WorldWideScience

Sample records for innovative telemedicine knowledge

  1. Clinicians' Knowledge and Perception of Telemedicine Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayatollahi, Haleh; Sarabi, Fatemeh Zahra Pourfard; Langarizadeh, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Telemedicine is an application of information and communication technology in the healthcare environment. This study aimed to compare knowledge and perceptions of telemedicine technology among different groups of clinicians. This survey study was conducted in 2013. The potential participants included 532 clinicians who worked in two hospitals and three clinics in a northern province of Iran. Data were collected using a five-point Likert-scale questionnaire. The content validity of the questionnaire was checked, and the reliability was calculated using Cronbach's alpha coefficient (α = 0.73). The results showed that most of the clinicians (96.1 percent) had little knowledge about telemedicine. They perceived the advantages of telemedicine at a moderate level and its disadvantages at a low level. The knowledge of dentists about this technology was less than that of other groups, and as a result they were less positive about the advantages of telemedicine compared to nurses, general physicians, and specialists. The limited knowledge of clinicians about telemedicine seems to have influenced their perceptions of the technology. Therefore, providing healthcare professionals with more information about new technologies in healthcare, such as telemedicine, can help to gain a more realistic picture of their perceptions.

  2. Innovation Network Development Model in Telemedicine: A Change in Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, Maryam; Torabi, Mashallah; Safdari, Reza; Dargahi, Hossein; Naeimi, Sara

    2015-10-01

    This paper introduces a telemedicine innovation network and reports its implementation in Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The required conditions for the development of future projects in the field of telemedicine are also discussed; such projects should be based on the common needs and opportunities in the areas of healthcare, education, and technology. The development of the telemedicine innovation network in Tehran University of Medical Sciences was carried out in two phases: identifying the beneficiaries of telemedicine, and codification of the innovation network memorandum; and brainstorming of three workgroup members, and completion and clustering ideas. The present study employed a qualitative survey by using brain storming method. Thus, the ideas of the innovation network members were gathered, and by using Freeplane software, all of them were clustered and innovation projects were defined. In the services workgroup, 87 and 25 ideas were confirmed in phase 1 and phase 2, respectively. In the education workgroup, 8 new programs in the areas of telemedicine, tele-education and teleconsultation were codified. In the technology workgroup, 101 and 11 ideas were registered in phase 1 and phase 2, respectively. Today, innovation is considered a major infrastructural element of any change or progress. Thus, the successful implementation of a telemedicine project not only needs funding, human resources, and full equipment. It also requires the use of innovation models to cover several different aspects of change and progress. The results of the study can provide a basis for the implementation of future telemedicine projects using new participatory, creative, and innovative models.

  3. Telemedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, T

    2000-09-01

    Telemedicine began from the humble beginnings of the first telephone call from Alexander Graham Bell to his associate, Watson. These systems already have been used for educational programs, consultative care, image transfer, second opinions, and direct acute patient care. Most of the original programs failed because of several reasons, primarily because of lack of funding when a grant ended. The major lesson of these programs is that a solid business plan is needed initially for long-term survival. The reliability of telemedical examinations has been demonstrated superficially, but more conclusive work in this area is needed. Studies that evaluate clinical, financial, and satisfaction outcomes are required simultaneously. Further integration of medical informatics into telemedicine systems is needed before these systems can achieve more acceptance. Twenty years ago, few people predicted this technologic revolution. Innovations arise almost daily. The future seems promising for telemedical systems, but much work is required. Partnerships with industry must move beyond niche projects, and regulatory and medicolegal issues must be resolved. Anesthesiologists can expect their practice to be affected directly by technology, and should embrace it, evaluate it, and help lead its use in this millennium.

  4. An innovative telemedicine knowledge translation program to improve quality of care in intensive care units: protocol for a cluster randomized pragmatic trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinto Ruxandra

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are challenges to timely adoption of, and ongoing adherence to, evidence-based practices known to improve patient care in the intensive care unit (ICU. Quality improvement initiatives using a collaborative network approach may increase the use of such practices. Our objective is to evaluate the effectiveness of a novel knowledge translation program for increasing the proportion of patients who appropriately receive the following six evidence-based care practices: venous thromboembolism prophylaxis; ventilator-associated pneumonia prevention; spontaneous breathing trials; catheter-related bloodstream infection prevention; decubitus ulcer prevention; and early enteral nutrition. Methods and design We will conduct a pragmatic cluster randomized active control trial in 15 community ICUs and one academic ICU in Ontario, Canada. The intervention is a multifaceted videoconferenced educational and problem-solving forum to organize knowledge translation strategies, including comparative audit and feedback, educational sessions from content experts, and dissemination of algorithms. Fifteen individual ICUs (clusters will be randomized to receive quality improvement interventions targeting one of the best practices during each of six study phases. Each phase lasts four months during the first study year and three months during the second. At the end of each study phase, ICUs are assigned to an intervention for a best practice not yet received according to a random schedule. The primary analysis will use patient-level process-of-care data to measure the intervention's effect on rates of adoption and adherence of each best practice in the targeted ICU clusters versus controls. Discussion This study design evaluates a new system for knowledge translation and quality improvement across six common ICU problems. All participating ICUs receive quality improvement initiatives during every study phase, improving buy-in. This study design

  5. Technology, Innovation and Knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ulf; Dasi, Angels; Mudambi, Ram

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of ideas is at the core of the IB field and has been captured in concepts like technology, innovation and knowledge. While these concepts have evolved over the last decades, the point that the ideas and the international connectivity are central for IB remains genuine. This paper...... is an attempt to take stock of the evolution of the concepts technology, innovation and knowledge in IB literature along the past five decades with a particular focus on the role of the Columbia Journal of World Business (CJWB) and the Journal of World Business (JWB) in this evolution. Likewise, our objective...

  6. Telemedicine in the acute health setting: A disruptive innovation for specialists (an example from stroke).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagot, Kathleen L; Cadilhac, Dominique A; Vu, Michelle; Moss, Karen; Bladin, Christopher F

    2015-12-01

    Telemedicine is a disruptive innovation within health care settings as consultations take place via audio-visual technology rather than traditional face-to-face. Specialist perceptions and experiences of providing audio-visual consultations in emergency situations, however, are not well understood. The aim of this exploratory study was to describe the experience of medical specialists providing acute stroke decision-making support via telemedicine. Data from the Victorian Stroke Telemedicine (VST) programme were used. The experiences of specialists providing an acute clinical telemedicine service to rural emergency departments were explored, drawing on disruptive innovation theory. Document analysis of programme consultation records, meeting minutes and in-depth individual interviews with three neurologists were analysed using triangulation. Since February 2014, 269 stroke telemedicine consultations with 12 neurologists have occurred. Retention on the roster has varied between 1 and >4 years. Overall, neurologists reported benefits of participation, as they were addressing health equity gaps for rural patients. Negative effects were the unpredictability of consultations impacting on their personal life, the mixed level of experience of colleagues initiating the consult and not knowing patient outcomes since follow-up communication was not routine. Insights into workforce experience and satisfaction were identified to inform strategies to support specialists to adapt to the disruptive innovation of telemedicine. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Knowledge and Continuous Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boer, Harry; Caffyn, S.; Corso, M.

    1999-01-01

    proposes a model to describe and explain how companies can gain a substantive competitive advantage by extending their innovation efforts to other phases of the product life cycle and by facilitating knowledge transfer and learning both within the company and with other partner organisations. The model......Competition today is forcing companies to increase their effectiveness through exploiting synergy and learning in product innovation. Literature, however, is still mainly focused on how product development projects, seen largely as isolated efforts, should be organised and managed. This article...

  8. Innovation quality in knowledge cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makkonen, Teemu; Inkinen, Tommi

    2014-01-01

    Innovation awards have for long attracted policy makers as a method for innovation promotion. Still, academic research on innovation awards has thus far received little attention. In particular, empirical studies on the motives to enter award competitions and the realized impacts of winning an in...... for innovation promotion, alongside innovation inducement policies including tax reductions and direct funding, as they produce significant positive effects for the award winning companies, and an additional indicator of innovation quality in the context of knowledge cities....

  9. Innovation through Knowledge Transfer 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Gabrys, Bogdan; Musial-Gabrys, Katarzyna; Roach, Jim; Innovation through Knowledge Transfer InnovationKT-2012

    2013-01-01

    Across the world there is growing awareness of the importance of innovation and knowledge transfer.  Innovation in the sense of generating new knowledge and making better use of existing knowledge, coupled with knowledge transfer and sharing paradigms, have never been more relevant to the universities, industry, commerce and the third sector.  This volume represents the proceedings of the Innovation through Knowledge Transfer 2012 Conference which formed an excellent opportunity to disseminate, share and discuss the impact of innovation, knowledge sharing, enterprise and entrepreneurship.  The volume contains papers presented at a Workshop on ‘The Meta Transfer of Knowledge: Challenges in the Transfer of Knowledge in Industry’, others from thematic sessions on ‘Next-Practice in University Based Open Innovation’,  ‘Social Innovation and Related Paradigms’, ‘Engagement with Industry and Commerce’ and ‘Knowledge Exchange’.  All papers were thoroughly reviewed by referees knowledgeable in...

  10. Innovating in knowledge transfer

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    When you ask people whether investment in basic science is worth it, the answer you get is an overwhelming ‘yes’… followed by a pause, and then a question: ‘what’s the immediate benefit?’ Of course we have answers.   Basic research at CERN expands the pool of human knowledge. It inspires the young, and provides an important impetus to scientific and technical education. Applications of CERN technology are to be found in many domains, and the results of basic science provide the seeds for applied research. All this is clear and well established, but we can always do more, and that’s why I was particularly impressed with an event that took place at CERN last week. Education and innovation are core missions for CERN, and they came together last week when 17 students from universities in Finland, Greece and Italy presented the results of their five-month challenge-based innovation course (CBI). Developed by CERN along with Aa...

  11. Telemedicine in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lasse Overballe; Krebs, Hans Jørgen; Albert, Nancy M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Telemedicine may have the possibility to provide better access to healthcare delivery for the citizens. Telemedicine in arctic remote areas must be tailored according to the needs of the local population. Therefore, we need more knowledge about their needs and their view of telemedicine......: Data collected on citizens' views about the possibilities of using telemedicine in Greenland revealed the following findings: Greenlandic citizens are positive toward telemedicine, and telemedicine can help facilitate improved access to healthcare for residents in these Greenlandic settlements...

  12. Knowledge management, innovation and creativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhondt, S.

    2003-01-01

    Since five years, knowledge management stays high on the policy agenda of companies. They hope to improve their operations by introducing knowledge and innovation programs. Also, at the EU-level, knowledge management is seen as an important item for research. The European Commission has included

  13. Awareness Knowledge Attitude Skills of Telemedicine among Health Professional Faculty Working in Teaching Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayapragassarazan, Zayabalaradjane; Kumar, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Telemedicine is an emerging technology in health sector in India. The success of any new technology depends on many factors including the knowledge and understanding of the concept, skills acquired, attitude towards technology and working environment by the concerned professionals. Aim: The main objective of this study was to assess…

  14. Knowledge Management and Innovation Policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhonny Antonio Pabón Cadavid

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of knowledge management strategies and administration of intellectual capital defines the effectiveness of national innovation policies. This article analyses the intersection between national policies and organizational strategies to transfer value to the economy and society. It studies the recent scholarship related to this intersection. The article introduces and defines the main concepts that are relevant for the understanding of the topic. The article stresses that democratization of education and knowledge production should be part of the analysis of innovation models. The importance of intellectual capital valuation is highlighted with special emphasis on national and organizational policies regarding human capital, knowledge assets and education.

  15. How Do Low-Income Urban African Americans and Latinos Feel about Telemedicine? A Diffusion of Innovation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheba George

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Telemedicine is promoted as a means to increase access to specialty medical care among the urban underserved, yet little is known about its acceptability among these populations. We used components of a diffusion of innovation conceptual framework to analyze preexperience perceptions about telemedicine to assess its appeal among urban underserved African Americans and Latinos. Methods. Ten focus groups were conducted with African American (=43 and Latino participants (=44 in both English and Spanish and analyzed for key themes. Results. Both groups perceived increased and immediate access to multiple medical opinions and reduced wait time as relative advantages of telemedicine. However, African Americans expressed more concerns than Latinos about confidentiality, privacy, and the physical absence of the specialist. This difference may reflect lower levels of trust in new health care innovations among African Americans resulting from a legacy of past abuses in the US medical system as compared to immigrant Latinos who do not have this particular historical backdrop. Conclusions. These findings have implications for important issues such as adoption of telemedicine, patient satisfaction, doctor-patient interactions, and the development and tailoring of strategies targeted to each of these populations for the introduction, marketing, and implementation of telemedicine.

  16. Knowledge governance, innovation and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Burlamaqui

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to be a very preliminary effort to contribute to a better understanding of the interaction among innovation, competition and intellectual property policies from an evolutionary-developmental perspective. As such, it seeks to build a more coherent framework within which the discussions of both institution building and policy design for development can proceed. In order to accomplish that, the paper introduces the concept of "Knowledge Governance" as an alternative analytical and policy-oriented approach, and suggests that from a public policy/public interest perspective, and within an evolutionary framework, it is a better way to address the problems concerning the production, appropriability and diffusion of knowledge. In doing so, it also intends contribute to broaden the ongoing discussions on the "New Developmentalism".

  17. Knowledge transfer objects and innovation performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sajadirad, Solmaz; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    2016-01-01

    Local knowledge of globally distributed subsidiaries may be a valuable source of innovation for headquarters. However, acquiring local knowledge of subsidiaries and transforming it into innovation performance remains a challenge for many multinational companies. In this paper, based on analysis...... of eleven multinational companies present in Danish industry, we characterize different approaches to the use of knowledge transfer objects (static vs. dynamic), and discuss the respective effect on innovation performance. A conceptual framework is proposed to classify such different approaches on the basis...

  18. Knowledge Base, Exporting Activities, Innovation Openness and Innovation Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Spyros Arvanitis; Areti Gkypali; Kostas Tsekouras

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the complexity that regulates the innovation-exports nexus. In particular we argue that innovation and exports should be treated as latent variables in order to account for as many facets possible thus, accounting for multifaceted heterogeneity. In this context, the role of innovation openness ought to be highlighted within a unified framework, as it is considered an additional activity of firms’ knowledge creation strategy. In this line, innovation and exporting ...

  19. Impacts of Incoming Knowledge on Product Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machikita, Tomohiro

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies two questions on the role of networked sources of knowledge influential to product innovation. First, what is the extent of technology transferred through vertical linkages and public–private alliances, including university–industry linkages, in the phase of product improvement...... and developing new products. The impacts of public–private alliances on innovation are sizable compared with the impacts of vertical linkages. Public–private alliances and vertical linkages offer knowledge with different effects on product innovation....

  20. Knowledge related activities in open innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedrosa, Alex; Välling, Margus; Boyd, Britta

    2013-01-01

    interaction in open innovation. Despite valuable insights into the importance of the variety of external knowledge sources to enhance (open) innovation, research has overlooked so far that managers’ characteristics and practices are relevant for the absorption of external knowledge in open innovation. Thus......Theory and practice both have recognised the importance of external knowledge to enhance organisations’ innovation performance. Due to organisations’ growing interest in effectively collaborating with external knowledge sources, research has investigated the importance of firm-external stakeholder......, the purpose of this study is to explore how organisations’ absorptive capacity – exploration, transformation, and exploitation – becomes manifested in managers’ characteristics and practices in open innovation. This article reports on the findings obtained from four case studies of manufacturing and service...

  1. Global and local knowledge networks in innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Anne

    2006-01-01

    , of which global sources are considered most important to innovation, while the regional level basically provides a labour market. Firms are able to establish direct links to knowledge sources at all scales, and widely rely on ICT and their access to foreign customers. This questions the proximity...... hypothesis and the regional focus of industrial and regional innovation policies....

  2. Knowledge adquisition strategies in firm innovation processes

    OpenAIRE

    Vega Jurado, Jaider; Gutiérrez Gracia, Antonio; Fernández de Lucio, Ignacio

    2009-01-01

    The recognition of external agents as an important knowledge source to innovation processes means that the firms must face a key decision: generate in-house or acquire externally the required technological knowledge. Owing to its implications, this decision has become a very important topic between academics and practitioners of innovation, promoting the development of a body of theoretical and empirical literature about the factors and motivations which influence it. This paper provides a re...

  3. Knowledge Economy and Research Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastalich, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    The "knowledge economy" has been received with considerable scepticism by scholars within the fields of political economy, social and political philosophy, and higher education. Key arguments within this literature are reviewed in this article to suggest that, despite policy claims, "knowledge economy" does not describe a "new" mode of economic…

  4. Competitive Advantage Achievement through Innovation and Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbancova Hana

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In today’s highly competitive environment the goal of each organisation is to defeat competition and win new customers. Individuals who are holders of knowledge represent a tool for the generation of innovations. Thanks to their personal creativity, their knowledge, skills and abilities it is possible to generate new innovative ideas that will help organisations to achieve a competitiveadvantage. The aim of the article is to present the findings of a survey targeted at innovations and to identify knowledge as an important element in the process of innovations. Primary data were obtained through a questionnaire survey carried out in organisations in the Czech Republic and evaluated using the tools of descriptive statistics and also the methods of comparison, induction, deduction and synthesis were applied. One of the conclusions of the article is that organisations find it important to innovate and support an innovative culture. Knowledge too is very significant in the innovation process since it represents not only important input, but also output of the transformation process.

  5. Promoting Innovation Ecosystem from Knowledge Supplying Side

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqiu WANG

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Innovation and development paradigm has dominated the world since the 19th century. In the era of industry 4.0, innovation ecosystem has been advocated globally. There are different innovation paradigms in history. Before 1960s, the competitive and monopolized paradigm was dominative, while between the 1970s and 1990s, the cluster and innovation valley paradigm had played a key role. In the 21st century, with the advent of industry 4.0, the innovation ecosystem paradigm is advocated globally. Accordingly, there exist different innovation strategies, in reality, considering different economic and social context. However, no matter if having in mind developed or developing countries, the ecosystem paradigm has high rewards for different companies and society. There is also evidence showing that research and development by top universities and research institutes have high productivity and benefits for enterprises and society nowadays, no matter the development state of the areas considered. The author analyzes by literature review and case study the necessity, feasibility, strategy and approaches of innovation ecosystem from a knowledge supplying side. The strategy and approaches include collaboration between university, industry, agriculture and government, talents education, knowledge diffusion, patent purchasing, technology tailoring, consulting, human resource training and platform construction. Science community also takes the role of standards development and maintaining, high technology forecasting and innovation monitoring. The patent office, start-ups, spin-offs and innovation labs act as the links between science, technology, and application.

  6. Health care for all: effective, community supported, healthcare with innovative use of telemedicine technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Tariq Kazim; Tariq, Tasneem; Phillips, Roger; Davison, Steve; Hoare, Adam; Hasan, Syed Shahzad; Babar, Zaheer-Ud-Din

    2018-01-01

    Almost half of the world's total population reside in rural and remote areas and a large number of these people remain deprived of most basic facilities like healthcare and education. It is deemed impossible for government with scarce resources in developing countries to open and run a health facility in every remote community using conventional means. One increasingly popular unconventional mean is the use of existing technology to improve exchange of medical information for the purpose of improving health of underprivileged communities. Telemedicine implies the use of information and communication technology to provide health care remotely from a distance. With the induction of telemedicine, patients who live in rural and remote areas can have increased access to medical services. In many developing countries, use of telemedicine however has been limited mainly to teleconferencing between primary and secondary/tertiary care facilities for diagnosis and management of patients. This system still requires patients from remote communities to travel, often long and arduous journeys to the centre where telecom and medical facilities are available. Health Care 4 All International, a not for profit registered charity is providing primary care to patients by taking telemedicine into their homes in remote communities, thus obviating the need and hardships of travel for patient.

  7. Informal Knowledge Institutions and Market Innovation by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A framework is built in which small firms develop new market innovations through the utilization of knowledge acquired from informal (e.g. personal contact, network of friends, families etc.) institutions. Data was collected through a survey of 510 small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) in knowledge intensive business ...

  8. Innovation system and knowledge-intensive entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermans, Bram

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this deliverable is to investigate the properties and the nature of knowledge-intensive entrepreneurship as a largely distributed phenomenon at firm, sector and national levels in Denmark. Following the guidelines previously developed in the Deliverable 2.2.1 “Innovation systems...... and knowledge-intensive entrepreneurship: Analytical framework and guidelines for case study research” I will investigate the interplay between national innovation systems and knowledge- intensive entrepreneurship by focusing on two main sectors: machine tools, and computer and related activities....

  9. Innovative methods for knowledge transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goanta, A. M.

    2015-11-01

    At this time, learning takes place, either with classic books on paper support or using books scanned or drawn and further converted into PDF or PPT files that are printed on type support CD / DVD. The latter modern means of learning, the study adds live on the Internet using search engines and not least e-learning method, which allows the study of bibliographic related materials in PDF or PPT, stacked and grouped on the basis of a curriculum imposed which can be accessed on a website via a user name and password. Innovative methods come to successfully use other file types than those mentioned above. The graphics in teaching technical subjects such as descriptive geometry can be achieved using animated PowerPoint files, allowing for visualization of steps to be taken, in the case of solving by drawing a descriptive geometry. Another innovative method relies on the use of HTML files, inspired by related sites help design software packages that can be used when teaching descriptive geometry that the technical design. Through this work, the author has proposed to present a new innovative method, which is inspired by the methods listed above, but involves using AVI files to teaching of computer-assisted type graphics or info graphics. In general this new author's method lends itself particularly well to the teaching of the use of software packages because the student actually see the place from where the delivered command is accessed and contextual options of right button of the mouse. These laboratory courses or mentoring can be freestanding cards support CD / DVD or can be posted on websites with restricted access based on user name and password. Practically paper presents the methodology of creating courses and tutorials in AVI format, and how to monitor the degree of accessing the website, on which there were posted mentioned teaching materials, using the tools offered by Google Analytics. The results consist of graphical work, about the degree of access to

  10. Indigenous knowledges driving technological innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilian Alessa; Carlos Andrade; Phil Cash Cash; Christian P. Giardina; Matt Hamabata; Craig Hammer; Kai Henifin; Lee Joachim; Jay T. Johnson; Kekuhi Kealiikanakaoleohaililani; Deanna Kingston; Andrew Kliskey; Renee Pualani Louis; Amanda Lynch; Daryn McKenny; Chels Marshall; Mere Roberts; Taupouri Tangaro; Jyl Wheaton-Abraham; Everett. Wingert

    2011-01-01

    This policy brief explores the use and expands the conversation on the ability of geospatial technologies to represent Indigenous cultural knowledge. Indigenous peoples' use of geospatial technologies has already proven to be a critical step for protecting tribal self-determination. However, the ontological frameworks and techniques of Western geospatial...

  11. Knowledge translation mechanisms in open innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simeone, Luca; Secundo, Giustina; Schiuma, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. This paper investigates the role of design as a knowledge translation mechanism in R&D-oriented open innovation. The scope of the paper is the investigation of how design can be used as a mean of knowledge transfer among various stakeholders who speak different languages and have divergent...... needs and interests in a process where knowledge openly flew across the boundaries of a high number of organizations. Methods. The paper combines the insights from theory with the empirical evidences gathered by adopting an extreme case study approach: the detailed analysis of a case study related...... and favors coordination in open innovation projects where many different stakeholders are engaged in. Research limitations. Although the adoption of an extreme case study approach offers important implications to understand the role of design in R&D-oriented open innovation, the use of single case study...

  12. Supporting the Knowledge, Innovation and Development Program at ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Supporting the Knowledge, Innovation and Development Program at FORO ... limited support granted to science, technology and innovation (STI) activities in Peru ... sustainable development strategy, as it relates to knowledge and innovation.

  13. From Knowledge Transfer to Situated Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dittrich, Yvonne; Eriksén, Sara; Wessels, Bridgette

    Innovation systems, ‘triple helix’, and similar expressions, are used to conceptualise the growing need for more integrated forms of co-operation between academia and other societal actors, such as governmental agencies and industry, in order to produce knowledge relevant for society. However......, developers and domain experts that form constituencies and where scientific knowledge is confronted by requirements, constraints and possibilities of the specific situation. In this context innovation of, or involving, ICT requires a significant amount of imagination, represents a relatively sharp break...

  14. Evaluating the Knowledge Assets of Innovative Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maen Al-Hawari

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge has long been recognised as a valuable resource for organisational growth and sustained competitive advantage, especially for organisations competing in an uncertain environment (Miller & Shamsie 1987. In the current post-industrial society, knowledge is recognised as a primary source of a company’s wealth. However knowledge assets are much more difficult to identify and measure than are the physical assets with which we are much more familiar. (Boisot 1998 As a company’s innovative capacity may be dependent upon its ability to take advantage of its knowledge assets, it is important to be able to identify and measure those assets. While large companies can afford extensive knowledge management projects, there is a acute need for a method by which managers in smaller organisations can easily and reliably locate, quantify and compare their knowledge assets in order to maximise their potential for innovation. The paper will begin with an overview of current thinking on the topic of Knowledge Management (KM. It will then introduce the three functions of the knowledge life cycle (Bhatt 2000, Tan 2000, the four modes of conversion between tacit and explicit knowledge (Nonaka 1995 and the five knowledge enablers (Von Krogh 2000. The research, reported here, aims to identify, from the literature, a set of knowledge elements that will give a balanced view of knowledge assets across the four modes and five enablers. An integrated model, which is the result of research to date by the authors, will then be defined. This model combines the functions of the knowledge life cycle and Nonaka’s knowledge creation spiral with the notion of I-Space, which has been used to classify information across three dimensions, to form a new model of K-Space, which can be used to classify the knowledge elements. The paper will present this model and discuss the appropriateness of a set of knowledge elements as a means of measuring the knowledge asset of an

  15. Organizational Values and Innovative Organizational Knowledge Creation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Aparecida Pasquini Miguel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Innovation is a source of competitive advantage and is based on the continuous creation of organizational knowledge, which is supported by the individual learning. The individual learning of traditional / comportamentalist and constructivist nature can be understood, by extension, as organizational learning. The knowledge can be innovative if, along with the enabling conditions that characterize it - intention, fluctuation or chaos, autonomy, redundancy and variety of requirements – the process of learning is based on a constructivist nature, the only one capable to generate new learning solutions. The organizational values are beliefs that guide the organizations behavior and constitute motivational goals. This work had as aim to identify the relationship between organizational values and the creation of knowledge. The descriptive exploratory research used the quantitative method. The organizational values appeared in this study mainly associated to the knowledge creation aspects in the internal sphere of the organizations. The orientation towards the external environment appeared less related to the organizational values.

  16. IT-Enabled Knowledge Creation for Open Innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eseryel, U. Yeliz

    2014-01-01

    Open innovation is increasingly important for researchers and practitioners alike. Open innovation is closely linked to knowledge creation in that, with open innovation, knowledge inflows and outflows are exploited for innovation. In the information systems field, open innovation has been closely

  17. Collaborative efforts are needed to ensure proper knowledge dissemination of telemedicine projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Neel Kolthoff; Jensen, Lena Sundby; Kayser, Lars

    2014-01-01

    documented and disseminated. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Public and private funds were contacted for information about telemedicine studies focusing on people residing in their homes. After an initial screening of titles and abstracts, 19 projects were identified. The managers of the projects were contacted......INTRODUCTION: Telemedicine is often seen as the solution to the challenge of providing health care for an increasing number of people with chronic conditions. Projects are often organised locally and based on the involvement of stakeholders with a wide range of backgrounds. It can be challenging...... to ensure that projects are based on previous experience and that they do not repeat previous studies. To better understand these challenges and current practice, we examined telemedicine projects funded in the 2008-2010 period to explore where, how and to what extent results from the projects were...

  18. Globalisation of innovation in knowledge intensive industries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yun-Chung; Vang, Jan; Chaminade, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    in developing countries: reduce research costs, access large markets, tap into a large pool of qualified human resources or benefit from knowledge spillovers available in the local/regional system of innovation. The empirical research presented in this paper reveals that none of these arguments can fully......The global location of R&D labs by MNCs is a rather new phenomenon; especially when it comes to establishing R&D labs in developing countries. The existing and rather limited literature on globalisation of innovation provides four possible explanations of why multinationals locate R&D labs...... countries such as China and thus calls for an integration in the regional innovation systems framework....

  19. Telemedicine as an innovative model for rebuilding medical systems in developing countries through multipartnership collaboration: the case of Albania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latifi, Rifat; Dasho, Erion; Shatri, Zhaneta; Tilley, Elizabeth; Osmani, Kalterina L; Doarn, Charles R; Dogjani, Agron; Olldashi, Fatos; Koçiraj, Agim; Merrell, Ronald C

    2015-06-01

    The U.S. Government and other developed nations provide billions of dollars annually in relief assistance to countries around the world. The long-term benefits of this aid, however, are often difficult to elucidate. The aim of this article is to present a model of a multipartnership collaboration among U.S. governmental, nongovernmental organizations, and academia to rebuild medical systems using telemedicine as a sustainable model of foreign aid. The International Virtual e-Hospital implemented the "initiate-build-operate-transfer" strategy to establish an effective telemedicine system in Albania that includes the National Telemedicine Center and 12 regional telemedicine centers. This nationwide telemedicine network has active clinical programs, virtual educational programs, and an electronic library that has substantially improved the access to care while advancing medical education. We propose that telemedicine is an optimal, sustainable, low-cost model for rebuilding medical systems of developing countries when implemented through a multipartnership approach.

  20. Telemedicine in Greenland: Citizens' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Lasse O; Krebs, Hans J; Albert, Nancy M; Anderson, Nick; Catz, Sheryl; Hale, Timothy M; Hansen, John; Hounsgaard, Lise; Kim, Tae Youn; Lindeman, David; Spindler, Helle; Marcin, James P; Nesbitt, Thomas; Young, Heather M; Dinesen, Birthe

    2017-05-01

    Telemedicine may have the possibility to provide better access to healthcare delivery for the citizens. Telemedicine in arctic remote areas must be tailored according to the needs of the local population. Therefore, we need more knowledge about their needs and their view of telemedicine. The aim of this study has been to explore how citizens living in the Greenlandic settlements experience the possibilities and challenges of telemedicine when receiving healthcare delivery in everyday life. Case study design was chosen as the overall research design. Qualitative interviews (n = 14) were performed and participant observations (n = 80 h) carried out in the local healthcare center in the settlements and towns. A logbook was kept and updated each day during the field research in Greenland. Observations were made of activities in the settlements. Data collected on citizens' views about the possibilities of using telemedicine in Greenland revealed the following findings: Greenlandic citizens are positive toward telemedicine, and telemedicine can help facilitate improved access to healthcare for residents in these Greenlandic settlements. Regarding challenges in using telemedicine in Greenland, the geographical and cultural context hinders accessibility to the Greenlandic healthcare system, and telemedicine equipment is not sufficiently mobile. Greenlandic citizens are positive toward telemedicine and regard telemedicine as a facilitator for improved access for healthcare in the Greenlandic settlements. We have identified challenges, such as geographical and cultural context, that hinder accessibility to the Greenlandic healthcare system.

  1. Exploring the Communicative Dimensions of Knowledge-Intensive Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porup Thomasen, Ulf

    into their communicative micro-foundations. It emphasizes the narrative of a particularly significant and constitutive discrepancy between innovation project teams with an innovation process design aligned with complexity-focused knowledge communication principles and a core business with a set of strategic expectations...... aligned with reductionist knowledge transfer principles. In short, it challenges the validity of reductionist approaches to knowledge-intensive innovation....

  2. Virtual reality, telemedicine, web and data processing innovations in medical and psychiatric education and clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilty, Donald M; Alverson, Dale C; Alpert, Jonathan E; Tong, Lowell; Sagduyu, Kemal; Boland, Robert J; Mostaghimi, Arash; Leamon, Martin L; Fidler, Don; Yellowlees, Peter M

    2006-01-01

    This article highlights technology innovations in psychiatric and medical education, including applications from other fields. The authors review the literature and poll educators and informatics faculty for novel programs relevant to psychiatric education. The introduction of new technologies requires skill at implementation and evaluation to assess the pros and cons. There is a significant body of literature regarding virtual reality and simulation, including assessment of outcomes, but other innovations are not well studied. Innovations, like other uses of technology, require collaboration between parties and integration within the educational framework of an institution.

  3. ICU Telemedicine Program Financial Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, Craig M; Motzkus, Christine; Rincon, Teresa; Cody, Shawn E; Landry, Karen; Irwin, Richard S

    2017-02-01

    ICU telemedicine improves access to high-quality critical care, has substantial costs, and can change financial outcomes. Detailed information about financial outcomes and their trends over time following ICU telemedicine implementation and after the addition of logistic center function has not been published to our knowledge. Primary data were collected for consecutive adult patients of a single academic medical center. We compared clinical and financial outcomes across three groups that differed regarding telemedicine support: a group without ICU telemedicine support (pre-ICU intervention group), a group with ICU telemedicine support (ICU telemedicine group), and an ICU telemedicine group with added logistic center functions and support for quality-care standardization (logistic center group). The primary outcome was annual direct contribution margin defined as aggregated annual case revenue minus annual case direct costs (including operating costs of ICU telemedicine and its related programs). All monetary values were adjusted to 2015 US dollars using Producer Price Index for Health-Care Facilities. Annual case volume increased from 4,752 (pre-ICU telemedicine) to 5,735 (ICU telemedicine) and 6,581 (logistic center). The annual direct contribution margin improved from $7,921,584 (pre-ICU telemedicine) to $37,668,512 (ICU telemedicine) to $60,586,397 (logistic center) due to increased case volume, higher case revenue relative to direct costs, and shorter length of stay. The ability of properly modified ICU telemedicine programs to increase case volume and access to high-quality critical care with improved annual direct contribution margins suggests that there is a financial argument to encourage the wider adoption of ICU telemedicine. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Collaborative efforts are needed to ensure proper knowledge dissemination of telemedicine projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Neel Kolthoff; Jensen, Lena Sundby; Kayser, Lars

    2014-09-01

    Telemedicine is often seen as the solution to the challenge of providing health care for an increasing number of people with chronic conditions. Projects are often organised locally and based on the involvement of stakeholders with a wide range of backgrounds. It can be challenging to ensure that projects are based on previous experience and that they do not repeat previous studies. To better understand these challenges and current practice, we examined telemedicine projects funded in the 2008-2010 period to explore where, how and to what extent results from the projects were documented and disseminated. Public and private funds were contacted for information about telemedicine studies focusing on people residing in their homes. After an initial screening of titles and abstracts, 19 projects were identified. The managers of the projects were contacted and information about project results and dissemination were obtained. More than half of all projects were disseminated to professionals as well as to the public and used two-way communication. However, it was generally difficult to obtain an overview of the projects due to dynamic changes in names and scopes. We propose that the funding authorities require designs comprising proper evaluation models that will subsequently allow the investigators to publish their findings. Furthermore, a dissemination plan comprising both peers and other professions should be made mandatory. The investigators should ensure proper documentation and dissemination of changes both during and after the projects in order to ensure transparency, and national or international organisations should establish a database with relevant data fields. not relevant. not relevant.

  5. Research and Application of Knowledge Resources Network for Product Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to enhance the capabilities of knowledge service in product innovation design service platform, a method of acquiring knowledge resources supporting for product innovation from the Internet and providing knowledge active push is proposed. Through knowledge modeling for product innovation based on ontology, the integrated architecture of knowledge resources network is put forward. The technology for the acquisition of network knowledge resources based on focused crawler and web services is studied. Knowledge active push is provided for users by user behavior analysis and knowledge evaluation in order to improve users’ enthusiasm for participation in platform. Finally, an application example is illustrated to prove the effectiveness of the method.

  6. Research and application of knowledge resources network for product innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuan; Li, Wen-qiang; Li, Yan; Na, Hui-zhen; Shi, Qian

    2015-01-01

    In order to enhance the capabilities of knowledge service in product innovation design service platform, a method of acquiring knowledge resources supporting for product innovation from the Internet and providing knowledge active push is proposed. Through knowledge modeling for product innovation based on ontology, the integrated architecture of knowledge resources network is put forward. The technology for the acquisition of network knowledge resources based on focused crawler and web services is studied. Knowledge active push is provided for users by user behavior analysis and knowledge evaluation in order to improve users' enthusiasm for participation in platform. Finally, an application example is illustrated to prove the effectiveness of the method.

  7. HOW DO FIRMS SOURCE EXTERNAL KNOWLEDGE FOR INNOVATION? ANALYSING EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT KNOWLEDGE SOURCING METHODS

    OpenAIRE

    KI H. KANG; JINA KANG

    2009-01-01

    In the era of "open innovation", external knowledge is a very important source for technology innovation. In this paper, we investigate the relationship between external knowledge and performance of technology innovation. The effect of external knowledge on the performance of technology innovation can vary with different external knowledge sourcing methods. We identify three ways of external knowledge sourcing: information transfer from informal network, R&D collaboration and technology acqui...

  8. Assumptions of Customer Knowledge Enablement in the Open Innovation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jokubauskienė Raminta

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the scientific literature, open innovation is one of the most effective means to innovate and gain a competitive advantage. In practice, there is a variety of open innovation activities, but, nevertheless, customers stand as the cornerstone in this area, since the customers’ knowledge is one of the most important sources of new knowledge and ideas. Evaluating the context where are the interactions of open innovation and customer knowledge enablement, it is necessary to take into account the importance of customer knowledge management. Increasingly it is highlighted that customers’ knowledge management facilitates the creation of innovations. However, it should be an examination of other factors that influence the open innovation, and, at the same time, customers’ knowledge management. This article presents a theoretical model, which reveals the assumptions of open innovation process and the impact on the firm’s performance.

  9. Virtual Reality, Telemedicine, Web and Data Processing Innovations in Medical and Psychiatric Education and Clinical Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilty, Donald M.; Alverson, Dale C.; Alpert, Jonathan E.; Tong, Lowell; Sagduyu, Kemal; Boland, Robert J.; Mostaghimi, Arash; Leamon, Martin L.; Fidler, Don; Yellowlees, Peter M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This article highlights technology innovations in psychiatric and medical education, including applications from other fields. Method: The authors review the literature and poll educators and informatics faculty for novel programs relevant to psychiatric education. Results: The introduction of new technologies requires skill at…

  10. Reflexivity, Knowledge and the Management of Potential Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordum, Anders

    2005-01-01

    In this article I will interpret John Deweys perspective on reflective thinking as if he were a philosopher of innovation management. From his pragmatist point of departure, the problems involved in knowledge-processes relevant to innovation are analysed and reconceptualised. On the basis...... of the analysis I attempt to identify some categories of general applicability when understanding, designing, and managing radical innovation processes. These categories are useful to conceptualise and talk about innovation, when knowledge is taken seriously, and when managing innovation is also understood...... as managing the production of new knowledge, that is of making the unjustified justified, and the unknown known. Keywords: Reflexivity, reflective thought, radical innovation, innovation management, potential innovation, Plato, John Dewey, epistemology, knowledge....

  11. Knowledge Productivity for Sustainable Innovation: Social Capital as HRD Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlen, Corry; van der Klink, Marcel; Roentgen, Uta; Curfs, Emile; Boshuizen, Henny

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to test the feasibility of a conceptual model on relations between organisational innovation, knowledge productivity and social capital. It explores processes of knowledge productivity for sustainable innovation and associated HRD implications in knowledge intensive organisations, taking the perspective that…

  12. Knowledge productivity for sustainable innovation: social capital as HRD target

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ehlen, Corry; Van der Klink, Marcel; Roentgen, Uta; Curfs, Emile; Boshuizen, Els

    2018-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to test the feasibility of a conceptual model on relations between organisational innovation, knowledge productivity and social capital. It explores processes of knowledge productivity for sustainable innovation and associated HRD implications in knowledge

  13. The Challenge of Managing Knowledge in Innovative Organisations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deverell, Andrea; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    2006-01-01

    different knowledge acquisition strategies utilised by firms during the innovation process. It suggests that there is a relationship between the kind of innovative activity (cumulative or radical) and the sourcing of knowledge i.e. the internal and/or external environment. Two hypotheses are derived from...... on a dual ability to focus on both cumulative and radical innovation aligned with the most appropriate knowledge acquisition strategy....... are continually pushing out the boundaries of knowledge and replacing existing core competencies with new ideas and knowledge and are therefore predisposed towards utilising external knowledge. The research findings confirm the hypotheses and enable the authors to develop a third dimension which is based...

  14. Nuclear Knowledge Innovations Assimilation: The Impact of Organizational Knowledge Frames and Triple Helix Dynamics of Knowledge Base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, M. D.; Sultana, T.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Previous research did not investigate the impact of the TH dynamics of knowledge innovations on the nuclear knowledge innovations adoption/assimilation in the organizational context. Hence, the recommendation of R&D policy reformulation seems too broad. These gaps are the prime motivators for the research. In the organizational context, we posit that TH dynamics of knowledge base innovation serves as complements to managers’ knowledge frames related to a technology innovation. We examine interactions between three knowledge frames—integration frame, opportunism frame, and policy knowledge frame, and two TH dynamics of knowledge innovations—bilateral TH dynamics of knowledge innovations and trilateral TH dynamics of knowledge innovations, and their relationship with the assimilation of nuclear knowledge innovations. We aim to research on the issues of the dynamics of knowledge base of innovations involving TH collaborations (university, industry and government) in Bangladesh as a new build nuclear project. As a result, we can find out the impact of TH collaborations on organizational nuclear knowledge innovations management as well as core institutional problems of the knowledge base of innovation systems in terms of R&D policy. Finally, findings identify lack in production of nuclear knowledge innovations and concrete recommendation of R&D policy reformulation. (author

  15. Innovation Policy for Knowledge Production and R&D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borrás, Susana; Edquist, Charles

    Who produces scientific and technical knowledge these days? What type of knowledge is being produced and for what purposes? Why are firms and governments funding research and development? This chapter studies the role of knowledge production (especially R&D activities) in the innovation process f...... those tensions and unbalances. This chapter suggests that innovation policy develops a portfolio approach to the public investment in R&D and knowledge production....... from an innovation system perspective. It examines how governments and public agencies in different countries and at different times have actually approached the issue of building, maintaining and using knowledge production in their innovation systems. It also examines the critical and most important...... issues at stake from the point of view of innovation policy, looking in particular at the unresolved tensions and systemic unbalances related to knowledge production and last but not least, it elaborates a set of overall criteria for the selection and design of relevant policy instruments and addresses...

  16. Intended R&D Knowledge Spillover - Strategy for Innovation Leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harryson, Sigvald; Søberg, Peder Veng

    2009-01-01

    , inhibit companies striving for innovation leadership. In our enquiry into R&D knowledge spillover effects on innovation, we develop case studies from Fastcar and Bigpack. The resulting theoretical framework, built on selected networking and knowledge creation theories, is illustrated through the two case...... studies and useful for further analysis of positive R&D knowledge spillover effects. By proactively facilitating knowledge sharing with relevant parts of the surrounding environment, the company enables itself to feed knowledge into its surrounding environment - thereby developing the innovation potential...

  17. Research on Efficiency of Knowledge Transfer in Technical Innovation Alliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang-sheng, Jiang

    The knowledge transfer efficiency (KTE) is closely relative to the success or failure of technology innovation in strategic alliances. This paper takes the KTE as the essential variable to establish the benefit function model of technology innovations to explore the KTE's influences on partners' innovative decisions under two different modes: independent innovations and alliance innovations. It is found that the higher the KTE, the greater the reducing extent of production costs is. The results could provide some theoretical supports for selections of the optimal competitive-ooperative relationship and managerial flexibility in technical innovation alliances.

  18. Developing technology intelligence strategy to access knowledge of innovation clusters.

    OpenAIRE

    Rani Jeanne Dang; Letizia Mortara; Ruth Thomson; Tim Minshall

    2010-01-01

    Current times are characterised by a knowledge-based economy and fast technological change. In this difficult environment, companies compete to maintain a relevant position through innovation. In response to these challenges, many companies are currently adopting an open approach to innovation, pursuing innovation by combining internal and external resources. Technology intelligence (TI) activities support the implementation of open innovation with the systematic capture and delivery of infor...

  19. Detection of cyst using image segmentation and building knowledge-based intelligent decision support system as an aid to telemedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janet, J.; Natesan, T. R.; Santhosh, Ramamurthy; Ibramsha, Mohideen

    2005-02-01

    An intelligent decision support tool to the Radiologist in telemedicine is described. Medical prescriptions are given based on the images of cyst that has been transmitted over computer networks to the remote medical center. The digital image, acquired by sonography, is converted into an intensity image. This image is then subjected to image preprocessing which involves correction methods to eliminate specific artifacts. The image is resized into a 256 x 256 matrix by using bilinear interpolation method. The background area is detected using distinct block operation. The area of the cyst is calculated by removing the background area from the original image. Boundary enhancement and morphological operations are done to remove unrelated pixels. This gives us the cyst volume. This segmented image of the cyst is sent to the remote medical center for analysis by Knowledge based artificial Intelligent Decision Support System (KIDSS). The type of cyst is detected and reported to the control mechanism of KIDSS. Then the inference engine compares this with the knowledge base and gives appropriate medical prescriptions or treatment recommendations by applying reasoning mechanisms at the remote medical center.

  20. Effect of Knowledge Sources on Firm Level Innovation in Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osoro, O.; Vermeulen, P.A.M.; Knoben, J.; Kahyarara, G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyses the impact of different sources of knowledge on product and process innovation in Tanzania using firm-level data. We specifically analyse the separate impacts of internal knowledge, external knowledge and the combined impact of both types of knowledge on firms’ product and

  1. Orchestration of Globally Distributed Knowledge for Innovation in Multinational Companies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sajadirad, Solmaz; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    Conducting a multiple-case study in five companies from Danish industry, this paper explores how multinational companies orchestrate knowledge from their globally distributed subsidiaries for innovation. Comparisons of knowledge orchestration within headquarter and subsidiaries for improvement...... and innovation show that a combination of the dynamic use of inter-firm objects and a well-established knowledge orchestration process underlies knowledge orchestration for innovation in multinational companies, as it advances headquarters’ abilities to effectively acquire, evaluate, disseminate, and utilize...... globally distributed knowledge. This study contributes to the understanding of knowledge orchestration between headquarter and distributed subsidiaries in multinational companies and how it is related to innovation. Specifically, this paper has important implications regarding the use of inter-firm objects...

  2. Innovation as a distributed, collaborative process of knowledge generation: open, networked innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloep, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Sloep, P. B. (2009). Innovation as a distributed, collaborative process of knowledge generation: open, networked innovation. In V. Hornung-Prähauser & M. Luckmann (Eds.), Kreativität und Innovationskompetenz im digitalen Netz - Creativity and Innovation Competencies in the Web, Sammlung von

  3. The knowledge conversion SECI process as innovation indicator analysis factor

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Elaine da [UNESP; Valentim, Marta Lígia Pomim [UNESP

    2013-01-01

    It highlights the innovation importance in the current society and presents innovation indicators applied in 125 countries. We made an analysis in the 80 variables distributed through seven GII pillars, trying to identify the direct, indirect or null incidences of the knowledge conversion way described by the SECI Process. The researched revealed the fact that knowledge management, in this case specifically the knowledge conversion SECI Process, is present in the variables that, according to ...

  4. Project-based knowledge in organizing open innovation

    CERN Document Server

    Comacchio, Anna; Pizzi, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Enriching understanding of the current theoretical debate on project-based open innovation, ‘Project-based Knowledge in Organizing Open Innovation’ draws on innovation management literature and knowledge-based perspectives to investigate the relationship between knowledge development at project level and the strategic organization of open innovation. Addressing the still open issue of how the firm level should be complemented by studies at the project level of analysis, this book provides theoretical and empirical arguments on the advantages of a more fine-grained level of analysis to understand how firms organize their innovation processes across boundaries. The book also addresses the emerging interest in the management literature on project-based organizations, and on the relevance of project forms of organizing in a knowledge-based economy. Through field research in different industrial settings , this book provides empirical evidence on how firms design open innovation project-by-project and it will ...

  5. The role of knowledge-oriented leadership in knowledge management and innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolreza Sadeghi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Therefore, improving innovative performance is critical for creating com-petitive advantage. On the other hand, availability of information and knowledge can be defined as one the best ways to increase the innovation ability of organizations. Many theorists as well as practitioners emphasize on knowledge management as an enabler in enhancing organizational inno-vation. Hence, This study is carried out in the Fars governor in Iran during the year of 2017 to in-vestigate the relationship between the knowledge-based leadership and knowledge management and innovation performance. This study is descriptive / survey and the data collection is a cross-sectional and data questionnaire is used to collect the required data. Data analysis and hypotheses testing have indicated a significant relationship between knowledge-based leadership and knowledge management and innovation performance in Fars governor. The results also suggest a relationship between knowledge-based leadership and the knowledge management activities with a coefficient of 0.97. In addition, There is also a positive and meaningful relationship between knowledge management and innovation performance with a coefficient of 0.73 and between knowledge-based leadership and innovation performance with a coefficient of 0.73. The results al-so led to the existence of a relationship between knowledge based leadership, knowledge manage-ment practices and innovation performance with a coefficient of 0.7081.

  6. Complementarity between innovation knowledge sources: Does the innovation performance measure matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Mª Serrano-Bedia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyse complementarity between different knowledge sources (internal, external and/or cooperation employing a wide range of innovation performance measures (product, process, organizational, and commercial. The empirical study uses 2014 Spanish CIS data and studies complementarities by performing conditional complementarity/substitutability tests. The results show evidence of conditional complementarity in product innovation performance between external and internal knowledge sources in absence of cooperation and of conditional substitute relationship between external and cooperation knowledge sources in presence of internal source. In product and process innovation performance we found a conditional substitute relationship between internal and cooperation sources when external source is used and not used, respectively. This relationship turns to conditional complementarity in organisational innovation in absence of external knowledge source. Therefore, when designing innovation strategy, managers must consider their objectives on a priority basis, since not all the strategies have the same effects on innovation performance.

  7. Knowledge and continuous innovation. The CIMA methodology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Harm; Caffyn, Sarah; Corso, Mariano; Coughlan, Paul; Gieskes, J.F.B.; Magnusson, Mats; Pavesi, S.; Ronchi, Stefano

    2001-01-01

    Competition today is forcing companies to increase their effectiveness through exploiting synergy and learning in product innovation. Literature, however, is still mainly focused on how product development projects, seen largely as isolated efforts, should be organised and managed. This article

  8. Effect of Knowledge Sources on Firm Level Innovation in Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osoro, Otieno; Kahyarara, Godius; Knoben, Joris; Vermeulen, P.A.M.

    In this paper we analyse the impact of different sources of knowledge on product innovation in Tanzania using firm level data from 543 firms. Specifically, we assess the separate impacts of internal knowledge and external knowledge and the combined impact of both on a firm’s likelihood of

  9. Knowledge management and innovation : An empirical study of Dutch SMEs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uhlaner, L.M.; Tan, S.; Zhou, H.

    2007-01-01

    Western economies are increasingly viewed as knowledge-driven (Audretch and Thurik, 2001, 2004). Knowledge plays a crucial role in determining firm innovation capability and in enhancing working life quality of knowledge workers (Corso, Martini, Pelligrini, and Paolucci, 2001). Previous studies show

  10. Collaborating to innovate : effects on customer knowledge management and performance

    OpenAIRE

    Fidel Criado, Pilar; Schlesinger, María Walesska; Cervera Taulet, Amparo

    2015-01-01

    Scholars regard customer knowledge management (CKM) as a strategic resource for businesses to improve innovation, facilitate the detection of new market opportunities, and support long-term customer relationship management. However, literature suffers from a lack of understanding of customer collaboration's role in the innovation process and innovation orientation in CKM. Accordingly, this paper tests a model examining how both variables act as antecedents of CKM. The model also explores CKM ...

  11. Linking Knowledge to Innovation in Government Services : the Case ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This action research project will study innovation in service delivery by local ... Linking knowledge to innovation in the economy and society : the role of universities in Asia ... IWRA/IDRC webinar on climate change and adaptive water management ... Eleven world-class research teams set to improve livestock vaccine ...

  12. The Challenges of Collaborative Knowledge Creation in Open Innovation Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Chatenier, Elise; Verstegen, Jos A. A. M.; Biemans, Harm J. A.; Mulder, Martin; Omta, Onno

    2009-01-01

    In open innovation teams, people from different organizations work together to develop new products, services, or markets. This organizational diversity can positively influence collaborative knowledge creation but can frustrate and obstruct the process as well. To increase the success rates of open innovation, it is vital to learn how individuals…

  13. Knowledge base, information search and intention to adopt innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnsoever, van F.J.; Castaldi, C.

    2008-01-01

    Innovation is a process that involves searching for new information. This paper builds upon theoretical insights on individual and organizational learning and proposes a knowledge based model of how actors search for information when confronted with innovation. The model takes into account different

  14. ADMINISTRATIVE KNOWLEDGE IN INNOVATIVE DEVELOPMENT OF EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana A. Pankratova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article investigated the conditionsfor generating administrative knowledgeand ways to evaluate his conditionand optimization. Designated methodsand tools actualization administrative management of knowledge as aresource of innovative development ofthe educational institution. The basic directions of innovative development ofsoftware, including the assessment of theimpact of corporate culture, and diagnosisof barriers to educational institution.

  15. Knowledge and innovation in networks : a conceptual framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Man, de A.P.; Berends, J.J.; Lammers, I.S.; Raaij, van E.M.; Weele, van A.J.; Man, de A.P.

    2008-01-01

    Increasingly, innovation na longer takes place within individual firms, but within networks of organizations. An important requirement tor such network-based innovations to come to fruition is that knowledge flows across organizational boundaries. Yet, it is not self-evident or easy to create and

  16. Knowledge Management Innovation of the USCG Counternarcotics Deployment Process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Espino, James

    2000-01-01

    ...) Pacific Area Tactical Law Enforcement Team (PACAREA TACLET). The focus was on applying knowledge management innovation using the above mentioned methodology to the Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET) Counternarcotic (CN...

  17. Innovation and Virtual Environments: Towards Virtual Knowledge Brokers

    OpenAIRE

    VERONA G; PRANDELLI E.; SAWHNEY M.

    2006-01-01

    The authors examine the implications of virtual customer environments for supporting the innovation process. By building on the literature of knowledge brokers, they introduce the concept of virtual knowledge brokers — actors who leverage the internet to support third parties’ innovation activities. These actors enable firms to extend their reach in engaging with customers and they also allow firms to have a richer dialogue with customers because of their perceived neutrality. Consequently...

  18. What turns knowledge into innovative products? The role of entrepreneurship and knowledge spillovers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Block, Joern H.; Thurik, Roy; Zhou, Haibo

    The knowledge spillover theory of entrepreneurship seeks to explain the fundamentals and consequences of entrepreneurship with respect to economic performance. This paper uses the knowledge spillover theory to explain different innovation outcomes. We hypothesize that a high rate of entrepreneurship

  19. Knowledge Protection and Input Complexity Arising from Open Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peeters, Thijs; Sofka, Wolfgang

    Controlling unique knowledge is of increasing importance to firms. Therefore, firms use knowledge protection mechanisms to prevent competitors from imitating their knowledge. We study the effects of the complexity of knowledge inputs that arises from open innovation on the importance of two widely...... used protection mechanisms: patents and trademarks. We argue that this complexity makes the threat of imitation less predictable, and thus makes knowledge protection more important. By analyzing survey data of 938 German firms, we find that patents are more important for firms in industries with higher...... knowledge input complexity. Furthermore, we show that the dynamics and not the level of knowledge input complexity positively affect the importance of trademarks....

  20. Knowledge Management Orientation: An Innovative Perspective to Hospital Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Matina; Ghadiri Nejad, Mazyar; Bagzibagli, Kemal

    2017-12-01

    By considering innovation as a new project in hospitals, all the project management's standard steps should be followed in execution. This study investigated the validation of a new set of measures in terms of providing a procedure for knowledge management-oriented innovation that enriches the hospital management system. The relation between innovation and all the knowledge management areas, as the main constructs of project management, was illustrated by referring to project management standard steps and previous studies. Through consultations and meetings with a committee of professional project managers, a questionnaire was developed to measure ten knowledge management areas in hospital's innovation process. Additionally, a group of experts from hospital managers were invited to comment on the applicability of the questionnaires by considering if the items are measurable in hospitals practically. A close-ended, Likert-type scale items, consisted of ten sections, were developed based on project management body of knowledge thorough Delphi technique. It enables the managers to evaluate hospitals' situation to be aware whether the organization follows the knowledge management standards in innovation process or not. By pilot study, confirmatory factor analysis and exploratory factor analysis were conducted to ensure the validity and reliability of the measurement items. The developed items seem to have a potential to help hospital managers and subsequently delivering new products/services successfully based on the standard procedures in their organization. In all innovation processes, the knowledge management areas and their standard steps help hospital managers by a new tool as questionnaire format.

  1. WOMEN ENTREPRENEURSHIP: EFFECT OF SOCIAL CAPITAL, INNOVATION AND MARKET KNOWLEDGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BANAFSHEH DASTOURIAN

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Women entrepreneurship plays a key role in the economic growth. This study investigates the mediatory role of innovation concerning the effect of social capital on entrepreneurship. The sample population included 130 female entrepreneurs in Ilam province, Iran. Using questionnaire as the main means of data collection, the correlation among variables of entrepreneurship, innovation, social capital and market knowledge was evaluated. Data analysis was performed by structural equation modeling in LISREL software. The findings showed that social capital and innovation had a positive and significant effect on entrepreneurship. However, the impact of social capital on innovation was not confirmed.

  2. Knowledge, Innovation and Performance in SMEs: a new Methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Farace, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    2013-2014 The role of innovation in SMEs is strategic in shaping the ability of the firm to compete; innovation depends on on the firms’ ability to identify, assimilate and exploit knowledge from all around. Generally, an important source of knowledge is the R&D because it helps the firm in developing an absorptive capacity (Cohen, Levinthal, 1989) and also it is a strategic input of the path to innovation. If the firm is too small to afford R&D expenses this important sourc...

  3. Information technology, knowledge processes, and innovation success

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, X.M.; Zang, F.; Bij, van der J.D.; Weggeman, M.C.D.P.

    2001-01-01

    Despite the obvious linkage between information technologies (IT) and knowledge processes and the apparent strategic importance of both, little research has done to explicitly examine how, if at all, IT and knowledge processes affect firm outcomes. The purpose of this study is to bridge this

  4. Profiting from external knowledge: the impact of different external knowledge acquisition strategies on innovation performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wubben, E.F.M.; Batterink, M.H.; Kolympiris, C.; Kemp, R.G.M.; Omta, S.W.F.

    2015-01-01

    Innovation is key to company growth, but hinges on timely access to new knowledge. Individual companies have difficulty pursuing innovation and acquiring the knowledge they need on their own. Companies therefore resort to various governance modes (licensing-in, collaborations, mergers and

  5. Knowledge management and organizational innovativeness in Iranian banking industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Bidmeshgipour

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge management has changed its nature from theoretical concept to an instrument that assists innovativeness. The originality of this study lies in its purpose to explore issues of knowledge management and its relation to the innovativeness of organizations. The study focuses on three selected Iranian banks (in public and private sector, an industry and a setting that has received less attention by researches so far. This paper studies the effectiveness of managers’ mindset in leading or misleading the organizations to achieve organizational innovativeness through KM. Based on a questionnaire survey, the authors argue that applying knowledge management makes it simpler to achieve the innovativeness in organizations. What we found significant in this study is that employees, provided with appropriate training and mentoring opportunities to generate novel ideas, would create new services in banking. The mindset of bank managers about their human resources absorbs diversity of opinions and provides equal opportunity for all employees to present ideas.

  6. Knowledge Management, Total Quality Management and Innovation: A New Look

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Honarpour

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present challenging dynamic environment, innovation is considered as a capability that renews the competitive advantage of a company. In recent years, considerable effort has been made to examine the factors that affect innovation in organizations. Knowledge management and total quality management, which play an important role in the contemporary management progress, are among the factors investigated. On the one hand, knowledge management has been recognized as an enabler that can deploy innovation by creating, storing, transferring, and applying knowledge, while on the other hand, the implementation of total quality management practices are addressed as one of the important factors that can influence innovation in a positive way. Lately, although a few researchers have shown some interest in the relationship of total quality management and knowledge management and their have not reached a consensus to conceptualize this relation. Looking at it from the methodological perspective, this problem can be tackled by using the Joint Variance analysis method where it can demonstrate correlation among independent variables and the effect of them on innovation. This study aims to propose a framework that shows how total quality management and knowledge management are reciprocally related to each other and how this affinity can impact innovation.

  7. From Knowledge to Innovation and Back: Empirical Testing of Knowledge-Intensive Industries in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Radovanović

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In the technology and knowledge intensive industries, innovation and knowledge use are key elements for competitiveness. Organisations are oriented towards increasing their potential for exploiting innovation and developing knowledge base internally through various techniques employed. This research aims at analysing the relationship between the dynamics of knowledge use and innovation efforts of organisations. Research Design & Methods: The methodology included quantitative and qualitative research method based on a survey, while the data of this research were analysed with the application of descriptive statistical method (variance. Findings: The results of the study suggest that realised innovation correlates with the use of knowledge in organisations and that an increase in research and development activities, as well as in patented and non-patented products or services will likely lead to an increase in the volume of internal knowledge use by employees. Implications & Recommendations: The results of this research can be useful for researchers and practitioners in technology and knowledge intensive industries. The findings can be used as a basis for adjusting organisational policies towards developing competitiveness based on the enhancement of the use of existing knowledge and by developing innovation strength. Contribution & Value Added: This paper is a valuable contribution to research fields of organisational management, innovation management, knowledge management, absorptive capacity, and especially innovation management.

  8. Enabling knowledge processes in innovative environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavesi, S.

    2003-01-01

    The concept of organisational knowledge as a valuable strategic asset has become quite popular recently. Increased competition, globalisation and the emergence of new organisational models built on process-based organisational structures require organisations to create, capture, share and apply

  9. Pursuing Innovation: Benchmarking Milwaukee's Transition to a Knowledge-Based Economy. Metro Milwaukee Innovation Index 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million, Laura; Dickman, Anneliese; Henken, Rob

    2010-01-01

    While the Milwaukee region's economic base is rooted in its manufacturing history, many believe that the region's future prosperity will be tied to its ability to successfully transition its economy into one that is based on knowledge and innovation. Indeed, fostering innovation has become the call to action for business and political leaders…

  10. External knowledge acquisition and innovation output: an analysis of the moderating effect of internal knowledge transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Segarra Ciprés, Mercedes; Roca Puig, Vicente; Bou Llusar, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies highlight the advantages of accessing knowledge from outside the firm as a means of enhancing the firm’s innovation efforts. However, access to external knowledge is not without organisational problems, including rejection of external knowledge by firm members or difficulties in applying such knowledge to the firm’s operations. Based on the knowledge management literature, this paper analyses the conditions within the firm that favour external knowledge acqu...

  11. Telemedicine and anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veena Chatrath

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Telemedicine is the use of electronic information and communication technology to provide and support healthcare when distance separates the participants. India is characterised by low penetration of healthcare services where primary healthcare facilities for rural population are highly inadequate. The majority of doctors practice in urban and semi-urban areas, whereas the major proportion of population lives in rural areas. This calls for the innovative methods for utilisation of science and technology for the benefit of our society. There are few reports in the literature which support the use of telemedicine technology for pre-operative assessment, intra-operative consultation, monitoring and post-operative follow-up, which is discussed in this article.

  12. Telemedicine and anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatrath, Veena; Attri, Joginder Pal; Chatrath, Raman

    2010-05-01

    Telemedicine is the use of electronic information and communication technology to provide and support healthcare when distance separates the participants. India is characterised by low penetration of healthcare services where primary healthcare facilities for rural population are highly inadequate. The majority of doctors practice in urban and semi-urban areas, whereas the major proportion of population lives in rural areas. This calls for the innovative methods for utilisation of science and technology for the benefit of our society. There are few reports in the literature which support the use of telemedicine technology for pre-operative assessment, intra-operative consultation, monitoring and post-operative follow-up, which is discussed in this article.

  13. Relational capital, new knowledge and innovative ideas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.J.M. Mom (Tom)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractOrganisational learning occurs when people engage in exploration activities – activities aimed at acquiring and using new knowledge, ideas and insights. Exploration, explains Tom Mom, associate professor of strategic entrepreneurship at RSM, ‘is about people and organisations

  14. Research on knowledge support technology for product innovation design based on quality function knowledge deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the analysis of the relationship between the process of product innovation design and knowledge, this article proposes a theoretical model of quality function knowledge deployment. In order to link up the product innovation design and the knowledge required by the designer, the iterative method of quality function knowledge deployment is refined, as well as the knowledge retrieval model and knowledge support model based on quality function knowledge deployment are established. In the whole life cycle of product design, in view of the different requirements for knowledge in conceptual design stage, components’ configuration stage, process planning stage, and production planning stage, the quality function knowledge deployment model could link up the required knowledge with the engineering characteristics, component characteristics, process characteristics, and production characteristics in the four stages using the mapping relationship between the function characteristics and the knowledge and help the designer to track the required knowledge for realizing product innovation design. In this article, an instance about rewinding machine is given to demonstrate the practicability and validity of product innovation design knowledge support technology based on quality function knowledge deployment.

  15. Managing Knowledge across Boundaries in Healthcare when Innovation is Desired

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mats Edenius

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to explore how knowledge can be managed across boundaries when implementing innovations in the healthcare sector is desired, in this specific case a healthcare quality register. The research is based on a qualitative, case study approach and comprises methodologies such as semi-structured interviews and document analysis. The findings of this study describe knowledge transferred across boundaries on a syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic level. On the syntactic level, knowledge of the innovation was transferred by training sessions for healthcare staff and through information to patients. On the semantic level, knowledge was transferred by knowledge brokering in the professional community of rheumatologists, and by creating collective stories and encouraging rheumatologists to “try” the innovation to find added value. On the pragmatic level, there were explicit conflicts of interest between physicians and healthcare authorities, as well as resistance from some rheumatologists to share knowledge of patients and treatment. The paper is concluded with implications for innovation practice in healthcare drawn from the study and ends with remarks about challenges ahead.

  16. Organization, 'Anchoring' of Knowledge, and Innovative Activity in Construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drejer, Ina; Vinding, Anker Lund

    2006-01-01

    The construction industry is characterised by the widespread use of project organisation. It has been suggested that the relatively low level of innovative activity in the industry can be explained by the temporary nature of firm boundary-crossing projects. Survey data from the Danish construction...... industry is used to investigate the importance of learning and 'anchoring' of project-specific knowledge at the firm level for participation in innovative activities. The data cover both the overall Danish construction industry and a specific region, North Jutland, which has a relatively high...... specialisation of construction workers. Latent class and regression analyses reveal that firms that make extensive use of partnering, together with internal product and process evaluation and knowledge diffusion (labelled 'knowledge-anchoring mechanisms'), are more likely to participate in innovative activities...

  17. Knowledge management and innovation for local development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Silva-Cutiño

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, the international environment has been characterized by the existence of a systemic structural crisis with greater incidence in the underdeveloped countries. Today, scientific and technological knowledge can greatly contribute to the countries having the opportunity to consolidate their progress and meet the challenges in terms of economy, education, culture, the same ones with a long strategic vision term and in depth, strengthening common bonds. Linking the institutions of science and technology with the demands of society entails a process that mobilizes not only the scientific community but many other actors in social life.

  18. Diffusing Scientific Knowledge to Innovative Experts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tveden-Nyborg, Svend; Misfeldt, Morten; Boelt, Birte

    2013-01-01

    Communicating science to scientists works well thanks to well-defined communication structures based on both printed material in peer-reviewed publications and oral presentations, e.g.\\ at conferences and seminars. However, when science is communicated to practitioners, the structures become fuzz...... and argued for more collaboration between scientists and practitioners. This can be done by implementing fast-learning via online website, but it needs to be assisted by slower-paced face-to-face learning to lessen the risk of a digital knowledge divide within the community.......Communicating science to scientists works well thanks to well-defined communication structures based on both printed material in peer-reviewed publications and oral presentations, e.g.\\ at conferences and seminars. However, when science is communicated to practitioners, the structures become fuzzy....... We are looking at how to implement Web2.0 technologies to Danish seed scientists communicating to seed consultants, agricultural advisors, and seed growers, and we are met with the challenge of securing effective knowledge diffusion to the community. Our investigation's focal point is on Rogers...

  19. Relationships between Organizational Trust, Knowledge Transfer, Knowledge Creation, and Firm's Innovativeness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankowska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study seeks to provide empirical evidence of relationships between organizational trust, knowledge transfer, creation and innovativeness at the firm level. It aims to hypothesize a mediational model implying that organizational trust is related to knowledge transfer, which will, in turn, enhance knowledge creation, thereby…

  20. UH Telemedicine Proposal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Friedman, Richard

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the University of Hawaii Telemedicine Project (UHTP) is to assess and establish an effective telemedicine curriculum uniquely tailored for the training of military healthcare personnel...

  1. Knowledge Transfer and Innovation in Brazilian Multinational Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisson Eduardo Maehler

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes how innovation generation occurs in subsidiaries of Brazilian multinational corporations acting in Portugal, specifically the role of customers in the process and the knowledge dynamics. A multiple case study approach was conducted in four subsidiaries operating in the Portuguese market for at least one year. Firms came from different activity sectors and sizes. Results identify permanent knowledge exchange flows between subsidiaries and headquarters, while the largest pour is from the later ones (in Brazil to their wings in Portugal. There are frequent innovations taking place in Portuguese subsidiaries. Such innovation processes are typically incremental in nature and occur predominantly in only some areas of the organization, where greater specialization and expertise are located. The most relevant results regard the existing strong interaction between subsidiaries and markets, especially with the larger customers that contribute with suggestions and are able to influence the new products creation in the subsidiaries.

  2. The “green-impact” of the open innovation mode. Bridging knowledge sourcing and absorptive capacity for environmental innovations

    OpenAIRE

    Sandro Montresor; Claudia Ghisetti; Alberto Marzucchi

    2013-01-01

    This Policy Brief presents recent results on the impact that an open innovation mode has on European firms' environmental innovations. New evidence drawn from the CIS suggests that knowledge sourcing can increase the environmental innovation performance of firms. However, the way firms search for external knowledge and work to absorb it can lead them to different results, depending on whether they are involved in the adoption of an eco-innovation or the extension of their eco-innovation portf...

  3. Telemedicine Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Since the 1970s, NASA has been involved in the research and demonstration of telemedicine for its potential in the care of astronauts in flight and Earth-bound applications. A combination of NASA funding, expertise and off-the-shelf computer and networking systems made telemedicine possible for a medically underserved hospital in Texas. Through two-way audio/video relay, the program links pediatric oncology specialists at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio to South Texas Hospital in Harlingen, providing easier access and better care to children with cancer. Additionally, the hospital is receiving teleclinics on pediatric oncology nursing, family counseling and tuberculosis treatment. VTEL Corporation, Sprint, and the Healthcare Open Systems and Trials Consortium also contributed staff and hardware.

  4. Science teachers' knowledge development in the context of educational innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henze-Rietveld, Francina Adriana

    2006-01-01

    The research reported in this thesis is concerned with the knowledge development of a small sample of experienced science teachers in the context of a broad innovation in Dutch secondary education, including the introduction of a new syllabus on Public Understanding of Science. The aim of the study

  5. Does Knowledge Always Benefit the Innovative Performance of Employees?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bysted, Rune

    2014-01-01

    to be important for innovative job performance. The result in addition confirms the synergies of possessing different knowledge bases and demonstrates the positive effects of the expertise based intuitions theoretically developed in Salas et al. (2010). The synergy of education and the competence development...

  6. The Research Agenda in ICU Telemedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Nicholas S.; Lilly, Craig M.; Angus, Derek C.; Jacobi, Judith; Rubenfeld, Gordon D.; Rothschild, Jeffrey M.; Sales, Anne E.; Scales, Damon C.; Mathers, James A. L.

    2011-01-01

    ICU telemedicine uses audiovisual conferencing technology to provide critical care from a remote location. Research is needed to best define the optimal use of ICU telemedicine, but efforts are hindered by methodological challenges and the lack of an organized delivery approach. We convened an interdisciplinary working group to develop a research agenda in ICU telemedicine, addressing both methodological and knowledge gaps in the field. To best inform clinical decision-making and health policy, future research should be organized around a conceptual framework that enables consistent descriptions of both the study setting and the telemedicine intervention. The framework should include standardized methods for assessing the preimplementation ICU environment and describing the telemedicine program. This framework will facilitate comparisons across studies and improve generalizability by permitting context-specific interpretation. Research based on this framework should consider the multidisciplinary nature of ICU care and describe the specific program goals. Key topic areas to be addressed include the effect of ICU telemedicine on the structure, process, and outcome of critical care delivery. Ideally, future research should attempt to address causation instead of simply associations and elucidate the mechanism of action in order to determine exactly how ICU telemedicine achieves its effects. ICU telemedicine has significant potential to improve critical care delivery, but high-quality research is needed to best inform its use. We propose an agenda to advance the science of ICU telemedicine and generate research with the greatest potential to improve patient care. PMID:21729894

  7. The Globalization of Value chain activities, Knowledge dynamics, and Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Eunkyung

    Firms are increasingly relocating diverse activities in the value chain abroad to reap the locational advantage available in other countries. One of the issues raised in this context is that, as global operations can function as channels for knowledge flows, the involved firms and locations may...... of the involved regions and countries. The purpose of this thesis is to study these issues with a broad research question, “What implications does the globalization of value chain activities have on innovation in firms and locations?” Four articles and a case study included in the thesis present empirical results...... gain or lose knowledge associated with the activities that are being globalized. Since knowledge is a critical input for innovation, this has some implications for the capability of firms to create new products and services. At the macro level, it may have an influence on the competitiveness...

  8. Omissions in managing knowledge in innovation processes or how to handle knowledge, humans and tasks : A semio-cognitive approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cijsouw, R. S.; Jorna, R. J.; Rakhorst, G.; Verkerke, G. J.; Charrel, PJ; Galarreta, D

    2007-01-01

    In organizations, innovation is a long-lasting process that is difficult to manage. Innovation is characterized by the use of new (combinations of) knowledge. Innovation, as knowledge creation, is also an activity of individuals. However, neither the individual nor knowledge is studied as

  9. Contextual-Based Knowledge Creation for Agroindustrial Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Anggraeni

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the knowledge creation process in one department, in a higher educational context, and the possible actions to take to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the knowledge creation system in it. We conducted a case study at one department of a university that strives to improve its innovations, in terms of their quantity and quality.We used a soft system methodology to investigate the knowledge creation system in the chosen department. From the study, we conclude that the department can be considered as a learning organization, within which its staff continually create, acquire and transfer knowledge. This department has a learning environment which is conducive, concrete learning processes, and leadership that reinforces learning. In the context of producing agroindustry innovations, the knowledge creation system in this department is considered to be less effective since it frequently happens more at individual or small group levels. To improve its effectiveness, the management may facilitate the institutionalization of knowledge creation processes at every phase of the interactions between tacit and explicit knowledge.

  10. What Turns Knowledge into Innovative Products? The Role of Entrepreneurship and Knowledge Spillovers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Block (Jörn); A.R. Thurik (Roy); H. Zhou (Haibo)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe knowledge spillover theory of entrepreneurship seeks to explain the fundamentals and consequences of entrepreneurship with respect to economic performance. This paper uses the knowledge spillover theory to explain different innovation outcomes. We hypothesize that a high rate of

  11. What turns knowledge into innovative products? The role of entrepreneurship and knowledge spillovers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Block (Jörn); A.R. Thurik (Roy); H. Zhou (Hui)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe knowledge spillover theory of entrepreneurship seeks to explain the fundamentals and consequences of entrepreneurship with respect to economic performance. This paper uses the knowledge spillover theory to explain different innovation outcomes. We hypothesize that a high rate of

  12. The HRM practices of innovative knowledge-intensive firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Frances; Becker, Karen; Matthews, Judy

    2011-01-01

    , is the basis of this research. The study investigates the HRM practices being used by four innovative firms: two KIFs and two traditional production companies. The findings suggest that there are some similarities between the HRM practices of the case firms, but there are also important differences......There is little research on HRM practices in knowledge-intensive firms (KIFs), especially in comparison to that conducted in traditional production environments. Whether such HRM practices are appropriate for KIFs, particularly ones that differentiate themselves on their ability to innovate...

  13. SOCIAL KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT, RESEARCH AND INNOVATION NETWORKS FOR INCLUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Ace vedo Zapata

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to describe the social management of knowledge through research and innovation networks to promote social inclusion. The reflection of the exploratory stage is presented within the doctoral thesis analyzing the challenges of the universities in the achievement of social inclusion with networks of research and innovation. A descriptive work was done, with documentary tracking, systematization and analysis. The findings show that it is necessary to articulate efforts in interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary networks with different actors: state, company, education, scientists, technologists and vulnerable, excluded populations, to build policies and strategies for social inclusion.

  14. Match & Manage : The use of knowledge matching and project management to integrate knowledge in collaborative inbound open innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Lakemond, Nicolette; Bengtsson, Lars; Laursen, Keld; Tell, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Despite mounting evidence on the potential benefits of inbound open innovation, little is known about how firms purposefully manage inflows of knowledge. We investigate the use of two knowledge governance procedures—project management and knowledge matching—in collaborative inbound open innovation. Our findings suggest that, in addition to “knowledge-precursors,” which the literature on open innovation and absorptive capacity has shown to be important for the integration of external knowledge...

  15. The evolution of publication hotspots in the field of telemedicine from 1962 to 2015 and differences among six countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanjun; Zhao, Ye; Zheng, Jianzhong; Zhang, Ailian; Dong, Haiyuan

    2018-04-01

    Introduction Telemedicine has been implemented in many countries and has captured the attention of many researchers. Herein, we aim to quantify publication hotspots in the field of telemedicine, analyse their evolution, compare them in different countries, and provide visual representations. Methods We used software tools to process PubMed entries for a 54-year period and identified publication hotspots using keyword frequency analysis. We employed a keyword co-occurrence analysis, principal component analysis, multidimensional scaling analysis, and network visualization technology. Results The number of Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) terms increased with time. The most common subcategories of telemedicine between 1962 and 2015 were Remote Consultation, Teleradiology, and Telepathology. The most popular information communication technologies in telemedicine publications were related to the Internet and cell phones. The topics of Patient Satisfaction, Treatment Outcomes, and Home Care Services associated with telemedicine were highlighted after the 1990s. Use frequency of the terms Cell Phones and Self-Care increased drastically in the past six years, and the publication focus in six countries that had the highest output was different. Knowledge network maps and perceptual maps show the relationship between high-frequency MeSH terms. Discussion The telemedicine field has experienced significant growth and expansion in knowledge and innovation in the last 54 years. Publication hotspots for telemedicine lean towards clinical treatment, home care services, and personal care, and countries emphasize publishing in areas related to their national characteristics. This study quantitatively discusses publication hotspots, provides an objective and systematic understanding of this field, and suggests directions for future telemedicine research.

  16. Knowledge Management and Innovation: The Role of Virtual Social Networks in Innovative Consumer Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Grutzmann

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Online social networks made up of actors with different degrees of innovativeness may allow knowledge management to collect new ideas and measure their acceptance. This research investigates consumer innovativeness and relationships with the uses and participation in social networks. This research has a quantitative exploratory scope, and among the main findings, we can mention that the dimensions of the adopted scale were corroborated by using factor analysis. The findings cannot be generalized, but there are evidences that relationship between social networking and innovative consumer behavior exists. Although there are limitations, correlations were found between the social dimension of innovativeness and information search in the networks and also the use of social networking information for the decision to purchase new products.

  17. KNOWLEGMENT, UNIVERSITY AND INNOVATION: HOW THEY ARE RELATED IN KNOWLEDGE-BASED INNOVATION GENERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Cristina Benetti Tonani Tosta

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Universities as generators and diffusers of knowledge are innovation agents when they interact with the environment. The role of the university in support of innovation also depends on the regional context, what means that not all universities need to adopt the same behavior in terms of support to innovation policy. This way it is necessary to study further the relationship between the university and society to promote deeper understanding of each one’s role in this relationship in order to produce innovation. A systematic review of the literature and a documental research were carried out with the purpose of knowing better the area and checking if this perception. Thus, this paper aims to deepen this analysis by conducting a systematic review performed based on the seven basic steps proposed by Jackson et al (2004. Based on this discussion, there were raised documents that describe the functioning of the Brazilian National System of Innovation and from the interface between the results of the systematic review and document analysis, it was designed the role of the university in this system. There were also identified the catalysts factors of innovation that point to the results of academic research that impact on economic development. It is suggested that this paper be followed by empirical research that can demonstrate practical results of the role of universities in innovation.

  18. Doctor-Patient Knowledge Transfer: Innovative Technologies and Policy Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Sára, Zoltán; Csedő, Zoltán; Tóth, Tamás; Fejes, József; Pörzse, Gábor

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to empirically investigate the barriers in doctor-patient communication and knowledge transfer and the role of innovative technologies in overcoming these barriers. We applied qualitative research methods. Our results show that patients extensively use information sources, primarily the Internet before the visits. Patients regularly apply a self-diagnosis regarding their diseases. This implies several risks as many of them are not able to properly inte...

  19. An Integrated Model of Knowledge Acquisition and Innovation: Examining the Mediation Effects of Knowledge Integration and Knowledge Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiyat, Samer E.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to empirically investigate the relationships among the three vital knowledge management processes of acquisition, integration and application, and their effects on organisational innovation in the pharmaceutical manufacturing industry in Jordan; a knowledge-intensive business service (KIBS) sector. Structural equation…

  20. Knowledge Translation: Moving Proteomics Science to Innovation in Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Christina; McDonald, Fiona; Jones, Mavis; Graham, Janice

    2016-06-01

    Proteomics is one of the pivotal next-generation biotechnologies in the current "postgenomics" era. Little is known about the ways in which innovative proteomics science is navigating the complex socio-political space between laboratory and society. It cannot be assumed that the trajectory between proteomics laboratory and society is linear and unidirectional. Concerned about public accountability and hopes for knowledge-based innovations, funding agencies and citizens increasingly expect that emerging science and technologies, such as proteomics, are effectively translated and disseminated as innovation in society. Here, we describe translation strategies promoted in the knowledge translation (KT) and science communication literatures and examine the use of these strategies within the field of proteomics. Drawing on data generated from qualitative interviews with proteomics scientists and ethnographic observation of international proteomics conferences over a 5-year period, we found that proteomics science incorporates a variety of KT strategies to reach knowledge users outside the field. To attain the full benefit of KT, however, proteomics scientists must challenge their own normative assumptions and approaches to innovation dissemination-beyond the current paradigm relying primarily on publication for one's scientific peers within one's field-and embrace the value of broader (interdisciplinary) KT strategies in promoting the uptake of their research. Notably, the Human Proteome Organization (HUPO) is paying increasing attention to a broader range of KT strategies, including targeted dissemination, integrated KT, and public outreach. We suggest that increasing the variety of KT strategies employed by proteomics scientists is timely and would serve well the omics system sciences community.

  1. Innovation, knowledge and information management in supply chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szuster Mariusz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study the question of innovation and information management in supply chain is addressed. We assume that innovation and information management are interrelated in supply chains and that the relationship is crucial for their success on the market. Considerable attention was given to the issue of outsourcing which is now a commonplace in supply chain management. In particular, we examined how approaches to managing information and knowledge in the supply chain differ according to ICT outsourcing. The deduction is based on a data set of 426 companies located in Poland, representing a variety of industry sectors. Two stages of the research were realised. The rationale behind this was to identify enterprises that utilise a welldeveloped system of information and knowledge management to determine the scope of possible in-depth analyses. This helped to receive valuable responses. We find what information and knowledge management is mainly driven by. We show the similarities and differences in information and knowledge management between entities that use ICT outsourcing and those that do not. We discuss the research results and draw conclusions.

  2. What Turns Knowledge into Innovative Products? The Role of Entrepreneurship and Knowledge Spillovers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Haibo; Block, Joern; Thurik, A. Roy

    2010-01-01

    The knowledge spillover theory of entrepreneurship seeks to explain the sources of entrepreneurship and its consequences with regard to economic performance. This paper extends the theory and links it to innovation performance. We propose that a high rate of entrepreneurship facilitates the process

  3. THE EFFECT OF KNOWLEDGE SOURCES ON INNOVATION CAPABILITIES AMONG RESTAURANTS AND CAFÉ BUSINESSES IN INDONESIA

    OpenAIRE

    Utami, Tri Lestari Wahyuning; Indarti, Nurul; Sitalaksmi, Sari; Makodian, Nuraksa

    2017-01-01

    To conduct innovation, firms absorb and utilise internal and external knowledge. This study examines the effect of internal and external knowledge, in terms of the breadth and depth of knowledge sources, on a firm’s innovation. The breadth of knowledge sources refers to the amount of knowledge sources used within the firm. The depth of knowledge sources is the amount of knowledge sources intensively used by the firm. This study is aimed at answering the following questions. a) What knowledge ...

  4. Innovation and knowledge transference in a cluster user-driven innovation perspective – the Inovcluster experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Paiva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Our purpose with this article is to show the importance of assessing trends and promoting innovation in a real business context, through a cluster ecosystem, mainly composed of micro-enterprises in the agro-industrial Portuguese sector.As many studies show, Inovcluster (which has 158 associates, from which 120 are enterprises is also a geographic region cluster, which improves innovation performance of businesses seeking to gain competitiveness and ability to improve their exportations in the agro-industrial Portuguese sector.The role of the cluster is fundamental to creating a model for knowledge transfer of innovation capacity, interconnecting its institutional, scientific and business associates. This model has to be adapted to the sector and enterprise characteristics, relying in an interconnecting structure which is more or less decentralized according to the mentioned features. Here we present an experience and case study of the Inovcluster ecosystem and its trends and innovation transfer to business value creation, contextualized within the regional strategy for smart specialization.We have shown how, through the establishment of an Inovcluster network, it is possible to integrate the contribution of different research and academic centres, channelled to assist micro-enterprises by innovating within a geographical constraint.

  5. Barriers and challenges in adopting Saudi telemedicine network: The perceptions of decision makers of healthcare facilities in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulellah Alaboudi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Despite emerging evidence about the benefits of telemedicine, there are still many barriers and challenges to its adoption. Its adoption is often cited as a failed project because 75% of them are abandoned or ‘failed outright’ and this percentage increases to 90% in developing countries. The literature has clarified that there is neither one-size-fit-all framework nor best-practice solution for all ICT innovations or for all countries. Barriers and challenges in adopting and implementing one ICT innovation in a given country/organisation may not be similar – not for the same ICT innovation in another country/organisation nor for another ICT innovation in the same country/organisation.To the best of our knowledge, no comprehensive scientific study has investigated these challenges and barriers in all Healthcare Facilities (HCFs across the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA. This research, which is undertaken based on the Saudi Telemedicine Network roadmap and in collaboration with the Saudi Ministry of Health (MOH, is aimed at identifying the principle predictive challenges and barriers in the context of the KSA, and understanding the perspective of the decision makers of each HCF type, sector, and location. Three theories are used to underpin this research: the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT, the Technology–Organisation–Environment (TOE theoretical framework, and the Evaluating Telemedicine Systems Success Model (ETSSM. This study applies a three-sequential-phase approach by using three mixed methods (i.e., literature review, interviews, and questionnaires in order to utilise the source triangulation and the data comparison analysis technique. The findings of this study show that the top three influential barriers to adopt and implement telemedicine by the HCF decision makers are: (i the availability of adequate sustainable financial support to implement, operate, and maintain the telemedicine system, (ii

  6. The Knowledge Management for Innovation Processes for SME Sector Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Norek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexity and variability of the modern economy means that the informationbecomes a key resource, essential for the proper functioning of anyenterprise and in the broader sense of the country and the national economy.Currently, practically all areas of modern economics are grappling withthe problem of information management, both in theory and practice. It isespecially visible in the attempts to support knowledge management in theareas, which are considered core from the viewpoint of increasing marketcompetitiveness of the company. Knowledge management in the field of company’sinnovative potential or in the area of intellectual capital may serve asan example. This situation forces the search for new solutions of knowledgemanagement in the field of research and evaluation of the innovative potentialof companies. The main purpose of this article is to present an Internetplatform for innovation audit, as a tool which supports knowledge management.An additional goal of this article is to present the preliminary results ofa research carried out by means of the described tools.

  7. Innovative teaching methods for capacity building in knowledge translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahabi, Hayfaa A; Al-Ansary, Lubna A

    2011-10-14

    In some current healthcare settings, there is a noticeable absence of national institutions committed to the synthesis and use of evidence in healthcare decision- and policy-making. This absence creates a need to broaden the responsibilities of healthcare providers to include knowledge brokering and advocacy in order to optimize knowledge translation to other stakeholders, especially policy-makers. However, this process requires practitioners and researchers to acquire certain types of knowledge and skills. This article introduces two innovative methods for capacity building in knowledge translation (KT). During a workshop aimed at preparing 21 trainers in evidence-based medicine, two innovative methods were used: (1) debate and (2) a knowledge translation project (KTP). The main objective of the debates approach was to strengthen participants' critical thinking abilities by requiring them to search for and appraise evidence and defend their arguments. The KTP was used to introduce participants to the essential steps of knowledge translation and to suggest an extended role for healthcare practitioners, i.e., using evidence to manage not only individual patients but also to a community of patients. Participants' performances were assessed according to a pre-designed scheme. At the end of the workshop, participants' opinions and experiences with the innovative teaching methods were evaluated based on their answers to a questionnaire and the results of small-group discussions. The participants performed well in both the debate and KTP methods. During post-workshop group discussions, they indicated that the debate approach had added a new dimension to their evidence-based medicine skills by adding purpose and motivation. However, they felt that their performances would have been better if they had been offered practical demonstrations of how to conduct the debate. The participants indicated that the KTP enhanced their understanding of the relationships between evidence

  8. Innovative teaching methods for capacity building in knowledge translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Ansary Lubna A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In some current healthcare settings, there is a noticeable absence of national institutions committed to the synthesis and use of evidence in healthcare decision- and policy-making. This absence creates a need to broaden the responsibilities of healthcare providers to include knowledge brokering and advocacy in order to optimize knowledge translation to other stakeholders, especially policy-makers. However, this process requires practitioners and researchers to acquire certain types of knowledge and skills. This article introduces two innovative methods for capacity building in knowledge translation (KT. Methods During a workshop aimed at preparing 21 trainers in evidence-based medicine, two innovative methods were used: (1 debate and (2 a knowledge translation project (KTP. The main objective of the debates approach was to strengthen participants' critical thinking abilities by requiring them to search for and appraise evidence and defend their arguments. The KTP was used to introduce participants to the essential steps of knowledge translation and to suggest an extended role for healthcare practitioners, i.e., using evidence to manage not only individual patients but also to a community of patients. Participants' performances were assessed according to a pre-designed scheme. At the end of the workshop, participants' opinions and experiences with the innovative teaching methods were evaluated based on their answers to a questionnaire and the results of small-group discussions. Results The participants performed well in both the debate and KTP methods. During post-workshop group discussions, they indicated that the debate approach had added a new dimension to their evidence-based medicine skills by adding purpose and motivation. However, they felt that their performances would have been better if they had been offered practical demonstrations of how to conduct the debate. The participants indicated that the KTP enhanced their

  9. The Relationship between Customer Knowledge Management and Performance of Agricultural Product Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Jia-jia

    2012-01-01

    This paper takes an overview of the CKM and the performance of agricultural product innovation from contents of agricultural product innovation and customer knowledge management (CKM), the relation between CKM and agricultural product innovation. On the basis of the overview, it builds the theoretical framework of CKM and agricultural product innovation. It points out that enterprises can satisfy demands of customers through acquisition, share, utilization and innovation of customer knowledge...

  10. Simulation as a tool for developing knowledge mobilisation strategies: Innovative knowledge transfer in youth services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ungar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available While there are excellent models of knowledge mobilisation (KMb that address the opportunity for co-production and sharing of best practice knowledge among human service professionals, it remains unclear whether these models will work in less formal settings like community-based non-government organisations (NGOs where there are fewer resources for KMb. For three days, 65 policy-makers, senior staff of NGOs, mental health professionals, KMb specialists and youth participated in a set of simulation exercises to problem solve how to mobilise knowledge in less formal settings that provide services to children and youth in challenging contexts (CYCC. Based on simulation exercises used in other settings (such as the deployment of international aid workers, participants were first provided with reports synthesising best practice knowledge relevant to their workplaces. They then engaged in an appreciative inquiry process, and were finally tasked with developing innovative strategies for KMb. Observation notes and exit interviews were used to evaluate the process and assess impact. Findings related to the process of the simulation exercises show the technique of simulation to be useful but that it requires effort to keep participants focused on the task of KMb rather than the content of best practices within a focal population. With regard to developing innovative KMb strategies, findings suggest that service providers in less formal community-based services prefer KMb activities that promote one-to-one relationships, including the participation of youth themselves, who can speak to the effectiveness of the interventions they have experienced. Unexpectedly, the use of electronic communication, including social media, was not viewed very positively by participants. These results suggest that the use of simulation to search for innovative KMb strategies and to problem solve around barriers to KMb has the potential to inform new ways of co-producing and

  11. Social Enterprises in Brazil: Socially Produced Knowledge Versus Social Innovation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edileusa Godói-de-Sousa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated whether socially produced knowledge in social ventures in Brazil has promoted social innovation and local development. The research is exploratory and descriptive, and was developed in two stages. At first, the sample group was composed of 378 projects selected from the mapping of Solidarity Economic Enterprises, conducted by the National Secretary of Solidarity Economy (Secretaria Nacional de Economia Solidária. The sample was surveyed to verify the main characteristics of these enterprises. After that, interviews were conducted with key managers in a sample of 32 projects. The results indicate challenges in the long path of favoring dynamic learning, with a generation of knowledge from the collective experiences of socialization: there is a lack of joint discussion and a predominance of individualized learning actions.

  12. [Medicine in the digital age : Telemedicine in medical school education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, S; Jungmann, F

    2018-03-01

    The increasing digitization of our lives and work has also reached medicine and is changing the profession of medical doctors. The modern forms of communication and cooperation in everyday medical practice demand new skills and qualifications. To enable future doctors to comply with this digitally competent profile, an innovative blended learning curriculum was developed and first implemented at the University Medical Center Mainz in summer semester 2017-Medicine in the Digital Age. The teaching concept encompasses five modules, each consisting of an e‑learning unit and a 3-hour classroom course. This publication presents the teaching concept, the initial implementation and evaluation of the module "Telemedicine". The competency development in the field of telemedicine showed a significant increase for the subcomponents "knowledge" and "skills". The neutral attitude towards telemedicine at the beginning of the module could be changed to a positive opinion after the session. The teaching of digital skills is a relevant component of future curriculum development in medical studies and also a challenge for continuing medical education.

  13. Managing knowledge boundaries for open innovation - lessons from the automotive industry : lessons from the automotive industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilhelm, Miriam; Dolfsma, Wilfred

    2018-01-01

    Purpose - The rising need to innovate and obtain knowledge from more distant knowledge sources calls for new innovation strategies and a better integration of other external actors who lie outside the traditional automotive supply chain. Such an open innovation strategy challenges organizational

  14. THE EFFECT OF SOCIAL CAPITAL AND KNOWLEDGE SHARING ON INNOVATION CAPABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhyah Harjanti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This research examines social capital and knowledge sharing effect on innovation capability among lectures in universities. Social capital was analyzed using three constructs, namely trust, norm and network, while knowledge sharing was broken down into two variables, namely knowledge collecting and knowledge donating. Innovation capability was explained on an individual level based on personality, behavioral and output perspectives. The research model and hypotheses were developed from the literature. Data collection is conducted through a survey on lecturers of private universities in Surabaya. The obtained data from the questionnaires were analyzed with the Partial Least Square (PLS to investigate the research model. The results suggest that social capital significantly influences innovation capability, while high level of knowledge collecting and knowledge donating can lead to high level of innovation capability. This study offers a foundation to analyze the relationships between social capital, knowledge-sharing process, consisting of knowledge collecting and knowledge donating, and innovation capability

  15. Relation Analysis of Knowledge Management, Research, and Innovation in University Research Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heyder Paez-Logreira

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge is a competitive advantage for companies. Knowledge Management helps to keep this competitiveness. Universities face with challenges in research, innovation and international competitiveness. The purpose of this paper includes studying Knowledge Management Models, and Innovation Models apply to Research Groups of Universities, through an analysis of relation in inter-organizational level. Some researchers and leaders of research groups participated in a survey about knowledge management and innovation. Here we show the relationship between knowledge management, innovation and research, including processes and operations performed by universities around these. We organize the results in three dimensions: Knowledge Management perception, the relationship between Knowledge Management and Innovation, and Strategic Knowledge organization. Too, we identify a generality of good practices, challenges, and limitations on Research Groups for Knowledge Management.

  16. Early phase telemedicine requirements elicitation in collaboration with medical practitioners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larburu Rubio, Nekane; Widya, I.A.; Bults, Richard G.A.; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Napolitano, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquity of Information and Communication Technology enables innovative telemedicine treatment applications for disease management of ambulant patients. Development of new treatment applications must comply with medical protocols and ‘way of working’ to obtain safety and efficacy evidence before

  17. Local-global knowledge sourcing in the context of an open innovation knowledge platform : the case of Amsterdam Denim City

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DiVito, Lori; Ingen-Housz, Zita

    2016-01-01

    Our paper investigates the inherent tensions between the local embeddedness of highly tacit knowledge and the global sourcing of ‘open’ knowledge or innovation. A single case study design enabled us to perform a thorough and detailed analysis of inter-firm collaboration and open innovation within

  18. Knowledge Sharing as a Social Dilemma in Pharmaceutical Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daria

    This article addresses the problem of restricted access to industry-sponsored clinical trial data. In particular, it analyzes the intersection of the competing claims that mandatory disclosure of pharmaceutical test data impedes drug sponsors’ innovation incentives and that access facilitates new drug development. These claims are characterized in terms of public-good and common-resource dilemmas. The analysis finds confidentiality protection of primary research data plays an ambiguous role. While secrecy, as such, does not solve the public-good problem in pharmaceutical innovation (in the presence of regulatory instruments that protect the originator drug against generic competition), it is likely to exacerbate the common-resource problem, in view of data as a source of scientific knowledge. It is argued that the claim by the research-based industry that disclosure of clinical data impedes innovation incentives is misplaced and should not be leveraged against pro-access policies. While much attention has been paid to the problem of appropriability of drug R&D investment, this analysis highlights another consequence resulting from the private provision of clinical trials, i.e., factual confidentiality and possession of data by drug sponsors. The associated social costs are qualified in terms of internalized knowledge externalities. Since, in a competitive environment, companies are unlikely to change the strategy of non-sharing of primary data, the resulting economic inefficiencies at the sector level call for regulatory intervention. To reconcile the competing policy objectives, it is proposed that the rules of access should be designed in such a way that third-party use of primary data does not interfere with protection against generic competition. At the same time, the long-term collective benefit can be maximized when the “cooperative choice” (i.e., when everyone shares data) becomes the “dominant strategy.” This can be achieved only when access is

  19. Knowledge management driven leadership, culture and innovation success – an integrative model

    OpenAIRE

    Zieba, M.; Schivinski, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Purpose - This article examines the relation between knowledge management (KM) driven leadership, culture and innovation success of knowledge-intensive small and medium sized companies. By building on the previously reported research on leadership, culture, innovation , and knowledge management, we synergistically integrate d KM-driven leadership and innovation success while exploring the meditational role of culture in that. Design/methodology/approach - A conceptual model comprising three c...

  20. Education for Knowledge Society: Learning and Scientific Innovation Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander O. Karpov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive-active learning research-type environment is the fundamental component of the education system for the knowledge society. The purpose of the research is the development of conceptual bases and a constructional model of a cognitively active learning environment that stimulates the creation of new knowledge and its socio-economic application. Research methods include epistemic-didactic analysis of empirical material collected as a result of the study of research environments at schools and universities; conceptualization and theoretical modeling of the cognitively active surrounding, which provides an infrastructure of the research-type cognitive process. The empirical material summarized in this work was collected in the research-cognitive space of the “Step into the Future” program, which is one of the most powerful systems of research education in present-day Russia. The article presents key points of the author's concept of generative learning environments and a model of learning and scientific innovation environment implemented at Russian schools and universities.

  1. Reaching the Unreachable: Novel Approaches to Telemedicine Screening of Underserved Populations for Vitreoretinal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchison, Ann P; Haller, Julia A; Mayro, Eileen; Hark, Lisa; Gower, Emily; Huisingh, Carrie; Rhodes, Lindsay; Friedman, David S; Lee, David J; Lam, Byron L

    2017-07-01

    Telemedicine involves electronic communication between a physician in one location and a patient in another location to provide remote medical care. Ophthalmologists are increasingly employing telemedicine, particularly in retinal disease screening and monitoring. Telemedicine has been utilized to decrease barriers to care and yield greater patient satisfaction and lower costs, while maintaining high sensitivity and specificity. This review discusses common patient barriers to eye care, innovative approaches to retinal disease screening and monitoring using telemedicine, and eye care policy initiatives needed to enact large-scale telemedicine eye disease screening programs.

  2. An Integrated Open Approach to Capturing Systematic Knowledge for Manufacturing Process Innovation Based on Collective Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangfeng Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Process innovation plays a vital role in the manufacture realization of increasingly complex new products, especially in the context of sustainable development and cleaner production. Knowledge-based innovation design can inspire designers’ creative thinking; however, the existing scattered knowledge has not yet been properly captured and organized according to Computer-Aided Process Innovation (CAPI. Therefore, this paper proposes an integrated approach to tackle this non-trivial issue. By analyzing the design process of CAPI and technical features of open innovation, a novel holistic paradigm of process innovation knowledge capture based on collective intelligence (PIKC-CI is constructed from the perspective of the knowledge life cycle. Then, a multi-source innovation knowledge fusion algorithm based on semantic elements reconfiguration is applied to form new public knowledge. To ensure the credibility and orderliness of innovation knowledge refinement, a collaborative editing strategy based on knowledge lock and knowledge–social trust degree is explored. Finally, a knowledge management system MPI-OKCS integrating the proposed techniques is implemented into the pre-built CAPI general platform, and a welding process innovation example is provided to illustrate the feasibility of the proposed approach. It is expected that our work would lay the foundation for the future knowledge-inspired CAPI and smart process planning.

  3. Linking scientific and practical knowledge in innovation systems

    OpenAIRE

    Isaksen, Arne; Nilsson, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    New research indicates that firms combining the science-based STI (Science, Technology, Innovation) and the experience-based DUI (Doing, Using, Interacting) modes of innovation are more efficient when it comes to improving innovation capacity and competitiveness. With regard to innovation policy, the STI mode calls for a supply driven policy, typically aimed to commercialise research results. The DUI mode suggests a demand driven policy approach, such as supporting the development of new prod...

  4. Telemedicine in dermatology: Evaluation of secondary and tertiary teledermatology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    The field of dermatology was one of the first adaptors of telemedicine, dating back to 1995, and has one of the highest scientific output in the field of telemedicine. The research described in this thesis expanded on this scientific knowledge base by answering the following research questions: 1.

  5. Telemedicine for Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combi, Carlo; Pozzani, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Developing countries need telemedicine applications that help in many situations, when physicians are a small number with respect to the population, when specialized physicians are not available, when patients and physicians in rural villages need assistance in the delivery of health care. Moreover, the requirements of telemedicine applications for developing countries are somewhat more demanding than for developed countries. Indeed, further social, organizational, and technical aspects need to be considered for successful telemedicine applications in developing countries. Objective We consider all the major projects in telemedicine, devoted to developing countries, as described by the proper scientific literature. On the basis of such literature, we want to define a specific taxonomy that allows a proper classification and a fast overview of telemedicine projects in developing countries. Moreover, by considering both the literature and some recent direct experiences, we want to complete such overview by discussing some design issues to be taken into consideration when developing telemedicine software systems. Methods We considered and reviewed the major conferences and journals in depth, and looked for reports on the telemedicine projects. Results We provide the reader with a survey of the main projects and systems, from which we derived a taxonomy of features of telemedicine systems for developing countries. We also propose and discuss some classification criteria for design issues, based on the lessons learned in this research area. Conclusions We highlight some challenges and recommendations to be considered when designing a telemedicine system for developing countries. PMID:27803948

  6. The Positions of Virtual Knowledge Brokers in the Core Process of Open Innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hacievliyagil, N.K.; Maisonneuve, Y.E.; Auger, J.F.; Hartmann, L.

    2007-01-01

    Several companies are implementing the strategy of open innovation in their research and development operations. They become more dependent, therefore, on their capabilities to exchange knowledge and technology with external parties. To facilitate these exchanges, virtual knowledge brokers use

  7. THE EFFECT OF KNOWLEDGE SOURCES ON INNOVATION CAPABILITIES AMONG RESTAURANTS AND CAFÉ BUSINESSES IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Lestari Wahyuning Utami

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To conduct innovation, firms absorb and utilise internal and external knowledge. This study examines the effect of internal and external knowledge, in terms of the breadth and depth of knowledge sources, on a firm’s innovation. The breadth of knowledge sources refers to the amount of knowledge sources used within the firm. The depth of knowledge sources is the amount of knowledge sources intensively used by the firm. This study is aimed at answering the following questions. a What knowledge sources are mainly used? b What type of innovation is frequently conducted? c What are the effects of the breadth and the depth of knowledge sources on the innovation capabilities among Indonesian restaurants and cafés? The resource-based view and resource dependency theory are used to understand the role of internal and external knowledge on innovation within a firm. We distributed a semi-structured questionnaire to 101 owners/managers, using a purposive, in several cities in Indonesia, such as Bandung, Denpasar Bogor, Malang, Yogyakarta and other cities in East Java. The results show that the Indonesian restaurants and cafés utilised external knowledge sources more often than internal ones. The firms produce more incremental product innovations than radical ones. The depth of the internal knowledge sources has a positive significant impact on the firms’ innovation capabilities, which supports the previous studies. Meanwhile, the breadth of the internal knowledge sources is found not to have a significant effect on innovation. Additionally, the effects of the breadth and depth of the external knowledge sources on the innovation capabilities are also insignificant.

  8. Energy prices, technological knowledge and green energy innovation. A dynamic panel analysis of patent counts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruse, Juergen; Wetzel, Heike; Koeln Univ.

    2014-01-01

    We examine the effect of energy prices and technological knowledge on innovation in green energy technologies. In doing so, we consider both demand-pull effects, which induce innovative activity by increasing the expected value of innovations, and technology-push effects, which drive innovative activity by extending the technological capability of an economy. Our analysis is conducted using patent data from the European Patent Office on a panel of 26 OECD countries over the period 1978-2009. Utilizing a dynamic count data model for panel data, we analyze 11 distinct green energy technologies. Our results indicate that the existing knowledge stock is a significant driver of green energy innovation for all technologies. Furthermore, the results suggest that energy prices have a positive impact on innovation for some but not all technologies and that the e.ect of energy prices and technological knowledge on green energy innovation becomes more pronounced after the Kyoto protocol agreement in 1997.

  9. Pursuing Knowledge and Innovation through Collective Actions. The Case of Young Farmers in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsou, Stavriani; Partalidou, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper examines new coalitions for knowledge diffusion and innovations of young farmers. Understanding their patterns and the factors influencing their cooperative and innovating norms is crucial in improving these young farmers' positioning in the agricultural knowledge and information system. Design/methodology/approach: Drawing on…

  10. Innovative knowledge sharing, supply chain integration and firm performance of Australian manufacturing firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, Prakash J.; Power, Damien

    2014-01-01

    A number of reports show that innovation in Australian manufacturing firms is declining. We propose that better knowledge sharing practices can assist these firms to become more innovative. In this paper, we examine this proposition by empirically testing the relationship between knowledge sharing

  11. Developing technology intelligence strategy to access knowledge of innovation clusters. : The case of KODAK in Cambridge

    OpenAIRE

    Dang , Rani Jeanne; Mortara , Letizia; Thomson , Ruth; Minshall , Tim

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Current times are characterised by a knowledge-based economy and fast technological change. In this difficult environment, companies compete to maintain a relevant position through innovation. In response to these challenges, many companies are currently adopting an open approach to innovation, pursuing innovation by combining internal and external resources. Technology intelligence (TI) activities support the implementation of open innovation with the systematic captu...

  12. Breakthrough innovations : The impact of foreign acquisition of knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Tojeiro Rivero, Damián; Moreno Serrano, Rosina; Badillo Enciso, Erika Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Based on the Spanish Technological Innovation Panel, this paper explores the role of R+D offshoring on innovation performance from 2004 to 2013. Specifically, we focus our attention on the impact of different types of offshoring governance models on the profitability of developing breakthrough innovations. Using a novel methodology for panel data sets, we control for the heterogeneity of firms as well as for the sample selection and endogeneity. Our study provides evidence that firms developi...

  13. Ba, Japanese-Style Knowledge Creation Concept: A Building Brick of Innovation Process inside Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Pribadi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Survival of a firm in industry will be primarily determined by how efficient it can harness competitive advantage from innovation process. Innovation process itself has strong correlation with knowledge creation, and to understand about innovation, people must understand about knowledge creation process. By successfully harnessing knowledge, people can use those resources to create some innovation product or service that in the end will provide competitive edge into the company. Unfortunately, not much research can be sought to provide more insight on the creation of knowledge inside a company. This paper explores about interesting concept of knowledge creation in Japanese term, which is called as “ba”. Ba concept can be used to describe how tacit knowledge and casual knowledge can be harnessed into a useful knowledge which in turn will be transformed into innovation process. This paper will briefly give some introduction about ba concept and how it is related to innovation process. A brief study of one multinational company will be used to describe how concept of ba is applied in understanding the success story of innovation from knowledge creation.

  14. Barriers and challenges in adopting Saudi telemedicine network: The perceptions of decision makers of healthcare facilities in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaboudi, Abdulellah; Atkins, Anthony; Sharp, Bernadette; Balkhair, Ahmed; Alzahrani, Mohammed; Sunbul, Tamara

    Despite emerging evidence about the benefits of telemedicine, there are still many barriers and challenges to its adoption. Its adoption is often cited as a failed project because 75% of them are abandoned or 'failed outright' and this percentage increases to 90% in developing countries. The literature has clarified that there is neither one-size-fit-all framework nor best-practice solution for all ICT innovations or for all countries. Barriers and challenges in adopting and implementing one ICT innovation in a given country/organisation may not be similar - not for the same ICT innovation in another country/organisation nor for another ICT innovation in the same country/organisation. To the best of our knowledge, no comprehensive scientific study has investigated these challenges and barriers in all Healthcare Facilities (HCFs) across the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). This research, which is undertaken based on the Saudi Telemedicine Network roadmap and in collaboration with the Saudi Ministry of Health (MOH), is aimed at identifying the principle predictive challenges and barriers in the context of the KSA, and understanding the perspective of the decision makers of each HCF type, sector, and location. Three theories are used to underpin this research: the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT), the Technology-Organisation-Environment (TOE) theoretical framework, and the Evaluating Telemedicine Systems Success Model (ETSSM). This study applies a three-sequential-phase approach by using three mixed methods (i.e., literature review, interviews, and questionnaires) in order to utilise the source triangulation and the data comparison analysis technique. The findings of this study show that the top three influential barriers to adopt and implement telemedicine by the HCF decision makers are: (i) the availability of adequate sustainable financial support to implement, operate, and maintain the telemedicine system, (ii) ensuring conformity of

  15. Mapping telemedicine efforts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kierkegaard, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    are being utilized? What medical disciplines are being addressed using telemedicine systems? Methods: All data was surveyed from the "Telemedicinsk Landkort", a newly created database designed to provide a comprehensive and systematic overview of all telemedicine technologies in Denmark. Results......Objectives: The aim of this study is to survey telemedicine services currently in operation across Denmark. The study specifically seeks to answer the following questions: What initiatives are deployed within the different regions? What are the motivations behind the projects? What technologies......: The results of this study suggest that a growing number of telemedicine initiatives are currently in operation across Denmark but that considerable variations existed in terms of regional efforts as the number of operational telemedicine projects varied from region to region. Conclusions: The results...

  16. Combined Innovation Policy: Linking Scientific and Practical Knowledge in Innovation Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Isaksen, Arne; Nilsson, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    New research indicates that firms combining the science-based STI (Science, Technology, Innovation) and the experience-based DUI (Doing, Using, Interacting) modes of innovation are more efficient when it comes to improving innovation capacity and competitiveness. With regard to innovation policy, the STI mode calls for a supply driven policy, typically aimed to commercialise research results. The DUI mode suggests a demand driven policy approach, such as supporting the development of new prod...

  17. The impacts of network competence, knowledge sharing on service innovation performance: Moderating role of relationship quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaoquan Jian

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To examine how network competence, knowledge sharing and relationship quality affect service innovation performanceDesign/methodology/approach: Empirical ResearchFindings: 1 Both enterprise’s network competence and knowledge sharing have distinct positive impact on SIP; (2 Knowledge sharing partially mediates the effect of network competence on SIP. (3 Relationship quality positively moderates the effect of network competence on knowledge sharing, and the effect of knowledge sharing on SIP. (4 Relationship quality does not positively moderate the effect of network competence on SIP.Originality/value: This study has enriched current understanding of the relationship among network competence, knowledge sharing, relationship quality and service innovation performance.

  18. Small- and medium-sized enterprises’ knowledge management systems as edifiers of new value innovations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boniface Okanga

    2017-07-01

    Objectives: This research evaluates how the effectiveness of the small- and medium-sized enterprises’ (SMEs knowledge management systems enhance new value innovations so as to identify the major paradoxes and a business model that coherently integrates knowledge management with new value innovations. Method: Using a qualitative research method, semi-structured interviews were used to explore the opinions of 20 purposively sampled managers from 20 SMEs on how knowledge management edifies new value innovations. Results: A strong culture of information utilisation was found to enhance relevant analysis and identification of new gaps in the markets that must be filled through new value innovations or modifications of the existing products. However, poor culture of knowledge utilisation, cost of knowledge management and the often poorly functional business information systems were still reiterated as major paradoxes hampering effective knowledge management as one of the determinants of new value innovations. Conclusion: The study concluded with a model highlighting a continuum of knowledge management–new value innovation pillars like a strong culture of information utilisation, and encouragement of creativity that the executives must consider to create an effective knowledge management foundation that subsequently leverages the overall effectiveness of new value innovations.

  19. Knowledge management, market orientation, innovativeness and organizational outcomes: a study on companies operating in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Ferraresi, Alex Antonio; Santos, Silvio Aparecido dos; Frega, José Roberto; Pereira, Heitor José

    2012-01-01

    This article analyzes the study of the relationship among knowledge management, the company's market orientation, innovativeness and organizational outcomes. The survey was conducted based on a survey held with executives from 241 companies in Brazil. The evidence found indicates that knowledge management directly contributes to market orientation, but it requires a clearly defined strategic direction to achieve results and innovativeness. It was also concluded that knowledge, as a resource, ...

  20. The Mediating Role of Knowledge Sharing on Information Technology and Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onwika Kaewchur

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the relationship between information technology, knowledge sharing, and a firm’s innovation. Knowledge sharing as a mediating effect is also simultaneously investigated with regard to the relationship between information technology and a firm’s innovation. In this research, the quantitative method was mainly employed. The data was collected with a survey. A total of 224 respondents from herbal manufacturing companies were included in the research. The results presented in this paper demonstrate that knowledge sharing and information technology can critically influence the organization’s innovation and can play a vital role as a significant success factor in this process.

  1. Knowledge collaborative incentive based on inter-organizational cooperative innovation of project-based supply chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangdong Wu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Within project-based supply chain inter-organizational cooperative innovation, the achievement of project value-adding reflects by factors such as project-based organizational effect level, the relationship between project cooperative innovation objectives etc. The purpose is to provide a reliable reference for the contractor reasonably allocate the effect level and resources between the knowledge input and innovation stage and realize the knowledge collaboration for project-based supply chain. Design/methodology/approach: Based on the assumption of equal cooperation between project-based organizations, from the view of maximizing project value-adding and the relationship of effect cost between knowledge input and innovation stage in consideration, the knowledge collaborative incentive model for project-based supply chain inter-organizational cooperative innovation was established, and solved through the first-order and second-order approach, then the digital simulation and example analysis were presented. Findings: The results show that, the project management enterprise resorted to adjust project knowledge collaboration incentive intensity and implemented knowledge input-innovation coordinative incentive strategy, not only could achieve project value-adding maximization, but also could realize net earnings Pareto improvement between project management enterprise and contractor. Research limitations/implications: To simplify the knowledge flow among project-based organizations, the knowledge flow in the model hypothesis is presented as knowledge input and knowledge innovation stage, thus it may affect the final analysis results. Originality/value: In construction project practice, knowledge is become more and more important to achieve project value-adding. The research can provide a theoretical guideline for the project-based organizations, such as the contractor, the owner, especially how to utilize their core knowledge.

  2. The knowledge dynamics of organizational innovation : understanding the implementation of decision support for planners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sjarbaini, Vivyane Larissa Ratna Nirma

    2009-01-01

    This thesis argues that a knowledge perspective on organizational innovation provides essential insights. A cognitive-semiotic model on knowledge dynamics is presented and used to perform an empirical study. We seek an answer to the question: What happens to the knowledge of planners during an

  3. Knowledge Creation and Innovation in a Civil Engineering Course for the First-Year University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmisto, Alpo; Nokelainen, Petri

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the application of knowledge creation learning and innovation to higher education in construction. The objectives are to demonstrate the application of the course based on knowledge creation learning to mass teaching and to analyse whether knowledge creation learning improves student motivation and learning. The empirical…

  4. ROMANIA AND THE KNOWLEDGE-BASED ECONOMY: INNOVATION THE SOURCE OF ECONOMIC GROWTH

    OpenAIRE

    Holban (Oncioiu) Ionica; Oncioiu Florin Razvan

    2008-01-01

    The is already a vast literature on the role of knowledge in economic growth butthere is need to clarify the meaning and scope of this term and define the Romanianperspective on the relationship between knowledge-based economy and growth. This paper focuses on innovation systems in Romania as the key challenge and meanfor embracing growth based on knowledge-based economy.

  5. On the Implications of Knowledge Bases for Regional Innovation Policies in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassink Robert

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Regional innovation policies have been criticised for being too standardised, one-size-fits-all and place-neutral in character. Embedded in these debates, this paper has two aims: first, to analyse whether industries with different knowledge bases in regions in Germany have different needs for regional innovation policies, and secondly, to investigate whether knowledge bases can contribute to the fine-tuning of regional innovation policies in particular and to a modern, tailor-made, place-based regional innovation policy in general. It concludes that although needs differ due to differences in knowledge bases, those bases are useful only to a limited extent in fine-tuning regional innovation policies

  6. Multi-business firms, knowledge flows and intra-network open innovations

    OpenAIRE

    Villasalero, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The increasing competition in the marketplace has led firms to change their innovation patterns to a more open system according to which they rely on networks to manage knowledge resources and innovate. The so-called open innovation paradigm has been developed by taking single-business firms and external networks as cornerstones of the standard model. However, in the case of multi-business firms, the role of internal networks has been neglected. Business units within multi-business corporatio...

  7. Globalisation of Knowledge Production and Regional Innovation Policy: Supporting Specialized Hubs in the Bangalore Software Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Chaminade, Cristina; Vang, Jan

    2008-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the changing role of regional innovation systems and regional policies in supporting the transition of indigenous firms in developing countries from competing on low costs towards becoming knowledge providers in global value chains. Special attention is paid to policies supporting the emergence and development of the regional innovation system in this transition process. Regional innovation systems in developing countries have very recently started to be conceptua...

  8. Towards radical innovation in knowledge-intensive service firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B.M. van Poucke (Anna)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractWhat is happening in the field of knowledge-intensive work and professional services? Why do knowledge workers have to work harder to prove their added value and significance on the basis of the knowledge they hold? Due to globalization and explosive growth in the use of information

  9. Emergent Innovation—a Socio-Epistemological Innovation Technology. Creating Profound Change and Radically New Knowledge as Core Challenges in Knowledge Management

    OpenAIRE

    Peschl, Markus F.; Fundneider, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces an alternative approach to innovation: Emergent Innovation. As opposed to radical innovation Emergent Innovation finds a balance and integrates the demand both for radically new knowledge and at the same time for an organic development from within the organization. From a knowledge management perspective one can boil down this problem to the question of how to cope with the new and with profound change in knowledge. This question will be dealt with in the first part of t...

  10. Agricultural knowledge transfer and innovation processes in Vietnam's northwestern uplands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thai, Thi Minh; Neef, Andreas; Hoffmann, Volker

    2011-01-01

    and income generation in the uplands are adopted by a high number of farmers, but tend to be less environmentally sound. Innovations driven by political and ecological interests, i.e. of the type “adoption for political and social rewards” and “adoption for a sustainable environment,” are accepted by only...... a period of rapid growth in the recent past. Examples of this include intensive rice cultivation for household food needs and hybrid maize cultivation for market demand. This study further identified three main mechanisms of innovation diffusion, namely the trickle-down mechanism, the ripple mechanism...

  11. How HE (Hydrogen Energy) Knowledge and Innovativeness Affect Potential Innovators' Acceptance and Opinions Regarding HE An example from UNIDO-ICHET Web-site Users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavis Tsai; Scott Warren; Reide Song; JingYi Gao

    2006-01-01

    According to innovation diffusion research, the innovators, opinion leaders, and diffusion agents play vital roles in promoting the acceptance of innovation. The purpose of this research is to investigate how HE innovators' knowledge affects their acceptance and opinions about HE and related products. The research method is an on-line survey and the sample is a voluntary sample. This survey successfully collected 1126 HE innovators' information. The researchers used SPSS statistics software to analyze the data and found the relationship between HE innovators' demographics, their knowledge about hydrogen energy, their innovativeness, and their familiarity with new energy technology with their acceptance and opinions about HE, and how they use the UNIDO-ICHET web-site. The researchers found HE knowledge could be used to predict new energy innovators' information resource usage, innovativeness, new energy product adoption and their opinions about HE. (authors)

  12. Knowledge sharing behavior and intensive care nurse innovation: the moderating role of control of care quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li-Ying, Jason; Paunova, Minna; Egerod, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Aims This study investigates the influence of intensive care unit nurses’ knowledge sharing behaviour on nurse innovation, given different conditions of care quality control. Background Health-care organisations face an increasing pressure to innovate while controlling care quality. We have littl...

  13. Knowledge Sharing, Control of Care Quality, and Innovation in Intensive Care Nursing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paunova, Minna; Li-Ying, Jason; Egerod, Ingrid Eugenie

    This study investigates the influence of nurse knowledge sharing behavior on nurse innovation, given different conditions of control of care quality within the intensive care unit (ICU). After conducting a number of interviews and a pilot study, we carried out a multi-source survey study of more...... control of care quality and innovate may be conflicting, unless handled properly....

  14. Characterizing and comparing innovation systems by different ‘modes’ of knowledge production: A proximity approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardeman, Sjoerd; Frenken, Koen; Nomaler, Önder; Ter Wal, Anne L. J.

    2015-01-01

    Though the concept of innovation systems has become influential in both academia and policymaking, an analytical approach to understanding innovation systems is still lacking. In particular, there is no analytical framework to measure `Mode 1? and `Mode 2? knowledge production. We propose a

  15. Telemedicine: Pediatric Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Bryan L.; Hall, R. W.

    2017-01-01

    Telemedicine is a technological tool that is improving the health of children around the world. This report chronicles the use of telemedicine by pediatricians and pediatric medical and surgical specialists to deliver inpatient and outpatient care, educate physicians and patients, and conduct medical research. It also describes the importance of telemedicine in responding to emergencies and disasters and providing access to pediatric care to remote and underserved populations. Barriers to telemedicine expansion are explained, such as legal issues, inadequate payment for services, technology costs and sustainability, and the lack of technology infrastructure on a national scale. Although certain challenges have constrained more widespread implementation, telemedicine’s current use bears testimony to its effectiveness and potential. Telemedicine’s widespread adoption will be influenced by the implementation of key provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, technological advances, and growing patient demand for virtual visits. PMID:26122813

  16. UH Telemedicine Proposal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Friedman, Richard

    2001-01-01

    .... To accomplish this task, a clinical telemedicine service was established such that a hub of physician specialists in Honolulu is available to primary care providers and patients in rural and/or remote clinics...

  17. The role of knowledge in the processes of creating and implementing innovations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baruk Jerzy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of changes taking place in the environment of organizations encourages them to design and implement internal changes allowing to sustain the balance between the organizations and their environment. These changes concern the formulation of the main goal of an organization, process and structural solutions, management concept, relations with clients, a different look at resources, using knowledge as a source of innovation etc. One of the conditions for the functioning and development of contemporary organizations is systemic utilization of knowledge for solving the emerging problems, including the creation of innovations. Satisfying this condition requires using knowledge in management. The purpose of this work is to show that knowledge plays a fundamental role in the processes of generating and implementing innovation, that’s why the process of creating innovation has to be manager in a rational way, according to the proposed models.

  18. Knowledge Creation Through Mobile Social Networks and Its Impact on Intentions to Use Innovative Mobile Services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijnen, M.H.P.; Lievens, A.; de Ruyter, K.; Wetzels, M.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Taking a social network perspective, the authors investigate consumers' intentions to use innovative mobile services. With a sociometric survey, they empirically assess how consumers integrate and connect through mobile social networks, as well as how their network position influences knowledge

  19. Knowledge management as a strategic tool to foster innovativeness in SMEs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, H.; Uhlaner, L.M.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between knowledge management (KM) (in terms of external acquisition and internal sharing) and innovation behavior. The concept of absorptive capacity and assumptions from the dynamic capabilities view underlie the proposed framework and hypotheses. The framework

  20. Knowledge Management as a Strategic Tool to Foster Innovativeness of SMEs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Zhou (Haibo); L.M. Uhlaner (Lorraine)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis study examines the relationship between knowledge management (KM) (in terms of external acquisition and internal sharing) and innovation behavior. The concept of absorptive capacity and assumptions from the dynamic capabilities view underlie the proposed framework and hypotheses.

  1. Knowledge as a Critical Resource in Innovation among Small Furniture Companies in Indonesia: An Exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina van Geenhuizen

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The furniture industry makes a significant contribution to the Indonesian economy but is exposed to an intensifying competitive environment and to emerging shortages of raw material. These circumstances have prompted small furniture manufacturers in the district of Jepara to undertake several types of innovation. It appears that of all first ranked innovations, product innovation is the largest category. In the overall pattern of innovations, market innovation and logistics innovation are also important, a situation that can be explained by the typical character and current circumstances of the furniture industry in this area. The innovation process concerned mainly relies on traditional knowledge sources, namely in-house learning-by-doing and experimentation, and buyers (customers. However, the manufacturers show willingness to use other knowledge sources in the near future, particularly more formal and globally oriented ones, such as exhibitions, research institutions, and the Internet. What tends to hamper such progress is that the manufacturers’ capability to access these knowledge sources is limited by financial obstacles and to a smaller extent by complexity and language obstacles. The paper concludes with a few policy recommendations and potential directions of future research. One of the policy recommendations aims at a combination of the traditional way of knowledge generation through in-house learning-by-doing and experimentation with knowledge from modern and formal sources.

  2. Telemedicine and European law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callens, Stefaan

    2003-01-01

    A Directive of the European Union was first published in 2000, which dealt with telemedicine as part of its provisions. This E-Commerce Directive, as it became known, was subjected to further study which revealed some problems relative to the practice of telemedicine. Among the subjects discussed in this paper are those of privacy, data protection, free movement of services, the impact of electronic communication and ethical issues.

  3. Applying Indigenous Knowledge to Innovations in Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertel, Amy Locklear

    2017-01-01

    Grounded in an indigenous holistic worldview and borrowing from the four Rs (values of relationships, responsibility, reciprocity, and redistribution), this article supports the inclusion of translational science and the integration of core metacompetencies into social work doctoral education as innovations in the field of social work science. The…

  4. University Knowledge Production and Innovation: Getting a Grip

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooij, Arjan

    2014-01-01

    Today universities are increasingly seen as motors of innovation: they not only need to provide trained manpower and publications to society, but also new products, new processes and new services that create firms, jobs, and economic growth. This function of universities is controversial, and a huge and still expanding literature has tried to…

  5. Knowledge work in successful supermarkets: Shop assistants as innovators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Tjip; Verdonschot, S.G.M.; Kessels, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Managers constantly seek for innovative ideas to improve their organisations. Their staff, sometimes supported by external consultants should then develop these ideas further and implement the results in the organisation. This does not always work out the way intended. In this paper we examined this

  6. Knowledge sharing and innovation in relationships interorganizational type of information technology outsourcing

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta Rodrigues Faoro; Mírian Oliveira; Marcelo Faoro de Abreu

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: this paper presents an analysis of the sharing of knowledge and innovation in the inter-relationships of the type outsourcing of Information Technology. Objective: analyze the existence of relationship between knowledge sharing and innovation in the inter-relationships of the type of outsourcing information technology (IT). Methodology: research is exploratory, qualitative and using as a strategy the multiple case study, which analyzed 12 companies in IT outsourci...

  7. Socially Relevant Knowledge Based Telemedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    in the field of education as well. Advantage (s) of training in virtual worlds The most important advantage of use of computer based...Shirmohammadi, S. (2007). Accessibility and scalability in collaborative eCommerce environments. Digital Information Management, 2007. ICDIM 󈧋. 2nd...methods on human effort has certain advantages and disadvantages. The main advantage is that human-intensive methods usually yield data that are of high

  8. Socially Relevant Knowledge Based Telemedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    As Second Life does not provide SDK, the authors use open source e-learning software SLOODLE that links Second Life with a course management tool...operating system. The software automatically time-stamps all observations entered into the system. In this manner, observations were gathered unobtrusively...education. Health Info Libr J 2007, 24 (4), 2007, 233-45. 7. Wayne, D.B., Butter, J., Siddall, V.J., Fudala, M.J., Wade, L.D., Feinglass, J., McGaghie

  9. Knowledge sharing and innovation in relationships interorganizational type of information technology outsourcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Rodrigues Faoro

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: this paper presents an analysis of the sharing of knowledge and innovation in the inter-relationships of the type outsourcing of Information Technology. Objective: analyze the existence of relationship between knowledge sharing and innovation in the inter-relationships of the type of outsourcing information technology (IT. Methodology: research is exploratory, qualitative and using as a strategy the multiple case study, which analyzed 12 companies in IT outsourcing environments, 4 suppliers of IT and IT 8 client companies. Data were collected through semi structured interviews, documentary and direct observation. Results: it can be noted that the sharing of knowledge showed contribute to the existence of innovation in IT outsourcing environment. The suppliers prioritize the codification of shared knowledge, while customers prefer the sharing of knowledge through informal conversations. It was identified that the motives for outsourcing IT may be related to the sharing of knowledge and innovation. Conclusions: this research contributes to the advancement of knowledge about the knowledge and innovation sharing phenomena in outsourcing of IT environments.

  10. Knowledge base combinations and innovation performance in Swedish regions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grillitsch, M.; Martin, R.; Srholec, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 5 (2017), s. 458-479 ISSN 0013-0095 Institutional support: Progres-Q24 Keywords : knowledge base * knowledge combination * region Subject RIV: AH - Economics OBOR OECD: Applied Economics, Econometrics Impact factor: 5.344, year: 2016

  11. Knowledge base combinations and innovation performance in Swedish regions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grillitsch, M.; Martin, R.; Srholec, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 5 (2017), s. 458-479 ISSN 0013-0095 Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : knowledge base * knowledge combination * region Subject RIV: AH - Economics OBOR OECD: Applied Economics, Econometrics Impact factor: 5.344, year: 2016

  12. Team innovation climate and knowledge sharing among healthcare managers: mediating effects of altruistic intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng-Chuan; Cheng, Kai-Lin; Chao, Minston; Tseng, Hsu-Min

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to provide empirical evidence concerning the impact of team climate on knowledge sharing behavior and the mediating effects of individuals' altruistic intentions in the context of healthcare settings. Questionnaire data were collected from 212 administrators employed at a medical center in Taiwan. Team climate was assessed by the Team Climate Inventory composed of four factors, participative safety, support for innovation, vision, and task orientation. The proposed hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling. The influence of the team innovation climate on knowledge sharing behavior was evident. Furthermore, individuals' altruistic intentions played a full mediating role in the relationship between team innovation climate and knowledge sharing behavior. These results contribute to the field of the people-orientated perspective in knowledge management. The full mediating effect of employees' altruistic intentions provides healthcare team managers the direction to accelerate knowledge sharing behavior.

  13. [Telecardiology: Tasks and duties of telemedicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borbás, János; Forczek, Erzsébet; Sepp, Róbert; Bari, Ferenc

    2017-11-01

    Telemedicine is a young science that integrates innovations of information-technology and telecommunications into medical science. A successful telemedicine procedure should guarantee reduced workload of the healthcare system with well secured and cost-effective processes. Our goal was to collect the development phases of telemedicine projects through existing telecardiology solutions. Subsequent to reviewing international publications we analyzed the past and present situation of blood pressure monitoring, remote diagnostics of electrocardiography, implantable cardioverter defibrillator monitoring and pocket ultrasound devices. In case of new solutions (a) several internationally accepted, confidently reproducible "good practices" are needed for creating (b) guidelines and recommendations of international medical associations. They have to ensure (c) cost-effective work, with well-designed sustainability and (d) patient confidentiality. Improving (e) education for professionals and patients is essential. We recommend to telemedicine developers to use our standards in order to introduce their products more effectively into clinical practice. It is encouraging that current possibilities of telecardiology partly or fully meet the aforementioned criteria. Further development of the topic can contribute to financial sustainability of our healthcare and might be able to resolve limitations of human resources. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(44): 1741-1746.

  14. Perceived risks and use of psychotherapy via telemedicine for patients at risk for suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Amanda K; Ward-Ciesielski, Erin F

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Suicide is a major public health problem and its human, emotional, and economic costs are significant. Individuals in rural areas are at highest risk for suicide. However, telemedicine services are typically not rendered to individuals who are actively suicidal. The goals of the current study were to identify the risks of using telemedicine for mental healthcare from the perspective of licensed mental health providers and to determine factors associated with the use of telemedicine with patients who are at high risk for suicide. Methods A total of 52 licensed mental health providers were recruited online through several professional organization listservs and targeted emails. Providers completed online questionnaires regarding demographics, caseload of suicidal patients, perceived risks for using telemedicine with patients at risk for suicide, attitudes towards telemedicine, and use of telemedicine with patients at risk for suicide. Results Three key perceived risks associated with using telemedicine were identified, including assessment, lack of control over patient, and difficulties triaging patients if needed. It was also found that individuals who had more positive attitudes towards telemedicine, younger providers, and more experienced providers were more likely to use telemedicine with patients who are at high risk for suicide. Discussion To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the perceived risks and use of telemedicine with patients at high risk for suicide. It is essential to continue this line of research to develop protocols for the provision of evidence-based therapy via telemedicine for this high-risk group.

  15. Market Orientation and Sources of Knowledge to Innovate in SMEs: A Firm Level Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Regina Didonet

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This work examines the relationship between the three market orientation (MO components, i.e. customer orientation, competitor orientation and inter-functional coordination, and the extension to which small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs use different sources of knowledge to innovate. Based on a sample of 181 Chilean SMEs, a confirmatory factorial analysis (CFA was performed to analyze the relationship among constructs. The results show that the extension to which SMEs use different sources of knowledge to innovate depends on the interactions between MO components. This study addresses a gap in the literature, by linking and interrelating market orientation components to the innovation perspective in SMEs. Therefore, we provide insights into the role of each MO component in influencing the extension to which firms seek for and use different sources of knowledge to innovate and attempt to explain some literature inconsistencies on the theme.

  16. Open innovation: A preliminary model from the Knowledge-based Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío González-Sánchez

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The open innovation paradigm is an alternative and/or complementary way to knowledge management processes in its various stages, questioning the basic assumptions where some of the technological innovation strategies and processes are based on. The new logic of innovation process exploits knowledge dissemination through new innovation communities, on the one hand, and, considers of strategic value the external access to intangible resources. Thus, this approach supposes an alternative view to the traditional close innovation, focused on the exclusive exploitation of value innovations. This paper aims to contribute to building an integrated model of key factors to success in open innovation processes. It is analyzed for the role that certain key knowledge management decisions have on the results of open innovation projects, to facilitate the change process and provide new capacity or skills to do so. Design/methodology/approach: Through the review of theoretical and empirical literature, we show the main variables related to the functioning of open innovation systems, and establish various propositions about the meaning and intensity of such relationships.Findings: The management of open innovation project improves through three external factors: technical leadership based on experience, the intensive use of ICT, which allows a multilateral communication, and the existence of intermediate agents or facilitators with a strong neutral attitude. The results also depend on internal factors: the link function, the search routines, the establishment of incentive systems to encourage proactivity and organizational culture.Originality/value: In the absence of full proposals to guide effective decision making on both the management of relationships between organizations, as well as factors inherent to each of them, this paper proposes an exploratory model that integrates the key success factors in open innovation processes.

  17. Telemedicine: the slow revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncrief, Jack W

    2014-01-01

    The use of interactive video has been recognized as a means of delivering medical support to isolated areas since the 1950s. The Department of Defense recognized early the capacity of telemedicine to deliver medical care and support to front-line military personnel. In 1989, the Texas Telemedicine Project received grants and support from the then American Telephone and Telegraph Company (now AT&T) and the Meadows Foundation of Dallas, Texas, to establish and evaluate telemedicine delivery in central Texas. That project had 6 connected telemedicine sites: 3 in Austin, Texas, and 3 in Giddings, Texas (a small community 55 miles to the southeast of Austin). The sites in Giddings included a chronic outpatient dialysis facility, an inpatient psychiatric hospital, and the emergency department at Giddings Hospital. Patient contact began in April 1991 and continued through March 1993. During that period, data on the 1500 patient contacts made were recorded. After termination of the Texas Telemedicine Project, AT&T continued to provide the transmission lines, and between 1993 and 1996, another 12,000 patient contacts were made. Approximately 80% were dialysis evaluations and 20% were non-dialysis primary care contacts. The original cost of materials and equipment in the Texas Telemedicine Project exceeded $50,000 per site. Today, a secure Internet connection with full-motion video and wireless data transfer to almost any location in the world is achievable with an iPad. Multiple inexpensive applications with connections for electrocardiogram, otoscope, and stethoscope, among others, make this technology extremely inexpensive and user-friendly. The revolution now is rapidly moving forward, with Medicare reimbursing telemedicine contacts in medically underserved areas. Multiple bills are before Congress to expand Medicare and therefore private insurance payment for this service.

  18. Innovative teaching methods for capacity building in knowledge translation

    OpenAIRE

    Wahabi, Hayfaa A; Al-Ansary, Lubna A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background In some current healthcare settings, there is a noticeable absence of national institutions committed to the synthesis and use of evidence in healthcare decision- and policy-making. This absence creates a need to broaden the responsibilities of healthcare providers to include knowledge brokering and advocacy in order to optimize knowledge translation to other stakeholders, especially policy-makers. However, this process requires practitioners and researchers to acquire cer...

  19. Education for Knowledge Society: Learning and Scientific Innovation Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander O. Karpov

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive-active learning research-type environment is the fundamental component of the education system for the knowledge society. The purpose of the research is the development of conceptual bases and a constructional model of a cognitively active learning environment that stimulates the creation of new knowledge and its socio-economic application. Research methods include epistemic-didactic analysis of empirical material collected as a result of the study of research environments at school...

  20. Enhancing innovation between scientific and indigenous knowledge: pioneer NGOs in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laplante Julie

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Until recently, little attention has been paid to local innovation capacity as well as management practices and institutions developed by communities and other local actors based on their traditional knowledge. This paper doesn't focus on the results of scientific research into innovation systems, but rather on how local communities, in a network of supportive partnerships, draw knowledge for others, combine it with their own knowledge and then innovate in their local practices. Innovation, as discussed in this article, is the capacity of local stakeholders to play an active role in innovative knowledge creation in order to enhance local health practices and further environmental conservation. In this article, the innovative processes through which this capacity is created and reinforced will be defined as a process of "ethnomedicine capacity". Methods The field study undertaken by the first author took place in India, in the State of Tamil Nadu, over a period of four months in 2007. The data was collected through individual interviews and focus groups and was complemented by participant observations. Results The research highlights the innovation capacity related to ethnomedical knowledge. As seen, the integration of local and scientific knowledge is crucial to ensure the practices anchor themselves in daily practices. The networks created are clearly instrumental to enhancing the innovation capacity that allows the creation, dissemination and utilization of 'traditional' knowledge. However, these networks have evolved in very different forms and have become entities that can fit into global networks. The ways in which the social capital is enhanced at the village and network levels are thus important to understand how traditional knowledge can be used as an instrument for development and innovation. Conclusion The case study analyzed highlights examples of innovation systems in a developmental context. They demonstrate that

  1. Information and communication technology and user knowledge-driven innovation in services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Y. Park

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available User knowledge has been an important source of novel product development and innovation, but gathering accurate user knowledge has been time consuming and difficult because user knowledge is tacit and globally dispersed. However, information and communication technology can expand the boundaries by making user knowledge easier and less expensive to access. Structures and organizations are emerging to perform the task of user information gathering. This paper examines the nature of user knowledge and the emergence of a new system/structure for user knowledge gathering and user involvement in innovation. Three case studies of business innovation in three different organizations illustrate the ways that the organization matches the type of innovation with the characteristics of user knowledge. User involvement can occur either through direct input or via feedback provided after customers received services. User input can also be either proactive or reactive. User knowledge is often employed to monitor service workers also, which has significantly contributed to recent improvement in service quality. The cases presented support our proposition.

  2. A Study of Innovative Entrepreneurial Talents of Business and Management: Knowledge, Ability and Quality Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yurong; Wang, Wenhua

    2011-01-01

    It has been an urgent mission for universities and institutes to instruct the students with enterprise knowledge and cultivate high quality entrepreneurial talents with innovation. The paper discusses the knowledge, ability and quality structure of talents of economics and administration with a purpose to achieve the goal of innovative…

  3. Artificial Intelligence Base Telemedicine Robotic

    OpenAIRE

    Hakika, Kisti; TS, Hendra Yunianto; Afriyanti, Liza

    2009-01-01

    Telemedicine atau pelayanan kesehatan jarak jauh bukan hal yang baru lagi dalam dunia kesehatan.Penggunaan teknologi sangat membantu dalam mengimplementasikan telemedicine. Namun perkembangantelemedicine mengalami kemajuan seiring dengan perkembangan teknologi informasi. Salah satu perkembanganteknologi adalah robot. Secara umum kegunaan robot adalah untuk menggantikan tugas manusia. Padamakalah ini, akan dibuat simulasi telemedicine berupa konsultasi antara dokter dan pasien menggunakansebua...

  4. Knowledge evaluation : A new aim for knowledge management to enhance sustainable innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, K.; Maruster, L.; Jorna, R.J.J.M.; Remenyi, D

    2007-01-01

    Sustainability is a topic that presently forces organizations to strive for innovation. Sustainable innovation relates to organizational measures to gain more sustainable outcomes and processes from a social and ecological point of view (People, Planet 8 Profit, i.e. the three Ps, Elkington 1997).

  5. THE JOURNEY TO COMPETITIVENESS: EU SPEEDING UP ON THE ROAD PAVED WITH KNOWLEDGE AND INNOVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oprescu Raluca

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In the attempt to boost its international competitiveness, the European Union realized that it should enrich the ways to achieve it by using the intangible assets that it holds. Knowledge and intellectual capital, innovation, science and entrepreneurship are key drivers of economic development and renewal. The traditional resources on which economies rely on are scarce, while these ones are abundant and steady. Moreover, this type of assets can easily increase their value through sharing and they trigger multiplicative effects in the economy. The paper tackles these issues and makes an assessment of the degree of innovation in the EU. The study aims to provide an answer to the question of whether EU's overall performance proves that it is truly driven by knowledge and innovation or not. Using a qualitative method of research, this paper identifies innovation patterns of the member states from a geographical perspective. In order to provide a compelling analysis, the data ranges from indicators capturing science and technology activities, firm innovation to the internationalization of research activities and the tertiary-level graduates. The results show substantial discrepancies between the European countries and reveal that knowledge flows scaled by the level of innovation are a localized phenomenon, therefore some countries are more innovation-oriented and they reap the benefits better.

  6. Knowledge networks: socio-environmental innovation regional systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Macedo Valinhas

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to evaluate knowledge networks by analyzing actions executed by two socio-environmental projects designed to improve life of fishermen communities in Macaé, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The network structure was studied in terms of institutional representatives, regional character, types of network, flow and kinds of knowledge, formal and informal network aspects, and development of technical confidence. Despite the need for improving the network connectivity in the two evaluated projects, and adapting them to emphasize decentralization, multi-leadership, transparence, cooperation and interdependence principles, the studied network has provided an increase in the knowledge flow of participants and closer contact among technical staff, researches and social segments badly affected by the extremely accelerated urban growth resulting from local oil industry activities.

  7. Knowledge Preservation and Consolidation through an Innovative Multimedia Tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corniani, E.

    2013-01-01

    The JRC (Joint Research Centre) is the European Commission’s in-house science service. It provides the science for policy decisions, with a view to ensuring that the EU achieves its Europe 2020 goals for a productive economy as well as a safe, secure and sustainable future. The JRC plays a key role in the European Research Area and reinforces its multi-disciplinarity by networking extensively with leading scientific organisations in the Member States, Associated Countries and worldwide. The presentation is about • JRC methodology in Knowledge Preservation; • A Multimedia tool developed for preserving knowledge on WWER reactors; • EC involvement on Fast Reactors

  8. Making knowledge work : Intra-firm Networks, Gifts, and Innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolfsma, W.A.

    2008-01-01

    Exchanging knowledge between individuals working in a firm, between but even within divisions, does not occur automatically (Szulanski 1996). It is not obvious that people exchange ideas, point each other to information that the other might use, or give feedback, even when they have no evil motives

  9. The role of innovative global institutions in linking knowledge and action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kerkhoff, Lorrae; Szlezák, Nicole A

    2016-04-26

    It is becoming increasingly recognized that our collective ability to tackle complex problems will require the development of new, adaptive, and innovative institutional arrangements that can deal with rapidly changing knowledge and have effective learning capabilities. In this paper, we applied a knowledge-systems perspective to examine how institutional innovations can affect the generation, sharing, and application of scientific and technical knowledge. We report on a case study that examined the effects that one large innovative organization, The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria, is having on the knowledge dimensions of decision-making in global health. The case study shows that the organization created demand for new knowledge from a range of actors, but it did not incorporate strategies for meeting this demand into their own rules, incentives, or procedures. This made it difficult for some applicants to meet the organization's dual aims of scientific soundness and national ownership of projects. It also highlighted that scientific knowledge needed to be integrated with managerial and situational knowledge for success. More generally, the study illustrates that institutional change targeting implementation can also significantly affect the dynamics of knowledge creation (learning), access, distribution, and use. Recognizing how action-oriented institutions can affect these dynamics across their knowledge system can help institutional designers build more efficient and effective institutions for sustainable development.

  10. A Conceptual Framework for Analyzing the Relations between Demand and Public Procurement for Innovation and between Knowledge-intensive Entrepreneurship and Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermans, Bram; Zabala, Jon Mikel; Edquist, Charles

    2010-01-01

    ) in stimulating innovative knowledge-intensive initiatives should also examined in the different deliverables included in the WP. In the case of this particular deliverable, a theoretical framework focusing on the links between demand and public innovative procurement and knowledge intensive entrepreneurship...

  11. The influence of knowledge flow on sustainable innovation in a project-based industry : From demonstration to limited adoption of eco-innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossink, Bart

    2018-01-01

    The effect of the flow of knowledge on sustainable innovation in project-based firms in project-based industries is the subject of in-depth research in this paper. It studies the simultaneous functioning and effects of knowledge flow mechanisms on sustainable innovation in project-based firms in

  12. Product development, strategy, product innovation performance, and the mediating role of knowledge utilization : evidence from subsidiares in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Junfeng; Benedetto, Di A.C.; Hoenig, S.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the interplay of product development strategy, knowledge utilization, and product innovation performance in the context of Chinese subsidiaries of multinational companies. When firms strive to develop highly innovative products (breakthrough focus), the amount of resources

  13. Towards a National Innovation System in México Based on Knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Helios Feria, Victor; Hidalgo Nuchera, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    In the last years, the research in diverse disciplines has increased the importance of innovation studies at the national level. In this sense, this paper proposes the development of National Innovation Systems (NIS) and its application to the economy in Mexico. Considering the characteristics and limitations of the study region, the mentioned proposal of NIS it is necessary to integrate the study of Knowledge-Based Economies (KBE) approach to study of the different approaches developed about...

  14. Telemedicine in otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtel, Michael R; Burgess, Lawrence P A

    2002-12-01

    More research is needed in otolaryngology telemedicine, but it would be a mistake to stop at only determining if telemedicine is as good as an in-person exam. The digital image recorded in a telemedicine encounter can be manipulated to increase diagnostic information not currently available. Radiologists currently take a chest radiograph in which a chest mass or the tip of an nasogastric tube is difficult to visualize, and by inverting the gray scale or viewing other digital manipulations of that image, the mass or tube tip becomes obvious. Examples in otolaryngology might include images of the larynx manipulated to better demonstrate the inflamed tissue of reflux, or images of the tympanic membrane manipulated to better demonstrate early retraction. Despite dramatic and likely continued decreases, equipment cost is still an issue. Current research points to good consumer acceptance, and certainly with each new generation the technology is more readily accepted. As Nesbitt [4] points out, it is certainly not difficult to look to the future and see ubiquitous broadband with video as common as telephone, or even extreme broadband enabling robotics and virtual reality TV with three-dimensional touch. Robotics and genomics will eventually play a greater role in telemedicine and our lives in general. Applications for remote diagnosis in biologic warfare defense and homeland security are currently raising interest in telemedicine. Telemedicine will be combined with new technological advances such as virtual "fly-through" computerized axial tomography examinations. Instead of performing an exploratory tympanotomy, surgeons will use computer programs to "fly through" and examine all aspects of a patient's middle or even inner ear. Spectral imaging of the eardrum, larynx, or oropharynx will immediately identify bacteria without cultures, or gram stain, and potential malignancy without biopsy. By measuring fluorescence emitted from an oropharynx illuminated with a specific

  15. Scaling up Telemedicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jannie Kristine Bang; Nielsen, Jeppe Agger; Gustafsson, Jeppe

    through negotiating, mobilizing coalitions, and legitimacy building. To illustrate and further develop this conceptualization, we build on insights from a longitudinal case study (2008-2014) and provide a rich empirical account of how a Danish telemedicine pilot was transformed into a large......-scale telemedicine project through simultaneous translation and theorization efforts in a cross-sectorial, politicized social context. Although we focus on upscaling as a bottom up process (from pilot to large scale), we argue that translation and theorization, and associated political behavior occurs in a broader...

  16. Knowledge Mobilization, Collaboration, and Social Innovation: Leveraging Investments in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Nichols

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This article is a qualitative literature synthesis in the areas of community-campus collaborations, knowledge mobilization and social innovation. The article aims to be useful to people who work in academic settings, community organizations, public institutions, and government. The authors utilized a purposive sampling methodology to explore the following questions: 1. How can university-based knowledge mobilization leverage investments in higher education research and development (R&D through community-campus collaboration and social innovation? 2. What is the role of university-wide knowledge mobilization projects in supporting community-campus connections and ultimately social innovation strategies that contribute to the public good? Our review indicates considerable interplay between community-campus collaborations, knowledge mobilization and social innovation given that knowledge mobilization facilitates – and is facilitated by – collaboration. With sufficient knowledge mobilization, community-campus collaborations stimulate social innovation. The article concludes with recommendations based on our review of the literature.RÉSUMÉCet article se fonde sur une synthèse littéraire qualitative portant sur les collaborations communautaires/académiques, la mobilisation du savoir et l’innovation sociale. Il se veut utile pour toute personne travaillant dans un milieu académique, un organisme communautaire ou une institution publique. Les auteurs ont recours à une méthode d’échantillonnage raisonné pour répondre aux questions suivantes : 1. Comment la mobilisation du savoir universitaire – au moyen de la collaboration communautaire/académique et de l’innovation sociale – peut-elle faire augmenter les investissements en recherche et développement dans l’enseignement supérieur? 2. Comment les projets de mobilisation du savoir universitaire peuvent-ils resserrer les liens entre campus et communauté et, en fin de compte

  17. Cross-border knowledge transfer and innovation in the European neighbourhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makkonen, Teemu; Williams, Allan; Weidenfeld, Adi

    2018-01-01

    . This research gap is addressed here via interview data collected from participants in tourism related EU-funded projects in the Finnish-Russian cross-border region. These underline the importance of EU-funding in facilitating knowledge transfer and innovation between Finland and Russia. While language issues......Knowledge transfer and innovation cooperation between the EU and its neighbours has remained weakly developed. To promote this cooperation, the EU has set up initiatives for the European neighbourhood. The issue has, however, received very limited scholarly attention in the field of tourism......, and differences in business culture and administrative/legislative systems between the two countries, constitute barriers for practical cross-border cooperation, it is cross-border differences in culture and technological capabilities that drive cross-border knowledge transfer and innovation in the cross...

  18. Organisation, ‘anchoring’ of knowledge, and innovation in the construction industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drejer, Ina; Vinding, Anker Lund

    2004-01-01

    explanation for the relatively poor innovation performance of the industry. Using survey data from the Danish construction industry the paper investigates the importance of learning and ?anchoring? of project specific knowledge within the firms for facilitating engagement in innovative activities...... at the firm level. The data refer to the overall Danish construction industry, as well as a specific region, North Jutland, which is relatively specialised in construction. By using latent class and regression analysis the results show that firms, which to a high extent make use of partnering and other...... interorganisational features, combined with internal product and process evaluation and knowledge diffusion, are more likely to engage in innovative activities than firms that make less use of what we label ?knowledge anchoring mechanisms?. This indicates that there are ways for firms to compensate for the problems...

  19. Drive Cost Reduction, Increase Innovation and Mitigate Risk with Advanced Knowledge Discovery Tools Designed to Unlock and Leverage Prior Knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, I.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The nuclear industry is knowledge-intensive and includes a diverse number of stakeholders. Much of this knowledge is at risk as engineers, technicians and project professionals retire, leaving a widening skills and information gap. This knowledge is critical in an increasingly complex environment with information from past projects often buried in decades-old, non-integrated systems enterprise. Engineers can spend 40% or more of their time searching for answers across the enterprise instead of solving problems. The inability to access trusted industry knowledge results in increased risk and expense. Advanced knowledge discovery technologies slash research times by as much as 75% and accelerate innovation and problem solving by giving technical professionals access to the information they need, in the context of the problems they are trying to solve. Unlike traditional knowledge management approaches, knowledge discovery tools powered by semantic search technologies are adept at uncovering answers in unstructured data and require no tagging, organization or moving of data, meaning a smaller IT footprint and faster time-to-knowledge. This session will highlight best-in-class knowledge discovery technologies, content, and strategies to give nuclear industry organizations the ability to leverage the corpus of enterprise knowledge into the future. (author

  20. The evolution of telemedicine and nano-technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong Kyun; Young Jung, Eun; Chan Moon, Byung

    2012-10-01

    This paper will cover definition and history of telemedicine, changes in medical paradigm and roll of telemedicine and roll of nano-technology for evolution of telemedicine. Hypothetically, telemedicine is distance communication for medical purpose and modern definition explains telemedicine as `a system of health care delivery in which physicians examine distant patients through the use of telecommunications technology. Medical service will change to personalized medicine based on gene information to prevent and manage diseases due to decrease of acute diseases, population aging and increase of prevalence in chronic diseases, which means current medical services based on manualized treatment for diseases will change to personalized medicine based on individual gene information. Also, international healthcare will be activated to provide high quality medical services with low cost using developed transportation. Moreover, hospital centered medical services will change to patients centered medical service due to increase of patient's rights. Development in sensor technology is required for telemedicine to be applied as basic infrastructure for medical services. Various researches in nano-biosensor field are conducted due to introduction of new technologies. However, most researches are in fundamental levels that requires more researches for stability and clinical usefulness. Nano technology is expected to achieve innovative development and define new criteria for disease prevention and management.

  1. Towards reinforcing telemedicine adoption amongst clinicians in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adenuga, Kayode I; Iahad, Noorminshah A; Miskon, Suraya

    2017-08-01

    Telemedicine systems have been considered as a necessary measure to alleviate the shortfall in skilled medical specialists in developing countries. However, the obvious challenge is whether clinicians are willing to use this technological innovation, which has aided medical practice globally. One factor which has received little academic attention is the provision of suitable encouragement for clinicians to adopt telemedicine, in the form of rewards, motivation or incentives. A further consideration for telemedicine usage in developing countries, especially sub-Saharan Africa and Nigeria in particular, are to the severe shortage of available practising clinicians. The researchers therefore explore the need to positively reinforce the adoption of telemedicine amongst clinicians in Nigeria, and also offer a rationale for this using the UTAUT model. Data were collected using a structured paper-based questionnaire, with 252 physicians and nurses from six government hospitals in Ondo state, Nigeria. The study applied SmartPLS 2.0 for analysis to determine the relationship between six variables. Demographic moderating variables, age, gender and profession, were included. The results indicate that performance expectancy (ptelemedicine systems, as predicted using the extended UTAUT model. Our results showed that the use of telemedicine by clinicians in the Nigerian context is perceived as a dual responsibility which requires suitable reinforcement. In addition, performance expectancy, effort expectancy, facilitating condition and reinforcement determinants are influential factors in the use of telemedicine services for remote-patient clinical diagnosis and management by the Nigerian clinicians. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Combining artefact analysis, interview and participant observation to study the organizational sensemaking of knowledge-based innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Reischauer, Georg

    2015-01-01

    "Innovation studies have hardly investigated the link between innovation and organization with respect to what individual actors in organizations mean when they refer to innovation. More precisely, there are few research designs with the goal to understand (Verstehen) the meaning of innovation in organizations. To address this gap on a methodological level, I introduce an interpretative research design to study the organizational sense-making of innovation. Informed by the knowledge-based vie...

  3. Innovative Approaches to Knowledge Management in EDF Energy Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.; Robinson, P.; Roberts, A.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Organizational learning is a key discipline in the safe, sustainable operation of civil nuclear fleet. In order to have an effective organizational learning culture a free flow of information is required. To facilitate this free flow of information and ideas EDF Energy Nuclear Generation created the concept of the Organizational Learning Portal (OLP). The OLP was created to remove existing barriers to knowledge sharing and allow easy exchange of information and ideas. To transfer existing data from legacy systems onto the OLP required a considerable effort, to ensure that information and knowledge was preserved and available to recall easily for future use. The OLP, was designed using the latest ‘App’ design to promote accessibility, in line with contemporary information portals and applications sites to ensure a positive and intuitive user journey. A key operational use of the OLP is for accelerated learning, after significant events, e.g., reactor Trips or SCRAM. Additional functionality within the OLP allows implementation of video OPEX and cataloguing of information sources. The OLP was recognized in the 2015 Operational and Safety Assessment Readiness Team as a Best Practice. (author

  4. Innovative methods of knowledge transfer by multimedia library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goanta, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    The present situation of teaching and learning new knowledge taught in the classroom is highly variable depending on the specific topics concerned. If we analyze the manifold ways of teaching / learning at university level, we can notice a very good combination between classical and modern methods. The first category includes the classic chalk blackboard teaching, followed by the also classical learning based on paper reference material. The second category includes books published in PDF or PPT [1], which are printed on the type backing CD / DVD. Since 2006 the author was concerned about the transfer of information and knowledge through video files like AVI, FLV or MPEG using various means of transfer, from the free ones (via Internet) and continuing with those involving minimal costs, i.e. on CD / DVD support. Encouraged by the students’ interest in this kind of teaching material as proved by monitoring [2] the site http://www.cursuriuniversitarebraila.ugal.ro, the author has managed to publish with ISBN the first video book in Romania, which has a non conformist content in that the chapters are located not by paging but by the hour or minutes of shooting when they were made.

  5. MARKETING AND INNOVATION IN ENVIRONMENT BANKING FINANCIAL - REQUIREMENTS IN A KNOWLEDGE-BASED SOCIETY AND TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIRCEA VALERIA ARINA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the context of knowledge-based economy and society has acquired a connotation marketing role vital for all fields. Evolution of social, cultural, political and economic, information, design and conduct of marketing activities contribute to increasing the efficiency of any institution. Evolution of marketing over time provoked the great researchers who have tried to define the concept of their views, but only surprising aspects of this vast and important field. The definitions are different as shown in the article approach, the essence is the same. In the banking and financial role of marketing is to continually improve the quality of customer services and products offered by formulating appropriate marketing strategies so as to be able to influence The consumer buying behavior. Customer focus, his loyalty and not least an innovative marketing that starts at the client key aspects FEATURES today. The emphasis on innovation and ingenuity in order to: create new banking services and products, ways to attract customers; loyalty of existing ones, defining marketing and communication strategies lead to appropriate strategies to maximize the results of innovative marketing campaigns. Referring to work in the banking environment we can say that innovation is the key to success BANK and are based on: product and service innovations, process innovations, organizational innovations, and not least of marketing innovations.

  6. The overlooked knowledge: exploring knowledge circulation in the scaling up of Local Innovation: the case of beehive construction and queen replacement in Enebsie District, Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Getnet, A.

    2008-01-01

    The study here is set out to explore the facilitating and restraining factors for knowledge circulation in the scaling up of local innovation taking beehive and queen replacement innovation as case of the study in Enebsie district, Amhara region, Ethiopia. Appreciating farmers’ innovations and

  7. Knowledge economy readiness, innovativeness and competitiveness of the Western Balkan countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetanović Slobodan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Western Balkan countries have set themselves the goal to join the European Union as soon as possible. Accordingly, they must adjust the key components of their development policies to the Europe 2020 strategy, focusing on key priorities such as smart, sustainable and inclusive growth. This paper explores the relationship among knowledge economy readiness, innovativeness, and competitiveness of six Western Balkan countries (Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Macedonia, Serbia, Croatia, and Montenegro and the group of six selected neighboring EU countries (Austria, Bulgaria, Greece, Hungary, Romania, and Slovenia. The paper relies on the data obtained from the Knowledge Economy Index of the World Bank Institute, INSEAD's Global Innovation Index and the Global Competitiveness Index of the World Economic Forum for 2013. Obtained data from all three sources indicated significantly lower readiness for the development of economy based on knowledge, innovation and competitiveness in the Western Balkans countries in comparison to the selected EU countries. The analysis of the interdependence of the aforementioned variables points to: a statistically significant correlation between the indicator knowledge economy index and the global innovation index for both groups of countries; b statistically significant linear correlation between innovativeness and innovation efficiency ratio for the Western Balkan countries. Conversely, no respective correlation has been registered for the group of selected EU countries; c no statistically significant correlation between the global innovation index and the global competitiveness index in the Western Balkan countries, while in respect of the group of selected EU countries, the existence of significant linear correlation between these variables has been revealed.

  8. Telemedicine for wound management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi K Chittoria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The escalating physiological, psychological, social and financial burdens of wounds and wound care on patients, families and society demand the immediate attention of the health care sector. Many forces are affecting the changes in health care provision for patients with chronic wounds, including managed care, the limited number of wound care therapists, an increasingly ageing and disabled population, regulatory and malpractice issues, and compromised care. The physician is also faced with a number of difficult issues when caring for chronic wound patients because their conditions are time consuming and high risk, represent an unprofitable part of care practice and raise issues of liability. Telemedicine enhances communication with the surgical wound care specialist. Digital image for skin lesions is a safe, accurate and cost-effective referral pathway. The two basic modes of telemedicine applications, store and forward (asynchronous transfer and real-time transmission (synchronous transfer, e.g. video conference, are utilized in the wound care setting. Telemedicine technology in the hands of an experienced physician can streamline management of a problem wound. Although there is always an element of anxiety related to technical change, the evolution of wound care telemedicine technology has demonstrated a predictable maturation process.

  9. Telemedicine in the 'Hood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgrably, Jordan

    1998-01-01

    Telemedicine, the ability to examine patients while physically removed from them by using high-tech virtual treatment, is used increasingly to diagnose and prescribe treatment for patients in nontraditional settings. In Los Angeles (California), Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and King-Drew Medical Center communicate in real time with…

  10. Current Landscape of Telemedicine Practice in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Seema A; Cross, Raymond K

    2018-04-28

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), comprised of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, affects 1.6 million people in the United States. Although effective medical treatments exist to treat the disease, outcomes are still suboptimal. The reasons for poor outcomes vary but include nonadherence to therapy, inadequate monitoring of patients, limited access to IBD specialty care, concurrent psychiatric disease, limited patient knowledge of the disease and treatments, and patient provider discordance. Telemedicine is a candidate intervention that can be used to improve patient outcomes through more frequent monitoring, patient self-management, delivery of education (patient and provider), and to increase access to multidisciplinary IBD care. Telemedicine includes remote monitoring, telehealth, teleconsultation, and teleconferencing.Telemedicine systems have been used in patients with IBD with widespread patient acceptance of the technology. However, early clinical trials demonstrated high attrition rates among intervention patients. In general, use of telemedicine systems have been associated with improved quality of life, improved patient knowledge, and decreased utilization of health care resources. Early studies evaluating telehealth visits report high patient satisfaction, decreased indirect costs to patients, and no decrease in quality of care delivered.Due to widespread access to computers and smart phones among patients, telemedicine will continue to expand in the care of patients with IBD. To optimize use and effectiveness of telemedicine, barriers for use including concerns over increased liability, need for informed consent, licensure restrictions to providing interstate telehealth visits, and cybersecurity need to be addressed.

  11. WAP - based telemedicine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, K.; Zhang, Y.T.

    2001-01-01

    Telemedicine refers to the utilization of telecommunication technology for medical diagnosis, treatment, and patient care. Its aim is to provide expert-based health care to remote sites through telecommunication and information technologies. The significant advances in technologies have enabled the introduction of a broad range of telemedicine applications, which are supported by computer networks, wireless communication, and information superhighway. For example, some hospitals are using tele-radiology for remote consultation. Such a system includes medical imaging devices networked with computers and databases. Another growing area is patient monitoring, in which sensors are used to acquire biomedical signals, such as electrocardiogram (ECG), blood pressure, and body temperature, from a remote patient, who could be in bed or moving freely. The signals are then relayed to remote systems for viewing and analysis. Telemedicine can be divided into two basic modes of operations: real-time mode, in which the patient data can be accessed remotely in real-time, and store-and-forward mode, in which the acquired data does not have to be accessed immediately. In the recent years, many parties have demonstrated various telemedicine applications based on the Internet and cellular phone as these two fields have been developing rapidly. A current, recognizable trend in telecommunication is the convergence of wireless communication and computer network technologies. This has been reflected in recently developed telemedicine systems. For example, in 1998 J. Reponen, et al. have demonstrated transmission and display of computerized tomography (CT) examinations using a remote portable computer wirelessly connected to a computer network through TCP/IP on a GSM cellular phone. Two years later, they carried out the same tests with a GSM-based wireless personal digital assistant (PDA). The WAP (Wireless Application Protocol) Forum was founded in 1997 to create a global protocol

  12. Designing Telemedicine Systems for Geriatric Patients: A Review of the Usability Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimha, Shraddhaa; Madathil, Kapil Chalil; Agnisarman, Sruthy; Rogers, Hunter; Welch, Brandon; Ashok, Aparna; Nair, Aswathi; McElligott, James

    2017-06-01

    One area where telemedicine may prove to be highly effective is in providing medical care to the geriatric population, an age group predicted to account for 20% of the population in the near future. However, even though telemedicine has certain advantages, the usability of these systems with this population merits investigation. This article reviews the literature published from 2000 to 2016 with the goal of analyzing the characteristics of usability-related studies conducted using geriatric participants and the subsequent usability challenges identified. Articles were found using Web of Knowledge and PubMed citation indexing portals using the keywords (1) Telemedicine* AND Geriatrics* (2) Telemedicine* AND Usability* (3) Telemedicine* AND Usability* AND Older Adults*. A total of 297 articles were obtained from the initial search. After further detailed screening, 16 articles were selected for review based on the inclusion criteria. Of these, 60% of the studies focused on the overall usability of telemedicine systems; 6.25% focused on the usability of a telepresence robot; 12.5% compared a face-to-face medical consultation with the use of telemedicine systems, and 25% focused on the study of other aspects of telemedicine in addition to its usability. Findings reported in the studies included high patient satisfaction with telemedicine in 31.25%, whereas another 31.25% indicated a high acceptance of this method of medical consultation. Care coordination in 6.25% of the studies; confidence in telemedicine in 6.25%; trust, privacy, and reliability in 6.25%; and increased convenience when compared to personal visits in 18.75% were also reported. This review suggests limited research providing scientifically valid and reproducible usability evaluation at various stages of telemedicine system development. Telemedicine system designers need to consider the age-related issues in cognition, perception, and behavior of geriatric patients while designing telemedicine

  13. Telemedicine is helping the parents of children with neurodevelopmental disorders living in remote and deprived areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckey, Ruth; Domingues-Montanari, Sophie

    2017-08-01

    Telecommunication technologies are advancing rapidly with huge investment to improve infrastructure in rural areas. Telemedicine brings the benefits of telecommunication to healthcare, especially in resource-limited and remote communities. The recent literature on telemedicine in paediatrics will be reviewed, with particular focus on its application to help children with neurodevelopmental disorders and their families living in remote regions and/or low-income countries, and gaps identified for future research. Studies show that telemedicine can enable a family's access to appropriately qualified help that physically may only be available hundreds of miles away, helping to overcome geographic barriers. Telemedicine can also train parents and equip them with the knowledge and skills to better care for their children. Despite some technological barriers to implementation, telemedicine can help transform all stages of autism treatment. However, more studies are required in low- and middle-income countries to fully elucidate the benefits offered by telemedicine to autistic children and their families.

  14. Inter-Organizational Knowledge Conversion and Innovative Capacity in Cooperative Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Trincade Caldas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the current business and management environments, organizations are challenged to search for new ways of working focused on findings and practical innovation. In this sense, knowledge management constitutes a tool to support the practices of innovation, which are facilitated by the existence of physical, virtual or mental spaces, called Ba's, where knowledge can be better used. The objective of this paper is to analyze the dynamics of inter-organizational knowledge conversion into existing Ba spaces in a cooperative network. The data analysis was performed from the triangulation of primary and secondary data and from the non-participant observation, within specific variables. The results point that the network displays an unfavorable configuration regarding the favorable characteristics to dynamics of knowledge conversion, which influences negatively its performance, especially the intensity and quality of information.

  15. From static to dynamic use of knowledge transfer objects and its effect on innovation performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sajadirad, Solmaz; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum

    2016-01-01

    Many different tools (objects) are applied by companies to transfer knowledge to globally distributed subsidiaries. Nevertheless, tapping into the local knowledge of subsidiaries and transforming this into innovation capabilities remains a challenge for many multinational companies. In this paper......, we aim to discuss how different approach to the use of knowledge transfer objects can affect companies’ abilities to obtain the subsidiaries’ knowledge and utilize it to different degrees of innovation performance. For this purpose, we adopted a multiple case study approach consisting of ten...... multinational companies located in Denmark. Based on literature review and empirical evidence, we discuss that inter-firm objects can be considered as boundary objects if they support specific circumstances, i.e., interactions and negotiations, collaboration, shared understanding and identity...

  16. Evolution of Knowledge Management: From Expert Systems to Innovation 2.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karagiannis, Dimitris

    2014-01-01

    Open Innovation 2.0 takes full advantage of cross-fertilisation of ideas and drives for experimentation and prototyping in real world, to speed up and increase the potential for innovation. It is a catalytic, positive approach for innovation which helps solving key European challenges by embracing change, not resisting it! We drive the Open Innovation 2.0 paradigm towards recognition and adoption in Europe, in all sectors. The Open Innovation Strategy and Policy Group (OISPG) works on increasing knowledge and ICT intense sectors to respond to highly open and competitive ecosystems needed to create new markets and ICT and knowledge based products and services. There are 5 key elements in the new innovation process: 1. Networking; 2. Collaboration involving partners, competitors, universities, and users; 3. Corporate Entrepreneurship, enhancing corporate venturing, start-ups and spin-offs; 4. Proactive Intellectual Property Management: to create markets for technology; 5. Research and Development (R and D): to achieve competitive advantages in the market

  17. Profiting from external knowledge : how firms use different knowledge acquisition strategies to improve their innovation performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batterink, M.H.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, innovation has become essential for the competitive advantage of firms in a growing number of industries. Due to the fast development of technologies, changing customer demands, shortening of product life cycles, increased global competition and changing regulations, modern firms

  18. Relating learning, knowledge creation and innovation: Case studies into knowledge productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keursten, P.; Verdonschot, S.G.M.; Kessels, Joseph; Kwakman, C.H.E.

    2006-01-01

    This study explores which learning processes contribute to the improvement and innovation of an organisation’s procedures, products and services. It aims to find the variables that promote or inhibit these learning processes. For this purpose a conceptual framework was developed. This framework

  19. Innovations in knowledge management the impact of social media, semantic web and cloud computing

    CERN Document Server

    Phillips-Wren, Gloria; Jain, Lakhmi

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses emerging trends in the field of managing knowledge work due to technological innovations. The book is organized in 3 sections. The first section, entitled "Managing Knowledge, Projects and Networks", discusses knowledge processes and their use, reuse or generation in the context of an organization. The second section, entitled "Managing Knowledge using Social Media", focuses on factors influencing adoption and usage, the role of social media in managing knowledge, and factors that influence employees' acceptance and participation. The third section brings into discussion new approaches and technologies for acquiring knowledge. The book will be useful to both academics engaged in research in knowledge management and practitioners who are considering or implementing strategies for managing one of their most important resources.

  20. The effect of knowledge management on organizational innovation: Evidence from banking industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Valipour

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge management is frequently identified as an important antecedent of innovation. However, few empirical studies have specifically addressed antecedents and consequences of effective knowledge management. Today, domestic organizations are compelled, as well as other international organizations and have to compete to stay in business environment. Hence, they must be innovative. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of knowledge management on employee's innovation in organizations through empowerment as a mediator for a case study of the Agricultural Bank of Qazvin province of Iran. Required information was gathered by a self-made questionnaire adapted and based on conceptual model adapted from previous studies. The population of this study consists of 369 employees of the Agricultural Bank of Qazvin. A total of 200 questionnaires were distributed, in which 188 valid questionnaires were collected. These questionnaires were distributed randomly among the male and female employees in branches of Agricultural Bank. The questionnaire is conducted by factor analysis and the reliability is measured by Cronbach's alpha. The structural equation modeling is used for data analysis. The results reveal the fact that empowerment will lead to employee's innovation. However, other variables did not have any significant and direct or indirect effect on employee's innovation.

  1. Ethnodrama: An Innovative Knowledge Translation Tool in the Management of Lymphedema

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Shahid; Quinlan, Elizabeth; McMullen, Linda; Thomas, Roanne; Fichtner, Pam; Block, Janice

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lymphedema can cause significant physical impairment and quality-of-life issues. Yet there is a gap in knowledge about lymphedema among breast cancer survivors (BCS), and health care professionals (HCP). Ethnodrama is an innovative knowledge translation strategy that uses theatrical performances for dissemination of research results. We evaluated the impact of live ethnodrama on HCP' and BCS' awareness and attitudes in relation to impact of lymphedema on BCS' lives. Methods: Ethno...

  2. Knowledge about knowledge[Technology innovation in petroleum industry]; Kunnskap om kunnskap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramm, Hans Henrik

    2006-07-01

    Technology and knowledge make up the knowledge capital that has been so essential to the oil and gas industry's value creation, competitiveness and internationalization. Report prepared for the Norwegian Oil Industry Association (OLF) and The Norwegian Society of Chartered Technical and Scientific Professionals (Tekna), on the Norwegian petroleum cluster as an environment for creating knowledge capital from human capital, how fiscal and other framework conditions may influence the building of knowledge capital, the long-term perspectives for the petroleum cluster, what Norwegian society can learn from the experiences in the petroleum cluster, and the importance of gaining more knowledge about the functionality of knowledge for increased value creation (author) (ml)

  3. Innovation and learning curves. Report on knowledge questions of the Working Group Energy and Climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoots, K.

    2010-05-01

    This report has been written on account of knowledge questions formulated by the Working Group Energy and Climate. This Working Group has been established in the framework of the Broad Reconsideration of Dutch government policy caused by the economic crisis of 2008-2009. Its task is to investigate the possibilities for a structural reduction of government spending by 20% on sustainable energy, energy saving and fiscal advantages carrying non-sustainable incentives. Apart from that, spending on policies aimed at mitigating climate change are scrutinized. In connection with this task, the working group has formulated knowledge questions which refer to cost effectiveness and possibilities for target achievement, possibilities within the European Renewables Directive and learning curves and innovation. This report addresses the latter two themes: learning curves and innovation. The selection of technologies assessed is not all-embracing, but based on the technologies within the SDE regulation (Dutch regulation on support for sustainable energy) supplemented by some promising innovations. [nl

  4. Obtaining Knowledge for Innovation: Benefits and Harms of Procedures for Managing Information Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Geraldo Pereira Barbosa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The research reported in this article aims to describe how the processes of information security used in a manufacturing and packaging paper company influenced the attainment of knowledge on two innovations. The study was conducted through field research, using interviews, narratives, direct observation and thematic analysis for data collection and data processing. The research started from the assumption that even considering the importance of managing information security and its benefits to an organization, the processes of logical security, and physical access controls, would undermine the process of obtaining and transference of knowledge required by innovations. It was observed the presence of five instruments of physical and logical security: "confidentiality", "general control of protection", "antivirus", "backups" and "facility security procedures" which did not interfere negatively in obtaining knowledge. The single barrier identified for the transfer of knowledge was the lack of absorptive capacity of knowledge workers. Therefore, the case describes a situation where a clearly and consistent information security policy allowed the obtaining and transferring of knowledge necessary for innovation. In other words, the assumption of the research was rejected by the findings.

  5. Knowledge Organisations and High-Tech Regional Innovation Systems in Developing Countries: Evidence from Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Pasciaroni

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the globally and knowledge based economy, the universities and other knowledge organisations are valued for their ability to contribute to the regional innovation processes. This is particularly relevant for the developing countries in South America since their R&D spending is highly concentrated on the public knowledge infrastructure. However, there are few studies examining the role of knowledge organizations at regional level in Latin America. The proposed study aims to analyse the role played by knowledge organisations in the formation of a high-tech Regional Innovation Systems in Argentina. This country has a number of attractive features relative to the positive evolution of its R&D spending and the recent implementation of a policy that promotes cooperation between firms and knowledge organisations among high-tech sectors. As evidenced in developed regions, the organisations under study play a key role in the promotion of a high-tech Regional Innovation Systems. However, this prominent role is not based on those local factors identified in the literature, such as organisational and institutional local assets, but on national science and technology policies and individual initiatives conducted by the faculties involved.

  6. Integrating telemedicine and telehealth: putting it all together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Ronald S; Lopez, Ana Maria; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Beinar, Sandra J; Holcomb, Michael; McNeely, Richard A; Latifi, Rifat; Barker, Gail

    2008-01-01

    organizations. Telemedicine programs should perform ongoing assessments of activities, ranging from service usage to quality of service assessments, to ongoing analyses of financial performance. The financial assessments should include evaluations of costs and benefits, coding issues, reimbursement, account receivables, bad debt and network utilization. Long-range strategic planning for a telemedicine and telehealth program should be carried out on an on-going basis and should include the program's governing board. This planning process should include goal setting and the periodic updating of the program's vision and mission statements. There can be additional special issues for multi-organization telemedicine and telehealth programs. For example, authority management can require the use of innovative approaches tailored to the realities of the organizational structures of the participating members. Inter-institutional relations may introduce additional issues when competing health care organizations are utilizing shared resources. Branding issues are preferably addressed during the initial planning of a multi-organizational telemedicine and telehealth program. Ideally, public policy regarding telemedicine and telehealth within a service region will complement the objectives of telemedicine and telehealth programs within that service area.

  7. Knowledge transfer and innovation in cross-border cooperation programmes between Finland and Russia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makkonen, Teemu; Williams, Allan; Weidenfeld, Adi

    2017-01-01

    Cross-border cooperation (CBC) at the European Union’s (EU) external borders has been promoted via programmes, such as the European Neighbourhood and Partnership Instrument (ENPI), funded jointly by the EU and participating countries. However, little empirical attention has been laid to these pro...... the actors in opposing sides of the border, is actually the main factor that facilitates and creates potential for learning, knowledge transfer and innovation to take place in the Finnish-Russian cross-border region....... to these programmes in terms of their role in enhancing cross-border knowledge transfer and innovation, particularly in the field of tourism. To shed light on the issue, semi-structured interviews were conducted with representatives of (12 Russian; 12 Finnish) organisations that had participated in ENPI CBC funded...... tourism related Finnish-Russian cross-border projects. The results shed light on the possibilities of and obstacles to cross-border knowledge transfer and innovation. ENPI CBC programmes between Finland and Russia are highly relevant for successful cross-border knowledge transfer and innovation...

  8. Managing innovation in regional supply networks : a Dutch case of "knowledge industry clustering"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.P.J.H.; Batenburg, R.S.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a case study on the collaboration between Océ, a large Dutch manufacturer of copiers and printers, and several of its lead suppliers within the so-called "knowledge industry clustering" (KIC) project. In 1993 Océ initiated this project to enable innovation by creating

  9. Replication of innovation in professional service firms: options for leveraging knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuominen, T.; van der Aa, W.

    2013-01-01

    In this conceptual paper we elaborate on the replication of innovation in professional service firms (PSFs). We do this by integrating literature streams on replication, knowledge sharing, productization of services and management of PSF’s. First we discuss the object of replication in order to

  10. Analysing the Role of Business Intelligence, Knowledge Sharing and Organisational Innovation on Gaining Competitive Advantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidizadeh, Rosa; Salehzadeh, Reza; Chitsaz Esfahani, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to study the role of business intelligence, knowledge sharing and organisational innovation on gaining competitive advantage. Design/Methodology/Approach: The statistical population of the study was the managers and the specialists of some export companies of which 213 persons participated in this research. Path analysis…

  11. Framing and interorganizational knowledge transfer: A process study of collaborative innovation in the aircraft industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Burg, J.C.; Berends, J.J.; van Raaij, E.

    2014-01-01

    This article explains how and why organizational actors' decisions about interorganizational knowledge transfer might change over time. We find that organizational actors' framing of future innovation developments, as either an opportunity or a threat, motivates them to engage or disengage in

  12. Knowledge Management Systems and Open Innovation in Second Tier UK Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaston, Ian

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the performance of second tier UK universities in relation to the effectiveness of their knowledge management systems and involvement in open innovation. Data were acquired using a mail survey of academic staff in social science and business faculties in second tier institutions. The results indicate that…

  13. Marshall's disciples: Knowledge and innovation driving regional economic development and growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werker, C.; Athreye, S.

    2004-01-01

    Studies of knowledge and innovation as driving forces of regional development and growth offer a myriad of approaches. Here, questions asked, methods used and answers given are manifold. In our overview, we cover recent developments in this research area. Moreover, we explore the question as to the

  14. Interorganizational Knowledge Division Decision Model Based on Cooperative Innovation of Supply Chain System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Within interorganizational cooperative innovation of construction supply chain system, the achievement of project value-adding could be reflected by several factors, such as project-based organizational effect level, and the relationship between project cooperative innovation objectives. In this paper, based on the assumption of equal cooperation between project-based organizations, we selected the knowledge cooperation between the owner and contractor in construction supply chain system as research object. From the perspective of maximizing project value-adding and the relationship of effort cost between knowledge input and innovation stage in consideration, we established the knowledge collaborative incentive model for interorganizational cooperative innovation of construction supply chain system and proposed the first-order and second-order approaches. Then we conducted the digital simulation and example analysis, its results showed that if the owner has the capability to achieve project value-adding in knowledge cooperation, he would adopt a part commissioned way. Otherwise, a fully commissioned way would be better.

  15. How do collaboration and investments in knowledge management affect process innovation in services?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashok, M.; Narula, R.; Martinez-Noya, A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the keen interest in radical and incremental innovation, few studies have tested the varying impact of firm-level factors in service sectors. This paper analyses how collaboration with existing and prospective users, and investments in knowledge management (KM) practices can be

  16. Each-One-Teach-One Mobile Networks: An Innovative Strategy for Knowledge Access in Asian Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, P. K.

    2012-01-01

    The changing landscape of learning is helping Asian countries to emerge as technology-driven knowledge-based societies. The success of these societies depends on promoting the acquisition of key competences and broadening opportunities for innovative and more flexible forms of learning for every citizen. Considering that in Asia almost everyone…

  17. Telemedicine and distributed medical intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, D; Tichenor, J M; Balch, D C

    1996-01-01

    Recent trends in health care informatics and telemedicine indicate that systems are being developed with a primary focus on technology and business, not on the process of medicine itself. The authors present a new model of health care information, distributed medical intelligence, which promotes the development of an integrative medical communication system addressing the process of providing expert medical knowledge to the point of need. The model incorporates audio, video, high-resolution still images, and virtual reality applications into an integrated medical communications network. Three components of the model (care portals, Docking Station, and the bridge) are described. The implementation of this model at the East Carolina University School of Medicine is also outlined.

  18. Navy Telemedicine: Current Research and Future Directions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reed, Cheryl

    2002-01-01

    .... This report reviews military and civilian models for evaluating telemedicine systems in order to determine future directions for Navy telemedicine research within the current funding environment...

  19. TOOLS OF KNOWLEDGE DISSEMINATION WITHIN A NATIONAL DEFENSE INSTITUTION FOR INNOVATION, TECHNOLOGY AND SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Aparecida de Araújo Querido Oliveira

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes and analyzes in a National Defense Institution for Innovation, Technology and Science its tools of knowledge dissemination. The methodology contemplates the period of 2004 and 2005. Qualitative and quantitative information orientate the research in order to understand focal aspects on knowledge dissemination, in comparison with theoretical references of renowned authors and other elaborated research searching for elements to perform an organizational diagnosis, focused on the knowledge dissemination as well as on the forces which promote or obstruct the organizational development. Conclusions are that the tools of knowledge dissemination must suitable to spread the tacit knowledge in such a way as the explicit ones and that, in a National Defense Institution, other important aspects must be considered, a time that, being the spread knowledge of wrong form can, besides bringing damages for the organization, to compromise the national sovereignty.

  20. An exploratory survey of the applications of telemedicine in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darkwa, O

    2000-01-01

    We examined the use of telemedicine at two major medical institutions in Ghana. Doctors and administrators were surveyed to assess their knowledge of computers and familiarity with telemedicine. The use of modern telecommunications and information technology products within the health service was also examined. Thirty questionnaires were distributed to staff at the two hospitals, one urban and one rural. Twenty were returned (a response rate of 67%). Although most of the respondents were computer literate, they were less familiar with telemedicine applications. Only a minority of the respondents were participating in an information-sharing network, transmitting information by fax or telephone, or had Internet access. Financial constraint appeared to be the major barrier to establishing information-sharing networks. Other constraints were technological and organizational. The respondents expressed an interest in using telemedicine, having access to health-care databases and specific telemedicine applications such as tele-education and videoconferencing. Staff in the urban hospital were more likely to be familiar with telemedicine and more likely to have access to information technology than those in the rural hospital.

  1. Risk of Telemedicine Infeasibility: An Evidential Reasoning Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofienne Mansouri

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The viability of a telemedicine system is the strength of its business continuity. Business continuity can only stand if the telemedicine system remains continuously feasible. This article studies telemedicine risk in terms of its feasibility on all its five components: economical, technical, social, operational, and legal/ethical. Any deficiencies in one or more of the feasibility components will affect the system business continuity risk and can lead to infeasibility and possible dissolution. The telemedicine computing environment is full of uncertainties and ambiguities and it just involves too much background knowledge that Bayesian theory cannot accommodate. Decision theory however offers a basic evidence-based multi-criteria decision mechanism that can tackle those decision problems treating both quantitative and qualitative criteria under various uncertainties including ignorance and randomness. We propose an evidential reasoning model to assess a telemedicine business continuity risk based on infeasibility. This business continuity risk is modelled using Dempster and Shafer Theory as the plausibility of infeasibility of the telemedicine system. A numerical example is provided to demonstrate the working of the proposed risk assessment model.

  2. From Kisiizi to Baltimore: cultivating knowledge brokers to support global innovation for community engagement in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibe, Chidinma A; Basu, Lopa; Gooden, Rachel; Syed, Shamsuzzoha B; Dadwal, Viva; Bone, Lee R; Ephraim, Patti L; Weston, Christine M; Wu, Albert W

    2018-02-09

    Reverse Innovation has been endorsed as a vehicle for promoting bidirectional learning and information flow between low- and middle-income countries and high-income countries, with the aim of tackling common unmet needs. One such need, which traverses international boundaries, is the development of strategies to initiate and sustain community engagement in health care delivery systems. In this commentary, we discuss the Baltimore "Community-based Organizations Neighborhood Network: Enhancing Capacity Together" Study. This randomized controlled trial evaluated whether or not a community engagement strategy, developed to address patient safety in low- and middle-income countries throughout sub-Saharan Africa, could be successfully applied to create and implement strategies that would link community-based organizations to a local health care system in Baltimore, a city in the United States. Specifically, we explore the trial's activation of community knowledge brokers as the conduit through which community engagement, and innovation production, was achieved. Cultivating community knowledge brokers holds promise as a vehicle for advancing global innovation in the context of health care delivery systems. As such, further efforts to discern the ways in which they may promote the development and dissemination of innovations in health care systems is warranted. Trial Registration Number: NCT02222909 . Trial Register Name: Reverse Innovation and Patient Engagement to Improve Quality of Care and Patient Outcomes (CONNECT). Date of Trial's Registration: August 22, 2014.

  3. R&D Cooperation and Knowledge Spillover Effects for Sustainable Business Innovation in the Chemical Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Hájek

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the influence of research and development (R&D cooperation on the creation of spillover effects for sustainable firms in the chemical industry. We explore the evidence for the origin of knowledge spillovers derived from cooperation amongst firms and universities and R&D organizations as well as to test the influence of internal/external financial support on these effects. The results confirm that when firms acquire knowledge from internal sources, this leads to increased innovation and sustainable performance. We have proved that internal expenditure results in increased internal knowledge spillovers. These findings may be specific for Central and Eastern (CEE transition countries, indicating their efforts to build path-dependent structures based on knowledge institutions and businesses as well as knowledge networks. However, this study also provides a more “global” contribution to the knowledge spillover effect theory. It shows that a firm’s cooperation both with universities and with other firms promotes different types of knowledge spillovers and can affect diverse modes of sustainable activities in innovation.

  4. Emerging technologies for telemedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Minh Duc; Minh, Cao Duc; Shimizu, Shuji; Antoku, Yasuaki; Torata, Nobuhiro; Kudo, Kuriko; Okamura, Koji; Nakashima, Naoki; Tanaka, Masao

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on new technologies that are practically useful for telemedicine. Three representative systems are introduced: a Digital Video Transport System (DVTS), an H.323 compatible videoconferencing system, and Vidyo. Based on some of our experiences, we highlight the advantages and disadvantages of each technology, and point out technologies that are especially targeted at doctors and technicians, so that those interested in using similar technologies can make appropriate choices and achieve their own goals depending on their specific conditions.

  5. Emerging Technologies for Telemedicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minh, Cao Duc [National Agency for Science and Technology Information, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Shimizu, Shuji; Antoku, Yasuaki; Torata, Nobuhiro; Kudo, Kuriko; Okamura, Koji; Nakashima, Naoki; Tanaka, Masao [Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2012-02-15

    This paper focuses on new technologies that are practically useful for telemedicine. Three representative systems are introduced: a Digital Video Transport System (DVTS), an H.323 compatible videoconferencing system, and Vidyo. Based on some of our experiences, we highlight the advantages and disadvantages of each technology, and point out technologies that are especially targeted at doctors and technicians, so that those interested in using similar technologies can make appropriate choices and achieve their own goals depending on their specific conditions.

  6. Emerging Technologies for Telemedicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minh, Cao Duc; Shimizu, Shuji; Antoku, Yasuaki; Torata, Nobuhiro; Kudo, Kuriko; Okamura, Koji; Nakashima, Naoki; Tanaka, Masao

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on new technologies that are practically useful for telemedicine. Three representative systems are introduced: a Digital Video Transport System (DVTS), an H.323 compatible videoconferencing system, and Vidyo. Based on some of our experiences, we highlight the advantages and disadvantages of each technology, and point out technologies that are especially targeted at doctors and technicians, so that those interested in using similar technologies can make appropriate choices and achieve their own goals depending on their specific conditions.

  7. Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA frames innovation as critical to the protection of human health and the environment through initiatives such as sustainable practices, innovative research, prize competitions, innovation awards, partnerships, and community activities.

  8. The knowledge absorptive capacity to improve the cooperation and innovation in the firm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Saiz

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to study the absorptive capacity types in the knowledge management literature and aims to understand how companies can strength their contexts of cooperation in order to innovate. Design/methodology/approach: A balanced panel of 1,220 firms that respond to the Survey of Business Strategies for a three-year period was used, which represents a total of 3,660 observations.   Findings: The justification of absorptive capacity typology for an innovation efficiency process. The influence of the potential and realized absorptive capacity on new products is significant and causes effects on internal research and development in diverse way. The impact of the joint ventures, suppliers’ cooperation and customers’ cooperation are significant on absorptive capacity. Research limitations/implications: It would be interesting to extend the research to another innovation metrics as new organizational methods, new processes, new designs or new methods in the use of sales channels. Practical implications: The agreement of cooperation activities constitutes an important decision for the firm’s innovation. Companies must be conscious that while suppliers and customers’ cooperation are relevant cooperation actions to increase the internal research and development, joint ventures and customers’ cooperation are significant to the growth of the new products. Social implications: The types of absorptive capacity and internal research and development serve as mediating mechanisms between cooperative activities and innovative performance. Originality/value: This paper advances the literature on absorptive capacity by showing how firms use their positions of technological vigilance and management to form their capabilities, and subsequently, to enhance innovation outcomes. This study considers it is necessary to analyze the typology of the absorptive capacity that can allow managers to understand an innovation efficiency

  9. Structural Conditions for Collaboration and Learning in Innovation Networks: Using an Innovation System Performance Lens to Analyse Agricultural Knowledge Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, F.; Klerkx, L.W.A.; Roep, D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We investigate how the structural conditions of eight different European agricultural innovation systems can facilitate or hinder collaboration and social learning in multidisciplinary innovation networks. Methodology: We have adapted the Innovation System Failure Matrix to investigate the

  10. American Telemedicine Association: 18th Annual International Meeting & Tradeshow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Forstag

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available For 18 years, the American Telemedicine Association (ATA Annual International Meeting & Exposition has been the premier forum for professionals in the telemedicine, telehealth and mHealth space -- one of the fastest growing meetings in the country. ATA 2013 is on course to be the largest ATA meeting ever, with over 6,000 projected attendees.  The program will include 500 educational sessions and posters, highlighting the latest innovations, applications and research in telemedicine. The 2013 exhibit hall will feature nearly 300 of the leading vendors in remote healthcare technologies. With over 6000 projected attendees, from all around the world, there's no better place to meet and network with your peers and thought leaders in the field. Detailed program information--including courses, sessions and CME information--will be available January 2013 at:http://www.americantelemed.org.

  11. Topology of Innovation Spaces in the Knowledge Networks Emerging through Questions-And-Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andjelković, Miroslav; Tadić, Bosiljka; Mitrović Dankulov, Marija; Rajković, Milan; Melnik, Roderick

    2016-01-01

    The communication processes of knowledge creation represent a particular class of human dynamics where the expertise of individuals plays a substantial role, thus offering a unique possibility to study the structure of knowledge networks from online data. Here, we use the empirical evidence from questions-and-answers in mathematics to analyse the emergence of the network of knowledge contents (or tags) as the individual experts use them in the process. After removing extra edges from the network-associated graph, we apply the methods of algebraic topology of graphs to examine the structure of higher-order combinatorial spaces in networks for four consecutive time intervals. We find that the ranking distributions of the suitably scaled topological dimensions of nodes fall into a unique curve for all time intervals and filtering levels, suggesting a robust architecture of knowledge networks. Moreover, these networks preserve the logical structure of knowledge within emergent communities of nodes, labeled according to a standard mathematical classification scheme. Further, we investigate the appearance of new contents over time and their innovative combinations, which expand the knowledge network. In each network, we identify an innovation channel as a subgraph of triangles and larger simplices to which new tags attach. Our results show that the increasing topological complexity of the innovation channels contributes to network’s architecture over different time periods, and is consistent with temporal correlations of the occurrence of new tags. The methodology applies to a wide class of data with the suitable temporal resolution and clearly identified knowledge-content units. PMID:27171149

  12. Revelatory aspects when innovating the “as – is” business model – actualizing hidden knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saghaug, Kristin Margrethe; Lindgren, Peter

    This paper combines the area of innovation of business models (BM) and revelation. It explains the importance of discovering ones current, “as is” BM in relation to actualization of the company’s hidden knowledge and potential. The biblical revelations concern truly seeing, knowing and experience...... in line with Polanyi’s focus on practice related to knowing and also addressed directly by (Spender 2009a;Sveiby 2001;Weick 1996) or indirectly by (Roos et al. 2005). For the innovation leader of a company our empirical findings show that the discovering of one’s current business (model)’s “as is” seems...... to inherent revelatory information. First things first - know your own “as is” BM and then see your real innovation potential of your company....

  13. Internet technologies and requirements for telemedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamaster, H.; Meylor, J.; Meylor, F.

    1997-01-01

    Internet technologies are briefly introduced and those applicable for telemedicine are reviewed. Multicast internet technologies are described. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) 'Telemedicine Space-bridge to Russia' project is described and used to derive requirements for internet telemedicine. Telemedicine privacy and Quality of Service (QoS) requirements are described.

  14. Knowledge and Cooperation Determinants of Innovation Networks: A Mixed-Methods Approach to the Case of Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Pinto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Systemic perspectives of innovation integrate complex interrelations among enterprise, science and technology, and governance spheres. Innovation networks are crucial within innovation systems and refer to the linkages of a variety of actors with the purpose of innovation. In this article, the determinants of innovation networks are analyzed using a qualitative original database of online information about 623 organizations in Portugal. A binary econometric regression for all types of entities is estimated. The model underlines that actors using external technologies and promoting knowledge are more likely to innovate. In parallel, actors that are involved in managing and supporting entrepreneurship have a smaller probability to do it. Advanced firms and universities are the actors more willing to dynamically innovate. Specific models for firms and universities create a direct comparison between the determinants in both collectives. While promoting knowledge and specific orientation towards innovation is essential for firms it is not relevant for universities. Managing knowledge is the crucial catalyst for the innovation practices in universities. External technological linkages are essential for both types of actors in the creation of innovation networks. The article concludes with policy implications regarding the support of cooperation activities to instigate innovation.

  15. Human Capital and Knowledge Emergence. Induced Effects of the Global Crisis on Human capital and Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Buta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the global crisis context crossed by organizations and countries in the past six years we assist also at conflicting measures in which regards knowledge, innovation and human capital; for example, countries such as England and France have reduced their costs for education, while Germany and other countries (Australia, Austria, Canada and Norway maintained the same allocations for education. What will be the effects of such measures on human capital in the near future? What are the best human resources policies in companies in the crisis context? Given that the subject of the research is "knowledge and human capital", in this paper we refer to the induced effects of the crisis on human capital and innovation. We will also identify the key steps that can be taken during crisis, and not only, to stimulate human capital.

  16. Active Learning Innovations in Knowledge Management Education Generate Higher Quality Learning Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Shelley

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Innovations in how a postgraduate course in knowledge management is delivered have generated better learning outcomes and made the course more engaging for learners. Course participant feedback has shown that collaborative active learning is preferred and provides them with richer insights into how knowledge is created and applied to generate innovation and value. The course applies an andragogy approach in which students collaborate in weekly dialogue of their experiences of the content, rather than learn the content itself. The approach combines systems thinking, learning praxis, and active learning to explore the interdependencies between topics and how they impact outcomes in real world situations. This has stimulated students to apply these ideas in their own workplaces.

  17. Product returns – interdisciplinary interfaces between knowledge, quality and product innovation management

    OpenAIRE

    Klapalová Alena; Krčál Michal

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to review existing research on intersections of four disciplines, specifically knowledge, quality and product innovation management related to the consumers´ product returns within the reverse logistics (reverse supply chain management) discipline to identify gaps justifying further research activities. The primary aim of this review is to summarize and evaluate existing literature pertaining the above-mentioned areas of interest and to formulate potentia...

  18. Essays on innovation, productivity and knowledge flows: evidence for Spanish firms

    OpenAIRE

    Goya Carrillo, Esther

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation aims to further understand the relationship between innovation and productivity in Spain taking into account the impact of knowledge flows. To this end, Spanish firms from both manufacturing and services sectors are considered. This thesis consists of three empirical studies. The first study analyses the impact that R&D expenditures and intra- and inter-industry externalities have on Spanish firms’ performance considering the firm’s technology level. A Cobb-Douglas produ...

  19. An introduction to the Research Innovation and Knowledge Management Roadmap for the South African Maritime Sector

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Funke, Nicola S

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES & ACTIONS We have a maritime culture and recognise and learn from our maritime history 1 Foster national maritime pride 3 Develop and communicate a co-authored discourse on South Africa’s maritime history 2 Support maritime historical... and training facilities 6 Build and retain skills in the maritime sector 2 Support and develop maritime-focused technology and innovation 7 OBJECTIVES & ACTIONS Conduct humanities and social science research on pertinent issues 3 Create knowledge...

  20. Knowledge Management as a Strategic Tool to Foster Innovativeness of SMEs

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Haibo; Uhlaner, Lorraine

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis study examines the relationship between knowledge management (KM) (in terms of external acquisition and internal sharing) and innovation behavior. The concept of absorptive capacity and assumptions from the dynamic capabilities view underlie the proposed framework and hypotheses. The framework is empirically tested using a random sample of 649 Dutch small to medium sized enterprises (SMEs). Our empricial results indicate that external acquisition practices play a key role in ...

  1. Innovative Engineering Organizational Excellence Best Practices Through Capturing Tacit Knowledge: Evidence from Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magd Hesham A. E.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the way tacit knowledge is dealt with in a high turnover business environment through a qualitative research approach in an engineering organization in Saudi Arabia with respect to organizational culture and values and the effect in competitive stance. The study found peer review process and managerial supervisory style to be effective in enabling new employees in a short time with knowledge critical for them to do a successful job, core values, and open door policy to be necessary factors in forming a fertile environment for a quick tacit knowledge harvesting. The study also showed that a good competitive stance and customer satisfaction can be achieved and maintained through implementation of an innovative peer review process. The study revealed that noneffective utilization of knowledge management technical resources was evident in the current study which may impact on achieving competitive advantage.

  2. Interorganizational Diffusion and Transformation of Knowledge in the Process of Product Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinding, Anker Lund

    In the knowledge-based economy interorganizational interaction is regarded as crucial in the process of product innovation. Contributions from Lundvall, Von Hippel and the resource based view of the firm all argue that absorptive capacity is of importance for an efficient use of external knowledge...... knowledge the firm also needs to invest in the establishment of channels and codes of communication to external parties. By emphasizing the relative aspect of absorptive capacity as investment in social capital we argue that absolute absorptive capacity and social capital are complementary. This calls...... with respect to the complementarity between the absolute and the relative aspects of absorptive capacity the dissertation concludes that complementarity exists. The implications for firms and policy makers are that in order to give effective access to absorption investment in both the internal knowledge base...

  3. Disentangling the Effects of Collaborative Social Platforms on Organizational Knowledge Practices and Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmerita, Liana; Tan, Chee-Wee

    Social media has given birth to a novel paradigm of knowledge management that entails both formal and informal communication to bring about collaboration via diverse applications. Through online conversations and virtual interactions, the advent of social media is accompanied by unprecedented means...... of sharing, externalizing and retaining knowledge. In doing so, social media allows the articulation of personal and collective knowledge for innovation and value co-creation (Razmerita et al. 2014). Emerging social-collaborative platforms in the likes of Podio, Jive, Trello, Yammer, and Slack promote...... communication, collaboration, and project work. These platforms incorporate social media and networking functionalities for realizing both synchronous and asynchronous cooperative efforts. This study hence takes a critical view of the adoption and deployment of collaborative social platforms in a knowledge...

  4. Innovation and Integrity in Intervention Research: Conceptual Issues, Methodology, and Knowledge Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malti, Tina; Beelmann, Andreas; Noam, Gil G; Sommer, Simon

    2018-04-01

    In this article, we introduce the special issue entitled Innovation and Integrity in Intervention Science. Its focus is on essential problems and prospects for intervention research examining two related topics, i.e., methodological issues and research integrity, and challenges in the transfer of research knowledge into practice and policy. The main aims are to identify how to advance methodology in order to improve research quality, examine scientific integrity in the field of intervention science, and discuss future steps to enhance the transfer of knowledge about evidence-based intervention principles into sustained practice, routine activities, and policy decisions. Themes of the special issue are twofold. The first includes questions about research methodology in intervention science, both in terms of research design and methods, as well as data analyses and the reporting of findings. Second, the issue tackles questions surrounding the types of knowledge translation frameworks that might be beneficial to mobilize the transfer of research-based knowledge into practice and public policies. The issue argues that innovations in methodology and thoughtful approaches to knowledge translation can enable transparency, quality, and sustainability of intervention research.

  5. Shared Care of Childhood Cancer Survivors: A Telemedicine Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Aimee G; Nugent, Bethany D; Conover, Noelle; Moore, Amanda; Dempsey, Kathleen; Tersak, Jean M

    2017-12-01

    With an increasing number of childhood cancer survivors (CCSs), determining the best model of survivorship transition care is becoming a growing priority. Shared care between pediatric oncology and adult primary care is often necessary, making survivorship a time of transition, but effective standard models are lacking. We sought to provide a more integrated approach to transition using telemedicine. Recruited primary care provider/CCS dyads were instructed to log-in to a password-protected virtual meeting room using telemedicine equipment at the time or a regularly scheduled office visit. Dyads were joined by a pediatric survivorship clinic team member who conducted the telemedicine portion of the transition visit, which consisted of the review of an individualized treatment summary and care plan. Postquestionnaires were developed to evaluate key points such as fund of knowledge, satisfaction with the visit, and effectiveness of this electronic tool. There were 19 transition visits conducted, 13 of which used the telemedicine equipment as planned. Those that did not use the equipment were primarily unable to due to technical difficulties. Postquestionnaires were overall positive, confirming increased knowledge, comfort and abilities, and patient satisfaction in survivorship care. Negative comments were primarily related to equipment difficulties. A gap still remains in helping CCSs transition from oncology to primary care and this pilot study offered insights into how we might better bridge that gap through the use of telemedicine. Further research is needed to refine the transition process for CCSs, including evaluation and testing models for standard of care.

  6. Patient empowerment and involvement in telemedicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konge Nielsen, Marie; Johannessen, Helle

    2018-01-01

    Basic ideas of empowerment and user involvement in relation to telemedicine are presented, as is a case implying user resistance to telemedicine. Four logics of empowerment are employed to identify the underlying rationale of specific cases of telemedicine. The article concludes, that although...... telemedicine is acknowledged as relevant, the approach to it is often too mechanical to imply empowerment of the patient. Some patient groups may not feel safe by using telemedicine, and user involvement and empowerment will not be possible....

  7. Telemedicine in Alentejo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Steffen; Gonçalves, Luís; Barlow, James

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Alentejo covers a third of Portugal, yet it is home to only 5% of the population. Residents of the region are poorer, older, and less educated than the rest of the country. There is a shortage of physicians in several specialties. The low population density, a concentration of specialized services, and a poor public transportation network all create barriers to access. Telemedicine was introduced in 1998 to help address these challenges. In this article, we provide an overview of the program and its current status, focusing on infrastructure, services, and activity volume. We also discuss the impact the program has had from the perspectives of patients and healthcare professionals. From 1998 to 2011, there were 132,546 episodes of service using telemedicine, including real-time teleconsultations, teleradiology, teleultrasound, and telepathology. At present, the network includes 20 primary care units and five hospitals, covering almost 30,000 km2 and 500,000 people. Units have high-resolution videoconferencing equipment, access to patients' clinical records, an image archive, and peripherals, such as electronic dermatoscopes and phonendoscopes. Teleconsultations are available in 15 medical specialties and areas, ranging from neurology to pediatric surgery. In 2008, regional health authorities started a tele-education program, and by the end of 2011, 876 healthcare professionals, across 52 locations, had participated in remote learning sessions. More than a decade since telemedicine was introduced in Alentejo, it is now an integral part of everyday service provision. A comprehensive assessment of the costs and consequences of the program is currently underway. PMID:24180419

  8. American Telemedicine Association: First China (Tianjin International Telemedicine Technology Exhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordana Bernard

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available With the support of Tianjin Municipal People’s Government and the People’s Government of Binhai New Area, the “First China (Tianjin International Telemedicine Technology Exhibition” hosted by the American Telemedicine Association (ATA, will be held October 28- 30, 2014 at the Tianjin Binhai International Convention and Exhibition Center. The three day event will feature keynote sessions, concurrent discussion forums, exhibits (e.g., telemedicine, information technology, mHealth, a venture summit, meet-and-greet sessions for international and domestic companies for potential business collaboration, and policy discussions on China healthcare. For registration information: http://www.atacn.org/en/

  9. Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janni; Yaganeh, Suzanne; Bloch Rasmussen, Leif

    2013-01-01

    This paper contributes to a theoretical discussion of creation of innovation with participants in, or outside, organisations. We address the creation of innovation with a complex theoretical understanding drawing on the Scandinavian and the Participatory Design tradition introducing two approaches...... to the processes of innovation. We ask if innovation can be initiated and enhanced looking at two collaborative approaches; participatory innovation (PIN) and cooperative innovation (COIN). We invite to dialogue and reflections on PIN’s conflict and creative frictions on one side and COIN’s complexity......, complementarity in diversity and the didactic scaffolding of the innovation process on the other side. Our contribution focuses on the methods and practices for facilitation of co-creating activities between different groups leading to cooperation, and innovation in thinking....

  10. Impact of external knowledge acquisition strategies on innovation: a comparative study based on Dutch and Swiss panel data

    OpenAIRE

    Arvanitis, S.; Lokshin, B.; Mohnen, P.; Wörter, M.

    2013-01-01

    There is growing evidence that firms increasingly adopt open innovation practices. In this paper we investigate the impact of two such external knowledge acquisition strategies, ‘buy’ and ‘cooperate’, on firm’s product innovation performance. Taking a direct (productivity)approach, we test for complementarity effects in the simultaneous use of the two strategies, and in the intensity of their use. Our results based on large panels of Dutch and Swiss innovating firms, suggest that while both ‘...

  11. Telemedicine in wound care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanussot-Deprez, Caroline; Contreras-Ruiz, José

    2008-12-01

    Telemedical wound care is one of the applications of teledermatology. We present our experience using telemedicine in the successful assessment and treatment of three patients with hard-to-heal ulcers. Three patients were seen at the PEMEX General Hospital in Veracruz, Mexico. The first patient was a 53-year-old man with hypertension, morbid obesity, chronic venous insufficiency, recurrent erysipelas, leg ulcers and lymphoedema. There was one ulcer on his left lower leg (20 x 10 cm) and one on his right leg (9 x 7 cm). The second patient was a 73-year-old woman with class III obesity and ulcers in her right leg, secondary to surgical debridement of bullous erysipelas. The third patient was a 51-year-old female with rheumatoid arthritis with one ulcer on each leg and chronic lymphostasis. Photographs with a digital camera were taken and sent weekly via email to a wound care specialist in Mexico City. The photographs allowed the expert to diagnose and evaluate the chronic wounds periodically. In the present cases, telemedicine allowed us to have a rapid evaluation, diagnosis and treatment. The images were of enough quality to be useful and small enough to be sent via regular email to the remote physician who immediately gave his feedback. The expert was confident to give therapeutic recommendations in this way, and we considered this method to be very cost-effective, saving the patient and the health care system, especially in transportation.

  12. Telemedicine: opportunities and risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, R.

    2002-01-01

    Problem. Due to the rapid progress in the fields of information technology and data networks, telemedicine applications are growing in number. Besides curative telemedicine, the electronic exchange of medical data and the integration of health information systems between health care providers is gaining importance. Through the improved accessibility of electronic patient record information, considerable risks arise.Methods. A project for the interconnection of medical picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) between several hospitals is presented and the possibilities for further developing such networking systems utilizing new software technologies for transparent data access between different locations (GRID) and for decision support (software agents) are considered.Results. The availability of the electronic patient record via the data network and the perspective of semi intelligent software systems automatically preparing the data bears great potential for a boost in treatment quality and efficiency. Systems for unique electronic patient identification and for secure digital signature are a prerequisite, but per se not enough to ensure the protection of data against illegitimate access.Conclusion. Despite quality and efficiency benefits, challenges in the protection of sensible data and in the change of the physicians role result. (orig.) [de

  13. Towards technical interoperability in telemedicine.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craft, Richard Layne, II

    2004-05-01

    For telemedicine to realize the vision of anywhere, anytime access to care, the question of how to create a fully interoperable technical infrastructure must be addressed. After briefly discussing how 'technical interoperability' compares with other types of interoperability being addressed in the telemedicine community today, this paper describes reasons for pursuing technical interoperability, presents a proposed framework for realizing technical interoperability, identifies key issues that will need to be addressed if technical interoperability is to be achieved, and suggests a course of action that the telemedicine community might follow to accomplish this goal.

  14. Improving service innovation in Aker Solutions – How clients’ knowledge, management and organisational structure can facilitate service innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Hreinsdóttir, Sign! Jóna; Dhali-Lund, Faysal Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Services have long been perceived as non-innovative or technologically backward. It is only recently that innovation in services has attracted greater interest. However, service innovation is important for organisational competitive advantage and is of ever greater importance in the economic development through creating new business opportunities and employment. In our study we look into how application of service innovation theories can benefit Aker Solutions by investigati...

  15. Semantically based clinical TCM telemedicine systems

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, Allan K Y; Lin, Wilfred W K; Dillon, Tharam S; Chang, Elizabeth J

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen the development of two significant trends namely: the adoption of some Traditional Chinese Medicine Practices into mainstream Allopathic Western Medicine and the advent of the internet and broad band networks leading to an increased interest in the use of Telemedicine to deliver medical services. In this book, we see the convergence of these two trends leading to a semantically-based TCM Telemedicine system that utilizes an ontology to provide sharable knowledge in the TCM realm to achieve this. The underpinning research required the development of a three-layer architecture and an Ontology of the TCM knowledge. As TCM knowledge like all medical knowledge is not frozen in time it was important to develop an approach that would allow evolution of the Ontology when new evidence became available. In order for the system to be practically grounded it was important to work with an industry partner PuraPharm Group/HerbMiners Informatics Limited. This partnership was initiated through Professo...

  16. Tastes differ : comparing company strategy, innovation trajectories and knowledge sources in Dutch soft drink production in the 1930s

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkers, E.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Impelled by a crisis in Dutch horticulture in the early 1930s, two Dutch food preserving companies, Hero and De Betuwe, decided to start producing non-alcoholic drinks made from fruits and vegetables. Different kinds of knowledge were needed for this radical innovation. Innovation trajectories were

  17. Spatial knowledge dynamics of innovation processes: local and non-local aspects of buzz and collective learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanner, Anne Nygaard

    2014-01-01

    learning processes and require face-to-face contact. In sum, the innovation biography method contributes in uncovering innovation processes and how these rely on many different configurations of spatial knowledge dynamics, including buzz, local ties and global pipelines. The findings imply that policy...

  18. Telemedicine and biomedical care in Africa: Prospects and challenges

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-01-28

    Jan 28, 2016 ... medical education in the absence or limited healthcare ... to medical services is inadequate, holds promise in expanding ... Prospects and challenges of telemedicine in Africa. 2 ... experts' opinions and sharing of knowledge between doctors. .... patients now depend on their pastors or spiritual leaders in.

  19. Supporting the developers of context-aware mobile telemedicine applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broens, T.H.F.

    2005-01-01

    Telemedicine, which is defined as providing healthcare and sharing of medical knowledge over distance using telecommunication means, is a promising approach to improve and enhance the healthcare provisioning process. However, only recently, technology has evolved (i.e. miniaturization of high power

  20. The drive to innovation: The privileging of science and technology knowledge production in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauchi, Laura

    This dissertation project explored the privileging of knowledge production in science and technology as a Canadian national economic, political and social strategy. The project incorporated the relationship between nation-state knowledge production and how that knowledge is then systematically evaluated, prioritized and validated by systems of health technology assessment (HTA). The entry point into the analysis and this dissertation project was the Scientific Research and Experimental Design (SR&ED) federal tax incentive program as the cornerstone of science and technology knowledge production in Canada. The method of inquiry and analysis examined the submission documents submitted by key stakeholders across the country, representing public, private and academic standpoints, during the public consultation process conducted from 2007 to 2008 and how each of these standpoints is hooked into the public policy interests and institutional structures that produce knowledge in science and technology. Key public meetings, including the public information sessions facilitated by the Canada Revenue Agency and private industry conferences, provided context and guidance regarding the current pervasive public and policy interests that direct and drive the policy debates. Finally, the "Innovation Canada: A Call to Action Review of Federal Support to Research and Development: Expert Panel Report," commonly referred to as "The Jenkins Report" (Jenkins et al., 2011), was critically evaluated as the expected predictor of future public policy changes associated with the SR&ED program and the future implications for the production of knowledge in science and technology. The method of inquiry and analytical lens was a materialist approach that drew on the inspiring frameworks of such scholars as Dorothy Smith, Michel Foucault, Kaushik Sunder Rajan, Melinda Cooper, and, Gilles Deleuze. Ultimately, I strove to illuminate the normalizing force and power of knowledge production in science

  1. The social underpinnings of absorptive capacity: the moderating effects of structural holes on innovation generation based on external knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Tortoriello, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Building on absorptive capacity and social network research, in this paper I investigate how individuals inside the organization use external knowledge to generate innovations. Through original sociometric data collected from 276 scientists, researchers, and engineers from the Research and Development division of a large multinational high-tech company, I show that the effects of external knowledge on individuals' innovativeness are contingent upon individuals' position in the internal social...

  2. Impact of Clusters on Innovation, Knowledge and Competitiveness in the Romanian Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina VLĂSCEANU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The concept of clusters has become extremely popular in the recent years, as more and more practitioners and theorists refer to it.From my point of view, clusters are the ideal structure for some companies to build their skills, knowledge and know-how together. To the same extent, this form of organization enables the creation of common structures / facilities, which allows the smaller firms or the ones that lack experience to learn from the ones with more experience and to benefit from their more advanced capabilities, and thus to grow together. Moreover, the participation, collaboration and cooperation of universities, institutes, research centers and other organizations/entities inside a cluster undoubtedly leads to the growth of the economic development of the region, from which the cluster is part of. In the case of Romania, the eight development regions could greatly benefit from the formation and implementation of clusters. With the shift to a knowledge-based economy and society, the difference, made by clusters and creative networks that promote innovation, is now clear. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to outline the benefits that can come from the development of clusters, and to highlight the impact of clusters on innovation, knowledge and competitiveness in the Romanian Economy.

  3. [Telemedicine in dermatological practice: teledermatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danis, Judit; Forczek, Erzsébet; Bari, Ferenc

    2016-03-06

    Technological advances in the fields of information and telecommunication technologies have affected the health care system in the last decades, and lead to the emergence of a new discipline: telemedicine. The appearance and rise of internet and smart phones induced a rapid progression in telemedicine. Several new applications and mobile devices are published every hour even for medical purposes. Parallel to these changes in the technical fields, medical literature about telemedicine has grown rapidly. Due to its visual nature, dermatology is ideally suited to benefit from this new technology and teledermatology became one of the most dynamically evolving fields of telemedicine by now. Teledermatology is not routinely practiced in Hungary yet, however, it promises the health care system to become better, cheaper and faster, but we have to take notice on the experience and problems faced in teledermatologic applications so far, summarized in this review.

  4. Multipurpose Health Care Telemedicine System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kyriacou, E

    2001-01-01

    .... Ambulances, Rural Health Centers (RHC) or other remote health location, Ships navigating in wide seas and Airplanes in flight are common examples of possible emergency sites, while critical care telemetry, and telemedicine home follow-ups...

  5. Impacts of Leadership on Project-Based Organizational Innovation Performance: The Mediator of Knowledge Sharing and Moderator of Social Capital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junwei Zheng

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing importance of leadership in project-based organizations, innovation is essential for the sustainable development of construction projects. Since few studies have explored the relationship between leadership and innovation in construction projects, this study fills this research gap and makes a significant theoretical contribution to the existing body of literature. Based on a knowledge-rated and resource-based view, this study aims to investigate various effects of different types of leadership on innovation performance in a construction project-based organization. Therefore, a theoretical model was constructed to explore the mediation mechanism and boundary condition of different types of leadership to improve innovation. The theoretical model was validated with empirical data covering project managers and engineers from the project-based organization in China via regression analysis and path analysis. The results show that transformational leadership and transactional leadership have some positively significant effects on knowledge sharing and innovation performance. Meanwhile, knowledge sharing partially mediates the relationship between transformational leadership and/or transactional leadership and innovation performance. Additionally, by considering different levels of social capital, transformational leadership is likely to have a strong positive impact on innovation performance through knowledge sharing. Our findings ensure a better understanding of the role of leadership, knowledge management, and social capital in the innovation process of construction projects. Therefore, project managers should promote a higher stimulation of a leadership behavior, encouraging knowledge management, and establishing the social capital, thus improving the innovation performance in the project-based organizations in construction projects.

  6. Use of Telemedicine in Addiction Treatment: Current Practices and Organizational Implementation Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd Molfenter

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Telemedicine applications offer innovative approaches for treating and reducing the effects of substance use disorders (SUDs. This analysis assessed the interest in and use of 11 telemedicine applications in a sample of 363 SUD organizations in the United States of America. Fifty percent of the organizations expressed high rates of interest in seven of the telemedicine applications, demonstrating the appeal of telemedicine within this field. The top three self-reported telemedicine applications being used were (1 computerized screening/assessments (44.6%, (2 telephone-based recovery supports (29.5%, and (3 telephone-based therapy (28.37%. The greatest gaps between interest and use were for (1 texting appointment reminders (55.2% differential, (2 mobile apps for posttreatment recovery (46.6% differential, and (3 recovery support chats (46.6% differential. A Latent Class Analysis (LCA of the organizations’ telemedicine use behavior identified three groupings: “Innovators” that were using a range of technologies (n=27, 7.4%; “Technology Traditionalists” that limited their use to telephone, video, and web portal technologies (n=101, 27.8%; and “Low Tech” that had low overall technology use (n=235, 64.7%. Future studies should build on how telemedicine could be applied in SUD settings, organizational behaviors towards its adoption, and telemedicine’s effect on treatment adherence and clinical outcomes.

  7. Effectiveness and future prospects of telemedicine/remote health care management applications in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, S.; Khan, N.

    2017-01-01

    Medical/Health care system is spraining in Pakistan because of innovative technology, activities and services as per their financial cost (position) which is increasing day by day. This research is intended for the assessment of Telemedicine/Remote Health Care Management practices (system), which encompasses usability, acceptance and impact in public/private hospitals. To improve the existing remote health care/telemedicine practices in Pakistan by using EM (Engineering Management) based approach. It has been widely and successfully implemented and is considered as a strategic and operational tool. In the 21st century due to the Technological advancements the mode of operation of service and business sector have been changed drastically. In the same way the health sectors activities also have been altered, new methods and techniques have also been devised for the treatment of the patients that were never even thought before. In the health sector Telemedicine/Remote Health Care Management is one of the development which was experienced lately. Telemedicine/Remote Health Careistaken exactly "medicine at a distance". Therefore, hypothetically, some procedures performed with medication which does not take place "face-to-face"and"in person"which can be considered as Telemedicine/Remote Health Care. In the industrialized world telemedicine is being used in full capacity to provide the health care services to remote and un-accessible areas. But Telemedicine/Remote Health Care Management is not very popular and admired in Pakistan; few applications are being functional presently. (author)

  8. Pediatric Diabetes Telemedicine Program Improves Access to Care for Rural Families: Role of APRNs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nancy Marie; Satyshur, Rosemarie DiMauro

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus has increased in children by 23% from 2001 to 2009. Rural communities additionally have increased disparities related to access barriers and a large minority population with poorer overall health. Research evidence supports telemedicine as an effective alternative to bring preventive diabetes care to remote areas. This article presents an overview of the leadership role of advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) with the implementation and evaluation of a pediatric diabetes telemedicine program at a rural pediatric outpatient specialty clinic in partnership with a tertiary center telemedicine network. The telemedicine program quality improvement (QI) project explored caregiver satisfaction with a convenience sample of caregivers (N = 14) using a nine-item Telemedicine Diabetes Caregiver Satisfaction Survey (TDCSS), with responses ranging from 1 = strongly disagree to 5 = strongly agree. Findings indicate caregivers were highly satisfied with communication/ privacy (M = 4.8), access to care (M = 4.1), and quality of services (M = 5.0). The multidisciplinary collaborative teamwork, continuous QI, and dependable technology were integral to the quality of the telemedicine clinical initiative. APRNs provided technology expertise, interdisciplinary collaboration leadership, care coordination, and advocacy for policy changes. Results demonstrate that telemedicine and APRN leadership can help implement innovative programs into rural communities to improve access to care, healthcare cost, and outcomes.

  9. Innovative visualization and segmentation approaches for telemedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, D.; Roehrig, Hans; Borders, Marisa H.; Fitzpatrick, Kimberly A.; Roveda, Janet

    2014-09-01

    In health care applications, we obtain, manage, store and communicate using high quality, large volume of image data through integrated devices. In this paper we propose several promising methods that can assist physicians in image data process and communication. We design a new semi-automated segmentation approach for radiological images, such as CT and MRI to clearly identify the areas of interest. This approach combines the advantages from both the region-based method and boundary-based methods. It has three key steps compose: coarse segmentation by using fuzzy affinity and homogeneity operator, image division and reclassification using the Voronoi Diagram, and refining boundary lines using the level set model.

  10. Innovation and knowledge generation in cooperation nets: challenges for regulations in the nuclear safety area in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staude, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    The importance of inter-organisational cooperation within the innovation process has been increasingly recognized. In fact, all organisations, at some point, need to look to external sources for inputs to the process of building up technological competence. In this sense, through a detailed case study, this thesis examine theoretical and empirically how collaborative initiatives have supported the Brazilian nuclear regulatory body in the development and implementation of innovations, in order to verify the positive relationship between the collaboration and the organisational innovation performance. Emphasizing the importance of both internal sources of knowledge and external participation, the study encompasses documentary analysis, a preliminary survey and semi-structured interviews with the regulatory body employers in charge of controlling medical and research facilities and activities involving radiation sources. The thesis demonstrates that innovations developed and implemented in the Brazilian nuclear safety and security area are associated with collaborative initiatives, in order to improve the organizational capability to fulfill safety obligations, providing some important implications for regulatory body managers concerned with the management of innovation. The findings also identified actors with a significant degree of influence in the innovation process. The result reveals that the support provided by these actors has a significant influence on the innovation performance of the Brazilian nuclear regulatory body, suggesting that Brazil should adopt more interactive models of innovation and knowledge transfer. In addition, the findings show that these key actors can play a very distinctive role in the context of sectoral systems of innovation information regime. (author)

  11. Bridging CAGD knowledge into CAD/CG applications: Mathematical theories as stepping stones of innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobithaasan, R. U.; Miura, Kenjiro T.; Hassan, Mohamad Nor

    2014-07-01

    Computer Aided Geometric Design (CAGD) which surpasses the underlying theories of Computer Aided Design (CAD) and Computer Graphics (CG) has been taught in a number of Malaysian universities under the umbrella of Mathematical Sciences' faculty/department. On the other hand, CAD/CG is taught either under the Engineering or Computer Science Faculty. Even though CAGD researchers/educators/students (denoted as contributors) have been enriching this field of study by means of article/journal publication, many fail to convert the idea into constructive innovation due to the gap that occurs between CAGD contributors and practitioners (engineers/product/designers/architects/artists). This paper addresses this issue by advocating a number of technologies that can be used to transform CAGD contributors into innovators where immediate impact in terms of practical application can be experienced by the CAD/CG practitioners. The underlying principle of solving this issue is twofold. First would be to expose the CAGD contributors on ways to turn mathematical ideas into plug-ins and second is to impart relevant CAGD theories to CAD/CG to practitioners. Both cases are discussed in detail and the final section shows examples to illustrate the importance of turning mathematical knowledge into innovations.

  12. Participatory innovation through user-designed knowledge sharing and Web2.0 in the Danish seed industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tveden-Nyborg, Svend; Boelt, Birte; Misfeldt, Morten

    seed scientists from Aarhus University will work together with seed growers and seed company consultants in designing a collaborative knowledge platform to optimise the diffusion of innovation between them. The aim of the Ph.D. project is to look at the processes within the three communities......For many years the Danish seed industry has been at the forefront with high quality seed production, but in a rapidly changing global market innovation is a key factor for the future of Danish seed production - one important element to innovation is transfer of knowledge. In a new Ph.D. project...... of practice in their participatory efforts to design and select technologies that will improve their knowledge dissemination through a shared understanding of learning and innovation within the Danish seed industry. The research questions are: •What boundary objects emerge between and within the collaborating...

  13. Participatory innovation through user-designed knowledge sharing and Web2.0 in the Danish seed industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tveden-Nyborg, Svend; Boelt, Birte; Misfeldt, Morten

    2010-01-01

    For many years the Danish seed industry has been at the forefront with high quality seed production, but in a rapidly changing global market innovation is a key factor for the future of Danish seed production - one important element to innovation is transfer of knowledge. In a new Ph.D. project...... seed scientists from Aarhus University will work together with seed growers and seed company consultants in designing a collaborative knowledge platform to optimise the diffusion of innovation between them. The aim of the Ph.D. project is to look at the processes within the three communities...... of practice in their participatory efforts to design and select technologies that will improve their knowledge dissemination through a shared understanding of learning and innovation within the Danish seed industry. The research questions are: •What boundary objects emerge between and within the collaborating...

  14. Mobile Cloud Computing for Telemedicine Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela GHEORGHE

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile Cloud Computing is a significant technology which combines emerging domains such as mobile computing and cloud computing which has conducted to the development of one of the most IT industry challenging and innovative trend. This is still at the early stage of devel-opment but its main characteristics, advantages and range of services which are provided by an internet-based cluster system have a strong impact on the process of developing telemedi-cine solutions for overcoming the wide challenges the medical system is confronting with. Mo-bile Cloud integrates cloud computing into the mobile environment and has the advantage of overcoming obstacles related to performance (e.g. battery life, storage, and bandwidth, envi-ronment (e.g. heterogeneity, scalability, availability and security (e.g. reliability and privacy which are commonly present at mobile computing level. In this paper, I will present a compre-hensive overview on mobile cloud computing including definitions, services and the use of this technology for developing telemedicine application.

  15. Enlarging the `knowledge toolbox': helping students prepare for an innovation-driven world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    Physics students graduate from their course of studies to enter the ``world of work.'' While for many years that transition meant joining a large corporation for a life-long career, this is no longer the case. Today's graduates will find their career with a series of organizations - often start-ups and small to mid-sized organizations - whose future depends on the ability to rapidly leverage technical knowledge into useful products and services. This session will discuss the value of preparing physics students to be innovators and entrepreneurs, both as a strategy to prepare them for future careers, as well as an opportunity to fully engage students in seeing the relevance of physics to ``real world'' challenges. The session will feature three case studies: 1) embedding core knowledge and skills within a technical content course; 2) building learning experiences around a team-based start-up exploration; 3) engaging an entire department in considering how to comprehensively include innovation & entrepreneurship themes in the curriculum. The session will conclude with information about how faculty members and institutions can access resources for adopting this approach to their course offerings.

  16. Innovators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NEA Today, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Describes various innovations that have been developed to enhance education. These innovations include: helping educators help at-risk students succeed; promoting high school journalism; ensuring quality online learning experiences; developing a student performing group that uses theater to address social issues; and having students design their…

  17. Feasibility of telemedicine in detecting diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaziri, Kamyar; Moshfeghi, Darius M; Moshfeghi, Andrew A

    2015-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy are important causes of visual impairment and blindness in the world. Because of recent advances and newly available treatment modalities along with the devastating consequences associated with late stages of these diseases, much attention has been paid to the importance of early detection and improving patient access to specialist care. Telemedicine or, more specifically, digital retinal imaging utilizing telemedical technology has been proposed as an important alternative screening and management strategy to help meet this demand. In this paper, we perform a literature review and analysis that evaluates the validity and feasibility of telemedicine in detecting diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. Understanding both the progress and barriers to progress that have been demonstrated in these two areas is important for future telemedicine research projects and innovations in telemedicine technology.

  18. Knowledge management in industrial districts as support of innovation. Proposal of a metrologic based on Strelnet model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposito Langa, M.; Capo Vicedo, J.; Masia Buades, M.

    2007-01-01

    One of the major challenges of endogenous development resides in how to improve the competitiveness of a territory. By fomenting innovation in industrial districts, one can give rise to strategic value capable of promoting competitive advantages and, at the same time, makes possible for greater sustainable development of the territory. To innovate implies making knowledge a key element; therefore those tasks that are dedicated to the management and incorporation of new knowledge in organizations will be fundamental in this process. Following this line, this research paper presents a methodology that helps with the management of knowledge in industrial districts. (Author) 36 refs

  19. External Knowledge Sourcing and Green Innovation Growth with Environmental and Energy Regulations: Evidence from Manufacturing in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Hou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper adopts the slacks-based measure-directional distance function (SBM-DDF, 2009 method for deriving the “Green Innovation Growth” rates of 28 manufacturing industries in China. The results indicate that the overall level of green innovation growth in China’s manufacturing is relatively low, with a declining trend. The tradeoffs among energy, environment and economy are rather sharp, and the “Porter Effect (1995” (environmental regulation will promote green technology innovation is not currently realized quickly in manufacturing. These evaluations imply an unsustainable development model in China, with significant differences among industries. By using a dynamic panel threshold model and employing an industry-level panel dataset for 2008–2014, we show that external knowledge sourcing has a significant negative impact on green innovation growth but with different constraints on R&D levels among industries. With the strengthening of R&D levels, gradually surpassing “critical mass”, the negative role of external knowledge sourcing in driving this mechanism becomes smaller and smaller; it has a non-linear relationship with the “threshold effect”. Consequently, we provide insights into the relationship among energy consumption, environmental pollution and technology innovation, and show how the heterogeneity of the R&D threshold affects differences in external knowledge sourcing and green innovation growth. These insights lead to a better understanding of the driving force, realizing path and policy design for green innovation growth.

  20. Utilisation of Business Advice in Small Innovative Firms: the Role of Trust and Tacit Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Łobacz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this paper is to expand the understanding of the influence of trust relationship, as well as tacit knowledge on the process of business advice utilisation in small innovative firms. Research Design & Methods: The  analysis  is  based  on  empirical  research  conducted with the use of the explorative approach. The multiple case study methodology was used. Findings: Trust relationships as well as tacit knowledge were identified as factors essential to the process of utilisation of business advice in small innovative firms. It was recognised that the significance of both factors is related not only to the process of advice, but also as a purpose of activities happening prior to advice. They are referred to as the initial phase. Implications & Recommendations: The  findings  provide  implications  for  further  research of the structure of the process of business advice utilisation. It is related to the inclusion of the “initial phase”, as well as to the  necessity to include both factors in further research. The paper also provides implicationsrelated to the measurement of business advice output, and recommendations on the construction of public policy instruments. Contribution & Value Added: The originality of this work lies in using the process perspective and qualitative methodology in the field of the utilisation of business advice. It extends our understanding of the processes of business advice with regard to trust, as well as the use of tacit knowledge. The original contribution is to add the “initial phase” to the description of the business advice process.

  1. The Current State of Telemedicine in Urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Adam; Rhee, Eugene; Gettman, Matthew; Spitz, Aaron

    2018-03-01

    Telemedicine use in urology is an evolving practice. In this article, the authors review the early experience of telemedicine specifically as it relates to urologic practice and discuss the future implications and the utility of telemedicine as it applies to other fields. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Innovation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In recent years ULA has emphasized advocacy, and contributed to progress towards new legislation (freedom of information, copyright, the ... East African Community e-government strategy) of importance to the library and ... Innovation Vol.

  3. The Importance of Attitude to Knowledge and Innovation for Performance of Manufacturing Enterprises Operating Either Locally Or Internationally

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Soniewicki

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Today knowledge management actions and innovation processes are very specific and complex topics. That is why this publication is focused on small and narrow aspect of these issues – their perception in only one category of entities, which are manufacturing companies. This paper analyzes and compares the attitude to knowledge management and innovation amid manufacturing enterprises operating locally only or internationally. It also checks the influence of various approaches to studied issues on creating mentioned businesses’ competitive advantage. Empirical study, in which 331 companies took part, has shown that enterprises in international process appreciate knowledge management and innovation more than their counterparts operating only on the local markets. Moreover, the research results demonstrated that knowledge and innovation appreciation by managers and employees is important for competitive advantage of every kind of manufacturing enterprises. Nevertheless, it is crucial to remember for those firms involved on foreign markets – the more a company is engaged in international operations the more attention it should pay to its knowledge and innovation processes.

  4. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 59: Japanese Technological Innovation. Implications for Large Commercial Aircraft and Knowledge Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kotler, Mindy L.

    1997-01-01

    This paper explores three factors-public policy, the Japanese (national) innovation system, and knowledge-that influence technological innovation in Japan. To establish a context for the paper, we examine Japanese culture and the U.S. and Japanese patent systems in the background section. A brief history of the Japanese aircraft industry as a source of knowledge and technology for other industries is presented. Japanese and U.S. alliances and linkages in three sectors-biotechnology, semiconductors, and large commercial aircraft (LCA)-and the importation, absorption, and diffusion of knowledge and technology are examined next. The paper closes with implications for diffusing knowledge and technology, U.S. public policy, and LCA.

  5. A multimedia telemedicine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Li; Dezhong, Yao; Jianqing, Li; Bin, Li; Ling, Wang

    2005-01-01

    A multimedia telemedicine system (MTS) using Transfer Control Protocol and Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) over the Internet is developed. Doctor with patient and doctor can communicate each other using this system. Real-time data, including audio, video and instant message (IM), and non-real-time data, including vital sign signals, radiological images with DICOM 3.0, file, bio-signal, bio-data and so on, can be exchanged on the system. This system's architecture is client/server mode. All data are encoded/compressed before transferring through Internet/Intranet. The real-time audio is encoded and decoded by MPEG (Moving Picture Experts Group) audio layer 3 algorithm and real-time video is encoded and decoded by MPEG-4. The software implementation of needed functionality without any externally attached hardware CODEC (Coder/Decoder) units enables the compact design with low cost. The real-time video has 25 frames per second at Local Area Network (LAN) and more than 20 frames per second at ADSL.

  6. Telemedicine and the law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilloy, W.J.; Lewalle, L.; Pilloy, S.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Aim: To identify the legal and ethical obstacles to the development of tele (nuclear) medicine, and to propose solutions. Material and method: Lessons have been drawn from 4 years practice of telemedicine between Luxemburg and 5 European centres. Problems so raised have been confronted with the US and EU literature. Results: Academic applications (web sites, teaching, hospital networks) are yet functional and are not dealt with here. Difficulties arise in case of 1st reading (e.g. 24 hour service), 2nd reading (expert advice) or distant reading (locum, service in remote places). In most applications, the relation is doctor to doctor; patient issues like quality of content, freedom of choice are minor. A body of laws, rules and directives apply to other issues. Confidentiality is ruled by the EU Directives on the Protection of Individuals and on Data Protection. Data are commonly encrypted/anonymized. Consent and free choice are ruled by the law of medicine. A doctor requiring 2nd advice stays in charge of the patient (no need to consent). Remote reading or 1st reading is usually based on prior agreement between doctors (like after hours service), and information or consent is recommended. Registration and accreditation are ruled by the Directives of the European Internal Market for Services. No obstacle to the delivery of services across the EU would remain if it is perceived that a tele-patient consults abroad rather than a tele-doctor practices abroad. (author)

  7. Innovation, entrepreneurial, knowledge, and business ecosystems: Old wine in new bottles?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scaringella, Laurent; Radziwon, Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    Rooted in the territorial approach, this theoretical paper offers a systematic literature review (SLR) of ecosystems based on a selection of 104 articles and books and their archetypes. First, we identify and discuss the four main types of ecosystems – business, innovation, entrepreneurial, and k...... empirical research. This study therefore links the ecosystem and territorial approaches under the complex evolutionary system umbrella by creating a theoretical framework that reflects the complex interconnection between models, theories, and emerging concepts.......Rooted in the territorial approach, this theoretical paper offers a systematic literature review (SLR) of ecosystems based on a selection of 104 articles and books and their archetypes. First, we identify and discuss the four main types of ecosystems – business, innovation, entrepreneurial......, and knowledge ecosystems – and indicate the presence of other transversal concepts. Second, we provide an overview of related and well-established theories from the territorial approach that have been largely omitted although they are ecosystem archetypes. Third, we identify the invariants across the four...

  8. Knowledge in the energy sector : what research and development expenditures and patents reveal about innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bointner, R.

    2015-01-01

    This work is dealing with knowledge in the energy sector and structured in three main parts. Part I is dealing with energy research expenditures and patents in IEA countries. A broad literature review on innovation drivers and barriers is followed by an analysis of the knowledge induced by public research and development expenditures (R&D) and patents in the energy sector. The cumulative knowledge stock induced by public R&D expenditures in 14 investigated IEA-countries is 102.3 bn. EUR in 2013. Nuclear energy has the largest share of 43.9 bn. EUR, followed by energy efficiency accounting for 14.9 bn. EUR, fossil fuels with 13.5 bn. EUR, and renewable energy with 12.1 bn. EUR. A regression analysis indicates a linear relation between the GDP and the cumulative knowledge, with each billion EUR of GDP leading to an additional knowledge of 3.1 mil. EUR. However, linearity is not given for single energy technologies. Further, the results show that appropriate public R&D funding for research and development associated with a subsequent promotion of the market diffusion of a niche technology may lead to a breakthrough of the respective technology. Part II aims to examine public expenditures for energy R&D in the European Union and the resulting energy knowledge stock. The energy R&D distribution among technologies of the EU member states and the European Commission was similar in the 1980s with a strong focus on nuclear energy. Nowadays energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies are of growing importance. For instance, the new programme Horizon 2020 is expected to have an equal distribution between non-nuclear and nuclear R&D expenditures. The cumulative energy knowledge stock induced by public R&D expenditures amounts to 35.8 bn. EUR in 2013, whereupon the EU member states’ share is more than three times larger than the European Commission’s share. Moreover, knowledge stock scenarios for the next decade are provided, followed by an investigation, if there

  9. What knowledge counts? Insights from an action research project using participatory video with grassroots innovation experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boni, A.; Leivas, M.; Talon, A.; De La Fuente, T.; Pellicer-Sifres, V.; Belda-Miquel, S.; Lopez-Fogues, A.; Arias, B

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a contribution on a participatory action-research process using Participatory Video (PV) methodology. Duringsix months, a group of 6 facilitators and 9 members of two grassroots innovation initiatives (Solar Dómada and Fuel Poverty Group) took part of the process and produced two videos during a five-st age PV process, from initial definition and planning to public screening and debate of the videos. We present some insightrs from that research using an original framework developed to analyze PV process: the eParc Cube. This framework examines the interaction between knowledge production, participation and communicative spaces that happen during PV. We conclude reflecting on the social relevance of that kind of research considering the impact among of the coresearchers of both process and products. (Author)

  10. From Space to Earth – Spaceflight for new Knowledge and Innovations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    In his presentation, titled "From Space to Earth – Spaceflight for new Knowledge and Innovations", Prof. Ernst Messerschmid will begin with his own spaceflight experience on the U.S. Space Shuttle Challenger in 1985 for the German Spacelab D1 Mission. With a few examples he will illustrate the relevance of using the microgravity environment for a wide range of multidisciplinary experiments. This is followed by a description of the International Space Station, the European contribution to the ISS, and how astronauts live and work over several months in space. In the next two decades, humanity will strive to fly back to the Moon, to asteroids and later on to Mars. New systems for transportation and infrastructure will form a complex mission scenario, operated by robotic systems and later by astronauts. Today a wide range of scientific or technological objectives are carried out in space, mostly through international cooperation. Commercial missions are funded by the private sector. Space is now a scienti...

  11. Preservation vs Innovation. Sustainable rehabilitation in architectural preservation contexts: knowledge, techniques, languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Gulli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The theme of the preservation of the characteristics of protected architectural heritage must nowadays be correlated to new requirements for the adaptation of existing buildings to performance standards. This subject raises new questions about the theoretical assumptions and tools to be adopted to coherently answer that request. Focusing on the theme of energy requalification of heritage buildings - the primary focus of interest for the reduction of pollution emissions, according to Horizon 2020 objectives - the preservation of the meanings of an architecture work and of its linguistic, typological and material characteristics proofs to be essential for protection interventions on buildings. However this can’t be considered exhaustive, as the raised issue necessarily requires to be further addressed within the speculative domain of Technique, or rather to open out to the contribution that innovation processes and methods belonging to the field of scientific knowledge could offer.

  12. Collaborative open training with serious games: Relations, culture, knowledge, innovation, and desire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oihab Allal-Chérif

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the convergence between MOOCs (massive open online courses and serious games, two new types of information systems designed to improve learning. The aim of this research is to identify the areas of influence in collaborative open training serious games developed by large firms for a significant cost and made available for free to the public and to students according to the same principles as MOOCs. The methodology of this exploratory research is based on Kurt Lewin's (1945 statement “nothing is so practical as a good theory” and takes the opposite view. The deep observation of three serious games from L’Oréal, IBM, and Thales results in a theoretical model with five distinct influence domains of serious games: relations, culture, knowledge, innovation, and desire. This model is then discussed and tested on eight other serious games from major industrial companies such as General Electric, Nestlé, and Cisco.

  13. How to establish knowledge sharing from the very first moment in critical and risky Business Model Innovation project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Peter; Aagaard, Annabeth; Ulldall, Lene

    Joint action and knowledge sharing are fundamental aspects of business model innovation for businesses to meet the complex Business Model Innovation challenges; for example, think about 12 business jointly innovating on the establishment of a new concept of a balanced energy plant project where...... practice tools have had little to say on this topic because for many years perception, action, and cognition have been studied without taking their role in social interaction related to BMI seriously (Sebanz 2006). However the establishment of a “room” for social BMI interaction is essential at the very...

  14. The business of telemedicine: strategy primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeRouge, Cynthia; Tulu, Bengisu; Forducey, Pamela

    2010-10-01

    There is some tacit understanding that telemedicine can provide cost efficiency along with increased access and equality of care for the geographically disadvantaged. However, concrete strategic guidance for healthcare organizations to attain these benefits is fragmented and limited in existing literature. Telemedicine programs need to move from a grant-funded to a profit-centered status to sustain their existence. This article extends work presented at a recent American Telemedicine Association Business and Finance Special Interest Group course to provide a conceptual framework for strategic planning and for effectively implementing telemedicine programs. An expert panel of telemedicine coordinators provides insight and recommendations.

  15. Inter-organisational knowledge transfer: building and sustaining the sources of innovation in nuclear safety and security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staude, Fabio; Ramirez, Matias

    2013-01-01

    The current complexity of innovation processes has led to an understanding that the models of innovation have changed from linear model to a model characterised by multiple interactions and complex networks. Within this more multifaceted environment, has emerged a new set of actors, generally termed as intermediaries, performing a variety of tasks in the innovation process. The innovation literature has recognised various important supporting activities performed by intermediaries, by linking and facilitating the movement of information and knowledge between actors within an innovation system, in order to fill information gaps. Complementary, we make the assumption that the intermediary can assume a more central role in the innovation process, performing activities beyond to filling information gaps, since they intervene to create, prioritise, and articulate meaning to practices. Under this argument, this paper explores how intermediaries work in making innovation happen in the Brazilian nuclear safety and security area, demonstrating the influence of intermediary organisations in improving nuclear regulatory activities. We make sense of these processes by analyzing intermediary roles in the recent regulatory activities improvements, specifically those related to the practices involving radiation sources in medicine. Thus, through an empirical case study, this paper examines the issue of intermediation in a wide sense, including strategic activities preformed by intermediaries, associated with accessing, diffusing, coordinating and enabling knowledge activities. (author)

  16. From university research to innovation: Detecting knowledge transfer via text mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woltmann, S.; Clemmensen, L.; Alkærsig, L

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge transfer by universities is a top priority in innovation policy and a primary purpose for public research funding, due to being an important driver of technical change and innovation. Current empirical research on the impact of university research relies mainly on formal databases and indicators such as patents, collaborative publications and license agreements, to assess the contribution to the socioeconomic surrounding of universities. In this study, we present an extension of the current empirical framework by applying new computational methods, namely text mining and pattern recognition. Text samples for this purpose can include files containing social media contents, company websites and annual reports. The empirical focus in the present study is on the technical sciences and in particular on the case of the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). We generated two independent text collections (corpora) to identify correlations of university publications and company webpages. One corpus representing the company sites, serving as sample of the private economy and a second corpus, providing the reference to the university research, containing relevant publications. We associated the former with the latter to obtain insights into possible text and semantic relatedness. The text mining methods are extrapolating the correlations, semantic patterns and content comparison of the two corpora to define the document relatedness. We expect the development of a novel tool using contemporary techniques for the measurement of public research impact. The approach aims to be applicable across universities and thus enable a more holistic comparable assessment. This rely less on formal databases, which is certainly beneficial in terms of the data reliability. We seek to provide a supplementary perspective for the detection of the dissemination of university research and hereby enable policy makers to gain additional insights of (informal) contributions of knowledge

  17. Incorporation of Nuclear Knowledge Management to the Integrated System of Quality and Technological Innovation in Cubaenergía

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oviedo Rivero, I.; González García, A.; Amado Picasso, M.; Yera López, B.; Contreras, M.; López Núñez, A.; García Rodríguez, B.; Elías Hardy, L. L.; Rivero Blanco, J. M.; Peña Tornet, A.; Quintana Castillo, N.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Technical knowledge management and innovation become important tools for organizations to meet the needs and expectations of the market and society in general; especially those related to the peaceful use of nuclear energy. Since 2011 Cubaenergia, under the model of the UNE 166002, integrated process management Scientific and Technological Innovation to the requirements of NC-ISO 9001, compliance with national regulations applicable to the sector. In September 2015 the new ISO 9001 includes a clause that makes explicit mention knowledge. Although this clause is not a standard for knowledge management nor does it imply its obligatory; Cubaenergia decided to expand its integrated management system to include the Nuclear Knowledge Management system. In this article the conceptual framework for the integration of these three systems, diagnosis in the organization and the proposed design and implementation plan of management knowledge management integrated analyzes R&D and the quality management system in Cubaenergía. (author

  18. The new world of discovery, invention, and innovation: convergence of knowledge, technology, and society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roco, Mihail C.; Bainbridge, William S.

    2013-09-01

    Convergence of knowledge and technology for the benefit of society (CKTS) is the core opportunity for progress in the twenty-first century. CKTS is defined as the escalating and transformative interactions among seemingly different disciplines, technologies, communities, and domains of human activity to achieve mutual compatibility, synergism, and integration, and through this process to create added value and branch out to meet shared goals. Convergence has been progressing by stages over the past several decades, beginning with nanotechnology for the material world, followed by convergence of nanotechnology, biotechnology, information, and cognitive science (NBIC) for emerging technologies. CKTS is the third level of convergence. It suggests a general process to advance creativity, innovation, and societal progress based on five general purpose principles: (1) the interdependence of all components of nature and society, (2) decision analysis for research, development, and applications based on dynamic system-logic deduction, (3) enhancement of creativity and innovation through evolutionary processes of convergence that combines existing principles and divergence that generates new ones, (4) the utility of higher-level cross-domain languages to generate new solutions and support transfer of new knowledge, and (5) the value of vision-inspired basic research embodied in grand challenges. CKTS is a general purpose approach in knowledge society. It allows society to answer questions and resolve problems that isolated capabilities cannot, as well as to create new competencies, knowledge, and technologies on this basis. Possible solutions are outlined for key societal challenges in the next decade, including support for foundational emerging technologies NBIC to penetrate essential platforms of human activity and create new industries and jobs, improve lifelong wellness and human potential, achieve personalized and integrated healthcare and education, and secure a

  19. The new world of discovery, invention, and innovation: convergence of knowledge, technology, and society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roco, Mihail C.; Bainbridge, William S.

    2013-01-01

    Convergence of knowledge and technology for the benefit of society (CKTS) is the core opportunity for progress in the twenty-first century. CKTS is defined as the escalating and transformative interactions among seemingly different disciplines, technologies, communities, and domains of human activity to achieve mutual compatibility, synergism, and integration, and through this process to create added value and branch out to meet shared goals. Convergence has been progressing by stages over the past several decades, beginning with nanotechnology for the material world, followed by convergence of nanotechnology, biotechnology, information, and cognitive science (NBIC) for emerging technologies. CKTS is the third level of convergence. It suggests a general process to advance creativity, innovation, and societal progress based on five general purpose principles: (1) the interdependence of all components of nature and society, (2) decision analysis for research, development, and applications based on dynamic system-logic deduction, (3) enhancement of creativity and innovation through evolutionary processes of convergence that combines existing principles and divergence that generates new ones, (4) the utility of higher-level cross-domain languages to generate new solutions and support transfer of new knowledge, and (5) the value of vision-inspired basic research embodied in grand challenges. CKTS is a general purpose approach in knowledge society. It allows society to answer questions and resolve problems that isolated capabilities cannot, as well as to create new competencies, knowledge, and technologies on this basis. Possible solutions are outlined for key societal challenges in the next decade, including support for foundational emerging technologies NBIC to penetrate essential platforms of human activity and create new industries and jobs, improve lifelong wellness and human potential, achieve personalized and integrated healthcare and education, and secure a

  20. The new world of discovery, invention, and innovation: convergence of knowledge, technology, and society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roco, Mihail C., E-mail: mroco@nsf.gov; Bainbridge, William S. [National Science Foundation (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Convergence of knowledge and technology for the benefit of society (CKTS) is the core opportunity for progress in the twenty-first century. CKTS is defined as the escalating and transformative interactions among seemingly different disciplines, technologies, communities, and domains of human activity to achieve mutual compatibility, synergism, and integration, and through this process to create added value and branch out to meet shared goals. Convergence has been progressing by stages over the past several decades, beginning with nanotechnology for the material world, followed by convergence of nanotechnology, biotechnology, information, and cognitive science (NBIC) for emerging technologies. CKTS is the third level of convergence. It suggests a general process to advance creativity, innovation, and societal progress based on five general purpose principles: (1) the interdependence of all components of nature and society, (2) decision analysis for research, development, and applications based on dynamic system-logic deduction, (3) enhancement of creativity and innovation through evolutionary processes of convergence that combines existing principles and divergence that generates new ones, (4) the utility of higher-level cross-domain languages to generate new solutions and support transfer of new knowledge, and (5) the value of vision-inspired basic research embodied in grand challenges. CKTS is a general purpose approach in knowledge society. It allows society to answer questions and resolve problems that isolated capabilities cannot, as well as to create new competencies, knowledge, and technologies on this basis. Possible solutions are outlined for key societal challenges in the next decade, including support for foundational emerging technologies NBIC to penetrate essential platforms of human activity and create new industries and jobs, improve lifelong wellness and human potential, achieve personalized and integrated healthcare and education, and secure a

  1. Characterizing the Danish telemedicine ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manikas, Konstantinos; Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2013-01-01

    and interoperability issues, silo solutions, and lack of guidelines and standards. In this paper, we characterise the ecosystem evolved around the telemedicine services in Denmark and study the actors involved in this ecosystem. We establish a method for this study, where we define two actor roles and ways...... of characterizing actor contributions, and apply the method to the largest healthcare region of Denmark. Our findings reveal an ecosystem that is relatively closed to new actors, where the actors tend to be related to single telemedicine applications, the applications have low connectivity, and the most influential...... actors of the ecosystem can be characterised as both being beneficial and inhibitory to the ecosystem prosperity....

  2. Health information systems to improve health care: A telemedicine case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liezel Cilliers

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: E-health has been identified as an integral part of the future of South African public healthcare. Telemedicine was first introduced in South Africa in 1997 and since then the cost of running the Telemedicine projects has increased substantially. Despite these efforts to introduce the system, only 34% of the Telemedicine sites in South Africa are functional at present. Objectives: Literature has suggested that one of the barriers to the successful implementation of health information systems is the user acceptance by health care workers of systems such as Telemedicine. This study investigated the user acceptance of Telemedicine in the public health care system in the Eastern Cape Province, making use of the Unified Theory of the Use and Acceptance of Technology. Method: The study employed a quantitative survey approach. A questionnaire was developed making use of existing literature and was distributed to various clinics around the province where Telemedicine has been implemented. Statistics were produced making use of Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS. Results: In general, the health care workers did understand the value and benefit of health information systems to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the health care system. The barriers to the effective implementation of a health information system include the lack of knowledge and the lack of awareness regarding the Telemedicine system. This in turn means that the user is apprehensive when making use of the system thus contributing to less frequent usage. Conclusion: Health care workers do acknowledge that information systems can help to increase the effectiveness of the health care system. In general, the acceptance of Telemedicine in the Eastern Cape Department of Health is positive, but in order to integrate it into standard work practices, more must be done with regards to the promotion and education of telemedicine.

  3. State Policies Influence Medicare Telemedicine Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Jonathan D; Doarn, Charles R; Aly, Reem

    2016-01-01

    Medicare policy regarding telemedicine reimbursement has changed little since 2000. Many individual states, however, have added telemedicine reimbursement for either Medicaid and/or commercial payers over the same period. Because telemedicine programs must serve patients from all or most payers, it is likely that these state-level policy changes have significant impacts on telemedicine program viability and utilization of services from all payers, not just those services and payers affected directly by state policy. This report explores the impact of two significant state-level policy changes-one expanding Medicaid telemedicine coverage and the other introducing telemedicine parity for commercial payers-on Medicare utilization in the affected states. Medicare claims data from 2011-2013 were examined for states in the Great Lakes region. All valid claims for live interactive telemedicine professional fees were extracted and linked to their states of origin. Allowed encounters and expenditures were calculated in total and on a per 1,000 members per year basis to standardize against changes in the Medicare population by state and year. Medicare telemedicine encounters and professional fee expenditures grew sharply following changes in state Medicaid and commercial payer policy in the examined states. Medicare utilization in Illinois grew by 173% in 2012 (over 2011) following Medicaid coverage expansion, and Medicare utilization in Michigan grew by 118% in 2013 (over 2012) following adoption of telemedicine parity for commercial payers. By contrast, annual Medicare telemedicine utilization growth in surrounding states (in which there were no significant policy changes during these years) varied somewhat but showed no discernible pattern. Although Medicare telemedicine policy has changed little since its inception, changes in state policies with regard to telemedicine reimbursement appear to have significant impacts on the practical viability of telemedicine programs

  4. Examining Structural Relationships between Work Engagement, Organizational Procedural Justice, Knowledge Sharing, and Innovative Work Behavior for Sustainable Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woocheol Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of the human/social dimension of organizational sustainability, this area of scholastic endeavor has received relatively little attention when compared to the economic and environmental dimensions of sustainability. On the basis of social exchange theory, this study posited the important role that employee work engagement is a key component for improving human performance for organizational sustainability. In order to do so, it suggests the important role that employee work engagement has on the relationships among various factors in the organization, including organizational procedural justice, knowledge sharing, and innovative work behaviors. A total of 400 complete responses from full-time employees in Korean organizations were used for the purpose of data analysis with structural equation modeling (SEM. The results demonstrated that organizational procedural justice is positively related with employee work engagement, knowledge sharing, and innovative work behavior. In addition, work engagement enhances employee knowledge sharing and innovative work behavior, and knowledge sharing enhances innovative work behavior. With regard to the mechanisms of these relationships, work engagement and knowledge sharing acted as significant mediators. Based on the findings, we suggested relevant research implications and recommendations for future research on sustainable organizations.

  5. Workplace Development as Part of Broad-based Innovation Policy: Exploiting and Exploring Three Types of Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuomo Alasoini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at the possibilities that a broad-based innovation policy contained by the national innovation strategy recently adopted in Finland opens up for the promotion of workplace innovations and examines the types of knowledge needed in workplace development. The author highlights the interconnections between workplace development and the prerequisites of both economic growth and the preservation of the Finnish welfare state. The paper also aims to explain why, in addition to the productivity of work, improving the quality of working life should feature as an increasingly important aim in the innovation policy of the future. An argument for the need of three types of knowledge in workplace development - design knowledge, process knowledge and dissemination knowledge - is made, together with an overview on new developments in each of those three domains. In conclusion, the author demonstrates how problems in the productivity of work and the quality of working life can be simultaneously tackled with at work organization level through two kinds of development approaches.

  6. Innovation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of Innovation journal of appropriate librarianship and information work in Southern Africa is to publish material on libraries, information supply and other related matters in South and Southern Africa. Vol 45 (2012). DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access ...

  7. Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torfing, Jacob; Ricard, Lykke Margot

    2017-01-01

    Innovation i krydsfeltet mellem forskellige styringsparadigmer i offentlige organisationer. New Public Governance gør det muligt at skabe offentlig værdi på nye måder. Men NPG er ingen trylledrik, der fra den ene dag til den anden skaber balance mellem borgernes store forventninger og en trængt ø...

  8. Ethnodrama: An Innovative Knowledge Translation Tool in the Management of Lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shahid; Quinlan, Elizabeth; McMullen, Linda; Thomas, Roanne; Fichtner, Pam; Block, Janice

    2015-01-01

    Lymphedema can cause significant physical impairment and quality-of-life issues. Yet there is a gap in knowledge about lymphedema among breast cancer survivors (BCS), and health care professionals (HCP). Ethnodrama is an innovative knowledge translation strategy that uses theatrical performances for dissemination of research results. We evaluated the impact of live ethnodrama on HCP' and BCS' awareness and attitudes in relation to impact of lymphedema on BCS' lives. Ethnodrama performances were developed by script writers and a theatre director in collaboration with the investigators and BCS using data from published research and pre-performances workshops. Six interactive live performances were given to audiences of BCS, HCP, and community members in four cities across Canada. After watching these live performances, members of the audiences were asked to complete a paper-based questionnaire regarding their knowledge of lymphedema, and their attitudes and practices toward lymphedema. Of 238 audience members who participated in the survey, 55 (23%) were BCS and 85 (37.5%) were HCP. Most members rated the performances as very effective in changing their (84%) or other people's (93%) understanding of lymphedema; 96% reported being motivated to seek additional information on lymphedema, and 72% of HCP anticipated changes in their practices related to lymphedema screening. Overall no significant differences were noted in responses to ethnodrama between BCS and HCP. Open-ended responses were supportive of the findings from the closed-ended questions. Our results indicate that ethnodrama performances effectively convey information and positively affecting changes in HCP' and BCS' attitudes toward lymphedema.

  9. Telemedicine and Diabetic Eye Disease

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    We know that the leading cause of blindness in working-age adults is eye disease related to poorly managed diabetes. In a prevention research study, telemedicine was shown to increase the number of people getting screened for diabetic eye disease.

  10. Arizona TeleMedicine Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona Univ., Tucson. Coll. of Medicine.

    Designed to provide health services for American Indians living on rurally isolated reservations, the Arizona TeleMedicine Project proposes to link Phoenix and Tucson medical centers, via a statewide telecommunications system, with the Hopi, San Carlos Apache, Papago, Navajo, and White Mountain Apache reservations. Advisory boards are being…

  11. Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Présenté par FutuRIS, plate-forme prospective sur la recherche, l’innovation et la société animée par l’Association Nationale de la Recherche et de la Technologie, ce volume livre un panorama du système français de recherche et d’innovation dans son environnement européen. Sont abordés dans une première partie les champs décisionnels concernés, les politiques nationales menées en matière de R&D, les relations entre enseignement supérieur et recherche et l’Espace européen de la recherche à l’h...

  12. INNOVATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Niels Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Kravet om innovation og kreativitet er på flere måder en stor og en ny udfordring for voksenuddannelserne. Det udfordrer det didaktiske dilemma, det at vi skal gøres til kompetente og frie mennesker gennem pædagogiske handlinger, som netop pålægger os en ufrihed. – Men hvor denne ufrihed tidligere...... kunne begrundes med, at skolen eller uddannelsen vidste bedre, så er det ikke længere tilfældet. Skolen skal sørge for, at vi lærer noget – og ikke noget andet. Men det kan ikke længere med bestemthed afgøres, hvad det er vi skal lære i skolen, fordi det nye, det kreative og ikke mindst innovative...

  13. Wireless and mobile systems in telemedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Safdari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is necessary to deploy mobile and wireless systems in healthcare, because they have many benefits for healthcare systems. The objectives of this article were introducing various systems, applications, and standards of the wireless and mobile telemedicine. Material and Methods: This review study was conducted in 2010. To conduct the study, published articles in the years 2005 to 2012, in English with an emphasis on wireless and mobile technologies in health were studied. Search was done with key words include telemedicine, wireless health systems, health and telecommunications technology in databases including Pubmed, Science Direct, Google Scholar, Web of Sciences, Proquest. The collected data were analyzed. Results: Telemedicine system in the ambulance, telemedicine systems in space, telecardiology systems, EEG system, ultrasound system are some types of wireless and mobile systems in telemedicine. PDA-based mobile and wireless telemedicine application, based PDA drug application, and patient tracking application are some of wireless and mobile applications of telemedicine. The most important standards of wireless and mobile telemedicine are HL7, DICOM, SNOMed, and ICD-9-CM. Conclusion: There are many challenges in the wireless and mobile systems in telemedicine, despite the many benefits. Slow speed in sending pictures and video, lack of attention to the privacy in the design of these systems, environmental variables and the number of users during the day are some of these challenges. It is recommended to consider these challenges during the planning and designing of wireless and mobile systems in telemedicine.

  14. Telemedicine and rural health care applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Anthony

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Telemedicine has the potential to help facilitate the delivery of health services to rural areas. In the right circumstances, telemedicine may also be useful for the delivery of education and teaching programmes and the facilitation of administrative meetings. In this paper reference is made to a variety of telemedicine applications in Australia and other countries including telepaediatrics, home telehealth, critical care telemedicine for new born babies, telemedicine in developing countries, health screening via e-mail, and teleradiology. These applications represent some of the broad range of telemedicine applications possible. An overriding imperative is to focus on the clinical problem first with careful consideration given to the significant organisational changes which are associated with the introduction of a new service or alternative method of service delivery. For telemedicine to be effective it is also important that all sites involved are adequately resourced in terms of staff, equipment, telecommunications, technical support and training. In addition, there are a number of logistical factors which are important when considering the development of a telemedicine service including site selection, clinician empowerment, telemedicine management, technological requirements, user training, telemedicine evaluation, and information sharing through publication.

  15. Domestic and foreign knowledge sources for innovation in internationalized Production Networks: the automotive and the iron and steel cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernan Alejandro Morero

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the relative relevance of domestic knowledge sources for innovation in internationalized production activities in an emerging economy. Two Production Networks from Argentina with a different kind of internationalization were considered: organized around subsidiaries of multinational companies (the automotive case and organized around local headquarters (the iron and steel case. A multiple factor analysis was carried out and cluster techniques were applied using a specific innovation survey done to 163 automotive and iron and steel firms from Argentina from the period of 2001 to2005, to evaluate the relative importance of domestic and foreign knowledge sources. The main finding is that in a production network organized around domestic headquarters the best innovative performance underrates the importance of international linkages, in comparison with networks organized around foreign subsidiaries.

  16. Perspectives and expectations for telemedicine opportunities from families of nursing home residents and caregivers in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jun-Yih; Chen, Liang-Kung; Chang, Chia-Ching

    2009-07-01

    This study assessed current perspectives and expectations for telemedicine by nursing home caregivers and families of nursing home patients in Taipei, Taiwan. A total of 116 interviews were conducted with family members (n=37) and caregivers (n=79) using an original, four-part questionnaire devised to assess the expectations and concerns related to prospective telemedicine opportunities, including consumer attitude, knowledge of and interest in medicine, concerns and worries about telemedicine, and anticipated benefits of telemedicine. Statistical significance between the two groups was observed in sex, age, and educational level (all pexpectations concerning benefits of telemedicine. More than 60% of family members or caregivers expected improved efficiency and quality of hospital and nursing home health care, greater rapport between nursing homes and either staff or patients, reduced overall medical costs of caregiving, and reduced staff/caregiver working hours. The acceptable cost was anything up to $15.30 USD per month. Nursing home caregivers and families of nursing home patients are highly interested in telemedicine; however, they are only willing to pay a slightly higher cost of nursing care for this service. The challenge for the future in this industry is to balance peoples' demands and telemedicine's associated costs. Results of this study suggest that caregivers and families of nursing home residents favour telemedicine implementation to provide enhanced care coordination in nursing homes when economic circumstances are favourable.

  17. Hanging with the Right Crowd: Crowdsourcing as a New Business Practice for Innovation, Productivity, Knowledge Capture, and Marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Lisa B.

    2013-01-01

    In today's connected world, the reach of the Internet and collaborative social media tools have opened up new opportunities for individuals, regardless of their location, to share their knowledge, expertise, and creativity with others. These tools have also opened up opportunities for organizations to connect with new sources of innovation to…

  18. The Role of Knowledge Sharing in Enhancing Innovation: A Comparative Study of Public and Private Higher Education Institutions in Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Husseini, Sawasn; Elbeltagi, Ibrahim

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports on an examination of the impact of knowledge sharing on product and process innovation. In it we try to identify the similarities and differences between these impacts in public and private Higher Education (HE) Institutions in Iraq. A mixed methods approach was conducted using 486 valid responses to test the causal…

  19. The public knowledge challenge:Where the management of cities and business converge towards innovation and prosperity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijn, van S.; Tissen, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    The creative and innovative power of cities and regions is of decisive importance in materializing the Knowledge Based Economy on such a scale, that it will ultimately have a positive impact on the prosperity of citizens. (Grotenhuis 2007, Van Winden, Van den Berg en Pol 2007, Florida 2005, Landers

  20. The public knowledge challenge : Where the management of cities and businesses converge towards creativity, innovation and prosperity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijn, van S.; Tissen, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    The creative and innovative power of cities and regions is of decisive importance in materialising the knowledge-based economy on such a scale, that it will ultimately have a positive impact on the prosperity of citizens (Grotenhuis 2007, Van Winden et al. 2007, Florida 2005). Similar to what

  1. Hidden talents: mapping innovations and knowledge management competencies in the sunflower value chain in Lira District, Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oremo, M.

    2008-01-01

    A study was undertaken on the sunflower value chain in Lira district of Uganda. The objective of the study was twofold: First to catalogue innovations that have been developed or introduced in the value chain over a 10 year trajectory (1998-2007). The second objective was to map the knowledge

  2. Knowledge investments, business R&D and innovativeness of countries – A qualitative meta-analytic comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hemert, P.P.; Nijkamp, P.

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between knowledge investments, innovation and competitiveness is an important topic in both academic research and economic policy and has been studied extensively over the past decades. Nowadays, investments in private and public R&D are believed to make up the heart of a modern

  3. Collaboration, Knowledge and Innovation toward a Welfare Society: The Case of the Board of Social Farming in Valdera (Tuscany), Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Iacovo, Francesco; Moruzzo, Roberta; Rossignoli, Cristiano M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Through an analysis of a social farming (SF) case study, this article investigates how collaboration and knowledge co-creation between different actors can support the process of rural transition in order to stimulate innovation in the welfare system using agricultural resources. Methodology: We used the "Antecedent-Process-Outcome…

  4. Awaking the Public Sector with Strategic Corporate Philanthropy: Revitalizing the Public Servant's Organizational Knowledge, Innovative Capability, and Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Janese Marie

    2011-01-01

    Given the perils of today's dynamic and resource-constrained environment, intellectual capital has become a source of competitive advantage for public sector organizations. Composed of three elements--organizational knowledge, innovative capability, and organizational commitment--intellectual capital is an asset that cannot simply be bought or…

  5. Making medical treatments resilient to technological disruptions in telemedicine systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larburu Rubio, Nekane; Widya, I.A.; Bults, Richard G.A.; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    Telemedicine depends on Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to support remote treatment of patients. This dependency requires the telemedicine system design to be resilient for ICT performance degradation or subsystem failures. Nevertheless, using telemedicine systems create a dependency

  6. The business case for telemedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henny, Chris; Hartington, Katharine; Scott, Stuart; Tveiten, Agnar; Canals, Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Following the coming into force of the International Labour Organisation Maritime Labour Convention (ILO/MLC) and International Maritime Organisation Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping, Manila 2010 (IMO/STCW) amendments, the objective of this article is to provide the shipping community with an initial assessment of the economic reasons and business case, in support of both publicly financed and private telemedicine being implemented on board commercial vessels. It provides the global scale of the requirement, the number of Telemedicine Assistance Services (TMAS) calls handled by participating TMAS, the average direct and indirect costs incurred by both TMAS and ship operators, responding to medical emergencies, and also provides a calculation of the market size of about 760 million Euro/year. It estimates a return on investment per ship, of implementing telemedicine on board to meet the MLC and STCW requirements at less than 1 year. 1. There are both financial and soft benefits, such as crew retention and being perceived as a quality employer offering a telemedicine service on board. 2. It is quite possible to obtain a 20% savings to the industry of perhaps 152 million Euro/year from the deployment of telemedicine on board. 3. The deployment of a telemedical service on ships is an opportunity to encourage further cooperation between TMAS and also with the private TMAS sector. 4. There is clearly a great need, on a global basis, for more cooperation, particularly in standardisation of pre-boarding medical files available, the equipmentrequired on board at a minimum, and level of service quality provided. 5. A collection of a common TMAS annual set of normalised statistics from the stakeholders in the maritime industry is needed. Should someone not be tasked with collecting this? 6. Open registries and countries where the private sector only providestele medicine, should be encouraged to work with the global public TMAS system and contribute to

  7. e-ENERCA: telemedicine platform for rare anaemias

    OpenAIRE

    Béatrice Gulbis; María del Mar Mañú Pereira; Emilio J. Armaza Armaza; Pilar Nicolás; for the ENERCA working group

    2014-01-01

    The creation of a telemedicine, tele-expertise platform opens a new challenge within the European Network for Rare and Congenital Anaemias (ENERCA; www.enerca.org). This is a cornerstone in the field of rare anaemias, in which national expertise is usually scarce and a significant number of patients remain undiagnosed. Experts in rare diseases are specially needed of shared knowledge platforms offering the possibility of a faster and more accurate diagnosis and the availability of a better pa...

  8. Engaging Elderly People in Telemedicine Through Gamification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, Monique; Dekker - van Weering, Marit; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Background Telemedicine can alleviate the increasing demand for elderly care caused by the rapidly aging population. However, user adherence to technology in telemedicine interventions is low and decreases over time. Therefore, there is a need for methods to increase adherence, specifically of the elderly user. A strategy that has recently emerged to address this problem is gamification. It is the application of game elements to nongame fields to motivate and increase user activity and retention. Objective This research aims to (1) provide an overview of existing theoretical frameworks for gamification and explore methods that specifically target the elderly user and (2) explore user classification theories for tailoring game content to the elderly user. This knowledge will provide a foundation for creating a new framework for applying gamification in telemedicine applications to effectively engage the elderly user by increasing and maintaining adherence. Methods We performed a broad Internet search using scientific and nonscientific search engines and included information that described either of the following subjects: the conceptualization of gamification, methods to engage elderly users through gamification, or user classification theories for tailored game content. Results Our search showed two main approaches concerning frameworks for gamification: from business practices, which mostly aim for more revenue, emerge an applied approach, while academia frameworks are developed incorporating theories on motivation while often aiming for lasting engagement. The search provided limited information regarding the application of gamification to engage elderly users, and a significant gap in knowledge on the effectiveness of a gamified application in practice. Several approaches for classifying users in general were found, based on archetypes and reasons to play, and we present them along with their corresponding taxonomies. The overview we created indicates great

  9. Engaging Elderly People in Telemedicine Through Gamification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vette, Frederiek; Tabak, Monique; Dekker-van Weering, Marit; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam

    2015-12-18

    Telemedicine can alleviate the increasing demand for elderly care caused by the rapidly aging population. However, user adherence to technology in telemedicine interventions is low and decreases over time. Therefore, there is a need for methods to increase adherence, specifically of the elderly user. A strategy that has recently emerged to address this problem is gamification. It is the application of game elements to nongame fields to motivate and increase user activity and retention. This research aims to (1) provide an overview of existing theoretical frameworks for gamification and explore methods that specifically target the elderly user and (2) explore user classification theories for tailoring game content to the elderly user. This knowledge will provide a foundation for creating a new framework for applying gamification in telemedicine applications to effectively engage the elderly user by increasing and maintaining adherence. We performed a broad Internet search using scientific and nonscientific search engines and included information that described either of the following subjects: the conceptualization of gamification, methods to engage elderly users through gamification, or user classification theories for tailored game content. Our search showed two main approaches concerning frameworks for gamification: from business practices, which mostly aim for more revenue, emerge an applied approach, while academia frameworks are developed incorporating theories on motivation while often aiming for lasting engagement. The search provided limited information regarding the application of gamification to engage elderly users, and a significant gap in knowledge on the effectiveness of a gamified application in practice. Several approaches for classifying users in general were found, based on archetypes and reasons to play, and we present them along with their corresponding taxonomies. The overview we created indicates great connectivity between these taxonomies

  10. Arab-Norman Heritage: State of Knowledge and New Actions and Innovative Proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescia, R.; Scianna, A.

    2017-05-01

    This paper wants to offers a perlustrative recognition on the 'state of the studies', concerning to the Arab-Norman architecture of Palermo, admissed by Unesco in 2015 and explain a research in progress which, starting from re-cognition of the peculiarities of the restoration work carried out on it, consisting of the identification of authentic material-constructive values and / or reconstruction, it orients itself to develop a concrete proposal of filing for a more conscious knowledge. She, moreover, wants contribute to real enhancement through the use of targeted communication strategies that use innovative means capable, on one hand, to attracting the greatest possible number of users, on the other hand, to plan further interventions of conservation coherent with the previous data. The product that you want to achieve is that of a Bank-data that allows the "networking" of monumental emergencies, that become the virtual itineraries waypoint, which can be implemented periodically and whose boards meet the cataloging needs and documentation but with reference at geo-referred systems, compatible with the conservation and management of heritage and with need of usability, real and virtual.

  11. A review of telemedicine business models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shengnan; Cheng, Alice; Mehta, Khanjan

    2013-04-01

    Telemedicine has become an increasingly popular option for long-distance/virtual medical care and education, but many telemedicine ventures fail to grow beyond the initial pilot stage. Studying the business models of successful telemedicine ventures can help develop business strategies for upcoming ventures. This article describes business models of eight telemedicine ventures from different regions of the world using Osterwalder's "Business Model Canvas." The ventures are chosen on the basis of their apparent success and their diverse value chains. The business models are compared to draw inferences and lessons regarding their business strategy and contextual factors that influenced it. Key differences between telemedicine business practices in developing and developed countries are also discussed. The purpose of this article is to inform and inspire the business strategy of the next generation of telemedicine ventures to be economically sustainable and to successfully address local healthcare challenges.

  12. The Integrated Knowledge Space - the Foundation for Enhancing the Effectiveness of the University’s Innovative Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury TELNOV

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the implementation of Integrated Knowledge Space as an effective method for knowledge management in a global university network which will integrate all interested parties of the educational space: the faculty, scholars and business people within the framework of distributed departments on the basis of Information Centre of Disciplines (ICD. ICD enables higher education institutions to accumulate and make on-line renewal of knowledge for teaching and learning processes and for enhancing innovation potential. ICD facilitates the development of human and relational capital of integrated and interconnected educational, research and business communities.

  13. Participatory innovation through user-designed knowledge sharing and Web2.0 in the Danish seed industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tveden-Nyborg, Svend; Boelt, Birte; Misfeldt, Morten

    their previous experience. A second workshop will focus on hands-on user experience based on a prototype predesigned from the preliminary research findings. The final workshop will build up a common knowledge discourse among its participants, and work towards an overall requirement specification for a preferred...... seed scientists from Aarhus University will work together with seed growers and seed company consultants in designing a collaborative knowledge platform to optimise the diffusion of innovation between them. The aim of the Ph.D. project is to look at the processes within the three communities...... of practice in their participatory efforts to design and select technologies that will improve their knowledge dissemination through a shared understanding of learning and innovation within the Danish seed industry. The research questions are: •What boundary objects emerge between and within the collaborating...

  14. Integrating Data Mining Techniques into Telemedicine Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela GHEORGHE

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The medical system is facing a wide range of challenges nowadays due to changes that are taking place in the global healthcare systems. These challenges are represented mostly by economic constraints (spiraling costs, financial issues, but also, by the increased emphasis on accountability and transparency, changes that were made in the education field, the fact that the biomedical research keeps growing in what concerns the complexities of the specific studies etc. Also the new partnerships that were made in medical care systems and the great advances in IT industry suggest that a predominant paradigm shift is occurring. This needs a focus on interaction, collaboration and increased sharing of information and knowledge, all of these may is in turn be leading healthcare organizations to embrace the techniques of data mining in order to create and sustain optimal healthcare outcomes. Data mining is a domain of great importance nowadays as it provides advanced data analysis techniques for extracting the knowledge from the huge volumes of data collected and stored by every system of a daily basis. In the healthcare organizations data mining can provide valuable information for patient's diagnosis and treatment planning, customer relationship management, organization resources management or fraud detection. In this article we focus on describing the importance of data mining techniques and systems for healthcare organizations with a focus on developing and implementing telemedicine solution in order to improve the healthcare services provided to the patients. We provide architecture for integrating data mining techniques into telemedicine systems and also offer an overview on understanding and improving the implemented solution by using Business Process Management methods.

  15. The interaction between internal R&D and different types of external knowledge sourcing: an empirical study of Chinese innovative firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Y.; Vanhaverbeke, W.; Du, J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates to what extent internal R&D efforts and different types of external knowledge sources jointly affect innovation performance of firms in emerging economies. Based on a survey about external knowledge sourcing activities of Chinese innovative firms, we categorize external

  16. Case study: Atlantis Systems International - Using KM principles to drive productivity and performance, prevent critical knowledge loss and encourage innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melnick, B.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: 'Knowledge and information are different. You can manage information; you can't manage knowledge. However you can manage the process that converts information into knowledge. At Atlantis, we treat knowledge management as a construct of information management (product, content) and knowledge building (process, people)' In 2003 Atlantis Systems International a 28 year old Aerospace engineering company was on the brink of insolvency. While the company was a leader in providing simulation-based training products, their market share had decreased steadily over the past 3 years. This decline was due in part to uncontrollable external forces - The formation of the European Economic Union and the tragic events of September 11. Both events lead to restricted market access in the U.S. and Europe for Atlantis's products and services. In addition to these external forces, the company experienced prolonged instability at the management level that resulted in a loss of key personnel to other companies. As no formal knowledge management processes were in place for capturing Intellectual capital, these employees took their knowledge and with them when they left the firm leaving critical gaps in knowledge base of the company. For a company to become knowledge centric organization where knowledge is continuously captured and leveraged to drive innovation requires an understanding of the processes that convert information into usable knowledge. This is as much a social challenge as it is a systems or use of technology challenge. The central question the company or organization has to address is, 'how do we get people (employees and management) to willing share what they know in order to grow the company?' The type of organizational change is synonymous with building a 'learning organization', but while this is certainly implicit, the term is sufficiently ambiguous as to include almost any activity where there is some transfer of information or knowledge - It does not

  17. State of the Art Telemedicine/Telehealth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bashshur, Rashid

    2001-01-01

    .... Reports were derived for the following topics: network organizational models, technology development and application, clinical applications, public health, disease surveillance and personal health, education, and telemedicine diffusion...

  18. A Review of Telemedicine Services in Finland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khatri, Vikramajeet; Peterson, Carrie Beth; Kyriazakos, Sofoklis

    2011-01-01

    Telemedicine is gaining popularity due to the provision of ubiquitous health care services that is a fundamental need for every socialized society. In this paper, telemedicine services in Finland are discussed, as well as how they came into existence, how they are funded, evaluated, and what...... are their impacts on health care systems and society. Telemedicine services like teleradiology, telelaboratory, telepsychiatry and remote consultations, are being offered in all hospital districts. Primary health care centers in Finland are lacking telemedicine services, and are planning to have them. Electronic...

  19. Telemedicine services in the Republic of Ireland: an evolving policy context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFarlane, Anne; Murphy, Andrew William; Clerkin, Pauline

    2006-05-01

    The Republic of Ireland is characterised by few urban conurbations and a high rural population, including significant numbers of island dwellers. Information communication technologies (ICT), including telemedicine, present opportunities to address rural health-service delivery issues. As in other countries, the recent National Health Information Strategy is regarded as pivotal to the modernisation of the Irish health care system. There is, however, a dearth of research about telemedicine in Ireland. This paper reports, to the best of our knowledge, the first systematic review of telemedicine in the two regional health boards in the Republic of Ireland. Details of 11 telemedicine services, all initiated by local policy, will be presented. Results of an interview study with service providers about their experiences of the practices and processes involved in telemedicine service delivery are also provided. The focus of our analysis is two-fold. We assess the resonance of these Irish data with the international literature with particular reference to a recently developed model for the normalisation of telemedicine. For the first time, this model which was developed in the United Kingdom is applied to a fresh set of empirical data in a different health care context. We then discuss a number of health information policy issues for Ireland and elsewhere arising from our analysis.

  20. Adopting Telemedicine for the Self-Management of Hypertension: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mileski, Michael; Kruse, Clemens Scott; Catalani, Justin; Haderer, Tara

    2017-10-24

    Hypertension is a chronic condition that affects adults of all ages. In the United States, 1 in 3 adults has hypertension, and about half of the hypertensive population is adequately controlled. This costs the nation US $46 billion each year in health care services and medications required for treatment and missed workdays. Finding easier ways of managing this condition is key to successful treatment. A solution to reduce visits to physicians for chronic conditions is to utilize telemedicine. Research is limited on the effects of utilizing telemedicine in health care facilities. There are potential benefits for implementing telemedicine programs with patients dealing with chronic conditions. The purpose of this review was to weigh the facilitators against the barriers for implementing telemedicine. Searches were methodically conducted in the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature Complete (CINAHL Complete) via Elton B Stephens Company (EBSCO) and PubMed (which queries MEDLINE) to collect information about self-management of hypertension through the use of telemedicine. Results identify facilitators and barriers corresponding to the implementation of self-management of hypertension using telemedicine. The most common facilitators include increased access, increase in health and quality, patient knowledge and involvement, technology growth with remote monitoring, cost-effectiveness, and increased convenience/ease. The most prevalent barriers include lack of evidence, self-management difficult to maintain, no long-term results/more areas to address, and long-term added workload commitment. This review guides health care professionals in incorporating new practices and identifying the best methods to introduce telemedicine into their practices. Understanding the facilitators and barriers to implementation is important, as is understanding how these factors will impact a successful implementation of telemedicine in the area of self-management of

  1. Innovative nuclear fuels and applications. Part 1: limits of today's fuels and concepts for innovative fuels. Part 2: materials properties, irradiation performance and gaps in our knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzke, H.

    2000-01-01

    Part I of this contribution on innovative nuclear fuels gives a summary of current developments and problems of today's fuels, i.e. enriched UO 2 and UO 2 with a few % of PUO 2 (MOX fuel) or Gd 2 O 3 (as burnable neutron poison). The problems and property changes caused by high burnups (e.g. degradation of the thermal conductivity, polygonization or formation of the rim-structure) are discussed. Subsequently, the concepts for new fuels to burn excess Pu and to achieve an effective transmutation of the minor actinides Np, Am and Cm are treated. The criteria for the choice of suitable fuels and different fuel types (high Pu-content fuels, nitrides, U-free fuels, inert matrix supported fuels, cercers, cermets, etc.) are discussed. Part II of this contribution on innovative nuclear fuels deals with the properties of relevance of the different materials suggested to be used in innovative fuels which range from pure actinide fuel such as PuN and AmO 2 to spinel MgAl 2 O 4 and zircon ZrSiO 4 for inert matrix-based fuels, etc. The available knowledge on materials research aspects is summarized with emphasis on the physics of radiation damage. It is shown that significant gaps in the present knowledge exist, e.g. for the minor actinide compounds, and suggestions are made to fill these gaps in order to achieve a sufficient data base to design and operate suitable innovative fuels in a near future. (author)

  2. Strategic Academic Unit as a Synergy between Education, Research and Innovations and Its Position in Knowledge Life Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pryakhin, A.; Tikhomirov, G.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The strategic goal of MEPhI is to become a global leader in education, science and innovations. Influence of the world development and current trends imply flexibility of the university to respond to today’s challenges and ability to introduce new forms and organizational structures for effective and efficient education. Strategic Academic Unit (SAE) is a new academic and scientific entity engaging nuclear industry partners in processes related to knowledge breeding, handling, and transfer through education and experience. The new SAE is titled as Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering (INPhE). SAE comprises objects belonging to three kinds or classes: education, research, and innovations. Education objects are education programs, teachers, students. Research objects are scientific teams and related mega-science laboratories working for fundamental and applied research. Innovations are typically knowledge assets created in research groups together with industrial partners and customers, recognized by the market, and used by all involved players for the next generations in the knowledge breeding chains. The key elements representing capacity of the SAE and maturity of the university are knowledge assets which are outputs of the intellectual activity and intellectual property itself, that they create. (author

  3. Transforming Gastroenterology Care With Telemedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Corey A

    2017-04-01

    Health care is changing rapidly, so we must change with the times to develop more efficient, practical, cost-effective, and, importantly, high-quality methods to care for patients. We teach medical students that optimal patient care requires face-to-face interaction to collect information on the patient's history and perform the physical examination. However, management of many patients-especially those with chronic diseases-does not always require physical examination. Telemedicine offers an opportunity to take advantage of technology while leveraging the progressive push toward efficiency and value but also requires the belief that excellent patient care is not always provided in person. Telemedicine can include a variety of aspects of patient care adapted to be performed remotely, such as telemonitoring, tele-education, teleconsultation, and telecare. All of these have been evaluated in gastroenterology practice and have demonstrated feasibility and patient preference but have produced mixed results regarding patient outcomes. By combining telemedicine tools and new care models, we can redesign chronic disease management to include fewer in-person visits when patients are well yet increase access for patients who need to be seen. This change could lead to higher-value care by improving the experience of care, decreasing costs, and improving the health of the population. Barriers include reimbursement, licensing, and fear of litigation. However, if we hope to meet the needs of patients within our changing health care system, telemedicine should be incorporated into our strategy. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Telemedicine as a source of universal health coverage in pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhry, B.S.; Bhatti, M.I.; Baig, M.A.A.

    2013-01-01

    The combination of information and communication technologies (ICTs) for sustainable healthcare through telemedicine focuses on both changes in the access of healthcare information services as well as wider dissemination of healthcare related skills and professional expertise of medical community. Many developing countries are deficient in healthcare services and suffer from a shortage of doctors and other healthcare Professionals. In Pakistan, the inadequate allocation of doctors/specialists, infrastructures of telecommunications, roads and transport make it more difficult to provide in remote and rural areas. Where clinics and hospitals exist, they are often ill-equipped. The aim of this paper is to share knowledge about the use of telemedic solutions in the health sector in order to propose strategies and actions to formulate tactical recommendations for policy makers and advisors as well as researchers. The examples in this paper illustrate that telemedicine has clearly made an impact on healthcare. (author)

  5. The intellectual property cookbook: a guide for the novice health-care telemedicine provider working with industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauregard, D; Beauregard, G

    2000-01-01

    Telemedicine is a new field and many health-care providers are developing their own products with the help of industry. Most practitioners are novices in the legal tools necessary to protect their own work with regard to any future commercialization. To summarize these issues for the telemedicine practitioner, a review of intellectual property protection has been performed. Intellectual property can be protected by tools such as copyrights, patents, non-disclosure and confidentiality agreements, integrated circuit topographies and industrial design. Knowledge of the intellectual property background should allow telemedicine providers to protect their own work when working with industry.

  6. Telemedicine and burns: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atiyeh, B; Dibo, S A; Janom, H H

    2014-06-30

    Access to specialized burn care is becoming more difficult and is being restricted by the decreasing number of specialized burn centers. It is also limited by distance and resources for many patients, particularly those living in poverty or in rural medically underserved communities. Telemedicine is a rapidly evolving technology related to the practice of medicine at a distance through rapid access to remote medical expertise by telecommunication and information technologies. Feasibility of telemedicine in burn care has been demonstrated by various centers. Its use facilitates the delivery of care to patients with burn injuries of all sizes. It allows delivery of acute care and can be appropriately used for a substantial portion of the long-term management of patients after a burn by guiding less-experienced surgeons to treat and follow-up patients more appropriately. Most importantly, it allows better effective triage which reduces unnecessary time and resource demanding referrals that might overwhelm system capacities. However, there are still numerous barriers to the implementation of telemedicine, including technical difficulties, legal uncertainties, limited financial support, reimbursement issues, and an inadequate evidence base of its value and efficiency.

  7. Factors Forming Collaboration within the Knowledge Triangle of Education, Research and Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zascerinska, Jelena; Ahrens, Andreas; Bassus, Olaf

    2009-01-01

    A proper combination of education, research and innovation is provided by varied cooperative networks. However, the success of collaboration within a multicultural environment requires that the key factors enabling synergy between education, research and innovation have to be considered. Aim of the following paper is to identify and to analyze…

  8. Twenty years of the journal of product innovation management : History, participants and knowledge stock and flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moenaert, R.K.; Griffin, A.; Biemans, W.

    2007-01-01

    The Journal of Product Innovation Management (JPIM) serves as a marketplace for science-based, innovative ideas that are produced and consumed by scholars and businesspeople. Now that JPIM has existed for 20 years, two intriguing questions emerge: (1) How has the journal evolved over time in terms

  9. Twenty years of the Journal of product innovation management : History, participants, and knowledge stock and flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemans, Wim; Griffin, Abbie; Moenaert, Rudy

    The Journal of Product Innovation Management (JPIM) serves as a marketplace for science-based, innovative ideas that are produced and consumed by scholars and businesspeople. Now that JPIM has existed for 20 years, two intriguing questions emerge: (1) How has the journal evolved over time in terms

  10. Knowledge Sharing, Control of Care Quality, and Innovation in Intensive Care Nursing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paunova, Minna; Li-Ying, Jason; Egerod, Ingrid Eugenie

    2016-01-01

    affect innovation differently, depending on the strength as well as type of control of care quality within the unit. Healthcare organizations face an increasing pressure to innovate while controlling and accounting for care quality. This study demonstrates that the increasing pressures to implement...

  11. A modular approach for stimulating knowledge use in organizations to attain real sustainable innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ad Breukel; Dr. ir. Jan Venselaar

    2010-01-01

    The Fociss (Focussing Innovation for a Sustainable Strategy) approach is a structured method to define core business related issues within sustainable development that require main attention in a specific company. In theory, Fociss has the ability for all kinds of innovations, but the implementation

  12. Hubungan antara Knowledge-Technology-Innovation (KTI, Commitment, Competence, Leadership, Government Policy, Human Capital, dan Competitive Advantage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darjat Sudrajat

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In current tight competitive situation, companies always try to create differentiation anytime to achieve better and sustainable performance. Rapid and unpredictable changes insist the companies should always be innovative, so that aspects of globalization, e-business, technology innovation, creativity, global competition, knowledge creation, diffusion of new technologies and knowledge revolution should be sources of performance and competitiveness improvement. Therefore, tomaintain core competencies and competitive advantage, the companies should develop continuous innovation, technologylearning, and knowledge management. Knowledge-Technology-Innovation (KTI can be a driver for country’s development and growth. Japan, South Korea, and Singapore are the countries that have limited natural and human resources, but able to achieve sustainable economic development. KTI is not only to be practiced at individual and organizational level, but also can be implemented at the community, national, or state level. KTI, therefore, can encourage expected competitive advantage creation and become a decisive factor for a country to achieve stable and sustainable economic growth. This research intends to analyze relationships of KTI, competitive advantage, commitment, leadership, human capital, government policy,and competence. This research used correlational method and literature study approach. The result of this research is a relationship model of each of these aspects that can be used as a framework for further research. The relationships model isas follows: Leadership, competence, and human capital (as independent variables have direct relationship (influence oncompetitive advantage (dependent variable or indirectly (through KTI as an intervening variable; KTI has direct relationship (effect on competitive advantage; Government policy and commitment are moderator variables for relationshipof KTI and competitive advantage.

  13. The Responsibility of Telemedicine Focused Organizations in regards to creating Compliant end Users Products and Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Dumitru Tanţău

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the present study is to provide a highly comprehensive methodological solution for carrying out products/services which fully comply with customers (i.e. end users functional and performance requirements in Telemedicine field, and furthermore to satisfy multitude end users simultaneously. By bringing into the light Systems Engineering (SE as a multidisciplinary theory used preponderantly in the aero-space segment for realization of complex projects, the paper illustrates the way it can be fulfilled the Functional and Performance Requirements of the end users from Romanian (non emergency medicine services in order to develop an innovative telemedicine product. The case study is based on two sets of qualitative researches as interviews in order to validate the telemedicine triggering idea among users, and to classify them, and secondly, as ample observations in order to gain insights on the users' scenarios and further to elaborate user requirements. Both sets of researches undertaken from users' specific environments were backed up with secondary information gained through document analysis. Relevant for this telemedicine research, it is the fact that the results of this survey have been already successfully used as a baseline to prototype the telemedicine product for Romanian market, in a European Space Agency (ESA Project.

  14. Engaging elderly people in telemedicine through gamification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vette, Anna Frederiek Alberdien; Tabak, Monique; van Weering, Marit; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam Marie Rosé

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Telemedicine can alleviate the increasing demand for elderly care caused by the rapidly aging population. However, user adherence to technology in telemedicine interventions is low and decreases over time. Therefore, there is a need for methods to increase adherence, specifically of the

  15. The Model for Assessment of Telemedicine (MAST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kidholm, Kristian; Clemensen, Jane; Caffery, Liam J

    2017-01-01

    The evaluation of telemedicine can be achieved using different evaluation models or theoretical frameworks. This paper presents a scoping review of published studies which have applied the Model for Assessment of Telemedicine (MAST). MAST includes pre-implementation assessment (e.g. by use...

  16. Communication network for telemedicine | Debretsion | Zede Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Telemedicine is the most promising one for improving the access to specialized health services to all remote, rural areas in all developing countries. Exploiting the technological advancements in the field of electronics, signal processing and software a communication network for telemedicine is proposedfor the existing ...

  17. Knowledge creation and management in the five LHC experiments at CERN implications for technology innovation and transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bressan, Beatrice Alessandra; Lavonen, J; Nordberg, M; Saarikko, H; Streit-Bianchi, M

    2008-01-01

    The present study analyses knowledge creation, acquisition and transfer in the five LHC physics experiments at CERN: ALICE, ATLAS, CMS, LHCb, and TOTEM. A questionnaire was provided during collaboration meetings and a total of 291 replies were obtained and analysed. The results of this research study provide evidence that the social process of participation in meetings, acquisition of skills in different areas, and the development of interests by interaction with colleagues are key elements of the learning process. Furthermore, the results indicate that knowledge acquisition in a multicultural environment plays a mediating role in the interaction between social capital constructs (social interaction, relationship quality, and network ties) and competitive advantage outcomes (invention development and technological distinctiveness). Social interaction, relationship quality, and network ties are connected to greater knowledge acquisition, and also contribute to innovation and transfer of the knowledge to indust...

  18. Strategies for knowledge use in R&D and their implications for innovative performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, T.J.G.; Martin, X.Y.F.

    We argue that research on R&D strategy and on the use of external knowledge in R&D in particular, should differentiate between distinct uses of external knowledge. We distinguish between uses of external knowledge for replication (using knowledge as is) versus for compounding (building on acquired

  19. "Towards a Europe of Knowledge and Innovation", the EIROforum paper on science policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    Brussels, April 20, 2005 - Today Europe's seven major intergovernmental research organisations, working together in the EIROforum partnership, presented their comprehensive paper on science policy, "Towards a Europe of Knowledge and Innovation", in the presence of the European Commissioner for Science and Research, Mr. Janez Potocnik and the Luxembourg Minister for Culture, Higher Education, Employment and Research, Mr. François Biltgen. Luxembourg currently holds the presidency of the European Union. ESO PR Photo 11/05 ESO PR Photo 11/05 EIROforum Paper on Science Policy Presentation [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 475 pix - 176k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 950 pix - 505k] [Full Res - JPEG: 2023 x 2402 pix - 2.1M] Five years ago, at the meeting of the European Council in Lisbon, the creation of a European Research Area (ERA) was proposed as a means to achieve the ambitious targets necessary to develop a leading, knowledge-based economy in Europe. The ERA intends to make a single market for European research, bringing together scientists from all member states. The EIROforum partners operate some of the largest research infrastructures in the world, possess unique and long-standing expertise in the organisation of pan-European research, bring expert knowledge to discussions about new large facilities in Europe, provide a model for the ERA, and offer their experience and active engagement in creating a true European Research Area. The EIROforum paper on science policy describes their collective vision on the future of European scientific research in order to support the Lisbon Process by working, alongside the Commission, for the implementation of the European Research Area. In combination with the individual success and expertise of each of the EIROforum partners, this provides a strong boost to European Research and thus to the Lisbon Goals of developing a knowledge-based economy. "As the borders of the European Union expand there is a fundamental role for the EIROforum

  20. 'It was like he was in the room with us': patients' and carers' perspectives of telemedicine in acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Josephine; Lightbody, Elizabeth; McLoughlin, Alison; McAdam, Joanna; Gibson, Alison; Day, Elaine; Fitzgerald, Jane; May, Carl; Price, Chris; Emsley, Hedley; Ford, Gary A; Watkins, Caroline

    2016-02-01

    Telemedicine can facilitate delivery of thrombolysis in acute stroke. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore patients' and carers' views of their experiences of using a stroke telemedicine system in order to contribute to the development of reliable and acceptable telemedicine systems and training for health-care staff. We recruited patients who had, and carers who were present at, recent telemedicine consultations for acute stroke in three hospitals in NW England. Semi-structured interviews were conducted using an interview guide based on normalization process theory (NPT). Thematic analysis was undertaken. We conducted 24 interviews with 29 participants (16 patients; 13 carers). Eleven interviews pertained to 'live' telemedicine assessments (at the time of admission); nine had mock-up telemedicine assessments (within 48 h of admission); four had both assessments. Using the NPT domains as a framework for analysis, factors relating to coherence (sense making) included people's knowledge and understanding of telemedicine. Cognitive participation (relational work) included interaction between staff and with patients and carers. Issues relating to collective action (operational work) included information exchange and support, and technical matters. Findings relating to reflexive monitoring (appraisal) included positive and negative impressions of the telemedicine process, and emotional reactions. Although telemedicine was well accepted by many participants, its use added an additional layer of complexity to the acute stroke consultation. The 'remote' nature of the consultation posed challenges for some patients. These issues may be ameliorated by clear information for patients and carers, staff interpersonal skills, and teamworking. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Determinants of Green Innovation: The Impact of Internal and External Knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Stucki, Tobias; Wörter, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Based on a comprehensive data set comprising 13 countries, 22 industries and a period of 30 years we investigate the impact of internal and external knowledge pools of both green and 'other than green' technologies on green patent activities. It turned out that the internal green knowledge stock is positively related to green patent activities with a considerably large marginal value. The country's green knowledge stock and the green knowledge stock of the same industry in other countries are...

  2. KNOWLEDGE AND INNOVATION - ESSENTIAL FACTORS FOR OVERCOMING THE CURRENT ECONOMIC IMPASSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Frunză

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Human resource is currently the most valuable wealth of a nation and carries with it the most important principle of development; it is about innovation, without which competitiveness is unthinkable. Romania is part of the “catching–up” group of countries in innovation. In order to assume new responsibilities and to prepare for the competition with other European countries and not only, manyreforms and changes is necessary. Assuming these premises, in this paper, our intention is to analyze the situation of innovation at EUlevel and to see at what chapters our authorities must to work harder to equalize the other states from the Western European states. This thing is absolutely necessary because, now, when our country makes part from EU, it needs to invest in human resources through better education, skills and support.

  3. Studying open innovation collaboration between the high-tech industry and science with linguistic ethnography : Battling over the status of knowledge in a setting of distrust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Maeijer, E.D.R.; Van Hout, T.; Weggeman, M.C.D.P.; Post, G.

    2016-01-01

    Open Innovation collaborations often pit academia against industry. Such inter-organizational collaborations can be troublesome due to different organizational backgrounds. This paper investigates what kind of knowledge a multinational high tech company and a research institute share with each

  4. Knowledge flows : analyzing the core literature of innovation, entrepreneurship and science and technology studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhupatiraju, S.; Nomaler, Z.O.; Triulzi, G.; Verspagen, B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper applies network analysis to a citation database that combines the key references in the fields of Entrepreneurship (ENT), Innovation Studies (INN) and Science and Technology Studies (STS). We find that citations between the three fields are relatively scarce, as compared to citations

  5. The influence of attitudes to knowledge in the implementation of open innovation strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Ana Luiza Lara de Araújo; Søndergaard, Helle Alsted

    and Allen, 1982; Lichtenthaler et al., 2010). In this paper, we examine the extent to which these attitudes impact the actual adoption of both the inbound and the outbound approaches to open innovation. We posit that these attitudes have a negative influence, since they create unfavourable perceptions...

  6. Intellectual property and pharmaceutical innovation : a model for managing the creation of knowledge under proprietary conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reekum, Antonie Henric van

    1999-01-01

    This study focused on IP management in the context of pharmaceutical innovation. The pharmaceutical industry was chosen because, in an early stage of the project, several indications were found that intellectual property is of particular concern to management in this industry. The theoretical

  7. A model for assessment of telemedicine applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kidholm, Kristian; Ekeland, Anne Granstrøm; Jensen, Lise Kvistgaard

    2012-01-01

    the European Commission initiated the development of a framework for assessing telemedicine applications, based on the users' need for information for decision making. This article presents the Model for ASsessment of Telemedicine applications (MAST) developed in this study.......Telemedicine applications could potentially solve many of the challenges faced by the healthcare sectors in Europe. However, a framework for assessment of these technologies is need by decision makers to assist them in choosing the most efficient and cost-effective technologies. Therefore in 2009...

  8. Telemedicine for Trauma, Emergencies, and Disaster Management

    CERN Document Server

    Latifi, Rifat

    2010-01-01

    Telemedicine has evolved to become an important field of medicine and healthcare, involving everything from simple patient care to actual performance of operations at a distance. This groundbreaking volume addresses the complex technical and clinical development in the management of trauma, disaster, and emergency situations using telemedicine. The book explains how telemedicine and related technologies can be used to effectively handle a wide range of scenarios, from a situation as small as a car crash, to major disasters such as an earthquake. Professionals find critical discussions on the p

  9. Telemedicine Workplace Environments: Designing for Success

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth A. Krupinski

    2014-01-01

    When designing a facility for telemedicine, there are several things to consider from a human factors point of view, as well as from a practicality point of view. Although the future practice of telemedicine is likely to be more of a mobile-based practice and centered more in the home than it is now, it is still very important to consider ways to optimize the design of clinic-based telemedicine facilities. This is true on both ends of a consultation?where the patient is and where the consulta...

  10. Brand innovation and social media: knowledge acquisition from social media, market orientation, and the moderating role of social media strategic capability

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Bang; Xiaoyu, Yu; Melewar, T. C.; Chen, Junsong

    2015-01-01

    The study examines the relationships between knowledge acquisition from social media, two forms of market orientation (proactive and reactive), social media strategic capability, and brand innovation strategy in the context of China’s online technology industry. Analysis of 357 online technology ventures, created during the past 6 years, suggests that brand innovation is affected by both knowledge acquisition from social media and market orientation. Social media strategic capability positive...

  11. Development of telemedicine technology in India: ′′Sanjeevani′′-An integrated telemedicine application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sood S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Telemedicine has been a technological takeaway for the developed countries. Even in the developing countries, it is increasingly being viewed as a tool for improving care and enhancing access to healthcare. Countries like India where the majority of the population lives in rural areas, where healthcare facilities are inefficient and inadequate, tools like telemedicine can contribute substantially in bridging the gap between the demand and supply. "Sanjeevani"-is an integrated telemedicine application that offers a suite of high utility features as a part of an Indian telemedicine technology. Sanjeevani is based on store and forward as well as real-time models.

  12. Innovative Activities to Ensure Safety: Strategy and Plans to Implement Nuclear Knowledge Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eremin, S.; Tikhonov, N.; Yuzhakov, A.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The Russian operating organization Concern Rosenergoatom established a program for a knowledge management (KM) implementation in the organization as part of ROSATOM State Corporation KM activities. The plan includes activities both in the framework of the classic knowledge management cycle: detection, preservation, retention, sharing and transfer, as well as creation of new knowledge such as training programs for the construction of new nuclear power plants. The approach embraces key techniques overviewed in IAEA documents on KM, and ROSATOM’s strategical focus on the commercial use of R&D results and corporate knowledge and, thus, contribute to safe, reliable and efficient operation of NPPs. (author

  13. Open Innovation Thinking as a Mechanism for Strategic Development of Knowledge Intensive Ventures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Astrid Heidemann; McKelvey, Maureen

    questions on the specificities hereof remain unanswered. This is the starting point of the current research study. In order to research the identified gap in knowledge, we address the following research question in this paper. How do strategic considerations unfold in the context of knowledge intensive...

  14. Contributions to Education from the Psychology of Innovation and Entrepreneurship, in Today's Knowledge Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, Jesus; Vera, Manuel Mariano; Cardelle-Elawar, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The globalized Knowledge Society of the 21st century brings with it important changes in models of work and lifestyle, triggered by the revolution in Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs). It has led to new ways of understanding knowledge itself, human activity, and consequently, professional and economic activity. In this current…

  15. Co-Learning and Knowledge Diffusion in Public Procurement of Sustainable Innovation Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolfstam, Max

    to identify and remedy implementation barriers academics and policy analysts have studied (e.g.) the role of the public procurement law and public agencies risk averseness. Distinguishable is also a tension between two approaches how to stimulate the diffusion of more innovation-friendly procurement practices......, firms and NGO’s in Denmark and Sweden interested in the innovation potential that prevails in municipalities’ challenges in relation to climate change and resource use/ waste handling. A central variable looked into is the opportunities available in the new EU Public procurement directives, i.e. how...... in order to support the project. This creates a set-up facilitating co-learning in a situation where not all aspects of the final solutions are known. Based on qualitative case material (observation studies, interviews, workshop material) from the Cleantech TIPP project, the paper attempts to summarise...

  16. Clinical Telemedicine Utilization in Ontario over the Ontario Telemedicine Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Laurel D; Hogenbirk, John C; Warry, Wayne

    2016-06-01

    Northern Ontario is a region in Canada with approximately 775,000 people in communities scattered across 803,000 km(2). The Ontario Telemedicine Network (OTN) facilitates access to medical care in areas that are often underserved. We assessed how OTN utilization differed throughout the province. We used OTN medical service utilization data collected through the Ontario Health Insurance Plan and provided by the Ministry of Health and Long Term Care. Using census subdivisions grouped by Northern and Southern Ontario as well as urban and rural areas, we calculated utilization rates per fiscal year and total from 2008/2009 to 2013/2014. We also used billing codes to calculate utilization by therapeutic area of care. There were 652,337 OTN patient visits in Ontario from 2008/2009 to 2013/2014. Median annual utilization rates per 1,000 people were higher in northern areas (rural, 52.0; urban, 32.1) than in southern areas (rural, 6.1; urban, 3.1). The majority of usage in Ontario was in mental health and addictions (61.8%). Utilization in other areas of care such as surgery, oncology, and internal medicine was highest in the rural north, whereas primary care use was highest in the urban south. Utilization was higher and therapeutic areas of care were more diverse in rural Northern Ontario than in other parts of the province. Utilization was also higher in urban Northern Ontario than in Southern Ontario. This suggests that telemedicine is being used to improve access to medical care services, especially in sparsely populated regions of the province.

  17. ICT, Innovation and Knowledge Challenges as seen by a World Conference of Experts

    OpenAIRE

    Jose Francisco Aguilar Pereira; Fedro S. Zazueta

    2015-01-01

    Over the course of the past two decades important developments in Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) took place that enabled new approaches to production, harvest, storage, transport, distribution and delivery of food and other products. Of particular interest are innovations that increase the quality of food, reduce its cost to the final consumer and create opportunities for developing countries to address food security issues in a sustainable way. Technology evolved resulting...

  18. Trends in telemedicine utilizing artificial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacis, Danica Mitch M.; Subido, Edwin D. C.; Bugtai, Nilo T.

    2018-02-01

    With the growth and popularity of the utilization of artificial intelligence (AI) in several fields and industries, studies in the field of medicine have begun to implement its capabilities in handling and analyzing data to telemedicine. With the challenges in the implementation of telemedicine, there has been a need to expand its capabilities and improve procedures to be specialized to solve specific problems. The versatility and flexibility of both AI and telemedicine gave the endless possibilities for development and these can be seen in the literature reviewed in this paper. The trends in the development of the utilization of this technology can be classified in to four: patient monitoring, healthcare information technology, intelligent assistance diagnosis, and information analysis collaboration. Each trend will be discussed and presented with examples of recent literature and the problems they aim to address. Related references will also be tabulated and categorized to see the future and potential of this current trend in telemedicine.

  19. COMMUNICA TION NETWORK FOR TELEMEDICINE Debretsion G ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (3) continuing medical education and (4) Training the medical ... Telemedicine system consists of at least five major subsystems. [l,4]. ... and wire-line (optical network) telecommunication facilities .... An ATM network needs certain traffic control.

  20. 5G, an approach towards future telemedicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anwar, Sadia; Prasad, Ramjee; Kumar, Ambuj

    for telemedicine application. Telemedicine’s applications and high data medical information generally require high definition visuals and lower latency connection, in addition mobility and reliability. The next generation of wireless communication standard, known as 5G, will provide data speed in (Gigabit per...... second) Gb/s with lower latency and higher reliability connection, and can be better approach for future telemedicine. In this paper we survey the current state of telemedicine along with examining the characteristics of 5G technology. We also present research challenges concerning 5G and telemedicine.......The use of smartphones has been increasing rapidly and it is expected that in future most people will have a smartphone capable of high speed Internet connection. The capability of smartphones with high definition display, computation power and multitude of sensors made it an excellent candidate...

  1. Nursing Roles within a Stroke Telemedicine Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terri-Ellen J. Kiernan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Time sensitive acute stroke treatments and the growing shortage of vascular neurologists compound to create a gap in the delivery of care to meet the American Stroke Association guidelines in underserviced regions. Audio/video consultation (telemedicine, which has been evolving since the late 1990's, is a putative solution. While telemedicine can serve as a valuable facilitative tool, the telestroke consultation is only one piece of a complex collaboration between hub and spoke environments and clinical personnel. The growing use of telemedicine in stroke offers more opportunities for all nurses to participate in the continuum of cerebrovascular disease care. A review of this collaboration will include but will not be limited to: algorithms of the acute stroke evaluation, hub and spoke staff meetings, stroke education for spoke staff, and patient follow–up post acute treatment. Our team's telemedicine experience, utilizing research, education, and clinical practice, will be described.

  2. Secure Wireless Military Healthcare Telemedicine Enterprise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lucas, Kenneth W

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this research effort is to integrate ViTel Net's MedVizerTM software and Division Tools with cross platform telemedicine systems, inclusive of computer based systems, handheld...

  3. Advances in Telemedicine Using Mobile Communications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Istepanian, Robert S. H

    2001-01-01

    Future telemedicine systems will exploit mobile communications technology so that patients who are free to move around at home or at work, or in emergency medical situations, can be monitored in a hospital...

  4. Navy Telemedicine: Current Research and Future Directions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reed, Cheryl

    2002-01-01

    .... An assessment of Navy telemedicine as a complex healthcare support system is needed to demonstrate how current practices, training, equipment, and expenditures measure up to the emerging needs of the Fleet...

  5. Secure Wireless Military Healthcare Telemedicine Enterprise System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lucas, Kenneth

    2003-01-01

    ...(exp TM) software and Division Tools with cross platform telemedicine systems, inclusive of computer based systems, handheld wireless PDA devices, and miniature computers, to existing DoD legacy...

  6. Secure Wireless Military Healthcare Telemedicine Enterprise System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lucas, Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    ...) software and Dvision Tools with cross platform telemedicine systems, inclusive of computer based systems, handheld wireless PDA devices, and miniature computers, to existing DoD legacy and developing...

  7. Augmentation of Acute Stroke Management via Telemedicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Choi, John

    2001-01-01

    .... 0 Necessary telemedicine study equipment was installed at the study sites. (PictureTel monitors and associated VTC equipment, flat-screen monitors, one PC, and VCR with digital video tape/VHS capabilities were installed...

  8. UH - USA Agreement - A Telemedicine Research Proposal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burgess, Lawrence

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the University of Hawaii Telemedicine Curriculum Research Project is to develop an effective web-based curriculum for training military health care personnel in the use of contemporary...

  9. Playing a 3-Stringed Violin: Innovation via the Joint Evolution of People, Process, and Knowledge Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lynne P.

    2010-01-01

    Users continuously evaluate the value and performance of their Knowledge Management Systems (KMS). As suggested by a punctuated socio-technical system process model, today's success can quickly become tomorrow's failure should the KMS fail to meet evolving needs and expectations. The more deeply a tool is embedded in the actual work process, the more vulnerable it is to emergent changes and perturbations. This paper uses the metaphor of a "3-stringed violin" to explore how differing levels of user knowledge about tools and processes can lead to system perturbations and how the active involvement of other actors can dampen the impact of perturbations, i.e., help the system survive the operational equivalent of a broken string. Recommendations suggest ways to increase system resiliency and contribute to incremental innovation.

  10. Engineering and technology talent for innovation and knowledge-based economies competencies, leadership, and a roadmap for implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Abdulwahed, Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces and analyzes the models for engineering leadership and competency skills, as well as frameworks for industry-academia collaboration and is appropriate for students, researchers, and professionals interested in continuous professional development. The authors look at the organizational structures of engineering education in knowledge-based economies and examine the role of innovation and how it is encouraged in schools. It also provides a methodological framework and toolkit for investigating the needs of engineering and technology skills in national contexts. A detailed empirical case study is included that examines the leadership competencies that are needed in knowledge-based economies and how one university encourages these in their program. The book concludes with conceptual modeling and proposals of specific organizational structures for implementation in engineering schools, in order to enable the development of necessary skills for future engineering graduates.

  11. Knowledge translation in tri-sectoral collaborations: An exploration of perceptions of academia, industry and healthcare collaborations in innovation adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ii, Suzanne Sayuri; Fitzgerald, Louise; Morys-Carter, Megan M; Davie, Natasha L; Barker, Richard

    2018-02-01

    With the aging population and increase in chronic disease conditions, innovation to transform treatment pathways and service delivery will be necessary. The innovation adoption process however, can take 15 years before widespread adoption occurs in most healthcare systems. Current UK government policies to increase the facilitation of innovation adoption are under way. The aim of this study is to explore perceptions of tri-sectoral collaborations in the healthcare sector. The data in the study are drawn from a cross-sectional survey conducted in 2015 of professionals in academia, industry and the healthcare sectors in England, focusing on Diabetes care. Academia and healthcare respondents had the least work experience outside of their sectors compared to the industry respondents. Healthcare and academia respondents rated the industry sector less trustworthy, unethical, having different goals and less understanding of the other sectors. Industry respondents had a more positive perspective towards potential collaborators. The results from the study demonstrate greater potential challenges to tri-sectoral collaborations and the government's knowledge translation policy, due to pre-conceived notions and lack of understanding of other sectors. The purely structural approach of establishing government mandated translational networks may be insufficient without active attempts to improve collaborative relationships. Mechanisms to facilitate trust building and collaboration are proposed. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. On the evaluation of social innovations and social enterprises: Recognizing and integrating two solitudes in the empirical knowledge base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szijarto, Barbara; Milley, Peter; Svensson, Kate; Cousins, J Bradley

    2018-02-01

    Social innovation (SI) is billed as a new way to address complex social problems. Interest in SI has intensified rapidly in the last decade, making it an important area of practice for evaluators, but a difficult one to navigate. Learning from developments in SI and evaluation approaches applied in SI contexts is challenging because of 'fuzzy' concepts and silos of activity and knowledge within SI communities. This study presents findings from a systematic review and integration of 41 empirical studies on evaluation in SI contexts. We identify two isolated conversations: one about 'social enterprises' (SEs) and the other about non-SE 'social innovations'. These conversations diverge in key areas, including engagement with evaluation scholarship, and in the reported purposes, approaches and use of evaluation. We identified striking differences with respect to degree of interest in collaborative approaches and facilitation of evaluation use. The findings speak to trends and debates in our field, for example how evaluation might reconcile divergent information needs in multilevel, cross-sectoral collaborations and respond to fluidity and change in innovative settings. Implications for practitioners and commissioners of evaluation include how evaluation is used in different contexts and the voice of evaluators (and the evaluation profession) in these conversations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. International telemedicine consultations for neurodevelopmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Phillip L; Sable, Craig; Evans, Sarah; Knight, Joseph; Cunningham, Parker; Lotrecchiano, Gaetano R; Gropman, Andrea; Stuart, Sheela; Glass, Penny; Conway, Anne; Ramadan, Issam; Paiva, Tania; Batshaw, Mark L; Packer, Roger J

    2014-06-01

    A telemedicine program was developed between the Children's National Medical Center (CNMC) in Washington, DC, and the Sheikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Foundation in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). A needs assessment and a curriculum of on-site training conferences were devised preparatory to an ongoing telemedicine consultation program for children with neurodevelopmental disabilities in the underserved eastern region of the UAE. Weekly telemedicine consultations are provided by a multidisciplinary faculty. Patients are presented in the UAE with their therapists and families. Real-time (video over Internet protocol; average connection, 768 kilobits/s) telemedicine conferences are held weekly following previews of medical records. A full consultation report follows each telemedicine session. Between February 29, 2012 and June 26, 2013, 48 weekly 1-h live interactive telemedicine consultations were conducted on 48 patients (28 males, 20 females; age range, 8 months-22 years; median age, 5.4 years). The primary diagnoses were cerebral palsy, neurogenetic disorders, autism, neuromuscular disorders, congenital anomalies, global developmental delay, systemic disease, and epilepsy. Common comorbidities were cognitive impairment, communication disorders, and behavioral disorders. Specific recommendations included imaging and DNA studies, antiseizure management, spasticity management including botulinum toxin protocols, and specific therapy modalities including taping techniques, customized body vests, and speech/language and behavioral therapy. Improved outcomes reported were in clinician satisfaction, achievement of therapy goals for patients, and requests for ongoing sessions. Weekly telemedicine sessions coupled with triannual training conferences were successfully implemented in a clinical program dedicated to patients with neurodevelopmental disabilities by the Center for Neuroscience at CNMC and the UAE government. International consultations in neurodevelopmental

  14. Telemedicine: history, applications, and impact on librarianship.

    OpenAIRE

    Zundel, K M

    1996-01-01

    This paper traces the uses of telecommunications in health care from the Civil War era to the present. Topics include the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's involvement in the origins of current telemedicine systems and the impact of television. Applications of telemedicine discussed include remote consultation and diagnosis, specialty clinical care (including examples from anesthesia, dermatology, cardiology, psychiatry, radiology, critical care, and oncology), and others (inclu...

  15. Technology and quality control in telemedicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barman, Mallika Roy; Pratik Kumar; Subramaniam, Kailash

    2003-01-01

    Transferring of medical electronic data from one place to another is known as telemedicine. All relevant medical opinions and investigations, like EGG, x-ray, sonography, GT scan, MRI and angiography can be transferred from one location to another by telemedicine. In developing countries like India where rural population is more and specialized doctors and hospital are few and located more in cities, it should be very useful

  16. Telemedicine in education: bridging the gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Jesse; Berger, Ryan; Samra, Cynthia; Van Durme, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The increasing cost and inequitable access to quality healthcare, coupled with the merger of the information technology and health service sectors, has given rise to the modern field of telemedicine. Telemedicine, meaning medicine at a distance, allows us to transcend geographic and socioeconomic boundaries to deliver high quality care to remote and/or in-need patients. As technology becomes more affordable and a physician shortage looms, telemedicine is gaining attention as a possible solution to healthcare delivery. Simultaneously, telemedicine holds great promise with regard to medical education. Several studies integrating telemedicine in medical education have shown positive outcomes, demonstrating similar or greater efficacy compared with traditional educational methods with high student-reported enthusiasm. Other domestic and international telemedicine projects, largely spearheaded by universities, have also achieved great success. In a novel approach, by pairing medical schools with in-need partner communities, utilizing similar faculty resources as traditional learning methods with standardized patients, students can gain valuable experience and skills while serving actual patients. This progressive approach to medical education fosters collaboration, communication, longitudinal care and teaches students needed skills for their future practices as 21 st Century healthcare providers.

  17. Standards and Guidelines in Telemedicine and Telehealth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Bernard, Jordana

    2014-01-01

    The development of guidelines and standards for telemedicine is an important and valuable process to help insure effective and safe delivery of quality healthcare. Some organizations, such as the American Telemedicine Association (ATA), have made the development of standards and guidelines a priority. The practice guidelines developed so far have been well received by the telemedicine community and are being adopted in numerous practices, as well as being used in research to support the practice and growth of telemedicine. Studies that utilize published guidelines not only help bring them into greater public awareness, but they also provide evidence needed to validate existing guidelines and guide the revision of future versions. Telemedicine will continue to grow and be adopted by more healthcare practitioners and patients in a wide variety of forms not just in the traditional clinical environments, and practice guidelines will be a key factor in fostering this growth. Creation of guidelines is important to payers and regulators as well as increasingly they are adopting and integrating them into regulations and policies. This paper will review some of the recent ATA efforts in developing telemedicine practice guidelines, review the role of research in guidelines development, review data regarding their use, and discuss some of areas where guidelines are still needed. PMID:27429261

  18. Ticuna traditional knowledge on chagra agriculture and innovative mechanisms for its protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Eduardo Acosta Muñoz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The relationship of indigenous peoples to the global market is a reality and it sets strategies of appropriation of traditional knowledge, without any rule mediating the restitution of rights that knowledge holders have, while indigenous people are asking a sui generis system for protection and equitable participation in these markets. The paper presents the results of a participatory research carried out with Ticuna communities of the south of the Colombian Amazon, in the border with Brazil and Peru, in the upper part of the Amazon River. From the knowledge about the use and management of chagra agriculture, the research analyzes how the productive chain of manioc (Manihot esculenta Crantz is structured. It also explains how indigenous people discuss the intellectual property rights they have on it, and how the geographical indications and the collective trademarks can help to protect traditional knowledge associated to biodiversity.

  19. Leveraging academic knowledge in the innovation ecosystem : The Societal Impact Value Cycle as a toolbox

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Burgwal, L.H.M.; van der Waal, M.B.; Claassen, H.J.H.M.

    2018-01-01

    Scientific advancement and advancements in information technology have increased our capability for sharing information, and spreading scientific discoveries throughout society. In the past decade the Dutch government has been trying to stimulate the knowledge economy through various means. Among

  20. Leveraging academic knowledge in the innovation ecosystem : The Societal Impact Value Cycle as a toolbox

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.H.M. van de Burgwal (Linda); M. van der Waal (Mark); H.J.H.M. Claassen (Eric)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractScientific advancement and advancements in information technology have increased our capability for sharing information, and spreading scientific discoveries throughout society. In the past decade the Dutch government has been trying to stimulate the knowledge economy through various

  1. Telemedicine in Neonatal Home Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Kristina Garne; Brødsgaard, Anne; Zachariassen, Gitte

    2016-01-01

    participatory design and qualitative methods. Data were collected from observational studies, individual interviews, and focus group interviews. Two neonatal units participated. One unit was experienced in providing neonatal home care with home visits, and the other planned to offer neonatal home care......BACKGROUND: For the majority of preterm infants, the last weeks of hospital admission mainly concerns tube feeding and establishment of breastfeeding. Neonatal home care (NH) was developed to allow infants to remain at home for tube feeding and establishment of breastfeeding with regular home...... visits from neonatal nurses. For hospitals covering large regions, home visits may be challenging, time consuming, and expensive and alternative approaches must be explored. OBJECTIVE: To identify parental needs when wanting to provide neonatal home care supported by telemedicine. METHODS: The study used...

  2. Perceptual Image Compression in Telemedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.; Eckstein, Miguel; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The next era of space exploration, especially the "Mission to Planet Earth" will generate immense quantities of image data. For example, the Earth Observing System (EOS) is expected to generate in excess of one terabyte/day. NASA confronts a major technical challenge in managing this great flow of imagery: in collection, pre-processing, transmission to earth, archiving, and distribution to scientists at remote locations. Expected requirements in most of these areas clearly exceed current technology. Part of the solution to this problem lies in efficient image compression techniques. For much of this imagery, the ultimate consumer is the human eye. In this case image compression should be designed to match the visual capacities of the human observer. We have developed three techniques for optimizing image compression for the human viewer. The first consists of a formula, developed jointly with IBM and based on psychophysical measurements, that computes a DCT quantization matrix for any specified combination of viewing distance, display resolution, and display brightness. This DCT quantization matrix is used in most recent standards for digital image compression (JPEG, MPEG, CCITT H.261). The second technique optimizes the DCT quantization matrix for each individual image, based on the contents of the image. This is accomplished by means of a model of visual sensitivity to compression artifacts. The third technique extends the first two techniques to the realm of wavelet compression. Together these two techniques will allow systematic perceptual optimization of image compression in NASA imaging systems. Many of the image management challenges faced by NASA are mirrored in the field of telemedicine. Here too there are severe demands for transmission and archiving of large image databases, and the imagery is ultimately used primarily by human observers, such as radiologists. In this presentation I will describe some of our preliminary explorations of the applications

  3. The Sylvia Fedoruk Canadian Centre for Nuclear Innovation: advancing knowledge through partnerships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, N.; Root, J.H., E-mail: neil.alexander@usask.ca, E-mail: john.root@usask.ca [Sylvia Fedoruk Canadian Centre for Nuclear Innovation, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Chad, K., E-mail: karen.chad@usask.ca [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Bereznai, G., E-mail: george.bereznai@uoit.ca [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Tech., Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, Oshawa, ON (Canada); Dalzell, M.T.J., E-mail: matthew.dalzell@usask.ca [Sylvia Fedoruk Canadian Centre for Nuclear Innovation, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The vision of the Sylvia Fedoruk Canadian Centre for Nuclear Innovation is to place the Canadian province of Saskatchewan among global leaders in nuclear research, development and training through partnerships with industry and academia for economic and social benefit. Saskatchewan is one of the world's largest producers of uranium and home to pioneering research in nuclear medicine, most notably the development of cobalt-60 teletherapy. The Fedoruk Centre is striving to build on this legacy through the attainment of four strategic goals: (1) building nuclear expertise and capacity through the support to academic programs and research projects in partnership with industry, academic institutions and research organizations in nuclear medicine, materials research, energy and the environment; (2) enhancing innovation in partnership with the research community and industry; (3) engaging communities and increasing understanding of risks, benefits and potential impacts of nuclear technologies; and (4) ensuring the sustainability and accountability of the Centre and its resources. The Fedoruk Centre's mandate includes the stewardship of select nuclear facilities, the first being a 24 MeV cyclotron and nuclear substances laboratory as a resource for the development of novel imaging agents, training and production of radioisotopes for clinical diagnoses. By attracting new research leadership in the nuclear domain, developing networks of expertise, training highly-qualified personnel in nuclear disciplines, stimulating industrial partnerships, and creating conditions for fact-based conversation regarding nuclear issues, the Fedoruk Centre is working to establish a research and innovation capacity to support a vibrant nuclear sector in Saskatchewan. (author)

  4. The Sylvia Fedoruk Canadian Centre for Nuclear Innovation: advancing knowledge through partnerships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, N.; Root, J.H.; Chad, K.; Bereznai, G.; Dalzell, M.T.J.

    2014-01-01

    The vision of the Sylvia Fedoruk Canadian Centre for Nuclear Innovation is to place the Canadian province of Saskatchewan among global leaders in nuclear research, development and training through partnerships with industry and academia for economic and social benefit. Saskatchewan is one of the world's largest producers of uranium and home to pioneering research in nuclear medicine, most notably the development of cobalt-60 teletherapy. The Fedoruk Centre is striving to build on this legacy through the attainment of four strategic goals: (1) building nuclear expertise and capacity through the support to academic programs and research projects in partnership with industry, academic institutions and research organizations in nuclear medicine, materials research, energy and the environment; (2) enhancing innovation in partnership with the research community and industry; (3) engaging communities and increasing understanding of risks, benefits and potential impacts of nuclear technologies; and (4) ensuring the sustainability and accountability of the Centre and its resources. The Fedoruk Centre's mandate includes the stewardship of select nuclear facilities, the first being a 24 MeV cyclotron and nuclear substances laboratory as a resource for the development of novel imaging agents, training and production of radioisotopes for clinical diagnoses. By attracting new research leadership in the nuclear domain, developing networks of expertise, training highly-qualified personnel in nuclear disciplines, stimulating industrial partnerships, and creating conditions for fact-based conversation regarding nuclear issues, the Fedoruk Centre is working to establish a research and innovation capacity to support a vibrant nuclear sector in Saskatchewan. (author)

  5. What contributes to the enhanced use of customer, competition and technology knowledge for product innovation performance? : a survey of multinational companies' subsidiaries operating in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Junfeng; Hoenig, S.; Benedetto, Di A.C.; Lancioni, R.A.; Phatak, A.

    2009-01-01

    This study extends an emerging research area in knowledge management to new product development by empirically examining the factors associated with the use of different types of knowledge flows from various sources and product innovation performance (i.e., market success of new products) in the

  6. Technological Innovation Projects: Proposal For an Integrative Model Between Project Management and Knowledge Management in a Customer-Supplier Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edval da Silva Tavares

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In face of strong competition, companies in Brazil have increased their financial investments in automation, offering new products and services and reducing operating costs. These companies are focusing their efforts on core competencies and, therefore, they often lack the internal expertise to implement new projects, especially those that bring technological innovation. For this reason, we use the processes of outsourcing or subcontracting to help implement such projects. The unit of analysis in this study is the project and the object of the study to analyze the process of knowledge transfer from a provider to a customer during the duration of the project, which involves new technologies. The main motivation of this work is to address the acquisition and retention of new knowledge related to projects designed for business customers. We have developed a study of three cases of multiple financial firms that buy new technologies and two suppliers of information technology. As a practical result, a management model of knowledge transfer and retention of knowledge in client companies is proposed and incorporated into project management.

  7. When 'national innovation system' meet 'varieties of capitalism' arguments on labour qualifications: On the skill types and scientific knowledge needed for radical and incremental product innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herrmann, A.M.; Peine, A.

    2011-01-01

    The literatures on 'varieties of capitalism' (VoC) and 'national innovation systems' (NIS) propose very similar arguments about how firms require different types of labour qualifications to pursue strategies of radical product innovation (RPI), incremental product innovation (IPI), and product

  8. Accepting telemedicine in a circulatory medicine ward in major hospitals in South Korea: patients' and health professionals' perception of real-time electrocardiogram monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seo-Joon; Jung, Tae-Young; Lee, Tae-Ro; Han, Jae-Hoon

    2018-04-20

    South Korean government is currently in progress of expanding the coverage of telemedicine projects as part of an attempt to vitalize service industry, but is facing fierce opposition from KMA. Practice of telemedicine requires sufficient discussions among related parties. Although the participation of medical specialists is important, agreement from the public is essential. Three main tertiary care centers in Seoul were selected for data collection. A total of 224 patients (patients n = 180, patient guardian n = 44) and medical professionals (n = 41) were selected using simple random sampling. Mixed method of quantitative survey and qualitative semi-interview was used. This study analyzed patients' and medical professionals' perception about the application of telemedicine in cardiology ward in tertiary care centers to provide baseline data when developing and applying telemedicine services. Results implied high need for encouraging telemedicine projects in order to appeal needs among population by providing experience (p < 0.001) and knowledge (p < 0.001). Other results showed that the need for electrocardiography monitoring was high among not only in remote areas but also in areas close to the capital. 64.52% of all participants thought that telemedicine was needed, and 73.21% of participants were willing to use telemedicine service if provided. Semi-interviews revealed that participants expected more cost and time saving services through remote treatment, by not having to visit long distance hospitals frequently. Research results oppose Korean Medical Association's opinion that the population is against enforcing telemedicine related laws. The findings in this study reflect an up-to-date perception of telemedicine among patients and medical professionals in a tertiary care centers' cardiology ward. Moreover, the study provides a baseline that is needed in order to overcome past failures and to successfully implement telemedicine in South

  9. Telemedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... government's Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). Communicating with your doctor using other means, such as ... reviewed: August 2016 More on this topic for: Parents Teens Electronic Health Records Talking to Your Child's ...

  10. Telemedicine in healthcare. 1: Exploring its uses, benefits and disadvantages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarhan, Firas

    This first in a two part series on telemedicine in healthcare outlines the background and context for using this technology. It discusses the levels of telemedicine and its possible applications in healthcare, and examines its advantages and disadvantages.

  11. Knowledge Management, Innovation and Intellectual Capital for Corporate Value in the United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bleoca, Lavinia

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic capabilities of 74 publicly listed U.S. companies are examined to determine their knowledge management’s effects on shareholder value. R&D practices, patenting and intellectual capital are examined in a cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis to offer insights into the temporal dyna...

  12. ERP as an organization innovation : Key users and cross-boundary knowledge management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, J.-B.; van Fenema, P.C.; Soeters, J.M.M.L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to provide more insight in the ways key users act as knowledge managers and boundary spanners during the enterprise resource planning (ERP) system usage phase. Despite the recognized importance of key users during the implementation phase of an ERP system, little

  13. Harvesting a knowledge commons: collective action, transparency, and innovation at the Portland Fish Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer F. Brewer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available While localist visions of alternative food systems advocate for the expansion of local ecological knowledge through more proximate producer-consumer relationships, globalized seafood supply-demand chains persist. Moving beyond this dichotomy, commons scholars recognize that collective action among resource users at the local level can shape cross-scalar producer relations with government and more capitalized firms operating in regional and global markets. In the case of the New England groundfishery, a quasi-public fish auction not only transformed the scalar, logistical, and financial parameters of harvester-buyer relationships, it altered the production and use of local knowledge among some harvesters, and their technological choices. Resulting markets offer potential benefits that extend to broader publics, by increasing the monetary value and experimental development of a knowledge commons. Qualitative analysis of field data shows that with new market transparency, fish are no longer valued as an undifferentiated commodity, but as a variety of products with individually nuanced price structures. Displacement of local seafood buyers incurred some shoreside job losses, but fishers on smaller, owner-operated boats in multi-generational fishing harbours benefit particularly from new opportunities compared to larger, fleet boats due to different labour relations, allocations of decision-making responsibilities, observational contexts, and associated information flows. Implications for the mobilization of knowledge-action linkages to influence formal resource management arenas merit further research.

  14. Telemedicine in a pediatric headache clinic: A prospective survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qubty, William; Patniyot, Irene; Gelfand, Amy

    2018-05-08

    The aim of this prospective study was to survey our patients about their experience with our clinic's telemedicine program to better understand telemedicine's utility for families, and to improve patient satisfaction and ultimately patient care. This was a prospective survey study of patients and their families who had a routine telemedicine follow-up visit with the University of California San Francisco Pediatric Headache Program. The survey was administered to patients and a parent(s) following their telemedicine visit. Fifty-one of 69 surveys (74%) were completed. All (51/51) patients and families thought that (1) telemedicine was more convenient compared to a clinic visit, (2) telemedicine caused less disruption of their daily routine, and (3) they would choose to do telemedicine again. The mean round-trip travel time from home to clinic was 6.8 hours (SD ± 8.6 hours). All participants thought telemedicine was more cost-effective than a clinic visit. Parents estimated that participating in a telemedicine visit instead of a clinic appointment saved them on average $486. This prospective, pediatric headache telemedicine study shows that telemedicine is convenient, perceived to be cost-effective, and patient-centered. Providing the option of telemedicine for routine pediatric headache follow-up visits results in high patient and family satisfaction. © 2018 American Academy of Neurology.

  15. Knowledge management and Competitive Intelligenge: designing competitiveness and innovation strategies to small business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassia Aparecida Corsatto

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper´s intention was make a presentation about the concepts and definitions of knowledge management and competitive intelligence search in the current bibliography and draw a parallel about their real possibility of application in the small business context. By the way, the main intention was bring the discussion to the relevance of the knowledge management to make and applied competitiveness strategies in this enterprise, another intention was show others elements and tools to support the application of this strategies inside the organization. This elements are: person and process. This elements are: person and process and they have a essential importance to create an internal enterprise knowledge, to create and maintain the information organized to keep the organizations with more appropriate information witch will support the way to formulated strategies and make decisions. It also intend to show tolls and methodologies to help organizations improved the competitive intelligence`s strategies as a way to increase competitiveness and value creation for customers and market.

  16. Clinical and financial considerations for implementing an ICU telemedicine program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruklitis, Robert J; Tracy, Joseph A; McCambridge, Matthew M

    2014-06-01

    As the population in the United States increases and ages, the need to provide high-quality, safe, and cost-effective care to the most critically ill patients will be of great importance. With the projected shortage of intensivists, innovative changes to improve efficiency and increase productivity will be necessary. Telemedicine programs in the ICUs (tele-ICUs) are a successful strategy to improve intensivist access to critically ill patients. Although significant capital and maintenance costs are associated with tele-ICUs, these costs can be offset by indirect financial benefits, such as decreased length of stay. To achieve the positive clinical outcomes desired, tele-ICUs must be carefully designed and implemented. In this article, we discuss the clinical benefits of tele-ICUs. We review the financial considerations, including direct and indirect reimbursement and development and maintenance costs. Finally, we review design and implementation considerations for tele-ICUs.

  17. Systematic Integration of Innovation in Process Improvement Projects Using the Enhanced Sigma-TRIZ Algorithm and Its Effective Use by Means of a Knowledge Management Software Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea FULEA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In an evolving, highly turbulent and uncertain socio-economic environment, organizations must consider strategies of systematic and continuous integration of innovation within their business systems, as a fundamental condition for sustainable development. Adequate methodologies are required in this respect. A mature framework for integrating innovative problem solving approaches within business process improvement methodologies is proposed in this paper. It considers a TRIZ-centred algorithm in the improvement phase of the DMAIC methodology. The new tool is called enhanced sigma-TRIZ. A case study reveals the practical application of the proposed methodology. The integration of enhanced sigma-TRIZ within a knowledge management software platform (KMSP is further described. Specific developments to support processes of knowledge creation, knowledge storage and retrieval, knowledge transfer and knowledge application in a friendly and effective way within the KMSP are also highlighted.

  18. Sustainable Telemedicine: Designing and Building Infrastructure to Support a Comprehensive Telemedicine Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreofsky, Beth L H; Blegen, R Nicole; Lokken, Troy G; Kapraun, Susan M; Bushman, Matthew S; Demaerschalk, Bart M

    2018-04-16

    Telemedicine services in medical institutions are often developed in isolation of one another and not as part of a comprehensive telemedicine program. The Center for Connected Care is the administrative home for a broad range of telehealth services at Mayo Clinic. This article speaks of real-time video services, referenced as telemedicine throughout. This article discusses how a large healthcare system designed and built the infrastructure to support a comprehensive telemedicine practice. Based on analysis of existing services, Mayo Clinic developed a multifaceted operational plan that addressed high-priority areas and outlined clear roles and responsibilities of the Center for Connected Care and that of the clinical departments. The plan set priorities and a direction that would lead to long-term success. The plan articulated the governing and operational infrastructure necessary to support telemedicine by defining the role of the Center for Connected Care as the owner of core administrative operations and the role of the clinical departments as the owners of clinical telemedicine services. Additional opportunities were identified to develop product selection processes, implementation services, and staffing models that would be applied to ensure successful telemedicine deployment. The telemedicine team within the Center for Connected Care completed 45 business cases resulting in 54 implementations. The standardization of core products along with key operational offerings around implementation services, and the establishment of a 24/7 support model resulted in improved provider satisfaction and fewer reported technical issues. The foundation for long-term scalability and growth was developed by centralizing operations of telemedicine services, implementing sustainable processes, employing dedicated qualified personnel, and deploying robust products.

  19. Adoption of telemedicine: from pilot stage to routine delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanaboni Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Today there is much debate about why telemedicine has stalled. Teleradiology is the only widespread telemedicine application. Other telemedicine applications appear to be promising candidates for widespread use, but they remain in the early adoption stage. The objective of this debate paper is to achieve a better understanding of the adoption of telemedicine, to assist those trying to move applications from pilot stage to routine delivery. Discussion We have investigated the reasons why telemedicine has stalled by focusing on two, high-level topics: 1 the process of adoption of telemedicine in comparison with other technologies; and 2 the factors involved in the widespread adoption of telemedicine. For each topic, we have formulated hypotheses. First, the advantages for users are the crucial determinant of the speed of adoption of technology in healthcare. Second, the adoption of telemedicine is similar to that of other health technologies and follows an S-shaped logistic growth curve. Third, evidence of cost-effectiveness is a necessary but not sufficient condition for the widespread adoption of telemedicine. Fourth, personal incentives for the health professionals involved in service provision are needed before the widespread adoption of telemedicine will occur. Summary The widespread adoption of telemedicine is a major -- and still underdeveloped -- challenge that needs to be strengthened through new research directions. We have formulated four hypotheses, which are all susceptible to experimental verification. In particular, we believe that data about the adoption of telemedicine should be collected from applications implemented on a large-scale, to test the assumption that the adoption of telemedicine follows an S-shaped growth curve. This will lead to a better understanding of the process, which will in turn accelerate the adoption of new telemedicine applications in future. Research is also required to identify

  20. Adoption of telemedicine: from pilot stage to routine delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Today there is much debate about why telemedicine has stalled. Teleradiology is the only widespread telemedicine application. Other telemedicine applications appear to be promising candidates for widespread use, but they remain in the early adoption stage. The objective of this debate paper is to achieve a better understanding of the adoption of telemedicine, to assist those trying to move applications from pilot stage to routine delivery. Discussion We have investigated the reasons why telemedicine has stalled by focusing on two, high-level topics: 1) the process of adoption of telemedicine in comparison with other technologies; and 2) the factors involved in the widespread adoption of telemedicine. For each topic, we have formulated hypotheses. First, the advantages for users are the crucial determinant of the speed of adoption of technology in healthcare. Second, the adoption of telemedicine is similar to that of other health technologies and follows an S-shaped logistic growth curve. Third, evidence of cost-effectiveness is a necessary but not sufficient condition for the widespread adoption of telemedicine. Fourth, personal incentives for the health professionals involved in service provision are needed before the widespread adoption of telemedicine will occur. Summary The widespread adoption of telemedicine is a major -- and still underdeveloped -- challenge that needs to be strengthened through new research directions. We have formulated four hypotheses, which are all susceptible to experimental verification. In particular, we believe that data about the adoption of telemedicine should be collected from applications implemented on a large-scale, to test the assumption that the adoption of telemedicine follows an S-shaped growth curve. This will lead to a better understanding of the process, which will in turn accelerate the adoption of new telemedicine applications in future. Research is also required to identify suitable financial and

  1. Development and pilot testing of 24/7 in-ambulance telemedicine for acute stroke : prehospital stroke study at the Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel-project

    OpenAIRE

    Espinoza, Alexis Valenzuela; Van Hooff, Robbert-Jan; De Smedt, Ann; Moens, Maarten; Yperzeele, Laetitia; Nieboer, Koenraad; Hubloue, Ives; de Keyser, Jacques; Convents, Andre; Tellez, Helio Fernandez; Dupont, Alain; Putman, Koen; Brouns, Raf

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Background: In-ambulance telemedicine is a recently developed and a promising approach to improve emergency care. We implemented the first ever 24/7 in-ambulance telemedicine service for acute stroke. We report on our experiences with the development and pilot testing of the Prehospital Stroke Study at the Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (PreSSUB) to facilitate a wider spread of the knowledge regarding this technique. Methods: Successful execution of the project involved the develop...

  2. Development and Pilot Testing of 24/7 In-Ambulance Telemedicine for Acute Stroke: Prehospital Stroke Study at the Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel-Project

    OpenAIRE

    Espinoza, Alexis Valenzuela; Van Hooff, Robbert-Jan; De Smedt, Ann; Moens, Maarten; Yperzeele, Laetitia; Nieboer, Koenraad; Hubloue, Ives; de Keyser, Jacques; Convents, Andre; Tellez, Helio Fernandez; Dupont, Alain; Putman, Koen; Brouns, Raf

    2016-01-01

    Background: In-ambulance telemedicine is a recently developed and a promising approach to improve emergency care. We implemented the first ever 24/7 in-ambulance telemedicine service for acute stroke. We report on our experiences with the development and pilot testing of the Prehospital Stroke Study at the Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (PreSSUB) to facilitate a wider spread of the knowledge regarding this technique. Methods: Successful execution of the project involved the development and v...

  3. Exploring Ayurvedic Knowledge on Food and Health for Providing Innovative Solutions to Contemporary Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payyappallimana, Unnikrishnan; Venkatasubramanian, Padma

    2016-01-01

    Ayurveda, a traditional system of medicine that originated over three millennia ago in the South Asian region, offers extensive insights about food and health based on certain unique conceptual as well as theoretical positions. Health is defined as a state of equilibrium with one’s self (svasthya) but which is inextricably linked to the environment. Ayurvedic principles, such as the tridosa (three humors) theory, provide the relationship between the microcosm and the macrocosm that can be applied in day-to-day practice. Classical Ayurveda texts cover an array of themes on food ranging from diversity of natural sources, their properties in relation to seasons and places and to their specific function both in physiological and pathological states. The epistemic perspective on health and nutrition in Ayurveda is very different from that of biomedicine and modern nutrition. However, contemporary knowledge is reinventing and advancing several of these concepts in an era of systems biology, personalized medicine, and the broader context of a more holistic transition in sciences in general. Trans-disciplinary research could be important not only for pushing the boundaries of food and health sciences but also for providing practical solutions for contemporary health conditions. This article briefly reviews the parallels in Ayurveda and biomedicine and draws attention to the need for a deeper engagement with traditional knowledge systems, such as Ayurveda. It points out that recreation of the methodologies that enabled the holistic view point about health in Ayurveda may unravel some of the complex connections with Nature. PMID:27066472

  4. Telemedicine expanding the scope of health care information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balch, D C; Tichenor, J M

    1997-01-01

    The definition of health information is growing to include multimedia audio, video, and high-resolution still images. This article describes the telemedicine program at East Carolina University School of Medicine, including the telemedicine applications presently in use and the virtual reality applications currently under development' Included are the major design criteria that shape the telemedicine network some of the lessons learned in developing the network, and a discussion of the future of telemedicine, including efforts to incorporate telemedicine within a fully integrated health information system.

  5. A biometric method to secure telemedicine systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G H; Poon, Carmen C Y; Li, Ye; Zhang, Y T

    2009-01-01

    Security and privacy are among the most crucial issues for data transmission in telemedicine systems. This paper proposes a solution for securing wireless data transmission in telemedicine systems, i.e. within a body sensor network (BSN), between the BSN and server as well as between the server and professionals who have assess to the server. A unique feature of this solution is the generation of random keys by physiological data (i.e. a biometric approach) for securing communication at all 3 levels. In the performance analysis, inter-pulse interval of photoplethysmogram is used as an example to generate these biometric keys to protect wireless data transmission. The results of statistical analysis and computational complexity suggest that this type of key is random enough to make telemedicine systems resistant to attacks.

  6. Selecting a digital camera for telemedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricoski, Chris; Ferguson, A Stewart

    2009-06-01

    The digital camera is an essential component of store-and-forward telemedicine (electronic consultation). There are numerous makes and models of digital cameras on the market, and selecting a suitable consumer-grade camera can be complicated. Evaluation of digital cameras includes investigating the features and analyzing image quality. Important features include the camera settings, ease of use, macro capabilities, method of image transfer, and power recharging. Consideration needs to be given to image quality, especially as it relates to color (skin tones) and detail. It is important to know the level of the photographer and the intended application. The goal is to match the characteristics of the camera with the telemedicine program requirements. In the end, selecting a digital camera is a combination of qualitative (subjective) and quantitative (objective) analysis. For the telemedicine program in Alaska in 2008, the camera evaluation and decision process resulted in a specific selection based on the criteria developed for our environment.

  7. Telemedicine - a scientometric and density equalizing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groneberg, David A; Rahimian, Shaghayegh; Bundschuh, Matthias; Schwarzer, Mario; Gerber, Alexander; Kloft, Beatrix

    2015-01-01

    As a result of the various telemedicine projects in the past years a large number of studies were recently published in this field. However, a precise bibliometric analysis of telemedicine publications does not exist so far. The present study was conducted to establish a data base of the existing approaches. Density-equalizing algorithms were used and data was retrieved from the Thomson Reuters database Web of Science. During the period from 1900 to 2006 a number of 3290 filed items were connected to telemedicine, with the first being published in 1964. The studies originate from 101 countries, with the USA, Great Britain and Canada being the most productive suppliers participating in 56.08 % of all published items. Analyzing the average citation per item for countries with more than 10 publications, Ireland ranked first (10.19/item), New Zealand ranked second (9.5/item) followed by Finland (9.04/item). The citation rate can be assumed as an indicator for research quality. The ten most productive journals include three journals with the main focus telemedicine and another five with the main focus "Information/Informatics". In all subject categories examined for published items related to telemedicine, "Health Care Sciences & Services" ranked first by far. More than 36 % of all publications are assigned to this category, followed by "Medical Informatics" with 9.72 % and "Medicine, General & Internal" with 8.84 % of all publications. In summary it can be concluded that the data shows clearly a strong increase in research productivity. Using science citation analysis it can be assumed that there is a large rise in the interest in telemedicine studies.

  8. Application of Telemedicine in Gansu Province of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hui; Wang, Hongjing

    2016-01-01

    Telemedicine has become an increasingly popular option for long-distance health care and continuing education. As information and communication technology is underdeveloped in China, telemedicine develops slowly. At present, telemedicine consultation centers are situated mainly in developed cities, such as Beijing, Shanghai, and Guangzhou. In many less developed regions, such as northwest China, the conditions or related facilities are not available for the application of a better medical service. Accordingly, the aim of this paper was to introduce the construction and application of a telemedicine consultation center in Gansu Province in the northwest of China. In addition, the function of Gansu Provincial Telemedicine Consultation Center on emergency public events was introduced. As a whole, there was a great demand for telemedicine service in the local medical institutions. In the telemedicine consultation center, the telemedicine equipments and regulations were needed to be improved. The function of telemedicine service was not fully used, there was a large space to be applied and the publicity of telemedicine service was important. What is important was that telemedicine played a significance role in promoting the medical policy reform, improving the medical environment and launching the remote rescue in the emergency public events. This paper emphasizes the health care challenges of poor regions, and indicates how to share the high-quality medical service of provincial hospitals effectively and how to help residents in resource-poor environments. PMID:27332894

  9. Multistandard Receiver Design for Telemedicine Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In short-distance wireless communications for telemedicine monitoring, different medical data measurement equipment has different wireless transmission modes. A multistandard receiver is designed that can adapt to different medical data measuring equipment. Using a second-order bandpass sampling for the design of antialiasing filters, two aliasing signals can be separated. Simultaneously, constraint conditions for sampling frequency are not as critical. The design is useful for a multistandard receiver in a telemedicine monitoring system and has the advantages such as saving spectrum resources and facilitating spectrum planning.

  10. Mapping telemedicine efforts: surveying regional initiatives in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierkegaard, Patrick

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to survey telemedicine services currently in operation across Denmark. The study specifically seeks to answer the following questions: What initiatives are deployed within the different regions? What are the motivations behind the projects? What technologies are being utilized? What medical disciplines are being supported using telemedicine systems? All data were surveyed from the Telemedicinsk Landkort, a newly created database designed to provide a comprehensive and systematic overview of all telemedicine technologies in Denmark. The results of this study suggest that a growing numbers of telemedicine initiatives are currently in operation across Denmark but that considerable variations exist in terms of regional efforts as the number of operational telemedicine projects varied from region to region. The results of this study provide a timely picture of the factors that are shaping the telemedicine landscape of Denmark and suggest potential strategies to help policymakers increase and improve national telemedicine deployment.

  11. Service design attributes affecting diabetic patient preferences of telemedicine in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hayoung; Chon, Yucheong; Lee, Jongsu; Choi, Ie-Jung; Yoon, Kun-Ho

    2011-01-01

    Attempts to introduce telemedicine in South Korea have failed mostly, leaving critical questions for service developers and providers about whether patients would be willing to pay for the service and how the service should be designed to encourage patient buy-in. In this study, we explore patients' valuations and preferences for each attribute of telemedicine service for diabetes management and evaluate patient willingness to pay for specific service attributes. We conducted a conjoint survey to collect data on patients' stated preferences among telemedicine service alternatives. The alternatives for diabetes-related service differed in 10 attributes, including those related to price, type of service provider, and service scope. To estimate the relative importance of attributes, patients' willingness to pay for each attribute, and their probable choice of specific alternatives, we used a rank-ordered logit model. A total of 118 respondents participated in the survey. All 10 attributes significantly affected patients' valuations and preferences, and demographic and disease characteristics, such as existence of complications and comorbidities, significantly affected patients' valuations of the attributes. Price was the most important attribute, followed by comprehensive scope of service, the availability of mobile phone-based delivery, and large general-hospital provided services. The study findings have significant implications for adoption policy and strategy of telemedicine in diabetes management care. Further, the methodology presented in this study can be used to draw knowledge needed to formulate effective policy for adoption of the necessary technology and for the design of services that attract potential beneficiaries.

  12. Scientometric and patentometric analyses to determine the knowledge landscape in innovative technologies: The case of 3D bioprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Salvador, Marisela; Rio-Belver, Rosa María; Garechana-Anacabe, Gaizka

    2017-01-01

    This research proposes an innovative data model to determine the landscape of emerging technologies. It is based on a competitive technology intelligence methodology that incorporates the assessment of scientific publications and patent analysis production, and is further supported by experts' feedback. It enables the definition of the growth rate of scientific and technological output in terms of the top countries, institutions and journals producing knowledge within the field as well as the identification of main areas of research and development by analyzing the International Patent Classification codes including keyword clusterization and co-occurrence of patent assignees and patent codes. This model was applied to the evolving domain of 3D bioprinting. Scientific documents from the Scopus and Web of Science databases, along with patents from 27 authorities and 140 countries, were retrieved. In total, 4782 scientific publications and 706 patents were identified from 2000 to mid-2016. The number of scientific documents published and patents in the last five years showed an annual average growth of 20% and 40%, respectively. Results indicate that the most prolific nations and institutions publishing on 3D bioprinting are the USA and China, including the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (USA), Nanyang Technological University (Singapore) and Tsinghua University (China), respectively. Biomaterials and Biofabrication are the predominant journals. The most prolific patenting countries are China and the USA; while Organovo Holdings Inc. (USA) and Tsinghua University (China) are the institutions leading. International Patent Classification codes reveal that most 3D bioprinting inventions intended for medical purposes apply porous or cellular materials or biologically active materials. Knowledge clusters and expert drivers indicate that there is a research focus on tissue engineering including the fabrication of organs, bioinks and new 3D bioprinting systems. Our

  13. The Impact of Telemedicine on Pediatric Critical Care Triage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Jillian B; Yeager, Brooke E; Cramer, Christina; Wheeler, David; McSwain, S David

    2017-11-01

    To examine the relationship between pediatric critical care telemedicine consultation to rural emergency departments and triage decisions. We compare the triage location and provider rating of the accuracy of remote assessment for a cohort of patients who receive critical care telemedicine consultations and a similar group of patients receiving telephone consultations. Retrospective evaluation of consultations occurring between April 2012 and March 2016. Pediatric critical care telemedicine and telephone consultations in 52 rural healthcare settings in South Carolina. Pediatric patients receiving critical care telemedicine or telephone consultations. Telemedicine consultations. Data were collected from the consulting provider for 484 total consultations by telephone or telemedicine. We examined the providers' self-reported assessments about the consultation, decision-making, and triage outcomes. We estimate a logit model to predict triage location as a function of telemedicine consult age and sex. For telemedicine patients, the odds of triage to a non-ICU level of care are 2.55 times larger than the odds for patients receiving telephone consultations (p = 0.0005). Providers rated the accuracy of their assessments higher when consultations were provided via telemedicine. When patients were transferred to a non-ICU location following a telemedicine consultation, providers indicated that the use of telemedicine influenced the triage decision in 95.7% of cases (p telemedicine consultation to community hospitals is feasible and results in a reduction in PICU admissions. This study demonstrates an improvement in provider-reported accuracy of patient assessment via telemedicine compared with telephone, which may produce a higher comfort level with transporting patients to a lower level of care. Pediatric critical care telemedicine consultations represent a promising means of improving care and reducing costs for critically ill children in rural areas.

  14. A Case Study - On Patient Empowerment and Integration of Telemedicine to National Healthcare Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urazimbetova, Surayya

    Patient empowerment in the digitalized healthcare can be supported by means of telemedicine. As opposed to Electronic Patient Records developed by a few large business suppliers for healthcare professionals, telemedical applications include innovative solutions of small-medium size suppliers...... and are targeted at specific groups of patients (e.g., hip operated or dermatology patients) and their care network. Based on an integration experiment we argue that in order to support the national visions for patient empowerment and connectedness of healthcare at the same time, it is necessary to achieve...... the integration of telemedicine to the national healthcare services on a business logic (functional) integration level. In this paper, (1) we identify the lack of business logic (functional) level integration opportunities for patient oriented telemedical applications with national healthcare services; (2) we...

  15. Quality of life in patients receiving telemedicine enhanced chronic heart failure disease management: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Liam; Rahman, Rachel J; Beedie, Chris

    2017-08-01

    Background Previous reviews have investigated the effectiveness of telemedicine in the treatment of heart failure (HF). Dependent variables have included hospitalisations, mortality rates, disease knowledge and health costs. Few reviews, however, have examined the variable of health-related quality of life (QoL). Methods Randomised controlled trials comparing the delivery methods of any form of telemedicine with usual care for the provision of HF disease-management were identified via searches of all relevant databases and reference lists. Studies had to report a quantitative measure for mental, physical or overall QoL in order to be included. Results A total of 33 studies were identified. However, poor reporting of data resulted in the exclusion of seven, leaving 26 studies with 7066 participants. Three separate, random effects meta-analyses were conducted for mental, physical and overall QoL. Telemedicine was not significantly more effective than usual care on mental and physical QoL (standardised mean difference (SMD) 0.03, (95% confidence interval (CI) -0.05-0.12), p = 0.45 and SMD 0.24, (95% CI -0.08-0.56), p = 0.14, respectively). However, when compared to usual care, telemedicine was associated with a small significant increase in overall QoL (SMD 0.23, (95% CI 0.09-0.37), p = 0.001). Moderator analyses indicated that telemedicine delivered over a long-duration (≥52 weeks) and via telemonitoring was most beneficial. Conclusion Compared to usual care, telemedicine significantly increases overall QoL in patients receiving HF disease management. Statistically non-significant but nonetheless positive trends were also observed for physical QoL. These findings provide preliminary support for the use of telemedicine in the management of heart failure without jeopardising patient well-being.

  16. Knowledge-based model of competition in restaurant industry: a qualitative study about culinary competence, creativity, and innovation in five full-service restaurants in Jakarta

    OpenAIRE

    NAPITUPULU JOSHUA H.; ASTUTI ENDANG SITI; HAMID DJAMHUR; RAHARDJO KUSDI

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to have an in-depth description in the form of the analysis of culinary competence, creativity and innovation that develops knowledge-based model of competence in full-service restaurant business. Studies on restaurant generally focused on customers more particularly customer’s satisfaction and loyalty, and very few studies discussed internal competitive factors in restaurant business. The study aims at filling out the research gap, using knowledge-based approach t...

  17. Triple-loop learning as foundation for profound change, individual cultivation, and radical innovation. Construction processes beyond scientific and rational knowledge.

    OpenAIRE

    Peschl, Markus F.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Ernst von Glasersfeld’s question concerning the relationship between scientific/ rational knowledge and the domain of wisdom and how these forms of knowledge come about is the starting point. This article aims at developing an epistemological as well as methodological framework that is capable of explaining how profound change can be brought about in various contexts, such as in individual cultivation, in organizations, in processes of radical innovation, etc. This fra...

  18. Innovative products and services with environmental benefits: design of search strategies for external knowledge and absorptive capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Mothe, Caroline; NGuyen-Thi, Uyen; Triguero-Cano, Angela

    2018-01-01

    International audience; Although the antecedents of environmental innovation and open innovation strategies have been well studied separately, the relationship between a firm's openness and environmental technological innovation still remains an interesting topic to research, especially in terms of the various modes of openness on the one hand and the product–process distinction on the other. This study relies on data from the French Community Innovation Survey to differentiate the associatio...

  19. Antecedents and Outcomes of Supplier Innovativeness in International Customer-Supplier Relationships: The Role of Knowledge Distance

    OpenAIRE

    Jean, Ruey-Jer "Bryan"; Sinkovics, Rudolf R.; Kim, Daekwan

    2017-01-01

    The increasing competitive pressures and speed of R&D and product innovation is prompting many multinational enterprise customers to outsource their core activities to suppliers. Despite organizational challenges due to cultural and physical separation from their partners, these are now charged with supplier-driven innovation. This study looks at key drivers of supplier innovativeness, examines the role of cross-national differences in shaping supplier innovativeness and examines the impa...

  20. Sailing for Science: on board experiences for transferring knowledge on Historical Oceanography for Future Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvani, Sara; Carmisciano, Cosmo; Locritani, Marina; Grossi, Luigi; Mori, Anna; Stroobant, Mascha; Schierano, Erika; De Strobel, Federico; Manzella, Giuseppe; Muzi, Enrico; Leccese, Dario; Sinapi, Luigi; Morellato, Claudio; La Tassa, Hebert; Talamoni, Roberta; Coelho, Emanuel; Nacini, Francesca

    2017-04-01

    Smart, sustainable and inclusive Blue Growth means also knowing past technology and the paths followed by ancients in order to understand and monitor marine environments. In general, history of Science is a matter that is not enough explored and explained or promoted in high schools or university official programmes, and, usually, scientist do not consider it as an important part of their curricula. However, bad or good ideas, abandoned or forgotten beliefs, concepts, opinions, do still have a great potential for inspiring present and future scientists, no matter in which historical period they may have been formulated: they should be always be taken into consideration, critically examined and observed by a very close point of view, not just as part of the intellectual framework of some obsolete 'Cabinet of Curiosities' with limited access except for the chosen few. Moreover, history of Science should be transmitted in a more practical way, with hands-on labs showing the limits and challenges that prior generations of ocean explorers, investigators and seafarers had to face in order to answer to crucial questions as self-orientation in open sea, understanding main currents and waves, predicting meteorological conditions for a safe navigation. Oceanography is a relatively young branch of science, and still needs further approvals and knowledge (National Science Foundation, 2000). The Scientific Dissemination Group (SDG) "La Spezia Gulf of Science" - made up by Research Centres, Schools and Cultural associations located in La Spezia (Liguria, Italy) - has a decadal experience in initiatives aimed at people and groups of people of all ages, who are keen on science or who can be guided in any case to take an interest in scientific matters (Locritani et al., 2015). Amongst the SDG activities, the tight relationship with the Historical Oceanography Society, the Italian Navy and the Naval Technical Museum (that collects a rich heritage of civilization, technology and

  1. 11-th International conference Nuclear power safety and nuclear education - 2009. Abstracts. Part 1. Session: Safety of nuclear technology; Innovative nuclear systems and fuel cycle; Nuclear knowledge management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The book includes abstracts of the 11-th International conference Nuclear power safety and nuclear education - 2009 (29 Sep - 2 Oct, 2009, Obninsk). Problems of safety of nuclear technology are discussed, innovative nuclear systems and fuel cycles are treated. Abstracts on professional education for nuclear power and industry are presented. Nuclear knowledge management are discussed

  2. Need to Knowledge (NtK) Model: an evidence-based framework for generating technological innovations with socio-economic impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flagg, Jennifer L; Lane, Joseph P; Lockett, Michelle M

    2013-02-15

    Traditional government policies suggest that upstream investment in scientific research is necessary and sufficient to generate technological innovations. The expected downstream beneficial socio-economic impacts are presumed to occur through non-government market mechanisms. However, there is little quantitative evidence for such a direct and formulaic relationship between public investment at the input end and marketplace benefits at the impact end. Instead, the literature demonstrates that the technological innovation process involves a complex interaction between multiple sectors, methods, and stakeholders. The authors theorize that accomplishing the full process of technological innovation in a deliberate and systematic manner requires an operational-level model encompassing three underlying methods, each designed to generate knowledge outputs in different states: scientific research generates conceptual discoveries; engineering development generates prototype inventions; and industrial production generates commercial innovations. Given the critical roles of engineering and business, the entire innovation process should continuously consider the practical requirements and constraints of the commercial marketplace.The Need to Knowledge (NtK) Model encompasses the activities required to successfully generate innovations, along with associated strategies for effectively communicating knowledge outputs in all three states to the various stakeholders involved. It is intentionally grounded in evidence drawn from academic analysis to facilitate objective and quantitative scrutiny, and industry best practices to enable practical application. The Need to Knowledge (NtK) Model offers a practical, market-oriented approach that avoids the gaps, constraints and inefficiencies inherent in undirected activities and disconnected sectors. The NtK Model is a means to realizing increased returns on public investments in those science and technology programs expressly intended to

  3. Japanese experience of telemedicine in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizushima, H; Uchiyama, E; Nagata, H; Matsuno, Y; Sekiguchi, R; Ohmatsu, H; Hojo, F; Shimoda, T; Wakao, F; Shinkai, T; Yamaguchi, N; Moriyama, N; Kakizoe, T; Abe, K; Terada, M

    2001-05-01

    We started telemedicine projects from 1990 with a telepathology system within Tsukiji Campus of National Cancer Center. In 1994, we connected Tsukiji Campus and Kashiwa Campus by 6 Mbps optical fiber leased line using IP protocol for data transmission, for teleconference, telepathology, and teleradiology projects. We also started connection of regional cancer centers and are now forming a cancer center network of 14 cancer centers. We are at present organizing 130 teleconferences per year with an attendance of more than 16000 people as summary. We have also used a high-resolution image transferring system, such as SHD (2000 pixelsx2000 pixels resolution) system on one side, and an economical telemedicine system using JAVA and a WWW browser (NCC_image) on the other side. We think that providing information is another field of telemedicine. We began the experimental gopher and WWW service in 1993. We are now providing official up-to-date cancer information for patients and healthcare professionals. We are getting more than 400000 hits per month. We are also providing a teleconference video session which is held every week on the Internet using a Real Video system with synchronized slide presentation on the WWW browser. We are also organizing a Cancer Image Reference Database System including DICOM images with viewer software. This paper is a summary of the telemedicine projects performed at the National Cancer Center.

  4. Telemedicine in Majuro Hospital, Marshall Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardane, K J

    2000-09-01

    Since March 1998 up to June 2000, telemedicine activities in Marshall Islands have mainly been for Referrals to Tripler Army Medical Center (TAMC) in Hawaii. The activities are based on a computer which has the Internet connection and accessories including a digital camera, flatbed scanner with a transparency adapter, color printer, a video printer, ophthalmoscope, otoscope and a video Lens, all of which were donated by Project Akamai in Hawaii. Two sessions of training were conducted by representatives from Akamai Project and from PBMA at the very beginning of the establishment of the unit, to all levels of Health Care Providers in Ministry of Health in Majuro. The computer and Internet facility is available 24 hours. Since March 1998 to June 2000, there had been 144 telemedicine consultations to TAMC. Out of a total of 326 off-island referrals for the same period, approximately 80 patients have been sent to TAMC using the PIHCP/Telemedicine program. This accounts for approximately 25% of total off-island referrals. This represents a significant reduction in cost. In addition to cost reduction the telemedicine unit most important impact is on the health providers, especially the physicians working at Majuro Hospital. Availability of medical information through internet has helped them to feel less isolated from the constantly changing field of medical science.

  5. Online Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vujovic, Sladjana; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2008-01-01

      Purpose - The aim of this paper is to investigate the role of online networking during the innovation process, including its role(s) in communication, cooperation and coordination. The paper neither implicitly assumes that online computer-based networking is a prerequisite for the innovation...... process nor denies the possibility that innovation can emerge and successfully survive without it. It merely presupposes that, in cases of innovation where information and communication technologies play a substantial role, non-proprietarity may offer an interesting alternative to innovations based...... on proprietary knowledge. Design/methodology/approach - The paper borrows from the theory of communities-of-practice, which takes into account social relations, contacts, and the transfer and incorporation of knowledge. Open source innovation is not the exclusive preserve of computer nerds, but also has...

  6. Adoption of routine telemedicine in Norway: the current picture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanaboni, Paolo; Knarvik, Undine; Wootton, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background Telemedicine appears to be ready for wider adoption. Although existing research evidence is useful, the adoption of routine telemedicine in healthcare systems has been slow. Objective We conducted a study to explore the current use of routine telemedicine in Norway, at national, regional, and local levels, to provide objective and up-to-date information and to estimate the potential for wider adoption of telemedicine. Design A top-down approach was used to collect official data on the national use of telemedicine from the Norwegian Patient Register. A bottom-up approach was used to collect complementary information on the routine use of telemedicine through a survey conducted at the five largest publicly funded hospitals. Results Results show that routine telemedicine has been adopted in all health regions in Norway and in 68% of hospitals. Despite being widely adopted, the current level of use of telemedicine is low compared to the number of face-to-face visits. Examples of routine telemedicine can be found in several clinical specialties. Most services connect different hospitals in secondary care, and they are mostly delivered as teleconsultations via videoconference. Conclusions Routine telemedicine in Norway has been widely adopted, probably for geographical reasons, as in other settings. However, the level of use of telemedicine in Norway is rather low, and it has significant potential for further development as an alternative to face-to-face outpatient visits. This study is a first attempt to map routine telemedicine at regional, institutional, and clinical levels, and it provides useful information to understand the adoption of telemedicine in routine healthcare and to measure change in future updates. PMID:24433942

  7. INFLUENCE OF KNOWLEDGE WORKERS ON THE PROCESS OF CREATING OF INNOVATIVE SERVICES IN ENTERPRISES FROM THE BALTIC SEA REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Igielski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the 21st century systematic processes should be a basic task of contemporary enterprises aiming at raising the competitive edge on the global market. It is effect of functioning in the era of the forming oneself of the economy based on the knowledge. It is extorting on all participants being functional on the market, pointing main reserves to such immaterial sources, which cooperating with the economy will be answering too faster their economic development. It means that still the changing market is putting new requirements before enterprises in delivering to customers new services. Without appropri-ately of qualified and appropriate employees the enterprise isn't able even to initiate of the implementation of strategies based on such a destination. Companies would become more competing and have provided better services every now and then, for the worker I must perform my work still more creatively. Features and capacities to work of crucial employees constitute most important and most valuable capital of every company however which is often undervalued, not to say wasted. Additionally the economic policy in various parts is pointing world oneself with own laws, like for example in the sea region Baltic, where is extorting on entrepreneurs additional pressure - this region is supposed to constitute the antidote extending to the dominance of area from south-eastern coasts of Great Britain until north Italy in the nearest years. Therefore showing the role they are performing which, in studied subjects is a main purpose of the present article identified knowledge workers, in the process creating and delivering innovative services to the market.

  8. e-ENERCA: telemedicine platform for rare anaemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béatrice Gulbis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The creation of a telemedicine, tele-expertise platform opens a new challenge within the European Network for Rare and Congenital Anaemias (ENERCA; www.enerca.org. This is a cornerstone in the field of rare anaemias, in which national expertise is usually scarce and a significant number of patients remain undiagnosed. Experts in rare diseases are specially needed of shared knowledge platforms offering the possibility of a faster and more accurate diagnosis and the availability of a better patients’ follow-up. The platform developed by e- ENERCA will be user friendly and intuitive so it will be used by the majority of professionals without requiring a specific formation. The idea of inter professional consultation is to bring medical experts together for collaborative involvement in activities that maximize the benefits and improvement in patient care.

  9. Knowledge and synergy as inductors of regional innovation in tourism: the case of the Observatory for Tourism at Federal District (Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Henrique Souza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is the place for innovation. The reason for this pragmatic sentence comes from the multiplicity of competitive scenarios that contextualize companies and tourist destinations. From the current paradigms of competitiveness, satisfaction and loyalty of tourists, and the offer of value experiences, it is noticed a panoply of innovations that perform a strategic role on managing tourist destinations. In this sense, this article aims to conduct a discussion about regional innovation in tourism with emphasis on synergy and shared knowledge among stakeholders involved with touristic activities. The methodology employed consists of literature review about innovation in tourism and regional innovation in tourism and also used the qualitative research approach at a case study which addresses the implementation of the Tourism Observatory at the Federal District (Brazil, as practice-based governance in that region. The results show that the participation of public sector and educational institutions, as well as the cooperation interplayed by the stakeholders involved by this governance design, were key drivers for creating an innovative platform for the tourism management at the destination.

  10. Application of Telemedicine Technologies to Long Term Spaceflight Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, O. I.; Grigoriev, A. I.

    effective means lowering the risk level. The characteristics of the interplanetary flights projects make it necessary to develop a special system of telemedicine support with an accent on the onboard facilities. Space crew medical support systems must be "intellectual". The telemedicine system of the interplanetary spacecraft should be based on the extremely large data bank, it's better say "knowledge bank", i.e. it should contain the mankind medical knowledge in miniature. At the same time the system capacity is determined by the flight conditions and existing or supposed factors of the effect on the crew. It can be complemented and concretized from the Earth during the flight. Crew interaction with this system will be built on symbiotic "man-machine" combination where a man has a creative inception, adaptability, common sense and intuition, he or she is irreplaceable in situations when nonstandard decisions should be taken in conditions of time and ingoing parameters shortage. A physician's presence in the crew of the spacecraft will decrease the medical risk of the mission. It's quite natural that the effective operations of this knowledge system carried out autonomously by the crew physician or earth-based service can function only if the system is based on the artificial intelligence principles, neuro information systems with the highest degree of analytical functions and prognostical capabilities of the models. Development of telemedicine technologies will greatly change an extent and level of the interference into a crewmember organism. Interplanetary flight support telemedicine solutions present a new quality of simulation and influence systems. They're not simply a new instrument opening promising opportunities to improve flight medical support systems. They integrate information technologies with biology, physics and chemistry. It's a new interdisciplinary technological breakthrough.

  11. Telemedicine Technologies for Diabetes in Pregnancy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Wai-Kit; Mackillop, Lucy H; Farmer, Andrew J; Loerup, Lise; Bartlett, Katy; Levy, Jonathan C; Tarassenko, Lionel; Velardo, Carmelo; Kenworthy, Yvonne; Hirst, Jane E

    2016-11-09

    Diabetes in pregnancy is a global problem. Technological innovations present exciting opportunities for novel approaches to improve clinical care delivery for gestational and other forms of diabetes in pregnancy. To perform an updated and comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature to determine whether telemedicine solutions offer any advantages compared with the standard care for women with diabetes in pregnancy. The review was developed using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) framework. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) in women with diabetes in pregnancy that compared telemedicine blood glucose monitoring with the standard care were identified. Searches were performed in SCOPUS and PubMed, limited to English language publications between January 2000 and January 2016. Trials that met the eligibility criteria were scored for risk of bias using the Cochrane Collaborations Risk of Bias Tool. A meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager software version 5.3 (Nordic Cochrane Centre, Cochrane Collaboration). A total of 7 trials were identified. Meta-analysis demonstrated a modest but statistically significant improvement in HbA1c associated with the use of a telemedicine technology. The mean HbA1c of women using telemedicine was 5.33% (SD 0.70) compared with 5.45% (SD 0.58) in the standard care group, representing a mean difference of -0.12% (95% CI -0.23% to -0.02%). When this comparison was limited to women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) only, the mean HbA1c of women using telemedicine was 5.22% (SD 0.70) compared with 5.37% (SD 0.61) in the standard care group, mean difference -0.14% (95% CI -0.25% to -0.04%). There were no differences in other maternal and neonatal outcomes reported. There is currently insufficient evidence that telemedicine technology is superior to standard care for women with diabetes in pregnancy; however, there was no evidence of harm. No trials were

  12. Telemedicine for Developing Countries. A Survey and Some Design Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combi, Carlo; Pozzani, Gabriele; Pozzi, Giuseppe

    2016-11-02

    Developing countries need telemedicine applications that help in many situations, when physicians are a small number with respect to the population, when specialized physicians are not available, when patients and physicians in rural villages need assistance in the delivery of health care. Moreover, the requirements of telemedicine applications for developing countries are somewhat more demanding than for developed countries. Indeed, further social, organizational, and technical aspects need to be considered for successful telemedicine applications in developing countries. We consider all the major projects in telemedicine, devoted to developing countries, as described by the proper scientific literature. On the basis of such literature, we want to define a specific taxonomy that allows a proper classification and a fast overview of telemedicine projects in developing countries. Moreover, by considering both the literature and some recent direct experiences, we want to complete such overview by discussing some design issues to be taken into consideration when developing telemedicine software systems. We considered and reviewed the major conferences and journals in depth, and looked for reports on the telemedicine projects. We provide the reader with a survey of the main projects and systems, from which we derived a taxonomy of features of telemedicine systems for developing countries. We also propose and discuss some classification criteria for design issues, based on the lessons learned in this research area. We highlight some challenges and recommendations to be considered when designing a telemedicine system for developing countries.

  13. Innovations in workplace accessibility and accommodation for persons with hearing loss: using social networking and community of practice theory to promote knowledge exchange and change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Lynn; Jennings, Mary Beth; Poost-Foroosh, Laya; Hodgins, Heather; Kuchar, Ashley

    2013-01-01

    Despite widespread availability of assistive technology and the role of occupational therapists and audiologists in workplace health, little is known about how these groups influence the health of workers with hearing loss. Based on a previously conducted study, this paper explores the need for networking and community of practice theory to promote knowledge sharing and use between occupational therapists, audiologists, educators, regulators, workers, and employers. Five occupational therapists and five audiologists participated in in-depth interviews. Grounded theory was used to investigate the processes that hinder or support these professionals in addressing the accommodation needs of and workplace accessibility for workers with hearing loss. Constraints to addressing the needs of workers with hearing loss included: lack of knowledge about professional practice processes, lack of networking, lack of knowledge on current research, and lack of knowledge on the realm of expertise of audiologists by occupational therapists and of occupational therapists by audiologists. Innovations in workplace practice in hearing loss require engagement of occupational therapists, audiologists, and employers in knowledge transfer, networking, and learning. This column introduces two theories that may guide the use and development of evidence, knowledge, and expertise toward innovations in hearing work practice.

  14. Innovation in tourism companies, where are they and where are they going? An approach to the state of knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Delgado Cruz

    2016-09-01

    Originality/value: It represents an innovative contribution by providing information on how it has been addressed the issue of innovation in the context of tourism companies -restaurants and hotels-, besides provides an overview of research conducted in Mexico on the topic, being of interest to the companies and academic community.

  15. Border blocking effects in collaborative firm innovation: exploring the factors related with scientist' willingness to incorporating external knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, Jos; Benneworth, Paul Stephen; Rutten, Roel

    2016-01-01

    Border regions are not often associated with innovation and economic prosperity. Nevertheless, the opening up of borders in Europe has presented new opportunities for firms located in these border regions to co-operate and find necessary resources for their innovation process. Despite the reduction

  16. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Telemedicine Systems/Units in Greek Remote Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouskoukis, Marios-Nikolaos; Botsaris, Charalambos

    2017-06-01

    Telemedicine units and information technology systems provide special healthcare services to remote populations using telecommunication technology, in order to reduce or even remove the usual and typical face-to-face contact between doctor and patient. This innovative approach to medical care delivery has been expanding for several years and currently covers various medical specialties. To facilitate installation of telemedicine systems/units in Greek remote areas, this article presents results of a cost-benefit analysis for two Greek islands, Patmos and Leros, using specific economic criteria. Net present value (NPV), internal rate of return (IRR), and payback period were calculated, in order to monetize the economic benefits and the costs savings, estimate the depreciation of each project, and highlight the social benefits. Costs were reduced (through saved air medical transportations) by €19,005 for Patmos and €78,225 for Leros each year. NPV and IRR were positive; NPV was €29,608 for Patmos and €293,245 for Leros, and IRR was 21.5% for Patmos and 140.5% for Leros. Each project depreciated faster than the 5-year life-cycle period, and specifically in 3.13 years for Patmos and in 0.70 years for Leros. The establishment of telemedicine systems/units in Patmos and Leros was evaluated and assessed positively, with large savings, economical and social, gained by reducing or even removing the face-to-face contact between doctor and patient. Telemedicine systems/units seem to be a promising solution, especially in Greece, where the problem of primary healthcare services in remote/inaccessible areas is of great concern.

  17. Participatory design methods in telemedicine research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danbjørg, Dorthe Boe; Clemensen, Jane; Rothmann, Mette Juel

    together with the patients. Participatory design is a research design and methodology that encourages the participation of users in the design process of technological solutions. Therefore, it has a potential for designing technologies that actually reflect the needs of the users, why it is relevant within...... telemedicine. The aim of this presentation is to explain the process and theoretical framework of a PD project; give an example of a project including the applied methods, and to determine its application to telemedicine with focus on the rationale for genuine participation. Theory: Participation implies....... Methods: Key activities of a Participatory Design project comprise methods such as fieldwork; literature reviewing; development and testing, and user activities as workshops. Methods that support telling, making, enacting. For instance telling activities as drivers for participation, where practitioners...

  18. Comparative study of connectivity in telemedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Indra Pratap; Kapoor, Lily; Daman, Repu; Mishra, Saroj Kanta

    2008-10-01

    Communication links are the lifelines for telemedicine practice. Various terrestrial and satellite media can be used; however, each has its own plus and minus side. The current study was designed to evaluate three types of telecommunication media used for telemedical videoconference at the Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow Telemedicine program over a period of 20 months. The evaluation was based on analysis of technical parameters recorded in a prescribed proforma designed for the study purpose and maintained prospectively after completion of each event. Only technical issues were addressed. At the end of the study period, analysis of data revealed that leased line-based terrestrial Internet Protocol (IP) was better than Sky IP. Integrated Services Digital Network media were found technically less acceptable for telemedical videoconference.

  19. Telemedicine: licensing and other legal issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Gil

    2011-12-01

    The growth of information technology and telecommunications has created promising opportunities for better, faster, more accessible, barrier-free health care; telemedicine (TM). The feasibility of many TM projects depends on resolving legal issues. Mastering technical issues or providing training remain important benchmarks for implementation of TM, but legal issues constrain progress. This article identifies the key legal issues, maps current legislation, and offers a forecast of necessary steps to expedite the dissemination of TM. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The principles of telemedicine in practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilvana Vučković

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Telemedicine (distance medicine represents a field of medicine that has been in a tremendous expansion over the last couple of years thanks to the fast development of telecommunications and reduction of their costs. It enables a direct communication (visual between the peripheral hospitals and referral facilities in the interior of the country as well as a connection of centres with referral centres abroad in the fields of diagnostics, consultations or education. The main objective is to encourage interest in telemedicine among physicians and other health care experts, initiate an exchange of opinions, and experience about the application of telecommunication technology in medicine, so to reach a common perception of its role in the context of future development of the health care system in Bosnia and Herzegovina. As a standard, current equipment consists of computers, which are equipped with frame grabbers and communication modem for communication through a public telecommunication system. Input data can all be visual data (X-Ray, CT, MRI, ultrasound, ECG, histological finding, cariogram, and of course photos of the patients, of operational/surgical field. The Institute of Pathology of the Sarajevo Medical Faculty has actively participated in the experimental project “SHARED” (1996-2000 together with the Radiology and Ophthalmology Clinic of the Sarajevo Clinical Centre. The past experience in using telemedicine has shown that the introduction of such a telemedicine system in B&H would be of great significance in the future in the context of providing better and more efficient health services to the patients. In practice, that means a more simple approach to some services and data for patients, a better and faster circulation of information and experience of medical experts and health care workers with cost control at the same time.