WorldWideScience

Sample records for initiating infertility treatment

  1. First Contact: the intersection of demographics, knowledge, and appraisal of treatment at the initial infertility visit

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHILDRESS, Krista J.; LAWSON, Angela K.; GHANT, Marissa S.; MENDOZA, Gricelda; CARDOZO, Eden R.; CONFINO, Edmond; MARSH, Erica E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of the initial infertility visit on treatment-related knowledge, patient anxiety, and appraisals of treatment. Study Design Prospective survey. Setting Academic medical center. Patients 234 English-speaking women, ages 18-50, attending their first infertility visit Intervention(s) Participants completed a survey assessing health literacy, knowledge, anxiety, and appraisals of the treatment process before and after their infertility visit. Main Outcome Measure(s) 1) Knowledge of infertility and treatment and, 2) Anxiety and appraisal scores. Results Most participants were white and earned >$100,000/year and had at least a college education. Baseline knowledge of reproductive anatomy, ART, and fertility factors was modest, but improved after the initial visit. Factors associated with higher knowledge included higher education and income, White or Asian ethnicity, and English as their primary language. Patient appraisals of treatment represented by the positive (Challenge) and negative (Threat and Loss) subscale scores on the Appraisal of Life Events (ALE) scale, changed from the pre-visit survey to the post-visit survey. Negative appraisals of treatment and anxiety scores decreased and positive appraisals of treatment increased after the initial visit. Lower knowledge was associated with higher positive appraisal scores lower health literacy was associated with higher anxiety and appraisal scores (positive and negative) post-visit. Black women had higher Challenge scores compared to White and Asian women. Hispanic women had higher anxiety scores than non-Hispanic women. Conclusions Infertility patients have modest baseline knowledge of fertility and infertility treatment. The initial infertility visit can improve this knowledge and decrease both negative appraisals of treatment and anxiety levels. Differences in knowledge and appraisal were seen across ethnic groups and other demographic variables. Physicians should individualize

  2. Infertility, infertility treatment and twinning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Basso, Olga; Obel, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have previously observed that an increasing time to pregnancy (TTP) is associated with a reduced frequency of twin deliveries in couples not receiving infertility treatment. By using updated information, we assessed the frequencies of dizygotic (DZ) and monozygotic (MZ) twin...... deliveries as a function of infertility (TTP > 12 months), as well as infertility treatment. METHODS: From the Danish National Birth Cohort (1997-2003), we identified 51 730 fertile couples with TTP 12 months and 5163 infertile couples who conceived after treatment. Information on zygosity, available...... for part of the cohort (1997-2000), was based on standardized questions on the similarities between the twins at the age of 3-5 years. RESULTS: Compared with fertile couples, the frequency of DZ twin deliveries was lower for infertile couples conceiving naturally (odds ratio 0.4, 95% confidence interval 0...

  3. Religion, Infertility and Infertility Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Religion, Infertility and Infertility Treatment; Culley, Lorraine; Hudson, Nicky; Norton, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    Infertility is a common medical condition. An estimated 9% of women between the ages of 20 and 44 experience infertility, which equates to over 70 million women worldwide. However, infertility is more than a medical condition. For many people, especially in strongly pro-natalist cultures, involuntary childlessness is a highly stigmatised social status, with significant effects on the lives of women and men. The inability to conceive has been documented in an extensive collection of studies...

  4. Infertility, infertility treatment, and fetal growth restriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Obel, Carsten; Hammer Bech, Bodil

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between infertility, with or without treatment, and fetal growth, as well as perinatal and infant mortality. METHODS: From the Danish National Birth Cohort (1997-2003), we identified 51,041 singletons born of fertile couples (time to pregnancy 12 months or le...

  5. Psychosocial Problems during Infertility Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurcan Kirca

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is a complex situation crisis which is often psychologically-threatening and emotionally stressful for both partners as well as economically expensive and causes physical pain due to the operations performed for diagnosis and treatment purposes. Infertility has physical, psychological, social, emotional and financial impacts. Infertile couples are under a great social pressure, and need to conceal the problem as it is exceptionally private for them. Infertile individuals are destitute of support when they do not share their pregnancy problems with their families and relatives. Couples define their infertility experience as the most stressful experience of their lives.

  6. Prospective longitudinal cohort study on cumulative 5-year delivery and adoption rates among 1338 couples initiating infertility treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinborg, A; Hougaard, C O; Andersen, A Nyboe

    2009-01-01

    occurred for 5.9% (48/817) of the women. Positive prognostic factors for delivery were male infertility, female age infertility and less than three previous treatment cycles. CONCLUSIONS A crude delivery rate of 69.4% in the total population 5 years after referral to tertiary......BACKGROUND The objective was to assess crude 5-year delivery rates after assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment, intrauterine inseminations (IUI), spontaneous conceptions (SC) and adoptions in a large infertile cohort. METHODS A prospective longitudinal survey comprised 1338 infertile...... couples starting public infertility programmes offering IUIs and three free ART cycles during 2000-2001. The cohort was cross-linked with the National Medical Birth Register to obtain delivery rates for all 1338 couples. More detailed data were available from 817 women responding to a 5-year follow...

  7. Sexual dysfunction in infertile couples: evaluation and treatment of infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayar, U.; Arikan, I.I.; Barut, A.; Harma, M.; Harma, M.; Atasoy, N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic and the predictive value of Arizona Sexual Experience Scale among primary infertile couples regarding sexual dysfunction. Methods: The cross-sectional and prospective pre, post study comprising primary infertile patients was carried out at Bulent Ecevit University Hospital, Zonguldak, Turkey. Fifty consecutive primary infertile couples not treated previously were investigated between 2003 and 2007 for the presence of sexual dysfunction by a psychiatrist. Arizona Sexual Experience Scale scoring was self-administered to determine sexual dysfunction among couples before treatment and also 3 months after the initiation of the treatment. Results: Pretreatment mean values of the index parametres in both women and men were significantly increased after treatment. Statistically significant positive correlation was observed between pre- and post-treatment total scores in both women (r=0.83; p 14 (Sensitivity: 57%; Specificity: 90%) and >13 (Sensitivity: 83%; Specificity: 93%), respectively. Pre- and post-treatment scores in men were >10 (Sensitivity: 65%; Specificity: 61%), >11 (Sensitivity: 83%; Specificity: 62%), respectively. Binary logistic regression analyses revealed women's pre-treatment and post-treatment scores as a significant factor for prediction of sexual dysfunction independent of sociodemographic factors (p=0.001 and p=0.001, respectively). Conclusion: Evaluation and treatment of infertility is an important risk factor for sexual dysfunction. Pre- and post-treatment Arizona Sexual Experience Scale score could be used as a screening test for sexual dysfunction and might be used to decide pre/post-treatment consultation of couples with a specialist. (author)

  8. Infertility, infertility treatment and behavioural problems in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Obel, Carsten; Basso, Olga

    2011-01-01

    Behavioural patterns in children of infertile couples may be influenced by both the underlying causes of infertility and stress in the couples. Treatment procedures, such as culture media and manipulation of gametes and embryos, may also result in developmental problems. We examined behavioural...... to pregnancy of >12 months and no infertility treatment had a behavioural pattern similar to children of fertile parents. Teachers reported a higher total difficulties score for children born after infertility treatment, but no significant differences were seen on any subscales of the teachers' report...

  9. Ectopic pregnancy after infertility treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri Patil

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Early pregnancy complications are more common in women who conceive after infertility treatment. Most of these occur before 12 weeks of gestation and include miscarriage, vaginal bleeding, intrauterine hematoma, vanishing twin, and ectopic pregnancy (EP. The incidence of EPs following infertility treatment is much higher compared with that in spontaneous pregnancies. The occurrence of an EP is very distressing to an infertile couple, who has lots of hopes pinned on the treatment outcome, especially because of the cost incurred and the physical and mental trauma both have gone through during the treatment process. The association between infertility and EP is complex, as it can be a consequence of infertility as well as a cause. The two principal risk factors for an EP are genital tract infections and tubal surgeries. Though several etiologies are proposed, but patients with tubal factor infertility are at an increased risk of an EP. Earlier diagnosis of EP helps to improve prognosis and optimize subsequent fertility. It is pivotal to evaluate the likelihood of subsequent occurrence of an EP and be too vigilant when treating. The correct choice of the treatment modality should be made to prevent the recurrence. The early prediction of the pregnancy outcome therefore has great importance for both the couple and clinician. Today with the help of sensitive beta human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG assays and transvaginal sonography, one can diagnose an EP prior to symptoms, and conservative treatment for the preservation of the fallopian tube is possible. Conservative management in the form of expectant and medical management should be considered as a first-line treatment modality, provided that the overall clinical picture suggests that it is safe to do so. If not, laparoscopic management of EPs appears to be the favored approach of management as compared to laparotomy.

  10. Infertility, infertility treatment, and congenital malformations: Danish national birth cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Basso, Olga; Obel, Carsten; Bille, Camilla; Olsen, Jørn

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether infertile couples (with a time to pregnancy of > 12 months), who conceive naturally or after treatment, give birth to children with an increased prevalence of congenital malformations. Design Longitudinal study. Setting Danish national birth cohort. Participants Three groups of liveborn children and their mothers: 50 897 singletons and 1366 twins born of fertile couples (time to pregnancy ≤ 12 months), 5764 singletons and 100 twins born of infertile couples who conceived naturally (time to pregnancy > 12 months), and 4588 singletons and 1690 twins born after infertility treatment. Main outcome measures Prevalence of congenital malformations determined from hospital discharge diagnoses. Results Compared with singletons born of fertile couples, singletons born of infertile couples who conceived naturally or after treatment had a higher prevalence of congenital malformations—hazard ratios 1.20 (95% confidence interval 1.07 to 1.35) and 1.39 (1.23 to 1.57). The overall prevalence of congenital malformations increased with increasing time to pregnancy. When the analysis was restricted to singletons born of infertile couples, babies born after treatment had an increased prevalence of genital organ malformations (hazard ratio 2.32, 1.24 to 4.35) compared with babies conceived naturally. No significant differences existed in the overall prevalence of congenital malformations among twins. Conclusions Hormonal treatment for infertility may be related to the occurrence of malformations of genital organs, but our results suggest that the reported increased prevalence of congenital malformations seen in singletons born after assisted reproductive technology is partly due to the underlying infertility or its determinants. The association between untreated infertility and congenital malformations warrants further examination. PMID:16893903

  11. OVARIAN AGING AND INFERTILITY TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Meden Vrtovec

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Due to changes in the socio-economic environment the first pregnancy is being more often postponed to advanced age; an increasing number of women seek medical help for infertility in their late thirties. Degenerative processes in the ovary start as early as after 35 years of age. When the woman is over 38, the signs of hormonal changes occur (FSH, inhibin, the menstrual cycle changes, and fertility is being increasingly reduced. Infertility treatment by assisted reproduction technology (ART has proved less efficient in older than in younger women.Material and methods. In a retrospective analysis we evaluated the success rates achieved with homologous intrauterine insemination (IUI, in vitro fertilization and embryo-transfer (IVF-ET, intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI, and compared them in regard to the women > 38 years vs. < 38 years.Results. After IUI the pregnancy rate in the women over 38 was 3.7% per patient (1.5% per cycle and 28.0% (9.9% in the women younger than 38 years. After IVF-ET the pregnancy rate in the over 38-year group was 16% per patient (14% per cycle, and 28% per patient (25% per cycle in the less than 38-year group. After ICSI, the pregnancy rate in the group over 38 years was 11% per patient (9% per cycle, and 25% per patient (22% per cycle in the less than 38-year group. In the analysed population, the spontaneous abortion rate was 26.0% in the group of women aged over 38 years, and 14.0% in the group of women aged less than 38 years.Conclusions. Before introduction of an ART procedure the woman with advanced age should be properly counselled and well informed about poor success of their infertility treatment and high spontaneous abortion rate.

  12. Infertility, Fertility Treatment, and Risk of Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farland, Leslie V; Grodstein, Francine; Srouji, Serene S; Forman, John P; Rich-Edwards, Janet; Chavarro, Jorge E; Missmer, Stacey A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between infertility and fertility treatments on subsequent risk of hypertension. Design Cohort Study Setting Nurses’ Health Study II Patients 116,430 female nurses followed from 1993 to June 2011 as part of the Nurses' Health Study II cohort. Intervention None Main Outcome Measures Self-reported, physician diagnosed hypertension Results Compared to women who never reported infertility, infertile women were at no greater risk of hypertension (multi-variable adjusted relative risk (RR) = 1.01 95% confidence interval [0.94–1.07]). Infertility due to tubal disease was associated with a higher risk of hypertension (RR=1.15 [1.01–1.31]) but all other diagnoses were not associated with hypertension risk compared to women who did not report infertility (ovulatory disorder: RR=1.03 [0.94–1.13], cervical: RR=0.88 [0.70–1.10], male factor: RR= 1.05 [0.95–1.15], other reason: RR=1.02 [0.94–1.11], reason not found: RR=1.02 [0.95–1.10]). Among infertile women there were 5,070 cases of hypertension. No clear pattern between use of fertility treatment and hypertension was found among infertile women (Clomiphene: RR =0.97 [0.90–1.04], Gonadotropin alone: RR=0.97 [0.87–1.08], IUI: RR=0.86 [0.71–1.03], IVF: RR=0.86 [0.73–1.01]). Conclusion Among this relatively young cohort of women, there was no apparent increase in hypertension risk among infertile women or among women who underwent fertility treatment in the past. PMID:26049054

  13. Initiative for standardization of reporting genetics of male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traven, Eva; Ogrinc, Ana; Kunej, Tanja

    2017-02-01

    The number of publications on research of male infertility is increasing. Technologies used in research of male infertility generate complex results and various types of data that need to be appropriately managed, arranged, and made available to other researchers for further use. In our previous study, we collected over 800 candidate loci for male fertility in seven mammalian species. However, the continuation of the work towards a comprehensive database of candidate genes associated with different types of idiopathic human male infertility is challenging due to fragmented information, obtained from a variety of technologies and various omics approaches. Results are published in different forms and usually need to be excavated from the text, which hinders the gathering of information. Standardized reporting of genetic anomalies as well as causative and risk factors of male infertility therefore presents an important issue. The aim of the study was to collect examples of diverse genomic loci published in association with human male infertility and to propose a standardized format for reporting genetic causes of male infertility. From the currently available data we have selected 75 studies reporting 186 representative genomic loci which have been proposed as genetic risk factors for male infertility. Based on collected and formatted data, we suggested a first step towards unification of reporting the genetics of male infertility in original and review studies. The proposed initiative consists of five relevant data types: 1) genetic locus, 2) race/ethnicity, number of participants (infertile/controls), 3) methodology, 4) phenotype (clinical data, disease ontology, and disease comorbidity), and 5) reference. The proposed form for standardized reporting presents a baseline for further optimization with additional genetic and clinical information. This data standardization initiative will enable faster multi-omics data integration, database development and sharing

  14. Social concerns of women undergoing infertility treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finamore, Peter S; Seifer, David B; Ananth, Cande V; Leiblum, Sandra R

    2007-10-01

    Our study was undertaken to determine [1] what women are disclosing to their employer with regard to their infertility, [2] what demographic characteristics are associated with women who are more likely to disclose, and [3] if there is an association between disclosure and lowering one's stress. We hypothesize that, in certain women, disclosure may lower stress, and therefore increase success rate of in vitro fertilization. Cross-sectional questionnaire. University Infertility Treatment Center. We handed out a questionnaire to patients being evaluated and treated for infertility over a 6-month period. A total of 267 questionnaires were handed out and all were collected. We collected demographic data as well as information regarding privacy, disclosure, and stress. We then compared women who disclose to their employer that they are being seen by an infertility specialist to those women who do not disclose. We also measured stress and determined if higher stress level was associated with disclosure or nondisclosure. Most women who did disclose did so because they needed a reason to leave work for frequent doctor visits. Among women who did not disclose, the main reason for nondisclosure was to protect their privacy. Women with a high school education were more likely to disclose compared with those with a college and postgraduate education. African American/Caribbean American women were least likely to disclose. Those who were out of work more often because of their infertility were more likely to disclose. There was not an association with disclosure and decreasing stress level. Women who did or did not disclose their infertility status to their employer were different with regard to level of education, race/ethnicity, and number of visits per month to the doctor. The decision to disclose does not seem to have a significant impact on stress.

  15. Parental Infertility, Fertility Treatment, and Childhood Epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kettner, Laura O.; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia H.; Kesmodel, Ulrik S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A few studies have indicated an increased risk of epilepsy in children conceived by fertility treatment possibly due to characteristics of the infertile couple rather than the treatment. We therefore aimed to investigate the association between parental infertility, fertility treatment......, and epilepsy in the offspring, including the subtypes of epilepsy; idiopathic generalised epilepsy and focal epilepsy. METHODS: This cohort included all pregnancies resulting in liveborn singletons from the Aarhus Birth Cohort, Denmark (1995-2013). Information on time to pregnancy and fertility treatment...... was obtained from pregnancy questionnaires in early pregnancy. Children developing epilepsy were identified from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Prescription Registry until 2013. Data were analysed using Cox proportional hazards regression adjusted for potential confounders...

  16. Infertility treatments and counselling in the context of patriarchy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infertility, as a social and cultural problem affecting individuals and families, makes People Living with Infertility (PLWI) to seek solution through different pathways, but with little or no information on patriarchal barrier(s) militating against counselling in the course of treatment. The study, therefore, investigated infertility ...

  17. Results of modern tuboperitoneal infertility treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turjačanin-Pantelić Drenka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. A modern approach to surgical treatment of tuboperitoneal infertility is based on laporascopic techniques. The aim of this study was to compare results of tuboperitoneal infertility treatment by the use of laparoscopy and classical laparotomy. Methods. A retrospectiveprospective study on 66 women treated operatively form tuboperitoneal infertility was performed. Data from patient's anamnesis and those related to the surgical treatment results, obtained by the use of an inquiry, were used in retrospective and prospective analysis, respectively. Chi-square test was used in statistical analysis. P value < 0.05 was considered significant. Results. Classical laparotomy was used on 34 women in a period from 1996 to 1997, while 32 women were operated laparoscopically in a period from 1999 to 2000. The results were as follows: a total number of conceived women was 16 (24%, seven in the group I (20.6% and nine in the group II (28.1%; 13 women were with one pregnancy, six in the group I (17.6% and seven in the group II (22%. Twice pregnant were three women, one in the group I (2.9% and two in the group II (6.2%. The resulting pregnancies were: five women with abortion spontaneous, two in the group I (5.9% and three in the group II (9.4%; two women with extrauterine pregnancy in the group I (5.9%; three with pretemporal birth, one in the group I (2.9% and two in the group II (6.2%, while six women were with the temporal birth, two in the group I (5.9% and four in the group II (12.5%. Statistical analysis showed that there was no significant difference in the results between these two groups. Conclusion. Surgical treatment of tubeperitoneal infertility, regardless of the used methods (classical laparotomy or laparoscopy was successful in a great number of women. These methods have a great advantage over in vitro fertilization, and they should not be ignored.

  18. Infertility, infertility treatment and psychomotor development: the Danish National Birth Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Basso, Olga; Obel, Carsten; Hvidtjørn, Dorte; Olsen, Jørn

    2009-03-01

    Babies born of infertile couples, regardless of treatment, have a higher risk of preterm birth and low birthweight, conditions associated with delayed development. We examined developmental milestones in singletons as a function of parental infertility [time to pregnancy (TTP) > 12 months] and infertility treatment. From the Danish National Birth Cohort (1997-2003), we identified 37 897 singletons born of fertile couples (TTP 12 months), and 3309 born after infertility treatment. When the children were about 18 months old, mothers reported 12 developmental milestones by responding to structured questions. We defined a failure to achieve the assessed milestone or the minimal numbers of milestones in a summary (motor, or cognitive/language skills) as delay. Naturally conceived children born of infertile couples had a pattern of psychomotor development similar to that of children born of fertile couples, but increasing TTP correlated with a modest delay. When the analysis was restricted to infertile couples (treated and untreated), children born after treatment showed a slight delay in cognitive/language development (odds ratio 1.24, [95% confidence interval 1.01, 1.53]) for not meeting at least three out of six cognitive/language milestones); children born after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) had the highest estimated relative risk of delay for most milestones, especially motor milestones. These results suggest that a long TTP may be associated with a modest developmental delay. Infertility treatment, especially ICSI, may be associated with a slight delay for some of these early milestones.

  19. Occupational social class, coping responses and infertility-related stress of women undergoing infertility treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykeridou, Katerina; Gourounti, Kleanthi; Sarantaki, Antigoni; Loutradis, Dimitrios; Vaslamatzis, Grigorios; Deltsidou, Anna

    2011-07-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the association between (1) occupational social class and coping responses, (2) coping responses and infertility-related stress and (3) occupational social class and infertility-related distress. The coping strategies that individuals use in most of the stressful situations vary according to certain factors, such as, the appraised characteristics of the stressful condition, personality dispositions and social resources. This study was a cross-sectional survey. The study involved 404 women undergoing infertility treatment at a public clinic in Athens, Greece. State and trait anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory), infertility-related stress (Copenhagen Multi-centre Psychosocial Infertility) and coping strategies (Copenhagen Multi-centre Psychosocial Infertility) were measured. Women of low/very low social class reported higher levels of active-confronting coping compared with women of higher social class (p social) were positively correlated with both active-avoidance (r = 0·302, 0·423 and 0·211, respectively, p Infertile women of the lowest social class used more active-confronting coping and more passive-avoidance coping than women of the highest social class. Factors such as low social class and maladaptive coping strategies might contribute to infertility-related stress and anxiety. Nurses and midwives who work in infertility clinics should aim to identify individuals who are at high risk for infertility stress and adjustment difficulties and they should minimise the identified risk factors for infertility-related stress and strengthen the protective factors. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Clinical determinants of mental disorders occurring during the infertility treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holka-Pokorska, Justyna; Jarema, Marek; Wichniak, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Today, infertility is an increasingly common medical and social problem. Treatment of infertility has been revolutionised by the introduction and continuous improvement of assisted reproductive technology (ART). In most countries an increase in the frequency of performing of such procedures is observed. Infertility, mental disorders and infertility treatment are related in a very complex way. Most research indicates that the presence of psychiatric disorders (including depressive disorders which is the most common among them) in patients treated for infertility, can affect the efficacy of gynaecological therapy. According to other studies an ineffective treatment for infertility could be an independent risk factor for the development of psychiatric disorders (particularly psychotic disorders and addiction ). Despite the increasing prevalence of assisted reproduction technologies (ART), there are no uniform standards for psychological and psychiatric procedures in the case of mental health complications of the diagnosis and treatment of infertility. The aim of this paper was the analysis of the studies concerning the mental health aspects in the course of the infertility treatment. The studies were analysed in terms of their relevance to clinical practice in the field of psychiatric and psychological support for patients treated for infertility.

  1. Perceptions of Infertility and In Vitro Fertilization Treatment among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main outcome measures included perceptions of infertility and IVF treatment, utilization of IVF treatment and association between some demographic variables and IVF utilization. The results showed that infertility was perceived majorly as - destiny/supernatural powers (17.1%), threat to men's procreativity/continuity of ...

  2. When to Give Up Infertility Treatment?

    OpenAIRE

    Rohit Bhatt

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a worldwide phenomenon. In recent times, Women prefer to study and build a career. They marry late and many women are 30+ years by the time they decide to conceive. Some couples in first few years after marriage, believe in DINK syndrome (Double income no kids). Suddenly they realize the need to have a child. In some cultures infertility is considered a social stigma. The woman suffers the most if she is infertile. Infertile couples may feel loss of self-esteem, sexual distress...

  3. Infertility Evaluation and Treatment among Women in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Lawrence M.; Craig, Benjamin M.; Plosker, Shayne M.; Reed, Damon R.; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the characteristics of women seeking infertility evaluation and treatment. Design Cross-sectional survey based on in-person interviews, followed by two-step hurdle analysis. Participants 4,558 married or cohabitating women ages 25–44 Setting U.S. household population of women based on the 2006–2010 National Survey of Family Growth Intervention None Main Outcome Measure(s) Likelihood of seeking preliminary infertility evaluation. Likelihood of seeking infertility treatment once evaluated. Treatment type provided. Results 623 women (13.7%) reported seeking infertility evaluation, of which 328 reported undergoing subsequent infertility treatment. Age at marriage, marital status, education, health insurance status, race/ethnicity, and religion were associated with the likelihood of seeking infertility evaluation. For example, the predicted probability that a non-White woman who married at 25 will seek evaluation was 12%. This probability increased to 34% for White women with a graduate degree who married at age 30. Among women who are evaluated, income, employment status, and ethnicity correlated strongly with the likelihood of seeking infertility treatment. Infertility drug therapy was the most frequent treatment used. Reproductive surgery and in vitro fertilization (IVF) were used the least. Conclusions The use of infertility services is not random and understanding the socio-demographic factors correlated with use may assist new couples with family planning. Roughly 50% of the women evaluated for infertility progressed to treatment, and only a small proportion were treated with more advanced assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) such as IVF therapy. Future research aimed at improving access to effective healthcare treatments within the boundaries of affordability is warranted. PMID:23849845

  4. Marital stability and repartnering: infertility-related stress trajectories of unsuccessful fertility treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Mariana V; Costa, Patrício; Peterson, Brennan D; Costa, Maria E; Schmidt, Lone

    2014-12-01

    To compare the trajectories of infertility-related stress between patients who remain in the same relationship and patients who repartner. Longitudinal cohort study using latent growth modeling. Fertility centers. Childless men and women evaluated before starting a new cycle of fertility treatment and observed for a 5-year period of unsuccessful treatments. None. Marital stability and infertility-related stress. The majority of patients (86%) remained with their initial partner, but 14% of participants separated and repartnered while pursuing fertility treatments. Marital stability significantly predicted the initial status of infertility stress and infertility stress growth levels. Specifically, patients who repartnered had higher infertility stress levels at all time points compared with those who remained in the same relationship, regardless of the partner they were with at assessment. Furthermore, results showed an increasing stress trajectory over time for those who repartnered, compared with those who remained in a stable relationship. Men and women in fertility treatment who form a second union have higher initial levels of stress in their original relationship and higher changes in stress levels over the course of treatments. These findings suggest that high infertility-related stress levels before entering fertility treatment can negatively affect the stability of marital relationships and lead to repartnering. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Models Predicting Success of Infertility Treatment: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarinara, Alireza; Zeraati, Hojjat; Kamali, Koorosh; Mohammad, Kazem; Shahnazari, Parisa; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infertile couples are faced with problems that affect their marital life. Infertility treatment is expensive and time consuming and occasionally isn’t simply possible. Prediction models for infertility treatment have been proposed and prediction of treatment success is a new field in infertility treatment. Because prediction of treatment success is a new need for infertile couples, this paper reviewed previous studies for catching a general concept in applicability of the models. Methods: This study was conducted as a systematic review at Avicenna Research Institute in 2015. Six data bases were searched based on WHO definitions and MESH key words. Papers about prediction models in infertility were evaluated. Results: Eighty one papers were eligible for the study. Papers covered years after 1986 and studies were designed retrospectively and prospectively. IVF prediction models have more shares in papers. Most common predictors were age, duration of infertility, ovarian and tubal problems. Conclusion: Prediction model can be clinically applied if the model can be statistically evaluated and has a good validation for treatment success. To achieve better results, the physician and the couples’ needs estimation for treatment success rate were based on history, the examination and clinical tests. Models must be checked for theoretical approach and appropriate validation. The privileges for applying the prediction models are the decrease in the cost and time, avoiding painful treatment of patients, assessment of treatment approach for physicians and decision making for health managers. The selection of the approach for designing and using these models is inevitable. PMID:27141461

  6. Associations of Psychosocial Factors with the Stress of Infertility Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Myra G.; Forthofer, Melinda S.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated psychosocial factors thought to be associated with perceived stress over the course of infertility treatment. The research was based on secondary analysis of data from the Study of Marriage, Family, and Life Quality with a sample of 128 people who completed an infertility-related stress instrument at all three measurement…

  7. Coping Strategies of Women Seeking Infertility Treatment in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infertility is a health problem faced by an estimated 15% of women of childbearing age in Ghana. This study explores the coping strategies adopted by 615 women seeking infertility treatment in southern Ghana. Both closed and open-ended questions were used through a survey conducted using face-to-face interviews in ...

  8. Infertility Counselling: Alleviating the Emotional Burden of Infertility and Infertility Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Thorn

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an overview of international developments in the area of infertility counselling.It informs about the development of international organizations and relevant professional standardsand describes the need to make counselling accessible to all patients, especially those who experiencegreat distress or display previous vulnerability. Whereas in previous years counselling focused onpsychopathology; research shows that on average, men and women experiencing infertility are ashealthy as others. Therefore, the aim of counselling is to reduce the emotional burden of infertility,help couples to consider the implication of family building alternatives and provide therapeuticcare where relevant. In some instances, counsellors also have the task to carry out psychologicalassessments. For the sake of transparency, it is important to clearly differentiate between these twointerventions. Last but not least, this article argues that much of our current knowledge is based onresearch carried out in Western societies, therefore lacking understanding and appreciation for themeaning of infertility in other cultures. Therefore we need more international debate across culturesto further our understanding and to honor different cultural values.

  9. Infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Práxedes Rojas Quintana; Dulce María Medina Tío; Lidia Torres Ajá

    2011-01-01

    Literature review on the main issues related to infertile couples. It includes concept and classification, physiology of ovulation, causes in women and men, basic tests that are commonly performed evolution and prognosis, and health actions to provide appropriate orientation to the infertile couple. It is aimed at creating a teaching complementary material for Medicine and Nursing students, as well as for residents and specialists in general medicine and gynecology.

  10. Psychological determinants of life satisfaction in women undergoing infertility treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Anna Dembińska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Infertility treatment is a long-term process, spread out over months, or even years, and carries no guarantee of success. It generates an incessant state of uncertainty which becomes a chronic state of psychological discomfort. Each stage of treatment may become a source of more trouble. Women deciding to undergo infertility treatment are exposed to many negative feelings concerning different aspects of their life. Participants and procedure The present study was an attempt to understand psychological determinants of life satisfaction in women undergoing infertility treatment. The study group included 470 women treated for infertility. Results Patients perceiving more social support in general, as well as more of the support types used in the study, i.e. emotional, instrumental, informational and institutional support, and support from family and friends, have better self-esteem, higher acceptance of their infertility, higher satisfaction with life, higher hope as an emotional state, and lower levels of anxiety and depression. Three negative emotional states, i.e. anxiety, depression and irritation, are predictors influencing (lowering life satisfaction of women struggling with infertility. The strongest of these predictors is depression, which is also a factor lowering the acceptance of one’s own infertility. The conducted analyses revealed that predictors influencing the life satisfaction of patients treated for infertility are self-esteem and acceptance of one’s own infertility (apart from the aforementioned emotional state – anxiety, depression, irritation. It was found that the higher the self-esteem and acceptance of one’s own infertility, the higher was the satisfaction with life. Conclusions Knowledge of these determinants is extremely valuable for medical personnel conducting treatments, because, according to many studies, the psychological state of women suffering from procreation problems is connected not only with

  11. Psychological determinants of life satisfaction in women undergoing infertility treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandra Anna Dembińska

    2016-01-01

    Background Infertility treatment is a long-term process, spread out over months, or even years, and carries no guarantee of success. It generates an incessant state of uncertainty which becomes a chronic state of psychological discomfort. Each stage of treatment may become a source of more trouble. Women deciding to undergo infertility treatment are exposed to many negative feelings concerning different aspects of their life. Participants and procedure The present study wa...

  12. Increasing and decreasing factors of hope in infertile women with failure in infertility treatment: A phenomenology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosalanejad, Leili; Parandavar, Nehle; Gholami, Morteza; Abdollahifard, Sareh

    2014-02-01

    Assisted reproductive technology (ART) provide the hope of pregnancy for infertile women, but do not always turn this hope into reality. The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experience of infertile women from increasing and decreasing factors of hope in infertile women with failure in infertility treatment. Using a qualitative research design (Phenomenology study), 23 subjects were selected who had experienced infertility failure visited by gynecologist (Rasekh Infertility center) in 2012. The data were collected through semi structured interviews and analyzed using interpretive research strategies of phenomenology by Collizi's seven-stage method. Totally 96 codes were identified. The data arranged in two categories. The factors decreasing and increasing hope in infertility treatments. Totally 5 themes and 20 sub themes were extracted. The increasing factors which emerged from the data contain "spiritual source", "family interaction and support" and "information through the media", and decreasing factors contain "nature of treatments" and "negatively oriented mind".

  13. Treatment of infertility in men with spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brackett, N.L.; Lynne, C.M.; El Dib, Hussein Ibrahim El Desouki Hussein

    2010-01-01

    Most men with spinal cord injury (SCI) are infertile. Erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities contribute to the problem. Treatments for erectile dysfunction include phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, intracavernous injections of alprostadil, penile prostheses...

  14. Predicting suitable timing for artificial reproductive technology treatment in aged infertile women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akino, Nana; Isono, Wataru; Wada-Hiraike, Osamu

    2016-10-01

    It has been widely accepted that the age of women plays a fundamental role in fecundity, and age-related fertility decline has one of the most significant and detrimental effects on the success rate of infertility treatment. Therefore, treatment cycles of non-in vitro fertilization (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) treatment for infertile women of advanced aged have been limited due to their lack of efficacy, and they are often optimized, compared to IVF/ICSI treatment. Recent trends in infertility treatment apparently indicate that IVF/ICSI treatment, including egg donation, is frequently offered to aged women for first-line management, despite its heavy burden, but hasty IVF/ICSI treatment should be avoided, considering its socioeconomic problems. It is important to distinguish women who could conceive by non-IVF/ICSI treatment, although the optimization of non-IVF/ICSI treatment protocols remains poorly understood. This review focuses on extracting aged patients who have higher chance of conceiving with non-IVF/ICSI treatment and providing necessary and sufficient infertility treatment. After initial evaluation for fertility, including tubal factor, male factor, the presence of endometriosis and/or adenomyosis, and ovarian reserve, the outcomes of fertility treatment can be predicted to some extent in aged infertile women.

  15. Infertility, infertility treatment and twinning: the Danish National BirthCohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Basso, Olga; Obel, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND We have previously observed that an increasing time to pregnancy (TTP) is associated with a reduced frequency of twin deliveries in couples not receiving infertility treatment. By using updated information, we assessed the frequencies of dizygotic (DZ) and monozygotic (MZ) twin...

  16. Ethical Problems with Infertility Treatments: Attitudes and Explanations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreffler, Karina M; Johnson, David R; Scheuble, Laurie K

    2010-12-01

    Although media coverage of infertility treatments has increased markedly over the past decade, there is a dearth of empirical information about public perceptions of the ethics of infertility procedures (e.g. artificial insemination, in-vitro fertilization, donor eggs, surrogate mothering, gestational carriers) and about the factors that shape them. Two representative telephone survey samples (930 adults in a Midwestern state, and 580 adult women aged 25 to 50 in the North Central region) are analyzed to gauge public views on the ethics of infertility treatments and estimate the effects of social structure and exposure on these views. Ethical concerns were viewed as more serious for techniques that could result in a child who may not be biologically related to the woman or her partner than for those yielding a child biologically related to both parents. Social structural factors such as age and education were the strongest predictors of attitudes towards the ethics of infertility treatments. Neither parenthood nor experiencing infertility was related to ethical concerns, although women reporting the use of infertility services had fewer ethical concerns than their counterparts.

  17. Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment for opioid and other substance use during infertility treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Tricia E

    2017-08-01

    Opioid use and misuse have reached epidemic proportions in the United States, especially in women of childbearing age, some of whom seek infertility treatments. Substance use is much more common than many of the conditions routinely screened for during the preconception period, and it can have devastating consequences for the woman and her family. Substance use can worsen infertility, complicate pregnancy, increase medical problems, and lead to psychosocial difficulties for the woman and her family. The reproductive endocrinologist thus has an ethical and medical duty to screen for substance use, provide initial counseling, and refer to specialized treatment as needed. This article provides an overview of screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT), a public health approach shown to be effective in ameliorating the harms of substance use. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Treatment of Leukocytospermia in Male Infertility: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Hung Jung

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Male factors account for 20% to 50% of infertility cases, and infection in the genitourinary tract may play a contributing role in up to 15% of male infertility. Leukocytospermia is a well-known indicator of infection or inflammation in the male sex glands and the urogenital tract. Although great deal of effort has been expended to elucidate definite management strategies in infertile men with leukocytospermia, the gold standard of treatment remains unclear. Until recently, broad spectrum antibiotics and antioxidants have been used in the treatment of leukocytospermia for male infertility to eliminate infection and reduce reactive oxygen free radicals produced inside cellular mitochondria as a result of inflammation. The present review reveals that antibiotics might improve sperm parameters, the rate of resolution of leukocytospermia, the bacteriologic cure rate, and even the pregnancy rate, although some reports conflict. Antioxidants might also have clinical benefits for sperm function as shown by in vitro studies. However, the data are insufficient to conclude whether antibiotics and antioxidants for the treatment of infertile men with leukocytospermia are effective or not. Better designed investigations into leukocytospermia are needed.

  19. Female infertility in India: Causes, treatment and impairment of fertility in selected districts with high prevalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shraboni Patra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the ‘universal access to sexual and reproductive health care’ has received priority in the SDG‐3, the rural women experiencing infertility problem in India are unable to access and afford quality reproductive health care. The study investigates the present infertility situation, with a focus on risk factors, treatment seeking for infertility, and impact of infertility on fertility in India and its districts with high infertility prevalence. The DLHS‐3 data is used. Top fifteen districts with high infertility prevalence are selected for analysis. Simple bivariate and multivariate techniques are applied. In India, the prevalence of ever‐experienced primary, secondary, and current infertility is 6.6%, 2.1% and 4.6% respectively, whereas, in the selected districts, the estimates for the same indicators are 15%, 3.1%, and 5% respectively. A higher prevalence of reported symptoms of RTIs/STIs and menstrual problems is observed among women who ever had infertility. Treatment seeking for infertility is low in Korba and Koryia. The MCEB is less among women who ever had experienced infertility. The prevalence of ever‐experienced infertility and current infertility is considerably higher among women from socio‐economically disadvantaged sections. Awareness of RTIs, STIs, and menstrual problems, and preventive care can reduce infertility among rural women.

  20. Differential effect of mode of conception and infertility treatment on fetal growth and prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela-Alcaraz, Brenda; Crispi, Fátima; Manau, Dolors; Cruz-Lemini, Mónica; Borras, Aina; Balasch, Juan; Gratacós, Eduard

    2016-12-01

    Objectives To examine perinatal outcomes in pregnancies conceived by different methods: fertile women with spontaneous pregnancies, infertile women who achieved pregnancy without treatment, pregnancies achieved by ovulation induction (OI) and in vitro fertilization or intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF/ICSI). Methods Retrospective single-center cohort study including 200 fertile and 748 infertile women stratified according to infertility treatment. The outcome measurements were preterm delivery (PTD), small-for-gestational-age (SGA), gestational diabetes, placenta previa or preeclampsia. Results The overall rate of pregnancy complications was significantly increased in all infertility groups regardless of the infertility treatment (adjusted odds ratio (OR): infertile without treatment 2.3 versus OI 2.2 versus IVF/ICSI 3.4). While PTD was mainly associated to IVF/ICSI (adjusted OR: infertile without treatment 1.3 versus OI 1.6 versus IVF/ICSI 3.3), SGA was significantly associated to both OI and IVF/ICSI (adjusted OR: infertile without treatment 1.9 versus OI 2.7 versus IVF/ICSI 2.6). All these associations remained statistically significant after adjusting by maternal age and twin pregnancy. Conclusions This study confirms the higher prevalence of pregnancy complications in infertile women irrespectively of receiving infertility treatment or not, and further describes a preferential association of prematurity with IVF/ICSI, and SGA with treated infertility (OI and IVF/ICSI).

  1. Treatments for Diseases That Cause Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... but so far there is no evidence that metformin treatment increases the rate of pregnancy in women with PCOS. A combination of clomiphene ... do not respond to clomiphene by itself, adding metformin may slightly increase the rate of pregnancy. Hormone therapy . Gonadotropins and hCG are types of ...

  2. Survey of reasons for discontinuation from in vitro fertilization treatment among couples attending infertility clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grishma Kulkarni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: With the increase in infertility burden, more and more couples are opting for in vitro fertilization (IVF. Despite the availability of various treatment options, the major concern that needs to be addressed is the reasons why such couples, initially motivated so strongly, drop out in fairly high numbers from IVF cycles. With this point of view the study was designed. AIM: The objective of this study was to explore the reasons why couples discontinue fertility treatment. Settings and Design: This retrospective study was carried out among couples in the age group of 20-40 years who opted for IVF at Tertiary care hospital and a private infertility center. Materials and Methods: Medical records for 3 years (2009-2012 were taken out and included in the study for analysis. Socio-demographic details along with indication for IVF and reasons for drop-separate IVF therapy were recorded on case record form and were analyzed. Results: Twenty-one percent of the patients had tubal pathology, thus making it the commonest female related factor for indication of IVF. Oligoasthenospermia (13% was the commonest cause of male related infertility factor. Financial burden was the primary cause for terminating treatment in majority of the IVF cases. Conclusions: Financial burden (62.5% was the commonest reason for drop out among couples from IVF cycle.

  3. Maternal self-esteem after successful treatment for infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Sara Jane; Glazebrook, Cris; Sheard, Charlotte; Ndukwe, George; Oates, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    To [1] investigate self-esteem during pregnancy after previous infertility and [2] establish the relationship among self-esteem, anxiety during pregnancy, and parenting self-efficacy. Limited prospective study. A regional infertility clinic and antenatal clinic. Seventy women who had conceived through assisted reproductive technology and 111 women who had conceived naturally. Measures of self-esteem, anxiety, and parenting self-efficacy. Self-esteem, anxiety, and parenting self-efficacy. Women who had conceived through IVF treatment did not differ in terms of self-esteem during pregnancy from those who had conceived naturally. All of the women in the present study displayed levels of self-esteem that were within the normal range. Self-esteem increased as pregnancy progressed. Self-esteem was negatively correlated with anxiety during pregnancy. As self-esteem increased, anxiety decreased. Self-esteem at the start of pregnancy (18 weeks) and anxiety in the early stages of parenthood (6 weeks postpartum) predicted parenting self-efficacy. Self-esteem in the early stages of pregnancy, for both women who conceived through IVF and women who conceived naturally, is related to self-reported levels of parenting efficacy. Coaching and mentoring through antenatal clinics in the early stages of pregnancy should be tailored to incorporate advice regarding self-esteem in addition to management of pregnancy and psychological well-being.

  4. Treatment of infertility in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: approach to clinical practice

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    Anderson Sanches Melo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome represents 80% of anovulatory infertility cases. Treatment initially includes preconception guidelines, such as lifestyle changes (weight loss, folic acid therapy to prevent the risk of fetal neural tube defects and halting the consumption of tobacco and alcohol. The first-line pharmacological treatment for inducing ovulation consists of a clomiphene citrate treatment for timed intercourse. The second-line pharmacological treatment includes the administration of exogenous gonadotropins or laparoscopic ovarian surgery (ovarian drilling. Ovulation induction using clomiphene citrate or gonadotropins is effective with cumulative live birth rates of approximately 70%. Ovarian drilling should be performed when laparoscopy is indicated; this procedure is typically effective in approximately 50% of cases. Finally, a high-complexity reproduction treatment (in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection is the third-line treatment and is recommended when the previous interventions fail. This option is also the first choice in cases of bilateral tubal occlusion or semen alterations that impair the occurrence of natural pregnancy. Evidence for the routine use of metformin in infertility treatment of anovulatory women with polycystic ovary syndrome is not available. Aromatase inhibitors are promising and longer term studies are necessary to prove their safety.

  5. Survey of the Situation of Infertile Women Seeking In Vitro Fertilization Treatment in China

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    Xuan Jin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In previous studies, people’s knowledge of reproductive health and infertile women’s psychological states was surveyed in several countries. However, there has been limited information concerning the psychological states of infertile women seeking treatment and the outcomes of in vitro fertilization (IVF in China. Methods. Infertile women were asked to complete short questionnaires on the day that their oocytes were retrieved; these questionnaires covered the durations of their infertility, levels of education, sources of pressure, and psychological states. Data concerning IVF outcomes were provided by embryologists and clinicians. The correlations between the duration of infertility and educational level, psychological state and education level, and psychological state and outcome of IVF were analyzed in the cohort study. Results. The duration of infertility in more than half of the females was longer than 5 years. Compared with less-educated women, women with higher levels of education sought treatment earlier and their rates of depressive symptoms were lower. There is an association between negative emotions and outcome of IVF. Conclusions. The survey of the situations of infertile women seeking IVF treatment in China indicates the importance of popularizing knowledge concerning reproductive health. Improving medical conditions, reducing the costs of treatment, and developing social culture will aid in relieving the stress of infertile women and improving assisted reproductive treatment.

  6. Gender differences and factors associated with treatment-seeking behaviour for infertility in Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhont, N.; Luchters, S.; Ombelet, W.; Vyankandondera, J.; Gasarabwe, A.; van de Wijgert, J.; Temmerman, M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study examines perceptions of infertility causes, treatment-seeking behaviour and factors associated with seeking medical care in an urban infertile population in Rwanda, as well as the response of health providers. METHODS: Between November 2007 and May 2009 a hospital based survey

  7. Factors Influencing Anxiety in Infertile Women Undergoing IVF/ICSI Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Hassanzadeh Bashtian

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Infertility can lead to a diminished sense of well-being and is associated with a high frequency of psychosomatic and somatic disorders. Generally, infertile women are more affected by infertility than men. This study aimed to determine factors influencing anxiety among infertile women undergoing in-vitro fertilization (IVF and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 224 infertile women who were candidate for IVF/ICSI referred to Milad IVF Center, Mashhad, Iran, from September 2015 to July 2016. Prior to the treatment, the participants completed the demographic characteristics questionnaire and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI to assess the level of anxiety. Additionally, a self-structured questionnaire containing the infertility-associated data including the duration and cause of infertility as well as history and the duration of treatment, was completed by the respondents. The subjects were selected through purposive sampling technique. Data analysis was performed using Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis, Fisher exact test, regression tests, as well as Spearman’s correlation coefficient in SPSS software, version 16.   Results: The results obtained from BAI showed that 38.4% of the subjects had moderate anxiety. There was a significant relationship between the level of anxiety and age (P=0.001, the cause of infertility (P=0.007, and the duration of treatment (P=0.001. Conclusion: As the level of anxiety was higher in infertile women with younger age, female factor infertility and longer duration of treatment, it is recommended to consider this population more vulnerable and to provide them supportive counseling to be able to overcome their anxiety.

  8. The impact of perceived stigma and mediating social factors on infertility-related stress among women seeking infertility treatment in Southern Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donkor, Ernestina S; Sandall, Jane

    2007-10-01

    This research aimed to investigate the extent to which women in Southern Ghana seeking infertility treatment perceived themselves as stigmatised in order to investigate the relationship between perceived stigma and infertility-related stress. A survey was conducted using face-to-face interviews in three languages with 615 women receiving infertility treatment on three health sites in Southern Ghana. The majority (64%) of women in this sample felt stigmatised. Sequential multiple regression analyses indicated that higher levels of perceived stigma were associated with increased infertility-related stress. Also women with higher levels of education felt less infertility-related stress. The presence of an existing child/children, the number of years spent in infertility treatment and the type of marriage (monogamous/polygamous union) were less important in predicting stress. The findings suggest that the social status of infertile women derived from other factors can be of importance in minimising the impact of stigmatisation and stress related to infertility. These findings highlight the wider beneficial effects of improved educational opportunities for girls and women.

  9. A 10-year follow-up study of psychosocial factors affecting couples after infertility treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wischmann, T; Korge, K; Scherg, H; Strowitzki, T; Verres, R

    2012-11-01

    Little is known about the long-term course taken in life by couples who had undergone medically assisted reproduction (MAR). The aim of this study was to find out in a large sample whether, in comparison with parents, involuntarily childless couples have a different subjective perception of overall and specific quality of life over a period of >10 years. Between 1994 and 1997, 564 couples participated in the initial Heidelberg Fertility Consultation Service study of psychosocial aspects of infertility. In March 2008, a follow-up questionnaire was sent to all of these couples. Both partners were asked about the current status of their desire for a child and their satisfaction with life, their self-esteem, partnership, sexuality and career, as well as their current attitude towards the MAR they had undergone and experience of the process. The final sample consisted of 148 couples and 60 women (response rate: 41% of the women and 31% of the men contacted). Fifty-nine percent of the women had at least one genetically related child, 11% had a foster or adopted child and 30% remained childless. Comparisons of psychological variables between parents and childless couples were done for the 148 couples only. Post-MAR parents indicated significantly higher self-esteem than childless couples (P < 0.01) and were more inclined to go through the infertility treatment again than childless couples (P < 0.001 for women, P < 0.05 for men). Positive aspects of infertility were seen more often by childless couples than by parents (P < 0.001). Childless women reported more occupational satisfaction than mothers (P < 0.01), while no such difference was identified in the male partners. Concerning overall life satisfaction, satisfaction with friendships and the partnership, and sexual satisfaction there were no statistically significant differences between childless women/men and mothers/fathers. Overall, our 10-year follow-up survey indicated good psychological adjustment both in

  10. Anxiety and depression after failure of assisted reproductive treatment among patients experiencing infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroufizadeh, Saman; Karimi, Elaheh; Vesali, Samira; Omani Samani, Reza

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the impact of the number of previous infertility treatment failures on anxiety and depression. In a cross-sectional study, individuals (men and women, but not couples) aged at least 18 years who had a history of infertility and could read and write in Persian were enrolled at the Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran, between November 1, 2013, and February 28, 2014. Participants provided demographic and infertility information and completed the Persian version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Overall, 330 patients (122 men, 208 women) were included. Mean scores on the HADS anxiety and depression subscales (HADS-A and HADS-D) were 8.40±4.51 and 5.95±3.54, respectively. In multiple regression analysis, mean HADS-A scores were significantly higher for patients with one treatment failure (9.57±4.58) than for those without a history of treatment (7.79±4.13; P=0.003). HADS-D scores were significantly higher for patients with two failures (6.92±3.69) than for those with no previous treatment (5.59±3.79; P=0.019). Patients with infertility have increased depression and anxiety after infertility treatment failure. Counseling or treatment for these potential psychological effects should be considered after infertility treatment failure. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Improving the Reporting of Clinical Trials of Infertility Treatments (IMPRINT): modifying the CONSORT statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Clinical trials testing infertility treatments often do not report on the major outcomes of interest to patients and clinicians and the public (such as live birth) nor on the harms, including maternal risks during pregnancy and fetal anomalies. This is complicated by the multiple participants in infertility trials which may include a woman (mother), a man (father), and a third individual if successful, their offspring (child), who is also the desired outcome of treatment. The primary outcome of interest and many adverse events occur after cessation of infertility treatment and during pregnancy and the puerperium, which creates a unique burden of follow-up for clinical trial investigators and participants. In 2013, because of the inconsistencies in trial reporting and the unique aspects of infertility trials not adequately addressed by existing Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statements, we convened a consensus conference in Harbin, China, with the aim of planning modifications to the CONSORT checklist to improve the quality of reporting of clinical trials testing infertility treatment. The consensus group recommended that the preferred primary outcome of all infertility trials is live birth (defined as any delivery of a live infant after ≥20 weeks' gestation) or cumulative live birth, defined as the live birth per women over a defined time period (or number of treatment cycles). In addition, harms to all participants should be systematically collected and reported, including during the intervention, any resulting pregnancy, and the neonatal period. Routine information should be collected and reported on both male and female participants in the trial. We propose to track the change in quality that these guidelines may produce in published trials testing infertility treatments. Our ultimate goal is to increase the transparency of benefits and risks of infertility treatments to provide better medical care to affected individuals and couples

  12. Treatment of infertile women with unilateral tubal occlusion by intrauterine insemination and ovarian stimulation

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    Ming-Huei Lin

    2013-09-01

    Conclusions: Infertile patients with only unilateral proximal tubal occlusion detected on HSG can be treated initially by IUI combined with ovarian stimulation. The cycle outcomes in patients with proximal tubal occlusion are similar to patients with unexplained infertility. However, the stimulated IUI might not be a good choice for patients with unilateral mid-distal tubal occlusion because of a lower success rate, although further evidence is needed.

  13. Antisperm antibodies as a factor of male infertility. Relevance, modern methods of diagnosis and treatment

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    O. A. Nikiforov

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available According to WHO statistics 40 % of childless marriage is due to factors of male infertility. One of them is the presence of antisperm antibodies in the male organism, which may be in blood serum, on the surface of spermatozoids and seminal plasma. Aim. Оn the grounds of specialized literature analysis, to show the relevance of this problem in Reproductive Medicine, to descript Basic methods of Modern treatment and diagnosis of this pathology in the body of infertile males. The most common methods of antisperm antibodies identifying are: MAR-test sample Shuvarskiy–Sims–Hyuner, Kurtsrok–Miller test, the method of latex agglutination, solid-phase immunoenzymatic blood test. Indications for antisperm antibodies determining are: modified indices, deviations in post-coital test, a negative test of sperm and cervical mucus interaction in vitro, unexplained infertility in the married couples, failure or low indices during IVF (in vitro fertilization and of course, the exclusion of other causes of infertility. When antisperm antibodies are detected, the strategy of treatment may be destined to reduction of their titer for further pregnancy. Such types of therapy can be used: contraceptive (long-term use contraception barrier to reduce antisperm antibodies titer in women, plasmapheresis, artificial insemination with pretreated from antisperm antibodies husband's sperm, methods of assisted reproductive technologies. Conclusoins. The formation of antisperm antibodies leads to infertility of immunological genesis (in 20 % of couples with unexplained infertility. To confirm their presence in the male body it is necessary to perform the MAR-test, Shuvarsky test, other tests and, of course, the exclusion of other causes of infertility. Men of reproductive age with an immunological factor of infertility provides for a comprehensive treatment, including elimination of all possible causative and contributing factors of infertility (infection of the male

  14. The treatment of infertility in polycystic ovary syndrome: a brief update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Michael F; Misso, Marie L; Wong, Jennifer; Hart, Roger; Rombauts, Luk; Melder, Angela; Norman, Robert J; Teede, Helena J

    2012-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common cause of anovulatory infertility. Lifestyle change alone is considered the first-line treatment for the management of infertile anovulatory PCOS women who are overweight or obese. First-line medical ovulation induction therapy to improve fertility outcomes is clomiphene citrate, whilst gonadotrophins, laparoscopic ovarian surgery or possibly metformin are second line in clomiphene citrate-resistant PCOS women. There is currently insufficient evidence to recommend aromatase inhibitors over that of clomiphene citrate in infertile anovulatory PCOS women in general or specifically in therapy naive or clomiphene citrate-resistant PCOS women. IVF/ICSI treatment is recommended either as a third-line treatment or in the presence of other infertility factors. © 2012 The Authors ANZJOG © 2012 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  15. Cohesion and adaptability among individuals under treatment for infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Maria Paz Loayza; Caleffi, Lorena; Baron, Ana; Mattana, Eunice; Chaves, Marcia Lorena F

    2004-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate cohesion and adaptability as relationship patterns of individuals in the presence or absence of infertility. Infertile subjects (20 men and 26 women, age 29.9 yr., SD = 3.8), and 100 fertile individuals (52 men and 48 women, age 29.5 yr., SD = 3.6) were included in this cross-sectional study conducted in Brazil. Subjects were married for the first time and had no children. The pattern of relationship (cohesion and adaptability) was assessed on the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale (FACES III). Subjects were also interviewed and the interviews tape-recorded and analyzed by independent and blinded senior psychiatrists. The concepts of cohesion and adaptability did not differentiate infertile couples from fertile ones. Further, the recorded interviews also resulted in heterogeneous. nonconcordant judgments. These results lead to two conclusions: that awareness of infertility is not present in the population studied or that it is present but the magnitude of its effect is quite small and that FACES III and the interview focus on adaptability and cohesion are not sensitive enough to measure the difficulties in these couples' relationships. This leads us to reflect on the type of psychiatric support available to infertile couples.

  16. Robot-assisted laparoscopy for infertility treatment: current views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonnel, Marie; Goetgheluck, Julie; Frati, Albane; Even, Marc; Ayoubi, Jean Marc

    2014-03-01

    To determine the interest of using robotic laparoscopic surgery in the management of female infertility, we reviewed our own activity and searched the Medline database for publications on robotic technology in infertility surgery, with the use of the following search words: robotic laparoscopy, tubal anastomosis, myomectomy, deep infiltrating endometriosis, and adnexal surgery. Robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery has seen rapid progression over the past few years. It has been mostly used for myomectomy, proximal tubal reanastomosis, and deep endometriosis surgery. Despite its increased range of indications, no randomized control studies are available. The place of robotic surgery in the management of infertility remains undetermined. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Increased incidence of infertility treatment among women working in the plastics industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, K.S.; Hannerz, H.; Feveile, H.

    2009-01-01

    Several plastic chemicals adversely affect reproductive ability. This study examined the possible association between employment in the plastics industry and infertility. Dynamic cohorts of economically active women and men were followed for hospital contacts due to infertility in the Danish...... Occupational Hospitalisation Register, from 1995 to 2005. A person was considered to be at increased risk in a particular year if plastic work was the main occupation in the previous year. Analyses were standardized according to county, socio-economic group, year and age. 107 cases of treatment for female...... infertility were observed among female plastic workers, as opposed to an expected 87.15 cases, i.e. relative risk was 1.23 (95% CI: 1.01-1.48). For male workers the numbers were 41 respectively 49.9 cases, with relative risk being 0.82 (95% CI: 0.59-1.11). The increased incidence of infertility treatment...

  18. Is there a place for nutritional supplements in the treatment of idiopathic male infertility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Arcaniolo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Infertility affects 15% of couples in fertile age. Male factor is a cause of infertility in almost half of cases, mainly due to oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OAT. The purpose of this study is to review the effects of nutritional supplements as medical treatment for idiopathic male infertility. Material and methods: A Pub Med and Medline review of the published studies utilizing nutritional supplements for the treatment of male infertility has been performed. Results: Clinical trials on Vitamin E, Vitamin A, Vitamin C. Arginine, Carnitine, N-Acetyl-Carnitine, Glutathione, Coenzyme Q10, Selenium and Zinc were reviewed. Although there is a wide variability in selected population, dose regimen and final outcomes, nutritional supplements both alone and in combination seems to be able to improve semen parameters (sperm count, sperm motility and morphology and pregnancy rate in infertile men. Conclusions: There are rising evidences from published randomized trials and systematic review suggesting that nutritional supplementation may improve semen parameters and the likelihood of pregnancy in men affected by OAT. This improvement, however, is not consistent and there is a wide variation in the treatment regimens used. Well designed and adequately powered RCTs are needed to better clarify the role of nutritional supplements as treatment for male infertility.

  19. The psychological impact of infertility and fertility treatment on the male partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Maeve; Dineen, Tim; Sarma, Kiran; Nolan, Aonghus

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports the findings of two studies that examined factors predicting infertility distress in male partners within couples with an infertility diagnosis and where the couple was receiving fertility treatment. A cross-sectional design was implemented using a questionnaire battery (The questionnaire battery comprised an inventory of four different standardised questionnaires compiled together into one booklet) compiled from earlier theory-building qualitative research conducted by the authors. Infertility related distress was examined in relation to a number of psychosocial variables including relationship dynamics, self-esteem, current mental health and attitudes towards idealised masculinity. The questionnaire battery was completed by 167 men undergoing or consulting for fertility treatment. Participants were recruited through Irish fertility clinics (Study 1, n = 111) and through an online survey (Study 2, n = 55). Regression analyses identified four variables that predicted variance in infertility distress in both studies: 'Attitude towards idealised masculinity', 'Mental health', 'Relationship satisfaction' and 'Self-esteem'. This finding was found to be robust having controlled for age, time since diagnosis, number of attempts at treatment and diagnostic category (male factor, female factor or mixed factor infertility). ConclusiON: Recommendations for fertility clinics and mental health professionals should be made in relation to managing infertility distress and supporting couples during fertility treatment.

  20. Perceptions of Infertility and In Vitro Fertilization Treatment among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    This was a cross-sectional survey in Anambra State,. Nigeria involving household respondents (married couples) and hospital respondents (patients undergoing infertility evaluation). The study sample included a total of 600 married couples aged 18 years and above who were resident in Anambra state at the time of this ...

  1. Severe male infertility after failed ICSI treatment-a phenomenological study of men's experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellström Anna-Lena

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male-factor infertility underlies approximately 30% of infertility in couples seeking treatment; of which 10% is due to azoospermia. The development of assisted reproductive technology (ART, enabling the use of epididymal or testicular sperm for fertilization of the partner's oocytes, has made biological fatherhood possible for men with obstructive azoospermia. There is limited knowledge of men's experience of their own infertility. The aim of this study was to describe men's experiences of obstructive azoospermia infertility. Methods Eight men with obstructive azoospermia, who had terminated Swedish public health system ART treatment two years previously without subsequent childbirth, were interviewed using a descriptive phenomenological method. Results The essence of the phenomenon is expressed with a metaphor: climbing a mountain step by step with the aim of reaching the top, i.e. having a child and thus a family with a child. Four constituents are included (1 inadequacy followed by a feeling of redress (2 marginalisation, (3 chivalry (4 extension of life and starting a family as driving forces. Conclusions Knowledge of men's experiences of their own infertility is important as a supporting measure to increase the quality of care of infertile couples. By adopting this facet of gender perspective in fertility treatment guidelines, care can hopefully be optimized.

  2. Family-Related Opinions and Stressful Situations Associated with Psychological Distress in Women Undergoing Infertility Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiro Takaki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate how family-related opinions and stressful situations are related to psychological distress in women undergoing infertility treatment. The subjects in this cross-sectional study were recruited from female patients undergoing infertility treatment (n = 2540 at 70 infertility treatment institutions in Japan. Because of non-participation or missing data, the number of subjects included in the analysis was 635 (response rate, 25.0%. The family-related opinions and stressful situations were evaluated using the original questions. Psychological distress was assessed using a self-report measure, the Kessler Six-question Psychological Distress Scale (K6. The K6 scores of the following participants were significantly (p < 0.05 and independently high: those with more frequent miscarriage/stillbirth/abortions, those with repeated miscarriages as the cause of infertility, those with infertility of unknown causes, those living with no child, those having a low joint income with their partner, those with the opinion that “women should devote themselves to their household duties” those who had considered stopping treatment, those without the opinion that “married life without children is favorable” and those who had experienced stressful situations such as inadequate explanation by doctors, frustration of multiple failed attempts, differences of opinion with the partner, and lack of knowledge regarding when to stop treatment. Family-related opinions and stressful situations associated with psychological distress in women undergoing infertility treatment are outlined. The results of this study may contribute to the prevention of and care for psychological distress in female patients undergoing infertility treatment.

  3. Identification of Reproductive Education Needs of Infertile Clients Undergoing Assisted Reproduction Treatment Using Assessments of Their Knowledge and Attitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezabadi, Zahra; Mollaahmadi, Fahimeh; Mohammadi, Maryam; Omani Samani, Reza; Vesali, Samira

    2017-01-01

    In order to empower infertile individuals and provide high quality patient-centered infertility care, it is necessary to recognize and meet infertile individuals' educational needs. This study aims to examine infertility patients' knowledge and subsequently their education needs given their attitudinal approach to infertility education in terms of patients who undergo assisted reproduction treatment. This descriptive study enrolled 150 subjects by conveni- ence sampling of all patients who received their first assisted reproductive treatment between July and September 2015 at a referral fertility clinic, Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran. We used a questionnaire that measured fertility and infertility information (8 questions) as well as attitude toward education on the causes and treatment of infertility (5 questions). Chi-square, independent sample t test, and one way ANOVA analyses were conducted to examine differences by sex. Pknowledge was 3.08 ± 0.99. Clients' responses indicated that the highest mean knowledge scores related to knowledge of factors that affected pregnancy (3.97 ± 1.11) and infertility treatment (3.97 ± 1.16). The lowest mean knowledge scores related to knowledge of the natural reproductive cycle (2.96 ± 1.12) and anatomy of the genital organs (2.94 ± 1.16). Most females (92.1%) and males (83.3%) were of the opinion that infertility education programs should include causes of infertility and types of treatment associated with diagnostic and laboratory procedures. No statistically significant difference existed between male and female participants (P=0.245). Most participants in this study expressed awareness of factors that affect pregnancy and infertility treatment. It is imperative to educate and empower infertile individuals who seek reproduction treatment in terms of infertility causes and types of treatment, as well as diagnostic and laboratory procedures to enable them to make informed decisions about their assisted reproductive

  4. Identification of Reproductive Education Needs of Infertile Clients Undergoing Assisted Reproduction Treatment Using Assessments of Their Knowledge and Attitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezabadi Zahra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background In order to empower infertile individuals and provide high quality patient-centered infertility care, it is necessary to recognize and meet infertile individuals’ educational needs. This study aims to examine infertility patients’ knowledge and subsequently their education needs given their attitudinal approach to infertility education in terms of patients who undergo assisted reproduction treatment. Materials and Methods This descriptive study enrolled 150 subjects by conveni- ence sampling of all patients who received their first assisted reproductive treatment between July and September 2015 at a referral fertility clinic, Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran. We used a questionnaire that measured fertility and infertility information (8 questions as well as attitude toward education on the causes and treatment of infertility (5 questions. Chi-square, independent sample t test, and one way ANOVA analyses were conducted to examine differences by sex. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Total mean knowledge was 3.08 ± 0.99. Clients’ responses indicated that the highest mean knowledge scores related to knowledge of factors that affected pregnancy (3.97 ± 1.11 and infertility treatment (3.97 ± 1.16. The lowest mean knowledge scores related to knowledge of the natural reproductive cycle (2.96 ± 1.12 and anatomy of the genital organs (2.94 ± 1.16. Most females (92.1% and males (83.3% were of the opinion that infertility education programs should include causes of infertility and types of treatment associated with diagnostic and laboratory procedures. No statistically significant difference existed between male and female participants (P=0.245. Conclusion Most participants in this study expressed awareness of factors that affect pregnancy and infertility treatment. It is imperative to educate and empower infertile individuals who seek reproduction treatment in terms of infertility causes and types of treatment, as

  5. Perceptions of infertility and treatment stress in females as compared with males entering in vitro fertilization treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, A; Freeman, E W; Boxer, A S; Tureck, R

    1992-02-01

    To determine gender similarities and differences in perceptions of infertility and anticipated treatment stress in couples enrolling for in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment. Both partners were evaluated at enrollment of IVF treatment. The evaluation was part of the screening procedure. The Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at a teaching hospital. Two hundred consecutive couples who entered an IVF treatment program. Self-report questionnaire included items on the duration of infertility, degree of social support, effect of infertility on sexual relationship, expected likelihood of achieving pregnancy, anticipation of stress during treatment, and a self-rating scale of emotional reactions to infertility. The women anticipated more stress in IVF treatment but also rated greater degree of social support than the men. Both partners overestimated their chances of a successful treatment outcome. Factor analysis of the Infertility Scale produced three factors that were similar for both sexes. The first factor represented the desire to have a child as a major focus of life with inadequacy of the male role, social functioning and work efficiency, and pressure to have a child following. Women reported more stress, but the factors affecting stress of infertility were very similar for both partners. The intense focus on having a child was the predominant factor in anticipated stress of IVF treatment for both males and females.

  6. Understanding the perceptions of and emotional barriers to infertility treatment: a survey in four European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domar, Alice; Gordon, Keith; Garcia-Velasco, Juan; La Marca, Antonio; Barriere, Paul; Beligotti, Fabiola

    2012-04-01

    Infertility can significantly impact women's lives and personal relationships. Despite the negative impact of infertility, a significant number of women who are struggling to conceive do not consult a physician. This cross-sectional survey was conducted to determine the emotional impact of infertility on women to identify which aspects of fertility treatment contribute to the psychological stress experienced by so many patients and to identify barriers to seeking treatment. Women (n = 445; 18-44 years) who had received fertility treatment within the past 2 years or were having trouble conceiving but had not received treatment, completed a 15-min survey online. Participants were from France (n = 108), Germany (n = 111), Italy (n = 112) and Spain (n = 114). Responses indicated that infertility causes a range of emotions and can strain relationships. Women who had received treatment were more likely to feel hopeful (26 versus 21%) and closer to their partner than women not in treatment (33 versus 19%, P < 0.05). Most women delayed starting treatment because of a desire to conceive naturally, and on the advice of physicians. Women aged ≥35 years took longer to seek help with their fertility issues. Injection-related anxiety was the second greatest barrier to treatment. This study has provided insight into the physical and psychological challenges of infertility treatments and permitted a better understanding of the factors that impact patient lives. A treatment protocol with minimal injections and provision of additional information may lessen the emotional impact and challenges of infertility and contribute to patient satisfaction with fertility treatment protocols.

  7. Male factor infertility and lack of openness about infertility as risk factors for depressive symptoms in males undergoing assisted reproductive technology treatment in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babore, Alessandra; Stuppia, Liborio; Trumello, Carmen; Candelori, Carla; Antonucci, Ivana

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the association between male factor infertility and openness to discussing assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment with levels of depression among men undergoing infertility treatment. Cross-sectional. Not applicable. Three hundred forty participants (170 men and their partners) undergoing ART treatments. Administration of a set of questionnaires. Depressive symptoms were detected by means of the Zung Depression Self-Rating Scale. Participants' willingness to share their infertility treatment experience with other people was assessed by means of self-report questionnaires. In this study, 51.8% of males chose not to discuss their ART treatments with people other than their partner. In addition, the decision to discuss or not discuss the ART treatments with others was significantly associated with men's depressive symptoms. Male factor infertility was significantly associated with depression when considered together with the decision not to discuss ART treatments with others. A general disposition characterized by a lack of openness with others seemed to be a significant predictor of depression. There is a need for routine fertility care to pay greater attention to men's emotional needs. Before commencing reproductive treatment, male patients may benefit from undergoing routine screening for variables (i.e., male factor infertility and openness to others about ART) that may affect their risk of depression. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Risk of adverse pregnancy and perinatal outcomes after high technology infertility treatment: a comprehensive systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomba, Stefano; Homburg, Roy; Santagni, Susanna; La Sala, Giovanni Battista; Orvieto, Raoul

    2016-11-04

    In the literature, there is growing evidence that subfertile patients who conceived after infertility treatments have an increased risk of pregnancy and perinatal complications and this is particularly true for patients who conceived through use of high technology infertility treatments. Moreover, high technology infertility treatments include many concomitant clinical and biological risk factors. This review aims to summarize in a systematic fashion the current evidence regarding the relative effect of the different procedures for high technology infertility treatments on the risk of adverse pregnancy and perinatal outcome. A literature search up to August 2016 was performed in IBSS, SocINDEX, Institute for Scientific Information, PubMed, Web of Science and Google Scholar and an evidence-based hierarchy was used to determine which articles to include and analyze. Data on prepregnancy maternal factors, low technology interventions, specific procedures for male factor, ovarian tissue/ovary and uterus transplantation, and chromosomal abnormalities and malformations of the offspring were excluded. The available evidences were analyzed assessing the level and the quality of evidence according to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine guidelines and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system, respectively. Current review highlights that every single procedure of high technology infertility treatments can play a crucial role in increasing the risk of pregnancy and perinatal complications. Due to the suboptimal level and quality of the current evidence, further well-designed studies are needed.

  9. A new rapid and effective method for treatment of unexplained infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edelstam, G.; Sjosten, A.; Bjuresten, K.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Artificial insemination (intrauterine insemination by husband or artificial insemination by husband) is often tried as first treatment for couples with unexplained infertility. Perturbation has previously proved to increase the chance of achieving pregnancy for these couples. The effect...... and insemination cycles for couples with unexplained infertility. METHODS: In a prospective, open study, the patients were randomized, the day before ovulation, during a clomiphene citrate stimulated cycle to either perturbation with low-dose local anaesthetic or no perturbation before insemination. RESULTS......: The perturbation treatment significantly enhanced the clinical pregnancy rate and was well tolerated. No complications were noted. The combined treatment of clomiphene citrate, perturbation and insemination can be used as a cost-effective, first-line treatment for couples with unexplained infertility...

  10. The experience of women in unsuccessful infertility treatment: what do patients need when medical intervention fails?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergart, A M

    2000-01-01

    Approximately half of the women who seek medical treatment for infertility never give birth to a child. Extended infertility treatment extracts a particularly devastating toll on female patients. The inability to bear children creates a developmental crisis for a woman, disrupting her identity, her relationships, and her sense of meaning. Infertility treatment tends to be delivered in an impersonal way, with little attention to the psychosocial needs of patients. Social workers can play a key role in preventive and clinical intervention, and can educate medical professionals about the needs of their patients when treatment fails. The author presents interview data from a recent study in order to illustrate these needs, offering guidelines for social workers and medical professionals.

  11. Identification of Reproductive Education Needs of Infertile Clients Undergoing Assisted Reproduction Treatment Using Assessments of Their Knowledge and Attitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezabadi, Zahra; Mollaahmadi, Fahimeh; Mohammadi, Maryam; Omani Samani, Reza; Vesali, Samira

    2017-01-01

    Background In order to empower infertile individuals and provide high quality patient-centered infertility care, it is necessary to recognize and meet infertile individuals’ educational needs. This study aims to examine infertility patients’ knowledge and subsequently their education needs given their attitudinal approach to infertility education in terms of patients who undergo assisted reproduction treatment. Materials and Methods This descriptive study enrolled 150 subjects by conveni- ence sampling of all patients who received their first assisted reproductive treatment between July and September 2015 at a referral fertility clinic, Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran. We used a questionnaire that measured fertility and infertility information (8 questions) as well as attitude toward education on the causes and treatment of infertility (5 questions). Chi-square, independent sample t test, and one way ANOVA analyses were conducted to examine differences by sex. Pinfertility treatment (3.97 ± 1.16). The lowest mean knowledge scores related to knowledge of the natural reproductive cycle (2.96 ± 1.12) and anatomy of the genital organs (2.94 ± 1.16). Most females (92.1%) and males (83.3%) were of the opinion that infertility education programs should include causes of infertility and types of treatment associated with diagnostic and laboratory procedures. No statistically significant difference existed between male and female participants (P=0.245). Conclusion Most participants in this study expressed awareness of factors that affect pregnancy and infertility treatment. It is imperative to educate and empower infertile individuals who seek reproduction treatment in terms of infertility causes and types of treatment, as well as diagnostic and laboratory procedures to enable them to make informed decisions about their assisted reproductive procedures. PMID:28367301

  12. Sperm Cryopreservation before Testicular Cancer Treatment and Its Subsequent Utilization for the Treatment of Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Žáková

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. In this study we report our results with storage of cryopreserved semen intended for preservation and subsequent infertility treatment in men with testicular cancer during the last 18 years. Methods. Cryopreserved semen of 523 men with testicular cancer was collected between October 1995 and the end of December 2012. Semen of 34 men (6.5% was used for fertilization of their partners. They underwent 57 treatment cycles with cryopreserved, fresh, and/or donor sperm. Results. A total of 557 men have decided to freeze their semen before cancer treatment. Azoospermia was diagnosed in 34 men (6.1%, and semen was cryopreserved in 532 patients. Seminoma was diagnosed in 283 men (54.1% and nonseminomatous germ cell tumors in 240 men (45.9%. 34 patients who returned for infertility treatment underwent 46 treatment cycles with cryopreserved sperm. Totally 16 pregnancies were achieved, that is, 34.8% pregnancy rate. Conclusion. The testicular cancer survivors have a good chance of fathering a child by using sperm cryopreserved prior to the oncology treatment, even when it contains only limited number of spermatozoa.

  13. Psychosocial services for couples in infertility treatment: what do couples really want?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Suzanne C; Carrier, Marie-Eve; Boucher, Marie-Eve; Whitley, Robert; Bond, Sharon; Zelkowitz, Phyllis

    2014-03-01

    To describe the psychosocial supports that infertile couples desire to help cope with infertility-related distress, which psychosocial services they sought, and the benefits and drawbacks of these services. Qualitative interview study with 32 heterosexual infertile couples seeking infertility treatment. Maximum variation sampling was used; data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Most couples desired psychosocial support, but only half of the sample sought support. Some couples met with psychologists for help with relationship conflict and coping strategies. Participants suggested peer mentoring to fulfill needs for coping, shared experience, and guidance through the treatment process. Couples also desired written information about practical and emotional aspects of treatment. Negative attitudes toward psychological counseling and a lack of information about support services prevented some couples from seeking support. Infertile couples expressed numerous needs for psychosocial supports, but often felt that supports were not available. A variety of services should be offered in order to fulfill patients' varied needs. Awareness of the reasons why patients desire psychosocial services will help clinicians to refer patients to currently available psychosocial supports, and will aid in the development of appropriate supports, including couples counseling, peer mentoring, and written information in lay language. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Role of laparoscopic surgery in treatment of infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanka Šijanović

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of laparoscopy in assisted reproduction is disputed by many. A rising problem of infertility is battled by an increasingnumber of centres for reproductive medicine in the region. Nevertheless,there is a large number of indications and conditionswhere laparoscopic surgery should not be avoided as a therapeuticchoice or an aid in assisted reproductive techniques (ART.The number of centres where laparoscopic surgery is performed is significantly higher than the number of reproductive centres; anumber of gynaecologists educated in laparoscopic gynaecologyis growing, making it more available for patients.

  15. Treatment of infertility in men with spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brackett, N.L.; Lynne, C.M.; El Dib, Hussein Ibrahim El Desouki Hussein

    2010-01-01

    dysfunction and abnormal semen constituents contribute to the problem. Despite abnormalities, sperm from men with SCI can successfully induce pregnancy. In selected couples, the simple method of intravaginal insemination is a viable option. Another option is intrauterine insemination. The efficacy...... of intrauterine insemination increases as the total motile sperm count inseminated increases. In vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection are options in cases of extremely low total motile sperm count. Reproductive outcomes for SCI male factor infertility are similar to outcomes for general male...

  16. [Diagnosis and treatment of pelvic splenosis during exploration of infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, S; Epelboin, S; Valiere, M; Chis, C; Walker, F; Luton, D

    2012-04-01

    Splenosis is the heterotopic autotransplantation of splenic tissue that usually follows traumatic splenectomy. Rare pelvic localizations are reported. We report here a case of a 36-year-old woman, followed for secondary infertility. On transvaginal ultrasound pelvic scanning hypervascular paracervical nodules were demonstrated. Pelvic splenosis was suspected regarding the patient's medical past (post-traumatic splenectomy). Surgical exploration and resection were decided considering the nodule localization, the risk during ovarian punction for IVF, and the hypothetical risk of bleeding at delivery. Generally, it is recommended to leave in place the splenic tissue, which may be immunologically functional. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Reduced protein C Global assay level in infertile women prior to IVF-ET treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Johnny S; Ben-Ami, Moshe; Izhaki, Ido; Brenner, Benjamin; Sarig, Galit

    2014-01-01

    In the last few years more robust evidence is emerging to point out at an increased rate of prematurity and low birth weight in singleton pregnancies following ART. Whether this increased rate is related to ART practice or to infertility per se, is still an open question. Our aim in this study was to explore this question by evaluating Protein C (ProC) Global assay in infertile women before ART treatment. A cohort of 95 unselected and consecutive infertile women, eligible for ART, was prospectively recruited for the study. The control group included 77 matched healthy fertile women with a history of spontaneous conceptions. Pro C Global assay was evaluated in both groups. A full thrombophilic work-up was performed in the study group. ProC Global assay level was found to be significantly lower in the study as compared to the control group, corresponding to 0.78 ± 0.16 and 0.88 ± 0.16, respectively (P women within the study group found to have APCR, factor V Leiden and high factor VIII level, any thrombophilia or combined thrombophilia when compared to women without these thrombophilic risk factors. Reduced ProC Global assay level is encountered in infertile women prior to ART treatment. This finding may suggest a unique anticoagulation Protein C pathway in infertile as compared to fertile women. Further studies are encouraged to explore this finding.

  18. In vitro sperm capacitation and transcervical intrauterine insemination for the treatment of refractory infertility: phase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, G; Knutzen, V K; Stratton, C J; Montakhab, M M; Allenson, S G

    1984-02-01

    Fourteen couples with long-standing infertility, associated with cervical mucus insufficiency, male subfertility, or unexplained infertility, participated in a therapeutic trial. The female partners, who were all ovulatory, were given human menopausal gonadotropin from day 2 of the menstrual cycle (controlled ovarian hyperstimulation). When plasma estradiol concentrations reached 1000 to 2000 pg/ml, human chorionic gonadotropin was given. Approximately 32 hours and again 70 hours thereafter, a masturbation specimen of the husband's sperm was capacitated in vitro and inseminated transcervically into the uterine cavity. Five women (35%) conceived following a single cycle of treatment. Four of the pregnancies are currently progressing normally; one ended in a spontaneous miscarriage in the early first trimester. The potential role of in vitro sperm capacitation and transcervical intrauterine insemination in the treatment of refractory infertility unrelated to female organic pelvic disease is discussed.

  19. Improving the reporting of clinical trials of infertility treatments (IMPRINT): modifying the CONSORT statement†‡.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legro, Richard S; Wu, Xiaoke; Barnhart, Kurt T; Farquhar, Cynthia; Fauser, Bart C J M; Mol, Ben

    2014-10-10

    Clinical trials testing infertility treatments often do not report on the major outcomes of interest to patients and clinicians and the public (such as live birth) nor on the harms, including maternal risks during pregnancy and fetal anomalies. This is complicated by the multiple participants in infertility trials which may include a woman (mother), a man (father), and result in a third individual if successful, their offspring (child), who is also the desired outcome of treatment. The primary outcome of interest and many adverse events occur after cessation of infertility treatment and during pregnancy and the puerperium, which create a unique burden of follow-up for clinical trial investigators and participants. In 2013, because of the inconsistencies in trial reporting and the unique aspects of infertility trials not adequately addressed by existing Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statements, we convened a consensus conference in Harbin, China, with the aim of planning modifications to the CONSORT checklist to improve the quality of reporting of clinical trials testing infertility treatment. The consensus group recommended that the preferred primary outcome of all infertility trials is live birth (defined as any delivery of a live infant ≥20 weeks gestations) or cumulative live birth, defined as the live birth per women over a defined time period (or number of treatment cycles). In addition, harms to all participants should be systematically collected and reported, including during the intervention, any resulting pregnancy, and during the neonatal period. Routine information should be collected and reported on both male and female participants in the trial. We propose to track the change in quality that these guidelines may produce in published trials testing infertility treatments. Our ultimate goal is to increase the transparency of benefits and risks of infertility treatments to provide better medical care to affected individuals and

  20. Social Perception of Infertility and Its Treatment in Late Medieval Italy: Margherita Datini, an Italian Merchant’s Wife

    OpenAIRE

    Jong Kuk NAM

    2016-01-01

    Because the perception of infertility in medieval Europe ranged from the extremely religious view of it as a malediction of God or the devil’s work, to the reasonable medical conception of it as a sort of disease to treat, it is very difficult to determine the general attitudes of ordinary people towards infertility. This article seeks to elucidate the common social perception of infertility and its treatment in late medieval Europe by analyzing the case of Margherita Datini, an Italian merch...

  1. LASER THERAPY TECHNIQUES FOR THE TREATMENT OF MALE INFERTILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Borovets

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Male infertility is a multifactorial syndrome, which includes a wide range of disorders. It is a symptom of many different pathological conditions affecting both the reproductive and other body systems: endocrine, nervous, blood-vascular, and immune systems. Low level laser therapy is a method of modern physiotherapy, in which the impact is carried out by lowintensity laser illumination (LILI. It is widely used in all areas of modern medicine, due to its high efficiency, simplicity of use, the absence of contraindications and side effects. The results of clinical studies on the subject of the article were analyzed, various variants of low level laser therapy techniqueswere suggested: locally, rectally, laser acupuncture, ILBI (intravenous laser blood illumination, on the projection of various organs, paravertebrally and etc.

  2. Does infertility cause marital benefit? An epidemiological study of 2250 women and men in fertility treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lone; Holstein, Bjørn; Christensen, Ulla

    2005-01-01

    the infertility as a secret, difficult marital communication, and using active-avoidance coping (e.g., avoid being with pregnant women or children, turning to work to take mind off things) were among men significant predictors for low marital benefit. No significant predictors were identified among women......OBJECTIVE: To investigate (i) marital benefit, e.g., that infertility has strengthen the marriage and brought the partners closer together among people beginning fertility treatment and (ii) communication and coping strategies as predictors of marital benefit 12 months later. METHODS: A prospective...

  3. An Analysis of the Concept of Partnership in the Couples Undergoing Infertility Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Liying; Loke, Alice Yuen

    2016-01-01

    The elements of a partnership in the couples undergoing infertility treatment are not well understood. This article aims to fill the gap by using Rodger's evolutionary method of concept analysis. The attributes of the concept partnership that were identified are a process of joint hardship, sharing, intracouple communication, and mutual support. The antecedents are love and attraction for each other, agreement, and interpersonal skills. The consequences are marital benefit, improvement in psychological status, and quality of life. A middle-range model for partnership in relationship to infertile couples is proposed. The understanding of the phenomenon of partnership will enable the researchers to develop interventions, identify the appropriate assessment instruments, and to determine directions for future research on effort to support infertile couples through their hardship.

  4. Hysteroscopic polypectomy prior to infertility treatment: A cost analysis and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouhayar, Youssef; Yin, Ophelia; Mumford, Sunni L; Segars, James H

    2017-06-01

    The cost of fertility treatment is expensive and interventions that reduce cost can lead to greater efficiency and fewer embryos transferred. Endometrial polyps contribute to infertility and are frequently removed prior to infertility treatment. It is unclear whether polypectomy reduces fertility treatment cost and if so, the magnitude of cost reduction afforded by the procedure. The aim of this study was to determine whether performing office or operative hysteroscopic polypectomy prior to infertility treatment would be cost-effective. PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane libraries were used to identify publications reporting pregnancy rates after hysteroscopic polypectomy. Studies were required to have a polypectomy treatment group and control group of patients with polyps that were not resected. The charges of infertility treatments and polypectomy were obtained through infertility organizations and a private healthcare cost reporting website. These charges were applied to a decision tree model over the range of pregnancy rates observed in the representative studies to calculate an average cost per clinical or ongoing pregnancy. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to assess cost savings of polypectomy over a range of pregnancy rates and polypectomy costs. Pre-treatment office or operative hysteroscopic polypectomy ultimately saved €6658 ($7480) and €728 ($818), respectively, of the average cost per clinical pregnancy in women treated with four cycles of intrauterine insemination. Polypectomy prior to intrauterine insemination was cost-effective for clinical pregnancy rates greater than 30.2% for office polypectomy and 52.6% for operative polypectomy and for polypectomy price cost per ongoing pregnancy for in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection treated women and was cost-effective for ongoing pregnancy rates greater than 26.4% (office polypectomy) and 31.7% (operative polypectomy) and polypectomy price cost-effective when performed prior to both

  5. Seminal Helicobacter pylori treatment improves sperm motility in infertile asthenozoospermic men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Garem, Yehia; El-Sawy, Mohamed; Mostafa, Taymour

    2014-12-01

    To assess the effect of treatment of seminal Helicobacter pylori in infertile asthenozoospermic men. In all, 223 infertile asthenozoospermic men were consecutively selected. They were subjected to history taking, clinical examination, semen analysis, and estimation of H pylori IgA antibodies in their seminal fluid. Infertile men with high seminal H pylori IgA were subjected to triple drug treatment, omeprazole, 20 mg; tinidazole, 500 mg; and clarithromycin, 250 mg twice a day for 2 weeks. Semen analysis as well as H pylori IgA antibodies was estimated after 3 months. In all, 22 of 223 men (9.87%) demonstrated H pylori IgA antibodies in their seminal plasma. After treatment, mean seminal H pylori IgA levels demonstrated significant decrease (1.55 ± 0.4 vs 0.52 ± 0.26; 95% confidence interval, 0.83-1.21; P = .001) concomitant with improved progressive as well as nonprogressive sperm motility. H pylori IgA antibodies demonstrated significant negative correlation with progressive sperm motility, nonprogressive sperm motility, normal sperm morphology, and significant positive correlation with immotile sperm motility. H pylori treatment significantly improves sperm motility in infertile asthenozoospermic men with elevated seminal H pylori IgA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Looking at Infertility Treatment through The Lens of The Meaning of Life: The Effect of Group Logotherapy on Psychological Distress in Infertile Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosalanejad, Leili; Khodabakshi Koolee, Anahita

    2013-01-01

    Women in particular suffer from psychological stress when diagnosed with infertility. Psychosocial interventions are known to not only prevent and lessen various mental problems, but also to play a positive role in physical health and pregnancy rates. The aim of this study is to determine the unique impact of spiritual psychotherapy on concerns about infertility and their perceived psychological stresses. This study was a randomized clinical trial. The study population included nearly 800 infertile couples who attended the Maternity and Gynecology Clinic of Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Jahrom, Iran. We enrolled65 people who were randomly divided into two groups, experimental (n=33)and control (n=32). The experimental group received spiritual group psychotherapy counseling for 12 sessions, 2 hours per week for a 3 months period. The control group did not receive any intervention, but due to ethical considerations, we gave a presentation (one session) about infertility treatment for this group after the research process was completed. We used two questionnaires to obtain data, the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ) and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). Data analysis was done by descriptive and analytic statistics using SPSS 16 software. Psychological intervention in the treatment group significantly decreased the PSWQ (p=0.004). There were significant differences in the mean score of the PSWQ in both groups as determined by analysis of covariance (ANCOVA; p=0.009). Psychological intervention in the treatment group decreased the level of perceived stress, when compared with the control group. According to ANCOVA there were significant differences between the mean PSS scores of both groups (p=0.01). Logotherapy is related to stress reduction and can decrease psychiatric symptoms of worry and perceived stress. This approach tends to improve an infertile person's ability to deal with their problem of finding the meaning of life. Thus it can be concluded that

  7. Looking at Infertility Treatment through The Lens of The Meaning of Life: The Effect of Group Logotherapy on Psychological Distress in Infertile Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahita Khodabakshi Koolee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Women in particular suffer from psychological stress when diagnosed with infertility.Psychosocial interventions are known to not only prevent and lessen various mental problems,but also to play a positive role in physical health and pregnancy rates. The aim of this study isto determine the unique impact of spiritual psychotherapy on concerns about infertility and theirperceived psychological stresses.Materials and Methods: This study was a randomized clinical trial. The study population includednearly 800 infertile couples who attended the Maternity and Gynecology Clinic of Jahrom Universityof Medical Sciences, Jahrom, Iran. We enrolled65 people who were randomly divided into twogroups, experimental (n=33and control (n=32. The experimental group received spiritual grouppsychotherapy counseling for 12 sessions, 2 hours per week for a 3 months period. The controlgroup did not receive any intervention, but due to ethical considerations, we gave a presentation (onesession about infertility treatment for this group after the research process was completed. We usedtwo questionnaires to obtain data, the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ and Perceived StressScale (PSS. Data analysis was done by descriptive and analytic statistics using SPSS 16 software.Results: Psychological intervention in the treatment group significantly decreased the PSWQ(p=0.004. There were significant differences in the mean score of the PSWQ in both groups asdetermined by analysis of covariance (ANCOVA; p=0.009. Psychological intervention in thetreatment group decreased the level of perceived stress, when compared with the control group.According to ANCOVA there were significant differences between the mean PSS scores of bothgroups (p=0.01.Conclusion: Logotherapy is related to stress reduction and can decrease psychiatric symptomsof worry and perceived stress. This approach tends to improve an infertile person's ability todeal with their problem of finding the

  8. Management of Unexplained Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Kan

    2014-06-01

    In the management of the unexplained infertility, the initial treatment must be observational approach and changing the life style. It is demonstrated that using only the clomiphene citrate or intrauterine insemination is not effective. For this reason, as the patients age and ovarian reserve considered, after the observational approach, the initial treatment must be the combination of clomiphene citrate and intrauterine insemination. With this approach, pregnancy rate is rises to 10 percent for a cycle. Management wise, choosing the cheapest effective treatment for increased fertilization should be the priority, before moving onto more expensive and aggresive approaches. Apart from the diagnostic work-up, which more or less the same for every patient, treatment protocol should be individualised for every infertile couple. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(3.000: 506-518

  9. Treating Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patients Search FAQs Treating Infertility Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy Book Treating Infertility Patient Education FAQs Treating Infertility Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Treating ...

  10. Evaluating Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patients Search FAQs Evaluating Infertility Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy Book Evaluating Infertility Patient Education FAQs Evaluating Infertility Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Evaluating ...

  11. Studying the Relationship between the Attitude to Infertility and Coping Strategies in Couples Undergoing Assisted Reproductive Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Fatemeh; Kazemi, Ashraf; Ureizi-Samani, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Using appropriate coping strategies has a positive influence on moderating mental pressures caused by infertility and the stress during treatment. Using these strategies needs personal skills and they could be influenced by individual's inner psychological and environmental factors. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between the attitude toward infertility and coping strategies considering the couple's social and financial situation. This was a cross sectional study conducted on 133 volunteered couples undergoing assisted reproductive treatment. Coping strategies and the attitude toward infertility were assessed using a self-report questionnaire. Higher scores of attitude indicated positive attitudes. Data was analyzed using paired-samples t test and multiple regression model. Independent from demographic information and causes of infertility, using self-blame and self-focused rumination coping strategies were negatively related to attitude toward infertility in both men and women (pstrategies.

  12. Infertility stress in couples undergoing intrauterine insemination and in vitro fertilization treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Awtani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The main aim of the study was to assess the stress levels of husbands and wives undergoing intrauterine insemination (IUI and in vitro fertilization (IVF treatments, and also to observe whether the stress levels differed between the methods of treatments. Materials and Methods: This research focused on 120 infertile couples who underwent IUI and In Vitro Fertilization-Intra Sperm Cytoplasmic sperm Injection (IVF-ICSI at an infertility clinic from April 2014 to November 2014. Sixty couples who underwent each method of treatment were selected using purposive sampling technique. Fertility Problem Inventory (Newton et al., 1999 was used to collect the data after obtaining their consent. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was performed at descriptive (mean, standard deviation, and Kolmogorov test and inferential (analysis of variance, ANOVA levels. Results and Conclusion: The prevalence of global stress was very high in couples undergoing IUI and IVF treatments, as found by descriptive analysis [mean = 149.95, standard deviation (SD = 29.76]. Considering the various subscales, stress related to the need for parenthood was found to be high (mean = 45.95, SD = 9.53. Infertility stress (global was higher among wives when compared to their husbands (f = 9.408; P = 0.002, and the same was noted on the domains of need for parenthood (f = 10.145; P = 0.002, social concern (f = 11.107; P = 0.001, and sexual concern (f = 4.013; P = 0.046. No difference in the levels of global stress was observed when both the modes of treatments were compared (f = 0.180, P = 0.672. For couples, infertility stress showed no significant difference irrespective of whether they underwent IUI or IVF.

  13. Infertility-related stress in men and women predicts treatment outcome 1 year later

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boivin, J; Schmidt, Lone

    2005-01-01

    stress, psychology, psychosocial, reproduction, marital, gender, counselling, infertility, in vitro fertilization, fertility......stress, psychology, psychosocial, reproduction, marital, gender, counselling, infertility, in vitro fertilization, fertility...

  14. Are women with obesity and infertility willing to attempt weight loss prior to fertility treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacha, C R; Page, C M; Goldman, R H; Ginsburg, E S; Zera, C A

    To assess attitudes towards weight loss interventions in patients seeking infertility treatment. We evaluated prior weight loss experiences, attitudes towards future interventions by body mass index (BMI), and willingness to delay fertility treatment for weight loss interventions stratified by BMI using logistic regression amongst women ≤45years old with infertility over three months or recurrent pregnancy loss. The average age of our convenience sample of respondents (148 of 794 eligible women, 19%) was 34.5 years old, with a mean BMI of 26.7±7.4kg/m 2 , including 37 with a BMI >30kg/m 2 (25%). Most women had attempted conception over 1year. The majority of women with overweight or obesity were attempting weight loss at the time of survey completion (69%). While 47% of these women reported interest in a supervised medical weight loss program, 92% of overweight women and 84% of women with obesity were not willing to delay fertility treatment more than 3 months to attempt weight loss. Most women with obesity and infertility in our population are unwilling to postpone fertility treatment for weight loss interventions. Copyright © 2017 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Surgical treatment of male infertility in the era of intracytoplasmic sperm injection - new insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro C. Esteves

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Assisted reproductive technology is an evolving area, and several adjuvant procedures have been created to increase a couple's chance of conceiving. For male infertility, the current challenges are to properly accommodate old and new techniques that are both cost-effective and evidence-based. In this context, urologists are expected to diagnose, counsel, provide medical or surgical treatment whenever possible and/or correctly refer male patients for assisted conception. Urologists are sometimes part of a multiprofessional team in an assisted reproduction unit and are responsible for the above-cited tasks as well as the surgical retrieval of sperm from either the epididymides or testicles. We present a comprehensive review of the surgical treatment options for infertile males, including the perioperative planning and prognostic aspects, with an emphasis on the role of microsurgery in the optimization of treatment results. This review also discusses current techniques for sperm retrieval that are used in association with assisted reproductive technology and includes sperm retrieval success rates according to the technique and the type of azoospermia. New insights are provided with regard to each surgical treatment option in view of the availability of assisted conception to overcome male infertility.

  16. Surgical treatment of male infertility in the era of intracytoplasmic sperm injection – new insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Sandro C.; Miyaoka, Ricardo; Agarwal, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Assisted reproductive technology is an evolving area, and several adjuvant procedures have been created to increase a couple's chance of conceiving. For male infertility, the current challenges are to properly accommodate old and new techniques that are both cost-effective and evidence-based. In this context, urologists are expected to diagnose, counsel, provide medical or surgical treatment whenever possible and/or correctly refer male patients for assisted conception. Urologists are sometimes part of a multiprofessional team in an assisted reproduction unit and are responsible for the above-cited tasks as well as the surgical retrieval of sperm from either the epididymides or testicles. We present a comprehensive review of the surgical treatment options for infertile males, including the perioperative planning and prognostic aspects, with an emphasis on the role of microsurgery in the optimization of treatment results. This review also discusses current techniques for sperm retrieval that are used in association with assisted reproductive technology and includes sperm retrieval success rates according to the technique and the type of azoospermia. New insights are provided with regard to each surgical treatment option in view of the availability of assisted conception to overcome male infertility. PMID:21915501

  17. Does infertility cause marital benefit? An epidemiological study of 2250 women and men in fertility treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lone; Holstein, Bjørn; Christensen, Ulla

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate (i) marital benefit, e.g., that infertility has strengthen the marriage and brought the partners closer together among people beginning fertility treatment and (ii) communication and coping strategies as predictors of marital benefit 12 months later. METHODS: A prospective...... the infertility as a secret, difficult marital communication, and using active-avoidance coping (e.g., avoid being with pregnant women or children, turning to work to take mind off things) were among men significant predictors for low marital benefit. No significant predictors were identified among women....... CONCLUSION: Fertility patients frequently experience marital benefit. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: The study provides information about where to intervene with male fertility patients in order to increase their marital benefit after medically unsuccessful treatment....

  18. Treatment of Recurrent Ovarian Cysts and Primary Infertility by Iranian Traditional Medicine: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Mehdi; Setayesh, Mohammad; Mokaberinejad, Roshanak

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a medical and psychosocial problem with a high prevalence. There are different treatments for this problem in Iranian traditional medicine. A 28-year-old woman presented with the complaints of 4 emergency operations of the left ovarian cyst during 4 years and infertility. Diagnostic laparoscopy showed an ovarian cyst, adhesion, and endometriosis. Hysteroscopy was unremarkable. After 2 months of letrozole administration, the ovarian cyst ruptured again. Considering the failure of conventional treatments, Iranian traditional medicine products were administered to the patient. After 3 months, the patient conceived and delivered a healthy boy through normal vaginal delivery. These compounds may help with pregnancy as a uterine tonic, vitalizer, and aphrodisiac with brain and cardiac tonic properties. PMID:27932523

  19. Infertility associated with precoital ovulation in observant Jewish couples; prevalence, treatment, efficacy and side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haimov-Kochman, Ronit; Adler, Chana; Ein-Mor, Eliana; Rosenak, Daniel; Hurwitz, Arye

    2012-02-01

    Religious (halachic*) infertility' results from precoital ovulation prior to immersion in a ritual bath (mikveh) 7 days after menstruation, as mandated by Jewish religious law. Previous authors recommended treatment with estradiol to postpone ovulation and enhance pregnancy rates. To evaluate the prevalence of halachic infertility in an ultra-Orthodox jewish community, and assess the efficacy of estradiol treatment in postponing ovulation and increasing pregnancy rates. We reviewed 88 cycles, of which 23 were control cycles and 65 estradiol-treated cycles, and analyzed the files of 23 women who were treated with 6 mg estradiol/day from day 1 for 5 days of the cycle. The prevalence of precoital ovulation in the infertile population was 21%. Most of the patients (94%) ovulated before day 13 of the cycle. A short follicular phase due to low ovarian reserve orthyroid endocrinopathy was noted in 12% of the patients. While 64% of the women reported consultation with a Rabbinate authority, 68% of the patients sought medical therapy. Estradiol postponed ovulation for at least one day in 89% of the treatment cycles. Ovulation post-mikveh occurred in 73% of estradiol-treated cycles. The pregnancy rate was 12.5% per cycle and the cumulative pregnancy rate 35% per woman. Half the patients reported spotting during estradiol-treated cycles, and this postponed coitus. Precoital ovulation is a major reason for infertility among observant couples attending fertility clinics. Estradiol treatment is effective in delaying ovulation and restoring fecundity; however, it causes some adverse effects that may decrease its effectiveness.

  20. Endometriosis-associated infertility: aspects of pathophysiological mechanisms and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanbo, Tom; Fedorcsak, Peter

    2017-06-01

    Endometriosis is a common condition in women of reproductive age. In addition to pain, endometriosis may also reduce fertility. The causes of infertility in women with endometriosis may range from anatomical distortions due to adhesions and fibrosis to endocrine abnormalities and immunological disturbances. In some cases, the various pathophysiological disturbances seem to interact through mechanisms so far not fully understood. Whether surgery should be offered as a treatment option in endometriosis-associated infertility has become controversial, partly due to its modest or undocumented effect. Medical or hormonal treatment alone has little or no effect and should only be used in conjunction with assisted reproductive technology (ART). Of the various methods of ART, intrauterine insemination, due to its simplicity, can be recommended in women with minimal or mild peritoneal endometriosis, even though insemination may yield a lower success rate than in women without endometriosis. In vitro fertilization (IVF) is an effective treatment option in less-advanced disease stages, and the success rates are similar to the results in other causes of infertility. However, women with more advanced stages of endometriosis have lower success rates with IVF. © 2016 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  1. Women’s perceptions and experiences of the challenges in the process of male infertility treatment: A qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghipour, Ali; Karimi, Fatemeh Zahra; Roudsari, Robab Latifnejad; Kimiaei, Seyed Ali; Mazlom, Seyed Reza; Amirian, Maliheh

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite the fact that both men and women are equally subject to infertility, it is usually women who bear the burden of treatment and its consequences, even in cases of male infertility. Therefore, it is more necessary to recognize their health problems in order to help them. Aim To explore women’s perceptions and experiences of the challenges they face in the process of male infertility treatment. Methods This qualitative study was conducted during 2014–2015 using content analysis. Thirty semi-structured interviews were conducted with women whose husbands suffered from male infertility. Purposive sampling was conducted until data saturation was achieved. All interviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using conventional content analysis adopted by Graneheim and Lundman. Results From data analysis, the major category of “treatment-related stresses” and four subcategories of “high treatment expenses”, “inefficiency of healthcare system”, “being captive in the infertility treatment” and “treatment failure” emerged. Conclusion Experiences of women who face male infertility indicate their various concerns in the process of treatment. Therefore, it is required to develop emotional and financial support for the clients and to promote their quality of healthcare services. In addition, awareness of treatment challenges of these women can assist proper planning to promote the quality of services they need. PMID:28713506

  2. Clinical application of an improved utero-operator in the interventional treatment of infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yaoming; Zhang Guangfu; Li Detai

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of an improved utero-operator in the interventional treatment of tube obstruction infertility, and to make a comparison with other methods. Methods: One hundred cases of infertile women with tubal obstruction were divided into 3 groups and treated separately under TV fluoroscopy with 3 different methods and follow-up examination was made up to 24 months. Among the 100 cases, 60 cases were treated with improved utero-operator (109 tubes), 20 with Cook cupped coaxial catheter (36 tubes), and 20 with emulsoid double-cavity tube (20 tubes). Result: Among the improved utero-operator group, Cook cupped coaxial catheter group, and emulsoid double-cavity tube group, the successful rate of selective catheterization was 92.7%, 80.6% and 80.0%, respectively. The successful rate of recanalization was 72.3%, 72.4% and 71.4%, respectively. The pregnancy rate was 36.4%, 35.7% and 36.4%, respectively. Improved utero-operator has the highest successful rate in selective catheterization (x 2 = 4.275, P < 0.05). Conclusion: Improved utero-operator has a high successful rate of selective catheterization in selective salpingography and treatment of tube obstruction infertility, and it is an easy and stable method which spends less time and received less X-ray. It is an ideal treating method at the moment

  3. Treatment of infertility in men with spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brackett, N.L.; Lynne, C.M.; El Dib, Hussein Ibrahim El Desouki Hussein

    2010-01-01

    is not possible, prostate massage is an alternative. Surgical sperm retrieval should be considered as a last resort when other methods fail. Most men with SCI have a unique semen profile characterized by normal sperm count but abnormally low sperm motility. Scientific investigations indicate that accessory gland......, and vacuum constriction devices. In anejaculatory patients who wish to father children, semen retrieval is necessary. Penile vibratory stimulation is recommended as the first line of treatment. Patients who fail penile vibratory stimulation can be referred for electroejaculation. If this approach...

  4. Evaluation of factors associated with the anxiety and depression of female infertility patients

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    Ogawa Mariko

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because the primary aim of infertility treatment is to achieve pregnancy, mental health care during this treatment is often neglected. However, the inability to conceive children is stressful for couples throughout the world. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate factors related to the anxiety and depression of female infertility patients. Methods Participants included 83 Japanese women who initially visited the Reproduction Center of the Tokyo Dental College Ichikawa General Hospital to undergo testing and receive infertility treatment between February and April 2008. We administered two psychological tests, the Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS test and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS test. We then examined the association of the test results with age, pregnancy and delivery history, employment status, duration of infertility, infertility treatment history, and male infertility. Results As patient age increased, total HADS and depression scores also increased. No correlation was observed between duration of infertility and SDS or HADS scores. Results were similar when the presence and absence of delivery history was compared. Patients who underwent infertility treatment were more likely to have high HADS depression scores compared to patients who had not undergone treatment. Additionally, patients whose husbands were infertile had significantly lower total HADS and anxiety scores than those whose husbands were not infertile. Conclusions Age and male infertility are factors that influence the presence of anxiety and depression in female infertility patients.

  5. Social Perception of Infertility and Its Treatment in Late Medieval Italy: Margherita Datini, an Italian Merchant's Wife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jong Kuk

    2016-12-01

    Because the perception of infertility in medieval Europe ranged from the extremely religious view of it as a malediction of God or the devil's work, to the reasonable medical conception of it as a sort of disease to treat, it is very difficult to determine the general attitudes of ordinary people towards infertility. This article seeks to elucidate the common social perception of infertility and its treatment in late medieval Europe by analyzing the case of Margherita Datini, an Italian merchant's wife who lived in the 1400s. It relies heavily on the documents left by her and her husband, Francesco Datini; the couple left many records, including letters of correspondence between them. Margherita and those around her regarded infertility not as the devil's curse or a punishment by God but as a disease that can be cured. Margherita and her husband, Francesco, tried hard to cure their infertility. They received treatment and prescriptions from several doctors while also relying on folk remedies, religious therapies, and even magical remedies. The comparative analysis of Datini documents, medical books, and theoretical treatises or prescriptive essays by clerics suggests that the general perception of infertility in medieval Europe was located between the extremely religious and modern medical conceptions of it.

  6. Social Perception of Infertility and Its Treatment in Late Medieval Italy: Margherita Datini, an Italian Merchant’s Wife

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Kuk NAM

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Because the perception of infertility in medieval Europe ranged from the extremely religious view of it as a malediction of God or the devil’s work, to the reasonable medical conception of it as a sort of disease to treat, it is very difficult to determine the general attitudes of ordinary people towards infertility. This article seeks to elucidate the common social perception of infertility and its treatment in late medieval Europe by analyzing the case of Margherita Datini, an Italian merchant’s wife who lived in the 1400s. It relies heavily on the documents left by her and her husband, Francesco Datini; the couple left many records, including letters of correspondence between them. Margherita and those around her regarded infertility not as the devil’s curse or a punishment by God but as a disease that can be cured. Margherita and her husband, Francesco, tried hard to cure their infertility. They received treatment and prescriptions from several doctors while also relying on folk remedies, religious therapies, and even magical remedies. The comparative analysis of Datini documents, medical books, and theoretical treatises or prescriptive essays by clerics suggests that the general perception of infertility in medieval Europe was located between the extremely religious and modern medical conceptions of it.

  7. The effect of health-promoting lifestyle education on the treatment of unexplained female infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Yeliz; Kizilkaya Beji, Nezihe; Aydin, Yunus; Hassa, Hikmet

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to reveal the 1) awareness, 2) improvements of a health-promoting lifestyle on women with unexplained infertility having at least one of the risk factors that have been indicated to negatively affect fertility (smoking, body mass index lower than 18.5kg/m 2 and more than 25kg/m 2 , over-exercising or not exercising at all, alcohol consumption, caffeine consumption of more than 300mg/day, and high levels of stress) by means of health-promoting lifestyle education, 3) the effect of this improvement on the result of assisted-reproduction treatment in terms of clinical pregnancy. 64 women diagnosed with unexplained infertility were divided into a group receiving Health-Promoting Lifestyle (HPL) education and a control group. 1) Risk Factors Questionnaire (BMI, Smoking, Alcohol, Stress, Exercise, Caffeine), 2) Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale, 3) Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II. The health promoting lifestyle was given to the education group. The Risk Factors Questionnaire; Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale and Healthcare-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II were also administered after the first-second-third month of education but before ART treatment. A statistically significant decrease was found in the average levels of four variables as; BMI (pfactors that females had between the first and third interview decreased significantly. Clinical pregnancy rate after ART was 12 (46.1%) and 5 (19.2%) in education and control group consequently (p=0.02). Health-promoting lifestyle education was found to be effective in reducing the lifestyle risk factors for infertility and increasing the success rates of assisted reproduction treatment by correcting these risk factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Congenital malformations among babies born following letrozole or clomiphene for infertility treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sunita; Ghosh, Sanghamitra; Singh, Soma; Chakravarty, Astha; Ganesh, Ashalatha; Rajani, Shweta; Chakravarty, B N

    2014-01-01

    Clomiphene citrate (CC) is the first line drug for ovulation induction but because of its peripheral antiestrogenic effect, letrozole was introduced as the 2nd line drug. It lacks the peripheral antiestrogenic effect and is associated with similar or even higher pregnancy rates. Since letrozole is a drug for breast cancer, its use for the purpose of ovulation induction became controversial in the light of studies indicating an increased incidence of congenital malformations. To evaluate and compare the incidence of congenital malformations among offsprings of infertile couples who conceived naturally or with clomiphene citrate or letrozole treatment. A retrospective cohort study done at a tertiary infertility centre. A total of 623 children born to infertile women who conceived naturally or following clomiphene citrate or letrozole treatment were included in this study. Subjects were sorted out from medical files of both mother and newborn and follow up study was done based on the information provided by parents through telephonic conversations. Babies with suspected anomaly were called and examined by specialists for the presence of major and minor congenital malformations. Other outcomes like multiple pregnancy rate and birth weight were also studied. Overall, congenital malformations, chromosomal abnormalities were found in 5 out of 171 (2.9%) babies in natural conception group and 5 out of 201 babies in the letrozole group (2.5%) and in 10 of 251 babies in the CC group (3.9%). There was no significant difference in the overall rate of congenital malformations among children born to mothers who conceived naturally or after letrozole or CC treatment. Congenital malformations have been found to be comparable following natural conception, letrozole and clomiphene citrate. Thus, the undue fear against letrozole may be uncalled for.

  9. An algorithm for treatment of infertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer F. Kawwass

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a common condition with both a reproductive and metabolic phenotype. Women with PCOS often seek care because of infertility or menstrual cycle irregularities that result from chronic anovulation interspersed with occasional ovulatory cycles. Initially, it is important to delineate a differential diagnosis for oligo- or amenorrhea and to evaluate for disorders that may “masquerade” as PCOS. If fertility is a desired goal, then it is critical to optimize health conditions that impact fertility and gestation. Lifestyle modifications, including nutritional counseling and weight loss, should be a part of all treatment plans. Even minimal (5% weight loss in obese women with PCOS improves both ovulation and pregnancy rates. The first line of treatment for ovulation induction remains the selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM clomiphene citrate. The role of insulin sensitizers, particularly metformin, remains unclear. A recent consensus panel recommended against its routine use in the absence of an elevated glucose or hemoglobin A1c. If a woman fails to achieve pregnancy after a trial of weight loss and six ovulatory cycles induced by clomiphene citrate, then ovulation induction with exogenous gonadotropin, with or without timed intrauterine insemination, or in vitro fertilitization, is a reasonable next step. Women with PCOS are particularly prone to excessive follicle development and are at increased risk for ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS. Although limited data exist comparing approaches to ovulation induction or controlled ovarian stimulation in women with PCOS, the American Society for Reproductive Medicine recommends the use of “step-up” or “step-down” protocols in which a low dose of exogenous FSH or combined gonadotropins are employed in an attempt to constrain ovarian responsiveness. In vitro fertilization allows for the transfer of only one embryo or for cryopreservation of all

  10. General psychopathology, anxiety, depression and self-esteem in couples undergoing infertility treatment: a comparative study between men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kissi, Yousri; Romdhane, Asma Ben; Hidar, Samir; Bannour, Souhail; Ayoubi Idrissi, Khadija; Khairi, Hedi; Ben Hadj Ali, Bechir

    2013-04-01

    To compare measures of psychological distress between men and women undergoing ART in the Unit of Reproductive Medicine "UMR" in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at "Farhat Hached" Hospital in Sousse, Tunisia. We conducted a gender comparative study of psychological profile in infertile couples. Recruitment was done during period from January to May 2009. 100 infertile couples with primary infertility were recruited. Scores of general psychopathology, depression, anxiety and self-esteem were evaluated. We administrated questionnaires on psychological factors among infertile couples before starting a new infertility treatment cycle. Psychological factors included the symptom check-list (SCL-90-R), the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HAD-S) and the Rosenberg self-esteem scale (RSE). Infertile women had higher scores than their spouses in the three global scores of the SCL-90-R and in several items such as somatisation, obsessive symptoms, interpersonal sensitivity and phobias. Scores of HADS were higher among women for both depression and anxiety. Scores of self-esteem were lower among women. Women endorsed higher psychological distress than men across multiple symptoms domains: general psychopathology, anxiety, depression and self esteem. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Dienogest treatment after ovarian endometrioma removal in infertile women prior to IVF.

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    Muller, Valeria; Kogan, Igor; Yarmolinskaya, Maria; Niauri, Dariko; Gzgzyan, Alexandr; Aylamazyan, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Severe forms of genital endometriosis are known to be associated with infertility and its subsequent treatment failure. Both gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs (a-GnRH) and dienogest have been suggested as additional hormone therapy for patients with endometriomas. However, the result of hormonal suppression before an in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle remains undetermined. A prospective cohort study of 144 infertile women planning IVF after laparoscopic surgery of ovarian endometriomas was conducted at our department in 2012-2015. Patients were divided into three groups: group I (N = 38) with dienogest course, group II (N = 70) with a-GnRH group III (N = 70) without any hormonal therapy within 6 months preceding IVF. The study groups did not differ by removed endometriomas size and ovarian reserve indicators. The gonadotropin dose per Cycle was higher, while the number of retrieved oocytes was lower in group III patients (p dienogest pretreatment, clinical pregnancy rate was 2.5 times (44.7% versus 16.7%, p = .012) and delivery rate - three times higher (36.8% versus 11.1%, p = .013) as compared with those from group III. The present study confirms the necessity of pre-cycle medical interventions in women with ovarian forms of endometriosis undergoing IVF. We suggest dienogest to be possibly more efficient treatment option for this kind of patients.

  12. Cryopreservation of very low numbers of spermatozoa from male patients undergoing infertility treatment using agarose capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Shota; Tokuoka, Susumu; Abe, Hiroyuki; Araki, Yasuyuki; Araki, Yasuhisa

    2017-07-01

    This study tried to cryopreserve low numbers of spermatozoa from men undergoing infertility treatments by inserting into agarose capsules. The capsules were transferred into a drop of cryoprotectant solution and injected 3-4 motile spermatozoa that were selected by the swim-up method by conventional intracytoplasmic sperm injection. These capsules were put on a Cryotop ® and frozen in liquid nitrogen vapor, and then submerged into liquid nitrogen and subsequently thawed and recovered. The motile spermatozoa in the capsules were counted. Eventually, we cryopreserved 2142 motile spermatozoa in 702 agarose capsules from 26 male patients and 1356 (63%) spermatozoa maintained their motility after thawing. The spermatozoa motility rates after thawing (MRAT) ranged from 20.0% (5/25) to 95.1% (58/61) among patients. The median MRAT was 68.3% (interquartile range 46.1-75.7). The total number of motile spermatozoa collected by swim-up method strongly correlated with MRAT (r = 0.746). It was possible to cryopreserve spermatozoa from male patients undergoing infertility treatment using agarose capsules. However, there were wide differences in MRAT among patients. It seems the spermatozoa from semen where there were many motile spermatozoa may have higher freezing resistance. Further studies using this method in cryptozoospermic semen, testicular and epididymal spermatozoa are required.

  13. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Holistic Pelvic Examination and Holistic Treatment of Infertility

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    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In clinical holistic practice, it is recommended that ample time is spent with the gynecological or pelvic examination, especially in cases of women with suspected old emotional traumas following early childhood cases of incest or sexual abuse. The holistic principles of holding and processing should be followed with the purpose of healing the patient, re-establishing the natural relationship with the body, sexuality, and reproductive organs. Sexual violations are often forcibly repressed. It appears that the tissues that were touched during the violation often bear the trauma. It is characteristic of these patients that their love lives are often problematic and do not provide the necessary support to heal the old wounds in the soul and therapy is therefore indicated. When this is concerned with the reproductive organs, it poses particular difficulties, as the therapy can easily be experienced as a repetition of the original violation, not least due to the risk of projection and transference. There is, therefore, a need for a procedure that is familiar to and safe for the patient, for all work that involves therapeutic touching of sexual organs over and beyond what is standard medical practice. This paper presents one case story of earlier child sexual abuse and one case of temporary infertility. We have established a procedure of slow or extended pelvic examination, where time is spent to make the patient familiar with the examination and accept the whole procedure, before the treatment is initiated. The procedure is carried out with a nurse, and 3 h are set aside. It includes conversation on the present condition and symptoms; concept of boundaries; about how earlier assaults can be projected into the present; establishment of the therapeutic room as a safe place; exercises on when to say “stop”; therapeutic touch; visualization of the pelvic examination step by step beforehand; touching on the outside of the clothes with repetition of the

  14. Assessment of Anxiety in Pregnancy Following Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) and Associated Infertility Factors in Women Commencing Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemieh, Chehreha; Neisani Samani, Leila; Taghinejad, Hamid

    2013-12-01

    Successful pregnancy is the ultimate goal of almost all couples. However, this pleasant event is usually accompanied psychological and behavioral changes and can result in stress in women, particularly women who pregnant by assisted reproductive technology methods (ARTs). This study aims to determine the anxiety level during pregnancy and its relation with infertility factors in women who has been pregnant by Assisted Reproduction Technology (ART) methods. A total number of 100 ARTs pregnant women who came to three infertility centers in Tehran from August to November 2009 participated in this descriptive cross sectional study. The rational for selecting the subjects was their availability to the researcher at the time of the research. Anxiety was measured by Beck Anxiety Inventory and for obtaining the infertility data, a questionnaire designed by the researcher was given to the subjects. Data were statistically analyzed using the inferential statistic of chi-square. Study results showed that 34 % of subjects were anxious (moderate and sever levels in total). There are significant relations between infertility duration, history of treatment failure and anxiety level (P = 0.03) (P = 0.02). There were no statistically significant relationships with regard to other variables. Infertility duration and history of treatment failure in ARTs pregnant women are two factors that affect the anxiety level during pregnancy.

  15. N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2 Gene Polymorphisms and the Effectiveness of Infertility Treatment in Patients with Peritoneal Endometriosis

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    Ekaterina D. Dubinskaya

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Today, infertility has become a global issue. WHO ranks it the fifth among the major diseases of those below 60 years, after alcoholism, depression, injuries and eyesight disorders. Numerous studies conducted on the problems of infertility in endometriosis still do not offer clear answers regarding the pathogenesis and mechanisms of this disease and its influences on fertility. According to the survey results, point mutations of the NAT2 gene (NAT2*5 and NAT2*6 have been identified in 75.6% of the patients with infertility problems and the peritoneal form of endometriosis, that create “slow” allelic variants, which exceed the average index in the population. The peculiarities of the NAT2 gene polymorphisms have been proven to be associated with the effectiveness of the infertility treatment of female patients with peritoneal endometriosis. In the group of non-pregnant patients, the presence of с.341Т>C, c.481C>T, c.590G>A and c.803A>G heterozygous point mutations are 73.2, 73.2, 5.4, and 62.5%, respectively. The significant difference in the comparison of the allelic polymorphism during the various stages of the endometriosis was not identified. At stage III-IV endometriosis the frequency of three and more point substitutions was significantly higher. NAT2 gene polymorphisms can find use as an additional criterion for predicting the effectiveness of the infertility treatment of patients with peritoneal endometriosis.

  16. HLA-G profile of infertile couples who underwent assisted reproduction treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Cynthia Hernandes; Gelmini, Georgia Fernanda; Nardi, Fabiola Silva; Roxo, Valéria Maria Munhoz Sperandio; Schuffner, Alessandro; da Graça Bicalho, Maria

    2016-12-01

    HLA-G codes for a non-classical class I (Ib) protein which is mainly expressed in trophoblast cells. Many pieces of evidence pointed out its essential role conferring immunological tolerance to the fetus. Some HLA-G alleles have been linked to enhanced or reduced HLA-G protein levels expression, which have been associated with reproductive failure. In this study 33 couples undergoing ART (assisted reproduction treatment; n=66) and 120 couples who conceived naturally (controls; n=240) were enrolled in the study. Genotyping was performed by SBT and tagged an 1837bp at 5'URR as well as exons 2, 3 and4 of HLA-G. Alleles, genotypes and haplotypes were compared between infertile and control groups using Fisher Exact Test. The haplotype HLA-G ∗ 010101b/HLA-G ∗ 01:01:01 showed statistically significant higher frequency in control groups. The immunogenetics of infertility is complex and might be dependent on different genes involved in the establishment of a successful pregnancy. A better understanding of HLA-G alleles and haplotypes structure and how the genetic diversity at their regulatory sites could impact on their level of expression and build up the susceptibility or protection conditions may shed light on the comprehension of immunogenetics mechanisms acting at the fetus-maternal interface. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Current approach to male infertility treatment: sperm selection procedure based on hyaluronic acid binding ability

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    A. V. Zobova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracytoplasmic sperm injection into an oocyte is widely used throughout the world in assisted reproductive technologies programs in the presence of male infertility factor. However, this approach can allow selection of a single sperm, which is carrying different types of pathologies. Minimizing of any potential risks, entailing the occurrence of abnormalities in the embryos development (apoptosis, fragmentation of embryos, alterations in gene expression, aneuploidies is a very important condition for reducing the potential negative consequences resulting the manipulation with gametes. Processes that could be influenced by the embryologist must be fulfilled in safe and physiological way as much as it is possible. Data of numerous publications reporting about the positive effects of using the technology of sperm selection by hyaluronic acid binding, let make a conclusion about the high prospects of this approach in the treatment of male infertility by methods of in vitro fertilization. The selection of sperm with improved characteristics, which determine the maturity and genetic integrity, provides an opportunity to improve the parameters of pre-implantation embryogenesis, having thus a positive effect on clinical outcomes of assisted reproductive technologies programs.

  18. Mind-body group treatment for women coping with infertility: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psaros, Christina; Kagan, Leslee; Shifren, Jan L; Willett, Jessica; Jacquart, Jolene; Alert, Marissa D; Macklin, Eric A; Styer, Aaron K; Denninger, John W; LaRoche, Katie L; Park, Elyse R

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of a 10-week mind-body intervention (MBI) for women coping with fertility challenges, examine the impact of an MBI on psychological distress and cortisol levels, and assess adherence to MBI skills 12-months after completion of the intervention. Prospective open pilot study of 51 women with infertility enrolled in a group MBI. Psychological variables and salivary cortisol levels were obtained pre- and post-intervention; a 12-month follow-up survey assessed MBI skill adherence. Participants completed practice logs throughout the intervention. Participants attended an average of eight sessions (SD = 2.0), and practiced mind-body techniques which elicited the relaxation response (RR) an average of 5.9 (SD = 0.8) days/week and 20.1 (SD = 9.9) min/day; 80% completed the post-treatment assessment. The intervention resulted in a significant increase in perceived social support and a decrease in depressive symptoms and perceived stress; however, there were no significant changes in cortisol levels. Sixty-eight percent of the participants completed the 12-month follow-up, with 51% reporting continuation of RR-eliciting practice. This group of women with infertility provided with an MBI showed decreased symptoms of depression and stress and increased perceived social support. The protocol was feasible and participants reported a high degree of adherence and maintenance to the skills taught during the intervention. The findings indicate the value of appropriate evaluation against a control group.

  19. State laws and regulations addressing third-party reimbursement for infertility treatment: implications for cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Vadaparampil, Susan T; McGowan Lowrey, Kerri; Eidson, Shelby; Knapp, Caprice; Bukulmez, Orhan

    2011-01-01

    To examine codified state policies related to infertility and assess their implications for cancer patients. Lack of insurance is often identified as a barrier to use of fertility preservation (FP) services. None. A keyword search was developed to identify statutes and administrative regulations of insurance coverage for FP in the United States. N/A. N/A. Laws addressing the general population but pertaining to FP were compiled using Lexis-Nexis. Data were analyzed by reviewing the "plain meaning" of the text, legislative/administrative history, and annotated case law. Legal reasoning and common rules of statutory construction and legislative interpretation were used. Fifteen states (29.4%) had laws relating to insurance coverage for infertility or in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures and two states (CA and IL) specifically excluded IVF from a mandatory offer of coverage. No state laws or regulations addressed insurance coverage for FP methods specific to cancer patients. There is an argument for policies that require coverage for FP for cancer survivors before treatment. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Awareness of and attitudes towards infertility and its treatment: a cross-sectional survey of men in a United States primary care population

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    Robert S Gerhard

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have described racial and socioeconomic disparities in the treatment of infertility. Patient factors such as attitudes and awareness may be contributing factors. Since primary care is often the setting that serves as an entry into other areas of medicine, we sought to evaluate men's attitudes and awareness of male infertility in the primary care setting. To do this, we performed a cross-sectional survey of men's attitudes toward men's health issues in 210 men from two primary care clinic waiting rooms in Atlanta, Georgia. The survey was self-administered with closed-ended question items and was approximately 20 min in length. Of the 310 men approached, 210 agreed to participate and returned completed surveys. Overall, 52% of men said they were "very" or "somewhat" familiar with infertility and 25% were familiar with treatments for infertility. Some men had heard of surgery (21% and medication (35% as treatments for male infertility. Awareness and familiarity with the condition was greater in high socioeconomic status men (i.e. college graduates or those with income >$100 k per year but did not differ by race on multivariate analysis. Attitudes toward infertility varied by race with non-Caucasian men being more likely to indicate that infertility is a serious condition, to be concerned about infertility, and to believe it decreases a man's quality-of-life. Therefore, a lack of awareness, but not negative attitudes, may contribute to previously-described disparities in the treatment of infertility.

  1. The effect of metformin treatment on ICSI in infertile polycystic ovary syndrome

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    Firoozeh Akbari Asbagh

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Insulin resistance is common in women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS and can cause poor outcome of infertility treatment. The aim of our study was to assess the effect of treatment with metformin on outcome of Intra Cytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI in infertile PCOS women."n"nMethods: A randomized clinical trial study was carried out in infertile women with PCOS, before ICSI, referred to infertility clinic of Mirza Koochackhan Hospital of Tehran University of Medical Science Tehran, Iran, between 2006 and 2008. The patients were randomized in two groups of metformin 500 mg Po, three times daily, six weeks before the ICSI cycle and placebo patients in each group were divided into BMI <28 kg/m2 and BMI ≥28 kg/m2."n"nResults: Of 52 study women 26(50% were in metformin group. mean age were 29.8±4.9 year in metformin group versus 29.4±5.9 year and placebo groups. Treatment with metformin, in subgroup of BMI <28 kg/m2, significantly increased number of mature follicle (p=0.01, embryo (p=0.04, oocytes (p=0.007 and mature oocytes (p=0.03 but in subgroup of BMI≥28 kg/m2, there was no significant difference in the metformin and placebo groups (p>0.05. Metformin treatment caused more chemical and clinical

  2. The Effect of a Complex Multi-modality Ayurvedic Treatment in a Case of Unknown Female Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Christian; Stapelfeldt, Elmar; Michalsen, Andreas; Kowalcek, Ingrid; Kronpaß, Ludwig; Dhruva, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of female infertility has been growing globally in recent years. In spite of improvements in medical strategies and the improved outcomes for infertile couples, treatment attempts remain largely unsuccessful. A growing number of patients pursue complementary and alternative medicine treatment options like Ayurveda that offers a variety of inpatient and outpatient treatments for infertility. A case of a 38 year-old woman with infertility of unknown origin is presented. She received 18 conventional fertility treatments in 5 different fertility centers and 3 different countries. After several complications, the patient quitted conventional treatment and admitted to an Ayurvedic outpatient clinic where she received a complex Ayurvedic treatment, which included botanicals, dietary and lifestyle advice, manual therapy, yoga, and spiritual elements. The patient then became pregnant and gave birth to a healthy boy in 2012. Ayurveda may be a useful complementary option in the case of futile conventional treatment attempts in female infertility. Nevertheless, the evidence base for Ayurvedic interventions remains weak and requires well-designed clinical trials. This case raises some questions, such as whether the exposure to a large number of assisted reproduction procedures can lead to more health problems than health benefits. The Ayurvedic approach to fertility strives first to improve the health of the patient leading to a higher likelihood of pregnancy. As this is a case report, we are not able to exclude temporal factors stimulating the pregnancy. However, the chronology suggests that this approach might have been an important factor in the eventual pregnancy. © 2015 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  3. Priorities for family building among patients and partners seeking treatment for infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duthie, Elizabeth A; Cooper, Alexandra; Davis, Joseph B; Sandlow, Jay; Schoyer, Katherine D; Strawn, Estil; Flynn, Kathryn E

    2017-04-05

    Infertility treatment decisions require people to balance multiple priorities. Within couples, partners must also negotiate priorities with one another. In this study, we assessed the family-building priorities of couples prior to their first consultations with a reproductive specialist. Participants were couples who had upcoming first consultations with a reproductive specialist (N = 59 couples (59 women; 59 men)). Prior to the consultation, couples separately completed the Family-Building Priorities Tool, which tasked them with ranking from least to most important 10 factors associated with family building. We describe the highest (top three) and lowest (bottom three) priorities, the alignment of priorities within couples, and test for differences in prioritization between men and women within couples (Wilcoxon signed rank test). Maintaining a close and satisfying relationship with one's partner was ranked as a high priority by majorities of men and women, and in 25% of couples, both partners ranked this factor as their most important priority for family building. Majorities of men and women also ranked building a family in a way that does not make infertility obvious to others as a low priority, and in 27% of couples, both partners ranked this factor as the least important priority for family building. There were also differences within couples that involved either men or women ranking a particular goal more highly than their partners. More women ranked two factors higher than did their partners: 1) that I become a parent one way or another (p = 0.015) and 2) that I have a child in the next year or two (p < 0.001), whereas more men ranked 4 factors higher than their partners: 1) that our child has [woman's] genes (p = 0.025), 2) that our child has [man's] genes (p < 0.001), 3) that I maintain a close relationship with my partner (p = 0.034), and 4) that I avoid side effects from treatment (p < 0.001). Clinicians who support

  4. Treatment Outcome of Ovulation-inducing Agents in Patients with Anovulatory Infertility: A Prospective, Observational Study

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    Prajapati, Kinjal; Desai, Mira; Shah, Samidh; Choudhary, Sumesh; Aggarwal, Rohina; Mishra, Vineet

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To compare different treatment regimens on pregnancy rate and outcome in patients with anovulatory infertility. Patients and Methods: A prospective observational study was conducted on patients with infertility due to anovulation. Patients treated with clomiphene citrate (CC) 50/100 mg/day from 2nd to 6th day of menstrual cycle (MC) (n = 38), short gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist regimen (leuprolide [0.5 mg subcutaneous] + recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone [rFSH] [225 IU intramuscular [IM] from 2nd to 10th day of MC [n = 32]), long GnRH agonist regimen (leuprolide from 21st day followed by leuprolide + rFSH from 2nd to 10th day of MC [n = 19]), and antagonist regimen (human menopausal gonadotropin [hMG] [150 IU IM] from 2nd day followed by hMG + cetrorelix from 7th to 10th day of MC) (n = 6) were recruited and followed up for follicular size, endometrial thickness, and pregnancy test. Data were analyzed using appropriate statistical test andP < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: A significant increase in follicular diameter and endometrial thickness was observed in patients treated with gonadotropin regimens as compared to CC alone (P < 0.0001). The highest number of positive pregnancy test with ultrasonographic evidence of gestational sac was observed with leuprolide + rFSH (long regimen) (10/19, 52.6%) followed by leuprolide + rFSH (short regimen) (13/32, 40.6%) while least in antagonist regimen (2/6, 33.3%) and CC (1/38, 2.63%). All regimens were well tolerated. Conclusion: Treatment outcome was better with long agonist regimen. PMID:29081619

  5. Recent acquisitions in the medical treatment of infertility caused by Chlamydia Trachomatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Moushaly, A

    2013-06-15

    The infertility defined as the incapacity of the people to conceive a child in a given period, usually of 1-2 years of sexually unprotected relations, represents a major dysfunction of the genital apparatus. Its frequency is estimated at 10-15% of the couples at the reproductive age. The incidence of sterility is high, a couple out of 10 being sterile. The conjugal sterility is a phenomenon representative for the couple; the woman is responsible for it only in 35-40% of the cases, in 40% of the cases, the male factor is involved. In 20% of the cases, mixed factors are met, both feminine and masculine, and in 5-10% of the cases, the causes cannot be detected. From the multitude of causes of infertility, the infectious factor plays an important role, the Chlamydia infections being lately blamed in the etiology of sterility. The infections due to Chlamydia Trachomatis (CT) represent the most frequent sexually transmitted diseases, which, most of the times lead to sterility. Taking into account the widespread of this bacterium in the sexually active population, the effective treatment of the CT infection is very important. We have selected 200 cases with PID genital infection in the study. All the selected patients had at least 2, 3 and more than 3 inflammation recurrence episodes, this way being considered cases with medium and severe forms of disease. All these selected patients had at least 2, 3 and more than 3 episodes of inflammation recurrence, this way being considered medium and severe disease cases. In conclusion, there is a high clinical efficiency of the azithromycin treatment in PID case.

  6. Kisspeptin, unexplained infertility and embryo implantation

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    Aaida Mumtaz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Kisspeptin (KP is a neuropeptide that causes the release of the gonadotropin releasing hormone, which controls hypothalamo pituitary ovarian axis and exerts a number of peripheral effects on reproductive organs. The primary objective of this study was to compare baseline KP levels in females with different types of infertility and identify possible correlations with risk of failure to conceive, preclinical abortion and pregnancy after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI. Materials and Methods A longitudinal cohort study was carried out from August 2014 until May 2015 by recruiting 124 female patients undergoing ICSI, after obtaining ethical approval from the Australian Concept Infertility Medical Center. Cause of infertility due to male, female and unexplained factors was at a frequency of 32 (24%, 33 (31% and 59 (45% among the individuals respectively. KP levels were measured by ELISA assay before the initiation of the ICSI treatment protocol. Outcome of ICSI was categorized into three groups of non-pregnant with beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG25 mIU/ml and no cardiac activity, and clinical pregnancy declared upon confirmation of cardiac activity. Results based on cause of infertility and outcome groups were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. Results Females with unexplained infertility had significantly lower levels of KP when compared with those with male factor infertility (176.69 ± 5.03 vs. 397.6 ± 58.2, P=0.001. Clinical pregnancy was observed in 28 (23% females of which 17 (71% had a female cause of infertility. In the non-pregnant group of 66 (53% females, common cause of infertility was unexplained 56(85%. A weak positive correlation of KP levels with fertilized oocytes and endometrial thickness was observed (P=0.04 and 0.01 respectively. Conclusion Deficiency of KP in females with unexplained infertility was associated with reduced chances of implantation after ICSI.

  7. Effect of Pertubation on Pregnancy Rates before Intrauterine Insemination Treatment in Patients with Unexplained Infertility

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    Funda Yildiz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between marital violence and distress level among women with a diagnosis of infertility. Materials and Methods: In this prospective randomized study, a total of 180 patients were included in the study. Amongst these, pertubation of the uterine cavity was carried out in 79 patients prior to insemination. One patient in the pertubation group was later excluded because insemination could not be performed due to cycle cancellation. Results: There were no significant differences in demographic characteristics between the study and control groups. When the pregnancy rates of both groups were evaluated, 14(17.8% patients in the study group achieved pregancy. Three (3.8% had a biochemical pregnancy, 1(1.3% miscarried and 10(12.7% had live births. In the control group, a total of 24(23.8% pregnancies were achieved, amongst which one (1% had a biochemical pregnancy, 3(3% miscarried and 20(19.8% resulted in live births. There was no significant difference between groups in terms of total pregnancy and live birth rates (p>0.05. There was a 21% total pregnancy loss rate. There was no significant difference between the control and study groups in terms of pregnancy loss rates (p>0.05. Conclusion: This study on a homogenous group of unexplained infertile patients determined that the addition of pertubation to a controlled ovarian hyperstimulation plus intrauterine insemination (COH+IUI treatment protocol did not affect pregnancy rates (Registration Number: NCT01999959.

  8. IPPF statement on infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    The policy statement on infertility issued by the International Medical Advisory Panel of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) and adopted by the Central Council of the IPPF in November, 1984, is provided. The IPPF recognizes that subinfertility and infertility is a part of family planning and provides suggestions for how Family Planning Associations (FPAs) can provide supportive assistance in this area of concern. Depending on the facilities and resources available at specific clinics, FPS can provide preventive, counseling, diagnostic, treatment, and referral services. FPAs can play a major role in prevention. Many conditions which cause infertility are preventable, and these include sexually transmitted diseases, infections stemming from abortion and childbirth, and possibly tuberculosis. IUDs increase the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease and may increase the risk of infertility; however, a direct relationship between IUDs and infertility has not been established. Injectable contraceptives may delay the return of fertility but do not lead to permanent infertility. Barrier methods protect againsr sexually transmitted diseases, and oral contraceptives may provide protection from pelvic inflammatory disease. FPAs should be familiar with the major causes of infertility in their region and adopt an advocacy role by promoting community programs to control sexually transmitted diseases which may play a role in infertility, to improve obstetric care, to increase access to reproductive health services, and to provide reproductive educational services for adolescents. FPAs can work in cooporation with other agencies concerned with infertility prevention and management. FPAs can play a direct role by educating their clients about infertility prevention. Most FPAs do have have the facilities and personnel to provide diagnostic and treatment services, but they can provide referral services. They should establish a link with centers which are fully

  9. Evaluation on Hope and Psychological Symptoms in Infertile Couples Undergoing Assisted Reproduction Treatment

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    maryam mohammadi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study evaluated hope, depression, anxiety, and stress among three groups of infertile couples. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study consisted of three groups of infertile couples-candidates for oocyte donation (n=60, embryo donation (n=60, and normal infertile (n=60. Participants included couples seen at Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran between 2013-2014 who were at least 18 years of age and could read and write in Persian. Participants provided demographic and general characteristics and completed the Persian version of the Adult Trait Hope Scale (hope, agency and pathway and Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS. Data was analyzed by the paired t test, ANOVA, ANCOVA and Pearson correlation tests using SPSS statistical software. Results: Overall, 180 infertile couples participated in the three groups. There was a significant higher mean score for hope in husbands compared to wives in the normal infertile group (P=0.046. Husbands in the normal infertile group also had a significantly higher mean score for pathway (P=0.032. The frequency of anxiety significantly differed in female subjects (P=0.028. In the normal infertile group, the anxiety distribution significantly differed between wives and husbands (P=0.006. There was a significantly different stress frequency in male subjects (P=0.048. In the embryo donation group, stress significantly differed between wives and husbands (P=0.002. In the normal infertile group, stress also significantly differed between wives and husbands (P=0.05. Conclusion: The results have suggested that hope might be important in reducing psychological symptoms and psychological adjustment in those exposed to infertility problems who follow medical recommendations, which accelerates recovery. It is recommended to hold psychological counseling sessions (hope therapy during reproduction cycles.

  10. Evaluation on Hope and Psychological Symptoms in Infertile Couples Undergoing Assisted Reproduction Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omani Samani, Reza; Vesali, Samira; Navid, Behnaz; Vakiliniya, Bahareh; Mohammadi, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated hope, depression, anxiety, and stress among three groups of infertile couples. This cross-sectional study consisted of three groups of infertile couples-candidates for oocyte donation (n=60), embryo donation (n=60), and normal infertile (n=60). Participants included couples seen at Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran between 2013-2014 who were at least 18 years of age and could read and write in Persian. Participants provided demographic and general characteristics and completed the Persian version of the Adult Trait Hope Scale (hope, agency and pathway) and Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS). Data was analyzed by the paired t test, ANOVA, ANCOVA and Pearson correlation tests using SPSS statistical software. Overall, 180 infertile couples participated in the three groups. There was a significant higher mean score for hope in husbands compared to wives in the normal infertile group (P=0.046). Husbands in the normal infertile group also had a significantly higher mean score for pathway (P=0.032). The frequency of anxiety significantly differed in female subjects (P=0.028). In the normal infertile group, the anxiety distribution significantly differed between wives and husbands (P=0.006). There was a significantly different stress frequency in male subjects (P=0.048). In the embryo donation group, stress significantly differed between wives and husbands (P=0.002). In the normal infertile group, stress also significantly differed between wives and husbands (P=0.05). The results have suggested that hope might be important in reducing psychological symptoms and psychological adjustment in those exposed to infertility problems who follow medical recommendations, which accelerates recovery. It is recommended to hold psychological counseling sessions (hope therapy) during reproduction cycles.

  11. Psychosocial Consequences of Infertility on Infertile Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, P; Rahman, D; Hossain, H B; Hossain, H N; Mughi, C R

    2015-10-01

    This study explores to find out the qualitative and quantitative psychosocial consequences of infertility in women coming for infertility treatment in tertiary infertility center. A total of 400 infertile couples who agreed to participate in the study were asked to fill up the questionnaires and later interviewed to access the psychosocial consequences of infertility on their personal life in a tertiary infertility clinic in Dhaka at Center for Assisted Reproduction (CARe Hospital), Dhaka from June 2011 to December 2011 and agreed to participate in the study were included in the study. The data was analyzed and the quantitative and qualitative psychosocial factors were evaluated. Four hundred infertile couple who filled the questionnaires was included in the study. Sixty three percent of the women belonged to age group >20 30 years at the time of interview. Regarding age at marriage 43.8% of the women were married by 20 years, 51.3% were married between 20 30 years. Mean±SD duration of present married life was 7.20±4.45 (range 1 to 28) years and 74.4% of the women were living with their husbands. Of them 75.5% women were housewife. When asked whether they knew what was the reason of infertility in the couple, 32.5% knew the cause was in the female partner, 14.5%, knew the cause was in the male partner, 10.3% knew the cause was in both partners, 21.5% knew cause of infertility was not in any of the partners, and 21.3% had no idea about the cause of infertility. The male partner's response about the issue of prognosis and outcome of couple's infertility revealed 37.3% believed their wives will conceive someday, 31.3% had no intention for a second marriage, 13% were indifferent, 11.3% blamed their wives for infertility and 4.8% threatened for a second marriage. Only 2.5% of the male partners were suggested on consulting and continuing treatment by specialist. The family pressure by in-laws and relatives towards their infertility was that 57.3% insisted on consulting

  12. Stress and Quality of Life for Taiwanese Women Who Underwent Infertility Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Yu; Stevenson, Eleanor Lowndes; Yang, Cheng-Ta; Liou, Shwu-Ru

    2018-04-28

    To describe the psychological stress and quality of life experienced by women who underwent fertility treatment in Taiwan. Cross-sectional, correlational study. Recruitment was conducted and questionnaires administered at a reproductive medicine center in Chiayi City, Taiwan. Informed consent to participate was obtained from 126 women who sought fertility treatment at the center. The Chinese Fertility Problem Inventory and Fertility Quality of Life scale were used to measure participants' levels of fertility-related stress and fertility-related quality of life. Descriptive statistics, correlation, and regression analysis were used. Overall, participants reported low levels of fertility-related stress and fertility-related quality of life; however, they had relatively high levels of stress related to need for parenthood. Women who were older, had greater body mass indexes, and consumed coffee regularly had lower fertility-related quality of life. Social and relationship concerns and stress related to need for parenthood were significant predictors of low fertility-related quality of life. In a culture in which childbearing is generally an expectation and an important part of family life, women who experience infertility are at risk to experience fertility-related stress. Social support and family consultation might be offered to improve women's fertility-related quality of life. Copyright © 2018 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A non-surgical uterine lavage technique in large cats intended for treatment of uterine infection-induced infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, T B; Göritz, F; Boardman, W; Strike, T; Strauss, G; Jewgenow, K

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents the successful use of a non-surgical, transcervical uterine lavage technique for the treatment of uterine infection-induced infertility in three female large cats. We developed a non-surgical uterine lavage technique, which allowed repeated flushing of the uterine lumen and installation of therapeutic antibiotics. The entire procedure was performed under general anaesthesia (duration of anesthesia ranged from 40 to 70 min). It was successfully applied in a Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae), a Corbett tiger (Panthera tigris corbetti) and an Amur leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis). The tigers were treated only once, whereas the leopard received four uterine treatments, due to re-infection after mating. Decisions to conduct uterine treatments were based on detection of uterine fluid during previous transrectal ultrasound examinations. The catheter was guided into the vagina, with the aid of an endoscope, passing the urethra, and then into the uterus, with the aid of transrectal ultrasonography. Both uterine horns were separately flushed with approximately 300 mL of cell medium M199, followed by an antibiotic infusion. Upon ultrasonographic re-examination, the topical uterine treatments resulted in an apparent decline in the inflammatory and/or degenerative processes. The Corbett tiger had the most severe uterine alterations, in addition to an aseptic pyometra. As a result, she was treated 1 month prior to ovariohysterectomy (in order to reduce the surgical risk). The Sumatran tiger was artificially inseminated twice after hormone-induced estrus, and the Amur leopard expressed a spontaneous estrus and re-initiated mating behaviour.

  14. Increased incidence of infertility treatment among women working in the plastics industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, K.S.; Hannerz, H.; Feveile, H.

    2009-01-01

    Several plastic chemicals adversely affect reproductive ability. This study examined the possible association between employment in the plastics industry and infertility. Dynamic cohorts of economically active women and men were followed for hospital contacts due to infertility in the Danish...... in female plastics workers motivates more specific studies of reproductive occupational health in the plastics industry. (C) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2009/4...

  15. Breast Cancer and Infertility

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    Guluzar Arzu Turan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women and may accompany infertility. The relationship between infertility treatment and breast cancer has not yet been proven. However, estrogen exposure is well known to cause breast cancer. Recent advances in treatment options have provided young patients with breast cancer a chance of being mother [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(3.000: 317-323

  16. The effect of an expressive writing intervention (EWI) on stress in infertile couples undergoing assisted reproductive technlogy (ART) treatment: A randomized controlled pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, Signe Maria Schneevoigt; Klonoff-Cohen, Hillary; Zachariae, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Infertile couples undergoing fertility treatments may experience stress and could benefit from psychological intervention. Expressive Writing Intervention (EWI) has shown promising results on various psychological outcomes, yet only one study has applied the method to infertility....... A total of 82 participants (45 women, 37 men), mean age: 33.17, were randomized to home-based EWI or neutral writing control group and completed an infertility-related stress questionnaire at treatment enrollment, 3 weeks later (at the time of down regulation), and 6 weeks after the intervention...

  17. [Experience of use of allokin-alfa in the treatment of genitourinary infections complicated by excretory-toxic infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimov, O V; Kostromeev, S A; Dyshkovets, A A

    2013-01-01

    The results of the examination and treatment of 67 patients aged 18 to 45 years are presented. Patients suffered from chronic prostatitis, chronic prostatovesiculitis, chronic uretroprostatitis complicated by excretory-toxic infertility. Pathogens, including sexually transmitted infections (STIs), were identified in all patients. The control group received conventional therapy (causative agents, a-adrenoblockers, enzyme therapy). In the study group, patients received allokin alpha in addition to conventional therapy. The use of allokin-alfa promoted more rapid and complete eradication of STI pathogens, and normalization of the spermogram. The results of this study allow to recommend allokin-alfa for the combined treatment of patients with infectious and inflammatory diseases of the genitourinary system, complicated by excretory-toxic infertility.

  18. Emotional reaction to diagnosis of infertility in Kuwait and successful clients' perception of nurses' role during treatment

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    Omu Alexander E

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The unfulfilled desire of millions of infertile couples worldwide to have their own biological children results in emotional distress. This study evaluated the emotional reactions of couples attending a combined infertility clinic in Kuwait and successful clients' perception of nurses. Methods Quantitative and qualitative methods were used. The first phase was by structured interview using two standardized psychological scales: the 25-item Hopkins Symptom Checklist and Modified Fertility Adjustment Scale. Data were collected from 268 couples attending the combined infertility clinic, between October 2002 and September 2007. The second phase was a semi-structured interview of 10 clients who got pregnant following treatment. The interview explored their feelings and perception of the nurses' role. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed. Results The average duration of infertility was 4 years; 65.7% of the women and 76.1% of men suffered from primary infertility. Emotional reactions experienced were: anxiety in women (12.7% and men (6%, depression in women (5.2% and men (14.9% and reduced libido in women (6.7% and men (29.9%. Also in men, 14.9% experienced premature ejaculation, 5.2% weak ejaculation and 7.9% had impotence although 4.9% were transient. In the semi-structured interviews, the emotions expressed were similar and in addition to anger, feelings of devastation, powerlessness, sense of failure and frustration. In the survey, 12.7% of the men were found to show more anxiety than women (6%. Although all the 10 women interviewed confirmed they were anxious; only 4 of their partners were reported to be sad or anxious. Successful clients' perception of nurses' roles included nurses carrying out basic nursing procedures, communicating, educating about investigative and treatment procedures, providing emotional support by listening, encouraging, reassuring and being empathetic. Conclusions This study illuminates

  19. Myoinositol as a Safe and Alternative Approach in the Treatment of Infertile PCOS Women: A German Observational Study

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    Pedro-Antonio Regidor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of 2×2000 mg myoinositol + 2×200 μg folic acid per day is a safe and promising tool in the effective improvement of symptoms and infertility for patients with a polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS. Using a questionnaire an observational study was performed under German gynecologists to collect data on ovulation and pregnancy rates in PCOS patients with infertility. In this observational study, 3602 infertile women used myoinositol and folic acid between 2 and 3 months in a dosage of 2×2000 mg myoinositol + 2×200 μg folic acid per day. In a subgroup of 32 patients, hormonal values for testosterone, free testosterone, and progesterone were analyzed before and after 12 weeks of treatment. The mean time of use was 10.2 weeks. During this time 70% of these women had a restored ovulation, and 545 pregnancies were obtained. This means a pregnancy rate of 15.1% of all the myoinositol and folic acid users. In 19 cases a concomitant medication with clomiphene or dexamethasone was used. One twin pregnancy was documented. Testosterone levels changed from 96.6 ng/ml to 43.3 ng/ml and progesterone from 2.1 ng/ml to 12.3 ng/ml (p<0.05 after 12 weeks of treatment. No relevant side effects were present among the patients. This study could show that a new treatment option for patients with a PCOS and infertility is available. The achieved pregnancy rates are at least in an equivalent or even superior range than those reported by the use of metformin.

  20. Psychiatric Aspects of Infertility

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    Hacer Sezgin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Infertility can be defined as a crisis with cultural, religious, and class related aspects, which coexists with medical, psychiatric, psychological, and social problems. Relation between psychiatric and psychological factors stem from a mutual interaction of both. Family is an important institution in maintaining human existence and raising individuals in line with society's expectations. Fertility and reproduction are seen as universal functions unique to women with raising children as the expected result of the family institution. Incidence of infertility has increased recently and can become a life crisis for a couple. Even though not being able to have a child affects both sexes emotionally, women feel greater amounts of stress, pressure, anxiety, and depression.Consequences of infertility arise from short and long-term devastating effects on both individual's physical and mental health, and marital system. Many studies focus on infertility related psychological and psychiatric disorders (depression, anxiety, grief, marital conflict, gender differences, relation between the causes of infertility and psychopathology, the effects of psychiatric evaluation and intervention -when necessaryon the course of infertility treatment, pregnancy rates, and childbirth. The most important underlying causes of high levels of stress and anxiety that infertile women experience are the loss of maternity, reproduction, sense of self, and genetic continuity. In this review article is to investigate the relationship between medically unexplained symptoms and psychiatric symptoms. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(2.000: 165-185

  1. Association of assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment and parental infertility diagnosis with autism in ART-conceived children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissin, D M; Zhang, Y; Boulet, S L; Fountain, C; Bearman, P; Schieve, L; Yeargin-Allsopp, M; Jamieson, D J

    2015-02-01

    Are assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment factors or infertility diagnoses associated with autism among ART-conceived children? Our study suggests that the incidence of autism diagnosis in ART-conceived children during the first 5 years of life was higher when intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) was used compared with conventional IVF, and lower when parents had unexplained infertility (among singletons) or tubal factor infertility (among multiples) compared with other types of infertility. Some studies found an increased risk of autism among ART-conceived infants compared with spontaneously-conceived infants. However, few studies, and none in the USA, have examined the associations between types of ART procedures and parental infertility diagnoses with autism among ART-conceived children. Population-based retrospective cohort study using linkages between National ART Surveillance System (NASS) data for 1996-2006, California Birth Certificate data for 1997-2006, and California Department of Developmental Services (DDS) Autism Caseload data for 1997-2011. All live born ART-conceived infants born in California in 1997-2006 (n = 42 383) with 5-year observation period were included in the study. We assessed the annual incidence of autism diagnosis documented in DDS, which includes information on the vast majority of persons with autism in California, and the association of autism diagnosis with ART treatment factors and infertility diagnoses. Among ART-conceived singletons born in California between 1997 and 2006, the incidence of autism diagnosis remained at ∼0.8% (P for trend 0.19) and was lower with parental diagnosis of unexplained infertility (adjusted hazard risk ratio [aHRR]; 95% confidence interval: 0.38; 0.15-0.94) and higher when ICSI was used (aHRR 1.65; 1.08-2.52), when compared with cases without these patient and treatment characteristics. Among ART-conceived multiples, the incidence of autism diagnosis between 1997 and 2006 remained at

  2. Infertility: Inability or Disability?

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    Abha Khetarpal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Disability is a complex phenomenon. It reflects an interaction between features of a person’s body and features of the society in which he or she lives. International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF, lays stress on the functional as well as the structural problem of a person. All the definitions of disability also include the disorders of the reproductive and endocrine system. So infertility and impotency should also be included in the category of disability. It affects the participation in areas of life and can have a disabling affect on an individual. Like any other disability the couple has to adapt and integrate infertility in their sense of self thus infertility comes as a major life crisis. Medically, infertility, in most cases, is considered to be the result of a physical impairment or a genetic abnormality. Socially, couples are incapable of their reproductive or parental roles. On social level, infertility in most cultures remains associated with social stigma and taboo just like the social model of disability. Couples who are unable to reproduce may be looked down upon due to social stigmatisation. Infertility can lead to divorces and separation leading to a broken family life. Without labelling infertility as a disability, it is difficult for the people to access services and welfare benefits offered by the government. Infertility treatments are highly sophisticated so they are very expensive and are even not covered by insurance and government aid.In the light of all this it becomes imperative to categorise infertility as disability.

  3. A logistic regression analysis of factors related to the treatment compliance of infertile patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Saijiao; He, Aiyan; Yang, Jing; Yin, TaiLang; Xu, Wangming

    2011-01-01

    To investigate factors that can affect compliance with treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in infertile patients and to provide a basis for clinical treatment, specialist consultation and health education. Patient compliance was assessed via a questionnaire based on the Morisky-Green test and the treatment principles of PCOS. Then interviews were conducted with 99 infertile patients diagnosed with PCOS at Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University in China, from March to September 2009. Finally, these data were analyzed using logistic regression analysis. Logistic regression analysis revealed that a total of 23 (25.6%) of the participants showed good compliance. Factors that significantly (p < 0.05) affected compliance with treatment were the patient's body mass index, convenience of medical treatment and concerns about adverse drug reactions. Patients who are obese, experience inconvenient medical treatment or are concerned about adverse drug reactions are more likely to exhibit noncompliance. Treatment education and intervention aimed at these patients should be strengthened in the clinic to improve treatment compliance. Further research is needed to better elucidate the compliance behavior of patients with PCOS.

  4. Comparison of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment strategies in promotion of infertility self-efficacy scale in infertile women: A randomized controlled trial

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    Hajar Pasha

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The infertility is associated with psychological consequence including depression, and lack of self-efficacy. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacological and no pharmacological strategies in promotion of self-efficacy of infertile women. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on 89 infertile women who were recruited from Fatemeh Zahra Infertility and Reproductive Health Research Center and were randomized into three groups; cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT, antidepressant therapy with flouxetine 20 mg daily for 3 month, and a control group. All participants completed Infertility Self-efficacy Inventory (ISE and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI at the beginning and end of the study. Results: The means ISE scores among the CBT, fluoxetine, and control groups at the beginning and end of the study were 6.1±1.6 vs. 7.2±0.9, 6.4±1.4 vs. 6.9±1.3 and 6.1±1.1 vs. 5.9±1.4 respectively. Both CBT and fluoxetine increased the mean of ISE scores more than control group after intervention (p<0.0001, p=0.033; respectively, but increase in the CBT group was significantly greater than flouxetine group. Finally, there was evidence of high infertility self-efficacy for women exposed to the intervention compared with those in the control group. Also, there was an improvement in depression. Both fluoxetine and CBT decreased significantly the mean of BDI scores more than the control group; decrease in the CBT group was significantly more than that in the fluoxetine group. Conclusion: CBT can serve as an effective psychosocial intervention for promoting self-efficacy of infertile women

  5. Are attachment dimensions associated with infertility-related stress in couples undergoing their first IVF treatment? A study on the individual and cross-partner effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donarelli, Zaira; Lo Coco, Gianluca; Gullo, Salvatore; Marino, Angelo; Volpes, Andrea; Allegra, Adolfo

    2012-11-01

    Are attachment anxiety and avoidance dimensions in female and male partners in couples seeking infertility treatment associated with her and his infertility-related stress? Attachment dimensions are significantly associated with several aspects of infertility stress in couples undergoing IVF treatment. Attachment dimensions of anxiety and avoidance (where highly anxious individuals fear rejection and are preoccupied with maintaining proximity to their partner and highly avoidant individuals are uncomfortable with intimacy and prefer to maintain distance from their partner) may influence the well being of individuals undergoing IVF/ICSI treatment. This study showed that one partner's attachment dimensions had a direct effect on the infertility-related stress of the other partner. Cross-sectional study of consecutive couples before starting their first IVF/ICSI treatment in 2009-2011 at the ANDROS clinic in Palermo, Italy. Three hundred and fifty-nine couples undergoing fertility treatments were invited to participate in the research. The final sample comprised 316 females and 316 males who filled out the psychological questionnaires (Experiences in Close Relationships; Fertility Problem Inventory; State scale of State-Trait Anxiety Inventory). The participants included patients who had a primary infertility diagnosis and were about to undergo their first IVF or ICSI treatment. Paired t-tests were used to examine gender differences on the study variables (attachment anxiety, attachment avoidance, infertility stress, state anxiety, etc.). Associations between infertility-related stress and the study variables were explored using hierarchical stepwise multivariate linear regression analyses. Attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance were significantly associated with global infertility stress in both women (β = 0.24, P infertility stress and relationship concerns were associated with their partners' attachment avoidance (β = 0.10 P infertility stress of women and

  6. The influence of emotional distress on the outcome of in-vitro fertilization (IVF) and/or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) treatment among infertile Turkish women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlidere, Tunay; Bozkurt, Ali; Ozmenler, Kamil Nahit; Ozsahin, Aytekin; Kucuk, Tansu; Yetkin, Sinan

    2008-01-01

    To determine whether the emotional distress of infertile Turkish women is related to social support and influences the outcome of their IVF and/or ICSI treatment. The Beck Depression Inventory, State- Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Social Support scales were administered to 104 primary infertile Turkish women before the date of their embryo transfer. Comparisons were made between the women who became pregnant and those who did not following the embryo transfer. Compared to the pregnant women, the non-pregnant women had a greater number of emotional symptoms despite similar levels of social support. Also, the increased severity of depressive symptoms and higher levels of anxiety were predictive of low pregnancy rates. The pregnancy rate of infertile Turkish women was associated with emotional distress and low levels of social support were associated with increased emotional distress. Further research is needed to determine the factors and mechanisms that contribute to emotional distress in the treatment of infertility.

  7. Effect of antitubercular treatment on ovarian function in female genital tuberculosis with infertility

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    Jai Bhagwan Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the effect of antitubercular therapy (ATT on an ovarian function such as ovarian reserve, ovarian dimensions, and ovarian stromal blood flow. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Prospective study design. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty infertile women with female genital tuberculosis (FGTB without tubo-ovarian masses diagnosed by positive acid-fast bacilli culture or epithelioid granuloma on endometrial aspirate or positive polymerase chain reaction with positive findings on laparoscopy or hysteroscopy were recruited. The ovarian function tests were performed on day 2/3 as follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH levels and anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH levels. Ovarian dimensions (length, width, and depth were measured using a transvaginal ultrasound. Mean antral follicle count (AFC and ovarian stromal blood flow (peak systolic velocity [PSV], pulsatility index (PI, and resistive index [RI] were measured using a transvaginal ultrasound. All women were started on ATT for 6 months by directly observed treatment strategy. After completion of ATT, all the parameters were repeated. RESULTS: There was a significant increase in AMH (2.68 ± 0.97 ng/ml to 2.8 ± 1.03 ng/ml pre- to post-ATT, nonsignificant increase in FSH (7.16 ± 2.34 mIU/ml to 7.26 ± 2.33 mIU/ml post-ATT, significant increase in mean AFC (7.40 ± 2.12-8.14 ± 2.17, PSV in the right ovary (6.015-6.11 cm/s and left ovary (6.05-6.08 cm/s, PI in the right ovary (0.935-0.951 cm/s and left ovary (0.936-0.957 cm/s, and RI in the right ovary (0.62 ± 0.01-0.79 ± 0.02 and left ovary (0.65 ± 0.02-0.84 ± 0.01 with ATT. There was no significant change in mean ovarian dimensions (ovarian length, breadth, and width and summed ovarian volume with ATT. On laparoscopy, tubercles were seen in 27 (54% women. Caseous nodules and encysted ascites were seen in 8% cases each. CONCLUSION: ATT improves the ovarian function (AMH and AFC and ovarian blood flow in women with FGTB.

  8. Defining Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's FAQs about In Vitro Fertilization REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH TOPICS Topics Index NEWS AND PUBLICATIONS Publications Overview News and Research Ethics Documents Practice Committee Documents Patient Fact Sheets and ...

  9. Indonesian infertility patients' health seeking behaviour and patterns of access to biomedical infertility care: an interviewer administered survey conducted in three clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Linda Rae; Wiweko, Budi; Hinting, Aucky; Adnyana, I B Putra; Pangestu, Mulyoto

    2012-09-28

    Indonesia has high levels of biological need for infertility treatment, great sociological and psychological demand for children, and yet existing infertility services are underutilized. Access to adequate comprehensive reproductive health services, including infertility care, is a basic reproductive right regardless of the economic circumstances in which individuals are born into. Thus, identifying and implementing strategies to improve access to assisted reproductive technology (ART) in Indonesia is imperative. The principle objectives of this article are to improve our understanding of infertility patients' patterns of health seeking behaviour and their patterns of access to infertility treatment in Indonesia, in order to highlight the possibilities for improving access. An interviewer-administered survey was conducted with 212 female infertility patients recruited through three Indonesian infertility clinics between July and September 2011. Participants were self-selected and data was subject to descriptive statistical analysis. Patients identified a number of barriers to access, including: low confidence in infertility treatment and high rates of switching between providers due to perceived treatment failure; the number and location of clinics; the lack of a well established referral system; the cost of treatment; and patients also experienced fear of receiving a diagnosis of sterility, of vaginal examinations and of embarrassment. Women's age of marriage and the timing of their initial presentation to gynaecologists were not found to be barriers to timely access to infertility care. The findings based on the responses of 212 female infertility patients indicated four key areas of opportunity for improving access to infertility care. Firstly, greater patient education about the nature and progression of infertility care was required among this group of women. Secondly, increased resources in terms of the number and distribution of infertility clinics would

  10. Indonesian infertility patients’ health seeking behaviour and patterns of access to biomedical infertility care: an interviewer administered survey conducted in three clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Indonesia has high levels of biological need for infertility treatment, great sociological and psychological demand for children, and yet existing infertility services are underutilized. Access to adequate comprehensive reproductive health services, including infertility care, is a basic reproductive right regardless of the economic circumstances in which individuals are born into. Thus, identifying and implementing strategies to improve access to assisted reproductive technology (ART) in Indonesia is imperative. The principle objectives of this article are to improve our understanding of infertility patients’ patterns of health seeking behaviour and their patterns of access to infertility treatment in Indonesia, in order to highlight the possibilities for improving access. Methods An interviewer-administered survey was conducted with 212 female infertility patients recruited through three Indonesian infertility clinics between July and September 2011. Participants were self-selected and data was subject to descriptive statistical analysis. Results Patients identified a number of barriers to access, including: low confidence in infertility treatment and high rates of switching between providers due to perceived treatment failure; the number and location of clinics; the lack of a well established referral system; the cost of treatment; and patients also experienced fear of receiving a diagnosis of sterility, of vaginal examinations and of embarrassment. Women’s age of marriage and the timing of their initial presentation to gynaecologists were not found to be barriers to timely access to infertility care. Conclusions The findings based on the responses of 212 female infertility patients indicated four key areas of opportunity for improving access to infertility care. Firstly, greater patient education about the nature and progression of infertility care was required among this group of women. Secondly, increased resources in terms of the number and

  11. Indonesian infertility patients’ health seeking behaviour and patterns of access to biomedical infertility care: an interviewer administered survey conducted in three clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennett Linda Rae

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indonesia has high levels of biological need for infertility treatment, great sociological and psychological demand for children, and yet existing infertility services are underutilized. Access to adequate comprehensive reproductive health services, including infertility care, is a basic reproductive right regardless of the economic circumstances in which individuals are born into. Thus, identifying and implementing strategies to improve access to assisted reproductive technology (ART in Indonesia is imperative. The principle objectives of this article are to improve our understanding of infertility patients’ patterns of health seeking behaviour and their patterns of access to infertility treatment in Indonesia, in order to highlight the possibilities for improving access. Methods An interviewer-administered survey was conducted with 212 female infertility patients recruited through three Indonesian infertility clinics between July and September 2011. Participants were self-selected and data was subject to descriptive statistical analysis. Results Patients identified a number of barriers to access, including: low confidence in infertility treatment and high rates of switching between providers due to perceived treatment failure; the number and location of clinics; the lack of a well established referral system; the cost of treatment; and patients also experienced fear of receiving a diagnosis of sterility, of vaginal examinations and of embarrassment. Women’s age of marriage and the timing of their initial presentation to gynaecologists were not found to be barriers to timely access to infertility care. Conclusions The findings based on the responses of 212 female infertility patients indicated four key areas of opportunity for improving access to infertility care. Firstly, greater patient education about the nature and progression of infertility care was required among this group of women. Secondly, increased resources

  12. The effect of problem-solving skill training on mental health and the success of treatment of infertile women under intrauterine insemination treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gojani, Marziyeh Ghasemi; Kordi, Masoume; Asgharipour, Negar; Esmaeili, Habibollah; Amirian, Maliheh; Eskandarnia, Elnaze

    2017-01-01

    Using fertility treatment will cause high levels of anxiety and depression. The study was carried out with the objective of determining the effect of problem-solving skills (PSS) training on mental health and the success of treatment of infertile women under intrauterine insemination (IUI) treatment. this randomized clinical trial was carried out on 72 women referring to Milad Infertility Center in Mashhad. Individuals were randomly assigned into control and intervention groups. PSS were taught in three sessions in the intervention group, and the control group received usual care. The success rate of therapy and the mean of anxiety and depression on the day of IUI operation were compared using the Beck Depression Inventory and Spielberger Anxiety Inventory in both groups. t -test, Mann-Whitney, paired t -test, Wilcoxon, and Chi-square tests were used to analyze the data. on the day of IUI operation, the mean score of state anxiety in the control group(5 0. 11 ± 8.51) and PSS (68.12 ± 11.49) was significant ( P problem-solving on reducing anxiety and depression, it is suggested that infertility center of this intervention should be used.

  13. Female infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, D.A.; Yoder, I.

    1984-01-01

    Infertility, defined as 1 year of unprotected intercourse without conception, is becoming of increasingly important medical concern. Fertility in both the male and the female is at its peak in the twenties. Many couples today have postponed marriage and/or childbearing into their 30s until careers are established, but at that point fertility may be diminished. The current epidemic of venereal disease has been associated with an increasing incidence of tubal scarring. In addition, the use of intrauterine devices (IUDs) and birth control pills for contraception have let to later problems with pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and ovulation disturbances. The problem of infertility intensifies as the number of babies available for adoption decreases. Therefore, it is estimated that approximately 10-20% of couples will eventually seek medical attention for an infertility-related problem. Fortunately, marked improvements in the results of tubal surgery are concurrently occurring secondary to refinements in microsurgical techniques, and many medical alternatives to induce ovulation are being developed. The male factor causes infertility in 30-40 % of couples, and the female factor is responsible in approximately 50% of couples. No cause is found in 10-20% of couples. This chapter discusses the role of coordinated imaging in the diagnosis and therapy of infertility in the female

  14. The ter mutation in the rat Dnd1 gene initiates gonadal teratomas and infertility in both genders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrup, Emily; Zschemisch, Nils-Holger; Eisenblätter, Regina; Glage, Silke; Wedekind, Dirk; Cuppen, Edwin; Dorsch, Martina; Hedrich, Hans-Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    A spontaneous mutation leading to the formation of congenital ovarian and testicular tumors was detected in the WKY/Ztm rat strain. The histological evaluation revealed derivatives from all three germ layers, thereby identifying these tumors as teratomas. Teratocarcinogenesis was accompanied by infertility and the underlying mutation was termed ter. Linkage analysis of 58 (WKY-ter×SPRD-Cu3) F2 rats associated the ter mutation with RNO18 (LOD = 3.25). Sequencing of candidate genes detected a point mutation in exon 4 of the dead-end homolog 1 gene (Dnd1), which introduces a premature stop codon assumed to cause a truncation of the Dnd1 protein. Genotyping of the recessive ter mutation revealed a complete penetrance of teratocarcinogenesis and infertility in homozygous ter rats of both genders. Morphologically non-tumorous testes of homozygous ter males were reduced in both size and weight. This testicular malformation was linked to a lack of spermatogenesis using immunohistochemical and histological staining. Our WKY-Dnd1(ter)/Ztm rat is a novel animal model to investigate gonadal teratocarcinogenesis and the molecular mechanisms involved in germ cell development of both genders.

  15. Infertility Treatments and Determination of Fetus Gender don’t Challenge God’s Justice and Wisdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dezhkam, L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of modern technology to cure barrenness has arisen challenges in various aspects some of which are ethical, legal and ideological. One of the ideological challenges, inserted in the above topic, has been discussed through this essay. The cause-effect system ruling the universe, helps a lot to determine God’s; the Almighty; Justice and Wisdom in creation. Therefore, the creation of the barren person, in the framework of that system, doesn’t conflict with His Justice and Wisdom. Of course, based on the penal justice, God will compensate these deficiencies by either giving rewards or mitigating the punishment. So, unveiling the creation mysteries-and the infertility of some diseases or the ability to do some affairs such as the selection of fetus gender doesn’t derange the best Divine system ruling the universe. Besides, these Facts prove the existence of such a system because if the relations weren’t established in the system, how could we access to these facts.By understanding the best system and the accurate determining of the ordination ruling it, we conclude that fetus gender selection and modern infertility treatments can’t be judged as the interference in God’s creation and the conflict with God’s Justice; rather the stability of the best system is proved through the occurance of such affairs.

  16. Infertility Treatments and Determination of Fetus Gender don’t Challenge God’s Justice and Wisdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotfollah Dezhkam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available   Application of modern technology to cure barrenness has arisen challenges in various aspects some of which are ethical, legal and ideological. One of the ideological challenges, inserted in the above topic, has been discussed through this essay.   The cause-effect system ruling the universe, helps a lot to determine God’s the Almighty Justice and Wisdom in creation. Therefore, the creation of the barren person, in the framework of that system, doesn’t conflict with His Justice and Wisdom. Of course, based on the penal justice, God will compensate these deficiencies by either giving rewards or mitigating the punishment. So, unveiling the creation mysteries-and the infertility of some diseases or the ability to do some affairs such as the selection of fetus gender doesn’t derange the best Divine system ruling the universe. Besides, these Facts prove the existence of such a system because if the relations weren’t established in the system, how could we access to these facts.   By understanding the best system and the accurate determining of the ordination ruling it, we conclude that fetus gender selection and modern infertility treatments can’t be judged as the interference in God’s creation and the conflict with God’s Justice rather the stability of the best system is proved through the occurance of such affairs.

  17. A Rare Case of Flare-Up of PID in Infertility Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Wadhwa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Case Presentation. Mrs. X, 35 years old, case of primary infertility, was diagnosed to have genital tuberculosis on the basis of PCR positive and hysterolaparoscopy findings and received category I ATT for 6 months. Following ATT completion, her USG revealed no evidence of tuboovarian mass or hydrosalpinx. Since her tubes were patent, she underwent 3 cycles of ovulation induction and 2 cycles of IUI. The women presented with acute PID, five days after IUI, and was conservatively managed. She again presented 24 days after IUI with persistent low grade fever and abdominal pain. Suspecting relapse of genital tuberculosis, she was started on category II ATT. She had acute episodes of high grade fever with chills 2 weeks after starting ATT and MRI revealed bilateral TO masses suggestive of pyosalpinx. Emergency laparotomy was done, pus was drained, and cyst wall was removed and HPE was suggestive of chronic inflammation with few granulation tissues. ATT was continued for one year and the woman improved. Conclusion. The possibility of flare-up of PID (pelvic inflammatory disease in treated case of tuberculosis undergoing infertility management should be kept in mind and aggressive management should be done.

  18. Assisted conception and South Asian communities in the UK: public perceptions of the use of donor gametes in infertility treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culley, Lorraine; Hudson, Nicky; Rapport, Frances

    2013-03-01

    This paper explores 'public' attitudes to the use of donated gametes in infertility treatment amongst members of British South Asian communities in the UK. The study included 14 single-sex focus groups with a total of 100 participants of Indian, Pakistani and Bangladeshi origins in three English cities and 20 individual semi-structured interviews with key informants. It explores five themes from the data: childlessness and stigma; using sperm and using eggs; cultural connections; choosing gametes; religion and the use of donated gametes; and disclosure and the management of information. The paper demonstrates that the socio-cultural context of fertility treatment is highly relevant and those delivering services and those consulting the public need to be aware of cultural and gender differences. Third party assisted conception represents a challenge to received ideas of identity and has implications for social reproduction and kinship which go well beyond immediate conjugal relationships.

  19. Cost-effectiveness analysis of lifestyle intervention in obese infertile women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oers, A. M.; Mutsaerts, M. A. Q.; Burggraaff, J. M.; Kuchenbecker, W. K. H.; Perquin, D. A. M.; Koks, C. A. M.; van Golde, R.; Kaaijk, E. M.; Schierbeek, J. M.; Klijn, N. F.; van Kasteren, Y. M.; Land, J. A.; Mol, B. W. J.; Hoek, A.; Groen, H.

    2017-01-01

    Study question: What is the cost-effectiveness of lifestyle intervention preceding infertility treatment in obese infertile women? Summary answer: Lifestyle intervention preceding infertility treatment as compared to prompt infertility treatment in obese infertile women is not a cost-effective

  20. Varicocele and male infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Fuglesang S.; Østergren, Peter; Dupree, James M.

    2017-01-01

    in semen quality after varicocelectomy do not always result in spontaneous pregnancy. Studies regarding possible pathophysiological mechanisms behind varicocele-induced infertility have tried to address these controversies. Oxidative stress seems to be a central mechanism; however, no single theory is able...... to explain the differential effect of varicoceles on infertility. As a consequence, careful patient selection for treatment based on couple fertility status, varicocele grade, and semen quality is critical for achieving a chance of a subsequent pregnancy. A substantial amount of data on the effects...

  1. Hyperprolactinemia and infertility: new insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical vignette: A 29-year-old woman is referred for management of infertility. After menarche at age 12, menses occurred irregularly for a year and then became regular. She initiated use of oral contraceptive pills at the age of 18, then stopped at age 27 to try to conceive. Evaluation revealed hyperprolactinemia with serum prolactin of 90 ng/ml; pituitary MRI showed a 6-mm microadenoma. Other pituitary function tested was normal. Therapy was initiated with bromocriptine, but it was poorly tolerated, with fatigue, nausea, and lightheadedness to the point of syncopal events during her work as a hairdresser. Treatment was changed to cabergoline, with similar difficulties. Prolactin levels declined to the 30s–40s, but she was never able to tolerate the medication sufficiently to attain normal prolactin levels, and menses were sporadic and infrequent, with only 2–3 occurring per year. She and her husband had not conceived despite regular unprotected intercourse. She asks whether other medical treatment options might be available for her infertility. PMID:23193578

  2. Cabozantinib for Initial Treatment of Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    FDA has approved cabozantinib (Cabometyx®) as an initial treatment for patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma. The approval adds another tyrosine kinase inhibitor to the available options for patients with advanced kidney cancer.

  3. Child development and quality of parenting in lesbian families: no psychosocial indications for a-priori withholding of infertility treatment. A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A.M. Hunfeld (Joke); B.C.J.M. Fauser (Bart); I.D. de Beaufort (Inez); J. Passchier (Jan)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractAmong fertility centres, much discussion focuses on whether to withhold infertility treatment from special patient groups (lesbians, prospective single parent(s), prospective parent(s) of relatively advanced age, or with severe diseases) because it is assumed that this

  4. Coping with infertility: a transcultural perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Liu, Botao; Li, Min

    2014-09-01

    To review the most important and interesting articles in infertility published in the last year. This systematic review covers 60 studies published in journals or dissertations in Science Direct and PubMed in the last year, including those related to prevention and treatment as well as related psychosocial services in infertility. We also propose some suggestions about coping with infertility in China. Infertility is a multidisciplinary problem that requires medical, social, and political efforts to prevent and offer infertile patients the best diagnostic, therapeutic, and psychosocial services. Cultural factors should be taken into consideration when designing coping strategies.

  5. Epidemiological Survey and Risk Factor Analysis of Recurrent Spontaneous Miscarriages in Infertile Women at Large Infertility Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Yan Wang

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Compared to patients with only a SSM, the conditions of patients with RSM are more complicated. To increase the success rate of assisted reproductive technology, factors including uterus cavity adhesion, cervical relaxation, endocrine disorders, and immune disorders should be treated before assisted reproduction is initiated. These data may provide treatment guidance for infertile patients with a history of RSM.

  6. Varicocele and Male Factor Infertility Treatment : A New Meta-analysis and Review of the Role of Varicocele Repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baazeem, Abdulaziz; Belzile, Eric; Ciampi, Antonio; Dohle, Gert; Jarvi, Keith; Salonia, Andrea; Weidner, Wolfgang; Zini, Armand

    2011-01-01

    Context: Varicocele is a common condition, found in many men who present for infertility evaluation. Objective: To assess the effect of varicocelectomy on male infertility. Evidence acquisition: A literature search was performed using Embase and Medline. Literature reviewed included meta-analyses

  7. Admissibility Investigation and Validation of Infertility Distress Scale (IDS) in Iranian Infertile Women

    OpenAIRE

    Arab-sheybani, Khadijeh; Janbozorgi, Masoud; Akyuz, Aygul

    2012-01-01

    Background Psychological stress has a profound effect on infertility and its treatment. The aim of this study was to develop a specific scale to determine distress levels among Iranian infertile women. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study the samples included 300 women (145 fertile and 155 infertile) who completed the Infertility Distress Scale (IDS) form. Data was analysed using correlation method and main component analysis. Results These results show that all 21 items had a ...

  8. Anxiety and depression symptoms among sub-fertile women, women pregnant after infertility treatment, and naturally pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih Joelsson, L; Tydén, T; Wanggren, K; Georgakis, M K; Stern, J; Berglund, A; Skalkidou, A

    2017-09-01

    Infertility has been associated with psychological distress, but whether these symptoms persist after achieving pregnancy via assisted reproductive technology (ART) remains unclear. We compared the prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms between women seeking for infertility treatment and women who conceived after ART or naturally. Four hundred and sixty-eight sub-fertile non-pregnant women, 2972 naturally pregnant women and 143 women pregnant after ART completed a questionnaire in this cross-sectional study. The Anxiety subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-A≥8) and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS≥12) were used for assessing anxiety and depressive symptoms, respectively. Multivariate Poisson regression models with robust variance were applied to explore associations with anxiety and depressive symptoms. The prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms among sub-fertile, non-pregnant women (57.6% and 15.7%, respectively) were significantly higher compared to women pregnant after ART (21.1% and 8.5%, respectively) and naturally pregnant women (18.8% and 10.3%, respectively). History of psychiatric diagnosis was identified as an independent risk factor for both anxiety and depressive symptoms. The presence of at least one unhealthy lifestyle behavior (daily tobacco smoking, weekly alcohol consumption, BMI≥25, and regular physical exerciseanxiety (Prevalence Ratio, PR: 1.24; 95%CI: 1.09-1.40) and depressive symptoms (PR: 1.25; 95%CI: 1.04-1.49). Women pregnant after ART showed no difference in anxiety and depressive symptoms compared to naturally pregnant women. However, early psychological counseling and management of unhealthy lifestyle behaviors for sub-fertile women may be advisable, particularly for women with a previous history of psychiatric diagnosis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. Clinical Effectiveness of Modified Laparoscopic Fimbrioplasty for the Treatment of Minimal Endometriosis and Unexplained Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E. Franjoine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study the reproductive outcomes of modified laparoscopic fimbrioplasty (MLF, a surgical technique designed to increase the working surface area of the fimbriated end of the fallopian tube. We postulated that an improvement in fimbrial function through MLF will improve reproductive outcomes. Design. Retrospective cohort study. Setting. Academic tertiary-care medical center. Patients. Women with minimal endometriosis or unexplained infertility, who underwent MLF during diagnostic laparoscopy (n=50 or diagnostic laparoscopy alone (n=87. Intervention. MLF involved gentle, circumferential dilatation of the fimbria and lysis of fimbrial adhesions bridging the fimbrial folds. Main Outcome Measures. The primary outcome was pregnancy rate and the secondary outcome was time to pregnancy. Results. The pregnancy rate for the MLF group was 40.0%, compared to 28.7% for the control group. The average time to pregnancy for the MLF group was 13 weeks, compared to 18 weeks for the control group. The pregnancy rate in the MLF group was significantly higher for patients ≤35 ys (51.5% versus 28.8%, but not for those >35 ys (17.6% versus 28.6%. Conclusion. MLF was associated with a significant increase in pregnancy rate for patients ≤35 ys.

  10. [Study of the correlation between 51 immune infertility patients of the Han nationality in Anhui and HLA-DQA1 gene and treatment of Mianbu III].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xin; Wang, Wang-jiu; Dai, Ning

    2011-03-01

    To explore the correlation between anti-sperm antibody-positive immune infertility patients and human leucocyte antigen (HLA) DQA1 gene, and to study the correlation between the treatment of Chinese medicine and pharmacy and HLA-DQA1 genotype. The polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP) technique was used in studying HLA-DQA1 genotypes of 51 anti-sperm antibody-positive immune infertility patients and 60 healthy subjects. Mianbu III (consisting of rehmannia root, white peony root, Fructus Comi, yam, barbary wolfberry fruit, moutan bark, and dwarf lilyturf root) was used in patients for three months. The HLA-DQA1 *0401 allele in the immune infertility group was obviously higher than that in the healthy control group (chi2 = 29.869, P HLA-DQA1 * 0401 turned to negative with statistical difference (chi2 = 5.24, P = 0.022). HLA-DQA1 *0401 allele might be predisposing gene of the anti-sperm antibody-positive immune infertility. The Chinese medicinal treatment was effective for the HLA-DQA1 *0401 allele patients.

  11. Infertility and Fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print About Infertility and Fertility "Infertility" is a term that describes when a ... infertility and recurrent pregnancy loss: A committee opinion. Fertility and Sterility, 99 (1), 63. American Society for ...

  12. Causes of Male Infertility

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's FAQs about In Vitro Fertilization REPRODUCTIVE ...

  13. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's FAQs about In Vitro Fertilization REPRODUCTIVE ...

  14. Causes of Male Infertility

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Donate ASRM Store Site Endowment Menu Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and ...

  15. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  16. Causes of Male Infertility

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  17. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and ... Page not found! Please click on one of the links in the navigation bar. FAQs Reproductive Health ...

  18. Practical approaches for design and analysis of clinical trials of infertility treatments: crossover designs and the Mantel-Haenszel method are recommended.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Michihiro; Sozu, Takashi; Sato, Tosiya

    2015-01-01

    Crossover designs have some advantages over standard clinical trial designs and they are often used in trials evaluating the efficacy of treatments for infertility. However, clinical trials of infertility treatments violate a fundamental condition of crossover designs, because women who become pregnant in the first treatment period are not treated in the second period. In previous research, to deal with this problem, some new designs, such as re-randomization designs, and analysis methods including the logistic mixture model and the beta-binomial mixture model were proposed. Although the performance of these designs and methods has previously been evaluated in large-scale clinical trials with sample sizes of more than 1000 per group, the actual sample sizes of infertility treatment trials are usually around 100 per group. The most appropriate design and analysis for these moderate-scale clinical trials are currently unclear. In this study, we conducted simulation studies to determine the appropriate design and analysis method of moderate-scale clinical trials for irreversible endpoints by evaluating the statistical power and bias in the treatment effect estimates. The Mantel-Haenszel method had similar power and bias to the logistic mixture model. The crossover designs had the highest power and the smallest bias. We recommend using a combination of the crossover design and the Mantel-Haenszel method for two-period, two-treatment clinical trials with irreversible endpoints. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Treatment of infertility does not increase the risk of ovarian cancer among women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronwald, Jacek; Glass, Karen; Rosen, Barry; Karlan, Beth; Tung, Nadine; Neuhausen, Susan L; Moller, Pal; Ainsworth, Peter; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A; Lubinski, Jan; Kotsopoulos, Joanne

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the relationship between use of fertility medication (i.e., selective estrogen receptor [ER] modulator, gonadotropin, or other) or infertility treatment (i.e., IVF or IUI) and the risk of ovarian cancer among women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. A matched case-control study of 941 pairs of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers with and without a diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Genetic clinics. Detailed information regarding treatment of infertility was collected from a routinely administered questionnaire. None. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals associated with fertility treatment. There was no significant relationship between the use of any fertility medication or IVF treatment (odds ratio, 0.66; 95% confidence interval 0.18-2.33) and the subsequent risk of ovarian cancer. Our findings suggest that treatment for infertility does not significantly increase the risk of ovarian cancer among women with a BRCA mutation. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  20. After the FLUSH trial: a prospective observational study of lipiodol flushing as an innovative treatment for unexplained and endometriosis-related infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brent, Kira; Hadden, Wendy E; Weston-Webb, Marianne; Johnson, Neil P

    2006-08-01

    To assess the demographics, efficacy and safety of lipiodol flushing fertility treatment. Prospective observational study. Secondary level care infertility clinic and radiology centre based in Auckland, New Zealand. The first cohort of 100 New Zealand women with infertility to undergo lipiodol flushing as an innovative fertility treatment. Women received lipiodol flushing performed by a hysterosalpingogram technique and were followed up at 6 months. Clinical pregnancy at 6 months post-treatment; and live birth or ongoing pregnancy. The overall pregnancy rate was 30% and the live birth or ongoing pregnancy rate 27%. For women under 40 years old, a 32% pregnancy rate and a 25% live birth or ongoing pregnancy rate were seen in women with unexplained infertility, and a 50% pregnancy rate and a 47% live birth or ongoing pregnancy rate were seen in women with endometriosis. Of women aged 40 years and older, the pregnancy rate was 13% and the live birth or ongoing pregnancy rate was 13%. The pregnancy rates included those occurring after additional interventions, such as intrauterine insemination and in vitro fertilisation, accounting for 12 of the 30 pregnancies. There were no treatment complications. This study provides further evidence of the efficacy and safety of lipiodol flushing fertility treatment.

  1. Male Infertility and Its Causes in Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshinobu Miyamoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is one of the most serious social problems facing advanced nations. In general, approximate half of all cases of infertility are caused by factors related to the male partner. To date, various treatments have been developed for male infertility and are steadily producing results. However, there is no effective treatment for patients with nonobstructive azoospermia, in which there is an absence of mature sperm in the testes. Although evidence suggests that many patients with male infertility have a genetic predisposition to the condition, the cause has not been elucidated in the vast majority of cases. This paper discusses the environmental factors considered likely to be involved in male infertility and the genes that have been clearly shown to be involved in male infertility in humans, including our recent findings.

  2. Paving the way for a gold standard of care for infertility treatment: improving outcomes through standardization of laboratory procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoolcraft, William; Meseguer, Marcos

    2017-10-01

    Infertility affects over 70 million couples globally. Access to, and interest in, assisted reproductive technologies is growing worldwide, with more couples seeking medical intervention to conceive, in particular by IVF. Despite numerous advances in IVF techniques since its first success in 1978, almost half of the patients treated remain childless. The multifactorial nature of IVF treatment means that success is dependent on many variables. Therefore, it is important to examine how each variable can be optimized to achieve the best possible outcomes for patients. The current approach to IVF is fragmented, with various protocols in use. A systematic approach to establishing optimum best practices may improve IVF success and live birth rates. Our vision of the future is that technological advancements in the laboratory setting are standardized and universally adopted to enable a gold standard of care. Implementation of best practices for laboratory procedures will enable clinicians to generate high-quality gametes, and to produce and identify gametes and embryos of maximum viability and implantation potential, which should contribute to improving take-home healthy baby rates. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. The role of steroid hormone supplementation in non-assisted reproductive technology treatments for unexplained infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaas, Alexander M; Hansen, Karl R

    2016-12-01

    Fertility treatment strategies are evolving, with a more rapid transition to assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatments after unsuccessful non-ART treatments. This trend increases the potential importance of adjuvant treatments in non-ART cycles, such as steroid hormone supplementation. It has been established that success rates of ART treatments are increased with the use of luteal support with progesterone. In the setting of non-ART cycles, however, the evidence is less clear, and clinical practices vary widely between providers and clinics. In this review, we aimed to provide an overview of the current evidence for the use of steroid hormone supplementation, including progesterone for luteal support, estrogens, androgens, and mineralocorticoids, in the setting of non-ART treatments for ovulatory women. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinicopathologic characteristics and treatment features of women with the incidental diagnosis of endometrial adenocarcinoma during infertility follow-up in Ankara, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayfun Gungor

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: The investigation of patients during infertility work-up provides an opportunity to evaluate the endometrium and its malignancies in young women, when the disease is in its early stage and symptom free. The standard surgical treatment for early-stage EC is total hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. However, conservative management of early stage EC with progestational drugs, especially in young patients who wish to preserve their fertility, is acceptable with the possibility of future pregnancies.

  5. Insurance coverage for male infertility care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupree, James M

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a common condition experienced by many men and women, and treatments are expensive. The World Health Organization and American Society of Reproductive Medicine define infertility as a disease, yet private companies infrequently offer insurance coverage for infertility treatments. This is despite the clear role that healthcare insurance plays in ensuring access to care and minimizing the financial burden of expensive services. In this review, we assess the current knowledge of how male infertility care is covered by insurance in the United States. We begin with an appraisal of the costs of male infertility care, then examine the state insurance laws relevant to male infertility, and close with a discussion of why insurance coverage for male infertility is important to both men and women. Importantly, we found that despite infertility being classified as a disease and males contributing to almost half of all infertility cases, coverage for male infertility is often excluded from health insurance laws. Excluding coverage for male infertility places an undue burden on their female partners. In addition, excluding care for male infertility risks missing opportunities to diagnose important health conditions and identify reversible or irreversible causes of male infertility. Policymakers should consider providing equal coverage for male and female infertility care in future health insurance laws.

  6. The impact of infertility on sexuality: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Maycock3

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most studies address medical treatment of infertility and psychosocial outcomes caused by infertility-related stress, but few studies examine the infertility’s impact on sexuality.Aim: A literature review was conducted to answer the questions: 1 How is sexual self concept impacted in infertile individuals and their partners? 2 Does infertility have a negative impact on sexual relationships? 3 Is sexual function affected by infertility? In answering these questions, we may develop a better understanding of sexuality in the context of infertility, and thus better inform infertility management. Ultimately the aim is to improve the quality of life for infertile couples.Method: A literature search was conducted for publications from 1990 to 2011 via the electronic databases PubMed, PsycInfo and Scopus, which focused on sexuality in infertile subjects or couples.Results: In this review, all studies were descriptive quantitative studies which mapped the different aspects of sexuality in the context of infertility. The results suggested that infertility and its treatment approaches for fertilisationcould lead to changes in sexual self-esteem, sexual relationship and sexual function.Conclusion: The literature substantiated that many infertile subjects experienced trouble in various aspects of sexuality. However, further research should examine the reciprocal relations between sexual self concept, sexual relationship and sexual function in the context of infertility. How these changes affect the partners of infertile subjects should also be addressed.

  7. Compliance to the recommended use of folic acid supplements for women in Sweden is higher among those under treatment for infertility than among fertile controls and is also related to socioeconomic status and lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murto, Tiina; Yngve, Agneta; Skoog Svanberg, Agneta; Altmäe, Signe; Salumets, Andres; Wånggren, Kjell; Stavreus-Evers, Anneli

    2017-01-01

    Background : Folate has been discussed in relation to fertility among women, but studies on women under treatment for infertility are lacking. Objective : The objective of this study was to investigate folic acid supplement use and folate status among women under treatment for infertility (hereafter infertile) and fertile women also in regard to socioeconomic and lifestyle factors. Design : Lifestyle and dietary habits, and use of dietary supplements were assessed using a questionnaire. Blood samples were obtained for analysis of folate status. 24-hour recall interviews were also performed. Results : Highly educated, employed and infertile women were most prone to using folic acid supplements. The infertile women had a significantly better folate status than the fertile women. Folate status did not correlate with socioeconomic or lifestyle factors. The infertile women were physically more active, smoked less and were employed. Our questionnaire data had only fair agreement with the data from 24-hour recalls, but the folate status data was clearly correlated to our questionnaire results. Conclusions : Infertile women were most prone to using folic acid supplements and had better folate status than the controls. High educational and employment status were found to be key factors for high compliance to the recommended use folic acid supplements.

  8. Psychopathology, emotional aspects and psychological counselling in infertility: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Berardis, D; Mazza, M; Marini, S; Del Nibletto, L; Serroni, N; Pino, M C; Valchera, A; Ortolani, C; Ciarrocchi, F; Martinotti, G; Di Giannantonio, M

    2014-01-01

    Over the years, infertility has been variably defined. Infertility affects approximately 80 million people from all parts of the world. An important area of discussion has been represented by the possible causal link between psychopathology and infertility. In the past, the prevalence of psychiatric problems among infertile couples was estimated to be 25-60%. The incidence of depression and anxiety in infertile couples is significantly high than in fertile controls and in the general population respectively. Infertility has been linked to obsessive-compulsive symptoms, psychoticism, substance abuse and eating disorders. Psychological impact of infertility is greater in women than in men. Additionally, authors found that infertile patients were more alexithymic than healthy controls. In relation to the different needs, different psychological therapeutic interventions may be indicated. Psychological counseling can provide valuable assistance in dealing with infertility treatments and their eventual failures.

  9. Infertility | Jose-Miller | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infertility is defined as failure to achieve pregnancy during one year of frequent, unprotected intercourse. Evaluation generally begins after 12 months, but it can be initiated earlier if infertility is suspected based on history or if the female partner is older than 35 years. Major causes of infertility include male factors, ovarian ...

  10. Missing Motherhood: Jordanian Women's Experiences with Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Mahmoud Obeidat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim, Background, and Introduction. Bearing and rearing children are an important part of life in nearly all cultures and are a central role for Jordanian Muslim women. Infertility can create anxiety, stress, and depression for couples who are infertile. Women frequently bear the emotional stigma of a couple’s infertility. There is a paucity of literature focusing on Jordanian Muslim women experiencing infertility and failed assistive reproductive technology. Therefore, this study explored these women’s lived experience. Methods. Qualitative data were collected through interviews with 30 Jordanian Muslim women who experienced failed assistive reproductive technology for infertility. Perceptions of experiences with failed treatment of infertility were documented and analyzed. Results. Major themes were identified: missing out on motherhood and living with infertility, experiencing marital stressors, feeling social pressure, experiencing depression and disappointment, having treatment associated difficulties, appreciating support from family and friends, using coping strategies, and fear of an unknown future. Discussion, Conclusion, and Implications for Clinical Practice. Being infertile significantly influences the physical, emotional, social, and spiritual health of Jordanian Muslim women as well as their quality of life. Perceived social support and personal coping strategies were used by study participants to mediate failed attempts to conceive. Designing and implementing culturally appropriate interventions for Muslim women globally who are experiencing infertility are essential.

  11. [The current role of microsurgery and in vitro fertilization in the treatment of tubal infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubuisson, J B; Aubriot, F X; Ranoux, C; Henrion, R

    1985-01-01

    Tubal sterility is an important cause of sterility in the couple. Its treatment has been revolutionised, firstly by the progress in microsurgery and, more recently, by the current progress in in vitro fertilisation. Consequently, the gynecologist must have a very good knowledge of sterility in the couple and of tubal pathology. The authors report the results of 400 microsurgical operations performed in the Maternity department of the Port-Royal hospital and compare these results with those of in vitro fertilisation. In the light of these results, they then attempt to define the therapeutic indications which depend on a very precise investigation of the condition of the tubes. Microsurgery and in vitro fertilisation constitute complementary approaches in cases which are difficult to evaluate.

  12. Infertility as a psychological problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolska, Magdalena Z; Bidzan, Mariola

    2011-01-01

    Recently there has been enormous progress in couple infertility treatment and diagnostics. Some couples cannot conceive despite the fact that there seems to be no objective somatic or immunologic reasons. In such situations gynaecologists are helpless and couples may be overwhelmed by a sense of defeat and hopelessness. Thus, consulting a psychologist or therapist on how to cope better with the problem may be a good solution. The objective of the following paper is to discuss the dilemmas of couples undergoing infertility treatment, related psychological problems, and to determine the need for psychological and therapeutic support. The study demonstrates numerous infertility causes and concludes that there is no universal method of dealing with them. Very frequently psychological and somatic problems overlap. Psychological causes are often the primary factors, but sometimes they are secondary derivatives of the therapeutic process. A wide scope of factors must be considered to attempt psychological analysis of patients treated for infertility including the influence of the family and relations within, reaction to the diagnosis and suggested treatment, the influence of religion on the treatment, the evaluation of the relations in the family of procreation, sexual life assessment, the sense of a woman's self-esteem and self-acceptance. Basing on empirical analysis it was concluded that all women treated for infertility want to create a full family. They have problems in coping with emotional liability during treatment and a sense of fear and failure. Understanding the psychological mechanisms observed in patients treated for infertility might help to diagnose the causes of their problems with facing the new, extremely difficult situation.

  13. Exploration of Infertile Couples’ Support Requirements: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Jafarzadeh-Kenarsari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to high prevalence of infertility, increasing demand for infertility treatment, and provision of high quality of fertility care, it is necessary for healthcare professionals to explore infertile couples’ expectations and needs. Identification of these needs can be a prerequisite to plan the effective supportive interventions. The current study was, therefore, conducted in an attempt to explore and to understand infertile couples’ experiences and needs. Materials and Methods: This is a qualitative study based on a content analysis approach. The participants included 26 infertile couples (17 men and 26 women and 7 members of medical personnel (3 gynecologists and 4 midwives as the key informants. The infertile couples were selected from patients attending public and private infertility treatment centers and private offices of infertility specialists in Isfahan and Rasht, Iran, during 2012-2013. They were selected through purposive sampling method with maximum variation. In-depth unstructured interviews and field notes were used for data gathering among infertile couples. The data from medical personnel was collected through semi-structured interviews. The interview data were analyzed using conventional content analysis method. Results: Data analysis revealed four main categories of infertile couples’ needs, including: i. Infertility and social support, ii. Infertility and financial support, iii. Infertility and spiritual support and iv. Infertility and informational support. The main theme of all these categories was assistance and support. Conclusion: The study showed that in addition to treatment and medical needs, infertile couples encounter various challenges in different emotional, psychosocial, communicative, cognitive, spiritual, and economic aspects that can affect various areas of their life and lead to new concerns, problems, and demands. Thus, addressing infertile couples’ needs and expectations alongside their

  14. Another face of violence against women: Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Rusen; Taner, Aylin; Guneri, Sezer Er; Yilmaz, Bulent

    2017-01-01

    Background & Objective: Violence against women is a widespread problem and has serious implications on women’s health. Infertility, in many ways, is a very stressful condition that affect social and marital life of a couple; moreover, compared to fertile women, infertile women are twice as vulnerable against violence. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of violence and define the effect of infertility on violence on women receiving infertility treatment. Methods: Descriptive and cross-sectional study was carried out 301 infertile women between November 2015 and August 2016 in a state hospital, Izmir. Data were collected as “Sociodemographic Characteristics Form” and “Infertile Women’s Exposure to Violence Determination Scale”. Results: The mean age of women was 31.77±5.46 years; the average duration of marriage was 6.93±4.53 years. About 32.5% of women stated that they have suffered from violence throughout their lives and 4.7% of women were still suffering from violence, while 5.0% of women were subjected to violence after infertility was diagnosed. Conclusion: It is an encouraging finding that infertile women have a low exposure to violence. However, despite a low violence rate, there is an increase in violence toward women who have been diagnosed with infertility. PMID:29067064

  15. [Evaluation of endometriosis fertility index in follow-up treatment of endometriosis combined with infertility patients after laparoscopic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, R Y; Wu, X; Sheng, J; Zheng, P; Zhou, Q; Duan, A H; Zhang, J P; Zhang, Y L; Lu, D

    2017-04-25

    Objective: To explore the application of endometriosis fertility index (EFI) in guidance after laparoscopic surgery of endometriosis patients combined with infertility and to explore methods to improve pregnancy rate in different EFI groups. Methods: A prospective research was done in endometriosis patients combined with infertility in Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital from January 2010 to June 2011, after laparoscopic surgery, these 146 patients were divided into 3 groups by EFI score. Using different pregnancy guidance, these patients had 5 years follow-up. Results: (1) The 5 years overall pregnancy rate was 89.0% (130/146). The pregnancy rate was 95.7% (45/47) in EFI≥9 group, 92.8% (77/83) in EFI 5-8 group and 8/16 in EFI≤4 group, three groups were all reach satisfactory pregnancy rate; the rate of the first two groups had no statistically significance ( P= 0.498), but had significant difference with the last group ( Pendometriosis patients combined with infertility after laparoscopic surgery. EFI score guidance, strict post-operation management and positive pregnancy scheme could significantly improve the pregnancy rate of endometriosis patients with infertility.

  16. Cognitive coping, goal adjustment, and depressive and anxiety symptoms in people undergoing infertility treatment : a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaij, V.; Garnefski, N.; Schroevers, M.J.; Weijmer, J.; Helmerhorst, F.

    2010-01-01

    The relationships between cognitive coping strategies, goal adjustment, and symptoms of depression and anxiety were studied in people with fertility problems. Both cross-sectional and prospective relationships were studied in a sample of 313 patients attending an infertility clinic. Self-report

  17. Cognitive Coping, Goal Adjustment, and Depressive and Anxiety Symptoms in People Undergoing Infertility Treatment A Prospective Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaij, Vivian; Garnefski, Nadia; Schroevers, Maya J.; Weijmer, Janneke; Helmerhorst, Frans

    The relationships between cognitive coping strategies, goal adjustment, and symptoms of depression and anxiety were studied in people with fertility problems. Both cross-sectional and prospective relationships were studied in a sample of 313 patients attending an infertility clinic. Self-report

  18. Retinoblastoma: concerning its initiation and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Ping Deng

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Retinoblastoma (RB is the most common intraocular cancer of infancy and childhood. This cancer is initiated by mutation on RB1, the tumor suppressor gene that is responsible for the regulation of both cell cycle and gnome stability in retinal cells. Patients with a constitutional mutation on RB1 can be inherited. RB occurs approximately 1 in every 15 000-20 000 live births. The worldwide mortality for this cancer is about 5%-11%. However, this rate rises to about 40%-70% in developing countries due to a delay in diagnosis. A wide variety of options are available for the treatment, but often a combination of therapies is adopted to optimize individualized care.

  19. INFERTILITY IN A COMMUNITY AND CLINIC-BASED SAMPLE OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2006-01-01

    Jan 1, 2006 ... in research on the social consequences and psychological disorders of infertility in ... for infertility treatment, and new reproductive ... couples (8-10). The WHO study documented that, with regards to the aetiology of infertility, 'Africa is different' compared to Latin America and Asia: i) infection was the major ...

  20. Experiencing Male Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmée Hanna

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the qualitative research literature that exists in relation to men’s experiences of male infertility. Since men have often been marginalized in the realm of reproduction, including academic research on infertility, it is important to focus on any qualitative research that gives voices to male perspectives and concerns. Given the distress documented by studies of infertile women, we focus in particular on the emotive responses and lived experiences of men in relation to infertility. In this article then, we present an analysis of the core themes across 19 qualitative articles, which include “infertility as crisis”; “emoting infertility- men as “being strong”’ “infertility as a source of stigma”; and the “desire for fatherhood.” In light of these insights, we identify key areas for future research and development including men’s emotional responses to infertility, how men seek support for infertility, the intersection between masculinity and infertility, the relationship between the desire to father and infertility, and the outcomes of infertility for men in terms of other aspects of their lives. We suggest that such research would facilitate making the experiences of men more central within our understandings of infertility within a field that has primarily been female focused.

  1. Investigating Infertility-Related Stress and Adoption in Iranian Infertile Females with Assisted Reproductive Technology Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayebe Hajiyan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Using Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART is a stressful experience marked by lengthy and invasive medical procedures, high financial cost and relatively low success rate. Adoption is considered as one of the infertility treatment methods that can have great impact on healing emotional problems of infertile couples and can improve their relationship. Objectives The current study aimed to investigate infertility-related stress and adoption in Iranian Infertile females with a history of ART failure, during year 2015. Methods This was a cross sectional study in which 30 Iranian infertile females, 30 to 45 years old, with primary infertility of five years or more, and history of ART failure, were investigated. Data collection instruments included the questionnaire of infertility and demographic factors, fertility problem inventory (FPI and adoption questionnaire. The data were analyzed by SPSS V22, using descriptive statistics and Pearson test to assess possible correlations. Results The mean of the total score of infertility stress of the participants was 186.1 ± 29.46 (moderate to high. All participants showed some level of infertility stress. The mean score of adoption was 38.4 ± 3.73 (moderate acceptance, 53.33% of which showed moderate acceptance. There was no relationship between infertility stress and adoption (correlation = - 0.13, P = 0.48. Conclusions Infertile females with a history of unsuccessful ART had a high level of infertility stress and moderate acceptance of adoption. We must pay more attention to psychological aspects of infertility and failure of treatment. There is an obvious need to increase society awareness about adoption and promote “adoption” as a sensible choice to form a family.

  2. Knowledge, attitude, and practices of infertility among Saudi couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfotouh MA

    2013-07-01

    treatment by 6.7% and 44.2% of IVF patients, respectively. Compared with fertile patients, IVF patients were significantly less likely to favor divorce (38.5% versus 57.6%; P = 0.001 or marriage to a second wife (62.5% versus 86.2%; P < 0.001, if the woman could not have a baby. The patients with infertility had more favorable attitudes toward fertility drugs (87.5% versus 68.4%; P = 0.003 and having a test tube baby (92.4% versus 70.3%; P < 0.001. Child adoption was accepted as an option for treatment by the majority of IVF patients (60.6% and fertile outpatients (71.5%. Alternative treatments previously practiced by the IVF patients to improve fertility include practicing Ruqia (61%, using alternative medicine (42%, engaging in physical exercise (39%, eating certain foods (22%, and quitting smoking (12%. Conclusion: These findings have implications for health care providers regarding the reluctance that couples experiencing fertility problems may have, at least initially, to accept some interventions required for the couple to conceive. Keywords: infertility, knowledge, attitude, practice, KAP, misconceptions

  3. Modifiable Risk Factors and Infertility: What are the Connections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Brooke V.; Abusief, Mary; Missmer, Stacey A.

    2015-01-01

    Infertility is a relatively common condition, greatly affecting couples medically and psychologically. Although infertility treatment is safe, it can be time-intensive, expensive and increase the risk of multiple gestations. Thus, to reduce costs and risks, couples may initially consider lifestyle change to increase their fertility and chances of pregnancy. For many of the diet factors studied (for example: caffeine, soy, protein, iron), there are conflicting data. However, there are some items men and women consume that are detrimental to fertility, such as alcohol and tobacco. The data on exercise are varied but may have an effect on ovulation and fertility - positive or negative. Body mass index appears to impact fertility also, with obesity in both men and women negatively affecting pregnancy rates. In addition, there remains concern and a growing body of research on environmental toxin exposures and reproductive health. Finally, supporting patients through infertility diagnosis and treatment is critical, as psychological stress may impact conception. It is imperative that the relationship between lifestyle factors and fertility continue to be explored as to lessen the morbidity associated with infertility. PMID:27594813

  4. Infertility Research at the NICHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Studies are also under way to identify effective treatments for infertility. Obesity in Early Adolescence Alters Sex-Specific Hormone Production Research shows that obesity is associated with increased production of androgens in adult women and during late female puberty or adolescence. Androgens ...

  5. Cognitive coping, goal adjustment, and depressive and anxiety symptoms in people undergoing infertility treatment: a prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Kraaij, V.; Garnefski, N.; Schroevers, M.J.; Weijmer, J.; Helmerhorst, F.

    2010-01-01

    The relationships between cognitive coping strategies, goal adjustment, and symptoms of depression and anxiety were studied in people with fertility problems. Both cross-sectional and prospective relationships were studied in a sample of 313 patients attending an infertility clinic. Self-report questionnaires were filled out at home. Positive refocusing, rumination and catastrophizing, and goal reengagement were related to symptoms of depression and anxiety. When looking at the long-term effe...

  6. Comparison of Treatment Outcomes of Infertile Women by Clomiphene Citrate and Letrozole with Gonadotropins Underwent Intrauterine Insemination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyede Afsar Sharafy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to compare the effect of clomiphene and letrozole in ovulatory stimulation in infertile women under intrauterine insemination who referred to Mahdiyeh infertility clinic during 2008-2009. 106 infertile women were randomly divided into two equal groups. Patients were treated with 5 mg of letrozole daily (in letrozole group or 100 mg of clomiphene citrate daily (in clomiphene group for five days starting on day 3 of their menses. Dose and time of FSH was similar in the two groups. Number of follicles, endometrial thickness, Pregnancy rate and prevalence of complications were compared in the two groups. Mean (±SD of age in letrozole and clomiphene groups was 26.3 ±3.9 and 25.2 ±4.9 respectively (P=0.186. Average number of follicles was 2.5 ± 1.65 in letrozole group and 2.36 ± 1.4 in clomiphene group (P=0.764. β-hCG was positive in 11 (20.8% in letrozole and 12 (22.6% in clomiphene groups (P=0.814. Pregnancy rate was 20.8% and 22.6% in letrozole and clomiphene group respectively (P=0.814. There was no difference in rate of abortion between groups. Endometrial thickness (ET at the time of hCG administration in the letrozole (6.8 ±1.5 mm and in clomiphene (6.6 ±1.2 mm (P=0.615. But ET>7.4 mm was found in 2 cased (3.8% in clomiphene group and 12 cases (%22.8 in letrozole groups (P=0.01. It appears that letrozole and clomiphene have similar outcome infertile women under intrauterine insemination and these drugs are good alternative for each others.

  7. Prevalence of Infertility Problems among Iranian Infertile Patients Referred to Royan Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Sepidarkish

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Few studies have been conducted on the infertility problems in Iran. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of infertility problems and related factors in Iranian infertile patients. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 405 infertile patients referred to Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran, between 2014 and 2015, were selected by simple random sampling. Participants completed the Fertility Problem Inventory (FPI including 46 questions in five domains (social concern, sexual concern, relationship concern, rejection of parenthood, and need for parenthood. Mean difference between male and female was verified using independent-samples Student’s t test. A generalized linear model (GLM was also used for testing the effect of variables on the fertility problems. Data was analyzed using Stata software version 13. Results: The mean age (SD of participants was 31.28 (5.42. Our results showed that 160 infertile men (95.23% were classified as very high prevalence of infertility problems. Among infertile women, 83 patients (35.02% were as very high prevalence of infertility problems, and 154 patients (64.98% were as high prevalence. Age (P<0.001, sex (P<0.001, a history of abortion (P=0.009, failure of previous treatment (P<0.001, and education (P=0.014 had a significant relationship with FPI scores. Conclusion: Bases on the results of current study, an younger male with lower education level, history of abortion and history of previous treatments failure experienced more infertility problems.

  8. Parental infertility and sexual maturation in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Basso, Olga; Obel, Carsten; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard; Shrestha, Anshu; Olsen, Jørn

    2009-02-01

    The reproductive health of children born of infertile couples may be affected by infertility treatment or factors associated with infertility. We examined sexual maturation in children of parents with infertility. We used data from a follow-up of 3382 girls and 2810 boys born between 1984 and 1987 in the Aalborg-Odense Birth Cohort. We had mothers' report of time to pregnancy (TTP) and infertility treatment (at the time, mostly hormonal) from the pregnancy questionnaire administered in 1984-1987, and the children's report of their own sexual maturation from the follow-up questionnaire administered in 2005, when they were between 18 and 21 years old. Many reported age only in year when they had the events related to sexual maturation, and for each event, we imputed the month based on the median month at each year of age among those reporting both years and months. In girls, the mean age at menarche was 13.3 years and, in boys, the mean age at appearance of acne, voice break, regular shaving and first nocturnal emission were 14.5, 14.5, 17.2 and 14.7 years, respectively. We saw no significant differences in age at these events among children born of either fertile (with TTP of 0-12 months and no treatment), untreated infertile (with TTP of more than 12 months and no treatment) or treated infertile couples (with a history of examination or treatment for infertility). Our data suggest no significant association between parental infertility or hormonal treatment and timing of sexual maturation in the offspring.

  9. Early Marriage: a Policy for Infertility Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Karimzadeh

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Female fertility begins to decline many years prior to the onset of menopause despite continued regular ovulatory cycles. Age related infertility is due to oocyte abnormalities and decreased ovarian reserve. Treatment of infertility when the cause is limited to decreased ovarian reserve is empirical at present except for oocyte donation. This mini review of the literature covers all available English biomedical journals that have been published from 1995 to 2008. The search based on combination of the words age, fertility, infertility, and oocyte abnormalities. The important findings from this search strategy are summarized and presented in the sub headings including female age and fertility, miscarriage and in vitro fertilization. Regarding infertility prevention, this mini review suggested that early marriage is a primordial, effective, inexpensive and easy way to prevent infertility.

  10. Is Any Press Good Press? The Impact of Media Portrayals of Infertility on Young Adults' Perceptions of Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangster, Sarah L; Lawson, Karen L

    2015-12-01

    Infertility is an issue of current concern across North America. The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada advocates for public education regarding infertility issues. Public education is supposed to be a fundamental objective of news media. However, it is uncertain whether the media are acting as good partners to the medical profession in this objective of educating the public, and young women in particular. Recent findings suggest that print news tends to present infertility using high-alarm framing strategies; however, the impact of this framing on news consumers is unknown. The purpose of this study was to understand the effects of high- versus low-alarm frames on consumers of infertility-related news. In this experiment, 131 undergraduate students were randomly assigned to read infertility-focused news articles judged to employ either high- or low-alarm framing strategies in presenting infertility. Participants subsequently completed various psychological, emotional, and knowledge measures to gauge the impact of the news exposure. The participants exposed to the high-alarm framing showed higher levels of perceived personal susceptibility to infertility, marginally higher levels of worry about infertility, and significantly lower levels of infertility-related knowledge than those exposed to the low-alarm framing. The manner in which the news media report on infertility has repercussions on how individuals think and feel about infertility. The findings of this study can inform health care providers about how the media are shaping perceptions of infertility, and can assist professional bodies interested in undertaking public education initiatives.

  11. Domestic violence in Iranian infertile women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhan, Zohre; Ozgoli, Giti; Azar, Mahyar; Alavimajd, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Millions of men and women suffer from infertility worldwide. In many cultures, infertile women are at risk of social and emotional problems. Infertility may affect the public health in many countries. Domestic violence is the intentional use of physical force, power or threat against oneself, another person or another group or community which leads to injury, death, mental harm, lack of development or deprivation. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of domestic violence against infertile women who referred to the infertility centres of Tehran, Iran in 2011. This was cross- sectional descriptive study conducted on 400 infertile women who were selected through convenient sampling method. The questionnaire used in this study included two sections: a demographic section with questions about demographic characteristics of the infertile women and their husbands; and the domestic violence questionnaire with questions about physical, emotional and sexual violence. Data were analysed by SPSS16; descriptive statistics, Spearman's test, t- test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and logistic regression were used for data analysis. Four hundred women with the average age of 30.50 ± 6.16 years participated in the study; of whom, 34.7% experienced domestic violence physical violence (5.3%), emotional violence (74.3%) and sexual violence (47.3%). Domestic violence was significantly associated with unwanted marriage, number of IVFs, drug abuse, emotional status of the women, smoking and addiction or drug abuse of the spouse, mental and physical diseases of the husband (pwomen experience violence in Iran. Domestic violence against infertile women is a problem that should not be ignored. Clinicians should identify abused women. Providing counseling services to women in infertility treatment centers is suggested to prevent domestic violence against infertile women.

  12. Parents' anxiety and depression symptoms after successful infertility treatment and spontaneous conception: does singleton/twin pregnancy matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendais, I; Figueiredo, B

    2016-10-01

    Does mode of conception [spontaneous/after infertility treatment (IT)], type of pregnancy (singleton/twin) and parent gender have an effect on anxiety and depression levels and trajectories during pregnancy and the post-partum period? Conception after IT was associated with a transitory increase in anxiety during the perinatal period for parents of singletons, while for IT parents of twins higher levels of psychopathological symptoms tended to persist during pregnancy and the post-partum period. Most previous studies have shown that successful IT is not associated with poor psychological well-being during pregnancy and the post-partum period, but there is also some evidence for heightened pregnancy-related anxiety, lower self-esteem and lower self-efficacy. Parents of twins experience increased postnatal anxiety and depression. This prospective longitudinal study assessed 267 couples (N = 534) at each trimester of pregnancy, after childbirth and at 3 months post-partum. The sample comprised 36 couples who had conceived after IT (19 twin pairs and 17 singletons) and 231 couples who had conceived spontaneously (SC; 28 twin pairs and 203 singletons). Couples were recruited at four public hospitals in Portugal, and self-report measures of anxiety and depression symptoms were administered. IT parents reported higher anxiety after childbirth than parents who SC, regardless of pregnancy type. IT parents of twins showed higher anxiety at mid-pregnancy, as well as higher anxiety and depression at 3 months post-partum than IT parents of singletons. Among IT mothers, those who had twins exhibited higher depression after childbirth than those who had singletons. Differences according to mode of conception, pregnancy type and parents gender over time were also noted. During pregnancy, IT parents of twins showed no significant change in depression scores, while the other groups depression scores statistically significantly decreased over time. From pregnancy to the post

  13. Male Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other options to make a baby. Assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatments can include: Intrauterine insemination (IUI). A ... Featured ContentSports and Exercise at Every AgeRead Article >>Sports and Exercise at Every AgeDiabetesRead Article >>DiabetesTics and ...

  14. Infertility Treatments and Determination of Fetus Gender don’t Challenge God’s Justice and Wisdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abbaszadeh Jahromi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Application of modern technology to cure barrenness has arisen challenges in various aspects some of which are ethical, legal and ideological. One of the ideological challenges, inserted in the above topic, has been discussed through this essay.   The cause-effect system ruling the universe, helps a lot to determine God’s the Almighty Justice and Wisdom in creation. Therefore, the creation of the barren person, in the framework of that system, doesn’t conflict with His Justice and Wisdom. Of course, based on the penal justice, God will compensate these deficiencies by either giving rewards or mitigating the punishment. So, unveiling the creation mysteries-and the infertility of some diseases or the ability to do some affairs such as the selection of fetus gender doesn’t derange the best Divine system ruling the universe. Besides, these Facts prove the existence of such a system because if the relations weren’t established in the system, how could we access to these facts.   By understanding the best system and the accurate determining of the ordination ruling it, we conclude that fetus gender selection and modern infertility treatments can’t be judged as the interference in God’s creation and the conflict with God’s Justice rather the stability of the best system is proved through the occurance of such affairs.

  15. Would Phoenix Dactyflera Pollen (palm seed) be considered as a treatment agent against Males’ infertility? A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahi, Soghra; Rajaei, Minoo; Malekzadeh, Kianoosh; Kalantar, Seyed Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Oxidative stress is a key factor involved in male infertility, which is due to an unnatural increase in environmental free radicals. In the majority of cases, this has a negative effect on a male’s ability to impregnate a female. Currently, it is believed that spermatozoa can be protected against the damages induced by oxidative stress by saturating sperm with antioxidants. The antioxidant role of phoenix dactylifera pollen is capable of collecting the reactive oxygen and neutralizing it in and out of body cells. The present research provides a review of the antioxidant roles of phoenix dactylifera pollen on male infertility. Methods This research is based on English-Language studies and articles found by comprehensively reviewing electronic databases, websites, books, and academic articles over the last 10 years. Results The phenolic compounds of phoenix dactylifera pollen, due to the existing polyphenols, are strong chelators of heavy metals. Therefore, they are effective in eliminating environmental hydroxyl radicals. Moreover, these plants have high capacities of eliminating hydroxyl free radicals, picrylhydrazyl, diphenyl and phoenix dactylifera pollen and also inhibiting glutathione-S-transferase (GST). Conclusion Currently, the use of herbal antioxidants to neutralize reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reduce the negative effects of oxidative stress on body cells and tissues has attracted researchers’ attention. Various substances, such as flavonoids and catechins, perform their antioxidant role by increasing the concentration of glutathione peroxidase. The final product of this process is an increase in the number of motile sperm, which can have significant effects on fertility. PMID:26816585

  16. Psychological and social aspects of infertility in men: an overview of the evidence and implications for psychologically informed clinical care and future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jane R W; Hammarberg, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Research concerning the psychosocial aspects of infertility and infertility treatment focuses more often on women than men. The aim of this review was to synthesize the English-language evidence related to the psychological and social aspects of infertility in men and discuss the implications of these reports for clinical care and future research. A structured search identified 73 studies that reported data concerning the desire for fatherhood and the psychological and social aspects of diagnosis, assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment and unsuccessful treatment among men with fertility difficulties. The studies are diverse in conceptualisation, design, setting and data collection, but the findings were reasonably consistent. These studies indicated that fertile and infertile childless men of reproductive age have desires to experience parenthood that are similar to those of their female counterparts; in addition, diagnosis and initiation of treatment are associated with elevated infertility-specific anxiety, and unsuccessful treatment can lead to a state of lasting sadness. However, rates of clinically significant mental health problems among this patient population are no higher than in the general population. Infertile men who are socially isolated, have an avoidant coping style and appraise stressful events as overwhelming, are more vulnerable to severe anxiety than men without these characteristics. Men prefer oral to written treatment information and prefer to receive emotional support from infertility clinicians rather than from mental health professionals, self-help support groups or friends. Nevertheless, structured, facilitated psycho-educational groups that are didactic but permit informal sharing of experiences might be beneficial. There are gaps in knowledge about factors governing seeking, persisting with and deciding to cease treatment; experiences of invasive procedures; parenting after assisted conception; adoption and infertility

  17. AB174. Erectile dysfunction and usage of PDE5-inhibitors in male partner of infertile couple

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Seung-Hun; Kim, Dong Suk; Kwon, Sung Won; Ahn, Tai Young

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Infertility is a major source of life stress and could be associated with male sexual dysfunction. We investigated sexual function in male partner of infertile couples during timed intercourse (TI) and the usage of PDE5-inhibitor for ED treatment Materials and methods Male partners of couples with more than 1 year of infertility period seeking medical care or an evaluation of couple infertility were enrolled. In conjunction with infertility evaluation, the participants completed ...

  18. Ketotifen, a mast cell blocker improves sperm motility in asthenospermic infertile men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Saharkhiz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of ketotifen on sperm motility of asthenospermic infertile men. Setting and Design: It is a prospective study designed in vivo. Materials and Methods: In this interventional experimental study, a total of 40 infertile couples with asthenospermic infertility factor undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART cycles were enrolled. The couples were randomly assigned to one of two groups at the starting of the cycle. In control group (n = 20, the men did not receive Ketotifen, while in experiment group (n = 20, the men received oraly ketotifen (1 mg Bid for 2 months. Semen analysis, under optimal circumferences, was obtained prior to initiation of treatment. The second semen analysis was done 2-3 weeks after stopped ketotifen treatment and sperm motility was defined. Clinical pregnancy was identified as the presence of a fetal sac by vaginal ultrasound examination. Statistical Analysis Used: All data are expressed as the mean ± standard error of mean (SEM. t test was used for comparing the data of the control and treated groups. Results: The mean sperm motility increased significantly (from 16.7% to 21.4% after ketotifen treatment (P < 0.001. This sperm motility improvement was more pronounced in the primary infertility cases (P < 0.003. The rate of pregnancy was 12.5% in infertile couples that their men receiving 1 mg/twice a day ketotifen. In 52% of infertile men′s semen, the percentage of sperm motility was increased from 5% to 35% and this sperm motility improvement was also observed in 33% of necrospermia (0% motility cases. Conclusion: These results suggest that ketotifen may represent as a novel therapeutic approach to improve sperm motility in the infertile men with cause of asthenospermia or necrospermia.

  19. Psychological Factors Affecting Infertile Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sati Unal

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: This study was performed to determine the psychological factors affecting infertile women presenting at the infertility outpatients department. METHOD: The sample of this cross-sectional study consisted of 344 women who presented at the IVF center of a special branch hospital or a university hospital, March 2008 through September 2008, as determined by the non-random sampling method. All participating women gave their informed consent. The data were collected using the Data Form that consisted of questions on socio-demographic features and the Infertility Distress Scale (IDS. In the results, percentages were provided along with the Kruskal-Wallis H, Mann-Whitney U and Spearman correlation tests. RESULTS: The mean IDS was 39.01±9.6. There was a statistically significant linear relationship between the mean IDS score and age (r=0.106, p=0.048, marriage duration (r=0.232, p<0.001 and duration of desire to have a child (r=0.217, p<0.001. Women who were primary school graduates (X²=13.03, p=0.004, did not work (p=0.007, had no social security benefits (p=0.021 or from low socioeconomic status (X²=24.85, p<0.001 had significantly higher mean IDS scores. CONCLUSION: The results of this study show women become more adversely affected by infertility as their age, duration of marriage, and duration of desire to have a child increase. Women who are primary school graduates, do not work, have no social security benefits or have lower income are affected more negatively. We believe that taking these features into account when evaluating and planning supportive approaches for women presenting at the infertility treatment center and determining the psychological state of the women using the IDS will increase treatment success. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(5.000: 481-486

  20. Psychological Disorders among Iranian Infertile Couples Undergoing Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Mansoureh; Salsabili, Nasser; Akbari Asbagh, Firouzeh; Teymouri, Robab; Pourmand, Golamreza; Soleimanieh Naeini, Tahereh

    2017-03-01

    Worldwide, infertility affects 10%-15% of couples and most of them seek medical help including Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) treatments. Undergoing ART treatments create many physical and emotional burdens. This study examined the psychological consequences of infertility in Iranian infertile males and females as well as their spouses, unlike previous studies that examined mainly females with infertility. Subjects in this descriptive analytical design were recruited from the IVF Department of Mirza Koochak Khan Hospital and the Rouyesh Infertility Treatment Center of Tehran, Iran between Aug 2014 and Sep 2015. Overall, 256 couples (64% response rate), consisting of 78 infertile male and their spouses and 50 infertile female and their spouses, were included in this research. The psychological disorders were measured by the Persian version of Symptoms Checklist-90-Revised and Cattle Inventory. Psychological disorders of infertile couples are significantly associated with increasing age, higher education, longer duration of infertility and unemployment ( P ART treatments.

  1. Association Between Pesticide Residue Intake From Consumption of Fruits and Vegetables and Pregnancy Outcomes Among Women Undergoing Infertility Treatment With Assisted Reproductive Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yu-Han; Williams, Paige L; Gillman, Matthew W; Gaskins, Audrey J; Mínguez-Alarcón, Lidia; Souter, Irene; Toth, Thomas L; Ford, Jennifer B; Hauser, Russ; Chavarro, Jorge E

    2018-01-01

    Animal experiments suggest that ingestion of pesticide mixtures at environmentally relevant concentrations decreases the number of live-born offspring. Whether the same is true in humans is unknown. To examine the association of preconception intake of pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables (FVs) with outcomes of infertility treatment with assisted reproductive technologies (ART). This analysis included 325 women who completed a diet assessment and subsequently underwent 541 ART cycles in the Environment and Reproductive Health (EARTH) prospective cohort study (2007-2016) at a fertility center at a teaching hospital. We categorized FVs as having high or low pesticide residues using a validated method based on surveillance data from the US Department of Agriculture. Cluster-weighted generalized estimating equations were used to analyze associations of high- and low-pesticide residue FV intake with ART outcomes. Adjusted probabilities of clinical pregnancy and live birth per treatment cycle. In the 325 participants (mean [SD] age, 35.1 [4.0] y; body mass index, 24.1 [4.3]), mean (SD) intakes of high- and low-pesticide residue FVs were 1.7 (1.0) and 2.8 (1.6) servings/d, respectively. Greater intake of high-pesticide residue FVs was associated with a lower probability of clinical pregnancy and live birth. Compared with women in the lowest quartile of high-pesticide FV intake (women in the highest quartile (≥2.3 servings/d) had 18% (95% CI, 5%-30%) lower probability of clinical pregnancy and 26% (95% CI, 13%-37%) lower probability of live birth. Intake of low-pesticide residue FVs was not significantly related to ART outcomes. Higher consumption of high-pesticide residue FVs was associated with lower probabilities of pregnancy and live birth following infertility treatment with ART. These data suggest that dietary pesticide exposure within the range of typical human exposure may be associated with adverse reproductive consequences.

  2. Natural regeneration response to initial treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. E. Gruell; W. C. Schmidt; S. F. Arno; W. J. Reich; James Menakis

    1999-01-01

    During the 1907 to 1911 harvest, logs were transported to landings by means of log chutes, horse skidding, and steam donkey yarding. Slash was disposed of by piling and burning, which the purchaser considered to be an unnecessary practice (Koch 1998). Usually this type of logging and postlogging treatment results in relatively light site disturbance, and the photo...

  3. Dream changes following initiation of efavirenz treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, María; Pareja, Juan Antonio; Losa, Juan Emilio; Valverde, José Francisco; Espinosa, Alfredo; Gujarro, Carlos

    2011-02-12

    The objective was to evaluate abnormalities in the quality of dreams after the use of efavirenz. Ten HIV patients without neuropsychiatric diseases underwent a polisomnography (PSG) study before and after efavirenz treatment, [after 10.4 (SD 5.4) days]. Patients were awoke after REM phases to record their dreams. All patients had therapeutic efavirenz plasma levels. Dreams were recalled in 84% before efavirenz and 43% after efavirenz (p=0.024). There were no differences in the mean number of words per dream before and after efavirenz treatment (61.9 versus 47.5, p=0.115). The proportion of dreams with no neutral emotional content (either pleasant or unpleasant) was 37.5% in the first night and 66.7% in the second night (p=0.046). There were a higher proportion of dreams with no neutral emotional content after efavirenz treatment in this group of patients. However, no longer dreams and no more dreams with negative emotional content were noted. Dream recall was lower after efavirenz treatment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. ETHNOBOTANICAL SURVEY OF PHOENIX DACTYLIFERA L. POLLEN USED FOR THE TREATMENT OF INFERTILITY PROBLEMS IN ALGERIAN OASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmani, Cherifa; Chabane, Djamila; Bouguedoura, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    Background: The Phoenix dactylifera L. (date palm) is known for its traditional medicinal properties across the history of native population in Algerian Sahara. There is a large trend of consumption of date palm pollen preparations in many human infertility cases in our country. However, the validity has not been scientifically tested. There has been no direct scientific research on this application. This study was undertaken to identify cultivars with greater potential in the traditional medicine uses. To evaluate the effects of date palm pollen on some sexual behavioural parameters of male adult rats, we tested the role of pollen powder from Deglet Nour cultivar on some male reproductive parameters. Materials and Methods: An Ethnobotanical survey was conducted in 17 oases in southern Algeria to identify all cultivars with medicinal interest. Local people were interviewed with open questions. A questionnaire and personal interviews for data collection were designed to record important cultivars, parts used and preparations. To determine the active constituents of date palm pollen used in traditional medicine, a phytochemical screening was performed. The effects of oral administration of date palm pollen suspension on male adult rats were investigated on body and testicle weights, serum testosterone level. Results: 131 prominent cultivars were found within 12 cultivars containing various parts with medicinal effects. Some primary and secondary metabolites were detected by phytochemical screening. The pollen increased the weight of the body, testicles and enhanced the serum testosterone level of male rats treated. Conclusion: The present survey has provided the identification and recognition of date palm cultivars used in traditional Saharan medicine. Date palm pollen could improve sexual activities in male infertility cases and may be attempted to derive drugs. PMID:28480429

  5. Effects of a psychological intervention on Quality of life in infertile couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Abedinia

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to determine factors affecting depression in infertile couples and effect of psychological intervention on pregnancy rate of infertile couples.Materials and Methods: In this study, 638 infertile patients referring to a university infertility clinic were evaluated. Among them, 140 couples with different levels of depression in at least one of the spouses were found and the study was continued by dividing them randomly into two groups, entering a randomized clinical trial. Patients in the case group received 6-8 sessions of psychotherapy before infertility treatment and were given daily Fluoxetin 20- 60 mg at the same period, and the control group did not receive any intervention. Three questionnaires including Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, Stress Scale (Holmes-Rahe and a sociodemographic questionnaire were applied for all patients. Pregnancy rate was compared between two groups.Results: Depression was initially found in 48% of women and 23.8% of men. The mean±SD Beck scores fell from 18.7±9.7 to 10.7±5.8 in the group psychologically treated before receiving infertility treatment (P<0.001. Pregnancy rate was 47.1% in case group and 7.1% in control group. Pregnancy rate showed a significant relation with duration and cause of infertility and the level of stress in both groups (P< 0.001. Pregnancy rate was shown to be higher in couples with a second level of education in men (P< 0.001.Conclusion: The psychological intervention was found useful in alleviating depression and promoting pregnancy rate, it is crucial to mandate psychology counseling in all fertility centers.

  6. High ratings of satisfaction with fertility treatment are common: findings from the Copenhagen Multi-centre Psychosocial Infertility (COMPI) Research Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, L; Holstein, B E; Boivin, J

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aims were: (i). to identify gender differences in evaluation of medical and patient-centred (psychosocial) care in fertility clinics and (ii). to identify predictors of satisfaction. METHODS: An epidemiological prospective study based on questionnaire responses among all new couples...... attending five fertility clinics. The response rate at the 12 month follow-up was 87.7% and included a total of 1934 patients. RESULTS: During the follow-up period about two-thirds had achieved a pregnancy and about a third became parents. The participants were satisfied with both the medical and patient....../delivery and the report of marital benefits resulting from the infertility experience. Lower social class was a significant predictor for satisfaction. CONCLUSIONS: Both men and women in fertility treatment had high ratings on medical and patient-centred care. It seemed that satisfaction with the psychosocial services...

  7. Effects of Acupuncture on Anxiety in Infertile Women: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Hassanzadeh Bashtian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Stress and anxiety due to waiting for treatment results and uncertainty of treatment success are common problems in infertile women. Acupuncture has been suggested as an effective strategy to relieve anxiety. This study aimed to review the available evidence on the effects of acupuncture on anxiety in infertile women. Methods: This systematic review was conducted via searching in databases such as MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and PsycINFO, as well as clinical trial registries and reference lists of the retrieved articles. Selected articles included the studies published since the initiation of each database until March 2015. All randomized controlled trials regarding the effects of acupuncture on the anxiety of infertile women were reviewed in this study. Moreover, methodological qualities of the selected studies were examined based on the checklist of Oxford Center for Evidence-Based Medicine by two independent investigators. Results: Literature search yielded 193 relevant titles and abstracts, which were narrowed down to four randomized controlled trials involving 595 women.The majority of the reviewed articles showed that use of acupuncture could decrease anxiety in infertile women. Conclusion: According to the results of this systematic review, acupuncture is an effective technique in controlling the anxiety of infertile women. However, it is recommended that future studies with more appropriate design and methodology be conducted in this regard.

  8. A pilot double-blind randomised placebo-controlled dose-response trial assessing the effects of melatonin on infertility treatment (MIART): study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Shavi; Osianlis, Tiki; Vollenhoven, Beverley; Wallace, Euan; Rombauts, Luk

    2014-09-01

    High levels of oxidative stress can have considerable impact on the outcomes of in vitro fertilisation (IVF). Recent studies have reported that melatonin, a neurohormone secreted from the pineal gland in response to darkness, has significant antioxidative capabilities which may protect against the oxidative stress of infertility treatment on gametes and embryos. Early studies of oral melatonin (3-4 mg/day) in IVF have suggested favourable outcomes. However, most trials were poorly designed and none have addressed the optimum dose of melatonin. We present a proposal for a pilot double-blind randomised placebo-controlled dose-response trial aimed to determine whether oral melatonin supplementation during ovarian stimulation can improve the outcomes of assisted reproductive technology. We will recruit 160 infertile women into one of four groups: placebo (n=40); melatonin 2 mg twice per day (n=40); melatonin 4 mg twice per day (n=40) and melatonin 8 mg twice per day (n=40). The primary outcome will be clinical pregnancy rate. Secondary clinical outcomes include oocyte number/quality, embryo number/quality and fertilisation rate. We will also measure serum melatonin and the oxidative stress marker, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine at baseline and after treatment and levels of these in follicular fluid at egg pick-up. We will investigate follicular blood flow with Doppler ultrasound, patient sleepiness scores and pregnancy complications, comparing outcomes between groups. This protocol has been designed in accordance with the SPIRIT 2013 Guidelines. Ethical approval has been obtained from Monash Health HREC (Ref: 13402B), Monash University HREC (Ref: CF14/523-2014000181) and Monash Surgical Private Hospital HREC (Ref: 14107). Data analysis, interpretation and conclusions will be presented at national and international conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals. ACTRN12613001317785. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where

  9. Cytogenetic of Male Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutfiye Ozpak

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Infertility by definition, is not to get pregnant within one year of regular sexual relationship without protection, affects 15-20% of reproductive age couples. Approximately 30% of infertility cases are male originated. Male infertility is caused by endocrine-related genetic defects affecting urogenital system function. These defects adversely affect subsequent spermatogenesis, sexual function, fertility, early embryonic stage of sexual maturation. Autosomal and gonosomal, numerical and structural chromosome abnormalities and related syndromes rank at the top causes of male infertility. Similar chromosome abnormalities are detected in male infertility and as the rate of these abnormalities increase, it was found to reduce sperm count especially in azospermic and oligozoospermic men. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2011; 20(4.000: 230-245

  10. Infertility trial outcomes: healthy moms and babies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Traditionally, the primary outcome of infertility trials has been a positive pregnancy test or a clinically recognized pregnancy. However, parents desire a healthy baby that grows up to be a healthy adult, rather than a positive pregnancy test. Too often results of infertility trials are lacking in crucial obstetric details. This is problematic because treatments for infertility have the capacity to increase the risk for a variety of adverse obstetric outcomes. This review will outline important obstetric variables that should be included when reporting infertility research. The rationale for including these data, precise definitions of the variables, and cost-effective strategies for obtaining these obstetric details will be highlighted. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Infertility and in vitro fertilization: the social worker's role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needleman, S K

    1987-01-01

    The inability to have children may provoke a life crisis for a couple, and infertility treatment itself is usually stressful. After examining the psychosocial impact of infertility and the various options available to infertile couples, this article describes a hospital-based, in vitro fertilization program and the role of the social worker in supporting patients through the course of complicated and anxiety-producing medical procedures.

  12. Perceptions of infertile couples to assisted reproductive techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Maritsa Gourni; Pinelopi Sotiropoulou; Ioanna Gourni; Efthimios Faros; Maria Polikandrioti; Zoi Roupa

    2009-01-01

    Infertility treatment influences significantly not only the couples’ quality of life but also their psychology separately.Aim: The aim of the present study was to explore perceptions of infertility couples in regard to assisted reproductive techniques.Method and material: The sample study consisted of 110 infertile couples that seek medical help to a Center of Assisted Reproductive Techniques. A specially designed questionnaire was used for the needs of the survey, that included items relate...

  13. [Phenomenological study of infertile women with obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arranz-Lara, Lilia; Martínez-Lemus, Hugo; Ruíz-Ornelas, Jaime; Sauceda-González, Luciano; Pimentel, Elizabeth; Anguiano, Norma; Sondón, Zoé; Cedillo, Javier; Chávez, Alvaro; Regalado, Miguel Angel; Moreno, Daniel

    2010-10-01

    Obesity is a condition strongly associated with polycystic ovary and other conditions that interfere with or complicate the treatment of assisted reproduction. To examine, from a phenomenological point of view, the perception of infertile women obesity problem before undergoing assisted reproduction treatment. This analysis should help to design a psychotherapeutic strategy focused on this problem. One hundred patients with infertility, with a BMI equal to or greater than 30, candidates for assisted reproductive treatments in the service of Human Reproduction, Centro Médico Nacional 20 de Noviembre, ISSSTE. The phenomenological qualitative analysis was performed in 72 women who agreed to be interviewed in depth. The phenomenon is to study obesity in infertile women candidates for assisted reproduction treatment. Obese infertile women subject to assisted reproduction treatment perceive their difficulty losing weight is closely associated with infertility. Most patients had social feelings of worthlessness, sadness, worthlessness, and family rejection. The inability to obtain a steady weight loss is regarded as a minor frustration that sterility. It is very important to perform intensive, multidisciplinary labor, which is focused on concepts associated with psychological distress, such as: management of depression by sterility, control of anxiety and stress, control of social pressures and management of the illusion of motherhood. Also rely on specialists of eating habits and exercise.

  14. [Internet as a source of information about infertility among infertile patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talarczyk, Joanna; Hauke, Jan; Poniewaz, Marta; Serdyńska-Szuster, Monika; Pawelczyk, Leszek; Jedrzejczak, Piotr

    2012-04-01

    Around one million couples in Poland suffer from infertility People in reproductive age are most active Internet users. The aim of the study was to assess Internet habits of infertile patients. We checked to what extent infertile patients seek information about infertility on-line and what is their approach to the information found. 85 female patients treated for infertility for at least one year were surveyed. The anonymous questionnaire was designed by the authors of the publication. It consisted of questions related to medical history of the patients and sources of information about infertility they used. It also checked Internet activity of the patients and contained Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI). Chi-square test and Spearman's correlation test were used to evaluate the results. The majority of patients used Internet to find information about infertility (93%); 46% of the respondent declared Internet forums to be their main source of information about it. Patients used on-line sources of information more often than stricte medical sources. Internet influenced their relation with the physician. 64% of patients verified on-line information and treatment proposed by their doctor before using them. One third of the surveyed women claimed their knowledge about infertility comes more from the Internet than the specialist who treated them. There was a positive correlation between patients who checked diagnostic or therapeutic methods proposed by their physician with depression in BDI. Considering the great impact of Internet forums and web pages on patient approach to diagnostics and treatment of infertility there seems to be a need to create a professional Polish website and forum to provide the patients with reliable information about the disease.

  15. DMRTC2, PAX7, BRACHYURY/T and TERT Are Implicated in Male Germ Cell Development Following Curative Hormone Treatment for Cryptorchidism-Induced Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Gegenschatz-Schmid

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Defective mini-puberty results in insufficient testosterone secretion that impairs the differentiation of gonocytes into dark-type (Ad spermatogonia. The differentiation of gonocytes into Ad spermatogonia can be induced by administration of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist, GnRHa (Buserelin, INN. Nothing is known about the mechanism that underlies successful GnRHa treatment in the germ cells. Using RNA-sequencing of testicular biopsies, we recently examined RNA profiles of testes with and without GnRHa treatment. Here, we focused on the expression patterns of known gene markers for gonocytes and spermatogonia, and found that DMRTC2, PAX7, BRACHYURY/T, and TERT were associated with defective mini-puberty and were responsive to GnRHa. These results indicate novel testosterone-dependent genes and provide valuable insight into the transcriptional response to both defective mini-puberty and curative GnRHa treatment, which prevents infertility in man with one or both undescended (cryptorchid testes.

  16. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... RESOURCES Overview Infographic Gallery Educational Videos State Infertility Insurance Laws Protect Your Fertility Campaign Choosing Wisely Find ... Endowment © 1996 - 2018 ASRM, American Society for Reproductive Medicine. All Rights Reserved. ASRM Non Discrimination Policy ASRM ...

  17. Causes of Male Infertility

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... RESOURCES Overview Infographic Gallery Educational Videos State Infertility Insurance Laws Protect Your Fertility Campaign Choosing Wisely Find ... Endowment © 1996 - 2018 ASRM, American Society for Reproductive Medicine. All Rights Reserved. ASRM Non Discrimination Policy ASRM ...

  18. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's FAQs about In Vitro Fertilization REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH TOPICS Topics Index NEWS AND PUBLICATIONS Publications Overview News and Research Ethics Documents Practice Committee Documents Patient Fact Sheets and ...

  19. Ovarian Drilling for Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's FAQs about In Vitro Fertilization REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH TOPICS Topics Index NEWS AND PUBLICATIONS Publications Overview News and Research Ethics Documents Practice Committee Documents Patient Fact Sheets and ...

  20. Stress and Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's FAQs about In Vitro Fertilization REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH TOPICS Topics Index NEWS AND PUBLICATIONS Publications Overview News and Research Ethics Documents Practice Committee Documents Patient Fact Sheets and ...

  1. Causes of Male Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's FAQs about In Vitro Fertilization REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH TOPICS Topics Index NEWS AND PUBLICATIONS Publications Overview News and Research Ethics Documents Practice Committee Documents Patient Fact Sheets and ...

  2. Smoking and Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's FAQs about In Vitro Fertilization REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH TOPICS Topics Index NEWS AND PUBLICATIONS Publications Overview News and Research Ethics Documents Practice Committee Documents Patient Fact Sheets and ...

  3. Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's FAQs about In Vitro Fertilization REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH TOPICS Topics Index NEWS AND PUBLICATIONS Publications Overview News and Research Ethics Documents Practice Committee Documents Patient Fact Sheets and ...

  4. Causes of Male Infertility

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's FAQs about In Vitro Fertilization REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH ... Index NEWS AND PUBLICATIONS Publications Overview News and Research Ethics Documents Practice Committee Documents Patient Fact Sheets ...

  5. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's FAQs about In Vitro Fertilization REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH ... Index NEWS AND PUBLICATIONS Publications Overview News and Research Ethics Documents Practice Committee Documents Patient Fact Sheets ...

  6. Office Hysteroscopy in Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojghan Barati

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: For patients undergoing in vitro fertilization, lower pregnancy rates are observed inthe presence of uterine cavity anomalies and correction of these anomalies has been associated withimproved pregnancy rates. Office hysteroscopy has been proven to have superior sensitivity andspecificity in evaluation of the endometrial cavity. Diagnostic hysteroscopy can be performed inan office with minimal discomfort and at a much lower cost than in an operating room. Our studywas done to evaluate the importance of office hysteroscopy in diagnosis of pathology in normalappearing infertility work up.Materials and Methods: This study was performed from September 1, 2006 till September 1, 2008at Imam Khomayni hospital, Ahwaz, Iran. All infertile patients who had unexplained infertilityor uterine factor infertility were enrolled in the study and underwent office hysteroscopy. Theparticipants were divided into two groups. Group one was composed of 54 patients with unexplainedinfertility and group two was composed of 53 patients with abnormal vaginal sonography orhysterosalpangography.Results: Of the 54 patients with unexplained infertility; 33 patients (61.2% had normal and 21patients (38.8% had abnormal hysteroscopic findings. Among 53 patients in the uterine factorgroup, there were 7 women (13.3% who had a normal hysteroscopy and abnormal sonography orhysterography.Conclusion: In group one (unexplained infertility, there was a 38.8% positive finding in officehysteroscopy in spite of normal hysterosalpingography and sonography results. Therefore, it seemsthat office hysteroscopy should be a part of a routine work up in infertile patients.

  7. Gastrointestinal events and association with initiation of treatment for osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modi A

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ankita Modi,1 Ethel S Siris,2 Jackson Tang,3 Shiva Sajjan,1 Shuvayu S Sen1 1Center for Observational and Real-World Evidence, Merck & Co., Inc, Kenilworth, NJ, 2Toni Stabile Osteoporosis Center, Columbia University Medical Center, NY Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY, 3Asclepius Analytics Ltd, Brooklyn, NY, USA Background: Preexisting gastrointestinal (GI events may deter the use of pharmacologic treatment in patients diagnosed with osteoporosis (OP. The objective of this study was to examine the association between preexisting GI events and OP pharmacotherapy initiation among women diagnosed with OP. Methods: The study utilized claims data from a large US managed care database to identify women aged ≥55 years with a diagnosis code for OP (index date during 2002–2009. Patients with a claim for pharmacologic OP treatment in the 12-month pre-index period (baseline were excluded. OP treatment initiation in the post-index period was defined as a claim for bisphosphonates (alendronate, ibandronate, risedronate, zoledronic acid, calcitonin, raloxifene, or teriparatide. During the post-index period (up to 12 months, GI events were identified before treatment initiation. A time-dependent Cox regression model was used to investigate the likelihood of initiating any OP treatment. Among patients initiating OP treatment, a discrete choice model was utilized to assess the relationship between post-index GI events and likelihood of initiating with a bisphosphonate versus a non-bisphosphonate. Results: In total, 65,344 patients (mean age 66 years were included; 23.7% had a GI event post diagnosis and before treatment initiation. Post-index GI events were associated with a 75% lower likelihood of any treatment initiation (hazard ratio 0.25; 95% confidence interval 0.24–0.26. Among treated patients (n=23,311, those with post-index GI events were 39% less likely to receive a bisphosphonate versus a non-bisphosphonate (odds ratio 0.61; 95% confidence

  8. Couples' experiences of infertility: a phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imeson, M; McMurray, A

    1996-11-01

    If nurses are to work effectively with families in contemporary society, their practice activities must be appropriately informed. Families exposed to new technologies, such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) require care that is sensitive to their particular experience. Infertile couples have been the subject of a substantial body of research, however, most studies to date focus on the physiological effects of infertility and do not take into account the context in which the experience takes place, or the meanings that people assign to this experience. The purpose of this study was to examine in-depth the experience of couples undergoing IVF treatment for infertility. A phenomenological approach was adopted for the study. A purposive sample of six couples was selected for interview. Data were generated from taped interviews and the researcher's observational field notes. Data analysis was in accordance with the procedure outlined by Colaizzi (1978). Interview responses were categorized by examining the participants' transcripts and identifying significant statements and meanings. Themes which emerged from the statements were then identified, and cross-case comparisons were made to confirm or modify these themes. Four key themes emerged from the data: life changes; powerlessness; hope-disappointment cycle; and social isolation. All couples undergoing infertility treatment experienced life changes which included: lifestyle changes, various physical and emotional changes, and changes in their relationships. There was a perceived loss of control over many aspects of their lives. Couples also described a cycle, alternating feelings of hope and disappointment. Most of the couples reported feelings of social isolation associated with being infertile, that were intensified by having to deal with the inappropriate responses of others. Findings from this study will add to the knowledge base on infertility, and contribute to recommendations for improving the way nurses guide

  9. Pregnancy following robot-assisted laparoscopic partial cystectomy and gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist treatment within three months in an infertile woman with bladder endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Jen Tan

    2018-02-01

    Conclusion: Robot-assisted complete resection of deep-infiltrating endometriosis and bladder repair immediately followed by GnRHa therapy and medical assistance improves reproductive outcomes efficiently in women with endometriosis-associated infertility.

  10. The Sexual Impact of Infertility Among Women Seeking Fertility Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D. Winkelman, MD

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: In women seeking fertility treatment, younger age and female factor infertility were associated with increased sexual impact and thus these women are potentially at higher risk of sexual dysfunction. Providers should consider the role young age and an infertility diagnosis plays in a women’s sexual well-being.

  11. Periodontal status in infertile women attending in vitro fertilization clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godavarthi Lalasa

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that altered hormonal levels in infertile women undergoing assisted reproductive therapy and infertile women not undergoing this treatment can lead to increased attachment loss, suggesting that these women may require constant periodontal monitoring.

  12. Acceptability of artificial insemination by donor among infertile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acceptability of artificial insemination by donor among infertile women attending the Gynaecological Clinic of the University College Hospital, Ibadan. ... Providing information on AID as a treatment option during counseling and routine infertility management may be the needed drive to improve awareness and promote ...

  13. Hormonal evaluation of the infertile male: has it evolved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Ernest M; Chudnovsky, Aleksander; Niederberger, Craig S

    2008-05-01

    An endocrinologic evaluation of patients who have male-factor infertility has clearly evolved and leads to specific diagnoses and treatment strategies in a large population of infertile men. A well-considered endocrine evaluation is especially essential with the ever-growing popularity of assisted reproductive techniques and continued refinements with intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

  14. Revised criteria for PCOS in WHO Group II anovulatory infertility – a revival of hypothalamic amenorrhoea?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Mette Petri; Pinborg, Anja; Loft, Anne

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate revised criteria for polycystic ovarian morphology (PCOM) in the diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in anovulatory infertility. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. PATIENTS: WHO Group II anovulatory infertile women (n = 75). MEASUREMENTS: Clinical, sonographic......, but according to AMH levels, the ovaries remain multifollicular. PERSPECTIVES: A better distinction between hypothalamic amenorrhoea and PCOS could improve treatment strategies for anovulatory infertility....

  15. Tratamento da infertilidade em mulheres com síndrome dos ovários policísticos Treatment of infertility in women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ferreira Santana

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome dos ovários policísticos (SOP é a principal endocrinopatia ginecológica na idade reprodutiva, com incidência de 6 a 10% das mulheres no menacme. A resistência insulínica e a hiperinsulinemia compensatória permanecem como os elementos mais importantes na etiopatogenia da SOP. Esta revisão teve como objetivo discutir as controvérsias no tratamento de mulheres com SOP nos diferentes contextos da infertilidade feminina e gestação, à luz das evidências atuais, com ênfase no consenso de 2008 proposto pelas sociedades européia (European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology, ESHRE e americana (American Society for Reproductive Medicine, ASRM de reprodução.Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS occurs in 6 to 10% of women during the reproductive age. Insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia are currently two of the main factors involved in the etiopathogenesis of PCOS. The objective of the present review was to discuss the controversies related to the treatment of infertile women with PCOS and during their pregnancy, focusing on the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM current consensus.

  16. Epidemiology of infertility: social problems of the infertile couples ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infertility causes marital disharmony, which often leads to divorce. Women are often blamed for the infertility and men engage in polygyny in an attempt to have children. The couple can also suffer stress from the management of the infertility. Adoption is not popular and assisted reproduction has medico-legal implications.

  17. Post-laparoscopic oral contraceptive combined with Chinese herbal mixture in treatment of infertility and pain associated with minimal or mild endometriosis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shaomi; Liu, Dong; Huang, Wei; Wang, Qiushi; Wang, Qiuyi; Zhou, Lu; Feng, Guimei

    2014-07-05

    Endometriosis affects fertility negatively. The study aims to evaluate whether laparoscopic surgery combined with oral contraceptive or herbs were more effective than laparoscopic alone in improving fecundity and pelvic pain in women with minimal/mild endometriosis. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted in 156 infertile women with minimal/mild endometriosis. After laparoscopic surgery, patients were randomized to three groups: in Group A (n = 52) oral contraceptive (OC) was administered one pill a day, continuous for 63 days without intervals, in Group B (n = 52) OC was administered as above and then Dan'e mixture was added 30 g/day for the latter 30 days, and in control Group C (n = 52) patients tried to get pregnant after surgery without complementary treatment. The follow-up periods were 12 months in Group C and 14 months in complementary medical treatment Group A and B. The pregnant women were further followed up, and labor and pregnancy outcomes were assessed. Primary outcome was pregnancy rate (PR) and live birth rate (LBR). Secondary outcomes included changes of pelvic pain visual analog scale scores and side effects. Analyses were done as intention-to-treat. The PR was 46.80% (73/156), and the LBR was 69.86% (51/73). Of the 73 pregnancies, 60 occurred within 12 months of follow-up and 7 of the remaining 13 patients underwent assisted reproductive technology for >1 year. No significant difference was observed in PR and LBR among the three groups. Patients given medical treatment (OCs or OCs plus herbal medicine) had significantly decreased pain scores compared with the laparoscopy alone group. Combination of laparoscopy with OCs or OCs and herbal medicine does not have more advantages than laparoscopy alone in improving fertility of women with minimal/mild endometriosis. ChiCTR-TRC-11001820.

  18. Risk of diabetes according to male factor infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glazer, Clara Helene; Bonde, Jens Peter; Giwercman, Aleksander

    2017-01-01

    problem. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: Previous cross-sectional studies have shown an increased prevalence of comorbidities among infertile men when compared to controls. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: In this prospective cohort study, 39 516 men who had since 1994 undergone fertility treatment with their female...... partner were identified from the Danish national IVF register, which includes data on assumed cause of couple infertility (male/female factor, mixed and unexplained infertility) and type of fertility treatment. With a median follow-up time of 5.6 years, each man was followed for diabetes occurrence from......STUDY QUESTION: Is male factor infertility associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes? SUMMARY ANSWER: The study provides evidence that male factor infertility may predict later occurrence of diabetes mellitus with the risk being related to the severity of the underlying fertility...

  19. Systematic Review of Premenstrual, Postmenstrual and Infertility Disorders of Vitex Agnus Castus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Movahedi, Mino

    2017-01-01

    Vitex agnus-castus, also called vitex is aboriginal to the Mediterranean region, with long leaves, tender stem, flowers and ripening seeds. The aim of this study was to overview premenstrual, postmenstrual and infertility disorder of Vitex agnus-castus. This review article was carried out by searching studies in PubMed, Medline, Web of Science, and IranMedex databases. The initial search strategy identified about 87 references. In this study, 43 studies were accepted for further screening, and met all our inclusion criteria (in English, full text, therapeutic effects of Vitex agnus-castus and dated mainly from the year 2009 to 2016). The search terms were Vitex agnus-castus, premenstrual, postmenstrual, infertility disorder properties and pharmacological effects. Vitex agnus-castus was shown to contribute to the treatment of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Moreover, the result of the present study showed that this valuable plant is helpful in alleviation of pain resulting from postmenstrual disease. Furthermore, it was found that Vitex agnus-castus is beneficial in infertility disorder. Vitex agnus-castus (AC) is a phytopharmaceutical compound and is shown to be widely used to treat PMS and PMDD. In addition, it was shown to be beneficial in post-menstrual cases and it can also contribute to treatment of infertility cases in both men and women. Dopaminergic compounds available in this plant help to treat premenstrual mastodynia as well as other symptoms of the premenstrual syndrome.

  20. Procreative sex in infertile couples: the decay of pleasure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marci Roberto

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infertility represents a major challenge to the emotional balance and sexual life of couples, with long-lasting and gender-specific effects. The objective of this study is to explore personality features of infertile patients and detect possible sexual disorders in couples undergoing infertility treatment. Materials and methods In this prospective study 60 infertile couples and 52 fertile control couples were asked to complete standardized and validated questionnaires: the Adjective Check List (ACL to enquire about personality features and the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI or the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF to assess sexual functioning of female and male partners. The study population was divided into 3 groups: Group A (N = 30, recently diagnosed infertile couples Group B (N = 30, infertile couples already undergoing Intrauterine Insemination and Group C (N = 52, fertile control group. Results Infertile patients did not display any distinguishing personality features. Regarding sexual function, men of all the three groups scored higher in both questionnaires (sexual satisfaction, desire and orgasm than their female partners. Comparing results between groups, Group A male partners obtained lower scores in all the subscales. Women belonging to Group A and Group B showed an impairment of sexual arousal, satisfaction, lubrification and orgasm when compared to fertile controls. Conclusions Even if at the very first stages of infertility treatment no personality disturbances can be detected, the couples’ sexual life is already impaired with different sexual disorders according to gender.

  1. Dyadic dynamics of perceived social support in couples facing infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, M V; Peterson, B D; Almeida, V; Mesquita-Guimarães, J; Costa, M E

    2014-01-01

    Is perceived social support from partner, family, and friends associated with increased infertility-related stress? While men's perceived support did not seem to influence their partners' stress, women's perceptions of spousal and familial support can affect the way men deal with the challenge of infertility. Previous studies showed that low levels of social support are associated with poor psychosocial adjustment and treatment termination in women and men. Studies examining the impact of social support using the couple as unit of analysis are lacking. A cross-sectional sample of 613 Portuguese patients participated in the research, online over a 3-month period, and in a public fertility clinic over 11 months. The final sample comprised 213 married or cohabiting couples (191 from the fertility clinic) who were actively attempting to have a child, were seeking infertility treatment and had not undergone previous preimplantation genetic diagnosis. Perceived social support was assessed through the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support and infertility-related stress was assessed with the fertility problem inventory. Hypotheses were tested by applying the actor-partner interdependence model using structural equation modeling. Couples had been living together for an average (±SD) of 6 ± 3.5 years, and attempting a pregnancy for 3.8 ± 2.6 years. Nearly half of the couples had undergone infertility treatment (41.3%). Infertility stress was found to be associated with low family support for women (β = -0.27, P = .003), and low partner support for both men (β = -0.29, P = .001) and women (β = -0.45, P = .006). Both women and men's perceived friend support were not significantly related to male or female infertility stress. Men infertility stress was also associated with their partners low levels of partner (β = -0.24, P = .049) and family support (β = -0.23, P perception of infertility-specific supportive behaviors was not assessed and differential

  2. Are repeated assisted reproductive technology treatments and an unsuccessful outcome risk factors for unipolar depression in infertile women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejbaek, Camilla S; Pinborg, Anja; Hageman, Ida; Forman, Julie L; Hougaard, Charlotte Ø; Schmidt, Lone

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies have shown conflicting results as to whether unsuccessful medically assisted reproduction is a risk factor for depression among women. This study therefore investigated if women with no live birth after assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment had a higher risk of unipolar depression compared with women with a live birth after ART treatment. The Danish National ART-Couple (DANAC) Cohort is a national register-based cohort study that consists of women who received ART treatment from 1 January 1994 to 30 September 2009, in Denmark (n = 41 050). Information on unipolar depression was obtained from the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register. The analyses were conducted in Cox regression analysis. During the 308 494 person-years of follow up, 552 women were diagnosed with unipolar depression. A Cox proportional hazards model showed that women in ART treatment, with no live birth yet, had a lower risk of unipolar depression compared with women with a live birth. Women had the highest risk of unipolar depression 0-42 days after a live birth (adjusted hazard ratio 5.08, 95% CI 3.11-8.29) compared with women with no live birth. A lower, but still increased, risk of unipolar depression, was found in women 43 days to 1 year and >1 year after a live birth compared with women with no live birth yet. Motherhood is an important trigger of unipolar depression in women conceiving after ART treatment. © 2015 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  3. Is There a Relationship between Ovarian Epithelial Dysplasia and Infertility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautier Chene

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Ovarian epithelial dysplasia was initially described in material from prophylactic oophorectomies performed in patients at genetic risk of ovarian cancer. Similar histopathological abnormalities have been revealed after ovulation stimulation. Since infertility is also a risk factor for ovarian neoplasia, the aim of this study was to study the relationship between infertility and ovarian dysplasia. Methods. We blindly reviewed 127 histopathological slides of adnexectomies or ovarian cystectomies according to three groups—an exposed group to ovulation induction (n = 30, an infertile group without stimulation (n = 35, and a spontaneously fertile control group (n = 62—in order to design an eleven histopathological criteria scoring system. Results. The ovarian dysplasia score was significantly higher in exposed group whereas dysplasia score was low in infertile and control groups (resp., 8.21 in exposed group, 3.69 for infertile patients, and 3.62 for the controls. In the subgroup with refractory infertility there was a trend towards a more severe dysplasia score (8.53 in ovulation induction group and 5.1 in infertile group. Conclusion. These results raise questions as to the responsibility of drugs used to induce ovulation and/or infertility itself in the genesis of ovarian epithelial dysplasia.

  4. Are repeated assisted reproductive technology treatments and an unsuccessful outcome risk factors for unipolar depression in infertile women?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejbaek, Camilla S; Pinborg, Anja; Hageman, Ida

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Previous studies have shown conflicting results whether unsuccessful medically assisted reproduction is a risk factor for depression among women. This study therefore investigated if women with no live birth after assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment had a higher risk...... of unipolar depression compared with women with a live birth after ART treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The Danish National ART-Couple (DANAC) Cohort is a national register-based cohort study that consists of women who received ART treatment from 1 January 1994 to 30 September 2009, in Denmark (n = 41 050......). Information on unipolar depression was obtained from the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register. The analyses were conducted in Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: During the 308 494 person-years of follow up, 552 women were diagnosed with unipolar depression. A Cox proportional hazards model showed...

  5. Acceptability of surgery as initial treatment for primary open angle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and fifty four new glaucoma patients at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital were interviewed to determine the acceptance of surgery, reasons for refusal, and factors affecting acceptability of surgery as an initial treatment option. Fifty patients (32.5%) accepted surgery while 89 (57.8%) refused. The main ...

  6. Infertility: Ongoing Global challenge of new millennium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kantibhai Naranbhai Sonaliya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility tends to be the global challenge even in the second decade of the new millennium. Especially in developing countries like India, it is still one the most lethal social evil responsible for a big proportion of cases of psychological disturbances including suicide. Again, recently, few conditions other than communicable or Non-communicable diseases are given place among the categories of significant public health problems like Road Traffic Accidents, Burns, Poisoning, drowning and few more. But, for developing countries like India, the list is incomplete without inclusion of Infertility (there may be several others also. In public health, tuberculosis, leprosy and some other diseases are considered social diseases which produce social stigma for the patients and/or his family members.1 In same manner, Infertility is an important cause of social stigmatization since centuries for a couple suffering from, especially for woman involved. During a transitory phase of industrialization and socio-economic development, the situation is changed a minute smidgen at urban areas of India but at rural parts, sub-urban or even at urban slums (mainly among pockets of recent migrants the situation is as same as a few hundred years ago. A female of no religion, caste, social status or higher level of education are barred from some stringent mores related to infertility. Infertile females are still not allowed to take part in so many religious or social ceremonies; on the contrary, they have to face more harassment including domestic violence than their counterparts, who have given birth to the child. Due to social, psychological, economic disturbances, they are forced to take multiple sorts of treatments including religious quacks. So many infertile women are exploited physically and economically also in such weird ways of treatment to gain a pregnancy.

  7. Adverse cardiac events in out-patients initiating clozapine treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, C; Polcwiartek, C; Kragholm, K

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Using national Danish registers, we estimated rates of clozapine-associated cardiac adverse events. Rates of undiagnosed myocarditis were estimated by exploring causes of death after clozapine initiation. METHOD: Through nationwide health registers, we identified all out-patients initi......OBJECTIVE: Using national Danish registers, we estimated rates of clozapine-associated cardiac adverse events. Rates of undiagnosed myocarditis were estimated by exploring causes of death after clozapine initiation. METHOD: Through nationwide health registers, we identified all out...... the maximum rate of clozapine-associated fatal myocarditis to 0.28%. CONCLUSION: Cardiac adverse effects in Danish out-patients initiating clozapine treatment are extremely rare and these rates appear to be comparable to those observed for other antipsychotic drugs....

  8. [Infertility: psychological-psychopathological consequences and cognitive-behavioural interventions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsi, C; Efthimiou, K

    2014-01-01

    Infertility primarily refers to the biological inability of a man or a woman to contribute to conception. Infertility may also refer to the state of a woman who is unable to carry a pregnancy to full term, however other causes can be found in both sexes. The diagnosis of infertility and the concurrent medical treatment are rather stressful events for the couple and can provoke a number of negative symptoms such as depression, anxiety and psychosomatic symptoms which may interfere with the medical therapeutic procedures especially with the in-vitro fertilisation technique. The relationship between infertility and psychological factors has not been explored fully and are still under research. However current findings can be summarized in three basic hypotheses; namely, the effect of psychological factors on the appearance of infertility, the psychological consequences of infertility at the couple, and the reciprocal relation of psychological factors and infertility. Stress and anxiety activate the hypothalamic-adrenal axis (HPA), and this activation can disturb the hormones of fertility. The presence of depressive/anxiety symptoms seems to have a negative impact on the treatment of infertility and sometimes can be a risk factor for lower pregnancy rate. There is a possibility that psychological complaints could develop, prior, during and after the diagnosis of infertility and may interfere with the fertilisation therapy. Should such psychological complaints develop it is suggested that psychotherapeutic treatment is used in conjunction with the treatment approach of infertility, e.g. IVF. The above mentioned suggestion is supported by a large number of researchers and current research efforts focus on different psychotherapeutic interventions such as Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy. Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT) has shown during research its superiority compared to other psychotherapeutic interventions and that could be an effective way to decrease the depressive

  9. Restorative treatment for initial, cavitated and gross coronal carious lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, D S; Balasubramanian, M; Spencer, A J

    2016-09-01

    Treatment patterns for caries have been shown to reflect high rates of restorative services. The objective of this study was to investigate types of restorative treatment provided to patients with a main diagnosis of coronal caries in relation to the severity of the caries lesion. A random sample of Australian dentists was surveyed by mailed questionnaires in 2009-2010 (response rate 67%). Data on types of restorative treatment, patient characteristics and main diagnosis were collected from a service log. Models of service rates adjusted for age, gender, insurance status and reason for visit showed that compared to the reference category of initial caries lesions, there were lower rates [Rate Ratio, 95% CI] of adhesive anterior restorative services [0.57, 0.34-0.95] and lower rates of adhesive posterior restorations [0.56, 0.40-0.79] for gross lesions. Treatment of coronal caries was characterized by high rates of adhesive posterior restorative services, but gross lesions had lower rates of both anterior and posterior adhesive restorations. Types of restorative treatment for coronal caries were similar between initial and cavitated lesions. This could indicate scope for the adoption of more minimum intervention approaches to the management of initial carious lesions. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  10. Parenting after Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshansky, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Becoming a parent after experiencing infertility can pose unique challenges to early parenthood. Parents may struggle with the normal anxiety and fatigue, as well as possible depression, that accompany new parenthood, but with added guilt or shame because of how much they wanted a child and how hard they worked to become parents. These feelings…

  11. Male factor infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jens Peter; Te Velde, Egbert

    2017-01-01

    A recent systematic review on worldwide declining trends in sperm counts has fuelled alarming reports in national and international news media. However, methodological issues exist with data gathering and analysis precluding any conclusion and no solid data exist to indicate increasing frequency ...... of couple infertility during past decades....

  12. Causes of Male Infertility

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's FAQs about In Vitro Fertilization REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH TOPICS Topics Index NEWS AND PUBLICATIONS Publications Overview News and Research Ethics Documents Practice Committee Documents Patient Fact Sheets and ...

  13. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's FAQs about In Vitro Fertilization REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH TOPICS Topics Index NEWS AND PUBLICATIONS Publications Overview News and Research Ethics Documents Practice Committee Documents Patient Fact Sheets and ...

  14. The results of surgical treatment of oviductal infertility with use of microsurgical technique; Wyniki leczenia operacyjnego nieplodnosci pochodzenia jajowodowego przy zastosowaniu techniki mikrochirurgicznej

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cislo, M.; Murawski, M.; Palczynski, B. [Akademia Medyczna, Wroclaw (Poland)

    1993-12-31

    40 women were operated on infertility due to oviductal factor. This kind of infertility has been previously diagnosed by hysterosalpingography examination and then verified in 22 cases (55%) by laparoscopy combined with chromotubation. The operations were carried out with use of microsurgical technique and instruments. At the same time the prophylactics of postoperative intraperitoneal adhesions was applied. Seven pregnancies were obtained, that makes 17.5% of success. It is an outcome comparable with results presented by many other world centers of gynecological microsurgery. (author) 20 refs, 1 tab

  15. [Analysis of the demographic profile of patients treated for infertility using assisted reproductive techniques in 2005-2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, Robert; Milewska, Anna Justyna; Czerniecki, Jan; Leśniewska, Monika; Wołczyński, Sławomir

    2013-07-01

    Analysis of the demographic profile of patients, causes for infertility and effectiveness of infertility treatment methods in the years 2005-2010. Retrospective research was conducted to analyze data of 1705 randomly selected couples who underwent in vitro fertilization procedure at the Department of Reproduction and Gynecological Endocrinology Medical University of Bialystok, between 2005 and 2010. The analyzed data included mainly causes for infertility age of the female and male subjects, place of residence and final treatment results. The percentage of pregnancy rate increased significantly to approximately 40% in 2007. The contribution of male and female infertility factors remained at a similar level, but the idiopathic factor continued to steadily increase (to 20% in the last years of the study). We observed a greater prevalence of the male factor among couples living in cities compared to inhabitants of rural areas (42.3% vs. 34.3%, p = 0.004), whereas the tubal factor dominated among couples living in the countryside when compared to city dwellers (29.7% vs. 21.6%, p = 0.001). The average age of women entering treatment was significantly higher in cities than the countryside (p womens health proved to have the strongest effect on the distribution of infertility causes between urban and rural areas. Significant efforts should be made, especially in cities, to decrease the average age of women's reproductive decisions and also to shorten the time to the first contact with the specialist after unsuccessful attempts at conception. It is also crucial to initiate the reimbursement of infertility treatment using ART (Assisted Reproductive Technology).

  16. Investigação e reprodução assistida no tratamento da infertilidade masculina Investigation and assisted reproduction in the treatment of male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Firmbach Pasqualotto

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available A infertilidade masculina afeta 10% dos casais em idade reprodutiva em todo o mundo e pode ser tratada em muitos casos. Além de outras etiologias bem documentadas como causadoras da infertilidade masculina, as causas genéticas cada vez mais têm sido diagnosticadas. Reconstrução microcirúrgica do trato reprodutivo ou varicocelectomia é preferível à captação de espermatozóides com fertilização in vitro e injeção intracitoplasmática de espermatozóides em homens vasectomizados ou com varicocele na ausência de fatores de risco para infertilidade feminina. Se ocorrer uma obstrução epididimária após a vasectomia ou se a mulher possuir uma idade avançada, a decisão para reconstrução microcirúrgica ou captação de espermatozóides com fertilização in vitro ou injeção intracitoplasmática de espermatozóides deve ser individualizada. Captação espermática com fertilização in vitro e injeção intracitoplasmática de espermatozóides é preferível ao tratamento cirúrgico quando o tratamento do fator feminino requer fertilização in vitro ou quando as chances de sucesso com a captação de espermatozóides e injeção intracitoplasmática de espermatozóides são superiores às chances com o tratamento cirúrgico.Male infertility affects 10% of couples in the reproductive age worldwide and is treatable in many cases. In addition to other well-described etiologies, genetic causes of male infertility are now more commonly diagnosed. In men with prior vasectomy or varicocele, microsurgical reconstruction of the reproductive tract or varicocelectomy is more cost-effective than sperm retrieval with in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection if no female fertility risk factors are present. If epididymal obstruction after vasectomy is detected or advanced female age is present, the decision to use either microsurgical reconstruction or sperm retrieval with in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm

  17. [Knowledge and perception of medical students about infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdei, Márta; Cserepes, Réka Eszter; Bugán, Antal

    2015-01-18

    The effectiveness of fertility treatments is influenced by the health care professionals' knowledge regarding infertility as well as their empathy. The aim of the study was to examine infertility-related knowledge and perceptions of emotional and mind/body consequences of infertility among medical students. A questionnaire design was used. Data were obtained from 112 medical university students (76 women, 36 men) who participated involuntary and compensation-free. Medical students' knowledge concerning infertility proved to be incomplete and ambiguous. Subjects underestimated the presence of mind/body and emotional symptoms caused by infertility in men particularly, and overestimated some emotional concerns in women, e.g. sadness. Medical students have gaps in their subject-specific knowledge, so that they need more (even practical) information regarding infertility during their studies. Students' conceptions about emotional and physical consequences of infertility are distorted by stereotypes. The risk of these biases is that it could make it difficult to perceive patients in a non-distorted way, especially infertile male patients.

  18. Frequency of depression among fertile and infertile women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qayyum, M.; Ahmed, S.; Kanwal, S.; Ishfaq, Y.; Hassan, H.; Waheed, N.

    2014-01-01

    To compare the frequency of depression among fertile and infertile women reporting in CMH Abbottabad. Study Design: A case control study. Place and Duration of Study: This study was conducted in Combined Military Hospital Abbottabad, over a period of six months from January 2013 to June 2013. Patients and Methods: The inclusion criteria were all those patients who were married. All the cases were selected from the women reporting in the obstetrics and gynecology department of CMH Abbottabad for investigation and treatment of infertility. A total of 200 patients, 100 fertile and 100 infertile women were included. Patients were given questionnaire form with their consent for research. Beck depression inventory (BDI) was used to assess depression among fertile and infertile women. Other factors such as age, educational level, and duration of infertility, pressure from family members, miscarriages, and support from husband were studied. Results: Depression was significantly higher in infertile women as compared to fertile women i.e. 95% vs. 63% (p < 0.001). It was higher among women with more than 1 year of duration of marriage as compared to those with infertility of one year duration or less. Conclusion: Infertility is associated with depression. (author)

  19. Women's experiences of infertility - towards a relational model of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Nicola; Cunningham, Tom

    2013-12-01

    To consider the effectiveness of current models of patient-centred infertility care. Patient centredness is defined as one of six key dimensions of quality of care. In the field of infertility, a new interaction model of patient-centred infertility care is proposed. Despite positive moves, this model reveals shortcomings in knowledge about the lived experience of infertility and lacks the shift in attitudes and approach that effective patient-centred care requires. The study has a qualitative research design. Nine women living with and through infertility participated in online life-story interviews. Data were analysed using a layered strategy influenced by the voice-centred relational method, emphasising narrative content, form and function. Women reveal a complex experience. Three key themes were found: Approaching the clinic narratives are infused with personal expectations while deeply reflective of cultural expectations and social norms. Relatedness recognises women's experiences cannot be neatly separated into distinct domains. Liminality and infertility describes women's experiences lost in transition through and beyond infertility treatment. The current model of patient-centred infertility care requires further development. Women in this study found themselves lost in transition and irrespective of treatment failure or success. Conceptual development must embrace a relational understanding of patient's experience to ensure that patient-centred infertility care is realistic and relevant to patients, clinical staff and the system as a whole. Psychosocial skills are recognised as core competences for fertility nurses. A relational conceptualisation of patient's experiences, living with and through infertility, provides further information for the development of staff and enhanced knowledge and practice skills. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Spirituality, infertility-related stress, and quality of life in Brazilian infertile couples: Analysis using the actor-partner interdependence mediation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casu, Giulia; Ulivi, Giulia; Zaia, Victor; Fernandes Martins, Maria do Carmo; Parente Barbosa, Caio; Gremigni, Paola

    2018-04-01

    Infertility has a stressful impact on both partners, with adverse effects on the quality of life of infertile couples. Spirituality is a meaning-based strategy that can protect couples against infertility's negative impact on quality of life, but analysis of this mediator relationship in infertile couples has not been reported. We adopted a dyadic approach and used the actor-partner interdependence mediation model to examine whether and how women's and men's spirituality was associated with their own and their partners' infertility-related stress and quality of life. In 2014, 152 infertile couples starting their first fertility treatment at a private clinic in Brazil were recruited and completed self-reports of spirituality, infertility-related stress, and quality of life. Results indicated that women's and men's level of spirituality was positively associated with their own quality of life directly and indirectly, by reducing their own infertility-related stress. Their spirituality was associated with an increase in their partners' quality of life only indirectly, by reducing their partners' infertility-related stress. Findings highlight the importance of assessing and promoting spirituality as a coping resource that infertile women and men might use to deal with the stress of infertility and reduce its adverse effects on quality of life. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Spermatogonial stem cell transplantation and male infertility: Current status and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connor M. Forbes

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To summarise the current state of research into spermatogonial stem cell (SSC therapies with a focus on future directions, as SSCs show promise as a source for preserving or initiating fertility in otherwise infertile men. Materials and methods: We performed a search for publications addressing spermatogonial stem cell transplantation in the treatment of male infertility. The search engines PubMed and Google Scholar were used from 1990 to 2017. Search terms were relevant for spermatogonial stem cell therapies. Titles of publications were screened for relevance; abstracts were read, if related and full papers were reviewed for directly pertinent original research. Results: In all, 58 papers were found to be relevant to this review, and were included in appropriate subheadings. This review discusses the various techniques that SSCs are being investigated to treat forms of male infertility. Conclusions: Evidence does not yet support clinical application of SSCs in humans. However, significant progress in the in vitro and in vivo development of SSCs, including differentiation into functional germ cells, gives reason for cautious optimism for future research. Keywords: Non-obstructive azoospermia, Fertility preservation, Onco-fertility, Male infertility, Stem cell therapy, Allograft

  2. Traditional Chinese medicine patterns and recommended acupuncture points in infertile and fertile women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkeflet, Oddveig; Laake, Petter; Vøllestad, Nina

    2012-03-01

    Acupuncture is rooted in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and emphasises individualised treatment according to TCM patterns. Eight TCM patterns are regarded as typical for female infertility. There are no empirical data comparing these patterns in fertile and infertile women. To identify and compare the TCM patterns and recommended acupuncture points in infertile and fertile women. The hypothesis that infertile and fertile women should differ in occurrence of TCM patterns described as typical for infertility was examined. A cross-sectional study examined the distribution of TCM patterns and acupuncture points among 24 infertile and 24 fertile women. TCM patterns and points proposed by two acupuncturists were analysed. The odds ratio was used as the effect measure. Three patterns were found in more than 92% of the women. Five patterns occurred more frequently among infertile (p≤0.03), and four among fertile (p≤0.02) women. Only three of the eight patterns assumed typical for infertile women were more common among infertile women. Two of the eight patterns were more common among fertile women. Acupuncture points KI3, LI3 and SP6 were chosen for almost all women, whereas CV4, CV3 and ST29 were chosen more often for infertile women (pwomen (p<0.001). The data indicate that the presence of some, and the absence of other, TCM patterns are associated with infertility. These results are not consistent with the assumed associations between eight specific patterns and infertility, as maintained by TCM textbooks.

  3. Clomifene citrate or low-dose FSH for the first-line treatment of infertile women with anovulation associated with polycystic ovary syndrome: a prospective randomized multinational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homburg, R.R.; Hendriks, M.L.; König, T.E.; Anderson, R.A.; Balen, A.H.; Brincat, M.; Child, T.; Davies, M.; D'Hooghe, T.; Martinez, A; Rajkhowa, M.; Rueda-Saenz, R.; Hompes, P.G.A.; Lambalk, C.B.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clomifene citrate (CC) is accepted as the first-line method for ovulation induction (OI) in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) associated with infertility owing to anovulation. Low-dose FSH has been reserved for women failing to conceive with CC. In this RCT, we tested the

  4. Extraterritoriality for cross-border reproductive care: should states act against citizens travelling abroad for illegal infertility treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoof, Wannes; Pennings, Guido

    2011-11-01

    Since the development of assisted reproduction technologies, there has been discussion on which people should have access to these technologies and which treatments and techniques are morally acceptable. However, national legislation can no longer determine what citizens do. Some countries react to their citizens going abroad to evade restrictions by implementing even more restrictive laws. Turkey has recently become the first state to ban reproductive travel in pursuit of donor gametes. Several states in Australia have enacted or are considering laws that prohibit international commercial surrogacy. This article investigates the consistency and morality of several state reactions to cross-border reproductive care (CBRC), including extraterritorial regulation. The only widespread existing extraterritorial regulation of private life concerns female genital cutting (FGC), sex with children and (largely in the past) abortion. This discussion develops an analogy with these cross-border crimes to evaluate the morality of similar legislation in cases of CBRC. The dissimilarity in these analogies shows that extraterritoriality is a radical position that is generally inappropriate in the case of CBRC. Subsequently, several potential state reactions to CBRC for law evasion are considered. It is concluded that legislation of CBRC should be modest, tolerant and nuanced. Copyright © 2011 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Guidelines for counselling in infertility: outline version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, J; Appleton, T C; Baetens, P; Baron, J; Bitzer, J; Corrigan, E; Daniels, K R; Darwish, J; Guerra-Diaz, D; Hammar, M; McWhinnie, A; Strauss, B; Thorn, P; Wischmann, T; Kentenich, H

    2001-06-01

    The Guidelines for Counselling in Infertility describe the purpose, objectives, typical issues and communication skills involved in providing psychosocial care to individuals using fertility services. The Guidelines are presented in six sections. The first section describes how infertility consultations differ from other medical consultations in obstetrics and gynaecology, whereas the second section addresses fundamental issues in counselling, such as what is counselling in infertility, who should counsel and who is likely to need counselling. Section 3 focuses on how to integrate patient-centred care and counselling into routine medical treatment and section 4 highlights some of the special situations which can provoke the need for counselling (e.g. facing the end of treatment, sexual problems). Section 5 deals exclusively with third party reproduction and the psychosocial implications of gamete donation, surrogacy and adoption for heterosexual and gay couples and single women without partners. The final section of the Guidelines is concerned with psychosocial services that can be used to supplement counselling services in fertility clinics: written psychosocial information, telephone counselling, self-help groups and professionally facilitated group work. This paper summarizes the different sections of the Guidelines and describes how to obtain the complete text of the Guidelines for Counselling in Infertility.

  6. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of infertile couples on male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge, attitudes and practices of infertile couples on male participation in infertility management at the Kenyatta National Hospital. ... helping decide the treatment the partner receives (p-value = 0.04, OR=2.5[1.0-5.9]) and accepting treatment if found to have a problem (p-value=0.005, OR=4.0[1.5-10.5]). Conclusion: ...

  7. The long-term prognosis for live birth in couples initiating fertility treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malchau, S S; Henningsen, A A; Loft, A; Rasmussen, S; Forman, J; Nyboe Andersen, A; Pinborg, A

    2017-07-01

    What are the long-term chances of having a child for couples starting fertility treatments and how many conceive with ART, IUI and without treatment? Total 5-year live birthrates were strongly influenced by female age and ranged from 80% in women under 35-26% in women ≥40 years, overall, 14% of couples conceived naturally and one-third of couples starting treatments with intrauterine insemination delivered from that treatment. Few studies report success rates in fertility treatments across a couple's complete fertility treatment history, across clinics, evaluating live births after insemination, ART and natural conceptions. This register-based national cohort study from Denmark includes all women initiating fertility treatments in public and private clinics with homologous gametes in 2007-2010. Women were identified in the Danish ART Registry and were cross-linked with the Medical Birth Registry to identify live births. Subfertile couples were followed 2 years (N = 19 884), 3 years (N = 14 445) and 5 years (N = 5165), or until their first live birth. Cumulative live birthrates were estimated 2, 3 and 5 years from the first treatment cycle, in all women, including drop-outs. Birthrates were stratified by type of first treatment (ART/IUI), mode of conception (ART/IUI/natural conception) and female age. Within 5 years, in women aged women aged women starting treatments with IUI (N = 3028), 35% delivered after IUI within 5 years, 24% delivered after shift to ART treatments and 17% delivered after natural conception. Within 5 years from starting treatments with ART (N = 2137), 53% delivered after ART, 11% delivered after natural conception and 0.6% delivered after IUI. Birthrates are most likely higher compared to countries without national coverage of treatments and results are influenced by laws and regulations. Information on duration of infertility prior to treatment was not available. Future prospective intervention studies should focus on the role of expectant

  8. Psychological aspects of infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thara, R; Ramachandran, V; Hassan, P P

    1986-10-01

    Forty couples who attended the Infertility clinic of Government Royapettah Hospital, Madras, were included in the study and compared with matched controls who had off springs. All 80 persons were administered the M.H.Q. and the E.P.I. Psychosocial data was recorded and a clinical psychiatric evaluation was done. 51 out of 80 in the study group had psychiatric problems, predominantly depression and anxiety. These problems increased with increasing duration of childless marriage. 40 % of the infertile group had psychosexual dysfunction such as premature ejaculation and erectile disturbances as opposed to 2.5% in the controls. Presence of vaginisms, dysmenorrhea and sexual dissatisfaction were more in the women of the study group. 15 males bad oligospermia/azospermia.

  9. PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF INFERTILITY*

    OpenAIRE

    Thara, R.; Ramachandran, V.; Hassan, P.P. Mohammed

    1986-01-01

    SUMMARY Forty couples who attended the Infertility clinic of Government Royapettah Hospital, Madras, were included in the study and compared with matched controls who had off springs. All 80 persons were administered the M.H.Q. and the E.P.I. Psychosocial data was recorded and a clinical psychiatric evaluation was done. 51 out of 80 in the study group had psychiatric problems, predominantly depression and anxiety. These problems increased with increasing duration of childless marriage. 40 % o...

  10. Fertility prognosis for infertile couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bostofte, E; Bagger, P; Michael, A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a fertility prognosis model for infertile couples. DESIGN: Prospective follow-up study. PARTICIPANTS: In the period November 30, 1977 to June 1, 1985, 321 consecutive couples were investigated for infertility at Hvidovre University Hospital. Investigation of the female...... MEASURE: The Cox regression model was used to predict the time required to conceive based on informations provided by fertility investigations. RESULTS: Three of 16 prognostic variables (the period of infertility, the female infertility factor, and the P-test) possess significant prognostic information....... The period of infertility and the P-test are best scored as continuous variables, whereas the female infertility factor are best categorized in four classes, i.e., normal, ovulation or cervical disorder, anatomic disorder, or a combination of disorders. CONCLUSIONS: The three prognostic variables...

  11. Genetic testing and counselling for male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krausz, Csilla; Chianese, Chiara

    2014-06-01

    Genetic disorders can be identified in about 15% of cases of male infertility. With the widespread application of assisted reproductive technology, infertile patients are now given the possibility of having their biological children; however, a genetic risk exists for assisted reproductive technology-born offspring, implying the necessity for future parents to be appropriately informed about potential consequences. In this review, we provide current recommendations on clinical genetic testing and genetic counselling. New insights are presented concerning Klinefelter syndrome, X and Y chromosome-linked deletions, monogenic diseases and pharmacogenetics. As for Klinefelter patients, novel preventive measures to preserve fertility have been proposed although they are not yet applicable in the routine setting. Y-chromosome deletions have both diagnostic and prognostic values and their testing is advised to be performed according to the new European Academy of Andrology/European Molecular Genetics Quality Network guidelines. Among monogenic diseases, major advances have been obtained in the identification of novel genes of hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. Pharmacogenetic approaches of hormonal treatment in infertile men with normal values of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) are promising and based on FSHR and FSHB polymorphisms. X chromosome-linked deletions are relevant for impaired spermatogenesis. In about 40% of male infertility, the cause is unknown and novel genetic factors are expected to be discovered in the near future.

  12. Obstetric management after infertility treatment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Les mesures de résultat obstétriques analysés comprennent : les complications antenatal et des enfants, le nombre de bébés livrées et le mode de livraison. Les données a été entrées dans la base .... became pregnant after assisted reproduction.[9,10]. Intrapartum complications like placenta previa and placental abruption ...

  13. Obstetric management after infertility treatment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    You need a software (e.g. RSSReader, Feed Demon, FeedReader, My Yahoo!, NewsGator and. NewzCrawler) to get advantage of this tool. RSS feeds can also be read through FireFox or Microsoft Outlook 2007. Once any of these small (and mostly free) software is installed, add www.annalsafrmed.org/rssfeed.asp as one.

  14. What Infertility Treatments Are Available?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español NICHD Theme Browse AZTopics Browse A-Z Adrenal Gland Disorders Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Down Syndrome Endometriosis Learning ... Funding Opportunities & Notices Health A to Z List Adrenal Gland Disorders About NICHD Research Information Find a Study More ...

  15. Pregnancy and live birth after follicle-stimulating hormone treatment for an infertile couple including a male affected by Sertoli cell-only syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulis G

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Gianni Paulis,1,2 Luca Paulis,3 Gennaro Romano,4 Carmen Concas,5 Marika Di Sarno,5 Renata Pagano,5 Antonio Di Filippo,5 Maria Luisa Di Petrillo5 1Andrology Center, Regina Apostolorum Hospital, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Uro-Andrology, Castelfidardo Medical Team, Peyronie’s Disease Care Center, Rome, Italy; 3Section of Pharmacology and Research, Department of Uro-Andrology, Castelfidardo Medical Team, Peyronie’s Disease Care Center, Rome, Italy; 4Department of Urologic Oncology, Italian League Against Cancer, Avellino, Italy; 5Department of Reproductive Medicine and Biology, Caran Center, Caserta, Italy Abstract: In males with nonobstructive azoospermia, one of the main histopathologic patterns of the testis is Sertoli cell-only syndrome (SCOS, in which no germ cells are present and only Sertoli cells are contained in the seminiferous tubules. There is not any formal treatment for this pathological condition. However, several studies reported the possibility to perform testicular sperm extraction in patients with SCOS, although, according to some authors, sperm retrieval is possible only in the presence of focal spermatogenesis. We report the case of an infertile couple in whom the 30-year-old male was azoospermic. After the diagnosis, the patient underwent multiple bilateral testicular biopsies, which showed a histological pattern corresponding to SCOS. We administered a cycle of hormone stimulation followed by medically assisted procreation procedures to the male patient. Therefore, the male patient was treated with follicle-stimulating hormone gonadotropin for a total of 7 months (150 IU recombinant human follicle stimulating hormone three times per week. After carrying out a new multiple testicular sperm extraction, several spermatozoa were microscopically observed, and it was then possible to perform an intracytoplasmic sperm injection with subsequent embryo transfer of the blastocyst into the wife’s uterus, and so pregnancy was

  16. Fertility prognosis for infertile couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bostofte, E; Bagger, P; Michael, A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a fertility prognosis model for infertile couples. DESIGN: Prospective follow-up study. PARTICIPANTS: In the period November 30, 1977 to June 1, 1985, 321 consecutive couples were investigated for infertility at Hvidovre University Hospital. Investigation of the female...... MEASURE: The Cox regression model was used to predict the time required to conceive based on informations provided by fertility investigations. RESULTS: Three of 16 prognostic variables (the period of infertility, the female infertility factor, and the P-test) possess significant prognostic information...

  17. Dermatoglyphic pattern in male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontakke, B R; Talhar, S; Ingole, I V; Shende, M R; Pal, A K; Bhattacharaya, T

    2013-06-01

    Dermatoglyphics in infertile male patients were studied and compared with that of age matched controls to see whether any specific dermatoglyphic pattern exists in infertile male patients. Infertile male patients with abnormal semen profile were referred to Cytogenetic Laboratory for karyotyping. We selected twenty-four infertile male patients with abnormal semen profile. Out of twenty-four infertile male patients, nineteen were with normal Karyotype and five patients were with abnormal Karyotype. Loop was the commonest pattern observed in the infertile male patients. All these fingertip and palmar dermatoglyphic findings were compared with that of result on finger and palmar dermatoglyphics of equal number of age matched controls. Statistical evaluation was done with software "EPI- info, version-6.04 d". Infertile males had reduced number of loops as compared to that of controls which was statistically significant. Total whorls were increased in infertile male patients as compared to that of controls which was statistically insignificant. Percentage of true palmar pattern in I 3 and I 4 areas was reduced in infertile male patients as compared to that of controls which was statistically insignificant.

  18. Endodontic treatment options after unsuccessful initial root canal treatment: Alternatives to single-tooth implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabinejad, Mahmoud; White, Shane N

    2016-03-01

    Initial root canal treatment is highly successful, appreciated by patients, and cost-effective, but failures occur. Should a tooth with unsuccessful initial root canal treatment be treated by means of other endodontic procedures or be replaced by a single-tooth implant? Results from systematic reviews of the outcomes of nonsurgical retreatment, apical surgery, replantation, and autotransplantation show high tooth survival rates. Nonsurgical retreatment generally is prioritized before surgical endodontic treatment. Microsurgical endodontic treatment is superior to traditional surgical endodontic treatment and has high survival rates. Intentional replantation remains a viable alternative to extraction. Autotransplantation has a place, particularly in growing patients with an appropriate donor tooth. Single-tooth implants have higher survival rates, but the natural state has intrinsic value. The first-line treatment option after failure of initial root canal treatment is nonsurgical retreatment. Endodontic surgery, intentional replantation, and autotransplantation should be considered before extraction and replacement by a single-tooth implant. Comprehensive case assessment, evaluation of all endodontic options, and risk assessment for caries and periodontal disease are always necessary when choosing the optimal treatment for a patient when initial root canal treatment has failed to heal. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Complementary and alternative medicine usage and its determinant factors among Iranian infertile couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan, Mahlagha; Mokhtarabadi, Sima; Heidari, Fatemeh Ghaedi

    2018-04-04

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the status of utilizing some complementary and alternative medicine techniques in infertile couples. Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted on 250 infertile couples referred to a hospital in Kerman using convenience sampling. A researcher-made questionnaire was used to study the prevalence and user satisfaction of complementary and alternative medicines. Results Results indicated that 49.6% of the infertile couples used at least one of the complementary and alternative medicines during the past year. Most individuals used spiritual techniques (71.8% used praying and 70.2% used Nazr) and medicinal plants (54.8%). Safety is the most important factor affecting the satisfaction of infertile couples with complementary treatments (couples think that such treatments are safe (54.8%)). Discussion Concerning high prevalence of complementary and alternative treatments in infertile couples, incorporating such treatments into the healthcare education and promoting the awareness of infertile individuals seem crucial.

  20. Infertility and assisted reproduction in Denmark. Epidemiology and psychosocial consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Lone

    2006-11-01

    Clinically a couple is considered to be infertile after at least one year without contraception and without pregnancy. There was scant knowledge about the prevalences of infertility, involuntary childlessness and the seeking of fertility treatment and only few longitudinal studies about the psychosocial consequences of infertility and its treatment. This thesis is about the epidemiological aspects of infertility; the conceptualization and measurement of important psychosocial aspects of infertility; and a medical sociological analysis of the associations between these psychosocial variables among Danish women and men in fertility treatment. The thesis is based on nine papers. The three main purposes were: (i) to review critically, population based studies of infertility and medical care seeking in industrialised countries. Further, to examine these prevalences and subsequent motherhood among women in former assisted reproduction in a Danish population. (ii) To develop measures of psychosocial consequences of infertility: fertility problem stress, marital benefit, communication, coping strategies, attitudes to and evaluation of fertility treatment. (iii) To examine these phenomena and to analyse their interrelations among Danish women and men in fertility treatment. The thesis is based on four empirical studies: (i) The Women and Health Survey, a cross-sectional population-based study among 15-44 year old women (n=907, 25-44 year old) in Copenhagen County, 1989. (ii) The Psychosocial Infertility Interview Study, a qualitative interview study among 16 couples (n=2 participants) infertility treatment at The Fertility Clinic, Herlev University Hospital,1992. (iii) The Infertility Cohort, a longitudinal cohort study consecutively including all couples (n=250 participants) beginning anew fertility treatment period at one of four public (Braedstrup, Herlev, Odense, Rigshospitalet) and one private fertility clinic (Trianglen),2000-2002. (iv) The Communication and Stress

  1. Counselling in infertility: individual, couple and group interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Broeck, Uschi; Emery, Marysa; Wischmann, Tewes; Thorn, Petra

    2010-12-01

    Infertility is considered a biopsychosocial crisis and infertility counselling is recommended as an integral part of a multidisciplinary approach. This article will outline the theoretical background and describe common interventions used in infertility counselling for individuals, couples and in a group setting. This article summarizes the proceedings of the first campus workshop of the Special interest group of Psychology and Counselling of the European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE). Infertility counselling offers the opportunity to explore, discover and clarify ways of living more satisfyingly and resourcefully when fertility impairments have been diagnosed. The Heidelberg Fertility Consultation Service is presented as a framework for individual and couples counselling and highlights important issues in counselling patients. For group work a number of steps to set up a group within an infertility framework are discussed. In recent years, infertility counselling has become a specialist form of counselling requiring professional expertise and qualification. Key issues and common interventions are presented to raise awareness for the specific counselling needs of individuals and couples experiencing infertility and undergoing medical treatment. Mental health professionals new to the field of reproductive technologies as well as those in other areas of mental health counselling clients with fertility disorders can benefit from the topics addressed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Role of Dyadic Coping on the Marital and Emotional Adjustment of Couples With Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Catarina; Canavarro, Maria Cristina; Moura-Ramos, Mariana

    2018-04-30

    Infertility is a challenging experience, affecting individual and couples' adjustment. However, the way the members of the couple support each other may affect the experience of infertility and their adjustment. This study aimed to investigate the role of dyadic coping by oneself and by the partner in the association between the impact of infertility and dyadic and emotional adjustment (anxiety and depression) to infertility. In this cross-sectional study, a total of 134 participants (67 couples with infertility) completed self-report questionnaires assessing infertility-related stress, dyadic coping, dyadic adjustment, and depression and anxiety symptoms. A path analysis examined the direct and indirect effects between the impact of infertility in one's life and dyadic and emotional adjustment. There is an indirect effect of the impact of infertility in one's life on dyadic adjustment through men's perceived dyadic coping efforts employed by the self (dyadic coping by oneself) and women's perceived dyadic coping efforts of the partner (dyadic coping by the partner). Regarding the emotional adjustment of infertile couples, infertility stress impact had an indirect effect only on depressive symptoms through men's dyadic coping by oneself. The results highlight the importance of men's dyadic coping strategies for the marital adjustment of couples as well as for men's emotional adjustment. Findings emphasize the importance of involving men in the fertility treatment process, reinforcing the dyadic nature of infertility processes. © 2018 Family Process Institute.

  3. Depression and infertility in women seeking bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrell, Julie; Lavery, Megan; Ashton, Kathleen; Heinberg, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with abnormalities in reproductive functioning and fertility in women. A number of potential mechanisms have been identified, including neuroendocrine functioning and polycystic ovarian syndrome. Associations between infertility, depression, and anxiety have been found in nonobese populations; however, the relationship between depression and infertility in women pursuing bariatric surgery has not been examined. This study sought to explore potential psychosocial correlates of infertility in a female bariatric population. Data were analyzed from female patients of childbearing age (n = 88; 70.5% Caucasian; mean age 36.2; mean education 14.3 years; mean body mass index [BMI] 47.9 kg/m(2)) psychologically evaluated for bariatric surgery. Participants were dichotomized as Infertility+(n = 43) or Infertility-(n = 45) based on a medical history self-report questionnaire. Medical records were reviewed for demographic characteristics, BMI, physical and/or sexual abuse history, psychiatric medication usage, outpatient behavioral health treatment, and psychiatric diagnoses. Women identified as Infertility+were more likely to have been diagnosed with a depressive disorder not otherwise specified or a major depressive disorder (χ(2) = 3.71, Pwomen. However, Infertility+women were less likely to be involved in outpatient behavioral health treatment (χ(2) = 5.65, PWomen struggling with infertility may be more psychiatrically vulnerable than other bariatric surgery candidates and less likely to have received mental health treatment. Additional research on the association between fertility, depression, behavioral health treatment, and obesity is warranted. Future research should consider whether this potential relationship changes after bariatric surgery. © 2013 American Society for Bariatric Surgery Published by American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery All rights reserved.

  4. 'Crisis' and 'everyday' initiators: A qualitative study of coercion and agency in the context of methadone maintenance treatment initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damon, Will; Small, Will; Anderson, Solanna; Maher, Lisa; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas; McNeil, Ryan

    2017-03-01

    Patient attrition is common among people enrolled in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) programs and most pronounced during the first year of treatment. However, the experiences of patients initiating MMT have been overlooked in the literature. This study explores experiences of MMT initiation among MMT patients, focusing on contextual influences on MMT initiation and perceptions of MMT and their subsequent influence on treatment retention. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 39 MMT patients in Vancouver, Canada. Individuals reporting enrolment in MMT were recruited from within two ongoing cohort studies comprised of people who use drugs. Interview transcripts were analysed using an inductive and iterative approach. Two groups of MMT initiators were identified: (i) 'crisis initiators' prescribed methadone following critical transition events, such as incarceration or pregnancy; and (ii) 'everyday initiators' enrolled in MMT as part of routine healthcare utilisation. While most 'crisis initiators' and some 'everyday initiators' described experiencing coercion during MMT initiation, 'crisis initiators' were further subjected to the coercive leveraging of their vulnerability to motivate 'consent' for MMT. 'Crisis initiators' developed negative views towards MMT and were more likely to discontinue treatment. Long-standing patient-provider relationships and open dialogue were associated with more positive views regarding MMT, regardless of the circumstances of initiation. Findings underscore the need for clear and effective communication regarding treatment regimens and expectations during MMT initiation. Furthermore, training in trauma-informed care may help reduce perceptions of coercion and rates of early treatment termination. [Damon W, Small W, Anderson S, Maher L, Wood E, Kerr T, McNeil R. Crisis' and 'everyday' initiators: A qualitative study of coercion and agency in the context of methadone maintenance treatment initiation. Drug

  5. Who goes to treatment? Predictors of treatment initiation among gambling help-line callers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledgerwood, David M; Arfken, Cynthia L; Wiedemann, Ashley; Bates, Kendrich E; Holmes, Donald; Jones, LaNeice

    2013-01-01

    Although the consequences of problem gambling can be severe, few ever seek treatment for this disorder. Problem gambling help-lines represent a crucial point of entry into the treatment system. Through brief telephone counseling, help-lines have the potential of enhancing callers' motivations to engage in longer-term treatment. We prospectively examined treatment initiation and its predictors among individuals calling a state help-line. Participants (n = 143) were assessed shortly after their initial call and re-contacted at least two months later. Overall 67% of the re-contacted help-line callers had attended at least one treatment session at the time of the follow-up interview (92.7% formal treatment and 28.1% peer-support meetings). Multivariate analysis revealed that gambling-related financial difficulties and past treatment for problem gambling (but not for mental health or substance abuse) predicted treatment initiation. Enhanced counseling focusing on motivational factors may result in better treatment engagement for some problem gamblers. Copyright © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  6. Association Between Infertility and Sexual Dysfunction in Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Michael H; Messore, Marisa; Pastuszak, Alexander W; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2016-10-01

    The relation between infertility and sexual dysfunction can be reciprocal. Causes of sexual dysfunction that affect fertility include erectile dysfunction, Peyronie's disease (abnormal penile curvature), low libido, ejaculatory disorders in men, and genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder (GPPPD) and low sexual desire in women. To review the association between infertility and sexual dysfunction and discuss current management strategies to address sexual disorders in couples with infertility. Peer-reviewed publications from PubMed published from 1980 through February 2016 were identified that related to sexual dysfunction and infertility in men and women. Pathophysiology and management approach of erectile dysfunction, Peyronie's disease, low libido, ejaculatory disorders in men, and GPPPD and low sexual desire in women and how each etiology contributes to sexual dysfunction and infertility in the couple. Treating the infertile couple with sexual dysfunction involves addressing underlying conditions such as psychogenic erectile dysfunction, low testosterone, Peyronie's disease in men, and GPPPD and low sexual desire in women. Psychogenic erectile dysfunction can be successfully treated with phosphodiesterase inhibitors. Low testosterone is often identified in men with infertility, but testosterone therapy is contraindicated in men attempting conception. Men with Peyronie's disease have a new treatment option to address their penile curvature-collagenase Clostridium histolyticum injection directly into the penile plaque. GPPPD is a broad disorder that includes vulvodynia and vaginismus and can be treated with topical lubricants and moisturizers. We must address psychosocial factors in women with low sexual desire. Flibanserin and transdermal testosterone (off-label) are novel therapies for women with low sexual desire. Sexual dysfunction in a couple with infertility is a complex issue. Management of infertility and sexual dysfunction should involve appropriate

  7. Brachytherapy as sole treatment modality in initial cervix carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heredia Z, A.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate brachytherapy as the only treatment modality in inoperable early cervix carcinoma patients (carcinoma in situ, IA and IBocc). In a retrospective analysis 36 patients were treated with intracavitary irradiation between 1984 and 1988 in the Radiotherapy Department of the National Institute of Neoplasmic Diseases. Distribution by stage was; carcinoma in situ: one patient (2,47%), IA: six patients (16,6%), IBooc: twenty-nine patients (80,7%). Histology revealed epidermoid carcinoma in all cases. Mean age 55 years (range: 32-78). Treatment consisted in: two intracavitary applications of Radium, for 120 hours each, with a month interval, in 30 patients (carcinoma in situ: one, IA: four, IBocc: twenty-five patients), two applications of 72 hours each, with 15 days interval in four patients (IA: one, IBocc: 3) and one single intracavitary radium application in two patients (IA and IBocc). Local control was complete in all carcinoma in situ and IA patients. Only 1 of 29 patients with IBocc stage failed to respond, in spite of having received two applications, this shows that local response is independent of the number of insertions. Incidence of complications was low, and resolved with medical treatment. One patient had rectal adenocarcinoma 3 years after treatment -it was considered as radio induced neoplasm, since time of appearance was more than two years and localization was within irradiated area. Two patients died form intercurrent diseases, one (IBocc) from persistent diseases. Two patients were lost to follow-up. Three years survival was: 100% for carcinoma in situ and IA 86,2% for IBocc. Five years survival was 80% for IA and IBocc. Brachytherapy as unique modality of treatment is highly effective in initial cervix carcinoma stages. (author). 41 refs., 14 tabs., 2 figs., 1 ill

  8. Recommended foods for male infertility in Iranian traditional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejatbakhsh, Fatemeh; Nazem, Esmaeil; Goushegir, Ashrafeddin; Isfahani, Mohammad Mahdi; Nikbakht Nasrabadi, Alireza; Baygom Siahpoosh, Marzieh

    2012-11-01

    Male infertility accounts for 30-50% of all infertilities among couples. Iranian traditional medicine (ITM) stressed the importance of nutrition in the prevention and treatment of male infertility. Many Iranian traditional physicians have described the traits of specific foods for prevention and treatment of male infertility. To explore the principles and roles of foods recommended by ITM scientists in prevention and treatment of male infertility as well as enlisting all the recommended foods for treating this problem addressed through the ITM original resources written between 815 and 1901. In this review study specific data related to the subject among all referral ITM texts was extracted firstly, and then the collected data were analyzed using inductive content analysis. The analysis of data revealed that foods that enhance sexual performance must have 3 properties; they should be warm in nature, very nutritious, and flatulent. Foods that are warm in nature and nutritious affect the quality and quantity of semen. A food having the third trait of being flatulent is required to complete sexual performance by creating an erection. Foods with only one of these traits must be consumed with another food that has the other trait. This study also provided a list of foods that can enhance the quality and increase the quantity of semen. Foods that can enhance sexual performance and the quality and quantity of semen can be recommended to male patients who suffer from infertility in medical centers.

  9. A Biopsychosocial Theory of Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrity, Deborah A.

    2001-01-01

    Briefly reviews the literature on infertility and its emotional, physical, existential, and relational effects on individuals, couples, and families. Life crisis and biopsychosocial theories are discussed as they apply to persons struggling with infertility issues. In addition, stage models derived from a biopsychosocial perspective are presented.…

  10. Characteristics of Rainfall Runoff Pollutant and Initial Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seongjoon Byeon

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The spread of urbanization drives problems which distort the urban water cycle as a form of flood disaster and pollutant loads. When it comes to pollution, a lack of information on the load and characteristics of pollutants has led to insufficient reduction measures. Thus, this study discusses filtration by different types of filter media as an initial treatment to reduce pollutant loads. This study examined the effectiveness of the filtration method with different types of filter to control micro-particles from rainfall runoff water. The particle size and characteristics of pollutants were investigated. In addition, the characteristics of filter media in the filtration process, such as head loss, treatment efficiency, and changes in particle size distribution were also analyzed by lab-scale experiments. This study suggested the best filtration material to treat surface wash-off pollutants based on the results of various experiments on the treatment of real samples collected from roads and combined sewers. The results and discussions shown in this study may be useful as basic information for appropriate design and operating parameters of filtering facilities to control rainfall runoff pollutants caused by urban storms.

  11. Investigating Marital Relationship in Infertility: A Systematic Review of Quantitative Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Peng; Coates, Rosemary; Maycock, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Background Infertility is a complex issue that affects individuals and groups, and also it has serious implications for the mental and social well-being of those involved. The aim of this review was to assess marital relationship in the context of infertility, using data from infertile individuals or both couples. Methods A literature search was undertaken using multiple databases (Medline, PsycInfo and Scopus) to identify and synthesize all relevant literature published from 1990 to 2011. All studies in the systematic review were confirmed using specific inclusion criteria; the methodological quality of these studies were examined according to a checklist. Results Of the potential 794 articles, 18 studies were included in the final analysis, of which 6 were graded as high quality and 12 as moderate. The results indicated male factor infertility did not have a negative marital impact. In addition, infertile male participants expressed higher marital satisfaction than their wives. Infertile females had significantly less stable marital relationship compared to fertile females, which was associated with their socio-demographics and treatment experience. For infertile couples, the infertile subjects or their partners’ marital relationship was affected by either member's infertility, experience specifically coping strategies. Moreover other factors such as sexual satisfaction, age of the infertile couples, education level, and congruency of couples’ perceptions of infertility were associated with the quality of martial relationship. Conclusion Although the review can provide an outline of marital relationship in infertility, future studies should focus on the perspective from both infertile couple, across a range of different infertility types, including extended sample sizes and longitudinal study designs. In addition, more consideration should be given to qualitative study. PMID:23926528

  12. Response to second treatment after initial failed treatment in a multicenter prospective infantile spasms cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knupp, Kelly G.; Leister, Erin; Coryell, Jason; Nickels, Katherine C.; Ryan, Nicole; Juarez-Colunga, Elizabeth; Gaillard, William D.; Mytinger, John R.; Berg, Anne T.; Millichap, John; Nordli, Douglas R.; Joshi, Sucheta; Shellhaas, Renée A.; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Dlugos, Dennis; Wirrell, Elaine; Sullivan, Joseph; Hartman, Adam L.; Kossoff, Eric H.; Grinspan, Zachary M.; Hamikawa, Lorie

    2018-01-01

    Objective Infantile spasms (IS) represent a severe epileptic encephalopathy presenting in the first 2 years of life. Recommended first-line therapies (hormonal therapy or vigabatrin) often fail. We evaluated response to second treatment for IS in children in whom the initial therapy failed to produce both clinical remission and electrographic resolution of hypsarhythmia and whether time to treatment was related to outcome. Methods The National Infantile Spasms Consortium established a multicenter, prospective database enrolling infants with new diagnosis of IS. Children were considered nonresponders to first treatment if there was no clinical remission or persistence of hypsarhythmia. Treatment was evaluated as hormonal therapy (adrenocorticotropic hormone [ACTH] or oral corticosteroids), vigabatrin, or “other.” Standard treatments (hormonal and vigabatrin) were compared to all other nonstandard treatments. We compared response rates using chi-square tests and multivariable logistic regression models. Results One hundred eighteen infants were included from 19 centers. Overall response rate to a second treatment was 37% (n = 44). Children who received standard medications with differing mechanisms for first and second treatment had higher response rates than other sequences (27/49 [55%] vs. 17/69 [25%], p < 0.001). Children receiving first treatment within 4 weeks of IS onset had a higher response rate to second treatment than those initially treated later (36/82 [44%] vs. 8/34 [24%], p = 0.040). Significance Greater than one third of children with IS will respond to a second medication. Choosing a standard medication (ACTH, oral corticosteroids, or vigabatrin) that has a different mechanism of action appears to be more effective. Rapid initial treatment increases the likelihood of response to the second treatment. PMID:27615012

  13. Response to second treatment after initial failed treatment in a multicenter prospective infantile spasms cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knupp, Kelly G; Leister, Erin; Coryell, Jason; Nickels, Katherine C; Ryan, Nicole; Juarez-Colunga, Elizabeth; Gaillard, William D; Mytinger, John R; Berg, Anne T; Millichap, John; Nordli, Douglas R; Joshi, Sucheta; Shellhaas, Renée A; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Dlugos, Dennis; Wirrell, Elaine; Sullivan, Joseph; Hartman, Adam L; Kossoff, Eric H; Grinspan, Zachary M; Hamikawa, Lorie

    2016-11-01

    Infantile spasms (IS) represent a severe epileptic encephalopathy presenting in the first 2 years of life. Recommended first-line therapies (hormonal therapy or vigabatrin) often fail. We evaluated response to second treatment for IS in children in whom the initial therapy failed to produce both clinical remission and electrographic resolution of hypsarhythmia and whether time to treatment was related to outcome. The National Infantile Spasms Consortium established a multicenter, prospective database enrolling infants with new diagnosis of IS. Children were considered nonresponders to first treatment if there was no clinical remission or persistence of hypsarhythmia. Treatment was evaluated as hormonal therapy (adrenocorticotropic hormone [ACTH] or oral corticosteroids), vigabatrin, or "other." Standard treatments (hormonal and vigabatrin) were compared to all other nonstandard treatments. We compared response rates using chi-square tests and multivariable logistic regression models. One hundred eighteen infants were included from 19 centers. Overall response rate to a second treatment was 37% (n = 44). Children who received standard medications with differing mechanisms for first and second treatment had higher response rates than other sequences (27/49 [55%] vs. 17/69 [25%], p treatment within 4 weeks of IS onset had a higher response rate to second treatment than those initially treated later (36/82 [44%] vs. 8/34 [24%], p = 0.040). Greater than one third of children with IS will respond to a second medication. Choosing a standard medication (ACTH, oral corticosteroids, or vigabatrin) that has a different mechanism of action appears to be more effective. Rapid initial treatment increases the likelihood of response to the second treatment. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  14. Quality and quantity of infertility care in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, P; Ishrat, S; Rahman, D; Banu, J; Deeba, F; Begum, N; Anwary, S A; Hossain, H B

    2015-01-01

    Infertility is an important health issue which has been neglected in the developing countries. First test-tube babies (triplet) in Bangladesh were born on 30th May, 2001. Although there is no tertiary level infertility center in the public sector, several private centers have come up with the facilities. The objective of the study was to find i) the quality and quantity of infertility care in Bangladesh and ii) the cause of infertility in the attending patients iii) the treatment seeking behaviors iv) and the reasons for not taking treatment among the attending patients. There are now 10 tertiary level Infertility centers in Bangladesh. The information was collected in a preformed datasheet about the facilities and the profile of the patients and the treatment seeking behavior of the attending patients. Out of the ten centers two centers refused to respond and did not disclose their data. Around 16700 new patients are enrolled in a year in the responsive clinics. Five percent (5%) of the patients underwent ART, 7% of the patients gave only one visit, 84% of the patients completed their evaluation, 76% of the patients took treatment. Causes of infertility in the patients taking treatment were male factor in 36.4%, bilateral tubal block in 20.2%, PCOS and anovulation in 31.7%, endometriosis in 19.6%, unexplained in 10.95, combined in 3.5%, ovarian failure in 1.4%, testicular failure in 0.33%, congenital anomaly in 0.3%. The main reason for not taking treatment was financial constrainment. The quality and quantity of infertility care is dependent on the available resources and on the use of the resources by the patients. In developing countries the resources are merging and confined to specified areas which cannot meet the demand of their population. The study gives us the idea of the need and the demand of the services in the country.

  15. Parenting after infertility: issues for families and infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Jacqueline M; Samra, Haifa A; Zukowsky, Ksenia; Baker, Brenda

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the research related to parenting after assisted reproduction and uses that research to discuss clinical implications for nurses who work to support these families and the development of their children. The worldwide diagnosis of infertility continues to rise and now hovers near 20%. The increased availability and success of assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) provides a potential option for infertile families to conceive and begin a family, but as nurses know, infertility treatments are not easy to tolerate, are time-consuming, physically taxing, and expensive. In addition, a positive outcome is far from guaranteed. Even when infertile couples successfully give birth, they can continue to struggle with the psychological aspects of infertility and the ongoing care of a child who may be premature, low birth weight, or afflicted with another high-risk condition such as long-term developmental or behavioral problems. Unfortunately, the psychological needs of the couple and the family may not be addressed during ART treatment or after the birth of a child. Parenting is a challenging life task; parenting when the partners may have to work through the psychological aspects of infertility and the care of a high-risk child is even more complex and may have long-lasting effects on the partners as well as their children.

  16. Clinical management and therapeutic outcome of infertile couples in southeast Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menuba IE

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ifeanyi E Menuba,1 Emmanuel O Ugwu,1 Samuel N Obi,1 Lucky O Lawani,2 Chidinma I Onwuka11Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku Ozalla Enugu, Enugu State, Nigeria; 2School of Postgraduate Studies, Department of Community Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus, Enugu, Enugu State, NigeriaBackground: Infertility is highly prevalent in Nigeria and most infertile couples in southeast Nigeria are offered conventional forms of treatment, which consist mainly of ovulation induction and tubal surgery, due to limited availability and high cost of endoscopic and assisted reproductive technologies like laparoscopy and in vitro fertilization. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of infertility, outcome of infertility investigation, and the treatment outcome of infertile couples following therapeutic interventions in southeast Nigeria over a 12-month period.Methods: This was a prospective cross-sectional study of 218 consecutive infertile couples presenting for infertility management at the infertility clinics of two tertiary health institutions in Enugu, southeast Nigeria. Infertility investigations were carried out on these couples using the available conventional diagnostic facilities. Following the results of the investigations/diagnosis, conventional treatment was offered to the couples as appropriate. Data analysis was both descriptive and inferential at 95% confidence level.Results: The mean age of the women was 33.5±4.62 (range: 15–49 years. Most (58.3% [n=127] were nulliparous. The prevalence of infertility was 12.1%. Infertility was primary in 28.4% (n=62 and secondary in 71.6% (n=156. Female etiologic factors were responsible in 32.1% (n=70, male factors in 26.1% (n=57, and a combination of male/female factors in 29.4% (n=64. The etiology was unknown in 12.4% (n=27. Tubal factors 23.8 % (n=52 and ovulation failures 26.1% (n=57 are common female factors implicated

  17. Pediatric prolactinoma: initial presentation, treatment, and long-term prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Anika; Adelmann, Sarah; Lohle, Kristin; Claviez, Alexander; Müller, Hermann L

    2018-01-01

    Prolactinoma is a rare pituitary adenoma secreting prolactin. Studies on diagnostics, treatment, and prognosis in pediatric prolactinoma patients are rare. We analyzed clinical presentation, response to treatment, and prognosis of 27 pediatric prolactinoma patients (10 m/17 f. based on patients' records. Tumors included 6 microadenomas (tumor volume: median 0.2 cm 3 , range 0.01-0.4 cm 3 ; serum prolactin at diagnosis: median 101 ng/ml, range 33-177 ng/ml), 15 macroadenomas (volume: median 3.3 cm 3 , range 0.4-25.8 cm 3 ; prolactin: median 890 ng/ml, range 87-8624), and 3 giant adenomas (volume: median 44.5 cm 3 , range 38.6-93.5 cm 3 ; prolactin: median 4720 ng/ml, range 317-10,400); data for 3 patients were not available. Dopamine agonist treatment (n = 22) was safe and effective, leading to reductions in tumor size (p effective and safe. Overall survival and functional capacity as a measure of quality of survival were not impaired, indicating an optimistic prognosis. Surgery should be considered only in emergency situations of threatened visual function, not presenting a fast response to dopamine agonist treatment. Severe side effects of medication and lack of efficacy should be considered as contraindications. What is Known: • In pediatric prolactinoma-a very rare pediatric neuroendocrinological disease-gender-related differences in terms of clinical presentation at initial diagnosis are known. • Due to the rareness of the disease, reports on long-term outcome and prognosis after childhood-onset prolactinoma based on prospective follow-up are not published. What is New: • Dopamine agonist treatment is efficient and safe for tumor volume reduction in pediatric prolactinoma and surgical interventions are recommended only for decompression of the optic chiasm in case of threat to vision. In case of inefficient response to medication, side effects or parental refuse, alternative therapeutic options should be considered. • Quality of life in

  18. Treatment interruption after 2-year antiretroviral treatment initiated during acute/early HIV in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamalwa, Dalton; Benki-Nugent, Sarah; Langat, Agnes; Tapia, Kenneth; Ngugi, Evelyn; Moraa, Helen; Maleche-Obimbo, Elizabeth; Otieno, Vincent; Inwani, Irene; Richardson, Barbra A; Chohan, Bhavna; Overbaugh, Julie; John-Stewart, Grace C

    2016-09-24

    Treatment interruption has been well tolerated and durable in some pediatric studies but none have compared treatment interruption with continued antiretroviral treatment (ART) following ART initiation in early HIV. The objective of this study was to compare outcomes in treatment interruption versus continued ART among early-treated infants. Randomized trial (OPH-03; NCT00428116). The trial included HIV-infected infants who initiated ART at less than 13 months of age, received ART for 24 months, and, if eligible (CD4% >25%, normal growth), were randomized to treatment interruption versus continued ART. Children in the treatment interruption group restarted ART if they met WHO ART-eligibility criteria. During 18-months postrandomization, primary outcomes were incidence of serious adverse events and growth. CD4%, viral load, morbidity, and growth were compared. Of 140 infants enrolled, 121 started ART, of whom 75 completed at least 24 months ART and 42 were randomized (21 per arm). ART was initiated at median age 5 months and randomization at 30 months. Among 21 treatment interruption children, 14 met ART restart criteria within 3 months. Randomization was discontinued by Data and Safety Monitoring Board due to low treatment interruption durability. At 18 months postrandomization, growth and serious adverse events were comparable between arms; hypercholesteremia incidence was higher in the continued arm (P = 0.03). CD4% and viral load did not differ between arms [CD4% 35% and median viral load undetectable (<150 copies/ml) in both arms, P = 0.9 for each comparison]. No infants had post-treatment viral control. Short treatment interruption did not compromise 18-month CD4%, viral control, growth, or morbidity compared with continued ART among infants who started ART in early HIV infection.

  19. The Impact of Emotionally Focused Therapy on Emotional Distress in Infertile Couples

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    Marzieh Soltani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study investigated the effect of emotionally focused therapy (EFT on factors contributing to emotional distress among infertile couples. Materials and Methods: In this semi-experimental study, the subjects consisted of 12 Iranian couples: six infertile men and six infertile women. They were assessed as depressed, anxious and stressful individuals using depression, anxiety and stress scale (DASS. The subjects were randomly divided into control and experimental groups. The experimental group with six couples (i.e. three infertile men and three infertile women received EFT, while the control group with similar number of couples (i.e. three infertile men and three infertile women was deprived of the treatment. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding job, educational level, income, age, marriage and infertility duration. The pre- and post-test comparisons of DASS subscales showed that level of depression, anxiety and stress among couples with EFT instruction was significantly less than those without such instructions (p<0.0001. Conclusion: Emotionally focused therapy could reduce the rate of depression, anxiety and stress in infertile couples, regardless of the man or woman as the cause of infertility.

  20. Men's accounts of infertility within their intimate partner relationships: an analysis of online forum discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Esmée; Gough, Brendan

    2017-04-01

    This article aims to provide insights into men's accounts of infertility in the context of their intimate partnerships. Although we are beginning to understand that men experience the emotions of infertility acutely, little is known about how such emotions impact on men's intimate partner relationships. Evidence suggests that infertility can impact intimate partner relationships (both positively and negatively), but there is a paucity of research around how men talk about such relationship impacts, and how they share their stories with other men. Men are often viewed as the silent supporting partner within infertility contexts, with women narrated as taking the burden within the relationship. The paper draws on data from a general discussion board on an online men-only forum. Inductive thematic analysis was utilised to identify key themes across the men's online posts. Men's posts demonstrate that infertility challenges relationships, and that men use the forum examined to offer each other advice on coping with infertility in their relationships. Men highlighted a sense of having less agency than their female partners in relation to infertility and that they were less able to access support for themselves as a result. We argue that infertility can be a challenging and complex time within intimate partner relationships and that men construct this situation with reference to gendered norms and constraints within their online accounts. Consideration of both parties in couples experiencing infertility is important for supporting relationships during any diagnosis and treatment processes for infertility.

  1. (Male) infertility: what does it mean to men? New evidence from quantitative and qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wischmann, Tewes; Thorn, Petra

    2013-09-01

    Scientific knowledge of the emotional repercussions of infertility on men remains limited and has only recently become the focus of social science research. Firstly, the current developments in research on the psychosocial impact of infertility on men through a search of the literature over the last 10 years are outlined in this paper. In the second section, issues raised in pretreatment counselling for men and their partner who consider donor insemination are described as this treatment typically raises many emotional issues. The results of more recent studies with sophisticated methodological design show that the emotional impact of infertility may be nearly balanced, suggesting that men do suffer as well and that they have to be addressed in infertility counselling too. The emotional and clinical aspects of donor insemination support the hypothesis that the emotional repercussions of infertility affect both sexes. In general, male factor infertility seems to be more stigmatized than other infertility diagnoses. Forthcoming studies have to differentiate between the psychological impact of infertility on women and men and their respective abilities to communicate easily about this distress. More studies on infertile men in non-Western societies need to be conducted in order to understand the cultural impact on infertility. Copyright © 2013 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A STUDY ON THE ROLE OF ELEVATED SERUM PROLACTIN IN PRIMARY FEMALE INFERTILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Saloi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Infertility affects large number of couples both globally as well as in India. Primary infertility is a common, preventable, but neglected reproductive health problem in developing countries like India. The present study was undertaken in an attempt to find out the role of hyperprolactinaemia or elevated prolactin level in the development of primary infertility in female and analyse its effect in folliculogenesis. MATERIALS AND METHODS In this study, 52 female subjects with the complaint of primary infertility in the child bearing age group who have attended Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Outpatient Department, Gauhati Medical College and Hospital, Guwahati, for treatment were taken as the cases. RESULTS The incidence of hyperprolactinaemia, i.e. serum prolactin levels >25 ng/mL in the infertile women was 42.31%, whereas in the control group of fertile females, the incidence of hyperprolactinaemia was 13.46%. Anovulatory cycles were detected in 51.92% of the infertile group, whereas in the control group, it was detected in 7.69%. Galactorrhea was present in 9.62% of the infertile women. Menstrual disorders observed in the infertile and control groups were 61.54% and 17.31%, respectively. The results of the study were statistically analysed. CONCLUSION There is a high incidence of hyperprolactinaemia in infertile women. Percentage of anovulatory/delayed ovulatory cycles were also found to be higher in the infertile group than the fertile females.

  3. Hysterosalpingographic findings in infertility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, M. S.; Kim, K. S.; Kim, J. S.; Bai, B. C. [Seoul Red Cross Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1981-12-15

    Four hundred and fifty four cases of H.S.G. in infertility were analyzed and following brief results were obtained. 1. Most frequent age group was 25-29 year old, and those number of patient were 188 (41.4%). 2. Most frequent abnormal uterine findings was intravasation (113 cases), and malposition (119), irregular margin (104), filling defect (37), and diverticulum (6) in decreasing order. 3. Most frequent abnormal tubal finding was obstruction (199 cases), and hydrosalpinx (99), diverticulosis (22), intravasation (17), peritubal adhesion (13), and beaded tube (10) in decreasing order. 4. Nagative findings was seen in 155 cases (34.1%) of uterus and in 227 cases (50.0%) of fallopian tubes. 5. Nagative findings in both uterus and fallopian tubes was seen only 87 cases (19.2%)

  4. Hysterosalpingographic findings in infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, M. S.; Kim, K. S.; Kim, J. S.; Bai, B. C.

    1981-01-01

    Four hundred and fifty four cases of H.S.G. in infertility were analyzed and following brief results were obtained. 1. Most frequent age group was 25-29 year old, and those number of patient were 188 (41.4%). 2. Most frequent abnormal uterine findings was intravasation (113 cases), and malposition (119), irregular margin (104), filling defect (37), and diverticulum (6) in decreasing order. 3. Most frequent abnormal tubal finding was obstruction (199 cases), and hydrosalpinx (99), diverticulosis (22), intravasation (17), peritubal adhesion (13), and beaded tube (10) in decreasing order. 4. Nagative findings was seen in 155 cases (34.1%) of uterus and in 227 cases (50.0%) of fallopian tubes. 5. Nagative findings in both uterus and fallopian tubes was seen only 87 cases (19.2%)

  5. Online psychoeducational support for infertile women: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousineau, Tara M.; Green, Traci C.; Corsini, Evelyn; Seibring, A; Showstack, Marianne T.; Applegarth, Linda; Davidson, Marie; Perloe, Mark

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND The study goal was to develop and test the effectiveness of a brief online education and support program for female infertility patients. METHODS A randomized-controlled trial was conducted. Using a Solomon-four group design, 190 female patients were recruited from three US fertility centers and were randomized into two experimental and two no-treatment control groups. The psychological outcomes assessed included infertility distress, infertility self-efficacy, decisional conflict, marital cohesion and coping style. Program dosage and satisfaction were also assessed at four weeks follow-up. RESULTS Women exposed to the online program significantly improved in the area of social concerns (P = 0.038) related to infertility distress, and felt more informed about a medical decision with which they were contending (P = 0.037). Trends were observed for decreased global stress (P = 0.10), sexual concerns (P = 0.059), distress related to child-free living (P = 0.063), increased infertility self-efficacy (P = 0.067) and decision making clarity (P = 0.079). A dosage response was observed in the experimental groups for women who spent >60 min online for decreased global stress (P = 0.028) and increased self efficacy (P = 0.024). CONCLUSIONS This evidence-based eHealth program for women experiencing infertility suggests that a web-based patient education intervention can have beneficial effects in several psychological domains and may be a cost effective resource for fertility practices. PMID:18089552

  6. Clinical Outcomes of Varicocele Repair in Infertile Men: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Chiba

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Varicoceles are a major cause of impaired spermatogenesis and the most common correctable cause of male infertility. They are found in approximately 40% of men with primary infertility and 80% of men with secondary infertility, although they also occur in 12% of men with normal semen parameters. The presence of a varicocele does not always affect spermatogenesis, as it has been reported that only 20% of men with documented varicoceles suffer fertility problems. However, varicocele repair appears to have beneficial effects in men with impaired semen parameters and palpable varicoceles. Currently, the main procedures employed for varicocele repair are microsurgical subinguinal or inguinal varicocelectomy, laparoscopic varicocelectomy, and radiological percutaneous embolization. Microsurgical varicocelectomy appears to be the optimal treatment in most cases, whereas the other procedures are useful only in specific cases. After treatment, it typically takes 3 to 6 months for patients’ semen parameters to improve; thus, other therapies, including assisted reproductive technology, should be considered if infertility persists after this interval, especially in older couples. Controversies still remain regarding how varicoceles in certain subgroups, such as adolescents or men with azoospermia, should be treated. Due to their relatively high prevalence rate among the general population, varicoceles can occur concomitantly with other conditions that cause impaired spermatogenesis. Further studies are necessary in order to identify the patients who are most likely to benefit from treatment. In this review, we sought to summarize the issues currently associated with varicocele treatment in infertile men.

  7. Endometriosis: Does It Cause Infertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Website of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine Endometriosis: Does It Cause Infertility? This fact sheet was ... with The Society of Reproductive Surgeons What is endometriosis? Endometriosis is when tissue is found outside the ...

  8. Diagnostic Testing for Female Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's FAQs about In Vitro Fertilization REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH TOPICS Topics Index NEWS AND PUBLICATIONS Publications Overview News and Research Ethics Documents Practice Committee Documents Patient Fact Sheets and ...

  9. Infertility and Weight Reduction: Influence and Outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaskheli, M. N.; Baloch, S.; Baloch, A. S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effect of weight reduction in obese infertile women on conception rate spontaneously as well as with ovulation induction and pregnancy outcome. Study Design: Observational experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Different private clinics at Mirpurkhas, Thana Bola Khan and Hyderabad, Sindh, Pakistan, from March 2008 to February 2011. Methodology: Infertile women who were obese with the body mass index (BMI) > 30 kg/ m2 and failed to conceive within 2-5 years after taking treatment of infertility for many cycles were inducted. These women underwent life style change program related to exercise and diet for 6 months and in the next 6 months they were observed for spontaneous conception. Those women who failed to conceive were prescribed ovulation induction (clomifene citrate) for the next 6 months and were observed for conception. After conception, they visited regularly during antenatal period till delivery. The data was collected and analyzed on SPSS version 17. Results: The mean decrease in the body index observed was 9.6 +- 1.23 kg/m2, spontaneous conception rate was (n = 35, 41.17%) and miscarriage rate was (n = 9, 16.66%). Conclusion: Weight reduction leads to high spontaneous conception rate as well as with ovulation induction therapy and improves the pregnancy outcome. (author)

  10. Factors associated with secondary infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasina Momtaz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is an experience that strikes at the very core of a woman’s life and as a whole her family and society. Studies in Bangladesh to evaluate the factors are difficult to come by. This case control study was carried out from Jan 2010 to June 2010 to find out the factors associated with secondary infertility. A total of 70 cases were selected from the infertility unit of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University and 70 unmatched controls from the same hospital attending the pediatrics unit with their children were also recruited. Data were collected by interview and review of documents. No age difference was noticed between the cases (29.26 ± 4.13 and controls (29.21 ± 3.95. Association of secondary infertility was found with body mass index (p=0.036, previous bad obstetric history (p = 0.011 and previous caesarian delivery (p=0.044. Women with secondary infertility were more than four times more likely to have gynecological problem(s than their fertile counterparts [OR 4.76 with 95% CI (2.018-11.270]. The factors identified in this study might help the policy makers in designing prevention and health care programmes and thus reducing the hidden burden of secondary infertility. Ibrahim Med. Coll. J. 2011; 5(1: 17-21

  11. Treatment of initially metastatic small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohutek, F.; Bystricky, B.; Tamasova, M.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer (LC) is the most common cause of death associated with neoplasms. The incidence of LC in 2007 was 71.3/100,000 men and 18.6/100,000 women in Slovakia. Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) includes 15 - 18% of all cases. The diagnosis of LC is based on patient's history, physical examination, basic laboratory tests, x-ray imaging and computed tomography (CT) imaging and histology. The material required for histology can be obtained by means of endoscopy or surgery. Ultrasonography (USG) and/or CT of abdomen is commonly performed as a part of staging process, along with CT or MRI of brain. Bone scan is performed in case of suspicion of bone involvement. According to TNM classification, seventh edition, the same classification can be used for SCLC and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Chemotherapy and radiotherapy are available for treatment of initially metastatic SCLC. First-line chemotherapy regimen should be based on combination of cisplatin or carboplatin with etoposide (PE). Alternatively, CAV regimen (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine) can be used. Newer regimens did not provide benefit when compared to standard regimens. If progression occurs later than 3 months after finishing first-line chemotherapy, the same regimen may be used in second-line chemotherapy. If progression occurs earlier than 3 months after finishing first-line chemotherapy, topotecan-based regimen is an option for second-line line chemotherapy. Despite promising outcomes of amrubicin-based second-line chemotherapy in Japan, amrubicin is not available in countries of E U. Standard therapy schedules do not include radiotherapy targeted on primary tumor and affected lymph-nodes. According to American and European guidelines, prophylactic cranial irradiation is recommended for patients with extensive disease-SCLC with good performance status after achieving complete or partial response to first-line chemotherapy. (author)

  12. Assisted reproductive technology treatments and quality of life: a longitudinal study among subfertile women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, Francesca; Monti, Fiorella; Andrei, Federica; Paterlini, Marcella; Palomba, Stefano; La Sala, Giovanni Battista

    2017-10-01

    Quality of life (QoL) may represent a comprehensive indicator for the assessment of the psychological impact of complex clinical conditions, such as infertility. Infertile women have a worse QoL compared to both infertile men and non-infertile controls. However, the initial phases of infertility treatments have been frequently investigated using cross-sectional study designs. This prospective longitudinal study aimed at assessing the health-related QoL change across different phases of assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatments in subfertile women and men. Eighty-five subfertile women and men undergoing ART cycles were assessed at the beginning of the ovarian stimulation, during oocyte retrieval before discharging, and around 14 days after the embryo transfer. QoL was assessed through the Short Form 36. Irrespective of the cause of infertility, work status, and age, QoL levels decreased from the first to the third assessment, and women scored significantly lower than men to each QoL indicator. Additionally, a higher number of previous ART failures had a negative impact on QoL, irrespective of gender and the phase of treatment. ART outcome marginally affected women's QoL across time. Infertile women have a worse QoL throughout all phases of ARTs compared to men, and this difference increases in infertile patients with more than one previous ART failure.

  13. Treatment of Stiff Initial Value Problems using Block Backward ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... on some standard stiff initial value Problems. The results show that the 3-point BDF step size ratio with r = 2 has the widest region of absolute stability and highest accuracy. Keywords: Zero stability, Hybrid, k –step, Block methods, first order initial value problem. Journal of the Nigerian Association of Mathematical Physics, ...

  14. Viewpoint: medical infertility care in low income countries: the case for concern in policy and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zandvoort, H.; de Koning, K.; Gerrits, T.

    2001-01-01

    Based on published, 'grey' and anecdotal information, this paper explores some aspects of infertility, its medical treatment and their burden in poor countries. Many cases of infertility result from sexually transmitted infections (STI) and unsafe abortion and there is no doubt that their prevention

  15. Biomedical infertility care in Sub-Saharan Africa: what is going on?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerrits, G.J.E.; Slager, E.

    2011-01-01

    Infertility treatments, including the use of advanced reproductive technologies (ARTs), are nowadays provided at several places in sub-Saharan Africa. This article, which is based on a review of (scarce) social science studies, gives insight into the way biomedical infertility care is provided,

  16. Responding to Infertility: Lessons From a Growing Body of Research and Suggested Guidelines for Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreffler, Karina M; Greil, Arthur L; McQuillan, Julia

    2017-10-01

    Infertility is a common, yet often misunderstood, experience. Infertility is an important topic for family scientists because of its effects on families; its relevance to research in related areas, such as fertility trends and reproductive health; and its implications for practitioners who work with individuals and couples experiencing infertility. In this review, we focus on common misperceptions in knowledge and treatment of infertility and highlight insights from recent research that includes men, couples, and people with infertility who are not in treatment. The meaning of parenthood, childlessness, awareness of a fertility problem, and access to resources are particularly relevant for treatment seeking and psychosocial outcomes. On the basis of insights from family science research, we provide specific guidelines for infertility practice within broader social contexts such as trends in health care, education, employment, and relationships. Guidelines are presented across three areas of application: infertility education for individuals, families, and practitioners; steps to support the emotional well-being of those affected by infertility; and understanding of treatment approaches and their implications for individuals and couples.

  17. Male infertility: An audit of 70 cases in a single centre

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    E.A. Jeje

    2016-07-25

    Jul 25, 2016 ... Male infertility: An audit of 70 cases in a single centre. E.A. Jejea, T.O. Alabia, R.W. ... Objectives: To audit the aetiology, treatment and predictors of outcome in infertile men who attended urology clinic of a private hospital in ..... Ethics Committee of Lagoon Hospital Limited, Apapa, Lagos. Conflict of interest.

  18. Exploration of the counseling needs of infertile couples: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Jafarzadeh-Kenarsari

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The counseling needs of infertile couples are varied, and they require various psychosocial support and counseling interventions. The participants of this study identified clearly the significance of psychological counseling and information throughout the long and onerous journey of infertility and its treatment.

  19. Evolution of psychology and counseling in infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Jacky; Gameiro, Sofia

    2015-08-01

    Five key paradigm shifts are described to illustrate the evolution of psychology and counseling in infertility. The first paradigm shift was in the 1930s when psychosomatic concepts were introduced in obstetrics and gynecology as causal factors to explain why some couples could not conceive despite the absence of organic pathology. In the second shift, the nurse advocacy movement of the 1970s stimulated the investigation of the psychosocial consequences of infertility and promoted counseling to help couples grieve childlessness when medical treatments often could not help them conceive. The third shift occurred with the advent of IVF, which created a demand for mental health professionals in fertility clinics. Mental health professionals assessed the ability of couples to withstand the demands of this new high technology treatment as well as their suitability as potential parents. The fourth shift, in the 1990s, saw reproductive medicine embrace the principles of evidence-based medicine, which introduced a much more rigorous approach to medical practice (effectiveness and safety) that extended to psychosocial interventions. The most recent paradigm shift, in the new millennium, occurred with the realization that compliance with protracted fertility treatment depended on the adoption of an integrated approach to fertility care. An integrated approach could reduce treatment burden arising from multiple sources (i.e., patient, clinic, and treatment). This review describes these paradigm shifts and reflects on future clinical and research directions for mental health professionals. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of the melatonin and oxidative stress markers level in serum of fertile and infertile women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Soleimani Rad

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is defined as the inability to achieve the pregnancy within a year of unprotected intercourse. Infertility is a complex issue and different factors such as stress oxidative can be involved in this problem. So, any attempt to neutralize oxidative stress would be helpful in the treatment of infertility. Melatonin is a known scavenger of free radicals. Objective: The aim of our study was to evaluate the level of melatonin and its correlation with oxidative biomarkers in fertile and infertile women. Materials and Methods: The participants including fertile and infertile women were divided into two groups of 30 people. Blood sampling was performed and sera were collected. The level of Malondialdehyde (MDA, total antioxidant capacity (TAC and melatonin were detected. Data were analyzed using T-test and their correlation was assessed using Spearman test. Results: Serum melatonin from fertile women was higher than infertile women but the difference was not significant (p= 0.46. MDA level in fertile women was significantly lower than infertile women (p<0.001 and the level of TAC in fertile women was significantly higher than infertile women (p<0.001. Spearman test revealed a significant and direct correlation between melatonin and TAC in fertile and infertile women and a significant but reverse correlation between melatonin and MDA in infertile and fertile women. Conclusion: Differences in the level of oxidative stress biomarkers in fertile and infertile individuals have been reported. This study revealed a significant correlation between melatonin and oxidative stress biomarkers, concluding that melatonin level could be involved in infertility.

  1. An introduction to infertility counseling: a guide for mental health and medical professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Brennan; Boivin, Jacky; Norré, Jan; Smith, Cassandra; Thorn, Petra; Wischmann, Tewes

    2012-03-01

    The practice of infertility counseling delivered by mental health and medical professionals has become more sophisticated and widespread over the past decade. This paper summarizes information presented at the second campus workshop of the Special Interest Group of Psychology and Counseling of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE). This group is dedicated to improving infertility services by creating meaningful connections between mental health and medical professionals. The paper identifies key issues that infertility counselors must consider in their work with couples experiencing infertility. The use of supportive psychosocial interventions and treatments are highlighted. The paper also details the process for choosing the most appropriate type of infertility counseling, and the use of assessment tools that assist in understanding infertility related symptoms. Infertility counselors should also consider gender differences, the impact of infertility on a couple's sexual relationship,and the unique challenges couples face regarding third-party conception. Finally, the paper addresses specific recommendations for infertility counselors in mental health and medical settings.

  2. [Religious (Halachic) infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haimov-Kochman, Ronit; Hurwitz, Arye

    2009-04-01

    Reproductive concepts and practices among observant Orthodox Jews may Lead to Halachic subfertility in a significant portion of couples. According to Halachah [the Jewish code of law) sexual activity may not take place during the time a woman menstruates (Niddah) as well as for a full week thereafter (7 days of cleanliness). Coitus is allowed to resume after the woman has immersed herself in a ritual bath (mikvah). In the case of unexpected spotting or bleeding (Zavah), the woman should consult a rabbi and a doctor to determine the origin of the blood. Uterine bleeding entails that intercourse is forbidden for a minimum of 5 initial days plus 7 days thereafter. In practice, any minute bleeding or spotting, regardless of timing during the menstrual cycle, renders the woman ritually impure and invokes the stringencies of Niddah rulings. Even a physiologic occurrence such as midcycle ovulatory bleeding or spotting renders the woman Zavah and prohibits sexual intercourse at the optimal time for conception. The inability to conceive in this halachically mandated time period is not due to a biologic fault but rather to social, cultural and religious norms as defined by the rabbinate. Medically lengthening the pre-ovulatory phase is a common practice, as shortening the count of days of ritual impurity is often seen as nonnegotiable. Ethical issues concerning the role of the physician and the safety of such treatments are discussed.

  3. Does infertility history affect the emotional adjustment of couples undergoing assisted reproduction? the mediating role of the importance of parenthood

    OpenAIRE

    Moura?Ramos, Mariana; Gameiro, Sofia; Canavarro, Maria Cristina; Soares, Isabel; Almeida?Santos, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The emotional adjustment of couples undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatments has been widely studied; however, it remains unclear whether infertility history contributes to couples' adjustment. This study examined the impact of infertility history (duration of infertility and number of previous ART treatment cycles) on the emotional adjustment of couples undergoing an ART cycle and the mediating effect of importance of parenthood on that association. Methods In ...

  4. Quality of life and its related factors in infertile couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keramat, Afsaneh; Masoomi, Seyyedeh Zahra; Mousavi, Seyed Abbas; Poorolajal, Jalal; Shobeiri, Fatemeh; Hazavhei, Seyyed Mohammad Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Health related quality of life (QoL) has now been considered as a main tool for outcome measurement in infertility. The present study aimed to determine the association between general and specified QoL with different psychological aspects of self-esteem, social support, sexual satisfaction, and marital satisfaction in a sample of Iranian infertile couples. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 385 infertile couples referred to the Fatemieh Hospital in Hamadan City, western Iran in 2012.To measure the self-esteem, the Iseng test was used. The social support scaling developed by Cassidy and Long was used for assessment of social support. The sexual satisfaction was also assessed by the Lindaberg questionnaire. For assessing the general QoL state, the WHO-QoL-BREF and FertiQoL tools were employed. Self-esteem scores were lower in the couples with longer infertility duration. The social support mean score was lower in low income couples. Those with higher educational level, shorter infertility duration, and higher income were more satisfied from their marital relationships. Besides, we revealed that the previous failed efforts for treatment of infertility were adversely associated with the lower social support and sexual satisfaction. The higher educational level, higher monthly income, living in urban area, shorter duration of marriage and infertility, and male gender were associated with better. QoL status in the most components.Associations between QoL and self-esteem, social support, sexual satisfaction, and marital satisfaction were significant (Pself-esteem, social support, sexual satisfaction, and marital satisfaction.

  5. A Naval Postgraduate Dental School Analysis of Initial Endodontic Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    to prevent or heal disease, i.e. apical periodontitis . Accordingly, endodontic treatment outcomes can better be defined in reference to healing and...population. It is hoped that the results of this study will ultimately allow us to provide more accurate prognosis and improved treatment planning related...CS, BeGole EA, Johnson BR. Outcome of One-visit and Two-visit Endodontic Treatment of Necrotic Teeth with Apical Periodontitis : A Randomized

  6. [L-arginine and male infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scibona, M; Meschini, P; Capparelli, S; Pecori, C; Rossi, P; Menchini Fabris, G F

    1994-12-01

    The clinical efficacy and acceptance of L-arginina HCL was tested in 40 infertile men. All of these men had a normal number of spermatozoa (> 20 million/ml), but a decreased motility; this decreased motility was not due to infection or to immunological disorders. The treatment consisted of 80 ml of 10% L-arginine HCL administered daily per os for 6 months. L-arginine HCL showed to be able to improve the motility of spermatozoa without any side-effects.

  7. Does infertility history affect the emotional adjustment of couples undergoing assisted reproduction? the mediating role of the importance of parenthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura-Ramos, Mariana; Gameiro, Sofia; Canavarro, Maria Cristina; Soares, Isabel; Almeida-Santos, Teresa

    2016-05-01

    The emotional adjustment of couples undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatments has been widely studied; however, it remains unclear whether infertility history contributes to couples' adjustment. This study examined the impact of infertility history (duration of infertility and number of previous ART treatment cycles) on the emotional adjustment of couples undergoing an ART cycle and the mediating effect of importance of parenthood on that association. In this cross-sectional study, 70 infertile couples (70 women and 70 men) completed self-report questionnaires assessing emotional adjustment and infertility stress during the hormonal stimulation phase of an ART cycle. Path models accounting for the dyadic nature of the data examined the direct and indirect effects (by affecting representations about parenthood and childlessness) of infertility history on emotional adjustment. The number of previous cycles affected men's, but not women's, emotional adjustment by affecting the representations on the importance of parenthood and of childlessness. Duration of infertility had the opposite effect, as couples with longer infertility reported heightened importance of parenthood, which negatively affected their emotional adjustment. Infertility history was associated with emotional adjustment in men and women, although these associations were complex. The results suggest that progression through treatment is harder for those men and women who attribute higher importance to being parents, which is aggravated by longer infertility. What is already known about the subject? Infertility is an unexpected and stressful life event Assisted reproductive treatments (ART) are emotionally demanding What does this study add? The influence of infertility history on adjustment is mediated by the importance of parenthood Men and women are affected by their past history of infertility differently. © 2015 The Authors. British Journal of Health Psychology published by John

  8. Sociodemographic Findings in an Infertile Male Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayfun Güngör

    2008-08-01

    CONCLUSION: This study claims that the previously established risk factors which are considered to be associated with infertility might influence less or interfere with male infertility in more subtle ways.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Y chromosome infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chromosomal abnormalities in 2078 infertile couples referred for assisted reproductive techniques. Hum Reprod. 2005 Feb;20(2):437-42. ... Yq microdeletions in infertile italian couples referred for assisted reproductive technique. Sex Dev. 2007;1(6):347-52. doi: ...

  10. Dasatinib and Doxorubicin Treatment of Sarcoma Initiating Cells: A Possible New Treatment Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aggerholm-Pedersen, Ninna; Demouth, Christina; Safwat, Akmal

    2016-01-01

    Background. One of the major challenges affecting sarcoma treatment outcome, particularly that of metastatic disease, is resistance to chemotherapy. Cancer-initiating cells are considered a major contributor to this resistance. Methods. An immortalised nontransformed human stromal (mesenchymal......) stem cell line hMSC-TERT4 and a transformed cell line hMSC-TERT20-CE8, known to form sarcoma-like tumours when implanted in immune-deficient mice, were used as models. Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) activation was analysed by RTK arrays and cellular viability after tyrosine kinases inhibitor (TKI...

  11. Immune Aspects of Female Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Brazdova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Immune infertility, in terms of reproductive failure, has become a serious health issue involving approximately 1 out of 5 couples at reproductive age. Semen that is defined as a complex fluid containing sperm, cellular vesicles and other cells and components, could sensitize the female genital tract. The immune rejection of male semen in the female reproductive tract is explained as the failure of natural tolerance leading to local and/or systemic immune response. Present active immune mechanism may induce high levels of anti-seminal/sperm antibodies. It has already been proven that iso-immunization is associated with infertility. Comprehensive studies with regards to the identification of antibody-targets and the determination of specific antibody class contribute to the development of effective immuno-therapy and, on the other hand, potential immuno-contraception, and then of course to complex patient diagnosis. This review summarizes the aspects of female immune infertility.

  12. [Informations for the infertile couple].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oger, P; Nicollet, B; Wainer, B; de Crécy, M-A

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the first consultation related to infertility is supposed to be the optimization of all factors that can increase the chances of pregnancy: more frequent sexual intercourse during the fertility windows; lifestyle modifications (better diet, decreased exposure to tobacco or other toxics); older couples can enjoy the same advice but should be proposed a quicker medical support. Maternal preconceptional advice must be transmitted. A testicular cancer must always be excluded in infertile men, while the risk of hormone-dependent cancers in infertile women remains undetermined. With the results of this first consultation, couples will generally be proposed the best solution to achieve their parental project: ovarian stimulation assisted reproductive technology (IUI, IVF or ICSI) or adoption. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Peritoneal drainage versus laparotomy as an initial treatment in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective To determine whether initial peritoneal drainage (PD) or primary laparotomy is the most effective intervention in very-low-birth-weight and extremely lowbirth- weight infants who are diagnosed with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC, Bell's stage II and stage III). Patients and methods It is a retrospective chart review ...

  14. Thyroid dysfunction in infertile women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elahi, S.; Tanseem, A.; Nazir, I.; Nagra, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the frequency of thyroid dysfunction in infertile women referred for thyroid evaluation. Age matched infertile (n=140 each) and fertile women (n=152 each) referred to CENUM for thyroid evaluation were investigated for incidence of hyperthyroidism (TSH 20 IU/L). Serum free T4 (FT4), free T3 (FT3) and antithyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab) was determined by radioimmunoassay (RIA) and TSH by immunoradiometric assay (IRMA). Most of the infertile women (89.3%), like control women (93.4%), were euthyroid. The difference of overall thyroid dysfunction was not statistically significant in infertile and control women (10.7% vs. 7.9%; p=0.395). The same was true for incidence of hyperthyroidism (4.3% vs. 5.3%; p=0.701) as well as hypothyroidism (6.4% vs. 2.6%; p=0.104). In infertile women, the incidence of hypothyroidism (6.4%) was slightly higher as compared to hyperthyroidism (4.3%). In euthyroid women of both groups, mean FT4, FT3 and TSH levels were significantly higher (p 2.5 mIU/L compared to fertile women (31.2% vs. 15.6%; p 20 IU/L) than control women (7.2% vs. 1.4%; p<0.05). Increased incidence of high normal TSH and raised TPO-Ab titer indicate relatively more frequent occurrence of compensated thyroid function in infertile women than normal women of reproductive age. This necessitates considering them a subgroup of women in which all aspects of pituitary-thyroid axis should be thoroughly investigated than merely TSH testing. (author)

  15. Contribution of environmental factors to the risk of male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, A; Spira, A; Multigner, L

    2001-08-01

    An increasing number of reports suggest that chemical and physical agents in the environment, introduced and spread by human activity, may affect male fertility in humans. We investigated the relationships between exposure to environmental agents and seminal characteristics, and the concentrations of reproductive hormones in the serum of men seeking infertility treatment. We studied 225 male partners from consecutively recruited couples, who had their first infertility consultation between 1995 and 1998, in the Litoral Sur region of Argentina, one of the most productive farming regions in the world. A multivariate logistic regression model showed that exposure to pesticides and solvents is significantly associated with sperm threshold values well below the limit for male fertility. We also found that men exposed to pesticides had higher serum oestradiol concentrations, and that men exposed to solvents had lower LH concentrations than non-exposed men. All of these effects were greater in men with primary infertility than in men with secondary infertility. We have shown that environmental factors contribute to the severity of infertility, and that this may worsen the effects of pre-existing genetic or medical risk factors.

  16. Increases in body mass index following initiation of methadone treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenn, Jennifer M; Laurent, Jennifer S; Sigmon, Stacey C

    2015-04-01

    Despite the clear efficacy of methadone for opioid dependence, one less desirable phenomenon associated with methadone may be weight gain. We examined changes in body mass index (BMI) among patients entering methadone treatment. A retrospective chart review was conducted for 96 patients enrolled in an outpatient methadone clinic for ≥ 6 months. The primary outcome of BMI was assessed at intake and a subsequent physical examination approximately 1.8 ± 0.95 years later. Demographic, drug use and treatment characteristics were also examined. There was a significant increase in BMI following intake (pmethadone treatment enrollment was associated with clinically significant weight gain, particularly among female patients. This study highlights the importance of efforts to help patients mitigate weight gain during treatment, particularly considering the significant health and economic consequences of obesity for individuals and society more generally. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A redesigned follitropin alfa pen injector for infertility: results of a market research study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbotts C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Carole Abbotts1, Cristiana Salgado-Braga2, Céline Audibert-Gros31Pharmaceutical Marketing Research Consultancy, London, UK; 2Fertility and Endocrinology Global Business Unit, 3Business Intelligence, Merck Serono SA, Geneva, SwitzerlandBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate patient-learning and nurse-teaching experiences when using a redesigned prefilled, ready-to-use follitropin alfa pen injector.Methods: Seventy-three UK women of reproductive age either administering daily treatment with self-injectable gonadotropins or about to start gonadotropin treatment for infertility (aged 24–47 years; 53 self-injection-experienced and 20 self-injection-naïve and 28 nurses from UK infertility clinics were recruited for the study. Following instruction, patients and nurses used the redesigned follitropin alfa pen to inject water into an orange and completed questionnaires to evaluate their experiences with the pen immediately after the simulated injections.Results: Most (88%, n = 64 patients found it easy to learn how to use the pen. Among injection-experienced patients, 66% (n = 35 agreed that the redesigned pen was easier to learn to use compared with their current method and 70% (n = 37 also said they would prefer its use over current devices for all injectable fertility medications. All nurses considered the redesigned pen easy to learn and believed it would be easy to teach patients how to use. Eighty-six percent (n = 24 of the nurses thought it was easy to teach patients to determine the remaining dose to be dialed and injected in a second pen if the initial dose was incomplete. Compared with other injection devices, 96% (n = 27 thought it was "much easier" to "as easy" to teach patients to use the redesigned pen. Based on ease of teaching, 68% (n = 19 of nurses would choose to teach the pen in preference to any other injection method. Almost all (93%, n = 26 nurses considered that having the same pen format for a range of

  18. How Infertility Patients and Providers View and Confront Religious and Spiritual Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitzman, Robert

    2018-02-01

    Questions arise concerning whether and how religion affects infertility treatment decisions. Thirty-seven infertility providers and patients were interviewed. Patients confront religious, spiritual, and metaphysical issues coping with treatment failures and religious opposition from clergy and others. Religion can provide meaning and support, but poses questions and objections that patients may try to avoid or negotiate-e.g., concealing treatment or changing clergy. Differences exist within and between religions. Whether and how much providers discuss these issues with patients varies. These data, the first to examine several key aspects of how infertility providers and patients confront religious/spiritual issues, have important implications for practice, research, guidelines, and education.

  19. Infertility and Life Satisfaction among Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillan, Julia; Stone, Rosalie A. Torres; Greil, Arthur L.

    2007-01-01

    Using data from a random sample of 580 midwestern women, the authors explore the association between lifetime infertility and life satisfaction. Past research shows lower life satisfaction among those seeking help for infertility. The authors find no direct effects of lifetime infertility, regardless of perception of a problem, on life…

  20. Plasma Homocysteine and Haematological Changes in Infertile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aim to find possible relationship between elevated plasma homocysteine level and infertility. This descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out among eligible infertile and fertile women seeking care at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital. The subjects were 100 infertile women randomly selected from the ...

  1. Diabetes Care and Treatment Project: A Joslin Telemedicine Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-31

    using CDMP for bariatric surgery , and his involvement in the Hispanic initiative in Springfield. Lastly, Kevin Nickels, CEO of Celleration presented on...treatable and its complications are preventable through optimal care- and self-management. However, the traditional physician-centered, episodic...mellitus may ultimately reduce the drain on resources from diabetes and its complications . An Internet-based care management model may prove to be more

  2. Male sexual dysfunction and infertility associated with neurological disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Krogh-Jespersen, Sheila; Brackett, Nancy L

    2012-01-01

    Normal sexual and reproductive functions depend largely on neurological mechanisms. Neurological defects in men can cause infertility through erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities. Among the major conditions contributing to these symptoms are pelvic and retroperito......Normal sexual and reproductive functions depend largely on neurological mechanisms. Neurological defects in men can cause infertility through erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities. Among the major conditions contributing to these symptoms are pelvic...... and retroperitoneal surgery, diabetes, congenital spinal abnormalities, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Erectile dysfunction can be managed by an increasingly invasive range of treatments including medications, injection therapy and the surgical insertion of a penile implant. Retrograde ejaculation...

  3. Male factor infertility and risk of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glazer, Clara Helene; Tøttenborg, Sandra Søgaard; Giwercman, Aleksander

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gender, possibly due to the influence of gonadal hormones, is presumed to play a role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), but no studies have evaluated whether male infertility is associated with MS. OBJECTIVE: To study the association between male factor infertility...... and prevalent as well as incident MS. METHOD: Our cohort was established by linkage of the Danish National in vitro fertilization (IVF) registry to The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry and consisted of 51,063 men whose partners had undergone fertility treatment in all public and private fertility clinics...

  4. Sulfasalazine induced oxidative stress: a possible mechanism of male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Virginia; Linares, Victoria; Bellés, Montserrat; Albina, Maria L; Sirvent, Juan J; Domingo, José L; Sánchez, Domènec J

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism of action of sulfasalazine (SASP) in male infertility is not well elucidated. For it, an oxidative stress-like mechanism inductor of infertility was hypothesized. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (20/group) were orally administered 0, 300, and 600mg SASP/kg body weight for 14 days. One-half of animals in each group remained an additional period of 14 days without treatment. SASP induced a significant decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione reductase (GR) at the highest dose in both testis and epididymis. GR remained altered in these tissues within the recovery period. However, an increase in SOD was noted in epididymis. An increase in thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) was noted in all SASP-treated groups. In epididymis, catalase (CAT) significantly increased at 600mg/(kgday). These results suggest that SASP induces oxidative stress, which in turn might act as a possible mechanism of male-induced infertility.

  5. Is infertility after surgery for cryptorchidism congenital or acquired?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortes, Dina; Thorup, J M; Visfeldt, J

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated whether deletions of the DAZ (deleted in azoospermia) gene, abnormal karyotypes or hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) were demonstrable in infertile men who had undergone surgery in childhood for cryptorchidism with a simultaneous testicular biopsy that demonstrated no or almost...... no germ cells. In six men with infertility after surgery for cryptorchidism, the adult karyotype and analyses for the DAZ gene, serum follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and testosterone were performed from a peripheral blood sample. Testicular volume was also measured. All patients...... exhibited a 46,XY karyotype. There were no deletions of the DAZ-gene, no HH and no testicular atrophy. The infertility was thus not proved to be congenital, and consequently, surgical treatment is indicated before the germ cells disappear from undescended testes. This appears to be before 15 months of age....

  6. A Review: Role of oxidative stress in male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Fanaei

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that reactive oxygen species (ROS have a very important role in the intracellular signaling process in physiological conditions. On the other hand, during the recent decade it has been indicated that ROS play a role in various types of male infertility and it is due to the overproduction of ROS or decrease in the antioxidant defense system in the reproductive system and sperm. In pathological conditions, ROS via interferences in the spermatogenesis process, sperm function, and sperm structure (motility, viability, acrosome reaction, sperm-oocyte fusion, and damage to DNA and cell membrane as well as reduction in fertilization and implantation can lead to infertility. Knowledge of how ROS affect the physiological process of the reproductive system is crucial in the treatment of infertility. Thus, in this review article we will discuss experimental and clinical findings related to the effects of ROS on male fertility.

  7. Assessment of questionnaires measuring quality of life in infertile couples: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Seyyed Abbas; Masoumi, Seyyedeh Zahra; Keramat, Afsaneh; Pooralajal, Jalal; Shobeiri, Fatemeh

    2013-07-01

    Infertility has potentially inappropriate effects on quality of life in infertile couples. Various general and specific questionnaires have been structured for assessing different aspects of quality of life in infertile men, women, or couples. The present systematic review was designed to assess these questionnaires and also identify different factors affecting infertile couples based on the aforesaid questionnaires. The research strategy involved general and specific terms in relation to couples's infertility and their quality of life. A review was done for studies published from 1982 to 2012 that were indexed in Medline, ISI Web of Science and Scopus as well as abstract books on this subject. We also corresponded with the authors of the references in related studies for introducing more resources and references. In all reviewed studies, different aspects of the quality of life in couples were evaluated including sexual, psychological, social, communicational, environmental, occupational, medical, as well as economical ones. In total, after initial screening of all studies, 10 general and 2 specific questionnaires were retrieved. Although no meta-analysis was found in the review, infertility had a negative effect on quality of life in couples. This study revealed that some general questionnaires such as SF-36 and WHO-QOL were mostly used for assessing quality of life in infertile couples and some specific questionnaires such as FERTI-QoL and Fertility Problem Inventory were rarely used. Thus, it seems that the evaluation of quality of life in infertile couples needs valid instruments for measurement.

  8. Male Infertility Secondary to Varicocele: A Study of the Management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    elearning

    operation can be done either by open, laparoscopic, microscopic or embolization unilaterally or bilaterally5-7. The effect of varicocelectomy on male fertility is contentious.4,8,9. Earlier studies on the use of varicocelectomy for the treatment of varicocele induced infertility indicated a remarkable improvement in fertility profile8 ...

  9. Therapy choice - Therapy possibility in PCOS infertility patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Mitrovic Jovanovic

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS constitutes the most common endocrinopathy of women of reproductive age. Infertility due to the PCOS is a complex and specific condition but the majority of the problem is the ovulatory dysfunction. Aims Evaluation of the therapy choice and reproductive therapy possibilities in PCOS infertility patients. Make it easier for clinicians. Methods Clinical experience based on review of the literature. Results The syndromes heterogeneity is reflected in the different response to the various ovulation inducting drugs. Management of anovulatory infertility associated with PCOS is based on the overall clinical picture. Lifestyle change programs, weight reduction diet and exercise, have been shown to be very effective in improving reproductive as well as metabolic characteristics of overweight and obese patients with PCOS. In women with anovulatory infertility, the first line of treatment for induction of ovulation is clomiphene citrate. Aromatase inhibitors have been suggested as an alternative treatment to clomiphene therapy. Gonadotropin treatment is effective, but there is a risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Surgery, such as laparoscopic ovarian drilling should be considered in some patients. Reconsider a use of metformin and supplements. Conclusion Understanding specific features and metabolic implications of different PCOS patients, may guide us to treat individuals optimally, as well as to develop effective prevention strategies to reduce the risk of long term complicationsconsequences and improve reproductive outcomes. Individual treatment modalities in PCOS patients are imperative for successful therapy.

  10. Initial Experience with Bevacizumab (Avastin ) in the Treatment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF SABE NWOSU

    Objective: To report on the early experience with the treatment of neovascular AMD with intravitreal injection of bevacizumab. (Avastin) in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Eight eyes (7 patients) with neovascular. AMD who met the inclusion criteria were treated with intravitreal 1.25mg bevacizumab between September 2008 ...

  11. Initial Experience with Bevacizumab (Avastin TM ) in the Treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To report on the early experience with the treatment of neovascular AMD with intravitreal injection of bevacizumab (Avastin) in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Eight eyes (7 patients) with neovascular AMD who met the inclusion criteria were treated with intravitreal 1.25mg bevacizumab between September 2008 ...

  12. Diagnostic methods in finding out the causes of infertility, results of HSG examination and laparoscopy in infertile women examined at the Gynecological Ward of the City Hospital; Metody diagnostyczne w dochodzeniu do przyczyn nieplodnosci, wyniki badan HSG i laparoskopii u nieplodnych pacjentek badanych w Oddziale Ginekologicznym Szpitala Miejskiego

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwasniewski, S.; Kukulski, P.; Szymanski, J.; Kwasniewska, A. [Szpital Miejski, Pruszkow (Poland)

    1993-12-31

    The paper presents diagnostic methods and the results of hysterosalpingography (HSG) and laparoscopy examination, with special attention being drawn to the usefulness of these methods in finding out the causes of infertility. 51 patients with primary and second infertility were examined. HSG and laparoscopy make it possible to diagnose correctly the cause of infertility. They also enable adequate and early classification of patients for further diagnosis and treatment at highly specialized centers dealing with the problems of infertility. (author) 8 refs, 3 tabs

  13. A Naval Postgraduate Dental School Analysis Of Initial Endodontic Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    replacement did not significantly impact periapical health or tooth loss, but diabetes and systemic steroid treatment were found to significantly...of symptoms, tooth type ( single versus multi-root), and existing medical conditions (smoker, coronary heart disease, diabetes). lntraoperative...2004; Siqueira, 2008) some studies use a more loose criteria in defining success where the tooth has no symptoms but does have a lesion that has

  14. A Naval Postgraduate Dental School Analysis Of Initial Endodontic Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-30

    defined as the absence of clinical symptoms and radiographically, the absence of a lesion, and the presence of a normal periodontal ligament (PDL...Hemoglobin Levels and Prevalence of Apical Periodontitis in Type 2 Diabetic Patients. J Endod 2015;41:601-6. Santos SM, Soares JA, Costa GM, Brito...endodontic treatment. J Endod 2011;37:!-5. Zhang M, Liang Y, Gao X, Jiang L, Van der Sluis L, Wu M. Management of apical periodontitis : healing of

  15. Initial Experience in the Treatment of "Borderline Resectable" Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquets, Juli; Fabregat, Juan; Verdaguer, Helena; Laquente, Berta; Pelaez, Núria; Secanella, Luis; Leiva, David; Serrano, Teresa; Cambray, María; Lopez-Urdiales, Rafael; Ramos, Emilio

    2017-10-01

    A borderline resectable group (APBR) has recently been defined in adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. The objective of the study is to evaluate the results in the surgical treatment after neoadjuvancy of the APBR. Between 2010 and 2014, we included patients with APBR in a neoadjuvant and surgery protocol, staged by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Treatment with chemotherapy was based on gemcitabine and oxaliplatin. Subsequently, MDCT was performed to rule out progression, and 5-FU infusion and concomitant radiotherapy were given. MDCT and resection were performed in absence of progression. A descriptive statistical study was performed, dividing the series into: surgery group (GR group) and progression group (PROG group). We indicated neoadjuvant treatment to 22 patients, 11 of them were operated, 9 pancreatoduodenectomies, and 2 distal pancreatectomies. Of the 11 patients, 7 required some type of vascular resection; 5 venous resections, one arterial and one both. No postoperative mortality was recorded, 7 (63%) had any complications, and 4 were reoperated. The median postoperative stay was 17 (7-75) days. The pathological study showed complete response (ypT0) in 27%, and free microscopic margins (R0) in 63%. At study clossure, all patients had died, with a median actuarial survival of 13 months (9,6-16,3). The median actuarial survival of the GR group was higher than the PROG group (25 vs. 9 months; p vascular resection in most cases. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. [Reporting initiatives. An update on treatment in radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, J-M; Pinto dos Santos, D; Kloeckner, R; Dueber, C; Mildenberger, P

    2014-07-01

    The written radiological report is the most important means of communication between the radiologist and the referring medical doctor. There is no universal definition of a radiological report concerning its structure and content. The majority of clinicians and radiologists prefer structured reporting rather than free text reports of findings. Structured reporting does not increase the quality of a radiological report but has many advantages in research, teaching and quality management. Using standard RadLex terms facilitates translation and ontological assignment of a report. The Reporting Initiative of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) offers free and freely available extensively validated best practices radiology report templates in the new management of radiology report templates (MRRT) format according to the guidelines of the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE).

  17. Role of semen analysis in the diagnosis of infertility at a tertiary care centre in Western India: a prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Atul Jain; Puja Iyengar Ambrish; Hoogar MB; Reeta Dhar; Ajay Wani; Shonit Agrwal

    2016-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of infertility in the general population is 15%-20%. Of this, the male factor is responsible for 20%-40%. In Indian couples seeking treatment, the male factor is the cause in approximately 23%. Semen analysis is an indispensable diagnostic tool in the evaluation of the male partners of infertile couples. Careful evaluation of the ejaculate parameters may suggest the possible causes of infertility and their identification could help to institute appropriate therapy, ...

  18. Sexual Satisfaction and Sexual Reactivity in Infertile Women: The Contribution of The Dyadic Functioning and Clinical Variables

    OpenAIRE

    Czy?kowska, Anna; Awruk, Katarzyna; Janowski, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infertility is a factor which has been linked to higher prevalence of sexual dysfunctions in women; however, ambiguous results have been reported about the impact of infertility on women’s sexual satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to compare sexual and dyadic functioning in infertile and fertile women. Furthermore, the associations between sexual variables and clinical variables (depressive symptoms, period trying to conceive, and treatment period) were ass...

  19. Impact of asymptomatic urogenital tract infections on ejaculate parameters in infertile men with varicocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. F. Kurilo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Varicocele, a pathology developing in 15 % males, is associated with 30 % male infertility cases. The role of urogenital infections coinciding with varicocele in infertile men has not been studied in sufficient detail.Objective: to examine the effects of bacterial and viral infections on ejaculate parameters in infertile patients with varicocele. The study included 49 patients with infertility and varicocele and 26 healthy males undergoing prophylactic medical examination. Highlevel infection was recorded after examination of ejaculates and urethral scrapes of 49 patients: bacterial (30.6 % and viral (14.3 % pathogens. Quantitative analysis of viral DNA showed high contamination of ejaculates with herpes viruses (> 3 lg10/ml. Detailed analysis of spermatograms demonstrated a decrease in all basic parameters in patients with varicocele and infertility compared with those in healthy subjects. The presence of infectious agents had a statistically significant negative effect on ejaculate parameters. Spermiological examination revealed high level of sperm abnormalities (astenozoospermia, oligoteratozoospermia, and oligoastenoteratozoospermia in patients with infertility, varicocele and bacterioviral infection of urogenital tract compared with uninfected infertile patients with varicocele. Laboratory tests for bacterial and viral infections should be recommended in infertility associated with varicocele even in the absence of clinical signs of these infections. Quantitative analysis of urogenital pathogens allows one to determine the necessity of etiotherapy of hidden infection and to monitor the effectiveness of treatment.

  20. Causes of infertility in view of Iranian traditional medicine: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemeini, Seyed Kazem; Emtiazy, Majid; Owlia, Fatemeh; Khani, Parisa

    2017-04-01

    Infertility is one of the most important reproductive health concerns in the conventional medicine. Iranian traditional medicine presents different viewpoints in this regard which they could be of benefit and a good guide for the society of medicine. This study sought to provide the comprehensive investigation on the causes of infertility according to Iranian traditional medicine for understanding of old sages' ideas and categorizing of the causes of infertility. In this narrative review, we searched causes of infertility in traditional medicine books and available articles in this field. Iranian traditional physicians have investigated the causes of infertility in couples and attributed them to male and female causes. They have divided the main causes of infertility in both sexes into structural and functional abnormalities, that both traditional medicine and conventional medicine have a lot of participations, but the traditional medicine believes holistic approach in the treatment of diseases and the involvement of all parts of the body particularly specialty board members (heart, liver, brain, ovary, and testicles) in the proper conduct activities in different parts of the body such as reproduction system. There is also special attention to temperament Mizaj disorders. Given the numerous commonalities existing between traditional and conventional medicine in categorizing the causes of infertility, Iranian traditional medicine methods can be applied as a complementary solution in infertility. It could be also subject to further research and investigation due to its opposition to modern medicine in some regards.

  1. Infertility in resource-constrained settings: moving towards amelioration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarberg, Karin; Kirkman, Maggie

    2013-02-01

    It is often presumed that infertility is not a problem in resource-poor areas where fertility rates are high. This is challenged by consistent evidence that the consequences of childlessness are very severe in low-income countries, particularly for women. In these settings, childless women are frequently stigmatized, isolated, ostracized, disinherited and neglected by the family and local community. This may result in physical and psychological abuse, polygamy and even suicide. Attitudes among people in high-income countries towards provision of infertility care in low-income countries have mostly been either dismissive or indifferent as it is argued that scarce healthcare resources should be directed towards reducing fertility and restricting population growth. However, recognition of the plight of infertile couples in low-income settings is growing. One of the United Nation's Millennium Development Goals was for universal access to reproductive health care by 2015, and WHO has recommended that infertility be considered a global health problem and stated the need for adaptation of assisted reproductive technology in low-resource countries. This paper challenges the construct that infertility is not a serious problem in resource-constrained settings and argues that there is a need for infertility care, including affordable assisted reproduction treatment, in these settings. It is often presumed that infertility is not a problem in densely populated, resource-poor areas where fertility rates are high. This presumption is challenged by consistent evidence that the consequences of childlessness are very severe in low-income countries, particularly for women. In these settings, childless women are frequently stigmatized, isolated, ostracized, disinherited and neglected by the family and local community. This may result in physical and psychological abuse, polygamy and even suicide. Because many families in low-income countries depend on children for economic survival

  2. Cost effectiveness of arthrocentesis as initial treatment for temporomandibular joint arthralgia: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, L.M.; Stant, A.D.; Quik, E.H.; Huddleston Slater, J.J.R.; Stegenga, B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the cost effectiveness of arthrocentesis as initial treatment compared to care as usual (CAU) for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthralgia. Materials and methods: 80 patients were randomly allocated to arthrocentesis as initial treatment (n = 40) or CAU (n = 40).

  3. The Evaluation of the Relationship Between Obesity and Male Infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Fikret Erdemir

    2013-01-01

      Infertility, defined as the inability to conceive after one year of unprotected intercourse, affects approximately 15% of couples. Male factor infertility is the sole cause of infertility in approximately 20% of infertile couples, with an additional 30% to 40% secondary to both male and female factors. Thus, male factor infertility is present in approximately half of all infertile couples. Known etiologies of male infertility include cryptorchidism, testicular torsion or trauma, varico...

  4. Towards a global initiative for fibrosis treatment (GIFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Molina-Molina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is a progressive lung disease characterised by increased scarring of lung tissue. Despite the recent introduction of novel drugs that slow disease progression, IPF remains a deadly disease, and the benefits of these new drugs differ markedly between patients. Human diseases arise due to alterations in an almost limitless network of interconnected genes, proteins, metabolites, cells and tissues, in direct relationship with a continuously changing macro- or microenvironment. Systems biology is a novel research strategy that seeks to understand the structure and behaviour of the so-called “emergent properties” of complex systems, such as those involved in disease pathogenesis, which are most often overlooked when just one element of disease pathogenesis is observed in isolation. This article summarises the debate that took place during a European Respiratory Society research seminar in Barcelona, Spain on December 15–16, 2016, which focused on how systems biology could generate new data by integrating the different IPF pathogenic levels of complexity. The main conclusion of the seminar was to create a global initiative to improve IPF outcomes by integrating cutting-edge international research that leverages systems biology to develop a precision medicine approach to tackle this devastating disease.

  5. The Role of Infertility Etiology in Success Rate of Intrauterine Insemination Cycles: An Evaluation of Predictive Factors for Pregnancy Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, Mahnaz; Rashidi, Mandana; Ghasemi, Afsaneh; Arabipoor, Arezoo; Daghighi, Sara; Pourasghari, Parisa; Zolfaghari, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to identify the prognostic factors that influence the outcome of ovarian stimulation with intrauterine insemination (IUI) cycles in couples with different infertility etiology. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was performed in data of 1348 IUI cycles with ovarian stimulation by clomiphene citrate (CC) and/or gonadotropins in 632 women with five different infertility etiology subgroups at Akbarabbadi Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Results: The pregnancy rate (PR)/ cycle was highest (19.9%) among couples with unexplained infertility and lowest (10.6%) in couples with multiple factors infertility. In cases of unexplained infertility, the best PRs were seen after CC plus gonadotropins stimulation (26.3%) and with inseminated motile sperm count>30×106 (21.9%), but the tendency didn’t reach statistical significant. In the ovarian factor group, the best PRs were observed in women aged between 30 and 34 years (20.8%), with 2-3 preovulatory follicles (37.8%) and infertility duration between 1and 3 years (20.8%), while only infertility duration (p=0.03) and number of preovulatory follicles (p=0.01) were statistically significant. Multiple logistic regression analysis determined that number of preovulatory follicles (p=0.02), duration of infertility (p=0.015), age (p=0.019), infertility etiology (p=0.05) and stimulation regimen (p=0.01) were significant independent factors in order to predict overall clinical PR. Conclusion: The etiology of infertility is important to achieve remarkable IUI success. It is worth mentioning that within different etiologies of infertility, the demographic and cycles characteristics of couples did not show the same effect. Favorable variables for treatment success are as follows: age infertility ≤5 years and a cause of infertility except of multiple factors. PMID:24520471

  6. Breast Cancer-Initiating Cells: Insights into Novel Treatment Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santilli, Guido; Binda, Mara; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Daidone, Maria Grazia, E-mail: mariagrazia.daidone@istitutotumori.mi.it [Department of Experimental Oncology and Molecular Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS-Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Via Amadeo 42, Milan 20133 (Italy)

    2011-03-16

    There is accumulating evidence that breast cancer may arise from mutated mammary stem/progenitor cells which have been termed breast cancer-initiating cells (BCIC). BCIC identified in clinical specimens based on membrane phenotype (CD44{sup +}/CD24{sup −/low} and/or CD133{sup +} expression) or enzymatic activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1{sup +}), have been demonstrated to have stem/progenitor cell properties, and are tumorigenic when injected in immunocompromized mice at very low concentrations. BCIC have also been isolated and in vitro propagated as non-adherent spheres of undifferentiated cells, and stem cell patterns have been recognized even in cancer cell lines. Recent findings indicate that aberrant regulation of self renewal is central to cancer stem cell biology. Alterations in genes involved in self-renewal pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, sonic hedgehog, PTEN and BMI, proved to play a role in breast cancer progression. Hence, targeting key elements mediating the self renewal of BCIC represents an attractive option, with a solid rationale, clearly identifiable molecular targets, and adequate knowledge of the involved pathways. Possible concerns are related to the poor knowledge of tolerance and efficacy of inhibiting self-renewal mechanisms, because the latter are key pathways for a variety of biological functions and it is unknown whether their interference would kill BCIC or simply temporarily stop them. Thus, efforts to develop BCIC-targeted therapies should not only be focused on interfering on self-renewal, but could seek to identify additional molecular targets, like those involved in regulating EMT-related pathways, in reversing the MDR phenotype, in inducing differentiation and controlling cell survival pathways.

  7. Breast Cancer-Initiating Cells: Insights into Novel Treatment Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santilli, Guido; Binda, Mara; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Daidone, Maria Grazia

    2011-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that breast cancer may arise from mutated mammary stem/progenitor cells which have been termed breast cancer-initiating cells (BCIC). BCIC identified in clinical specimens based on membrane phenotype (CD44 + /CD24 −/low and/or CD133 + expression) or enzymatic activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1 + ), have been demonstrated to have stem/progenitor cell properties, and are tumorigenic when injected in immunocompromized mice at very low concentrations. BCIC have also been isolated and in vitro propagated as non-adherent spheres of undifferentiated cells, and stem cell patterns have been recognized even in cancer cell lines. Recent findings indicate that aberrant regulation of self renewal is central to cancer stem cell biology. Alterations in genes involved in self-renewal pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, sonic hedgehog, PTEN and BMI, proved to play a role in breast cancer progression. Hence, targeting key elements mediating the self renewal of BCIC represents an attractive option, with a solid rationale, clearly identifiable molecular targets, and adequate knowledge of the involved pathways. Possible concerns are related to the poor knowledge of tolerance and efficacy of inhibiting self-renewal mechanisms, because the latter are key pathways for a variety of biological functions and it is unknown whether their interference would kill BCIC or simply temporarily stop them. Thus, efforts to develop BCIC-targeted therapies should not only be focused on interfering on self-renewal, but could seek to identify additional molecular targets, like those involved in regulating EMT-related pathways, in reversing the MDR phenotype, in inducing differentiation and controlling cell survival pathways

  8. Multivariate Markov chain analysis of the probability of pregnancy in infertile couples undergoing assisted reproduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. McDonnell; A.J. Goverde (Angelique); J.P.W. Vermeiden; F.F.H. Rutten (Frans)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Estimating the probability of pregnancy leading to delivery and the influence of clinical factors on that probability is of fundamental importance in the treatment counselling of infertile couples. A variety of statistical techniques have been used to

  9. High singleton live birth rate following classical ovulation induction in normogonadotrophic anovulatory infertility (WHO 2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.C. Eijkemans (René); B. Imani (Babak); A.G.M.G.J. Mulders (Annemarie); J.D.F. Habbema (Dik); B.C.J.M. Fauser (Bart)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Medical induction of ovulation using clomiphene citrate (CC) as first line and exogenous gonadotrophins as second line forms the classical treatment algorithm in normogonadotrophic anovulatory infertility. Because the chances of success following

  10. Cultural factors contributing to health care disparities among patients with infertility in Midwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missmer, Stacey A; Seifer, David B; Jain, Tarun

    2011-05-01

    To identify cultural differences in access to infertility care. Cross-sectional, self-administered survey. University hospital-based fertility center. Thirteen hundred fifty consecutive women who were seen for infertility care. None. Details about demographic characteristics, health care access, and treatment opinions based on patient race or ethnicity. The median age of participants was 35 years; 41% were white, 28% African American, 18% Hispanic, and 7% Asian. Compared with white women, African American and Hispanic women had been attempting to conceive for 1.5 years longer. They also found it more difficult to get an appointment, to take time off from work, and to pay for treatment. Forty-nine percent of respondents were concerned about the stigma of infertility, 46% about conceiving multiples, and 40% about financial costs. Disappointing one's spouse was of greater concern to African-American women, whereas avoiding the stigmatization of infertility was of greatest concern to Asian-American women. While the demand for infertility treatment increases in the United States, attention to cultural barriers to care and cultural meanings attributed to infertility should be addressed. Enhanced cultural competencies of the health care system need to be employed if equal access is to be realized as equal utilization for women of color seeking infertility care. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Immunoregulation of follicular renewal, selection, POF, and menopause in vivo, vs. neo-oogenesis in vitro, POF and ovarian infertility treatment, and a clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    to degenerative changes of the immune system. This causes cessation of oocyte and follicular renewal at 38 +/-2 years of age due to the lack of formation of new granulosa cells. Oocytes in primordial follicles persisting after the end of the prime reproductive period accumulate genetic alterations resulting in an exponentially growing incidence of fetal trisomies and other genetic abnormalities with advanced maternal age. The secondary germ cells also develop in the OSC cultures derived from POF and aging ovaries. In vitro conditions are free of immune mechanisms, which prevent neo-oogenesis in vivo. Such germ cells are capable of differentiating in vitro into functional oocytes. This may provide fresh oocytes and genetically related children to women lacking the ability to produce their own follicular oocytes. Further study of "immune physiology" may help us to better understand ovarian physiology and pathology, including ovarian infertility caused by POF or by a lack of ovarian follicles with functional oocytes in aging ovaries. The observations indicating involvement of immunoregulation in physiological neo-oogenesis and follicular renewal from OSC during the fetal and prime reproductive periods are reviewed as well as immune system and age-independent neo-oogenesis and oocyte maturation in OSC cultures, perimenopausal alteration of homeostasis causing disorders of many tissues, and the first OSC culture clinical trial. PMID:23176151

  12. STDs and Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment and Care Archive STD Risk and Oral Sex Other STDs Archive Life Stages and Populations Adolescents and Young Adults Adolescents and Technology Adolescents and STDs Fact Sheet Gay, Bisexual and Other MSM Gay Men & STDs Fact ...

  13. [What is the true role of surgery in the infertility associated with endometriosis?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Purata, J; Cervantes, E; Luna, M; Sandler, B

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is one of the most challenging clinical conditions for gynecologists. Associated pain and infertility are often difficult to manage, and current treatment strategies remain limited. This review reviews the current scientific evidence for general gynecologist and provides an overview of current information regarding the treatment of patients with endometriosis-related infertility, offering strong evidence to consider a less invasive approach, and highlights potential hazards of surgery within patients desiring to achieve a pregnancy.

  14. Infertility and assisted reproductive technology: the role of the perinatal social worker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfeld, D A

    1997-01-01

    The inability to conceive a pregnancy can cause disruption and anguish to individuals and couples sharing that experience. The treatments for infertility, especially those involving assisted reproductive technology such as in vitro fertilization, can be physically, financially and emotionally stressful for participants. The impact of infertility and its treatment has introduced a new venue for perinatal social worker services to counsel, educate and support these patients.

  15. Infertility among women working in horticulture. A follow-up study in the Danish Occupational Hospitalization Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Hannerz, Harald; Feveile, Helene; Bonde, Jens Peter; Burr, Hermann

    2009-04-01

    The possible association between employment in horticulture with potential exposure to pesticides and female infertility was examined by identification of women with hospital contact due to infertility and working in horticulture through the Danish Occupational Hospitalization Register. This follow-up study gave a standardized incidence ratio of 1.06 (95% confidence interval: 0.84-1.32) for treatment of infertility in women working in horticulture compared with the standard population and did not confirm that women working in the horticultural industry are at increased risk for infertility.

  16. Infertility among women working in horticulture. A follow-up study in the Danish Occupational Hospitalization Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Hannerz, Harald; Feveile, Helene

    2009-01-01

    The possible association between employment in horticulture with potential exposure to pesticides and female infertility was examined by identification of women with hospital contact due to infertility and working in horticulture through the Danish Occupational Hospitalization Register. This follow......-up study gave a standardized incidence ratio of 1.06 (95% confidence interval: 0.84-1.32) for treatment of infertility in women working in horticulture compared with the standard population and did not confirm that women working in the horticultural industry are at increased risk for infertility....

  17. Development and initial evaluation of a treatment decision dashboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, James G; Veazie, Peter J; Russ, Ann J

    2013-04-21

    For many healthcare decisions, multiple alternatives are available with different combinations of advantages and disadvantages across several important dimensions. The complexity of current healthcare decisions thus presents a significant barrier to informed decision making, a key element of patient-centered care.Interactive decision dashboards were developed to facilitate decision making in Management, a field marked by similarly complicated choices. These dashboards utilize data visualization techniques to reduce the cognitive effort needed to evaluate decision alternatives and a non-linear flow of information that enables users to review information in a self-directed fashion. Theoretically, both of these features should facilitate informed decision making by increasing user engagement with and understanding of the decision at hand. We sought to determine if the interactive decision dashboard format can be successfully adapted to create a clinically realistic prototype patient decision aid suitable for further evaluation and refinement. We created a computerized, interactive clinical decision dashboard and performed a pilot test of its clinical feasibility and acceptability using a multi-method analysis. The dashboard summarized information about the effectiveness, risks of side effects and drug-drug interactions, out-of-pocket costs, and ease of use of nine analgesic treatment options for knee osteoarthritis. Outcome evaluations included observations of how study participants utilized the dashboard, questionnaires to assess usability, acceptability, and decisional conflict, and an open-ended qualitative analysis. The study sample consisted of 25 volunteers - 7 men and 18 women - with an average age of 51 years. The mean time spent interacting with the dashboard was 4.6 minutes. Mean evaluation scores on scales ranging from 1 (low) to 7 (high) were: mechanical ease of use 6.1, cognitive ease of use 6.2, emotional difficulty 2.7, decision-aiding effectiveness 5

  18. A Survey on Infertility in Royan Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kamali

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is defined as failure in pregnancy after one year of unprotected intercourse.Several centers have reported different causes of infertility. The most common causes of infertility are:male factor such as sperm disturbance, female factor such as ovulation dysfunction and tubal factor,both male and female factor, and unexplained infertility .The aim of this study was to survey theepidemiology of infertility in Royan institute.Material and Methods: In this descriptive retrospective study, 2492 infertile couples were studied.These couples were selected by systematic sampling among couples referred to Royan institutebetween 1995 and 2001.All existing demographic data and diagnostic methods were recorded inquestionnaires .Results were analyzed using SPSS version 11.5.Results: In this study, the frequency of primary and secondary infertility was 90.1% and 9.9%,respectively. Among 2492 couples, 50.5% had male factor, 28.6% had female factor, 11.6% had bothmale and female factors and in 9.3% of couples, the cause of infertility was unknown .Results showedthat 32.3% of men had normal spermogram, 23.6% of couples had azoospermia, and 40.3% had spermdisturbance including oligospermia, asthenospermia, oligoasthenospermia and teratospermia .3.8%were not able to collect sample for semen analysis. Among women, different infertility factors included:ovarian factor (20.36%, tubal factor (12.64%, uterine factor (4.13%, endometriosis (1.28% andrecurrent abortion (0.68%. 50.48% of women were normal.Conclusion: Although male factor was the most common cause of infertility in Royan institute, we cannot conclude that this factor is the most common cause of infertility in Iran since this center isconsidered referral especially for male infertility. We suggest performance of similar researches inother centers to evaluate the most common causes of infertility in Iran.

  19. The Potential Use of Intrauterine Insemination as a Basic Option for Infertility: A Review for Technology-Limited Medical Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelrahman M. Abdelkader

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. There is an asymmetric allocation of technology and other resources for infertility services. Intrauterine insemination (IUI is a process of placing washed spermatozoa transcervically into the uterine cavity for treatment of infertility. This is a review of literature for the potential use of IUI as a basic infertility treatment in technology-limited settings. Study design. Review of articles on treatment of infertility using IUI. Results. Aspects regarding the use of IUI are reviewed, including ovarian stimulation, semen parameters associated with good outcomes, methods of sperm preparation, timing of IUI, and number of inseminations. Implications of the finding in light of the needs of low-technology medical settings are summarized. Conclusion. The reviewed evidence suggests that IUI is less expensive, less invasive, and comparably effective for selected patients as a first-line treatment for couples with unexplained or male factor infertility. Those couples may be offered three to six IUI cycles in technology-limited settings.

  20. Schistosoma mansoni infection associated infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Botelho, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease, endemic in 76 countries, that afflicts more than 240 million people. The impact of schistosomiasis on infertility may be underestimated according to recent literature. Extracts of Schistosoma haematobium include estrogen-like metabolites termed catechol-estrogens that down regulate estrogen receptors alpha and beta in estrogen responsive cells. In addition, schistosome derived catechol-estrogens induce genotoxicity that result in estrogen-DNA a...

  1. Lifestyle causes of male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damayanthi Durairajanayagam

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine the potential effects of lifestyle factors on male reproductive health. Evidence of a global decline in human sperm quality over recent decades has been accumulating. Environmental, occupational, and modifiable lifestyle factors may contribute to this decline. This review focuses on key lifestyle factors that are associated with male infertility such as smoking cigarettes, alcohol intake, use of illicit drugs, obesity, psychological stress, advanced paternal age, dietary practices, and coffee consumption. Other factors such as testicular heat stress, intense cycling training, lack of sleep and exposure to electromagnetic radiation from mobile phone use are briefly discussed. Materials and method: A comprehensive literature search was performed to identify and synthesise all relevant information, mainly from within the last decade, on the major lifestyle factors associated with male infertility and semen quality. Database searches were limited to reports published in English only. A manual search of bibliographies of the reports retrieved was conducted to identify additional relevant articles. Results: In all, 1012 articles were identified from the database search and after reviewing the titles and abstract of the reports, 104 articles met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 30 reports were excluded as the full-text could not be retrieved and the abstract did not have relevant data. The remaining 74 reports were reviewed for data on association between a particular lifestyle factor and male infertility and were included in the present review. Conclusion: The major lifestyle factors discussed in the present review are amongst the multiple potential risk factors that could impair male fertility. However, their negative impact may well be mostly overcome by behaviour modification and better lifestyle choices. Greater awareness and recognition of the possible impact of these lifestyle factors are important amongst couples seeking

  2. The Infertility Experience: Biopsychosocial Effects and Suggestions for Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Kathryn J.; Baldo, Tracy D.

    2004-01-01

    Infertility affects many individuals and couples. This article begins with a case study of a couple who have experienced infertility yet do not identify infertility as their presenting problem. Clients and counselors alike often overlook infertility. This article offers an overview of the biology of infertility and its psychological and…

  3. ROLE OF MALE INFERTILITY IN ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMS (A LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. I. Gamidov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Тhe literature review is devoted to the most important medical and social problem of modern medicine — the male infertility. Nowadays the assessment and treatment of male infertility can identify a number of problems: the lack of standard tests for assessing fertility, incomplete knowledge of the pathophysiology of infertility, a shortage of specialists in the field of andrology and male infertility, as well as a lack of necessary technical resources. The lack of proven methods of pharmacotherapy can be added to this list. In comparison with the successes in the detection and treatment of female infertility, the diagnosis and therapy of male, especially idiopathic, remain ineffective and are largely empirical in nature. It is difficult to identify at what rates of spermogram the most frequent failures of the ART program occur, to compare the indicators of failures of ART with the parameters of pathozoospermia to reveal the regularity. Not all pathological mechanisms of fertility disorders in men have developed correct diagnostic tests at the present time, this significantly reduces the prognostic value of the spermogram and makes the question of assessing the disturbances in the character of the spermogram and its effect on the effectiveness of ART procedures extremely topical. There will be discussed the development and effectiveness of ART in the world and in Russia, the role of unfavorable lifestyle factors in infertile couples, the role of male infertility factors and the dependence of the effects of spermogram indices on the results of ART.

  4. The Efficacy of Well-Being Therapy for Depression in Infertile Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Moeenizadeh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is a major public health problem with physical, psychological and social dimensions. High prevalence of psychological problems has been reported in infertile women. The objective of this study was to examine the effectiveness of wellbeing therapy (WBT for depression in infertile women who were referred to an infertility center in Mashhad, Iran. Materials and Methods: This preliminary trial was conducted at the Montasariya Infertility Center, Mashhad, Iran, between July and October 2011. A group of 22 infertile women were randomly assigned into experimental (n=11 and control groups (n=11. Patients were assessed with two self-rating inventories including the Psychological Wellbeing (PWB and the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21 before and after the interventions and the waiting-list period. WBT was performed in 8 to 10 sessions according to the published protocol. Results: Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA showed a significant difference regarding the depression scores of experimental group between pre- and post-treatment as compared to control subjects. Conclusion: The results suggested the feasibility and clinical advantages of adding WBT to repertoire of the treatment techniques for depression in infertile women.

  5. Nationwide survey of urological specialists regarding male infertility: results from a 2015 questionnaire in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumura, Yasushi; Tsujimura, Akira; Imamoto, Takashi; Umemoto, Yukihiro; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Shiraishi, Koji; Shin, Takeshi; Taniguchi, Hisanori; Chiba, Koji; Miyagawa, Yasushi; Iwamoto, Teruaki

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the incidence, etiology, treatment indications, and outcomes regarding infertile male patients in Japan. Between April, 2014 and March, 2015, the authors contacted 47 clinical specialists in male infertility who had been certified by the Japan Society for Reproductive Medicine. The participating clinicians were sent a questionnaire regarding information on their infertile patients, according to etiology and the number and success rates of male infertility operations that had been performed in their practice. Thirty-nine specialists returned the questionnaire and provided information regarding 7268 patients. The etiology of infertility included testicular factors, sexual disorders, and seminal tract obstruction. During the study year, the clinicians performed varicocelectomies, testicular sperm extractions (TESEs), and re-anastomoses of the seminal tract. The rate of successful varicocelectomies was >70%. The sperm retrieval rates with conventional TESE and microdissection TESE were 98.3% and 34.0%, respectively, while the patency rates with vasovasostomy and epididymovasostomy were 81.8% and 61.0%, respectively. Surgical outcomes for infertile male patients are favorable and can be of great clinical benefit for infertile couples. To achieve this, urologists should work in collaboration with gynecological specialists in order to optimize the treatment of both partners.

  6. Predictors of antiviral treatment initiation in hepatitis C virus-infected patients: a Danish cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, N; Obel, N; Christensen, P B

    2009-01-01

    Predictive factors for initiation of antiviral therapy in chronically infected hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients are not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine predictive factors for initiation of treatment with standard or pegylated interferon either alone or combined...... with ribavirin. A Danish cohort of individuals chronically infected with HCV was used and observation time was calculated from the date of inclusion in the cohort to date of death, last clinical observation, 1 January 2007, or start of HCV antiviral treatment in treatment-naïve patients. Kaplan-Meier survival.......15-0.53). To our knowledge, this study is the first to estimate factors predicting initiation of antiviral treatment in patients with chronic HCV infection on a nationwide scale. We found that several of the factors predicting initiation of antiviral treatment correlate with factors known to predict a better...

  7. Infertility and preterm delivery, birthweight, and Caesarean section: a study within the Danish National Birth Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basso, Olga; Baird, Donna D.

    2003-01-01

    , longitudinal studies enrolling couples irrespective of infertility treatment. METHODS: We used data from the Danish National Birth Cohort: 55 906 singleton live births from women who reported their waiting time to pregnancy (TTP) and other covariates in an interview during the 2nd trimester of pregnancy....... RESULTS: A TTP >1 year was associated with an increased risk of all outcomes studied, including preterm birth [odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were 1.5 (1.2, 1.8) among primiparas and 1.9 (1.5, 2.4) among multiparas]. Odds ratios for preterm remained elevated after adjustment for covariates....... Among couples with a TTP >1 year, infertility treatment was associated with added risk only among multiparas. CONCLUSION: Infertile women are at higher risk of adverse birth outcomes even if they conceive without treatment. With >10% of babies born to infertile couples, it is important to consider...

  8. An online infertility clinical decision support system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Diniz de Souza

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore some possibilities of computer applications in medicine, and to discuss an online infertility clinical decision support system. Methods: Retrospective data were obtained from 52 couples, and then entered into the online tool. Both its results and the initial diagnoses obtained by the treating physicians were compared with the final diagnoses established by laparoscopy and other diagnostic tests (semen analysis, hormone analysis, endometrial biopsy, ultrasound and hysteroscopy. The initial hypothesis of the research was that the online tool’s output was statistically associated with the final diagnoses. In order to verify that hypothesis, a chi-square (氈2 test with Yates’ correction for continuity (P<0.05 was performed to verify if the online tool’s and the doctor’s diagnoses were statistically associated with the final diagnoses. Results: Four etiological factors were present in more than 50% of the couples (ovarian, tubal-peritoneal, uterine, and endometriosis. The statistical results confirmed the research hypothesis for eight out of the nine etiological factors (ovarian, tubal-peritoneal, uterine, cervical, male, vaginal, psychosomatic, and endometriosis; P<0.05. Since there were no cases related to the immune factor in the sample, further clinical data are necessary in order to assess the online tool’s performance for that factor. Conclusions: The online tool tends to present more false-positives than false negatives, whereas the expert physician tends to present more false-negatives than false-positives. Therefore, the online tool and the doctor seem to complement each other. Finally, the obtained results suggest that the infertility online tool discussed herein might be a useful research and instructional tool.

  9. Initial Severity and Differential Treatment Outcome in the National Institute of Mental Health Treatment of Depression Collaborative Research Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkin, Irene; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Random regression models were used to investigate the role of initial severity in the outcome of four treatments for major depression: cognitive behavioral therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, imipramine plus clinical management, and placebo plus clinical management. Initial severity of depression and impairment of functioning significantly…

  10. Psychological aspects of infertility due to various causes--prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaliwal, L K; Gupta, K R; Gopalan, S; Kulhara, P

    2004-01-01

    One hundred and twenty infertile couples (30 each among unexplained infertility, anovulation, tubal factor, and male factor groups) and 30 fertile couples as controls were evaluated for psychological assessment by different psychological test instruments. Initial evaluation was done at recruitment, followed by reassessment at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months during the infertility work-up, and at the end when the specific diagnosis and the management and prognosis were disclosed. Psychological components were found to play a significant role in infertility of unknown etiology, especially in the male partner. They affected the personality and social behavior of the male partner and caused anxiety, but led to depression in the female partner. In cases of organically caused infertility, partners were worried about the other's reaction. Anxiety was significantly greater in the partner with the fertility problem than in the other partner. Life events were significant in the partner in whom the fertility problem was detected. Periodic psychological assessment was not affected by infertility work-up on the male partner in any of the groups, whereas anovulation and tubal factor infertility showed a significant psychological effect on the female partner at the end of work-up. Depression and anxiety in the female partner were evident soon after the investigation started.

  11. Results of infertility investigations and follow-up among 312 infertile women and their partners in Kigali, Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhont, Nathalie; van de Wijgert, Janneke; Vyankandondera, Joseph; Busasa, Rosette; Gasarabwe, Ammiel; Temmerman, Marleen

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the outcome of infertility investigations and an 18-month follow-up of 312 infertile women and their partners in Rwanda. Between November 2007 and May 2009, an infertility research clinic was opened. Infertile couples received basic infertility

  12. Role of Ultrasound in Male Infertility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Min Hoan; Sung, Chang Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    US evaluation is the mainstay of diagnostic imaging of infertile men. In this editorial, we review the spectrum of diseases responsible for male infertility, discuss the way in which US imaging studies can be used for evaluation of male infertility, and illustrate characteristic US imaging features that allow for specific diagnosis. The discussion will be divided into three main categories: obstruction in sperm passage, impairment of sperm function, and defect in sperm genesis.

  13. Epigenetic regulatory mechanisms associated with infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Madon, Prochi F; Parikh, Firuza R

    2010-01-01

    Infertility is a complex human condition and is known to be caused by numerous factors including genetic alterations and abnormalities. Increasing evidence from studies has associated perturbed epigenetic mechanisms with spermatogenesis and infertility. However, there has been no consensus...... on whether one or a collective of these altered states is responsible for the onset of infertility. Epigenetic alterations involve changes in factors that regulate gene expression without altering the physical sequence of DNA. Understanding these altered epigenetic states at the genomic level along...... with the phenotype could further determine what possible mechanisms are involved. This paper reviews certain mechanisms of epigenetic regulation with particular emphasis on their possible role in infertility....

  14. Beyond the Mechanics of Infertility: Perspectives on the Social Psychology of Infertility and Involuntary Childlessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Anne Martin; Matthews, Ralph

    1986-01-01

    Examines the social and social psychological implications of infertility and involuntary childlessness. Examines the clinical and popular literature on the correlates and causes of infertility and the social psychological consequences of infertility. Suggests ways that family practitioners and researchers might overcome some of the limitations.…

  15. Gender differences in experiences with and adjustments to infertility: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Li Ying; Wu, Lai Har; Loke, Alice Yuen

    2015-10-01

    It has been widely recognized that infertility and its treatment affects a couple as a dyad. Given biomedical differences and differences in socialization processes and gender-role expectations, it is reasonable to suspect that females and males may experience and respond to infertility in different ways. To explore gender differences among infertile couples with regard to experiences with and adjustments to infertility. A literature review. A literature search was performed using the following databases: PubMed, CINAHL, PsycInfo, Web of Science, Scopus, and the China Academic Journal Full-text Database. The studies that were included were those published in English or Chinese from the years 2000 to 2014. The references of all of the studies selected for this review were also searched. An author search was also performed to retrieve relevant articles. Experiences with and adjustments to infertility were explored from the perspective of gender. A total of 33 studies were included in this review. The experiences with infertility can be grouped under the five domains of the biopsychosocial theory, namely: existential stressors, physical stressors, emotional stressors, interpersonal stressors, and the moderators of stress. In general, females had more negative experiences with infertility than men in most of the domains, including lower levels of identity, self-esteem, and physical health; and higher levels of depression, stress, anxiety, stigma, and shame. Infertile couples experienced stress in their married life, although there were no gender differences in the areas of marital adjustment, marital satisfaction, and sexual satisfaction. Females were likely to perceive themselves as being less confident than their partners in coping with infertility. For both men and women, partner support was found to be negatively related to stress due to infertility. This review revealed that while there were gender differences in the experience with infertility in many realms

  16. Sleep Hygiene and Melatonin Treatment for Children and Adolescents with ADHD and Initial Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Margaret D.; Wasdell, Michael B.; Bomben, Melissa M.; Rea, Kathleen J.; Freeman, Roger D.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of sleep hygiene and melatonin treatment for initial insomnia in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: Twenty-seven stimulant-treated children (6-14 years of age) with ADHD and initial insomnia (greater than 60 minutes) received sleep hygiene intervention. Nonresponders were…

  17. Guidelines for infertility counselling in different countries: is there an emerging trend?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyth, Eric

    2012-07-01

    It is widely accepted that infertility and involuntary childlessness, and the decision to engage with assisted reproduction technology (ART) services as a patient, donor or surrogate can entail wide-ranging psychosocial issues. Psychosocial counselling has, therefore, become valued as an integral element of ART services. The objective of this study was to begin to map out what exists globally by the way of guidelines for infertility counselling. Data were analysed from formal guidelines produced by seven national infertility counselling bodies, onetransnational infertility counselling organization, reports of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine Ethics Committee and Practice Committee and the ESHRE Task Force on Ethics and Law. Additional sources of data were the International Infertility Counseling Organization and counselling colleagues internationally. Four broad areas concerning contemporary practice in infertility counselling are identified: (i) the legal mandate for counselling; (ii) eligibility credentials for individuals carrying out professional counselling activities; (iii) different forms of counselling and (iv) counselling practice in relation to specific elements of assisted reproduction treatment. Internationally, the development of infertility guidelines is best described as a 'work in progress', although key trends are evident.

  18. Assessing the quality of life of infertile Chinese women: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoli, Su; Mei, Li; Junjun, Bao; Shu, Ding; Zhaolian, Wei; Jin, Wang; Ju, Quan; Wanli, Sun; Huali, Zhao; Li, Jin; Dong, Li; Li, Pan; Xiaojin, He

    2016-04-01

    To assess QoL of infertile Chinese women and determine the specific factors adversely affecting QoL for improving the care and treatment compliance of infertile women. We conducted a cross-sectional study on a randomized, demographically matched, controlled population of infertile married Chinese women to determine their demographic, menstrual, family stress, and infertility characteristics and then applied the World Health Organization QoL Instrument (WHOQOL-100) to determine which factors would be associated with significant QoL differences between infertile women and their demographically matched fertile controls. Infertile women showed lower QoL scores in the facets of spirituality/religion/personal beliefs, self-esteem, financial resources, and accessibility to and quality of health and social care, as well as increased pain and discomfort, while also experiencing positive QoL adjustments in terms of mobility, daily living activities, work capacity, sexual activity, freedom, physical safety, security, and transport. Married infertile Chinese women had significantly lower overall and comprehensive QoL scores, as well as higher anxiety scores, compared with fertile controls. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Authors' reply to comment on "Are repeated assisted reproductive technology treatments and an unsuccessful outcome risk factors for unipolar depression in infertile women?"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejbaek, Camilla S.; Pinborg, Anja; Hageman, Ida

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our national register-based study (1) was to investigate the risk of a new episode of unipolar depression among women treated with assisted reproductive technology (ART) in regards to whether they had achieved a live birth (as a result of treatment or spontaneous conception) or not. He...... compared to women having conceived spontaneously. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  20. Serum albumin level predicts initial intravenous immunoglobulin treatment failure in Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ho-Chang; Liang, Chi-Di; Wang, Chih-Lu; Yu, Hong-Ren; Hwang, Kao-Pin; Yang, Kuender D

    2010-10-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis primarily affecting children who are initial IVIG treatment. This study was conducted to investigate the risk factors for initial IVIG treatment failure in KD. Children who met KD diagnosis criteria and were admitted for IVIG treatment were retrospectively enrolled for analysis. Patients were divided into IVIG-responsive and IVIG-resistant groups. Initial laboratory data before IVIG treatment were collected for analysis. A total of 131 patients were enrolled during the study period. At 48 h after completion of initial IVIG treatment, 20 patients (15.3%) had an elevated body temperature. Univariate analysis showed that patients who had initial findings of high neutrophil count, abnormal liver function, low serum albumin level (≤2.9 g/dL) and pericardial effusion were at risk for IVIG treatment failure. Multivariate analysis with a logistic regression procedure showed that serum albumin level was considered the independent predicting factor of IVIG resistance in patients with KD (p = 0.006, OR = 40, 95% CI: 52.8-562). There was no significant correlation between age, gender, fever duration before IVIG treatment, haemoglobin level, total leucocyte and platelet counts, C-reactive protein level, or sterile pyuria and initial IVIG treatment failure. The specificity and sensitivity for prediction of IVIG treatment failure in this study were 96% and 34%, respectively. Pre-IVIG treatment serum albumin levels are a useful predictor of IVIG resistance in patients with KD. © 2010 The Author(s)/Journal Compilation © 2010 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  1. Visual field progression in the Collaborative Initial Glaucoma Treatment Study the impact of treatment and other baseline factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musch, David C; Gillespie, Brenda W; Lichter, Paul R; Niziol, Leslie M; Janz, Nancy K

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate factors associated with visual field (VF) progression, using all available follow-up through 9 years after treatment initiation, in the Collaborative Initial Glaucoma Treatment Study (CIGTS). Longitudinal follow-up of participants enrolled in a randomized clinical trial. Six hundred seven newly diagnosed glaucoma patients. In a randomized clinical trial, 607 subjects with newly diagnosed open-angle glaucoma initially were treated with either medication or trabeculectomy. After treatment initiation and early follow-up, subjects were evaluated clinically at 6-month intervals. Study participants in both arms of the CIGTS were treated aggressively in an effort to reduce intraocular pressure (IOP) to a level at or below a predetermined, eye-specific target pressure. Visual field progression was analyzed using repeated measures models. Visual field progression, measured by Humphrey 24-2 full-threshold testing and assessed by the change in the mean deviation (MD), and an indicator of substantial worsening of the VF (MD decrease of > or =3 dB from baseline), assessed at each follow-up visit. Follow-up indicated minimal change from baseline in each initial treatment group's average MD. However, at the 8-year follow-up examination, substantial worsening (> or =3 dB) of MD from baseline was found in 21.3% and 25.5% of the initial surgery and initial medicine groups, respectively. The effect of initial treatment on subsequent VF loss was modified by time (Ppresentation, but detrimental for patients with diabetes, are noteworthy and warrant independent confirmation. The author(s) have no proprietary or commercial interest in any materials discussed in this article.

  2. Psychiatric disorders among infertile men and women attending three infertility clinics in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alosaimi, Fahad Dakheel; Altuwirqi, Maram Hani; Bukhari, Mujahid; Abotalib, Zeinab; BinSaleh, Saleh

    2015-01-01

    No study has assessed psychiatric disorders among infertile men and women seeking fertility treatment in Saudi Arabia. Therefore, we sought to measure the rate of psychiatric disorders in this population. This was a cross-sectional observational study among patients attending infertility clinics at three referral hospitals in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, between January 2013 and September 2014. 406 patients (206 women and 200 men) participated in the study. The approved Arabic version of the MINI tool was used to assess 18 common psychiatric illnesses. The response rate was 81%. Of the men surveyed, only 4.5% self-reported having a psychiatric disorder. Of the women surveyed, only 10.2% reported having a psychiatric disorder. However, using the MINI scale, psychiatric illness was documented in 30% of males and 36.9% of females. The most common diagnoses for both genders were depression (21.7%) and anxiety (21.2%). Significantly more females than males exhibited suicidality and depression. In contrast, significantly more males than females had bipolar disorders and substance-related disorders. A low monthly income among male and female participants and polygamy among female participants were significantly associated with psychiatric disorders. This study shows that a higher prevalence of psychiatric disorders, particularly depression and anxiety, among infertile men and women in Saudi Arabia is associated with lower income and polygamy. This study highlights the importance of integrated care for alleviating the psychological burden of this unfortunate population and improving outcomes and quality of life. This study also encourages follow-up studies that aim to further understand the complex relationship between fertility and psychological well-being.

  3. Original article Expectations towards medical personnel – a study with infertility clinic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Redo; Eleonora Bielawska-Batorowicz

    2014-01-01

    Background Contacts with medical personnel are important for patients’ experiences. The role of physicians’ psychosocial competence was noted in Polish studies, but systematic analyses of infertile patients’ expectations have not been conducted. This study was designed to learn about patients’ views on relationships with medical personnel. It was assumed that: 1) staff involvement in infertility treatment would be reflected in expectations towards persons in different roles, 2) expectati...

  4. Perfluoroalkyl substances and endometriosis-related infertility in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Zhang, Rongrong; Jin, Fan; Lou, Hangying; Mao, Yuchan; Zhu, Wenting; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Jun

    2017-05-01

    Endometriosis is one of the main causes for female infertility. Previous studies suggested that perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), a group of ubiquitous environmental chemicals with properties of endocrine disruption and reproductive toxicity, were risk factors for endometriosis but there lacks direct evidence on the possible role of PFASs in endometriosis-related infertility. To fill this gap, we examined the association between PFASs and endometriosis-related infertility among Chinese reproductive-age women in a case-control study, which comprised 157 surgically confirmed endometriosis cases and 178 controls seeking infertility treatment because of male reproductive dysfunction in 2014 and 2015. Blood specimens were collected at the enrollment and analyzed for ten PFASs. Logistic regression was utilized to estimate the adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for individual PFAS compound. Plasma concentrations of perfluorobutane sulfonic acid (PFBS) were associated with an increased risk of endometriosis-related infertility (second vs. lowest tertile: OR=3.74, 95% CI: 2.04, 6.84; highest vs. lowest tertile: OR=3.04, 95% CI: 1.65, 5.57). This association remained consistent when we restricted to subjects with no previous pregnancy (second vs. lowest tertile: OR=2.91, 95% CI: 1.28, 6.61; highest vs. lowest tertile: OR=3.41, 95% CI: 1.52, 7.65) or to subjects without other gynecologic pathology (second vs. lowest tertile: OR=4.65, 95% CI: 2.21, 9.82; highest vs. lowest tertile: OR=3.36, 95% CI: 1.58, 7.15). Plasma concentrations of perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA), perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS) and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) were inversely associated with endometriosis-related infertility, but the associations were attenuated in the sensitivity analyses. Our preliminary evidence suggests that exposure to PFBS may increase the risk of female infertility due to endometriosis. Future prospective studies are necessary to confirm these

  5. Motivational Interviewing Fidelity in a Community Corrections Setting: Treatment Initiation and Subsequent Drug Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spohr, Stephanie A; Taxman, Faye S; Rodriguez, Mayra; Walters, Scott T

    2016-06-01

    Although substance use is common among people in the U.S. criminal justice system, treatment initiation remains an ongoing problem. This study assessed the reliability and predictive validity of the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity 3.1.1. (MITI) coding instrument in a community corrections sample. We used data from 80 substance-using clients who were participating in a clinical trial of MI in a probation setting. We analyzed 124 MI counseling sessions using the MITI, a coding system for documenting MI fidelity. Bivariate associations and logistic regression modeling were used to determine if MI-consistent behaviors predicted substance use or treatment initiation at a 2-month follow-up. We found a high level of agreement between coders on behavioral utterance counts. Counselors met at least beginning proficiency on most MITI summary scores. Probationers who initiated treatment at 2-month follow-up had significantly higher ratings of clinician empathy and MI spirit than clients who did not initiate treatment. Other MITI summary scores were not significantly different between clients who had initiated treatment and those who did not. MI spirit and empathy ratings were entered into a forward logistic regression in which MI spirit significantly predicted 2-month treatment initiation (χ(2) (1)=4.10, p<.05, R(2)=.05) but counselor empathy did not. MITI summary scores did not predict substance use at 2-month follow-up. Counselor MI-consistent relational skills were an important predictor of client treatment initiation. Counselor behaviors such as empathy and MI spirit may be important for developing client rapport with people in a probation setting. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Infertility treatment strategy involving combined freeze-all embryos and single vitrified-warmed embryo transfer during hormonal replacement cycle for in vitro fertilization of women with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Keiji; Ezoe, Kenji; Kato, Keiichi; Yabuuchi, Akiko; Segawa, Tomoya; Kobayashi, Tamotsu; Ochiai, Asako; Katoh, Noriko; Takeda, Satoru

    2018-02-13

    Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) is a condition caused by the deficient secretion of pituitary gonadotropins, leading to diminished ovarian function. Several studies of in vitro fertilization (IVF) in women with HH revealed acceptable clinical pregnancy outcomes but high multiple pregnancy rates after multiple fresh embryo transfer (ET). The purpose of this study was to analyze the outcomes of combined freeze-all embryos and single vitrified-warmed ET in women with HH. Of 91 infertile women with HH (basal luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone levels <2.0 mIU/mL), we excluded patients aged ≥40 years (n = 2) and women who preferred fresh ET (n = 10). Seventy-nine women underwent 117 oocyte retrieval cycles and 135 vitrified-warmed ET during hormone replacement (HR) cycles from 2008 to 2014 at the Kato Ladies Clinic and Juntendo University Hospital. In 26 single cleavage ET cycles, the rates of clinical pregnancy and live birth were 34.6% (9/26 ET) and 26.9% (7/26 ET), respectively. Regarding the outcomes after single vitrified-warmed blastocyst transfer, clinical pregnancy and live birth rates were 65.1% (71/109 ET) and 50.5% (55/109 ET), respectively. Multiple conceptions and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome did not occur in any of the women with HH. Our results demonstrated that IVF followed by single vitrified-warmed ET in adjusted endocrine milieu during the HR cycle is an effective fertility treatment for women with HH and decreases the incidence of complications, including multiple conceptions. © 2018 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  7. Infertility experience and health differentials - a population-based comparative study on infertile and non-infertile women (the HUNT Study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostad, Berit; Schmidt, Lone; Sundby, Johanne

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Studies suggest that health complaints, distress and poor life satisfaction are associated with infertility experience. Research on health consequences of infertility experience in women has relied heavily on clinic-based samples. This population-based study investigates the association...... differences in depression and anxiety between infertile and non-infertile women, or between the two groups of infertile women (with/without a child). CONCLUSIONS: The study confirms the adverse effect of infertility on health and life-satisfaction. The childless infertile women stand out as being vulnerable...

  8. 78 FR 62506 - TRICARE; Coverage of Care Related to Non-Covered Initial Surgery or Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... nonadjunctive dental care or cosmetic surgery) but only if, the later complication represents a separate medical... TRICARE; Coverage of Care Related to Non-Covered Initial Surgery or Treatment AGENCY: Office of the...-covered surgery or treatment was necessary to assure adequate availability of health care to the Active...

  9. Low molecular weight heparin versus unfractionated heparin in the initial treatment of venous thromboembolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettiarachchi, R. J.; Prins, M. H.; Lensing, A. W.; Buller, H. R.

    1998-01-01

    In this review, we analyze data from randomized trials in which low molecular weight heparin was compared with unfractionated heparin, both to estimate the treatment effect of low molecular weight heparin in the initial treatment of venous thromboembolism and to evaluate the effect of the varied

  10. Pontine abscess with initial treatment failure following infectious endocarditis with Streptococcus salivarius

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudtzen, Fredrikke Christie; Lynge, Maja; Gaini, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    for Streptococcus salivarius aortic valve endocarditis. The abscess was not suitable for surgery, and the patient received multidrug antibiotic treatment for 4 weeks. The patient initially responded well clinically, but was readmitted 4 weeks after discontinuation of treatment, with headache and dizziness. A new...

  11. Seeking New Treatments for Endometriosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... E. (2013). Aromatase inhibitor treatment limits progression of peritoneal endometriosis in baboons. Fertility and Infertility, 99 (3), 656– ... 2012). Retinoic acid suppresses growth of lesions, inhibits peritoneal ... of endometriosis. Fertility and Infertility, 97 (6), 1430–1437. PMID: ...

  12. The Effect of Marital Violence on Infertility Distress among A Sample of Turkish Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aygül Akyüz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between marital violence and distress level among women with a diagnosis of infertility. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study consisted of 139 married women diagnosed as primary infertile who applied to an in vitro fertilization (IVF center in Turkey, between September and December 2009. A descriptive information questionnaire developed by the researcher was used for data collection. In addition, an infertility distress scale (IDS for determining the severity effect of infertility and the scale for marital violence against women (SDVW for determining level of marital violence against the women were used. Results: The total IDS score of the study sample was 37.76 ± 10.53. There was no significant relationship between the age and education level of the women and the total IDS score. The total IDS score was higher in women who did not work and those being treated for infertility for more than three years. The total SDVW score of the study sample was 67.0 ± 8.26. The total SDVW score was higher in women who had been trying to have a child for more than six years and had received infertility treatment for longer than three years. The employment status of the women and physical, emotional, and sexual violence scores had a statistically significant relationship with the IDS scores. The emotional violence score was found to have the highest significance among the variables affecting total IDS score. Conclusion: Marital violence is a factor increasing the distress of infertile women. Healthcare staff serving infertile couples should consider the possibility of domestic violence against women as a factor affecting the psychological infertility distress level.

  13. The Effect of Marital Violence on Infertility Distress among A Sample of Turkish Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyüz, Aygül; Şahiner, Gönül; Seven, Memnun; Bakır, Bilal

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between marital violence and distress level among women with a diagnosis of infertility. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study consisted of 139 married women diagnosed as primary infertile who applied to an in vitro fertilization (IVF) center in Turkey, between September and December 2009. A descriptive information questionnaire developed by the researcher was used for data collection. In addition, an infertility distress scale (IDS) for determining the severity effect of infertility and the scale for marital violence against women (SDVW) for determining level of marital violence against the women were used. Results: The total IDS score of the study sample was 37.76 ± 10.53. There was no significant relationship between the age and education level of the women and the total IDS score. The total IDS score was higher in women who did not work and those being treated for infertility for more than three years. The total SDVW score of the study sample was 67.0 ± 8.26. The total SDVW score was higher in women who had been trying to have a child for more than six years and had received infertility treatment for longer than three years. The employment status of the women and physical, emotional, and sexual violence scores had a statistically significant relationship with the IDS scores. The emotional violence score was found to have the highest significance among the variables affecting total IDS score. Conclusion: Marital violence is a factor increasing the distress of infertile women. Healthcare staff serving infertile couples should consider the possibility of domestic violence against women as a factor affecting the psychological infertility distress level. PMID:24696770

  14. Patient predictors for outcome of gonadotrophin ovulation induction in women with normogonadotrophic anovulatory infertility: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.S.E. Laven (Joop); M.J.C. Eijkemans (René); E.G. Hughes; B.C.J.M. Fauser (Bart); A.G.M.G.J. Mulders (Annemarie)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractA systematic review was conducted to determine whether initial screening characteristics of women with normogonadotrophic anovulatory infertility predict clinically significant outcomes of ovulation induction with gonadotrophins, and to obtain pooled estimates of their

  15. Predictors of chances to conceive in ovulatory patients during clomiphene citrate induction of ovulation in normogonadotropic oligoamenorrheic infertility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Imani (Babak); M.J.C. Eijkemans (René); E.R. te Velde (Egbert); J.D.F. Habbema (Dik); B.C.J.M. Fauser (Bart)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThe present prospective follow-up study was designed to identify whether clinical, endocrine, or ultrasound characteristics assessed by standardized initial screening of normogonadotropic oligo/amenorrheic infertile patients could predict conception in

  16. Investigation of Personality Traits between Infertile Women Submitted to Assisted Reproductive Technology or Surrogacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Najmeh; Yazdkhasti, Fariba; Nasr Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Personality traits affect human relationships, social interactions, treatment procedures, and essentially all human activities. The purpose of this study is to investigate the personality traitsincluding sensation seeking, flexibility, and happiness among a variety of infertile women who were apt to choose assisted reproductive technology (ART) or surrogacy. This is a cross-sectional study that was performed on 251 infertile women who visited Isfahan and Tehran Reproductive Medicine Center. These fertility clinics are located in Isfahan and Tehran, Iran. In this study, 201 infertile women who underwent treatment using ART and 50 infertile women who tended to have surrogacy were chosen by convenience sampling. Zuckerman's Sensation Seeking Scale Form V (SSS-V), Psychological Flexibility Questionnaire (adapted from NEO Personality Inventory-Revised) and Oxford Happiness Questionnaire (OHQ) were used as research instruments. All participants had to complete the research instruments in order to be included in this study. Data were analyzed by descriptive-analytical statistics and statistical tests including multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and Z Fisher. Statistically significant effects were accepted for Pwomen underwent ART (Pwomen sought surrogacy (Pwomen who sought surrogacy (Pwomen who sought either ART or surrogacy (Pwomen who underwent treatment using ART compared women who tended to have surrogacy. This study shows that demographic variables are effective in happiness of infertile women. Also, there is a significant relation among sensation seeking, flexibility and happiness in infertile women.

  17. Choices and Motivations of Infertile Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Balen, Frank; Verdurmen, Jacqueline; Ketting, Evert

    1997-01-01

    Infertile couples' (N=131) consideration of options for dealing with infertility (medical help, adoption, fostering, alternative medicine, and focusing on other life goals) is studied. Options were related to specific motivations including altruistic motives for adoption or foster care. Results, timing of choices, and motivations are discussed.…

  18. Personality and emotional adjustment in infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Vânia Margarida Silva; Leal, Isabel Maria Pereira

    2012-01-01

    To examine the relationship between adjustment to diagnosed infertility and personality, anxiety, depression and stress (in general and inherent to infertility) in couples. A cross-sectional study, with a convenience sample of 35 couples attending infertility consultations, in a public health service in the Lisbon district. Data was collected using the following main outcome measures: NEO Personality Inventory--Short Form; Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale; Fertility Problem Inventory; and Fertility Adjustment Scale. In women, neuroticism was associated with greater stress in situations of infertility, and depression was related with social, sexual and relational aspects of stress in infertility. Social aspects and need to be a parent expressed maladjustment to fertility. In men, personality was not related to stress in infertility; this was explained by the sexual and relational aspects. The maladjustment to fertility was explained by the need to be a parent. Infertile men and women are emotionally adjusted, determined to fulfill their goals while exhibiting low levels of anxiety, depression and stress. Thus, although it is relevant to identify the effects of infertility which may make one susceptible to maladjustment, psychological intervention is not always necessary in these couples. Although the results are very relevant, the sample's reduced dimension is a limitation.

  19. Infertility, psychological distress, and coping strategies among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relatively little is known about infertility and its consequences in Mali, West Africa where the context and culture are different from those of previously studied settings. This study therefore aimed to specifically examine infertility induced psychological distress and coping strategies among women in Mali. A convergent ...

  20. Effect of the Modern Life on Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keziban Amanak

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is defined as failing to become pregnant at the end of one year although unprotected sexual intercourse of the couples. Infertility affects 15 % of couples at the reproductive age according to data of the World Health Organization. It was stated that approximately 1,5-2 million individuals in our country face infertility problem and problem increases gradually. One of the most important factors of increasing infertility problem is the adverse effects of modern life on our existence. Adverse effects of modern life are the common problems of the whole World. Postponement of gestational age as the result of modern life, obesity, electromagnetic waves, hormone-injected and genetically modified foodstuffs, stress, smoking and using alcohol, sexually transmitted diseases are among the increasing infertility causes. Adverse effects of the modern life on infertility may be minimized if the midwives and nurses know the harmful effects of modern life on infertility and provide consultancy services to couples, wishing to have a child. Effects of modern life on infertility and consultancy role of the midwives-nurses are discussed in this article. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(4.000: 345-350

  1. Is initial (24 hours) lavage necessary in treatment of CAPD peritonitis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejlersen, E; Brandi, L; Løkkegaard, H

    1991-01-01

    either initial 24 hours lavage before resumption of routine CAPD schedule (prior standard approach) or continued prolonged exchanges as in routine CAPD schedule. Median time to solved infection (normalization of white cell count in dialysis effluent) was identical (3 days) in the two groups. Treatment......A randomized trial was conducted to examine the influence of initial lavage on treatment of CAPD peritonitis. Patients with hypotension and shock were excluded from the trial. Thirty-six CAPD patients with acute peritonitis were randomized to treatment with intraperitoneal antibiotics including...... success rate was found to be 72% in the group with initial lavage and 89% in the group with prolonged exchanges. The difference in treatment success (17%) in favour of continued CAPD schedule was not found significant (95% confidence limits--1% to 35%). The results suggest lavage to be of no clinical...

  2. Factors associated with delays in treatment initiation after tuberculosis diagnosis in two districts of India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durba Paul

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Excessive time between diagnosis and initiation of tuberculosis (TB treatment contributes to ongoing TB transmission and should be minimized. In India, Revised National TB Control Programme (RNTCP focuses on indicator start of treatment within 7 days of diagnosis for patients with sputum smear-positive PTB for monitoring DOTS implementation. OBJECTIVES: To determine length of time between diagnosis and initiation of treatment and factors associated with delays of more than 7 days in smear-positive pulmonary TB. METHODS: Using existing programme records such as the TB Register, treatment cards, and the laboratory register, we conducted a retrospective cohort study of all patients with smear-positive pulmonary TB registered from July-September 2010 in two districts in India. A random sample of patients with pulmonary TB who experienced treatment delay of more than 7 days was interviewed using structured questionnaire. RESULTS: 2027 of 3411 patients registered with pulmonary TB were smear-positive. 711(35% patients had >7 days between diagnosis and treatment and 262(13% had delays >15 days. Mean duration between TB diagnosis and treatment initiation was 8 days (range = 0-128 days. Odds of treatment delay >7 days was 1.8 times more likely among those who had been previously treated (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5-2.3 and 1.6 (95% CI 1.3-1.8 times more likely among those diagnosed in health facilities without microscopy centers. The main factors associated with a delay >7 days were: patient reluctance to start a re-treatment regimen, patients seeking second opinions, delay in transportation of drugs to the DOT centers and delay in initial home visits. To conclude, treatment delay >7 days was associated with a number of factors that included history of previous treatment and absence of TB diagnostic services in the local health facility. Decentralized diagnostic facilities and improved referral procedures may reduce such treatment

  3. The infertility trap: how defeat and entrapment affect depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galhardo, A; Moura-Ramos, M; Cunha, M; Pinto-Gouveia, J

    2016-02-01

    Does the perception of failure without a solution or way forward of infertile couples have a mediator role between the importance couples attribute to parenthood and depressive symptoms? The perception of failure without a solution or way forward, assessed by feelings of entrapment and defeat, mediates the effect of the importance of parenthood on depressive symptoms of infertile men and women. Research has documented that the heightened importance of parenthood affects infertile couples' adjustment to infertility and medical treatments. However, it remains unclear which psychological mechanisms and perceptions may underlie the association between having parenthood as a nuclear aspect of life and presenting depressive symptoms related to difficulties in accomplishing that important life goal. Although these links have been scantly addressed in infertility, previous studies have pointed to the role that perceptions of defeat and entrapment have in several psychopathological conditions. The study was cross-sectional. Couples pursuing medical treatment for their fertility problems were invited to participate by their doctors in several public and private clinics. Data collection took place between July 2009 and 2011. One hundred forty-seven infertile couples consented to participate in the study. Both couple members (147 women and 147 men) completed a set of self-report instruments for the assessment of depressive symptoms, perceptions of defeat and entrapment, importance of parenthood and rejection of a childfree lifestyle. Analyses were conducted through Structural Equation Modeling and followed a dyadic analysis strategy, allowing for controlling the interdependence of the data. The hypothesized tested model showed a very good fit to the data [(χ(2) = 68.45, P = 0.014, comparative fit index = 0.98, standardized root-mean-square residual = 0.06 and root mean square error of approximation = 0.06] and explained 67 and 58% of the variability in depressive symptoms in

  4. Consequences of infertility in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouchou, Brittany

    2013-05-01

    Infertility affects more than 10% of the world's population. In developing countries, there are severe social, psychological and economic consequences for infertile men and women. All of the cited references are compiled from primary peer-reviewed research articles that were conducted through one-to-one interviews or focus groups in countries of developing regions, such as Africa, Asia and the Middle East. The following paper seeks to raise awareness of the consequences of infertility in developing nations and identify infertility as an under-observed, but significant public health issue. It is proposed that education programmes tailored to each society's specific religious beliefs and grounded traditions must be implemented in order to reverse the social stigma, detrimental psychological effects, and loss of economic security that results from infertility.

  5. Social stigma and familial attitudes related to infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergin, Rahime Nida; Polat, Aslıhan; Kars, Bülent; Öztekin, Deniz; Sofuoğlu, Kenan; Çalışkan, Eray

    2018-03-01

    To determine the perceived social stigma and familial attitides and perception of sexuality in infertile couples attending infertility clinics. Infertile couples attending infertility clinics between the years of 2014 and 2015 were requested to complete detailed evaluation forms including questions related to the social stigma on their infertility, their familial attitudes, and perception of sexuality. Any partner of the infertile couple accepting to enroll in the study was given the evaluation forms. Their scores related to answers and demographics, and parameters related to infertility were analyzed. A total 598 partners of infertile couples enrolled in the study, 58% represented 177 couples. Their infertility was primary in 98.3% and the duration of marriage and infertility was 9.81±5.58 and 9.76±5.53 years, respectively. The perception of social exclusion was present in 38% (pstigma on infertile couples.

  6. Diminished endometrial expression of ghrelin and ghrelin receptor contributes to infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghajanova, Lusine; Rumman, Amani; Altmäe, Signe; Wånggren, Kjell; Stavreus-Evers, Anneli

    2010-09-01

    The objectives were to investigate the presence, distribution and sex steroid hormone regulation of ghrelin and its receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), in human endometrium in relation to endometrial receptivity and fertility. Endometrial biopsies were obtained from women with unexplained infertility and healthy fertile volunteers. Ishikawa cells were used to mimic the action of ghrelin in endometrium. Immunostaining of GHSR was strong in luminal epithelium and stroma during mid-secretory phase. Ghrelin and GHSR expression is less intense in mid-secretory endometrium of infertile women compared to fertile controls. Treatment with estrogen and/or progesterone or their antagonists did not significantly change the relative expression of GHSR in Ishikawa and stromal cells. Ghrelin was present in and secreted from human blastocysts, which suggest that the communication between human blastocyst and endometrium might involve ghrelin. Low levels of GHSR in endometrium from women with unexplained infertility may in part explain the infertility.

  7. Investigation of Personality Traits between Infertile Women Submitted to Assisted Reproductive Technology or Surrogacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmeh Asgarini

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Personality traits affect human relationships, social interactions, treatment procedures, and essentially all human activities. The purpose of this study is to investigate the personality traits -including sensation seeking, flexibility, and happiness - among a variety of infertile women who were apt to choose assisted reproductive technology (ART or surrogacy. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study that was performed on 251 infertile women who visited Isfahan and Tehran Reproductive Medicine Center. These fertility clinics are located in Isfahan and Tehran, Iran. In this study, 201 infertile women who underwent treatment using ART and 50 infertile women who tended to have surrogacy were chosen by convenience sampling. Zuckerman’s Sensation Seeking Scale Form V (SSS-V, Psychological Flexibility Questionnaire (adapted from NEO Personality Inventory-Revised and Oxford Happiness Questionnaire (OHQ were used as research instruments. All participants had to complete the research instruments in order to be included in this study. Data were analyzed by descriptive-analytical statistics and statistical tests including multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA and Z Fisher. Statistically significant effects were accepted for P<0.05. Results: In the sensation-seeking variable, there was a meaningful difference between under-study groups. However, the flexibility and happiness variables did not have a significant difference between under-study groups (P<0.001. Interaction between education, employment, and financial status was effective in happiness of infertile women underwent ART (P<0.05, while age, education and financial status were also effective in happiness of infertile women sought surrogacy (P<0.05. A positive meaningful relationship was seen between sensation seeking and flexibility variables in both groups (P<0.05. And a negative meaningful relationship was seen between sensation seeking and happiness in infertile

  8. Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problems include those with eating disorders, such as anorexia or bulimia, and women who follow a very low calorie or restrictive diet. Exercise issues. Insufficient exercise contributes to obesity, which ...

  9. Infertility

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    ... Diabetes Drinking too much alcohol Exercising too much Eating disorders or poor nutrition Growths (such as fibroids or ... must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get ...

  10. Impact of combination antiretroviral therapy initiation on adherence to antituberculosis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Knight

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Healthcare workers are often reluctant to start combination antiretroviral therapy (ART in patients receiving tuberculosis (TB treatment because of the fear of high pill burden, immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, and side-effects. Object: To quantify changes in adherence to tuberculosis treatment following ART initiation. Design: A prospective observational cohort study of ART-naïve individuals with baseline CD4 count between 50 cells/mm3 and 350 cells/mm3 at start of TB treatment at a primary care clinic in Johannesburg, South Africa. Adherence to TB treatment was measured by pill count,self-report, and electronic Medication Event Monitoring System (eMEMS before and after initiation of ART. Results: ART tended to negatively affect adherence to TB treatment, with an 8% – 10% decrease in the proportion of patients adherent according to pill count and an 18% – 22% decrease in the proportion of patients adherent according to eMEMS in the first month following ART initiation, independent of the cut-off used to define adherence (90%, 95% or 100%. Reasons for non-adherence were multi factorial, and employment was the only predictor for optimal adherence (adjusted odds ratio 4.11, 95% confidence interval 1.06–16.0. Conclusion: Adherence support in the period immediately following ART initiation could optimise treatment outcomes for people living with TB and HIV.

  11. Associations between timing of corticosteroid treatment initiation and clinical outcomes in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunkyung; Zhu, Yong; Romitti, Paul A; Fox, Deborah J; Sheehan, Daniel W; Valdez, Rodolfo; Matthews, Dennis; Barber, Brent J

    2017-08-01

    The long-term efficacy of corticosteroid treatment and timing of treatment initiation among Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients is not well-understood. We used data from a longitudinal, population-based DMD surveillance program to examine associations between timing of treatment initiation (early childhood [before or at age 5 years], late childhood [after age 5 years], and naïve [not treated]) and five clinical outcomes (age at loss of ambulation; ages at onset of cardiomyopathy, scoliosis, and first fracture; and pulmonary function). Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using survival analysis. DMD patients who initiated corticosteroid treatment in early childhood had a higher risk of earlier onset cardiomyopathy compared to cases who initiated treatment in late childhood (HR = 2.0, 95% CI = [1.2, 3.4]) or treatment naïve patients (HR = 1.9, 95% CI = [1.1, 3.2]), and higher risk of suffering a fracture (HR = 2.3, 95% CI = [1.4, 3.7] and HR = 2.6, 95% CI = [1.6, 4.2], respectively). Patients with early childhood treatment had slightly decreased respiratory function compared with those with late childhood treatment. Ages at loss of ambulation or scoliosis diagnosis did not differ statistically among treatment groups. We caution that the results from our study are subject to several limitations, as they were based on data abstracted from medical records. Further investigations using improved reporting of disease onset and outcomes are warranted to obtain a more definitive assessment of the association between the timing of corticosteroid treatment and disease severity. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. The Social Consequences of Infertility among Iranian Women: A Qualitative Study

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    Syedeh Batool Hasanpoor-Azghdy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility may prevent couples to achieve the desired social roles and lead to some social and psychological problems. This study aimed to explain the social consequences of infertility in Iranian women seeking treatment. Materials and Methods: A qualitative content analysis was conducted based on 32 semi-structured interviews with 25 women affected by primary and secondary infertility with no surviving children. The participants were purposefully selected with maximum variability from a fertility health research center in Tehran, Iran, from January to October 2012. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews and analyzed using the conventional content analysis method. Results: Our findings indicate that the consequences of infertility are divided into five main categories: 1. violence including psychological violence and domestic physical violence, 2. marital instability or uncertainty, 3. social isolation including avoiding certain people or certain social events and self-imposed isolation from family and friends, 4. social exclusion and partial deprivation including being disregarded by family members and relatives and reducing social interactions with the infertile woman and 5. social alienation. Conclusion: This study reveals that Iranian women with fertility issues seeking treatment face several social problems that could have devastating effects on the quality of their lives. It is, therefore, recommended that, in Iran, infertility is only considered as a biomedical issue of a couple and pay further attention to its sociocultural dimensions and consequences.

  13. Acute kidney injury aggravated by treatment initiation with apixaban: Another twist of anticoagulant-related nephropathy

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    Sergey V. Brodsky

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Anticoagulant-related nephropathy (ARN was initially described in patients on warfarin (as warfarin-related nephropathy and recently in those using dabigatran. Herein, we report clinical history and kidney biopsy findings in a patient on apixaban (Eliquis. Initiation of treatment with apixaban resulted in aggravation of preexisting mild acute kidney injury (AKI. A few days after apixaban therapy, the patient became oligoanuric, and kidney biopsy showed severe acute tubular necrosis with numerous occlusive red blood cell casts. Only one out of 68 glomeruli with open capillary loops had small segmental cellular crescent. Therefore, there was major discrepancy between the degree of glomerular injury and the glomerular hematuria. Considering that the onset of this AKI was associated with apixaban treatment initiation, we propose that this patient had ARN associated with factor Xa inhibitor (apixaban, which has not previously been described. Monitoring of kidney function is recommended after initiation of anticoagulant therapy.

  14. Laparoscopia na decisão da estratégia terapêutica para o casal infértil Laparoscopy in the decision of treatment strategy for the infertile couple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Ricardo Goçalves Baptista Pereira

    2010-09-01

    0.79 (95%CI=0.62-0.9 and its specificity was 0.58 (95%CI=0.42-0.73 when the disease was defined as any form of tubal occlusion detected with the laparoscopy, wheter this occlusion was one-sided or two-sided. HSG sensitivity and specificity were 0.47 (95%CI=0.24-0.71 and 0.77 (95%CI=0.64-0.86, respectively, when the definition of the disease was limited to two-sided tubal occlusion. In nine cases (15.3% in which HSG had shown normal findings or only a unilateral occlusion, laparoscopy revealed a two-sided occlusion. And in 15 cases (65.2% in which HSG had shown a two-sided occlusion, laparoscopy revealed normal findings or one-sided occlusion. CONCLUSIONS: the laparoscopy demonstrated its diagnostic and therapeutic relevance, proving to have fundamental importance for the clarification of the tuboperitoneal status. It has permitted the development of concomitant accessory therapeutic procedures, thus defining the best treatment strategy for the infertile couples.

  15. Recent advances in male infertility research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldamone, A A; Cockett, A T

    1981-02-01

    Recent developments in the following areas of andrology are highlighted: varicocele; biochemical markers of epididymal function; genitourinary tract infection; evaluation of sperm motility; capacity for sperm fertilization; and the immunologic consequences of vasectomy. Discussion of the varicocele effect focuses on detection of thesubclinical varicocele, spermatic venography, Leydig cell functon, experimental models, and percutaneous venous treatment modalities. The size of the varicocele bears no relationship to its subsequent effects on spermatogenesis. Consequently, the "subclinical" varicocele, which is not palpable, becomes an important entity in the infertile patient. Use of a Doppler ultrasonic stethoscope for the detection of the nonpalpable varicocele and use of scrotal thermography have been reported although caution is advised with these techniques. The stress pattern is a nonspecific response of the germinal epithelium to a stimulus or the lack of a stimulus. Genitourinary infection or endocrinopathy can also cause an increased number of ejaculated immature sperm. Spermatic vein ligation is not justified in an infertile patient with a seminal stress pattern but without clinial evidence of a varicocele. Varicocelectomy also is unjustified in a patient with a palpable asymptomatic varicocele in the absence of a stress pattern. Venography in patients with varicocele should be reserved for individuals in whom persistence of a palpable or subclinical varicocele and abnormal semen parameters are observed following spermatic vein legation. It is also a research tool and can prove helpful in providing more information about testicular venous drainage. It may provide a vehicle for percutaneous treatment of the varicocele. Recent attention has been directed to a possible correlation between the presence of varicocele, Leydig cell function, and testosterone synthesis. The seminal stress pattern has been successfully produced in monkeys by a 90% constriction of

  16. Drug-Use Initiation and Conduct Disorder among Adolescents in Drug Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Grella, Christine E.; Collins, Cyleste; Teruya, Cheryl

    2003-01-01

    Investigates effects of drug-use initiation and conduct disorder (CD) among 1031 adolescents who participated in the Drug Abuse Treatment Outcomes Studies for Adolescents (DATOS-A). The mean age of first drug use was 12.7, 57% met DSM-III-R criteria for CD, and earlier initiators were more likely to have CD. (Contains 27 references and 4 tables.)…

  17. The work of a woman is to give birth to children: cultural constructions of infertility in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimka, Ritgak A; Dein, Simon L

    2013-06-01

    Infertility is a condition loaded with meaning spanning across biomedical, psychological, social, economic, cultural and religious spheres. Given its disruptive power over women's lives, it provides a unique lens through which issues of kinship, gender, sexuality, cosmology and religion can be examined. The paper presents the results of an ethnographic study of infertility in Central Nigeria. Explanatory models of infertility were variegated, encompassing biomedical, folk and religious elements. Like other ethnographic studies of help seeking for infertility in Nigeria, among this group resort was made to biomedical treatments, traditional healers and religious healing with no one system being hegemonic. The findings of this study accord with studies of infertility in other cultural groups indicating the disruptive influence of missing motherhood.

  18. A randomized controlled trial of prison-initiated buprenorphine: prison outcomes and community treatment entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michael S; Kinlock, Timothy W; Schwartz, Robert P; Fitzgerald, Terrence T; O'Grady, Kevin E; Vocci, Frank J

    2014-09-01

    Buprenorphine is a promising treatment for heroin addiction. However, little is known regarding its provision to pre-release prisoners with heroin dependence histories who were not opioid-tolerant, the relative effectiveness of the post-release setting in which it is provided, and gender differences in treatment outcome in this population. This is the first randomized clinical trial of prison-initiated buprenorphine provided to male and female inmates in the US who were previously heroin-dependent prior to incarceration. A total of 211 participants with 3-9 months remaining in prison were randomized to one of four conditions formed by crossing In-Prison Treatment Condition (received buprenorphine vs. counseling only) and Post-release Service Setting (at an opioid treatment center vs. a community health center). Outcome measures were: entered prison treatment; completed prison treatment; and entered community treatment 10 days post-release. There was a significant main effect (p=.006) for entering prison treatment favoring the In-Prison buprenorphine Treatment Condition (99.0% vs. 80.4%). Regarding completing prison treatment, the only significant effect was Gender, with women significantly (pPrison buprenorphine Treatment Condition (47.5% vs. 33.7%). Buprenorphine appears feasible and acceptable to prisoners who were not opioid-tolerant and can facilitate community treatment entry. However, concerns remain with in-prison treatment termination due to attempted diversion of medication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Prison-Initiated Buprenorphine: Prison Outcomes and Community Treatment Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michael S.; Kinlock, Timothy W.; Schwartz, Robert P.; Fitzgerald, Terrence; O’Grady, Kevin E.; Vocci, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Buprenorphine is a promising treatment for heroin addiction. However, little is known regarding its provision to pre-release prisoners with heroin dependence histories who were not opioid-tolerant, the relative effectiveness of the post-release setting in which it is provided, and gender differences in treatment outcome in this population. Methods This is the first randomized clinical trial of prison-initiated buprenorphine provided to male and female inmates in the US who were previously heroin-dependent prior to incarceration. A total of 211 participants with 3–9 months remaining in prison were randomized to one of four conditions formed by crossing In-Prison Treatment Condition (received buprenorphine vs. counseling only) and Post-release Service Setting (at an opioid treatment center vs. a community health center). Outcome measures were: entered prison treatment; completed prison treatment; and entered community treatment 10 days post-release. Results There was a significant main effect (p=.006) for entering prison treatment favoring the In-Prison buprenorphine Treatment Condition (99.0% vs. 80.4%). Regarding completing prison treatment, the only significant effect was Gender, with women significantly (pbuprenorphine Treatment Condition (47.5% vs. 33.7%). Conclusions Buprenorphine appears feasible and acceptable to prisoners who were not opioid-tolerant and can facilitate community treatment entry. However, concerns remain with in-prison treatment termination due to attempted diversion of medication. PMID:24962326

  20. The evolving role of saline infusion sonography (SIS) in infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, S; Khalil, M; Osman, A; Clough, A; Jayaprakasan, K; Khalaf, Y

    2015-02-01

    Saline infusion sonography (SIS) has become a valuable diagnostic modality in gynaecology over the last three decades. SIS is now commonly employed for detailed evaluation of the uterine cavity as part of pre-treatment assessment in infertile women. The objective of this paper is review the scientific literature on SIS in infertility. Medline, Ovid and Cochrane databases were searched for relevant articles. The indications, technical aspects and the potential advantages of SIS are discussed. The efficacy and sensitivity of SIS are compared to hysteroscopy in the evaluation of uterine polyps, fibroids, intrauterine adhesions and uterine anomalies. Increasing evidence suggests the use of SIS prior to an in-vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle as it has increased sensitivity in the detection of intrauterine pathology. SIS is cost-effective and results in better patient satisfaction scores than hysteroscopy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Quality of Life and Its Influencing Factors of Couples Referred to An Infertility Center in Shiraz, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namavar Jahromi, Bahia; Mansouri, Mahsa; Forouhari, Sedighe; Poordast, Tahere; Salehi, Alireza

    2018-01-01

    Background Infertility adversely affects quality of life (QoL). The present study aims to evaluate QoL and its associated factors among infertile couples. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, the Fertility QoL (FertiQoL) instrument was used to measure QoL among 501 volunteer couples who attended the Infertility Clinic at the Mother and Child Hospital, Shiraz, Iran. We used an additional questionnaire to assess participants’ demographic and clinical characteristics. The relationship between the scores of QoL to the sociodemographic and treatment data was analysed. Results The subjects with lower income levels had lower relational, mind/body, emotional, and total core scores. Female participants without academic education had lower scores in the emotional subscale, while the male participants showed lower scores in emotional, mind/body, relational, social, and total QoL domains. Subjects who had undergone any type of treatment, including pharmacological treatment, intrauterine insemination (IUI), intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), and in vitro fertilization (IVF) showed significantly lower scores in the environmental domain. Participants with lower infertility duration obtained significantly greater QoL scores. Finally, tolerability, emotional, and environmental domains were significantly more desirable when the infertility problem was related to a male factor. Conclusion Infertile couples with shorter duration of infertility and male etiology have higher QoL. Lower academic education, lower income levels, or prior unsuccessful treatments are associated with lower QoL. PMID:29043705

  2. Male infertility: an obstacle to sexuality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechoua, S; Hamamah, S; Scalici, E

    2016-05-01

    Interactions between infertility and sexuality are numerous and complex. Infertile men may suffer from sexual dysfunction (SD) when undergoing an assisted reproductive technology programme. We undertook a review both in French and English of the available data on male SD when being diagnosed with a fertility problem with a specific focus on azoospermic men. The review was performed over a 30-year time period using PubMed/Medline. The sexual concerns and needs of infertile/sterile men for whom potential parenting can be compromised were evaluated. When diagnosed with infertility, men usually go through a crisis that can have a deleterious effect on their sexuality with sometimes a feeling of sexual inadequacy. Infertile men will feel stigmatized because they are perceived as being deficient in a specific component of their masculinity. Hence, subsequent SD may occur that can impact the couple sexuality and the infertility management. However, little is known on how the announcement of azoospermia may affect male on a sexual and psychological point of view. The present review suggests that a global management through a healthcare network (biologist, andrologist, sexologist and psychologist) is required which will allow to consider infertility and its subsequent sexual disorders as a whole and not as dichotomized issues. © 2016 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  3. Small Supernumerary Marker Chromosomes in Human Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armanet, Narjes; Tosca, Lucie; Brisset, Sophie; Liehr, Thomas; Tachdjian, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) are structurally abnormal chromosomes that cannot be unambiguously identified by banding cytogenetics. The objective of this study was to provide an overview of sSMC frequency and characterization in a context of infertility and to review the literature describing sSMC in relation with male and female infertility. Therefore, a systematic literature review on sSMC associated with infertility was conducted by means of a PubMed literature and a sSMC database (http://ssmc-tl.com/sSMC.html) search. A total of 234 patients with infertility were identified as carriers of sSMC. All chromosomes, except chromosomes 10, 19 and the X, were involved in sSMC, and in 72% the sSMC originated from acrocentric chromosomes. Euchromatic imbalances were caused by the presence of sSMC in 30% of the cases. Putative genes have been identified in only 1.2% of sSMC associated with infertility. The implication of sSMC in infertility could be due to a partial trisomy of some genes but also to mechanical effects perturbing meiosis. Further precise molecular and interphase-architecture studies on sSMC are needed in the future to characterize the relationship between this chromosomal anomaly and human infertility. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Hysterosalpingography and laparoscopy in infertile women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konarzewska, J.; Bianek-Bodzak, A.; Mielcarek, P.; Kobierski, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Despite dynamic development of diagnostic imaging methods and endoscopic procedures, X-ray hysterosalpingography remains the basic diagnostic procedure when anatomical cause of infertility is suspected. The aim of the study was to assess the correlation between HSG results and laparoscopy findings, especially in infertile women with normal results of hysterosalpingography. Material/Methods: The results of HSG and laparoscopies performed between 2002 and 2005 years in 53 infertile women were analyzed retrospectively. The indication for HSG was primary infertility in 44 cases and secondary infertility in 9 cases.Results: The result of HSG was normal in 51%. Pathological findings were observed in 49% of HSG and in 93% of laparoscopies. The most common pathological findings observed during laparoscopy were tubal occlusion (26% cases) and endometriosis (25% cases). Polycystic ovaries and myomas were observed in 20% of the performed laparoscopies. HSG and laparoscopy yield consistent results in evaluation of tubal patency (p < 0.001). Conclusions: HSG remains the method of first choice in the diagnostics of uterine malformations and tubal diseases as causes of infertility. When mechanical factors of female infertility are suspected, HSG allows the optimal choice of more invasive procedure. (authors)

  5. Optimizing treatment initiation: Effects of a patient education program about fingolimod treatment on knowledge, self-efficacy and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Andrea; Bläuer, Cornelia; Coslovsky, Michael; Kappos, Ludwig; Derfuss, Tobias

    2015-09-01

    Satisfaction with information on medication is linked to adherence, but patients are often dissatisfied with information about medication. Information about treatment with fingolimod is important for MS patients since an active role in managing treatment is required from them. To facilitate optimal treatment initiation, a nurse-led patient education program on fingolimod was implemented in a Swiss MS center. To evaluate the impact of the evidence-based comprehensive patient education program on knowledge, self-efficacy and patient satisfaction. Knowledge gain, subjective perception of being informed about the new treatment, self-efficacy in handling it and satisfaction with the program were evaluated in a pretest-posttest design. Patient reported outcomes were collected before and after an educational session on the first-dose day at the MS Center in a consecutive sample of 98 people with MS. Data was analyzed descriptively, score comparisons were done by Wilcoxon tests, and associations were estimated with Spearman's correlation coefficient. Knowledge increased significantly from pre- to posttest. Similarly, perception of being informed and self-efficacy increased significantly. Satisfaction with the program was high. Pretest-differences in knowledge concerning gender and marital status were balanced after the educational session. Results did not differ between patients with fingolimod as first treatment and those switching from other MS treatments. At posttest perception of being informed and self-efficacy were significantly related to satisfaction. An evidence-based comprehensive treatment education program is suitable to satisfy MS patients' information needs at treatment initiation. It enhances short-term treatment knowledge and self-efficacy in handling a new treatment in daily life. MS Nurses can thus contribute to effective treatment education and potentially to medication safety and adherence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. An evaluation of multimedia and online support groups (OSG) contents and application of information by infertile patients: Mixed method study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiweko, Budi; Narasati, Shabrina; Agung, Prince Gusti; Zesario, Aulia; Wibawa, Yohanes Satrya; Maidarti, Mila; Harzif, Achmad Kemal; Pratama, Gita; Sumapradja, Kanadi; Muharam, Raden; Hestiantoro, Andon

    2018-02-01

    Background: The presence of Online Support Groups (OSG) is expected to empower patients with infertility, thus allowing patients to be the focus of healthcare services. This study will evaluate multimedia content, OSG, and utilization of information for decision-making by patients using infertility services. This study is a mixed method study conducted from January - June 2016 at Yasmin IVF Clinic, Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital; and SMART IVF Clinic, Jakarta. The subjects are patients with infertility who sought treatment at the clinics. Data was collected through a structured interview in the form of a questionnaire. Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study. All procedures that performed in studies were by the ethical standards of the institutional. The result from 72 respondents showed quantitative analysis did not reveal any association between multimedia and OSG information sources with patient knowledge regarding infertility management. However, qualitative analysis highlighted three issues: the information regarding infertility services in the available multimedia and the OSG; use of the available information by patients when deciding to use infertility services. The level of awareness of respondents on searching information regarding infertility on the clinic website is still limited. It happened because most of the patients in the clinic are unaware of clinic website existence which provided the infertility information. Therefore, the clinic website needs to be promoted so the usage of this website will increase in the future.

  7. Classification of Patients Treated for Infertility Using the IVF Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malinowski Paweł

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most effective methods of infertility treatment is in vitro fertilization (IVF. Effectiveness of the treatment, as well as classification of the data obtained from it, is still an ongoing issue. Classifiers obtained so far are powerful, but even the best ones do not exhibit equal quality concerning possible treatment outcome predictions. Usually, lack of pregnancy is predicted far too often. This creates a constant need for further exploration of this issue. Careful use of different classification methods can, however, help to achieve that goal.

  8. Hysteroscopic evaluation of post abortive infertile females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehab Elhelw

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To study the hysteroscopic findings in cases of secondary infertility following abortion compared to cases with primary infertility. Methods: This was a case control study of 200 selected infertile women undergoing diagnostic hysteroscopy as a part of their infertility work-up. These 200 patient were classified into the following: A – 100 patients in whom abortion has occurred whether evacuation and curettage (E.&C. was done or not and B – 100 patients complaining of primary infertility. Results: Hysteroscopy was normal in about 44% of patients group and 45% in control group. Observed abnormalities were septate uterus in 17 cases, intrauterine synechiae in 30 cases, submucus myoma in 10 cases, deformed cavity in 5 cases and endometrial polyp in 35 cases. Endometrial abnormalities (fibrosis, inflammation or atrophy were observed in 7 patients. No significance was found regarding the total number of intrauterine pathologies when comparing the groups of primary versus secondary infertility. Patients group showed higher prevalence of Intra Uterine Septum and Intra Uterine Adhesions. Control group showed higher prevalence of endometrial polyp, submucous myoma and Endometritis. Other findings showed nearly equal prevalence in the two groups. Conclusion: There is a direct correlation between the number of abortions, number of evacuations (E.&C. and degree of intra-uterine adhesion, and an increase in the number of abortions is associated with an increase in the degree of intra-uterine adhesions. However, in this study, there was no significant difference between degree of intra-uterine adhesions in the two groups (patient group and control group. Our data are an additional argument to suggest hysteroscopy as part of investigation in infertile woman. Routine diagnostic hysteroscopy should be part of an infertility work-up in primary and secondary infertility.

  9. A randomized controlled trial of the effects of nursing care based on Watson's Theory of Human Caring on distress, self-efficacy and adjustment in infertile women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan-Özkan, İlkay; Okumuş, Hülya; Buldukoğlu, Kadriye

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the effects of nursing care based on the Theory of Human Caring on distress caused by infertility, perceived self-efficacy and adjustment levels. Infertility leads to individual, familial and social problems. Nursing care standards for women affected by infertility have yet to emerge. A randomized controlled trial. This study was conducted from May 2010-February 2011, with 105 Turkish women with infertility (intervention group: 52, control group: 53). We collected data using the Infertility Distress Scale, the Turkish-Infertility Self Efficacy Scale Short Form and the Turkish-Fertility Adjustment Scale. The intervention group received nursing care based on the Theory of Human Caring. Data were analysed using t-tests, chi-square tests and intention-to-treat analyses. The intervention and control groups significantly differed with regard to infertility distress, self-efficacy and adjustment levels. The intervention group's mean self-efficacy score increased by seven points and adjustment score decreased by seven points (in a positive direction). In addition, there was a significant reduction in infertility distress scores in the intervention group, but there was no change in the control group. Nursing care based on the Theory of Human Caring decreased the negative impact of infertility in women receiving infertility treatment and increased self-efficacy and adjustment. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Sexual Satisfaction and Sexual Reactivity in Infertile Women: The Contribution of The Dyadic Functioning and Clinical Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Czyżkowska

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is a factor which has been linked to higher prevalence of sexual dysfunctions in women; however, ambiguous results have been reported about the impact of infertility on women’s sexual satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to compare sexual and dyadic functioning in infertile and fertile women. Furthermore, the associations between sexual variables and clinical variables (depressive symptoms, period trying to conceive, and treatment period were assessed in infertile women sample. Materials and Methods: The cross-sectional study involved 50 women with the history of infertility and 50 fertile women recruited from the general population. The Sexual Satisfaction Scale (SSS, Mell-Krat Scale (women’s version, Family Assessment Measure (FAM-III, and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI were administered to all participants. Results: Infertile women reported lower sexual satisfaction and more maladaptive patterns of dyadic functioning in comparison to the control group. As many as 45 (90% of infertile women, compared to 13 (26% of the control group, reported the scores on the Mell-Krat Scale indicative of the presence of dysfunctions in sexual reactivity (P≤0.001. Infertile women reported significantly higher levels of depressive symptoms than the women from the control group (P≤0.001. Negative correlations were observed between sexual satisfaction and dyadic functioning in both groups (P≤0.05; however, the patterns of these associations were different in infertile and fertile women. For example, negative correlations were found between satisfaction with control and task accomplishment, role performance, affective involvement, and values and norms in infertile women. However, these relationships were not observed in the control group. No correlations were revealed between sexual reactivity and dyadic functioning in infertile women and the control group. Negative correlations were observed between satisfaction with

  11. Sexual Satisfaction and Sexual Reactivity in Infertile Women: The Contribution of The Dyadic Functioning and Clinical Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyżkowska, Anna; Awruk, Katarzyna; Janowski, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a factor which has been linked to higher prevalence of sexual dysfunctions in women; however, ambiguous results have been reported about the impact of infertility on women's sexual satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to compare sexual and dyadic functioning in infertile and fertile women. Furthermore, the associations between sexual variables and clinical variables (depressive symptoms, period trying to conceive, and treatment period) were assessed in infertile women sample. The cross-sectional study involved 50 women with the history of infertility and 50 fertile women recruited from the general population. The Sexual Satisfaction Scale (SSS), Mell-Krat Scale (women's version), Family Assessment Measure (FAM-III), and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were administered to all participants. Infertile women reported lower sexual satisfaction and more maladaptive patterns of dyadic functioning in comparison to the control group. As many as 45 (90%) of infertile women, compared to 13 (26%) of the control group, reported the scores on the Mell-Krat Scale indicative of the presence of dysfunctions in sexual reactivity (P≤0.001). Infertile women reported significantly higher levels of depressive symptoms than the women from the control group (P≤0.001). Negative correlations were observed between sexual satisfaction and dyadic functioning in both groups (P≤0.05); however, the patterns of these associations were different in infertile and fertile women. For example, negative correlations were found between satisfaction with control and task accomplishment, role performance, affective involvement, and values and norms in infertile women. However, these relationships were not observed in the control group. No correlations were revealed between sexual reactivity and dyadic functioning in infertile women and the control group. Negative correlations were observed between satisfaction with control and relationship duration and treatment period as well

  12. Leptin levels in infertile males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahan, S.; Bibi, R.; Ahmed, S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the leptin levels in the serum of normal, sub fertile and infertile men. Study Design: Analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Animal Sciences Quaid-e-Azam University, Islamabad, National Institute of Health (NIH), Islamabad and Dr. Salma and Kafeel Medical Centre, Islamabad, from April to December 2009. Methodology: Serum leptin levels hormonal concentrations (LH, FSH and testosterone) were determined by EIA in 154 males including 24 (15.58%) fertile, 19 (12.34%) polyzoospermic (PZs), 26 (16.88%) teratozoospermic (TZs), 27 (17.53%) astheno-teratozoospermic (ATZs), 18 (11.69%) oligozoospermic (OZs), 18 (11.69%) oligo-astheno-teratozoospermic (OATZs), 11 (7.14%) obstructive azoospermic (OBST-AZOOs) and 11 (7.14%) non-obstructive azoospermic (NON-OBST-AZOOs). BMI was also determined, divided into groups of greater than 24. Hormonal concentrations were compared by ANOVA and correlation was performed by using Graph pad prism version 5. Results: Significantly high levels of leptin concentrations were found in fertile (p 24 compared to fertile and infertile male patients with BMI 24. Leptin showed a significant positive correlation with LH (p < 0.01) and FSH (p < 0.002) and a significant negative correlation with testosterone (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Abnormal leptin level was significantly associated with fertility problems in males. Providing a link between leptin and reproduction factors contributing in control of testosterone and gonadotropins secretion in many aspects depending on fertility status in male subjects. BMI appears to have significant association with serum leptin levels. (author)

  13. Frequency of endometrial tuberculosis in female infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousaf, A.; Zaman, G.; Sultana, N.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of endometrial tuberculosis in infertility patients. Design: an observational analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Military Hospital Rawalpindi and Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi from August 1998 to April 1999. Subjects and Methods: Endometrial biopsies were taken from 50 cases of infertility and subjected to culture on BACTEC 460 TB instrument. Results: Tuberculous endometritis was found in 10 % (n=5) of cases. Conclusion: It was concluded that endometrial tuberculosis is not an infrequent cause of infertility in our setup. (author)

  14. Infertility, Adoption, and Family Formation in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Linda Rae

    2017-11-28

    When combined, primary and secondary infertility affects up to 21 percent of Indonesian couples. Based on ethnographic fieldwork with married heterosexual couples, I explore how intra-family adoption represents a culturally and religiously acceptable pathway to family formation for couples without access to assisted reproductive technologies. I examine how kinship is central to the negotiation of adoption, and to maintaining ethnic and religious continuity within adoptive families. I reveal how adoption can enable infertile women and birth mothers to achieve or escape the dominant expectations of heteronormativity, and discuss intra-family adoption by infertile couples in relation to reproductive stratification and leveling.

  15. Treatment patterns of rheumatoid arthritis in Japanese hospitals and predictors of the initiation of biologic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlich, Joerg; Sruamsiri, Rosarin

    2017-01-01

    To describe the usage of different biologic agents for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Japan over time and to identify factors that affects the decision to initiate treatment with biologic agents. Determinants of a switch to another biologic agent for patients who are already on biologic treatment were also analyzed. We utilized a hospital claims database containing 36,504 Japanese patients with a confirmed RA diagnosis. To analyze the determinants of treatment choices, we applied logistic regression analysis taking into account socio-demographic and medical factors. Analyses determined that 11.8% of diagnoses and 25.4% of treated patients in Japan receive a biologic agent. Significant factors associated with biologic treatment initiation include younger age, female sex, and a higher comorbidity index. The route of administration plays a major role when it comes to a switch between different biologic agents. The lower likelihood of elderly patients to be initiated on biologic treatment might be explained by the risk aversion of Japanese physicians' and patients who are afraid of the potential side effects of biologics. This finding is also consistent with the notion of an age bias that impedes elderly patients from optimal access to biologic treatment. Because claims data does not contain clinical parameters such as disease activity the results should be validated in a clinical context.

  16. Safety of BTZ retreatment for patients with low-grade peripheral neuropathy during the initial treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidisheva, Aleksandra P; Wang, James; Spektor, Tanya M; Bitran, Jacob D; Lutzky, Jose; Tabbara, Imad A; Ye, Joseph Z; Ailawadhi, Sikander; Stampleman, Laura V; Steis, Ronald G; Moezi, Mehdi M; Swift, Regina A; Maluso, Tina M; Udd, Kyle A; Eshaghian, Shahrooz; Nassir, Youram; Berenson, James R

    2017-10-01

    Neuropathy is an important complication that may limit treatment options for patients with multiple myeloma. Previous studies have focused on treatment efficacy and have shown that retreatment with bortezomib (BTZ) is an effective treatment option. The goal of this study was to focus on the clinical manifestations of peripheral neuropathy (PN) and to retrospectively compare the incidence and severity of PN between the initial BTZ regimen and upon retreatment. Furthermore, this study evaluated how certain factors affect BIPN, which will help determine what conditions should be considered prior to retreatment. Charts were reviewed from 93 patients who were retreated with a BTZ-containing regimen after previously being treated with this drug. Among the patients who developed PN, most patients in the study had low-grade neuropathy during the initial BTZ treatment (n = 52, 68%). The results showed no evidence of cumulative toxicity, and there was no significant difference in the incidence and severity of PN upon retreatment. Factors such as the presence of baseline PN, number of prior treatments, dose of BTZ, and comorbidities did not increase the severity of PN upon retreatment. The lapse of time between the two regimens also did not affect the severity of PN. The results suggest that retreatment with BTZ may be a feasible option, without additional risks of PN, for MM patients even with peripheral neuropathy during their initial treatment with this drug.

  17. Reasons for entering treatment reported by initially treatment-resistant patients with substance use disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyers, R.J.; Roozen, H.G.; Smith, J.E.; Evans, B.E.

    2014-01-01

    Many individuals with substance use disorders are resistant to entering formal treatment, despite the negative consequences that plague their own lives and the lives of concerned significant others (CSOs). Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT) has been developed as an effective

  18. Disease Activity-Guided Rituximab Therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis The Effects of Re-Treatment in Initial Nonresponders Versus Initial Responders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thurlings, Rogier M.; Vos, Koen; Gerlag, Daniëlle M.; Tak, Paul P.

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To explore the efficacy of re-treatment with rituximab in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who were initial nonresponders to treatment, and to evaluate the effects of rituximab in RA when re-treatment is given in a standardized way based on the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints

  19. The Effect of The Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Pharmacotherapy on Infertility Stress: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faramarzi, Mahbobeh; Pasha, Hajar; Esmailzadeh, Seddigheh; Kheirkhah, Farzan; Heidary, Shima; Afshar, Zohreh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Infertility has been described as creating a form of stress leading to a variety of psychological problems. Both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy are effective treatments for infertility stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy along with fluoxetine for improvement infertility stress in infertile women. Materials and Methods: In a randomized controlled clinical trial, 89 infertile women with mild to moderate depression (Beck scores 10-47) were recruited into the following three groups: i. cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), ii. antidepressant therapy, and iii. control group. Twenty-nine participants in the CBT method received gradual relaxation training, restructuring, and eliminating of negative automatic thoughts and dysfunctional attitudes to infertility for 10 sessions. Thirty participants in the pharmacotherapy group took 20 mg fluoxetine daily for 90 days. Thirty individuals in control group did not receive any intervention. All participants completed fertility problem inventory (FPI) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) at the beginning and end of the study. We applied Chi-square paired t test, ANOVA and Turkey’s test to analyze the data. Results: The mean of the infertility stress scores in CBT, fluoxetine, and control groups at the beginning and end of the study were as follows, respectively: 3.5 ± 0.62 vs.2.7 ± 0.62 (pinfertility reduced significantly. Also, fluoxetine and CBT reduced depression compared to the control group. Conclusion: CBT improved the social concerns, sexual concerns, marital concerns, rejection of child-free lifestyle, and need for parenthood more than floxitine group. Thus, CBT was not only a reliable alternative to pharmacotherapy, but also superior to fluoxetine in resolving and reducing of infertility stress (Registration Number: IRCT2012061710048N1). PMID:24520487

  20. Sexuality, Self-Esteem and Partnership Quality in Infertile Women and Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wischmann, T; Schilling, K; Toth, B; Rösner, S; Strowitzki, T; Wohlfarth, K; Kentenich, H

    2014-08-01

    Introduction: Infertile couples often report quality-of-life impairments, especially in terms of sexuality, self-esteem and partnership quality. So far, there have been no systematic studies of the sex lives and behaviour of infertile women and men before and after the emergence of their mutual desire for a child. Materials and Methods: From February 2010 to August 2010 all couples starting treatment either at Heidelberg University's Women's Hospital or at the Fertility Center Berlin were asked to fill out the Self-Esteem and Relationship Questionnaire (SEAR). A total of n = 158 women and n = 153 men participated in the study. Results: Decreasing tendencies were observable for both partners in the domains Sexual Relationship Satisfaction and Confidence and in the subscales Self-Esteem and Overall Relationship Satisfaction. There were especially clear indications of a loss of spontaneous sexuality during the experience of infertility. We were also able to establish that infertility has a negative impact on women's self-esteem. Discussion: The results of this study indicate that SEAR can be used as a feasible instrument for identifying infertile women and men whose infertility has a negative effect on their relationship quality and/or sex lives.

  1. Yoga Can Improve Assisted Reproduction Technology Outcomes in Couples With Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbandi, Sara; Darbandi, Mahsa; Khorram Khorshid, Hamid Reza; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza

    2017-11-07

    Context • Depending on the cause of the infertility, nonsurgical or surgical treatments may be used to treat men and women with infertility. Despite improved outcomes due to medical advances, assisted reproductive technology (ART) for couples with infertility is sometimes unsuccessful. Success may be affected by the patient's social, psychological, and physical status. Objective • The study examined the effects of yoga-including asanas (yoga poses), pranayama (proper breathing), shavasana, and meditation-on male and female fertility and ART outcomes. Design • The research team performed a literature review, electronically searching for articles published between January 1978 and January 2016 in the PubMed, Scopus, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar databases. Setting • The study took place at the Reproductive Biotechnology Research Center at the Avicenna Research Institute at the Academic Center for Education, Culture, and Research (Tehran, Iran). Participants • Participants were couples with infertility taking part in 87 reviewed studies. Intervention • Yoga was the intervention. Outcome Measures • The outcome measures comprised fertility factors in males and females, fertility rate, and ART success rate. Results • The reviewed studies showed that yoga can provide stress management for patients with infertility, with beneficial effects on fertility, helping couples give birth. They found that yoga also could reduce pain; decrease depression, anxiety, and stress; reduce the rate of assisted vaginal delivery; and improve fetal outcomes. Conclusions • Yoga can help couples overcome infertility and increase the ART success rate by improving the physiological and psychological states of both men and women.

  2. Clinical and Para Clinical Information Needs of Infertility Electronic Health Records in Iran: A Delphi Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzandipour, Mehrdad; Jeddi, Fateme Rangraz; Gilasi, Hamid Reza; Shirzadi, Diana

    2017-09-01

    infertility is referred to the person's inability to conceive pregnancy after one year of intercourse without using protection. This study paves the ground for creating a complete, united, and coherent source of patients' medical information. this is an applied research of descriptive-cross sectional type which has been carried out through qualitative - quantitative methods. The sample of the present study was 50 specialists in the field of infertility which has been chosen based on purposive sampling method. Designing the questionnaire was done based on library studies and Gathering experts' views was done based on Delphi technique. 261 items from clinical and Para clinical information of infertile patients' electronic health records were subjected to an opinion poll by experts. During this process 223 items were accepted and 38 items have been rejected after two sessions of surveys by infertility experts. Para clinical information section consisted of 57 items that all of them have been accepted by the experts. Also, clinical information section consisted of 242 items from which 204 items were accepted and 38 items were rejected by the experts. existence of a structured electronic record system of infertile patients' information leads to the integration of patients' information, improvement of health care services and a decrease in treatment costs: all working to increase information safety. Furthermore, only essential and relevant information would be provided for the specialists and it will facilitate and direct the future infertility related studies due to the coherence, unity and relevance of the information.

  3. Environment as a Risk Factor for Male Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Multigner

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Infertility affects 15% of couples in Western countries. Infertility is defined as the inability to conceive after 1 year of attempts without contraception, but it is not synonymous with sterility. Between 30 and 50% of infertile couples are infertile due to male reasons, mainly due to sperm production disorders. Although some risk factors, most of which are infectious, have been identified, there is still much uncertainty about the origins of male infertility.

  4. Environment as a Risk Factor for Male Infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Multigner, Luc; Oliva, Alejandro

    2001-01-01

    Infertility affects 15% of couples in Western countries. Infertility is defined as the inability to conceive after 1 year of attempts without contraception, but it is not synonymous with sterility. Between 30 and 50% of infertile couples are infertile due to male reasons, mainly due to sperm production disorders. Although some risk factors, most of which are infectious, have been identified, there is still much uncertainty about the origins of male infertility.

  5. Outcome of SIGN Nail Initiative in Treatment of Long Bone Fractures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Currently the standard of treatment for femoral shaft fracture and unstable tibia fracture are closed locking intramedullary nail which require fluoroscopy and fracture table. The objective of this review was to evaluate the outcome of Surgical Implant Generation Network (SIGN ) initiative, locking intramedullary ...

  6. Nitrogen implantation of steels: A treatment which can initiate sustained oxidative wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hale, E.B.; Reinbold, R.; Missouri Univ., Rolla; Kohser, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Falex wear tests on mild (SAE 3135) steel samples treated by either nitrogen implantation (2.5x10 17 N 2 + cm -2 at 180 keV) or low temperature (about 315 0 C) oxidation are reported. The results show that both treatments lead to about an order-of-magnitude reduction in the long-term wear rate of the steel. In addition to the wear rate measurements, the wear member asymmetry behavior, scanning electron microscopy studies, Auger spectra and sputter profiles all indicate that the wear modes induced by both treatments are the same and are oxidative wear. These results confirm the previously proposed initiator-sustainer wear model in which implanted nitrogen simply acts as an initiator of favorable oxidative wear but is not directly involved in maintaining the sustained wear resistance. Possible mechanisms for both the initiation process and the sustained wear process are reviewed and discussed. (orig.)

  7. Treatment initiation in paediatric pulmonary hypertension: insights from a multinational registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humpl, Tilman; Berger, Rolf M F; Austin, Eric D; Fasnacht Boillat, Margrit S; Bonnet, Damien; Ivy, Dunbar D; Zuk, Malgorzata; Beghetti, Maurice; Schulze-Neick, Ingram

    2017-08-01

    Different treatment options for pulmonary hypertension have emerged in recent years, and evidence-based management strategies have improved quality of life and survival in adults. In children with pulmonary vascular disease, therapeutic algorithms are not so clearly defined; this study determined current treatment initiation in children with pulmonary hypertension in participating centres of a registry. Through the multinational Tracking Outcomes and Practice in Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension registry, patient demographics, diagnosis, and treatment as judged and executed by the local physician were collected. Inclusion criteria were >3 months and pulmonary hypertension (mean pulmonary arterial pressure ⩾25 mmHg, pulmonary vascular resistance index ⩾3 Wood units×m2, and mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ⩽12 mmHg). At diagnostic catheterisation, 217/244 patients (88.9%) were treatment naïve for pulmonary hypertension-targeted therapy. Targeted therapy was initiated after catheterisation in 170 (78.3%) treatment-naïve patients. A total of 19 patients received supportive therapy, 28 patients were not started on therapy, and 26 patients (10.7%) were on targeted treatment before catheterisation. Among treatment-naïve subjects, treatment was initiated with one targeted drug (n=112, 51.6%), dual therapy (n=39, 18%) or triple-therapy (n=5, 2.3%), and calcium channel blockers with one targeted medication in one patient (0.5%). Phosphodiesterase inhibitors type 5 were used frequently; some patients with pulmonary hypertension related to lung disease received targeted therapy. There is a diverse therapeutic approach for children with pulmonary hypertension with a need of better-defined treatment algorithms based on paediatric consensus for different aetiologies including the best possible diagnostic workup.

  8. "Salvage microbiology": detection of bacteria directly from clinical specimens following initiation of antimicrobial treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J Farrell

    Full Text Available PCR coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS is a diagnostic approach that has demonstrated the capacity to detect pathogenic organisms from culture negative clinical samples after antibiotic treatment has been initiated. [1] We describe the application of PCR/ESI-MS for detection of bacteria in original patient specimens that were obtained after administration of antibiotic treatment in an open investigation analysis.We prospectively identified cases of suspected bacterial infection in which cultures were not obtained until after the initiation of antimicrobial treatment. PCR/ESI-MS was performed on 76 clinical specimens that were submitted for conventional microbiology testing from 47 patients receiving antimicrobial treatment.In our series, 72% (55/76 of cultures obtained following initiation of antimicrobial treatment were non-diagnostic (45 negative cultures; and 10 respiratory specimens with normal flora (5, yeast (4, or coagulase-negative staphylococcus (1. PCR/ESR-MS detected organisms in 83% (39/47 of cases and 76% (58/76 of the specimens. Bacterial pathogens were detected by PCR/ESI-MS in 60% (27/45 of the specimens in which cultures were negative. Notably, in two cases of relapse of prosthetic knee infections in patients on chronic suppressive antibiotics, the previous organism was not recovered in tissue cultures taken during extraction of the infected knee prostheses, but was detected by PCR/ESI-MS.Molecular methods that rely on nucleic acid amplification may offer a unique advantage in the detection of pathogens collected after initiation of antimicrobial treatment and may provide an opportunity to target antimicrobial therapy and "salvage" both individual treatment regimens as well as, in select cases, institutional antimicrobial stewardship efforts.

  9. Infertility around the globe: new thinking on gender, reproductive technologies and global movements in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhorn, Marcia C; Patrizio, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Infertility is estimated to affect as many as 186 million people worldwide. Although male infertility contributes to more than half of all cases of global childlessness, infertility remains a woman's social burden. Unfortunately, areas of the world with the highest rates of infertility are often those with poor access to assisted reproductive techniques (ARTs). In such settings, women may be abandoned to their childless destinies. However, emerging data suggest that making ART accessible and affordable is an important gender intervention. To that end, this article presents an overview of what we know about global infertility, ART and changing gender relations, posing five key questions: (i) why is infertility an ongoing global reproductive health problem? (ii) What are the gender effects of infertility, and are they changing over time? (iii) What do we know about the globalization of ART to resource-poor settings? (iv) How are new global initiatives attempting to improve access to IVF? (v) Finally, what can be done to overcome infertility, help the infertile and enhance low-cost IVF (LCIVF) activism? An exhaustive literature review using MEDLINE, Google Scholar and the keyword search function provided through the Yale University Library (i.e. which scans multiple databases simultaneously) identified 103 peer-reviewed journal articles and 37 monographs, chapters and reports from the years 2000-2014 in the areas of: (i) infertility demography, (ii) ART in low-resource settings, (iii) gender and infertility in low-resource settings and (iv) the rise of LCIVF initiatives. International Federation of Fertility Societies Surveillance reports were particularly helpful in identifying important global trends in IVF clinic distribution between 2002 and 2010. Additionally, a series of articles published by scholars who are tracking global cross-border reproductive care (CBRC) trends, as well as others who are involved in the growing LCIVF movement, were invaluable. Recent

  10. Different Patterns of Restoration Provision Between Initial Endodontic Treatment and Retreatment: A Retrospective Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrafioti, Anastasia; Giannakoulas, Dimitrios G; Kournetas, Nikos; Grigoriou, Stamatina; Kontakiotis, Evangelos G

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between type of endodontic treatment and choice of definitive restoration and to show the prevalence of endodontic treatment options according to patient age and type of tooth. Data were collected from the archive system of the School of Dentistry, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens in Athens, Greece. The sample included endodontically treated teeth being restored definitively at the time of data collection. Statistically significant difference was found regarding the type of restoration between initial endodontic treatments and retreatments (P Endodontic retreatment seemed to have a significant effect on the choice of definitive restoration of the tooth.

  11. What are some causes of infertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What are some causes of infertility? When a couple experiences problems with fertility, the cause(s) can be multiple and overlapping. Problems in the male are just as likely as problems in the ...

  12. Female Infertility: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may be involved with infertility in females and males? (National Institute of Child Health and Human Development) ... Spanish Statistics and Research Couples With Obesity May Take Longer to Achieve Pregnancy ( ...

  13. Psychological and ethical implications related to infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minucci, Daria

    2013-12-01

    Being a parent is deeply demanding and one of the most important events in life; parents experience the deepening of human relationships with their partner, within their families, and in society, and moreover the fundamental relationship between parent and child. Every medical, social, and political effort must be made to prevent infertility but also to offer infertile couples the best diagnostic and therapeutic paths. Understanding the suffering of the couple and their families prevents and helps ease the possible psychological and social complications of infertility. Therefore, infertility concerns not only biomedical sciences but also psychological and social ones-ethics and law-in their combined efforts to identify areas of understanding and of research for solutions while respecting the dignity of the couple and unborn child. The Catholic Church offers an ongoing contribution through dialogue in looking for ethical principles guiding scientific and medical research respectful of the true life of human beings. © 2013.

  14. Sexually Transmitted Disease and Male Infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Fusco, Ferdinando; Lipshultz, Larry

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: Theoretically, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) have the potential to disrupt male fertility; however, the topic remains controversial. OBJECTIVE: To describe the possible association between STDs and male infertility and to explore possible pathophysiologic mechanisms. EVIDENCE...... performed in men and published in English. Studies were included if they contained original data on a possible association or a cause-and-effect relationship between STD and male infertility. Studies were considered only if they included an appropriate control group and/or comprehensive laboratory data. Due...... an association between STDs and male infertility is also of inadequate quality. The data regarding possible pathophysiologic mechanisms are inconclusive. CONCLUSIONS: There may be an association between STDs and male infertility of unknown genesis and possibly with different pathogenic mechanisms for different...

  15. Endometriosis and Infertility: Can Surgery Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's FAQs about In Vitro Fertilization REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH TOPICS Topics Index NEWS AND PUBLICATIONS Publications Overview News and Research Ethics Documents Practice Committee Documents Patient Fact Sheets and ...

  16. Diagnostic Testing for Male Factor Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's FAQs about In Vitro Fertilization REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH TOPICS Topics Index NEWS AND PUBLICATIONS Publications Overview News and Research Ethics Documents Practice Committee Documents Patient Fact Sheets and ...

  17. Secondary Infertility: Why Does It Happen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2016. http://accessmedicine.com. Accessed Nov. 29, 2016. Hacker NF, et al. Infertility and assisted reproductive technologies. In: Hacker & Moore's Essentials of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 6th ed. ...

  18. Topiramate and Adrenal Cortico-tropic Hormone as Initial Treatment of Infantile Spasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Bradley; Alonso, William D.; Porter, Brenda E.

    2009-01-01

    Historically, adrenal cortico-tropic hormone (ACTH) was used as first line treatment for infantile spasms, however there has been increasing use of topiramate as initial therapy. Here we report a retrospective study of ACTH and topiramate as initial treatment of infantile spasms. The neurology patient database at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia was searched using the ICD-9 code for infantile spasms, and 50 patients were randomly chosen for chart review. We identified thirty-one patients receiving either ACTH or topiramate monotherapy (ACTH, n = 12, topiramate n = 19) as a first line treatment for infantile spasms. Twenty-six patients were symptomatic and five cryptogenic. Six patients treated with ACTH had resolution of clinical spasms and hypsarrhithmia within a month, but three relapsed. Four of the nineteen patients treated with topiramate eventually, though over a period of 0,1,8 or 69 months, had resolution of spasms and hypsarrhythmia. PMID:19225138