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Sample records for inotocin receptor quantitative

  1. Development of a human vasopressin V1a-receptor antagonist from an evolutionary-related insect neuropeptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Giglio, Maria Giulia; Muttenthaler, Markus; Harpsøe, Kasper; Liutkeviciute, Zita; Keov, Peter; Eder, Thomas; Rattei, Thomas; Arrowsmith, Sarah; Wray, Susan; Marek, Ales; Elbert, Tomas; Alewood, Paul F.; Gloriam, David E.; Gruber, Christian W.

    2017-02-01

    Characterisation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) relies on the availability of a toolbox of ligands that selectively modulate different functional states of the receptors. To uncover such molecules, we explored a unique strategy for ligand discovery that takes advantage of the evolutionary conservation of the 600-million-year-old oxytocin/vasopressin signalling system. We isolated the insect oxytocin/vasopressin orthologue inotocin from the black garden ant (Lasius niger), identified and cloned its cognate receptor and determined its pharmacological properties on the insect and human oxytocin/vasopressin receptors. Subsequently, we identified a functional dichotomy: inotocin activated the insect inotocin and the human vasopressin V1b receptors, but inhibited the human V1aR. Replacement of Arg8 of inotocin by D-Arg8 led to a potent, stable and competitive V1aR-antagonist ([D-Arg8]-inotocin) with a 3,000-fold binding selectivity for the human V1aR over the other three subtypes, OTR, V1bR and V2R. The Arg8/D-Arg8 ligand-pair was further investigated to gain novel insights into the oxytocin/vasopressin peptide-receptor interaction, which led to the identification of key residues of the receptors that are important for ligand functionality and selectivity. These observations could play an important role for development of oxytocin/vasopressin receptor modulators that would enable clear distinction of the physiological and pathological responses of the individual receptor subtypes.

  2. Quantitative densitometry of neurotransmitter receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rainbow, T.C.; Bleisch, W.V.; Biegon, A.; McEwen, B.S.

    1982-01-01

    An autoradiographic procedure is described that allows the quantitative measurement of neurotransmitter receptors by optical density readings. Frozen brain sections are labeled in vitro with [ 3 H]ligands under conditions that maximize specific binding to neurotransmitter receptors. The labeled sections are then placed against the 3 H-sensitive LKB Ultrofilm to produce the autoradiograms. These autoradiograms resemble those produced by [ 14 C]deoxyglucose autoradiography and are suitable for quantitative analysis with a densitometer. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat and zebra finch brain and 5-HT receptors in rat brain were visualized by this method. When the proper combination of ligand concentration and exposure time are used, the method provides quantitative information about the amount and affinity of neurotransmitter receptors in brain sections. This was established by comparisons of densitometric readings with parallel measurements made by scintillation counting of sections. (Auth.)

  3. Quantitative analysis of receptor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Zhanli; Wang Rongfu

    2004-01-01

    Model-based methods for quantitative analysis of receptor imaging, including kinetic, graphical and equilibrium methods, are introduced in detail. Some technical problem facing quantitative analysis of receptor imaging, such as the correction for in vivo metabolism of the tracer and the radioactivity contribution from blood volume within ROI, and the estimation of the nondisplaceable ligand concentration, is also reviewed briefly

  4. Discovery of defense- and neuropeptides in social ants by genome-mining.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian W Gruber

    Full Text Available Natural peptides of great number and diversity occur in all organisms, but analyzing their peptidome is often difficult. With natural product drug discovery in mind, we devised a genome-mining approach to identify defense- and neuropeptides in the genomes of social ants from Atta cephalotes (leaf-cutter ant, Camponotus floridanus (carpenter ant and Harpegnathos saltator (basal genus. Numerous peptide-encoding genes of defense peptides, in particular defensins, and neuropeptides or regulatory peptide hormones, such as allatostatins and tachykinins, were identified and analyzed. Most interestingly we annotated genes that encode oxytocin/vasopressin-related peptides (inotocins and their putative receptors. This is the first piece of evidence for the existence of this nonapeptide hormone system in ants (Formicidae and supports recent findings in Tribolium castaneum (red flour beetle and Nasonia vitripennis (parasitoid wasp, and therefore its confinement to some basal holometabolous insects. By contrast, the absence of the inotocin hormone system in Apis mellifera (honeybee, another closely-related member of the eusocial Hymenoptera clade, establishes the basis for future studies on the molecular evolution and physiological function of oxytocin/vasopressin-related peptides (vasotocin nonapeptide family and their receptors in social insects. Particularly the identification of ant inotocin and defensin peptide sequences will provide a basis for future pharmacological characterization in the quest for potent and selective lead compounds of therapeutic value.

  5. Quantitative autoradiography of [3H]corticosterone receptors in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapolsky, R.M.; McEwen, B.S.; Rainbow, T.C.

    1983-01-01

    The authors have quantified corticosterone receptors in rat brain by optical density measurements of tritium-film autoradiograms. Rats were injected i.v. with 500 μCi [ 3 H]corticosterone to label brain receptors. Frozen sections of brain were cut with a cryostat and exposed for 2 months against tritium-sensitive sheet film (LKB Ultrofilm). Tritium standards were used to convert optical density readings into molar concentrations of receptor. High levels of corticosterone receptors were present throughout the pyramidal and granule cell layers of the hippocampus. Moderate levels of receptors were found in the neuropil of the hippocampus, the lateral septum, the cortical nucleus of the amygdala and the entorhinal cortex. All other brain regions had low levels of receptors. These results extend previous non-quantitative autoradigraphic studies of corticosterone receptors and provide a general procedure for the quantitative autoradiography of steroid hormone receptors in brain tissue. (Auth.)

  6. Development of a human vasopressin V-1a-receptor antagonist from an evolutionary-related insect neuropeptide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Di Giglio, M. G.; Muttenthaler, M.; Harpsoe, K.; Liutkeviciute, Z.; Keov, P.; Eder, T.; Rattei, T.; Arrowsmith, S.; Wray, S.; Marek, Aleš; Elbert, Tomáš; Alewood, P. F.; Gloriam, D. E.; Gruber, C. W.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, Feb 1 (2017), č. článku 41002. ISSN 2045-2322 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : neuropeptide * inotocin * V1aR-antagonist Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016 https://www.nature.com/articles/srep41002

  7. Quantitative immunolocalization of {mu} opioid receptors: regulation by naltrexone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, C.J.; Lam, H.; To, T.; Anton, B. [Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, Neuropsychiatric Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Unterwald, E.M. [Department of Psychiatry, New York University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    1998-04-24

    The present study utilized a newly developed quantitative immunohistochemical assay to measure changes in {mu} opioid receptor abundance following chronic administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone. These data were compared with those obtained from {mu} receptor radioligand binding on adjacent tissue sections, in order to determine whether the characteristic antagonist-induced increase in radioligand binding is due to an increase in the total number of {mu} receptors and/or to an increase in the proportion of receptors that are in an active binding conformation in the absence of a change in the total number of receptors. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered naltrexone, 7-8 mg/kg per day, or saline continuously for seven days by osmotic minipumps, after which time their brains were processed for immunohistochemistry and receptor autoradiography on adjacent fresh frozen tissue sections. Semiquantitative immunohistochemistry was performed using a radiolabelled secondary antibody for autoradiographic determination and a set of radioactive standards. Results demonstrate an overall concordance between the distribution of {mu} opioid receptors as measured by the two different methods with a few exceptions. Following naltrexone administration, {mu} receptor immunoreactivity was significantly higher in the amygdala, thalamus, hippocampus, and interpeduncular nucleus as compared with the saline-treated control animals. [{sup 3}H]D-Ala{sup 2},N-Me-Phe{sup 4},Gly-ol{sup 5}-enkephalin binding to {mu} opioid receptors was significantly higher in the globus pallidus, amygdala, thalamus, hypothalamus, hippocampus, substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, central gray, and interpeduncular nucleus of the naltrexone-treated rats.These findings indicate that in some brain regions chronic naltrexone exposure increases the total number of {mu} opioid receptors, while in other regions there is an increase in the percent of active receptors without an

  8. Quantitative immunolocalization of μ opioid receptors: regulation by naltrexone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, C.J.; Lam, H.; To, T.; Anton, B.; Unterwald, E.M.

    1998-01-01

    The present study utilized a newly developed quantitative immunohistochemical assay to measure changes in μ opioid receptor abundance following chronic administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone. These data were compared with those obtained from μ receptor radioligand binding on adjacent tissue sections, in order to determine whether the characteristic antagonist-induced increase in radioligand binding is due to an increase in the total number of μ receptors and/or to an increase in the proportion of receptors that are in an active binding conformation in the absence of a change in the total number of receptors. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered naltrexone, 7-8 mg/kg per day, or saline continuously for seven days by osmotic minipumps, after which time their brains were processed for immunohistochemistry and receptor autoradiography on adjacent fresh frozen tissue sections. Semiquantitative immunohistochemistry was performed using a radiolabelled secondary antibody for autoradiographic determination and a set of radioactive standards. Results demonstrate an overall concordance between the distribution of μ opioid receptors as measured by the two different methods with a few exceptions. Following naltrexone administration, μ receptor immunoreactivity was significantly higher in the amygdala, thalamus, hippocampus, and interpeduncular nucleus as compared with the saline-treated control animals. [ 3 H]D-Ala 2 ,N-Me-Phe 4 ,Gly-ol 5 -enkephalin binding to μ opioid receptors was significantly higher in the globus pallidus, amygdala, thalamus, hypothalamus, hippocampus, substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, central gray, and interpeduncular nucleus of the naltrexone-treated rats.These findings indicate that in some brain regions chronic naltrexone exposure increases the total number of μ opioid receptors, while in other regions there is an increase in the percent of active receptors without an observable change in the total number

  9. Quantitative receptor radioautography in the study of receptor-receptor interactions in the nucleus tractus solitarii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fior-Chadi D.R.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS in the dorsomedial medulla comprises a wide range of neuropeptides and biogenic amines. Several of them are related to mechanisms of central blood pressure control. Angiotensin II (Ang II, neuropeptide Y (NPY and noradrenaline (NA are found in the NTS cells, as well as their receptors. Based on this observation we have evaluated the modulatory effect of these peptide receptors on a2-adrenoceptors in the NTS. Using quantitative receptor radioautography, we observed that NPY and Ang II receptors decreased the affinity of a2-adrenoceptors for their agonists in the NTS of the rat. Cardiovascular experiments agreed with the in vitro data. Coinjection of a threshold dose of Ang II or of the NPY agonists together with an ED50 dose of adrenergic agonists such as NA, adrenaline and clonidine counteracted the depressor effect produced by the a2-agonist in the NTS. The results provide evidence for the existence of an antagonistic interaction between Ang II at1 receptors and NPY receptor subtypes with the a2-adrenoceptors in the NTS. This receptor interaction may reduce the transduction over the a2-adrenoceptors which can be important in central cardiovascular regulation and in the development of hypertension

  10. Quantitative autoradiographic mapping of serotonin receptors in the rat brain. II. Serotonin-2 receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazos, A.; Cortes, R.; Palacios, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    The distribution of serotonin-2 (5-HT 2 ) receptors in the rat brain was studied by light microscopic quantitative autoradiography. Receptors were labeled with four ligands: [ 3 H]ketanserin, [ 3 H]mesulergine, [ 3 H]LSD and [ 3 H]spiperone, which are reported to show high affinity for 5-HT 2 receptors. Very high concentrations were localized in the claustrum, olfactory tubercle and layer IV of the neocortex. The anterior olfactory nucleus, piriform cortex and layer I of neocortex were also rich in 5-HT 2 receptors. The specificity of the different ligands used is discussed in terms of the other populations of sites recognized by them. The distribution of 5-HT 2 receptors here reported is discussed in correlation with (a) the known distribution of serotoninergic terminals, (b) the specific anatomical systems and (c) the central effects reported to be mediated by 5-HT 2 -selective drugs. (Auth.)

  11. Quantitative Impact of Plasma Clearance and Down-regulation on GLP-1 Receptor Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Thurber, Greg M

    2016-02-01

    Quantitative molecular imaging of beta cell mass (BCM) would enable early detection and treatment monitoring of type 1 diabetes. The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor is an attractive target due to its beta cell specificity and cell surface location. We quantitatively investigated the impact of plasma clearance and receptor internalization on targeting efficiency in healthy B6 mice. Four exenatide-based probes were synthesized that varied in molecular weight, binding affinity, and plasma clearance. The GLP-1 receptor internalization rate and in vivo receptor expression were quantified. Receptor internalization (54,000 receptors/cell in vivo) decreased significantly within minutes, reducing the benefit of a slower-clearing agent. The multimers and albumin binding probes had higher kidney and liver uptake, respectively. Slow plasma clearance is beneficial for GLP-1 receptor peptide therapeutics. However, for exendin-based imaging of islets, down-regulation of the GLP-1 receptor and non-specific background uptake result in a higher target-to-background ratio for fast-clearing agents.

  12. Special issues in quantitation of brain receptors and related markers by emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Links, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Emission computed tomography provides an opportunity to quantify neurotransmitter-neuro receptor systems in vivo. In order to do so, very high image quality and quantitative accuracy are required. Quantitation of receptor systems involves considerations of physical effects (such as finite spatial resolution, scatter, and attenuation), instrumentation design (such as spatial sampling), image processing (such as filtering), and data analysis (such as kinetic modeling). Appropriate application of these considerations can lead to useful results, but emerging approaches promise even greater levels of accuracy and precision

  13. Laminar pattern of cholinergic and adrenergic receptors in rat visual cortex using quantitative receptor autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schliebs, R.; Walch, C.

    1989-01-01

    The laminar distribution of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, including the M1-receptor subtype, of beta-adrenergic receptors, and noradrenaline uptake sites, was studied in the adult rat visual, frontal, somatosensory and motor cortex, using quantitative receptor autoradiography. In the visual cortex, the highest density of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors was found in layer I. From layer II/III to layer V binding decreases continueously reaching a constant binding level in layers V and VI. This laminar pattern of muscarinic receptor density differs somewhat from that observed in the non-visual cortical regions examined: layer II/III contained the highest receptor density followed by layer I and IV: lowest density was found in layer V and VI. The binding profile of the muscarinic cholinergic M1-subtype through the visual cortex shows a peak in cortical layer II and in the upper part of layer VI, whereas in the non-visual cortical regions cited the binding level was high in layer II/III, moderate in layer I and IV, and low in layer VI. Layers I to IV of the visual cortex contained the highest beta-adrenergic receptor densities, whereas only low binding levels were observed in the deeper layers. A similar laminar distribution was found also in the frontal, somatosensory and motor cortex. The density of noradrenaline uptake sites was high in all layers of the cortical regions studied, but with noradrenaline uptake sites somewhat more concentrated in the superficial layers than in deeper ones. The distinct laminar pattern of cholinergic and noradrenergic receptor sites indicates a different role for acetylcholine and noradrenaline in the functional anatomy of the cerebral cortex, and in particular, the visual cortex. (author)

  14. Laminar pattern of cholinergic and adrenergic receptors in rat visual cortex using quantitative receptor autoradiography

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    Schliebs, R; Walch, C [Leipzig Univ. (German Democratic Republic). Bereich Medizin; Stewart, M G [Open Univ., Milton Keynes (UK)

    1989-01-01

    The laminar distribution of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, including the M1-receptor subtype, of beta-adrenergic receptors, and noradrenaline uptake sites, was studied in the adult rat visual, frontal, somatosensory and motor cortex, using quantitative receptor autoradiography. In the visual cortex, the highest density of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors was found in layer I. From layer II/III to layer V binding decreases continueously reaching a constant binding level in layers V and VI. This laminar pattern of muscarinic receptor density differs somewhat from that observed in the non-visual cortical regions examined: layer II/III contained the highest receptor density followed by layer I and IV: lowest density was found in layer V and VI. The binding profile of the muscarinic cholinergic M1-subtype through the visual cortex shows a peak in cortical layer II and in the upper part of layer VI, whereas in the non-visual cortical regions cited the binding level was high in layer II/III, moderate in layer I and IV, and low in layer VI. Layers I to IV of the visual cortex contained the highest beta-adrenergic receptor densities, whereas only low binding levels were observed in the deeper layers. A similar laminar distribution was found also in the frontal, somatosensory and motor cortex. The density of noradrenaline uptake sites was high in all layers of the cortical regions studied, but with noradrenaline uptake sites somewhat more concentrated in the superficial layers than in deeper ones. The distinct laminar pattern of cholinergic and noradrenergic receptor sites indicates a different role for acetylcholine and noradrenaline in the functional anatomy of the cerebral cortex, and in particular, the visual cortex. (author).

  15. Quantitative autoradiographic mapping of serotonin receptors in the rat brain. I. Serotonin-1 receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazos, A.; Palacios, M.

    1985-01-01

    The distribution of serotonin-1 (5-HT 1 ) receptors in the rat brain was studied by light microscopic quantitative autoradiography. Receptors were labeled with [ 3 H]serotonin (5-[ 3 H]HT), 8-hydroxy-2-[N-dipropylamino- 3 H]tetralin (8-OH-[ 3 H]DPAT), [ 3 H]LSD and [ 3 H]mesulergine, and the densities quantified by microdensitometry with the aid of a computer-assisted image-analysis system. Competition experiments for 5-[ 3 H]HT binding by several serotonin-1 agonists led to the identification of brain areas enriched in each one of the three subtypes of 5-HT 1 recognition sites already described. The existence of these 'selective' areas allowed a detailed pharmacological characterization of these sites to be made in a more precise manner than has been attained in membrane-binding studies. Very high concentrations of 5-HT 1 receptors were localized in the choroid plexus, lateroseptal nucleus, globus pallidus and ventral pallidum, dentate gyrus, dorsal subiculum, olivary pretectal nucleus, substantia nigra, reticular and external layer of the entorhinal cortex. The distribution of 5-HT 1 receptors reported here is discussed in correlation with the distribution of serotoninergic neurons and fibers, the related anatomical pathways and the effects which appear to be mediated by these sites. (Auth.)

  16. Quantitative measurement of cell membrane receptor internalization by the nanoluciferase reporter: Using the G protein-coupled receptor RXFP3 as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Song, Ge; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Ya-Li; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2015-02-01

    Nanoluciferase (NanoLuc) is a newly developed small luciferase reporter with the brightest bioluminescence to date. In the present work, we developed NanoLuc as a sensitive bioluminescent reporter to measure quantitatively the internalization of cell membrane receptors, based on the pH dependence of the reporter activity. The G protein-coupled receptor RXFP3, the cognate receptor of relaxin-3/INSL7, was used as a model receptor. We first generated stable HEK293T cells that inducibly coexpressed a C-terminally NanoLuc-tagged human RXFP3 and a C-terminally enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged human RXFP3. The C-terminal EGFP-tag and NanoLuc-tag had no detrimental effects on the ligand-binding potency and intracellular trafficking of RXFP3. Based on the fluorescence of the tagged EGFP reporter, the ligand-induced RXFP3 internalization was visualized directly under a fluorescence microscope. Based on the bioluminescence of the tagged NanoLuc reporter, the ligand-induced RXFP3 internalization was measured quantitatively by a convenient bioluminescent assay. Coexpression of an EGFP-tagged inactive [E141R]RXFP3 had no detrimental effect on the ligand-binding potency and ligand-induced internalization of the NanoLuc-tagged wild-type RXFP3, suggesting that the mutant RXFP3 and wild-type RXFP3 worked independently. The present bioluminescent internalization assay could be extended to other G protein-coupled receptors and other cell membrane receptors to study ligand-receptor and receptor-receptor interactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of estrogen receptor gene expression in laser microdissected prostate cancer tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Thomas J; Li, Geng; McCulloch, Thomas A; Seth, Rashmi; Powe, Desmond G; Bishop, Michael C; Rees, Robert C

    2009-06-01

    Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis of laser microdissected tissue is considered the most accurate technique for determining tissue gene expression. The discovery of estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta) has focussed renewed interest on the role of estrogen receptors in prostate cancer, yet few studies have utilized the technique to analyze estrogen receptor gene expression in prostate cancer. Fresh tissue was obtained from 11 radical prostatectomy specimens and from 6 patients with benign prostate hyperplasia. Pure populations of benign and malignant prostate epithelium were laser microdissected, followed by RNA isolation and electrophoresis. Quantitative RT-PCR was performed using primers for androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta), estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha), progesterone receptor (PGR) and prostate specific antigen (PSA), with normalization to two housekeeping genes. Differences in gene expression were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Correlation coefficients were analyzed using Spearman's test. Significant positive correlations were seen when AR and AR-dependent PSA, and ERalpha and ERalpha-dependent PGR were compared, indicating a representative population of RNA transcripts. ERbeta gene expression was significantly over-expressed in the cancer group compared with benign controls (P cancer group (P prostate cancer specimens. In concert with recent studies the findings suggest differential production of ERbeta splice variants, which may play important roles in the genesis of prostate cancer. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Quantitative autoradiographic characterization of GA-BAB receptors in mammalian central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, D.Chin-Mei.

    1989-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of the amino acid neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) within the nervous system appear to be mediated through two distinct classes of receptors: GABA A and GABA B receptors. A quantitative autoradiographic method with 3 H-GABA was developed to examine the hypotheses that GABA A and GABA B sites have distinct anatomical distributions, pharmacologic properties, and synaptic localizations within the rodent nervous system. The method was also applied to a comparative study of these receptors in postmortem human brain from individuals afflicted with Alzheimer's disease and those without neurologic disease. The results indicated that GABA B receptors occur in fewer numbers and have a lower affinity for GABA than GABA A receptors in both rodent and human brain. Within rodent brain, the distribution of these two receptor populations were clearly distinct. GABA B receptors were enriched in the medial habenula, interpeduncular nucleus, cerebellar molecular layer and olfactory glomerular layer. After selective lesions of postsynaptic neurons of the corticostriatal and perforant pathway, both GABA B and GABA A receptors were significantly decreased in number. Lesions of the presynaptic limbs of the perforant but not the corticostriatal pathway resulted in upregulation of both GABA receptors in the area of innervation. GABA B receptors were also upregulated in CA3 dendritic regions after destruction of dentate granule neurons

  19. Fundamental study on brain receptor mapping by neuronuclear medicine imaging. Quantitation of receptor autoradiography in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuji, Shiro

    1988-04-01

    The usefulness of autoradiography in the quantitation of the rat brain receptor was evaluated. H-3 spiperone, H-3 quinuclidinyl benzylate (QNB), H-3 muscimol, H-3 diprenorphine, H-3 ketanserin, and H-3 dihydroalprenolol hydrochloride were used for autoradiography. Satisfactory autoradiograms with these H-3 labeled ligants were obtained for incubation time, washing time, and binding curve. The video digitizer system was the most suitable in autoradiography. Using appropriate conditions for the ligand-receptor interaction, receptor autoradiography and in vitro receptor assay were concordant as for the the number of maximum binding sites (Bmax) of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of its antagonist, H-3 QNB. Receptor autoradiography with high spatial resolution allowed the comparison of Bmax and Kd in the brain. To improve conventional Scatchard analysis, used in the estimation of Bmax and Kd, a new mathematical method was developed for estimating individual rate constants and Bmax on the basis of time courses of association and dissociation. Using the new mathematical method, apparent equilibrium dissociation rate constant was in good agreement with that from a non-isomerization model. Autoradiography may provide a clue for the basic data on brain receptor mapping by a promising emission computerized tomography in neuropsychiatric diseases. (Namekawa, K.).

  20. Quantitative Microscopic Analysis of Plasma Membrane Receptor Dynamics in Living Plant Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yu; Russinova, Eugenia

    2017-01-01

    Plasma membrane-localized receptors are essential for cellular communication and signal transduction. In Arabidopsis thaliana, BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1 (BRI1) is one of the receptors that is activated by binding to its ligand, the brassinosteroid (BR) hormone, at the cell surface to regulate diverse plant developmental processes. The availability of BRI1 in the plasma membrane is related to its signaling output and is known to be controlled by the dynamic endomembrane trafficking. Advances in fluorescence labeling and confocal microscopy techniques enabled us to gain a better understanding of plasma membrane receptor dynamics in living cells. Here we describe different quantitative microscopy methods to monitor the relative steady-state levels of the BRI1 protein in the plasma membrane of root epidermal cells and its relative exocytosis and recycling rates. The methods can be applied also to analyze similar dynamics of other plasma membrane-localized receptors.

  1. Quantitative structure-activity relationships of selective antagonists of glucagon receptor using QuaSAR descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoj Kumar, Palanivelu; Karthikeyan, Chandrabose; Hari Narayana Moorthy, Narayana Subbiah; Trivedi, Piyush

    2006-11-01

    In the present paper, quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) approach was applied to understand the affinity and selectivity of a novel series of triaryl imidazole derivatives towards glucagon receptor. Statistically significant and highly predictive QSARs were derived for glucagon receptor inhibition by triaryl imidazoles using QuaSAR descriptors of molecular operating environment (MOE) employing computer-assisted multiple regression procedure. The generated QSAR models revealed that factors related to hydrophobicity, molecular shape and geometry predominantly influences glucagon receptor binding affinity of the triaryl imidazoles indicating the relevance of shape specific steric interactions between the molecule and the receptor. Further, QSAR models formulated for selective inhibition of glucagon receptor over p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase of the compounds in the series highlights that the same structural features, which influence the glucagon receptor affinity, also contribute to their selective inhibition.

  2. Quantitative autoradiography of hippocampal GABAB and GASAA receptor changes in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, D.C.M.; Penney, J.B. Jr.; Young, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    GABA B and GABA A receptors were examined by quantitative [ 3 H] GABA autoradiography in postmortem human hippocampus from 6 histopathologically verified cases of dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT) and 6 normal controls. Significant decrements in the B max for both types of GABA receptors were observed in DAT hippocampus as compared to normal controls. No significant differences in K d values were revealed. As compared to controls, DAT hippocampus exhibited fewer GABA B receptors in stratum moleculare of the denate gyrus, stratum lacunosum-molecular and stratum pyramidale of CA 1 . Significant loss of GABA A receptors in DAT hippocampus was also observed in the CA 1 pyramidal cell region. These changes could not be correlated with differences in age nor in postmortem delay between the two groups. These findings may reflect the neuronal pathologies in CA 1 region in dentate gyrus, and in projections from the entorhinal cortex which are associated with the memory impairment of DAT. 29 refs. (Author)

  3. GABA and benzodiazepine receptors in the gerbil brain after transient ischemia: demonstration by quantitative receptor autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onodera, H.; Sato, G.; Kogure, K.

    1987-01-01

    Quantitative receptor autoradiography was used to measure the binding of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and benzodiazepine receptors after ischemia by means of transient occlusion of bilateral common carotid arteries in the gerbil. [ 3 H]Muscimol was used to label the GABAA receptors and [ 3 H]flunitrazepam to label central type benzodiazepine receptors. In the superolateral convexities of the frontal cortices, [ 3 H]muscimol binding was increased in 60% of the animals killed 3 days after ischemia, and decreased in 67% of the animals killed 27 days after ischemia. Twenty-seven days after ischemia, [ 3 H]flunitrazepam binding in the substantia nigra pars reticulata increased to 252% of the control, though the increase in [ 3 H]muscimol binding was not significant. In the dorsolateral region of the caudate putamen, marked neuronal necrosis and depletion of both [ 3 H]muscimol and [ 3 H]flunitrazepam binding sites were observed 27 days after ischemia, the ventromedial region being left intact. In spite of the depletion of pyramidal cells in the CA1 region of the hippocampus, both [ 3 H]muscimol and [ 3 H]flunitrazepam binding sites were preserved 27 days after ischemia. Since our previous study revealed that adenosine A1 binding sites were depleted in the CA1 subfield of the hippocampus after ischemia correlating with neuronal damage, GABAA and benzodiazepine receptors may not be distributed predominantly on the pyramidal cells in the CA1 region

  4. Quantitation of multisite EGF receptor phosphorylation using mass spectrometry and a novel normalization approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erba, Elisabetta Boeri; Matthiesen, Rune; Bunkenborg, Jakob

    2007-01-01

    Using stable isotope labeling and mass spectrometry, we performed a sensitive, quantitative analysis of multiple phosphorylation sites of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. Phosphopeptide detection efficiency was significantly improved by using the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor sodium p...

  5. Quantitative autoradiographic localization of cholecystokinin receptors in rat and guinea pig brain using 125I-Bolton-Hunter-CCK8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niehoff, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    The autoradiographic localization of receptors for the brain-gut peptide cholecystokinin (CCK) has shown differences in receptor distribution between rat and guinea pig brain. However the full anatomical extent of the differences has not been determined quantitatively. In the present study, 125 I-Bolton-Hunter-CCK8 ( 125 I-BH-CCK8) was employed in a comparative quantitative autoradiographic analysis of the distribution of CCK receptors in these two species. The pharmacological profile of 125 I-BH-CCK8 binding in guinea pig forebrain sections was comparable to those previously reported for rat and human. Statistically significant differences in receptor binding between rat and guinea pig occurred in olfactory bulb, caudate-putamen, amygdala, several cortical areas, ventromedial hypothalamus, cerebellum, and a number of midbrain and brainstem nuclei. The results of this study confirm the presence of extensive species-specific variation in the distribution of CCK receptors, suggesting possible differences in the physiological roles of this peptide in different mammalian species

  6. Quantitative characterization of glycan-receptor binding of H9N2 influenza A virus hemagglutinin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karunya Srinivasan

    Full Text Available Avian influenza subtypes such as H5, H7 and H9 are yet to adapt to the human host so as to establish airborne transmission between humans. However, lab-generated reassorted viruses possessing hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA genes from an avian H9 isolate and other genes from a human-adapted (H3 or H1 subtype acquired two amino acid changes in HA and a single amino acid change in NA that confer respiratory droplet transmission in ferrets. We previously demonstrated for human-adapted H1, H2 and H3 subtypes that quantitative binding affinity of their HA to α2→6 sialylated glycan receptors correlates with respiratory droplet transmissibility of the virus in ferrets. Such a relationship remains to be established for H9 HA. In this study, we performed a quantitative biochemical characterization of glycan receptor binding properties of wild-type and mutant forms of representative H9 HAs that were previously used in context of reassorted viruses in ferret transmission studies. We demonstrate here that distinct molecular interactions in the glycan receptor-binding site of different H9 HAs affect the glycan-binding specificity and affinity. Further we show that α2→6 glycan receptor-binding affinity of a mutant H9 HA carrying Thr-189→Ala amino acid change correlates with the respiratory droplet transmission in ferrets conferred by this change. Our findings contribute to a framework for monitoring the evolution of H9 HA by understanding effects of molecular changes in HA on glycan receptor-binding properties.

  7. Quantitative autoradiographic localization of cholecystokinin receptors in rat and guinea pig brain using sup 125 I-Bolton-Hunter-CCK8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niehoff, D.L. (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL (USA))

    1989-03-01

    The autoradiographic localization of receptors for the brain-gut peptide cholecystokinin (CCK) has shown differences in receptor distribution between rat and guinea pig brain. However the full anatomical extent of the differences has not been determined quantitatively. In the present study, {sup 125}I-Bolton-Hunter-CCK8 ({sup 125}I-BH-CCK8) was employed in a comparative quantitative autoradiographic analysis of the distribution of CCK receptors in these two species. The pharmacological profile of {sup 125}I-BH-CCK8 binding in guinea pig forebrain sections was comparable to those previously reported for rat and human. Statistically significant differences in receptor binding between rat and guinea pig occurred in olfactory bulb, caudate-putamen, amygdala, several cortical areas, ventromedial hypothalamus, cerebellum, and a number of midbrain and brainstem nuclei. The results of this study confirm the presence of extensive species-specific variation in the distribution of CCK receptors, suggesting possible differences in the physiological roles of this peptide in different mammalian species.

  8. Quantitative PET of human urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor with 64Cu-DOTA-AE105

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Morten; Madsen, Jacob; Østergaard, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Expression levels of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) represent an established biomarker for poor prognosis in a variety of human cancers. The objective of the present study was to explore whether noninvasive PET can be used to perform a quantitative assessment of expressi...

  9. A highly sensitive quantitative cytosensor technique for the identification of receptor ligands in tissue extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenkei, Z; Beaudet, A; Chartrel, N; De Mota, N; Irinopoulou, T; Braun, B; Vaudry, H; Llorens-Cortes, C

    2000-11-01

    Because G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute excellent putative therapeutic targets, functional characterization of orphan GPCRs through identification of their endogenous ligands has great potential for drug discovery. We propose here a novel single cell-based assay for identification of these ligands. This assay involves (a) fluorescent tagging of the GPCR, (b) expression of the tagged receptor in a heterologous expression system, (c) incubation of the transfected cells with fractions purified from tissue extracts, and (d) imaging of ligand-induced receptor internalization by confocal microscopy coupled to digital image quantification. We tested this approach in CHO cells stably expressing the NT1 neurotensin receptor fused to EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein), in which neurotensin promoted internalization of the NT1-EGFP receptor in a dose-dependent fashion (EC(50) = 0.98 nM). Similarly, four of 120 consecutive reversed-phase HPLC fractions of frog brain extracts promoted internalization of the NT1-EGFP receptor. The same four fractions selectively contained neurotensin, an endogenous ligand of the NT1 receptor, as detected by radioimmunoassay and inositol phosphate production. The present internalization assay provides a highly specific quantitative cytosensor technique with sensitivity in the nanomolar range that should prove useful for the identification of putative natural and synthetic ligands for GPCRs.

  10. Demonstration of lactogenic receptors in rat endocrine pancreases by quantitative autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polak, M.; Scharfmann, R.; Ban, E.; Haour, F.; Postel-Vinay, M.C.; Czernichow, P.

    1990-01-01

    A direct effect of growth hormone and/or prolactin on the growth of the pancreatic beta-cell has been proposed. This study assessed the presence of human growth hormone (hGH)-binding sites in male adult rat endocrine pancreas via quantitative autoradiography. The binding of 125I-labeled hGH was evaluated by receptor autoradiography on frozen-pancreas cryostat cut sections. The sections were incubated with 125I-hGH (10(-10) M) for 75 min at room temperature, and nonspecific binding was determined in the presence of excess native hGH (5 X 10(-7) M). The specificity of the binding was assessed in competition experiments with bovine GH and ovine prolactin. The autoradiograms were quantified with a computer-assisted image-processing system. The sections were then stained to visualize the endocrine islets. Nondiabetic control and streptozocin (STZ)-injected rats were used. Our results show that (1) there is specific binding of iodinated hGH in small areas of the pancreas, which appear as the Langerhans islets when the autoradiogram and the stained sections are superimposed; (2) the specificity of hGH binding in rat islets is lactogenic; (3) the density of the hGH-binding sites in the endocrine pancreas is estimated at 4.8 fmol/mg protein, with IC50 ranging from 0.98 to 2.50 nM; and (4) binding sites may be present on the beta-cell, because specific binding disappears in STZ-injected rats. In conclusion, by use of a quantitative autoradiographic technique, we provide evidence for the presence of lactogenic receptors on rat beta-cells

  11. Quantitative autoradiography of TRH receptors and radioimmunoassay of TRH in the cat central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogin, R.M.; Kreider, M.S.; Caine, S.B.; Pack, A.I.; Winokur, A.

    1986-01-01

    In the cat, microinjection of Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone (TRH) into certain areas of the central nervous system (CNS) changes ventilation and cardiovascular variables. To initiate a more systematic investigation of these effects, they undertook a study to determine the location of TRH and its receptors in the cat CNS. Using techniques previously described from the laboratory, quantitative autoradiograms for TRH receptors of the cat brain were produced; additional specimens were dissected, and radioimmunoassay for TRH was performed. Heterogeneous distribution of receptors was observed in the cat brain. In the forebrain, large quantities of TRH receptors were found in amygdala, hippocampus, claustrum, pyriform nucleus, and tuberculum olfactorium. In the brainstem, high concentrations were localized to the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, the hypoglossal nucleus, and the periaqueductal grey. The cerebellum contained few receptors. The largest quantities of the TRH tripeptide were noted in the hypothalamus and septum, with substantial amounts also obtained from the olfactory bulb, corpus striatum, and thalamus. The results demonstrate that the distribution of TRH and TRH receptors in the cat brain is very similar to that previously described in the rat and human brain. They provide a basis for exploring the physiological and pharmacological effects of TRH in cats

  12. Label-Free, LC-MS-Based Assays to Quantitate Small-Molecule Antagonist Binding to the Mammalian BLT1 Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xun; Stout, Steven; Mueller, Uwe; Boykow, George; Visconti, Richard; Siliphaivanh, Phieng; Spencer, Kerrie; Presland, Jeremy; Kavana, Michael; Basso, Andrea D; McLaren, David G; Myers, Robert W

    2017-08-01

    We have developed and validated label-free, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based equilibrium direct and competition binding assays to quantitate small-molecule antagonist binding to recombinant human and mouse BLT1 receptors expressed in HEK 293 cell membranes. Procedurally, these binding assays involve (1) equilibration of the BLT1 receptor and probe ligand, with or without a competitor; (2) vacuum filtration through cationic glass fiber filters to separate receptor-bound from free probe ligand; and (3) LC-MS analysis in selected reaction monitoring mode for bound probe ligand quantitation. Two novel, optimized probe ligands, compounds 1 and 2, were identified by screening 20 unlabeled BLT1 antagonists for direct binding. Saturation direct binding studies confirmed the high affinity, and dissociation studies established the rapid binding kinetics of probe ligands 1 and 2. Competition binding assays were established using both probe ligands, and the affinities of structurally diverse BLT1 antagonists were measured. Both binding assay formats can be executed with high specificity and sensitivity and moderate throughput (96-well plate format) using these approaches. This highly versatile, label-free method for studying ligand binding to membrane-associated receptors should find broad application as an alternative to traditional methods using labeled ligands.

  13. Quantitative phosphoproteomics dissection of seven-transmembrane receptor signaling using full and biased agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Gitte L; Kelstrup, Christian D; Lyngsø, Christina

    2010-01-01

    (q)-dependent and -independent AT(1)R signaling. This study provides substantial novel insight into angiotensin II signal transduction and is the first study dissecting the differences between a full agonist and a biased agonist from a 7TMR on a systems-wide scale. Importantly, it reveals a previously unappreciated diversity......Seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs) signal through the well described heterotrimeric G proteins but can also activate G protein-independent signaling pathways of which the impact and complexity are less understood. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT(1)R) is a prototypical 7TMR...... and quantity of Galpha(q) protein-independent signaling and uncovers novel signaling pathways. We foresee that the amount and diversity of G protein-independent signaling may be more pronounced than previously recognized for other 7TMRs as well. Quantitative mass spectrometry is a promising tool for evaluation...

  14. In-vivo quantitative measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Takashi

    1992-01-01

    So far by positron CT, the quantitative analyses of oxygen consumption rate, blood flow distribution, glucose metabolic rate and so on have been carried out. The largest merit of using the positron CT is the observation and verification of mankind have become easy. Recently, accompanying the rapid development of the mapping tracers for central nervous receptors, the observation of many central nervous receptors by the positron CT has become feasible, and must expectation has been placed on the elucidation of brain functions. The conditions required for in vitro processes cannot be realized in strict sense in vivo. The quantitative measurement of in vivo tracer method is carried out by measuring the accumulation and movement of a tracer after its administration. The movement model of the mapping tracer for central nervous receptors is discussed. The quantitative analysis using a steady movement model, the measurement of dopamine receptors by reference method, the measurement of D 2 receptors using 11C-Racloprode by direct method, and the possibility of measuring dynamics bio-reaction are reported. (K.I.)

  15. Quantitative autoradiography of hippocampal GABA/sub B/ and GASA/sub A/ receptor changes in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, D C.M.; Penney, Jr, J B; Young, A B

    1987-12-04

    GABA/sub B/ and GABA/sub A/ receptors were examined by quantitative (/sup 3/H) GABA autoradiography in postmortem human hippocampus from 6 histopathologically verified cases of dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT) and 6 normal controls. Significant decrements in the B/sub max/ for both types of GABA receptors were observed in DAT hippocampus as compared to normal controls. No significant differences in K/sub d/ values were revealed. As compared to controls, DAT hippocampus exhibited fewer GABA/sub B/ receptors in stratum moleculare of the denate gyrus, stratum lacunosum-molecular and stratum pyramidale of CA/sub 1/. Significant loss of GABA/sub A/ receptors in DAT hippocampus was also observed in the CA/sub 1/ pyramidal cell region. These changes could not be correlated with differences in age nor in postmortem delay between the two groups. These findings may reflect the neuronal pathologies in CA/sub 1/ region in dentate gyrus, and in projections from the entorhinal cortex which are associated with the memory impairment of DAT. 29 refs.

  16. Quantitation of the receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønne, E; Behrendt, N; Ploug, M

    1994-01-01

    variant of uPAR, suPAR, has been constructed by recombinant technique and the protein content of a purified suPAR standard preparation was determined by amino acid composition analysis. The sensitivity of the assay (0.6 ng uPAR/ml) is strong enough to measure uPAR in extracts of cultured cells and cancer......Binding of the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) to a specific cell surface receptor (uPAR) plays a crucial role in proteolysis during tissue remodelling and cancer invasion. An immunosorbent assay for the quantitation of uPAR has now been developed. This assay is based on two monoclonal...... antibodies recognizing the non-ligand binding part of this receptor, and it detects both free and occupied uPAR, in contrast to ligand-binding assays used previously. In a variant of the assay, the occupied fraction of uPAR is selectively detected with a uPA antibody. To be used as a standard, a soluble...

  17. Functional characterization and quantitative expression analysis of two GnRH-related peptide receptors in the mosquito, Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oryan, Alireza; Wahedi, Azizia; Paluzzi, Jean-Paul V

    2018-03-04

    To cope with stressful events such as flight, organisms have evolved various regulatory mechanisms, often involving control by endocrine-derived factors. In insects, two stress-related factors include the gonadotropin-releasing hormone-related peptides adipokinetic hormone (AKH) and corazonin (CRZ). AKH is a pleiotropic hormone best known as a substrate liberator of proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates. Although a universal function has not yet been elucidated, CRZ has been shown to have roles in pigmentation, ecdysis or act as a cardiostimulatory factor. While both these neuropeptides and their respective receptors (AKHR and CRZR) have been characterized in several organisms, details on their specific roles within the disease vector, Aedes aegypti, remain largely unexplored. Here, we obtained three A. aegypti AKHR transcript variants and further identified the A. aegypti CRZR receptor. Receptor expression using a heterologous functional assay revealed that these receptors exhibit a highly specific response for their native ligands. Developmental quantitative expression analysis of CRZR revealed enrichment during the pupal and adult stages. In adults, quantitative spatial expression analysis revealed CRZR transcript in a variety of organs including head, thoracic ganglia, primary reproductive organs (ovary and testis), as well as male carcass. This suggest CRZ may play a role in ecdysis, and neuronal expression of CRZR indicates a possible role for CRZ within the nervous system. Quantitative developmental expression analysis of AKHR identified significant transcript enrichment in early adult stages. AKHR transcript was observed in the head, thoracic ganglia, accessory reproductive tissues and the carcass of adult females, while it was detected in the abdominal ganglia and enriched significantly in the carcass of adult males, which supports the known function of AKH in energy metabolism. Collectively, given the enrichment of CRZR and AKHR in the primary and

  18. Quantitative autoradiography of muscarinic and benzodiazepine receptors in the forebrain of the turtle, Pseudemys scripta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlegel, J.R.; Kriegstein, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of muscarinic and benzodiazepine receptors was investigated in the turtle forebrain by the technique of in vitro receptor autoradiography. Muscarinic binding sites were labeled with 1 nM 3 H-quinuclidinyl benzilate ( 3 H-QNB), and benzodiazepine sites were demonstrated with the aid of 1 nM 3 H-flunitrazepam ( 3 H-FLU). Autoradiograms generated on 3 H-Ultrofilm apposed to tissue slices revealed regionally specific distributions of muscarinic and benzodiazepine binding sites that are comparable with those for mammalian brain. Dense benzodiazepine binding was found in the anterior olfactory nucleus, the lateral and dorsal cortices, and the dorsal ventricular ridge (DVR), a structure with no clear mammalian homologue. Muscarinic binding sites were most dense in the striatum, accumbens, DVR, lateral geniculate, and the anterior olfactory nucleus. Cortical binding sites were studied in greater detail by quantitative analysis of autoradiograms generated by using emulsion-coated coverslips. Laminar gradients of binding were observed that were specific for each radioligand; 3 H-QNB sites were most dense in the inner molecular layer in all cortical regions, whereas 3 H-FLU binding was generally most concentrated in the outer molecular layer and was least dense through all layers in the dorsomedial cortex. Because pyramidal cells are arranged in register in turtle cortex, the laminar patterns of receptor binding may reflect different receptor density gradients along pyramidal cell dendrites

  19. (/sup 76/Br)Bromolisuride: a new tool for quantitative in vivo imaging of D-2 dopamine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziere, B; Loc' h, C; Stulzaft, O; Ottaviani, M; Comar, D; Maziere, M; Hantraye, P

    1986-08-15

    Bromolisuride, an ergoline derivative, was labeled with the positron emitter radionuclide, bromine 76. In vitro and in vivo binding and competition studies in rats demonstrated a high affinity (K/sub D/ = 0.3 nM) and a high specificity of this new radioligand for D-2 dopamine receptors. PET kinetic studies in baboons showed an accumulation of (/sup 76/Br)bromolisuride in the striatum which reached a maximum 30 min post-injection and which could be displaced by haloperidol. All these results indicated that this new ligand is certainly suitable for the non-invasive in vivo quantitative imaging of D-2 dopamine receptor sites in human brain. 20 refs.; 6 figs.; 1 table.

  20. Receptor tyrosine kinase signaling: a view from quantitative proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dengjel, Joern; Kratchmarova, Irina; Blagoev, Blagoy

    2009-01-01

    Growth factor receptor signaling via receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is one of the basic cellular communication principals found in all metazoans. Extracellular signals are transferred via membrane spanning receptors into the cytoplasm, reversible tyrosine phosphorylation being the hallmark of all...

  1. Neuroanatomical patterns of the mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors of rat brain as determined by quantitative in vitro autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tempel, A.; Zukin, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    Highly specific radioligands and quantitative autoradiography reveal strikingly different neuroanatomical patterns for the mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors of rat brain. The mu receptors are most densely localized in patches in the striatum, layers I and III of the cortex, the pyramidal cell layer of the hippocampal formation, specific nuclei of the thalamus, the pars reticulata of the substantia nigra, the interpeduncular nucleus, and the locus coeruleus. In contrast, delta receptors are highly confined, exhibiting selective localization in layers I, II, and VIa of the neocortex, a diffuse pattern in the striatum, and moderate concentration in the pars reticulata of the substantia nigra and in the interpeduncular nucleus. delta receptors are absent in most other brain structures. This distribution is unexpected in that the enkephalins, the putative endogenous ligands of the delta receptor, occur essentially throughout the brain. The kappa receptors of rat brain exhibit a third pattern distinct from that of the mu and delta receptors. kappa receptors occur at low density in patches in the striatum and at particularly high density in the nucleus accumbens, along the pyramidal and molecular layers of the hippocampus, in the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus, specific midline nuclei of the thalamus, and hindbrain regions. kappa receptors appear to be uniformly distributed across regions in the neocortex with the exception of layer III, which revealed only trace levels of binding. An important conclusion of the present study is that delta receptors occur at high density only in the forebrain and in two midbrain structures, whereas mu and kappa receptors exhibit discrete patterns in most major brain regions

  2. Receptor assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, K; Ibayashi, H [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1975-05-01

    This paper summarized present status and problems of analysis of hormone receptor and a few considerations on clinical significance of receptor abnormalities. It was pointed that in future clinical field quantitative and qualitative analysis of receptor did not remain only in the etiological discussion, but that it was an epoch-making field of investigation which contained the possiblity of artificial change of sensitivity of living body on drugs and the development connected directly with treatment of various diseases.

  3. Progesterone receptor isoform analysis by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded canine mammary dysplasias and tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guil-Luna, S.; Stenvang, Jan; Brünner, Nils

    2014-01-01

    and its isoforms in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples from canine mammary lesions (4 dysplasias, 10 benign tumors, and 46 carcinomas) using 1-step SYBR Green quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Progesterone receptor was expressed in 75% of dysplasias, all benign...... in the expression of isoform A versus B. Analysis of progesterone receptor mRNA isoforms by RT-qPCR was successful in routinely formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples and enabled the distribution of isoforms A and B to be identified for the first time in dysplasias, benign tumors, and malignant tumors...

  4. Long-Range Regulatory Polymorphisms Affecting a GABA Receptor Constitute a Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) for Social Behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendesky, Andres; Pitts, Jason; Rockman, Matthew V.; Chen, William C.; Tan, Man-Wah; Kruglyak, Leonid; Bargmann, Cornelia I.

    2012-01-01

    Aggregation is a social behavior that varies between and within species, providing a model to study the genetic basis of behavioral diversity. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, aggregation is regulated by environmental context and by two neuromodulatory pathways, one dependent on the neuropeptide receptor NPR-1 and one dependent on the TGF-β family protein DAF-7. To gain further insight into the genetic regulation of aggregation, we characterize natural variation underlying behavioral differences between two wild-type C. elegans strains, N2 and CB4856. Using quantitative genetic techniques, including a survey of chromosome substitution strains and QTL analysis of recombinant inbred lines, we identify three new QTLs affecting aggregation in addition to the two known N2 mutations in npr-1 and glb-5. Fine-mapping with near-isogenic lines localized one QTL, accounting for 5%–8% of the behavioral variance between N2 and CB4856, 3′ to the transcript of the GABA neurotransmitter receptor gene exp-1. Quantitative complementation tests demonstrated that this QTL affects exp-1, identifying exp-1 and GABA signaling as new regulators of aggregation. exp-1 interacts genetically with the daf-7 TGF-β pathway, which integrates food availability and population density, and exp-1 mutations affect the level of daf-7 expression. Our results add to growing evidence that genetic variation affecting neurotransmitter receptor genes is a source of natural behavioral variation. PMID:23284308

  5. Long-range regulatory polymorphisms affecting a GABA receptor constitute a quantitative trait locus (QTL for social behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Bendesky

    Full Text Available Aggregation is a social behavior that varies between and within species, providing a model to study the genetic basis of behavioral diversity. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, aggregation is regulated by environmental context and by two neuromodulatory pathways, one dependent on the neuropeptide receptor NPR-1 and one dependent on the TGF-β family protein DAF-7. To gain further insight into the genetic regulation of aggregation, we characterize natural variation underlying behavioral differences between two wild-type C. elegans strains, N2 and CB4856. Using quantitative genetic techniques, including a survey of chromosome substitution strains and QTL analysis of recombinant inbred lines, we identify three new QTLs affecting aggregation in addition to the two known N2 mutations in npr-1 and glb-5. Fine-mapping with near-isogenic lines localized one QTL, accounting for 5%-8% of the behavioral variance between N2 and CB4856, 3' to the transcript of the GABA neurotransmitter receptor gene exp-1. Quantitative complementation tests demonstrated that this QTL affects exp-1, identifying exp-1 and GABA signaling as new regulators of aggregation. exp-1 interacts genetically with the daf-7 TGF-β pathway, which integrates food availability and population density, and exp-1 mutations affect the level of daf-7 expression. Our results add to growing evidence that genetic variation affecting neurotransmitter receptor genes is a source of natural behavioral variation.

  6. Estrogen receptor quantitation and staging as complementary prognostic indicators in breast cancer: a study of 583 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godolphin, W; Elwood, J M; Spinelli, J J

    1981-12-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) quantity was measured at the time of primary diagnosis on 583 patients with breast cancer seen at the major treatment centre in British Columbia between 1975 and 1979. Survival rates (overall, recurrence-free and post-recurrence) were assessed relative to ER concentration, staging, menopausal status, age, differentiation, and therapy. A linear trend in increased survival was demonstrable through variations in ER concentration from less than 1 to greater than 260 fmoles/mg cytosol protein. This trend was highly significant and remained after adjustment for stage, menopausal status, and age, and was seen for all groups of patients except those with metastatic disease. The association of high ER concentration with increased recurrence-free survival was not due to differing responses to adjuvant therapy, but the trend in post-recurrence survival was only significant in patients who had received hormonal therapy. Survival was as strongly associated with receptor concentration as with staging, and these two factors were almost completely independent. A proportional hazards model was fitted to produce predictions of survival, and showed that TNM stage III patients with high ER concentrations have a better survival than stage I or II patients with lower ER concentrations. This suggests that quantitative assessment of ER status is essential to definition of risk in breast cancer patients and that stratification in clinical trials and consideration for adjuvant therapy ought to be guided, in part, by a standardized ER-quantitative determination performed on the primary tumor.

  7. Labeled receptor ligands for spect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kung, H.F.

    1989-01-01

    Receptor specific imaging agents for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can potentially be useful in the understanding of basic biochemistry and pharmacology of receptors. SPECT images may also provide tools for evaluation of density and binding kinetics of a specific receptor, information important for diagnosis and patient management. Basic requirements for receptor imaging agents are: (a) they are labeled with short-lived isotopes, (b) they show high selectivity and specific uptake, (c) they exhibit high target/background ratio, and (d) they can be modeled to obtain quantitative information. Several good examples of CNS receptor specific ligands labeled with I-123 have been developed, including iodoQNB, iodoestrogen iodobenzadiazepine, iodobenazepine, iodobenzamides for muscarinic, estrogen benzadiazepine, D-1 and D-2 dopamine receptors. With the advent of newer and faster SPECT imaging devices, it may be feasible to quantitate the receptor density by in vivo imaging techniques. These new brain imaging agents can provide unique diagnostic information, which may not be available through other imaging modalities, such as CT and MRI

  8. Abnormal Skeletal Growth in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Is Associated with Abnormal Quantitative Expression of Melatonin Receptor, MT2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Moreau

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The defect of the melatonin signaling pathway has been proposed to be one of the key etiopathogenic factors in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS. A previous report showed that melatonin receptor, MT2, was undetectable in some AIS girls. The present study aimed to investigate whether the abnormal MT2 expression in AIS is quantitative or qualitative. Cultured osteoblasts were obtained from 41 AIS girls and nine normal controls. Semi-quantification of protein expression by Western blot and mRNA expression by TaqMan real-time PCR for both MT1 and MT2 were performed. Anthropometric parameters were also compared and correlated with the protein expression and mRNA expression of the receptors. The results showed significantly lower protein and mRNA expression of MT2 in AIS girls compared with that in normal controls (p = 0.02 and p = 0.019, respectively. No differences were found in the expression of MT1. When dichotomizing the AIS girls according to their MT2 expression, the group with low expression was found to have a significantly longer arm span (p = 0.036. The results of this study showed for the first time a quantitative change of MT2 in AIS that was also correlated with abnormal arm span as part of abnormal systemic skeletal growth.

  9. Correlation of Adiponectin mRNA Abundance and Its Receptors with Quantitative Parameters of Sperm Motility in Rams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Kadivar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adiponectin and its receptors (AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, known as adiponectin system, have some proven roles in the fat and glucose metabolisms. Several studies have shown that adiponectin can be considered as a candidate in linking metabolism to testicular function. In this regard, we evaluated the correlation between sperm mRNA abundance of adiponectin and its receptors, with sperm motility indices in the present study. Materials and Methods: In this completely randomized design study, semen samples from 6 adult rams were fractionated on a two layer discontinuous percoll gradient into high and low motile sperm cells, then quantitative parameters of sperm motility were determined by computer-assisted sperm analyzer (CASA. The mRNA abundance levels of Adiponectin, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 were measured quantitatively using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR in the high and low motile groups. Results: Firstly, we showed that adiponectin and its receptors (AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 were transcriptionally expressed in the ram sperm cells. Using Pfaff based method qRTPCR, these levels of transcription were significantly higher in the high motile rather than low motile samples. This increase was 3.5, 3.6 and 2.5 fold change rate for Adiponectin, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, respectively. Some of sperm motility indices [curvilinear velocity (VCL, straight-line velocity (VSL, average path velocity (VAP, linearity (LIN, wobble (WOB and straightness (STR] were also significantly correlated with Adiponectin and AdipoR1 relative expression. The correlation of AdipoR2 was also significant with the mentioned parameters, although this correlation was not comparable with adiponectin and AdipoR1. Conclusion: This study revealed the novel association of adiponectin system with sperm motility. The results of our study suggested that adiponectin is one of the possible factors which can be evaluated and studied in male infertility disorders.

  10. Quantitative proteomics and transcriptomics addressing the estrogen receptor subtype-mediated effects in T47D breast cancer cells exposed to the phytoestrogen genistein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sotoca Covaleda, A.M.; Sollewijn Gelpke, M.D.; Boeren, S.; Ström, A.; Gustafsson, J.A.; Murk, A.J.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Vervoort, J.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The present study addresses, by transcriptomics and quantitative SILAC-based proteomics, the estrogen receptor alpha (ER) and beta (ERß)-mediated effects on gene and protein expression in T47D breast cancer cells exposed to the phytoestrogen genistein. Using the T47D human breast cancer cell line

  11. Quantitative autoradiography of neurochemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rainbow, T.C.; Biegon, A.; Bleisch, W.V.

    1982-01-01

    Several new methods have been developed that apply quantitative autoradiography to neurochemistry. These methods are derived from the 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) technique of Sokoloff (1), which uses quantitative autoradiography to measure the rate of glucose utilization in brain structures. The new methods allow the measurement of the rate of cerbral protein synthesis and the levels of particular neurotransmitter receptors by quantitative autoradiography. As with the 2DG method, the new techniques can measure molecular levels in micron-sized brain structures; and can be used in conjunction with computerized systems of image processing. It is possible that many neurochemical measurements could be made by computerized analysis of quantitative autoradiograms

  12. Cloning, characterisation, and comparative quantitative expression analyses of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) transcript forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterenczak, Katharina A; Willenbrock, Saskia; Barann, Matthias; Klemke, Markus; Soller, Jan T; Eberle, Nina; Nolte, Ingo; Bullerdiek, Jörn; Murua Escobar, Hugo

    2009-04-01

    RAGE is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell surface molecules playing key roles in pathophysiological processes, e.g. immune/inflammatory disorders, Alzheimer's disease, diabetic arteriosclerosis and tumourigenesis. In humans 19 naturally occurring RAGE splicing variants resulting in either N-terminally or C-terminally truncated proteins were identified and are lately discussed as mechanisms for receptor regulation. Accordingly, deregulation of sRAGE levels has been associated with several diseases e.g. Alzheimer's disease, Type 1 diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis. Administration of recombinant sRAGE to animal models of cancer blocked tumour growth successfully. In spite of its obvious relationship to cancer and metastasis data focusing sRAGE deregulation and tumours is rare. In this study we screened a set of tumours, healthy tissues and various cancer cell lines for RAGE splicing variants and analysed their structure. Additionally, we analysed the ratio of the mainly found transcript variants using quantitative Real-Time PCR. In total we characterised 24 previously not described canine and 4 human RAGE splicing variants, analysed their structure, classified their characteristics, and derived their respective protein forms. Interestingly, the healthy and the neoplastic tissue samples showed in majority RAGE transcripts coding for the complete receptor and transcripts showing insertions of intron 1.

  13. An analytic study of central benzodiazepine receptor in the surgically resected tissues of patients with intractable localization-related epilepsy. Quantitative analysis using 125I-iomazenil autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Toshiaki; Matsuda, Kazumi; Mihara, Tadahiro; Yagi, Kazuichi; Seino, Masakazu

    1998-01-01

    The authors report a quantitative autoradiographic analysis of benzodiazepine receptors using the partial inverse agonist 125 I-iomazenil in surgically resected tissues of 27 patients with intractable partial epilepsies. Pathological diagnosis of these tissues was; 14 mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS), 8 dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (DNT), 4 cortical dysplasia (CD) and 1 angioma. In MTS patients, the density of benzodiazepine receptors decreased in CA1, CA3 and CA4. The layers of gyrus dentatus were displaced with a thick and high density band. These findings were similar to simultaneous GABA-A stain findings. The decrease of receptor in each hippocampal structure highly correlated to the degree of cell loss in CA1, CA3 and CA4. The receptors were almost absent in the main lesions of DNT and angioma, and showed irregular distributions in the cortex around these lesions. The receptor densities of CD were parallel to Palmini's pathological grading. Nine cases were analyzed using 123 I-iomazenil SPECT before surgery after obtaining informed consent. Eight of them revealed marked low accumulations in the areas corresponding to the epileptogenic foci. We conclude that our results support histochemically the clinical availability of 123 I-iomazenil SPECT as a non-invasive technique for detecting the changes in benzodiazepine receptor densities in patients with partial epilepsies. (author)

  14. An anti-phospholipase A2 receptor quantitative immunoassay and epitope analysis in membranous nephropathy reveals different antigenic domains of the receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Behnert

    Full Text Available The phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R was recently discovered as a target autoantigen in patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy (IMN. Published evidence suggests that the autoantibodies directed towards a conformation dependent epitope are currently effectively detected by a cell based assay (CBA utilizing indirect immunofluorescence (IIF on tissue culture cells transfected with the PLA2R cDNA. Limitations of such IIF-CBA assays include observer dependent subjective evaluation of semi-quantitative test results and the protocols are not amenable to high throughput diagnostic testing. We developed a quantitative, observer independent, high throughput capture immunoassay for detecting PLA2R autoantibodies on an addressable laser bead immunoassay (ALBIA platform. Since reactive domains of PLA2R (i.e. epitopes could be used to improve diagnostic tests by using small peptides in various high throughput diagnostic platforms, we identified PLA2R epitopes that bound autoantibodies of IMN patients. These studies confirmed that inter-molecular epitope spreading occurs in IMN but use of the cognate synthetic peptides in immunoassays was unable to conclusively distinguish between IMN patients and normal controls. However, combinations of these peptides were able to effectively absorb anti-PLA2R reactivity in IIF-CBA and an immunoassay that employed a lysate derived from HEK cells tranfected with and overexpressing PLA2R. While we provide evidence of intermolecular epitope spreading, our data indicates that in addition to conformational epitopes, human anti-PLA2R reactivity in a commercially available CBA and an addressable laser bead immunoassay is significantly absorbed by peptides representing epitopes of PLA2R.

  15. Time-resolved quantitative analysis of CCK1 receptor-induced intracellular calcium increase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staljanssens, D.; Vos, W.H. De; Willems, P.H.; Camp, J. Van; Smagghe, G.

    2012-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a gastrointestinal hormone, which regulates many physiological functions such as satiety by binding to the CCK receptor (CCKR). Molecules, which recognize this receptor can mimic or block CCK signaling and thereby influence CCKR-mediated processes. We have set up a

  16. XMRV: usage of receptors and potential co-receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaddam Durga

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background XMRV is a gammaretrovirus first identified in prostate tissues of Prostate Cancer (PC patients and later in the blood cells of patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS. Although XMRV is thought to use XPR1 for cell entry, it infects A549 cells that do not express XPR1, suggesting usage of other receptors or co-receptors. Methods To study the usage of different receptors and co- receptors that could play a role in XMRV infection of lymphoid cells and GHOST (GFP- Human osteosarcoma cells expressing CD4 along with different chemokine receptors including CCR1, CCR2, etc., were infected with XMRV. Culture supernatants and cells were tested for XMRV replication using real time quantitative PCR. Results Infection and replication of XMRV was seen in a variety of GHOST cells, LNCaP, DU145, A549 and Caski cell lines. The levels of XMRV replication varied in different cell lines showing differential replication in different cell lines. However, replication in A549 which lacks XPR1 expression was relatively higher than DU145 but lower than, LNCaP. XMRV replication varied in GHOST cell lines expressing CD4 and each of the co- receptors CCR1-CCR8 and bob. There was significant replication of XMRV in CCR3 and Bonzo although it is much lower when compared to DU145, A549 and LNCaP. Conclusion XMRV replication was observed in GHOST cells that express CD4 and each of the chemokine receptors ranging from CCR1- CCR8 and BOB suggesting that infectivity in hematopoietic cells could be mediated by use of these receptors.

  17. The role of quantitative estrogen receptor status in predicting tumor response at surgery in breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, Jacques; Gandhi, Sonal; Li, Nim; Lu, Fang-I; Trudeau, Maureen

    2017-07-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) negative (-) breast cancer (BC) patients have better tumor response rates than ER-positive (+) patients after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT). We conducted a retrospective review using the institutional database "Biomatrix" to assess the value of quantitative ER status in predicting tumor response at surgery and to identify potential predictors of survival outcomes. Univariate followed by multivariable regression analyses were conducted to assess the association between quantitative ER and tumor response assessed as tumor size reduction and pathologic complete response (pCR). Predictors of recurrence-free survival (RFS) were identified using a cox proportional hazards model (CPH). A log-rank test was used to compare RFS between groups if a significant predictor was identified. 304 patients were included with a median follow-up of 43.3 months (Q1-Q3 28.7-61.1) and a mean age of 49.7 years (SD 10.9). Quantitative ER was inversely associated with tumor size reduction and pCR (OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.99-1.00, p = 0.027 and 0.98 95% CI 0.97-0.99, p Quantitative ER status is inversely associated with tumor response in BC patients treated with NCT. A cut-off of 60 and 80% predicts best the association with tumor size reduction and pCR, respectively. Therefore, patients with an ER status higher than the cut-off might benefit from a neoadjuvant endocrine therapy approach. Patients with pCR had better survival outcomes independently of their tumor phenotype. Further prospective studies are needed to validate the clinical utility of quantitative ER as a predictive marker of tumor response.

  18. Discrete mapping of brain Mu and delta opioid receptors using selective peptides: Quantitative autoradiography, species differences and comparison with kappa receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharif, N.A.; Hughes, J. (Addenbrookes Hospital Site, Cambridge (England))

    1989-05-01

    The opioid peptides, (3H)DAGO and (3H)DPDPE, bound to rat and guinea pig brain homogenates with a high, nanomolar affinity and to a high density of mu and delta receptors, respectively. (3H)DAGO binding to mu receptors was competitively inhibited by unlabelled opioids with the following rank order of potency: DAGO greater than morphine greater than DADLE greater than naloxone greater than etorphine much greater than U50488 much greater than DPDPE. In contrast, (3H)DPDPE binding to delta receptors was inhibited by compounds with the following rank order of potency: DPDPE greater than DADLE greater than etorphine greater than dynorphin(1-8) greater than naloxone much greater than U50488 much greater than DAGO. These profiles were consistent with specific labelling of the mu and delta opioid receptors, respectively. In vitro autoradiographic techniques coupled with computer-assisted image analyses revealed a discrete but differential anatomical localization of mu and delta receptors in the rat and guinea pig brain. In general, mu and delta receptor density in the rat exceeded that in the guinea pig brain and differed markedly from that of kappa receptors in these species. However, while mu receptors were distributed throughout the brain with hotspots in the fore-, mid- and hindbrain of the two rodents, the delta sites were relatively diffusely distributed, and were mainly concentrated in the forebrain with particularly high levels within the olfactory bulb (OB), n. accumbens and striatum. Notable regions of high density of mu receptors in the rat and guinea pig brain were the accessory olfactory bulb, striatal patches and streaks, amygdaloid nuclei, ventral hippocampal subiculum and dentate gyrus, numerous thalamic nuclei, geniculate bodies, central grey, superior and inferior colliculi, solitary and pontine nuclei and s. nigra.

  19. Regulation of GABA and benzodiazepine receptors following neurotoxin-induced striatal and medial forebrain bundle lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, H.S.I.

    1985-01-01

    GABA, a major inhibitory transmitter, is used by many projection neurons of the striatum. To investigate the role of GABA in striatal function, the GABA receptor complex was studied after lesions of the striatum or the nigrostriatal neurons. Quantitative receptor autoradiography using thaw-mounted tissue slices was developed for the study of GABA and benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptors. With the technique established, binding to GABA and BDZ receptors after unilateral striatal kainate lesions was examined. Subsequently, changes in GABA and BDZ receptors were studied following the destruction of dopaminergic nigrostriatal cells by unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the medial forebrain bundle. In summary, quantitative receptor autoradiography allowed the detection of GABA and BDZ receptor changes in multiple small areas in each lesioned brain. This technique made it feasible to carry out kinetic saturation, and competition studies using less than 1 mg of tissue. The data suggest that dopamine is functionally inhibitory on striatopallidal neurons but is functionally excitatory on striatoentopeduncular and striatonigral cells which in turn inhibit the thalamus. This quantitative autoradiographic technique can be generalized to study other transmitter receptors and can be combined with 2-deoxyglucose uptake studies

  20. The mathematics of a successful deconvolution: a quantitative assessment of mixture-based combinatorial libraries screened against two formylpeptide receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Radleigh G; Appel, Jon R; Giulianotti, Marc A; Edwards, Bruce S; Sklar, Larry A; Houghten, Richard A; Pinilla, Clemencia

    2013-05-30

    In the past 20 years, synthetic combinatorial methods have fundamentally advanced the ability to synthesize and screen large numbers of compounds for drug discovery and basic research. Mixture-based libraries and positional scanning deconvolution combine two approaches for the rapid identification of specific scaffolds and active ligands. Here we present a quantitative assessment of the screening of 32 positional scanning libraries in the identification of highly specific and selective ligands for two formylpeptide receptors. We also compare and contrast two mixture-based library approaches using a mathematical model to facilitate the selection of active scaffolds and libraries to be pursued for further evaluation. The flexibility demonstrated in the differently formatted mixture-based libraries allows for their screening in a wide range of assays.

  1. A candidate pheromone receptor and two odorant receptors of the hawkmoth Manduca sexta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patch, Harland M; Velarde, Rodrigo A; Walden, Kimberly K O; Robertson, Hugh M

    2009-05-01

    In this study, we cloned and characterized three Manduca sexta odorant receptors (ORs). One receptor is a putative pheromone receptor expressed exclusively in a cell associated with male-specific type-I trichoid sensilla. We describe the results of real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) experiments that show MsextaOR1 is expressed only in male antennae. In situ hybridization labels a single cell associated with type-1 trichoid sensilla, which houses two neurons that have been previously determined to respond to the major components of the pheromone blend. The second receptor, MsextaOR2, was discovered using degenerate primers designed to conserved motifs of a unique group ORs that share as much as 88% identity. Comparison of RT-PCR, qRT-PCR, and in situ hybridization results with those of ORs in the Drosophila melanogaster Or83b subfamily shows a strong sequence and expression pattern similarity. The third receptor, MsextaOR3, was found by 5'-end sequencing of a normalized and subtracted cDNA library from male M. sexta antennae. RT-PCR and qRT-PCR show that this receptor is expressed only in male and female antennae. These are the first ORs, including a putative pheromone receptor, to be described from M. sexta.

  2. Modelling the interdependence between the stoichiometry of receptor oligomerization and ligand binding for a coexisting dimer/tetramer receptor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira, X; Vivó, M; Serra, J; Roche, D; Strange, P G; Giraldo, J

    2009-01-01

    Many G protein-coupled receptors have been shown to exist as oligomers, but the oligomerization state and the effects of this on receptor function are unclear. For some G protein-coupled receptors, in ligand binding assays, different radioligands provide different maximal binding capacities. Here we have developed mathematical models for co-expressed dimeric and tetrameric species of receptors. We have considered models where the dimers and tetramers are in equilibrium and where they do not interconvert and we have also considered the potential influence of the ligands on the degree of oligomerization. By analogy with agonist efficacy, we have considered ligands that promote, inhibit or have no effect on oligomerization. Cell surface receptor expression and the intrinsic capacity of receptors to oligomerize are quantitative parameters of the equations. The models can account for differences in the maximal binding capacities of radioligands in different preparations of receptors and provide a conceptual framework for simulation and data fitting in complex oligomeric receptor situations.

  3. Quantitative analysis of adenosine A1 receptors in human brain using positron emission tomography and [1 -methyl-11C]8-dicyclopropylmethyl-1-methyl-3-propylxanthine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Yuichi; Ishii, Kenji; Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Oda, Keiichi; Sasaki, Toru; Kawamura, Kazunori; Ishiwata, Kiichi

    2004-01-01

    Fully quantitative analysis of the adenosine A 1 receptor (A1R) in the brain with 11 C-MPDX and positron emission tomography is reported. The kinetics is described using a two-tissue three-compartment model, and estimated binding potentials correspond well with the estimates made by Logan plot. The image of the binding potential of the MPDX is physiologically reasonable. We conclude that MPDX is applicable to the visualization of the A1Rs in the brain with Logan plot

  4. Quantitation of estrogen receptor in seventy-five specimens of breast cancer: comparison between an immunoassay (Abbott ER-EIA monoclonal) and a [3H]estradiol binding assay based on isoelectric focusing in polyacrylamide gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pousette, A.; Gustafsson, S.A.; Thoernblad, A.M.N.; Nordgren, A.; Saellstroem, J.Li.; Lindgren, A.; Sundelin, P.; Gustafsson, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Quantitation of estrogen receptor has been performed in cytosol prepared from 75 specimens of breast cancer tissue from patients who had not received hormonal therapy. The study was performed in order to compare an immunoassay (Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, IL) with our currently used method for estrogen receptor analysis based on isoelectric focusing of [ 3 H]estradiol-receptor complex in polyacrylamide gels. Using linear regression analysis, a regression coefficient (slope) of 1.30 and a correlation coefficient of 0.75 were calculated. The differences in results between the two methods are probably partly explained by the fact that the ligand-based method only measures unoccupied receptor, whereas the immunoassay detects the total amount of receptor, resulting in generally slightly higher concentrations with the latter method. However, in five of 75 specimens the ligand-based method gave a considerably higher concentration of estrogen receptor. This was most probably explained by partial proteolysis resulting in the formation of receptor fragment(s), which was undetectable with the immunoassay but detectable with the ligand-based method. These observations underline the importance of careful handling of specimens during the whole immunoassay procedure

  5. Quantitative properties and receptor reserve of the IP(3) and calcium branch of G(q)-coupled receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Eamonn J; Falkenburger, Björn H; Hille, Bertil

    2013-05-01

    Gq-coupled plasma membrane receptors activate phospholipase C (PLC), which hydrolyzes membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) into the second messengers inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG). This leads to calcium release, protein kinase C (PKC) activation, and sometimes PIP2 depletion. To understand mechanisms governing these diverging signals and to determine which of these signals is responsible for the inhibition of KCNQ2/3 (KV7.2/7.3) potassium channels, we monitored levels of PIP2, IP3, and calcium in single living cells. DAG and PKC are monitored in our companion paper (Falkenburger et al. 2013. J. Gen. Physiol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1085/jgp.201210887). The results extend our previous kinetic model of Gq-coupled receptor signaling to IP3 and calcium. We find that activation of low-abundance endogenous P2Y2 receptors by a saturating concentration of uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP; 100 µM) leads to calcium release but not to PIP2 depletion. Activation of overexpressed M1 muscarinic receptors by 10 µM Oxo-M leads to a similar calcium release but also depletes PIP2. KCNQ2/3 channels are inhibited by Oxo-M (by 85%), but not by UTP (calcium responses can be elicited even after PIP2 was partially depleted by overexpressed inducible phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphatases, suggesting that very low amounts of IP3 suffice to elicit a full calcium release. Hence, weak PLC activation can elicit robust calcium signals without net PIP2 depletion or KCNQ2/3 channel inhibition.

  6. Levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor in non-small cell lung cancer as measured by quantitative ELISA and semiquantitative immunohistochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pappot, Helle; Skov, Birgit Guldhammer; Pyke, Charles

    1997-01-01

    The components of the plasminogen activation system have been reported to have prognostic impact in several cancer types, e.g. breast-, colon-, gastric- and lung cancer. Most of these studies have used quantification by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) on tumour tissue extracts. However......, results in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) studies obtained by quantitative ELISA and semiquantitative immunohistochemistry differ. If the prognostic value of the components of the plasminogen activation system is to be exploited clinically in the future, it is important to choose an easy and valid...... methodology. In the present study we investigated levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-I) and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), as quantitated by ELISA in tumour extracts from 64 NSCLC patients (38 squamous cell carcinomas, 26 adenocarcinomas), and compared them to staining...

  7. Tracking Drug-induced Changes in Receptor Post-internalization Trafficking by Colocalizational Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Edmund; Cahill, Catherine

    2015-07-03

    The intracellular trafficking of receptors is a collection of complex and highly controlled processes. Receptor trafficking modulates signaling and overall cell responsiveness to ligands and is, itself, influenced by intra- and extracellular conditions, including ligand-induced signaling. Optimized for use with monolayer-plated cultured cells, but extendable to free-floating tissue slices, this protocol uses immunolabelling and colocalizational analysis to track changes in intracellular receptor trafficking following both chronic/prolonged and acute interventions, including exogenous drug treatment. After drug treatment, cells are double-immunolabelled for the receptor and for markers for the intracellular compartments of interest. Sequential confocal microscopy is then used to capture two-channel photomicrographs of individual cells, which are subjected to computerized colocalizational analysis to yield quantitative colocalization scores. These scores are normalized to permit pooling of independent replicates prior to statistical analysis. Representative photomicrographs may also be processed to generate illustrative figures. Here, we describe a powerful and flexible technique for quantitatively assessing induced receptor trafficking.

  8. Enzyme immunoassay of oestrogen receptors in needle biopsies from human liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, U; Andersen, J; Poulsen, H S

    1991-01-01

    For quantitative assessments of sex hormone receptors in liver tissue, ligand binding assays are inconvenient, as they require large biopsies (0.5-1.0 g). The present study shows that it is possible to measure oestrogen receptors (ER) quantitatively in needle biopsy specimens as small as 10 mg...... by modifications of a commercial enzyme immunoassay employing monoclonal antibodies. Sucrose gradient centrifugation and the dextran charcoal method served as reference methods. A consecutive series of needle biopsies from patients suspected of liver disease were investigated. The biopsies (n = 37) had a median...

  9. Development of a quantitative bead capture assay for soluble IL-7 receptor alpha in human plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Faucher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: IL-7 is an essential cytokine in T-cell development and homeostasis. It binds to the IL-7R receptor, a complex of the IL-7Ralpha (CD127 and common gamma (CD132 chains. There is significant interest in evaluating the expression of CD127 on human T-cells as it often decreased in medical conditions leading to lymphopenia. Previous reports showed the usefulness of CD127 as a prognostic marker in viral infections such as HIV, CMV, EBV and HCV. A soluble CD127 (sCD127 is released in plasma and may contribute to disease pathogenesis through its control on IL-7 activities. Measuring sCD127 is important to define its role and may complement existing markers used in lymphopenic disease management. We describe a new quantitative assay for the measurement of sCD127 in plasma and report sCD127 concentrations in healthy adults. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a quantitative bead-based sCD127 capture assay. Polyclonal CD127-specific antibodies were chosen for capture and a biotinylated monoclonal anti-CD127 antibody was selected for detection. The assay can detect native sCD127 and recombinant sCD127 which served as the calibrator. The analytical performance of the assay was characterized and the concentration and stability of plasma sCD127 in healthy adults was determined. The assay's range was 3.2-1000 ng/mL. The concentration of plasma sCD127 was 164+/-104 ng/mL with over a log variation between subjects. Individual sCD127 concentrations remained stable when measured serially during a period of up to one year. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report on the quantification of plasma sCD127 in a population of healthy adults. Soluble CD127 plasma concentrations remained stable over time in a given individual and sCD127 immunoreactivity was resistant to repeated freeze-thaw cycles. This quantitative sCD127 assay is a valuable tool for defining the potential role of sCD127 in lymphopenic diseases.

  10. Efficacy of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists in radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: A quantitative systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tramer, M.R.; Reynolds, D.J.M.; Stoner, N.S.; Moore, R.A.; McQuay, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    5-HT 3 receptor antagonists are used to treat radiation-induced sickness. The purpose of this study was to define anti-emetic efficacy and potential for harm of these drugs in radiotherapy. A systematic search, critical appraisal and quantitative analysis of relevant data using the number-needed-to-treat or harm (NNT/H) were conducted. Acute (0 to 24 h) and delayed (beyond 24 h) anti-emetic efficacy were analysed separately. Data from 1,404 patients were found in 40 trials published in 36 reports. Data from 197 patients receiving ondansetron or granisetron in five randomised trials were regarded as valid according to preset criteria. One placebo-controlled trial had 10 patients per group and in this ondansetron was not significantly different from placebo. In a larger (n=105) placebo-controlled trial, ondansetron was significantly more efficacious than metoclopramide for complete control of acute vomiting (NNT 2.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-3.3) and acute nausea (NNT 3.6, 95% CI 2.2-10.2). Three trials reported delayed outcomes with ondansetron or granisetron: there was no evidence of any difference compared with placebo or other anti-emetics. Two trials reported no acute or delayed but a 'worst day' outcome; in these ondansetron's antivomiting effect was significantly better than placebo (NNT 4.4, 95% CI 2.5-23) or prochlorperazine (NNT 3.8, 95% CI 2.4-10.3), but not its antinausea effect. Constipation and headache were associated significantly with 5-HT 3 receptor antagonists compared with other anti-emetics or placebo (NNH 6.4 and 17.1, respectively). Only 14% of published data enabled valid estimation of the anti-emetic efficacy of 5-HT 3 receptor antagonists in radiotherapy. There was some evidence that these drugs prevent acute vomiting: 40% of treated patients will benefit (NNT approximately 2.5). The evidence for nausea was less clear. There was no evidence that these drugs are of any benefit beyond 24 h. There was evidence that they produce specific

  11. Imaging dopamine and opiate receptors in the human brain in health and disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Dannals, R.F.; Frost, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    Chemical activity accompanies mental activity, but only recently has it been possible to begin to examine its nature. In 1983 the first imaging of a neuroreceptor in the human brain was accomplished with carbon-11 methyl spipeone, a ligand that binds preferentially to dopamine-2 receptors, 80% of which are located in the caudate nucleus and putamen. Quantitative imaging of serotonin-2, opiate, benzodiazapine and muscarinic cholinergic receptors has subsequently been accomplished. In studies of normal men and women, it has been found that dopamine and serotonin receptor activity decreases dramatically with age, such a decrease being more pronounced in men than in women and greater in the case of dopamine receptors than serotonin-2 receptors. Preliminary studies in patients with neuropsychiatric disorders suggests that dopamine-2 receptor activity is diminished in the caudate nucleus of patients with Huntington's disease. Positron tomography permits quantitative assay of picomolar quantities of neuroreceptors within the living human brain. Studies of patients with Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, acute and chronic pain states and drug addiction are now in progress

  12. Receptor Autoradiography Protocol for the Localized Visualization of Angiotensin II Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Andrea; Couling, Leena E; Carrera, Eduardo J; Speth, Robert C

    2016-06-07

    This protocol describes receptor binding patterns for Angiotensin II (Ang II) in the rat brain using a radioligand specific for Ang II receptors to perform receptor autoradiographic mapping. Tissue specimens are harvested and stored at -80 °C. A cryostat is used to coronally section the tissue (brain) and thaw-mount the sections onto charged slides. The slide-mounted tissue sections are incubated in (125)I-SI-Ang II to radiolabel Ang II receptors. Adjacent slides are separated into two sets: 'non-specific binding' (NSP) in the presence of a receptor saturating concentration of non-radiolabeled Ang II, or an AT1 Ang II receptor subtype (AT1R) selective Ang II receptor antagonist, and 'total binding' with no AT1R antagonist. A saturating concentration of AT2 Ang II receptor subtype (AT2R) antagonist (PD123319, 10 µM) is also present in the incubation buffer to limit (125)I-SI-Ang II binding to the AT1R subtype. During a 30 min pre-incubation at ~22 °C, NSP slides are exposed to 10 µM PD123319 and losartan, while 'total binding' slides are exposed to 10 µM PD123319. Slides are then incubated with (125)I-SI-Ang II in the presence of PD123319 for 'total binding', and PD123319 and losartan for NSP in assay buffer, followed by several 'washes' in buffer, and water to remove salt and non-specifically bound radioligand. The slides are dried using blow-dryers, then exposed to autoradiography film using a specialized film and cassette. The film is developed and the images are scanned into a computer for visual and quantitative densitometry using a proprietary imaging system and a spreadsheet. An additional set of slides are thionin-stained for histological comparisons. The advantage of using receptor autoradiography is the ability to visualize Ang II receptors in situ, within a section of a tissue specimen, and anatomically identify the region of the tissue by comparing it to an adjacent histological reference section.

  13. Quantitative analysis of adenosine A{sub 1} receptors in human brain using positron emission tomography and [1 -methyl-{sup 11}C]8-dicyclopropylmethyl-1-methyl-3-propylxanthine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Yuichi [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 1-1, Naka, Itabashi, Tokyo, 173-0022 (Japan)]. E-mail: ukimura@ieee.org; Ishii, Kenji [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 1-1, Naka, Itabashi, Tokyo, 173-0022 (Japan); Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 1-1, Naka, Itabashi, Tokyo, 173-0022 (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tsukuba Hospital, Amakubo, 2-1-1, Tsukuba, 305-8576 (Japan); Oda, Keiichi [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 1-1, Naka, Itabashi, Tokyo, 173-0022 (Japan); Sasaki, Toru [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 1-1, Naka, Itabashi, Tokyo, 173-0022 (Japan); Kawamura, Kazunori [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 1-1, Naka, Itabashi, Tokyo, 173-0022 (Japan); SHI Accelerator Service Ltd., 1-17-6, Ohsaki, Shinagawa, Tokyo, 141-0032 (Japan); Ishiwata, Kiichi [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 1-1, Naka, Itabashi, Tokyo, 173-0022 (Japan)

    2004-11-01

    Fully quantitative analysis of the adenosine A{sub 1} receptor (A1R) in the brain with {sup 11}C-MPDX and positron emission tomography is reported. The kinetics is described using a two-tissue three-compartment model, and estimated binding potentials correspond well with the estimates made by Logan plot. The image of the binding potential of the MPDX is physiologically reasonable. We conclude that MPDX is applicable to the visualization of the A1Rs in the brain with Logan plot.

  14. Activation of toll-like receptors 2 and 4 by gram-negative periodontal bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kikkert, R.; Laine, M. L.; Aarden, L. A.; van Winkelhoff, A. J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Periodontitis is a chronic infectious disease associated with a gram-negative subgingival microflora. Bacterial components stimulate, among other receptors, Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and/or TLR4. Accumulating evidence indicates that both qualitatively and quantitatively distinct

  15. In vivo characteristics of IBZM in rat brains: an agent for quantitative SPECT imaging of dopamine D[sub 2] receptors; Preparation of [sup 125]I-IBZM and its biodistribution and kinetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, Kaname; Nakashima, Hiromichi; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi [Mie Univ., Tsu (Japan). School of Medicine; Toyama, Hiroshi; Ichise, Masanori; Kurami, Miki; Maeda, Hisato; Takeuchi, Akira; Koga, Sukehiko

    1994-05-01

    [sup 123]I-(S)-(-)-3-iodo-2-hydroxy-6-methoxy-N-[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) methyl]-benzamide (IBZM) is a CNS dopamine D[sub 2] receptor imaging agent for SPECT and has already been used clinically in the United States, Canada and Europe. However, methods of quantitative SPECT measurement of the D[sub 2] receptor density have not been well established. We performed in vivo biodistribution studies of [sup 125]I-IBZM in rat brains as the first step toward establishment of a basis for quantitative SPECT imaging of D[sub 2] receptors in humans. [sup 125]I-IBZM was prepared by the chloramine-T method. Radiochemical yields were 80 to 90% and radiochemical purity was 94.7% on day 81 after labeling. At 10, 30, 60 and 120 min after injection of the radiopharmaceutical, the percent uptakes (% dose/g) in the rat striatum were 2.9, 1.9, 1.7 and 1.0, respectively. These kinetic data were considered suitable for SPECT imagings. Pretreatment with haloperidol (1 mg/kg) blocked specific striatal uptake and there was a significant reduction in the uptake to 40.9% of the unblocked uptake at 60 min after injection (p=0.006). The regional IBZM uptake ratio of striatum-to-cerebellum increased steadily from 1.7 at 10 min to 5.7 at 120 min. This suggests that SPECT imaging must be done during fixed time after tracer injection for the semiquantitative ratio to be meaningful. (author).

  16. Efficacy of 5-HT{sub 3} receptor antagonists in radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: A quantitative systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tramer, M.R. [Pain Research and Nuffield Department of Anaesthetics, University of Oxford, Oxford Radcliffe Hospital, The Churchill, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom); Reynolds, D.J.M. [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford, Radcliffe Hospital (United Kingdom); Stoner, N.S. [ICRF Department of Medical Oncology, Oxford Radcliffe Hospital (United Kingdom); Moore, R.A.; McQuay, H.J. [Pain Research and Nuffield Department of Anaesthetics, University of Oxford, Oxford Radcliffe Hospital, The Churchill, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1998-11-01

    5-HT{sub 3} receptor antagonists are used to treat radiation-induced sickness. The purpose of this study was to define anti-emetic efficacy and potential for harm of these drugs in radiotherapy. A systematic search, critical appraisal and quantitative analysis of relevant data using the number-needed-to-treat or harm (NNT/H) were conducted. Acute (0 to 24 h) and delayed (beyond 24 h) anti-emetic efficacy were analysed separately. Data from 1,404 patients were found in 40 trials published in 36 reports. Data from 197 patients receiving ondansetron or granisetron in five randomised trials were regarded as valid according to preset criteria. One placebo-controlled trial had 10 patients per group and in this ondansetron was not significantly different from placebo. In a larger (n=105) placebo-controlled trial, ondansetron was significantly more efficacious than metoclopramide for complete control of acute vomiting (NNT 2.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-3.3) and acute nausea (NNT 3.6, 95% CI 2.2-10.2). Three trials reported delayed outcomes with ondansetron or granisetron: there was no evidence of any difference compared with placebo or other anti-emetics. Two trials reported no acute or delayed but a 'worst day' outcome; in these ondansetron's antivomiting effect was significantly better than placebo (NNT 4.4, 95% CI 2.5-23) or prochlorperazine (NNT 3.8, 95% CI 2.4-10.3), but not its antinausea effect. Constipation and headache were associated significantly with 5-HT{sub 3} receptor antagonists compared with other anti-emetics or placebo (NNH 6.4 and 17.1, respectively). Only 14% of published data enabled valid estimation of the anti-emetic efficacy of 5-HT{sub 3} receptor antagonists in radiotherapy. There was some evidence that these drugs prevent acute vomiting: 40% of treated patients will benefit (NNT approximately 2.5). The evidence for nausea was less clear. There was no evidence that these drugs are of any benefit beyond 24 h. There was

  17. Quantitative Method of Measuring Metastatic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The metastatic potential of tumors can be evaluated by the quantitative detection of urokinase and DNA. The cell sample selected for examination is analyzed for the presence of high levels of urokinase and abnormal DNA using analytical flow cytometry and digital image analysis. Other factors such as membrane associated uroldnase, increased DNA synthesis rates and certain receptors can be used in the method for detection of potentially invasive tumors.

  18. Quantitative proteomics by amino acid labeling in C. elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredens, Julius; Engholm-Keller, Kasper; Giessing, Anders

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate labeling of Caenorhabditis elegans with heavy isotope-labeled lysine by feeding them with heavy isotope-labeled Escherichia coli. Using heavy isotope-labeled worms and quantitative proteomics methods, we identified several proteins that are regulated in response to loss or RNAi-med......-mediated knockdown of the nuclear hormone receptor 49 in C. elegans. The combined use of quantitative proteomics and selective gene knockdown is a powerful tool for C. elegans biology.......We demonstrate labeling of Caenorhabditis elegans with heavy isotope-labeled lysine by feeding them with heavy isotope-labeled Escherichia coli. Using heavy isotope-labeled worms and quantitative proteomics methods, we identified several proteins that are regulated in response to loss or RNAi...

  19. [Effect of dietary fiber in the quantitative expression of butyrate receptor GPR43 in rats colon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corte Osorio, L Y; Martínez Flores, H E; Ortiz Alvarado, R

    2011-01-01

    Short chain fatty acids (SCFA) acetate, propionate and butyrate are the major anions produced by the bacterial fermentation of dietary fiber (DF) in colon. Recently, butyrate has been recently studied because is important to maintain colonic functions and because it has been related with a protective effect in colorectal cancer, which is mainly, explained by its potential to regulate gene expression by inhibiting enzyme histonedeacetylase (HDAC). Several investigationsshown that SCFAreceptor GPR43 is involved insignal transduction mechanisms once they bind to ligands such as butyrate to generate different physiological effects in colonocytes. Determine if dietary fiber consumption from nopal (Opuntia ficus I.) containing a ratio of soluble-insoluble fiber 40/60, has a direct influence on the quantitative expression of butyrate-specific receptor GPR43. Wistar rats were fed with four different diets formulated at different concentrations of dietary fiber of 0, 5, 15 and 25% of dietary fiber from opuntia, respectively. The results shown an increase in the expression of GPR43 (93.1%) when rats was fed with a 5% fiber diet, using β-actin as a reference gene. The results of this investigation will contribute to determinate the relation of diet with intestinal health for the purpose of expanding the knowledge of butyric acid on colonic functions.

  20. Functional relevance of neurotransmitter receptor heteromers in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferré, Sergi; Ciruela, Francisco; Woods, Amina S; Lluis, Carme; Franco, Rafael

    2007-09-01

    The existence of neurotransmitter receptor heteromers is becoming broadly accepted and their functional significance is being revealed. Heteromerization of neurotransmitter receptors produces functional entities that possess different biochemical characteristics with respect to the individual components of the heteromer. Neurotransmitter receptor heteromers can function as processors of computations that modulate cell signaling. Thus, the quantitative or qualitative aspects of the signaling generated by stimulation of any of the individual receptor units in the heteromer are different from those obtained during coactivation. Furthermore, recent studies demonstrate that some neurotransmitter receptor heteromers can exert an effect as processors of computations that directly modulate both pre- and postsynaptic neurotransmission. This is illustrated by the analysis of striatal receptor heteromers that control striatal glutamatergic neurotransmission.

  1. Farnesoid X Receptor Activation Promotes Hepatic Amino Acid Catabolism and Ammonium Clearance in Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massafra, Vittoria; Milona, Alexandra; Vos, Harmjan R; Ramos, Rúben J J; Gerrits, Johan; Willemsen, Ellen C L; Ramos Pittol, José M; Ijssennagger, Noortje; Houweling, Martin; Prinsen, Hubertus C M T; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M; Burgering, Boudewijn M T; van Mil, Saskia W C

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The nuclear receptor subfamily 1 group H member 4 (NR1H4 or farnesoid X receptor [FXR]) regulates bile acid synthesis, transport, and catabolism. FXR also regulates postprandial lipid and glucose metabolism. We performed quantitative proteomic analyses of liver tissues from mice

  2. Correlated receptor transport processes buffer single-cell heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan M Kallenberger

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cells typically vary in their response to extracellular ligands. Receptor transport processes modulate ligand-receptor induced signal transduction and impact the variability in cellular responses. Here, we quantitatively characterized cellular variability in erythropoietin receptor (EpoR trafficking at the single-cell level based on live-cell imaging and mathematical modeling. Using ensembles of single-cell mathematical models reduced parameter uncertainties and showed that rapid EpoR turnover, transport of internalized EpoR back to the plasma membrane, and degradation of Epo-EpoR complexes were essential for receptor trafficking. EpoR trafficking dynamics in adherent H838 lung cancer cells closely resembled the dynamics previously characterized by mathematical modeling in suspension cells, indicating that dynamic properties of the EpoR system are widely conserved. Receptor transport processes differed by one order of magnitude between individual cells. However, the concentration of activated Epo-EpoR complexes was less variable due to the correlated kinetics of opposing transport processes acting as a buffering system.

  3. The development of the glucocorticoid receptor system in the rat limbic brain. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meaney, M.J.; Sapolsky, R.M.; McEwen, B.S.

    1985-01-01

    The authors report the results of an autoradiographic analysis of the postnatal development of the hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor system in the rat brain. Quantitative analysis of the autoradiograms revealed a varied pattern of gradual development towards adult receptor concentrations during the second week of life. Receptor concentrations in the dentate gyrus increased dramatically between Days 9 and 15, while the changes during this period in the pyramidal layers of Ammon's horn seemed to reflect both structural changes in these regions as well as increases in receptor concentrations. (orig.)

  4. Adenosine A2A Receptor in the Monkey Basal Ganglia: Ultrastructural Localization and Colocalization With the Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 in the Striatum

    OpenAIRE

    Bogenpohl, James W.; Ritter, Stefanie L.; Hall, Randy A.; Smith, Yoland

    2012-01-01

    The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) is a potential drug target for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and other neurological disorders. In rodents, the therapeutic efficacy of A2AR modulation is improved by concomitant modulation of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5). To elucidate the anatomical substrate(s) through which these therapeutic benefits could be mediated, pre-embedding electron microscopy immunohistochemistry was used to conduct a detailed, quantitative ultrastructural...

  5. The development of epidermal growth factor receptor molecular imaging in cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xiaoliang; Wang Hao; Shi Peiji; Liu Jianfeng; Meng Aimin

    2013-01-01

    In vivo epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeted therapy has great potential for cancer diagnosis and the evaluation of curative effects. Enhancement of EGFR-targeted therapy needs a reliable quantitative molecular imaging method which could enable monitoring of receptor drug binding and receptor occupancy in vivo, and identification of the mutation in EGFR. PET or SPECT is the most advanced molecular imaging technology of non-invasively selecting responders, predicting therapeutic outcome and monitoring EGFR-targeted treatment. This review analyzed the present situation and research progress of molecular imaging agents. (authors)

  6. A threshold model for receptor tyrosine kinase signaling specificity and cell fate determination [version 1; referees: 4 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Zinkle

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Upon ligand engagement, the single-pass transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs dimerize to transmit qualitatively and quantitatively different intracellular signals that alter the transcriptional landscape and thereby determine the cellular response. The molecular mechanisms underlying these fundamental events are not well understood. Considering recent insights into the structural biology of fibroblast growth factor signaling, we propose a threshold model for RTK signaling specificity in which quantitative differences in the strength/longevity of ligand-induced receptor dimers on the cell surface lead to quantitative differences in the phosphorylation of activation loop (A-loop tyrosines as well as qualitative differences in the phosphorylation of tyrosines mediating substrate recruitment. In this model, quantitative differences on A-loop tyrosine phosphorylation result in gradations in kinase activation, leading to the generation of intracellular signals of varying amplitude/duration. In contrast, qualitative differences in the pattern of tyrosine phosphorylation on the receptor result in the recruitment/activation of distinct substrates/intracellular pathways. Commensurate with both the dynamics of the intracellular signal and the types of intracellular pathways activated, unique transcriptional signatures are established. Our model provides a framework for engineering clinically useful ligands that can tune receptor dimerization stability so as to bias the cellular transcriptome to achieve a desired cellular output.

  7. A quantitative characterization of the yeast heterotrimeric G protein cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Tau-Mu; Kitano, Hiroaki; Simon, Melvin I.

    2003-01-01

    The yeast mating response is one of the best understood heterotrimeric G protein signaling pathways. Yet, most descriptions of this system have been qualitative. We have quantitatively characterized the heterotrimeric G protein cycle in yeast based on direct in vivo measurements. We used fluorescence resonance energy transfer to monitor the association state of cyan fluorescent protein (CFP)-Gα and Gβγ-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), and we found that receptor-mediated G protein activation produced a loss of fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Quantitative time course and dose–response data were obtained for both wild-type and mutant cells possessing an altered pheromone response. These results paint a quantitative portrait of how regulators such as Sst2p and the C-terminal tail of α-factor receptor modulate the kinetics and sensitivity of G protein signaling. We have explored critical features of the dynamics including the rapid rise and subsequent decline of active G proteins during the early response, and the relationship between the G protein activation dose–response curve and the downstream dose–response curves for cell-cycle arrest and transcriptional induction. Fitting the data to a mathematical model produced estimates of the in vivo rates of heterotrimeric G protein activation and deactivation in yeast. PMID:12960402

  8. Validation of a rapid, non-radioactive method to quantify internalisation of G-protein coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongsma, Maikel; Florczyk, Urszula M; Hendriks-Balk, Mariëlle C; Michel, Martin C; Peters, Stephan L M; Alewijnse, Astrid E

    2007-07-01

    Agonist exposure can cause internalisation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which may be a part of desensitisation but also of cellular signaling. Previous methods to study internalisation have been tedious or only poorly quantitative. Therefore, we have developed and validated a quantitative method using a sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor as a model. Because of a lack of suitable binding studies, it has been difficult to study S1P receptor internalisation. Using a N-terminal HisG-tag, S1P(1) receptors on the cell membrane can be visualised via immunocytochemistry with a specific anti-HisG antibody. S1P-induced internalisation was concentration dependent and was quantified using a microplate reader, detecting either absorbance, a fluorescent or luminescent signal, depending on the antibodies used. Among those, the fluorescence detection method was the most convenient to use. The relative ease of this method makes it suitable to measure a large number of data points, e.g. to compare the potency and efficacy of receptor ligands.

  9. Bioorthogonal fluorescent labeling of functional G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, He; Naganathan, Saranga; Kazmi, Manija A

    2014-01-01

    Novel methods are required for site-specific, quantitative fluorescent labeling of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and other difficult-to-express membrane proteins. Ideally, fluorescent probes should perturb the native structure and function as little as possible. We evaluated bioorthogonal...

  10. Receptor macroautoradiography of 3H-spiroperidol binding in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hirofumi; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Tsuji, Shiro; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Hisada, Kinichi; Kojima, Kazuhiko

    1985-01-01

    The kinetic and pharmacological characteristics of 3 H-spiroperidol binding sites were studied in slide mounted sections of rat forebrain, and optical binding conditions were defined. Using the receptor macroautoradiographic techniques with tritium-sensitive LKB sheet film, the distribution of dopamine (D 2 ) receptor was determined in slices including striatum of rat brain. The autoradiograms were analyzed using Video Digitizer System combined with video camera and minicomputer, and the subtraction images were obtained. These studies suggest that this quantitative receptor macroautoradiography might be useful in the explanation of etiology in the field of neuro-psychiatric diseases and the fundamental studies of positron emission computed tomography, since this method has several advantages over in vivo autoradiography and in vitro receptor assay. (author)

  11. Validation of a rapid, non-radioactive method to quantify internalisation of G-protein coupled receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, Maikel; Florczyk, Urszula M.; Hendriks-Balk, Marieelle C.; Michel, Martin C.; Peters, Stephan L. M.; Alewijnse, Astrid E.

    2007-01-01

    Agonist exposure can cause internalisation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which may be a part of desensitisation but also of cellular signaling. Previous methods to study internalisation have been tedious or only poorly quantitative. Therefore, we have developed and validated a quantitative

  12. Establishment of Dimethyl Labeling-based Quantitative Acetylproteomics in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shichang; Yu, Fengchao; Yang, Zhu; Wang, Tingliang; Xiong, Hairong; Chang, Caren; Yu, Weichuan; Li, Ning

    2018-05-01

    Protein acetylation, one of many types of post-translational modifications (PTMs), is involved in a variety of biological and cellular processes. In the present study, we applied both C sCl d ensity g radient (CDG) centrifugation-based protein fractionation and a dimethyl-labeling-based 4C quantitative PTM proteomics workflow in the study of dynamic acetylproteomic changes in Arabidopsis. This workflow integrates the dimethyl c hemical labeling with c hromatography-based acetylpeptide separation and enrichment followed by mass spectrometry (MS) analysis, the extracted ion chromatogram (XIC) quantitation-based c omputational analysis of mass spectrometry data to measure dynamic changes of acetylpeptide level using an in-house software program, named S table isotope-based Qua ntitation- D imethyl labeling (SQUA-D), and finally the c onfirmation of ethylene hormone-regulated acetylation using immunoblot analysis. Eventually, using this proteomic approach, 7456 unambiguous acetylation sites were found from 2638 different acetylproteins, and 5250 acetylation sites, including 5233 sites on lysine side chain and 17 sites on protein N termini, were identified repetitively. Out of these repetitively discovered acetylation sites, 4228 sites on lysine side chain ( i.e. 80.5%) are novel. These acetylproteins are exemplified by the histone superfamily, ribosomal and heat shock proteins, and proteins related to stress/stimulus responses and energy metabolism. The novel acetylproteins enriched by the CDG centrifugation fractionation contain many cellular trafficking proteins, membrane-bound receptors, and receptor-like kinases, which are mostly involved in brassinosteroid, light, gravity, and development signaling. In addition, we identified 12 highly conserved acetylation site motifs within histones, P-glycoproteins, actin depolymerizing factors, ATPases, transcription factors, and receptor-like kinases. Using SQUA-D software, we have quantified 33 ethylene hormone-enhanced and

  13. NK Cell Receptor/H2-Dk–Dependent Host Resistance to Viral Infection Is Quantitatively Modulated by H2 q Inhibitory Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fodil-Cornu, Nassima; Loredo-Osti, J. Concepción; Vidal, Silvia M.

    2011-01-01

    The cytomegalovirus resistance locus Cmv3 has been linked to an epistatic interaction between two loci: a Natural Killer (NK) cell receptor gene and the major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) locus. To demonstrate the interaction between Cmv3 and H2k, we generated double congenic mice between MA/My and BALB.K mice and an F2 cross between FVB/N (H-2q) and BALB.K (H2k) mice, two strains susceptible to mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV). Only mice expressing H2k in conjunction with Cmv3MA/My or Cmv3FVB were resistant to MCMV infection. Subsequently, an F3 cross was carried out between transgenic FVB/H2-Dk and MHC-I deficient mice in which only the progeny expressing Cmv3FVB and a single H2-Dk class-I molecule completely controlled MCMV viral loads. This phenotype was shown to be NK cell–dependent and associated with subsequent NK cell proliferation. Finally, we demonstrated that a number of H2q alleles influence the expression level of H2q molecules, but not intrinsic functional properties of NK cells; viral loads, however, were quantitatively proportional to the number of H2q alleles. Our results support a model in which H-2q molecules convey Ly49-dependent inhibitory signals that interfere with the action of H2-Dk on NK cell activation against MCMV infection. Thus, the integration of activating and inhibitory signals emanating from various MHC-I/NK cell receptor interactions regulates NK cell–mediated control of viral load. PMID:21533075

  14. Quantitative phosphoproteomics dissection of 7TM receptor signaling using full and biased agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Gitte L; Kelstrup, Christian D; Lyngsø, Christina

    2010-01-01

    only activates the Gaq protein-independent signaling.e quantified more than ten thousand phosphorylation sites of which 1183 were regulated by Angiotensin II or its analogue SII Angiotensin II. 36% of the AT1R regulated phosphorylations were regulated by SII Angiotensin II. Analysis of phosphorylation...... into Angiotensin II signal transduction and is the first study dissecting the differences between a full agonist and a biased agonist from a 7TMR on a systems-wide scale. Importantly, it reveals a previously unappreciated diversity and quantity of Gaq protein-independent signaling and uncovers novel signaling......Seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs) signal through the well described heterotrimeric G proteins, but can also activate G protein-independent signaling pathways of which the impact and complexity are less understood. The Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) is a prototypical 7TMR and an important...

  15. Research resource: new and diverse substrates for the insulin receptor isoform a revealed by quantitative proteomics after stimulation with igf-ii or insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morcavallo, Alaide; Gaspari, Marco; Pandini, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    progression. We hypothesized that IGF-II binding to the IR-A elicits a unique signaling pathway. In order to obtain an unbiased evaluation of IR-A substrates differentially involved after IGF-II and insulin stimulation, we performed quantitative proteomics of IR-A substrates recruited to tyrosine......-phosphorylated protein complexes using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture in combination with antiphosphotyrosine antibody pull down and mass spectrometry. Using cells expressing only the human IR-A and lacking the IGF-I receptor, we identified 38 IR-A substrates. Only 10 were known IR mediators......, whereas 28 substrates were not previously related to IR signaling. Eleven substrates were recruited by stimulation with both ligands: two equally recruited by IGF-II and insulin, three more strongly recruited by IGF-II, and six more strongly recruited by insulin. Moreover, 14 substrates were recruited...

  16. Prolactin receptor, growth hormone receptor, and putative somatolactin receptor in Mozambique tilapia: tissue specific expression and differential regulation by salinity and fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, A L; Fox, B K; Davis, L K; Visitacion, N; Kitahashi, T; Hirano, T; Grau, E G

    2007-01-01

    In fish, pituitary growth hormone family peptide hormones (growth hormone, GH; prolactin, PRL; somatolactin, SL) regulate essential physiological functions including osmoregulation, growth, and metabolism. Teleost GH family hormones have both differential and overlapping effects, which are mediated by plasma membrane receptors. A PRL receptor (PRLR) and two putative GH receptors (GHR1 and GHR2) have been identified in several teleost species. Recent phylogenetic analyses and binding studies suggest that GHR1 is a receptor for SL. However, no studies have compared the tissue distribution and physiological regulation of all three receptors. We sequenced GHR2 from the liver of the Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus), developed quantitative real-time PCR assays for the three receptors, and assessed their tissue distribution and regulation by salinity and fasting. PRLR was highly expressed in the gill, kidney, and intestine, consistent with the osmoregulatory functions of PRL. PRLR expression was very low in the liver. GHR2 was most highly expressed in the muscle, followed by heart, testis, and liver, consistent with this being a GH receptor with functions in growth and metabolism. GHR1 was most highly expressed in fat, liver, and muscle, suggesting a metabolic function. GHR1 expression was also high in skin, consistent with a function of SL in chromatophore regulation. These findings support the hypothesis that GHR1 is a receptor for SL. In a comparison of freshwater (FW)- and seawater (SW)-adapted tilapia, plasma PRL was strongly elevated in FW, whereas plasma GH was slightly elevated in SW. PRLR expression was reduced in the gill in SW, consistent with PRL's function in freshwater adaptation. GHR2 was elevated in the kidney in FW, and correlated negatively with plasma GH, whereas GHR1 was elevated in the gill in SW. Plasma IGF-I, but not GH, was reduced by 4 weeks of fasting. Transcript levels of GHR1 and GHR2 were elevated by fasting in the muscle. However

  17. Evaluation of estrogen receptor alpha and beta and progesterone receptor expression and correlation with clinicopathologic factors and proliferative marker Ki-67 in breast cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosa, Fabíola E; Caldeira, José R F; Felipes, Joice

    2008-01-01

    To elucidate the molecular profile of hormonal steroid receptor status, we analyzed ER-alpha, ER-beta, and PGR mRNA and protein expression in 80 breast carcinomas using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), quantitative RT-PCR, and immunohistochemical analysis. Qualitative ana...

  18. Quantitative modeling assesses the contribution of bond strengthening, rebinding and force sharing to the avidity of biomolecule interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Lo Schiavo

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion is mediated by numerous membrane receptors. It is desirable to derive the outcome of a cell-surface encounter from the molecular properties of interacting receptors and ligands. However, conventional parameters such as affinity or kinetic constants are often insufficient to account for receptor efficiency. Avidity is a qualitative concept frequently used to describe biomolecule interactions: this includes incompletely defined properties such as the capacity to form multivalent attachments. The aim of this study is to produce a working description of monovalent attachments formed by a model system, then to measure and interpret the behavior of divalent attachments under force. We investigated attachments between antibody-coated microspheres and surfaces coated with sparse monomeric or dimeric ligands. When bonds were subjected to a pulling force, they exhibited both a force-dependent dissociation consistent with Bell's empirical formula and a force- and time-dependent strengthening well described by a single parameter. Divalent attachments were stronger and less dependent on forces than monovalent ones. The proportion of divalent attachments resisting a force of 30 piconewtons for at least 5 s was 3.7 fold higher than that of monovalent attachments. Quantitative modeling showed that this required rebinding, i.e. additional bond formation between surfaces linked by divalent receptors forming only one bond. Further, experimental data were compatible with but did not require stress sharing between bonds within divalent attachments. Thus many ligand-receptor interactions do not behave as single-step reactions in the millisecond to second timescale. Rather, they exhibit progressive stabilization. This explains the high efficiency of multimerized or clustered receptors even when bonds are only subjected to moderate forces. Our approach provides a quantitative way of relating binding avidity to measurable parameters including bond

  19. Quantitative Modeling Assesses the Contribution of Bond Strengthening, Rebinding and Force Sharing to the Avidity of Biomolecule Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Schiavo, Valentina; Robert, Philippe; Limozin, Laurent; Bongrand, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion is mediated by numerous membrane receptors. It is desirable to derive the outcome of a cell-surface encounter from the molecular properties of interacting receptors and ligands. However, conventional parameters such as affinity or kinetic constants are often insufficient to account for receptor efficiency. Avidity is a qualitative concept frequently used to describe biomolecule interactions: this includes incompletely defined properties such as the capacity to form multivalent attachments. The aim of this study is to produce a working description of monovalent attachments formed by a model system, then to measure and interpret the behavior of divalent attachments under force. We investigated attachments between antibody-coated microspheres and surfaces coated with sparse monomeric or dimeric ligands. When bonds were subjected to a pulling force, they exhibited both a force-dependent dissociation consistent with Bell’s empirical formula and a force- and time-dependent strengthening well described by a single parameter. Divalent attachments were stronger and less dependent on forces than monovalent ones. The proportion of divalent attachments resisting a force of 30 piconewtons for at least 5 s was 3.7 fold higher than that of monovalent attachments. Quantitative modeling showed that this required rebinding, i.e. additional bond formation between surfaces linked by divalent receptors forming only one bond. Further, experimental data were compatible with but did not require stress sharing between bonds within divalent attachments. Thus many ligand-receptor interactions do not behave as single-step reactions in the millisecond to second timescale. Rather, they exhibit progressive stabilization. This explains the high efficiency of multimerized or clustered receptors even when bonds are only subjected to moderate forces. Our approach provides a quantitative way of relating binding avidity to measurable parameters including bond maturation, rebinding and

  20. Synergistic Action of Presynaptic Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors and Adenosine Receptors in Developmental Axonal Competition at the Neuromuscular Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, Laura; Garcia, Neus; Hurtado, Erica; Simó, Anna; Tomàs, Marta; Lanuza, Maria Angel; Cilleros, Victor; Tomàs, Josep Maria

    2016-01-01

    The development of the nervous system involves the initial overproduction of synapses, which promotes connectivity. Hebbian competition between axons with different activities leads to the loss of roughly half of the overproduced elements and this refines connectivity. We used quantitative immunohistochemistry to investigate, in the postnatal day 7 (P7) to P9 neuromuscular junctions, the involvement of muscarinic receptors (muscarinic acetylcholine autoreceptors and the M1, M2, and M4 subtypes) and adenosine receptors (A1 and A2A subtypes) in the control of axonal elimination after the mouse levator auris longus muscle had been exposed to selective antagonists in vivo. In a previous study we analyzed the role of each of the individual receptors. Here we investigate the additive or occlusive effects of their inhibitors and thus the existence of synergistic activity between the receptors. The main results show that the A2A, M1, M4, and A1 receptors (in this order of ability) delayed axonal elimination at P7. M4 produces some occlusion of the M1 pathway and some addition to the A1 pathway, which suggests that they cooperate. M2 receptors may modulate (by allowing a permissive action) the other receptors, mainly M4 and A1. The continued action of these receptors (now including M2 but not M4) finally promotes axonal loss at P9. All 4 receptors (M2, M1, A1, and A2A, in this order of ability) are necessary. The M4 receptor (which in itself does not affect axon loss) seems to modulate the other receptors. We found a synergistic action between the M1, A1, and A2A receptors, which show an additive effect, whereas the potent M2 effect is largely independent of the other receptors (though can be modulated by M4). At P9, there is a full mutual dependence between the A1 and A2A receptors in regulating axon loss. In summary, postnatal axonal elimination is a regulated multireceptor mechanism that involves the cooperation of several muscarinic and adenosine receptor subtypes.

  1. Identifying Environmental Chemicals as Agonists of the Androgen Receptor by Applying a Quantitative High-throughput Screening Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The androgen receptor (AR, NR3C4) is a nuclear receptor whose main function is acting as a transcription factor regulating gene expression for male sexual development and maintaining accessory sexual organ function. It is also a necessary component of female fertility...

  2. Compositions and methods related to serotonin 5-HT1A receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Jogeshwar [Irvine, CA; Saigal, Neil [Fresno, CA; Saigal, legal representative, Harsh

    2012-09-25

    Contemplated substituted arylpiperazinyl compounds, and most preferably .sup.18F-Mefway, exhibit desirable in vitro and in vivo binding characteristics to the 5-HT1A receptor. Among other advantageous parameters, contemplated compounds retain high binding affinity, display optimal lipophilicity, and are radiolabeled efficiently with .sup.18F-fluorine in a single step. Still further, contemplated compounds exhibit high target to non-target ratios in receptor-rich regions both in vitro and in vivo, and selected compounds can be effectively and sensitively displaced by serotonin, thus providing a quantitative tool for measuring 5-HT1A receptors and serotonin concentration changes in the living brain.

  3. Quantitative Expression of C-Type Lectin Receptors in Humans and Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Maciej; Susanti, Heni Eka; Römmele, Christoph; Gröbmayr, Regina; Günthner, Roman; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2012-01-01

    C-type lectin receptors and their adaptor molecules are involved in the recognition of glycosylated self-antigens and pathogens. However, little is known about the species- and organ-specific expression profiles of these molecules. We therefore determined the mRNA expression levels of Dectin-1, MR1, MR2, DC-SIGN, Syk, Card-9, Bcl-10, Malt-1, Src, Dec-205, Galectin-1, Tim-3, Trem-1, and DAP-12 in 11 solid organs of human and mice. Mouse organs revealed lower mRNA levels of most molecules compared to spleen. However, Dec-205 and Galectin-1 in thymus, Src in brain, MR2, Card-9, Bcl-10, Src, and Dec-205 in small intestine, MR2, Bcl-10, Src, Galectin-1 in kidney, and Src and Galectin-1 in muscle were at least 2-fold higher expressed compared to spleen. Human lung, liver and heart expressed higher mRNA levels of most genes compared to spleen. Dectin-1, MR1, Syk and Trem-1 mRNA were strongly up-regulated upon ischemia-reperfusion injury in murine kidney. Tim3, DAP-12, Card-9, DC-SIGN and MR2 were further up-regulated during renal fibrosis. Murine kidney showed higher DAP-12, Syk, Card-9 and Dectin-1 mRNA expression during the progression of lupus nephritis. Thus, the organ-, and species-specific expression of C-type lectin receptors is different between mice and humans which must be considered in the interpretation of related studies. PMID:22949850

  4. Nested Expression Domains for Odorant Receptors in Zebrafish Olfactory Epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weth, Franco; Nadler, Walter; Korsching, Sigrun

    1996-11-01

    The mapping of high-dimensional olfactory stimuli onto the two-dimensional surface of the nasal sensory epithelium constitutes the first step in the neuronal encoding of olfactory input. We have used zebrafish as a model system to analyze the spatial distribution of odorant receptor molecules in the olfactory epithelium by quantitative in situ hybridization. To this end, we have cloned 10 very divergent zebrafish odorant receptor molecules by PCR. Individual genes are expressed in sparse olfactory receptor neurons. Analysis of the position of labeled cells in a simplified coordinate system revealed three concentric, albeit overlapping, expression domains for the four odorant receptors analyzed in detail. Such regionalized expression should result in a corresponding segregation of functional response properties. This might represent the first step of spatial encoding of olfactory input or be essential for the development of the olfactory system.

  5. Adrenal medullary regulation of rat renal cortical adrenergic receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundaresan, P.R.; Guarnaccia, M.M.; Izzo, J.L. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The role of the adrenal medulla in the regulation of renal cortical adrenergic receptors was investigated in renal cortical particular fractions from control rats and rats 6 wk after adrenal demedullation. The specific binding of [ 3 H]prazosin, [ 3 H]rauwolscine, and [ 125 I]iodocyanopindolol were used to quantitate α 1 -, α 2 -, and β-adrenergic receptors, respectively. Adrenal demedullation increased the concentration of all three groups of renal adrenergic receptors; maximal number of binding sites (B max , per milligram membrane protein) for α 1 -, and α 2 -, and β-adrenergic receptors were increased by 22, 18.5, and 25%, respectively. No differences were found in the equilibrium dissociation constants (K D ) for any of the radioligands. Plasma corticosterone and plasma and renal norepinephrine levels were unchanged, whereas plasma epinephrine was decreased 72% by adrenal demedullation, renal cortical epinephrine was not detectable in control or demedullated animals. The results suggest that, in the physiological state, the adrenal medulla modulates the number of renal cortical adrenergic receptors, presumably through the actions of a circulating factor such as epinephrine

  6. The development of [18F]cyclofoxy as a ligand for imaging opioid receptors in the CNS of conscious humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, K.C.; Newman, A.H.; Ostrowski, N.L.; Cohen, R.M.; Pert, A.; Pert, C.B.; Burke, T.R. Jr.; McLellan, C.A.; Channing, M.A.; Finn, R.D.; Dunn, B.; Simpson, N.; Carson, R.W.; Larson, S.M.; Eckelman, W.C.; Bennett, J.M.; Kawai, R.; Sawada, Y.; Herscovitch, P.; Yolles, P.S.; Nordhal, T.; Gross, M.; Blasberg, R.

    1989-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a unique, noninvasive technique applicable to real time visualization and quantitation of drug receptor occupancy in the brain of conscious humans. Such studies with the normal and abnormal human CNS can potentially provide insight into the biochemical basis of disease states and the effects of drug therapy. The (-)-enantiomer of cyclofoxy, a fluorinated, potent narcotic antagonist derived from naltrexone, has been developed at NIH as an agent for study of the opioid receptor-endorphin system using PET. The development and current status of this program is described, including application of the NIH Opiate Total Synthesis for production the pharmacologically inert (+)-[ 18 F]cyclofoxy required for quantitation of receptor occupancy

  7. Presynaptic Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors and TrkB Receptor Cooperate in the Elimination of Redundant Motor Nerve Terminals during Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, Laura; Garcia, Neus; Hurtado, Erica; Simó, Anna; Tomàs, Marta; Lanuza, Maria A; Cilleros, Victor; Tomàs, Josep

    2017-01-01

    The development of the nervous system involves the overproduction of synapses but connectivity is refined by Hebbian activity-dependent axonal competition. The newborn skeletal muscle fibers are polyinnervated but, at the end of the competition process, some days later, become innervated by a single axon. We used quantitative confocal imaging of the autofluorescent axons from transgenic B6.Cg-Tg (Thy1-YFP)16 Jrs/J mice to investigate the possible cooperation of the muscarinic autoreceptors (mAChR, M 1 -, M 2 - and M 4 -subtypes) and the tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) receptor in the control of axonal elimination after the mice Levator auris longus (LAL) muscle had been exposed to several selective antagonist of the corresponding receptor pathways in vivo . Our previous results show that M 1 , M 2 and TrkB signaling individually increase axonal loss rate around P9. Here we show that although the M 1 and TrkB receptors cooperate and add their respective individual effects to increase axonal elimination rate even more, the effect of the M 2 receptor is largely independent of both M 1 and TrkB receptors. Thus both, cooperative and non-cooperative signaling mechanisms contribute to developmental synapse elimination.

  8. NK cell receptor/H2-Dk-dependent host resistance to viral infection is quantitatively modulated by H2q inhibitory signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fodil-Cornu, Nassima; Loredo-Osti, J Concepción; Vidal, Silvia M

    2011-04-01

    The cytomegalovirus resistance locus Cmv3 has been linked to an epistatic interaction between two loci: a Natural Killer (NK) cell receptor gene and the major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) locus. To demonstrate the interaction between Cmv3 and H2(k), we generated double congenic mice between MA/My and BALB.K mice and an F(2) cross between FVB/N (H-2(q)) and BALB.K (H2(k)) mice, two strains susceptible to mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV). Only mice expressing H2(k) in conjunction with Cmv3(MA/My) or Cmv3(FVB) were resistant to MCMV infection. Subsequently, an F(3) cross was carried out between transgenic FVB/H2-D(k) and MHC-I deficient mice in which only the progeny expressing Cmv3(FVB) and a single H2-D(k) class-I molecule completely controlled MCMV viral loads. This phenotype was shown to be NK cell-dependent and associated with subsequent NK cell proliferation. Finally, we demonstrated that a number of H2(q) alleles influence the expression level of H2(q) molecules, but not intrinsic functional properties of NK cells; viral loads, however, were quantitatively proportional to the number of H2(q) alleles. Our results support a model in which H-2(q) molecules convey Ly49-dependent inhibitory signals that interfere with the action of H2-D(k) on NK cell activation against MCMV infection. Thus, the integration of activating and inhibitory signals emanating from various MHC-I/NK cell receptor interactions regulates NK cell-mediated control of viral load.

  9. A sensitive electrochemiluminescence cytosensor for quantitative evaluation of epidermal growth factor receptor expressed on cell surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yanjuan; Zhang, Shaolian; Wen, Qingqing; Huang, Hongxing; Yang, Peihui, E-mail: typh@jnu.edu.cn

    2015-06-30

    Highlights: • EGF-cytosensor was used for evaluating EGFR expression level on cell surfaces. • CdSQDs and EGF were coated on magnetic beads (MBs) for ECL-probe. • Good sensitivity was achieved due to the signal amplification of ECL-probe. - Abstract: A sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) strategy for evaluating the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression level on cell surfaces was designed by integrating the specific recognition of EGFR expressed on MCF-7 cell surfaces with an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-funtionalized CdS quantum dots (CdSQDs)-capped magnetic bead (MB) probe. The high sensitivity of ECL probe of EGF-funtionalized CdSQD-capped-MB was used for competitive recognition with EGFR expressed on cell surfaces with recombinant EGFR protein. The changes of ECL intensity depended on both the cell number and the expression level of EGFR receptor on cell surfaces. A wide linear response to cells ranging from 80 to 4 × 10{sup 6} cells mL{sup −1} with a detection limit of 40 cells mL{sup −1} was obtained. The EGF-cytosensor was used to evaluate EGFR expression levels on MCF-7 cells, and the average number of EGFR receptor on single MCF-7 cells was 1.35 × 10{sup 5} with the relative standard deviation of 4.3%. This strategy was further used for in-situ and real-time evaluating EGFR receptor expressed on cell surfaces in response to drugs stimulation at different concentration and incubation time. The proposed method provided potential applications in the detection of receptors on cancer cells and anticancer drugs screening.

  10. Quantitative autoradiography of ligands for dopamine receptors and transporters in brain of Göttingen minipig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minuzzi, Luciano; Olsen, Aage Kristian; Bender, Dirk

    2006-01-01

    The pig has been used as animal model for positron emission tomography (PET) studies of dopamine (DA) receptors and pharmacological perturbations of DA neurotransmission. However, the binding properties of DA receptors and transporters in pig brain have not been characterized in vitro. Therefore...... in young and old pigs, and were close to those reported for rat and human brain. Furthermore, gradients in the concentrations of D1 and D2/3 sites in striatum measured in vitro agreed with earlier findings in PET studies. However, the dopamine transporter (DAT) ligand [3H]GBR12935 did not bind in pig brain...

  11. Filtration assay for quantitation of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) specific binding to whole cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dold, K.M.; Greenlee, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive filtration assay for quantitating the specific binding of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) to whole cells in culture is described. Cell monolayers are incubated with [3H]TCDD in the presence or absence of excess unlabeled ligand, detached from the culture dish with trypsin, filtered, and washed with cold (-78 degrees C) acetone to separate free and nonspecifically bound TCDD from specifically bound TCDD. TCDD receptor binding parameters were characterized in the murine hepatoma cell line Hepa1c1c7. The lower limit of detection of TCDD specific binding was in a sample equivalent to 10 micrograms of total cell protein. The equilibrium dissociation constant and stereospecificity for binding to the TCDD receptor were the same as those previously reported with other TCDD receptor assays on broken cell preparations. Analysis of binding in the murine hepatoma TCDD receptor variants TAO-c1BPrc1 and BPrc1 indicated that this assay will detect receptor number or affinity variants, but will not detect nuclear transfer deficient variants. The major advantage of the whole cell binding assay is that it provides the means to rapidly and reproducibly quantitate TCDD specific binding in small samples of whole cells in culture. In addition, this method eliminates loss or degradation of the receptor protein during the fractionation of cells required in previously reported methods. This method should prove useful in screening clonal cell populations for TCDD receptor number and affinity variants, and in screening for TCDD receptor binding activity in complementation studies of receptor deficient cells

  12. Changing the insulin receptor to possess insulin-like growth factor I ligand specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, A.S.; Kjeldsen, T.; Wiberg, F.C.; Christensen, P.M.; Rasmussen, J.S.; Norris, K.; Moeller, K.B.; Moeller, N.P.H.

    1990-01-01

    To examine the role of the N-terminal part of the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptor and insulin receptor in determining ligand specificity, the authors prepared an expression vector encoding a hybrid receptor where exon 1 (encoding the signal peptide and seven amino acids of the α-subunit), exon 2, and exon 3 of the insulin receptor were replaced with the corresponding IGF-I receptor cDNA (938 nucleotides). To allow direct quantitative comparison of the binding capabilities of this hybrid receptor with those of the human IGF-I receptor and the insulin receptor, all three receptors were expressed in baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells as soluble molecules and partially purified before characterization. The hybrid IGF-I/insulin receptor bound IGF-I with an affinity comparable to that of the wild-type IGF-I receptor. In contrast, the hybrid receptor no longer displayed high-affinity binding of insulin. These results directly demonstrate that it is possible to change the specificity of the insulin receptor to that of the IGF-I receptor and, furthermore, that the binding specificity for IGF-I is encoded within the nucleotide sequence from 135 to 938 of the IGF-I receptor cDNA. Since the hybrid receptor only bound insulin with low affinity, the insulin binding region is likely to be located within exons 2 and 3 of the insulin receptor

  13. Quantitative analysis of macro-ARG using IP system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Eiichi; Kawai, Kenji; Furuta, Yoshitake

    1997-01-01

    Recent progress in imaging plate (IP) system allow us to analyze autoradiographic images quantitatively. In the 'whole-body autoradiography', a method clarify the distribution of radioisotope or labeled compounds in the tissues and organs in a freeze-dried whole-body section of small animals such as rats and mice, the sections are pressed against a IP for exposure and the IP is scanned by Bio-Imaging Analyzer (Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd) and a digital autoradiographic image is given. Quantitative data concerning the activity in different tissues can be obtained using an isotope scale as a reference source. Fading effect, application of IP system for distribution of receptor binding ARG, analysis of radio-spots on TLC and radioactive concentration in liquid such as blood are also discussed. (author)

  14. Quantitative autoradiographic analysis of muscarinic receptor subtypes and their role in representational memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messer, W.S.

    1986-01-01

    Autoradiographic techniques were used to examine the distribution of muscarinic receptors in rat brain slices. Agonist and selective antagonist binding were examined by measuring the ability for unlabeled ligands to inhibit [ 3 H]-1-QNB labeling of muscarinic receptors. The distribution of high affinity pirenzepine binding sites (M 1 subtype) was distinct from the distribution of high affinity carbamylcholine sites, which corresponded to the M 2 subtype. In a separate assay, the binding profile for pirenzepine was shown to differ from the profile for scopolamine, a classical muscarinic antagonist. Muscarinic antagonists, when injected into the Hippocampus, impaired performance of a representational memory task. Pirenzepine, the M 1 selective antagonist, produced representational memory deficits. Scopolamine, a less selective muscarinic antagonist, caused increases in running times in some animals which prevented a definitive interpretation of the nature of the impairment. Pirenzepine displayed a higher affinity for the hippocampus and was more effective in producing a selective impairment of representational memory than scopolamine. The data indicated that cholinergic activity in the hippocampus was necessary for representation memory function

  15. Quantitation of the mRNA expression of the epidermal growth factor system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, B S; Tørring, N; Bor, M V

    2000-01-01

    ) and for the quantitation of mRNA for the receptors HER-1 and its preferred dimerization partner, HER-2. The method is based on the generation of specific RNA standards, which are amplified by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with the sample RNA and a set of calibrators. The resulting calibration...

  16. Transient receptor potential channel polymorphisms are associated with the somatosensory function in neuropathic pain patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Binder

    Full Text Available Transient receptor potential channels are important mediators of thermal and mechanical stimuli and play an important role in neuropathic pain. The contribution of hereditary variants in the genes of transient receptor potential channels to neuropathic pain is unknown. We investigated the frequency of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1, transient receptor potential melastin 8 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 single nucleotide polymorphisms and their impact on somatosensory abnormalities in neuropathic pain patients. Within the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (Deutscher Forscbungsverbund Neuropathischer Schmerz 371 neuropathic pain patients were phenotypically characterized using standardized quantitative sensory testing. Pyrosequencing was employed to determine a total of eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms in transient receptor potential channel genes of the neuropathic pain patients and a cohort of 253 German healthy volunteers. Associations of quantitative sensory testing parameters and single nucleotide polymorphisms between and within groups and subgroups, based on sensory phenotypes, were analyzed. Single nucleotide polymorphisms frequencies did not differ between both the cohorts. However, in neuropathic pain patients transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 710G>A (rs920829, E179K was associated with the presence of paradoxical heat sensation (p = 0.03, and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1911A>G (rs8065080, I585V with cold hypoalgesia (p = 0.0035. Two main subgroups characterized by preserved (1 and impaired (2 sensory function were identified. In subgroup 1 transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1911A>G led to significantly less heat hyperalgesia, pinprick hyperalgesia and mechanical hypaesthesia (p = 0.006, p = 0.005 and pG (rs222747, M315I to cold hypaesthesia (p = 0.002, but there was absence of associations in subgroup 2. In this study we found no evidence that genetic

  17. Bombyx neuropeptide G protein-coupled receptor A7 is the third cognate receptor for short neuropeptide F from silkworm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qiang; Cao, Zheng; Yu, Yena; Yan, Lili; Zhang, Wenjuan; Shi, Ying; Zhou, Naiming; Huang, Haishan

    2017-12-15

    The short neuropeptide F (sNPF) neuropeptides, closely related to vertebrate neuropeptide Y (NPY), have been suggested to exert pleiotropic effects on many physiological processes in insects. In the silkworm ( Bombyx mori ) two orphan G protein-coupled receptors, Bombyx neuropeptide G protein-coupled receptor (BNGR) A10 and A11, have been identified as cognate receptors for sNPFs, but other sNPF receptors and their signaling mechanisms in B. mori remain unknown. Here, we cloned the full-length cDNA of the orphan receptor BNGR-A7 from the brain of B. mori larvae and identified it as a receptor for Bombyx sNPFs. Further characterization of signaling and internalization indicated that BNGR-A7, -A10, and -A11 are activated by direct interaction with synthetic Bombyx sNPF-1 and -3 peptides. This activation inhibited forskolin or adipokinetic hormone-induced adenylyl cyclase activity and intracellular Ca 2+ mobilization via a G i/o -dependent pathway. Upon activation by sNPFs, BNGR-A7, -A10, and -A11 evoked ERK1/2 phosphorylation and underwent internalization. On the basis of these findings, we designated the receptors BNGR-A7, -A10, and -A11 as Bommo -sNPFR-1, -2, and -3, respectively. Moreover, the results obtained with quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that the three Bombyx sNPF receptor subtypes exhibit differential spatial and temporal expression patterns, suggesting possible roles of sNPF signaling in the regulation of a wide range of biological processes. Our findings provide the first in-depth information on sNPF signaling for further elucidation of the roles of the Bombyx sNPF/sNPFR system in the regulation of physiological activities. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Development of radiodiagnostics for image diagnosis of intracerebral dopamine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Motoi; Kitamura, Hideaki; Nakajima, Takashi

    1999-01-01

    By measuring Vd value as an index to catch a functional change of nonspecific amine receptor at pathological regeneration region, Table Look Up method was thought to be useful for evaluation on functions of cerebellum and brainstem in Machado-Joseph disease. As it could simply calculate r-CBF and Vd values only adding SPWCT image to single time artery blood collection, it was thought to be useful for evaluation of Machado-Joseph disease. In last fiscal years, some animal experiments and clinical SPECT were conducted and evaluated to conduct research and development of a receptor imaging chemicals for clinics using radioactive reagent. In 1997 fiscal year, some examination of quantitative image analysis method on Vd value considering to reflex change of neural degeneration and receptor by using SPECT was conducted. (G.K.)

  19. Quantitative Analysis of the Association Angle between T-cell Receptor Vα/Vβ Domains Reveals Important Features for Epitope Recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Hoffmann

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available T-cell receptors (TCR play an important role in the adaptive immune system as they recognize pathogen- or cancer-based epitopes and thus initiate the cell-mediated immune response. Therefore there exists a growing interest in the optimization of TCRs for medical purposes like adoptive T-cell therapy. However, the molecular mechanisms behind T-cell signaling are still predominantly unknown. For small sets of TCRs it was observed that the angle between their Vα- and Vβ-domains, which bind the epitope, can vary and might be important for epitope recognition. Here we present a comprehensive, quantitative study of the variation in the Vα/Vβ interdomain-angle and its influence on epitope recognition, performing a systematic bioinformatics analysis based on a representative set of experimental TCR structures. For this purpose we developed a new, cuboid-based superpositioning method, which allows a unique, quantitative analysis of the Vα/Vβ-angles. Angle-based clustering led to six significantly different clusters. Analysis of these clusters revealed the unexpected result that the angle is predominantly influenced by the TCR-clonotype, whereas the bound epitope has only a minor influence. Furthermore we could identify a previously unknown center of rotation (CoR, which is shared by all TCRs. All TCR geometries can be obtained by rotation around this center, rendering it a new, common TCR feature with the potential of improving the accuracy of TCR structure prediction considerably. The importance of Vα/Vβ rotation for signaling was confirmed as we observed larger variances in the Vα/Vβ-angles in unbound TCRs compared to epitope-bound TCRs. Our results strongly support a two-step mechanism for TCR-epitope: First, preformation of a flexible TCR geometry in the unbound state and second, locking of the Vα/Vβ-angle in a TCR-type specific geometry upon epitope-MHC association, the latter being driven by rotation around the unique center of rotation.

  20. Unique expression pattern of the three insulin receptor family members in the rat mammary gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Henning; Klopfleisch, Robert; Vienberg, Sara Gry

    2011-01-01

    mammary gland. Using laser micro-dissection, quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, we examined the expression of IR (insulin receptor), IGF-1R (IGF-1 receptor), IRR (insulin receptor-related receptor), ERα (estrogen receptor alpha), ERβ (estrogen receptor beta) and PR (progesteron receptor......) in young, virgin, female Sprague-Dawley rats and compared to expression in reference organs. The mammary gland displayed the highest expression of IRR and IGF-1R. In contrast, low expression of IR transcripts was observed in the mammary gland tissue with expression of the IR-A isoform being 5-fold higher...... than the expression of the IR-B. By immunohistochemistry, expression of IR and IGF-1R was detected in all mammary gland epithelial cells. Expression of ERα and PR was comparable between mammary gland and ovary, whereas expression of ERβ was lower in mammary gland than in the ovary. Finally, expression...

  1. GABAergic Neurons of the Rat Dorsal Hippocampus Express Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, E.A.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1993-01-01

    The expression of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)-positive cells in the different strata of CA1, CA3, and the dentate gyrus (DG) of the dorsal hippocampus is examined by way of quantitative immunofluorescent double labeling employing M35, the

  2. Quantitative method of measuring cancer cell urokinase and metastatic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The metastatic potential of tumors can be evaluated by the quantitative detection of urokinase and DNA. The cell sample selected for examination is analyzed for the presence of high levels of urokinase and abnormal DNA using analytical flow cytometry and digital image analysis. Other factors such as membrane associated urokinase, increased DNA synthesis rates and certain receptors can be used in the method for detection of potentially invasive tumors.

  3. Quantitation of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors in porcine uterine and mesenteric arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farley, D.B.; Ford, S.P.; Reynolds, L.P.; Bhatnagar, R.K.; Van Orden, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    The activation of vascular alpha-adrenergic receptors may be involved in the control of uterine blood flow. A radioligand binding assay with the use of the alpha 1-adrenergic antagonist 3 H-WB-4101 was established to characterize the alpha-adrenergic receptors in uterine and mesenteric arterial membranes obtained from nonpregnant pigs. Specific binding of 3 H-WB-4101 was rapid, saturable, and exhibited the alpha-adrenergic agonist potency order of (-)-epinephrine inhibition constant [Ki] . 0.6 mumol/L greater than (-)-norepinephrine (Ki . 1.5 mumol/L) much greater than (-)-isoproterenol (Ki . 120 mumol/L). The alpha-adrenergic antagonist phentolamine (Ki . 6.0 nmol/L) was 200 times more potent than the beta-adrenergic antagonist (+/-)-propranolol (Ki . 1,200 nmol/L); the alpha 1-selective antagonist prazosin (Ki . 1.2 nmol/L) was 130 times more potent than the alpha 2-selective antagonist yohimbine (Ki . 160 nmol/L). Scatchard analysis, as well as iterative curve-fitting analysis, demonstrated that 3 H-WB-4101 binding by arterial membranes was to a single class of binding sites. Uterine arteries exhibited greater maximal binding capacity (BMax) than that of mesenteric arteries (47.5 +/- 3.2 versus 30.9 +/- 3.6 fmol per milligram of protein, p less than 0.01), but the uterine artery dissociation constant (Kd) was higher, thus indicating a lower affinity, when compared with mesenteric artery (0.43 +/- 0.04 versus 0.33 +/- 0.04 nmol/L, p less than 0.05)

  4. Expression of glucocorticoid and progesterone nuclear receptor genes in archival breast cancer tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Robert A; Lea, Rod A; Curran, Joanne E; Weinstein, Stephen R; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown associations of specific nuclear receptor gene variants with sporadic breast cancer. In order to investigate these findings further, we conducted the present study to determine whether expression levels of the progesterone and glucocorticoid nuclear receptor genes vary in different breast cancer grades. RNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded archival breast tumour tissue and converted into cDNA. Sample cDNA underwent PCR using labelled primers to enable quantitation of mRNA expression. Expression data were normalized against the 18S ribosomal gene multiplex and analyzed using analysis of variance. Analysis of variance indicated a variable level of expression of both genes with regard to breast cancer grade (P = 0.00033 for glucocorticoid receptor and P = 0.023 for progesterone receptor). Statistical analysis indicated that expression of the progesterone nuclear receptor is elevated in late grade breast cancer tissue

  5. Comparison between narcotic 'receptors' in the guinea-pig ileum and the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terenius, L [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    1975-01-01

    The receptors, i.e., specific binding molecules, for narcotic analgesics in the guinea-pig ileum and rat brain have been compared. The relative affinities of a number of narcotics for the two receptors were very similar and discrimination between stereoisomeric agents was identical. The dissociation constants for dihydromorphine binding were 0.78 nM for the ileum and 1.4 nM for the brain receptor, respectively. There was a good correspondance between receptor affinities on the ileum preparation and the literature data on biologic activity on the isolated ileum. Codeine, diphenoxylate, difenoxine and loperamide, which are used clinically for the treatment of diarrhoea showed no selectivity against the ileum receptor. The two latter drugs had a very high receptor affinity and their lack of narcotic activity after oral administration is probably attributable to lack of penetration of the CNS. Receptor binding in both ileum and brain preparations was inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide, Triton X-100, trypsin and phospholipase C. There were small quantitative differences in sensitivity to these agents but it is difficult to assess whether this is because of real differences between the receptor molecules or attributable to secondary effects. As previously described for the brain receptor, the ileum receptor appeared to be present in a fraction enriched in plasma membranes.

  6. Topographical distribution of decrements and recovery in muscarinic receptors from rat brains repeatedly exposed to sublethal doses of soman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churchill, L.; Pazdernik, T.L.; Jackson, J.L.; Nelson, S.R.; Samson, F.E.; McDonough, J.H. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    [3H]Quinuclidinyl benzilate binding to rat brain muscarinic receptors decreased after repeated exposure to soman, a potent organophosphorus cholinesterase inhibitor. The topographical distribution of this decrement was analyzed by quantitative receptor autoradiography. After 4 weeks of soman, three times a week, quinuclidinyl benzilate binding decreased to 67 to 80% of control in frontal and parietal cortex, caudate-putamen, lateral septum, hippocampal body, dentate gyrus, superior colliculus, nucleus of the fifth nerve, and central grey. Minor or no decreases were observed in thalamic or hypothalamic nuclei, reticular formation, pontine nuclei, inferior colliculus, nucleus of the seventh nerve, and cerebellum. Scatchard analyses of saturation curves using frontal cortex sections from soman-treated rats revealed a decrease in maximal quinuclidinyl benzilate binding from that in control rats and a return toward control levels by 24 days without any significant change in affinity. These brain areas showing significant decrements in muscarinic receptors recovered with a similar time course. An estimate of the time for 50% recovery for some of the brain areas was 14 days for superior colliculus, 16 days for cortex, and 19 days for hippocampal body. The application of quantitative receptor autoradiography to analyze receptor alterations has been valuable in localizing the telencephalon as a region more susceptible to change in receptor concentration

  7. Topographical distribution of decrements and recovery in muscarinic receptors from rat brains repeatedly exposed to sublethal doses of soman

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churchill, L.; Pazdernik, T.L.; Jackson, J.L.; Nelson, S.R.; Samson, F.E.; McDonough, J.H. Jr.

    1984-08-01

    (3H)Quinuclidinyl benzilate binding to rat brain muscarinic receptors decreased after repeated exposure to soman, a potent organophosphorus cholinesterase inhibitor. The topographical distribution of this decrement was analyzed by quantitative receptor autoradiography. After 4 weeks of soman, three times a week, quinuclidinyl benzilate binding decreased to 67 to 80% of control in frontal and parietal cortex, caudate-putamen, lateral septum, hippocampal body, dentate gyrus, superior colliculus, nucleus of the fifth nerve, and central grey. Minor or no decreases were observed in thalamic or hypothalamic nuclei, reticular formation, pontine nuclei, inferior colliculus, nucleus of the seventh nerve, and cerebellum. Scatchard analyses of saturation curves using frontal cortex sections from soman-treated rats revealed a decrease in maximal quinuclidinyl benzilate binding from that in control rats and a return toward control levels by 24 days without any significant change in affinity. These brain areas showing significant decrements in muscarinic receptors recovered with a similar time course. An estimate of the time for 50% recovery for some of the brain areas was 14 days for superior colliculus, 16 days for cortex, and 19 days for hippocampal body. The application of quantitative receptor autoradiography to analyze receptor alterations has been valuable in localizing the telencephalon as a region more susceptible to change in receptor concentration.

  8. Beta-adrenergic receptors of lymphocytes in children with allergic respiratory diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittera, I.; Gyurkovits, K.; Falkay, G.; Eck, E.; Koltai, M.

    1988-01-01

    The beta-adrenergic receptor binding sites on peripheral lymphocytes in children with bronchial asthma (n = 16) and seasonal allergic rhinitis (n = 8) were examined in comparison with normal controls (n = 18) by means of 124 I-cyanopindolol. The number of beta-adrenergic receptors was significantly lower in the asthmatic group (858 +/- 460/lymphocyte) than in the controls (1564 +/- 983/lymphocyte). The value (1891 +/- 1502/lymphocyte in children with allergic rhinitis was slightly higher than that in healthy controls. Of the 24 patients suffering from allergic diseases of the lower or upper airways, the bronchial histamine provocation test was performed in 21; 16 gave positive results, while 5 were negative. No difference in beta-adrenergic receptor count was found between the histamine-positive and negative patients. Neither was there any correlation between the number of beta-adrenergic receptors and the high (16/24) and low (8/24) serum IgE concentrations found in allergic patients. The significant decrease in beta-adrenergic receptor count in asthmatic children lends support to Szentivanyi's concept. Further qualitative and quantitative analysis of lymphocyte beta-adrenergic receptors may provide an individual approach to the treatment of bronchial asthma with beta-sympathomimetic drugs

  9. Distribution of neurotensin receptors in the primate hippocampal region: a quantitative autoradiographic study in the monkey and the postmortem human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohler, Christer; Radesater, A.; Chan-Palay, V.

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of [ 3 H]neurotensin ([ 3 H]NT) binding sites in the monkey and the postmortem human brain was studied by using quantitative in vitro receptor autoradiography. Biochemical experiments carried out on tissue sections of the monkey hippocampus showed that the binding of [ 3 H]NT was saturable, reversible and of high specificity. The hippocampal [ 3 H]NT binding was displaced by fragment NT 8-13 but not fragment NT 1-8 of the peptide. The anatomical analysis showed a highly heterogeneous distribution of [ 3 H]NT binding sites within both the monkey and the human hippocampal region. In both species the highest density of [ 3 H]NT binding sites was found in the presubiculum (rank order of binding density: layer 2>6>1>3, 4, 5 in both monkey and man) and the entorhinal area (monkey: layer 4>6>5>1>2>3; human: layer 1=2>5>3). The subiculum and Ammon's horn were relatively poor in [ 3 H]NT binding sites in both species. In the area dentata the highest density of [ 3 H]NT binding sites was found in the hilar region. (author)

  10. A fundamental study on brain receptor mapping by neuronuclear medicine imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Shiro

    1988-01-01

    The usefulness of autoradiography in the quantitation of the rat brain receptor was evaluated. H-3 spiperone, H-3 quinuclidinyl benzylate (QNB), H-3 muscimol, H-3 diprenorphine, H-3 ketanserin, and H-3 dihydroalprenolol hydrochloride were used for autoradiography. Satisfactory autoradiograms with these H-3 labeled ligants were obtained for incubation time, washing time, and binding curve. The video digitizer system was the most suitable in autoradiography. Using appropriate conditions for the ligand-receptor interaction, receptor autoradiography and in vitro receptor assay were concordant as for the the number of maximum binding sites (Bmax) of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of its antagonist, H-3 QNB. Receptor autoradiography with high spatial resolution allowed the comparison of Bmax and Kd in the brain. To improve conventional Scatchard analysis, used in the estimation of Bmax and Kd, a new mathematical method was developed for estimating individual rate constants and Bmax on the basis of time courses of association and dissociation. Using the new mathematical method, apparent equilibrium dissociation rate constant was in good agreement with that from a non-isomerization model. Autoradiography may provide a clue for the basic data on brain receptor mapping by a promising emission computerized tomography in neuropsychiatric diseases. (Namekawa, K.)

  11. Odor memories regulate olfactory receptor expression in the sensory periphery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudianos, Charles; Lim, Julianne; Young, Melanie; Yan, Shanzhi; Cristino, Alexandre S; Newcomb, Richard D; Gunasekaran, Nivetha; Reinhard, Judith

    2014-05-01

    Odor learning induces structural and functional modifications throughout the olfactory system, but it is currently unknown whether this plasticity extends to the olfactory receptors (Or) in the sensory periphery. Here, we demonstrate that odor learning induces plasticity in olfactory receptor expression in the honeybee, Apis mellifera. Using quantitative RT-PCR analysis, we show that six putative floral scent receptors were differentially expressed in the bee antennae depending on the scent environment that the bees experienced. Or151, which we characterized using an in vitro cell expression system as a broadly tuned receptor binding floral odorants such as linalool, and Or11, the specific receptor for the queen pheromone 9-oxo-decenoic acid, were significantly down-regulated after honeybees were conditioned with the respective odorants in an olfactory learning paradigm. Electroantennogram recordings showed that the neural response of the antenna was similarly reduced after odor learning. Long-term odor memory was essential for inducing these changes, suggesting that the molecular mechanisms involved in olfactory memory also regulate olfactory receptor expression. Our study demonstrates for the first time that olfactory receptor expression is experience-dependent and modulated by scent conditioning, providing novel insight into how molecular regulation at the periphery contributes to plasticity in the olfactory system. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Liver receptor homolog-1 is a critical determinant of methyl-pool metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balance of labile methyl groups (choline, methionine, betaine, and folate) is important for normal liver function. Quantitatively, a significant use of labile methyl groups is in the production of phosphatidylcholines (PCs), which are ligands for the nuclear liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1). We stud...

  13. Quantitative imaging of protein targets in the human brain with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, Roger N; Slifstein, Mark; Searle, Graham E; Price, Julie C

    2015-01-01

    PET imaging of proteins in the human brain with high affinity radiolabelled molecules has a history stretching back over 30 years. During this period the portfolio of protein targets that can be imaged has increased significantly through successes in radioligand discovery and development. This portfolio now spans six major categories of proteins; G-protein coupled receptors, membrane transporters, ligand gated ion channels, enzymes, misfolded proteins and tryptophan-rich sensory proteins. In parallel to these achievements in radiochemical sciences there have also been significant advances in the quantitative analysis and interpretation of the imaging data including the development of methods for image registration, image segmentation, tracer compartmental modeling, reference tissue kinetic analysis and partial volume correction. In this review, we analyze the activity of the field around each of the protein targets in order to give a perspective on the historical focus and the possible future trajectory of the field. The important neurobiology and pharmacology is introduced for each of the six protein classes and we present established radioligands for each that have successfully transitioned to quantitative imaging in humans. We present a standard quantitative analysis workflow for these radioligands which takes the dynamic PET data, associated blood and anatomical MRI data as the inputs to a series of image processing and bio-mathematical modeling steps before outputting the outcome measure of interest on either a regional or parametric image basis. The quantitative outcome measures are then used in a range of different imaging studies including tracer discovery and development studies, cross sectional studies, classification studies, intervention studies and longitudinal studies. Finally we consider some of the confounds, challenges and subtleties that arise in practice when trying to quantify and interpret PET neuroimaging data including motion artifacts

  14. Quantitative imaging of protein targets in the human brain with PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Roger N.; Slifstein, Mark; Searle, Graham E.; Price, Julie C.

    2015-11-01

    PET imaging of proteins in the human brain with high affinity radiolabelled molecules has a history stretching back over 30 years. During this period the portfolio of protein targets that can be imaged has increased significantly through successes in radioligand discovery and development. This portfolio now spans six major categories of proteins; G-protein coupled receptors, membrane transporters, ligand gated ion channels, enzymes, misfolded proteins and tryptophan-rich sensory proteins. In parallel to these achievements in radiochemical sciences there have also been significant advances in the quantitative analysis and interpretation of the imaging data including the development of methods for image registration, image segmentation, tracer compartmental modeling, reference tissue kinetic analysis and partial volume correction. In this review, we analyze the activity of the field around each of the protein targets in order to give a perspective on the historical focus and the possible future trajectory of the field. The important neurobiology and pharmacology is introduced for each of the six protein classes and we present established radioligands for each that have successfully transitioned to quantitative imaging in humans. We present a standard quantitative analysis workflow for these radioligands which takes the dynamic PET data, associated blood and anatomical MRI data as the inputs to a series of image processing and bio-mathematical modeling steps before outputting the outcome measure of interest on either a regional or parametric image basis. The quantitative outcome measures are then used in a range of different imaging studies including tracer discovery and development studies, cross sectional studies, classification studies, intervention studies and longitudinal studies. Finally we consider some of the confounds, challenges and subtleties that arise in practice when trying to quantify and interpret PET neuroimaging data including motion artifacts

  15. In Vitro Binding of [³H]PSB-0413 to P2Y₁₂ Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, Arnaud; Heim, Véronique; Ohlmann, Philippe; Gachet, Christian

    2015-12-08

    The P2Y₁₂/ADP receptor plays a central role in platelet activation. Characterization of this receptor is mandatory for studying disorders associated with a P2Y₁₂ receptor defect and for evaluating P2Y₁₂ receptor agonists and antagonists. In the absence of suitable anti-P2Y₁₂ antibodies, radioligand binding assays are the only way to conduct such studies. While various radioligands were employed in the past for this purpose, none were found to be suitable for routine use. Described in this unit are protocols for quantitatively and qualitatively assessing P2Y₁₂ receptors with [³H]PSB-0413, a selective antagonist for this site. The saturation and competition assays described herein make possible the determination of P2Y₁₂ receptor density on cells, as well as the potencies and affinities of test agents at this site. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. EGF-induced stimualtion of EGF-receptor synthesis in human cytotrophoblasts and A431 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePalo, L.; Basu, A.; Das, M.

    1987-01-01

    EGF-receptor is a transmembrane glycoprotein whose intracellular degradation is known to be enhanced by EGF. The authors tested whether the receptor is replenished during this process by an enhanced rate of synthesis. Human A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells, and primary cultures of human placental cytotrophoblasts were used in these studies. Cells were labeled with 35 S-methionine, and EGF-receptor biosynthesis was quantitated by immunoprecipitation using a monoclonal anti-EGF-receptor antibody. EGF stimulated receptor biosynthesis at concentrations of 0.1-1 nM. The effect was seen within 2 h of EGF addition. The maximal stimulatory effect was modest in A431 (∼ 2-fold), but marked in the cytotrophoblasts (>5-fold). At EGF concentrations higher than 3 nM, the stimulatory effect was abolished. In contrast, the effect of EGF on receptor degradation is negligible at low subnanomolar concentrations, and is pronounced only at saturating concentrations. These results show that occupation of the cell surface EGF-receptor by its ligand can lead to production of more receptor protein, thus counterbalancing the negative effect on receptor degradation. At low subnanomolar (mitogenic) concentrations of EGF the stimulator effect on receptor synthesis is likely to predominate over the effect on receptor degradation

  17. Relationship between Fc receptors and Ia alloantigens: analysis with a sensitive radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieber, E.P.; Wernet, P.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes the successful use of 125 I-labeled lgG aggregate to detect la-type alloantibodies in pregnancy sera. The blockade of aggregate uptake of a variety of normal mononuclear and leukemic cell types by anti-Ia alloantibodies is analyzed. Fc receptors and la alloantigens are clearly two distinct molecular entities. The association between Fc receptors and Ia alloantigens on a quantitative level seems to depend on a ligand-binding mechanism to control their interaction rather than the presence of a topographical molecular tandem arrangement. (Auth.)

  18. Autoradiographic analysis of alpha 1-noradrenergic receptors in the human brain postmortem. Effect of suicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross-Isseroff, R.; Dillon, K.A.; Fieldust, S.J.; Biegon, A.

    1990-01-01

    In vitro quantitative autoradiography of alpha 1-noradrenergic receptors, using tritiated prazosin as a ligand, was performed on 24 human brains postmortem. Twelve brains were obtained from suicide victims and 12 from matched controls. We found significant lower binding to alpha 1 receptors in several brain regions of the suicide group as compared with matched controls. This decrease in receptor density was evident in portions of the prefrontal cortex, as well as the temporal cortex and in the caudate nucleus. Age, sex, presence of alcohol, and time of death to autopsy did not affect prazosin binding, in our sample, as measured by autoradiography

  19. Novel estrogen receptor-related Transcripts in Marisa cornuarietis; a freshwater snail with reported sensitivity to estrogenic chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannister, Richard; Beresford, Nicola; May, Denise; Routledge, Edwin J; Jobling, Susan; Rand-Weaver, Mariann

    2007-04-01

    We have isolated novel molluskan steroid receptor transcripts orthologous to vertebrate estrogen receptors (ERs) and estrogen receptor-related receptors (ERRs) from the freshwater snail Marisa cornuarietis. Radiolabeled ligand binding analyses showed that neither recombinant receptor protein specifically bound 17beta-estradiol over the range applied (0.3-9.6 nM). These novel receptor transcripts have thus been designated mcER-like and mcERR respectively. Quantitative PCR revealed mcER-like to be expressed ubiquitously throughout a range of male and female structures studied, including neural and reproductive tissues. Highest absolute levels were seen in the male penis-sheath complex. The mcERR mRNA was also expressed ubiquitously throughout all male and female tissues analyzed here, with very low absolute transcript numbers in female accessory sex structures compared to other tissues.

  20. Distribution of mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptor binding sites in the brain of the one-day-old domestic chick (Gallus domesticus): An in vitro quantitative autoradiographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Csillag, A.; Bourne, R.C.; Stewart, M.G. (Open Univ., Milton Keynes (England))

    1990-12-15

    Three highly specific opioid ligands--(D-Ala2,Gly-ol)-enkephalin (DAGO) for mu (mu) receptor sites, (D-Pen2,D-Pen5)-enkephalin (DPDPE) for delta (delta) sites, and U-69593 for kappa (kappa) sites--were used to determine the regional distribution of the three major subtypes of opioid receptor binding sites in the brains of 1-day-old domestic chicks by the technique of quantitative receptor autoradiography. While there was a degree of heterogeneity in the binding levels of each of the ligands, some notable similarities existed in the binding of the mu and kappa ligands in several forebrain regions, and in the optic tectum of the midbrain where mu and delta binding was very high. In the forebrain there was a high level of binding of mu and kappa ligands in the hyperstriatum, and for the mu ligand there was a very distinct lamination of binding sites in hyperstriatum accessorium, intercalatum supremum, dorsale and ventrale. Levels of binding of the mu and kappa ligands were also high in nucleus basalis, and (for mu only) in the neostriatum. The distribution of binding of the delta specific ligand in the forebrain showed marked differences to that of mu and kappa, being particularly low in the hyperstriatum and neostriatum. Very high levels of labelling of delta binding sites were, however, found in the nucleus rotundus. Binding of the three ligands was generally low or absent in the cerebellum and medulla, apart from a distinct labelling of the granule cell layer by the mu-ligand. A kinetic analysis was made of the binding of the three ligands to whole forebrain sections using scintillation counting methods.

  1. Autoradiographic localization of thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) receptors in the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manaker, S.

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiography was used to examine the distribution of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) receptors in the rat and human central nervous system (CNS). The binding of [ 3 H]-3-methyl-histidine 2 -TRH ([ 3 H]-MeTRH) to TRH receptors was saturable, of a high affinity (K/sub d/ = 5 nM), and specific for TRH analogs. Studies with neurotoxins ibotenic acid and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) suggest that TRH receptors within the amygdala are predominantly located on cell bodies, and not nerve terminals. Finally, an examination was made of the concentrations of TRH receptors in spinal cords of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a degenerative disease of the motor neurons located in Lamina IX. Large decreases in TRH receptors were noted in ALS spinal cords, when compared to non-neurological controls, probably reflecting the loss of motor neurons. In addition, decreases in the TRH receptor concentration of Lamina II were observed. This finding may reflect the sensitivity of neurons throughout the CNS to the pathophysiologic mechanisms of neuronal degeneration which cause ALS

  2. Iterative reconstruction or filtered backprojection for semi-quantitative assessment of dopamine D2 receptor SPECT studies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, Walter; Suessmair, Christine; Tatsch, Klaus; Poepperl, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    In routine clinical practice striatal dopamine D 2 receptor binding is generally assessed using data reconstructed by filtered backprojection (FBP). The aim of this study was to investigate the use of an iterative reconstruction algorithm (ordered subset expectation maximization, OSEM) and to assess whether it may provide comparable or even better results than those obtained by standard FBP. In 56 patients with parkinsonian syndromes, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scans were acquired 2 h after i.v. application of 185 MBq [ 123 I]iodobenzamide (IBZM) using a triple-head gamma camera (Siemens MS 3). The scans were reconstructed both by FBP and OSEM (3 iterations, 8 subsets) and filtered using a Butterworth filter. After attenuation correction the studies were automatically fitted to a mean template with a corresponding 3-D volume of interest (VOI) map covering striatum (S), caudate (C), putamen (P) and several reference VOIs using BRASS software. Visual assessment of the fitted studies suggests a better separation between C and P in studies reconstructed by OSEM than FBP. Unspecific background activity appears more homogeneous after iterative reconstruction. The correlation shows a good accordance of dopamine receptor binding using FBP and OSEM (intra-class correlation coefficients S: 0.87; C: 0.88; P: 0.84). Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses show comparable diagnostic power of OSEM and FBP in the differentiation between idiopathic parkinsonian syndrome (IPS) and non-IPS. Iterative reconstruction of IBZM SPECT studies for assessment of the D 2 receptors is feasible in routine clinical practice. Close correlations between FBP and OSEM data suggest that iteratively reconstructed IBZM studies allow reliable quantification of dopamine receptor binding even though a gain in diagnostic power could not be demonstrated. (orig.)

  3. Association between p75 neurotrophin receptor gene expression and cell apoptosis in tissues surrounding hematomas in rat models of intracerebral hemorrhage?

    OpenAIRE

    He, Baixiang; Bao, Gang; Guo, Shiwen; Xu, Gaofeng; Li, Qi; Wang, Ning

    2012-01-01

    Animal models of intracerebral hemorrhage were established by injection of autologous blood into the caudate nucleus in rats. Cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry and immunohistochemical staining of the p75 neurotrophin receptor. p75 neurotrophin receptor protein was detected by immunohistochemistry. p75 neurotrophin receptor mRNA was examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions. At 24 hours after modeling, cellular apoptosis occured around hematoma with upregulation...

  4. Site-specific effects of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug lysine clonixinate on rat brain opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortí, E; Coirini, H; Pico, J C

    1999-04-01

    In addition to effects in the periphery through inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, several lines of evidence suggest that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) act in the central nervous system. The possibility that the central action of NSAIDs involves regulation of opioid receptors was investigated by quantitative autoradiography of mu, delta, and kappa sites in rat brain slices. Increased (p lysine clonixinate. Labeling of delta receptors was lower in the lateral septum, and kappa sites decreased in thalamic nuclei. These effects were not mediated through direct interaction with opioid-binding sites, since receptor-binding assays using rat brain membranes confirmed that clonixinate up to 1 x 10(-4) mol/l does not inhibit mu, delta, and kappa receptor specific binding. Central effects of NSAIDs might, therefore, involve interaction with the opioid receptor system through indirect mechanisms.

  5. Sympatholytic properties of several AT(1)-receptor antagonists in the isolated rabbit thoracic aorta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nap, Alexander; Balt, Jippe C.; Pfaffendorf, Martin; van Zwieten, Pieter A.

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the facilitating effect of angiotensin II on sympathetic neurotransmission to quantitatively compare the sympatho-inhibitory potencies of the selective AT(1)-receptor antagonists losartan, irbesartan and telmisartan in the isolated rabbit thoracic aorta. Design To investigate

  6. GABAA receptor B subunit expression in the superior frontal cortex of human alcoholics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, S.T.; Dodd, P.R.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Changes in GABA A receptor pharmacology can be ascribed to alterations in expression of specific GABA A receptor subunits. Ethanol is known to be a potent agonist of the GABA A receptor. Chronic abuse of alcohol in humans results in damage of selective brain regions such as the superior frontal cortex (SFC), leading to neuronal cell loss. Studies in our laboratory 1 and elsewhere 2 have shown differences in expression of a number of GABA A receptor subunits in chronic human alcoholism. This suggests that alterations in GABA A receptor composition may be involved in the pathogenesis of alcoholic brain damage. We analysed the expression of the β 1 ,β 2 and β 3 isoforms of the GABA A receptor by a competitive reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique, which utilised an internal standard (IS) for quantitation. 35 S-dATP was incorporated to enable visualisation of the PCR products. Human brain tissue was obtained at autopsy and stored in 0.32 M sucrose at -80 deg C. Total RNA was extracted from pathologically susceptible and spared regions, SFC and motor cortex respectively,of 22 control and 22 alcoholic patients. 1 μg of total RNA from each sample was co-amplified with 0.5 pg of IS and a ratio determined. A standard consisting of known amounts of β 1 cRNA titrated against 0.5 pg of IS enabled a standard curve to be generated for quantitation of each unknown sample. The samples were subjected to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and the dried gel exposed to a phosphorimager screen. Data analysis was performed using the ImageQuant program. Initial results indicate that there is a reduction in expression of all the β transcripts in alcoholics when compared with controls, which supports the hypothesis that the GABA A receptor is altered by alcohol abuse. Supported by NHMRC. Copyright (2001) Australian Neuroscience Society

  7. Function and distribution of 5-HT2 receptors in the honeybee (Apis mellifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Thamm

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Serotonin plays a pivotal role in regulating and modulating physiological and behavioral processes in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In the honeybee (Apis mellifera, serotonin has been implicated in division of labor, visual processing, and learning processes. Here, we present the cloning, heterologous expression, and detailed functional and pharmacological characterization of two honeybee 5-HT2 receptors. METHODS: Honeybee 5-HT2 receptor cDNAs were amplified from brain cDNA. Recombinant cell lines were established constitutively expressing receptor variants. Pharmacological properties of the receptors were investigated by Ca(2+ imaging experiments. Quantitative PCR was applied to explore the expression patterns of receptor mRNAs. RESULTS: The honeybee 5-HT2 receptor class consists of two subtypes, Am5-HT2α and Am5-HT2β. Each receptor gene also gives rise to alternatively spliced mRNAs that possibly code for truncated receptors. Only activation of the full-length receptors with serotonin caused an increase in the intracellular Ca(2+ concentration. The effect was mimicked by the agonists 5-methoxytryptamine and 8-OH-DPAT at low micromolar concentrations. Receptor activities were blocked by established 5-HT receptor antagonists such as clozapine, methiothepin, or mianserin. High transcript numbers were detected in exocrine glands suggesting that 5-HT2 receptors participate in secretory processes in the honeybee. CONCLUSIONS: This study marks the first molecular and pharmacological characterization of two 5-HT2 receptor subtypes in the same insect species. The results presented should facilitate further attempts to unravel central and peripheral effects of serotonin mediated by these receptors.

  8. Function and distribution of 5-HT2 receptors in the honeybee (Apis mellifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamm, Markus; Rolke, Daniel; Jordan, Nadine; Balfanz, Sabine; Schiffer, Christian; Baumann, Arnd; Blenau, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin plays a pivotal role in regulating and modulating physiological and behavioral processes in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In the honeybee (Apis mellifera), serotonin has been implicated in division of labor, visual processing, and learning processes. Here, we present the cloning, heterologous expression, and detailed functional and pharmacological characterization of two honeybee 5-HT2 receptors. Honeybee 5-HT2 receptor cDNAs were amplified from brain cDNA. Recombinant cell lines were established constitutively expressing receptor variants. Pharmacological properties of the receptors were investigated by Ca(2+) imaging experiments. Quantitative PCR was applied to explore the expression patterns of receptor mRNAs. The honeybee 5-HT2 receptor class consists of two subtypes, Am5-HT2α and Am5-HT2β. Each receptor gene also gives rise to alternatively spliced mRNAs that possibly code for truncated receptors. Only activation of the full-length receptors with serotonin caused an increase in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. The effect was mimicked by the agonists 5-methoxytryptamine and 8-OH-DPAT at low micromolar concentrations. Receptor activities were blocked by established 5-HT receptor antagonists such as clozapine, methiothepin, or mianserin. High transcript numbers were detected in exocrine glands suggesting that 5-HT2 receptors participate in secretory processes in the honeybee. This study marks the first molecular and pharmacological characterization of two 5-HT2 receptor subtypes in the same insect species. The results presented should facilitate further attempts to unravel central and peripheral effects of serotonin mediated by these receptors.

  9. A generalized quantitative antibody homeostasis model: maintenance of global antibody equilibrium by effector functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prechl, József

    2017-11-01

    The homeostasis of antibodies can be characterized as a balanced production, target-binding and receptor-mediated elimination regulated by an interaction network, which controls B-cell development and selection. Recently, we proposed a quantitative model to describe how the concentration and affinity of interacting partners generates a network. Here we argue that this physical, quantitative approach can be extended for the interpretation of effector functions of antibodies. We define global antibody equilibrium as the zone of molar equivalence of free antibody, free antigen and immune complex concentrations and of dissociation constant of apparent affinity: [Ab]=[Ag]=[AbAg]= K D . This zone corresponds to the biologically relevant K D range of reversible interactions. We show that thermodynamic and kinetic properties of antibody-antigen interactions correlate with immunological functions. The formation of stable, long-lived immune complexes correspond to a decrease of entropy and is a prerequisite for the generation of higher-order complexes. As the energy of formation of complexes increases, we observe a gradual shift from silent clearance to inflammatory reactions. These rules can also be applied to complement activation-related immune effector processes, linking the physicochemical principles of innate and adaptive humoral responses. Affinity of the receptors mediating effector functions shows a wide range of affinities, allowing the continuous sampling of antibody-bound antigen over the complete range of concentrations. The generation of multivalent, multicomponent complexes triggers effector functions by crosslinking these receptors on effector cells with increasing enzymatic degradation potential. Thus, antibody homeostasis is a thermodynamic system with complex network properties, nested into the host organism by proper immunoregulatory and effector pathways. Maintenance of global antibody equilibrium is achieved by innate qualitative signals modulating a

  10. Receptor-receptor interactions within receptor mosaics. Impact on neuropsychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuxe, K; Marcellino, D; Rivera, A; Diaz-Cabiale, Z; Filip, M; Gago, B; Roberts, D C S; Langel, U; Genedani, S; Ferraro, L; de la Calle, A; Narvaez, J; Tanganelli, S; Woods, A; Agnati, L F

    2008-08-01

    Future therapies for diseases associated with altered dopaminergic signaling, including Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia and drug addiction or drug dependence may substantially build on the existence of intramembrane receptor-receptor interactions within dopamine receptor containing receptor mosaics (RM; dimeric or high-order receptor oligomers) where it is believed that the dopamine D(2) receptor may operate as the 'hub receptor' within these complexes. The constitutive adenosine A(2A)/dopamine D(2) RM, located in the dorsal striato-pallidal GABA neurons, are of particular interest in view of the demonstrated antagonistic A(2A)/D(2) interaction within these heteromers; an interaction that led to the suggestion and later demonstration that A(2A) antagonists could be used as novel anti-Parkinsonian drugs. Based on the likely existence of A(2A)/D(2)/mGluR5 RM located both extrasynaptically on striato-pallidal GABA neurons and on cortico-striatal glutamate terminals, multiple receptor-receptor interactions within this RM involving synergism between A(2A)/mGluR5 to counteract D(2) signaling, has led to the proposal of using combined mGluR5 and A(2A) antagonists as a future anti-Parkinsonian treatment. Based on the same RM in the ventral striato-pallidal GABA pathways, novel strategies for the treatment of schizophrenia, building on the idea that A(2A) agonists and/or mGluR5 agonists will help reduce the increased dopaminergic signaling associated with this disease, have been suggested. Such treatment may ensure the proper glutamatergic drive from the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus to the prefrontal cortex, one which is believed to be reduced in schizophrenia due to a dominance of D(2)-like signaling in the ventral striatum. Recently, A(2A) receptors also have been shown to counteract the locomotor and sensitizing actions of cocaine and increases in A(2A) receptors have also been observed in the nucleus accumbens after extended cocaine self-administration, probably

  11. Ligand-receptor Interactions by NMR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novak. P.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Today NMR spectroscopy is a method of choice for elucidation of interactions between biomolecules and the potential ligands. Knowledge on these interactions is an essential prerequisite for the rational drug design. The most important contribution of NMR to drug design a few years ago was the 3D structure determination of proteins. Besides delivering the 3D structures of the free proteins as a raw material for the modeling studies on ligand binding, NMR can directly yield valuable experimental data on the biologically important protein-ligand complexes. In addition to X-ray diffraction, NMR spectroscopy can provide information on the internal protein dynamics ordynamics of intermolecular interactions. Changes in NMR parameters allow us to detect ("SAR by NMR" and quantitatively determine binding affinities (titration, diffusion NMR experiments, etc. of potential ligands. Also, it is possible to determine the binding site and conformations of ligands, receptors and receptor-ligand complexes with the help of NMR methods such as tr-NOESY. Epitopes or functional groups responsible for binding of ligands to the receptor can be identified by employing STD or WaterLOGSY experiments. In this review are described some of the most frequent NMR methods for the characterization of the interactions between biomolecules and ligands, together with their advantages and disadvantages.

  12. Alpha adrenergic receptors in dog coronary arteries as detected with autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muntz, K.; Calianos, T.; Buja, L.M.

    1986-01-01

    The authors used previously established methods to determine the presence of alpha adrenergic receptors in different sizes of dog coronary arteries using autoradiography of 3 H-prazosin (PRAZ) and 125 I-BE 2254 (HEAT) to label alpha 1 adrenergic receptors and 3 H-rauwolscine (RAUW) to label alpha 2 adrenergic receptors. Frozen sections of the left main coronary artery (LMA), the left anterior descending artery (LAD) and myocardium were incubated in 3 concentrations of PRAZ (0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 nM) (n=5 dogs), 3 concentrations of RAUW (1, 3 and 5 nM) (n=5) and one concentration of HEAT (50 pM) (n=3). All incubations were done in the absence of (total binding) or presence of (nonspecific binding) 10 -5 M phentolamine or yohimbine. The sections were processed for autoradiography and silver grains quantitated using an image analyzer. Analysis of variance determined that there was a significant difference between total and nonspecific binding in the LMA incubated with PRAZ (p 1 receptors decreases as vessel size decreases, while the number of alpha 2 receptors increases as vessel size decreases

  13. Cannabinoid Receptor 1 Gene Polymorphisms and Marijuana Misuse Interactions On White Matter and Cognitive Deficits in Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Beng-Choon; Wassink, Thomas H.; Ziebell, Steven; Andreasen, Nancy C.

    2011-01-01

    Marijuana exposure during the critical period of adolescent brain maturation may disrupt neuro-modulatory influences of endocannabinoids and increase schizophrenia susceptibility. Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1/CNR1) is the principal brain receptor mediating marijuana effects. No study to-date has systematically investigated the impact of CNR1 on quantitative phenotypic features in schizophrenia and inter-relationships with marijuana misuse. We genotyped 235 schizophrenia patients using 12 tag s...

  14. Identification of an estrogenic hormone receptor in Caenorhabditis elegans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimoto, Ai; Fujii, Madoka; Usami, Makoto; Shimamura, Maki; Hirabayashi, Naoko; Kaneko, Takako; Sasagawa, Noboru; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2007-01-01

    Changes in both behavior and gene expression occur in Caenorhabditis elegans following exposure to sex hormones such as estrogen and progesterone, and to bisphenol A (BPA), an estrogenic endocrine-disrupting compound. However, only one steroid hormone receptor has been identified. Of the 284 known nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) in C. elegans, we selected nhr-14, nhr-69, and nhr-121 for analysis as potential estrogenic hormone receptors, because they share sequence similarity with the human estrogen receptor. First, the genes were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and then the affinity of each protein for estrogen was determined using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. All three NHRs bound estrogen in a dose-dependent fashion. To evaluate the specificity of the binding, we performed a solution competition assay using an SPR biosensor. According to our results, only NHR-14 was able to interact with estrogen. Therefore, we next examined whether nhr-14 regulates estrogen signaling in vivo. To investigate whether these interactions actually control the response of C. elegans to hormones, we investigated the expression of vitellogenin, an estrogen responsive gene, in an nhr-14 mutant. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that vitellogenin expression was significantly reduced in the mutant. This suggests that NHR-14 is a C. elegans estrogenic hormone receptor and that it controls gene expression in response to estrogen

  15. Quantitation of Fc receptors and surface immunoglobulin is affected by cell isolation procedures using plasmagel and ficoll-hypaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, E L; Titus, J A; Segal, D M

    1978-01-01

    When mononuclear leukocytes are isolated directly from whole human blood using Ficoll-Hypaque or Plasmagel, cytophilic immunoglobulin is detected on cell surfaces. Upon incubation at 37 degrees C, this cell-associated immunoglobulin is shed slowly into the medium. However, when cells are prewashed in phosphate-buffered saline prior to isolation, they appear to be free of cytophilic immunoglobulin. Compared to prewashed cells, populations retaining cytophilic immunoglobulin on their surfaces demonstrate a decreased binding of soluble immune complexes and radiolabelled trimeric rabbit IgG. The data suggest that Ficoll-Hypaque and Plasmagel cause serum IgG to bind with abnormally high affinity to human mononuclear leukocytes, probably via Fc receptors. This artifact of preparation can lead to erroneous estimates of the numbers of cells bearing Fc receptors or intrinsic membrane immunoglobulin within a given population of cells and to an inaccurate assessment of the average number of Fc receptors per cell.

  16. Quantitative High-Throughput Screening and Orthogonal Assays to Identify Modulators of the Vitamin D Receptor (SETAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Vitamin D nuclear receptor (VDR) is a selective, ligand-inducible transcription factor involved in numerous biological processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, detoxification, calcium homeostasis, neurodevelopment, immune system regulation, cardiovascular functi...

  17. Physiology and physiopathology of central type Benzodiazepine receptors: Study in the monkey and in human brain using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hantraye, P.

    1987-01-01

    A new non-invasive technique that allows to study in a living subject central type benzodiazepine receptors is developed. A combined approach is applied using a specific positron-emitting radiotracer for the in vivo labelling of the receptors and positron emission tomography allowing, by external detection, a quantitative determination of tissue radioactivity. The radioligand used for the in vivo labelling of benzodiazepine receptors is the antagonist RO 15-1788 labelled with carbon 11. The various stages of the study are described: in vivo characterization in the monkey of central type benzodiazepine receptors; characterization of central type benzodiazepine receptors in human brain using selective molecules for the BZ1 benzodiazepine subclass; demonstration of the heterogeneity of central type benzodiazepine receptors in the brain; study of pathological alteration of benzodiazepine receptors in experimental epilepsy [fr

  18. Subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced upregulation of the 5-HT1B receptor in cerebral arteries in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen-Schwartz, Jacob; Hoel, Natalie Løvland; Xu, Cang-Bao

    2003-01-01

    experimental SAH. METHODS: Experimental SAH was induced in rats by using an autologous prechiasmatic injection of arterial blood. Two days later, the middle cerebral artery (MCA), posterior communicating artery (PCoA), and basilar artery (BA) were harvested and examined functionally with the aid of a sensitive...... RNA coding for the 5-HT1B receptor as determined by quantitative real-time PCR. In the PCoA no upregulation of the 5-HT1B receptor was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in the receptor phenotype in favor of contractile receptors may well represent the end stage in a sequence of events leading from SAH...... to the actual development of cerebral vasospasm. Insight into the mechanism of upregulation may provide new targets for developing specific treatment against cerebral vasospasm....

  19. Covalent affinity labeling, radioautography, and immunocytochemistry localize the glucocorticoid receptor in rat testicular Leydig cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stalker, A.; Hermo, L.; Antakly, T.

    1989-01-01

    The presence and distribution of glucocorticoid receptors in the rat testis were examined by using 2 approaches: in vivo quantitative radioautography and immunocytochemistry. Radioautographic localization was made possible through the availability of a glucocorticoid receptor affinity label, dexamethasone 21-mesylate, which binds covalently to the glucocorticoid receptor, thereby preventing dissociation of the steroid-receptor complex. Adrenalectomized adult rats were injected with a tritiated (3H) form of this steroid into the testis and the tissue was processed for light-microscope radioautography. Silver grains were observed primarily over the Leydig cells of the interstitial space and to a lesser extent, over the cellular layers which make up the seminiferous epithelium, with no one cell type showing preferential labeling. To determine the specificity of the labeling, a 25- or 50-fold excess of unlabeled dexamethasone was injected simultaneously with the same dose of (3H)-dexamethasone 21-mesylate. In these control experiments, a marked reduction in label intensity was noted over the Leydig as well as tubular cells. Endocytic macrophages of the interstitium were non-specifically labeled, indicating uptake of the ligand possibly by fluid-phase endocytosis. A quantitative analysis of the label confirmed the presence of statistically significant numbers of specific binding sites for glucocorticoids in both Leydig cells and the cellular layers of the seminiferous epithelium; 86% of the label was found over Leydig cells, and only 14% over the cells of the seminiferous epithelium. These binding data were confirmed by light-microscope immunocytochemistry using a monoclonal antibody to the glucocorticoid receptor

  20. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology: Volume 51, Molecular biology of /ital Homo sapiens/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This volume is the second part of a collection of papers submitted by the participants to the 1986 Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology entitled Molecular Biology of /ital Homo sapiens/. The 49 papers included in this volume are grouped by subject into receptors, human cancer genes, and gene therapy. (DT)

  1. Association between p75 neurotrophin receptor gene expression and cell apoptosis in tissues surrounding hematomas in rat models of intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Baixiang; Bao, Gang; Guo, Shiwen; Xu, Gaofeng; Li, Qi; Wang, Ning

    2012-03-15

    Animal models of intracerebral hemorrhage were established by injection of autologous blood into the caudate nucleus in rats. Cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry and immunohistochemical staining of the p75 neurotrophin receptor. p75 neurotrophin receptor protein was detected by immunohistochemistry. p75 neurotrophin receptor mRNA was examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions. At 24 hours after modeling, cellular apoptosis occured around hematoma with upregulation of p75 neurotrophin receptor protein and mRNA was observed, which directly correlated to apoptosis. This observation indicated that p75 neurotrophin receptor upregulation was associated with cell apoptosis around hematomas after intracerebral hemorrhage.

  2. Estrogen- and progesterone-receptor status in ECOG 2197: comparison of immunohistochemistry by local and central laboratories and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction by central laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badve, Sunil S; Baehner, Frederick L; Gray, Robert P; Childs, Barrett H; Maddala, Tara; Liu, Mei-Lan; Rowley, Steve C; Shak, Steven; Perez, Edith A; Perez, Edith D; Shulman, Lawrence J; Martino, Silvana; Davidson, Nancy E; Sledge, George W; Goldstein, Lori J; Sparano, Joseph A

    2008-05-20

    Central and local laboratory concordance for hormone receptor measurement is therapeutically important. This study compares estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) measured by local laboratory immunohistochemistry (IHC), central IHC, and central reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using a proprietary 21-gene assay. A case-control sample of 776 breast cancer patients from Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) study E2197 was evaluated. Central IHC Allred score for ER and PR was obtained using tissue microarrays and 1D5 ER antibody and 636 PR antibody. Quantitative RT-PCR for ER and PR in whole sections was performed using the 21-gene assay. For ER, the concordance between local and central IHC was 90% (95% CI, 88% to 92%), between local IHC and central RT-PCR was 91% (95% CI, 89% to 93%), and between central IHC and central RT-PCR was 93% (95% CI, 91% to 95%). For PR, the concordance between local IHC and central IHC was 84% (95% CI, 82% to 87%), between local IHC and central RT-PCR was 88% (95% CI, 85% to 90%), and between central IHC and central RT-PCR was 90% (95% CI, 88% to 92%). Although concordance was high, IHC ER-negative cases that were RT-PCR positive were more common than IHC ER-positive cases that were RT-PCR negative. In ER-positive patients, ER expression by central IHC Allred score was marginally associated with recurrence (P = .091), and ER expression by central RT-PCR was significantly associated with recurrence (P = .014). However, recurrence score, which incorporates additional genes/pathways, was a highly significant predictor of recurrence (P < .0001). There is a high degree of concordance among local IHC, central IHC, and central RT-PCR by the proprietary gene assay for ER and PR status. Although ER expression is marginally associated with relapse in ER-positive patients treated with chemohormonal therapy, recurrence score is a highly significant predictor of recurrence.

  3. Expression pattern of G protein‑coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER) in human cumulus granulosa cells (CGCs) of patients with PCOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Lili; Zhang, Quan; Zhou, Yi; Zhao, Yan; Lu, Linlin; Jiang, Zhou; Peng, Zhen; Zou, Shuhua

    2016-06-01

    Estradiol mediates its actions by binding to classical nuclear receptors, estrogen receptor α (ER-α) and estrogen receptor β (ER-β), and the non-classical G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1(GPER). Several gene knockdown models have shown the importance of the receptors for growth of the oocyte and for ovulation. The aim of our study was to identify the pattern of GPER expression in human cumulus granulosa cells (CGCs) from ovarian follicles at different stages of oocyte maturation, and the differences of GPER expression between polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients and non-PCOS women. Thirty-eight cases of PCOS patients and a control group of thirty-two infertile women without PCOS were used in this study. GPER's location in CGCs was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Quantitative RT-PCR and western blot were used to identify the quantify GPER expression. Here we demonstrated that GPER was expressed in CGCs of both PCOS patients and non-PCOS women, and the expression of GPER was decreased significantly during oocyte maturation. But the expression levels of GPER in CGCs of PCOS patients and non-PCOS women were not significantly different. The data indicate that GPER may play a role during human oocyte maturation through its action in cumulus granulosa cells. AMHRIIs: anti-Mullerian hormone type II receptors; BMI: body mass index; CGCs: cumulus granulosa cells; COH: controlled ovarian hyperstimulation; E2: estradiol; EGFR: epidermal growth factor receptor; ER-α: estrogen receptor; ER-β: estrogen receptor β; FF: follicular fluid; FSH: follicle-stimulating hormone; GCs: granulosa cells; GPER: G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1; GV: germinal vesicle; GVBD: germinal vesicle breakdown; HCG: human chorionic gonadotropin; IRS: immunoreactive score; IVF-ET: in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer; MI: metaphase I; MII: metaphase II; MAPK: mitogen-activated protein kinase; OCCCs: oocyte corona cumulus complexes; PCOS: polycystic ovarian syndrome; q

  4. Quantitative Autoradiography on [(35)S]TBPS Binding Sites of Gamma- Aminobutyric Acid(A) Receptors in Discrete Brain Regions of High- Alcohol-Drinking and Low-Alcohol- Drinking Rats Selectively Bred forHigh- and Low-Alcohol Preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, B.H.; Kunkler, P.E.; Lumeng, L.

    1997-01-01

    It has been documented that ethanol can potentiate brain gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic function, and there is a close link between the GABA(A) receptor complex and effects of ethanol, including reinforcement of alcohol which is a fundamental element of alcohol preference. However, it is unknown in what discrete brain regions GABA(A) receptors might be associated with alcohol preference. In the present study, [(35)S]t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate ([(35)S]TBPS) was used to localize GABA(A) receptors in high-alcohol-drinking (HAD) rats and low-alcohol-drinking (LAD) rats which were selectively bred for high and low alcohol preference, respectively. Initial qualitative observations indicated that [(35)S]TBPS binding sites were abundant in many brain areas including the cerebral cortex, hypothalamus and amygdala of HAD and LAD rats. Furthermore, the quantitative autoradiographic analysis revealed fewer [(35)S]TBPS binding sites of GABA(A) receptors in the amygdaloid complex, central medial thalamic nucleus, lateral hypothalamic nucleus and anterior hypothalamic nucleus of HAD rats than LAD rats. Collectively, this study has indicated that HAD rats selectively bred for high alcohol preference possess lower [(35)S]TBPS binding in the brain. Since lower TBPS binding has been proposed to reflect enhanced GABAergic function, as evidenced in rats with seizure or under alcohol withdrawal, the results from the present study suggest that HAD rats might have an enhanced GABAergic function. It is thus likely that enhanced GABAergic function in the brain might be related to high alcohol preference which is characteristic in HAD rats. In addition, the present result showing no difference of [(35)S]TBPS binding in the nucleus accumbens is also in agreement with a notion that [(35)S]TBPS binding may represent only a small spectrum of the GABA(A) receptor complex which is constituted of a sophisticated subunit combination whose functional compositions are still unknown. In

  5. Expression profile and prognostic role of sex hormone receptors in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gan, Lu; He, Jian; Zhang, Xia; Zhang, Yong-Jie; Yu, Guan-Zhen; Chen, Ying; Pan, Jun; Wang, Jie-Jun; Wang, Xi

    2012-01-01

    Increasing interest has been devoted to the expression and possible role of sex hormone receptors in gastric cancer, but most of these findings are controversial. In the present study, the expression profile of sex hormone receptors in gastric cancer and their clinicopathological and prognostic value were determined in a large Chinese cohort. The mRNA and protein expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), estrogen receptor beta (ERβ), progesterone receptor (PR), and androgen receptor (AR) in primary gastric tumors and corresponding adjacent normal tissues from 60 and 866 Chinese gastric cancer patients was detected by real-time quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry method, respectively. The expression profile of the four receptors was compared and their associations with clinicopathological characteristics were assessed by using Chi-square test. The prognostic value of the four receptors in gastric cancer was evaluated by using univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis. The presence of ERα, ERβ, PR, and AR in both gastric tumors and normal tissues was confirmed but their expression levels were extremely low except for the predominance of ERβ. The four receptors were expressed independently and showed a decreased expression pattern in gastric tumors compared to adjacent normal tissues. The positive expression of the four receptors all correlated with high tumor grade and intestinal type, and ERα and AR were also associated with early TNM stage and thereby a favorable outcome. However, ERα and AR were not independent prognostic factors for gastric cancer when multivariate survival analysis was performed. Our findings indicate that the sex hormone receptors may be partly involved in gastric carcinogenesis but their clinicopathological and prognostic significance in gastric cancer appears to be limited

  6. Signaling properties and pharmacological analysis of two sulfakinin receptors from the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zels, Sven; Verlinden, Heleen; Dillen, Senne; Vleugels, Rut; Nachman, Ronald J; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2014-01-01

    Sulfakinin is an insect neuropeptide that constitutes an important component of the complex network of hormonal and neural factors that regulate feeding and digestion. The key modulating functions of sulfakinin are mediated by binding and signaling via G-protein coupled receptors. Although a substantial amount of functional data have already been reported on sulfakinins in different insect species, only little information is known regarding the properties of their respective receptors. In this study, we report on the molecular cloning, functional expression and characterization of two sulfakinin receptors in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Both receptor open reading frames show extensive sequence similarity with annotated sulfakinin receptors from other insects. Comparison of the sulfakinin receptor sequences with homologous vertebrate cholecystokinin receptors reveals crucial conserved regions for ligand binding and receptor activation. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR shows that transcripts of both receptors are primarily expressed in the central nervous system of the beetle. Pharmacological characterization using 29 different peptide ligands clarified the essential requirements for efficient activation of these sulfakinin receptors. Analysis of the signaling pathway in multiple cell lines disclosed that the sulfakinin receptors of T. castaneum can stimulate both the Ca²⁺ and cyclic AMP second messenger pathways. This in depth characterization of two insect sulfakinin receptors may provide useful leads for the further development of receptor ligands with a potential applicability in pest control and crop protection.

  7. Selection of the regions of interest (SRI) in the SPECT semi-quantitative analysis of central dopaminergic receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baulieu, J.L.; Prunier-Levilion, C.; Tranquart, F.; Ribeiro, M.J.; Chartier, J.R.; Guilloteau, D.; Autret, A.; Besnard, J.C.; Bekhechi, D.; Chossat, F.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare different types of SRIs used in the SPECT semi-quantitative analysis of central dopaminergic receptors. The SPECT with 123 I iodolisuride (Cis bio international) was carried out in the same center with a Helix - Elscint double head camera with 'fan beam', one hour after injection of 123 I iodolisuride (190 ± 31 MBq). In 8 patients afflicted with Parkinson's disease (group 1) and 9 patients presenting an extra-pyramidal syndrome by striatal stretching (group 2), two approaches of SRI tracing were undertaken: 1. Geometrical and standard (circles, ellipses, rectangles) SRIs; 2. Anatomical and individual SRIs based on TDM and perfusion scintigraphy. The SRIs were placed on the entire striatum, the head of cauda nucleus, putamen, thalamus, frontal, occipital cortex and cerebellum. In total, for each patient, 31 ratios were calculated of the striatal activity and the activity of a references zone. The discriminative value of the ratios was evaluated by the p value of comparison between groups 1 and 2. A correlation has been searched for between the ratios taken 2 by 2. The most discriminative ratios were: cauda/occipital, cauda/frontal, striatum/occipital based on geometrical standard SRIs (p 0.001, p = 0.002, p = 0.003, respectively). A close correlation has been found between the ratios with occipital and cerebellar references (r 2 0.71) but not between the ratios with frontal or occipital reference, or frontal and cerebellum reference. In the employed conditions, the geometrical tracing of the SRIs is preferable as against an anatomic tracing. The occipital cortex is the best reference while the frontal activity can not be retained as reference. The cauda/occipital ratios allow a very good discrimination between the Parkinson's disease and other extra pyramidal syndromes investigated by 123 I iodolisuride SPECT

  8. Differential expression of TRAIL and its receptors relative to calcification in AAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xun; Winrow, Vivienne R.; Horrocks, Michael; Stevens, Cliff R.

    2007-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is commonly associated with atherosclerosis. Human AAA tissue displays cells undergoing all stages of apoptosis. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis in tumour cells but not in normal cells. It has death receptors and decoy receptors. An inhibitor of TRAIL, osteoprotegerin (OPG), is involved in osteogenesis and vascular calcification. We investigated TRAIL and its receptors in AAA compared within normal aorta (NA). Both qualitative and quantitative analyses of calcification in AAA walls were determined using Von Kossa staining and pre-operation computer tomography (CT) scans. There was a significant difference in calcification level at different locations in the AAA wall (p < 0.05). Apoptosis was confirmed in AAA by TUNEL assay. A significant difference in TRAIL and its receptor expression was observed between normal aortae and AAA (p < 0.05). Significant differences were also observed between tissues displaying different extents of calcification for TRAIL mRNA (p < 0.05) by RT-PCR examination and OPG protein (p < 0.01) by protein blotting examination. We propose that this pattern of expression of TRAIL and its receptors may contribute to AAA formation and calcification in the AAA wall

  9. Adiponectin, Leptin, and Leptin Receptor in Obese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Treated with Insulin Detemir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Olczyk

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to quantitatively assess the expression of selected regulatory molecules, such as leptin, leptin receptor, and adiponectin in the blood of obese patients with type 2 diabetes both before treatment and after six months of pharmacological therapy with the long-lasting insulin analogue, insulin detemir. A significant decrease in the analysed regulatory molecules, i.e., leptin receptor and adiponectin, was found in blood plasma of the patients with untreated type 2 diabetes. These changes were accompanied by an increase in plasma leptin concentrations. Insulin treatment resulted in the normalization of plasma leptin receptor and adiponectin concentrations. The circulating leptin level did not change following anti-diabetic therapy with insulin detemir. Gender was a significant factor modifying the circulating level of all the analysed regulatory active compounds. Bioinformatic analysis was performed using Matlab with the Signal Processing Toolbox. The conducted discriminant analysis revealed that the leptin receptor, Δw(19, and adiponectin, Δw(21, were the parameters undergoing the most significant quantitative changes during the six-month therapy with insulin detemir. The conducted examinations indicated the contribution of adipocytokines—the biologically-active mediators of systemic metabolism, such as leptin and adiponectin in the pathomechanism of disorders being the basis for obesity which leads to development of insulin resistance, which, in turn, results in the occurrence of type 2 diabetes.

  10. Insulin receptor binding and protein kinase activity in muscles of trained rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dohm, G.L.; Sinha, M.K.; Caro, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    Exercise has been shown to increase insulin sensitivity, and muscle is quantitatively the most important tissue of insulin action. Since the first step in insulin action is the binding to a membrane receptor, the authors postulated that exercise training would change insulin receptors in muscle and in this study they have investigated this hypothesis. Female rats initially weighing ∼ 100 g were trained by treadmill running for 2 h/day, 6 days/wk for 4 wk at 25 m/min (0 grade). Insulin receptors from vastus intermedius muscles were solubilized by homogenizing in a buffer containing 1% Triton X-100 and then partially purified by passing the soluble extract over a wheat germ agglutinin column. The 4 wk training regimen resulted in a 65% increase in citrate synthase activity in red vastus lateralis muscle, indicating an adaptation to exercise [ 125 I]. Insulin binding by the partially purified receptor preparations was approximately doubled in muscle of trained rats at all insulin concentrations, suggesting an increase in the number of receptors. Training did not alter insulin receptor structure as evidenced by electrophoretic mobility under reducing and nonreducing conditions. Basal insulin receptor protein kinase activity was higher in trained than untrained animals and this was likely due to the greater number of receptors. However, insulin stimulation of the protein kinase activity was depressed by training. These results demonstrate that endurance training does alter receptor number and function in muscle and these changes may be important in increasing insulin sensitivity after exercise training

  11. Modulation of β-adrenergic receptors in the pituitary gland following adrenalectomy in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, E.B. de

    1987-01-01

    The effects of adrenalectomy on β-adrenergic receptors in the rat pituitary were examined using quantitative in vitro autoradiography with 125 I-iodocyanopindolol( 125 ICYP). 125 ICYP binding in the anterior, intermediate and posterior lobes of the pituitary gland was significantly increased in chronically adrenalectomized rats. The increase in 125 ICYP binding sites in the rat pituitary following adrenalectomy was not reversed by glucocorticoid replacement with dexamethasone. These data indicate that catecholamines of adrenomedullary origin are capable of modulating β-adrenergic receptors in the pituitary gland and suggest that peripheral epinephrine may be important in regulating pituitary hormone secretion. (author)

  12. Kappa opioid receptors in rat spinal cord vary across the estrous cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, P C; Aicher, S A; Drake, C T

    2000-04-07

    Kappa opioid receptors (KORs) were immunocytochemically localized in the lumbosacral spinal cord of female rats in different stages of the estrous cycle to examine the influence of hormonal status on receptor density. KOR labeling was primarily in fine processes and a few neuronal cell bodies in the superficial dorsal horn and the dorsolateral funiculus. Quantitative light microscopic densitometry of the superficial dorsal horn revealed that rats in diestrus had significantly lower KOR densities than those in proestrus or estrus. This suggests that female reproductive hormones regulate spinal KOR levels, which may contribute to variations in analgesic effectiveness of KOR agonists across the estrous cycle.

  13. Development of an image analysis screen for estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) ligands through measurement of nuclear translocation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dull, Angie; Goncharova, Ekaterina; Hager, Gordon; McMahon, James B

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a robust high-content assay to screen for novel estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) agonists and antagonists by quantitation of cytoplasmic to nuclear translocation of an estrogen receptor chimera in 384-well plates. The screen utilizes a green fluorescent protein tagged-glucocorticoid/estrogen receptor (GFP-GRER) chimera which consisted of the N-terminus of the glucocorticoid receptor fused to the human ER ligand binding domain. The GFP-GRER exhibited cytoplasmic localization in the absence of ERα ligands, and translocated to the nucleus in response to stimulation with ERα agonists or antagonists. The BD Pathway 435 imaging system was used for image acquisition, analysis of translocation dynamics, and cytotoxicity measurements. The assay was validated with known ERα agonists and antagonists, and the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC 1280). Additionally, screening of crude natural product extracts demonstrated the robustness of the assay, and the ability to quantitate the effects of toxicity on nuclear translocation dynamics. The GFP-GRER nuclear translocation assay was very robust, with z' values >0.7, CVs screening of natural product extracts. This assay has been developed for future primary screening of synthetic, pure natural products, and natural product extracts libraries available at the National Cancer Institute at Frederick. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Quantitative ligand and receptor binding studies reveal the mechanism of interleukin-36 (IL-36) pathway activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Todorovic, Viktor; Kakavas, Steve; Sielaff, Bernhard; Medina, Limary; Wang, Leyu; Sadhukhan, Ramkrishna; Stockmann, Henning; Richardson, Paul L; DiGiammarino, Enrico; Sun, Chaohong; Scott, Victoria

    2018-01-12

    IL-36 cytokines signal through the IL-36 receptor (IL-36R) and a shared subunit, IL-1RAcP (IL-1 receptor accessory protein). The activation mechanism for the IL-36 pathway is proposed to be similar to that of IL-1 in that an IL-36R agonist (IL-36α, IL-36β, or IL-36γ) forms a binary complex with IL-36R, which then recruits IL-1RAcP. Recent studies have shown that IL-36R interacts with IL-1RAcP even in the absence of an agonist. To elucidate the IL-36 activation mechanism, we considered all possible binding events for IL-36 ligands/receptors and examined these events in direct binding assays. Our results indicated that the agonists bind the IL-36R extracellular domain with micromolar affinity but do not detectably bind IL-1RAcP. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR), we found that IL-1RAcP also does not bind IL-36R when no agonist is present. In the presence of IL-36α, however, IL-1RAcP bound IL-36R strongly. These results suggested that the main pathway to the IL-36R·IL-36α·IL-1RAcP ternary complex is through the IL-36R·IL-36α binary complex, which recruits IL-1RAcP. We could not measure the binding affinity of IL-36R to IL-1RAcP directly, so we engineered a fragment crystallizable-linked construct to induce IL-36R·IL-1RAcP heterodimerization and predicted the binding affinity during a complete thermodynamic cycle to be 74 μm The SPR analysis also indicated that the IL-36R antagonist IL-36Ra binds IL-36R with higher affinity and a much slower off rate than the IL-36R agonists, shedding light on IL-36 pathway inhibition. Our results reveal the landscape of IL-36 ligand and receptor interactions, improving our understanding of IL-36 pathway activation and inhibition. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Efficient olfactory coding in the pheromone receptor neuron of a moth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubomir Kostal

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The concept of coding efficiency holds that sensory neurons are adapted, through both evolutionary and developmental processes, to the statistical characteristics of their natural stimulus. Encouraged by the successful invocation of this principle to predict how neurons encode natural auditory and visual stimuli, we attempted its application to olfactory neurons. The pheromone receptor neuron of the male moth Antheraea polyphemus, for which quantitative properties of both the natural stimulus and the reception processes are available, was selected. We predicted several characteristics that the pheromone plume should possess under the hypothesis that the receptors perform optimally, i.e., transfer as much information on the stimulus per unit time as possible. Our results demonstrate that the statistical characteristics of the predicted stimulus, e.g., the probability distribution function of the stimulus concentration, the spectral density function of the stimulation course, and the intermittency, are in good agreement with those measured experimentally in the field. These results should stimulate further quantitative studies on the evolutionary adaptation of olfactory nervous systems to odorant plumes and on the plume characteristics that are most informative for the 'sniffer'. Both aspects are relevant to the design of olfactory sensors for odour-tracking robots.

  16. Excitatory amino acid neurotoxicity and modulation of glutamate receptor expression in organotypic brain slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmer, J; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Jakobsen, B

    2000-01-01

    Using organotypic slice cultures of hippocampus and cortex-striatum from newborn to 7 day old rats, we are currently studying the excitotoxic effects of kainic acid (KA), AMPA and NMDA and the neuroprotective effects of glutamate receptor blockers, like NBQX. For detection and quantitation...

  17. Trofile HIV co-receptor usage assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Andrew J; McGovern, Rachel A; Harrigan, P Richard

    2009-03-01

    The introduction of CCR5 antagonists increases the options available for constructing therapeutic drug regimens for HIV-positive patients. However, as these drugs do not inhibit HIV variants that use the CXCR4 co-receptor, a pretreatment test is required to determine accurately HIV co-receptor usage (tropism) before initiating CCR5 antagonist-based therapy. To discuss the Monogram Trofile assay as a diagnostic tool for determining HIV tropism by critically reviewing reported literature and available data. Monogram Trofile has become, largely by default, the de facto standard for HIV tropism assay. However, there is significant room for improvement in the speed, cost and availability of the test. Furthermore, the test is not quantitative, requires high-input HIV RNA viral loads, and produces results that are less biologically stable than expected. These technical considerations may limit the use of CCR5 antagonists in therapy. Nevertheless, this test is likely to remain the most widely used tropism diagnostic for the short term. We expect that a more practical and possibly more accurate method for measuring HIV tropism can be developed.

  18. Possible Relevance of Receptor-Receptor Interactions between Viral- and Host-Coded Receptors for Viral-Induced Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi F. Agnati

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that some viruses, such as the cytomegalovirus, code for G-protein coupled receptors not only to elude the immune system, but also to redirect cellular signaling in the receptor networks of the host cells. In view of the existence of receptor-receptor interactions, the hypothesis is introduced that these viral-coded receptors not only operate as constitutively active monomers, but also can affect other receptor function by interacting with receptors of the host cell. Furthermore, it is suggested that viruses could also insert not single receptors (monomers, but clusters of receptors (receptor mosaics, altering the cell metabolism in a profound way. The prevention of viral receptor-induced changes in host receptor networks may give rise to novel antiviral drugs that counteract viral-induced disease.

  19. Signaling properties and pharmacological analysis of two sulfakinin receptors from the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Zels

    Full Text Available Sulfakinin is an insect neuropeptide that constitutes an important component of the complex network of hormonal and neural factors that regulate feeding and digestion. The key modulating functions of sulfakinin are mediated by binding and signaling via G-protein coupled receptors. Although a substantial amount of functional data have already been reported on sulfakinins in different insect species, only little information is known regarding the properties of their respective receptors. In this study, we report on the molecular cloning, functional expression and characterization of two sulfakinin receptors in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Both receptor open reading frames show extensive sequence similarity with annotated sulfakinin receptors from other insects. Comparison of the sulfakinin receptor sequences with homologous vertebrate cholecystokinin receptors reveals crucial conserved regions for ligand binding and receptor activation. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR shows that transcripts of both receptors are primarily expressed in the central nervous system of the beetle. Pharmacological characterization using 29 different peptide ligands clarified the essential requirements for efficient activation of these sulfakinin receptors. Analysis of the signaling pathway in multiple cell lines disclosed that the sulfakinin receptors of T. castaneum can stimulate both the Ca²⁺ and cyclic AMP second messenger pathways. This in depth characterization of two insect sulfakinin receptors may provide useful leads for the further development of receptor ligands with a potential applicability in pest control and crop protection.

  20. Expression and biochemical characteristics of two different aldosterone receptors in both healthy and dilated cardiomyopathy dog heart tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynoso Palomar, Alejandro R; Rodriguez Bravo, Moncerrat; Villa Mancera, Abel E; Mucha, Carlos J

    2017-03-01

    Recently, replicates of the aldosterone receptor expression have been done in healthy heart dog tissues through immunohistochemistry, showing an apparent heterogeneous distribution in the four chambers. Recent studies have also identified immediate effects of aldosterone, suggesting aldosterone also produces non-genomic effects caused by an unidentified receptor. In order to study the molecular and quantitative expression characteristics of aldosterone binding receptors in the canine heart, we conducted studies, using Western Blot, in the heart from both healthy animals and animals with dilated cardiomyopathy. The results show the presence and distribution of two aldosterone receptors; one of 110/120 kDa molecular weight, suggested as cytosolic/nuclear and the other of undetermined location with a 250 kDa molecular weight.

  1. Physiologic basics and clinical experience with somatostatin-receptor-scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henze, E.; Eberhardt, J.U.; Bohuslavizki, K.H.

    1994-01-01

    The introduction of radiolabelled octreotide, an analogon to the receptor binding hormone Somatostatin, has markedly increased the ability to detect structures and tumours carrying somatostatin receptors by nuclear medicine imaging with high sensitivity and specificity. It has been shown that in vitro receptor density and in vivo scintigraphic results correlate well in particular in tumours of neuroendocrine origin of the GI tract such as insulinomas, gastrinomas, glucagonomas, carcionoids, but also in paragangliomas, small cell lung cancer and meningiomas. As receptors were also shown to be present on so called activated leucocytes granulomas, lymphomas and autoimmune disease have been imaged with octreotide successfully. The specific tracer (In-111-DTPA-D-PHE-Octreotide, Octreoscan R ) is rapidly cleared from the blood pool by the kidneys and, partially, via the liver providing a high target to background ratio. Physiologic uptake is usually observed in the pituitary and thyroid glands, in spleen and liver. Optimum tracer accumulation for tumour scintigraphy is seen on the 24-h-images with the best target to background ratios. Additional SPECT-imaging is recommended in particular in the abdominal regions. The sensitivity in imaging the above named tumours ranges from 70 up to 100%. In-111 octreotide imaging is of diagnostic impact both for the primary diagnostic evaluation as well as for detecting or excluding secondary manifestations in known tumour sites. Of specific value is the information on relative receptor density in the tumour to be treated as may be obtained by quantitative In-111 octreotide imaging for decision making whether or not to use cold octreotide (Sandostatin R ) as a receptor blocking drug for therapy as well as for treatment follow-up studies. (author)

  2. Study of receptor-chaperone interactions using the optical technique of spectroscopic ellipsometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Tsargorodskaya, Anna; Mustafa, Mohd K; Vinogradova, Tatiana; Lacey, Joanne; Smith, David P; Abell, Benjamin M; Nabok, Alexei

    2011-07-20

    This work describes a detailed quantitative interaction study between the novel plastidial chaperone receptor OEP61 and isoforms of the chaperone types Hsp70 and Hsp90 using the optical method of total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE). The receptor OEP61 was electrostatically immobilized on a gold surface via an intermediate layer of polycations. The TIRE measurements allowed the evaluation of thickness changes in the adsorbed molecular layers as a result of chaperone binding to receptor proteins. Hsp70 chaperone isoforms but not Hsp90 were shown to be capable of binding OEP61. Dynamic TIRE measurements were carried out to evaluate the affinity constants of the above reactions and resulted in clear discrimination between specific and nonspecific binding of chaperones as well as differences in binding properties between the highly similar Hsp70 isoforms. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. mRNA levels of enzymes and receptors implicated in arachidonic acid metabolism in gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Armas, Rafael; Durand, Karine; Guillaudeau, Angélique; Weinbreck, Nicolas; Robert, Sandrine; Moreau, Jean-Jacques; Caire, François; Acosta, Gisela; Pebet, Matias; Chaunavel, Alain; Marin, Benoît; Labrousse, François; Denizot, Yves

    2010-07-01

    Gliomas are tumors of the central nervous system derived from glial cells. They show cellular heterogeneity and lack specific diagnostic markers. Although a possible role for the eicosanoid cascade has been suggested in glioma tumorigenesis, the relationship between enzymes and receptors implicated in arachidonic acid metabolism, with histological tumor type has not yet been determined. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to measure and compare transcript levels of enzymes and receptors implicated in both lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase pathways between oligodendrogliomas, astrocytomas, glioblastomas and mixed oligoastrocytomas. Arachidonic acid metabolism-related enzymes and receptor transcripts (i) were underexpressed in classical oligodendrogliomas compared to astrocytomas and/or glioblastomas, (ii) differed between astrocytomas and glioblastomas and (iii) had an intermediate expression in mixed oligoastrocytomas. mRNA levels of enzymes and receptors implicated both in lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase pathways differed significantly in gliomas according to the histological type. Copyright 2010 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Image-derived and arterial blood sampled input functions for quantitative PET imaging of the angiotensin II subtype 1 receptor in the kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Tao; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; Li, Xin; Vranesic, Melin; Lodge, Martin A.; Gulaldi, Nedim C. M.; Szabo, Zsolt, E-mail: zszabo@jhmi.edu [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The radioligand {sup 11}C-KR31173 has been introduced for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the angiotensin II subtype 1 receptor in the kidney in vivo. To study the biokinetics of {sup 11}C-KR31173 with a compartmental model, the input function is needed. Collection and analysis of arterial blood samples are the established approach to obtain the input function but they are not feasible in patients with renal diseases. The goal of this study was to develop a quantitative technique that can provide an accurate image-derived input function (ID-IF) to replace the conventional invasive arterial sampling and test the method in pigs with the goal of translation into human studies. Methods: The experimental animals were injected with [{sup 11}C]KR31173 and scanned up to 90 min with dynamic PET. Arterial blood samples were collected for the artery derived input function (AD-IF) and used as a gold standard for ID-IF. Before PET, magnetic resonance angiography of the kidneys was obtained to provide the anatomical information required for derivation of the recovery coefficients in the abdominal aorta, a requirement for partial volume correction of the ID-IF. Different image reconstruction methods, filtered back projection (FBP) and ordered subset expectation maximization (OS-EM), were investigated for the best trade-off between bias and variance of the ID-IF. The effects of kidney uptakes on the quantitative accuracy of ID-IF were also studied. Biological variables such as red blood cell binding and radioligand metabolism were also taken into consideration. A single blood sample was used for calibration in the later phase of the input function. Results: In the first 2 min after injection, the OS-EM based ID-IF was found to be biased, and the bias was found to be induced by the kidney uptake. No such bias was found with the FBP based image reconstruction method. However, the OS-EM based image reconstruction was found to reduce variance in the subsequent

  5. Effects of egg-adaptation on receptor-binding and antigenic properties of recent influenza A (H3N2) vaccine viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Lauren; Wharton, Stephen A; Martin, Stephen R; Cross, Karen; Lin, Yipu; Liu, Yan; Feizi, Ten; Daniels, Rodney S; McCauley, John W

    2016-06-01

    Influenza A virus (subtype H3N2) causes seasonal human influenza and is included as a component of influenza vaccines. The majority of vaccine viruses are isolated and propagated in eggs, which commonly results in amino acid substitutions in the haemagglutinin (HA) glycoprotein. These substitutions can affect virus receptor-binding and alter virus antigenicity, thereby, obfuscating the choice of egg-propagated viruses for development into candidate vaccine viruses. To evaluate the effects of egg-adaptive substitutions seen in H3N2 vaccine viruses on sialic acid receptor-binding, we carried out quantitative measurement of virus receptor-binding using surface biolayer interferometry with haemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays to correlate changes in receptor avidity with antigenic properties. Included in these studies was a panel of H3N2 viruses generated by reverse genetics containing substitutions seen in recent egg-propagated vaccine viruses and corresponding cell culture-propagated wild-type viruses. These assays provide a quantitative approach to investigating the importance of individual amino acid substitutions in influenza receptor-binding. Results show that viruses with egg-adaptive HA substitutions R156Q, S219Y, and I226N, have increased binding avidity to α2,3-linked receptor-analogues and decreased binding avidity to α2,6-linked receptor-analogues. No measurable binding was detected for the viruses with amino acid substitution combination 156Q+219Y and receptor-binding increased in viruses where egg-adaptation mutations were introduced into cell culture-propagated virus. Substitutions at positions 156 and 190 appeared to be primarily responsible for low reactivity in HI assays with post-infection ferret antisera raised against 2012-2013 season H3N2 viruses. Egg-adaptive substitutions at position 186 caused substantial differences in binding avidity with an insignificant effect on antigenicity.

  6. Cow's milk increases the activities of human nuclear receptors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha and delta and retinoid X receptor alpha involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis, obesity, and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhara, W; Koide, H; Okuzawa, T; Hayashi, D; Hashimoto, T; Kojo, H

    2009-09-01

    The nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) have been shown to play crucial roles in regulating energy homeostasis including lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, inflammatory responses, and cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Because PPAR agonists have the potential to prevent or ameliorate diseases such as hyperlipidemia, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and obesity, we have explored new natural agonists for PPAR. For this purpose, cow's milk was tested for agonistic activity toward human PPAR subtypes using a reporter gene assay. Milk increased human PPARalpha activity in a dose-dependent manner with a 3.2-fold increase at 0.5% (vol/vol). It also enhanced human PPARdelta activity in a dose-dependent manner with an 11.5-fold increase at 0.5%. However, it only slightly affected human PPARgamma activity. Ice cream, butter, and yogurt also increased the activities of PPARalpha and PPARdelta, whereas vegetable cream affected activity of PPARdelta but not PPARalpha. Skim milk enhanced the activity of PPAR to a lesser degree than regular milk. Milk and fresh cream increased the activity of human retinoid X receptor (RXR)alpha as well as PPARalpha and PPARdelta, whereas neither affected vitamin D3 receptor, estrogen receptors alpha and beta, or thyroid receptors alpha and beta. Both milk and fresh cream were shown by quantitative real-time PCR to increase the quantity of mRNA for uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), an energy expenditure gene, in a dose-dependent manner. The increase in UCP2 mRNA was found to be reduced by treatment with PPARdelta-short interfering (si)RNA. This study unambiguously clarified at the cellular level that cow's milk increased the activities of human PPARalpha, PPARdelta, and RXRalpha. The possible role in enhancing the activities of PPARalpha, PPARdelta, and RXRalpha, and the health benefits of cow's milk were discussed.

  7. Hepatocyte and keratinocyte growth factors and their receptors in human lung emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchal Joëlle

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatocyte and keratinocyte growth factors are key growth factors in the process of alveolar repair. We hypothesized that excessive alveolar destruction observed in lung emphysema involves impaired expression of hepatocyte and keratinocyte growth factors or their respective receptors, c-met and keratinocyte growth factor receptor. The aim of our study was to compare the expression of hepatocyte and keratinocyte growth factors and their receptors in lung samples from 3 groups of patients: emphysema; smokers without emphysema and non-smokers without emphysema. Methods Hepatocyte and keratinocyte growth factor proteins were analysed by immunoassay and western blot; mRNA expression was measured by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results Hepatocyte and keratinocyte growth factors, c-met and keratinocyte growth factor receptor mRNA levels were similar in emphysema and non-emphysema patients. Hepatocyte growth factor mRNA correlated negatively with FEV1 and the FEV1/FVC ratio both in emphysema patients and in smokers with or without emphysema. Hepatocyte and keratinocyte growth factor protein concentrations were similar in all patients' groups. Conclusion The expression of hepatocyte and keratinocyte growth factors and their receptors is preserved in patients with lung emphysema as compared to patients without emphysema. Hepatocyte growth factor mRNA correlates with the severity of airflow obstruction in smokers.

  8. Quantitative Analysis of HER2 Receptor Expression In Vivo by Near-Infrared Optical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Chernomordik

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 overexpression in breast cancers is associated with poor prognosis and resistance to therapy. Current techniques for estimating this important characteristic use ex vivo assays that require tissue biopsies. We suggest a novel noninvasive method to characterize HER2 expression in vivo, using optical imaging, based on HER2-specific probes (albumin-binding domain–fused-(ZHER2:3422-Cys Affibody molecules [Affibody AB, Solna, Sweden], labeled with Alexa Fluor 750 [Molecular Probes, Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA] that could be used concomitantly with HER2-targeted therapy. Subcutaneous tumor xenografts, expressing different levels of HER2, were imaged with a near-infrared fluorescence small-animal imaging system at several times postinjection of the probe. The compartmental ligand-receptor model was used to calculate HER2 expression from imaging data. Correlation between HER2 amplification/overexpression in tumor cells and parameters, directly estimated from the sequence of optical images, was observed (eg, experimental data for BT474 xenografts indicate that initial slope, characterizing the temporal dependence of the fluorescence intensity detected in the tumor, linearly depends on the HER2 expression, as measured ex vivo by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the same tumor. The results obtained from tumors expressing different levels of HER2 substantiate a similar relationship between the initial slope and HER2 amplification/overexpression. This work shows that optical imaging, combined with mathematical modeling, allows noninvasive monitoring of HER2 expression in vivo.

  9. Insulin receptor isoforms A and B as well as insulin receptor substrates-1 and -2 are differentially expressed in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heni, Martin; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Scharpf, Marcus; Lutz, Stefan Z; Schwentner, Christian; Todenhöfer, Tilman; Schilling, David; Kühs, Ursula; Gerber, Valentina; Machicao, Fausto; Staiger, Harald; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Stenzl, Arnulf

    2012-01-01

    In different cancers types, insulin receptor isoform composition or insulin receptor substrate (IRS) isoforms are different to healthy tissue. This may be a molecular link to increased cancer risk in diabetes and obesity. Since this is yet unclear for prostate cancer, we investigated IR isoform composition and IRS balance in prostate cancer compared to benign and tumor adjacent benign prostate tissue and brought this into relation to cell proliferation. We studied 23 benign prostate samples from radical cystectomy or benign prostatic hyperplasia surgery, 30 samples from benign tissue directly adjacent to prostate cancer foci and 35 cancer samples from different patients. RNA expression levels for insulin receptor isoforms A and B, IRS-1, IRS-2, and IGF-1 receptor were assessed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. In addition, RNA- and protein expression of the cell cycle regulator p27(Kip1) was quantified by real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Insulin receptor isoform A to B ratio was significantly higher in cancer as well as in tumor adjacent benign prostate tissue compared to purely benign prostates (pprostatic tissue (pcancer and adjacent tissue were significantly associated with reduced p27(Kip1) content (preceptor levels were significantly lower in patients with type 2 diabetes (p = 0.0019). We found significant differences in the insulin signaling cascade between benign prostate tissue and prostate cancer. Histological benign tissue adjacent to cancer showed expression patterns similar to the malignancies. Our findings suggest a role of the insulin signaling pathway in prostate cancer and surrounding tissue and can hence be relevant for both novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in this malignancy.

  10. Somatostatin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lars Neisig; Stidsen, Carsten Enggaard; Hartmann, Bolette

    2003-01-01

    functional units, receptors co-operate. The total receptor apparatus of individual cell types is composed of different-ligand receptors (e.g. SRIF and non-SRIF receptors) and co-expressed receptor subtypes (e.g. sst(2) and sst(5) receptors) in characteristic proportions. In other words, levels of individual......-peptides, receptor agonists and antagonists. Relatively long half lives, as compared to those of the endogenous ligands, have been paramount from the outset. Motivated by theoretical puzzles or the shortcomings of present-day diagnostics and therapy, investigators have also aimed to produce subtype...

  11. Identification and characterization of a novel outer membrane protein receptor required for hemin utilization in Vibrio vulnificus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Shreya

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus, the cause of septicemia and serious wound infection in humans and fishes, require iron for its pathogenesis. Hemin uptake through the outer membrane receptor, HupA, is one of its many mechanisms by which it acquires iron. We report here the identification of an additional TonB-dependent hemin receptor HvtA, that is needed in conjunction with the HupA protein for optimal hemin utilization. The HvtA protein is significantly homologous to other outer membrane hemin receptors and its expression in trans restored the uptake of hemin and hemoglobin, the latter to a weaker extent, in a mutant strain that was defective in both receptors. Quantitative RT-PCR suggested that transcription of the hvtA gene was iron regulated. The operon containing the hvtA gene is homologous to the operon in V. cholerae containing the hemin receptor gene hutR suggesting a vertical transmission of the hvtA cluster from V. cholerae to V. vulnificus. PMID:22015545

  12. Multivariate quantitative structure-pharmacokinetic relationships (QSPKR) analysis of adenosine A(1) receptor agonists in rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Graaf, PH; Nilsson, J; Van Schaick, EA; Danhof, M

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a quantitative structure-pharmacokinetic relationships (QSPKR) method based on contemporary three-dimensional (3D) molecular characterization and multivariate statistical analysis. For this purpose, the programs SYBYL/CoMFA, GRID, and

  13. Is quantitative oestrogen receptor expression useful in the evaluation of the clinical prognosis? Analysis of a homogeneous series of 797 patients with prospective determination of the ER status using simultaneous EIA and IHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazouni, Chafika; Bonnier, Pascal; Goubar, Aïcha; Romain, Sylvie; Martin, Pierre-Marie

    2010-10-01

    Oestrogen receptor (ER) determination in breast cancer (BC) is a major yardstick for the prognosis and for response to hormonal therapy (HT). As several techniques have been proposed for ER quantification, the purpose of our study was to assess whether the qualitative or quantitative analysis of ER expression might influence the prognosis and response to treatment. We analysed overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) in 797 primary BC cases with ER determination by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). The clinical impact according to qualitative or quantitative analysis of ER expression was assessed. Response to HT was evaluated according to quantitative EIA-determined ER expression levels. According to the qualitative analysis of ER expression, patients with EIA-determined and IHC-determined ER-positive tumours had significantly longer OS and DFS (p<0.001). The analysis stratified on quartiles of ER levels showed significantly different outcomes according to EIA- and IHC-determined subgroups. In the group of patients who received adjuvant treatment, 5-year OS was significantly different between the groups, with a clear benefit for the highest EIA-determined ER quartiles (p<0.001). Comparatively, in terms of 5-year DFS, a clear separation was noted between groups for adjuvant treatment (p<0.001). The group with moderate ER+ values was clearly distinct from the ER-negative population. Quantitative ER expression helped to better distinguish the beneficial or detrimental effect of HT within quartiles of ER-expressing tumours. Based on the STEPP analysis which showed a trend towards an ER effect on DFS as a function of HT assignment, we confirm the benefit of HT in patients with a very high EIA-determined ER level and a detrimental impact on negative and weakly positive groups. Quantitative ER expression in BC helps to better discriminate heterogeneity in clinical outcome and response to HT. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  14. Role of Ca+2 and other second messengers in excitatory amino acid receptor mediated neurodegeneration: clinical perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, A; Belhage, B; Frandsen, A

    1997-01-01

    Neurodegeneration associated with neurological disorders such as epilepsy, Huntington's Chorea, Alzheimer's disease, and olivoponto cerebellar atrophy or with energy failure such as ischemia, hypoxia, and hypoglycemia proceeds subsequent to overexposure of neurons to excitatory amino acids of which...... glutamate and aspartate may be quantitatively the most important. The toxic action of glutamate and aspartate is mediated through activation of glutamate receptors of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA subtypes. Antagonists for these receptors can act as neuroprotectants both in in vitro model...

  15. Quantitative localization of (/sup 3/H)TCP binding in rat brain by light microscopy autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sircar, R; Zukin, S R

    1985-09-30

    The anatomical localization of phencyclidine (PCP)/sigma-opiate receptors in rat brain was determined by quantitative light microscopy autoradiography using the new ligand N-(1-(2-thienyl) cyclohexyl(/sup 3/H) piperidine ((/sup 3/H)TCP). TCP is a potent analog of PCP which possesses a higher affinity for PCP/sigma-opiate receptor than does PCP itself. The highest level of (/sup 3/H)TCP binding was detected in the hippocampus. Intermediate levels were found in frontal cortex, striatum, amygdala and cerebellum. Specific (/sup 3/H)TCP binding was undetectable in anterior commissure and corpus callosum. The distribution pattern of (/sup 3/H)TCP binding sites is similar to the pattern obtained with (/sup 3/H)PCP but more sharply defined. On the basis of its greater potency and specificity, (/sup 3/H)TCP may prove superior to (/sup 3/H)PCP as a molecular probe for the study of brain sigma opiate/phencyclidine receptors. 13 refs.; 1 figure; 1 table.

  16. Receptors for sensory neuropeptides in human inflammatory diseases: Implications for the effector role of sensory neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantyh, P.W.; Catton, M.D.; Boehmer, C.G.; Welton, M.L.; Passaro, E.P. Jr.; Maggio, J.E.; Vigna, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    Glutamate and several neuropeptides are synthesized and released by subpopulations of primary afferent neurons. These sensory neurons play a role in regulating the inflammatory and immune responses in peripheral tissues. Using quantitative receptor autoradiography we have explored what changes occur in the location and concentration of receptor binding sites for sensory neurotransmitters in the colon in two human inflammatory diseases, ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. The sensory neurotransmitter receptors examined included bombesin, calcitonin gene related peptide-alpha, cholecystokinin, galanin, glutamate, somatostatin, neurokinin A (substance K), substance P, and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide. Of the nine receptor binding sites examined only substance P binding sites associated with arterioles, venules and lymph nodules were dramatically up-regulated in the inflamed tissue. These data suggest that substance P is involved in regulating the inflammatory and immune responses in human inflammatory diseases and indicate a specificity of efferent action for each sensory neurotransmitter in peripheral tissues

  17. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M

    2016-05-05

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared - non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents.

  18. Quantitative Comparison of Abundance Structures of Generalized Communities: From B-Cell Receptor Repertoires to Microbiomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadkarim Saeedghalati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The community, the assemblage of organisms co-existing in a given space and time, has the potential to become one of the unifying concepts of biology, especially with the advent of high-throughput sequencing experiments that reveal genetic diversity exhaustively. In this spirit we show that a tool from community ecology, the Rank Abundance Distribution (RAD, can be turned by the new MaxRank normalization method into a generic, expressive descriptor for quantitative comparison of communities in many areas of biology. To illustrate the versatility of the method, we analyze RADs from various generalized communities, i.e. assemblages of genetically diverse cells or organisms, including human B cells, gut microbiomes under antibiotic treatment and of different ages and countries of origin, and other human and environmental microbial communities. We show that normalized RADs enable novel quantitative approaches that help to understand structures and dynamics of complex generalized communities.

  19. Region-selective effects of neuroinflammation and antioxidant treatment on peripheral benzodiazepine receptors and NMDA receptors in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biegon, A.; Alvarado, M.; Budinger, T.F.; Grossman, R.; Hensley, K.; West, M.S.; Kotake, Y.; Ono, M.; Floyd, R.A.

    2001-12-10

    Following induction of acute neuroinflammation by intracisternal injection of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) in rats, quantitative autoradiography was used to assess the regional level of microglial activation and glutamate (NMDA) receptor binding. The possible protective action of the antioxidant phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone in this model was tested by administering the drug in the drinking water for 6 days starting 24 hours after endotoxin injection. Animals were killed 7 days post-injection and consecutive cryostat brain sections labeled with [3H]PK11195 as a marker of activated microglia and [125I]iodoMK801 as a marker of the open-channel, activated state of NMDA receptors. Lipopolysaccharide increased [3H]PK11195 binding in the brain, with the largest increases (2-3 fold) in temporal and entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and substantia innominata. A significant (>50 percent) decrease in [125I]iodoMK801 binding was found in the same brain regions. Phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone treatment resulted in a partial inhibition ({approx}25 percent decrease) of the lipopolysaccharide-induced increase in [3H]PK11195 binding but completely reversed the lipopolysaccharide-induced decrease in [125I]iodoMK80 binding in the entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and substantia innominata. Loss of NMDA receptor function in cortical and hippocampal regions may contribute to the cognitive deficits observed in diseases with a neuroinflammatory component, such as meningitis or Alzheimer's disease.

  20. Species differences in the localization and number of CNS beta adrenergic receptors: Rat versus guinea pig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booze, R.M.; Crisostomo, E.A.; Davis, J.N.

    1989-01-01

    The localization and number of beta adrenergic receptors were directly compared in the brains of rats and guinea pigs. The time course of association and saturability of [125I]cyanopindolol (CYP) binding to slide-mounted tissue sections was similar in rats (Kd = 17 pM) and guinea pigs (Kd = 20 pM). The beta-1 and beta-2 receptor subtypes were examined through the use of highly selective unlabeled receptor antagonists, ICI 118,551 (50 nM) and ICI 89,406 (70 nM). Dramatic species differences between rats and guinea pigs were observed in the neuroanatomical regional localization of the beta adrenergic receptor subtypes. For example, in the thalamus prominent beta-1 and beta-2 receptor populations were identified in the rat; however, the entire thalamus of the guinea pig had few, if any, beta adrenergic receptors of either subtype. Hippocampal area CA1 had high levels of beta-2 adrenergic receptors in both rats and guinea pigs but was accompanied by a widespread distribution of beta-2 adrenergic receptors only in rats. Quantitative autoradiographic analyses of 25 selected neuroanatomical regions (1) confirmed the qualitative differences in CNS beta adrenergic receptor localization, (2) determined that guinea pigs had significantly lower levels of beta adrenergic receptors than rats and (3) indicated a differential pattern of receptor subtypes between the two species. Knowledge of species differences in receptor patterns may be useful in designing effective experiments as well as in exploring the relationships between receptor and innervation patterns. Collectively, these data suggest caution be used in extrapolation of the relationships of neurotransmitters and receptors from studies of a single species

  1. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY) receptors in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkubo, T.; Niwa, M.; Yamashita, K.; Kataoka, Y.; Shigematsu, K.

    1990-01-01

    1. Specific binding sites for neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY) were investigated in rat brain areas using quantitative receptor autoradiography with 125 I-Bolton-Hunter NPY ( 125 I-BH-NPY) and 125 I-PYY, radioligands for PP-fold family peptides receptors. 2. There were no differences between localization of 125 I-BH-NPY and 125 I-PYY binding sites in the rat brain. High densities of the binding sites were present in the anterior olfactory nucleus, lateral septal nucleus, stratum radiatum of the hippocampus, posteromedial cortical amygdaloid nucleus, and area postrema. 3. In cold ligand-saturation experiments done in the presence of increasing concentrations of unlabeled NPY and PYY, 125 I-BH-NPY and 125 I-PYY binding to the stratum radiatum of the hippocampus, layer I of the somatosensory frontoparietal cortex, molecular layer of the cerebellum, and area postrema was single and of a high affinity. There was a significant difference between the affinities of 125 I-BH-NPY (Kd = 0.96 nM) and 125 I-PYY binding (Kd = 0.05 nM) to the molecular layer of the cerebellum. The binding of the two radioligands to the other areas examined had the same affinities. 4. When comparing the potency of unlabeled rat pancreatic polypeptide (rPP), a family peptide of NPY and PYY, to inhibit the binding to the areas examined, rPP displaced 125 I-BH-NPY and 125 I-PYY binding to the area postrema more potently than it did the binding to the stratum radiatum of the hippocampus, layer I of the somatosensory frontoparietal cortex, and molecular layer of the cerebellum. 5. Thus, the quantitative receptor autoradiographic method with 125 I-BH-NPY and 125 I-PYY revealed differences in binding characteristics of specific NPY and PYY binding sites in different areas of the rat brain. The results provide further evidence for the existence of multiple NPY-PYY receptors in the central nervous system

  2. Insulin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, C.R.; Harrison, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on insulin receptors. Part A: Methods for the study of structure and function. Topics covered include: Method for purification and labeling of insulin receptors, the insulin receptor kinase, and insulin receptors on special tissues

  3. Bisphenol A affects androgen receptor function via multiple mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Christina; Goodwin, Bonnie; Shockley, Keith; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Norris, John; Merrick, B Alex; Jetten, Anton M; Austin, Christopher P; Tice, Raymond R

    2013-05-25

    Bisphenol A (BPA), is a well-known endocrine disruptor compound (EDC) that affects the normal development and function of the female and male reproductive system, however the mechanisms of action remain unclear. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of how BPA may affect ten different nuclear receptors, stable cell lines containing individual nuclear receptor ligand binding domain (LBD)-linked to the β-Gal reporter were examined by a quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) format in the Tox21 Screening Program of the NIH. The results showed that two receptors, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and androgen receptor (AR), are affected by BPA in opposite direction. To confirm the observed effects of BPA on ERα and AR, we performed transient transfection experiments with full-length receptors and their corresponding response elements linked to luciferase reporters. We also included in this study two BPA analogs, bisphenol AF (BPAF) and bisphenol S (BPS). As seen in African green monkey kidney CV1 cells, the present study confirmed that BPA and BPAF act as ERα agonists (half maximal effective concentration EC50 of 10-100 nM) and as AR antagonists (half maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 of 1-2 μM). Both BPA and BPAF antagonized AR function via competitive inhibition of the action of synthetic androgen R1881. BPS with lower estrogenic activity (EC50 of 2.2 μM), did not compete with R1881 for AR binding, when tested at 30 μM. Finally, the effects of BPA were also evaluated in a nuclear translocation assays using EGPF-tagged receptors. Similar to 17β-estradiol (E2) which was used as control, BPA was able to enhance ERα nuclear foci formation but at a 100-fold higher concentration. Although BPA was able to bind AR, the nuclear translocation was reduced. Furthermore, BPA was unable to induce functional foci in the nuclei and is consistent with the transient transfection study that BPA is unable to activate AR. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  4. Synaptic glutamate spillover increases NMDA receptor reliability at the cerebellar glomerulus

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Cassie S.; Lee, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Glutamate spillover in the mossy fiber to granule cell cerebellar glomeruli has been hypothesized to increase neurotransmission reliability. In this study, we evaluate this hypothesis using an experimentally-based quantitative model of glutamate spillover on the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDA-Rs) at the cerebellar glomerulus. The transient and steady-state responses of NMDA-Rs were examined over a physiological range of firing rates. Examined cases included direct glutamate release acti...

  5. Expression and autoregulation of transforming growth factor beta receptor mRNA in small-cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, P; Spang-Thomsen, M; Poulsen, H S

    1996-01-01

    In small-cell lung cancer cell lines resistance to growth inhibition by transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1, was previously shown to correlate with lack of TGF-beta receptor I (RI) and II (RII) proteins. To further investigate the role of these receptors, the expression of mRNA for RI, RII...... and beta-glycan (RIII) was examined. The results showed that loss of RII mRNA correlated with TGF-beta 1 resistance. In contrast, RI-and beta-glycan mRNA was expressed by all cell lines, including those lacking expression of these proteins. According to Southern blot analysis, the loss of type II m......RNA was not due to gross structural changes in the gene. The effect of TGF-beta 1 on expression of TGF-beta receptor mRNA (receptor autoregulation) was examined by quantitative Northern blotting in four cell lines with different expression of TGF-beta receptor proteins. In two cell lines expressing all three TGF...

  6. D2 dopamine receptors in neuroleptic-naive schizophrenic patients. A positron emission tomography study with [11C]raclopride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farde, L.; Wiesel, F.A.; Stone-Elander, S.; Halldin, C.; Nordstroem, A.L.H.; Hall, H.; Sedvall, G.

    1990-01-01

    Several groups have reported increased densities of D2 dopamine receptors in the basal ganglia of schizophrenic brains postmortem. The significance of this finding has been questioned, since an upregulation of receptor number may be a neuronal response to neuroleptic drug treatment. We have used positron emission tomography and [ 11 C]raclopride to examine central D2 dopamine receptor binding in 20 healthy subjects and 18 newly admitted, young, neuroleptic-naive patients with schizophrenia. An in vivo saturation procedure was applied for quantitative determination of D2 dopamine receptor density (Bmax) and affinity (Kd). When the two groups were compared, no significant difference in Bmax or Kd values was found in the putamen or the caudate nucleus. The hypothesis of generally elevated central D2 dopamine receptor densities in schizophrenia was thus not supported by the present findings. In the patients but not in the healthy controls, significantly higher densities were found in the left than in the right putamen but not in the caudate nucleus

  7. Polysiloxane surface modified with bipyrazolic tripodal receptor for quantitative lead adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radi, Smaail, E-mail: radi_smaail@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Organique, Macromoleculaire et Produits Naturels, Equipe de Chimie Bio-organique et Macromoleculaire, Unite Associee au CNRST URAC 25, Departement de Chimie, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Med I, BP 524, 60 000 Oujda (Morocco); Tighadouini, Said; Toubi, Yahya [Laboratoire de Chimie Organique, Macromoleculaire et Produits Naturels, Equipe de Chimie Bio-organique et Macromoleculaire, Unite Associee au CNRST URAC 25, Departement de Chimie, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Med I, BP 524, 60 000 Oujda (Morocco); Bacquet, Maryse [Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, UMET: Unite Materiaux et Transformations UMR8207, Equipe Ingenierie des Systemes Polymeres, Batiment C6 salle 119-59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    2011-01-15

    A new silica gel compound modified N,N-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-ylmethyl) amine (SiN{sub 2}Pz) was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, {sup 13}C NMR of the solid state, nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm, BET surface area and BJH pore sizes. The new surface exhibits good chemical and thermal stability determined by thermogravimetry curves (TGA). The effect of pH and stirring time on the adsorption of Pb(II) were studied. The process of metal retention was followed by batch method and the optimum pH value for the quantitative adsorption of this toxic metal ion was 7. At this pH value, the new functionalized polysiloxane presents further improvements and shows higher affinity (123 mg of Pb{sup 2+}/g of silica) for the effective adsorption of Pb(II) compared to others described sorbents. The extracted amounts of Pb(II) were determined by atomic absorption measurements.

  8. A quantitative comet infection assay for influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Stephen M.; Timm, Andrea; Yin, John

    2011-01-01

    Summary The virus comet assay is a cell-based virulence assay used to evaluate an antiviral drug or antibody against a target virus. The comet assay differs from the plaque assay in allowing spontaneous flows in 6-well plates to spread virus. When implemented quantitatively the comet assay has been shown to have an order-of-magnitude greater sensitivity to antivirals than the plaque assay. In this study, a quantitative comet assay for influenza virus is demonstrated, and is shown to have a 13-fold increase in sensitivity to ribavirin. AX4 cells (MDCK cells with increased surface concentration of α2–6 sialic acid, the influenza virus receptor) have reduced the comet size variability relative to MDCK cells, making them a better host cell for use in this assay. Because of enhanced antiviral sensitivity in flow-based assays, less drug is required, which could lead to lower reagent costs, reduced cytotoxicity, and fewer false-negative drug screen results. The comet assay also serves as a readout of flow conditions in the well. Observations from comets formed at varying humidity levels indicate a role for evaporation in the mechanism of spontaneous fluid flow in wells. PMID:22155578

  9. Biphasic regulation of development of the high-affinity saxitoxin receptor by innervation in rat skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, S.J.; Catterall, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    Specific binding of 3 H-saxitoxin (STX) was used to quantitate the density of voltage-sensitive sodium channels in developing rat skeletal muscle. In adult triceps surae, a single class of sites with a KD . 2.9 nM and a density of 21 fmol/mg wet wt was detected. The density of these high-affinity sites increased from 2.0 fmol/mg wet wt to the adult value in linear fashion during days 2-25 after birth. Denervation of the triceps surae at day 11 or 17 reduced final saxitoxin receptor site density to 10.4 or 9.2 fmol/mg wet wt, respectively, without changing KD. Denervation of the triceps surae at day 5 did not alter the subsequent development of saxitoxin receptor sites during days 5-9 and accelerated the increase of saxitoxin receptor sites during days 9-13. After day 13, saxitoxin receptor development abruptly ceased and the density of saxitoxin receptor sites declined to 11 fmol/wg wet wt. These results show that the regulation of high-affinity saxitoxin receptor site density by innervation is biphasic. During the first phase, which is independent of continuing innervation, the saxitoxin receptor density increases to 47-57% of the adult level. After day 11, the second phase of development, which is dependent on continuing innervation, gives rise to the adult density of saxitoxin receptors

  10. Elevation of D4 dopamine receptor mRNA in postmortem schizophrenic brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanis, N C; Bresnick, J N; Kerwin, R W; Schofield, W N; McAllister, G

    1998-01-01

    The D4 dopamine (DA) receptor has been proposed to be a target for the development of a novel antipsychotic drug based on its pharmacological and distribution profile. There is much interest in whether D4 DA receptor levels are altered in schizophrenia, but the lack of an available receptor subtype-specific radioligand made this difficult to quantitate. In this study, we examined whether D4 mRNA levels are altered in different brain regions of schizophrenics compared to controls. Ribonuclease protection assays were carried out on total RNA samples isolated postmortem from frontal cortex and caudate brain regions of schizophrenics and matched controls. 32P-labelled RNA probes to the D4 DA receptor and to the housekeeping gene, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH), were hybridised with the RNA samples, digested with ribonucleases to remove unhybridised probe, and separated on 6% sequencing gels. Densitometer analysis on the subsequent autoradiogams was used to calculate the relative optical density of D4 mRNA compared to G3PDH mRNA. Statistical analysis of the data revealed a 3-fold higher level (P<0.011) of D4 mRNA in the frontal cortex of schizophrenics compared to controls. No increase was seen in caudate. D4 receptors could play a role in mediating dopaminergic activity in frontal cortex, an activity which may be malfunctioning in schizophrenia.

  11. The brain 5-HT4 receptor binding is down-regulated in the Flinders Sensitive Line depression model and in response to paroxetine administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, Cecilie Löe; Marcussen, Anders Bue; Wegener, Gregers

    2009-01-01

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT(4)) receptor may be implicated in depression and is a new potential target for antidepressant treatment. We have investigated the brain 5-HT(4) receptor [(3)H]SB207145 binding in the Flinders Sensitive Line rat depression model by quantitative receptor autoradiography....... In the Flinders Sensitive Line, the 5-HT(4) receptor and 5-HT transporter binding were decreased in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus, and the changes in binding were directly correlated within the dorsal hippocampus. Chronic but not acute paroxetine administration caused a 16-47% down-regulation of 5-HT(4......) receptor binding in all regions evaluated including the basal ganglia and hippocampus, while 5-HT depletion increased the 5-HT(4) receptor binding in the dorsal hippocampus, hypothalamus, and lateral globus pallidus. In comparison, the 5-HT(2A) receptor binding was decreased in the frontal and cingulate...

  12. Airborne fine particulate matter induces an upregulation of endothelin receptors on rat bronchi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Rong; Xiao, Xue; Cao, Lei; Shen, Zhen-xing; Lei, Ying; Cao, Yong-xiao

    2016-01-01

    Airborne fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is a risk factor for respiratory diseases. However, little is known about the effects of PM2.5 on bronchi. The present study investigated the effect of airborne PM2.5 on rat bronchi and the underlying mechanisms. Isolated rat bronchial segments were cultured for 24 h. Endothelin (ET) receptor-mediated contractile responses were recorded using a wire myograph. The mRNA and protein expression levels of ET receptors were studied using quantitative real-time PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry. The results demonstrated that ET A and ET B receptor agonists induced remarkable contractile responses on fresh and cultured bronchial segments. PM2.5 (1.0 or 3.0 μg/ml) significantly enhanced ET A and ET B receptor-mediated contractile responses in bronchi with a markedly increased maximal contraction compared to the DMSO or fresh groups. PM2.5 increased the mRNA and protein expression levels of ET A and ET B receptors. U0126 (a MEK1/2 inhibitor) and SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor) significantly suppressed PM2.5-induced increases in ET B receptor-mediated contractile responses, mRNA and protein levels. SP600125 (a JNK inhibitor) and SB203580 significantly abrogated the PM2.5-induced enhancement of ET A receptor-mediated contraction and receptor expression. In conclusion, PM2.5 upregulates ET receptors in bronchi. ET B receptor upregulation is associated with MEK1/2 and p38 pathways, and the upregulation of ET A receptor is involved in JNK and p38 pathways. - Highlights: • Airborne PM2.5 induces bronchial hyperreactivity mediated with endothelin ET B and ET A receptors in rats. • PM2.5 increases mRNA and protein expressions of endothelin ET B and ET A receptors in bronchi. • The upregulation of ET B receptor is associated with MEK1/2 and p38 pathways. • The upregulation of ET A receptor is involved in JNK and p38 pathways. • The research provides novel understanding for PM2.5-associated respiratory diseases.

  13. Differentiated human midbrain-derived neural progenitor cells express excitatory strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors containing α2β subunits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Wegner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human fetal midbrain-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs may deliver a tissue source for drug screening and regenerative cell therapy to treat Parkinson's disease. While glutamate and GABA(A receptors play an important role in neurogenesis, the involvement of glycine receptors during human neurogenesis and dopaminergic differentiation as well as their molecular and functional characteristics in NPCs are largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we investigated NPCs in respect to their glycine receptor function and subunit expression using electrophysiology, calcium imaging, immunocytochemistry, and quantitative real-time PCR. Whole-cell recordings demonstrate the ability of NPCs to express functional strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors after differentiation for 3 weeks in vitro. Pharmacological and molecular analyses indicate a predominance of glycine receptor heteromers containing α2β subunits. Intracellular calcium measurements of differentiated NPCs suggest that glycine evokes depolarisations mediated by strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors and not by D-serine-sensitive excitatory glycine receptors. Culturing NPCs with additional glycine, the glycine-receptor antagonist strychnine, or the Na(+-K(+-Cl(- co-transporter 1 (NKCC1-inhibitor bumetanide did not significantly influence cell proliferation and differentiation in vitro. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that NPCs derived from human fetal midbrain tissue acquire essential glycine receptor properties during neuronal maturation. However, glycine receptors seem to have a limited functional impact on neurogenesis and dopaminergic differentiation of NPCs in vitro.

  14. Subtle differences in molecular recognition between modified glycopeptide antibiotics and bacterial receptor peptides identified by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.; Staroske, T; Roepstorff, P

    1999-01-01

    showing that electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) can be used in the rapid quantitative analysis of mixtures of vancomycin-group antibiotics and their bacterial cell-wall receptors allowing the identification of even subtle differences in binding constants. Differences in affinities...

  15. Distribution of beta-adrenergic receptors in failing human myocardium. Implications for mechanisms of down-regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphree, S.S.; Saffitz, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    The density of beta-adrenergic receptors is reduced in crude membranes prepared from failing human myocardium. We used quantitative autoradiography of radioligand binding sites in intact tissue slices to determine whether the total tissue content of receptors is reduced and to characterize the transmural distribution of receptors in cardiac myocytes and the coronary vasculature in hearts obtained from nine cardiac transplant patients with severe congestive failure. Binding of [125Iodo]cyanopindolol to transmural slices of human myocardium was rapid, saturable, stereoselective, and displaceable by agonists and antagonists with an appropriate rank order of potency. Binding isotherms in four normal and nine failing ventricles showed a significant reduction in the total tissue content of beta-receptors in failing myocardium (38.3 +/- 2.0 fmol/mg protein) compared with normal tissue (52.4 +/- 1.7 fmol/mg protein, p = 0.038). In the normal ventricles, the greatest receptor density was observed autoradiographically in myocytic regions of the subendocardium. Receptor density of the coronary arterioles was approximately 70% of that in adjacent myocytic regions. The density of binding sites in both myocytic regions and arterioles was diminished in all regions of the failing ventricles, but down-regulation was due primarily to a selective reduction of beta-receptors of subendocardial myocytes (63 +/- 5% of subepicardial receptor density vs. 115 +/- 6% in controls, p less than 0.0001). These observations indicate that down-regulation occurs nonuniformly in the transmural distribution and thus is likely not related simply to elevated circulating catecholamine levels

  16. Human brain receptor autoradiography using whole hemisphere sections: a general method that minimizes tissue artefacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quirion, R.; Robitaille, Y.; Martial, J.; Chabot, J.G.; Lemoine, P.; Pilapil, C.; Dalpe, M.

    1987-01-01

    A general method for the preparation of high-quality, mostly ice-crystal-artefact-free whole human brain hemisphere sections is described. Upon receipt, hemispheres are divided; one is then fixed in buffered 10% formalin for neuropathological analysis while the other is cut in 8-10-mm-thick coronal slices that are then rapidly frozen in 2-methylbutane at -40 degrees C (10-15 sec) before being placed in the brain bank at -80 degrees C. Such rapid freezing markedly decreases the formation of ice-crystal artefacts. Whole-hemisphere 20-micron thick sections are then cut and mounted onto lantern-type gelatin-coated slides. These sections are subsequently used for both qualitative and quantitative in vitro receptor autoradiography. Examples of data obtained are given by using various radioligands labelling classical neutrotransmitter, neuropeptide, enzyme, and ion channel receptor binding sites. This method should be useful for the obtention of various receptor maps in human brain. Such information could be most useful for in vivo receptor visualization studies using positron emission tomography (PET) scanning. It could also indicate if a given receptor population is specifically and selectively altered in certain brain diseases, eventually leading to the development of new therapeutic approaches

  17. Molecular imaging with 68Ga-SSTR PET/CT and correlation to immunohistochemistry of somatostatin receptors in neuroendocrine tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaemmerer, Daniel; Haugvik, Sven-Petter; Hommann, Merten; Peter, Luisa; Lupp, Amelie; Schulz, Stefan; Saenger, Joerg; Prasad, Vikas; Kulkarni, Harshad; Baum, Richard Paul

    2011-01-01

    Somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are known for an overexpression in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (GEP-NET). The aim of the present study was to find out if the receptor density predicted by the semi-quantitative parameters generated from the static positron emission tomography (PET/CT) correlated with the in vitro immunohistochemistry using a novel rabbit monoclonal anti-SSTR2A antibody (clone UMB-1) for specific SSTR2A immunohistochemistry and polyclonal antibodies for SSTR1 and 3-5. Overall 14 surgical specimens generated from 34 histologically documented GEP-NET patients were correlated with the preoperative 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT. Quantitative assessment of the receptor density was done using the immunoreactive score (IRS) of Remmele and Stegner; the additional 4-point IRS classification for immunohistochemistry and standardized uptake values (SUV max and SUV mean ) were used for PET/CT. The IRS for SSTR2A and SSTR5 correlated highly significant with the SUV max on the PET/CT (p mean (p max on the 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT scans is concordant with the affinity profile of 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC to the SSTR subtypes and demonstrates the excellent qualification of somatostatin analogues in the diagnostics of NET. This study correlating somatostatin receptor imaging using 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT with immunohistochemically analysed SSTR also underlines the approval of therapy using somatostatin analogues, follow-up imaging as well as radionuclide therapy. (orig.)

  18. A kinetic study of bitter taste receptor sensing using immobilized porcine taste bud tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lihui; Qiao, Lixin; Pang, Guangchang; Xie, Junbo

    2017-06-15

    At present, developing an efficient assay method for truly reflecting the real feelings of gustatory tissues is of great importance. In this study, a novel biosensor was fabricated to investigate the kinetic characteristics of the receptors in taste bud tissues sensing bitter substances for the first time. Porcine taste bud tissues were used as the sensing elements, and the sandwich-type sensing membrane was fixed onto a glassy carbon electrode for assembling the biosensor. With the developed sensor, the response currents induced by sucrose octaacetate, denatonium benzoate, and quercetin stimulating corresponding receptors were determined. The results demonstrated that the interaction between the analyst with their receptors were fitting to hyperbola (R 2 =0.9776, 0.9980 and 0.9601), and the activation constants were 8.748×10 -15 mol/L, 1.429×10 -12 mol/L, 6.613×10 -14 mol/L, respectively. The average number of receptors per cell was calculated as 1.75, 28.58, and 13.23, while the signal amplification factors were 1.08×10 4 , 2.89×10 3 and 9.76×10 4 . These suggest that the sensor can be used to quantitatively describe the interaction characteristics of cells or tissue receptors with their ligands, the role of cellular signaling cascade, the number of receptors, and the signal transmission pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Unequal Activities of Enantiomers via Biological Receptors: Examples of Chiral Drug, Pesticide, and Fragrance Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannschreck, Albrecht; Kiesswetter, Roland; von Angerer, Erwin

    2007-01-01

    A molecule coming from outside an organism can form a ligand-receptor complex. Upon its formation, a message is transmitted, for example, to certain cells. In this way, two enantiomers can emit messages that differ, either quantitatively or qualitatively. In the present article, these facts are taken as a common basis for the actions of chiral…

  20. Expression of Angiotensin II Types 1 and 2 Receptors in Endometriotic Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Takehiro; Chishima, Fumihisa; Sugitani, Masahiko; Tsujimura, Ryusuke; Hayashi, Chuyu; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the gene and protein expression of angiotensin type (AT) 1, AT2 receptors in endometriotic lesions and its relation to prostaglandin (PG) synthases. Endometriosis samples were obtained from 32 patients with endometriotic cysts. Endometrial tissues were obtained during operations for benign gynecological conditions. The expression of the AT1 and AT2 receptor mRNA and that of PG-endoperoxide synthase 2 and microsomal PGE2 synthase-1 (mPGES-1) was examined by quantitative RT-PCR. Immunohistochemical staining was performed for these receptors. AT1 and AT2 receptor proteins were mostly located in endometrial glandular epithelium and some stromal cells. Immunoreactivity of the receptor proteins was observed in both the eutopic endometrium and endometriotic lesions. The AT1/AT2 ratio in endometriotic cysts (median 7.29, range 1.88-187.60) was significantly increased compared with that in the eutopic endometrium in the proliferative-phase in controls (median 1.01, range 0.37-2.09, p < 0.001). There was a relationship between the AT1 mRNA expression and that of mPGES-1 mRNA in the endometriotic cysts (r = 0.394089, p < 0.05). There was a significant relationship between the mRNA expression of the AT2 receptor and that of mPGES-1 in eutopic endometrium of non-endometriotic control (r = 0.610714, p < 0.05). Renin-angiotensin system may play an important role in the pathophysiology of endometriosis. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Quantitative expression patterns of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ (PPARβ/δ) protein in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girroir, Elizabeth E.; Hollingshead, Holly E.; He Pengfei; Zhu Bokai; Perdew, Gary H.; Peters, Jeffrey M.

    2008-01-01

    The expression patterns of PPARβ/δ have been described, but the majority of these data are based on mRNA data. To date, there are no reports that have quantitatively examined the expression of PPARβ/δ protein in mouse tissues. In the present study, a highly specific PPARβ/δ antibody was developed, characterized, and used to examine tissue expression patterns of PPARβ/δ. As compared to commercially available anti-PPARβ/δ antibodies, one of six polyclonal anti-PPARβ/δ antibodies developed was significantly more effective for immunoprecipitation of in vitro-translated PPARβ/δ. This antibody was used for quantitative Western blot analysis using radioactive detection methods. Expression of PPARβ/δ was highest in colon, small intestine, liver, and keratinocytes as compared to other tissues including heart, spleen, skeletal muscle, lung, brain, and thymus. Interestingly, PPARβ/δ expression was localized in the nucleus and RXRα can be co-immunoprecipitated with nuclear PPARβ/δ. Results from these studies demonstrate that PPARβ/δ expression is highest in intestinal epithelium, liver, and keratinocytes, consistent with significant biological roles in these tissues

  2. Examination of relaxin and its receptors expression in pig gametes and embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bathgate Ross A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relaxin is a small peptide also known as pregnancy hormone in many mammals. It is synthesized by both male and female tissues, and its secretions are found in various body fluids such as plasma serum, ovarian follicular fluid, utero-oviduct secretions, and seminal plasma of many mammals, including pigs. However, the presence and effects of relaxin in porcine gametes and embryos are still not well-known. The purpose of this study was to assess the presence of relaxin and its receptors RXFP1 and RXFP2 in pig gametes and embryos. Methods Immature cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs were aspirated from sows' ovaries collected at the abattoir. After in vitro-maturation, COCs were in vitro-fertilized and cultured. For studies, immature and mature COCs were separately collected, and oocytes were freed from their surrounding cumulus cells. Denuded oocytes, cumulus cells, mature boar spermatozoa, zygotes, and embryos (cleaved and blastocysts were harvested for temporal and spatial gene expression studies. Sections of ovary, granulosa and neonatal porcine uterine cells were also collected to use as controls. Results Using both semi-quantitative and quantitative PCRs, relaxin transcripts were not detected in all tested samples, while RXFP1 and RXFP2 mRNA were present. Both receptor gene products were found at higher levels in oocytes compared to cumulus cells, irrespective of the maturation time. Cleaved-embryos contained higher levels of RXFP2 mRNA, whereas, blastocysts were characterized by a higher RXFP1 mRNA content. Using western-immunoblotting or in situ immunofluorescence, relaxin and its receptor proteins were detected in all samples. Their fluorescence intensities were consistently more important in mature oocytes than immature ones. The RXFP1 and RXFP2 signal intensities were mostly located in the plasma membrane region, while the relaxin ones appeared homogeneously distributed within the oocytes and embryonic cells. Furthermore

  3. Identification and characterization of alpha 1 adrenergic receptors in the canine prostate using [125I]-Heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepor, H.; Baumann, M.; Shapiro, E.

    1987-01-01

    We have recently utilized radioligand receptor binding methods to characterize muscarinic cholinergic and alpha adrenergic receptors in human prostate adenomas. The primary advantages of radioligand receptor binding methods are that neurotransmitter receptor density is quantitated, the affinity of unlabelled drugs for receptor sites is determined, and receptors can be localized using autoradiography on slide-mounted tissue sections. Recently, [ 125 I]-Heat, a selective and high affinity ligand with high specific activity (2200 Ci/mmole) has been used to characterize alpha 1 adrenergic receptors in the brain. In this study alpha 1 adrenergic receptors in the dog prostate were characterized using [ 125 I]-Heat. The Scatchard plots were linear indicating homogeneity of [ 125 I]-Heat binding sites. The mean alpha 1 adrenergic receptor density determined from these Scatchard plots was 0.61 +/- 0.07 fmol/mg. wet wt. +/- S.E.M. The binding of [ 125 I]-Heat to canine prostate alpha 1 adrenergic binding sites was of high affinity (Kd = 86 +/- 19 pM). Steady state conditions were reached following an incubation interval of 30 minutes and specific binding and tissue concentration were linear within the range of tissue concentrations assayed. The specificity of [ 125 I]-Heat for alpha 1 adrenergic binding sites was confirmed by competitive displacement assays using unlabelled clonidine and prazosin. Retrospective analysis of the saturation experiments demonstrated that Bmax can be accurately calculated by determining specific [ 125 I]-Heat binding at a single ligand concentration. [ 125 I]-Heat is an ideal ligand for studying alpha 1 adrenergic receptors in the prostate and its favorable properties should facilitate the autoradiographic localization of alpha 1 adrenergic receptors in the prostate

  4. The interleukin-4 receptor: signal transduction by a hematopoietin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, A D; Pierce, J H

    1994-02-01

    Over the last several years, the receptors for numerous cytokines have been molecularly characterized. Analysis of their amino acid sequences shows that some of these receptors bear certain motifs in their extracellular domains that define a family of receptors called the Hematopoietin receptor superfamily. Significant advances in characterizing the structure, function, and mechanisms of signal transduction have been made for several members of this family. The purpose of this review is to discuss the recent advances made for one of the family members, the interleukin (IL) 4 receptor. Other receptor systems have recently been reviewed elsewhere. The IL-4 receptor consists of, at the minimum, the cloned 140 kDa IL-4-binding chain with the potential for associating with other chains. The IL-4 receptor transduces its signal by activating a tyrosine kinase that phosphorylates cellular substrates, including the receptor itself, and the 170 kDa substrate called 4PS. Phosphorylated 4PS interacts with the SH2 domain of the enzyme PI-3'-kinase and increases its enzymatic activity. These early events in the IL-4 receptor initiated signaling pathway may trigger a series of signals that will ultimately lead to an IL-4 specific biologic outcome.

  5. Molecular biology of Homo sapiens: Abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Spring Harbor symposium on quantitative biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, J.D.; Siniscalco, M.

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Springs Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology. The topic for this meeting was the ''Molecular Biology of Homo sapiens.'' Sessions were entitled Human Gene Map, Human Cancer Genes, Genetic Diagnosis, Human Evolution, Drugs Made Off Human Genes, Receptors, and Gene Therapy. (DT)

  6. Fcγ receptor-mediated inflammation inhibits axon regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhang

    Full Text Available Anti-glycan/ganglioside antibodies are the most common immune effectors found in patients with Guillain-Barré Syndrome, which is a peripheral autoimmune neuropathy. We previously reported that disease-relevant anti-glycan autoantibodies inhibited axon regeneration, which echo the clinical association of these antibodies and poor recovery in Guillain-Barré Syndrome. However, the specific molecular and cellular elements involved in this antibody-mediated inhibition of axon regeneration are not previously defined. This study examined the role of Fcγ receptors and macrophages in the antibody-mediated inhibition of axon regeneration. A well characterized antibody passive transfer sciatic nerve crush and transplant models were used to study the anti-ganglioside antibody-mediated inhibition of axon regeneration in wild type and various mutant and transgenic mice with altered expression of specific Fcγ receptors and macrophage/microglia populations. Outcome measures included behavior, electrophysiology, morphometry, immunocytochemistry, quantitative real-time PCR, and western blotting. We demonstrate that the presence of autoantibodies, directed against neuronal/axonal cell surface gangliosides, in the injured mammalian peripheral nerves switch the proregenerative inflammatory environment to growth inhibitory milieu by engaging specific activating Fcγ receptors on recruited monocyte-derived macrophages to cause severe inhibition of axon regeneration. Our data demonstrate that the antibody orchestrated Fcγ receptor-mediated switch in inflammation is one mechanism underlying inhibition of axon regeneration. These findings have clinical implications for nerve repair and recovery in antibody-mediated immune neuropathies. Our results add to the complexity of axon regeneration in injured peripheral and central nervous systems as adverse effects of B cells and autoantibodies on neural injury and repair are increasingly recognized.

  7. Dopamine, Noradrenaline and Serotonin Receptor Densities in the Striatum of Hemiparkinsonian Rats following Botulinum Neurotoxin-A Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, T; Zilles, K; Dikow, H; Hellfritsch, A; Cremer, M; Piel, M; Rösch, F; Hawlitschka, A; Schmitt, O; Wree, A

    2018-03-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) that causes a dopamine (DA) deficit in the caudate-putamen (CPu) accompanied by compensatory changes in other neurotransmitter systems. These changes result in severe motor and non-motor symptoms. To disclose the role of various receptor binding sites for DA, noradrenaline, and serotonin in the hemiparkinsonian (hemi-PD) rat model induced by unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injection, the densities of D 1 , D 2 /D 3 , α 1 , α 2 , and 5HT 2A receptors were longitudinally visualized and measured in the CPu of hemi-PD rats by quantitative in vitro receptor autoradiography. We found a moderate increase in D 1 receptor density 3 weeks post lesion that decreased during longer survival times, a significant increase of D 2 /D 3 receptor density, and 50% reduction in 5HT 2A receptor density. α 1 receptor density remained unaltered in hemi-PD and α 2 receptors demonstrated a slight right-left difference increasing with post lesion survival. In a second step, the possible role of receptors on the known reduction of apomorphine-induced rotations in hemi-PD rats by intrastriatally injected Botulinum neurotoxin-A (BoNT-A) was analyzed by measuring the receptor densities after BoNT-A injection. The application of this neurotoxin reduced D 2 /D 3 receptor density, whereas the other receptors mainly remained unaltered. Our results provide novel data for an understanding of the postlesional plasticity of dopaminergic, noradrenergic and serotonergic receptors in the hemi-PD rat model. The results further suggest a therapeutic effect of BoNT-A on the impaired motor behavior of hemi-PD rats by reducing the interhemispheric imbalance in D 2 /D 3 receptor density. Copyright © 2018 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Immune adherence: a quantitative and kinetic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, T [National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan). Research Inst.

    1978-09-01

    Quantitative and kinetic analysis of the immune-adherence reaction (IA) between C3b fragments and IA receptors as an agglutination reaction is difficult. Analysis is possible, however, by use of radio-iodinated bovine serum albumin as antigen at low concentrations (less than 200 ng/ml) and optimal concentration of antibody to avoid precipitation of antigen-antibody complexes with human erythrocytes without participation of complement. Antigen and antibody are reacted at 37/sup 0/C, complement is added, the mixture incubated and human erythrocytes added; after further incubation, ice-cold EDTA containing buffer is added and the erythrocytes centrifuged and assayed for radioactivity. Control cells reacted with heated guinea pig serum retained less than 5% of the added radioactivity. The method facilitates measurement of IA reactivity and permits more detailed analysis of the mechanism underlying the reaction.

  9. Quantitative single-photon emission tomography for cerebral flow and receptor distribution imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budinger, T.F.

    1985-01-01

    Recently there has been renewed interest in single-photon emission tomography for two major reasons. First, correction methods have been devised for attenuation compensation, nonuniform resolution, and scattered radiation. Second, new radiopharmaceuticals with 1-5% uptake in the brain provide adequate statistics for quantitative imaging of flow using properly designed single-photon tomographic instruments. The lack of commercially available instruments designed specifically to optimize sensitivity for a resolution finer than 15 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) seems now to be the major deterrent to the widespread use of single-photon emission tomography. But it appears now that some development in this respect also might lead to a widespread renewed interest in single-photon tomography of the brain. Major activities of the past few years can be placed in three distinct categories of instrumentation and methodology

  10. Restriction of Receptor Movement Alters Cellular Response: Physical Force Sensing by EphA2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salaita, Khalid; Nair, Pradeep M; Petit, Rebecca S; Neve, Richard M; Das, Debopriya; Gray, Joe W; Groves, Jay T

    2009-09-09

    Activation of the EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase by ephrin-A1 ligands presented on apposed cell surfaces plays important roles in development and exhibits poorly understood functional alterations in cancer. We reconstituted this intermembrane signaling geometry between live EphA2-expressing human breast cancer cells and supported membranes displaying laterally mobile ephrin-A1. Receptor-ligand binding, clustering, and subsequent lateral transport within this junction were observed. EphA2 transport can be blocked by physical barriers nanofabricated onto the underlying substrate. This physical reorganization of EphA2 alters the cellular response to ephrin-A1, as observed by changes in cytoskeleton morphology and recruitment of a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10. Quantitative analysis of receptor-ligand spatial organization across a library of 26 mammary epithelial cell lines reveals characteristic differences that strongly correlate with invasion potential. These observations reveal a mechanism for spatio-mechanical regulation of EphA2 signaling pathways.

  11. Receptor-based 3D-QSAR in Drug Design: Methods and Applications in Kinase Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Cheng; Xiao, Zhiyan

    2016-01-01

    Receptor-based 3D-QSAR strategy represents a superior integration of structure-based drug design (SBDD) and three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) analysis. It combines the accurate prediction of ligand poses by the SBDD approach with the good predictability and interpretability of statistical models derived from the 3D-QSAR approach. Extensive efforts have been devoted to the development of receptor-based 3D-QSAR methods and two alternative approaches have been exploited. One associates with computing the binding interactions between a receptor and a ligand to generate structure-based descriptors for QSAR analyses. The other concerns the application of various docking protocols to generate optimal ligand poses so as to provide reliable molecular alignments for the conventional 3D-QSAR operations. This review highlights new concepts and methodologies recently developed in the field of receptorbased 3D-QSAR, and in particular, covers its application in kinase studies.

  12. Up-regulation of proproliferative genes and the ligand/receptor pair placental growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 in hepatitis C cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao X; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Shackel, Nicholas A; Gorrell, Mark D

    2007-09-01

    Cirrhosis can lead to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Non-diseased liver and hepatitis C virus (HCV)-associated cirrhosis with or without HCC were compared. Proliferation pathway genes, immune response genes and oncogenes were analysed by a quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunostaining. Real-time RT-PCR showed up-regulation of genes in HCV cirrhosis including the proliferation-associated genes bone morphogenetic protein 3 (BMP3), placental growth factor 3 (PGF3), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1) and soluble VEGFR1, the oncogene FYN, and the immune response-associated genes toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) and natural killer cell transcript 4 (NK4). Expressions of TLR2 and the oncogenes B-cell CLL/lymphoma 9 (BCL9) and PIM2 were decreased in HCV cirrhosis. In addition, PIM2 and TLR2 were increased in HCV cirrhosis with HCC compared with HCV cirrhosis. The ligand/receptor pair PGF and VEGFR1 was intensely expressed by the portal tract vascular endothelium. VEGFR1 was expressed in reactive biliary epithelial structures in fibrotic septum and in some stellate cells and macrophages. PGF and VEGFR1 may have an important role in the pathogenesis of the neovascular response in cirrhosis.

  13. The LDL receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Joseph L; Brown, Michael S

    2009-04-01

    In this article, the history of the LDL receptor is recounted by its codiscoverers. Their early work on the LDL receptor explained a genetic cause of heart attacks and led to new ways of thinking about cholesterol metabolism. The LDL receptor discovery also introduced three general concepts to cell biology: receptor-mediated endocytosis, receptor recycling, and feedback regulation of receptors. The latter concept provides the mechanism by which statins selectively lower plasma LDL, reducing heart attacks and prolonging life.

  14. Aberrant dopamine D2-like receptor function in a rodent model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Stephanie M; Lodge, Daniel J

    2012-11-01

    Based on the observation that antipsychotic medications display antagonist properties at dopamine D2-like receptors, aberrant dopamine signaling has been proposed to underlie psychosis in patients with schizophrenia. Thus, it is not surprising that considerable research has been devoted to understanding the mechanisms involved in the antipsychotic action of these compounds. It is important to note that the majority of these studies have been performed in "normal" experimental animals. Given that these animals do not possess the aberrant neuronal information processing typically associated with schizophrenia, the aim of the current study was to examine the dopamine D2 receptor system in a rodent model of schizophrenia. Here, we demonstrate that methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM)-treated rats display an enhanced effect of quinpirole on dopamine neuron activity and an aberrant locomotor response to D2-like receptor activation, suggesting changes in postsynaptic D2-like receptor function. To better understand the mechanisms underlying the enhanced response to D2-like ligands in MAM-treated rats, we examined the expression of D2, D3, and dopamine transporter mRNA in the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. MAM-treated rats displayed a significant increase in dopamine D3 receptor mRNA expression in the nucleus accumbens with no significant changes in the expression of the D2 receptor. Taken together, these data demonstrate robust alterations in dopamine D2-like receptor function in a rodent model of schizophrenia and provide evidence that preclinical studies examining the mechanisms of antipsychotic drug action should be performed in animal models that mirror aspects of the abnormal neuronal transmission thought to underlie symptoms of schizophrenia.

  15. The selective estrogen receptor modulator raloxifene inhibits neutrophil extracellular trap formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana Flores

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Raloxifene is a selective estrogen receptor modulator typically prescribed for the prevention/treatment of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Although raloxifene is known to have anti-inflammatory properties, its effect on human neutrophils, the primary phagocytic leukocytes of the immune system, remain poorly understood. Here, through a screen of pharmacologically active small molecules, we find that raloxifene prevents neutrophil cell death in response to the classical activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, a compound known to induce formation of DNA-based neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs. Inhibition of PMA-induced NET production by raloxifene was confirmed using quantitative and imaging-based assays. Human neutrophils from both male and female donors express the nuclear estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ, known targets of raloxifene. Like raloxifene, selective antagonists of these receptors inhibit PMA-induced NET production. Furthermore, raloxifene inhibited PMA-induced ERK phosphorylation but not reactive oxygen species (ROS production, pathways known to be key modulators of NET production. Finally, we found that raloxifene inhibited PMA-induced, NET-based killing of the leading human bacterial pathogen, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. Our results reveal that raloxifene is a potent modulator of neutrophil function and NET production.

  16. In vivo (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam binding: imaging of receptor regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciliax, B.J.; Penney, J.B. Jr.; Young, A.B.

    1986-08-01

    The use of (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam as a ligand to measure alterations in benzodiazepine receptors in vivo in rats was investigated. Animals were injected with (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam i.v., arterial samples of (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam were obtained and, later, the animals were sacrificed to assay brain binding. (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam enters the brain rapidly and binds to benzodiazepine receptors. About two-thirds of this binding is blocked by predosing the animals with 5 mg/kg of clonazepam. The amount of remaining (nonspecific) binding correlates very well (r = 0.88) with the amount of radioactivity found in plasma at the time of death. A series of rats were lesioned unilaterally with kainic acid in the caudate-putamen several months before the infusion of (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam. In vivo autoradiography in lesioned rats showed that benzodiazepine binding in globus pallidus and substantia nigra on the side of the lesion was increased significantly as compared to the intact side. The observed changes in benzodiazepine binding were similar to those observed previously in lesioned rats using in vitro techniques. Thus, benzodiazepine receptor regulation can be imaged quantitatively using in vivo binding techniques.

  17. Estrogen alters the diurnal rhythm of alpha 1-adrenergic receptor densities in selected brain regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiland, N.G.; Wise, P.M.

    1987-01-01

    Norepinephrine regulates the proestrous and estradiol-induced LH surge by binding to alpha 1-adrenergic receptors. The density of alpha 1-receptors may be regulated by estradiol, photoperiod, and noradrenergic neuronal activity. We wished to determine whether alpha 1-receptors exhibit a diurnal rhythm in ovariectomized and/or estradiol-treated female rats, whether estradiol regulates alpha 1-receptors in those areas of brain involved with LH secretion and/or sexual behavior, and whether the concentrations of alpha-receptors vary inversely relative to previously reported norepinephrine turnover patterns. Young female rats, maintained on a 14:10 light-dark cycle were ovariectomized. One week later, half of them were outfitted sc with Silastic capsules containing estradiol. Groups of animals were decapitated 2 days later at 0300, 1000, 1300, 1500, 1800, and 2300 h. Brains were removed, frozen, and sectioned at 20 micron. Sections were incubated with [ 3 H]prazosin in Tris-HCl buffer, washed, dried, and exposed to LKB Ultrofilm. The densities of alpha 1-receptors were quantitated using a computerized image analysis system. In ovariectomized rats, the density of alpha 1-receptors exhibited a diurnal rhythm in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), medial preoptic nucleus (MPN), and pineal gland. In SCN and MPN, receptor concentrations were lowest during the middle of the day and rose to peak levels at 1800 h. In the pineal gland, the density of alpha 1-receptors was lowest at middark phase, rose to peak levels before lights on, and remained elevated during the day. Estradiol suppressed the density of alpha 1 binding sites in the SCN, MPN, median eminence, ventromedial nucleus, and the pineal gland but had no effect on the lateral septum. Estrogen treatment altered the rhythm of receptor densities in MPN, median eminence, and the pineal gland

  18. Estrogen alters the diurnal rhythm of alpha 1-adrenergic receptor densities in selected brain regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiland, N.G.; Wise, P.M.

    1987-11-01

    Norepinephrine regulates the proestrous and estradiol-induced LH surge by binding to alpha 1-adrenergic receptors. The density of alpha 1-receptors may be regulated by estradiol, photoperiod, and noradrenergic neuronal activity. We wished to determine whether alpha 1-receptors exhibit a diurnal rhythm in ovariectomized and/or estradiol-treated female rats, whether estradiol regulates alpha 1-receptors in those areas of brain involved with LH secretion and/or sexual behavior, and whether the concentrations of alpha-receptors vary inversely relative to previously reported norepinephrine turnover patterns. Young female rats, maintained on a 14:10 light-dark cycle were ovariectomized. One week later, half of them were outfitted sc with Silastic capsules containing estradiol. Groups of animals were decapitated 2 days later at 0300, 1000, 1300, 1500, 1800, and 2300 h. Brains were removed, frozen, and sectioned at 20 micron. Sections were incubated with (/sup 3/H)prazosin in Tris-HCl buffer, washed, dried, and exposed to LKB Ultrofilm. The densities of alpha 1-receptors were quantitated using a computerized image analysis system. In ovariectomized rats, the density of alpha 1-receptors exhibited a diurnal rhythm in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), medial preoptic nucleus (MPN), and pineal gland. In SCN and MPN, receptor concentrations were lowest during the middle of the day and rose to peak levels at 1800 h. In the pineal gland, the density of alpha 1-receptors was lowest at middark phase, rose to peak levels before lights on, and remained elevated during the day. Estradiol suppressed the density of alpha 1 binding sites in the SCN, MPN, median eminence, ventromedial nucleus, and the pineal gland but had no effect on the lateral septum. Estrogen treatment altered the rhythm of receptor densities in MPN, median eminence, and the pineal gland.

  19. Determinants of glycan receptor specificity of H2N2 influenza A virus hemagglutinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Karthik; Koh, Xiaoying; Chandrasekaran, Aarthi; Pappas, Claudia; Raman, Rahul; Srinivasan, Aravind; Shriver, Zachary; Tumpey, Terrence M; Sasisekharan, Ram

    2010-10-29

    The H2N2 subtype of influenza A virus was responsible for the Asian pandemic of 1957-58. However, unlike other subtypes that have caused pandemics such as H1N1 and H3N2, which continue to circulate among humans, H2N2 stopped circulating in the human population in 1968. Strains of H2 subtype still continue to circulate in birds and occasionally pigs and could be reintroduced into the human population through antigenic drift or shift. Such an event is a potential global health concern because of the waning population immunity to H2 hemagglutinin (HA). The first step in such a cross-species transmission and human adaptation of influenza A virus is the ability for its surface glycoprotein HA to bind to glycan receptors expressed in the human upper respiratory epithelia. Recent structural and biochemical studies have focused on understanding the glycan receptor binding specificity of the 1957-58 pandemic H2N2 HA. However, there has been considerable HA sequence divergence in the recent avian-adapted H2 strains from the pandemic H2N2 strain. Using a combination of structural modeling, quantitative glycan binding and human respiratory tissue binding methods, we systematically identify mutations in the HA from a recent avian-adapted H2N2 strain (A/Chicken/PA/2004) that make its quantitative glycan receptor binding affinity (defined using an apparent binding constant) comparable to that of a prototypic pandemic H2N2 (A/Albany/6/58) HA.

  20. Determinants of glycan receptor specificity of H2N2 influenza A virus hemagglutinin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Viswanathan

    Full Text Available The H2N2 subtype of influenza A virus was responsible for the Asian pandemic of 1957-58. However, unlike other subtypes that have caused pandemics such as H1N1 and H3N2, which continue to circulate among humans, H2N2 stopped circulating in the human population in 1968. Strains of H2 subtype still continue to circulate in birds and occasionally pigs and could be reintroduced into the human population through antigenic drift or shift. Such an event is a potential global health concern because of the waning population immunity to H2 hemagglutinin (HA. The first step in such a cross-species transmission and human adaptation of influenza A virus is the ability for its surface glycoprotein HA to bind to glycan receptors expressed in the human upper respiratory epithelia. Recent structural and biochemical studies have focused on understanding the glycan receptor binding specificity of the 1957-58 pandemic H2N2 HA. However, there has been considerable HA sequence divergence in the recent avian-adapted H2 strains from the pandemic H2N2 strain. Using a combination of structural modeling, quantitative glycan binding and human respiratory tissue binding methods, we systematically identify mutations in the HA from a recent avian-adapted H2N2 strain (A/Chicken/PA/2004 that make its quantitative glycan receptor binding affinity (defined using an apparent binding constant comparable to that of a prototypic pandemic H2N2 (A/Albany/6/58 HA.

  1. First direct electron microscopic visualization of a tight spatial coupling between GABAA-receptors and voltage-sensitive calcium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert Helge; Belhage, B; Schousboe, A

    1992-01-01

    Using cerebellar granule neurons in culture it was demonstrated that exposure of the cells to the GABAA receptor agonist 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP) leads to an increase in the number of voltage-gated calcium channels as revealed by quantitative preembedding indirect imm...

  2. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha acts as a tumor suppressor in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Zhang, Haiyang; Zhang, Yan; Li, Shuang; Wang, Xinyi; Wang, Xia; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Bin; Zen, Ke; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zhang, Chunni; Ba, Yi

    2017-04-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha plays a crucial role in regulating the biosynthesis of mitochondria, which is closely linked to the energy metabolism in various tumors. This study investigated the regulatory role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha in the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, the changes of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha messenger RNA levels between normal human liver and hepatocellular carcinoma tissue were examined by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Knockdown of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha was conducted by RNA interference in the human liver cell line L02, while overexpression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha was conducted by adenovirus encoding peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha complementary DNA in the human hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2. Cellular morphological changes were observed via optical and electron microscopy. Cellular apoptosis was determined by Hoechst 33258 staining. In addition, the expression levels of 21,400 genes in tissues and cells were detected by microarray. It was shown that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha expression was significantly downregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma compared with normal liver tissues. After knockdown of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha expression in L02 cells, cells reverted to immature and dedifferentiated morphology exhibiting cancerous tendency. Apoptosis occurred in the HepG2 cells after transfection by adenovirus encoding peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha. Microarray analysis showed consistent results. The results suggest that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha acts as a tumor

  3. β-Adrenergic receptor-mediated suppression of interleukin 2 receptors in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, R.D.; Hunninghake, G.W.; McArdle, W.L.

    1987-01-01

    Adrenergic receptor agonists are know to attenuate the proliferative response of human lymphocytes after activation; however, their mechanism of action is unknown. Since expression of interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptors is a prerequisite for proliferation, the effect of β-adrenergic receptor agonists on lymphocyte IL-2 receptors was studied on both mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes and IL-2-dependent T lymphocyte cell lines. In both cell types the β-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol blocked the expression of IL-2 receptors, as determined with the IL-2 receptor anti-TAC antibody. To determine the effect of β-adrenergic agonists on expression of the high affinity IL-2 receptors, [ 125 I]IL-2 binding studies were performed at concentrations selective for high affinity sites. No significant effect of β-adrenergic agonists on high affinity IL-2 receptor sites could be detected. The data demonstrate that β-adrenergic receptor agonists down-regulate IL-2 receptors primarily affecting low affinity sites

  4. Molecular biology of Homo sapiens: Abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Spring Harbor symposium on quantitative biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, J.D.; Siniscalco, M.

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Springs Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology. The topic for this meeting was the ''Molecular Biology of Homo sapiens.'' Sessions were entitled Human Gene Map, Human Cancer Genes, Genetic Diagnosis, Human Evolution, Drugs Made Off Human Genes, Receptors, and Gene Therapy. (DT)

  5. Autoradiographic localization of adenosine A1 receptors in rat brain using [3H]XCC, a functionalized congener of 1,3-dipropylxanthine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, M.J.; Williams, M.; Jacobson, K.A.

    1987-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiography was used to visualize the anatomical distribution of adenosine receptors labeled by the carboxylic acid congener of 1,3-dipropylxanthine, [ 3 Hi](8-(p-carbonxymethyloxy) phenyl-1,3 dipropylxanthine)([ 3 H]XCC) in rat brain. [ 3 H]XCC was observed to specifically bind to rat brain sagittal sections in a heterogenous pattern. Saturation experiments revealed that [ 3 H]XCC binds with nanomolar affinity to 20μm frozen tissue sections with the highest binding densities occurring in the hippocampus and cerebellum. Both the binding characteristics and regional receptor distribution obtained with [ 3 H]XCC demonstrate the potential usefulness of this new ligand in the study of adenosine A 1 receptors. 13 refs. (Author)

  6. G Protein Coupled Receptor Kinase 3 Regulates Breast Cancer Migration, Invasion, and Metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Billard

    Full Text Available Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC is a heterogeneous disease that has a poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Chemokine receptor interactions are important modulators of breast cancer metastasis; however, it is now recognized that quantitative surface expression of one important chemokine receptor, CXCR4, may not directly correlate with metastasis and that its functional activity in breast cancer may better inform tumor pathogenicity. G protein coupled receptor kinase 3 (GRK3 is a negative regulator of CXCR4 activity, and we show that GRK expression correlates with tumorigenicity, molecular subtype, and metastatic potential in human tumor microarray analysis. Using established human breast cancer cell lines and an immunocompetent in vivo mouse model, we further demonstrate that alterations in GRK3 expression levels in tumor cells directly affect migration and invasion in vitro and the establishment of distant metastasis in vivo. The effects of GRK3 modulation appear to be specific to chemokine-mediated migration behaviors without influencing tumor cell proliferation or survival. These data demonstrate that GRK3 dysregulation may play an important part in TNBC metastasis.

  7. G Protein Coupled Receptor Kinase 3 Regulates Breast Cancer Migration, Invasion, and Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billard, Matthew J.; Fitzhugh, David J.; Parker, Joel S.; Brozowski, Jaime M.; McGinnis, Marcus W.; Timoshchenko, Roman G.; Serafin, D. Stephen; Lininger, Ruth; Klauber-Demore, Nancy; Sahagian, Gary; Truong, Young K.; Sassano, Maria F.; Serody, Jonathan S.; Tarrant, Teresa K.

    2016-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a heterogeneous disease that has a poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Chemokine receptor interactions are important modulators of breast cancer metastasis; however, it is now recognized that quantitative surface expression of one important chemokine receptor, CXCR4, may not directly correlate with metastasis and that its functional activity in breast cancer may better inform tumor pathogenicity. G protein coupled receptor kinase 3 (GRK3) is a negative regulator of CXCR4 activity, and we show that GRK expression correlates with tumorigenicity, molecular subtype, and metastatic potential in human tumor microarray analysis. Using established human breast cancer cell lines and an immunocompetent in vivo mouse model, we further demonstrate that alterations in GRK3 expression levels in tumor cells directly affect migration and invasion in vitro and the establishment of distant metastasis in vivo. The effects of GRK3 modulation appear to be specific to chemokine-mediated migration behaviors without influencing tumor cell proliferation or survival. These data demonstrate that GRK3 dysregulation may play an important part in TNBC metastasis. PMID:27049755

  8. The fast-recycling receptor Megalin defines the apical recycling pathway of epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Bay, Andres E.; Schreiner, Ryan; Benedicto, Ignacio; Paz Marzolo, Maria; Banfelder, Jason; Weinstein, Alan M.; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique J.

    2016-01-01

    The basolateral recycling and transcytotic pathways of epithelial cells were previously defined using markers such as transferrin (TfR) and polymeric IgA (pIgR) receptors. In contrast, our knowledge of the apical recycling pathway remains fragmentary. Here we utilize quantitative live-imaging and mathematical modelling to outline the recycling pathway of Megalin (LRP-2), an apical receptor with key developmental and renal functions, in MDCK cells. We show that, like TfR, Megalin is a long-lived and fast-recycling receptor. Megalin enters polarized MDCK cells through segregated apical sorting endosomes and subsequently intersects the TfR and pIgR pathways at a perinuclear Rab11-negative compartment termed common recycling endosomes (CRE). Whereas TfR recycles to the basolateral membrane from CRE, Megalin, like pIgR, traffics to subapical Rab11-positive apical recycling endosomes (ARE) and reaches the apical membrane in a microtubule- and Rab11-dependent manner. Hence, Megalin defines the apical recycling pathway of epithelia, with CRE as its apical sorting station. PMID:27180806

  9. Fc-receptors and surface immunoglobulins in cells of the hairy cell leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieber, E.P.; Linke, R.P.; Riethmueller, G.; Heyden, H.W. von; Waller, H.D.

    1976-01-01

    Using 125 I-labelled aggregated IgG in a quantitative assay a strong expression of Fc-receptors was found on the leukemic cells of a patient with hairy cell leukemia. The Fc-receptor activity on these cells was much higher than that on monocytes and B-lymphocytes from normal blood. Surface immunoglobulins were detected by radioautography using radioactively labelled (Fab') 2 -fragments of monospecific antibodies directed against immunoglobulin heavy chains. Prior to radioautography the cells were stained for the tartrate resistant acid phosphatase. It is found that all cells containing this enzyme bore delta-chains on their surface. On more than 90% of these cells a simultaneous expression of μ-chains was detected. γ-chains could only be demonstrated on cells which were negative for the tartrate resistant acid phosphatase; part of these cells, however, were hairy cells by morphological criteria. (orig.) [de

  10. Fc-receptors and surface immunoglobulins in cells of the hairy cell leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieber, E P; Linke, R P; Riethmueller, G [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. fuer Experimentelle Chirurgie und Immunologie; Heyden, H.W. von; Waller, H D [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Innere Medizin 2

    1976-01-01

    Using /sup 125/I-labelled aggregated IgG in a quantitative assay a strong expression of Fc-receptors was found on the leukemic cells of a patient with hairy cell leukemia. The Fc-receptor activity on these cells was much higher than that on monocytes and B-lymphocytes from normal blood. Surface immunoglobulins were detected by radioautography using radioactively labelled (Fab')/sub 2/-fragments of monospecific antibodies directed against immunoglobulin heavy chains. Prior to radioautography the cells were stained for the tartrate resistant acid phosphatase. It is found that all cells containing this enzyme bore delta-chains on their surface. On more than 90% of these cells a simultaneous expression of ..mu..-chains was detected. ..gamma..-chains could only be demonstrated on cells which were negative for the tartrate resistant acid phosphatase; part of these cells, however, were hairy cells by morphological criteria.

  11. Substance P and substance K receptor binding sites in the human gastrointestinal tract: localization by autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, T.S.; Zimmerman, R.P.; Mantyh, C.R.; Vigna, S.R.; Maggio, J.E.; Welton, M.L.; Passaro, E.P. Jr.; Mantyh, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    Quantitative receptor autoradiography was used to localize and quantify the distribution of binding sites for 125 I-radiolabeled substance P (SP), substance K (SK) and neuromedin K (NK) in the human GI tract using histologically normal tissue obtained from uninvolved margins of resections for carcinoma. The distribution of SP and SK binding sites is different for each gastrointestinal (GI) segment examined. Specific SP binding sites are expressed by arterioles and venules, myenteric plexus, external circular muscle, external longitudinal muscle, muscularis mucosa, epithelial cells of the mucosa, and the germinal centers of lymph nodules. SK binding sites are distributed in a pattern distinct from SP binding sites and are localized to the external circular muscle, external longitudinal muscle, and the muscularis mucosa. Binding sites for NK were not detected in any part of the human GI tract. These results demonstrate that: (1) surgical specimens from the human GI tract can be effectively processed for quantitative receptor autoradiography; (2) of the three mammalian tachykinins tested, SP and SK, but not NK binding sites are expressed in detectable levels in the human GI tract; (3) whereas SK receptor binding sites are expressed almost exclusively by smooth muscle, SP binding sites are expressed by smooth muscle cells, arterioles, venules, epithelial cells of the mucosa and cells associated with lymph nodules; and (4) both SP and SK binding sites expressed by smooth muscle are more stable than SP binding sites expressed by blood vessels, lymph nodules, and mucosal cells

  12. GABA receptor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Doo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    GABA is primary an inhibitory neurotransmitter that is localized in inhibitory interneurons. GABA is released from presynaptic terminals and functions by binding to GABA receptors. There are two types of GABA receptors, GABA{sub A}-receptor that allows chloride to pass through a ligand gated ion channel and GABA{sub B}-receptor that uses G-proteins for signaling. The GABA{sub A}-receptor has a GABA binding site as well as a benzodiazepine binding sites, which modulate GABA{sub A}-receptor function. Benzodiazepine GABAA receptor imaging can be accomplished by radiolabeling derivates that activates benzodiazepine binding sites. There has been much research on flumazenil (FMZ) labeled with {sup 11}C-FMZ, a benzodiazepine derivate that is a selective, reversible antagonist to GABAA receptors. Recently, {sup 18}F-fluoroflumazenil (FFMZ) has been developed to overcome {sup 11}C's short half-life. {sup 18}F-FFMZ shows high selective affinity and good pharmacodynamics, and is a promising PET agent with better central benzodiazepine receptor imaging capabilities. In an epileptic focus, because the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor amount is decreased, using '1{sup 1}C-FMZ PET instead of {sup 18}F-FDG, PET, restrict the foci better and may also help find lesions better than high resolution MR. GABA{sub A} receptors are widely distributed in the cerebral cortex, and can be used as an viable neuronal marker. Therefore it can be used as a neuronal cell viability marker in cerebral ischemia. Also, GABA-receptors decrease in areas where neuronal plasticity develops, therefore, GABA imaging can be used to evaluate plasticity. Besides these usages, GABA receptors are related with psychological diseases, especially depression and schizophrenia as well as cerebral palsy, a motor-related disorder, so further in-depth studies are needed for these areas.

  13. GABA receptor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Doo

    2007-01-01

    GABA is primary an inhibitory neurotransmitter that is localized in inhibitory interneurons. GABA is released from presynaptic terminals and functions by binding to GABA receptors. There are two types of GABA receptors, GABA A -receptor that allows chloride to pass through a ligand gated ion channel and GABA B -receptor that uses G-proteins for signaling. The GABA A -receptor has a GABA binding site as well as a benzodiazepine binding sites, which modulate GABA A -receptor function. Benzodiazepine GABAA receptor imaging can be accomplished by radiolabeling derivates that activates benzodiazepine binding sites. There has been much research on flumazenil (FMZ) labeled with 11 C-FMZ, a benzodiazepine derivate that is a selective, reversible antagonist to GABAA receptors. Recently, 18 F-fluoroflumazenil (FFMZ) has been developed to overcome 11 C's short half-life. 18 F-FFMZ shows high selective affinity and good pharmacodynamics, and is a promising PET agent with better central benzodiazepine receptor imaging capabilities. In an epileptic focus, because the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor amount is decreased, using '1 1 C-FMZ PET instead of 18 F-FDG, PET, restrict the foci better and may also help find lesions better than high resolution MR. GABA A receptors are widely distributed in the cerebral cortex, and can be used as an viable neuronal marker. Therefore it can be used as a neuronal cell viability marker in cerebral ischemia. Also, GABA-receptors decrease in areas where neuronal plasticity develops, therefore, GABA imaging can be used to evaluate plasticity. Besides these usages, GABA receptors are related with psychological diseases, especially depression and schizophrenia as well as cerebral palsy, a motor-related disorder, so further in-depth studies are needed for these areas

  14. Endothelin B Receptors on Primary Chicken Müller Cells and the Human MIO-M1 Müller Cell Line Activate ERK Signaling via Transactivation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Harun-Or-Rashid

    Full Text Available Injury to the eye or retina triggers Müller cells, the major glia cell of the retina, to dedifferentiate and proliferate. In some species they attain retinal progenitor properties and have the capacity to generate new neurons. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR system and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK signaling are key regulators of these processes in Müller cells. The extracellular signals that modulate and control these processes are not fully understood. In this work we studied whether endothelin receptor signaling can activate EGFR and ERK signaling in Müller cells. Endothelin expression is robustly upregulated at retinal injury and endothelin receptors have been shown to transactivate EGFRs in other cell types. We analyzed the endothelin signaling system in chicken retina and cultured primary chicken Müller cells as well as the human Müller cell line MIO-M1. The Müller cells were stimulated with receptor agonists and treated with specific blockers to key enzymes in the signaling pathway or with siRNAs. We focused on endothelin receptor mediated transactivation of EGFRs by using western blot analysis, quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and immunocytochemistry. The results showed that chicken Müller cells and the human Müller cell line MIO-M1 express endothelin receptor B. Stimulation by the endothelin receptor B agonist IRL1620 triggered phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and autophosphorylation of (Y1173 EGFR. The effects could be blocked by Src-kinase inhibitors (PP1, PP2, EGFR-inhibitor (AG1478, EGFR-siRNA and by inhibitors to extracellular matrix metalloproteinases (GM6001, consistent with a Src-kinase mediated endothelin receptor response that engage ligand-dependent and ligand-independent EGFR activation. Our data suggest a mechanism for how injury-induced endothelins, produced in the retina, may modulate the Müller cell responses by Src-mediated transactivation of EGFRs. The data give support to a view in

  15. The two-state dimer receptor model: a general model for receptor dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Rafael; Casadó, Vicent; Mallol, Josefa; Ferrada, Carla; Ferré, Sergi; Fuxe, Kjell; Cortés, Antoni; Ciruela, Francisco; Lluis, Carmen; Canela, Enric I

    2006-06-01

    Nonlinear Scatchard plots are often found for agonist binding to G-protein-coupled receptors. Because there is clear evidence of receptor dimerization, these nonlinear Scatchard plots can reflect cooperativity on agonist binding to the two binding sites in the dimer. According to this, the "two-state dimer receptor model" has been recently derived. In this article, the performance of the model has been analyzed in fitting data of agonist binding to A(1) adenosine receptors, which are an example of receptor displaying concave downward Scatchard plots. Analysis of agonist/antagonist competition data for dopamine D(1) receptors using the two-state dimer receptor model has also been performed. Although fitting to the two-state dimer receptor model was similar to the fitting to the "two-independent-site receptor model", the former is simpler, and a discrimination test selects the two-state dimer receptor model as the best. This model was also very robust in fitting data of estrogen binding to the estrogen receptor, for which Scatchard plots are concave upward. On the one hand, the model would predict the already demonstrated existence of estrogen receptor dimers. On the other hand, the model would predict that concave upward Scatchard plots reflect positive cooperativity, which can be neither predicted nor explained by assuming the existence of two different affinity states. In summary, the two-state dimer receptor model is good for fitting data of binding to dimeric receptors displaying either linear, concave upward, or concave downward Scatchard plots.

  16. Quantitative assessment of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 expression in neurons and glia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisha Choubey

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs and their receptors (FGFRs have numerous functions in the developing and adult central nervous system (CNS. For example, the FGFR1 receptor is important for proliferation and fate specification of radial glial cells in the cortex and hippocampus, oligodendrocyte proliferation and regeneration, midline glia morphology and soma translocation, Bergmann glia morphology, and cerebellar morphogenesis. In addition, FGFR1 signaling in astrocytes is required for postnatal maturation of interneurons expressing parvalbumin (PV. FGFR1 is implicated in synapse formation in the hippocampus, and alterations in the expression of Fgfr1 and its ligand, Fgf2 accompany major depression. Understanding which cell types express Fgfr1 during development may elucidate its roles in normal development of the brain as well as illuminate possible causes of certain neuropsychiatric disorders. Methods Here, we used a BAC transgenic reporter line to trace Fgfr1 expression in the developing postnatal murine CNS. The specific transgenic line employed was created by the GENSAT project, tgFGFR1-EGFPGP338Gsat, and includes a gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP under the regulation of the Fgfr1 promoter, to trace Fgfr1 expression in the developing CNS. Unbiased stereological counts were performed for several cell types in the cortex and hippocampus. Results This model reveals that Fgfr1 is primarily expressed in glial cells, in both astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, along with some neurons. Dual labeling experiments indicate that the proportion of GFP+ (Fgfr1+ cells that are also GFAP+ increases from postnatal day 7 (P7 to 1 month, illuminating dynamic changes in Fgfr1 expression during postnatal development of the cortex. In postnatal neurogenic areas, GFP expression was also observed in SOX2, doublecortin (DCX, and brain lipid-binding protein (BLBP expressing cells. Fgfr1 is also highly expressed in DCX positive cells of

  17. Decrease in benzodiazepine receptor binding in a patient with Angelman syndrome detected by iodine-123 iomazenil and single-photon emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odano, Ikuo; Anezaki, Toshiharu; Ohkubo, Masaki; Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Onishi, Yoshihiro; Inuzuka, Takashi; Takahashi, Makoto; Tsuji, Shoji

    1996-01-01

    A receptor mapping technique using iodine-123 iomazenil and single-photon emission tomography (SPET) was employed to examine benzodiazepine receptor binding in a patient with Angelman syndrome (AS). AS is characterized by developmental delay, seizures, inappropriate laughter and ataxic movement. In this entity there is a cytogenic deletion of the proximal long arm of chromosome 15q11-q13, where the gene encoding the GABA A receptor β3 subunit (GABRB3) is located. Since the benzodiazepine receptor is constructed as a receptor-ionophore complex that contains the GABA A receptor, it is a suitable marker for GABA-ergic synapsis. To determine whether benzodiazepine receptor density, which indirectly indicates changes in GABA A receptor density, is altered in the brain in patients with AS, we investigated a 27-year-old woman with AS using 123 I-iomazenil and SPET. Receptor density was quantitatively assessed by measuring the binding potential using a simplified method. Regional cerebral blood flow was also measured with N-isopropyl-p- 123 iodoamphetamine. We demonstrated that benzodiazepiine receptor density is severely decreased in the cerebellum, and mildly decreased in the frontal and temporal cortices and basal ganglia, a result which is considered to indicate decreased GABA A receptor density in these regions. Although the deletion of GABRB3 was not observed in the present study, we indirectly demonstrated the disturbance of inhibitory neurotransmission mediated by the GABA A receptor in the investigated patient. 123 I-iomazenil with SPET was useful to map benzodiazepine receptors, which indicate GABA A receptor distribution and their density. (orig.)

  18. Quantitative analysis of multiple kappa-opioid receptors by selective and nonselective ligand binding in guinea pig spinal cord: Resolution of high and low affinity states of the kappa 2 receptors by a computerized model-fitting technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiberi, M.; Magnan, J.

    1990-01-01

    The binding characteristics of selective and nonselective opioids have been studied in whole guinea pig spinal cord, using a computer fitting method to analyze the data obtained from saturation and competition studies. The delineation of specific binding sites labeled by the mu-selective opioid [3H]D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly-ol5-enkephalin (Kd = 2.58 nM, R = 4.52 pmol/g of tissue) and by the delta-selective opioid [3H]D-Pen2, D-Pen5-enkephalin (Kd = 2.02 nM, R = 1.47 pmol/g of tissue) suggests the presence of mu and delta-receptors in the spinal cord tissue. The presence of kappa receptors was probed by the kappa-selective opioid [3H]U69593 (Kd = 3.31 nM, R = 2.00 pmol/g of tissue). The pharmacological characterization of the sites labeled by [3H]U69593 confirms the assumption that this ligand discriminates kappa receptors in guinea pig spinal cord. The benzomorphan [3H]ethylketazocine labels a population of receptors with one homogeneous affinity state (Kd = 0.65 nM, R = 7.39 pmol/g of tissue). The total binding capacity of this ligand was not different from the sum of the binding capacities of mu, delta-, and kappa-selective ligands. Under mu- and delta-suppressed conditions, [3H]ethylketazocine still binds to receptors with one homogeneous affinity state (Kd = 0.45 nM, R = 1.69 pmol/g of tissue). Competition studies performed against the binding of [3H]ethylketazocine under these experimental conditions reveal that the pharmacological profile of the radiolabeled receptors is similar to the profile of the kappa receptors labeled with [3H]U69593. Saturation studies using the nonselective opioid [3H]bremazocine demonstrate that this ligand binds to spinal cord membranes with heterogeneous affinities (Kd1 = 0.28 nM, R1 = 7.91 pmol/g of tissue; Kd2 = 3.24 nM, R2 = 11.2 pmol/g of tissue)

  19. Quantitative analysis of multiple kappa-opioid receptors by selective and nonselective ligand binding in guinea pig spinal cord: Resolution of high and low affinity states of the kappa 2 receptors by a computerized model-fitting technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiberi, M.; Magnan, J. (Universite de Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

    1990-05-01

    The binding characteristics of selective and nonselective opioids have been studied in whole guinea pig spinal cord, using a computer fitting method to analyze the data obtained from saturation and competition studies. The delineation of specific binding sites labeled by the mu-selective opioid (3H)D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly-ol5-enkephalin (Kd = 2.58 nM, R = 4.52 pmol/g of tissue) and by the delta-selective opioid (3H)D-Pen2, D-Pen5-enkephalin (Kd = 2.02 nM, R = 1.47 pmol/g of tissue) suggests the presence of mu and delta-receptors in the spinal cord tissue. The presence of kappa receptors was probed by the kappa-selective opioid (3H)U69593 (Kd = 3.31 nM, R = 2.00 pmol/g of tissue). The pharmacological characterization of the sites labeled by (3H)U69593 confirms the assumption that this ligand discriminates kappa receptors in guinea pig spinal cord. The benzomorphan (3H)ethylketazocine labels a population of receptors with one homogeneous affinity state (Kd = 0.65 nM, R = 7.39 pmol/g of tissue). The total binding capacity of this ligand was not different from the sum of the binding capacities of mu, delta-, and kappa-selective ligands. Under mu- and delta-suppressed conditions, (3H)ethylketazocine still binds to receptors with one homogeneous affinity state (Kd = 0.45 nM, R = 1.69 pmol/g of tissue). Competition studies performed against the binding of (3H)ethylketazocine under these experimental conditions reveal that the pharmacological profile of the radiolabeled receptors is similar to the profile of the kappa receptors labeled with (3H)U69593. Saturation studies using the nonselective opioid (3H)bremazocine demonstrate that this ligand binds to spinal cord membranes with heterogeneous affinities (Kd1 = 0.28 nM, R1 = 7.91 pmol/g of tissue; Kd2 = 3.24 nM, R2 = 11.2 pmol/g of tissue).

  20. The D1 family dopamine receptor, DopR, potentiates hind leg grooming behavior in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitmon, E; Stephens, G; Parkhurst, S J; Wolf, F W; Kehne, G; Taylor, M; Lebestky, T

    2016-03-01

    Drosophila groom away debris and pathogens from the body using their legs in a stereotyped sequence of innate motor behaviors. Here, we investigated one aspect of the grooming repertoire by characterizing the D1 family dopamine receptor, DopR. Removal of DopR results in decreased hind leg grooming, as substantiated by quantitation of dye remaining on mutant and RNAi animals vs. controls and direct scoring of behavioral events. These data are also supported by pharmacological results that D1 receptor agonists fail to potentiate grooming behaviors in headless DopR flies. DopR protein is broadly expressed in the neuropil of the thoracic ganglion and overlaps with TH-positive dopaminergic neurons. Broad neuronal expression of dopamine receptor in mutant animals restored normal grooming behaviors. These data provide evidence for the role of DopR in potentiating hind leg grooming behaviors in the thoracic ganglion of adult Drosophila. This is a remarkable juxtaposition to the considerable role of D1 family dopamine receptors in rodent grooming, and future investigations of evolutionary relationships of circuitry may be warranted. © 2016 The Authors. Genes, Brain and Behavior published by International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Pet imaging of human pituitary 5-HT2 receptors with F-18 setoperone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischman, A.J.; Bonab, A.A.; Babich, J.W. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) receptors play an important role in the regulation of pituitary function. In particular, 5HT agonists stimulate ACTH, {beta}-endorphin, prolactin and growth hormone secretion but inhibit TSH release. 5-HT binding sites have been identified by autoradiographic studies of rat and human pituitary. In the present investigation, we used PET with F-18 setoperone to image 5-HT2 receptors in normal humans. Setoperone, a piperidine derivative with potent 5-HT2 receptor blocking properties was labelled with F-18 by nucleophilic substitution on the nitro derivative. After HPLC purification, specific activity was between 10,000 and 15,000 mCi/{mu} mole and radiochemical purity was >98%. Six healthy male volunteers were injected with 5-7 mCi of F-18. Setoperone and serial PET images and arterial blood samples were collected over 2 hrs. Specific binding to 5-HT2 receptors in the frontal cortex (FC), striatum (ST) and pituitary (P) was quantitated using the cerebellum (C) as reference. The tracer showed clear retention in FC, ST and P (known to contain a high density of 5-HT2 receptors) relative to C (known to be devoid of 5-HT2 receptors). In all subjects, FC/C, ST/C and P/C ratios increased during the first hr. and remained stable thereafter. For FC and ST, the ratios reached similar values; 3.92{plus_minus}0.73 and 3.53{plus_minus}0.32. For pituitary, a significantly higher ratio, was measured at all times; 6.53{plus_minus}1.82 (p<0.01). These results indicate that F-18 setoperone is an effective PET radiopharmaceutical for imaging 5-HT2 receptors in the human pituitary. Future applications of this agent could provide important new insights into neuroendocrine function.

  2. Actions of Bupivacaine, a Widely Used Local Anesthetic, on NMDA Receptor Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganelli, Meaghan A.

    2015-01-01

    NMDA receptors mediate excitatory neurotransmission in brain and spinal cord and play a pivotal role in the neurological disease state of chronic pain, which is caused by central sensitization. Bupivacaine is the indicated local anesthetic in caudal, epidural, and spinal anesthesia and is widely used clinically to manage acute and chronic pain. In addition to blocking Na+ channels, bupivacaine affects the activity of many other channels, including NMDA receptors. Importantly, bupivacaine inhibits NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, an area critically involved in central sensitization. We used recombinant NMDA receptors expressed in HEK293 cells and found that increasing concentrations of bupivacaine decreased channel open probability in GluN2 subunit- and pH-independent manner by increasing the mean duration of closures and decreasing the mean duration of openings. Using kinetic modeling of one-channel currents, we attributed the observed current decrease to two main mechanisms: a voltage-dependent “foot-in-the-door” pore block and an allosteric gating effect. Further, the inhibition was state-independent because it occurred to the same degree whether the drug was applied before or after glutamate stimulation and was mediated by extracellular and intracellular inhibitory sites, via hydrophilic and hydrophobic pathways. These results predict that clinical doses of bupivacaine would decrease the peak and accelerate the decay of synaptic NMDA receptor currents during normal synaptic transmission. These quantitative predictions inform possible applications of bupivacaine as preventative and therapeutic approaches in chronic pain. PMID:25589775

  3. Studies on functional and structural role of urokinase receptor and other components of the plasminogen activation system in malignancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weidle, U H; Wöllisch, E; Rønne, E

    1994-01-01

    ) in the intratumoral extracellular matrix and plasminogen activator inhibitor type II (PAI-2) in tumour cells and stromal cells. In order to investigate the role of u-PAR as a prognostic marker, we have developed an assay for quantitation of the receptor. As a first step towards structural investigations, we have...

  4. Nuclear hormone receptor expression in mouse kidney and renal cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Ogawa

    Full Text Available Nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs are transcription factors that regulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, immune responses, and inflammation. Although several NHRs, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ and PPARα, demonstrate a renoprotective effect in the context of diabetic nephropathy (DN, the expression and role of other NHRs in the kidney are still unrecognized. To investigate potential roles of NHRs in the biology of the kidney, we used quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to profile the expression of all 49 members of the mouse NHR superfamily in mouse kidney tissue (C57BL/6 and db/m, and cell lines of mesangial (MES13, podocyte (MPC, proximal tubular epithelial (mProx24 and collecting duct (mIMCD3 origins in both normal and high-glucose conditions. In C57BL/6 mouse kidney cells, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α, chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II (COUP-TFII and COUP-TFIII were highly expressed. During hyperglycemia, the expression of the NHR 4A subgroup including neuron-derived clone 77 (Nur77, nuclear receptor-related factor 1, and neuron-derived orphan receptor 1 significantly increased in diabetic C57BL/6 and db/db mice. In renal cell lines, PPARδ was highly expressed in mesangial and proximal tubular epithelial cells, while COUP-TFs were highly expressed in podocytes, proximal tubular epithelial cells, and collecting duct cells. High-glucose conditions increased the expression of Nur77 in mesangial and collecting duct cells, and liver x receptor α in podocytes. These data demonstrate NHR expression in mouse kidney cells and cultured renal cell lines and suggest potential therapeutic targets in the kidney for the treatment of DN.

  5. Nuclear hormone receptor NHR-49 controls fat consumption and fatty acid composition in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc R Van Gilst

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs, such as liver X receptor, farnesoid X receptor, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs, precisely control energy metabolism. Consequently, these receptors are important targets for the treatment of metabolic diseases, including diabetes and obesity. A thorough understanding of NHR fat regulatory networks has been limited, however, by a lack of genetically tractable experimental systems. Here we show that deletion of the Caenorhabditis elegans NHR gene nhr-49 yielded worms with elevated fat content and shortened life span. Employing a quantitative RT-PCR screen, we found that nhr-49 influenced the expression of 13 genes involved in energy metabolism. Indeed, nhr-49 served as a key regulator of fat usage, modulating pathways that control the consumption of fat and maintain a normal balance of fatty acid saturation. We found that the two phenotypes of the nhr-49 knockout were linked to distinct pathways and were separable: The high-fat phenotype was due to reduced expression of enzymes in fatty acid beta-oxidation, and the shortened adult life span resulted from impaired expression of a stearoyl-CoA desaturase. Despite its sequence relationship with the mammalian hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 receptor, the biological activities of nhr-49 were most similar to those of the mammalian PPARs, implying an evolutionarily conserved role for NHRs in modulating fat consumption and composition. Our findings in C. elegans provide novel insights into how NHR regulatory networks are coordinated to govern fat metabolism.

  6. Nuclear hormone receptor NHR-49 controls fat consumption and fatty acid composition in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gilst, Marc R; Hadjivassiliou, Haralambos; Jolly, Amber; Yamamoto, Keith R

    2005-02-01

    Mammalian nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs), such as liver X receptor, farnesoid X receptor, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), precisely control energy metabolism. Consequently, these receptors are important targets for the treatment of metabolic diseases, including diabetes and obesity. A thorough understanding of NHR fat regulatory networks has been limited, however, by a lack of genetically tractable experimental systems. Here we show that deletion of the Caenorhabditis elegans NHR gene nhr-49 yielded worms with elevated fat content and shortened life span. Employing a quantitative RT-PCR screen, we found that nhr-49 influenced the expression of 13 genes involved in energy metabolism. Indeed, nhr-49 served as a key regulator of fat usage, modulating pathways that control the consumption of fat and maintain a normal balance of fatty acid saturation. We found that the two phenotypes of the nhr-49 knockout were linked to distinct pathways and were separable: The high-fat phenotype was due to reduced expression of enzymes in fatty acid beta-oxidation, and the shortened adult life span resulted from impaired expression of a stearoyl-CoA desaturase. Despite its sequence relationship with the mammalian hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 receptor, the biological activities of nhr-49 were most similar to those of the mammalian PPARs, implying an evolutionarily conserved role for NHRs in modulating fat consumption and composition. Our findings in C. elegans provide novel insights into how NHR regulatory networks are coordinated to govern fat metabolism.

  7. Receptor modeling for source apportionment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urban atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kunwar P; Malik, Amrita; Kumar, Ranjan; Saxena, Puneet; Sinha, Sarita

    2008-01-01

    This study reports source apportionment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in particulate depositions on vegetation foliages near highway in the urban environment of Lucknow city (India) using the principal components analysis/absolute principal components scores (PCA/APCS) receptor modeling approach. The multivariate method enables identification of major PAHs sources along with their quantitative contributions with respect to individual PAH. The PCA identified three major sources of PAHs viz. combustion, vehicular emissions, and diesel based activities. The PCA/APCS receptor modeling approach revealed that the combustion sources (natural gas, wood, coal/coke, biomass) contributed 19-97% of various PAHs, vehicular emissions 0-70%, diesel based sources 0-81% and other miscellaneous sources 0-20% of different PAHs. The contributions of major pyrolytic and petrogenic sources to the total PAHs were 56 and 42%, respectively. Further, the combustion related sources contribute major fraction of the carcinogenic PAHs in the study area. High correlation coefficient (R2 > 0.75 for most PAHs) between the measured and predicted concentrations of PAHs suggests for the applicability of the PCA/APCS receptor modeling approach for estimation of source contribution to the PAHs in particulates.

  8. Competitive receptor binding radioassay for β-1 and β-2 adrenergic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, M.N.; Culbreth, W.; Dalrymple, R.; Fung, C.; Ricks, C.

    1987-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive competitive receptor bonding assay for β-1 and β-2 adrenergic binding for adrenergic agents has been developed. The steps that are critical for the success of the assay are given in detail so that the assay can be set up in any routine laboratory with relative ease. The rationale behind the use of specific reagents is discussed. The assay requires microgram quantities of test compound, a radiolabeled specific β adrenergic antagonist [ 3 H]dihydroalprenolol (DHA), and turkey erythrocyte β-1 and rat erythrocyte β-2 receptor membranes. Serial dilutions of sample are incubated with appropriate receptor membranes and DHA for 1 hr at room temperature. After equilibrium is attained, the bound radioligand is separated by rapid filtration under vacuum through Whatman GF/B filters. The amount of bound DHA trapped on the filter is inversely proportional to the degree of β-1 and β-2 adrenergic binding of the sample. Separation of bound from free radioligand by filtration permits rapid determination of a large number of samples. This assay quantitates and differentiates β-1 and β-2 adrenergic binding of synthetic adrenergic agents

  9. Hormone Receptor Expression Analyses in Neoplastic and Non-Neoplastic Canine Mammary Tissue by a Bead Based Multiplex Branched DNA Assay: A Gene Expression Study in Fresh Frozen and Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Mohr

    Full Text Available Immunohistochemistry (IHC is currently considered the method of choice for steroid hormone receptor status evaluation in human breast cancer and, therefore, it is commonly utilized for assessing canine mammary tumors. In case of low hormone receptor expression, IHC is limited and thus is complemented by molecular analyses. In the present study, a multiplex bDNA assay was evaluated as a method for hormone receptor gene expression detection in canine mammary tissues. Estrogen receptor (ESR1, progesterone receptor (PGR, prolactin receptor (PRLR and growth hormone receptor (GHR gene expressions were evaluated in neoplastic and non-neoplastic canine mammary tissues. A set of 119 fresh frozen and 180 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE was comparatively analyzed and used for assay evaluation. Furthermore, a possible association between the hormone receptor expression in different histological subtypes of canine malignant mammary tumors and the castration status, breed and invasive growth of the tumor were analyzed. The multiplex bDNA assay proved to be more sensitive for fresh frozen specimens. Hormone receptor expression found was significantly decreased in malignant mammary tumors in comparison to non-neoplastic tissue and benign mammary tumors. Among the histological subtypes the lowest gene expression levels of ESR1, PGR and PRLR were found in solid, anaplastic and ductal carcinomas. In summary, the evaluation showed that the measurement of hormone receptors with the multiplex bDNA assay represents a practicable method for obtaining detailed quantitative information about gene expression in canine mammary tissue for future studies. Still, comparison with IHC or quantitative real-time PCR is needed for further validation of the present method.

  10. Experiment K-6-18. Study of muscarinic and gaba (benzodiazepine) receptors in the sensory-motor cortex, hippcampus and spinal code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunton, N.; Damelio, F.; Krasnov, I.

    1990-01-01

    Frontal lobe samples of rat brains flown aboard Cosmos 1887 were processed for the study of muscarinic (cholinergic) and GABA (benzodiazepine) receptors and for immunocytochemical localization of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Although radioactive labeling of both muscarinic cholinergic and GABA (benzodiazepine) receptors proved to be successful with the techniques employed, distinct receptor localization of individual laminae of the frontal neocortex was not possible since the sampling of the area was different in the various groups of animals. In spite of efforts made for proper orientation and regional identification of laminae, it was found that a densitometric (quantitation of autoradiograms) analysis of the tissue did not contribute to the final interpretation of the effects of weightlessness on these receptors. As to the immunocytochemical studies the use of both markers, GFAP and GABA antiserum, confirmed the suitability of the techniques for use in frozen material. However, similar problems to those encountered in the receptor studies prevented an adequate interpretation of the effects of micro-G exposure on the localization and distribution of GABA and GFAP. This study did, however, confirm the feasibility of investigating neurotransmitters and their receptors in future space flight experiments.

  11. Using random forests for assistance in the curation of G-protein coupled receptor databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkurin, Aleksei; Vellido, Alfredo

    2017-08-18

    Biology is experiencing a gradual but fast transformation from a laboratory-centred science towards a data-centred one. As such, it requires robust data engineering and the use of quantitative data analysis methods as part of database curation. This paper focuses on G protein-coupled receptors, a large and heterogeneous super-family of cell membrane proteins of interest to biology in general. One of its families, Class C, is of particular interest to pharmacology and drug design. This family is quite heterogeneous on its own, and the discrimination of its several sub-families is a challenging problem. In the absence of known crystal structure, such discrimination must rely on their primary amino acid sequences. We are interested not as much in achieving maximum sub-family discrimination accuracy using quantitative methods, but in exploring sequence misclassification behavior. Specifically, we are interested in isolating those sequences showing consistent misclassification, that is, sequences that are very often misclassified and almost always to the same wrong sub-family. Random forests are used for this analysis due to their ensemble nature, which makes them naturally suited to gauge the consistency of misclassification. This consistency is here defined through the voting scheme of their base tree classifiers. Detailed consistency results for the random forest ensemble classification were obtained for all receptors and for all data transformations of their unaligned primary sequences. Shortlists of the most consistently misclassified receptors for each subfamily and transformation, as well as an overall shortlist including those cases that were consistently misclassified across transformations, were obtained. The latter should be referred to experts for further investigation as a data curation task. The automatic discrimination of the Class C sub-families of G protein-coupled receptors from their unaligned primary sequences shows clear limits. This study has

  12. Ovarian steroids regulate tachykinin and tachykinin receptor gene expression in the mouse uterus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patak Eva

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the mouse uterus, pregnancy is accompanied by changes in tachykinin and tachykinin receptor gene expression and in the uterotonic effects of endogenous tachykinins. In this study we have investigated whether changes in tachykinin expression and responses are a result of changes in ovarian steroid levels. Methods We quantified the mRNAs of tachykinins and tachykinin receptors in uteri from ovariectomized mice and studied their regulation in response to estrogen and progesterone using real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Early (3 h and late (24 h responses to estrogen were evaluated and the participation of the estrogen receptors (ER, ERalpha and ERbeta, was analyzed by treating mice with propylpyrazole triol, a selective ERalpha agonist, or diarylpropionitrile, a selective agonist of ERbeta. Results All genes encoding tachykinins (Tac1, Tac2 and Tac4 and tachykinin receptors (Tacr1, Tacr2 and Tacr3 were expressed in uteri from ovariectomized mice. Estrogen increased Tac1 and Tacr1 mRNA after 3 h and decreased Tac1 and Tac4 expression after 24 h. Tac2 and Tacr3 mRNA levels were decreased by estrogen at both 3 and 24 h. Most effects of estrogen were also observed in animals treated with propylpyrazole triol. Progesterone treatment increased the levels of Tac2. Conclusion These results show that the expression of tachykinins and their receptors in the mouse uterus is tightly and differentially regulated by ovarian steroids. Estrogen effects are mainly mediated by ERalpha supporting an essential role for this estrogen receptor in the regulation of the tachykinergic system in the mouse uterus.

  13. Increased NMDA and AMPA receptor densities in the anterior cingulate cortex in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavitsanou, K.; Huang, X.-F.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is a brain area of potential importance to our understanding of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Since a disturbed balance between excitatory and inhibitory activity is suggested to occur in the ACC in schizophrenia, the present study has focused on the analysis of binding of [ 3 H]MK801, [ 3 H]AMPA and [ 3 H]kainate, radioligands which respectively label the NMDA, AMPA and kainate receptors of the ionotropic glutamate receptor family in the ACC of 10 schizophrenia patients and 10 matched controls, using quantitative autoradiography. AMPA receptor densities were higher in cortical layer II whereas NMDA receptor densities were higher in cortical layers II-III in the ACC of both control and schizophrenia group. In contrast, kainate receptors displayed the highest density in cortical layer V. [ 3 H]AMPA binding was significantly increased by 25% in layer II in the schizophrenia group as compared to the control group. Similarly, a significant 17% increase of [ 3 H]MK801 binding was observed in layers II-III in the schizophrenia group. No statistically significant differences were observed for [ 3 H] kainate binding between the two groups. These results suggest that ionotropic glutamate receptors are differentially altered in the ACC of schizophrenia. The increase in [ 3 H]AMPA and [ 3 H]MK801 binding points to a postsynaptic compensation for impaired glutamatergic neurotransmission in the ACC in schizophrenia. Such abnormality could lead to an imbalance between the excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in this brain area that may contribute to the emergence of some schizophrenia symptoms. Copyright (2002) Australian Neuroscience Society

  14. Receptor oligomerization in family B1 of G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, Sarah Norklit; Ørgaard, Anne; Jørgensen, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    , the glucagon receptor, and the receptors for parathyroid hormone (PTHR1 and PTHR2). The dysregulation of several family B1 receptors is involved in diseases, such as diabetes, chronic inflammation, and osteoporosis which underlines the pathophysiological importance of this GPCR subfamily. In spite of this......, investigation of family B1 receptor oligomerization and especially its pharmacological importance is still at an early stage. Even though GPCR oligomerization is a well-established phenomenon, there is a need for more investigations providing a direct link between these interactions and receptor functionality......The superfamily of the seven transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors (7TM/GPCRs) is the largest family of membrane-associated receptors. GPCRs are involved in the pathophysiology of numerous human diseases, and they constitute an estimated 30-40% of all drug targets. During the last two decades...

  15. Activation of glucocorticoid receptors increases 5-HT2A receptor levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trajkovska, Viktorija; Kirkegaard, Lisbeth; Krey, Gesa

    2009-01-01

    an effect of GR activation on 5-HT2A levels, mature organotypic hippocampal cultures were exposed to corticosterone with or without GR antagonist mifepristone and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist spironolactone. In GR under-expressing mice, hippocampal 5-HT2A receptor protein levels were decreased......Major depression is associated with both dysregulation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis and serotonergic deficiency, not the least of the 5-HT2A receptor. However, how these phenomena are linked to each other, and whether a low 5-HT2A receptor level is a state or a trait marker...... of depression is unknown. In mice with altered glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression we investigated 5-HT2A receptor levels by Western blot and 3H-MDL100907 receptor binding. Serotonin fibre density was analyzed by stereological quantification of serotonin transporter immunopositive fibers. To establish...

  16. Investigation of Elemental Mass Spectrometry in Pharmacology for Peptide Quantitation at Femtomolar Levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Cordeau

    Full Text Available In the search of new robust and environmental-friendly analytical methods able to answer quantitative issues in pharmacology, we explore liquid chromatography (LC associated with elemental mass spectrometry (ICP-MS to monitor peptides in such complex biological matrices. The novelty is to use mass spectrometry to replace radiolabelling and radioactivity measurements, which represent up-to now the gold standard to measure organic compound concentrations in life science. As a proof of concept, we choose the vasopressin (AVP/V1A receptor system for model pharmacological assays. The capacity of ICP-MS to provide highly sensitive quantitation of metallic and hetero elements, whatever the sample medium, prompted us to investigate this technique in combination with appropriate labelling of the peptide of interest. Selenium, that is scarcely present in biological media, was selected as a good compromise between ICP-MS response, covalent tagging ability using conventional sulfur chemistry and peptide detection specificity. Applying selenium monitoring by elemental mass spectrometry in pharmacology is challenging due to the very high salt content and organic material complexity of the samples that produces polyatomic aggregates and thus potentially mass interferences with selenium detection. Hyphenation with a chromatographic separation was found compulsory. Noteworthy, we aimed to develop a straightforward quantitative protocol that can be performed in any laboratory equipped with a standard macrobore LC-ICP-MS system, in order to avoid time-consuming sample treatment or special implementation of instrumental set-up, while allowing efficient suppression of all mass interferences to reach the targeted sensitivity. Significantly, a quantification limit of 57 ng Se L-1 (72 femtomoles of injected Se was achieved, the samples issued from the pharmacological assays being directly introduced into the LC-ICP-MS system. The established method was successfully

  17. Characterization of ubiquitination dependent dynamics in growth factor receptor signaling by quantitative proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akimov, Vyacheslav; Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Nielsen, Mogens M

    2011-01-01

    Protein ubiquitination is a dynamic reversible post-translational modification that plays a key role in the regulation of numerous cellular processes including signal transduction, endocytosis, cell cycle control, DNA repair and gene transcription. The conjugation of the small protein ubiquitin...... investigating ubiquitination on a proteomic scale, mainly due to the inherited complexity and heterogeneity of ubiquitination. We describe here a quantitative proteomics strategy based on the specificity of ubiquitin binding domains (UBDs) and Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC...... as ubiquitination-dependent events in signaling pathways. In addition to a detailed seven time-point profile of EGFR ubiquitination over 30 minutes of ligand stimulation, our data determined prominent involvement of Lysine-63 ubiquitin branching in EGF signaling. Furthermore, we found two centrosomal proteins, PCM1...

  18. Underlying mathematics in diversification of human olfactory receptors in different loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Sk Sarif; Choudhury, Pabitra Pal; Goswami, Arunava

    2013-12-01

    As per conservative estimate, approximately 51-105 Olfactory Receptors (ORs) loci are present in human genome occurring in clusters. These clusters are apparently unevenly spread as mosaics over 21 pairs of human chromosomes. Olfactory Receptor (OR) gene families which are thought to have expanded for the need to provide recognition capability for a huge number of pure and complex odorants, form the largest known multigene family in the human genome. Recent studies have shown that 388 full length and 414 OR pseudo-genes are present in these OR genomic clusters. In this paper, the authors report a classification method for all human ORs based on their sequential quantitative information like presence of poly strings of nucleotides bases, long range correlation and so on. An L-System generated sequence has been taken as an input into a star-model of specific subfamily members and resultant sequence has been mapped to a specific OR based on the classification scheme using fractal parameters like Hurst exponent and fractal dimensions.

  19. Effect of Heat Stress on the Expression of GABA Receptor mRNA in the HPG Axis of Wenchang Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LJ Xie

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We investigated the effect of heat stress (HS on the expression of the GABA receptor in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis of Wenchang chickens. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR was used to quantify the GABA receptor mRNA levels along the HPG axis of chickens under HS (40±0.5 °C for 1-6 weeks. Our results showed that the expression of GABAA and GABAB receptor at the mRNAs levels in the tissues of HPG axis exhibited fluctuation and variability. After HS, the mRNA level of GABAA receptor was significantly reduced in the hypothalamus of 1-week-old and in the pituitary of 3-week-old chickens, but significantly increased in the pituitary of 1-, 4-, and 5-week-old chickens. The GABAB receptor mRNA level significantly declined in the hypothalamus of 1-week-old and in the pituitary of 3-week-old chickens, but was significantly upregulated in the pituitary and testis of 1- and 2-week-old chickens. At other time points, the expressions of GABAA receptor and GABAB receptor showed no significant differences compared with control group. These results indicated that the levels of GABAA receptor and GABAB receptor mRNAs varied in different tissues of the HPG axis in chickens of different ages, displaying temporal and spatial variations. GABA receptor behaved as a positively-regulated gene by HS, i.e., its mRNA was increased by HS; similarly, it was a negatively-regulated gene by HS, when its expression was reduced by HS.

  20. Quantification of the number of EP3 receptors on a living CHO cell surface by the AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyonchol; Arakawa, Hideo; Hatae, Noriyuki; Sugimoto, Yukihiko; Matsumoto, Osamu; Osada, Toshiya; Ichikawa, Atsushi; Ikai, Atsushi

    2006-01-01

    The distribution of EP3 receptors on a living cell surface was quantitatively studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Green fluorescent protein (GFP) was introduced to the extracellular region of the EP3 receptor on a CHO cell. A microbead was used as a probe to ensure certain contact area, whose surface was coated with anti-GFP antibody. The interactions between the antibodies and GFP molecules on the cell surface were recorded to observe the distribution of the receptors. The result indicated that EP3 receptors were distributed on the CHO cell surface not uniformly but in small patches coincident with immunohistochemical observation. Repeated measurements on the same area of cell surface gave confirmation that it was unlikely that the receptors were extracted from the cell membrane during the experiments. The measurement of single molecular interaction between GFP and the anti-GFP antibody was succeeded on the cell surface using compression-free force spectroscopy. The value of separation work required to break a single molecular pair was estimated to be about 1.5x10 -18 J. The number of EP3 receptor on the CHO cell surface was estimated using this value to be about 1x10 4 under the assumption that the area of the cell surface was about 5000 μm 2 . These results indicated that the number of receptors on a living cell surface could be quantified through the force measurement by the AFM

  1. Surface TRAIL decoy receptor-4 expression is correlated with TRAIL resistance in MCF7 breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanlioglu, Ahter D; Dirice, Ercument; Aydin, Cigdem; Erin, Nuray; Koksoy, Sadi; Sanlioglu, Salih

    2005-01-01

    Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) selectively induces apoptosis in cancer cells but not in normal cells. Despite this promising feature, TRAIL resistance observed in cancer cells seriously challenged the use of TRAIL as a death ligand in gene therapy. The current dispute concerns whether or not TRAIL receptor expression pattern is the primary determinant of TRAIL sensitivity in cancer cells. This study investigates TRAIL receptor expression pattern and its connection to TRAIL resistance in breast cancer cells. In addition, a DcR2 siRNA approach and a complementary gene therapy modality involving IKK inhibition (AdIKKβKA) were also tested to verify if these approaches could sensitize MCF7 breast cancer cells to adenovirus delivery of TRAIL (Ad5hTRAIL). TRAIL sensitivity assays were conducted using Molecular Probe's Live/Dead Cellular Viability/Cytotoxicity Kit following the infection of breast cancer cells with Ad5hTRAIL. The molecular mechanism of TRAIL induced cell death under the setting of IKK inhibition was revealed by Annexin V binding. Novel quantitative Real Time RT-PCR and flow cytometry analysis were performed to disclose TRAIL receptor composition in breast cancer cells. MCF7 but not MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells displayed strong resistance to adenovirus delivery of TRAIL. Only the combinatorial use of Ad5hTRAIL and AdIKKβKA infection sensitized MCF7 breast cancer cells to TRAIL induced cell death. Moreover, novel quantitative Real Time RT-PCR assays suggested that while the level of TRAIL Decoy Receptor-4 (TRAIL-R4) expression was the highest in MCF7 cells, it was the lowest TRAIL receptor expressed in MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, conventional flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that TRAIL resistant MCF7 cells exhibited substantial levels of TRAIL-R4 expression but not TRAIL decoy receptor-3 (TRAIL-R3) on surface. On the contrary, TRAIL sensitive MDA-MB-231 cells displayed very low levels of surface TRAIL-R4

  2. Regional specific binding of [11C]RO 15 1788 to central type benzodiazepine receptors in human brain: quantitative evaluation by PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pappata, S.; Samson, Y.; Chavoix, C.; Prenant, C.; Maziere, M.; Baron, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    The central type benzodiazepine receptors were studied in 17 healthy human subjects with 11 C-RO 15 1788 and positron emission tomography (PET). The brain regional distribution of the tracer in eight control studies performed after injection of trace doses of 11 C-RO 15 1788 was consistent with that of benzodiazepine receptors. Saturation studies with co-injected cold RO 15 1788 in the remaining subjects showed a dose-dependent decrease of brain radiotracer until full inhibition of specific binding was achieved with doses above 0.1 mg/kg (four studies). Based on the results, a simple method to estimate the specifically bound 11 C-RO 15 1788 regionally in a single PET study is proposed, using the data from the full-saturation studies as a stable estimate of the nondisplaceable radioligand concentration. Using this method, it was found that quasiequilibrium between the estimated specifically bound and nondisplaceable components was achieved at times equal to or longer than 20 min after tracer administration. The validity of this method was partly supported by further results, showing a good agreement between the regional specific binding so calculated and postmortem data of receptor density

  3. Combinatory annotation of cell membrane receptors and signalling pathways of Bombyx mori prothoracic glands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulos, Panagiotis; Samiotaki, Martina; Panayotou, George; Dedos, Skarlatos G.

    2016-01-01

    The cells of prothoracic glands (PG) are the main site of synthesis and secretion of ecdysteroids, the biochemical products of cholesterol conversion to steroids that shape the morphogenic development of insects. Despite the availability of genome sequences from several insect species and the extensive knowledge of certain signalling pathways that underpin ecdysteroidogenesis, the spectrum of signalling molecules and ecdysteroidogenic cascades is still not fully comprehensive. To fill this gap and obtain the complete list of cell membrane receptors expressed in PG cells, we used combinatory bioinformatic, proteomic and transcriptomic analysis and quantitative PCR to annotate and determine the expression profiles of genes identified as putative cell membrane receptors of the model insect species, Bombyx mori, and subsequently enrich the repertoire of signalling pathways that are present in its PG cells. The genome annotation dataset we report here highlights modules and pathways that may be directly involved in ecdysteroidogenesis and aims to disseminate data and assist other researchers in the discovery of the role of such receptors and their ligands. PMID:27576083

  4. Gβ promotes pheromone receptor polarization and yeast chemotropism by inhibiting receptor phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismael, Amber; Tian, Wei; Waszczak, Nicholas; Wang, Xin; Cao, Youfang; Suchkov, Dmitry; Bar, Eli; Metodiev, Metodi V; Liang, Jie; Arkowitz, Robert A; Stone, David E

    2016-04-12

    Gradient-directed cell migration (chemotaxis) and growth (chemotropism) are processes that are essential to the development and life cycles of all species. Cells use surface receptors to sense the shallow chemical gradients that elicit chemotaxis and chemotropism. Slight asymmetries in receptor activation are amplified by downstream signaling systems, which ultimately induce dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton. During the mating response of budding yeast, a model chemotropic system, the pheromone receptors on the plasma membrane polarize to the side of the cell closest to the stimulus. Although receptor polarization occurs before and independently of actin cable-dependent delivery of vesicles to the plasma membrane (directed secretion), it requires receptor internalization. Phosphorylation of pheromone receptors by yeast casein kinase 1 or 2 (Yck1/2) stimulates their internalization. We showed that the pheromone-responsive Gβγ dimer promotes the polarization of the pheromone receptor by interacting with Yck1/2 and locally inhibiting receptor phosphorylation. We also found that receptor phosphorylation is essential for chemotropism, independently of its role in inducing receptor internalization. A mathematical model supports the idea that the interaction between Gβγ and Yck1/2 results in differential phosphorylation and internalization of the pheromone receptor and accounts for its polarization before the initiation of directed secretion. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Glucocorticoid receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Onno C; Koorneef, Lisa L; Kroon, Jan

    2018-06-01

    The glucocorticoid hormone cortisol acts throughout the body to support circadian processes and adaptation to stress. The glucocorticoid receptor is the target of cortisol and of synthetic glucocorticoids, which are used widely in the clinic. Both agonism and antagonism of the glucocorticoid receptor may be beneficial in disease, but given the wide expression of the receptor and involvement in various processes, beneficial effects are often accompanied by unwanted side effects. Selective glucocorticoid receptor modulators are ligands that induce a receptor conformation that allows activation of only a subset of downstream signaling pathways. Such molecules thereby combine agonistic and antagonistic properties. Here we discuss the mechanisms underlying selective receptor modulation and their promise in treating diseases in several organ systems where cortisol signaling plays a role. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Angiotensin receptors and angiotensin I-converting enzyme in rat intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duggan, K.A.; Mendelsohn, F.A.; Levens, N.R.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to map the distribution of angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors and ANG I-converting enzyme (ACE) in rat intestine. ANG II binding sites were visualized by in vitro autoradiography using iodinated [Sar1, Ile8]ANG II. The distribution of ACE was mapped using an iodinated derivative of lisinopril. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were killed and the interior of the whole intestine washed with ice-cold saline. Segments of duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and colon were quickly frozen in a mixture of isopentane and dry ice. Twenty-micron frozen sections were thaw-mounted onto gelatin-coated slides, incubated with either ligand, and exposed to X-ray film. After exposure and subsequent development, the films were quantitated by computerized densitometry. ANG II receptors were most dense in the colon, followed by the ileum, duodenum, and jejunum. Within each segment of intestine, specific ANG II binding sites were localized exclusively to the muscularis. In contrast, ACE was present in both the mucosa and the muscularis. The colocalization of ANG II receptors and ACE may suggest a role for locally generated ANG II in the control of intestinal function. The luminal orientation of ACE in the mucosa of the small intestine may suggest that at this site ACE serves primarily to hydrolyze dietary peptides

  7. The effect of leptin receptor deficiency and fasting on cannabinoid receptor 1 mRNA expression in the rat hypothalamus, brainstem and nodose ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelsing, Jacob; Larsen, Philip Just; Vrang, Niels

    2009-10-02

    Despite ample evidence for the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the control of appetite, food intake and energy balance, relatively little is known about the regulation of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB(1)R) expression in respect to leptin signalling and fasting. In the present study, we examined CB(1)R mRNA levels in lean (Fa/?) and obese (fa/fa) male Zucker rats under basal and food-restricted conditions. Using stereological sampling principles coupled with semi-quantitative radioactive in situ hybridization we provide semi-quantitative estimates of CB(1)R mRNA expression in key appetite regulatory hypothalamic and brainstem areas, as well as in the nodose ganglia. Whereas no effect of fasting were determined on CB(1)R mRNA levels in the paraventricular (PVN) and ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH) nucleus, in the brainstem dorsal vagal complex or nodose ganglion of lean Zucker rats, CB(1)R mRNA levels were consistently elevated in obese Zucker rats pointing to a direct influence of disrupted leptin signalling on CB(1)R mRNA regulation.

  8. Application of a Receptor-Binding Capture Quantitative Reverse Transcription-PCR Assay To Concentrate Human Norovirus from Sewage and To Study the Distribution and Stability of the Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, David; Pan, Liangwen; Mandrell, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Water is an important route for human norovirus (HuNoV) transmission. Using magnetic beads conjugated with blood group-like antigens (HuNoV receptors), we developed a simple and rapid receptor-binding capture and magnetic sequestration (RBCMS) method and compared it to the existing negatively charged membrane absorption/elution (NCMAE) method for concentrating HuNoV from sewage effluent. RBCMS required 6-fold-less sample volume than the NCMAE method and also resulted in a significantly higher yield of HuNoV. The NCMAE and RBCMS concentrations of genogroup I (GI) HuNoV measured by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) resulted in average threshold cycle (CT) values of 34.68 (8.68 copies, 252-fold concentration) versus 34.07 (13.05 copies, 477-fold concentration), respectively; the NCMAE and RBCMS concentrations of genogroup II (GII) HuNoV were measured as average CT values of 33.32 (24.7 copies, 239-fold concentration) versus 32.38 (46.9 copies, 333-fold concentration), respectively. The specificity of qRT-PCR was confirmed by traditional RT-PCR and an RNase I protection assay. The qRT-PCR signal from RBCMS-concentrated HuNoV treated with RNase I indicated that it was from encapsidated RNA and, probably, viable virus. In contrast, the qRT-PCR signal from NCMAE-concentrated HuNoV was not protected from RNase I and, likely, degradation. Both GI and GII HuNoV were detected from sewage effluent samples collected between April and July with average concentrations of 7.8 × 103 genomic copies per liter (gc/liter) and 4.3 × 104 gc/liter, respectively. No GI and sewage samples stored at room temperature for 4 weeks. We conclude that RBCMS requires less sample volume, has better recovery and sensitivity, and is faster than NCMAE for detection of HuNoV in sewage. PMID:22101044

  9. Molecular conformation, receptor binding, and hormone action of natural and synthetic estrogens and antiestrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duax, W L; Griffin, J F; Weeks, C M; Korach, K S

    1985-01-01

    The X-ray crystallographic structural determinations of synthetic estrogens and antiestrogens provide reliable information on the global minimum energy conformation of these molecules or a local minimum energy conformation that is within 1 or 2 kcal/mole of the global minimum. In favorable cases, state-of-the-art molecular mechanics calculations provide quantitative agreement with X-ray results and information on the relative energy of other local minimum energy conformations not observed crystallographically. Because the conformation of diethylstilbestrol (DES) observed in solvated crystals has an overall conformation and dipole moment more similar to estradiol it is the form more likely to bind to the receptor and produce hormone activity. Either phenol ring of DES can successfully mimic the estradiol A-ring in binding to the receptor. Indenestrol A (INDA) and indenestrol B (INDB) have nearly identical fully extended planar conformations. Either the alpha or gamma rings of these compounds may mimic the A ring of estradiol and compete for the estrogen receptor. Although there are eight distinct ways in which molecules of a racemic mixture of INDA or INDB can bind to the receptor, not all of them may be able to elicit a hormonal response. This may account for the reduced biological activity of the compounds despite their successful competition for receptor binding. The minimum energy conformations of Z-pseudodiethylstilbestrol (ZPD) and E-pseudodiethylstilbestrol (EPD) are bent in a fashion similar to that of indanestrol (INDC). These molecules have good binding affinity suggesting that the receptor does not require a flat molecule. Therefore these conformations would appear to be compatible with receptor binding, but only the Z isomer has an energetically allowed extended conformation that accounts for its observed biological activity relative to DES. PMID:3905370

  10. Phrenic motoneuron expression of serotonergic and glutamatergic receptors following upper cervical spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, Carlos B.; Bailey, Jeffrey P.; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Sieck, Gary C.

    2012-01-01

    Following cervical spinal cord injury at C2 (SH hemisection model) there is progressive recovery of phrenic activity. Neuroplasticity in the postsynaptic expression of neurotransmitter receptors may contribute to functional recovery. Phrenic motoneurons express multiple serotonergic (5-HTR) and glutamatergic (GluR) receptors, but the timing and possible role of these different neurotransmitter receptor subtypes in the neuroplasticity following SH are not clear. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that there is an increased expression of serotonergic and glutamatergic neurotransmitter receptors within phrenic motoneurons after SH. In adult male rats, phrenic motoneurons were labeled retrogradely by intrapleural injection of Alexa 488-conjugated cholera toxin B. In thin (10 μm) frozen sections of the spinal cord, fluorescently-labeled phrenic motoneurons were visualized for laser capture microdissection (LCM). Using quantitative real-time RT-PCR in LCM samples, the time course of changes in 5-HTR and GluR mRNA expression was determined in phrenic motoneurons up to 21 days post-SH. Expression of 5-HTR subtypes 1b, 2a and 2c and GluR subtypes AMPA, NMDA, mGluR1 and mGluR5 was evident in phrenic motoneurons from control and SH rats. Phrenic motoneuron expression of 5-HTR2a increased ~8-fold (relative to control) at 14 days post-SH, whereas NMDA expression increased ~16-fold by 21-days post-SH. There were no other significant changes in receptor expression at any time post-SH. This is the first study to systematically document changes in motoneuron expression of multiple neurotransmitter receptors involved in regulation of motoneuron excitability. By providing information on the neuroplasticity of receptors expressed in a motoneuron pool that is inactivated by a higher-level spinal cord injury, appropriate pharmacological targets can be identified to alter motoneuron excitability. PMID:22227062

  11. Benchmarking the performance of fixed-image receptor digital radiographic systems part 1: a novel method for image quality analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kam L; Ireland, Timothy A; Bernardo, Michael

    2016-06-01

    This is the first part of a two-part study in benchmarking the performance of fixed digital radiographic general X-ray systems. This paper concentrates on reporting findings related to quantitative analysis techniques used to establish comparative image quality metrics. A systematic technical comparison of the evaluated systems is presented in part two of this study. A novel quantitative image quality analysis method is presented with technical considerations addressed for peer review. The novel method was applied to seven general radiographic systems with four different makes of radiographic image receptor (12 image receptors in total). For the System Modulation Transfer Function (sMTF), the use of grid was found to reduce veiling glare and decrease roll-off. The major contributor in sMTF degradation was found to be focal spot blurring. For the System Normalised Noise Power Spectrum (sNNPS), it was found that all systems examined had similar sNNPS responses. A mathematical model is presented to explain how the use of stationary grid may cause a difference between horizontal and vertical sNNPS responses.

  12. Angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) and receptor Mas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villela, Daniel; Leonhardt, Julia; Patel, Neal

    2015-01-01

    The angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) and the receptor Mas are components of the protective arms of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), i.e. they both mediate tissue protective and regenerative actions. The spectrum of actions of these two receptors and their signalling mechanisms display striki...

  13. An in vivo study of the dopaminergic receptors in the brain of man using 11C-pimozide and positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, J.C.; Comar, D.; Crouzel, C.; Mestelan, G.; Zarifian, E.; Loo, H.; Agid, Y.

    1982-09-01

    Positron emission tomography was used to establish the regional cerebral pharmacokinetics of a carbon 11-labelled neuroleptic, pimozide, in an attempt to observe its specific bonding to dopaminergic receptors in vivo. The 11 C-pimozide kinetics were compared in two brain structures at the two ends of the dopaminergic receptor density scale: the striatum and cerebellum, very rich in and devoid of these receptors respectively. In 8 patients a significant radioactivity uptake was observed in the striatum as compared with the cerebellum, in agreement with in vivo studies on animals using tritiated pimozide. In 5 patients pre-treated by a therapeutic dose of a cold neuroleptic (haloperidol) this difference in kinetics no longer existed. Moreover no kinetic difference is observed, either before or after haloperidol administration, between the frontal cortex (relatively low in dopaminergic receptors) and cerebellum. These results strongly suggest that pharmacokinetic phenomena directly related to the specific bonding of 11 C-pimozide on the striatal dopaminergic receptors are observable on man in vivo. This specific bonding however remains quantitatively weak as compared with the strong non-specific bonding

  14. High throughput techniques for discovering new glycine receptor modulators and their binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F Gilbert

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR is a member of the Cys-loop receptor family that mediates inhibitory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. These receptors are emerging as potential drug targets for inflammatory pain, immunomodulation, spasticity and epilepsy. Antagonists that specifically inhibit particular GlyR isoforms are also required as pharmacological probes for elucidating the roles of particular GlyR isoforms in health and disease. Although a substantial number of both positive and negative GlyR modulators have been identified, very few of these are specific for the GlyR over other receptor types. Thus, the potential of known compounds as either therapeutic leads or pharmacological probes is limited. It is therefore surprising that there have been few published studies describing attempts to discover novel GlyR isoform-specific compounds. The first aim of this review is to consider various methods for efficiently screening compounds against these receptors. We conclude that an anion sensitive yellow fluorescent protein is optimal for primary screening and that automated electrophysiology of cells stably expressing GlyRs is useful for confirming hits and quantitating the actions of identified compounds. The second aim of this review is to demonstrate how these techniques are used in our laboratory for the purpose of both discovering novel GlyR-active compounds and characterizing their binding sites. We also describe a reliable, cost effective method for transfecting HEK293 cells in single wells of a 384 well plate using nanogram quantities of cDNA.

  15. Receptor models for source apportionment of remote aerosols in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artaxo Netto, P.E.

    1985-11-01

    The PIXE (particle induced X-ray emission), and PESA (proton elastic scattering analysis) method were used in conjunction with receptor models for source apportionment of remote aerosols in Brazil. The PIXE used in the determination of concentration for elements with Z >- 11, has a detection limit of about 1 ng/m 3 . The concentrations of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen in the fine fraction of Amazon Basin aerosols was measured by PESA. We sampled in Jureia (SP), Fernando de Noronha, Arembepe (BA), Firminopolis (GO), Itaberai (GO) and Amazon Basin. For collecting the airbone particles we used cascade impactors, stacked filter units, and streaker samplers. Three receptor models were used: chemical mass balance, stepwise multiple regression analysis and principal factor analysis. The elemental and gravimetric concentrations were explained by the models within the experimental errors. Three sources of aerosol were quantitatively distinguished: marine aerosol, soil dust and aerosols related to forests. The emission of aerosols by vegetation is very clear for all the sampling sites. In Amazon Basin and Jureia it is the major source, responsible for 60 to 80% of airborne concentrations. (Author) [pt

  16. Suppression of Human Liver Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion via the GABAA Receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhi-ao; Bao, Mei-yan; Xu, Yong-fen; Zha, Ruo-peng; Shi, Hai-bing; Chen, Tao-yang; He, Xiang-huo

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the roles of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and to explore the potential of a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of HCC. The expression levels of GABA receptor subunit genes in various HCC cell lines and patients‘ tissues were detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Transwell cell migration and invasion assays were carried out for functional analysis. The effects of GABA on liver cancer cell cytoskeletal were determined by immunofluorescence staining. And the effects of GABA on HCC metastasis in nude mice were evaluated using an in vivo orthotopic model of liver cancer. The mRNA level of GABA receptor subunits varied between the primary hepatocellular carcinoma tissue and the adjacent non-tumor liver tissue. GABA inhibited human liver cancer cell migration and invasion via the ionotropic GABA A receptor as a result of the induction of liver cancer cell cytoskeletal reorganization. Pretreatment with GABA also significantly reduced intrahepatic liver metastasis and primary tumor formation in vivo. These findings introduce a potential and novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer patients based on the modulation of the GABAergic system

  17. A search for presynaptic inhibitory histamine receptors in guinea-pig tissues: Further H3 receptors but no evidence for H4 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, Doris; Schlicker, Eberhard

    2016-07-01

    The histamine H4 receptor is coupled to Gi/o proteins and expressed on inflammatory cells and lymphoid tissues; it was suggested that this receptor also occurs in the brain or on peripheral neurones. Since many Gi/o protein-coupled receptors, including the H3 receptor, serve as presynaptic inhibitory receptors, we studied whether the sympathetic neurones supplying four peripheral tissues and the cholinergic neurones in the hippocampus from the guinea-pig are equipped with release-modulating H4 and H3 receptors. For this purpose, we preincubated tissue pieces from the aorta, atrium, renal cortex and vas deferens with (3)H-noradrenaline and hippocampal slices with (3)H-choline and determined the electrically evoked tritium overflow. The stimulation-evoked overflow in the five superfused tissues was inhibited by the muscarinic receptor agonist oxotremorine, which served as a positive control, but not affected by the H4 receptor agonist 4-methylhistamine. The H3 receptor agonist R-α-methylhistamine inhibited noradrenaline release in the peripheral tissues without affecting acetylcholine release in the hippocampal slices. Thioperamide shifted the concentration-response curve of histamine in the aorta and the renal cortex to the right, yielding apparent pA2 values of 8.0 and 8.1, respectively, which are close to its affinity at other H3 receptors but higher by one log unit than its pKi at the H4 receptor of the guinea-pig. In conclusion, histamine H4 receptors could not be identified in five experimental models of the guinea-pig that are suited for the detection of presynaptic inhibitory receptors whereas H3 receptors could be shown in the peripheral tissues but not in the hippocampus. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Challenges predicting ligand-receptor interactions of promiscuous proteins: the nuclear receptor PXR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Ekins

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional regulation of some genes involved in xenobiotic detoxification and apoptosis is performed via the human pregnane X receptor (PXR which in turn is activated by structurally diverse agonists including steroid hormones. Activation of PXR has the potential to initiate adverse effects, altering drug pharmacokinetics or perturbing physiological processes. Reliable computational prediction of PXR agonists would be valuable for pharmaceutical and toxicological research. There has been limited success with structure-based modeling approaches to predict human PXR activators. Slightly better success has been achieved with ligand-based modeling methods including quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR analysis, pharmacophore modeling and machine learning. In this study, we present a comprehensive analysis focused on prediction of 115 steroids for ligand binding activity towards human PXR. Six crystal structures were used as templates for docking and ligand-based modeling approaches (two-, three-, four- and five-dimensional analyses. The best success at external prediction was achieved with 5D-QSAR. Bayesian models with FCFP_6 descriptors were validated after leaving a large percentage of the dataset out and using an external test set. Docking of ligands to the PXR structure co-crystallized with hyperforin had the best statistics for this method. Sulfated steroids (which are activators were consistently predicted as non-activators while, poorly predicted steroids were docked in a reverse mode compared to 5alpha-androstan-3beta-ol. Modeling of human PXR represents a complex challenge by virtue of the large, flexible ligand-binding cavity. This study emphasizes this aspect, illustrating modest success using the largest quantitative data set to date and multiple modeling approaches.

  19. In LDL receptor-deficient mice, catabolism of remnant lipoproteins requires a high level of apoE but is inhibited by excess apoE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, K.W. van; Vlijmen, B.J.M. van; Hof, H.B. van 't; Zee, A. van der; Santamarina-Fojo, S.; Berkel, T.J.C. van; Havekes, L.M.; Hofker, M.H.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the quantitative requirement for apolipoprotein (apo) E in the clearance of lipoproteins via the non-low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor mediated pathway, human APOE was overexpressed at various levels in the livers of mice deficient for both the endogenous Apoe and Ldlr genes

  20. Clinical Usefulness of a One-Tube Nested Reverse Transcription Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for Evaluating Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 mRNA Overexpression in Formalin-Fixed and Paraffin-Embedded Breast Cancer Tissue Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hye-Young; Ahn, Sungwoo; Park, Sunyoung; Kim, SeungIl; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2017-01-01

    Currently, the two main methods used to analyze human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) amplification or overexpression have a limited accuracy and high costs. These limitations can be overcome by the development of complementary quantitative methods. In this study, we analyzed HER2 mRNA expression in clinical formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples using a one-tube nested reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assay. We measured expression relative to 3 reference genes and compared the results to those obtained by conventional immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assays with 226 FFPE breast cancer tissue samples. The one-tube nested RT-qPCR assay proved to be highly sensitive and specific based on comparisons with IHC (96.9 and 97.7%, respectively) and FISH (92.4 and 92.9%, respectively) obtained with the validation set. Comparisons with clinicopathological data revealed significant associations between HER2 overexpression and TNM stage (p < 0.01), histological type (p < 0.01), ER status (p < 0.001), PR status (p < 0.05), HER2 status (p < 0.001), and molecular subtypes (p < 0.001). Based on these findings, our one-tube nested RT-qPCR assay is a potentially useful and complementary screening tool for the detection of HER2 mRNA overexpression. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Real-Time G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Imaging to Understand and Quantify Receptor Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María S. Aymerich

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the trafficking of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs and their regulation by agonists and antagonists is fundamental to develop more effective drugs. Optical methods using fluorescent-tagged receptors and spinning disk confocal microscopy are useful tools to investigate membrane receptor dynamics in living cells. The aim of this study was to develop a method to characterize receptor dynamics using this system which offers the advantage of very fast image acquisition with minimal cell perturbation. However, in short-term assays photobleaching was still a problem. Thus, we developed a procedure to perform a photobleaching-corrected image analysis. A study of short-term dynamics of the long isoform of the dopamine type 2 receptor revealed an agonist-induced increase in the mobile fraction of receptors with a rate of movement of 0.08 μm/s For long-term assays, the ratio between the relative fluorescence intensity at the cell surface versus that in the intracellular compartment indicated that receptor internalization only occurred in cells co-expressing G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2. These results indicate that the lateral movement of receptors and receptor internalization are not directly coupled. Thus, we believe that live imaging of GPCRs using spinning disk confocal image analysis constitutes a powerful tool to study of receptor dynamics.

  2. Expression of fatty acid sensing G-protein coupled receptors in peripartal Holstein cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Alea; Alharthi, Abdulrahman; Vailati-Riboni, Mario; Zhou, Zheng; Loor, Juan J

    2017-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR), also referred as Free Fatty Acid Receptors (FFAR), are widely studied within human medicine as drug targets for metabolic disorders. To combat metabolic disorders prevalent in dairy cows during the transition period, which co-occur with negative energy balance and changes to lipid and glucose metabolism, it may be helpful to identify locations and roles of FFAR and other members of the GPCR family in bovine tissues. Quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR) of subcutaneous adipose, liver, and PMNL samples during the transition period (-10, +7, and +20 or +30 d) were used for expression profiling of medium- (MCFA) and long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) receptors GPR120 and GPR40 , MCFA receptor GPR84 , and niacin receptor HCAR2/3 . Adipose samples were obtained from cows with either high (HI; BCS ≥ 3.75) or low (LO; BCS ≤ 3.25) body condition score (BCS) to examine whether FFAR expression is correlated with this indicator of health and body reserves. Supplementation of rumen-protected methionine (MET), which may improve immune function and production postpartum, was also compared with unsupplemented control (CON) cows for liver and blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) samples. In adipose tissue, GPR84 and GPR120 were differentially expressed over time, while GPR40 was not expressed; in PMNL, GPR40 was differentially expressed over time and between MET vs. CON, GPR84 expression differed only between dietary groups, and GPR120 was not expressed; in liver, GPCR were either not expressed or barely detectable. The data indicate that there is likely not a direct role in liver for the selected GPCR during the transition period, but they do play variable roles in adipose and PMN. In future, these receptors may prove useful targets and/or markers for peripartal metabolism and immunity.

  3. Differential association of GABAB receptors with their effector ion channels in Purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luján, Rafael; Aguado, Carolina; Ciruela, Francisco; Cózar, Javier; Kleindienst, David; de la Ossa, Luis; Bettler, Bernhard; Wickman, Kevin; Watanabe, Masahiko; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yugo

    2018-04-01

    Metabotropic GABA B receptors mediate slow inhibitory effects presynaptically and postsynaptically through the modulation of different effector signalling pathways. Here, we analysed the distribution of GABA B receptors using highly sensitive SDS-digested freeze-fracture replica labelling in mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells. Immunoreactivity for GABA B1 was observed on presynaptic and, more abundantly, on postsynaptic compartments, showing both scattered and clustered distribution patterns. Quantitative analysis of immunoparticles revealed a somato-dendritic gradient, with the density of immunoparticles increasing 26-fold from somata to dendritic spines. To understand the spatial relationship of GABA B receptors with two key effector ion channels, the G protein-gated inwardly rectifying K + (GIRK/Kir3) channel and the voltage-dependent Ca 2+ channel, biochemical and immunohistochemical approaches were performed. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that GABA B receptors co-assembled with GIRK and Ca V 2.1 channels in the cerebellum. Using double-labelling immunoelectron microscopic techniques, co-clustering between GABA B1 and GIRK2 was detected in dendritic spines, whereas they were mainly segregated in the dendritic shafts. In contrast, co-clustering of GABA B1 and Ca V 2.1 was detected in dendritic shafts but not spines. Presynaptically, although no significant co-clustering of GABA B1 and GIRK2 or Ca V 2.1 channels was detected, inter-cluster distance for GABA B1 and GIRK2 was significantly smaller in the active zone than in the dendritic shafts, and that for GABA B1 and Ca V 2.1 was significantly smaller in the active zone than in the dendritic shafts and spines. Thus, GABA B receptors are associated with GIRK and Ca V 2.1 channels in different subcellular compartments. These data provide a better framework for understanding the different roles played by GABA B receptors and their effector ion channels in the cerebellar network.

  4. Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis: case series and analysis of the effects of antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmau, Josep; Gleichman, Amy J; Hughes, Ethan G; Rossi, Jeffrey E; Peng, Xiaoyu; Lai, Meizan; Dessain, Scott K; Rosenfeld, Myrna R; Balice-Gordon, Rita; Lynch, David R

    2008-12-01

    A severe form of encephalitis associated with antibodies against NR1-NR2 heteromers of the NMDA receptor was recently identified. We aimed to analyse the clinical and immunological features of patients with the disorder and examine the effects of antibodies against NMDA receptors in neuronal cultures. We describe the clinical characteristics of 100 patients with encephalitis and NR1-NR2 antibodies. HEK293 cells ectopically expressing single or assembled NR1-NR2 subunits were used to determine the epitope targeted by the antibodies. Antibody titres were measured with ELISA. The effect of antibodies on neuronal cultures was determined by quantitative analysis of NMDA-receptor clusters. Median age of patients was 23 years (range 5-76 years); 91 were women. All patients presented with psychiatric symptoms or memory problems; 76 had seizures, 88 unresponsiveness (decreased consciousness), 86 dyskinesias, 69 autonomic instability, and 66 hypoventilation. 58 (59%) of 98 patients for whom results of oncological assessments were available had tumours, most commonly ovarian teratoma. Patients who received early tumour treatment (usually with immunotherapy) had better outcome (p=0.004) and fewer neurological relapses (p=0.009) than the rest of the patients. 75 patients recovered or had mild deficits and 25 had severe deficits or died. Improvement was associated with a decrease of serum antibody titres. The main epitope targeted by the antibodies is in the extracellular N-terminal domain of the NR1 subunit. Patients' antibodies decreased the numbers of cell-surface NMDA receptors and NMDA-receptor clusters in postsynaptic dendrites, an effect that could be reversed by antibody removal. A well-defined set of clinical characteristics are associated with anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis. The pathogenesis of the disorder seems to be mediated by antibodies.

  5. Laminar and Cellular Distribution of Monoamine Receptors in Rat Medial Prefrontal Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemí Santana

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The prefrontal cortex (PFC is deeply involved in higher brain functions, many of which are altered in psychiatric conditions. The PFC exerts a top-down control of most cortical and subcortical areas through descending pathways and is densely innervated by axons emerging from the brainstem monoamine cell groups, namely, the dorsal and median raphe nuclei (DR and MnR, respectively, the ventral tegmental area and the locus coeruleus (LC. In turn, the activity of these cell groups is tightly controlled by afferent pathways arising from layer V PFC pyramidal neurons. The reciprocal connectivity between PFC and monoamine cell groups is of interest to study the pathophysiology and treatment of severe psychiatric disorders, such as major depression and schizophrenia, inasmuch as antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs target monoamine receptors/transporters expressed in these areas. Here we review previous reports examining the presence of monoamine receptors in pyramidal and GABAergic neurons of the PFC using double in situ hybridization. Additionally, we present new data on the quantitative layer distribution (layers I, II–III, V, and VI of monoamine receptor-expressing cells in the cingulate (Cg, prelimbic (PrL and infralimbic (IL subfields of the medial PFC (mPFC. The receptors examined include serotonin 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C, and 5-HT3, dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, and α1A-, α1B-, and α1D-adrenoceptors. With the exception of 5-HT3 receptors, selectively expressed by layers I–III GABA interneurons, the rest of monoamine receptors are widely expressed by pyramidal and GABAergic neurons in intermediate and deep layers of mPFC (5-HT2C receptors are also expressed in layer I. This complex distribution suggests that monoamines may modulate the communications between PFC and cortical/subcortical areas through the activation of receptors expressed by neurons in intermediate (e.g., 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, α1D-adrenoceptors, dopamine D1 receptors and deep

  6. Knock-In Mice with NOP-eGFP Receptors Identify Receptor Cellular and Regional Localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Akihiko; Brunori, Gloria; Mercatelli, Daniela; Wu, Jinhua; Cippitelli, Andrea; Zou, Bende; Xie, Xinmin Simon; Williams, Melissa; Zaveri, Nurulain T; Low, Sarah; Scherrer, Grégory; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Toll, Lawrence

    2015-08-19

    The nociceptin/orphanin FQ (NOP) receptor, the fourth member of the opioid receptor family, is involved in many processes common to the opioid receptors including pain and drug abuse. To better characterize receptor location and trafficking, knock-in mice were created by inserting the gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) into the NOP receptor gene (Oprl1) and producing mice expressing a functional NOP-eGFP C-terminal fusion in place of the native NOP receptor. The NOP-eGFP receptor was present in brain of homozygous knock-in animals in concentrations somewhat higher than in wild-type mice and was functional when tested for stimulation of [(35)S]GTPγS binding in vitro and in patch-clamp electrophysiology in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and hippocampal slices. Inhibition of morphine analgesia was equivalent when tested in knock-in and wild-type mice. Imaging revealed detailed neuroanatomy in brain, spinal cord, and DRG and was generally consistent with in vitro autoradiographic imaging of receptor location. Multicolor immunohistochemistry identified cells coexpressing various spinal cord and DRG cellular markers, as well as coexpression with μ-opioid receptors in DRG and brain regions. Both in tissue slices and primary cultures, the NOP-eGFP receptors appear throughout the cell body and in processes. These knock-in mice have NOP receptors that function both in vitro and in vivo and appear to be an exceptional tool to study receptor neuroanatomy and correlate with NOP receptor function. The NOP receptor, the fourth member of the opioid receptor family, is involved in pain, drug abuse, and a number of other CNS processes. The regional and cellular distribution has been difficult to determine due to lack of validated antibodies for immunohistochemical analysis. To provide a new tool for the investigation of receptor localization, we have produced knock-in mice with a fluorescent-tagged NOP receptor in place of the native NOP receptor. These

  7. Ligand-receptor assay for evaluation of functional activity of human recombinant VEGF and VEGFR-1 extracellular fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopol'd, A V; Baklaushev, V P; Korchagina, A A; Shein, S A; Grinenko, N F; Pavlov, K A; Ryabukhin, I A; Chekhonin, V P

    2012-04-01

    cDNA encoding VEGF and Ig-like extracellular domains 2-4 of VEGFR-1 (sFlt-1(2-4)) were cloned into prokaryotic expression vectors pET32a and pQE60. Recombinant proteins were purified (metal affinity chromatography) and renatured. Chemiluminescent study for the interaction of recombinant VEGF and sFlt-1(2-4) showed that biotinylated VEGF specifically binds to the polystyrene-immobilized receptor extracellular fragment. Biotinylated recombinant sFlt-1 interacts with immobilized VEGF. Analysis of the interaction of immobilized recombinant VEGFR-1 and VEGF with C6 glioma cells labeled with CFDA-SE (vital fluorescent dye) showed that recombinant VEGFR-1 also binds to native membrane-associated VEGF. Recombinant VEGF was shown to bind to specific receptors expressed on the surface of C6 glioma cells. Functional activity of these proteins was confirmed by ligand-receptor assay for VEGF and VEGFR-1 (sFlt-1) and quantitative chemiluminescent detection.

  8. Reliable PCR quantitation of estrogen, progesterone and ERBB2 receptor mRNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue is independent of prior macro-dissection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tramm, Trine; Hennig, Guido; Kyndi, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression analysis on messenger RNA (mRNA) purified from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue is increasingly used for research purposes. Tissue heterogeneity may question specificity and interpretation of results from mRNA isolated from a whole slide section, and thresholds for minimal...... tumor content in the paraffin block or macrodissection are used to avoid contamination from non-neoplastic tissue. The aim was to test if mRNA from tissue surrounding breast cancer affected quantification of estrogen receptor α (ESR1), progesterone receptor (PGR) and human epidermal growth factor...... receptor 2 (ERBB2), by comparing gene expression from whole slide and tumor-enriched sections, and correlating gene expression from whole slide sections with corresponding immunohistochemistry. Gene expression, based on mRNA extracted from a training set (36 paraffin blocks) and two validation sets (133...

  9. Molecular cloning and tissue distribution of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARα) and gamma (PPARγ) in the pigeon (Columba livia domestica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, P; Yuan, C; Wang, C; Zou, X-T; Po, Z; Tong, H-B; Zou, J-M

    2014-01-01

    1. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) are involved in lipid metabolism through transcriptional regulation of target gene expression. The objective of the current study was to clone and characterise the PPARα and PPARγ genes in pigeon. 2. The full-length of 1941-bp PPARα and 1653-bp PPARγ were cloned from pigeons. The two genes were predicted to encode 468 and 475 amino acids, respectively. Both proteins contained two C4-type zinc fingers, a nuclear hormone receptor DNA-binding region signature and a HOLI domain (ligand binding domain of hormone receptors), and had high identities with other corresponding avian genes. 3. Using quantitative real-time PCR, pigeon PPARα gene expression was shown to be high in kidney, liver, gizzard and duodenum whereas PPARγ was predominantly expressed in adipose tissue.

  10. Quantitation: clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, K.E.

    1982-01-01

    Single photon emission tomography may be used quantitatively if its limitations are recognized and quantitation is made in relation to some reference area on the image. Relative quantitation is discussed in outline in relation to the liver, brain and pituitary, thyroid, adrenals, and heart. (U.K.)

  11. The relationship between quantitative human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 gene expression by the 21-gene reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay and adjuvant trastuzumab benefit in Alliance N9831.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Edith A; Baehner, Frederick L; Butler, Steven M; Thompson, E Aubrey; Dueck, Amylou C; Jamshidian, Farid; Cherbavaz, Diana; Yoshizawa, Carl; Shak, Steven; Kaufman, Peter A; Davidson, Nancy E; Gralow, Julie; Asmann, Yan W; Ballman, Karla V

    2015-10-01

    The N9831 trial demonstrated the efficacy of adjuvant trastuzumab for patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) locally positive tumors by protein or gene analysis. We used the 21-gene assay to examine the association of quantitative HER2 messenger RNA (mRNA) gene expression and benefit from trastuzumab. N9831 tested the addition of trastuzumab to chemotherapy in stage I-III HER2-positive breast cancer. For two of the arms of the trial, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by paclitaxel (AC-T) and doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by paclitaxel and trastuzumab concurrent chemotherapy-trastuzumab (AC-TH), recurrence score (RS) and HER2 mRNA expression were determined by the 21-gene assay (Oncotype DX®) (negative 10 % positive cells = positive), 91 % for RT-PCR versus central fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) (≥2.0 = positive) and 94 % for central IHC versus central FISH. In the primary analysis, the association of HER2 expression by 21-gene assay with trastuzumab benefit was marginally nonsignificant (nonlinear p = 0.057). In hormone receptor-positive patients (local IHC) the association was significant (p = 0.002). The association was nonlinear with the greatest estimated benefit at lower and higher HER2 expression levels. Concordance among HER2 assessments by central IHC, FISH, and RT-PCR were similar and high. Association of HER2 mRNA expression with trastuzumab benefit as measured by time to distant recurrence was nonsignificant. A consistent benefit of trastuzumab irrespective of mHER2 levels was observed in patients with either IHC-positive or FISH-positive tumors. Trend for benefit was observed also for the small groups of patients with negative results by any or all of the central assays. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00005970 . Registered 5 July 2000.

  12. Organophosphorus pesticides decrease M2 muscarinic receptor function in guinea pig airway nerves via indirect mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becky J Proskocil

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies link organophosphorus pesticide (OP exposures to asthma, and we have shown that the OPs chlorpyrifos, diazinon and parathion cause airway hyperreactivity in guinea pigs 24 hr after a single subcutaneous injection. OP-induced airway hyperreactivity involves M2 muscarinic receptor dysfunction on airway nerves independent of acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibition, but how OPs inhibit neuronal M2 receptors in airways is not known. In the central nervous system, OPs interact directly with neurons to alter muscarinic receptor function or expression; therefore, in this study we tested whether the OP parathion or its oxon metabolite, paraoxon, might decrease M2 receptor function on peripheral neurons via similar direct mechanisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Intravenous administration of paraoxon, but not parathion, caused acute frequency-dependent potentiation of vagally-induced bronchoconstriction and increased electrical field stimulation (EFS-induced contractions in isolated trachea independent of AChE inhibition. However, paraoxon had no effect on vagally-induced bradycardia in intact guinea pigs or EFS-induced contractions in isolated ileum, suggesting mechanisms other than pharmacologic antagonism of M2 receptors. Paraoxon did not alter M2 receptor expression in cultured cells at the mRNA or protein level as determined by quantitative RT-PCR and radio-ligand binding assays, respectively. Additionally, a biotin-labeled fluorophosphonate, which was used as a probe to identify molecular targets phosphorylated by OPs, did not phosphorylate proteins in guinea pig cardiac membranes that were recognized by M2 receptor antibodies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that neither direct pharmacologic antagonism nor downregulated expression of M2 receptors contributes to OP inhibition of M2 function in airway nerves, adding to the growing evidence of non-cholinergic mechanisms of OP neurotoxicity.

  13. Calcitonin and calcitonin receptor-like receptors: common themes with family B GPCRs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwell, James; Gingell, Joseph J; Watkins, Harriet A; Archbold, Julia K; Poyner, David R; Hay, Debbie L

    2012-05-01

    The calcitonin receptor (CTR) and calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) are two of the 15 human family B (or Secretin-like) GPCRs. CTR and CLR are of considerable biological interest as their pharmacology is moulded by interactions with receptor activity-modifying proteins. They also have therapeutic relevance for many conditions, such as osteoporosis, diabetes, obesity, lymphatic insufficiency, migraine and cardiovascular disease. In light of recent advances in understanding ligand docking and receptor activation in both the family as a whole and in CLR and CTR specifically, this review reflects how applicable general family B GPCR themes are to these two idiosyncratic receptors. We review the main functional domains of the receptors; the N-terminal extracellular domain, the juxtamembrane domain and ligand interface, the transmembrane domain and the intracellular C-terminal domain. Structural and functional findings from the CLR and CTR along with other family B GPCRs are critically appraised to gain insight into how these domains may function. The ability for CTR and CLR to interact with receptor activity-modifying proteins adds another level of sophistication to these receptor systems but means careful consideration is needed when trying to apply generic GPCR principles. This review encapsulates current thinking in the realm of family B GPCR research by highlighting both conflicting and recurring themes and how such findings relate to two unusual but important receptors, CTR and CLR. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  14. The quantitative Morse theorem

    OpenAIRE

    Loi, Ta Le; Phien, Phan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we give a proof of the quantitative Morse theorem stated by {Y. Yomdin} in \\cite{Y1}. The proof is based on the quantitative Sard theorem, the quantitative inverse function theorem and the quantitative Morse lemma.

  15. Tachykinin NK2 receptor and functional mechanisms in human colon: changes with indomethacin and in diverticular disease and ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcher, Elizabeth; Shang, Fei; Warner, Fiona J; Du, Qin; Lubowski, David Z; King, Denis W; Liu, Lu

    2008-01-01

    Neurokinin A (NKA) is an important spasmogen in human colon. We examined inflammatory disease-related changes in the tachykinin NK(2) receptor system in human sigmoid colon circular muscle, using functional, radioligand binding, and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction methods. In circular muscle strips, indomethacin enhanced contractile responses to NKA (p diverticular disease (DD) specimens, indicating NK(2) receptor-mediated release of relaxant prostanoids. Contractile responses to both tachykinins were reduced in strips from DD (p disease patients, demonstrating that the change in responsiveness to tachykinins in disease is specifically mediated by the NK(2) receptor. In membranes from UC specimens, receptor affinity for (125)I-NKA (median K(D) 0.91 nM, n = 16) was lower (p disease-related changes in receptor number (B(max)) were found (mean, 2.0-2.5 fmol/mg of wet weight tissue), suggesting that the reduced contractile responses in disease are not due to a loss of receptor number. Different mechanisms may account for the reduced contractility in DD compared with UC. A gender-related difference in receptor density was seen in controls, with B(max) lower in females (1.77 fmol/mg, n = 15) than in males (2.60 fmol/mg, n = 25, p = 0.01). In contrast, no gender-related differences were seen in NK(2) receptor mRNA in control colonic muscle, indicating that the gender difference is a post-translational event.

  16. Molecular modeling of ligand-receptor interactions in the OR5 olfactory receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, M S; Shepherd, G M

    1994-06-02

    Olfactory receptors belong to the superfamily of seven transmembrane domain, G protein-coupled receptors. In order to begin analysis of mechanisms of receptor activation, a computer model of the OR5 olfactory receptor has been constructed and compared with other members of this superfamily. We have tested docking of the odor molecule lyral, which is known to activate the OR5 receptor. The results point to specific ligand-binding residues on helices III through VII that form a binding pocket in the receptor. Some of these residues occupy sequence positions identical to ligand-binding residues conserved among other superfamily members. The results provide new insights into possible molecular mechanisms of odor recognition and suggest hypotheses to guide future experimental studies using site-directed mutagenesis.

  17. Fluorescence lifetime FRET imaging of receptor-ligand complexes in tumor cells in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudkouskaya, Alena; Sinsuebphon, Nattawut; Intes, Xavier; Mazurkiewicz, Joseph E.; Barroso, Margarida

    2017-02-01

    To guide the development of targeted therapies with improved efficacy and accelerated clinical acceptance, novel imaging methodologies need to be established. Toward this goal, fluorescence lifetime Förster resonance energy transfer (FLIM-FRET) imaging assays capitalize on the ability of antibodies or protein ligands to bind dimerized membrane bound receptors to measure their target engagement levels in cancer cells. Conventional FLIM FRET microscopy has been widely applied at visible wavelengths to detect protein-protein interactions in vitro. However, operation at these wavelengths restricts imaging quality and ability to quantitate lifetime changes in in vivo small animal optical imaging due to high auto-fluorescence and light scattering. Here, we have analyzed the uptake of iron-bound transferrin (Tf) probes into human breast cancer cells using FLIM-FRET microscopy in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) range. The development of NIR FLIM FRET microscopy allows for the use of quantitative lifetime-based molecular assays to measure drug-target engagement levels at multiple scales: from in vitro microscopy to in vivo small animal optical imaging (macroscopy). This novel approach can be extended to other receptors, currently targeted in oncology. Hence, lifetime-based molecular imaging can find numerous applications in drug delivery and targeted therapy assessment and optimization.

  18. Receptor downregulation and desensitization enhance the information processing ability of signalling receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resat Haluk

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to initiating signaling events, the activation of cell surface receptors also triggers regulatory processes that restrict the duration of signaling. Acute attenuation of signaling can be accomplished either via ligand-induced internalization of receptors (endocytic downregulation or via ligand-induced receptor desensitization. These phenomena have traditionally been viewed in the context of adaptation wherein the receptor system enters a refractory state in the presence of sustained ligand stimuli and thereby prevents the cell from over-responding to the ligand. Here we use the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR as model systems to respectively examine the effects of downregulation and desensitization on the ability of signaling receptors to decode time-varying ligand stimuli. Results Using a mathematical model, we show that downregulation and desensitization mechanisms can lead to tight and efficient input-output coupling thereby ensuring synchronous processing of ligand inputs. Frequency response analysis indicates that upstream elements of the EGFR and GPCR networks behave like low-pass filters with the system being able to faithfully transduce inputs below a critical frequency. Receptor downregulation and desensitization increase the filter bandwidth thereby enabling the receptor systems to decode inputs in a wider frequency range. Further, system-theoretic analysis reveals that the receptor systems are analogous to classical mechanical over-damped systems. This analogy enables us to metaphorically describe downregulation and desensitization as phenomena that make the systems more resilient in responding to ligand perturbations thereby improving the stability of the system resting state. Conclusion Our findings suggest that in addition to serving as mechanisms for adaptation, receptor downregulation and desensitization can play a critical role in temporal information

  19. Modulating Estrogen Receptor-related Receptor-α Activity Inhibits Cell Proliferation*

    OpenAIRE

    Bianco, Stéphanie; Lanvin, Olivia; Tribollet, Violaine; Macari, Claire; North, Sophie; Vanacker, Jean-Marc

    2009-01-01

    High expression of the estrogen receptor-related receptor (ERR)-α in human tumors is correlated to a poor prognosis, suggesting an involvement of the receptor in cell proliferation. In this study, we show that a synthetic compound (XCT790) that modulates the activity of ERRα reduces the proliferation of various cell lines and blocks the G1/S transition of the cell cycle in an ERR...

  20. Receptor binding properties and antinociceptive effects of chimeric peptides consisting of a micro-opioid receptor agonist and an ORL1 receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Susumu; Ito, Risa; Nishiyama, Miharu; Kubo, Mai; Matsushima, Tomoko; Minamisawa, Motoko; Ambo, Akihiro; Sasaki, Yusuke

    2007-07-01

    Receptor binding properties and antinociceptive activities of chimeric peptides linked by spacers were investigated. The peptides consisted of the micro-opioid receptor ligand dermorphin (Tyr-D-Ala-Phe-Gly-Tyr-Pro-Ser-NH(2)) or its analog YRFB (Tyr-D-Arg-Phe-betaAla-NH(2)) linked to the ORL1 receptor ligand Ac-Arg-Tyr-Tyr-Arg-Ile-Lys-NH(2) (Ac-RYYRIK-NH(2)). All chimeric peptides were found to possess high receptor binding affinities for both micro-opioid and ORL1 receptors in mouse brain membranes although their binding affinities for both receptors in spinal membranes were significantly lower. Among them, chimeric peptide 2, which consists of dermorphin and Ac-RYYRIK-NH(2) connected by a long spacer, had the highest binding affinity towards both receptors. In the tail-flick test following intrathecal (i.t.) administration to mice, all chimeric peptides showed potent and dose-dependent antinociceptive activities with an ED(50) of 1.34-4.51 (pmol/mouse), nearly comparable to dermorphin alone (ED(50); 1.08 pmol/mouse). In contrast to their micro-opioid receptor binding profiles, intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of the chimeric peptides resulted in much less potent antinociceptive activity (ED(50) 5.55-100peptides, and the regulation of mu-opioid receptor-mediated antinociception in brain. The present chimeric peptides may be useful as pharmacological tools for studies on micro-opioid receptor/ORL1 receptor heterodimers.

  1. Glutamate receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogensen, Stine Byskov; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Bunch, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    The neurotransmitter (S)-glutamate [(S)-Glu] is responsible for most of the excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. The effect of (S)-Glu is mediated by both ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. Glutamate receptor agonists are generally a-amino acids with one or more...... stereogenic centers due to strict requirements in the agonist binding pocket of the activated state of the receptor. By contrast, there are many examples of achiral competitive antagonists. The present review addresses how stereochemistry affects the activity of glutamate receptor ligands. The review focuses...... mainly on agonists and discusses stereochemical and conformational considerations as well as biostructural knowledge of the agonist binding pockets, which is useful in the design of glutamate receptor agonists. Examples are chosen to demonstrate how stereochemistry not only determines how the agonist...

  2. Inhibitory effects of azole-type fungicides on interleukin-17 gene expression via retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors α and γ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Hiroyuki, E-mail: kojima@iph.pref.hokkaido.jp [Hokkaido Institute of Public Health, Kita-19, Nishi-12, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0819 (Japan); Muromoto, Ryuta; Takahashi, Miki [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita-12, Nishi-6, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan); Takeuchi, Shinji [Hokkaido Institute of Public Health, Kita-19, Nishi-12, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0819 (Japan); Takeda, Yukimasa; Jetten, Anton M. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Matsuda, Tadashi [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita-12, Nishi-6, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    The retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors α and γ (RORα and RORγ), are key regulators of helper T (Th)17 cell differentiation, which is involved in the innate immune system and autoimmune disorders. However, it remains unclear whether environmental chemicals, including pesticides, have agonistic and/or antagonistic activity against RORα/γ. In this study, we investigated the RORα/γ activity of several azole-type fungicides, and the effects of these fungicides on the gene expression of interleukin (IL)-17, which mediates the function of Th17 cells. In the ROR-reporter gene assays, five azole-type fungicides (imibenconazole, triflumizole, hexaconazole, tetraconazole and imazalil) suppressed RORα- and/or RORγ-mediated transcriptional activity as did benzenesulphonamide T0901317, a ROR inverse agonist and a liver X receptor (LXR) agonist. In particular, imibenconazole, triflumizole and hexaconazole showed RORγ inverse agonistic activity at concentrations of 10{sup −6} M. However, unlike T0901317, these fungicides failed to show any LXRα/β agonistic activity. Next, five azole-type fungicides, showing ROR inverse agonist activity, were tested on IL-17 mRNA expression in mouse T lymphoma EL4 cells treated with phorbol myristate acetate and ionomycin. The quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that these fungicides suppressed the expression of IL-17 mRNA without effecting RORα and RORγ mRNA levels. In addition, the inhibitory effect of imibenconazole as well as that of T0901317 was absorbed in RORα/γ-knocked down EL4 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that some azole-type fungicides inhibit IL-17 production via RORα/γ. This also provides the first evidence that environmental chemicals can act as modulators of IL-17 expression in immune cells. -- Highlights: ► Nuclear receptors, RORα and RORγ, are key regulators of Th17 cell differentiation. ► Five azole-type fungicides act as RORα/γ inverse agonists. ► These fungicides

  3. Inhibitory effects of azole-type fungicides on interleukin-17 gene expression via retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors α and γ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Hiroyuki; Muromoto, Ryuta; Takahashi, Miki; Takeuchi, Shinji; Takeda, Yukimasa; Jetten, Anton M.; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    The retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors α and γ (RORα and RORγ), are key regulators of helper T (Th)17 cell differentiation, which is involved in the innate immune system and autoimmune disorders. However, it remains unclear whether environmental chemicals, including pesticides, have agonistic and/or antagonistic activity against RORα/γ. In this study, we investigated the RORα/γ activity of several azole-type fungicides, and the effects of these fungicides on the gene expression of interleukin (IL)-17, which mediates the function of Th17 cells. In the ROR-reporter gene assays, five azole-type fungicides (imibenconazole, triflumizole, hexaconazole, tetraconazole and imazalil) suppressed RORα- and/or RORγ-mediated transcriptional activity as did benzenesulphonamide T0901317, a ROR inverse agonist and a liver X receptor (LXR) agonist. In particular, imibenconazole, triflumizole and hexaconazole showed RORγ inverse agonistic activity at concentrations of 10 −6 M. However, unlike T0901317, these fungicides failed to show any LXRα/β agonistic activity. Next, five azole-type fungicides, showing ROR inverse agonist activity, were tested on IL-17 mRNA expression in mouse T lymphoma EL4 cells treated with phorbol myristate acetate and ionomycin. The quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that these fungicides suppressed the expression of IL-17 mRNA without effecting RORα and RORγ mRNA levels. In addition, the inhibitory effect of imibenconazole as well as that of T0901317 was absorbed in RORα/γ-knocked down EL4 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that some azole-type fungicides inhibit IL-17 production via RORα/γ. This also provides the first evidence that environmental chemicals can act as modulators of IL-17 expression in immune cells. -- Highlights: ► Nuclear receptors, RORα and RORγ, are key regulators of Th17 cell differentiation. ► Five azole-type fungicides act as RORα/γ inverse agonists. ► These fungicides suppress

  4. The Quantitative Basis of the Arabidopsis Innate Immune System to Endemic Pathogens Depends on Pathogen Genetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason A Corwin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The most established model of the eukaryotic innate immune system is derived from examples of large effect monogenic quantitative resistance to pathogens. However, many host-pathogen interactions involve many genes of small to medium effect and exhibit quantitative resistance. We used the Arabidopsis-Botrytis pathosystem to explore the quantitative genetic architecture underlying host innate immune system in a population of Arabidopsis thaliana. By infecting a diverse panel of Arabidopsis accessions with four phenotypically and genotypically distinct isolates of the fungal necrotroph B. cinerea, we identified a total of 2,982 genes associated with quantitative resistance using lesion area and 3,354 genes associated with camalexin production as measures of the interaction. Most genes were associated with resistance to a specific Botrytis isolate, which demonstrates the influence of pathogen genetic variation in analyzing host quantitative resistance. While known resistance genes, such as receptor-like kinases (RLKs and nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat proteins (NLRs, were found to be enriched among associated genes, they only account for a small fraction of the total genes associated with quantitative resistance. Using publically available co-expression data, we condensed the quantitative resistance associated genes into co-expressed gene networks. GO analysis of these networks implicated several biological processes commonly connected to disease resistance, including defense hormone signaling and ROS production, as well as novel processes, such as leaf development. Validation of single gene T-DNA knockouts in a Col-0 background demonstrate a high success rate (60% when accounting for differences in environmental and Botrytis genetic variation. This study shows that the genetic architecture underlying host innate immune system is extremely complex and is likely able to sense and respond to differential virulence among pathogen

  5. Reduction in mRNA and protein expression of a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α8 subunit is associated with resistance to imidacloprid in the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yixi; Wang, Xin; Yang, Baojun; Hu, Yuanyuan; Huang, Lixin; Bass, Chris; Liu, Zewen

    2015-11-01

    Target-site resistance is commonly caused by qualitative changes in insecticide target-receptors and few studies have implicated quantitative changes in insecticide targets in resistance. Here we show that resistance to imidacloprid in a selected strain of Nilaparvata lugens is associated with a reduction in expression levels of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit Nlα8. Synergism bioassays of the selected strain suggested resistance was conferred, in part, by a target-site mechanism. Sequencing of N. lugens nAChR subunit genes identified no mutations associated with resistance, however, a decrease in mRNA and protein levels of Nlα8 was observed during selection. RNA interference knockdown of Nlα8 decreased the sensitivity of N. lugens to imidacloprid, demonstrating that a decrease in Nlα8 expression is sufficient to confer resistance in vivo. Radioligand binding assays revealed that the affinity of the high-affinity imidacloprid-binding site of native nAChRs was reduced by selection, and reducing the amount of Nlα8 cRNA injected into Xenopus oocytes significantly decreased imidacloprid potency on recombinant receptors. Taken together, these results provide strong evidence that a decrease in Nlα8 levels confers resistance to imidacloprid in N. lugens, and thus provides a rare example of target-site resistance associated with a quantitative rather than qualitative change. In insects, target-site mutations often cause high resistance to insecticides, such as neonicotinoids acting on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Here we found that a quantitative change in target-protein level, decrease in mRNA and protein levels of Nlα8, contributed importantly to imidacloprid resistance in Nilaparvata lugens. This finding provides a new target-site mechanism of insecticide resistance. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  6. Follitropin receptors in rat testis. Characterization with enzymatically 125I-labeled human follitropin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketelslegers, J M; Catt, K J

    1978-07-03

    The interaction between enzymatically radioiodinated human follitropin and the follitropin receptors in testis homogenate was investigated in immature and adult rats. The 125I-labeled human follitropin exhibited high binding activity with specific binding of up to 17% in the presence of an excess of testis homogenate. Approx. 50% of the bound hormone could be eluted at pH 5, and the receptor purified tracer exhibited a 3.6-fold increase in binding activity when compared with the original tracer preparation. Quantitative analysis of equilibrium binding data was performed with corrections for the measured specific activity and maximum binding activity of the tracer hormone. The equilibrium association constants (Ka) determined 24 degrees C were not significantly different in immature and adult rat testis, and the mean value for Ka was 3.9 . 10(9) M-1. At 37 degrees C, the Ka value obtained using immature rat testis was 1.3 . 10(10) M-1. The association of 125I-labeled human follitropin with immature rat testis homogenate was time and temperature dependent. In the presence of an excess of unlabeled hormone, 30--60% of the preformed hormone . receptor complex was dissociated after 24 h incubation. A specific and sensitive radioligand-receptor assay for follitropin was developed using immature rat testis homogenate. The minimum detectable dose of purified human follitropin was 0.6 ng, and human urinary and pituitary follitropin, ovine follitropin and pregnant mare serum gonadotropin reacted in the assay with equivalent slopes. The potencies of highly purified pregnent mare serum gonadotropin and highly purified human follitropin were similar in the radioligand-receptor assay, consistent with the follitropin bioactivity of the equine gonadotropin.

  7. Cocaine Inhibits Dopamine D2 Receptor Signaling via Sigma-1-D2 Receptor Heteromers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Gemma; Moreno, Estefania; Bonaventura, Jordi; Brugarolas, Marc; Farré, Daniel; Aguinaga, David; Mallol, Josefa; Cortés, Antoni; Casadó, Vicent; Lluís, Carmen; Ferre, Sergi

    2013-01-01

    Under normal conditions the brain maintains a delicate balance between inputs of reward seeking controlled by neurons containing the D1-like family of dopamine receptors and inputs of aversion coming from neurons containing the D2-like family of dopamine receptors. Cocaine is able to subvert these balanced inputs by altering the cell signaling of these two pathways such that D1 reward seeking pathway dominates. Here, we provide an explanation at the cellular and biochemical level how cocaine may achieve this. Exploring the effect of cocaine on dopamine D2 receptors function, we present evidence of σ1 receptor molecular and functional interaction with dopamine D2 receptors. Using biophysical, biochemical, and cell biology approaches, we discovered that D2 receptors (the long isoform of the D2 receptor) can complex with σ1 receptors, a result that is specific to D2 receptors, as D3 and D4 receptors did not form heteromers. We demonstrate that the σ1-D2 receptor heteromers consist of higher order oligomers, are found in mouse striatum and that cocaine, by binding to σ1 -D2 receptor heteromers, inhibits downstream signaling in both cultured cells and in mouse striatum. In contrast, in striatum from σ1 knockout animals these complexes are not found and this inhibition is not seen. Taken together, these data illuminate the mechanism by which the initial exposure to cocaine can inhibit signaling via D2 receptor containing neurons, destabilizing the delicate signaling balance influencing drug seeking that emanates from the D1 and D2 receptor containing neurons in the brain. PMID:23637801

  8. Brain receptor single-photon emission computer tomography with 123I Datscan in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minchev, D.; Peshev, N.; Kostadinova, I.; Grigorova, O.; Trindev, P.; Shotekov, P.

    2005-01-01

    Clinical aspects of Parkinson's disease are not enough for the early diagnosis of the disease. Positron emission tomography and the receptor single - photon emission tomography can be used for imaging functional integrity of nigrostriatal dopaminergic structures. 24 patient (17 men and 7 women) were investigated. 20 of them are with Parkinson's disease and 4 are with essential tremor. The radiopharmaceutical - 123I-Datscan (ioflupane, bind with 123I) represent a cocaine analogue with selective affinity to dopamine transporters, located in the dopaminergic nigrostriatal terminals in the striatum. Single - photon emission computer tomography was performed with SPECT gamma camera (ADAC, SH Epic detector). The scintigraphic study was made 3 to 6 hours after intravenous injection of the radiopharmaceutical - 123I- Datscan in dose 185 MBq. 120 frames are registered with duration of each one 22 seconds and gamma camera rotation 360. After generation of transversal slices we generated two composites pictures. The first composite picture image the striatum, the second - the occipital region. Two ratios were calculated representing the uptake of the radiopharmaceutical in the left and right striatum. Qualitative and quantitative criteria were elaborated for evaluating the scintigraphic patterns. Decreased, nonhomogeneous and asymmetric uptake of the radiopharmaceutical coupled with low quantitative parameters in range from 1.44 to 2.87 represents the characteristic scintigraphic pattern for Parkinson's disease with clear clinical picture. Homogenous with high intensity and symmetric uptake of the radiopharmaceutical in the striatum coupled with his clear frontier and with quantitative parameters up to 4.40 represent the scintigraphic pattern in two patients with essential tremor. Receptor single - photon emission computer tomography with 123I - Datscan represents an accurate nuclear-medicine method for precise diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and for its differentiation from

  9. Knocking out P2X receptors reduces transmitter secretion in taste buds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yijen A.; Stone, Leslie M.; Pereira, Elizabeth; Yang, Ruibiao; Kinnamon, John C.; Dvoryanchikov, Gennady; Chaudhari, Nirupa; Finger, Thomas E.; Kinnamon, Sue C.; Roper, Stephen D.

    2011-01-01

    In response to gustatory stimulation, taste bud cells release a transmitter, ATP, that activates P2X2 and P2X3 receptors on gustatory afferent fibers. Taste behavior and gustatory neural responses are largely abolished in mice lacking P2X2 and P2X3 receptors (P2X2 and P2X3 double knockout, or “DKO” mice). The assumption has been that eliminating P2X2 and P2X3 receptors only removes postsynaptic targets but that transmitter secretion in mice is normal. Using functional imaging, ATP biosensor cells, and a cell-free assay for ATP, we tested this assumption. Surprisingly, although gustatory stimulation mobilizes Ca2+ in taste Receptor (Type II) cells from DKO mice, as from wild type (WT) mice, taste cells from DKO mice fail to release ATP when stimulated with tastants. ATP release could be elicited by depolarizing DKO Receptor cells with KCl, suggesting that ATP-release machinery remains functional in DKO taste buds. To explore the difference in ATP release across genotypes, we employed reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR, immunostaining, and histochemistry for key proteins underlying ATP secretion and degradation: Pannexin1, TRPM5, and NTPDase2 (ecto-ATPase) are indistinguishable between WT and DKO mice. The ultrastructure of contacts between taste cells and nerve fibers is also normal in the DKO mice. Finally, quantitative RT-PCR show that P2X4 and P2X7, potential modulators of ATP secretion, are similarly expressed in taste buds in WT and DKO taste buds. Importantly, we find that P2X2 is expressed in WT taste buds and appears to function as an autocrine, positive feedback signal to amplify taste-evoked ATP secretion. PMID:21940456

  10. Knocking out P2X receptors reduces transmitter secretion in taste buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yijen A; Stone, Leslie M; Pereira, Elizabeth; Yang, Ruibiao; Kinnamon, John C; Dvoryanchikov, Gennady; Chaudhari, Nirupa; Finger, Thomas E; Kinnamon, Sue C; Roper, Stephen D

    2011-09-21

    In response to gustatory stimulation, taste bud cells release a transmitter, ATP, that activates P2X2 and P2X3 receptors on gustatory afferent fibers. Taste behavior and gustatory neural responses are largely abolished in mice lacking P2X2 and P2X3 receptors [P2X2 and P2X3 double knock-out (DKO) mice]. The assumption has been that eliminating P2X2 and P2X3 receptors only removes postsynaptic targets but that transmitter secretion in mice is normal. Using functional imaging, ATP biosensor cells, and a cell-free assay for ATP, we tested this assumption. Surprisingly, although gustatory stimulation mobilizes Ca(2+) in taste Receptor (Type II) cells from DKO mice, as from wild-type (WT) mice, taste cells from DKO mice fail to release ATP when stimulated with tastants. ATP release could be elicited by depolarizing DKO Receptor cells with KCl, suggesting that ATP-release machinery remains functional in DKO taste buds. To explore the difference in ATP release across genotypes, we used reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR, immunostaining, and histochemistry for key proteins underlying ATP secretion and degradation: Pannexin1, TRPM5, and NTPDase2 (ecto-ATPase) are indistinguishable between WT and DKO mice. The ultrastructure of contacts between taste cells and nerve fibers is also normal in the DKO mice. Finally, quantitative RT-PCR show that P2X4 and P2X7, potential modulators of ATP secretion, are similarly expressed in taste buds in WT and DKO taste buds. Importantly, we find that P2X2 is expressed in WT taste buds and appears to function as an autocrine, positive feedback signal to amplify taste-evoked ATP secretion.

  11. Quantitative Algebraic Reasoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardare, Radu Iulian; Panangaden, Prakash; Plotkin, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    We develop a quantitative analogue of equational reasoning which we call quantitative algebra. We define an equality relation indexed by rationals: a =ε b which we think of as saying that “a is approximately equal to b up to an error of ε”. We have 4 interesting examples where we have a quantitative...... equational theory whose free algebras correspond to well known structures. In each case we have finitary and continuous versions. The four cases are: Hausdorff metrics from quantitive semilattices; pWasserstein metrics (hence also the Kantorovich metric) from barycentric algebras and also from pointed...

  12. Function of the cytoplasmic tail of human calcitonin receptor-like receptor in complex with receptor activity-modifying protein 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwasako, Kenji, E-mail: kuwasako@fc.miyazaki-u.ac.jp [Frontier Science Research Center, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan); Kitamura, Kazuo; Nagata, Sayaka; Hikosaka, Tomomi [Division of Circulation and Body Fluid Regulation, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan); Kato, Johji [Frontier Science Research Center, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan)

    2010-02-12

    Receptor activity-modifying protein 2 (RAMP2) enables calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) to form an adrenomedullin (AM)-specific receptor. Here we investigated the function of the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail (C-tail) of human (h)CRLR by co-transfecting its C-terminal mutants into HEK-293 cells stably expressing hRAMP2. Deleting the C-tail from CRLR disrupted AM-evoked cAMP production or receptor internalization, but did not affect [{sup 125}I]AM binding. We found that CRLR residues 428-439 are required for AM-evoked cAMP production, though deleting this region had little effect on receptor internalization. Moreover, pretreatment with pertussis toxin (100 ng/mL) led to significant increases in AM-induced cAMP production via wild-type CRLR/RAMP2 complexes. This effect was canceled by deleting CRLR residues 454-457, suggesting Gi couples to this region. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that CRLR truncation mutants lacking residues in the Ser/Thr-rich region extending from Ser{sup 449} to Ser{sup 467} were unable to undergo AM-induced receptor internalization and, in contrast to the effect on wild-type CRLR, overexpression of GPCR kinases-2, -3 and -4 failed to promote internalization of CRLR mutants lacking residues 449-467. Thus, the hCRLR C-tail is crucial for AM-evoked cAMP production and internalization of the CRLR/RAMP2, while the receptor internalization is dependent on the aforementioned GPCR kinases, but not Gs coupling.

  13. Prostaglandin Receptor Signaling in Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Matsuoka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostanoids, consisting of the prostaglandins (PGs and the thromboxanes (TXs, are a group of lipid mediators formed in response to various stimuli. They include PGD2, PGE2, PGF2α, PGI2, and TXA2. They are released outside of the cells immediately after synthesis, and exert their actions by binding to a G-protein coupled rhodopsin-type receptor on the surface of target cells. There are eight types of the prostanoid receptors conserved in mammals from mouse to human. They are the PGD receptor (DP, four subtypes of the PGE receptor (EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4, the PGF receptor (FP, PGI receptor (IP, and TXA receptor (TP. Recently, mice deficient in each of these prostanoid receptors were generated and subjected to various experimental models of disease. These studies have revealed the roles of PG receptor signaling in various pathological conditions, and suggest that selective manipulation of the prostanoid receptors may be beneficial in treatment of the pathological conditions. Here we review these recent findings of roles of prostanoid receptor signaling and their therapeutic implications.

  14. Molecular imaging with {sup 68}Ga-SSTR PET/CT and correlation to immunohistochemistry of somatostatin receptors in neuroendocrine tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaemmerer, Daniel; Haugvik, Sven-Petter; Hommann, Merten [Zentralklinik Bad Berka GmbH, Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Bad Berka (Germany); Peter, Luisa; Lupp, Amelie; Schulz, Stefan [University of Jena, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Jena (Germany); Saenger, Joerg [Laboratory of Pathology and Cytology, Bad Berka (Germany); Prasad, Vikas; Kulkarni, Harshad; Baum, Richard Paul [Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Center for PET, Bad Berka (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are known for an overexpression in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (GEP-NET). The aim of the present study was to find out if the receptor density predicted by the semi-quantitative parameters generated from the static positron emission tomography (PET/CT) correlated with the in vitro immunohistochemistry using a novel rabbit monoclonal anti-SSTR2A antibody (clone UMB-1) for specific SSTR2A immunohistochemistry and polyclonal antibodies for SSTR1 and 3-5. Overall 14 surgical specimens generated from 34 histologically documented GEP-NET patients were correlated with the preoperative {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT. Quantitative assessment of the receptor density was done using the immunoreactive score (IRS) of Remmele and Stegner; the additional 4-point IRS classification for immunohistochemistry and standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean}) were used for PET/CT. The IRS for SSTR2A and SSTR5 correlated highly significant with the SUV{sub max} on the PET/CT (p < 0.001; p < 0.05) and the IRS for SSTR2A with the SUV{sub mean} (p < 0.013). The level of SSTR2A score correlated significantly with chromogranin A staining and indirectly to the tumour grading. The highly significant correlation between SSTR2A and SSTR5 and the SUV{sub max} on the {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT scans is concordant with the affinity profile of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC to the SSTR subtypes and demonstrates the excellent qualification of somatostatin analogues in the diagnostics of NET. This study correlating somatostatin receptor imaging using {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT with immunohistochemically analysed SSTR also underlines the approval of therapy using somatostatin analogues, follow-up imaging as well as radionuclide therapy. (orig.)

  15. Steroid receptor status in breast cancer: the roles of radioreceptor assay and immunohistochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myint Aye Mu; Ch'ong

    1997-01-01

    A total of 24 cases of female breast cancer were reviewed, typed and graded based on the WHO classification. The steroid receptors (oestrogen and progesterone receptors) status was assessed using radio-receptor assay (RRA) and immunohistochemical (IH) method. The data showed that there were 21 cases of infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast and 3 cases of medullary carcinoma. The age of the patients ranged from 36 to 71 years and 4 patients were post-menopausal. The oestrogen receptor (ER) and progesteronc receptor (PR) status were analyzed by radio-receptor assay using 'H-oestradiol and 3 H-ORG respectively, and also by IH using immunoperoxidase detection assay (DAKO LSAB 2 Kit. Peroxidase K 677). Primary antibodies used were also procured from Dako Corp. and these were mouse anti-human ER and rabbit anti-human PR antibodies. On RRA analysis, 22 (95.7%) cases showed ER positivity (i.e. >20 fmol/mg of cytosol protien), and the ER content ranged from 16.64 to 297.8 fmovmg of cytosol protein. All cases showed PR positivity, and PR content ranged from 20.56 to 364 fmoumg of cytosol protein. A significant positive correlation was found between the ER content and PR content of tumour tissues (r = 0.7132, p<0.003). No significant association was found between ER content and menopausal status or histological grade IH showed that 10 of 24 cases (41.67%) showed ER positivity of which 8 were also PR positive. PR status was negative in all ER negative tissues. A decreasing trend in ER positivity was observed with worsening in histological grade (67% positivity in Grade 1, 50% positivity in Grade 11, and 33% positivity in Grade 111). ER and PR positivity occurred more frequently in pre-menopausal women. The results of this study showed that the result derived from IH method were found to have association with grade of tumour and confirmed findings by other workers. These findings revealed that although the quantitative data from radio-receptor assay for estimation of

  16. Connecting qualitative observation and quantitative measurement for enhancing quantitative literacy in plant anatomy course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuraeni, E.; Rahmat, A.

    2018-05-01

    Forming of cognitive schemes of plant anatomy concepts is performed by processing of qualitative and quantitative data obtained from microscopic observations. To enhancing student’s quantitative literacy, strategy of plant anatomy course was modified by adding the task to analyze quantitative data produced by quantitative measurement of plant anatomy guided by material course. Participant in this study was 24 biology students and 35 biology education students. Quantitative Literacy test, complex thinking in plant anatomy test and questioner used to evaluate the course. Quantitative literacy capability data was collected by quantitative literacy test with the rubric from the Association of American Colleges and Universities, Complex thinking in plant anatomy by test according to Marzano and questioner. Quantitative literacy data are categorized according to modified Rhodes and Finley categories. The results showed that quantitative literacy of biology education students is better than biology students.

  17. Expression of GABAergic receptors in mouse taste receptor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret R Starostik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple excitatory neurotransmitters have been identified in the mammalian taste transduction, with few studies focused on inhibitory neurotransmitters. Since the synthetic enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA is expressed in a subset of mouse taste cells, we hypothesized that other components of the GABA signaling pathway are likely expressed in this system. GABA signaling is initiated by the activation of either ionotropic receptors (GABA(A and GABA(C or metabotropic receptors (GABA(B while it is terminated by the re-uptake of GABA through transporters (GATs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR analysis, we investigated the expression of different GABA signaling molecules in the mouse taste system. Taste receptor cells (TRCs in the circumvallate papillae express multiple subunits of the GABA(A and GABA(B receptors as well as multiple GATs. Immunocytochemical analyses examined the distribution of the GABA machinery in the circumvallate papillae. Both GABA(A-and GABA(B- immunoreactivity were detected in the peripheral taste receptor cells. We also used transgenic mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP in either the Type II taste cells, which can respond to bitter, sweet or umami taste stimuli, or in the Type III GAD67 expressing taste cells. Thus, we were able to identify that GABAergic receptors are expressed in some Type II and Type III taste cells. Mouse GAT4 labeling was concentrated in the cells surrounding the taste buds with a few positively labeled TRCs at the margins of the taste buds. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The presence of GABAergic receptors localized on Type II and Type III taste cells suggests that GABA is likely modulating evoked taste responses in the mouse taste bud.

  18. mRNA expression of 5-hydroxytryptamine 1B, 1D, and 1F receptors and their role in controlling the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide in the rat trigeminovascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amrutkar, Dipak V; Ploug, Kenneth B; Hay-Schmidt, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Triptans, a family of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) 1B, 1D, and 1F receptor agonists, are used in the acute treatment of migraine attacks. The site of action and subtypes of the 5-HT(1) receptor that mediate the antimigraine effect have still to be identified. This study investigated the mRNA expres......Triptans, a family of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) 1B, 1D, and 1F receptor agonists, are used in the acute treatment of migraine attacks. The site of action and subtypes of the 5-HT(1) receptor that mediate the antimigraine effect have still to be identified. This study investigated the m......RNA expression of these receptors and the role of 5-HT(1) receptor subtypes in controlling the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in rat dura mater, trigeminal ganglion (TG), and trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC). The mRNA for each receptor subtype was quantified by quantitative real...

  19. AMPA receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømgaard, Kristian; Mellor, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (AMPAR), subtype of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (IGRs), mediate fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS), and are involved in many neurological disorders, as well as being a key player in the f......Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (AMPAR), subtype of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (IGRs), mediate fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS), and are involved in many neurological disorders, as well as being a key player...... in the formation of memory. Hence, ligands affecting AMPARs are highly important for the study of the structure and function of this receptor, and in this regard polyamine-based ligands, particularly polyamine toxins, are unique as they selectively block Ca2+ -permeable AMPARs. Indeed, endogenous intracellular...

  20. A2A-D2 receptor-receptor interaction modulates gliotransmitter release from striatal astrocyte processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervetto, Chiara; Venturini, Arianna; Passalacqua, Mario; Guidolin, Diego; Genedani, Susanna; Fuxe, Kjell; Borroto-Esquela, Dasiel O; Cortelli, Pietro; Woods, Amina; Maura, Guido; Marcoli, Manuela; Agnati, Luigi F

    2017-01-01

    Evidence for striatal A2A-D2 heterodimers has led to a new perspective on molecular mechanisms involved in schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease. Despite the increasing recognition of astrocytes' participation in neuropsychiatric disease vulnerability, involvement of striatal astrocytes in A2A and D2 receptor signal transmission has never been explored. Here, we investigated the presence of D2 and A2A receptors in isolated astrocyte processes prepared from adult rat striatum by confocal imaging; the effects of receptor activation were measured on the 4-aminopyridine-evoked release of glutamate from the processes. Confocal analysis showed that A2A and D2 receptors were co-expressed on the same astrocyte processes. Evidence for A2A-D2 receptor-receptor interactions was obtained by measuring the release of the gliotransmitter glutamate: D2 receptors inhibited the glutamate release, while activation of A2A receptors, per se ineffective, abolished the effect of D2 receptor activation. The synthetic D2 peptide VLRRRRKRVN corresponding to the receptor region involved in electrostatic interaction underlying A2A-D2 heteromerization abolished the ability of the A2A receptor to antagonize the D2 receptor-mediated effect. Together, the findings are consistent with heteromerization of native striatal astrocytic A2A-D2 receptors that via allosteric receptor-receptor interactions could play a role in the control of striatal glutamatergic transmission. These new findings suggest possible new pathogenic mechanisms and/or therapeutic approaches to neuropsychiatric disorders. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  1. CERAPP: Collaborative estrogen receptor activity prediction project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansouri, Kamel; Abdelaziz, Ahmed; Rybacka, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    ). Risk assessors need tools to prioritize chemicals for evaluation in costly in vivo tests, for instance, within the U.S. EPA Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program. oBjectives: We describe a large-scale modeling project called CERAPP (Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project...... States and Europe to predict ER activity of a common set of 32,464 chemical structures. Quantitative structure-activity relationship models and docking approaches were employed, mostly using a common training set of 1,677 chemical structures provided by the U.S. EPA, to build a total of 40 categorical......: Individual model scores ranged from 0.69 to 0.85, showing high prediction reliabilities. Out of the 32,464 chemicals, the consensus model predicted 4,001 chemicals (12.3%) as high priority actives and 6,742 potential actives (20.8%) to be considered for further testing. conclusion: This project demonstrated...

  2. Characterization of a novel human scavenger receptor cysteine-rich molecule SCART1 expressed by lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, D.; Fink, D. R.; Steffensen, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    a member of the SRCR superfamily, mSCART1, which primarily is expressed on a large subset of γδ T cells in mice. Here we report the cloning and characterization of human SCART1 (hSCART1) mainly expressed by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes. The hSCART1 gene maps to chromosome 10, region q26.3, a region...... domain. Shorter splice forms have also been isolated. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis on human blood-fractions has shown that hSCART1 is expressed primarily by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes with either αβ or γδ T cell receptors, and real-time PCR on 22 different human tissues showed high expression...... that the protein plays a role in the immune system, perhaps as a co-receptor on αβ and γδ T cells....

  3. Quantitative sexing (Q-Sexing) and relative quantitative sexing (RQ ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    samer

    Key words: Polymerase chain reaction (PCR), quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), quantitative sexing, Siberian tiger. INTRODUCTION. Animal molecular sexing .... 43:3-12. Ellegren H (1996). First gene on the avian W chromosome (CHD) provides a tag for universal sexing of non-ratite birds. Proc.

  4. N-glycosylation of the β2 adrenergic receptor regulates receptor function by modulating dimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaona; Zhou, Mang; Huang, Wei; Yang, Huaiyu

    2017-07-01

    N-glycosylation is a common post-translational modification of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). However, it remains unknown how N-glycosylation affects GPCR signaling. β 2 adrenergic receptor (β 2 AR) has three N-glycosylation sites: Asn6, Asn15 at the N-terminus, and Asn187 at the second extracellular loop (ECL2). Here, we show that deletion of the N-glycan did not affect receptor expression and ligand binding. Deletion of the N-glycan at the N-terminus rather than Asn187 showed decreased effects on isoproterenol-promoted G-protein-dependent signaling, β-arrestin2 recruitment, and receptor internalization. Both N6Q and N15Q showed decreased receptor dimerization, while N187Q did not influence receptor dimerization. As decreased β 2 AR homodimer accompanied with reduced efficiency for receptor function, we proposed that the N-glycosylation of β 2 AR regulated receptor function by influencing receptor dimerization. To verify this hypothesis, we further paid attention to the residues at the dimerization interface. Studies of Lys60 and Glu338, two residues at the receptor dimerization interface, exhibited that the K60A/E338A showed decreased β 2 AR dimerization and its effects on receptor signaling were similar to N6Q and N15Q, which further supported the importance of receptor dimerization for receptor function. This work provides new insights into the relationship among glycosylation, dimerization, and function of GPCRs. Peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase F, EC 3.2.2.11); endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase A (Endo-A, EC 3.2.1.96). © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  5. Prognostic Value of Estrogen Receptor alpha and Progesterone Receptor Conversion in Distant Breast Cancer Metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefnagel, Laurien D. C.; Moelans, Cathy B.; Meijer, S. L.; van Slooten, Henk-Jan; Wesseling, Pieter; Wesseling, Jelle; Westenend, Pieter J.; Bart, Joost; Seldenrijk, Cornelis A.; Nagtegaal, Iris D.; Oudejans, Joost; van der Valk, Paul; van Gils, Carla H.; van der Wall, Elsken; van Diest, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Changes in the receptor profile of primary breast cancers to their metastases (receptor conversion) have been described for the estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha) and progesterone receptor (PR). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of receptor conversion for ER alpha and

  6. Microarray-Based Determination of Estrogen Receptor, Progesterone Receptor, and HER2 Receptor Status in Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roepman, Paul; Horlings, Hugo M.; Krijgsman, Oscar; Kok, Marleen; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Jolien M.; Bender, Richard; Linn, Sabine C.; Glas, Annuska M.; van de Vijver, Marc J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The level of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and HER2 aids in the determination of prognosis and treatment of breast cancer. Immunohistochemistry is currently the predominant method for assessment, but differences in methods and interpretation can substantially affect

  7. Endogenous protein "barcode" for data validation and normalization in quantitative MS analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wooram; Lazar, Iulia M

    2014-07-01

    Quantitative proteomic experiments with mass spectrometry detection are typically conducted by using stable isotope labeling and label-free quantitation approaches. Proteins with housekeeping functions and stable expression level such actin, tubulin, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase are frequently used as endogenous controls. Recent studies have shown that the expression level of such common housekeeping proteins is, in fact, dependent on various factors such as cell type, cell cycle, or disease status and can change in response to a biochemical stimulation. The interference of such phenomena can, therefore, substantially compromise their use for data validation, alter the interpretation of results, and lead to erroneous conclusions. In this work, we advance the concept of a protein "barcode" for data normalization and validation in quantitative proteomic experiments. The barcode comprises a novel set of proteins that was generated from cell cycle experiments performed with MCF7, an estrogen receptor positive breast cancer cell line, and MCF10A, a nontumorigenic immortalized breast cell line. The protein set was selected from a list of ~3700 proteins identified in different cellular subfractions and cell cycle stages of MCF7/MCF10A cells, based on the stability of spectral count data generated with an LTQ ion trap mass spectrometer. A total of 11 proteins qualified as endogenous standards for the nuclear and 62 for the cytoplasmic barcode, respectively. The validation of the protein sets was performed with a complementary SKBR3/Her2+ cell line.

  8. Quantitative image analysis of cellular heterogeneity in breast tumors complements genomic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yinyin; Failmezger, Henrik; Rueda, Oscar M; Ali, H Raza; Gräf, Stefan; Chin, Suet-Feung; Schwarz, Roland F; Curtis, Christina; Dunning, Mark J; Bardwell, Helen; Johnson, Nicola; Doyle, Sarah; Turashvili, Gulisa; Provenzano, Elena; Aparicio, Sam; Caldas, Carlos; Markowetz, Florian

    2012-10-24

    Solid tumors are heterogeneous tissues composed of a mixture of cancer and normal cells, which complicates the interpretation of their molecular profiles. Furthermore, tissue architecture is generally not reflected in molecular assays, rendering this rich information underused. To address these challenges, we developed a computational approach based on standard hematoxylin and eosin-stained tissue sections and demonstrated its power in a discovery and validation cohort of 323 and 241 breast tumors, respectively. To deconvolute cellular heterogeneity and detect subtle genomic aberrations, we introduced an algorithm based on tumor cellularity to increase the comparability of copy number profiles between samples. We next devised a predictor for survival in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer that integrated both image-based and gene expression analyses and significantly outperformed classifiers that use single data types, such as microarray expression signatures. Image processing also allowed us to describe and validate an independent prognostic factor based on quantitative analysis of spatial patterns between stromal cells, which are not detectable by molecular assays. Our quantitative, image-based method could benefit any large-scale cancer study by refining and complementing molecular assays of tumor samples.

  9. Quantitative measurements of tumoral p95HER2 protein expression in metastatic breast cancer patients treated with trastuzumab: independent validation of the p95HER2 clinical cutoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchnowska, Renata; Sperinde, Jeff; Chenna, Ahmed; Haddad, Mojgan; Paquet, Agnes; Lie, Yolanda; Weidler, Jodi M; Huang, Weidong; Winslow, John; Jankowski, Tomasz; Czartoryska-Arłukowicz, Bogumiła; Wysocki, Piotr J; Foszczyńska-Kłoda, Małgorzata; Radecka, Barbara; Litwiniuk, Maria M; Zok, Jolanta; Wiśniewski, Michał; Zuziak, Dorota; Biernat, Wojciech; Jassem, Jacek

    2014-05-15

    P95HER2 (p95) is a truncated form of the HER2, which lacks the trastuzumab-binding site and contains a hyperactive kinase domain. Previously, an optimal clinical cutoff of p95 expression for progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was defined using a quantitative VeraTag assay (Monogram Biosciences) in a training set of trastuzumab-treated metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients. In the current study, the predictive value of the p95 VeraTag assay cutoff established in the training set was retrospectively validated for PFS and OS in an independent series of 240 trastuzumab-treated MBC patients from multiple institutions. In the subset of 190 tumors assessed as HER2-total (H2T)-positive using the quantitative HERmark assay (Monogram Biosciences), p95 VeraTag values above the predefined cutoff correlated with shorter PFS (HR = 1.43; P = 0.039) and shorter OS (HR = 1.94; P = 0.0055) where both outcomes were stratified by hormone receptor status and tumor grade. High p95 expression correlated with shorter PFS (HR = 2.41; P = 0.0003) and OS (HR = 2.57; P = 0.0025) in the hormone receptor-positive subgroup of patients (N = 78), but not in the hormone receptor-negative group. In contrast with the quantitative p95 VeraTag measurements, p95 immunohistochemical expression using the same antibody was not significantly correlated with outcomes. The consistency in the p95 VeraTag cutoff across different cohorts of patients with MBC treated with trastuzumab justifies additional studies using blinded analyses in larger series of patients. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor TR4 Is a Vitamin A-activated Nuclear Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, X. Edward; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Xu, Yong; Chan, Cee-Wah; Tanabe, Osamu; Kruse, Schoen W.; Reynolds, Ross; Engel, James Douglas; Xu, H. Eric (Michigan-Med); (Van Andel)

    2015-11-30

    Testicular receptors 2 and 4 (TR2/4) constitute a subgroup of orphan nuclear receptors that play important roles in spermatogenesis, lipid and lipoprotein regulation, and the development of the central nervous system. Currently, little is known about the structural features and the ligand regulation of these receptors. Here we report the crystal structure of the ligand-free TR4 ligand binding domain, which reveals an autorepressed conformation. The ligand binding pocket of TR4 is filled by the C-terminal half of helix 10, and the cofactor binding site is occupied by the AF-2 helix, thus preventing ligand-independent activation of the receptor. However, TR4 exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity on multiple promoters, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, or ligand binding substantially reduce the transcriptional activity of this receptor. Importantly, both retinol and retinoic acid are able to promote TR4 to recruit coactivators and to activate a TR4-regulated reporter. These findings demonstrate that TR4 is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor and suggest that retinoids might have a much wider regulatory role via activation of orphan receptors such as TR4.

  11. Soman- or kainic acid-induced convulsions decrease muscarinic receptors but not benzodiazepine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churchill, L.; Pazdernik, T.L.; Cross, R.S.; Nelson, S.R.; Samson, F.E.

    1990-01-01

    [3H]Quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) binding to muscarinic receptors decreased in the rat forebrain after convulsions induced by a single dose of either soman, a potent inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase, or kainic acid, an excitotoxin. A Rosenthal plot revealed that the receptors decreased in number rather than affinity. When the soman-induced convulsions were blocked, the decrease in muscarinic receptors at 3 days was less extensive than when convulsions occurred and at 10 days they approached control levels in most of the brain areas. The most prominent decrements in QNB binding were in the piriform cortex where the decline in QNB binding is probably related to the extensive convulsion-associated neuropathology. The decrements in QNB binding after convulsions suggest that the convulsive state leads to a down-regulation of muscarinic receptors in some brain areas. In contrast to the decrease in QNB binding after convulsions, [3H]flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptors did not change even in the piriform cortex where the loss in muscarinic receptors was most prominent. Thus, it appears that those neuronal processes that bear muscarinic receptors are more vulnerable to convulsion-induced change than those with benzodiazepine receptors

  12. Quantitative analysis chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Wansuk; Lee, Choongyoung; Jun, Kwangsik; Hwang, Taeksung

    1995-02-01

    This book is about quantitative analysis chemistry. It is divided into ten chapters, which deal with the basic conception of material with the meaning of analysis chemistry and SI units, chemical equilibrium, basic preparation for quantitative analysis, introduction of volumetric analysis, acid-base titration of outline and experiment examples, chelate titration, oxidation-reduction titration with introduction, titration curve, and diazotization titration, precipitation titration, electrometric titration and quantitative analysis.

  13. [The Relationship Study between Expressions of P2X5 Receptor and Deficiency-cold Syndrome/Deficiency-heat Syndrome at Various Ambient Temperatures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-ping; Yu, Hong-jie; Huang, Rui; Li, Xin-min; Zhan, Xiang-hong; Hou, Jun-lin

    2015-05-01

    To detect the expression of the peripheral blood P2X5 receptor at various ambient temperatures, and to explore its relationship with deficiency-cold syndrome and deficiency-heat syndrome. Subjects were selected by questionnaire and expert diagnosis, and assigned to the normal control group, the deficiency-cold syndrome group, and the deficiency-heat syndrome group, 20 in each group. 5 mL venous blood was collected at room temperature (25 °C) and cold temperature (-4-5 °C) respectively. Then the expression of P2X5 receptor was relatively quantified by real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR, and compared at room temperature and cold temperature respectively. The expression of P2X5 receptor in deficiency-cold syndrome and deficiency-heat syndrome groups was lower than that in the normal control group at room temperature (P cold temperature in the deficiency-cold syndrome group than in the normal control group (P receptor showed no difference in all groups at two different temperatures (P > 0.05). The expression of P2X5 receptor was different in different syndrome groups at various ambient temperatures. Ambient temperatures had insignificant effect on the expression of P2X5 receptor of the population with the same syndrome.

  14. Cooperative ethylene receptor signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Qian; Wen, Chi-Kuang

    2012-01-01

    The gaseous plant hormone ethylene is perceived by a family of five ethylene receptor members in the dicotyledonous model plant Arabidopsis. Genetic and biochemical studies suggest that the ethylene response is suppressed by ethylene receptor complexes, but the biochemical nature of the receptor signal is unknown. Without appropriate biochemical measures to trace the ethylene receptor signal and quantify the signal strength, the biological significance of the modulation of ethylene responses ...

  15. Radiolabelled GLP-1 receptor antagonist binds to GLP-1 receptor-expressing human tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude

    2014-01-01

    Radiolabelled glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have recently been shown to successfully image benign insulinomas in patients. For the somatostatin receptor targeting of tumours, however, it was recently reported that antagonist tracers were superior to agonist tracers. The present study therefore evaluated various forms of the 125 iodinated-Bolton-Hunter (BH)-exendin(9-39) antagonist tracer for the in vitro visualization of GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues in rats and humans and compared it with the agonist tracer 125 I-GLP-1(7-36)amide. Receptor autoradiography studies with 125 I-GLP-1(7-36)amide agonist or 125 I-BH-exendin(9-39) antagonist radioligands were performed in human and rat tissues. The antagonist 125 I-BH-exendin(9-39) labelled at lysine 19 identifies all human and rat GLP-1 target tissues and GLP-1 receptor-expressing tumours. Binding is of high affinity and is comparable in all tested tissues in its binding properties with the agonist tracer 125 I-GLP-1(7-36)amide. For comparison, 125 I-BH-exendin(9-39) with the BH labelled at lysine 4 did identify the GLP-1 receptor in rat tissues but not in human tissues. The GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39) labelled with 125 I-BH at lysine 19 is an excellent GLP-1 radioligand that identifies human and rat GLP-1 receptors in normal and tumoural tissues. It may therefore be the molecular basis to develop suitable GLP-1 receptor antagonist radioligands for in vivo imaging of GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues in patients. (orig.)

  16. Distribution of seratonin-1A receptors in the monkey and the postmortem human hippocampal region. A quantitative autoradiographic study using the selective agonist (3H)8-PH-DPAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, Christer; Radesaeter, A.C.; Lang, Walter; Chan-Palay, Victoria

    1986-01-01

    Serotonin-1A receptors were visualized and their anatomical distribution mapped within the monkey and the human hippocampus by using in vitro receptor autoradiography of the selective agonist ( 3 H)8-OH-N, N-dipropyl-2-aminotetralin (( 3 H)8-OH-DPAT). The results show high densities of serotonin-1A receptors hetergeneously distributed in different subfields and layers of the monkey and the human hippocampal region. High densities are found in the molecular layer of area dentata, all layers of regio superior and the subiculum, parasubiculum, and layers 2, and 4 through 6 of the entorhinal area. In the human hippocampus, a distinct band of ( 3 H)8-OH-DPAT binding sites is present in the subgranular zone of the area dentata. The similar anatomical distribution of ( 3 H)8-OH-DPAT binding sites in the monkey and the human hippocampal region suggests that the serotonin-1A receptor is phylogenetically well preserved and indicates that this receptor may mediate action(s) of serotonin in the primate, including the human hippocampal region. (author)

  17. Quantitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Roger

    2015-04-01

    This article describes the basic tenets of quantitative research. The concepts of dependent and independent variables are addressed and the concept of measurement and its associated issues, such as error, reliability and validity, are explored. Experiments and surveys – the principal research designs in quantitative research – are described and key features explained. The importance of the double-blind randomised controlled trial is emphasised, alongside the importance of longitudinal surveys, as opposed to cross-sectional surveys. Essential features of data storage are covered, with an emphasis on safe, anonymous storage. Finally, the article explores the analysis of quantitative data, considering what may be analysed and the main uses of statistics in analysis.

  18. Quantitative film radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devine, G.; Dobie, D.; Fugina, J.; Hernandez, J.; Logan, C.; Mohr, P.; Moss, R.; Schumacher, B.; Updike, E.; Weirup, D.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a system of quantitative radiography in order to produce quantitative images displaying homogeneity of parts. The materials that we characterize are synthetic composites and may contain important subtle density variations not discernible by examining a raw film x-radiograph. In order to quantitatively interpret film radiographs, it is necessary to digitize, interpret, and display the images. Our integrated system of quantitative radiography displays accurate, high-resolution pseudo-color images in units of density. We characterize approximately 10,000 parts per year in hundreds of different configurations and compositions with this system. This report discusses: the method; film processor monitoring and control; verifying film and processor performance; and correction of scatter effects

  19. Effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) receptor in locally advanced breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, L.A.; Hegg, R.; Freitas, F.R.; Tavares, E.R.; Almeida, C.P.; Baracat, E.C.; Maranhão, R.C.

    2012-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors are overexpressed in most neoplastic cell lines and provide a mechanism for the internalization and concentration of drug-laden nanoemulsions that bind to these receptors. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the administration of standard chemotherapeutic schemes can alter the expression of LDL and LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) receptors in breast carcinoma. Fragments of tumoral and normal breast tissue from 16 consecutive volunteer women with breast cancer in stage II or III were obtained from biopsies before the beginning of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and after chemotherapy, from fragments excised during mastectomy. Tissues were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for both receptors. Because complete response to treatment was achieved in 4 patients, only the tumors from 12 were analyzed. Before chemotherapy, there was overexpression of LDL receptor in the tumoral tissue compared to normal breast tissue in 8 of these patients. LRP-1 receptor overexpression was observed in tumors of 4 patients. After chemotherapy, expression of both receptors decreased in the tumors of 6 patients, increased in 4 and was unchanged in 2. Nonetheless, even when chemotherapy reduced receptors expression, the expression was still above normal. The fact that chemotherapy does not impair LDL receptors expression supports the use of drug carrier systems that target neoplastic cells by the LDL receptor endocytic pathway in patients on conventional chemotherapy

  20. Phosphorylation site dynamics of early T-cell receptor signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chylek, Lily A; Akimov, Vyacheslav; Dengjel, Jörn

    2014-01-01

    In adaptive immune responses, T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling impacts multiple cellular processes and results in T-cell differentiation, proliferation, and cytokine production. Although individual protein-protein interactions and phosphorylation events have been studied extensively, we lack...... that diverse dynamic patterns emerge within seconds. We detected phosphorylation dynamics as early as 5 s and observed widespread regulation of key TCR signaling proteins by 30 s. Development of a computational model pointed to the presence of novel regulatory mechanisms controlling phosphorylation of sites...... a systems-level understanding of how these components cooperate to control signaling dynamics, especially during the crucial first seconds of stimulation. Here, we used quantitative proteomics to characterize reshaping of the T-cell phosphoproteome in response to TCR/CD28 co-stimulation, and found...

  1. Synthesis and characterization of arylamine derivatives of rauwolscine as molecular probes for alpha 2-adrenergic receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanier, S.M.; Graham, R.M.; Hess, H.J.; Grodski, A.; Repaske, M.G.; Nunnari, J.M.; Limbird, L.E.; Homcy, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    The selective alpha 2-adrenergic receptor antagonist rauwolscine was structurally modified to yield a series of arylamine carboxamide derivatives, which were investigated as potential molecular probes for the localization and structural characterization of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors. The arylamine carboxamides differ in the number of carbon atoms separating the reactive phenyl moiety from the fused ring structure of the parent compound, rauwolscine carboxylate. Competitive inhibition studies with [ 3 H]rauwolscine in rat kidney membranes indicate that the affinity for the carboxamide derivatives is inversely related to the length of the carbon spacer arm with rauwolscine 4-aminophenyl carboxamide exhibiting the highest affinity (Kd = 2.3 +/- 0.2 nM). Radioiodination of rau-AMPC yields a ligand, 125 I-rau-AMPC, which binds to rat kidney alpha 2-adrenergic receptors with high affinity, as determined by both kinetic analysis (Kd = k2/k1 = 0.016 min-1/2.1 X 10(7) M-1 min-1 = 0.76 nM) and equilibrium binding studies (Kd = 0.78 +/- 0.16 nM). 125 I-rau-AMPC was quantitatively converted to the photolabile arylazide derivative 17 alpha-hydroxy-20 alpha-yohimban-16 beta-(N-4-azido-3-[ 125 I]iodophenyl) carboxamide ( 125 I-rau-AZPC). In a partially purified receptor preparation from porcine brain, this compound photolabels a major (Mr = 62,000) peptide. The labeling of this peptide is inhibited by adrenergic agonists and antagonists with a rank order of potency consistent with an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor binding site. Both 125 I-rau-AMPC and the photolabile arylazide derivative, 125 I-rau-AZPC, should prove useful as molecular probes for the structural and biochemical characterization of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors

  2. The Three Dimensional Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (3D-QSAR and Docking Studies of Curcumin Derivatives as Androgen Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor antagonists have been proved to be effective anti-prostate cancer agents. 3D-QSAR and Molecular docking methods were performed on curcumin derivatives as androgen receptor antagonists. The bioactive conformation was explored by docking the potent compound 29 into the binding site of AR. The constructed Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA and Comparative Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA models produced statistically significant results with the cross-validated correlation coefficients q2 of 0.658 and 0.567, non-cross-validated correlation coefficients r2 of 0.988 and 0.978, and predicted correction coefficients r2pred of 0.715 and 0.793, respectively. These results ensure the CoMFA and CoMSIA models as a tool to guide the design of novel potent AR antagonists. A set of 30 new analogs were proposed by utilizing the results revealed in the present study, and were predicted with potential activities in the developed models.

  3. Hepatocyte growth factor enhances death receptor-induced apoptosis by up-regulating DR5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yang; Fan, Xing; Goodwin, C Rory; Laterra, John; Xia, Shuli

    2008-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and its receptor c-MET are commonly expressed in malignant gliomas and embryonic neuroectodermal tumors including medulloblastoma and appear to play an important role in the growth and dissemination of these malignancies. Dependent on cell context and the involvement of specific downstream effectors, both pro- and anti-apoptotic effects of HGF have been reported. Human medulloblastoma cells were treated with HGF for 24–72 hours followed by death receptor ligand TRAIL (Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) for 24 hours. Cell death was measured by MTT and Annexin-V/PI flow cytometric analysis. Changes in expression levels of targets of interest were measured by Northern blot analysis, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, Western blot analysis as well as immunoprecipitation. In this study, we show that HGF promotes medulloblastoma cell death induced by TRAIL. TRAIL alone triggered apoptosis in DAOY cells and death was enhanced by pre-treating the cells with HGF for 24–72 h prior to the addition of TRAIL. HGF (100 ng/ml) enhanced TRAIL (10 ng/ml) induced cell death by 36% (P < 0.001). No cell death was associated with HGF alone. Treating cells with PHA-665752, a specific c-Met receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, significantly abrogated the enhancement of TRAIL-induced cell death by HGF, indicating that its death promoting effect requires activation of its canonical receptor tyrosine kinase. Cell death induced by TRAIL+HGF was predominately apoptotic involving both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways as evidenced by the increased activation of caspase-3, 8, 9. Promotion of apoptosis by HGF occurred via the increased expression of the death receptor DR5 and enhanced formation of death-inducing signal complexes (DISC). Taken together, these and previous findings indicate that HGF:c-Met pathway either promotes or inhibits medulloblastoma cell death via pathway and context specific mechanisms

  4. Radiolabelled GLP-1 receptor antagonist binds to GLP-1 receptor-expressing human tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude [University of Berne, Division of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, PO Box 62, Berne (Switzerland)

    2014-06-15

    Radiolabelled glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have recently been shown to successfully image benign insulinomas in patients. For the somatostatin receptor targeting of tumours, however, it was recently reported that antagonist tracers were superior to agonist tracers. The present study therefore evaluated various forms of the {sup 125}iodinated-Bolton-Hunter (BH)-exendin(9-39) antagonist tracer for the in vitro visualization of GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues in rats and humans and compared it with the agonist tracer {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide. Receptor autoradiography studies with {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide agonist or {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) antagonist radioligands were performed in human and rat tissues. The antagonist {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) labelled at lysine 19 identifies all human and rat GLP-1 target tissues and GLP-1 receptor-expressing tumours. Binding is of high affinity and is comparable in all tested tissues in its binding properties with the agonist tracer {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide. For comparison, {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) with the BH labelled at lysine 4 did identify the GLP-1 receptor in rat tissues but not in human tissues. The GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39) labelled with {sup 125}I-BH at lysine 19 is an excellent GLP-1 radioligand that identifies human and rat GLP-1 receptors in normal and tumoural tissues. It may therefore be the molecular basis to develop suitable GLP-1 receptor antagonist radioligands for in vivo imaging of GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues in patients. (orig.)

  5. Islet-selectivity of G-protein coupled receptor ligands evaluated for PET imaging of pancreatic {beta}-cell mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, Gary W., E-mail: gary.cline@yale.edu [Yale University School of Medicine (United States); Zhao, Xiaojian [Yale University School of Medicine (United States); Jakowski, Amy B.; Soeller, Walter C.; Treadway, Judith L. [Pfizer Global Research and Development, Pfizer Inc., Groton CT (United States)

    2011-09-02

    Highlights: {yields} We screened G-protein coupled receptors for imaging pancreatic. {yields} Database mining and immunohistochemistry identified GPCRs enriched in {beta}-cells. {yields} In vitro and in vivo assays were used to determine exocrine vs endocrine specificity. {yields} GPCR candidates for imaging of {beta}-cell mass are Prokineticin-1R, mGluR5, and GLP-1R. -- Abstract: A critical unmet need exists for methods to quantitatively measure endogenous pancreatic {beta}-cell mass (BCM) for the clinical evaluation of therapies to prevent or reverse loss of BCM and diabetes progression. Our objective was to identify G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are expressed with a high degree of specificity to islet {beta}-cells for receptor-targeted imaging of BCM. GPCRs enriched in pancreatic islets relative to pancreas acinar and hepatic tissue were identified using a database screen. Islet-specific expression was confirmed by human pancreas immunohistochemistry (IHC). In vitro selectivity assessment was determined from the binding and uptake of radiolabeled ligands to the rat insulinoma INS-1 832/13 cell line and isolated rat islets relative to the exocrine pancreas cell-type, PANC-1. Tail-vein injections of radioligands into rats were used to determine favorable image criteria of in vivo biodistribution to the pancreas relative to other internal organs (i.e., liver, spleen, stomach, and lungs). Database and IHC screening identified four candidate receptors for further in vitro and in vivo evaluation for PET imaging of BCM: prokineticin-1 receptor (PK-1R), metabotropic glutamate receptor type-5 (mGluR5), neuropeptide Y-2 receptor (NPY-2R), and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R). In vitro specificity ratios gave the following receptor rank order: PK-1R > GLP-1R > NPY-2R > mGluR5. The biodistribution rank order of selectivity to the pancreas was found to be PK-1R > VMAT2 {approx} GLP-1R > mGluR5. Favorable islet selectivity and biodistribution

  6. Islet-selectivity of G-protein coupled receptor ligands evaluated for PET imaging of pancreatic β-cell mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, Gary W.; Zhao, Xiaojian; Jakowski, Amy B.; Soeller, Walter C.; Treadway, Judith L.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We screened G-protein coupled receptors for imaging pancreatic. → Database mining and immunohistochemistry identified GPCRs enriched in β-cells. → In vitro and in vivo assays were used to determine exocrine vs endocrine specificity. → GPCR candidates for imaging of β-cell mass are Prokineticin-1R, mGluR5, and GLP-1R. -- Abstract: A critical unmet need exists for methods to quantitatively measure endogenous pancreatic β-cell mass (BCM) for the clinical evaluation of therapies to prevent or reverse loss of BCM and diabetes progression. Our objective was to identify G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are expressed with a high degree of specificity to islet β-cells for receptor-targeted imaging of BCM. GPCRs enriched in pancreatic islets relative to pancreas acinar and hepatic tissue were identified using a database screen. Islet-specific expression was confirmed by human pancreas immunohistochemistry (IHC). In vitro selectivity assessment was determined from the binding and uptake of radiolabeled ligands to the rat insulinoma INS-1 832/13 cell line and isolated rat islets relative to the exocrine pancreas cell-type, PANC-1. Tail-vein injections of radioligands into rats were used to determine favorable image criteria of in vivo biodistribution to the pancreas relative to other internal organs (i.e., liver, spleen, stomach, and lungs). Database and IHC screening identified four candidate receptors for further in vitro and in vivo evaluation for PET imaging of BCM: prokineticin-1 receptor (PK-1R), metabotropic glutamate receptor type-5 (mGluR5), neuropeptide Y-2 receptor (NPY-2R), and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R). In vitro specificity ratios gave the following receptor rank order: PK-1R > GLP-1R > NPY-2R > mGluR5. The biodistribution rank order of selectivity to the pancreas was found to be PK-1R > VMAT2 ∼ GLP-1R > mGluR5. Favorable islet selectivity and biodistribution characteristics suggest several GPCRs as potential

  7. Change in the properties of the opiate receptors of the brain under conditions of habituation of rats to morphine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaitsev, S.V.; Sergeeva, M.G.; Chichenkov, O.N.; Petrov, V.E.; Varfolomeev, S.D.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of prolonged administration of morphine on the properties of the opiate receptors of the rat brain was investigated. For this purpose they conducted an analysis of the isotherms of binding of labeled μ-, σ-, and chi-ligands: morphine, D-Ala 2 , D-Leu 5 -enkephalin, and ethylketocyclazocin, with membrane preparations of the brains of rats tolerant to morphine, as well as the control animals. For a quantitative determination of the dissociation constants of the ligand-receptor complexes (K) and the concentration of the reagents ([Q]), they used differential method and the method of simulation modeling. It was shown that the values of K and [Q] for individual animals are subjected to substantial dispersion, whereas the ratios [Q]/K undergo minor individual fluctuations, both in the control group and in the group of rats tolerant to morphine. This permits the ratio [Q]/K to be singled out as one of the main parameters for comparing the properties of opiate receptors of various groups of animals. Using this criterion, as well as the method of simulated modeling, it was shown that the development of tolerance is accompanied by a change in the properties of the δ-receptors (the ratio [Q]/K decreases by a factor of more than two). In contrast to the δ-receptors, no significant influence of the tolerance on the properties of the μ- and chi-receptors, as well as the ultrahigh-affinity ligand binding sites, was detected

  8. Change in the properties of the opiate receptors of the brain under conditions of habituation of rats to morphine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaitsev, S.V.; Sergeeva, M.G.; Chichenkov, O.N.; Petrov, V.E.; Varfolomeev, S.D.

    1987-02-20

    The influence of prolonged administration of morphine on the properties of the opiate receptors of the rat brain was investigated. For this purpose they conducted an analysis of the isotherms of binding of labeled ..mu..-, sigma-, and chi-ligands: morphine, D-Ala/sup 2/, D-Leu/sup 5/-enkephalin, and ethylketocyclazocin, with membrane preparations of the brains of rats tolerant to morphine, as well as the control animals. For a quantitative determination of the dissociation constants of the ligand-receptor complexes (K) and the concentration of the reagents ((Q)), they used differential method and the method of simulation modeling. It was shown that the values of K and (Q) for individual animals are subjected to substantial dispersion, whereas the ratios (Q)/K undergo minor individual fluctuations, both in the control group and in the group of rats tolerant to morphine. This permits the ratio (Q)/K to be singled out as one of the main parameters for comparing the properties of opiate receptors of various groups of animals. Using this criterion, as well as the method of simulated modeling, it was shown that the development of tolerance is accompanied by a change in the properties of the delta-receptors (the ratio (Q)/K decreases by a factor of more than two). In contrast to the delta-receptors, no significant influence of the tolerance on the properties of the ..mu..- and chi-receptors, as well as the ultrahigh-affinity ligand binding sites, was detected.

  9. Multicompartmental study of fluorine-18 altanserin binding to brain 5HT2 receptors in humans using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biver, F.; Goldman, S.; Luxen, A.; Monclus, M.; Forestini, M.; Mendlewicz, J.; Lotstra, F.

    1994-01-01

    Serotoninergic type 2 (5HT 2 ) receptors have been implicated in the regulation of many brain functions in humans and may play a role in several neurological and psychiatric diseases. Fluorine-18 altanserin has been proposed as a new radiotracer for the study of 5HT 2 receptors by PET because of its high affinity for 5HT 2 receptors (Ki: 0.13 nM) and its good specificity in in vitro studies. Dynamic PET studies were carried out in 12 healthy volunteers after intravenous injection of 0.1 mCi/kg [ 18 F] altanserin. Ninety minutes after injection, we observed mainly cortical binding. Basal ganglia and cerebellum showed very low uptake and the frontal cortex to cerebellum ratio was about 3. To evaluate the quantitative distribution of this ligand in the brain, we used two different methods of data analysis: a four-compartment model was used to achieve quantitative evaluation of rate constants (K 1 and k 2 through k 6 ) by non-linear regression, and a multiple-time graphical analysis technique for reversible binding was employed for the measurement of k 1 /k 2 and k 3 /k 4 ratios. Using both methods, we found significant differences in binding capacity (estimated by k 3 /k 4 = B max /K d ) between regions, the values increasing as follows: occipital, limbic, parietal, frontal and temporal cortex. After correction of values obtained by the graphical method for the existence of non-specific binding, results generated by the two methods were consistent. (orig.)

  10. Dengue virus receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Hidari, Kazuya I.P.J.; Suzuki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus is an arthropod-borne virus transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. Dengue virus causes fever and hemorrhagic disorders in humans and non-human primates. Direct interaction of the virus introduced by a mosquito bite with host receptor molecule(s) is crucial for virus propagation and the pathological progression of dengue diseases. Therefore, elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between dengue virus and its receptor(s) in both humans and mosquitoes is essent...

  11. Dynamic changes in the expression of DEP-1 and other PDGF receptor-antagonizing PTPs during onset and termination of neointima formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappert, Kai; Paulsson, Janna; Sparwel, Jan; Leppänen, Olli; Hellberg, Carina; Ostman, Arne; Micke, Patrick

    2007-02-01

    Growth factor-dependent tissue remodeling, such as restenosis, is believed to be predominantly regulated by changes in expression of receptor-tyrosine-kinases (RTKs) and their ligands. As endogenous antagonists of RTKs, protein-tyrosine-phosphatases (PTPs) are additional candidate regulators of these processes. Using laser-capture-microdissection and quantitative RT-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), we investigated the layer-specific expression of the four platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) isoforms, the PDGF-alpha and beta receptors, and five PTPs implied in control of PDGF-receptor signaling 8 and 14 days after balloon injury of the rat carotid. Results were correlated with analyses of PDGF-beta receptor phosphorylation and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation in vivo. The expression levels of all components, as well as receptor activation and VSMC proliferation, showed specific changes, which varied between media and neointima. Interestingly, PTP expression--particularly, DEP-1 levels--appeared to be the dominating factor determining receptor-phosphorylation and VSMC proliferation. In support of these findings, cultured DEP-1(-/-) cells displayed increased PDGF-dependent cell signaling. Hyperactivation of PDGF-induced signaling was also observed after siRNA-down-regulation of DEP-1 in VSMCs. The results indicate a previously unrecognized role of PDGF-receptor-targeting PTPs in controlling neointima formation. In more general terms, the observations indicate transcriptional regulation of PTPs as an important mechanism for controlling onset and termination of RTK-dependent tissue remodeling.

  12. Quantification of Estrogen Receptor Expression in Normal Breast Tissue in Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer and Association With Tumor Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbahce, H Evin; Blair, Cindy K; Sweeney, Carol; Salama, Mohamed E

    2017-09-01

    Estrogen exposure is important in the pathogenesis of breast cancer and is a contributing risk factor. In this study we quantified estrogen receptor (ER) alpha expression in normal breast epithelium (NBR) in women with breast cancer and correlated it with breast cancer subtypes. Tissue microarrays were constructed from 204 breast cancer patients for whom normal breast tissue away from tumor was available. Slides stained with ER were scanned and expression in normal terminal duct lobular epithelium was quantitated using computer-assisted image analysis. ER expression in normal terminal duct lobular epithelium of postmenopausal women with breast cancer was significantly associated with estrogen and triple (estrogen, progesterone receptors, and HER2) negative phenotypes. Also increased age at diagnosis was significantly associated with ER expression in NBR. ER positivity in normal epithelium did not vary by tumor size, lymph node status, tumor grade, or stage. On the basis of quantitative image analysis, we confirm that ER expression in NBR increases with age in women with breast cancer, and report for the first time, a significant association between ER expression in NBR with ER-negative and triple-negative cancers in postmenopausal women.

  13. True Molecular Scale Visualization of Variable Clustering Properties of Ryanodine Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isuru Jayasinghe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Signaling nanodomains rely on spatial organization of proteins to allow controlled intracellular signaling. Examples include calcium release sites of cardiomyocytes where ryanodine receptors (RyRs are clustered with their molecular partners. Localization microscopy has been crucial to visualizing these nanodomains but has been limited by brightness of markers, restricting the resolution and quantification of individual proteins clustered within. Harnessing the remarkable localization precision of DNA-PAINT (<10 nm, we visualized punctate labeling within these nanodomains, confirmed as single RyRs. RyR positions within sub-plasmalemmal nanodomains revealed how they are organized randomly into irregular clustering patterns leaving significant gaps occupied by accessory or regulatory proteins. RyR-inhibiting protein junctophilin-2 appeared highly concentrated adjacent to RyR channels. Analyzing these molecular maps showed significant variations in the co-clustering stoichiometry between junctophilin-2 and RyR, even between nearby nanodomains. This constitutes an additional level of complexity in RyR arrangement and regulation of calcium signaling, intrinsically built into the nanodomains. : Jayasinghe et al. resolve the distribution of single ryanodine receptors (RyRs within intracellular signaling domains in cardiac myocytes with DNA-PAINT, a super-resolution microscopy approach. Individual RyRs are resolved within irregular cluster arrays. Quantitative imaging reveals significant variation in the co-clustering stoichiometry between RyRs and the regulatory protein junctophilin-2. Keywords: nanodomains, DNA-PAINT, single-molecule localization microscopy, ryanodine receptor, super-resolution imaging, junctophilin, heart

  14. Involvement of norepinephrine activity in the regulation of α1 adrenergic receptors in the medial preoptic nucleus of estradiol-treated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sortino, M.A.; Weiland, N.G.; Wise, P.M.

    1989-01-01

    To establish whether the diurnal decrease in the density of α1 receptors observed in the medial preoptic nucleus (MPN) of estrogen (E 2 )-treated rats is related to the concomitant diurnal increase in norepinephrine (NE) turnover rates, we quantitiated the density of [ 3 H]-Prazosin binding to α1 receptors after blockade of NE turnover with alpha-methyl-paratyrosine (αMPT). A series of preliminary studies was performed to rule out an interference of this drug with [ 3 H]-Prazosin binding to α1 adrenergic receptors in vitro and in vivo. Incubation of brain slices with αMPT produced a dose-dependent inhibition of [ 3 H]-Prazosin binding to α1 adrenergic receptors with an IC 50 of approximately 6 mM. Scatchard analysis demonstrated that αMPT exhibited a simple competitive interaction with [ 3 H]-Prazosin binding sites as shown by an increase in the apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of the ligand and no change in the number of α1 receptors (B/sub max/). In contrast, preincubation of brain slices with αMPT and prior in vivo administration of αMPT did not affect [ 3 H]-Prazosin binding to α1 adrenergic receptors. The density of α1 adrenergic receptors in MPN was quantitated autoradiographically. Blockade of NE turnover with αMPT only partially prevented the reduction in α1 receptor density observed in the E 2 -treated rats, suggesting that the decrease in the level of [ 3 H]-Prazosin binding sites cannot be completely ascribed to increased NE turnover rates

  15. Characterization of the three different states of the cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor in pancreatic acini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talkad, V D; Patto, R J; Metz, D C; Turner, R J; Fortune, K P; Bhat, S T; Gardner, J D

    1994-10-20

    the low affinity state of the CCK receptor. When amplification was expressed quantitatively as the value of Kd for the low affinity state divided by the corresponding EC50 for stimulating amylase secretion the values were CCK-8 (1000), de(SO)CCK-8 (1500), gastrin (100) and CCK-JMV-180 (Menozzi, D., Vinayek, R., Jensen, R.T. and Gardner, J.D. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 10385-1091).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  16. Weak Ergodicity Breaking of Receptor Motion in Living Cells Stemming from Random Diffusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Carlo; Torreno-Pina, Juan A.; Massignan, Pietro; Lapeyre, Gerald J.; Lewenstein, Maciej; Garcia Parajo, Maria F.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular transport in living systems regulates numerous processes underlying biological function. Although many cellular components exhibit anomalous diffusion, only recently has the subdiffusive motion been associated with nonergodic behavior. These findings have stimulated new questions for their implications in statistical mechanics and cell biology. Is nonergodicity a common strategy shared by living systems? Which physical mechanisms generate it? What are its implications for biological function? Here, we use single-particle tracking to demonstrate that the motion of dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), a receptor with unique pathogen-recognition capabilities, reveals nonergodic subdiffusion on living-cell membranes In contrast to previous studies, this behavior is incompatible with transient immobilization, and, therefore, it cannot be interpreted according to continuous-time random-walk theory. We show that the receptor undergoes changes of diffusivity, consistent with the current view of the cell membrane as a highly dynamic and diverse environment. Simulations based on a model of an ordinary random walk in complex media quantitatively reproduce all our observations, pointing toward diffusion heterogeneity as the cause of DC-SIGN behavior. By studying different receptor mutants, we further correlate receptor motion to its molecular structure, thus establishing a strong link between nonergodicity and biological function. These results underscore the role of disorder in cell membranes and its connection with function regulation. Because of its generality, our approach offers a framework to interpret anomalous transport in other complex media where dynamic heterogeneity might play a major role, such as those found, e.g., in soft condensed matter, geology, and ecology.

  17. 3D-QSAR comparative molecular field analysis on opioid receptor antagonists: pooling data from different studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Youyi; Keenan, Susan M; Zhang, Qiang; Kholodovych, Vladyslav; Welsh, William J

    2005-03-10

    Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) models were constructed using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) on a series of opioid receptor antagonists. To obtain statistically significant and robust CoMFA models, a sizable data set of naltrindole and naltrexone analogues was assembled by pooling biological and structural data from independent studies. A process of "leave one data set out", similar to the traditional "leave one out" cross-validation procedure employed in partial least squares (PLS) analysis, was utilized to study the feasibility of pooling data in the present case. These studies indicate that our approach yields statistically significant and highly predictive CoMFA models from the pooled data set of delta, mu, and kappa opioid receptor antagonists. All models showed excellent internal predictability and self-consistency: q(2) = 0.69/r(2) = 0.91 (delta), q(2) = 0.67/r(2) = 0.92 (mu), and q(2) = 0.60/r(2) = 0.96 (kappa). The CoMFA models were further validated using two separate test sets: one test set was selected randomly from the pooled data set, while the other test set was retrieved from other published sources. The overall excellent agreement between CoMFA-predicted and experimental binding affinities for a structurally diverse array of ligands across all three opioid receptor subtypes gives testimony to the superb predictive power of these models. CoMFA field analysis demonstrated that the variations in binding affinity of opioid antagonists are dominated by steric rather than electrostatic interactions with the three opioid receptor binding sites. The CoMFA steric-electrostatic contour maps corresponding to the delta, mu, and kappa opioid receptor subtypes reflected the characteristic similarities and differences in the familiar "message-address" concept of opioid receptor ligands. Structural modifications to increase selectivity for the delta over mu and kappa opioid receptors have been predicted on the

  18. Repeated blockade of mineralocorticoid receptors, but not of glucocorticoid receptors impairs food rewarded spatial learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, B. R.; Korte, S. M.; Buwalda, B.; La Fleur, S. E.; Bohus, B.; Luiten, P. G.

    1998-01-01

    Corticosteroids from the adrenal cortex influence a variety of behaviours including cognition, learning and memory. These hormones act via two intracellular receptors, the mineralo-corticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). These two receptor types display a high concentration and

  19. Repeated blockade of mineralocorticoid receptors, but not of glucocorticoid receptors impairs food rewarded spatial learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, BRK; Korte, SM; Buwalda, B; la Fleur, SE; Bohus, B; Luiten, PGM

    Corticosteroids from the adrenal cortex influence a variety of behaviours including cognition, learning and memory. These hormones act via two intracellular receptors, the mineralo-corticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). These two receptor types display a high concentration and

  20. Localization and characterization of angiotensin II receptor binding and angiotensin converting enzyme in the human medulla oblongata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, A M; Chai, S Y; Clevers, J; McKinley, M J; Paxinos, G; Mendelsohn, F A

    1988-03-08

    Angiotensin II receptor and angiotensin converting enzyme distributions in the human medulla oblongata were localised by quantitative in vitro autoradiography. Angiotensin II receptors were labelled with the antagonist analogue 125I-[Sar1, Ile8] AII while angiotensin converting enzyme was labelled with 125I-351A, a derivative of the specific converting enzyme inhibitor, lisinopril. Angiotensin II receptor binding and angiotensin converting enzyme are present in high concentrations in the nucleus of the solitary tract, the dorsal motor nucleus of vagus, the rostral and caudal ventrolateral reticular nucleus, and in a band connecting the dorsal and ventral regions. In the rostral and caudal ventrolateral reticular nucleus, angiotensin II receptors are distributed in a punctate pattern that registers with neuronal cell bodies. The distribution and density of these cell bodies closely resemble those of catecholamine-containing neurones mapped by others. In view of the known interactions of angiotensin II with both central and peripheral catecholamine-containing neurons of laboratory animals, the current anatomical findings suggest similar interactions between these neuroactive compounds in the human central nervous system. The presence of angiotensin II receptors and angiotensin converting enzyme in the nucleus of the solitary tract, dorsal motor nucleus of vagus, and rostral and caudal ventrolateral reticular nucleus demonstrates sites for central angiotensin II to exert its known actions on vasopressin release and autonomic functions including blood pressure control. These data also suggest a possible interaction between angiotensin II and central catecholeminergic systems.

  1. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis Shows That SAV-3 Infection Upregulates Pattern Recognition Receptors of the Endosomal Toll-Like and RIG-I-Like Receptor Signaling Pathways in Macrophage/Dendritic Like TO-Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Xu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental step in cellular defense mechanisms is the recognition of “danger signals” made of conserved pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs expressed by invading pathogens, by host cell germ line coded pattern recognition receptors (PRRs. In this study, we used RNA-seq and the Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG to identify PRRs together with the network pathway of differentially expressed genes (DEGs that recognize salmonid alphavirus subtype 3 (SAV-3 infection in macrophage/dendritic like TO-cells derived from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L headkidney leukocytes. Our findings show that recognition of SAV-3 in TO-cells was restricted to endosomal Toll-like receptors (TLRs 3 and 8 together with RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs and not the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors NOD-like receptor (NLRs genes. Among the RLRs, upregulated genes included the retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I, melanoma differentiation association 5 (MDA5 and laboratory of genetics and physiology 2 (LGP2. The study points to possible involvement of the tripartite motif containing 25 (TRIM25 and mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS in modulating RIG-I signaling being the first report that links these genes to the RLR pathway in SAV-3 infection in TO-cells. Downstream signaling suggests that both the TLR and RLR pathways use interferon (IFN regulatory factors (IRFs 3 and 7 to produce IFN-a2. The validity of RNA-seq data generated in this study was confirmed by quantitative real time qRT-PCR showing that genes up- or downregulated by RNA-seq were also up- or downregulated by RT-PCR. Overall, this study shows that de novo transcriptome assembly identify key receptors of the TLR and RLR sensors engaged in host pathogen interaction at cellular level. We envisage that data presented here can open a road map for future intervention strategies in SAV infection of salmon.

  2. Divisional role of quantitative HER2 testing in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto-Ibusuki, Mutsuko; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Fu, Peifen; Yamamoto, Satoko; Fujiwara, Saori; Honda, Yumi; Iyama, Ken-ichi; Iwase, Hirotaka

    2015-03-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is amplified in human breast cancers in which therapy targeted to HER2 significantly improves patient outcome. We re-visited the use of real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)-based assays using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues as alternative methods and investigated their particular clinical relevance. DNA and RNA were isolated from FFPE specimens and HER2 status was assessed by qPCR in 249 consecutive patients with primary breast cancer. Concordance with results forg immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in situ hybridization (ISH), clinical characteristics and survival was assessed. HER2 gene copy number had a stronger correlation with clinicopathological characteristics and excellent concordance with IHC/ISH results (Sensitivity: 96.7 %; concordance: 99.2 %). HER2 gene expression showed inadequate sensitivity, rendering it unsuitable to determine HER2 status (Sensitivity: 46.7 %; concordance: 92.1 %), but lower HER2 gene expression, leading to the classification of many cases as "false negative", contributed to a prediction of better prognosis within the HER2-amplified subpopulation. Quantitative HER2 assessments are suggested to have evolved their accuracy in this decade, which can be a potential alternative for HER2 diagnosis in line with the in situ method, while HER2 gene expression levels could provide additional information regarding prognosis or therapeutic strategy within a HER2-amplified subpopulation.

  3. Exclusive nuclear location of estrogen receptors in Squalus testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callard, G V; Mak, P

    1985-01-01

    An estrogen (E)-binding molecule having both occupied and unoccupied sites is restricted to nuclear subfractions in the testis of the spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias). We investigated the hypothesis that a species characterized by high body-fluid osmolarity (1010 mosM) has an estrogen receptor (ER) that binds to chromatin with high affinity and consequently resists redistribution during tissue processing. Although the steroid binding and sedimentation properties of the Squalus nuclear ER conformed to those of classical ER, its elution maximum from DNA-cellulose was unusually high (0.55 M NaCl). A tendency to adhere tightly to cell nuclei was reflected in the high salt concentration (0.43 M KCl) required to extract 50% of the receptors from the nuclear compartment during homogenization and in the stability of the nuclear ER population in the presence of high concentrations of a nonionic solute (urea) or increased buffer volume. Mixing and redistribution experiments showed that nuclear ER could be quantitatively and qualitatively measured in cytosolic extracts, ruling out the possibility that soluble receptors were being masked. Although Squalus oviduct ER was similar to that of testis, ER in the testis and liver of a related elasmobranch (Potamotrygon) that maintains osmotic equilibrium at 300 mosM more closely resembled mammalian ER in its elution maximum from DNA-cellulose (0.22 M NaCl) and cytosolic/nuclear ratios in low-salt buffers. We conclude that Squalus testis has a single ER pool located exclusively in the nuclear compartment. These observations support a revised concept of steroid action and further indicate that the chromatin affinity of the hormone-ER complex is an important factor in determining subfractional distribution during tissue processing. PMID:3856265

  4. Inhibitory effects of azole-type fungicides on interleukin-17 gene expression via retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors α and γ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Hiroyuki; Muromoto, Ryuta; Takahashi, Miki; Takeuchi, Shinji; Takeda, Yukimasa; Jetten, Anton M.; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    The retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors α and γ (RORα and RORγ), are key regulators of helper T (Th)17 cell differentiation, which is involved in the innate immune system and autoimmune disorders. However, it remains unclear whether environmental chemicals, including pesticides, have agonistic and/or antagonistic activity against RORα/γ. In this study, we investigated the RORα/γ activity of several azole-type fungicides, and the effects of these fungicides on the gene expression of interleukin (IL)-17, which mediates the function of Th17 cells. In the ROR-reporter gene assays, five azole-type fungicides (imibenconazole, triflumizole, hexaconazole, tetraconazole and imazalil) suppressed RORα- and/or RORγ-mediated transcriptional activity as did benzenesulphonamide T0901317, a ROR inverse agonist and a liver X receptor (LXR) agonist. In particular, imibenconazole, triflumizole and hexaconazole showed RORγ inverse agonistic activity at concentrations of 10−6 M. However, unlike T0901317, these fungicides failed to show any LXRα/β agonistic activity. Next, five azole-type fungicides, showing ROR inverse agonist activity, were tested on IL-17 mRNA expression in mouse T lymphoma EL4 cells treated with phorbol myristate acetate and ionomycin. The quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that these fungicides suppressed the expression of IL-17 mRNA without effecting RORα and RORγ mRNA levels. In addition, the inhibitory effect of imibenconazole as well as that of T0901317 was absorbed in RORα/γ-knocked down EL4 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that some azole-type fungicides inhibit IL-17 production via RORα/γ. This also provides the first evidence that environmental chemicals can act as modulators of IL-17 expression in immune cells. PMID:22289359

  5. Functional relevance of G-protein-coupled-receptor-associated proteins, exemplified by receptor-activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, J A; Muff, R; Born, W

    2002-08-01

    The calcitonin (CT) receptor (CTR) and the CTR-like receptor (CRLR) are close relatives within the type II family of G-protein-coupled receptors, demonstrating sequence identity of 50%. Unlike the interaction between CT and CTR, receptors for the related hormones and neuropeptides amylin, CT-gene-related peptide (CGRP) and adrenomedullin (AM) require one of three accessory receptor-activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) for ligand recognition. An amylin/CGRP receptor is revealed when CTR is co-expressed with RAMP1. When complexed with RAMP3, CTR interacts with amylin alone. CRLR, initially classed as an orphan receptor, is a CGRP receptor when co-expressed with RAMP1. The same receptor is specific for AM in the presence of RAMP2. Together with human RAMP3, CRLR defines an AM receptor, and with mouse RAMP3 it is a low-affinity CGRP/AM receptor. CTR-RAMP1, antagonized preferentially by salmon CT-(8-32) and not by CGRP-(8-37), and CRLR-RAMP1, antagonized by CGRP-(8-37), are two CGRP receptor isotypes. Thus amylin and CGRP interact specifically with heterodimeric complexes between CTR and RAMP1 or RAMP3, and CGRP and AM interact with complexes between CRLR and RAMP1, RAMP2 or RAMP3.

  6. Pathophysiological consequences of receptor mistraffic: Tales from the platelet P2Y12 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Margaret R; Aungraheeta, Riyaad; Mundell, Stuart J

    2017-07-05

    Genetic variations in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes can disrupt receptor function in a wide variety of human genetic diseases, including platelet bleeding disorders. Platelets are critical for haemostasis with inappropriate platelet activation leading to the development of arterial thrombosis, which can result in heart attack and stroke whilst decreased platelet activity is associated with an increased risk of bleeding. GPCRs expressed on the surface of platelets play key roles in regulating platelet activity and therefore function. Receptors include purinergic receptors (P2Y 1 and P2Y 12 ), proteinase-activated receptor (PAR1 and PAR4) and thromboxane receptors (TPα), among others. Pharmacological blockade of these receptors forms a powerful therapeutic tool in the treatment and prevention of arterial thrombosis. With the advance of genomic technologies, there has been a substantial increase in the identification of naturally occurring rare and common GPCR variants. These variants include single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertion or deletions that have the potential to alter GPCR expression or function. A number of defects in platelet GPCRs that disrupt receptor function have now been characterized in patients with mild bleeding disorders. This review will focus on rare, function-disrupting variants of platelet GPCRs with particular emphasis upon mutations in the P2Y 12 receptor gene that affect receptor traffic to modulate platelet function. Further this review will outline how the identification and characterization of function-disrupting GPCR mutations provides an essential link in translating our detailed understanding of receptor traffic and function in cell line studies into relevant human biological systems. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Current V3 genotyping algorithms are inadequate for predicting X4 co-receptor usage in clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Andrew J; Dong, Winnie; Chan, Dennison; Sing, Tobias; Swanstrom, Ronald; Jensen, Mark; Pillai, Satish; Good, Benjamin; Harrigan, P Richard

    2007-09-12

    Integrating CCR5 antagonists into clinical practice would benefit from accurate assays of co-receptor usage (CCR5 versus CXCR4) with fast turnaround and low cost. Published HIV V3-loop based predictors of co-receptor usage were compared with actual phenotypic tropism results in a large cohort of antiretroviral naive individuals to determine accuracy on clinical samples and identify areas for improvement. Aligned HIV envelope V3 loop sequences (n = 977), derived by bulk sequencing were analyzed by six methods: the 11/25 rule; a neural network (NN), two support vector machines, and two subtype-B position specific scoring matrices (PSSM). Co-receptor phenotype results (Trofile Co-receptor Phenotype Assay; Monogram Biosciences) were stratified by CXCR4 relative light unit (RLU) readout and CD4 cell count. Co-receptor phenotype was available for 920 clinical samples with V3 genotypes having fewer than seven amino acid mixtures (n = 769 R5; n = 151 X4-capable). Sensitivity and specificity for predicting X4 capacity were evaluated for the 11/25 rule (30% sensitivity/93% specificity), NN (44%/88%), PSSM(sinsi) (34%/96%), PSSM(x4r5) (24%/97%), SVMgenomiac (22%/90%) and SVMgeno2pheno (50%/89%). Quantitative increases in sensitivity could be obtained by optimizing the cut-off for methods with continuous output (PSSM methods), and/or integrating clinical data (CD4%). Sensitivity was directly proportional to strength of X4 signal in the phenotype assay (P < 0.05). Current default implementations of co-receptor prediction algorithms are inadequate for predicting HIV X4 co-receptor usage in clinical samples, particularly those X4 phenotypes with low CXCR4 RLU signals. Significant improvements can be made to genotypic predictors, including training on clinical samples, using additional data to improve predictions and optimizing cutoffs and increasing genotype sensitivity.

  8. Quantitative analysis of secretome from adipocytes regulated by insulin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Zhou; Yuanyuan Xiao; Rongxia Li; Shangyu Hong; Sujun Li; Lianshui Wang; Rong Zeng; Kan Liao

    2009-01-01

    Adipocyte is not only a central player involved in storage and release of energy, but also in regulation of energy metabolism in other organs via secretion of pep-tides and proteins. During the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, adipocytes are subjected to the increased levels of insulin, which may have a major impact on the secretion of adipokines. We have undertaken cleavable isotope-coded affinity tag (clCAT) and label-free quantitation approaches to identify and quantify secretory factors that are differen-tially secreted by 3T3-LI adipocytes with or without insulin treatment. Combination of clCAT and label-free results, there are 317 proteins predicted or annotated as secretory proteins. Among these secretory proteins, 179 proteins and 53 proteins were significantly up-regulated and down-regulated, respectively. A total of 77 reported adipokines were quantified in our study, such as adiponectin, cathepsin D, cystatin C, resistin, and transferrin. Western blot analysis of these adipo-kines confirmed the quantitative results from mass spectrometry, and revealed individualized secreting pat-terns of these proteins by increasing insulin dose. In addition, 240 proteins were newly identified and quanti-fied as secreted proteins from 3T3-L1 adipocytes in our study, most of which were up-regulated upon insulin treatment. Further comprehensive bioinformatics analysis revealed that the secretory proteins in extra-cellular matrix-receptor interaction pathway and glycan structure degradation pathway were significantly up-regulated by insulin stimulation.

  9. Targeting of TAM Receptors Ameliorates Fibrotic Mechanisms in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espindola, Milena S; Habiel, David M; Narayanan, Rohan; Jones, Isabelle; Coelho, Ana L; Murray, Lynne A; Jiang, Dianhua; Noble, Paul W; Hogaboam, Cory M

    2018-06-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is characterized by aberrant lung remodeling, which progressively abolishes lung function in an RTK (receptor tyrosine kinase)-dependent manner. Gas6 (growth arrest-specific 6) ligand, Tyro3 (TYRO3 protein tyrosine kinase 3), and Axl (anexelekto) RTK expression and activity are increased in IPF. To determine if targeting these RTK pathways would inhibit fibroblast activation and the development of pulmonary fibrosis. Quantitative genomic, proteomic, and functional analyses were used to determine Gas6/TAM (Tyro3, Axl, and Mertk [MER proto-oncogene, tyrosine kinase]) RTK expression and activation in tissues and fibroblasts from normal and IPF lungs. The profibrotic impact of these RTK pathways were also examined in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis and in SCID/Bg mice that developed pulmonary fibrosis after the intravenous administration of primary IPF fibroblasts. Gas6, Axl, and Tyro3 were increased in both rapidly and slowly progressive IPF compared with normal lung samples and fibroblasts. Targeting these pathways with either specific antibodies directed at Gas6 or Axl, or with small-molecule TAM inhibitors indicated that the small molecule-mediated targeting approach was more efficacious in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Specifically, the TAM receptor inhibitor R428 (also known as BGB324) significantly inhibited the synthetic, migratory, and proliferative properties of IPF fibroblasts compared with the other Gas6/TAM receptor targeting agents. Finally, loss of Gas6 expression decreased lung fibrotic responses to bleomycin and treatment with R428 inhibited pulmonary fibrosis in humanized SCID/Bg mice. Gas6/TAM receptor activity contributes to the activation of pulmonary fibroblasts in IPF, suggesting that targeting this RTK pathway might be an effective antifibrotic strategy in this disease.

  10. Rigour in quantitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claydon, Leica Sarah

    2015-07-22

    This article which forms part of the research series addresses scientific rigour in quantitative research. It explores the basis and use of quantitative research and the nature of scientific rigour. It examines how the reader may determine whether quantitative research results are accurate, the questions that should be asked to determine accuracy and the checklists that may be used in this process. Quantitative research has advantages in nursing, since it can provide numerical data to help answer questions encountered in everyday practice.

  11. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003576.htm Acetylcholine receptor antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetylcholine receptor antibody is a protein found in the blood of ...

  12. Xingshentongqiao Decoction Mediates Proliferation, Apoptosis, Orexin-A Receptor and Orexin-B Receptor Messenger Ribonucleic Acid Expression and Represses Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanli Dong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypocretin (HCRT signaling plays an important role in the pathogenesis of narcolepsy and can be significantly influenced by Chinese herbal therapy. Our previous study showed that xingshentongqiao decoction (XSTQ is clinically effective for the treatment of narcolepsy. To determine whether XSTQ improves narcolepsy by modulating HCRT signaling, we investigated its effects on SH-SY5Y cell proliferation, apoptosis, and HCRT receptor 1/2 (orexin receptor 1 [OX1R] and orexin receptor 2 [OX2R] expression. The signaling pathways involved in these processes were also assessed. Methods: The effects of XSTQ on proliferation and apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells were assessed using cell counting kit-8 and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate assays. OX1R and OX2R expression was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. Western blotting for mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway activation was performed to further assess the signaling mechanism of XSTQ. Results: XSTQ reduced the proliferation and induced apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells. This effect was accompanied by the upregulation of OX1R and OX2R expression and the reduced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk 1/2, p38 MAPK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK. Conclusions: XSTQ inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells. XSTQ also promotes OX1R and OX2R expression. These effects are associated with the repression of the Erk1/2, p38 MAPK, and JNK signaling pathways. These results define a molecular mechanism for XSTQ in regulating HCRT and MAPK activation, which may explain its ability to treat narcolepsy.

  13. L-glutamate Receptor In Paramecium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal-Martínez, Juan; Ortega-Soto, Arturo

    2004-09-01

    Behavioral, electrophysiological and biochemical experiments were performed in order to establish the presence of a glutamate receptor in the ciliate Paramecium. It was found that an AMPA/KA receptor is functionally expressed in Paramecium and that this receptor is immunologically and fillogenetically related to the AMPA/KA receptor present in vertebrates.

  14. Do receptors get pregnant too? Adrenergic receptor alterations in human pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiley, R M; Finster, M

    1996-01-01

    In this review we discuss adrenergic receptor number and function during pregnancy, with emphasis on evidence that pregnancy results in specific receptor alterations from the nonpregnant state. Changes in adrenergic receptor function or distribution in vascular smooth muscle may be in part responsible for the decreased vascular responsiveness seen in human pregnancy, and the lack of the normal alterations may be a part of the syndromes of gestational hypertension, including preeclampsia-eclampsia. The onset of labor may be influenced by adrenergic modulation, and receptor or postreceptor level molecular alterations may trigger or facilitate normal or preterm labor. Human studies are emphasized when possible to assess the role of adrenergic signal transduction regulation in the physiology and pathophysiology of normal and complicated human pregnancy.

  15. Melatonin Receptor Genes in Vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Dong Yin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR family. Three genes for melatonin receptors have been cloned. The MT1 (or Mel1a or MTNR1A and MT2 (or Mel1b or MTNR1B receptor subtypes are present in humans and other mammals, while an additional melatonin receptor subtype, Mel1c (or MTNR1C, has been identified in fish, amphibians and birds. Another melatonin related orphan receptor, GPR50, which does not bind melatonin, is found exclusively in mammals. The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily by the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone acts systemically in numerous organs. In the brain, it is involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes, and it readjusts the circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This article reviews recent studies of gene organization, expression, evolution and mutations of melatonin receptor genes of vertebrates. Gene polymorphisms reveal that numerous mutations are associated with diseases and disorders. The phylogenetic analysis of receptor genes indicates that GPR50 is an outgroup to all other melatonin receptor sequences. GPR50 may have separated from a melatonin receptor ancestor before the split between MTNR1C and the MTNR1A/B ancestor.

  16. Clinical and Genomic Crosstalk between Glucocorticoid Receptor and Estrogen Receptor α In Endometrial Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffery M. Vahrenkamp

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Steroid hormone receptors are simultaneously active in many tissues and are capable of altering each other’s function. Estrogen receptor α (ER and glucocorticoid receptor (GR are expressed in the uterus, and their ligands have opposing effects on uterine growth. In endometrial tumors with high ER expression, we surprisingly found that expression of GR is associated with poor prognosis. Dexamethasone reduced normal uterine growth in vivo; however, this growth inhibition was abolished in estrogen-induced endometrial hyperplasia. We observed low genomic-binding site overlap when ER and GR are induced with their respective ligands; however, upon simultaneous induction they co-occupy more sites. GR binding is altered significantly by estradiol with GR recruited to ER-bound loci that become more accessible upon estradiol induction. Gene expression responses to co-treatment were more similar to estradiol but with additional regulated genes. Our results suggest phenotypic and molecular interplay between ER and GR in endometrial cancer. : Estrogen receptor α (ER and glucocorticoid receptor (GR are expressed in the uterus and have differential effects on growth. Vahrenkamp et al. find that expression of both receptors is associated with poor outcome in endometrial cancer and that simultaneous induction of ER and GR leads to molecular interplay between the receptors. Keywords: estrogen receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, endometrial cancer

  17. Expression and function of serotonin 2A and 2B receptors in the mammalian respiratory network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Niebert

    Full Text Available Neurons of the respiratory network in the lower brainstem express a variety of serotonin receptors (5-HTRs that act primarily through adenylyl cyclase. However, there is one receptor family including 5-HT(2A, 5-HT(2B, and 5-HT(2C receptors that are directed towards protein kinase C (PKC. In contrast to 5-HT(2ARs, expression and function of 5-HT(2BRs within the respiratory network are still unclear. 5-HT(2BR utilizes a Gq-mediated signaling cascade involving calcium and leading to activation of phospholipase C and IP3/DAG pathways. Based on previous studies, this signal pathway appears to mediate excitatory actions on respiration. In the present study, we analyzed receptor expression in pontine and medullary regions of the respiratory network both at the transcriptional and translational level using quantitative RT-PCR and self-made as well as commercially available antibodies, respectively. In addition we measured effects of selective agonists and antagonists for 5-HT(2ARs and 5-HT(2BRs given intra-arterially on phrenic nerve discharges in juvenile rats using the perfused brainstem preparation. The drugs caused significant changes in discharge activity. Co-administration of both agonists revealed a dominance of the 5-HT(2BR. Given the nature of the signaling pathways, we investigated whether intracellular calcium may explain effects observed in the respiratory network. Taken together, the results of this study suggest a significant role of both receptors in respiratory network modulation.

  18. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 assessment in a case-control study: comparison of fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction performed by central laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baehner, Frederick L; Achacoso, Ninah; Maddala, Tara; Shak, Steve; Quesenberry, Charles P; Goldstein, Lynn C; Gown, Allen M; Habel, Laurel A

    2010-10-01

    The optimal method to assess human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status remains highly controversial. Before reporting patient HER2 results, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)/College of American Pathologists (CAP) guidelines mandate that laboratories demonstrate ≥ 95% concordance to another approved laboratory or methodology. Here, we compare central laboratory HER2 assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using Oncotype DX in lymph node-negative, chemotherapy-untreated patients from a large Kaiser Permanente case-control study. Breast cancer specimens from the Kaiser-Genomic Health study were examined. Central FISH assessment of HER2 amplification and polysomy 17 was conducted by PhenoPath Laboratories (ratios > 2.2, 1.8 to 2.2, and < 1.8 define HER2 positive, HER2 equivocal, and HER2 negative, respectively). HER2 expression by RT-PCR was conducted using Oncotype DX by Genomic Health (normalized expression units ≥ 11.5, 10.7 to < 11.5, and < 10.7 define HER2 positive, HER2 equivocal, and HER2 negative, respectively). Concordance analyses followed ASCO/CAP guidelines. HER2 concordance by central FISH and central RT-PCR was 97% (95% CI, 96% to 99%). Twelve percent (67 of 568 patients) and 11% (60 of 568 patients) of patients were HER2 positive by RT-PCR and FISH, respectively. HER2-positive patients had increased odds of dying from breast cancer compared with HER2-negative patients. Polysomy 17 was demonstrated in 12.5% of all patients and 33% of FISH-positive patients. Nineteen of 20 FISH-positive patients with polysomy 17 were also RT-PCR HER2 positive. Although not statistically significantly different, HER2-positive/polysomy 17 patients tended to have the worst prognosis, followed by HER2-positive/eusomic, HER2-negative/polysomy 17, and HER2-negative/eusomic patients. There is a high degree of concordance between central FISH and quantitative RT

  19. Quantitative investment analysis

    CERN Document Server

    DeFusco, Richard

    2007-01-01

    In the "Second Edition" of "Quantitative Investment Analysis," financial experts Richard DeFusco, Dennis McLeavey, Jerald Pinto, and David Runkle outline the tools and techniques needed to understand and apply quantitative methods to today's investment process.

  20. Critical Quantitative Inquiry in Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stage, Frances K.; Wells, Ryan S.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter briefly traces the development of the concept of critical quantitative inquiry, provides an expanded conceptualization of the tasks of critical quantitative research, offers theoretical explanation and justification for critical research using quantitative methods, and previews the work of quantitative criticalists presented in this…

  1. Receptor binding radiotracers for the angiotensin II receptor: radioiodinated [Sar1, Ile8]angiotensin II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, R.E.; Beauchamp, H.T.; Fioravanti, C.; Brenner, N.; Burns, H.D.

    1994-01-01

    The potential for imaging the angiotensin II receptor was evaluated using the radioiodinated peptide antagonist [ 125 I][Sar 1 , Ile 8 ]angiotensin II. The radioligand provides a receptor-mediated signal in several tissues in rat (kidneys, adrenal and liver). The receptor-mediated signal of 3% ID/g kidney cortex should be sufficient to permit imaging, at least via SPECT. The radiotracer is sensitive to reductions in receptor concentration and can be used to define in vivo dose-occupancy curves of angiotensin II receptor ligands. Receptor-mediated images of [ 123 I][Sar 1 , Ile 8 ]angiotensin II were obtained in the rat kidney and Rhesus monkey liver. (author)

  2. Estrogen Receptor and Progesterone Receptor Expression in Normal Terminal Duct Lobular Units Surrounding Invasive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaohong R.; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Falk, Roni T.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Peplonska, Beata; Brinton, Louise A.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Sherman, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Molecular and morphological alterations related to carcinogenesis have been found in terminal duct lobular units (TDLUs), the microscopic structures from which most breast cancer precursors and cancers develop, and therefore, analysis of these structures may reveal early changes in breast carcinogenesis and etiologic heterogeneity. Accordingly, we evaluated relationships of breast cancer risk factors and tumor pathology to estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression in TDLUs surrounding breast cancers. Methods We analyzed 270 breast cancer cases included in a population-based breast cancer case-control study conducted in Poland. TDLUs were mapped in relation to breast cancer: within the same block as the tumor (TDLU-T), proximal to tumor (TDLU-PT), or distant from (TDLU-DT). ER/PR was quantitated using image analysis of immunohistochemically stained TDLUs prepared as tissue microarrays. Results In surgical specimens containing ER-positive breast cancers, ER and PR levels were significantly higher in breast cancer cells than in normal TDLUs, and higher in TDLU-T than in TDLU-DT or TDLU-PT, which showed similar results. Analyses combining DT-/PT TDLUs within subjects demonstrated that ER levels were significantly lower in premenopausal women vs. postmenopausal women (odds ratio [OR]=0.38, 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.19, 0.76, P=0.0064) and among recent or current menopausal hormone therapy users compared with never users (OR=0.14, 95% CI=0.046–0.43, Ptrend=0.0006). Compared with premenopausal women, TDLUs of postmenopausal women showed lower levels of PR (OR=0.90, 95% CI=0.83–0.97, Ptrend=0.007). ER and PR expression in TDLUs was associated with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression in invasive tumors (P=0.019 for ER and P=0.03 for PR), but not with other tumor features. Conclusions Our data suggest that TDLUs near breast cancers reflect field effects, whereas those at a distance demonstrate influences of breast

  3. Quantitative automated microscopy (QuAM elucidates growth factor specific signalling in pain sensitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levine Jon D

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dorsal root ganglia (DRG-neurons are commonly characterized immunocytochemically. Cells are mostly grouped by the experimenter's eye as "marker-positive" and "marker-negative" according to their immunofluorescence intensity. Classification criteria remain largely undefined. Overcoming this shortfall, we established a quantitative automated microscopy (QuAM for a defined and multiparametric analysis of adherent heterogeneous primary neurons on a single cell base. The growth factors NGF, GDNF and EGF activate the MAP-kinase Erk1/2 via receptor tyrosine kinase signalling. NGF and GDNF are established factors in regeneration and sensitization of nociceptive neurons. If also the tissue regenerating growth factor, EGF, influences nociceptors is so far unknown. We asked, if EGF can act on nociceptors, and if QuAM can elucidate differences between NGF, GDNF and EGF induced Erk1/2 activation kinetics. Finally, we evaluated, if the investigation of one signalling component allows prediction of the behavioral response to a reagent not tested on nociceptors such as EGF. Results We established a software-based neuron identification, described quantitatively DRG-neuron heterogeneity and correlated measured sample sizes and corresponding assay sensitivity. Analysing more than 70,000 individual neurons we defined neuronal subgroups based on differential Erk1/2 activation status in sensory neurons. Baseline activity levels varied strongly already in untreated neurons. NGF and GDNF subgroup responsiveness correlated with their subgroup specificity on IB4(+- and IB4(--neurons, respectively. We confirmed expression of EGF-receptors in all sensory neurons. EGF treatment induced STAT3 translocation into the nucleus. Nevertheless, we could not detect any EGF induced Erk1/2 phosphorylation. Accordingly, intradermal injection of EGF resulted in a fundamentally different outcome than NGF/GDNF. EGF did not induce mechanical hyperalgesia, but blocked

  4. Retinoid X Receptor α-Dependent HBV Minichromosome Remodeling and Viral Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; He, Song; Guo, Jin-Jun; Peng, Hong; Fan, Jia-Hao; Li, Qing-Ling

    2017-01-01

    The HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) is organized into a minichromosome in the nuclei of infected hepatocytes through interactions with histone and nonhistone proteins. Retinoid X receptor α (RXRα), a liver-enriched nuclear receptor, participates in regulation of HBV replication and transcription through modulation of HBV enhancer 1 and core promoter activity. This study investigated RXRα involvement in HBV cccDNA epigenetic modifications. Quantitative cccDNA chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) was applied to study the recruitment of RXRα, histones, and chromatin-modifying enzymes to HBV minichromosome in HepG2 cells after transfection of the linear HBV genome. RXRα Was found to directly bind to HBV cccDNA; recruitment of RXRα to HBV mini-chromosome paralleled HBV replication, histone recruitment, and histone acetylation in HBVcccDNA. Moreover, RXRα overexpression or knock-down significantly increased or impaired the recruitment of the p300 acetyltransferase to cccDNAminichromosome. Our results confirmed the regulation of RXRα on HBV replication in vitro and demonstrated the modulation of RXRα on HBV cccDNA epigenetics. These findings provide a profound theoretical and experimental basis for late-model antiviral treatment acting on the HBV cccDNA and minichromosome.

  5. Enhanced expressions of microvascular smooth muscle receptors after focal cerebral ischemia occur via the MAPK MEK/ERK pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edvinsson Lars

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MEK1/2 is a serine/threonine protein that phosphorylates extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2. Cerebral ischemia results in enhanced expression of cerebrovascular contractile receptors in the middle cerebral artery (MCA leading to the ischemic region. Here we explored the role of the MEK/ERK pathway in receptor expression following ischemic brain injury using the specific MEK1 inhibitor U0126. Methods and result Rats were subjected to a 2-h middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO followed by reperfusion for 48-h and the ischemic area was calculated. The expression of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and Elk-1, and of endothelin ETA and ETB, angiotensin AT1, and 5-hydroxytryptamine 5-HT1B receptors were analyzed with immunohistochemistry using confocal microscopy in cerebral arteries, microvessels and in brain tissue. The expression of endothelin ETB receptor was analyzed by quantitative Western blot. We demonstrate that there is an increase in the number of contractile smooth muscle receptors in the MCA and in micro- vessels within the ischemic region. The enhanced expression occurs in the smooth muscle cells as verified by co-localization studies. This receptor upregulation is furthermore associated with enhanced expression of pERK1/2 and of transcription factor pElk-1 in the vascular smooth muscle cells. Blockade of transcription with the MEK1 inhibitor U0126, given at the onset of reperfusion or as late as 6 hours after the insult, reduced transcription (pERK1/2 and pElk-1, the enhanced vascular receptor expression, and attenuated the cerebral infarct and improved neurology score. Conclusion Our results show that MCAO results in upregulation of cerebrovascular ETB, AT1 and 5-HT1B receptors. Blockade of this event with a MEK1 inhibitor as late as 6 h after the insult reduced the enhanced vascular receptor expression and the associated cerebral infarction.

  6. [Integration of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics based on the in vivo analysis of drug-receptor binding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shizuo

    2015-01-01

      As I was deeply interested in the effects of drugs on the human body, I chose pharmacology as the subject of special study when I became a 4th year student at Shizuoka College of Pharmacy. I studied abroad as a postdoctoral fellow for two years, from 1978, under the tutelage of Professor Henry I. Yamamura (pharmacology) in the College of Medicine at the University of Arizona, USA. He taught me a variety of valuable skills such as the radioreceptor binding assay, which represented the most advanced technology developed in the US at that time. After returning home, I engaged in clarifying receptor abnormalities in pathological conditions, as well as in drug action mechanisms, by making the best use of this radioreceptor binding assay. In 1989, following the founding of the University of Shizuoka, I was invited by Professor Ryohei Kimura to join the Department of Pharmacokinetics. This switch in discipline provided a good opportunity for me to broaden my perspectives in pharmaceutical sciences. I worked on evaluating drug-receptor binding in vivo as a combined index for pharmacokinetics and pharmacological effect manifestation, with the aim of bridging pharmacology and pharmacokinetics. In fact, by focusing on data from in vivo receptor binding, it became possible to clearly rationalize the important consideration of drug dose-concentration-action relationships, and to study quantitative and kinetic analyses of relationships among pharmacokinetics, receptor binding and pharmacological effects. Based on this concept, I was able to demonstrate the utility of dynamic analyses of drug-receptor binding in drug discovery, drug fostering, and the proper use of pharmacokinetics with regard to many drugs.

  7. The lactate receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor 81/hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morland, Cecilie; Lauritzen, Knut Huso; Puchades, Maja

    2015-01-01

    We have proposed that lactate is a “volume transmitter” in the brain and underpinned this by showing that the lactate receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor 81 (GPR81, also known as HCA1 or HCAR1), which promotes lipid storage in adipocytes, is also active in the mammalian brain. This includes......, energy metabolism, and energy substrate availability, including a glucose- and glycogen-saving response. HCAR1 may contribute to optimizing the cAMP concentration. For instance, in the prefrontal cortex, excessively high cAMP levels are implicated in impaired cognition in old age, fatigue, stress...

  8. Adenosine receptor desensitization and trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundell, Stuart; Kelly, Eamonn

    2011-05-01

    As with the majority of G-protein-coupled receptors, all four of the adenosine receptor subtypes are known to undergo agonist-induced regulation in the form of desensitization and trafficking. These processes can limit the ability of adenosine receptors to couple to intracellular signalling pathways and thus reduce the ability of adenosine receptor agonists as well as endogenous adenosine to produce cellular responses. In addition, since adenosine receptors couple to multiple signalling pathways, these pathways may desensitize differentially, while the desensitization of one pathway could even trigger signalling via another. Thus, the overall picture of adenosine receptor regulation can be complex. For all adenosine receptor subtypes, there is evidence to implicate arrestins in agonist-induced desensitization and trafficking, but there is also evidence for other possible forms of regulation, including second messenger-dependent kinase regulation, heterologous effects involving G proteins, and the involvement of non-clathrin trafficking pathways such as caveolae. In this review, the evidence implicating these mechanisms is summarized for each adenosine receptor subtype, and we also discuss those issues of adenosine receptor regulation that remain to be resolved as well as likely directions for future research in this field. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Cyto- and receptor architectonic mapping of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Zilles, Karl

    2018-01-01

    Mapping of the human brain is more than the generation of an atlas-based parcellation of brain regions using histologic or histochemical criteria. It is the attempt to provide a topographically informed model of the structural and functional organization of the brain. To achieve this goal a multimodal atlas of the detailed microscopic and neurochemical structure of the brain must be registered to a stereotaxic reference space or brain, which also serves as reference for topographic assignment of functional data, e.g., functional magnet resonance imaging, electroencephalography, or magnetoencephalography, as well as metabolic imaging, e.g., positron emission tomography. Although classic maps remain pioneering steps, they do not match recent concepts of the functional organization in many regions, and suffer from methodic drawbacks. This chapter provides a summary of the recent status of human brain mapping, which is based on multimodal approaches integrating results of quantitative cyto- and receptor architectonic studies with focus on the cerebral cortex in a widely used reference brain. Descriptions of the methods for observer-independent and statistically testable cytoarchitectonic parcellations, quantitative multireceptor mapping, and registration to the reference brain, including the concept of probability maps and a toolbox for using the maps in functional neuroimaging studies, are provided. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Cocaine Disrupts Histamine H3 Receptor Modulation of Dopamine D1 Receptor Signaling: σ1-D1-H3 Receptor Complexes as Key Targets for Reducing Cocaine's Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Estefanía; Moreno-Delgado, David; Navarro, Gemma; Hoffmann, Hanne M.; Fuentes, Silvia; Rosell-Vilar, Santi; Gasperini, Paola; Rodríguez-Ruiz, Mar; Medrano, Mireia; Mallol, Josefa; Cortés, Antoni; Casadó, Vicent; Lluís, Carme; Ferré, Sergi; Ortiz, Jordi; Canela, Enric

    2014-01-01

    The general effects of cocaine are not well understood at the molecular level. What is known is that the dopamine D1 receptor plays an important role. Here we show that a key mechanism may be cocaine's blockade of the histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of D1 receptor function. This blockade requires the σ1 receptor and occurs upon cocaine binding to σ1-D1-H3 receptor complexes. The cocaine-mediated disruption leaves an uninhibited D1 receptor that activates Gs, freely recruits β-arrestin, increases p-ERK 1/2 levels, and induces cell death when over activated. Using in vitro assays with transfected cells and in ex vivo experiments using both rats acutely treated or self-administered with cocaine along with mice depleted of σ1 receptor, we show that blockade of σ1 receptor by an antagonist restores the protective H3 receptor-mediated brake on D1 receptor signaling and prevents the cell death from elevated D1 receptor signaling. These findings suggest that a combination therapy of σ1R antagonists with H3 receptor agonists could serve to reduce some effects of cocaine. PMID:24599455

  11. Receptor studies in biological psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Yutaka

    1992-01-01

    Recent advances in the pharmacological treatment of endogenous psychosis have led to the development of biological studies in psychiatry. Studies on neurotransmitter receptors were reviewed in order to apply positron-emission tomograph (PET) for biological psychiatry. The dopamine (DA) hypothesis for schizophrenia was advanced on the basis of the observed effects of neuroleptics and methamphetamine, and DA(D 2 ) receptor supersensitivity measured by PET and receptor binding in the schizophrenic brain. The clinical potencies of neuroleptics for schizophrenia were correlated with their abilities to inhibit the D 2 receptor, and not other receptors. The σ receptor was expected to be a site of antipsychotic action. However, the potency of drugs action on it was not correlated with clinical efficacy. Haloperidol binds with high affinity to the σ receptor, which may mediate acute dystonia, an extrapyramidal side effect of neuroleptics. Behavioral and neurochemical changes induced by methamphetamine treatment were studied as an animal model of schizophrenia, and both a decrease of D 2 receptor density and an increase of DA release were detected. The monoamine hypothesis for manic-depressive psychosis was advanced on the basis of the effect of reserpine, monoamine oxidase inhibitor and antidepressants. 3 H-clonidine binding sites were increased in platelet membranes of depressive patients, 3 H-imipramine binding sites were decreased. The GABA A receptor is the target site for the action of anxiolytics and antiepileptics such as benzodiazepines and barbiturates. Recent developments in molecular biology techniques have revealed the structure of receptor proteins, which are classified into two receptor families, the G-protein coupled type (D 2 ) and the ion-channel type (GABA A ). (J.P.N.)

  12. Arrestin scaffolds NHERF1 to the P2Y12 receptor to regulate receptor internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisar, Shaista P; Cunningham, Margaret; Saxena, Kunal; Pope, Robert J; Kelly, Eamonn; Mundell, Stuart J

    2012-07-13

    We have recently shown in a patient with mild bleeding that the PDZ-binding motif of the platelet G protein-coupled P2Y(12) receptor (P2Y(12)R) is required for effective receptor traffic in human platelets. In this study we show for the first time that the PDZ motif-binding protein NHERF1 exerts a major role in potentiating G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) internalization. NHERF1 interacts with the C-tail of the P2Y(12)R and unlike many other GPCRs, NHERF1 interaction is required for effective P2Y(12)R internalization. In vitro and prior to agonist stimulation P2Y(12)R/NHERF1 interaction requires the intact PDZ binding motif of this receptor. Interestingly on receptor stimulation NHERF1 no longer interacts directly with the receptor but instead binds to the receptor via the endocytic scaffolding protein arrestin. These findings suggest a novel model by which arrestin can serve as an adaptor to promote NHERF1 interaction with a GPCR to facilitate effective NHERF1-dependent receptor internalization.

  13. Transcriptional targets shared by estrogen receptor- related receptors (ERRs) and estrogen receptor (ER) alpha, but not by ERbeta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanacker, J M; Pettersson, K; Gustafsson, J A; Laudet, V

    1999-01-01

    The physiological activities of estrogens are thought to be mediated by specific nuclear receptors, ERalpha and ERbeta. However, certain tissues, such as the bone, that are highly responsive to estrogens only express a low level of these receptors. Starting from this apparent contradiction, we have evaluated the potentials of two related receptors ERRalpha and ERRbeta to intervene in estrogen signaling. ERalpha, ERRalpha and ERRbeta bind to and activate transcription through both the classical estrogen response element (ERE) and the SF-1 response element (SFRE). In contrast, ERbeta DNA-binding and transcriptional activity is restricted to the ERE. Accordingly, the osteopontin gene promoter is stimulated through SFRE sequences, by ERRalpha as well as by ERalpha, but not by ERbeta. Analysis of the cross-talk within the ER/ERR subgroup of nuclear receptors thus revealed common targets but also functional differences between the two ERs. PMID:10428965

  14. Flavivirus Entry Receptors: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Perera-Lecoin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses enter host cells by endocytosis initiated when the virus particles interact with cell surface receptors. The current model suggests that flaviviruses use at least two different sets of molecules for infectious entry: attachment factors that concentrate and/or recruit viruses on the cell surface and primary receptor(s that bind to virions and direct them to the endocytic pathway. Here, we present the currently available knowledge regarding the flavivirus receptors described so far with specific attention to C-type lectin receptors and the phosphatidylserine receptors, T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (TIM and TYRO3, AXL and MER (TAM. Their role in flavivirus attachment and entry as well as their implication in the virus biology will be discussed in depth.

  15. Pharmacological characterization of receptor-activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) and the human calcitonin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, S L; Foord, S; Kenakin, T; Chen, W J

    1999-12-01

    Receptor-activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) are a family of single transmembrane domain proteins shown to be important for the transport and ligand specificity of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor. In this report, we describe the analysis of pharmacological properties of the human calcitonin receptor (hCTR) coexpressed with different RAMPs with the use of the Xenopus laevis melanophore expression system. We show that coexpression of RAMP3 with human calcitonin receptor changed the relative potency of hCTR to human calcitonin (hCAL) and rat amylin. RAMP1 and RAMP2, in contrast, had little effect on the change of hCTR potency to hCAL or rat amylin. When coexpressed with RAMP3, hCTR reversed the relative potency by a 3.5-fold loss in sensitivity to hCAL and a 19-fold increase in sensitivity to rat amylin. AC66, an inverse agonist, produced apparent simple competitive antagonism of hCAL and rat amylin, as indicated by linear Schild regressions. The potency of AC66 was changed in the blockade of rat amylin but not hCAL responses with RAMP3 coexpression. The mean pK(B) for AC66 to hCAL was 9.4 +/- 0.3 without RAMP3 and 9.45 +/- 0.07 with RAMP3. For the antagonism of AC66 to rat amylin, the pK(B) was 9.25 +/- 0.15 without RAMP3 and 8.2 +/- 0.35 with RAMP3. The finding suggests that RAMP3 might modify the active states of calcitonin receptor in such a way as to create a new receptor phenotype that is "amylin-like." Irrespective of the physiological association of the new receptor species, the finding that a coexpressed membrane protein can completely change agonist and antagonist affinities for a receptor raises implications for screening in recombinant receptor systems.

  16. A physical model describing the interaction of nuclear transport receptors with FG nucleoporin domain assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahn, Raphael; Osmanović, Dino; Ehret, Severin; Araya Callis, Carolina; Frey, Steffen; Stewart, Murray; You, Changjiang; Görlich, Dirk; Hoogenboom, Bart W; Richter, Ralf P

    2016-04-08

    The permeability barrier of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) controls bulk nucleocytoplasmic exchange. It consists of nucleoporin domains rich in phenylalanine-glycine motifs (FG domains). As a bottom-up nanoscale model for the permeability barrier, we have used planar films produced with three different end-grafted FG domains, and quantitatively analyzed the binding of two different nuclear transport receptors (NTRs), NTF2 and Importin β, together with the concomitant film thickness changes. NTR binding caused only moderate changes in film thickness; the binding isotherms showed negative cooperativity and could all be mapped onto a single master curve. This universal NTR binding behavior - a key element for the transport selectivity of the NPC - was quantitatively reproduced by a physical model that treats FG domains as regular, flexible polymers, and NTRs as spherical colloids with a homogeneous surface, ignoring the detailed arrangement of interaction sites along FG domains and on the NTR surface.

  17. Serotonin 5-HT4 receptors and forebrain cholinergic system: receptor expression in identified cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñas-Cazorla, Raúl; Vilaró, M Teresa

    2015-11-01

    Activation of serotonin 5-HT4 receptors has pro-cognitive effects on memory performance. The proposed underlying neurochemical mechanism is the enhancement of acetylcholine release in frontal cortex and hippocampus elicited by 5-HT4 agonists. Although 5-HT4 receptors are present in brain areas related to cognition, e.g., hippocampus and cortex, the cellular localization of the receptors that might modulate acetylcholine release is unknown at present. We have analyzed, using dual label in situ hybridization, the cellular localization of 5-HT4 receptor mRNA in identified neuronal populations of the rat basal forebrain, which is the source of the cholinergic innervation to cortex and hippocampus. 5-HT4 receptor mRNA was visualized with isotopically labeled oligonucleotide probes, whereas cholinergic, glutamatergic, GABAergic and parvalbumin-synthesizing neurons were identified with digoxigenin-labeled oligonucleotide probes. 5-HT4 receptor mRNA was not detected in the basal forebrain cholinergic cell population. In contrast, basal forebrain GABAergic, parvalbumin synthesizing, and glutamatergic cells contained 5-HT4 receptor mRNA. Hippocampal and cortical glutamatergic neurons also express this receptor. These results indicate that 5-HT4 receptors are not synthesized by cholinergic cells, and thus would be absent from cholinergic terminals. In contrast, several non-cholinergic cell populations within the basal forebrain and its target hippocampal and cortical areas express these receptors and are thus likely to mediate the enhancement of acetylcholine release elicited by 5-HT4 agonists.

  18. Stargazin Modulation of AMPA Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana A. Shaikh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fast excitatory synaptic signaling in the mammalian brain is mediated by AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors. In neurons, AMPA receptors co-assemble with auxiliary proteins, such as stargazin, which can markedly alter receptor trafficking and gating. Here, we used luminescence resonance energy transfer measurements to map distances between the full-length, functional AMPA receptor and stargazin expressed in HEK293 cells and to determine the ensemble structural changes in the receptor due to stargazin. In addition, we used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer to study the structural and conformational distribution of the receptor and how this distribution is affected by stargazin. Our nanopositioning data place stargazin below the AMPA receptor ligand-binding domain, where it is well poised to act as a scaffold to facilitate the long-range conformational selection observations seen in single-molecule experiments. These data support a model of stargazin acting to stabilize or select conformational states that favor activation.

  19. Photo-antagonism of the GABAA receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Martin; Iqbal, Favaad; Pandurangan, Arun P; Hannan, Saad; Huckvale, Rosemary; Topf, Maya; Baker, James R; Smart, Trevor G

    2014-07-29

    Neurotransmitter receptor trafficking is fundamentally important for synaptic transmission and neural network activity. GABAA receptors and inhibitory synapses are vital components of brain function, yet much of our knowledge regarding receptor mobility and function at inhibitory synapses is derived indirectly from using recombinant receptors, antibody-tagged native receptors and pharmacological treatments. Here we describe the use of a set of research tools that can irreversibly bind to and affect the function of recombinant and neuronal GABAA receptors following ultraviolet photoactivation. These compounds are based on the competitive antagonist gabazine and incorporate a variety of photoactive groups. By using site-directed mutagenesis and ligand-docking studies, they reveal new areas of the GABA binding site at the interface between receptor β and α subunits. These compounds enable the selected inactivation of native GABAA receptor populations providing new insight into the function of inhibitory synapses and extrasynaptic receptors in controlling neuronal excitation.

  20. Scavenger receptors in homeostasis and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canton, Johnathan; Neculai, Dante; Grinstein, Sergio

    2013-09-01

    Scavenger receptors were originally identified by their ability to recognize and to remove modified lipoproteins; however, it is now appreciated that they carry out a striking range of functions, including pathogen clearance, lipid transport, the transport of cargo within the cell and even functioning as taste receptors. The large repertoire of ligands recognized by scavenger receptors and their broad range of functions are not only due to the wide range of receptors that constitute this family but also to their ability to partner with various co-receptors. The ability of individual scavenger receptors to associate with different co-receptors makes their responsiveness extremely versatile. This Review highlights recent insights into the structural features that determine the function of scavenger receptors and the emerging role that these receptors have in immune responses, notably in macrophage polarization and in the pathogenesis of diseases such as atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Central alpha2 adrenergic receptors in the rat cerebral cortex: repopulation kinetics and receptor reserve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    The alpha 2 adrenergic receptor subtype is thought to play a role in the mechanism of action of antidepressant and antihypertensive drugs. This thesis has attempted to shed light on the regulation of central alpha 2 adrenergic receptors in the rat cerebral cortex. Repopulation kinetics analysis allows for the determination of the rate of receptor production, rate constant of degradation, and half-life of the receptor. This analysis was carried out using both radioligand binding and functional receptor assays at various times following the irreversible inactivation of central alpha 2 adrenergic receptors by in vivo administration of N-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethyoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline (EEDQ). Both alpha 2 agonist and antagonist ligand binding sites recovered with a t/sub 1/2/ equal to approximately 4 days. The function of alpha 2 adrenergic autoreceptors, which inhibit stimulation-evoked release of 3 H-norepinephrine ( 3 H-NE) and alpha 2 adrenergic heteroreceptors which inhibit stimulation-evoked release of 3 H-serotonin ( 3 H-5-HT) were assayed. The t/sub 1/2/ for recovery of maximal autoreceptor and heteroreceptor function was 2.4 days and 4.6 days, respectively. The demonstration of a receptor reserve is critical to the interpretation of past and future studies of the alpha 2 adrenergic receptor since it demonstrates that: (1) alterations in the number of alpha 2 adrenergic receptor binding sites cannot be extrapolated to the actual function of the alpha 2 adrenergic receptor; and (2) alterations in the number of alpha 2 receptors is not necessarily accompanied by a change in the maximum function being studied, but may only result in shifting of the dose-response curve

  2. Identifying the receptor subtype selectivity of retinoid X and retinoic acid receptors via quantum mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Motonori; Shudo, Koichi; Kagechika, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-01

    Understanding and identifying the receptor subtype selectivity of a ligand is an important issue in the field of drug discovery. Using a combination of classical molecular mechanics and quantum mechanical calculations, this report assesses the receptor subtype selectivity for the human retinoid X receptor (hRXR) and retinoic acid receptor (hRAR) ligand-binding domains (LBDs) complexed with retinoid ligands. The calculated energies show good correlation with the experimentally reported binding affinities. The technique proposed here is a promising method as it reveals the origin of the receptor subtype selectivity of selective ligands.

  3. Quantitative assessment of antibody internalization with novel monoclonal antibodies against Alexa fluorophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao-Chan, Sindy; Daine-Matsuoka, Barbara; Heald, Nathan; Wong, Tiffany; Lin, Tracey; Cai, Allen G; Lai, Michelle; D'Alessio, Joseph A; Theunissen, Jan-Willem

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies against cell surface antigens may be internalized through their specific interactions with these proteins and in some cases may induce or perturb antigen internalization. The anti-cancer efficacy of antibody-drug conjugates is thought to rely on their uptake by cancer cells expressing the surface antigen. Numerous techniques, including microscopy and flow cytometry, have been used to identify antibodies with desired cellular uptake rates. To enable quantitative measurements of internalization of labeled antibodies, an assay based on internalized and quenched fluorescence was developed. For this approach, we generated novel anti-Alexa Fluor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that effectively and specifically quench cell surface-bound Alexa Fluor 488 or Alexa Fluor 594 fluorescence. Utilizing Alexa Fluor-labeled mAbs against the EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase, we showed that the anti-Alexa Fluor reagents could be used to monitor internalization quantitatively over time. The anti-Alexa Fluor mAbs were also validated in a proof of concept dual-label internalization assay with simultaneous exposure of cells to two different mAbs. Importantly, the unique anti-Alexa Fluor mAbs described here may also enable other single- and dual-label experiments, including label detection and signal enhancement in macromolecules, trafficking of proteins and microorganisms, and cell migration and morphology.

  4. Quantitative assessment of antibody internalization with novel monoclonal antibodies against Alexa fluorophores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sindy Liao-Chan

    Full Text Available Antibodies against cell surface antigens may be internalized through their specific interactions with these proteins and in some cases may induce or perturb antigen internalization. The anti-cancer efficacy of antibody-drug conjugates is thought to rely on their uptake by cancer cells expressing the surface antigen. Numerous techniques, including microscopy and flow cytometry, have been used to identify antibodies with desired cellular uptake rates. To enable quantitative measurements of internalization of labeled antibodies, an assay based on internalized and quenched fluorescence was developed. For this approach, we generated novel anti-Alexa Fluor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs that effectively and specifically quench cell surface-bound Alexa Fluor 488 or Alexa Fluor 594 fluorescence. Utilizing Alexa Fluor-labeled mAbs against the EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase, we showed that the anti-Alexa Fluor reagents could be used to monitor internalization quantitatively over time. The anti-Alexa Fluor mAbs were also validated in a proof of concept dual-label internalization assay with simultaneous exposure of cells to two different mAbs. Importantly, the unique anti-Alexa Fluor mAbs described here may also enable other single- and dual-label experiments, including label detection and signal enhancement in macromolecules, trafficking of proteins and microorganisms, and cell migration and morphology.

  5. Interaction of epidermal growth factor receptors with the cytoskeleton is related to receptor clustering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Belzen, N.; Spaargaren, M.; Verkleij, A. J.; Boonstra, J.

    1990-01-01

    Recently it has been established that cytoskeleton-associated epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors are predominantly of the high-affinity class and that EGF induces a recruitment of low-affinity receptors to the cytoskeleton. The nature of this EGF-induced receptor-cytoskeleton interaction,

  6. Comparison of benzodiazepine receptor and regional cerebral blood flow imagings of epileptiform foci in hippocampal kindled rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurokawa, Kenzo

    1993-01-01

    To compare the benzodiazepine (Bz) receptor imaging and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) imaging in the detection of epileptic foci, the distribution pattern of the Bz receptor and rCBF in hippocampal kindled rabbits was examined by a double tracer autoradiography using ethyl 7-[ 125 I]-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo [1, 5-a][1,4] benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate ( 125 I-Ro 16-0154) and 99m Tc-hexamethyl-propyleneamine oxime ( 99m Tc-HMPAO). In visual and quantitative analyses, 125 I-Ro 16-0154 accumulation in brain slices extracted after the completion of the kindling was markedly and extensively decreased in the kindled CA1 region mimicking a primary epileptic focus. 125 I-Ro 16-0154 accumulation was moderately decreased in the ipsilateral temporal lobe, dentate gyrus, CA2, CA4, and bilateral CA3 regions, regarded as the propagated sites of seizure discharges. 99m Tc-HMPAO accumulation was found to be decreased in the ipsilateral CA1, frontal, temporal and dentate gyri. However, the decrease was much more slight and less extensive than that in 125 I-Ro 16-0154 accumulation. These results suggest that Bz receptor imaging is much more sensitive in the detection of epileptic foci than rCBF imaging, and therefore that Bz receptor imaging is useful in clinical epilepsy. (author)

  7. Chronic cocaine administration induces opposite changes in dopamine receptors in the striatum and nucleus accumbens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeders, N.E.; Kuhar, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    A variety of clinical and animal data suggest that the repeated administration of cocaine and related psychomotor stimulants may be associated with a behavioral sensitization whereby the same dose of the drug results in increasing behavioral pathology. This investigation was designed to determine the effects of chronic cocaine administration on the binding of [ 3 H]sulpiride, a relatively specific ligand for D2 dopaminergic receptors, in the rat brain using in vitro homogenate binding and light microscopic quantitative autoradiographic methodologies. Chronic daily injections of cocaine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) for 15 days resulted in a significant decrease in the maximum concentration of sulpiride binding sites in the striatum and a significant increase in the maximum number of these binding sites in the nucleus accumbens. No significant differences in binding affinity were observed in either brain region. These data suggest that chronic cocaine administration may result in differential effects on D2 receptors in the nigro-striatal and mesolimbic dopaminergic systems

  8. Thermodynamic study of dihydrogen phosphate dimerisation and complexation with novel urea- and thiourea-based receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregović, Nikola; Cindro, Nikola; Frkanec, Leo; Užarević, Krunoslav; Tomišić, Vladislav

    2014-11-24

    Complexation of dihydrogen phosphate by novel thiourea and urea receptors in acetonitrile and dimethyl sulfoxide was studied in detail by an integrated approach by using several methods (isothermal titration calorimetry, ESI-MS, and (1)H NMR and UV spectroscopy). Thermodynamic investigations into H2PO4(-) dimerisation, which is a process that has been frequently recognised, but rarely quantitatively described, were carried out as well. The corresponding equilibrium was taken into account in the anion-binding studies, which enabled reliable determination of the complexation thermodynamic quantities. In both solvents the thiourea derivatives exhibited considerably higher binding affinities with respect to those containing the urea moiety. In acetonitrile, 1:1 and 2:1 (anion/receptor) complexes formed, whereas in dimethyl sulfoxide only the significantly less stable complexes of 1:1 stoichiometry were detected. The solvent effects on the thermodynamic parameters of dihydrogen phosphate dimerisation and complexation reactions are discussed. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Toll-like receptors and NOD-like receptors in rheumatic diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCormack, William J

    2012-02-01

    The past 10 years have seen the description of families of receptors that drive proinflammatory cytokine production in infection and tissue injury. Two major classes have been examined in the context of inflammatory joint disease--the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and NOD-like receptors (NLRs). TLRs such as TLR2 and TLR4 are being implicated in the pathology of rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, lyme arthritis and osteoarthritis. Nalp3 has been identified as a key NLR for IL-1beta production and has been shown to have a particular role in gout. These findings present new therapeutic opportunities, possibly allowing for the replacement of biologics with small molecule inhibitors.

  10. Olfactory Receptor Database: a sensory chemoreceptor resource

    OpenAIRE

    Skoufos, Emmanouil; Marenco, Luis; Nadkarni, Prakash M.; Miller, Perry L.; Shepherd, Gordon M.

    2000-01-01

    The Olfactory Receptor Database (ORDB) is a WWW-accessible database that has been expanded from an olfactory receptor resource to a chemoreceptor resource. It stores data on six classes of G-protein-coupled sensory chemoreceptors: (i) olfactory receptor-like proteins, (ii) vomeronasal receptors, (iii) insect olfactory receptors, (iv) worm chemoreceptors, (v) taste papilla receptors and (vi) fungal pheromone receptors. A complementary database of the ligands of these receptors (OdorDB) has bee...

  11. Molecular characterization of opioid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this research was to purify and characterize active opioid receptors and elucidate molecular aspects of opioid receptor heterogeneity. Purification to apparent homogeneity of an opioid binding protein from bovine caudate was achieved by solubilization in the non-ionic detergent, digitonin, followed by sequential chromatography on the opiate affinity matrix, ..beta..-naltrexylethylenediamine-CH-Sepharose 4B, and on the lectine affinity matrix, wheat germ agglutinin-agarose. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS-PAGE) followed by autoradiography revealed that radioiodinated purified receptor gave a single band. Purified receptor preparations showed a specific activity of 12,000-15,000 fmol of opiate bound per mg of protein. Radioiodinated human beta-endorphin (/sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/) was used as a probe to investigate the ligand binding subunits of mu and delta opioid receptors. /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ was shown to bind to a variety of opioid receptor-containing tissues with high affinity and specificity with preference for mu and delta sites, and with little, if any, binding to kappa sites. Affinity crosslinking techniques were employed to covalently link /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ to opioid receptors, utilizing derivatives of bis-succinimidyl esters that are bifunctional crosslinkers with specificities for amino and sulfhydryl groups. This, and competition experiments with high type-selective ligands, permitted the assignment of two labeled peptides to their receptor types, namely a peptide of M/sub r/ = 65,000 for mu receptors and one of M/sub r/ = 53,000 for delta receptors.

  12. Deterministic quantitative risk assessment development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, Jane; Colquhoun, Iain [PII Pipeline Solutions Business of GE Oil and Gas, Cramlington Northumberland (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    Current risk assessment practice in pipeline integrity management is to use a semi-quantitative index-based or model based methodology. This approach has been found to be very flexible and provide useful results for identifying high risk areas and for prioritizing physical integrity assessments. However, as pipeline operators progressively adopt an operating strategy of continual risk reduction with a view to minimizing total expenditures within safety, environmental, and reliability constraints, the need for quantitative assessments of risk levels is becoming evident. Whereas reliability based quantitative risk assessments can be and are routinely carried out on a site-specific basis, they require significant amounts of quantitative data for the results to be meaningful. This need for detailed and reliable data tends to make these methods unwieldy for system-wide risk k assessment applications. This paper describes methods for estimating risk quantitatively through the calibration of semi-quantitative estimates to failure rates for peer pipeline systems. The methods involve the analysis of the failure rate distribution, and techniques for mapping the rate to the distribution of likelihoods available from currently available semi-quantitative programs. By applying point value probabilities to the failure rates, deterministic quantitative risk assessment (QRA) provides greater rigor and objectivity than can usually be achieved through the implementation of semi-quantitative risk assessment results. The method permits a fully quantitative approach or a mixture of QRA and semi-QRA to suit the operator's data availability and quality, and analysis needs. For example, consequence analysis can be quantitative or can address qualitative ranges for consequence categories. Likewise, failure likelihoods can be output as classical probabilities or as expected failure frequencies as required. (author)

  13. Lipid raft integrity affects GABAA receptor, but not NMDA receptor modulation by psychopharmacological compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothdurfter, Caroline; Tanasic, Sascha; Di Benedetto, Barbara; Uhr, Manfred; Wagner, Eva-Maria; Gilling, Kate E; Parsons, Chris G; Rein, Theo; Holsboer, Florian; Rupprecht, Rainer; Rammes, Gerhard

    2013-07-01

    Lipid rafts have been shown to play an important role for G-protein mediated signal transduction and the function of ligand-gated ion channels including their modulation by psychopharmacological compounds. In this study, we investigated the functional significance of the membrane distribution of NMDA and GABAA receptor subunits in relation to the accumulation of the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine (DMI) and the benzodiazepine diazepam (Diaz). In the presence of Triton X-100, which allowed proper separation of the lipid raft marker proteins caveolin-1 and flotillin-1 from the transferrin receptor, all receptor subunits were shifted to the non-raft fractions. In contrast, under detergent-free conditions, NMDA and GABAA receptor subunits were detected both in raft and non-raft fractions. Diaz was enriched in non-raft fractions without Triton X-100 in contrast to DMI, which preferentially accumulated in lipid rafts. Impairment of lipid raft integrity by methyl-β-cyclodextrine (MβCD)-induced cholesterol depletion did not change the inhibitory effect of DMI at the NMDA receptor, whereas it enhanced the potentiating effect of Diaz at the GABAA receptor at non-saturating concentrations of GABA. These results support the hypothesis that the interaction of benzodiazepines with the GABAA receptor likely occurs outside of lipid rafts while the antidepressant DMI acts on ionotropic receptors both within and outside these membrane microdomains.

  14. A hormone pulse induces transient changes in the subcellular distribution and leads to a lysosomal accumulation of the estradiol receptor alpha in target tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualmann, B; Kessels, M M; Thole, H H; Sierralta, W D

    2000-06-01

    An intrauterine pulse-stimulation with estradiol induced changes in the subcellular localization of estrogen receptor alpha in porcine endometrium, as detected with F(ab') fragments of various anti-receptor antibodies covalently linked to nanogold. The low-sterically hindered immunoreagents--recognizing different epitopes within the hormone binding domain--allowed for an efficient immunolabeling of estradiol receptor alpha, detecting it both in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of nonstimulated epithelium cells. In the cytoplasm, the receptor often seemed to be associated with actin filaments and the endoplasmatic reticulum. After the stimulation with estradiol, a predominantly nuclear localization and a labeling of nucleoli was observed. Our immunoelectron microscopy study demonstrates a localization of the receptor in cytoplasmic organelles that increased after the hormone pulse. These organelles exhibited the morphological properties of lysosomes and relocated to the perinuclear area. In analogous cytoplasmic organelles, the presence of cathepsin D was detected via indirect immunogold labeling, justifying their classification as lysosomes. Quantitative examinations revealed that not only the number of lysosomes in the proximity of the nucleus but also their immunostaining for estradiol receptor alpha increased significantly after the hormone pulse. Thus, estradiol induces both the rapid shift of receptor into the nucleus, a slower perinuclear accumulation of lysosomes and an increase of lysosomal ERalpha-immunoreactivity. These results suggest a role for lysosomes in the degradation of receptor shuttling out of the nucleus. This could serve as termination of the estradiol receptor alpha-dependent activation of target cells. This hypothesis is strengthened by the fact that the receptor content in uterine tissue declined drastically few hours after the hormone pulse.

  15. Orphan Nuclear Receptor Nur77 Is a Novel Negative Regulator of Endothelin-1 Expression In Vascular Endothelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Qing; Chen, Ming; Yi, Bing; You, Xiaohua; Yang, Ping; Sun, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) produced by vascular endothelial cells plays essential roles in the regulation of vascular tone and development of cardiovascular diseases. The objective of this study is to identify novel regulators implicated in the regulation of ET-1 expression in vascular endothelial cells (ECs). By using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we show that either ectopic expression of orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 or pharmacological activati...

  16. NMDA and kainate receptor expression, long-term potentiation, and neurogenesis in the hippocampus of long-lived Ames dwarf mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sunita; Darland, Diane; Lei, Saobo; Rakoczy, Sharlene; Brown-Borg, Holly M

    2012-06-01

    In the current study, we investigated changes in N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) and kainate receptor expression, long-term potentiation (LTP), and neurogenesis in response to neurotoxic stress in long-living Ames dwarf mice. We hypothesized that Ames dwarf mice have enhanced neurogenesis that enables retention of spatial learning and memory with age and promotes neurogenesis in response to injury. Levels of the NMDA receptors (NR)1, NR2A, NR2B, and the kainate receptor (KAR)2 were increased in Ames dwarf mice, relative to wild-type littermates. Quantitative assessment of the excitatory postsynaptic potential in Schaffer collaterals in hippocampal slices from Ames dwarf mice showed an increased response in high-frequency induced LTP over time compared with wild type. Kainic acid (KA) injection was used to promote neurotoxic stress-induced neurogenesis. KA mildly increased the number of doublecortin-positive neurons in wild-type mice, but the response was significantly enhanced in the Ames dwarf mice. Collectively, these data support our hypothesis that the enhanced learning and memory associated with the Ames dwarf mouse may be due to elevated levels of NMDA and KA receptors in hippocampus and their ability to continue producing new neurons in response to neuronal damage.

  17. Internalization of G-protein-coupled receptors: Implication in receptor function, physiology and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calebiro, Davide; Godbole, Amod

    2018-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of membrane receptors and mediate the effects of numerous hormones and neurotransmitters. The nearly 1000 GPCRs encoded by the human genome regulate virtually all physiological functions and are implicated in the pathogenesis of prevalent human diseases such as thyroid disorders, hypertension or Parkinson's disease. As a result, 30-50% of all currently prescribed drugs are targeting these receptors. Once activated, GPCRs induce signals at the cell surface. This is often followed by internalization, a process that results in the transfer of receptors from the plasma membrane to membranes of the endosomal compartment. Internalization was initially thought to be mainly implicated in signal desensitization, a mechanism of adaptation to prolonged receptor stimulation. However, several unexpected functions have subsequently emerged. Most notably, accumulating evidence indicates that internalization can induce prolonged receptor signaling on intracellular membranes, which is apparently required for at least some biological effects of hormones like TSH, LH and adrenaline. These findings reveal an even stronger connection between receptor internalization and signaling than previously thought. Whereas new studies are just beginning to reveal an important physiological role for GPCR signaling after internalization and ways to exploit it for therapeutic purposes, future investigations will be required to explore its involvement in human disease. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Autoradiographic demonstration of glucocorticoid receptors in the intermediate lobe of the rat pituitary transplanted to the anterior eye chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruehle, H.J.; Schnabel, C.; Lausch, A.

    1989-01-01

    The neurointermediate lobe of adult male Wistar rats was syngeneic transplanted to the anterior eye chamber. The recipient rats were adrenalectomized 19 days after grafting and injected with (3H)corticosterone 5 days later. After a survival time of 60 min, autoradiograms were prepared by thaw-mount technique and quantitatively evaluated by silver grain counting. Beside the classical targets, anterior pituitary and hippocampal stratum pyramidale, the intraocular transplants showed a nuclear accumulation of radioactivity. This was abolished in rats treated for competition with an excess of unlabelled corticosterone prior to tracer application. No such receptor binding was found in the normotopic intermediate lobe and in the diaphragm studied as a non-target reference. Thus, this study confirmed that the glucocorticoid receptor gene is expressed of the tissue is grafted into an ectopic site. (author)

  19. Pharmacological characterization of a β-adrenergic-like octopamine receptor in Plutella xylostella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qing-Ting; Ma, Hai-Hao; Deng, Xi-Le; Zhu, Hang; Liu, Jia; Zhou, Yong; Zhou, Xiao-Mao

    2018-04-25

    The β-adrenergic-like octopamine receptor (OA2B2) belongs to the class of G-protein coupled receptors. It regulates important physiological functions in insects, thus is potentially a good target for insecticides. In this study, the putative open reading frame sequence of the Pxoa2b2 gene in Plutella xylostella was cloned. Orthologous sequence alignment, phylogenetic tree analysis, and protein sequence analysis all showed that the cloned receptor belongs to the OA2B2 protein family. PxOA2B2 was transiently expressed in HEK-293 cells. It was found that PxOA2B2 could be activated by both octopamine and tyramine, resulting in increased intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels, whereas dopamine and serotonin were not effective in eliciting cAMP production. Further studies with series of PxOA2B2 agonists and antagonists showed that all four tested agonists (e.g., naphazoline, clonidine, 2-phenylethylamine, and amitraz) could activate the PxOA2B2 receptor, and two of tested antagonists (e.g., phentolamine and mianserin) had significant antagonistic effects. However, antagonist of yohimbine had no effects. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that Pxoa2b2 gene was expressed in all developmental stages of P. xylostella and that the highest expression occurred in male adults. Further analysis with fourth-instar P. xylostella larvae showed that the Pxoa2b2 gene was mainly expressed in Malpighian tubule, epidermal, and head tissues. This study provides both a pharmacological characterization and the gene expression patterns of the OA2B2 in P. xylostella, facilitating further research for insecticides using PxOA2B2 as a target. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The Cannabinoid Receptor CB1 Modulates the Signaling Properties of the Lysophosphatidylinositol Receptor GPR55*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargl, Julia; Balenga, Nariman; Parzmair, Gerald P.; Brown, Andrew J.; Heinemann, Akos; Waldhoer, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) 55 (GPR55) and the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) are co-expressed in many tissues, predominantly in the central nervous system. Seven transmembrane spanning (7TM) receptors/GPCRs can form homo- and heteromers and initiate distinct signaling pathways. Recently, several synthetic CB1 receptor inverse agonists/antagonists, such as SR141716A, AM251, and AM281, were reported to activate GPR55. Of these, SR141716A was marketed as a promising anti-obesity drug, but was withdrawn from the market because of severe side effects. Here, we tested whether GPR55 and CB1 receptors are capable of (i) forming heteromers and (ii) whether such heteromers could exhibit novel signaling patterns. We show that GPR55 and CB1 receptors alter each others signaling properties in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. We demonstrate that the co-expression of FLAG-CB1 receptors in cells stably expressing HA-GPR55 specifically inhibits GPR55-mediated transcription factor activation, such as nuclear factor of activated T-cells and serum response element, as well as extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) activation. GPR55 and CB1 receptors can form heteromers, but the internalization of both receptors is not affected. In addition, we observe that the presence of GPR55 enhances CB1R-mediated ERK1/2 and nuclear factor of activated T-cell activation. Our data provide the first evidence that GPR55 can form heteromers with another 7TM/GPCR and that this interaction with the CB1 receptor has functional consequences in vitro. The GPR55-CB1R heteromer may play an important physiological and/or pathophysiological role in tissues endogenously co-expressing both receptors. PMID:23161546

  1. Developmental changes in human dopamine neurotransmission: cortical receptors and terminators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rothmond Debora A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dopamine is integral to cognition, learning and memory, and dysfunctions of the frontal cortical dopamine system have been implicated in several developmental neuropsychiatric disorders. The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC is critical for working memory which does not fully mature until the third decade of life. Few studies have reported on the normal development of the dopamine system in human DLPFC during postnatal life. We assessed pre- and postsynaptic components of the dopamine system including tyrosine hydroxylase, the dopamine receptors (D1, D2 short and D2 long isoforms, D4, D5, catechol-O-methyltransferase, and monoamine oxidase (A and B in the developing human DLPFC (6 weeks -50 years. Results Gene expression was first analysed by microarray and then by quantitative real-time PCR. Protein expression was analysed by western blot. Protein levels for tyrosine hydroxylase peaked during the first year of life (p O-methyltransferase (p = 0.024 were significantly higher in neonates and infants as was catechol-O-methyltransferase protein (32 kDa, p = 0.027. In contrast, dopamine D1 receptor mRNA correlated positively with age (p = 0.002 and dopamine D1 receptor protein expression increased throughout development (p Conclusions We find distinct developmental changes in key components of the dopamine system in DLPFC over postnatal life. Those genes that are highly expressed during the first year of postnatal life may influence and orchestrate the early development of cortical neural circuitry while genes portraying a pattern of increasing expression with age may indicate a role in DLPFC maturation and attainment of adult levels of cognitive function.

  2. Mechanism of A2 adenosine receptor activation. I. Blockade of A2 adenosine receptors by photoaffinity labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohse, M.J.; Klotz, K.N.; Schwabe, U.

    1991-01-01

    It has previously been shown that covalent incorporation of the photoreactive adenosine derivative (R)-2-azido-N6-p-hydroxy-phenylisopropyladenosine [(R)-AHPIA] into the A1 adenosine receptor of intact fat cells leads to a persistent activation of this receptor, resulting in a reduction of cellular cAMP levels. In contrast, covalent incorporation of (R)-AHPIA into human platelet membranes, which contain only stimulatory A2 adenosine receptors, reduces adenylate cyclase stimulation via these receptors. This effect of (R)-AHPIA is specific for the A2 receptor and can be prevented by the adenosine receptor antagonist theophylline. Binding studies indicate that up to 90% of A2 receptors can be blocked by photoincorporation of (R)-AHPIA. However, the remaining 10-20% of A2 receptors are sufficient to mediate an adenylate cyclase stimulation of up to 50% of the control value. Similarly, the activation via these 10-20% of receptors occurs with a half-life that is only 2 times longer than that in control membranes. This indicates the presence of a receptor reserve, with respect to both the extent and the rate of adenylate cyclase stimulation. These observations require a modification of the models of receptor-adenylate cyclase coupling

  3. The First Fifteen Years of Steroid Receptor Research in Zebrafish; Characterization and Functional Analysis of the Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel J. M. Schaaf

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Steroid hormones regulate a wide range of processes in our body, and their effects are mediated by steroid receptors. In addition to their physiological role, these receptors mediate the effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs and are widely used targets for dugs involved in the treatment of numerous diseases, ranging from cancer to inflammatory disorders. Over the last fifteen years, the zebrafish has increasingly been used as an animal model in steroid receptor research. Orthologues of all human steroid receptor genes appear to be present in zebrafish. All zebrafish steroid receptors have been characterized in detail, and their expression patterns have been analyzed. Functional studies have been performed using morpholino knockdown of receptor expression and zebrafish lines carrying mutations in one of their steroid receptor genes. To investigate the activity of the receptors in vivo, specific zebrafish reporter lines have been developed, and transcriptomic studies have been carried out to identify biomarkers for steroid receptor action. In this review, an overview of research on steroid receptors in zebrafish is presented, and it is concluded that further exploitation of the possibilities of the zebrafish model system will contribute significantly to the advancement of steroid receptor research in the next decade.

  4. Different effects of pentobarbital on two γ-aminobutyrate receptors from rat brain: channel opening, desensitization, and an additional conformational change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cash, D.J.; Subbarao, K.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of pentobarbital on the responses of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor from rat brain was studied in quantitative measurements of GABA-mediated chloride-exchange rates (reflecting channel-opening equilibrium) and receptor desensitization rates by using 36 Cl - tracer ion with negative membrane vesicles. Pentobarbital effected the two phases of 36 Cl - influx in different ways, supporting previous evidence that these are mediated by two different receptors. Both the chloride-exchange rate and the desensitization rate of the faster desensitizing receptor were increased by pentobarbital at concentrations above 20 μM by an allosteric effect shifting the response curve to lower GABA concentrations. A similar enhancement of the responses of the slower desensitizing receptor occurred up to 200 μM pentobarbital. Two pentobarbital effector sites were involved in the allosteric mechanism. Above 500 μM pentobarbital, both the initial chloride-exchange rate and the desensitization rate of the slower desensitizing receptor were decreased. This inhibition, which was immediate, occurred with saturating as well as low GABA concentrations and therefore was not attributed to decreased GABA binding but to inhibitory sites for pentobarbital, different from the allosteric activating sites and the GABA binding sites. The chloride ion exchange activity was seen to recover with time, at concentrations above 1000 μM pentobarbital, in a process with a very steep dependence on pentobarbital concentration. This reactivation was attributed to the conversion of an initial form of the receptor to a final form that was less inhibited by pentobarbital. Comparisons of the effects of pentobarbital on desensitization and on high-affinity ligand binding measurements suggest that increased GABA binding at equilibrium reflects an increased conversion to the desensitized state

  5. How calcium makes endocytic receptors attractive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian B F; Moestrup, Søren K

    2014-01-01

    of the receptor. Endosomal acidification and calcium efflux lead to the essential ligand-receptor affinity switch and separation. Recent data, including crystal structures of receptor-ligand complexes, now reveal how calcium, in different types of domain scaffolds, functions in a common way as a removable...... 'lynchpin' that stabilizes favorable positioning of ligand-attractive receptor residues. In addition to explaining how calcium depletion can cause ligand-receptor dissociation, the new data add further insight into how acidification contributes to dissociation through structural changes that affect...... the receptor calcium sites....

  6. Radiosequence analysis of the human progestin receptor charged with [3H]promegestone. A comparison with the glucocorticoid receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroemstedt, P.E.B.; Berkenstam, A.; Joernvall, H.G.; Gustafsson, J.A.; Carlstedt-Duke, J.

    1990-01-01

    Partially purified preparations of the human progestin receptor and the human and rat glucocorticoid receptor proteins were covalently charged with the synthetic progestin, [ 3 H]promegestone, by photoaffinity labeling. After labeling, the denaturated protein was cleaved and the mixture of peptides subjected to radiosequence analysis as previously described for the rat glucocorticoid receptor protein. The radioactivity labels identified, corresponded to Met-759 and Met-909 after photoaffinity labeling of the human progestin receptor, and Met-622 and Cys-754 after labeling of the rat glucocorticoid receptor. The residues labeled in the glucocorticoid receptor are the same as those previously reported to bind triamcinolone actonide. The corresponding residues were also labeled in the human glucocorticoid receptor. Met-759 of the progestin receptor and Met-622 of the rat glucocorticoid receptor are positioned within a segment with an overall high degree of sequence similarity and are equivalent. However, Met-909 (progestin receptor) and Cys-754 (glucocorticoid receptor) do not occur within equivalent segments of the two proteins. Thus, although the two classes of steroid hormone share a common structure within the A-ring, there are subtle differences in their interaction with the two separate receptor proteins

  7. Toll-like receptors in neonatal sepsis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hare, Fiona M

    2013-06-01

    Toll-like receptors are vital transmembrane receptors that initiate the innate immune response to many micro-organisms. The discovery of these receptors has improved our understanding of host-pathogen interactions, and these receptors play an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple neonatal conditions such as sepsis and brain injury. Toll-like receptors, especially TLRs 2 and 4, are associated with necrotizing enterocolitis, periventricular leukomalacia and sepsis.

  8. Omeprazole and lansoprazole enantiomers induce CYP3A4 in human hepatocytes and cell lines via glucocorticoid receptor and pregnane X receptor axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotna, Aneta; Dvorak, Zdenek

    2014-01-01

    Benzimidazole drugs lansoprazole and omeprazole are used for treatment of various gastrointestinal pathologies. Both compounds cause drug-drug interactions because they activate aryl hydrocarbon receptor and induce CYP1A genes. In the current paper, we examined the effects of lansoprazole and omeprazole enantiomers on the expression of key drug-metabolizing enzyme CYP3A4 in human hepatocytes and human cancer cell lines. Lansoprazole enantiomers, but not omeprazole, were equipotent inducers of CYP3A4 mRNA in HepG2 cells. All forms (S-, R-, rac-) of lansoprazole and omeprazole induced CYP3A4 mRNA and protein in human hepatocytes. The quantitative profiles of CYP3A4 induction by individual forms of lansoprazole and omeprazole exerted enantiospecific patterns. Lansoprazole dose-dependently activated pregnane X receptor PXR in gene reporter assays, and slightly modulated rifampicin-inducible PXR activity, with similar potency for each enantiomer. Omeprazole dose-dependently activated PXR and inhibited rifampicin-inducible PXR activity. The effects of S-omeprazole were much stronger as compared to those of R-omeprazole. All forms of lansoprazole, but not omeprazole, slightly activated glucocorticoid receptor and augmented dexamethasone-induced GR transcriptional activity. Omeprazole and lansoprazole influenced basal and ligand inducible expression of tyrosine aminotransferase, a GR-target gene, in HepG2 cells and human hepatocytes. Overall, we demonstrate here that omeprazole and lansoprazole enantiomers induce CYP3A4 in HepG2 cells and human hepatocytes. The induction comprises differential interactions of omeprazole and lansoprazole with transcriptional regulators PXR and GR, and some of the effects were enantiospecific. The data presented here might be of toxicological and clinical importance, since the effects occurred in therapeutically relevant concentrations.

  9. The alpha-fetoprotein third domain receptor binding fragment: in search of scavenger and associated receptor targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizejewski, G J

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the carboxyterminal third domain of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP-CD) binds with various ligands and receptors. Reports within the last decade have established that AFP-CD contains a large fragment of amino acids that interact with several different receptor types. Using computer software specifically designed to identify protein-to-protein interaction at amino acid sequence docking sites, the computer searches identified several types of scavenger-associated receptors and their amino acid sequence locations on the AFP-CD polypeptide chain. The scavenger receptors (SRs) identified were CD36, CD163, Stabilin, SSC5D, SRB1 and SREC; the SR-associated receptors included the mannose, low-density lipoprotein receptors, the asialoglycoprotein receptor, and the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE). Interestingly, some SR interaction sites were localized on the AFP-derived Growth Inhibitory Peptide (GIP) segment at amino acids #480-500. Following the detection studies, a structural subdomain analysis of both the receptor and the AFP-CD revealed the presence of epidermal growth factor (EGF) repeats, extracellular matrix-like protein regions, amino acid-rich motifs and dimerization subdomains. For the first time, it was reported that EGF-like sequence repeats were identified on each of the three domains of AFP. Thereafter, the localization of receptors on specific cell types were reviewed and their functions were discussed.

  10. Histamine H4 receptor in oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, A; Al-Samadi, A; Stegajev, V; Stark, H; Häyrinen-Immonen, R; Ainola, M; Hietanen, J; Konttinen, Y T

    2015-04-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is an autoimmune disease characterized by a band-like T-cell infiltrate below the apoptotic epithelial cells and degenerated basement membrane. We tested the hypothesis that the high-affinity histamine H4 receptors (H4 Rs) are downregulated in OLP by high histamine concentrations and proinflammatory T-cell cytokines. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence staining, image analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction of tissue samples and cytokine-stimulated cultured SCC-25 and primary human oral keratinocytes. H4 R immunoreactivity was weak in OLP and characterized by mast cell (MC) hyperplasia and degranulation. In contrast to controls, H4 R immunostaining and MC counts were negatively correlated in OLP (P = 0.003). H4 R agonist at nanomolar levels led to a rapid internalization of H4 Rs, whereas high histamine concentration and interferon-γ decreased HRH4 -gene transcripts. Healthy oral epithelial cells are equipped with H4 R, which displays a uniform staining pattern in a MC-independent fashion. In contrast, in OLP, increased numbers of activated MCs associate with increasing loss of epithelial H4 R. Cell culture experiments suggest a rapid H4 R stimulation-dependent receptor internalization and a slow cytokine-driven decrease in H4 R synthesis. H4 R may be involved in the maintenance of healthy oral mucosa. In OLP, this maintenance might be impaired by MC degranulation and inflammatory cytokines. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Modulating Estrogen Receptor-related Receptor-α Activity Inhibits Cell Proliferation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Stéphanie; Lanvin, Olivia; Tribollet, Violaine; Macari, Claire; North, Sophie; Vanacker, Jean-Marc

    2009-01-01

    High expression of the estrogen receptor-related receptor (ERR)-α in human tumors is correlated to a poor prognosis, suggesting an involvement of the receptor in cell proliferation. In this study, we show that a synthetic compound (XCT790) that modulates the activity of ERRα reduces the proliferation of various cell lines and blocks the G1/S transition of the cell cycle in an ERRα-dependent manner. XCT790 induces, in a p53-independent manner, the expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21waf/cip1 at the protein, mRNA, and promoter level, leading to an accumulation of hypophosphorylated Rb. Finally, XCT790 reduces cell tumorigenicity in Nude mice. PMID:19546226

  12. Functionally biased signalling properties of 7TM receptors - opportunities for drug development for the ghrelin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivertsen, B; Holliday, N; Madsen, A N

    2013-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The ghrelin receptor is a 7 transmembrane (7TM) receptor involved in a variety of physiological functions including growth hormone secretion, increased food intake and fat accumulation as well as modulation of reward and cognitive functions. Because of its important role in metabolism...... and energy expenditure, the ghrelin receptor has become an important therapeutic target for drug design and the development of anti-obesity compounds. However, none of the compounds developed so far have been approved for commercial use. Interestingly, the ghrelin receptor is able to signal through several...... review, we have described how ligands and mutations in the 7TM receptor may bias the receptors to favour either one G-protein over another or to promote G-protein independent signalling pathways rather than G-protein-dependent pathways. For the ghrelin receptor, both agonist and inverse agonists have...

  13. Compensatory molecular and functional mechanisms in nervous system of the Grm1(crv4) mouse lacking the mGlu1 receptor: a model for motor coordination deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Pia Irene Anna; Musante, Ilaria; Summa, Maria; Pittaluga, Anna; Emionite, Laura; Ikehata, Masami; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Puliti, Aldamaria

    2013-09-01

    The metabotropic glutamate type 1 (mGlu1) and type 5 (mGlu5) receptors, the only members of group I mGlu receptors, are implicated in synaptic plasticity and mechanisms of feedback control of glutamate release. They exhibit nearly complementary distributions throughout the central nervous system, well evident in the cerebellum, where mGlu1 receptor is most intensely expressed while mGlu5 receptor is not. Despite their different distribution, they show a similar subcellular localization and use common transducing pathways. We recently described the Grm1(crv4) mouse with motor coordination deficits and renal anomalies caused by a spontaneous mutation inactivating the mGlu1 receptor. To define the neuropathological mechanisms in these mice, we evaluated expression and function of the mGlu5 receptor in cerebral and cerebellar cortices. Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses showed mGlu5 receptor overexpression. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction results indicated that the up-regulation is already evident at RNA level. Functional studies confirmed an enhanced glutamate release from cortical cerebral and cerebellar synaptosomes when compared with wild-type that is abolished by the mGlu5 receptor-specific inhibitor, 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl) pyridine hydrochloride (MPEP). Finally, acute MPEP treatment of Grm1(crv4/crv4) mice induced an evident although incomplete improvement of motor coordination, suggesting that mGlu5 receptors enhanced activity worsens, instead of improving, the motor-coordination defects in the Grm1(crv4/crv4) mice.

  14. How to Choose the Suitable Template for Homology Modelling of GPCRs: 5-HT7 Receptor as a Test Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahaf, Nir; Pappalardo, Matteo; Basile, Livia; Guccione, Salvatore; Rayan, Anwar

    2016-09-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a super-family of membrane proteins that attract great pharmaceutical interest due to their involvement in almost every physiological activity, including extracellular stimuli, neurotransmission, and hormone regulation. Currently, structural information on many GPCRs is mainly obtained by the techniques of computer modelling in general and by homology modelling in particular. Based on a quantitative analysis of eighteen antagonist-bound, resolved structures of rhodopsin family "A" receptors - also used as templates to build 153 homology models - it was concluded that a higher sequence identity between two receptors does not guarantee a lower RMSD between their structures, especially when their pair-wise sequence identity (within trans-membrane domain and/or in binding pocket) lies between 25 % and 40 %. This study suggests that we should consider all template receptors having a sequence identity ≤50 % with the query receptor. In fact, most of the GPCRs, compared to the currently available resolved structures of GPCRs, fall within this range and lack a correlation between structure and sequence. When testing suitability for structure-based drug design, it was found that choosing as a template the most similar resolved protein, based on sequence resemblance only, led to unsound results in many cases. Molecular docking analyses were carried out, and enrichment factors as well as attrition rates were utilized as criteria for assessing suitability for structure-based drug design. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Ionotropic crustacean olfactory receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Corey

    Full Text Available The nature of the olfactory receptor in crustaceans, a major group of arthropods, has remained elusive. We report that spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus, express ionotropic receptors (IRs, the insect chemosensory variants of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Unlike insects IRs, which are expressed in a specific subset of olfactory cells, two lobster IR subunits are expressed in most, if not all, lobster olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs, as confirmed by antibody labeling and in situ hybridization. Ligand-specific ORN responses visualized by calcium imaging are consistent with a restricted expression pattern found for other potential subunits, suggesting that cell-specific expression of uncommon IR subunits determines the ligand sensitivity of individual cells. IRs are the only type of olfactory receptor that we have detected in spiny lobster olfactory tissue, suggesting that they likely mediate olfactory signaling. Given long-standing evidence for G protein-mediated signaling in activation of lobster ORNs, this finding raises the interesting specter that IRs act in concert with second messenger-mediated signaling.

  16. Identification and functional analysis of pheromone and receptor genes in the B3 mating locus of Pleurotus eryngii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Hee; Kang, Young Min; Im, Chak Han; Ali, Asjad; Kim, Sun Young; Je, Hee-Jeong; Kim, Min-Keun; Rho, Hyun Su; Lee, Hyun Sook; Kong, Won-Sik; Ryu, Jae-San

    2014-01-01

    Pleurotus eryngii has recently become a major cultivated mushroom; it uses tetrapolar heterothallism as a part of its reproductive process. Sexual development progresses only when the A and B mating types are compatible. Such mating incompatibility occasionally limits the efficiency of breeding programs in which crossing within loci-shared strains or backcrossing strategies are employed. Therefore, understanding the mating system in edible mushroom fungi will help provide a short cut in the development of new strains. We isolated and identified pheromone and receptor genes in the B3 locus of P. eryngii and performed a functional analysis of the genes in the mating process by transformation. A genomic DNA library was constructed to map the entire mating-type locus. The B3 locus was found to contain four pheromone precursor genes and four receptor genes. Remarkably, receptor PESTE3.3.1 has just 34 amino acid residues in its C-terminal cytoplasmic region; therefore, it seems likely to be a receptor-like gene. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR (real-time qRT-PCR) revealed that most pheromone and receptor genes showed significantly higher expression in monokaryotic cells than dikaryotic cells. The pheromone genes PEphb3.1 and PEphb3.3 and the receptor gene PESTE3.3.1 were transformed into P5 (A3B4). The transformants were mated with a tester strain (A4B4), and the progeny showed clamp connections and a normal fruiting body, which indicates the proposed role of these genes in mating and fruiting processes. This result also confirms that PESTE3.3.1 is a receptor gene. In this study, we identified pheromone and receptor genes in the B3 locus of P. eryngii and found that some of those genes appear to play a role in the mating and fruiting processes. These results might help elucidate the mechanism of fruiting differentiation and improve breeding efficiency.

  17. Components of the CCR4-NOT complex function as nuclear hormone receptor coactivators via association with the NRC-interacting Factor NIF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garapaty, Shivani; Mahajan, Muktar A; Samuels, Herbert H

    2008-03-14

    CCR4-NOT is an evolutionarily conserved, multicomponent complex known to be involved in transcription as well as mRNA degradation. Various subunits (e.g. CNOT1 and CNOT7/CAF1) have been reported to be involved in influencing nuclear hormone receptor activities. Here, we show that CCR4/CNOT6 and RCD1/CNOT9, members of the CCR4-NOT complex, potentiate nuclear receptor activity. RCD1 interacts in vivo and in vitro with NIF-1 (NRC-interacting factor), a previously characterized nuclear receptor cotransducer that activates nuclear receptors via its interaction with NRC. As with NIF-1, RCD1 and CCR4 do not directly associate with nuclear receptors; however, they enhance ligand-dependent transcriptional activation by nuclear hormone receptors. CCR4 mediates its effect through the ligand binding domain of nuclear receptors and small interference RNA-mediated silencing of endogenous CCR4 results in a marked decrease in nuclear receptor activation. Furthermore, knockdown of CCR4 results in an attenuated stimulation of RARalpha target genes (e.g. Sox9 and HoxA1) as shown by quantitative PCR assays. The silencing of endogenous NIF-1 also resulted in a comparable decrease in the RAR-mediated induction of both Sox9 and HoxA1. Furthermore, CCR4 associates in vivo with NIF-1. In addition, the CCR4-enhanced transcriptional activation by nuclear receptors is dependent on NIF-1. The small interference RNA-mediated knockdown of NIF-1 blocks the ligand-dependent potentiating effect of CCR4. Our results suggest that CCR4 plays a role in the regulation of certain endogenous RARalpha target genes and that RCD1 and CCR4 might mediate their function through their interaction with NIF-1.

  18. Dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton mediates receptor cross talk: An emerging concept in tuning receptor signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Pieta K.; Batista, Facundo D.

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence implicates the actin cytoskeleton in the control of receptor signaling. This may be of particular importance in the context of immune receptors, such as the B cell receptor, where dysregulated signaling can result in autoimmunity and malignancy. Here, we discuss the role of the actin cytoskeleton in controlling receptor compartmentalization, dynamics, and clustering as a means to regulate receptor signaling through controlling the interactions with protein partners. We propose that the actin cytoskeleton is a point of integration for receptor cross talk through modulation of protein dynamics and clustering. We discuss the implication of this cross talk via the cytoskeleton for both ligand-induced and low-level constitutive (tonic) signaling necessary for immune cell survival. PMID:26833785

  19. DMPD: Toll-like receptor 3: a link between toll-like receptor, interferon and viruses. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15031527 Toll-like receptor 3: a link between toll-like receptor, interferon and virus... (.csml) Show Toll-like receptor 3: a link between toll-like receptor, interferon and viruses. PubmedID 1503...1527 Title Toll-like receptor 3: a link between toll-like receptor, interferon and virus

  20. The dynamics of the G protein-coupled neuropeptide Y2 receptor in monounsaturated membranes investigated by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Lars; Kahr, Julian; Schmidt, Peter; Krug, Ulrike; Scheidt, Holger A.; Huster, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.huster@medizin.uni-leipzig.de [University of Leipzig, Institute of Medical Physics and Biophysics (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    In contrast to the static snapshots provided by protein crystallography, G protein-coupled receptors constitute a group of proteins with highly dynamic properties, which are required in the receptors’ function as signaling molecule. Here, the human neuropeptide Y2 receptor was reconstituted into a model membrane composed of monounsaturated phospholipids and solid-state NMR was used to characterize its dynamics. Qualitative static {sup 15}N NMR spectra and quantitative determination of {sup 1}H–{sup 13}C order parameters through measurement of the {sup 1}H–{sup 13}C dipolar couplings of the CH, CH{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} groups revealed axially symmetric motions of the whole molecule in the membrane and molecular fluctuations of varying amplitude from all molecular segments. The molecular order parameters (S{sub backbone} = 0.59–0.67, S{sub CH2} = 0.41–0.51 and S{sub CH3} = 0.22) obtained in directly polarized {sup 13}C NMR experiments demonstrate that the Y2 receptor is highly mobile in the native-like membrane. Interestingly, according to these results the receptor was found to be slightly more rigid in the membranes formed by the monounsaturated phospholipids than by saturated phospholipids as investigated previously. This could be caused by an increased chain length of the monounsaturated lipids, which may result in a higher helical content of the receptor. Furthermore, the incorporation of cholesterol, phosphatidylethanolamine, or negatively charged phosphatidylserine into the membrane did not have a significant influence on the molecular mobility of the Y2 receptor.