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Sample records for instrumented spinal fusion

  1. Outcome of instrumented spinal fusion for chronic low back pain: review of 100 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, M.A; Pasha, I.F.; Malik, A.S.; Asad, A.; Aebi, M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective of this study was to evaluate the outcome of instrumented spinal fusion in selected patients with Chronic Low Back Pain (CLBP) in our setup. Consecutive first one hundred patients were selected from spine unit database that underwent instrumented spinal fusion for chronic low back pain lasting more than one year, due to degenerative disease of spine. Average age was 42 years. There were 62 males and 38 females. Diagnosis included; spinal stenosis (26%), failed disc surgery (22%), spondylolisthesis (19%), degenerative disc disease (17%), and instability (16%). Operations performed; Pedicle Screw Fixation (PSF) with Postero-lateral Fusion (PLF) in 3% patients. Trans Laminar Facet Screw (TLFS) with PLF in 24% patients. Anterior Lumbar Inter-body Fusion (ALIF) in 9% patients. Posterior Lumbar Inter-body Fusion (PLIF) in 40% patients and Trans-foraminal Lumbar Inter-body Fusion (TLIF) in 24% patients. Average follow up was for 30 months. 86% patients had full spinal fusion. 71% patients were fully satisfied with treatment, 28% were partially satisfied. Post-operatively, on average, visual analogue scale (VAS) showed 48 points significant improvement and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) showed 53 points significant improvement. Instrumented Spinal Fusion is effective in our set up for relieving symptoms and improving functional outcome in selected patients with debilitating Chronic Low Back Pain due to degenerative disease of spine. Single fusion technique is not ideal for all types of patients and surgeon has to be versatile and trained in using different fusion techniques as the situation demands. (author)

  2. Treatment of postoperative infection after posterior spinal fusion and instrumentation in a patient with neuromuscular scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghattas, Paul J; Mehlman, Charles T; Eichten, David

    2014-02-01

    According to the literature, patients with neuromuscular scoliosis have a higher rate of infection after spinal fusion. No randomized controlled trials have been completed to assess the optimal treatment and related outcomes for patients with infections after posterior spinal fusion. In this article, we examine the data and report a case in which a vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) device was used as definitive treatment for a deep wound infection after posterior spinal fusion and instrumentation in a patient with neuromuscular scoliosis. Our patient, a 17-year-old adolescent girl with progressive neuromuscular scoliosis, underwent posterior spinal fusion with instrumentation and bone graft from T2 to sacrum without complication. One month after surgery, she presented with a draining wound. She underwent repeat surgical irrigation and debridement with subsequent use of a wound VAC. The wound VAC was used for more than 2 months, until skin closure was complete. The deep polymicrobial wound infection was treated successfully and definitively with a wound VAC. This case report suggests that good long-term outcomes can be achieved with use of a wound VAC for definitive closure, with possible avoidance of other secondary surgeries requiring skin grafts or flaps for wound closure.

  3. Comparison of instrumented anterior interbody fusion with instrumented circumferential lumbar fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, S S; Boeree, N R

    2003-12-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) restores disc height, the load bearing ability of anterior ligaments and muscles, root canal dimensions, and spinal balance. It immobilizes the painful degenerate spinal segment and decompresses the nerve roots. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) does the same, but could have complications of graft extrusion, compression and instability contributing to pseudarthrosis in the absence of instrumentation. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the outcome of instrumented circumferential fusion through a posterior approach [PLIF and posterolateral fusion (PLF)] with instrumented ALIF using the Hartshill horseshoe cage, for comparable degrees of internal disc disruption and clinical disability. It was designed as a prospective study, comparing the outcome of two methods of instrumented interbody fusion for internal disc disruption. Between April 1994 and June 1998, the senior author (N.R.B.) performed 39 instrumented ALIF procedures and 35 instrumented circumferential fusion with PLIF procedures. The second author, an independent assessor (S.M.), performed the entire review. Preoperative radiographic assessment included plain radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and provocative discography in all the patients. The outcome in the two groups was compared in terms of radiological improvement and clinical improvement, measured on the basis of improvement of back pain and work capacity. Preoperatively, patients were asked to fill out a questionnaire giving their demographic details, maximum walking distance and current employment status in order to establish the comparability of the two groups. Patient assessment was with the Oswestry Disability Index, quality of life questionnaire (subjective), pain drawing, visual analogue scale, disability benefit, compensation status, and psychological profile. The results of the study showed a satisfactory outcome (scorelife questionnaire) score of 71.8% (28 patients) in

  4. Single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation in surgical treatment for single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis.

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    Zeng, Hao; Wang, Xiyang; Zhang, Penghui; Peng, Wei; Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Yupeng

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility and efficacy of surgical management of single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis (TB) by using single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation. Seventeen cases of single-segment lumbar TB were treated with single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation. The mean follow-up was 36.9 months (range: 24-62 months). The kyphotic angle ranged from 15.2-35.1° preoperatively, with an average measurement of 27.8°. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) score system was used to evaluate the neurological deficits and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) used to judge the activity of TB. Spinal TB was completely cured in all 17 patients. There was no recurrent TB infection. The postoperative kyphotic angle was 6.6-10.2°, 8.1° in average, and there was no significant loss of the correction at final follow-up. Solid fusion was achieved in all cases. Neurological condition in all patients was improved after surgery. Single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation can be a feasible and effective method the in treatment of single-segment lumbar spinal TB.

  5. Spinal fusion-hardware construct: Basic concepts and imaging review

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    Nouh, Mohamed Ragab

    2012-01-01

    The interpretation of spinal images fixed with metallic hardware forms an increasing bulk of daily practice in a busy imaging department. Radiologists are required to be familiar with the instrumentation and operative options used in spinal fixation and fusion procedures, especially in his or her institute. This is critical in evaluating the position of implants and potential complications associated with the operative approaches and spinal fixation devices used. Thus, the radiologist can play an important role in patient care and outcome. This review outlines the advantages and disadvantages of commonly used imaging methods and reports on the best yield for each modality and how to overcome the problematic issues associated with the presence of metallic hardware during imaging. Baseline radiographs are essential as they are the baseline point for evaluation of future studies should patients develop symptoms suggesting possible complications. They may justify further imaging workup with computed tomography, magnetic resonance and/or nuclear medicine studies as the evaluation of a patient with a spinal implant involves a multi-modality approach. This review describes imaging features of potential complications associated with spinal fusion surgery as well as the instrumentation used. This basic knowledge aims to help radiologists approach everyday practice in clinical imaging. PMID:22761979

  6. Lumbar spinal fusion. Outcome in relation to surgical methods, choice of implant and postoperative rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Finn Bjarke

    2004-10-01

    were included in the investigation from 1979 to 1999. Each had prior to inclusion at least 2 years of CLBP and had therefore been subjected to most of the conservative treatment leg pain, due to localized isthmic spondylolisthesis grades I-II or primary or secondary degeneration. PATIENT-BASED FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME: Patients' self-reported parameters should include the impact of CLBP on daily activity, work and leisure time activities, anxiety/depression, social interests and intensity of back and leg pain. Between 1993 and 2003 approximately 1400 lumbar spinal fusion patients completed the Dallas Pain Questionnaire under prospective design studies. In 1996, the Low Back Pain Rating scale was added to the standard questionnaire packet distributed among spinal fusion patients. In our experience, these tools are valid instruments for clinical assessment of candidates for spinal fusion procedures. It is extremely difficult to interpret radiographs of both lumbar posterolateral fusion and anterior interbody fusion. Plain radiographs are clearly not the perfect media for analysis of spinal fusion, but until new and better diagnostic methods are available for clinical use, radiographs will remain the golden standard. Therefore, the development of a detailed reliable radiographic classification system is highly desirable. The classification used in the present thesis for the evaluation of posteroalteral spinal fusion, both with and without instrumentation, demonstrated good interobserver and intraobserver agreement. The classification showed acceptable reliability and may be one way to improve interstudy and intrastudy correlation of radiologic outcomes after posterolateral spinal fusion. Radiology-based evaluation of anterior lumbar interbody fusion is further complicated when cages are employed. The use of different cage designs and materials makes it almost impossible to establish a standard radiological classification system for anterior fusions. BONE-SCREW INTERFACE

  7. Circumferential fusion improves outcome in comparison with instrumented posterolateral fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Videbaek, Tina S; Christensen, Finn B; Soegaard, Rikke

    2006-01-01

    with respect to all four DPQ categories: daily activities, work/leisure, anxiety/depression, and social interest. The Oswestry Disability Index supported these results (P ...STUDY DESIGN: Prospective randomized clinical study with a 5- to 9-year follow-up period. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to analyze the long-term outcome with respect to functional disability, pain, and general health of patients treated by means of circumferential lumbar fusion...... in comparison with those treated by means of instrumented posterolateral lumbar fusion. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Circumferential fusion has become a common procedure in lumbar spinal fusion both as a primary and salvage procedure. However, the claimed advantages of circumferential fusion over conventional...

  8. The Effect of Early Initiation of Rehabilitation after Lumbar Spinal Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oestergaard, Lisa G; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Bünger, Cody

    2012-01-01

    examined patients' subsequent rehabilitation. Group-based rehabilitation is both efficient and cost-effective in rehabilitation of lumbar spinal fusion patients.Methods: Patients with degenerative disc diseases undergoing instrumented lumbar spinal fusion were randomly assigned to initiate...... work. Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare the groups in terms of differences from baseline to 6 months and 1-year follow-up.Results: According to the ODI, at 1-year follow-up, the 6w-group had a median reduction of -6(-19;4) compared with -20(-30;-7) in the 12w-group (p...

  9. Single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation in surgical treatment for single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Hao; Wang, Xiyang; Zhang, Penghui; Peng, Wei; Zhang, Yupeng; Liu, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility and efficacy of surgical management of single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis (TB) by using single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation.Methods: Seventeen cases of single-segment lumbar TB were treated with single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reco...

  10. Wound healing without drains in posterior spinal fusion in idiopathic scoliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsiddiky, A.; Nisar, K.A.; Alhuzaimi, F.; Albishi, W.; Alnuaim, B.; Albarrag, M.; Meo, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    To determine the frequency of wound infection and neurological injuries in patients with idiopathic scoliosis who underwent posterior spinal fusion without use of drains. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Orthopaedics, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, from February 2007 to June 2010. Methodology: Patients who underwent similar technique of posterior spinal fusion instrumentation for the correction of scoliosis without use of drain were included. Wound Demographics, wound healing, complications and duration of hospital stay were considered and described as frequency and mean values. Results: The average age at the time of surgery was 12.80 +- 1.30 years, duration of surgery was 3.80 +- 0.86 hours, hospital stay was 3.84 +- 0.78 days and patients were followed-up over the last 30 months. There was no incidence of any neurological complication and deep infection. However, only 2 (4.16%) cases with superficial skin infection were treated with dressing and antibiotics with full recovery. Conclusion: The wound healing is adequate without using drain for patients with idiopathic scoliosis who underwent posterior spinal fusion and instrumentation when good wash, watertight closure technique and appropriate antibiotics coverage is provided. (author)

  11. Rod Migration Into the Spinal Canal After Posterior Instrumented Fusion Causing Late-Onset Neurological Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavese, Federico; Dmitriev, Petru; Deslandes, Jacques; Samba, Antoine; Dimeglio, Alain; Mansour, Mounira; Rousset, Marie; Dubousset, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Rod migration into the spinal canal after posterior instrumented fusion is a rare complication causing late-onset neurological symptoms. The purpose of the present study is to report a case of a 13-year-old boy with spastic cerebral palsy and related neuromuscular kyphoscoliosis who developed late-onset neurological deterioration secondary to progressive implant migration into the spinal canal over a 5-year period. A decision was made to remove both rods to achieve decompression. Intraoperative findings were consistent with information gained from preoperative imaging. The rods were found to have an intracanal trajectory at T9-T10 for the right rod and T12-L2 for the left rod. The cause of implant migration, with progressive laminar erosion slow enough to generate a solid mass behind, was progressive kyphosis in a skeletally immature patient with neuromuscular compromise. Fixation type, early surgery, and spasticity management contributed significantly to the presenting condition. Mechanical factors and timing of surgery played a decisive role in this particular presentation. Level IV--Case report and review of the literature.

  12. Single-stage transforaminal decompression, debridement, interbody fusion, and posterior instrumentation for lumbosacral brucellosis.

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    Abulizi, Yakefu; Liang, Wei-Dong; Muheremu, Aikeremujiang; Maimaiti, Maierdan; Sheng, Wei-Bin

    2017-07-14

    Spinal brucellosis is a less commonly reported infectious spinal pathology. There are few reports regarding the surgical treatment of spinal brucellosis in existing literature. This retrospective study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of single-stage transforaminal decompression, debridement, interbody fusion, and posterior instrumentation for lumbosacral spinal brucellosis. From February 2012 to April 2015, 32 consecutive patients (19 males and 13 females, mean age 53.7 ± 8.7) with lumbosacral brucellosis treated by transforaminal decompression, debridement, interbody fusion, and posterior instrumentation were enrolled. Medical records, imaging studies, laboratory data were collected and summarized. Surgical outcomes were evaluated based on visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scale. The changes in C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), clinical symptoms and complications were investigated. Graft fusion was evaluated using Bridwell grading criteria. The mean follow-up period was 24.9 ± 8.2 months. Back pain and radiating leg pain was relieved significantly in all patients after operation. No implant failures were observed in any patients. Wound infection was observed in two patients and sinus formation was observed in one patient. Solid bony fusion was achieved in 30 patients and the fusion rate was 93.8%. The levels of ESR and CRP were returned to normal by the end of three months' follow-up. VAS and ODI scores were significantly improved (P brucellosis.

  13. Proximal Junctional Kyphosis in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Following Segmental Posterior Spinal Instrumentation and Fusion; Minimum 2 Years Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Khaki Nahad

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background:To evaluate proximal junctional segment changes in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis(AIS the posterior spinal fusion and also instrumentation also and finding of probable risk factors, were all considered in this study.Methods: We retrospectively reviewed radiographs of 121 consecutive patients who underwent posterior spinal fusion for AIS from T3 or below, with a mean follow-   up of 32.8 months(range,24-83. All coronal and sagittal measurements including the proximal junctional kyphosis (PJKangle recorded on standing anteroposterior and lateral radiographs preoperative, early postoperative and on follow-up radiographs.The data were analyzed using the Spss 10.0 software.Dependent(paired samples student t-test was used for analysis between the groups Results: There was PJK angle above normal for the same junctional segment preoperatively in 13 patients (10.7% and the incidence of the PJK postoperatively was   7.4% (9 patients, 7 female and 2 male, all detected until 2 years postoperation.The mean increase in the PJK angle from pre-operation until 6 weeks postoperation was 5.9° (range,0-13°(P=0.02 and until 2 years post operation was 14.3° (range, 2- 16°(p=0.000.The mean proximal junctional angle increased 1.6° until 2 years postoperation in non-PJK group(n=112.Conclusion: The prevalence of Proximal Junctional Kyphosis was low and a silent radiographic problem. In some cases is preventable with perfect pre-operative planning. There is no specific demographic or radiographic variables or instrumentation types associated with developing PJK .

  14. Overpowering posterior lumbar instrumentation and fusion with hyperlordotic anterior lumbar interbody cages followed by posterior revision: a preliminary feasibility study.

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    Kadam, Abhijeet; Wigner, Nathan; Saville, Philip; Arlet, Vincent

    2017-12-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors' aim in this study was to evaluate whether sagittal plane correction can be obtained from the front by overpowering previous posterior instrumentation and/or fusion with hyperlordotic anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) cages in patients undergoing revision surgery for degenerative spinal conditions and/or spinal deformities. METHODS The authors report their experience with the application of hyperlordotic cages at 36 lumbar levels for ALIFs in a series of 20 patients who underwent revision spinal surgery at a single institution. Included patients underwent staged front-back procedures: ALIFs with hyperlordotic cages (12°, 20°, and 30°) followed by removal of posterior instrumentation and reinstrumentation from the back. Patients were divided into the following 2 groups depending on the extent of posterior instrumentation and fusion during the second stage: long constructs (≥ 6 levels with extension into thoracic spine and/or pelvis) and short constructs (lumbar lordosis increased from 44.3° to 59.8° (p lumbar levels that have pseudarthrosis from the previous posterior spinal fusion. Meticulous selection of levels for ALIF is crucial for safely and effectively performing this technique.

  15. Comparison of short-term and long-term outcomes of spinal fusion with and without posterior instrumentation in congenital scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behtash H.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congenital scoliosis is a developmental disorder defined as a lateral curvature of the spine. Its progressive trend and complications, such as cosmetic problems, pain and pulmonary symptoms, have put scoliosis as an important skeletal deformity that should be corrected. One of the currently accepted methods of treatment is posterior spinal fusion (PSF that may be performed with or without instrumentation. However, the use of implants in conjunction with PSF in congenital spine deformity has been debated over the past three decades primarily because of increased risk of neurological deficit and implant displacement. The aim of this study was to compare short-term and long-term outcomes of spinal fusion with and without posterior instrumentation in congenital scoliosis.Methods: In this historical cohort study, 41 patients with congenital scoliosis were recruited. All patients underwent PSF surgery between 1977 and 1996. They were divided into two groups according to the use of instrumentation: 22 congenital scoliotic patients who were treated by PSF without any instrumentation (group A, and 19 instrumented PSF patients (group B. Instrumentation was mostly performed using the Harrington rod. The major curve angle was measured before surgery, two weeks and one year after PSF surgery and at the end of the follow-up period. Results: The mean baseline curve angles were 66.3° and 69.1° in groups A and B, respectively. The mean Cobb angles one year after PSF were 43.1° and 38.4° in groups A and B, respectively. The mean follow-up period was 8 years (SD=3 and, at the end of this period, the final Cobb angles were 47.3° and 39.4° in groups A and B, respectively. Therefore, the final angle correction was 28.7% in patients without instrumentation and 43% in patients with instrumentation. The mean loss of correction was 5.5% and 4.3% in groups A and B, respectively. The final curve angles was significantly more corrected for those patients

  16. Modern spinal instrumentation. Part 1: Normal spinal implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W.; Allouni, A.K.; Mankad, K.; Prezzi, D.; Elias, T.; Rankine, J.; Davagnanam, I.

    2013-01-01

    The general radiologist frequently encounters studies demonstrating spinal instrumentation, either as part of the patient's postoperative evaluation or as incidental to a study performed for another purpose. There are various surgical approaches and devices used in spinal surgery with an increased understanding of spinal and spinal implant biomechanics drives development of modern fixation devices. It is, therefore, important that the radiologist can recognize commonly used devices and identify their potential complications demonstrated on imaging. The aim of part 1 of this review is to familiarize the reader with terms used to describe surgical approaches to the spine, review the function and normal appearances of commonly used instrumentations, and understand the importance of the different fixation techniques. The second part of this review will concentrate on the roles that the different imaging techniques play in assessing the instrumented spine and the recognition of complications that can potentially occur.

  17. Effect of age on the perioperative and radiographic complications of multilevel cervicothoracic spinal fusions.

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    Cloyd, Jordan M; Acosta, Frank L; Ames, Christopher P

    2008-12-15

    Retrospective review. To investigate the effect of age on the perioperative and radiographic complications associated with multilevel (>or=5) fusion of the cervicothoracic spine. Although the elderly comprise a substantial proportion of patients presenting with complex spinal pathology necessitating multilevel procedures across the cervical and cervicothoracic spine, the risk of perioperative and radiographic complications after these procedures is unknown. Between 2000 and 2007, 58 patients 65 years of age or older at a single institution underwent instrumented cervicothoracic spinal fusion of at least 5 levels. Fifty-eight patients under the age of 65 from the same time period served as a control group. A retrospective review of all hospital records, operative reports, radiographs, and clinic notes was conducted. Complications were classified as intraoperative, major and minor postoperative, and need for revision surgery. Flexion-extension radiographs were examined at discharge, 1.5, 6, 12 months, and then yearly, thereafter to evaluate fusion status and instrumentation-related complications. Principal diagnoses included spondylostenosis, malignancy, vertebral fracture, and osteomyelitis. Both groups were similar in number of levels fused (elderly, 6.7 +/- 2.1; control, 6.3 +/- 1.7) and circumferential procedures (27 vs. 28), respectively. There were no significant differences in operative time, blood loss, or length of hospital stay. Rates of intraoperative (5.2% vs. 3.4%), major (20.7% vs. 17.2%) and minor postoperative complications (27.6% vs. 22.4%), and reoperation (8.6% vs. 8.6%) were similar between the 2 groups. Utilization of a combined anterior-posterior fusion was associated with increased perioperative complications in the elderly on univariate but not multivariate analyses. Radiographic evidence of fusion was also comparable between the 2 groups. Perioperative complication rates of multilevel (>or=5) cervicothoracic spinal fusion in the elderly are

  18. Acute vertebral fracture after spinal fusion: a case report illustrating the added value of single-source dual-energy computed tomography to magnetic resonance imaging in a patient with spinal Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, M.; Putzier, M.; Pumberger, M.; Hermann, K.G.; Diekhoff, T.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is degraded by metal-implant-induced artifacts when used for the diagnostic assessment of vertebral compression fractures in patients with instrumented spinal fusion. Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) offers a promising supplementary imaging tool in these patients. This case report describes an 85-year-old woman who presented with a suspected acute vertebral fracture after long posterior lumbar interbody fusion. This is the first report of a vertebral fracture that showed bone marrow edema on DECT; however, edema was missed by an MRI STIR sequence owing to metal artifacts. Bone marrow assessment using DECT is less susceptible to metal artifacts than MRI, resulting in improved visualization of vertebral edema in the vicinity of fused vertebral bodies. (orig.)

  19. Three-dimensional imaging of lumbar spinal fusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chafetz, N.; Hunter, J.C.; Cann, C.E.; Morris, J.M.; Ax, L.; Catterling, K.F.

    1986-01-01

    Using a Cemax 1000 three-dimensional (3D) imaging computer/workstation, the author evaluated 15 patients with lumbar spinal fusions (four with pseudarthrosis). Both axial images with sagittal and coronal reformations and 3D images were obtained. The diagnoses (spinal stenosis and psuedarthrosis) were changed in four patients, confirmed in six patients, and unchanged in five patients with the addition of the 3D images. The ''cut-away'' 3D images proved particularly helpful for evaluation of central and lateral spinal stenosis, whereas the ''external'' 3D images were most useful for evaluation of the integrity of the fusion. Additionally, orthopedic surgeons found 3D images superior for both surgical planning and explaining pathology to patients

  20. Use of vacuum assisted closure in instrumented spinal deformities for children with postoperative deep infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canavese Federico

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative deep infections are relatively common in children with instrumented spinal deformities, whose healing potential is somewhat compromised. Children with underlying diagnosis of cerebral palsy, spina bifida and other chronic debilitating conditions are particularly susceptible. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC is a newer technique to promote healing of wounds resistant to treatment by established methods. This article aims to review the efficacy of the VAC system in the treatment of deep spinal infections following spinal instrumentation and fusion in children and adolescents. Materials and Methods: We reviewed 33 patients with deep postoperative surgical site infection treated with wound VAC technique. We reviewed clinical and laboratory data, including the ability to retain the spinal hardware, loss of correction and recurrent infections. Results : All patients successfully completed their wound VAC treatment regime. None had significant loss of correction and one had persistent infection requiring partial hardware removal. The laboratory indices normalized in all but three patients. Conclusions: Wound VAC technique is a useful tool in the armamentarium of the spinal surgeon dealing with patients susceptible to wound infections, especially those with neuromuscular diseases. It allows for retention of the instrumentation and maintenance of the spinal correction. It is reliable and easy to use.

  1. [Spinal instrumentation, source of progress, but also revealing pitfalls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubousset, Jean

    2003-01-01

    addition the noticed improvements on the biological field for fusion with bone activators like BMP, Hydroxyapatite, or bone substitutes like bio-active ceramics will probably help for fusion and decrease necessity of bone grafting. It is the same about disc regeneration which is on the way. Finally it is evident that the first steps already done for spinal surgery avoiding fusion will extend.--For children and growing spine, the challenge is major, but with memory metal instruments, laser precise destruction of abnormal growing structures as well as posterior flexible instrumentation avoiding stripping of the periosteum and leaving integrity of the disc and facet joints function, improvements are also on the way.--For adult and degenerative spinal deformities and pain, the development of spinal arthroplasty already done for the disc replacement will improve as well as for the posterior joints units where artificial ligaments experience will be replaced by real artificial joints still on experiment. In conclusion, some general biological medical questions are still waiting for answers:--Neurology and erect posture--Growth and degeneration--Malignancy (comprehension and control)--Pain and suffering. And of course what is the fact of the genetics for all of these problems: plenty of work for the future.

  2. Adolescents' perceptions of music therapy following spinal fusion surgery.

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    Kleiber, Charmaine; Adamek, Mary S

    2013-02-01

    To explore adolescents' memories about music therapy after spinal fusion surgery and their recommendations for future patients. Spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is one of the most painful surgeries performed. Music therapy is shown to decrease postoperative pain in children after minor surgery. In preparation for developing a preoperative information program, we interviewed adolescents who had spinal fusion and postoperative music therapy to find out what they remembered and what they recommended for future patients. Eight adolescents who had spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were interviewed about their experiences. For this qualitative study, the investigators independently used thematic analysis techniques to formulate interpretive themes. Together they discussed their ideas and assigned overall meanings to the information. The eight participants were 13-17 years of age and had surgery between 2-24 months previously. The overarching themes identified from the interviews were relaxation and pain perception, choice and control, therapist interaction and preoperative information. Participants stated that music therapy helped with mental relaxation and distraction from pain. It was important to be able to choose the type of music for the therapy and to use self-control to focus on the positive. Their recommendation was that future patients should be provided with information preoperatively about music therapy and pain management. Participants recommended a combination of auditory and visual information, especially the experiences of previous patients who had spinal fusion and music therapy. Music provided live at the bedside by a music therapist was remembered vividly and positively by most of the participants. The presence of a music therapist providing patient-selected music at the bedside is important. Methods to introduce adolescents to music therapy and how to use music for relaxation should be developed and tested. © 2012

  3. Tissue identification with micro-magnetic resonance imaging in a caprine spinal fusion model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uffen, M.; Krijnen, M.; Hoogendoorn, R.; Strijkers, G.; Everts, V.; Wuisman, P.; Smit, T.

    2008-01-01

    Nonunion is a major complication of spinal interbody fusion. Currently X-ray and computed tomography (CT) are used for evaluating the spinal fusion process. However, both imaging modalities have limitations in judgment of the early stages of this fusion process, as they only visualize mineralized

  4. Spinal fusion in patients with congenital heart disease. Predictors of outcome.

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    Coran, D L; Rodgers, W B; Keane, J F; Hall, J E; Emans, J B

    1999-07-01

    The strong association between congenital heart disease and spinal deformity is well established, but data on the risks and outcome of spinal fusion surgery in patients with congenital heart disease are scarce. The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of perioperative risk and outcome in a large series of children and adolescents with congenital heart disease who underwent spinal fusion for scoliosis or kyphosis. In the authors' retrospective analysis of 74 consecutive patients with congenital heart disease undergoing spinal fusion, there were two deaths (2.7%) and 18 significant complications (24.3%) in the perioperative period. Preoperative cyanosis (arterial oxygen saturation < 90% at rest) with uncorrected or incompletely corrected congenital heart disease was associated with both deaths. Complications occurred in nine of 18 (50%) patients with cyanosis and in 11 of 56 (20%) patients without cyanosis. As judged by multivariate analysis the best predictors of perioperative outcome were the overall physical status of the patient as represented by the American Society of Anesthesiologists' preoperative score and a higher rate of intraoperative blood loss. Seventeen of 43 patients (40%) with an American Society of Anesthesiologists score of 3 or higher experienced complications including two perioperative deaths. Successful spinal fusion and correction were achieved in 97% of patients. Children and adolescents with congenital heart disease can undergo elective spinal fusion with risks that relate to overall cardiac status. Careful assessment of preoperative status by pediatric cardiologists and cardiac anesthesiologists familiar with surgical treatment of patients with congenital heart disease will assist the orthopaedic surgeon in providing the most realistic estimate of risk.

  5. Transforaminal Percutaneous Endoscopic Discectomy and Foraminoplasty after Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery.

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    Wu, Jian-Jun; Chen, Hui-Zhen; Zheng, Changkun

    2017-07-01

    The most common causes of pain following lumbar spinal fusions are residual herniation, or foraminal fibrosis and foraminal stenosis that is ignored, untreated, or undertreated. The original surgeon may advise his patient that nothing more can be done in his opinion that the nerve was visually decompressed by the original surgery. Post-operative imaging or electrophysiological assessment may be inadequate to explain all the reasons for residual or recurrent symptoms. Treatment of failed lumbar spinal fusions by repeat traditional open revision surgery usually incorporates more extensive decompression causing increased instability and back pain. The authors, having limited their practice to endoscopic surgery over the last 10 years, report on their experience gained during that period to relieve pain by transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic revision of lumbar spinal fusions. To assess the effectiveness of transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic discectomy and foraminoplasty in patients with pain after lumbar spinal fusion. Retrospective study. Inpatient surgery center. Sixteen consecutive patients with pain after lumbar spinal fusions presenting with back and leg pain that had supporting imaging diagnosis of foraminal stenosis and/or residual/recurrent disc herniation, or whose pain complaint was supported by relief from diagnostic and therapeutic injections, were offered percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy and foraminoplasty over a repeat open procedure. Each patient sought consultation following a transient successful, partially successful or unsuccessful open lumbar spinal fusions treatment for disc herniation or spinal stenosis. Endoscopic foraminoplasty was also performed to either decompress the bony foramen in the case of foraminal stenosis, or to allow for endoscopic visual examination of the affected traversing and exiting nerve roots in the axilla. The average follow-up time was 30.3 months, minimum 12 months. Outcome data at each visit

  6. Differences in 3D vs. 2D analysis in lumbar spinal fusion simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hung-Wei; Bashkuev, Maxim; Pumberger, Matthias; Schmidt, Hendrik

    2018-04-27

    Lumbar interbody fusion is currently the gold standard in treating patients with disc degeneration or segmental instability. Despite it having been used for several decades, the non-union rate remains high. A failed fusion is frequently attributed to an inadequate mechanical environment after instrumentation. Finite element (FE) models can provide insights into the mechanics of the fusion process. Previous fusion simulations using FE models showed that the geometries and material of the cage can greatly influence the fusion outcome. However, these studies used axisymmetric models which lacked realistic spinal geometries. Therefore, different modeling approaches were evaluated to understand the bone-formation process. Three FE models of the lumbar motion segment (L4-L5) were developed: 2D, Sym-3D and Nonsym-3D. The fusion process based on existing mechano-regulation algorithms using the FE simulations to evaluate the mechanical environment was then integrated into these models. In addition, the influence of different lordotic angles (5, 10 and 15°) was investigated. The volume of newly formed bone, the axial stiffness of the whole segment and bone distribution inside and surrounding the cage were evaluated. In contrast to the Nonsym-3D, the 2D and Sym-3D models predicted excessive bone formation prior to bridging (peak values with 36 and 9% higher than in equilibrium, respectively). The 3D models predicted a more uniform bone distribution compared to the 2D model. The current results demonstrate the crucial role of the realistic 3D geometry of the lumbar motion segment in predicting bone formation after lumbar spinal fusion. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Posterior-only spinal fusion without rib head resection for treating type I neurofibromatosis with intra-canal rib head dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Sun

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Patients with Type I neurofibromatosis scoliosis with intra-canal rib head protrusion are extremely rare. Current knowledge regarding the diagnosis and treatment for this situation are insufficient. The purpose of this study is to share our experience in the diagnosis and surgical treatments for such unique deformities. METHODS: Six patients with Type I neurofibromatosis scoliosis with rib head dislocation into the spinal canal were diagnosed at our institution. Posterior instrumentation and spinal fusion without intra-canal rib head resection via a posterior-only approach was performed for deformity correction and rib head extraction. The efficacy and outcomes of the surgery were evaluated by measurements before, immediately and 24 months after the surgery using the following parameters: coronal spinal Cobb angle, apex rotation and kyphosis of the spine and the intra-canal rib head position. Post-operative complications, surgery time and blood loss were also evaluated. RESULTS: Patients were followed up for at least 24 months post-operatively. The three dimensional spinal deformity was significantly improved and the intra-canal rib head was significantly extracted from the canal immediately after the surgery. At follow-up 24 months after surgery, solid fusions were achieved along the fusion segments, and the deformity corrections and rib head positions were well maintained. There were no surgery-related complications any time after the surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Systematic examinations are needed to identify patients with Type I neurofibromatosis scoliosis with rib head dislocation into the canal who can be treated by posterior-only spinal fusion without rib head resection.

  8. Role of allografts in spinal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz Nather

    1999-01-01

    With development of more tissue banks in the region and internationally, allografts are increasingly being used in orthopaedic surgery including spinal surgery. Two groups of patients will particularly benefit from the use of allografts. The first group is young children in whom iliac crest is cartilaginous and cannot provide sufficient quantity of autografts. The second is the elderly where bones from iliac crest are porotic and fatty. Allografts are used to fulfill two distinct functions in Spinal Surgery. One is to act as a buttress for anterior spinal surgery using cortical allografts. The other is to enhance fusion for posterior spinal surgery. Up to December 1997, 71 transplantations have been performed using allografts from NUH Tissue Bank. Anterior Spinal Surgery has been performed in 15 cases. The indications are mainly Trauma-Burst Fractures and Spinal Secondaries to the Spine. All cases are in thoracic and thoracolumbar region. Allografts used are deep frozen and freeze-dried cortical allografts. Femur is used for thoraco-lumbar region and humerus for upper thoracic region. Instrumentation used ranged from anterior devices (Canada, DCP, Synergy etc) to posterior devices (ISOLA). Deep frozen allografts and more recently freeze-dried allografts are preferred especially for osteoporotic spines. Cortical allografts are packed with autografts from ribs in the medullary canal. Allograft-autograft composites are always used to ensure better incorporation. Postero-lateral fusion has been performed for 56 cases. The indications include congenital and idiopathic scoliosis, degenerative stenosis, degenerative spondylolisthesis, spondylolytic spondylolisthesis, fracture-dislocation, osteoporotic burst fracture, spinal secondaries with cord compression and traumatic spondylolisthesis. Deep frozen bone allografts are used in combination with patient's own autografts from spinous processes to provide a 50% mix. Instrumentation used include Hartshill, Steffee, Isola

  9. Long-term health care utilisation and costs after spinal fusion in elderly patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas; Bünger, Cody; Søgaard, Rikke

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Spinal fusion surgery rates in the elderly are increasing. Cost effectiveness analyses with relatively short-length follow-up have been performed. But the long-term effects in terms of health care use are largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to describe the long......-term consequences of spinal fusion surgery in elderly patients on health care use and costs using a health care system perspective. METHODS: 194 patients undergoing spinal fusion between 2001 and 2005 (70 men, 124 women) with a mean age of 70 years (range 59-88) at surgery were included. Average length of follow......-up was 6.2 years (range 0.3-9.0 years). Data on resource utilisation and costs were obtained from national registers providing complete coverage of all reimbursed contacts with primary- and secondary health care providers. Data were available from 3 years prior fusion surgery until the end of 2009. RESULTS...

  10. Multiple-hook fixation in revision spinal deformity surgery for patients with a previous multilevel fusion mass: technical note and preliminary outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Wood, Kirkham B

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE A previous multilevel fusion mass encountered during revision spinal deformity surgery may obscure anatomical landmarks, making instrumentation unworkable or incurring substantial blood loss and operative time. This study introduced a surgical technique of multiple-hook fixation for fixating previous multilevel fusion masses in revision spinal deformity surgeries and then evaluated its outcomes. METHODS Patients with a previous multilevel fusion mass who underwent revision corrective surgery down to the lumbosacral junction were retrospectively studied. Multiple hooks were used to fixate the fusion mass and linked to distal pedicle screws in the lumbosacral-pelvic complex. Radiological and clinical outcomes were evaluated. RESULTS The charts of 8 consecutive patients with spinal deformity were retrospectively reviewed (7 women, 1 man; mean age 56 years). The primary diagnoses included flat-back deformity (6 cases), thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis (1 case), and lumbar spondylosis secondary to a previous scoliosis fusion (1 case). The mean follow-up duration was 30.1 months. Operations were performed at T3/4-ilium (4 cases), T7-ilium (1 case), T6-S1 (1 case), T12-S1 (1 case), and T9-L5 (1 case). Of 8 patients, 7 had sagittal imbalance preoperatively, and their mean C-7 plumb line improved from 10.8 ± 2.9 cm preoperatively to 5.3 ± 3.6 cm at final follow-up (p = 0.003). The mean lumbar lordosis of these patients at final follow-up was significantly greater than that preoperatively (35.2° ± 12.6° vs 16.8° ± 11.8°, respectively; p = 0.005). Two perioperative complications included osteotomy-related leg weakness in 1 patient and a stitch abscess in another. CONCLUSIONS The multiple-hook technique provides a viable alternative option for fixating a previous multilevel fusion mass in revision spinal deformity surgery.

  11. Predicting operative blood loss during spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ialenti, Marc N; Lonner, Baron S; Verma, Kushagra; Dean, Laura; Valdevit, Antonio; Errico, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    Patient and surgical factors are known to influence operative blood loss in spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), but have only been loosely identified. To date, there are no established recommendations to guide decisions to predonate autologous blood, and the current practice is based primarily on surgeon preference. This study is designed to determine which patient and surgical factors are correlated with, and predictive of, blood loss during spinal fusion for AIS. Retrospective analysis of 340 (81 males, 259 females; mean age, 15.2 y) consecutive AIS patients treated by a single surgeon from 2000 to 2008. Demographic (sex, age, height, weight, and associated comorbidities), laboratory (hematocrit, platelet, PT/PTT/INR), standard radiographic, and perioperative data including complications were analyzed with a linear stepwise regression to develop a predictive model of blood loss. Estimated blood loss was 907±775 mL for posterior spinal fusion (PSF, n=188), 323±171 mL for anterior spinal fusion (ASF, n=124), and 1277±821 mL for combined procedures (n=28). For patients undergoing PSF, stepwise analysis identified sex, preoperative kyphosis, and operative time to be the most important predictors of increased blood loss (Ploss in PSF: blood loss (mL)=C+Op-time (min)×(6.4)-pre-op T2-T12 kyphosis (degrees)×(8.7), C=233 if male and -270 if female. We find sex, operative time, and preoperative kyphosis to be the most important predictors of increased blood loss in PSF for AIS. Mean arterial pressure and operative time were predictive of estimated blood loss in ASF. For posterior fusions, we also present a model that estimates blood loss preoperatively and can be used to guide decisions regarding predonation of blood and the use of antifibrinolytic agents. Retrospective study: Level II.

  12. Fusion of SPECT/TC images: Usefulness and benefits in degenerative spinal cord pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocampo, Monica; Ucros, Gonzalo; Bermudez, Sonia; Morillo, Anibal; Rodriguez, Andres

    2005-01-01

    The objectives are to compare CT and SPECT bone scintigraphy evaluated independently with SPECT-CT fusion images in patients with known degenerative spinal pathology. To demonstrate the clinical usefulness of CT and SPECT fusion images. Materials and methods: Thirty-one patients with suspected degenerative spinal disease were evaluated with thin-slice, non-angled helical CT and bone scintigrams with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), both with multiplanar reconstructions within a 24-hour period After independent evaluation by a nuclear medicine specialist and a radiologist, multimodality image fusion software was used to merge the CT and SPECT studies and a final consensus interpretation of the combined images was obtained. Results: Thirty-two SPECT bone scintigraphy images, helical CT studies and SPECT-CT fusion images were obtained for 31 patients with degenerative spinal disease. The results of the bone scintigraphy and CT scans were in agreement in 17 pairs of studies (53.12%). In these studies image fusion did not provide additional information on the location or extension of the lesions. In 11 of the study pairs (34.2%), the information obtained was not in agreement between scintigraphy and CT studies: CT images demonstrated several abnormalities, whereas the SPECT images showed only one dominant lesion, or the SPECT images did not provide enough information for anatomical localization. In these cases image fusion helped establish the precise localization of the most clinically significant lesion, which matched the lesion with the greatest uptake. In 4 studies (12.5%) the CT and SPECT images were not in agreement: CT and SPECT images showed different information (normal scintigraphy, abnormal CT), thus leading to inconclusive fusion images. Conclusion: The use of CT-SPECT fusion images in degenerative spinal disease allows for the integration of anatomic detail with physiologic and functional information. CT-SPECT fusion improves the

  13. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with cages and local bone graft in the treatment of spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouillier, Hans; Birkenmaier, Christof; Rauch, Alexander; Weiler, Christoph; Kauschke, Thomas; Refior, Hans Jürgen

    2006-08-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) implants are increasingly being used for 360 degrees fusion after decompression of lumbar spinal stenosis combined with degenerative instability. Both titanium and PEEK (PolyEtherEtherKetone) implants are commonly used. Assessing the clinical and radiological results as well as typical complications, such as migration of the cages, is important. In addition, questions such as which radiological parameters can be used to assess successful fusion, and whether the exclusive use of local bone graft is sufficient, are frequently debated. We prospectively evaluated 30 patients after PLIF instrumentation for degenerative lumbar spinal canal stenosis, over a course of 42 months. In all cases, titanium cages and local bone graft were used for spondylodesis. The follow-up protocol of these 30 cases included standardised clinical and radiological evaluation at 3, 6, 12 and 42 months after surgery. Overall satisfactory results were achieved. With one exception, a stable result was achieved with restoration of the intervertebral space in the anterior column. After 42 months of follow-up in most cases, a radiologically visible loss of disc space height can be demonstrated. Clinically relevant migration of the cage in the dorsal direction was detected in one case. Based on our experience, posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) can be recommended for the treatment of monosegmental and bisegmental spinal stenosis, with or without segmental instability. Postoperative evaluation is mainly based on clinical parameters since the titanium implant affects the diagnostic value of imaging studies and is responsible for artefacts. The results observed in our group of patients suggest that local autologous bone graft procured from the posterior elements after decompression is an adequate material for bone grafting in this procedure.

  14. rhBMP-2 for posterolateral instrumented lumbar fusion: a multicenter prospective randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlbert, R John; Alexander, David; Bailey, Stewart; Mahood, James; Abraham, Ed; McBroom, Robert; Jodoin, Alain; Fisher, Charles

    2013-12-01

    Multicenter randomized controlled trial. To evaluate the effect of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP-2) on radiographical fusion rate and clinical outcome for surgical lumbar arthrodesis compared with iliac crest autograft. In many types of spinal surgery, radiographical fusion is a primary outcome equally important to clinical improvement, ensuring long-term stability and axial support. Biologic induction of bone growth has become a commonly used adjunct in obtaining this objective. We undertook this study to objectify the efficacy of rhBMP-2 compared with traditional iliac crest autograft in instrumented posterolateral lumbar fusion. Patients undergoing 1- or 2-level instrumented posterolateral lumbar fusion were randomized to receive either autograft or rhBMP-2 for their fusion construct. Clinical and radiographical outcome measures were followed for 2 to 4 years postoperatively. One hundred ninety seven patients were successfully randomized among the 8 participating institutions. Adverse events attributable to the study drug were not significantly different compared with controls. However, the control group experienced significantly more graft-site complications as might be expected. 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, Oswestry Disability Index, and leg/back pain scores were comparable between the 2 groups. After 4 years of follow-up, radiographical fusion rates remained significantly higher in patients treated with rhBMP-2 (94%) than those who received autograft (69%) (P = 0.007). The use of rhBMP-2 for instrumented posterolateral lumbar surgery significantly improves the chances of radiographical fusion compared with the use of autograft. However, there is no associated improvement in clinical outcome within a 4-year follow-up period. These results suggest that use of rhBMP-2 should be considered in cases where lumbar arthrodesis is of primary concern.

  15. Fusion instrumentation and control: a development strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, P.Y.; Greninger, R.C.; Longhurst, G.R.; Madden, P.

    1981-01-01

    We have examined requirements for a fusion instrumentation and control development program to determine where emphasis is needed. The complex, fast, and closely coupled system dynamics of fusion reactors reveal a need for a rigorous approach to the development of instrumentation and control systems. A framework for such a development program should concentrate on three principal need areas: the operator-machine interface, the data and control system architecture, and fusion compatible instruments and sensors. System dynamics characterization of the whole fusion reactor system is also needed to facilitate the implementation process in each of these areas. Finally, the future need to make the instrumentation and control system compatible with the requirements of a commercial plant is met by applying transition technology. These needs form the basis for the program tasks suggested

  16. A Systematic Review of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Spinal Cord Injury, Intervertebral Disc Repair and Spinal Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shujhat; Mafi, Pouya; Mafi, Reza; Khan, Wasim

    2018-01-01

    Spinal surgery presents a challenge for both neurosurgery and orthopaedic surgery. Due to the heterogeneous differentiation potential of mesenchymal stem cells, there is much interest in the treatment of spine surgery. Animal and human trials focussing on the efficacy of mesenchymal stem cells in spinal cord injury, spine fusion and disc degeneration were included in this systematic review. Published articles up to January 2016 from MEDLINE, PubMed and Ovid were used by searching for specific terms. Of the 2595 articles found, 53 met the selection criteria and were included for analysis (16 on spinal cord injury, 28 on intervertebral disc repair and 9 on spinal fusion). Numerous studies reported better results when the mesenchymal stem cells were used in co-culture with other cells or used in scaffolds. Mesenchymal stem cells were also found to have an immune-modulatory role, which can improve surgical outcome. This systematic review suggests that mesenchymal stem cells can be used safely and effectively for these spinal surgery treatments. Whilst, in certain studies, mesenchymal stem cells did not necessarily show improved results from existing treatments, they provide an alternative option. This can reduce morbidity that arises from current surgical treatment. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Lumbar spinal fusion patients' demands to the primary health sector: evaluation of three rehabilitation protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soegaard, Rikke; Christensen, Finn B; Lauerberg, Ida

    2006-01-01

    Very few studies have investigated the effects or costs of rehabilitation regimens following lumbar spinal fusion. The effectiveness of in-hospital rehabilitation regimens has substantial impact on patients' demands in the primary health care sector. The aim of this study was to investigate patie...... service utilization in the primary health care sector as compared to the usual regimen and a training exercise regimen. The results stress the importance of a cognitive element of coping in a rehabilitation program.......Very few studies have investigated the effects or costs of rehabilitation regimens following lumbar spinal fusion. The effectiveness of in-hospital rehabilitation regimens has substantial impact on patients' demands in the primary health care sector. The aim of this study was to investigate patient......-articulated demands to the primary health care sector following lumbar spinal fusion and three different in-hospital rehabilitation regimens in a prospective, randomized study with a 2-year follow-up. Ninety patients were randomized 3 months post lumbar spinal fusion to either a 'video' group (one-time oral...

  18. Refractory hypotension due to intraoperative hypothermia during spinal instrumentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponniah Vanamoorthy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of inadvertent hypothermia leading to severe hypotension resistant to high dose vasopressors, which responded to temperature correction in a patient undergoing spinal instrumentation surgery. A 60-year-old female developed severe hypotension during spinal instrumentation surgery. After review of all factors it was found to be secondary to hypothermia. The patient did not respond to high dose vasopressors. However, when normothermia was restored she recovered uneventfully. Patients undergoing lengthy spinal procedures in prone position are vulnerable to develop hypothermia and consequent cardiovascular depression so adequate measures should be taken to prevent hypothermia.

  19. Potential risks of using cement-augmented screws for spinal fusion in patients with low bone quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Fernández, M; López-Herradón, A; Piñera, A R; Tomé-Bermejo, F; Duart, J M; Vlad, M D; Rodríguez-Arguisjuela, M G; Alvarez-Galovich, L

    2017-08-01

    Dramatic increases in the average life expectancy have led to increases in the variety of degenerative changes and deformities observed in the aging spine. The elderly population can present challenges for spine surgeons, not only because of increased comorbidities, but also because of the quality of their bones. Pedicle screws are the implants used most commonly in spinal surgery for fixation, but their efficacy depends directly on bone quality. Although polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-augmented screws represent an alternative for patients with osteoporotic vertebrae, their use has raised some concerns because of the possible association between cement leakages (CLs) and other morbidities. To analyze potential complications related to the use of cement-augmented screws for spinal fusion and to investigate the effectiveness of using these screws in the treatment of patients with low bone quality. A retrospective single-center study. This study included 313 consecutive patients who underwent spinal fusion using a total of 1,780 cement-augmented screws. We analyzed potential complications related to the use of cement-augmented screws, including CL, vascular injury, infection, screw extraction problems, revision surgery, and instrument failure. There are no financial conflicts of interest to report. A total of 1,043 vertebrae were instrumented. Cement leakage was observed in 650 vertebrae (62.3%). There were no major clinical complications related to CL, but two patients (0.6%) had radicular pain related to CL at the S1 foramina. Of the 13 patients (4.1%) who developed deep infections requiring surgical debridement, two with chronic infections had possible spondylitis that required instrument removal. All patients responded well to antibiotic therapy. Revision surgery was performed in 56 patients (17.9%), most of whom had long construction. A total of 180 screws were removed as a result of revision. There were no problems with screw extraction. These results

  20. Bone SPECT/CT in the postoperative spine: a focus on spinal fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Riyami, Khulood; Bomanji, Jamshed [University College London Hospitals, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Gnanasegaran, Gopinath [Royal Free Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Wyngaert, Tim van den [Antwerp University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Edegem (Belgium); University of Antwerp, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Wilrijk (Belgium)

    2017-11-15

    Low back pain is a global problem affecting one in 10 people. The management of low back pain varies from conservative to more invasive methods with a spectacular increase in the number of patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery during the last decade. Conventional radiological and radionuclide studies are often used in the assessment of persistent or recurring pain after spinal surgery with several advantages and limitations related to each technique. This article reviews the key contribution of integrated bone SPECT/CT in evaluating patients with persistent or recurring pain after spinal surgery, focusing on spinal fusion. Current literature supports the use of bone SPECT/CT as an adjunct imaging modality and problem-solving tool in evaluating patients with suspicion of pseudarthrosis, adjacent segment degeneration, and hardware failure. The role of bone SPECT/CT in post-operative orthopaedic scenarios is evolving, and this review highlights the need for further research on the role of bone SPECT/CT in these patients. (orig.)

  1. Local effect of zoledronic acid on new bone formation in posterolateral spinal fusion with demineralized bone matrix in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolak, Pawel; Farei-Campagna, Jan; Jentzsch, Thorsten; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Werner, Clément M

    2018-01-01

    Posterolateral spinal fusion is a common orthopaedic surgery performed to treat degenerative and traumatic deformities of the spinal column. In posteriolateral spinal fusion, different osteoinductive demineralized bone matrix products have been previously investigated. We evaluated the effect of locally applied zoledronic acid in combination with commercially available demineralized bone matrix putty on new bone formation in posterolateral spinal fusion in a murine in vivo model. A posterolateral sacral spine fusion in murine model was used to evaluate the new bone formation. We used the sacral spine fusion model to model the clinical situation in which a bone graft or demineralized bone matrix is applied after dorsal instrumentation of the spine. In our study, group 1 received decortications only (n = 10), group 2 received decortication, and absorbable collagen sponge carrier, group 3 received decortication and absorbable collagen sponge carrier with zoledronic acid in dose 10 µg, group 4 received demineralized bone matrix putty (DBM putty) plus decortication (n = 10), and group 5 received DBM putty, decortication and locally applied zoledronic acid in dose 10 µg. Imaging was performed using MicroCT for new bone formation assessment. Also, murine spines were harvested for histopathological analysis 10 weeks after surgery. The surgery performed through midline posterior approach was reproducible. In group with decortication alone there was no new bone formation. Application of demineralized bone matrix putty alone produced new bone formation which bridged the S1-S4 laminae. Local application of zoledronic acid to demineralized bone matrix putty resulted in significant increase of new bone formation as compared to demineralized bone matrix putty group alone. A single local application of zoledronic acid with DBM putty during posterolateral fusion in sacral murine spine model increased significantly new bone formation in situ in our model. Therefore, our

  2. Development of an instrumented spinal cord surrogate using optical fibers: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchinello, Yann; Wagnac, Éric; Ung, Bora; Petit, Yvan; Pradhan, Prabin; Peyrache, Louis-Marie; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc

    2017-10-01

    In vitro replication of traumatic spinal cord injury is necessary to understand its biomechanics and to improve animal models. During a traumatic spinal cord injury, the spinal cord withstands an impaction at high velocity. In order to fully assess the impaction, the use of spinal canal occlusion sensor is necessary. A physical spinal cord surrogate is also often used to simulate the presence of the spinal cord and its surrounding structures. In this study, an instrumented physical spinal cord surrogate is presented and validated. The sensing is based on light transmission loss observed in embedded bare optical fibers subjected to bending. The instrumented surrogate exhibits similar mechanical properties under static compression compared to fresh porcine spinal cords. The instrumented surrogate has a compression sensing threshold of 40% that matches the smallest compression values leading to neurological injuries. The signal obtained from the sensor allows calculating the compression of the spinal cord surrogate with a maximum of 5% deviation. Excellent repeatability was also observed under repetitive loading. The proposed instrumented spinal cord surrogate is promising with satisfying mechanical properties and good sensing capability. It is the first attempt at proposing a method to assess the internal loads sustained by the spinal cord during a traumatic injury. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Preparing Platelet-Rich Plasma with Whole Blood Harvested Intraoperatively During Spinal Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Bin; Zhang, Zheng; Zhou, Ning-Feng; Huang, Yu-Feng; Bao, Yu-Jie; Wu, De-Sheng; Zhang, Ya-Dong

    2017-07-22

    BACKGROUND Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has gained growing popularity in use in spinal fusion procedures in the last decade. Substantial intraoperative blood loss is frequently accompanied with spinal fusion, and it is unknown whether blood harvested intraoperatively qualifies for PRP preparation. MATERIAL AND METHODS Whole blood was harvested intraoperatively and venous blood was collected by venipuncture. Then, we investigated the platelet concentrations in whole blood and PRP, the concentration of growth factors in PRP, and the effects of PRP on the proliferation and viability of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HBMSCs). RESULTS Our results revealed that intraoperatively harvested whole blood and whole blood collected by venipuncture were similar in platelet concentration. In addition, PRP formulations prepared from both kinds of whole blood were similar in concentration of platelet and growth factors. Additional analysis showed that the similar concentrations of growth factors resulted from the similar platelet concentrations of whole blood and PRP between the two groups. Moreover, these two kinds of PRP formulations had similar effects on promoting cell proliferation and enhancing cell viability. CONCLUSIONS Therefore, intraoperatively harvested whole blood may be a potential option for preparing PRP spinal fusion.

  4. Efficacy of different bone volume expanders for augmenting lumbar fusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Nancy E

    2008-01-01

    A wide variety of bone volume expanders are being used in performing posterolateral lumbar noninstrumented and instrumented lumbar fusions. This article presents a review of their efficacy based on fusion rates, complications, and outcomes. Lumbar noninstrumented and instrumented fusions frequently use laminar autografts and different bone graft expanders. This review presents the utility of multiple forms/ratios of DBMs containing allografts. It also discusses the efficacy of artificial bone graft substitutes, including HA and B-TCP. Dynamic x-ray and/or CT examinations were used to document fusion in most series. Outcomes were variously assessed using Odom's criteria or different outcome questionnaires (Oswestry Questionnaire, SF-36, Dallas Pain Questionnaire, and/or Low Back Pain Rating Scale). Performing noninstrumented and instrumented lumbar posterolateral fusions resulted in comparable fusion rates in many series. Similar outcomes were also documented based on Odom's criteria or the multiple patient-based questionnaires. However, in some studies, the addition of spinal instrumentation increased the reoperation rate, operative time, blood loss, and cost. Various forms of DBMs, applied in different ratios to autografts, effectively supplemented spinal fusions in animal models and patient series. beta-Tricalcium phosphate, which is used to augment autograft fusions addressing idiopathic scoliosis or lumbar disease, also proved to be effective. Different types of bone volume expanders, including various forms of allograft-based DBMs, and artificial bone graft substitutes (HA and B-TCP) effectively promote posterolateral lumbar noninstrumented and instrumented fusions when added to autografts.

  5. Spinal fusion limits upper body range of motion during gait without inducing compensatory mechanisms in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holewijn, R M; Kingma, I; de Kleuver, M; Schimmel, J J P; Keijsers, N L W

    2017-09-01

    Previous studies show a limited alteration of gait at normal walking speed after spinal fusion surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), despite the presumed essential role of spinal mobility during gait. This study analyses how spinal fusion affects gait at more challenging walking speeds. More specifically, we investigated whether thoracic-pelvic rotations are reduced to a larger extent at higher gait speeds and whether compensatory mechanisms above and below the stiffened spine are present. 18 AIS patients underwent gait analysis at increasing walking speeds (0.45 to 2.22m/s) before and after spinal fusion. The range of motion (ROM) of the upper (thorax, thoracic-pelvic and pelvis) and lower body (hip, knee and ankle) was determined in all three planes. Spatiotemporal parameters of interest were stride length and cadence. Spinal fusion diminished transverse plane thoracic-pelvic ROM and this difference was more explicit at higher walking speeds. Transversal pelvis ROM was also decreased but this effect was not affected by speed. Lower body ROM, step length and cadence remained unaffected. Despite the reduction of upper body ROM after spine surgery during high speed gait, no altered spatiotemporal parameters or increased compensatory ROM above or below the fusion (i.e. in the shoulder girdle or lower extremities) was identified. Thus, it remains unclear how patients can cope so well with such major surgery. Future studies should focus on analyzing the kinematics of individual spinal levels above and below the fusion during gait to investigate possible compensatory mechanisms within the spine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. INFLUENCE OF THE SAGITTAL BALANCE ON THE CLINICAL OUTCOME IN SPINAL FUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Almeida Campos Coutinho

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Evaluates which radiographic parameters of the sagittal and spinopelvic balance influence the clinical and functional outcomes of a sample of patients undergoing spinal fusion. Methods: We studied 32 patients who underwent spinal fusion. Radiographs of the total spine were obtained from all patients. The clinical and functional parameters studied were analysis of pain by visual analogic scale (VAS and Oswestry and SRS-30 questionnaires. We analyzed the correlation between the clinical and functional parameters and radiographic parameters of the sagittal and spinopelvic balance. Results: There was no significant correlation between parameters pelvic incidence (PI, pelvic tilt (PT, lumbar lordosis (LL and difference between PI and LL (PI-LL and clinical parameters (p > 0.05 and r <0.2. Significant correlation were identified only between Sagittal Vertical Axis (SVA and Satisfaction with Treatment domain of SRS-30 (r = 0.402 e p = 0.023 and between thoracic kyphosis (TK and the total SRS-30 (r = 0.419 and p = 0.017. Conclusions: According to the study results, it was not possible to precisely characterize the role of the parameters of the sagittal and spinopelvic balance in the post-operative analysis of the clinical outcome of spinal fusion. There was a significant correlation only between SVA and the Satisfaction with Treatment domain of SRS-30 and between TK and total SRS-30.

  7. Temporary occipital fixation in young children with severe cervical-thoracic spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Brian J; Minkara, Anas A; Angevine, Peter D; Vitale, Michael G; Lenke, Lawrence G; Anderson, Richard C E

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE The long-term effects of instrumentation and fusion of the occipital-cervical-thoracic spine on spinal growth in young children are poorly understood. To mitigate the effects of this surgery on the growing pediatric spine, the authors report a novel technique used in 4 children with severe cervical-thoracic instability. These patients underwent instrumentation from the occiput to the upper thoracic region for stabilization, but without bone graft at the craniovertebral junction (CVJ). Subsequent surgery was then performed to remove the occipital instrumentation, thereby allowing further growth and increased motion across the CVJ. METHODS Three very young children (15, 30, and 30 months old) underwent occipital to thoracic posterior segmental instrumentation due to cervical or upper thoracic dislocation, progressive kyphosis, and myelopathy. The fourth child (10 years old) underwent similar instrumentation for progressive cervical-thoracic scoliosis. Bone graft was placed at and distal to C-2 only. After follow-up CT scans demonstrated posterior arthrodesis without unintended fusion from the occiput to C-2, 3 patients underwent removal of the occipital instrumentation. RESULTS Follow-up cervical spine flexion/extension radiographs demonstrated partial restoration of motion at the CVJ. One patient has not had the occipital instrumentation removed yet, because only 4 months have elapsed since her operation. CONCLUSIONS Temporary fixation to the occiput provides increased biomechanical stability for spinal stabilization in young children, without permanently eliminating motion and growth at the CVJ. This technique can be considered in children who require longer instrumentation constructs for temporary stabilization, but who only need fusion in more limited areas where spinal instability exists.

  8. Modern spinal instrumentation. Part 2: Multimodality imaging approach for assessment of complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allouni, A.K.; Davis, W.; Mankad, K.; Rankine, J.; Davagnanam, I.

    2013-01-01

    Radiologists frequently encounter studies demonstrating spinal instrumentation, either as part of the patient's postoperative evaluation, or as incidental to a study performed for another purpose. It is important for the reporting radiologist to identify potential complications of commonly used spinal implants. Part 1 of this review examined both the surgical approaches used and the normal appearances of these spinal implants and bone grafting techniques. This second part of the review will focus on the multimodal imaging strategy adopted in the assessment of the instrumented spine and the demonstration of imaging findings of common postoperative complications.

  9. Pain prevalence and trajectories following pediatric spinal fusion surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Sieberg, Christine B.; Simons, Laura E.; Edelstein, Mark R.; DeAngelis, Maria R.; Pielech, Melissa; Sethna, Navil; Hresko, M. Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Factors contributing to pain following surgery are poorly understood with previous research largely focused on adults. With approximately 6 million children undergoing surgery each year8, there is a need to study pediatric persistent postsurgical pain. The present study includes patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis undergoing spinal fusion surgery enrolled in a prospective, multi-centered registry examining post-surgical outcomes. The Scoliosis Research Society Questionnaire- Version...

  10. Stem cells regenerative properties on new rat spinal fusion model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klíma, K.; Vaněček, Václav; Kohout, A.; Jiroušek, Ondřej; Foltán, R.; Štulík, J.; Machoň, V.; Pavlíková, G.; Jendelová, Pavla; Syková, Eva; Šedý, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 1 (2015), s. 119-128 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT13477; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/10/0320 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:68378297 ; RVO:68378041 Keywords : mesenchymal stem cells * bone graft substitute * spinal fusion Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.643, year: 2015

  11. The Outcomes of Anterior Spinal Fusion for Cervical Compressive Myelopathy—A Retrospective Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsz-King Suen

    2011-12-01

    Conclusion: Anterior cervical decompression with bone fusion is a viable surgical option for patients with one level of anterior cervical cord compression, especially for patients with kyphosis or straight canal spine. For patients with two- to three-level involvement, anterior cervical decompression with bone fusion provides good functional result in proper selection of cases. We also identified some prognostic factors (male sex, symptoms less than 1 year, and age less than 70 years in predicting a favourable outcome of anterior spinal fusion for CCM.

  12. Engineering spinal fusion: evaluating ceramic materials for cell based tissue engineered approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, C.E.

    2011-01-01

    The principal aim of this thesis was to advance the development of tissue engineered posterolateral spinal fusion by investigating the potential of calcium phosphate ceramic materials to support cell based tissue engineered bone formation. This was accomplished by developing several novel model

  13. Osteoporosis and the Management of Spinal Degenerative Disease (II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomé-Bermejo, Félix; Piñera, Angel R.; Alvarez, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Osteoporosis has become a major medical problem as the aged population of the world rapidly grows. Osteoporosis predisposes patients to fracture, progressive spinal deformities, and stenosis, and is subject to be a major concern before performing spine surgery, especially with bone fusions and instrumentation. Osteoporosis has often been considered a contraindication for spinal surgery, while in some instances patients have undergone limited and inadequate procedures in order to avoid concomitant instrumentation. As the population ages and the expectations of older patients increase, the demand for surgical treatment in older patients with osteoporosis and spinal degenerative diseases becomes progressively more important. Nowadays, advances in surgical and anesthetic technology make it possible to operate successfully on elderly patients who no longer accept disabling physical conditions. This article discusses the biomechanics of the osteoporotic spine, the diagnosis and management of osteoporotic patients with spinal conditions, as well as the novel treatments, recommendations, surgical indications, strategies and instrumentation in patients with osteoporosis who need spine operations. PMID:29299490

  14. The effects of local insulin application to lumbar spinal fusions in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerner, John D; Yalamanchili, Praveen; Munoz, William; Uko, Linda; Chaudhary, Saad B; Lin, Sheldon S; Vives, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    The rates of pseudoarthrosis after a single-level spinal fusion have been reported up to 35%, and the agents that increase the rate of fusion have an important role in decreasing pseudoarthrosis after spinal fusion. Previous studies have analyzed the effects of local insulin application to an autograft in a rat segmental defect model. Defects treated with a time-released insulin implant had significantly more new bone formation and greater quality of bone compared with controls based on histology and histomorphometry. A time-released insulin implant may have similar effects when applied in a lumbar spinal fusion model. This study analyzes the effects of a local time-released insulin implant applied to the fusion bed in a rat posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion model. Our hypothesis was twofold: first, a time-released insulin implant applied to the autograft bed in a rat posterolateral lumbar fusion will increase the rate of successful fusion and second, will alter the local environment of the fusion site by increasing the levels of local growth factors. Animal model (Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee approved) using 40 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Forty skeletally mature Sprague-Dawley rats weighing approximately 500 g each underwent posterolateral intertransverse lumbar fusions with iliac crest autograft from L4 to L5 using a Wiltse-type approach. After exposure of the transverse processes and high-speed burr decortication, a Linplant (Linshin Canada, Inc., ON, Canada) consisting of 95% microrecrystalized palmitic acid and 5% bovine insulin (experimental group) or a sham implant consisting of only palmitic acid (control group) was implanted on the fusion bed with iliac crest autograft. As per the manufacturer, the Linplant has a release rate of 2 U/day for a minimum of 40 days. The transverse processes and autograft beds of 10 animals from the experimental and 10 from the control group were harvested at Day 4 and analyzed for growth factors. The

  15. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT evaluation of children and young adults with suspected spinal fusion hardware infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagrosky, Brian M. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Children' s Hospital Colorado, 12123 E. 16th Ave., Box 125, Aurora, CO (United States); University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Hayes, Kari L.; Fenton, Laura Z. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Children' s Hospital Colorado, 12123 E. 16th Ave., Box 125, Aurora, CO (United States); Koo, Phillip J. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Evaluation of the child with spinal fusion hardware and concern for infection is challenging because of hardware artifact with standard imaging (CT and MRI) and difficult physical examination. Studies using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT combine the benefit of functional imaging with anatomical localization. To discuss a case series of children and young adults with spinal fusion hardware and clinical concern for hardware infection. These people underwent FDG PET/CT imaging to determine the site of infection. We performed a retrospective review of whole-body FDG PET/CT scans at a tertiary children's hospital from December 2009 to January 2012 in children and young adults with spinal hardware and suspected hardware infection. The PET/CT scan findings were correlated with pertinent clinical information including laboratory values of inflammatory markers, postoperative notes and pathology results to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of FDG PET/CT. An exempt status for this retrospective review was approved by the Institution Review Board. Twenty-five FDG PET/CT scans were performed in 20 patients. Spinal fusion hardware infection was confirmed surgically and pathologically in six patients. The most common FDG PET/CT finding in patients with hardware infection was increased FDG uptake in the soft tissue and bone immediately adjacent to the posterior spinal fusion rods at multiple contiguous vertebral levels. Noninfectious hardware complications were diagnosed in ten patients and proved surgically in four. Alternative sources of infection were diagnosed by FDG PET/CT in seven patients (five with pneumonia, one with pyonephrosis and one with superficial wound infections). FDG PET/CT is helpful in evaluation of children and young adults with concern for spinal hardware infection. Noninfectious hardware complications and alternative sources of infection, including pneumonia and pyonephrosis, can be diagnosed. FDG PET/CT should be the first-line cross-sectional imaging study in

  16. Lumbar lordosis restoration following single-level instrumented fusion comparing 4 commonly used techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimar, John R; Glassman, Steven D; Vemuri, Venu M; Esterberg, Justin L; Howard, Jennifer M; Carreon, Leah Y

    2011-11-09

    A major sequelae of lumbar fusion is acceleration of adjacent-level degeneration due to decreased lumbar lordosis. We evaluated the effectiveness of 4 common fusion techniques in restoring lordosis: instrumented posterolateral fusion, translumbar interbody fusion, anteroposterior fusion with posterior instrumentation, and anterior interbody fusion with lordotic threaded (LT) cages (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, Tennessee). Radiographs were measured preoperatively, immediately postoperatively, and a minimum of 6 months postoperatively. Parameters measured included anterior and posterior disk space height, lumbar lordosis from L3 to S1, and surgical level lordosis.No significant difference in demographics existed among the 4 groups. All preoperative parameters were similar among the 4 groups. Lumbar lordosis at final follow-up showed no difference between the anteroposterior fusion with posterior instrumentation, translumbar interbody fusion, and LT cage groups, although the posterolateral fusion group showed a significant loss of lordosis (-10°) (Plordosis and showed maintenance of anterior and posterior disk space height postoperatively compared with the other groups. Instrumented posterolateral fusion produces a greater loss of lordosis compared with anteroposterior fusion with posterior instrumentation, translumbar interbody fusion, and LT cages. Maintenance of lordosis and anterior and posterior disk space height is significantly better with anterior interbody fusion with LT cages. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Towards the development of an outcome instrument for spinal trauma: an international survey of spinal surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oner, F Cumhur; Sadiqi, Said; Lehr, A Mechteld; Dvorak, Marcel F; Aarabi, Bizhan; Chapman, Jens R; Fehlings, Michael G; Kandziora, Frank; Rajasekaran, S; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2015-01-15

    International web-based survey. To identify the most relevant aspects of human function and health status from the perspective of health care professionals involved in the treatment of spinal trauma patients. There is no universally accepted outcome instrument available that is specifically designed or validated for spinal trauma patients, contributing to controversies related to the optimal treatment and evaluation of many types of spinal injuries. Therefore, the AOSpine Knowledge Forum Trauma aims to develop such an instrument using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) as its basis. Experts from the 5 AOSpine International world regions were asked to give their opinion on the relevance of a compilation of 143 ICF categories for spinal trauma patients on a 3-point scale: "not relevant," "probably relevant," or "definitely relevant." The responses were analyzed using frequency analysis. Possible differences in responses between the 5 world regions were analyzed with the Fisher exact test and descriptive statistics. Of the 895 invited AOSpine International members, 150 (16.8%) participated in this study. A total of 13 (9.1%) ICF categories were identified as definitely relevant by more than 80% of the participants. Most of these categories were related to the ICF component "activities and participation" (n = 8), followed by "body functions" (n = 4), and "body structures" (n = 1). Only some minor regional differences were observed in the pattern of answers. More than 80% of an international group of health care professionals experienced in the clinical care of adult spinal trauma patients indicated 13 of 143 ICF categories as definitely relevant to measure outcomes after spinal trauma. This study creates an evidence base to define a core set of ICF categories for outcome measurement in adult spinal trauma patients.

  18. AxiaLIF system: minimally invasive device for presacral lumbar interbody spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Steven M; Miller, Larry E; Block, Jon E

    2011-01-01

    Lumbar fusion is commonly performed to alleviate chronic low back and leg pain secondary to disc degeneration, spondylolisthesis with or without concomitant lumbar spinal stenosis, or chronic lumbar instability. However, the risk of iatrogenic injury during traditional anterior, posterior, and transforaminal open fusion surgery is significant. The axial lumbar interbody fusion (AxiaLIF) system is a minimally invasive fusion device that accesses the lumbar (L4-S1) intervertebral disc spaces via a reproducible presacral approach that avoids critical neurovascular and musculoligamentous structures. Since the AxiaLIF system received marketing clearance from the US Food and Drug Administration in 2004, clinical studies of this device have reported high fusion rates without implant subsidence, significant improvements in pain and function, and low complication rates. This paper describes the design and approach of this lumbar fusion system, details the indications for use, and summarizes the clinical experience with the AxiaLIF system to date.

  19. Can povidone-iodine solution be used safely in a spinal surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Fang-Yeng; Chang, Ming-Chau; Wang, Shih-Tien; Yu, Wing-Kwang; Liu, Chien-Lin; Chen, Tain-Hsiung

    2006-06-01

    Intra-operative incidental contamination of surgical wounds is not rare. Povidone-iodine solution can be used to disinfect surgical wounds. Although povidone-iodine is a good broad-spectrum disinfecting agent, it has occasionally been reported to have a negative effect on wound healing and bone union. Therefore, its safety in a spinal surgery is unclear. A prospective, single-blinded, randomized study was accordingly conducted to evaluate the safety of povidone-iodine solution in spinal surgeries. Ascertained herein was the effect of wound irrigation with diluted povidone-iodine solution on wound healing, infection rate, fusion status and clinical outcome of spinal surgeries. From January 2002 to August 2003, 244 consecutive cases undergoing primary instrumented lumbosacral posterolateral fusion due to degenerative spinal disorder with segmental instability had been collected and randomly divided into two groups: the study group (120 cases, 212 fusion levels) and the control group (124 cases, 223 fusion levels). Excluded were those patients with a prior spinal surgery, spinal trauma, malignant tumor, infectious spondylitis, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, metabolic bone disease, skeletal immaturity or with an immunosuppressive treatment. In the former group, wounds were irrigated with 0.35% povidone-iodine solution followed by normal saline solution just before the bone-grafting and instrumentation procedure. However, only with normal saline solution in the latter. All the operations were done by the same surgeon with a standard technique. All the patients were treated in the same postoperative fashion as well. Later on, wound healing, infection rate, spinal bone fusion and clinical outcome were evaluated in both groups. A significant improvement of back and leg pain scores, modified Japanese Orthopedic Association function scores (JOA) and ambulatory capacity have been observed in both groups. One hundred and seven patients in the study group and one

  20. Evaluation of cell binding peptide (p15) with silk fibre enhanced hydroxyappatite bone substitute for posterolateral spinal fusion in sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, M.; Jespersen, Stig; Overgaard, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spinal fusion is indicated in the surgical management of various spinal disorders. To ensure stabile fusion, bone graft materials are essential. Traditionally allo- or autograft has been used, but both are associated with limitations. Synthetic bone graft materials that reassemble today......: In this study, we compared fusion rates between silk fibre enhanced anorganic bovine derived hydroxyapatite matrix (ABM) with and without P15 peptide coating in uninstrumented PLF in a preclinical setting. Study design: Randomised prospective study in sheep. Method/materials: Twelve Tex/got sheep underwent open...

  1. Minimally invasive instrumentation without fusion during posterior thoracic corpectomies: a comparison of percutaneously instrumented nonfused segments with open instrumented fused segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Darryl; Chou, Dean

    2017-07-01

    OBJECTIVE During the mini-open posterior corpectomy, percutaneous instrumentation without fusion is performed above and below the corpectomy level. In this study, the authors' goal was to compare the perioperative and long-term implant failure rates of patients who underwent nonfused percutaneous instrumentation with those of patients who underwent traditional open instrumented fusion. METHODS Adult patients who underwent posterior thoracic corpectomies with cage reconstruction between 2009 and 2014 were identified. Patients who underwent mini-open corpectomy had percutaneous instrumentation without fusion, and patients who underwent open corpectomy had instrumented fusion above and below the corpectomy site. The authors compared perioperative outcomes and rates of implant failure requiring reoperation between the open (fused) and mini-open (unfused) groups. RESULTS A total of 75 patients were identified, and 53 patients (32 open and 21 mini-open) were available for followup. The mean patient age was 52.8 years, and 56.6% of patients were male. There were no significant differences in baseline variables between the 2 groups. The overall perioperative complication rate was 15.1%, and there was no significant difference between the open and mini-open groups (18.8% vs 9.5%; p = 0.359). The mean hospital stay was 10.5 days. The open group required a significantly longer stay than the mini-open group (12.8 vs 7.1 days; p open and mini-open groups at 6 months (3.1% vs 0.0%, p = 0.413), 1 year (10.7% vs 6.2%, p = 0.620), and 2 years (18.2% vs 8.3%, p = 0.438). The overall mean follow-up was 29.2 months. CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that percutaneous instrumentation without fusion in mini-open transpedicular corpectomies offers similar implant failure and reoperation rates as open instrumented fusion as far out as 2 years of follow-up.

  2. Spinal fusion for chronic low back pain: systematic review on the accuracy of tests for patient selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, P.C.P.H.; Staal, J.B.; Walenkamp, G.H.; Bie, R.A. de

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Spinal fusion is a common but controversial treatment for chronic low back pain (LBP) with outcomes similar to those of programmed conservative care. To improve the results of fusion, tests for patient selection are used in clinical practice. PURPOSE: To determine the prognostic

  3. Radionuclide imaging of spinal infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemmel, Filip; Dumarey, Nicolas; Palestro, Christopher J.

    2006-01-01

    The diagnosis of spinal infection, with or without implants, has been a challenge for physicians for many years. Spinal infections are now being recognised more frequently, owing to aging of the population and the increasing use of spinal-fusion surgery. The diagnosis in many cases is delayed, and this may result in permanent neurological damage or even death. Laboratory evidence of infection is variable. Conventional radiography and radionuclide bone imaging lack both sensitivity and specificity. Neither in vitro labelled leucocyte scintigraphy nor 99m Tc-anti-granulocyte antibody scintigraphy is especially useful, because of the frequency with which spinal infection presents as a non-specific photopenic area on these tests. Sequential bone/gallium imaging and 67 Ga-SPECT are currently the radionuclide procedures of choice for spinal osteomyelitis, but these tests lack specificity, suffer from poor spatial resolution and require several days to complete. [ 18 F]Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) PET is a promising technique for diagnosing spinal infection, and has several potential advantages over conventional radionuclide tests. The study is sensitive and is completed in a single session, and image quality is superior to that obtained with single-photon emitting tracers. The specificity of FDG-PET may also be superior to that of conventional tracers because degenerative bone disease and fractures usually do not produce intense FDG uptake; moreover, spinal implants do not affect FDG imaging. However, FDG-PET images have to be read with caution in patients with instrumented spinal-fusion surgery since non-specific accumulation of FDG around the fusion material is not uncommon. In the future, PET-CT will likely provide more precise localisation of abnormalities. FDG-PET may prove to be useful for monitoring response to treatment in patients with spinal osteomyelitis. Other tracers for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis are also under investigation, including radiolabelled

  4. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion vs. posterolateral instrumented fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, A; Høy, K; Bünger, C

    2014-01-01

    difference in either cost or effects although a tendency for the TLIF regimen being more costly on bed days (a,not sign2,554) and production loss (a,not sign1,915) was observed. The probability that TLIF would be cost-effective did not exceed 30 % for any threshold of willingness to pay per quality......Long-lasting low back pain is an increasing problem, and for some patients surgery is the final option for improvement. Several techniques for spinal fusion are available and the optimal technique remains uncertain. The objective of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness and cost...... Index and SF-6D questionnaires. Conventional cost-effectiveness methodology was employed to estimate net benefit and to illustrate cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. The statistical analysis was based on means and bootstrapped confidence intervals. Results showed no statistically significant...

  5. Postoperative spinal infection mimicking systemic vasculitis with titanium-spinal implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stathopoulos Konstantinos

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary systemic vasculitis after posterior spinal fusion surgery is rare. It is usually related to over-reaction of immune-system, to genetic factors, toxicity, infection or metal allergies. Case Description A 14 year-old girl with a history of extended posterior spinal fusion due to idiopathic scoliosis presented to our department with diffuse erythema and nephritis (macroscopic hemuresis and proteinuria 5 months post surgery. The surgical trauma had no signs of inflammation or infection. The blood markers ESR and CRP were increased. Skin tests were positive for nickel allergy, which is a content of titanium alloy. The patient received corticosteroids systematically (hydrocortisone 10 mg for 6 months, leading to total recess of skin and systemic reaction. However, a palpable mass close to the surgical wound raised the suspicion of a late infection. The patient had a second surgery consisting of surgical debridement and one stage revision of posterior spinal instrumentation. Intraoperative cultures were positive to Staphylococcus aureus. Intravenous antibiotics were administered. The patient is now free of symptoms 24 months post revision surgery without any signs of recurrence of either vasculitis or infection. Literature Review Systemic vasculitis after spinal surgery is exceptionally rare. Causative factors are broad and sometimes controversial. In general, it is associated with allergy to metal ions. This is usually addressed with metal on metal total hip bearings. In spinal surgery, titanium implants are considered to be inert and only few reports have presented cases with systemic vasculitides. Therefore, other etiologies of immune over-reaction should always be considered, such as drug toxicity, infection, or genetic predisposition. Purposes and Clinical Relevance Our purpose was to highlight the difficulties during the diagnostic work-up for systemic vasculitis and management in cases of posterior spinal surgery.

  6. Instrument cables and ceramic-to-metal seals for fusion-environment service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, C.P.

    1982-10-01

    The intent of this paper is to form a technical basis to address questions pertinent to the use of instrument cables, ceramic-to-metal seals, and connector components in a fusion environment. The service environment of future fusion devices poses a unique challenge to instrumentation. The radiation environment of 14 MeV neutrons is markedly different from other instrumented radiation environments. There exist other environmental concerns as well (some instruments may operate at elevated temperatures, etc)

  7. Instrumented circumferential fusion for tuberculosis of the dorso-lumbar spine. A single or double stage procedure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sharkawi, Mohammad Mostafa; Said, Galal Zaki

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to present our experience in treating dorso-lumbar tuberculosis by one-stage posterior circumferential fusion and to compare this group with a historical group treated by anterior debridement followed by postero-lateral fusion and stabilization. Between 2003 and 2008, 32 patients with active spinal tuberculosis were treated by one-stage posterior circumferential fusion and prospectively followed for a minimum of two years. Pain severity was measured using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Neurological assessment was done using the Frankel scale. The operative data, clinical, radiological, and functional outcomes were also compared to a similar group of 25 patients treated with anterior debridement and fusion, followed 10-14 days later by posterior stabilization and postero-lateral fusion. The mean operative time and duration of hospital stay were significantly longer in the two-stage group. The mean estimated blood loss was also larger, though insignificantly, in the two-stage group. The incidence of complications was significantly lower in the one-stage group. At final follow-up, all 34 patients with pre-operative neurological deficits showed at least one Frankel grade of neurological improvement, all 57 patients showed significant improvement of their VAS back pain score, the mean kyphotic angle has significantly improved, all patients achieved solid fusion and 43 (75.4%) patients returned to their pre-disease activity level or work. Instrumented circumferential fusion, whether in one or two stages, is an effective treatment for dorso-lumbar tuberculosis. One-stage surgery, however, is advantageous because it has lower complication rate, shorter hospital stay, less operative time and blood loss.

  8. Increased Total Anesthetic Time Leads to Higher Rates of Surgical Site Infections in Spinal Fusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puffer, Ross C; Murphy, Meghan; Maloney, Patrick; Kor, Daryl; Nassr, Ahmad; Freedman, Brett; Fogelson, Jeremy; Bydon, Mohamad

    2017-06-01

    A retrospective review of a consecutive series of spinal fusions comparing patient and procedural characteristics of patients who developed surgical site infections (SSIs) after spinal fusion. It is known that increased surgical time (incision to closure) is associated with a higher rate of postoperative SSIs. We sought to determine whether increased total anesthetic time (intubation to extubation) is a factor in the development of SSIs as well. In spine surgery for deformity and degenerative disease, SSI has been associated with operative time, revealing a nearly 10-fold increase in SSI rates in prolonged surgery. Surgical time is associated with infections in other surgical disciplines as well. No studies have reported whether total anesthetic time (intubation to extubation) has an association with SSIs. Surgical records were searched in a retrospective fashion to identify all spine fusion procedures performed between January 2010 and July 2012. All SSIs during that timeframe were recorded and compared with the list of cases performed between 2010 and 2012 in a case-control design. There were 20 (1.7%) SSIs in this fusion cohort. On univariate analyses of operative factors, there was a significant association between total anesthetic time (Infection 7.6 ± 0.5 hrs vs. no infection -6.0 ± 0.1 hrs, P operative time (infection 5.5 ± 0.4 hrs vs. no infection - 4.4 ± 0.06 hrs, P infections, whereas level of pathology and emergent surgery were not significant. On multivariate logistic analysis, BMI and total anesthetic time remained independent predictors of SSI whereas ASA status and operative time did not. Increasing BMI and total anesthetic time were independent predictors of SSIs in this cohort of over 1000 consecutive spinal fusions. 3.

  9. Tritium instrumentation for a fusion reactor power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shank, K.E.; Easterly, C.E.

    1976-09-01

    A review of tritium instrumentation is presented. This includes a discussion of currently available in-plant instrumentation and methods required for sampling stacks, monitoring process streams and reactor coolants, analyzing occupational work areas for air and surface contamination, and personnel monitoring. Off-site instrumentation and collection techniques are also presented. Conclusions are made concerning the adequacy of existing instrumentation in relation to the monitoring needs for fusion reactors

  10. Three-dimensional reconstructed computed tomography-magnetic resonance fusion image-based preoperative planning for surgical procedures for spinal lipoma or tethered spinal cord after myelomeningocele repair. Technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamba, Yohei; Nonaka, Masahiro; Nakajima, Shin; Yamasaki, Mami

    2011-01-01

    Surgical procedures for spinal lipoma or tethered spinal cord after myelomeningocele (MMC) repair are often difficult and complicated, because the anatomical structures can be deformed in complex and unpredictable ways. Imaging helps the surgeon understand the patient's spinal anatomy. Whereas two-dimensional images provide only limited information for surgical planning, three-dimensional (3D) reconstructed computed tomography (CT)-magnetic resonance (MR) fusion images produce clearer representations of the spinal regions. Here we describe simple and quick methods for obtaining 3D reconstructed CT-MR fusion images for preoperative planning of surgical procedures using the iPlan cranial (BrainLAB AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) neuronavigation software. 3D CT images of the vertebral bone were combined with heavily T 2 -weighted MR images of the spinal cord, lipoma, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space, and nerve root through a process of fusion, segmentation, and reconstruction of the 3D images. We also used our procedure called 'Image Overlay' to directly project the 3D reconstructed image onto the body surface using an light emitting diode (LED) projector. The final reconstructed 3D images took 10-30 minutes to obtain, and provided the surgeon with a representation of the individual pathological structures, so enabled the design of effective surgical plans, even in patients with bony deformity such as scoliosis. None of the 19 patients treated based on our 3D reconstruction method has had neurological complications, except for CSF leakage. This 3D reconstructed imaging method, combined with Image Overlay, improves the visual understanding of complicated surgical situations, and should improve surgical efficiency and outcome. (author)

  11. Surgical Outcome of Reduction and Instrumented Fusion in Lumbar Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Omidi-Kashani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis (LDS is a degenerative slippage of the lumbar vertebrae. We aimed to evaluate the surgical outcome of degenerative spondylolisthesis with neural decompression, pedicular screw fixation, reduction, and posterolateral fusion. Methods: This before-after study was carried out on 45 patients (37 female and 8 male with LDS operated from August 2008 to January 2011. The patients’ pain and disability were assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS and Oswestry disability index (ODI questionnaire. In surgery, we applied distraction force to facilitate slip reduction. All the intra- and postoperative complications were recorded. The paired t-test and Pearson correlation coefficient were used for statistical analysis. Results: The mean age of patients and mean follow-up period were 58.3±3.5 years and 31.2±4.8 months, respectively. The mean slip correction rate was 52.2% with a mean correction loss of 4.8%. Preoperative VAS and ODI improved from 8.8 and 71.6 to postoperative 2.1 and 28.7, respectively. Clinical improvement was more prominent in more reduced patients, but Pearson coefficient could not find a significant correlation. Conclusion: Although spinal decompression with fusion and posterior instrumentation in surgical treatment of the patients with LDS result in satisfactory outcome, vertebral reduction cannot significantly enhance the clinical improvement.

  12. Hospital competitive intensity and perioperative outcomes following lumbar spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Wesley M; Johnson, Joseph R; Li, Neill Y; Yang, JaeWon; Eltorai, Adam E M; DePasse, J Mason; Daniels, Alan H

    2018-04-01

    Interhospital competition has been shown to influence the adoption of surgical techniques and approaches, clinical patient outcomes, and health care resource use for select surgical procedures. However, little is known regarding these dynamics as they relate to spine surgery. This investigation sought to examine the relationship between interhospital competitive intensity and perioperative outcomes following lumbar spinal fusion. This study used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample dataset, years 2003, 2006, and 2009. Patients were included based on the presence of the International Classification of Disease, Ninth Edition, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes corresponding to lumbar spinal fusion, as well as on the presence of data on the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI). The outcome measures are perioperative complications, defined using an ICD-9-CM coding algorithm. The HHI, a validated measure of competition within a market, was used to assess hospital market competitiveness. The HHI was calculated based on the hospital cachement area. Multiple regression was performed to adjust for confounding variables including patient age, gender, primary payer, severity of illness score, primary versus revision fusion, anterior versus posterior approach, national region, hospital bed size, location or teaching status, ownership, and year. Perioperative clinical outcomes were assessed based on ICD-9-CM codes with modifications. In total, 417,520 weighted patients (87,999 unweighted records) were analyzed. The mean cachement area HHI was 0.31 (range 0.099-0.724). The average patient age was 55.4 years (standard error=0.194), and the majority of patients were female (55.8%, n=232,727). The majority of procedures were primary spinal fusions (92.7%, n=386,998) and fusions with a posterior-only technique (81.5%, n=340,271). Most procedures occurred in the South (42.5%, n=177,509) or the Midwest (27.0%, n=112,758) regions. In the multiple regression analysis, increased hospital

  13. Analyzer-based imaging of spinal fusion in an animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, M E; Beavis, R C; Allen, L A; Fiorella, David; Schueltke, E; Juurlink, B H; Chapman, L D; Zhong, Z

    2008-01-01

    Analyzer-based imaging (ABI) utilizes synchrotron radiation sources to create collimated monochromatic x-rays. In addition to x-ray absorption, this technique uses refraction and scatter rejection to create images. ABI provides dramatically improved contrast over standard imaging techniques. Twenty-one adult male Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups to undergo the following interventions: (1) non-injured control, (2) decortication alone, (3) decortication with iliac crest bone grafting and (4) decortication with iliac crest bone grafting and interspinous wiring. Surgical procedures were performed at the L5-6 level. Animals were killed at 2, 4 and 6 weeks after the intervention and the spine muscle blocks were excised. Specimens were assessed for the presence of fusion by (1) manual testing, (2) conventional absorption radiography and (3) ABI. ABI showed no evidence of bone fusion in groups 1 and 2 and showed solid or possibly solid fusion in subjects from groups 3 and 4 at 6 weeks. Metal artifacts were not present in any of the ABI images. Conventional absorption radiographs did not provide diagnostic quality imaging of either the graft material or fusion masses in any of the specimens in any of the groups. Synchrotron-based ABI represents a novel imaging technique which can be used to assess spinal fusion in a small animal model. ABI produces superior image quality when compared to conventional radiographs

  14. Analyzer-based imaging of spinal fusion in an animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, M. E.; Beavis, R. C.; Fiorella, David; Schültke, E.; Allen, L. A.; Juurlink, B. H.; Zhong, Z.; Chapman, L. D.

    2008-05-01

    Analyzer-based imaging (ABI) utilizes synchrotron radiation sources to create collimated monochromatic x-rays. In addition to x-ray absorption, this technique uses refraction and scatter rejection to create images. ABI provides dramatically improved contrast over standard imaging techniques. Twenty-one adult male Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups to undergo the following interventions: (1) non-injured control, (2) decortication alone, (3) decortication with iliac crest bone grafting and (4) decortication with iliac crest bone grafting and interspinous wiring. Surgical procedures were performed at the L5-6 level. Animals were killed at 2, 4 and 6 weeks after the intervention and the spine muscle blocks were excised. Specimens were assessed for the presence of fusion by (1) manual testing, (2) conventional absorption radiography and (3) ABI. ABI showed no evidence of bone fusion in groups 1 and 2 and showed solid or possibly solid fusion in subjects from groups 3 and 4 at 6 weeks. Metal artifacts were not present in any of the ABI images. Conventional absorption radiographs did not provide diagnostic quality imaging of either the graft material or fusion masses in any of the specimens in any of the groups. Synchrotron-based ABI represents a novel imaging technique which can be used to assess spinal fusion in a small animal model. ABI produces superior image quality when compared to conventional radiographs.

  15. Regression of an atlantoaxial rheumatoid pannus following posterior instrumented fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bydon, Mohamad; Macki, Mohamed; Qadi, Mohamud; De la Garza-Ramos, Rafael; Kosztowski, Thomas A; Sciubba, Daniel M; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Witham, Timothy F; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Bydon, Ali

    2015-10-01

    Rheumatoid patients may develop a retrodental lesion (atlantoaxial rheumatoid pannus) that may cause cervical instability and/or neurological compromise. The objective is to characterize clinical and radiographic outcomes after posterior instrumented fusion for atlantoaxial rheumatoid pannus. We retrospectively reviewed all patients who underwent posterior fusions for an atlantoaxial rheumatoid pannus at a single institution. Both preoperative and postoperative imaging was available for all patients. Anterior or circumferential operations, non-atlantoaxial panni, or prior C1-C2 operations were excluded. Primary outcome measures included Nurick score, Ranawat score (neurologic status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis), pannus regression, and reoperation. Pannus volume was determined with axial and sagittal views on both preoperative and postoperative radiological images. Thirty patients surgically managed for an atlantoaxial rheumatoid pannus were followed for a mean of 24.43 months. Nine patients underwent posterior instrumented fusion alone, while 21 patients underwent posterior decompression and instrumented fusion. Following a posterior instrumented fusion in all 30 patients, the pannus statistically significantly regressed by 44.44%, from a mean volume of 1.26cm(3) to 0.70cm(3) (ppannus radiographically regressed by 44.44% over a mean of 8.02 months, and patients clinically improved per the Nurick score. The Ranawat score did not improve, and 20% of patients required reoperation over a mean of 13.18 months. The annualized reoperation rate was approximately 13.62%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Delayed Presentation of a Cervical Spinal Epidural Abscess of Dental Origin after a Fall in an Elderly Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodman, Alexa; Riordan, Margaret; Chin, Lawrence S

    2016-05-23

    Spinal epidural abscesses are an uncommon cause of spinal cord injury but, depending on the size and presence of neurological deficits, urgent neurosurgical intervention may be required. We present a unique case of a patient presenting with a spinal epidural collection several days after a fall. While a spinal epidural hematoma was suspected based on the patient's history and MRI findings, a spinal epidural abscess was found during surgery. The patient underwent laminectomy and instrumented fusion with successful treatment of her infection.

  17. AxiaLIF system: minimally invasive device for presacral lumbar interbody spinal fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapp SM

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Steven M Rapp1, Larry E Miller2,3, Jon E Block31Michigan Spine Institute, Waterford, MI, USA; 2Miller Scientific Consulting Inc, Biltmore Lake, NC, USA; 3Jon E. Block, Ph.D., Inc., San Francisco, CA, USAAbstract: Lumbar fusion is commonly performed to alleviate chronic low back and leg pain secondary to disc degeneration, spondylolisthesis with or without concomitant lumbar spinal stenosis, or chronic lumbar instability. However, the risk of iatrogenic injury during traditional anterior, posterior, and transforaminal open fusion surgery is significant. The axial lumbar interbody fusion (AxiaLIF system is a minimally invasive fusion device that accesses the lumbar (L4–S1 intervertebral disc spaces via a reproducible presacral approach that avoids critical neurovascular and musculoligamentous structures. Since the AxiaLIF system received marketing clearance from the US Food and Drug Administration in 2004, clinical studies of this device have reported high fusion rates without implant subsidence, significant improvements in pain and function, and low complication rates. This paper describes the design and approach of this lumbar fusion system, details the indications for use, and summarizes the clinical experience with the AxiaLIF system to date.Keywords: AxiaLIF, fusion, lumbar, minimally invasive, presacral

  18. [Controversies about instrumented surgery and pain relief in degenerative lumbar spine pain. Results of scientific evidence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robaina-Padrón, F J

    2007-10-01

    Investigation and development of new techniques for intrumented surgery of the spine is not free of conflicts of interest. The influence of financial forces in the development of new technologies an its immediately application to spine surgery, shows the relationship between the published results and the industry support. Even authors who have defend eagerly fusion techniques, it have been demonstrated that them are very much involved in the revision of new articles to be published and in the approval process of new spinal technologies. When we analyze the published results of spine surgery, we must bear in mind what have been call in the "American Stock and Exchange" as "the bubble of spine surgery". The scientific literature doesn't show clear evidence in the cost-benefit studies of most instrumented surgical interventions of the spine compare with the conservative treatments. It has not been yet demonstrated that fusion surgery and disc replacement are better options than the conservative treatment. It's necessary to point out that at present "there are relationships between the industry and back pain, and there is also an industry of the back pain". Nonetheless, the "market of the spine surgery" is growing up because patients are demanding solutions for their back problems. The tide of scientific evidence seams to go against the spinal fusions in the degenerative disc disease, discogenic pain and inespecific back pain. After decades of advances in this field, the results of spinal fusions are mediocre. New epidemiological studies show that "spinal fusion must be accepted as a non proved or experimental method for the treatment of back pain". The surgical literature on spinal fusion published in the last 20 years following the Cochrane's method establish that: 1- this is at least incomplete, not reliable and careless; 2- the instrumentation seems to slightly increase the fusion rate; 3- the instrumentation doesn't improve the clinical results in general, lacking

  19. Radionuclide imaging of spinal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemmel, Filip [Ghent Maria-Middelares, General Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium); Medical Center Leeuwarden (MCL), Division of Nuclear Medicine, Henri Dunantweg 2, Postbus 888, Leeuwarden (Netherlands); Dumarey, Nicolas [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Hopital Erasme, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Brussels (Belgium); Palestro, Christopher J. [Long Island Jewish Medical Center, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Long Island, NY (United States)

    2006-10-15

    The diagnosis of spinal infection, with or without implants, has been a challenge for physicians for many years. Spinal infections are now being recognised more frequently, owing to aging of the population and the increasing use of spinal-fusion surgery. The diagnosis in many cases is delayed, and this may result in permanent neurological damage or even death. Laboratory evidence of infection is variable. Conventional radiography and radionuclide bone imaging lack both sensitivity and specificity. Neither in vitro labelled leucocyte scintigraphy nor {sup 99m}Tc-anti-granulocyte antibody scintigraphy is especially useful, because of the frequency with which spinal infection presents as a non-specific photopenic area on these tests. Sequential bone/gallium imaging and {sup 67}Ga-SPECT are currently the radionuclide procedures of choice for spinal osteomyelitis, but these tests lack specificity, suffer from poor spatial resolution and require several days to complete. [{sup 18}F]Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) PET is a promising technique for diagnosing spinal infection, and has several potential advantages over conventional radionuclide tests. The study is sensitive and is completed in a single session, and image quality is superior to that obtained with single-photon emitting tracers. The specificity of FDG-PET may also be superior to that of conventional tracers because degenerative bone disease and fractures usually do not produce intense FDG uptake; moreover, spinal implants do not affect FDG imaging. However, FDG-PET images have to be read with caution in patients with instrumented spinal-fusion surgery since non-specific accumulation of FDG around the fusion material is not uncommon. In the future, PET-CT will likely provide more precise localisation of abnormalities. FDG-PET may prove to be useful for monitoring response to treatment in patients with spinal osteomyelitis. Other tracers for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis are also under investigation, including

  20. CORRELATION BETWEEN OBESITY, SAGITTAL BALANCE AND CLINICAL OUTCOME IN SPINAL FUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Machado da Motta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To correlate obesity with radiographic parameters of spinal and spinopelvic balance in patients undergoing spinal arthrodesis, and to correlate obesity with clinical outcome of these patients.Methods:Observational retrospective study including patients who underwent spinal arthrodesis, with minimum follow-up period of three months. We measured waist circumference, as well as height and weight to calculate body mass index (BMI and obtained radiographs of the total column. The clinical parameters studied were pain by visual analog scale (VAS and the Oswestry questionnaire (ODI. Obesity correlated with radiographic parameters of the sagittal and spinopelvic balance and postoperative clinical parameters.Results:32 patients were analyzed. The higher the BMI, the greater the value of VAS found, but without statistical significance (p=0.83. There was also no correlation between BMI and the ODI questionnaire. Analyzing the abdominal circumference, there was no correlation between the VAS and ODI. There was no correlation between BMI or waist circumference and the radiographic parameters of global spinopelvic sagittal alignment. Regarding the postoperative results, there was no correlation between the mean BMI and waist circumference and the postoperative results for ODI and VAS (p=0.75 and p=0.7, respectively.Conclusions:The clinical outcomes of patients who undergone spinal fusion were not affected by the BMI and waist circumference. Also, there was no correlation between radiographic parameters of spinal and spinopelvic sagittal balance with obesity in patients previously treated with arthrodesis of the spine.

  1. Allograft versus autograft in cervical and lumbar spinal fusions: an examination of operative time, length of stay, surgical site infection, and blood transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Meghan E; McCutcheon, Brandon A; Grauberger, Jennifer; Shepherd, Daniel; Maloney, Patrick R; Rinaldo, Lorenzo; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Fogelson, Jeremy L; Nassr, Ahmad; Bydon, Mohamad

    2016-11-23

    Autograft harvesting for spine arthrodesis has been associated with longer operative times and increased blood loss. Allograft compared to autograft in spinal fusions has not been studied in a multicenter cohort. Patients enrolled in the ACS-NSQIP registry between 2012 and 2013 who underwent cervical or lumbar spinal fusion with either allograft or autograft through a separate incision were included for analysis. The primary outcomes of interest were operative time, length of stay, blood transfusion, and surgical site infection (SSI). A total of 6,790 and 6,718 patients received a cervical or lumbar spinal fusion, respectively. On unadjusted analysis in both cervical and lumbar cohorts, autograft was associated with increased rates of blood transfusion (cervical: 2.9% vs 1.0%, poperative time (cervical: 167 vs 128 minutes, poperative times (cervical: 27.8 minutes, 95% CI 20.7-35.0; and lumbar: 25.4 minutes, 95% CI 17.7-33.1) relative to allograft. Autograft was not associated with either length of stay or SSI. In a multicenter cohort of patients undergoing cervical or lumbar spinal fusion, autograft was associated with increased rates of blood transfusion and increased operative time relative to allograft.

  2. Migration of a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt catheter into a back incision of a patient with previous spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryadevara, Raviteja; Lieber, Bryan A; Garcia, Erick; Sood, Sandeep; Haridas, Abilash; Ham, Steven

    2018-04-01

    This case examines a unique, longitudinal presentation of an abandoned, migrating VP shunt which presents as multiple complications, including a weeping abscess in the patients back. We believe that the latter complication was potentially caused by the wound from the patient's previous history of spinal fusion surgery. The patient presents with an associated type 2 Chiari malformation, hydrocephalus, and a previous history of posterior spinal fusion (T4-L5 anterior fusion and T2-L5 posterior fusion) at age 11. The patient had undergone shunt revisions in early adolescence as well. At 22, the patient is admitted into emergency care due to recurrent infections caused by a migrating VP shunt. Due to complications in corrective surgery at the time, the shunt was forced to be abandoned. This resulted in the most recent presentation of a weeping abscess at the patient's spinal fusion surgery wound; the culprit was the abandoned, migrating VP shunt.. An initial course of broad-spectrum antibiotics was started. However, the abscess continued to recur. Eventually, the catheter was surgically removed, a tailored antibiotic regiment was started, and a 6-month patient follow-up was performed. The patient is no longer symptomatic and off of antibiotics. In abandoned VP shunts, migration into a non-sterile cavity dictates prompt removal, especially after symptoms of infection present. Additionally, careful monitoring for signs of peritonitis or other symptoms for a dedicated period of time is necessary. To the authors' best knowledge, this is the first case of an occult shunt migration through the patient's back that presented with a weeping abscess.

  3. Distracted cervical spinal fusion for management of caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy in large-breed dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellison, G. W.; Seim, III, H. B.; Clemmons, R. M.

    1988-08-15

    Using an autogenous bone graft (obtained from the iliac crest), 4-mm cancellous bone screws, and polymethylmethacrylate, a distracted cervical spinal fusion technique was performed on 10 dogs with myelographic evidence of caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy. All dogs had evidence of dynamic soft tissue spinal cord compression, as indicated by flexion, extension, and traction myelographic views. Of the 10 dogs, 4 previously had undergone surgery by use of ventral slot or cervical disk fenestration techniques, and their neurologic status had deteriorated after the original surgery. Preoperative neurologic status of the 10 dogs included nonambulatory tetraparesis (n = 5), severe ataxia with conscious proprioceptive deficits (n = 2), and mild ambulatory ataxia with conscious proprioceptive deficits (n = 3). Five dogs had signs of various degrees of cervical pain. Clinical improvement was observed in 8 of 10 dogs--either improved neurologic status or elimination of cervical pain. Implant loosening developed in 3 dogs; 2 of them were euthanatized because of lack of neurologic improvement. Radiographic evidence of bony cervical fusion was observed during a 9- to 24-week period in 6 of the 8 surviving dogs. The distracted cervical fusion technique appears to be a valid surgical procedure to manage cervical spondylomyelopathy in those dogs in which the lesions are limited to one cervical intervertebral disk space.

  4. Distracted cervical spinal fusion for management of caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy in large-breed dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellison, G.W.; Seim, H.B. III; Clemmons, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    Using an autogenous bone graft (obtained from the iliac crest), 4-mm cancellous bone screws, and polymethylmethacrylate, a distracted cervical spinal fusion technique was performed on 10 dogs with myelographic evidence of caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy. All dogs had evidence of dynamic soft tissue spinal cord compression, as indicated by flexion, extension, and traction myelographic views. Of the 10 dogs, 4 previously had undergone surgery by use of ventral slot or cervical disk fenestration techniques, and their neurologic status had deteriorated after the original surgery. Preoperative neurologic status of the 10 dogs included nonambulatory tetraparesis (n = 5), severe ataxia with conscious proprioceptive deficits (n = 2), and mild ambulatory ataxia with conscious proprioceptive deficits (n = 3). Five dogs had signs of various degrees of cervical pain. Clinical improvement was observed in 8 of 10 dogs--either improved neurologic status or elimination of cervical pain. Implant loosening developed in 3 dogs; 2 of them were euthanatized because of lack of neurologic improvement. Radiographic evidence of bony cervical fusion was observed during a 9- to 24-week period in 6 of the 8 surviving dogs. The distracted cervical fusion technique appears to be a valid surgical procedure to manage cervical spondylomyelopathy in those dogs in which the lesions are limited to one cervical intervertebral disk space

  5. Treatment of Spinal Tuberculosis by Debridement, Interbody Fusion and Internal Fixation via Posterior Approach Only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ming-xing; Zhang, Hong-qi; Wang, Yu-xiang; Guo, Chao-feng; Liu, Jin-yang

    2016-02-01

    Surgical treatment for spinal tuberculosis includes focal tuberculosis debridement, segmental stability reconstruction, neural decompression and kyphotic deformity correction. For the lesions mainly involved anterior and middle column of the spine, anterior operation of debridement and fusion with internal fixation has been becoming the most frequently used surgical technique for the spinal tuberculosis. However, high risk of structural damage might relate with anterior surgery, such as damage in lungs, heart, kidney, ureter and bowel, and the deformity correction is also limited. Due to the organs are in the front of spine, there are less complications in posterior approach. Spinal pedicle screw passes through the spinal three-column structure, which provides more powerful orthopedic forces compared with the vertebral body screw, and the kyphotic deformity correction effect is better in posterior approach. In this paper, we report a 68-year-old male patient with thoracic tuberculosis who underwent surgical treatment by debridement, interbody fusion and internal fixation via posterior approach only. The patient was placed in prone position under general anesthesia. Posterior midline incision was performed, and the posterior spinal construction was exposed. Then place pedicle screw, and fix one side rod temporarily. Make the side of more bone destruction and larger abscess as lesion debridement side. Resect the unilateral facet joint, and retain contralateral structure integrity. Protect the spinal cord, nerve root. Clear sequestrum, necrotic tissue, abscess of paravertebral and intervertebral space. Specially designed titanium mesh cages or bone blocks were implanted into interbody. Fix both side rods and compress both sides to make the mesh cages and bone blocks tight. Reconstruct posterior column structure with allogeneic bone and autologous bone. Using this technique, the procedures of debridement, spinal cord decompression, deformity correction, bone grafting

  6. Spine kinematics exhibited during the stop-jump by physically active individuals with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakar, Rumit Singh; Li, Yumeng; Brown, Cathleen N; Kim, Seock-Ho; Oswald, Timothy S; Simpson, Kathy J

    2018-01-01

    Individuals with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis post spinal fusion often return to exercise and sport. However, the movements that individuals with spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (SF-AIS) use to compensate for the loss of spinal flexibility during high-effort tasks are not known. The objective of this study was to compare the spinal kinematics of the trunk segments displayed during the stop-jump, a maximal effort task, between SF-AIS and healthy control groups. The study used a case-controlled design. Ten SF-AIS (physically active, posterior-approach spinal fusion: 11.2±1.9 fused segments, postop time: 2±.6 years) and nine control individuals, pair matched for gender, age (17.4±1.3 years and 20.6±1.5 years, respectively), mass (63.50±12.2 kg and 66. 40±10.9 kg), height (1.69±.09 m and 1.72±.08 m), and level of physical activity, participated in the study. Individuals with spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and controls (CON) performed five acceptable trials of the stop-jump task. Spatial locations of 21 retroreflective trunk and pelvis markers were recorded via high-speed motion capture methodology. Mean differences and analysis of covariance (jump height=covariate, pjump height and RelAng were detected in the three phases of stop-jump. Individuals with spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis displayed 3.2° greater transverse plane RelAng of LT compared with CON (p=.059) in the stance phase. Group differences for RelAng ranged from 0° to 15.3°. For SegAng in the stance phase, LT demonstrated greater SegAng in the sagittal and frontal planes (mean difference: 3.2°-6.2°), whereas SegAng for MT was 5.1° greater in the sagittal plane and had a tendency of 2° greater displacement in the frontal plane (p=.070). In the vertical flight phase, greater LT displacement in the frontal plane was observed for SF-AIS than CON. In the flight phase, LT had a tendency for greater SegAng for SF-AIS than for CON

  7. Radiological and clinical outcomes of novel Ti/PEEK combined spinal fusion cages: a systematic review and preclinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assem, Yusuf; Mobbs, Ralph J; Pelletier, Matthew H; Phan, Kevin; Walsh, William R

    2017-03-01

    The primary objective of this paper was to provide a systematic review of the available clinical studies of Ti/PEEK combined cages in spinal interbody fusion surgeries, focusing on their radiological and clinical outcomes. A secondary aim was to provide a review and evaluation of the in vitro and preclinical studies reported on Ti/PEEK-coated implants. A systematic search of the literature was performed in March 2015 via three databases: Medline, Embase and Cochrane library. The following key search terms were combined with synonyms to identify relevant articles: "spinal fusion," "PEEK," "titanium" and "cage." The novelty of this intervention translates into a paucity of clinical trials, albeit the results of the seven clinical studies that met the criteria for inclusion are promising. All studies reported rate of fusion as a primary outcome. Two studies reported slightly improved fusion in the experimental Ti/PEEK combination cohort, one study identical fusion (91.7 %) and three studies excellent fusion (96, 100 and 94 %) in the Ti/PEEK cohort, although no differences reached statistical significance. Clinical studies at this early stage demonstrate that Ti/PEEK implants are safe and efficacious, exhibiting similar fusion rates and clinical outcomes compared to the current standard PEEK. There is clinical evidence substantiating the improved radiographic fusion of Ti/PEEK, albeit the differences were not significant. This field is promising, gaining substantial popularity, and further clinical trials are needed in the future to establish Ti/PEEK cages as a mainstay of clinical practice.

  8. [Mechanical studies of lumbar interbody fusion implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, R J; Steinhauser, E; Rechl, H; Mittelmeier, W; Bertagnoli, R; Gradinger, R

    2002-05-01

    In addition to autogenous or allogeneic bone grafts, fusion cages composed of metal or plastic are being used increasingly as spacers for interbody fusion of spinal segments. The goal of this study was the mechanical testing of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) fusion cages used for anterior lumbar interbody fusion. With a special testing device according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards, the mechanical properties of the implants were determined under four different loading conditions. The implants (UNION cages, Medtronic Sofamor Danek) provide sufficient axial compression, shear, and torsional strength of the implant body. Ultimate axial compression load of the fins is less than the physiological compression loads at the lumbar spine. Therefore by means of an appropriate surgical technique parallel grooves have to be reamed into the endplates of the vertebral bodies according to the fin geometry. Thereby axial compression forces affect the implants body and the fins are protected from damaging loading. Using a supplementary anterior or posterior instrumentation, in vivo failure of the fins as a result of physiological shear and torsional spinal loads is unlikely. Due to specific complications related to autogenous or allogeneic bone grafts, fusion cages made of metal or carbon fiber reinforced plastic are an important alternative implant in interbody fusion.

  9. The "shadow sign": a radiographic differentiation of stainless steel versus titanium spinal instrumentation in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Quaidoo, Sean M; Novicoff, Wendy; Park, Andrew; Arlet, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    Stainless steel spinal instrumentation has been supplanted in recent years by titanium instrumentation. Knowing whether stainless steel or titanium was used in a previous surgery can guide clinical decision making processes, but frequently the clinician has no way to know what type of metal was used. We describe the radiographic "shadow sign," in which superimposed titanium rods and screws remain radiolucent enough that the contour of the underlying components can be seen on a lateral radiograph, whereas superimposed stainless steel rods and screws are completely radiopaque. This technique was evaluated using a retrospective, randomized, and blinded radiographic comparison of titanium and stainless steel spinal instrumentation. The objective was to determine whether the "shadow sign" can reliably differentiate titanium from stainless steel spinal instrumentation. Lateral radiographs from 16 cases of posterior spinal instrumentation (6 titanium, 6 stainless steel, and 2 replicates of each to assess intraobserver reliability) were randomly selected from a database of cases performed for pediatric scoliosis in a university setting from 2005 to 2009. The cases were randomized then shown to 19 orthopaedic surgery residents, 1 spine fellow, and 2 spine attendings. After the "shadow sign" was described, the surgeons were asked to determine what type of metal each implant was made of. The κ value for both stainless steel and titanium versus the gold standard was 0.83 [standard error (SE) = 0.053], indicating excellent agreement. The κ value for agreement between raters was 0.71 (SE = 0.016) and the κ value for agreement within raters was 0.70 (SE = 0.016), both of which indicated substantial agreement. The "shadow sign" can help a clinician differentiate titanium from stainless steel spinal instrumentation based on radiographic appearance alone. Furthermore, our study reveals that the level of experience in diagnosing spinal lateral radiographs also enhances the use of

  10. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: Who Should Be Fused? An Updated Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasankhani, Ebrahim Ghayem; Ashjazadeh, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is mostly caused by osteoarthritis (spondylosis). Clinically, the symptoms of patients with LSS can be categorized into two groups; regional (low back pain, stiffness, and so on) or radicular (spinal stenosis mainly presenting as neurogenic claudication). Both of these symptoms usually improve with appropriate conservative treatment, but in refractory cases, surgical intervention is occasionally indicated. In the patients who primarily complain of radiculopathy with an underlying biomechanically stable spine, a decompression surgery alone using a less invasive technique may be sufficient. Preoperatively, with the presence of indicators such as failed back surgery syndrome (revision surgery), degenerative instability, considerable essential deformity, symptomatic spondylolysis, refractory degenerative disc disease, and adjacent segment disease, lumbar fusion is probably recommended. Intraoperatively, in cases with extensive decompression associated with a wide disc space or insufficient bone stock, fusion is preferred. Instrumentation improves the fusion rate, but it is not necessarily associated with improved recovery rate and better functional outcome. PMID:25187873

  11. Considerations in Spinal Fusion Surgery for Chronic Lumbar Pain: Psychosocial Factors, Rating Scales, and Perioperative Patient Education-A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudin, Daniel; Krafcik, Brianna M; Mansour, Tarek R; Alnemari, Ahmed

    2017-02-01

    Despite widespread use of lumbar spinal fusion as a treatment for back pain, outcomes remain variable. Optimizing patient selection can help to reduce adverse outcomes. This literature review was conducted to better understand factors associated with optimal postoperative results after lumbar spinal fusion for chronic back pain and current tools used for evaluation. The PubMed database was searched for clinical trials related to psychosocial determinants of outcome after lumbar spinal fusion surgery; evaluation of commonly used patient subjective outcome measures; and perioperative cognitive, behavioral, and educational therapies. Reference lists of included studies were also searched by hand for additional studies meeting inclusion and exclusion criteria. Patients' perception of good health before surgery and low cardiovascular comorbidity predict improved postoperative physical functional capacity and greater patient satisfaction. Depression, tobacco use, and litigation predict poorer outcomes after lumbar fusion. Incorporation of cognitive-behavioral therapy perioperatively can address these psychosocial risk factors and improve outcomes. The 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, European Quality of Life five dimensions questionnaire, visual analog pain scale, brief pain inventory, and Oswestry Disability Index can provide specific feedback to track patient progress and are important to understand when evaluating the current literature. This review summarizes current information and explains commonly used assessment tools to guide clinicians in decision making when caring for patients with lower back pain. When determining a treatment algorithm, physicians must consider predictive psychosocial factors. Use of perioperative cognitive-behavioral therapy and patient education can improve outcomes after lumbar spinal fusion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Are existing outcome instruments suitable for assessment of spinal trauma patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadhouder, Agnita; Buckens, Constantinus F M; Holtslag, Herman R; Oner, F Cumhur

    2010-11-01

    Valid outcome assessment tools specific for spinal trauma patients are necessary to establish the efficacy of different treatment options. So far, no validated specific outcome measures are available for this patient population. The purpose of this study was to assess the current state of outcome measurement in spinal trauma patients and to address the question of whether this group is adequately served by current disease-specific and generic health-related quality-of-life instruments. A number of widely used outcome measures deemed most appropriate were reviewed, and their applicability to spinal trauma outcome discussed. An overview of recent movements in the theoretical foundations of outcome assessment, as it pertains to spinal trauma patients has been attempted, along with a discussion of domains important for spinal trauma. Commonly used outcome measures that are recommended for use in trauma patients were reviewed from the perspective of spinal trauma. The authors further sought to select a number of spine trauma-relevant domains from the WHO's comprehensive International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) as a benchmark for assessing the content coverage of the commonly used outcome measurements reviewed. The study showed that there are no psychometrically validated outcome measurements for the spinal trauma population and there are no commonly used outcome measures that provide adequate content coverage for spinal trauma domains. Spinal trauma patients are currently followed either as a subset of the polytrauma population in the acute and early postacute setting or as a subset of neurological injury in the long-term revalidation medicine setting.

  13. Mini-open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangviriyapaiboon, Teera

    2008-09-01

    To demonstrate the surgical technique and advantages of the mini-open transforaminal approach for lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) combined with transpedicular screw fixation. Clinical and radiographic results were assessed to determine the clinical outcomes in twelve consecutive patients selected for minimally invasive access (mini-open technique) for TLIF in Prasat Neurological Institute. A retrospective analysis was performed on 12 patients (age range, 38-74 yr; mean, 54. 8 yr) who underwent mini-open transforaminal approach for lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) combined with transpedicular screw fixation between September 2006 and June 2008. The titanium pedicle screws were introduced bilaterally through the 3.5 cm length, skin incisions with Spine Classics MLD- system retractor, autologous bone graft were inserted to perform TLIF in all patients. Eight patients were augmented anterior column support with titanium interbody cage, unilateral cage insertion in four patients and the others were inserted bilaterally interbody cages. Six patients presented with low back pain and associated radiculopathy, and six presented with low back pain only. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion was performed at L3-L4 in two patients, L4-L5 in four patients, L5-S1 in five patients, and two levels fusion in one patient. All patients were able to ambulate after spinal fusion. The patients were able to walk within 1.4 days (range 1-2 days). The hospital stay averaged 4.4 days (range 3-7 days). Periodic follow-up took place 1 to 21 months after surgery (mean, 7.4 months). The radiological fusion was archived in all nine patients who were operated on more than two months age. The other three patients who had been follow-up less than two months were probably fusion on the 1-month followed-up radiological examination. The use of mini-open technique for pedicle screw instrumentation with spinal fusion procedure provides excellent clinical results and may be an operation of choice for

  14. Remifentanil in combination with ketamine versus remifentanil in spinal fusion surgery--a double blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, B A; Al Ramadani, R; Daas, R; Naylor, I; Zelkó, R

    2010-08-01

    This study is aimed at conducting a program for two different anesthetic methods used during a spinal fusion surgery to ensure better intra-operative hemodynamic stability and post-operative pain control. A prospective, randomized, double blind study in patients scheduled for spinal fusion surgery, who were randomly allocated to two groups, G1 and G2, (n = 15 per group), class I-II ASA, was carried out. Both groups received pre-operatively midazolam, followed intra-operatively by propofol, sevoflurane, atracurium, and either remifentanil infusion 0.2 microg/kg/min (G1), or the same dose of remifentanil infusion and low doses of ketamine infusion 1 microg/kg/min (G2) anesthetics, antidote medication and post-operative morphine doses. HR, MAP, vital signs, surgical bleeding, urine output, duration of surgery and duration of anesthesia were recorded. In a 24-h recovery period in a post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) the recovery time, the first pain score and analgesic requirements were measured. Intra-operative HR and arterial BP were significantly less (p < 0.05) in G1 as compared to G2. In the PACU the first pain scores were significantly less (p < 0.05) in G2 than in G1. The time for the first patient analgesia demand dose was greater in G2, as also morphine consumption which was greater in G1 than G2 (p < 0.05). Other results were the same. None of the patients had any adverse drug reaction. Adding low doses of ketamine hydrochloride could be a routine therapy to improve the hemodynamic stability and reduce the post-operative morphine consumption during spinal fusion surgery.

  15. Bipolar sealer device reduces blood loss and transfusion requirements in posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Zachary L; Son-Hing, Jochen P; Poe-Kochert, Connie; Thompson, George H

    2013-01-01

    Reducing perioperative blood loss and transfusion requirements is important in the operative treatment of idiopathic scoliosis. This can be achieved with special frames, cell saver systems, pharmacologic aspects, and other techniques. Recently there has been interest in bipolar sealer devices as an adjunct to traditional monopolar electrocautery. However, there is limited information on this device in pediatric spinal deformity surgery. We reviewed our experience with this device in a setting of a standard institutional operative carepath. Perioperative blood loss and transfusion requirements of 50 consecutive patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis undergoing a posterior spinal fusion and segmental spinal instrumentation and who had a bipolar sealer device used during their surgery was compared with a control group of the 50 preceding consecutive patients who did not. Anesthesia, surgical technique, use of intraoperative epsilon aminocaproic acid (Amicar), postoperative protocol, and indications for transfusions (hemoglobin≤7.0 g/dL) were identical in both groups. The preoperative demographics for the patients in both groups were statistically the same. The bipolar sealer group demonstrated a significant reduction in intraoperative estimated blood loss, total perioperative blood loss, volume of blood products transfused, and overall transfusion rate when compared with the control group. When subgroups consisting of only hybrid or all-pedicle screw constructs were considered individually, these findings remained consistent. There were no complications associated with the use of this device. Using the bipolar sealer device is a significant adjunct in decreasing perioperative blood loss and transfusion requirements in patients undergoing surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Level III-retrospective comparative study.

  16. Metallic artefact reduction with monoenergetic dual-energy CT: systematic ex vivo evaluation of posterior spinal fusion implants from various vendors and different spine levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guggenberger, R; Winklhofer, S; Osterhoff, G; Wanner, G A; Fortunati, M; Andreisek, G; Alkadhi, H; Stolzmann, P

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate optimal monoenergetic dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) settings for artefact reduction of posterior spinal fusion implants of various vendors and spine levels. Posterior spinal fusion implants of five vendors for cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine were examined ex vivo with single-energy (SE) CT (120 kVp) and DECT (140/100 kVp). Extrapolated monoenergetic DECT images at 64, 69, 88, 105 keV and individually adjusted monoenergy for optimised image quality (OPTkeV) were generated. Two independent radiologists assessed quantitative and qualitative image parameters for each device and spine level. Inter-reader agreements of quantitative and qualitative parameters were high (ICC = 0.81-1.00, κ = 0.54-0.77). HU values of spinal fusion implants were significantly different among vendors (P metallic artefacts from implants than SECT. Use of individual keV values for vendor and spine level is recommended. • Artefacts pose problems for CT following posterior spinal fusion implants. • CT images are interpreted better with monoenergetic extrapolation using dual-energy (DE) CT. • DECT extrapolation improves image quality and reduces metallic artefacts over SECT. • There were considerable differences in monoenergy values among vendors and spine levels. • Use of individualised monoenergy values is indicated for different metallic hardware devices.

  17. AxiaLIF system: minimally invasive device for presacral lumbar interbody spinal fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Block, Jon; Rapp,; Miller,Larry E.

    2011-01-01

    Steven M Rapp1, Larry E Miller2,3, Jon E Block31Michigan Spine Institute, Waterford, MI, USA; 2Miller Scientific Consulting Inc, Biltmore Lake, NC, USA; 3Jon E. Block, Ph.D., Inc., San Francisco, CA, USAAbstract: Lumbar fusion is commonly performed to alleviate chronic low back and leg pain secondary to disc degeneration, spondylolisthesis with or without concomitant lumbar spinal stenosis, or chronic lumbar instability. However, the risk of iatrogenic injury during traditional anterior, post...

  18. Deep postoperative spine infection treated by negative pressure therapy in patients with progressive spinal deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavese, Federico; Marengo, Lorenza; Corradin, Marco; Mansour, Mounira; Samba, Antoine; Andreacchio, Antonio; Rousset, Marie; Dimeglio, Alain

    2018-04-01

    The aim of the study is to review the outcome of using the VAC system in children and adolescents who have developed postoperative spinal infection after posterior instrumented spinal fusion, and to evaluate whether this technique is also feasible in patients treated with posterior instrumented fusion with polyester sublaminar bands. A total of 11 out of 118 consecutive children and adolescents (5 males) with deep postoperative spinal infection were identified; infections were categorised as early (acute), delayed (subacute) or late (chronic) according to time of onset. Irrespective of the etiology and the onset, all the deep infections were managed with the reported technique. All the patients had regular clinical and radiological follow-up. Eight out of 11 patients developed an early (72.7%), 2 a delayed (18.2%) and 1 a late deep postoperative infection (9.1%); 7 out of 11 (63.6%) showed severe mental compromise. No statistically significant differences were observed for mean number of VAC dressing changes (p = 0.81) and mean length of hospitalisation comparing patients with early infection versus patients with delayed or late infections (p = 0.32). Mean number of VAC dressing changes (p = 0.02) and mean number of hospitalisation days (p = 0.05) were higher in patients with underlying neurological disorders than in those without, while mean length of hospitalisation was longer in neuromuscular patients. The application of the VAC system, as an adjunct to surgical debridement and adequate antibiotic therapy, is a reliable method for the treatment of postoperative infection in children and adolescents undergoing spinal instrumentation and fusion. It can reduce the need for further complex soft-tissue procedure, removal of hardware with consequent loss of correction, and pseudoarthrosis. Finally, the use of VAC therapy is not contraindicated in patients treated with hybrid constructs with sublaminar bands. III.

  19. Rigid Occipitocervical Instrumented Fusion for Atlantoaxial Instability in an 18-Month-Old Toddler With Brachytelephalangic Chondrodysplasia Punctata: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, Hiroki; Takahashi, Jun; Takano, Kyoko; Inaba, Yuji; Motobayashi, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Gen; Kuraishi, Shugo; Shimizu, Masayuki; Ikegami, Shota; Futatsugi, Toshimasa; Uehara, Masashi; Kosho, Tomoki; Kato, Hiroyuki; Uno, Koki

    2017-12-01

    Case report. We report here on an 18-month-old boy with brachytelephalangic chondrodysplasia punctata (BCDP), whose atlantoaxial instability was successfully managed with occipitocervical instrumented fusion (OCF) using screw and rod instrumentations. Recently, there have been a number of reports on BCDP with early onset of cervical myelopathy. Surgical OCF is a vital intervention to salvage affected individuals from the life-threatening morbidity. Despite recent advancement of instrumentation techniques, however, rigid OCF is technically demanding in very young children with small and fragile osseous elements. To our best knowledge, this is the first report on application of the instrumentation technique to a toddler patient with BCDP. A 16-month-old boy with BCDP presented with tetraplegia and swallow obstacle. Hypoplasia of the odontoid process and atlantoaxial instability were present in lateral radiographs. T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images revealed a high signal region in the spinal cord at the C1-2 and C7-T1 levels. Cervical computed tomography (CT) showed that the pedicles and lateral masses in the cervical spine were small and immature, but the laminae were comparatively thick. One week before surgery, the patient was fitted with a Halo-body jacket. We performed plate-rod placement with occipital cortical screws and C2/C3 interlaminar screws, and added an autogenous bone graft using the right 8 and 9 ribs. Rigid fixation of the occipito-cervical spine was completed successfully without major complications. Postoperative halo-body jacket immobilization was continued for 3 months, after which Aspen collar was fitted. CT confirmed occipitocervical bone fusion at 6 months after surgery. Mild clinical improvements in motor power of the affected muscles and swallowing were witnessed at 1 year postoperatively. Rigid fixation using screw, rod, and occipital plate instrumentation was successful in an 18-month-old toddler with BCDP and atlantoaxial

  20. Sagittal spinal balance after lumbar spinal fusion: the impact of anterior column support results from a randomized clinical trial with an eight- to thirteen-year radiographic follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videbaek, Tina S; Bünger, Cody E; Henriksen, Mads; Neils, Egund; Christensen, Finn B

    2011-02-01

    Randomized clinical trial. To analyze the long-term clinical impact of anterior column support on sagittal balance after lumbar spinal fusion. Several investigators have stressed the importance of maintaining sagittal balance in relation to spinal fusion to avoid lumbar 'flat back,' accelerated adjacent segment degeneration, pain, and inferior functional outcome. Only limited evidence exists on how sagittal alignment affects clinical outcome. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion combined with posterolateral fusion has been proved superior to posterolateral fusion alone regarding outcome and cost-effectiveness. No randomized controlled trial has been published analyzing the effect of anterior support on radiographic measurements of sagittal balance. Between 1996 and 1999, 148 patients with severe chronic low back pain were randomly selected for posterolateral lumbar fusion plus anterior support (PLF + ALIF) or posterolateral lumbar fusion. A total of 92 patients participated. Sagittal balance parameters were examined on full lateral radiographs of the spine: pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilt (PT), sacral slope, thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, and positioning of C7 plumb line. The type of lumbar lordosis was evaluated and outcome assessed by Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Follow-up rate was 74%. Sagittal balance parameters were similar between randomization groups. None of the parameters differed significantly between patients with an ODI from 0 to 40 and patients with ODI over 40. Balanced patients had a significantly superior outcome as measured by ODI (P Lumbar lordosis and type of lordosis correlated with outcome but could not explain the superior outcome in the group with anterior support. Whether sagittal balance and anterior support during fusion provide a protective effect on adjacent motion segments remains unclear.

  1. Management of unstable spinal fractures with segmental spinal instrumentation (VSP System : Results at 5 year follow up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Dipankar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pedicle screw instrumentation has been widely used for spinal stabilisation following spinal injury with variable results. The controversial points associated with spinal injury are effects of canal compromise and decompression on neurological status. Methods: Thirty four patients of unstable thoraco-lumbar fracture with or without neuro-deficit were treated by decompression and stabilisation with VSP system and followed up for 22 - 39 months (mean 29 months. The results were evaluated by neurological recovery (ASIA score, pain relief, loss of surgical correction and functional rehabilitation (FIM score. Results: We achieved a mean post-operative correction of the kyphotic deformity by 14 degrees and an average gain of 30.2% in the canal diameter by decompression. However no correlation was established between degree of canal compromise before or after the surgery with the final neurological outcome. Conclusion: Although the infrastructure for spinal injury management in developing countries is inadequate in many aspects, we find that it is still possible to achieve results, which are comparable with standard literature by adequate decompression and stabilisation followed by appropriate rehabilitation according to the social and cultural demands of the patients.

  2. POSTERIOR LUMBAR INTERBODY FUSION AND INSTRUMENTED POSTEROLATERAL FUSION IN ADULT SPONDYLOLISTHESIS: ASSESSMENT AND CLINICAL OUTCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajarajan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Aim of this study is to assess and compare the outcomes of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF and posterolateral fusion (PLF in adult isthmic spondylosthesis. BACKGROUND: Posterolateral fusion has been considered the best method and widely been used for surgical treatment of adult spondylolisthesis.Superior results have subsequently been reported with interbody fusion with cages and posterior instrumentation MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty six patients with isthmic spondylolisthesis were operated. One group (20 patients had decompression and posterolateral fusion (PLF with a pedicle screw system; other group (16 patients was treated by decompression, posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF and a Pedicle screw system. In both groups adequate decompression was done RESULTS: Seventy seven percent of the patients had a good result with (PLIF and 68 percent with posterolateral fusion (PLF. However there was no statistical difference in cases with low grade slipping, whereas the difference was significant for cases with high grade slipping. Fusion rate was 93% with (PLIF and 68% with (PLF, but without any significant incidence in the functional outcome. 78% has relief of sciatica and neurogenic claudication. CONCLUSION: Based on these findings we found that for high grade spondylolisthesis which requires reduction or if the disc space is still high posterior lumbar inter body fusion is preferable. For low grade spondylolisthesis or if the disc space is narrow posterolateral fusion is preferable. A successful result of fusion operation depends on adequate decompression which relieves radicular symptoms.

  3. Pneumomediastinum, Subcutaneous Emphysema, and Tracheal Tear in the Early Postoperative Period of Spinal Surgery in a Paraplegic Achondroplastic Dwarf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan Kahraman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Achondroplasia was first described in 1878 and is the most common form of human skeletal dysplasia. Spinal manifestations include thoracolumbar kyphosis, foramen magnum, and spinal stenosis. Progressive kyphosis can result in spinal cord compression and paraplegia due to the reduced size of spinal canal. The deficits are typically progressive, presenting as an insidious onset of paresthesia, followed by the inability to walk and then by urinary incontinence. Paraplegia can be the result of direct pressure on the cord by bone or the injury to the anterior spinal vessels by a protruding bone. Surgical treatment consists of posterior instrumentation, fusion with total wide laminectomy at stenosis levels, and anterior interbody support. Pedicle screws are preferred for spinal instrumentation because wires and hooks may induce spinal cord injury due to the narrow spinal canal. Pedicle lengths are significantly shorter, and 20–25 mm long screws are appropriate for lower thoracic and lumbar pedicles in adult achondroplastic There is no information about the appropriate length of screws for the upper thoracic pedicles. Tracheal injury due to inappropriate pedicle screw length is a rare complication. We report an extremely rare case of tracheal tear due to posterior instrumentation and its management in the early postoperative period.

  4. The mechanical consequence of failure of ossified union in attempted posterior spinal fusion. A canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonecipher, T K; Vanderby, R; Sciammarella, C A; Lei, S S; Fisk, J R

    1983-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of pseudarthrosis in posterior spinal fusion was investigated. A canine model was developed in which an incompletely ossified posterior fusion mass was consistently produced. The spines were excised, and the motion segments were mechanically tested using a specially developed loading apparatus. Tests were performed to evaluate stiffness of the segments to loading with compression, torsion, and anterioposterior and lateral bending shear stiffness. Changes in other modes of loading were less consistent. The motion characteristics of the pseudarthrosis could not be predicted from the extent of the osseous defect noted on roentgenograms. These findings correlate clinically with the progression of curvature seen with pseudarthrosis in scoliosis surgery and the unpredictable results of pseudarthrosis in posterior fusion performed in treatment of degenerative disc disease.

  5. Early results of two methods of posterior spinal stabilization in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-04-17

    Apr 17, 2013 ... Discussion. PSR has become the gold standard in posterior spinal fusion techniques. Its success has revolutionized spinal surgery. The Advantages include three column fusion as against one column fusion as is seen in other posterior fusion techniques like Rogers and Bohlman's techniques.[9‑13] Other.

  6. Health economic evaluation in lumbar spinal fusion: a systematic literature review anno 2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soegaard, Rikke; Christensen, Finn B

    2006-01-01

    in clinical practice are present, economic evaluation is needed in order to facilitate the decision-makers' budget allocations. NHS Economic Evaluation Database, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library were searched. Two independent reviewers (one clinical content expert and one economic content expert) applied...... that the clinical effects are statistically synonymous, it does not support the use of high-cost techniques. There is a great potential for improvement of methodological quality in economic evaluations of lumbar spinal fusion and further research is imperative....

  7. How Is Pulmonary Function and Exercise Tolerance Affected in Patients With AIS Who Have Undergone Spinal Fusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeans, Kelly A; Lovejoy, John F; Karol, Lori A; McClung, Anna M

    2017-11-01

    Prospectively enrolled AIS patients who underwent spinal fusion, with 2 year follow-up. To evaluate the cardiovascular fitness and activity level in patients with AIS pre- and post-spinal fusion and to determine if initial curve magnitude or pulmonary function is predictive of exercise capacity. Researchers have tried to link pulmonary function testing (PFT) to exercise capacity; the results are mixed. Some report no improvement in PFTs or aerobic activity after surgical correction, and PFT measures were not predictive of exercise capacity. Conflicting results have shown Vo 2max results to fall within normal range in AIS patients while PFTs show minimal impairment. AIS patients underwent PFT and oxygen consumption (VO 2 ) testing during a submaximal graded exercise test (GXT) pre- and post-spinal fusion. Vo 2max was predicted in those patients who completed the test to 85% of maximal heart rate. Pre- to postoperative changes were assessed and then compared to age-matched control subjects. Correlations between Vo 2max and curve severity, pulmonary function, and activity level were assessed. Thirty-seven patients participated. Vo 2max was predicted in 23 patients pre- and postoperation. There was a significant reduction in Vo 2max postfusion (39.5 ± 6.5 mL/kg/min vs 42.1 ± 8.1 mL/kg/min, p = .033); however, compared with controls (40.5 ± 6.5 mL/kg/min), all data were within the normal range (p > .05). AIS patients reporting high activity had significantly greater Vo 2max than those reporting low activity both pre and postoperatively, but this difference only met statistical significance preop (p .05). Vo 2max in patients with AIS is within normal range both pre- and postfusion. Pulmonary limitations are accommodated for with a slightly increased breathing rate and a slightly reduced overall workload. Activity level rather than curve severity affects Vo 2max outcomes following fusion in AIS. Copyright © 2017 Scoliosis Research Society. Published by Elsevier Inc

  8. Biomechanical demands on posterior fusion instrumentation during lordosis restoration procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Calvin C; Martin, Audrey; Telles, Connor; Leasure, Jeremi; Iezza, Alex; Ames, Christopher; Kondrashov, Dimitriy

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE The goal of this study was to investigate the forces placed on posterior fusion instrumentation by 3 commonly used intraoperative techniques to restore lumbar lordosis: 1) cantilever bending; 2) in situ bending; and 3) compression and/or distraction of screws along posterior fusion rods. METHODS Five cadaveric torsos were instrumented with pedicle screws at the L1-5 levels. Specimens underwent each of the 3 lordosis restoration procedures. The pedicle screw pullout force was monitored in real time via strain gauges that were mounted unilaterally at each level. The degree of correction was noted through fluoroscopic imaging. The peak loads experienced on the screws during surgery, total demand on instrumentation, and resting loads after corrective maneuvers were measured. RESULTS A mean overall lordotic correction of 10.9 ± 4.7° was achieved. No statistically significant difference in lordotic correction was observed between restoration procedures. In situ bending imparted the largest loads intraoperatively with an average of 1060 ± 599.9 N, followed by compression/distraction (971 ± 534.1 N) and cantilever bending (705 ± 413.0 N). In situ bending produced the largest total demand and postoperative loads at L-1 (1879 ± 1064.1 and 487 ± 118.8 N, respectively), which were statistically higher than cantilever bending and compression/distraction (786 ± 272.1 and 138 ± 99.2 N, respectively). CONCLUSIONS In situ bending resulted in the highest mechanical demand on posterior lumbar instrumentation, as well as the largest postoperative loads at L-1. These results suggest that the forces generated with in situ bending indicate a greater chance of intraoperative instrumentation failure and postoperative proximal pedicle screw pullout when compared with cantilever bending and/or compression/distraction options. The results are aimed at optimizing correction and fusion strategies in lordosis restoration cases.

  9. Osteoconductive hydroxyapatite coated PEEK for spinal fusion surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Byung-Dong, E-mail: cera72@kims.re.kr [Functional Ceramics Group, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwon-daero, Seongsan-gu, Changwon, Gyeong-Nam, 641-010 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Dong-Soo; Choi, Jong-Jin; Ryu, Jungho; Yoon, Woon-Ha; Choi, Joon-Hwan; Kim, Jong-Woo; Ahn, Cheol-Woo [Functional Ceramics Group, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwon-daero, Seongsan-gu, Changwon, Gyeong-Nam, 641-010 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoun-Ee [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, San 56-1 Sillim-Dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Byung-Ho; Jung, In-Kwon [GENOSS, Gyeonggi R and DB Center, Iui-dong, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do, 443-270 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has attracted much interest as biomaterial for interbody fusion cages due to its similar stiffness to bone and good radio-transparency for post-op visualization. Hydroxyapatite (HA) coating stimulates bone growth to the medical implant. The objective of this work is to make an implant consisting of biocompatible PEEK with an osteoconductive HA surface for spinal or orthopedic applications. Highly dense and well-adhered HA coating was developed on medical-grade PEEK using aerosol deposition (AD) without thermal degradation of the PEEK. The HA coating had a dense microstructure with no cracks or pores, and showed good adhesion to PEEK at adhesion strengths above 14.3 MPa. The crystallinity of the HA coating was remarkably enhanced by hydrothermal annealing as post-deposition heat-treatment. In addition, in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility of PEEK, in terms of cell adhesion morphology, cell proliferation, differentiation, and bone-to-implant contact ratio, were remarkably enhanced by the HA coating through AD.

  10. Osteoconductive hydroxyapatite coated PEEK for spinal fusion surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Byung-Dong; Park, Dong-Soo; Choi, Jong-Jin; Ryu, Jungho; Yoon, Woon-Ha; Choi, Joon-Hwan; Kim, Jong-Woo; Ahn, Cheol-Woo; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Yoon, Byung-Ho; Jung, In-Kwon

    2013-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has attracted much interest as biomaterial for interbody fusion cages due to its similar stiffness to bone and good radio-transparency for post-op visualization. Hydroxyapatite (HA) coating stimulates bone growth to the medical implant. The objective of this work is to make an implant consisting of biocompatible PEEK with an osteoconductive HA surface for spinal or orthopedic applications. Highly dense and well-adhered HA coating was developed on medical-grade PEEK using aerosol deposition (AD) without thermal degradation of the PEEK. The HA coating had a dense microstructure with no cracks or pores, and showed good adhesion to PEEK at adhesion strengths above 14.3 MPa. The crystallinity of the HA coating was remarkably enhanced by hydrothermal annealing as post-deposition heat-treatment. In addition, in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility of PEEK, in terms of cell adhesion morphology, cell proliferation, differentiation, and bone-to-implant contact ratio, were remarkably enhanced by the HA coating through AD.

  11. Osteoconductive hydroxyapatite coated PEEK for spinal fusion surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Byung-Dong; Park, Dong-Soo; Choi, Jong-Jin; Ryu, Jungho; Yoon, Woon-Ha; Choi, Joon-Hwan; Kim, Jong-Woo; Ahn, Cheol-Woo; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Yoon, Byung-Ho; Jung, In-Kwon

    2013-10-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has attracted much interest as biomaterial for interbody fusion cages due to its similar stiffness to bone and good radio-transparency for post-op visualization. Hydroxyapatite (HA) coating stimulates bone growth to the medical implant. The objective of this work is to make an implant consisting of biocompatible PEEK with an osteoconductive HA surface for spinal or orthopedic applications. Highly dense and well-adhered HA coating was developed on medical-grade PEEK using aerosol deposition (AD) without thermal degradation of the PEEK. The HA coating had a dense microstructure with no cracks or pores, and showed good adhesion to PEEK at adhesion strengths above 14.3 MPa. The crystallinity of the HA coating was remarkably enhanced by hydrothermal annealing as post-deposition heat-treatment. In addition, in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility of PEEK, in terms of cell adhesion morphology, cell proliferation, differentiation, and bone-to-implant contact ratio, were remarkably enhanced by the HA coating through AD.

  12. 90-day Readmission After Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery in New York State Between 2005 and 2014: A 10-year Analysis of a Statewide Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaj, Ali A; Lang, Gernot; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Avila, Mauricio J; Mao, Jialin; Sedrakyan, Art

    2017-11-15

    MINI: We assessed 90-day readmission and evaluated risk factors associated with readmission after lumbar spinal fusion surgery in New York State. The overall 90-day readmission rate was 24.8%. Age, sex, race, insurance, procedure, number of operated spinal levels, health service area, and comorbidities are major risk factors for 90-day readmission. Retrospective cohort study. The aim of this study was to assess 90-day readmission and evaluate risk factors associated with readmission after lumbar fusion in New York State. Readmission is becoming an important metric for quality and efficiency of health care. Readmission and its predictors following spine surgery are overall poorly understood and limited evidence is available specifically in lumbar fusion. The New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS) was utilized to capture patients undergoing lumbar fusion from 2005 to 2014. Temporal trend of 90-day readmission was assessed using Cochran-Armitage test. Logistic regression was used to examine predictors associated with 90-day readmission. There were 86,869 patients included in this cohort study. The overall 90-day readmission rate was 24.8%. On a multivariable analysis model, age (odds ratio [OR] comparing ≥75 versus New York-Pennsylvania border: 0.67, 95% CI: 0.61-0.73), and comorbidity, i.e., coronary artery disease (OR: 1.26, 95% CI: 1.19-1.33) were significantly associated with 90-day readmission. Directions of the odds ratios for these factors were consistent after stratification by procedure type. Age, sex, race, insurance, procedure, number of operated spinal levels, HSA, and comorbidities are major risk factors for 90-day readmission. Our study allows risk calculation to determine high-risk patients before undergoing spinal fusion surgery to prevent early readmission, improve quality of care, and reduce health care expenditures. 3.

  13. Risk factor analysis for predicting vertebral body re-collapse after posterior instrumented fusion in thoracolumbar burst fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hae-Dong; Bang, Chungwon; Lee, Jae Chul; Soh, Jae-Wan; Choi, Sung-Woo; Cho, Hyeung-Kyu; Shin, Byung-Joon

    2018-02-01

    In the posterior instrumented fusion surgery for thoracolumbar (T-L) burst fracture, early postoperative re-collapse of well-reduced vertebral body fracture could induce critical complications such as correction loss, posttraumatic kyphosis, and metal failure, often leading to revision surgery. Furthermore, re-collapse is quite difficult to predict because of the variety of risk factors, and no widely accepted accurate prediction systems exist. Although load-sharing classification has been known to help to decide the need for additional anterior column support, this radiographic scoring system has several critical limitations. (1) To evaluate risk factors and predictors for postoperative re-collapse in T-L burst fractures. (2) Through the decision-making model, we aimed to predict re-collapse and prevent unnecessary additional anterior spinal surgery. Retrospective comparative study. Two-hundred and eight (104 men and 104 women) consecutive patients with T-L burst fracture who underwent posterior instrumented fusion were reviewed retrospectively. Burst fractures caused by high-energy trauma (fall from a height and motor vehicle accident) with a minimum 1-year follow-up were included. The average age at the time of surgery was 45.9 years (range, 15-79). With respect to the involved spinal level, 95 cases (45.6%) involved L1, 51 involved T12, 54 involved L2, and 8 involved T11. Mean fixation segments were 3.5 (range, 2-5). Pedicle screw instrumentation including fractured vertebra had been performed in 129 patients (62.3%). Clinical data using self-report measures (visual analog scale score), radiographic measurements (plain radiograph, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance image), and functional measures using the Oswestry Disability Index were evaluated. Body height loss of fractured vertebra, body wedge angle, and Cobb angle were measured in serial plain radiographs. We assigned patients to the re-collapse group if their body height loss progressed greater

  14. Intrathecal morphine attenuates acute opioid tolerance secondary to remifentanil infusions during spinal surgery in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripi PA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Paul A Tripi,1 Matthew E Kuestner,1 Connie S Poe-Kochert,2 Kasia Rubin,1 Jochen P Son-Hing,2 George H Thompson,2 Joseph D Tobias3 1Division of Pediatric Anesthesiology, 2Division of Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery, Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, 3Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA Introduction: The unique pharmacokinetic properties of remifentanil with a context-sensitive half-life unaffected by length of infusion contribute to its frequent use during anesthetic management during posterior spinal fusion in children and adolescents. However, its intraoperative administration can lead to increased postoperative analgesic requirements, which is postulated to be the result of acute opioid tolerance with enhancement of spinal N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor function. Although strategies to prevent or reduce tolerance have included the coadministration of longer acting opioids or ketamine, the majority of these studies have demonstrated little to no benefit. The current study retrospectively evaluates the efficacy of intrathecal morphine (ITM in preventing hyperalgesia following a remifentanil infusion.Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 54 patients undergoing posterior spinal fusion with segmental spinal instrumentation, to evaluate the effects of ITM on hyperalgesia from remifentanil. Patients were divided into two groups based on whether they did or did not receive remifentanil during the surgery: no remifentanil (control group (n=27 and remifentanil (study group (n=27. Data included demographics, remifentanil dose and duration, Wong–Baker visual analog scale postoperative pain scores, and postoperative intravenous morphine consumption in the first 48 postoperative hours.Results: The demographics of the two study groups were similar. There were no differences in the Wong–Baker visual analog

  15. Return to sports after surgery to correct adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a survey of the Spinal Deformity Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Ronald A; Kang, Daniel G; Lenke, Lawrence G; Sucato, Daniel J; Bevevino, Adam J

    2015-05-01

    There are no guidelines for when surgeons should allow patients to return to sports and athletic activities after spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Current recommendations are based on anecdotal reports and a survey performed more than a decade ago in the era of first/second-generation posterior implants. To identify current recommendations for return to sports and athletic activities after surgery for AIS. Questionnaire-based survey. Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis after corrective surgery. Type and time to return to sports. A survey was administered to members of the Spinal Deformity Study Group. The survey consisted of surgeon demographic information, six clinical case scenarios, three different construct types (hooks, pedicle screws, hybrid), and questions regarding the influence of lowest instrumented vertebra (LIV) and postoperative physical therapy. Twenty-three surgeons completed the survey, and respondents were all experienced expert deformity surgeons. Pedicle screw instrumentation allows earlier return to noncontact and contact sports, with most patients allowed to return to running by 3 months, both noncontact and contact sports by 6 months, and collision sports by 12 months postoperatively. For all construct types, approximately 20% never allow return to collision sports, whereas all surgeons allow eventual return to contact and noncontact sports regardless of construct type. In addition to construct type, we found progressively distal LIV resulted in more surgeons never allowing return to collision sports, with 12% for selective thoracic fusion to T12/L1 versus 33% for posterior spinal fusion to L4. Most respondents also did not recommend formal postoperative physical therapy (78%). Of all surgeons surveyed, there was only one reported instrumentation failure/pullout without neurologic deficit after a patient went snowboarding 2 weeks postoperatively. Modern posterior instrumentation allows surgeons to recommend earlier return

  16. Monitoring and Hardware Management for Critical Fusion Plasma Instrumentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Paulo F.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlled nuclear fusion aims to obtain energy by particles collision confined inside a nuclear reactor (Tokamak. These ionized particles, heavier isotopes of hydrogen, are the main elements inside of plasma that is kept at high temperatures (millions of Celsius degrees. Due to high temperatures and magnetic confinement, plasma is exposed to several sources of instabilities which require a set of procedures by the control and data acquisition systems throughout fusion experiments processes. Control and data acquisition systems often used in nuclear fusion experiments are based on the Advanced Telecommunication Computer Architecture (AdvancedTCA® standard introduced by the Peripheral Component Interconnect Industrial Manufacturers Group (PICMG®, to meet the demands of telecommunications that require large amount of data (TB transportation at high transfer rates (Gb/s, to ensure high availability including features such as reliability, serviceability and redundancy. For efficient plasma control, systems are required to collect large amounts of data, process it, store for later analysis, make critical decisions in real time and provide status reports either from the experience itself or the electronic instrumentation involved. Moreover, systems should also ensure the correct handling of detected anomalies and identified faults, notify the system operator of occurred events, decisions taken to acknowledge and implemented changes. Therefore, for everything to work in compliance with specifications it is required that the instrumentation includes hardware management and monitoring mechanisms for both hardware and software. These mechanisms should check the system status by reading sensors, manage events, update inventory databases with hardware system components in use and maintenance, store collected information, update firmware and installed software modules, configure and handle alarms to detect possible system failures and prevent emergency

  17. Monitoring and Hardware Management for Critical Fusion Plasma Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Paulo F.; Santos, Bruno; Correia, Miguel; Combo, Álvaro M.; Rodrigues, AntÓnio P.; Pereira, Rita C.; Fernandes, Ana; Cruz, Nuno; Sousa, Jorge; Carvalho, Bernardo B.; Batista, AntÓnio J. N.; Correia, Carlos M. B. A.; Gonçalves, Bruno

    2018-01-01

    Controlled nuclear fusion aims to obtain energy by particles collision confined inside a nuclear reactor (Tokamak). These ionized particles, heavier isotopes of hydrogen, are the main elements inside of plasma that is kept at high temperatures (millions of Celsius degrees). Due to high temperatures and magnetic confinement, plasma is exposed to several sources of instabilities which require a set of procedures by the control and data acquisition systems throughout fusion experiments processes. Control and data acquisition systems often used in nuclear fusion experiments are based on the Advanced Telecommunication Computer Architecture (AdvancedTCA®) standard introduced by the Peripheral Component Interconnect Industrial Manufacturers Group (PICMG®), to meet the demands of telecommunications that require large amount of data (TB) transportation at high transfer rates (Gb/s), to ensure high availability including features such as reliability, serviceability and redundancy. For efficient plasma control, systems are required to collect large amounts of data, process it, store for later analysis, make critical decisions in real time and provide status reports either from the experience itself or the electronic instrumentation involved. Moreover, systems should also ensure the correct handling of detected anomalies and identified faults, notify the system operator of occurred events, decisions taken to acknowledge and implemented changes. Therefore, for everything to work in compliance with specifications it is required that the instrumentation includes hardware management and monitoring mechanisms for both hardware and software. These mechanisms should check the system status by reading sensors, manage events, update inventory databases with hardware system components in use and maintenance, store collected information, update firmware and installed software modules, configure and handle alarms to detect possible system failures and prevent emergency scenarios

  18. A comparison of commercially available demineralized bone matrices with and without human mesenchymal stem cells in a rodent spinal fusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tetsuo; Lord, Elizabeth L; Suzuki, Akinobu; Takahashi, Shinji; Scott, Trevor P; Phan, Kevin; Tian, Haijun; Daubs, Michael D; Shiba, Keiichiro; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE The efficacy of some demineralized bone matrix (DBM) substances has been demonstrated in the spinal fusion of rats; however, no previous comparative study has reported the efficacy of DBM with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). There is an added cost to the products with stem cells, which should be justified by improved osteogenic potential. The purpose of this study is to prospectively compare the fusion rates of 3 different commercially available DBM substances, both with and without hMSCs. METHODS Posterolateral fusion was performed in 32 mature athymic nude rats. Three groups of 8 rats were implanted with 1 of 3 DBMs: Trinity Evolution (DBM with stem cells), Grafton (DBM without stem cells), or DBX (DBM without stem cells). A fourth group with no implanted material was used as a control group. Radiographs were obtained at 2, 4, and 8 weeks. The rats were euthanized at 8 weeks. Overall fusion was determined by manual palpation and micro-CT. RESULTS The fusion rates at 8 weeks on the radiographs for Trinity Evolution, Grafton, and DBX were 8 of 8 rats, 3 of 8 rats, and 5 of 8 rats, respectively. A significant difference was found between Trinity Evolution and Grafton (p = 0.01). The overall fusion rates as determined by micro-CT and manual palpation for Trinity Evolution, Grafton, and DBX were 4 of 8 rats, 3 of 8 rats, and 3 of 8 rats, respectively. The Trinity Evolution substance had the highest overall fusion rate, however no significant difference was found between groups. CONCLUSIONS The efficacies of these DBM substances are demonstrated; however, the advantage of DBM with hMSCs could not be found in terms of posterolateral fusion. When evaluating spinal fusion using DBM substances, CT analysis is necessary in order to not overestimate fusion.

  19. Effect of Surgical Approach on Pulmonary Function in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Patients: A Systemic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andy C H; Feger, Mark A; Singla, Anuj; Abel, Mark F

    2016-11-15

    Systemic review and meta-analysis. To analyze the effect of spinal fusion and instrumentation for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) on absolute pulmonary function test (PFTs). Pulmonary function is correlated with severity of deformity in AIS patients and studies that have analyzed the effect of spinal fusion and instrumentation on PFTs for AIS have reported inconsistent results. There is a need to analyze the effect of spinal fusion on PFTs with stratification by surgical approach. Our analysis included 22 studies. Cohen's d effect sizes were calculated for absolute PFT outcome measures with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Meta-analyses were performed at each postoperative time frame for six homogeneous surgical approaches: (i) combined anterior release and posterior fusion with instrumentation; (ii) combined video assisted anterior release and posterior fusion with instrumentation without thoracoplasty; (iii) posterior fusion with instrumentation without thoracoplasty; (iv) anterior fusion with instrumentation and without thoracoplasty; (v) video assisted anterior fusion with instrumentation without thoracoplasty; and (vi) any scoliosis surgery with additional thoracoplasty. Anterior spinal fusion with instrumentation, any scoliosis surgery with concomitant thoracoplasty, or video-assisted anterior fusion with instrumentation for AIS had similar absolute PFTs at their 2 year postoperative follow up compared with their preoperative PFTs (effect sizes ranging from -0.2-0.2 with all CI crossing "0"). Posterior spinal fusion with instrumentation (with or without an anterior release) demonstrated small to moderate increases in PFTs 2 years postoperatively (effect sizes ranging from 0.35-0.65 with all CI not crossing "0"). Anterior fusion with instrumentation, regardless of the approach, and any scoliosis surgery with concomitant thoracoplasty do not lead to significant change in pulmonary functions 2 year after surgery. Posterior spinal fusion with instrumentation

  20. Comparison between 4.0-mm stainless steel and 4.75-mm titanium alloy single-rod spinal instrumentation for anterior thoracoscopic scoliosis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seung Hwan; Ugrinow, Valerie L; Upasani, Vidyadhar V; Pawelek, Jeff B; Newton, Peter O

    2008-09-15

    Retrospective review of a consecutive, single surgeon case series. To compare minimum 2-year postoperative outcomes between 4.0-mm stainless steel and 4.75-mm titanium alloy single-rod anterior thoracoscopic instrumentation for the treatment of thoracic idiopathic scoliosis. Advances in anterior thoracoscopic spinal instrumentation for scoliosis have attempted to mitigate the postoperative complications of rod failure, pseudarthrosis, and deformity progression. Biomechanical data suggest that the 4.75-mm titanium construct has a lower risk of fatigue failure compared to the 4.0-mm stainless steel construct. Sixty-four consecutive anterior thoracoscopic spinal instrumentation cases in patients with thoracic scoliosis performed by a single surgeon and with minimum 2-year follow-up were retrospectively reviewed. The first 34 cases used a 4.0-mm stainless steel (SS) construct, whereas the subsequent 30 cases used a 4.75-mm titanium (Ti) alloy instrumentation system. The first 10 SS cases and the first 5 Ti cases were excluded from the statistical comparison to account for a potential learning curve effect. A multivariate analysis of variance (P 0.13). The average follow-up in the SS group was, however, significantly longer than in the Ti group (4.0 +/- 1.4 years vs. 2.3 +/- 1.0 years; P = 0.001). Preop main thoracic Cobb angles were similar between the 2 groups (P = 0.62); however, the 2-year main thoracic Cobb was significantly smaller (P = 0.03) and the 2-year percent correction was significantly greater in the Ti group (P = 0.03). Five patients (21%) in the SS group had a pseudarthrosis, 3 (13%) experienced rod failure, and 2 (8%) required a revision posterior spinal fusion. In the Ti group, 2 patients (8%) had a pseudarthrosis, and no patient experienced rod failure or required a revision procedure. Although the average follow-up in the Ti group was significantly shorter than in the SS group, the 4.75-mm titanium alloy construct resulted in improved maintenance of

  1. OP-1 compared with iliac crest autograft in instrumented posterolateral fusion a randomized, multicenter non-inferiority trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delawi, Diyar; Jacobs, Wilco; Van Susante, Job L C; Rillardon, Ludovic; Prestamburgo, Domenico; Specchia, Nicola; Gay, Emmanuel; Verschoor, Nico; Garcia-Fernandez, Carlos; Guerado, Enrique; Van Ufford, Henriette Quarles; Kruyt, Moyo C.; Dhert, Wouter J A; Cumhur Oner, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Spinal fusion with the use of autograft is a commonly performed procedure. However, harvesting of bone from the iliac crest is associated with complications. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are extensively used as alternatives, often without sufficient evidence of safety and efficacy.

  2. Instrumented fusion in a 12-month-old with atlanto-occipital dislocation: case report and literature review of infant occipitocervical fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Andrew T; Dewan, Michael C; Patel, Bhairav; Geck, Matthew J; Tomycz, Luke D

    2017-08-01

    The treatment of atlantoaxial dislocation in very young children is challenging and lacks a consensus management strategy. We review the literature on infantile occipitocervical (OC) fusion is appraised and technical considerations are organized for ease of reference. Surgical decisions such as graft type and instrumentation details are summarized, along with the use of bone morphogenic protein and post-operative orthoses. We present the case of a 12-month-old who underwent instrumented occipitocervical (OC) fusion in the setting of traumatic atlanto-occipital dislocation (AOD). Occipitocervical (OC) arthrodesis is obtainable in very young infants and children. Surgical approaches are variable and use a combination of autologous grafting and creative screw and/or wire constructs. The heterogeneity of pathologic etiology leading to OC fusion makes it difficult to make definitive recommendations for surgical management.

  3. Interobserver agreement in fusion status assessment after instrumental desis of the lower lumbar spine using 64-slice multidetector computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laoutliev, Borislav; Havsteen, Inger; Bech, Birthe Højlund

    2012-01-01

    Persistent lower back pain after instrumental posterolateral desis may arise from incomplete fusion. We investigate the impact of experience on interobserver agreement in fusion estimation.......Persistent lower back pain after instrumental posterolateral desis may arise from incomplete fusion. We investigate the impact of experience on interobserver agreement in fusion estimation....

  4. The clinical outcomes of surgical treatment of noncontiguous spinal tuberculosis: a retrospective study in 23 cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Huang

    Full Text Available STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective clinical study. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of the surgical treatment of noncontiguous spinal tuberculosis (NSTB, and to discuss its therapeutic strategies. METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of clinical and radiographic data that were prospectively collected on 550 consecutive spinal tubercular patients including 27 patients who were diagnosed and treated as NSTB in our institution from June 2005 to June 2011. Apart from 4 patients being treated conservatively, the remainder received surgery by posterior transforaminal debridement, interbody fusion with instrumentation, posterior instrumentation and anterior debridement with fusion in a single or two-stage operation. The clinical outcomes were evaluated before and after treatment in terms of hematologic and radiographic examinations, bone fusion and neurologic status. The Oswestry Disability Index score was determined before treatment and at the last follow-up visit. RESULTS: 23 patients (15 M/8F, averaged 44.6 ± 14.2 years old (range, 19 to 70 yd, who received surgical treatment, were followed up after surgery for a mean of 52.5 ± 19.5 months (range, 24 to 72 months. The kyphotic angle was changed significantly between pre- and postoperation (P<0.05. The mean amount of correction was 12.6 ± 7.2 degrees, with a small loss of correction at last follow-up. All patients achieved solid bone fusion. No patients with neurological deficit deteriorated postoperatively. Neither mortalities nor any major complications were found. There was a significant difference of Oswestry Disability Index scores between preoperation and the final follow-up. CONCLUSION: The outcomes of follow-up showed that posterior and posterior-anterior surgical treatment methods were both viable surgical options for NSTB. Posterior transforaminal debridement, interbody fusion and posterior instrumentation, as a less invasive technique, was feasible and effective to treat

  5. Automated double-cone-beam CT fusion technique. Enhanced evaluation of glue distribution in cases of spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) embolisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farago, Giuseppe; Caldiera, V.; Antozzi, C.; Bellino, A.; Innocenti, A.; Ciceri, E.

    2017-01-01

    Spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas (SDAVFs) are acquired diseases that represent the majority of all arteriovenous spinal shunts, leading to progressive and disabling myelopathy. Treatment is focused on accurately disconnecting the fistula point. We present our experience with the double-cone-beam CT fusion technique successfully applied to evaluate treatment results in a series of SDAVFs. Between November 2011 and December 2015 we performed double-DynaCT acquisition (pre- and post-embolisation) in 12 cases of SDAVF. A successful DynaCT fusion technique was only achieved in the group of patients with pre- and post-treatment images acquired at the same time as the treatment session, under general anaesthesia (4/12). DynaCT performed on different days proved to be inadequate for the automated fusion technique because of changes in the body position (8/12). A pre-treatment flat-panel cone-beam CT with contrast, at the time of diagnostic angiography, can be very helpful to detect the correct level of the fistula and the relationship between the fistula and the surrounding structures. In case of the endovascular approach, additional post-treatment native acquisition merged with the pre-treatment acquisition (double-cone-beam CT fusion technique) permits to immediately evaluate the distribution of the glue cast and to confirm the success of the procedure. (orig.)

  6. Automated double-cone-beam CT fusion technique. Enhanced evaluation of glue distribution in cases of spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) embolisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farago, Giuseppe [Foundation Neurological Institute ' ' C. Besta' ' , Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, Milan (Italy); Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, Milan (Italy); Caldiera, V. [Foundation Neurological Institute ' ' C. Besta' ' , Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, Milan (Italy); Antozzi, C.; Bellino, A. [Foundation Neurological Institute ' ' C. Besta' ' , Department of Neuroimmunology and Neuromuscular Diseases, Milan (Italy); Innocenti, A. [Foundation Neurological Institute ' ' C. Besta' ' , Department of Neuro-Oncology, Milan (Italy); Ciceri, E. [Foundation Neurological Institute ' ' C. Besta' ' , Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, Milan (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata Borgo Trento, Department of Neuroradiology, Verona (Italy)

    2017-05-15

    Spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas (SDAVFs) are acquired diseases that represent the majority of all arteriovenous spinal shunts, leading to progressive and disabling myelopathy. Treatment is focused on accurately disconnecting the fistula point. We present our experience with the double-cone-beam CT fusion technique successfully applied to evaluate treatment results in a series of SDAVFs. Between November 2011 and December 2015 we performed double-DynaCT acquisition (pre- and post-embolisation) in 12 cases of SDAVF. A successful DynaCT fusion technique was only achieved in the group of patients with pre- and post-treatment images acquired at the same time as the treatment session, under general anaesthesia (4/12). DynaCT performed on different days proved to be inadequate for the automated fusion technique because of changes in the body position (8/12). A pre-treatment flat-panel cone-beam CT with contrast, at the time of diagnostic angiography, can be very helpful to detect the correct level of the fistula and the relationship between the fistula and the surrounding structures. In case of the endovascular approach, additional post-treatment native acquisition merged with the pre-treatment acquisition (double-cone-beam CT fusion technique) permits to immediately evaluate the distribution of the glue cast and to confirm the success of the procedure. (orig.)

  7. Computed tomography of thoracic and lumbar spine fractures that have been treated with Harrington instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golimbu, C.; Firooznia, H.; Rafii, M.; Engler, G.; Delman, A.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty patients with fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine underwent computed tomography (CT) following Harrington distraction instrumentation and a spinal fusion. CT was done to search for a cause of persistent cord or nerve root compression in those patients who failed to improve and completely recover their partial neurologic deficit (14 cases). The most common abnormality was the presence of residual bone fragments originating in the burst fracture of a vertebral body displaced posteriorly, into the spinal canal. In patients with complications in the late recovery period, CT found exuberant callus indenting the canal or lack of fusion of the bone grafts placed in the anterolateral aspect of the vertebral bodies. This experience indicates that CT is the modality of choice for spinal canal evaluation in those patients who fail to have an optimal clinical course following fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine treated with Harrington rods

  8. Pseudarthrosis after lumbar spinal fusion: the role of 18F-fluoride PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Marloes; Willems, Paul; Jutten, Liesbeth; Arts, Chris; Rhijn, Lodewijk van; Weijers, Rene; Wierts, Roel; Urbach, Christian; Brans, Boudewijn

    2015-01-01

    Painful pseudarthrosis is one of the most important indications for (revision) surgery after spinal fusion procedures. If pseudarthrosis is the source of recurrent pain it may require revision surgery. It is therefore of great clinical importance to ascertain if it is the source of such pain. The correlation between findings on conventional imaging (plain radiography and CT) and clinical well-being has been shown to be moderate. The goal of this study was to determine the possible role of 18 F-fluoride PET in patients after lumbar spinal interbody fusion by investigating the relationship between PET/CT findings and clinical function and pain. A cohort of 36 patients was retrospectively included in the study after 18 F-fluoride PET/CT for either persistent or recurrent low back pain (18 patients) or during routine postoperative investigation (18 patients) between 9 and 76 months and 11 and 14 months after posterior lumbar interbody fusion, respectively. Sixty minutes after intravenous injection of 156 - 263 MBq (mean 199 MBq, median 196 MBq) 18 F-fluoride, PET and CT images were acquired using an integrated PET/CT scanner, followed by a diagnostic CT scan. Two observers independently scored the images. The number of bony bridges between vertebrae was scored on the CT images to quantify interbody fusion (0, 1 or 2). Vertebral endplate and intervertebral disc space uptake were evaluated visually as well as semiquantitatively following 18 F-fluoride PET. Findings on PET and CT were correlated with clinical wellbeing as measured by validated questionnaires concerning general daily functioning (Oswestry Disability Index), pain (visual analogue scale) and general health status (EuroQol). Patients were divided into three categories based on these questionnaire scores. No correlation was found between symptom severity and fusion status. However, 18 F-fluoride activity in the vertebral endplates was significantly higher in patients in the lowest Oswestry Disability Index

  9. An instrumented implant for vertebral body replacement that measures loads in the anterior spinal column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlmann, Antonius; Gabel, Udo; Graichen, Friedmar; Bender, Alwina; Bergmann, Georg

    2007-06-01

    Realistic loads on a spinal implant are required among others for optimization of implant design and preclinical testing. In addition, such data may help to choose the optimal physiotherapy program for patients with such an implant and to evaluate the efficacy of aids like braces or crutches. Presently, no implant is available that can measure loads in the anterior spinal column during activities of daily life. Therefore, an implant instrumented for in vivo load measurement was developed for vertebral body replacement. The aim of this paper is to describe in detail a telemeterized implant that measures forces and moments acting on it. Six load sensors, a nine-channel telemetry unit and a coil for inductive power supply of the electronic circuits were integrated into a modified vertebral body replacement (Synex). The instrumented part of the implant is hermetically sealed. Patients are videotaped during measurements, and implant loads are displayed on and off line. The average accuracy of load measurement is better than 2% for force and 5% for moment components with reference to the maximum value of 3000 N and 20 Nm, respectively. The measuring implant described here will provide additional information on spinal loads.

  10. Ketamine as an adjunct to postoperative pain management in opioid tolerant patients after spinal fusions: a prospective randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Michael K; Ya Deau, Jacques T; Wukovits, Barbara; Lipnitsky, Jane Y

    2008-02-01

    Management of acute postoperative pain is challenging, particularly in patients with preexisting narcotic dependency. Ketamine has been used at subanesthetic doses as a N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist to block the processing of nociceptive input in chronic pain syndromes. This prospective randomized study was designed to assess the use of ketamine as an adjunct to acute pain management in narcotic tolerant patients after spinal fusions. Twenty-six patients for 1-2 level posterior lumbar fusions with segmental instrumentation were randomly assigned to receive ketamine or act as a control. Patients in the ketamine group received 0.2 mg/kg on induction of general anesthesia and then 2 mcg kg(-1) hour(-1) for the next 24 hours. Patients were extubated in the operating room and within 15 minutes of arriving in the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) were started on intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) hydromorphone without a basal infusion. Patients were assessed for pain (numerical rating scale [NRS]), narcotic use, level of sedation, delirium, and physical therapy milestones until discharge. The ketamine group had significantly less pain during their first postoperative hour in the PACU (NRS 4.8 vs 8.7) and continued to have less pain during the first postoperative day at rest (3.6 vs 5.5) and with physical therapy (5.6 vs 8.0). Three patients in the control group failed PCA pain management and were converted to intravenous ketamine infusions when their pain scores improved. Patients in the ketamine group required less hydromorphone than the control group, but the differences were not significant. Subanesthetic doses of ketamine reduced postoperative pain in narcotic tolerant patients undergoing posterior spine fusions.

  11. Is fusion necessary for thoracolumbar burst fracture treated with spinal fixation? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Juliete M; Botelho, Ricardo V

    2017-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Thoracolumbar fractures account for 90% of spinal fractures, with the burst subtype corresponding to 20% of this total. Controversy regarding the best treatment for this condition remains. The traditional surgical approach, when indicated, involves spinal fixation and arthrodesis. Newer studies have brought the need for fusion associated with internal fixation into question. Not performing arthrodesis could reduce surgical time and intraoperative bleeding without affecting clinical and radiological outcomes. With this study, the authors aimed to assess the effect of fusion, adjuvant to internal fixation, on surgically treated thoracolumbar burst fractures. METHODS A search of the Medline and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases was performed to identify randomized trials that compared the use and nonuse of arthrodesis in association with internal fixation for the treatment of thoracolumbar burst fractures. The search encompassed all data in these databases up to February 28, 2016. RESULTS Five randomized/quasi-randomized trials, which involved a total of 220 patients and an average follow-up time of 69.1 months, were included in this review. No significant difference between groups in the final scores of the visual analog pain scale or Low Back Outcome Scale was detected. Surgical time and blood loss were significantly lower in the group of patients who did not undergo fusion (p < 0.05). Among the evaluated radiological outcomes, greater mobility in the affected segment was found in the group of those who did not undergo fusion. No significant difference between groups in the degree of kyphosis correction, loss of kyphosis correction, or final angle of kyphosis was observed. CONCLUSIONS The data reviewed in this study suggest that the use of arthrodesis did not improve clinical outcomes, but it was associated with increased surgical time and higher intraoperative bleeding and did not promote significant improvement in radiological

  12. Compressive cervical pannus formation in a patient after 2-level disc arthroplasty: a rare complication treated with posterior instrumented fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Carl M; Hoh, Daniel J

    2018-06-01

    Cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) has received widespread attention as an alternative to anterior fusion due to its similar neurological and functional improvement, with the advantage of preservation of segmental motion. As CDA becomes more widely implemented, the potential for unexpected device-related adverse events may be identified. The authors report on a 48-year-old man who presented with progressive neurological deficits 3 years after 2-level CDA was performed. Imaging demonstrated periprosthetic osteolysis of the vertebral endplates at the CDA levels, with a heterogeneously enhancing ventral epidural mass compressing the spinal cord. Diagnostic workup for infectious and neoplastic processes was negative. The presumptive diagnosis was an inflammatory pannus formation secondary to abnormal motion at the CDA levels. Posterior cervical decompression and instrumented fusion was performed without removal of the arthroplasty devices or the ventral epidural mass. Postoperative imaging at 2 months demonstrated complete resolution of the compressive pannus, with associated improvement in clinical symptoms. Follow-up MRI at > 6 months showed no recurrence of the pannus. At 1 year postoperatively, CT scanning revealed improvement in periprosthetic osteolysis. Inflammatory pannus formation may be an unexpected complication of abnormal segmental motion after CDA. This rare etiology of an epidural mass associated with an arthroplasty device should be considered, in addition to workup for other potential infectious or neoplastic mass lesions. In symptomatic individuals, compressive pannus lesions can be effectively treated with fusion across the involved segment without removal of the device.

  13. Long-term outcomes of anterior spinal fusion for treating thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis curves: average 15-year follow-up analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, Hideki; Ito, Manabu; Kaneda, Kiyoshi; Shono, Yasuhiro; Takahata, Masahiko; Abumi, Kuniyoshi

    2013-05-01

    Retrospective review. To assess the long-term outcomes of anterior spinal fusion (ASF) for treating thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Although ASF is reported to provide good coronal and sagittal correction of the main thoracic (MT) AIS curves, the long-term outcomes of ASF is unknown. A consecutive series of 25 patients with Lenke 1 MT AIS were included. Outcome measures comprised radiographical measurements, pulmonary function, and Scoliosis Research Society outcome instrument (SRS-30) scores (preoperative SRS-30 scores were not documented). Postoperative surgical revisions and complications were recorded. Twenty-five patients were followed-up for 12 to 18 years (average, 15.2 yr). The average MT Cobb angle correction rate and the correction loss at the final follow-up were 56.7% and 9.2°, respectively. The average preoperative instrumented level of kyphosis was 8.3°, which significantly improved to 18.6° (P = 0.0003) at the final follow-up. The average percent-predicted forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second were significantly decreased during long-term follow-up measurements (73% and 69%; P = 0.0004 and 0.0016, respectively). However, no patient had complaints related to pulmonary function. The average total SRS-30 score was 4.0. Implant breakage was not observed. All patients, except 1 who required revision surgery, demonstrated solid fusion. Late instrumentation-related bronchial problems were observed in 1 patient who required implant removal and bronchial tube repair, 13 years after the initial surgery. Overall radiographical findings and patient outcome measures of ASF for Lenke 1 MT AIS were satisfactory at an average follow-up of 15 years. ASF provides significant sagittal correction of the main thoracic curve with long-term maintenance of sagittal profiles. Percent-predicted values of forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second were decreased in this cohort; however, no patient had complaints

  14. Clinical results of posterolateral fusion for degenerative lumbar spinal diseases. A follow-up study of more than 10 years

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    Kuroki, Hiroshi; Tajima, Naoya; Kubo, Shinichiro

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the long-term clinical outcomes and the effects on unfused motion segments of posterolateral fusion. This study involved 35 cases (37 intervertebral levels) of posterolateral fusion performed to treat degenerative lumbar spinal diseases. There were 20 male and 15 female patients ranging in age from 30 to 67 years, with a mean age of 49 years. The postoperative period ranged from 10 years to 17 years and 8 months, with a mean period of 13 years. The clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score for assessment of treatment for low back pain. The effects on unfused motion segments were investigated with radiographic and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Postoperative satisfactory improvement (mean recovery rate, 66.9%) reached a plateau at 1 year and was maintained at final follow-up. Radiographically, the union rate was 86.5%. There were few cases of induced instability of unfused motion segments. On MR imaging, increased signal intensity in both T 1 - and T 2 -weighted images was seen in the paravertebral muscles in 15 of 20 cases (75.0%). Posterolateral fusion is a useful technique for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal diseases. Clinical outcomes were stable throughout follow-up. Instability of unfused motion segments rarely occurred. (author)

  15. Costs and effects in lumbar spinal fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soegaard, Rikke; Christensen, Finn Bjarke; Christiansen, Terkel

    2007-01-01

    of the Dallas Pain Questionnaire and the Low Back Pain Rating Scale at baseline and 2 years postoperatively. Regression models were used to reveal determinants for costs and effects. Costs and effects were analyzed as a net-benefit measure to reveal determinants for cost-effectiveness, and finally, adjusted...... areas. Multi-level fusion and surgical technique significantly affected the net-benefit as well. Surprisingly, no correlation was found between treatment costs and treatment effects. Incremental analysis suggested that the probability of posterior instrumentation being cost-effective was limited......Although cost-effectiveness is becoming the foremost evaluative criterion within health service management of spine surgery, scientific knowledge about cost-patterns and cost-effectiveness is limited. The aims of this study were (1) to establish an activity-based method for costing at the patient...

  16. Continuous intravenous morphine infusion for postoperative analgesia following posterior spinal fusion for idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poe-Kochert, Connie; Tripi, Paul A; Potzman, Jennifer; Son-Hing, Jochen P; Thompson, George H

    2010-04-01

    A retrospective study of postoperative pain management. Evaluate the efficacy and safety of continuous intravenous morphine infusion for postoperative pain management in patients with idiopathic scoliosis (IS) undergoing posterior spinal fusion (PSF) and segmental spinal instrumentation (SSI). Postoperative pain is a common problem following surgery for IS. There are no published reports regarding the use of a continuous intravenous morphine infusion for this patient population. We retrospectively reviewed data regarding 339 consecutive patients with IS who underwent PSF and SSI between 1992 and 2006. All patients received intrathecal morphine after the induction of general anesthesia. Following surgery, preordered morphine infusion (0.01 mg/kg/h) was started at first reported pain. The infusion rate was titrated based on vital signs, visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores (0-10), and clinical status. It was continued until patients were able to take oral analgesics. We reviewed intrathecal morphine dosage, VAS pain scores through the third postoperative day, interval to start of morphine infusion, total morphine requirements in the first 48 hours, and any adverse reactions (nausea/vomiting, pruritus, respiratory depression, and pediatric intensive care unit admission). Mean intrathecal morphine dose was 15.5 +/- 3.9 microg/kg and mean interval to start of the intravenous morphine infusion was 17.5 +/- 5 hours. Mean VAS pain scores were 3.1, 4.5, 4.5, and 4.6 at 12 hours, 1, 2, and 3 days after surgery, respectively.The total mean morphine dose in the first 48 hours postoperatively was 0.03 +/- 0.01 mg/kg/h. Total morphine received was 1.44 +/- 0.5 mg/kg. Nausea/vomiting and pruritus, related to the morphine infusion occurred in 45 patients (13.3%) and 14 patients (4.1%), respectively. No patients had respiratory depression or required Pediatric Intensive Care Unit admission. A low frequency of adverse events and a mean postoperative VAS pain score of 5 or less

  17. Intrathecal morphine for postoperative analgesia in patients with idiopathic scoliosis undergoing posterior spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripi, Paul A; Poe-Kochert, Connie; Potzman, Jennifer; Son-Hing, Jochen P; Thompson, George H

    2008-09-15

    A retrospective study of postoperative pain management with intrathecal morphine. Identify the dosing regimen of intrathecal morphine that safely and effectively provides postoperative analgesia with minimal complications in patients with idiopathic scoliosis undergoing posterior spinal fusion (PSF) and segmental spinal instrumentation (SSI). Postoperative pain after surgery for idiopathic scoliosis is a concern. Intrathecal morphine has been used to decrease pain. However, the most appropriate dose has not been determined. We retrospectively analyzed 407 consecutive patients with idiopathic scoliosis who underwent PSF and SSI at our institution from 1992 through 2006. Patients were divided into 3 groups based on the intrathecal morphine dose: no dose (n = 68); moderate dose of 9 to 19 microg/kg, mean 14 microg/kg (n = 293); and high dose of 20 microg/kg or greater, mean 24 microg/kg (n = 46). Data included demographics, Wong-Baker visual analog scale postoperative pain scores, postoperative intravenous morphine requirements, time to first rescue dose of intravenous morphine, and postoperative complications of pruritus, nausea/vomiting, respiratory depression, and pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admission. The demographics of the 3 study groups showed no statistical differences. The mean Wong-Baker visual analog scale pain score in the post anesthesia care unit was 5.2, 0.5, and 0.2, and the mean time to first morphine rescue was 6.6, 16.7, and 22.9 hours, respectively. In the first 48 postoperative hours, respiratory depression occurred in 1 (1.5%), 8 (2.7%), and 7 (15.2%) patients, whereas PICU admission occurred in 0 (0%), 6 (2%), and 8 (17.4%) patients, respectively. The majority of PICU admissions were the result of respiratory depression. Frequency of pruritus and nausea/vomiting was similar in all 3 groups. Intrathecal morphine in the moderate dose range of 9 to 19 microg/kg (mean 14 microg/kg), provides safe and effective postoperative analgesia in the

  18. Pseudarthrosis after lumbar spinal fusion: the role of {sup 18}F-fluoride PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Marloes; Willems, Paul; Jutten, Liesbeth; Arts, Chris; Rhijn, Lodewijk van [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Postbox 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Weijers, Rene; Wierts, Roel; Urbach, Christian; Brans, Boudewijn [Maastricht University Medical Center, Radiology /Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    Painful pseudarthrosis is one of the most important indications for (revision) surgery after spinal fusion procedures. If pseudarthrosis is the source of recurrent pain it may require revision surgery. It is therefore of great clinical importance to ascertain if it is the source of such pain. The correlation between findings on conventional imaging (plain radiography and CT) and clinical well-being has been shown to be moderate. The goal of this study was to determine the possible role of {sup 18}F-fluoride PET in patients after lumbar spinal interbody fusion by investigating the relationship between PET/CT findings and clinical function and pain. A cohort of 36 patients was retrospectively included in the study after {sup 18}F-fluoride PET/CT for either persistent or recurrent low back pain (18 patients) or during routine postoperative investigation (18 patients) between 9 and 76 months and 11 and 14 months after posterior lumbar interbody fusion, respectively. Sixty minutes after intravenous injection of 156 - 263 MBq (mean 199 MBq, median 196 MBq) {sup 18}F-fluoride, PET and CT images were acquired using an integrated PET/CT scanner, followed by a diagnostic CT scan. Two observers independently scored the images. The number of bony bridges between vertebrae was scored on the CT images to quantify interbody fusion (0, 1 or 2). Vertebral endplate and intervertebral disc space uptake were evaluated visually as well as semiquantitatively following {sup 18}F-fluoride PET. Findings on PET and CT were correlated with clinical wellbeing as measured by validated questionnaires concerning general daily functioning (Oswestry Disability Index), pain (visual analogue scale) and general health status (EuroQol). Patients were divided into three categories based on these questionnaire scores. No correlation was found between symptom severity and fusion status. However, {sup 18}F-fluoride activity in the vertebral endplates was significantly higher in patients in the lowest

  19. Olive oil sensory defects classification with data fusion of instrumental techniques and multivariate analysis (PLS-DA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borràs, Eva; Ferré, Joan; Boqué, Ricard; Mestres, Montserrat; Aceña, Laura; Calvo, Angels; Busto, Olga

    2016-07-15

    Three instrumental techniques, headspace-mass spectrometry (HS-MS), mid-infrared spectroscopy (MIR) and UV-visible spectrophotometry (UV-vis), have been combined to classify virgin olive oil samples based on the presence or absence of sensory defects. The reference sensory values were provided by an official taste panel. Different data fusion strategies were studied to improve the discrimination capability compared to using each instrumental technique individually. A general model was applied to discriminate high-quality non-defective olive oils (extra-virgin) and the lowest-quality olive oils considered non-edible (lampante). A specific identification of key off-flavours, such as musty, winey, fusty and rancid, was also studied. The data fusion of the three techniques improved the classification results in most of the cases. Low-level data fusion was the best strategy to discriminate musty, winey and fusty defects, using HS-MS, MIR and UV-vis, and the rancid defect using only HS-MS and MIR. The mid-level data fusion approach using partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) scores was found to be the best strategy for defective vs non-defective and edible vs non-edible oil discrimination. However, the data fusion did not sufficiently improve the results obtained by a single technique (HS-MS) to classify non-defective classes. These results indicate that instrumental data fusion can be useful for the identification of sensory defects in virgin olive oils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Interdisciplinary Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy as Part of Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery Rehabilitation: Experience of Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgreen, Pil; Rolving, Nanna; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Lomborg, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Patients receiving lumbar spinal fusion surgery often have persisting postoperative pain negatively affecting their daily life. These patients may be helped by interdisciplinary cognitive-behavioral therapy which is recognized as an effective intervention for improving beneficial pain coping behavior, thereby facilitating the rehabilitation process of patients with chronic pain. The purpose of this study was to describe the lived experience of patients recovering from lumbar spinal fusion surgery and to explore potential similarities and disparities in pain coping behavior between receivers and nonreceivers of interdisciplinary cognitive-behavioral group therapy. We conducted semistructured interviews with 10 patients; 5 receiving cognitive-behavioral therapy in connection with their lumbar spinal fusion surgery and 5 receiving usual care. We conducted a phenomenological analysis to reach our first aim and then conducted a comparative content analysis to reach our second aim. Patients' postoperative experience was characterized by the need to adapt to the limitations imposed by back discomfort (coexisting with the back), need for recognition and support from others regarding their pain, a relatively long rehabilitation period during which they "awaited the result of surgery", and ambivalence toward analgesics. The patients in both groups had similar negative perception of analgesics and tended to abstain from them to avoid addiction. Coping behavior apparently differed among receivers and nonreceivers of interdisciplinary cognitive-behavioral group therapy. Receivers prevented or minimized pain by resting before pain onset, whereas nonreceivers awaited pain onset before resting. The postoperative experience entailed ambivalence, causing uncertainty, worry and insecurity. This ambivalence was relieved when others recognized the patient's pain and offered support. Cognitive-behavioral therapy as part of rehabilitation may have encouraged beneficial pain coping

  1. Evaluation of Posterolateral Lumbar Fusion in Sheep Using Mineral Scaffolds Seeded with Cultured Bone Marrow Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María D. Cuenca-López

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to investigate the efficacy of hybrid constructs in comparison to bone grafts (autograft and allograft for posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF in sheep, instrumented with transpedicular screws and bars. Hybrid constructs using cultured bone marrow (BM mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have shown promising results in several bone healing models. In particular, hybrid constructs made by calcium phosphate-enriched cells have had similar fusion rates to bone autografts in posterolateral lumbar fusion in sheep. In our study, four experimental spinal fusions in two animal groups were compared in sheep: autograft and allograft (reference group, hydroxyapatite scaffold, and hydroxyapatite scaffold seeded with cultured and osteoinduced bone marrow MSCs (hybrid construct. During the last three days of culture, dexamethasone (dex and beta-glycerophosphate (β-GP were added to potentiate osteoinduction. The two experimental situations of each group were tested in the same spinal segment (L4–L5. Spinal fusion and bone formation were studied by clinical observation, X-ray, computed tomography (CT, histology, and histomorphometry. Lumbar fusion rates assessed by CT scan and histology were higher for autograft and allograft (70% than for mineral scaffold alone (22% and hybrid constructs (35%. The quantity of new bone formation was also higher for the reference group, quite similar in both (autograft and allograft. Although the hybrid scaffold group had a better fusion rate than the non-hybrid scaffold group, the histological analysis revealed no significant differences between them in terms of quantity of bone formation. The histology results suggested that mineral scaffolds were partly resorbed in an early phase, and included in callus tissues. Far from the callus area the hydroxyapatite alone did not generate bone around it, but the hybrid scaffold did. In nude mice, labeled cells were induced to differentiate in vivo and monitored

  2. Fourth-generation spinal instrumentation: experience with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis at a tertiary care hospital in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Akil; Lakdawala, Riaz H

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the radiological and functional outcome of surgical treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis using fourth-generation posterior spinal instrumentation at The Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan. Case series. The Aga Khan University Hospital after a minimum of 2 years postoperatively. A total of 20 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were recruited into the study and evaluated for radiological and functional outcome. The study period was from 2000 to 2005. Radiological outcome was assessed using Cobb angle measurement pre and postoperatively, hence assessing percentage correction. The lower instrumented vertebra was taken as the neutral vertebra and the level was recorded. Functional outcome was determined using the Scoliosis Research Society patient administered questionnaire. All patients were called to the clinic and asked to fill in the form. Those patients who were out of the city were mailed the forms and requested via telephone to complete and return. Of the 20 patients operated on, twelve were female and eight were male. The average age at operation was 12.7 years. The mean Cobb angle was 69° preoperatively and 20° postoperatively, representing a percentage correction of 71%. The average duration of follow-up was 3.6 years. There was one major complication involving neurological injury post-op and two minor complications involving wound infection. The average Scoliosis Research Society score (on a scale of 1-5, with 5 being best) for pain was 4.5, self-image was 4.2, functional status was 4.1, mental status was 3.8, and satisfaction was 4.4. There was no relationship between the percentage correction of scoliosis and the functional outcome. Those patients with a high preoperative Cobb angle tended to have a better outcome for functional and mental status postoperatively. There was no relation between the lower instrumented vertebra and functional outcome. In the correct indications, fourth-generation posterior instrumentation

  3. Clinical features and surgical management of spinal osteoblastoma: a retrospective study in 18 cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghai Li

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To investigate the clinical manifestation and surgical outcome of spinal osteoblastoma. METHODS: From June 2006 to July 2011, 18 patients with spinal osteoblastoma treated surgically were analyzed retrospectively. There were 11 males and 7 females with an average age of 27.5 years(range, 16-38 years. The tumors were located at C5 in 7, C6 in 6, C7 in 3, C6-T1 1 in 1 and T11 in 1. Based on WBB classification, 16 were 1-3 or 10-12 and 2 were 4-9 and 1-3. 18 operations had been performed with en bloc resection. A posterior approach was used for 16 patients, and a combined posterior and anterior approach was used for 2 patients. Reconstruction using instrumentation and fusion was performed using spinal instrumentation in 13 patients. We used visual analogue scales (VAS to evaluate the change of pain before and after the operation, and the McCormick System to assess functional status of the spine. Imaging test was used to review the stability and recurrence rate of spine cord, and the confluence of graft bones. RESULTS: All cases were followed up for 24-80 months (average, 38.4 months. The average surgical time was 120.8 minutes (range, 80-220 minutes, with the average intraoperative blood loss of 520 ml (range, 300-1200 ml. During the follow-up period, the VAS grade reduced from 6.46±1.32 to 2.26±1.05 (P <0.05. 15 patients had neurological function improved and 3 remained no change which was evaluated by McCormick scale for spinal function status at final follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Spinal osteoblastoma has its own specific radiographic features. There is some recurrence in simple curettage of tumor lesion. The thoroughly en bloc resection of tumor or spondylectomy, bone fusion and strong in Ter fixation are the key points for successful surgical treatment.

  4. Full-thickness thoracic laminar erosion after posterior spinal fusion associated with late-presenting infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribus, Clifford B; Garvey, Kathleen E

    2003-05-15

    A case report describes unilateral complete laminar erosion of the caudal thoracic spine and late-presenting infection in a patient 10 years after anteroposterior reconstruction for scoliosis. To present an unusual but significant complication that may occur after implantation of spinal instrumentation. The reported patient presented with a deep infection and persistent back pain 10 years after successful anteroposterior reconstruction for adult idiopathic scoliosis. Delayed onset infections after implantation of spinal instrumentation are infrequent, yet when present, often require hardware removal. The case of a 51-year-old woman who underwent irrigation and debridement for a late-presenting infection and removal of posterior hardware 10 years after her index procedure is presented. Interoperatively, it was noted that full-thickness laminar erosion was present from T4 to T12. The patient was taken to the operating room for wound irrigation, debridement, and hardware removal. It was discovered that a Cotrel-Dubousset rod placed on the convexity of the curve had completely eroded through the lamina of T7-T12. Infectious material was found along the entire length of both the convex and concave Cotrel-Dubousset rods. Intraoperative cultures grew Staphylococcus epidermidis and Propionibacterium acnes. Intravenous and oral antibiotics were administered, resulting in resolution of the infection and preoperative pain. The exact role of late-presenting infection with regard to the laminar erosion and rod migration seen in this case remains to be elucidated. However, the authors believe the primary cause of bony erosion was mechanical in origin. Regardless, most spine surgeons will treat many patients who have had posterior spinal implants and will perform hardware removal on a significant number of these patients during their careers. A full-thickness laminar erosion exposes the spinal cord to traumatic injury during hardware removal and debridement. This case is

  5. Metallic artefact reduction with monoenergetic dual-energy CT: systematic ex vivo evaluation of posterior spinal fusion implants from various vendors and different spine levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guggenberger, R.; Winklhofer, S.; Andreisek, G.; Alkadhi, H.; Stolzmann, P. [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Osterhoff, G.; Wanner, G.A. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Fortunati, M. [The Spine Center, Thun (Switzerland)

    2012-11-15

    To evaluate optimal monoenergetic dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) settings for artefact reduction of posterior spinal fusion implants of various vendors and spine levels. Posterior spinal fusion implants of five vendors for cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine were examined ex vivo with single-energy (SE) CT (120 kVp) and DECT (140/100 kVp). Extrapolated monoenergetic DECT images at 64, 69, 88, 105 keV and individually adjusted monoenergy for optimised image quality (OPTkeV) were generated. Two independent radiologists assessed quantitative and qualitative image parameters for each device and spine level. Inter-reader agreements of quantitative and qualitative parameters were high (ICC = 0.81-1.00, {kappa} = 0.54-0.77). HU values of spinal fusion implants were significantly different among vendors (P < 0.001), spine levels (P < 0.01) and among SECT, monoenergetic DECT of 64, 69, 88, 105 keV and OPTkeV (P < 0.01). Image quality was significantly (P < 0.001) different between datasets and improved with higher monoenergies of DECT compared with SECT (V = 0.58, P < 0.001). Artefacts decreased significantly (V = 0.51, P < 0.001) at higher monoenergies. OPTkeV values ranged from 123-141 keV. OPTkeV according to vendor and spine level are presented herein. Monoenergetic DECT provides significantly better image quality and less metallic artefacts from implants than SECT. Use of individual keV values for vendor and spine level is recommended. (orig.)

  6. Fourth-generation spinal instrumentation: experience with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis at a tertiary care hospital in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazal A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Akil Fazal1, Riaz H Lakdawala21Hospital for Joint Disease, New York University, New York, USA; 2Section of Orthopaedics, Department of Surgery, The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, PakistanObjective: To evaluate the radiological and functional outcome of surgical treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis using fourth-generation posterior spinal instrumentation at The Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan.Design: Case series.Place and duration of study: The Aga Khan University Hospital after a minimum of 2 years postoperatively.Patients and methods: A total of 20 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were recruited into the study and evaluated for radiological and functional outcome. The study period was from 2000 to 2005. Radiological outcome was assessed using Cobb angle measurement pre and postoperatively, hence assessing percentage correction. The lower instrumented vertebra was taken as the neutral vertebra and the level was recorded. Functional outcome was determined using the Scoliosis Research Society patient administered questionnaire. All patients were called to the clinic and asked to fill in the form. Those patients who were out of the city were mailed the forms and requested via telephone to complete and return.Results: Of the 20 patients operated on, twelve were female and eight were male. The average age at operation was 12.7 years. The mean Cobb angle was 69° preoperatively and 20° postoperatively, representing a percentage correction of 71%. The average duration of follow-up was 3.6 years. There was one major complication involving neurological injury post-op and two minor complications involving wound infection. The average Scoliosis Research Society score (on a scale of 1–5, with 5 being best for pain was 4.5, self-image was 4.2, functional status was 4.1, mental status was 3.8, and satisfaction was 4.4. There was no relationship between the percentage correction of scoliosis and the functional outcome

  7. Vitom-3D for Exoscopic Neurosurgery: Initial Experience in Cranial and Spinal Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oertel, Joachim M; Burkhardt, Benedikt W

    2017-09-01

    The authors describe the application of a new exoscope that offers 3-dimensional (3D) visualization in cranial and spinal neurosurgery in detail. Five cranial and 11 spinal procedures were performed with a 3D exoscope. Instrument handling, repositioning of the exoscope, handling of the image control unit, the adjustment of magnification and focal length, the depth perception, the image quality, the illumination, and the comfort level of the posture during the procedure were assessed via a questionnaire. The following procedures were performed: Microvascular decompression (n = 1), craniotomy and tumor resection (n = 4), anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with cervical plating (n = 2), cervical laminectomy and lateral mass fixation (n = 1), shear cervical lateral mass osteosynthesis (n = 1), lumbar canal decompression (n = 1), transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (n = 2), thoracic intraspinal extradural tumor resection (n = 1), and lumbar discectomy (n = 3). Instrument handling, the intraoperative repositioning and handling of the VITOM-3D, and the comfort level of the intraoperative posture was rated excellent in 100% of procedures. The image quality was rated equal to the operating microscope in 68.75% of procedures. None of the procedures had to be stopped because of technical problems. No surgical complications were noted that could be related to the use of the exoscope. The 3D-exoscopic system is safe and effective tool to perform spinal procedures and less demanding cranial procedures. The image quality and 3D visualization were comparable with the operating microscope. The technique harbors the unique advantage of excellent comfort for the involved surgical team during the procedure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. EVALUATION OF PROGNOSTIC FACTORS IN QUALITY OF LIFE OF PATIENTS WITH ADOLESCENT IDIOPATHIC SCOLIOSIS UNDERGOING SPINAL FUSION BY THE POSTERIOR APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FELIPE DE MORAES POMAR

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the prognostic factors in the treatment of patients diagnosed with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis undergoing spinal fusion by the posterior approach. Methods: The study included 48 patients with idiopathic adolescent scoliosis (43 females and 5 males who underwent spinal fusion by the posterior approach, with an average age at diagnosis of 12 years, and clinical signs of Risser between 3 and 4 at the time of surgery. Clinical and radiographic measurements were performed, the participants answered the SRS-30 questionnaire, and the analysis of the medical record data was performed in two occasions during the preoperative period and at the end of two years of follow-up. Results: All satisfaction measures showed statistically significant change after the procedure (p<0.05 with respect to the radiographic characteristics, except for the lumbar apical vertebral translation (p=0.540 and Cobb L1-L5 (p=0.225. Conclusion: In general, it was found that patients who received surgical treatment were more satisfied with their appearance than those who underwent conservative treatment.

  9. Results of instrumented posterolateral fusion in treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis with and without segmental kyphosis: A retrospective investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Yuan Chen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treatment by posterolateral fusion (PLF with pedicle-screw instrumentation can be unsuccessful in one-segment and low-grade lumbar spondylolisthesis. Segmental kyphosis, either rigid or dynamic, was hypothesized to be one of the factors interfering with the fusion results. Methods: From 2004 to 2005, 239 patients with single-segment and low-grade spondylolisthesis were recruited and divided into two groups: Group 1 consisting of 129 patients without segmental kyphosis and group 2 consisting of 110 patients with segmental kyphosis. All patients underwent instrumented PLF at the same medical institute, and the average follow-up period was 31 ± 19 months. We obtained plain radiographs of the lumbosacral spine with the anteroposterior view, the lateral view, and the dynamic flexion-extension views before the operation and during the follow-ups. The results of PLF in the two groups were then compared. Results: There was no significant difference in the demographic data of the two groups, except for gender distribution. The osseous fusion rates were 90.7% in group 1 and 68.2% in group 2 (p < 0.001. Conclusion: Instrumented PLF resulted in significantly higher osseous fusion rate in patients without segmental kyphosis than in the patients with segmental kyphosis. For the patients with sagittal imbalance, such as rigid or dynamic kyphosis, pedicle-screw fixation cannot ensure successful PLF. Interbody fusion by the posterior lumbar interbody fusion or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion technique might help overcome this problem.

  10. Seasonal Variations in the Risk of Reoperation for Surgical Site Infection Following Elective Spinal Fusion Surgery: A Retrospective Study Using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohya, Junichi; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Oichi, Takeshi; Kato, So; Matsui, Hiroki; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Tanaka, Sakae; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2017-07-15

    A retrospective study of data abstracted from the Diagnosis Procedure Combination (DPC) database, a national representative database in Japan. The aim of this study was to examine seasonal variations in the risk of reoperation for surgical site infection (SSI) following spinal fusion surgery. Although higher rates of infection in the summer than in other seasons were thought to be caused by increasing inexperience of new staff, high temperature, and high humidity, no studies have examined seasonal variations in the risk of SSI following spinal fusion surgery in the country where medical staff rotation timing is not in summer season. In Japan, medical staff rotation starts in April. We retrospectively extracted the data of patients who were admitted between July 2010 and March 2013 from the DPC database. Patients were included if they were aged 20 years or older and underwent elective spinal fusion surgery. The primary outcome was reoperation for SSI during hospitalization. We performed multivariate analysis to clarify the risk factors of primary outcome with adjustment for patient background characteristics. We identified 47,252 eligible patients (23,659 male, 23,593 female). The mean age of the patients was 65.4 years (range, 20-101 yrs). Overall, reoperation for SSI occurred in 0.93% of the patients during hospitalization. The risk of reoperation for SSI was significantly higher in April (vs. February; odds ratio, 1.93; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-3.43, P = 0.03) as well as other known risk factors. In subgroup analysis with stratification for type of hospital, month of surgery was identified as an independent risk factor of reoperation for SSI among cases in an academic hospital, although there was no seasonal variation among those in a nonacademic hospital. This study showed that month of surgery is a risk factor of reoperation for SSI following elective spinal fusion surgery, nevertheless, in the country where medical staff rotation timing is not in

  11. Adjacent segment pathology following anterior decompression and fusion using cage and plate for the treatment of degenerative cervical spinal diseases.

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    Song, Kyung-Jin; Choi, Byung-Wan; Kim, Jong-Kil

    2014-12-01

    Retrospective study. To analyze the incidence and prevalence of clinical adjacent segment pathology (CASP) following anterior decompression and fusion with cage and plate augmentation for degenerative cervical diseases. No long-term data on the use of cage and plate augmentation have been reported. The study population consisted of 231 patients who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with cage and plate for degenerative cervical spinal disease. The incidence and prevalence of CASP was determined by using the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. To analyze the factors that influence CASP, data on preoperative and postoperative sagittal alignment, spinal canal diameter, the distance between the plate and adjacent disc, extent of fusion level, and the presence or absence of adjacent segment degenerative changes by imaging studies were evaluated. CASP occurred in 15 of the cases, of which 9 required additional surgery. At 8-year follow-up, the average yearly incidence was 1.1%. The rate of disease-free survival based on Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was 93.6% at 5 years and 90.2% at 8 years. No statistically significant differences in CASP incidence based on radiological analysis were observed. Significantly high incidence of CASP was observed in the presence of increased adjacent segment degenerative changes (pdegenerative cervical disease is associated with a lower incidence in CSAP by 1.1% per year, and the extent of preoperative adjacent segment degenerative changes has been shown as a risk factor for CASP.

  12. Kyphosis in spinal tuberculosis - Prevention and correction

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    Jain Anil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal deformity and paraplegia/quadriplegia are the most common complications of tuberculosis (TB of spine. TB of dorsal spine almost always produces kyphosis while cervical and lumbar spine shows reversal of lordosis to begin with followed by kyphosis. kyphosis continues to increase in adults when patients are treated nonoperatively or by surgical decompression. In children, kyphosis continues to increase even after healing of the tubercular disease. The residual, healed kyphosis on a long follow-up produces painful costopelvic impingement, reduced vital capacity and eventually respiratory complications; spinal canal stenosis proximal to the kyphosis and paraplegia with healed disease, thus affecting the quality and span of life. These complications can be avoided by early diagnosis of tubercular spine lesion to heal with minimal or no kyphosis. When tubercular lesion reports with kyphosis of more than 50° or is likely to progress further, they should be undertaken for kyphus correction. The sequential steps of kyphosis correction include anterior decompression and corpectomy, posterior column shortening, posterior instrumentation, anterior bone grafting and posterior fusion. During the procedure, the spinal cord should be kept under vision so that it should not elongate. Internal kyphectomy (gibbectomy is a preferred treatment for late onset paraplegia with severe healed kyphosis.

  13. Instrumental intelligent test of food sensory quality as mimic of human panel test combining multiple cross-perception sensors and data fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang, Qin; Zhao, Jiewen; Chen, Quansheng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • To develop a novel instrumental intelligent test methodology for food sensory analysis. • A novel data fusion was used in instrumental intelligent test methodology. • Linear and nonlinear tools were comparatively used for modeling. • The instrumental test methodology can be imitative of human test behavior. - Abstract: Instrumental test of food quality using perception sensors instead of human panel test is attracting massive attention recently. A novel cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion imitating multiple mammal perception was proposed for the instrumental test in this work. First, three mimic sensors of electronic eye, electronic nose and electronic tongue were used in sequence for data acquisition of rice wine samples. Then all data from the three different sensors were preprocessed and merged. Next, three cross-perception variables i.e., color, aroma and taste, were constructed using principal components analysis (PCA) and multiple linear regression (MLR) which were used as the input of models. MLR, back-propagation artificial neural network (BPANN) and support vector machine (SVM) were comparatively used for modeling, and the instrumental test was achieved for the comprehensive quality of samples. Results showed the proposed cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion presented obvious superiority to the traditional data fusion methodologies, also achieved a high correlation coefficient (>90%) with the human panel test results. This work demonstrated that the instrumental test based on the cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion can actually mimic the human test behavior, therefore is of great significance to ensure the quality of products and decrease the loss of the manufacturers

  14. Instrumental intelligent test of food sensory quality as mimic of human panel test combining multiple cross-perception sensors and data fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang, Qin; Zhao, Jiewen; Chen, Quansheng, E-mail: qschen@ujs.edu.cn

    2014-09-02

    Highlights: • To develop a novel instrumental intelligent test methodology for food sensory analysis. • A novel data fusion was used in instrumental intelligent test methodology. • Linear and nonlinear tools were comparatively used for modeling. • The instrumental test methodology can be imitative of human test behavior. - Abstract: Instrumental test of food quality using perception sensors instead of human panel test is attracting massive attention recently. A novel cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion imitating multiple mammal perception was proposed for the instrumental test in this work. First, three mimic sensors of electronic eye, electronic nose and electronic tongue were used in sequence for data acquisition of rice wine samples. Then all data from the three different sensors were preprocessed and merged. Next, three cross-perception variables i.e., color, aroma and taste, were constructed using principal components analysis (PCA) and multiple linear regression (MLR) which were used as the input of models. MLR, back-propagation artificial neural network (BPANN) and support vector machine (SVM) were comparatively used for modeling, and the instrumental test was achieved for the comprehensive quality of samples. Results showed the proposed cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion presented obvious superiority to the traditional data fusion methodologies, also achieved a high correlation coefficient (>90%) with the human panel test results. This work demonstrated that the instrumental test based on the cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion can actually mimic the human test behavior, therefore is of great significance to ensure the quality of products and decrease the loss of the manufacturers.

  15. Iatrogenic Spinal Cord Injury Resulting From Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Alan H; Hart, Robert A; Hilibrand, Alan S; Fish, David E; Wang, Jeffrey C; Lord, Elizabeth L; Buser, Zorica; Tortolani, P Justin; Stroh, D Alex; Nassr, Ahmad; Currier, Bradford L; Sebastian, Arjun S; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Retrospective cohort study of prospectively collected data. To examine the incidence of iatrogenic spinal cord injury following elective cervical spine surgery. A retrospective multicenter case series study involving 21 high-volume surgical centers from the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network was conducted. Medical records for 17 625 patients who received cervical spine surgery (levels from C2 to C7) between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011, were reviewed to identify occurrence of iatrogenic spinal cord injury. In total, 3 cases of iatrogenic spinal cord injury following cervical spine surgery were identified. Institutional incidence rates ranged from 0.0% to 0.24%. Of the 3 patients with quadriplegia, one underwent anterior-only surgery with 2-level cervical corpectomy, one underwent anterior surgery with corpectomy in addition to posterior surgery, and one underwent posterior decompression and fusion surgery alone. One patient had complete neurologic recovery, one partially recovered, and one did not recover motor function. Iatrogenic spinal cord injury following cervical spine surgery is a rare and devastating adverse event. No standard protocol exists that can guarantee prevention of this complication, and there is a lack of consensus regarding evaluation and treatment when it does occur. Emergent imaging with magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography myelography to evaluate for compressive etiology or malpositioned instrumentation and avoidance of hypotension should be performed in cases of intraoperative and postoperative spinal cord injury.

  16. Spinal Epidural Hematoma after Thoracolumbar Posterior Fusion Surgery without Decompression for Thoracic Vertebral Fracture

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    Tsuyoki Minato

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a rare case of spinal epidural hematoma (SEH after thoracolumbar posterior fusion without decompression surgery for a thoracic vertebral fracture. A 42-year-old man was hospitalized for a thoracic vertebral fracture caused by being sandwiched against his back on broken concrete block. Computed tomography revealed a T12 dislocation fracture of AO type B2, multiple bilateral rib fractures, and a right hemopneumothorax. Four days after the injury, in order to promote early orthostasis and to improve respiratory status, we performed thoracolumbar posterior fusion surgery without decompression; the patient had back pain but no neurological deficits. Three hours after surgery, he complained of acute pain and severe weakness of his bilateral lower extremities; with allodynia below the level of his umbilicus, postoperative SEH was diagnosed. We performed immediate revision surgery. After removal of the hematoma, his symptoms improved gradually, and he was discharged ambulatory one month after revision surgery. Through experience of this case, we should strongly consider the possibility of preexisting SEH before surgery, even in patients with no neurological deficits. We should also consider perioperative coagulopathy in patients with multiple trauma, as in this case.

  17. Lateral Transpsoas Fusion: Indications and Outcomes

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    Vishal C. Patel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal fusion historically has been used extensively, and, recently, the lateral transpsoas approach to the thoracic and lumbar spine has become an increasingly common method to achieve fusion. Recent literature on this approach has elucidated its advantage over more traditional anterior and posterior approaches, which include a smaller tissue dissection, potentially lower blood loss, no need for an access surgeon, and a shorter hospital stay. Indications for the procedure have now expanded to include degenerative disc disease, spinal stenosis, degenerative scoliosis, nonunion, trauma, infection, and low-grade spondylolisthesis. Lateral interbody fusion has a similar if not lower rate of complications compared to traditional anterior and posterior approaches to interbody fusion. However, lateral interbody fusion has unique complications that include transient neurologic symptoms, motor deficits, and neural injuries that range from 1 to 60% in the literature. Additional studies are required to further evaluate and monitor the short- and long-term safety, efficacy, outcomes, and complications of lateral transpsoas procedures.

  18. Evaluation of Orthopedic Metal Artifact Reduction Application in Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography Reconstruction of Spinal Instrumentation: A Single Saudi Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Amir Monir

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the commercially available orthopedic metal artifact reduction (OMAR) technique in postoperative three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) reconstruction studies after spinal instrumentation and to investigate its clinical application. One hundred and twenty (120) patients with spinal metallic implants were included in the study. All had 3DCT reconstruction examinations using the OMAR software after obtaining the informed consents and approval of the Institution Ethical Committee. The degree of the artifacts, the related muscular density, the clearness of intermuscular fat planes, and definition of the adjacent vertebrae were qualitatively evaluated. The diagnostic satisfaction and quality of the 3D reconstruction images were thoroughly assessed. The majority (96.7%) of 3DCT reconstruction images performed were considered satisfactory to excellent for diagnosis. Only 3.3% of the reconstructed images had rendered unacceptable diagnostic quality. OMAR can effectively reduce metallic artifacts in patients with spinal instrumentation with highly diagnostic 3DCT reconstruction images.

  19. Ketamine as an Adjunct to Postoperative Pain Management in Opioid Tolerant Patients After Spinal Fusions: A Prospective Randomized Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Urban, Michael K.; Ya Deau, Jacques T.; Wukovits, Barbara; Lipnitsky, Jane Y.

    2007-01-01

    Management of acute postoperative pain is challenging, particularly in patients with preexisting narcotic dependency. Ketamine has been used at subanesthetic doses as a N-methyl d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist to block the processing of nociceptive input in chronic pain syndromes. This prospective randomized study was designed to assess the use of ketamine as an adjunct to acute pain management in narcotic tolerant patients after spinal fusions. Twenty-six patients for 1–2 level poster...

  20. Complication with Removal of a Lumbar Spinal Locking Plate

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    Brooke Crawford

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The use of locking plate technology for anterior lumbar spinal fusion has increased stability of the vertebral fusion mass over traditional nonconstrained screw and plate systems. This case report outlines a complication due to the use of this construct. Case. A patient with a history of L2 corpectomy and anterior spinal fusion presented with discitis at the L4/5 level and underwent an anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF supplemented with a locking plate placed anterolaterally for stability. Fifteen months after the ALIF procedure, he returned with a hardware infection. He underwent debridement of the infection site and removal of hardware. Results. Once hardware was exposed, removal of the locking plate screws was only successful in one out of four screws using a reverse thread screw removal device. Three of the reverse thread screw removal devices broke in attempt to remove the subsequent screws. A metal cutting drill was then used to break hoop stresses associated with the locking device and the plate was removed. Conclusion. Anterior locking plates add significant stability to an anterior spinal fusion mass. However, removal of this hardware can be complicated by the inherent properties of the design with significant risk of major vascular injury.

  1. Initial investigation of 18F-NaF PET/CT for identification of vertebral sites amenable to surgical revision after spinal fusion surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quon, Andrew; Iagaru, Andrei; Dodd, Robert; Abreu, Marcelo Rodrigues de; Sprinz, Clarice; Hennemann, Sergio; Alves Neto, Jose Maria

    2012-01-01

    A pilot study was performed in patients with recurrent back pain after spinal fusion surgery to evaluate the ability of 18 F-NaF PET/CT imaging to correctly identify those requiring surgical intervention and to locate a site amenable to surgical intervention. In this prospective study 22 patients with recurrent back pain after spinal surgery and with equivocal findings on physical examination and CT were enrolled for evaluation with 18 F-NaF PET/CT. All PET/CT images were prospectively reviewed with the primary objective of identifying or ruling out the presence of lesions amenable to surgical intervention. The PET/CT results were then validated during surgical exploration or clinical follow-up of at least 15 months. Abnormal 18 F-NaF foci were found in 16 of the 22 patients, and surgical intervention was recommended. These foci were located at various sites: screws, cages, rods, fixation hardware, and bone grafts. In 6 of the 22 patients no foci requiring surgical intervention were found. Validation of the results by surgery (15 patients) or on clinical follow-up (7 patients) showed that 18 F-NaF PET/CT correctly predicted the presence of an abnormality requiring surgical intervention in 15 of 16 patients and was falsely positive in 1 of 16. In this initial investigation, 18 F-NaF PET/CT imaging showed potential utility for evaluation of recurrent symptoms after spinal fusion surgery by identifying those patients requiring surgical management. (orig.)

  2. Driving Safety after Spinal Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhammoud, Abduljabbar; Alkhalili, Kenan; Hannallah, Jack; Ibeche, Bashar; Bajammal, Sohail; Baco, Abdul Moeen

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to assess driving reaction times (DRTs) after spinal surgery to establish a timeframe for safe resumption of driving by the patient postoperatively. The MEDLINE and Google Scholar databases were analyzed according to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis) Statement for clinical studies that investigated changes in DRTs following cervical and lumbar spinal surgery. Changes in DRTs and patients' clinical presentation, pathology, anatomical level affected, number of spinal levels involved, type of intervention, pain level, and driving skills were assessed. The literature search identified 12 studies that investigated postoperative DRTs. Six studies met the inclusion criteria; five studies assessed changes in DRT after lumbar spine surgery and two studies after cervical spina surgery. The spinal procedures were selective nerve root block, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, and lumbar fusion and/ordecompression. DRTs exhibited variable responses to spinal surgery and depended on the patients' clinical presentation, spinal level involved, and type of procedure performed. The evidence regarding the patients' ability to resume safe driving after spinal surgery is scarce. Normalization of DRT or a return of DRT to pre-spinal intervention level is a widely accepted indicator for safe driving, with variable levels of statistical significance owing to multiple confounding factors. Considerations of the type of spinal intervention, pain level, opioid consumption, and cognitive function should be factored in the assessment of a patient's ability to safely resume driving.

  3. Outlines and Outcomes of Instrumented Posterior Fusion in the Pediatric Cervical Spine: A Review Article

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    Kaveh Haddadi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context The most common source of cervical spine arthrodesis in the pediatric populace is the instability related to congenital or traumatic damage. Surgery of cervical spine can be challenging given slighter anatomical constructions, fewer hardened bone, and upcoming growth potential and growth. Evidence Acquisition Trainings in adult patients recommended that consuming screw constructs results in enhanced consequences with inferior amounts of instrumentation catastrophe. But, the pediatric literature is inadequate for minor retrospective series. Authors reviewed the existing pediatric cervical spine arthrodesis literature. They studied 184 abstracts from January 1976 to December 2014. An entire of 883 patients in 82 articles were involved in the evaluation. Patients were characterized as taking either posterior cervical fusion with wiring or posterior cervical fusion with screws or occipitocervical fusion. Results The etiologies faced most frequently were inherited abnormalities (54% shadowed by trauma (28%, Down syndrome (8%, and infectious, oncological, iatrogenic, or mixed causes (10%. The mean duration of follow-up was 32.5 months. Conclusions The consequences of this training are restricted by deviations in construct policy, usage of orthoses, follow-up period and fresher adjuvant produces stimulating fusions. But, a literature review recommend that instrumentation of the cervical spine in children may be harmless and more effective than using screw concepts rather than wiring methods.

  4. Lumbar Lordosis of Spinal Stenosis Patients during Intraoperative Prone Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su-Keon; Song, Kyung-Sub; Park, Byung-Moon; Lim, Sang-Youn; Jang, Geun; Lee, Beom-Seok; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Lee, Hwan-Mo

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the effect of spondylolisthesis on lumbar lordosis on the OSI (Jackson; Orthopaedic Systems Inc.) frame. Restoration of lumbar lordosis is important for maintaining sagittal balance. Physiologic lumbar lordosis has to be gained by intraoperative prone positioning with a hip extension and posterior instrumentation technique. There are some debates about changing lumbar lordosis on the OSI frame after an intraoperative prone position. We evaluated the effect of spondylolisthesis on lumbar lordosis after an intraoperative prone position. Methods Sixty-seven patients, who underwent spinal fusion at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery of Gwangmyeong Sungae Hospital between May 2007 and February 2012, were included in this study. The study compared lumbar lordosis on preoperative upright, intraoperative prone and postoperative upright lateral X-rays between the simple stenosis (SS) group and spondylolisthesis group. The average age of patients was 67.86 years old. The average preoperative lordosis was 43.5° (± 14.9°), average intraoperative lordosis was 48.8° (± 13.2°), average postoperative lordosis was 46.5° (± 16.1°) and the average change on the frame was 5.3° (± 10.6°). Results Among all patients, 24 patients were diagnosed with simple spinal stenosis, 43 patients with spondylolisthesis (29 degenerative spondylolisthesis and 14 isthmic spondylolisthesis). Between the SS group and spondylolisthesis group, preoperative lordosis, intraoperative lordosis and postoperative lordosis were significantly larger in the spondylolisthesis group. The ratio of patients with increased lordosis on the OSI frame compared to preoperative lordosis was significantly higher in the spondylolisthesis group. The risk of increased lordosis on frame was significantly higher in the spondylolisthesis group (odds ratio, 3.325; 95% confidence interval, 1.101 to 10.039; p = 0.033). Conclusions Intraoperative lumbar lordosis on the OSI frame with a prone

  5. Spinal Implant Density and Postoperative Lumbar Lordosis as Predictors for the Development of Proximal Junctional Kyphosis in Adult Spinal Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClendon, Jamal; Smith, Timothy R; Sugrue, Patrick A; Thompson, Sara E; O'Shaughnessy, Brian A; Koski, Tyler R

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate spinal implant density and proximal junctional kyphosis (PJK) in adult spinal deformity (ASD). Consecutive patients with ASD receiving ≥5 level fusions were retrospectively analyzed between 2007 and 2010. ASD, elective fusions, minimum 2-year follow-up. age lordosis (LL) were predictors for PJK (P = 0.018 and 0.045, respectively). Controlling for age, BMI, and gender, postoperative LL (not implant density) continued to show significance in multivariate logistic regression model. PJK, although influenced by a multitude of factors, may be statistically related to implant density and LL. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in assessing lung function in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a pilot study of comparison before and after posterior spinal fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam Wynnie WM

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Restrictive impairment is the commonest reported pulmonary deficit in AIS, which improves following surgical operation. However, exact mechanism of how improvement is brought about is unknown. Dynamic fast breath-hold (BH-MR imaging is a recent advance which provides direct quantitative visual assessment of pulmonary function. By using above technique, change in lung volume, chest wall and diaphragmatic motion in AIS patients before and six months after posterior spinal fusion surgery were measured. Methods 16 patients with severe right-sided predominant thoracic scoliosis (standing Cobb's angle 50° -82°, mean 60° received posterior spinal fusion without thoracoplasty were recruited into this study. BH-MR sequences were used to obtain coronal images of the whole chest during full inspiration and expiration. The following measurements were assessed: (1 inspiratory, expiratory and change in lung volume; (2 change in anteroposterior (AP and transverse (TS diameter of the chest wall at two levels: carina and apex (3 change in diaphragmatic heights. The changes in parameters before and after operation were compared using Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Patients were also asked to score their breathing effort before and after operation using a scale of 1–9 with ascending order of effort. The degree of spinal surgical correction at three planes was also assessed by reformatted MR images and correction rate of Cobb's angle was calculated. Results The individual or total inspiratory and expiratory volume showed slight but insignificant increase after operation. There was significantly increase in bilateral TS chest wall movement at carina level and increase in bilateral diaphragmatic movements between inspiration and expiration. The AP chest wall movements, however, did not significantly change. The median breathing effort after operation was lower than that before operation (p There was significant reduction in coronal Cobb's angle

  7. Anterior lumbar fusion with titanium threaded and mesh interbody cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauzzino, M J; Shaffrey, C I; Nockels, R P; Wiggins, G C; Rock, J; Wagner, J

    1999-12-15

    The authors report their experience with 42 patients in whom anterior lumbar fusion was performed using titanium cages as a versatile adjunct to treat a wide variety of spinal deformity and pathological conditions. These conditions included congenital, degenerative, iatrogenic, infectious, traumatic, and malignant disorders of the thoracolumbar spine. Fusion rates and complications are compared with data previously reported in the literature. Between July 1996 and July 1999 the senior authors (C.I.S., R.P.N., and M.J.R.) treated 42 patients by means of a transabdominal extraperitoneal (13 cases) or an anterolateral extraperitoneal approach (29 cases), 51 vertebral levels were fused using titanium cages packed with autologous bone. All vertebrectomies (27 cases) were reconstructed using a Miami Moss titanium mesh cage and Kaneda instrumentation. Interbody fusion (15 cases) was performed with either the BAK titanium threaded interbody cage (in 13 patients) or a Miami Moss titanium mesh cage (in two patients). The average follow-up period was 14.3 months. Seventeen patients had sustained a thoracolumbar burst fracture, 12 patients presented with degenerative spinal disorders, six with metastatic tumor, four with spinal deformity (one congenital and three iatrogenic), and three patients presented with spinal infections. In five patients anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) was supplemented with posterior segmental fixation at the time of the initial procedure. Of the 51 vertebral levels treated, solid arthrodesis was achieved in 49, a 96% fusion rate. One case of pseudarthrosis occurred in the group treated with BAK cages; the diagnosis was made based on the patient's continued mechanical back pain after undergoing L4-5 ALIF. The patient was treated with supplemental posterior fixation, and successful fusion occurred uneventfully with resolution of her back pain. In the group in which vertebrectomy was performed there was one case of fusion failure in a patient with

  8. Personal assistance, income and employment: the spinal injuries survey instrument (SISI) and its application in a sample of people with quadriplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, D; Connelly, L B

    2008-06-01

    Our aim was to ascertain what effect access to personal care package (PCP) has on the labour market activities of people who have a spinal cord injury (SCI). We developed a new instrument called the spinal injuries survey instrument (SISI). The SISI is a 35-item instrument, which contains items on health, education, employment, along with measures of personal assistance, mobility and psychological attribution style. The SISI was administered, with the Short Form 36 (SF-36) health status instrument, to 250 people with an SCI. The response rate was 72%. A retrospective, matched case-control sampling approach matched individuals who received a PCP, with a cohort who did not. The matching criteria included the site and severity of spinal lesion, age and gender. Although data on the reliability of the instrument are currently lacking, our empirical results are consistent with other studies: (1) mean annual health care costs (AUD$8741) are comparable with Walsh's estimates (2) SF-36 data support Kreuter's contention that mental health is resilient to SCI and (3) a post-injury employment rate of 29.7% corroborates Murphy et al. We present additional data describing income, educational attainment and family support. Our discussion borrows a conceptualization of disability by Sen, that includes both an 'earning handicap' (an impediment to earn income) and a 'conversion handicap' (an impediment to the enjoyment of income). Our application of the SISI provides evidence of both. The labour income of people with quadriplegia is AUD$10,007 per annum, while diminished health status, increased out-of-pocket health expenditure and loss of time suggest a conversion handicap.

  9. Transient long thoracic nerve injury during posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios I Tsirikos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the transient long thoracic nerve (LTN injury during instrumented posterior spinal arthrodesis for idiopathic scoliosis. The suspected mechanism of injury, postoperative course and final outcome is discussed. The LTN is susceptible to injury due to its long and relatively superficial course across the thoracic wall through direct trauma or tension. Radical mastectomies with resection of axillary lymph nodes, first rib resection to treat thoracic outlet syndrome and cardiac surgery can be complicated with LTN injury. LTN injury producing scapular winging has not been reported in association with spinal deformity surgery. We reviewed the medical notes and spinal radiographs of two adolescent patients with idiopathic scoliosis who underwent posterior spinal arthrodesis and developed LTN neuropraxia. Scoliosis surgery was uneventful and intraoperative spinal cord monitoring was stable throughout the procedure. Postoperative neurological examination was otherwise normal, but both patients developed winging of the scapula at 4 and 6 days after spinal arthrodesis, which did not affect shoulder function. Both patients made a good recovery and the scapular winging resolved spontaneously 8 and 11 months following surgery with no residual morbidity. We believe that this LTN was due to positioning of our patients with their head flexed, tilted and rotated toward the contralateral side while the arm was abducted and extended. The use of heavy retractors may have also applied compression or tension to the nerve in one of our patients contributing to the development of neuropraxia. This is an important consideration during spinal deformity surgery to prevent potentially permanent injury to the nerve, which can produce severe shoulder dysfunction and persistent pain.

  10. Is hospital information system relevant to detect surgical site infection? Findings from a prospective surveillance study in posterior instrumented spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boetto, J; Chan-Seng, E; Lonjon, G; Pech, J; Lotthé, A; Lonjon, N

    2015-11-01

    Spinal instrumentation has a high rate of surgical site infection (SSI), but results greatly vary depending on surveillance methodology, surgical procedures, or quality of follow-up. Our aim was to study true incidence of SSI in spinal surgery by significant data collection, and to compare it with the results obtained through the hospital information system. This work is a single center prospective cohort study that included all patients consecutively operated on for spinal instrumentation by posterior approach over a six-month period regardless the etiology. For all patients, a "high definition" prospective method of surveillance was performed by the infection control (IC) department during at least 12 months after surgery. Results were then compared with findings from automatic surveillance though the hospital information system (HIS). One hundred and fifty-four patients were included. We found no hardly difference between "high definition" and automatic surveillance through the HIS, even if HIS tended to under-estimate the infection rate: rate of surgical site infection was 2.60% and gross SSI incidence rate via the hospital information system was 1.95%. Smoking and alcohol consumption were significantly related to a SSI. Our SSI rates to reflect the true incidence of infectious complications in posterior instrumented adult spinal surgery in our hospital and these results were consistent with the lower levels of published infection rate. In-house surveillance by surgeons only is insufficiently sensitive. Further studies with more patients and a longer inclusion time are needed to conclude if SSI case detection through the HIS could be a relevant and effective alternative method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. The results of decompressive surgery and instrumented posterolateral fusion in refractory degenerative spondylolisthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behtash H

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Degenerative spondylolisthesis is a common disease of the lumbar spine especially in older ones. The disease represents a challenge to the treating physician. At present, for those patients that deteriorate clinically, there are many proposed algorithms for the surgical treatment. This before and after study was undertaken to assess the surgical results of decompression and instrumented posterolateral fusion in these patients. "nMethods: The study population consisted of 23 patients who had undergone no prior surgery for degenerative spondylolisthesis on the lumbar spine. These patients were treated by decompression, bilateral posterolateral fusion, and segmental (pedicle screw instrumentation with mean follow-up of 29 months (range, 13-73 months. Finally, The clinical results were evaluated for all patients by means of an Oswestry Disability Index (ODI version 2.1, the Henderson's functional capacity, and persistence of leg symptoms, low back pain or claudication. Mann-Whitney and Chi-Square tests were used to assess the average values and comparison, respectively. "nResults: Henderson's functional capacity at the last visit session was excellent in 14 (60.9%, good in 7 (30.4%, fair in 2 (8.7% cases. ODI decreased from 72.2% (50-88% preoperatively to 14.4% (0-54% at the latest follow-up visit. A history of leg pain or claudication was correlated significantly with the amount of decline in ODI score and Henderson's functional capacity (p<0.05. "nConclusion: In spite of limited number of our patients, decompressive surgery plus instrumented posterolateral fusion is a safe, reliable, and satisfactory procedure for treating degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. This procedure may be done when conservative treatment was failed and psychological problems can be ruled out.

  12. Assessment of the suitability of biodegradable rods for use in posterior lumbar fusion: An in-vitro biomechanical evaluation and finite element analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fon-Yih Tsuang

    Full Text Available Interbody fusion with posterior instrumentation is a common method for treating lumbar degenerative disc diseases. However, the high rigidity of the fusion construct may produce abnormal stresses at the adjacent segment and lead to adjacent segment degeneration (ASD. As such, biodegradable implants are becoming more popular for use in orthopaedic surgery. These implants offer sufficient stability for fusion but at a reduced stiffness. Tailored to degrade over a specific timeframe, biodegradable implants could potentially mitigate the drawbacks of conventional stiff constructs and reduce the loading on adjacent segments. Six finite element models were developed in this study to simulate a spine with and without fixators. The spinal fixators used both titanium rods and biodegradable rods. The models were subjected to axial loading and pure moments. The range of motion (ROM, disc stresses, and contact forces of facet joints at adjacent segments were recorded. A 3-point bending test was performed on the biodegradable rods and a dynamic bending test was performed on the spinal fixators according to ASTM F1717-11a. The finite element simulation showed that lumbar spinal fusion using biodegradable implants had a similar ROM at the fusion level as at adjacent levels. As the rods degraded over time, this produced a decrease in the contact force at adjacent facet joints, less stress in the adjacent disc and greater loading on the anterior bone graft region. The mechanical tests showed the initial average fatigue strength of the biodegradable rods was 145 N, but this decreased to 115N and 55N after 6 months and 12 months of soaking in solution. Also, both the spinal fixator with biodegradable rods and with titanium rods was strong enough to withstand 5,000,000 dynamic compression cycles under a 145 N axial load. The results of this study demonstrated that biodegradable rods may present more favourable clinical outcomes for lumbar fusion. These polymer rods

  13. Favourable outcome of posterior decompression and stabilization in lordosis for cervical spondylotic myelopathy: the spinal cord "back shift" concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denaro, Vincenzo; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Berton, Alessandra; Salvatore, Giuseppe; Denaro, Luca

    2015-11-01

    Surgical management of patients with multilevel CSM aims to decompress the spinal cord and restore the normal sagittal alignment. The literature lacks of high level evidences about the best surgical approach. Posterior decompression and stabilization in lordosis allows spinal cord back shift, leading to indirect decompression of the anterior spinal cord. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of posterior decompression and stabilization in lordosis for multilevel CSM. 36 out of 40 patients were clinically assessed at a mean follow-up of 5, 7 years. Outcome measures included EMS, mJOA Score, NDI and SF-12. Patients were asked whether surgery met their expectations and if they would undergo the same surgery again. Bone graft fusion, instrumental failure and cervical curvature were evaluated. Spinal cord back shift was measured and correlation with EMS and mJOA score recovery rate was analyzed. All scores showed a significative improvement (p 0.05). Ninety percent of patients would undergo the same surgery again. There was no deterioration of the cervical alignment, posterior grafted bones had completely fused and there were no instrument failures. The mean spinal cord back shift was 3.9 mm (range 2.5-4.5 mm). EMS and mJOA recovery rates were significantly correlated with the postoperative posterior cord migration (P lordosis is a valuable procedure for patients affected by multilevel CSM, leading to significant clinical improvement thanks to the spinal cord back shift. Postoperative lordotic alignment of the cervical spine is a key factor for successful treatment.

  14. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using nonresorbable poly-ether-ether-ketone versus resorbable poly-L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide fusion devices: a prospective, randomized study to assess fusion and clinical outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiya, T.U.; Smit, T.H.; Deddens, J.; Mullender, M.G.

    2009-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A prospective randomized clinical study. OBJECTIVE.: To assess fusion, clinical outcome, and complications. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Resorbable poly-L- lactide-co-D,L-lactide (PLDLLA) cages intended to aid spinal interbody fusion have been introduced into clinical practice within

  15. Treatment of spinal fractures with paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riska, E B; Myllynen, P

    1981-01-01

    Of 206 patients with vertebral fractures in the thoraco-lumbar spine with spinal cord injuries, an antero-lateral decompression with stabilization of the injured segment of the vertebral column was undertaken in 56 cases. In all these cases there was a compression of the spinal cord from the front. 8 patients made a complete recovery, 31 a good recovery, and 6 were improved. In 8 patients no improvement was noted. 2 patients developed pressure sores later and 1 patient died one year after the operation of uraemia. 22 patients out of 55 got a normal function of the bladder and 25 patients out of 54 a normal function of the anal sphincter. 16 patients out of 17 made a complete or good recovery after removal of a displaced rotated vertebral bony fragment from the spinal canal, and 7 patients out of 9 with wedge shaped fractures. In our clinic today, in cases of vertebral fractures with neural involvement, reduction and internal fixation with Harrington rods and fusion of the injured segment is undertaken as soon as possible, also during the night. If narrowing of the neural canal and compression of the spinal cord are verified, a decompression operation with interbody fusion is undertaken during the next days.

  16. N + 1 redundancy on ATCA instrumentation for Nuclear Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correia, Miguel, E-mail: miguelfc@ipfn.ist.utl.pt [Associação EURATOM/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico – Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Sousa, Jorge; Rodrigues, António P.; Batista, António J.N.; Combo, Álvaro; Carvalho, Bernardo B.; Santos, Bruno; Carvalho, Paulo F.; Gonçalves, Bruno [Associação EURATOM/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico – Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Correia, Carlos M.B.A. [Centro de Instrumentação, Departamento de Física, Universidade de Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Varandas, Carlos A.F. [Associação EURATOM/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico – Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► In Nuclear Fusion, demanding security and high-availability requirements call for redundancy to be available. ► ATCA standard features desirable redundancy features for Fusion instrumentation. ► The developed control and data acquisition hardware modules support additional redundancy schemes. ► Implementation of N + 1 redundancy of host processor and I/O data modules. -- Abstract: The role of redundancy on control and data acquisition systems has gained a significant importance in the case of Nuclear Fusion, as demanding security and high-availability requirements call for redundancy to be available. IPFN's control and data acquisition system hardware is based on an Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture (ATCA) set of I/O (DAC/ADC endpoints) and data/timing switch modules, which handle data and timing from all I/O endpoints. Modules communicate through Peripheral Component Interconnect Express (PCIe), established over the ATCA backplane and controlled by one or more external hosts. The developed hardware modules were designed to take advantage of ATCA specification's redundancy features, namely at the hardware management level, including support of: (i) multiple host operation with N + 1 redundancy – in which a designated failover host takes over data previously assigned to a suddenly malfunctioning host and (ii) N + 1 redundancy of I/O and data/timing switch modules. This paper briefly describes IPFN's control and data acquisition system, which is being developed for ITER fast plant system controller (FPSC), and analyses the hardware implementation of its supported redundancy features.

  17. Development and treatment of spinal deformity in patients with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsirikos Athanasios

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Scoliosis is a common deformity in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy. This is usually associated with pelvic obliquity due to extension of the curve to the sacrum. Sagittal plane deformity is less common and often develops along with scoliosis. Spinal deformity in patients with severe neurological handicaps can affect their ability to sit and cause significant back pain or pain due to rib impingement against the elevated side of the pelvis on the concavity of the curvature. Surgical correction followed by spinal arthrodesis is indicated in patients with progressive deformities which interfere with their level of function and quality of life. Spinal deformity correction is a major task in children with multiple medical co-morbidities and can be associated with a high risk of complications including death. A well-coordinated multidisciplinary approach is required in the assessment and treatment of this group of patients with the aim to minimize the complication rate and secure a satisfactory surgical outcome. Good knowledge of the surgical and instrumentation techniques, as well as the principles of management is needed to achieve optimum correction of the deformity and balancing of the spine and pelvis. Spinal fusion has a well-documented positive impact even in children with quadriplegia or total body involvement and is the only surgical procedure which has such a high satisfaction rate among parents and caregivers.

  18. The relationship between cervical lordosis and Nurick scores in patients undergoing circumferential vs. posterior alone cervical decompression, instrumentation and fusion for treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shalin; Glivar, Phillip; Asgarzadie, Farbod; Cheng, David Juma Wayne; Danisa, Olumide

    2017-11-01

    The loss of regional cervical sagittal alignment and the progressive development of cervical kyphosis is a factor in the advancement of myelopathy. Adequate decompression of the spinal canal along with reestablishment of cervical lordosis are desired objective with regard to the surgical treatment of patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy. A retrospective chart review was conducted in which patients who underwent either a combined anterior/posterior instrumentation and decompression or a posterior alone instrumentation and decompression for the treatment of CSM at our institution were identified. Any patient undergoing operative intervention for trauma, infection or tumors were excluded. Similarly, patients undergoing posterior instrumentation with constructs extending beyond the level of C2-C7 were similarly excluded from this study. A total of 67 patients met the inclusion criteria for this study. A total of 32 patients underwent posterior alone surgery and the remaining 35 underwent combined anterior/posterior procedure. Radiographic evaluation of patient's preoperative and postoperative cervical lordosis as measured by the C2-C7 Cobb angle was performed. Each patient's preoperative and postoperative functional disability as enumerated by the Nurick score was also recorded. Statistical analysis was conducted to determine if there was a significant relationship between improvement in cervical lordosis and improvement in patient's clinical outcomes as enumerated by the Nurick Score in patients undergoing posterior alone versus combined anterior/posterior decompression, instrumentation and fusion of the cervical spine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Anterior lumbar interbody fusion. Indications, technique, advantages and disadvantages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, M; Weidenfeld, M; Uckmann, F P

    2015-02-01

    Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) for lumbar interbody fusion from L2 to the sacrum has been an established technique for decades. The advantages and disadvantages of ALIF compared to posterior interbody fusion techniques are discussed. The operative technique is described in detail. Complications and avoidance strategies are discussed. This article is based on a selective literature search using PubMed and the experience of the authors in this medical field. The advantages of ALIF compared to posterior fusion techniques are the free approach to the anterior disc space without opening of the spinal canal or the neural foramina. This gives the possibility of an extensive anterior release and placement of the largest possible cages without the risk of neural structure damage. The disadvantages of ALIF are the additional anterior approach and the related complications. The most frequent complication is due to damage of vessels. The rate of complications is significantly increased in revision surgery. The ALIF technique meaningfully expands the repertoire of the spinal surgeon especially for the treatment of non-union after interbody fusion, in patients with epidural scar tissue at the index level and spinal infections. Advantages and disadvantages should be considered when evaluating the indications for ALIF.

  20. The Effect of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy With Antiseptic Instillation on Biofilm Formation in a Porcine Model of Infected Spinal Instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Devinder P; Gowda, Arvind U; Chopra, Karan; Tholen, Michael; Chang, Sarah; Mavrophilipos, Vasilios; Semsarzadeh, Nina; Rasko, Yvonne; Holton Iii, Luther

    2017-06-01

    This study evaluates the effect of negative pressure wound therapy with antiseptic instillation (NPWTi) in the clearance of infection and biofilm formation in an in vivo model of infected spinal implants compared to traditional treatment modalities. Five pigs underwent titanium rod implantation of their spinous processes followed by injection of 1 x 106 CFUs/100μL of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus through the fascia at each site. At 1 week postoperatively, an experimental arm of 3 pigs received NPWTi, and a control arm of 2 pigs received wet-to-dry dressings. The persistence of local infection in the experimental group was compared to the control group using tissue cultures. Biofilm development on spinal implants was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. Mean bacterial count showed a statistical difference between the experimental and the control groups (P < .05). Scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of uniform biofilm formation across the surface of control group instrumentation, whereas the experimental group showed interrupted areas between biofilm formations. The authors concluded that NPWTi is associated with decreased bacterial load and biofilm formation compared to wet-to-dry dressings in an in vivo porcine model of infected spinal instrumentation.

  1. Cyst-Like Osteolytic Formations in Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 (rhBMP-2) Augmented Sheep Spinal Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hsin Chuan; Lee, Soonchul; Ting, Kang; Shen, Jia; Wang, Chenchao; Nguyen, Alan; Berthiaume, Emily A; Zara, Janette N; Turner, A Simon; Seim, Howard B; Kwak, Jin Hee; Zhang, Xinli; Soo, Chia

    2017-07-01

    Multiple case reports using recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) have reported complications. However, the local adverse effects of rhBMP-2 application are not well documented. In this report we show that, in addition to promoting lumbar spinal fusion through potent osteogenic effects, rhBMP-2 augmentation promotes local cyst-like osteolytic formations in sheep trabecular bones that have undergone anterior lumbar interbody fusion. Three months after operation, conventional computed tomography showed that the trabecular bones of the rhBMP-2 application groups could fuse, whereas no fusion was observed in the control group. Micro-computed tomography analysis revealed that the core implant area's bone volume fraction and bone mineral density increased proportionately with rhBMP-2 dose. Multiple cyst-like bone voids were observed in peri-implant areas when using rhBMP-2 applications, and these sites showed significant bone mineral density decreases in relation to the unaffected regions. Biomechanically, these areas decreased in strength by 32% in comparison with noncystic areas. Histologically, rhBMP-2-affected void sites had an increased amount of fatty marrow, thinner trabecular bones, and significantly more adiponectin- and cathepsin K-positive cells. Despite promoting successful fusion, rhBMP-2 use in clinical applications may result in local adverse structural alterations and compromised biomechanical changes to the bone. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cobalt Chrome Spinal Constructs Trigger Airport Security Screening in 24% of Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woon, Regina P; Andras, Lindsay M; Barrett, Kody K; Skaggs, David L

    2015-03-01

    Retrospective study. To determine whether pediatric patients undergo additional airport security screening after posterior spinal fusion. Airport security has expanded to include body scanners as well as traditional metal detectors. Families frequently ask whether spinal implants will trigger airport security, but there is limited information on modern implants and screening methods. The researchers conducted a survey of 50 pediatric patients after posterior spinal fusion from 2004 to 2013. Inclusion criteria were posterior instrumentation, pedicle screws for at least 80% of anchors, and at least 1 trip through an American airport after surgery. Charts and radiographs were reviewed for metal type, number of levels fused, number of anchors, and rod diameter. A total of 16% of patients (8 of 50) were detected by body scan or metal detector and all had cobalt chrome (CoCr) rods. No patients with stainless-steel (SS) rods were detected. The CoCr rods triggered additional screening in 24% of children (8 of 33), compared with none of 17 with SS rods (p = .03). For patients with CoCr rods, the detection rate was 18% (5 of 28) by metal detector and 17% (3 of 18) by body scanner. For patients with CoCr rods, there was no significant difference between detection rates and levels fused (p = .30), number of anchors (p = .15), or rod diameter (p = .17). In this series, CoCr constructs were more likely to incur additional airport security compared with more traditional SS constructs. Copyright © 2015 Scoliosis Research Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The role of Amicar in same-day anterior and posterior spinal fusion for idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, George H; Florentino-Pineda, Ivan; Poe-Kochert, Connie; Armstrong, Douglas G; Son-Hing, Jochen P

    2008-09-15

    A retrospective study of the effectiveness of Amicar (epsilon aminocaproic acid). Evaluate the effectiveness of Amicar in decreasing perioperative blood loss and transfusion requirements in same-day anterior (ASF) and posterior spinal fusion (PSF) with segmental spinal instrumentation (SSI) for idiopathic scoliosis. Preliminary prospective, prospective randomized double-blind, and fibrinogen studies have demonstrated Amicar to be effective in decreasing perioperative blood loss in patients with idiopathic scoliosis undergoing PSF with SSI. Increased fibrinogen secretion is a possible explanation. There were 73 consecutive patients divided into 3 study groups based on the administration of Amicar: Group 1 (n = 16), no Amicar; Group 2 (n = 18), Amicar for the PSF with SSI only; and Group 3 (n = 39), Amicar for both ASF and PSF with SSI. All patients were managed using the same general anesthesia technique, intraoperative procedure, postoperative care path, and indications for transfusion (hemoglobin <7 g/dL). Total perioperative blood loss (estimated intraoperative blood loss for both procedures and measured postoperative chest tube and PSF wound suction drainage) and total transfusion requirements between groups were compared using one-way ANOVA. There were statistically significant decreases in mean estimated intraoperative PSF with SSI, total perioperative blood loss, and transfusion requirements in the 2 Amicar groups. However, Amicar had no significant effect on estimated intraoperative ASF blood loss, chest tube drainage, or PSF wound suction drainage. Total perioperative blood loss and transfusion requirements (cell saver, autologous, directed, and allogeneic blood) were: 3442.8 +/- 1344.0 mL and 1537.1 +/- 905.1 mL in Group 1; 2089.8 +/- 684.0 mL and 485.2 +/- 349.8 mL in Group 2; and 2184.1 +/- 1163.7 mL and 531.5 +/- 510.5 mL in Group 3. There were no Amicar related complications. Amicar was highly effective in decreasing total perioperative blood loss and

  4. Compression and contact area of anterior strut grafts in spinal instrumentation: a biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizanis, Antonius; Holstein, Jörg H; Vossen, Felix; Burkhardt, Markus; Pohlemann, Tim

    2013-08-26

    Anterior bone grafts are used as struts to reconstruct the anterior column of the spine in kyphosis or following injury. An incomplete fusion can lead to later correction losses and compromise further healing. Despite the different stabilizing techniques that have evolved, from posterior or anterior fixating implants to combined anterior/posterior instrumentation, graft pseudarthrosis rates remain an important concern. Furthermore, the need for additional anterior implant fixation is still controversial. In this bench-top study, we focused on the graft-bone interface under various conditions, using two simulated spinal injury models and common surgical fixation techniques to investigate the effect of implant-mediated compression and contact on the anterior graft. Calf spines were stabilised with posterior internal fixators. The wooden blocks as substitutes for strut grafts were impacted using a "pressfit" technique and pressure-sensitive films placed at the interface between the vertebral bone and the graft to record the compression force and the contact area with various stabilization techniques. Compression was achieved either with posterior internal fixator alone or with an additional anterior implant. The importance of concomitant ligament damage was also considered using two simulated injury models: pure compression Magerl/AO fracture type A or rotation/translation fracture type C models. In type A injury models, 1 mm-oversized grafts for impaction grafting provided good compression and fair contact areas that were both markedly increased by the use of additional compressing anterior rods or by shortening the posterior fixator construct. Anterior instrumentation by itself had similar effects. For type C injuries, dramatic differences were observed between the techniques, as there was a net decrease in compression and an inadequate contact on the graft occurred in this model. Under these circumstances, both compression and the contact area on graft could only

  5. Instrumental intelligent test of food sensory quality as mimic of human panel test combining multiple cross-perception sensors and data fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Qin; Zhao, Jiewen; Chen, Quansheng

    2014-09-02

    Instrumental test of food quality using perception sensors instead of human panel test is attracting massive attention recently. A novel cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion imitating multiple mammal perception was proposed for the instrumental test in this work. First, three mimic sensors of electronic eye, electronic nose and electronic tongue were used in sequence for data acquisition of rice wine samples. Then all data from the three different sensors were preprocessed and merged. Next, three cross-perception variables i.e., color, aroma and taste, were constructed using principal components analysis (PCA) and multiple linear regression (MLR) which were used as the input of models. MLR, back-propagation artificial neural network (BPANN) and support vector machine (SVM) were comparatively used for modeling, and the instrumental test was achieved for the comprehensive quality of samples. Results showed the proposed cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion presented obvious superiority to the traditional data fusion methodologies, also achieved a high correlation coefficient (>90%) with the human panel test results. This work demonstrated that the instrumental test based on the cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion can actually mimic the human test behavior, therefore is of great significance to ensure the quality of products and decrease the loss of the manufacturers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Variations in Practice Patterns among Neurosurgeons and Orthopaedic Surgeons in the Management of Spinal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Manzar; Nasir, Sadaf; Moed, Amber; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2011-12-01

    This is a case series. We wanted to identify variations in the practice patterns among neurosurgeons and orthopedic surgeons for the management of spinal disorders. Spinal disorders are common in the clinical practice of both neurosurgeons and orthopedic surgeons. It has been observed that despite the availability of various guidelines, there is lack of consensus among surgeons about the management of various disorders. A questionnaire was distributed, either directly or via e-mail, to the both the neurosurgeons and orthopedic surgeons who worked at 5 tertiary care centers within a single region of Korea. The surgeons were working either in private practice or in academic institutions. The details of the questionnaire included demographic details and the specialty (orthopedic/neurosurgeon). The surgeons were classified according to the level of experience as up to 5 years, 6-10 years and > 10 years. Questions were asked about the approach to lumbar discectomy (fragmentectomy or aggressive disc removal), using steroids for treating discitis, the fusion preference for spondylolisthesis, the role of an orthosis after fusion, the preferred surgical approach for spinal stenosis, the operative approach for spinal trauma (early within 72 hours or late > 72 hours) and the role of surgery in complete spinal cord injury. The data was analyzed using SPSS ver 16. p-values neurosurgeons and 10 were orthopedic surgeons. Statistically significant differences were observed for the management of spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, using an orthosis after fusion, the type of lumbar discectomy and the value of surgical intervention after complete spinal cord injury. Our results suggest that there continues to exist a statistically significant lack of consensus among neurosurgeons and orthopedic spine surgeons when considering using an orthosis after fusion, the type of discectomy and the value of intervention after complete spinal injury.

  7. Current strategies for the restoration of adequate lordosis during lumbar fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrey, Cédric; Darnis, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Not restoring the adequate lumbar lordosis during lumbar fusion surgery may result in mechanical low back pain, sagittal unbalance and adjacent segment degeneration. The objective of this work is to describe the current strategies and concepts for restoration of adequate lordosis during fusion surgery. Theoretical lordosis can be evaluated from the measurement of the pelvic incidence and from the analysis of spatial organization of the lumbar spine with 2/3 of the lordosis given by the L4-S1 segment and 85% by the L3-S1 segment. Technical aspects involve patient positioning on the operating table, release maneuvers, type of instrumentation used (rod, screw-rod connection, interbody cages), surgical sequence and the overall surgical strategy. Spinal osteotomies may be required in case of fixed kyphotic spine. AP combined surgery is particularly efficient in restoring lordosis at L5-S1 level and should be recommended. Finally, not one but several strategies may be used to achieve the need for restoration of adequate lordosis during fusion surgery. PMID:25621216

  8. Single stage reduction and stabilization of basilar invagination after failed prior fusion surgery in children with Down's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedequist, Daniel; Bekelis, Kimon; Emans, John; Proctor, Mark R

    2010-02-15

    We describe an innovative single-stage reduction and stabilization technique using modern cervical instrumentation. We hypothesis modern instrumentation has made more aggressive surgical corrections possible and has reduced the need for transoral resection of the odontoid and traction reduction in children with basilar invagination. Craniocervical junction abnormalities, including atlantoaxial instability and progressive basilar invagination, are relatively common phenomenon in Down's syndrome patients, and can lead to chronic progressive neurologic deficits, catastrophic injury, and death. This patient population also can be a difficult one in which to perform successful stabilization and fusion. We reviewed the records and films on 2 children with Down's syndrome and atlantoaxial instability who had undergone prior occipital-cervical fusion and then presented with symptomatic progressive basilar invagination due to atlantoaxial displacement. In both cases, the children had progressive symptoms of spinal cord and brain stem compression. Multiple approaches for surgical correction, including preoperative traction and transoral odontoid resection, were considered, but ultimately it was elected to perform a single stage posterior operation. In both patients, we performed fusion takedown, intraoperative realignment with reduction of the basilar invagination, and stabilization using modern occipito-cervical instrumentation. In both children, excellent cranio-cervical realignment was achieved; along with successful fusion and improvement in clinical symptoms. In this article we will discuss the clinical cases and review the background of craniocervical junction abnormalities in Down's syndrome patients. We hypothesis modern instrumentation has made more aggressive surgical corrections possible and has reduced the need for transoral resection of the odontoid and traction reduction in children with basilar invagination.

  9. Spinal column shortening for tethered cord syndrome associated with myelomeningocele, lumbosacral lipoma, and lipomyelomeningocele in children and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldave, Guillermo; Hansen, Daniel; Hwang, Steven W; Moreno, Amee; Briceño, Valentina; Jea, Andrew

    2017-06-01

    fusion and no instrumentation failure in all cases by the most recent follow-up. Five of 7 patients (71%) reported improvement in preoperative symptoms during the follow-up period. The mean differences in initial and most recent Scoliosis Research Society Outcomes Questionnaire and Oswestry Disability Index scores were 0.26 and -13%, respectively; minimum clinically important difference in SRS-22 and ODI were assumed to be 0.4% and -12.8%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Spinal column shortening seems to represent a safe and efficacious alternative to traditional untethering of the spinal cord for tethered cord syndrome.

  10. Safety and efficacy of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages in combination with posterior pedicel screw fixation in pyogenic spinal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiban, Ehab; Janssen, Insa; da Cunha, Pedro Ribeiro; Rainer, Jessica; Stoffel, Michael; Lehmberg, Jens; Ringel, Florian; Meyer, Bernhard

    2016-10-01

    To date, there is growing consensus that PEEK material may be used for interbody fusion in spinal infections. Data supporting that claim are however restricted to a few very small clinical series. The aim of this study is to evaluate the outcome of surgical treatment of pyogenic spinal infections with PEEK cages in combination with posterior pedicel screw fixation. Between 2006 and 2013, a total of 211 patients suffering from spondylodiscitis underwent surgical debridement and instrumentation. There were 52 cases where PEEK cages were used. Laboratory and physical examinations were assessed at a 3-month follow-up. Last follow-up was performed with at a minimum of 12 months after surgery via a telephone interview. Mean age at presentation was 67 years, with 19 (37 %) male patients and 33 (63 %) female. Distribution of the infection was lumbar in 29 (56 %%), thoracic in 3 (6 %) and cervical in 11 (21 %) cases. Nine patients (17 %) had concomitant non-contiguous spondylodiscitis. Epidural abscess was found in 17 patients (33 %); 48 (92 %%) had pain; neurological deficits were found in 20 patients (38 %). All patients in this series underwent surgical debridement with instrumentation of the spine. Postoperative intravenous antibiotics were administered for 15.4 ± 6.8 days followed by 2.9 ± 0.5 months of oral antibiotics. Complete resolution of the infection was achieved in all cases. Of the 28 patients with neurological deficits, 6 had full recovery and 10 had improved incompletely after surgery. One patient suffered from a pulmonary embolism postoperatively. There were no mortalities. Use of PEEK cages for interbody fusion is feasible and safe in patients suffering from a pyogenic spinal infection.

  11. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation, industrial applications, plasma physics and nuclear fusion 1986-1996. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Measurements, Techniques, and Instrumentation, Industrial Applications, Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion, issued during the period 1986-1996. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain some papers in languages other than English (French, Russian or Spanish), but all of these papers have abstracts in English. Contents cover the three main areas of (i) Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation (Physics, Dosimetry Techniques, Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Research Reactor and Particle Accelerator Applications, and Nuclear Data), (ii) Industrial Applications (Radiation Processing, Radiometry, and Tracers), and (iii) Plasma Physics and Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion

  12. Anthropometric characteristics, high prevalence of undernutrition and weight loss: impact on outcomes in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis after spinal fusion.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tarrant, Roslyn C

    2015-02-01

    Abnormal anthropometry including comparably lower weight and body mass index (BMI) in the adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) population is increasingly recognised, however, no study has examined postoperative weight loss or its clinical relevance in these relatively thin patients. This study aimed to assess perioperative nutritional status as well as clinically severe involuntary weight loss and its impact on outcomes in patients with AIS undergoing posterior spinal fusion (PSF). A further objective was to compare preoperative anthropometric measurements of the current AIS cohort with healthy controls.

  13. Matrilin-1 expression is increased in the vertebral column of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) individuals displaying spinal fusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Mona E; Takle, Harald; Ytteborg, Elisabeth; Veiseth-Kent, Eva; Enersen, Grethe; Færgestad, Ellen; Baeverfjord, Grete; Hannesson, Kirsten O

    2011-12-01

    We have previously characterized the development of vertebral fusions induced by elevated water temperature in Atlantic salmon. Molecular markers of bone and cartilage development together with histology were used to understand the complex pathology and mechanism in the development of this spinal malformation. In this study, we wanted to use proteomics, a non-hypothetical approach to screen for possible new markers involved in the fusion process. Proteins extracted from non-deformed and fused vertebrae of Atlantic salmon were therefore compared by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) and MALDI-TOF analysis. Data analysis of protein spots in the 2DE gels demonstrated matrilin-1, also named cartilage matrix protein, to be the most highly up-regulated protein in fused compared with non-deformed vertebrae. Furthermore, real-time PCR analysis showed strong up-regulation of matrilin-1 mRNA in fused vertebrae. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated induced matrilin-1 expression in trans-differentiating cells undergoing a metaplastic shift toward chondrocytes in fusing vertebrae, whereas abundant expression was demonstrated in cartilaginous tissue and chordocytes of both non-deformed and fused vertebrae. These results identifies matrilin-1 as a new interesting candidate in the fusion process, and ratify the use of proteomic as a valuable technique to screen for markers involved in vertebral pathogenesis.

  14. Central nociceptive sensitization vs. spinal cord training: Opposing forms of plasticity that dictate function after complete spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R Ferguson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The spinal cord demonstrates several forms of plasticity that resemble brain-dependent learning and memory. Among the most studied form of spinal plasticity is spinal memory for noxious (nociceptive stimulation. Numerous papers have described central pain as a spinally-stored memory that enhances future responses to cutaneous stimulation. This phenomenon, known as central sensitization, has broad relevance to a range of pathological conditions. Work from the spinal cord injury (SCI field indicates that the lumbar spinal cord demonstrates several other forms of plasticity, including formal learning and memory. After complete thoracic SCI, the lumbar spinal cord can be trained by delivering stimulation to the hindleg when the leg is extended. In the presence of this response-contingent stimulation the spinal cord rapidly learns to hold the leg in a flexed position, a centrally mediated effect that meets the formal criteria for instrumental (response-outcome learning. Instrumental flexion training produces a central change in spinal plasticity that enables future spinal learning on both the ipsilateral and contralateral leg. However, if stimulation is given in a response-independent manner, the spinal cord develops central maladaptive plasticity that undermines future spinal learning on both legs. The present paper tests for interactions between spinal cord training and central nociceptive sensitization after complete spinal cord transection. We found that spinal training alters future central sensitization by intradermal formalin (24 h post-training. Conversely intradermal formalin impaired future spinal learning (24 h post-injection. Because the NMDA receptor has been implicated in formalin-induced central sensitization, we tested whether pretreatment with NMDA affects spinal learning. We found intrathecal NMDA impaired learning in a dose-dependent fashion, and that this effect endures for at least 24h. These data provide strong evidence for an

  15. Sacroiliac Joint Fusion Minimally Affects Adjacent Lumbar Segment Motion: A Finite Element Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Derek P; Kiapour, Ali; Yerby, Scott A; Goel, Vijay K

    2015-01-01

    Adjacent segment disease is a recognized consequence of fusion in the spinal column. Fusion of the sacroiliac joint is an effective method of pain reduction. Although effective, the consequences of sacroiliac joint fusion and the potential for adjacent segment disease for the adjacent lumbar spinal levels is unknown. The objective of this study was to quantify the change in range of motion of the sacroiliac joint and the adjacent lumbar spinal motion segments due to sacroiliac joint fusion and compare these changes to previous literature to assess the potential for adjacent segment disease in the lumbar spine. An experimentally validated finite element model of the lumbar spine and pelvis was used to simulate a fusion of the sacroiliac joint using three laterally placed triangular implants (iFuse Implant System, SI-BONE, Inc., San Jose, CA). The range of motion of the sacroiliac joint and the adjacent lumbar spinal motion segments were calculated using a hybrid loading protocol and compared with the intact range of motion in flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. The range of motions of the treated sacroiliac joints were reduced in flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation, by 56.6%, 59.5%, 27.8%, and 53.3%, respectively when compared with the intact condition. The stiffening of the sacroiliac joint resulted in increases at the adjacent lumbar motion segment (L5-S1) for flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation, of 3.0%, 3.7%, 1.1%, and 4.6%, respectively. Fusion of the sacroiliac joint resulted in substantial (> 50%) reductions in flexion, extension, and axial rotation of the sacroiliac joint with minimal (sacroiliac joint fusion, the long-term clinical results remain to be investigated.

  16. Biomechanics of coupled motion in the cervical spine during simulated whiplash in patients with pre-existing cervical or lumbar spinal fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H.; Nightingale, R. W.

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Loss of motion following spine segment fusion results in increased strain in the adjacent motion segments. However, to date, studies on the biomechanics of the cervical spine have not assessed the role of coupled motions in the lumbar spine. Accordingly, we investigated the biomechanics of the cervical spine following cervical fusion and lumbar fusion during simulated whiplash using a whole-human finite element (FE) model to simulate coupled motions of the spine. Methods A previously validated FE model of the human body in the driver-occupant position was used to investigate cervical hyperextension injury. The cervical spine was subjected to simulated whiplash exposure in accordance with Euro NCAP (the European New Car Assessment Programme) testing using the whole human FE model. The coupled motions between the cervical spine and lumbar spine were assessed by evaluating the biomechanical effects of simulated cervical fusion and lumbar fusion. Results Peak anterior longitudinal ligament (ALL) strain ranged from 0.106 to 0.382 in a normal spine, and from 0.116 to 0.399 in a fused cervical spine. Strain increased from cranial to caudal levels. The mean strain increase in the motion segment immediately adjacent to the site of fusion from C2-C3 through C5-C6 was 26.1% and 50.8% following single- and two-level cervical fusion, respectively (p = 0.03, unpaired two-way t-test). Peak cervical strains following various lumbar-fusion procedures were 1.0% less than those seen in a healthy spine (p = 0.61, two-way ANOVA). Conclusion Cervical arthrodesis increases peak ALL strain in the adjacent motion segments. C3-4 experiences greater changes in strain than C6-7. Lumbar fusion did not have a significant effect on cervical spine strain. Cite this article: H. Huang, R. W. Nightingale, A. B. C. Dang. Biomechanics of coupled motion in the cervical spine during simulated whiplash in patients with pre-existing cervical or lumbar spinal fusion: A Finite Element Study. Bone

  17. Asymmetrical trunk movement during walking improved to normal range at 3 months after corrective posterior spinal fusion in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Chung, Daniel A C F; Schimmel, Janneke J P; de Kleuver, Marinus; Keijsers, Noël L W

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the effects of posterior spinal fusion (PSF) and curve type on upper body movements in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) patients during gait. Twenty-four girls (12-18 years) with AIS underwent PSF. 3D-Gait-analyses were performed preoperatively, at 3 months and 1 year postoperatively. Mean position (0° represents symmetry) and range of motion (ROM) of the trunk (thorax-relative-to-pelvis) in all planes were assessed. Lower body kinematics and spatiotemporal parameters were also evaluated. Mean trunk position improved from 7.0° to 2.9° in transversal plane and from 5.0° to - 0.8° in frontal plane at 3 months postoperative (p maintenance of normal gait can explain the rapid recovery and well functioning in daily life of AIS patients, despite undergoing a fusion of large parts of their spine.

  18. Late Results of Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion with Interbody Cages

    OpenAIRE

    Da?l?, Murat; Er, Uygur; ?im?ek, Serkan; Bavbek, Murad

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis. Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness of anterior cervical discectomy with fusion for degenerative cervical disc disease. Overview of Literature Anterior spinal surgery originated in the mid-1950s and graft for fusion was also employed. Currently anterior cervical microdiscectomy and fusion with an intervertebral cage is a widely accepted procedure for treatment of cervical disc hernia. Artificial grafts and cages for fusion are preferred because of their ...

  19. Relaxation Training and Postoperative Music Therapy for Adolescents Undergoing Spinal Fusion Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Kirsten; Adamek, Mary; Kleiber, Charmaine

    2017-02-01

    Spinal fusion for idiopathic scoliosis is one of the most painful surgeries experienced by adolescents. Music therapy, utilizing music-assisted relaxation with controlled breathing and imagery, is a promising intervention for reducing pain and anxiety for these patients. It can be challenging to teach new coping strategies to post-operative patients who are already in pain. This study evaluated the effects of introducing music-assisted relaxation training to adolescents before surgery. Outcome measures were self-reported pain and anxiety, recorded on 0-10 numeric rating scale, and observed behavioral indicators of pain and relaxation. The training intervention was a 12-minute video about music-assisted relaxation with opportunities to practice before surgery. Forty-four participants between the ages of 10 and 19 were enrolled. Participants were randomly assigned to the experimental group that watched the video at the preoperative visit or to the control group that did not watch the video. All subjects received a music therapy session with a board certified music therapist on post-operative day 2 while out of bed for the first time. Pain and anxiety were significantly reduced from immediately pre-therapy to post-therapy (paired t-test; p). Copyright © 2016 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cost-Utility Analysis of Pedicle Screw Removal After Successful Posterior Instrumented Fusion in Thoracolumbar Burst Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han-Dong; Jeon, Chang-Hoon; Chung, Nam-Su; Seo, Young-Wook

    2017-08-01

    A cost-utility analysis (CUA). The aim of this study was to determine the cost-effectiveness of pedicle screw removal after posterior fusion in thoracolumbar burst fractures. Pedicle screw instrumentation is a standard fixation method for unstable thoracolumbar burst fracture. However, removal of the pedicle screw after successful fusion remains controversial because the clinical benefits remain unclear. CUA can help clinicians make appropriate decisions about optimal health care for pedicle screw removal after successful fusion in thoracolumbar burst fractures. We conducted a single-center, retrospective, longitudinal matched-cohort study of prospectively collected outcomes. In total, 88 consecutive patients who had undergone pedicle screw instrumentation for thoracolumbar burst fracture with successful fusion confirmed by computed tomography (CT) were used in this study. In total, 45 patients wanted to undergo implant removal surgery (R group), and 43 decided not to remove the implant (NR group). A CUA was conducted from the health care perspective. The direct costs of health care were obtained from the medical bill of each patient. Changes in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) scores, validated by Short Form 6D, were used to calculate quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Total costs and gained QALY were calculated at 1 year (1 year) and 2 years (2 years) compared with baseline. Results are expressed as an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Different discount rates (0%, 3%, and 5%) were applied to both cost and QALY for sensitivity analysis. Baseline patient variables were similar between the two groups (all P > 0.05). The additional benefits of implant removal (0.201 QALY at 2 years) were achieved with additional costs ($2541 at 2 years), equating to an ICER of $12,641/QALY. On the basis of the different discount rates, the robustness of our study's results was also determined. Implant removal after successful fusion in a thoracolumbar burst

  1. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation industrial applications plasma physics and nuclear fusion. 1980-1994. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation, with Industrial Applications (of Nuclear Physics and Engineering), and with Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion, issued during the period 1980-1994. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia, and panels of experts may contain some papers in other languages (French, Russian, or Spanish), but all papers have abstracts in English. Price quotes are in Austrian Schillings, do not include local taxes, and are subject to change without notice. Contents cover the three main categories of (i) Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation (Physics, Chemistry, Dosimetry Techniques, Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Research Reactors and Particle Accelerator Applications, Nuclear Data); (ii) Industrial Applications (Radiation Processing, Radiometry, Tracers); and (iii) Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion

  2. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation industrial applications plasma physics and nuclear fusion, 1980-1993. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation, with Industrial Applications (of Nuclear Physics and Engineering), and with Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion, issued during the period 1980-1993. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia, and panels of experts may contain some papers in other languages (French, Russian, or Spanish), but all papers have abstracts in English. Price quotes are in Austrian Schillings, do not include local taxes, and are subject to change without notice. Contents cover the three main categories of (I) Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation (Physics, Chemistry, Dosimetry Techniques, Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Research Reactors and Particle Accelerator Applications, Nuclear Data); (ii) Industrial Applications (Radiation Processing, Radiometry, Tracers); and (iii) Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion

  3. "White Cord Syndrome" of Acute Hemiparesis After Posterior Cervical Decompression and Fusion for Chronic Cervical Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antwi, Prince; Grant, Ryan; Kuzmik, Gregory; Abbed, Khalid

    2018-05-01

    "White cord syndrome" is a very rare condition thought to be due to acute reperfusion of chronically ischemic areas of the spinal cord. Its hallmark is the presence of intramedullary hyperintense signal on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging sequences in a patient with unexplained neurologic deficits following spinal cord decompression surgery. The syndrome is rare and has been reported previously in 2 patients following anterior cervical decompression and fusion. We report an additional case of this complication. A 68-year-old man developed acute left-sided hemiparesis after posterior cervical decompression and fusion for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. The patient improved with high-dose steroid therapy. The rare white cord syndrome following either anterior cervical decompression and fusion or posterior cervical decompression and fusion may be due to ischemic-reperfusion injury sustained by chronically compressed parts of the spinal cord. In previous reports, patients have improved following steroid therapy and acute rehabilitation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Developments in bone tissue engineering research for spinal fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gaalen, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Many orthopaedic procedures require fusion of a bony defect. Sometimes a bone graft is needed for this fusion. Autograft bone is considered the golden standard. The harvesting of this bone is time consuming and may have serious side effects, such as chronic donor site pain. Available alternatives

  5. Effect of TheraCyte-encapsulated parathyroid cells on lumbar fusion in a rat model

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Sung-Hsiung; Huang, Shun-Chen; Lui, Chun-Chung; Lin, Tzu-Ping; Chou, Fong-Fu; Ko, Jih-Yang

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Implantation of TheraCyte 4 × 106 live parathyroid cells can increase the bone marrow density of the spine of ovariectomized rats. There has been no published study examining the effect of such implantation on spinal fusion outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of TheraCyte-encapsulated parathyroid cells on posterolateral lumbar fusions in a rat model. Materials and methods Forty Sprague-Dawley rats underwent single-level, intertransverse process spinal fu...

  6. Lumbar interbody fusion: techniques, indications and comparison of interbody fusion options including PLIF, TLIF, MI-TLIF, OLIF/ATP, LLIF and ALIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Kevin; Malham, Greg; Seex, Kevin; Rao, Prashanth J.

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative disc and facet joint disease of the lumbar spine is common in the ageing population, and is one of the most frequent causes of disability. Lumbar spondylosis may result in mechanical back pain, radicular and claudicant symptoms, reduced mobility and poor quality of life. Surgical interbody fusion of degenerative levels is an effective treatment option to stabilize the painful motion segment, and may provide indirect decompression of the neural elements, restore lordosis and correct deformity. The surgical options for interbody fusion of the lumbar spine include: posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF), transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF), oblique lumbar interbody fusion/anterior to psoas (OLIF/ATP), lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) and anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF). The indications may include: discogenic/facetogenic low back pain, neurogenic claudication, radiculopathy due to foraminal stenosis, lumbar degenerative spinal deformity including symptomatic spondylolisthesis and degenerative scoliosis. In general, traditional posterior approaches are frequently used with acceptable fusion rates and low complication rates, however they are limited by thecal sac and nerve root retraction, along with iatrogenic injury to the paraspinal musculature and disruption of the posterior tension band. Minimally invasive (MIS) posterior approaches have evolved in an attempt to reduce approach related complications. Anterior approaches avoid the spinal canal, cauda equina and nerve roots, however have issues with approach related abdominal and vascular complications. In addition, lateral and OLIF techniques have potential risks to the lumbar plexus and psoas muscle. The present study aims firstly to comprehensively review the available literature and evidence for different lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) techniques. Secondly, we propose a set of recommendations and guidelines

  7. Ogilvie′s syndrome following posterior spinal arthrodesis for scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios I Tsirikos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report Ogilvie′s syndrome following posterior spinal arthrodesis on a patient with thoracic and lumbar scoliosis associated with intraspinal anomalies. Postoperative paralytic ileus can commonly complicate scoliosis surgery. Ogilvie′s syndrome as a cause of abdominal distension and pain has not been reported following spinal deformity correction and can mimic post-surgical ileus. 12 year old female patient with double thoracic and lumbar scoliosis associated with Arnold-Chiari 1 malformation and syringomyelia. The patient underwent posterior spinal fusion from T 4 to L 3 with segmental pedicle screw instrumentation and autogenous iliac crest grafting. She developed abdominal distension and pain postoperatively and this deteriorated despite conservative management. Repeat ultrasounds and abdominal computer tomography scans ruled out mechanical obstruction. The clinical presentation and blood parameters excluded toxic megacolon and cecal volvulus. As the symptoms persisted, a laparotomy was performed on postoperative day 16, which demonstrated ragged tears of the colon and cecum. A right hemi-colectomy followed by ileocecal anastomosis was required. The pathological examination of surgical specimens excluded inflammatory bowel disease and vascular abnormalities. The patient made a good recovery following bowel surgery and at latest followup 3.2 years later she had no abdominal complaints and an excellent scoliosis correction. Ogilvie′s syndrome should be included in the differential diagnosis of postoperative ileus in patients developing prolonged unexplained abdominal distension and pain after scoliosis correction. Early diagnosis and instigation of conservative management can prevent major morbidity and mortality due to bowel ischemia and perforation.

  8. Evaluation of spinal instrumentation rod bending characteristics for in-situ contouring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noshchenko, Andriy; Xianfeng, Yao; Armour, Grant Alan; Baldini, Todd; Patel, Vikas V; Ayers, Reed; Burger, Evalina

    2011-07-01

    Bending characteristics were studied in rods used for spinal instrumentation at in-situ contouring conditions. Five groups of five 6 mm diameter rods made from: cobalt alloy (VITALLIUM), titanium-aluminum-vanadium alloy (SDI™), β-titanium alloy (TNTZ), cold worked stainless steel (STIFF), and annealed stainless steel (MALLEABLE) were studied. The bending procedure was similar to that typically applied for in-situ contouring in the operating room and included two bending cycles: first--bending to 21-24° under load with further release of loading for 10 min, and second--bending to 34-37° at the previously bent site and release of load for 10 min. Applied load, bending stiffness, and springback effect were studied. Statistical evaluation included ANOVA, correlation and regression analysis. TNTZ and SDI™ rods showed the highest (p under load (p < 0.001). To reach the necessary bend angle after unloading, over bending should be 37-40% of the required angle in TNTZ and SDI™ rods, 27-30% in VITALLIUM and STIFF rods, and around 20% in MALLEABLE rods. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Fusionless instrumentation systems for congenital scoliosis: expandable spinal rods and vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib in the management of congenital spine deformities in the growing child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Muharrem; Emans, John

    2009-08-01

    Review of relevant literature including personal opinions. To review the current researches investigating the efficacy of growing rod and thoracic expansion techniques in the treatment of congenital spine deformity of young children, and to highlight the contrasting advantages and limitations in the fusionless treatment of progressive congenital scoliosis. Congenital scoliosis has the potential for severe spinal deformity and thoracic insufficiency syndrome (TIS). Conventional fusion treatments in children tend to shorten the spine further exacerbating trunk shortening and TIS. In the surgical treatment of congenital spinal deformities in young children, while reconstructing the spinal deformity, one should simultaneously pursue preserving the growth potential of the vertebrae, improving the volume, symmetry, and functions of the thorax, and protecting this improvement during the growth. Today, employed in the treatment of spinal deformities of young children, there are 2 deformity reconstruction methods serving these targets: Growing rod technique and vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib (VEPTR) with or without expansion thoracostomy. Peer-reviewed research articles and major international meeting presentations were reviewed. Methods were compared in terms of advantages and limitations. The growing rod technique is a safe and reliable method in the treatment of congenital spine deformity of young children who present some flexibility in the anomalous segment, or when the congenital anomaly involves a vertebral segment too long for resection, or with compensating curve with structural pattern concomitant to the congenital deformity. Expansion thoracostomy and VEPTR are the appropriate choice for severe congenital spine deformity when a large amount of growth remains. Although ventilator dependence is significantly decreasing, thoracic volume and space available for the lung are increased after expansion thoracostomy and VEPTR. Growing rod technique should be

  10. Does minimal access tubular assisted spine surgery increase or decrease complications in spinal decompression or fusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourney, Daryl R; Dettori, Joseph R; Norvell, Daniel C; Dekutoski, Mark B

    2010-04-20

    . There was no evidence to assess the effectiveness of strategies to reduce the risk of complications in MAS. Some data suggests that the rate of complications may decrease with experience. (1) Compared to open techniques, MAS does not decrease the rate of complications for posterior lumbar spinal decompression or fusion. (2) There is no evidence to assess the effectiveness of strategies to reduce the risk of MAS-related complications.

  11. Biomechanical comparison of force levels in spinal instrumentation using monoaxial versus multi degree of freedom postloading pedicle screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Aubin, Carl-Eric; Crandall, Dennis; Labelle, Hubert

    2011-01-15

    biomechanical analysis and simulations of correction mechanisms and force levels during scoliosis instrumentation using two types of pedicle screws and primary correction maneuvers. to biomechanically analyze implant-vertebra and inter-vertebral forces during scoliosis correction, to address the hypothesis that multi degree of freedom (MDOF) postloading screws with a direct incremental segmental translation (DIST) correction technique significantly reduce the loads as compared with monoaxial (MA) tulip-top design screws with a rod derotation technique (RDT). MA screw is widely used for spinal instrumentation. The MDOF screw was introduced as a refinement of the correction philosophy based on multiaxial screws. The kinematics of the MDOF construct is fundamentally different and offers more degrees of freedom than that of the MA construct; however, a systematic comparison of their biomechanics has not been done so far. a biomechanical model was developed to simulate the instrumentation of six scoliotic patients, first with the MDOF screws and DIST. Then, the instrumentation with MA screws and RDT was simulated using the same cases. Thirty more simulations were done to study the force-level sensitivity to small implant placement variation. there was a small average difference of 7°, 5°, and 4° between the two simulated systems for the computed main thoracic Cobb angle, kyphosis, and apical axial rotation, respectively. On average, the mean, standard deviation (SD), and maximum values of the implant-vertebra forces for MDOF screws were 56%, 59%, and 59%, respectively, lower than those for the MA screws, while the intervertebral forces for the MDOF screws were 31%, 37%, and 36% lower, respectively. Under the same set of random small implant placement changes, the mean, SD, and maximum values of implant-vertebra force magnitude changes for MDOF screws were 93%, 92%, and 95%, respectively, lower than those for MA screws. with MDOF screws and DIST, it is possible for

  12. The changes of the interspace angle after anterior correction and instrumentation in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Qi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In idiopathic scoliosis patients, after anterior spinal fusion and instrumentation, the discs (interspace angle between the lowest instrumented vertebra (LIV and the next caudal vertebra became more wedged. We reviewed these patients and analyzed the changes of the angle. Methods By reviewing the medical records and roentgenograms of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients underwent anterior spinal fusion and instrumentation, Cobb angle of the curve, correction rate, coronal balance, LIV rotation, interspace angle were measured and analyzed. Results There were total 30 patients included. The mean coronal Cobb angle of the main curve (thoracolumbar/lumbar curve before and after surgery were 48.9° and 11.7°, respectively, with an average correction rate of 76.1%. The average rotation of LIV before surgery was 2.1 degree, and was improved to 1.2 degree after surgery. The interspace angle before surgery, on convex side-bending films, after surgery, at final follow up were 3.2°, -2.3°, 1.8° and 4.9°, respectively. The difference between the interspace angle after surgery and that preoperatively was not significant (P = 0.261, while the interspace angle at final follow-up became larger than that after surgery, and the difference was significant(P = 0.012. The interspace angle after surgery was correlated with that on convex side-bending films (r = 0.418, P = 0.022, and the interspace angle at final follow-up was correlated with that after surgery (r = 0.625, P = 0.000. There was significant correlation between the loss of the interspace angle and the loss of coronal Cobb angle of the main curve during follow-up(r = 0.483, P = 0.007. Conclusion The interspace angle could be improved after anterior correction and instrumentation surgery, but it became larger during follow-up. The loss of the interspace angle was correlated with the loss of coronal Cobb angle of the main curve during follow-up.

  13. Optimal Pelvic Incidence Minus Lumbar Lordosis Mismatch after Long Posterior Instrumentation and Fusion for Adult Degenerative Scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao-Cong; Zhang, Zi-Fang; Wang, Zhao-Han; Cheng, Jun-Yao; Wu, Yun-Chang; Fan, Yi-Ming; Wang, Tian-Hao; Wang, Zheng

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the influence of Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-Schwab sagittal modifiers of pelvic incidence minus lumbar lordosis mismatch (PI-LL) on clinical outcomes for adult degenerative scoliosis (ADS) after long posterior instrumentation and fusion. This was a single-institute, retrospective study. From 2012 to 2014, 44 patients with ADS who underwent posterior instrumentation and fusion treatment were reviewed. Radiological evaluations were investigated by standing whole spine (posteroanterior and lateral views) X-ray and all radiological measurements, including Cobb's angle, LL, PI, and the grading of vertebral rotation, were performed by two experienced surgeons who were blind to the operations. The patients were divided into three groups based on postoperative PI-LL and the classification of the SRS-Schwab: 0 grade PI-LL (20°, n = 12). The clinical outcomes were assessed according to Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Lumbar Stiffness Disability Index (LSDI), and complications. Other characteristic data of patients were also collected, including intraoperative blood loss, operative time, length of hospital stay, complications, number of fusion levels, and number of decompressions. The mean operative time, blood loss, and hospital stay were 284.5 ± 30.2 min, 1040.5 ± 1207.6 mL, and 14.5 ± 1.9 day. At the last follow-up (2.6 ± 0.6 years), the radiological and functional parameters, except the grading of vertebral rotation, were all significantly improved in comparison with preoperative results (P  0.05). A Pearson correlation analysis further demonstrated that LSDI was negatively associated with PI-LL. Furthermore, the incidence rate of postoperative complications was lower in patients with + grade PI-LL (1/19, 5.26%) than that in patients with 0 (2/13, 15.4%) and ++ grade PI-LL (3/12, 25%). Our present study suggest that the ideal PI-LL may be

  14. Preservation or Restoration of Segmental and Regional Spinal Lordosis Using Minimally Invasive Interbody Fusion Techniques in Degenerative Lumbar Conditions: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, Juan S; Myhre, Sue Lynn; Youssef, Jim A

    2016-04-01

    A literature review. The purpose of this study was to review lumbar segmental and regional alignment changes following treatment with a variety of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) interbody fusion procedures for short-segment, degenerative conditions. An increasing number of lumbar fusions are being performed with minimally invasive exposures, despite a perception that minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion procedures are unable to affect segmental and regional lordosis. Through a MEDLINE and Google Scholar search, a total of 23 articles were identified that reported alignment following minimally invasive lumbar fusion for degenerative (nondeformity) lumbar spinal conditions to examine aggregate changes in postoperative alignment. Of the 23 studies identified, 28 study cohorts were included in the analysis. Procedural cohorts included MIS ALIF (two), extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) (16), and MIS posterior/transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (P/TLIF) (11). Across 19 study cohorts and 720 patients, weighted average of lumbar lordosis preoperatively for all procedures was 43.5° (range 28.4°-52.5°) and increased 3.4° (9%) (range -2° to 7.4°) postoperatively (P lordosis increased, on average, by 4° from a weighted average of 8.3° preoperatively (range -0.8° to 15.8°) to 11.2° at postoperative time points (range -0.2° to 22.8°) (P lordosis and change in lumbar lordosis (r = 0.413; P = 0.003), wherein lower preoperative lumbar lordosis predicted a greater increase in postoperative lumbar lordosis. Significant gains in both weighted average lumbar lordosis and segmental lordosis were seen following MIS interbody fusion. None of the segmental lordosis cohorts and only two of the 19 lumbar lordosis cohorts showed decreases in lordosis postoperatively. These results suggest that MIS approaches are able to impact regional and local segmental alignment and that preoperative patient factors can impact the extent of correction gained

  15. 3D Image Fusion to Localise Intercostal Arteries During TEVAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Koutouzi

    Full Text Available Purpose: Preservation of intercostal arteries during thoracic aortic procedures reduces the risk of post-operative paraparesis. The origins of the intercostal arteries are visible on pre-operative computed tomography angiography (CTA, but rarely on intra-operative angiography. The purpose of this report is to suggest an image fusion technique for intra-operative localisation of the intercostal arteries during thoracic endovascular repair (TEVAR. Technique: The ostia of the intercostal arteries are identified and manually marked with rings on the pre-operative CTA. The optimal distal landing site in the descending aorta is determined and marked, allowing enough length for an adequate seal and attachment without covering more intercostal arteries than necessary. After 3D/3D fusion of the pre-operative CTA with an intra-operative cone-beam CT (CBCT, the markings are overlaid on the live fluoroscopy screen for guidance. The accuracy of the overlay is confirmed with digital subtraction angiography (DSA and the overlay is adjusted when needed. Stent graft deployment is guided by the markings. The initial experience of this technique in seven patients is presented. Results: 3D image fusion was feasible in all cases. Follow-up CTA after 1 month revealed that all intercostal arteries planned for preservation, were patent. None of the patients developed signs of spinal cord ischaemia. Conclusion: 3D image fusion can be used to localise the intercostal arteries during TEVAR. This may preserve some intercostal arteries and reduce the risk of post-operative spinal cord ischaemia. Keywords: TEVAR, Intercostal artery, Spinal cord ischaemia, 3D image fusion, Image guidance, Cone-beam CT

  16. Outcome of a posterior spinal fusion technique using spinous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    haemangioma of the body of T5. ... is not reliable in preventing rotational movement because of its closeness to the midline. It is perhaps good for preventing motion in the saggital plane. An .... of using rigid vertical strut and spinal process wire.

  17. A Narrative Review of Lumbar Fusion Surgery With Relevance to Chiropractic Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Clinton J; Wakefield, Pamela J; Bub, Glenn A; Toombs, James D

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this narrative review was to describe the most common spinal fusion surgical procedures, address the clinical indications for lumbar fusion in degeneration cases, identify potential complications, and discuss their relevance to chiropractic management of patients after surgical fusion. The PubMed database was searched from the beginning of the record through March 31, 2015, for English language articles related to lumbar fusion or arthrodesis or both and their incidence, procedures, complications, and postoperative chiropractic cases. Articles were retrieved and evaluated for relevance. The bibliographies of selected articles were also reviewed. The most typical lumbar fusion procedures are posterior lumbar interbody fusion, anterior lumbar interbody fusion, transforaminal interbody fusion, and lateral lumbar interbody fusion. Fair level evidence supports lumbar fusion procedures for degenerative spondylolisthesis with instability and for intractable low back pain that has failed conservative care. Complications and development of chronic pain after surgery is common, and these patients frequently present to chiropractic physicians. Several reports describe the potential benefit of chiropractic management with spinal manipulation, flexion-distraction manipulation, and manipulation under anesthesia for postfusion low back pain. There are no published experimental studies related specifically to chiropractic care of postfusion low back pain. This article describes the indications for fusion, common surgical practice, potential complications, and relevant published chiropractic literature. This review includes 10 cases that showed positive benefits from chiropractic manipulation, flexion-distraction, and/or manipulation under anesthesia for postfusion lumbar pain. Chiropractic care may have a role in helping patients in pain who have undergone lumbar fusion surgery.

  18. A STUDY OF POSTERIOR LUMBAR INTERBODY FUSION WITH LOCALLY HARVESTED SPINOLAMINECTOMY BONE GRAFT AND PEDICLE SCREW FIXATION IN SPONDYLOLISTHESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardhasaradhi M

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (PLIF and Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (TLIF create intervertebral fusion by means of a posterior approach. Successful results have been reported with allograft, various cages (for interbody support, autograft and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein‐2. Interbody fusion techniques facilitate reduction and enhance fusion. Corticocancellous laminectomy bone chips alone can be used as a means of spinal fusion in patients with single level instrumented PLIF. This has got a good fusion rate. PLIF with cage gives better fusion on radiology than PLIF with iliac bone graft, but no statistical difference in the clinical outcome. Cage use precludes complications associated with iliac bone harvesting. The reported adjacent segment degeneration was 40.5% and reoperation was 8.1% after 10 years of follow up. MATERIALS AND METHODS 30 cases of spondylolisthesis who attended the Orthopaedic Outpatient Department of Andhra Medical College, Visakhapatnam, from 2014 to 2016 were taken up for study. All the cases were examined clinically and confirmed radiologically. The patient’s age, sex, symptoms and duration were noted and were examined clinically for the status of the spine. Straight leg raising test was done and neurological examination of the lower limbs performed. All the patients were subjected to the radiological examination of the lumbosacral spine by taking anteroposterior, lateral (flexion and extension views, oblique views to demonstrate spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis. MRI and x-rays studies were done in all the cases to facilitate evaluation of the root compression disk changes and spinal cord changes. RESULTS In our study, we followed all the 30 patients after the surgery following procedure of removal of loose lamina, spinous process and fibrocartilaginous mass, PLIF with only the laminectomy bone mass and CD screw system fixation up to 2 years. 12 patients (40% had excellent

  19. Wound management with vacuum-assisted closure in postoperative infections after surgery for spinal stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karaaslan F

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fatih Karaaslan,1 Şevki Erdem,2 Musa Ugur Mermerkaya11Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Bozok University Medical School, Yozgat, Turkey; 2Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Haydarpasa Numune Training Hospital, Istanbul, TurkeyObjective: To evaluate the results of negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT in the treatment of surgical spinal site infections.Materials and methods: The use of NPWT in postoperative infections after dorsal spinal surgery (transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion plus posterior instrumentation was studied retrospectively. From February 2011 to January 2012, six patients (females out of 317 (209 females; 108 males were readmitted to our clinic with surgical site infections on postoperative day 14 (range 9–19 and were treated with debridement, NPWT, and antibiotics. We evaluated the clinical and laboratory data, including the ability to retain the spinal hardware and recurrent infections.Results: The incidence of deep postoperative surgical site infection was six (1.89% patients (females out of 317 patients (209 females; 108 males at 1 year. All patients completed their wound NPWT regimen successfully. An average of 5.1 (range 3–8 irrigation and debridement sessions was performed before definitive wound closure. The mean follow-up period was 13 (range 12–16 months. No patient had a persistent infection requiring partial or total hardware removal. The hospital stay infection parameters normalized within an average of 4.6 weeks.Conclusion: The study illustrates the usefulness of NPWT as an effective adjuvant treatment option for managing complicated deep spinal surgical wound infections.Keywords: surgical infection, NPWT, VAC, TLIF

  20. [Sustained release of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 combined with stromal vascular fraction cells in promoting posterolateral spinal fusion in rat model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wei; Zheng, Jun; Qian, Jinyu; Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Minghui; Wang, Xiuhui

    2017-07-01

    To observe the effect of stromal vascular fraction cells (SVFs) from rat fat tissue combined with sustained release of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) in promoting the lumbar fusion in rat model. SVFs were harvested from subcutaneous fat of bilateral inguinal region of 4-month-old rat through the collagenase I digestion. The sustained release carrier was prepared via covalent bond of the rhBMP-2 and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) by the biominetic apatite coating process. The sustained release effect was measured by BCA method. Thirty-two rats were selected to establish the posterolateral lumbar fusion model and were divided into 4 groups, 8 rats each group. The decalcified bone matrix (DBX) scaffold+PBS, DBX scaffold+rhBMP-2/β-TCP sustained release carrier, DBX scaffold+SVFs, and DBX scaffold+rhBMP-2/β-TCP sustained release carrier+SVFs were implanted in groups A, B, C, and D respectively. X-ray films, manual spine palpation, and high-resolution micro-CT were used to evaluate spinal fusion at 8 weeks after operation; bone mineral density (BMD) and bone volume fraction were analyzed; the new bone formation was evaluated by HE staining and Masson's trichrome staining, osteocalcin (OCN) was detected by immunohistochemical staining. The cumulative release amount of rhBMP-2 was about 40% at 2 weeks, indicating sustained release effect of rhBMP-2; while the control group was almost released within 2 weeks. At 8 weeks, the combination of manual spine palpation, X-ray, and micro-CT evaluation showed that group D had the strongest bone formation (100%, 8/8), followed by group B (75%, 6/8), group C (37.5%, 3/8), and group A (12.5%, 1/8). Micro-CT analysis showed BMD and bone volume fraction were significantly higher in group D than groups A, B, and C ( P cells with bone matrix deposition, and an active osteogenic process similar to the mineralization of long bones in group D. The bone formation of group B was weaker than that of group D, and

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of the Position of the Cerebellar Tonsil before and after Posterior Spinal Fusion in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Tomas Bosio

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective:  To evaluate variations in cerebellar tonsil position after posterior spinal fusion (PSF in neurologically intact patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS.  Methods: We retrospective evaluated 40 patients with AIS and no neurological symptoms that underwent PSF. Anteroposterior and sagittal standing radiographs, and sagittal hindbrain MRI were performed in all patients before and after spinal surgery.  The level of the cerebellar tonsil relative to the magnum foramen was measured according to the method described by Aboulezz (J Comput Assist Tomogr 1985. We evaluate variations in cerebellar tonsil position in relation to spinal correction and spinal elongation after PSF. Results: Mean preoperative magnitude of the curve was 53,15° (SD 10,46° and thoracic kyphosis was 35,42º (SD 12,38°. Mean postoperative values were 7,45º (SD 7,33°  and 27,87º (SD 9,03°, respectively. This represents 86% correction in the coronal plane (p<0.00001 and 25% of kyphosis variation (p<0.00001. The average length of the spine in the coronal plane was 44,5 cm (SD 5,25 cm in preoperative x-rays and 48,27 cm (SD 4,40 cm in postoperative x-rays (p<0.00001.  The average length in the sagittal plane was 50,87 cm (SD 4,47 cm in preoperative x-rays and 55,13cm (SD 3,27 cm in postoperative x-rays (p<0.00001. There was no significant difference in the position of the Cerebellar Tonsil before and after spinal correction (p=0,6042. In 10 (25% of the 40 patients, we observed caudal displacement in cerebellar tonsil position after PSF. Average displacement in these patients was 1,22 mm (range 0.1-2.3 mm. In 21 patients we did not observe any variation and in 2 a cephalic displacement was measured. Conclusions:  In most AIS patients, position of the cerebellar tonsil does not change with PSF. We were not able to find any correlation between curve correction or spine elongation and variations in cerebellar tonsillar position.

  2. Degenerative spondylolisthesis is associated with low spinal bone density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas; Christensen, Finn B; Langdahl, Bente Lomholt

    2013-01-01

    and degenerative spondylolisthesis patients. 81 patients older than 60 years, who underwent DXA-scanning of their lumbar spine one year after a lumbar spinal fusion procedure, were included. Radiographs were assessed for disc height, vertebral wedging, and osteophytosis. Pain was assessed using the Low Back Pain...... Rating Scale pain index. T-score of the lumbar spine was significantly lower among degenerative spondylolisthesis patients compared with spinal stenosis patients (-1.52 versus -0.52, P = 0.04). Thirty-nine percent of degenerative spondylolisthesis patients were classified as osteoporotic and further 30...

  3. Intraoperative 3-dimensional navigation and ultrasonography during posterior decompression with instrumented fusion for ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament in the thoracic spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wei; Weng, Chong; Liu, Bo; Li, Qin; Sun, Yu-Qing; Yuan, Qiang; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yong-Qing; He, Da

    2013-08-01

    A retrospective clinical study was conducted. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical outcomes of intraoperative 3D navigation (ITN) and ultrasonography during posterior decompression and instrumented fusion for thoracic myelopathy due to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). The symptoms caused by thoracic-ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (T-OPLL) are usually progressive and do not respond to conservative treatment-surgical intervention is the only effective treatment option. Various methods have been described for the treatment of symptomatic T-OPLL, all of which have limitations. The study included 18 patients with T-OPLL who underwent posterior decompression with instrumented fusion from 2006 to 2011. A staged operative procedure was used. First, pedicle screws were placed with ITN and a wide laminectomy was performed with resection of ossification of the ligamentum flavum (if present). With insufficient decompression on intraoperative ultrasonography, additional circumferential decompression was performed through a transpedicular approach. ITN-guided OPLL resection was performed using a burr attached to a navigational tracker. In all cases, posterior instrumented fusion was performed in situ. The outcomes were evaluated with the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores and recovery rates. Intraoperative ultrasonography showed that posterior laminectomy was sufficient in 6 patients; the remaining 12 were treated with additional circumferential decompression. The follow-up period ranged from 1 to 6 years (mean period, 2.8 y). Postoperative transient neurological deterioration occurred in 1 patient, and cerebrospinal fluid leakage occurred in 4 patients. All patients showed neurological recovery with a mean Japanese Orthopaedic Association score that improved from 5.5 points preoperatively to 8.5 points at the final follow-up and a mean recovery rate of 54.5%. Intraoperative ultrasonography and ITN

  4. 21 CFR 888.3070 - Pedicle screw spinal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... immobilization and stabilization of spinal segments in skeletally mature patients as an adjunct to fusion in the... injury to the patient.” (2) Class III (premarket approval), when intended to provide immobilization and...-4V, and unalloyed titanium, that allow the surgeon to build an implant system to fit the patient's...

  5. Surgical treatment for osteoporotic thoracolumbar vertebral collapse using vertebroplasty with posterior spinal fusion: a prospective multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsumi, Keiichi; Hirano, Toru; Watanabe, Kei; Ohashi, Masayuki; Yamazaki, Akiyoshi; Ito, Takui; Sawakami, Kimihiko; Sano, Atsuki; Kikuchi, Ren; Endo, Naoto

    2016-11-01

    The study aimed to investigate the clinical outcomes and limitations after vertebroplasty with posterior spinal fusion (VP+PSF) without neural decompression for osteoporotic vertebral collapse. We conducted a prospective multicenter study including 45 patients (12 men and 33 women, mean age: 77.0 years) evaluated between 2008 and 2012. Operation time, blood loss, visual analog scale (VAS) of back pain, neurological status, kyphosis angle in the fused area, and vertebral union of the collapsed vertebra were evaluated. The mean operation time was 162 min and blood loss was 381 mL. The postoperative VAS score significantly improved, and the neurological status improved in 35 patients (83 %), and none of the remaining patients demonstrated a deteriorating neurological status at two years post-operatively. The mean kyphosis angle pre-operatively, immediately post-operatively, and two years post-operatively was 23.8°, 10.7°, and 24.3°, respectively, and there was no significant difference between the angles pre-operatively and two years post-operatively. The extensive correction of kyphosis >16° was a risk factor for a higher correction loss and subsequent fracture. Union of the collapsed vertebra was observed in 43 patients (95 %) at two years post-operatively. The present study suggests that spinal stabilization rather than neural decompression is essential to treat OVC. Short-segment VP+PSF can achieve a high union rate of collapsed vertebra and provide a significant improvement in back pain or neurological status with less invasive surgery, but has a limit of kyphosis correction more than 16°.

  6. Lower complication and reoperation rates for laminectomy rather than MI TLIF/other fusions for degenerative lumbar disease/spondylolisthesis: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Utilizing the spine literature, we compared the complication and reoperation rates for laminectomy alone vs. instrumented fusions including minimally invasive (MI) transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) for the surgical management of multilevel degenerative lumbar disease with/without degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). Methods: Epstein compared complication and reoperation rates over 2 years for 137 patients undergoing laminectomy alone undergoing 2-3 level (58 patients) and 4-6 level (79 patients) Procedures for lumbar stenosis with/without DS. Results showed no new postoperative neurological deficits, no infections, no surgery for adjacent segment disease (ASD), 4 patients (2.9%) who developed intraoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistulas, no readmissions, and just 1 reopereation for a (postoperative day 7). These rates were compared to other literature for lumbar laminectomies vs. fusions (e.g. particularly MI TLIF) addressing pathology comparable to that listed above. Results: Some studies in the literature revealed an average 4.8% complication rate for laminectomy alone vs. 8.3% for decompressions/fusion; at 5 postoperative years, reoperation rates were 10.6% vs. 18.4%, respectively. Specifically, the MI TLIF literature complication rates ranged from 7.7% to 23.0% and included up to an 8.3% incidence of wound infections, 6.1% durotomies, 9.7% permanent neurological deficits, and 20.2% incidence of new sensory deficits. Reoperation rates (1.6–6%) for MI TLIF addressed instrumentation failure (2.3%), cage migration (1.26–2.4%), cage extrusions (0.8%), and misplaced screws (1.6%). The learning curve (e.g. number of cases required by a surgeon to become proficient) for MI TLIF was the first 33-44 cases. Furthermore, hospital costs for lumbar fusions were 2.6 fold greater than those for laminectomy alone, with overall neurosurgeon reimbursement quoted in one study as high as $142,075 per year. Conclusions: The spinal literature revealed

  7. Segmental and global lordosis changes with two-level axial lumbar interbody fusion and posterior instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgar, Miguel A; Tobler, William D; Ernst, Robert J; Raley, Thomas J; Anand, Neel; Miller, Larry E; Nasca, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Background Loss of lumbar lordosis has been reported after lumbar interbody fusion surgery and may portend poor clinical and radiographic outcome. The objective of this research was to measure changes in segmental and global lumbar lordosis in patients treated with presacral axial L4-S1 interbody fusion and posterior instrumentation and to determine if these changes influenced patient outcomes. Methods We performed a retrospective, multi-center review of prospectively collected data in 58 consecutive patients with disabling lumbar pain and radiculopathy unresponsive to nonsurgical treatment who underwent L4-S1 interbody fusion with the AxiaLIF two-level system (Baxano Surgical, Raleigh NC). Main outcomes included back pain severity, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Odom's outcome criteria, and fusion status using flexion and extension radiographs and computed tomography scans. Segmental (L4-S1) and global (L1-S1) lumbar lordosis measurements were made using standing lateral radiographs. All patients were followed for at least 24 months (mean: 29 months, range 24-56 months). Results There was no bowel injury, vascular injury, deep infection, neurologic complication or implant failure. Mean back pain severity improved from 7.8±1.7 at baseline to 3.3±2.6 at 2 years (p lordosis, defined as a change in Cobb angle ≤ 5°, was identified in 84% of patients at L4-S1 and 81% of patients at L1-S1. Patients with loss or gain in segmental or global lordosis experienced similar 2-year outcomes versus those with less than a 5° change. Conclusions/Clinical Relevance Two-level axial interbody fusion supplemented with posterior fixation does not alter segmental or global lordosis in most patients. Patients with postoperative change in lordosis greater than 5° have similarly favorable long-term clinical outcomes and fusion rates compared to patients with less than 5° lordosis change. PMID:25694920

  8. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using non resorbable poly-ether-ether-ketone versus resorbable poly-L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide fusion devices. Clinical outcome at a minimum of 2-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiya, Timothy U; Smit, T; van Royen, B J; Mullender, M

    2011-04-01

    Previous papers on resorbable poly-L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide (PLDLLA) cages in spinal fusion have failed to report adequately on patient-centred clinical outcome measures. Also comparison of PLDLLA cage with a traditionally applicable counterpart has not been previously reported. This is the first randomized prospective study that assesses clinical outcome of PLDLLA cage compared with a poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) implant. Twenty-six patients were randomly assigned to undergo instrumented posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) whereby either a PEEK cage or a PLDLLA cage was implanted. Clinical outcome based on visual analogue scale scores for leg pain and back pain, as well as Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and SF-36 questionnaires were documented and analysed. When compared with preoperative values, all clinical parameters have significantly improved in the PEEK group at 2 years after surgery with the exception of SF-36 general health, SF-36 mental health and SF-36 role emotional scores. No clinical parameter showed significant improvement at 2 years after surgery compared with preoperative values in the PLDLLA patient group. Only six patients (50%) in the PLDLLA group showed improvement in the VAS scores for leg and back pain as well as the ODI, as opposed to 10 patients (71%) in the PEEK group. One-third of the patients in the PLDLLA group actually reported worsening of their pain scores and ODI. Three cases of mild to moderate osteolysis were seen in the PLDLLA group. Following up on our preliminary report, these 2-year results confirm the superiority of the PEEK implant to the resorbable PLDLLA implant in aiding spinal fusion and alleviating symptoms following PLIF in patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis associated with either canal stenosis or foramen stenosis or both and emanating from a single lumbar segment.

  9. Recurrent Primary Spinal Hydatid Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okan Turk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary hydatid disease of spine is rare and spinal hydatitosis constitute only 1% of all hydatitosis. We report a case of recurrent primary intraspinal extradural hydatid cyst of the thoracic region causing progressive paraparesis. The patient was operated 16 years ago for primary spinal hydatid disease involvement and was instrumented dorsally for stabilization. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of thoracic spine showed a cystic lesion at T11-12 level and compressed spinal cord posterolaterally. Intraspinal cyst was excised through T11-12 laminectomy which made formerly. The early postoperative period showed a progressive improvement of his neurological deficit and he was discharged with antihelmintic treatment consisting of albendazole and amoxicillin-sulbactam combination. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(Suppl 1: 84-89

  10. Adjacent Lumbar Disc Herniation after Lumbar Short Spinal Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Ninomiya, Koshi; Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Ohkawa, Toshika; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2014-01-01

    A 70-year-old outpatient presented with a chief complaint of sudden left leg motor weakness and sensory disturbance. He had undergone L4/5 posterior interbody fusion with L3–5 posterior fusions for spondylolisthesis 3 years prior, and the screws were removed 1 year later. He has been followed up for 3 years, and there had been no adjacent segment problems before this presentation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a large L2/3 disc hernia descending to the L3/4 level. Compared to...

  11. Percutaneous Iliac Screws for Minimally Invasive Spinal Deformity Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Y. Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Adult spinal deformity (ASD surgeries carry significant morbidity, and this has led many surgeons to apply minimally invasive surgery (MIS techniques to reduce the blood loss, infections, and other peri-operative complications. A spectrum of techniques for MIS correction of ASD has thus evolved, most recently the application of percutaneous iliac screws. Methods. Over an 18 months 10 patients with thoracolumbar scoliosis underwent MIS surgery. The mean age was 73 years (70% females. Patients were treated with multi-level facet osteotomies and interbody fusion using expandable cages followed by percutaneous screw fixation. Percutaneous iliac screws were placed bilaterally using the obturator outlet view to target the ischial body. Results. All patients were successfully instrumented without conversion to an open technique. Mean operative time was 302 minutes and the mean blood loss was 480 cc, with no intraoperative complications. A total of 20 screws were placed successfully as judged by CT scanning to confirm no bony violations. Complications included: two asymptomatic medial breaches at T10 and L5, and one patient requiring delayed epidural hematoma evacuation. Conclusions. Percutaneous iliac screws can be placed safely in patients with ASD. This MIS technique allows for successful caudal anchoring to stress-shield the sacrum and L5-S1 fusion site in long-segment constructs.

  12. The Terra Data Fusion Project: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Girolamo, L.; Bansal, S.; Butler, M.; Fu, D.; Gao, Y.; Lee, H. J.; Liu, Y.; Lo, Y. L.; Raila, D.; Turner, K.; Towns, J.; Wang, S. W.; Yang, K.; Zhao, G.

    2017-12-01

    Terra is the flagship of NASA's Earth Observing System. Launched in 1999, Terra's five instruments continue to gather data that enable scientists to address fundamental Earth science questions. By design, the strength of the Terra mission has always been rooted in its five instruments and the ability to fuse the instrument data together for obtaining greater quality of information for Earth Science compared to individual instruments alone. As the data volume grows and the central Earth Science questions move towards problems requiring decadal-scale data records, the need for data fusion and the ability for scientists to perform large-scale analytics with long records have never been greater. The challenge is particularly acute for Terra, given its growing volume of data (> 1 petabyte), the storage of different instrument data at different archive centers, the different file formats and projection systems employed for different instrument data, and the inadequate cyberinfrastructure for scientists to access and process whole-mission fusion data (including Level 1 data). Sharing newly derived Terra products with the rest of the world also poses challenges. As such, the Terra Data Fusion Project aims to resolve two long-standing problems: 1) How do we efficiently generate and deliver Terra data fusion products? 2) How do we facilitate the use of Terra data fusion products by the community in generating new products and knowledge through national computing facilities, and disseminate these new products and knowledge through national data sharing services? Here, we will provide an update on significant progress made in addressing these problems by working with NASA and leveraging national facilities managed by the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). The problems that we faced in deriving and delivering Terra L1B2 basic, reprojected and cloud-element fusion products, such as data transfer, data fusion, processing on different computer architectures

  13. Biomechanics of coupled motion in the cervical spine during simulated whiplash in patients with pre-existing cervical or lumbar spinal fusion: A Finite Element Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H; Nightingale, R W; Dang, A B C

    2018-01-01

    Loss of motion following spine segment fusion results in increased strain in the adjacent motion segments. However, to date, studies on the biomechanics of the cervical spine have not assessed the role of coupled motions in the lumbar spine. Accordingly, we investigated the biomechanics of the cervical spine following cervical fusion and lumbar fusion during simulated whiplash using a whole-human finite element (FE) model to simulate coupled motions of the spine. A previously validated FE model of the human body in the driver-occupant position was used to investigate cervical hyperextension injury. The cervical spine was subjected to simulated whiplash exposure in accordance with Euro NCAP (the European New Car Assessment Programme) testing using the whole human FE model. The coupled motions between the cervical spine and lumbar spine were assessed by evaluating the biomechanical effects of simulated cervical fusion and lumbar fusion. Peak anterior longitudinal ligament (ALL) strain ranged from 0.106 to 0.382 in a normal spine, and from 0.116 to 0.399 in a fused cervical spine. Strain increased from cranial to caudal levels. The mean strain increase in the motion segment immediately adjacent to the site of fusion from C2-C3 through C5-C6 was 26.1% and 50.8% following single- and two-level cervical fusion, respectively (p = 0.03, unpaired two-way t -test). Peak cervical strains following various lumbar-fusion procedures were 1.0% less than those seen in a healthy spine (p = 0.61, two-way ANOVA). Cervical arthrodesis increases peak ALL strain in the adjacent motion segments. C3-4 experiences greater changes in strain than C6-7. Lumbar fusion did not have a significant effect on cervical spine strain. Cite this article : H. Huang, R. W. Nightingale, A. B. C. Dang. Biomechanics of coupled motion in the cervical spine during simulated whiplash in patients with pre-existing cervical or lumbar spinal fusion: A Finite Element Study. Bone Joint Res 2018;7:28-35. DOI: 10

  14. Imaging fusion (SPECT/CT) in degenerative disease of spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernal, P.; Ucros, G.; Bermudez, S.; Ocampo, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Objective: To determine the utility of Fusion Imaging SPECT/CT in degenerative pathology of the spine and to establish the impact of the use of fusion imaging in spinal pain due to degenerative changes of the spine. Materials and methods: 44 Patients (M=21, F=23) average age of 63 years and with degenerative pathology of spine were sent to Diagnosis Imaging department in FSFB. Bone scintigraphy (SPECT), CT of spine (cervical: 30%, Lumbar 70%) and fusion imaging were performed in all of them. Bone scintigraphy was carried out in a gamma camera Siemens Diacam double head attached to ESOFT computer. The images were acquired in matrix 128 x 128, 20 seg/imag, 64 images. CT of spine was performed same day or two days after in Helycoidal Siemens somatom emotion CT. The fusion was done in a Dicom workstation in sagital, axial and coronal reconstruction. The findings were evaluated by 2 Nuclear Medicine physicians and 2 radiologists of the staff of FSFB in an independent way. Results: Bone scan (SPECT) and CT of 44 patients were evaluated. CT showed facet joint osteoarthrities in 27 (61.3%) patients, uncovertebral joint arthrosis in 7 (15.9%), bulging disc in 9(20.4%), spinal nucleus lesion in 7(15.9%), osteophytes in 9 (20.4%), spinal foraminal stenosis in 7 (15.9%), spondylolysis/spondylolisthesis in 4 (9%). Bone scan showed facet joint osteoarthrities in 29 (65.9%), uncovertebral joint arthrosis in 4 (9%), osteophytes in 9 (20.4%) and normal 3 (6.8%). The imaging fusion showed coincidence findings (main lesion in CT with high uptake in scintigraphy) in 34 patients (77.2%) and no coincidence in 10 (22.8%). In 15 (34.09%) patients the fusion provided additional information. The analysis of the findings of CT and SPECT showed similar results in most of the cases and the fusion didn't provide additional information but it allowed to confirm the findings but when the findings didn't match where the CT showed several findings and SPECT only one area with high uptake

  15. Cell Fusion along the Anterior-Posterior Neuroaxis in Mice with Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenivasa R Sankavaram

    Full Text Available It is well documented that bone marrow-derived cells can fuse with a diverse range of cells, including brain cells, under normal or pathological conditions. Inflammation leads to robust fusion of bone marrow-derived cells with Purkinje cells and the formation of binucleate heterokaryons in the cerebellum. Heterokaryons form through the fusion of two developmentally differential cells and as a result contain two distinct nuclei without subsequent nuclear or chromosome loss.In the brain, fusion of bone marrow-derived cells appears to be restricted to the complex and large Purkinje cells, raising the question whether the size of the recipient cell is important for cell fusion in the central nervous system. Purkinje cells are among the largest neurons in the central nervous system and accordingly can harbor two nuclei.Using a well-characterized model for heterokaryon formation in the cerebellum (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis - a mouse model of multiple sclerosis, we report for the first time that green fluorescent protein-labeled bone marrow-derived cells can fuse and form heterokaryons with spinal cord motor neurons. These spinal cord heterokaryons are predominantly located in or adjacent to an active or previously active inflammation site, demonstrating that inflammation and infiltration of immune cells are key for cell fusion in the central nervous system. While some motor neurons were found to contain two nuclei, co-expressing green fluorescent protein and the neuronal marker, neuron-specific nuclear protein, a number of small interneurons also co-expressed green fluorescent protein and the neuronal marker, neuron-specific nuclear protein. These small heterokaryons were scattered in the gray matter of the spinal cord.This novel finding expands the repertoire of neurons that can form heterokaryons with bone marrow-derived cells in the central nervous system, albeit in low numbers, possibly leading to a novel therapy for spinal cord

  16. [Fusion implants of carbon fiber reinforced plastic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Früh, H J; Liebetrau, A; Bertagnoli, R

    2002-05-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) are used in the medical field when high mechanical strength, innovative design, and radiolucency (see spinal fusion implants) are needed. During the manufacturing process of the material CFRP carbon fibers are embedded into a resin matrix. This resin material could be thermoset (e.g., epoxy resin EPN/DDS) or thermoplastic (e.g., PEAK). CFRP is biocompatible, radiolucent, and has higher mechanical capabilities compared to other implant materials. This publication demonstrates the manufacturing process of fusion implants made of a thermoset matrix system using a fiber winding process. The material has been used clinically since 1994 for fusion implants of the cervical and lumbar spine. The results of the fusion systems CORNERSTONE-SR C (cervical) and UNION (lumbar) showed no implant-related complications. New implant systems made of this CFRP material are under investigation and are presented.

  17. Comparison of three calcium phosphate bone graft substitutes from biomechanical, histological, and crystallographic perspectives using a rat posterolateral lumbar fusion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Ming-Hsien [Department of Biomedical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Orthopedics, Show-Chwan Memorial Hospital, Changhua 50544, Taiwan (China); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Lee, Pei-Yuan [Department of Biomedical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Orthopedics, Show-Chwan Memorial Hospital, Changhua 50544, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wen-Cheng, E-mail: wincheng0925@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Fiber and Composite Materials, College of Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung 40724, Taiwan (China); Hu, Jin-Jia, E-mail: jjhu@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Medical Device Innovation Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of three calcium phosphate bone graft substitutes with different chemical compositions on spinal fusion using a rat posterolateral lumbar fusion model. Specifically, two recently developed non-dispersive tetracalcium phosphate/dicalcium phosphate anhydrous-based calcium phosphate cements (CPCs), namely a CPC consisting of equimolar amounts of the two compounds (nd-CPC) and a CPC consisting of a two-fold greater amount of dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCP-rich CPC), were compared with a commercial calcium phosphate bone graft (c-CPG) consisting of hydroxyapatite (60%) and β-tricalcium phosphate (40%). Single-level posterolateral lumbar fusion was performed at the L4–L5 vertebrae in fifteen adult rats (n = 5 for each group). Spinal fusion was evaluated with radiographs, manual palpation, mechanical testing, micro-CT, and histology 8 weeks post-surgery. In particular, the crystallographic phases in the three substitutes were identified before and 8 weeks after their implantation. Manual palpation revealed stable constructs in nearly all of the spine specimens. The stiffness and bending load of fused spines in the two CPC groups were comparable to those in the c-CPG group. The radiographs specifically revealed implant resorption and bone remodeling in the DCP-rich CPC group. Analysis of 3D micro-CT images revealed that the bone volume ratio in the DCP-rich CPC group was significantly greater than those in the nd-CPC and c-CPG groups. Histology showed that the DCP-rich CPC group exhibited the highest degree of bone regeneration and osseointegration. Notably, DCP-rich CPC led to a pronounced phase transformation, generating the greatest amount of poorly crystalline apatite among the three groups, which together with adequate resorption may explain the aforementioned positive findings. We therefore conclude that of the bone graft substitutes considered, DCP-rich CPC has the greatest potential to be used in spinal fusion

  18. The Stanmore Nursing Assessment of Psychological Status: Understanding the emotions of patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Carol; Spada, Marcantonio M; Coultry-Keane, Katherine; Ikkos, George

    2016-09-01

    Research has shown that individuals who have sustained a spinal cord injury can experience strong and abrupt variations in their emotional state; however no instrument for nurses has been developed to assess these patients' psychological status. To develop a brief, reliable instrument to enable nurses to accurately assess, record and respond to spinal cord injury patients' psychological status. In Phase 1, semi-structured interviews were conducted with spinal cord injury patients (n = 10) and nurses (n = 10) which were audio recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed to develop the instrument. The instrument's content validity was then ensured via independent expert review. In Phase 2, the instrument was trialled on 80 spinal cord injury patients to determine inter-rater reliability, internal consistency and test-retest reliability. In Phase 1, four core themes (emotional impact, coping, relationships and assessment) were identified together with a number of related sub-themes. In Phase 2, the instrument was shown to have excellent inter-rater reliability, acceptable internal consistency and satisfactory test re-test reliability. Subsequently a rating sheet, user manual and prompt card were produced. The new instrument, the Stanmore Nursing Assessment of Psychological Status, was shown to be valid and reliable. It is anticipated that training nurses to use this instrument may help to enhance good emotional care of patients.

  19. Surgical techniques for lumbo-sacral fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropiano, P; Giorgi, H; Faure, A; Blondel, B

    2017-02-01

    Lumbo-sacral (L5-S1) fusion is a widely performed procedure that has become the reference standard treatment for refractory low back pain. L5-S1 is a complex transition zone between the mobile lordotic distal lumbar spine and the fixed sacral region. The goal is to immobilise the lumbo-sacral junction in order to relieve pain originating from this site. Apart from achieving inter-vertebral fusion, the main challenge lies in the preoperative determination of the fixed L5-S1 position that will be optimal for the patient. Many lumbo-sacral fusion techniques are available. Stabilisation can be achieved using various methods. An anterior, posterior, or combined approach may be used. Recently developed minimally invasive techniques are gaining in popularity based on their good clinical outcomes and high fusion rates. The objective of this conference is to resolve the main issues faced by spinal surgeons in their everyday practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Determining clinical practice of expert physiotherapy for patients undergoing lumbar spinal fusion: a cross-sectional survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Esther R C; Scheijen, Elle E M; van Meeteren, Nico L U; de Bie, Rob A; Lenssen, Anton F; Willems, Paul C; Hoogeboom, Thomas J

    2016-05-01

    To determine the content of current Dutch expert hospital physiotherapy practice for patients undergoing lumbar spinal fusion (LSF), to gain insight into expert-based clinical practice. At each hospital where LSF is performed, one expert physiotherapist received an e-mailed questionnaire, about pre- and postoperative physiotherapy and discharge after LSF. The level of uniformity in goals and interventions was graded on a scale from no uniformity (50-60 %) to very strong uniformity (91-100 %). LSF was performed at 34 of the 67 contacted hospitals. From those 34 hospitals, 28 (82 %) expert physiotherapists completed the survey. Twenty-one percent of the respondents saw patients preoperatively, generally to provide information. Stated postoperative goals and administered interventions focused mainly on performing transfers safely and keeping the patient informed. Outcome measures were scarcely used. There was no uniformity regarding advice on the activities of daily living. Dutch perioperative expert physiotherapy for patients undergoing LSF is variable and lacks structural outcome assessment. Studies evaluating the effectiveness of best-practice physiotherapy are warranted.

  1. One-stage posterior approaches for treatment of thoracic spinal infection: Transforaminal and costotransversectomy, compared with anterior approach with posterior instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Fu-Cheng; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Niu, Chi-Chien; Lai, Po-Liang; Chen, Lih-Huei; Chen, Wen-Jer

    2017-10-01

    Treating thoracic infective spondylodiscitis with anterior surgical approaches carry a relatively high risk of perioperative and postoperative complications. Posterior approaches have been reported to result in lower complication rates than anterior procedures, but more evidence is needed to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of 1-stage posterior approaches for treating infectious thoracic spondylodiscitis.Preoperative and postoperative clinical data, of 18 patients who underwent 2 types of 1-stage posterior procedures, costotransversectomy and transforaminal thoracic interbody debridement and fusion and 7 patients who underwent anterior debridement and reconstruction with posterior instrumentation, were retrospectively assessed.The clinical outcomes of patients treated with 1-stage posterior approaches were generally good, with good infection control, back pain relief, kyphotic angle correction, and either partial or solid union for fusion status. Furthermore, they achieved shorter surgical time, fewer postoperative complications, and shorter hospital stay than the patients underwent anterior debridement with posterior instrumentation.The results suggested that treating thoracic spondylodiscitis with a single-stage posterior approach might prevent postoperative complications and avoid respiratory problems associated with anterior approaches. Single-stage posterior approaches would be recommended for thoracic spine infection, especially for patients with medical comorbidities.

  2. Towards the development of an outcome instrument for spinal trauma : An international survey of spinal surgeons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oner, F. Cumhur; Sadiqi, Said; Lehr, A. Mechteld; Dvorak, Marcel F.; Aarabi, Bizhan; Chapman, Jens R.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Kandziora, Frank; Rajasekaran, S.; Vaccaro, Alexander R.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN.: International web-based survey. OBJECTIVE.: To identify the most relevant aspects of human function and health status from the perspective of health care professionals involved in the treatment of spinal trauma patients. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: There is no universally accepted

  3. Radical Surgery of Only the Anterior Elements of the Spine at the Posterior Element Fusion Level due to Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuto Tsuchiya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal metastasis of differentiated thyroid cancer can have a favorable prognosis if radical surgery is performed. We encountered a case of spinal metastasis involving three anterior vertebral bodies at the posterior element fusion level and successfully achieved adequate stability by radical surgery involving only the anterior elements. A 67-year-old woman who had numbness and muscle weakness in the lower limbs caused by metastatic spinal tumor at the posterior element fusion level of L1–L3 vertebrae was treated with radical surgery of only the anterior element to gain stability. Similar situations may occur in cases involving other malignant tumor metastases or spinal primary tumors. If such a case occurs, this method could be useful in preventing metastasis to the posterior element.

  4. Pattern of Spinal Pain Managed at the Physiotherapy Department of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mr Ogunlana

    The results showed that the cases of SP involved patients between the ages of 13-89 years with a mean age of. 53.42±15.08 years. .... centred outcome measuring instruments in the management .... study that more older patients reported with spinal pain suggests that .... Sitting spinal posture in adolescents differs between ...

  5. The dosimetric impact of implants on the spinal cord dose during stereotactic body radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yazici, Gozde; Sari, Sezin Yuce; Yedekci, Fazli Yagiz; Yucekul, Altug; Birgi, Sumerya Duru; Demirkiran, Gokhan; Gultekin, Melis; Hurmuz, Pervin; Yazici, Muharrem; Ozyigit, Gokhan; Cengiz, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    The effects of spinal implants on dose distribution have been studied for conformal treatment plans. However, the dosimetric impact of spinal implants in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatments has not been studied in spatial orientation. In this study we evaluated the effect of spinal implants placed in sawbone vertebra models implanted as in vivo instrumentations. Four different spinal implant reconstruction techniques were performed using the standard sawbone lumbar vertebrae model; 1. L2-L4 posterior instrumentation without anterior column reconstruction (PI); 2. L2-L4 anterior instrumentation, L3 corpectomy, and anterior column reconstruction with a titanium cage (AIAC); 3. L2-L4 posterior instrumentation, L3 corpectomy, and anterior column reconstruction with a titanium cage (PIAC); 4. L2-L4 anterior instrumentation, L3 corpectomy, and anterior column reconstruction with chest tubes filled with bone cement (AIABc). The target was defined as the spinous process and lamina of the lumbar (L) 3 vertebra. A thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD, LiF:Mg,Ti) was located on the measurement point anterior to the spinal cord. The prescription dose was 8 Gy and the treatment was administered in a single fraction using a CyberKnife® (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA). We performed two different treatment plans. In Plan A beam interaction with the rod was not limited. In plan B the rod was considered a structure of avoidance, and interaction between the rod and beam was prevented. TLD measurements were compared with the point dose calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS). In plan A, the difference between TLD measurement and the dose calculated by the TPS was 1.7 %, 2.8 %, and 2.7 % for the sawbone with no implant, PI, and PIAC models, respectively. For the AIAC model the TLD dose was 13.8 % higher than the TPS dose; the difference was 18.6 % for the AIABc model. In plan B for the AIAC and AIABc models, TLD measurement was 2.5 % and 0.9 % higher than the

  6. Pain is the Greatest Preoperative Concern for Patients and Parents Before Posterior Spinal Fusion for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Priscella; Skaggs, David L; Sanders, Austin E; Villamor, Gabriela A; Choi, Paul D; Tolo, Vernon T; Andras, Lindsay M

    2017-11-01

    Prospective cross-sectional study. To evaluate patients' and parents' concerns so they can be addressed with appropriate preoperative counseling. Despite much research on outcomes for posterior spinal fusion (PSF) in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), little is available about preoperative fears or concerns. Patients with AIS undergoing PSF, their parents, and surgeons were prospectively enrolled and asked to complete a survey on their fears and concerns about surgery at their preoperative appointment. Forty-eight patients and parents completed surveys. Four attending pediatric spine surgeons participated and submitted 48 responses. Mean age of patients was 14.2 years. On a scale of 0 to 10, mean level of concern reported by parents (6.9) was higher than that reported by patients (4.6). Surgeons rated the procedure's complexity on a scale of 0 to 10 and reported a mean of 5.2. Neither patients' nor parents' level of concern correlated with the surgeons' assessment of the procedure's complexity level (R = 0.19 and 0.12, P = 0.20 and P = 0.42, respectively). Top three concerns for patients were pain (25%), ability to return to activities (21%), and neurologic injury (17%). Top three concerns for parents were pain (35%), neurologic injury (21%), and amount of correction (17%). Top three concerns for surgeons were postoperative shoulder balance (44%), neurologic injury (27%), and lowest instrumented vertebrae selection (27%). Patients reported the same concerns 23% of the time as parents, and 17% of the time as surgeons. Parents and surgeons reported the same concerns 21% of the time. Pain was the greatest concern for both patients and parents but was rarely listed as a concern by surgeons. Parent and patient level of concern did not correlate to the surgeon's assessment of the procedure's complexity. Neurologic injury was a top concern for all groups, but otherwise there was little overlap between physician, patient, and parent concerns. 3.

  7. Development of a Detailed Volumetric Finite Element Model of the Spine to Simulate Surgical Correction of Spinal Deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Driscoll

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A large spectrum of medical devices exists; it aims to correct deformities associated with spinal disorders. The development of a detailed volumetric finite element model of the osteoligamentous spine would serve as a valuable tool to assess, compare, and optimize spinal devices. Thus the purpose of the study was to develop and initiate validation of a detailed osteoligamentous finite element model of the spine with simulated correction from spinal instrumentation. A finite element of the spine from T1 to L5 was developed using properties and geometry from the published literature and patient data. Spinal instrumentation, consisting of segmental translation of a scoliotic spine, was emulated. Postoperative patient and relevant published data of intervertebral disc stress, screw/vertebra pullout forces, and spinal profiles was used to evaluate the models validity. Intervertebral disc and vertebral reaction stresses respected published in vivo, ex vivo, and in silico values. Screw/vertebra reaction forces agreed with accepted pullout threshold values. Cobb angle measurements of spinal deformity following simulated surgical instrumentation corroborated with patient data. This computational biomechanical analysis validated a detailed volumetric spine model. Future studies seek to exploit the model to explore the performance of corrective spinal devices.

  8. Titanium vs. polyetheretherketone (PEEK) interbody fusion: Meta-analysis and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Scott; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Bydon, Mohamad; Torner, James C; Hitchon, Patrick W

    2017-10-01

    Spinal interbody fusion is a standard and accepted method for spinal fusion. Interbody fusion devices include titanium (Ti) and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages with distinct biomechanical properties. Titanium and PEEK cages have been evaluated in the cervical and lumbar spine, with conflicting results in bony fusion and subsidence. Using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we reviewed the available literature evaluating Ti and PEEK cages to assess subsidence and fusion rates. Six studies were included in the analysis, 3 of which were class IV evidence, 2 were class III, and 1 was class II. A total of 410 patients (Ti-228, PEEK-182) and 587 levels (Ti-327, PEEK-260) were studied. Pooled mean age was 50.8years in the Ti group, and 53.1years in the PEEK group. Anterior cervical discectomy was performed in 4 studies (395 levels) and transforaminal interbody fusion in 2 studies (192 levels). No statistically significant difference was found between groups with fusion (OR 1.16, 95% C.I 0.59-2.89, p=0.686, I 2 =49.7%) but there was a statistically significant the rate of subsidence with titanium (OR 3.59, 95% C.I 1.28-10.07, p=0.015, I 2 =56.9%) at last follow-up. Titanium and PEEK cages are associated with a similar rate of fusion, but there is an increased rate of subsidence with titanium cage. Future prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to further evaluate these cages using surgical and patient-reported outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The evaluation of short fusion in idiopathic scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wajanavisit Wiwat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Selective thoracic fusion in type II curve has been recommended by King et al. since 1983. They suggested that care must be taken to use the vertebra that is neutral and stable so that the lower level of fusion is centered over the sacrum. Since then there has been the trend to do shorter and selective fusion of the major curve. This study was conducted to find out whether short posterior pedicle instrumentation alone could provide efficient correction and maintain trunk balance comparing to the anterior instrumentation. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was conducted during 2005-2007 on 39 consecutive cases with idiopathic scoliosis cases King 2 and 3 (Lenke 1A, 1B, 5C and miscellaneous. Only the major curve was instrumented unless both curves were equally rigid and of the same magnitude. The level of fusion was planned as the end vertebra (EVB to EVB fusion, although minor adjustment was modified by the surgeons intraoperatively. The most common fusion levels in major thoracic curves were T6-T12, whereas the most common fusion levels in the thoraco-lumbar curves were T10-L3. Fusion was performed from the posterior only approach and the implants utilized were uniformly plate and pedicle screw system. All the patients were followed at least 2 years till skeletal maturity. The correction of the curve were assessed according to type of curve (lenke IA, IB and 5, severity of curve (less than 450, 450-890 and more than 900, age at surgery (14 or less and 15 or more and number of the segment involved in instrumentation (fusion level less than curve, fusion level as of the curve and fusion more than the curve Results: The average long-term curve correction for the thoracic was 40.4% in Lenke 1A, 52.2% in Lenke 1B and 56.3% in Lenke 5. The factors associated with poorer outcome were younger age at surgery (< 11 years or Risser 0, fusion at wrong levels (shorter than the measured end vertebra and rigid curve identified by bending

  10. Spinal Tissue Loading Created by Different Methods of Spinal Manipulative Therapy Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funabashi, Martha; Nougarou, François; Descarreaux, Martin; Prasad, Narasimha; Kawchuk, Gregory N

    2017-05-01

    Comparative study using robotic replication of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) vertebral kinematics together with serial dissection. The aim of this study was to quantify loads created in cadaveric spinal tissues arising from three different forms of SMT application. There exist many distinct methods by which to apply SMT. It is not known presently whether different forms of SMT application have different effects on spinal tissues. Should the method of SMT application modulate spinal tissue loading, quantifying this relation may help explain the varied outcomes of SMT in terms of effect and safety. SMT was applied to the third lumbar vertebra in 12 porcine cadavers using three SMT techniques: a clinical device that applies forces through a hand-held instrument (INST), a manual technique of applying SMT clinically (MAN) and a research device that applies parameters of manual SMT through a servo-controlled linear actuator motor (SERVO). The resulting kinematics from each SMT application were tracked optically via indwelling bone pins. The L3/L4 segment was then removed, mounted in a parallel robot and the resulting kinematics from SMT replayed for each SMT application technique. Serial dissection of spinal structures was conducted to quantify loading characteristics of discrete spinal tissues. In terms of load magnitude, SMT application with MAN and SERVO created greater forces than INST in all conditions (P < 0.05). Additionally, MAN and SERVO created comparable posterior forces in the intact specimen, but MAN created greater posterior forces on IVD structures compared to SERVO (P < 0.05). Specific methods of SMT application create unique vertebral loading characteristics, which may help explain the varied outcomes of SMT in terms of effect and safety. N/A.

  11. Cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Suk Yong; Sung, Ki Woong; Kang, Joo Sang; Lee, Jong Jik

    1995-02-01

    So called 'cold fusion phenomena' are not confirmed yet. Excess heat generation is very delicate one. Neutron generation is most reliable results, however, the records are erratic and the same results could not be repeated. So there is no reason to exclude the malfunction of testing instruments. The same arguments arise in recording 4 He, 3 He, 3 H, which are not rich in quantity basically. An experiment where plenty of 4 He were recorded is attached in appendix. The problem is that we are trying to search cold fusion which is permitted by nature or not. The famous tunneling effect in quantum mechanics will answer it, however, the most fusion rate is known to be negligible. The focus of this project is on the theme that how to increase that negligible fusion rate. 6 figs, 4 tabs, 1512 refs. (Author)

  12. Achievement of solid-state plasma fusion ('Cold-Fusion')

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arata, Yoshiaki; Zhang, Yue-Chang

    1995-01-01

    Using a 'QMS' (Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer), the authors detected a significantly large amount (10 20 -10 21 [cm -3 ]) of helium ( 2 4 He), which was concluded to have been produced by a deuterium nuclear reaction within a host solid. These results were found to be fully repeatable and supported the authors' proposition that solid state plasma fusion ('Cold Fusion') can be generated in energetic deuterium Strongly Coupled Plasma ('SC-plasma'). This fusion reaction is thought to be sustained by localized 'Latticequake' in a solid-state media with the deuterium density equivalent to that of the host solid. While exploring this basic proposition, the characteristic differences when compared with ultra high temperature-state plasma fusion ('Hot Fusion') are clarified. In general, the most essential reaction product in both types of the deuterium plasma fusion is considered to be helium, irrespective of the 'well-known and/or unknown reactions', which is stored within the solid-state medium in abundance as a 'Residual Product', but which generally can not enter into nor be released from host-solid at a room temperature. Even measuring instruments with relatively poor sensitivity should be able to easily detect such residual helium. An absence of residual helium means that no nuclear fusion reaction has occurred, whereas its presence provides crucial evidence that nuclear fusion has, in fact, occurred in the solid. (author)

  13. Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2001-04-01

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on instrumentation involves the assessment and the development of sensitive measurement systems used within a radiation environment. Particular emphasis is on the assessment of optical fibre components and their adaptability to radiation environments. The evaluation of ageing processes of instrumentation in fission plants, the development of specific data evaluation strategies to compensate for ageing induced degradation of sensors and cable performance form part of these activities. In 2000, particular emphasis was on in-core reactor instrumentation applied to fusion, accelerator driven and water-cooled fission reactors. This involved the development of high performance instrumentation for irradiation experiments in the BR2 reactor in support of new instrumentation needs for MYRRHA, and for diagnostic systems for the ITER reactor.

  14. Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2001-01-01

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on instrumentation involves the assessment and the development of sensitive measurement systems used within a radiation environment. Particular emphasis is on the assessment of optical fibre components and their adaptability to radiation environments. The evaluation of ageing processes of instrumentation in fission plants, the development of specific data evaluation strategies to compensate for ageing induced degradation of sensors and cable performance form part of these activities. In 2000, particular emphasis was on in-core reactor instrumentation applied to fusion, accelerator driven and water-cooled fission reactors. This involved the development of high performance instrumentation for irradiation experiments in the BR2 reactor in support of new instrumentation needs for MYRRHA, and for diagnostic systems for the ITER reactor

  15. Vitamin D Levels and 1-Year Fusion Outcomes in Elective Spine Surgery: A Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Godzik, Jakub; Dailey, Andrew T; Schmidt, Meic H; Bisson, Erica F; Hood, Robert S; Cutler, Andrew; Ray, Wilson Z

    2015-10-01

    Prospective observational study. To investigate the association of perioperative vitamin D levels and nonunion rates and time to fusion in patients undergoing elective spine fusion. Although there is a clear link between bone mineral density and the risk of osteoporosis, it is unclear whether low vitamin D levels affect rates and timing of spinal fusion. Serum 25-OH vitamin D levels were measured perioperatively in adults undergoing elective spinal fusion between 2011 and 2012. Vitamin D levels vitamin D deficiency. Mean patient age was 57 ± 13 years; 44% were female and 94% were Caucasian. The cervical spine was fused in 49%, the lumbar spine in 47%, and the thoracic spine in 4%. Mean construct length was 2 levels (range 1-16). At 12-month follow-up, 112/133 (84%) patients demonstrated fusion (median time to fusion 8.4 mo). Nonunion at 12 months was associated with vitamin D deficiency (20% of patients with adequate vitamin D level vs. 38% of vitamin D-deficient patients, P = 0.063). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated time to fusion was significantly longer in the vitamin D-deficient group (12 vs. 6 mo, P = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, vitamin D deficiency was an independent predictor of nonunion (odds ratio 3.449, P = 0.045) when adjusted for age, sex, obesity, fusion length, location, graft type, smoking, and bone morphogenetic protein use. Vitamin D levels may affect nonunion rate and time to fusion. These results offer insight into the importance of the metabolic milieu for bony fusion as well as a potential avenue for therapeutic intervention. 3.

  16. Cold fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Suk Yong; Sung, Ki Woong; Kang, Joo Sang; Lee, Jong Jik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-01

    So called `cold fusion phenomena` are not confirmed yet. Excess heat generation is very delicate one. Neutron generation is most reliable results, however, the records are erratic and the same results could not be repeated. So there is no reason to exclude the malfunction of testing instruments. The same arguments arise in recording {sup 4}He, {sup 3}He, {sup 3}H, which are not rich in quantity basically. An experiment where plenty of {sup 4}He were recorded is attached in appendix. The problem is that we are trying to search cold fusion which is permitted by nature or not. The famous tunneling effect in quantum mechanics will answer it, however, the most fusion rate is known to be negligible. The focus of this project is on the theme that how to increase that negligible fusion rate. 6 figs, 4 tabs, 1512 refs. (Author).

  17. Lumbar Spinous Process Fixation and Fusion: A Systematic Review and Critical Analysis of an Emerging Spinal Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Alejandro J; Scheer, Justin K; Dahdaleh, Nader S; Patel, Alpesh A; Smith, Zachary A

    2017-11-01

    A systematic review. The available literature on interspinous rigid fixation/fusion devices (IFD) was systematically reviewed to explore the devices' efficacy and complication profile. The clinical application of new spinal technologies may proceed without well-established evidence, as is the case with IFDs. IFDs are plate-like devices that are attached to the lateral aspects of 2 adjacent spinous processes to promote rigidity at that segment. Despite almost a decade since the devices' introduction, the literature regarding efficacy and safety is sparse. Complications have been reported but no definitive study is known to the authors. A systematic review of the past 10 years of English literature was conducted according to PRISMA guidelines. The timeframe was chosen based on publication of the first study containing a modern IFD, the SPIRE, in 2006. All PubMed publications containing MeSH headings or with title or abstract containing any combination of the words "interspinous," "spinous process," "fusion," "fixation," "plate," or "plating" were included. Exclusion criteria consisted of dynamic stabilization devices (X-Stop, DIAM, etc.), cervical spine, pediatrics, and animal models. The articles were blinded to author and journal, assigned a level of evidence by Oxford Centre of Evidence-Based Medicine (OCEBM) criteria, and summarized in an evidentiary table. A total of 293 articles were found in the initial search, of which 15 remained after examination for exclusion criteria. No class I or class II evidence regarding IFDs was found. IFDs have been shown by methodologically flawed and highly biased class III evidence to reduce instability at 1 year, without statistical comparison of complication rates against other treatment modalities. Although IFDs are heavily marketed and commonly applied in modern practice, data on safety and efficacy are inadequate. The paucity of evidence warrants reexamination of these devices' value and indications by the spine surgery

  18. The increased prevalence of cervical spondylosis in patients with adult thoracolumbar spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, William W; Carrer, Alexandra; Lu, Michael; Hu, Serena S

    2014-12-01

    Retrospective cohort study. To assess the concomitance of cervical spondylosis and thoracolumbar spinal deformity. Patients with degenerative cervical spine disease have higher rates of degeneration in the lumbar spine. In addition, degenerative cervical spine changes have been observed in adult patients with thoracolumbar spinal deformities. However, to the best of our knowledge, there have been no studies quantifying the association between cervical spondylosis and thoracolumbar spinal deformity in adult patients. Patients seen by a spine surgeon or spine specialist at a single institution were assessed for cervical spondylosis and/or thoracolumbar spinal deformity using an administrative claims database. Spinal radiographic utilization and surgical intervention were used to infer severity of spinal disease. The relative prevalence of each spinal diagnosis was assessed in patients with and without the other diagnosis. A total of 47,560 patients were included in this study. Cervical spondylosis occurred in 13.1% overall, but was found in 31.0% of patients with thoracolumbar spinal deformity (OR=3.27, Pspondylosis (OR=3.26, Pspondylosis or thoracolumbar spinal deformity had significantly higher rates of the other spinal diagnosis. This correlation was increased with increased severity of disease. Patients with both diagnoses were significantly more likely to have received a spine fusion. Further research is warranted to establish the cause of this correlation. Clinicians should use this information to both screen and counsel patients who present for cervical spondylosis or thoracolumbar spinal deformity.

  19. Spinal deformity in patients with Sotos syndrome (cerebral gigantism).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirikos, Athanasios I; Demosthenous, Nestor; McMaster, Michael J

    2009-04-01

    Retrospective review of a case series. To present the clinical characteristics and progression of spinal deformity in patients with Sotos syndrome. There is limited information on the development of spinal deformity and the need for treatment in this condition. The medical records and spinal radiographs of 5 consecutive patients were reviewed. All patients were followed to skeletal maturity (mean follow-up: 6.6 y). The mean age at diagnosis of spinal deformity was 11.9 years (range: 5.8 to 14.5) with 4 patients presenting in adolescence. The type of deformity was not uniform. Two patients presented in adolescence with relatively small and nonprogressive thoracolumbar and lumbar scoliosis, which required observation but no treatment until the end of spinal growth. Three patients underwent spinal deformity correction at a mean age of 11.7 years (range: 6 to 15.4). The first patient developed a double structural thoracic and lumbar scoliosis and underwent a posterior spinal arthrodesis extending from T3 to L4. Five years later, she developed marked degenerative changes at the L4/L5 level causing symptomatic bilateral lateral recess stenosis and affecting the L5 nerve roots. She underwent spinal decompression at L4/L5 and L5/S1 levels followed by extension of the fusion to the sacrum. The second patient developed a severe thoracic kyphosis and underwent a posterior spinal arthrodesis. The remaining patient presented at the age of 5.9 years with a severe thoracic kyphoscoliosis and underwent a 2-stage antero-posterior spinal arthrodesis. The development of spinal deformity is a common finding in children with Sotos syndrome and in our series it occurred in adolescence in 4 out of 5 patients. There is significant variability on the pattern of spine deformity, ranging from a scoliosis through kyphoscoliosis to a pure kyphosis, and also the age at presentation and need for treatment.

  20. Increased incidence of pseudarthrosis after unilateral instrumented transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in patients with lumbar spondylosis: Clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gologorsky, Yakov; Skovrlj, Branko; Steinberger, Jeremy; Moore, Max; Arginteanu, Marc; Moore, Frank; Steinberger, Alfred

    2014-10-01

    Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) with segmental pedicular instrumentation is a well established procedure used to treat lumbar spondylosis with or without spondylolisthesis. Available biomechanical and clinical studies that compared unilateral and bilateral constructs have produced conflicting data regarding patient outcomes and hardware complications. A prospective cohort study was undertaken by a group of neurosurgeons. They prospectively enrolled 80 patients into either bilateral or unilateral pedicle screw instrumentation groups (40 patients/group). Demographic data collected for each group included sex, age, body mass index, tobacco use, and Workers' Compensation/litigation status. Operative data included segments operated on, number of levels involved, estimated blood loss, length of hospital stay, and perioperative complications. Long-term outcomes (hardware malfunction, wound dehiscence, and pseudarthrosis) were recorded. For all patients, preoperative baseline and 6-month postoperative scores for Medical Outcomes 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) outcomes were recorded. Patient follow-up times ranged from 37 to 63 months (mean 52 months). No patients were lost to follow-up. The patients who underwent unilateral pedicle screw instrumentation (unilateral cohort) were slightly younger than those who underwent bilateral pedicle screw instrumentation (bilateral cohort) (mean age 42 vs. 47 years, respectively; p = 0.02). No other significant differences were detected between cohorts with regard to demographic data, mean number of lumbar levels operated on, or distribution of the levels operated on. Estimated blood loss was higher for patients in the bilateral cohort, but length of stay was similar for patients in both cohorts. The incidence of pseudarthrosis was significantly higher among patients in the unilateral cohort (7 patients [17.5%]) than among those in the bilateral cohort (1 patient [2.5%]) (p = 0.02). Wound dehiscence occurred for

  1. Adjacent Lumbar Disc Herniation after Lumbar Short Spinal Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshi Ninomiya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old outpatient presented with a chief complaint of sudden left leg motor weakness and sensory disturbance. He had undergone L4/5 posterior interbody fusion with L3–5 posterior fusions for spondylolisthesis 3 years prior, and the screws were removed 1 year later. He has been followed up for 3 years, and there had been no adjacent segment problems before this presentation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed a large L2/3 disc hernia descending to the L3/4 level. Compared to the initial MRI, this hernia occurred in an “intact” disc among multilevel severely degenerated discs. Right leg paresis and bladder dysfunction appeared a few days after admission. Microscopic lumbar disc herniotomy was performed. The right leg motor weakness improved just after the operation, but the moderate left leg motor weakness and difficulty in urination persisted.

  2. Perioperative Vision Loss in Cervical Spinal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Brandon C; Lam, Arthur; Chapman, Jens R; Oskouian, Rod J; Nassr, Ahmad; Currier, Bradford L; Sebastian, Arjun S; Arnold, Paul M; Hamilton, Steven R; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Retrospective multicenter case series. To assess the rate of perioperative vision loss following cervical spinal surgery. Medical records for 17 625 patients from 21 high-volume surgical centers from the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network who received cervical spine surgery (levels from C2 to C7) between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011, inclusive, were reviewed to identify occurrences of vision loss following surgery. Of the 17 625 patients in the registry, there were 13 946 patients assessed for the complication of blindness. There were 9591 cases that involved only anterior surgical approaches; the remaining 4355 cases were posterior and/or circumferential fusions. There were no cases of blindness or vision loss in the postoperative period reported during the sampling period. Perioperative vision loss following cervical spinal surgery is exceedingly rare.

  3. Digitalized design of extraforaminal lumbar interbody fusion: a computer-based simulation and cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingjie; Zeng, Cheng; Guo, Song; Pan, Jie; Han, Yingchao; Li, Zeqing; Li, Lijun; Tan, Jun

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the feasibility of a novel lumbar approach named extraforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (ELIF), a newly emerging minimally invasive technique for treating degenerative lumbar disorders, using a digitalized simulation and a cadaveric study. The ELIF surgical procedure was simulated using the Mimics surgical simulator and included dissection of the superior articular process, dilation of the vertebral foramen, and placement of pedicle screws and a cage. ELIF anatomical measures were documented using a digitalized technique and subsequently validated on fresh cadavers. The use of the Mimics allowed for the vivid simulation of ELIF surgical procedures, while the cadaveric study proved the feasibility of this novel approach. ELIF had a relatively lateral access approach that was located 8-9 cm lateral to the median line with an access depth of approximately 9 cm through the intermuscular space. Dissection of the superior articular processes could fully expose the target intervertebral discs and facilitate a more inclined placement of the pedicle screws and cage with robust enhancement. According to the computer-based simulation and cadaveric study, it is feasible to perform ELIF. Further research including biomechanical study is needed to prove ELIF has a superior ability to preserve the posterior tension bands of the spinal column, with similar effects on spinal decompression, fixation, and fusion, and if it can enhance post-fusion spinal stability and expedites postoperative recovery.

  4. Preliminary Report of Instrumentation in Tuberculous Lumbosacral Spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Zin-Naing

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aims of spinal tuberculosis treatment are to eradicate the disease, to prevent the development of paraplegia and kyphotic deformity, to manage the existing deformity and neurological deficit, to allow early ambulation and to return the patient back to daily life. Methods for the treatment of tuberculosis of vertebra are still controversial. Conservative treatment includes medical therapy as well as external supports and surgery is indicated for deformity of spine, severe pain, or neurological compromise conditions. Most cases in our country were late presentations with disc space already infected, and after débridement there was a large gap needing bone graft to enhance bony fusion and anterior column support. Although the spine was infected, instrumentation posed no additional hazard in terms of tuberculous discitis. Oga et al. reported that M. tuberculosis has low adhesion capability and forms only a few microcolonies surrounded by a biofilm. Moon et al. stated that interbody fusion performed with classical anterior radical surgery per se was ineffective in the correction of kyphosis and did not prevent the increase in kyphosis angle. The present study focuses on collected clinical and radiographic outcomes in ten patients who underwent Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (PLIF for tuberculous lumbosacral spine. All the cases had instability with kyphotic deformity or loss of lordosis. Clinical outcomes were measured by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS, modified MacNab Criteria, and radiographic outcomes (segmental kyphotic angle and total lumbar lordotic, TLL, angle on follow-up to six months. The mean VAS back scores showed decrease, and kyphotic angles and lordotic angles improved. Three cases had excellent results, six good and one fair using the modified MacNab criteria.

  5. Evaluation of a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) titanium composite interbody spacer in an ovine lumbar interbody fusion model: biomechanical, microcomputed tomographic, and histologic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilvray, Kirk C; Waldorff, Erik I; Easley, Jeremiah; Seim, Howard B; Zhang, Nianli; Linovitz, Raymond J; Ryaby, James T; Puttlitz, Christian M

    2017-12-01

    The most commonly used materials used for interbody cages are titanium metal and polymer polyetheretherketone (PEEK). Both of these materials have demonstrated good biocompatibility. A major disadvantage associated with solid titanium cages is their radiopacity, limiting the postoperative monitoring of spinal fusion via standard imaging modalities. However, PEEK is radiolucent, allowing for a temporal assessment of the fusion mass by clinicians. On the other hand, PEEK is hydrophobic, which can limit bony ingrowth. Although both PEEK and titanium have demonstrated clinical success in obtaining a solid spinal fusion, innovations are being developed to improve fusion rates and to create stronger constructs using hybrid additive manufacturing approaches by incorporating both materials into a single interbody device. The purpose of this study was to examine the interbody fusion characteristic of a PEEK Titanium Composite (PTC) cage for use in lumbar fusion. Thirty-four mature female sheep underwent two-level (L 2 -L 3 and L 4 -L 5 ) interbody fusion using either a PEEK or a PTC cage (one of each per animal). Animals were sacrificed at 0, 8, 12, and 18 weeks post surgery. Post sacrifice, each surgically treated functional spinal unit underwent non-destructive kinematic testing, microcomputed tomography scanning, and histomorphometric analyses. Relative to the standard PEEK cages, the PTC constructs demonstrated significant reductions in ranges of motion and a significant increase in stiffness. These biomechanical findings were reinforced by the presence of significantly more bone at the fusion site as well as ingrowth into the porous end plates. Overall, the results indicate that PTC interbody devices could potentially lead to a more robust intervertebral fusion relative to a standard PEEK device in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Can Surgeon Demographic Factors Predict Postoperative Complication Rates After Elective Spinal Fusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Danielle S; Cook, Ralph W; Weiner, Joseph A; Schallmo, Michael S; Barth, Kathryn A; Singh, Sameer K; Freshman, Ryan D; Patel, Alpesh A; Hsu, Wellington K

    2018-03-01

    Retrospective cohort. Determine whether surgeon demographic factors influence postoperative complication rates after elective spine fusion procedures. Surgeon demographic factors have been shown to impact decision making in the management of degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Complication rates are frequently reported outcome measurements used to evaluate surgical treatments, quality-of-care, and determine health care reimbursements. However, there are few studies investigating the association between surgeon demographic factors and complication outcomes after elective spine fusions. A database of US spine surgeons with corresponding postoperative complications data after elective spine fusions was compiled utilizing public data provided by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (2011-2013) and ProPublica Surgeon Scorecard (2009-2013). Demographic data for each surgeon was collected and consisted of: surgical specialty (orthopedic vs. neurosurgery), years in practice, practice setting (private vs. academic), type of medical degree (MD vs. DO), medical school location (United States vs. foreign), sex, and geographic region of practice. General linear mixed models using a Beta distribution with a logit link and pairwise comparison with post hoc Tukey-Kramer were used to assess the relationship between surgeon demographics and complication rates. 2110 US-practicing spine surgeons who performed spine fusions on 125,787 Medicare patients from 2011 to 2013 met inclusion criteria for this study. None of the surgeon demographic factors analyzed were found to significantly affect overall complication rates in lumbar (posterior approach) or cervical spine fusion. Publicly available complication rates for individual spine surgeons are being utilized by hospital systems and patients to assess aptitude and gauge expectations. The increasing demand for transparency will likely lead to emphasis of these statistics to improve outcomes. We conclude that none of the

  7. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R Ferguson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI. Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. The mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain pathways in the spinal cord may emerge with certain patterns of activity, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after spinal cord injury. We review these basic phenomena, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and discuss implications of these findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after spinal cord injury.

  8. A case of marked short-neck with fusion of cervical vertebrae in a Holstein cow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, J.; Ando, T.; Otsuka, H.; Paku, T.; Yoshioka, I.; Saruyama, Y.; Yamada, H.; Iso, H.; Oyamada, T.; Watanabe, D.

    2007-01-01

    An 11-month old Holstein cow with congenitally shortened neck was subjected to clinical, radiographic and myelographic examination, and also autopsy and histopathological examination. Skeletal preparations of the cervical region were made to investigate the abnormality of the vertebrae. The cow was growing normally, and no critical neurological signs were observed. Radiographic examination showed marked kyphosis of the cervical spine, and fusion of posterior cervical vertebrae was suspected. Myelographic examination showed curvature of the spinal cord, but no narrowing at any part. Atrophy, hyaline degeneration, and hydropic degeneration of muscle fibers were seen in the dorsal part of the cervical region in the histopathological examination, but there was no abnormality in the cervical spinal cord. Deformation, fusion, and hypoplasia of the cervical vertebrae and posterior thoracic vertebrae were observed. It is suggested that in the organ system-wise classification of congenital abnormalities, this may be classified as a case of defective vertebrae with the coexisting congenital anomalies of kyphosis, scoliosis and vertebral fusion. The cause of this defect was not clear, but the observed vertebral fusion and hypoplasia indicated defective development of the vertebral segment during the early fetal stage

  9. The fusion blanket program at Chalk River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastings, I.J.

    1986-03-01

    Work on the Fusion Blanket Program commenced at Chalk River in 1984 June. Co-funded by Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, the Program utilizes Chalk River expertise in instrumented irradiation testing, ceramics, tritium technology, materials testing and compound chemistry. This paper gives highlights of studies to date on lithium-based ceramics, leading contenders for the fusion blanket

  10. The effects of massage therapy after decompression and fusion surgery of the lumbar spine: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Glenda

    2012-01-01

    Spinal fusion and decompression surgery of the lumbar spine are common procedures for problems such as disc herniations. Various studies for postoperative interventions have been conducted; however, no massage therapy studies have been completed. The objective of this study is to determine if massage therapy can beneficially treat pain and dysfunction associated with lumbar spinal decompression and fusion surgery. Client is a 47-year-old female who underwent spinal decompression and fusion surgery of L4/L5 due to chronic disc herniation symptoms. The research design was a case study in a private clinic involving the applications of seven, 30-minute treatments conducted over eight weeks. Common Swedish massage and myofascial techniques were applied to the back, shoulders, posterior hips, and posterior legs. Outcomes were assessed using the following measures: VAS pain scale, Hamstring Length Test, Oswestry Disability Index, and the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire. Hamstring length improved (in degrees of extension) from pretreatment measurements in the right leg of 40° and left leg 65° to post-treatment measurement at the final visit, when the results were right 50° and left 70°. The Oswestry Disability Index improved 14%, from 50% to 36% disability. Roland-Morris Disability decreased 1 point, from 3/24 to 2/24. The VAS pain score decreased by 2 points after most treatments, and for three of the seven treatments, client had a post-treatment score of 0/10. Massage for pain had short-term effects. Massage therapy seemed to lengthen the hamstrings bilaterally. Massage therapy does appear to have positive effects in the reduction of disability. This study is beneficial for understanding the relationship between massage therapy and clients who have undergone spinal decompression and fusion. Further research is warranted.

  11. Preoperative embolization in surgical treatment of spinal metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Caroline; Dahl, Benny; Frevert, Susanne Christiansen

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess whether preoperative transcatheter arterial embolization of spinal metastases reduces blood loss, the need for transfusion with allogeneic red blood cells (RBCs), and surgery time in the surgical treatment of patients with symptomatic metastatic spinal cord compression. MATERIALS......L) versus 902 mL (SD, 416 mL). CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative embolization in patients with symptomatic spinal metastasis independent of primary tumor diagnosis did not reduce intraoperative blood loss and allogeneic RBC transfusion significantly but did reduce the surgery time. A small reduction...... instrumentation and randomly assigned to either preoperative embolization (n = 23) or a control group (n = 22). The primary outcome was intraoperative blood loss. Secondary outcomes were perioperative blood loss, allogeneic RBC transfusion, and surgery time. Analyses were performed by intention-to-treat. RESULTS...

  12. Investigation of different cage designs and mechano-regulation algorithms in the lumbar interbody fusion process - a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postigo, Sergio; Schmidt, Hendrik; Rohlmann, Antonius; Putzier, Michael; Simón, Antonio; Duda, Georg; Checa, Sara

    2014-04-11

    Lumbar interbody fusion cages are commonly used to treat painful spinal degeneration and instability by achieving bony fusion. Many different cage designs exist, however the effect of cage morphology and material properties on the fusion process remains largely unknown. This finite element model study aims to investigate the influence of different cage designs on bone fusion using two mechano-regulation algorithms of tissue formation. It could be observed that different cages play a distinct key role in the mechanical conditions within the fusion region and therefore regulate the time course of the fusion process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Increased multiaxial lumbar motion responses during multiple-impulse mechanical force manually assisted spinal manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunzburg Robert

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal manipulation has been found to create demonstrable segmental and intersegmental spinal motions thought to be biomechanically related to its mechanisms. In the case of impulsive-type instrument device comparisons, significant differences in the force-time characteristics and concomitant motion responses of spinal manipulative instruments have been reported, but studies investigating the response to multiple thrusts (multiple impulse trains have not been conducted. The purpose of this study was to determine multi-axial segmental and intersegmental motion responses of ovine lumbar vertebrae to single impulse and multiple impulse spinal manipulative thrusts (SMTs. Methods Fifteen adolescent Merino sheep were examined. Tri-axial accelerometers were attached to intraosseous pins rigidly fixed to the L1 and L2 lumbar spinous processes under fluoroscopic guidance while the animals were anesthetized. A hand-held electromechanical chiropractic adjusting instrument (Impulse was used to apply single and repeated force impulses (13 total over a 2.5 second time interval at three different force settings (low, medium, and high along the posteroanterior axis of the T12 spinous process. Axial (AX, posteroanterior (PA, and medial-lateral (ML acceleration responses in adjacent segments (L1, L2 were recorded at a rate of 5000 samples per second. Peak-peak segmental accelerations (L1, L2 and intersegmental acceleration transfer (L1–L2 for each axis and each force setting were computed from the acceleration-time recordings. The initial acceleration response for a single thrust and the maximum acceleration response observed during the 12 multiple impulse trains were compared using a paired observations t-test (POTT, alpha = .05. Results Segmental and intersegmental acceleration responses mirrored the peak force magnitude produced by the Impulse Adjusting Instrument. Accelerations were greatest for AX and PA measurement axes. Compared to

  14. Surgical outcome of posterior decompression, posterolateral fusion and stabilization by pedicle screw and rod in thoracolumbar tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Anowarul Islam

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal tuberculosis causes severe complications like neurological and spinal deformity which may lead to respiratory distress, costo-pelvic impingement, paraplegia and consequent reduction in the quality and longevity of life. The aim of the present treatment is to avoid the consequence of neural complications and gain near-normal spine. Mechanical factor causes pathological fracture or dislocation of an affected vertebral body. Surgical decompression ensues further instability. Reconstruction of spinal column by pedicle screw and rod provide stability and prevents secondary neural damage and deformity thereby helps in early mobilization. Prospective study was done to evaluate the results in 20 cases of spinal tuberculosis in thoracolumbar region associated with neurological deficit. We operated our cases (12 males and 8 females by posterolateral decompression, fusion and stabilization by pedicle screw and rod along with antitubercular drug treatment. All patients were with neurological deficit, single level involvement and 10 to 30 degree of mild kyphosis. After surgery, kyphosis improved from 20.7 ± 5.5 degrees to 12.5 ± 3.9 degree. Bony fusion was in 65.0% cases. Neurological improvement and pain subsided in all the patients.

  15. The Retrospective Analysis of Posterior Short-Segment Pedicle Instrumentation without Fusion for Thoracolumbar Burst Fracture with Neurological Deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhouming Deng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the efficacy of posterior short-segment pedicle instrumentation without fusion in curing thoracolumbar burst fracture. All of the 53 patients were treated with short-segment pedicle instrumentation and laminectomy without fusion, and the restoration of retropulsed bone fragments was conducted by a novel custom-designed repositor (RRBF. The mean operation time and blood loss during surgery were analyzed; the radiological index and neurological status were compared before and after the operation. The mean operation time was 93 min (range: 62–110 min and the mean intraoperative blood loss was 452 mL in all cases. The average canal encroachment was 50.04% and 10.92% prior to the surgery and at last followup, respectively (P<0.01. The preoperative kyphotic angle was 17.2 degree (±6.87 degrees, whereas it decreased to 8.42 degree (±4.99 degrees at last followup (P<0.01. Besides, the mean vertebral body height increased from 40.15% (±9.40% before surgery to 72.34% (±12.32% at last followup (P<0.01. 45 patients showed 1-2 grades improvement in Frankel’s scale at last followup. This technique allows for satisfactory canal clearance and restoration of vertebral body height and kyphotic angle, and it may promote the recovery of neurological function. However, further research is still necessary to confirm the efficacy of this treatment.

  16. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D.; Baumbauer, Kyle M.; Hook, Michelle A.; Garraway, Sandra M.; Lee, Kuan H.; Hoy, Kevin C.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. A mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain) pathways in the spinal cord may emerge in response to various noxious inputs, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord below the level of SCI. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Prior work from our group has shown that stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after SCI. We review these basic phenomena, how these findings relate to the broader spinal plasticity literature, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and finally discuss implications of these and other findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after SCI. PMID

  17. Measurement of inertial confinement fusion reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Xiaoshi; Wang Feng; Tang Daorun; Liu Shenye; Huang Tianxuan; Liu Yonggang; Xu Tao; Chen Ming; Mei Yu

    2011-01-01

    Fusion reaction rate is an important parameter for measuring compression during the implosion in inertial confinement fusion experiment. We have developed a system for fusion reaction history measurement with high temporal resolution. The system is composed of plastic scintillator and nose cone, optical system and streak camera. We have applied this system on the SG-III prototype for fusion reaction rate measuring. For the first time, fusion reaction rate history have been measured for deuterium-tritium filled targets with neutrons yields about 10 10 . We have analyzed possible influence factor during fusion reaction rate measuring. It indicates that the instrument measures fusion reaction bang time at temporal resolutions as low as 30 ps.(authors)

  18. Charcot arthropathy of the lumbar spine treated using one-staged posterior three-column shortening and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Kenny Samuel; Agarwala, Amit Omprakash; Rampersaud, Yoga Raja

    2010-06-15

    Case report. We present a case of lumbar Charcot arthropathy successfully treated surgically using posterior 3-column resection, spinal shortening, and fusion. The operative treatment of Charcot arthropathy of the spine has conventionally been a combination of anterior and posterior surgery. The morbidity associated with these surgical procedures can be considerable. A posterior-only approach to the problem would avoid the additional morbidity associated with an anterior approach. We present a case of lumbar Charcot arthropathy with deformity treated successfully using such a procedure. Discussion of the patient's clinical and radiologic history, the technical merits of the operative intervention and a review of the relevant background literature are presented. A multilevel, single-stage, posterior 3-column resection with primary shortening and instrumented fusion augmented with rhBMP2 in a multiply operated patient with deformity provided a optimal biologic and mechanical environment for healing of the Charcot arthropathy and improved the sagittal and coronal profile of the spine. A single-stage, multilevel, posterior 3-column resection and primary shortening can be a useful surgical strategy in symptomatic patients with Charcot arthropathy of the spine.

  19. Experimental lumbar spine fusion with novel tantalum-coated carbon fiber implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Haisheng; Zou, Xuenong; Woo, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    the possibility of coating a biocompatible metal layer on top of the carbon fiber material, to improve its biological performance. Tantalum was chosen because of its bone compatibility, based on our previous studies. A novel spinal fusion cage was fabricated by applying a thin tantalum coating on the surface...

  20. Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2002-01-01

    SCK-CEN's R and D programme on instrumentation involves the development of advanced instrumentation systems for nuclear applications as well as the assessment of the performance of these instruments in a radiation environment. Particular emphasis is on the use of optical fibres as umbilincal links of a remote handling unit for use during maintanance of a fusion reacor, studies on the radiation hardening of plasma diagnostic systems; investigations on new instrumentation for the future MYRRHA accelerator driven system; space applications related to radiation-hardened lenses; the development of new approaches for dose, temperature and strain measurements; the assessment of radiation-hardened sensors and motors for remote handling tasks and studies of dose measurement systems including the use of optical fibres. Progress and achievements in these areas for 2001 are described

  1. Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2002-04-01

    SCK-CEN's R and D programme on instrumentation involves the development of advanced instrumentation systems for nuclear applications as well as the assessment of the performance of these instruments in a radiation environment. Particular emphasis is on the use of optical fibres as umbilincal links of a remote handling unit for use during maintanance of a fusion reacor, studies on the radiation hardening of plasma diagnostic systems; investigations on new instrumentation for the future MYRRHA accelerator driven system; space applications related to radiation-hardened lenses; the development of new approaches for dose, temperature and strain measurements; the assessment of radiation-hardened sensors and motors for remote handling tasks and studies of dose measurement systems including the use of optical fibres. Progress and achievements in these areas for 2001 are described.

  2. HEAVEN: The head anastomosis venture Project outline for the first human head transplantation with spinal linkage (GEMINI)

    OpenAIRE

    Canavero, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    In 1970, the first cephalosomatic linkage was achieved in the monkey. However, the technology did not exist for reconnecting the spinal cord, and this line of research was no longer pursued. In this paper, an outline for the first total cephalic exchange in man is provided and spinal reconnection is described. The use of fusogens, special membrane-fusion substances, is discussed in view of the first human cord linkage. Several human diseases without cure might benefit from the procedure.

  3. The Effect of Iliac Crest Autograft on the Outcome of Fusion in the Setting of Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliff, Kristen; Hwang, Raymond; Hilibrand, Alan; Smith, Harvey E.; Gruskay, Jordan; Lurie, Jon D.; Zhao, Wenyan; Albert, Todd; Weinstein, James

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is considerable controversy about the long-term morbidity associated with the use of posterior autologous iliac crest bone graft for lumbar spine fusion procedures compared with the use of bone-graft substitutes. The hypothesis of this study was that there is no long-term difference in outcome for patients who had posterior lumbar fusion with or without iliac crest autograft. Methods: The study population includes patients enrolled in the degenerative spondylolisthesis cohort of the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial who underwent lumbar spinal fusion. Patients were divided according to whether they had or had not received posterior autologous iliac crest bone graft. Results: There were 108 patients who had fusion with iliac crest autograft and 246 who had fusion without iliac crest autograft. There were no baseline differences between groups in demographic characteristics, comorbidities, or baseline clinical scores. At baseline, the group that received iliac crest bone graft had an increased percentage of patients who had multilevel fusions (32% versus 21%; p = 0.033) and L5-S1 surgery (37% versus 26%; p = 0.031) compared with the group without iliac crest autograft. Operative time was higher in the iliac crest bone-graft group (233.4 versus 200.9 minutes; p case-by-case basis for lumbar spinal fusion. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:22878599

  4. Digitalized design of extraforaminal lumbar interbody fusion: a computer-based simulation and cadaveric study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjie Yang

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study aims to investigate the feasibility of a novel lumbar approach named extraforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (ELIF, a newly emerging minimally invasive technique for treating degenerative lumbar disorders, using a digitalized simulation and a cadaveric study. METHODS: The ELIF surgical procedure was simulated using the Mimics surgical simulator and included dissection of the superior articular process, dilation of the vertebral foramen, and placement of pedicle screws and a cage. ELIF anatomical measures were documented using a digitalized technique and subsequently validated on fresh cadavers. RESULTS: The use of the Mimics allowed for the vivid simulation of ELIF surgical procedures, while the cadaveric study proved the feasibility of this novel approach. ELIF had a relatively lateral access approach that was located 8-9 cm lateral to the median line with an access depth of approximately 9 cm through the intermuscular space. Dissection of the superior articular processes could fully expose the target intervertebral discs and facilitate a more inclined placement of the pedicle screws and cage with robust enhancement. CONCLUSIONS: According to the computer-based simulation and cadaveric study, it is feasible to perform ELIF. Further research including biomechanical study is needed to prove ELIF has a superior ability to preserve the posterior tension bands of the spinal column, with similar effects on spinal decompression, fixation, and fusion, and if it can enhance post-fusion spinal stability and expedites postoperative recovery.

  5. Effect of TheraCyte-encapsulated parathyroid cells on lumbar fusion in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sung-Hsiung; Huang, Shun-Chen; Lui, Chun-Chung; Lin, Tzu-Ping; Chou, Fong-Fu; Ko, Jih-Yang

    2012-09-01

    Implantation of TheraCyte 4 × 10(6) live parathyroid cells can increase the bone marrow density of the spine of ovariectomized rats. There has been no published study examining the effect of such implantation on spinal fusion outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of TheraCyte-encapsulated parathyroid cells on posterolateral lumbar fusions in a rat model. Forty Sprague-Dawley rats underwent single-level, intertransverse process spinal fusions using iliac crest autograft. The rats were randomly assigned to two groups: Group 1 rats received sham operations on their necks (control; N = 20); Group 2 rats were implanted with TheraCyte-encapsulated 4 × 10(6) live parathyroid cells into the subcutis of their necks (TheraCyte; N = 20). Six weeks after surgery the rats were killed. Fusion was assessed by inspection, manual palpation, radiography, and histology. Blood was drawn to measure the serum levels of calcium, phosphorus, and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH). Based on manual palpation, the control group had a fusion rate of 33 % (6/18) and the TheraCyte group had a fusion rate of 72 % (13/18) (P = 0.044). Histology confirmed the manual palpation results. Serum iPTH levels were significantly higher in the TheraCyte group compared with the control group (P TheraCyte-encapsulated 4 × 10(6) live parathyroid cells than in control rats without significant change in serum calcium or phosphorus concentrations. As with any animal study, the results may not extrapolate to a higher species. Further studies are needed to determine if these effects are clinically significant.

  6. Design of Lamifuse: a randomised, multi-centre controlled trial comparing laminectomy without or with dorsal fusion for cervical myeloradiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grotenhuis J André

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background laminectomy is a valuable surgical treatment for some patients with a cervical radiculomyelopathy due to cervical spinal stenosis. More recently attention has been given to motion of the spinal cord over spondylotic spurs as a cause of myelopathic changes. Immobilisation by fusion could have a positive effect on the recovery of myelopathic signs or changes. This has never been investigated in a prospective, randomised trial. Lamifuse is an acronyme for laminectomy and fusion. Methods/Design Lamifuse is a multicentre, randomised controlled trial comparing laminectomy with and without fusion in patients with a symptomatic cervical canal stenosis. The study population will be enrolled from patients that are 60 years or older with myelopathic signs and/or symptoms due to a cervical canal stenosis. A kyphotis shape of the cervical spine is an exclusion criterium. Each treatment arm needs 30 patients. Discussion This study will contribute to the discussion whether additional fusion after a cervical laminectomy results in a better clinical outcome. ISRCT number ISRCTN72800446

  7. Multilevel Spondylolysis Repair Using the "Smiley Face" Technique with 3-Dimensional Intraoperative Spinal Navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voisin, Mathew R; Witiw, Christopher D; Deorajh, Ryan; Guha, Daipayan; Oremakinde, Adetunji; Wang, Shelly; Yang, Victor

    2018-01-01

    Multilevel spondylolysis is a rare cause of progressive lower back pain, and patients who fail conservative management are treated surgically. Direct repair methods can maintain mobility and lead to decreased morbidity compared with spinal fusion in single-level spondylolysis. In this paper, we present a patient with nonadjacent multilevel spondylolysis who underwent the "smiley face" technique of direct multilevel repair without fusion using 3-dimensional intraoperative spinal navigation. Bilateral spondylolysis at L3 and L5 with associated spondylolisthesis in a 50-year-old male was repaired using the "smiley face" technique. Patient-reported outcomes, including the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and visual analog scale scores for back and leg pain, were assessed preoperatively along with 6 weeks and 4 months postoperatively. Postoperative computed tomography imaging showed precise screw insertion and rod placement along with stable hardware alignment in follow-up imaging. The patient's ODI and lower back visual analog scale scores decreased from 25 to 8 and 7.5 to 4, respectively, correlating to an excellent outcome on ODI. Direct repair and avoidance of fusion is possible and can provide good functional outcomes in patients with nonadjacent multilevel spondylolysis and associated spondylolisthesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of Outcome of Posterior Decompression and Instrumented Fusion in Lumbar and Lumbosacral Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Akshay; Jain, Ravikant; Kiyawat, Vivek

    2016-09-01

    For surgical treatment of lumbar and lumbosacral tuberculosis, the anterior approach has been the most popular approach because it allows direct access to the infected tissue, thereby providing good decompression. However, anterior fixation is not strong, and graft failure and loss of correction are frequent complications. The posterior approach allows circumferential decompression of neural elements along with three-column fixation attained via pedicle screws by the same approach. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome (functional, neurological, and radiological) in patients with lumbar and lumbosacral tuberculosis operated through the posterior approach. Twenty-eight patients were diagnosed with tuberculosis of the lumbar and lumbosacral region from August 2012 to August 2013. Of these, 13 patients had progressive neurological deterioration or increasing back pain despite conservative measures and underwent posterior decompression and pedicle screw fixation with posterolateral fusion. Antitubercular therapy was given till signs of radiological healing were evident (9 to 16 months). Functional outcome (visual analogue scale [VAS] score for back pain), neurological recovery (Frankel grading), and radiological improvement were evaluated preoperatively, immediately postoperatively and 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year postoperatively. The mean VAS score for back pain improved from 7.89 (range, 9 to 7) preoperatively to 2.2 (range, 3 to 1) at 1-year follow-up. Frankel grading was grade B in 3, grade C in 7, and grade D in 3 patients preoperatively, which improved to grade D in 7 and grade E in 6 patients at the last follow-up. Radiological healing was evident in the form of reappearance of trabeculae formation, resolution of pus, fatty marrow replacement, and bony fusion in all patients. The mean correction of segmental kyphosis was 9.85° postoperatively. The mean loss of correction at final follow-up was 3.15°. Posterior decompression with instrumented

  9. Burst fractures of the thoracolumbar spine : changes of the spinal canal during operative treatment and follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, VJM; Nijboer, JMM; Zimmerman, KW; Veldhuis, EFM; ten Vergert, EM; ten Duis, HJ

    Although multiple studies have concluded operative decompression of a traumatically narrowed spinal canal is not indicated because of spontaneous remodeling, instrumental decompression is frequently used as part of the operative treatment of spinal fractures. To investigate the process of

  10. Curve Modulation and Apex Migration Using Shilla Growth Guidance Rods for Early-onset Scoliosis at 5-Year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, John T; Songy, Chad E; Bumpass, David B; McCullough, Francis L; McCarthy, Richard E

    2017-04-03

    The Shilla procedure was designed to correct and control early-onset spinal deformity while harnessing a child's remaining spinal growth. It allows for controlled axial skeletal growth within the construct, avoiding the need for frequent surgeries to lengthen implants. We hypothesized that curve characteristics evolve over time after initial apex fusion and placement of the Shilla implants. The purpose of this study was to identify trends in curve evolution after Shilla implantation and understand how these changes influence ultimate outcome. A single-center, retrospective review of all patients with Shilla implants in place for ≥5 years yielded 21 patients. Charts and radiographs were reviewed to compare coronal curve characteristics preoperatively, postoperatively, and at last follow-up to note changes in the apex of the primary curve. Also noted were the development of adjacent compensatory curves, the overall vertical spinal growth, and the need for definitive spinal fusion once skeletal maturity was reached. Of the 21 patients, the curve apex migrated caudally in 12 patients (57%) and cephalad in 1 patient (5%), with a mean migration of 2.7 vertebral levels. Two patients (10%) developed new, significant compensatory curves (1 caudal and 1 cephalad). All patients demonstrated spinal growth in T1-S1 length following index surgery (mean, 45 mm). At skeletal maturity, 10 patients underwent definitive posterior spinal fusion and instrumentation, and 3 underwent implant removal alone. This study constitutes the longest follow-up of Shilla patients evaluating curve and implant behavior. Results of this review suggest that the apex of the fused primary curve shifts in approximately 62% of patients, with nearly all of these (92%) involving a distal migration. Compensatory curves did develop after Shilla placement as well. Overall, these findings represent adding-on distal to the apex after Shilla instrumentation rather than a crankshaft phenomenon about the apex. A

  11. A Low-Cost, Passive Navigation Training System for Image-Guided Spinal Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorias-Espinoza, Daniel; Carranza, Vicente González; de León, Fernando Chico-Ponce; Escamirosa, Fernando Pérez; Martinez, Arturo Minor

    2016-11-01

    Navigation technology is used for training in various medical specialties, not least image-guided spinal interventions. Navigation practice is an important educational component that allows residents to understand how surgical instruments interact with complex anatomy and to learn basic surgical skills such as the tridimensional mental interpretation of bidimensional data. Inexpensive surgical simulators for spinal surgery, however, are lacking. We therefore designed a low-cost spinal surgery simulator (Spine MovDigSys 01) to allow 3-dimensional navigation via 2-dimensional images without altering or limiting the surgeon's natural movement. A training system was developed with an anatomical lumbar model and 2 webcams to passively digitize surgical instruments under MATLAB software control. A proof-of-concept recognition task (vertebral body cannulation) and a pilot test of the system with 12 neuro- and orthopedic surgeons were performed to obtain feedback on the system. Position, orientation, and kinematic variables were determined and the lateral, posteroanterior, and anteroposterior views obtained. The system was tested with a proof-of-concept experimental task. Operator metrics including time of execution (t), intracorporeal length (d), insertion angle (α), average speed (v¯), and acceleration (a) were obtained accurately. These metrics were converted into assessment metrics such as smoothness of operation and linearity of insertion. Results from initial testing are shown and the system advantages and disadvantages described. This low-cost spinal surgery training system digitized the position and orientation of the instruments and allowed image-guided navigation, the generation of metrics, and graphic recording of the instrumental route. Spine MovDigSys 01 is useful for development of basic, noninnate skills and allows the novice apprentice to quickly and economically move beyond the basics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Return to Golf After Lumbar Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shifflett, Grant D; Hellman, Michael D; Louie, Philip K; Mikhail, Christopher; Park, Kevin U; Phillips, Frank M

    Spinal fusion surgery is being increasingly performed, yet few studies have focused on return to recreational sports after lumbar fusion and none have specifically analyzed return to golf. Most golfers successfully return to sport after lumbar fusion surgery. Case series. Level 4. All patients who underwent 1- or 2-level primary lumbar fusion surgery for degenerative pathologies performed by a single surgeon between January 2008 and October 2012 and had at least 1-year follow-up were included. Patients completed a specifically designed golf survey. Surveys were mailed, given during follow-up clinic, or answered during telephone contact. A total of 353 patients met the inclusion and exclusion criteria, with 200 responses (57%) to the questionnaire producing 34 golfers. The average age of golfers was 57 years (range, 32-79 years). In 79% of golfers, preoperative back and/or leg pain significantly affected their ability to play golf. Within 1 year from surgery, 65% of patients returned to practice and 52% returned to course play. Only 29% of patients stated that continued back/leg pain limited their play. Twenty-five patients (77%) were able to play the same amount of golf or more than before fusion surgery. Of those providing handicaps, 12 (80%) reported the same or an improved handicap. More than 50% of golfers return to on-course play within 1 year of lumbar fusion surgery. The majority of golfers can return to preoperative levels in terms of performance (handicap) and frequency of play. This investigation offers insight into when golfers return to sport after lumbar fusion surgery and provides surgeons with information to set realistic expectations postoperatively.

  13. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using non resorbable poly-ether-ether-ketone versus resorbable poly-L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide fusion devices. Clinical outcome at a minimum of 2-year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiya, T.U.; Smit, T.H.; van Royen, B.J.; Mullender, M.G.

    2011-01-01

    Previous papers on resorbable poly-L-lactideco-D,L-lactide (PLDLLA) cages in spinal fusion have failed to report adequately on patient-centred clinical outcome measures. Also comparison of PLDLLA cage with a traditionally applicable counterpart has not been previously reported. This is the first

  14. Evolution of the postoperative sagittal spinal profile in early-onset scoliosis: is there a difference between rib-based and spine-based growth-friendly instrumentation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhonghui; Li, Song; Qiu, Yong; Zhu, Zezhang; Chen, Xi; Xu, Liang; Sun, Xu

    2017-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Although the vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib (VEPTR) and growing rod instrumentation (GRI) encourage spinal growth via regular lengthening, they can create different results because of their different fixation patterns and mechanisms in correcting scoliosis. Previous studies have focused comparisons on coronal plane deformity with minimal attention to the sagittal profile. In this retrospective study, the authors aimed to compare the evolution of the sagittal spinal profile in early-onset scoliosis (EOS) treated with VEPTR versus GRI. METHODS The data for 11 patients with VEPTR and 22 with GRI were reviewed. All patients had more than 2 years' follow-up with more than 2 lengthening procedures. Radiographic measurements were performed before and after the index surgery and at the latest follow-up. The complications in both groups were recorded. RESULTS Patients in both groups had similar diagnoses, age at the index surgery, and number of lengthening procedures. The changes in the major coronal Cobb angle and T1-S1 spinal height were not significantly different between the 2 groups. Compared with the GRI group, the VEPTR group had less correction in thoracic kyphosis (23% ± 12% vs 44% ± 16%, p GRI: 8° ± 5°, p = 0.569), the incidence of proximal junctional kyphosis was relatively lower in the VEPTR group (VEPTR: 18.2% vs GRI: 22.7%). No significant changes in the spinopelvic parameters were observed, while the sagittal vertical axis showed a tendency toward a neutral position in both groups. The overall complication rate was higher in the VEPTR group than in the GRI group (72.7% vs 54.5%). CONCLUSIONS The VEPTR had coronal correction and spinal growth results similar to those with GRI. In the sagittal plane, however, the VEPTR was not comparable to the GRI in controlling thoracic kyphosis. Thus, for hyperkyphotic EOS patients, GRI is recommended over VEPTR.

  15. Surgical treatment of adult scoliosis: is anterior apical release and fusion necessary for the lumbar curve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngbae B; Lenke, Lawrence G; Kim, Yongjung J; Kim, Young-Woo; Bridwell, Keith H; Stobbs, Georgia

    2008-05-01

    A retrospective study. To analyze radiographic and functional outcomes after posterior segmental spinal instrumentation and fusion (PSSIF) with and without an anterior apical release of the lumbar curve in adult scoliosis patients. No comparison study on PSSIF of adult lumbar scoliosis with apical release versus without has been published. Forty-eight adult patients with lumbar scoliosis (average age at surgery 49.6 years, average follow-up 3.7 years) who underwent PSSIF were analyzed with respect to radiographic change, perioperative and postoperative complications, and Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) outcome scores. Twenty-three patients underwent an anterior apical release of the lumbar curve via a thoracoabdominal approach followed by PSSIF (Group I). The remaining 25 patients underwent a PSSIF of the lumbar curve followed by anterior column support at the lumbosacral region through an anterior paramedian retroperitoneal or posterior transforaminal approach (Group II). Before surgery, Group I showed a somewhat larger lumbar major Cobb angle (63.2 degrees vs. 55.9 degrees , P = 0.07), and both groups demonstrated significant differences in lumbar curve flexibility (26.9% vs. 37.2%, P = 0.02) and thoracolumbar kyphosis (27.0 degrees vs. 15.0 degrees , P = 0.03). After surgery, at the ultimate follow-up, there were no significant differences in major Cobb angle, C7 plumbline to the center sacral vertical line (P = 0.17), C7 plumbline to the posterior superior endplate of S1 (P = 0.44), and sagittal Cobb angles at the proximal junction (P = 0.57), T10-L2 (P = 0.24) and T12-S1 (P = 0.51). There were 4 pseudarthroses in Group I and one in Group II (P = 0.02). Postoperative total normalized SRS outcome scores at ultimate follow-up were significantly higher in Group II (69% vs. 79%, P = 0.01). Posterior segmental spinal instrumentation and fusion without anterior apical release of lumbar curves in adult scoliosis demonstrated better total SRS outcome scores and no

  16. Image-guided linear accelerator-based spinal radiosurgery for hemangioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selch, Michael T; Tenn, Steve; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Lee, Steve P; Gorgulho, Alessandra; De Salles, Antonio A F

    2012-01-01

    To retrospectively review the efficacy and safety of image-guided linear accelerator-based radiosurgery for spinal hemangioblastomas. Between August 2004 and September 2010, nine patients with 20 hemangioblastomas underwent spinal radiosurgery. Five patients had von Hipple-Lindau disease. Four patients had multiple tumors. Ten tumors were located in the thoracic spine, eight in the cervical spine, and two in the lumbar spine. Tumor volume varied from 0.08 to 14.4 cc (median 0.72 cc). Maximum tumor dimension varied from 2.5 to 24 mm (median 10.5 mm). Radiosurgery was performed with a dedicated 6 MV linear accelerator equipped with a micro-multileaf collimator. Median peripheral tumor dose and prescription isodose were 12 Gy and 90%, respectively. Image guidance was performed by optical tracking of infrared reflectors, fusion of oblique radiographs with dynamically reconstructed digital radiographs, and automatic patient positioning. Follow-up varied from 14 to 86 months (median 51 months). Kaplan-Meier estimated 4-year overall and solid tumor local control rates were 90% and 95%, respectively. One tumor progressed 12 months after treatment and a new cyst developed 10 months after treatment in another tumor. There has been no clinical or imaging evidence for spinal cord injury. Results of this limited experience indicate linear accelerator-based radiosurgery is safe and effective for spinal cord hemangioblastomas. Longer follow-up is necessary to confirm the durability of tumor control, but these initial results imply linear accelerator-based radiosurgery may represent a therapeutic alternative to surgery for selected patients with spinal hemangioblastomas.

  17. Techniques of lumbar-sacral spine fusion in spondylosis: systematic literature review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeta, Ricardo S G; Avanzi, Osmar

    2011-07-01

    Spine fusions can be performed through different techniques and are used to treat a number of vertebral pathologies. However, there seems to be no consensus regarding which technique of fusion is best suited to treat each distinct spinal disease or group of diseases. To study the effectiveness and complications of the different techniques used for spinal fusion in patients with lumbar spondylosis. Systematic literature review and meta-analysis. Randomized clinical studies comparing the most commonly performed surgical techniques for spine fusion in lumbar-sacral spondylosis, as well as those reporting patient outcome were selected. Identify which technique, if any, presents the best clinical, functional, and radiographic outcome. Systematic literature review and meta-analysis based on scientific articles published and indexed to the following databases: PubMed (1966-2009), Cochrane Collaboration-CENTRAL, EMBASE (1980-2009), and LILACS (1982-2009). The general search strategy focused on the surgical treatment of patients with lumbar-sacral spondylosis. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria and were selected with a total of 1,136 patients. Meta-analysis showed that patients who underwent interbody fusion presented a significantly smaller blood loss (p=.001) and a greater rate of bone fusion (p=.02). Patients submitted to fusion using the posterolateral approach had a significantly shorter operative time (p=.007) and less perioperative complications (p=.03). No statistically significant difference was found for the other studied variables (pain, functional impairment, and return to work). The most commonly used techniques for lumbar spine fusion in patients with spondylosis were interbody fusion and posterolateral approach. Both techniques were comparable in final outcome, but the former presented better rates of fusion and the latter the less complications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. 21 CFR 882.4560 - Stereotaxic instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. A stereotaxic instrument is a device consisting of a rigid frame with a calibrated guide mechanism for precisely positioning probes or other devices within a patient's brain, spinal cord, or other part of the nervous system. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ...

  19. Controlled thermonuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walstrom, P.L.

    1976-01-01

    Controlled production of energy by fusion of light nuclei has been the goal of a large portion of the physics community since the 1950's. In order for a fusion reaction to take place, the fuel must be heated to a temperature of 100 million degrees Celsius. At this temperature, matter can exist only in the form of an almost fully ionized plasma. In order for the reaction to produce net power, the product of the density and energy confinement time must exceed a minimum value of 10 20 sec m -3 , the so-called Lawson criterion. Basically, two approaches are being taken to meet this criterion: inertial confinement and magnetic confinement. Inertial confinement is the basis of the laser fusion approach; a fuel pellet is imploded by intense laser beams from all sides and ignites. Magnetic confinement devices, which exist in a variety of geometries, rely upon electromagnetic forces on the charged particles of the plasma to keep the hot plasma from expanding. Of these devices, the most encouraging results have been achieved with a class of devices known as tokamaks. Recent successes with these devices have given plasma physicists confidence that scientific feasibility will be demonstrated in the next generation of tokamaks; however, an even larger effort will be required to make fusion power commercially feasible. As a result, emphasis in the controlled thermonuclear research program is beginning to shift from plasma physics to a new branch of nuclear engineering which can be called fusion engineering, in which instrumentation and control engineers will play a major role. Among the new problem areas they will deal with are plasma diagnostics and superconducting coil instrumentation

  20. Fracture of fusion mass after hardware removal in patients with high sagittal imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedney, Cara L; Daffner, Scott D; Stefanko, Jared J; Abdelfattah, Hesham; Emery, Sanford E; France, John C

    2016-04-01

    As spinal fusions become more common and more complex, so do the sequelae of these procedures, some of which remain poorly understood. The authors report on a series of patients who underwent removal of hardware after CT-proven solid fusion, confirmed by intraoperative findings. These patients later developed a spontaneous fracture of the fusion mass that was not associated with trauma. A series of such patients has not previously been described in the literature. An unfunded, retrospective review of the surgical logs of 3 fellowship-trained spine surgeons yielded 7 patients who suffered a fracture of a fusion mass after hardware removal. Adult patients from the West Virginia University Department of Orthopaedics who underwent hardware removal in the setting of adjacent-segment disease (ASD), and subsequently experienced fracture of the fusion mass through the uninstrumented segment, were studied. The medical records and radiological studies of these patients were examined for patient demographics and comorbidities, initial indication for surgery, total number of surgeries, timeline of fracture occurrence, risk factors for fracture, as well as sagittal imbalance. All 7 patients underwent hardware removal in conjunction with an extension of fusion for ASD. All had CT-proven solid fusion of their previously fused segments, which was confirmed intraoperatively. All patients had previously undergone multiple operations for a variety of indications, 4 patients were smokers, and 3 patients had osteoporosis. Spontaneous fracture of the fusion mass occurred in all patients and was not due to trauma. These fractures occurred 4 months to 4 years after hardware removal. All patients had significant sagittal imbalance of 13-15 cm. The fracture level was L-5 in 6 of the 7 patients, which was the first uninstrumented level caudal to the newly placed hardware in all 6 of these patients. Six patients underwent surgery due to this fracture. The authors present a case series of 7

  1. Applications of intelligent-measurement systems in controlled-fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, E.W.; Shimer, D.W.; Lindquist, W.B.; Peterson, R.L.; Wyman, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    The paper describes the control and instrumentation for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, California, USA. This large-scale scientific experiment in controlled thermonuclear fusion, which is currently being expanded, originally had 3000 devices to control and 7000 sensors to monitor. A hierarchical computer control system, is used with nine minicomputers forming the supervisory system. There are approximately 55 local control and instrumentation microcomputers. In addition, each device has its own monitoring equipment, which in some cases consists of a small computer. After describing the overall system a more detailed account is given of the control and instrumentation for two large superconducting magnets

  2. Learning spinal manipulation: A best-evidence synthesis of teaching methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stainsby, Brynne E; Clarke, Michelle C S; Egonia, Jade R

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of different reported methods used to teach spinal manipulative therapy to chiropractic students. For this best-evidence literature synthesis, 5 electronic databases were searched from 1900 to 2015. Eligible studies were critically appraised using the criteria of the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network. Scientifically admissible studies were synthesized following best-evidence synthesis principles. Twenty articles were critically appraised, including 9 randomized clinical trials, 9 cohort studies, and 2 systematic reviews/meta-analyses. Eleven articles were accepted as scientifically admissible. The type of teaching method aids included a Thrust in Motion cervical manikin, instrumented cardiopulmonary reanimation manikin, padded contact with a load cell, instrumented treatment table with force sensor/transducer, and Dynadjust instrument. Several different methods exist in the literature for teaching spinal manipulative therapy techniques; however, future research in this developing area of chiropractic education is proposed. It is suggested that various teaching methods be included in the regular curricula of chiropractic colleges to aid in developing manipulation skills, efficiency, and knowledge of performance.

  3. Canadian fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, T.S.

    1982-06-01

    The National Research Council of Canada is establishing a coordinated national program of fusion research and development that is planned to grow to a total annual operating level of about $20 million in 1985. The long-term objective of the program is to put Canadian industry in a position to manufacture sub-systems and components of fusion power reactors. In the near term the program is designed to establish a minimum base of scientific and technical expertise sufficient to make recognized contributions and thereby gain access to the international effort. The Canadian program must be narrowly focussed on a few specializations where Canada has special indigenous skills or technologies. The programs being funded are the Tokamak de Varennes, the Fusion Fuels Technology Project centered on tritium management, and high-power gas laser technology and associated diagnostic instrumentation

  4. Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and spinal fusion do not substantially impact on postural balance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schimmel, J.J.; Groen, B.E.; Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.; Kleuver, M. de

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The spinal curvature in patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) causes an asymmetry of upper body postural alignment, which might affect postural balance. However, the currently available studies on balance in AIS patients are not consistent. Furthermore, it is not known

  5. Spinal instrumentation for unstable C1-2 injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, J; Nakagawa, H

    1999-06-01

    Seventeen patients with unstable C1-2 injuries were treated between 1990 and 1997. Various methods of instrumentation surgery were performed in 16 patients, excluding a case of atlantoaxial rotatory fixation. Posterior stabilization was carried out in 14 cases using Halifax interlaminar clamp, Sof'wire or Danek cable, or more recently, transarticular screws. Transodontoid anterior screw fixation was performed in four cases of odontoid process fractures, with posterior instrumentation in two cases because of malunion. Rigid internal fixation by instrumentation surgery for the unstable C1-2 injury avoids long-term application of a Halo brace and facilitates early rehabilitation. However, the procedure is technically demanding with the risk of neural and vascular injuries, particularly with posterior screw fixation. Sagittal reconstruction of thin-sliced computed tomography scans at the C1-2 region, neuronavigator, and intraoperative fluoroscopy are essential to allow preoperative surgical planning and intraoperative guidance.

  6. Intraoperative ketamine reduces immediate postoperative opioid consumption after spinal fusion surgery in chronic pain patients with opioid dependency: a randomized, blinded trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Rikke Vibeke; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm; Siegel, Hanna; Martusevicius, Robertas; Nikolajsen, Lone; Dahl, Jørgen Berg; Mathiesen, Ole

    2017-03-01

    Perioperative handling of surgical patients with opioid dependency represents an important clinical problem. Animal studies suggest that ketamine attenuates central sensitization and hyperalgesia and thereby reduces postoperative opioid tolerance. We hypothesized that intraoperative ketamine would reduce immediate postoperative opioid consumption compared with placebo in chronic pain patients with opioid dependency undergoing lumbar spinal fusion surgery. Primary outcome was morphine consumption 0 to 24 hours postoperatively. Secondary outcomes were acute pain at rest and during mobilization 2 to 24 hours postoperatively (visual analogue scale), adverse events, and persistent pain 6 months postoperatively. One hundred fifty patients were randomly assigned to intraoperative S-ketamine bolus 0.5 mg/kg and infusion 0.25 mg·kg·h or placebo. Postoperatively, patients received their usual opioids, paracetamol and IV patient-controlled analgesia with morphine. In the final analyses, 147 patients were included. Patient-controlled analgesia IV morphine consumption 0 to 24 hours postoperatively was significantly reduced in the ketamine group compared with the placebo group: 79 (47) vs 121 (53) mg IV, mean difference 42 mg (95% confidence interval -59 to -25), P ketamine group 6 and 24 hours postoperatively. There were no significant differences regarding acute pain, nausea, vomiting, hallucinations, or nightmares. Back pain at 6 months postoperatively compared with preoperative pain was significantly more improved in the ketamine group compared with the placebo group, P = 0.005. In conclusion, intraoperative ketamine significantly reduced morphine consumption 0 to 24 hours after lumbar fusion surgery in opioid-dependent patients. The trend regarding less persistent pain 6 months postoperatively needs further investigation.

  7. The beneficial effect of Batroxobin on blood loss reduction in spinal fusion surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Hui-Min; Chen, Li; Frary, Charles Edward

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Batroxobin on blood loss during spinal operations. Methods After obtaining approval from the ethics committee at the hospital along with informed written consent, we performed a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study w...

  8. Sagittal balance, a useful tool for neurosurgeons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villard, Jimmy; Ringel, Florian; Meyer, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    New instrumentation techniques have made any correction of the spinal architecture possible. Sagittal balance has been described as an important parameter for assessing spinal deformity in the early 1970s, but over the last decade its importance has grown with the published results in terms of overall quality of life and fusion rate. Up until now, most of the studies have concentrated on spinal deformity surgery, but its use in the daily neurosurgery practice remains uncertain and may warrant further studies.

  9. Design of a fusion reaction-history measurement system with high temporal resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Xiaoshi; Wang Feng; Liu Shenye; Jiang Xiaohua; Tang Qi

    2010-01-01

    In order to accurately measure the history of fusion reaction for experimental study of inertial confinement fusion, we advance the design of a fusion reaction-history measurement system with high temporal resolution. The diagnostic system is composed of plastic scintillator and nose cone, an optical imaging system and the system of optic streak camera. Analyzing the capability of the system indicated that the instrument measured fusion reaction history at temporal resolution as low as 55ps and 40ps correspond to 2.45MeV DD neutrons and 14.03MeV DT neutrons. The instrument is able to measure the fusion reaction history at yields 1.5 x 10 9 DD neutrons, about 4 x 10 8 DT neutrons are required for a similar quality signal. (authors)

  10. The evolution of spinal surgery in the west of Ireland, 2005-2013.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’Sullivan, M D

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the changes in both the short and long term, in the trends within the practice of spinal surgery in Galway University Hospitals (GUH) over a seven year period, January 2005 – January 2013. The absolute number of spinal surgery cases has increased from 147 in 2005, to 257 cases by 2013. Multiple level spine surgery accounts for 51% (131) of all cases by 2013, which is an increase from 31% (45) in 2005. On analysis of the trends within spinal surgery during the study period, a statistically significant (p<0.05) increase in all aspects of spinal surgery was noted, with the exception of surgeries for single level, lumbar and infection pathology respectively. The average waiting time for lumbar decompression and instrumentation climbed for an average of 1.3 months in 2008 to 12.1 months by 2012.The volume and complexity of spinal surgery has increased during the study period, in the West of Ireland.

  11. Hybrid testing of lumbar CHARITE discs versus fusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjabi, Manohar; Malcolmson, George; Teng, Edward; Tominaga, Yasuhiro; Henderson, Gweneth; Serhan, Hassan

    2007-04-20

    An in vitro human cadaveric biomechanical study. To quantify effects on operated and other levels, including adjacent levels, due to CHARITE disc implantations versus simulated fusions, using follower load and the new hybrid test method in flexion-extension and bilateral torsion. Spinal fusion has been associated with long-term accelerated degeneration at adjacent levels. As opposed to the fusion, artificial discs are designed to preserve motion and diminish the adjacent-level effects. Five fresh human cadaveric lumbar specimens (T12-S1) underwent multidirectional testing in flexion-extension and bilateral torsion with 400 N follower load. Intact specimen total ranges of motion were determined with +/-10 Nm unconstrained pure moments. The intact range of motion was used as input for the hybrid tests of 5 constructs: 1) CHARITE disc at L5-S1; 2) fusion at L5-S1; 3) CHARITE discs at L4-L5 and L5-S1; 4) CHARITE disc at L4-L5 and fusion at L5-S1; and 5) 2-level fusion at L4-L5-S1. Using repeated-measures single factor analysis of variance and Bonferroni statistical tests (P < 0.05), intervertebral motion redistribution of each construct was compared with the intact. In flexion-extension, 1-level CHARITE disc preserved motion at the operated and other levels, while 2-level CHARITE showed some amount of other-level effects. In contrast, 1- and 2-level fusions increased other-level motions (average, 21.0% and 61.9%, respectively). In torsion, both 1- and 2-level discs preserved motions at all levels. The 2-level simulated fusion increased motions at proximal levels (22.9%), while the 1-level fusion produced no significant changes. In general, CHARITE discs preserved operated- and other-level motions. Fusion simulations affected motion redistribution at other levels, including adjacent levels.

  12. [Effects of different pelvic incidence minus lumbar lordosis mismatch after long posterior instrumentation and fusion for adult degenerative scoliosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, X Y; Hai, Y; Zhang, X N

    2017-06-01

    Objective: To evaluate the influence of PI-LL (pelvic incidence minus lumbar lordosis mismatch) on scoliosis correction, living quality and internal fixation related complications for adult degenerative scoliosis (ASD) after long posterior instrumentation and fusion. Methods: A total of 79 patients with ADS underwent long posterior instrumentation and fusion in the Department of Orthopedics at Beijing Chao Yang Hospital from January 2010 to January 2014 were retrospectively reviewed.There were 21 males and 58 females aging from 55 to 72 years with the mean age (63.4±4.8)years. The patients were divided into three groups according to immediately postoperative PI-LL: PI-LL20°.Compare the Cobb's angles, PI-LL, Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and Lumbar Stiffness Disability Index (LSDI). Measurement data were compared via t test and ANOVA, enumeration data were compared via Kruskal-Wallis test, noncontiguous data was performed by χ(2) test. Univariate linear regression equation was performed to investigate the relative influences of postoperative PI-LL on postoperative radiographic parameters and clinical outcome. Results: All the operations were successful without intraoperative complications. The operation time was 145-310 minutes (235.3±42.0) minutes, the intraoperative blood loss was 300-5 300 ml (1 021±787) ml, the duration of hospital was 12-18 d (14.5±1.3) d. A total of 4 to 10 (7.0±1.1) vertebra levels were fused. Compared to preoperative, the Cobb's angle of scoliosis ((4.2±1.8)° vs . (20.1±2.7)°), PI-LL ((16.1±8.6)° vs . (36.0±4.3)°), JOA (3.0±1.3 vs . 5.5±1.2), ODI (24.4±8.1 vs . 62.9±2.7), VAS (3.0±1.0 vs . 6.8±1.3) were significantly decreased postoperative ( t =18.539~53.826, P 20° group. Compared to preoperative, ODI (27.7±4.9 vs . 63.3±2.6, 17.7±5.9 vs . 63.1±2.8, 30.6±6.5 vs . 62.3±2.5) ( t =21.218~50.858, P 20° group. Conclusions: The PI-LL between 10

  13. Spondylectomy and lateral lumbar interbody fusion for thoracolumbar kyphosis in an adult with achondroplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Masashi; Kanezaki, Shozo; Notani, Naoki; Ishihara, Toshinobu; Tsumura, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Fixed thoracolumbar kyphosis with spinal stenosis in adult patients with achondroplasia presents a challenging issue. We describe the first case in which spondylectomy and minimally invasive lateral access interbody arthrodesis were used for the treatment of fixed severe thoracolumbar kyphosis and lumbar spinal canal stenosis in an adult with achondroplasia. Patient concerns: A 61-year-old man with a history of achondroplastic dwarfism presented with low back pain and radiculopathy and neurogenic claudication. Diagnoses: Plain radiographs revealed a high-grade thoracolumbar kyphotic deformity with diffuse degenerative changes in the lumbar spine. The apex was located at L2, the local kyphotic angle from L1 to L3 was 105°, and the anterior area was fused from the L1 to L3 vertebrae. MRI revealed significant canal and lateral recess stenosis secondary to facet hypertrophy. Interventions: We planned a front-back correction of the anterior and posterior spinal elements. We first performed anterior release at the fused part from L1 to L3 and XLIF at L3/4 and L4/5. Next, the patient was placed in the prone position. Spondylectomy at the L2 vertebra and posterior fusion from T10 to L5 were performed. Postoperative radiographs revealed L1 to L3 kyphosis of 32°. Outcomes: No complications occurred during or after surgery. Postoperatively, the patient's low back pain and neurological claudication were resolved. No worsening of kyphosis was observed 24 months postoperatively. Lessons: Circumferential decompression of the spinal cord at the apical vertebral level and decompression of lumbar canal stenosis were necessary. Front-back correction of the anterior and posterior spinal elements via spondylectomy and lateral lumbar interbody fusion is a reasonable surgical option for thoracolumbar kyphosis and developmental canal stenosis in patients with achondroplasia. PMID:29245270

  14. Fusion Programme SCK-CEN - Annual report 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massaut, V.

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes the Research and Development work carried out at SCK-CEN on fusion technology in the year 2009. This covers mostly the work done under the EFDA agreement as well as the new developments carried out within the so-called Broader Approach of fusion such as - studies on structural and first wall materials for ITER and DEMO - studies and testing on the radiation resistance of instruments and componenets for the diagnostic and remote handling - development of irradiation devices and systems for the testing of fusion materials under representative environment.

  15. Fusion Programme SCK-CEN - Annual report 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaut, V

    2009-10-15

    This report summarizes the Research and Development work carried out at SCK-CEN on fusion technology in the year 2009. This covers mostly the work done under the EFDA agreement as well as the new developments carried out within the so-called Broader Approach of fusion such as - studies on structural and first wall materials for ITER and DEMO - studies and testing on the radiation resistance of instruments and componenets for the diagnostic and remote handling - development of irradiation devices and systems for the testing of fusion materials under representative environment.

  16. Comparison of Clinical and Radiologic Results of Mini-Open Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Extreme Lateral Interbody Fusion Indirect Decompression for Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Yutaka; Gen, Hogaku; Sakuma, Yoshio; Koshika, Yasuhide

    2018-04-01

    Retrospective study. In this study, we compared the postoperative outcomes of extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) indirect decompression with that of mini-open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) in patients with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. There are very few reports examining postoperative results of XLIF and minimally invasive TLIF for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis, and no reports comparing XLIF and mini-open TLIF. Forty patients who underwent 1-level spinal fusion, either by XLIF indirect decompression (X group, 20 patients) or by mini-open TLIF (T group, 20 patients), for treatment of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis were included in this study. Invasiveness of surgery was evaluated on the basis of surgery time, blood loss, hospitalization period, and perioperative complications. The Japanese Orthopedic Association Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire (JOABPEQ), disc angle (DA), disc height (DH), and slipping length (SL) were evaluated before surgery, immediately after surgery, and at 12 months after surgery. Cross-sectional spinal canal area (CSA) was also measured before surgery and at 1 month after surgery. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of surgery time or hospitalization period; however, X group showed a significant decrease in blood loss ( p X group ( p <0.05), and the changes in DA and SL were not significantly different between the two groups. The change in CSA was significantly greater in the T group ( p <0.001). Postoperative clinical results were equally favorable for both procedures; however, in comparison with mini-open TLIF, less blood loss and greater correction of DH were observed in XLIF.

  17. Unilateral fusion of the odontoid process with the atlas in Klippel-Feil syndrome: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So Young; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Park, Ji Seon; Suk, Kyung Soo; Han, Mi Young [Kyunghee Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-15

    Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) displays congenital fusion of the cervical vertebrae; it is a relatively common condition and has many associated malformations such as Sprengel's deformity, scoliosis, rib anomalies, congenital defects of the brain or spinal cord, renal anomalies, congenital heart disease, deafness, cleft palate, cranial and facial asymmetry, and enteric cysts. There are various types of cervical fusion observed in KFS. However, fusion of the odontoid process with the atlas is a very rare finding. We report here on a 4-year-old boy with unilateral fusion of a separated odontoid process with the lateral mass of the atlas, and this was associated with a spontaneously closed ventricular septal defect, a small patent ductus arteriosus and a horseshoe kidney.

  18. Spinal subspecialization in post-graduate neurosurgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Brian D

    2004-05-01

    The growing science and technology of various neurosurgical areas fosters subspecialization. The transmission of this expanding knowledge base to the neurosurgical resident becomes an increasing challenge. A survey of neurosurgical residency program directors was undertaken to evaluate their response to the budding subspecialization of spine surgery within general neurosurgery. A survey requesting background data, educational infrastructure and prevailing opinion was distributed to all 13 neurosurgical program directors in Canada. The responses were tabulated and results recorded. It is upon these results that conclusions and proposed directions are based. The current practice of the overwhelming majority of Canadian academic neurosurgical centers is to have neurosurgical spinal subspecialists working under the umbrella of the general neurosurgical division. A large percentage of neurosurgical program directors in Canada believe that the management of spinal disease, including both intradural procedures and instrumentation, is and should remain an integral part of general neurosurgical training. A consensus statement regarding the requirements of neurosurgical training in spinal disorders is the expressed desire of almost all program directors. A proposed direction and resolution is discussed.

  19. Spinal intradural extraosseous Ewing’s sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lachance

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Extraosseous Ewing’s sarcoma (EES involving the central nervous system is rare, but can be diagnosed and distinguished from other primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET by identification of the chromosomal translocation (11;22(q24;q12. We report EES arising from the spinal intradural extramedullary space, based on imaging, histopathological, and molecular data in two men, ages 50 and 60 years old and a review of the literature using PubMed (1970-2009. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR identified the fusion product FL1-EWS. Multimodal therapy, including radiation and alternating chemotherapy including vincristine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and ifosfamide and etoposide led to local tumor control and an initial, favorable therapeutic response. No systemic involvement was seen from the time of diagnosis to the time of last follow-up (26 months or death (4 years. This report confirms that EES is not confined to the earliest decades of life, and like its rare occurrence as an extra-axial meningeal based mass intracranially, can occasionally present as an intradural mass in the spinal canal without evidence of systemic tumor. Gross total resection followed by multimodal therapy may provide for extended progression free and overall survival.

  20. Teriparatide versus low-dose bisphosphonates before and after surgery for adult spinal deformity in female Japanese patients with osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Shoji; Hirano, Norikazu; Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu; Nakano, Masato; Yasuda, Taketoshi; Suzuki, Kayo; Watanabe, Kenta; Makino, Hiroto; Kanamori, Masahiko; Kimura, Tomoatsu

    2017-08-01

    Complications of adult spinal deformity surgery are problematic in osteoporotic individuals. We compared outcomes between Japanese patients treated perioperatively with teriparatide vs. low-dose bisphosphonates. Fifty-eight osteoporotic adult Japanese female patients were enrolled and assigned to perioperative teriparatide (33 patients) and bisphosphonate (25 patients) groups in non-blinded fashion. Pre- and post-operative X-ray and computed tomography imaging were used to assess outcome, and rates were compared between the groups and according to age. Pain scores and Oswestry Disability Indices (ODI) were calculated before and 2 years after surgery. Adjacent vertebral fractures and implant failure, fusion failure, and poor pain and ODI outcomes were significantly more common in the bisphosphonates group than the teriparatide group. Perioperative administration of teriparatide is more effective than that of low-dose bisphosphonates in preventing complications and maintaining fusion rates in osteoporotic Japanese females with spinal deformities undergoing surgery.

  1. Multilevel lumbar fusion and postoperative physiotherapy rehabilitation in a patient with persistent pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Tracey; Shipton, Edward A

    2011-04-01

    There are no comparative randomised controlled trials of physiotherapy modalities for chronic low back and radicular pain associated with multilevel fusion. Physiotherapy-based rehabilitation to control pain and improve activation levels for persistent pain following multilevel fusion can be challenging. This is a case report of a 68-year-old man who was referred for physiotherapy intervention 10 months after a multilevel spinal fusion for spinal stenosis. He reported high levels of persistent postoperative pain with minimal activity as a consequence of his pain following the surgery. The physiotherapy interventions consisted of three phases of rehabilitation starting with pool exercise that progressed to land-based walking. These were all combined with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) that was used consistently for up to 8 hours per day. As outcome measures, daily pain levels and walking distances were charted once the pool programme was completed (in the third phase). Phase progression was determined by shuttle test results. The pain level was correlated with the distance walked using linear regression over a 5-day average. Over a 5-day moving average, the pain level reduced and walking distance increased. The chart of recorded pain level and walking distance showed a trend toward decreased pain with the increased distance walked. In a patient undergoing multilevel lumbar fusion, the combined use of TENS and a progressive walking programme (from pool to land) reduced pain and increased walking distance. This improvement was despite poor medication compliance and a reported high level of postsurgical pain.

  2. [Enlargement in managment of lumbar spinal stenosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steib, J P; Averous, C; Brinckert, D; Lang, G

    1996-05-01

    instability and to restore the normal static anatomy; thus bone resection is not necessary. At the present time all the lumbar stenoses with reduction in flexion are instrumented with spinal reduction and arthrodesis without opening the canal. The laminoarthrectomy and the enlargement are done when there is a fixed arthrosis which is rare in our practice and found in an older population. The follow-up shows a loss of reduction in some cases after reduction-instrumentation-arthrodesis and poses the question of an interbody fusion. We don't open the canal only for fusion (PLIF) if this is not necessary for the treatment of the stenosis. We think that, in such a situation, the future is ALIF with endoscopical approach. The problem is to determine which disc demanding this anterior fusion, is able to regenerate or not.

  3. Fusion Rates of Different Anterior Grafts in Thoracolumbar Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Maxime; Charles, Yann Philippe; Walter, Axel; Schuller, Sébastien; Steib, Jean-Paul

    2015-11-01

    Retrospective CT analysis of anterior fusion in thoracolumbar trauma. The aim of this study was to compare fusion rates of different bone grafts and to analyze risk factors for pseudarthrosis. Interbody fusion is indicated in anterior column defects. Different grafts are used: autologous iliac crest, titanium mesh cages filled with cancellous bone, and autologous ribs. It is not clear which graft offers the most reliable fusion. Radiologic data of 116 patients (71 men, 45 women) operated for type A2, A3, B, or C fractures were analyzed. The average age was 44.6 years (range, 16-75 y) and follow-up was 2.7 years (range, 1-9 y). All patients were treated by posterior instrumentation followed by an anterior graft: 53 cases with iliac crest, 43 cases with mesh cages, and 20 with rib grafts. Fusion was evaluated on CT and classified into complete fusion, partial fusion, unipolar pseudarthrosis, and bipolar pseudarthrosis. Iliac crest fused in 66%, cages in 98%, and rib grafts in 90%. The fusion rate of cages filled with bone was significantly higher as the iliac graft fusion rate (P=0.002). The same was applied to rib grafts compared with iliac crest (P=0.041). Additional bone formation around the main graft, bridging both vertebral bodies, was observed in 31 of the 53 iliac crests grafts. Pseudarthrosis occurred more often in smokers (P=0.042). A relationship between fracture or instrumentation types, sex, age, BMI, and fusion could not be determined. Tricortical iliac crest grafts showed an unexpected high pseudarthrosis rate in thoracolumbar injuries. Their cortical bone is dense and their fusion surface is small. Rib grafts led to a better fusion when used in combination with the cancellous bone from the fractured vertebral body. Titanium mesh cages filled with cancellous bone led to the highest fusion rate and built a complete bony bridge between vertebral bodies. Smoking seemed to influence fusion. Case control study, Level III.

  4. Evaluation of Anterior Vertebral Interbody Fusion Using Osteogenic Mesenchymal Stem Cells Transplanted in Collagen Sponge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wencheng; Dong, Youhai; Hong, Yang; Guang, Qian; Chen, Xujun

    2016-05-01

    The study used a rabbit model to achieve anterior vertebral interbody fusion using osteogenic mesenchymal stem cells (OMSCs) transplanted in collagen sponge. We investigated the effectiveness of graft material for anterior vertebral interbody fusion using a rabbit model by examining the OMSCs transplanted in collagen sponge. Anterior vertebral interbody fusion is commonly performed. Although autogenous bone graft remains the gold-standard fusion material, it requires a separate surgical procedure and is associated with significant short-term and long-term morbidity. Recently, mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow have been studied in various fields, including posterolateral spinal fusion. Thus, we hypothesized that cultured OMSCs transplanted in porous collagen sponge could be used successfully even in anterior vertebral interbody fusion. Forty mature male White Zealand rabbits (weight, 3.5-4.5 kg) were randomly allocated to receive one of the following graft materials: porous collagen sponge plus cultured OMSCs (group I); porous collagen sponge alone (group II); autogenous bone graft (group III); and nothing (group IV). All animals underwent anterior vertebral interbody fusion at the L4/L5 level. The lumbar spine was harvested en bloc, and the new bone formation and spinal fusion was evaluated using radiographic analysis, microcomputed tomography, manual palpation test, and histologic examination at 8 and 12 weeks after surgery. New bone formation and bony fusion was evident as early as 8 weeks in groups I and III. And there was no statistically significant difference between 8 and 12 weeks. At both time points, by microcomputed tomography and histologic analysis, new bone formation was observed in both groups I and III, fibrous tissue was observed and there was no new bone in both groups II and IV; by manual palpation test, bony fusion was observed in 40% (4/10) of rabbits in group I, 70% (7/10) of rabbits in group III, and 0% (0/10) of rabbits in both groups

  5. [Influence of disc height on outcome of posterolateral fusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drain, O; Lenoir, T; Dauzac, C; Rillardon, L; Guigui, P

    2008-09-01

    Experimentally, posterolateral fusion only provides incomplete control of flexion-extension, rotation and lateral inclination forces. The stability deficit increases with increasing height of the anterior intervertebral space, which for some warrants the adjunction of an intersomatic arthrodesis in addition to the posterolateral graft. Few studies have been devoted to the impact of disc height on the outcome of posterolateral fusion. The purpose of this work was to investigate the spinal segment immobilized by the posterolateral fusion: height of the anterior intervertebral space, the clinical and radiographic impact of changes in disc height, and the short- and long-term impact of disc height measured preoperatively on clinical and radiographic outcome. In order to obtain a homogeneous group of patients, the series was limited to patients undergoing posterolateral arthrodesis for degenerative spondylolisthesis, in combination with radicular release. This was a retrospective analysis of a consecutive series of 66 patients with mean 52 months follow-up (range 3-63 months). A dedicated self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data on pre- and postoperative function, the SF-36 quality of life score, and patient satisfaction. Pre- and postoperative (early, one year, last follow-up) radiographic data were recorded: olisthesic level, disc height, intervertebral angle, intervertebral mobility (angular, anteroposterior), and global measures of sagittal balance (thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, T9 sagittal tilt, pelvic version, pelvic incidence, sacral slope). SpineView was used for all measures. Univariate analysis searched for correlations between variation in disc height and early postoperative function and quality of fusion at last follow-up. Multivariate analysis was applied to the following preoperative parameters: intervertebral angle, disc height, intervertebral mobility, sagittal balance parameters, use of osteosynthesis or not. At the olisthesic

  6. Grafton and local bone have comparable outcomes to iliac crest bone in instrumented single-level lumbar fusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, James; An, Howard; Hilibrand, Alan; Yoon, S Tim; Kavanagh, Eoin; Boden, Scott

    2012-05-20

    Prospective multicenter randomized clinical trail. The goal of our 2-year prospective study was to perform a randomized clinical trial comparing the outcomes of Grafton demineralized bone matrix (DBM) Matrix with local bone with that of iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) in a single-level instrumented posterior lumbar fusion. There has been extensive research and development in identifying a suitable substitute to replace autologous ICBG that is associated with known morbidities. DBMs are a class of commercially available grafting agents that are prepared from allograft bone. Many such products have been commercially available for clinical use; however, their efficacy for spine fusion has been mostly based on anecdotal evidence rather than randomized controlled clinical trials. Forty-six patients were randomly assigned (2:1) to receive Grafton DBM Matrix with local bone (30 patients) or autologous ICBG (16 patients). The mean age was 64 (females [F] = 21, males [M] = 9) in the DBM group and 65 (F = 9, M = 5) in the ICBG group. An independent radiologist evaluated plain radiographs and computed tomographic scans at 6-month, 1-year, and 2-year time points. Clinical outcomes were measured using Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey. Forty-one patients (DBM = 28 and ICBG = 13) completed the 2-year follow-up. Final fusion rates were 86% (Grafton Matrix) versus 92% (ICBG) (P = 1.0 not significant). The Grafton group showed slightly better improvement in ODI score than the ICBG group at the final 2-year follow-up (Grafton [16.2] and ICBG [22.7]); however, the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.2346 at 24 mo). Grafton showed consistently higher physical function scores at 24 months; however, differences were not statistically significant (P = 0.0823). Similar improvements in the physical component summary scores were seen in both the Grafton and ICBG groups. There was a statistically significant greater mean

  7. Two chronic motor training paradigms differentially influe nce acute instrume ntal learning in spinally transected rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigbee, Allison J.; Crown, Eric D.; Ferguson, Adam R.; Roy, Roland R.; Tillakaratne, Niranjala J.K.; Grau, James W.; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    2008-01-01

    The effect of two chronic motor training paradigms on the ability of the lumbar spinal cord to perform an acute instrumental learning task was examined in neonatally (postnatal day 5; P5) spinal cord transected (i.e., spinal) rats. At ∼P30, rats began either unipedal hindlimb stand training (Stand-Tr; 20-25 min/day, 5 days/wk), or bipedal hindlimb step training (Step-Tr; 20 min/day; 5 days/wk) for 7 wks. Non-trained spinal rats (Non-Tr) served as controls. After 7 wks all groups were tested on the flexor-biased instrumental learning paradigm. We hypothesized that 1) Step-Tr rats would exhibit an increased capacity to learn the flexor-biased task relative to Non-Tr subjects, as locomotion involves repetitive training of the tibialis anterior (TA), the ankle flexor whose activation is important for successful instrumental learning, and 2) Stand-Tr rats would exhibit a deficit in acute motor learning, as unipedal training activates the ipsilateral ankle extensors, but not flexors. Results showed no differences in acute learning potential between Non-Tr and Step-Tr rats, while the Stand-Tr group showed a reduced capacity to learn the acute task. Further investigation of the Stand-Tr group showed that, while both the ipsilateral and contralateral hindlimbs were significantly impaired in their acute learning potential, the contralateral, untrained hindlimbs exhibited significantly greater learning deficits. These results suggest that different types of chronic peripheral input may have a significant impact on the ability to learn a novel motor task, and demonstrate the potential for experience-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord in the absence of supraspinal connectivity. PMID:17434606

  8. Rating of intra-operative neuro-monitoring results in operative correction of the spinal deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Skripnikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the work was filing the electrophysiological phenomena observed in the process of intra-operative neuromonitoring followed by development of the results’ scale of intra-operative neuro-physiological testing of the pyramidal tract. Materials and мethods. The selection for evaluation included data of 147 protocols of intra-operative neuromonitoring in 135 patients (53 males, 82 females, aged from 1 y. 5 m. to 52 years (14,1±0,7 years with spinal deformities of different etiology who underwent instrumentation spinal correction followed by fixation of thoracic / thoracolumbar spine segments using various variants of internal systems of trans-pedicular fixation. Intra-operative neuro-monitoring was performed using system «ISIS IOM» (Inomed Medizintechnik GmbH, Germany. The changes of motor evoked potentials were evaluated according to this scale. Results. Five types of pyramidal system reaction to operative invasion were revealed. According to neurophysiological criteria three grades of the risk of neurological disorders development during operative spinal deformity correction and, correspondingly, three levels of anxiety for the surgeon were defined. Conclusion. Intra-operative neurophysiological monitoring is the effective highly technological instrument to prevent neurological disorders in the spinal deformity. Offered rating scale of the risk of neurological complications gives the possibility to highlight three levels of anxiety during operative invasion.

  9. A case of deep infection after instrumentation in dorsal spinal surgery: the management with antibiotics and negative wound pressure without removal of fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobran, Mauro; Mancini, Fabrizio; Nasi, Davide; Scerrati, Massimo

    2017-07-28

    Until today the role of spinal instrumentation in the presence of a wound infection has been widely discussed and recently many authors leave the hardware in place with appropriate antibiotic therapy. This is a case of a 65-year-old woman suffering from degenerative scoliosis and osteoporotic multiple vertebral collapses treated with posterior dorsolumbar stabilisation with screws and rods. Four months later, skin necrosis and infection appeared in the cranial wound with exposure of the rods. A surgical procedure of debridement of the infected tissue and package with a myocutaneous trapezius muscle flap was performed. One week after surgery, negative pressure wound therapy was started on the residual skin defect. The wound healed after 2 months. The aim of this case report is to focus on the utility of this method even in the case of hardware exposure and infection. This may help avoid removing instrumentation and creating instability. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Advantages and Disadvantages of Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery and Its Impact on Health-Related Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Go; Boissiere, Louis; Larrieu, Daniel; Bourghli, Anouar; Vital, Jean Marc; Gille, Olivier; Pointillart, Vincent; Challier, Vincent; Mariey, Remi; Pellisé, Ferran; Vila-Casademunt, Alba; Perez-Grueso, Francisco Javier Sánchez; Alanay, Ahmet; Acaroglu, Emre; Kleinstück, Frank; Obeid, Ibrahim

    2017-03-15

    Prospective multicenter study of adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery. To clarify the effect of ASD surgery on each health-related quality of life (HRQOL) subclass/domain. For patients with ASD, surgery offers superior radiological and HRQOL outcomes compared with nonoperative care. HRQOL may, however, be affected by surgical advantages related to corrective effects, yielding adequate spinopelvic alignment and stability or disadvantages because of long segment fusion. The study included 170 consecutive patients with ASD from a multicenter database with more than 2-year follow-up period. We analyzed each HRQOL domain/subclass (short form-36 items, Oswestry Disability Index, Scoliosis Research Society-22 [SRS-22] questionnaire), and radiographic parameters preoperatively and at 1 and 2 years postoperatively. We divided the patients into two groups each based on lowest instrumented vertebra (LIV; above L5 or S1 to ilium) or surgeon-determined preoperative pathology (idiopathic or degenerative). Improvement rate (%) was calculated as follows: 100 × |pre.-post.|/preoperative points (%) (+, advantages; -, disadvantages). The scores of all short form-36 items and SRS-22 subclasses improved at 1 and 2 years after surgery, regardless of LIV location and preoperative pathology. Personal care and lifting in Oswestry Disability Index were, however, not improved after 1 year. These disadvantages were correlated to sagittal modifiers of SRS-Schwab classification similar to other HRQOL. The degree of personal care disadvantage mainly depended on LIV location and preoperative pathology. Although personal care improved after 2 years postoperatively, no noticeable improvements in lifting were recorded. HRQOL subclass analysis indicated two disadvantages of ASD surgery, which were correlated to sagittal radiographic measures. Fusion to the sacrum or ilium greatly restricted the ability to stretch or bend, leading to limited daily activities for at least 1 year postoperatively

  11. Application of Piezosurgery in Anterior Cervical Corpectomy and Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Sheng-Fa; Sun, Yu

    2016-05-01

    Anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF) is frequently used to decompress the cervical spine; however, this procedure is risky when dealing with a hard disc or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). Piezosurgery offers a useful tool for performing this procedure. In this article, we present a 50 years old man who had cervical spondylotic myelopathy with OPLL at the C 6 level and segmental stenosis of the cervical spinal canal. When removing the posterior wall of his C 6 vertebral body and OPLL, piezosurgery was used to selectively cut hard structures piece by piece without injuring delicate soft tissues like the nerve roots and spinal cord. Because there is no bleeding from the bone surface with piezosurgery, it provides a clean operative field. © 2016 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Measurement of sexual functioning after spinal cord injury: preferred instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, Marcalee Sipski; Brackett, Nancy L; Bodner, Donald

    2009-01-01

    into male and female sexual function, male reproductive function, and female reproductive function. The instruments that have been used most frequently to measure these aspects of sexual function over the past 5 years were identified by expert consensus. Finally, these instruments were subjected...... to a critical review. RESULTS: The Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), measurement of vaginal pulse amplitude (VPA), the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), and the measurement of ejaculatory function and semen quality were considered appropriate measures to assess sexual responses......BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: To determine the utility of certain instruments to assess sexuality and fertility after SCI, an expert panel identified key areas to study and evaluated available instruments. These were rated according to certain predefined criteria. METHODS: The authors divided sexual issues...

  13. Safety and resource utilization of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Tung Feng; Shiuh-Lin Hwang; Chih-Lung Lin; I-Chen Lee; King-Teh Lee

    2012-01-01

    Degenerative cervical spondylosis (DCS) is part of the aging process and is the most common reason for degenerative changes with the spinal column. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is a major option for operative management of DCS in our institution. This retrospective study investigated the frequency of postoperative complications and resource utilization in 145 patients who underwent ACDF procedures from January 2009 to December 2011. Patients with degenerative changes that in...

  14. Subdural Thoracolumbar Spine Hematoma after Spinal Anesthesia: A Rare Occurrence and Literature Review of Spinal Hematomas after Spinal Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddali, Prasanthi; Walker, Blake; Fisahn, Christian; Page, Jeni; Diaz, Vicki; Zwillman, Michael E; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R Shane; Moisi, Marc

    2017-02-16

    Spinal hematomas are a rare but serious complication of spinal epidural anesthesia and are typically seen in the epidural space; however, they have been documented in the subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas likely exist within a traumatically induced space within the dural border cell layer, rather than an anatomical subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas present a dangerous clinical situation as they have the potential to cause significant compression of neural elements and can be easily mistaken for spinal epidural hematomas. Ultrasound can be an effective modality to diagnose subdural hematoma when no epidural blood is visualized. We have reviewed the literature and present a full literature review and a case presentation of an 82-year-old male who developed a thoracolumbar spinal subdural hematoma after spinal epidural anesthesia. Anticoagulant therapy is an important predisposing risk factor for spinal epidural hematomas and likely also predispose to spinal subdural hematomas. It is important to consider spinal subdural hematomas in addition to spinal epidural hematomas in patients who develop weakness after spinal epidural anesthesia, especially in patients who have received anticoagulation.

  15. Spinal cord contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Gong; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yazhou; Zhao, Xianghui

    2014-04-15

    Spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability with devastating neurological outcomes and limited therapeutic opportunities, even though there are thousands of publications on spinal cord injury annually. There are two major types of spinal cord injury, transaction of the spinal cord and spinal cord contusion. Both can theoretically be treated, but there is no well documented treatment in human being. As for spinal cord contusion, we have developed an operation with fabulous result.

  16. Adult's Degenerative Scoliosis: Midterm Results of Dynamic Stabilization without Fusion in Elderly Patients—Is It Effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Silvestre, Mario; Lolli, Francesco; Greggi, Tiziana; Vommaro, Francesco; Baioni, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Study Design. A retrospective study. Purpose. Posterolateral fusion with pedicle screw instrumentation used for degenerative lumbar scoliosis can lead to several complications. In elderly patients without sagittal imbalance, dynamic stabilization could represent an option to avoid these adverse events. Methods. 57 patients treated by dynamic stabilization without fusion were included. All patients had degenerative lumbar de novo scoliosis (average Cobb angle 17.2°), without sagittal imbalance, associated in 52 cases (91%) with vertebral canal stenosis and in 24 (42%) with degenerative spondylolisthesis. Nineteen patients (33%) had previously undergone lumbar spinal surgery. Results. At an average followup of 77 months, clinical results improved with statistical significance. Scoliosis Cobb angle was 17.2° (range, 12° to 38°) before surgery and 11.3° (range, 4° to 26°) at last follow-up. In the patients with associated spondylolisthesis, anterior vertebral translation was 19.5% (range, 12% to 27%) before surgery, 16.7% (range, 0% to 25%) after surgery, and 17.5% (range, 0% to 27%) at followup. Complications incidence was low (14%), and few patients required revision surgery (4%). Conclusions. In elderly patients with mild degenerative lumbar scoliosis without sagittal imbalance, pedicle screw-based dynamic stabilization is an effective option, with low complications incidence, granting curve stabilization during time and satisfying clinical results. PMID:23781342

  17. Nuclear magnetic imaging for MTRA. Spinal canal and spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsch, Dominik; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus

    2011-01-01

    The booklet covers the following topics: (1) Clinical indications for NMR imaging of spinal cord and spinal canal; (2) Methodic requirements: magnets and coils, image processing, contrast media: (3) Examination technology: examination conditions, sequences, examination protocols; (4) Disease pattern and indications: diseases of the myelin, the spinal nerves and the spinal canal (infections, tumors, injuries, ischemia and bleedings, malformations); diseases of the spinal cord and the intervertebral disks (degenerative changes, infections, injuries, tumors, malformations).

  18. Noncontiguous double-level unstable spinal injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takami, Masanari; Okada, Motohiro; Enyo, Yoshio; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Yamada, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Munehito

    2017-01-01

    Noncontiguous double-level unstable spinal injuries (NDUSI) are uncommon and have not been well described. In this study, we aimed to better understand the patterns of NDUSI, in order to recommend proper diagnostic and treatment methods, as well as to raise awareness among traumatologists about the possibility of these uncommon injuries. A total of 710 consecutive patients with spine fractures were treated for >9 years since 2007 at a single regional trauma center. Of them, 18 patients with NDUSI were reviewed retrospectively. The incidence of NDUSI was 2.5 % of all spine fractures. In 17 of 18 patients (94.7 %), NDUSI was caused by a high-energy trauma. Nine patients (50.0 %) exhibited complete neurological deficit. Spinal cord injury occurred in the cranial injured region in all American Spinal Injury Association grade A cases. In one case, a second fracture was overlooked at the initial examination. NDUSI are common in cases of high-energy trauma and should be taken into consideration at the initial examination. A second fracture may be easily overlooked because of the high frequency of concomitant severe spinal cord injury in the cranial injured region and/or loss of consciousness due to associated injuries. To avoid overlooking injuries, full spine computed tomography is useful at the initial examination. Operative reduction and internal fixation with instrumentation through a posterior approach is recommendable for cases of NDUSI. In elderly patients, a very rapid stabilizing surgery should be planned before aspiration pneumonia occurs or the pulmonary condition worsens.

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ... Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ...

  1. Comparison of occipitocervical and atlantoaxial fusion in treatment of unstable Jefferson fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Hu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Controversy exists regarding the management of unstable Jefferson fractures, with some surgeons performing reduction and immobilization of the patient in a halo vest and others performing open reduction and internal fixation. This study compares the clinical and radiological outcome parameters between posterior atlantoaxial fusion (AAF and occipitocervical fusion (OCF constructs in the treatment of the unstable atlas fracture. Materials and Methods: 68 consecutive patients with unstable Jefferson fractures treated by AAF or OCF between October 2004 and March 2011 were included in this retrospective evaluation from institutional databases. The authors reviewed medical records and original images. The patients were divided into two surgical groups treated with either AAF ( n = 48, F/M 30:18 and OCF ( n = 20, F/M 13:7 fusion. Blood loss, operative time, Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA score, visual analog scale (VAS score, atlanto-dens interval, lateral mass displacement, complications, and the bone fusion rates were recorded. Results: Five patients with incomplete paralysis (7.4% demonstrated postoperative improvement by more than 1 grade on the American Spinal Injury Association impairment scale. The JOA score of the AAF group improved from 12.5 ± 3.6 preoperatively to 15.7 ± 2.3 postoperatively, while the JOA score of the OCF group improved from 11.2 ± 3.3 preoperatively to 14.8 ± 4.2 postoperatively. The VAS score of AAF group decreased from 4.8 ± 1.5 preoperatively to 1.0 ± 0.4 postoperatively, the VAS score of the OCF group decreased from 5.4 ± 2.2 preoperatively to 1.3 ± 0.9 postoperatively. Conclusions: The OCF or AAF combined with short-term external immobilization can establish the upper cervical stability and prevent further spinal cord injury and nerve function damage.

  2. Development and evaluation of a social cognitive theory-based instrument to assess correlations for physical activity among people with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilroy, Jereme; Turner, Lori; Birch, David; Leaver-Dunn, Deidre; Hibberd, Elizabeth; Leeper, James

    2018-01-01

    People with spinal cord injury (SCI) are more susceptible to sedentary lifestyles because of the displacement of physical functioning and the copious barriers. Benefits of physical activity for people with SCI include physical fitness, functional capacity, social integration and psychological well-being. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a social cognitive theory-based instrument aimed to predict physical activity among people with SCI. An instrument was developed through the utilization and modification of previous items from the literature, an expert panel review, and cognitive interviewing, and tested among a sample of the SCI population using a cross-sectional design. Statistical analysis included descriptives, correlations, multiple regression, and exploratory factor analysis. The physical activity outcome variable was significantly and positively correlated with self-regulatory efficacy (r = 0.575), task self-efficacy (r = 0.491), self-regulation (r = 0.432), social support (r = 0.284), and outcome expectations (r = 0.247). Internal consistency for the constructs ranged from 0.82 to 0.96. Construct reliability values for the self-regulation (0.95), self-regulatory efficacy (0.96), task self-efficacy (0.94), social support (0.84), and outcome expectations (0.92) each exceeded the 0.70 a priori criteria. The factor analysis was conducted to seek modifications of current instrument to improve validity and reliability. The data provided support for the convergent validity of the five-factor SCT model. This study provides direction for further development of a valid and reliable instrument for predicting physical activity among people with SCI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Lumbar degenerative spinal deformity: Surgical options of PLIF, TLIF and MI-TLIF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hey Hwee Weng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine is common in ageing populations. It causes disturbing back pain, radicular symptoms and lowers the quality of life. We will focus our discussion on the surgical options of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF and minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF for lumbar degenerative spinal deformities, which include symptomatic spondylolisthesis and degenerative scoliosis. Through a description of each procedure, we hope to illustrate the potential benefits of TLIF over PLIF. In a retrospective study of 53 ALIF/PLIF patients and 111 TLIF patients we found reduced risk of vessel and nerve injury in TLIF patients due to less exposure of these structures, shortened operative time and reduced intra-operative bleeding. These advantages could be translated to shortened hospital stay, faster recovery period and earlier return to work. The disadvantages of TLIF such as incomplete intervertebral disc and vertebral end-plate removal and potential occult injury to exiting nerve root when under experienced hands are rare. Hence TLIF remains the mainstay of treatment in degenerative deformities of the lumbar spine. However, TLIF being a unilateral transforaminal approach, is unable to decompress the opposite nerve root. This may require contralateral laminotomy, which is a fairly simple procedure.The use of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF to treat degenerative lumbar spinal deformity is still in its early stages. Although the initial results appear promising, it remains a difficult operative procedure to master with a steep learning curve. In a recent study comparing 29 MI-TLIF patients and 29 open TLIF, MI-TLIF was associated with longer operative time, less blood loss, shorter hospital stay, with no difference in SF-36 scores at six months and two years. Whether it can replace traditional TLIF as the surgery of

  4. Multiple hemorrhages in brain after spine surgery supra- and infra-tentorial components together

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baran Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after cranial and spinal surgeries is a well-documented entity, so far concomitant supra- and infra-tentorial hemorrhage after spine surgery has rarely been reported in the literature. A 57-year-old woman presented with intractable low back pain and severely impaired mobility. One year ago, she underwent lumbar laminectomy and fusion with posterior spinal instrumentation between L2 and S1. She developed adjacent segment disease at the upper level of the instrumented vertebra. She had a revision surgery and underwent posterior laminectomy and fusion with bilateral transpedicular instrumentation between T10 and S1. She had severe headache, somnolence, and left hemiparesia 48 h after the surgery. Her emergent head computed tomography depicted intra-parenchymal hemorrhage in the right parietal lobe accompanying with subarachnoid hemorrhage, bilateral symmetrical cerebellar hemorrhages and pneumocephalus. She was treated nonsurgically and she got better despite some residual deficits. Symptoms including constant headache, nausea, vomiting, impaired consciousness, new onset seizure, and focal neurological deficit after spine surgeries should raise suspicion for intracranial intra-parenchymal hemorrhage.

  5. Risk factors of non-specific spinal pain in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szita, Julia; Boja, Sara; Szilagyi, Agnes; Somhegyi, Annamaria; Varga, Peter Pal; Lazary, Aron

    2018-05-01

    Non-specific spinal pain can occur at all ages and current evidence suggests that pediatric non-specific spinal pain is predictive for adult spinal conditions. A 5-year long, prospective cohort study was conducted to identify the lifestyle and environmental factors leading to non-specific spinal pain in childhood. Data were collected from school children aged 7-16 years, who were randomly selected from three different geographic regions in Hungary. The risk factors were measured with a newly developed patient-reported questionnaire (PRQ). The quality of the instrument was assessed by the reliability with the test-retest method. Test (N = 952) and validity (N = 897) datasets were randomly formed. Risk factors were identified with uni- and multivariate logistic regression models and the predictive performance of the final model was evaluated using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) method. The final model was built up by seven risk factors for spinal pain for days; age > 12 years, learning or watching TV for more than 2 h/day, uncomfortable school-desk, sleeping problems, general discomfort and positive familiar medical history (χ 2  = 101.07; df = 8; p < 0.001). The probabilistic performance was confirmed with ROC analysis on the test and validation cohorts (AUC = 0.76; 0.71). A simplified risk scoring system showed increasing possibility for non-specific spinal pain depending on the number of the identified risk factors (χ 2  = 65.0; df = 4; p < 0.001). Seven significant risk factors of non-specific spinal pain in childhood were identified using the new, easy to use and reliable PRQ which makes it possible to stratify the children according to their individual risk. These slides can be retrieved under Electronic Supplementary Material.

  6. Design and testing of a controlled electromagnetic spinal cord impactor for use in large animal models of acute traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petteys, Rory J; Spitz, Steven M; Syed, Hasan; Rice, R Andrew; Sarabia-Estrada, Rachel; Goodwin, C Rory; Sciubba, Daniel M; Freedman, Brett A

    2017-09-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes debilitating neurological dysfunction and has been observed in warfighters injured in IED blasts. Clinical benefit of SCI treatment remains elusive and better large animal models are needed to assess treatment options. Here, we describe a controlled electromagnetic spinal cord impactor for use in large animal models of SCI. A custom spinal cord impactor and platform were fabricated for large animals (e.g., pig, sheep, dog, etc.). Impacts were generated by a voice coil actuator; force and displacement were measured with a load cell and potentiometer respectively. Labview (National Instruments, Austin, TX) software was used to control the impact cycle and import force and displacement data. Software finite impulse response (FIR) filtering was employed for all input data. Silicon tubing was used a surrogate for spinal cord in order to test the device; repeated impacts were performed at 15, 25, and 40 Newtons. Repeated impacts demonstrated predictable results at each target force. The average duration of impact was 71.2 ±6.1ms. At a target force of 40N, the output force was 41.5 ±0.7N. With a target of 25N, the output force was 23.5 ±0.6N; a target of 15Newtons revealed an output force of 15.2 ±1.4N. The calculated acceleration range was 12.5-21.2m/s 2 . This custom spinal cord impactor reliably delivers precise impacts to the spinal cord and will be utilized in future research to study acute traumatic SCI in a large animal. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Minimally Invasive Spinal Surgery with Intraoperative Image-Guided Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrence T. Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present our perioperative minimally invasive spine surgery technique using intraoperative computed tomography image-guided navigation for the treatment of various lumbar spine pathologies. We present an illustrative case of a patient undergoing minimally invasive percutaneous posterior spinal fusion assisted by the O-arm system with navigation. We discuss the literature and the advantages of the technique over fluoroscopic imaging methods: lower occupational radiation exposure for operative room personnel, reduced need for postoperative imaging, and decreased revision rates. Most importantly, we demonstrate that use of intraoperative cone beam CT image-guided navigation has been reported to increase accuracy.

  8. Spondylectomy and lateral lumbar interbody fusion for thoracolumbar kyphosis in an adult with achondroplasia: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Masashi; Kanezaki, Shozo; Notani, Naoki; Ishihara, Toshinobu; Tsumura, Hiroshi

    2017-12-01

    Fixed thoracolumbar kyphosis with spinal stenosis in adult patients with achondroplasia presents a challenging issue. We describe the first case in which spondylectomy and minimally invasive lateral access interbody arthrodesis were used for the treatment of fixed severe thoracolumbar kyphosis and lumbar spinal canal stenosis in an adult with achondroplasia. A 61-year-old man with a history of achondroplastic dwarfism presented with low back pain and radiculopathy and neurogenic claudication. Plain radiographs revealed a high-grade thoracolumbar kyphotic deformity with diffuse degenerative changes in the lumbar spine. The apex was located at L2, the local kyphotic angle from L1 to L3 was 105°, and the anterior area was fused from the L1 to L3 vertebrae. MRI revealed significant canal and lateral recess stenosis secondary to facet hypertrophy. We planned a front-back correction of the anterior and posterior spinal elements. We first performed anterior release at the fused part from L1 to L3 and XLIF at L3/4 and L4/5. Next, the patient was placed in the prone position. Spondylectomy at the L2 vertebra and posterior fusion from T10 to L5 were performed. Postoperative radiographs revealed L1 to L3 kyphosis of 32°. No complications occurred during or after surgery. Postoperatively, the patient's low back pain and neurological claudication were resolved. No worsening of kyphosis was observed 24 months postoperatively. Circumferential decompression of the spinal cord at the apical vertebral level and decompression of lumbar canal stenosis were necessary. Front-back correction of the anterior and posterior spinal elements via spondylectomy and lateral lumbar interbody fusion is a reasonable surgical option for thoracolumbar kyphosis and developmental canal stenosis in patients with achondroplasia.

  9. Lack of a synergistic effect of a non-viral ALS gene therapy based on BDNF and a TTC fusion molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navarro Xavier

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is one of the most devastating neurodegenerative diseases. Neurotrophic factors have been widely tested to counteract neurodegenerative conditions, despite their unspecific neuronal access. The non-toxic C-terminal fragment of the tetanus toxin (TTC heavy chain has been studied not only as a carrier molecule to the CNS but also as a neuroprotective agent. Because the neurotrophic effects of BDNF have been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo, the question addressed in this work is whether a fusion molecule of BDNF-TTC may have a synergistic effect and enhance the neuroprotective properties of TTC alone in a mouse model of ALS. Methods Recombinant plasmid constructs (pCMV-TTC and pCMV-BDNF-TTC were injected into the quadriceps femoris and triceps brachialis muscles of SOD1G93A transgenic mice at 8 weeks of age. The hanging wire and rotarod tests were performed to assess motor coordination, strength and balance. Electrophysiological tests, morphological assays of spinal cord sections of L2 and L4 segments, and gene and protein expression analyses were performed. The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis test was used for comparisons of survival. Multiple comparisons of data were analyzed using a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results Treatment with the fusion-molecule BDNF-TTC and with TTC alone significantly delayed the onset of symptoms and functional deficits of SOD1G93A mice. Muscle innervation was partially preserved with these treatments, and the number of surviving motoneurons in L2 spinal cord segment was increased particularly by the fusion protein induction. Inhibition of pro-apoptotic protein targets (caspase-3 and Bax and significant phosphorylation of Akt and ERK were also found in the spinal cord of treated mice. Conclusions Significant improvements in behavioral and electrophysiological results, motoneuron survival and anti-apoptotic/survival-activated pathways were observed with

  10. Safety and resource utilization of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yu-Tung; Hwang, Shiuh-Lin; Lin, Chih-Lung; Lee, I-Chen; Lee, King-Teh

    2012-09-01

    Degenerative cervical spondylosis (DCS) is part of the aging process and is the most common reason for degenerative changes with the spinal column. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is a major option for operative management of DCS in our institution. This retrospective study investigated the frequency of postoperative complications and resource utilization in 145 patients who underwent ACDF procedures from January 2009 to December 2011. Patients with degenerative changes that involved cervical intervertebral levels C1-C2, spinal injury of traumatic origin, spinal tumors, or previous cervical fusion were excluded. Patients were then further classified into two groups: (1) level 1 or 2 disease (Group M) and (2) level 3 or 4 disease (Group S). Measures of mortality, complications after surgery as well as immediate reoperation for any reason were evaluated. Operation time, length of hospital stay, and hospitalization cost were defined as resource utilization. Ninety seven patients met the inclusion criteria and were further reviewed to characterize the sample better. There were no hematomas, airway complications or deaths, except in one patient who developed postoperative hemorrhage that required immediate surgical intervention, and resolved without any neurological deficit or casualty. Resource utilization indicated that the average operation time for Group S was significantly higher than for Group M (4.31±1.25 vs. 2.88±0.90 hours, p<0.0001). There were no significant differences in length of hospital stay and hospitalization cost between the two groups (p=0.265 and p=0.649). Our results indicate that neurosurgical intervention is safe for patients with DSC. Postoperative complication rates associated with these procedures are low. When surgery is considered appropriate for patients with multilevel diseases, these data suggest that ACDF is a safe surgical option. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Safety and resource utilization of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Tung Feng

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Degenerative cervical spondylosis (DCS is part of the aging process and is the most common reason for degenerative changes with the spinal column. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF is a major option for operative management of DCS in our institution. This retrospective study investigated the frequency of postoperative complications and resource utilization in 145 patients who underwent ACDF procedures from January 2009 to December 2011. Patients with degenerative changes that involved cervical intervertebral levels C1–C2, spinal injury of traumatic origin, spinal tumors, or previous cervical fusion were excluded. Patients were then further classified into two groups: (1 level 1 or 2 disease (Group M and (2 level 3 or 4 disease (Group S. Measures of mortality, complications after surgery as well as immediate reoperation for any reason were evaluated. Operation time, length of hospital stay, and hospitalization cost were defined as resource utilization. Ninety seven patients met the inclusion criteria and were further reviewed to characterize the sample better. There were no hematomas, airway complications or deaths, except in one patient who developed postoperative hemorrhage that required immediate surgical intervention, and resolved without any neurological deficit or casualty. Resource utilization indicated that the average operation time for Group S was significantly higher than for Group M (4.31±1.25 vs. 2.88±0.90 hours, p<0.0001. There were no significant differences in length of hospital stay and hospitalization cost between the two groups (p=0.265 and p=0.649. Our results indicate that neurosurgical intervention is safe for patients with DSC. Postoperative complication rates associated with these procedures are low. When surgery is considered appropriate for patients with multilevel diseases, these data suggest that ACDF is a safe surgical option.

  12. The use of 3D computer graphics in the diagnosis and treatment of spinal vascular malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Keisuke; Kin, Taichi; Oyama, Hiroshi; Iijima, Akira; Shojima, Masaaki; Nishido, Hajime; Saito, Nobuhito

    2011-12-01

    Digital subtraction (DS) angiography is the gold standard for diagnosing spinal vascular malformations. Recently, multidetectorrow spiral CT and contrast-enhanced MR angiography have been introduced as screening examinations before DS angiography. These methods, however, do not always determine the accurate location of an arteriovenous shunt because the resulting images lack information about the spinal cord or the dura mater. Between April 2009 and December 2010, 13 patients underwent imaging evaluations for spinal vascular malformations at the authors' university hospital. This group included 8 patients with spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs), 3 with perimedullary AVFs, and 2 with intramedullary arteriovenous malformations. Using data from these patients, the authors attempted to develop 3D computer graphics (CG) based upon the fusion of 3D rotational angiography and postmyelographic CT. They subsequently verified the accuracy of this imaging method. Ten of these 13 patients underwent surgical treatment for their lesions (11 AVFs), and for these 11 lesions the authors compared the diagnoses obtained using 3D CG with those obtained using conventional DS angiography. In all 13 cases, 3D CG images of the spinal lesions were successfully developed using the patients' actual data. Four (36%) of 11 AVFs were correctly identified using DS angiography, whereas 10 (91%) were correctly identified using 3D CG. Results from 3D CG of spinal AVFs corresponded well with operative findings, and 3D CG was significantly better than conventional DS angiography at predicting AVF location (p = 0.024, Fisher exact test). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case series in which 3D CG of spinal vascular malformations was used to provide simultaneous, stereoscopic visualization of the spinal vascular system, spinal cord, dura mater, and bone. The 3D CG method provides precise visual images for the diagnosis and treatment of these lesions.

  13. Laser fusion experiments at LLL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1980-06-16

    These notes present the experimental basis and status for laser fusion as developed at LLL. Two other chapters, one authored by K.A. Brueckner and the other by C. Max, present the theoretical implosion physics and laser plasma interaction physics. The notes consist of six sections. The first is an introductory section which provides some of the history of inertial fusion and a simple explanation of the concepts involved. The second section presents an extensive discussion of diagnostic instrumentation used in the LLL Laser Fusion Program. The third section is a presentation of laser facilities and capabilities at LLL. The purpose here is to define capability, not to derive how it was obtained. The fourth and fifth sections present the experimental data on laser-plasma interaction and implosion physics. The last chapter is a short projection of the future.

  14. Laser fusion experiments at LLL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1980-01-01

    These notes present the experimental basis and status for laser fusion as developed at LLL. Two other chapters, one authored by K.A. Brueckner and the other by C. Max, present the theoretical implosion physics and laser plasma interaction physics. The notes consist of six sections. The first is an introductory section which provides some of the history of inertial fusion and a simple explanation of the concepts involved. The second section presents an extensive discussion of diagnostic instrumentation used in the LLL Laser Fusion Program. The third section is a presentation of laser facilities and capabilities at LLL. The purpose here is to define capability, not to derive how it was obtained. The fourth and fifth sections present the experimental data on laser-plasma interaction and implosion physics. The last chapter is a short projection of the future

  15. Historic overview of inertial confinement fusion: What have we learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    Although laser fusion has been the subject of research since the early 1960s, it has only been intensively studied for about 14 years. During that time, substantive advances have been made in our understanding of the complex physics of laser-heated plasmas, in the development of sophisticated diagnostic instrumentation, and in the technology of fusion targets and inertial fusion drivers. These advances will be reviewed. Of equal importance are the lessons learned in the economic and political arenas. These lessons may be of greater significance for scientific endeavors in other fields of research. The economic and political issues surrounding inertial fusion research will be discussed. Possible future directions for inertial fusion development will be presented

  16. Computed tomography of the spinal canal for the cervical spine and spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Isao; Niimiya, Hikosuke; Nasu, Kichiro; Shioya, Akihide; Ohhama, Mitsuru

    1983-01-01

    The cervical spinal canal and cervical spinal cord were measured in normal cases and 34 cases of spinal or spinal cord injury. The anteroposterior diameter and area of the normal cervical spinal canal showed a high correlation. The area ratio of the normal cervical spinal canal to the cervical spinal cord showed that the proportion of the cervical spinal cord in the spinal canal was 1/3 - 1/5, Csub(4,5) showing a particularly large proportion. In acute and subacute spinal or spinal cord injury, CT visualized in more details of the spinal canal in cases that x-ray showed definite bone injuries. Computer assisted myelography visualized more clearly the condition of the spinal cord in cases without definite findings bone injuries on x-ray. Demonstrating the morphology of spinal injury in more details, CT is useful for selection of therapy for injured spines. (Chiba, N.)

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available menu Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ...

  18. The Influence of No Fault Compensation on Functional Outcomes After Lumbar Spine Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Alexander Sheriff; Cunningham, John Edward; Robertson, Peter Alexander

    2015-07-15

    Prospective cohort study and systematic literature review. To compare the functional outcomes for lumbar spinal fusion in both compensation and noncompensation patients in an environment of universal no fault compensation and then to compare these outcomes with those in worker's compensation and nonworkers compensation cohorts from other countries. Compensation has an adverse effect on outcomes in spine fusion possibly based on adversarial environment, delayed resolution of claims and care, and increased compensation associated with prolonged disability. It is unclear whether a universal no fault compensation system would provide different outcomes for these patients. New Zealand's Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC) provides universal no fault compensation for personal injury secondary to accident and offers an opportunity to compare results with differing provision of compensation. A total of 169 patients undergoing lumbar spinal fusion were assessed preoperatively, at 1 year, and at long-term follow-up out to 14 years, using functional outcome measures and health-related quality-of-life measures. Comparison was made between those covered and not covered by ACC for 3 distinct diagnostic categories. A systematic literature review comparing outcomes in Worker's Compensation and non-Compensation cohorts was also performed. The functional outcomes for both ACC and non-ACC cohorts were similar, with significant and comparable improvements over the first year that were then sustained out to long-term follow-up for both cohorts. At long-term follow-up, the health-related quality-of-life measures were the same between the 2 cohorts.The literature review revealed a marked difference in outcomes between worker's compensation and non-worker's compensation cohorts with a near universal inferior outcome for the compensation group. The similarities in outcomes of patients undergoing lumbar spine fusion under New Zealand's universal no fault compensation system, when

  19. Septic shock after posterior spinal arthrodesis on a patient with Scheuermann kyphosis and multiple body piercings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirikos, Athanasios I; Subramanian, Ashok Sridhara

    2011-10-15

    A case report. We report septic shock as postoperative complication following an instrumented posterior spinal arthrodesis on a patient with multiple body piercings. The management of this potentially catastrophic complication and outcome of treatment is been discussed. Body piercing has become increasingly more common because of change in culture or as a fashion statement. This has been associated with local or generalized ill effects including tissue injury, skin and systemic infections, and septic shock. There is no clear guideline pathway regarding removal and reinsertion of body piercings in patients who undergo major surgery. Complications following orthopedic or spinal procedures associated with body piercing have not been reported. We reviewed the medical notes and radiographs of an adolescent patient with Scheuermann kyphosis and multiple body piercings who underwent a posterior spinal arthrodesis and developed septic shock. Septic shock developed on postoperative day 2 after reinsertion of all piercings following the patient's request. The patient became systemically very unwell and required intensive medical management, as well as a total course of antibiotics of 3 months. The piercings remained in situ. She did not develop a wound infection despite the presence of bacteremia and spinal instrumentation. The patient had no new piercings subsequent to her deformity procedure. Two and a half years after spinal surgery she reported no medical problems, had a balanced spine with no loss of kyphosis correction and no evidence of nonunion or recurrence of deformity. The development of septic shock as a result of piercing reinsertion in the postoperative period has not been previously reported. This is an important consideration to prevent potentially life-threatening complications following major spinal surgery.

  20. RESULTS OF SURGICAL TREATMENT OF INFANTILE AND JUVENILE SCOLIOSIS USING VARIOUS INSTRUMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Mikhailovsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The analysis Results of surgical treatment of growing children with infantile and juvenile scoliosis (IS can the optimal method of treatment select. In young children with significant growth potential spinal fusion may not be the best option as it limits further longitudinal growth of the spine and may to the thoracic insufficiency syndrome result. To address this problem recently several techniques focused, their have advantages and drawbacks.Material and methods. Since 2008 year 127 patients (64 girls, 63 boys aged (4.5 ± 2.1 years were operated on. In group I 65 patients were operated on using VEPTR (Vertical Expandable Prosthetic Titanium Rib instrumentation, in group II 42 patients using various spinal instrumentation. 20 patients with congenital kyphosis were excluded. The average follow-up time was (5.6 ± 1.1 years.Results. In group I average value of the primary scoliotic curve before surgery was (74.7 ± 22.9, secondary curve (42.8 ± 16.0, thoracic kyphosis (46.3 ± 27.4, lumbar lordosis (54.6 ± 14. Average value of the primary scoliotic curve after surgery was reduced to (51 ± 20 (correction 31.7%, at followup to (56.5 ± 18.5, secondary curve (31.8 ± 12.8 (25.7%, at follow-up to (32.4 ± 18.4, thoracic kyphosis (36.8 ± 20.8 (20,5%, at follow-up to (41.8 ± 21.0, lumbar lordosis (45.4 ± 12.7 (16,9%, at follow-up to (48.2 ± 11.7 (p < 0.05. Space available for lung before surgery was (84.5 ± 8.7 %, after surgery was (94.8 ± 6.7%, at follow-up increased to (98.6 ± 5.4 % (p < 0.05. Complications included 11 implant dislocations and 1 infection. In group II average value of the primary scoliotic curve before surgery was (87.6 ± 6.6, secondary curve (47.8 ± 4.6, thoracic kyphosis (61.4 ± 10.4, lumbar lordosis (61.8 ± 4.9. Average value of the primary scoliotic curve after surgery was reduced to 50.6 ± 5.3 (correction 42.3%, at follow-up to (66.1 ± 6.3

  1. D-dimer in the diagnosis of thromboembolic disease after spinal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyama, Motohiko; Saita, Kazuo; Iijima, Yuki; Ueda, Yusuke; Endo, Teruaki

    2010-01-01

    The plasma D-dimer levels of 136 patients (80 men and 56 women, mean age 63.9 years) who underwent spinal surgery in our hospital were measured on pod 3 and pod 7, as a method of screening for thromboembolic disease. A D-dimer cut off value of 10 μg/dl was used and only the patients with higher values were examined by CT. No patients had symptomatic thromboembolic disease. On pod 7 the D-dimer levels of 14 patients was above 10 μg/dl, but only 2 of them were detected in asymptomatic pulmonary embolism. Both of them had undergone anterior fusion surgery, and no deep venous thrombosis was detected in the lower extremities. Anticoagulation therapy with heparin and warfarin was started immediately, and the patients were discharged symptom-free. Another methods of thromboprophylaxis in addition to traditional mechanical thromboprophylaxis, such as by wearing compression stockings and foot pumps, may be necessary after anterior spinal surgery. (author)

  2. Comparisons of MR findings of the spinal metastasis and the spinal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Myung Sun; Lee, Kil Woo; Kang, Ik Won; Yun, Ku Sub; Choi, Chul Sun; Bae, Sang Hoon

    1994-01-01

    MR findings of the spinal metastasis and the tuberculosis are well known, but sometimes it might be difficult to differentiate these lesions. Therefore we reviewed and analyzed the MR findings which would be useful for the differentiation. T1- and T2- weighted spin echo images and gadolinium-enhanced T1- weighted images were obtained with 1.5 T and 1.0 T superconductive MR imager. We reviewed MR findings in 16 cases of spinal metastases and 24 cases of spinal tuberculosis in terms of signal intensity, contrast enhancement pattern, disc space involvement, spinal canal compressing feature and paraspinal soft tissue mass. The signal intensities of both lesions were hypointense on T1WI and hyperintense on T2WI except those of the metastatic lesions from the prostatic carcinoma. Heterogeneous enhancement was noted in 63% of metastasis, whereas peripheral rim enhancement was noted 83% of spinal tuberculosis(p < .001). Spinal canal compression by collapsed vertebra was only noted in spinal metastasis, and that by paraspinal soft tissue was noted in both spinal metastasis and tuberculosis(p<.001). Disc space invasion was noted in 19% of spinal metastasis and 88% of spinal tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis was common at lower thoracic spine(T10) and typically involved two or more adjacent vertebral bodies(96%). The important differential point between spinal metastasis and tuberculosis was the enhancement pattern, involvement of two or more contiguous vertebral bodies and the feature of spinal canal compressing. The secondary importance was the disc space involvement pattern

  3. When and how to operate on spondylodiscitis: a report of 13 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Igoumenou, Vasilis; Tsiavos, Konstantinos; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis; Panagopoulos, Georgios N; Vottis, Christos; Giannitsioti, Efthymia; Papadopoulos, Antonios; Soultanis, Konstantinos C

    2016-01-01

    Conflicting reports exist regarding the surgical indications, timing, approach, staged or not operation, and spinal instrumentation for patients with spondylodiscitis. Therefore, we performed this study to evaluate the outcome of a series of patients with spondylodiscitis aiming to answer when and how to operate on these patients. We retrospectively studied the files of 153 patients with spondylodiscitis treated at our institution from 2002 to 2012. The approach included MR imaging of the infected spine, isolation of the pathogen with blood cultures and/or biopsy, and further conservative or surgical treatment. The mean follow-up was 6 years (range 1-13 years). We evaluated the indications, timing (when), and methods (how) for surgical treatment, and the clinical outcome of these patients. Orthopedic surgical treatment was necessary for 13 of the 153 patients (8.5 %). These were patients with low access to healthcare systems because of low socioeconomic status, third-country migrants, prisoners or intravenous drug use, patients in whom a bacterial isolate documentation was necessary, and patients with previous spinal operations. The most common pathogen was Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The surgical indications included deterioration of the neurological status (11 patients), need for bacterial isolate (10 patients), septicemia due to no response to antibiotics (five patients), and/or spinal instability (three patients). An anterior vertebral approach was more commonly used. Nine of the 13 patients had spinal instrumentation in the same setting. Improvement or recovery of the neurological status was observed postoperatively in all patients with preoperative neurological deficits. Postoperatively, two patients deceased from pulmonary infection and septicemia, and heart infarction. At the last follow-up, patients who were alive were asymptomatic; ten patients were neurologically intact, and one patient experienced paraparesis. Imaging showed spinal fusion, without

  4. PAM50: Unbiased multimodal template of the brainstem and spinal cord aligned with the ICBM152 space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leener, Benjamin; Fonov, Vladimir S; Collins, D Louis; Callot, Virginie; Stikov, Nikola; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2018-01-15

    Template-based analysis of multi-parametric MRI data of the spinal cord sets the foundation for standardization and reproducibility, thereby helping the discovery of new biomarkers of spinal-related diseases. While MRI templates of the spinal cord have been recently introduced, none of them cover the entire spinal cord. In this study, we introduced an unbiased multimodal MRI template of the spinal cord and the brainstem, called PAM50, which is anatomically compatible with the ICBM152 brain template and uses the same coordinate system. The PAM50 template is based on 50 healthy subjects, covers the full spinal cord (C1 to L2 vertebral levels) and the brainstem, is available for T1-, T2-and T2*-weighted MRI contrasts and includes a probabilistic atlas of the gray matter and white matter tracts. Template creation accuracy was assessed by computing the mean and maximum distance error between each individual spinal cord centerline and the PAM50 centerline, after registration to the template. Results showed high accuracy for both T1- (mean = 0.37 ± 0.06 mm; max = 1.39 ± 0.58 mm) and T2-weighted (mean = 0.11 ± 0.03 mm; max = 0.71 ± 0.27 mm) contrasts. Additionally, the preservation of the spinal cord topology during the template creation process was verified by comparing the cross-sectional area (CSA) profile, averaged over all subjects, and the CSA profile of the PAM50 template. The fusion of the PAM50 and ICBM152 templates will facilitate group and multi-center studies of combined brain and spinal cord MRI, and enable the use of existing atlases of the brainstem compatible with the ICBM space. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Remodeling of the notochord during development of vertebral fusions in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ytteborg, Elisabeth; Torgersen, Jacob Seilø; Pedersen, Mona E; Baeverfjord, Grete; Hannesson, Kirsten O; Takle, Harald

    2010-12-01

    Histological characterization of spinal fusions in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) has demonstrated shape alterations of vertebral body endplates, a reduced intervertebral space, and replacement of intervertebral cells by ectopic bone. However, the significance of the notochord during the fusion process has not been addressed. We have therefore investigated structural and cellular events in the notochord during the development of vertebral fusions. In order to induce vertebral fusions, Atlantic salmon were exposed to elevated temperatures from fertilization until they attained a size of 15g. Based on results from radiography, intermediate and terminal stages of the fusion process were investigated by immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Examination of structural extracellular matrix proteins such as Perlecan, Aggrecan, Elastin, and Laminin revealed reduced activity and reorganization at early stages in the pathology. Staining for elastic fibers visualized a thinner elastic membrane surrounding the notochord of developing fusions, and immunohistochemistry for Perlecan showed that the notochordal sheath was stretched during fusion. These findings in the outer notochord correlated with the loss of Aggrecan- and Substance-P-positive signals and the further loss of vacuoles from the chordocytes in the central notochord. At more progressed stages of fusion, chordocytes condensed, and the expression of Aggrecan and Substance P reappeared. The hyperdense regions seem to be of importance for the formation of notochordal tissue into bone. Thus, the remodeling of notochord integrity by reduced elasticity, structural alterations, and cellular changes is probably involved in the development of vertebral fusions.

  6. Safety of continuing aspirin therapy during spinal surgery: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenggui; Wang, Guodong; Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Yang; Sun, Jianmin

    2017-11-01

    Questions whether to continue or discontinue aspirin administration in the perioperative period of spinal surgery has not been systematically evaluated. The present systematic review is carried out to assess the impact of continuing aspirin administration on the bleeding and cardiovascular events in perispinal surgery period. Studies were retrieved through MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Springer Link Databases (search terms, aspirin, continue or discontinue, and spinal fusion), bibliographies of the articles retrieved, and the authors' reference files. We included studies that enrolled patients who underwent spinal surgery who were anticoagulated with aspirin alone and that reported bleeding or cardiovascular events as an outcome. Study quality was assessed using a validated form. 95% confidence interval (95% CI) was pooled to give summary estimates of bleeding and cardiovascular risk. We identified 4 studies assessing bleeding risk associated with aspirin continuation or cardiovascular risk with aspirin discontinuation during spinal surgery. The continuation of aspirin will not increase the risk of blood loss during the spinal surgery (95% CI, -111.72 to -0.59; P = .05). Also, there was no observed increase in the operative time (95% CI, -33.29 to -3.89; P = .01) and postoperative blood transfusion (95% CI, 0.00-0.27; P = .05). But as for the cardiovascular risk without aspirin continuation and mean hospital length of stay with aspirin continuation, we did not get enough samples to make an accurate decision about their relations with aspirin. Patients undergoing spinal surgery with continued aspirin administration do not have an increased risk for bleeding. In addition, there is no observed increase in the operation time and postoperative blood transfusion.

  7. Non-contiguous spinal injury in cervical spinal trauma: evaluation with cervical spine MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Soo Jung; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon; Bae, Sang Jin

    2004-01-01

    We wished to evaluate the incidence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) or the upper thoracic spines on cervical spinal MR images in the patients with cervical spinal injuries. Seventy-five cervical spine MR imagings for acute cervical spinal injury were retrospectively reviewed (58 men and 17 women, mean age: 35.3, range: 18-81 years). They were divided into three groups based on the mechanism of injury; axial compression, hyperflexion or hyperextension injury, according to the findings on the MR and CT images. On cervical spine MR images, we evaluated the presence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the CTJ or upper thoracic spine with regard to the presence of marrow contusion or fracture, ligament injury, traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury. Twenty-one cases (28%) showed CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries (C7-T5) on cervical spinal MR images that were separated from the cervical spinal injuries. Seven of 21 cases revealed overt fractures in the CTJs or upper thoracic spines. Ligament injury in these regions was found in three cases. Traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury in these regions were shown in one and two cases, respectively. The incidence of the non-contiguous spinal injuries in CTJ or upper thoracic spines was higher in the axial compression injury group (35.5%) than in the hyperflexion injury group (26.9%) or the hyperextension (25%) injury group. However, there was no statistical significance (ρ > 0.05). Cervical spinal MR revealed non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries in 28% of the patients with cervical spinal injury. The mechanism of cervical spinal injury did not significantly affect the incidence of the non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injury

  8. Non-contiguous spinal injury in cervical spinal trauma: evaluation with cervical spine MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soo Jung; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sang Jin [Sanggyepaik Hospital, Inje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-15

    We wished to evaluate the incidence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) or the upper thoracic spines on cervical spinal MR images in the patients with cervical spinal injuries. Seventy-five cervical spine MR imagings for acute cervical spinal injury were retrospectively reviewed (58 men and 17 women, mean age: 35.3, range: 18-81 years). They were divided into three groups based on the mechanism of injury; axial compression, hyperflexion or hyperextension injury, according to the findings on the MR and CT images. On cervical spine MR images, we evaluated the presence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the CTJ or upper thoracic spine with regard to the presence of marrow contusion or fracture, ligament injury, traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury. Twenty-one cases (28%) showed CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries (C7-T5) on cervical spinal MR images that were separated from the cervical spinal injuries. Seven of 21 cases revealed overt fractures in the CTJs or upper thoracic spines. Ligament injury in these regions was found in three cases. Traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury in these regions were shown in one and two cases, respectively. The incidence of the non-contiguous spinal injuries in CTJ or upper thoracic spines was higher in the axial compression injury group (35.5%) than in the hyperflexion injury group (26.9%) or the hyperextension (25%) injury group. However, there was no statistical significance ({rho} > 0.05). Cervical spinal MR revealed non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries in 28% of the patients with cervical spinal injury. The mechanism of cervical spinal injury did not significantly affect the incidence of the non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injury.

  9. Exploration of Quality-of-Life Goals in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullmann, Lajos; Toth, Katalin

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate the applicability of structured interviews for exploration of quality-of-life goals using an established instrument. Structured interviews were performed using WHOQOL-BREF and Disabilities Module as guideline with 35 clients admitted for first rehabilitation intervention after spinal cord injury. Although…

  10. Fatigue in patients with spinal muscular atrophy type II and congenital myopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Ulla; Højberg, A; Firla-Holme, R

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the fatigue severity scale (FSS) is an appropriate instrument to assess fatigue in patients with spinal muscular atrophy type II (SMA II) and congenital myopathies (CM). METHODS: FSS and visual analog scale (VAS) were administered to 33 SMA II...

  11. Care of post-traumatic spinal cord injury patients in India: An analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey V

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The spinal cord injured patients if congregated early in spinal units where better facilities and dedicated expert care exist the outcome of treatment and rehabilitation, can be improved. The objective of this study is to find out the various factors responsible for a delay in the presentation of spinal injury patients to the specialized spinal trauma units and to suggest steps to improve the quality of care of the spinal trauma patients in the Indian setup. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients of traumatic spinal cord injury admitted for rehabilitation between August 2005 and May 2006 were enrolled into the study and their data was analyzed. Results: Eighty-five per cent of the spinal cord injured patients were males and the mean age was 34 years (range 13-56 years. Twenty-nine (48.33% of the spinal injuries occurred due to fall from height. There was an average of 45 days (range 0-188 days of delay in presentation to a specialized spinal unit and most of the time the cause for the delay was unawareness on the part of patients and/or doctors regarding specialized spinal units. In 38 (62.5% cases the mode of transportation of the spinal cord injured patient to the first visited hospital was by their own conveyance and the attendants of the patients did not have any idea about precautions essential to prevent neurological deterioration. Seventeen (28.33% patients were given injection solumedrol with conservative treatment, 35 (60% patients were given only conservative treatment and seven patients were operated (11.66% upon at initially visited hospital. Of the seven patients operated five were fixed with posterior Harrington instrumentation (71.42% and two (28.57% were operated by short segment posterior pedicle screw fixation. None of the patients were subjected to physiotherapy-assisted transfers or wheel chair skills or even basic postural training, proper bladder/ bowel training program and sitting balance. Conclusion: Awareness

  12. Chitin Oligosaccharide (COS) Reduces Antibiotics Dose and Prevents Antibiotics-Caused Side Effects in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) Patients with Spinal Fusion Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yang; Xu, Jinyu; Zhou, Haohan; Dong, Rongpeng; Kang, Mingyang; Zhao, Jianwu

    2017-03-14

    Antibiotics are always considered for surgical site infection (SSI) in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) surgery. However, the use of antibiotics often causes the antibiotic resistance of pathogens and side effects. Thus, it is necessary to explore natural products as drug candidates. Chitin Oligosaccharide (COS) has anti-inflammation and anti-bacteria functions. The effects of COS on surgical infection in AIS surgery were investigated. A total of 312 AIS patients were evenly and randomly assigned into control group (CG, each patient took one-gram alternative Azithromycin/Erythromycin/Cloxacillin/Aztreonam/Ceftazidime or combined daily), experiment group (EG, each patient took 20 mg COS and half-dose antibiotics daily), and placebo group (PG, each patient took 20 mg placebo and half-dose antibiotics daily). The average follow-up was one month, and infection severity and side effects were analyzed. The effects of COS on isolated pathogens were analyzed. SSI rates were 2%, 3% and 8% for spine wounds and 1%, 2% and 7% for iliac wound in CG, EG and PG ( p antibiotics ( p antibiotics dose and antibiotics-caused side effects in AIS patients with spinal fusion surgery by improving antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. COS should be developed as potential adjuvant for antibiotics therapies.

  13. Differential diagnoses of spinal tumors; Differenzialdiagnose spinaler Tumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, U. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    A wide variety of degenerative, inflammatory and vascular diseases can resemble the clinical presentation and imaging findings of spinal tumors. This article provides an overview of the most frequent diseases which are important to recognize for diagnostic imaging of the spine. (orig.) [German] Eine Vielzahl degenerativer, entzuendlicher und vaskulaerer Erkrankungen kann das klinische Bild und radiologische Befunde spinaler Tumoren imitieren. Dieser Artikel dient der Uebersicht ueber die haeufigsten dieser Erkrankungen, deren Kenntnis wichtig fuer die spinale Bildgebung ist. (orig.)

  14. Major destructive asymptomatic lumbar Charcot lesion treated with three column resection and short segment reconstruction. Case report, treatment strategy and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valancius Kestutis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Charcot's spine is a long-term complication of spinal cord injury. The lesion is often localized at the caudal end of long fusion constructs and distal to the level of paraplegia. However, cases are rare and the literature relevant to the management of Charcot's arthropathy is limited. This paper reviews the clinical features, diagnosis, and surgical management of post-traumatic spinal neuroarthropathy in the current literature. We present a rare case of adjacent level Charcot's lesion of the lumbar spine in a paraplegic patient, primarily treated for traumatic spinal cord lesion 39 years before current surgery. We have performed end-to-end apposition of bone after 3 column resection of the lesion, 3D correction of the deformity, and posterior instrumentation using a four-rod construct. Although the natural course of the disease remains unclear, surgery is always favorable and remains the primary treatment modality. Posterior long-segment spinal fusion with a four-rod construct is the mainstay of treatment to prevent further morbidity. Our technique eliminated the need for more extensive anterior surgery while preserving distal motion

  15. Efficacy comparison of Accell Evo3 and Grafton demineralized bone matrix putties against autologous bone in a rat posterolateral spine fusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecevich, Antonio T; Kiely, Paul D; Yoon, B Victor; Nguyen, Joseph T; Cammisa, Frank P; Abjornson, Celeste

    2017-06-01

    Spinal fusion procedures are intended to stabilize the spinal column for a multitude of disorders including abnormal curvature, traumatic instability, degenerative instability, and damage from infections or tumors. As an aid in the bone healing response, bone graft materials are used to bridge joints for arthrodesis and promote unions in pseudoarthrosis. Currently, the gold standard for stabilizing fusion masses in spinal procedures involves using the osteogenic, osteoinductive, and osteoconductive properties of autologous iliac crest corticocancellous bone. However, considerable morbidity is associated with harvesting the autologous graft. Donor site complications including infection, large hematomas, and pain have been reported at rates as high as 50% (Boden and Jeffrey, 1995). Biologically, the rate of bone repair dictates the rate at which the fusion mass will unite under autologous graft conditions. The purpose of this study is to compare the quality and rate of fusion between Accell Evo3 and Grafton demineralized bone matrix (DBM), with the gold standard iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) as the control, in athymic rat posterolateral fusion. This study was a randomized, controlled study in a laboratory setting at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City. Blinded observations were made, which created an assessment of outcomes for successful fusions between each method. Forty-eight (48) athymic rats were used in this study and underwent posterolateral lumbar fusion. They were assessed at either 3 weeks or 9 weeks to see the rate and efficacy of fusion. Outcome measures will be the efficacy of the different bone grafts and their success rates of fusion in the rats. A comparison of the quality and rate of fusion between Accell Evo3® (DBM A) and Grafton (DBM B), with the gold standard iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) as the control, was performed using the established posterolateral intertransverse process on an athymic rat model. Materials were evaluated for

  16. Fault-tolerant Sensor Fusion for Marine Navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanke, Mogens

    2006-01-01

    Reliability of navigation data are critical for steering and manoeuvring control, and in particular so at high speed or in critical phases of a mission. Should faults occur, faulty instruments need be autonomously isolated and faulty information discarded. This paper designs a navigation solution...... where essential navigation information is provided even with multiple faults in instrumentation. The paper proposes a provable correct implementation through auto-generated state-event logics in a supervisory part of the algorithms. Test results from naval vessels document the performance and shows...... events where the fault-tolerant sensor fusion provided uninterrupted navigation data despite temporal instrument defects...

  17. Study Protocol- Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injections for Spinal Stenosis (LESS: a double-blind randomized controlled trial of epidural steroid injections for lumbar spinal stenosis among older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedly Janna L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lumbar spinal stenosis is one of the most common causes of low back pain among older adults and can cause significant disability. Despite its prevalence, treatment of spinal stenosis symptoms remains controversial. Epidural steroid injections are used with increasing frequency as a less invasive, potentially safer, and more cost-effective treatment than surgery. However, there is a lack of data to judge the effectiveness and safety of epidural steroid injections for spinal stenosis. We describe our prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial that tests the hypothesis that epidural injections with steroids plus local anesthetic are more effective than epidural injections of local anesthetic alone in improving pain and function among older adults with lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods We will recruit up to 400 patients with lumbar central canal spinal stenosis from at least 9 clinical sites over 2 years. Patients with spinal instability who require surgical fusion, a history of prior lumbar surgery, or prior epidural steroid injection within the past 6 months are excluded. Participants are randomly assigned to receive either ESI with local anesthetic or the control intervention (epidural injections with local anesthetic alone. Subjects receive up to 2 injections prior to the primary endpoint at 6 weeks, at which time they may choose to crossover to the other intervention. Participants complete validated, standardized measures of pain, functional disability, and health-related quality of life at baseline and at 3 weeks, 6 weeks, and 3, 6, and 12 months after randomization. The primary outcomes are Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire and a numerical rating scale measure of pain intensity at 6 weeks. In order to better understand their safety, we also measure cortisol, HbA1c, fasting blood glucose, weight, and blood pressure at baseline, and at 3 and 6 weeks post-injection. We also obtain data on resource utilization

  18. Chronic spinal subdural hematoma; Spinales chronisches subdurales Haematom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, T.; Lensch, T. [Radiologengemeinschaft, Augsburg (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    Compared with spinal epidural hematomas, spinal subdural hematomas are rare; chronic forms are even more uncommon. These hematomas are associated not only with lumbar puncture and spinal trauma, but also with coagulopathies, vascular malformations and tumors. Compression of the spinal cord and the cauda equina means that the patients develop increasing back or radicular pain, followed by paraparesis and bladder and bowel paralysis, so that in most cases surgical decompression is carried out. On magnetic resonance imaging these hematomas present as thoracic or lumbar subdural masses, their signal intensity varying with the age of the hematoma. We report the clinical course and the findings revealed by imaging that led to the diagnosis in three cases of chronic spinal subdural hematoma. (orig.) [German] Spinale subdurale Haematome sind im Vergleich zu epiduralen Haematomen selten, chronische Verlaufsformen noch seltener. Ursaechlich sind neben Lumbalpunktionen und traumatischen Verletzungen auch Blutgerinnungsstoerungen, Gefaessmalformationen und Tumoren. Aufgrund der Kompression von Myelon und Cauda equina kommt es zu zunehmenden Ruecken- oder radikulaeren Schmerzen mit anschliessender Paraparese sowie einer Darm- und Blasenstoerung, weshalb in den meisten Faellen eine operative Entlastung durchgefuehrt wird. Magnetresonanztomographisch stellen sich die Haematome meist als thorakale bzw. lumbale subdurale Raumforderungen dar, die Signalintensitaet variiert mit dem Blutungsalter. Wir berichten ueber den klinischen Verlauf und die bildgebende Diagnostik von 3 Patienten mit spinalen chronischen subduralen Haematomen. (orig.)

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ...

  1. Spinal Cord Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such ...

  2. Spinal segmental dysgenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Mahomed

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal segmental dysgenesis is a rare congenital spinal abnormality , seen in neonates and infants in which a segment of the spine and spinal cord fails to develop normally . The condition is segmental with normal vertebrae above and below the malformation. This condition is commonly associated with various abnormalities that affect the heart, genitourinary, gastrointestinal tract and skeletal system. We report two cases of spinal segmental dysgenesis and the associated abnormalities.

  3. The effect of milrinone on induced hypotension in elderly patients during spinal surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wonjung; Kim, Eunsung

    2014-08-01

    Induced hypotension is widely used intraoperatively to reduce blood loss and to improve the surgical field during spinal surgery. To determine the effect of milrinone on induced hypotension during spinal surgery in elderly patients. Prospective randomized clinical trial. Forty patients, 60 to 70 years old, ASA I-II, who underwent elective lumbar fusion surgery. Intraoperative hemodynamics, blood loss, hourly urine output, and grade of surgical field. All patients were randomized to group M or N. The study drug was infused after perivertebral muscle retraction until complete interbody fusion. In group M, 50 μg/kg/min of milrinone was infused over 10 minutes as a loading dose followed by 0.6 μg/kg/min of milrinone as a continuous dose. In group N, an identical volume of normal saline was infused in the same fashion. This study was not funded by commercial or other sponsorship and the authors confirm no conflicts of interest, financial or otherwise. During infusion of the study drug, the systolic and mean blood pressures were maintained within adequate limits of induced hypotension in group M. Intraoperative blood loss was 445.0±226.5 mL in group M and 765.0±339.2 mL in group N (p=.001). Hourly urine output was 1.4±0.6 mL in group M and 0.8±0.2 mL in group N (pmilrinone is useful for induced hypotension in elderly patients during spinal surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical outcome of trans-sacral interbody fusion after partial reduction for high-grade l5-s1 spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J A; Deviren, V; Berven, S; Kleinstueck, F; Bradford, D S

    2001-10-15

    A clinical retrospective study was conducted. To evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcome of reduction followed by trans-sacral interbody fusion for high-grade spondylolisthesis. In situ posterior interbody fusion with fibula allograft has improved the fusion rates for patients with high-grade spondylolisthesis. The use of this technique in conjunction with partial reduction has not been reported. Nine consecutive patients underwent treatment of high-grade (Grade 3 or 4) spondylolisthesis with partial reduction followed by posterior interbody fusion using cortical allograft. The average age at the time of surgery was 27 years (range, 8-51 years), and the average follow-up period was 43 months (range, 24-72 months). Before surgery, eight patients had low back pain, seven patients had radiating leg pain, and five patients had hamstring tightness. The average grade of spondylolisthesis by Meyerding grading was 3.9 (range, 3-5). Charts and radiographs were evaluated, and outcomes were collected by use of the modified SRS outcomes instrument. Radiographic indexes demonstrated significant improvement with partial reduction and fusion. The slip angle, as measured from the inferior endplate of L5, improved from 41.2 degrees (range, 24-82 degrees ) before surgery to 21 degrees (range, 5-40 degrees ) after surgery. All the patients were extremely or somewhat satisfied with surgery. The two patients who underwent this operation without initial instrumentation experienced fractures of their interbody grafts. Both of these patients underwent repair of the pseudarthrosis with placement of trans-sacral pedicle screw instrumentation and subsequent fusion. Partial reduction followed by posterior interbody fusion is an effective technique for the management of high-grade spondylolisthesis in pediatric and adult patient populations, as assessed by radiographic and clinical criteria. Pedicle screw instrumentation with the sacral screws capturing L5 is recommended when this

  5. Influence of curve magnitude and other variables on operative time, blood loss and transfusion requirements in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, M

    2015-05-03

    Posterior spinal instrumentation and fusion for correction of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) typically requires lengthy operating time and may be associated with significant blood loss and subsequent transfusion. This study aimed to identify factors predictive of duration of surgery, intraoperative blood loss and transfusion requirements in an Irish AIS cohort.

  6. Hyperacute spinal subdural haematoma as a complication of lumbar spinal anaesthesia: MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedraza Gutierrez, S.; Suescun, M.; Rovira Canellas, A.; Coll Masfarre, S.; Castano Duque, C.H.

    1999-01-01

    We report two cases of hyperacute spinal subdural haematoma secondary to lumbar spinal anaesthesia, identified with MRI. Prompt diagnosis of this infrequent, potentially serious complication of spinal anaesthesia is essential, as early surgical evacuation may be needed. Suggestive MRI findings in this early phase include diffuse occupation filling of the spinal canal with poor delineation of the spinal cord on T1-weighted images, and a poorly-defined high-signal lesion with a low-signal rim on T2-weighted images. (orig.)

  7. Spinal Subdural Abscess Following Laminectomy for Symptomatic Stenosis: A Report of 2 Cases and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Alexander D; Rolston, John D; Gauger, Grant E; Larson, Paul S

    2016-07-12

    BACKGROUND Spinal subdural abscesses, also known as empyemas, are rare infectious lesions, the exact incidence of which is unknown. Presentation is typically dramatic, with back pain, fever, motor, and sensory deficits. Rapid identification and surgical intervention with laminectomy, durotomy, and washout provides the best outcomes. While hematogenous spread of an extra-spinal infection is the most common cause of this condition, a significant number of cases result from iatrogenic mechanisms, including lumbar punctures, epidural injections, and surgery. CASE REPORT Here we present 2 cases: 1) an 87-year-old man with type 2 diabetes, schizophrenia, mild cognitive impairment, and symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis and 2) a 62-year-old man with a prior L3-4 spinal fusion with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis. In both cases, patients underwent laminectomy for spinal stenosis and developed epidural abscess. Following successful drainage of the epidural abscess, they continued to be symptomatic, and repeat imaging revealed the presence of a subdural abscess that was subsequently evacuated. Case 1 had significant improvement with residual lower-extremity weakness, while Case 2 made a complete neurological recovery. CONCLUSIONS These cases illustrate patients at increased risk for developing this rare spinal infection, and demonstrate that rapid recognition and surgical treatment is key to cure and recovery. Review of the literature highlights pertinent risk factors and demonstrates nearly one-third of reported cases have an iatrogenic etiology. The cases presented here demonstrate that a subdural process should be suspected in any patient with intractable pain following treatment of an epidural abscess.

  8. MULTIPLE SPINAL CANAL MENINGIOMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandigama Pratap Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Meningiomas of the spinal canal are common tumours with the incidence of 25 percent of all spinal cord tumours. But multiple spinal canal meningiomas are rare in compare to solitary lesions and account for 2 to 3.5% of all spinal meningiomas. Most of the reported cases are both intra cranial and spinal. Exclusive involvement of the spinal canal by multiple meningiomas are very rare. We could find only sixteen cases in the literature to the best of our knowledge. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for single lesion. We analysed the literature, with illustration of our case. MATERIALS AND METHODS In September 2016, we performed a literature search for multiple spinal canal meningiomas involving exclusively the spinal canal with no limitation for language and publication date. The search was conducted through http://pubmed.com, a wellknown worldwide internet medical address. To the best of our knowledge, we could find only sixteen cases of multiple meningiomas exclusively confined to the spinal canal. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for solitary intradural extra medullary spinal canal meningioma at D4-D6 level, again presented with spastic quadriparesis of two years duration and MRI whole spine demonstrated multiple intradural extra medullary lesions, which were excised completely and the histopathological diagnosis was transitional meningioma. RESULTS Patient recovered from his weakness and sensory symptoms gradually and bladder and bowel symptoms improved gradually over a period of two to three weeks. CONCLUSION Multiple

  9. Pain management in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis undergoing posterior spinal fusion: combined intrathecal morphine and continuous epidural versus PCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravish, Matthew; Muldowney, Bridget; Becker, Aimee; Hetzel, Scott; McCarthy, James J; Nemeth, Blaise A; Noonan, Kenneth J

    2012-12-01

    A retrospective case-comparison study. Compare efficacy and safety of combined intrathecal morphine (ITM) and epidural analgesia (EPI) to that of conventional intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) after posterior spinal fusion (PSF) for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Pain control after PSF in AIS has been managed traditionally with IV-PCA. More recently studies have shown improvement in pain control with the use of continuous EPI or intraoperative ITM. No studies to our knowledge have compared the use of both ITM and EPI analgesia to that of IV-PCA. An Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective case-comparison study was performed from 1989 to 2009 of all patients undergoing PSF for AIS. Patients received either IV-PCA or ITM/EPI. Daily pain scores were recorded along with total opioid and benzodiazepine use. Adverse events were recorded for all the patients. A total of 146 patients were initially included in the study; 95 patients received ITM/EPI and 51 received IV-PCA as a historical control. Eight patients from the ITM/EPI group were excluded from the pain comparison portion of the study. There were no statistical differences in age, sex, weight, or hospital stay between the 2 groups. The ITM/EPI group had, on average, 1 additional level of fusion (P = 0.001). Daily average pain scores were lower in the ITM/EPI group on all hospital days, and statistically lower in days 1 and 3 to 5. Total opioid requirement was significantly lower in the ITM/EPI patients, although oral opioid use was higher among this group. Total benzodiazepine use was lower among the IV-PCA group. A total of 15.7% of the IV-PCA patients had bladder hypotonia, compared with 1.1% of the ITM/EPI group (P = 0.002). The rate of illeus was 15.7% in the IV-PCA patients and 5.7% in the ITM/EPI (P = 0.071). Respiratory depression was reported in 4 ITM/EPI patients, 0 in our PCA group. Technical catheter malfunction was reported in 8.5% of the EPI group. The use of ITM

  10. Imaging of extradural spinal lesions; Bildgebung extraduraler Raumforderungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlhelm, F.; Schulte-Altedorneburg, G.; Naumann, N.; Reith, W. (Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar); Nabhan, A. (Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar, Klinik fuer Allgemeine und Spezielle Neurochirurgie)

    2006-12-15

    There is a wide variety of spinal extradural tumors. In addition to real neoplasms, degenerative diseases, congenital abnormalities and inflammatory disorders can be causes of extradural masses. Due to the bony boundary of the spinal canal, both benign as well as malignant masses can cause progressive neurological deficits including paraplegia. Most of the spinal tumors are benign (hemangioma of the vertebral body, degenerative diseases). In younger patients congenital abnormalities and primary tumors of the spine have to be considered, whereas in adults the list of differential diagnoses should include secondary malignancies such as metastases and lymphomas as well as metabolic disorders such as osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture and Paget's disease. Cross-sectional imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) of the spine often help to make a specific diagnosis of extradural spinal lesions and represent important tools for tumor staging and preoperative evaluation. (orig.) Das Spektrum der spinalen extraduralen Tumoren ist sehr gross. Neben echten Neoplasien koennen auch degenerative Veraenderungen und Anlagestoerungen sowie entzuendliche Veraenderungen Ursachen einer extraduralen Raumforderung sein. Aufgrund der knoechernen Begrenzung des Spinalkanals koennen neben Malignomen auch benigne Tumoren und degenerative spinale Veraenderungen zu progredienten neurologischen Ausfallsymptomen (einschliesslich Querschnittsymptomatik) fuehren. Die ueberwiegende Mehrzahl der extraduralen Raumforderungen der Wirbelsaeule ist benigne (Haemangiom des Wirbelkoerpers, degenerative Erkrankungen). Bei jungen Patienten sind Anlagestoerungen und primaere Wirbelsaeulentumoren zu beruecksichtigen, wogegen beim Erwachsenen an sekundaere Malignome, wie Metastasen und Lymphome sowie eine metabolische Erkrankung, wie die osteoporotische Wirbelkoerpersinterungsfraktur oder der Morbus Paget, differenzialdiagnostisch gedacht werden

  11. Effectiveness of L2 spinal nerve infiltration for selective discogenic low back pain patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtori, Seiji; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Koshi, Takana

    2010-01-01

    It has been reported that rat L5/6 lumbar discs are innervated mainly by L2 dorsal root ganglion neurons. We previously reported that L2 spinal nerve infiltration was effective for discogenic low back pain (DLBP) patients, although the diagnosis was based only on the results of physical examination, plain films, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of the current study was to evaluate L2 spinal nerve block for DLBP patients retrospectively based on MRI findings and surgical results. A total of 62 patients with only LBP and no accompanying radicular pain were investigated. Patients had only one level of disc degeneration on MRI. When pain was provoked during discography, we performed surgery at the next stage (40 patients). In all, 22 patients were excluded owing to negative discography results. Of the 40 patients, we evaluated 25 strictly selected patients suffering from DLBP. DLBP was diagnosed when the patient experienced pain relief at least 2 years after anterior lumbar interbody fusion. Fifteen patients who did not show pain relief after surgery were used for the non-DLBP group. L2 spinal nerve infiltration using 1.5 ml of lidocaine was performed in all 40 patients before surgery. The visual analogue scale (VAS) score after L2 spinal nerve infiltration was recorded, and an association of L2 spinal nerve infiltration and DLBP was explored. Low back pain scores assessed using the VAS score, the Japanese Orthopedic Association score, and the Oswestry Disability Index score in the two groups were not significantly different. L2 spinal nerve infiltration was effective for 27 patients but not effective for 13 patients; the VAS score after 15 min and 2 h improved in the DLBP group compared with that of the non-DLBP group (P<0.05). L2 spinal nerve infiltration was more effective in DLBP patients (21 patients, 84%) than in the non-DLBP group (6 patients, 40%) (P<0.05). In the current study, L2 spinal nerve infiltration was effective in 84% of selected DLBP

  12. Physics of laser fusion. Volume II. Diagnostics of experiments on laser fusion targets at LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    These notes present the experimental basis and status for laser fusion as developed at LLNL. There are two other volumes in this series: Vol. I, by C.E. Max, presents the theoretical laser-plasma interaction physics; Vol. III, by J.F. Holzrichter et al., presents the theory and design of high-power pulsed lasers. A fourth volume will present the theoretical implosion physics. The notes consist of six sections. The first, an introductory section, provides some of the history of inertial fusion and a simple explanation of the concepts involved. The second section presents an extensive discussion of diagnostic instrumentation used in the LLNL Laser Fusion Program. The third section is a presentation of laser facilities and capabilities at LLNL. The purpose here is to define capability, not to derive how it was obtained. The fourth and fifth sections present the experimental data on laser-plasma interaction and implosion physics. The last chapter is a short projection of the future.

  13. Physics of laser fusion. Volume II. Diagnostics of experiments on laser fusion targets at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    These notes present the experimental basis and status for laser fusion as developed at LLNL. There are two other volumes in this series: Vol. I, by C.E. Max, presents the theoretical laser-plasma interaction physics; Vol. III, by J.F. Holzrichter et al., presents the theory and design of high-power pulsed lasers. A fourth volume will present the theoretical implosion physics. The notes consist of six sections. The first, an introductory section, provides some of the history of inertial fusion and a simple explanation of the concepts involved. The second section presents an extensive discussion of diagnostic instrumentation used in the LLNL Laser Fusion Program. The third section is a presentation of laser facilities and capabilities at LLNL. The purpose here is to define capability, not to derive how it was obtained. The fourth and fifth sections present the experimental data on laser-plasma interaction and implosion physics. The last chapter is a short projection of the future

  14. Long-term functional outcome after type A3 spinal fractures : operative versus non-operative treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Richard B.; van der Sluis, Corry K.; Leferink, Vincent J. M.; ten Duis, Henk-Jan

    The authors retrospectively studied, by questionnaires, the long-term (5 years) functional outcome after operative (posterior instrumentation : 38 cases) and non-operative treatment (25 cases) for type A3 spinal fractures (Comprehensive Classification) without neurological deficit. A possible bias

  15. Surgical site infections following instrumented stabilization of the spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dapunt U

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ulrike Dapunt,1 Caroline Bürkle,1 Frank Günther,2 Wojciech Pepke,1 Stefan Hemmer,1 Michael Akbar1 1Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Center for Orthopedics, Trauma Surgery and Spinal Cord Injury, Heidelberg University Hospital, 2Department for Infectious Diseases, Medical Microbiology and Hygiene, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany Background: Implant-associated infections are still a feared complication in the field of orthopedics. Bacteria attach to the implant surface and form so-called biofilm colonies that are often difficult to diagnose and treat. Since the majority of studies focus on prosthetic joint infections (PJIs of the hip and knee, current treatment options (eg, antibiotic prophylaxis of implant-associated infections have mostly been adapted according to these results. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate patients with surgical site infections following instrumented stabilization of the spine with regard to detected bacteria species and the course of the disease. Patients and methods: We performed a retrospective single-center analysis of implant-associated infections of the spine from 2010 to 2014. A total of 138 patients were included in the study. The following parameters were evaluated: C-reactive protein serum concentration, microbiological evaluation of tissue samples, the time course of the disease, indication for instrumented stabilization of the spine, localization of the infection, and the number of revision surgeries required until cessation of symptoms. Results: Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. were most commonly detected (n=69, 50%, followed by fecal bacteria (n=46, 33.3%. In 23.2% of cases, no bacteria were detected despite clinical suspicion of an infection. Most patients suffered from degenerative spine disorders (44.9%, followed by spinal fractures (23.9%, non-degenerative scoliosis (20.3%, and spinal tumors (10.1%. Surgical site infections occurred predominantly within 3

  16. Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... down on the nerve parts that carry signals. Spinal cord injuries can be complete or incomplete. With a complete ...

  17. Preoperative embolization in surgical treatment of metastatic spinal cord compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Caroline

    2017-07-01

    independent of primary tumor diagnosis does not reduce intraoperative blood loss and the need for allogenic RBC transfusion significantly, but does reduce the surgery time. However, a small reduction of intraoperative blood loss was observed in the hypervascular metastases. This tendency could be underestimated because of the study design and furthermore the tendency may be enhanced in metastases of only the most pronounced hypervascularity. The findings furthermore support that perioperative blood transfusion of less than 5 units does not decrease survival in patients operated for spinal metastases and transfusion of 1-2 units seems to be weakly associated with increased 12-month survival. It was demonstrated that approximately 75 percent of spinal metastases are hypervascular in a consecutive series of patients with symptoms of metastatic medullary compression and spinal instability operated by decompression and instrumented spinal stabilization. In addition the findings show that there is satisfactory moderate inter- and intrarater agreement in classifying the vascularity of spinal metastases on a three-step ordinal scale for DSA tumor blush. Nevertheless, there is a call for an accurate preoperative way to evaluate the vascularity of spinal metastases in order to select patients most likely to benefit from preoperative embolization. Articles published in the Danish Medical Journal are “open access”. This means that the articles are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial License, which permits any non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and source are credited.

  18. Intraoperative CT with integrated navigation system in spinal neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zausinger, S.; Heigl, T.; Scheder, B.; Schnell, O.; Tonn, J.C.; Uhl, E.; Morhard, D.

    2007-01-01

    For spinal surgery navigational system images are usually acquired before surgery with patients positioned supine. The aim of this study was to evaluate prospectively navigated procedures in spinal surgery with data acquisition by intraoperative computed tomography (iCT). CT data of 38 patients [thoracolumbar instability (n = 24), C1/2 instability (n = 6), cervicothoracic stabilization (n = 7), disk herniation (n = 1)] were acquired after positioning the patient in prone position. A sliding gantry 24 detector row CT was used for image acquisition. Data were imported to the frameless infrared-based neuronavigation station. A postprocedural CT was obtained to assess the extent of decompression and the accuracy of instrumentation. Intraoperative registration revealed computed accuracy 2 mm in 9/158 screws (5.6%), allowing immediate correction in five screws without any damage to vessels or nerves. There were three transient complications with clinical improvement in all patients. Intraoperative CT in combination with neuronavigation provides high accuracy of screw placement and thus safety for patients undergoing spinal stabilization. The procedure is rapid and easy to perform and - by replacing pre- and postoperative imaging-is not associated with additional exposure to radiation. (orig.)

  19. Acute hypotension in a patient undergoing posttraumatic cervical spine fusion with somatosensory and motor-evoked potential monitoring while under total intravenous anesthesia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, David F

    2009-02-01

    Hypotension should be vigilantly prevented in patients with spinal cord injury. Recent advances in neurological, intraoperative monitoring techniques have allowed Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists to assess the effects of spinal cord ischemia and compression as they occur. This case report describes a young, healthy man who sustained a cervical spine fracture and was scheduled for anterior spinal fusion with somatosensory and motor-evoked potential (MEP) monitoring while under total intravenous anesthesia. This patient experienced a brief period of intraoperative hypotension with evidence of abnormal MEPs. A wake-up test was performed, which showed normal functioning, and the case resumed an uneventful course. Although this scenario resulted in no neurological sequelae, the effects of spinal cord ischemia due to hypotension can lead to permanent, devastating motor and sensory damage.

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal ... What is a spinal cord injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a ...

  1. Remotely sensed data fusion for offshore wind energy resource mapping; Fusion de donnees satellitaires pour la cartographie du potentiel eolien offshore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Ticha, M.B

    2007-11-15

    Wind energy is a component of an energy policy contributing to a sustainable development. Last years, offshore wind parks have been installed offshore. These parks benefit from higher wind speeds and lower turbulence than onshore. To sit a wind park, it is necessary to have a mapping of wind resource. These maps are needed at high spatial resolution to show wind energy resource variations at the scale of a wind park. Wind resource mapping is achieved through the description of the spatial variations of statistical parameters characterizing wind climatology. For a precise estimation of these statistical parameters, high temporal resolution wind speed and direction measurements are needed. However, presently, there is no data source allying high spatial resolution and high temporal resolution. We propose a data fusion method taking advantage of the high spatial resolution of some remote sensing instruments (synthetic aperture radars) and the high temporal resolution of other remote sensing instruments (scatterometers). The data fusion method is applied to a case study and the results quality is assessed. The results show the pertinence of data fusion for the mapping of wind energy resource offshore. (author)

  2. International Spinal Cord Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvorak, M F; Itshayek, E; Fehlings, M G

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Survey of expert opinion, feedback and final consensus. OBJECTIVE: To describe the development and the variables included in the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data set. SETTING: International working group. METHODS......: A committee of experts was established to select and define data elements. The data set was then disseminated to the appropriate committees and organizations for comments. All suggested revisions were considered and both the International Spinal Cord Society and the American Spinal Injury Association endorsed...... spinal intervention and procedure is coded (variables 1 through 7) and the spinal segment level is described (variables 8 and 9). Sample clinical cases were developed to illustrate how to complete it. CONCLUSION: The International SCI Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data Set...

  3. Vertebral Osteomyelitis Caused by Mycobacterium abscessus Surgically Treated Using Antibacterial Iodine-Supported Instrumentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Kato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium abscessus infections rarely develop in healthy individuals, and mostly they occur in immunocompromised hosts. Vertebral osteomyelitis due to Mycobacterium abscessus is very rare and only three previous cases of spinal infection caused by Mycobacterium abscessus have been reported. Mycobacterium abscessus isolates are uniformly resistant to antituberculous agents and can display a virulent biofilm-forming phenotype. The patient was a 67-year-old woman with vertebral osteomyelitis of the L1-2. She was healthy without immune-suppressed condition, history of trauma, or intravenous drug use. The smear examination of the specimen harvested by CT-guided puncture of the paravertebral abscess revealed Mycobacterium abscessus. Her disease condition did not abate with conservative treatment using antimicrobial chemotherapy. Radical debridement of the vertebral osteomyelitis and anterior reconstruction from T12 to L2 using antibacterial iodine-supported instrumentation were performed. Chemotherapy using clarithromycin, amikacin, and imipenem was applied for 6 months after surgery as these antibiotics had been proven to be effective to Mycobacterium abscessus after surgery. Two years after surgery, the infected anterior site healed and bony fusion was successfully achieved without a recurrence of infection.

  4. Epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma metastasis to the thoracic spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, C Rory; Khattab, Mohamed H; Sankey, Eric W; Crane, Genevieve M; McCarthy, Edward F; Sciubba, Daniel M

    2016-02-01

    Epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma (EMC) is a very rare salivary gland malignancy accounting for less than 1% of salivary gland tumors, and classically arises from the parotid gland in females. Spinal cord compression caused by EMC metastasized from the parotid gland has only been described once in the literature to our knowledge. We report the first case of a patient with parotid EMC spinal metastasis undergoing a gross total resection with instrumented fusion. This case illustrates that an en bloc resection with a planned transgression through the spinal canal may be a reasonable option for EMC metastasized to the spine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Spinal cysts. Diagnostic workup and therapy; Spinale Zysten. Diagnostik und Therapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simgen, A. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2018-02-15

    Spinal cysts can be classified as meningeal, not meningeal, and tumor-associated cysts. Due to the widespread availability of high-resolution computed tomography and magnet resonance imaging, spinal cysts can be detected with high sensitivity these days. Concerning the variety of potential cystic differential diagnoses, a precise classification is difficult and can often only be realized after surgical inspection or histological examination. Spinal cysts are generally incidental findings during a routine diagnostic workup and need no further therapy. Surgical treatment can be necessary if the spinal cyst reaches a certain size and causes neurological symptoms due to the compression of the spinal cord or the nerve root. (orig.) [German] Spinale Zysten koennen in meningeale, nichtmeningeale und tumorassoziierte Zysten eingeteilt werden. Durch die weite Verbreitung von hochaufloesenden Computer- und Magnetresonanztomographen koennen spinale Zysten heutzutage mit einer hohen Sensitivitaet erkannt werden. Eine genaue Klassifikation kann sich unter der Vielzahl der moeglichen zystischen Differenzialdiagnosen schwierig gestalten und ist haeufig nur durch eine chirurgische Inspektion oder die histologische Untersuchung moeglich. Meistens werden spinale Zysten bei der Routinediagnostik als Zufallsbefunde entdeckt und benoetigen keine weitere Therapie. Erreichen sie allerdings eine gewisse Groesse, koennen sie raumfordernd auf das Myelon oder einzelne Nervenwurzeln wirken und somit ausgepraegte neurologische Symptome verursachen. In solchen Faellen ist ein chirurgisches Vorgehen zur Resektion einer spinalen Zyste notwendig. (orig.)

  6. Rational decision making in a wide scenario of different minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion approaches and devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, Luiz; Tohmeh, Antoine; Jones, David; Amaral, Rodrigo; Marchi, Luis; Oliveira, Leonardo; Pittman, Bruce C; Bae, Hyun

    2018-03-01

    With the proliferation of a variety of modern MIS spine surgery procedures, it is mandatory that the surgeon dominate all aspects involved in surgical indication. The information related to the decision making in patient selection for specific procedures is mandatory for surgical success. The objective of this study is to present decision-making criteria in minimally invasive surgery (MIS) selection for a variety of patients and pathologies. In this article, practicing surgeons who specialize in various MIS approaches for spinal fusion were engaged to provide expert opinion and literature review on decision making criteria for several MIS procedures. Pros, cons, relative limitations, and case examples are provided for patient selection in treatment with MIS posterolateral fusion (MIS-PLF), mini anterior lumbar interbody fusion (mini-ALIF), lateral interbody fusion (LLIF), MIS posterior lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-PLIF) and MIS transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF). There is a variety of aspects to consider when deciding which modern MIS surgical approach is most appropriate to use based on patient and pathologic characteristics. The surgeon must adapt them to the characteristic of each type of patients, helping them to choose the most effective and efficient therapeutic option for each case.

  7. Does the application site of spinal manipulative therapy alter spinal tissues loading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funabashi, Martha; Nougarou, François; Descarreaux, Martin; Prasad, Narasimha; Kawchuk, Gregory N

    2018-01-31

    Previous studies found that the intervertebral disc (IVD) experiences the greatest loads during spinal manipulation therapy (SMT). Based on that, this study aimed to determine if loads experienced by spinal tissues are significantly altered when the application site of SMT is changed. A biomechanical robotic serial dissection study. Thirteen porcine cadaveric motion segments. Forces experienced by lumbar spinal tissues. A servo-controlled linear actuator provided standardized 300 N SMT simulations to six different cutaneous locations of the porcine lumbar spine: L2-L3 and L3-L4 facet joints (FJ), L3 and L4 transverse processes (TVP), and the space between the FJs and the TVPs (BTW). Vertebral kinematics were tracked optically using indwelling bone pins; the motion segment was removed and mounted in a parallel robot equipped with a six-axis load cell. Movements of each SMT application at each site were replayed by the robot with the intact specimen and following the sequential removal of spinal ligaments, FJs and IVD. Forces induced by SMT were recorded, and specific axes were analyzed using linear mixed models. Analyses yielded a significant difference (p<.05) in spinal structures loads as a function of the application site. Spinal manipulative therapy application at the L3 vertebra caused vertebral movements and forces between L3 and L4 spinal segment in the opposite direction to when SMT was applied at L4 vertebra. Additionally, SMT applications over the soft tissue between adjacent vertebrae significantly decreased spinal structure loads. Applying SMT with a constant force at different spinal levels creates different relative kinetics of the spinal segments and load spinal tissues in significantly different magnitudes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Spin-off produced by the fusion research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Koichi; Konishi, T.; Tsuji, Hiroshi

    2001-03-01

    Nuclear fusion devices are constructed by the integration of many frontier technologies and fusion science based on a wide area of science such as physics, electromagnetics, thermodynamics, mechanics, electrical engineering, electronics, material engineering, heat transfer and heat flow, thermal engineering, neutronics, cryogenics, chemical engineering, control engineering, instrumentation engineering, vacuum engineering. For this, the research and development of elementary technology for fusion devices contributes to advance the technology level of each basic field. In addition, the mutual stimulus among various research fields contributes to increase the potential level of whole 'science and technology'. The spin-offs produced by the fusion technology development give much contribution not only to the general industrial technologies such as semiconductor technology, precision machining of large component, but also contribute to the progress of the accelerator technology, application technology of superconductivity, instrumentation and diagnostics, plasma application technology, heat-resistant and heavy radiation-resistant material technology, vacuum technology, and computer simulation technology. The spin-off produced by the fusion technology development expedite the development of frontier technology of other field and give much contribution to the progress of basic science on physics, space science, material science, medical science, communication, and environment. This report describes the current status of the spin-off effects of fusion research and development by focusing on the contribution of technology development for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) to industrial technology. The possibilities of future application in the future are also included in this report from the view point of researchers working for nuclear fusion development. Although the nuclear fusion research has a characteristic to integrate the frontier technologies of

  9. Glioblastoma with spinal seeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakhrai, N.; Fazeny-Doerner, B.; Marosi, C.; Czech, T.; Diekmann, K.; Birner, P.; Hainfellner, J.A.; Prayer, D.

    2004-01-01

    Background: extracranial seeding of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is very rare and its development depends on several factors. This case report describes two patients suffering from GBM with spinal seeding. In both cases, the anatomic localization of the primary tumor close to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was the main factor for spinal seeding. Case reports: two patients with GBM and spinal seeding are presented. After diagnosis of spinal seeding, both patients were highly symptomatic from their spinal lesions. Case 1 experienced severe pain requiring opiates, and case 2 had paresis of lower limbs as well as urinary retention/incontinence. Both patients were treated with spinal radiation therapy. Nevertheless, they died 3 months after diagnosis of spinal seeding. Results: in both patients the diagnosis of spinal seeding was made at the time of cranial recurrence. Both tumors showed close contact to the CSF initially. Even though the patients underwent intensive treatment, it was not possible to keep them in a symptom-free state. Conclusion: because of short survival periods, patients deserve optimal pain management and dedicated palliative care. (orig.)

  10. Glioblastoma with spinal seeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhrai, N.; Fazeny-Doerner, B.; Marosi, C. [Clinical Div. of Oncology, Dept. of Medicine I, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Czech, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Diekmann, K. [Dept. of Radiooncology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Birner, P.; Hainfellner, J.A. [Clinical Inst. for Neurology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Prayer, D. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)

    2004-07-01

    Background: extracranial seeding of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is very rare and its development depends on several factors. This case report describes two patients suffering from GBM with spinal seeding. In both cases, the anatomic localization of the primary tumor close to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was the main factor for spinal seeding. Case reports: two patients with GBM and spinal seeding are presented. After diagnosis of spinal seeding, both patients were highly symptomatic from their spinal lesions. Case 1 experienced severe pain requiring opiates, and case 2 had paresis of lower limbs as well as urinary retention/incontinence. Both patients were treated with spinal radiation therapy. Nevertheless, they died 3 months after diagnosis of spinal seeding. Results: in both patients the diagnosis of spinal seeding was made at the time of cranial recurrence. Both tumors showed close contact to the CSF initially. Even though the patients underwent intensive treatment, it was not possible to keep them in a symptom-free state. Conclusion: because of short survival periods, patients deserve optimal pain management and dedicated palliative care. (orig.)

  11. Learning About Time Within the Spinal Cord II: Evidence that Temporal Regularity is Encoded by a Spinal Oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan Hsien Lee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available How a stimulus impacts spinal cord function depends upon temporal relations. When intermittent noxious stimulation (shock is applied and the interval between shock pulses is varied (unpredictable, it induces a lasting alteration that inhibits adaptive learning. If the same stimulus is applied in a temporally regular (predictable manner, the capacity to learn is preserved and a protective/restorative effect is engaged that counters the adverse effect of variable stimulation. Sensitivity to temporal relations implies a capacity to encode time. This study explores how spinal neurons discriminate variable and fixed spaced stimulation. Communication with the brain was blocked by means of a spinal transection and adaptive capacity was tested using an instrumental learning task. In this task, subjects must learn to maintain a hind limb in a flexed position to minimize shock exposure. To evaluate the possibility that a distinct class of afferent fibers provide a sensory cue for regularity, we manipulated the temporal relation between shocks given to two dermatomes (leg and tail. Evidence for timing emerged when the stimuli were applied in a coherent manner across dermatomes, implying that a central (spinal process detects regularity. Next, we show that fixed spaced stimulation has a restorative effect when half the physical stimuli are randomly omitted, as long as the stimuli remain in phase, suggesting that stimulus regularity is encoded by an internal oscillator Research suggests that the oscillator that drives the tempo of stepping depends upon neurons within the rostral lumbar (L1-L2 region. Disrupting communication with the L1-L2 tissue by means of a L3 transection eliminated the restorative effect of fixed spaced stimulation. Implications of the results for step training and rehabilitation after injury are discussed.

  12. Intraoperative visible bubbling of air may be the first sign of venous air embolism during posterior surgery for scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, John; Schwend, Richard M; Paterson, Andrew; Albin, Maurice S

    2005-10-15

    Case report of two children sustaining venous air embolism (VAE) during posterior surgery for scoliosis. To report 2 cases where visible bubbling at the operative site was the first clinical indication of VAE-induced cardiovascular collapse and to raise the level of consciousness that VAE in the prone position can occur, often with serious consequences. Twenty-two cases of VAE during surgery for scoliosis in the prone position have been reported. Ten were fatal and ten were in children. Visible bubbling at the operative site was noted in two published cases. Retrospective study of 2 cases of VAE at one institution. Clinical, anesthetic, and radiographic features are presented. Details of previously published cases are reviewed and discussed. Both patients were girls with adolescent scoliosis who underwent prone positioned posterior spinal fusion with instrumentation. Visible bubbling of air at the thoracic aspect of the surgical site was noted near the completion of instrumentation and was the first indication of VAE. In both cases, this was clinically recognized and promptly treated. One patient survived normally and the other died. Visible air bubbling at the operative site may herald the onset of massive VAE during multilevel posterior spinal fusion and instrumentation. A prospective multicenter study using precordial Doppler, central venous catheter, and end-tidal CO2 is recommended to determine the true incidence of VAE in spinal deformity surgery and to evaluate monitoring and treatment methods.

  13. Tritium monitor for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalbert, R.A.

    1982-08-01

    This report describes the design, operation, and performance of a flow-through ion-chamber instrument designed to measure tritium concentrations in air containing /sup 13/N, /sup 16/N, and /sup 41/Ar produced by neutrons generated by D-T fusion devices. The instrument employs a chamber assembly consisting of two coaxial ionization chambers. The inner chamber is the flow-through measuring chamber and the outer chamber is used for current subtraction. A thin wall common to both chambers is opaque to the tritium betas. Currents produced in the two chambers by higher energy radiation are automatically subtracted, leaving only the current due to tritium.

  14. Spinal Surgeon Variation in Single-Level Cervical Fusion Procedures: A Cost and Hospital Resource Utilization Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijji, Fady Y; Massel, Dustin H; Mayo, Benjamin C; Narain, Ankur S; Long, William W; Modi, Krishna D; Burke, Rory M; Canar, Jeff; Singh, Kern

    2017-07-01

    Retrospective analysis. To compare perioperative costs and outcomes of patients undergoing single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusions (ACDF) at both a service (orthopedic vs. neurosurgical) and individual surgeon level. Hospital systems are experiencing significant pressure to increase value of care by reducing costs while maintaining or improving patient-centered outcomes. Few studies have examined the cost-effectiveness cervical arthrodesis at a service level. A retrospective review of patients who underwent a primary 1-level ACDF by eight surgeons (four orthopedic and four neurosurgical) at a single academic institution between 2013 and 2015 was performed. Patients were identified by Diagnosis-Related Group and procedural codes. Patients with the ninth revision of the International Classification of Diseases coding for degenerative cervical pathology were included. Patients were excluded if they exhibited preoperative diagnoses or postoperative social work issues affecting their length of stay. Comparisons of preoperative demographics were performed using Student t tests and chi-squared analysis. Perioperative outcomes and costs for hospital services were compared using multivariate regression adjusted for preoperative characteristics. A total of 137 patients diagnosed with cervical degeneration underwent single-level ACDF; 44 and 93 were performed by orthopedic surgeons and neurosurgeons, respectively. There was no difference in patient demographics. ACDF procedures performed by orthopedic surgeons demonstrated shorter operative times (89.1 ± 25.5 vs. 96.0 ± 25.5 min; P = 0.002) and higher laboratory costs (Δ+$6.53 ± $5.52 USD; P = 0.041). There were significant differences in operative time (P = 0.014) and labor costs (P = 0.034) between individual surgeons. There was no difference in total costs between specialties or individual surgeons. Surgical subspecialty training does not significantly affect total costs of

  15. Pediatric spinal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The infections of the spinal axis in children are rare when compared with adults. They encompass a large spectrum of diseases ranging from relatively benign diskitis to spinal osteomyleitis and to the rapidly progressive, rare, and potentially devastating spinal epidural, subdural, and intramedullary spinal cord infections. We present a comprehensive review of the literature pertaining to these uncommon entities, in light of our experience from northern India. The most prevalent pediatric spinal infection in Indian scenario is tuberculosis, where an extradural involvement is more common than intradural. The craniovertebral junction is not an uncommon site of involvement in children of our milieu. The majority of pyogenic infections of pediatric spine are associated with congenital neuro-ectodermal defects such as congenital dermal sinus. The clinico-radiological findings of various spinal infections commonly overlap. Hence the endemicity of certain pathogens should be given due consideration, while considering the differential diagnosis. However, early suspicion, rapid diagnosis, and prompt treatment are the key factors in avoiding neurological morbidity and deformity in a growing child.

  16. Human spinal motor control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    Human studies in the past three decades have provided us with an emerging understanding of how cortical and spinal networks collaborate to ensure the vast repertoire of human behaviors. We differ from other animals in having direct cortical connections to spinal motoneurons, which bypass spinal...... the central motor command by opening or closing sensory feedback pathways. In the future, human studies of spinal motor control, in close collaboration with animal studies on the molecular biology of the spinal cord, will continue to document the neural basis for human behavior. Expected final online...

  17. Use of the ORACLE DBMS in determining the response of complex scientific instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, J.M.; DeMartini, B.J.; McCauley, E.W.

    1984-01-01

    In the Laser Fusion Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a single laser fusion experiment lasts only a billionth of a second but in this time high speed instrumentation collects data that when digitized will create a data bank of several megabytes. This first level of data must be processed in several stages to put it in a form useful for interpretation of the experiments. One stage involves unfolding the source characteristics from the data and response of the instrument. This involves calculating the response of the instrument from the characteristics of each of its components. It is in this calculation that the ORACLE DBMS has become an invaluable tool for manipulation and archiving of the component data

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 ...

  19. Plans for the CIT [Compact Ignition Tokamak] instrumentation and control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preckshot, G.G.

    1987-01-01

    Extensive experience with previous fusion experiments (TFTR, MFTF-B and others) is driving the design of the Instrumentation and Control System (I and C) for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) to be built at Princeton. The new design will reuse much equipment from TFTR and will be subdivided into six major parts: machine control, machine data acquisition, plasma diagnostic instrument control and instrument data acquisition, the database, shot sequencing and safety interlocks. In a major departure from previous fusion experiment control systems, the CIT machine control system will be a commercial process control system. Since the machine control system will be purchased as a completely functional product, we will be able to concentrate development manpower in plasma diagnostic instrument control, data acquisition, data processing and analysis, and database systems. We will discuss the issues driving the design, give a design overview and state the requirements upon any prospective commercial process control system

  20. Predictors of Oswestry Disability Index worsening after lumbar fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gum, Jeffrey L; Carreon, Leah Y; Stimac, Jeffrey D; Glassman, Steven D

    2013-04-01

    The authors identified patients with an increase in their Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score after lumbar spine fusion to evaluate whether this is a plausible definition of deterioration and to determine whether any common patient characteristics exist.A total of 1054 patients who underwent lumbar spinal fusion and had 2-year follow-up data, including the Short Form 36, the ODI, and numeric rating scales for back and leg pain, were identified. Patients with worsening ODI were compared with the remaining cohort. Twenty-eight patients had an absolute increase (worse) in ODI at 1 year postoperatively. Participants with worsening ODI scores included 13 men and 15 women with an average age of 43.3 years; 15 (54%) were smokers. Common medical comorbidities included obesity and hypertension. Complications occurred in 5 (18%) patients and included wound infection, dural tear, and nerve root injury. Pseudarthrosis was common (n=8; 28%). Twenty-one patients required an additional intervention, including epidural injections, fusion revision, and cervical spine surgery.It is important to have a clear definition of deterioration to better provide informed consent or choice of treatment. Only 28 (2.6%) patients were identified as having an increase in ODI score at 2-year follow-up. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Spinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Oezsarlak, Oe.; Schepper, A.M.A. de; Parizel, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal tumors are uncommon lesions but may cause significant morbidity in terms of limb dysfunction. In establishing the differential diagnosis for a spinal lesion, location is the most important feature, but the clinical presentation and the patient's age and gender are also important. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays a central role in the imaging of spinal tumors, easily allowing tumors to be classified as extradural, intradural-extramedullary or intramedullary, which is very useful in tumor characterization. In the evaluation of lesions of the osseous spine both computed tomography (CT) and MR are important. We describe the most common spinal tumors in detail. In general, extradural lesions are the most common with metastasis being the most frequent. Intradural tumors are rare, and the majority is extramedullary, with meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors being the most frequent. Intramedullary tumors are uncommon spinal tumors. Astrocytomas and ependymomas comprise the majority of the intramedullary tumors. The most important tumors are documented with appropriate high quality CT or MR images and the characteristics of these tumors are also summarized in a comprehensive table. Finally we illustrate the use of the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of neoplasms affecting the central nervous system

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David ...

  3. Local bone graft harvesting and volumes in posterolateral lumbar fusion: a technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carragee, Eugene J; Comer, Garet C; Smith, Micah W

    2011-06-01

    In lumbar surgery, local bone graft is often harvested and used in posterolateral fusion procedures. The volume of local bone graft available for posterolateral fusion has not been determined in North American patients. Some authors have described this as minimal, but others have suggested the volume was sufficient to be reliably used as a stand-alone bone graft substitute for single-level fusion. To describe the technique used and determine the volume of local bone graft available in a cohort of patients undergoing single-level primary posterolateral fusion by the authors harvesting technique. Technical description and cohort report. Consecutive patients undergoing lumbar posterolateral fusion with or without instrumentation for degenerative processes. Local bone graft volume. Consecutive patients undergoing lumbar posterolateral fusion with or without instrumentation for degenerative processes of were studied. Local bone graft was harvested by a standard method in each patient and the volume measured by a standard procedure. Twenty-five patients were studied, and of these 11 (44%) had a previous decompression. The mean volume of local bone graft harvested was measured to be 25 cc (range, 12-36 cc). Local bone graft was augmented by iliac crest bone in six of 25 patients (24%) if the posterolateral fusion bed was not well packed with local bone alone. There was a trend to greater local bone graft volumes in men and in patients without previous decompression. Large volumes of local bone can be harvested during posterolateral lumbar fusion surgery. Even in patients with previous decompression the volume harvested is similar to that reported harvested from the posterior iliac crest for single-level fusion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Application of Lean Principles to Neurosurgical Procedures: The Case of Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery, a Literature Review and Pilot Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jesse J; Raskin, Jeffrey S; Hardaway, Fran; Holste, Katherine; Brown, Sarah; Raslan, Ahmed M

    2018-03-14

    Delivery of higher value healthcare is an ultimate government and public goal. Improving efficiency by standardization of surgical steps can improve patient outcomes, reduce costs, and lead to higher value healthcare. Lean principles and methodology have improved timeliness in perioperative medicine; however, process mapping of surgery itself has not been performed. To apply Plan/Do/Study/Act (PDSA) cycles methodology to lumbar posterior instrumented fusion (PIF) using lean principles to create a standard work flow, identify waste, remove intraoperative variability, and examine feasibility among pilot cases. Process maps for 5 PIF procedures were created by a PDSA cycle from 1 faculty neurosurgeon at 1 institution. Plan, modularize PIF into basic components; Do, map and time components; Study, analyze results; and Act, identify waste. Waste inventories, spaghetti diagrams, and chartings of time spent per step were created. Procedural steps were broadly defined in order to compare steps despite the variability in PIF and were analyzed with box and whisker plots to evaluate variability. Temporal variabilities in duration of decompression vs closure and hardware vs closure were significantly different (P = .003). Variability in procedural step duration was smallest for closure and largest for exposure. Wastes including waiting and instrument defects accounted for 15% and 66% of all waste, respectively. This pilot series demonstrates that lean principles can standardize surgical workflows and identify waste. Though time and labor intensive, lean principles and PDSA methodology can be applied to operative steps, not just the perioperative period.

  5. Outcomes of oblique lateral interbody fusion for degenerative lumbar disease in patients under or over 65 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chengzhen; Jaiswal, Milin S; Jeun, Sin-Soo; Ryu, Kyeong-Sik; Hur, Jung-Woo; Kim, Jin-Sung

    2018-02-20

    Oblique lateral interbody fusion (OLIF) offers the solution to problems of anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) and lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF). However, OLIF technique for degenerative spinal diseases of elderly patients has been rarely reported. The objective of this study was to determine the clinical and radiological results of OLIF technique for degenerative spinal diseases in patients under or over 65 years of age. Sixty-three patients who underwent OLIF procedure were enrolled, including 29 patients who were less than 65 years of age and 34 patients who were over 65 years of age. Fusion rate, change of disc height and lumbar lordotic angle, Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), return to daily activity, patient's satisfaction rate (PSR), and Oswestry disability index (ODI) were used to assess clinical and functional outcomes. The mean NRS scores for back and leg pain decreased, respectively, from 4.6 and 5.9 to 2.3 and 1.8 in the group A (less than 65 years) and from 4.5 and 6.8 to 2.6 and 2.2 in the group B (over 65 years) at the final follow-up period. The mean ODI scores improved from 48.4 to 24.0% in the group A and from 46.5 to 25.2% in the group B at the final follow-up period. In both groups, the NRS and ODI scores significantly changed preoperatively to postoperatively (p degenerative lumbar diseases in elderly patients showed favorable clinical and radiological outcomes.

  6. Changes in lumbosacral spinal nerve roots on diffusion tensor imaging in spinal stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-jun Hou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbosacral degenerative disc disease is a common cause of lower back and leg pain. Conventional T1-weighted imaging (T1WI and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI scans are commonly used to image spinal cord degeneration. However, these modalities are unable to image the entire lumbosacral spinal nerve roots. Thus, in the present study, we assessed the potential of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI for quantitative assessment of compressed lumbosacral spinal nerve roots. Subjects were 20 young healthy volunteers and 31 patients with lumbosacral stenosis. T2WI showed that the residual dural sac area was less than two-thirds that of the corresponding normal area in patients from L 3 to S 1 stenosis. On T1WI and T2WI, 74 lumbosacral spinal nerve roots from 31 patients showed compression changes. DTI showed thinning and distortion in 36 lumbosacral spinal nerve roots (49% and abruption in 17 lumbosacral spinal nerve roots (23%. Moreover, fractional anisotropy values were reduced in the lumbosacral spinal nerve roots of patients with lumbosacral stenosis. These findings suggest that DTI can objectively and quantitatively evaluate the severity of lumbosacral spinal nerve root compression.

  7. Changes in lumbosacral spinal nerve roots on diffusion tensor imaging in spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zhong-Jun; Huang, Yong; Fan, Zi-Wen; Li, Xin-Chun; Cao, Bing-Yi

    2015-11-01

    Lumbosacral degenerative disc disease is a common cause of lower back and leg pain. Conventional T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) scans are commonly used to image spinal cord degeneration. However, these modalities are unable to image the entire lumbosacral spinal nerve roots. Thus, in the present study, we assessed the potential of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for quantitative assessment of compressed lumbosacral spinal nerve roots. Subjects were 20 young healthy volunteers and 31 patients with lumbosacral stenosis. T2WI showed that the residual dural sac area was less than two-thirds that of the corresponding normal area in patients from L3 to S1 stenosis. On T1WI and T2WI, 74 lumbosacral spinal nerve roots from 31 patients showed compression changes. DTI showed thinning and distortion in 36 lumbosacral spinal nerve roots (49%) and abruption in 17 lumbosacral spinal nerve roots (23%). Moreover, fractional anisotropy values were reduced in the lumbosacral spinal nerve roots of patients with lumbosacral stenosis. These findings suggest that DTI can objectively and quantitatively evaluate the severity of lumbosacral spinal nerve root compression.

  8. Biomechanical evaluation of different instrumentation for spinal stabilisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graftiaux, A G; Wattier, B; Gentil, P; Mazel, C; Skalli, W; Diop, A; Kehr, P H; Lavaste, F

    1995-12-01

    The varying problems following arthrodesis of the lumbar spine with rods or plates (too much rigidity for the first and insufficient stability for the second) have led us to conceive another type of material, flexible but with enough stability, to favorise healing of bone graft, and decrease the induced pathology on adjacent levels. An experimental study of three types of material: rigid, semi-rigid and flexible was performed on eighteen fresh cadaver spinal segments without and then with discectomy and corporectomy to find out the various types of behaviour. The flexible device seems more supple than the other materials tested: more mobility, less stiffness. Rising hysteresis is explained by plastic deformation. The semi-rigid device presents strong osseous stresses on the L3 level and a large hysteresis corresponding most likely to a mobility between the screws and plates. The rigid device has less mobility, especially in torsion, ascribed to the transverse connection. The stability is high with a small hysteresis. This is of value for bone loss or instability with displacement of the vertebral body.The second study was a modeling of the flexible device validated by comparison to the experimental study. The strains in the wire were high, decreasing with increasing diameter, but is still lower than the elastic limit. The proximity of the elastic limit may allow plastic deformation of the wire. Howewer less strains were found on the screw fixation but increase with the increase diameter of the wire. The influence of the bone quality on the behavior of the device was demonstrated.

  9. Spinal Cord Independence Measure, version III: applicability to the UK spinal cord injured population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Clive A; Tesio, Luigi; Itzkovich, Malka; Soni, Bakul M; Silva, Pedro; Mecci, Munawar; Chadwick, Raymond; el Masry, Waghi; Osman, Aheed; Savic, Gordana; Gardner, Brian; Bergström, Ebba; Catz, Amiram

    2009-09-01

    To examine the validity, reliability and usefulness of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure for the UK spinal cord injury population. Multi-centre cohort study. Four UK regional spinal cord injury centres. Eighty-six people with spinal cord injury. Spinal Cord Independence Measure and Functional Independence Measure on admission analysed using inferential statistics, and Rasch analysis of Spinal Cord Independence Measure. Internal consistency, inter-rater reliability, discriminant validity; Spinal Cord Independence Measure subscale match between distribution of item difficulty and patient ability measurements; reliability of patient ability measures; fit of data to Rasch model; unidimensionality of subscales; hierarchical ordering of categories within items; differential item functioning across patient groups. Scale reliability (kappa coefficients range 0.491-0.835; (p Spinal Cord Independence Measure subscales compatible with stringent Rasch requirements; mean infit indices high; distinct strata of abilities identified; most thresholds ordered; item hierarchy stable across clinical groups and centres. Misfit and differences in item hierarchy identified. Difficulties assessing central cord injuries highlighted. Conventional statistical and Rasch analyses justify the use of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure in clinical practice and research in the UK. Cross-cultural validity may be further improved.

  10. Perioperative morbidity and mortality after lumbar trauma in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Ethan A; Yue, John K; Birk, Harjus; Robinson, Caitlin K; Manley, Geoffrey T; Dhall, Sanjay S; Tarapore, Phiroz E

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT Traumatic fractures of the thoracolumbar spine are common injuries, accounting for approximately 90% of all spinal trauma. Lumbar spine trauma in the elderly is a growing public health problem with relatively little evidence to guide clinical management. The authors sought to characterize the complications, morbidity, and mortality associated with surgical and nonsurgical management in elderly patients with traumatic fractures of the lumbar spine. METHODS Using the National Sample Program of the National Trauma Data Bank, the authors performed a retrospective analysis of patients ≥ 55 years of age who had traumatic fracture to the lumbar spine. This group was divided into middle-aged (55-69 years) and elderly (≥ 70 years) cohorts. Cohorts were subdivided into nonoperative, vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty, noninstrumented surgery, and instrumented surgery. Univariate and multivariable analyses were used to characterize and identify predictors of medical and surgical complications, mortality, hospital length of stay, ICU length of stay, number of days on ventilator, and hospital discharge in each subgroup. Adjusted odds ratios, mean differences, and associated 95% CIs were reported. Statistical significance was assessed at p elderly is associated with increased morbidity. In particular, instrumented fusion is associated with periprocedural complications, prolonged hospitalization, and a decreased likelihood of being discharged home. However, fusion surgery is also associated with reduced mortality. Age alone should not be an exclusionary factor in identifying surgical candidates for instrumented lumbar spinal fusion. Future studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, ... Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injury? play_arrow What kind of surgery is common after a spinal cord injury? play_ ... How soon after a spinal cord injury should surgery be performed? play_arrow Is it common to ...

  13. Late presentation of superior mesenteric artery syndrome following scoliosis surgery: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsirikos Athanasios I

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Obstruction of the third part of the duodenum by the superior mesenteric artery (SMA can occur following surgical correction of scoliosis. The condition most commonly occurs in significantly underweight patients with severe deformities during the first few days to a week following spinal surgery. Case presentation We present the atypical case of a patient with normal body habitus and a 50° adolescent idiopathic thoracolumbar scoliosis who underwent anterior spinal arthrodesis with instrumentation and developed SMA syndrome due to progressive weight loss several weeks postoperatively. The condition manifested with recurrent vomiting, abdominal distension, marked dehydration, and severe electrolyte disorder. Prolonged nasogastric decompression and nasojejunal feeding resulted in resolution of the symptoms with no recurrence at follow-up. The spinal instrumentation was retained and a solid spinal fusion was achieved with good spinal balance in both the coronal and sagittal planes. Conclusion SMA syndrome can occur much later than previously reported and with potentially life-threatening symptoms following scoliosis correction. Early recognition of the condition and institution of appropriate conservative measures is critical to prevent the development of severe complications including the risk of death.

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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