relação entre sensibilidade (78,6% e especificidade (89,2% na detecção de RI. A circunferência da cintura foi o parâmetro clínico mais associado à RI. CONCLUSÃO: As definições atuais de SM podem identificar, com razoável sensibilidade e especificidade, RI em pacientes com TB. A obesidade abdominal é bastante associada à RI nessa população de pacientes.BACKGROUND: Bipolar disorder (BD is associated with significant morbidity and mortality from metabolic diseases. There is a paucity of data regarding insulin resistance (IR and its relationship with the metabolic syndrome (MS in bipolar patients. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence of both IR and MS in BD outpatients and to assess clinical criteria associated with IR. METHOD: Cross-sectional study in 65 DSM-IV-TR BD patients

  5. Metabolic Syndrome and Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: A New Paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, A.A.; Kaklamani, V.G.

    2012-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are aggressive tumors with poor prognosis compared to other breast cancer subtypes. The evidence linking TNBC with the metabolic syndrome, which consists of central obesity, insulin resistance, impaired glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, has emerged from clinical studies and experiments using cell lines and mouse models. Epidemiological studies have associated abdominal obesity with increased incidence of TNBC. Additionally, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension are associated with increased incidence of breast cancer across all subtypes. The insulin-leptin-adiponectin axis has been implicated mechanistically in breast cancer tumorigenesis. Specifically, increased leptin and decreased adiponectin levels disrupt homeostatic signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation, survival, cell-cycle regulation, and angio genesis. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) may mediate interactions between these two hormones. Further research will facilitate the development of targeted therapeutics and programs to modify lifestyle factors to modulate the insulin-leptin-adiponectin axis for TNBC

  6. Metabolic Syndrome and Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: A New Paradigm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, A A; Kaklamani, V G [Cancer Genetics Program, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine and Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611 (Ukraine)

    2012-07-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are aggressive tumors with poor prognosis compared to other breast cancer subtypes. The evidence linking TNBC with the metabolic syndrome, which consists of central obesity, insulin resistance, impaired glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, has emerged from clinical studies and experiments using cell lines and mouse models. Epidemiological studies have associated abdominal obesity with increased incidence of TNBC. Additionally, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension are associated with increased incidence of breast cancer across all subtypes. The insulin-leptin-adiponectin axis has been implicated mechanistically in breast cancer tumorigenesis. Specifically, increased leptin and decreased adiponectin levels disrupt homeostatic signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation, survival, cell-cycle regulation, and angio genesis. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) may mediate interactions between these two hormones. Further research will facilitate the development of targeted therapeutics and programs to modify lifestyle factors to modulate the insulin-leptin-adiponectin axis for TNBC

  7. Effect of high fat and high sugar diet on insulin binding and insulin action in isolated rat adipocytes

    OpenAIRE

    岡﨑,悟

    1987-01-01

    To clarify on a cellular basis the mechanism of the diabetogenic effect of the westernized diet, insulin binding, insulin stimulated 3-o-methylglucose uptake and glucose oxidation were studied in isolated adipocytes from rats fed experimental diets : low fat-no sugar diet (energy ratio of 10% fat, 70% starch, a model of the traditional Japanese diet), high fat-high sugar diet (40% fat, 20% starch, 20% sugar, a model of the westernized diet), low fat-high sugar diet (10% fat, 50% starch, 20% s...

  8. WNIN/GR-Ob - an insulin-resistant obese rat model from inbred WNIN strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harishankar, N; Vajreswari, A; Giridharan, N V

    2011-09-01

    WNIN/GR-Ob is a mutant obese rat strain with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) developed at the National Institute of Nutrition (NIN), Hyderabad, India, from the existing 80 year old Wistar rat (WNIN) stock colony. The data presented here pertain to its obese nature along with IGT trait as evidenced by physical, physiological and biochemical parameters. The study also explains its existence, in three phenotypes: homozygous lean (+/+), heterozygous carrier (+/-) and homozygous obese (-/-). Thirty animals (15 males and 15 females) from each phenotype (+/+, +/-, -/-) and 24 lean and obese (6 males and 6 females) rats were taken for growth and food intake studies respectively. Twelve adult rats from each phenotype were taken for body composition measurement by total body electrical conductivity (TOBEC); 12 rats of both genders from each phenotype at different ages were taken for clinical chemistry parameters. Physiological indices of insulin resistance were calculated according to the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and also by studying U¹⁴C 2-deoxy glucose uptake (2DG). WNINGR-Ob mutants had high growth, hyperphagia, polydipsia, polyurea, glycosuria, and significantly lower lean body mass, higher fat mass as compared with carrier and lean rats. These mutants, at 50 days of age displayed abnormal response to glucose load (IGT), hyperinsulinaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia, hypercholesterolaemia and hyperleptinaemia. Basal and insulin-stimulated glucose uptakes by diaphragm were significantly decreased in obese rats as compared with lean rats. Obese rats of the designated WNIN/GR-Ob strain showed obesity with IGT, as adjudged by physical, physiological and biochemical indices. These indices varied among the three phenotypes, being lowest in lean, highest in obese and intermediate in carrier phenotypes thereby suggesting that obesity is inherited as autosomal incomplete dominant trait in this strain. This mutant obese rat model is easy to

  9. Validation of insulin resistance indexes in a stable renal transplant population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oterdoom, Leendert H.; de Vries, Aiko P. J.; van Son, Willem J.; Homan van der Heide, Jaap J.; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; de Jong, Paul E.; Gans, Rijk O. B.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the validity of established insulin resistance indexes, based on fasting blood parameters, in a stable renal transplant population. Fasting insulin, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), and

  10. Validation of insulin resistance indexes in a stable renal transplant population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oterdoom, LH; De Vries, APJ; Van Son, WJ; Van Der Heide, JJH; Ploeg, RJ; Gansevoort, RT; De Jong, PE; Gans, ROB; Bakker, SJL

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - The purpose of this study was to investigate the validity of established insulin resistance indexes, based on fasting blood parameters, in a stable renal transplant population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Fasting insulin, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), the quantitative insulin

  11. Fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and insulin resistance in the prediction of myocardial infarction and mortality at long-term follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M. L.; Pareek, M.; Leosdottir, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the additional prognostic value of fasting blood glucose (FBG), fasting plasma insulin (FPI), and homeostasis model assessment derived insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) for predicting incident myocardial infarction (MI) and all-cause mortality, independently of traditional...... measured at baseline. Subsequently, HOMA-IR was derived using the computerized HOMA calculator and ranked into quartiles due to the non-normal distribution and presumably non-linear biological effect of insulin resistance. Prognostic values of FBG, FPI, HOMA-IR, and traditional risk factors were tested.......1-48.3] years, whereas median [IQR] HOMA-IR was 0.9 [0.4-1.4]. Over a median follow-up time of 20 years, 1448 events occurred (11.3 per 1000 person-years). The simple prediction model, i.e. the model with traditional CV risk factors only, included age, gender, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, total...

  12. Pregestational diabetes with extreme insulin resistance: use of U-500 insulin in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwise, Lisa C; Werner, Erika F; Pettker, Christian M; McMahon-Brown, Erin K; Thung, Stephen F; Han, Christina S

    2012-08-01

    Increased insulin requirements in pregnancy can hinder attainment of glycemic control in diabetic patients. U-500 insulin is a concentrated form of regular insulin that can be a valuable tool in the treatment of patients with severe insulin resistance. A 24-year-old woman with pregestational diabetes mellitus experienced increasing insulin requirements during pregnancy, peaking at 650 units daily. The frequent, large-volume injections of standard-concentration insulin were poorly tolerated by the patient and resulted in nonadherence. She subsequently achieved glycemic control on thrice-daily U-500 insulin. Pregnancy exacerbates insulin resistance in diabetic patients, and these patients may require high doses of insulin. U-500 insulin is an effective alternative for patients with severe insulin resistance and should be considered for pregnant women with difficulty achieving glycemic control.

  13. High Uric Acid Induces Insulin Resistance in Cardiomyocytes In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhi

    Full Text Available Clinical studies have shown hyperuricemia strongly associated with insulin resistance as well as cardiovascular disease. Direct evidence of how high uric acid (HUA affects insulin resistance in cardiomyocytes, but the pathological mechanism of HUA associated with cardiovascular disease remains to be clarified. We aimed to examine the effect of HUA on insulin sensitivity in cardiomyocytes and on insulin resistance in hyperuricemic mouse model. We exposed primary cardiomyocytes and a rat cardiomyocyte cell line, H9c2 cardiomyocytes, to HUA, then quantified glucose uptake with a fluorescent glucose analog, 2-NBDG, after insulin challenge and detected reactive oxygen species (ROS production. Western blot analysis was used to examine the levels of insulin receptor (IR, phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1, Ser307 and phospho-Akt (Ser473. We monitored the impact of HUA on insulin resistance, insulin signaling and IR, phospho-IRS1 (Ser307 and phospho-Akt levels in myocardial tissue of an acute hyperuricemia mouse model established by potassium oxonate treatment. HUA inhibited insulin-induced glucose uptake in H9c2 and primary cardiomyocytes. It increased ROS production; pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, a ROS scavenger, reversed HUA-inhibited glucose uptake induced by insulin. HUA exposure directly increased the phospho-IRS1 (Ser307 response to insulin and inhibited that of phospho-Akt in H9C2 cardiomyocytes, which was blocked by NAC. Furthermore, the acute hyperuricemic mice model showed impaired glucose tolerance and insulin tolerance accompanied by increased phospho-IRS1 (Ser307 and inhibited phospho-Akt response to insulin in myocardial tissues. HUA inhibited insulin signaling and induced insulin resistance in cardiomyocytes in vitro and in vivo, which is a novel potential mechanism of hyperuricemic-related cardiovascular disease.

  14. Vitamin D Supplementation Does Not Impact Insulin Resistance in Black and White Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferira, Ashley J; Laing, Emma M; Hausman, Dorothy B; Hall, Daniel B; McCabe, George P; Martin, Berdine R; Hill Gallant, Kathleen M; Warden, Stuart J; Weaver, Connie M; Peacock, Munro; Lewis, Richard D

    2016-04-01

    Vitamin D supplementation trials with diabetes-related outcomes have been conducted almost exclusively in adults and provide equivocal findings. The objective of this study was to determine the dose-response of vitamin D supplementation on fasting glucose, insulin, and a surrogate measure of insulin resistance in white and black children aged 9–13 years, who participated in the Georgia, Purdue, and Indiana University (or GAPI) trial: a 12-week multisite, randomized, triple-masked, dose-response, placebo-controlled vitamin D trial. Black and white children in the early stages of puberty (N = 323, 50% male, 51% black) were equally randomized to receive vitamin D3 (0, 400, 1000, 2000, or 4000 IU/day) for 12 weeks. Fasting serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), glucose and insulin were assessed at baseline and weeks 6 and 12. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance was used as a surrogate measure of insulin resistance. Statistical analyses were conducted as intent-to-treat using a mixed effects model. Baseline serum 25(OH)D was inversely associated with insulin (r = −0.140, P = 0.017) and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (r = −0.146, P = 0.012) after adjusting for race, sex, age, pubertal maturation, fat mass, and body mass index. Glucose, insulin, and insulin resistance increased (F > 5.79, P insulin resistance, vitamin D supplementation had no impact on fasting glucose, insulin, or a surrogate measure of insulin resistance over 12 weeks in apparently healthy children.

  15. Liraglutide increases FGF-21 activity and insulin sensitivity in high fat diet and adiponectin knockdown induced insulin resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengliu Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Liraglutide is a glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue that stimulates insulin secretion and improves β-cell function. However, it is not clear whether liraglutide achieves its glucose lowering effect only by its known effects or whether other as yet unknown mechanisms are involved. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of liraglutide on Fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF-21 activity in High-fat diet (HFD fed ApoE(-/- mice with adiponectin (Acrp30 knockdown. METHOD: HFD-fed ApoE(-/- mice were treated with adenovirus vectors expressing shAcrp30 to produce insulin resistance. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies were performed to evaluate insulin sensitivity of the mouse model. QRT-PCR and Western blot were used to measure the mRNA and protein expression of the target genes. RESULTS: The combination of HFD, ApoE deficiency, and hypoadiponectinemia resulted in an additive effect on insulin resistance. FGF-21 mRNA expressions in both liver and adipose tissues were significantly increased while FGF-21 receptor 1 (FGFR-1 and β-Klotho mRNA levels in adipose tissue, as well as FGFR-1-3 and β-Klotho mRNA levels in liver were significantly decreased in this model. Liraglutide treatment markedly improved insulin resistance and increased FGF-21 expression in liver and FGFR-3 in adipose tissue, restored β-Klotho mRNA expression in adipose tissue as well as FGFR-1-3, β-Klotho levels and phosphorylation of FGFR1 up to the levels observed in control mice in liver. Liraglutide treatment also further increased FGF-21 proteins in liver and plasma. In addition, as shown by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, liraglutide treatment also markedly improved glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity in these animals. CONCLUSION: These findings demonstrate an additive effect of HFD, ApoE deficiency, and adiponectin knockdown on insulin resistance and unveil that the regulation of glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity by liraglutide may be

  16. Effect of isologous and autologous insulin antibodies on in vivo bioavailability and metabolic fate of immune-complexed insulin in Lou/M rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arquilla, E.R.; McDougall, B.R.; Stenger, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    The in vivo bioavailability, distribution, and metabolic fate of 125I-labeled insulin complexed to isologous and autologous antibodies were studied in inbred Lou/M rats. There was an impaired bioavailability of the 125I-insulin bound to the isologous and autologous antibodies. Very little of the 125I-insulin in these immune complexes could bind to insulin receptors on hepatocytes or renal tubular cells and be degraded, because the amounts of 125I from degraded 125I-insulin in the blood or secreted into the stomach were markedly attenuated in both cases for at least 30 min after injection. There was a simultaneous accumulation of 125I-insulin immune complexes in the liver and the kidneys of Lou/M rats injected with 125I-insulin complexed with isologous antibodies or when insulin-immunized Lou/M rats were injected with 125I-insulin during the same interval. The impaired bioavailability of immune-complexed insulin and altered distribution of radioactivity due to the accumulation of immune complexes in the liver and kidney were also observed in previous experiments in which Lewis rats were injected with xenogenic guinea pig and homologous insulin antibodies. These observations are therefore submitted as evidence that the Lou/M rat is a valid model in which to study the bioavailability of insulin immune complexed to isologous, homologous, and xenogenic antibodies and the metabolic fate of the respective insulin-antibody immune complexes

  17. Insulin resistance in Nigerians with essential hypertension | Akande ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) was used to determine insulin resistance (IR). Results: The hypertensive subjects had significantly higher fasting insulin and HOMA-IR compared with normotensives (p =0.02 and 0.04) respectively. There were significant correlations between HOMA-IR, BMI, waist and hip ...

  18. Multivariate Prediction Equations for HbA1c Lowering, Weight Change, and Hypoglycemic Events Associated with Insulin Rescue Medication in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Informing Economic Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Michael; Asseburg, Christian; Nilsson, Andreas; Johnsson, Kristina; Kartman, Bernt

    2017-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is chronic and progressive and the cost-effectiveness of new treatment interventions must be established over long time horizons. Given the limited durability of drugs, assumptions regarding downstream rescue medication can drive results. Especially for insulin, for which treatment effects and adverse events are known to depend on patient characteristics, this can be problematic for health economic evaluation involving modeling. To estimate parsimonious multivariate equations of treatment effects and hypoglycemic event risks for use in parameterizing insulin rescue therapy in model-based cost-effectiveness analysis. Clinical evidence for insulin use in T2DM was identified in PubMed and from published reviews and meta-analyses. Study and patient characteristics and treatment effects and adverse event rates were extracted and the data used to estimate parsimonious treatment effect and hypoglycemic event risk equations using multivariate regression analysis. Data from 91 studies featuring 171 usable study arms were identified, mostly for premix and basal insulin types. Multivariate prediction equations for glycated hemoglobin A 1c lowering and weight change were estimated separately for insulin-naive and insulin-experienced patients. Goodness of fit (R 2 ) for both outcomes were generally good, ranging from 0.44 to 0.84. Multivariate prediction equations for symptomatic, nocturnal, and severe hypoglycemic events were also estimated, though considerable heterogeneity in definitions limits their usefulness. Parsimonious and robust multivariate prediction equations were estimated for glycated hemoglobin A 1c and weight change, separately for insulin-naive and insulin-experienced patients. Using these in economic simulation modeling in T2DM can improve realism and flexibility in modeling insulin rescue medication. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  19. Heart Rate Variability, Insulin Resistance, and Insulin Sensitivity in Japanese Adults: The Toon Health Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isao Saito

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although impaired cardiac autonomic function is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in Caucasians, evidence in Asian populations with a lower body mass index is limited. Methods: Between 2009–2012, the Toon Health Study recruited 1899 individuals aged 30–79 years who were not taking medication for diabetes. A 75-g oral glucose tolerance test was used to diagnose type 2 diabetes, and fasting and 2-h-postload glucose and insulin concentrations were measured. We assessed the homeostasis model assessment index for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and Gutt’s insulin sensitivity index (ISI. Pulse was recorded for 5 min, and time-domain heart rate variability (HRV indices were calculated: the standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN and the root mean square of successive difference (RMSSD. Power spectral analysis provided frequency domain measures of HRV: high frequency (HF power, low frequency (LF power, and the LF:HF ratio. Results: Multivariate-adjusted logistic regression models showed decreased SDNN, RMSSD, and HF, and increased LF:HF ratio were associated significantly with increased HOMA-IR and decreased ISI. When stratified by overweight status, the association of RMSSD, HF, and LF:HF ratio with decreased ISI was also apparent in non-overweight individuals. The interaction between LF:HF ratio and decreased ISI in overweight individuals was significant, with the odds ratio for decreased ISI in the highest quartile of LF:HF ratio in non-overweight individuals being 2.09 (95% confidence interval, 1.41–3.10. Conclusions: Reduced HRV was associated with insulin resistance and lower insulin sensitivity. Decreased ISI was linked with parasympathetic dysfunction, primarily in non-overweight individuals.

  20. Evaluation of left ventricular mass and function, lipid profile, and insulin resistance in Egyptian children with growth hormone deficiency: A single-center prospective case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotb Abbass Metwalley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Growth hormone deficiency (GHD in adults is associated with a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors that may contribute to an increased mortality for cardiovascular disease. In children, relatively few studies have investigated the effect of GHD and replacement therapy on cardiac performance and metabolic abnormalities that may place them at a higher risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD at an early age. Aim: This study was aimed to assess the left ventricular function, lipid profile, and degree of insulin resistance in Egyptian children with GHD before and after 1 year of GH replacement therapy. Settings and Design: Prospective case-control study, single-center study. Materials and Methods: Thirty children with short stature due to GHD were studied in comparison to 20 healthy age- and sex-matched children. All subjects were subjected to history, clinical examination, auxological assessment, and echocardiography to assess the left ventricular function. Blood samples were collected for measuring IGF-1, lipid profile (Total, LDL, HDL cholesterol, triglyceride, and atherogenic index (AI, fasting blood sugar, and fasting insulin levels. In addition, basal and stimulated GH levels were measured in children with suspected GHD. Statistical Analysis Used: Student′s t-test was used for parametric data, and the Mann-Whitney U-test was used for non-parametric data. Results: Total, LDL cholesterol, triglyceride, AI, and insulin were significantly higher in children with GHD than in healthy controls at baseline. After 12 months of GH replacement therapy, total, LDL cholesterol, triglyceride, AI and insulin were significantly decreased, while homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR was significantly increased compared to both pre-treatment and control values. At baseline, the left ventricular mass (LVM and left ventricular mass index (LVMi were significantly lower in GHD children than in controls. After 12 months of GH

  1. Alternative translation initiation of Caveolin-2 desensitizes insulin signaling through dephosphorylation of insulin receptor by PTP1B and causes insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hayeong; Jang, Donghwan; Choi, Moonjeong; Lee, Jaewoong; Jeong, Kyuho; Pak, Yunbae

    2018-06-01

    Insulin resistance, defined as attenuated sensitivity responding to insulin, impairs insulin action. Direct causes and molecular mechanisms of insulin resistance have thus far remained elusive. Here we show that alternative translation initiation (ATI) of Caveolin-2 (Cav-2) regulates insulin sensitivity. Cav-2β isoform yielded by ATI desensitizes insulin receptor (IR) via dephosphorylation by protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), and subsequent endocytosis and lysosomal degradation of IR, causing insulin resistance. Blockage of Cav-2 ATI protects against insulin resistance by preventing Cav-2β-PTP1B-directed IR desensitization, thereby normalizing insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake. Our findings show that Cav-2β is a negative regulator of IR signaling, and identify a mechanism causing insulin resistance through control of insulin sensitivity via Cav-2 ATI. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of lifestyle interventions with or without metformin therapy on serum levels of osteoprotegerin and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand in patients with prediabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Muyesser Sayki; Tutal, Esra; Sahin, Mustafa; Karakose, Melia; Ucan, Bekir; Ozturk, Gulfer; Cakal, Erman; Biyikli Gencturk, Zeynep; Ozbek, Mustafa; Delibasi, Tuncay

    2017-02-01

    Osteoprotegerin has been shown to be increased in cardiovascular disorders and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Prediabetes represents a high risk condition for diabetes and diabetic complications. Therefore, we aimed to find the relationship between prediabetes and osteoprotegerin with nuclear factor-B ligand, carotid intima media thickness, and metabolic markers. A total of 54 participants with prediabetes including impaired fasting glucose (n = 21), impaired glucose tolerance (n = 8), impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance (n = 25), and 60 healthy individuals as a control were admitted to the study. Metabolic and anthropometric parameters, insulin resistance variables, osteoprotegerin, and nuclear factor-B ligand markers, carotid intima media thickness were examined at baseline for all participants. To evaluate the effect of therapy we determined the same parameters after the end of the study. Measurements of waist circumference, body mass index, body fat percentage and levels of fasting blood glucose, fasting insulin, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, triglyceride levels and hsCRP and carotid intima media thickness were significantly higher in patients with prediabetes (p  0.05). Patients with prediabetes were under lifestyle interventions with (group 1, n = 33) or without metformin (group 2, n = 21) therapy. Baseline anthropometric and metabolic characteristics were not found statistically different in group 1 and group 2. Mean follow up period of the patients were 7.9 ± 2.2 month (min-max: 6-12 months). After the follow up period we evaluated the same parameters and found significant differences between waist circumference, body mass index, body fat percentage, fasting insulin, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, and osteoprotegerin levels (p prediabetes was associated with a significant decrease in osteoprotegerin and certain metabolic variables together with an increase in nuclear

  3. Conversion from insulin glargine U-100 to insulin glargine U-300 or insulin degludec and the impact on dosage requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Scott M; Trujillo, Jennifer M

    2018-04-01

    We wanted to determine whether basal insulin requirements change when patients transition from insulin glargine U-100 (Gla-100) to insulin glargine U-300 (Gla-300) or insulin degludec. This study involved subjects seen in the University of Colorado Health Endocrine Clinic who were transitioned from Gla-100 to either Gla-300 ( n = 95) or insulin degludec ( n = 39). The primary outcome was the difference between baseline Gla-100 dose and dose of Gla-300 or insulin degludec prescribed after first follow-up visit within 1-12 months. Secondary outcomes included changes in glycemic control and empiric dose conversion from Gla-100 to Gla-300 or insulin degludec on the day of transition. Wilcoxon rank sum tests evaluated changes in insulin doses, and paired t tests assessed changes in glycemic control using GraphPad statistical software. Median daily basal insulin dose increased for individuals transitioned from Gla-100 to Gla-300 from 30 [19-60 interquartile range (IQR)] units at baseline to 34.5 (19-70 IQR) units after follow up ( p = 0.01). For patients transitioned to insulin degludec, dose changes from baseline to follow up were not significantly different ( p = 0.56). At the time of transition, the prescribed dose of Gla-300 or insulin degludec did not significantly differ from the previous dose of Gla-100 ( p = 0.73 and 0.28, respectively), indicating that empiric dose adjustments were not routinely prescribed. Patients who transitioned from Gla-100 to Gla-300 had increased basal insulin requirements between visits, while basal insulin requirements for those transitioned from Gla-100 to insulin degludec were not significantly different.

  4. Short-term antidiabetic treatment with insulin or metformin has a similar impact on the components of metabolic syndrome in women with gestational diabetes mellitus requiring antidiabetic agents: results of a prospective, randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawiejska, A; Wender-Ozegowska, E; Grewling-Szmit, K; Brazert, M; Brazert, J

    2016-04-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with an increased prevalence of fetal and maternal complications primarily caused by maternal hyperglycemia, which results in abnormal fetal growth. Diet modification is a common first step in the treatment of GDM, followed by antidiabetic pharmacotherapy if this approach fails. Insulin therapy is generally accepted; however, oral hypoglycemic agents have been used in this population. In this prospective, randomised study, we compared maternal metabolic status after treatment with insulin or metformin. Pregnant women (gestational age: ≥ 20 weeks) with GDM requiring medical hypoglycemic treatment were randomly allocated to the Metformin (n = 35) or Insulin (n = 43) Groups. Maternal metabolic status - assessed by glycated hemoglobin (HBA1c) level, glycemic profile, insulin concentration, Homeostatic Model Assessment - Insulin Resistance index, and lipids - was recorded at booking and throughout pregnancy. The characteristics of the study group were: maternal age 33.5 ± 5.9 years, gestational age at baseline 28.5 ± 3.5 weeks, prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) 32.2 ± 3.5 kg/m(2), HbA1c at baseline 5.6 ± 0.6%, and average daily glycemia 5.9 ± 0.6 mmol/dl. Fasting glycemia at term was significantly lower in the Insulin Group but there were no significant differences in mean daily glycemia, HbA1c and BMI at term between the groups. Longitudinally, there was a small but significant increase in BMI and a significant increase in high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol in the Insulin Group and a significant increase in the atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) and a trend towards higher triglycerides in the Metformin Group. Both fasting and average daily glycemia were significantly reduced following treatment in both groups. No such change was evident for HbA1c. In a relative risk analysis, metformin treatment was associated with an insignificant elevated risk of HbA1c, triglycerides and lipid indices falling within the

  5. Pathophysiology-based phenotyping in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Jacob V; Henriksen, Jan E; Olsen, Michael H

    2018-01-01

    clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetes. METHODS: We first identified all patients with rare subtypes of diabetes, latent autoimmune diabetes of adults (LADA), secondary diabetes, or glucocorticoid-associated diabetes. We then used the homeostatic assessment model to subphenotype all remaining patients......BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes may be a more heterogeneous disease than previously thought. Better understanding of pathophysiological subphenotypes could lead to more individualized diabetes treatment. We examined the characteristics of different phenotypes among 5813 Danish patients with new...... into insulinopenic (high insulin sensitivity and low beta cell function), classical (low insulin sensitivity and low beta cell function), or hyperinsulinemic (low insulin sensitivity and high beta cell function) type 2 diabetes. RESULTS: Among 5813 patients diagnosed with incident type 2 diabetes in the community...

  6. Homeostatic Presynaptic Plasticity Is Specifically Regulated by P/Q-type Ca2+ Channels at Mammalian Hippocampal Synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeans, Alexander F; van Heusden, Fran C; Al-Mubarak, Bashayer; Padamsey, Zahid; Emptage, Nigel J

    2017-10-10

    Voltage-dependent Ca 2+ channels (VGCC) represent the principal source of Ca 2+ ions driving evoked neurotransmitter release at presynaptic boutons. In mammals, presynaptic Ca 2+ influx is mediated mainly via P/Q-type and N-type VGCC, which differ in their properties. Changes in their relative contributions tune neurotransmission both during development and in Hebbian plasticity. However, whether this represents a functional motif also present in other forms of activity-dependent regulation is unknown. Here, we study the role of VGCC in homeostatic plasticity (HSP) in mammalian hippocampal neurons using optical techniques. We find that changes in evoked Ca 2+ currents specifically through P/Q-type, but not N-type, VGCC mediate bidirectional homeostatic regulation of both neurotransmitter release efficacy and the size of the major synaptic vesicle pools. Selective dependence of HSP on P/Q-type VGCC in mammalian terminals has important implications for phenotypes associated with P/Q-type channelopathies, including migraine and epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of metformin and insulin versus insulin alone for type 2 diabetes: systematic review of randomised clinical trials with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmingsen, Bianca; Christensen, Louise Lundby; Wetterslev, Jørn; Vaag, Allan; Gluud, Christian; Lund, Søren S; Almdal, Thomas

    2012-04-19

    To compare the benefits and harms of metformin and insulin versus insulin alone as reported in randomised clinical trials of patients with type 2 diabetes. Systematic review of randomised clinical trials with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses. The Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, Science Citation Index Expanded, Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature until March 2011. We also searched abstracts presented at the American Diabetes Association and European Association for the Study of Diabetes Congresses, contacted relevant trial authors and pharmaceutical companies, hand searched reference lists of included trials, and searched the US Food and Drug Administration website. Two authors independently screened titles and abstracts for randomised clinical trials comparing metformin and insulin versus insulin alone (with or without placebo) in patients with type 2 diabetes, older than 18 years, and with an intervention period of at least 12 weeks. We included trials irrespective of language, publication status, predefined outcomes, antidiabetic interventions used before randomisation, and reported outcomes. We included 26 randomised trials with 2286 participants, of which 23 trials with 2117 participants could provide data. All trials had high risk of bias. Data were sparse for outcomes relevant to patients. Metformin and insulin versus insulin alone did not significantly affect all cause mortality (relative risk 1.30, 95% confidence interval 0.57 to 2.99) or cardiovascular mortality (1.70, 0.35 to 8.30). Trial sequential analyses showed that more trials were needed before reliable conclusions could be drawn regarding these outcomes. In a fixed effect model, but not in a random effects model, severe hypoglycaemia was significantly more frequent with metformin and insulin than with insulin alone (2.83, 1.17 to 6.86). In a random effects model, metformin and insulin resulted in reduced Hb

  8. Insulin gene therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handorf, Andrew M; Sollinger, Hans W; Alam, Tausif

    2015-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is an autoimmune disease resulting from the destruction of pancreatic β cells. Current treatments for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus include daily insulin injections or whole pancreas transplant, each of which are associated with profound drawbacks. Insulin gene therapy, which has shown great efficacy in correcting hyperglycemia in animal models, holds great promise as an alternative strategy to treat type 1 diabetes mellitus in humans. Insulin gene therapy refers to the targeted expression of insulin in non-β cells, with hepatocytes emerging as the primary therapeutic target. In this review, we present an overview of the current state of insulin gene therapy to treat type 1 diabetes mellitus, including the need for an alternative therapy, important features dictating the success of the therapy, and current obstacles preventing the translation of this treatment option to a clinical setting. In so doing, we hope to shed light on insulin gene therapy as a viable option to treat type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  9. Omentin, an adipokine with insulin-sensitizing properties, is negatively associated with insulin resistance in normal gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Benny; Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Hemi, Rina; Yinon, Yoav; Schiff, Eyal; Mashiach, Roy; Kanety, Hannah; Sivan, Eyal

    2015-05-01

    Omentin, a newly identified adipokine, enhances insulin mediated glucose uptake in human adipocytes, thus, inducing systemic insulin-sensitizing effect. The aims of this study were to determine whether circulating maternal omentin levels are associated with insulin resistance indices and to assess which compartment, maternal, fetal, or placental, is the source of omentin in maternal circulation. Fasting serum glucose, insulin, and omentin were determined in 25 healthy pregnant women at the third trimester, before and 3 days after elective cesarean section. Cord blood omentin was measured in the 25 term neonates. Homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) was used to evaluate insulin sensitivity before and after delivery. Antepartum maternal omentin levels were negatively correlated with insulin levels (r=-0.41, P=0.04) and positively correlated with insulin sensitivity (HOMA%S; r=0.4, P=0.04). Postpartum omentin levels were negatively correlated with maternal body mass index (r=-0.44, P=0.02). Median maternal omentin levels was comparable before and after delivery (57.2, inter-quartile range: 38.2-76.2 ng/mL vs. 53.4, 39.8-69.4 ng/mL, respectively, P=0.25) and highly correlated (r=0.83, Pinsulin resistance indices, suggesting that this adipokine may play a role in metabolic adaptations of normal gestation. The strong correlation between anteparum and postpartum maternal omentin levels, as well as the lack of association between maternal and neonatal omentin levels, suggest that placental or fetal compartments are unlikely as the main source of circulating maternal omentin.

  10. Effects of glucose, insulin, and insulin resistance on cerebral 18F-FDG distribution in cognitively normal older subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Airin; Fujiwara, Yoshinori; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Ishii, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Background Increasing plasma glucose levels and insulin resistance can alter the distribution pattern of fluorine-18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) in the brain and relatively reduce 18F-FDG uptake in Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related hypometabolic regions, leading to the appearance of an AD-like pattern. However, its relationship with plasma insulin levels is unclear. We aimed to compare the effects of plasma glucose levels, plasma insulin levels and insulin resistance on the appearance of the AD-like pattern in 18F-FDG images. Methods Fifty-nine cognitively normal older subjects (age = 75.7 ± 6.4 years) underwent 18F-FDG positron emission tomography along with measurement of plasma glucose and insulin levels. As an index of insulin resistance, the Homeostasis model assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated. Results Plasma glucose levels, plasma insulin levels, and HOMA-IR were 102.2 ± 8.1 mg/dL, 4.1 ± 1.9 μU/mL, and 1.0 ± 0.5, respectively. Whole-brain voxelwise analysis showed a negative correlation of 18F-FDG uptake with plasma glucose levels in the precuneus and lateral parietotemporal regions (cluster-corrected p < 0.05), and no correlation with plasma insulin levels or HOMA-IR. In the significant cluster, 18F-FDG uptake decreased by approximately 4–5% when plasma glucose levels increased by 20 mg/dL. In the precuneus region, volume-of-interest analysis confirmed a negative correlation of 18F-FDG uptake with plasma glucose levels (r = -0.376, p = 0.002), and no correlation with plasma insulin levels (r = 0.156, p = 0.12) or HOMA-IR (r = 0.096, p = 0.24). Conclusion This study suggests that, of the three parameters, plasma glucose levels have the greatest effect on the appearance of the AD-like pattern in 18F-FDG images. PMID:28715453

  11. Effects of glucose, insulin, and insulin resistance on cerebral 18F-FDG distribution in cognitively normal older subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Ishibashi

    Full Text Available Increasing plasma glucose levels and insulin resistance can alter the distribution pattern of fluorine-18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG in the brain and relatively reduce 18F-FDG uptake in Alzheimer's disease (AD-related hypometabolic regions, leading to the appearance of an AD-like pattern. However, its relationship with plasma insulin levels is unclear. We aimed to compare the effects of plasma glucose levels, plasma insulin levels and insulin resistance on the appearance of the AD-like pattern in 18F-FDG images.Fifty-nine cognitively normal older subjects (age = 75.7 ± 6.4 years underwent 18F-FDG positron emission tomography along with measurement of plasma glucose and insulin levels. As an index of insulin resistance, the Homeostasis model assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR was calculated.Plasma glucose levels, plasma insulin levels, and HOMA-IR were 102.2 ± 8.1 mg/dL, 4.1 ± 1.9 μU/mL, and 1.0 ± 0.5, respectively. Whole-brain voxelwise analysis showed a negative correlation of 18F-FDG uptake with plasma glucose levels in the precuneus and lateral parietotemporal regions (cluster-corrected p < 0.05, and no correlation with plasma insulin levels or HOMA-IR. In the significant cluster, 18F-FDG uptake decreased by approximately 4-5% when plasma glucose levels increased by 20 mg/dL. In the precuneus region, volume-of-interest analysis confirmed a negative correlation of 18F-FDG uptake with plasma glucose levels (r = -0.376, p = 0.002, and no correlation with plasma insulin levels (r = 0.156, p = 0.12 or HOMA-IR (r = 0.096, p = 0.24.This study suggests that, of the three parameters, plasma glucose levels have the greatest effect on the appearance of the AD-like pattern in 18F-FDG images.

  12. A novel insulin resistance index to monitor changes in insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance: the ACT NOW study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Devjit; Cobb, Jeff E; Gall, Walter; Adam, Klaus-Peter; George, Tabitha; Schwenke, Dawn C; Banerji, MaryAnn; Bray, George A; Buchanan, Thomas A; Clement, Stephen C; Henry, Robert R; Kitabchi, Abbas E; Mudaliar, Sunder; Ratner, Robert E; Stentz, Frankie B; Reaven, Peter D; Musi, Nicolas; Ferrannini, Ele; DeFronzo, Ralph A

    2015-05-01

    The objective was to test the clinical utility of Quantose M(Q) to monitor changes in insulin sensitivity after pioglitazone therapy in prediabetic subjects. Quantose M(Q) is derived from fasting measurements of insulin, α-hydroxybutyrate, linoleoyl-glycerophosphocholine, and oleate, three nonglucose metabolites shown to correlate with insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. Participants were 428 of the total of 602 ACT NOW impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) subjects randomized to pioglitazone (45 mg/d) or placebo and followed for 2.4 years. At baseline and study end, fasting plasma metabolites required for determination of Quantose, glycated hemoglobin, and oral glucose tolerance test with frequent plasma insulin and glucose measurements to calculate the Matsuda index of insulin sensitivity were obtained. Pioglitazone treatment lowered IGT conversion to diabetes (hazard ratio = 0.25; 95% confidence interval = 0.13-0.50; P < .0001). Although glycated hemoglobin did not track with insulin sensitivity, Quantose M(Q) increased in pioglitazone-treated subjects (by 1.45 [3.45] mg·min(-1)·kgwbm(-1)) (median [interquartile range]) (P < .001 vs placebo), as did the Matsuda index (by 3.05 [4.77] units; P < .0001). Quantose M(Q) correlated with the Matsuda index at baseline and change in the Matsuda index from baseline (rho, 0.85 and 0.79, respectively; P < .0001) and was progressively higher across closeout glucose tolerance status (diabetes, IGT, normal glucose tolerance). In logistic models including only anthropometric and fasting measurements, Quantose M(Q) outperformed both Matsuda and fasting insulin in predicting incident diabetes. In IGT subjects, Quantose M(Q) parallels changes in insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance with pioglitazone therapy. Due to its strong correlation with improved insulin sensitivity and its ease of use, Quantose M(Q) may serve as a useful clinical test to identify and monitor therapy in insulin-resistant patients.

  13. Update on insulin treatment for dogs and cats: insulin dosing pens and more

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson A

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ann Thompson,1 Patty Lathan,2 Linda Fleeman3 1School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland, Gatton, QLD, Australia; 2College of Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, USA; 3Animal Diabetes Australia, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: Insulin therapy is still the primary therapy for all diabetic dogs and cats. Several insulin options are available for each species, including veterinary registered products and human insulin preparations. The insulin chosen depends on the individual patient's requirements. Intermediate-acting insulin is usually the first choice for dogs, and longer-acting insulin is the first choice for cats. Once the insulin type is chosen, the best method of insulin administration should be considered. Traditionally, insulin vials and syringes have been used, but insulin pen devices have recently entered the veterinary market. Pens have different handling requirements when compared with standard insulin vials including: storage out of the refrigerator for some insulin preparations once pen cartridges are in use; priming of the pen to ensure a full dose of insulin is administered; and holding the pen device in place for several seconds during the injection. Many different types of pen devices are available, with features such as half-unit dosing, large dials for visually impaired people, and memory that can display the last time and dose of insulin administered. Insulin pens come in both reusable and disposable options. Pens have several benefits over syring