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Sample records for inhalation reference concentrations

  1. Estimation of inhaled airborne particle number concentration by subway users in Seoul, Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Minhae; Park, Sechan; Namgung, Hyeong-Gyu; Kwon, Soon-Bark

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) causes several diseases in the human body. The smaller particles, which have relatively large surface areas, are actually more harmful to the human body since they can penetrate deeper parts of the lungs or become secondary pollutants by bonding with other atmospheric pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides. The purpose of this study is to present the number of PM inhaled by subway users as a possible reference material for any analysis of the hazards to the human body arising from the inhalation of such PM. Two transfer stations in Seoul, Korea, which have the greatest number of users, were selected for this study. For 0.3–0.422 μm PM, particle number concentration (PNC) was highest outdoors but decreased as the tester moved deeper underground. On the other hand, the PNC between 1 and 10 μm increased as the tester moved deeper underground and showed a high number concentration inside the subway train as well. An analysis of the particles to which subway users are actually exposed to (inhaled particle number), using particle concentration at each measurement location, the average inhalation rate of an adult, and the average stay time at each location, all showed that particles sized 0.01–0.422 μm are mostly inhaled from the outdoor air whereas particles sized 1–10 μm are inhaled as the passengers move deeper underground. Based on these findings, we expect that the inhaled particle number of subway users can be used as reference data for an evaluation of the hazards to health caused by PM inhalation. - Highlights: • Size-dependent aerosol number was measured along the path of subway user. • Particles less than 0.4 μm were inhaled in outdoor but less so as deeper underground. • Coarse particles were inhaled significantly as users moved deeper underground. - We estimated the inhaled aerosol number concentration depending on particle size along the path of subway users.

  2. Estimation of inhaled airborne particle number concentration by subway users in Seoul, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minhae; Park, Sechan; Namgung, Hyeong-Gyu; Kwon, Soon-Bark

    2017-12-01

    Exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) causes several diseases in the human body. The smaller particles, which have relatively large surface areas, are actually more harmful to the human body since they can penetrate deeper parts of the lungs or become secondary pollutants by bonding with other atmospheric pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides. The purpose of this study is to present the number of PM inhaled by subway users as a possible reference material for any analysis of the hazards to the human body arising from the inhalation of such PM. Two transfer stations in Seoul, Korea, which have the greatest number of users, were selected for this study. For 0.3-0.422 μm PM, particle number concentration (PNC) was highest outdoors but decreased as the tester moved deeper underground. On the other hand, the PNC between 1 and 10 μm increased as the tester moved deeper underground and showed a high number concentration inside the subway train as well. An analysis of the particles to which subway users are actually exposed to (inhaled particle number), using particle concentration at each measurement location, the average inhalation rate of an adult, and the average stay time at each location, all showed that particles sized 0.01-0.422 μm are mostly inhaled from the outdoor air whereas particles sized 1-10 μm are inhaled as the passengers move deeper underground. Based on these findings, we expect that the inhaled particle number of subway users can be used as reference data for an evaluation of the hazards to health caused by PM inhalation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of inhaling concentrated oxygen on performance during repeated anaerobic exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Heller

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the pilot study was to test the effect of inhaling 99.5% oxygen on recovery. The source of concentrated oxygen was O-PUR (Oxyfit. Research subjects completed two thirty-second Wingate tests at an interval of ten minutes, and in the interval between the tests the subjects inhaled either oxygen or a placebo in random order. This procedure was then repeated. The pilot study revealed a significantly (p<0.03 smaller performance drop in the second Wingate test following the inhalation of 99.5% oxygen when compared with the placebo. The results of the study indicate that inhaling concentrated oxygen may have a positive effect on short-term recovery processes.

  4. Direct-reading inhalable dust monitoring--an assessment of current measurement methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Andrew; Walsh, Peter T

    2013-08-01

    Direct-reading dust monitors designed specifically to measure the inhalable fraction of airborne dust are not widely available. Current practice therefore often involves comparing the response of photometer-type dust monitors with the concentration measured with a reference gravimetric inhalable sampler, which is used to adjust the dust monitor measurement. However, changes in airborne particle size can result in significant errors in the estimation of inhalable concentration by this method. The main aim of this study was to assess how these dust monitors behave when challenged with airborne dust containing particles in the inhalable size range and also to investigate alternative dust monitors whose response might not be as prone to variations in particle size or that could be adapted to measure inhalable dust concentration. Several photometer-type dust monitors and a Respicon TM, tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM) personal dust monitor (PDM) 3600, TEOM 1400, and Dustrak DRX were assessed for the measurement of airborne inhalable dust during laboratory and field trials. The PDM was modified to allow it to sample and measure larger particles in the inhalable size range. During the laboratory tests, the dust monitors and reference gravimetric samplers were challenged inside a large dust tunnel with aerosols of industrial dusts known to present an inhalable hazard and aluminium oxide powders with a range of discrete particle sizes. A constant concentration of each dust type was generated and peak concentrations of larger particles were periodically introduced to investigate the effects of sudden changes in particle size on monitor calibration. The PDM, Respicon, and DataRam photometer were also assessed during field trials at a bakery, joinery, and a grain mill. Laboratory results showed that the Respicon, modified PDM, and TEOM 1400 observed good linearity for all types of dust when compared with measurements made with a reference IOM sampler; the

  5. Estimation of chloroform inhalation dose by other routes based on the relationship of area under the blood concentration-time curve (AUC)-inhalation dose to chloroform distribution in the blood of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Take, Makoto; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Haresaku, Mitsuru; Matsumoto, Michiharu; Nagano, Kasuke; Yamamoto, Seigo; Takamura-Enya, Takeji; Fukushima, Shoji

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the time-course changes of concentration of chloroform (CHCl3) in the blood during and after exposure of male rats to CHCl3 by inhalation. Increasing the dose of CHCl3 in the inhalation exposed groups caused a commensurate increase in the concentration of CHCl3 in the blood and the area under the blood concentration-time curve (AUC). There was good correlation (r = 0.988) between the inhalation dose and the AUC/kg body weight. Based on the AUC/kg body weight-inhalation dose curve and the AUC/kg body weight after oral administration, inhalation equivalent doses of orally administered CHCl3 were calculated. Calculation of inhalation equivalent doses allows the body burden due to CHCl3 by inhalation exposure and oral exposure to be directly compared. This type of comparison facilitates risk assessment in humans exposed to CHCl3 by different routes. Our results indicate that when calculating inhalation equivalent doses of CHCl3, it is critical to include the AUC from the exposure period in addition to the AUC after the end of the exposure period. Thus, studies which measure the concentration of volatile organic compounds in the blood during the inhalation exposure period are crucial. The data reported here makes an important contribution to the physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) database of CHCl3 in rodents.

  6. On detecting reference level of acrolein content in children's blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.S. Ulanova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article gives the results of complex chemical-analytical and clinical-laboratory research in course of which biological media of children living in Perm region were examined. To study impacts exerted by exogenous acrolein we examined 156 children in 2014–2016, aged 5–10, attending pre-school facilities and schools, and living in Perm region. As we conducted this research we detected average annual acrolein concentration in atmosphere on the examined territory; this concentration was equal to 0.000024 mg/m3, and it was 1.2 times higher than reference acrolein concentration in the air for chronic inhalation exposure. Average group acrolein concentration in children's blood was 1.2 times authentically higher (р3.96, p≤0.05. We used increased content of delta-aminolevulinic acid in urine as a limiting marker for effects occurring at chronic inhalation exposure to acrolein. Basing on the results of the performed examination we recommend concentration equal to 0.10 mgr/dm 3 as a reference level of acrolein content in blood at chronic inhalation exposure.

  7. Inhalation Therapy in Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Mandy L; Costa, Lais R R

    2017-04-01

    This article discusses the benefits and limitations of inhalation therapy in horses. Inhalation drug therapy delivers the drug directly to the airways, thereby achieving maximal drug concentrations at the target site. Inhalation therapy has the additional advantage of decreasing systemic side effects. Inhalation therapy in horses is delivered by the use of nebulizers or pressured metered dose inhalers. It also requires the use of a muzzle or nasal mask in horses. Drugs most commonly delivered through inhalation drug therapy in horses include bronchodilators, antiinflammatories, and antimicrobials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Sub-chronic inhalation of high concentrations of manganese sulfate induces lower airway pathology in rhesus monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Brian A

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurotoxicity and pulmonary dysfunction are well-recognized problems associated with prolonged human exposure to high concentrations of airborne manganese. Surprisingly, histological characterization of pulmonary responses induced by manganese remains incomplete. The primary objective of this study was to characterize histologic changes in the monkey respiratory tract following manganese inhalation. Methods Subchronic (6 hr/day, 5 days/week inhalation exposure of young male rhesus monkeys to manganese sulfate was performed. One cohort of monkeys (n = 4–6 animals/exposure concentration was exposed to air or manganese sulfate at 0.06, 0.3, or 1.5 mg Mn/m3 for 65 exposure days. Another eight monkeys were exposed to manganese sulfate at 1.5 mg Mn/m3 for 65 exposure days and held for 45 or 90 days before evaluation. A second cohort (n = 4 monkeys per time point was exposed to manganese sulfate at 1.5 mg Mn/m3 and evaluated after 15 or 33 exposure days. Evaluations included measurement of lung manganese concentrations and evaluation of respiratory histologic changes. Tissue manganese concentrations were compared for the exposure and control groups by tests for homogeneity of variance, analysis of variance, followed by Dunnett's multiple comparison. Histopathological findings were evaluated using a Pearson's Chi-Square test. Results Animals exposed to manganese sulfate at ≥0.3 mg Mn/m3 for 65 days had increased lung manganese concentrations. Exposure to manganese sulfate at 1.5 mg Mn/m3 for ≥15 exposure days resulted in increased lung manganese concentrations, mild subacute bronchiolitis, alveolar duct inflammation, and proliferation of bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue. Bronchiolitis and alveolar duct inflammatory changes were absent 45 days post-exposure, suggesting that these lesions are reversible upon cessation of subchronic high-dose manganese exposure. Conclusion High-dose subchronic manganese sulfate inhalation is

  9. SITE SPECIFIC REFERENCE PERSON PARAMETERS AND DERIVED CONCENTRATION STANDARDS FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannik, T.

    2013-03-14

    The purpose of this report is twofold. The first is to develop a set of behavioral parameters for a reference person specific for the Savannah River Site (SRS) such that the parameters can be used to determine dose to members of the public in compliance with Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1 “Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment.” A reference person is a hypothetical, gender and age aggregation of human physical and physiological characteristics arrived at by international consensus for the purpose of standardizing radiation dose calculations. DOE O 458.1 states that compliance with the annual dose limit of 100 mrem (1 mSv) to a member of the public may be demonstrated by calculating the dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) or to a representative person. Historically, for dose compliance, SRS has used the MEI concept, which uses adult dose coefficients and adult male usage parameters. Beginning with the 2012 annual site environmental report, SRS will be using the representative person concept for dose compliance. The dose to a representative person will be based on 1) the SRS-specific reference person usage parameters at the 95th percentile of appropriate national or regional data, which are documented in this report, 2) the reference person (gender and age averaged) ingestion and inhalation dose coefficients provided in DOE Derived Concentration Technical Standard (DOE-STD-1196-2011), and 3) the external dose coefficients provided in the DC_PAK3 toolbox. The second purpose of this report is to develop SRS-specific derived concentration standards (DCSs) for all applicable food ingestion pathways, ground shine, and water submersion. The DCS is the concentration of a particular radionuclide in water, in air, or on the ground that results in a member of the public receiving 100 mrem (1 mSv) effective dose following continuous exposure for one year. In DOE-STD-1196-2011, DCSs were developed for the ingestion of water, inhalation of

  10. Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Wasiolek

    2006-06-05

    This analysis is one of the technical reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), referred to in this report as the biosphere model. ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. This report documents development of input parameters for the biosphere model that are related to atmospheric mass loading and supports the use of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for a Yucca Mountain repository. ''Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'' is one of five reports that develop input parameters for the biosphere model. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the biosphere model is presented in Figure 1-1 (based on BSC 2006 [DIRS 176938]). This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling. This analysis report defines and justifies values of atmospheric mass loading for the biosphere model. Mass loading is the total mass concentration of resuspended particles (e.g., dust, ash) in a volume of air. Mass loading values are used in the air submodel of the biosphere model to calculate concentrations of radionuclides in air inhaled by a receptor and concentrations in air surrounding crops. Concentrations in air to which the receptor is exposed are then used in the inhalation submodel to calculate the dose contribution to the receptor from inhalation of contaminated airborne particles. Concentrations in air surrounding plants are used in the plant submodel to calculate the concentrations of radionuclides in foodstuffs contributed from uptake by foliar interception. This

  11. Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. Wasiolek

    2006-01-01

    This analysis is one of the technical reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), referred to in this report as the biosphere model. ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. This report documents development of input parameters for the biosphere model that are related to atmospheric mass loading and supports the use of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for a Yucca Mountain repository. ''Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'' is one of five reports that develop input parameters for the biosphere model. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the biosphere model is presented in Figure 1-1 (based on BSC 2006 [DIRS 176938]). This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling. This analysis report defines and justifies values of atmospheric mass loading for the biosphere model. Mass loading is the total mass concentration of resuspended particles (e.g., dust, ash) in a volume of air. Mass loading values are used in the air submodel of the biosphere model to calculate concentrations of radionuclides in air inhaled by a receptor and concentrations in air surrounding crops. Concentrations in air to which the receptor is exposed are then used in the inhalation submodel to calculate the dose contribution to the receptor from inhalation of contaminated airborne particles. Concentrations in air surrounding plants are used in the plant submodel to calculate the concentrations of radionuclides in foodstuffs contributed from uptake by foliar interception. This report is concerned primarily with the

  12. Deposition of inhaled uranium in Brazilian reference man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Joaquim Carlos S.; Moraes, Jose Carlos T.B.

    1996-01-01

    Brazilian's morphometric and physiological parameters were selected for use in assessment of deposition of inhaled uranium. The assessment results were compared with estimates of deposition made with parameters recommended in ICRP 66. (author)

  13. Neurobehavioural evaluation and kinetics of inhalation of constant or fluctuating toluene concentrations in human volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, J.H.C.M.; Meuling, W.J.A.; Muijser, H.; Freidig, A.P.; Bessems, J.G.M.

    2005-01-01

    The health risks of inhalation exposure to volatile organic solvents may not only depend on the total external dose, but also on the pattern of exposure. It has been suggested that exposure to regularly occurring peak concentrations may have a stronger impact on the brain than constant exposure at

  14. Personal exposure to inhalable cement dust among construction workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Susan; Thomassen, Yngvar; Fechter-Rink, Edeltraud; Kromhout, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Objective- A case study was carried out to assess cement dust exposure and its determinants among construction workers and for comparison among workers in cement and concrete production.Methods- Full-shift personal exposure measurements were performed and samples were analysed for inhalable dust and its cement content. Exposure variability was modelled with linear mixed models.Results- Inhalable dust concentrations at the construction site ranged from 0.05 to 34 mg/m(3), with a mean of 1.0 mg/m(3). Average concentration for inhalable cement dust was 0.3 mg/m(3) (GM; range 0.02-17 mg/m(3)). Levels in the ready-mix and pre-cast concrete plants were on average 0.5 mg/m(3) (GM) for inhalable dust and 0.2 mg/m(3) (GM) for inhalable cement dust. Highest concentrations were measured in cement production, particularly during cleaning tasks (inhalable dust GM = 55 mg/m(3); inhalable cement dust GM = 33 mg/m(3)) at which point the workers wore personal protective equipment. Elemental measurements showed highest but very variable cement percentages in the cement plant and very low percentages during reinforcement work and pouring. Most likely other sources were contributing to dust concentrations, particularly at the construction site. Within job groups, temporal variability in exposure concentrations generally outweighed differences in average concentrations between workers. 'Using a broom', 'outdoor wind speed' and 'presence of rain' were overall the most influential factors affecting inhalable (cement) dust exposure.Conclusion- Job type appeared to be the main predictor of exposure to inhalable (cement) dust at the construction site. Inhalable dust concentrations in cement production plants, especially during cleaning tasks, are usually considerably higher than at the construction site.

  15. PBTK modeling demonstrates contribution of dermal and inhalation exposure components to end-exhaled breath concentrations of naphthalene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, David; Andersen, Melvin E; Chao, Yi-Chun E; Egeghy, Peter P; Rappaport, Stephen M; Nylander-French, Leena A

    2007-06-01

    Dermal and inhalation exposure to jet propulsion fuel 8 (JP-8) have been measured in a few occupational exposure studies. However, a quantitative understanding of the relationship between external exposures and end-exhaled air concentrations has not been described for occupational and environmental exposure scenarios. Our goal was to construct a physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK) model that quantitatively describes the relative contribution of dermal and inhalation exposures to the end-exhaled air concentrations of naphthalene among U.S. Air Force personnel. The PBTK model comprised five compartments representing the stratum corneum, viable epidermis, blood, fat, and other tissues. The parameters were optimized using exclusively human exposure and biological monitoring data. The optimized values of parameters for naphthalene were a) permeability coefficient for the stratum corneum 6.8 x 10(-5) cm/hr, b) permeability coefficient for the viable epidermis 3.0 x 10(-3) cm/hr, c) fat:blood partition coefficient 25.6, and d) other tissue:blood partition coefficient 5.2. The skin permeability coefficient was comparable to the values estimated from in vitro studies. Based on simulations of workers' exposures to JP-8 during aircraft fuel-cell maintenance operations, the median relative contribution of dermal exposure to the end-exhaled breath concentration of naphthalene was 4% (10th percentile 1% and 90th percentile 11%). PBTK modeling allowed contributions of the end-exhaled air concentration of naphthalene to be partitioned between dermal and inhalation routes of exposure. Further study of inter- and intraindividual variations in exposure assessment is required to better characterize the toxicokinetic behavior of JP-8 components after occupational and/or environmental exposures.

  16. Personal exposure to inhalable cement dust among construction workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Susan; Kromhout, Hans; Thomassen, Yngvar; Fechter-Rink, Edeltraud

    2009-01-01

    A case study was carried out in 2006-2007 to assess the actual cement dust exposure among construction workers involved in a full-scale construction project and as a comparison among workers involved in various stages of cement and concrete production. Full-shift personal exposure measurements were performed for several job types. Inhalable dust and cement dust (based on analysis of elemental calcium) concentrations were determined. Inhalable dust exposures at the construction site ranged from 0.05 to 34 mg/m3, with a mean concentration of 1.0 mg/m3. For inhalable cement dust mean exposure was 0.3 mg/m3 (range 0.02-17 mg/m3). Reinforcement and pouring workers had the lowest average concentrations. Inhalable dust levels in the ready-mix and pre-cast concrete plants were, on average, below 0.5 mg/m3 for inhalable dust and below 0.2 mg/m3 for inhalable cement dust. Highest dust concentrations were measured in cement production, particularly during cleaning tasks (inhalable dust GM=55 mg/m3; inhalable cement dust GM=33 mg/m3) at which point the workers wore personal protective equipment. Elemental measurements showed highest but very variable cement percentages in the cement plant and very low percentages of cement during reinforcement work and pouring.

  17. Elemental Concentration of Inhalable and Respirable Particulate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    20537 and respirable foam for I.O.M sampler. The elemental composition (Co, Ni, Zn, Cu, Fe, Pb, Cr, Mn and Cd) were analyzed by using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometric (AAS). The data generated were subjected to descriptive analysis. In inhalable fraction,the enrichment factor ranged from 1-73.3 while in respirable ...

  18. Derived ERLs for inhalation of alpha-emitting aerorols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, H.F.

    1977-01-01

    Derived alpha action levels are expressed as dpm/m 3 and give the airborne concentration of an assumed mixture of α-emitters which if inhaled for a period of 4 hours would result in a dose commitment to members of the critical group in the exposed population equal to the emergency reference levels (ERLs) of dose recommended by the Medical Research Council (1975). The period of 4 hours is chosen as a realistic time during which an assessment of the severity of a release may be made and appropriate countermeasures instituted. The derived α ERLs are set with reference to the potential range of isotopic releases for a specific reactor system and in the case of gas-cooled magnox reactors, a value of 10 3 dpm/m 3 (170 Bqm -3 ) has been used. This level was based upon the lung and GI tract models originally recommended by ICRP 2 (1959:1964) and revised ERLs for the inhalation of α-emitters consequent upon the improved metabolic models subsequently proposed by the ICRP (1966:1972) are evaluated. It is shown that the derived α ERLs for irradiated magnox and AGR fuels are largely independent of the physico-chemical forms of the released material, while variations with cooling time of fuel are also discussed. In addition, the special limits imposed by the chemical toxicity of uranium when inhaled in a soluble, low enriched form are briefly outlined

  19. Toxicological perspectives of inhaled therapeutics and nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Amanda J; Bakand, Shahnaz

    2014-07-01

    The human respiratory system is an important route for the entry of inhaled therapeutics into the body to treat diseases. Inhaled materials may consist of gases, vapours, aerosols and particulates. In all cases, assessing the toxicological effect of inhaled therapeutics has many challenges. This article provides an overview of in vivo and in vitro models for testing the toxicity of inhaled therapeutics and nanoparticles implemented in drug delivery. Traditionally, inhalation toxicity has been performed on test animals to identify the median lethal concentration of airborne materials. Later maximum tolerable concentration denoted by LC0 has been introduced as a more ethically acceptable end point. More recently, in vitro methods have been developed, allowing the direct exposure of airborne material to cultured human target cells on permeable porous membranes at the air-liquid interface. Modifications of current inhalation therapies, new pulmonary medications for respiratory diseases and implementation of the respiratory tract for systemic drug delivery are providing new challenges when conducting well-designed inhalation toxicology studies. In particular, the area of nanoparticles and nanocarriers is of critical toxicological concern. There is a need to develop toxicological test models, which characterise the toxic response and cellular interaction between inhaled particles and the respiratory system.

  20. Time- and concentration-dependent genomic responses of the rat airway to inhaled nickel subsulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremenko, A.Y.; Campbell, J.L.; Dodd, D.E.; Oller, A.R.; Clewell, H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To provide insights into the mode of action for Ni 3 S 2 lung carcinogenicity by examining gene expression changes in target cells after inhalation exposure. Methods: Gene expression changes were determined in micro-dissected lung broncho-alveolar cells from Fischer 344 rats following inhalation of Ni 3 S 2 at 0.0, 0.04, 0.08, 0.15, and 0.60 mg/m 3 (0.03, 0.06, 0.11, and 0.44 mg Ni/m 3 ) for one and four weeks (6 h/day, 5 days/week). Results: Broncho-alveolar lavage fluid evaluation and lung histopathology provided evidence of inflammation only at the two highest concentrations, which were similar to those tested in the 2-year bioassay. The number of statistically significant up- and down-regulated genes decreased markedly from one to four weeks of exposure, suggesting adaptation. Cell signal pathway enrichment at both time-points primarily reflected responses to toxicity, including inflammatory and proliferative signaling. While proliferative signaling was up-regulated at both time points, some inflammatory signaling reversed from down-regulation at 1 week to up-regulation at 4 weeks. Conclusions: These results support a mode of action for Ni 3 S 2 carcinogenicity driven by chronic toxicity, inflammation and proliferation, leading to mis-replication, rather than by direct genotoxicity. Benchmark dose (BMD) analysis identified the lowest pathway transcriptional BMD exposure concentration as 0.026 mg Ni/m 3 , for apoptosis/survival signaling. When conducted on the basis of lung Ni concentration the lowest pathway BMD was 0.64 μg Ni/g lung, for immune/inflammatory signaling. Implications: These highly conservative BMDs could be used to derive a point of departure in a nonlinear risk assessment for Ni 3 S 2 toxicity and carcinogenicity. - Highlights: • The mode of action for lung carcinogenicity of inhaled Ni 3 S 2 was investigated in rats. • Gene expression changes were determined in micro-dissected lung tissue at 1–4 weeks. • A non-genotoxic mode

  1. Time- and concentration-dependent genomic responses of the rat airway to inhaled nickel subsulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efremenko, A.Y., E-mail: aefremenko@thehamner.org [The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Campbell, J.L.; Dodd, D.E. [The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Oller, A.R. [NiPERA, Inc., 2525 Meridian Parkway, Suite 240, Durham, NC 27713 (United States); Clewell, H.J. [The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Objective: To provide insights into the mode of action for Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} lung carcinogenicity by examining gene expression changes in target cells after inhalation exposure. Methods: Gene expression changes were determined in micro-dissected lung broncho-alveolar cells from Fischer 344 rats following inhalation of Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} at 0.0, 0.04, 0.08, 0.15, and 0.60 mg/m{sup 3} (0.03, 0.06, 0.11, and 0.44 mg Ni/m{sup 3}) for one and four weeks (6 h/day, 5 days/week). Results: Broncho-alveolar lavage fluid evaluation and lung histopathology provided evidence of inflammation only at the two highest concentrations, which were similar to those tested in the 2-year bioassay. The number of statistically significant up- and down-regulated genes decreased markedly from one to four weeks of exposure, suggesting adaptation. Cell signal pathway enrichment at both time-points primarily reflected responses to toxicity, including inflammatory and proliferative signaling. While proliferative signaling was up-regulated at both time points, some inflammatory signaling reversed from down-regulation at 1 week to up-regulation at 4 weeks. Conclusions: These results support a mode of action for Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} carcinogenicity driven by chronic toxicity, inflammation and proliferation, leading to mis-replication, rather than by direct genotoxicity. Benchmark dose (BMD) analysis identified the lowest pathway transcriptional BMD exposure concentration as 0.026 mg Ni/m{sup 3}, for apoptosis/survival signaling. When conducted on the basis of lung Ni concentration the lowest pathway BMD was 0.64 μg Ni/g lung, for immune/inflammatory signaling. Implications: These highly conservative BMDs could be used to derive a point of departure in a nonlinear risk assessment for Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} toxicity and carcinogenicity. - Highlights: • The mode of action for lung carcinogenicity of inhaled Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} was investigated in rats. • Gene expression changes were determined in micro

  2. An equivalence study comparing nitrous oxide and oxygen with low-dose sevoflurane and oxygen as inhalation sedation agents in dentistry for adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, M; Thompson, S

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether sevoflurane in oxygen was equivalent to near equipotent concentrations of nitrous oxide in oxygen when used as an inhalation sedation agent in terms of patient and user acceptability. Forty anxious dental patients referred to the sedation suite at Cardiff University School of Dentistry received either nitrous oxide to a maximum concentration of 40% or sevoflurane to a maximum concentration of 0.3% for a routine maxillary plastic restoration with articaine infiltration local analgesia. The inhalation sedation agent to be administered was chosen by a random number allocator. Measurements of blood pressure, oxygen saturation, heart rate, respiratory rate and bispectral index were recorded every 5 minutes. At the end of the treatment episode the patient, the operator and an observer who was unaware of the agent used, recorded their impressions about the episode by completing questionnaires. In the doses used in this study, sevoflurane was found to be as effective as an inhalation sedation agent as the standard dose of nitrous oxide used in normal inhalation sedation in the treatment of adult anxious dental patients. Sevoflurane in low concentrations is equivalent in effect to near equipotent concentrations of nitrous oxide. This would suggest that further research, perhaps with slightly higher concentrations of sevoflurane, is needed. If sevoflurane was shown to be acceptable at slightly higher concentrations, there is scope to explore the development of equipment specifically designed to deliver sevoflurane as an inhalation sedation agent in future.

  3. Oxidative stress in a rat model of cotton smoke inhalation-induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Smoke inhalation injury refers to airway and lung parenchyma injury and general chemical damage caused by inhaling toxic gases and substances. The aim of this study was to explore the oxidative stress mechanism of cotton smoke inhalation-induced pulmonary injury in a rat model. Materials and Methods: ...

  4. Concentrations and size distribution of inhalable and respirable dust among sugar industry workers: a pilot study in Khon Kaen, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakunkoo, Pornpun; Chaiear, Naesinee; Chaikittiporn, Chalermchai; Sadhra, Steven

    2011-11-01

    There has been very limited information regarding bagasse exposure among workers in sugar industries as well as on health outcomes. The authors determined the occupational exposure of sugar industry workers in Khon Kaen to airborne bagasse dust. The size of the bagasse dust ranged from 0.08 to 9 µm with the highest size concentration of 2.1 to 4.7 µm. The most common size had a geometric mean diameter of 5.2 µm, with a mass concentration of 6.89 mg/m(3)/log µm. The highest mean values of inhalable and respirable dust were found to be 9.29 mg/m(3) from February to April in bagasse storage, 5.12 mg/m(3) from May to September, and 4.12 mg/m(3) from October to January. Inhalable dust concentrations were 0.33, 0.47, and 0.41 mg/m(3), respectively. Workers are likely to be exposed to high concentrations of bagasse dust and are at risk of respiratory diseases. Preventive measures, both in the form of engineering designs and personal protective devices, should be implemented.

  5. The Advantages of Low-Flow Inhalational Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Torok

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the economical and ecological use of inhalation anesthetics in low-flow anesthesia (LFA, 1—0.5 l/ min and high-flow anesthesia (HFA, more than 2—6 l/min. Four hundred and ninety six inhalational anesthesias lasting at least 80 minutes were analyzed in each group under consideration. The concentration of inhalation anesthetics was measures in the atmosphere of an operative theatre if inhalational anesthesia lasted more than 4 hours. There is evidence for the economical and ecological benefits in the use of LFA in terms of the availability of appropriate anesthesiological equipment, monitoring, and a highly skilled anesthesiologist.

  6. Pharmacokinetics and Bioavailability of Inhaled Esketamine in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonkman, Kelly; Duma, Andreas; Olofsen, Erik; Henthorn, Thomas; van Velzen, Monique; Mooren, René; Siebers, Liesbeth; van den Beukel, Jojanneke; Aarts, Leon; Niesters, Marieke; Dahan, Albert

    2017-10-01

    Esketamine is traditionally administered via intravenous or intramuscular routes. In this study we developed a pharmacokinetic model of inhalation of nebulized esketamine with special emphasis on pulmonary absorption and bioavailability. Three increasing doses of inhaled esketamine (dose escalation from 25 to 100 mg) were applied followed by a single intravenous dose (20 mg) in 19 healthy volunteers using a nebulizer system and arterial concentrations of esketamine and esnorketamine were obtained. A multicompartmental pharmacokinetic model was developed using population nonlinear mixed-effects analyses. The pharmacokinetic model consisted of three esketamine, two esnorketamine disposition and three metabolism compartments. The inhalation data were best described by adding two absorption pathways, an immediate and a slower pathway, with rate constant 0.05 ± 0.01 min (median ± SE of the estimate). The amount of esketamine inhaled was reduced due to dose-independent and dose-dependent reduced bioavailability. The former was 70% ± 5%, and the latter was described by a sigmoid EMAX model characterized by the plasma concentration at which absorption was impaired by 50% (406 ± 46 ng/ml). Over the concentration range tested, up to 50% of inhaled esketamine is lost due to the reduced dose-independent and dose-dependent bioavailability. We successfully modeled the inhalation of nebulized esketamine in healthy volunteers. Nebulized esketamine is inhaled with a substantial reduction in bioavailability. Although the reduction in dose-independent bioavailability is best explained by retention of drug and particle exhalation, the reduction in dose-dependent bioavailability is probably due to sedation-related loss of drug into the air.

  7. Particle exposure and inhaled dose during commuting in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sok Huang; Roth, Matthias; Velasco, Erik

    2017-12-01

    Exposure concentration and inhaled dose of particles during door-to-door trips walking and using motorized transport modes (subway, bus, taxi) are evaluated along a selected route in a commercial district of Singapore. Concentrations of particles smaller than 2.5 μm in size (PM2.5), black carbon, particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, number of particles, active surface area and carbon monoxide have been measured in-situ using portable instruments. Simultaneous measurements were conducted at a nearby park to capture the background concentrations. The heart rate of the participants was monitored during the measurements as a proxy of the inhalation rate used to calculate the inhaled dose of particles. All measured metrics were highest and well above background levels during walking. No significant difference was observed in the exposure concentration of PM2.5 for the three motorized transport modes, unlike for the metrics associated with ultrafine particles (UFP). The concentration of these freshly emitted particles was significantly lower on subway trips. The absence of combustion sources, use of air conditioning and screen doors at station platforms are effective measures to protect passengers' health. For other transport modes, sections of trips close to accelerating and idling vehicles, such as bus stops, traffic junctions and taxi stands, represent hotspots of particles. Reducing the waiting time at such locations will lower pollutants exposure and inhaled dose during a commute. After taking into account the effect of inhalation and travel duration when calculating dose, the health benefit of commuting by subway for this particular district of Singapore became even more evident. For example, pedestrians breathe in 2.6 and 3.2 times more PM2.5 and UFP, respectively than subway commuters. Public buses were the second best alternative. Walking emerged as the worst commuting mode in terms of particle exposure and inhaled dose.

  8. Exposition by inhalation to the formaldehyde in the air. Source, measures and concentrations; Exposition par inhalation au formaldehyde dans l'air. Source, mesures et concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Gratta, F.; Durif, M.; Fagault, Y.; Zdanevitch, I

    2004-12-15

    This document presents the main techniques today available to characterize the formaldehyde concentrations in the air for different contexts: urban and rural areas or around industrial installations but also indoor and occupational area. It provides information to guide laboratories and research departments. A synthesis gives also the main emissions sources of these compounds as reference concentrations measured in different environments. (A.L.B.)

  9. Age of Inhalant First Time Use and Its Association to the Use of Other Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Kele; Chang, G. Andy; Southerland, Ron

    2009-01-01

    Inhalants are the 4th most commonly abused drugs after alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana. Although inhalants are often referred as Gateway Drugs this hypothesis is less examined. Using the 2003 National Survey on Drug Use and Health data, age of first time inhalant use was compared with the age of onset of other drugs among 6466 inhalant users who…

  10. Inhaled Antibiotics for Ventilator-Associated Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Lucy B

    2017-09-01

    Multidrug-resistant organisms are creating a challenge for physicians treating the critically ill. As new antibiotics lag behind the emergence of worsening resistance, intensivists in countries with high rates of extensively drug-resistant bacteria are turning to inhaled antibiotics as adjunctive therapy. These drugs can provide high concentrations of drug in the lung that could not be achieved with intravenous antibiotics without significant systemic toxicity. This article summarizes current evidence describing the use of inhaled antibiotics for the treatment of bacterial ventilator-associated pneumonia and ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis. Preliminary data suggest aerosolized antimicrobials may effectively treat resistant pathogens with high minimum inhibitory concentrations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Variability in dose-equivalent assessments for inhaled U3O8 concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewson, G.; Blyth, D.I.

    1985-01-01

    A potentially significant radiological hazard exists in the packaging area of uranium mills through the inhalation of airborne uranium octoxide (U 3 O 8 ). The Radiation Protection (Mining and Milling Code (1980) requires the measurement and assessment of quarterly, annual and cumulative dose equivalents for employees working in these areas. Arising through differences which exist between the abovementioned Code and ICRP 30, and assumptions of particle size and dust concentration distributions, confusion exists within Australia regarding the methods which can be used to make the required assessments. Exposure data were collected during routine monitoring at an operating mill facility and were interpreted using different methods and a range of assumptions. Results indicated the dust at this facility is characterised by an AMAD greater than 10 μ, and dust concentrations were distributed lognormally. Assumptions of a normal distribution may result in an overestimate of the dose equivalent. The importance of particle size in dose assessments using ICRP 30 techniques was highlighted. Information was masked when employee data was grouped to provide work category dose assessments. The use of ICRP 30 methods were recommended to provide uniformity throughout Australia

  12. Objective measurement of inhaler inhalation flow profile using acoustic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacalle, H.; Taylor, T.E.; Marco, S.; Reilly, R.B.

    2016-07-01

    Patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) are mostly treated with inhalers that deliver medication directly to their airways. Drug delivery from dry powder inhalers (DPIs) is very much reliant on the inhalation manoeuvre, specifically the peak inspiratory flow rate (PIFR), inspiratory capacity (IC) and inhalation rise time (IRT) of the inhalation. It has been widely reported that patients may not follow correct inhalation technique while using their inhaler. In this study, a novel acoustic method is proposed to accurately estimate inhalation flow profile using only one inhalation recording for calibration. An Ellipta DPI was placed inside an airtight container with a spirometer connected in order to measure inhalation flow parameters. An acoustic recording device (Inhaler Compliance Assessment (INCA)) was also attached to the DPI. Inhalation audio and flow signals were recorded simultaneously. The data were collected from 20 healthy subjects while performing inhaler inhalations at a range of inspiratory flow rates. A power law regression model was computed to obtain the relationship between the acoustic envelope of the inhalation and flow profile of each recording. Each model was tested on the remaining audio signals to estimate flow profile. The average estimation error was found to be 10.5±0.3% for estimating flow profile from audio signals. Inhalation flow profile parameters (PIFR, IC and IRT) could then be measured from the estimated flow profile with high accuracy giving information on user inhalation technique. This method may assist in improving patient inhaler adherence and overall disease control. (Author)

  13. Lung deposition of inhaled drugs increases with age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Onhøj, J; Thorsson, L; Bisgaard, H

    2000-01-01

    Budesonide plasma concentrations after inhalation of a fixed dose of the drug from a pressurized metered dose inhaler (pMDI) with spacer (Nebuchamber) were compared in young children and adults: 26 patients with mild asthma comprising 8 children 2-3 yr, 8 children 4-6 yr, and 10 adults 20-41 yr...

  14. Treatment outcomes of using inhalation sedation for comprehensive dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madouh, M; BaniHani, A; Tahmassebi, J F

    2018-02-01

    To assess the outcomes of dental treatment under inhalation sedation within a UK specialist hospital setting. This was a retrospective cohort study of the case notes of patients under 17 years of age who received dental treatment using inhalation sedation at a UK specialist setting during the period 2006-2011. Treatment outcomes were categorised into five groups: (1) treatment completed as planned, (2) modified treatment completed, (3) treatment abandoned in sedation unit and patient referred for treatment under general analgesia (GA), (4) treatment abandoned in sedation unit and patient referred for treatment under local analgesia (LA), (5) child failed to return to complete treatment. In total, the case notes of 453 patients were evaluated. The mean age of the patients was 10.3 ± 2.9 years. Treatment was completed successfully in 63.6% of the cases, 15.9% were referred for treatment under GA, 11.2% failed to return to complete the treatment, 7.1% received modified treatment completed, and only 2.2% were referred for treatment under LA. Treatment outcomes were significantly associated with patient`s age (p = 0.002). The treatment outcome "treatment abandoned and child referred to be treated under GA" had significantly lower mean patient ages than the other outcomes. The majority of children referred for inhalation sedation, completed their course of treatment. A significantly higher proportion of those in the younger age group required GA to complete their treatment.

  15. Difference in pulmonary absorption of inhaled terbutaline in healthy smokers and non-smokers.

    OpenAIRE

    Schmekel, B; Borgström, L; Wollmer, P

    1991-01-01

    Pathophysiological studies have shown that the alveolocapillary transfer of small solutes is much faster in healthy smokers than in non-smokers. The effects of smoking on the pulmonary absorption of inhaled terbutaline were examined in normal subjects. Nine healthy smokers and 13 healthy non-smokers inhaled nebulised terbutaline and dry terbutaline powder on two study days. Plasma concentrations of terbutaline were measured up to 240 minutes after the inhalation. The plasma concentration of t...

  16. Mimicking exposures to acute and lifetime concentrations of inhaled silver nanoparticles by two different in vitro approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Herzog

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the emerging market of nano-sized products, silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs are widely used due to their antimicrobial properties. Human interaction with Ag NPs can occur through the lung, skin, gastrointestinal tract, and bloodstream. However, the inhalation of Ag NP aerosols is a primary concern. To study the possible effects of inhaled Ag NPs, an in vitro triple cell co-culture model of the human alveolar/airway barrier (A549 epithelial cells, human peripheral blood monocyte derived dendritic and macrophage cells together with an air–liquid interface cell exposure (ALICE system was used in order to reflect a real-life exposure scenario. Cells were exposed at the air–liquid interface (ALI to 0.03, 0.3, and 3 µg Ag/cm2 of Ag NPs (diameter 100 nm; coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone: PVP. Ag NPs were found to be highly aggregated within ALI exposed cells with no impairment of cell morphology. Furthermore, a significant increase in release of cytotoxic (LDH, oxidative stress (SOD-1, HMOX-1 or pro-inflammatory markers (TNF-α, IL-8 was absent. As a comparison, cells were exposed to Ag NPs in submerged conditions to 10, 20, and 30 µg Ag/mL. The deposited dose per surface area was estimated by using a dosimetry model (ISDD to directly compare submerged vs ALI exposure concentrations after 4 and 24 h. Unlike ALI exposures, the two highest concentrations under submerged conditions promoted a cytotoxic and pro-inflammatory response after 24 h. Interestingly, when cell cultures were co-incubated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, no synergistic inflammatory effects were observed. By using two different exposure scenarios it has been shown that the ALI as well as the suspension conditions for the lower concentrations after 4 h, reflecting real-life concentrations of an acute 24 h exposure, did not induce any adverse effects in a complex 3D model mimicking the human alveolar/airway barrier. However, the highest concentrations used in the ALI setup, as well

  17. Whole-body nanoparticle aerosol inhalation exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jinghai; Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Frazer, Dave; Castranova, Vince; McBride, Carroll; Knuckles, Travis L; Stapleton, Phoebe A; Minarchick, Valerie C; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R

    2013-05-07

    Inhalation is the most likely exposure route for individuals working with aerosolizable engineered nano-materials (ENM). To properly perform nanoparticle inhalation toxicology studies, the aerosols in a chamber housing the experimental animals must have: 1) a steady concentration maintained at a desired level for the entire exposure period; 2) a homogenous composition free of contaminants; and 3) a stable size distribution with a geometric mean diameter generation of aerosols containing nanoparticles is quite challenging because nanoparticles easily agglomerate. This is largely due to very strong inter-particle forces and the formation of large fractal structures in tens or hundreds of microns in size (6), which are difficult to be broken up. Several common aerosol generators, including nebulizers, fluidized beds, Venturi aspirators and the Wright dust feed, were tested; however, none were able to produce nanoparticle aerosols which satisfy all criteria (5). A whole-body nanoparticle aerosol inhalation exposure system was fabricated, validated and utilized for nano-TiO2 inhalation toxicology studies. Critical components: 1) novel nano-TiO2 aerosol generator; 2) 0.5 m(3) whole-body inhalation exposure chamber; and 3) monitor and control system. Nano-TiO2 aerosols generated from bulk dry nano-TiO2 powders (primary diameter of 21 nm, bulk density of 3.8 g/cm(3)) were delivered into the exposure chamber at a flow rate of 90 LPM (10.8 air changes/hr). Particle size distribution and mass concentration profiles were measured continuously with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), and an electric low pressure impactor (ELPI). The aerosol mass concentration (C) was verified gravimetrically (mg/m(3)). The mass (M) of the collected particles was determined as M = (Mpost-Mpre), where Mpre and Mpost are masses of the filter before and after sampling (mg). The mass concentration was calculated as C = M/(Q*t), where Q is sampling flowrate (m(3)/min), and t is the sampling

  18. Algorithm for calculating an availability factor for the inhalation of radioactive and chemical materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-02-01

    This report presents a method of calculating the availability of buried radioactive and nonradioactive materials via an inhalation pathway. Availability is the relationship between the concentration of a substance in the soil and the dose rate to a human receptor. Algorithms presented for calculating availabiliy of elemental inorganic substances are based on atmospheric enrichment factors; those presented for calculating availability of organic substances are based on vapor pressures. The basis, use, and limitations of the developed equations are discussed. 32 references, 5 tables

  19. Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Rautenstrauch

    2004-09-10

    This analysis is one of 10 reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN) biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. This report documents development of input parameters for the biosphere model that are related to atmospheric mass loading and supports the use of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for a Yucca Mountain repository. Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model is one of five reports that develop input parameters for the biosphere model. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling, and the plan for development of the biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]). This analysis report defines and justifies values of mass loading for the biosphere model. Mass loading is the total mass concentration of resuspended particles (e.g., dust, ash) in a volume of air. Mass loading values are used in the air submodel of ERMYN to calculate concentrations of radionuclides in air inhaled by a receptor and concentrations in air surrounding crops. Concentrations in air to which the receptor is exposed are then used in the inhalation submodel to calculate the dose contribution to the receptor from inhalation of contaminated airborne particles. Concentrations in air surrounding plants are used in the plant submodel to calculate the concentrations of radionuclides in foodstuffs contributed from uptake by foliar interception.

  20. Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. Rautenstrauch

    2004-01-01

    This analysis is one of 10 reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN) biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. This report documents development of input parameters for the biosphere model that are related to atmospheric mass loading and supports the use of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for a Yucca Mountain repository. Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model is one of five reports that develop input parameters for the biosphere model. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling, and the plan for development of the biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]). This analysis report defines and justifies values of mass loading for the biosphere model. Mass loading is the total mass concentration of resuspended particles (e.g., dust, ash) in a volume of air. Mass loading values are used in the air submodel of ERMYN to calculate concentrations of radionuclides in air inhaled by a receptor and concentrations in air surrounding crops. Concentrations in air to which the receptor is exposed are then used in the inhalation submodel to calculate the dose contribution to the receptor from inhalation of contaminated airborne particles. Concentrations in air surrounding plants are used in the plant submodel to calculate the concentrations of radionuclides in foodstuffs contributed from uptake by foliar interception

  1. Anesthetic Overdose Leading to Cardiac Arrest Diagnosed by End-Tidal Inhalant Concentration Analysis in a Dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Hofmeister

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 5-year-old male-castrated Cocker Spaniel presented to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital of the University of Georgia for a total ear canal ablation. Premedication was with carprofen 2.2 mg/kg SQ, hydromorphone 0.1 mg/kg IM, diazepam 0.2 mg/kg IM, and glycopyrrolate 0.01 mg/kg IM. The patient was induced with lidocaine 2 mg/kg IV and etomidate 1 mg/kg IV and maintained with sevoflurane and a constant rate infusion consisting of lidocaine 0.05 mg/kg/min. Before surgery start, the patient’s systolic arterial blood pressure was 110 mmHg, heart rate (HR was 85 beats/min, respiratory rate was 8 breaths/min, end-tidal sevoflurane concentration was 3.2%, and end-tidal CO2 (ETCO2 was 23 mmHg. As a scrub was being performed, the patient’s HR abruptly dropped to 20 beats/min over the course of 2 minutes. His ETCO2 simultaneously decreased to 16 mmHg. At this time, cardiopulmonary arrest was diagnosed. After two minutes of resuscitation, a spontaneous heart beat was obtained and the patient was successfully recovered and discharged without further incident. The cardiac arrest in this case is most likely attributable to an overdose of inhalant anesthesia, which was diagnosed by an anesthetic inhalant concentration monitor. A gas analyzer may be a helpful contribution to the small animal practitioner, particularly those performing more lengthy or complex procedures.

  2. Health Risk Assessment of Inhalation Exposure to Formaldehyde and Benzene in Newly Remodeled Buildings, Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lihui; Mo, Jinhan; Sundell, Jan; Fan, Zhihua; Zhang, Yinping

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess health risks associated with inhalation exposure to formaldehyde and benzene mainly emitted from building and decoration materials in newly remodeled indoor spaces in Beijing. Methods We tested the formaldehyde and benzene concentrations in indoor air of 410 dwellings and 451 offices remodeled within the past year, in which the occupants had health concerns about indoor air quality. To assess non-carcinogenic health risks, we compared the data to the health guidelines in China and USA, respectively. To assess carcinogenic health risks, we first modeled indoor personal exposure to formaldehyde and benzene using the concentration data, and then estimated the associated cancer risks by multiplying the indoor personal exposure by the Inhalation Unit Risk values (IURs) provided by the U.S. EPA Integrated Risk Information System (U.S. EPA IRIS) and the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA), respectively. Results (1) The indoor formaldehyde concentrations of 85% dwellings and 67% offices were above the acute Reference Exposure Level (REL) recommended by the OEHHA and the concentrations of all tested buildings were above the chronic REL recommended by the OEHHA; (2) The indoor benzene concentrations of 12% dwellings and 32% offices exceeded the reference concentration (RfC) recommended by the U.S. EPA IRIS; (3) The median cancer risks from indoor exposure to formaldehyde and benzene were 1,150 and 106 per million (based on U.S. EPA IRIS IURs), 531 and 394 per million (based on OEHHA IURs). Conclusions In the tested buildings, formaldehyde exposure may pose acute and chronic non-carcinogenic health risks to the occupants, whereas benzene exposure may pose chronic non-carcinogenic risks to the occupants. Exposure to both compounds is associated with significant carcinogenic risks. Improvement in ventilation, establishment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emission labeling systems for decorating and refurbishing materials

  3. Inhalation exposure of children to fragrances present in scented toys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuck, I; Hutzler, C; Jann, O; Luch, A

    2011-12-01

    When utilized in the perfuming of children's toys, fragrances capable of inducing contact allergy in human skin may also become bioavailable to children via the inhalation route. The aim of this study was to determine the area-specific emission rates of 24 fragrances from a plasticized PVC reference material that was meant to mimic a real plastic toy. This material was introduced into an emission chamber for 28 days at handling conditions or at worst-case conditions. As a result, fragrances can be separated into three categories according to their emission rates ranging from 0.0041 to 16.2 mg/m² × h, i.e., highly volatile, semivolatile, and low-volatile compounds. Compounds of the first and second categories were monitored with decreasing emission rates. Substances of the third category were detected with increasing emission rates over time. Further, higher temperatures led to higher emission rates. The emission concentration of fragrances from four real scented toys varied between 1.10 and 107 μg/m³ at day 1 in the test chamber. Therefore, short-term inhalation exposure to fragrances originating from toys was in the range of 0.53-2700 ng/kg BW/d for the children of age 1 and older. Long-term exposure to these fragrances was calculated in the range of 2.2-220 ng/kg BW/d. Besides household products and cosmetics, fragrances can be found in toys for children. Some fragrances are known contact allergens in the skin, but there is a lack of information on their effects in the human respiratory tract. Here, we analyzed and categorized fragrances present in a plasticized PVC reference material according to their emission profiles and volatility. We also demonstrate that volatile fragrances are being emitted from real toys and thus may get inhaled under consumer conditions to different extents. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Inhaled 239PuO2 in rats with pulmonary emphysema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundgren, D.L.; Mauderly, J.L.; Hahn, F.F.

    1984-01-01

    The modifying effects of a pre-existing lung disease (emphysema) on the deposition, distribution, retention, and effects of inhaled 239 PuO 2 in the rat are being investigated. Preliminary observations indicated that the deposition and retention patterns for 239 Pu particles inhaled by rats with emphysema and control rats were similar, but the distribution of inhaled 239 Pu immediately after exposure was different. Respiratory function measured through one year after exposure to 239 Pu was consistent with emphysema and was not altered by the 239 Pu lung burden. Long-term observations are continuing. 4 references, 2 tables

  5. Accurate determination of brain metabolite concentrations using ERETIC as external reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoelch, Niklaus; Hock, Andreas; Heinzer-Schweizer, Susanne; Avdievitch, Nikolai; Henning, Anke

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) can provide in vivo metabolite concentrations in standard concentration units if a reliable reference signal is available. For 1 H MRS in the human brain, typically the signal from the tissue water is used as the (internal) reference signal. However, a concentration determination based on the tissue water signal most often requires a reliable estimate of the water concentration present in the investigated tissue. Especially in clinically interesting cases, this estimation might be difficult. To avoid assumptions about the water in the investigated tissue, the Electric REference To access In vivo Concentrations (ERETIC) method has been proposed. In this approach, the metabolite signal is compared with a reference signal acquired in a phantom and potential coil-loading differences are corrected using a synthetic reference signal. The aim of this study, conducted with a transceiver quadrature head coil, was to increase the accuracy of the ERETIC method by correcting the influence of spatial B 1 inhomogeneities and to simplify the quantification with ERETIC by incorporating an automatic phase correction for the ERETIC signal. Transmit field ( B1+) differences are minimized with a volume-selective power optimization, whereas reception sensitivity changes are corrected using contrast-minimized images of the brain and by adapting the voxel location in the phantom measurement closely to the position measured in vivo. By applying the proposed B 1 correction scheme, the mean metabolite concentrations determined with ERETIC in 21 healthy subjects at three different positions agree with concentrations derived with the tissue water signal as reference. In addition, brain water concentrations determined with ERETIC were in agreement with estimations derived using tissue segmentation and literature values for relative water densities. Based on the results, the ERETIC method presented here is a valid tool to derive in vivo metabolite

  6. Experimental study of inhalation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamamoto, Junji; Ohura, Takehiko; Yoshida, Tetsunori; Ono, Ichiro; Iida, Kazunori; Ooiwa, Akira

    1984-01-01

    We conducted the following inhalation injury experiment on dogs. A hose was connected to the chimney of a stove so that wood smoke could be led to the dog by means of damper adjustment. Under intravenous anesthesia, the dog was intubated and made to inhale the wood smoke for from 5 to 10 minutes at a smoke temperature of between 55 and 60 C. After this inhalation, observation of trachea by a fiberoptic bronchoscopy was done and blood gas change, blood analysis, serum electrolytes and cardiac output were observed with a passage of time. Furthermore, we did lung scan using 133xe and performed autopsies. We injected 0.3 microcurie of 133Xe per 1 kg body weight in its vein of the dog's foreleg. The concentration in the lung reached maximum 20 seconds after the injection and then washed out with expiration. In the control experiment with a normal dog, it was almost all washed out 70 seconds after the 133Xe injection. But the delay of wash out time was observed in smoke inhaled dogs. In other words it can be said that the wash out time was dependent on the degree of injury. When these data were processed by a computer, and exponential approximation decay curve was obtained. Then these data were replotted into semi-logarithmic chart and a linear line was obtained. One may interprete the clearance rate recorded on the graph as the ability of the lung to wash out 133Xe, that is, the degree of injury of the lung. The clearance rate had a tendancy to concentrate between 3.5 to 5.0 when observed 2 to 7 hours after the injury. However when observed 20 to 27 hours, concentration was between 2.4 to 3.2. Furthermore, the clearance rate for each lung regions were obtained and compared with one another by means of proper computer program. The clearance rate had lower values at lower region of lung, that is, deterioration of lung function was greater. (J.P.N.)

  7. Is the 'blue' colour convention for inhaled reliever medications important? A UK-based survey of healthcare professionals and patients with airways disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Monica; Scullion, Jane; White, John; Thompson, Bronwen; Capstick, Toby

    2016-11-03

    In many countries, short-acting β 2 -agonist inhalers have traditionally been coloured blue. This inhaled therapy has also conventionally been known as a 'reliever' by patients and healthcare professionals (HCPs), in comparison with 'preventer' medications (inhaled steroids). With the rapidly changing market in inhaled therapy for COPD and asthma and growing numbers of devices, there has been some concern that the erosion of traditional colour conventions is leading to patients (and HCPs) becoming confused about the role of different therapies. In order to assess whether there was concern over the perceived changing colour conventions, the UK Inhaler Group carried out a large online survey of patients and HCPs. The aim was to determine how patients and HCPS identify and describe inhaled drugs, and how this might impact on use of medicines and safety. The results of the survey highlighted the importance of the term 'blue inhaler' for patients with only 11.3% never referring to the colour when referring to their inhaler. For HCPs, 95% felt colour conventions were important when referring to reliever medication. In addition, HCPs appear to refer to inhalers mainly by colour when talking to patients. Our conclusions were that the concept of a 'blue inhaler' remains important to patients and healthcare professionals. These results add to the debate about the need to formalise the colour coding of inhaled therapies, in particular using the colour blue for inhalers for rapid relief of symptoms, as this convention may be an important measure and contributor to patient safety. Our survey should provide impetus for all interested parties to discuss and agree a formal industry-wide approach to colour coding of inhaled therapies for the benefit of patients and carers and HCPs.

  8. Inhaled Steroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... considerations when your dosage changes. What about side effects and inhaled steroids? The most common side effects with inhaled steroids ... inhaled steroid has much less potential for side effects than steroid pills or syrups. There have been concerns regarding ...

  9. Inhalant Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is when you pour the product into a bag, hold it over your mouth and nose, and inhale. How is inhalant abuse diagnosed? If you think your child is abusing inhalants, talk to them. Be honest and open. Tell them ...

  10. Basic study on positive effects of radon inhalation on pet's health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Takahiro; Sakoda, Akihiro; Kawabe, Atsushi; Hanamoto, Katsumi; Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Tokunaga, Rikizo

    2012-01-01

    Radon inhalation using our radon exposure device activated anti-oxidative function in some organs of mouse. To assess the possibility of its application to veterinary care, healthy dogs and cats with chronic renal failure were inhaled radon at a concentration of 5500 Bq/m 3 for 30 minutes every 2 days for 30 days. In result, radon inhalation within a relatively long time period significantly decreased the triglyceride level of dogs. On the other hand, some cats increased the volume of drinking water by radon inhalation and the creatinine level in blood of these cats was decreased to normal level. These findings suggest that radon inhalation may have curative properties against chronic renal failure. (author)

  11. Development of a Zealand white rabbit deposition model to study inhalation anthrax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asgharian, Bahman; Price, Owen; Kabilan, Senthil; Jacob, Richard E.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Corley, Richard A.

    2016-01-28

    Despite using rabbits in several inhalation exposure experiments to study diseases such as anthrax, there is a lack of understanding regarding deposition characteristics and fate of inhaled particles (bio-aerosols and viruses) in the respiratory tracts of rabbits. Such information allows dosimetric extrapolation to humans to inform human outcomes. The lung geometry of the New Zealand white rabbit (referred to simply as rabbits throughout the article) was constructed using recently acquired scanned images of the conducting airways of rabbits and available information on its acinar region. In addition, functional relationships were developed for the lung and breathing parameters of rabbits as a function of body weight. The lung geometry and breathing parameters were used to extend the existing deposition model for humans and several other species to rabbits. Evaluation of the deposition model for rabbits was made by comparing predictions with available measurements in the literature. Deposition predictions in the lungs of rabbits indicated smaller deposition fractions compared to those found in humans across various particle diameter ranges. The application of the deposition model for rabbits was demonstrated by extrapolating deposition predictions in rabbits to find equivalent human exposure concentrations assuming the same dose-response relationship between the two species. Human equivalent exposure concentration levels were found to be much smaller than those for rabbits.

  12. Potential consequences of yellowcake inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eidson, A.F.; Damon, E.G.; Hahn, F.F.; Pickrell, J.A.; Muggenburg, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    The uranium ore milling process includes dusty operations and workers can be exposed to aerosols of highly concentrated uranium. Measurements made during uranium milling operations were used to predict that, if a worker was not wearing respiratory protection, 0.14-50 μg U/min might be deposited in the respiratory tract, predominantly in the nesopharyngeal compartment. Yellowcake was shown by infrared and solubility measurements to be a highly variable mixture of ammonium diuranate and U 3 O 8 . Biokinetic studies of inhaled yellowcake in beagle dogs showed that the more soluble fraction caused kidney damage. After inhalation of 0.5 mg U/kg body wt of soluble uranium, kidney concentration was 0.3 to 3.5 μg U/g kidney within 4-8 days; and was accompanied by kidney damage. Kidney damage was neither severe nor widespread, and was repaired within 64 days after exposure. The damage seen is due to heavy metal nephrotoxicity of uranium, and not to radiation damage

  13. Exposure to inhalable, respirable, and ultrafine particles in welding fume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Martin; Pesch, Beate; Lotz, Anne; Pelzer, Johannes; Kendzia, Benjamin; Gawrych, Katarzyna; Heinze, Evelyn; Van Gelder, Rainer; Punkenburg, Ewald; Weiss, Tobias; Mattenklott, Markus; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Möhlmann, Carsten; Berges, Markus; Hartwig, Andrea; Brüning, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    This investigation aims to explore determinants of exposure to particle size-specific welding fume. Area sampling of ultrafine particles (UFP) was performed at 33 worksites in parallel with the collection of respirable particles. Personal sampling of respirable and inhalable particles was carried out in the breathing zone of 241 welders. Median mass concentrations were 2.48 mg m(-3) for inhalable and 1.29 mg m(-3) for respirable particles when excluding 26 users of powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs). Mass concentrations were highest when flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) with gas was applied (median of inhalable particles: 11.6 mg m(-3)). Measurements of particles were frequently below the limit of detection (LOD), especially inside PAPRs or during tungsten inert gas welding (TIG). However, TIG generated a high number of small particles, including UFP. We imputed measurements welding fume. Concentrations were mainly predicted by the welding process and were significantly higher when local exhaust ventilation (LEV) was inefficient or when welding was performed in confined spaces. Substitution of high-emission techniques like FCAW, efficient LEV, and using PAPRs where applicable can reduce exposure to welding fume. However, harmonizing the different exposure metrics for UFP (as particle counts) and for the respirable or inhalable fraction of the welding fume (expressed as their mass) remains challenging.

  14. Appropriate xenon-inhalation time in xenon-enhanced CT using the end-tidal gas-sampling method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asada, Hideo; Furuhata, Shigeru; Onozuka, Satoshi; Uchida, Koichi; Fujii, Koji; Suga, Sadao; Kawase, Takeshi; Toya, Shigeo; Shiga, Hayao

    1988-12-01

    For the end-tidal gas-sampling method of xenon-enhanced CT (Xe-CT), the respective functional images of K, lambda, and the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were studied and compared using the data at 7-, 10-, 15- and 25-minute inhalations. The most appropriate inhalation time of xenon gas was evaluated in 14 clinical cases. An end-tidal xenon curve which represents the arterial xenon concentration was monitored with a xenon analyzer; the xenon concentration was gradually increased to a level of 50% by using a xenon inhalator with a closed circuit to prevent the overestimation of the xenon concentration sampled from the mask. Serial CT scans were taken over a period of 25 minutes of inhalation. The functional images of K, lambda, and rCBF were calculated for serial CT scans for 7, 10, 15 and 25 minutes using Fick's equation. Those various images and absolute values were then compared. The rCBF value of a 15-minute inhalation was approximately 15% greater than that of 25 minutes, while the values of K, lambda, rCBF from a 15-minute inhalation were significantly correlated to those from 25 minutes. The regression line made it possible to estimate 25-minute inhalation values from those of 15 minutes. In imaging, the rCBF mapping of the 15-minute inhalation was found to be more reliable than that of 25 minutes. This study suggests that the minimal time of xenon inhalation is 15 minutes for the end-tidal gas-sampling method. A longer inhalation may be necessary for the estimation of rCBF in the low-flow area, such as the white matter or the pathological region.

  15. Reference values of urinary trans,trans-muconic acid: Italian Multicentric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprea, C; Sciarra, G; Bozzi, N; Pagliantini, M; Perico, A; Bavazzano, P; Leandri, A; Carrieri, M; Scapellato, M L; Bettinelli, M; Bartolucci, G B

    2008-08-01

    This article reports the results of a study, conducted in the framework of the scientific activities of the Italian Society for Reference Values, aimed at defining reference values of urinary trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA) in the general population not occupationally exposed to benzene. t,t-MA concentrations detected in 376 subjects of the resident population in three areas of Italy, two in central (Florence and southern Tuscany) and one in northern Italy (Padua), by three laboratories, compared by repeated interlaboratory controls, showed an interval of 14.4-225.0 microg/L (5th-95th percentile) and a geometric mean of 52.5 microg/L. The concentrations measured were influenced by tobacco smoking in a statistically significant way: Geometric mean concentrations were 44.8 microg/L and 76.1 microg/Ll in nonsmokers (264 subjects) and smokers (112 subjects), respectively. In the nonsmoking population, a significant influence of gender was found when concentrations were corrected for urinary creatinine, geometric mean concentrations being 36.7 microg/g creatinine in males (128 subjects) and 44.7 microg/g creatinine in females (136 subjects). The place of residence of subjects did not seem to influence urinary excretion of the metabolite, although personal inhalation exposure to benzene over a 24-h period showed slightly higher concentrations in Padua and Florence (geometric means of 6.5 microg/m(3) and 6.6 microg/m(3), respectively) than in southern Tuscany (geometric mean of 3.9 microg/m(3)). Concentration of t,t-MA in urine samples collected at the end of personal air sampling showed little relationship to personal inhalation exposure to benzene, confirming the importance of other factors in determining excretion of t,t-MA when concentrations in personal air samples are very low.

  16. Assessing inhalation injury in the emergency room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanizaki S

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Shinsuke Tanizaki Department of Emergency Medicine, Fukui Prefectural Hospital, Fukui, Japan Abstract: Respiratory tract injuries caused by inhalation of smoke or chemical products are related to significant morbidity and mortality. While many strategies have been built up to manage cutaneous burn injuries, few logical diagnostic strategies for patients with inhalation injuries exist and almost all treatment is supportive. The goals of initial management are to ensure that the airway allows adequate oxygenation and ventilation and to avoid ventilator-induced lung injury and substances that may complicate subsequent care. Intubation should be considered if any of the following signs exist: respiratory distress, stridor, hypoventilation, use of accessory respiratory muscles, blistering or edema of the oropharynx, or deep burns to the face or neck. Any patients suspected to have inhalation injuries should receive a high concentration of supplemental oxygen to quickly reverse hypoxia and to displace carbon monoxide from protein binding sites. Management of carbon monoxide and cyanide exposure in smoke inhalation patients remains controversial. Absolute indications for hyperbaric oxygen therapy do not exist because there is a low correlation between carboxyhemoglobin levels and the severity of the clinical state. A cyanide antidote should be administered when cyanide poisoning is clinically suspected. Although an ideal approach for respiratory support of patients with inhalation injuries do not exist, it is important that they are supported using techniques that do not further exacerbate respiratory failure. A well-organized strategy for patients with inhalation injury is critical to reduce morbidity and mortality. Keywords: inhalation injury, burn, carbon monoxide poisoning, cyanide poisoning

  17. Dose-Dependent Protective Effect of Inhalational Anesthetics Against Postoperative Respiratory Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grabitz, Stephanie D; Farhan, Hassan N; Ruscic, Katarina J

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Inhalational anesthetics are bronchodilators with immunomodulatory effects. We sought to determine the effect of inhalational anesthetic dose on risk of severe postoperative respiratory complications. DESIGN: Prospective analysis of data on file in surgical cases between January 2007...... with endotracheal intubation. INTERVENTIONS: Median effective dose equivalent of inhalational anesthetics during surgery (derived from mean end-tidal inhalational anesthetic concentrations). MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Postoperative respiratory complications occurred in 6,979 of 124,497 cases (5.61%). High...... inhalational anesthetic dose of 1.20 (1.13-1.30) (median [interquartile range])-fold median effective dose equivalent versus 0.57 (0.45-0.64)-fold median effective dose equivalent was associated with lower odds of postoperative respiratory complications (odds ratio, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.53-0.65; p

  18. Systemic delivery of atropine sulfate by the MicroDose Dry-Powder Inhaler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, T E; Venkataramanan, R; Hoffman, R M; George, M P; Petrov, A; Richards, T; Zhang, S; Choi, J; Gao, Y Y; Oakum, C D; Cook, R O; Donahoe, M

    2013-02-01

    Inhaled atropine is being developed as a systemic and pulmonary treatment for the extended recovery period after chemical weapons exposure. We performed a pharmacokinetics study comparing inhaled atropine delivery using the MicroDose Therapeutx Dry Powder Inhaler (DPIA) with intramuscular (IM) atropine delivery via auto-injector (AUTO). The MicroDose DPIA utilizes a novel piezoelectric system to aerosolize drug and excipient from a foil dosing blister. Subjects inhaled a 1.95-mg atropine sulfate dose from the dry powder inhaler on one study day [5 doses × 0.4 mg per dose (nominal) delivered over 12 min] and received a 2-mg IM injection via the AtroPen® auto-injector on another. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamic response, and safety were studied for 12 hr. A total of 17 subjects were enrolled. All subjects completed IM dosing. One subject did not perform inhaled delivery due to a skin reaction from the IM dose. Pharmacokinetic results were as follows: area under the curve concentration, DPIA=20.1±5.8, AUTO=23.7±4.9 ng hr/mL (means±SD); maximum concentration reached, DPIA=7.7±3.5, AUTO=11.0±3.8 ng/mL; time to reach maximum concentration, DPIA=0.25±0.47, AUTO=0.19±0.23 hr. Pharmacodynamic results were as follows: maximum increase in heart rate, DPIA=18±12, AUTO=23±13 beats/min; average change in 1-sec forced expiratory volume at 30 min, DPIA=0.16±0.22 L, AUTO=0.11±0.29 L. The relative bioavailability for DPIA was 87% (based on output dose). Two subjects demonstrated allergic responses: one to the first dose (AUTO), which was mild and transient, and one to the second dose (DPIA), which was moderate in severity, required treatment with oral and intravenous (IV) diphenhydramine and IV steroids, and lasted more than 7 days. Dry powder inhalation is a highly bioavailable route for attaining rapid and consistent systemic concentrations of atropine.

  19. Predictive role of arterial carboxyhemoglobin concentrations in ovine burn and smoke inhalation-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Matthias; Cox, Robert A; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Whorton, Elbert B; Nakano, Yoshimitsu; Hamahata, Atsumori; Jonkam, Collette; Esechie, Aimalohi; von Borzyskowski, Sanna; Traber, Lillian D; Traber, Daniel L

    2011-05-01

    Inhalation injury frequently occurs in burn patients and contributes to the morbidity and mortality of these injuries. Arterial carboxyhemoglobin has been proposed as an indicator of the severity of inhalation injury; however, the interrelation between arterial carboxyhemoglobin and histological alterations has not yet been investigated. Chronically instrumented sheep were subjected to a third degree burn of 40% of the total body surface area and inhalation of 48 breaths of cotton smoke. Carboxyhemoglobin was measured immediately after injury and correlated to clinical parameters of pulmonary function as well as histopathology scores from lung tissue harvested 24 hours after the injury. The injury was associated with a significant decline in pulmonary oxygenation and increases in pulmonary shunting, lung lymph flow, wet/dry weight ratio, congestion score, edema score, inflammation score, and airway obstruction scores. Carboxyhemoglobin was negatively correlated to pulmonary oxygenation and positively correlated to pulmonary shunting, lung lymph flow, and lung wet/dry weight ratio. No significant correlations could be detected between carboxyhemoglobin and histopathology scores and airway obstruction scores. Arterial carboxyhemoglobin in sheep with combined burn and inhalation injury are correlated with the degree of pulmonary failure and edema formation, but not with certain histological alterations including airway obstruction scores.

  20. Estimation of inhalation flow profile using audio-based methods to assess inhaler medication adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacalle Muls, Helena; Costello, Richard W.; Reilly, Richard B.

    2018-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients are required to inhale forcefully and deeply to receive medication when using a dry powder inhaler (DPI). There is a clinical need to objectively monitor the inhalation flow profile of DPIs in order to remotely monitor patient inhalation technique. Audio-based methods have been previously employed to accurately estimate flow parameters such as the peak inspiratory flow rate of inhalations, however, these methods required multiple calibration inhalation audio recordings. In this study, an audio-based method is presented that accurately estimates inhalation flow profile using only one calibration inhalation audio recording. Twenty healthy participants were asked to perform 15 inhalations through a placebo Ellipta™ DPI at a range of inspiratory flow rates. Inhalation flow signals were recorded using a pneumotachograph spirometer while inhalation audio signals were recorded simultaneously using the Inhaler Compliance Assessment device attached to the inhaler. The acoustic (amplitude) envelope was estimated from each inhalation audio signal. Using only one recording, linear and power law regression models were employed to determine which model best described the relationship between the inhalation acoustic envelope and flow signal. Each model was then employed to estimate the flow signals of the remaining 14 inhalation audio recordings. This process repeated until each of the 15 recordings were employed to calibrate single models while testing on the remaining 14 recordings. It was observed that power law models generated the highest average flow estimation accuracy across all participants (90.89±0.9% for power law models and 76.63±2.38% for linear models). The method also generated sufficient accuracy in estimating inhalation parameters such as peak inspiratory flow rate and inspiratory capacity within the presence of noise. Estimating inhaler inhalation flow profiles using audio based methods may be

  1. Acute systemic accumulation of acrolein in mice by inhalation at a concentration similar to that in cigarette smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Melissa; Zheng, Lingxing; Acosta, Glen; Tian, Ran; Shi, Riyi

    2014-12-01

    Cigarette smoke is an important environmental factor associated with a wide array of public health concerns. Acrolein, a component of tobacco smoke and a known toxin to various cell types, may be a key pathological factor mediating the adverse effects linked with tobacco smoke. Although acrolein is known to accumulate in the respiratory system after acute nasal exposure, it is not clear if it accumulates systemically, and less is known in the nervous system. The aim of this study was to assess the degree of acrolein accumulation in the circulation and in the spinal cord following acute acrolein inhalation in mice. Using a laboratory-fabricated inhalation chamber, we found elevated urinary 3-HPMA, an acrolein metabolite, and increased acrolein adducts in the spinal cord after weeks of nasal exposure to acrolein at a concentration similar to that in tobacco smoke. The data indicated that acrolein is absorbed into the circulatory system and some enters the nervous system. It is expected that these findings may facilitate further studies to probe the pathological role of acrolein in the nervous system resulting from smoke and other external sources.

  2. Inhalation dose due to indoor radon and thoron concentrations in the surrounding villages of Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreenath Reddy, M.; Sreenivasa Reddy, B.; Yadagiri Reddy, P.; Gopal Reddy, Ch.; Rama Reddy, K.

    2006-01-01

    Inhalation of radon, thoron and their decay products is the major contribution to the total radioactive dose received by the human population from the natural radiation. The indoor inhalation doses due to radon, thoron and their progenies in the surrounding villages of Hyderabad, India are evaluated. The average inhalation dose due to radon and its progeny is found to be 0.26 ± 0.21 mSv y -1 and due to thoron and its progeny is 0.35 ± 0.38 mSv y -1 . The inhalation dose is also analyzed based on the types of floor, roof and walls of the dwellings and it is found that the dwellings with mud type construction materials have higher inhalation dose. Generally, the contribution of thoron and its progeny to the total dose is neglected but in the present study area the fractional dose of thoron and its progeny is found to be comparable to that of radon and its progeny. (author)

  3. Effects of Radon inhalation on physiology and disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Komoto, Yoshiaki

    1998-01-01

    In the first study, we administered Radon (Rn) to rabbits by inhalation and examined changes in the lipid peroxide (thiobarbituric acid reacting substances; TBARS) level, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and membrane fluidity in various organs to clarify the therapeutic effects of Rn. In the second study, we sprayed Rn spring water of various concentrations to rabbits to make the animals inhale them, and examined mainly the responses of biogenic amine neurotransmitters for clarifying the effects of Rn inhalation in the neuronal transmitter system. In the third study, indications for treatment at the Misasa Hot Spring, a Rn producing radioactive spring, include hypertension, diabetes mellitus and pain. To clarify its mechanisms of action on these conditions, we evaluated dynamic changes in blood components such as vasoactive substances after Rn inhalation. Vasodilation, alleviation of diabetic symptoms and morphine-like analgesic effects were observed, suggesting that these changes constitute part of the mechanisms of the Rn spring therapy on the above conditions. (J.P.N.)

  4. Economic considerations in the use of inhaled anesthetic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golembiewski, Julie

    2010-04-15

    To describe the components of and factors contributing to the costs of inhaled anesthesia, basis for quantifying and comparing these costs, and practical strategies for performing pharmacoeconomic analyses and reducing the costs of inhaled anesthetic agents. Inhaled anesthesia can be costly, and some of the variable costs, including fresh gas flow rates and vaporizer settings, are potential targets for cost savings. The use of a low fresh gas flow rate maximizes rebreathing of exhaled anesthetic gas and is less costly than a high flow rate, but it provides less control of the level of anesthesia. The minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) hour is a measure that can be used to compare the cost of inhaled anesthetic agents at various fresh gas flow rates. Anesthesia records provide a sense of patterns of inhaled anesthetic agent use, but the amount of detail can be limited. Cost savings have resulted from efforts to reduce the direct costs of inhaled anesthetic agents, but reductions in indirect costs through shortened times to patient recovery and discharge following the judicious use of these agents are more difficult to demonstrate. The patient case mix, fresh gas flow rates typically used during inhaled anesthesia, availability and location of vaporizers, and anesthesia care provider preferences and practices should be taken into consideration in pharmacoeconomic evaluations and recommendations for controlling the costs of inhaled anesthesia. Understanding factors that contribute to the costs of inhaled anesthesia and considering those factors in pharmacoeconomic analyses and recommendations for use of these agents can result in cost savings.

  5. Exposition by inhalation to the formaldehyde in the air. Source, measures and concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Gratta, F.; Durif, M.; Fagault, Y.; Zdanevitch, I.

    2004-12-01

    This document presents the main techniques today available to characterize the formaldehyde concentrations in the air for different contexts: urban and rural areas or around industrial installations but also indoor and occupational area. It provides information to guide laboratories and research departments. A synthesis gives also the main emissions sources of these compounds as reference concentrations measured in different environments. (A.L.B.)

  6. Characterization of an area of reference for inhalable particulate matter (PM2.5) associated with genetic biomonitoring in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva da Silva, Cristiane; Rossato, Juliana Marzari; Vaz Rocha, Jocelita Aparecida; Vargas, Vera Maria Ferrão

    2015-01-15

    Humans are exposed to health-impairing air pollutants, especially children who are more sensitive to cancer-causing toxins. This study described an area of reference for inhalable particulates (PM2.5) by chemical (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) and mutagenic characterization associated with the genetic biomonitoring of children (aged 5-11 years). The area studied was in a small town in Brazil, used as reference in previous studies. Organic matter of PM2.5 (extracted with dichloromethane) was evaluated for mutagenesis in a Salmonella/microsome (microsuspension) assay, in strains measuring frameshift error (TA98, YG1021 and YG1024) and base pair substitution (TA100) of DNA, in the presence and absence of rat liver metabolization fraction (S9). Exposure was studied analyzing a sample of 45 children using comet assay (peripheral blood lymphocytes) and micronucleus (exfoliated buccal mucosa cells). PM2.5 concentration for the period was 9% (25.89-64.71 μg/m3) events above WHO limit value (25 μg/m3). Mutagenesis responses (revertants/m3) varied from negative (spring) to 8.3±0.69 (autumn) (-S9) and 5.4±0.36 (winter) (+S9), in strain TA98, and for TA100, in spring, from negative to 14.8±4.23 (-S9) and 17.5±2.72 (+S9). YG strain results show mononitroarenes and aromatic amines. Mean biomonitoring values were established for MN, 0.3±0.41 (‰) and for other cell types a variation from 0.6±0.73 (‰), nuclear buds to 57.5±24.92 (‰), karyorrhexis. Comet assay means were 23.1±12.44; 7.3±11.66 and 0.9±2.30 for tail length, intensity and moment, respectively. There was no difference for sex and age for the different parameters. A significant difference in confounding factors was observed for passive smoking and MN induction. PAHs and mutagenesis in the air may be related to local vehicular emissions. These results challenge the definition of areas of reference for air pollution associated with human biomonitoring including the region studied. Copyright © 2014

  7. Inhaled corticosteroid metered-dose inhalers: how do variations in technique for solutions versus suspensions affect drug distribution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Christie A; Tsourounis, Candy

    2013-03-01

    To assess the literature that evaluates how variations in metered-dose inhaler (MDI) technique affect lung distribution for inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) formulated as MDI suspensions and solutions. PubMed (up to November 2012) and Cochrane Library (up to November 2012) were searched using the terms metered-dose inhalers, HFA 134a, Asthma/*drug therapy, and inhaled corticosteroids. In addition, reference citations from publications identified were reviewed. All articles in English from the data sources that assessed MDI technique comparing total lung distribution (TLD) of MDI solutions or suspensions formulated with ICSs were included in the review. Five relevant studies were identified. Five controlled studies compared how variations in MDI technique affect TLD for ICS MDI solutions with suspensions. MDI solutions resulted in greater TLD compared with larger particle MDI suspensions. Delayed or early inspiration upon device actuation of MDI solutions resulted in less TLD than coordinated actuation, but with a 3- to 4-times greater TLD than MDI suspensions inhaled using a standard technique. A sixth study evaluated inspiratory flow rates (IFR) for small, medium, and large particles. Rapid and slow IFRs resulted in similar TLD for small particles, while far fewer particles reached the airways with medium and large particles at rapid, rather than slow, IFRs. Based on the literature evaluated, standard MDI technique should be used for ICS suspensions. ICS MDI solutions can provide a higher average TLD than larger-particle ICS suspensions using standard technique, discoordinated inspiration and medication actuation timing, or rapid and slow IFRs. ICS MDI solutions allow for a more forgiving technique, which makes them uniquely suitable options for patients with asthma who have difficultly with MDI technique.

  8. Pentoxifylline does not alter the response to inhaled grain dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagielo, P J; Watt, J L; Quinn, T J; Knapp, H R; Schwartz, D A

    1997-05-01

    Pentoxifylline (PTX) has been shown to reduce sepsis-induced neutrophil sequestration in the lung and inhibit endotoxin-mediated release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Previously, we have shown that endotoxin appears to be the principal agent in grain dust causing airway inflammation and airflow obstruction following grain dust inhalation. To determine whether PTX affects the physiologic and inflammatory events following acute grain dust inhalation, 10 healthy, nonsmoking subjects with normal airway reactivity were treated with PTX or placebo (PL) followed by corn dust extract (CDE) inhalation (0.08 mL/kg), using a single-blinded, crossover design. Subjects received PTX (1,200 mg/d) or PL for 4 days prior to CDE inhalation and 400 mg PTX or PL on the exposure day. Both respiratory symptoms and declines in FEV1 and FVC occurred following CDE exposure in both groups, but there were no significant differences in the frequency of symptoms or percent declines from baseline in the FEV1 and FVC at any of the time points measured in the study. Elevations in peripheral blood leukocyte and neutrophil concentrations and BAL total cell, neutrophil, TNF-alpha, and interleukin-8 concentrations were measured 4 h following exposure to CDE in both the PTX- and PL-treated subjects, but no significant differences were found between treatment groups. These results suggest that pretreatment with PTX prior to inhalation of CDE, in the doses used in this study, does not alter the acute physiologic or inflammatory events following exposure to inhaled CDE.

  9. Reproduction and evaluation of a rat model of inhalation lung injury caused by black gunpowder smog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-fan LIU

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To reproduce and evaluate a rat model of inhalation lung injury caused by black gunpowder smog. Methods The smog composition was analyzed and a rat model of inhalation lung injury was reproduced. Forty two healthy male Wistar rats were randomly divided into normal control (NC group and 1h, 2h, 6h, 24h, 48h and 96h after inhalation group (n=6. The arterial blood gas, wet to dry weight ratio (W/D of lung, leukocyte count, and protein concentration in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF were determined. Macroscopic and microscopic changes in lung tissue were observed. Results The composition of black gunpowder smog was composed mainly of CO2 and CO, and their concentrations remained stable within 12 minutes. Smog inhalation caused a significant hypoxemia, the concentration of blood COHb reached a peak value 1h, and the W/D of lung reached peak value 2h after inhalation (P<0.05. The amount of leukocytes and content of protein in BALF increased significantly within 24h after inhalation (P<0.05. Histopathological observation showed diffuse hemorrhage, edema and inflammatory cell infiltration in lung tissue as manifestations of acute lung injury, and the injury did not recover at 96h after inhalation. Conclusion The rat model of inhalation lung injury can be reproduced using black gunpowder smog, and it has the advantages of its readiness for reproduction, reliability and stability, and it could be used for the experiment of inhalation injury in a battlefield environment.

  10. Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. A. Wasiolek

    2003-01-01

    This analysis is one of the nine reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN) biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2003a) describes in detail the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. This report documents a set of input parameters for the biosphere model, and supports the use of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for a Yucca Mountain repository. This report, ''Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'', is one of the five reports that develop input parameters for the biosphere model. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling, and the plan for development of the biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan: for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (BSC 2003b). It should be noted that some documents identified in Figure 1-1 may be under development at the time this report is issued and therefore not available at that time. This figure is included to provide an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application, and is not intended to imply that access to the listed documents is required to understand the contents of this analysis report. This analysis report defines and justifies values of mass loading, which is the total mass concentration of resuspended particles (e.g., dust, ash) in a volume of air. Measurements of mass loading are used in the air submodel of ERMYN to calculate concentrations of radionuclides in air surrounding crops and concentrations in air inhaled by a receptor. Concentrations in air to which the

  11. Development of a Zealand White Rabbit Deposition Model to Study Inhalation Anthrax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgharian, Bahman; Price, Owen; Kabilan, Senthil; Jacob, Richard E.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Kuprat, A.P.; Corley, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite using rabbits in several inhalation exposure experiments to study diseases such as anthrax, there is a lack of understanding regarding deposition characteristics and fate of inhaled particles (bio-aerosols and viruses) in the respiratory tracts of rabbits. Such information allows dosimetric extrapolation to humans to inform human outcomes. The lung geometry of the New Zealand white rabbit (referred to simply as rabbits throughout the article) was constructed using recently acquired scanned images of the conducting airways of rabbits and available information on its acinar region. In addition, functional relationships were developed for the lung and breathing parameters of rabbits as a function of body weight. The lung geometry and breathing parameters were used to extend the existing deposition model for humans and several other species to rabbits. Evaluation of the deposition model for rabbits was made by comparing predictions with available measurements in the literature. Deposition predictions in the lungs of rabbits indicated smaller deposition fractions compared to those found in humans across various particle diameter ranges. The application of the deposition model for rabbits was demonstrated by extrapolating deposition predictions in rabbits to find equivalent human exposure concentrations assuming the same dose-response relationship between the two species. Human equivalent exposure concentration levels were found to be much smaller than those for rabbits. PMID:26895308

  12. Pharmacological Characterization of the Discriminative Stimulus of Inhaled 1,1,1-Trichloroethane

    OpenAIRE

    Shelton, Keith L.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the involvement of the GABAA, N-methy-d-aspartate (NMDA), nicotinic acetylcholine, and μ-opioid receptor systems in the transduction of the discriminative stimulus effects of the abused inhalant 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCE). Sixteen B6SJLF1/J mice were trained to discriminate 10 min of exposure to 12,000-ppm inhaled TCE vapor from air. Substitution and antagonism tests and TCE blood concentration analysis were subsequently conducted. TCE blood concentrations decrease...

  13. Granulometric determinations and inhalation dose assessment for atmospheric aerosol contaminated by 137Cs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellani, C.M.; Luciani, A.; Oliviero, L.; Donato, R.

    1996-07-01

    During the redevelopment of Brescia freight-yard a measurement campaign of atmospheric aerosol was carried out: in fact a 137 Cs ground contamination, caused by the permanence of wagons carrying iron materials contaminated by this radionuclide, had been found out. During the redevelopment phases of excavation and can filling the workers were exposed to the danger of radioactive aerosol inhalation. The aim of the measurement campaign was to test the aerosol sampling and granulometric analysis methodologies with their sensitivity related to the inhalation dose assessments. The results of both aerosuspended mass and activity, evaluated by means of a portable cascade impactor, are presented. The granulometries have been interpolated with a log normal distribution using an iterative routine minimizing the square deviation between the calculated and experimental data. The results related to the dose assessments are also presented. These evaluations have been carried out using both the granulometric information obtained and the more recent models (ICRP 66) both the total concentration data and the dose coefficients referring to the standard conditions of ICRP 68 and of the Italian law (D.Lgs. 230/95). Furthermore the significance and the reliability of the dose assessments referring to the different methodologies are discussed, also in relation to the possibility of using this sampling methodologies for other radionuclides and different exposure conditions

  14. Unintended inhalation of nitric oxide by contamination of compressed air: physiologic effects and interference with intended nitric oxide inhalation in acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzing, A; Loop, T; Mols, G; Geiger, K

    1999-10-01

    Compressed air from a hospital's central gas supply may contain nitric oxide as a result of air pollution. Inhaled nitric oxide may increase arterial oxygen tension and decrease pulmonary vascular resistance in patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Therefore, the authors wanted to determine whether unintentional nitric oxide inhalation by contamination of compressed air influences arterial oxygen tension and pulmonary vascular resistance and interferes with the therapeutic use of nitric oxide. Nitric oxide concentrations in the compressed air of a university hospital were measured continuously by chemiluminescence during two periods (4 and 2 weeks). The effects of unintended nitric oxide inhalation on arterial oxygen tension (n = 15) and on pulmonary vascular resistance (n = 9) were measured in patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome by changing the source of compressed air of the ventilator from the hospital's central gas supply to a nitric oxide-free gas tank containing compressed air. In five of these patients, the effects of an additional inhalation of 5 ppm nitric oxide were evaluated. During working days, compressed air of the hospital's central gas supply contained clinically effective nitric oxide concentrations (> 80 parts per billion) during 40% of the time. Change to gas tank-supplied nitric oxide-free compressed air decreased the arterial oxygen tension by 10% and increased pulmonary vascular resistance by 13%. The addition of 5 ppm nitric oxide had a minimal effect on arterial oxygen tension and pulmonary vascular resistance when added to hospital-supplied compressed air but improved both when added to tank-supplied compressed air. Unintended inhalation of nitric oxide increases arterial oxygen tension and decreases pulmonary vascular resistance in patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome. The unintended nitric oxide inhalation interferes with the

  15. IFCC primary reference procedures for the measurement of catalytic activity concentrations of enzymes at 37 °C. Part 9: reference procedure for the measurement of catalytic concentration of alkaline phosphatase International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) Scientific Division, Committee on Reference Systems of Enzymes (C-RSE) (1)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Gerhard; Klauke, Rainer; Canalias, Francesca; Bossert-Reuther, Steffen; Franck, Paul F H; Gella, F-Javier; Jørgensen, Poul J; Kang, Dongchon; Lessinger, Jean-Marc; Panteghini, Mauro; Ceriotti, Ferruccio

    2011-09-01

    Abstract This paper is the ninth in a series dealing with reference procedures for the measurement of catalytic activity concentrations of enzymes at 37 °C and the certification of reference preparations. Other parts deal with: Part 1. The concept of reference procedures for the measurement of catalytic activity concentrations of enzymes; Part 2. Reference procedure for the measurement of catalytic concentration of creatine kinase; Part 3. Reference procedure for the measurement of catalytic concentration of lactate dehydrogenase; Part 4. Reference procedure for the measurement of catalytic concentration of alanine aminotransferase; Part 5. Reference procedure for the measurement of catalytic concentration of aspartate aminotransferase; Part 6. Reference procedure for the measurement of catalytic concentration of γ-glutamyltransferase; Part 7. Certification of four reference materials for the determination of enzymatic activity of γ-glutamyltransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, alanine aminotransferase and creatine kinase at 37 °C; Part 8. Reference procedure for the measurement of catalytic concentration of α-amylase. The procedure described here is derived from the previously described 30 °C IFCC reference method. Differences are tabulated and commented on in Appendix 1.

  16. Inhaled Antibiotics for Gram-Negative Respiratory Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraidenburg, Dustin R.; Scardina, Tonya

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Gram-negative organisms comprise a large portion of the pathogens responsible for lower respiratory tract infections, especially those that are nosocomially acquired, and the rate of antibiotic resistance among these organisms continues to rise. Systemically administered antibiotics used to treat these infections often have poor penetration into the lung parenchyma and narrow therapeutic windows between efficacy and toxicity. The use of inhaled antibiotics allows for maximization of target site concentrations and optimization of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic indices while minimizing systemic exposure and toxicity. This review is a comprehensive discussion of formulation and drug delivery aspects, in vitro and microbiological considerations, pharmacokinetics, and clinical outcomes with inhaled antibiotics as they apply to disease states other than cystic fibrosis. In reviewing the literature surrounding the use of inhaled antibiotics, we also highlight the complexities related to this route of administration and the shortcomings in the available evidence. The lack of novel anti-Gram-negative antibiotics in the developmental pipeline will encourage the innovative use of our existing agents, and the inhaled route is one that deserves to be further studied and adopted in the clinical arena. PMID:27226088

  17. Absorption, distribution and excretion of inhaled hydrogen fluoride in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J.B.

    1979-01-01

    Rats were subjected to whole body HF exposure for 6 hrs or to nose-only HF exposure for 1 hr. Total and/or ionic fluoride concentrations in selected tissues were determined at various times following exposure. In rats sacrificed 6 hrs after whole body exposure, dose-dependent increases in lung, plasma, and kidney total and ionic fluoride concentration occurred. Rats excreted more fluoride in the urine after whole body exposure than could be explained by the amount of HF inhaled. Considerable evidence suggests that airborne HF deposits on fur and is then ingested due to preening activity. Urinary fluoride excretion was increased by nose-only exposure. The urinary fluoride excretion accounted for approximately twice the fluoride estimated to be inhaled during exposure. Tissue fluoride concentrations were elevated immediately after nose-only exposure. Fluoride concentrations in lung and kidney returned to control levels within 12 hrs. Plasma fluoride concentration was slightly elevated 24 hrs after the start of the 1 hr exposure but was at control levels at 96 hrs. Immediately following nose-only exposure, lung ionic fluoride concentrations were less than plasma ionic fluoride concentrations suggesting that the fluoride in the lung had reached that site via plasma transport rather than by inhalation. A dose-dependent increase in plasma ionic fluoride concentration occurred after upper respiratory tract HF exposure providing strong evidence that fluoride is absorbed systemically from that site. The plasma ionic fluoride concentration after upper respiratory tract exposure was of sufficient magnitude to account for the plasma fluoride concentrations observed in intact nose-only exposed rats. (ERB)

  18. Inhalable desert dust, urban emissions, and potentially biotoxic metals in urban Saharan-Sahelian air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Virginia H.; Majewski, Michael S.; Konde, Lassana; Wolf, Ruth E.; Otto, Richard D.; Tsuneoka, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Saharan dust incursions and particulates emitted from human activities degrade air quality throughout West Africa, especially in the rapidly expanding urban centers in the region. Particulate matter (PM) that can be inhaled is strongly associated with increased incidence of and mortality from cardiovascular and respiratory diseases and cancer. Air samples collected in the capital of a Saharan–Sahelian country (Bamako, Mali) between September 2012 and July 2013 were found to contain inhalable PM concentrations that exceeded World Health Organization (WHO) and US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) PM2.5 and PM10 24-h limits 58 – 98% of days and European Union (EU) PM10 24-h limit 98% of days. Mean concentrations were 1.2-to-4.5 fold greater than existing limits. Inhalable PM was enriched in transition metals, known to produce reactive oxygen species and initiate the inflammatory response, and other potentially bioactive and biotoxic metals/metalloids. Eroded mineral dust composed the bulk of inhalable PM, whereas most enriched metals/metalloids were likely emitted from oil combustion, biomass burning, refuse incineration, vehicle traffic, and mining activities. Human exposure to inhalable PM and associated metals/metalloids over 24-h was estimated. The findings indicate that inhalable PM in the Sahara–Sahel region may present a threat to human health, especially in urban areas with greater inhalable PM and transition metal exposure.

  19. Inhalants in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, R; Ferrando, D

    1995-01-01

    In Peru, the prevalence and consequences of inhalant abuse appear to be low in the general population and high among marginalized children. Inhalant use ranks third in lifetime prevalence after alcohol and tobacco. Most of the use appears to be infrequent. Among marginalized children, that is, children working in the streets but living at home or children living in the street, the problem of inhalant abuse is a serious problem. Among children working in the streets but living at home, the lifetime prevalence rate for inhalant abuse is high, ranging from 15 to 45 percent depending on the study being cited. For children living in the streets, the use of inhalant is even more severe. As mentioned earlier in this chapter, most of these street children use inhalants on a daily basis. The lack of research on the problem of inhalant abuse is a serious impediment to development of intervention programs and strategies to address this problem in Peru. Epidemiologic and ethnographic research on the nature and extent of inhalant abuse are obvious prerequisites to targeted treatment and preventive intervention programs. The urgent need for current and valid data is underscored by the unique vulnerability of the youthful population at risk and the undisputed harm that results from chronic abuse of inhalants. Nonetheless, it is important to mention several programs that work with street children. Some, such as the Information and Education Center for the Prevention of Drug Abuse, Generation, and Centro Integracion de Menores en Abandono have shelters where street children are offered transition to a less marginal lifestyle. Teams of street educators provide the children with practical solutions and gain their confidence, as well as offer them alternative socialization experiences to help them survive the streets and avoid the often repressive and counterproductive environments typical of many institutions. Most of the children who go through these programs tend to abandon

  20. The Effect of Inhalation Volume and Breath-Hold Duration on the Retention of Nicotine and Solanesol in the Human Respiratory Tract and on Subsequent Plasma Nicotine Concentrations During Cigarette Smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armitage AK

    2014-12-01

    absorbed into the systemic circulation. After 75 mL inhalation, plasma nicotine levels were significantly greater than for zero inhalation but not significantly less than after 500 mL inhalation except at the time of maximum nicotine concentration. As in every experimental condition, a higher percentage of nicotine than solanesol was retained within the respiratory tract, it was concluded that the difference in retention of the moderately volatile nicotine and the non-volatile solanesol is consistent with the concept of nicotine evaporation from smoke particles and the subsequent efficient retention in the airways of gaseous nicotine. The retention of solanesol followed the expected pattern of particulate deposition i.e., an increase with both increasing depth of inhalation and breath-hold duration. However, nicotine retention was almost complete even at shallow inhalations and short breath-hold durations.

  1. Hydrazine inhalation hepatotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Yung Hsiang; Chong, C H; Ng, W T; Lim, D

    2007-10-01

    Abstract Hydrazine is a hazardous chemical commonly used as a reactant in rocket and jet fuel cells. Animal studies have demonstrated hepatic changes after hydrazine inhalation. Human case reports of hydrazine inhalation hepatotoxicity are rare. We report a case of mild hepatotoxicity following brief hydrazine vapour inhalation in a healthy young man, which resolved completely on expectant management.

  2. Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. A. Wasiolek

    2003-09-24

    This analysis is one of the nine reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN) biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2003a) describes in detail the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. This report documents a set of input parameters for the biosphere model, and supports the use of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for a Yucca Mountain repository. This report, ''Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'', is one of the five reports that develop input parameters for the biosphere model. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling, and the plan for development of the biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan: for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (BSC 2003b). It should be noted that some documents identified in Figure 1-1 may be under development at the time this report is issued and therefore not available at that time. This figure is included to provide an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application, and is not intended to imply that access to the listed documents is required to understand the contents of this analysis report. This analysis report defines and justifies values of mass loading, which is the total mass concentration of resuspended particles (e.g., dust, ash) in a volume of air. Measurements of mass loading are used in the air submodel of ERMYN to calculate concentrations of radionuclides in air surrounding crops and concentrations in air

  3. Inhalation of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, B.O.; Jackson, P.O.

    1975-01-01

    In previous studies the biological dispositions of individual long-lived alpha members of the uranium chain ( 238 U, 234 U and 230 Th) were determined during and following repeated inhalation exposures of rats to pitchblende (26 percent U 3 O 8 ) ore. Although finely dispersed ore in secular equilibrium was inhaled, 230 Th/ 234 U radioactivity ratios in the lungs rose from 1.0 to 2.5 during 8 weeks of exposures and increased to 9.2 by four months after cessation of exposures. Marked non-equilibrium levels were also found in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes, kidneys, liver, and femur. Daily exposures of beagle dogs to high levels of this ore for 8 days resulted in lung 230 Th/ 234 U ratios of >2.0. Daily exposures of dogs to lower levels (0.1 mg/1) for 6 months, with sacrifice 15 months later, resulted in lung and thoracic lymph node 230 Th/ 234 U ratios ranging from 3.6 to 9 and nearly 7, respectively. The lungs of hamsters exposed to carnotite (4 percent U 3 O 8 ) ore in current lifespan studies show 230 Th/ 234 U ratios as high as 2.0 during daily inhalation of this ore in secular equilibrium. Beagle dogs sacrificed after several years of daily inhalations of the same carnotite ore plus radon daughters also showed marked non-equilibrium ratios of 230 Th/ 234 U, ranging from 5.6 to 7.4 in lungs and 6.2 to 9.1 in thoracic lymph nodes. This pattern of higher retention of 230 Th than 234 U in lungs, thoracic lymph nodes, and other tissues is thus consistent for two types of uranium ore among several species and suggests a reevaluation of maximum permissible air concentrations of ore, currently based only on uranium content

  4. An evaluation of children's metered-dose inhaler technique for asthma medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Patricia V; Rayens, Mary Kay; Bowman, Roxanne K

    2005-03-01

    Regardless of the medication delivery system, health care providers need to teach accurate medication administration techniques to their patients, educate them about the particular nuances of the prescribed delivery system (eg, proper storage), and reinforce these issues at each health encounter. A single instruction session is not sufficient to maintain appropriate inhaler techniques for patients who require continued use. Providing written steps for the administration technique is helpful so that the patient can refer to them later when using the medication. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's "Practical Guide for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma" recommends that practitioners follow these steps for effective inhaler technique training when first prescribing an inhaler: 1. Teach patients the steps and give written instruction handouts. 2. Demonstrate how to use the inhaler step-by-step. 3. Ask patients to demonstrate how to use the inhaler. Let the patient refer to the handout on the first training. Then use the handout asa checklist to assess the patient's future technique. 4. Provide feedback to patients about what they did right and what they need to improve. Have patients demonstrate their technique again, if necessary. The last two steps should be performed (ie, demonstration and providing feedback on what patients did right and what they need to improve) at every subsequent visit. If the patient makes multiple errors, it is advisable to focus on improving one or two key steps at a time. With improvements in drug delivery come challenges, necessitating that practitioners stay current with new medication administration techniques. Teaching and reinforcing accurate technique at each health care encounter are critical to help ensure medication efficacy for patients with asthma. Since one fifth of children in the study performed incorrect medication technique even after education, checklists of steps for the correct use of inhalation devices

  5. Special aspects of pharmacokinetics of inhalation anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickx, J F A; De Wolf, A

    2008-01-01

    Recent interest in the use of low-flow or closed circuit anesthesia has rekindled interest in the pharmacokinetics of inhaled anesthetics. The kinetic properties of inhaled anesthetics are most often modeled by physiologic models because of the abundant information that is available on tissue solubilities and organ perfusion. These models are intuitively attractive because they can be easily understood in terms of the underlying anatomy and physiology. The use of classical compartment modeling, on the other hand, allows modeling of data that are routinely available to the anesthesiologist, and eliminates the need to account for every possible confounding factor at each step of the partial pressure cascade of potent inhaled agents. Concepts used to describe IV kinetics can readily be applied to inhaled agents (e.g., context-sensitive half-time and effect site concentrations). The interpretation of the F(A)/F(I) vs time curve is expanded by reintroducing the concept of the general anesthetic equation-the focus is shifted from "how F(A) approaches F(I)" to "what combination of delivered concentration and fresh gas flow (FGF) can be used to attain the desired F(A)." When the desired F(A) is maintained with a FGF that is lower than minute ventilation, rebreathing causes a discrepancy between the concentration delivered by the anesthesia machine (=selected by the anesthesiologist on the vaporizer, F(D)) and that inspired by the patient. This F(D)-F(I) discrepancy may be perceived as "lack of control" and has been the rationale to use a high FGF to ensure the delivered matched the inspired concentration. Also, with low FGF there is larger variability in F(D) because of interpatient variability in uptake. The F(D)-F(I) discrepancy increases with lower FGF because of more rebreathing, and as a consequence the uptake pattern seems to be more reflected in the F(D) required to keep F(A) constant. The clinical implication for the anesthesiologist is that with high FGF few F

  6. Effect of inhaled formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine on airway function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berend, N; Peters, M J; Armour, C L; Black, J L; Ward, H E

    1988-01-01

    Formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP), a synthetic, acylated tripeptide analogous to bacterial chemotactic factors, has been shown to cause bronchoconstriction in guinea pig, rabbit, and human airways in vitro. To determine whether FMLP causes bronchoconstriction in man in vivo, a preliminary study was undertaken in which five non-smokers (mean age 35 years, FEV1 94% (SEM 5%) predicted) and five smokers (mean age 34 years, FEV1 93% (6%) predicted) inhaled aerosols of FMLP. None of the subjects showed airway hyperresponsiveness to histamine (the provocative concentrations of histamine causing a fall of greater than or equal to 20% in FEV1 (PC20) were over 8 mg/ml). FMLP dissolved in 50% dimethylsulphoxide and 50% saline in concentrations of 0, 0.06, 0.12, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 mg/ml was administered to the subjects by means of a French-Rosenthal dosimeter, FEV1 being recorded after inhalation of each concentration. Dose dependent falls in FEV1 occurred in five non-smokers (geometric mean 1.76, 95% confidence limits 0.87-3.53 mg/ml) and three smokers (0.23, 0.07-0.78 mg/ml), with two smokers not responding by 20% to the highest concentration of FMLP. On a separate day the FMLP dose-response curves were repeated after nebulisation of 500 micrograms of ipratropium bromide. The PC20 FMLP in the responders more than doubled. In six additional normal subjects a histamine inhalation test was performed before and four and 24 hours after inhalation of FMLP. All subjects remained unresponsive to histamine. These results show that FMLP is a potent bronchoconstrictor in some non-asthmatic individuals in vivo and this may be important in bronchoconstriction related to infection in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease.

  7. Pharmacoeconomics of inhaled anesthetic agents: considerations for the pharmacist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernin, Eric L

    2004-10-15

    Types of economic analyses used for inhaled anesthetic agents, factors to consider in calculating the cost of inhaled anesthetics, limitations of pharmacoeconomic studies of these agents, and strategies for controlling inhaled anesthetic costs are discussed. Inhaled anesthetic agents comprise a substantial component of drug budgets. Calculation of the cost of administering an inhaled anesthetic should take into consideration the cost per mL, potency, waste, concentration and duration of gas delivery, fresh gas flow rate, molecular weight, and density. The use of newer inhaled anesthetic agents with low solubility in blood and tissue provides a more rapid recovery from anesthesia than older, more soluble agents, and also provides the same level of control of depth of anesthesia at a lower fresh gas flow rate and possibly a lower cost than older agents at a higher fresh gas flow rate. A more rapid recovery may facilitate fast-track recovery and yield cost savings if it allows the completion of additional surgical cases or allows a reduction in personnel overtime expenses. Interpretation of pharmacoeconomic studies of inhaled anesthetics requires an appreciation of the limitations in methodology and ability to extrapolate results from one setting to another. Pharmacists' efforts to reduce anesthetic waste and collaborate with anesthesiologists to improve the use of these agents can help contain costs, but improving scheduling and efficiency in the operating room has a greater potential to reduce operating room costs. Much can be done to control costs of anesthetic agents without compromising availability of these agents and patient care.

  8. Sex differences in bronchiolar epithelium response after the inhalation of lead acetate (Pb)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortoul, Teresa Imelda; Moncada-Hernandez, Sandra; Saldivar-Osorio, Liliana; Espejel-Maya, Guadalupe; Mussali-Galante, Patricia; Avila-Casado, Maria del Carmen; Colin-Barenque, Laura; Hernandez-Serrato, Maria Isidra; Avila-Costa, Maria Rosa

    2005-01-01

    In order to identify if there were sex differences in lead (Pb) lung concentrations and in bronchiolar response after its inhalation, a mice inhalation model was conducted. Sixty CD-1 adult mice from each sex inhaled separately, lead acetate 0.1 M for 1 h, thrice weekly during 15 days. Animals were evaluated for Pb-lung concentrations by atomic absorption spectrometry and for morphological evaluation by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Higher Pb-lung concentrations were determined in females, however, more cell damage was found in males, finding that correlated with an increased loss of the nonciliated bronchiolar cells (NCBC) more sloughing and necrosis. Differences in particle clearance, oxidative stress handling, cytokines pathway activation and cytochrome P450 enzymes activity, all influenced by sex hormones, might be a possible explanation for our findings. The relevance of further studies in this field is stressed, as well as its relation to the different development expected for each sex in disease evolution, possible complications and treatment response

  9. Rat inhalation test with particles from biomass combustion and biomass co-firing exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellmann, B.; Creutzenberg, O.; Ernst, H.; Muhle, H.

    2009-02-01

    The health effects of 6 different fly ash samples from biomass combustion plants (bark, wood chips, waste wood, and straw), and co-firing plants (coal, co-firing of coal and sawdust) were investigated in a 28-day nose-only inhalation study with Wistar WU rats. Respirable fractions of carbon black (Printex 90) and of titanium dioxide (Bayertitan T) were used as reference materials for positive and negative controls. The exposure was done 6 hours per day, 5 days per week at an aerosol concentration of 16 mg/m3. The MMAD of all fly ash samples and reference materials in the inhalation unit were in the range from 1.5 to 3 μm. The investigations focused predominantly on the analysis of inflammatory effects in the lungs of rats using bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and histopathology. Different parameters (percentage of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), interleukin-8 and interstitial inflammatory cell infiltration in the lung tissue) indicating inflammatory effects in the lung, showed a statistically significant increase in the groups exposed to carbon black (positive control), C1 (coal) and C1+BM4 (co-firing of coal and sawdust) fly ashes. Additionally, for the same groups a statistically significant increase of cell proliferation in the lung epithelium was detected. No significant effects were detected in the animal groups exposed to BM1 (bark), BM2 (wood chips), BM3 (waste wood), BM6 (straw) or titanium dioxide.

  10. Rat inhalation test with particles from biomass combustion and biomass co-firing exhaust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellmann, B; Creutzenberg, O; Ernst, H; Muhle, H

    2009-01-01

    The health effects of 6 different fly ash samples from biomass combustion plants (bark, wood chips, waste wood, and straw), and co-firing plants (coal, co-firing of coal and sawdust) were investigated in a 28-day nose-only inhalation study with Wistar WU rats. Respirable fractions of carbon black (Printex 90) and of titanium dioxide (Bayertitan T) were used as reference materials for positive and negative controls. The exposure was done 6 hours per day, 5 days per week at an aerosol concentration of 16 mg/m 3 . The MMAD of all fly ash samples and reference materials in the inhalation unit were in the range from 1.5 to 3 μm. The investigations focused predominantly on the analysis of inflammatory effects in the lungs of rats using bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and histopathology. Different parameters (percentage of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), interleukin-8 and interstitial inflammatory cell infiltration in the lung tissue) indicating inflammatory effects in the lung, showed a statistically significant increase in the groups exposed to carbon black (positive control), C1 (coal) and C1+BM4 (co-firing of coal and sawdust) fly ashes. Additionally, for the same groups a statistically significant increase of cell proliferation in the lung epithelium was detected. No significant effects were detected in the animal groups exposed to BM1 (bark), BM2 (wood chips), BM3 (waste wood), BM6 (straw) or titanium dioxide.

  11. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS After Nitric Acid Inhalation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülay Kır

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lung injury resulting from inhalation of chemical products continues to be associated with high morbidity and mortality. Concentrated nitric acids are also extremely corrosive fuming chemical liquids. Fumes of nitric acid (HNO3 and various oxides of nitrogen such as nitric oxide (NO and nitrogen dioxide (NO2 may cause fatal illnesses such as severe pulmonary edema and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS when inhaled. Intensive respiratory management including mechanical ventilation with positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP, inverse ratio ventilation, replacement of surfactant and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO, steroids and n-acetylcysteine (NAC may improve survival. In this case report we present the diagnosis and successful treatment of a 57 years old male patient who developed ARDS following pulmonary edema due to nitric acid fumes inhalation.

  12. Criteria for inhalation exposure systems utilizing concurrent flow spirometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raabe, O.G.; Yeh, H.C.

    1974-01-01

    Principles are given for the design and operation of a new class of inhalation exposure systems utilizing concurrent flow spirometry (CFS), a simple method for providing realtime measurement of respiratory volumes and rates during inhalation exposure by mouth or nose of individual experimental animals or man to aerosols or gases. This technique is especially useful for inhalation exposure of larger experimental animals, such as horses, where whole-body plethysmography is usually impractical. Difficulties encountered with conventional exposure systems in maintenance of uniform aerosol or gas concentrations and prevention of large pressure excursions in the exposure chamber during breathing are obviated by systems utilizing the principles of concurrent flow spirometry. For illustration, two exposure units with CFS are described, one for exposure of Beagle dogs and one for ponies. (U.S.)

  13. Limiting values of radionuclide intake and air concentration and dose conversion factors for inhalation, submersion, and ingestion: Federal guidance report No. 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckerman, K.F.; Wolbarst, A.B.; Richardson, A.C.B.

    1988-09-01

    Radiation protection programs for workers are based, in the United States, on a hierarchy of limitations stemming from Federal guidance approved by the President. This guidance, which consists of principles, policies, and numerical primary guides, is used by Federal agencies as the basis for developing and implementing their own regulatory standards. The primary guides are usually expressed in terms of limiting doses to workers. The protection of workers against taking radioactive materials into the body, however, is accomplished largely through the use of regulations based on derived guides expressed in terms of quantities or concentrations of radionuclides. The values of these derived guides are chosen so as to assure that workers in work environments that conform to them are unlikely to receive radiation doses that exceed the primary guides. The purpose of the present report is to set forth derived guides that are consistent with current Federal radiation protection guidance. They are intended to serve as the basis for regulations setting upper bounds on the inhalation and ingestion of, and submersion in, radioactive materials in the workplace. The report also includes tables of exposure-to-dose conversion factors, for general use in assessing average individual committed doses in any population that is adequately characterized by Reference Man. 38 refs

  14. Limiting values of radionuclide intake and air concentration and dose conversion factors for inhalation, submersion, and ingestion: Federal guidance report No. 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckerman, K.F.; Wolbarst, A.B.; Richardson, A.C.B.

    1988-09-01

    Radiation protection programs for workers are based, in the United States, on a hierarchy of limitations stemming from Federal guidance approved by the President. This guidance, which consists of principles, policies, and numerical primary guides, is used by Federal agencies as the basis for developing and implementing their own regulatory standards. The primary guides are usually expressed in terms of limiting doses to workers. The protection of workers against taking radioactive materials into the body, however, is accomplished largely through the use of regulations based on derived guides expressed in terms of quantities or concentrations of radionuclides. The values of these derived guides are chosen so as to assure that workers in work environments that conform to them are unlikely to receive radiation doses that exceed the primary guides. The purpose of the present report is to set forth derived guides that are consistent with current Federal radiation protection guidance. They are intended to serve as the basis for regulations setting upper bounds on the inhalation and ingestion of, and submersion in, radioactive materials in the workplace. The report also includes tables of exposure-to-dose conversion factors, for general use in assessing average individual committed doses in any population that is adequately characterized by Reference Man. 38 refs.

  15. A Pilot Study of Inhaled CO Therapy in Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia: Carboxyhemoglobin Concentrations and Brain Volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas-Escobar, Martha; Mendes, Monique; Rossignol, Candace; Bliznyuk, Nikolay; Faraji, Ariana; Ahmad, Abdullah S; Doré, Sylvain; Weiss, Michael D

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this pilot study was to start evaluating the efficacy and the safety (i.e., carboxyhemoglobin concentration of carbon monoxide (CO)) as a putative neuroprotective therapy in neonates. Study Design: Neonatal C57BL/6 mice were exposed to CO at a concentration of either 200 or 250 ppm for a period of 1 h. The pups were then sacrificed at 0, 10, 20, 60, 120, 180, and 240 min after exposure to either concentration of CO, and blood was collected for analysis of carboxyhemoglobin. Following the safety study, 7-day-old pups underwent a unilateral carotid ligation. After recovery, the pups were exposed to a humidified gas mixture of 8% oxygen and 92% nitrogen for 20 min in a hypoxia chamber. One hour after the hypoxia exposure, the pups were randomized to one of two groups: air (HI+A) or carbon monoxide (HI+CO). An inhaled dose of 250 ppm of CO was administered to the pups for 1 h per day for a period of 3 days. At 7 days post-injury, the pups were sacrificed and the brains analyzed for cortical and hippocampal volumes. Results: CO exposure at 200 and 250 ppm produced a peak carboxyhemoglobin concentration of 21.52 ± 1.18% and 27.55 ± 3.58%, respectively. The carboxyhemoglobin concentrations decreased rapidly, reaching control concentrations by 60 min post exposure. At 14 days of age (7 days post injury), the HI+CO (treated with 1 h per day of 250 ppm of CO for 3 days post injury) had significant preservation of the ratio of ipsilateral to contralateral cortex (median 1.07, 25% 0.97, 75% 1.23, n = 10) compared the HI+A group ( p carboxyhemoglobin concentrations which would induce acute neurologic abnormalities and was effective in preserving cortical volumes following hypoxic-ischemic injury.

  16. 6.6-hour inhalation of ozone concentrations from 60 to 87 parts per billion in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelegle, Edward S; Morales, Christopher A; Walby, William F; Marion, Susan; Allen, Roblee P

    2009-08-01

    Identification of the minimal ozone (O(3)) concentration and/or dose that induces measurable lung function decrements in humans is considered in the risk assessment leading to establishing an appropriate National Ambient Air Quality Standard for O(3) that protects public health. To identify and/or predict the minimal mean O(3) concentration that produces a decrement in FEV(1) and symptoms in healthy individuals completing 6.6-hour exposure protocols. Pulmonary function and subjective symptoms were measured in 31 healthy adults (18-25 yr, male and female, nonsmokers) who completed five 6.6-hour chamber exposures: filtered air and four variable hourly patterns with mean O(3) concentrations of 60, 70, 80, and 87 parts per billion (ppb). Compared with filtered air, statistically significant decrements in FEV(1) and increases in total subjective symptoms scores (P < 0.05) were measured after exposure to mean concentrations of 70, 80, and 87 ppb O(3). The mean percent change in FEV(1) (+/-standard error) at the end of each protocol was 0.80 +/- 0.90, -2.72 +/- 1.48, -5.34 +/- 1.42, -7.02 +/- 1.60, and -11.42 +/- 2.20% for exposure to filtered air and 60, 70, 80, and 87 ppb O(3), respectively. Inhalation of 70 ppb O(3) for 6.6 hours, a concentration below the current 8-hour National Ambient Air Quality Standard of 75 ppb, is sufficient to induce statistically significant decrements in FEV(1) in healthy young adults.

  17. Model for deposition and long-term disposition of 134Cs-labeled fused aluminosilicate particles inhaled by guinea pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snipes, M.B.; McClellan, R.O.

    1986-01-01

    When considering which laboratory animal species to use in inhalation studies, it is important to evaluate the similarities and differences in deposition and fate of the inhaled materials in various laboratory animals compared with humans. Beagle dogs have deposition and clearance patterns of inhaled particles similar to humans. However, some studies require smaller laboratory animals to be cost effective or to allow an adequate number of animals to address the scientific questions. This study evaluated the deposition and clearance of a relatively insoluble aerosol inhaled by guinea pigs. The test aerosol was monodisperse 134 Cs-labeled fused aluminosilicate particles inhaled during 75 minute inhalation exposure. The guinea pigs had deposition similar to rats but respiratory tract retention and clearance patterns were similar to dogs and humans. 5 references, 2 figures, 1 table

  18. Lung cancer and inhaled uranium ore dust in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchel, R.E.J.; Jackson, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    Using a nose only inhalation system, 187 nine week old male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to two different concentrations of natural uranium ore dust aerosol (44% U) without significant radon content. Inhalation exposures averaged about 4.2 h/day, 5 days/week for 65 weeks at which point lung uranium burdens in the two groups averaged 0.9 and 1.9 mg/g dry weight. Animals (63) exposed to the air stream without dust served as controls. After inhalation exposure ceased, the rats were allowed to live for their natural lifetime, a maximum of about 900 days after the start of dust inhalation. Lung uranium burdens were measured at the time of death of each animal. Lung burdens were found to decline exponentially after dust inhalation ceased, and the rate of decline was independent of the initial lung burden. All lungs were examined at necropsy and histologically for lung tumors. Lung tumors of lung origin were observed in both exposed groups and in the control group. The frequency of primary malignant lung tumors was 0.016, 0.175 and 0.328 and primary non-malignant lung tumors 0.016, 0.135 and 0.131 in the control low and high aerosol exposed groups respectively. Absorbed dose to the lung was calculated for each animal in the study. The average maximum doses for all the animals exposed to the low or high concentration of dust aerosol were 0.87 Gy and 1.64 Gy respectively. The average risk of malignant lung tumors from inhaled natural uranium ore dust was therefore about 0.20 tumors/animal/Gy. For animals with lung tumors, the average doses were 0.98 and 1.90 in the exposed groups. In both exposed groups, the frequency of primary malignant or non-malignant lung tumors was significantly greater than in the control group (p < 0.02) and the frequency of primary malignant lung tumors in the two exposed group were significantly different from each other (p = 0.05). The frequency of primary lung tumors (malignant and non-malignant) was calculated as a function of dose

  19. Fate of inhaled azodicarbonamide in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mewhinney, J.A.; Ayres, P.H.; Bechtold, W.E.; Dutcher, J.S.; Cheng, Y.S.; Bond, J.A.; Medinsky, M.A.; Henderson, R.F.; Birnbaum, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    Azodicarbonamide (ADA) is widely used as a blowing agent in the manufacture of expanded foam plastics, as an aging and bleaching agent in flour, and as a bread dough conditioner. Human exposures have been reported during manufacture as well as during use. Groups of male F344/N rats were administered ADA by gavage, by intratracheal instillation, and by inhalation exposure to determine the disposition and modes of excretion of ADA and its metabolites. At 72 hr following gavage, 30% of the administered ADA was absorbed whereas following intratracheal instillation, absorption was 90%. Comparison between groups of rats exposed by inhalation to ADA to achieve body burdens of 24 or 1230 micrograms showed no significant differences in modes or rates of excretion of [ 14 C]ADA equivalents. ADA was readily converted to biurea under physiological conditions and biurea was the only 14 C-labeled compound present in excreta. [ 14 C]ADA equivalents were present in all examined tissues immediately after inhalation exposure, and clearance half-times on the order of 1 day were evident for all tissues investigated. Storage depots for [ 14 C]ADA equivalents were not observed. The rate of buildup of [ 14 C]ADA equivalents in blood was linearly related to the lung content as measured from rats withdrawn at selected times during a 6-hr inhalation exposure at an aerosol concentration of 25 micrograms ADA/liter. In a study extending 102 days after exposure, retention of [ 14 C]ADA equivalents in tissues was described by a two-component negative exponential function. The results from this study indicate that upon inhalation, ADA is rapidly converted to biurea and that biurea is then eliminated rapidly from all tissues with the majority of the elimination via the urine

  20. Analysis of uncertainties in CRAC2 calculations: the inhalation pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killough, G.G.; Dunning, D.E. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    CRAC2 is a computer code for estimating the health effects and economic costs that might result from a release of radioactivity from a nuclear reactor to the environment. This paper describes tests of sensitivity of the predicted health effects to uncertainties in parameters associated with inhalation of the released radionuclides. These parameters are the particle size of the carrier aerosol and, for each element in the release, the clearance parameters for the lung model on which the code's dose conversion factors for inhalation are based. CRAC2 uses hourly meteorological data and a straight-line Gaussian plume model to predict the transport of airborne radioactivity; it includes models for plume depletion and population evacuation, and data for the distributions of population and land use. The code can compute results for single weather sequences, or it can perform random sampling of weather sequences from the meteorological data file and compute results for each weather sequence in the sample. For the work described in this paper, we concentrated on three fixed weather sequences that represent a range of conditions. For each fixed weather sequence, we applied random sampling to joint distributions of the inhalation parameters in order to estimate the sensitivity of the predicted health effects. All sampling runs produced coefficients of variation that were less than 50%, but some differences of means between weather sequences were substantial, as were some differences between means and the corresponding CRAC2 results without random sampling. Early injuries showed differences of as much as 1 to 2 orders of magnitude, while the differences in early fatalities were less than a factor of 2. Latent cancer fatalities varied by less than 10%. 19 references, 6 figures, 3 tables

  1. Inhaled Antibiotic Therapy in Chronic Respiratory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego J. Maselli

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The management of patients with chronic respiratory diseases affected by difficult to treat infections has become a challenge in clinical practice. Conditions such as cystic fibrosis (CF and non-CF bronchiectasis require extensive treatment strategies to deal with multidrug resistant pathogens that include Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia species and non-tuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM. These challenges prompted scientists to deliver antimicrobial agents through the pulmonary system by using inhaled, aerosolized or nebulized antibiotics. Subsequent research advances focused on the development of antibiotic agents able to achieve high tissue concentrations capable of reducing the bacterial load of difficult-to-treat organisms in hosts with chronic respiratory conditions. In this review, we focus on the evidence regarding the use of antibiotic therapies administered through the respiratory system via inhalation, nebulization or aerosolization, specifically in patients with chronic respiratory diseases that include CF, non-CF bronchiectasis and NTM. However, further research is required to address the potential benefits, mechanisms of action and applications of inhaled antibiotics for the management of difficult-to-treat infections in patients with chronic respiratory diseases.

  2. Appropriate xenon-inhalation speed in xenon-enhanced CT using the end-tidal gas-sampling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, Sadao; Toya, Shigeo; Kawase, Takeshi; Koyama, Hideki; Shiga, Hayao

    1986-01-01

    This report describes some problems when end-tidal xenon gas is substituted for the arterial xenon concentration in xenon-enhanced CT. The authors used a newly developed xenon inhalator with a xenon-gas-concentration analyzer and performed xenon-enhanced CT by means of the ''arterio-venous shunt'' method and the ''end-tidal gas-sampling'' method simultaneously. By the former method, the arterial build-up rate (K) was obtained directly from the CT slices of a blood circuit passing through the phantom. By the latter method, it was calculated from the xenon concentration of end-tidal gas sampled from the mask. The speed of xenon supply was varied between 0.6 - 1.2 L/min. in 11 patients with or without a cerebral lesion. The results revealed that rapid xenon inhalation caused a discrepancy in the arterial K between the ''shunt'' method and the ''end-tidal'' method. This discrepancy may be responsible for the mixing of inhalated gas and expired gas in respiratory dead space, such as the nasal cavity or the mask. The cerebral blood flow was underestimated because of the higher arterial K in the latter method. Too much slow inhalation, however, was timewasting, and it increased the body motion in the subanesthetic state. Therefore, an inhalation speed of the arterial K of as much as 0.2 was ideal to represent the end-tidal xenon concentration for the arterial K in the ''end-tidal gas-sampling'' method. When attention is given to this point, this method may offer a reliable absolute value in xenon-enhanced CT. (author)

  3. Cure of tuberculosis despite serum concentrations of antituberculosis drugs below published reference ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Monica; Corti, Natascia; Müller, Daniel; Henning, Lars; Gutteck, Ursula; von Braun, Amrei; Weber, Rainer; Fehr, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic target serum concentrations of first-line antituberculosis drugs have not been well defined in clinical studies in tuberculosis (TB) patients. We retrospectively investigated the estimated maximum serum concentrations (eC max) of antituberculosis drugs and clinical outcome of TB patients with therapeutic drug monitoring performed between 2010-2012 at our institution, and follow-up until March 2014. The eC max was defined as the highest serum concentration during a sampling period (2, 4 and 6 hours after drug ingestion). We compared the results with published eC max values, and categorised them as either "within reference range", "low eC max", or "very low eC max".Low/very low eC max-levels were defined as follows: isoniazid 2-3/max levels were classified as "low" or "very low". The eC max was below the relevant reference range in 80% of isoniazid, 95% of rifampicin, 30% of pyrazinamide, and 30% of ethambutol measurements. All but one patient were cured of tuberculosis. Although many antituberculosis drug serum concentrations were below the widely used reference ranges, 16 of 17 patients were cured of tuberculosis. These results challenge the use of the published reference ranges for therapeutic drug monitoring.

  4. Reference Brain/Blood Concentrations of Citalopram, Duloxetine, Mirtazapine and Sertraline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedahl, Michael; Johansen, Sys Stybe; Linnet, Kristian

    2018-01-01

    Postmortem blood samples may not accurately reflect antemortem drug concentrations, as the levels of some drugs increase due to postmortem redistribution (PMR). The brain has been suggested as an alternative sampling site. The anatomically secluded site of the brain limits redistribution and prol.......85), whereas the median citalopram/N-desmethylcitalopram ratio was higher in brain (9.1) than blood (4.1). The results of this study may serve as reference concentrations in brain for forensic cases....

  5. Modeled exposure assessment via inhalation and dermal pathways to airborne semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in residences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shanshan; Zhao, Bin

    2014-05-20

    Exposure to airborne semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in indoor and outdoor environments of humans may lead to adverse health risks. Thus, we established a model to evaluate exposure to airborne SVOCs. In this model, SVOCs phase-specific concentrations were estimated by a kinetic partition model accounting for particle dynamics. The exposure pathways to airborne SVOCs included inhalation exposure to gas- and particle-phases, dermal exposure by direct gas-to-skin pathway and dermal exposure by direct particle deposition. Exposures of defined "reference people" to two typical classifications of SVOCs, one generated from both indoor and outdoor sources, represented by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and the other generated mainly from only indoor sources, represented by di 2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), were analyzed as an example application of the model. For PAHs with higher volatility, inhalation exposure to gas-phase, ranging from 6.03 to 16.4 ng/kg/d, accounted for the most of the exposure to the airborne phases. For PAHs with lower volatility, inhalation exposure to particle-phase, ranging from 1.48 to 1.53 ng/kg/d, was the most important exposure pathway. As for DEHP, dermal exposure via direct gas-to-skin pathway was 460 ng/kg/d, which was the most striking exposure pathway when the barrier effect of clothing was neglected.

  6. Ciclesonide Oral Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... use ciclesonide inhalation.Ciclesonide inhalation helps to prevent asthma attacks (sudden episodes of shortness of breath, wheezing, and coughing) but will not stop an asthma attack that has already started. Do not use ciclesonide ...

  7. Flunisolide Oral Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... use flunisolide inhalation.Flunisolide inhalation helps to prevent asthma attacks (sudden episodes of shortness of breath, wheezing, and coughing) but will not stop an asthma attack that has already started. Do not use flunisolide ...

  8. Passive inhalation of cannabis smoke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, B; Mason, P A; Moffat, A C; King, L J; Marks, V

    1984-09-01

    Six volunteers each smoked simultaneously, in a small unventilated room (volume 27 950 liter), a cannabis cigarette containing 17.1 mg delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). A further four subjects - passive inhalers - remained in the room during smoking and afterwards for a total of 3 h. Blood and urine samples were taken from all ten subjects and analyzed by radioimmunoassay for THC metabolites. The blood samples from the passive subjects taken up to 3 h after the start of exposure to cannabis smoke showed a complete absence of cannabinoids. In contrast, their urine samples taken up to 6 h after exposure showed significant concentrations of cannabinoid metabolites (less than or equal to 6.8 ng ml-1). These data, taken with the results of other workers, show passive inhalation of cannabis smoke to be possible. These results have important implications for forensic toxicologists who are frequently called upon to interpret cannabinoid levels in body fluids.

  9. Inhaled delivery of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) to rats by e-cigarette vapor technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Jacques D; Aarde, Shawn M; Vandewater, Sophia A; Grant, Yanabel; Stouffer, David G; Parsons, Loren H; Cole, Maury; Taffe, Michael A

    2016-10-01

    Most human Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) use is via inhalation, and yet few animal studies of inhalation exposure are available. Popularization of non-combusted methods for the inhalation of psychoactive drugs (Volcano(®), e-cigarettes) further stimulates a need for rodent models of this route of administration. This study was designed to develop and validate a rodent chamber suitable for controlled exposure to vaporized THC in a propylene glycol vehicle, using an e-cigarette delivery system adapted to standard size, sealed rat housing chambers. The in vivo efficacy of inhaled THC was validated using radiotelemetry to assess body temperature and locomotor responses, a tail-flick assay for nociception and plasma analysis to verify exposure levels. Hypothermic responses to inhaled THC in male rats depended on the duration of exposure and the concentration of THC in the vehicle. The temperature nadir was reached after ∼40 min of exposure, was of comparable magnitude (∼3 °Celsius) to that produced by 20 mg/kg THC, i.p. and resolved within 3 h (compared with a 6 h time course following i.p. THC). Female rats were more sensitive to hypothermic effects of 30 min of lower-dose THC inhalation. Male rat tail-flick latency was increased by THC vapor inhalation; this effect was blocked by SR141716 pretreatment. The plasma THC concentration after 30 min of inhalation was similar to that produced by 10 mg/kg THC i.p. This approach is flexible, robust and effective for use in laboratory rats and will be of increasing utility as users continue to adopt "vaping" for the administration of cannabis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Is the human nasal cavity at risk from inhaled radionuclides?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boecker, B.B.; Hahn, F.F.; Cuddihy, R.G.; Snipes, M.B.; McClellan, R.O.

    1986-01-01

    In a series of three life-span studies in which beagle dogs inhaled relatively soluble forms of beta-emitting radionuclides, a number of cancers of the nasal cavity have arisen at long times after the inhalation exposure. No such cancers were observed in the control dogs. Data obtained in other studies involving serial sacrifice of dogs that received these radionuclides in similar forms have shown that high local concentrations of the radionuclides can persist in nasal turbinates for long periods of time, depending on the physical half-life of the radionuclide inhaled. Several nasal carcinomas have also been observed in dogs injected with 137 CsCl in which the relative concentrations of beta activity in the turbinate region were not as pronounced as in the above studies. Similar risks of sinonasal cancer were calculated for dogs in each of these studies regardless of differences in radionuclide, dosimetry, and route of administration. Since sinonasal cancers have occurred in people exposed to alpha-emitting radionuclides, it is reasonable to assume this could occur with beta emitters as well. Radiation protection guidelines should account for the sinonasal region being at risk. 23 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs

  11. Pharmacokinetics of inhaled anesthetics in green iguanas (Iguana iguana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Robert J; Pypendop, Bruno H; Barter, Linda S; Hawkins, Michelle G

    2006-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that differences in anesthetic uptake and elimination in iguanas would counter the pharmacokinetic effects of blood:gas solubility and thus serve to minimize kinetic differences among inhaled agents. 6 green iguanas (Iguana iguana). Iguanas were anesthetized with isoflurane, sevoflurane, or desflurane in a Latin-square design. Intervals from initial administration of an anesthetic agent to specific induction events and from cessation of administration of an anesthetic agent to specific recovery events were recorded. End-expired gas concentrations were measured during anesthetic washout. Significant differences were not detected for any induction or recovery events for any inhalation agent in iguanas. Washout curves best fit a 2-compartment model, but slopes for both compartments did not differ significantly among the 3 anesthetics. Differences in blood:gas solubility for isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane did not significantly influence differences in pharmacokinetics for the inhalation agents in iguanas.

  12. Neptunium: a bibliographic reference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosley, R.E.

    1979-06-01

    A comprehensive bibliograhy of the literature on the element neptunium published prior to January 1976 is presented. A short abstract is given for each listed reference, with a few exceptions. The references are divided into sections categorized as General, Man-Made Sources (Reactors), Man-Made Sources (Fuel Reprocessing), Chemistry (Solubility), Chemistry (Compounds), Chemistry (Isotopes), Analyses (Instrumental), Analyses (Chemical), Chemical (Animal), Biological (Effects), Biological (Animal-Metabolism-Retention), Biological (Air Movement), Biological (Human Inhalation), Measurement, and Dosimetry. The bibliography contains author and keyword indexes and was compiled to serve as a quick reference source for neptunium-related work. 184 citations

  13. Systematic Review Protocol for the IRIS Chloroform Assessment (Inhalation) (Preliminary Assessment Materials)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In January 2018, EPA released the Systematic Review Protocol for the IRIS Chloroform Assessment (Inhalation). As part of developing a draft IRIS assessment, EPA presents a methods document, referred to as the protocol, for conducting a chemical-specific systematic revie...

  14. Combined usage of inhaled and intravenous milrinone in pulmonary hypertension after heart valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carev, Mladen; Bulat, Cristijan; Karanović, Nenad; Lojpur, Mihajlo; Jercić, Antonio; Nenadić, Denis; Marovih, Zlatko; Husedzinović, Ino; Letica, Dalibor

    2010-09-01

    Secondary pulmonary hypertension is a frequent condition after heart valve surgery. It may significantly complicate the perioperative management and increase patients' morbidity and mortality. The treatment has not been yet completely defined principally because of lack of the selectivity of drugs for the pulmonary vasculature. The usage of inhaled milrinone could be the possible therapeutic option. Inodilator milrinone is commonly used intravenously for patients with pulmonary hypertension and ventricular dysfunction in cardiac surgery. The decrease in systemic vascular resistance frequently necessitates concomitant use of norepinephrine. Pulmonary vasodilators might be more effective and also devoid of potentially dangerous systemic side effects if applied by inhalation, thus acting predominantly on pulmonary circulation. There are only few reports of inhaled milrinone usage in adult post cardiac surgical patients. We reported 2 patients with severe pulmonary hypertension after valve surgery. Because of desperate clinical situation, we decided to use the combination of inhaled and intravenous milrinone. Inhaled milrinone was delivered by means of pneumatic medication nebulizer dissolved with saline in final concentration of 0.5 mg/ml. The nebulizer was attached to the inspiratory limb of the ventilator circuit, just before the Y-piece. We obtained satisfactory reduction in mean pulmonary artery pressure in both patients, and they were successfully extubated and discharged. Although it is a very small sample of patients, we conclude that the combination of inhaled and intravenous milrinone could be an effective treatment of secondary pulmonary hypertension in high-risk cardiac valve surgery patient. The exact indications for inhaled milrinone usage, optimal concentrations for this route, and the beginning and duration of treatment are yet to be determined.

  15. A combined experimental and numerical study on upper airway dosimetry of inhaled nanoparticles from an electrical discharge machine shop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lin; Shang, Yidan; Chen, Rui; Bai, Ru; Chen, Chunying; Inthavong, Kiao; Tu, Jiyuan

    2017-07-12

    Exposure to nanoparticles in the workplace is a health concern to occupational workers with increased risk of developing respiratory, cardiovascular, and neurological disorders. Based on animal inhalation study and human lung tumor risk extrapolation, current authoritative recommendations on exposure limits are either on total mass or number concentrations. Effects of particle size distribution and the implication to regional airway dosages are not elaborated. Real time production of particle concentration and size distribution in the range from 5.52 to 98.2 nm were recorded in a wire-cut electrical discharge machine shop (WEDM) during a typical working day. Under the realistic exposure condition, human inhalation simulations were performed in a physiologically realistic nasal and upper airway replica. The combined experimental and numerical study is the first to establish a realistic exposure condition, and under which, detailed dose metric studies can be performed. In addition to mass concentration guided exposure limit, inhalation risks to nano-pollutant were reexamined accounting for the actual particle size distribution and deposition statistics. Detailed dosimetries of the inhaled nano-pollutants in human nasal and upper airways with respect to particle number, mass and surface area were discussed, and empirical equations were developed. An astonishing enhancement of human airway dosages were detected by current combined experimental and numerical study in the WEDM machine shop. Up to 33 folds in mass, 27 folds in surface area and 8 folds in number dosages were detected during working hours in comparison to the background dosimetry measured at midnight. The real time particle concentration measurement showed substantial emission of nano-pollutants by WEDM machining activity, and the combined experimental and numerical study provided extraordinary details on human inhalation dosimetry. It was found out that human inhalation dosimetry was extremely sensitive

  16. Evaluation of factors that allow the clinician to taper inhaled corticosteroids in childhood asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Matsuda

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhaled corticosteroids are potent and effective treatment agents for controlling symptoms of childhood asthma. However, there are no predictive factors that help to determine which patients with asthma are likely to be tapered off inhaled corticosteroids successfully. We examined whether any factor or combination of factors could help the clinician safely discontinue inhaled steroid therapy. Thirty-six asthmatic children whose symptoms were stable on low-dose beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP were divided by parental choice into two groups: maintenance BDP (n = 11 and no BDP (n = 25. Methacholine inhalation tests were performed at the beginning of the study and after 1 month. Twelve children (48% who had BDP discontinued developed exacerbations after 2–3 months, whereas there were no problems in the maintenance group. The no BDP group was retrospectively divided into two subgroups: exacerbation (+ and (−. The threshold to methacholine in the exacerbation (+ subgroup decreased significantly in advance of clinical symptoms. The two subgroups were analyzed statistically by two-group discriminant function analysis. The change in threshold to methacholine, the dose and potency of drugs, duration of asthma and gender (female correlated with exacerbation. These results suggest that discontinuation of inhaled steroids should be done carefully, even in stable asthmatic children. The methacholine inhalation test, gender, drugs and history may be used as references for discontinuing inhaled steroids.

  17. A Pilot Study of Inhaled CO Therapy in Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia: Carboxyhemoglobin Concentrations and Brain Volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Douglas-Escobar

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this pilot study was to start evaluating the efficacy and the safety (i.e., carboxyhemoglobin concentration of carbon monoxide (CO as a putative neuroprotective therapy in neonates.Study Design: Neonatal C57BL/6 mice were exposed to CO at a concentration of either 200 or 250 ppm for a period of 1 h. The pups were then sacrificed at 0, 10, 20, 60, 120, 180, and 240 min after exposure to either concentration of CO, and blood was collected for analysis of carboxyhemoglobin. Following the safety study, 7-day-old pups underwent a unilateral carotid ligation. After recovery, the pups were exposed to a humidified gas mixture of 8% oxygen and 92% nitrogen for 20 min in a hypoxia chamber. One hour after the hypoxia exposure, the pups were randomized to one of two groups: air (HI+A or carbon monoxide (HI+CO. An inhaled dose of 250 ppm of CO was administered to the pups for 1 h per day for a period of 3 days. At 7 days post-injury, the pups were sacrificed and the brains analyzed for cortical and hippocampal volumes.Results: CO exposure at 200 and 250 ppm produced a peak carboxyhemoglobin concentration of 21.52 ± 1.18% and 27.55 ± 3.58%, respectively. The carboxyhemoglobin concentrations decreased rapidly, reaching control concentrations by 60 min post exposure. At 14 days of age (7 days post injury, the HI+CO (treated with 1 h per day of 250 ppm of CO for 3 days post injury had significant preservation of the ratio of ipsilateral to contralateral cortex (median 1.07, 25% 0.97, 75% 1.23, n = 10 compared the HI+A group (p < 0.05.Conclusion: CO exposure of 250 ppm did not reach carboxyhemoglobin concentrations which would induce acute neurologic abnormalities and was effective in preserving cortical volumes following hypoxic-ischemic injury.

  18. Combined effects of inhalation of Radon daughter products and tobacco smoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chameaud, J.; Perraud, R.; Chretien, J.; Masse, R.; Lafuma, J.

    1980-01-01

    Over the last 10 years, more than 500 lung cancers have been induced in rats by inhalations of radon daughter products at various concentrations and cumulated doses. These cancers were compared with human cancers. Another study examines the cocarcinogenic effect of tobacco smoke. In the first experiment, 100 rats were exposed to a 4000-WLM (working level month) cumulated dose of radon daughter products. Fifty animals were then administered tobacco smoke by inhalation in a fume box during 5 months (i.e., for a total of 352 hr). In the group inhaling radon only, 17 cancers appeared; in the radon-tobacco group, 32 cancers were observed, many of them larger and more invasive than those seen in animals exposed to radon only. Under the same conditions tobacco smoke was inhaled by rats previously exposed to lower doses of radon daughter products (two groups of 30 rats each, at 500 and 100 WLM, respectively). Again, the number of cancers observed was greater than the number of cancers expected if the rats had inhaled radon only. The carcinogenic and potentiating action of tobacco smoke was clearly demonstrated

  19. Acute Impact of Inhaled Short Acting B-Agonists on 5 Km Running Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Dickinson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Whilst there appears to be no ergogenic effect from inhaled salbutamol no study has investigated the impact of the acute inhalation of 1600 µg, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA daily upper limit, on endurance running performance. To investigate the ergogenic effect of an acute inhalation of short acting β2-agonists at doses up to 1600 µg on 5 km time trial performance and resultant urine concentration. Seven male non-asthmatic runners (mean ± SD; age 22.4 ± 4.3 years; height 1.80 ± 0.07 m; body mass 76.6 ± 8.6 kg provided written informed consent. Participants completed six 5 km time-trials on separate days (three at 18 °C and three at 30 °C. Fifteen minutes prior to the initiation of each 5 km time-trial participants inhaled: placebo (PLA, 800 µg salbutamol (SAL800 or 1600 µg salbutamol (SAL1600. During each 5 km time-trial HR, VO2, VCO2, VE, RPE and blood lactate were measured. Urine samples (90 ml were collected between 30-180 minutes post 5 km time-trial and analysed for salbutamol concentration. There was no significant difference in total 5 km time between treatments (PLA 1714.7 ± 186.2 s; SAL800 1683.3 ± 179.7 s; SAL1600 1683.6 ± 190.7 s. Post 5 km time-trial salbutamol urine concentration between SAL800 (122.96 ± 69.22 ug·ml-1 and SAL1600 (574.06 ± 448.17 ug·ml-1 were not significantly different. There was no improvement in 5 km time-trial performance following the inhalation of up to 1600 µg of salbutamol in non-asthmatic athletes. This would suggest that the current WADA guidelines, which allow athletes to inhale up to 1600 µg per day, is sufficient to avoid pharmaceutical induced performance enhancement.

  20. Postmortem Quetiapine Reference Concentrations in Brain and Blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Louise; Johansen, Sys Stybe; Linnet, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    and related to concentrations in postmortem blood. For cases, where quetiapine was unrelated to the cause of death (N 5 36), the 10–90 percentiles for quetiapine concentrations in brain tissue were 0.030 – 1.54 mg/kg (median 0.48 mg/kg, mean 0.79 mg/kg). Corresponding blood 10 –90 percentile values were 0.......007 – 0.39 mg/kg (median 0.15 mg/kg, mean 0.19 mg/kg), giving brain –blood ratio 10 –90 percentiles of 2.31 – 6.54 (median 3.87, mean 4.32). Both correspond well to the limited amount of data found in the literature. For cases where quetiapine was a contributing factor to death (N 5 5), the median value......Brain tissue is a useful alternative to blood in postmortem forensic investigations, but scarcity of information on reference concentrations in brain tissue makes interpretation challenging. Here we present a study of 43 cases where the antipsychotic drug quetiapine was quantified in brain tissue...

  1. Relationships between Personal Measurements of 'Total' Dust, Respirable, Thoracic, and Inhalable Aerosol Fractions in the Cement Production Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notø, Hilde P; Nordby, Karl-Christian; Eduard, Wijnand

    2016-05-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the relationships and establish conversion factors between 'total' dust, respirable, thoracic, and inhalable aerosol fractions measured by parallel personal sampling on workers from the production departments of cement plants. 'Total' dust in this study refers to aerosol sampled by the closed face 37-mm Millipore filter cassette. Side-by-side personal measurements of 'total' dust and respirable, thoracic, and inhalable aerosol fractions were performed on workers in 17 European and Turkish cement plants. Simple linear and mixed model regressions were used to model the associations between the samplers. The total number of personal samples collected on 141 workers was 512. Of these 8.4% were excluded leaving 469 for statistical analysis. The different aerosol fractions contained from 90 to 130 measurements and-side-by side measurements of all four aerosol fractions were collected on 72 workers.The median ratios between observed results of the respirable, 'total' dust, and inhalable fractions relative to the thoracic aerosol fractions were 0.51, 2.4, and 5.9 respectively. The ratios between the samplers were not constant over the measured concentration range and were best described by regression models. Job type, position of samplers on left or right shoulder and plant had no substantial effect on the ratios. The ratios between aerosol fractions changed with different air concentrations. Conversion models for estimation of the fractions were established. These models explained a high proportion of the variance (74-91%) indicating that they are useful for the estimation of concentrations based on measurements of a different aerosol fraction. The calculated uncertainties at most observed concentrations were below 30% which is acceptable for comparison with limit values (EN 482, 2012). The cement industry will therefore be able to predict the health related aerosol fractions from their former or future measurements of one of the

  2. Inhalant allergies in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mims, James W; Veling, Maria C

    2011-06-01

    Children with chronic or recurrent upper respiratory inflammatory disease (rhinitis) should be considered for inhalant allergies. Risk factors for inhalant allergies in children include a first-degree relative with allergies, food allergy in infancy, and atopic dermatitis. Although inhalant allergies are rare in infancy, inhalant allergies are common in older children and impair quality of life and productivity. Differentiating between viral and allergic rhinitis can be challenging in children, but the child's age, history, and risk factors can provide helpful information. Allergic rhinitis is a risk factor for asthma, and if one is present, medical consideration of the other is warranted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Inhalant Abuse and Dextromethorphan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storck, Michael; Black, Laura; Liddell, Morgan

    2016-07-01

    Inhalant abuse is the intentional inhalation of a volatile substance for the purpose of achieving an altered mental state. As an important, yet underrecognized form of substance abuse, inhalant abuse crosses all demographic, ethnic, and socioeconomic boundaries, causing significant morbidity and mortality in school-aged and older children. This review presents current perspectives on epidemiology, detection, and clinical challenges of inhalant abuse and offers advice regarding the medical and mental health providers' roles in the prevention and management of this substance abuse problem. Also discussed is the misuse of a specific "over-the-counter" dissociative, dextromethorphan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Inhaled Drug Delivery: A Practical Guide to Prescribing Inhaler Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Ernst

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct delivery of medication to the target organ results in a high ratio of local to systemic bioavailability and has made aerosol delivery of respiratory medication the route of choice for the treatment of obstructive lung diseases. The most commonly prescribed device is the pressurized metered dose inhaler (pMDI; its major drawback is the requirement that inspiration and actuation of the device be well coordinated. Other requirements for effective drug delivery include an optimal inspiratory flow, a full inspiration from functional residual capacity and a breath hold of at least 6 s. Available pMDIs are to be gradually phased out due to their use of atmospheric ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs as propellants. Newer pMDI devices using non-CFC propellants are available; preliminary experience suggests these devices greatly increase systemic bioavailability of inhaled corticosteroids. The newer multidose dry powder inhalation devices (DPIs are breath actuated, thus facilitating coordination with inspiration, and contain fewer ingredients. Furthermore, drug delivery is adequate even at low inspired flows, making their use appropriate in almost all situations. Equivalence of dosing among different devices for inhaled corticosteroids will remain imprecise, requiring the physician to adjust the dose of medication to the lowest dose that provides adequate control of asthma. Asthma education will be needed to instruct patients on the effective use of the numerous inhalation devices available.

  5. Inhalation dose assessment for Maralinga and Emu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, P.N.; Lokan, K.H.; Williams, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    Dose assessments for the inhalation of artificial radionuclides are presented for all types of contaminated areas at Maralinga and Emu. These enable Committed Effective Dose Equivalent (CEDE), to be estimated by scaling at any area of interest where activity concentrations are known. In the case of Aborigines, these dose are estimated assuming respirable dust loadings of 1 mg/m 3 for adults and 1.5 mg/m 3 for children and infants. Details of the calculations are presented in the appendix. The model of the respiratory system used in this assessment is that described in Interantional Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 30 (ICRP, 1979a). With the exception of Kuli, which is contaminated with uranium, at all other sites it is only the inhalation of plutonium and americium that contributes significantly to the dose, and of these 239 Pu is the largest contributor. Therefore, considering the long half lives of the radionuclides concerned, it appears that the inhalation problems highlighted by this dose assessment will not diminish significantly within any reasonable period of time and hence management strategies must be developed to deal with such problems. 32 refs., 5 tabs., 1 fig

  6. The Effects of Inhaled Steroids on Recurrent Wheeze After Acute Bronchiolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Green MD

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acute bronchiolitis infection during infancy is associated with an increased risk of asthma later in life. The objective of this study was to determine if inhaled steroids are effective in preventing the development of recurrent wheeze or asthma following acute bronchiolitis. Methods. Multiple databases and bibliographies of selected references were searched. Inclusion required (a a randomized controlled trial of inhaled steroids and control group, (b at least 2 weeks duration of therapy started during the acute phase of disease, and (c identification of the rate of recurrent wheeze or asthma at least 6 months after therapy. Results. Of 1410 studies reviewed, 8 reports were included in this meta-analysis (748 patients. The overall odds ratio for developing recurrent wheeze or asthma with treatment versus without treatment was 1.02 (95% confidence interval = 0.58-1.81. Conclusions. A course of inhaled steroids after acute bronchiolitis is not effective in preventing recurrent wheeze or asthma.

  7. DUST-BATHING BEHAVIORS OF AFRICAN HERBIVORES AND THE POTENTIAL RISK OF INHALATIONAL ANTHRAX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barandongo, Zoe R; Mfune, John K E; Turner, Wendy C

    2018-01-01

    :  Anthrax in herbivorous wildlife and livestock is generally assumed to be transmitted via ingestion or inhalation of Bacillus anthracis spores. Although recent studies have highlighted the importance of the ingestion route for anthrax transmission, little is known about the inhalational route in natural systems. Dust bathing could aerosolize soilborne pathogens such as B. anthracis, exposing dust-bathing individuals to inhalational infections. We investigated the potential role of dust bathing in the transmission of inhalational anthrax to herbivorous wildlife in Etosha National Park, Namibia, an area with endemic seasonal anthrax outbreaks. We 1) cultured soils from dust-bathing sites for the presence and concentration of B. anthracis spores, 2) monitored anthrax carcass sites, the locations with the highest B. anthracis concentrations, for evidence of dust bathing, including a site where a zebra died of anthrax on a large dust bath, and 3) characterized the ecology and seasonality of dust bathing in plains zebra ( Equus quagga), blue wildebeest ( Connochaetes taurinus), and African savanna elephant ( Loxodonta africana) using a combination of motion-sensing camera traps and direct observations. Only two out of 83 dust-bath soils were positive for B. anthracis, both with low spore concentrations (≤20 colony-forming units per gram). We also detected no evidence of dust baths occurring at anthrax carcass sites, perhaps due to carcass-induced changes in soil composition that may deter dust bathing. Finally, despite observing some seasonal variation in dust bathing, preliminary evidence suggests that the seasonality of dust bathing and anthrax mortalities are not correlated. Thus, although dust bathing creates a dramatic cloud of aerosolized soil around an individual, our microbiologic, ecologic, and behavioral results in concert demonstrate that dust bathing is highly unlikely to transmit inhalational anthrax infections.

  8. Evaluation of a novel educational strategy, including inhaler-based reminder labels, to improve asthma inhaler technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basheti, Iman A; Armour, Carol L; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia Z; Reddel, Helen K

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness of a brief intervention about inhaler technique, delivered by community pharmacists to asthma patients. Thirty-one pharmacists received brief workshop education (Active: n=16, CONTROL: n=15). Active Group pharmacists were trained to assess and teach dry powder inhaler technique, using patient-centered educational tools including novel Inhaler Technique Labels. Interventions were delivered to patients at four visits over 6 months. At baseline, patients (Active: 53, CONTROL: 44) demonstrated poor inhaler technique (mean+/-S.D. score out of 9, 5.7+/-1.6). At 6 months, improvement in inhaler technique score was significantly greater in Active cf. CONTROL patients (2.8+/-1.6 cf. 0.9+/-1.4, p<0.001), and asthma severity was significantly improved (p=0.015). Qualitative responses from patients and pharmacists indicated a high level of satisfaction with the intervention and educational tools, both for their effectiveness and for their impact on the patient-pharmacist relationship. A simple feasible intervention in community pharmacies, incorporating daily reminders via Inhaler Technique Labels on inhalers, can lead to improvement in inhaler technique and asthma outcomes. Brief training modules and simple educational tools, such as Inhaler Technique Labels, can provide a low-cost and sustainable way of changing patient behavior in asthma, using community pharmacists as educators.

  9. Inhalant Dependence and its Medical Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Hamid Boztaş

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The term of inhalants is used for matters easily vapors. Inhalants are preferred for rapid, positive reinforcement and mild high effects. Products including inhalants are cheap, accessible, legal substances and are prevalently used in community. The prevalence of inhalant use in secondary schools in Turkey is about 5.1%. Inhalant substance dependence is generally observed within 14-15 age group. Age at first use could be as low as 5 to 6 years of age. Substance dependence is more probable in adults working in substance existing places. Inhalant usage is common in disadvantaged groups, children living in street, people with history of crimes, prison, depression, suicide, antisocial attitudes and conflict of family, history of abuse, violence and any other drug dependence and isolated populations. Inhalants are absorbed from lungs, after performing their quick and short effect metabolized by cytochrom P450 enzyme system except inhalant nitrites group which has a depressing effect like alcohol. In chronic use general atrophy, ventricular dilatation and wide sulcus were shown in cerebrum, cerebellum and pons by monitoring brain. Defects are mostly in periventricular, subcortical regions and in white matter. Demyelinization, hyperintensity, callosal slimming and wearing off in white and gray matter margins was also found. Ravages of brain shown by brain monitorisation are more and serious in inhalant dependence than in other dependences. It is important to decrease use of inhalants. Different approaches should be used for subcultures and groups in prevention. Prohibiting all the matters including inhalant is not practical as there are too many substances including inhalants. Etiquettes showing harmful materials can be used but this approach can also lead the children and adolescents recognize these substances easily.. Despite determintal effects of inhalant dependence, there are not yet sufficient number of studies conducted on prevention and

  10. Inhalation of a dry powder ciprofloxacin formulation in healthy subjects: a phase I study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stass, Heino; Nagelschmitz, Johannes; Willmann, Stefan; Delesen, Heinz; Gupta, Abhishek; Baumann, Sybille

    2013-06-01

    Oral and intravenous formulations of ciprofloxacin have established efficacy and safety profiles in respiratory infections. A dry powder for inhalation (DPI) that uses Novartis' PulmoSphere™ technology has been developed to deliver high concentrations of ciprofloxacin to the lung with low systemic exposure using a portable and convenient passive dry powder inhaler (Novartis' T-326 inhaler). The primary objective was to investigate the safety and tolerability of ciprofloxacin DPI in healthy male subjects, with a secondary objective to investigate the pharmacokinetics of ciprofloxacin after ciprofloxacin DPI administration. This was a phase I, single-dose, single-site, randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study conducted in the hospital setting. Subjects were followed up for safety for approximately 2 weeks. Six healthy male subjects, aged 27-42 years with no history of pulmonary disease, repeated bronchitis or respiratory allergies were enrolled. In randomized order and separated by a 1-week washout period, subjects inhaled a single dose of ciprofloxacin DPI 32.5 mg or placebo from the T-326 inhaler. Primary safety parameters included vital signs, electrocardiogram, laboratory tests, adverse events and lung function (total specific resistance, thoracic gas volume and forced expiratory volume in 1 s). Plasma concentration-time data were used to calculate pharmacokinetic parameters. Ciprofloxacin DPI was well tolerated with no clinically relevant adverse effects on lung function. Estimates of lung deposition derived from physiology-based pharmacokinetic modelling suggest that approximately 40 % of the total dose of ciprofloxacin DPI reached the trachea/bronchi and alveolar space. Systemic ciprofloxacin was detected soon after inhalation [peak concentration in plasma (C(max)) 56.42 μg/L, median time to C max 0.625 h], but total systemic exposure was minimal (area under the plasma concentration-time curve 354.4 μg·h/L). Terminal elimination half

  11. Establishment and evaluation of a rat model of inhalation lung injury induced by ship smog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-xin DUAN

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To establish and evaluate a rat model of inhalation lung injury induced by ship smog. Methods A rat model of inhalation lung injury was established by analyzing the composition of ship materials after combustion. Forty- two healthy male Wistar rats were randomly divided into normal control group and 2, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72h groups (6 eachafter inhalation, these rats were killed at each time point, and the changes of arterial blood gas, coagulation function, the lung water content (% were detected. Macroscopic and microscopic changes in lung tissues were observed to judge the degree of lung injury. Results The main components after combustion of 7 kinds of nonmetal materials on ship included CO, CO2, H2S, NOx and other harmful gases in this study, AIKE in one gas detector was used to monitor O2, CO, CO2 and H2S, and their concentrations remained relatively stable within 15 minutes, and the injury time was 15 minutes. The rats presented with shortness of breath and mouth breathing. Smoke inhalation caused a significant hypoxemia, the concentration of blood COHb reached a peak value 2h and the lung water content (% did 6h after inhalation (P<0.05. It is metabolic acidosis in the early stage after inhalation, but metabolic acidosis combined with respiratory acidosis in the later period. Histopathological observation showed diffuse hemorrhage, edema and inflammatory cell infiltration in the lung tissue as manifestations of lung injury, and the injury did not recover at 72h after inhalation, the change of blood coagulation function was not statistically significant. Conclusion A rat model of inhalation lung injury induced by ship smog has been successfully established, and has the advantages of easy replication, stability and reliability, thus can be used to research and treat inhalation lung injury induced by ship smog in naval war environment and other cases. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2018.03.14

  12. Health worker exposure risk during inhalation sedation with sevoflurane using the (AnaConDa®) anaesthetic conserving device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rodríguez, R; Muñoz Martínez, A; Galan Serrano, J; Moral García, M V

    2014-03-01

    Occupational exposure to sevoflurane should not exceed 2 ppm. During inhalation sedation with sevoflurane using the anaesthetic conserving device (AnaConDa(®)) in the post-anaesthesia care unit, waste gases can be reduced by gas extraction systems or scavenging devices such as CONTRAfluran™. However, the efficacy of these methods has not been clearly established. To determine the safest scenario for healthcare workers during inhalation sedation with sevoflurane in the post-surgical intensive care unit. An experimental study on occupational exposure was conducted in a post-cardiothoracic care unit during March-August 2009. The measurements were performed in four post-cardiac surgery sedated adults in post-surgical intensive care unit and four nurses at the bedside, and at four points: scenario A, inhalation sedation without gas extraction system or contrafluran as a reference scenario; scenario B, applying a gas extraction system to the ventilator; scenario C, using contrafluran; and scenario 0, performing intravenous isolation sedation. Sevoflurane concentrations were measured in the nurses' breathing area during patient care, and at 1.5 and 8 m from the ventilator using diffusive passive monitor badges. All badges corresponding to the nurses' breathing area were below 2 ppm. Levels of sevoflurane detected using prevention systems were lower than that in the control situation. Only one determination over 2 ppm was found, corresponding to the monitor placed nearest the gas outlet of the ventilator in scenario A. Trace concentrations of sevoflurane were found in scenario 0 during intravenous sedation. Administration of sevoflurane through the AnaConDa(®) system during inhalation sedation in post-surgical intensive care units is safe for healthcare workers, but gas extraction systems or scavenging systems, such as CONTRAfluran™ should be used to reduce occupational exposure as much as possible. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimaci

  13. Diagnostic Utility of Total IgE in Foods, Inhalant, and Multiple Allergies in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mughales, Jamil A

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess the diagnostic significance of total IgE in foods, inhalant, and multiple allergies. Methods. Retrospective review of the laboratory records of patients who presented with clinical suspicion of food or inhalant allergy between January 2013 and December 2014. Total IgE level was defined as positive for a value >195 kU/L; and diagnosis was confirmed by the detection of specific IgE (golden standard) for at least one food or inhalant allergen and at least two allergens in multiple allergies. Results. A total of 1893 (male ratio = 0.68, mean age = 39.0 ± 19.2 years) patients were included. Total IgE had comparable sensitivity (55.8% versus 59.6%) and specificity (83.9% versus 84.4%) in food versus inhalant allergy, respectively, but a superior PPV in inhalant allergy (79.1% versus 54.4%). ROC curve analysis showed a better diagnostic value in inhalant allergies (AUC = 0.817 (95% CI = 0.796-0.837) versus 0.770 (95% CI = 0.707-0.833)). In multiple allergies, total IgE had a relatively good sensitivity (78.6%), while negative IgE testing (allergies with 91.5% certitude. Conclusion. Total IgE assay is not efficient as a diagnostic test for foods, inhalant, or multiple allergies. The best strategy should refer to specific IgE testing guided by a comprehensive atopic history.

  14. No correlation between initial arterial carboxyhemoglobin level and degree of lung injury following ovine burn and smoke inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Matthias; Cox, Robert A; Traber, Daniel L; Hamahata, Atsumori; Nakano, Yoshimitsu; Traber, Lillian D; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei

    2014-04-01

    Fire victims often suffer from burn injury and concomitant inhalation trauma, the latter significantly contributing to the morbidity and mortality in these patients. Measurement of blood carboxyhemoglobin levels has been proposed as a diagnostic marker to verify and, perhaps, quantify the degree of lung injury following inhalation trauma. However, this correlation has not yet been sufficiently validated. A total of 77 chronically instrumented sheep received sham injury, smoke inhalation injury, or combined burn and inhalation trauma following an established protocol. Arterial carboxyhemoglobin concentrations were determined directly after injury and correlated to several clinical and histopathological determinants of lung injury that were detected 48 hours post-injury. The injury induced severe impairment of pulmonary gas exchange and increases in transvascular fluid flux, lung water content, and airway obstruction scores. No significant correlations were detected between initial carboxyhemoglobin levels and all measured clinical and histopathological determinants of lung injury. In conclusion, the amount of arterial carboxyhemoglobin concentration cannot predict the degree of lung injury at 48 hours after ovine burn and smoke inhalation trauma.

  15. Evaluation of personal inhalable aerosol samplers with different filters for use during anthrax responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinshpun, Sergey A; Weber, Angela M; Yermakov, Michael; Indugula, Reshmi; Elmashae, Yousef; Reponen, Tiina; Rose, Laura

    2017-08-01

    Risk of inhalation exposure to viable Bacillus anthracis (B. anthracis) spores has primarily been assessed using short-term, stationary sampling methods which may not accurately characterize the concentration of inhalable-sized spores reaching a person's breathing zone. While a variety of aerosol sampling methods have been utilized during previous anthrax responses, no consensus has yet been established for personal air sampling. The goal of this study was to determine the best sampler-filter combination(s) for the collection and extraction of B. anthracis spores. The study was designed to (1) evaluate the performance of four filter types (one mixed cellulose ester, MCE (pore size = 3 µm), two polytetrafluoroethylene, PTFE (1 and 3 µm), and one polycarbonate, PC (3 µm)); and (2) evaluate the best performing filters in two commercially available inhalable aerosol samplers (IOM and Button). Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki [Bt(k)], a simulant for B. anthracis, served as the aerosol challenge. The filters were assessed based on criteria such as ability to maintain low pressure drop over an extended sampling period, filter integrity under various environmental conditions, spore collection and extraction efficiencies, ease of loading and unloading the filters into the samplers, cost, and availability. Three of the four tested collection filters-except MCE-were found suitable for efficient collection and recovery of Bt(k) spores sampled from dry and humid as well as dusty and clean air environments for up to 8 hr. The PC (3 µm) filter was identified as the best performing filter in this study. The PTFE (3 µm) demonstrated a comparable performance, but it is more expensive. Slightly higher concentrations were measured with the IOM inhalable sampler which is the preferred sampler's performance criterion when detecting a highly pathogenic agent with no established "safe" inhalation exposure level. Additional studies are needed to address the effects of

  16. Inhaled nitric oxide and high concentrations of oxygen in pediatrics patients with congenital cardiopathy and pulmonary hypertension: report of five cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werther Brunow de Carvalho

    Full Text Available Five patients with ages ranging from 6 months to 3 years were analyzed. All received inhaled nitric oxide (NO - 20 parts per million (ppm and oxygen (0(2 - at a concentration of 90-95% by means of an oxygen hood. Mean Pulmonary Artery Pressure (MPAP, Mean Aortic Pressure (MAoP, Pulmonary Vascular Resistance (PVR and Systemic Vascular Resistance (SVR were measured and the calculation of their relationship to pulmonary/systemic flow (Qp/Qs was performed by the catheterization' of the femoral artery vein. Three patients presented reduction in PVR and increase in Qp/Qs. There were no systemic alterations or any side effect from using NO.

  17. Commuter exposure to inhalable, thoracic and alveolic particles in various transportation modes in Delhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pramod; Gupta, N C

    2016-01-15

    A public health concern is to understand the linkages between specific pollution sources and adverse health impacts. Commuting can be viewed as one of the significant-exposure activity in high-vehicle density areas. This paper investigates the commuter exposure to inhalable, thoracic and alveolic particles in various transportation modes in Delhi, India. Air pollution levels are significantly contributed by automobile exhaust and also in-vehicle exposure can be higher sometime than ambient levels. Motorcycle, auto rickshaw, car and bus were selected to study particles concentration along two routes in Delhi between Kashmere Gate and Dwarka. The bus and auto rickshaw were running on compressed natural gas (CNG) while the car and motorcycle were operated on gasoline fuel. Aerosol spectrometer was employed to measure inhalable, thoracic and alveolic particles during morning and evening rush hours for five weekdays. From the study, we observed that the concentration levels of these particles were greatly influenced by transportation modes. Concentrations of inhalable particles were found higher during morning in auto rickshaw (332.81 ± 90.97 μg/m(3)) while the commuter of bus exhibited higher exposure of thoracic particles (292.23 ± 110.45 μg/m(3)) and car commuters were exposed to maximum concentrations of alveolic particles (222.37 ± 26.56 μg/m(3)). We observed that in evening car commuters experienced maximum concentrations of all sizes of particles among the four commuting modes. Interestingly, motorcycle commuters were exposed to lower levels of inhalable and thoracic particles during morning and evening hours as compared to other modes of transport. The mean values were found greater than the median values for all the modes of transport suggesting that positive skewed distributions are characteristics of naturally occurring phenomenon. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Reference values for the nickel concentration in human finger nails

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Peters, K; Menné, T

    1991-01-01

    A reference value for the nickel concentration in finger nails from people who are not occupationally exposed to nickel was determined on the basis of nail samples from 95 healthy individuals. The mean +/- standard deviation was 1.19 +/- 1.61 mg/kg and the median was 0.49 mg/kg (range 0.042-7.50 mg...

  19. Potential inhalation exposure and containment efficiency when using hoods for handling nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Candace Su-Jung, E-mail: tsai51@purdue.edu [Purdue University, School of Health Science (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Inhalation exposure to airborne nanoparticles (NPs) has been reported during manual activities using typical fume hoods. This research studied potential inhalation exposure associated with the manual handling of NPs using two new nanoparticle-handling enclosures and two biological safety cabinets, and discussed the ability to contain NPs in the hoods to reduce environmental release and exposure. Airborne concentrations of 5 nm to 20 {mu}m diameter particles were measured while handling nanoalumina particles in various ventilated enclosures. Tests were conducted using two handling conditions and concentrations were measured using real-time particle counters, and particles were collected on transmission electron microscope grids to determine particle morphology and elemental composition. Airflow patterns were characterized visually using a laser-light sheet and fog. The average number concentration increase at breathing zone outside the enclosure was less than 1,400 particle/cm{sup 3} for each particle size at all tested conditions and the estimated overall mass concentration was about 83 {mu}g/m{sup 3} which was less than the dosage of typical nanoparticle inhalation exposure studies. The typical front-to-back airflow was used in the studied hoods, which could potentially induce reverse turbulence in the wake region. However, containment of NPs using studied hoods was demonstrated with excellent performance. Smoke tests showed that worker's hand motion could potentially cause nanoparticle escape. The challenge of front-to-back airflow can be partially overcome by gentle motion, low face velocity, and front exhaust to reduce nanoparticle escape.

  20. Effectiveness of Aromatherapy Massage and Inhalation on Symptoms of Depression in Chinese Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Mei; Li, Yanzhang; Tang, Ping; Zhang, Yuping; Cao, Min; Ni, Junwei; Xing, Mengmeng

    2018-03-22

    Geriatric depression is a major public health problem in China. The study compared the intervention and follow-up effects of aromatherapy massage and inhalation on symptoms of depression in community-dwelling older adults after an 8-week intervention. A prospective, randomized controlled trial was conducted on community-dwelling adults ≥60 years old, with symptoms of depression. Participants were randomly assigned, by Latin Square, to aromatherapy massage, inhalation, or control groups (each n = 20). The aromatherapy massage group received 30 min of aromatherapy massage with 5 mL oil, twice weekly for 8 weeks. The oil contained 50 μL (one drop) of compound essential oils (lavender [Lavandula angustifolia], sweet orange [Citrus sinensis], and bergamot (Citrus bergamia in a 2:1:1 ratio)], diluted in sweet almond oil to a concentration of 1%. The aromatherapy inhalation group received 30 min of nasal inhalation of 50 μL of the compound essential oils blended in 10 mL of purified water, twice weekly for 8 weeks. The control group received no intervention. The Geriatric Depression Scale Short Form (GDS-SF) and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) were used for assessment at pretest, posttest, and 6- and 10-week follow-ups in all groups. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) concentration was assessed pretest and posttest. Postintervention, the aromatherapy massage and inhalation groups demonstrated significantly lower GDS-SF and PHQ-9 scores than control participants. Compared with the pretest, the GDS-SF and PHQ-9 scores for depressive symptoms in both experimental groups remained lower at posttest (8 weeks), 6-week (14 weeks), and 10-week (18 weeks) follow-ups. However, the GDS-SF and PHQ-9 scores did not differ among the four time points in the control group. The posttest 5-HT concentrations in the aromatherapy massage and inhalation groups were increased over pretest values. Both aromatherapy massage and aromatherapy inhalation may have important

  1. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... KB] Using a metered dose inhaler (inhaler in mouth) Your browser does not support iframes Using a metered dose inhaler (inhaler in mouth) [PDF – 370 KB] Your browser does not support ...

  2. Inhaled concentrated ambient particles are associated with hematologic and bronchoalveolar lavage changes in canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, R W; Coull, B; Reinisch, U; Catalano, P; Killingsworth, C R; Koutrakis, P; Kavouras, I; Murthy, G G; Lawrence, J; Lovett, E; Wolfson, J M; Verrier, R L; Godleski, J J

    2000-01-01

    factor. BAL or hematologic parameters were not associated with increases in total CAPs mass concentration. These data suggest that CAPs inhalation is associated with subtle alterations in pulmonary and systemic cell profiles, and specific components of CAPs may be responsible for these biologic responses. PMID:11133399

  3. A Systematic Analysis of the Sensitivity of Plasma Pharmacokinetics to Detect Differences in the Pulmonary Performance of Inhaled Fluticasone Propionate Products Using a Model-Based Simulation Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Benjamin; Hochhaus, Guenther

    2015-07-01

    The role of plasma pharmacokinetics (PK) for assessing bioequivalence at the target site, the lung, for orally inhaled drugs remains unclear. A validated semi-mechanistic model, considering the presence of mucociliary clearance in central lung regions, was expanded for quantifying the sensitivity of PK studies in detecting differences in the pulmonary performance (total lung deposition, central-to-peripheral lung deposition ratio, and pulmonary dissolution characteristics) between test (T) and reference (R) inhaled fluticasone propionate (FP) products. PK bioequivalence trials for inhaled FP were simulated based on this PK model for a varying number of subjects and T products. The statistical power to conclude bioequivalence when T and R products are identical was demonstrated to be 90% for approximately 50 subjects. Furthermore, the simulations demonstrated that PK metrics (area under the concentration time curve (AUC) and C max) are capable of detecting differences between T and R formulations of inhaled FP products when the products differ by more than 20%, 30%, and 25% for total lung deposition, central-to-peripheral lung deposition ratio, and pulmonary dissolution characteristics, respectively. These results were derived using a rather conservative risk assessment approach with an error rate of <10%. The simulations thus indicated that PK studies might be a viable alternative to clinical studies comparing pulmonary efficacy biomarkers for slowly dissolving inhaled drugs. PK trials for pulmonary efficacy equivalence testing should be complemented by in vitro studies to avoid false positive bioequivalence assessments that are theoretically possible for some specific scenarios. Moreover, a user-friendly web application for simulating such PK equivalence trials with inhaled FP is provided.

  4. Role of inhaled amphotericin in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I S Sehgal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA is an immunological pulmonary disorder caused by immune reactions mounted against the ubiquitous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. The disease clinically manifests with poorly controlled asthma, hemoptysis, systemic manifestations like fever, anorexia and weight loss, fleeting pulmonary opacities and bronchiectasis. The natural course of the disease is characterized by repeated episodes of exacerbations. Almost 30-40% of the patients require prolonged therapy, which currently consists of corticosteroids and anti-fungal azoles; both these agents have significant adverse reactions. Amphotericin B administered via the inhaled route can achieve a high concentration in the small airways with minimal systemic side-effects. Nebulized amphotericin B has been used in the management of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. The aim of this review is to study the utility of inhaled amphotericin in ABPA.

  5. Electrostatic Properties of Particles for Inhalation

    OpenAIRE

    Rowland, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Dry powder inhalers (DPIs) and pressurised metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) aredevices used to deliver therapeutic agents to the lungs. Typically, inhaled activepharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) are electrically resistive materials and are prone toaccumulating electrostatic charge. The build-up of charge on inhaled therapeutics hastraditionally been viewed as a nuisance as it may result in problems such as weighingerrors, agglomeration, adhesion to surfaces and poor flow. Energetic processing st...

  6. Inhaled americium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    This project includes experiments to determine the effects of Zn-DTPA therapy on the retention, translocation and biological effects of inhaled 241 AmO 2 . Beagle dogs that received inhalation exposure to 241 AmO 2 developed leukopenia, clincial chemistry changes associated with hepatocellular damage, and were euthanized due to respiratory insufficiency caused by radiation pneumonitis 120 to 131 days after pulmonary deposition of 22 to 65 μCi 241 Am. Another group of dogs that received inhalation exposure to 241 AmO 2 and were treated daily with Zn-DTPA had initial pulmonary deposition of 19 to 26 μCi 241 Am. These dogs did not develop respiratory insufficiency, and hematologic and clinical chemistry changes were less severe than in the non-DTPA-treated dogs

  7. Exposition by inhalation to the benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene and xylenes (BTEX) in the air. Sources, measures and concentrations; Exposition par inhalation au benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene et xylenes (BTEX) dans l'air. Source, mesures et concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Gratta, F.; Durif, M.; Fagault, Y.; Zdanevitch, I

    2004-12-15

    This document presents the main techniques today available to characterize the benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene and xylene (BTEX) concentrations in the air for different contexts: urban and rural areas or around industrial installations but also indoor and occupational area. It provides information to guide laboratories and research departments. A synthesis gives also the main emissions sources of these compounds as reference concentrations measured in different environments. (A.L.B.)

  8. Radiological Modeling for Determination of Derived Concentration Levels of an Area with Uranium Residual Material - 13533

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Sanchez, Danyl [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 40, 28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    As a result of a pilot project developed at the old Spanish 'Junta de Energia Nuclear' to extract uranium from ores, tailings materials were generated. Most of these residual materials were sent back to different uranium mines, but a small amount of it was mixed with conventional building materials and deposited near the old plant until the surrounding ground was flattened. The affected land is included in an area under institutional control and used as recreational area. At the time of processing, uranium isotopes were separated but other radionuclides of the uranium decay series as Th-230, Ra-226 and daughters remain in the residue. Recently, the analyses of samples taken at different ground's depths confirmed their presence. This paper presents the methodology used to calculate the derived concentration level to ensure that the reference dose level of 0.1 mSv y-1 used as radiological criteria. In this study, a radiological impact assessment was performed modeling the area as recreational scenario. The modelization study was carried out with the code RESRAD considering as exposure pathways, external irradiation, inadvertent ingestion of soil, inhalation of resuspended particles, and inhalation of radon (Rn-222). As result was concluded that, if the concentration of Ra-226 in the first 15 cm of soil is lower than, 0.34 Bq g{sup -1}, the dose would not exceed the reference dose. Applying this value as a derived concentration level and comparing with the results of measurements on the ground, some areas with a concentration of activity slightly higher than latter were found. In these zones the remediation proposal has been to cover with a layer of 15 cm of clean material. This action represents a reduction of 85% of the dose and ensures compliance with the reference dose. (authors)

  9. Acrolein inhalation alters myocardial synchrony and performance at and below exposure concentrations that cause ventilatory responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acrolein is an irritating aldehyde generated during combustion of organic compounds. Altered autonomic activity has been documented following acrolein inhalation, possibly impacting myocardial synchrony and function. Given the ubiquitous nature of acrolein in the environment, we ...

  10. Effect of Eucalyptus Oil Inhalation on Pain and Inflammatory Responses after Total Knee Replacement: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Suk Jun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Eucalyptus oil has been reported effective in reducing pain, swelling, and inflammation. This study aimed to investigate the effects of eucalyptus oil inhalation on pain and inflammatory responses after total knee replacement (TKR surgery. Participants were randomized 1 : 1 to intervention group (eucalyptus inhalation group or control group (almond oil inhalation group. Patients inhaled eucalyptus or almond oil for 30 min of continuous passive motion (CPM on 3 consecutive days. Pain on a visual analog scale (VAS, blood pressure, heart rate, C-reactive protein (CRP concentration, and white blood cell (WBC count were measured before and after inhalation. Pain VAS on all three days (P<.001 and systolic (P<.05 and diastolic (P=.03 blood pressure on the second day were significantly lower in the group inhaling eucalyptus than that inhaling almond oil. Heart rate, CRP, and WBC, however, did not differ significantly in the two groups. In conclusion, inhalation of eucalyptus oil was effective in decreasing patient's pain and blood pressure following TKR, suggesting that eucalyptus oil inhalation may be a nursing intervention for the relief of pain after TKR.

  11. Comparison of inhalation risks : oil- versus gas-fired urban power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, L.

    2000-01-01

    The risks due to inhalation of emitted trace substances from natural gas-fired power plants tend to be significantly lower than those from oil- or coal-fired plants. A 1994 study suggested that the median inhalation life-time cancer risk from gas-fired plants was about 4 in one billion. This is an acceptable risk range according to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) classification of risks. In the same study, median oil plant risks were 8 in one billion. coal plant median risks ranged from 2 to 3 in one billion depending on the grade of coal being burned. The US EPA classifies risks from 1 to one million to one to 10,000 as being in an acceptable risk range. In some cases, gas plants were shown to exhibit higher inhalation risks than oil plants due to terrain, air circulation patterns, enhanced stack or building downwash or mechanical turbulence. Higher concentrations of very potent trace substances could also result in high inhalation risks. An examination of several power plants in an urban area showed that initial judgements about risk can often be incorrect

  12. Effects of various timings and concentrations of inhaled nitric oxide in lung ischemia-reperfusion. The Paris-Sud University Lung Transplantation Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, S; Bacha, E A; Mazmanian, G M; Détruit, H; Chapelier, A; Dartevelle, P; Hervé, P

    1997-08-01

    Experimental studies reveal that inhaled nitric oxide (NO) can prevent, worsen, or have no effect on lung injury in the setting of ischemia-reperfusion (I-R). We tested the hypothesis that these disparate effects could be related to differences in the timing of administration and/or concentration of inhaled NO during I-R. Isolated rat lungs were subjected to 1-h periods of ischemia followed by 1-h periods of blood reperfusion. We investigated the effects of NO (30 ppm) given during ischemia, NO (30 or 80 ppm) begun immediately at reperfusion, or NO (30 ppm) given 15 min after the beginning of reperfusion, on total pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), the coefficient of filtration (Kfc), the lung wet/dry weight ratio (W/D) of lung tissue, and lung myeloperoxidase activity (MPO). A control group did not receive NO. NO given during ischemia had no effect on Kfc or MPO, but decreased PVR. NO (30 ppm) during reperfusion (early or delayed) decreased PVR, W/D, Kfc and MPO. NO at 80 ppm decreased PVR and MPO but not W/D or Kfc. In conclusion, NO at 30 ppm, given immediately or in a delayed fashion during reperfusion, attenuates I-R-induced lung injury. NO at 30 ppm given during ischemia or at 80 ppm during reperfusion is not protective.

  13. Inhalants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Fentanyl Hallucinogens Inhalants Heroin Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Over-the-Counter Medicines Prescription Medicines Steroids (Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/ ...

  14. Saharan dust levels in Greece and received inhalation doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mitsakou

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The desert of Sahara is one of the major sources of mineral dust on Earth, producing around 2×108 tons/yr. Under certain weather conditions, dust particles from Saharan desert get transported over the Mediterranean Sea and most of Europe. The limiting values set by the directive EC/30/1999 of European Union can easily be exceeded by the transport of desert dust particles in the south European Region and especially in urban areas, where there is also significant contribution from anthropogenic sources. In this study, the effects of dust transport on air quality in several Greek urban areas are quantified. PM10 concentration values from stationary monitoring stations are compared to dust concentrations for the 4-year period 2003–2006. The dust concentration values in the Greek areas were estimated by the SKIRON modelling system coupled with embedded algorithms describing the dust cycle. The mean annual dust contribution to daily-averaged PM10 concentration values was found to be around or even greater than 10% in the urban areas throughout the years examined. Natural dust transport may contribute by more than 20% to the annual number of exceedances – PM10 values greater than EU limits – depending on the specific monitoring location. In a second stage of the study, the inhaled lung dose received by the residents in various Greek locations is calculated. The particle deposition efficiency of mineral dust at the different parts of the human respiratory tract is determined by applying a lung dosimetry numerical model, which incorporates inhalation dynamics and aerosol physical processes. The inhalation dose from mineral dust particles was greater in the upper respiratory system (extrathoracic region and less significant in the lungs, especially in the sensitive alveolar region. However, in cases of dust episodes, the amounts of mineral dust deposited along the human lung are comparable to those

  15. In vitro dose comparison of Respimat® inhaler with dry powder inhalers for COPD maintenance therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciciliani A

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Anna-Maria Ciciliani,1,2 Peter Langguth,1 Herbert Wachtel2 1Institute of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, Faculty 09 (Chemistry, Pharmaceutics and Geosciences, Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, 2Analytical Development Department, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH & Co. KG, Ingelheim, Germany Background: Combining in vitro mouth–throat deposition measurements, cascade impactor data and computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations, four different inhalers were compared which are indicated for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD treatment.Methods: The Respimat inhaler, the Breezhaler, the Genuair, and the Ellipta were coupled to the idealized Alberta throat model. The modeled dose to the lung (mDTL was collected downstream of the Alberta throat model using either a filter or a next generation impactor (NGI. Idealized breathing patterns from COPD patient groups – moderate and very severe COPD – were applied. Theoretical lung deposition patterns were assessed by an individual path model.Results and conclusion: For the Respimat the mDTL was found to be 59% (SD 5% for the moderate COPD breathing pattern and 67% (SD 5% for very severe COPD breathing pattern. The percentages refer to nominal dose (ND in vitro. This is in the range of 44%–63% in vivo in COPD patients who display large individual variability. Breezhaler showed a mDTL of 43% (SD 2% for moderate disease simulation and 51% (SD 2% for very severe simulation. The corresponding results for Genuair are mDTL of 32% (SD 2% for moderate and 42% (SD 1% for very severe disease. Ellipta vilanterol particles showed a mDTL of 49% (SD 3% for moderate and 55% (SD 2% for very severe disease simulation, and Ellipta fluticasone particles showed a mDTL of 33% (SD 3% and 41% (SD 2%, respectively for the two breathing patterns. Based on the throat output and average flows of the different inhalers, CFD simulations were performed. Laminar and turbulent steady flow calculations indicated that

  16. Effect of Nano-sized Carbon Black Particles on Lung and Circulatory System by Inhalation Exposure in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Kyu Kim

    2011-09-01

    Conclusion: We successfully generated nano-CBPs in the range of 83.3-87.9 nm at a maximum concentration of 4.2 × 106 particles/cm3 in a nose-only inhalation chamber system. This reliable method can be useful to investigate the biological and toxicological effects of inhalation exposure to nano-CBPs on experimental rats.

  17. Effect Of Inhalation Exposure To Kerosene And Petrol-Fumes On ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changes in total body weight, some anaemia-diagnostic indices (haematocrit or packed cell volume (PCV), haemoglobin (Hb) and total serum protein) were determined in rats (Wistar albino strain) after 2 weeks of 4 hours daily inhalation exposure to ungraded concentrations of kerosene and petrol fumes. The results ...

  18. Proposal for Reference Soil Concentrations of Radiocesium Applicable to Accidentally Contaminated Rice and Soybean Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yong-Ho; Lim, Kwang-Muk; Jun, In; Kim, Byung-Ho; Keum, Dong-Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Radionuclides in arable soil can be transferred to food plants via root uptake. If radionuclide concentrations in food plants to be grown in contaminated soil are estimated to be higher than the authorized food standards, their culture needs to be cancelled or ameliorating practices need to be taken. Therefore, it is necessary to establish soil concentration limits or reference soil concentrations of radiocesium standing with the food standards in preparation for potential severe NPP accidents in this and adjacent countries. In the present study, reference soil concentrations of radiocesium for rice and soybean, two of the most important food plants in Korea, were provisionally established using all relevant domestic data of soil-to-plant transfer factor (TF). The reference soil concentrations of radiocesium for rice and soybean were calculated using available domestic TF data, and were proposed for provisional use at the time of a severe NPP accident. The present RSCs are based on limited numbers of 137 Cs TF values. More amounts of relevant TF data should be produced to have more reliable RSCs. For other staple-food plants such as Chinese cabbage and radish, RSCs of radiocesium should also be established. However, only a couple of relevant domestic TF values are available for these vegetables

  19. Proposal for Reference Soil Concentrations of Radiocesium Applicable to Accidentally Contaminated Rice and Soybean Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong-Ho; Lim, Kwang-Muk; Jun, In; Kim, Byung-Ho; Keum, Dong-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Radionuclides in arable soil can be transferred to food plants via root uptake. If radionuclide concentrations in food plants to be grown in contaminated soil are estimated to be higher than the authorized food standards, their culture needs to be cancelled or ameliorating practices need to be taken. Therefore, it is necessary to establish soil concentration limits or reference soil concentrations of radiocesium standing with the food standards in preparation for potential severe NPP accidents in this and adjacent countries. In the present study, reference soil concentrations of radiocesium for rice and soybean, two of the most important food plants in Korea, were provisionally established using all relevant domestic data of soil-to-plant transfer factor (TF). The reference soil concentrations of radiocesium for rice and soybean were calculated using available domestic TF data, and were proposed for provisional use at the time of a severe NPP accident. The present RSCs are based on limited numbers of {sup 137}Cs TF values. More amounts of relevant TF data should be produced to have more reliable RSCs. For other staple-food plants such as Chinese cabbage and radish, RSCs of radiocesium should also be established. However, only a couple of relevant domestic TF values are available for these vegetables.

  20. How the reference values for serum parathyroid hormone concentration are (or should be) established?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souberbielle, J-C; Brazier, F; Piketty, M-L; Cormier, C; Minisola, S; Cavalier, E

    2017-03-01

    Well-validated reference values are necessary for a correct interpretation of a serum PTH concentration. Establishing PTH reference values needs recruiting a large reference population. Exclusion criteria for this population can be defined as any situation possibly inducing an increase or a decrease in PTH concentration. As recommended in the recent guidelines on the diagnosis and management of asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism, PTH reference values should be established in vitamin D-replete subjects with a normal renal function with possible stratification according to various factors such as age, gender, menopausal status, body mass index, and race. A consensus about analytical/pre-analytical aspects of PTH measurement is also needed with special emphasis on the nature of the sample (plasma or serum), the time and the fasting/non-fasting status of the blood sample. Our opinion is that blood sample for PTH measurement should be obtained in the morning after an overnight fast. Furthermore, despite longer stability of the PTH molecule in EDTA plasma, we prefer serum as it allows to measure calcium, a prerequisite for a correct interpretation of a PTH concentration, on the same sample. Once a consensus is reached, we believe an important international multicentre work should be performed to recruit a very extensive reference population of apparently healthy vitamin D-replete subjects with a normal renal function in order to establish the PTH normative data. Due to the huge inter-method variability in PTH measurement, a sufficient quantity of blood sample should be obtained to allow measurement with as many PTH kits as possible.

  1. Influence of inhaled Ca-DTPA on the long-term effects of inhaled Pu nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballou, J.E.; Dagle, G.E.; McDonald, K.E.; Buschbom, R.L.

    1975-01-01

    Inhaled Ca-DTPA administered to rats in 6 weekly, one-hour treatments of 3 mg/rat did not affect weight gain or life-span compared to Pu burdened animals (78 nCi ILB) or nontreated controls. In addition, the drug did not appear to promote the development of malignant lung tumors and bone tumors in Pu burdened rats although one rat exposed only to Ca-DTPA aerosols did develop a malignant lung tumor. This single lung tumor can not be considered significant although the normal incidence of this lesion is quite low. Inhaled Ca-DTPA therapy administered 20 days after Pu inhalation showed little effect in reducing the lung burden of plutonium. Skeletal deposition was decreased possibly because Ca-DTPA was administered during a time of active translocation of the inhaled Pu when Pu may have been available for chelation in the blood. Inhaled Ca-DTPA therapy did not appear to be beneficial in reducing the number of malignant lung tumors or bone tumors in plutonium burdened rats but on the other hand the chelate did not appear to promote these lesions. (U.S.)

  2. Administration of cyclosporine by inhalation: A feasibility study in Beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muggenburg, B.A.; Hoover, M.D.; Haley, P.J.; Snipes, M.B.; Wolff, R.K.; Yeh, H.C.; Griffith, B.P.; Burckart, J.; Mauderly, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Oral cyclosporine inhibits the primary,but-not the secondary immune responses in the lung. These findings suggest that the local administration of cyclosporine by inhalation could be a useful tool for increasing our understanding of lung immunity. Five dogs were each treated with inhaled, oral and intravenous cyclosporine, aerosol vehicle (ethyl alcohol), and no treatment, over a 5-wk period. One treatment per week was given to each dog. A radiolabel, 99m Tc was included in the cyclosporine aerosol to allow visualization of lung distribution of the aerosol. Blood plasma concentrations of cyclosporine were approximately the same at 4 h and were essentially cleared by 24 h for all routes of administration. Aerosol distribution in the lung appeared uniform, based on 99m Tc scintigrams. In a second study, two dogs inhaled cyclosporine once a day for five days, two dogs inhaled the aerosol vehicle, and one dog was not treated. No evidence of acute lung injury, based on cell counts, total protein, alkaline phosphatase, or lactic dehydrogenase levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, was found at 24 h after one or five administrations of cyclosporine. These data indicate that cyclosporine administered by aerosol either once or five times was distributed throughout the lung and was absorbed into the blood without producing an acute inflammatory reaction in the lung. Our results suggest that cyclosporine may be safely given by inhalation for studies of local immune responses in the lung. (author)

  3. Formulation and evaluation of CFC free inhalers for beclomethasone dipropionate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopala Krishna Murthy Talasila

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Beclomethasone dipropionate CFC free inhalation formulations were developed with a view to treat asthma prophylactically. Dry powder inhalers (DPI for beclomethasone dipropionate were prepared with different grades of lactose monohydrate. The influence of carrier and overages on performance of DPI was studied. Metered dose inhalers (MDI with HFA based propellants were formulated with various doses, overages and different concentrations of alcohol. Formulated DPI and MDI were evaluated for various official and unofficial quality control tests. The influence of over doses on valve delivery, effect of overages on emitted dose and influence of alcohol on spray pattern from MDI were studied. The better fine particle fraction and emitted dose were obtained from the DPI formulated with 10:90 ratio of fine lactose: coarse lactose and with 20% w/w overages. The studies on MDI revealed that the 15% of overdoses are required for effective valve delivery and 20% overages are required for 100% drug delivery. 5-10%v/v alcohol was found to be preferable to get optimum emitted dose and fine particle fraction.

  4. Beryllium concentration in pharyngeal tonsils in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Nogaj

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Power plant dust is believed to be the main source of the increased presence of the element beryllium in the environment which has been detected in the atmospheric air, surface waters, groundwater, soil, food, and cigarette smoke. In humans, beryllium absorption occurs mainly via the respiratory system. The pharyngeal tonsils are located on the roof of the nasopharynx and are in direct contact with dust particles in inhaled air. As a result, the concentration levels of beryllium in the pharyngeal tonsils are likely to be a good indicator of concentration levels in the air. The presented study had two primary aims: to investigate the beryllium concentration in pharyngeal tonsils in children living in southern Poland, and the appropriate reference range for this element in children’s pharyngeal tonsils. Pharyngeal tonsils were extracted from a total of 379 children (age 2–17 years, mean 6.2 ± 2.7 years living in southern Poland. Tonsil samples were mineralized in a closed cycle in a pressure mineralizer PDS 6, using 65% spectrally pure nitric acid. Beryllium concentration was determined using the ICP-AES method with a Perkin Elmer Optima 5300DVTM. The software Statistica v. 9 was used for the statistical analysis. It was found that girls had a significantly greater beryllium concentration in their pharyngeal tonsils than boys. Beryllium concentration varies greatly, mostly according to the place of residence. Based on the study results, the reference value for beryllium in pharyngeal tonsils of children is recommended to be determined at 0.02–0.04 µg/g.

  5. Modeling accumulations of particles in lung during chronic inhalation exposures that lead to impaired clearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, R.K.; Griffith, W.C. Jr.; Cuddihy, R.G.; Snipes, M.B.; Henderson, R.F.; Mauderly, J.L.; McClellan, R.O.

    1989-01-01

    Chronic inhalation of insoluble particles of low toxicity that produce substantial lung burdens of particles, or inhalation of particles that are highly toxic to the lung, can impair clearance. This report describes model calculations of accumulations in lung of inhaled low-toxicity diesel exhaust soot and high-toxicity Ga2O3 particles. Lung burdens of diesel soot were measured periodically during a 24-mo exposure to inhaled diesel exhaust at soot concentrations of 0, 0.35, 3.5, and 7 mg m-3, 7 h d-1, 5 d wk-1. Lung burdens of Ga2O3 were measured for 1 y after a 4-wk exposure to 23 mg Ga2O3 m-3, 2 h d-1, 5 d wk-1. Lung burdens of Ga2O3 were measured for 1 y both studies using inhaled radiolabeled tracer particles. Simulation models fit the observed lung burdens of diesel soot in rats exposed to the 3.5- and 7-mg m-3 concentrations of soot only if it was assumed that clearance remained normal for several months, then virtually stopped. Impaired clearance from high-toxicity particles occurred early after accumulations of a low burden, but that from low-toxicity particles was evident only after months of exposure, when high burdens had accumulated in lung. The impairment in clearances of Ga2O3 particles and radiolabeled tracers was similar, but the impairment in clearance of diesel soot and radiolabeled tracers differed in magnitude. This might have been related to differences in particle size and composition between the tracers and diesel soot. Particle clearance impairment should be considered both in the design of chronic exposures of laboratory animals to inhaled particles and in extrapolating the results to people

  6. Inhalable microorganisms in Beijing's PM2.5 and PM10 pollutants during a severe smog event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chen; Jiang, Wenjun; Wang, Buying; Fang, Jianhuo; Lang, Jidong; Tian, Geng; Jiang, Jingkun; Zhu, Ting F

    2014-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) air pollution poses a formidable public health threat to the city of Beijing. Among the various hazards of PM pollutants, microorganisms in PM2.5 and PM10 are thought to be responsible for various allergies and for the spread of respiratory diseases. While the physical and chemical properties of PM pollutants have been extensively studied, much less is known about the inhalable microorganisms. Most existing data on airborne microbial communities using 16S or 18S rRNA gene sequencing to categorize bacteria or fungi into the family or genus levels do not provide information on their allergenic and pathogenic potentials. Here we employed metagenomic methods to analyze the microbial composition of Beijing's PM pollutants during a severe January smog event. We show that with sufficient sequencing depth, airborne microbes including bacteria, archaea, fungi, and dsDNA viruses can be identified at the species level. Our results suggested that the majority of the inhalable microorganisms were soil-associated and nonpathogenic to human. Nevertheless, the sequences of several respiratory microbial allergens and pathogens were identified and their relative abundance appeared to have increased with increased concentrations of PM pollution. Our findings may serve as an important reference for environmental scientists, health workers, and city planners.

  7. Ferrocene: Disposition following nose-only inhalation by the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slauter, R.W.; Tippin, T.K.; Jeffcoat, A.R.; Matthews, H.B.

    1990-01-01

    Ferrocene (FCN) is a volatile solid organometallic proposed for use as an anti-knock additive in gasoline. Such use would provide significant potential for human exposure via inhalation. Nose-only exposure of male F344 rats over 6 h to constant concentrations of 5 and 25 ng of [ 14 C]FCN/mL air was conducted by blending correct proportions of an air stream concentrated with [ 14 C]FCN vapor with one that was FCN free. Fractional pulmonary absorption of FCN was estimated to be ca. 66 and 55% with concentrations of 14 C in blood increasing steadily throughout the exposure period to 80 and 370 ng-eq of FCN/mL, respectively. Disappearance of 14 C from the blood was multiphasic (terminal t 1/2 =∼2 d) following inhalation exposure, resulting in blood concentrations of 10 and 50 ng-eq of FCN/mL 72 h after end of exposure. More than 80% of the recovered 14 C was in the 0-72 h urine, approximately half of which was a single metabolite (radio-HPLC). Unchanged FCN was excreted in only minor amounts ( 14 C were also excreted in feces (ca. 10% of total) and breath (ca. 4% of total). Neither lung nor nasopharynx had tissue to blood ratios of 14 C>3 72 h after exposure. Similar disposition was shown after an iv bolus of 1.0 mg of [ 14 C]FCN/kg body weight

  8. Inhalation Injury: State of the Science 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Kevin N; Holmes, James H

    This article summarizes research conducted over the last decade in the field of inhalation injury in thermally injured patients. This includes brief summaries of the findings of the 2006 State of the Science meeting with regard to inhalation injury, and of the subsequent 2007 Inhalation Injury Consensus Conference. The reviewed studies are categorized in to five general areas: diagnosis and grading; mechanical ventilation; systemic and inhalation therapy; mechanistic alterations; and outcomes.

  9. Tissue distribution of a leukotriene antagonist 14C-LY170680, following inhalation exposure in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohland, R.C.; Beck, J.M.; Carlson, K.H.; Herman, D.R.; Hoppes, J.L.; Vavrek, M.T.; Wolff, R.K.

    1991-01-01

    Dissection and whole-body autoradiographic techniques were used to determine the tissue distribution profile of a leukotriene antagonist, 14 C-LY170680, following nose-only inhalation exposure in the rat. Liquid scintillation spectrometry and whole-body autoradiography indicated that highest concentrations of radiocarbon were present in stomach and small intestine at all time points. Radiocarbon reached maximum levels in stomach (2,259 ng-eq/g) and small intestine (2,399 ng-eq/g) 2 to 4 hours postexposure, respectively, and declined with time. In contrast, maximum radiocarbon concentrations in the head (146 ng-eq/g), trachea (408 ng-eq/g), and lung (534 ng-eq/g) occurred at 0 hours postexposure and steadily declined with time. Low concentrations of radiocarbon were detected in the liver ( 14 C-LY170680 were deposited in the head and within the lung following inhalation exposure. However, higher levels of radiocarbon present in the stomach and small intestine suggested significant nasal deposition followed by rapid clearance and ingestion of inhaled radioactive material. Distribution of radiocarbon limited to the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts demonstrated minimal systemic absorption and exposure over the time course of this study

  10. Experimental study of the combined effects of inhalation of radon daughter products and tobacco smoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chameaud, J.; Perraud, R.; Chretien, J.; Masse, R.; Lafuma, J.

    1979-01-01

    For 10 years, over 500 lung cancers have been induced in rats by inhalations of radon daughter products at various concentrations and cumulated doses. Considering several points and the dose-effect relationship especially, such cancers can be compared with human cancers. This type of experiments, fully mastered, has made it possible to undertake under good conditions the study of the co-carcinogenic effect of various inhaled pollutants such as tobacco smoke. In a first experiment, 100 rats were exposed to a 4000WLM cumulated dose of radon daughter products, knowing that this level induces some 30% of lung cancers. 50 animals were then administered tobacco smoke by inhalation in a fume box during 5 months (350 h.) In the group inhaling radon only, 17 cancers appeared; in the radon -tobacco group 32 cancers bigger and more invasive were observed. Under the same conditions, tobacco smoke was inhaled by rats previously exposed to lower doses of radon daughter products (2 groups of 30 rats, 500 and 100 WLM respectively). Again, the number of cancers observed was higher that the number of cancers expected if the rats had inhaled radon only. This co-carcinogenic and potentiating action of tobacco was clearly demonstrated. Further experiments are considered in order to determine the processes involved

  11. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Controlling Tools for Control Triggers Indoors In the Workplace Outdoors Management Asthma Action Plan Flu Shots Inhalers ... inhaler with a spacer Your browser does not support iframes Using a metered dose inhaler with a ...

  12. Generation and characterization of cyclosporine aerosols for administration by inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, M.D.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Snipes, M.B.; Wolff, R.K.; Yeh, H.C.; Griffith, B.P.; Burckart, G.J.; Mauderly, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    A method was developed for generating aerosols of the immunosuppressive agent cyclosporine and a gamma-emitting radiolabel ( 99m Tc) for administration by inhalation. Cyclosporine was dissolved in ethyl alcohol (EtOH) and nebulized with a Love- lace nebulizer operated with 50 psi compressed air. For a cyclosporine concentration of 25 mg/mL, the particle size of the aerosol was 0.7 μm activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD), with 1.8 geometric standard deviation (GSD). The clear solution of EtOH and cyclosporine became a cloudy suspension when a limited amount of saline solution containing a 99m Tc radiolabel was added. This occurred because cyclosporine is hydrophobic. If saline concentrations as high as 6% in EtOH by volume were used, a gummy residue formed in the nebulizer and the particle aerodynamic diameter became unacceptably large (4.7 μm). When the saline concentration was only 3 % (the minimum radiolabel volume needed for gamma camera studies of lung deposition), the suspensions of cyclosporine could be nebulized to give a particle size of 2.2 μm AMAD with 2.1 GSD. The radiolabel was uniformly distributed with the spherical cyclosporine particles. Concentrations and particle size distributions remained constant over 1-h generation periods. These aerosols have been used in inhalation studies with Beagle dogs. (author)

  13. Radioactive gas inhalator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeMon, D.E.

    1975-01-01

    An ''inhalator'', or more particularly an apparatus for permitting a patient to inhale a radioactive gas in order to provide a diagnostic test of the patient's lung area, is described. The disclosed apparatus provides a simple, trouble-free mechanism for achieving this result; and, furthermore, provides an improved testing method. Moreover, the disclosed apparatus has the capability of gradually introducing the test condition in a manner that makes it easy for the patient to become acclimated to it. (U.S.)

  14. Inhaled nitric oxide augments nitric oxide transport on sickle cell hemoglobin without affecting oxygen affinity

    OpenAIRE

    Gladwin, Mark T.; Schechter, Alan N.; Shelhamer, James H.; Pannell, Lewis K.; Conway, Deirdre A.; Hrinczenko, Borys W.; Nichols, James S.; Pease-Fye, Margaret E.; Noguchi, Constance T.; Rodgers, Griffin P.; Ognibene, Frederick P.

    1999-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) inhalation has been reported to increase the oxygen affinity of sickle cell erythrocytes. Also, proposed allosteric mechanisms for hemoglobin, based on S-nitrosation of β-chain cysteine 93, raise the possibilty of altering the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease by inhibiting polymerization or by increasing NO delivery to the tissue. We studied the effects of a 2-hour treatment, using varying concentrations of inhaled NO. Oxygen affinity, as measured by P50, did not respo...

  15. Reference natural radionuclide concentrations in Australian soils and derived terrestrial air kerma rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinschmidt, R

    2017-06-01

    Sediment from drainage catchment outlets has been shown to be a useful means of sampling large land masses for soil composition. Naturally occurring radioactive material concentrations (uranium, thorium and potassium-40) in soil have been collated and converted to activity concentrations using data collected from the National Geochemistry Survey of Australia. Average terrestrial air kerma rate data are derived using the elemental concentration data, and is tabulated for Australia and states for use as baseline reference information. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... metered dose inhaler with a spacer [ PDF – 377 KB] Your browser does not support iframes Cómo usar ... inhalador de dosis fija con espaciador [PDF – 343 KB] Using a metered dose inhaler (inhaler in mouth) ...

  17. Inhaled plutonium nitrate in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagle, G.E.; Cannon, W.C.; Ragan, H.A.; Watson, C.R.; Stevens, D.L.; Cross, F.T.; Dionne, P.J.; Harrington, T.P.

    1978-01-01

    Beagle dogs given a single inhalation exposure to 239 Pu(NO 3 ) 4 are being observed for life-span dose-effect relationships. Lymphopenia occurred at the two highest dosage levels as early as 1 mo following exposure and was associated with neutropenia and reduction in numbers of circulatory monocytes by 4 mo postexposure. Radiation pneumonitis developed in one dog at the highest dosage level at 14 mo postexposure. More rapid translocation to skeleton and liver occurred following inhalation of 238 Pu(NO 3 ) 4 than after 239 Pu(NO 3 ) 4 inhalation

  18. The concentrations of ambient Burkholderia pseudomallei during typhoon season in endemic area of melioidosis in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Lei Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Melioidosis is a severe bacterial infection caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei with a high case-fatality rate. Epidemiological and animal studies show the possibility of inhalation transmission. However, no B. pseudomallei concentrations in ambient air have been researched. Here, we developed a method to quantify ambient B. pseudomallei and then measured concentrations of ambient B. pseudomallei during the typhoon season and the non-typhoon season to determine the factors influencing ambient B. pseudomallei levels. METHODS: We quantified ambient B. pseudomallei by using a filter/real-time qPCR method in the Zoynan Region in Kaohsiung, southern Taiwan. Twenty-four hour samples were collected at a sampling rate of 20 L/min every day from June 11 to December 21, 2012 including during the typhoon season (June to September and reference season (October to December. RESULTS: We successfully developed a filtration/real-time qPCR method to quantify ambient B. pseudomallei. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing concentrations of ambient B. pseudomallei. Ambient B. pseudomallei were only detected during the typhoon season when compared to the reference season. For the typhoons affecting the Zoynan Region, the positive rates of ambient B. pseudomallei were very high at 80% to 100%. During June to December, rainfall was positively correlated with ambient B. pseudomallei with a statistical significance. Sediment at a nearby pond significantly influenced the concentration of ambient B. pseudomallei. During the typhoon month, the typhoon was positively correlated with ambient B. pseudomallei whereas wind speed was reversely correlated with ambient B. pseudomallei. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest the possibility of transmission of B. pseudomallei via inhalation during the typhoon season.

  19. The concentrations of ambient Burkholderia pseudomallei during typhoon season in endemic area of melioidosis in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ya-Lei; Yen, Yu-Chuan; Yang, Chun-Yuh; Lee, Min Sheng; Ho, Chi-Kung; Mena, Kristina D; Wang, Peng-Yau; Chen, Pei-Shih

    2014-01-01

    Melioidosis is a severe bacterial infection caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei with a high case-fatality rate. Epidemiological and animal studies show the possibility of inhalation transmission. However, no B. pseudomallei concentrations in ambient air have been researched. Here, we developed a method to quantify ambient B. pseudomallei and then measured concentrations of ambient B. pseudomallei during the typhoon season and the non-typhoon season to determine the factors influencing ambient B. pseudomallei levels. We quantified ambient B. pseudomallei by using a filter/real-time qPCR method in the Zoynan Region in Kaohsiung, southern Taiwan. Twenty-four hour samples were collected at a sampling rate of 20 L/min every day from June 11 to December 21, 2012 including during the typhoon season (June to September) and reference season (October to December). We successfully developed a filtration/real-time qPCR method to quantify ambient B. pseudomallei. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing concentrations of ambient B. pseudomallei. Ambient B. pseudomallei were only detected during the typhoon season when compared to the reference season. For the typhoons affecting the Zoynan Region, the positive rates of ambient B. pseudomallei were very high at 80% to 100%. During June to December, rainfall was positively correlated with ambient B. pseudomallei with a statistical significance. Sediment at a nearby pond significantly influenced the concentration of ambient B. pseudomallei. During the typhoon month, the typhoon was positively correlated with ambient B. pseudomallei whereas wind speed was reversely correlated with ambient B. pseudomallei. Our data suggest the possibility of transmission of B. pseudomallei via inhalation during the typhoon season.

  20. Development of a low-level radon reference chamber; Entwicklung einer Low-Level-Radon-Referenzkammer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linzmaier, Diana

    2013-01-04

    The naturally occurring, radioactive noble gas radon-222 exists worldwide in different activity concentrations in the air. During the decay of radon-222, decay products are generated which are electrically charged and attach to aerosols in the air. Together with the aerosols, the radon is inhaled and exhaled by humans. While the radon is nearly completely exhaled, ca. 20 % of the inhaled aerosols remain in the lungs in one breath cycle. Due to ionizing radiation, in a chain of events, lung cancer might occur. Consequently, radon and its decay products are according to the current findings the second leading cause of lung cancer. At the workplace and in the home measurements of radon activity concentration are performed to determine the radiation exposition of humans. All measurement devices for the determination of radon activity concentration are calibrated above 1000 Bq/m{sup 3}, even though the mean value of the present investigation in Germany shows only 50 Bq/m{sup 3}. For the calibration of measurement devices in the range below 1000 Bq/m{sup 3} over a long time period, the generation of a stable reference atmosphere is presented in this work. Due to a long term calibration (t>5 days) of the measurement devices, smaller uncertainties result for the calibration factor. For the calibration procedure, a so-called low-level radon reference chamber was set up and started operation. The generation of a stable reference atmosphere is effected by means of emanation sources which consist of a radium-226 activity standard. On the basis of {gamma}-spectrometry, the effective emanation coefficient ofthe emanation sources is determined. The traceability of the activity concentration in the reference volume is realized via the activity ofthe radium-226, the emanation coefficient and the volume. With the emanation sources produced, stable reference atmospheres within the range of 150 Bq/m{sup 3} to 1900 Bq/m{sup 3} are achieved. For the realization, maintenance and

  1. Teaching inhaler use in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lareau, Suzanne C; Hodder, Richard

    2012-02-01

    To review barriers to the successful use of inhalers in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and the role of the nurse practitioner (NP) in facilitating optimum inhaler use. Review of the national and international scientific literature. Pharmacologic treatment of COPD patients comprises mainly inhaled medications. Incorrect use of inhalers is very common in these individuals. Some of the consequences of poor inhaler technique include reduced therapeutic dosing, medication adherence, and disease stability, which can lead to increased morbidity, decreased quality of life, and a high burden on the healthcare system. Knowledgeable evaluation and frequent reassessment of inhaler use coupled with education of patients, caregivers, and healthcare professionals can significantly improve the benefits COPD patients derive from inhaled therapy. Patient education is vital for correct use of inhalers and to ensure the effectiveness of inhaled medications. The NP has a critical role in assessing potential barriers to successful learning by the patient and improving inhaler technique and medication management. The NP can also facilitate success with inhaled medications by providing up-to-date inhaler education for other healthcare team members, who may then act as patient educators. ©2011 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2011 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  2. Combined control of morphology and polymorph in spray drying of mannitol for dry powder inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Feng; Liu, Jing J.; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Xue Z.

    2017-06-01

    The morphology and polymorphism of mannitol particles were controlled during spray drying with the aim of improving the aerosolization properties of inhalable dry powders. The obtained microparticles were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction and inhaler testing with a next generation impactor. Mannitol particles of varied α-mannitol content and surface roughness were prepared via spray drying by manipulating the concentration of NH4HCO3 in the feed solution. The bubbles produced by NH4HCO3 led to the formation of spheroid particles with a rough surface. Further, the fine particle fraction was increased by the rough surface of carriers and the high α-mannitol content. Inhalable dry powders with a 29.1 ± 2.4% fine particle fraction were obtained by spray-drying using 5% mannitol (w/v)/2% NH4HCO3 (w/v) as the feed solution, proving that this technique is an effective method to engineer particles for dry powder inhalation.

  3. Element concentrations in candidate biological and environmental reference materials by k0-standardized INAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    K 0 -Based Neutron Activation Analysis (k 0 INAA) was used to analyze the candidate reference materials Apple Leaves and Peach Leaves, and Oriental Tobacco Leaves and Virginia Tobacco Leaves. Concentration values for 27 elements were measured. The accuracy was ascertained by analysis of two certified reference materials. NIST 1572 Citrus Leaves and 1573 Tomato Leaves. The homogeneity test of the IAEA Evernia prunastri candidate reference material in aliquots ≥ 100 mg is extended to the elements Sc, Cr, Fe, Co, Zn, Rb, Sb, Cs, Ba, Ce and Th. (orig.)

  4. Interpretation of positive results of a methacholine inhalation challenge and 1 week of inhaled bronchodilator use in diagnosing and treating cough-variant asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, R S; French, C T; Smyrnios, N A; Curley, F J

    1997-09-22

    In diagnosing cough due to asthma, methacholine chloride inhalation challenge (MIC) interpreted in a traditional fashion has been shown to have positive predictive values from 60% to 82%. To determine whether any features of positive results of an MIC or the results of a 1-week trial of inhaled beta-agonist therapy were helpful in predicting when the cough was due to asthma. The study design was a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover format performed in adult, nonsmoking subjects, who were referred for diagnosis and treatment of chronic cough. The subjects had no other respiratory complaints or medical conditions for which they were taking medications, the results of baseline spirometry and chest roentgenograms were normal, and the results of MIC were positive. After obtaining baseline data, including MICs on 2 separate days, objective cough counting, and self-assessment of cough severity using a visual analog scale, subjects were randomized to receive 2 inhalations (1.3 mg) of metaproterenol sulfate or placebo by metered dose inhaler attached to a spacer device every 4 hours while awake. At 1 week, data identical to baseline were collected, and subjects received the other metered dose inhaler for 7 days. At 1 week, data identical to baseline were collected. After completion of the protocol, subjects were followed up in the clinic to observe the final response of the cough to specific therapy. Based on the disappearance of the cough with specific therapy, the cough was due to asthma in 9 of 15 subjects and nonasthma in 6 of 15 subjects. Baseline data were similar between groups. With respect to MICs, there were no significant differences between groups in the cumulative dose of methacholine that provoked a 20% decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 second from the postsaline baseline value (PD20 values), slopes of dose-response curves, and maximal-response plateaus. Cough severity significantly improved after 1 week of

  5. Spray dried amikacin powder for inhalation in cystic fibrosis patients: a quality by design approach for product construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belotti, Silvia; Rossi, Alessandra; Colombo, Paolo; Bettini, Ruggero; Rekkas, Dimitrios; Politis, Stavros; Colombo, Gaia; Balducci, Anna Giulia; Buttini, Francesca

    2014-08-25

    An amikacin product for convenient and compliant inhalation in cystic fibrosis patients was constructed by spray-drying in order to produce powders of pure drug having high respirability and flowability. An experimental design was applied as a statistical tool for the characterization of amikacin spray drying process, through the establishment of mathematical relationships between six Critical Quality Attributes (CQAs) of the finished product and five Critical Process Parameters (CPPs). The surface-active excipient, PEG-32 stearate, studied for particle engineering, in general did not benefit the CQAs of the spray dried powders for inhalation. The spray drying feed solution required the inclusion of 10% (v/v) ethanol in order to reach the desired aerodynamic performance of powders. All desirable function solutions indicated that the favourable concentration of amikacin in the feed solution had to be kept at 1% w/v level. It was found that when the feed rate of the sprayed solution was raised, an increase in the drying temperature to the maximum value (160 °C) was required to maintain good powder respirability. Finally, the increase in drying temperature always led to an evident increase in emitted dose (ED) without affecting the desirable fine particle dose (FPD) values. The application of the experimental design enabled us to obtain amikacin powders with both ED and FPD, well above the regulatory and scientific references. The finished product contained only the active ingredient, which keeps low the mass to inhale for dose requirement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Inhalable Microorganisms in Beijing’s PM2.5 and PM10 Pollutants during a Severe Smog Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) air pollution poses a formidable public health threat to the city of Beijing. Among the various hazards of PM pollutants, microorganisms in PM2.5 and PM10 are thought to be responsible for various allergies and for the spread of respiratory diseases. While the physical and chemical properties of PM pollutants have been extensively studied, much less is known about the inhalable microorganisms. Most existing data on airborne microbial communities using 16S or 18S rRNA gene sequencing to categorize bacteria or fungi into the family or genus levels do not provide information on their allergenic and pathogenic potentials. Here we employed metagenomic methods to analyze the microbial composition of Beijing’s PM pollutants during a severe January smog event. We show that with sufficient sequencing depth, airborne microbes including bacteria, archaea, fungi, and dsDNA viruses can be identified at the species level. Our results suggested that the majority of the inhalable microorganisms were soil-associated and nonpathogenic to human. Nevertheless, the sequences of several respiratory microbial allergens and pathogens were identified and their relative abundance appeared to have increased with increased concentrations of PM pollution. Our findings may serve as an important reference for environmental scientists, health workers, and city planners. PMID:24456276

  7. Use of nitrite inhalants ("poppers") among American youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-Tzy; Schlenger, William E; Ringwalt, Chris L

    2005-07-01

    We examined the patterns and correlates of nitrite inhalant use among adolescents aged 12 to 17 years. Study data were drawn from the 2000 and 2001 National Household Surveys on Drug Abuse. Logistic regression was used to identify the characteristics associated with nitrite inhalant use. Among adolescents aged 12 to 17 years, 1.5% reported any lifetime use of nitrite inhalants. The prevalence of lifetime nitrite inhalant use increased to 12% and 14% among adolescents who were dependent on alcohol and any drug in the past year, respectively. Many nitrite inhalant users used at least three other types of inhalants (68%) and also met the criteria for alcohol (33%) and drug (35%) abuse or dependence. Increased odds of nitrite inhalant use were associated with residing in nonmetropolitan areas, recent utilization of mental health services, delinquent behaviors, past year alcohol and drug abuse and dependence, and multi-drug use. Adolescents who had used nitrite inhalants at least once in their lifetime tend to engage in delinquent activities and report co-occurring multiple drug abuse and mental health problems in the past year.

  8. Age dependent systemic exposure to inhaled salbutamol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønnelykke, Klaus; Jespersen, Jakob Jessing; Bisgaard, Hans

    2007-01-01

    AIMS: To determine the effect of age on systemic exposure to inhaled salbutamol in children. METHODS: Fifty-eight asthmatic children, aged 3-16 years, inhaled 400 microg of salbutamol from a pressurized metered dose inhaler with spacer. The 20 min serum profile was analyzed. RESULTS: Prescribing...

  9. Dermal and inhalation acute toxic class methods: test procedures and biometric evaluations for the Globally Harmonized Classification System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzhütter, H G; Genschow, E; Diener, W; Schlede, E

    2003-05-01

    The acute toxic class (ATC) methods were developed for determining LD(50)/LC(50) estimates of chemical substances with significantly fewer animals than needed when applying conventional LD(50)/LC(50) tests. The ATC methods are sequential stepwise procedures with fixed starting doses/concentrations and a maximum of six animals used per dose/concentration. The numbers of dead/moribund animals determine whether further testing is necessary or whether the test is terminated. In recent years we have developed classification procedures for the oral, dermal and inhalation routes of administration by using biometric methods. The biometric approach assumes a probit model for the mortality probability of a single animal and assigns the chemical to that toxicity class for which the best concordance is achieved between the statistically expected and the observed numbers of dead/moribund animals at the various steps of the test procedure. In previous publications we have demonstrated the validity of the biometric ATC methods on the basis of data obtained for the oral ATC method in two-animal ring studies with 15 participants from six countries. Although the test procedures and biometric evaluations for the dermal and inhalation ATC methods have already been published, there was a need for an adaptation of the classification schemes to the starting doses/concentrations of the Globally Harmonized Classification System (GHS) recently adopted by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Here we present the biometric evaluation of the dermal and inhalation ATC methods for the starting doses/concentrations of the GHS and of some other international classification systems still in use. We have developed new test procedures and decision rules for the dermal and inhalation ATC methods, which require significantly fewer animals to provide predictions of toxicity classes, that are equally good or even better than those achieved by using the conventional LD(50)/LC

  10. Effect of novel inhaler technique reminder labels on the retention of inhaler technique skills in asthma: a single-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basheti, Iman A; Obeidat, Nathir M; Reddel, Helen K

    2017-02-09

    Inhaler technique can be corrected with training, but skills drop off quickly without repeated training. The aim of our study was to explore the effect of novel inhaler technique labels on the retention of correct inhaler technique. In this single-blind randomized parallel-group active-controlled study, clinical pharmacists enrolled asthma patients using controller medication by Accuhaler [Diskus] or Turbuhaler. Inhaler technique was assessed using published checklists (score 0-9). Symptom control was assessed by asthma control test. Patients were randomized into active (ACCa; THa) and control (ACCc; THc) groups. All patients received a "Show-and-Tell" inhaler technique counseling service. Active patients also received inhaler labels highlighting their initial errors. Baseline data were available for 95 patients, 68% females, mean age 44.9 (SD 15.2) years. Mean inhaler scores were ACCa:5.3 ± 1.0; THa:4.7 ± 0.9, ACCc:5.5 ± 1.1; THc:4.2 ± 1.0. Asthma was poorly controlled (mean ACT scores ACCa:13.9 ± 4.3; THa:12.1 ± 3.9; ACCc:12.7 ± 3.3; THc:14.3 ± 3.7). After training, all patients had correct technique (score 9/9). After 3 months, there was significantly less decline in inhaler technique scores for active than control groups (mean difference: Accuhaler -1.04 (95% confidence interval -1.92, -0.16, P = 0.022); Turbuhaler -1.61 (-2.63, -0.59, P = 0.003). Symptom control improved significantly, with no significant difference between active and control patients, but active patients used less reliever medication (active 2.19 (SD 1.78) vs. control 3.42 (1.83) puffs/day, P = 0.002). After inhaler training, novel inhaler technique labels improve retention of correct inhaler technique skills with dry powder inhalers. Inhaler technique labels represent a simple, scalable intervention that has the potential to extend the benefit of inhaler training on asthma outcomes. REMINDER LABELS IMPROVE INHALER TECHNIQUE: Personalized

  11. Acute Inhalation Exposure to Titanium Ethanolate as a Possible Cause of Metal Fume Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ahmadimanesh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Occupational inhalation exposure to noxious agents is not uncommon. Herein, we present a 26-year-old male student who had accidental acute inhalation exposure to a large quantity of titanium ethanolate and hydrogen chloride in chemistry lab. He was referred to the emergency department of our hospital with low-grade fever, dyspnea, headache, fatigue and myalgia. After 24 hrs of symptomatic treatment (oxygen therapy and acetaminophen, the fever was subsided and the patient discharged home in a good clinical condition. The presented symptoms could be interpreted as a form of metal fume fever. It can therefore be concluded that organo-metallic compound of titanium metal may have the potential to produce metal fume fever in human.

  12. Nanomaterial inhalation exposure from nanotechnology-based cosmetic powders: a quantitative assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarenko, Yevgen; Zhen Huajun; Han Taewon; Lioy, Paul J.; Mainelis, Gediminas

    2012-01-01

    In this study we quantified exposures to airborne particles ranging from 14 nm to 20 μm due to the use of nanotechnology-based cosmetic powders. Three nanotechnology-based and three regular cosmetic powders were realistically applied to a mannequin’s face while measuring the concentration and size distribution of inhaled aerosol particles. Using these data we calculated that the highest inhaled particle mass was in the coarse aerosol fraction (2.5–10 μm), while particles <100 nm made minimal contribution to the inhaled particle mass. For all powders, 85–93 % of aerosol deposition occurred in the head airways, while <10 % deposited in the alveolar and <5 % in the tracheobronchial regions. Electron microscopy data suggest that nanomaterials were likely distributed as agglomerates across the entire investigated aerosol size range (14 nm–20 μm). Thus, investigation of nanoparticle health effects should consider not only the alveolar region, but also other respiratory system regions where substantial nanomaterial deposition during the actual nanotechnology-based product use would occur.

  13. Water chemistry and radon concentrations of thermal springs in Bastak area, south of Persia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirhosseini, S.M.; Moattar, F.; Karbassi, A.R.

    2015-01-01

    Physicochemical factors, major and some minor ions and 222 Rn concentration was measured in Todruyeh, Fotuyeh and Sanguyeh thermal balneutherapy springs in Bastak, south of Iran. Water type of these springs is Na-Cl and water-mixing phenomena seem possible in them. The average of U concentration in Fatuyeh's, Sanguyeh's and Todruyeh's water are 2.2, 1.1, 0.306 ppb, respectively, and the concentration of heavy metals such as Ag, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Se, Zn varies from 1 to 10 ppb. The concentration of 222 Rn in the water of Fotuyeh, Sanguyeh and Todruyeh Springs includes 125-253, 53-104, and 7.4-134.7 kBq/m 3 , respectively. Values of mean annual effective doses for inhalation from these waters are below the reference level recommended by WHO. (author)

  14. Skeletal lesions from inhaled plutonium in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagle, G.E.; Park, J.F.; Weller, R.E.; Ragan, H.A.; McClanahan, B.J.; Fisher, D.R.

    1984-10-01

    The report briefly reviews the skeletal effects observed in ongoing lifespan studies in beagle dogs at 13, 10, and 7 years, respectively, after inhalation exposure to 239 Pu oxide and nitrate or 238 Pu oxide. Plutonium nitrate was chosen to represent soluble material more readily translocated to bone and other tissues than the oxide. Bone lesions related to plutonium exposure were observed only in dogs exposed to 238 Pu oxide and 239 Pu nitrate. The skeleton accumulated approximately 2% ( 239 Pu oxide), 45% ( 238 Pu oxide) or 50% ( 239 Pu nitrate) of the final body burdens at 13, 10, and 7 years, respectively, after exposure. 11 references, 2 figures

  15. Radon-thoron levels and inhalation dose distribution patterns in India dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, T.V.; Eappen, K.P.; Nair, R.N.; Mayya, Y.S.; Sadasivan, S.

    2003-09-01

    A countrywide survey on radon and thoron levels has been carried out in Indian dwellings under a Coordinated Research Project sponsored by the Board of Research in Nuclear Sciences (BRNS), Department of Atomic Energy (DAE). Eight universities and a few research institutions from different parts of the country participated in this project. Under this project, radon and thoron levels were measured using Solid State Nuclear Track Detector (SSNTD) -spark counter based passive technique. A plastic twin chamber radon -thoron dosimeter was developed and standardized for the survey. This radon-thoron discriminating dosimeter uses three SSNTDs; two of which are exposed in cup modes and the third one is exposed in bare mode. Calibration factors (CF) are obtained for cup and bare mode SSNTDs through controlled experiments in a calibration facility. Calibration factors obtained from experiments showed very good agreement with the calibration factors derived from theoretical models. Four nodal centres were set up each at Kalpakkam, Jodhpur, Jaduguda and Mumbai for calibration and standardization of the dosimeter system. Inter calibration of the dosimeters were also carried out for comparison purpose. Nearly 4500 measurements in about 1400 dwellings were made during the survey period. An analysis of the data shows that the indoor radon gas concentrations at different locations vary between 4.6 and 147.0 Bq.m -3 with a geometric mean of 23.0 Bq.m -3 (GSD 2.61). Indoor thoron gas concentrations, in general, are found to be less than the radon concentrations and vary from 3.6 to 42.8 Bq.m -3 with a geometric mean of 12.2 Bq.m -3 (GSD 3.22). The mean annual inhalation dose rate due to radon, thoron and their progeny in the dwellings is estimated to be 0.97 mSv.y -1 (GSD 2.49). It is observed that the major contribution to the indoor inhalation dose is due to radon and its progeny. However, the contribution due to thoron and its progeny is not trivial as it is about 20 % of the total

  16. Organ dose from inhaled radionuclides taking lull period into account

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, S.

    1982-01-01

    The dosimetry of inhaled radionuclides is generally carried out in accordance with the lung model recommended by the ICRP Task Group on Lung Dynamics. The relevant expressions are integrated over a given period, assuming continuous inhalation in an atmosphere of constant aerosol concentration. Though for the same amount of intake the dose commitment is found to be independent of variations in the rate of intake, the dose determined over specific intervals of time, is influenced by it or by lull intervals therein. Formulae are developed to arrive at doses to different organs when the subject's intake is constant and continuous for 8 hours, followed by a lull period of 16 hours each day. Results are given for a number of radionuclides and are compared with values characteristic of continuous inhalation. It is observed that when exposure is assumed to be continuous the dose for the same intake of activity is underestimated as compared to the dose when lull period is taken into account. For working periods of 6 days and 30 days the underestimate ranges from 5%-20% and 0.6% to 4.5% respectively. (author)

  17. E-cigarette versus nicotine inhaler: comparing the perceptions and experiences of inhaled nicotine devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Michael B; Zimmermann, Mia Hanos; Delnevo, Cristine D; Lewis, M Jane; Shukla, Parth; Coups, Elliot J; Foulds, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    Novel nicotine delivery products, such as electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), have dramatically grown in popularity despite limited data on safety and benefit. In contrast, the similar U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved nicotine inhaler is rarely utilized by smokers. Understanding this paradox could be helpful to determine the potential for e-cigarettes as an alternative to tobacco smoking. To compare the e-cigarette with the nicotine inhaler in terms of perceived benefits, harms, appeal, and role in assisting with smoking cessation. A cross-over trial was conducted from 2012 to 2013 PARTICIPANTS/INTERVENTIONS: Forty-one current smokers age 18 and older used the e-cigarette and nicotine inhaler each for 3 days, in random order, with a washout period in between. Thirty-eight participants provided data on product use, perceptions, and experiences. The Modified Cigarette Evaluation Questionnaire (mCEQ) measured satisfaction, reward, and aversion. Subjects were also asked about each product's helpfulness, similarity to cigarettes, acceptability, image, and effectiveness in quitting smoking. Cigarette use was also recorded during the product-use periods. The e-cigarette had a higher total satisfaction score (13.9 vs. 6.8 [p e-cigarette received higher ratings for helpfulness, acceptability, and "coolness." More subjects would use the e-cigarette to make a quit attempt (76 %) than the inhaler (24 %) (p e-cigarette vs. 10 % (4/38) using the inhaler (p = 0.18). The e-cigarette was more acceptable, provided more satisfaction, and had higher perceived benefit than the inhaler during this trial. E-cigarettes have the potential to be important nicotine delivery products owing to their high acceptance and perceived benefit, but more data are needed to evaluate their actual efficacy and safety. Providers should be aware of these issues, as patients will increasingly inquire about them.

  18. Iatrogenic Cushing syndrome in patients receiving inhaled budesonide and itraconazole or ritonavir: two cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondin, Marie-Christine; Beauregard, Hugues; Serri, Omar

    2013-01-01

    To present two cases of iatrogenic Cushing syndrome caused by the interaction of budesonide, an inhaled glucocorticoid, with ritonavir and itraconazole. We present the clinical and biochemical data of two patients in whom diagnosis of Cushing syndrome was caused by this interaction. We also reviewed the pertinent literature and management options. A 71-year-old man was treated with inhaled budesonide for a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and itraconazole for a pulmonary aspergillosis. The patient rapidly developed a typical Cushing syndrome complicated by bilateral avascular necrosis of the femoral heads. Serum 8:00 AM cortisol concentrations were suppressed at 0.76 and 0.83 μg/dL on two occasions. The patient died 4 days later of a massive myocardial infarction. The second case is a 46-year-old woman who was treated for several years with inhaled budesonide for asthma. She was put on ritonavir, a retroviral protease inhibitor, for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In the following months, she developed typical signs of Cushing syndrome. Her morning serum cortisol concentration was 1.92 μg/dL. A cosyntropin stimulation test showed values of serum cortisol of Cushing syndrome and secondary adrenal insufficiency due to the association of inhaled corticosteroids with itraconazole or ritonavir.

  19. Inhaled medication and inhalation devices for lung disease in patients with cystic fibrosis: A European consensus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heijerman, Harry; Westerman, Elsbeth; Conway, Steven

    2009-01-01

    , mucolytics/mucous mobilizers, anti-inflammatory drugs, bronchodilators and combinations of solutions. Additionally, we review the current knowledge on devices for inhalation therapy with regard to optimal particle sizes and characteristics of wet nebulisers, dry powder and metered dose inhalers. Finally, we...... review the current status of inhaled medication in CF, including the mechanisms of action of the various drugs, their modes of administration and indications, their effects on lung function, exacerbation rates, survival and quality of life, as well as side effects. Specifically we address antibiotics...

  20. Inhalants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... uses inhalants may be unable to learn new things or may have a hard time carrying on simple conversations. If the cerebral ... get drugs on the street, it is really hard to know what you get, Sometimes, ... put in, all sorts of things could happen. And other times, one might get ...

  1. Inhaled actinides: some safety issues and some research problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bair, W.J.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: limited research funds; risk coefficients for inhaled particles; the hot particle hypothesis; the Gofman-Martell contention; critical tissues for inhaled actinides inhalation hazards associated with future nuclear fuel cycles; and approach to be used by the inhalation panel

  2. Role of inhalation in exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monarca, S.; Dominici, L.; Fatigoni, C.

    2007-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a group of aromatic compounds consisting of a biphenyl variously chlorinated. Industrial production of PCBs started in 1929 and stopped in the second half of the '70s in USA and in the late 80's and 90's in Europe. PCBs are ubiquitous pollutants. The way of human exposure to PCBs is a matter of discussion. Scientific data show that the greater exposure occurs through diet. However, other available data suggest a not marginal role of the inhalation exposure. The sources of PCBs to which population are exposed depend on the amount of redistribution of these compounds released in the environment. The aim of this work is to highlight numerous studies proving that the intake of PCBs by inhalation cannot be neglected, in particular in heavily industrialized areas and where the concentration of PCBs in the environmental matrices is particularly high

  3. Pig-MAP and haptoglobin concentration reference values in swine from commercial farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeiro, Carlos; Piñeiro, Matilde; Morales, Joaquín; Andrés, Marta; Lorenzo, Elia; Pozo, Mateo Del; Alava, María A; Lampreave, Fermín

    2009-01-01

    Pig-MAP (Major Acute-phase Protein) and haptoglobin concentrations were determined in pigs from commercial farms, and reference intervals obtained for different productive stages. Pig-MAP serum concentrations were lower in sows than in adult boars (mean values 0.81 vs. 1.23 mg/mL) and the opposite was observed for haptoglobin (1.47 vs. 0.94 mg/mL). No differences were found between parities, except for a minor decrease in haptoglobin concentration in the 4th parity. A linear correlation between pig-MAP and haptoglobin concentration was observed. In the period 4-12 weeks of life, pig-MAP mean concentrations were around 1mg/mL, being lower in the finishing period (0.7-0.8 mg/mL). Haptoglobin concentrations increased with time, from around 0.6 mg/mL at 4 weeks of age to 1.4 mg/mL at 12 weeks. Mean values of around 0.9 mg/mL were observed in the finishing period. A wider distribution of values was observed for haptoglobin than for pig-MAP concentrations. Differences between herds were observed, with the highest values obtained in a herd with signs of respiratory disease.

  4. Trends in stream nitrogen concentrations for forested reference catchments across the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Argerich; S.L. Johnson; S.D. Sebestyen; C.C. Rhoades; E. Greathouse; J.D. Knoepp; M.B. Adams; G.E. Likens; J.L. Campbell; W.H. McDowell; F.N. Scatena; G.G. Ice

    2013-01-01

    To examine whether stream nitrogen concentrations in forested reference catchments have changed over time and if patterns were consistent across the USA, we synthesized up to 44 yr of data collected from 22 catchments at seven USDA Forest Service Experimental Forests. Trends in stream nitrogen presented high spatial variability both among catchments at a site and among...

  5. Ease-of-use preference for the ELLIPTA® dry powder inhaler over a commonly used single-dose capsule dry powder inhaler by inhalation device-naïve Japanese volunteers aged 40 years or older

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komase Y

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Yuko Komase,1 Akimoto Asako,2 Akihiro Kobayashi,3 Raj Sharma4 1Department of Respiratory Internal Medicine, St Marianna University School of Medicine, Yokohama City Seibu Hospital, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan; 2MA Respiratory Department, Development and Medical Affairs Unit, GlaxoSmithKline KK, Tokyo, Japan; 3Biomedical Data Sciences Department, GlaxoSmithKline KK, Tokyo, Japan; 4Global Respiratory Franchise Medical Department, GSK, Stockley Park, UK Background: In patients receiving inhaled medication, dissatisfaction with and difficulty in using the inhaler can affect treatment adherence. The incidence of handling errors is typically higher in the elderly than in younger people. The aim of the study was to assess inhaler preference for and handling errors with the ELLIPTA® dry powder inhaler (DPI, (GSK, compared with the established BREEZHALER™, a single-dose capsule DPI (Novartis, in inhalation device-naïve Japanese volunteers aged ≥40 years. Methods: In this open-label, nondrug interventional, crossover DPI preference study comparing the ELLIPTA DPI and BREEZHALER, 150 subjects were randomized to handle the ELLIPTA or BREEZHALER DPIs until the point of inhalation, without receiving verbal or demonstrative instruction (first attempt. Subjects then crossed over to the other inhaler. Preference was assessed using a self-completed questionnaire. Inhaler handling was assessed by a trained assessor using a checklist. Subjects did not inhale any medication in the study, so efficacy and safety were not measured. Results: The ELLIPTA DPI was preferred to the BREEZHALER by 89% of subjects (odds ratio [OR] 70.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 33.69–146.01; P-value not applicable for this inhaler for ease of use, by 63% of subjects (OR 2.98, CI 1.87–4.77; P<0.0001 for ease of determining the number of doses remaining in the inhaler, by 91% for number of steps required, and by 93% for time needed for handling the inhaler. The BREEZHALER was

  6. Conference report: 1st Medicon Valley Inhalation Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lastow, Orest

    2013-02-01

    The 1st Medicon Valley Inhalation Symposium was arranged by the Medicon Valley Inhalation Consortium. It was held at the Medicon Village site, which is the former AstraZeneca site in Lund, Sweden. It was a 1-day symposium focused on inhaled drug delivery and inhalation product development. A total of 90 delegates listened to 15 speakers. The program was organized to follow the value chain of an inhalation product development. The benefits and future opportunities of inhaled drug delivery were discussed together with some new disease areas that can be targeted with inhalation. The pros and cons of the two main formulation types; dry powder and liquid formulations, were discussed by a panel. The different requirements of the drug molecules from a pharmacology, chemical and physical perspective were explained. The modeling of the physics inside an inhaler was demonstrated and the potential strategic benefits of device design were highlighted together with the many challenges of formulation manufacturing. Lung deposition mechanisms and the difficulties of the generic bioequivalence concept were discussed. Using an anatomically correct impactor inlet is a valuable tool in lung deposition predictions and the planning of clinical trials. The management of the biological material generated in clinical studies is key to successful studies.

  7. Workplace Inhalant Abuse in Adult Female: Brief Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Verma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhalant abuse is the purposeful inhalation of intoxicating gases and vapors for the purpose of achieving an altered mental state. With its propensity for being yet an under-recognized form of substance use, being gateway to hard substances, cross-cultural penetration crossing socioeconomic boundaries, and causing significant morbidity and mortality in early ages, the prevention of inhalant misuse is a highly pertinent issue. This clinical report identifies a newer perspective in the emergence of inhalant abuse initiation. We report a case of an adult female with late onset of inhalant dependence developing at workplace and recommend for greater awareness, prevention, and management of this expanding substance abuse problem.

  8. Toxicity of 90Sr inhaled in a relatively insoluble form by Beagle dogs. XVII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snipes, M.B.; Hahn, F.F.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Mauderly, J.L.; McClellan, R.O.; Pickrell, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    This study was initiated to determine health effects resulting from inhalation of 90 Sr in relatively insoluble form. Beagle dogs were briefly exposed by inhalation to produce lung burdens of 90 Sr that ranged from 0.12 to 96 μCi (4.4-3500 kBq)/kg body weight. Exposures to the higher concentrations of 90 Sr caused radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis, typically resulting in death 90 Sr-exposed dogs were euthanized during the past year. One remaining exposed dog and one control dog are both 14 yr old and are being maintained for lifetime observation. (author)

  9. Inhalation of uranium nanoparticles: respiratory tract deposition and translocation to secondary target organs in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitot, Fabrice; Lestaevel, Philippe; Tourlonias, Elie; Mazzucco, Charline; Jacquinot, Sébastien; Dhieux, Bernadette; Delissen, Olivia; Tournier, Benjamin B; Gensdarmes, François; Beaunier, Patricia; Dublineau, Isabelle

    2013-03-13

    Uranium nanoparticles (fuel cycle and during remediation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Explosions and fires in nuclear reactors and the use of ammunition containing depleted uranium can also produce such aerosols. The risk of accidental inhalation of uranium nanoparticles by nuclear workers, military personnel or civilian populations must therefore be taken into account. In order to address this issue, the absorption rate of inhaled uranium nanoparticles needs to be characterised experimentally. For this purpose, rats were exposed to an aerosol containing 10⁷ particles of uranium per cm³ (CMD=38 nm) for 1h in a nose-only inhalation exposure system. Uranium concentrations deposited in the respiratory tract, blood, brain, skeleton and kidneys were determined by ICP-MS. Twenty-seven percent of the inhaled mass of uranium nanoparticles was deposited in the respiratory tract. One-fifth of UO₂ nanoparticles were rapidly cleared from lung (T(½)=2.4 h) and translocated to extrathoracic organs. However, the majority of the particles were cleared slowly (T(½)=141.5 d). Future long-term experimental studies concerning uranium nanoparticles should focus on the potential lung toxicity of the large fraction of particles cleared slowly from the respiratory tract after inhalation exposure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Inhaled antibiotics in the treatment of non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis: clinical and drug delivery perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugianto, Tiffanie Daisy; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2016-01-01

    Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFB) is a chronic, progressive, suppurative lung disease characterized by permanent dilatation of bronchial subdivisions, which further causes accumulation of sputum and bacterial infections. The advent of inhaled antibiotics over the past two decades has been expected to effectively attenuate the problem of chronic bacterial infections in CF and NCFB subjects with higher, local drug concentrations and minimal systemic side effects. This review summarizes and evaluates current clinical evidence of efficacy and adverse effects of inhaled antibiotics in NCFB, as well as ongoing preclinical and clinical studies, followed by a discussion of issues and challenges in clinical practice and drug delivery strategies, together with future research directions. The evidence base of the clinical efficacy of inhaled antibiotics in NCFB is limited and the degrees of reported clinical benefits have been modest and conflicting. Challenges surrounding inhaled antibiotics application and development include the lack of knowledge of disease factors and optimum management strategies, unreceptive lung pathophysiology and the lack of factors that support compliance and tolerability. Nonetheless, research continues to give birth to new clinical findings and novel formulations such as combination antibiotics and sustained-release formulations, which add great value to the development of efficacious, safe and convenient inhalable antibiotics of the future.

  11. Inhalation treatment of primary lung cancer using liposomal curcumin dry powder inhalers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongtong Zhang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Traditional chemotherapy causes serious toxicity due to the wide bodily distribution of these drugs. Curcumin is a potential anticancer agent but its low water solubility, poor bioavailability and rapid metabolism significantly limits clinical applications. Here we developed a liposomal curcumin dry powder inhaler (LCD for inhalation treatment of primary lung cancer. LCDs were obtained from curcumin liposomes after freeze-drying. The LCDs had a mass mean aerodynamic diameter of 5.81 μm and a fine particle fraction of 46.71%, suitable for pulmonary delivery. The uptake of curcumin liposomes by human lung cancer A549 cells was markedly greater and faster than that of free curcumin. The high cytotoxicity on A549 cells and the low cytotoxicity of curcumin liposomes on normal human bronchial BEAS-2B epithelial cells yielded a high selection index partly due to increased cell apoptosis. Curcumin powders, LCDs and gemcitabine were directly sprayed into the lungs of rats with lung cancer through the trachea. LCDs showed higher anticancer effects than the other two medications with regard to pathology and the expression of many cancer-related markers including VEGF, malondialdehyde, TNF-α, caspase-3 and BCL-2. LCDs are a promising medication for inhalation treatment of lung cancer with high therapeutic efficiency. Key words: Curcumin, Dry powder inhaler, Liposome, Primary lung cancer, Pulmonary delivery

  12. Reference intervals for serum osteocalcin concentrations in adult men and women from the study of health in Pomerania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannemann, Anke; Friedrich, Nele; Spielhagen, Christin; Rettig, Rainer; Ittermann, Till; Nauck, Matthias; Wallaschofski, Henri

    2013-03-13

    Osteocalcin (OC) is a bone-specific protein produced primarily by osteoblasts during bone formation. Besides its role in bone formation, osteocalcin may play a role in the regulation of energy metabolism and male fertility. To interpret serum OC data, reference intervals adapted to a specific laboratory method are needed. A healthy reference population was selected from the first follow-up of the Study of Health in Pomerania. Serum OC concentrations were measured with the IDS-iSYS N-Mid Osteocalcin assay on the IDS-iSYS Automated System (Immunodiagnostic Systems, Frankfurt am Main, Germany). The reference interval was defined as the central 95% range (2.5th-97.5th percentile). Age-specific reference intervals were calculated by quantile regression for 1107 men (25-79 years) and 545 premenopausal women (25-54 years). The reference interval for 498 postmenopausal women (50-79 years) was calculated irrespective of age. Median (1st-3rd quartile) serum OC concentrations were 15.4 ng/mL (12.0-19.4 ng/mL) in men, 14.4 ng/mL (11.3-18.5 ng/mL) in premenopausal women, and 18.6 ng/mL (13.6-25.6 ng/mL) in postmenopausal women. Serum OC concentrations were highest in men and premenopausal women aged 25-29 years, were stable during midlife, and rose again after 65 years of age in men and at transition to menopause in women. Serum OC concentrations were lower in women taking oral contraceptives or who were under hormone replacement therapy after menopause and in subjects with diabetes mellitus or with body mass index  30 kg/m2 than in subjects without these conditions. We established sex-specific adult reference intervals for the serum OC concentration measured by the IDS-iSYS N-Mid Osteocalcin assay.

  13. Pulmonary and cardiovascular responses of rats to inhalation of silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jenny R; McKinney, Walter; Kan, Hong; Krajnak, Kristine; Frazer, David G; Thomas, Treye A; Waugh, Stacey; Kenyon, Allison; MacCuspie, Robert I; Hackley, Vincent A; Castranova, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to wet aerosols generated during use of spray products containing silver (Ag) has not been evaluated. The goal was to assess the potential for cardiopulmonary toxicity following an acute inhalation of wet silver colloid. Rats were exposed by inhalation to a low concentration (100 μg/m(3) ) using an undiluted commercial antimicrobial product (20 mg/L total silver; approximately 33 nm mean aerodynamic diameter [MAD]) or to a higher concentration (1000 μg/m(3)) using a suspension (200 mg/L total silver; approximately 39 nm MAD) synthesized to possess a similar size distribution of Ag nanoparticles for 5 h. Estimated lung burdens from deposition models were 0, 1.4, or 14 μg Ag/rat after exposure to control aerosol, low, and high doses, respectively. At 1 and 7 d postexposure, the following parameters were monitored: pulmonary inflammation, lung cell toxicity, alveolar air/blood barrier damage, alveolar macrophage activity, blood cell differentials, responsiveness of tail artery to vasoconstrictor or vasodilatory agents, and heart rate and blood pressure in response to isoproterenol or norepinephrine, respectively. Changes in pulmonary or cardiovascular parameters were absent or nonsignificant at 1 or 7 d postexposure with the exceptions of increased blood monocytes 1 d after high-dose Ag exposure and decreased dilation of tail artery after stimulation, as well as elevated heart rate in response to isoproterenol 1 d after low-dose Ag exposure, possibly due to bioavailable ionic Ag in the commercial product. In summary, short-term inhalation of nano-Ag did not produce apparent marked acute toxicity in this animal model.

  14. The Inhaled Steroid Treatment As Regular Therapy in Early Asthma (START) study 5-year follow-up: effectiveness of early intervention with budesonide in mild persistent asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busse, William W; Pedersen, Søren; Pauwels, Romain A

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Inhaled Steroid Treatment as Regular Therapy in Early Asthma (START) study enrolled 7241 patients aged 5 to 66 years with recent-onset, mild persistent asthma to assess early intervention with the inhaled corticosteroid budesonide on long-term asthma control. OBJECTIVE: The open......-label phase of the START study was included to determine the effect on lung function and asthma control of adding budesonide to the reference group patients who had not initially received inhaled corticosteroids. METHODS: Patients were randomized to double-blind treatment with budesonide, 200 mug (those aged...

  15. Carbon dioxide inhalation treatments of neurotic anxiety. An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolpe, J

    1987-03-01

    A lucky chance more than 30 years ago revealed the remarkable efficacy of single inhalations of high concentrations of carbon dioxide in eliminating or markedly reducing free-floating anxiety. The reduction of anxiety lasts for days, weeks, or longer--well beyond the persistence of carbon dioxide in the body. The effects are explicable on the hypothesis that free-floating anxiety is anxiety conditioned to continuously present sources of stimulation, such as background noise or the awareness of space or time, and that the anxiety response habit is weakened when the anxiety is inhibited by the competition of responses that carbon dioxide induces. More recently, it has become apparent that inhalations of carbon dioxide, applied in a different manner, are effective in overcoming maladaptive anxiety responses to specific stimuli, e.g., social stimuli. The substance is also proving to be a valuable resource in the treatment of the common variety of panic attacks.

  16. Radioactivity of 210Pb in Japanese cigarettes and radiation dose from smoking inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakoda, A.; Fukao, K.; Kawabe, A.; Kataoka, T.; Hanamoto, K.; Yamaoka, K.

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that cigarette tobaccos contain naturally occurring radioactive nuclides such as 210 Pb and 210 Po. In many countries, the radioactivity of tobaccos has been measured to estimate the effective dose from smoking inhalation. The present study covered 24 cigarette brands including the top 20 of sales in Japan between April 2008 and March 2009. The activity concentrations of 210 Pb were measured by gamma-ray spectrometry, and then those of its progeny ( 210 Po) were evaluated assuming the radioactive equilibrium between the two nuclides. Their concentrations were in the range of 2-14 mBq cigarette -1 with an arithmetic mean of 8±3 mBq cigarette -1 . The annual committed effective doses were also calculated, based on the scenario that a smoker consumes 20 cigarettes a day. The average doses from 210 Pb and 210 Po inhalations were 22±9 and 68±27 uμSv y -1 , respectively. (authors)

  17. Inhaler devices - from theory to practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchis, Joaquin; Corrigan, Chris; Levy, Mark L

    2013-01-01

    This brief overview of the factors determining lung deposition of aerosols provides background information required by health care providers when instructing patients to use their prescribed inhalers. We discuss differences in the optimal inhalation manoeuvres for each type of aerosol generator a...

  18. The effect of inhalant anesthetic and body temperature on peri-anesthetic serum concentrations of transdermally administered fentanyl in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettifer, Glenn R; Hosgood, Giselle

    2004-04-01

    To determine whether moderate hypothermia during anesthesia significantly affects the serum concentration of transdermally delivered fentanyl and whether halothane or isoflurane affect these concentrations. Randomized cross-over experimental trial. Six mature, healthy Beagles (three males, three females) weighing 10.6 +/- 0.43 kg. A 50-microg hour(-1) fentanyl patch was applied 36 hours prior to anesthesia. Anesthesia was induced at time 0 (t = 0). Each dog received four treatments: isoflurane + normothermia (ISO-NORM), isoflurane + hypothermia (ISO-HYPO), halothane + normothermia (HAL-NORM), and halothane + hypothermia (HAL-HYPO). Dogs were intubated and maintained at 1.5 times MAC. Animals in the hypothermia treatments were cooled to 35 degrees C during anesthesia. Serum fentanyl analysis was performed at -36, -24, -12, 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 3.5, 4, 4.5, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 18, and 26 hours. Direct arterial blood pressures and arterial blood gases were monitored. The mean body temperatures (+/-SEM) during the anesthetic period for the four treatments were: ISO-NORM = 37.7 +/- 0.07 degrees C, ISO-HYPO = 35.8 +/- 0.1 degrees C, HAL-NORM = 37.7 +/- 0.06 degrees C, and HAL-HYPO = 35.8 +/- 0.13 degrees C. The mean (+/-SEM) serum fentanyl concentrations (SFC) for both hypothermia treatments were significantly lower than baseline concentrations at t = 1 hour and persisted for the duration of anesthesia for the ISO-HYPO treatment but only from t = 1 to 2 hours for the HAL-HYPO treatment. Serum fentanyl concentrations returned to baseline within one hour of the end of anesthesia, regardless of body temperature. There were no significant differences between treatments for systolic or diastolic blood pressure but mean blood pressures were higher during normothermia versus hypothermia during the last hour of anesthesia. Hypothermia during inhalation anesthesia produced a significant reduction in SFC using transdermal administration and was more protracted with isoflurane

  19. Pulmonary toxicity of well-dispersed cerium oxide nanoparticles following intratracheal instillation and inhalation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, Yasuo, E-mail: yasuom@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp; Izumi, Hiroto; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Tomonaga, Taisuke; Oyabu, Takako; Myojo, Toshihiko; Kawai, Kazuaki; Yatera, Kazuhiro [University of Occupational and Environmental Health (Japan); Shimada, Manabu; Kubo, Masaru [Hiroshima University (Japan); Yamamoto, Kazuhiro [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) (Japan); Kitajima, Shinichi [National Sanatorium Hoshizuka Keiaien (Japan); Kuroda, Etsushi [Osaka University, Laboratory of Vaccine Science, WPI Immunology Frontier Research Center (Japan); Kawaguchi, Kenji; Sasaki, Takeshi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    We performed inhalation and intratracheal instillation studies of cerium dioxide (CeO{sub 2}) nanoparticles in order to investigate their pulmonary toxicity, and observed pulmonary inflammation not only in the acute and but also in the chronic phases. In the intratracheal instillation study, F344 rats were exposed to 0.2 mg or 1 mg of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles. Cell analysis and chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were analyzed from 3 days to 6 months following the instillation. In the inhalation study, rats were exposed to the maximum concentration of inhaled CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles (2, 10 mg/m{sup 3}, respectively) for 4 weeks (6 h/day, 5 days/week). The same endpoints as in the intratracheal instillation study were examined from 3 days to 3 months after the end of the exposure. The intratracheal instillation of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles caused a persistent increase in the total and neutrophil number in BALF and in the concentration of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)-1, CINC-2, chemokine for neutrophil, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an oxidative stress marker, in BALF during the observation time. The inhalation of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles also induced a persistent influx of neutrophils and expression of CINC-1, CINC-2, and HO-1 in BALF. Pathological features revealed that inflammatory cells, including macrophages and neutrophils, invaded the alveolar space in both studies. Taken together, the CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles induced not only acute but also chronic inflammation in the lung, suggesting that CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles have a pulmonary toxicity that can lead to irreversible lesions.

  20. Radiation dose to the lungs due to inhalation of alpha emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haque, A.K.M.M.; Al-Affan, I.A.M.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation dose to the lungs due to inhalation of radon daughters has been computed with improved data on lung models, aerosol parameters, deposition and clearance mechanisms. The dose corresponds to mean radon concentration of 23 Bq/m 3 indoors (recent NRPB Survey) for different living conditions. The dose rate to basal cells in gen. 5 is 12 mGy/WLM. (author)

  1. Tolerability of inhaled N-chlorotaurine in the pig model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholl-Bürgi Sabine

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background N-chlorotaurine, a long-lived oxidant produced by human leukocytes, can be applied in human medicine as an endogenous antiseptic. Its antimicrobial activity can be enhanced by ammonium chloride. This study was designed to evaluate the tolerability of inhaled N-chlorotaurine (NCT in the pig model. Methods Anesthetized pigs inhaled test solutions of 1% (55 mM NCT (n = 7, 5% NCT (n = 6, or 1% NCT plus 1% ammonium chloride (NH4Cl (n = 6, and 0.9% saline solution as a control (n = 7, respectively. Applications with 5 ml each were performed hourly within four hours. Lung function, haemodynamics, and pharmacokinetics were monitored. Bronchial lavage samples for captive bubble surfactometry and lung samples for histology and electron microscopy were removed. Results Arterial pressure of oxygen (PaO2 decreased significantly over the observation period of 4 hours in all animals. Compared to saline, 1% NCT + 1% NH4Cl led to significantly lower PaO2 values at the endpoint after 4 hours (62 ± 9.6 mmHg vs. 76 ± 9.2 mmHg, p = 0.014 with a corresponding increase in alveolo-arterial difference of oxygen partial pressure (AaDO2 (p = 0.004. Interestingly, AaDO2 was lowest with 1% NCT, even lower than with saline (p = 0.016. The increase of pulmonary artery pressure (PAP over the observation period was smallest with 1% NCT without difference to controls (p = 0.91, and higher with 5% NCT (p = 0.02, and NCT + NH4Cl (p = 0.05. Histological and ultrastructural investigations revealed no differences between the test and control groups. The surfactant function remained intact. There was no systemic resorption of NCT detectable, and its local inactivation took place within 30 min. The concentration of NCT tolerated by A549 lung epithelial cells in vitro was similar to that known from other body cells (0.25–0.5 mM. Conclusion The endogenous antiseptic NCT was well tolerated at a concentration of 1% upon inhalation in the pig model. Addition of

  2. Evaluation of Inhaled Versus Deposited Dose Using the Exponential Dose-Response Model for Inhalational Anthrax in Nonhuman Primate, Rabbit, and Guinea Pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutting, Bradford W; Rukhin, Andrey; Mackie, Ryan S; Marchette, David; Thran, Brandolyn

    2015-05-01

    The application of the exponential model is extended by the inclusion of new nonhuman primate (NHP), rabbit, and guinea pig dose-lethality data for inhalation anthrax. Because deposition is a critical step in the initiation of inhalation anthrax, inhaled doses may not provide the most accurate cross-species comparison. For this reason, species-specific deposition factors were derived to translate inhaled dose to deposited dose. Four NHP, three rabbit, and two guinea pig data sets were utilized. Results from species-specific pooling analysis suggested all four NHP data sets could be pooled into a single NHP data set, which was also true for the rabbit and guinea pig data sets. The three species-specific pooled data sets could not be combined into a single generic mammalian data set. For inhaled dose, NHPs were the most sensitive (relative lowest LD50) species and rabbits the least. Improved inhaled LD50 s proposed for use in risk assessment are 50,600, 102,600, and 70,800 inhaled spores for NHP, rabbit, and guinea pig, respectively. Lung deposition factors were estimated for each species using published deposition data from Bacillus spore exposures, particle deposition studies, and computer modeling. Deposition was estimated at 22%, 9%, and 30% of the inhaled dose for NHP, rabbit, and guinea pig, respectively. When the inhaled dose was adjusted to reflect deposited dose, the rabbit animal model appears the most sensitive with the guinea pig the least sensitive species. © 2014 Society for Risk Analysis.

  3. Exposition by inhalation to the benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene and xylenes (BTEX) in the air. Sources, measures and concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Gratta, F.; Durif, M.; Fagault, Y.; Zdanevitch, I.

    2004-12-01

    This document presents the main techniques today available to characterize the benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene and xylene (BTEX) concentrations in the air for different contexts: urban and rural areas or around industrial installations but also indoor and occupational area. It provides information to guide laboratories and research departments. A synthesis gives also the main emissions sources of these compounds as reference concentrations measured in different environments. (A.L.B.)

  4. Workplace aerosol mass concentration measurement using optical particle counters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görner, Peter; Simon, Xavier; Bémer, Denis; Lidén, Göran

    2012-02-01

    Direct-reading aerosol measurement usually uses the optical properties of airborne particles to detect and measure particle concentration. In the case of occupational hygiene, mass concentration measurement is often required. Two aerosol monitoring methods are based on the principle of light scattering: optical particle counting (OPC) and photometry. The former analyses the light scattered by a single particle, the latter by a cloud of particles. Both methods need calibration to transform the quantity of scattered light detected into particle concentration. Photometers are simpler to use and can be directly calibrated to measure mass concentration. However, their response varies not only with aerosol concentration but also with particle size distribution, which frequently contributes to biased measurement. Optical particle counters directly measure the particle number concentration and particle size that allows assessment of the particle mass provided the particles are spherical and of known density. An integrating algorithm is used to calculate the mass concentration of any conventional health-related aerosol fraction. The concentrations calculated thus have been compared with simultaneous measurements by conventional gravimetric sampling to check the possibility of field OPC calibration with real workplace aerosols with a view to further monitoring particle mass concentration. Aerosol concentrations were measured in the food industry using the OPC GRIMM® 1.108 and the CIP 10-Inhalable and CIP 10-Respirable (ARELCO®) aerosol samplers while meat sausages were being brushed and coated with calcium carbonate. Previously, the original OPC inlet had been adapted to sample inhalable aerosol. A mixed aerosol of calcium carbonate and fungi spores was present in the workplace. The OPC particle-size distribution and an estimated average particle density of both aerosol components were used to calculate the mass concentration. The inhalable and respirable aerosol fractions

  5. From dust to dose: Effects of forest disturbance on increased inhalation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whicker, Jeffrey J; Pinder, John E; Breshears, David D; Eberhart, Craig F

    2006-09-15

    Ecosystem disturbances that remove vegetation and disturb surface soils are major causes of excessive soil erosion and can result in accelerated transport of soils contaminated with hazardous materials. Accelerated wind erosion in disturbed lands that are contaminated is of particular concern because of potential increased inhalation exposure, yet measurements regarding these relationships are lacking. The importance of this was highlighted when, in May of 2000, the Cerro Grande fire burned over roughly 30% of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), mostly in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forest, and through areas with soils containing contaminants, particularly excess depleted and natural uranium. Additionally, post-fire thinning was performed in burned and unburned forests on about 25% of LANL land. The first goal of this study was to assess the potential for increased inhalation dose from uranium contaminated soils via wind-driven resuspension of soil following the Cerro Grande Fire and subsequent forest thinning. This was done through analysis of post-disturbance measurements of uranium air concentrations and their relationships with wind velocity and seasonal vegetation cover. We found a 14% average increase in uranium air concentrations at LANL perimeter locations after the fire, and the greatest air concentrations occurred during the months of April-June when wind velocities are highest, no snow cover, and low vegetation cover. The second goal was to develop a methodology to assess the relative contribution of each disturbance type towards increasing public and worker exposure to these resuspended soils. Measurements of wind-driven dust flux in severely burned, moderately burned, thinned, and unburned/unthinned forest areas were used to assess horizontal dust flux (HDF) in these areas. Using empirically derived relationships between measurements of HDF and respirible dust, coupled with onsite uranium soil concentrations, we estimate relative increases in

  6. Long-term effects of aluminium dust inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Susan; Reid, Alison; Fritschi, Lin; de Klerk, Nicholas; Musk, A W Bill

    2013-12-01

    During the 1950s and 1960s, aluminium dust inhalation was used as a potential prophylaxis against silicosis in underground miners, including in Australia. We investigated the association between aluminium dust inhalation and cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and Alzheimer's diseases in a cohort of Australian male underground gold miners. We additionally looked at pneumoconiosis mortality to estimate the effect of the aluminium therapy. SMRs and 95% CI were calculated to compare mortality of the cohort members with that of the Western Australian male population (1961-2009). Internal comparisons on duration of aluminium dust inhalation were examined using Cox regression. Aluminium dust inhalation was reported for 647 out of 1894 underground gold miners. During 42 780 person-years of follow-up, 1577 deaths were observed. An indication of increased mortality of Alzheimer's disease among miners ever exposed to aluminium dust was found (SMR=1.38), although it was not statistically significant (95% CI 0.69 to 2.75). Rates for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular death were above population levels, but were similar for subjects with or without a history of aluminium dust inhalation. HRs suggested an increasing risk of cardiovascular disease with duration of aluminium dust inhalation (HR=1.02, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.04, per year of exposure). No difference in the association between duration of work underground and pneumoconiosis was observed between the groups with or without aluminium dust exposure. No protective effect against silicosis was observed from aluminium dust inhalation. Conversely, exposure to aluminium dust may possibly increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and dementia of the Alzheimer's type.

  7. Enrolment in an Asthma Management Program during Pregnancy and Adherence with Inhaled Corticosteroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baarnes, Camilla Boslev; Hansen, A V; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Poor adherence with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) is a major problem in asthma and according to previous studies not least during pregnancy. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to assess if enrolment in an asthma management program, and by that close monitoring, can improve self-reported and docum......BACKGROUND: Poor adherence with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) is a major problem in asthma and according to previous studies not least during pregnancy. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to assess if enrolment in an asthma management program, and by that close monitoring, can improve self......-reported and documented adherence with ICS in pregnant women with asthma. METHODS: Pregnant women with doctor-diagnosed asthma, currently being prescribed ICS, referred during a 12-month period to the outpatient respiratory clinic, were consecutively included in the study. They had follow-up visits every 4 weeks during...

  8. Inhaled plutonium oxide in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This project is concerned with long-term experiments to determine the life-span dose-effect relationships of inhaled 239 PuO 2 and 238 PuO 2 in beagles. The data will be used to estimate the health effects of inhaled transuranics. The tissue distribution of plutonium, radiation effects in the lung and hematologic changes in plutonium-exposed beagles with lung tumors were evaluated

  9. 49 CFR 172.555 - POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard. 172.555 Section... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.555 POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard must be as follows: ER22JY97.025 (b) In addition to...

  10. Thinner inhalation effects on oxidative stress and DNA repair in a rat model of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Alfaro, Minerva; Cárabez-Trejo, Alfonso; Gallegos-Corona, Marco-Antonio; Pedraza-Aboytes, Gustavo; Hernández-Chan, Nancy Georgina; Leo-Amador, Guillermo Enrique

    2010-04-01

    Humans can come into contact with thinner by occupational exposure or by intentional inhalation abuse. Numerous studies of workers for genotoxic effects of thinner exposure have yielded conflicting results, perhaps because co-exposure to variable other compounds cannot be avoided in workplace exposure studies. In contrast, there is no data concerning the genotoxic effects of intentional inhalation abuse. The aim of this project was to examine the genotoxic effects of thinner inhalation in an animal model of thinner abuse (rats exposed to 3000 ppm toluene, a high solvent concentration over a very short, 15 min time period, twice a day for 6 weeks). The data presented here provides evidence that thinner inhalation in our experimental conditions is able to induce weight loss, lung abnormalities and oxidative stress. This oxidative stress induces oxidative DNA damage that is not a characteristic feature of genotoxic damage. No significant difference in DNA damage and DNA repair (biomarkers of genotoxicity) in lymphocytes from thinner-treated and control rats was found. Lead treatment was used as a positive control in these assays. Finally, bone marrow was evaluated as a biomarker of cellular alteration associated with thinner inhalation. The observed absence of hemopoietic and genetic toxicity could be explained in part by the absence of benzene, the only carcinogenic component of thinner; however, benzene is no longer a common component of thinner. In conclusion, thinner did not cause genotoxic effects in an experimental model of intentional abuse despite the fact that thinner inhalation induces oxidative stress. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. 49 CFR 172.429 - POISON INHALATION HAZARD label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON INHALATION HAZARD label. 172.429 Section... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.429 POISON INHALATION HAZARD label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON INHALATION HAZARD label must be as follows: ER22JY97.023 (b) In addition to complying...

  12. Acute Lung Injury Following Smoke Inhalation: Predictive Value of Sputum Biomarkers and Time Course of Lung Inflammation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burgess, Jefferey L

    2007-01-01

    ...: Bronchial secretions from 200-250 intubated patients with smoke inhalation injury will be evaluated for initial and longitudinal changes concentrations of substance P, TNF- , IL-1, IL-8, and IL-10...

  13. Value assignment of nutrient concentrations in five standard reference materials and six reference materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpless, K E; Gill, L M

    2000-01-01

    A number of food-matrix reference materials (RMs) are available from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and from Agriculture Canada through NIST. Most of these materials were originally value-assigned for their elemental composition (major, minor, and trace elements), but no additional nutritional information was provided. Two of the materials were certified for selected organic constituents. Ten of these materials (Standard Reference Material [SRM] 1,563 Cholesterol and Fat-Soluble Vitamins in Coconut Oil [Natural and Fortified], SRM 1,566b Oyster Tissue, SRM 1,570a Spinach Leaves, SRM 1,974a Organics in Mussel Tissue (Mytilus edulis), RM 8,415 Whole Egg Powder, RM 8,418 Wheat Gluten, RM 8,432 Corn Starch, RM 8,433 Corn Bran, RM 8,435 Whole Milk Powder, and RM 8,436 Durum Wheat Flour) were recently distributed by NIST to 4 laboratories with expertise in food analysis for the measurement of proximates (solids, fat, protein, etc.), calories, and total dietary fiber, as appropriate. SRM 1846 Infant Formula was distributed as a quality control sample for the proximates and for analysis for individual fatty acids. Two of the materials (Whole Egg Powder and Whole Milk Powder) were distributed in an earlier interlaboratory comparison exercise in which they were analyzed for several vitamins. Value assignment of analyte concentrations in these 11 SRMs and RMs, based on analyses by the collaborating laboratories, is described in this paper. These materials are intended primarily for validation of analytical methods for the measurement of nutrients in foods of similar composition (based on AOAC INTERNATIONAL's fat-protein-carbohydrate triangle). They may also be used as "primary control materials" in the value assignment of in-house control materials of similar composition. The addition of proximate information for 10 existing reference materials means that RMs are now available from NIST with assigned values for proximates in 6 of the 9 sectors of

  14. Lung retention and metabolic fate of inhaled benzo(a)pyrene associated with diesel exhaust particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, J.D.; Wolff, R.K.; Kanapilly, G.M.; McClellan, R.O.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of ultrafine, insoluble, carrier particles on the lung retention and metabolic fate of inhaled PAHs was investigated with a radiolabeled model PAH, [ 3 H]benzo(a)pyrene ( 3 H-BaP). Fischer-344 rats were exposed (30 min) by nose-only inhalation to 3 H-BaP adsorbed (approximately 0.1% by mass) onto diesel engine exhaust particles. The total mass concentration of these aerosols was 4-6 micrograms/liter of air with a mass median diameter of 0.14 micron. Lung clearance of the inhaled particle-associated 3 H radioactivity occurred in two phases. The initially rapid clearance of this inhaled radiolabel had a half-time of less than 1 hr. The second, long-term component of lung clearance had a half-time of 18 +/- 2 days and represented 50 +/- 2% of the 3 H radioactivity that had initially deposited in lungs. In contrast, previous inhalation studies with a pure 3 H-BaP aerosol showed that greater than 99% of the 3 H radioactivity deposited in lungs was cleared within 2 hr after exposure. By HPLC analysis, the majority of diesel soot-associated 3 H radioactivity retained in lungs was BaP (65-76%) with smaller amounts of BaP-phenol (13-17%) and BaP-quinone (5-18%) metabolites also being detected. No other metabolites of BaP were detected in lungs of exposed rats. Tissue distribution and excretion patterns of 3 H radioactivity were qualitatively similar to previous inhalation studies with 3 H-BaP coated Ga2O3 aerosols. These findings suggest that inhaled PAHs may be retained in lungs for a greater period of time when these compounds are associated with diesel engine exhaust particles. These results may have significant implications for the health risks that may be involved with human exposure to particle-associated organic pollutants

  15. Inhaled antibiotics for lower airway infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quon, Bradley S; Goss, Christopher H; Ramsey, Bonnie W

    2014-03-01

    Inhaled antibiotics have been used to treat chronic airway infections since the 1940s. The earliest experience with inhaled antibiotics involved aerosolizing antibiotics designed for parenteral administration. These formulations caused significant bronchial irritation due to added preservatives and nonphysiologic chemical composition. A major therapeutic advance took place in 1997, when tobramycin designed for inhalation was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Attracted by the clinical benefits observed in CF and the availability of dry powder antibiotic formulations, there has been a growing interest in the use of inhaled antibiotics in other lower respiratory tract infections, such as non-CF bronchiectasis, ventilator-associated pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, mycobacterial disease, and in the post-lung transplant setting over the past decade. Antibiotics currently marketed for inhalation include nebulized and dry powder forms of tobramycin and colistin and nebulized aztreonam. Although both the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency have approved their use in CF, they have not been approved in other disease areas due to lack of supportive clinical trial evidence. Injectable formulations of gentamicin, tobramycin, amikacin, ceftazidime, and amphotericin are currently nebulized "off-label" to manage non-CF bronchiectasis, drug-resistant nontuberculous mycobacterial infections, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and post-transplant airway infections. Future inhaled antibiotic trials must focus on disease areas outside of CF with sample sizes large enough to evaluate clinically important endpoints such as exacerbations. Extrapolating from CF, the impact of eradicating organisms such as P. aeruginosa in non-CF bronchiectasis should also be evaluated.

  16. Population pharmacokinetics of caffeine and its metabolites theobromine, paraxanthine and theophylline after inhalation in combination with diacetylmorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandvliet, Anthe S; Huitema, Alwin D R; de Jonge, Milly E; den Hoed, Rob; Sparidans, Rolf W; Hendriks, Vincent M; van den Brink, Wim; van Ree, Jan M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2005-01-01

    The stimulant effect of caffeine, as an additive in diacetylmorphine preparations for study purposes, may interfere with the pharmacodynamic effects of diacetylmorphine. In order to obtain insight into the pharmacology of caffeine after inhalation in heroin users, the pharmacokinetics of caffeine and its dimethylxanthine metabolites were studied. The objectives were to establish the population pharmacokinetics under these exceptional circumstances and to compare the results to published data regarding intravenous and oral administration in healthy volunteers. Diacetylmorphine preparations containing 100 mg of caffeine were used by 10 persons by inhalation. Plasma concentrations of caffeine, theobromine, paraxanthine and theophylline were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. Non-linear mixed effects modelling was used to estimate population pharmacokinetic parameters. The model was evaluated by the jack-knife procedure. Caffeine was rapidly and effectively absorbed after inhalation. Population pharmacokinetics of caffeine and its dimethylxanthine metabolites could adequately and simultaneously be described by a linear multi-compartment model. The volume of distribution for the central compartment was estimated to be 45.7 l and the apparent elimination rate constant of caffeine at 8 hr after inhalation was 0.150 hr(-1) for a typical individual. The bioavailability was approximately 60%. The presented model adequately describes the population pharmacokinetics of caffeine and its dimethylxanthine metabolites after inhalation of the caffeine sublimate of a 100 mg tablet. Validation proved the stability of the model. Pharmacokinetics of caffeine after inhalation and intravenous administration are to a large extent similar. The bioavailability of inhaled caffeine is approximately 60% in experienced smokers.

  17. Evaluation of Inhaler Techniques Among Asthma Patients Seen in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    Drug inhalation is an important and a common mode of .... to evaluate the use of inhaler technique among asthma patients in a .... The median duration of the use of the inhalers is 24 ..... Scalabrini A, Cukier A. Incorrect application technique of.

  18. Nanospray Drying as a Novel Technique for the Manufacturing of Inhalable NSAID Powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aquino Rita Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to evaluate the potential of the nanospray drier as a novel apparatus for the manufacturing of a dry powder for inhalation containing ketoprofen lysinate, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug able to control the inflammation in cystic fibrosis patients. We produced several ketoprofen lysinate and leucine powder batches by means of nanospray dryer, studying the influence of process parameters on yield, particle properties (size distribution and morphology, and, mainly, aerodynamic properties of powders. Micronized particles were prepared from different hydroalcoholic solutions (alcohol content from 0 to 30% v/v using ketoprofen in its lysine salt form and leucine as dispersibility enhancer in different ratios (from 5 to 15% w/w with a total solid concentration ranging from 1 to 7% w/v. Results indicated that the spray head equipped with a 7 µm nozzle produced powders too big to be inhaled. The reduction of nozzle size from 7 to 4 µm led to smaller particles suitable for inhalation but, at the same time, caused a dramatic increase in process time. The selection of process variables, together with the nozzle pretreatment with a surfactant solution, allowed us to obtain a free flowing powder with satisfying aerosol performance, confirming the usefulness of the nanospray drier in the production of powder for inhalation.

  19. Respirable versus inhalable dust sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hondros, J.

    1987-01-01

    The ICRP uses a total inhalable dust figure as the basis of calculations on employee lung dose. This paper was written to look at one aspect of the Olympic Dam dust situation, namely, the inhalable versus respirable fraction of the dust cloud. The results of this study will determine whether it is possible to use respirable dust figures, as obtained during routine monitoring to help in the calculations of employee exposure to internal radioactive contaminants

  20. The influence of exercise and dehydration on the urine concentrations of salbutamol after inhaled administration of 1600 µg salbutamol as a single dose in relation to doping analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, Christoffer Bjerre; Backer, Vibeke; Kalsen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the influence of exercise and dehydration on the urine concentrations of salbutamol after inhalation of that maximal permitted (1600 µg) on the 2015 World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) prohibited list. Thirteen healthy males participated in the study. Urine concentrations...... of salbutamol were measured during three conditions: exercise (EX), exercise+dehydration (EXD), and rest (R). Exercise consisted of 75 min cycling at 60% of VO2max and a 20-km time-trial. Fluid intake was 2300, 270, and 1100 mL during EX, EXD, and R, respectively. Urine samples of salbutamol were collected 0.......0±0.7 ng/mL) than EX(3.8±0.8 ng/mL) and EXD(3.6±0.8 ng/mL). AUC was lower for R (14.1±2.8 ng/mL·∙h) than EX (16.9±2.9 ng/mL·∙h)(Pdehydration affect urine concentrations of salbutamol and increase the risk of Adverse Analytical Findings...

  1. Using smartphone as a motion detector to collect time-microenvironment data for estimating the inhalation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoi, Tran Xuan; Phuong, Huynh Truc; Van Hung, Nguyen

    2016-01-01

    During the production of iodine-131 from neutron irradiated tellurium dioxide by the dry distillation, a considerable amount of "1"3"1I vapor is dispersed to the indoor air. People who routinely work at the production area may result in a significant risk of exposure to chronic intake by inhaled "1"3"1I. This study aims to estimate the inhalation dose for individuals manipulating the "1"3"1I at a radioisotope production. By using an application installed on smartphones, we collected the time-microenvironment data spent by a radiation group during work days in 2015. Simultaneously, we used a portable air sampler combined with radioiodine cartridges for grabbing the indoor air samples and then the daily averaged "1"3"1I concentration was calculated. Finally, the time-microenvironment data jointed with the concentration to estimate the inhalation dose for the workers. The result showed that most of the workers had the annual internal dose in 1÷6 mSv. We concluded that using smartphone as a motion detector is a possible and reliable way instead of the questionnaires, diary or GPS-based method. It is, however, only suitable for monitoring on fixed indoor environments and limited the targeted people. - Highlights: • We constructed the time-microenvironment patterns with 1-min resolution by using a smartphone application. • Exposure to "1"3"1I at the dry distillation areas may lead to an acute inhalation dose significantly. • Using smartphone as a motion detector in indoor exposure monitoring is a reliable method.

  2. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Control Triggers Indoors In the Workplace Outdoors Management Asthma Action Plan Flu Shots Inhalers Data, Statistics, ... How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir You can control your asthma ...

  3. (Blastomogenic action of low concentrations of nitrosodimethylamine, dimethylamine and nitrogen dioxide)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benemanskii, V V; Prusakov, V M; Leshchenko, M E

    1981-01-01

    The round-the clock inhalation of the mixture of nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), dimethylamine (DMA) and nitrogen dioxide, with NDMA concentrations varying within 0.66-0.0026 mg/m3, was followed by development of tumors in the kidney, liver, lungs and at other sites in albino nonbred rats, after a year of exposure. Application of DMA and nitrogen dioxide modified the carcinogenic effect of NDMA. In male rats, the blastogenic effect of the mixture was higher, as compared with that of inhalation of NDMA alone. NDMA inhalation resulted in a lower tumor yield in female rats.

  4. The use of multiple respiratory inhalers requiring different inhalation techniques has an adverse effect on COPD outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosnic-Anticevich S

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sinthia Bosnic-Anticevich,1 Henry Chrystyn,2 Richard W Costello,3,4 Myrna B Dolovich,5 Monica J Fletcher,6 Federico Lavorini,7 Roberto Rodríguez-Roisin,8 Dermot Ryan,9,10 Simon Wan Yau Ming,2 David B Price2,11 1Woolcock Institute of Medical Research, School of Medical Sciences, University of Sydney and Sydney Local Health District, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Observational and Pragmatic Research Institute Pte Ltd, Singapore; 3RCSI Medicine, Royal College of Surgeons, 4RCSI Education & Research Centre, Beaumont Hospital, Beaumont, Dublin, Ireland; 5Department of Medicine, Respirology, McMaster University, ON, Canada; 6Education for Health, Warwick, UK; 7Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy; 8Respiratory Institute, Hospital Clinic, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 9Optimum Patient Care, Cambridge, 10Centre for Population Health Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, 11Academic Primary Care, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK Background: Patients with COPD may be prescribed multiple inhalers as part of their treatment regimen, which require different inhalation techniques. Previous literature has shown that the effectiveness of inhaled treatment can be adversely affected by incorrect inhaler technique. Prescribing a range of device types could worsen this problem, leading to poorer outcomes in COPD patients, but the impact is not yet known. Aims: To compare clinical outcomes of COPD patients who use devices requiring similar inhalation technique with those who use devices with mixed techniques. Methods: A matched cohort design was used, with 2 years of data from the Optimum Patient Care Research Database. Matching variables were established from a baseline year of follow-up data, and two cohorts were formed: a “similar-devices cohort” and a “mixed-devices cohort”. COPD-related events were recorded during an outcome year of follow-up. The primary outcome measure was an

  5. Inhalation drug delivery devices: technology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim M

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Mariam Ibrahim, Rahul Verma, Lucila Garcia-ContrerasDepartment of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USAAbstract: The pulmonary route of administration has proven to be effective in local and systemic delivery of miscellaneous drugs and biopharmaceuticals to treat pulmonary and non-pulmonary diseases. A successful pulmonary administration requires a harmonic interaction between the drug formulation, the inhaler device, and the patient. However, the biggest single problem that accounts for the lack of desired effect or adverse outcomes is the incorrect use of the device due to lack of training in how to use the device or how to coordinate actuation and aerosol inhalation. This review summarizes the structural and mechanical features of aerosol delivery devices with respect to mechanisms of aerosol generation, their use with different formulations, and their advantages and limitations. A technological update of the current state-of-the-art designs proposed to overcome current challenges of existing devices is also provided.Keywords: pulmonary delivery, asthma, nebulizers, metered dose inhaler, dry powder inhaler

  6. Compilation of elemental concentration data for NBS Biological and Environmental Standard Reference Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladney, E.S.

    1980-07-01

    Concentration data on up to 76 elementals in 19 NBS Standard Reference Materials have been collected from 325 journal articles and technical reports. These data are summarized into mean +- one standard deviation values and compared with available data from NBS and other review articles. Data are presented on the analytical procedures employed and all raw data are presented in appendixes

  7. Inhaled ciclesonide versus inhaled budesonide or inhaled beclomethasone or inhaled fluticasone for chronic asthma in adults: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halpin David MG

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ciclesonide is a new inhaled corticosteroids licensed for the prophylactic treatment of persistent asthma in adults. Currently beclomethasone dipropionate, budesonide and fluticasone propionate are the most commonly prescribed inhaled corticosteroids for the treatment of asthma but there has been no systematic review comparing the effectiveness and safety ciclesonide to these agents. We therefore aimed to systematically review published randomised controlled trials of the effectiveness and safety of ciclesonide compared to alternative inhaled corticosteroids in people with asthma. Methods We performed literature searches on MEDLINE, EMBASE, PUBMED, the COCHRANE LIBRARY and various Internet evidence sources for randomised controlled trials or systematic reviews comparing ciclesonide to beclomethasone or budesonide or fluticasone in adult humans with persistent asthma. Data was extracted by one reviewer. Results Five studies met the inclusion criteria. Methodological quality was variable. There were no trials comparing ciclesonide to beclomethasone. There was no significant difference between ciclesonide and budesonide or fluticasone on the following outcomes: lung function, symptoms, quality of life, airway responsiveness to a provoking agent or inflammatory markers. However, the trials were very small in size, increasing the possibility of a type II error. One trial demonstrated that the combined deposition of ciclesonide (and its active metabolite in the oropharynx was 47% of that of budesonide while another trial demonstrated that the combined deposition of ciclesonide (and its active metabolite in the oropharynx was 53% of that of fluticasone. One trial demonstrated less suppression of cortisol in overnight urine collection after ciclesonide compared to fluticasone (geometric mean fold difference = 1.5, P Conclusion There is very little evidence comparing CIC to other ICS, restricted to very small, phase II studies of low

  8. Application of the new ICRP respiratory tract model to inhaled plutonium nitrate using experimental biokinetic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birchall, A.; Bailey, M.R.; Jarvis, N.S. [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the new ICRP respiratory tract model with particular reference to inhaled plutonium nitrate. The model is used to determine the absorption rates to blood for plutonium nitrate which when combined with the plutonium excretion functions were used to predict urinary excretion in man. The implications of the new model for radiological protection are discussed. (UK).

  9. Neuromotor effects of acute ethanol inhalation exposure in humans: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Véronique; Lamoureux, Daniel; Beuter, Anne; Charbonneau, Michel; Tardif, Robert

    2003-07-01

    Ethanol (ETOH) is added to unleaded gasoline to decrease environmental levels of carbon monoxide from automobiles emissions. Therefore, addition of ETOH in reformulated fuel will most likely increase and the involuntarily human exposure to this chemical will also increase. This preliminary study was undertaken to evaluate the possible neuromotor effects resulting from acute ETOH exposure by inhalation in humans. Five healthy non-smoking adult males, with no history of alcohol abuse, were exposed by inhalation, in a dynamic, controlled-environment exposure chamber, to various concentrations of ETOH (0, 250, 500 and 1,000 ppm in air) for six hours. Reaction time, body sway, hand tremor and rapid alternating movements were measured before and after each exposure session by using the CATSYS 7.0 system and a diadochokinesimeter. The concentrations of ETOH in blood and in alveolar air were also measured. ETOH was not detected in blood nor in alveolar air when volunteers were exposed to 250 and 500 ppm, but at the end of exposure to 1,000 ppm, blood and alveolar air concentrations were 0.443 mg/100ml and 253.1 ppm, respectively. The neuromotor tests did not show conclusively significant differences between the exposed and non-exposed conditions. In conclusion, this study suggests that acute exposure to ethanol at 1,000 ppm or lower or to concentrations that could be encountered upon refueling is not likely to cause any significant neuromotor alterations in healthy males.

  10. 75 FR 63827 - Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS); Request for Chemical Substance Nominations for 2011...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ... provides oral reference doses (RfDs) and inhalation reference concentrations (RfCs) for chronic noncancer...-3 4,4'-dimethyl-3-oxahexane (TAEE).. 919-94-8 1,4-dioxane (inhalation) 123-91-1 dipentyl phthalate... petroleum and are present in gasoline. Common alkylates found in gasoline for which IRIS assessments have...

  11. Jet fuel kerosene is not immunosuppressive in mice or rats following inhalation for 28 days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kimber L; DeLorme, Michael P; Beatty, Patrick W; Smith, Matthew J; Peachee, Vanessa L

    2013-01-01

    Previous reports indicated that inhalation of JP-8 aviation turbine fuel is immunosuppressive. However, in some of those studies, the exposure concentrations were underestimated, and percent of test article as vapor or aerosol was not determined. Furthermore, it is unknown whether the observed effects are attributable to the base hydrocarbon fuel (jet fuel kerosene) or to the various fuel additives in jet fuels. The present studies were conducted, in compliance with Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) regulations, to evaluate the effects of jet fuel kerosene on the immune system, in conjunction with an accurate, quantitative characterization of the aerosol and vapor exposure concentrations. Two female rodent species (B6C3F1 mice and Crl:CD rats) were exposed by nose-only inhalation to jet fuel kerosene at targeted concentrations of 0, 500, 1000, or 2000 mg/m(3) for 6 h daily for 28 d. Humoral, cell-mediated, and innate immune functions were subsequently evaluated. No marked effects were observed in either species on body weights, spleen or thymus weights, the T-dependent antibody-forming cell response (plaque assay), or the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response. With a few exceptions, spleen cell numbers and phenotypes were also unaffected. Natural killer (NK) cell activity in mice was unaffected, while the NK assessment in rats was not usable due to an unusually low response in all groups. These studies demonstrate that inhalation of jet fuel kerosene for 28 d at levels up to 2000 mg/m(3) did not adversely affect the functional immune responses of female mice and rats.

  12. Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute annual report 1987-1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauderly, J.L.; Mewhinney, J.A.; Bechtold, W.E.; Sun, J.D.; Coons, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    The mission of the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute is to investigate the magnitude of human health effects that result from the inhalation of airborne materials at home, in the work place, or in the general environment. Diseases of the respiratory tract are major causes of suffering and death, and many of these diseases are directly related to the materials that people breath. The Institute's research is directed toward obtaining a better understanding of the basic biology of the respiratory tract and the mechanisms by which inhaled materials produce respiratory disease. Special attention is focused on studying the airborne materials released by various energy technologies, as well as those associated with national defense activities. The research uses a wide-ranging, comprehensive array of investigative approaches that are directed toward characterizing the source of the airborne material, following the material through its potential transformation in the air, identifying the mechanisms that govern its inhalation and deposition in the respiratory tract, and determining the fate of these inhaled materials in the body and the health effects they produce. The ultimate objectives are to determine the roles played by inhaled materials in the development of disease processes adn to estimate the risk they pose by inhaled materials in the development of disease processes and to estimate the risk they pose to humans who may be exposed to them. This report contains brief research papers that reflect the scope and recent findings of the Institute's research funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, principally through the Office of Health and Environmental Research. The papers are divided into topical sections. The first section, Characterization of Airborne Materials and Generation of Experimental Exposure Atmospheres, reflects the Institute's capabilities for fundamental aerosol research and the application of that expertise to toxicological studies. The second

  13. Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute annual report 1987-1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauderly, J L; Mewhinney, J A; Bechtold, W E; Sun, J D; Coons, T A [eds.

    1988-12-01

    The mission of the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute is to investigate the magnitude of human health effects that result from the inhalation of airborne materials at home, in the work place, or in the general environment. Diseases of the respiratory tract are major causes of suffering and death, and many of these diseases are directly related to the materials that people breath. The Institute's research is directed toward obtaining a better understanding of the basic biology of the respiratory tract and the mechanisms by which inhaled materials produce respiratory disease. Special attention is focused on studying the airborne materials released by various energy technologies, as well as those associated with national defense activities. The research uses a wide-ranging, comprehensive array of investigative approaches that are directed toward characterizing the source of the airborne material, following the material through its potential transformation in the air, identifying the mechanisms that govern its inhalation and deposition in the respiratory tract, and determining the fate of these inhaled materials in the body and the health effects they produce. The ultimate objectives are to determine the roles played by inhaled materials in the development of disease processes adn to estimate the risk they pose by inhaled materials in the development of disease processes and to estimate the risk they pose to humans who may be exposed to them. This report contains brief research papers that reflect the scope and recent findings of the Institute's research funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, principally through the Office of Health and Environmental Research. The papers are divided into topical sections. The first section, Characterization of Airborne Materials and Generation of Experimental Exposure Atmospheres, reflects the Institute's capabilities for fundamental aerosol research and the application of that expertise to toxicological studies. The second

  14. Toxicological Assessments of Rats Exposed Prenatally to Inhaled Vapors of Gasoline and Gasoline-Ethanol Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    The primary alternative to petroleum-based fuels is ethanol, which is blended with gasoline in the United States at concentrations up to 15% for most automobiles. Efforts to increase the amount of ethanol in gasoline have prompted concerns about the potential toxicity of inhaled ...

  15. Using smartphone as a motion detector to collect time-microenvironment data for estimating the inhalation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoi, Tran Xuan; Phuong, Huynh Truc; Van Hung, Nguyen

    2016-09-01

    During the production of iodine-131 from neutron irradiated tellurium dioxide by the dry distillation, a considerable amount of (131)I vapor is dispersed to the indoor air. People who routinely work at the production area may result in a significant risk of exposure to chronic intake by inhaled (131)I. This study aims to estimate the inhalation dose for individuals manipulating the (131)I at a radioisotope production. By using an application installed on smartphones, we collected the time-microenvironment data spent by a radiation group during work days in 2015. Simultaneously, we used a portable air sampler combined with radioiodine cartridges for grabbing the indoor air samples and then the daily averaged (131)I concentration was calculated. Finally, the time-microenvironment data jointed with the concentration to estimate the inhalation dose for the workers. The result showed that most of the workers had the annual internal dose in 1÷6mSv. We concluded that using smartphone as a motion detector is a possible and reliable way instead of the questionnaires, diary or GPS-based method. It is, however, only suitable for monitoring on fixed indoor environments and limited the targeted people. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cromolyn Oral Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your doctor.Cromolyn oral inhalation helps to prevent asthma attacks (sudden episodes of shortness of breath, wheezing, and coughing) but will not stop an asthma attack that has already started. Your doctor will prescribe ...

  17. Olodaterol Oral Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in a class of medications called long-acting beta-agonists (LABAs). It works by relaxing and opening ... the inhaler upright with the yellow cap closed. Turn the clear base in the direction of the ...

  18. Ipratropium Oral Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with the clear end pointing upward. Place the metal canister inside the clear end of the inhaler. ... do not discard it in an incinerator or fire.Unneeded medications should be disposed of in special ...

  19. Inhaled Antibiotics in Reanimatology: Problem State and Development Prospects (Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Kuzovlev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial pneumonia is the second most common nosocomial infection in critical care units and most common in ALV patients (9—27%. The purpose of this literature review is to discuss the latest domestic and foreign body of evidence concerning the use of inhaled antibiotics в critical care. Search for domestic publications (literature reviews, observation studies, double blind randomized studies was carried out in elibrary.ru database, for foreign — in PubMed. Database for the period of yrs. 2005—2017. The following search enquiries were used: «inhaled antibiotics», «nosocomial pneumonia», «inhaled tobramycin», «inhaled colistin». The analysis includes 67 publications of yrs. 2007—2017 and 1 publication of yr. 2000. The literature review includes drug descriptions, contemporary capabilities of inhaled antibiotic therapy for nosocomial pneumonia, the advantages and drawbacks of this method of treatment. Special attention is focused on the use of inhaled aminoglycosides and inhaled colistin during nosocomial pneumonia in critical care units.

  20. Seat headrest-incorporated personalized ventilation: Thermal comfort and inhaled air quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Ivanova, T.; Stefanova, G.

    2012-01-01

    inhaled by the manikin was measured and used to assess the clean air supply efficiency of the SHPV. The response of 35 subjects was collected to examine thermal comfort with the SHPV. The subjects participated in 3 experiments at personalized air temperature and room air temperature of 22/20 °C, 23/23 °C......The performance of personalized ventilation with seat headrest-mounted air supply terminal devices (ATD), named seat headrest personalized ventilation (SHPV), was studied. Physical measurements using a breathing thermal manikin were taken to identify its ability to provide clean air to inhalation...... depending on design, shape, size and positioning of the ATD, flow rate and temperature of personalized air, room temperature, clothing thermal insulation of the manikin, etc. Tracer gas was mixed with the room air. The air supplied by the SHPV was free of tracer gas. Tracer gas concentration in the air...

  1. Nicotine Oral Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with a smoking cessation program, which may include support groups, counseling, or specific behavioral change techniques. Nicotine inhalation ... and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or ...

  2. The Reference Laboratory for Radon Gas Activity Concentration Measurements at PSI; Das Referenzlabor fuer Radongas-Konzentrationsmessungen am PSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuler, Christoph

    1998-09-01

    Active or passive radon gas measuring instruments are exposed during intercomparison exercises in the radon chamber of the Reference Laboratory for Radon Gas Concentration Measurements at Paul Scherrer Institut: The traceability of radon gas measurements to nationally and internationally acknowledged standards is inspected in the reference atmosphere of the chamber with calibrated {sup 222}Rn activity concentration. The use of secondary standards guarantees the traceability of the radon chamber reference atmosphere. Besides the principal secondary standard, a radon gas standard (secondary standard I), a {sup 226}Ra standard solution (secondary standard II) and a {sup 222}Rn emanation standard (secondary standard III) are used. The {sup 222}Rn activity delivered by one of these standards is quantitatively transferred into a reference volume and hence converted to an activity concentration serving for the calibration of a measuring instrument transfer standard consisting of scintillation cell and counter. By this way, the transfer standard calibration is related and traceable to the internationally acknowledged primary standard laboratories National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland (U.S.A.) or National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex (UK). The calibrated transfer standard is then used to calibrate the radon gas activity concentration in the radon chamber. For a single grab sampling determination of the {sup 222}Rn activity concentration in the radon chamber with the transfer standard, the estimation of Type A and Type B uncertainties yields a relative expanded uncertainty (95% confidence level) of minimum 3% for high concentration levels (10 kBqm{sup -3}) and maximum 30% for low concentration levels (0.2 kBqm{sup -3}). Extended evaluations of the reproducibility of calibration factor measurements obtained by calibration of the transfer standard with the secondary standards I, II and III show a very good reproducibility quality

  3. Modeling The Inhalation Exposure Pathway In Performance Assessment Of Geologic Radioactive Waste Repository At Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M.A. Wasiolek

    2006-01-01

    Inhalation exposure pathway modeling has recently been investigated as one of the tasks of the BIOPROTA Project (BIOPROTA 2005). BIOPROTA was set up to address the key uncertainties in long term assessments of contaminant releases into the environment arising from radioactive waste disposal. Participants of this international Project include national authorities and agencies, both regulators and operators, with responsibility for achieving safe and acceptable radioactive waste management. The objective of the inhalation task was to investigate the calculation of doses arising from inhalation of particles suspended from soils within which long-lived radionuclides, particularly alpha emitters, had accumulated. It was recognized that site-specific conditions influence the choice of conceptual model and input parameter values. Therefore, one of the goals of the task was to identify the circumstances in which different processes included in specific inhalation exposure pathway models were important. This paper discusses evaluation of processes and modeling assumptions specific to the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain as compared to the typical approaches and other models developed for different assessments and project specific contexts. Inhalation of suspended particulates that originate from contaminated soil is an important exposure pathway, particularly for exposure to actinides such as uranium, neptunium and plutonium. Radionuclide accumulation in surface soil arises from irrigation of soil with contaminated water over many years. The level of radionuclide concentration in surface soil depends on the assumed duration of irrigation. Irrigation duration is one of the parameters used on biosphere models and it depends on a specific assessment context. It is one of the parameters addressed in this paper from the point of view of assessment context for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. The preferred model for the assessment of inhalation exposure uses

  4. 'Chasing the Dragon' - imaging of heroin inhalation leukoencephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagel, J. [Vancouver General Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)]. E-mail: jeff_hagel@hotmail.com; Andrews, G. [UBC Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Vertinsky, T. [Vancouver General Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Heran, M.K.S. [Vancouver General Hospital, Div. of Neuroradiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Keogh, C. [BC Cancer Agency, Dept. of Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2005-10-15

    'Chasing the dragon' refers to the inhalation of heroin pyrolysate vapors produced when the freebase form of heroin is heated. Inhalation of these vapors can result in a rare toxic spongiform leukoencephalopathy. The patients may progress through 3 defined clinical stages, with one-quarter reaching the terminal stage, which invariably leads to death. Imaging and, in particular, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrates white matter findings that are felt to be specific for this entity and essential in its early diagnosis. We present the typical imaging findings in a pictorial essay format, using images taken from 9 patients who presented within an 18-month period at UBC-affiliated hospitals. These findings include low computed tomography (CT) attenuation and high T2 MRI signal most commonly in the posterior cerebral and cerebellar white matter, cerebellar peduncles, splenium of the corpus callosum, and posterior limb of the internal capsules. In addition, there is often selective, symmetric involvement of the corticospinal tract, the medial lemniscus, and the tractus solitarius. We also present the variable diffusion-weighted imaging arid apparent diffusion coefficient findings from 4 of our patients, which to our knowledge, have not been described in the literature. (author)

  5. Deposition of inhaled particles in the respiratory tract as a function of age at exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.G.; Healy, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    A respiratory tract deposition model was developed that would accommodate age 1 month to adulthood as an initial step in calculating radiation dose following inhalation during environmental exposures. The approach to changing respiratory tract and physiological parameters to be applicable to children was to derive an analytical function describing the ratio of the child value to the value for a reference adult with the desired characteristics. A computer program was written to carry out the tracing of airflow through the respiratory tract and deposition in each of the sections for monodispersed particles of known density and diameter. 7 references

  6. Biological effects of daily inhalation of radon and its short-lived daughters in experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.F.; Stuart, B.O.; Filipy, R.E.

    1973-01-01

    Syrian golden hamsters, C57BL mice, and specific-pathogen-free rats were exposed simultaneously in groups of 16 animals each for 90 hours per week to aerosols consisting of radon plus 3000--6000 Working Levels of radon-daughters with and without 18 mg/m 3 carnotite uranium ore dust. Condensation nuclei concentrations ranged from 2000--4000 per ml and from 90,000--120,000 per ml in the chamber without and with uranium ore dust, respectively. At 4 months of exposure only one of the rodents remained alive. Histopathology of radon-daughter exposed mice includes acute interstitial pneumonitis, severe pulmonary congestion, and supperative rhinitis; mice inhaling radon-daughters with ore showed these lesions plus macrophage proliferation, alveolar septal cell hyperplasia, and bronchial epithelial hyperplasia. Hamsters inhaling radon-daughters showed proliferating lesions characterized by alveolar septal thickening, bronchiolar epithelial hyperplasia, septal fibrosis, and occasionally adenomatoid metaplasia and squamous metaplasia. Hamsters inhaling radon-daughters with ore dust showed similar effects plus granulomatous response and intense septal fibrosis. Rats inhaling radon-daughters showed lesions similar to those of hamsters but more focalized with classic radiation pneumonitis; rats exposed to radon-daughters with ore showed similar lesions, with greater consolidation and pneumoconiosis. These findings will be discussed in relation to pulmonary pathology in uranium miners

  7. Inflammogenic effect of well-characterized fullerenes in inhalation and intratracheal instillation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamamoto Kazuhiro

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We used fullerenes, whose dispersion at the nano-level was stabilized by grinding in nitrogen gas in an agitation mill, to conduct an intratracheal instillation study and an inhalation exposure study. Fullerenes were individually dispersed in distilled water including 0.1% Tween 80, and the diameter of the fullerenes was 33 nm. These suspensions were directly injected as a solution in the intratracheal instillation study. The reference material was nickel oxide in distilled water. Wistar male rats intratracheally received a dose of 0.1 mg, 0.2 mg, or 1 mg of fullerenes and were sacrificed after 3 days, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months. In the inhalation study, Wistar rats were exposed to fullerene agglomerates (diameter: 96 ± 5 nm; 0.12 ± 0.03 mg/m3; 6 hours/days for 5 days/week for 4 weeks and were sacrificed at 3 days, 1 month, and 3 months after the end of exposure. The inflammatory responses and gene expression of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractants (CINCs were examined in rat lungs in both studies. Results In the intratracheal instillation study, both the 0.1 mg and 0.2 mg fullerene groups did not show a significant increase of the total cell and neutrophil count in BALF or in the expression of CINC-1,-2αβ and-3 in the lung, while the high-dose, 1 mg group only showed a transient significant increase of neutrophils and expression of CINC-1,-2αβ and -3. In the inhalation study, there were no increases of total cell and neutrophil count in BALF, CINC-1,-2αβ and-3 in the fullerene group. Conclusion These data in intratracheal instillation and inhalation studies suggested that well-dispersed fullerenes do not have strong potential of neutrophil inflammation.

  8. Calculation Of Radon Gas Inhaled By A Front End Worker Of The Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soedardjo

    1996-01-01

    The calculation of Radon gas inhaled by workers in a front end nuclear fuel cycle has been studied. The cycle of front end nuclear fuel is underground uranium exploration on Remaja tunnel West Kalimantan. The activities of mining consider of drilling, blasting, transporting mineral and tunnel supporting were chosen, It is assumed that in one month, for a worker has four assignments namely in tunnel I, tunnel II, tunnel III and tunnel IV, The activities in the mine are divided into some categories, namely 12 hours of drilling, 2 hours of after blasting, 9 hours of mineral transportation and 8 hours of tunnel support construction. The result of calculation shows that the average Radon gas concentration on each particular location is still less than maximum permissible concentration 300 pCi/l. The prediction of maximum dose inhaled by one uranium miner during a year is 2.3 x 10 2 μCi which is less than BATAN regulation 7.3 x 10 2 μCi

  9. The uptake, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of methyl tertiary-butyl ether inhaled alone and in combination with gasoline vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Janet M; Tibbetts, Brad M; Barr, Edward B

    2003-06-13

    The purpose of these studies was to evaluate the tissue uptake, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) in rats and to determine the effects of coinhalation of the volatile fraction of unleaded gasoline on these parameters. Male F344 rats were exposed nose-only once for 4 h to 4, 40, or 400 ppm 14C-MTBE and to 20 and 200 ppm of the light fraction of unleaded gasoline (LFG) containing 4 and 40 ppm 14C-MTBE, respectively. To evaluate the effects of repeated inhalation of LFG on the fate of inhaled MTBE, rats were exposed for 7 consecutive days to 20 and 200 ppm LFG followed on d 8 by exposure to LFG containing 14C-MTBE. Three subgroups of rats were included for evaluation of respiratory parameters, rates and routes of excretion, and tissue distribution and elimination. MTBE and its chief metabolite, tertiary-butyl alcohol, were quantitated in blood and kidney (immediately after exposure), and the major urinary metabolites, 2-hydroxyisobutyric acid and 2-methyl-1,2- propanediol, were identified and quantified in urine. Inhalation of MTBE alone or as a component of LFG had no concentration-dependent effect on respiratory minute volume. The initial body burdens (IBBs) of MTBE equivalents achieved after 4 h of exposure to MTBE did not increase linearly with exposure concentration. MTBE equivalents rapidly distributed to all tissues examined, with the largest percentages distributed to liver. Between 40 and 400 ppm, there was a significant reduction in percentage of the IBB present in the major organs examined, both immediately and 72 h after exposure. At 400 ppm, the elimination rates of MTBE equivalents from tissues changed significantly. Furthermore, at 400 ppm there was a significant decrease in the elimination half-time of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in breath and a significant increase in the percentage of the IBB of MTBE equivalents eliminated as VOCs in breath. LFG coexposure significantly decreased the percentage of the

  10. A whiff of death: fatal volatile solvent inhalation abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffee, C H; Davis, G J; Nicol, K K

    1996-09-01

    Inhalation abuse of volatile solvents, previously known generically as "glue sniffing," is typically pursued by adolescents. A wide range of legal, easily obtained products containing volatile substances are available for abuse. We report two illustrative cases of fatal volatile substance abuse: gasoline sniffing in a 20-year-old man and aerosol propellant gas inhalation (aerosol air freshener) in a 16-year-old girl with underlying reactive airway disease. Although the ratio of deaths to nonfatal inhalation escapades is extremely low, volatile solvent abuse carries the risk of sudden death due to cardiac arrest after a dysrhythmia or vasovagal event, central nervous system respiratory depression, hypoxia and hypercapnia due to the techniques of inhalation, and other mechanisms. Investigation of the patient's substance abuse history, examination of the scene of death, and special toxicologic analyses are critical to identifying volatile substance inhalation abuse as the cause of death because anatomic autopsy findings will typically be nonspecific. Above all, physicians must suspect the diagnosis of volatile substance inhalation abuse, especially in any case of sudden death involving an otherwise healthy young person.

  11. Inhaler technique maintenance: gaining an understanding from the patient's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinikova, Ludmila; Smith, Lorraine; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the patient-, education-, and device-related factors that predict inhaler technique maintenance. Thirty-one community pharmacists were trained to deliver inhaler technique education to people with asthma. Pharmacists evaluated (based on published checklists), and where appropriate, delivered inhaler technique education to patients (participants) in the community pharmacy at baseline (Visit 1) and 1 month later (Visit 2). Data were collected on participant demographics, asthma history, current asthma control, history of inhaler technique education, and a range of psychosocial aspects of disease management (including adherence to medication, motivation for correct technique, beliefs regarding the importance of maintaining correct technique, and necessity and concern beliefs regarding preventer therapy). Stepwise backward logistic regression was used to identify the predictors of inhaler technique maintenance at 1 month. In total 145 and 127 participants completed Visits 1 and 2, respectively. At baseline, 17% of patients (n = 24) demonstrated correct technique (score 11/11) which increased to 100% (n = 139) after remedial education by pharmacists. At follow-up, 61% (n = 77) of patients demonstrated correct technique. The predictors of inhaler technique maintenance based on the logistic regression model (X(2) (3, N = 125) = 16.22, p = .001) were use of a dry powder inhaler over a pressurized metered-dose inhaler (OR 2.6), having better asthma control at baseline (OR 2.3), and being more motivated to practice correct inhaler technique (OR 1.2). Contrary to what is typically recommended in previous research, correct inhaler technique maintenance may involve more than repetition of instructions. This study found that past technique education factors had no bearing on technique maintenance, whereas patient psychosocial factors (motivation) did.

  12. Comparative inhalation toxicity of multi-wall carbon nanotubes, graphene, graphite nanoplatelets and low surface carbon black.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma-Hock, Lan; Strauss, Volker; Treumann, Silke; Küttler, Karin; Wohlleben, Wendel; Hofmann, Thomas; Gröters, Sibylle; Wiench, Karin; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Landsiedel, Robert

    2013-06-17

    Carbon nanotubes, graphene, graphite nanoplatelets and carbon black are seemingly chemically identical carbon-based nano-materials with broad technological applications. Carbon nanotubes and carbon black possess different inhalation toxicities, whereas little is known about graphene and graphite nanoplatelets. In order to compare the inhalation toxicity of the mentioned carbon-based nanomaterials, male Wistar rats were exposed head-nose to atmospheres of the respective materials for 6 hours per day on 5 consecutive days. Target concentrations were 0.1, 0.5, or 2.5 mg/m3 for multi-wall carbon nanotubes and 0.5, 2.5, or 10 mg/m3 for graphene, graphite nanoplatelets and low-surface carbon black. Toxicity was determined after end of exposure and after three-week recovery using broncho-alveolar lavage fluid and microscopic examinations of the entire respiratory tract. No adverse effects were observed after inhalation exposure to 10 mg/m3 graphite nanoplatelets or relatively low specific surface area carbon black. Increases of lavage markers indicative for inflammatory processes started at exposure concentration of 0.5 mg/m3 for multi-wall carbon nanotubes and 10 mg/m3 for graphene. Consistent with the changes in lavage fluid, microgranulomas were observed at 2.5 mg/m3 multi-wall carbon nanotubes and 10 mg/m3 graphene. In order to evaluate volumetric loading of the lung as the key parameter driving the toxicity, deposited particle volume was calculated, taking into account different methods to determine the agglomerate density. However, the calculated volumetric load did not correlate to the toxicity, nor did the particle surface burden of the lung. The inhalation toxicity of the investigated carbon-based materials is likely to be a complex interaction of several parameters. Until the properties which govern the toxicity are identified, testing by short-term inhalation is the best option to identify hazardous properties in order to avoid unsafe applications or select

  13. Comparative inhalation toxicity of multi-wall carbon nanotubes, graphene, graphite nanoplatelets and low surface carbon black

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Carbon nanotubes, graphene, graphite nanoplatelets and carbon black are seemingly chemically identical carbon-based nano-materials with broad technological applications. Carbon nanotubes and carbon black possess different inhalation toxicities, whereas little is known about graphene and graphite nanoplatelets. Methods In order to compare the inhalation toxicity of the mentioned carbon-based nanomaterials, male Wistar rats were exposed head-nose to atmospheres of the respective materials for 6 hours per day on 5 consecutive days. Target concentrations were 0.1, 0.5, or 2.5 mg/m3 for multi-wall carbon nanotubes and 0.5, 2.5, or 10 mg/m3 for graphene, graphite nanoplatelets and low-surface carbon black. Toxicity was determined after end of exposure and after three-week recovery using broncho-alveolar lavage fluid and microscopic examinations of the entire respiratory tract. Results No adverse effects were observed after inhalation exposure to 10 mg/m3 graphite nanoplatelets or relatively low specific surface area carbon black. Increases of lavage markers indicative for inflammatory processes started at exposure concentration of 0.5 mg/m3 for multi-wall carbon nanotubes and 10 mg/m3 for graphene. Consistent with the changes in lavage fluid, microgranulomas were observed at 2.5 mg/m3 multi-wall carbon nanotubes and 10 mg/m3 graphene. In order to evaluate volumetric loading of the lung as the key parameter driving the toxicity, deposited particle volume was calculated, taking into account different methods to determine the agglomerate density. However, the calculated volumetric load did not correlate to the toxicity, nor did the particle surface burden of the lung. Conclusions The inhalation toxicity of the investigated carbon-based materials is likely to be a complex interaction of several parameters. Until the properties which govern the toxicity are identified, testing by short-term inhalation is the best option to identify hazardous properties in

  14. Inhaled antibiotics for lower respiratory tract infections: focus on ciprofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serisier, D J

    2012-05-01

    The administration of antibiotics by the inhaled route offers an appealing and logical approach to treating infectious respiratory conditions. Studies in the cystic fibrosis (CF) population have established the efficacy of this therapeutic concept and inhaled antibiotic therapy is now one of the pillars of management in CF. There are now a number of new inhaled antibiotic formulations that have shown impressive preliminary evidence for efficacy in CF and are commencing phase III efficacy studies. Translation of this paradigm into the non-CF bronchiectasis population has proven difficult thus far, apparently due to problems with tolerability of inhaled formulations. Inhaled versions of ciprofloxacin have shown good tolerability and microbiological efficacy in preliminary studies, suggesting that effective inhaled antibiotics are finally on the horizon for this previously neglected patient population. The increased use of long-term inhaled antibiotics for a wider range of non-CF indications presents risks to the broader community of greater antimicrobial resistance development that must be carefully weighed against any demonstrated benefits. Copyright 2012 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  15. Inhaled antibiotics in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li; Zhang, Fei; Du, Shuai; Yu, Qi; Chen, Lin; Long, Li-Hui; Li, Ya-Ming; Jia, Ai-Hua

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of inhaled antibiotics for the treatment of non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFB). Pubmed, Cochrane library, Embase, Elsevier, OVID, Springerlink, Web of knowledge and NEJM were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on inhaled antibiotics in treatment of NCFB from inception until April 2015. Meta-analysis was conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of inhaled antibiotics in the treatment of NCFB. Twelve RCTs involving 1154 participants were included. They showed that inhaled antibiotics were more effective in reduction of sputum bacterial density, eradication of P. aeruginosa, prolonged time to exacerbation and reduction of new pathogens emergence with no significant difference in adverse events compared with control groups. However, we did not find significant benefits of inhaled antibiotics in reducing the risk of acute exacerbation, improving health-related quality of life and reduction of P. aeruginosa resistance. Moreover, inhaled antibiotics exerted a statistically significant reduction in FEV1%. Inhaled antibiotics may be an alternative pathway to inhibit airway inflammation with no more adverse events in patients with NCFB.

  16. Characteristics of patients making serious inhaler errors with a dry powder inhaler and association with asthma-related events in a primary care setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerik, Janine A. M.; Carter, Victoria; Chrystyn, Henry; Burden, Anne; Thompson, Samantha L.; Ryan, Dermot; Gruffydd-Jones, Kevin; Haughney, John; Roche, Nicolas; Lavorini, Federico; Papi, Alberto; Infantino, Antonio; Roman-Rodriguez, Miguel; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Lisspers, Karin; Ställberg, Björn; Henrichsen, Svein Høegh; van der Molen, Thys; Hutton, Catherine; Price, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Correct inhaler technique is central to effective delivery of asthma therapy. The study aim was to identify factors associated with serious inhaler technique errors and their prevalence among primary care patients with asthma using the Diskus dry powder inhaler (DPI). Methods: This was a historical, multinational, cross-sectional study (2011–2013) using the iHARP database, an international initiative that includes patient- and healthcare provider-reported questionnaires from eight countries. Patients with asthma were observed for serious inhaler errors by trained healthcare providers as predefined by the iHARP steering committee. Multivariable logistic regression, stepwise reduced, was used to identify clinical characteristics and asthma-related outcomes associated with ≥1 serious errors. Results: Of 3681 patients with asthma, 623 (17%) were using a Diskus (mean [SD] age, 51 [14]; 61% women). A total of 341 (55%) patients made ≥1 serious errors. The most common errors were the failure to exhale before inhalation, insufficient breath-hold at the end of inhalation, and inhalation that was not forceful from the start. Factors significantly associated with ≥1 serious errors included asthma-related hospitalization the previous year (odds ratio [OR] 2.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.26–3.40); obesity (OR 1.75; 1.17–2.63); poor asthma control the previous 4 weeks (OR 1.57; 1.04–2.36); female sex (OR 1.51; 1.08–2.10); and no inhaler technique review during the previous year (OR 1.45; 1.04–2.02). Conclusions: Patients with evidence of poor asthma control should be targeted for a review of their inhaler technique even when using a device thought to have a low error rate. PMID:26810934

  17. Trends in stream nitrogen concentrations for forested reference catchments across the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argerich, A; Greathouse, E; Johnson, S L; Sebestyen, S D; Rhoades, C C; Knoepp, J D; Adams, M B; Likens, G E; Campbell, J L; McDowell, W H; Scatena, F N; Ice, G G

    2013-01-01

    To examine whether stream nitrogen concentrations in forested reference catchments have changed over time and if patterns were consistent across the USA, we synthesized up to 44 yr of data collected from 22 catchments at seven USDA Forest Service Experimental Forests. Trends in stream nitrogen presented high spatial variability both among catchments at a site and among sites across the USA. We found both increasing and decreasing trends in monthly flow-weighted stream nitrate and ammonium concentrations. At a subset of the catchments, we found that the length and period of analysis influenced whether trends were positive, negative or non-significant. Trends also differed among neighboring catchments within several Experimental Forests, suggesting the importance of catchment-specific factors in determining nutrient exports. Over the longest time periods, trends were more consistent among catchments within sites, although there are fewer long-term records for analysis. These findings highlight the critical value of long-term, uninterrupted stream chemistry monitoring at a network of sites across the USA to elucidate patterns of change in nutrient concentrations at minimally disturbed forested sites. (letter)

  18. Influence of experimental pulmonary emphysema on the toxicological effects from inhaled nitrogen dioxide and diesel exhaust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauderly, J.L.; Bice, D.E.; Cheng, Y.S.; Gillett, N.A.; Henderson, R.F.; Pickrell, J.A.; Wolff, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    This project examined the influence of preexisting, experimentally induced pulmonary emphysema on the adverse health effects in rats of chronic inhalation exposure to either nitrogen dioxide or automotive diesel-engine exhaust. Previous reports indicated that humans with chronic lung disease were among those most severely affected by episodic exposures to high concentrations of airborne toxicants. There were no previous reports comparing the effects of chronic inhalation exposure to components of automotive emissions in emphysematous and normal animals. The hypothesis tested in this project was that rats with preexisting pulmonary emphysema were more susceptible than rats with normal lungs to the adverse effects of the toxicant exposures. Young adult rats were housed continuously in inhalation exposure chambers and exposed seven hours per day, five days per week, for 24 months to nitrogen dioxide at 9.5 parts per million (ppm)2, or to diesel exhaust at 3.5 mg soot/m3, or to clean air as control animals. These concentrations were selected to produce mild, but distinct, effects in rats with normal lungs. Pulmonary emphysema was induced in one-half of the rats by intratracheal instillation of the proteolytic enzyme elastase six weeks before the toxicant exposures began. Health effects were evaluated after 12, 18, and 24 months of exposure. The measurements included respiratory function, clearance of inhaled radiolabeled particles, pulmonary immune responses to instilled antigen, biochemistry and cytology of airway fluid, total lung collagen, histopathology, lung morphometry, and lung burdens of diesel soot. The significance of influences of emphysema and toxicant exposure, and interactions between influences of the two treatments, were evaluated by analysis of variance

  19. Clinical effectiveness of the Respimat® inhaler device in managing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: evidence when compared with other handheld inhaler devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    et al

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Felix SF Ram1, Celso R Carvallho2, John White31School of Health and Social Services, Massey University, Auckland, New Zealand; 2Department of Physical Therapy, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, Brazil; 3York Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, York Hospital, York, UKObjectives: Medication for the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD may be delivered by a number of different inhaler devices. This study was undertaken to determine the clinical effectiveness of the Respimat® handheld inhaler device compared with other handheld inhaler devices for the delivery of medication in stable COPD.Methodology: A systematic review of high-quality randomized controlled clinical trials comparing Respimat with other inhaler devices using the same medication was performed. Studies were searched for in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials as well as other relevant electronic databases. Manufacturers of inhaled COPD medication were also contacted for potential trials.Results: Seven studies of high methodological quality with 3813 participants were included in the review. Three trials used Handihaler® as the comparator inhaler, three used a chlorofluorocarbon metered-dose inhaler (CFC-MDI, and one trial used a hydroflouroalkane (HFA-MDI. When Respimat was compared with Handihaler, the following reported outcomes were not significantly different: trough forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 (weighted mean difference [WMD] 0.01 L; P = 0.14, trough forced vital capacity (FVC (WMD 0.001 L: P = 0.88, peak FEV1 (WMD 0.01 L: P = 0.08, peak FVC (WMD 0.01 L: P = 0.55, morning peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR (WMD 5.06 L/min: P = 0.08, and evening PEFR (WMD 4.39 L/min: P = 0.15. Furthermore, there were no differences when Respimat was compared with Handihaler for risk of exacerbations (relative risk [RR] 0.94: P = 0.81, dry mouth (RR 1.57: P = 0.34, or nasopharyngitis (RR 1.42: P = 0.22. For Respimat compared with CFC-MDI, the

  20. Inhaling habits among smokers of different types of cigarette

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wald, N.J.; Idle, M.; Boreham, J.; Bailey, A.

    1980-12-01

    Inhaling habits were studied in 1316 men who freely smoked their usual brands of cigarette. An index of inhaling was calculated for each person by dividing the estimated increase in carboxyhaemoglobin level from a standard number of cigarettes by the carbon monoxide yield of the cigarette smoked. Smokers of ventilated filter cigarettes inhaled 82% more than smokers of plain cigarettes (p less than 0.001) and those who smoked unventilated filter cigarettes inhaled 36% more (p less than 0.001). Cigarette consumption was similar among smokers of each type of cigarette. Assuming that the intake of tar and nicotine is proportional to the inhaling index, the intake in either group of filter cigarette smokers would have been less than that in plain cigarette smokers. Among smokers of unventilated cigarettes, however, the intake would not have been much less.

  1. Opportunities for inhaler device selection in elderly patients with asthma or COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrons R

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Robert Barrons,1 James Wheeler,2 J Andrew Woods1 1Wingate University School of Pharmacy, Wingate, NC, USA; 2University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: An anticipated surge in the elderly population will be accompanied by a rise in aging patients with asthma or COPD. Clinician selection of inhalers needs to address the unique challenges to elderly patients. These challenges to the use of inhalers include diminished physical and cognitive abilities, as well as cost reimbursement issues associated with polypharmacy and the Medicare gap. Clinicians should consider patient preferences for an inhaler device that provides ease of administration, and addresses conveniences such as portability, visual, and auditory indicators of dosing completion. The addition of spacer devices resolves hand-breath coordination difficulty with pressurized metered dose inhalers, but reduces overall inhaler convenience. Soft mist inhalers (Respimat® improve ease of administration, but use may be limited by cost and formulary availability. Multiple dose dry powder inhalers provide convenience and simplified use by requiring only one to two steps prior to administration, but concerns of peak inspiratory flow requirements remain among patients with advanced age and severity of COPD. If unaddressed, these challenges to inhaler selection contribute to inappropriate use of inhalers in 41% to 69% of patients, accompanied by at least 51% non-adherence to treatment. Clinicians must first avail themselves of reputable educational resources regarding new inhaler developments and administration, for competent patient instruction. Patient education should include a checklist of inhaler technique, with physical demonstration of each device by the patient and provider. Device demonstration significantly improves inhaler technique and identifies the need for nebulization therapy. Clinician and patient knowledge of available inhalers and their

  2. Dyslipidemia and reference values for fasting plasma lipid concentrations in Danish/North-European White children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tenna Ruest Haarmark; Lausten-Thomsen, Ulrik; Fonvig, Cilius Esmann

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dyslipidemia is reported in 27 - 43% of children and adolescents with overweight/obesity and tracks into adulthood, increasing the risk of cardiovascular morbidity. Cut-off values for fasting plasma lipid concentrations are typically set at fixed levels throughout childhood. The objec......BACKGROUND: Dyslipidemia is reported in 27 - 43% of children and adolescents with overweight/obesity and tracks into adulthood, increasing the risk of cardiovascular morbidity. Cut-off values for fasting plasma lipid concentrations are typically set at fixed levels throughout childhood....... The objective of this cross-sectional study was to generate fasting plasma lipid references for a Danish/North-European White population-based cohort of children and adolescents, and investigate the prevalence of dyslipidemia in this cohort as well as in a cohort with overweight/obesity. METHODS: A population......, and fasting plasma lipid concentrations were measured on all participants. Smoothed reference curves and percentiles were generated using the Generalized Additive Models for Location Scale and Shape package in the statistical software R. RESULTS: In the population-based cohort, plasma concentrations of total...

  3. Hierarchical pulmonary target nanoparticles via inhaled administration for anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Xu, Liu; Fan, Qin; Li, Man; Wang, Jingjing; Wu, Li; Li, Weidong; Duan, Jinao; Chen, Zhipeng

    2017-11-01

    Inhalation administration, compared with intravenous administration, significantly enhances chemotherapeutic drug exposure to the lung tissue and may increase the therapeutic effect for pulmonary anticancer. However, further identification of cancer cells after lung deposition of inhaled drugs is necessary to avoid side effects on normal lung tissue and to maximize drug efficacy. Moreover, as the action site of the major drug was intracellular organelles, drug target to the specific organelle is the final key for accurate drug delivery. Here, we designed a novel multifunctional nanoparticles (MNPs) for pulmonary antitumor and the material was well-designed for hierarchical target involved lung tissue target, cancer cell target, and mitochondrial target. The biodistribution in vivo determined by UHPLC-MS/MS method was employed to verify the drug concentration overwhelmingly increasing in lung tissue through inhaled administration compared with intravenous administration. Cellular uptake assay using A549 cells proved the efficient receptor-mediated cell endocytosis. Confocal laser scanning microscopy observation showed the location of MNPs in cells was mitochondria. All results confirmed the intelligent material can progressively play hierarchical target functions, which could induce more cell apoptosis related to mitochondrial damage. It provides a smart and efficient nanocarrier platform for hierarchical targeting of pulmonary anticancer drug. So far, this kind of material for pulmonary mitochondrial-target has not been seen in other reports.

  4. Inhalant abuse of computer cleaner manifested as angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniali, Peter C; Henry, Letitia; Kurl, Rita; Meharg, Joseph V

    2012-01-01

    Inhalant abuse is the intentional inhalation of chemical vapors or volatile substance to achieve a euphoric effect. Although no statistical data are reported yet, inhalant abuse is potentially life-threatening and has resulted in a wide range of toxic effects such as central nervous system depression, seizures, aspiration, cardiac arrhythmia, asphyxiation, hypoxia, metabolic acidosis, and sudden death among others. We are reporting a 25-year-old white man who was brought to the emergency department after inhaling aerosolized computer-cleaning spray composed of difluoroethane. He was found to have marked upper and lower lip facial swelling consistent with angioedema. The patient also had a prolonged QT interval, mild inspiratory stridor, but no urticaria. In this case, we believe the difluoroethane-related angioedema represents either idiopathic or bradykinin-induced angioedema.

  5. Inhaled plutonium nitrate in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagle, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    The major objective of this project is to determine dose-effect relationships of inhaled plutonium nitrate in dogs to aid in predicting health effects of accidental exposure in man. For lifespan dose-effect studies, beagle dogs were given a single inhalation exposure to 239 Pu(NO 3 ) 4 , in 1976 and 1977. The earliest biological effect was on the hematopoietic system; lymphopenia and neutropenia occurred at the two highest dose levels. They have also observed radiation pneumonitis, lung cancer, and bone cancer at the three highest dose levels. 1 figure, 3 tables

  6. Inhaled plutonium nitrate in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagle, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    The major objective of this project is to determine dose-effect relationships of inhaled plutonium nitrate in dogs to aid in predicting health effects of accidental exposure in man. For lifespan dose-effect studies, beagle dogs were given a single inhalation exposure to 239 Pu(NO 3 ) 4 , in 1976 and 1977. The earliest biological effect was on the hematopoietic system; lymphopenia and neutropenia occurred at the two highest dose levels. The authors have also observed radiation pneumonitis, lung cancer, and bone cancer at the three highest dose levels. 1 figure, 4 tables

  7. Inhaled plutonium nitrate in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagle, G.E.

    1982-01-01

    The major objective of this project is to determine dose-effect relationships of inhaled plutonium nitrate in dogs to aid in the prediction of health effects of accidental exposure in man. For lifespan dose-effect studies, beagle dogs were given a single inhalation exposure to 239 Pu(NO 3 ) 4 , in 1976 and 1977. The earliest biological effect was on the hematopoietic system; as described in previous Annual Reports, lymphopenia and neutropenia occurred at the two highest dose levels. Radiation pneumonitis, lung cancer, and bone cancer have been observed at the highest dose levels

  8. Granulometric determinations and inhalation dose assessment for atmospheric aerosol contaminated by {sup 137}Cs; Determinazioni granulometriche e valutazioni di dose da inalazione per aerosol atmosferico contaminato da {sup 137}CS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellani, C.M.; Luciani, A. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche `E. Clementel`, Bologna (Italy). Dip. Ambiente; Oliviero, L.; Donato, R. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Saluggia, Vercelli (Italy). Dip. Ambiente

    1996-07-01

    During the redevelopment of Brescia freight-yard a measurement campaign of atmospheric aerosol was carried out: in fact a {sup 137}Cs ground contamination, caused by the permanence of wagons carrying iron materials contaminated by this radionuclide, had been found out. During the redevelopment phases of excavation and can filling the workers were exposed to the danger of radioactive aerosol inhalation. The aim of the measurement campaign was to test the aerosol sampling and granulometric analysis methodologies with their sensitivity related to the inhalation dose assessments. The results of both aerosuspended mass and activity, evaluated by means of a portable cascade impactor, are presented. The granulometries have been interpolated with a log normal distribution using an iterative routine minimizing the square deviation between the calculated and experimental data. The results related to the dose assessments are also presented. These evaluations have been carried out using both the granulometric information obtained and the more recent models (ICRP 66) both the total concentration data and the dose coefficients referring to the standard conditions of ICRP 68 and of the Italian law (D.Lgs. 230/95). Furthermore the significance and the reliability of the dose assessments referring to the different methodologies are discussed, also in relation to the possibility of using this sampling methodologies for other radionuclides and different exposure conditions.

  9. Phyto-inhalation for treatment of complications of acute respiratory viral diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.B. Ershova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Inhalations (inhalation of medicinal substances are one of the effective ways to treat upper respiratory tract diseases and colds. Inhalation therapy is used to treat rhinitis, sinusitis, tonsillitis, pharyngitis, laryngitis, bronchitis and pneumonia, which can be complications of acute respiratory viral infections. The main rules of inhalation are as follows to conduct the procedure better after 1.5 hours after eating; clothes should not impede breathing; the procedure can be carried out only while sitting or standing; solution for the inhaler for treatment of bronchitis should be fresh; it is necessary to strictly keep the prescribed dosage; the time of the procedure should also be respected — usually it is from 1 to 4 minutes, sometimes for adults up to 10 minutes, for children the inhalation period is shorter — 1–2 minutes. Contraindications to inhalation are body temperature above 37.5 degrees; propensity to nasal blee­ding in a patient; propensity to increased arterial pressure, with cardiovascular failure; purulent inflammation of the tonsils; respiratory failure. The procedure should be stopped immediately in case of appearance of adverse symptoms such as shortness of breath, dizziness, difficulty in breathing. Therefore, inhalations must be prescribed by a doctor after examination of a patient. During inhalations in rhinitis, you should try to inhale the vapor through the nose. For effective treatment of rhinitis, inhalations from conife­rous plants are very suitable: fir, pine, juniper, larch, from steamed dried chamomile flowers, mint, and blackberry leaves. Honey inhalations can be used for the treatment of acute and chronic diseases of the upper respiratory tract (tonsillitis, pharyngitis, laryngitis and tracheitis. Medical herbal inhalation for children should be carried out from the age of two years. This must be done under the constant supervision of an adult. Leaves of coniferous trees: pine, fir, if or juniper, cedar

  10. Does inhalation injury predict mortality in burns patients or require redefinition?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngmin Kim

    Full Text Available Inhalation injury is known to be an important factor in predicting mortality in burns patients. However, the diagnosis is complicated by the heterogeneous presentation and inability to determine the severity of inhalation injury. The purpose of this study was to identify clinical features of inhalation injury that affect mortality and the values that could predict the outcome more precisely in burns patients with inhalation injury. This retrospective observational study included 676 burns patients who were over 18 years of age and hospitalized in the Burns Intensive Care Unit between January 2012 and December 2015. We analyzed variables that are already known to be prognostic factors (age, percentage of total body surface area (%TBSA burned, and inhalation injury and factors associated with inhalation injury (carboxyhemoglobin and PaO2/FiO2 [PF] ratio by univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Age group (odds ratio [OR] 1.069, p<0.001, %TBSA burned (OR 1.100, p<0.001, and mechanical ventilation (OR 3.774, p<0.001 were identified to be significant predictive factors. The findings for presence of inhalation injury, PF ratio, and carboxyhemoglobin were not statistically significant in multivariate logistic regression. Being in the upper inhalation group, the lower inhalation group, and having a PF ratio <100 were identified to be significant predictors only in univariate logistic regression analysis (OR 4.438, p<0.001; OR 2.379, p<0.001; and OR 2.765, p<0.001, respectively. History and physical findings are not appropriate for diagnosis of inhalation injury and do not predict mortality. Mechanical ventilation should be recognized as a risk factor for mortality in burns patients with inhalation injury.

  11. Knowledge of spacer device, peak flow meter and inhaler technique ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Metered dose inhalers are cornerstone in effective management of bronchial asthma when correctly used. Most studies hitherto have focused on assessing patient's knowledge of inhaler technique. We sought to assess the knowledge of inhaler technique, spacer device and peak flow meter among doctors and ...

  12. Inhaled plutonium oxide in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    This project is concerned with long-term experiments to determine the lifespan dose-effect relationships of inhaled 239 PuO 2 and 238 PuO 2 in beagles. The data will be used to estimate the health effects of inhaled transuranics. Beagle dogs given a single exposure to 239 PuO 2 or 238 PuO 2 aerosols to obtain graded levels of initial lung burdens are being observed for lifespan dose-effect relationships. Mortality due to radiation pneumonitis and lung tumor increased in the four highest dose-level groups exposed to 239 PuO 2 , during the 13-yr postexposure period. During the 10 1/2 years after exposure to 238 PuO 2 , mortality due to lung and/or bone tumors increased in the three highest dose-level groups. Chronic lymphopenia, occurring 0.5 to 2 year after exposure, was the earliest observed effect after inhalation of either 239 PuO 2 or 238 PuO 2 in the four highest dose-level groups that had initial lung burdens greater than or equal to 80 nCi. 3 figures, 6 tables

  13. Inhalation exposure to chloramine T induces DNA damage and inflammation in lung of Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Ilseob; Seo, Gyun-Baek; Oh, Eunha; Lee, Mimi; Kwon, Jung-Taek; Sul, Donggeun; Lee, Byung-Woo; Yoon, Byung-Il; Kim, Pilje; Choi, Kyunghee; Kim, Hyun-Mi

    2013-01-01

    Chloramine T has been widely used as a disinfectant in many areas such as kitchens, laboratories and hospitals. It has been also used as a biocide in air fresheners and deodorants which are consumer products; however, little is known about its toxic effects by inhalation route. This study was performed to identify the subacute inhalation toxicity of chloramine T under whole-body inhalation exposure conditions. Male and female groups of rats were exposed to chloramine T at concentrations of 0.2, 0.9 and 4.0 mg/m³ for 6 hr/day, 5 days/week during 4 weeks. After 28-day repeated inhalation of chloramine T, there were dose-dependently significant DNA damage in the rat tissues evaluated and inflammation was histopathologically noted around the terminal airways of the lung in both genders. As a result of the expression of three types of antioxidant enzymes (SOD-2, GPx-1, PRX-1) in rat's lung after exposure, there was no significant change of all antioxidant enzymes in the male and female rats. The results showed that no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) was 0.2 mg/m³ in male rats and 0.9 mg/m³ in female rats under the present experimental condition.

  14. Combined effects of radon inhalation and antioxidant vitamin administration on acute alcohol-induced hepatopathy in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etani, Reo; Kataoka, Takahiro; Nishiyama, Yuichi; Takata, Yuji; Yamaoka, Kiyonori

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that radon inhalation activates antioxidative functions in liver and has an antioxidative effect against hepatopathy similar to that of the antioxidative effects of ascorbic acid (VC) or α-tocopherol (VE). In this study, we examined the combined effects of radon inhalation and antioxidant vitamin administration on acute alcohol-induced hepatopathy in mice. ICR mice were subjected to intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of alcohol after pretreating with air only (sham) or radon at a concentration of approximately 2000 Bq/m 3 for 24 hours and i.p. administration of VC (300 mg/kg body weight) or VE (300 mg/kg body weight). In mice injected with alcohol, the combined radon and antioxidant vitamins treatment significantly decreased the activities of glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase in serum compared to not only the alcohol-administered group (sham group), but also the radon inhalation with alcohol administration group or the vitamin and alcohol administration group. In addition, radon inhalation significantly increased the antioxidant level, in such as the catalase activity and the total glutathione content in liver compared to the sham group. These results suggested that the combined radon and antioxidant vitamin treatment could effectively inhibit alcohol-induced hepatopathy in mice without any antagonizing action. (author)

  15. Terbutaline accumulates in blood and urine following daily therapeutic inhalation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Nanna; Rzeppa, Sebastian; Dyreborg, Anders

    2017-01-01

    ×d) of inhaled terbutaline. After inhalation of terbutaline at each trial, subjects performed 90 min of bike ergometer exercise at 65% of maximal oxygen consumption after which they stayed inactive. Blood and urine samples were collected before and after inhalation of terbutaline. Samples were analyzed by high...

  16. Effect of inhaled formoterol and budesonide on exacerbations of asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pauwels, RA; Lofdahl, CG; Postma, DS; Tattersfield, AE; OByrne, P; Barnes, PJ; Ullman, A

    1997-01-01

    Background The role of long-acting, inhaled beta(2)-agonists in treating asthma is uncertain. In a double-blind study, we evaluated the effects of adding inhaled formoterol to both lower and higher doses of the inhaled glucocorticoid budesonide. Methods After a four-week run-in period of treatment

  17. Reference ranges for hematocrit and blood hemoglobin concentration during the neonatal period: data from a multihospital health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jopling, Jeffery; Henry, Erick; Wiedmeier, Susan E; Christensen, Robert D

    2009-02-01

    "Reference ranges" are developed when it is impossible or inappropriate to establish "normal ranges" by drawing blood on healthy normal volunteers. Reference ranges for the hematocrit and the blood hemoglobin concentration of newborn infants have previously been reported from relatively small sample sizes by using measurement methods that now are considered outmoded. We sought to develop reference ranges for hematocrit and hemoglobin during the neonatal period (28 days) by using very large sample sizes and modern hematology analyzers, accounting for gestational and postnatal age and gender. Data were assembled from a multihospital health care system after exclusion of patients with a high likelihood of an abnormal value and those who were receiving blood transfusions. During the interval from 22 to 40 weeks' gestation, the hematocrit and blood hemoglobin concentration increased approximately linearly. For every week advance in gestational age, the hematocrit increased by 0.64% and the hemoglobin concentration increased by 0.21 g/dL. No difference was seen on the basis of gender. During the 4-hour interval after birth, hematocrit/hemoglobin values of late preterm and term neonates (35-42 weeks' gestation) increased by 3.6% +/- 0.5% (mean +/- SD), those of neonates of 29 to 34 weeks' gestation remained unchanged, and those of hematocrit/hemoglobin occurred. The figures presented herein describe reference ranges for hematocrit and blood hemoglobin concentration during the neonatal period, accounting for gestational and postnatal age.

  18. Anticoagulant effects of inhaled unfractionated heparin in the dog as determined by partial thromboplastin time and factor Xa activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manion, Jill S; Thomason, John M; Langston, Vernon C; Claude, Andrew K; Brooks, Marjory B; Mackin, Andrew J; Lunsford, Kari V

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the anticoagulant effects of inhaled heparin in dogs. This study was conducted in 3 phases. In phase 1, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf) was collected to generate an in vitro calibration curve to relate heparin concentration to the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT). In phase 2, heparin was administered via nebulization to determine the threshold dose needed to prolong systemic aPTT. In phase 3, the local anticoagulant activity of inhaled heparin was determined by measurement of BALf anti-Xa activity and aPTT. University teaching hospital. Six healthy intact female Walker Hounds were used in this study. Two dogs were used for each phase. Inhaled unfractionated sodium heparin was administered in doses ranging from 50,000 to 200,000 IU. In vitro addition of heparin to BALf caused a prolongation in aPTT. Inhaled heparin at doses as high as 200,000 IU failed to prolong systemic aPTT, and a threshold dose could not be determined. No significant local anticoagulant effects were detected. Even at doses higher than those known to be effective in people, inhaled heparin appears to have no detectable local or systemic anticoagulant effects in dogs with the current delivery method. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2015.

  19. Treatment of proctalgia fugax with salbutamol inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckardt, V F; Dodt, O; Kanzler, G; Bernhard, G

    1996-04-01

    Although no generally effective treatment for proctalgia fugax is known, inhalation of salbutamol has been reported to shorten pain attacks in isolated cases. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial of inhaled salbutamol in 18 patients with proctalgia fugax. The clinical effect was evaluated by recording the duration of severe pain and discomfort during acute attacks. In addition, anorectal motility recordings were analyzed for possible changes in anal resting tone, sphincter relaxation during rectal distension and in rectal compliance prior to and following administration of the two test substances. Sixteen patients completed all investigations. Compared to placebo, salbutamol inhalation shortened the duration of severe pain (p = 0.019). The effect was most marked in patients having prolonged attacks. In the asymptomatic state, neither salbutamol nor placebo led to a significant change in anal resting pressure, anal relaxation during rectal distension, or rectal compliance. Salbutamol also did not alter the threshold for rectal sensation. Salbutamol inhalation shortens attacks of severe pain in patients with proctalgia fugax. The mechanism of this effect remains unexplained.

  20. Development of a High Efficiency Dry Powder Inhaler: Effects of Capsule Chamber Design and Inhaler Surface Modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behara, Srinivas R.B.; Farkas, Dale R.; Hindle, Michael; Longest, P. Worth

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to explore the performance of a high efficiency dry powder inhaler (DPI) intended for excipient enhanced growth (EEG) aerosol delivery based on changes to the capsule orientation and surface modifications of the capsule and device. Methods DPIs were constructed by combining newly designed capsule chambers (CC) with a previously developed three-dimensional (3D) rod array for particle deagglomeration and a previously optimized EEG formulation. The new CCs oriented the capsule perpendicular to the incoming airflow and were analyzed for different air inlets at a constant pressure drop across the device. Modifications to the inhaler and capsule surfaces included use of metal dispersion rods and surface coatings. Aerosolization performance of the new DPIs was evaluated and compared with commercial devices. Results The proposed capsule orientation and motion pattern increased capsule vibrational frequency and reduced the aerosol MMAD compared with commercial/modified DPIs. The use of metal rods in the 3D array further improved inhaler performance. Coating the inhaler and capsule with PTFE significantly increased emitted dose (ED) from the optimized DPI. Conclusions High efficiency performance is achieved for EEG delivery with the optimized DPI device and formulation combination producing an aerosol with MMAD 90%, and ED > 80%. PMID:23949304

  1. Development of a high efficiency dry powder inhaler: effects of capsule chamber design and inhaler surface modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behara, Srinivas R B; Farkas, Dale R; Hindle, Michael; Longest, P Worth

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the performance of a high efficiency dry powder inhaler (DPI) intended for excipient enhanced growth (EEG) aerosol delivery based on changes to the capsule orientation and surface modifications of the capsule and device. DPIs were constructed by combining newly designed capsule chambers (CC) with a previously developed three-dimensional (3D) rod array for particle deagglomeration and a previously optimized EEG formulation. The new CCs oriented the capsule perpendicular to the incoming airflow and were analyzed for different air inlets at a constant pressure drop across the device. Modifications to the inhaler and capsule surfaces included use of metal dispersion rods and surface coatings. Aerosolization performance of the new DPIs was evaluated and compared with commercial devices. The proposed capsule orientation and motion pattern increased capsule vibrational frequency and reduced the aerosol MMAD compared with commercial/modified DPIs. The use of metal rods in the 3D array further improved inhaler performance. Coating the inhaler and capsule with PTFE significantly increased emitted dose (ED) from the optimized DPI. High efficiency performance is achieved for EEG delivery with the optimized DPI device and formulation combination producing an aerosol with MMAD  90%, and ED > 80%.

  2. The effect of smoking status on burn inhalation injury mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlin, Laquanda; Stanford, Lindsay; Cairns, Bruce; Charles, Anthony

    2017-05-01

    Three factors that effect burn mortality are age, total body surface of burn (TBSA), and inhalation injury. Of the three, inhalation injury is the strongest predictor of mortality thus its inclusion in the revised Baux score (age+TBSA+17* (inhalation injury, 1=yes, 0=no)). However, the weighted contribution of specific comorbidities such as smoker status on mortality has traditionally not been accounted for nor studied in this subset of burn patients. We therefore sought to examine the impact of current tobacco and/or marijuana smoking in patients with inhalation injury. A retrospective analysis of patients admitted to a regional burn center from 2002 to 2012. Independent variables analyzed included basic demographics, burn mechanism, presence of inhalation injury, TBSA, pre-existing comorbidities, and smoker status. Bivariate analysis was performed and logistic regression modeling using significant variables was utilized to estimate odds of mortality. There were a total of 7640 patients over the study period. 7% (n=580) of the burn cohort with inhalation injury were included in this study. In-hospital burn mortality for inhalation injury patients was 23%. Current smokers (20%) included cigarette smokers and marijuana users, 19% and 3%, respectively. Preexisting respiratory disease (17%) was present in 36% of smokers compared to 13% of non-smokers (psmoke inhalation injury. Future prospective studies in human and/or animal models are needed to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  3. Which inhaled corticosteroid and long-acting β-agonist combination is better in patients with moderate-to-severe asthma, a dry powder inhaler or a pressurized metered-dose inhaler?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraki, Masato; Gose, Kyuya; Hanada, Soichiro; Sawaguchi, Hirochiyo; Tohda, Yuji

    2017-11-01

    Two main types of devices are used to facilitate the administration of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) and long-acting β-agonist (LABA) in combination, dry powder inhalers (DPIs) and pressurized metered-dose inhalers (pMDIs). There are few reports comparing the effects of the two devices, and it is unknown which should be recommended for asthma patients with given sets of characteristics. In the current study, the beneficial effects and side effects associated with DPIs and pMDIs were compared, and the question of which device should be recommended for asthma patients was investigated. A prospective, randomized, crossover, comparative study in adult outpatients with asthma was conducted using salmeterol/fluticasone propionate combination (SFC) 50 μg/250 μg, one inhalation of Adoair ® 250 Diskus ® twice daily or two inhalations of Adoair ® 125 Aerosol twice daily, for 8 weeks. Questionnaires, exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) tests and pulmonary function tests were administered after the use of each device for 8 weeks, and the results derived from each device were compared. Sixty-eight subjects were included in the final analysis. There were no significant differences between quality-of-life scores, FeNO, spirometry test results and forced oscillation results. With regard to patient preferences, 57.4% preferred the Adoair ® Aerosol and 35.3% preferred the Adoair ® Diskus ® , as determined via the comparative evaluation questionnaire. Although DPI prescription accounts for the predominant market share of combined ICS/LABA in Japan, patients preferred a pMDI device to a DPI device. Compared to DPIs, pMDIs may be the preferential choice for patients with asthma.

  4. Radon in indoor concentrations and indoor concentrations of metal dust particles in museums and other public buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, G L; Braz, D; de Jesus, E F; Santos, S M; Cardoso, K; Hecht, A A; Dias da Cunha, Moore K

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the public and occupational exposure to radon and metal-bearing particles in museums and public buildings located in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. For this study, four buildings were selected: two historic buildings, which currently house an art gallery and an art museum; and two modern buildings, a chapel and a club. Integrated radon concentration measurements were performed using passive radon detectors with solid state nuclear track detector-type Lexan used as nuclear track detector. Air samplers with a cyclone were used to collect the airborne particle samples that were analyzed by the particle-induced X-ray emission technique. The average unattached-radon concentrations in indoor air in the buildings were above 40 Bq/m(3), with the exception of Building D as measured in 2009. The average radon concentrations in indoor air in the four buildings in 2009 were below the recommended reference level by World Health Organization (100 Bq/m(3)); however, in 2011, the average concentrations of radon in Buildings A and C were above this level, though lower than 300 Bq/m(3). The average concentrations of unattached radon were lower than 148 Bq/m(3) (4pCi/L), the USEPA level recommended to take action to reduce the concentrations of radon in indoor air. The unattached-radon average concentrations were also lower than the value recommended by the European Union for new houses. As the unattached-radon concentrations were below the international level recommended to take action to reduce the radon concentration in air, it was concluded that during the period of sampling, there was low risk to human health due to the inhalation of unattached radon in these four buildings.

  5. Inhaled therapy for the management of perioperative pulmonary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C A Thunberg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH are at high risk for complications in the perioperative setting and often receive vasodilators to control elevated pulmonary artery pressure (PAP. Administration of vasodilators via inhalation is an effective strategy for reducing PAP while avoiding systemic side effects, chiefly hypotension. The prototypical inhaled pulmonary-specific vasodilator, nitric oxide (NO, has a proven track record but is expensive and cumbersome to implement. Alternatives to NO, including prostanoids (such as epoprostenol, iloprost, and treprostinil, NO-donating drugs (sodium nitroprusside, nitroglycerin, and nitrite, and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (milrinone, sildenafil may be given via inhalation for the purpose of treating elevated PAP. This review will focus on the perioperative therapy of PH using inhaled vasodilators.

  6. ‘Great ease and simplicity of action’: Dr Nelson’s Inhaler and the origins of modern inhalation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Murnane

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Unveiled at the conclusion of a meeting of the Royal Medical and Chirurgical Society in 1861,[1] ‘Dr Nelson’s Improved Inhaler’ was one of the most important milestones in the genesis of reliable treatment of respiratory ailments in the modern era. Affordable and suitable for self-medication, the Dr Nelson’s Inhaler offered simple and reliable relief for patients with respiratory and pulmonary ailments. Conspicuous for its modesty and simplicity, it was one of the most widely produced, reproduced, and used inhalation devices in the final third of the nineteenth century. By reconstructing the ‘biography’ of the Nelson Inhaler, this article will attempt to sketch a network of medical and commercial interests and expertise in London which aligned in the 1860s to help establish inhalation as a popular, inexpensive, and trusted form of medical therapy for pulmonary ailments. This article will look at what connects physicians, apothecaries, and patients in the era: the medicines and technologies that were prescribed, made, bought, and which caused wellness, side-effects, and even death. This approach allows us to develop a narrative of respiratory illness as it was experienced by practitioners and patients alike.

  7. Sudden death caused by 1,1-difluoroethane inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhenggang; Avella, Joseph; Wetli, Charles V

    2004-05-01

    A 20-year-old man was found dead on the floor next to a computer, with a nearly full can of "CRC Duster" dust remover located next to the deceased on the floor, and an empty can of the same product on the computer desk. Toxicologic evaluation using either gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) or gas chromatography/flame ionization detector (GC/FID) method identified the active ingredient 1,1-difluoroethane (Freon 152a) in all tissues analyzed. Tissue distribution studies revealed highest concentration in central blood, lung, and liver. It is believed that the 1,1-difluoroethane inhalation was the cause of death.

  8. Asthma control in patients receiving inhaled corticosteroid and long-acting beta2-agonist fixed combinations. A real-life study comparing dry powder inhalers and a pressurized metered dose inhaler extrafine formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolini Gabriele

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although patients have more problems using metered dose inhalers, clinical comparisons suggest they provide similar control to dry powder inhalers. Using real-life situations this study was designed to evaluate asthma control in outpatients with moderate to severe persistent asthma and to compare efficacy of fixed combinations of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS and long acting beta-agonists (LABA. Methods This real-life study had a cross-sectional design. Patients using fixed combinations of ICS and LABA had their asthma control and spirometry assessed during regular visits. Results 111 patients were analyzed: 53 (47.7% received maintenance therapy of extrafine beclomethasone-formoterol (BDP/F pressurized metered dose inhaler (pMDI, 25 (22.5% fluticasone-salmeterol (FP/S dry powder inhaler (DPI, and 33 (29.7% budesonide-formoterol (BUD/F DPI. Severity of asthma at time of diagnosis, assessed by the treating physician, was comparable among groups. Asthma control was achieved by 45.9% of patients; 38.7% were partially controlled and 15.3% were uncontrolled. In the extrafine BDF/F group, asthma control total score, daytime symptom score and rescue medication use score were significantly better than those using fixed DPI combinations (5.8 ± 6.2 vs. 8.5 ± 6.8; 1.4 ± 1.8 vs. 2.3 ± 2.1; 1.8 ± 2.2 vs. 2.6 ± 2.2; p = 0.0160; p = 0.012 and p = 0.025, respectively and the mean daily ICS dose were significantly lower. Conclusions pMDI extrafine BDP/F combination demonstrated better asthma control compared to DPIs formulated with larger particles. This could be due to the improved lung deposition of the dose or less reliance on the optimal inhalation technique or both.

  9. Practice makes perfect: self-reported adherence a positive marker of inhaler technique maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzi, Elizabeth; Srour, Pamela; Armour, Carol; Rand, Cynthia; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia

    2017-04-24

    Poor inhaler technique and non-adherence to treatment are major problems in the management of asthma. Patients can be taught how to achieve good inhaler technique, however maintenance remains problematic, with 50% of patients unable to demonstrate correct technique. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical, patient-related and/or device-related factors that predict inhaler technique maintenance. Data from a quality-controlled longitudinal community care dataset was utilized. 238 patients using preventer medications where included. Data consisted of patient demographics, clinical data, medication-related factors and patient-reported outcomes. Mixed effects logistic regression was used to identify predictors of inhaler technique maintenance at 1 month. The variables found to be independently associated with inhaler technique maintenance using logistic regression (Χ 2 (3,n = 238) = 33.24, p < 0.000) were inhaler technique at Visit 1 (OR 7.1), device type (metered dose inhaler and dry powder inhalers) (OR 2.2) and self-reported adherent behavior in the prior 7 days (OR 1.3). This research is the first to unequivocally establish a predictive relationship between inhaler technique maintenance and actual patient adherence, reinforcing the notion that inhaler technique maintenance is more than just a physical skill. Inhaler technique maintenance has an underlying behavioral component, which future studies need to investigate. BEHAVIORAL ELEMENT TO CORRECT LONG-TERM INHALER TECHNIQUES: Patients who consciously make an effort to perfect asthma inhaler technique will maintain their skills long-term. Elizabeth Azzi at the University of Sydney, Australia, and co-workers further add evidence that there is a strong behavioral component to patients retaining correct inhaler technique over time. Poor inhaler technique can limit asthma control, affecting quality of life and increasing the chances of severe exacerbations. Azzi's team followed 238 patients to

  10. Quintupling Inhaled Glucocorticoids to Prevent Childhood Asthma Exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Daniel J; Bacharier, Leonard B; Mauger, David T; Boehmer, Susan; Beigelman, Avraham; Chmiel, James F; Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Gaffin, Jonathan M; Morgan, Wayne J; Peters, Stephen P; Phipatanakul, Wanda; Sheehan, William J; Cabana, Michael D; Holguin, Fernando; Martinez, Fernando D; Pongracic, Jacqueline A; Baxi, Sachin N; Benson, Mindy; Blake, Kathryn; Covar, Ronina; Gentile, Deborah A; Israel, Elliot; Krishnan, Jerry A; Kumar, Harsha V; Lang, Jason E; Lazarus, Stephen C; Lima, John J; Long, Dayna; Ly, Ngoc; Marbin, Jyothi; Moy, James N; Myers, Ross E; Olin, J Tod; Raissy, Hengameh H; Robison, Rachel G; Ross, Kristie; Sorkness, Christine A; Lemanske, Robert F

    2018-03-08

    Asthma exacerbations occur frequently despite the regular use of asthma-controller therapies, such as inhaled glucocorticoids. Clinicians commonly increase the doses of inhaled glucocorticoids at early signs of loss of asthma control. However, data on the safety and efficacy of this strategy in children are limited. We studied 254 children, 5 to 11 years of age, who had mild-to-moderate persistent asthma and had had at least one asthma exacerbation treated with systemic glucocorticoids in the previous year. Children were treated for 48 weeks with maintenance low-dose inhaled glucocorticoids (fluticasone propionate at a dose of 44 μg per inhalation, two inhalations twice daily) and were randomly assigned to either continue the same dose (low-dose group) or use a quintupled dose (high-dose group; fluticasone at a dose of 220 μg per inhalation, two inhalations twice daily) for 7 days at the early signs of loss of asthma control ("yellow zone"). Treatment was provided in a double-blind fashion. The primary outcome was the rate of severe asthma exacerbations treated with systemic glucocorticoids. The rate of severe asthma exacerbations treated with systemic glucocorticoids did not differ significantly between groups (0.48 exacerbations per year in the high-dose group and 0.37 exacerbations per year in the low-dose group; relative rate, 1.3; 95% confidence interval, 0.8 to 2.1; P=0.30). The time to the first exacerbation, the rate of treatment failure, symptom scores, and albuterol use during yellow-zone episodes did not differ significantly between groups. The total glucocorticoid exposure was 16% higher in the high-dose group than in the low-dose group. The difference in linear growth between the high-dose group and the low-dose group was -0.23 cm per year (P=0.06). In children with mild-to-moderate persistent asthma treated with daily inhaled glucocorticoids, quintupling the dose at the early signs of loss of asthma control did not reduce the rate of severe asthma

  11. Evaluating inhaler use technique in COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pothirat C

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Chaicharn Pothirat, Warawut Chaiwong, Nittaya Phetsuk, Sangnual Pisalthanapuna, Nonglak Chetsadaphan, Woranoot Choomuang Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Allergy, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand Background: Poor inhalation techniques are associated with decreased medication delivery and poor disease control in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The purpose of this study was to evaluate techniques for using inhaler devices in COPD patients.Methods: A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted to assess patient compliance with correct techniques for using inhaler devices across four regimens, ie, the pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI, the pMDI with a spacer, the Accuhaler®, and the Handihaler®. The percentage of compliance with essential steps of correct device usage for each regimen was recorded without prior notification when COPD patients presented for a routine visit, and 1 month after receiving face-to-face training. We compared the percentage of compliance between the devices and risk factors related to incorrect techniques using logistic regression analysis. Percentage of patient compliance with correct techniques was compared between the two visits using the chi-square test. Statistical significance was set at P<0.05.Results: A total of 103 COPD patients (mean age 71.2±9.2 years, males 64.1%, low education level 82.5%, and percent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second 51.9±22.5 were evaluated. Seventy-seven patients (74.8% performed at least one step incorrectly. Patients using the Handihaler had the lowest compliance failure (42.5%, and the odds ratio for failure with the other devices compared with the Handihaler were 4.6 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.8–11.8 for the pMDI, 3.1 (95% CI 1.2–8.2 for the pMDI with a spacer, and 2.4 (95% CI 1.1–5.2 for the Accuhaler. Low education level was the single most important factor related

  12. Pollution level, inhalation exposure and lung cancer risk of ambient atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Taiyuan, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Zhonghuan; Duan Xiaoli; Tao Shu; Qiu Weixun; Liu Di; Wang Yilong; Wei Siye; Wang Bin; Jiang Qiujing; Lu Bin; Song Yunxue; Hu Xinxin

    2013-01-01

    Passive air samplers were deployed to collect both gas and particulate phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Taiyuan between 2009 and 2010. Annual average concentrations of BaP equivalent concentration (B[a]P eq ) in background, rural and urban areas were 2.90 ± 0.29, 23.2 ± 30.8 and 27.4 ± 28.1 ng/m 3 , respectively, with higher concentration in the winter than in other seasons. The median B[a]P eq concentrations of annual inhalation exposure were estimated to be in the range of 103–347 ng/d for all population groups in rural as well as in urban areas. The median values of incremental lifetime cancer risk (ILCR) induced by whole year inhalation exposure for all groups were basically larger than 10 −6 , with higher values in winter than in other seasons and in urban than in rural area. In the same season and area, the ILCR of adults was larger than other age groups and that of females was a little higher than males. - Highlights: ► The median values of ILCR were higher in winter than in other seasons. ► The median values of ILCR were higher in urban than in rural area. ► In the same season and area, the ILCR of adults was larger than other age groups. ► In the same season and area, the ILCR of females was a little higher than males. ► Exposure level and the cancer slope factor influenced the ILCR greatly. - The inhalation exposure and lung cancer risk of ambient atmospheric PAHs changed for different seasons, areas and population groups in Taiyuan, China.

  13. Inhaled Antibiotics in the Treatment of Nosocomial Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Kuzovlev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial pneumonia is the most common nosocomial infection in intensive care units. Rational antibiotic therapy is the basis for the treatment of nosocomial pneumonia. There is currently a challenge of the pathogens of nosocomial pneumonia being resistant to most of the antibiotics recommended for its treatment. Inhaled antibiotics used in combination with systemic drugs are an effective and safe treatment for nosocomial pneumonia. This review of literature characterizes the current possibilities of inhaled antibiotic therapy for nosocomial pneumonia in detail and describes medicaments and the advantages and disadvantages of this treatment option. Despite insufficient evidence in circumstances where the microorganisms are polyresistant and where the design of novel antibiotics shows no promise, the use of inhaled antibiotics is an important alternative in the treatment of severe nosocomial pneumonia caused by polyresistant gram-negative bacteria. Key words: nosocomial pneumonia, antibiotic therapy, inhaled antibiotics, resistance.

  14. Inhaled Nitric Oxide for the Prevention of Impaired Arterial Oxygenation during Myocardial Revascularization with Extracorporeal Circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Kozlov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the efficacy of inhaled nitric oxide used intraoperatively to prevent lung oxygenating dysfunction in patients with coronary heart disease after myocardial revascularization under extracorporeal circulation (EC. Subjects and methods. Thirty-two patients aged 55.0±2.0 years were examined. The inclusion criteria were the standard course of surgical intervention (the absence of hemorrhage, acute cardiovascular insufficiency, perioperative myocardial infarction, etc., a pulmonary artery wedge pressure of less than 15 – mm Hg throughout the study, and the baseline arterial partial oxygen tension/inspired mixture oxygen fraction (PaO2/FiO2 ratio of at least 350 mm Hg. There was a control group (n=21; Group 1 that used no special measures to prevent and/or to correct lung oxygenating dysfunction and Group 2 (n=11 that received inhaled nitric oxide. Ihe administration of inhaled nitric oxide at a concentration of 10 ppm was initiated after water anesthesia, stopped during EC, and resumed in the postperfusion period. Results. At the end, PaO2/FiO2 and intrapulmonary shunt fraction did not differ between the groups (p>0.05. Before EC, the patients receiving inhaled nitric oxide had a lower intrapulmonary blood shunting (8.9±0.7 and 11.7±1.0%; p<0.05. There were no intergroup differences in the values of PaO2/FiO2 at this stage. In the earliest postperfusion period, PaO2/FiO2 was higher in Group 2 than that in Group 1. At the end of operations, Groups 1 and 2 had a PaO2/FiO2 of 336.0±16.8 and 409.0±24.3 mm Hg, respectively (p<0.05 and an intrapulmonary shunt fraction of 14.5±1.0 and 10.4±1.0% (p<0.05. At the end of surgery, the rate of a reduction in PaO2/FiO2 to the level below 350 mm Hg was 52.4±11.1% in Group 1 and 18.2±11.6% in Group 2 (p<0.05. Six hours after surgery, PaO2/FiO2 values less than 300 mm Hg were diagnosed in 61.9±10.5% of Group 1 patients and in 27.3±13.4% of Group 2 ones (p<0.05. Conclusion. The

  15. Inhaled Surfactant Therapy in Newborns in Artificial Lung Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Perepelitsa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficiency of inhaled surfactant therapy in neonatal infants with respiratory failure.Subjects and methods. The trial enrolled 13 premature neonatal infants; their mean gestational age was 31.8±2.8 weeks and the birth weight was 1825±600.9 g. They had a oneminute Apgar score of 4.3±1.4. All the neonates needed mechanical ventilation (MV atbirth because the leading clinical sign was respiratory failure caused by acute intranatal hypoxia, neonatal amniotic fluid aspiration, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS, and cerebral ischemia. Curosurf was injected in a dose of 174.7±21 mg/kg in the infants with neonatal RDS at 35 minutes of life. All the babies included in the study were noted to have severe disease and prolonged MV. After stabilization of their status, the neonates received combination therapy involving surfactantBL inhalation to reduce the duration of MV. The dose of the agent was 75 mg. Results. After surfactantBL inhalation, effective spontaneous respiration occurred in 69.2% of the newborn infants; successful extubation was carried out. The median duration ofMV after surfactant BL inhalation was 22 hours (4—68 hours. There were no reintubated cases after inhalation therapy. Following surfactantBL inhalation, 4 (30.8% patients remained to be on MV as a control regimen; 3 of them had highfre quency MV. SurfactantBL inhalation made it possible to change the respiratory support regimen and to reduce MV parame ters in these babies. 

  16. Evaluation of air-interfaced Calu-3 cell layers for investigation of inhaled drug interactions with organic cation transporters in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Manali; Pritchard, D I; Bosquillon, C

    2012-04-15

    A physiologically pertinent in vitro model is urgently needed for probing interactions between inhaled drugs and the organic cation transporters (OCT) in the bronchial epithelium. This study evaluated OCT expression, functionality, inhibition by common inhaled drugs and impact on formoterol transepithelial transport in layers of human bronchial epithelial Calu-3 cells grown at an air-liquid interface. 21 day old Calu-3 layers expressed OCT1, OCT3, OCTN1 and OCTN2 whereas OCT2 could not be detected. Quantification of the cellular uptake of the OCT substrate ASP(+) in presence of inhibitors suggested several OCT were functional at the apical side of the cell layers. ASP(+) uptake was reduced by the bronchodilators formoterol, salbutamol (albuterol), ipratropium and the glucocorticoid budesonide. However, the OCT inhibitory properties of the two β(2)-mimetics were suppressed at therapeutically relevant concentrations. The absorptive permeability of formoterol across the cell layers was enhanced at a high drug concentration shown to decrease ASP(+) uptake by ∼50% as well as in presence of the OCT inhibitor tetraethylammonium (TEA). Secretory transport was unaffected by the drug concentration but was reduced by TEA. Our data indicate air-interfaced Calu-3 layers offer a low-cost in vitro model suitable for assessing inhaled drug-OCT interactions in the bronchial epithelium. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Factors related to the incorrect use of inhalers by asthma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo de Tarso Roth Dalcin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate inhaler technique in outpatients with asthma and to determine associations between the correctness of that technique and the level of asthma control. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study involving patients > 14 years of age with physician-diagnosed asthma. The patients were recruited from the Asthma Outpatient Clinic of the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil. The patients completed two questionnaires (a general questionnaire and an asthma control questionnaire based on the 2011 Global Initiative for Asthma guidelines, demonstrated their inhaler technique, and performed pulmonary function tests. Incorrect inhaler technique was defined as the incorrect execution of at least two of the predefined steps. RESULTS: We included 268 patients. Of those, 81 (30.2% showed incorrect inhaler technique, which was associated with poor asthma control (p = 0.002. Logistic regression analysis identified the following factors associated with incorrect inhaler technique: being widowed (OR = 5.01; 95% CI, 1.74-14.41; p = 0.003; using metered dose inhalers (OR = 1.58; 95% CI, 1.35-1.85; p 2 comorbidities (OR = 3.80; 95% CI, 1.03-14.02; p = 0.045. CONCLUSIONS: In the sample studied, incorrect inhaler technique was associated with poor asthma control. Widowhood, use of metered dose inhalers, low socioeconomic level, and the presence of > 2 comorbidities were associated with incorrect inhaler technique.

  18. Unsteady Particle Deposition in a Human Nasal Cavity during Inhalation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camby M.K. Se

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the deposition efficiency during the unsteady inhalation cycle by using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD. The unsteady inhalation profile was applied at the outlet of nasopharynx, which had a maximum flow rate of 40.3L/min which corresponds to an equivalent steady inhalation tidal volume flow rate of 24.6L/min. Aerodynamic particle sizes of 5μm and 20μm were studied in order to reflect contrasting Stokes numbered particle behaviour. Two particle deposition efficiencies in the nasal cavity versus time are presented. In general, the deposition of 5μm particles was much less than 20μm particles. The first 0.2 second of the inhalation cycle was found to be significant to the particle transport, since the majority of particles were deposited during this period (i.e. its residence time. Comparisons were also made with its equivalent steady inhalation flow rate which found that the unsteady inhalation produced lower deposition efficiency for both particle sizes.

  19. Internal contamination by natural uranium: monitoring by analysis of urine of individuals exposed by occupational inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramalho, A.T.

    1982-01-01

    Urine samples from men working at Usina Santo Amaro (USAM - State of Sao Paulo), a monazite refinery, were analysed for uranium concentration, using fluorometric analysis and alpha spectrometry. All samples analysed presented uranium concentration below the lower limit of detection. Theoretical values were calculated for uranium concentration in urine samples from workers at the annual limit of intake (ALI) for inhalation of natural uranium, recommended in Publication 30 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP, 1979). The two different methods used for analysis of natural uranium concentration in the urine samples were compared: fluorimetry and alpha spectrometry. (author)

  20. Effects of inhalational anaesthesia with low tidal volume ventilation on end-tidal sevoflurane and carbon dioxide concentrations: prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Matta-Martín, M; López-Herrera, D; Luis-Navarro, J C; López-Romero, J L

    2014-02-01

    We investigated how ventilation with low tidal volumes affects the pharmacokinetics of sevoflurane uptake during the first minutes of inhaled anaesthesia. Forty-eight patients scheduled for lung resection were randomly assigned to three groups. Patients in group 1, 2 and 3 received 3% sevoflurane for 3 min via face mask and controlled ventilation with a tidal volume of 2.2, 8 and 12 ml kg(-1), respectively (Phase 1). After tracheal intubation (Phase 2), 3% sevoflurane was supplied for 2 min using a tidal volume of 8 ml kg(-1) (Phase 3). End-tidal sevoflurane concentrations were significantly higher in group 1 at the end of phase 1 and lower at the end of phase 2 than in the other groups as follows: median of 2.5%, 2.2% and 2.3% in phase 1 for groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively (Ptidal carbon dioxide values in group 1 were significantly lower at the end of phase 1 and higher at the end of phase 2 than in the other groups as follows: median of 16.5, 31 and 29.5 mm Hg in phase 1 for groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively (Ptidal volume approximating the airway dead space volume, end-tidal sevoflurane and end-tidal carbon dioxide may not correctly reflect the concentration of these gases in the alveoli, leading to misinterpretation of expired gas data. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Inhalation of Budesonide/Formoterol Increases Diaphragm Muscle Contractility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiyohiko Shindoh

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: BUD/FORM inhalation has an inotropic effect on diaphragm muscle, protects diaphragm muscle deterioration after endotoxin injection, and inhibits NO production. Increments in muscle contractility with BUD/FORM inhalation are induced through a synergistic effect of an anti-inflammatory agent and 02-agonist.

  2. Social stigma stops adolescents from using inhalers for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-10

    Forgetfulness, poor routines, inadequate inhaler technique, organisational difficulties and families not understanding or accepting their children's asthma are described as barriers to the use of inhalers among adolescents with asthma.

  3. Characterization of a nose-only inhalation exposure system for hydrocarbon mixtures and jet fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sheppard A; Tremblay, Raphael T; Brunson, Kristyn F; Kendrick, Christine; Fisher, Jeffrey W

    2010-04-01

    A directed-flow nose-only inhalation exposure system was constructed to support development of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for complex hydrocarbon mixtures, such as jet fuels. Due to the complex nature of the aerosol and vapor-phase hydrocarbon exposures, care was taken to investigate the chamber hydrocarbon stability, vapor and aerosol droplet compositions, and droplet size distribution. Two-generation systems for aerosolizing fuel and hydrocarbons were compared and characterized for use with either jet fuels or a simple mixture of eight hydrocarbons. Total hydrocarbon concentration was monitored via online gas chromatography (GC). Aerosol/vapor (A/V) ratios, and total and individual hydrocarbon concentrations, were determined using adsorbent tubes analyzed by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TDS-GC-MS). Droplet size distribution was assessed via seven-stage cascade impactor. Droplet mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) was between 1 and 3 mum, depending on the generator and mixture utilized. A/V hydrocarbon concentrations ranged from approximately 200 to 1300 mg/m(3), with between 20% and 80% aerosol content, depending on the mixture. The aerosolized hydrocarbon mixtures remained stable during the 4-h exposure periods, with coefficients of variation (CV) of less than 10% for the total hydrocarbon concentrations. There was greater variability in the measurement of individual hydrocarbons in the A-V phase. In conclusion, modern analytical chemistry instruments allow for improved descriptions of inhalation exposures of rodents to aerosolized fuel.

  4. Inhaled Steroids: First Line Treatment of Adult Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Cartier

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Corticosteroids are the most potent inhaled anti-inflammatory drugs for asthma treatment. This paper reviews the clinical evidence supporting the early use of inhaled steroids in asthma as a first line treatment. Inhaled steroids can probably alter the course of asthma, especially in mild asthmatics. Once they have been shown to improve control of asthma and even if the need for beta2-agonists is virtually nil, their use should be continued at low doses (ie, equivalent to 400 to 500 μg of budesonide or beclomethasone for at least one year before attempting to reduce the dosage.

  5. Real-life characteristics of asthma inhaler device use in South Korea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wan Yau Ming, S.; Rhee, C.K.; Park, H.Y.; Yoo, K.H.; Kim, D.K.; Van Boven, J.F.; Price, D.; Park, H.S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Historically, dry powder inhalers (DPIs) were considered to provide better airway distribution, easier identification of empty devices, and easier handling when compared to pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs). Prior research into the major handling errors with inhaler

  6. Radionuclide concentration in ground-level air in 1991 in North Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, W.; Wershofen, H.

    1992-03-01

    The activity concentration of various fission products and some other radionuclides (e.g. Be-7, Na-22, K-40 and Pb-210) contained in ground-level air were determined by gamma-ray spectroscopy. Weekly and mean monthly activity concentrations measured in Brunswick and Berlin are tabulated. From 1990 to 1991 the Cs-137 concentration in Brunswick decreased only slightly. It was less than 0.1% of that in 1986 but due to resuspended soil dust still three times higher than in 1985. Occasionally, traces of activation products were detected such as Cr-51, Mn-54 or Co-60 in Januray and February in Brunswick and Berlin. The effective equivalent dose due to the inhalation of fission products is estimated to be less than 0.1% of the Pb-210 inhalation dose. (orig.) [de

  7. Air pollution and inhalation exposure to particulate matter of different sizes in rural households using improved stoves in central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weijian; Shen, Guofeng; Chen, Yuanchen; Shen, Huizhong; Huang, Ye; Li, Tongchao; Wang, Yilong; Fu, Xiaofang; Tao, Shu; Liu, Wenxin; Huang-Fu, Yibo; Zhang, Weihao; Xue, Chunyu; Liu, Guangqing; Wu, Fuyong; Wong, Minghung

    2018-01-01

    Household air pollution is considered to be among the top environmental risks in China. To examine the performance of improved stoves for reduction of indoor particulate matter (PM) emission and exposure in rural households, individual inhalation exposure to size-resolved PM was investigated using personal portable samplers carried by residents using wood gasifier stoves or improved coal stoves in a rural county in Central China. Concentrations of PM with different sizes in stationary indoor and outdoor air were also monitored at paired sites. The stationary concentrations of size-resolved PM in indoor air were greater than those in outdoor air, especially finer particles PM 0.25 . The daily averaged exposure concentrations of PM 0.25 , PM 1.0 , PM 2.5 and total suspended particle for all the surveyed residents were 74.4±41.1, 159.3±74.3, 176.7±78.1 and 217.9±78.1μg/m 3 , respectively. Even using the improved stoves, the individual exposure to indoor PM far exceeded the air quality guideline by WHO at 25μg/m 3 . Submicron particles PM 1.0 were the dominant PM fraction for personal exposure and indoor and outdoor air. Personal exposure exhibited a closer correlation with indoor PM concentrations than that for outdoor concentrations. Both inhalation exposure and indoor air PM concentrations in the rural households with gasifier firewood stoves were evidently lower than the reported results using traditional firewood stoves. However, local governments in the studied rural areas should exercise caution when widely and hastily promoting gasifier firewood stoves in place of improved coal stoves, due to the higher PM levels in indoor and outdoor air and personal inhaled exposure. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Inhalant abuse in the youth : A reason for concern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Simlai

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent times Inhalant or Volatile substances are emerging as a major drug of abuse in the preadolescent and adolescent age group. Most of the children are from broken homes and poor backgrounds. Inhalants have serious immediate and longterm side-effects and can also cause sudden sniffing death syndrome. It is difficult to control this ever-growing problem because Inhalants or Solvents are widely available. Management issues have been discussed in the review.

  9. Dosimetric assessment from 212Pb inhalation at a thorium purification plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, M. P.; Pecequilo, B. R. S.

    2004-01-01

    At the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo (Brazil)), there is a facility (thorium purification plant) where materials with high thorium concentrations are manipulated. In order to estimate afterwards the lung cancer risk for the workers, the thoron daughter ( 212 Pb) levels were assessed and the committed effective and lung committed equivalent doses for workers in place. A total of 28 air filter samples were measured by total alpha counting through the modified Kusnetz method, to determine the 212 Pb concentration. The committed effective dose and lung committed equivalent dose due to 212 Pb inhalation were derived from compartmental analysis following the ICRP 66 lung compartmental model, and ICRP 67 lead metabolic model. (authors)

  10. Animal study on biological responses by radon inhalation making use of waste rock which contains feeble activity of uranium (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimori, Yuu; Sakoda, Akihiro; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Mitsunobu, Fumihiro; Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Kataoka, Takahiro; Yamato, Keiko; Nishiyama, Yuichi

    2013-06-01

    Okayama University and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) have carried out the collaborative study of physiological effects of inhaled radon for the low-dose range. Main assignments were as follows. Based on the clinical knowledge, Misasa Medical Center (Okayama University Hospital) clarified the issues that should be addressed. Graduate School of Health Sciences (Okayama University) supervised the research and studied the biological responses. The JAEA made the development and control of a facility for radon inhalation experiments and the investigation of biokinetics and absorbed doses of radon. From 2007 to 2011, the following results were obtained. (1) Literature on effects of radon for the low-dose range was surveyed to determine the present tasks. (2) The first Japanese large-scale facility was developed for radon inhalation experiments with small animals. (3) Relationships between radon concentration and inhalation time were widely examined to understand the change in antioxidative functions due to radon, which are the most basic parameters. (4) Inhibitory effects of radon on oxidative damages were observed using model mice with reactive oxygen- or free radical-related diseases like alcohol-induced oxidative damages and type I diabetes. (5) In order to discuss biological responses quantitatively following radon inhalation, the biokinetics of inhaled radon was examined and the model for calculation of absorbed doses for organs and tissues was obtained. (author)

  11. Pirbuterol Acetate Oral Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pirbuterol is in a class of medications called beta-agonist bronchodilators. It works by relaxing and opening ... cleaning. Once a week, remove the mouthpiece cover, turn the inhaler upside down and wipe the mouthpiece ...

  12. Education on Correct Inhaler Technique in Pharmacy Schools ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Standard educational training may not be the most appropriate method of teaching students the correct use of inhalers. Clearly, there is a practice element missing which needs to be addressed in a feasible way. Keywords: Inhaler technique, Pharmacy education, Hands-on training, Training barrier ...

  13. Food hypersensitivity by inhalation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahna Sami L

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Though not widely recognized, food hypersensitivity by inhalation can cause major morbidity in affected individuals. The exposure is usually more obvious and often substantial in occupational environments but frequently occurs in non-occupational settings, such as homes, schools, restaurants, grocery stores, and commercial flights. The exposure can be trivial, as in mere smelling or being in the vicinity of the food. The clinical manifestations can vary from a benign respiratory or cutaneous reaction to a systemic one that can be life-threatening. In addition to strict avoidance, such highly-sensitive subjects should carry self-injectable epinephrine and wear MedicAlert® identification. Asthma is a strong predisposing factor and should be well-controlled. It is of great significance that food inhalation can cause de novo sensitization.

  14. Exposure to hydrocarbon concentrations while commuting or exercising in Dublin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, R T; Gill, L W; McKevitt, R J; Broderick, B

    2007-01-01

    In Ireland, several studies have monitored the air pollution due to traffic in both urban and rural environments. However, few studies have attempted to quantify the relative exposure to traffic derived HC pollutants between different modes of commuter transport. In this study, the difference in pollution exposure between bus and cycling commuters on a route in Dublin was compared by sampling for five vehicle related hydrocarbons: benzene, 1,3-butadiene, acetylene, ethane and ethylene. Samples were collected during both morning and afternoon rush hour periods using a fixed speed pump to gain representative concentrations across the whole journey. Journey times were also measured, as were typical breathing rates in order to calculate the overall dose of pollutant inhaled on the journey. Results clearly picked up significantly higher pollutant concentrations in the bus compared to cycling and also revealed elevated concentrations on the congested side of the road compared to the side moving against the traffic. However, when respiration rates and travel times were taken into account to reveal the mass of pollutants inhaled over the course of a journey, the pattern was reversed, showing slightly enhanced levels of hydrocarbons for the cyclist compared to the bus passenger. In addition, the concentrations of these compounds (excluding ethane), were ascertained at playing pitches in the vicinity of a heavily trafficked suburban motorway and in Dublin city centre. Although the concentrations were relatively low at all sites, when breathing rates were taken into consideration, the average inhaled weights of pollutants were, on occasion, higher than those average values observed for both bus and bicycle commuters.

  15. Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute annual report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belinsky, S.A.; Hoover, M.D.; Bradley, P.L.

    1994-11-01

    This document from the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute includes annual reports in the following general areas: (I) Aerosol Technology and Characterization of Airborne Materials; (II) Deposition, transport, and clearance of inhaled Toxicants; (III) Metabolism and Markers of Inhaled Toxicants; (IV) Carcinogenic Responses to Toxicants; (V) Mechanisms of carcinogenic response to Toxicants; (VI) Non carcinogenic responses to inhaled toxicants; (VII) Mechanisms of noncarcinogenic Responses to Inhaled Toxicants; (VIII) The application of Mathematical Modeling to Risk Estimates. 9 appendices are also included. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  16. Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute annual report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belinsky, S. A.; Hoover, M. D.; Bradley, P. L. [eds.

    1994-11-01

    This document from the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute includes annual reports in the following general areas: (I) Aerosol Technology and Characterization of Airborne Materials; (II) Deposition, transport, and clearance of inhaled Toxicants; (III) Metabolism and Markers of Inhaled Toxicants; (IV) Carcinogenic Responses to Toxicants; (V) Mechanisms of carcinogenic response to Toxicants; (VI) Non carcinogenic responses to inhaled toxicants; (VII) Mechanisms of noncarcinogenic Responses to Inhaled Toxicants; (VIII) The application of Mathematical Modeling to Risk Estimates. 9 appendices are also included. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  17. A prospective, randomized controlled trial of conscious sedation using propofol combined with inhaled nitrous oxide for dental treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoe, Chizuko; Hanamoto, Hiroshi; Sugimura, Mitsutaka; Morimoto, Yoshinari; Kudo, Chiho; Niwa, Hitoshi

    2015-03-01

    Adverse reactions during propofol sedation include a decrease in arterial blood pressure, propofol-induced pain on injection, and airway complications. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether combined use of intravenous propofol and inhaled nitrous oxide could decrease the hypotensive and other adverse effects of propofol. We designed and implemented a prospective, randomized controlled trial. Patients undergoing dental procedures requiring intravenous sedation were randomly allocated to 2 groups: group P comprised those receiving sedation with propofol alone, and group N+P comprised those receiving sedation with 40% nitrous oxide inhalation and propofol. During the dental procedures, the sedation level was maintained at an Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation scale score of 4 by adjusting propofol's target plasma concentration. Nitrous oxide inhalation was the predictor variable, whereas the hemodynamic changes, amount and concentration of propofol, and adverse events were the outcome variables. Eighty-eight patients were successfully analyzed without any complications. The total amount of propofol was significantly less in group N+P (249.8 ± 121.7 mg) than in group P (310.3 ± 122.4 mg) (P = .022), and the mean concentration of propofol was significantly less in group N+P (1.81 ± 0.34 μg/mL) than in group P (2.05 ± 0.44 μg/mL) (P = .006). The mean blood pressure reduction in group N+P (11.0 ± 8.0 mm Hg) was significantly smaller than that in group P (15.8 ± 10.2 mm Hg) (P = .034). Pain associated with the propofol injection and memory of the procedure were less in group N+P (P = .011 and P = .048, respectively). Nitrous oxide did not affect respiratory conditions or recovery characteristics. The results of this study suggest that nitrous oxide inhalation combined with propofol sedation attenuates the hypotensive effect and pain associated with propofol injections, along with potentiating the amnesic effect. Copyright © 2015 American

  18. Performance of prototype high-flow inhalable dust sampler in a livestock production facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, T Renée; Cai, Changjie; Mehaffy, John; Sleeth, Darrah; Volckens, John

    2017-05-01

    A high-flow inhalable sampler, designed for operational flow rates up to 10 L/min using computer simulations and examined in wind tunnel experiments, was evaluated in the field. This prototype sampler was deployed in collocation with an IOM (the benchmark standard sampler) in a swine farrowing building to examine the sampling performance for assessing concentrations of inhalable particulate mass and endotoxin. Paired samplers were deployed for 24 hr on 19 days over a 3-month period. On each sampling day, the paired samplers were deployed at three fixed locations and data were analyzed to identify agreement and to examine systematic biases between concentrations measured by these samplers. Thirty-six paired gravimetric samples were analyzed; insignificant, unsubstantial differences between concentrations were identified between the two samplers (p = 0.16; mean difference 0.03 mg/m 3 ). Forty-four paired samples were available for endotoxin analysis, and a significant (p = 0.001) difference in endotoxin concentration was identified: the prototype sampler, on average, had 120 EU/m 3 more endotoxin than did the IOM samples. Since the same gravimetric samples were analyzed for endotoxin content, the endotoxin difference is likely attributable to differences in endotoxin extraction. The prototype's disposable thin-film polycarbonate capsule was included with the filter in the 1-hr extraction procedure while the internal plastic cassette of the IOM required a rinse procedure that is susceptible to dust losses. Endotoxin concentrations measured with standard plastic IOM inserts that follow this rinsing procedure may underestimate the true endotoxin exposure concentrations. The maximum concentrations in the study (1.55 mg/m 3 gravimetric, 2328 EU/m 3 endotoxin) were lower than other agricultural or industrial environments. Future work should explore the performance of the prototype sampler in dustier environments, where concentrations approach particulates not otherwise

  19. The chemo and the mona : Inhalants, devotion and street youth in Mexico city

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gigengack, Roy

    This paper understands inhalant use - the deliberate inhalation of volatile solvents or glues with intentions of intoxication - as a socially and culturally constituted practice. It describes the inhalant use of young street people in Mexico City from their perspective ("the vicioso or inhalant

  20. Effectiveness of the different methods of inhalation drugs delivery in children with bronchial asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Nedelska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the work — to evaluate the effectiveness of inhalation technique when using different types of inhalers (dry powder inhalers — Turbuhaler, Diskus, metered-dose inhalers, breath-actuated inhalers — Easyhaler. Materials and methods. 45 patients aged 6–17 years underwent the evaluation of inhalation technique accuracy with the use of In-Check-Dial — apparatus, which imitates the airway resistance that should be overcome during inspiration through different inhaler types, and measure inspiration velocity. Incidence of mistakes was studied in different age groups. Results. 80 % of children aged 6–7 years made mistakes while using Turbuhaler, 73.3 % — metered-dose inhaler, 60 % — Easyhaler. There were no mistakes in patients making inhalation by means of Diskhaler. 100 % of children aged 12–14 years incorrectly used metered-dose inhaler. Easyhaler was incorrectly used in 66.6 % of cases, Diskhaler — in 26.6 %. Among elder group, incidence of mistakes when making inhalations through Turbuhaler was lower — 40 % in 12–14-year-old group and 25 % — in 15–17-year-old (р < 0.05. Children of 15–17 years old are able to use Turbuhaler and Diskus (mistakes in 33.3 and 46.6 %, respectively. At the same time, none of the patients have done the correct inhalation by means of metered-dose inhaler, 93.3 % of the patients have mistakes when using Easyhaler. Conclusions. The incidence of mistakes depends on the age and inhaler type and reaches 26–100 %. Minimal quantity of mistakes is seen for Diskus (in all age groups, maxi­mal — for metered-dose inhaler. For the purpose of optimal inhaler choice in a child with bronchial asthma, it is advisable to measure the inspiratory flow with the help of In-Check-Dial before therapy administration.

  1. Inhalation of water electrolysis-derived hydrogen ameliorates cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats - A possible new hydrogen resource for clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jin; Chen, Xiao; Zhai, Xiao; Shi, Dongchen; Zhang, Rongjia; Zhi, Xin; Li, Xiaoqun; Gu, Zhengrong; Cao, Liehu; Weng, Weizong; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Liping; Sun, Xuejun; Ji, Fang; Hou, Jiong; Su, Jiacan

    2016-10-29

    Hydrogen is a kind of noble gas with the character to selectively neutralize reactive oxygen species. Former researches proved that low-concentration of hydrogen can be used to ameliorating cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. Hydrogen electrolyzed from water has a hydrogen concentration of 66.7%, which is much higher than that used in previous studies. And water electrolysis is a potential new hydrogen resource for regular clinical use. This study was designed and carried out for the determination of safety and neuroprotective effects of water electrolysis-derived hydrogen. Sprague-Dawley rats were used as experimental animals, and middle cerebral artery occlusion was used to make cerebral ischemia/reperfusion model. Pathologically, tissues from rats in hydrogen inhalation group showed no significant difference compared with the control group in HE staining pictures. The blood biochemical findings matched the HE staining result. TTC, Nissl, and TUNEL staining showed the significant improvement of infarction volume, neuron morphology, and neuron apoptosis in rat with hydrogen treatment. Biochemically, hydrogen inhalation decreased brain caspase-3, 3-nitrotyrosine and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine-positive cells and inflammation factors concentration. Water electrolysis-derived hydrogen inhalation had neuroprotective effects on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats with the effect of suppressing oxidative stress and inflammation, and it is a possible new hydrogen resource to electrolyze water at the bedside clinically. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Influence of geometry of thermal manikins on concentration distribution and personal exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Kaczmarczyk, Jan

    2007-01-01

    The analyses performed in this paper reveal that a breathing thermal manikin with realistic simulation of respiration including breathing cycle, pulmonary ventilation rate, frequency and breathing mode, gas concentration, humidity and temperature of exhaled air and human body shape and surface...... temperature is sensitive enough to perform reliable measurement of characteristics of air as inhaled by occupants. The temperature, humidity, and pollution concentration in the inhaled air can be measured accurately with a thermal manikin without breathing simulation if they are measured at the upper lip...... at a distance of simulation of breathing, especially of exhalation, is needed for studying the transport of exhaled air between occupants. A method...

  3. Age-specific inhalation radiation dose commitment factors for selected radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strenge, D.L.; Peloquin, R.A.; Baker, D.A.

    1982-08-01

    Inhalation dose commitment factors are presented for selected radionuclides for exposure of individuals in four age groups: infant, child, teen and adult. Radionuclides considered are 35 S, 36 Cl, 45 Ca, 67 Ga, 75 Se, 85 Sr, 109 Cd, 113 Sn, 125 I, 133 Ba, 170 Tm, 169 Yb, 182 Ta, 192 Ir, 198 Au, 201 Tl, 204 Tl, and 236 Pu. The calculational method is based on the human metabolic model of ICRP as defined in Publication 2 (ICRP 1959) and as used in previous age-specific dose factor calculations by Hoenes and Soldat (1977). Dose commitment factors are presented for the following organs of reference: total body, bone, liver, kidney, thyroid, lung and lower large intestine

  4. Experiment of aerosol-release time for a novel automatic metered dose inhaler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingrong Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the aerosol-release time in the development of a new automatic adapter for metered dose inhaler. With this device, regular manually operated metered dose inhalers become automatic. During the study, an inhalation simulator was designed and tested with the newly developed mechatronic system. By adjusting the volume and the pressure of the vacuum tank, most human inhalation waveforms were able to simulate. As an example, regular quick-deep and slow-deep waveforms were matched within reasonable accuracy. Finally, with the help of dynamic image processing, the aerosol-release time (Tr was carefully measured and fully discussed, including the switch-on time (Ts, the mechatronics-hysteresis (Tm and the intentional-delay (Ti. Under slow-deep inhalation condition which is suitable for metered dose inhaler medicine delivery, the switch-on flow-rate could reach as low as 10 L/min, and the corresponding switch-on time was approximately 0.20 s. While the mechatronics-hysteresis depended on the brand of metered dose inhaler, assuming there was no intentional-delay, the aerosol-release time could be as low as 0.40 and 0.60 s, respectively, for two commercially available metered dose inhalers studied in this article. Therefore, this newly developed mechatronic adapter system could ensure aerosol-release time (Tr within satisfactory range for metered dose inhalers.

  5. Dosage of DTPA administration by inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Akira; Fukuda, Satoshi; Yamada, Yuji; Iida, Haruzo; Shimo, Michikuni

    2000-01-01

    The administration of DTPA by inhalation was examined as an emergency medical treatment. In order to estimate the practical dosage to the human, an accurate model of the human air way was connected to a anesthetizer and respiration was simulated. Ca-DTPA, aerosolized by an ultra-sonic nebulizer, was administered by inhalation to the model. For the experiments, the respiratory volume (tidal volume) and the respiration rate was 12 per minute. Irrigation water from the model of larynx and mouth, and the air filter were collected and measured by chelate titration in order to determine the quantity of aerosolized DTPA and the amount deposited on the trachea and lang. The results indicated that the quantity of aerosolized DTPA varied with dilution of the DTPA solution in a ample. It was found that a 3 time dilution was the most practical and that 73 mg of DTPA per minute could be aerosolized. Furthermore, the results indicated that 46% of the aerosolized DTPA was taken in through inhalation and that 26% of DTPA was deposited in the trachea and lung. These results suggest that in practical application in the emergency medical treatment, 15 minutes of inhalation could delivered to approximately 500 mg of DTPA, and 130 mg could be delivered to the trachea and lung. It is considered that these quantity are enough amount to increase the effects of radioactive nuclides from the body, comparing with the recommended dosage for injection administration. (author)

  6. The Chemo and the Mona: Inhalants, devotion and street youth in Mexico City

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gigengack, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper understands inhalant use – the deliberate inhalation of volatile solvents or glues with intentions of intoxication – as a socially and culturally constituted practice. It describes the inhalant use of young street people in Mexico City from their perspective (“the vicioso or inhalant

  7. [The effect of a single inhalation of mineral water on the blood hormonal status in healthy volunteers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khinchagov, B P; Polushina, N D; Frolkov, V K

    1998-01-01

    Concentrations of ACTH, TTH, STH, LH, PSH, hydrocortisone, insulin, glucagone, triiodthyronine, thyroxine, aldosterone, glucose and unesterified fatty acids (NEFA) were measured in the blood of 23 healthy male volunteers aged 18 to 35 years 15, 30 and 60 min after a single nose inhalation and oral intake of mineral water Essentuki No. 17. Inhalation of Essentuki No. 17 stimulated secretion of the hormones and some parameters of metabolic reactions: the levels of glucose, NEFA, hydrocortisone, aldosterone, TTH, PSH and LH rose while those of insulin and growth hormone decreased. Oral intake of this water brought about the same changes in the hormone status except blood insulin the levels of which went up.

  8. Towards the optimisation and adaptation of dry powder inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Y; Schmalfuß, S; Zellnitz, S; Sommerfeld, M; Urbanetz, N

    2014-08-15

    Pulmonary drug delivery by dry powder inhalers is becoming more and more popular. Such an inhalation device must insure that during the inhalation process the drug powder is detached from the carrier due to fluid flow stresses. The goal of the project is the development of a drug powder detachment model to be used in numerical computations (CFD, computational fluid dynamics) of fluid flow and carrier particle motion through the inhaler and the resulting efficiency of drug delivery. This programme will be the basis for the optimisation of inhaler geometry and dry powder inhaler formulation. For this purpose a multi-scale approach is adopted. First the flow field through the inhaler is numerically calculated with OpenFOAM(®) and the flow stresses experienced by the carrier particles are recorded. This information is used for micro-scale simulations using the Lattice-Boltzmann method where only one carrier particle covered with drug powder is placed in cubic flow domain and exposed to the relevant flow situations, e.g. plug and shear flow with different Reynolds numbers. Therefrom the fluid forces on the drug particles are obtained. In order to allow the determination of the drug particle detachment possibility by lift-off, sliding or rolling, also measurements by AFM (atomic force microscope) were conducted for different carrier particle surface structures. The contact properties, such as van der Waals force, friction coefficient and adhesion surface energy were used to determine, from a force or moment balance (fluid forces versus contact forces), the detachment probability by the three mechanisms as a function of carrier particle Reynolds number. These results will be used for deriving the drug powder detachment model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) with 133Xe inhalation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusunoki, Tadaki; Masumura, Michio; Tamaki, Norihiko; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Yamashita, Hideyuki.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of CO 2 inhalation on the cerebral blood flow (CBF) were examined with 133 Xe inhalation method (Novo Inhalation Cerebrograph) on 9 normal peoples and 20 patients. Nine normal peoples were divided into 3 groups consisting of each 3 peoples, namely young age group, middle age group, and old age group. Each increased CBF (%) by CO 2 inhalation was 40 -- 44 in young age group, 36 -- 37 in middle age group, and 35 -- 36 in old age group in the blood flow of the first compartment (F 1 ), and 27 -- 28 in young age group, 30 -- 31 in middle age group and 23 -- 24 in old age group in the initial slope index (ISI). Each CO 2 reactivity factor (RF) was 5.5 -- 5.8 in young age group, 3.8 -- 4.0 in middle age group and 3.3 in old age group in F 1 , and 3.1 -- 3.2 in young age group, 2.0 -- 3.3 in middle age group, and 1.2 -- 1.3 in old age group in ISI. Twenty patients consisted of 15 patients of occlusive cerebrovascular disease, 2 patients of head injury, 2 patients of normal pressure hydrocephalus and one patient of subarachnoid hemorrhage. RF was abnormally lower than normal value in 5 patients in F 1 , but in 7 in ISI. Clinical benefits of CBF study during CO 2 inhalation with 133 Xe inhalation method were discussed. (author)

  10. Accidental Cutaneous Burns Secondary to Salbutamol Metered Dose Inhaler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Kale

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of accidental cutaneous burns caused by salbutamol metered dose inhaler. A 9-year-old boy underwent dental extraction at a children's hospital and was incidentally noted to have burn injuries on dorsum of both hands. On questioning, the boy revealed that a few days ago his 14-year-old brother, who is an asthmatic, playfully sprayed his salbutamol metered dose inhaler on the back of both his hands with the inhaler's mouth piece being in direct contact with the patient's skin. On examination, there was a rectangular area of erythema with superficial peeling on the dorsum of both hands, the dimensions of which exactly matched those of the inhaler's mouthpiece. It is possible that the injury could have been a chemical burn from the pharmaceutical/preservative/propellant aerosol or due to the physical effect of severe cooling of the skin or mechanical abrasive effect of the aerosol blasts or a combination of some or all the above mechanisms. This case highlights the importance of informing children and parents of the potentially hazardous consequences of misusing a metered dose inhaler.

  11. Cow Dung Ingestion and Inhalation Dependence: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairkar, Praveen; Tiple, Prashant; Bang, Govind

    2009-01-01

    Although abuse of several unusual inhalants had been documented, addiction to cow dung fumes or their ashes has not been reported in medical literature as yet. We are reporting a case of cow dung dependence in ingestion and inhalational form.

  12. Detection of butane gas inhalation at 16days after hypoxic encephalopathy: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takako; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Kento; Katagi, Munehiro; Miki, Akihiro; Saito, Takashi; Abe, Shuntaro; Nomura, Masakatsu; Kitagawa, Misa; Tsuchihashi, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Koichi

    2017-11-01

    In Japan, there are increasing reports of death by poisoning following butane abuse. To determine the specific cause of death in such cases, it is important to confirm the presence of fuel gas components in the body, although careful analysis is required because of their volatile properties. In most reported cases, the subject died suddenly during or immediately after butane aspiration. Thus, the butane concentration in the samples from the deceased should be relatively high. Herein, we present a case of an 18-year-old man found with cardiopulmonary arrest, who then exhibited hypoxic encephalopathy for 16days in a hospital. At autopsy, we detected hypoxic encephalopathy, pneumonia, and ischemia-reperfusion injury of the myocardium, while the cause of cardiac arrest remained unclear. Toxicological analysis was then performed for fuel gas components in several specimens collected at autopsy. Results showed that n-butane and isobutane were detected in the adipose tissue at 16days after inhalation, indicating a role of butane gas inhalation as the cause of death. These data suggest that adipose tissue may be the most appropriate analysis sample to be collected at postmortem in cases where involvement of volatile and fat-soluble gas inhalation is suspected. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The preparation and certification of a South African phosphate concentrate for use as a reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the preparation, analysis, and certification of South African Reference Material (SARM) 32. The material is a phosphate concentrate from the Phalaborwa deposit, and was supplied by the Phosphate Development Corporation Ltd (Foskor). Eighteen laboratories in eight countries used a variety of analytical techniques to provide the analytical results

  14. Self-reported osteoporosis prevention in inhaled corticosteroid users in community pharmacy setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Chan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The use of inhaled corticosteroids is the standard maintenance therapy in asthma therapy and as adjunct therapy in moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A dose-related increase in fracture risk is associated with inhaled corticosteroid use; there is an inverse relationship between bone mineral density and duration and cumulative dose of inhaled corticosteroid. Adequate intake of calcium and vitamin D are cornerstones of osteoporosis prevention. The objectives are to assess whether the proportion of patients receiving inhaled corticosteroids are taking calcium and vitamin D; the association between long-term inhaled corticosteroid use and abnormal bone mineral density or fractures; and how many qualified patients received bone mineral density scans. Methods: Patients who filled a prescription for inhaled corticosteroids at selected community pharmacies across Alberta were recruited for a survey of their osteoporosis prevention activities. Results: A total of 256 patients from 12 community pharmacies were included. The average age was 60 ± 17.4 years with 65% female. There were 21%, 51%, and 28% of patients on high, medium, and low dose inhaled corticosteroids, respectively. Only 17% of patients >50 years old received recommended calcium and vitamin D supplementation and 87 (73% of the qualified patients received bone mineral density scan. Conclusion: Osteoporosis prevention in inhaled corticosteroid users is currently poorly addressed. More promotion is needed to raise pharmacist awareness of the risks of inhaled corticosteroids.

  15. Cancer hazard from inhaled plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gofman, J.W.

    1975-01-01

    The best estimate of the lung cancer potential in humans for inhaled insoluble compounds of plutonium (such as PuO 2 particles) has been grossly underestimated by such authoritative bodies as the International Commission on Radiological Protection and the British Medical Research Council. Calculations are presented of lung cancer induction by 239 Pu as insoluble particles and for deposited reactor-grade Pu. The reason for the gross underestimate of the carcinogenic effects of Pu by ICRP or the British Medical Research Council (BMRC) is their use of a totally unrealistic idealized model for the clearance of deposited Pu from the lungs and bronchi plus their non-recognition of the bronchi as the true site for most human lung cancers. The erroneous model used by such organizations also fails totally to take into account the effect of cigarette-smoking upon the physiological function of human lungs. Plutonium nuclides, such as 239 Pu, or other alpha particle-emitting nuclides, in an insoluble form represent an inhalation cancer hazard in a class some 100,000 times more potent than the potent chemical carcinogens, weight for weight. The already-existing lung cancer data for beagle dogs inhaling insoluble PuO 2 particles is clearly in order of magnitude agreement with calculations for humans

  16. Pulmonary retention and tissue distribution of 239Pu nitrate in F344 rats and syrian hamsters inhaling carbon tetrachloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, J.M.; Barr, E.B.; Lundgren, D.L.; Nikula, K.J.

    1994-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ) has been used extensively in the nuclear weapons industry, so it is possible that nuclear plant workers have been exposed to CCl 4 and plutonium compounds. Potential for future exposure exists during open-quotes cleanupclose quotes operations at weapon production sites such as the Hanford, Washington, and Rocky Flats, Colorado, facilities. The current Threshold Limit Value for CCl 4 is 5 ppm; however, concentrations of CCl 4 occurring in the nuclear weapons facilities over the past 40-50 y are unknown and may have exceeded this value. The pilot study described in this report is designed to determine whether subchronic inhalation of CCl 4 by CDF register (F-344)/CrlBR rats and Syrian golden hamsters, at concentrations expected to produce some histologic changes in liver, alters the hepatic retention and toxic effects of inhaled 239 Pu nitrate 239 Pu(NO 3 ) 4

  17. Identification of inhaler technique errors with a routine procedure in Portuguese community pharmacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castel-Branco MM

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: A correct selection of drugs prescribed, but also the choice of the appropriate inhaler device, is crucial for the control of respiratory diseases. Objective: To evaluate the inhaler technique and identify potential errors of patients when treated with inhalers by testing a routinary procedure to be implemented in any community pharmacy. Methods: Adults with asthma/COPD and under inhalation therapy were invited to demonstrate how they use their inhalers. After direct observation it was registered whether all the sequential steps included in the summary of product characteristics (SmPC were performed. Results: The study involved 67 patients from 4 community pharmacies (Portugal central region: 34 (50.7% males, 65.4 (SD=18.28 years old, 42 (62.7% with COPD, and 23 (34.3% using more than one inhaler. The 67 patients used 95 inhalers, comprising: 57 (60.0% multiple dose DPI (dry powder inhalers, 18 (18.9% single dose DPI, 16 (16.8% pMDI (pressurized metered dose inhalers, 2 (2.1% pMDI+spacer and 2 (2.1% SMI (soft mist inhalers. No errors were made only by 9 (13.4% patients. In the 75 DPIs techniques, the most frequent errors were ‘no previous forced expiration’ (46=61.3% and ‘no 10s apnea after inhalation’ (51=68.0%; in the 16 pMDIs techniques common errors were ‘lack of hand-lung coordination’ (7=43.8 %, ‘no previous forced exhalation’ (8=50.0% and ‘no apnea after inhalation’ (10=62.5%. After inhaling from 56 devices containing corticosteroids, 34 (60.7% of the patients did not wash their mouth. Conclusion: The study demonstrated the possibility of performing this procedure routinely in Portuguese community pharmacies and also its utility, since 58 (87% of patients had at least one error during the inhalers use.

  18. Cerebral blood flow measurement using stable xenon CT with very short inhalation times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touho, Hajime; Karasawa, Jun; Shishido, Hisashi; Yamada, Keisuke; Shibamoto, Keiji [Osaka Neurological Inst., Toyonaka (Japan)

    1991-02-01

    A noninvasive, simplified method using inhalation of stable xenon (Xe{sup s}) and computed tomographic (CT) scanning to estimate regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and regional partition coefficient (r{lambda}) is described. Twenty-four patients with cerebrovascular occlusive disease and six volunteer controls inhaled 30% Xe{sup s} and 70% oxygen for 180 seconds and exhaled for 144 seconds during serial CT scanning without denitrogenation. The end-tidal Xe{sup s} concentration was continuously monitored with a thermoconductivity analyzer to determine the build-up range (A value) and build-up rate constant (K value) for arteries with the curve fitting method. The time-CT number (Hounsfield unit) curve for cerebral tissue during the Xe{sup s} washin and washout phases was used to calculate r{lambda} and rCBF using least squares curve fitting analysis. The resultant r{lambda} and rCBF map demonstrated a reliable distribution between the gray and white matter, and infarcted areas. rCBF was high in gray matter, low in white matter, and much lower in infarcted areas than in white matter. r{lambda} was high in white matter, low in gray matter, and much lower in infarcted areas. Xe{sup s} CT-CBF studies with very short inhalation of 180 seconds is a clinically useful method for evaluation of rCBF in patients with cerebrovascular diseases. (author).

  19. Prediction of acute inhalation toxicity using in vitro lung surfactant inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørli, Jorid B; Huang, Yishi; Da Silva, Emilie; Hansen, Jitka S; Zuo, Yi Y; Frederiksen, Marie; Nørgaard, Asger W; Ebbehøj, Niels E; Larsen, Søren T; Hougaard, Karin S

    2018-01-01

    Private consumers and professionals may experience acute inhalation toxicity after inhaling aerosolized impregnation products. The distinction between toxic and non-toxic products is difficult to make for producers and product users alike, as there is no clearly described relationship between the chemical composition of the products and induction of toxicity. The currently accepted method for determination of acute inhalation toxicity is based on experiments on animals; it is time-consuming, expensive and causes stress for the animals. Impregnation products are present on the market in large numbers and amounts and exhibit great variety. Therefore, an alternative method to screen for acute inhalation toxicity is needed. The aim of our study was to determine if inhibition of lung surfactant by impregnation products in vitro could accurately predict toxicity in vivo in mice. We tested 21 impregnation products using the constant flow through set-up of the constrained drop surfactometer to determine if the products inhibited surfactant function or not. The same products were tested in a mouse inhalation bioassay to determine their toxicity in vivo. The sensitivity was 100%, i.e., the in vitro method predicted all the products that were toxic for mice to inhale. The specificity of the in vitro test was 63%, i.e., the in vitro method found three false positives in the 21 tested products. Six of the products had been involved in accidental human inhalation where they caused acute inhalation toxicity. All of these six products inhibited lung surfactant function in vitro and were toxic to mice.

  20. [Inhaled treatments in cystic fibrosis: what's new in 2013?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubus, J-C; Bassinet, L; Chedevergne, F; Delaisi, B; Desmazes-Dufeu, N; Reychler, G; Vecellio, L

    2014-04-01

    In the past few years some new inhaled drugs and inhalation devices have been proposed for the treatment of cystic fibrosis. Breath-controlled nebulizers allow increased pulmonary deposition, with a lower variability and a shorter delivery time. The new dry powder formulations of tobramycin, colistine and mannitol require a change in the inhalation technique which must be slow and deep. In the field of the inhaled mucolytic drugs, hypertonic saline and mannitol have an indication in some patients. With regard to antibiotics, dry-powder tobramycin and colistine can be substituted for the same drug delivered by nebulization. Nebulized aztreonam needs more studies to determine its place. These new treatments represent a definite advance for cystic fibrosis patients and need to be known by all practitioners. Their position in our therapeutic arsenal remains to be accurately defined. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. IFCC reference measurement procedure for substance concentration determination of total carbon dioxide in blood, plasma or serum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burnett, RW; Covington, AK; Fogh-Andersen, N; Kulpmann, WR; Lewenstam, A; Mas, AHJ; VanKessel, AL; Zijlstra, WG

    A reference measurement procedure for substance concentration determination of total CO, in blood, plasma (the anticoagulant is usually heparin) or serum is described. The document covers the principle of the method, the materials and equipment needed and essential aspects of the procedure. The

  2. Inhalation of nanoplatelets - Theoretical deposition simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Robert

    2017-12-01

    Primary objective of the contribution was the theoretical prediction of nanoplatelet deposition in the human respiratory tract. Modeling was founded on the hypothetical inhalation of graphene nanoplatelets (GNP) measuring 0.01 and 0.1μm in thickness and adopting a projected area diameter of 1-30μm. Particle uptake was assumed to take place with inhalation flow rates of 250, 500, 750, and 1000cm 3 s -1 , respectively. For an appropriate description of pulmonary particle behavior, transport of GNP in a stochastic lung structure and deposition formulae based on analytical and numerical studies were presupposed. The results obtained from the theoretical approach clearly demonstrate that GNP with a thickness of 0.01μm deposit in the respiratory tract by 20-50%, whereas GNP with a thickness of 0.1μm exhibit a deposition of 20-90%. Larger platelets deposit with higher probability than small ones. Increase of inhalation flow rate is accompanied by decreased deposition in the case of thin GNP, whilst thicker GNP are preferably accumulated in the extrathoracic region. Generation-specific deposition ranges from 0.05 to 7% (0.01μm) and from 0.05 to 9%, with maximum values being obtained in airway generation 20. In proximal airway generations (0-10), deposition is increased with inhalation flow rate, whereas in intermediate to distal generations a reverse effect may be observed. Health consequences of GNP deposition in different lung compartments are subjected to an intense debate. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  3. A study of the comparison between human and animal excretion data following inhalation exposure to plutonium 238 oxide aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, W.D.; Martinez, G.; Gautier, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Bioassay urine samples obtained since 1971 from eight Los Alamos employees, accidentally exposed by inhalation to high-fired plutonium-238 oxide aerosols, were studied and compared with excretion data obtained from Beagle dogs exposed to /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ aerosols. The early period Pu human excretion data from the inhalation exposure were unexpected and were unlike previously studied occupational exposure urinary data obtained at Los Alamos. The initial urine samples collected on day one were below the detection limits of the analytical method (0.01 pCi). Within thirty days, however, detectible concentrations of Pu were measured in the urine for several of the exposed personnel. The amounts of Pu excreted continued to increase in each of the cases throughout the first year and the individual patterns of Pu excretion were similar. The human urinary excretion data was compared with similar excretion data obtained from an animal study conducted by the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (Me81). In the animal study, Beagle dogs received inhalation exposure to one of three sizes of monodisperse of polydisperse aerosol of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/. Periodic sacrifice of pairs of dogs during the 4 years after the inhalation exposure provided data on the retention, translocation and mode of excretion of /sup 238/Pu. The comparison of human and animal /sup 238/Pu excretion data supported the observation that the excretion data were similar between the two species and that the animal excretion models can be applied to predict the human /sup 238/Pu excretion following inhalation exposure to high-fired oxides of /sup 238/Pu

  4. Experiment of aerosol-release time for a novel automatic metered dose inhaler

    OpenAIRE

    Mingrong Zhang; Songhao Wang; Yu-Ching Yang

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the aerosol-release time in the development of a new automatic adapter for metered dose inhaler. With this device, regular manually operated metered dose inhalers become automatic. During the study, an inhalation simulator was designed and tested with the newly developed mechatronic system. By adjusting the volume and the pressure of the vacuum tank, most human inhalation waveforms were able to simulate. As an example, regular quick-deep and slow-de...

  5. Field comparison of three inhalable samplers (IOM, PGP-GSP 3.5 and Button) for welding fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugasti, Agurtzane; Montes, Natividad; Rojo, José M; Quintana, M José

    2012-02-01

    Inhalable sampler efficiency depends on the aerodynamic size of the airborne particles to be sampled and the wind speed. The aim of this study was to compare the behaviour of three personal inhalable samplers for welding fumes generated by Manual Metal Arc (MMA) and Metal Active Gas (MAG) processes. The selected samplers were the ones available in Spain when the study began: IOM, PGP-GSP 3.5 (GSP) and Button. Sampling was carried out in a welding training center that provided a homogeneous workplace environment. The static sampling assembly used allowed the placement of 12 samplers and 2 cascade impactors simultaneously. 183 samples were collected throughout 2009 and 2010. The range of welding fumes' mass concentrations was from 2 mg m(-3) to 5 mg m(-3). The pooled variation coefficients for the three inhalable samplers were less than or equal to 3.0%. Welding particle size distribution was characterized by a bimodal log-normal distribution, with MMADs of 0.7 μm and 8.2 μm. For these welding aerosols, the Button and the GSP samplers showed a similar performance (P = 0.598). The mean mass concentration ratio was 1.00 ± 0.01. The IOM sampler showed a different performance (P IOM and 0.92 ± 0.02 for GSP/IOM. This information is useful to consider the measurements accomplished by the IOM, GSP or Button samplers together, in order to assess the exposure at workplaces over time or to study exposure levels in a specific industrial activity, as welding operations.

  6. An In Vitro Aerosolization Efficiency Comparison of Generic and Branded Salbutamol Metered Dose Inhalers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Rahimkhani, Saeed Ghanbarzadeh, Ali Nokhodchi, Hamed Hamishehkar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to the high rate of pulmonary diseases, respiratory drug delivery systems have been attracted excessive attention for the past decades. Because of limitations and growing drug bill, physicians are encouraged to prescribe generically whenever possible. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether there was any significant difference in aerosolization performance between a reference brand Salbutamol (A Metered Dose Inhalers (MDIs and two generic products (B and C. Methods: The aerosolization performance of MDIs was evaluated by calculating aerosolization indexes including fine particle fraction (FPF, fine particle dose (FPD, geometric standard deviation (GSD and mass median aerodynamic diameters (MMAD by using the next generation impactor. Results: Although aerosolization indexes of MDI A were superior than the Iranian brands, but the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion: These results verified that generic MDIs deliver similar quantities of Salbutamol to the reference brand and aerosolization performance parameters of generic Salbutamol MDIs did not differ significantly from the reference brand.

  7. Steam inhalation therapy: severe scalds as an adverse side effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baartmans, Martin; Kerkhof, Evelien; Vloemans, Jos; Dokter, Jan; Nijman, Susanne; Tibboel, Dick; Nieuwenhuis, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Background Steam inhalation therapy is often recommended in the treatment of a common cold. However, it has no proven benefit and may in fact have serious adverse side effects in terms of burn injuries. Aim To quantify the human and economic costs of steam inhalation therapy in terms of burn injury. Design and setting A prospective database study of all patients admitted to the burn centres (Beverwijk, Groningen, Rotterdam) and the hospital emergency departments in the Netherlands. Method Number and extent of burn injuries as a result of steam inhalation therapy were analysed, as well as an approximation made of the direct costs for their medical treatment. Results Annually, on average three people are admitted to in one of the Dutch burn centres for burns resulting from steam inhalation therapy. Most victims were children, and they needed skin grafting more often than adults. The total direct medical costs for burn centre and emergency department treatment were €115 500 (£93 000), emotional costs are not reflected. Conclusion As steam inhalation therapy has no proven benefit and the number and extent of complications of this therapy in terms of burn injury are significant, especially in children, steam inhalation therapy should be considered a dangerous procedure and not recommended anymore in professional guidelines and patient brochures. PMID:22781995

  8. Influence of treatment with inhalable heroin on pulmonary function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buster, M. C. A.; van den Brink, W.; van Brussel, G. H. A.; van Ree, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to asses the influence of inhalable heroin on pulmonary function in chronic heroin-dependent patients treated with inhalable heroin. Among 32 patients (all cigarette smokers), a spirometric test was conducted at baseline and after an average period of 10 months of treatment with

  9. Real-time monitoring of methanol concentration using a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor for direct methanol fuel cell without reference liquid measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Kyosuke; Nozawa, Takuya; Kondoh, Jun

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing demand for sensors that continuously measure liquid concentrations and detect abnormalities in liquid environments. In this study, a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) sensor is applied for the continuous monitoring of liquid concentrations. As the SH-SAW sensor functions using the relative measurement method, it normally needs a reference at each measurement. However, if the sensor is installed in a liquid flow cell, it is difficult to measure a reference liquid. Therefore, it is important to establish an estimation method for liquid concentrations using the SH-SAW sensor without requiring a reference measurement. In this study, the SH-SAW sensor is installed in a direct methanol fuel cell to monitor the methanol concentration. The estimated concentration is compared with a conventional density meter. Moreover, the effect of formic acid is examined. When the fuel temperature is higher than 70 °C, it is necessary to consider the influence of liquid conductivity. Here, an estimation method for these cases is also proposed.

  10. A review of the value of innovation in inhalers for COPD and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virchow, Johann Christian; Akdis, Cezmi A; Darba, Josep; Dekhuijzen, Richard; Hartl, Sylvia; Kobelt, Gisela; Roger, Albert; Simoens, Steven; Toumi, Mondher; Woodhouse, Ben; Plich, Adam; Torvinen, Saku

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate use of inhaled therapies for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is critical to ensuring good patient outcomes, efficient use of healthcare resources and limiting the effects of high-morbidity. The appropriate choice of inhaler and active therapy, incorporating patient preferences, can help improve treatment adherence and long-term outcomes. Despite this, many current inhalers are non-intuitive to use, and require extensive training. In this review, an expert panel considers the evidence for the use of inhaler devices in management of COPD and asthma. The panel also evaluates the value of innovation in inhaler technologies, which optimise the use of existing molecules from a clinical, economic and societal perspective. The panel conclusion is that there remains a substantial unmet need in inhaler technology and that innovation in inhaler devices can provide real-world health benefits to patients. Furthermore, we recommend that these innovations should be supported by healthcare systems through appropriate pricing and reimbursement mechanisms.

  11. Hemoglobin concentrations in 358 apparently healthy 80-year-old Danish men and women. Should the reference interval be adjusted for age?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, N.; Pedersen, Agnes Nadelmann; Ovesen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Background and aims: In elderly Danes, reference intervals for hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations are derived from younger population groups. The aim was to examine reference intervals for Hb and cut-off limits for anemia by application of criteria for normality to a representative population of 80...

  12. Biological effects of nano-nickel in rat lungs after administration by inhalation and by intratracheal instillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogami, A; Morimoto, Y; Murakami, M; Myojo, T; Oyabu, T; Tanaka, I

    2009-01-01

    We examined the biological effects of the nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles by inhalation and instillation study. Wistar male rats were exposed to NiO nanoparticles (nNiOs) for 4 weeks (6 hrs/day). The nNiOs was black-colored NiO (99.8%) and average particle size (APS) was 20 nm. The geometric mean diameter of the particles in the chamber and the daily average exposure concentration were 139 ± 12 nm and 1.0 ± 0.5 x 105 particles/cc, respectively. The deposited amount of nNiOs in the rat lungs at 4 days after the inhalation exposure ended was 29 ± 4 μg. Although nNiOs exposure group showed temporal significant increase in the number of total cells in brochoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) at 4 days after the exposure end, the difference were not seen at one month after an exposure end compared with control group. The histopathological change was not severe just after the inhalation nor throughout the observation time. Elemental mappings of nickel showed that nickel particles were located in agglomeration at the pulmonary macrophages.

  13. Safety of an alkalinizing buffer designed for inhaled medications in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Michael D; Walsh, Brian K; Dwyer, Scott T; Combs, Casey; Vehse, Nico; Paget-Brown, Alix; Pajewski, Thomas; Hunt, John F

    2013-07-01

    Airway acidification plays a role in disorders of the pulmonary tract. We hypothesized that the inhalation of alkalinized glycine buffer would measurably alkalinize the airways without compromising lung function or causing adverse events. We evaluated the safety of an inhaled alkaline glycine buffer in both healthy subjects and in subjects with stable obstructive airway disease. This work includes 2 open-label safety studies. The healthy controls were part of a phase 1 safety study of multiple inhalations of low-dose alkaline glycine buffer; nebulized saline was used as a comparator in 8 of the healthy controls. Subsequently, a phase 2 study in subjects with stable obstructive airway disease was completed using a single nebulized higher-dose strategy of the alkaline inhalation. We studied 20 non-smoking adults (10 healthy controls and 10 subjects with obstructive airway disease), both at baseline and after inhalation of alkaline buffer. We used spirometry and vital signs as markers of clinical safety. We used changes in fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (NO) and exhaled breath condensate (EBC) pH as surrogate markers of airway pH modification. Alkaline glycine inhalation was tolerated by all subjects in both studies, with no adverse effects on spirometric parameters or vital signs. Airway alkalinization was confirmed by a median increase in EBC pH of 0.235 pH units (IQR 0.56-0.03, P = .03) in subjects after inhalation of the higher-dose alkaline buffer (2.5 mL of 100 mmol/L glycine). Alkalinization of airway lining fluid is accomplished with inhalation of alkaline glycine buffer and causes no adverse effects on pulmonary function or vital signs.

  14. Preparation and Evaluation of Surface Modified Lactose Particles for Improved Performance of Fluticasone Propionate Dry Powder Inhaler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Deepak J; Jain, Rajesh R; Soni, P S; Abdul, Samad; Darshana, Hegde; Gaikwad, Rajiv V; Menon, Mala D

    2015-08-01

    Dry powder inhalers (DPI) are generally formulated by mixing micronized drug particles with coarse lactose carrier particles to assist powder handling during the manufacturing and powder aerosol delivery during patient use. In the present study, surface modified lactose (SML) particles were produced using force control agents, and their in vitro performance on dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulation of Fluticasone propionate was studied. With a view to reduce surface passivation of high surface free energy sites on the most commonly used DPI carrier, α- lactose monohydrate, effects of various force control agents such as Pluronic F-68, Cremophor RH 40, glyceryl monostearate, polyethylene glycol 6000, magnesium stearate, and soya lecithin were studied. DPI formulations prepared with SML showed improved flow properties, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies revealed decrease in surface roughness. The DSC and X-ray diffraction patterns of SML showed no change in the crystal structure and thermal behavior under the experimental conditions. The fine particle fraction (FPF) values of lactose modified with Pluronic F-68, Cremophor RH 40, glyceryl monostearate were improved, with increase in concentration up to 0.5%. Soya lecithin and PEG 6000 modified lactose showed decrease in FPF value with increase in concentration. Increase in FPF value was observed with increasing concentration of magnesium stearate. Two different DPI devices, Rotahaler(®) and Diskhaler(®), were compared to evaluate the performance of SML formulations. FPF value of all SML formulations were higher using both devices as compared to the same formulations prepared using untreated lactose. One month stability of SML formulations at 40°C/75% RH, in permeable polystyrene tubes did not reveal any significant changes in FPF values. SML particles can help in reducing product development hindrances and improve inhalational properties of DPI.

  15. Determination of natural occurring radionuclides concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stajic, J.; Markovic, V.; Krstic, D.; Nikezic, D.

    2011-01-01

    Tobacco smoke contains certain concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides from radioactive chains of uranium and thorium - 214 Pb, 214 Bi, 228 Ac, 208 Tl, 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K. Inhaling of tobacco smoke leads to internal exposure of man. In order to estimate absorbed dose of irradiation it is necessary to determine concentrations of radionuclides present in the tobacco leaves. In this paper specific activities of naturally occurring radionuclides were measured in tobacco samples from cigarettes which are used in Serbia. [sr

  16. Effects of Post-Treatment Hydrogen Gas Inhalation on Uveitis Induced by Endotoxin in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Weiming; Chen, Tao; Long, Pan; Zhang, Zhe; Liu, Qian; Wang, Xiaocheng; An, Jing; Zhang, Zuoming

    2018-06-07

    BACKGROUND Molecular hydrogen (H2) has been widely reported to have benefiicial effects in diverse animal models and human disease through reduction of oxidative stress and inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether hydrogen gas could ameliorate endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) in rats. MATERIAL AND METHODS Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into a normal group, a model group, a nitrogen-oxygen (N-O) group, and a hydrogen-oxygen (H-O) group. EIU was induced in rats of the latter 3 groups by injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). After that, rats in the N-O group inhaled a gas mixture of 67% N2 and 33% O2, while those in the H-O group inhaled a gas mixture of 67% H2 and 33% O2. All rats were graded according to the signs of uveitis after electroretinography (ERG) examination. Protein concentration in the aqueous humor (AqH) was measured. Furthermore, hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunostaining of anti-ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1) in the iris and ciliary body (ICB) were carried out. RESULTS No statistically significant differences existed in the graded score of uveitis and the b-wave peak time in the Dark-adapted 3.0 ERG among the model, N-O, and H-O groups (P>0.05), while rats of the H-O group showed a lower concentration of AqH protein than that of the model or N-O group (P0.05), while the activation of microglia cells in the H-O group was somewhat reduced (Ptreatment hydrogen gas inhalation did not ameliorate the clinical signs, or reduce the infiltrating cells of EIU. However, it inhibited the elevation of protein in the AqH and reduced the microglia activation.

  17. Effect of 144Ce inhaled in fused-clay particles on the tracheobronchial lymph nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, F.F.; Boecker, B.B.; Hobbs, C.H.; Jones, R.K.; Muggenburg, B.A.

    1976-01-01

    Tracheobronchial lymph node changes and lymphopenia are sequelae of inhalation of relatively insoluble radioactive aerosols by beagle dogs. The tracheobronchial lymph nodes from dogs that inhaled 144 Ce in fused-clay particles were examined at intervals from 2 to 730 days after exposure to assess the development of these lesions. Initial lung burdens in the dogs studied ranged from 33 to 63 μCi/kg of body weight. The concentration of radioisotope in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes increased during the first year after exposure and exceeded that in the lung about 100 days after exposure. Autoradiographs of the lymph nodes showed that 144 Ce particles were present in macrophages in the paracortical zone two days after exposure and that concentrations continued to increase in the paracortical zone and medullary cords. Histologic changes in the nodes included atrophy of the germinal centers and lymphocytic follicles, loss of lymphocytes and accumulation of macrophages in the paracortical zone, accumulation of pigment and isotope-laden macrophages in the medullary cords, occasional infiltrates of neutrophils in the medullary cords, and at later time periods focal fibrosis of the medullary cords. Tracheobronchial lymph node weights of the dogs exposed to 144 Ce in fused clay were not decreased until 512 days after exposure. These findings indicate that tracheobronchial lymph nodes accumulate relatively high burdens of 144 Ce after 144 Ce is inhaled in a relatively insoluble form and that the pathologic changes resulting from these burdens are basically atrophy of the nodes. Primary neoplasms in lymph nodes were not observed in dogs with initial lung burdens of 0.0024 to more than 30 μCi/kg of body weight followed for up to 2000 days after exposure. At the higher levels, however, a high incidence of primary pulmonary neoplasia was observed

  18. Formulation and Development of Metered Dose Inhalations of Salbutamol in Solution Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khale, Anubha; Bajaj, Amrita

    2011-01-01

    In the present study attempts were made to prepare metered dose inhalation of salbutamol in solution form and compared it with the marketed metered dose inhalation in suspension form. Solution form of the drug was found better than marketed suspension formulation with respect to homogeneity and content uniformity. Propellant blend P-11 and P-12 in the proportion 30:70 was selected as it gave optimum vapour pressure. Surfactant oleic acid in concentration 10 mg per can was selected as it gave best results with clarity, spray pattern, vapour pressure, content per spray and rate of evaporation. Ethyl alcohol 2 ml per can was used as a cosolvent to give a clear solution, optimum vapour pressure, maximum content per spray and fair rate of evaporation. The selected formulation was subjected to the physico-chemical evaluation tests as per the standard pharmacopoeial procedures and the characteristics of the formulations were further compared with a conventional marketed formulation. In vitro study reveled the net respirable fraction was better than marketed preparation. PMID:22923867

  19. Effects and Mechanism of SO2 Inhalation on Rat Myocardial Collagen Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ping; Qiao, Decai; Liu, Xiaoli

    2018-03-21

    BACKGROUND This study investigates the effects and mechanism of sulfur dioxide (SO2) inhalation and exercise on rat myocardial collagen fiber. MATERIAL AND METHODS The rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: a control group (RG), an exercise group (EG), an SO2 pollution group (SRG), and an SO2 pollution and exercise group (SEG). Body weight, cardiac index, and left ventricular index in each group were compared. The myocardial hydroxyproline (Hyp) concentration was determined by pepsin acid hydrolysis. The interstitial myocardial collagen expression was measured by Sirius Red F3B in saturated carbazotic acid. The local myocardial angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression was tested by immunohistochemistry SABC method. RESULTS Compared with RG, the weight growth rate of EG, SRG, and SEG decreased significantly (PSO2 inhalation and exercise will not only offset beneficial health effects of movement on the cardiovascular system, but also produce more unfavorable influences. People should pay attention to their environment when exercising, and try to avoid exercising in environments with SO2 pollution.

  20. [INHALED ANTIBIOTICS IN TREATMENT OF NOSOCOMIAL PNEUMONIA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzovlev, A N; Moroz, V V; Golubev, A M

    2015-01-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia is the most common infection in intensive care units. Currently the problem of resistance of noso-comial pathogens to miost of antibiotics is crucial. Using of inhaled antibiotics in combination with intravenous drugs is eff ective and safe method for treatment of nosocomial pneumonia. The literature review describes current opportunities of ihhaled antibiotic therapy of nosocomial pneumonia, descriptions of drugs, the advantages and disadvantages of this treatment. Special attention is paid for using inhaled aminoglycosides for nosocomial pneumonia.

  1. From dust to dose: Effects of forest disturbance on increased inhalation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whicker, Jeffrey J.; Pinder, John E.; Breshears, David D.; Eberhart, Craig F.

    2006-01-01

    Ecosystem disturbances that remove vegetation and disturb surface soils are major causes of excessive soil erosion and can result in accelerated transport of soils contaminated with hazardous materials. Accelerated wind erosion in disturbed lands that are contaminated is of particular concern because of potential increased inhalation exposure, yet measurements regarding these relationships are lacking. The importance of this was highlighted when, in May of 2000, the Cerro Grande fire burned over roughly 30% of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), mostly in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forest, and through areas with soils containing contaminants, particularly excess depleted and natural uranium. Additionally, post-fire thinning was performed in burned and unburned forests on about 25% of LANL land. The first goal of this study was to assess the potential for increased inhalation dose from uranium contaminated soils via wind-driven resuspension of soil following the Cerro Grande Fire and subsequent forest thinning. This was done through analysis of post-disturbance measurements of uranium air concentrations and their relationships with wind velocity and seasonal vegetation cover. We found a 14% average increase in uranium air concentrations at LANL perimeter locations after the fire, and the greatest air concentrations occurred during the months of April-June when wind velocities are highest, no snow cover, and low vegetation cover. The second goal was to develop a methodology to assess the relative contribution of each disturbance type towards increasing public and worker exposure to these resuspended soils. Measurements of wind-driven dust flux in severely burned, moderately burned, thinned, and unburned/unthinned forest areas were used to assess horizontal dust flux (HDF) in these areas. Using empirically derived relationships between measurements of HDF and respirible dust, coupled with onsite uranium soil concentrations, we estimate relative increases in

  2. PCDD, PCDF, and PCB contamination of air and inhalable particulate in Rome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turrio-Baldassarri, L.; Carere, A.; Di Domenico, A.; Fuselli, S.; Iacovella, N.; Rodriguez, F.

    1994-01-01

    The isomer specific determination of PCDD, PCDF and PCB was carried out on samples of air and inhalable particulate from Rome. Samples were taken daily for six months and pooled to yield two samples per month. Normal PCDD + PCDF concentrations expressed in TEQ ranged from 48 to 87 fg/m 3 , while total PCB ranged from 0.1 to 1.4 ng/m 3 . The 2, 3, 7, 8-substituted PCDD and PCDF congener pattern is shown together with the PCB congener pattern. (orig.)

  3. Inhalational and dermal exposures during spray application of biocides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger-Preiss, Edith; Boehncke, Andrea; Könnecker, Gustav; Mangelsdorf, Inge; Holthenrich, Dagmar; Koch, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Data on inhalational and potential dermal exposures during spray application of liquid biocidal products were generated. On the one hand, model experiments with different spraying devices using fluorescent tracers were carried out to investigate the influence of parameters relevant to the exposure (e.g. spraying equipment, nozzle size, direction of application). On the other hand, measurements were performed at selected workplaces (during disinfection operations in food and feed areas; pest control operations for private, public and veterinary hygiene; wood protection and antifouling applications) after application of biocidal products such as Empire 20, Responsar SC, Omexan-forte, Actellic, Perma-forte; Fendona SC, Pyrethrum mist; CBM 8, Aldekol Des 03, TAD CID, Basileum, Basilit. The measurements taken in the model rooms demonstrated dependence of the inhalation exposure on the type of spraying device used, in the following order: "spraying with low pressure" < "airless spraying" < "fogging" indicating that the particle diameter of the released spray droplets is the most important parameter. In addition inhalation exposure was lowest when the spraying direction was downward. Also for the potential dermal exposure, the spraying direction was of particular importance: overhead spraying caused the highest contamination of body surfaces. The data of inhalational and potential dermal exposures gained through workplace measurements showed considerable variation. During spraying procedures with low-pressure equipments, dose rates of active substances inhaled by the operators ranged from 7 to 230 microg active substance (a.s.)/h. An increase in inhaled dose rates (6-33 mg a.s./h) was observed after use of high application volumes/time unit during wood protection applications indoors. Spraying in the veterinary sector using medium-pressure sprayers led to inhaled dose rates between 2 and 24mga.s./h. The highest inhaled dose rates were measured during fogging (114 mg a

  4. Using 99mTc-DTPA radioaerosol inhalation lung scan as compared with computed tomography to detect lung injury in blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esme, H.; Kaya, E.; Solak, O.; Yavuz, Y.; Yurumez, Y.; Sezer, M.

    2007-01-01

    Detection of pulmonary contusion in patients with blunt chest trauma is very important so as to commence therapy immediately to avoid irreversible damage. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of technetium-99m diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid ( 99m Tc-DTPA) aerosol inhalation lung scintigraphy in comparison with chest computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of pulmonary contusion at acute blunt chest trauma. Twenty-nine patients with isolated blunt chest trauma were referred to the emergency department of our hospital, and nine healthy people participated in this study. Sixteen patients who had pulmonary contusion on CT scans were referred to as group 1, and 13 patients who had normal CT scans as group 2. Nine healthy people comprised a control group. 99m Tc-DTPA aerosol inhalation lung scintigraphy was performed on the first day in all patients. The mean half time (T 1/2 ) and penetration index values of 99m Tc-DTPA clearance were significantly lower in groups 1 and 2 compared with the control group. Among the three groups, there were no significant differences in arterial blood gas analysis except for PO 2 . The mean T 1/2 value of 99m Tc-DTPA clearance did correlate with PO 2 values but not with pH, PCO 2 , or HCO 3 values. 99m Tc-DTPA radioaerosol inhalation lung imaging may serve as a useful adjunct and supportive method to chest CT scanning for detecting mild pulmonary contusion. (author)

  5. Evaluation of Inhaler Techniques Among Asthma Patients Seen in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: An Adequate and an effective dose of inhalation drugs can be administered only if the correct inhaler‑specific technique is followed by asthma patients. There is paucity of data on this subject among Nigerians and Africans. Aims: This observational study was to assess the inhaler techniques among asthma ...

  6. Exhaled nitric oxide levels in asthma: Personal best versus reference values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew D; Cowan, Jan O; Taylor, D Robin

    2009-10-01

    Factors affecting the fraction of nitric oxide in exhaled air (FE(NO)) are multiple. Interpreting values when assessing airways disease may be problematic. Clinically optimum levels have not been defined. We aimed to establish the relationship between predicted values for FE(NO) obtained from equations by Olin et al, Travers et al, and Dressel et al, and normalized levels after oral prednisone. We also compared postprednisone FE(NO) levels with those obtained during optimized treatment with inhaled fluticasone. Data were obtained before and after a trial of oral prednisone (30mg/d for 14 days), and also from a previously published study in which patients had their dose of inhaled corticosteroid adjusted using either FE(NO) or symptoms/lung function to optimize treatment. Seventy-three patients completed the study. The geometric mean FE(NO) after prednisone (17.7 parts per billion [ppb]; 95% CI, 15.5-20.2) was significantly lower than mean FE(NO) at the optimized fluticasone dose (20.2 ppb; 95% CI, 17.1-23.8; P=.04) and at loss of control (27.6 ppb; 95% CI, 22.8-33.4; P values of Olin et al (16.8 ppb, 95% CI, 16.0-17.5; P=.44), but were significantly lower than values of Travers et al (predicted, 21.5 ppb; 95% CI, 20.9-22.2; P=.005) and Dressel et al (predicted, 27.8 ppb; 95% CI, 26.7-28.9; P values from the reference equation by Olin et al. However, at optimized doses of inhaled corticosteroid, although FE(NO) levels were higher than predicted, asthma was well controlled. Targeting FE(NO) on reference values is not justified.

  7. Lung clearance of inhaled particles after exposure to carbon black generated from a resuspension system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, P.S.; Gorski, R.A.; Hering, W.E.; Chan, T.L.

    1987-01-01

    A system to resuspend carbon black particles for providing submicron aerosols for inhalation exposure studies has been developed. The effect of continuous exposure to carbonaceous material (as a surrogate for the carbonaceous particles in diesel exhaust) on the pulmonary clearance of inhaled diesel tracer particles was studied in male Fischer 344 rats. Submicron carbon black particles with a mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of 0.22 micron and a size distribution similar to that of exhaust particles from a GM 5.7-liter diesel engine were successfully generated and administered to test animals at a nominal concentration of 6 mg/m3 for 20 hr/day, 7 days/week, for periods lasting 1 to 11 weeks. Immediately after the carbon black exposure, test animals were administered 14 C-tagged diesel particles for 45 min in a nose-only chamber. The pulmonary retention of inhaled radioactive tracer particles was determined at preselected time intervals. Based upon the data collected up to 1 year postexposure, prolonged exposure to carbon black particles exhibits a similar inhibitory effect on pulmonary clearance as does prolonged exposure to diesel exhaust with a comparable particulate dose. This observation indicates that the excessive accumulation of carbonaceous material may be the predominant factor affecting lung clearance

  8. Inhaled ammonium persulphate inhibits non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic relaxations in the guinea pig isolated trachea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellabianca, A; Faniglione, M; De Angelis, S; Colucci, M; Cervio, M; Balestra, B; Tonini, S; Candura, S M

    2010-01-01

    Persulphates can act both as irritants and sensitizers in inducing occupational asthma. A dysfunction of nervous control regulating the airway tone has been hypothesized as a mechanism underlying bronchoconstriction in asthma. It was the aim of this study to investigate whether inhaled ammonium persulphate affects the non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC) inhibitory innervation, the cholinergic nerve-mediated contraction or the muscular response to the spasmogens, carbachol or histamine, in the guinea pig epithelium-free, isolated trachea. Male guinea pigs inhaled aerosols containing ammonium persulphate (10 mg/m(3) for 30 min for 5 days during 3 weeks). Control animals inhaled saline aerosol. NANC relaxations to electrical field stimulation at 3 Hz were evaluated in whole tracheal segments as intraluminal pressure changes. Drugs inactivating peptide transmission, nitric oxide synthase, carbon monoxide production by haem oxygenase-2 and soluble guanylyl cyclase were used to assess the involvement of various inhibitory neurotransmitters. Carbachol and histamine cumulative concentration-response curves were obtained. In both groups, nitric oxide and carbon monoxide participated to the same extent as inhibitory neurotransmitters. In exposed animals, the tracheal NANC relaxations were reduced to 45.9 +/- 12.1% (p guinea pig airways. This may represent a novel mechanism contributing to persulphate-induced asthma. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute. Annual report, October 1, 1981-September 30, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snipes, M.B.; Marshall, T.C.; Martinez, B.S.

    1982-12-01

    Studies are presented of the effect on man of airborne particulates and gaseous emissions associated with the production of energy. Included in the report from the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute are papers on: (1) the physical and chemical characterization of energy technology aerosols; (2) laboratory studies of aerosol generation and characterization; (3) in vitro predictors of toxicity; (4) disposition and fate of inhaled materials; (5) dose-response relationships for inhaled radionuclides; (6) dose-response relationships for inhaled chemical toxicants; (7) biological factors which influence dose-response relationships; and (8) risk assessment

  10. Addition of inhaled long-acting beta2-agonists to inhaled steroids as first line therapy for persistent asthma in steroid-naive adults and children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Chroinin, Muireann

    2009-01-01

    Consensus statements recommend the addition of long-acting inhaled ss2-agonists (LABA) only in asthmatic patients who are inadequately controlled on inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). It is not uncommon for some patients to be commenced on ICS and LABA together as initial therapy.

  11. Uranium reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donivan, S.; Chessmore, R.

    1987-07-01

    The Technical Measurements Center has prepared uranium mill tailings reference materials for use by remedial action contractors and cognizant federal and state agencies. Four materials were prepared with varying concentrations of radionuclides, using three tailings materials and a river-bottom soil diluent. All materials were ground, dried, and blended thoroughly to ensure homogeneity. The analyses on which the recommended values for nuclides in the reference materials are based were performed, using independent methods, by the UNC Geotech (UNC) Chemistry Laboratory, Grand Junction, Colorado, and by C.W. Sill (Sill), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho. Several statistical tests were performed on the analytical data to characterize the reference materials. Results of these tests reveal that the four reference materials are homogeneous and that no large systematic bias exists between the analytical methods used by Sill and those used by TMC. The average values for radionuclides of the two data sets, representing an unbiased estimate, were used as the recommended values for concentrations of nuclides in the reference materials. The recommended concentrations of radionuclides in the four reference materials are provided. Use of these reference materials will aid in providing uniform standardization among measurements made by remedial action contractors. 11 refs., 9 tabs

  12. Inhaled Corticosteroids (ICSs) and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the airways in the lungs and reduce mucus production so that asthma attacks are less likely. ... of medicine that would be in the breast milk following inhalation is likely too small to cause ...

  13. Bronchospasm and anaphylactic shock following lidocaine aerosol inhalation in a patient with butane inhalation lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min-Young; Park, Kyong Ah; Yeo, So-Jeong; Kim, Shin-Hee; Goong, Hyeun-Jeong; Jang, An-Soo; Park, Choon-Sik

    2011-10-01

    Allergic reactions to local anesthetics are very rare and represent inhalation lung injury due to butane gas fuel. On the fifth day, he developed an asthmatic attack and anaphylactic shock immediately after lidocaine aerosol administration to prepare for bronchoscopy to confirm an acute inhalational lung injury diagnosis. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed immediately after respiratory arrest, and the patient was admitted to the intensive care unit intubated and on a ventilator. He was extubated safely on the third post-cardiopulmonary resuscitation day. These observations suggest that aerosol lidocaine anesthesia may cause airway narrowing and anaphylactic shock. Practitioners should be aware of this potential complication. We report on this case with a brief review of the literature.

  14. Reference values assessment in a Mediterranean population for small dense low-density lipoprotein concentration isolated by an optimized precipitation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Cidón B

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bárbara Fernández-Cidón,1–3 Ariadna Padró-Miquel,1 Pedro Alía-Ramos,1 María José Castro-Castro,1 Marta Fanlo-Maresma,4 Dolors Dot-Bach,1 José Valero-Politi,1 Xavier Pintó-Sala,4 Beatriz Candás-Estébanez1 1Clinical Laboratory, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain; 2Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biomedicine, Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB, Barcelona, Spain; 3Department of Pharmacotherapy, Pharmacogenetics and Pharmaceutical Technology, Institut d’Investigació Biomèdica de Bellvitge (IDIBELL, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain; 4Cardiovascular Risk Unit, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain Background: High serum concentrations of small dense low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (sd-LDL-c particles are associated with risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Their clinical application has been hindered as a consequence of the laborious current method used for their quantification. Objective: Optimize a simple and fast precipitation method to isolate sd-LDL particles and establish a reference interval in a Mediterranean population. Materials and methods: Forty-five serum samples were collected, and sd-LDL particles were isolated using a modified heparin-Mg2+ precipitation method. sd-LDL-c concentration was calculated by subtracting high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c from the total cholesterol measured in the supernatant. This method was compared with the reference method (ultracentrifugation. Reference values were estimated according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute and The International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine recommendations. sd-LDL-c concentration was measured in serums from 79 subjects with no lipid metabolism abnormalities. Results: The Passing–Bablok regression equation is y = 1.52 (0.72 to 1.73 + 0.07x (−0.1 to 0.13, demonstrating no significant statistical differences

  15. Inhalant abuse: monitoring trends by using poison control data, 1993-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsolek, Melinda R; White, Nicole C; Litovitz, Toby L

    2010-05-01

    To demonstrate the value of poison control data as an adjunct to national drug abuse surveys and a source of data to inform and focus prevention efforts. National Poison Data System (NPDS) data are collected and compiled in real time by the 60 US poison centers as callers seek guidance for poison exposures. Demographic, geographic, product, outcome, and treatment-site data for the 35453 inhalant cases reported between 1993 and 2008 were analyzed. The prevalence of inhalant cases reported to US poison control centers decreased 33% from 1993 to 2008. Prevalence was highest among children aged 12 to 17 years and peaked in 14-year-olds. In contrast to national survey data showing nearly equal use of inhalants by both genders, 73.5% of NPDS inhalant cases occurred in boys, which suggests that boys may pursue riskier usage behaviors. Most cases (67.8%) were managed in health care facilities. More than 3400 different products were reported. Propellants, gasoline, and paint were the most frequent product categories. Propellants were the only product category that substantially increased over time. Butane, propane, and air fresheners had the highest fatality rates. Prevalence for all inhalants was highest in western mountain states and West Virginia, but geographic distribution varied according to product type. Gasoline was a proportionately greater problem for younger children; propellants were an issue for older children. NPDS should be used to monitor inhalant abuse because it provides unique, timely, and clinically useful information on medical outcomes experienced by users, includes detailed product information (brand and formulation), and can potentially be used to identify real-time demographic, geographic, and product trends. Focusing inhalant prevention efforts on the most hazardous products and most seriously affected users may improve and facilitate strategic prevention, enabling interventions such as targeted education, product reformulation, repackaging

  16. Inhaled mycotoxins lead to acute renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paolo, N; Guarnieri, A; Garosi, G; Sacchi, G; Mangiarotti, A M; Di Paolo, M

    1994-01-01

    Mysterious deaths of archeologists after opening Egyptian tombs have been suspected, but never proved, to be secondary to inhalation of mycotoxin. We observed a case of acute renal failure (ARF) due to inhalation of ochratoxin A produced by a mould of the species Aspergillus ochraceus. After working 8 h in a granary closed for several months, a farmer and his wife suffered respiratory distress; the woman developed non-oliguric ARF and biopsy revealed tubulonecrosis. A strain of Aspergillus ochraceus producing ochratoxin was isolated from the wheat.

  17. Application of Kr-81m gas for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A comparison of various inhalation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakami, K; Katsuyama, N i; Anno, I i; Harada, J; Kuroda, T [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1978-11-01

    The Kr-81m ventilation study was performed by the following four inhalation techniques. 1) Spontaneous respiration with Kr-81m in air (Sp). 2) Serial inhalation of Kr-81m from residual volume to total lung capacity (VC). 3) Bolus inhalation of 50 ml of Kr-81m from the level of functional residual capacity (FRC), and 4) residual volume (RV), followed by air, to total lung capacity. Scintiphotos were taken during 10 sec of breathholding for VC, FRC, RV inhalation techniques and during tidal breathing for Sp technique, in a sitting position, by a scinticamera (Pho/Gamma HP). Twenty-three of the 28 subjects showed uneven distribution of the washout time in the Xe-133 study, 5 cases have a normal Xe-133 study. In severe obstructive changes with marked delay of the Xe-133 washout time, inhalation defects of Kr-81m were imaged in all techniques. In minor degrees of obstruction associated with slight delay of the washout, FRC and RV techniques detected abnormalities, whilst images by Sp and VC techniques showed homogeneous distribution of Kr-81m. This is due to rebreathing effect on Sp and to opening of partial airway obstruction in a high lung volume on VC technique. RV technique had a disadvantage for imaging of abnormalities in the lower lung fields, because Kr-81m concentration is low in the lower lung fields, due to physiological closure of the small airway. In 3 of 5 cases of asymptomatic asthma with a normal Xe-133 study, uneven distribution in RV technique was the only abnormality detected. FRC technique was most sensitive for slight obstructive changes in the upper lung fields as well as in the lower. For the ventilation study using Kr-81m, a combined test of Sp, VC, RV and FRC inhalation techniques is useful for early detection of the small airway disease and evaluation of the degree of abnormalities.

  18. Kinetics of inhaled krypton in the blood of pregnant ewes and their fetuses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meznarich, H.K.; Sikov, M.R.; Ballou, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    There has been concern about exposure of pregnant women and their fetuses to radiokrypton (Kr-85) released to the general environment. This led to previous studies on the distribution and effects of inhaled Kr-85 in sheep and rats. The data on hematogenous concentrations obtained during and after continuous inhalation by pregnant ewes had neither been analyzed nor reported in detail, which led to the kinetic analyses reported in this communication. Indwelling catheters were placed in an artery and a vein of pregnant ewes, and into a fetal artery or vein at gestational ages between 93 and 123 days. Ewes were exposed for 1.5 to 2 hors via a face mask to an atmosphere of 50 nCi/ml (1850 Bq/ml) Kr-85 in air; mean respiration rates were about 20 breaths per min. Blood samples were collected from each catheter at intervals throughout the accumulation and steady-state periods, and during a 90-min period following discontinuation of exposure. Results from 7 ewes, in which complete sampling was obtained, showed that both maternal fetal blood concentrations of Kr rose rapidly and attained a steady state by approximately 1 hr after initiation of exposure. The steady state concentrations of Kr-85 were significantly higher in maternal venous blood than in maternal arterial or fetal blood. There were no significant concentration differences between fetal arterial and venous bloods. The rate of disappearance of Kr-85 (per min) from maternal and fetal blood after discontinuation of exposure, 0.17 ± 0.02 and 0.06 ± 0.01, respectively, were significantly different. Thus, krypton is freely accessible to the fetal blood and rapidly reaches and maintains an equilibrium state with maternal blood during continuous exposure, although it disappears from fetal blood less rapidly after cessation of exposure

  19. Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute annual report, October 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-12-01

    The mission of the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) is to investigate the nature and magnitude of human health effects that might result from inhalation of airborne materials encountered in the work place, special attention is directed toward airborne particulate and gaseous emissions released by various energy technologies or from national defense activities. Included are five papers on the physical and chemical characterization of energy technology aerosols, 10 papers on laboratory studies of aerosol generation and characterization, 11 papers on in vitro predictors of toxicity, 12 papers on disposition and fate of inhaled materials, 24 papers on dose-response relationships for inhaled radionuclides, 3 papers on dose-response relationships for inhaled chemical toxicants, 8 papers on biological factors that influence dose-response relationships, and 4 papers are concerned with risk assessment

  20. Anthriscus nemorosa essential oil inhalation prevents memory impairment, anxiety and depression in scopolamine-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagci, Eyup; Aydin, Emel; Ungureanu, Eugen; Hritcu, Lucian

    2016-12-01

    Anthriscus nemorosa (Bieb.) Sprengel is used for medicinal purposes in traditional medicine around the world, including Turkey. Ethnobotanical studies suggest that Anthriscus essential oil could improve memory in Alzheimer's disease. The current study was hypothesized to investigate the beneficial effects of inhaled Anthriscus nemorosa essential oil on memory, anxiety and depression in scopolamine-treated rats. Anthriscus nemorosa essential oil was administered by inhalation in the doses of 1% and 3% for 21 continuous days and scopolamine (0.7mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 30min before the behavioral testing. Y-maze and radial arm-maze tests were used for assessing memory processes. Also, the anxiety and depressive responses were studied by elevated plus-maze and forced swimming tests. As expected, the scopolamine alone-treated rats exhibited the following: decrease the percentage of the spontaneous alternation in Y-maze test, increase the number of working and reference memory errors in radial arm-maze test, decrease of the exploratory activity, the percentage of the time spent and the number of entries in the open arm within elevated plus-maze test and decrease of swimming time and increase of immobility time within forced swimming test. However, dual scopolamine and Anthriscus nemorosa essential oil-treated rats showed significant improvement of memory formation and exhibited anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects in scopolamine-treated rats. These results suggest that Anthriscus nemorosa essential oil inhalation can prevent scopolamine-induced memory impairment, anxiety and depression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Opinion of pneumologists on the importance of inhalers in patients with asthma or COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitja Košnik

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medications for asthma and COPD are mainly used in the form of inhalations. A survey was performed to obtain the opinion of experts about the importance of inhalers in inhaled drug therapy.Methods: All members–pulmonologists of the Slovenian Respiratory Society were invited to participate in the survey using a two-stage Delphi method. The result of each response were shown by the median and interquartile range, whereby we calculated the level of consensus.Results: 176 doctors were invited. Most questions were answered by 49 (27.8 % participants. In the second round 42 doctors responded. As many as 33 out of 41 respondents (80.5 % felt that in the treatment of asthma and COPD the selection of medicines and inhalers are equally important. When choosing an inhaler, it is crucial that it is simple to instruct the patients about its use. Respondents highly agreed with the statement that patients should receive a prescription for inhaler only after they have been trained on how to use it. As appropriate persons for the training of patients on the use of inhalers the respondents recognized (from most to least suitable pulmonologists, nurses, general practitioners or pharmacists. 53.8 % of respondents considered that the patient’s skill of the use of inhaler should be checked on every visit to the doctor. Respondents believed that replacing inhalers without consulting the treating doctor may result in incorrect use of the inhaler, poor patient compliance, more exacerbations of the disease and poorer disease control. Some consensus with an indifferent median of 4.5 was reached with regard to the argument that the doctor should prescribe the inhaler that is the cheapest for society.Conclusions: Slovenian pulmonologists believe that any change of inhaler is a critical event, which must be coordinated with the patient and the doctor.

  2. Assessing human exposure risk to cadmium through inhalation and seafood consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Yun-Ru; Chen, Wei-Yu; Liao, Chung-Min

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Trophically available fraction in seafood and bioaccessibility is linked. ► Human health risk to Cd can via inhalation and seafood consumption. ► Female had the higher Cd accumulation in urine and blood than male. ► Cigarette smoking is a major determinant of human Cd intake. - Abstract: The role of cadmium (Cd) bioaccessibility in risk assessment is less well studied. The aim of this study was to assess human health risk to Cd through inhalation and seafood consumption by incorporating bioaccessibility. The relationships between trophically available Cd and bioaccessibility were constructed based on available experimental data. We estimated Cd concentrations in human urine and blood via daily intake from seafood consumption and inhalation based on a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. A Hill-based dose–response model was used to assess human renal dysfunction and peripheral arterial disease risks for long-term Cd exposure. Here we showed that fish had higher bioaccessibility (∼83.7%) than that of shellfish (∼73.2%) for human ingestion. Our results indicated that glomerular and tubular damage among different genders and smokers ranged from 18.03 to 18.18%. Our analysis showed that nonsmokers had 50% probability of peripheral arterial disease level exceeding from 3.28 to 8.80%. Smoking populations had 2–3 folds higher morbidity risk of peripheral arterial disease than those of nonsmokers. Our study concluded that the adverse effects of Cd exposure are exacerbated when high seafood consumption coincides with cigarette smoking. Our work provides a framework that could more accurately address risk dose dependency of Cd hazard.

  3. Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute annual report, October 1, 1983-September 30, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilmette, R.A.; Medinsky, M.A.

    1984-12-01

    The report describes research in the following areas: (1) aerosol generation and characterization; (2) deposition and fate of inhaled materials; (3) dose-response relationships for inhaled radionuclides; (4) dose-response relationships for inhaled chemical toxicants; and (5) biological factors that influence dose-response relationships. Project descriptions have been individually entered into the date base

  4. Inhalation device options for the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePietro, Michael; Gilbert, Ileen; Millette, Lauren A; Riebe, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by chronic respiratory symptoms and airflow limitation, resulting from abnormalities in the airway and/or damage to the alveoli. Primary care physicians manage the healthcare of a large proportion of patients with COPD. In addition to determining the most appropriate medication regimen, which usually includes inhaled bronchodilators with or without inhaled corticosteroids, physicians are charged with optimizing inhalation device selection to facilitate effective drug delivery and patient adherence. The large variety of inhalation devices currently available present numerous challenges for physicians that include: (1) gaining knowledge of and proficiency with operating different device classes; (2) identifying the most appropriate inhalation device for the patient; and (3) providing the necessary education and training for patients on device use. This review provides an overview of the inhalation device types currently available in the United States for delivery of COPD medications, including information on their successful operation and respective advantages and disadvantages, factors to consider in matching a device to an individual patient, the need for device training for patients and physicians, and guidance for improving treatment adherence. Finally, the review will discuss established and novel tools and technology that may aid physicians in improving education and promoting better adherence to therapy.

  5. AGE-DEPENDENT INHALATION DOSE DUE TO EXPOSURE OF SHORT LIVED PROGENY OF RADON AND THORON FOR DIFFERENT AGE GROUPS IN JAMMU & KASHMIR, HIMALAYAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sumit; Kumar, Ajay; Mehra, Rohit

    2018-05-16

    Dosimetric approach is used in this study for the assessment of doses due to inhalation of short lived radon/thoron progeny to the inhabitants of Udhampur district of Jammu & Kashmir. This paper also presents the activity concentrations and unattached fraction of radon and thoron progeny. The observed annual concentration of attached and unattached 222Rn and 220Rn progeny has been found to vary from 8 to 32 and 0.09 to 14 Bq/m3, 0.75 to 3.16 and 0.01 to 1.13 Bq/m3, respectively. The inhalation doses from radon progeny to different body organs of different age groups have been calculated by using the age dependent biokinetic model. The attachment rate of 222Rn and indoor aerosol concentration of 222Rn and 220Rn have been estimated and their relation between them has also been studied. The dose conversion factor for mouth and nasal breathing to different exposure conditions has been obtained from Porstendorfer model.

  6. Paradigms and mechanisms of inhalational anesthetics mediated neuroprotection against cerebral ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hailian; Li, Peiying; Xu, Na; Zhu, Ling; Cai, Mengfei; Yu, Weifeng; Gao, Yanqin

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral ischemic stroke is a leading cause of serious long-term disability and cognitive dysfunction. The high mortality and disability of cerebral ischemic stroke is urging the health providers, including anesthesiologists and other perioperative professioners, to seek effective protective strategies, which are extremely limited, especially for those perioperative patients. Intriguingly, several commonly used inhalational anesthetics are recently suggested to possess neuroprotective effects against cerebral ischemia. This review introduces multiple paradigms of inhalational anesthetic treatments that have been investigated in the setting of cerebral ischemia, such as preconditioning, proconditioning and postconditioning with a variety of inhalational anesthetics. The pleiotropic mechanisms underlying these inhalational anesthetics-afforded neuroprotection against stroke are also discussed in detail, including the common pathways shared by most of the inhalational anesthetic paradigms, such as anti-excitotoxicity, anti-apoptosis and anti-inflammation. There are also distinct mechanisms involved in specific paradigms, such as preserving blood brain barrier integrity, regulating cerebral blood flow and catecholamine release. The ready availability of these inhalational anesthetics bedside and renders them a potentially translatable stroke therapy attracting great efforts for understanding of the underlying mechanisms.

  7. Aerosol lung inhalation scintigraphy in normal subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Osamu; Shimazu, Hideki

    1985-03-01

    We previously reported basic and clinical evaluation of aerosol lung inhalation scintigraphy with /sup 99m/Tc-millimicrosphere albumin (milli MISA) and concluded aerosol inhalation scintigraphy with /sup 99m/Tc-milli MISA was useful for routine examination. But central airway deposit of aerosol particles was found in not only the patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but also normal subjects. So we performed aerosol inhalation scintigraphy in normal subjects and evaluated their scintigrams. The subjects had normal values of FEVsub(1.0)% (more than 70%) in lung function tests, no abnormal findings in chest X-ray films and no symptoms and signs. The findings of aerosol inhalation scintigrams in them were classified into 3 patterns; type I: homogeneous distribution without central airway deposit, type II: homogeneous distribution with central airway deposit, type III: inhomogeneous distribution. These patterns were compared with lung function tests. There was no significant correlation between type I and type II in lung function tests. Type III was different from type I and type II in inhomogeneous distribution. This finding showed no correlation with %VC, FEVsub(1.0)%, MMF, V radical50 and V radical50/V radical25, but good correlation with V radical25 in a maximum forced expiratory flow-volume curve. Flow-volume curve is one of the sensitive methods in early detection of COPD, so inhomogeneous distribution of type III is considered to be due to small airway dysfunction.

  8. Oral versus inhaled antibiotics for bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Sally; Felix, Lambert M; Milan, Stephen J; Normansell, Rebecca; Goeminne, Pieter C; Chalmers, James D; Donovan, Tim

    2018-03-27

    Bronchiectasis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterised by a recurrent cycle of respiratory bacterial infections associated with cough, sputum production and impaired quality of life. Antibiotics are the main therapeutic option for managing bronchiectasis exacerbations. Evidence suggests that inhaled antibiotics may be associated with more effective eradication of infective organisms and a lower risk of developing antibiotic resistance when compared with orally administered antibiotics. However, it is currently unclear whether antibiotics are more effective when administered orally or by inhalation. To determine the comparative efficacy and safety of oral versus inhaled antibiotics in the treatment of adults and children with bronchiectasis. We identified studies through searches of the Cochrane Airways Group's Specialised Register (CAGR), which is maintained by the Information Specialist for the group. The Register contains trial reports identified through systematic searches of bibliographic databases including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, AMED, and PsycINFO, and handsearching of respiratory journals and meeting abstracts. We also searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO trials portal. We searched all databases in March 2018 and imposed no restrictions on language of publication. We planned to include studies which compared oral antibiotics with inhaled antibiotics. We would have considered short-term use (less than four weeks) for treating acute exacerbations separately from longer-term use as a prophylactic (4 weeks or more). We would have considered both intraclass and interclass comparisons. We planned to exclude studies if the participants received continuous or high-dose antibiotics immediately before the start of the trial, or if they have received a diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF), sarcoidosis, active allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis or active non-tuberculous Mycobacterial infection

  9. A Comparison of "Total Dust" and Inhalable Personal Sampling for Beryllium Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Colleen M. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States). School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine

    2012-05-09

    In 2009, the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) reduced the Beryllium (Be) 8-hr Time Weighted Average Threshold Limit Value (TLV-TWA) from 2.0 μg/m3 to 0.05 μg/m3 with an inhalable 'I' designation in accordance with ACGIH's particle size-selective criterion for inhalable mass. Currently, per the Department of Energy (DOE) requirements, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is following the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 2.0 μg/m3 as an 8-hr TWA, which is also the 2005 ACGIH TLV-TWA, and an Action Level (AL) of 0.2 μg/m3 and sampling is performed using the 37mm (total dust) sampling method. Since DOE is considering adopting the newer 2009 TLV guidelines, the goal of this study was to determine if the current method of sampling using the 37mm (total dust) sampler would produce results that are comparable to what would be measured using the IOM (inhalable) sampler specific to the application of high energy explosive work at LLNL's remote experimental test facility at Site 300. Side-by-side personal sampling using the two samplers was performed over an approximately two-week period during chamber re-entry and cleanup procedures following detonation of an explosive assembly containing Beryllium (Be). The average ratio of personal sampling results for the IOM (inhalable) vs. 37-mm (total dust) sampler was 1.1:1 with a P-value of 0.62, indicating that there was no statistically significant difference in the performance of the two samplers. Therefore, for the type of activity monitored during this study, the 37-mm sampling cassette would be considered a suitable alternative to the IOM sampler for collecting inhalable particulate matter, which is important given the many practical and economic advantages that it presents. However, similar comparison studies would be necessary for this conclusion to be

  10. The child's behavior during inhalational induction and its impact on the anesthesiologist's sevoflurane exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog-Niescery, Jennifer; Vogelsang, Heike; Bellgardt, Martin; Botteck, Nikolaj Matthias; Seipp, Hans-Martin; Bartz, Horst; Weber, Thomas Peter; Gude, Philipp

    2017-12-01

    Sevoflurane is commonly used for inhalational inductions in children, but the personnel's exposure to it is potentially harmful. Guidance to reduce gas pollution refers mainly to technical aspects, but the impact of the child's behavior has not yet been studied. The purpose of this study was to determine how child behavior, according to the Frankl Behavioral Scale, affects the amount of waste sevoflurane in anesthesiologists' breathing zones. Sixty-eight children aged 36-96 months undergoing elective ENT surgery were recruited for this prospective, observational investigation. After oral midazolam premedication (0.5 mg/kg body weight), patients obtained sevoflurane using a facemask with an inspiratory concentration of 8 Vol.% in 100% oxygen (flow 10 L/min). Ventilation was manually supported and a venous catheter was placed. The inspiratory sevoflurane concentration was reduced, and remifentanil and propofol were administered before the facemask was removed and a cuffed tracheal tube inserted. The child's behavior toward the operating room personnel during induction was evaluated by the anesthesiologist (Frankl Behavioral Scale: 1-2 = negative behavior, 3-4 = positive behavior). During induction mean (c¯mean) and maximum (c¯max), sevoflurane concentrations were determined in the anesthesiologist's breathing zone by continuous photoacoustic gas monitoring. Mean and maximum sevoflurane concentrations were c¯mean = 4.38 ± 4.02 p.p.m and c¯max = 70.06 ± 61.08 p.p.m in patients with positive behaviors and sufficient premedications and c¯mean = 12.63 ± 8.66 p.p.m and c¯max = 242.86 ± 139.91 p.p.m in children with negative behaviors and insufficient premedications (c¯mean: P max: P < .001). Negative behavior was accompanied by significantly higher mean and maximum sevoflurane concentrations in the anesthesiologist's breathing zone compared with children with positive attitudes. Consequently, the status of premedication influences the amount of sevoflurane

  11. Real-time measurement of inhaled and exhaled cigarette smoke: Implications for dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, Conor; Warren, Nigel; Biggs, Philip; McAughey, John, E-mail: conor_mcgrath@bat.co [British American Tobacco, Group R and D Centre, Southampton, SO15 8TL (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-01

    Inhalation of tobacco smoke aerosol is a two-step process involving puffing followed by inhalation. Measured smoke deposition efficiencies in the lung (20-70%) are greater than expected for smoke particles of 150 -- 250 nm count median diameter (CMD). Various mechanisms have been put forward to explain this enhanced deposition pattern, including coagulation, hygroscopic growth, condensation and evaporation, changes in composition, or changes in inhalation behaviour. This paper represents one of a series of studies seeking to better quantify smoke chemistry, inhalation behaviour and cumulative particle growth. The studies have been conducted to better understand smoke dosimetry and links to disease as part of a wider programme defining risk and potential harm reduction. In this study, the average CMD of inhaled smoke was 160 nm while the average CMD of exhaled smoke was 239 nm with an average growth factor of 1.5.

  12. Real-time measurement of inhaled and exhaled cigarette smoke: Implications for dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, Conor; Warren, Nigel; Biggs, Philip; McAughey, John

    2009-01-01

    Inhalation of tobacco smoke aerosol is a two-step process involving puffing followed by inhalation. Measured smoke deposition efficiencies in the lung (20-70%) are greater than expected for smoke particles of 150 -- 250 nm count median diameter (CMD). Various mechanisms have been put forward to explain this enhanced deposition pattern, including coagulation, hygroscopic growth, condensation and evaporation, changes in composition, or changes in inhalation behaviour. This paper represents one of a series of studies seeking to better quantify smoke chemistry, inhalation behaviour and cumulative particle growth. The studies have been conducted to better understand smoke dosimetry and links to disease as part of a wider programme defining risk and potential harm reduction. In this study, the average CMD of inhaled smoke was 160 nm while the average CMD of exhaled smoke was 239 nm with an average growth factor of 1.5.

  13. Reference intervals and longitudinal changes in copeptin and MR-proADM concentrations during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosen, Annemiek M C P; van der Linden, Ivon J M; Schrauwen, Lianne; Theeuwes, Alisia; de Groot, Monique J M; Ermens, Antonius A M

    2017-11-27

    Vasopressin and adrenomedullin and their stable by-products copeptin and midregional part of proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM) are promising biomarkers for the development of preeclampsia. However, clinical use is hampered by the lack of trimester-specific reference intervals. We therefore estimated reference intervals for copeptin and MR-proADM in disease-free Dutch women throughout pregnancy. Apparently healthy low risk pregnant women were recruited. Exclusion criteria included current or past history of endocrine disease, multiple pregnancy, use of medication known to influence thyroid function and current pregnancy as a result of hormonal stimulation. Women who miscarried, developed hyperemesis gravidarum, hypertension, pre-eclampsia, hemolysis elevated liver enzymes and low platelets, diabetes or other disease, delivered prematurely or had a small for gestational age neonate were excluded from analyses. Blood samples were collected at 9-13 weeks (n=98), 27-29 weeks (n=94) and 36-39 weeks (n=91) of gestation and at 4-13 weeks post-partum (PP) (n=89). Sixty-two women had complete data during pregnancy and PP. All analyses were performed on a Kryptor compact plus. Copeptin increases during pregnancy, but 97.5th percentiles remain below the non-pregnant upper reference limit (URL) provided by the manufacturer. MR-proADM concentrations increase as well during pregnancy. In trimesters 2 and 3 the 97.5th percentiles are over three times the non-pregnant URL provided by the manufacturer. Trimester- and assay-specific reference intervals for copeptin and MR-proADM should be used. In addition, consecutive measurements and the time frame between measurements should be considered as the differences seen with or in advance of preeclampsia can be expected to be relatively small compared to the reference intervals.

  14. Computer tomographic assessment of partial liquid ventilation in dogs with inhalation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Liya; Gong Honghan; Xiao Xiangzuo; Guo Guanghua; Li Guohui; Zhou Li; Fu Lihui; Fan Kunwu

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To analyze CT and pathologic findings of lung in dogs with inhalation injury, and to provide reliable basis to explore the mechanism of partial liquid ventilation (PLV) treatment on inhalation injury. Methods: Respiratory tract injury models in 14 dogs were made by steam inhalation and they were divided into 2 groups. The control group was treated by high frequency ventilation (HFV) and the treatment group was treated by partial liquid with perfluorocarbon plus HFV. CT scan of the lung in dogs with inhalation injury was performed before and after perfluorocarbon (PFC) PLV, and then the histopathologic pieces with isolation lung were obtained. Analysis and comparison of the results among them was conducted. Results: After steam inhalation injury, CT appeared as exudation with patchy and mass in 6 dogs, cotton-wool spots in 2 dogs, ground-glass opacity in 2 dogs, and consolidation in 4 dogs. CT appeared as mass in 5 dogs with inhalation injury of perfluorocarbon-filled lungs during partial liquid ventilation, patchy in 2 dogs, and homogeneous in 1 dog. The distribution of perfluorocarbon was in the posterior region of lung. The CT findings were in accordance with those in histopathology. Conclusion: Perfluorocarbon is distributed predominantly in the dependent regions of the lung and the distribution of perfluorocarbon is gravity dependent. It is benefit for the inhalation injury

  15. Outcome following inhalation anesthesia in birds at a veterinary referral hospital: 352 cases (2004-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seamon, Amanda B; Hofmeister, Erik H; Divers, Stephen J

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the outcome in birds undergoing inhalation anesthesia and identify patient or procedure variables associated with an increased likelihood of anesthesia-related death. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 352 birds that underwent inhalation anesthesia. PROCEDURES Medical records of birds that underwent inhalation anesthesia from January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2014, at a single veterinary referral hospital were reviewed. Data collected included date of visit, age, species, sex, type (pet, free ranging, or wild kept in captivity), body weight, body condition score, diagnosis, procedure, American Society of Anesthesiologists status, premedication used for anesthesia, drug for anesthetic induction, type of maintenance anesthesia, route and type of fluid administration, volumes of crystalloid and colloid fluids administered, intraoperative events, estimated blood loss, duration of anesthesia, surgery duration, recovery time, recovery notes, whether birds survived to hospital discharge, time of death, total cost of hospitalization, cost of anesthesia, and nadir and peak values for heart rate, end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide, concentration of inhaled anesthetic, and body temperature. Comparisons were made between birds that did and did not survive to hospital discharge. RESULTS Of 352 birds, 303 (86%) were alive at hospital discharge, 12 (3.4%) died during anesthesia, 15 (4.3%) died in the intensive care unit after anesthesia, and 22 (6.3%) were euthanatized after anesthesia. Overall, none of the variables studied were associated with survival to hospital discharge versus not surviving to hospital discharge. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results confirmed previous findings that indicated birds have a high mortality rate during and after anesthesia, compared with mortality rates published for dogs and cats.

  16. Methanol toxicity secondary to inhalant abuse in adult men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Erik A; Green, Adam S

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the presentation, treatment, and outcomes of adults with methanol toxicity from inhalation of carburetor cleaning fluid fumes. Retrospective chart review of adults with positive serum volatile screen for methanol and history of carburetor cleaning fluid fume inhalation. Sixteen patients were admitted 68 times. Eleven Native American patients accounted for 90% of admissions. Sixty-five cases presented with nausea/vomiting; 27 with intoxication or altered mental status; 21 with specific visual complaints. About 93% had a pH or=10 mOsm/L, and 69% had anion gap >16. Ten had an initial serum methanol level or=50 mg/dL. Six patients had a measurable serum ethanol level. Of the 29 patients with a methanol level of 20-49 mg/dL, 20 received intravenous antidote (ethanol or fomepizole); three received an antidote and hemodialysis. All who presented with a serum methanol level >or=50 mg/dL received intravenous ethanol or fomepizole. All visual symptoms resolved before discharge and all patients survived without sequelae. Discussion. This is the largest reported number of cases of methanol toxicity from the inhalation of carburetor cleaning fluid fumes and demonstrates a problem with recurrent abuse among some older Native American men. Intentional inhalation of methanol fumes may produce toxicity. Clinicians need to question patients, especially older Native American men, regarding the possible inhalation of carburetor cleaning fluid fumes in those who present with an unexplained metabolic anion gap acidosis.

  17. Inhaled plutonium oxide in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    This project is concerned with long-term experiments to determine the lifespan dose-effect relationships of inhaled 239 PuO 2 and 238 PuO 2 in beagles. Beagle dogs given a single exposure to 239 PuO 2 or 238 PuO 2 aerosols are being observed for lifespan dose-effect relationships. The 239 Pu body burden of the nine dogs that died of pulmonary-fibrosis-induced respiratory insufficiency during the first 3 yr after exposure was 1 to 12μCi. Nineteen of the dogs exposed to 238 Pu haved died during the first 7-1/2 yr after exposure due to bone and/or lung tumors; their body burdens at death ranged from 0.7 to 10μCi. Chronic lymphopenia was the earliest observed effect after inhalation of 239 PuO 2 or 238 PuO 2

  18. Puffing and inhalation behaviour in cigarette smoking: Implications for particle diameter and dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickens, Colin; McGrath, Conor; Warren, Nigel; Biggs, Philip; McAughey, John, E-mail: colin_dickens@bat.co [British American Tobacco, Group R and D Centre, Southampton, SO15 8TL (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-01

    Inhalation of tobacco smoke aerosol is a two-step process involving puffing followed by inhalation. Measured smoke deposition efficiencies in the lung (20-70%) are greater than expected for smoke particles of diameter 150 - 250 nm CMD. Various mechanisms have been put forward to explain this enhanced deposition pattern, including coagulation, hygroscopic growth, condensation and evaporation, changes in composition, or changes in inhalation behaviour. This paper represents one of a series of studies seeking to better quantify smoke chemistry, inhalation behaviour and cumulative particle growth. The studies have been conducted to better understand smoke dosimetry and links to disease as part of a wider programme defining risk and potential harm reduction. In this study, it was noted that particle deposition increased with increasing inhalation depth, and that smoke inhalation volumes were generally greater than normal tidal breathing volumes. A weak association was observed between particle diameter and puff flow, but no strong association between particle diameter and retention efficiency.

  19. Puffing and inhalation behaviour in cigarette smoking: Implications for particle diameter and dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickens, Colin; McGrath, Conor; Warren, Nigel; Biggs, Philip; McAughey, John

    2009-01-01

    Inhalation of tobacco smoke aerosol is a two-step process involving puffing followed by inhalation. Measured smoke deposition efficiencies in the lung (20-70%) are greater than expected for smoke particles of diameter 150 - 250 nm CMD. Various mechanisms have been put forward to explain this enhanced deposition pattern, including coagulation, hygroscopic growth, condensation and evaporation, changes in composition, or changes in inhalation behaviour. This paper represents one of a series of studies seeking to better quantify smoke chemistry, inhalation behaviour and cumulative particle growth. The studies have been conducted to better understand smoke dosimetry and links to disease as part of a wider programme defining risk and potential harm reduction. In this study, it was noted that particle deposition increased with increasing inhalation depth, and that smoke inhalation volumes were generally greater than normal tidal breathing volumes. A weak association was observed between particle diameter and puff flow, but no strong association between particle diameter and retention efficiency.

  20. Comparison of the Pulmonary Oxidative Stress Caused by Intratracheal Instillation and Inhalation of NiO Nanoparticles when Equivalent Amounts of NiO Are Retained in the Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Horie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available NiO nanoparticles were administered to rat lungs via intratracheal instillation or inhalation. During pulmonary toxicity caused by NiO nanoparticles, the induction of oxidative stress is a major factor. Both intratracheal instillation and inhalation of NiO nanoparticles induced pulmonary oxidative stress. The oxidative stress response protein, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, was induced by the administration of NiO nanoparticles at both the protein and gene expression level. Additionally, certain oxidative-stress markers in the lung, such as 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α, thioredoxin, and inducible nitric oxide synthase were increased. Furthermore, the concentration of myeloperoxidase (MPO in the lung was also increased by the administration of NiO nanoparticles. When the amount of NiO in the lung is similar, the responses against pulmonary oxidative stress of intratracheal instillation and inhalation are also similar. However, the state of pulmonary oxidative stress in the early phase was different between intratracheal instillation and inhalation, even if the amount of NiO in the lung was similar. Inhalation causes milder oxidative stress than that caused by intratracheal instillation. On evaluation of the nanoparticle-induced pulmonary oxidative stress in the early phase, we should understand the different states of oxidative stress induced by intratracheal instillation and inhalation.

  1. Paradigms and mechanisms of inhalational anesthetics mediated neuroprotection against cerebral ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailian Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral ischemic stroke is a leading cause of serious long-term disability and cognitive dysfunction. The high mortality and disability of cerebral ischemic stroke is urging the health providers, including anesthesiologists and other perioperative professioners, to seek effective protective strategies, which are extremely limited, especially for those perioperative patients. Intriguingly, several commonly used inhalational anesthetics are recently suggested to possess neuroprotective effects against cerebral ischemia. This review introduces multiple paradigms of inhalational anesthetic treatments that have been investigated in the setting of cerebral ischemia, such as preconditioning, proconditioning and postconditioning with a variety of inhalational anesthetics. The pleiotropic mechanisms underlying these inhalational anesthetics-afforded neuroprotection against stroke are also discussed in detail, including the common pathways shared by most of the inhalational anesthetic paradigms, such as anti-excitotoxicity, anti-apoptosis and anti-inflammation. There are also distinct mechanisms involved in specific paradigms, such as preserving blood brain barrier integrity, regulating cerebral blood flow and catecholamine release. The ready availability of these inhalational anesthetics bedside and renders them a potentially translatable stroke therapy attracting great efforts for understanding of the underlying mechanisms.

  2. Personal exposure to grass pollen: relating inhaled dose to background concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peel, Robert George; Hertel, Ole; Smith, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Background: Very few studies on human exposure to allergenic pollen have been conducted using direct methods, with background concentrations measured at city center monitoring stations typically taken as a proxy for exposure despite the inhomogeneous nature of atmospheric pollen concentrations. A...

  3. Minimum concentrations of NO/sub 2/ causing acute effects on the respiratory gas exchange and airway-resistance in patients with chronic bronchitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Nieding, G; Wagner, M; Krekeler, H; Smidt, U; Muysers, K

    1971-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide-air mixtures containing 0.5 to 5.0 ppM NO/sub 2/ were inhaled by 88 patients with chronic bronchitis over a 15-minute period for a total of 30 breaths during studies investigating the effects of the gas on airway resistance and respiratory gas exchange. End-expiratory oxygen pressures remained nearly constant during inhalation of 4 or 5 ppM NO/sub 2/, though significant decreases in arterial oxygen pressure accompanied by increases in end-expiratory-arterial oxygen pressure difference occurred. Inhalation of 2 ppM NO/sub 2/ did not decrease arterial oxygen pressure. Airway resistances increased significantly down to 1.5 ppM NO/sub 2/ concentrations. Lower concentrations caused no significant effects.

  4. The optimization of iloprost inhalation under moderate flow of oxygen therapy in severe pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Kazuhiko; Emoto, Noriaki; Tamada, Naoki; Okano, Mitsumasa; Shinkura, Yuto; Yanaka, Kenichi; Onishi, Hiroyuki; Hiraishi, Mana; Yamada, Shinichiro; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Shinke, Toshiro; Hirata, Ken-Ichi

    2018-01-01

    Inhaled iloprost efficiently improves pulmonary hemodynamics, exercise capacity, and quality of life in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, the process of inhalation is laborious for patients suffering from resting dyspnea. We describe a 75-year-old man with idiopathic PAH and a low gas transfer. Investigations excluded significant parenchymal lung disease and airflow obstruction (presuming FEV1/FVC ration > 70%). The patient struggled to complete iloprost inhalation due to severe dyspnea and hypoxemia. As such, we optimized the methods of oxygen supply from the nasal cannula to the trans-inhalator during the inhalation. We successfully shortened the inhalation duration that effectively reduced the laborious efforts required of patients. We also recorded pulmonary hemodynamics during inhalation of nebulized iloprost. This revealed significant hemodynamic improvement immediately following inhalation but hemodynamics returned to baseline within 2 hours. We hope that this optimization will enable patients with severe PAH to undergo iloprost inhalation.

  5. Subchronic inhalation toxicity of gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Yong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gold nanoparticles are widely used in consumer products, including cosmetics, food packaging, beverages, toothpaste, automobiles, and lubricants. With this increase in consumer products containing gold nanoparticles, the potential for worker exposure to gold nanoparticles will also increase. Only a few studies have produced data on the in vivo toxicology of gold nanoparticles, meaning that the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME of gold nanoparticles remain unclear. Results The toxicity of gold nanoparticles was studied in Sprague Dawley rats by inhalation. Seven-week-old rats, weighing approximately 200 g (males and 145 g (females, were divided into 4 groups (10 rats in each group: fresh-air control, low-dose (2.36 × 104 particle/cm3, 0.04 μg/m3, middle-dose (2.36 × 105 particle/cm3, 0.38 μg/m3, and high-dose (1.85 × 106 particle/cm3, 20.02 μg/m3. The animals were exposed to gold nanoparticles (average diameter 4-5 nm for 6 hours/day, 5 days/week, for 90-days in a whole-body inhalation chamber. In addition to mortality and clinical observations, body weight, food consumption, and lung function were recorded weekly. At the end of the study, the rats were subjected to a full necropsy, blood samples were collected for hematology and clinical chemistry tests, and organ weights were measured. Cellular differential counts and cytotoxicity measurements, such as albumin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, and total protein were also monitored in a cellular bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid. Among lung function test measurements, tidal volume and minute volume showed a tendency to decrease comparing control and dose groups during the 90-days of exposure. Although no statistically significant differences were found in cellular differential counts, histopathologic examination showed minimal alveoli, an inflammatory infiltrate with a mixed cell type, and increased macrophages in the high-dose rats. Tissue

  6. Engineering of an Inhalable DDA/TDB Liposomal Adjuvant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingvarsson, Pall Thor; Yang, Mingshi; Mulvad, Helle

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and optimize spray drying parameters of importance for the design of an inhalable powder formulation of a cationic liposomal adjuvant composed of dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA) bromide and trehalose-6,6'-dibehenate (TDB).......The purpose of this study was to identify and optimize spray drying parameters of importance for the design of an inhalable powder formulation of a cationic liposomal adjuvant composed of dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA) bromide and trehalose-6,6'-dibehenate (TDB)....

  7. Particle-size dependent effects in the Balb/c murine model of inhalational melioidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard eThomas

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Deposition of Burkholderia pseudomallei within either the lungs or nasal passages of the Balb/c murine model resulted in different infection kinetics. The infection resulting from the inhalation of B. pseudomallei within a 12 um particle aerosol was prolonged compared to a 1 um particle aerosol with a mean time-to-death (MTD of 73.8 ± 11.3 h and 174.7 ± 14.9 h respectively. Inhalation of B. pseudomallei within 1 um or 12 um particle aerosols resulted in a median lethal dose (MLD of 4 and 12 cfu respectively. The 12 mm particle inhalational infection was characterised by involvement of the respiratory epithelium and inflammation of the neurological path leading from the olfactory epithelium to the olfactory bulb (100%, culminating in abscessation of the brain (33%. Initial involvement of the upper respiratory tract lymphoid tissues (nasal-associated lymphoid tissue and cervical lymph nodes was observed in both the 1 and 12 um particle inhalational infections (80-85%. Necrotising alveolitis and bronchiolitis were evident in both inhalational infections however lung pathology was greater after inhalation of the 1 mm particle aerosol with pronounced involvement of the mediastinal lymph node (50%. Terminal disease was characterised by bacteraemia in both inhalational infections with dissemination to the spleen, liver, kidneys and thymus. Treatment with co-trimoxazole was more effective than treatment with doxycycline irrespective of the size of the particles inhaled. Doxycycline was more effective against the 12 um particle inhalational infection as evidenced by increased time to death. However, both treatment regimes exhibited significant relapse when therapy was discontinued with massive enlargement and abscessation of the lungs, spleen and cervical lymph nodes observed.

  8. The importance of inclusion of kinetic information in the extrapolation of high-to-low concentrations for human limit setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraets, Liesbeth; Zeilmaker, Marco J; Bos, Peter M J

    2018-01-05

    Human health risk assessment of inhalation exposures generally includes a high-to-low concentration extrapolation. Although this is a common step in human risk assessment, it introduces various uncertainties. One of these uncertainties is related to the toxicokinetics. Many kinetic processes such as absorption, metabolism or excretion can be subject to saturation at high concentration levels. In the presence of saturable kinetic processes of the parent compound or metabolites, disproportionate increases in internal blood or tissue concentration relative to the external concentration administered may occur resulting in nonlinear kinetics. The present paper critically reviews human health risk assessment of inhalation exposure. More specific, it emphasizes the importance of kinetic information for the determination of a safe exposure in human risk assessment of inhalation exposures assessed by conversion from a high animal exposure to a low exposure in humans. For two selected chemicals, i.e. methyl tert-butyl ether and 1,2-dichloroethane, PBTK-modelling was used, for illustrative purposes, to follow the extrapolation and conversion steps as performed in existing risk assessments for these chemicals. Human health-based limit values based on an external dose metric without sufficient knowledge on kinetics might be too high to be sufficiently protective. Insight in the actual internal exposure, the toxic agent, the appropriate dose metric, and whether an effect is related to internal concentration or dose is important. Without this, application of assessment factors on an external dose metric and the conversion to continuous exposure results in an uncertain human health risk assessment of inhalation exposures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Inhalation scan using sup(81m)Kr-gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Hidetoshi; Sasaki, Tsuneo; Senda, Kohei; Ohara, Ken; Kaii, Osamu

    1979-01-01

    Inhalation scan using sup(81m) Kr-gas was performed in the various pulmonary diseases, in order to examine the ventilatory function of the lung after the measurement of ratio of expiratory ratio in the normal and diseased lung field. Inhalation scan is applied to the various pulmonary diseases such as lung cancer, radiation pulmonary fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In cases of lung cancer, there is disturbance of respiratory function at the site of lesion when compared to the remainder of the normal lung fields. In cases of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the inhalation scan is performed at three states such as pre-, in- and post-attack of the disease. During the asthma attack the respiratory function is disturbed considerably when compared to the pre- and post-attack states. In each pulmonary disease, the ratio of expiratory ratio is measured from the histogram and pulmonary function is evaluated. (author)

  10. Asthma Patients in US Overuse Quick-Relief Inhalers, Underuse Control Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... quick-relief inhalers, underuse control medications Share | Asthma patients in US overuse quick-relief inhalers, underuse control ... and uncontrolled asthma result in poor health outcomes. Patients with well-controlled asthma are at lower risk ...

  11. Inhalational Gentamicin Treatment Is Effective Against Pneumonic Plague in a Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gur

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonic plague is an infectious disease characterized by rapid and fulminant development of acute pneumonia and septicemia that results in death within days of exposure. The causative agent of pneumonic plague, Yersinia pestis (Y. pestis, is a Tier-1 bio-threat agent. Parenteral antibiotic treatment is effective when given within a narrow therapeutic window after symptom onset. However, the non-specific “flu-like” symptoms often lead to delayed diagnosis and therapy. In this study, we evaluated inhalational gentamicin therapy in an infected mouse model as a means to improve antibiotic treatment efficacy. Inhalation is an attractive route for treating lung infections. The advantages include directly dosing the main infection site, the relative accessibility for administration and the lack of extensive enzymatic drug degradation machinery. In this study, we show that inhalational gentamicin treatment administered 24 h post-infection, prior to the appearance of symptoms, protected against lethal intranasal challenge with the fully virulent Y. pestis Kimberley53 strain (Kim53. Similarly, a high survival rate was demonstrated in mice treated by inhalation with another aminoglycoside, tobramycin, for which an FDA-approved inhaled formulation is clinically available for cystic fibrosis patients. Inhalational treatment with gentamicin 48 h post-infection (to symptomatic mice was also successful against a Y. pestis challenge dose of 10 i.n.LD50. Whole-body imaging using IVIS technology demonstrated that adding inhalational gentamicin to parenteral therapy accelerated the clearance of Y. pestis from the lungs of infected animals. This may reduce disease severity and the risk of secondary infections. In conclusion, our data suggest that inhalational therapy with aerosolized gentamicin may be an effective prophylactic treatment against pneumonic plague. We also demonstrate the benefit of combining this treatment with a conventional parenteral

  12. Agglomerate behaviour of fluticasone propionate within dry powder inhaler formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, V N P; Robins, E; Flament, M P

    2012-04-01

    Due to their small size, the respirable drug particles tend to form agglomerates which prevent flowing and aerosolisation. A carrier is used to be mixed with drug in one hand to facilitate the powder flow during manufacturing, in other hand to help the fluidisation upon patient inhalation. Depending on drug concentration, drug agglomerates can be formed in the mixture. The aim of this work was to study the agglomeration behaviour of fluticasone propionate (FP) within interactive mixtures for inhalation. The agglomerate phenomenon of fluticasone propionate after mixing with different fractions of lactose without fine particles of lactose (smaller than 32 μm) was demonstrated by the optical microscopy observation. A technique measuring the FP size in the mixture was developed, based on laser diffraction method. The FP agglomerate sizes were found to be in a linear correlation with the pore size of the carrier powder bed (R(2)=0.9382). The latter depends on the particle size distribution of carrier. This founding can explain the role of carrier size in de-agglomeration of drug particles in the mixture. Furthermore, it gives more structural information of interactive mixture for inhalation that can be used in the investigation of aerosolisation mechanism of powder. According to the manufacturing history, different batches of FP show different agglomeration intensities which can be detected by Spraytec, a new laser diffraction method for measuring aerodynamic size. After mixing with a carrier, Lactohale LH200, the most cohesive batch of FP, generates a lower fine particle fraction. It can be explained by the fact that agglomerates of fluticasone propionate with very large size was detected in the mixtures. By using silica-gel beads as ball-milling agent during the mixing process, the FP agglomerate size decreases accordingly to the quantity of mixing aid. The homogeneity and the aerodynamic performance of the mixtures are improved. The mixing aid based on ball

  13. Radioactivity reference levels in ceramics tiles as building materials for different countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, Josefina; Ballesteros, Luisa; Serradell, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    Measurements campaigns of ceramic tiles and raw materials used in them, shows that natural radionuclides of uranium ( 238 U) and thorium ( 232 Th) series, together with the radioactive isotope of potassium ( 40 K ), are presents. Uranium series contain radium, which decays to radon ( 222 Rn), an inert gas that can be released from materials and inhaled by individuals. Limits of 226 Ra concentrations are established by different countries in order to control Radon levels (200 Bq.m -3 in European Union). Potassium -40 and others gamma emitters of 226 Ra and 232 Th descendent, can cause an external dose. Therefore, with the purpose that individual doses due to building materials doesn't exceed a certain level recommendations or regulations have been established. A maximum value of 1 mSv.y -1 is recommended in European Union. In practice an easy way to avoid ceramic tiles provide doses to individuals over the reference level is to introduce an index, depending on activities concentrations of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K, defined so that the dose limits due, exclusively, to building materials, will never be exceeded. These limits and indexes present differences between countries. In this paper indexes are compared and differences are discussed. (author)

  14. Jet Fuel Kerosene is not Immunosuppressive in Mice or Rats Following Inhalation for 28 Days

    OpenAIRE

    White, Kimber L.; DeLorme, Michael P.; Beatty, Patrick W.; Smith, Matthew J.; Peachee, Vanessa L.

    2013-01-01

    Previous reports indicated that inhalation of JP-8 aviation turbine fuel is immunosuppressive. However, in some of those studies, the exposure concentrations were underestimated, and percent of test article as vapor or aerosol was not determined. Furthermore, it is unknown whether the observed effects are attributable to the base hydrocarbon fuel (jet fuel kerosene) or to the various fuel additives in jet fuels. The present studies were conducted, in compliance with Good Laboratory Practice (...

  15. Acute renal failure from inhalation of mycotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paolo, N; Guarnieri, A; Loi, F; Sacchi, G; Mangiarotti, A M; Di Paolo, M

    1993-01-01

    Mysterious deaths of archeologists after opening Egyptian tombs have been suspected to be secondary to inhalation of mycotoxin, however, the hypothesis has never been verified. Recently, we observed a case of acute renal failure (ARF) undeniably due to inhalation of ochratoxin of Aspergillus ochraceus. After spending 8 h in a granary which had been closed for several months, a farmer and his wife suffered temporary respiratory distress; 24 h later, the woman developed nonoliguric ARF and biopsy revealed tubulonecrosis which healed in 24 days. Toxic substances were not found, but a strain of A. ochraceus producing ochratoxin was isolated from the wheat.

  16. Influence of inhaler technique on asthma and COPD control: a multicenter experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudvarski Ilic A

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Aleksandra Dudvarski Ilic,1,2 Vladimir Zugic,1,2 Biljana Zvezdin,3,4 Ivan Kopitovic,3,4 Ivan Cekerevac,5,6 Vojislav Cupurdija,5,6 Nela Perhoc,7 Vesna Veljkovic,7 Aleksandra Barac8 1Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, 2Clinic for Pulmonology, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Belgrade, 3Faculty of Medicine, University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad, 4Institute for Pulmonary Diseases of Vojvodina, Sremska Kamenica, 5Faculty of Medicine, University of Kragujevac, 6Clinic for Pulmonology, Clinical Centre Kragujevac, Kragujevac, 7Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases Knez Selo, Clinical Centre Nis, Nis, 8Faculty of Stomatology, University Academy of Business Novi Sad, Novi Sad, Serbia Background: The successful management of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD mostly depends on adherence to inhalation drug therapy, the usage of which is commonly associated with many difficulties in real life. Improvement of patients’ adherence to inhalation technique could lead to a better outcome in the treatment of asthma and COPD.Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the utility of inhalation technique in clinical and functional control of asthma and COPD during a 3-month follow-up.Methods: A total of 312 patients with asthma or COPD who used dry powder Turbuhaler were enrolled in this observational study. During three visits (once a month, training in seven-step inhalation technique was given and it was practically demonstrated. Correctness of patients’ usage of inhaler was assessed in three visits by scoring each of the seven steps during administration of inhaler dose. Assessment of disease control was done at each visit and evaluated as: fully controlled, partially controlled, or uncontrolled. Patients’ subjective perception of the simplicity of inhalation technique, disease control, and quality of life were assessed by using specially designed questionnaires.Results: Significant improvement in inhalation technique was achieved after the

  17. The Effects of Inhaled Pimpinella peregrina Essential Oil on Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment, Anxiety, and Depression in Laboratory Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Emel; Hritcu, Lucian; Dogan, Gulden; Hayta, Sukru; Bagci, Eyup

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, we identified the effects of inhaled Pimpinella peregrina essential oil (1 and 3 %, for 21 continuous days) on scopolamine-induced memory impairment, anxiety, and depression in laboratory rats. Y-maze and radial arm-maze tests were used for assessing memory processes. Also, the anxiety and depressive responses were studied by means of the elevated plus-maze and forced swimming tests. The scopolamine alone-treated rats exhibited the following: decrease of the spontaneous alternation percentage in Y-maze test, increase of the number of working and reference memory errors in radial arm-maze test, along with decrease of the exploratory activity, the percentage of the time spent and the number of entries in the open arm within elevated plus-maze test and decrease of swimming time and increase of immobility time within forced swimming test. Inhalation of the P. peregrina essential oil significantly improved memory formation and exhibited anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects in scopolamine-treated rats. Our results suggest that the P. peregrina essential oil inhalation ameliorates scopolamine-induced memory impairment, anxiety, and depression. Moreover, studies on the P. peregrina essential oil may open a new therapeutic window for the prevention of neurological abnormalities closely related to Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Inhalative cadmium effects in pregnant and fetal rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prigge, E.

    1978-01-01

    Pregnant and non-pregnant rats were continuously exposed for 21 days to an aerosol containing 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 mg cadmium/m/sup 3/ air. Pregnant and non-pregnant rats exposed to clean air served as controls. The aerosol was generated by an ultrasonic nebulizer and was carried into inhalation chambers. The median aerodynamic diameters were on the order of 0.6 ..mu..m. After inhalation of cadmium aerosols, serum iron levels were not lowered significantly in adult rats. A polycythaemic response of non-pregnant rats was observed due to a direct stimulatory effect of cadmium on erythropoiesis. Polycythaemia was less marked in pregnancy, presumably due to iron loss to placenta and fetus. Disturbances of pulmonary gas exchange or decreased plasma volumes were excluded as causative mechanisms of polycythaemia. In pregnant rats there was a marked dose dependent decrease of the activity of the alkaline phosphatase after cadmium inhalation, while there was no effect in exposed non-pregnant rats. This decreased enzyme activity, together with slowed growth rates and hemolytic effect indicate a higher sensitivity to cadmium in pregnancy. Proteinuria was not found in neither pregnant nor non-pregnant rats. Therefore, it is concluded that in this respect cadmium intoxication by inhalation does not resemble human toxemia of pregnancy, as discussed in the literature.

  19. Determination of reference concentrations for inorganic analytes in groundwater at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    Background (or reference) concentrations for inorganics in Y-12 Plant groundwater were determined using a combination of statistical cluster analysis and conventional cumulative probability graphing. Objective was to develop a methodology for setting groundwater reference concentrations that uses all site groundwater data instead of only results of sampling upgradient of groundwater contamination. Y-12 was selected as prototype because the groundwater data set is very large and the data have been consistently collected since 1986. A conceptual framework of groundwater quality at Y-12 was formulated; as a quality check, data were statistically modeled or clustered. Ten hydrochemical regimes or clusters were identified. Six well clusters closely corresponded to the water quality framework and to observed water quality regimes in groundwater at Y-12. Four clusters were associated with nitrate, an S-3 Site contaminant, or with nonspecific contaminants commonly encountered at shallow depths at industrial sites (e.g., road salt). These four clusters were eliminated from the reference data set. Cumulative probability graphs were used within a cluster or group of clusters to distinguish contaminated wells from wells with ambient water quality. Only median values of unfiltered samples were plotted. Outlying data points (assumed to be contaminated samples) were identified and eliminated from the data set. When all outliers for a given inorganic had been identified and deleted from the data set, the reference concentration was set at the one-sided upper tolerance limit on the 95th percentile with 95% confidence. The methodology proved useful in integrating a large amount of data into the Y-12 plant groundwater conceptual framework and in identifying those wells or groups of wells that have monitoring or sample and analysis problems or that may be monitoring site-related contamination

  20. Two-week inhalation of budesonide increases muscle Na,K ATPase content but not endurance in response to terbutaline in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostrup, M; Jessen, S; Onslev, J; Clausen, T; Porsbjerg, C

    2017-07-01

    While chronic systemic administration of glucocorticoids increases muscle Na + ,K + ATPase content, such effect is unexplored after therapeutic inhalation. We investigated the effect of therapeutic inhalation of the glucocorticoid budesonide on Na + ,K + ATPase content of skeletal muscle in men. Ten healthy trained subjects, aged 23 ± 4 years (mean ± 95% CI), participated in the study. Before and after 2 weeks of daily inhalation of budesonide (1.6 mg/day), a biopsy was taken from the vastus lateralis muscle for measurement of Na + ,K + ATPase content and blood samples were drawn for determination of plasma budesonide, cortisol, and K + . Subjects' performance during cycling to fatigue at 90% of incremental peak power output (iPPO) was measured in response to 4 mg inhaled terbutaline to maximally stimulate Na + ,K + ATPase activity. Plasma concentrations of budesonide rose to 5.0 ± 1.6 nM with the intervention, whereas no changes were observed in plasma cortisol. Muscle Na + ,K + ATPase content increased (P ≤ 0.01) by 46 ± 34 pmol/(g wet wt) (17% increase) with the intervention. Cycling performance at 90% of iPPO did not change (P = 0.21) with the intervention (203 vs 214 s) in response to terbutaline. The present observations show that therapeutic inhalation of glucocorticoids increases muscle Na + ,K + ATPase content, but does not enhance high-intensity cycling endurance in response to terbutaline. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Regional specific mean expiratory gas flow from Slmsub(Kr) equilibrium inhalation data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, D.; Causer, D.A.; McIntosh, J.A.; Godfrey, K.R.

    1985-01-01

    A new method of analysing the data available from routine sup(81m) Kr equilibrium inhalation investigations has been developed. The data for analysis are acquired from a gamma camera in the form of a sequential series of images from which multiple breath activity-time curves are generated for eight regions in the lung. The method is based on a description of the behaviour of the radioactive gas in the lung using a mathematical model. Values of specific mean expiratory gas flow, that is mean expiratory gas flow per unit lung volume, are calculated from the application of the model to the expiratory phase only only of a single breath activity-time curve which is generated from the multiple breath activity-time curve using post-acquisition gating. This method overcomes the problem of non-uniform inspiratory concentration of tracer gas experienced in previously reported techniques of analysing inhalation data obtained using poorly soluble radioactive gases. The model is shown, in simulation studies, to be an adequate description of the behaviour of radioactive gas in the lung and the analysis technique is shown, in clinical studies, to be both reproducible and sensitive to disease state. (orig.)

  2. Isocyanate and total inhalable particulate air measurements in the European wood panel industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangronsveld, E; Berckmans, S; Verbinnen, K; Van Leeuw, C; Bormans, C

    2010-11-01

    It is well known that the use of MDI (methylene diphenyldiisocyanate) as an alternative for formaldehyde-based resins is seen as a responsible option to reduce formaldehyde emissions for CWP (Composite Wood Products) in buildings. However, there are concerns raised regarding the exposure risk of workers. The purpose of this article is to provide the reader with factual information to demonstrate that the use of MDI compared to other agents used in CWP production processes does not pose increased inhalation exposure risks for workers. Personal and area air measurements were carried out at nine Composite Wood Panel plants throughout Europe to assess potential inhalation exposures to MDI and wood dust as Total Inhalable Particulates (TIP). In total, 446 pairs of samples were collected for MDI and TIP of which 283 pairs were personal samples and the remaining 163 pairs were area samples collected at key locations along the production line. This data together with published formaldehyde exposure data has been used to evaluate the exposure safety margin opposite what are considered relevant occupational exposure limits. The methods used for sampling and analysing MDI and TIP are based on internationally accepted methods, i.e. MDHS 25/3 (or ISO 16702) for MDI, and MDHS 14/3 for TIP. The job functions with an increased exposure profile for TIP were the cleaners, drying operators and quality control staff, and for MDI, the cleaners and quality control staff. The areas with an increased exposure profile for TIP are the conveyor area from OSB blender to former area and the OSB press infeed, and for MDI the OSB weigh belt and OSB former bin area. The exposure safety margin opposite the selected exposure limits can be ranked as MDI>TIP>formaldehyde (high margin of safety to low margin of safety), indicating that the use of MDI also reduces the exposure risks to workers during production of CWP compared to formaldehyde. By reducing the airborne TIP concentrations, a respiratory

  3. Smoke inhalation injury in a pregnant patient: a literature review of the evidence and current best practices in the setting of a classic case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roderique, Ensign Joseph D; Gebre-Giorgis, Abel A; Stewart, Dane H; Feldman, Michael J; Pozez, Andrea L

    2012-01-01

    For smoke inhalation injury of a pregnant woman, one must treat two patients and be aware of the potential effects of carbon monoxide (CO) and cyanide (CN) poisoning on both the mother and the fetus. In a pregnant woman, the size and age of the fetus and the degree of poisoning allow for tremendous variability in the toxicity of CO and CN and their respective treatment options. The authors will review a case of a 32-year-old woman who was at 37 weeks of gestation and admitted to the Evans-Haynes Burn Center after a house fire and received hydroxocobalamin (Cyanokit) for suspected CN poisoning. In addition, a review of the literature, current guidelines, and treatment options of inhalation injury during pregnancy will be discussed. The authors will focus only on the toxic components of smoke inhalation injury rather than the mechanical components from heat and particulate damage. Literature review clearly identifies that the treatment of pregnant women with inhalation injury remains a controversial subject. The use of hydroxocobalamin (Cyanokit) as a treatment modality for potential CN poisoning in a pregnant patient has not been reported in the literature. Animal studies have shown that combined CO and CN poisoning are more lethal than either one alone and at lower concentrations. Due to the synergistic effects of CO and CN, and because these two toxins concentrate at even higher levels in the fetus than the mother, the authors will clarify the urgent seriousness of prompt administration of hydroxocobalamin in a pregnant patient with suspected smoke inhalation injury. This case review details the treatment of a 32-year-old woman who was at 36 weeks of gestation on admission to the Evans-Haynes Burn Center. The authors will report her injuries and the course of treatment. Although burned and presenting with concomitant smoke inhalation injury, both the woman and her child fared well with no significant complications due to the smoke inhalation at 6 months of follow

  4. Bioaccumulation and locomotor effects of manganese phosphate/sulfate mixture in Sprague-Dawley rats following subchronic (90 days) inhalation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehi, Fariba; Krewski, Daniel; Mergler, Donna; Normandin, Louise; Kennedy, Greg; Philippe, Suzanne; Zayed, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    Methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) is an organic manganese (Mn) compound added to unleaded gasoline in Canada. The primary combustion products of MMT are Mn phosphate, Mn sulfate, and a Mn phosphate/Mn sulfate mixture. Concerns have been raised that the combustion products of MMT containing Mn could be neurotoxic, even at low levels of exposure. The objective of this study is to investigate exposure-response relationships for bioaccumulation and locomotor effects following subchronic inhalation exposure to a mixture of manganese phosphates/sulfate mixture. A control group and three groups of 30 male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed in inhalation chambers for a period of 13 weeks, 5 days per week, 6 h a day. Exposure concentrations were 3000, 300, and 30 μg/m 3 . At the end of the exposure period, locomotor activity and resting time tests were conducted for 36 h using a computerized autotrack system. Rats were then euthanized by exsanguination and Mn concentrations in different tissues (liver, lung, testis, and kidney) and blood and brain (caudate putamen, globus pallidus, olfactory bulb, frontal cortex, and cerebellum) were determined by neutron activation analysis. Increased manganese concentrations were observed in blood, kidney, lung, testis, and in all brain sections in the highest exposure group. Mn in the lung and in the olfactory bulb were dose dependent. Our data indicate that the olfactory bulb accumulated more Mn than other brain regions following inhalation exposure. Locomotor activity was increased at 3000 μg/m 3 , but no difference was observed in resting time among the exposed groups. At the end of the experiment, rats exposed to 300 and 3000 μg/m 3 exhibited significantly decreased body weight in comparison with the control group. Biochemical profiles also revealed some significant differences in certain parameters, specifically alkaline phospatase, urea, and chlorate

  5. Bioaccumulation and locomotor effects of manganese phosphate/sulfate mixture in Sprague-Dawley rats following subchronic (90 days) inhalation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Fariba; Krewski, Daniel; Mergler, Donna; Normandin, Louise; Kennedy, Greg; Philippe, Suzanne; Zayed, Joseph

    2003-09-15

    Methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) is an organic manganese (Mn) compound added to unleaded gasoline in Canada. The primary combustion products of MMT are Mn phosphate, Mn sulfate, and a Mn phosphate/Mn sulfate mixture. Concerns have been raised that the combustion products of MMT containing Mn could be neurotoxic, even at low levels of exposure. The objective of this study is to investigate exposure-response relationships for bioaccumulation and locomotor effects following subchronic inhalation exposure to a mixture of manganese phosphates/sulfate mixture. A control group and three groups of 30 male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed in inhalation chambers for a period of 13 weeks, 5 days per week, 6 h a day. Exposure concentrations were 3000, 300, and 30 microg/m(3). At the end of the exposure period, locomotor activity and resting time tests were conducted for 36 h using a computerized autotrack system. Rats were then euthanized by exsanguination and Mn concentrations in different tissues (liver, lung, testis, and kidney) and blood and brain (caudate putamen, globus pallidus, olfactory bulb, frontal cortex, and cerebellum) were determined by neutron activation analysis. Increased manganese concentrations were observed in blood, kidney, lung, testis, and in all brain sections in the highest exposure group. Mn in the lung and in the olfactory bulb were dose dependent. Our data indicate that the olfactory bulb accumulated more Mn than other brain regions following inhalation exposure. Locomotor activity was increased at 3000 microg/m(3), but no difference was observed in resting time among the exposed groups. At the end of the experiment, rats exposed to 300 and 3000 microg/m(3) exhibited significantly decreased body weight in comparison with the control group. Biochemical profiles also revealed some significant differences in certain parameters, specifically alkaline phospatase, urea, and chlorate.

  6. Synthesis and evaluation of inhaled [11C]butane and intravenously injected [11C]acetone as potential radiotracers for studying inhalant abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasimov, Madina R.; Ferrieri, Richard A.; Pareto, Deborah; Logan, Jean; Alexoff, David; Ding Yushin

    2005-01-01

    The phenomenon of inhalant abuse is a growing problem in the US and many countries around the world. Yet, relatively little is known about the pharmacokinetic properties of inhalants that underlie their abuse potential. While the synthesis of 11 C-labeled toluene, acetone and butane has been proposed in the literature, none of these compounds has been developed as radiotracers for PET studies. In the present report we extend our previous studies with [ 11 C]toluene to include [ 11 C]acetone and [ 11 C]butane with the goal of comparing the pharmacokinetic profiles of these three volatile abused substances. Both [ 11 C]toluene and [ 11 C]acetone were administered intravenously and [ 11 C]butane was administered via inhalation to anesthesized baboons. Rapid and efficient uptake of radiolabeled toluene and acetone into the brain was followed by fast clearance in the case of toluene and slower kinetics in the case of acetone. [ 11 C]Butane was detected in the blood and brain following inhalation, but the levels of radioactivity in both tissues dropped to half of the maximal values over the period of less than a minute. To our knowledge, this is the first reported study of the in vivo brain pharmacokinetics of labeled acetone and butane in nonhuman primates. These data provide insight into the pharmacokinetic features possibly associated with the abuse liability of toluene, acetone and butane

  7. Disparities in young adolescent inhalant use by rurality, gender, and ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Ruth W; Stanley, Linda; Plested, Barbara Ann; Marquart, Beverly S; Chen, Julie; Thurman, Pamela Jumper

    2007-01-01

    Inhalant use is of increasing concern as rates appear to be rising among young adolescents and gender differences narrowing. Data from 20,684 Mexican American and White non-Hispanic seventh- and eighth-grade males and females from the Western United States and 15,659 African American and White non-Hispanic seventh- and eighth-grade males and females from states in the southeastern United States collected via in-school surveys from 1996 to 2000 were analyzed using a variety of statistical techniques including multilevel modeling. Questions addressed in the study included: Does inhalant use vary by level of rurality? What effect does the ethnic composition of the community have on inhalant use and does this effect differ by an individual's ethnicity? Do males use more inhalants than females and does the level of use by males and females differ by individual ethnicity, ethnicity of the community, or level of rurality? Do males and females of different ethnicities initiate inhalant use at different ages? Limitations of the study and implications of findings for prevention are discussed and areas of future research are suggested. This study was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

  8. [Pollution characteristics and health risk assessment of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in pesticide factory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Bing; Wang, Tie-Yu; Pang, Bo; Zhu, Zhao-Yun; Wang, Dao-Han; Lü, Yong-Long

    2013-12-01

    A method for determining volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air by summa canister collecting and gas chromatography/ mass spectroscopy detecting was adopted. Pollution condition and characteristics of VOCs were discussed in three representative pesticide factories in Zhangjiakou City, Hebei Province. Meanwhile, an internationally recognized four-step evaluation model of health risk assessment was applied to preliminarily assess the health risk caused by atmospheric VOCs in different exposure ways, inhalation and dermal exposure. Results showed that serious total VOCs pollution existed in all factories. Concentrations of n-hexane (6161.90-6910.00 microg x m(-3)), benzene (126.00-179.30 microg x m(-3)) and 1,3-butadiene (115.00-177.30 microg x m(-3)) exceeded the Chronic Inhalation Reference Concentrations recommended by USEPA, corresponding to 700, 30 and 2 microg x m(-3), respectively. Concentration of dichloromethane (724.00 microg x m(-3)) in factory B was also higher than the reference concentration (600 microg x m(-3)). Results of health risk assessment indicated that non-carcinogenic risk indexes of VOCs ranged from 1.00E-04 to 1.00E + 00 by inhalation exposure, and 1.00E-09 to 1.00E-05 by dermal exposure. Risk indexes of n-hexane and dichloromethane by inhalation exposure in all factories exceeded 1, and risk index of benzene by inhalation in factory B was also higher than 1. Carcinogenic risk indexes exposed to VOCs ranged from 1.00E-08 to 1.00E-03 by inhalation exposure and 1. oo00E -13 to 1.00E-08 by dermal exposure. Cancer risk of 1,3-butadiene by inhalation exceeded 1.0E-04, which lead to definite risk, and those of benzene by inhalation also exceeded the maximum allowable level recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection (5.0E-05). The risks of dermal exposure presented the same trend as inhalation exposure, but the level was much lower than that of inhalation exposure. Thus, inhalation exposure of atmospheric VOCs was the

  9. Exposure levels and determinants of inhalable dust exposure in bakeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstyn, I; Teschke, K; Kennedy, S M

    1997-12-01

    The study's objectives were to measure full-shift exposure to inhalable dust in bakeries and define the determinants of full-shift exposure. Inhalable dust was measured gravimetrically. Ninety-six bakery workers, employed in seven different bakeries, participated in the study. Two side-by-side full-shift inhalable dust samples were obtained from each study participant on a single occasion. Samples were collected on 18 days selected at random. During the entire sampling period, bakers were observed and information on 14 different tasks was recorded at 15 min intervals. Other production characteristics were also recorded for each sampling day. These task and production variables were used in statistical modelling to identify significant predictors of exposure. The mean full-shift inhalable dust exposure was 8.2 mg/m3 (range: 0.1-110 mg/m3). A regression model explained 79% of the variability in exposure. The model indicated that tasks such as weighing, pouring and operating dough-brakers and reversible sheeters increased the exposure, while packing, catching and decorating decreased the exposure. Bread and bun production lines were associated with increased full-shift inhalable dust exposure, while cake production and substitution of dusting with the use of divider oil were associated with decreased exposure. Production tasks and characteristics are strong predictors of personal full-shift exposures to flour dust among bakers; these can be altered to reduce exposure levels.

  10. Inhaler education for hospital-based pharmacists: how much is required?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackevicius, C A; Chapman, K R

    1999-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of a more intensive educational intervention with a less intensive intervention on the ability of hospital pharmacists to be prepared to educate patients regarding inhaled device technique. Randomized controlled trial. Inhaler technique and knowledge were assessed pre-education, immediately after and three months after education by a research assistant blinded to the educational allocation. Tertiary hospital pharmacy department. Hospital-based pharmacists. A 1 h 'hands-on' session with feedback (more intense education, MIE) or written materials describing inhaler use (less intense education, LIE). The change in overall score from pre-education to early posteducation for MIE was greater than for LIE (mean [95% CI]) (2.64 [1.27 to 4.01] versus 1.26 [0.05 to 2.47], PMIE group than the LIE group, a difference that was not statistically significant (1.78 [0.82 to 2.74] versus 1. 22 [0.06 to 2.39], P=0.09). Scores in both groups were lower in the late posteducation period compared with the early posteducation period. Greater increases in total score in the immediate posteducation period were associated with a low baseline score and the MIE intervention. Individual coaching in inhaler technique produces greater improvement in inhaler knowledge among hospital pharmacists than provision of written materials. However, the advantage of the more intensive intervention was short-lived, with little advantage evident in three months.

  11. Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute annual report, October 1, 1987--September 30, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mewhinney, J.A.; Bechtold, W.E.; Sun, J.D.; Coons, T.A. (eds.)

    1988-12-01

    The mission of the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute is to investigate the nature and magnitude of human health effects that result from the inhalation of airborne materials at home, in the work place, or in the general environment. Diseases of the respiratory tract are major causes of suffering and death, and many of these diseases are directly related to the materials that people breathe. The Institute's research is directed toward obtaining a better understanding of the basic biology of the respiratory tract and the mechanisms by which inhaled materials produce respiratory disease. Special attention is focused on studying the airborne materials released by various energy technologies, as well as those associated with national defense activities. The research uses a wide-ranging, comprehensive array of investigative approaches that are directed toward characterizing the source of the airborne material, following the material through its potential transformation in the air, identifying the mechanisms that govern its inhalation and deposition in the respiratory tract, and determining the fate of these inhaled materials in the body and the health effects they produce. The ultimate objectives are to determine the roles played by inhaled materials in the development of disease processes and to estimate the risk they pose to humans who may be exposed to them.

  12. A perspective on the developmental toxicity of inhaled nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Campagnolo, Luisa; Chavatte-Palmer, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    This paper aimed to clarify whether maternal inhalation of engineered nanoparticles (NP) may constitute a hazard to pregnancy and fetal development, primarily based on experimental animal studies of NP and air pollution particles. Overall, it is plausible that NP may translocate from the respirat......This paper aimed to clarify whether maternal inhalation of engineered nanoparticles (NP) may constitute a hazard to pregnancy and fetal development, primarily based on experimental animal studies of NP and air pollution particles. Overall, it is plausible that NP may translocate from...... the respiratory tract to the placenta and fetus, but also that adverse effects may occur secondarily to maternal inflammatory responses. The limited database describes several organ systems in the offspring to be potentially sensitive to maternal inhalation of particles, but large uncertainties exist about...

  13. Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) Conversion from N-Ethyl-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-perfluorooctanesulfonamide (EtFOSE) in male Sprague Dawley rats after inhalation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Sue; Mader, Brian T.; Lindstrom, Kent R.; Lange, Cleston C.; Hart, Jill A.; Kestner, Thomas A.; Schulz, Jay F.; Ehresman, David J.; Butenhoff, John L.

    2017-01-01

    Ethyl-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-perfluorooctanesulfonamide (EtFOSE) was one of the key building blocks for many of the perfluorooctanesulfonyl-based chemistry and laboratory studies have shown that EtFOSE can metabolically degrade to perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS). Non-occupational contribution sources to PFOS are thought to occur in general population via diets, drinking water, air and dust. For workers, however, the exposure route was mostly airborne and the exposure source was predominantly to precursor compounds such as EtFOSE. We undertook this study to investigate how much EtFOSE was converted to PFOS in the serum for male rats after 6 h of exposure to EtFOSE vapor (whole body) at ambient temperature, which simulated a work place exposure scenario. There were no abnormal clinical observations and all rats gained weight during study. Interim tail-vein blood samples, collected up to 21 days after exposure, were analyzed for Et-FOSE and PFOS concentrations by LC-MS/MS. Upon inhalation exposure, the biotransformation of EtFOSE to PFOS in serum in the male rats was rapid and very little EtFOSE was detected in the serum within 24 h after EtFOSE exposure. The highest conversion to PFOS in serum after exposure to EtFOSE vapor appeared to occur between Day 8−14 post exposure. Considering the potential surface and fur adsorption of test compound in the whole-body exposure system, our data would support that at least 10% of the inhaled EtFOSE was biotransformed to PFOS in the serum based on the range of lower 95% CI (confidence interval) values. This information is valuable because it quantitatively translates EtFOSE exposure into serum PFOS concentration, which serves as a matrix for internal dosimetry (of PFOS exposure) that can be used as an anchor across species as well as between different exposure routes. - Highlights: • First inhalation study reported in rats that investigates the conversion of a major precursor compound (EtFOSE) to form PFOS. • Systemic

  14. Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) Conversion from N-Ethyl-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-perfluorooctanesulfonamide (EtFOSE) in male Sprague Dawley rats after inhalation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Sue, E-mail: s.chang@mmm.com [Medical Department, 3M Company, St. Paul, MN 55144 (United States); Mader, Brian T., E-mail: bmader@mmm.com [Environmental Laboratory, 3M Company, St. Paul, MN 55144 (United States); Lindstrom, Kent R., E-mail: krlindstrom@mmm.com [Environmental Laboratory, 3M Company, St. Paul, MN 55144 (United States); Lange, Cleston C., E-mail: clange@mmm.com [Environmental Laboratory, 3M Company, St. Paul, MN 55144 (United States); Hart, Jill A., E-mail: jahart@mmm.com [Medical Department, 3M Company, St. Paul, MN 55144 (United States); Kestner, Thomas A., E-mail: takestner@mmm.com [Materials Resource Division, 3M Company, St. Paul, MN 55144 (United States); Schulz, Jay F., E-mail: jfschulz@mmm.com [Materials Resource Division, 3M Company, St. Paul, MN 55144 (United States); Ehresman, David J., E-mail: depqehr@gmail.com [Medical Department, 3M Company, St. Paul, MN 55144 (United States); Butenhoff, John L., E-mail: john.butenhoff@gmail.com [SaluTox, LLC, Lake Elmo, MN 55042 (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Ethyl-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-perfluorooctanesulfonamide (EtFOSE) was one of the key building blocks for many of the perfluorooctanesulfonyl-based chemistry and laboratory studies have shown that EtFOSE can metabolically degrade to perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS). Non-occupational contribution sources to PFOS are thought to occur in general population via diets, drinking water, air and dust. For workers, however, the exposure route was mostly airborne and the exposure source was predominantly to precursor compounds such as EtFOSE. We undertook this study to investigate how much EtFOSE was converted to PFOS in the serum for male rats after 6 h of exposure to EtFOSE vapor (whole body) at ambient temperature, which simulated a work place exposure scenario. There were no abnormal clinical observations and all rats gained weight during study. Interim tail-vein blood samples, collected up to 21 days after exposure, were analyzed for Et-FOSE and PFOS concentrations by LC-MS/MS. Upon inhalation exposure, the biotransformation of EtFOSE to PFOS in serum in the male rats was rapid and very little EtFOSE was detected in the serum within 24 h after EtFOSE exposure. The highest conversion to PFOS in serum after exposure to EtFOSE vapor appeared to occur between Day 8−14 post exposure. Considering the potential surface and fur adsorption of test compound in the whole-body exposure system, our data would support that at least 10% of the inhaled EtFOSE was biotransformed to PFOS in the serum based on the range of lower 95% CI (confidence interval) values. This information is valuable because it quantitatively translates EtFOSE exposure into serum PFOS concentration, which serves as a matrix for internal dosimetry (of PFOS exposure) that can be used as an anchor across species as well as between different exposure routes. - Highlights: • First inhalation study reported in rats that investigates the conversion of a major precursor compound (EtFOSE) to form PFOS. • Systemic

  15. A physiologically based toxicokinetic model for inhaled ethylene and ethylene oxide in mouse, rat, and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filser, Johannes Georg; Klein, Dominik

    2018-04-01

    Ethylene (ET) is the largest volume organic chemical. Mammals metabolize the olefin to ethylene oxide (EO), another important industrial chemical. The epoxide alkylates macromolecules and has mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. In order to estimate the EO burden in mice, rats, and humans resulting from inhalation exposure to gaseous ET or EO, a physiological toxicokinetic model was developed. It consists of the compartments lung, richly perfused tissues, kidneys, muscle, fat, arterial blood, venous blood, and liver containing the sub-compartment endoplasmic reticulum. Modeled ET metabolism is mediated by hepatic cytochrome P450 2E1, EO metabolism by hepatic microsomal epoxide hydrolase or cytosolic glutathione S-transferase in various tissues. EO is also spontaneously hydrolyzed or conjugated with glutathione. The model was validated on experimental data collected in mice, rats, and humans. Modeled were uptake by inhalation, wash-in-wash-out effect in the upper respiratory airways, distribution into tissues and organs, elimination via exhalation and metabolism, and formation of 2-hydroxyethyl adducts with hemoglobin and DNA. Simulated concentration-time courses of ET or EO in inhaled (gas uptake studies) or exhaled air, and of EO in blood during exposures to ET or EO agreed excellently with measured data. Predicted levels of adducts with DNA and hemoglobin, induced by ET or EO, agreed with reported levels. Exposures to 10000 ppm ET were predicted to induce the same adduct levels as EO exposures to 3.95 (mice), 5.67 (rats), or 0.313 ppm (humans). The model is concluded to be applicable for assessing health risks from inhalation exposure to ET or EO. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Lung Deposition Analyses of Inhaled Toxic Aerosols in Conventional and Less Harmful Cigarette Smoke: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Feng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Inhaled toxic aerosols of conventional cigarette smoke may impact not only the health of smokers, but also those exposed to second-stream smoke, especially children. Thus, less harmful cigarettes (LHCs, also called potential reduced exposure products (PREPs, or modified risk tobacco products (MRTP have been designed by tobacco manufacturers to focus on the reduction of the concentration of carcinogenic components and toxicants in tobacco. However, some studies have pointed out that the new cigarette products may be actually more harmful than the conventional ones due to variations in puffing or post-puffing behavior, different physical and chemical characteristics of inhaled toxic aerosols, and longer exposure conditions. In order to understand the toxicological impact of tobacco smoke, it is essential for scientists, engineers and manufacturers to develop experiments, clinical investigations, and predictive numerical models for tracking the intake and deposition of toxicants of both LHCs and conventional cigarettes. Furthermore, to link inhaled toxicants to lung and other diseases, it is necessary to determine the physical mechanisms and parameters that have significant impacts on droplet/vapor transport and deposition. Complex mechanisms include droplet coagulation, hygroscopic growth, condensation and evaporation, vapor formation and changes in composition. Of interest are also different puffing behavior, smoke inlet conditions, subject geometries, and mass transfer of deposited material into systemic regions. This review article is intended to serve as an overview of contributions mainly published between 2009 and 2013, focusing on the potential health risks of toxicants in cigarette smoke, progress made in different approaches of impact analyses for inhaled toxic aerosols, as well as challenges and future directions.

  17. Standard Test Method for Calibration of Non-Concentrator Photovoltaic Secondary Reference Cells

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers calibration and characterization of secondary terrestrial photovoltaic reference cells to a desired reference spectral irradiance distribution. The recommended physical requirements for these reference cells are described in Specification E1040. Reference cells are principally used in the determination of the electrical performance of a photovoltaic device. 1.2 Secondary reference cells are calibrated indoors using simulated sunlight or outdoors in natural sunlight by reference to a primary reference cell previously calibrated to the same desired reference spectral irradiance distribution. 1.3 Secondary reference cells calibrated according to this test method will have the same radiometric traceability as the of the primary reference cell used for the calibration. Therefore, if the primary reference cell is traceable to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR, see Test Method E816), the resulting secondary reference cell will also be traceable to the WRR. 1.4 This test method appli...

  18. Dietary and inhalation exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and urinary excretion of monohydroxy metabolites – A controlled case study in Beijing, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yanyan; Ding, Junnan; Shen, Guofeng; Zhong, Junjun; Wang, Chen; Wei, Siye; Chen, Chaoqi; Chen, Yuanchen; Lu, Yan; Shen, Huizhong; Li, Wei; Huang, Ye; Chen, Han; Su, Shu; Lin, Nan; Wang, Xilong; Liu, Wenxin; Tao, Shu

    2014-01-01

    Daily dietary and inhalation exposures to 16 parent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and urinary excretion of 13 monohydroxy metabolites (OHPAHs) were monitored for 12 non-smoking university students in Beijing, China, during a controlled feeding experiment. The relationship between the urinary excretion of OHPAHs and the uptake of PAHs was investigated. The results suggest severe exposure of the subjects to PAHs via both dietary and inhalation pathways. Large increase of most urinary OHPAHs occurred after the ingestion of lamb kabob. Higher concentrations of OHPAHs were observed for female subjects, with the intakes of parent PAHs lower than those by males, likely due to the gender differences in metabolism. It appears that besides 1-PYR, metabolites of PHE could also be used as biomarkers to indicate the short-term dietary exposure to PAHs and urinary 3-BaA may serve as the biomarker for inhalation intake of high molecular weight PAHs. Highlights: • The dependence of urinary OHPAHs on PAH intake was explored. • Consumption of lamb kabob resulted in large increase of most urinary OHPAHs. • Gender differences in PAH metabolism was observed. • Urinary metabolites of PHE and PYR can be used as biomarkers for dietary PAH intake. • Urinary 3-BaA may serve as the indicator for the inhalation exposure to BaP eq . -- Severe exposure to PAHs via dietary and inhalation pathways indicated by the intake of parent PAHs as well as the urinary excretion of OHPAHs, was observed for students in Beijing

  19. Optically transmitted and inductively coupled electric reference to access in vivo concentrations for quantitative proton-decoupled ¹³C magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; Pavan, Matteo; Heinzer-Schweizer, Susanne; Boesiger, Peter; Henning, Anke

    2012-01-01

    This report describes our efforts on quantification of tissue metabolite concentrations in mM by nuclear Overhauser enhanced and proton decoupled (13) C magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the Electric Reference To access In vivo Concentrations (ERETIC) method. Previous work showed that a calibrated synthetic magnetic resonance spectroscopy-like signal transmitted through an optical fiber and inductively coupled into a transmit/receive coil represents a reliable reference standard for in vivo (1) H magnetic resonance spectroscopy quantification on a clinical platform. In this work, we introduce a related implementation that enables simultaneous proton decoupling and ERETIC-based metabolite quantification and hence extends the applicability of the ERETIC method to nuclear Overhauser enhanced and proton decoupled in vivo (13) C magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In addition, ERETIC signal stability under the influence of simultaneous proton decoupling is investigated. The proposed quantification method was cross-validated against internal and external reference standards on human skeletal muscle. The ERETIC signal intensity stability was 100.65 ± 4.18% over 3 months including measurements with and without proton decoupling. Glycogen and unsaturated fatty acid concentrations measured with the ERETIC method were in excellent agreement with internal creatine and external phantom reference methods, showing a difference of 1.85 ± 1.21% for glycogen and 1.84 ± 1.00% for unsaturated fatty acid between ERETIC and creatine-based quantification, whereas the deviations between external reference and creatine-based quantification are 6.95 ± 9.52% and 3.19 ± 2.60%, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The importance of continuity in inhaler device choice for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjermer, Leif

    2014-01-01

    Inhaled therapies are central to the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Physicians consider many factors when selecting the most appropriate inhaler device, including device efficacy and the cost to the health care system. This review aims to discuss the factors that are important when considering inhaler devices and the importance of continuity in the choice of inhaler device. A large number of factors can contribute to therapeutic outcomes with inhalation devices. The inhalation technique is critical to treatment success and differs substantially between inhaler devices. Misuse of an inhaler is common, and thorough training of patients and physicians is important to ensure correct utilization. Patient satisfaction is an important consideration because it is significantly correlated with compliance and better outcomes. Financial pressures contribute to decision making: although selecting the less expensive inhaler device might reduce direct treatment costs, it can have a large impact on disease control and the patient's well-being. Switching may be associated with a poor inhalation technique, reduced disease control and quality of life, increased use of other treatments and health care resources, and a greater chance of unsuccessful treatment. Nonconsensual switches can result in patient discontent, reduced confidence in the medication, and uncertainty regarding the degree of disease control. It is recommended that patients with stable disease remain on their current device. If a switch is considered, the patient should be consulted and the physician should take into account the patient's preference, their ability to correctly use the device, and the availability of the preferred drug in the preferred device.

  1. Inhalant drug use and street youth : Ethnographic insights from Mexico City

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gigengack, Roy; Preedy, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The inhalation of volatile substances with intentions of intoxication affects the lives of marginalized youths around the globe, but remains poorly understood. Based upon long-term ethnographic enquiry, this chapter describes the inhalant use of Mexico City's young street people from their

  2. Foreign Body Inhalation: A Review of Patients at the Korle Bu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Foreign body inhalation, a surgical emergency requiring prompt management to avoid morbidity and mortality , poses a diagnostic and management challenge to otolaryngologists. OBJECTIVE: To assess the pattern of foreign body inhalation at the ENT Unit Korle Bu Teaching Hospital Accra, Ghana.

  3. Baseline reference range for trace metal concentrations in whole blood of wild and managed West Indian Manatees (Trichechus manatus) in Florida and Belize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Noel Y.; Walsh, Michael T; Bonde, Robert K.; Powell, James A.; Bass, Dean A.; Gaspard, Joseph C.; Barber, David S.

    2016-01-01

    The West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus) is exposed to a number of anthropogenic influences, including metals, as they inhabit shallow waters with close proximity to shore. While maintaining homeostasis of many metals is crucial for health, there is currently no baseline reference range that can be used to make clinical and environmental decisions for this endangered species. In this study, whole blood samples from 151 manatees were collected during health assessments performed in Florida and Belize from 2008 through 2011. Whole blood samples (n = 37) from managed care facilities in Florida and Belize from 2009 through 2011 were also used in this study. The concentrations of 17 metals in whole blood were determined, and the data were used to derive a baseline reference range. Impacts of capture location, age, and sex on whole blood metal concentrations were examined. Location and age were related to copper concentrations as values were significantly higher in habitats near urban areas and in calves. Copper may also be a husbandry concern as concentrations were significantly higher in managed manatees (1.17 ± 0.04 ppm) than wild manatees (0.73 ± 0.02 ppm). Zinc (11.20 ± 0.30 ppm) was of special interest as normal concentrations were two to five times higher than other marine mammal species. Arsenic concentrations were higher in Belize (0.43 ± 0.07 ppm), with Placencia Lagoon having twice the concentration of Belize City and Southern Lagoon. Selenium concentrations were lower (0.18 ± 0.09 ppm) than in other marine mammal species. The lowest selenium concentrations were observed in rehabilitating and managed manatees which may warrant additional monitoring in managed care facilities. The established preliminary baseline reference range can be used by clinicians, biologists, and managers to monitor the health of West Indian manatees.

  4. Committed effective dose from thoron daughters inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, M.P.; Pecequilo, B.R.S.

    2000-01-01

    Mankind's interest in natural radiation exposure levels has increased over the past fifty years and it is now recognized that the most significant contributors to human irradiation by natural sources are the short-lived decay products of radon ( 222 Rn) and thoron ( 220 Rn). Despite the thoron short half-life of 55 s, effective dose from inhalation of thoron an its progeny ( 212 Pb and 212 Bi) must be considered, owing to the high thorium background in countries like Brazil, China and India, for example. The indoor committed effective dose was assessed by air sampling at the thorium purification plant and the nuclear materials storage site of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares; Sao Paulo, Brazil. A total of 21 glass fiber filter samples was analyzed by high resolution gamma ray spectrometry in order to obtain the 212 Pb and 212 Bi activities. The equilibrium equivalent concentration (EEC) varied from 0.3 Bq/m 3 to 6.8 Bq/m 3 for the storage site air samples and from 9.9 Bq/m 3 to 249.8 Bq/m 3 for the thorium purification plant air samples. As retention studies indicate a biological half-life of a few hours inhaled thoron progeny in the human lungs, the main fraction of the potential alpha energy (PAEC) deposited is absorbed in the lungs, meaning negligible to the effective dose the contribution of the dose in other times. The committed effective dose due thoron progeny was performed by compartimental analysis following the ICRP 66 lung compartimental model and ICRP 67 lead compartimental model. The values obtained varied from 0.03 mSv/a to 0.67 mSv/a for the storage site air samples and from 0.12 mSv/a to 6.00 mSv/a for the thorium purification plant air samples. (author)

  5. Inhalation exposures during operations in spent fuel bays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dua, S.K.; Maniyan, C.G.; Kotrappa, P.

    1987-01-01

    Radioactive aerosols are generated during operations (transfer, cutting, storage and shipment of fuel) in spent fuel bays. A study has been carried out on the airborne concentration, size distribution and solubility of the aerosol, to evaluate the inhalation exposure of the workers. Personal air samplers were used for the measurement of concentration of airborne radioactivity and Andersen impactor for particle size distribution. Some of the collected sampels were followed for their solubility in lung serum simulant for a period of about 200 days. The observed concentrations of the aerosols and their activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMAD) were 418 ± 443 Bq m -3 (βγ), 1.28 ± 1.478 Bq m -3 (∞) and 6.79 ± 0.4μm respectively. Analysis of the samples revealed the presence of 239 Pu, U, 90 Sr and 137 Cs. The clearance half-life of the aerosols was the same (155 days) for all the isotopes (U, 239 Pu, 90 Sr; 137 Cs). Calculation of effective dose equivalent for the clearance half-life and for 6.79 μm AMAD aerosols was carried out using the method recommended in ICRP-30. Annual effective dose equivalent of the workers, if no respirators were worn, worked out to be 3.2 mSv (320 mrem), the contribution from alpha emitters being about 63 per cent of the total. (author). 5 refs., 2 tables

  6. ATTITUDES OF PATIENTS WITH ASTHMA ON INHALER USE- A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY FROM SOUTH KERALA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shajahan Purathel Sulaiman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Asthma is an important health problem worldwide. High prevalence and poor control of asthma make its management a major public health problem with more than 5,00,000 hospital admissions and 2,50,000 deaths annually all over the world. India contribute maximum to the death toll accounting for 22.3% of all global asthma deaths. Medications in the inhaled forms are the best therapeutic options currently available for asthma. Despite this, the percentage of patients opting inhalers as the preferred modality of treatment seems to be low. The patient’s ability to use the device correctly and the adherence to the treatment regimen are likely to be influenced by their beliefs, attitudes and concerns about the use of inhalers as the preferred mode of treatment. The aim of the study is to- 1. To find out the proportion of asthmatics using inhalers as the preferred modality of treatment. 2. To bring out the various beliefs and misconceptions on inhalers among the above study group. MATERIALS AND METHODS Study subjects were asthmatics in the age group of 15 to 45 years who attended the medical camps conducted in Alappuzha and Kottayam districts of Kerala during the period 2006-2009 (n=912. A semi-structured interview schedule regarding the use of inhalers were administered to collect the data. RESULTS 52% of the study subjects accept inhaled preparations as the preferred modality of treatment (male-68%, female-35%. 48% are reluctant to take inhalers in the first step (male- 32%, female- 65%. 47% believe the term inhaler is the name of a particular drug rather than a device (male- 45%, female- 48%. 76% of inhaler users do not know how to use it properly. 7% think the powder in the dry powder inhalers can block the airways. CONCLUSION Knowledge about asthma and the importance of its proper management are poor in our population. A joint effort in the form of health awareness programmes are needed to alleviate fears and misconceptions of patients

  7. Fine particle mass from the Diskus inhaler and Turbuhaler inhaler in children with asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H; Klug, B; Sumby, B S

    1998-01-01

    (1) from the 8 yr old children, respectively. Similar particle fractions from the Budesonide Turbuhaler were 35 (9), 21 (10) and 7 (5) from 4 yr old children and 30 (7), 32 (9) and 12 (6) from 8 yr old children. In conclusion, the Diskus inhaler provides an improved dose consistency through...

  8. Aspergillus fumigatus viability drives allergic responses to inhaled conidia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Ajay P; Croston, Tara L; Lemons, Angela R; Goldsmith, W T; Marshall, Nikki B; Kashon, Michael L; Germolec, Dori R; Beezhold, Donald H; Green, Brett J

    2018-04-13

    Aspergillus fumigatus induced allergic airway disease has been shown to involve conidial germination in vivo but the immunological mechanisms remain uncharacterized. A subchronic murine exposure model was used to examine the immunological mediators that are regulated in response to either culturable or non-culturable A. fumigatus conidia. Female B6C3F1/N mice were repeatedly dosed via inhalation with 1 x 105 viable or heat inactivated conidia (HIC), twice a week for 13 weeks (26 exposures). Control mice inhaled HEPA-filtered air. The influence of A. fumigatus conidial germination on the pulmonary immunopathological outcomes was evaluated by flow cytometry analysis of cellular infiltration in the airways, assessment of lung mRNA expression, and quantitative proteomics and histopathology of whole lung tissue. Repeated inhalation of viable conidia, but not HIC, resulted in allergic inflammation marked by vascular remodeling, extensive eosinophilia, and accumulation of alternatively activated macrophages (AAMs) in the murine airways. More specifically, mice that inhaled viable conidia resulted in a mixed TH1 and TH2 (IL-13) cytokine response. Recruitment of eosinophils corresponded with increased Ccl11 transcripts. Furthermore, genes associated with M2 or alternatively activated macrophage polarization (e.g. Arg1, Chil3 and Retnla) were significantly upregulated in viable A. fumigatus exposed mice. In mice inhaling HIC, CD4+ T cells expressing IFN-γ (TH1) dominated the lymphocytic infiltration. Quantitative proteomics of the lung revealed metabolic reprogramming accompanied by mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress stimulated by oxidative stress from repetitive microbial insult. Our studies demonstrate that A. fumigatus conidial viability in vivo is critical to the immunopathological presentation of chronic fungal allergic disease. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Recreational inhalation of butane and propane in adolescents: Two forensic cases of accidental death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sironi, Luca; Amadasi, Alberto; Zoja, Riccardo

    2016-09-01

    The recreational use of inhalants is a fairly widespread habit among adolescents because of the ease of availability and methods of assumption. Their use is however not free of risks, both for direct toxicity on several target organs and for a mechanism of gas replacement with lack of oxygen. The first case concerns a 12-year-old boy who died suddenly after sniffing a mix of butane and propane contained in a can of air freshener. The second case concerns a 14-year-old boy who died by acute poisoning by the same mixture contained in a refill for lighters. High concentrations of the compounds were found in the tissues by analysis with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The compounds found in tissues and biological fluids were perfectly compatible with those contained in the containers used for the inhalation. The mechanisms of death were therefore assessed in a combination of the direct toxicity of the compound and oxygen replacement, thus highlighting the crucial help that toxicological analyses can provide in such cases. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  10. Repeated episodes of ozone inhalation amplifies the effects of allergen sensitization and inhalation on airway immune and structural development in Rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelegle, Edward S; Miller, Lisa A; Gershwin, Laurel J; Fanucchi, Michelle V; Van Winkle, Laura S; Gerriets, Joan E; Walby, William F; Mitchell, Valerie; Tarkington, Brian K; Wong, Viviana J; Baker, Gregory L; Pantle, Lorraine M; Joad, Jesse P; Pinkerton, Kent E; Wu, Reen; Evans, Michael J; Hyde, Dallas M; Plopper, Charles G

    2003-08-15

    Twenty-four infant rhesus monkeys (30 days old) were exposed to 11 episodes of filtered air (FA), house dust mite allergen aerosol (HDMA), ozone (O3), or HDMA + O3 (5 days each followed by 9 days of FA). Ozone was delivered for 8 h/day at 0.5 ppm. Twelve of the monkeys were sensitized to house dust mite allergen (Dermatophagoides farinae) at ages 14 and 28 days by subcutaneous inoculation (SQ) of HDMA in alum and intraperitoneal injection of heat-killed Bordetella pertussis cells. Sensitized monkeys were exposed to HDMA aerosol for 2 h/day on days 3-5 of either FA (n = 6) or O3 (n = 6) exposure. Nonsensitized monkeys were exposed to either FA (n = 6) or O3 (n = 6). During the exposure regimen, parameters of allergy (i.e., serum IgE, histamine, and eosinophilia), airways resistance, reactivity, and structural remodeling were evaluated. Eleven repeated 5-day cycles of inhaling 0.5 ppm ozone over a 6-month period had only mild effects on the airways of nonsensitized infant rhesus monkeys. Similarly, the repeated inhalation of HDMA by HDMA-sensitized infant monkeys resulted in only mild airway effects, with the exception of a marked increase in proximal airway and terminal bronchiole content of eosinophils. In contrast, the combined cyclic inhalation of ozone and HDMA by HDMA sensitized infants monkeys resulted in a marked increase in serum IgE, serum histamine, and airways eosinophilia. Furthermore, combined cyclic inhalation of ozone and HDMA resulted in even greater alterations in airway structure and content that were associated with a significant elevation in baseline airways resistance and reactivity. These results suggest that ozone can amplify the allergic and structural remodeling effects of HDMA sensitization and inhalation.

  11. Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute annual report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bice, D.E.; Hahn, F.F.; Hoover, M.D.; Neft, R.E.; Thornton-Manning, J.R.; Bradley, P.L.

    1995-12-01

    The mission of the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) is to conduct basic and applied research to improve the understanding of the nature and magnitude of the human health impacts of inhaling airborne materials in the home, workplace, and general environment. Institute research programs have a strong basic science orientation with emphasis on the nature and behavior of airborne materials, the fundamental biology of the