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Sample records for influencing mammography participation

  1. Factors contributing to low participation in mammography screening in Papua New Guinea

    Pape, R.; Spuur, K.M.; Umo, P.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this paper is to describe the current state of mammography screening services in Papua New Guinea (PNG) and to document factors thought to contribute to low participation in the free mammography screening service at the Pacific International Hospital (PIH), Port Moresby. Method: Women attending for mammography screening at PIH between August 2006 and July 2010 were invited to complete a survey investigating environmental, political, social, financial, cultural and health factors thought to be contributing to low participation in the mammography screening service. Ethics approval and permission to collect data was granted through the University of Papua New Guinea, School of Medicine and Health Sciences Research and Ethics Committee and by the Medical Director and Chief Operating Officer of PIH. Results: The reasons for low participation were found to be multifactorial; difficult environmental factors 42.86%; financial dependency factors 40.54%; cultural factors related to exposing the body 50.03%, social factors (sexual harassment) 77.6%, political factors 4.29% and health factors including poor health 54.54%. Conclusion: The study demonstrated that in this snapshot of PNG women, the low participation rate in the free mammography screening program at PIH was influenced by various interrelated factors inherent in both the PNG environment and culture, in particular lack of transport infrastructure, financial burden and sexual harassment. As low participation directly impacts upon the high breast cancer mortality in PNG women, a more comprehensive study of the women of PNG is required to validate this research. - Highlights: • Snap shot of issues surrounding low participation in the free screening program. • Geography and poor transport infrastructure made participation almost impossible. • Lack of funds for transport by either road or air deterred participation. • Sexual harassment was the main social factor that deterred access.

  2. Mammography

    ... breast cancer Whether there is any harm from breast cancer screening, such as side effects from testing or overtreatment of cancer when it's discovered Mammography is performed to screen women to detect early breast cancer when it is ...

  3. The Role of Effective Communication to Enhance Participation in Screening Mammography: A New Zealand Case

    Margaret A. Brunton

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the organisation of health care have dominated policy initiatives over the past two decades in many countries. An increasing reliance on public health initiatives to prevent or detect disease early has resulted in an increase in programs that screen for cancer in the community. In turn, this accentuates the need to persuasively communicate the value of such initiatives to encourage continued participation. Merely placing screening programs into a community setting is not sufficient to ensure that adequate numbers will voluntarily participate regularly to achieve anticipated cost and mortality savings in the population. In this research the influence of managing communication in a public screening mammography program was investigated. The results revealed that significant opportunities were overlooked for reassurance and information during the physical mammography process. In turn, this highlights the influence of constraints imposed by the structure of the screening program and the resources allocated to the process. This research suggests that it is important to address multiple influences, including ethnic differences, when asking questions about the effectiveness of public health policy, particularly when considering the choices women make about ongoing participation in breast screening programs.

  4. Factors influencing elderly women's mammography screening decisions: implications for counseling

    Davis Roger B

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although guidelines recommend that clinicians consider life expectancy before screening older women for breast cancer, many older women with limited life expectancies are screened. We aimed to identify factors important to mammography screening decisions among women aged 80 and older compared to women aged 65–79. Methods Telephone surveys of 107 women aged 80+ and 93 women aged 65–79 randomly selected from one academic primary care practice who were able to communicate in English (60% response rate. The survey addressed the following factors in regards to older women's mammography screening decisions: perceived importance of a history of breast disease, family history of breast cancer, doctor's recommendations, habit, reassurance, previous experience, mailed reminder cards, family/friend's recommendations or experience with breast cancer, age, health, and media. The survey also assessed older women's preferred role in decision making around mammography screening. Results Of the 200 women, 65.5% were non-Hispanic white and 82.8% were in good to excellent health. Most (81.3% had undergone mammography in the past 2 years. Regardless of age, older women ranked doctor's recommendations as the most important factor influencing their decision to get screened. Habit and reassurance were the next two highly ranked factors influencing older women to get screened. Among women who did not get screened, women aged 80 and older ranked age and doctor's counseling as the most influential factors and women aged 65–79 ranked a previous negative experience with mammography as the most important factor. There were no significant differences in preferred role in decision-making around mammography screening by age, however, most women in both age groups preferred to make the final decision on their own (46.6% of women aged 80+ and 50.5% of women aged 65–79. Conclusion While a doctor's recommendation is the most important factor influencing

  5. Factors influencing elderly women's mammography screening decisions: implications for counseling.

    Schonberg, Mara A; McCarthy, Ellen P; York, Meghan; Davis, Roger B; Marcantonio, Edward R

    2007-11-16

    Although guidelines recommend that clinicians consider life expectancy before screening older women for breast cancer, many older women with limited life expectancies are screened. We aimed to identify factors important to mammography screening decisions among women aged 80 and older compared to women aged 65-79. Telephone surveys of 107 women aged 80+ and 93 women aged 65-79 randomly selected from one academic primary care practice who were able to communicate in English (60% response rate). The survey addressed the following factors in regards to older women's mammography screening decisions: perceived importance of a history of breast disease, family history of breast cancer, doctor's recommendations, habit, reassurance, previous experience, mailed reminder cards, family/friend's recommendations or experience with breast cancer, age, health, and media. The survey also assessed older women's preferred role in decision making around mammography screening. Of the 200 women, 65.5% were non-Hispanic white and 82.8% were in good to excellent health. Most (81.3%) had undergone mammography in the past 2 years. Regardless of age, older women ranked doctor's recommendations as the most important factor influencing their decision to get screened. Habit and reassurance were the next two highly ranked factors influencing older women to get screened. Among women who did not get screened, women aged 80 and older ranked age and doctor's counseling as the most influential factors and women aged 65-79 ranked a previous negative experience with mammography as the most important factor. There were no significant differences in preferred role in decision-making around mammography screening by age, however, most women in both age groups preferred to make the final decision on their own (46.6% of women aged 80+ and 50.5% of women aged 65-79). While a doctor's recommendation is the most important factor influencing elderly women's mammography screening decisions, habit and reassurance

  6. Mammography

    1975-01-01

    This patent reveals a method and instrument for the detection and registration of breast cancer with the aid of X-radiation, i.e. mammography. The breast is irradiated with soft X-rays whereby the radiation beam is scanned with a moving 'stripform' screen and whereby the picture from the 'stripform' screen is recorded by a television camera that moves simultaneously with the strip. The image is then projected on a monitor

  7. Does health status influence intention regarding screening mammography?

    Park, Keeho; Park, Jong-Hyock; Park, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Hui-Jeong; Park, Bo-Yoon

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed information surveyed from a community-based sample of Korean women older than 40 years of age to understand the relationships between health status and screening behavior. In a cross-sectional population-based study, a two-stage, geographically stratified household-based sampling design was used for assembly of a probability sample of women aged 40-69 years living in Gunpo in Korea, resulting in a total sample size of 503 women. The primary outcome variable for this analysis was the respondent's intention to obtain a mammogram. Predictor variables included health status and other factors known to influence the use of cancer screening, such as age, education, income, marital status and the presence of co-morbid illnesses. Health status was assessed by using the EuroQol (EQ-5D). The median EQ visual analogue scale score was 75.0, ranging from 20 to 100. In bivariate analyses, the percentage of women reporting to have intention toward mammography use decreased with worsening health status. Women who had problems with mobility or anxiety/depression showed lower intention to undergo future screening mammography. Multivariate logistic regression confirmed that health status was significantly associated with intention toward mammography use. Anxiety or depression was an independent predictor of future screening mammography use. Health status is significantly associated with intention regarding screening mammography use. Physicians or other health professionals should be aware that health status is an important component for health promotion, and should pay more attention to clients' possible vulnerability in screening mammography use due to their poor health status. (author)

  8. Influence of age and menstrual cycle on mammography and MR imaging of the breast; Einfluss von Alter und Menstruationszyklus auf Mammographie und MR-Mammographie

    Mueller-Schimpfle, M.; Ohmenhaeuser, K.; Claussen, C.D. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    1997-09-01

    Age and menstrual cycle have an important influence on the breast. This well-known fact is experienced in the daily routine of gynecologists and radiologists. The number of publications addressing the effect of these influences on imaging, however, is surprisingly low. The aim of this work is to describe the influences of age and menstrual cycle on the breast and to address their clinical relevance for mammography and MR mammography. Therefore, own data are presented concerning the age and menstrual cycle influences on breast parenchyma in dynamic MR mammography. Literature data are used to correlate mammography and MR imaging findings with these influences. The changes of the breast due to age and menstrual cycle have important direct implications on performing and reading conventional mammography and MR mammography. The knowledge of these changes is also helpful in the interpretation of findings when comparing different methods. Finally, the data gained by using imaging methods enable important basic insights into physiology and physiopathology of the breast in vivo. (orig.) [Deutsch] Alter und Menstruationszyklus stellen wichtige Einflussfaktoren auf die Mamma dar. Diese Tatsache ist klinisch lange bekannt und im Alltag des Gynaekologen wie Radiologen staendig praesent. Dagegen ist die Anzahl der Publikationen zu den Auswirkungen dieser Einfluesse auf die Bildgebung erstaunlich niedrig. Ziel dieser Arbeit ist es, die alters- und zyklusabhaengigen Veraenderungen der Mamma und deren klinische Relevanz fuer die Mammographie und MR-Mammographie darzustellen. Zu diesem Zweck werden aus einer eigenen Studie Daten der dynamischen MR-Tomographie zum Alters- und Zykluseinfluss auf das Mammaparenchym praesentiert. Darueber hinaus werden diese Einflussfaktoren mit mammographischen und MR-tomographischen Daten aus der Literatur korreliert. Dabei zeigt sich, dass sich aus den alters- und menstruationszyklusbedingten Veraenderungen der Brust wichtige unmittelbare

  9. The influence of software filtering in digital mammography image quality

    Michail, C.; Spyropoulou, V.; Kalyvas, N.; Valais, I.; Dimitropoulos, N.; Fountos, G.; Kandarakis, I.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2009-05-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers among women. Several techniques have been developed to help in the early detection of breast cancer such as conventional and digital x-ray mammography, positron and single-photon emission mammography, etc. A key advantage in digital mammography is that images can be manipulated as simple computer image files. Thus non-dedicated commercially available image manipulation software can be employed to process and store the images. The image processing tools of the Photoshop (CS 2) software usually incorporate digital filters which may be used to reduce image noise, enhance contrast and increase spatial resolution. However, improving an image quality parameter may result in degradation of another. The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of three sharpening filters, named hereafter sharpen, sharpen more and sharpen edges on image resolution and noise. Image resolution was assessed by means of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF).In conclusion it was found that the correct use of commercial non-dedicated software on digital mammograms may improve some aspects of image quality.

  10. The influence of software filtering in digital mammography image quality

    Michail, C; Spyropoulou, V; Valais, I; Panayiotakis, G; Kalyvas, N; Fountos, G; Kandarakis, I; Dimitropoulos, N

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers among women. Several techniques have been developed to help in the early detection of breast cancer such as conventional and digital x-ray mammography, positron and single-photon emission mammography, etc. A key advantage in digital mammography is that images can be manipulated as simple computer image files. Thus non-dedicated commercially available image manipulation software can be employed to process and store the images. The image processing tools of the Photoshop (CS 2) software usually incorporate digital filters which may be used to reduce image noise, enhance contrast and increase spatial resolution. However, improving an image quality parameter may result in degradation of another. The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of three sharpening filters, named hereafter sharpen, sharpen more and sharpen edges on image resolution and noise. Image resolution was assessed by means of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF).In conclusion it was found that the correct use of commercial non-dedicated software on digital mammograms may improve some aspects of image quality.

  11. Participation rate or informed choice? Rethinking the European key performance indicators for mammography screening.

    Strech, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Despite the intensive controversies about the likelihood of benefits and harms of mammography screening almost all experts conclude that the choice to screen or not to screen needs to be made by the individual patient who is adequately informed. However, the "European guideline for quality assurance in breast cancer screening and diagnosis" specifies a participation rate of 70% as the key performance indicator for mammography screening. This paper argues that neither the existing evidence on benefits and harms, nor survey research with women, nor compliance rates in clinical trials, nor cost-effectiveness ratios justify participation rates as a reasonable performance indicator for preference-sensitive condition such as mammography screening. In contrast, an informed choice rate would be more reasonable. Further research needs to address the practical challenges in assessing informed choice rates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Socioeconomic status as determinant for participation in mammography screening: assessing the difference between using women's own versus their partner's

    Kjellén, Malin; von Euler-Chelpin, My

    2010-01-01

    Earlier research has shown that participation in mammography screening tends to vary across socioeconomic levels. We assessed the difference between using the woman's own socioeconomic status (SES) and using that of her household or partner as determinant of participation in mammography screening....

  13. Influence of the radiographer on the pain felt during mammography

    Goethem, M. van; Verslegers, I.; Biltjes, I.; De Schepper, A.; Mortelmans, D.; Bruyninckx, E.; Hove, E. Van

    2003-01-01

    Mammography is the only useful examination in screening for breast cancer. Mortality from breast cancer can be reduced if women go regularly for a screening mammography. Moreover, it is still the key examination in diagnosis of breast diseases and in the follow-up of patients treated for breast cancer. Pain with mammography can deter women from going for regular screening or follow-up; therefore, it is important to reduce pain experience or discomfort from mammography. In this study we evaluate the impact of the ''radiographer'' on the pain risk during mammography by analysing questionnaires filled in by women and radiographers. Study results reveal that the opinion of the radiographer, the information and communication during the examination and the number of years of experience are important factors in pain and discomfort experience. The attitude of the radiographer plays an important role in the pain experience. (orig.)

  14. Influence of age and menstrual cycle on mammography and MR imaging of the breast

    Mueller-Schimpfle, M.; Ohmenhaeuser, K.; Claussen, C.D.

    1997-01-01

    Age and menstrual cycle have an important influence on the breast. This well-known fact is experienced in the daily routine of gynecologists and radiologists. The number of publications addressing the effect of these influences on imaging, however, is surprisingly low. The aim of this work is to describe the influences of age and menstrual cycle on the breast and to address their clinical relevance for mammography and MR mammography. Therefore, own data are presented concerning the age and menstrual cycle influences on breast parenchyma in dynamic MR mammography. Literature data are used to correlate mammography and MR imaging findings with these influences. The changes of the breast due to age and menstrual cycle have important direct implications on performing and reading conventional mammography and MR mammography. The knowledge of these changes is also helpful in the interpretation of findings when comparing different methods. Finally, the data gained by using imaging methods enable important basic insights into physiology and physiopathology of the breast in vivo. (orig.) [de

  15. Predictors of Participation in Mammography Screening among non-Hispanic Black, non-Hispanic White, and Hispanic Women

    Cathy Melvin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many factors influence women’s decisions to participate in guideline recommended screening mammography. We evaluated the influence of women’s socioeconomic characteristics, healthcare access, and cultural and psychological healthcare preferences on timely mammography screening participation.Materials and methods: A random digit dial survey of United States non-Hispanic Black, non-Hispanic White, and Hispanic women ages 40-75, from January-August 2009 determined self- reported time of most recent mammogram. Screening rates were assessed based on receipt of a screening mammogram within the prior 12 months, the interval recommended at the time by the American Cancer Society.Results: Thirty-nine percent of women reported not having a mammogram within the last 12 months. The odds of not having had a screening mammography was higher for non-Hispanic White women than for non-Hispanic Black (OR=2.16, 95% CI=0.26, 0.82, p=0.009 or Hispanic (OR=4.17, 95% CI=0.12, 0.48, p=0.01 women. Lack of health insurance (OR=3.22, 95% CI=1.54, 6.73, p=0.002 and lack of usual source of medical care (OR=3.37, 95% CI=1.43, 7.94, p=0.01 were associated with not being screened as were lower self-efficacy to obtain screening (OR=2.43, 95% CI=1.26, 4.73, p=0.01 and greater levels of religiosity and spirituality (OR=1.42, 95% CI=1.00, 2.00, p=0.05. Neither perceived risk nor present temporal orientation was significant.Discussion: Odds of not having a mammogram increased if women were uninsured, without medical care, non-Hispanic white, older in age, not confident in their ability to obtain screening, or held passive or external religious/spiritual values. Results are encouraging given racial disparities in healthcare participation and suggest that efforts to increase screening among minority women may be working.

  16. Factors influencing elderly women's mammography screening decisions: implications for counseling

    Schonberg, Mara A; McCarthy, Ellen P; York, Meghan; Davis, Roger B; Marcantonio, Edward R

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Although guidelines recommend that clinicians consider life expectancy before screening older women for breast cancer, many older women with limited life expectancies are screened. We aimed to identify factors important to mammography screening decisions among women aged 80 and older compared to women aged 65–79. Methods Telephone surveys of 107 women aged 80+ and 93 women aged 65–79 randomly selected from one academic primary care practice who were able to communicate in ...

  17. The influence of travel time on breast cancer characteristics, receipt of primary therapy, and surveillance mammography.

    Onega, Tracy; Cook, Andrea; Kirlin, Beth; Shi, Xun; Alford-Teaster, Jennifer; Tuzzio, Leah; Buist, Diana S M

    2011-08-01

    Travel time has been shown to influence some aspects of cancer characteristics at diagnosis and care for women with breast cancer, but important gaps remain in our understanding of its impact. We examined the influence of travel time to the nearest radiology facility on breast cancer characteristics, treatment, and surveillance for women with early-stage invasive breast cancer. We included 1,012 women with invasive breast cancer (stages I and II) who had access to care within an integrated health care delivery system in western Washington State. The travel times to the nearest radiology facility were calculated for all the U.S. Census blocks within the study area and assigned to women based on residence at diagnosis. We collected cancer characteristics, primary and adjuvant therapies, and surveillance mammography for at least 2.5 years post diagnosis and used multivariable analyses to test the associations of travel time. The majority of women (68.6%) lived within 20 min of the nearest radiology facility, had stage I disease (72.7%), received breast conserving therapy (68.7%), and had annual surveillance mammography the first 2 years after treatment (73.7%). The travel time was not significantly associated with the stage or surveillance mammography after adjusting for covariates. Primary therapy was significantly related to travel time, with greater travel time (>30 min vs. ≤ 10 min) associated with a higher likelihood of mastectomy compared to breast conserving surgery (RR = 1.53; 95% CI, 1.16-2.01). The travel time was not associated with the stage at diagnosis or surveillance mammography receipt. The travel time does seem to influence the type of primary therapy among women with breast cancer, suggesting that women may prefer low frequency services, such as mastectomy, if geographic access to a radiology facility is limited.

  18. Mammography performance in Oman: Review of factors influencing cancer yield and positive predictive value.

    Taif, Sawsan; Tufail, Fatma; Alnuaimi, Ahmed Sameer

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to assess mammography performance in Oman by estimating the breast cancer rate and the positive predictive value (PPV) with the influence of some variables. This cross-sectional study was conducted on mammograms done in one of the three main breast imaging centers in Oman between January 2008 and July 2012. Diagnostic and screening groups were identified and assessed separately. Rate of abnormal mammograms, rate of breast cancer and the PPV were estimated according to Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) score, presence of breast lump and patient's age. Total of 653 mammograms were included, 254 diagnostic and 399 screening. Abnormal mammograms (BIRADS 4 and 5) form 31.9% of the diagnostic examinations compared with 6.8% of screening examinations. Breast cancer was present in 17.9% of the diagnostic compared with 1.0% of the screening group. The PPV of BIRADS 5 was 94.1%, and for BIRADS 4 was 37.1 and 26.7% for diagnostic and screening studies. Overall PPV for abnormal mammograms was 65.2% in the diagnostic and 26.7% in the screening group. Mammography PPV shows positive association with age (P = 0.039) while presence of breast lump has no significant effect on the PPV (P = 0.38). BIRADS 5 score was found to have a high cancer yield making it a strong predictor of cancer. Different results were obtained in the diagnostic compared with screening mammography with higher rates of abnormal mammograms and breast cancer. Mammography performance should be better in the older women. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Influences of Radiology Trainees on Screening Mammography Interpretation.

    Hawley, Jeffrey R; Taylor, Clayton R; Cubbison, Alyssa M; Erdal, B Selnur; Yildiz, Vedat O; Carkaci, Selin

    2016-05-01

    Participation of radiology trainees in screening mammographic interpretation is a critical component of radiology residency and fellowship training. The aim of this study was to investigate and quantify the effects of trainee involvement on screening mammographic interpretation and diagnostic outcomes. Screening mammograms interpreted at an academic medical center by six dedicated breast imagers over a three-year period were identified, with cases interpreted by an attending radiologist alone or in conjunction with a trainee. Trainees included radiology residents, breast imaging fellows, and fellows from other radiology subspecialties during breast imaging rotations. Trainee participation, patient variables, results of diagnostic evaluations, and pathology were recorded. A total of 47,914 mammograms from 34,867 patients were included, with an overall recall rate for attending radiologists reading alone of 14.7% compared with 18.0% when involving a trainee (P radiology trainees, with no change in cancer detection rate. Radiology faculty members should be aware of this potentiality and mitigate tendencies toward greater false positives. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of attitude, social influence, and self-efficacy model factors on regular mammography performance in life-transition aged women in Korea.

    Lee, Chang Hyun; Kim, Young Im

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzed predictors of regular mammography performance in Korea. In addition, we determined factors affecting regular mammography performance in life-transition aged women by applying an attitude, social influence, and self-efficacy (ASE) model. Data were collected from women aged over 40 years residing in province J in Korea. The 178 enrolled subjects provided informed voluntary consent prior to completing a structural questionnaire. The overall regular mammography performance rate of the subjects was 41.6%. Older age, city residency, high income and part-time job were associated with a high regular mammography performance. Among women who had undergone more breast self-examinations (BSE) or more doctors' physical examinations (PE), there were higher regular mammography performance rates. All three ASE model factors were significantly associated with regular mammography performance. Women with a high level of positive ASE values had a significantly high regular mammography performance rate. Within the ASE model, self-efficacy and social influence were particularly important. Logistic regression analysis explained 34.7% of regular mammography performance and PE experience (β=4.645, p=.003), part- time job (β=4.010, p=.050), self-efficacy (β=1.820, p=.026) and social influence (β=1.509, p=.038) were significant factors. Promotional strategies that could improve self-efficacy, reinforce social influence and reduce geographical, time and financial barriers are needed to increase the regular mammography performance rate in life-transition aged.

  1. Influence of breast compression pressure on the performance of population-based mammography screening.

    Holland, Katharina; Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Mann, Ritse M; den Heeten, Gerard J; van Gils, Carla H; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2017-11-28

    In mammography, breast compression is applied to reduce the thickness of the breast. While it is widely accepted that firm breast compression is needed to ensure acceptable image quality, guidelines remain vague about how much compression should be applied during mammogram acquisition. A quantitative parameter indicating the desirable amount of compression is not available. Consequently, little is known about the relationship between the amount of breast compression and breast cancer detectability. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of breast compression pressure in mammography on breast cancer screening outcomes. We used digital image analysis methods to determine breast volume, percent dense volume, and pressure from 132,776 examinations of 57,179 women participating in the Dutch population-based biennial breast cancer screening program. Pressure was estimated by dividing the compression force by the area of the contact surface between breast and compression paddle. The data was subdivided into quintiles of pressure and the number of screen-detected cancers, interval cancers, false positives, and true negatives were determined for each group. Generalized estimating equations were used to account for correlation between examinations of the same woman and for the effect of breast density and volume when estimating sensitivity, specificity, and other performance measures. Sensitivity was computed using interval cancers occurring between two screening rounds and using interval cancers within 12 months after screening. Pair-wise testing for significant differences was performed. Percent dense volume increased with increasing pressure, while breast volume decreased. Sensitivity in quintiles with increasing pressure was 82.0%, 77.1%, 79.8%, 71.1%, and 70.8%. Sensitivity based on interval cancers within 12 months was significantly lower in the highest pressure quintile compared to the third (84.3% vs 93.9%, p = 0.034). Specificity was lower in the

  2. One more hurdle to increasing mammography screening: pubescent, adolescent, and prior mammography screening experiences.

    Thomas, Eileen; Usher, LaToya

    2009-01-01

    Approximately $8.1 billion dollars is spent each year in the United States alone on the treatment of breast cancer. Survival rates are dependent on access to, and utilization of, early detection services. The primary reason for disparity in breast cancer mortality is the delay in time to diagnosis, resulting in poor prognosis. Despite ongoing research to understand barriers to mammography screening, recent studies report a decrease in mammography screening among all racial groups. A qualitative approach was used to elicit information from 36 White non- Hispanic, African-American, Hispanic, and Native American women without a history of breast cancer. Women were invited to share written or audiotape-recorded narratives about experiences pertaining to their breasts and their mammography screening experiences. Major categories identified were: teasing, family norms and values, media/societal influence, body image, and mammography screening experiences. The resulting effects of these experiences left these women with feelings of shame and "conflict" regarding their breasts. The major theme identified was breast conflict. Findings suggest that breast conflict may persist throughout the lifespan and can have a negative influence on a woman's decision to participate in mammography screening. The authors hypothesize that experiences that occur during adolescence pertaining to young girls' breasts can influence a women's body image, which in turn can later in life affect health-seeking behaviors related to mammography screening. These findings have implications for public health practice in planning for breast cancer screening, education, and interventions for women from diverse racial/ethnics groups.

  3. Assessment of Factors Influencing Beneficiary Participation in ...

    ISSN 0794-5698. Assessment of Factors Influencing Beneficiary Participation in Fadama II Project ... project implementation (80%) in the stages of project development. Women .... the project as they appeared to have more family burden to ...

  4. Evaluation of the influence of parameters that determine the mean glandular dose in mammography using different detectors

    Costa, K.; Nogueira, M. S.

    2015-10-01

    Full text: Mammography is a test used for early detection of breast cancer. The mean glandular dose (MGD) is dosimetric greatness accepted as indicative of carcinogenic risk induced by ionizing radiation in the breasts of women undergoing mammography exams. MGD value is estimated from the incident air kerma (k i), associated with conversion factors which depend on the half-value layer (HVL), the breast composition and thickness compressed breast. This study aims to evaluate the influence of the parameters used to determine the MGD using different measurement detectors. Measurements were performed on a Siemens Mammomat Model 300 Nova mammography equipment; this has the combinations Anode/Filter of Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh and W/Rh. Detectors used were the ionization chamber Model 10X6-6M manufactured by Radcal Co., two solid-state detectors, one Model AGMS-M manufactured by Radcal Co. and other Model Xi Mammo manufactured by UNFORS. The detectors measures were compared and the MGD value was estimated; differences between measurements and the reference values were higher in HVL and k i parameters. The results are displayed according to other published works. (Author)

  5. Digital mammography

    Bick, Ulrich; Diekmann, Felix

    2010-01-01

    This state-of-the-art reference book provides in-depth coverage of all aspects of digital mammography, including detector technology, image processing, computer-aided diagnosis, soft-copy reading, digital workflow, and PACS. Specific advantages and disadvantages of digital mammography in comparison to screen-film mammography are thoroughly discussed. By including authors from both North America and Europe, the book is able to outline variations in the use, acceptance, and quality assurance of digital mammography between the different countries and screening programs. Advanced imaging techniques and future developments such as contrast mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis are also covered in detail. All of the chapters are written by internationally recognized experts and contain numerous high-quality illustrations. This book will be of great interest both to clinicians who already use or are transitioning to digital mammography and to basic scientists working in the field. (orig.)

  6. Influence of breast compression pressure on the performance of population-based mammography screening

    Holland, Katharina; Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Mann, Ritse M.; Den Heeten, Gerard J.; van Gils, Carla H.; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2017-01-01

    Background: In mammography, breast compression is applied to reduce the thickness of the breast. While it is widely accepted that firm breast compression is needed to ensure acceptable image quality, guidelines remain vague about how much compression should be applied during mammogram acquisition. A

  7. Factors Influencing Smallholder Farmers Participation in IFAD ...

    USER

    2015-02-02

    Feb 2, 2015 ... This study assessed Factors Influencing smallholder farmers' ... percent of the population engaged in agricultural activities as a career and ... that the major source of income of the poor is agriculture and ... shown that farmers have different reasons for participation in agricultural ... 30 Dan gamau 534. 30.

  8. Targeted Ultrasound of an Indeterminate Breast Lesion on Mammography: When Does It Influence Management?

    Sohail, Saba; Masroor, Imrana; Afzal, Shaista

    2015-08-01

    To determine the change over mammographic diagnosis, BI-RADS category and management following targeted ultrasound of an indeterminate lesion seen on mammography and associated factors, if any. Descriptive, analytical study. Radiology Department, The Aga Khan University Hospital and Clifton Medical Services, Karachi, from April 2010 to May 2011. Patients referred for targeted breast ultrasound following X-ray mammography were selected regardless of age. Targeted Ultrasound (TUS) was defined as a limited ultrasound of a specific lesion or breast part as indicated by the referring source. Comparison was made between the post mammography and post TUS lesion characterization, diagnosis and BI-RADS category (0-5) which was taken as a measure of management change. Those were evaluated to determine significance of age, marital status, parity, breast parenchymal pattern ( dense, fatty, heterogeneous), referring source for the TUS (radiology resident, radiologist or surgeon), lesion characteristics (density, echogenecity, shape, location, margins, size, depth-to-width ratio, enhancement or shadowing), presenting symptoms or signs and reason for TUS. Ap-value of 0.05 or less was taken as significant. There were a total of 342 patients with mean age of 49.7 ±13.5 years. It assigned a definite category in 232 patients with an indefinite category (0) on mammography requiring further investigation. It decreased the suspicion for malignancy in 180 (77.58%) by assigning a low BI-RADS category and increased the suspicion in 52 (22.41%). The factors significantly associated with this changes included clinical indication being diagnostic (p management of an indeterminate breast lesion in a high number of patients, particularly when there was a lump as indication for imaging in the presence of risk factors in a patient with otherwise heterogeneously dense breast parenchyma.

  9. Ultrasonic mammography

    Hueneke, B.

    1982-01-01

    608 women are examined by means of ultrasonic mammography during the period of 1 year. 432 patients were examined with the compound method with the U.I. Octoson, a water tank scanner, and 176 patients with the real time method with a directly connected linear-array-scanner. The following results were obtained at the end of the examination period: In the ultrasonic and also in the X-ray mammogram tumour diameters can be determined with an error rate of +- 30%. In the diagnosing of carcinomas, a significant dependence of the exactness on the sice of the tumour is found for the combination of the five methods tested (clinical examination, X-ray mammography, ultrasonic mammography, thermography, cytology). Classifying the individual methods with regard to their exactness, X-ray mammography ranks in front of ultrasonic mammography. Mastopathic changes in the breast can be screened by means of ultrasonic mammography. The structure of the changes can be determined more exactly than with an X-ray picture which is due to the possibility of differentiating solid and cystic structures. In diagnosing fibro-adenomas and establishing diagnoses on young women with dense gland bodies, ultrasonic mammography is superior to radiology both in the ability of screening a finding of a fibro-adenoma (US=88%, X-ray=75%) and in the possibility of classifying it as ''more benign than malignant''. (orig./MG) [de

  10. Mammography Facilities

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mammography Facility Database is updated periodically based on information received from the four FDA-approved accreditation bodies: the American College of...

  11. The Influence of Spiritual Framing on African American Women's Mammography Intentions: A Randomized Trial.

    Best, Alicia L; Spencer, S Melinda; Friedman, Daniela B; Hall, Ingrid J; Billings, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    Spiritual framing of breast cancer communication may provide a useful strategy for addressing disparate rates of breast cancer mortality among African American women. The efficacy of a spiritually framed breast cancer screening (BCS) message was compared with that of a traditional BCS message. Specifically, 200 African American women were randomly assigned to review either a spiritually framed or traditional BCS message and complete a self-administered survey, including a thought-listing form. Message efficacy was measured by number of thoughts generated (elaboration), ratio of positive to negative thoughts (polarity), and intention to obtain and/or recommend a mammogram. Multiple linear regression and structural equation modeling were used to assess direct and indirect (mediated) associations among variables. Spiritual framing was positively associated with greater elaboration (β = .265, SE = .36, p framing also had a significant indirect effect on mammography intentions through polarity (standardized indirect effect = .057, 95% confidence interval [.024, .106], p framing may improve the efficacy of BCS messages among African American women by eliciting more positive thoughts about screening. Interventions targeting African American women might consider the role of spirituality when tailoring messages to encourage regular mammography use.

  12. MR mammography: influence of menstrual cycle on the dynamic contrast enhancement of fibrocystic disease

    Rieber, A.; Nuessle, K.; Merkle, E.; Tomczak, R.; Brambs, H.J.; Kreienberg, R.

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic resonance mammography (MRM) provides data regarding the nature of tumours based on contrast medium dynamics; fibrocystic changes in the breast, however, may lead to false-positive results. This study investigated whether the contrast medium dynamics of fibrocystic changes are dependent on the menstrual cycle. Twenty-four patients with palpable lumps but normal mammographies and ultrasound studies were examined. The MRM technique was performed during the first and second part of the menstrual cycle using a FLASH 3D sequence, both native and at 1, 2, 3 and 8 min after intravenous application of 0.15 mmol/kg body weight of gadodiamide. The calculated time-intensity curves were evaluated based on the following criteria: early percentage of contrast medium uptake in relation to the native value; formation of a plateau phenomenon after the second minute; the point of maximal contrast medium uptake; and calculation of the contrast enhancing index. During the second half of the menstrual cycle, a generally greater contrast medium uptake was observed. Nevertheless, when further diagnostic criteria, such as continuous contrast medium increase as a function of time, were considered, there was no increased rate of false-positive findings. The phase of the menstrual cycle may affect the specificity of the examination, if only the quantitative contrast medium uptake and the percentage of contrast medium uptake in the first 2 min are considered. A control MRM during the other half of the cycle may then be indicated and additional diagnostic criteria may improve specificity. (orig.)

  13. Factors Influencing Colorectal Cancer Screening Participation

    Antonio Z. Gimeno García

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is a major health problem worldwide. Although population-based CRC screening is strongly recommended in average-risk population, compliance rates are still far from the desirable rates. High levels of screening uptake are necessary for the success of any screening program. Therefore, the investigation of factors influencing participation is crucial prior to design and launches a population-based organized screening campaign. Several studies have identified screening behaviour factors related to potential participants, providers, or health care system. These influencing factors can also be classified in non-modifiable (i.e., demographic factors, education, health insurance, or income and modifiable factors (i.e., knowledge about CRC and screening, patient and provider attitudes or structural barriers for screening. Modifiable determinants are of great interest as they are plausible targets for interventions. Interventions at different levels (patient, providers or health care system have been tested across the studies with different results. This paper analyzes factors related to CRC screening behaviour and potential interventions designed to improve screening uptake.

  14. Assessing the Effects of Participant Preference and Demographics in the Usage of Web-based Survey Questionnaires by Women Attending Screening Mammography in British Columbia.

    Mlikotic, Rebecca; Parker, Brent; Rajapakshe, Rasika

    2016-03-22

    Increased usage of Internet applications has allowed for the collection of patient reported outcomes (PROs) and other health data through Web-based communication and questionnaires. While these Web platforms allow for increased speed and scope of communication delivery, there are certain limitations associated with this technology, as survey mode preferences vary across demographic groups. To investigate the impact of demographic factors and participant preferences on the use of a Web-based questionnaire in comparison with more traditional methods (mail and phone) for women participating in screening mammography in British Columbia, Canada. A sample of women attending the Screening Mammography Program of British Columbia (SMPBC) participated in a breast cancer risk assessment project. The study questionnaire was administered through one of three modes (ie, telephone, mail, or website platform). Survey mode preferences and actual methods of response were analyzed for participants recruited from Victoria General Hospital. Both univariate and multivariate analyses were used to investigate the association of demographic factors (ie, age, education level, and ethnicity) with certain survey response types. A total of 1192 women successfully completed the study questionnaire at Victoria General Hospital. Mail was stated as the most preferred survey mode (509/1192, 42.70%), followed by website platform (422/1192, 35.40%), and telephone (147/1192, 12.33%). Over 80% (955/1192) of participants completed the questionnaire in the mode previously specified as their most preferred; mail was the most common method of response (688/1192, 57.72%). Mail was also the most preferred type of questionnaire response method when participants responded in a mode other than their original preference. The average age of participants who responded via the Web-based platform (age 52.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] 52.1-53.7) was significantly lower than those who used mail and telephone methods

  15. MR mammography: influence of menstrual cycle on the dynamic contrast enhancement of fibrocystic disease

    Rieber, A.; Nuessle, K.; Merkle, E.; Tomczak, R.; Brambs, H.J. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Abt. Radiologie 1 (Roentgendiagnostik); Kreienberg, R. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Gynecology

    1999-08-01

    Magnetic resonance mammography (MRM) provides data regarding the nature of tumours based on contrast medium dynamics; fibrocystic changes in the breast, however, may lead to false-positive results. This study investigated whether the contrast medium dynamics of fibrocystic changes are dependent on the menstrual cycle. Twenty-four patients with palpable lumps but normal mammographies and ultrasound studies were examined. The MRM technique was performed during the first and second part of the menstrual cycle using a FLASH 3D sequence, both native and at 1, 2, 3 and 8 min after intravenous application of 0.15 mmol/kg body weight of gadodiamide. The calculated time-intensity curves were evaluated based on the following criteria: early percentage of contrast medium uptake in relation to the native value; formation of a plateau phenomenon after the second minute; the point of maximal contrast medium uptake; and calculation of the contrast enhancing index. During the second half of the menstrual cycle, a generally greater contrast medium uptake was observed. Nevertheless, when further diagnostic criteria, such as continuous contrast medium increase as a function of time, were considered, there was no increased rate of false-positive findings. The phase of the menstrual cycle may affect the specificity of the examination, if only the quantitative contrast medium uptake and the percentage of contrast medium uptake in the first 2 min are considered. A control MRM during the other half of the cycle may then be indicated and additional diagnostic criteria may improve specificity. (orig.) With 2 figs., 2 tabs., 24 refs.

  16. Influence of different anode/filter combination on radiation dose and image quality in digital mammography

    Liu Jie; Liu Peifang; Zhang Lianlian; Ma Wenjuan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of different anode/filter combination on radiation dose and image quality in digital mammography, so as to choose optimal anode/filter combination to reduce radiation injury without scarifying image quality. Methods: Mammography accredition phantoms with the thickness from 1.6 cm to 8.6 cm were used to simulate human breast tissue. The same exposure conditions, pressure, compression thickness. and different anode/filter combination were employed under the automatic and manual exposure modes. The image kV, mAs, pressure, filter, average glandular dose (ACD), contrast to noise ratio (CNR) were recorded and the figure of merit (FOM) was calculated. SPSS 17.0 and one-way analysis of variance were used in the statistical analysis. Results: As the phantom thickness increase, the ACD values which were acquired with Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh, and W/Ag three different anode/filter combinations were increased, but CNR and FOM values were decreased, ACD, CNR, and FOM values which were acquired in the phantom with different thickness, and three different anode/filter combinations were statistically different (P=0.000, respectively). The ACD values of Mo/Mo were lowest. For 1.6 cm-2.6 cm phantom thicknesses, the FOMs of Mo/Rh were lowest, and for 3.6 cm-8.6 cm phantom thicknesses, the FOMs of W/Ag were lowest. Conclusion: Phantom thickness in 1.6 cm-2.6 cm and 3.6 cm-8.6 cm. Mo/Rh combination and W/Ag combination respectively can achieve the highest FOM, and can provide the best imaging quality with low radiation dose. (authors)

  17. Compression force behaviours: An exploration of the beliefs and values influencing the application of breast compression during screening mammography

    Murphy, Fred; Nightingale, Julie; Hogg, Peter; Robinson, Leslie; Seddon, Doreen; Mackay, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    This research project investigated the compression behaviours of practitioners during screening mammography. The study sought to provide a qualitative understanding of ‘how’ and ‘why’ practitioners apply compression force. With a clear conflict in the existing literature and little scientific evidence base to support the reasoning behind the application of compression force, this research project investigated the application of compression using a phenomenological approach. Following ethical approval, six focus group interviews were conducted at six different breast screening centres in England. A sample of 41 practitioners were interviewed within the focus groups together with six one-to-one interviews of mammography educators or clinical placement co-ordinators. The findings revealed two broad humanistic and technological categories consisting of 10 themes. The themes included client empowerment, white-lies, time for interactions, uncertainty of own practice, culture, power, compression controls, digital technology, dose audit-safety nets, numerical scales. All of these themes were derived from 28 units of significant meaning (USM). The results demonstrate a wide variation in the application of compression force, thus offering a possible explanation for the difference between practitioner compression forces found in quantitative studies. Compression force was applied in many different ways due to individual practitioner experiences and behaviour. Furthermore, the culture and the practice of the units themselves influenced beliefs and attitudes of practitioners in compression force application. The strongest recommendation to emerge from this study was the need for peer observation to enable practitioners to observe and compare their own compression force practice to that of their colleagues. The findings are significant for clinical practice in order to understand how and why compression force is applied

  18. Print information to inform decisions about mammography screening participation in 16 countries with population-based programs.

    Zapka, Jane G; Geller, Berta M; Bulliard, Jean-Luc; Fracheboud, Jacques; Sancho-Garnier, Helene; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel

    2006-10-01

    To profile and compare the content and presentation of written communications related to informed decision-making about mammography. Materials from 16 screening programs organized at the national or regional level were analyzed according to five major information domains suggested by the international literature. A majority of countries provided information on the program (interval, cost and quality). There was considerable variability in comprehensiveness of elements in the domains, e.g., test characteristics (false positive/negative) and pros and cons of screening. The majority noted the likelihood of recall for further tests, few commented on the risks of additional tests or finding unimportant tumors. The audit also found variation in presentation (words and pictures). Presentation of comprehensive, but balanced information on screening benefits and risks is complex and daunting. Issues such as framing effects, coupled with debate about screening efficacy are challenging to the design of effective information tools. The objective of increasing screening prevalence at the population level must be balanced with objectively presenting complete and clear information. Additional research is needed on how information (and mode of presentation) impact screening decisions. Public health officials need to articulate their objectives and review written communication according to important decision-making domains.

  19. Evaluation of the influence of the TH-GEM detector components in dosimetric measurements of standard mammography beams

    Silva, Natália F.; Castro, Maysa C.; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: nsilva@ipen.br, E-mail: maysadecastro@gmail.com, E-mail: fbelonsi@gmail.com, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Silva, Tiago F.; Cintra, Felipe B.; Luz, Hugo N. da, E-mail: tfsilva@if.usp.br, E-mail: hugonluz@if.usp.br [Universidade de São Paulo (IF/USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Física

    2017-07-01

    GEM detectors have found applications in many areas due to their simplicity of construction, low cost, ruggedness and diversity of shape. A dosimeter with these qualities presents utility in several applications, as for example in diagnostic and therapeutic medicine, industrial radiography and nuclear meters. Furthermore, the high sensitivity provided by GEM detectors may extend their applications in low dose dosimetry. Based on these facts, it may be interesting to produce a prototype of a portable TH-GEM type detector with characteristics suitable for dosimetric use in X-rays with low and medium energies. The precise determination of the dosimeter characteristics is very important for laboratories of instrument calibration, as well as to determine how the various components of the detector may influence on the energy deposited in the sensitive volume. In this work, the results obtained about the influence of each one of the components present in this type of detector in standard mammography beams is presented. The code MCNP5 was used. The results allowed the adaptation of the detector to the desired conditions. (author)

  20. Influence of different exposure modes on image quality and radiation dose in digital mammography

    Liu Jie; Wang Xia; Li Xiaokang; Liu Peifang

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of different exposure modes on radiation dose and image quality in digital mammography, and to explore how to reduce patient's radiation injury by choosing proper exposure mode and exposure conditions without sacrifice image quality. Methods: A breast phantom was exposed by using automatic exposure mode (60 mAs, 28 k/V) and manual exposure modes (37.5 to 70 mAs range, 24 to 32 kV range) respectively. Same oppression thickness and pressure were set for all modes. The average glandular dose (AGD), entrance surface dose (ESD), and image quality score according to American College of Radiology (ACR) criteria were recorded for each image. Kruskal Wallis test was used to compare the image quality scores between automatic and manual modes. All statistic analyses were performed by using SPSS17.0. Results: Compared to automatic exposure mode (60 mAs, 28 k/V), the overall score of image quality of manual modes (45 to 70 mAs range, 26 to 32 kV range) had no significant difference. Both ESD and ACD decreased 26.1% and increased 15.4% when the tube loading was changed from 60 mAs to 45 mAs and 70 mAs respectively. The ESD and ACD decreased 22.6%, 28.2% and increased 47.0%, 62.7% when the tube voltage was changed from 28 kV to 26 kV and 32 kV respectively. Conclusion: When the image quality reaches to a certain level, it will not be raised by a higher photographic condition. Without sacrifice image quality, the tube loading and tube voltage can be manually decreased to reduce radiation dose. (authors)

  1. Analysis of participant factors that affect the diagnostic performance of screening mammography: A report of the alliance for breast cancer screening in Korea

    Kim, Young Joong; Lee, Eu Hye

    2017-01-01

    To analyze participant factors that affect the diagnostic performance of screening mammography. We enrolled 128756 cases from 10 hospitals between 2005 and 2010. We analyzed recall rate, cancer detection rate (CDR) per 1000 examinations, positive predictive value (PPV), sensitivity, specificity, false positive rate (FPR), and interval cancer rate (ICR) per 1000 negative examinations according to participant factors including age, breast density, and number of visit to the same institution, and adjusted for confounding variables. Increasing age improved recall rates (27.4% in 40's, 17.5% in 50's, 11.1% in 60's, and 8.6% in 70's), CDR (2.7, 3.2, 2.0, and 2.4), PPV (1.0, 1.8, 1.8, and 2.8%), sensitivity (81.3, 88.8, 90.3, and 94.7%), specificity (72.7, 82.7, 89.0, and 91.7%), and FPR (27.3, 17.3, 11.0, and 8.4%) (p < 0.05). Higher breast density impaired recall rates (4.0% in P1, 9.0% in P2, 28.9% in P3, and 27.8% in P4), PPV (3.3, 2.3, 1.2, and 1.3%), specificity (96.1, 91.2, 71.4, and 72.5%), and FPR (3.9, 8.9, 28.6, and 27.6%) (p < 0.001). It also increased CDR (1.3, 2.1, 3.3, and 3.6) and ICR (0.2, 0.3, 0.6, and 1.6) (p < 0.05). Successive visits to the same institution improved recall rates (20.9% for one visit, 10.7% for two visits, 7.7% for more than three visits), PPV (1.6, 2.8, and 2.7%), specificity (79.4, 89.6, and 92.5%), and FPR (20.6, 10.4, and 7.5%) (p < 0.001). Young age and dense breasts negatively affected diagnostic performance in mammography screening, whereas successive visits to the same institution had a positive effect. Examinee education for successive visits to the same institution would improve the diagnostic performance

  2. Analysis of participant factors that affect the diagnostic performance of screening mammography: A report of the alliance for breast cancer screening in Korea

    Kim, Young Joong [Dept. of Radiology, Konyang University Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eu Hye [Dept. of Radiology, Bucheon Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-08-01

    To analyze participant factors that affect the diagnostic performance of screening mammography. We enrolled 128756 cases from 10 hospitals between 2005 and 2010. We analyzed recall rate, cancer detection rate (CDR) per 1000 examinations, positive predictive value (PPV), sensitivity, specificity, false positive rate (FPR), and interval cancer rate (ICR) per 1000 negative examinations according to participant factors including age, breast density, and number of visit to the same institution, and adjusted for confounding variables. Increasing age improved recall rates (27.4% in 40's, 17.5% in 50's, 11.1% in 60's, and 8.6% in 70's), CDR (2.7, 3.2, 2.0, and 2.4), PPV (1.0, 1.8, 1.8, and 2.8%), sensitivity (81.3, 88.8, 90.3, and 94.7%), specificity (72.7, 82.7, 89.0, and 91.7%), and FPR (27.3, 17.3, 11.0, and 8.4%) (p < 0.05). Higher breast density impaired recall rates (4.0% in P1, 9.0% in P2, 28.9% in P3, and 27.8% in P4), PPV (3.3, 2.3, 1.2, and 1.3%), specificity (96.1, 91.2, 71.4, and 72.5%), and FPR (3.9, 8.9, 28.6, and 27.6%) (p < 0.001). It also increased CDR (1.3, 2.1, 3.3, and 3.6) and ICR (0.2, 0.3, 0.6, and 1.6) (p < 0.05). Successive visits to the same institution improved recall rates (20.9% for one visit, 10.7% for two visits, 7.7% for more than three visits), PPV (1.6, 2.8, and 2.7%), specificity (79.4, 89.6, and 92.5%), and FPR (20.6, 10.4, and 7.5%) (p < 0.001). Young age and dense breasts negatively affected diagnostic performance in mammography screening, whereas successive visits to the same institution had a positive effect. Examinee education for successive visits to the same institution would improve the diagnostic performance.

  3. Application of phase contrast imaging to mammography

    Tohyama, Keiko; Yamada, Katsuhiko; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Matsuo, Satoru; Morishita, Junji

    2005-01-01

    Phase contrast images were obtained experimentally by using a customized mammography unit with a nominal focal spot size of 100 μm and variable source-to-image distances of up to 1.5 m. The purpose of this study was to examine the applicability and potential usefulness of phase contrast imaging for mammography. A mammography phantom (ACR156 RMI phantom) was imaged, and its visibility was examined. The optical density of the phantom images was adjusted to approximately 1.3 for both the contact and phase contrast images. Forty-one observers (18 medical doctors and 23 radiological technologists) participated in visual evaluation of the images. Results showed that, in comparison with the images of contact mammography, the phantom images of phase contrast imaging demonstrated statistically significantly superior visibility for fibers, clustered micro-calcifications, and masses. Therefore, phase contrast imaging obtained by using the customized mammography unit would be useful for improving diagnostic accuracy in mammography. (author)

  4. Influence of the menstrual cycle on compression-induced pain during mammography: correlation with the thickness and volume of the mammary gland.

    Kitaoka, Hitomi; Kawashima, Hiroko

    2018-03-01

    In mammography, breast compression is necessary and an important factor influencing image quality. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of the menstrual cycle on compression-induced pain during mammography and to evaluate the association between the thickness and volume of the mammary gland and pain. We examined basal body temperature and categorized the menstrual cycle into five phases. We executed breast compression in the craniocaudal view using a customized compression plate, to which we introduced an opening. We measured the thickness of the mammary gland under compression using echography. Immediately after releasing the compression, we evaluated pain using the visual analogue scale. We performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on the same day and measured the volume of the mammary gland. The thickness of the mammary gland, pain, and the volume of the mammary gland were minimal in the late follicular phase and maximal in the late luteal and early follicular phases. It was shown that the changes in the thickness and volume of the mammary gland during the menstrual cycle accounted for the changes in compression-induced pain. On MRI examination of each breast quadrant, the same changes were observed in areas A and C. In area A, it was shown that both the anatomical characteristics and the increase in volume of the mammary gland were associated with pain. We concluded that the late follicular phase constitutes the optimal timing for mammography.

  5. Sport participation influences perceptions of mate characteristics.

    Schulte-Hostedde, Albrecht I; Eys, Mark A; Emond, Michael; Buzdon, Michael

    2012-02-22

    Sport provides a context in which mate choice can be facilitated by the display of athletic prowess. Previous work has shown that, for females, team sport athletes are more desirable as mates than individual sport athletes and non-participants. In the present study, the perceptions of males and females were examined regarding potential mates based on sport participation. It was predicted that team sport athletes would be more positively perceived than individual sport athletes and non-participants by both males and females. A questionnaire, a photograph, and manipulated descriptions were used to gauge perceptual differences with respect to team sport athletes, individual sport athletes, and extra-curricular club participants for 125 females and 119 males from a Canadian university. Both team and individual sport athletes were perceived as being less lazy, more competitive, and healthier than non-participants by both males and females. Interestingly, females perceived male athletes as more promiscuous than non-athletes, which upholds predictions based on previous research indicating (a) athletes have more sexual partners than non-athletes, and (b) females find athletes more desirable as partners than non-participants. Surprisingly, only males perceived female team sport athletes as more dependable than non-participants, and both team and individual sport athletes as more ambitious. This raises questions regarding the initial hypothesis that male team athletes would be perceived positively by females because of qualities such as the ability to cooperate, likeability, and the acceptance of responsibilities necessary for group functioning. Future studies should examine similar questions with a larger sample size that encompasses multiple contexts, taking into account the role of the social profile of sport in relation to mate choice and perception.

  6. Religious beliefs and mammography intention: findings from a qualitative study of a diverse group of American Muslim women.

    Padela, Aasim I; Vu, Milkie; Muhammad, Hadiyah; Marfani, Farha; Mallick, Saleha; Peek, Monica; Quinn, Michael T

    2016-10-01

    Studies suggest that American Muslim women underutilize mammography. While religion has a strong influence upon Muslim health behaviors, scant research has examined how religion-related beliefs inform Muslim women's intention for mammography. Our study identifies and examines such beliefs. Muslim women aged 40 years and older sampled from mosques participated in focus groups and individual interviews. Drawing upon the theory of planned behavior, interviews elicited salient behavioral, normative, and control beliefs regarding mammography and the influence of Islam upon screening intention. Fifty women participated in 6 focus groups and 19 in semistructured interviews, with near-equal numbers of African American, South Asian, and Arab Muslims. Forty-two percent of participants had not had a mammogram within the past 2 years. Across differences in race/ethnicity and mammography status, women voiced four religion-related salient beliefs that inform mammography intention: (1) the perceived duty to care for one's health, (2) religious practices as methods of disease prevention, (3) fatalistic notions about health, and (4) comfort with gender concordant health care. Religious beliefs influence decisions to pursue mammography across the ethnic/racial diversity of Muslim women. Notions about duty to God and the stewardship of one's body appear to enhance mammography intention. Theocentric notions of cure and illness and varied views regarding personal agency also inform decisional frames that impact mammography intention. Given the salience of religion among our participants, religiously tailored messages in interventions have the potential to enhance cancer screening. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Mammography screening in Greece: An exploratory survey of women's views, experiences and behaviours

    Athena Kalokerinou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Internationally, breast cancer comprises 29% of all cancer incidences. In Greece, 1,500-1,800women die annually from breast cancer out of the 4,000 who are affected. Only 5% are detected at an early diseasestage through mammography screening.Aim: This paper presents findings from a study exploring the factors that influence Greek women’smammography screening behaviour.Methodology: Data were collected in Athens-Greece, during the period March-July 2008, from individuals whowere members of six women’s associations. One hundred and eighty six questionnaires were completed and 33interviews were conducted from a sub-sample. This paper reports the findings from the questionnaire survey.Results: Participants had a variety of demographic characteristics with 85% of them having attendedmammography screening. Only 61% of them intended to continue in the future. Τhe majority of women agreedwith a number of factors which supported their decision to participate in regular mammography screening, such asdoctors’ encouragement and mammogram efficacy to detect breast cancer at an early stage, while anxiety wasidentified as a possible inhibitor to their participation.Conclusion: Women’s mammography screening behaviour and perceptions of mammography screening appearedto be positive in relation to their participation. However, the reasons as to why a large number of women indicatedthey were unlikely to go for mammography screening again is not known, and needs further investigation.

  8. Reader practice in mammography screen reporting in Australia

    Reed, W.; Poulos, A.; Brennan, P.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Reader variability is a problem in mammography image reporting and compromises the efficacy of screening programmes. The purpose of this exploratory study was to survey reader practice in reporting screening mammograms in Australia to identify aspects of practice that warrant further investigation. Mammography reporting practice and influences on concentration and attention were investigated by using an original questionnaire distributed to screen readers in Australia. A response rate of 71% (83 out of 117) was achieved. Demographic data indicated that the majority of readers were over 46 years of age (73%), have been reporting on screening mammograms for over 10 years (61%), take less than 1 min to report upon a screening mammogram examination (66%), report up to 200 examinations in a single session (83%) and take up to 2 h to report one session (61%). A majority report on more than 5000 examinations annually (66%); 93% of participants regard their search strategy as systematic, 87% agreed that their concentration can vary throughout a session, 64% agreed that the relatively low number of positives can lead to lapses in concentration and attention and almost all (94%) participants agreed that methods to maximise concentration should be explored. Participants identified a range of influences on concentration within their working environment including volume of images reported in one session, image types and aspects of the physical environment. This study has provided important evidence of the need to investigate adverse influences on concentration during mammography screen reporting

  9. Mammography fixture

    Henkes, J.L. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A device is described for compressing a pendant breast during tomographic mammography using X-rays. The device utilises a thin, elastic membrane pressurised by a fluid whose X-ray absorption properties are similar to those of soft human tissue. The membrane changes the normal conical shape of a pendant breast into a substantially cylindrical shape. The breast is surrounded by a second fluid medium whose X-ray absorption properties are also similar to that of soft human tissue and tomography transmission is carried out through the second fluid medium and the breast. This patent claims the advantages of eliminating high gradients in X-ray absorption density and the effective detection of breast tumours with minimum radiation dosage and processing time. (UK)

  10. Social Cultural Factors Influencing Women's Participation in Sports ...

    Social Cultural Factors Influencing Women's Participation in Sports as Perceived by Female Students of the University of Ilorin. ... sports competition while mass media should organize enlightenment programmes that will mitigate the ...

  11. Clinical factors influencing participation in society after successful kidney transplantation

    van der Mei, S.F.; Groothoff, J.W.; van Sonderen, E.L.P.; van den Heuvel, W.J.A.; de Jong, P.E.; van Son, W.J.

    2006-01-01

    Background. Little information is available on the degree of actual social functioning after successful kidney transplantation. Moreover, information on factors that influence participation in social activities is scarce. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of clinical factors on

  12. Magnification mammography

    Sickles, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    Lack of detail, a situation commonly encountered, renders unreliable the diagnostic criteria described above, leading to equivocal radiographic interpretations. Standard practice calls for biopsy of such equivocal lesions in order to rule out malignancy; indeed, this is necessary to detect as many small cancers as possible. An unfortunate consequence of this approach, however, is that several benign lesions have to be removed for each cancer discovered. In some circumstances, especially when malignancy is thought to be unlikely, biopsy is deferred in favor of a series of follow-up mammographic examinations. It is even more unfortunate, if this latter course of action is chosen, when the underlying lesion proves to be cancerous and appropriate treatment is thereby delayed. One potential solution to this double-edged problem of equivocal interpretations is to substantially improve the sharpness and detail of the radiographic image, thus permitting one to utilize more fully the standard mammographic interpretive criteria that otherwise might be ignored. If this approach proves successful, some equivocal interpretations will be converted into more definitive diagnoses, either benign or malignant. The technique of direct radiographic magnification has been shown to be very helpful in this regard. Not only are magnification images known to display improved sharpness and detail, but magnification techniques have already been applied successfully to mammography, angiography, and skeletal radiography, resulting in increased diagnostic accuracy for these examinations

  13. Control of image quality in mammography. Influence of assessing subjective image of a test object; Control de calidad de imagen en mamografia. Influencia de la valoracion subjetiva de la imagen de un objeto de prueba

    Hernandez Concepcion, E.; Garrido Breton, C.; Batista Arce, A.; Gonzalez Lopez, S.; Catalan Acosta, A.; Hernandez Armas, J.

    2013-07-01

    . The object of this work is to assess the influence of the observer in the control of image quality to the digital mammography machine of our hospital, establishing reference values and tolerances that take into account the variability between observers. (Author)

  14. Quality control of mammography departments in Slovakia

    Horvathova, M.; Nikodemova, D.

    2007-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. Considering the fact that mammary gland is the most sensitive organ to ionizing radiation, the Commission of the Ministry of Health of SR for QA in radiology organized a pilot two-run country wide audit conducted in 42 mammography departments that have met the beforehand criteria. During the audit the methods for establishing the individual parameters in technical and clinical part of quality assurance in mammography were elaborated and implemented. Technical and clinical parameters of the imaging process that mostly affect the quality of diagnostic information were followed up. These parameters included: the object thickness compensation, optical density deviation, evaluation of the film quality by means of special phantom, etc. Important measurement of ESDs at participating departments enabled to compare the radiation load of mammography patients in Slovakia with reference values in European guidelines. The uniform standard method for QA at mammography departments was elaborated and published as the regulation of the Ministry of Health for performance of preventive mammography examinations in SR. The presented results show the improved quality of mammography examinations due to regular check-ups of technical and clinical parameters and fulfilment of the required values in all parameters. The audit results are the basis for continuous quality assessment of mammography departments as a main prerequisite for conducting preventive examinations and for health insurance purposes.

  15. FAMILY PERCEPTION AND PARTICIPATION AND ITS INFLUENCE ON THEIR WEALTH

    Lutfi Sri Legowo Utami

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Micro Financial Institution (MFI is an alternative financial institution that helps micro entrepreneurs and poor families to get flexible loans. This study analyzes family perception and participation on micro financial institution and their influence on family welfare. It analyzes the cases of Bina Sejahtera Posdaya, Pasir Mulya, West Bogor sub-district, Bogor district. The sample consists of 32 MFI members and 38 non-MFI members. The result shows that experiences in financial institutions and cosmopolitans significantly influence welfare. Factors influence the family welfare are family income, members’ perception to MFI, and members participation. Keywords:    Family welfare, perception, family participation, micro financial institution JEL classification number: G21, G29

  16. Motivators and barriers to mammography screening uptake by female health-care workers in primary health-care centres: a cross-sectional study.

    Nazzal, Zaher; Sholi, Hisham; Sholi, Suha B; Sholi, Mohammad B; Lahaseh, Rawya

    2018-02-21

    Mammography screening is an effective tool for early detection and management of breast cancer. Female health-care workers' awareness of breast cancer screening is important because their beliefs and behaviours could influence other women. The aim of this study was to assess mammography screening uptake by female health-care workers at primary health-care centres and to identify the primary motivators and barriers that affect uptake. This cross-sectional study included all governmental primary health-care centres in the West Bank. Governorates were grouped into three regions as follows: north West Bank (Nablus, Jenin, Tulkarm, Tubas, Qalqiliya, and Salfit), middle West Bank (Jerusalem, Jericho, and Ramallah), and south West Bank (Hebron, and Bethlehem). The study population included all female health-care workers older than 40 years. Those who performed mammography for a suspected mass or other breast abnormalities were excluded. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data on demographic characteristics, knowledge about mammography screening, the extent and regularity of mammography screening, and motivators and barriers influencing their mammography screening uptake. The rate of mammography screening uptake was calculated. χ 2 test and t tests were used to assess screening motivators and barriers. The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the An-Najah National University. Participation was voluntary, and written consent was obtained from each participant. 299 female health-care workers completed a self-administered questionnaire. The mean age of the participants was 46 years (SD 4·7). 284 (95%) women had adequate knowledge about breast cancer and mammography screening, and 149 (50%) women reported having had at least one mammogram. 62 (21%) women had had regular scheduled mammograms. The most frequent reported motivators were the perceived benefit that early detection of breast cancer is important for its management (269 [90

  17. Family Influence on Teenage Participation in School Activities.

    Cashion, Barbara G.; Dager, Edward Z.

    This paper is concerned with the relationship between social participation and family structure. A theory is developed in the framework of George Herbert Mead's analysis on the development of a consistent self in response to a generalized other. According to this theory, the influence of the family is implicated as one of the social-psychological…

  18. Evaluating User Participation and User Influence in an Enterprise System

    Gibbs, Martin D.

    2010-01-01

    Does user influence have an impact on the data quality of an information systems development project? What decision making should users have? How can users effectively be engaged in the process? What is success? User participation is considered to be a critical success factor for Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) projects, yet there is little…

  19. Advanced Breast Cancer as Indicator of Quality Mammography

    Gaona, Enrique

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and is the second leading cause of cancer death among women in the Mexican Republic. Mammography is the more important screening tool for detecting early breast cancer. Screening mammography involves taking x-rays from two views from each breast, typically from above (cranial-caudal view, CC) and from an oblique or angled view (mediolateral-oblique, MLO). The purpose of this study was to carry out an exploratory survey of the issue of patients with advanced breast cancer who have had a screening mammography. A general result of the survey is that 22.5% of all patients (102) with advanced breast cancer that participated in the study had previous screening mammography. But we should consider that 10% of breast cancers are not detected by mammography. Only 70% of the family doctors prescribed a diagnostic mammography when the first symptoms were diagnosed

  20. A comparison of the accuracy of film-screen mammography, full-field digital mammography, and digital breast tomosynthesis

    Michell, M.J.; Iqbal, A.; Wasan, R.K.; Evans, D.R.; Peacock, C.; Lawinski, C.P.; Douiri, A.; Wilson, R.; Whelehan, P.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To measure the change in diagnostic accuracy of conventional film-screen mammography and full-field digital mammography (FFDM) with the addition of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) in women recalled for assessment following routine screening. Materials and methods: Ethics approval for the study was granted. Women recalled for assessment following routine screening with screen-film mammography were invited to participate. Participants underwent bilateral, two-view FFDM and two-view DBT. Readers scored each lesion separately for probability of malignancy on screen-film mammography, FFDM, and then DBT. The scores were compared with the presence or absence of malignancy based on the final histopathology outcome. Results: Seven hundred and thirty-eight women participated (93.2% recruitment rate). Following assessment 204 (26.8%) were diagnosed as malignant (147 invasive and 57 in-situ tumours), 286 (37.68%) as benign, and 269 (35.4%) as normal. The diagnostic accuracy was evaluated by using receiving operating characteristic (ROC) and measurement of area under the curve (AUC). The AUC values demonstrated a significant (p = 0.0001) improvement in the diagnostic accuracy with the addition of DBT combined with FFDM and film-screen mammography (AUC = 0.9671) when compared to FFDM plus film-screen mammography (AUC = 0.8949) and film-screen mammography alone (AUC = 0.7882). The effect was significantly greater for soft-tissue lesions [AUC was 0.9905 with the addition of DBT and AUC was 0.9201 for FFDM with film-screen mammography combined (p = 0.0001)] compared to microcalcification [with the addition of DBT (AUC = 0.7920) and for FFDM with film-screen mammography combined (AUC = 0.7843; p = 0.3182)]. Conclusion: The addition of DBT increases the accuracy of mammography compared to FFDM and film-screen mammography combined and film-screen mammography alone in the assessment of screen-detected soft-tissue mammographic abnormalities.

  1. Experience with digital mammography

    G. P. Korzhenkova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of digital techniques in mammography has become a last step for completing the process of digitization in diagnostic imaging. It is assumed that such a spatial decision will be required for digital mammography, as well as for high-resolution intensifying screen-film systems used in conventional mammography and that the digital techniques will be limited by the digitizer pixel size on detecting minor structures, such as microcalcifications. The introduction of digital technologies in mammography involves a tight control over an image and assures its high quality.

  2. Beyond participation -Social Influence on Information Technology and Work Environment

    Koch, Christian

    1997-01-01

    in danish industry indicates that the organisation is a poor unit of operation for participative management related to integrative IT. It is proposed rather to use segments as a analytical unit for participation and influence. A segment consists of a IT- supplier and his customer. It is argued that supplier...... and customer tend to build up a interdependency of economic, social and technical character. The segments works as a fortification of a dominant alliance between suppliers representatives and parts of management. The contribution argues for a revival of the collective ressource approach or other societal...

  3. Users' participation and social influence during information spreading on Twitter.

    Zhang, Xin; Han, Ding-Ding; Yang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Ziqiao

    2017-01-01

    Online Social Networks generate a prodigious wealth of real-time information at an incessant rate. In this paper we study the empirical data that crawled from Twitter to describe the topology and information spreading dynamics of Online Social Networks. We propose a measurement with three measures to state the efforts of users on Twitter to get their information spreading, based on the unique mechanisms for information retransmission on Twitter. It is noticed that small fraction of users with special performance on participation can gain great influence, while most other users play a role as middleware during the information propagation. Thus a community analysis is performed and four categories of users are found with different kinds of participation that cause the information dissemination dynamics. These suggest that exiting topological measures alone may reflect little about the influence of individuals and provide new insights for information spreading.

  4. Validation of the English and Spanish Mammography Beliefs and Attitudes Questionnaire.

    Lopez-McKee, Gloria; Bader, Julia

    2011-03-21

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among Hispanic women in the United States. Unfortunately Hispanic women exhibit poor mammography screening participation, are diagnosed at later stages of the disease, and have lower survival rates than non-Hispanic white women. Several cultural and psycho-social factors have been found to influence mammography screening participation among Hispanic women. We will begin by presenting the theoretical framework that grounded this research program to develop an instrument to assess factors contributing to poor mammography participation among Hispanic women. We will also summarize the early stages in the development of the English and Spanish Mammography Beliefs and Attitudes Questionnaire (MBAQ and SMBAQ) for use with low-health-literacy Mexican-American women. Next we will describe the initial psychometric testing of the MBAQ/SMBAQ, after which we will present the psychometric testing of the SMBAQ with low-health-literacy women. This will be followed by a discussion of the modification of the MBAQ and SMBAQ subscales. We'll conclude with a discussion of the instruments and share our assessment regarding the limitations of this research program, where the program stands to date, and the implications for practice and future research.

  5. Screen-film mammography

    Logan, W.W.; Janus, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The development of screen-film mammography has resulted in the re-emergence of confidence, rather than fear, in mammography. When screen-film mammography is performed with state-of-the-art dedicated equipment utilizing vigorous breast compression and a ''soft'' x-ray beam for improved contrast, screen-film images are equivalent or superior to those of reduced-dose xeromammography and superior to those of nonscreen film mammography. Technological aids for conversion from xeromammographic or nonscreen film mammographic techniques to screen-film techniques have been described. Screen-film mammography should not be attempted until dedicated equipment has been obtained and the importance of vigorous compression has been understood

  6. Automated Breast Density Computation in Digital Mammography and Digital Breast Tomosynthesis: Influence on Mean Glandular Dose and BIRADS Density Categorization.

    Castillo-García, Maria; Chevalier, Margarita; Garayoa, Julia; Rodriguez-Ruiz, Alejandro; García-Pinto, Diego; Valverde, Julio

    2017-07-01

    The study aimed to compare the breast density estimates from two algorithms on full-field digital mammography (FFDM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and to analyze the clinical implications. We selected 561 FFDM and DBT examinations from patients without breast pathologies. Two versions of a commercial software (Quantra 2D and Quantra 3D) calculated the volumetric breast density automatically in FFDM and DBT, respectively. Other parameters such as area breast density and total breast volume were evaluated. We compared the results from both algorithms using the Mann-Whitney U non-parametric test and the Spearman's rank coefficient for data correlation analysis. Mean glandular dose (MGD) was calculated following the methodology proposed by Dance et al. Measurements with both algorithms are well correlated (r ≥ 0.77). However, there are statistically significant differences between the medians (P density median values from FFDM are, respectively, 8% and 77% higher than DBT estimations. Both algorithms classify 35% and 55% of breasts into BIRADS (Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System) b and c categories, respectively. There are no significant differences between the MGD calculated using the breast density from each algorithm. DBT delivers higher MGD than FFDM, with a lower difference (5%) for breasts in the BIRADS d category. MGD is, on average, 6% higher than values obtained with the breast glandularity proposed by Dance et al. Breast density measurements from both algorithms lead to equivalent BIRADS classification and MGD values, hence showing no difference in clinical outcomes. The median MGD values of FFDM and DBT examinations are similar for dense breasts (BIRADS d category). Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Does gender discrimination impact regular mammography screening? Findings from the race differences in screening mammography study.

    Dailey, Amy B; Kasl, Stanislav V; Jones, Beth A

    2008-03-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determine if gender discrimination, conceptualized as a negative life stressor, is a deterrent to adherence to mammography screening guidelines. African American and white women (1451) aged 40-79 years who obtained an index screening mammogram at one of five urban hospitals in Connecticut between October 1996 and January 1998 were enrolled in this study. This logistic regression analysis includes the 1229 women who completed telephone interviews at baseline and follow-up (average 29.4 months later) and for whom the study outcome, nonadherence to age-specific mammography screening guidelines, was determined. Gender discrimination was measured as lifetime experience in seven possible situations. Gender discrimination, reported by nearly 38% of the study population, was significantly associated with nonadherence to mammography guidelines in women with annual family incomes of > or =$50,000 (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.33, 2.98) and did not differ across racial/ethnic group. Our findings suggest that gender discrimination can adversely influence regular mammography screening in some women. With nearly half of women nonadherent to screening mammography guidelines in this study and with decreasing mammography rates nationwide, it is important to address the complexity of nonadherence across subgroups of women. Life stressors, such as experiences of gender discrimination, may have considerable consequences, potentially influencing health prevention prioritization in women.

  8. Factors influencing participation in colorectal cancer screening programs in Spain.

    Vanaclocha-Espi, Mercedes; Ibáñez, Josefa; Molina-Barceló, Ana; Pérez, Elena; Nolasco, Andreu; Font, Rebeca; Pérez-Riquelme, Francisco; de la Vega, Mariola; Arana-Arri, Eunate; Oceja, MªElena; Espinàs, Josep Alfons; Portillo, Isabel; Salas, Dolores

    2017-12-01

    To analyze the sociodemographic and organizational factors influencing participation in population-based colorectal cancer screening programs (CRCSP) in Spain, a retrospective study was conducted in a cohort of people invited to participate in the first 3 screening rounds of 6 CRCSP from 2000 to 2012. Mixed logistic regression models were used to analyze the relationship between sociodemographic and organizational factors, such as the type of fecal occult blood test (FOBT) used and the FOBT delivery type. The analysis was performed separately in groups (Initial screening-first invitation, Subsequent invitation for previous never-responders, Subsequent invitation-regular, Subsequent invitation-irregular intervals). The results showed that, in the Initial screening-first invitation group, participation was higher in women than in men in all age groups (OR 1.05 in persons aged 50-59years and OR 1.12 in those aged 60-69years). Participation was also higher when no action was required to receive the FOBT kit, independently of the type of screening (Initial screening-first invitation [OR 2.24], Subsequent invitation for previous never-responders [OR 2.14], Subsequent invitation-regular [OR 2.03], Subsequent invitation-irregular intervals [OR 9.38]) and when quantitative rather than qualitative immunological FOBT (FIT) was offered (Initial screening-first invitation [OR 0.70], Subsequent invitation for previous never-responders [OR 0.12], Subsequent invitation-regular [OR 0.20]) or guaiac testing (Initial screening-first invitation [OR 0.81], Subsequent invitation for previous never-responders [OR 0.88], Subsequent invitation-regular [OR 0.73]). In conclusion, the results of this study show that screening participation could be enhanced by inclusion of the FOBT kit with the screening invitation and the use of the quantitative FIT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Digital mammography; Mamografia digital

    Chevalier, M.; Torres, R.

    2010-07-01

    Mammography represents one of the most demanding radiographic applications, simultaneously requiring excellent contrast sensitivity, high spatial resolution, and wide dynamic range. Film/screen is the most widely extended image receptor in mammography due to both its high spatial resolution and contrast. The film/screen limitations are related with its narrow latitude, structural noise and that is at the same time the medium for the image acquisition, storage and presentation. Several digital detector made with different technologies can overcome these difficulties. Here, these technologies as well as their main advantages and disadvantages are analyzed. Also it is discussed its impact on the mammography examinations, mainly on the breast screening programs. (Author).

  10. Mammography and radiation risk; Mammographie und Strahlenrisiko

    Jung, H. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Biophysik und Strahlenbiologie

    1998-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant neoplasia among women in Germany. The use of mammography as the most relevant diagnostic procedure has increased rapidly over the last decade. Radiation risks associated with mammography may be estimated from the results of numerous epidemiological studies providing risk coefficients for breast cancer in relation to age at exposure. Various calculations can be performed using the risk coefficients. For instance, a single mammography examination (bilateral, two views of each breast) of a women aged 45 may enhance the risk of developing breast cancer during her lifetime numerically from about 12% of 12.0036%. This increase in risk is lower by a factor of 3,300 as compared to the risk of developing breast cancer in the absence of radiation exposure. At the age of 40 or more, the benefit of mammography exceeds the radiation risk by a factor of about 100. At higher ages this factor increases further. Finally, the dualism of individual risk and collective risk is considered. It is shown that the individual risk of a patient, even after multiple mammography examinations, is vanishingly small. Nevertheless, the basic principle of minimising radiation exposure must be followed to keep the collective risk in the total population as low as reasonably achievable. (orig.) [Deutsch] Das Mammakarzinom ist in Deutschland die haeufigste Krebserkrankung der Frau, und entsprechend oft wird die Mammographie als das derzeit wichtigste Diagnoseverfahren eingesetzt. Zur Beurteilung des mit einer mammographischen Untersuchung verbundenen Strahlenrisikos liegen die Resultate einer groesseren Anzahl strahlenepidemiologischer Studien vor. Diese liefern den Risikokoeffizienten fuer Brustkrebs in Abhaengigkeit vom Lebensalter bei Strahlenexposition und ermoeglichen somit die Berechnung des altersabhaengigen Strahlenrisikos. Beispielsweise wird durch eine einmalige Mammographie-Untersuchung (bilateral, je zwei Aufnahmen in zwei Ebenen) bei einer 45

  11. Addition of tomosynthesis to conventional digital mammography: effect on image interpretation time of screening examinations.

    Dang, Pragya A; Freer, Phoebe E; Humphrey, Kathryn L; Halpern, Elkan F; Rafferty, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effect of implementing a screening tomosynthesis program on real-world clinical performance by quantifying differences between interpretation times for conventional screening mammography and combined tomosynthesis and mammography for multiple participating radiologists with a wide range of experience in a large academic center. In this HIPAA-compliant, institutional review board-approved study, 10 radiologists prospectively read images from screening digital mammography or screening combined tomosynthesis and mammography examinations for 1-hour-long uninterrupted sessions. Images from 3665 examinations (1502 combined and 2163 digital mammography) from July 2012 to January 2013 were interpreted in at least five sessions per radiologist per modality. The number of cases reported during each session was recorded for each reader. The experience level for each radiologist was also correlated to the average number of cases reported per hour. Analysis of variance was used to assess the number of studies interpreted per hour. A linear regression model was used to evaluate correlation between breast imaging experience and time taken to interpret images from both modalities. The mean number of studies interpreted in hour was 23.8 ± 0.55 (standard deviation) (range, 14.4-40.4) for combined tomosynthesis and mammography and 34.0 ± 0.55 (range, 20.4-54.3) for digital mammography alone. A mean of 10.2 fewer studies were interpreted per hour during combined tomosynthesis and mammography compared with digital mammography sessions (P tomosynthesis and mammography and 1.9 minutes ± 0.6 (range, 1.1-3.0) for digital mammography; interpretation time with combined tomosynthesis and mammography was 0.9 minute longer (47% longer) compared with digital mammography alone (P tomosynthesis and mammography examinations decreased (R(2) = 0.52, P = .03). Addition of tomosynthesis to mammography results in increased time to interpret images from screening examinations compared

  12. Quality assurance in mammography

    Fosmark, H.; Olerud, H.M.

    1992-01-01

    Guidelines in mammography are given, including competence of staff, performance of equipment and quality control procedures. The purpose of the guidelines is to ensure optimum diagnostic quality. 5 refs

  13. Household factors influencing participation in bird feeding activity

    Davies, Zoe G.; Fuller, Richard A.; Dallimer, Martin

    2012-01-01

    whether and how the socioeconomic background of a household influences participation in food provision for wild birds, the most popular and widespread form of human-wildlife interaction. A majority of households feed birds (64% across rural and urban areas in England, and 53% within five British study...... cities). House type, household size and the age of the head of the household were all important predictors of bird feeding, whereas gross annual household income, the occupation of the head of the household, and whether the house is owned or rented were not. In both surveys, the prevalence of bird...... a week. The proportion of households regularly feeding birds was positively related to the age of the head of the household, but declined with gross annual income. As concerns grow about the lack of engagement between people and the natural environment, such findings are important if conservation...

  14. Performance of clinical mammography: a nationwide study from Denmark

    Jensen, Allan; Vejborg, Ilse; Severinsen, Niels

    2006-01-01

    that clinical mammography worked best in patient populations of purely symptomatic women. Our data indicate that to increase the accuracy of clinical mammography at the community level, the presence of an experienced radiologist should be prioritized ahead of raising the clinic size.......Clinical mammography is the key tool for breast cancer diagnosis, but little is known about the impact of the organisational set-up on the performance. We evaluated whether organisational factors influence the performance of clinical mammography. Clinical mammography data from all clinics...... in Denmark in the year 2000 were collected and linked to cancer outcome. Use of the National Institute of Radiation Hygiene register for identification of radiology clinics ensured comprehensive nationwide registration. We used the final mammographic assessment at the end of the imaging work-up to determine...

  15. Anxiety in mammography: mammographers' and clients' perspectives

    Galletta, S.; Joel, N.; Maguire, R.; Weaver, K.; Poulos, A.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify causes of anxiety experienced by mammographers and clients during mammography and strategies to decrease the anxiety generated by the mammographic procedure. Two questionnaires were distributed: one to mammographers in public and private centres within NSW, the other to women (clients) who have experienced mammography. Mammographers' and clients' rankings of causes of clients' anxiety demonstrated many similarities indicating the mammographers' acknowledgement of factors contributing to client anxiety. Thematic analysis provided important qualitative data concerning anxiety experienced by both mammographers and clients and the influence of mammographer and client behaviour on that anxiety. The results of this study have provided important new knowledge for mammographic practice and mammography education. By understanding the causes of anxiety experienced by clients, mammographers can provide an informed, empathetic approach to the mammographic process. By acknowledging factors which increase their own anxiety mammographers can reduce the impact of this on themselves and on their clients. Copyright (2003) Australian Institute of Radiography

  16. Evaluation of the influence of parameters that determine the mean glandular dose in mammography using different detectors; Evaluacion de la influencia de los parametros que determinan la dosis glandular media en Mamografia utilizando diferentes detectores

    Costa, K.; Nogueira, M. S., E-mail: katicostabh@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, Pos-graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnologia das Radiacoes, Minerais e Materiais / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Mammography is a test used for early detection of breast cancer. The mean glandular dose (MGD) is dosimetric greatness accepted as indicative of carcinogenic risk induced by ionizing radiation in the breasts of women undergoing mammography exams. MGD value is estimated from the incident air kerma (k i), associated with conversion factors which depend on the half-value layer (HVL), the breast composition and thickness compressed breast. This study aims to evaluate the influence of the parameters used to determine the MGD using different measurement detectors. Measurements were performed on a Siemens Mammomat Model 300 Nova mammography equipment; this has the combinations Anode/Filter of Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh and W/Rh. Detectors used were the ionization chamber Model 10X6-6M manufactured by Radcal Co., two solid-state detectors, one Model AGMS-M manufactured by Radcal Co. and other Model Xi Mammo manufactured by UNFORS. The detectors measures were compared and the MGD value was estimated; differences between measurements and the reference values were higher in HVL and k i parameters. The results are displayed according to other published works. (Author)

  17. Implementation of Quality Control Protocol in Mammography: A Serbian Experience

    Ciraj Bjelac, O.; Kosutic, D.; Arandjic, D.; Kovacevic, M.

    2008-01-01

    Mammography is method of choice for early detection of breast cancer. In Serbia, mammography is performed only clinically, although there is a long term plan to introduce mammography as screening method. Currently there are 60 mammography units in practice in Serbia, resulting with 70 000 mammographies annually. The purpose of this paper is preliminary evaluation of the mammography practice in Serbia, having in mind the annual number of examinations and fact that part of examination is performed on women without any clinical signs. For pilot implementation of Quality Control (QC) protocol in mammography, five hospitals with highest workload have been selected, representing the typical mammography practice in Serbia. Developed QC protocol, based on European guidelines for quality assurance in breast cancer screening and diagnosis, actual practice and resources, includes equipment testing and maintenance, staff training and QC management and allocation of responsibilities. Subsequently, it should be applied on the national scale. The survey demonstrated considerable variations in technical parameters that affect image quality and patients doses. Mean glandular doses ranged from 0.12 to 2.8 mGy, while reference optical density ranged from 1.2 to 2.8. Main problems were associated with film processing, viewing conditions and optical density control. The preliminary survey of mammography practice highlighted the need for optimization of radiation protection and training of operating staff, although the survey itself was very valuable learning process for all participants. Furthermore, systematic implementation of QC protocol should provide reliable performance of mammography units and maintain satisfactory image quality and keep patient doses as low as reasonably practical.(author)

  18. Practical digital mammography

    Hashimoto, Beverly E. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States)]|[Virginia Mason Medical Center, VA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    This book is meant for the radiologist who is facing the challenge of organizing a digital mammographic imaging center. This text is meant to be a practical book that provides information about digital mammographic physics and equipment which will allow one to intelligently compare technologies and systems. Some of the major challenges include: large expense; rapidly changing technology, and inconsistent connectivity; and finally, need for strong information technology support. The initial conversion cost to digital mammographic imaging is relatively expensive due to the cost of digital mammography hardware, software, and storage. Virtually all other imaging modalities are being converted to purely digital storage and transfer, and the digital trend in mammography is inevitable. Technical advantages of digital mammography are described. However, the improved flexibility in image display and transfer are some of its strongest features. In conclusion, although there are increasing imaging modalities that may be used to evaluate breast disease, mammography will continue to play a key role in detecting breast cancer. To be an effective imager, the radiologist should become familiar with digital mammography and understand its role within the increasing complex structure of breast imaging techniques.

  19. Practical digital mammography

    Hashimoto, Beverly E.

    2008-01-01

    This book is meant for the radiologist who is facing the challenge of organizing a digital mammographic imaging center. This text is meant to be a practical book that provides information about digital mammographic physics and equipment which will allow one to intelligently compare technologies and systems. Some of the major challenges include: large expense; rapidly changing technology, and inconsistent connectivity; and finally, need for strong information technology support. The initial conversion cost to digital mammographic imaging is relatively expensive due to the cost of digital mammography hardware, software, and storage. Virtually all other imaging modalities are being converted to purely digital storage and transfer, and the digital trend in mammography is inevitable. Technical advantages of digital mammography are described. However, the improved flexibility in image display and transfer are some of its strongest features. In conclusion, although there are increasing imaging modalities that may be used to evaluate breast disease, mammography will continue to play a key role in detecting breast cancer. To be an effective imager, the radiologist should become familiar with digital mammography and understand its role within the increasing complex structure of breast imaging techniques

  20. Participation Apprehensive Students: The Influence of Face Support and Instructor-Student Rapport on Classroom Participation

    Frisby, Brandi N.; Berger, Erin; Burchett, Molly; Herovic, Emina; Strawser, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Participation is considered a positive student classroom behavior that can also create a face-threatening classroom climate that may be alleviated through interpersonal relationships with the instructor. Participants (N?=?189) categorized as low apprehensives perceived less face threat and more face support when participating; moderate…

  1. Image quality in mammography

    Haus, A.G.; Doi, K.; Metz, C.E.; Bernstein, J.

    1976-01-01

    In mammography, image quality is a function of the shape, size, and x-ray absorption properties of the anatomic part to be radiographed and of the lesion to be detected; it also depends on geometric unsharpness, and the resolution, characteristic curve and noise properties of the recording system. X-ray energy spectra, modulation transfer functions, Wiener spectra, characteristic and gradient curves, and radiographs of a breast phantom and of a resected breast specimen containing microcalcifications are used in a review of some current considerations of the factors, and the complex relationship among factors, that affect image quality in mammography. Image quality and patient radiation exposure in mammography are interrelated. An approach to the problem of evaluating the trade-off between diagnostic certainty and the cost or risk of performing a breast imaging procedure is discussed

  2. Teaching atlas of mammography

    Tabar, L.; Dean, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    The illustrated case reports in this teaching atlas cover practically the entire range of possible pathological changes and are based on in-patient case material and 80,000 screening documents. The two basic approaches, - detection and analysis of changes -, are taught comprehensively and in great detail. A systematic procedure for analysing the mammographies, in order to detect even the very least changes, and its practical application is explained using mammographies showing unclear findings at first sight. A system of coordinates is presented which allows precise localisation of the changes. Exercises for practising the technique of identifying the pathological changes round up the methodolical chapters. Additional imaging technical enhancements and detail enlargements are of great help in interpreting the findings. The specific approach adopted for this teaching atlas is a 'reverse procedure', which leaves the beaten track and starts with analysing the mammographies and evaluating the radiographic findings, in order to finally derive the diagnosis. (orig./CB) [de

  3. Comparison of digital mammography alone and digital mammography plus tomosynthesis in a population-based screening program.

    Skaane, Per; Bandos, Andriy I; Gullien, Randi; Eben, Ellen B; Ekseth, Ulrika; Haakenaasen, Unni; Izadi, Mina; Jebsen, Ingvild N; Jahr, Gunnar; Krager, Mona; Niklason, Loren T; Hofvind, Solveig; Gur, David

    2013-04-01

    To assess cancer detection rates, false-positive rates before arbitration, positive predictive values for women recalled after arbitration, and the type of cancers detected with use of digital mammography alone and combined with tomosynthesis in a large prospective screening trial. A prospective, reader- and modality-balanced screening study of participants undergoing combined mammography plus tomosynthesis, the results of which were read independently by four different radiologists, is under way. The study was approved by a regional ethics committee, and all participants provided written informed consent. The authors performed a preplanned interim analysis of results from 12,631 examinations interpreted by using mammography alone and mammography plus tomosynthesis from November 22, 2010, to December 31, 2011. Analyses were based on marginal log-linear models for binary data, accounting for correlated interpretations and adjusting for reader-specific performance levels by using a two-sided significance level of .0294. Detection rates, including those for invasive and in situ cancers, were 6.1 per 1000 examinations for mammography alone and 8.0 per 1000 examinations for mammography plus tomosynthesis (27% increase, adjusted for reader; P = .001). False-positive rates before arbitration were 61.1 per 1000 examinations with mammography alone and 53.1 per 1000 examinations with mammography plus tomosynthesis (15% decrease, adjusted for reader; P tomosynthesis; P = .72). Twenty-five additional invasive cancers were detected with mammography plus tomosynthesis (40% increase, adjusted for reader; P tomosynthesis (P tomosynthesis in a screening environment resulted in a significantly higher cancer detection rate and enabled the detection of more invasive cancers. Clinical trial registration no. NCT01248546. RSNA, 2013

  4. Mammography and Pap test screening among low-income foreign-born Hispanic women in the USA

    Fernandez Maria E.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the factors influencing screening among low-income Hispanic women particularly among recent immigrants. A sample of 148 low-income, low-literate, foreign-born Hispanic women residing in the Washington DC metropolitan area participated in the study. The mean age of the sample was 46.2 (SD = 11.5, 84% reported annual household incomes<=$15,000. All women were Spanish speakers and had low acculturation levels. Ninety six percent had reported having a Pap smear, but 24% were not in compliance with recommended screening (Pap test within the last 3 years. Among women 40 and older, 62% had received a mammogram, but only 33% were compliant with age appropriate recommended mammography screening guidelines. Women in this study had more misconceptions about cancer than Hispanics in other studies. Multivariate logistic models for correlates of Pap test and mammography screening behavior indicate that factors such as fear of the screening test, embarrassment, and lack of knowledge influenced screening behavior. In conclusion, women in this study had lower rates of mammography screening than non-Hispanic women and lower rates of compliance with recommended Mammography and Pap test screening guidelines.

  5. Contrast-Enhanced Spectral Mammography: Comparison with Conventional Mammography and Histopathology in 152 Women

    Luczyńska, Elzbieta; Heinze-Paluchowska, Sylwia; Dyczek, Sonia; Blecharz, Pawel; Rys, Janusz; Reinfuss, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Objective The goal of the study was to compare conventional mammography (MG) and contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) in preoperative women. Materials and Methods The study was approved by the local Ethics Committee and all participants provided informed consent. The study included 152 consecutive patients with 173 breast lesions diagnosed on MG or CESM. All MG examinations and consults were conducted in one oncology centre. Non-ionic contrast agent, at a total dose of 1.5 mL/kg body...

  6. Does Personality Influence Project Participation? Evidence from Rural Malawi

    Lønborg, Jonas Helth; Bie Lilleør, Helene

    participating in it. There is a large and still growing literature on how personality traits matter for economic and social outcomes in life. In this paper, we find that there is indeed a strong degree of self-selection on specific personality traits, when it comes to expressing interest in participating...

  7. Factors influencing participation in physical exercise by the elderly ...

    Regular exercise has been recommended as a partial solution to improving health and wellness among many groups of people including the elderly. Unfortunately, information on the participation of elderly in exercise in Kenya is lacking. This study sought to explore measures for enhancing participation in exercise by the ...

  8. Influence of Biblotherapy on Men's Participation in Reproductive ...

    The findings showed that bibliotherapy will not significantly influence men's participatory role in family planning and also that bibliotherpay will have significant influence on men's patronage of reproductive health (RH) services and effective communication of couples on sexuality and reproductive health matters.

  9. The influence of prices on market participation decisions of poultry ...

    user

    Kenya Agricultural Research Institute Naivasha, P.O Box 25, Naivasha. 2 ... study also investigates the probability of market participation by employing a binary logistic ..... Diseases, Socio Economics, Production and Biodiversity Unit, FAO.

  10. Influence of diagnostic quality scanning technique with CR mammography; Influencia de la tecnica de exploracion en la calidad diagnostica de la mamografia ocn CR

    Rivas Ballarin, M. A.; Ruiz Manzano, P.; Ortega Pardina, P.; Laliena Bielsa, V.; Calvo Carrillo, S.; Garcia Romero, A.; Millan Cebrian, E.

    2013-07-01

    Image quality criteria laid down in the Spanish Protocol of Control of quality in Radiology (PECCR) to a team of mammography with CR imaging system are applied in this work and evaluated the dosimetry impact implied by the modification of the technique of exposure required for the fulfilment of those criteria. Is also analyzes the impact on the image quality of the new radiographic technique, evaluated by three radiologists. (Author)

  11. Understanding women's mammography intentions: a theory-based investigation.

    Naito, Mikako; O'Callaghan, Frances V; Morrissey, Shirley

    2009-01-01

    The present study compared the utility of two models (the Theory of Planned Behavior and Protection Motivation Theory) in identifying factors associated with intentions to undertake screening mammography, before and after an intervention. The comparison was made between the unique components of the two models. The effect of including implementation intentions was also investigated. Two hundred and fifty-one women aged 37 to 69 years completed questionnaires at baseline and following the delivery of a standard (control) or a protection motivation theory-based informational intervention. Hierarchical multiple regressions indicated that theory of planned behavior variables were associated with mammography intentions. Results also showed that inclusion of implementation intention in the model significantly increased the association with mammography intentions. The findings suggest that future interventions aiming to increase screening mammography participation should focus on the theory of planned behavior variables and that implementation intention should also be targeted.

  12. [Hierarchy structuring for mammography technique by interpretive structural modeling method].

    Kudo, Nozomi; Kurowarabi, Kunio; Terashita, Takayoshi; Nishimoto, Naoki; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko

    2009-10-20

    Participation in screening mammography is currently desired in Japan because of the increase in breast cancer morbidity. However, the pain and discomfort of mammography is recognized as a significant deterrent for women considering this examination. Thus quick procedures, sufficient experience, and advanced skills are required for radiologic technologists. The aim of this study was to make the point of imaging techniques explicit and to help understand the complicated procedure. We interviewed 3 technologists who were highly skilled in mammography, and 14 factors were retrieved by using brainstorming and the KJ method. We then applied Interpretive Structural Modeling (ISM) to the factors and developed a hierarchical concept structure. The result showed a six-layer hierarchy whose top node was explanation of the entire procedure on mammography. Male technologists were related to as a negative factor. Factors concerned with explanation were at the upper node. We gave attention to X-ray techniques and considerations. The findings will help beginners improve their skills.

  13. Alteration of Influencing Factors of E-Learning Continued Intention for Different Degrees of Online Participation

    Chang, Chi-Cheng; Liang, Chaoyun; Shu, Kuen-Ming; Chiu, Yi-Chun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the variation of influencing factors of e-learning continuance intention for different degrees of participation and to examine moderating effects of degrees of participation on influencing factors of e-learning continuance intention. Participants included 670 learners from an adult professional…

  14. Breast compression in mammography: how much is enough?

    Poulos, Ann; McLean, Donald; Rickard, Mary; Heard, Robert

    2003-06-01

    The amount of breast compression that is applied during mammography potentially influences image quality and the discomfort experienced. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between applied compression force, breast thickness, reported discomfort and image quality. Participants were women attending routine breast screening by mammography at BreastScreen New South Wales Central and Eastern Sydney. During the mammographic procedure, an 'extra' craniocaudal (CC) film was taken at a reduced level of compression ranging from 10 to 30 Newtons. Breast thickness measurements were recorded for both the normal and the extra CC film. Details of discomfort experienced, cup size, menstrual status, existing breast pain and breast problems were also recorded. Radiologists were asked to compare the image quality of the normal and manipulated film. The results indicated that 24% of women did not experience a difference in thickness when the compression was reduced. This is an important new finding because the aim of breast compression is to reduce breast thickness. If breast thickness is not reduced when compression force is applied then discomfort is increased with no benefit in image quality. This has implications for mammographic practice when determining how much breast compression is sufficient. Radiologists found a decrease in contrast resolution within the fatty area of the breast between the normal and the extra CC film, confirming a decrease in image quality due to insufficient applied compression force.

  15. Mammography practices for radiation protection in Kenya

    Shadrack, Anthony K.

    2008-01-01

    and the medical physicist each of whom must participate actively in mammography Quality Control (QC). (author)

  16. Gender Influences on Students' Study Abroad Participation and Intercultural Competence

    Tompkins, Amanda; Cook, Trevor; Miller, Emily; LePeau, Lucy A.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand the impact of gender in study abroad participation rates and intercultural competence. The researchers aimed to identify the differences in intercultural competence between men and women and those who have and have not studied abroad. A mixed methods survey indicated there are significant…

  17. Factors That Influence Students to Participate in Team Decision Making

    Forrester, William R.; Tashchian, Armen

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of personality on participation in decision making in a sample of 225 business students. The Neo-FFI scale was used to measure the five personality dimensions of openness, agreeableness, extroversion, conscientiousness and neuroticism. Analysis indicated that personality dimensions, extroversion and…

  18. Potential Factors Influencing Indigenous Education Participation and Achievement. Research Report

    Biddle, Nicholas; Cameron, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    This report examines two sets of issues, the first being whether Indigenous Australians obtain a lower return on investment in education and training than other Australians. If they do, then this would partly explain why, in general, Indigenous participation in education and training is relatively low. The second issue is whether Indigenous…

  19. Factors Influencing or Discouraging Secondary School Students' FFA Participation

    Phelps, Kirstin; Henry, Anna L.; Bird, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Modern adolescents are faced with a variety of choices regarding how to spend their free time. As recruitment and increased student participation continues to be a major priority of the National FFA Organization, it is essential to explore the reasons why students make the choice to become or not to become a member of FFA. This study was a part of…

  20. Factors influencing participation of psychiatry inpatients in clinical trials.

    Mopuru, Nandeeshwar Reddy; Jose, Sam Padamadan; Viswanath, Biju; Kumar, C Naveen; Math, Suresh Bada; Thirthalli, Jagadisha

    2018-02-01

    Serious concerns have arisen in recent years regarding the unethical and illegal practices resorted to during clinical trials. Clinical trials in psychiatry are further complicated by issues such as 'validity of consent' and 'decision making capacity' of patients. This study was planned to explore the factors determining patient participation in clinical trials. A random sample of 123 consenting psychiatry inpatients were provided the information and consent-form of a hypothetical clinical drug trial. They were interviewed regarding their decision, the decision maker and factors that led to the decision. Family members tended to be the decision makers when patients were females, had low-income, were from rural background or had severe illnesses. Anticipated side effects and not wanting to interfere with existing treatment were the common reasons for refusal to participate while hope of betterment of the patient and benefit to humanity were cited for consent. The educated, urban, affluent class had more awareness regarding unethical trials and tended to be mistrustful of the medical community leading to higher rates of non-participation. Those who were adherent with ongoing treatment were also unwilling to participate. The lesser educated, low-income patients and rural domicile patients on the other hand had lesser awareness regarding clinical trials, trusted doctors and were more likely to participate. A good doctor-patient relationship, detailed explanations and clarification regarding the study and its conduct, and building awareness regarding clinical trials among vulnerable groups is necessary to ensure a valid consent involving no coercion, removal of prejudices, and ethical conduct of trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Dose measurements in mammography

    Kainberger, F.; Kallinger, W.

    1977-01-01

    Dose measurements at the mamma during mammography were carried out in the form of direct measurement with thermoluminescent dosimetry. Measurement was done for the in- and outcoming doses at the mamma, the dose exposure of the sternal region and the scattered rays above the symphysis, the latter as parameter for the genetic radiation exposure. As expected, the dose of the smooth radiation used for mammography showed a strong decrease at the outcome point in comparison with the income point. Surprisingly high was the scattered radiation in the sternal region. A corresponding protection by lead plates could be taken into consideration. Extremely low is the scattered radiation above the symphysis. Even measurements with the very sensitive calcium fluoride dosimeters did not reveal any practically important dose in the symphysis region. Most measurement values remained below the determinable dose of 0.3mR. Some maximal values varied in the range of 3-1 mR. (orig.) [de

  2. Hardware for mammography

    Rozhkova, N.I.; Chikirdin, Eh.G.; Ryudiger, Yu.G.; Kochetova, G.P.; Lisachenko, I.V.; Yakobs, O.Eh.

    2000-01-01

    The comparative studies on various visualization means, in particular, the intensifying screens and films with application of quantitative methods for determining small details on photographs, including measurements of corresponding exposures, absorbed doses and verification of conclusions through the analysis of clinical observations are carried out. It is shown, that technical equipment of the modern mammography room should include the X-ray mammographic apparatus, providing for the image high-quality by low dose loads with special film holders, meeting the mammography requirements, the corresponding X-ray film and the automatic photolaboratory process, provided by one and the same company. The quality of photographs under such conditions is guarantied, the defects and errors by the image interpretation are excluded. The modern computerized information technologies for work with medical images on the basic of creating new generations of diagnostic instrumentation with digital video channels and computerized working places dispose of many medical, technological, organizational and financial problems [ru

  3. Current status of mammography

    Crymes, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    Great progress has been made in recent years in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer; however, breast cancer continues to be the most common and lethal cancer in women today. Early diagnosis is essential in order for treatmet to be given before the tumor spreads beyond the breast. The radiation risks of mammography have been greatly reduced with the use of newer low-dose techniques, and the benefits of mammography have increased because of a better understanding of the natural history of breast cancer, as well as improved methods of treatment. Radiologists must continue to take an active role in the early diagnosis of breast cancer. Continued research is needed in order to improve screening methods and to develop newer, noninvasive techniques

  4. Soft copy digital mammography

    Kim, Hak Hee

    2005-01-01

    Screen-film mammography (SFM) has been the standard method used for breast cancer screening and making a clinical diagnosis. It is a valuable modality for the detection and differentiation of breast calcifications. The advantages are the high spatital resolution, the convenient display, and inexpensiveness. However, it has some inherent limitations such as its low detective quantum efficiency and difficulty of post-processing after obtaining after an image. Digital mammography (DM) has the potential to overcome the inherent limitations of SFM. DM systems directly qualify x-ray photons and decouple the process of x-ray photon detection from the image display. The digital images can be processed by a computer and displayed in multiple formats. Thus, DM is better than SFM for the detection of mass lesions due to its high contrast resolution

  5. Genetic influences on exercise participation in 37.051 twin pairs from seven countries.

    Stubbe, J.H.; Boomsma, D.I.; Vink, J.M.; Cornes, B.; Martin, N.G.; Skytthe, A.; Kyvik, K.; Rose, R.J.; Kujala, U.; Kaprio, J.; Harris, J.R.; Pedersen, N.L.; Hunkin, J.; Spector, T.D.; de Geus, E.J.C.

    2006-01-01

    Background. A sedentary lifestyle remains a major threat to health in contemporary societies. To get more insight in the relative contribution of genetic and environmental influences on individual differences in exercise participation, twin samples from seven countries participating in the

  6. Mammography accreditation program

    Wilcox, P.

    1993-12-31

    In the mid-1980`s, the movement toward the use of dedicated mammography equipment provided significant improvement in breast cancer detection. However, several studies demonstrated that this change was not sufficient to ensure optimal image quality at a low radiation dose. In particular, the 1985 Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends identified the wide variations in image quality and radiation dose, even from dedicated units. During this time period, the American Cancer Society (ACS) launched its Breast Cancer Awareness Screening Campaign. However, there were concerns about the ability of radiology to respond to the increased demand for optimal screening examinations that would result from the ACS program. To respond to these concerns, the ACS and the American College of Radiology (ACR) established a joint committee on mammography screening in 1986. After much discussion, it was decided to use the ACR Diagnostic Practice Accreditation Program as a model for the development of a mammography accreditation program. However, some constraints were required in order to make the program meet the needs of the ACS. This voluntary, peer review program had to be timely and cost effective. It was determined that the best way to address these needs would be to conduct the program by mail. Finally, by placing emphasis on the educational nature of the program, it would provide an even greater opportunity for improving mammographic quality. The result of this effort was that, almost six years ago, in May 1987, the pilot study for the ACR Mammography Accreditation Program (MAP) began, and in August of that year, the first applications were received. In November 1987, the first 3-year accreditation certificates were awarded.

  7. Mammography accreditation program

    Wilcox, P.

    1993-01-01

    In the mid-1980's, the movement toward the use of dedicated mammography equipment provided significant improvement in breast cancer detection. However, several studies demonstrated that this change was not sufficient to ensure optimal image quality at a low radiation dose. In particular, the 1985 Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends identified the wide variations in image quality and radiation dose, even from dedicated units. During this time period, the American Cancer Society (ACS) launched its Breast Cancer Awareness Screening Campaign. However, there were concerns about the ability of radiology to respond to the increased demand for optimal screening examinations that would result from the ACS program. To respond to these concerns, the ACS and the American College of Radiology (ACR) established a joint committee on mammography screening in 1986. After much discussion, it was decided to use the ACR Diagnostic Practice Accreditation Program as a model for the development of a mammography accreditation program. However, some constraints were required in order to make the program meet the needs of the ACS. This voluntary, peer review program had to be timely and cost effective. It was determined that the best way to address these needs would be to conduct the program by mail. Finally, by placing emphasis on the educational nature of the program, it would provide an even greater opportunity for improving mammographic quality. The result of this effort was that, almost six years ago, in May 1987, the pilot study for the ACR Mammography Accreditation Program (MAP) began, and in August of that year, the first applications were received. In November 1987, the first 3-year accreditation certificates were awarded

  8. Communication and patient participation influencing patient recall of treatment discussions.

    Richard, Claude; Glaser, Emma; Lussier, Marie-Thérèse

    2017-08-01

    Patient recall of treatment information is a key variable towards chronic disease (CD) management. It is unclear what communication and patient participation characteristics predict recall. To assess what aspects of doctor-patient communication predict patient recall of medication information. To describe lifestyle treatment recall, in CD primary care patients. Observational study within a RCT. Community-based primary care (PC) practices. Family physicians (n=18): practicing >5 years, with a CD patient caseload. Patients (n=159): >40 years old, English speaking, computer literate, off-target hypertension, type II diabetes and/or dyslipidaemia. Patient characteristics: age, education, number of CDs. Information characteristics: length of encounter, medication status, medication class. Communication variables: socio-emotional utterances, physician dominance and communication control scores and PACE (ask, check and express) utterances, measured by RIAS. Number of medication themes, dialogue and initiative measured by MEDICODE. Recall of CD, lifestyle treatment and medication information. Frequency of lifestyle discussions varied by topic. Patients recalled 43% (alcohol), 52% (diet) to 70% (exercise) of discussions. Two and a half of six possible medication themes were broached per medication discussion. Less than one was recalled. Discussing more themes, greater dialogue and patient initiative were significant predictors of improved medication information recall. Critical treatment information is infrequently exchanged. Active patient engagement and explicit conversations about medications are associated with improved treatment information recall in off-target CD patients followed in PC. Providers cannot take for granted that long-term off-target CD patients recall information. They need to encourage patient participation to improve recall of treatment information. © 2016 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Body weight and sensitivity of screening mammography

    Njor, Sisse H.; von Euler-Chelpin, My; Tjønneland, Anne

    2016-01-01

    benefit more from screening than other women. Methods: We combined data from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health study and the organised population-based screening mammography programme in Copenhagen, Denmark. Women were categorised according to body mass index (BMI) (...Aim: Obese women tend to participate less in breast cancer screening than normal weight women. However, obese women have fattier breast than normal weight women, and screening mammography works better in fatty than in dense breasts. One might, therefore, hypothesise that obese women would actually......, and 35+). We measured recall rate, sensitivity and specificity for subsequent screens with a 2-year follow-up period. Results: The study included 6787 women. The recall rate varied from 1.4% for women with BMI women with BMI 35+, test for trend p = 0.86. Sensitivity varied from 42% (95...

  10. Perceived influence of intrinsic/extrinsic factors on participation in life activities after spinal cord injury.

    Cobb, John E; Leblond, Jean; Dumont, Frédéric S; Noreau, Luc

    2018-04-03

    Various types of limitations on community participation are experienced by people with spinal cord injury (SCI). To determine: 1) the perceived influence of six intrinsic/extrinsic factors (i.e. physical impairment, emotional condition, thinking skills, environment, lack of assistance, discrimination) on participation in 26 life activities, 2) if this influence varied based on extent of participation, and 3) if personal or environmental characteristics influenced perceptions. Secondary analysis of a cohort (SCI Community Survey, n = 1508) using the SCI Person-Perceived Participation in Daily Activities Questionnaire. Frequency tables, Fisher's exact tests and correspondence analyses. Respectively, 79.6% and 38.5% of respondents perceived that their physical impairment and the natural and/or built environment were the main factors that limited participation across all activities. Considering participation between three groups (no participation; less than wanted; as much as wanted), significant differences (p intrinsic/extrinsic factors on participation was not significantly influenced by other personal or environmental characteristics. A majority of people with SCI perceived that their participation is limited by one or more of intrinsic/extrinsic factors. Perceptions regarding which factors influence participation differ between activities and these perceptions appear related to the extent of participation suggesting that those who actively participate could be the most sensitive to limitations in certain activities. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Trimodel Mammography with Perfect Coregistration

    2017-02-01

    background, the major confounding factor in reading mammography; the imaging characteristics suggest that this contrast mechanism would be preferable...image with enhanced edges and reduced anatomical background, the major confounding factor in reading mammography; the imaging characteristics suggest...subjects, vertebrate animals , biohazards, and/or select agents Describe significant deviations, unexpected outcomes, or changes in approved protocols

  12. Comparative evaluation of average glandular dose and image of digital mammography and film mammography in Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Nogueira, M.; Leyton, F.; Rodrigue, L. L.C.; Oliveira, M.A.; Joana, G.S.; Silva, S.D.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women, and early detection is critical to its diagnosis and treatment. Mammography is the best method for breast-cancer screening and is capable of reducing mortality rates To date, the most effective method for early detection of breast cancer has been x-ray mammography for which the screen/film (SF) technique has been the gold standard. Digital mammography has been proposed as a substitute for film mammography given the benefits inherent to digital technology. The purpose of our study was to compare the technical performance of digital mammographic and screen-film mammography. A PMMA phantom with objects to simulate breast structures. For the screen/film (SF) technique the results showed that 54% mammography units did not achieve the minimum acceptable performance as far the image quality. Besides, 67% services showed inadequate performance in their processing systems, which had significant influence on the image quality. At the mean glandular dose only 44% of digital systems evaluated were compliant in all thicknesses of PMMA. The average glandular dose AGD was 90 % higher than in screen/film systems. (authors)

  13. Contrast-Enhanced Spectral Mammography: Comparison with Conventional Mammography and Histopathology in 152 Women

    Luczyńska, Elzbieta; Heinze-Paluchowska, Sylwia; Dyczek, Sonia [Department of Radiology, Centre of Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Institute, Krakow 31-115 (Poland); Blecharz, Pawel [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Centre of Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Institute, Krakow 31-115 (Poland); Rys, Janusz [Department of Tumour Pathology, Centre of Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Institute, Krakow 31-115 (Poland); Reinfuss, Marian [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre of Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Institute, Krakow 31-115 (Poland)

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the study was to compare conventional mammography (MG) and contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) in preoperative women. The study was approved by the local Ethics Committee and all participants provided informed consent. The study included 152 consecutive patients with 173 breast lesions diagnosed on MG or CESM. All MG examinations and consults were conducted in one oncology centre. Non-ionic contrast agent, at a total dose of 1.5 mL/kg body weight, was injected intravenous. Subsequently, CESM exams were performed with a mammography device, allowing dual-energy acquisitions. The entire procedure was done within the oncology centre. Images from low and high energy exposures were processed together and the combination provided an 'iodine' image which outlined contrast up-take in the breast. MG detected 157 lesions in 150 patients, including 92 infiltrating cancers, 12 non-infiltrating cancers, and 53 benign lesions. CESM detected 149 lesions in 128 patients, including 101 infiltrating cancers, 13 non-infiltrating cancers, and 35 benign lesions. CESM sensitivity was 100% (vs. 91% for MG), specificity was 41% (vs. 15% for MG), area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.86 (vs. 0.67 for MG), and accuracy was 80% (vs. 65% for MG) for the diagnosis of breast cancer. Both MG and CESM overestimated lesion sizes compared to histopathology (p < 0.001). CESM may provide higher sensitivity for breast cancer detection and greater diagnostic accuracy than conventional mammography.

  14. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography: comparison with conventional mammography and histopathology in 152 women.

    Luczyńska, Elzbieta; Heinze-Paluchowska, Sylwia; Dyczek, Sonia; Blecharz, Pawel; Rys, Janusz; Reinfuss, Marian

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the study was to compare conventional mammography (MG) and contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) in preoperative women. The study was approved by the local Ethics Committee and all participants provided informed consent. The study included 152 consecutive patients with 173 breast lesions diagnosed on MG or CESM. All MG examinations and consults were conducted in one oncology centre. Non-ionic contrast agent, at a total dose of 1.5 mL/kg body weight, was injected intravenous. Subsequently, CESM exams were performed with a mammography device, allowing dual-energy acquisitions. The entire procedure was done within the oncology centre. Images from low and high energy exposures were processed together and the combination provided an "iodine" image which outlined contrast up-take in the breast. MG detected 157 lesions in 150 patients, including 92 infiltrating cancers, 12 non-infiltrating cancers, and 53 benign lesions. CESM detected 149 lesions in 128 patients, including 101 infiltrating cancers, 13 non-infiltrating cancers, and 35 benign lesions. CESM sensitivity was 100% (vs. 91% for MG), specificity was 41% (vs. 15% for MG), area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.86 (vs. 0.67 for MG), and accuracy was 80% (vs. 65% for MG) for the diagnosis of breast cancer. Both MG and CESM overestimated lesion sizes compared to histopathology (p mammography.

  15. Contrast-Enhanced Spectral Mammography: Comparison with Conventional Mammography and Histopathology in 152 Women

    Luczyńska, Elzbieta; Heinze-Paluchowska, Sylwia; Dyczek, Sonia; Blecharz, Pawel; Rys, Janusz; Reinfuss, Marian

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the study was to compare conventional mammography (MG) and contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) in preoperative women. The study was approved by the local Ethics Committee and all participants provided informed consent. The study included 152 consecutive patients with 173 breast lesions diagnosed on MG or CESM. All MG examinations and consults were conducted in one oncology centre. Non-ionic contrast agent, at a total dose of 1.5 mL/kg body weight, was injected intravenous. Subsequently, CESM exams were performed with a mammography device, allowing dual-energy acquisitions. The entire procedure was done within the oncology centre. Images from low and high energy exposures were processed together and the combination provided an 'iodine' image which outlined contrast up-take in the breast. MG detected 157 lesions in 150 patients, including 92 infiltrating cancers, 12 non-infiltrating cancers, and 53 benign lesions. CESM detected 149 lesions in 128 patients, including 101 infiltrating cancers, 13 non-infiltrating cancers, and 35 benign lesions. CESM sensitivity was 100% (vs. 91% for MG), specificity was 41% (vs. 15% for MG), area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.86 (vs. 0.67 for MG), and accuracy was 80% (vs. 65% for MG) for the diagnosis of breast cancer. Both MG and CESM overestimated lesion sizes compared to histopathology (p < 0.001). CESM may provide higher sensitivity for breast cancer detection and greater diagnostic accuracy than conventional mammography

  16. MR mammography (MRM)

    Kaiser, W.A.

    1993-01-01

    The book deals with MRI for the diagnostic evaluation of malignant breast lesions. A survey of methods available for breast examination, magnetic resonance mammography (MRM) is briefly explained in terms of development and technical problems encountered in the various examinations. The clinical aspects from a central part of the book, giving information relating to the various neoplasms and a comprehensive review of cases. The book concludes with a chapter discussing the interpretation of data and images, presenting examples of normal findings and of manifestations of carcinoma, fibroadenoma, cysts, mastopathies, scars due to plastic surgery, and the lactating breast. (UWA). 648 figs., 25 tabs.

  17. Mammography screening in Denmark

    Vejborg, Ilse; Mikkelsen, Ellen Margrethe; Garne, Jens Peter

    2011-01-01

    Mammography screening is offered healthy women, and a high standard on professional and organizational level is mandatory not only in the screening programme but even in the diagnostic work-up and treatment. The main goal is to achieve a substantial reduction in disease specific mortality......, but it is not possible to evaluate the effect on mortality until several years later, and continuously monitoring of the quality of all aspects of a screening programme is necessary. Based on other European guidelines, 11 quality indicators have been defined, and guidelines concerning organizational requirements...... for a Danish screening programme as well as recommendations for the radiographic and radiological work have been drawn up....

  18. Estimating the relative utility of screening mammography.

    Abbey, Craig K; Eckstein, Miguel P; Boone, John M

    2013-05-01

    The concept of diagnostic utility is a fundamental component of signal detection theory, going back to some of its earliest works. Attaching utility values to the various possible outcomes of a diagnostic test should, in principle, lead to meaningful approaches to evaluating and comparing such systems. However, in many areas of medical imaging, utility is not used because it is presumed to be unknown. In this work, we estimate relative utility (the utility benefit of a detection relative to that of a correct rejection) for screening mammography using its known relation to the slope of a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve at the optimal operating point. The approach assumes that the clinical operating point is optimal for the goal of maximizing expected utility and therefore the slope at this point implies a value of relative utility for the diagnostic task, for known disease prevalence. We examine utility estimation in the context of screening mammography using the Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trials (DMIST) data. We show how various conditions can influence the estimated relative utility, including characteristics of the rating scale, verification time, probability model, and scope of the ROC curve fit. Relative utility estimates range from 66 to 227. We argue for one particular set of conditions that results in a relative utility estimate of 162 (±14%). This is broadly consistent with values in screening mammography determined previously by other means. At the disease prevalence found in the DMIST study (0.59% at 365-day verification), optimal ROC slopes are near unity, suggesting that utility-based assessments of screening mammography will be similar to those found using Youden's index.

  19. Decision making and counseling around mammography screening for women aged 80 or older.

    Schonberg, Mara A; Ramanan, Radhika A; McCarthy, Ellen P; Marcantonio, Edward R

    2006-09-01

    Despite uncertain benefit, many women over age 80 (oldest-old) receive screening mammography. To explore decision-making and physician counseling of oldest-old women around mammography screening. Qualitative research using in-depth semi-structured interviews. Twenty-three women aged 80 or older who received care at a large academic primary care practice (13 had undergone mammography screening in the past 2 years) and 16 physicians at the same center. We asked patients and physicians to describe factors influencing mammography screening decisions of oldest-old women. We asked physicians to describe their counseling about screening to the oldest-old. Patients and/or physicians identified the importance of physician influence, patient preferences, system factors, and social influences on screening decisions. Although physicians felt that patient's health affected screening decisions, few patients felt that health mattered. Three types of elderly patients were identified: (1) women enthusiastic about screening mammography; (2) women opposed to screening mammography; and (3) women without a preference who followed their physician's recommendation. However, physician counseling about mammography screening to elderly women varies; some individualize discussions; others encourage screening; few discourage screening. Physicians report that discussions about stopping screening can be uncomfortable and time consuming. Physicians suggest that more data could facilitate these discussions. Some oldest-old women have strong opinions about screening mammography while others are influenced by physicians. Discussions about stopping screening are challenging for physicians. More data about the benefits and risks of mammography screening for women aged 80 or older could inform patients and improve provider counseling to lead to more rational use of mammography.

  20. Slit aperture technique for mammography

    Friedrich, M.

    1984-01-01

    Following a discussion of various principles used in the elimination of scatter, the prototype of a simple slit aperture mammography apparatus is described (modified Mammomat, Siemens). The main advantage of this technique compared with grid mammography is a halving of the radiation dose for identical image quality, using an identical film system. The technical requirements (heavy duty tube, new generator) are, however, considerable. If the film-screen systems currently in use are to remain the common systems for the future, then the development of a multi-lamellar slit diaphragm technique carries much promise for mammography. (orig.) [de

  1. Digital mammography and their developments

    Wienbeck, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    At the present time digital mammography is a satisfactory breast diagnostic imaging in clinical as well as screening mammography in defined age groups. Nevertheless it shows beside the application of ionizing radiation in women with dense breasts limitations in the detection of non calcification breast cancers. Tomosynthesis, digital contrast-enhanced mammography and breast-CT with or without contrast media lead to better results. Especially the application of contrast media for the visualisation of the tumor angiogenesis is invariably superior to all other non-contrast imaging modalities. However, the excellent results of breast MRI will be probably accessible with none of the new procedures.

  2. School Physical Education and Gender: Influences from outside the school at participation in classes

    Juliana Fagundes Jaco

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Participation in physical education classes is a complex issue; many factors lead students to participate in classroom activities in different ways. This research examines how the way to take part in the class is influenced by experiences outside of school. In this way, seeks to analyze how the actions and family discourses influence the different interests of girls and boys, such as the participation in physical activities outside of school. Also, examines the influence of the participating inside of the school, and how expectations and understandings of bodily practices for boys and girls influence different ways to participate in classes when comparing the male and female gender. For this, held semi-structured interviews and classroom observations into four groups of the eighth year of two public schools in the city of Campinas-SP. The notes of this research indicated that the experience and knowledge of the body and body practice outside of school have the big influence on the ways of participating in classes. The cultural environment of the students gave different experiences and understandings for boys and girls in the knowledge that circulate in physical education classes and contributed in different ways to participate in class. Keywords: Physical Education, Gender, Participation

  3. Open to Influence: What Counts as Academic Influence in Scholarly Networked "Twitter" Participation

    Stewart, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    Within the academy, signals of a scholar's academic influence are made manifest in indices like the "h"-index, which rank output. In open scholarly networks, however, signals of influence are less codified, and the ways in which they are enacted and understood have yet to be articulated. Yet the influence scholars cultivate in open…

  4. Image Quality in Screening Mammography in Croatia

    Brnic, Z.; Klasic, B.; Popic-Ramac, J.; Ljevar, A.

    2011-01-01

    Mortality reduction through screening mammography (SMG) is possible only with examination of high image quality (IQ), which should be performed with acceptable patient breast radiation dose (BRD). Besides film processing control, equipment assessment with breast phantom and dosimetry, periodical external mammographic IQ assessment (MIQA) is needed, including image labelling (L), breast positioning (BP), exposure (EX) and artefacts (AR) assessment. The nationwide breast cancer screening program (NBSP) has been introduced in Croatia in 2006, and the MIQA is initiated as the first step in establishing quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) framework in breast imaging in Croatia. The current study was aimed: (1) to provide objective evidence about the technical MIQ in NBSP in Croatia, (2) to compare MIQ between different types of mammographic units (MUs), (3) to identify the common deficiencies, and (4) to propose corrective activities. Mammograms (MGs) for IQA were collected from a total of 84 MUs which participate in NBSP, which represents 70 % of all MUs nationwide: A total of 420 MG examinations were reviewed. Each MU was requested to submit ''what they consider to be their five best representative MGs, each one performed in one of five consecutive workdays''. Mean age of MG machines was 7.76 years (range 2 - 21), with no difference between four MU types. This very first study of MIQ in Croatia corroborated our intuitive impression of inadequate IQ, staff training and equipment in many MUs nationwide. As MIQ strongly influences BC detection rate, suboptimal QA/QC always carries a risk to compromise the success of NBSP. Deficiencies in SMG, especially in ID and BP reflect different level of competency of radiological staff in Croatia. Differences in MIQ in various MU types are determined by their organization, equipment, education, working habits and motivation. More efforts are needed to train both RTs and radiologists to implement and maintain QA/QC in their

  5. Effect of adding screening ultrasonography to screening mammography on patient recall and cancer detection rates: A retrospective study in Japan

    Tohno, Eriko; Umemoto, Takeshi; Sasaki, Kyoko; Morishima, Isamu; Ueno, Ei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether adding screening ultrasonography to screening mammography can reduce patient recall rates and increase cancer detection rates. Materials and methods: We analyzed the results of mammography and ultrasonography breast screenings performed at the Total Health Evaluation Center Tsukuba, Japan, between April 2011 and March 2012. We also reviewed the modalities and results of diagnostic examinations from women with mammographic abnormalities who visited the Tsukuba Medical Center Hospital for further testing. Results: Of 11,753 women screened, cancer was diagnosed in 10 (0.22%) of the 4529 participants who underwent mammography alone, 23 (0.37%) of the 6250 participants who underwent ultrasonography alone, and 5 (0.51%) of the 974 participants who underwent mammography and ultrasonography. The recall rate due to mammographic abnormalities was 4.9% for women screened only with mammography and 2.6% for those screened with both modalities. The cancer detection rate was 0.22% for women screened only with mammography (positive predictive value, 4.5%) and 0.31% for those screened with both modalities (positive predictive value, 12.0%). Of the 211 lesions presenting as mammographic abnormalities investigated further, diagnostic ultrasonography found no abnormalities in 63 (29.9%) and benign findings in 69 (33.7%). The rest 36.4% needed mammography, cytological or histological examinations or follow-up in addition to diagnostic ultrasonography. Conclusions: It is possible to reduce the recall rate in screening mammography by combining mammography and ultrasonography for breast screening

  6. Mammography screening credit card and compliance.

    Schapira, D V; Kumar, N B; Clark, R A; Yag, C

    1992-07-15

    Screening for breast cancer using mammography has been shown to be effective in reducing mortality from breast cancer. The authors attempted to determine if use of a wallet-size plastic screening "credit" card would increase participants' compliance for subsequent mammograms when compared with traditional methods of increasing compliance. Two hundred and twenty consecutive women, ages 40-70 years, undergoing their first screening mammography were recruited and assigned randomly to four groups receiving (1) a reminder plastic credit card (2) reminder credit card with written reminder; (3) appointment card; and (4) verbal recommendation. Return rates of the four groups were determined after 15 months. The return rate for subsequent mammograms was significantly higher for participants (72.4%) using the credit card than for participants (39.8%) exposed to traditional encouragement/reminders (P less than 0.0001). The credit card was designed to show the participant's screening anniversary, and the durability of the card may have been a factor in increasing the return rate. The use of reminder credit cards may increase compliance for periodic screening examinations for other cancers and other chronic diseases.

  7. Response costs of mammography adherence: Iranian women's perceptions.

    Khodayarian, Mahsa; Mazloomi-Mahmoodabad, Seyed Saied; Lamyian, Minoor; Morowatisharifabad, Mohammad Ali; Tavangar, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Mammography as the most common secondary prevention method has known to be helpful in detecting breast cancer at the early stages. Low level of participation among women toward mammography uptake due to cultural beliefs is a great concern. This study aimed at exploring the perceptions of women about response costs of mammography adherence (MA) in Yazd, Iran. A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was performed. Fourteen women,one oncology nurse, and a breast cancer survivor were purposefully interviewed. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed by directed content analysis method based on protection motivation theory (PMT). One main theme was emerged from the analysis namely called "response costs".Two main categories were also emerged from the data; (1) psychological barriers with six subcategories including "embarrassment," "worry about being diagnosed with cancer," "preoccupation with underlying disease," "misconception about mammography," "need for an accompanying person," and "internalizing the experiences of the others," and (2) maladaptive coping modes which encompassed three subcategories: "religious faith," "fatalism," and"avoidance and denial." Useful information was provided about the response costs of mammography utilization based on the perceptions of women. Cognitive barriers may be decreased by conducting modifications in women's awareness and attitude toward MA as well as changing the national health system infrastructures. Incorporating religious and cultural belief systems into MA educational programs through motivational messages is recommended.

  8. Comparison of TLD air kerma measurements in mammography

    Pernicka, F.

    2002-01-01

    The mammography examination is usually targeted at asymptomatic women so the narrow balance between benefit and undesirable effects is important. During the past few decades there have been significant advances in the equipment used for mammography. Even when the latest equipment and imaging systems are used, there is considerable variation from centre-to-centre in the choice of imaging parameters and techniques. There may be quite large differences in image quality and breast dose among the centres. A Co-ordinated Research Programme on 'Image quality and patient dose optimization in mammography in Eastern European Countries' was conducted by the IAEA, aiming at defining a methodology for the implementation of a quality assurance (QA) programme in mammography and at exercising the assessment of image quality and patient doses in a sample of hospitals in East European countries. Selected mammography clinics from Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania and Slovakia participate in the project. The teams consisted of experienced clinicians and physicists. They were supported by a group of experts (clinicians and medical physicists) from France, Italy and Spain. As an outcome of the project, improvements in these indicators (image quality and patient dose) after the implementation of the QA programme are expected. A comparison of dosimetry systems has been organized to assure that dosimetry measurements done in the frame of the project are comparable and traceable to the international measurement system. All five East European countries plus Spain took part in the exercise. The thermoluminescent (TL) method was selected for the comparison

  9. Mammography screening among Arab American women in metropolitan Detroit.

    Schwartz, Kendra; Fakhouri, Monty; Bartoces, Monina; Monsur, Joseph; Younis, Amani

    2008-12-01

    Mammography screening behavior has not been well studied among Middle Eastern immigrant women. We conducted a telephone survey of 365 Arab American women residing in metropolitan Detroit, home to one of the largest populations of Middle Eastern immigrants in the US, to determine prevalence of factors associated with mammography, and attitudes and beliefs regarding mammography screening. Of 365 participants, only five were born in the US. Mean age was 53.2 years (SD 10.8). Two hundred twelve (58.1%) reported having mammogram every 1-2 years; 70% ever had mammogram. Age 50-64 years, having health insurance, married status, being in the US over 10 years, and being Lebanese were associated with mammography every 1-2 years. After adjusting for demographic factors, perceived seriousness of disease, general health motivation, and having fewer barriers were associated with more frequent screening. Appropriate mammography screening is decreased in this group. Targeted outreach regarding screening is appropriate for this population; however, lack of insurance may prevent adequate follow-up.

  10. Digital Mammography Tomosynthesis

    Gergov, I.; Alexov, G.; Rusonov, K.

    2017-01-01

    Siemens MAMMOMAT Inspiration with Tomosynthesis enhances the diagnostic precision in mammographic screening. The apparatus has a wide-angle tomosynthesis up to 50 degrees. The Siemens breast augmentation algorithm reconstructs multiple two-dimensional breast images into three-dimensional images at the lowest doses to help detect tumors hidden from the overlapping chest tissue, allowing for a more accurate diagnosis than standard 2-dimensional digital mammography, and reducing the number of false positive results. 3D digital tomosynthesis improves the precision of detecting and diagnosing a larger number of expansive lesions, ensures better morphological mass analysis and architectural distortion, and detecting calcifications by adding digital breast tomosynthesis to the traditional two-dimensional digital mammogram of the patient. In this way, it solves the problem of overlapping parenchyma, reduces the number of unnecessary biopsies from questionable sonomammographic findings, and the need for stressful repeating procedures, which usually contributes to both better patient outcomes and cost saving. [bg

  11. Improvements in mammography

    Redington, R.W.; Henkes, J.L.

    1976-01-01

    Equipment for positioning and supporting patients during tomographic X-ray mammography is described. It is comprised of a table and fabric slings which permit the examination of a downward, pendant breast of a prone patient by allowing the breast to pass through an aperture in the table into a fluid filled container. The fluid has an X-ray absorption coefficient similar to that of soft human tissue allowing high density resolution radiography and permitting accurate detection of breast tumours. The shape of the equipment and the positioning of the patient allow the detector and X-ray source to rotate 360 0 about a vertical axis through the breast. This permits the use of relatively simple image reconstruction algorithms and a divergent X-ray geometry with multiple detectors. Successive planes of the breast are scanned by translating the detectors and source vertically to produce a three-dimensional image of the breast tissue structure. (U.K.)

  12. Cultural views, language ability, and mammography use in Chinese American women.

    Liang, Wenchi; Wang, Judy; Chen, Mei-Yuh; Feng, Shibao; Yi, Bin; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S

    2009-12-01

    Mammography screening rates among Chinese American women have been reported to be low. This study examines whether and how culture views and language ability influence mammography adherence in this mostly immigrant population. Asymptomatic Chinese American women (n = 466) aged 50 and older, recruited from the Washington, D.C. area, completed a telephone interview. Regular mammography was defined as having two mammograms at age-appropriate recommended intervals. Cultural views were assessed by 30 items, and language ability measured women's ability in reading, writing, speaking, and listening to English. After controlling for risk perception, worry, physician recommendation, family encouragement, and access barriers, women holding a more Chinese/Eastern cultural view were significantly less likely to have had regular mammograms than those having a Western cultural view. English ability was positively associated with mammography adherence. The authors' results imply that culturally sensitive and language-appropriate educational interventions are likely to improve mammography adherence in this population.

  13. Does Digital Competence and Occupational Setting Influence MOOC Participation? Evidence from a Cross-Course Survey

    Castaño-Muñoz, Jonatan; Kreijns, Karel; Kalz, Marco; Punie, Yves

    2017-01-01

    While MOOCs are recognized nowadays as a potential format for professional development and lifelong learning, little research has been conducted on the factors that influence MOOC participation of professionals and unemployed in MOOCs. Based on a framework developed earlier, we conducted a study, which focused on the influence of background…

  14. Factors influencing job satisfaction of new graduate nurses participating in nurse residency programs: a systematic review.

    Lin, Patrice S; Viscardi, Molly Kreider; McHugh, Matthew D

    2014-10-01

    Nurse residency programs are designed to increase competence and skill, and ease the transition from student to new graduate nurse. These programs also offer the possibility to positively influence the job satisfaction of new graduate nurses, which could decrease poor nursing outcomes. However, little is known about the impact of participation in a nurse residency program on new graduate nurses' satisfaction. This review examines factors that influence job satisfaction of nurse residency program participants. Eleven studies were selected for inclusion, and seven domains influencing new graduate nurses' satisfaction during participation in nurse residency programs were identified: extrinsic rewards, scheduling, interactions and support, praise and recognition, professional opportunities, work environment, and hospital system. Within these domains, the evidence for improved satisfaction with nurse residency program participation was mixed. Further research is necessary to understand how nurse residency programs can be designed to improve satisfaction and increase positive nurse outcomes. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. A Longitudinal Comparison of Parent and Child Influence on Sports Participation

    Arena Chang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on expectancy-value theory, this study examines children’s motivational attributes and parental influences on how children spend their leisure time in middle childhood and adolescence. Specifically, the study examined if parent encouragement and beliefs (i.e., perceived importance of sports and perceived child ability and child motivation (expectancy and value for sports are predictive of sports participation over the course of middle childhood and adolescence. Parent and child reports are compared using data from the Childhood and Beyond (CAB longitudinal study. Findings reveal that parent beliefs and encouragement and child motivation were positively associated with sports participation in middle childhood. Both parental influences and children’s motivation measured in middle childhood were predictive of time spent participating in adolescence. However, only parent influences were predictive of whether the child continued to participate in sports in adolescence.

  16. Mammography screening: A major issue in medicine.

    Autier, Philippe; Boniol, Mathieu

    2018-02-01

    -detected cancers. Overdiagnosis leads to overtreatment and inflicts considerable physical, psychological and economic harm on many women. Overdiagnosis has also exerted considerable disruptive effects on the interpretation of clinical outcomes expressed in percentages (instead of rates) or as overall survival (instead of mortality rates or stage-specific survival). Rates of radical mastectomies have not decreased following the introduction of screening and keep rising in some countries (e.g. the United States of America (USA)). Hence, the epidemiological picture of mammography screening closely resembles that of screening for neuroblastoma. Reappraisals of Swedish mammography trials demonstrate that the design and statistical analysis of these trials were different from those of all trials on screening for cancers other than breast cancer. We found compelling indications that these trials overestimated reductions in breast cancer mortality associated with screening, in part because of the statistical analyses themselves, in part because of improved therapies and underreporting of breast cancer as the underlying cause of death in screening groups. In this regard, Swedish trials should publish the stage-specific breast cancer mortality rates for the screening and control groups separately. Results of the Greater New York Health Insurance Plan trial are biased because of the underreporting of breast cancer cases and deaths that occurred in women who did not participate in screening. After 17 years of follow-up, the United Kingdom (UK) Age Trial showed no benefit from mammography screening starting at age 39-41. Until around 2005, most proponents of breast screening backed the monitoring of changes in advanced cancer incidence and comparative studies on breast cancer mortality for the evaluation of breast screening effectiveness. However, in an attempt to mitigate the contradictions between results of mammography trials and population data, breast-screening proponents have elected to

  17. Virtually simulated social pressure influences early visual processing more in low compared to high autonomous participants.

    Trautmann-Lengsfeld, Sina Alexa; Herrmann, Christoph Siegfried

    2014-02-01

    In a previous study, we showed that virtually simulated social group pressure could influence early stages of perception after only 100  ms. In the present EEG study, we investigated the influence of social pressure on visual perception in participants with high (HA) and low (LA) levels of autonomy. Ten HA and ten LA individuals were asked to accomplish a visual discrimination task in an adapted paradigm of Solomon Asch. Results indicate that LA participants adapted to the incorrect group opinion more often than HA participants (42% vs. 30% of the trials, respectively). LA participants showed a larger posterior P1 component contralateral to targets presented in the right visual field when conforming to the correct compared to conforming to the incorrect group decision. In conclusion, our ERP data suggest that the group context can have early effects on our perception rather than on conscious decision processes in LA, but not HA participants. Copyright © 2013 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  18. Patients' Perceptions of Nurses' Behaviour That Influence Patient Participation in Nursing Care: A Critical Incident Study

    Inga E. Larsson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patient participation is an important basis for nursing care and medical treatment and is a legal right in many Western countries. Studies have established that patients consider participation to be both obvious and important, but there are also findings showing the opposite and patients often prefer a passive recipient role. Knowledge of what may influence patients' participation is thus of great importance. The aim was to identify incidents and nurses' behaviours that influence patients' participation in nursing care based on patients' experiences from inpatient somatic care. The Critical Incident Technique (CIT was employed. Interviews were performed with patients (=17, recruited from somatic inpatient care at an internal medical clinic in West Sweden. This study provided a picture of incidents, nurses' behaviours that stimulate or inhibit patients' participation, and patient reactions on nurses' behaviours. Incidents took place during medical ward round, nursing ward round, information session, nursing documentation, drug administration, and meal.

  19. The Influence of Nurses' Demographics on Patient Participation in Hospitals: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Malfait, Simon; Eeckloo, Kristof; Van Hecke, Ann

    2017-12-01

    Patient participation is an important issue in contemporary healthcare as it improves quality of care and enhances positive health outcomes. The participation of patients is mainly initiated by the nurses' willingness to share their power and responsibility, but knowledge on nurses' demographic characteristics influencing this behavior is nonexistent. This knowledge is essential to understand and improve patient participation. To determine if nurses' demographic characteristics influence their willingness to engage in patient participation. A cross-sectional multicenter study in 22 general and three university hospitals with 997 nurses was performed. The Patient Participation Culture Tool for healthcare workers, which measures patient participation behavior, was used. Multilevel analysis, taking into account the difference in wards and hospitals, was used to identify the influence of demographic characteristics. A position as supervisor (range: p nurses seem to be more reluctant in accepting a collaborative patient role (p = .002) and coping with more active patient behavior (p nurses on geriatric wards (p = .013), who also showed less sharing of information with their patients (p nurses' willingness to share power and responsibility with their patients, perhaps indicating that patient participation behavior is an advanced nursing skill and multifaceted interventions, are needed for optimal implementation. Moreover, supervising nurses have different perceptions on patient participation and possibly regard patient participation as an easier task than their team members. This could lead to misunderstandings about the expectations toward patient participation in daily practice, leading to struggles with their nursing staff. Both findings implicate that implementing patient participation on a wide scale is more difficult than expected, which is conflicting with the widespread societal demand for more participation. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  20. Factors influencing household participation in solid waste management (Case study: Waste Bank Malang)

    Maryati, S.; Arifiani, N. F.; Humaira, A. N. S.; Putri, H. T.

    2018-03-01

    Solid waste management is very important measure in order to reduce the amount of waste. One of solid waste management form in Indonesia is waste banks. This kind of solid waste management required high level of participation of the community. The objective of this study is to explore factors influencing household participation in waste banks. Waste bank in Malang City (WBM) was selected as case study. Questionnaires distribution and investigation in WBM were conducted to identify problems of participation. Quantitative analysis was used to analyze the data. The research reveals that education, income, and knowledge about WBM have relationship with participation in WBM.

  1. Mammography: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... Questions (National Cancer Institute) Mammography for Women with Breast Implants (American Cancer Society) Also in Spanish Mammography: What You Need to Know (Food and Drug Administration) Nipple Aspirate Test Is ... Specifics Breast Tomosynthesis (American College of Radiology, Radiological Society of ...

  2. Genetic influences on exercise participation in 37,051 twin pairs from seven countries.

    Janine H Stubbe

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A sedentary lifestyle remains a major threat to health in contemporary societies. To get more insight in the relative contribution of genetic and environmental influences on individual differences in exercise participation, twin samples from seven countries participating in the GenomEUtwin project were used.Self-reported data on leisure time exercise behavior from Australia, Denmark, Finland, Norway, The Netherlands, Sweden and United Kingdom were used to create a comparable index of exercise participation in each country (60 minutes weekly at a minimum intensity of four metabolic equivalents.Modest geographical variation in exercise participation was revealed in 85,198 subjects, aged 19-40 years. Modeling of monozygotic and dizygotic twin resemblance showed that genetic effects play an important role in explaining individual differences in exercise participation in each country. Shared environmental effects played no role except for Norwegian males. Heritability of exercise participation in males and females was similar and ranged from 48% to 71% (excluding Norwegian males.Genetic variation is important in individual exercise behavior and may involve genes influencing the acute mood effects of exercise, high exercise ability, high weight loss ability, and personality. This collaborative study suggests that attempts to find genes influencing exercise participation can pool exercise data across multiple countries and different instruments.

  3. Prospective study aiming to compare 2D mammography and tomosynthesis + synthesized mammography in terms of cancer detection and recall. From double reading of 2D mammography to single reading of tomosynthesis.

    Romero Martín, Sara; Raya Povedano, Jose Luis; Cara García, María; Santos Romero, Ana Luz; Pedrosa Garriguet, Margarita; Álvarez Benito, Marina

    2018-06-01

    To evaluate tomosynthesis compared with 2D-mammography in cancer detection and recalls in a screening-programme, and assess performing synthesized instead of 2D, and compare double reading of 2D with single reading of tomosynthesis. Women (age 50-69 years) participating in the screening-programme were included. 2D-mammography and tomosynthesis were performed. There were four reading models: 2D-mammography (first); 2D-mammography (second); tomosynthesis + synthesized (third); tomosynthesis + synthesized + 2D (fourth reading). Paired double reading of 2D (first+second) and tomosynthesis (third+fourth) were analysed. In 16,067 participants, there were 98 cancers and 1,196 recalls. Comparing double reading of 2D with single reading of tomosynthesis, there was an increase of 12.6 % in cancer detection with the third reading (p= 0.043) and 6.9 % with the fourth reading (p=0.210), and a decrease in recalls of 40.5 % (ptomosynthesis. Single reading of tomosynthesis plus synthesized increased cancer detection and decreased recalls compared with double reading 2D. 2D did not improve results when added to tomosynthesis. • Tomosynthesis increases cancer detection and decreases recall rates versus 2D mammography. • Synthesized-mammography avoids performing 2D, showing higher cancer detection. • Single reading of tomosynthesis + synthesized is feasible as a new practice.

  4. Starting participation in an employee fitness program: attitudes, social influence, and self-efficacy.

    Lechner, L; De Vries, H

    1995-11-01

    This article presents a study of the determinants of starting participation in an employee fitness program. Information from 488 employees, recruited from two worksites, was obtained. From these employees the determinants of participation were studied. A questionnaire based on two theoretical models was used. The Stages of Change model was used to measure the health behavior, consisting of precontemplation (no intention to participate), contemplation (considering participation), preparation (intending to participate within a short period), and action (participating in fitness). The possible determinants were measured according to the ASE model, including the attitude toward an employee fitness program, social influence, and self-efficacy expectations. Subjects in action stage were most convinced of the benefits of participation in the employee fitness program and of their own skills to participate in a fitness program. Subjects in precontemplation stage were least convinced of the advantages of participation and had the lowest self-efficacy scores. Subjects in action stage experienced the most social support to participate in the employee fitness program. Health education for employees within industrial fitness programs can be tailored toward their motivational stage. Promotional activities for industrial fitness programs should concentrate on persons in the precontemplation and contemplation stages, since people in these stages are insufficiently convinced of the advantages of a fitness program and expect many problems with regard to their ability to participate in the program.

  5. The influence of sport participation on physical function in patients with osteoarthritis during and after exercise therapy.

    Veenhof, C.; Perry, S.; Lucas, C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The objectives of this study were to investigate 1) in which sports activities patients with osteoarthritis (OA) participate, 2) the cross sectional differences in functional outcome between sports participants and nonsports participants and 3) the influence of regular sports

  6. The psychological influences on participation in Wheelchair Rugby: a social relational model of disability

    Damian Haslett

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sport and exercise psychology research in disability sport seldom engages with social models of disability. As a result, the socio-historical landscape of disability is underrepresented in sport psychology research. The aim of this study is to interpret influences on participation in disability sport through the conceptual lens of the social relational model (SRM of disability (Thomas, 1999, 2004, 2007. Ten Irish adult male athletes with physical disabilities participated in semi-structured interviews exploring the barriers and facilitators that influence participation in Wheelchair Rugby. Deductive thematic analysis produced four themes influenced by the social relational model: impairment effects; societal attitudes and discourse; opportunities and access; and psychological well-being. Links were made to the experience of embodied impairment, classification, oppression, inequality, media, independence, and self-efficacy. The analysis illustrates how cultural constructions of disability are inextricably linked to individual influences on participation in Wheelchair Rugby. The results indicate that in disability sport participation, the experience of social oppression, inequality and cultural stereotypes of disability can be synonymous with the personal experience of physical impairment. The implication of this research is that there is a value in sport and exercise psychology practitioners utilising the social relational model as a tool to conceptualise the lived experience of physical disability.

  7. The psychological influences on participation in Wheelchair Rugby: a social relational model of disability

    Damian Haslett; Ben Fitzpatrick; Gavin Breslin

    2017-01-01

    Sport and exercise psychology research in disability sport seldom engages with social models of disability. As a result, the socio-historical landscape of disability is underrepresented in sport psychology research. The aim of this study is to interpret influences on participation in disability sport through the conceptual lens of the social relational model (SRM) of disability (Thomas, 1999, 2004, 2007). Ten Irish adult male athletes with physical disabilities participated in semi-structured...

  8. Factors that influence exercise activity among women post hip fracture participating in the Exercise Plus Program

    Resnick, Barbara; Orwig, Denise; D?Adamo, Christopher; Yu-Yahiro, Janet; Hawkes, William; Shardell, Michelle; Golden, Justine; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Magaziner, Jay

    2007-01-01

    Using a social ecological model, this paper describes selected intra- and interpersonal factors that influence exercise behavior in women post hip fracture who participated in the Exercise Plus Program. Model testing of factors that influence exercise behavior at 2, 6 and 12 months post hip fracture was done. The full model hypothesized that demographic variables; cognitive, affective, physical and functional status; pain; fear of falling; social support for exercise, and exposure to the Exer...

  9. Radiation hazards of X-ray mammography

    Bailar, J.C. III

    1978-01-01

    X-ray mammography delivers significant amounts of ionizing radiation to the breast, and the female breast is more susceptible to radiation carcinogenesis than any other human organ. On the other hand, breast cancer is least likely to cause serious illness and death when it is detected at a very early stage. The risks and benefits of mammography can be estimated. This paper summarizes current risk estimates, then proceeds to a comparison of risks and benefits. As for breast cancer mortality, the addition of mammography to a programme of annual breast examinations of average U.S. women is of questionable value for women under age 50 but it is probably beneficial for older women. However, the break-even point is closely related to the average radiation exposure of breast tissue, and would be earlier in a few centres now using optimum techniques and equipment. For women with below-average risks of breast cancer, the age would be higher, and for a few women with a high probability of developing breast cancer it would be lower. Breast cancer screening programmes have been improved significantly since criticisms were first publicized in mid-1975. Partial improvements include reduction in radiation exposure (at least in some centres), guidelines from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the American Cancer Society (ACS) for restricting the screening of women under age 50, and changes in the patient consent form signed by participants in the NCI-ACS programme. Professional and public awareness of the need to balance the benefits of screening with its risks and costs has rapidly and markedly increased. Future improvements should further define the optimum design and application of breast cancer screening programmes

  10. Thyroid absorbed dose using TLDs during mammography

    Gonzalez A, M.; Melendez L, M.; Davila M, P.

    2015-10-01

    Full text: In this study, the mean glandular dose (MGD) and the thyroid dose (D Thy) were measured in 200 women screened with mammography in Cranio caudal (Cc) and mediolateral oblique projections. All mammograms were performed with Giotto-Ims (6000-14-M2 Model) equipment, which was verified to meet the criteria of quality of NOM-229-Ssa-2002. During audits performance and HVL, for each anode filter combinations was measured with the camera Radcal mammography equipment 10 X 6-6M (HVL = 0.26 mm Al). D Thy measurements were performed with TLD dosimeters (LiF:Mn) , that were read with the Harshaw 3500 TLD reader. The MGD, was obtained according to the UK and European protocols for mammographic dosimetry using a plane parallel chamber (Standard Imaging, Model A-600) calibrated by a radiation beam UW-23-Mo (= 0.279 mm Al HVL). A comparative statistical analysis was carried out with the measured MGD and D thy. The thyroid mean dose was 0.063 mGy and 0.078 mGy for Cc and mediolateral oblique respectively. There is a linear correlation between the MGD and the D Thy slightly influenced by the anode-filter combination. Using a 95% for the confidence interval in MGD (1.07 mGy), the 90% of measurements are in agreement with the established uncertainty limits. The D Thy are lower than the MGD. There is no risk for cancer induction in thyroid in women due to mammography screening. (Author)

  11. Influence of promised rewards on conflict resolution in healthy participants and patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Duprez, Joan; Naudet, Florian; Argaud, Soizic; Dondaine, Thibaut; Drapier, Sophie; Robert, Gabriel Hadrien; Drapier, Dominique; Vérin, Marc; Sauleau, Paul

    2016-08-15

    The influence of promised rewards on conflict resolution processes is not clearly defined in the literature, and the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Some studies have shown no effect of reward, while others have demonstrated a beneficial influence. In addition, although the basal ganglia are known to play a critical role in the association between motivation and cognition, the influence of promised rewards on conflict resolution processes in Parkinson's disease (PD) has received little attention. In this context, we assessed the influence of promised rewards on both impulse activation and suppression in 36 healthy participants and 36 patients with PD, using a rewarded Simon task. Analysis of performances revealed that promised rewards worsened the overall congruence effect, but only in healthy participants. Although the incentive context did not modulate the congruence effect in patients, by using the activation-suppression model, we were able to show that promised rewards did influence impulse suppression in patients-but not in healthy participants. Suppressing inappropriate response activation in an incentive context appears to be harder in medically treated Parkinson's disease. This indicates that incentive motivation can modulate at least one cognitive process involved in cognitive action control in patients with medically treated PD. The activation-suppression model provides essential additional information concerning the influence of promised rewards on conflict resolution processes in a pathological population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Pain and discomfort during mammography

    Aro, A R; Absetz-Ylöstalo, P; Eerola, T

    1996-01-01

    was the most powerful factor explaining pain and discomfort among women with earlier mammography. However, it had no effect among women without earlier mammography, for whom screening-related nervousness and perceptions of staff were crucial. Suggested interventions include better information before screening......The aim of this prospective study was to investigate associations of mammography pain and discomfort with sociodemographics, personal history and psychological and situational factors. Subjects were women with a negative screening finding (n = 883) from a random sample of 50-year-old Finnish women...... attending their first breast cancer screening. Questionnaires were sent 1 month before the screening invitation and 2 months after screening. Sixty-one per cent reported painful and 59% uncomfortable mammograms (4% severely). Linear regression analyses showed that anticipation of pain and discomfort...

  13. Radiographic techniques for digital mammography

    Horita, Katsuhei

    2007-01-01

    Since the differences in X-ray absorption between various breast tissues are small, a dedicated X-ray system for examination of the breast and a high-contrast, high-resolution screen/film system (SFM) (light-receiving system) are employed for X-ray diagnosis. Currently, however, there is a strong trend toward digital imaging in the field of general radiography, and this trend is also reflected in the field of mammographic examination. In fact, approximately 70% of facilities purchasing new mammography systems are now selecting a digital mammography system (DRM). Given this situation, this report reviews the differences between SFM and DRM and discusses the radiographic techniques and quality assurance procedures for digital mammography. (author)

  14. Mammography quality assurance in Morocco

    Zaoui, F.; Talsmat, K.; Lalaoui, K.

    2001-01-01

    The 'Centre National de l'Energie, des Sciences et des Techniques Nucleaires' (CNESTEN) realised, from February 1999 to March 2000, a quality control of 41 mammography facilities in Morocco. The protocol and standards adopted for achieving the control of elements constituting the mammography chain are those elaborated by GIM and Qualix association. Statistics and conformities results are presented. The program was performed in order to demonstrate to the practitioners in mammography field, the utility and necessity to have a national quality assurance policy. The main objective of CNESTEN is to be accredited by the Moroccan government as a reference laboratory in quality control and dose evaluation in medical imaging and radiotherapy. To achieve this goal the CNESTEN has set up Medical Physic Unit well trained and equipped with the necessary instruments. (author)

  15. The accuracy of digital breast tomosynthesis compared with coned compression magnification mammography in the assessment of abnormalities found on mammography

    Morel, J.C.; Iqbal, A.; Wasan, R.K.; Peacock, C.; Evans, D.R.; Rahim, R.; Goligher, J.; Michell, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To compare the diagnostic accuracy of the digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) with coned compression magnification mammography (CCMM). Materials and methods: The study design included two reading sessions completed by seven experienced radiologists. In the first session, all readers read bilateral standard two-view mammograms and a CCMM view of the lesion before giving a combined score for assessment. In the second session, readers read bilateral standard two-view mammograms plus one-view DBT. The two reading sessions of the experiment were separated by at least 2 weeks to reduce the chance of reader memory of the images read in the previous session from influencing the performance in the subsequent session. Results: Three hundred and fifty-four lesions were assessed and receiver-operative characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the difference between the two modes. For standard two-view mammography plus CCMM, the area under the curve (AUC) was 0.87 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.83–0.91] and for standard two-view mammography plus DBT the AUC was 0.93 (95% CI: 0.91–0.95). The difference between the AUCs was 0.06 with p-value of 0.0014. Conclusion: Two-view mammography with one-view DBT showed significantly improved accuracy compared to two-view mammography and CCMM in the assessment of mammographic abnormalities. These results show that DBT can be used effectively in the further evaluation of mammographic abnormalities found at screening and in symptomatic diagnostic practice. - Highlights: • Diagnostic accuracy of magnification mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis. • There is statistical difference between CCMM and DBT. • DBT has a role in evaluating mammographic abnormalities

  16. Factors influencing participation in a vascular disease prevention lifestyle program among participants in a cluster randomized trial.

    Laws, Rachel A; Fanaian, Mahnaz; Jayasinghe, Upali W; McKenzie, Suzanne; Passey, Megan; Davies, Gawaine Powell; Lyle, David; Harris, Mark F

    2013-05-31

    Previous research suggests that lifestyle intervention for the prevention of diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are effective, however little is known about factors affecting participation in such programs. This study aims to explore factors influencing levels of participation in a lifestyle modification program conducted as part of a cluster randomized controlled trial of CVD prevention in primary care. This concurrent mixed methods study used data from the intervention arm of a cluster RCT which recruited 30 practices through two rural and three urban primary care organizations. Practices were randomly allocated to intervention (n = 16) and control (n = 14) groups. In each practice up to 160 eligible patients aged between 40 and 64 years old, were invited to participate. Intervention practice staff were trained in lifestyle assessment and counseling and referred high risk patients to a lifestyle modification program (LMP) consisting of two individual and six group sessions over a nine month period. Data included a patient survey, clinical audit, practice survey on capacity for preventive care, referral and attendance records at the LMP and qualitative interviews with Intervention Officers facilitating the LMP. Multi-level logistic regression modelling was used to examine independent predictors of attendance at the LMP, supplemented with qualitative data from interviews with Intervention Officers facilitating the program. A total of 197 individuals were referred to the LMP (63% of those eligible). Over a third of patients (36.5%) referred to the LMP did not attend any sessions, with 59.4% attending at least half of the planned sessions. The only independent predictors of attendance at the program were employment status - not working (OR: 2.39 95% CI 1.15-4.94) and having high psychological distress (OR: 2.17 95% CI: 1.10-4.30). Qualitative data revealed that physical access to the program was a barrier, while GP/practice endorsement of the program and

  17. Participation of rural Zimbabwean female students in mathematics: The influence of perception

    Anna Gudyanga

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was premised on the influence of perceptions on the participation of Ordinary Level rural African Zimbabwean female students in mathematics. Qualitative research design grounded in the interpretive paradigm was employed. Eighteen Ordinary Level female students and six teachers purposively selected from three rural co-educational secondary schools participated in the study. Data were generated through lesson observations and semi-structured question type interview guide. Findings revealed that rural female students perceived mathematics as a difficult subject, masculine and irrelevant to their future aspirations. Participants outlined that their perceptions were rooted in the prevailing cultural belief that mathematics is a masculine subject and negative stereotypes about girls’ maths abilities. Further findings indicate that female students’ participation in mathematics was highly influenced by their perception towards the subject. These perceptions result in the development of a general negative attitude to the subject that caused fewer female students to participate in mathematics in large numbers. We recommended parents and teachers to work hard to eliminate the negative gender and cultural stereotypes in order to enhance female students’ confidence in mathematics abilities. Schools should employ female mathematics teachers and expose female students to female role models who have succeeded in life in order to encourage more participation of female students in mathematics. Schools are made responsible for smoothing out difficulties generated by the prevailing culture. There is a gap in knowledge base pertaining to the Zimbabwean rural girls’ participation in Mathematics.

  18. Influence of the environment on participation in social roles for young adults with down syndrome.

    Kitty-Rose Foley

    Full Text Available The concept of disability is now understood as a result of the interaction between the individual, features related to impairment, and the physical and social environment. It is important to understand these environmental influences and how they affect social participation. The purpose of this study is to describe the social participation of young adults with Down syndrome and examine its relationship with the physical and social environment.Families ascertained from the Down syndrome 'Needs Opinion Wishes' database completed questionnaires during 2011. The questionnaires contained two parts, young person characteristics and family characteristics. Young adults' social participation was measured using the Assessment of Life Habits (LIFE-H and the influences of environmental factors were measured by the Measure of the Quality of the Environment (MQE. The analysis involved descriptive statistics and linear and logistic regression.Overall, participation in daily activities was higher (mean 6.45 than in social roles (mean 5.17 (range 0 to 9. When the physical and/or social environment was reported as a facilitator, compared to being no influence or a barrier, participation in social roles was greater (coef 0.89, 95%CI 0.28, 1.52, coef 0.83, 95%CI 0.17, 1.49, respectively. The relationships between participation and both the physical (coef 0.60, 95% CI -0.40, 1.24 and social (coef 0.20, 95%CI -0.47, 0.87 environments were reduced when age, gender, behavior and functioning in ADL were taken into account.We found that young adults' participation in social roles was influenced more by the physical environment than by the social environment, providing a potentially modifiable avenue for intervention.

  19. Influence of the environment on participation in social roles for young adults with down syndrome.

    Foley, Kitty-Rose; Girdler, Sonya; Bourke, Jenny; Jacoby, Peter; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth; Einfeld, Stewart; Tonge, Bruce; Parmenter, Trevor R; Leonard, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The concept of disability is now understood as a result of the interaction between the individual, features related to impairment, and the physical and social environment. It is important to understand these environmental influences and how they affect social participation. The purpose of this study is to describe the social participation of young adults with Down syndrome and examine its relationship with the physical and social environment. Families ascertained from the Down syndrome 'Needs Opinion Wishes' database completed questionnaires during 2011. The questionnaires contained two parts, young person characteristics and family characteristics. Young adults' social participation was measured using the Assessment of Life Habits (LIFE-H) and the influences of environmental factors were measured by the Measure of the Quality of the Environment (MQE). The analysis involved descriptive statistics and linear and logistic regression. Overall, participation in daily activities was higher (mean 6.45) than in social roles (mean 5.17) (range 0 to 9). When the physical and/or social environment was reported as a facilitator, compared to being no influence or a barrier, participation in social roles was greater (coef 0.89, 95%CI 0.28, 1.52, coef 0.83, 95%CI 0.17, 1.49, respectively). The relationships between participation and both the physical (coef 0.60, 95% CI -0.40, 1.24) and social (coef 0.20, 95%CI -0.47, 0.87) environments were reduced when age, gender, behavior and functioning in ADL were taken into account. We found that young adults' participation in social roles was influenced more by the physical environment than by the social environment, providing a potentially modifiable avenue for intervention.

  20. Moving beyond 'not enough time': factors influencing paediatric clinicians' participation in research.

    Paget, Simon P; Caldwell, Patrina H Y; Murphy, Joyce; Lilischkis, Kimberley J; Morrow, Angie M

    2017-03-01

    Increasing the amount of clinical research that occurs in healthcare settings has been identified as an important mechanism to improve healthcare outcomes. While clinicians are key persons in achieving this aim, research participation amongst clinicians is generally limited. To identify the factors (barriers and facilitators) influencing clinician research participation and determine how professional culture impacts on these factors. Forty clinicians working at a tertiary children's hospital participated in six discipline-specific focus groups. Thematic analysis was performed using an inductive process based in grounded theory. Four major themes (cultural factors, personal factors, resources and solutions) and 16 subthemes were identified. Participants described how the current health system discourages clinician research. They reported that their research participation requires personal sacrifice of their own time; income or career progression. Research participation was seen to compete with other priorities in clinicians' workload and is disadvantaged because of the primacy of clinical work and the lack of immediate tangible benefit from research projects. Solutions suggested by our participants included better alignment of clinical and research goals, improved availability of research mentors and collaborative opportunities. Nurses and allied health professionals reported a changing professional culture that values research. Only doctors identified research participation to be important for career progression. For clinician research participation to flourish, significant changes in healthcare structure and priorities will be required that result in research becoming more embedded in healthcare delivery. Initiatives to improve collaboration between clinicians and universities may also support these aims. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  1. Quality Imaging - Comparison of CR Mammography with Screen-Film Mammography

    Gaona, E.; Azorin Nieto, J.; Iran Diaz Gongora, J. A.; Arreola, M.; Casian Castellanos, G.; Perdigon Castaneda, G. M.; Franco Enriquez, J. G.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work is a quality imaging comparison of CR mammography images printed to film by a laser printer with screen-film mammography. A Giotto and Elscintec dedicated mammography units with fully automatic exposure and a nominal large focal spot size of 0.3 mm were used for the image acquisition of phantoms in screen-film mammography. Four CR mammography units from two different manufacturers and three dedicated x-ray mammography units with fully automatic exposure and a nominal large focal spot size of 0.3 mm were used for the image acquisition of phantoms in CR mammography. The tests quality image included an assessment of system resolution, scoring phantom images, Artifacts, mean optical density and density difference (contrast). In this study, screen-film mammography with a quality control program offers a significantly greater level of quality image relative to CR mammography images printed on film

  2. Social capital influences farmer participation in collective irrigation management in Shaanxi Provence, China

    Miao, S.; Heijman, W.J.M.; Xueqin Zhu, Xueqin; Lu, Q.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of four components of social capital on farmers’ participative behaviour in collective actions for constructing and operating small-scale groundwater irrigation systems on the Guanzhong Plain, Shaanxi Province, China.

  3. Students' High School Organizational Leadership Opportunities and Their Influences on Academic Achievement and Civic Participation

    Elemen, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to analyze high school leadership praxis for its inclusion of students in organizational leadership dialogue and decision-making and the influences of these factors on student achievement and civic participation. Survey questionnaire data were provided by 215 full-time enrolled undergraduate students from…

  4. Assessing the Motivators and Barriers Influencing Undergraduate Students' Choices to Participate in International Experiences

    Bunch, J.C.; Lamm, Alexa J.; Israel, Glenn D.; Edwards, M. Craig

    2013-01-01

    International experiences (IEs) are becoming one of the most critical elements of an undergraduate student's education to address the knowledge needed to become globally competent. However, student enrollment in IEs has been limited. Agricultural educators can more easily influence students' decisions regarding participation in IEs if they…

  5. The Influence of Body Discourses on Adolescents' (Non)Participation in Physical Activity

    Beltrán-Carrillo, Vicente J.; Devís-Devís, José; Peiró-Velert, Carmen

    2018-01-01

    Drawing on semi-structured interviews with older adolescents, this article examines how healthism, ideal body discourses and performative body discourses influence their (non)participation in physical activity (PA) and their identity construction concerning exercise, sport and physical education. We illustrate that body transformation through PA,…

  6. Sibling Influence on Physical Activity and Sport Participation: Considerations for Coaches

    Allbaugh, Chelsea N.; Bolter, Nicole D.; Shimon, Jane M.

    2016-01-01

    Sibling relationships are some of the most influential throughout one's life. While family influences have often been examined in sports settings, less has been studied regarding the specific roles siblings may play. Research suggests that the way athletes view sport participation can be shaped by their experiences and relationships with siblings.…

  7. Friend me: which factors influence top global brands participation in social network sites

    Araujo, T.; Neijens, P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose - This study focuses on how brands participate in social network sites (SNSs) and investigates both the different strategies they adopt and the factors that influence these strategies. Design/methodology/approach - The activities of top brands in SNSs were investigated through a content

  8. Factors Influencing the Research Participation of Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Haas, Kaaren; Costley, Debra; Falkmer, Marita; Richdale, Amanda; Sofronoff, Kate; Falkmer, Torbjörn

    2016-01-01

    Recruiting adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) into research poses particular difficulties; longitudinal studies face additional challenges. This paper reports on a mixed methods study to identify factors influencing the participation in longitudinal autism research of adults with ASD, including those with an intellectual disability, and…

  9. Psychosocial Influences upon the Workforce and Professional Development Participation of Family Child Care Providers

    Swartz, Rebecca Anne; Wiley, Angela R.; A. Koziol, Natalie; Magerko, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Family child care is commonly used in the US by families, including by those receiving child care subsidies. Psychosocial influences upon the workforce and professional development participation of family child care providers (FCCPs) have implications for the investment of public dollars that aim to improve quality and stability of…

  10. Sport commitment and participation in masters swimmers: the influence of coach and teammates.

    Santi, Giampaolo; Bruton, Adam; Pietrantoni, Luca; Mellalieu, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated how coach and teammates influence masters athletes' sport commitment, and the effect of functional and obligatory commitments on participation in masters swimming. The sample consisted of 523 masters swimmers (330 males and 193 females) aged between 22 and 83 years (M = 39.00, SD = 10.42). A bi-dimensional commitment scale was used to measure commitment dimensions and perceived influence from social agents. Structural equation modelling analysis was conducted to evaluate the influence of social agents on functional and obligatory commitments, and the predictive capabilities of the two types of commitment towards sport participation. Support provided by coach and teammates increased functional commitment, constraints from these social agents determined higher obligatory commitment, and coach constraints negatively impacted functional commitment. In addition, both commitment types predicted training participation, with functional commitment increasing participation in team training sessions, and obligatory commitment increasing the hours of individual training. The findings suggest that in order to increase participation in masters swimming teams and reduce non-supervised training, coach and teammates should exhibit a supportive attitude and avoid over expectation.

  11. Perceived difficulties using everyday technology after acquired brain injury: influence on activity and participation.

    Lindén, Anita; Lexell, Jan; Lund, Maria Larsson

    2010-12-01

    Using everyday technology (ET) is a prerequisite for activities and participation at home and in the community. It is well known that persons with an acquired brain injury (ABI) can have limitations in activities of daily living but our knowledge of their difficulties using ET is not known. Thirty-six persons (27 men and 9 women, mean age 44 years, age range 26-60) with an ABI (2-10 years post injury) were interviewed, using the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire (ETUQ), about their perceived difficulties using ET and how these difficulties influenced their everyday activities and their possibilities to participate at home and in the community. A majority (78%) of the persons reported difficulties using ET. The most common difficulties were related to the use of telecommunication and computers. Despite these difficulties, a majority still used most objects and services independently. Twenty-six participants (72%) perceived that their difficulties using ET influenced their everyday activities and their possibility to participate at home and in the community. The results indicate that rehabilitation following an ABI should consider whether clients' use of ET influences their activity and participation and adopt interventions accordingly. The results also indicate that difficulties using ET need to be considered in the design of community services to prevent societal barriers.

  12. Children's influence on and participation in the family decision process during food buying

    Nørgaard, Maria Kümpel; Brunsø, Karen; Christensen, Pia Haudrup

    2007-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to contribute to studies of family decision making during food buying. In particular a theoretical framework is proposed for structuring future studies of family decision making that include children's influence and participation at specific stages of the pr......Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to contribute to studies of family decision making during food buying. In particular a theoretical framework is proposed for structuring future studies of family decision making that include children's influence and participation at specific stages...... to 13 using questionnaires for both children and parents. Findings - Family food decision making is often a joint activity, and children's active participation, among other things, determines the influence they gain. Parents and children do not always agree on how much influence children have...... in the various stages of the process, indicating the importance of listening to both parties in research into the family dynamics and processes involved in everyday food buying. Research limitations/implications - Future research should further extend the knowledge about the areas where children have influence...

  13. Interdisciplinary group of mammography (IGM). Quality assurance in mammography

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Assurance quality must be a preoccupation of each day in mammography. To be efficient and of low cost it must be discussed between radiologists and physicists; some countries like Federal Republic of Germany, Belgium, United Kingdom, Scandinavia and Netherlands engaged actions to make assurance quality a daily practice

  14. Determinants of mammography screening behavior in Iranian women: A population-based study

    Mitra Moodi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer remains a substantial health concern in Iran due to delay and late stage at diagnosis and treatment. Despite the potential benefits of mammography screening for early detection of breast cancer, the performance of this screening among Iranian women is low. For planning appropriate intervention, this study was carried out to identify mammography rates and explore determinants of mammography screening behavior in females of Isfahan, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this population-based study, 384 women of 40 years and older were interviewed by telephone. The Farsi version of Champion′s Health Belief Model scale (CHBMS was used to examine factors associated with mammography screening. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS (version 16.0 using statistical Chi-square, Fisher Exact test, t-test and multiple logistic regression model to identify the importance rate of socio-demographic and Health Belief Model (HBM variables to predict mammography screening behavior. In all of tests, the level of significant was considered a = 0.05. Results: Mean age ΁ SD of women was 52.24 ΁ 8.2 years. Of the 384 participants, 44.3% reported at least one mammogram in their lifetime. Logistic regression analysis indicated that women were more likely to have mammography if they heard/read about breast cancer (OR = 4.17, 95% CI 2.09, 8.34, menopause in lower age (OR = 0.2, 95% CI 0.87, 0.99 and history of breast problem (OR = 0.9, 95% CI 0.12, 0.32. Also, women who perceived more benefits of mammography (OR = 1.84, 95% CI 1.63, 2.09, fewer barriers of mammography (OR = 0.91, 95% CI 0.86, 0.96 and had more motivation for health (OR = 0.94, 95% CI 0.89, 1 were more likely to have mammography. Conclusion: The findings indicated that the rate of mammography screening among women in Isfahan province is low and highlights the need for developing a comprehensive national breast cancer control program, which should be considered as the first

  15. The perspective of children on factors influencing their participation in perioperative care.

    Sjöberg, Carina; Amhliden, Helene; Nygren, Jens M; Arvidsson, Susann; Svedberg, Petra

    2015-10-01

    To describe the experiences of participation in perioperative care of 8- to 11-year-old children. All children have the right to participate in decisions that affect them and have the right to express their views in all matters that concern them. Allowing children to be involved in their perioperative care can make a major difference in terms of their well-being by decreasing fear and anxiety and having more positive experiences. Taking the views of children into account and facilitating their participation could thus increase the quality of care. Descriptive qualitative design. The study was conducted in 2013 and data were collected by narrative interviews with 10 children with experience from perioperative care in Sweden. Qualitative content analysis was chosen to describe the variations, differences and similarities in children's experiences of participation in perioperative care. The result showed that receiving preparatory information, lack of information regarding postoperative care and wanting to have detailed information are important factors for influencing children's participation. Interaction with healthcare professionals, in terms of being listened to, being a part of the decision-making and feeling trust, is important for children's participation in the decision-making process. Poor adaptation of the care environment to the children's needs, feeling uncomfortable while waiting and needs for distraction are examples of how the environment and the care in the operating theatre influence the children's experiences of participation. Efforts should be made to improve children's opportunities for participation in the context of perioperative care and further research is needed to establish international standards for information strategies and care environment that promotes children's participation in perioperative care. Nurse anaesthetists need to acquire knowledge and develop strategies for providing preparatory visits and information to children prior to

  16. Factors influencing interest in recreational sports participation and its rural-urban disparity.

    Chiehfeng Chen

    Full Text Available Recreational sports are important leisure activities. However, most studies investigating barrier factors and motivation for participation in recreational sports have been limited to specific areas (e.g., a city or school or demographic groups (e.g., adolescents. Therefore, this study set out to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the behavioral and socioeconomic factors influencing interest in recreational sports participation in Taiwan, as well as to evaluate the effect of any urban-rural divide.This study analyzed data collected by the "Taiwan Social Change Survey" (program five, wave 3 "Leisure Life" questionnaire. We used hierarchical linear modeling to assess respondent interest in recreational sports participation and evaluated the influence of behavioral factors, socioeconomic factors, and residence location (urban/rural.Of the 2,146 participants in this study, 50.3% were male, and the average age was 43.9 years. Location of residence (urban/rural accounted for 35.3% of the variation in interest in recreational sports participation, while the remaining 64.7% came from the individual level. Participants who lived in rural settings were less interested in recreational sports than their urban counterparts. Gender, educational attainment, participation frequency, health-motivated interest, and appearance-motivated interest were also associated with interest in recreational sports participation.Different communication strategies may be needed to effectively reach different demographic groups. We suggest that future public health campaigns aiming to increase recreational sports participation include tailored interventions and messages to effectively encourage leisure physical activities among all, regardless of demographic boundaries.

  17. Breast density as indicator for the use of mammography or MRI to screen women with familial risk for breast cancer (FaMRIsc: a multicentre randomized controlled trial

    Saadatmand Sepideh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To reduce mortality, women with a family history of breast cancer often start mammography screening at a younger age than the general population. Breast density is high in over 50% of women younger than 50 years. With high breast density, breast cancer incidence increases, but sensitivity of mammography decreases. Therefore, mammography might not be the optimal method for breast cancer screening in young women. Adding MRI increases sensitivity, but also the risk of false-positive results. The limitation of all previous MRI screening studies is that they do not contain a comparison group; all participants received both MRI and mammography. Therefore, we cannot empirically assess in which stage tumours would have been detected by either test. The aim of the Familial MRI Screening Study (FaMRIsc is to compare the efficacy of MRI screening to mammography for women with a familial risk. Furthermore, we will assess the influence of breast density. Methods/Design This Dutch multicentre, randomized controlled trial, with balanced randomisation (1:1 has a parallel grouped design. Women with a cumulative lifetime risk for breast cancer due to their family history of ≥20%, aged 30–55 years are eligible. Identified BRCA1/2 mutation carriers or women with 50% risk of carrying a mutation are excluded. Group 1 receives yearly mammography and clinical breast examination (n = 1000, and group 2 yearly MRI and clinical breast examination, and mammography biennially (n = 1000. Primary endpoints are the number and stage of the detected breast cancers in each arm. Secondary endpoints are the number of false-positive results in both screening arms. Furthermore, sensitivity and positive predictive value of both screening strategies will be assessed. Cost-effectiveness of both strategies will be assessed. Analyses will also be performed with mammographic density as stratification factor. Discussion Personalized breast cancer screening

  18. Influence of ethical safeguards on research participation: comparison of perspectives of people with schizophrenia and psychiatrists.

    Roberts, Laura W; Hammond, Katherine A Green; Warner, Teddy D; Lewis, Rae

    2004-12-01

    Several safeguards have been developed to protect research volunteers, but little is known about how the people involved in this research-the stakeholders-view these efforts to assure participant rights and well-being. The authors' goal was to examine these perspectives. As part of a larger study, 60 people with schizophrenia and 69 psychiatrists rated the protectiveness and influence on patients' willingness to participate in research of five safeguards: informed consent, alternative decision makers, institutional review boards, data safety monitoring boards, and confidentiality measures. All safeguards were perceived by both the participants with schizophrenia and by the psychiatrists as protective: on a scale of 1-5 on which 1=not protective at all and 5=very much protects, the mean scores ranged from 3.54 to 4.07. Four of the five safeguards were perceived by both the people with schizophrenia and by the psychiatrists as positively influencing patients' participation decisions. On a scale of 1-5 on which 1=much less willing and 5=much more willing to participate, the mean scores for these four safeguards ranged from 3.86 to 4.30. The mean score for the safeguard of an alternative decision maker, however, was 3.09. The ratings of protectiveness made by both the people with schizophrenia and the psychiatrists were correlated with their ratings of patients' willingness to participate in studies. Ethical commitment to research volunteers is expressed in safeguards. These efforts appear to be viewed positively by key stakeholders and may influence research participation decision making.

  19. Sport Participation of Preschool Children and Parents Influence (2) : A Comparative Study on Sport-school Participants and Non-participants

    丸山, 富雄; Tomio, MARUYAMA; 仙台大学; SENDAI COLLEGE

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify a mechanism of sport participation of preschool children. Three items composed of parents' social achieved status, parents' interest in sport and parents' educational eagerness were investigated. Data were collected from 271 parents whose children attended kindergarten at Tokyo (sport-school participants 129, non-participants 142). As the results, participants' group was higher than non-participants' at all three items. Thus, it seems that sport partic...

  20. Mammography in women under 35

    Panzarola, P.; Bellucci, M.C.

    1991-01-01

    The detection of breast cancer in women under 35 is quite an uncommon event, accounting only for 3.2-3.4% of all breast cancers. To determine the indications for mammography in women under 35, the authors correlated clinical, mammographic, and US findings with fine-needle aspiration/surgical biopsy and follow-up results in 1040 symptomatic women examined at the Center of Senology of the Istitute of Radiology - University of Perugia, Italy, from 1984 to June 1990. Of 1040 women, 482 (41.6%) had normal findings; benign disease was diagnosed in 558 (53.7%) cases, and malignant disease in 49 (4.7%). Mammography was very useful to diagnose malignancy in palpable breast lesions, as well as to suggest the need for biopsy, to detect metachronous cancer and to define lesion sizes. In inflammatory process - e.g., mastitis and abscesses - both mammography and US were capable as its remission after therapy. Galactography had a specific role in the evaluation of the mammary duct and demonstrated intraductal pathologic conditions. In the authors'experiences, mammography never showed occult breast cancers in women with no palpable breast lesions or hematic nipple discharge

  1. Insights into the IASB due process: the influence of country characteristics on constituents’ formal participation

    Karsten Eisenschmidt

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores the impact of country characteristics on constituents’ formal participation in the IASB’s due process. We hypothesize that there is an association between the level of constituents’ partic- ipation and (1 the level of economic development, and (2 the cultural characteristics of the country of origin. We use a number of comment letters (CLs and their length as proxies for constituents’ formal participation in the IASB’s due process. The results indicate that economic development (equity market capitalization is the most important explanatory factor for the different levels of participation. In con- trast, the cultural characteristics measured by Hofstede’s cultural framework can only partially explain that differences. Only individualism is a significant positive influence factor for the level of constituents’ participation. The results of our descriptive analysis for the CLs and the information input provided show that there is still a lack of participation in the IASB’s due process. Despite the huge impact of accounting norms on societies, only a limited number of constituents participate, and some constituent groups, like users or academics, participate less.

  2. Factors that influence exercise activity among women post hip fracture participating in the Exercise Plus Program.

    Resnick, Barbara; Orwig, Denise; D'Adamo, Christopher; Yu-Yahiro, Janet; Hawkes, William; Shardell, Michelle; Golden, Justine; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Magaziner, Jay

    2007-01-01

    Using a social ecological model, this paper describes selected intra- and interpersonal factors that influence exercise behavior in women post hip fracture who participated in the Exercise Plus Program. Model testing of factors that influence exercise behavior at 2, 6 and 12 months post hip fracture was done. The full model hypothesized that demographic variables; cognitive, affective, physical and functional status; pain; fear of falling; social support for exercise, and exposure to the Exercise Plus Program would influence self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and stage of change both directly and indirectly influencing total time spent exercising. Two hundred and nine female hip fracture patients (age 81.0 +/- 6.9), the majority of whom were Caucasian (97%), participated in this study. The three predictive models tested across the 12 month recovery trajectory suggest that somewhat different factors may influence exercise over the recovery period and the models explained 8 to 21% of the variance in time spent exercising. To optimize exercise activity post hip fracture, older adults should be helped to realistically assess their self-efficacy and outcome expectations related to exercise, health care providers and friends/peers should be encouraged to reinforce the positive benefits of exercise post hip fracture, and fear of falling should be addressed throughout the entire hip fracture recovery trajectory.

  3. Can or can not? Electronic information sharing influence the participation behavior of the employees

    Mohammed, M. A.; Eman, Y.; Huda, I.; Thamer, A.

    2015-01-01

    Information sharing refers to information being shared between employees inside or outside an agency, or by providing accessibility of their information and data to other agencies so as to allow effective decision making. Electronic information sharing is a key to effective government. This study is conducted to investigate the factors of electronic information sharing that influence the participation behavior so as to augment it amongst the employees in public organizations. Eleven domains of factors that are considered in this study are benefits, risk, social network, Information stewardship, information quality, trust, privacy, reciprocity. The paper proposes electronic information sharing factors in public sector to increase the participation

  4. Influence of Participation, Facilitator Styles, and Metacognitive Reflection on Knowledge Building in Online University Courses

    Cacciamani, Stefano; Cesareni, Donatella; Martini, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    of engagement in knowledge building activity is the socio-cognitive dynamic of epistemic agency, in which students exercise a higher level of agency for setting forth their ideas and negotiating fit with those of others rather than relying on their teacher. The purpose of this paper is to investigate...... the influence of (a) levels of participation, (b) facilitator styles and (c) metacognitive reflection on knowledge building in two blended, post-secondary education contexts. A study of a total of 67 undergraduate students suggest that high levels of participation, a supportive facilitator style, and ample...

  5. Can or can not? Electronic information sharing influence the participation behavior of the employees

    Mohammed, M. A., E-mail: mhmdaldbag@yahoo.com; Eman, Y., E-mail: emaroof94@yahoo.com; Huda, I., E-mail: huda753@uum.edu.my; Thamer, A. [University Utara Malaysia, UUM Sintok (Malaysia)

    2015-12-11

    Information sharing refers to information being shared between employees inside or outside an agency, or by providing accessibility of their information and data to other agencies so as to allow effective decision making. Electronic information sharing is a key to effective government. This study is conducted to investigate the factors of electronic information sharing that influence the participation behavior so as to augment it amongst the employees in public organizations. Eleven domains of factors that are considered in this study are benefits, risk, social network, Information stewardship, information quality, trust, privacy, reciprocity. The paper proposes electronic information sharing factors in public sector to increase the participation.

  6. Can positron emission mammography help to identify clinically significant breast cancer in women with suspicious calcifications on mammography?

    Bitencourt, Almir G.V.; Lima, Eduardo N.P.; Macedo, Bruna R.C.; Conrado, Jorge L.F.A.; Marques, Elvira F.; Chojniak, Rubens [A C Camargo Cancer Center-Department of Imaging, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-05-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of positron emission mammography (PEM) for identifying malignant lesions in patients with suspicious microcalcifications detected on mammography. A prospective, single-centre study that evaluated 40 patients with suspicious calcifications at mammography and indication for percutaneous or surgical biopsy, with mean age of 56.4 years (range: 28-81 years). Patients who agreed to participate in the study underwent PEM with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose before the final histological evaluation. PEM findings were compared with mammography and histological findings. Most calcifications (n = 34; 85.0 %) were classified as BIRADS 4. On histology, there were 25 (62.5 %) benign and 15 (37.5 %) malignant lesions, including 11 (27.5 %) ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and 4 (10 %) invasive carcinomas. On subjective analysis, PEM was positive in 15 cases (37.5 %) and most of these cases (n = 14; 93.3 %) were confirmed as malignant on histology. There was one false-positive result, which corresponded to a fibroadenoma, and one false negative, which corresponded to an intermediate-grade DCIS. PEM had a sensitivity of 93.3 %, specificity of 96.0 % and accuracy of 95 %. PEM was able to identify all invasive carcinomas and high-grade DCIS (nuclear grade 3) in the presented sample, suggesting that this method may be useful for further evaluation of patients with suspected microcalcifications. (orig.)

  7. Influence of sport participation on community integration and quality of life: a comparison between sport participants and non-sport participants with spinal cord injury.

    McVeigh, Sonja A; Hitzig, Sander L; Craven, B Cathy

    2009-01-01

    To determine whether community integration and/or quality of life (QoL) among people living with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) are superior among sport participants vs non-sport participants. Cross-sectional study. Persons (n=90) living in the community with SCI (ASIA Impairment Scale A-D), level C5 or below, > 15 years of age, >12 months postinjury, and requiring a wheelchair for >1 hours/day were divided into 2 groups based on their self-reported sport participation at interview: sport participants (n=45) and non-sport participants (n 5). Independent-sample t tests revealed that both Community Integration Questionnaire (CIQ) and Reintegration to Normal Living Index (RNL) total mean scores were higher among sport participants vs nonsport participants (P sport participants. Similarly, the unadjusted odds ratio of a high RNL score was 7.00 (95% CI 2.3, 21.0) among current sport participants. Regression-adjusted odds ratios of high CIQ and high RNL scores were 1.36 (95% CI 0.09, 1.45) and 0.15 (95% CI 0.04, 0.55), respectively. The odds ratio for pre-SCI sport participation predicting post-SCI sport participation was 3.06 (95% CI 1.23, 7.65). CIQ and QoL scores were higher among sport participants compared to non-sport participants. There was an association between mean CIQ and RNL scores for both groups. Sport participants were 4.75 and 7.00 times as likely to have high CIQ and QoL scores. Both groups had a similar likelihood of high CIQ and RNL scores after adjusting for important confounders. Individuals who participated in sports prior to SCI were more likely to participate in sports post-SCI.

  8. Factors Influencing Participation in Continuing Professional Development: A Focus on Motivation Among Pharmacists.

    Tjin A Tsoi, Sharon L N M; de Boer, Anthonius; Croiset, Gerda; Koster, Andries S; Kusurkar, Rashmi A

    2016-01-01

    The interest in continuing education (CE) for pharmacists has increased because of patient safety issues, advancing science and the quick changes in the profession. Therefore, contemporary pharmaceutical care requires an effective and sustainable system for pharmacists to maintain and improve competencies. Although motivation plays an important role both as a facilitator (desire to learn) and a barrier (lack of motivation), there is little investigated about this specific factor. The aim of the study was to explore what factors influence pharmacists' participation in CE with a focus on motivation. The theoretical framework was self-determination theory (SDT), which describes autonomous motivation (AM) representing motivation from an internal locus of causality, controlled motivation (CM) originating from an external locus of causality, and relative autonomous motivation (RAM) that measures the AM in an individual after correcting for the CM. The relationship between pharmacists' characteristics, especially their motivation (AM, CM and RAM) in CE, and their participation in CE activities was explored using the AMS-questionnaire and the Dutch online portfolio system. RAM was positively correlated with CE participation of pharmacists and explained 7.8% of the variance. The correlations between the independent variables AM and CM and CE hours were negative (-0.301 and -0.476, respectively). Other factors influencing CE participation were pharmacy school (6.8%), traineeship (10.9%), and work experience (7.8%). Pharmacists participated for 27.0 hours on average in CE during 11 months and preferred face-to-face-learning (85.5%) above e-learning (13.8%). Our findings show a positive relationship between RAM and CE participation. The current CE system is probably not conducive to stimulation of AM. Further research is needed to understand the factors that stimulate pharmacists' motivation and participation in CE.

  9. Digital mammography in breast cancer screening: Evaluation and innovation

    Bluekens, A.M.J.

    2015-01-01

    With all other imaging modalities in radiology being digitised and conventional mammography being ready to phase out the transition to digital mammography was inevitable. This thesis describes the performance of digital screening mammography and the consequences of implementation in a

  10. Optimization in mammography - monthly monitoring of image quality at the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Joana, Georgia S.; Andrade, Mauricio C. de; Silva, Sabrina D. da; Silva, Rafael R. da; Cesar, Adriana C.Z.; Oliveira, Mauricio de; Peixoto, Joao E.

    2011-01-01

    The State Program of Quality Control in Mammography (PECQMamo) of the state of Minas Gerais was established in 2004 and consists of tests for evaluation of image quality and performance of equipment used in the diagnosis of breast cancer, and evaluation the infrastructure of mammography centers. The monthly monitoring of image quality in mammography is part of this program that has been executed since May 2009 with a character essentially educational. In the assessment of individual services that participate in the monthly monitoring, there was an increased percentage of average annual compliance from 2009 to 2010 in all 85 services with the exception of one service. Therefore, evolution of the performance of the services evaluated, since the program began, shows a positive impact on the numbers, confirming the relevance of this type of operation of Sanitary Surveillance in the area of quality in mammography. (author)

  11. Factors Influencing Farmers’ Willingness to Participate in Wetland Restoration: Evidence from China

    Honggen Zhu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Poyang Lake wetland has been at the center of discussion in China’s wetland restoration initiative because of the extent of its ecosystem degradation. The purpose of this paper is to model farmers’ willingness to participate in wetland restoration and analyze factors that will affect farmers’ participation decisions. A household survey was conducted among 300 randomly selected farm-households in the Poyang Lake area, Jiangxi Province. A binary probit regression model is applied to investigate the impacts of farmer demographics, farm characteristics, and farmers’ perceptions of wetland and wetland restoration policies on willingness to participate in wetland restoration. Results show that farmers’ education level, household migrant members, number of dependents, household net income, farm type, and distance to urban areas have significant effects on farmers’ participation in wetland restoration. Farmers’ perceptions about the ecological values and benefits of wetlands and their knowledge about wetland restoration policies do not appear to significantly influence farmers’ willingness to participate. A gap is identified between awareness of the importance of wetland restoration and willingness to take actions to restore wetlands. Farm-households tend to weigh personal needs and economic conditions when making participation decisions.

  12. What influences malaysian nurses to participate in continuing professional education activities?

    Chong, Mei Chan; Sellick, Kenneth; Francis, Karen; Abdullah, Khatijah Lim

    2011-03-01

    A cross sectional descriptive study, which involved government hospitals and health clinics from Peninsular Malaysia sought to identify the continuing professional education (CPE) needs and their readiness for E-learning. This paper focuses on the first phase of that study that aimed to determine the factors that influence nurses' participation in CPE. Multistage cluster sampling was used to recruit 1,000 nurses randomly from 12 hospitals and 24 health clinics from four states in Peninsular Malaysia who agreed to be involved. The respondent rate was 792 (79.2%), of which 562 (80%) had participated in CPE in the last 12 months. Findings suggested that updating knowledge and providing quality care are the most important factors that motivate participation in CPE, with respective means of 4.34 and 4.39. All the mean scores for educational opportunity were less than 3.0. Chi-square tests were used to test the association of demographic data and CPE participation. All demographical data were significantly associated with CPE participation, except marital status. Implementation of mandatory CPE is considered an important measure to increase nurse's participation in CPE. However, effective planning that takes into consideration the learning needs of nurses is recommended. Copyright © 2011 Korean Society of Nursing Science. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Factors influencing farmers’ willingness to participate in water allocation trading. A case study in southern Spain

    Giacomo Giannoccaro

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to uncover the factors that influence farmers’ attitudes towards water allocation trading. In the study, we simulate two water availability scenarios, an average year and a drought year, in a contingent valuation experiment with 241 farmers. A survey was held in the spring of 2012 in the Guadalquivir and Almanzora River Basins. First, we estimated a multinomial logit model to determine the factors that influence farmers to decide to participate in our hypothetical market. We then analysed the structural and socio-economic factors determining the monetary value of traded water using Heckman’s two-step model. Our results indicate that those farmers who are more innovative and have had agricultural training show a higher willingness to participate in water trading. Additionally, low water-supply guarantee and appropriate information about seasonal water availability increase the probability of participation. Higher willingness to pay (WTP for water is found in horticulture and among farmers who grow citrus and other permanent crops; lower water selling value (WTA is found in farms with extensive annual crops and traditional olive groves. However, monetary values (WTP/WTA are strongly dependent on the current cost of irrigation water services. While findings of this research seem to support the idea of diffusion innovation theory, the existence of ethical concerns that might influence farmers’ acceptance of irrigation water markets needs further analysis.

  14. Factors influencing farmers’ willingness to participate in water allocation trading. A case study in southern Spain

    Giannoccaro, G.; Castillo, M.; Berbel, J.

    2016-11-01

    This study aims to uncover the factors that influence farmers’ attitudes towards water allocation trading. In the study, we simulate two water availability scenarios, an average year and a drought year, in a contingent valuation experiment with 241 farmers. A survey was held in the spring of 2012 in the Guadalquivir and Almanzora River Basins. First, we estimated a multinomial logit model to determine the factors that influence farmers to decide to participate in our hypothetical market. We then analysed the structural and socio-economic factors determining the monetary value of traded water using Heckman’s two-step model. Our results indicate that those farmers who are more innovative and have had agricultural training show a higher willingness to participate in water trading. Additionally, low water-supply guarantee and appropriate information about seasonal water availability increase the probability of participation. Higher willingness to pay (WTP) for water is found in horticulture and among farmers who grow citrus and other permanent crops; lower water selling value (WTA) is found in farms with extensive annual crops and traditional olive groves. However, monetary values (WTP/WTA) are strongly dependent on the current cost of irrigation water services. While findings of this research seem to support the idea of diffusion innovation theory, the existence of ethical concerns that might influence farmers’ acceptance of irrigation water markets needs further analysis. (Author)

  15. Long-Term Influence of Duration and Frequency of Participation in Alcoholics Anonymous on Individuals With Alcohol Use Disorders.

    Moos, Rudolf H.; Moos, Bernice S.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the influence of the duration and frequency of a baseline episode of participation in Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) among 473 individuals with alcohol use disorders on 1-year and 8-year outcomes and the effect of additional participation and delayed participation on outcomes. Compared with individuals who did not participate,…

  16. Measuring the Influences of Youth Participation in Ohio 4-H Camps

    Greg Homan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Findings from a multi-component 4-H camp marketing and enrollment study of Ohio 4-H camps are highlighted. Significant influencers on the camp enrollment decision (parents, other adults, peers, siblings, and the respective camper are evaluated as well as the effectiveness of various marketing techniques. The data found in this study indicates that the decision to enroll in camp is most influenced by the respective 4-H camper; however parents are also a strong factor in the choice to participate in 4-H camps. Alumni parents report significantly higher influence in the camp enrollment decision than those parents who are not alumni of 4-H. Personal methods of promoting camps were rated the most effective in reaching potential camp audiences.

  17. CAD in breast imaging. Application in mammography and MR mammography

    Obenauer, S.; Hermann, K.P.

    2012-01-01

    Computer aided diagnosis systems (CAD-systems) are evaluated in different parts of diagnostic imaging. In breast imaging double reading which is time- and cost spending is necessary. Therefore a lot of studies evaluated the use of CAD-systems in mammography. However the rate of false-positives is too high to implement CAD-systems as double reader in routine work. In the future, improvements in this technique could perhaps change the performance of CAD-systems. (orig.)

  18. Digital mammography: current state and future aspects

    Fischer, U.; Baum, F. [Womens Health Care Center Goettingen, Diagnostisches Brustzentrum Goettingen, Goettingen (Germany); Hermann, K.P. [Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, Abteilung Diagnostische Radiologie, Goettingen (Germany)

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of digital technique in mammography has been the last step in completing the process of digitalization in diagnostic imaging. Meanwhile, some different digital techniques as well as a couple of different digital mammography systems were developed and have already been available for some years. In this review article, the relevant data of key studies are reported, the current status is defined, and perspectives of digital mammography are described. (orig.)

  19. Volumetric breast density affects performance of digital screening mammography

    Wanders, JO; Holland, K; Veldhuis, WB; Mann, RM; Pijnappel, RM; Peeters, PH; Van Gils, CH; Karssemeijer, N

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine to what extent automatically measured volumetric mammographic density influences screening performance when using digital mammography (DM). METHODS: We collected a consecutive series of 111,898 DM examinations (2003-2011) from one screening unit of the Dutch biennial screening program (age 50-75 years). Volumetric mammographic density was automatically assessed using Volpara. We determined screening performance measures for four density categories comparable to the Ameri...

  20. The Influence of Social Media Towards Student Political Participation During the 2014 Indonesian Presidential Election

    Anwar Kholid

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This research attempts to examine the political par- ticipation of social media users particularly of Facebook and Twitter during the 2014 Indonesian presidential election. The data collection was per- formed through survey with accidental sampling methods. Samples were taken from population of undergraduate students of political and social sci- ences faculty at five universities in Yogyakarta namely UGM, UIN Sunan Kalijaga, UMY, UNY and UPN “Veteran” Yogyakarta. Using statistic descriptive, this research conceptualizes the political participation of social media users while the relations of social me- dia and political participation is analyzed through OLS Regression. The findings indicated that the level of political participation of the social media users during the election was categorized as good. How- ever, the facilities offered by the two social media applications were not maximally used to supporting political participation activities. On the other hand, the result OLS regression shows that there were positive and significant correlations and influences of social media towards the political participation of its users during the election even though the per- centage was small.

  1. Internal and external influences on pro-environmental behavior: participation in a green electricity program

    Clark, C.F.; Moore, M.R.; Kotchen, M.J.; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI

    2003-01-01

    This paper integrates themes from psychology and economics to analyze pro-environmental behavior. Increasingly, both disciplines share an interest in understanding internal and external influences on behavior. In this study, we analyze data from a mail survey of participants and non-participants in a premium-priced, green electricity program. Internal variables consist of a newly developed scale for altruistic attitudes based on the Schwartz norm-activation model, and a modified version of the New Ecological Paradigm scale to measure environmental attitudes. External variables consist of household income and standard socio-demographic characteristics. The two internal variables and two external variables are significant in a logit model of the decision to participate in the program. We then focus on participants in the program and analyze their specific motives for participating. These include motives relating to several concerns: ecosystem health, personal health, environmental quality for residents in southeastern Michigan, global warming, and warm-glow (or intrinsic) satisfaction. In a statistical ranking of the importance of each motive, a biocentric motive ranks first, an altruistic motive ranks second, and an egoistic motive ranks third. (author)

  2. The self-referred mammography patient

    Reynolds, H.E.; Jackson, V.P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper compares the demographics, knowledge, and attitudes of women who refer themselves for screening mammography with those who undergo mammography on the advice of their physicians. Four hundred eighty-five consecutive mammography patients (437 doctor preferred [DR], 48 self-referred [SR]) completed a survey during their mammography appointment. The sample population contained a wide range of socioeconomic groups. While similar in age, race, and employment status to DR patients, SR patients were significantly more likely to have a family income of more than 30,000 per year, be college graduates, and report that they were in good or excellent health

  3. Update on new technologies in digital mammography

    Patterson SK

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie K Patterson, Marilyn A Roubidoux Division of Breast Imaging, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, USA Abstract: Despite controversy regarding mammography's efficacy, it continues to be the most commonly used breast cancer-screening modality. With the development of digital mammography, some improved benefit has been shown in women with dense breast tissue. However, the density of breast tissue continues to limit the sensitivity of conventional mammography. We discuss the development of some derivative digital technologies, primarily digital breast tomosynthesis, and their strengths, weaknesses, and potential patient impact. Keywords: screening mammography, breast cancer, contrast media, digital breast tomosynthesis

  4. Factors that influence exercise activity among women post hip fracture participating in the Exercise Plus Program

    Barbara Resnick

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Barbara Resnick1, Denise Orwig2, Christopher D’Adamo2, Janet Yu-Yahiro3, William Hawkes2, Michelle Shardell2, Justine Golden2, Sheryl Zimmerman4, Jay Magaziner21University of Maryland School of Nursing, 655 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD,21201, USA; 2University of Maryland School of Medicine, Howard Hall, Redwood Street, Baltimore MD 21201, USA; 3Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore, USA; 4University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, 301 Pittsboro St., CB#3550, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3550, USAAbstract: Using a social ecological model, this paper describes selected intra- and interpersonal factors that influence exercise behavior in women post hip fracture who participated in the Exercise Plus Program. Model testing of factors that influence exercise behavior at 2, 6 and 12 months post hip fracture was done. The full model hypothesized that demographic variables; cognitive, affective, physical and functional status; pain; fear of falling; social support for exercise, and exposure to the Exercise Plus Program would influence self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and stage of change both directly and indirectly influencing total time spent exercising. Two hundred and nine female hip fracture patients (age 81.0 ± 6.9, the majority of whom were Caucasian (97%, participated in this study. The three predictive models tested across the 12 month recovery trajectory suggest that somewhat different factors may influence exercise over the recovery period and the models explained 8 to 21% of the variance in time spent exercising. To optimize exercise activity post hip fracture, older adults should be helped to realistically assess their self-efficacy and outcome expectations related to exercise, health care providers and friends/peers should be encouraged to reinforce the positive benefits of exercise post hip fracture, and fear of falling should be addressed throughout the entire hip fracture recovery trajectory

  5. Control of quality in mammography

    2006-10-01

    The present protocol of quality control/quality assurance in mammography is the result of the work of two regional projects realised in Latin America within the frame of ARCAL with the support of the IAEA. The first is ARCAL LV (RLA/6/043) project on quality assurance/quality control in mammography studies which analysed the present situation of the mammography in the member countries of the project which include: Bolivia, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Dominican Republic and Republic of Venezuela and the second is ARCAL XLIX (RLA/9/035) project, whose members were Brazil, Colombia, Cuba, Chile, Mexico, and Peru, worked the application of Basic Safety Standards for the protection against ionising radiation with the aim to improve radiation protection in X-ray diagnosis medical practices through the implementation of the Basic Safety Standards (BSS) related to x-ray diagnosis in selected hospitals located in each country involved in the project. The work of both projects had been consolidated and harmonized in the present publication

  6. Rayleigh imaging in spectral mammography

    Berggren, Karl; Danielsson, Mats; Fredenberg, Erik

    2016-03-01

    Spectral imaging is the acquisition of multiple images of an object at different energy spectra. In mammography, dual-energy imaging (spectral imaging with two energy levels) has been investigated for several applications, in particular material decomposition, which allows for quantitative analysis of breast composition and quantitative contrast-enhanced imaging. Material decomposition with dual-energy imaging is based on the assumption that there are two dominant photon interaction effects that determine linear attenuation: the photoelectric effect and Compton scattering. This assumption limits the number of basis materials, i.e. the number of materials that are possible to differentiate between, to two. However, Rayleigh scattering may account for more than 10% of the linear attenuation in the mammography energy range. In this work, we show that a modified version of a scanning multi-slit spectral photon-counting mammography system is able to acquire three images at different spectra and can be used for triple-energy imaging. We further show that triple-energy imaging in combination with the efficient scatter rejection of the system enables measurement of Rayleigh scattering, which adds an additional energy dependency to the linear attenuation and enables material decomposition with three basis materials. Three available basis materials have the potential to improve virtually all applications of spectral imaging.

  7. Preparing women for breast screening mammography: A feasibility study to determine the potential value of an on-line social network and information hub

    Robinson, L.; Griffiths, M.; Wray, J.; Ure, C.; Shires, G.; Stein-Hodgins, J.R.; Hill, C.; Hilton, B.

    2015-01-01

    This feasibility study explored the attitudes of women towards social media for support about breast screening mammography. It sought their ideas about what a dedicated breast screening hub or Digital Support Network (DSN) might comprise; how they would network with other women on the DSN; what format information might take; and whether a health professional should be available on the DSN. Data comprised 94 survey questionnaires and two focus groups; one comprised women in the breast screening population age group, the other was a younger group. A socio-ecological framework was used to identify key influencers and potential barriers for the implementation of a mammography DSN. The study identified issues related to three intersecting concepts which influenced women's behaviour: on-line conversations about health in general; on-line conversations about breast screening mammography and the culture of privacy which makes conversing about intimate health (either face to face or on-line) difficult. Also, the transient nature of the mammography episode (three yearly), could mean an on-line breast screening digital network is challenging to sustain. super-users’ may be needed to continue on-line conversations. The health professional was also seen as essential for moderating potential misinformation shared by women although the participants were also insistent that ‘truth’ be shared. - Highlights: • Ensure factual information is provided that is in textual format with images and video. • Provide option to network in private. • Develop health practitioners who can provide a balanced perspective in facilitating the sharing of true experiences. • Work with employers to implement organisational changes. • Target certain groups in more direct ways (i.e. those with lower self-efficacy in terms of on-line skills).

  8. Perceptions of Physical Activity and Influences of Participation in Young African-American Adolescent Girls.

    Morrison, Shannon; Knight, Candace; Crew-Gooden, Annette

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore African-American adolescent girls' perceptions of physical activity participation, examine how physical activity is defined and identify the most preferred forms of physical activity. Qualitative focus group interviews of a convenience sample (N = 30; Mean age = 14.3 years) were used to identifyfactors that influence African-American girls' physical activity participation as well as to explore how physical activity is defined within this population. Four themes emerged: (a) benefits and motivation to engage in physical activity, (b) behaviors consistent with perceived physical activity, (c) most enjoyable physical activity/activities, and (d) barriers to physical activity. Physical activities that promoted normative adolescent development (i.e., autonomy) were perceived as most beneficial, desirable, and most likely to be sustained. Implications of these findings highlight the importance of the incorporation of socialization and peer engagement in physical activity programs designed for African-American adolescent girls.

  9. Sociocultural Influences on Arab Women's Participation in Breast Cancer Screening in Qatar.

    Hwang, Jasmine J; Donnelly, Tam T; Ewashen, Carol; McKiel, Elaine; Raffin, Shelley; Kinch, Janice

    2017-04-01

    Breast cancer, the most common cancer among Arab women in Qatar, significantly affects the morbidity and mortality of Arab women largely because of low participation rates in breast cancer screening. We used a critical ethnographic approach to uncover and describe factors that influence Arab women's breast cancer screening practices. We conducted semistructured interviews with 15 health care practitioners in Qatar. Through thematic analysis of the data, we found three major factors influencing breast cancer screening practices: (a) beliefs, attitudes, and practices regarding women's bodies, health, and illness; (b) religious beliefs and a culturally sensitive health care structure; and (c) culturally specific gender relations and roles. Arab women's health practices cannot be understood in isolation from the sociocultural environment. The problem of low rates of breast cancer screening practices and supportive interventions must be addressed within the context and not be limited to the individual.

  10. Latin American image quality survey in digital mammography studies

    Mora, Patricia; Khoury, Helen; Bitelli, Regina; Quintero, Ana Rosa; Garay, Fernando; Garcia Aguilar, Juan; Gamarra, Mirtha; Ubeda, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Under International Atomic Energy Agency regional programme TSA3 Radiological Protection of Patients in Medical Exposures, Latin American countries evaluated the image quality and glandular doses for digital mammography equipment with the purpose of seeing the performance and compliance with international recommendations. Totally, 24 institutions participated from Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Mexico, Paraguay and Venezuela. Signal difference noise ratio results showed for CR poor compliance with tolerances; better results were obtained for full-field digital mammography equipment. Mean glandular dose results showed that the majority of units have values below the acceptable dose levels. This joint Latin American project identified common problems: difficulty in working with digital images and lack of specific training by medical physicists from the region. Image quality is a main issue not being satisfied in accordance with international recommendations; optimisation processes in which the doses are increased should be very carefully done in order to improve early detection of any cancer signs. (authors)

  11. Factors that influence parental decisions to participate in clinical research: consenters vs nonconsenters.

    Hoberman, Alejandro; Shaikh, Nader; Bhatnagar, Sonika; Haralam, Mary Ann; Kearney, Diana H; Colborn, D Kathleen; Kienholz, Michelle L; Wang, Li; Bunker, Clareann H; Keren, Ron; Carpenter, Myra A; Greenfield, Saul P; Pohl, Hans G; Mathews, Ranjiv; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Chesney, Russell W

    2013-06-01

    A child's health, positive perceptions of the research team and consent process, and altruistic motives play significant roles in the decision-making process for parents who consent for their child to enroll in clinical research. This study identified that nonconsenting parents were better educated, had private insurance, showed lower levels of altruism, and less understanding of study design. To determine the factors associated with parental consent for their child's participation in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Cross-sectional survey conducted from July 2008 to May 2011. The survey was an ancillary study to the Randomized Intervention for Children with VesicoUreteral Reflux Study. Seven children's hospitals participating in a randomized trial evaluating management of children with vesicoureteral reflux. Parents asked to provide consent for their child's participation in the randomized trial were invited to complete an anonymous online survey about factors influencing their decision. A total of 120 of the 271 (44%) invited completed the survey; 58 of 125 (46%) who had provided consent and 62 of 144 (43%) who had declined consent completed the survey. A 60-question survey examining child, parent, and study characteristics; parental perception of the study; understanding of the design; external influences; and decision-making process. RESULTS Having graduated from college and private health insurance were associated with a lower likelihood of providing consent. Parents who perceived the trial as having a low degree of risk, resulting in greater benefit to their child and other children, causing little interference with standard care, or exhibiting potential for enhanced care, or who perceived the researcher as professional were significantly more likely to consent to participate. Higher levels of understanding of the randomization process, blinding, and right to withdraw were significantly positively associated with consent to participate. CONCLUSIONS AND

  12. The influence of sport participation on physical function in patients with osteoarthritis during and after exercise therapy.

    Perry, S.; Lucas, C.; Veenhof, C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were 1. to investigate in which sports activities patients with osteoarthritis (OA) participate, 2. the cross sectional differences in functional outcome between sport participators (SP) and non-sport participators (N-SP) and 3. the influence of sport

  13. Barriers to Mammography among Inadequately Screened Women

    Stoll, Carolyn R. T.; Roberts, Summer; Cheng, Meng-Ru; Crayton, Eloise V.; Jackson, Sherrill; Politi, Mary C.

    2015-01-01

    Mammography use has increased over the past 20 years, yet more than 30% of women remain inadequately screened. Structural barriers can deter individuals from screening, however, cognitive, emotional, and communication barriers may also prevent mammography use. This study sought to identify the impact of number and type of barriers on mammography…

  14. Mammography parameters: compression, dose, and discomfort

    Blanco, S.; Di Risio, C.; Andisco, D.; Rojas, R.R.; Rojas, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To confirm the importance of compression in mammography and relate it to the discomfort expressed by the patients. Materials and methods: Two samples of 402 and 268 mammographies were obtained from two diagnostic centres that use the same mammographic equipment, but different compression techniques. The patient age range was from 21 to 50 years old. (authors) [es

  15. Pre-Participation Physical Fitness does not Influence Adherence to a Supervised Exercise Program

    Fábio Akio Nishijuka

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation tends to reduce mortality. However, it requires medium/long-term adherence to regular physical exercise. It is relevant to identify the variables that affect adherence to an supervised exercise program (SEP. Objective: To evaluate the influence of pre-participation levels of aerobic and non-aerobic physical fitness components in medium-term adherence to SEP. Methods: A total of 567 SEP participants (65 ± 12 years (68% men were studied. Participants adherent to the program for less than 6 months (48% (non-adherent - NAD were compared with 52% of participants who were adherent for 6 months or more (adherents - AD. In the non-aerobic fitness, flexibility (FLX (Flexitest and muscle power (MPW/body weight in standing rowing (watts/kg were evaluated while aerobic fitness was obtained by direct measure of VO2max/body weight (VO2. These measurements were normatized for sex and age based on percentiles (P (P-FLX/P-MPW of reference data or percentages of predicted (P-VO2. Additionally, AD and NAD with extreme results (tertiles were simultaneously compared for the three variables. Results: There was no difference between AD and NAD for non-aerobic results, in median [P25-P75], P-FLX: 30 [13-56] and 31 [9-52], respectively, (p = 0.69 and P-MPW: 34 [17-58] and 36 [16-62], respectively (p = 0.96, and for aerobic results (mean ± standard error P-VO2 (75.9 ± 1.3% and 75.0 ± 1.3%, respectively (p = 0.83. When comparing extreme tertiles, a difference was found for P-MPW in the lower tertile only, with a slight advantage of AD over NAD- 9 [5-16] versus 4 [1-11] (p = 0.04. Conclusion: Although awareness of the pre-participation levels of aerobic and non-aerobic physical fitness components is useful for individualized exercise prescription, these variables do not seem to influence medium-term adherence to SEP.

  16. Interval breast cancers in the 'screening with tomosynthesis or standard mammography' (STORM) population-based trial.

    Houssami, Nehmat; Bernardi, Daniela; Caumo, Francesca; Brunelli, Silvia; Fantò, Carmine; Valentini, Marvi; Romanucci, Giovanna; Gentilini, Maria A; Zorzi, Manuel; Macaskill, Petra

    2018-04-01

    The prospective 'screening with tomosynthesis or standard mammography' (STORM) trial recruited women participating in biennial breast screening in Italy (2011-2012), and compared sequential screen-readings based on 2D-mammography alone or based on tomosynthesis (integrated 2D/3D-mammography). The STORM trial showed that tomosynthesis screen-reading significantly increased breast cancer detection compared to 2D-mammography alone. The present study completes reporting of the trial by examining interval breast cancers ascertained at two year follow-up. 9 interval breast cancers were identified; the estimated interval cancer rate was 1.23/1000 screens [9/7292] (95%CI 0.56 to 2.34) or 1.24/1000 negative screens [9/7235] (95%CI 0.57 to 2.36). In concurrently screened women who attended the same screening services and received 2D-mammography, interval cancer rate was 1.60/1000 screens [40/25,058] (95% CI 1.14 to 2.17) or 1.61/1000 negative screens [40/24,922] (95% CI 1.15 to 2.18). Estimated screening sensitivity for the STORM trial was 85.5% [59/69] (95%CI 75.0%-92.8%), and that for 2D-mammography screening was 77.3% [136/176] (95%CI 70.4%-83.2%). Interval breast cancer rate amongst screening participants in the STORM trial was marginally lower (and screening sensitivity higher) than estimates amongst 2D-screened women; these findings should be interpreted with caution given the small number of interval cases and the sample size of the trial. Much larger screening studies, or pooled analyses, are required to examine interval cancer rates arising after breast tomosynthesis screening versus digital mammography screening. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of diagnostic mammography unit

    Matsubara, M.; Muraki, T.; Kitade, K. (Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan))

    1981-07-01

    The mortality from breast cancer is gradually increasing year after year. Accordingly, it is eagerly desired that X-ray diagnosis information be obtainable with higher accuracy and ease for early detection of the disease. Meeting this demand, development has been made of a 2 x magnification mammography unit (Model MGU-01) capabel of minutely depicting microcalcifications with a size of 150 ..mu..m or thereabout and the peripheral condition of a mammary abscess. The background of the development, the substance of the unit and the examination made of the unit are described here.

  18. Development of diagnostic mammography unit

    Matsubara, Mitsuyoshi; Muraki, Takeshi; Kitade, Kooichi

    1981-01-01

    The mortality from breast cancer is gradually increasing year after year. Accordingly, it is eagerly desired that X-ray diagnosis information be obtainable with higher accuracy and ease for early detection of the disease. Meeting this demand, development has been made of a 2 x magnification mammography unit (Model MGU-01) capabel of minutely depicting microcalcifications with a size of 150 μm or thereabout and the peripheral condition of a mammary abscess. The background of the development, the substance of the unit and the examination made of the unit are described here. (author)

  19. Affective valence influences participant's susceptibility to false memories and illusory recollection.

    Dehon, Hedwige; Larøi, Frank; Van der Linden, Martial

    2010-10-01

    This study examined the influence of emotional valence on the production of DRM false memories (Roediger & McDermott, 1995). Participants were presented with neutral, positive, or negative DRM lists for a later recognition (Experiment 1) or recall (Experiment 2) test. In both experiments, confidence and recollective experience (i.e., "Remember-Know" judgments; Tulving, 1985) were also assessed. Results consistently showed that, compared with neutral lists, affective lists induced more false recognition and recall of nonpresented critical lures. Moreover, although confidence ratings did not differ between the false remembering from the different kinds of lists, "Remember" responses were more often associated with negative than positive and neutral false remembering of the critical lures. In contrast, positive false remembering of the critical lures was more often associated with "Know" responses. These results are discussed in light of the Paradoxical Negative Emotion (PNE) hypothesis (Porter, Taylor, & ten Bricke, 2008). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Evaluation of constructivist pedagogy: Influence on critical thinking skills, science fair participation and level of performance

    Foxx, Robbie Evelyn

    Science education reform, driven by a rapidly advancing technological society, demands the attention of both elementary and middle school curriculum-developers. Science education training in current standards (National Research Council [NRC] Standards 1996) emphasize inquiry, which is reported to be a basic tenet of the theory known as constructivism (NAASP, 1996; Cohen, 1988; Conley, 1993; Friedman, 1999; Newman, Marks, & Gamoran, 1996; Smerdon & Burkam 1999; Sizer 1992; Talbert & McLaughlin 1993; Tobin & Gallagher, 1987; Yager, 1991, 2000). Pedagogy focusing on the tenets of constructivist theory, at the intermediate level, can address current science standards. Many science educators believe participation in science fairs helps students develop the attitudes, skills, and knowledge that will help them to be comfortable and successful in the scientific and technological society (Czerniak, 1996). Competing in science fairs is one vehicle which allows students to apply science to societal issues, solve problems and model those things scientists do. Moreover, constructing a science fair project is suggested as being an excellent means to foster the development of concepts necessary in promoting scientific literacy (Czerniak, 1996). Research further suggests that through science fairs or other inquiry activities, students construct their knowledge with fewer misconceptions as they explore and discover the nature of science (NRC 1996). Tohn 's study (as cited in Bellipanni, 1994) stated that science fairs are a major campaign to increase student skills and to allow students a chance to have fun with science. The purpose of this research was twofold: (1) to assess science problem solving skills of students instructed using constructivist pedagogy, and (2) to explore the effects of constructivist pedagogy's influence(s) on science fair participation/placement. Students' attitudes resulting from these experiences were examined as well.

  1. Finding the minimal intervention needed for sustained mammography adherence.

    Gierisch, Jennifer M; DeFrank, Jessica T; Bowling, J Michael; Rimer, Barbara K; Matuszewski, Jeanine M; Farrell, David; Skinner, Celette Sugg

    2010-10-01

    Regular adherence to mammography screening saves lives, yet few women receive regular mammograms. RCT. Participants were recruited through a state employee health plan. All were women aged 40-75 years and had recent mammograms prior to enrollment (n=3547). Data were collected from 2004 to 2009. Trial tested efficacy of a two-step adaptively-designed intervention to increase mammography adherence over 4 years. The first intervention step consisted of three reminder types: enhanced usual care reminders (EUCR); enhanced letter reminders (ELR); both delivered by mail, and automated telephone reminders (ATR). After delivery of reminders, women who became off-schedule in any of the 4 years received a second step of supplemental interventions. Three supplemental intervention arms contained priming letters and telephone counseling: barriers only (BarriCall); barriers plus positive consequences of getting mammograms (BarriConCall+); and barriers plus negative consequences of not getting mammograms (BarriConCall-). Average cumulative number of days non-adherent to mammography over 4 years based on annual screening guidelines (analyses conducted in 2009). All reminders performed equally well in reducing number of days of non-adherence. Women randomized to receive supplemental interventions had significantly fewer days of non-adherence compared to women who received EUCR (p=0.0003). BarrConCall+ and BarrConCall- conditions did not significantly differ in days non-adherent compared to women in the barriers-only condition (BarriCon). The minimal intervention needed for sustained mammography use is a combination of a reminder followed by a priming letter and barrier-specific telephone counseling for women who become off-schedule. Additional costs associated with supplemental interventions should be considered by organizations deciding which interventions to use. NCT01148875. Copyright © 2010 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The mammography screening employee inreach program.

    Robinson, Joanne; Seltzer, Vicki; Lawrence, Loretta; Autz, George; Kostroff, Karen; Weiselberg, Lora; Colagiacomo, Maria

    2007-02-01

    To determine whether our health care employees were undergoing mammography screening according to American Cancer Society guidelines and to determine whether aggressive outreach, education and streamlining of mammography scheduling could improve compliance. All female employees at North Shore University Hospital (NSUH) and several other health system facilities (SF) were sent mailings to their homes that included breast health education and mammography screening guidelines, a questionnaire regarding their own mammography screening history and the opportunity to have their mammography screening scheduled by the Mammography Screening Employee Inreach Program (MSEIP) coordinator. Of the approximately 2,700 female employees aged 40 and over at NSUH and SF, 2,235 (82.7%) responded to the questionnaire, and 1,455 had a mammogram done via the MSEIP. Of the 1,455, 43% either were overdue for a mammogram or had never had one. During a second year of the MSEIP at NSUH and SF, an additional 1,706 mammograms were done. People employed in health care jobs do not necessarily avail themselves of appropriate health care screening. An aggressive program that utilized education, outreach and assistance with scheduling was effective in increasing compliance with mammography screening.

  3. Factors influencing work participation of adults with developmental dyslexia: a systematic review.

    de Beer, Joost; Engels, Josephine; Heerkens, Yvonne; van der Klink, Jac

    2014-01-24

    Evidence has been synthesized to determine hindering and facilitating factors associated with the work participation of adults with developmental dyslexia (DD), classified according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). A systematic literature review has been performed. Two search strings were used to determine the population and the context of work. The ICF was expanded with two subdivisions: one that made the environmental factors more work-related and a subdivision of personal factors. For data extraction the method known as qualitative metasummary was used and the manifest frequency effect size (MFES) for each category in the ICF was calculated. From 33 included studies 318 factors have been extracted and classified in the ICF. In the classification the frequency of occurrences and the consistency in direction (i.e., hindering or facilitating) have been made visible. The ICF categories with the highest MFES were mental functions with factors like feelings and emotions about dyslexia; activities like reading or writing/spelling; participation with factors like acquiring and keeping a job; social relationships at work where the attitudes and support of the employer and co-workers are important; working conditions with factors like the availability of assistive technology and accommodations on the job; and personal factors like self-disclosure and coping strategies. In the context of work DD affects nearly all domains of functioning, mostly in a negative way. Within each domain the impact of DD increases over the course of life. To overcome that negative influence, many forms of adaptation, compensation, or coping are mentioned. Also notable is the lack of positive attitudes toward DD of the participants with DD-with the exception of the attitudes of teachers with DD-as well as on the part of colleagues, supervisors, and employers.

  4. Mammography: Technique and diagnostic accuracy

    Kim, Chung Ja; Bahk, Yong Whee; Lee, Don Young

    1974-01-01

    Mammography is now in world wide use, But this has received rather scanty attention in Korea. The purposes of the present communication are twofold: (1) Detailing of technical and photographic aspects of mam in ography and (2) an assessment of its diagnostic accuracy as experienced by us. The clinical materials consisted of 88 cases of mammography performed at the Department of Radiology, St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic Medical College during the 2 years-period from April 1972. We used nonscreen type mammographic or industrial fine- grain films, and a special mammographic device that can be attached to any of the ordinary radiographic machine. Technical factors are shown in Table II. Of 88 cases 19 were operated on or biopsied. There were 7 cases of carcinoma. 8 cases of inflammatory diseases, and 4 cases of benign tumor. Mammographic diagnosis was correct in 85.7% of carcinoma and 87.5% of inflammatory diseases. One misdiagnosis of 7 cases of carcinoma was turned out to be cystosarcoma phylloides. Of 4 cases of benign tumors 2 were correctly diagnosed, and the other 2 mistaken for either inflammatory disease or simple lactating breast. However, none of the benign conditions were diagnosed as malignant process. We found that nonscreen type mammographic or industrial fine-grain films, and hand-processing were necessary in obtaining the mammograms of desirable quality

  5. Mammography image compression using Wavelet

    Azuhar Ripin; Md Saion Salikin; Wan Hazlinda Ismail; Asmaliza Hashim; Norriza Md Isa

    2004-01-01

    Image compression plays an important role in many applications like medical imaging, televideo conferencing, remote sensing, document and facsimile transmission, which depend on the efficient manipulation, storage, and transmission of binary, gray scale, or color images. In Medical imaging application such Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACs), the image size or image stream size is too large and requires a large amount of storage space or high bandwidth for communication. Image compression techniques are divided into two categories namely lossy and lossless data compression. Wavelet method used in this project is a lossless compression method. In this method, the exact original mammography image data can be recovered. In this project, mammography images are digitized by using Vider Sierra Plus digitizer. The digitized images are compressed by using this wavelet image compression technique. Interactive Data Language (IDLs) numerical and visualization software is used to perform all of the calculations, to generate and display all of the compressed images. Results of this project are presented in this paper. (Author)

  6. Study on patient exposure from mammography, 3

    Sato, Miyao

    1983-01-01

    Risks and benefits of the patient from mammography performed in Japan were estimated, and the indication of mammography were discussed. 1) Breast cancers induced by mammography were estimated based on the average breast dose, the average life span, risks of radiation-induced breast cancer and the breast cancer significant factor. 2) The breast cancer significant factor was calculated, similar to those of leukemia significant factor by Hashizume, from latent periods of radiation-induced breast cancer and the excess breast cancer induction rate in female A-bomb survivors. 3) Numbers of the deaths and Lost-years were calculated from risks of radiation-induced breast cancer, incidence of breast cancer by mammography, cure rate of breast cancer, average life span and latent period of radiation-induced breast cancer. 4) Numbers of the increased life and years saved were calculated from the improved rate of the ability of diagnosis, frequency of mammography, the average life span and cure rate of breast cancer. 5) Induction of leukemia, lung cancer and thyroid cancer by mammography also were investigated. Its contribution was not significant, compared to the induction of breast cancer. 6) Comparing risk and benefit, the latter was much higher than the former by factors of 71-76. This was suggested the efficacy of mammography. 7) From a pointview of risk and benefit, routine mammography is contraindicative for 10-19 years old women because of large risk, the indication must be scrutinized for 20-29 years old ones, and the benefit increases with age for over 30 years old ones so that mammography was positively admitted for the symptomatic women. (author)

  7. Comparative study of dose estimation in the change a conventional mammography to digital mammography

    Vazquez Vazquez, R.; Otero Martinez, C.; Soto Bua, M.; Santamarina Vazquez, F.; Carril Iglesias, S.; Lobato Busto, R.; Luna Vega, V.; Mosquera Sueiro, J.; Sqanchez Garcia, M.; Pombar Camean, M.

    2011-01-01

    Mammographic studies are now one of the most demanding radiological because of its effectiveness in detecting breast cancer early. The introduction of digital mammography has been a major advance because it has overcome some of the limitations of conventional systems. Due to the nature of the radiosensitive glandular tissue becomes very important control of the dose given to patients. In the present study is to analyze the variations in dosimetry that can exist between a conventional mammography and digital mammography.

  8. Expanded carrier screening: what determines intended participation and can this be influenced by message framing and narrative information?

    Voorwinden, Jan S; Buitenhuis, Anne H; Birnie, Erwin; Lucassen, Anneke M; Verkerk, Marian A; van Langen, Irene M; Plantinga, Mirjam; Ranchor, Adelita V

    2017-06-01

    Next-generation sequencing enabled us to create a population-based expanded carrier screening (ECS) test that simultaneously tests for 50 serious autosomal recessive diseases. Before offering this test universally, we wanted to know what factors are related to intended participation and how the general public can be informed about the test without being influenced in their intention to participate. We studied this by measuring to what extent 'message framing' and 'narrative information' can influence people's intended participation. Data were collected by means of an online survey of 504 potential users, and the factors examined were based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour and on previous research on intended participation in preconception carrier screening. Message framing was manipulated by explaining the risk of couple carriership in different ways, while narrative information was provided to only half of the respondents. The factors most positively related to intended participation were perceiving benefits of the screening, having a positive attitude towards the screening, having no religion, having an actual child wish and experiencing the choice to participate as easy. Perceived benefits and a positive attitude were most influential factors by far. Message framing and narrative information had no significant effect on intended participation, reinforcing that message framing and narrative information can help to inform the general public about ECS without influencing their intended participation. Future research should study if the importance of perceived benefits and a positive attitude can be replicated when other factors are included and when actual participation is measured instead of intended participation.

  9. Our trial to improve patient positioning during mammography

    Nakayama, Takashi; Kotsuma, Yoshikazu; Hiramatsu, Sawako

    2007-01-01

    For effective breast cancer screening, reading of high-quality mammograms is essential, and for this purpose proper patient positioning during mammography is important. At our Shin-Osaka Mammography Seminar, which includes eight institutions, a physician and nine radiology technicians get together weekly in order to critically review mammogram reading and techniques for obtaining good mammograms. We have recognized that patient positioning has a great effect on mammogram quality, particularly for women in their 40 s who have dense mammary glands, and we have adopted a digital mammography system, or comparative mammography for such patients. Since July 2005, we have critically reviewed positioning every 3 or 4 months with the aim of improving our technique. Eight institutions have participated in this trial, each contributing mammograms taken recently from 20 to 30 consecutive participants, and the grade of positioning has been determined according to the Institutional Mammogram Estimation Standard (6 items, each scoring a maximum of 4 points, total 24 points) proposed by the Central Committee for Quality Control of Mammography Screening. The estimation has been done by both ourselves and committee members. When a total of 20 points or more is obtained and all 6 items score 3 points or more, it is considered that the positioning has been good, and this is termed ''Positioning A'' (P-A). On the other hand, if the total score is less than 20 points, and any one of the 6 items scores less than 3 points, it is considered that positioning has been inadequate, and this is termed ''Positioning-D'' (P-D). At the first review meeting, which was held before our critical study, P-A accounted for 48% of cases, and this had improved to 72% at the second meeting, and to 66% at the third. P-D accounted for 41% of cases at the first meeting, 20% at the second, and 21% at the third. Thus our trial involving discussion between a physician and technicians to critically review good

  10. Radiogenic breast cancer risk and mammography

    Jayaprakash, Shobha; Nair, C.P.R.; Rao, B.S.; Sawant, S.G.

    2001-01-01

    There is a general concern that the risks from mammography screening in inducting radiogenic breast cancer may outweigh the possible benefits to be derived from it. A review of epidemiological, case-control and cohort studies of radiogenic breast cancer, age-specific incidence and dose and dose-rate relationship reveals that such a fear is unfounded. The dose to the breast tissues in a quality assured mammography screening programme falls far below the levels that were observed to produce increased relative risk. The age-specific incidence rates also indicate that the need for mammography is for the women of age at which the relative risk is minimum

  11. Factors influencing rural and urban emergency clinicians' participation in an online knowledge exchange intervention.

    Curran, Janet A; Murphy, Andrea L; Sinclair, Douglas; McGrath, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Rural emergency departments (EDs) generally have limited access to continuing education and are typically staffed by clinicians without pediatric emergency specialty training. Emergency care of children is complex and the majority of children receive emergency care in non-pediatric tertiary care centers. In recent decades, there has been a call to action to improve quality and safety in the emergency care of children. Of the one million ED visits by children in Ontario in 2005-2006, one in three visited more than once in a year and one in 15 returned to the ED within 72 hours of the index visit. This study explored factors influencing rural and urban ED clinicians' participation in a Web-based knowledge exchange intervention that focused on best practice knowledge about pediatric emergency care. The following questions guided the study: (i) What are the individual, context of practice or knowledge factors which impact a clinician's decision to participate in a Web-based knowledge exchange intervention?; (ii) What are clinicians' perceptions of organizational expectations regarding knowledge and information sources to be used in practice?; and (iii) What are the preferred knowledge sources of rural and urban emergency clinicians? A Web-based knowledge exchange intervention, the Pediatric Emergency Care Web Based Knowledge Exchange Project, for rural and urban ED clinicians was developed. The website contained 12 pediatric emergency practice learning modules with linked asynchronous discussion forums. The topics for the modules were determined through a needs assessment and the module content was developed by known experts in the field. A follow-up survey was sent to a convenience sample of 187 clinicians from nine rural and two urban Canadian EDs participating in the pediatric emergency Web-based knowledge exchange intervention study. The survey response rate was 56% (105/187). Participation in the knowledge exchange intervention was related to individual

  12. Digital versus screen-film mammography: impact of mammographic density and hormone therapy on breast cancer detection.

    Chiarelli, Anna M; Prummel, Maegan V; Muradali, Derek; Shumak, Rene S; Majpruz, Vicky; Brown, Patrick; Jiang, Hedy; Done, Susan J; Yaffe, Martin J

    2015-11-01

    Most studies that have examined the effects of mammographic density and hormone therapy use on breast cancer detection have included screen-film mammography. This study further examines this association in post-menopausal women screened by digital mammography. Approved by the University of Toronto Research Ethics Board, this study identified 688,418 women of age 50-74 years screened with digital or screen-film mammography from 2008 to 2009 within the Ontario Breast Screening Program. Of 2993 eligible women with invasive breast cancer, 2450 were contacted and 1421 participated (847 screen-film mammography, 574 digital direct radiography). Mammographic density was measured by study radiologists using the standard BI-RADS classification system and by a computer-assisted method. Information on hormone therapy use was collected by a telephone-administered questionnaire. Logistic regression and two-tailed tests for significance evaluated associations between factors and detection method by mammography type. Women with >75 % radiologist-measured mammographic density compared to those with diagnosed with an interval than screen-detected cancer, with the difference being greater for those screened with screen-film (OR = 6.40, 95 % CI 2.30-17.85) than digital mammography (OR = 2.41, 95 % CI 0.67-8.58) and aged 50-64 years screened with screen-film mammography (OR = 10.86, 95 % CI 2.96-39.57). Recent former hormone therapy users were also at an increased risk of having an interval cancer with the association being significant for women screened with digital mammography (OR = 2.08, 95 % CI 1.17-3.71). Breast screening using digital mammography lowers the risk of having an interval cancer for post-menopausal women aged 50-64 with greater mammographic density.

  13. Breast compression – An exploration of problem solving and decision-making in mammography

    Nightingale, J.M.; Murphy, F.J.; Robinson, L.; Newton-Hughes, A.; Hogg, P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Breast compression decreases radiation dose and reduces potential for motion and geometric unsharpness, yet there is variability in applied compression force within and between some centres. This article explores the problem solving process applied to the application of breast compression force from the mammography practitioners' perspective. Methods: A qualitative analysis was undertaken using an existing full data set of transcribed qualitative data collected in a phenomenological study of mammography practitioner values, behaviours and beliefs. The data emerged from focus groups conducted at six NHS breast screening centres in England (participant n = 41), and semi-structured interviews with mammography educators (n = 6). A researcher followed a thematic content analysis process to extract data related to mammography compression problem solving, developing a series of categories, themes and sub-themes. Emerging themes were then peer-validated by two other researchers, and developed into a model of practice. Results: Seven consecutive stages contributed towards compression force problem solving: assessing the request; first impressions; explanations and consent; handling the breast and positioning; applying compression force; final adjustments; feedback. The model captures information gathering, problem framing, problem solving and decision making which inform an ‘ideal’ compression scenario. Behavioural problem solving, heuristics and intuitive decision making are reflected within this model. Conclusion: The application of compression should no longer be considered as one single task within mammography, but is now recognised as a seven stage problem solving continuum. This continuum model is the first to be applied to mammography, and is adaptable and transferable to other radiography practice settings. - Highlights: • Mammography compression should no longer be considered as one single examination task. • A seven stage breast

  14. External Stakeholders' Roles and Factors Influencing Their Participation in Developing Generic Skills for Students in Vietnamese Universities

    Nghia, Tran Le Huu

    2018-01-01

    External stakeholders have increasingly participated in instructional and training activities in higher education; however, their contribution has not yet been adequately documented, especially in non-Western university contexts. This article reports a study that examined external stakeholders' roles and factors influencing their participation in…

  15. The U.S. Online News Coverage of Mammography Based on a Google News Search.

    Young Lin, Leng Leng; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2017-12-01

    To characterize online news coverage relating to mammography, including articles' stance toward screening mammography. Google News was used to search U.S. news sites over a 9-year period (2006-2015) based on the search terms "mammography" and "mammogram." The top 100 search results were recorded. Identified articles were manually reviewed. The top 100 news articles were from the following sources: local news outlet (50%), national news outlet (24%), nonimaging medical source (13%), entertainment or culture news outlet (6%), business news outlet (4%), peer-reviewed journal (1%), and radiology news outlet (1%). Most common major themes were the screening mammography controversy (29%), description of a new breast imaging technology (23%), dense breasts (11%), and promotion of a public screening initiative (11%). For the most recent year, article stance toward screening mammography was 59%, favorable; 16%, unfavorable; and 25%, neutral. After 2010, there was an abrupt shift in articles' stances from neutral to both favorable and unfavorable. A wide range of online news sources addressed a range of issues related to mammography. National, rather than local, news sites were more likely to focus on the screening controversy and more likely to take an unfavorable view. The controversial United States Preventive Services Task Force guidelines may have influenced articles to take a stance on screening mammography. As such online news may impact public perception of the topic and thus potentially impact guideline adherence, radiologists are encouraged to maintain awareness of this online coverage and to support the online dissemination of reliable and accurate information. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Using Mammography Screening: Hmong Women’s Perceptions and Beliefs

    Pang Vang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among all women in the United States. Although mammography screening has been shown to be effective in detecting breast cancer, Hmong women, one of the Asian American/Pacific Islander subgroups, have a very low screening rate. The purpose of this study was to explore factors that influence Hmong women‘s willingness to be screened for breast cancer. Grounded Theory methodology guided the analysis of fifteen qualitative interviews with Midwestern Hmong women between the ages of40-64. Regardless of age, length of US residency, and language spoken, the results showed one core theme and three interrelated themes regarding the women‘s decision to seek mammographyscreening. The three interrelated themes of Breast Health Messages, Screening Barriers, and Screening Facilitators can have negative and/or positive influences on the core theme of mammography-screening decision-making processes. The first related theme of Breast HealthMessages included professional and lay breast health messages. The second related theme, Screening Facilitators, included breast health messages from professionals, abnormal findings, social support, risk for getting breast cancer, doctor‘s recommendations, and insurance. The third related theme, Screening Barriers, identified symptomatic health seeking behavior, instrumental barriers, fear, social influence (which included lay breast health messages, use of traditional Hmong healing practices, embarrassment, and perception of breast cancer risk. This study suggested that the healthcare professionals need to use a culturally sensitive and multidisciplinaryapproach to provide breast health education as well as to assess and provide instrumental support, while encouraging social support to influence Hmong women to attain mammography screening.

  17. Volunteer Educators' Influence on Youth Participation and Learning in 4-H STEM Learning by Design Programs

    Worker, Steven Michael

    practices, STEM content learning, strengthening of tool competencies, learning dispositions, and psychological ownership - however, their expression, manifestation, and opportunities were afforded and/or constrained by the various participation structures. Furthermore, conflicts were evidenced in the use of participation structures; emphasis of educators on formal reasoning and planning versus youth preference for hands-on tinkering; and tensions amongst youth peers while engaging in design teams. Two themes emerged regarding the educators' pedagogy: adaptations in response to structural and curricular constraints and pedagogical approach influenced by self-identification with a professional field of engineering. This study contributes to our understanding of STEM learning through design in out-of-school time. This research helps clarify the tensions among major co-actors, youth, educator, and curriculum, as the learning environment was co-constructed and how that, in turn, afforded opportunities for youth to learn and develop. This study illuminated the complex negotiations between these co-actors and explored questions about who can and does decide the nature of the activity structures. These co-actors were not without conflict, thus suggesting that these spaces and pedagogies do not exemplify STEM teaching on their own, but neither do they preclude practices that deepen young people's interest and motivation for STEM learning.

  18. Introduction of organised mammography screening in tyrol: results of a one-year pilot phase

    Daniaux Martin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efficiency and efficacy of organised mammography screening programs have been proven in large randomised trials. But every local implementation of mammography screening has to check whether the well established quality standards are met. Therefore it was the aim of this study to analyse the most common quality indices after introducing organised mammography screening in Tyrol, Austria, in a smooth transition from the existing system of opportunistic screening. Methods In June 2007, the system of opportunistic mammography screening in Tyrol was changed to an organised system by introducing a personal invitation system, a training program, a quality assurance program and by setting up a screening database. All procedures are noted in a written protocol. Most EU recommendations for organised mammography screening were followed, except double reading. All women living in Tyrol and covered by social insurance are now invited for a mammography, in age group 40-59 annually and in age group 60-69 biannually. Screening mammography is offered mainly by radiologists in private practice. We report on the results of the first year of piloting organised mammography screening in two counties in Tyrol. Results 56,432 women were invited. Estimated participation rate was 34.5% at one year of follow-up (and 55.5% at the second year of follow-up; 3.4% of screened women were recalled for further assessment or intermediate screening within six months. Per 1000 mammograms nine biopsies were performed and four breast cancer cases detected (N = 68. Of invasive breast cancer cases 34.4% were ≤ 10 mm in size and 65.6% were node-negative. In total, six interval cancer cases were detected during one year of follow-up; this is 19% of the background incidence rate. Conclusions In the Tyrolean breast cancer screening program, a smooth transition from a spontaneous to an organised mammography screening system was achieved in a short time and with minimal

  19. Influences on participant reporting in the World Health Organisation drugs exposure pregnancy registry; a qualitative study.

    Allen, Elizabeth N; Gomes, Melba; Yevoo, Lucy; Egesah, Omar; Clerk, Christine; Byamugisha, Josaphat; Mbonye, Anthony; Were, Edwin; Mehta, Ushma; Atuyambe, Lynn M

    2014-10-31

    The World Health Organisation has designed a pregnancy registry to investigate the effect of maternal drug use on pregnancy outcomes in resource-limited settings. In this sentinel surveillance system, detailed health and drug use data are prospectively collected from the first antenatal clinic visit until delivery. Over and above other clinical records, the registry relies on accurate participant reports about the drugs they use. Qualitative methods were incorporated into a pilot registry study during 2010 and 2011 to examine barriers to women reporting these drugs and other exposures at antenatal clinics, and how they might be overcome. Twenty-seven focus group discussions were conducted in Ghana, Kenya and Uganda with a total of 208 women either enrolled in the registry or from its source communities. A question guide was designed to uncover the types of exposure data under- or inaccurately reported at antenatal clinics, the underlying reasons, and how women prefer to be asked questions. Transcripts were analysed thematically. Women said it was important for them to report everything they had used during pregnancy. However, they expressed reservations about revealing their consumption of traditional, over-the-counter medicines and alcohol to antenatal staff because of anticipated negative reactions. Some enrolled participants' improved relationship with registry staff facilitated information sharing and the registry tools helped overcome problems with recall and naming of medicines. Decisions about where women sought care, which influenced medicines used and antenatal clinic attendance, were influenced by pressure within and outside of the formal healthcare system to conform to conflicting behaviours. Conversations also reflected women's responsibilities for producing a healthy baby. Women in this study commonly take traditional medicines in pregnancy, and to a lesser extent over-the-counter medicines and alcohol. The World Health Organisation pregnancy registry

  20. Combined assessment (aspiration cytology and mammography) of ...

    Combined assessment (aspiration cytology and mammography) of clinically suspicious breast masses. W.F. van Wyk, D Dent, E Anne Hacking, Genevieve Learmonth, R.E. Kottler, C Anne Gudgeon, A Tiltman ...

  1. Mammography: What You Need to Know

    ... While standing in front of the machine, a technologist will position your breast on a small platform. ... mammography or additional 3D imaging methods, such as ultrasound or MRI, are options for you. Ochs adds: “ ...

  2. Heavy-ion mammography and breast cancer

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Tobias, C.A.; Capp, M.P.; Holley, W.R.; Woodruff, K.H.; Sickles, E.A.

    1980-01-01

    Heavy-ion radiography is a new diagnostic imaging technique developed in our laboratory that produces superior density resolution at low radiation doses. Heavy-ion mammography has now emerged as a low-dose, safe, reliable, noninvasive diagnostic radiological procedure that can quantitate and image very small differences in soft tissue densities in the breast tissues of patients with clinical breast disease. The improved density resolution of heavy-ion mammography over conventional X-ray mammography and breast xerography provides the potential of detecting small breast cancers of less than 1 cm diameter. The radiation dose to the breast from carbon-ion mammorgraphy is about 50 mrad or less, and can potentially be only a fraction of this level. The results of the present clinical trial in progress of heavy-ion mammography in 37 patients, thus far studied, are extremely encouraging, and warrant continued study for application to the early diagnosis of breast cancer in women

  3. CONTRAST ENHANCED SPECTRAL MAMMOGRAPHY (CESM (REVIEW

    N. I. Rozhkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of early diagnosis of a breast cancer is extremely actual. Growth of incidence at women from 19 to 39 years increased for 34% over the last 10 years. It defines need of acceleration of development and deployment of the latest technologies of identification of the earliest symptoms of diseases. The x-ray mammography is the conducting method among of all radiological methods of diagnostics. Nevertheless a number of restrictions of method reduces its efficiency. The technologies increasing informational content of x-ray mammography – the leading method of screening – due to use of artificial contrasting and advantages of digital technologies are constantly developed. In this review it is described works, in which the authors having clinical experience of application of CESM – contrastenhanced spectral mammography on representative group of women. Positive sides and restrictions of new technology in comparison with mammography, ultrasonography and MRT are shown in this article.

  4. Mammography screening services: market segments and messages.

    Scammon, D L; Smith, J A; Beard, T

    1991-01-01

    Mammography has become a vital tool for the early detection of breast cancer. Although many organizations and health care facilities are working to educate and motivate women to take advantage of the life saving opportunity that is offered through screening mammography, only twenty percent of women who should be screened actually have the procedure performed. In order to reach women who have not been screened, it is important to learn which factors most strongly motivate those women who do choose to have a mammogram. Depth interviews with 18 women attending a mobile mammography unit were conducted to explore the decision making process of women obtaining mammography screening services and to develop a profile of prevalent emotions, attitudes, and feelings associated with receiving breast cancer screening services. Analysis of the interview transcripts revealed several important themes to which health care professionals can direct marketing and health promotion strategies.

  5. Frequently Asked Questions about Digital Mammography

    ... at www.fda.gov/findmammography . Do private insurance companies, Medicare and Medicaid pay for digital mammography exams, ... Map Nondiscrimination Website Policies U.S. Food and Drug Administration 10903 New Hampshire Avenue Silver Spring, MD 20993 ...

  6. Mammography and breast sonography in transsexual women

    Weyers, S., E-mail: steven.weyers@ugent.b [Department of Gynecology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Villeirs, G.; Vanherreweghe, E. [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Verstraelen, H. [Department of Gynecology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Monstrey, S. [Department of Plastic Surgery, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Van den Broecke, R.; Gerris, J. [Department of Gynecology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2010-06-15

    Data on the necessity of performing screening mammographies in transsexual women are lacking. The main objective of this study was to assess the possibility to perform mammography and breast sonography in transsexual women. Fifty Dutch-speaking transsexual women were interviewed about the following: attitude towards mammography and breast sonography, importance attributed to and satisfaction with breast appearance, opinion about the necessity of breast check-up, expectations regarding discomfort during the exams and knowledge about the breast surgery. A fasting blood sample, clinical breast exam, mammography and breast sonography were performed. At mammography the following parameters were noted: density, technical quality, location of the prostheses, presence of any abnormalities and painfulness. At sonography the following parameters were recorded: density, presence of cysts, visualisation of retro-areolar ducts or any abnormalities. Twenty-three percent of patients are not aware of the type of breast implants and 79% do not know their position to the pectoral muscles. Patient satisfaction with the appearance of their breasts was rather high (7.94 on a scale of 0-10). Mean expected and experienced pain from mammography was low (4.37 and 2.00 respectively). There was no statistically significant difference in expected pain between those who already had mammography and those who did not. There was a significant positive correlation between the expected and the experienced pain. Mammography and breast sonography were technically feasible and no gross anomalies were detected. Since both exams were judged as nearly painless, 98% of transsexual women intended to come back if they would be invited. Since breast cancer risk in transsexual women is largely unknown and breast exams are very well accepted, breast screening habits in this population should not differ from those of biological women.

  7. The Future of Contrast-Enhanced Mammography.

    Covington, Matthew F; Pizzitola, Victor J; Lorans, Roxanne; Pockaj, Barbara A; Northfelt, Donald W; Appleton, Catherine M; Patel, Bhavika K

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss facilitators of and barriers to future implementation of contrast-enhanced mammography (CEM) in the United States. CEM provides low-energy 2D mammographic images analogous to digital mammography and contrast-enhanced recombined images that allow assessment of neovascularity similar to that offered by MRI. The utilization of CEM in the United States is currently low but could increase rapidly given the many potential indications for its clinical use.

  8. Mammography and breast sonography in transsexual women

    Weyers, S.; Villeirs, G.; Vanherreweghe, E.; Verstraelen, H.; Monstrey, S.; Van den Broecke, R.; Gerris, J.

    2010-01-01

    Data on the necessity of performing screening mammographies in transsexual women are lacking. The main objective of this study was to assess the possibility to perform mammography and breast sonography in transsexual women. Fifty Dutch-speaking transsexual women were interviewed about the following: attitude towards mammography and breast sonography, importance attributed to and satisfaction with breast appearance, opinion about the necessity of breast check-up, expectations regarding discomfort during the exams and knowledge about the breast surgery. A fasting blood sample, clinical breast exam, mammography and breast sonography were performed. At mammography the following parameters were noted: density, technical quality, location of the prostheses, presence of any abnormalities and painfulness. At sonography the following parameters were recorded: density, presence of cysts, visualisation of retro-areolar ducts or any abnormalities. Twenty-three percent of patients are not aware of the type of breast implants and 79% do not know their position to the pectoral muscles. Patient satisfaction with the appearance of their breasts was rather high (7.94 on a scale of 0-10). Mean expected and experienced pain from mammography was low (4.37 and 2.00 respectively). There was no statistically significant difference in expected pain between those who already had mammography and those who did not. There was a significant positive correlation between the expected and the experienced pain. Mammography and breast sonography were technically feasible and no gross anomalies were detected. Since both exams were judged as nearly painless, 98% of transsexual women intended to come back if they would be invited. Since breast cancer risk in transsexual women is largely unknown and breast exams are very well accepted, breast screening habits in this population should not differ from those of biological women.

  9. Evaluation of the mammography screening studies conducted in Europe and North America

    Schreer, I.

    2001-01-01

    The ancient randomized-controlled trials of breast cancer screening have offered clear evidence that invitation to participate in mammography screening with/without clinical examination is effective in breast cancer mortality reduction and underline the detection sensitivity of mammography. Recently published criticism of both the effect and fundamental data handling could be shown to be untenable. Randomized studies underestimate the effect while well-designed observational studies do not systematically overestimate the magnitude of the effect. To transform high-quality study results in all-day's practice is a huge challenge, but affordable as has been demonstrated in Great Britain, the Netherlands and Sweden. (orig.) [de

  10. An evaluation of musculoskeletal discomfort experience by radiographers performing mammography

    Gale, A.G.; May, J.

    1997-01-01

    not available. Significant interactions were found between pain/discomfort reported in the last 12 months and: the length of time worked as a radiographer (both in general radiography and in mammography); the length of time previously worked in general radiography before specialising in mammography; the number of hours worked in general radiography each week; whether rest breaks were generally taken throughout the working day; the anthropometric measurements of the radiographer; the lifting of heavy loads; difficulties in reaching controls and rotating the C-arm of the unit while screening; cramped working conditions; obstruction of vision by the cone or face shield and C-arm; how anxious radiographers felt regarding applying too much compression to the breast or causing the woman attending discomfort; the height and age of the radiographer. The task analysis revealed the interaction points between the radiographer and the mammography unit. Through direct observation potential difficulties regarding the usability of the units by the radiographer were identified. Task analyses conducted on radiographers of different mammographic experience also revealed that the experience of the radiographer influenced the process of taking a mammogram and which actions were performed and postures adopted. Comparison of the physical measurement of mammography units with anthropometric data revealed several problems. Many of these issues applied to some, rather than all, of the mammography units in use. It is recognised that some of these problems may now be addressed by more recent designs. The body mapping study revealed that some radiographers experienced no musculoskeletal discomfort throughout the working day. Discomfort already present when work started usually decreased as the day continued. However, musculoskeletal discomfort, first identified after several hours working, on average tended to increase throughout the working day. It is concluded that, due to the nature of their

  11. An evaluation of musculoskeletal discomfort experience by radiographers performing mammography

    Gale, A.G.; May, J

    1997-10-01

    not available. Significant interactions were found between pain/discomfort reported in the last 12 months and: the length of time worked as a radiographer (both in general radiography and in mammography); the length of time previously worked in general radiography before specialising in mammography; the number of hours worked in general radiography each week; whether rest breaks were generally taken throughout the working day; the anthropometric measurements of the radiographer; the lifting of heavy loads; difficulties in reaching controls and rotating the C-arm of the unit while screening; cramped working conditions; obstruction of vision by the cone or face shield and C-arm; how anxious radiographers felt regarding applying too much compression to the breast or causing the woman attending discomfort; the height and age of the radiographer. The task analysis revealed the interaction points between the radiographer and the mammography unit. Through direct observation potential difficulties regarding the usability of the units by the radiographer were identified. Task analyses conducted on radiographers of different mammographic experience also revealed that the experience of the radiographer influenced the process of taking a mammogram and which actions were performed and postures adopted. Comparison of the physical measurement of mammography units with anthropometric data revealed several problems. Many of these issues applied to some, rather than all, of the mammography units in use. It is recognised that some of these problems may now be addressed by more recent designs. The body mapping study revealed that some radiographers experienced no musculoskeletal discomfort throughout the working day. Discomfort already present when work started usually decreased as the day continued. However, musculoskeletal discomfort, first identified after several hours working, on average tended to increase throughout the working day. It is concluded that, due to the nature of their

  12. Computer assisted visualization of digital mammography images

    Funke, M.; Breiter, N.; Grabbe, E.; Netsch, T.; Biehl, M.; Peitgen, H.O.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: In a clinical study, the feasibility of using a mammography workstation for the display and interpretation of digital mammography images was evaluated and the results were compared with the corresponding laser film hard copies. Materials and Methods: Digital phosphorous plate radiographs of the entire breast were obtained in 30 patients using a direct magnification mammography system. The images were displayed for interpretation on the computer monitor of a dedicated mammography workstation and also presented as laser film hard copies on a film view box for comparison. The images were evaluted with respect to the image handling, the image quality and the visualization of relevant structures by 3 readers. Results: Handling and contrast of the monitor displayed images were found to be superior compared with the film hard copies. Image noise was found in some cases but did not compromise the interpretation of the monitor images. The visualization of relevant structures was equal with both modalities. Altogether, image interpretation with the mammography workstation was considered to be easy, quick and confident. Conclusions: Computer-assisted visualization and interpretation of digital mammography images using a dedicated workstation can be performed with sufficiently high diagnostic accuracy. (orig.) [de

  13. Mammography screening. Benefits, harms, and informed choice.

    Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl

    2013-04-01

    The rationale for breast cancer screening with mammography is deceptively simple: catch it early and reduce mortality from the disease and the need for mastectomies. But breast cancer is a complex problem, and complex problems rarely have simple solutions. Breast screening brings forward the time of diagnosis only slightly compared to the lifetime of a tumour, and screen-detected tumours have a size where metastases are possible. A key question is if screening can prevent metastases, and if the screen-detected tumours are small enough to allow breast conserving surgery rather than mastectomy. A mortality reduction can never justify a medical intervention in its own right, but must be weighed against the harms. Overdiagnosis is the most important harm of breast screening, but has gained wider recognition only in recent years. Screening leads to the detection and treatment of breast cancers that would otherwise never have been detected because they grow very slowly or not at all and would not have been detected in the woman's lifetime in the absence of screening. Screening therefore turns women into cancer patients unnecessarily, with life-long physical and psychological harms. The debate about the justification of breast screening is therefore not a simple question of whether screening reduces breast cancer mortality. This dissertation quantifies the primary benefits and harms of screening mammography. Denmark has an unscreened "control group" because only two geographical regions offered screening over a long time-period, which is unique in an international context. This was used to study breast cancer mortality, overdiagnosis, and the use of mastectomies. Also, a systematic review of overdiagnosis in five other countries allowed us to show that about half of the screen-detected breast cancers are overdiagnosed. An effect on breast cancer mortality is doubtful in today's setting, and overdiagnosis causes an increase in the use of mastectomies. These findings are

  14. Is mammography screening history a predictor of future breast cancer risk?

    Andersen, Sune Bangsbøll; Törnberg, Sven; Kilpeläinen, Sini

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by the model by Walter and Day for risk of cervical cancer following negative screens, one might hypothesize that women in a mammography screening programme with a certain number of negative screens had a lower remaining breast cancer risk than that of women in general. We studied whether...... number of negative screens was a predictor for a low remaining breast cancer risk in women participating in the mammography screening programmes in Stockholm, Copenhagen and Funen. Data were collected from the mammography screening programmes in Stockholm, Sweden (1989-2012), Copenhagen, Denmark (1991......-2009) and Funen, Denmark (1993-2009), and linked to the respective cancer registries. We calculated cumulative hazard rates for breast cancer in women in cohorts defined by age at entry and number of negative screens for the maximum follow-up period in each screening centre. For all centres and cohorts...

  15. Quality assurance for screening mammography data collection systems in 22 countries.

    Klabunde, C.N.; Sancho-Garnier, H.; Broeders, M.E.A.C.; Thoresen, S.; Rodrigues, V.J.; Ballard-Barbash, R.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To document the mammography data that are gathered by the organized screening programs participating in the International Breast Cancer Screening Network (IBSN), the nature of their procedures for data quality assurance, and the measures used to assess program performance and impact.

  16. Outcomes of a Structured Education Intervention for Latinas Concerning Breast Cancer and Mammography

    Laughman, Anna Bawtinhimer; Boselli, Danielle; Love, Magbis; Steuerwald, Nury; Symanowski, James; Blackley, Kris; Wheeler, Mellisa; Arevalo, Gustavo; Carrizosa, Daniel; Raghavan, Derek

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the utility of living room and church-based small group educational sessions on breast cancer and mammography, for under-served Latinas in North Carolina, USA. Design: Non-randomised, single arm design. Setting: A total of 329 self-selected Latinas participated in 31 small group educational classes in church and home…

  17. Mammography

    ... to those found in digital cameras and their efficiency enables better pictures with a lower radiation dose. ... greater accuracy in pinpointing the size, shape and location of breast abnormalities fewer unnecessary biopsies or additional ...

  18. Mammography

    Oliveira, S.B.

    1988-01-01

    The mamma anatomy are showed with the main characteristics for the mamography examination. The energy band, the additional filtration, the half-value thickness are also mentioned. The evaluation in the exposure and the doses in the mamography examination are described with a quality control for obtention the best image. (C.G.C.) [pt

  19. Family/Friend Recommendations and Mammography Intentions: The Roles of Perceived Mammography Norms and Support

    Molina, Yamile; Ornelas, India J.; Doty, Sarah L.; Bishop, Sonia; Beresford, Shirley A. A.; Coronado, Gloria D.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying factors that increase mammography use among Latinas is an important public health priority. Latinas are more likely to report mammography intentions and use, if a family member or friend recommends that they get a mammogram. Little is known about the mechanisms underlying the relationship between social interactions and mammography…

  20. Tomosynthesis and contrast-enhanced digital mammography: recent advances in digital mammography

    Diekmann, Felix; Bick, Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    Digital mammography is more and more replacing conventional mammography. Initial concerns about an inferior image quality of digital mammography have been largely overcome and recent studies even show digital mammography to be superior in women with dense breasts, while at the same time reducing radiation exposure. Nevertheless, an important limitation of digital mammography remains: namely, the fact that summation may obscure lesions in dense breast tissue. However, digital mammography offers the option of so-called advanced applications, and two of these, contrast-enhanced mammography and tomosynthesis, are promising candidates for improving the detection of breast lesions otherwise obscured by the summation of dense tissue. Two techniques of contrast-enhanced mammography are available: temporal subtraction of images acquired before and after contrast administration and the so-called dual-energy technique, which means that pairs of low/high-energy images acquired after contrast administration are subtracted. Tomosynthesis on the other hand provides three-dimensional information on the breast. The images are acquired with different angulations of the X-ray tube while the object or detector is static. Various reconstruction algorithms can then be applied to the set of typically nine to 28 source images to reconstruct 1-mm slices with a reduced risk of obscuring pathology. Combinations of both advanced applications have only been investigated in individual experimental studies; more advanced software algorithms and CAD systems are still in their infancy and have only undergone preliminary clinical evaluation. (orig.)

  1. Characterization of microcalcification: can digital monitor zooming replace magnification mammography in full-field digital mammography?

    Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kwak, Jin Young; Son, Eun Ju; Youk, Ji Hyun; Choi, Seon Hyeong; Oh, Ki Keun; Han, Mooyoung

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy and image quality of microcalcifications in zoomed digital contact mammography with digital magnification mammography. Three radiologists with different levels of experience in mammography reviewed 120 microcalcification clusters in 111 patients with a full-field digital mammography system relying on digital magnification mammogram (MAG) images and zoomed images from contact mammography (ZOOM) using commercially available zooming systems on monitors. Each radiologist estimated the probability of malignancy and rated the image quality and confidence rate. Performance was evaluated by sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. All three radiologists rated MAG images higher than ZOOM images for sensitivity with statistical significance (average value, 92% vs. 87%, P<0.05) and performance by ROC analysis improved with MAG imaging. The confidence rate for diagnosis decision and the assessment of lesion characteristics were also better in MAG images than in ZOOM images with statistical significance (P<0.0001). Digital magnification mammography can enhance diagnostic performance when characterizing microcalcifications. Images zoomed from digital contact mammography cannot serve as an alternative to direct magnification digital mammography. (orig.)

  2. The influence of participation on mortality in very old age among community-living people in Sweden.

    Haak, Maria; Löfqvist, Charlotte; Ullén, Susann; Horstmann, Vibeke; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2018-04-20

    Participation in everyday life and society is generally seen as essential for health-related outcomes and acknowledged to affect older people's well-being. To investigate if aspects of performance- and togetherness-related participation influence on mortality among very old single living people in Sweden. ENABLE-AGE Survey Study data involving single-living participants in Sweden (N = 314, aged 81-91 years), followed over 10 years were used. Multivariate Cox regression models adjusted for demographic and health-related variables were used to analyse specific items influencing mortality. Participation in performance- or togetherness-oriented activities was found to significantly influence mortality [HR 0.62 (0.44-0.88), P value 0.006, and HR 0.72 (0.53-0.97), P value 0.031, respectively]. Talking to neighbours and following local politics had a protective effect on mortality, speaking to relatives on the phone (CI 1.10-2.02) and performing leisure activities together with others (CI 1.10-2.00) had the opposite influence. That is, those performing the latter activities were significantly more likely to die earlier. The main contribution of this study is the facet of the results showing that aspects of performance- and togetherness-related participation have a protective effect on mortality in very old age. This is important knowledge for designing health promotion and preventive efforts for the ageing population. Moreover, it constitutes a contribution to the development of instruments capturing aspects of participation influencing on mortality. In the development of health promotion and preventive efforts the inclusion of participation facets could be considered in favour of potential positive influences on longevity.

  3. The influence of participation in leisure activities on quality of life in Spanish children and adolescents with Cerebral Palsy.

    Badia, Marta; Longo, Egmar; Orgaz, M Begoña; Gómez-Vela, María

    2013-09-01

    Participation is an important modifiable quality of life (QOL) determinant and a key outcome measure. The aim of this study was to confirm if participation in leisure activities affects the QOL domains in children and adolescents with Cerebral Palsy (CP) in Spain. A total of 206 children and adolescents with CP (and their parents), 115 boys and 91 girls, mean age of 11.96 years (SD=3.00; range 8-18 years) participated in the study. Distribution according to the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) was 24.3% Level I, 18% Level II, 18% Level III, 12.6% Level IV, and 27.2% Level V. Participation in leisure activities was assessed using the Spanish version of Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment (CAPE) and QOL using the KIDSCREEN parents' version. Diversity, intensity and enjoyment of participation explained the levels of QOL in the Physical well-being, Psychological well-being, Autonomy, Parent relation & home life and Social support & peers domains, independently of gender, age and level of impairment (motor and intellectual). We also found that intensity and enjoyment of participation in informal activities had more influence on the different QOL domains. The most influenced domain by the enjoyment of participation in all domains and types of CAPE activities was Psychological well-being. The participation in leisure activities had a positive effect on the QOL of the Spanish children and adolescents with CP. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Perspectives of Mobile Versus Fixed Mammography in Santa Clara County, California: A Focus Group Study.

    Chen, Yi-Ren; Chang-Halpenny, Christine; Kumarasamy, Narmadan A; Venegas, Angela; Braddock Iii, Clarence H

    2016-02-12

    Our aim was to examine underserved women's perceptions on mobile versus fixed mammography in Santa Clara, California through a focus group study.  Research has shown that medically underserved women have higher breast cancer mortality rates correlated with under-screening and a disproportional rate of late-stage diagnosis. The Community Health Partnership in Santa Clara County, California runs the Community Mammography Access Project (CMAP) that targets nearly 20,000 medically underserved women over the age of 40 in the county through the collaborative effort of an existing safety net of healthcare providers. However, little data exists on the advantages or disadvantages of mobile mammography units from the patient perspective.   We assessed underserved women's perspectives on mammography services in Santa Clara County through two focus groups from women screened at mobile or fixed site programs. Patients were recruited from both CMAP clinics and a county hospital, and focus group data were analyzed using content analysis.  We found that women from both the mobile and fixed sites shared similar motivating factors for getting a mammogram. Both groups recognized that screening was uncomfortable but necessary for good health and had positive feedback about their personal physicians. However, mobile participants, in particular, appreciated the atmosphere of mobile screening, reported shorter wait times, and remarked on the good communication from the clinic staff and empathetic treatment they received. However, mobile participants also expressed concern about the quality of films at mobile sites due to delayed initial reading of the films.   Mobile mammography offers a unique opportunity for women of underserved populations to access high satisfaction screenings, and it encourages a model similar to CMAP in other underserved areas. However, emphasis should be placed on providing a warm and welcoming environment for patients and ensuring the quality of

  5. Trajectories of Participation in Athletics and Positive Youth Development: The Influence of Sport Type

    Agans, Jennifer P.; Geldhof, G. John

    2012-01-01

    In order to examine youth experiences in athletic activities with different characteristics, the present study explored the developmental outcomes associated with participation in three different types of sport (individual sports, team sports, and dance-type sports) as well as across six identified patterns of participation (no participation,…

  6. Does Participation in Youth Sport Influence Sport and Physical Activity in Young Adulthood?

    Provence, Jeremy E.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of Russell and Limle's (2013) study was to determine whether youth-sport specialization and retrospective recall of youth-sport experiences were related to participants' perceptions of and participation in sport and physical activity as young adults. A significant number of participants (76 percent) reported specializing in…

  7. Organization and standards of screening and diagnostic mammography

    Linderbraten, L.D.; Chikirdin, Eh.G.; Rozhkova, N.I.

    1999-01-01

    Problem of organizing and standards of the reference and diagnostic mammography in our country is discussed. Attention is paid to the terminology, accreditation of mammographic establishments and specialists, specifications of equipment, image quality, mammography results processing, radiation doses [ru

  8. Mammography Screening Uptake among Female Health Care Workers in Primary Health Care Centers in Palestine - Motivators and Barriers.

    Nazzal, Zaher; Sholi, Hisham; Sholi, Suha; Sholi, Mohammad; Lahaseh, Rawya

    2016-01-01

    Early detection remains the cornerstone of breast cancer control in terms of outcome and survival. Thus far the only breast cancer screening method proven effective is mammography. The awareness of female health care workers (HCW) about breast cancer prevention is of vital importance, as their beliefs and behavior may have a major impact on other women. This study was designed to assess mammography screening uptake among female healthcare workers at primary healthcare centers, and to identify the primary motivators and barriers that affect uptake results. A cross sectional study design was used to assess mammography screening by 299 female healthcare workers who completed a self-administered questionnaire that assessed demographics, screening uptake, motivators and barriers. The mean age was 46 years (within age of risk). The majority (95.1%) demonstrated adequate knowledge about breast cancer and mammography screening and 50% of the participants reported having at least one mammogram; however only 21% of them had regularly scheduled mammograms. The most frequent reported motivator was the perceived benefit that early detection of breast cancer is important for its management (89.6%), followed by the belief that mammography can detect breast cancer before its symptoms appear (84.4%). On the other hand, the most frequent barrier reported was being busy (46.7%), followed by the lack of perceived susceptibility (41.5%). Mammography screening was found to be sub-optimal in a population of HCW's with 50 % stating that they received a mammogram at least once, and a minority reported regular screening. There is a pressing need for educational programs aimed at removing the barriers that limit compliance with recommendations for mammography screening, and to emphasize the importance of early detection in breast cancer treatment. Ensuring the availability and accessibility of screening services, particularly for healthcare workers within their work settings are other

  9. Alcohol peer influence of participating in organized school activities: a network approach.

    Fujimoto, Kayo; Valente, Thomas W

    2013-10-01

    This study compares the network influences on adolescent substance use from peers who coparticipated in school-sponsored organized activities (affiliation-based peer influence) with the influence both from their "nominated" friends (i.e., the adolescent named the alter as a friend), and only "reciprocated" friends (i.e., both adolescents mutually named each other as friends). The study also attempts to parse affiliation-based peer influence into the influence of both activity members who are also friends and those who are not, to address the potential confounding of these sources of peer influence. The study data consisted of a nationally representative sample of 12,551 adolescents in Grades 7-12 within 106 schools from the Add Health data. Ordinal logistic regression was conducted to estimate the effects of affiliation-based and friends influence on alcohol use and drinking frequency. Peer influence via organized activities (sports or clubs) with drinkers and the influence of friends who drink had significant effects on adolescent drinking. Peer influence through club activities with drinkers had a stronger effect on any drinking behavior than through sports activities with drinkers. After decomposing peer influence through activities by friendship status, influence through sport activities had a significant effect on drinking only when coparticipant drinkers were also reciprocated friends (but not nominated friends), whereas influence through club activities had a significant effect on drinking, regardless of friendship reciprocation. The design and implementation of school based substance use prevention and treatment programs should consider the contextual effects of school-sponsored activities. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Family and physician influence on asthma research participation decisions for adolescents: the effects of adolescent gender and research risk.

    Brody, Janet L; Scherer, David G; Annett, Robert D; Turner, Charles; Dalen, Jeanne

    2006-08-01

    There is considerable ethical and legal ambiguity surrounding the role of adolescents in the decision-making process for research participation. Depending on the nature of the study and the regulations involved, adolescents may have independent responsibility for providing informed consent, they may be asked to provide their assent, or they may be completely excluded from the decision-making process. This study examined parent and adolescent perceptions of decision-making authority and sources of influence on adolescent research participation decisions, and examined whether perceptions of influence differed based on adolescent gender and level of research risk. Adolescents (n = 36) with asthma and their parents reviewed 9 pediatric research protocols, decided whether they would choose to participate, rated the extent they would be responsible for the actual decision, and indicated the ability of family and physician to influence their decisions. Multivariate analyses of variance were used to evaluate differences in perceptions of decision-making authority and sources of influence on the decisions. Adolescents were less willing to cede decision making authority to parents than parents anticipated. Parents and adolescents acknowledged a greater openness to influence from physicians than from family for above minimal risk studies. Parents were more willing to consider opinions from male adolescents. Adolescents desire responsibility for research participation decisions, though parents may not share these views. Physicians' views on research participation are important to families, especially for above minimal risk studies. Parents may grant more decision-making autonomy to adolescent males than to females. Researchers, physicians, and institutions play a key role in facilitating the ethical enrollment of adolescents into biomedical research. Educational, policy, and oversight processes that support both adolescent autonomy and parental responsibility for research

  11. Understanding factors that influence participation in physical activity among people with a neuromusculoskeletal condition: a review of qualitative studies.

    Newitt, Rosemarie; Barnett, Fiona; Crowe, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    This review aims to describe the factors that influence participation in physical activity (PA) in people with neuromusculoskeletal (NMS) conditions. A systematic search of six databases was conducted. Articles were included if the study qualitatively explored factors that influence participation in PA by individuals with a NMS condition. Fifteen peer-reviewed articles published between 2003 and 2013 were analysed for common themes and critically appraised. Results were categorised using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health framework. The most common demotivators reported for the three areas of functioning, body function and structures, activities and participation were lack of walking balance, muscle weakness, pain, stiffness, bladder and blower problems, depression, thermoregulation and fear of injury. Fluctuating symptoms and fatigue were mentioned as demotivators in all of the progressive conditions. Maintaining independence, function and weight, and the prevention of secondary conditions were the leading motivators reported in this domain. Most common environmental barriers include accessibility, costs, transport and insufficient information and knowledge from health professionals. Social support is a consistent determinate of PA and is reported as a facilitator in every study. The most common personal demotivators include lack of motivation, feelings of self-consciousness and embarrassment in public, anxiety, frustration and anger. Personal motivators include goal setting and achieving, enjoyment, feeling good, feeling "normal", motivation and optimism, redefining self and escapism from everyday boundaries. Individuals with NMS conditions report complex common barriers, facilitators, demotivators and motivators to participation in PA. The way these factors influence participation in PA is unique to the individual; therefore, it is necessary to adopt an individually tailored approach when designing interventions. Individuals

  12. Data on the cost-benefit analysis of mammography

    Zarand, P.; Pentek, Z.

    1982-01-01

    The radiation exposure and the cost per examination are compared in the case of three methods: non-screen film mammography, 10-dose mammography and xeromammography. 10-dose mammography results in the lowest radiation exposure whereas xeromammography has the lowest cost. (L.E.)

  13. Decision Making in the PICU: An Examination of Factors Influencing Participation Decisions in Phase III Randomized Clinical Trials

    Slosky, Laura E.; Burke, Natasha L.; Siminoff, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. In stressful situations, decision making processes related to informed consent may be compromised. Given the profound levels of distress that surrogates of children in pediatric intensive care units (PICU) experience, it is important to understand what factors may be influencing the decision making process beyond the informed consent. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of clinician influence and other factors on decision making regarding participation in a randomized clinical trial (RCT). Method. Participants were 76 children under sedation in a PICU and their surrogate decision makers. Measures included the Post Decision Clinician Survey, observer checklist, and post-decision interview. Results. Age of the pediatric patient was related to participation decisions in the RCT such that older children were more likely to be enrolled. Mentioning the sponsoring institution was associated with declining to participate in the RCT. Type of health care provider and overt recommendations to participate were not related to enrollment. Conclusion. Decisions to participate in research by surrogates of children in the PICU appear to relate to child demographics and subtleties in communication; however, no modifiable characteristics were related to increased participation, indicating that the informed consent process may not be compromised in this population. PMID:25161672

  14. Does the sequence of data collection influence participants' responses to closed and open-ended questions? A methodological study.

    Covell, Christine L; Sidani, Souraya; Ritchie, Judith A

    2012-06-01

    The sequence used for collecting quantitative and qualitative data in concurrent mixed-methods research may influence participants' responses. Empirical evidence is needed to determine if the order of data collection in concurrent mixed methods research biases participants' responses to closed and open-ended questions. To examine the influence of the quantitative-qualitative sequence on responses to closed and open-ended questions when assessing the same variables or aspects of a phenomenon simultaneously within the same study phase. A descriptive cross-sectional, concurrent mixed-methods design was used to collect quantitative (survey) and qualitative (interview) data. The setting was a large multi-site health care centre in Canada. A convenience sample of 50 registered nurses was selected and participated in the study. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two sequences for data collection, quantitative-qualitative or qualitative-quantitative. Independent t-tests were performed to compare the two groups' responses to the survey items. Directed content analysis was used to compare the participants' responses to the interview questions. The sequence of data collection did not greatly affect the participants' responses to the closed-ended questions (survey items) or the open-ended questions (interview questions). The sequencing of data collection, when using both survey and semi-structured interviews, may not bias participants' responses to closed or open-ended questions. Additional research is required to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Screening mammography interpretation test: more frequent mistakes

    Gozzi, Gino; Ganzetti, Alessandra; Martinoli, Carlo; Bacigalupo, Lorenzo; Bodini, Maria; Fiorentino, Carla; Marini, Ugo Paolo; Santini, Dolores

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To present the mammographic cases most commonly misinterpreted by the participants in the mammography self-test proposed by the Italian Society of Medical Radiology (SIRM) National Congress in Rimini, Italy, 2002, by analysing the findings responsible for errors, suggesting reasons for the errors, and assessing possible inadequacies in the format of the test. Materials and methods: The self-test was performed on the mammograms of 160 cases (32 positive and 128 negative for cancer as confirmed by histology). The mammograms had been taken in the four standard projections and placed on four multi-panel diaphanoscopes, each displaying a set of 40 cases comprising benign and malignant cases in equal proportions. The participants were given pre-printed forms on which to note down their diagnostic judgement. We evaluated a total of 134 fully-completed forms. Among these, we identified the 23 cases most frequently misread by over 15 participants in percentages varying between 40-90%. Of these cases, 10 were malignancies and 13 were negative mammograms. On review, we also assessed the diagnostic contribution of complementary investigations (not available the participants). The 134 fully-completed forms (all of the 40 cases) yielded a total of 5360 responses, 1180 of which (22.01%) were incorrect. Of these 823 out of the 4288 cases expected to be negative (19.2%) were false positive, and 357 out of the 1072 cases expected to be positive (33.3%) were false negative. As regards the 23 most frequently misread cases, these were 10/32 (31.25%) mammograms positive for malignancy and 13/128 (10.15%) negative mammograms or mammograms showing benign disease. The 10 malignancies included 7 infiltrating ductal carcinomas, 1 infiltrating cribriform carcinoma, 1 infiltrating tubular carcinoma, and 1 carcinoma in situ. The 13 cases of benign disease - as established by histology or long-term follow-up - mistaken for malignancies by the test participants were fibrocystic breast

  16. Baseline Screening Mammography: Performance of Full-Field Digital Mammography Versus Digital Breast Tomosynthesis.

    McDonald, Elizabeth S; McCarthy, Anne Marie; Akhtar, Amana L; Synnestvedt, Marie B; Schnall, Mitchell; Conant, Emily F

    2015-11-01

    Baseline mammography studies have significantly higher recall rates than mammography studies with available comparison examinations. Digital breast tomosynthesis reduces recalls when compared with digital mammographic screening alone, but many sites operate in a hybrid environment. To maximize the effect of screening digital breast tomosynthesis with limited resources, choosing which patient populations will benefit most is critical. This study evaluates digital breast tomosynthesis in the baseline screening population. Outcomes were compared for 10,728 women who underwent digital mammography screening, including 1204 (11.2%) baseline studies, and 15,571 women who underwent digital breast tomosynthesis screening, including 1859 (11.9%) baseline studies. Recall rates, cancer detection rates, and positive predictive values were calculated. Logistic regression estimated the odds ratios of recall for digital mammography versus digital breast tomosynthesis for patients undergoing baseline screening and previously screened patients, adjusted for age, race, and breast density. In the baseline subgroup, recall rates for digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis screening were 20.5% and 16.0%, respectively (p = 0.002); digital breast tomosynthesis screening in the baseline subgroup resulted in a 22% reduction in recall compared with digital mammography, or 45 fewer patients recalled per 1000 patients screened. Digital breast tomosynthesis screening in the previously screened patients resulted in recall reduction of 14.3% (p tomosynthesis than from digital mammography alone.

  17. The influence of race and ethnicity on becoming a human subject: Factors associated with participation in research

    Mary A. Garza, PhD

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Inroduction: The purpose of this study was to explore factors associated with willingness of African Americans and Latinos to participate in biomedical and public health research and to delineate factors that influence the decision to become a human subject. Methods: We present results from a 2010 random digit-dial telephone survey of 2,455 African American (N = 1191 and Latino (N = 1264 adults. We used standard measures to assess knowledge of research, terminology, informed consent procedures, previous participation in research, health care experiences, social support, risk perception, religiousness, and trust. Results: Over 60% of both African Americans and Latinos reported they believed people in medical research are pressured into participating. Over 50% said that it was not at all important to have someone of the same race/ethnicity ask them to participate. In a sub-sample of 322 African Americans and 190 Latinos who had previously been asked to participate in a research study, 63% of African Americans and 65% of Latinos consented to participate in a study. Finally, both African Americans (57% and Latinos (68% reported willingness to participate in future research. Overall, the multivariate analysis explained 29% of the variability in willingness to participate in future research. Conclusions: Results suggest that African Americans and Latinos have no automatic predisposition to decline participation in research studies. These results can inform culturally tailored interventions for ethical recruitment of minorities into research and clinical trials.

  18. Doses in mammography. Preliminary study

    Marquez P, F.; Acosta R, N.; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Benavente, T.; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Poma, M.

    2002-01-01

    Mammography is the most important method to detect lesions in the breast with this technique one can detect small tumours before clear clinical symptoms appear. Mammographic image of require high quality standards due that the extremely low contrast between the normal and pathological areas in the breast, eg.g., they have similar attenuation and absorption coefficient. The x-ray mammographic systems, used in this study are Senographe 500t and Senographe DMR, a detector with a RadCal ionization chambers calibrated to the qualities of mammographic x-ray beams, and a breast simulator that is a phantoms of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) of several thicknesses with the equivalence of 50% of the glandular tissue. The results obtained indicate that the values of doses at the entrance surface of a breast (DES) are greater the reference value 20 mGy to 5,0 cm of PMMA and the values of the mean glandular dose (MGD) exceed the reference value of 2,1 mGy for 5,1 cm of compressed thick breast. We consider that the values high of the EDS and MGD are due that the x-ray systems no meeting in good condition or for used of x-ray spectra no suitable, so is recommendable be carried out test of quality control to the x-ray systems and also realize studies, or characterize the of x-ray mammographic spectra

  19. Factors Influencing Low Level of Women Participation in Literacy Programme in Maiha Local Government Area of Adamawa State

    Daniel, Aminchi

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the extent to which poverty, gender stereotype, socio-cultural belief and lack of awareness influence low level of women participation in literacy programme in Maiha Local Government Area of Adamawa State. Survey designed was adopted for the study and a sample consisting of three hundred (300) women who were…

  20. Environmental justice and factors that influence participation in tree planting programs in Portland, Oregon, U.S

    Geoffrey H. Donovan; John Mills

    2014-01-01

    Many cities have policies encouraging homeowners to plant trees. For these policies to be effective, it is important to understand what motivates a homeowner’s tree-planting decision. Researchers address this question by identifying variables that influence participation in a tree-planting program in Portland, Oregon, U.S. According to the study, homeowners with street...

  1. Comparison of tomosynthesis plus digital mammography and digital mammography alone for breast cancer screening.

    Haas, Brian M; Kalra, Vivek; Geisel, Jaime; Raghu, Madhavi; Durand, Melissa; Philpotts, Liane E

    2013-12-01

    To compare screening recall rates and cancer detection rates of tomosynthesis plus conventional digital mammography to those of conventional digital mammography alone. All patients presenting for screening mammography between October 1, 2011, and September 30, 2012, at four clinical sites were reviewed in this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study, for which the institutional review board granted approval and waived the requirement for informed consent. Patients at sites with digital tomosynthesis were offered screening with digital mammography plus tomosynthesis. Patients at sites without tomosynthesis underwent conventional digital mammography. Recall rates were calculated and stratified according to breast density and patient age. Cancer detection rates were calculated and stratified according to the presence of a risk factor for breast cancer. The Fisher exact test was used to compare the two groups. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the effect of screening method, breast density, patient age, and cancer risk on the odds of recall from screening. A total of 13 158 patients presented for screening mammography; 6100 received tomosynthesis. The overall recall rate was 8.4% for patients in the tomosynthesis group and 12.0% for those in the conventional mammography group (P tomosynthesis reduced recall rates for all breast density and patient age groups, with significant differences (P tomosynthesis versus 5.2 per 1000 in patients receiving conventional mammography alone (P = .70). Patients undergoing tomosynthesis plus digital mammography had significantly lower screening recall rates. The greatest reductions were for those younger than 50 years and those with dense breasts. A nonsignificant 9.5% increase in cancer detection was observed in the tomosynthesis group. © RSNA, 2013.

  2. Digital mammography screening: average glandular dose and first performance parameters

    Weigel, S.; Girnus, R.; Czwoydzinski, J.; Heindel, W.; Decker, T.; Spital, S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The Radiation Protection Commission demanded structured implementation of digital mammography screening in Germany. The main requirements were the installation of digital reference centers and separate evaluation of the fully digitized screening units. Digital mammography screening must meet the quality standards of the European guidelines and must be compared to analog screening results. We analyzed early surrogate indicators of effective screening and dosage levels for the first German digital screening unit in a routine setting after the first half of the initial screening round. Materials and Methods: We used three digital mammography screening units (one full-field digital scanner [DR] and two computed radiography systems [CR]). Each system has been proven to fulfill the requirements of the National and European guidelines. The radiation exposure levels, the medical workflow and the histological results were documented in a central electronic screening record. Results: In the first year 11,413 women were screened (participation rate 57.5 %). The parenchymal dosages for the three mammographic X-ray systems, averaged for the different breast sizes, were 0.7 (DR), 1.3 (CR), 1.5 (CR) mGy. 7 % of the screened women needed to undergo further examinations. The total number of screen-detected cancers was 129 (detection rate 1.1 %). 21 % of the carcinomas were classified as ductal carcinomas in situ, 40 % of the invasive carcinomas had a histological size ≤ 10 mm and 61 % < 15 mm. The frequency distribution of pT-categories of screen-detected cancer was as follows: pTis 20.9 %, pT1 61.2 %, pT2 14.7 %, pT3 2.3 %, pT4 0.8 %. 73 % of the invasive carcinomas were node-negative. (orig.)

  3. Motivational factors influencing small construction and auto repair enterprises to participate in occupational health and safety programmes

    Kvorning, Laura Veng; Hasle, Peter; Christensen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    the processmeaningful. Contextual factors, as experienced by the owner-managers, influenced the motivation foractive participation. These included inter alia general attitude towards authorities and procedures, accessto relevant projects and technical equipment, the characteristics of the manager, and the workplace......Small enterprises have limited resources to prioritise occupational health and safety (OHS) so regulatorsand other stakeholders have developed programmes to support them. The present study analysed thefactors influencing active participation of small construction and auto repair enterprises...... foractive participation also depended on the content of the prevention package, the economic support andthe possibility for facilitation. The decision to start the implementation process depended on whether theowner-managers acknowledged the need for the new OHS approach and whether they found...

  4. SU-E-I-88: Mammography Imaging: Does Positioning Matter?

    Zhang, J; Szabunio, M [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In mammography, compression is imperative for quality images and glandular radiation exposure dose. The thickness of the compressed breast directly determines mammography acquisition parameters. The compressed thickness varies due to variation in technologist practice, even for the same patient imaged at different time. This study is to investigate potential effect of the variation in breast positioning on radiation dose and image quality. Methods: Radiation dose at different thicknesses was measured with a BR-12 breast phantom for both conventional craniocaudal view and tomosynthesis in a Hologic Tomosynthesis mammography system. The CIRS stereotactic needle biopsy training phantom embedded dense masses and microcalcification in various sizes were imaged for image quality evaluation. Radiologists evaluated images. Clinical mammograms from the same patient but acquired at different time were retrospectively retrieved to evaluate potential effects of variation in positioning. Results: Acquisition parameters (kVp and mAs) increase with the increased phantom thickness. Radiation exposure increases following an exponential trend. The stereotactic phantom images showed loss of spatial and contrast resolution with inappropriate positioning. The compressed pressure may not be a good indicator for appropriate positioning. The inclusion of different amount of pectoralis muscle may lead to the same compressed pressure but different compressed thickness. The initial retrospective study of 3 patients showed that there were potential large variations in positioning the same patient at different examination time, resulting in large variations in patient radiation dose and image quality. Conclusion: Variations in patient positioning potentially influence patient radiation dose and image quality. The technologist has the critical responsibility to position patient to provide quality images in spite of different breast and body types. To reduce intra and inter practice

  5. Study on the factors that influence the intention of college students to participate in the green building

    Hung ChienJen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of green building has been extended for a period of time on both sides of the Taiwan Strait. However, there still is curiosity and skepticism in Fujian on green building. While in Taiwan, villages are filled with green-evolved houses and modern environmental farmhouses. With Theory of Planned Behavior as the framework, this study investigates influences of college students’ attitude toward green building, subjective norms of green building and perceived behavioral control of green building on the intention to participate in the green building. Findings show that college students’ attitude toward green building and the perceived behavioral control of green building significantly influence the intention to participate in the green building, but “subjective norms of green building” doesn’t have significant influence. The reason is probably that college students are at the rebellious stage and have high self consciousness and independent viewpoints.

  6. Analysis of mammography on breast fibroadenoma

    Fu Xiaomin; Han Benyi; Zhao Yae

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To study the imaging characteristics of breast fibroadenoma on mammograms. Methods: Mammography of 70 patients with breast fibroadenoma confirmed by pathology were analyzed retrospectively. All patients took breast X-ray of mediolateral oblique projection and craniocaudal projection before operation. Results: In 70 cases with fibroadenoma, mammography revealed 74 foci (36 left breast, 38 right breast) of 62 cases, and failed to reveal lesions in 8 cases. The shape of the lesions was round or round-like lesion in 60(31%). The border was well-defined in 46 masses, partly well-outlined in 14 and ill-defined in 4. 'Membranoid sign' can be seen in 40 cases. Conclusion: Typical X-ray findings of breast fibroadenoma is very important, mammography is a good method of choice in diagnosis of fibroadenoma. (authors)

  7. Dual-energy contrast-enhanced mammography.

    Travieso Aja, M M; Rodríguez Rodríguez, M; Alayón Hernández, S; Vega Benítez, V; Luzardo, O P

    2014-01-01

    The degree of vascularization in breast lesions is related to their malignancy. For this reason, functional diagnostic imaging techniques have become important in recent years. Dual-energy contrast-enhanced mammography is a new, apparently promising technique in breast cancer that provides information about the degree of vascularization of the lesion in addition to the morphological information provided by conventional mammography. This article describes the state of the art for dual-energy contrast-enhanced mammography. Based on 15 months' clinical experience, we illustrate this review with clinical cases that allow us to discuss the advantages and limitations of this technique. Copyright © 2014 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Quality control tests for conventional mammography

    Dawod, Alnazer Ahmed Ibrahim

    2014-12-01

    Mammography is this the test that allows the radiologist to look at images of the inside of the breasts. Mammograms help detect breast cancer early successful treatment of breast cancer depends on that early diagnosis. Breast cancer is a very common condition. About one in every nine women develops breast cancer by the age of eighty. In addition to the clinical examination and self-examination, mammography plays important role in the detection of breast cancer before they become clinically visible tumors. The mammography is the most common test for early detection of breast cancer. Quality control techniques that done ensured importance of this programme to produce images with good diagnostic values and help radiologist to diagnose breast discase easily and avoid exposing patient to radiation hazards.(Author)

  9. The influence of parental participation on obesity interventions in african american adolescent females: an integrative review.

    Nichols, Michelle; Newman, Susan; Nemeth, Lynne S; Magwood, Gayenell

    2015-01-01

    African American adolescent females have the highest prevalence rates of obesity among those age 18 and under. The long-term health effects and associated comorbidities of obesity within this cohort threaten the health and well-being of a major section of the U.S. population. There is a need to understand the influence of parental support in reducing obesity related health disparities. Using a social ecological framework to explore parental influence on adolescent obesity interventions allows for greater insight into the complex and dynamic influences affecting the lives of African American adolescent females who are obese. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Factors influencing work participation of adults with developmental dyslexia : a systematic review

    de Beer, Joost; Engels, Josephine; Heerkens, Yvonne; van der Klink, Jac

    2014-01-01

    Background: Evidence has been synthesized to determine hindering and facilitating factors associated with the work participation of adults with developmental dyslexia (DD), classified according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Methods: A systematic

  11. What Influences Malaysian Nurses to Participate in Continuing Professional Education Activities?

    Mei Chan Chong, RN, MSc, SCM

    2011-03-01

    Conclusions: Implementation of mandatory CPE is considered an important measure to increase nurse's participation in CPE. However, effective planning that takes into consideration the learning needs of nurses is recommended.

  12. The influence of motivational factors on the frequency of participation in citizen science activities

    Patrícia Tiago

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Citizen science has become a mainstream approach to collect information and data on many different scientific subjects. In this study, we assess the effectiveness of engagement and meaningful experience of participants in citizen science projects. We use motivational measures calculated from a web survey where respondents answered questions regarding to their motivation to participate in BioDiversity4All, a Portuguese citizen science project. We adapted the intrinsic motivation inventory (IMI and considered seven categories of measurement: Interest/Enjoyment, Perceived Competence, Effort/Importance, Perceived Choice, Value/Usefulness, Project Relatedness, and Group Relatedness each of them with statements rated on a seven-point Likert scale. We received 149 survey responses, corresponding to 10.3 % of BioDiversity4All Newsletter’s receivers. We analyzed for possible differences among the categories pertaining to gender, age, level of education and level of participation in the project. Finally, we assessed the different patterns of motivation existing among the users. No statistical differences were found between genders, age classes and levels of education for the averages in any category of analysis. However, IMI categories presented different results for respondents with different levels of participation. The highest value of Interest/Enjoyment and Perceived Competence was obtained by the group of respondents that participate a lot and the lowest by the ones that never participated. Project Relatedness had the highest value for all groups except for the group that never participated. This group had completely different motivations from the other groups, showing the lowest levels in categories such as Perceived Competence, Value/Usefulness, Project Relatedness and Group Relatedness. In conclusion, the results from our work show that working deeply on people’s involvement is fundamental to increase and maintain their participation on

  13. Comprendre l'influence des facteurs contextuels sur la participation communiautaire à la santé

    Sombie, Issa; Ilboudo, Sidbewendin David Olivier; Soubeiga, André Kamba

    2015-01-01

    Le Burkina Faso met en œuvre depuis plusieurs années la stratégie de la participation communautaire. Des comités de gestion (CoGes) ont été mis en place dans les centres de santé de la première ligne et doivent participer aux prises de décisions. L’objectif principal de cette stratégie est de...

  14. Several factors influenced general practitioner participation in the implementation of a disease management programme.

    Ribe, Anette Riisgaard; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Vedsted, Peter; Bro, Flemming; Kærsvang, Lone; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2014-09-01

    Disease management programmes (DMPs) require a high degree of participation from general practitioners (GPs) in order to succeed. We aimed to describe the participation among Danish GPs in a DMP. A quality improvement project entitled the Chronic Care Compass (CCC) was introduced in 2010 by the Central Denmark Region. The project was based on DMPs targeting persons suffering from three chronic diseases (diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and acute coronary syndrome). All GPs in the region were invited to participate. We obtained data from administrative registries and studied the participation and its association with characteristics of practices and patients. Differences in participation were assessed using binomial regression models. A total of 271 (69.1%) practices participated in the CCC. The participation was 28.9 percentage points (pp) (confidence interval (CI): 14.3; 43.6) lower among GPs who were older than 60 years versus younger than 50 years, 32.2 pp (CI: 19.1; 45.2) lower among GPs who provided few versus many chronic care consultations, 13.7 pp (CI: 1.7; 25.6) lower among GPs with lower versus medium practice gross income, and 16.9 pp (CI:6.1; 27.8) lower among GPs with a patient population with medium versus low degree of socio-economic deprivation. Participation in the CCC was lower among GPs who provided less chronic care, had a lower practice gross income and had a patient population with a higher degree of deprivation. The project was supported by the Research Unit for General Practice, Aarhus University, and the Lundbeck Foundation. not relevant.

  15. Exploration of Methodological and Participant-Related Influences on the Number of Artifacts in ERP Data

    Stephanie M. Shields

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Event-related potential (ERP data has low signal-to-noise ratio, requiring the conduction of a large number of trials in order to collect sufficient amounts of data for subsequent analysis. Therefore, it would be highly beneficial if researchers could minimize the number of artifacts that occur in the data, minimizing the number of discarded trials and the total number of trials needed. This study thus examined connections between the number of trials that have to be eliminated due to artifacts and a set of methodological variables, physical considerations, and individual differences. In half of the electroencephalography (EEG data collection blocks, naïve undergraduate participants were asked not to blink for the duration of the block (approximately 2.5 minutes, but in the other half, the stimulus set included blinking cues to give participants a chance to blink during blocks. The number of artifacts did not differ based on whether participants were cued to blink during blocks nor which type of block participants experienced first. However, the first block had significantly more artifacts than other blocks, and the third block had significantly fewer. Participants who had previously known one or both investigators had significantly fewer artifacts in their data than participants who had not, but no significant relationship was found between the number of artifacts and any other individual difference or physical consideration examined. These results imply that researchers could preemptively reduce the number of artifacts in their EEG data by including practice blocks and recruiting friends or acquaintances for studies if possible. Based on subjective, unsolicited participant feedback, the authors also recommend having blink cues in data collection blocks in order to make the task more comfortable for participants. Future studies with similar aims could use different equipment setups, e.g. electrode caps, and experimental manipulation of

  16. How the media can influence and collaborate in the development of youth participation

    Naval, C. (Concepción); Sádaba, Ch. (Charo)

    2007-01-01

    This paper's objective is to deal with the educational potentiality of media in the development of the communicative and participative competences which are clearly needed and an essential part of all civic education. After a description of the situation in Spain at present with reference to the absence of participation and its possible causes, the text refers to the support that educational policy has given to civic education in schools over the last 15 years, and which will, hopefully, help...

  17. The influence of a motivational climate intervention on participants' salivary cortisol and psychological responses.

    Hogue, Candace M; Fry, Mary D; Fry, Andrew C; Pressman, Sarah D

    2013-02-01

    Research in achievement goal perspective theory suggests that the creation of a caring/task-involving (C/TI) climate results in more advantageous psychological and behavioral responses relative to an ego-involving (EI) climate; however, research has not yet examined the physiological consequences associated with psychological stress in relation to climate. Given the possible health and fitness implications of certain physiological stress responses, it is critical to understand this association. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine whether an EI climate procures increases in the stress-responsive hormone cortisol, as well as negative psychological changes, following the learning of a new skill, compared with a C/TI climate. Participants (n = 107) were randomized to a C/TI or an EI climate in which they learned how to juggle for 30 min over the course of 2 hr. Seven salivary cortisol samples were collected during this period. Results indicated that EI participants experienced greater cortisol responses after the juggling session and significantly greater anxiety, stress, shame, and self-consciousness relative to C/TI participants. In contrast, the C/TI participants reported greater enjoyment, effort, self-confidence, and interest and excitement regarding future juggling than the EI participants. These findings indicate that motivational climates may have a significant impact on both the physiological and psychological responses of participants.

  18. Multiple groups confirmatory factor analysis of the motivational influencing individuals’ decisions about participating in intramural sports

    K. Rickel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intramural programs provide competition and recreation during the academic year for the diverse college populations of faculty, staff, and currently enrolled students and their spouses/partners who do not participate in other organized sports on campus. Sport psychologists, physical activity leaders, and others have shown an increased interest in the psychological factors that motivate college students to consume sport and physical activity (Rickel, Stoll, &Beller, 2005, 2006; Harkema, Dieser, Lankford, & Scholl, 2006; Yue-de, Wen-hao, & Ying-chun, 2009. Little research has been done with regard to the motivational factors affecting individuals’ decisions about participating specifically in intramural sports such as flag football, basketball, and soccer, etc. The purpose of this study was to independently test the measurement model of the Participant Motivations Questionnaire (PMQ assumed to underlie the motivational factors of the intramural sport participation by male and female college students. In addition, this study also examined whether or not PMQ was valid for the intramural sport participants in a northwestern university of the USA. Based on the results of the CFA, the one-factor model does fit both male and female college students. However, the factor loadings are not equivalent across the two groups. In summary, it is noted that the regenerated 24-item PMQ for the intramural sport participants is unequally valid for the current subjects of male and female college students.

  19. Quality assurance programme at Slovak mammography departments

    Horvathova, M.; Nikodemova, D.

    2004-01-01

    A co-ordinated research program (CRP) for optimisation of image quality in mammography in some Eastern European countries has been initiated by IAEA between 1999 and 2001 and the Slovak Republic took part in this program. The aim of this program was to implement the European QA/QC protocol in a sample of mammography departments and to achieve improvement of the image quality and patient dose reduction. On the national level 28 mammography units were chosen in accordance with equipment performance for quality control programme at this departments, for the first part of the mammography audit in the years 2002-2004. Realisation of CRP project contains: 1) Collection and evaluation of clinical images in agreement with EC criteria; 2) Evaluation of the image quality using mammography test phantom; 3) Measurements of the ESD at patients using TLD; 4) Intercomparison of TLD system calibration with IAEA laboratory; 5) Film reject analysis; 6) Implementation of QC program to the mammography units. The measurements of ESD on patients were performed with TLD (LiF 700 Harshaw). In the 6 month period were collected the results of measurements of: 1) object thickness compensation (measured weekly); 2) long time reproducibility (measured daily); 3) phantom image quality on the standard RMI 156 phantom (measured weekly); 4) ESD on phantom with TLD (once during the audit). Automatic Exposure Control compensation for the object thickness variation was measured by exposing different PMMA plates of thickness ranging from 20 to 60 mm, using the clinical settings. The long term reproducibility has been assessed from the measurements of the optical density and mAs product resulted from the exposure on the PMMA plates. In order to estimate the quality of the images the RMI 156 mammography accreditation phantom was chosen. The accreditation phantom contains test objects which simulate small structures seen in the breast (microcalcifications, fibrils, and tumor like masses). Results of

  20. Audit of mammography performed in our hospital

    Kantharia, Surita

    2013-09-01

    A medical audit is a compilation of patient outcomes over a certain period of time. Audit of Mammography provides an objective criterion of the appropriateness and accuracy in image interpretation, and is the best measure of a mammographer's performance. The audit assesses 3 important outcomes: i) detection of the percentage of cancers in a population, ii) finding these cancers while they are still curable (small and node negative), iii) finding these cancers through an acceptably low number of recalls and biopsies. With this background, I am presenting an audit of Mammography done at our centre from the period May 2010 to April 2013. (author)

  1. A computerized expert system for mammography

    Jackson, V.P.; Dines, K.A.; Bassett, L.W.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have developed a computer-based expert system to aid in the interpretation of mammograms, breast sonograms, and clinical findings. The radiologist enters clinical and image data into the artificial intelligence system and receives a prediction of the etiology of lesions seen on breast imaging studies. This prototype interactive system has undergone preliminary clinical testing and evaluation. Ultimately, a more refined and complex system will be of value in mammography education, for general radiologists without ready access to mammography experts, for paramedical personnel, and for all mammographers in need of a breast imaging database and reporting systems

  2. Dose and diagnostic performance comparison between phase-contrast mammography with synchrotron radiation and digital mammography: a clinical study report.

    Fedon, Christian; Rigon, Luigi; Arfelli, Fulvia; Dreossi, Diego; Quai, Elisa; Tonutti, Maura; Tromba, Giuliana; Cova, Maria Assunta; Longo, Renata

    2018-01-01

    Two dosimetric quantities [mean glandular dose (MGD) and entrance surface air kerma (ESAK)] and the diagnostic performance of phase-contrast mammography with synchrotron radiation (MSR) are compared to conventional digital mammography (DM). Seventy-one patients (age range, 41 to 82 years) underwent MSR after a DM examination if questionable or suspicious breast abnormalities were not clarified by ultrasonography. The MGD and the ESAK delivered in both examinations were evaluated and compared. Two on-site radiologists rated the images in consensus according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System assessment categories, which were then correlated with the final diagnoses by means of statistical generalized linear models (GLMs). Receiver operating characteristic curves were also used to assess the diagnostic performance by comparing the area under the curve (AUC). An important MGD and ESAK reduction was observed in MSR due to the monoenergetic beam. In particular, an average 43% reduction was observed for the MGD and a reduction of more than 50% for the ESAK. GLM showed higher diagnostic accuracy, especially in terms of specificity, for MSR, confirmed by AUC analysis ([Formula: see text]). The study design implied that the population was characterized by a high prevalence of disease and that the radiologists, who read the DM images before referring the patient to MSR, could have been influenced in their assessments. Within these limitations, the use of synchrotron radiation with the phase-contrast technique applied to mammography showed an important dose reduction and a higher diagnostic accuracy compared with DM. These results could further encourage research on the translation of x-ray phase-contrast imaging into the clinics.

  3. Too Young to Drink, Too Old to Dance: The Influences of Age and Gender on (Non Rave Participation

    Julie Gregory

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article I argue that rave participation is best understood as a form of accommodative resistance. Such a framework, it is maintained, helps highlight the nuanced influences of normative social discourses in relation to people’s experiences and descriptions of moving in, through and past active rave participation. Specifically, the research findings presented herein are based on ten women’s narratives about their participation within Toronto’s rave scene circa 1994 to 2000. As such, this research represents an effort to make these women’s particular – yet conspicuously absent – experiences central to analyses of rave participation. More generally, it is an argument for the importance of engaging various interlocking social discourses – including, but not limited to age and gender – vis-à-vis people’s (subcultural experiences.

  4. Compositional breast imaging using a dual-energy mammography protocol

    Laidevant, Aurelie D.; Malkov, Serghei; Flowers, Chris I.; Kerlikowske, Karla; Shepherd, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Mammography has a low sensitivity in dense breasts due to low contrast between malignant and normal tissue confounded by the predominant water density of the breast. Water is found in both adipose and fibroglandular tissue and constitutes most of the mass of a breast. However, significant protein mass is mainly found in the fibroglandular tissue where most cancers originate. If the protein compartment in a mammogram could be imaged without the influence of water, the sensitivity and specificity of the mammogram may be improved. This article describes a novel approach to dual-energy mammography, full-field digital compositional mammography (FFDCM), which can independently image the three compositional components of breast tissue: water, lipid, and protein. Methods: Dual-energy attenuation and breast shape measures are used together to solve for the three compositional thicknesses. Dual-energy measurements were performed on breast-mimicking phantoms using a full-field digital mammography unit. The phantoms were made of materials shown to have similar x-ray attenuation properties of the compositional compartments. They were made of two main stacks of thicknesses around 2 and 4 cm. Twenty-six thickness and composition combinations were used to derive the compositional calibration using a least-squares fitting approach. Results: Very high accuracy was achieved with a simple cubic fitting function with root mean square errors of 0.023, 0.011, and 0.012 cm for the water, lipid, and protein thicknesses, respectively. The repeatability (percent coefficient of variation) of these measures was tested using sequential images and was found to be 0.5%, 0.5%, and 3.3% for water, lipid, and protein, respectively. However, swapping the location of the two stacks of the phantom on the imaging plate introduced further errors showing the need for more complete system uniformity corrections. Finally, a preliminary breast image is presented of each of the compositional

  5. Factors influencing participation in a randomized controlled resistance exercise intervention study in breast cancer patients during radiotherapy

    Gollhofer, Sandra M; Wiskemann, Joachim; Schmidt, Martina E; Klassen, Oliver; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Oelmann, Jan; Hof, Holger; Potthoff, Karin; Steindorf, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Over the past years knowledge about benefits of physical activity after cancer is evolving from randomized exercise intervention trials. However, it has been argued that results may be biased by selective participation. Therefore, we investigated factors influencing participation in a randomized exercise intervention trial for breast cancer patients. Non-metastatic breast cancer patients were systematically screened for a randomized exercise intervention trial on cancer-related fatigue. Participants and nonparticipants were compared concerning sociodemographic characteristics (age, marital status, living status, travel time to the training facility), clinical data (body-mass-index, tumor stage, tumor size and lymph node status, comorbidities, chemotherapy), fatigue, and physical activity. Reasons for participation or declination were recorded. 117 patients (52 participants, 65 nonparticipants) were evaluable for analysis. Multiple regression analyses revealed significantly higher odds to decline participation among patients with longer travel time (p = 0.0012), living alone (p = 0.039), with more comorbidities (0.031), previous chemotherapy (p = 0.0066), of age ≥ 70 years (p = 0.025), or being free of fatigue (p = 0.0007). No associations were found with BMI or physical activity. By far the most frequently reported reason for declination of participation was too long commuting time to the training facility. Willingness of breast cancer patients to participate in a randomized exercise intervention study differed by sociodemographic factors and health status. Neither current physical activity level nor BMI appeared to be selective for participation. Reduction of personal inconveniences and time effort, e.g. by decentralized training facilities or flexible training schedules, seem most promising for enhancing participation in exercise intervention trials. Registered at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01468766 (October 2011)

  6. The Influence of the Breast on Sport and Exercise Participation in School Girls in the United Kingdom.

    Scurr, Joanna; Brown, Nicola; Smith, Jenny; Brasher, Amanda; Risius, Debbie; Marczyk, Anna

    2016-02-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that breasts may be a barrier to physical activity for adult females. With only 12% of the UK 14-year-old girls achieving exercise guidelines, to understand deterrents to exercise in this population, we should consider whether breasts may also influence sport and exercise participation in school girls. This survey-based study investigated the influence of the breast on sport and exercise participation and breast-specific concerns in the UK school girls. A survey was developed to assess demographics, breast characteristics, breast-specific concerns in sports, breast knowledge, views on breast education, and sport participation. Chi-squared tests assessed associations between participation and breast size, sports bra use, and breast concerns. Two thousand eighty-nine school girls aged 11-18 years completed the survey, for 97 their breasts had begun developing and 96% reported wearing breast support. Forty-six percent of girls reported that their breasts had some effect on their participation in compulsory sports and exercise, which was more prevalent in girls aged 13-14 years (51%) and in larger-breasted girls (63%). More than 50% reported never wearing a sports bra during sports. Breast concerns were high with 73% reporting ≥1 breast-specific concern in sports; with breast bounce being most prevalent (38%). As most of the breast concerns raised in this survey could be addressed via education and 87% of girls wanted to know more about breasts, this study demonstrates a need for breast education for school girls, which may reduce the influence of the breast on sport and exercise participation. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Understanding the Quality Factors That Influence the Continuance Intention of Students toward Participation in MOOCs

    Yang, Ming; Shao, Zhen; Liu, Qian; Liu, Chuiyi

    2017-01-01

    The massive open online course (MOOC) is emerging as the new paradigm for modern education. The success of MOOCs depends on learners' continued usage. Drawing upon the information systems success model (IS success model) and technology acceptance model, a theoretical model for studying learners' continuance intentions toward participation in MOOCs…

  8. Influences of Leadership Program Participation on Students' Capacities for Socially Responsible Leadership

    Dugan, John P.; Bohle, Christopher W.; Gebhardt, Matt; Hofert, Meghan; Wilk, Emily; Cooney, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined differential effects of various types of individual leadership experiences (e.g., retreats, academic minors) on college students' capacities for socially responsible leadership using data from 8,961 seniors representing 99 colleges and universities. Participation in individual leadership experiences explained a significant,…

  9. Individual Attitudes and Social Influences on College Students' Intent to Participate in Study Abroad Programs

    Wang, Liz C.; Gault, John; Christ, Paul; Diggin, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Participation in study abroad programs (SAPs) is widely viewed as offering important professional and personal benefits for college students. This study applies the "Theory of Reasoned Action" [Ajzen, I., & Fishbein, M. (1980) and "Understanding attitudes and predicting social behavior," Englewood Cliffs, NJ:…

  10. Environmental factors influencing participation of stroke survivors in a Western Cape setting

    Judy Cawood

    2015-10-01

    Objectives: To determine environmental barriers and facilitators to participation experienced by a group of stroke survivors in the Western Cape province of South Africa. Methods: A descriptive, mixed methods study was conducted in 2011. Quantitative data was collected with the International Classification for Functioning, Disability and Health core set for stroke (environmental factors, from 53 stroke survivors, sampled through proportional, stratified, random sampling. Data is presented through graphs and tables. Qualitative data was collected from five purposively sampled participants and thematically analysed. Results: Under products and technology, participants regarded assets, food, products and technology for daily living, transportation, mobility and communication, and access to buildings as barriers. The physical geography and attitudes of friends and society created further barriers. With regard to services, systems and policies - housing, communication, transport and social services created barriers. Health services, as well as support from health care service providers and family were considered facilitators. Conclusion: A lack of assets compounded barriers with regard to food, products for daily use, communication and transport. Barriers to participation were exacerbated by a lack of services, systems and implementation of policies focused on the inclusion of people with disabilities, as well as minimal access to assistive devices. Recommendations include provision of assistive devices, structural changes to houses, yards, roads and buildings, lobbying for accessible, affordable public transport, access audits of public buildings, and inclusion of non-governmental organisations and home-based care services in a seamless network of care.

  11. Influence of School Environment on Student Lunch Participation and Competitive Food Sales

    Litchfield, Ruth E.; Wenz, Betsy

    2011-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The school nutrition environment includes food policy and practices, advertising, and presence of competitive foods (CF). CF provide schools with revenue; however, CF decrease National School Lunch Program (NSLP) participation and reimbursement as well as the nutrient density of children's diets. Local wellness policies (LWPs)…

  12. Factors Influencing Teacher Instructional Practice in Mathematics When Participating in Professional Development

    Walker, William S., III

    2016-01-01

    In this research, I investigated teachers' interpretations of the goals of professional development and factors that contributed to enacted instructional practices. A multiple-case study design was used to examine the interpretations of four high school teachers participating in a year-long professional development program with a standards-based…

  13. Influence of socio-demographics and residential environment on leisure activity participation

    Kemperman, A.D.A.M.; Timmermans, H.J.P.

    2008-01-01

    Participating in leisure activities provides important benefits for all people. However, there is a substantial reduction of (green) leisure opportunities in cities, and the green spaces that are available often are poorly accessible. The purpose of this study is to analyze the diversity

  14. Language ability in children with permanent hearing impairment: the influence of early management and family participation.

    Watkin, Peter; McCann, Donna; Law, Catherine; Mullee, Mark; Petrou, Stavros; Stevenson, Jim; Worsfold, Sarah; Yuen, Ho Ming; Kennedy, Colin

    2007-09-01

    The goal was to examine the relationships between management after confirmation, family participation, and speech and language outcomes in the same group of children with permanent childhood hearing impairment. Speech, oral language, and nonverbal abilities, expressed as z scores and adjusted in a regression model, and Family Participation Rating Scale scores were assessed at a mean age of 7.9 years for 120 children with bilateral permanent childhood hearing impairment from a 1992-1997 United Kingdom birth cohort. Ages at institution of management and hearing aid fitting were obtained retrospectively from case notes. Compared with children managed later (> 9 months), those managed early (early did not have significantly higher scores for these outcomes. Family Participation Rating Scale scores showed significant positive correlations with language and speech intelligibility scores only for those with confirmation after 9 months and were highest for those with late confirmed, severe/profound, permanent childhood hearing impairment. Early management of permanent childhood hearing impairment results in improved language. Family participation is also an important factor in cases that are confirmed late, especially for children with severe or profound permanent childhood hearing impairment.

  15. Does resident participation influence otolaryngology-head and neck surgery morbidity and mortality?

    Abt, Nicholas B; Reh, Douglas D; Eisele, David W; Francis, Howard W; Gourin, Christine G

    2016-10-01

    Patients may perceive resident procedural participation as detrimental to their outcome. Our objective is to investigate whether otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OHNS) housestaff participation is associated with surgical morbidity and mortality. Case-control study. OHNS patients were analyzed from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program 2006 to 2013 databases. We compared the incidence of 30-day postoperative morbidity, mortality, readmissions, and reoperations in patients operated on by resident surgeons with attending supervision (AR) with patients operated on by an attending surgeon alone (AO) using cross-tabulations and multivariable regression. There were 27,018 cases with primary surgeon data available, with 9,511 AR cases and 17,507 AO cases. Overall, 3.62% of patients experienced at least one postoperative complication. The AR cohort had a higher complication rate of 5.73% than the AO cohort at 2.48% (P < .001). After controlling for all other variables, there was no significant difference in morbidity (odds ratio [OR] = 1.05 [0.89 to 1.24]), mortality (OR = 0.91 [0.49 to 1.70]), readmission (OR = 1.29 [0.92 to 1.81]), or reoperation (OR = 1.28 [0.91 to 1.80]) for AR compared to AO cases. There was no difference between postgraduate year levels for adjusted 30-day morbidity or mortality. There is an increased incidence of morbidity, mortality, readmission, and reoperation in OHNS surgical cases with resident participation, which appears related to increased comorbidity with AR patients. After controlling for other variables, resident participation was not associated with an increase in 30-day morbidity, mortality, readmission, or reoperation odds. These data suggest that OHNS resident participation in surgical cases is not associated with poorer short-term outcomes. 3b Laryngoscope, 126:2263-2269, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  16. Bi-Musicality and Dialogical Musicality: Influences of Javanese Gamelan Participation on Western Instrumental Learning

    Haddon, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative research examines the influence of learning Javanese gamelan on aspects of musicianship, attitudes and approaches relating to the learning and performance of Western instruments experienced by a sample of UK university music students. In addition to benefits to musicianship, students delineated positive developments in attitudes…

  17. Dose and risk evaluation in digital mammography using computer modeling

    Correa, Samanda Cristine Arruda; Souza, Edmilson Monteiro de; Silva, Humberto de Oliveira; Silva, Ademir Xavier da; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu; Magalhaes, Sarah Braga

    2010-01-01

    Digital mammography has been introduced in several countries in the last years. The new technology requires new optimising methods considering for instance the increased possibility of changing the absorbed dose, mainly in modern mammographic systems that allow the operator to choose the beam quality by varying the tube voltage, and filter and target materials. In this work, the Monte Carlo code MCNPX is used in order to investigate how the average glandular dose vary with tube voltage (23-32 kV) and anode-filter combination (Mo-Mo,Mo-Rh and Rh-Rh) in digital mammographic examinations. Furthermore, the risk of breast cancer incidence attributable to mammography exams was estimated using the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations (BEIR) VII Committee Report. The results show that the risk of breast cancer incidence in women younger than 30 years of age tends to decrease significantly using Rh-Rh anode-filter combination and higher tube voltage. For women older than 50 years of age the variation of tube voltage, and anode-filter combination did not influence the risk values considerably. (author)

  18. Dose and risk evaluation in digital mammography using computer modeling

    Correa, Samanda Cristine Arruda; Souza, Edmilson Monteiro de, E-mail: scorrea@nuclear.ufrj.b, E-mail: emonteiro@nuclear.ufrj.b [Centro Universitario Estadual da Zona Oeste (CCMAT/UEZO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Humberto de Oliveira, E-mail: hbetorj@gmail.co [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro IF/UFRJ, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Silva, Ademir Xavier da; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu; Magalhaes, Sarah Braga, E-mail: ademir@nuclear.ufrj.b, E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.b, E-mail: smagalhaes@nuclear.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2010-07-01

    Digital mammography has been introduced in several countries in the last years. The new technology requires new optimising methods considering for instance the increased possibility of changing the absorbed dose, mainly in modern mammographic systems that allow the operator to choose the beam quality by varying the tube voltage, and filter and target materials. In this work, the Monte Carlo code MCNPX is used in order to investigate how the average glandular dose vary with tube voltage (23-32 kV) and anode-filter combination (Mo-Mo,Mo-Rh and Rh-Rh) in digital mammographic examinations. Furthermore, the risk of breast cancer incidence attributable to mammography exams was estimated using the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations (BEIR) VII Committee Report. The results show that the risk of breast cancer incidence in women younger than 30 years of age tends to decrease significantly using Rh-Rh anode-filter combination and higher tube voltage. For women older than 50 years of age the variation of tube voltage, and anode-filter combination did not influence the risk values considerably. (author)

  19. Dual-energy mammography: simulation studies

    Bliznakova, K; Kolitsi, Z; Pallikarakis, N

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a mammography simulator and demonstrates its applicability in feasibility studies in dual-energy (DE) subtraction mammography. This mammography simulator is an evolution of a previously presented x-ray imaging simulation system, which has been extended with new functionalities that are specific for DE simulations. The new features include incident exposure and dose calculations, the implementation of a DE subtraction algorithm as well as amendments to the detector and source modelling. The system was then verified by simulating experiments and comparing their results against published data. The simulator was used to carry out a feasibility study of the applicability of DE techniques in mammography, and more precisely to examine whether this modality could result in better visualization and detection of microcalcifications. Investigations were carried out using a 3D breast software phantom of average thickness, monoenergetic and polyenergetic beam spectra and various detector configurations. Dual-shot techniques were simulated. Results showed the advantage of using monoenergetic in comparison with polyenergetic beams. Optimization studies with monochromatic sources were carried out to obtain the optimal low and high incident energies, based on the assessment of the figure of merit of the simulated microcalcifications in the subtracted images. The results of the simulation study with the optimal energies demonstrated that the use of the DE technique can improve visualization and increase detectability, allowing identification of microcalcifications of sizes as small as 200 μm. The quantitative results are also verified by means of a visual inspection of the synthetic images

  20. Mammography activity in Norway 1983 to 2008

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Braaten, Tonje; Njor, Sisse H

    2011-01-01

    In Norway, an organized screening mammography program, the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) started in four counties in 1996 and became nationwide in 2004. We collected data on pre-program screening activity, and in view of this activity we evaluated the potential impact...... of the program on breast cancer mortality in Norway....

  1. Computed Radiography Exposure Indices in Mammography | Koen ...

    Computed Radiography Exposure Indices in Mammography. L Koen, C Herbst, W Rae. Abstract. Background. Studies indicate that computed radiography (CR) can lead to increased radiation dose to patients. It is therefore important to relate the exposure indicators provided by CR manufacturers to the radiation dose ...

  2. Beyond the mammography debate: a moderate perspective.

    Kaniklidis, C

    2015-06-01

    After some decades of contention, one can almost despair and conclude that (paraphrasing) "the mammography debate you will have with you always." Against that sentiment, in this review I argue, after reflecting on some of the major themes of this long-standing debate, that we must begin to move beyond the narrow borders of claim and counterclaim to seek consensus on what the balance of methodologically sound and critically appraised evidence demonstrates, and also to find overlooked underlying convergences; after acknowledging the reality of some residual and non-trivial harms from mammography, to promote effective strategies for harm mitigation; and to encourage deployment of new screening modalities that will render many of the issues and concerns in the debate obsolete. To these ends, I provide a sketch of what this looking forward and beyond the current debate might look like, leveraging advantages from abbreviated breast magnetic resonance imaging technologies (such as the ultrafast and twist protocols) and from digital breast tomosynthesis-also known as three-dimensional mammography. I also locate the debate within the broader context of mammography in the real world as it plays out not for the disputants, but for the stakeholders themselves: the screening-eligible patients and the physicians in the front lines who are charged with enabling both the acts of screening and the facts of screening at their maximally objective and patient-accessible levels to facilitate informed decisions.

  3. The Influence of Climate Change Efficacy Messages and Efficacy Beliefs on Intended Political Participation.

    Hart, P Sol; Feldman, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Using an online survey experiment with a national sample, this study examined how changing the type and valence of efficacy information in news stories discussing global climate change may impact intended political participation through the mediators of perceived internal, external, and response efficacy. Overall, the results revealed that after a single exposure to a news story, stories including positive internal efficacy content increased perceived internal efficacy, while stories including negative external efficacy content lowered perceived external efficacy. There were limited impacts of other types of efficacy content on perceived efficacy. Perceived internal, external, and response efficacy all offered unique, positive associations with intentions to engage in climate change-related political participation. The results suggest that news stories including positive internal efficacy information in particular have the potential to increase public engagement around climate change. The implications for science communication are discussed.

  4. Network interventions - How citizens’ social media networks influence their political participation

    Ohme, Jakob; de Vreese, Claes Holger; Albæk, Erik

    Social media platforms are special places of information exposure because they are structured around a user’s social network and not around content, like other news media. Studies could show that news exposure on social media can affect citizens’ political participation due to the personalized......, targeted, & inadvertent exposure. However, previous research did not strongly focus on how the characteristics of a citizens’ social media network might alter this relationship. We tests how political information exposure via three different media channels affects political participation among Danish...... citizens and examine possible moderation effects of users network size, network diversity and the newly introduced parameter of perceived network activity. To this end, a two-wave online survey (n=858) among the Danish population was conducted, applying a smartphone-based media diary study. We find strong...

  5. THE INFLUENCE OF GENDER AND FAMILY IN ONLINE PARTICIPATION OF TEENAGERS AT SOCIAL RISK

    Gerulaitienė, Eglė; Šidagytė, Jolita

    2016-01-01

    Internet is a mean of mass information and fulfills the traditional functions of a public space without doubts. Participation in the virtual space is defined as a problematic use of the Internet process which damages the disadvantaged young person's personality, which is already characterized by a lack of social skills, communication, feelings of expression issues. The majority of young people are attracted by internet space, by its anonymity and availability. The aim of the research is to an...

  6. Factors influencing work participation of adults with developmental dyslexia: a systematic review

    de Beer, Joost; Engels, Josephine; Heerkens, Yvonne; van der Klink, Jac

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence has been synthesized to determine hindering and facilitating factors associated with the work participation of adults with developmental dyslexia (DD), classified according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Methods A systematic literature review has been performed. Two search strings were used to determine the population and the context of work. The ICF was expanded with two subdivisions: one that made the environmental factor...

  7. Factors influencing work participation of adults with developmental dyslexia: a systematic review

    de Beer, Joost; Engels, Josephine; Heerkens, Yvonne; van der Klink, Jac

    2014-01-01

    Background: Evidence has been synthesized to determine hindering and facilitating factors associated with the work participation of adults with developmental dyslexia (DD), classified according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Methods: A systematic literature review has been performed. Two search strings were used to determine the population and the context of work. The ICF was expanded with two subdivisions: one that made the environmental fact...

  8. A Standard Mammography Unit - Standard 3D Ultrasound Probe Fusion Prototype: First Results.

    Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Jud, Sebastian M; Fasching, Peter A; Hartmann, Arndt; Radicke, Marcus; Rauh, Claudia; Uder, Michael; Wunderle, Marius; Gass, Paul; Langemann, Hanna; Beckmann, Matthias W; Emons, Julius

    2017-06-01

    The combination of different imaging modalities through the use of fusion devices promises significant diagnostic improvement for breast pathology. The aim of this study was to evaluate image quality and clinical feasibility of a prototype fusion device (fusion prototype) constructed from a standard tomosynthesis mammography unit and a standard 3D ultrasound probe using a new method of breast compression. Imaging was performed on 5 mastectomy specimens from patients with confirmed DCIS or invasive carcinoma (BI-RADS ™ 6). For the preclinical fusion prototype an ABVS system ultrasound probe from an Acuson S2000 was integrated into a MAMMOMAT Inspiration (both Siemens Healthcare Ltd) and, with the aid of a newly developed compression plate, digital mammogram and automated 3D ultrasound images were obtained. The quality of digital mammogram images produced by the fusion prototype was comparable to those produced using conventional compression. The newly developed compression plate did not influence the applied x-ray dose. The method was not more labour intensive or time-consuming than conventional mammography. From the technical perspective, fusion of the two modalities was achievable. In this study, using only a few mastectomy specimens, the fusion of an automated 3D ultrasound machine with a standard mammography unit delivered images of comparable quality to conventional mammography. The device allows simultaneous ultrasound - the second important imaging modality in complementary breast diagnostics - without increasing examination time or requiring additional staff.

  9. Social processes used by African American women in making decisions about mammography screening.

    Fowler, Barbara Ann

    2006-01-01

    To describe the social processes used by African American (AA) women ages > or = 50 years in making decisions about mammography screening. Grounded theory methodology. Tape-recorded interviews with a researcher-designed, semi-structured interview guide with an initial and theoretical sample of 30 AA women ages 52 to 71 of diverse socioeconomic status. Interviews occurred in various settings such as the church rectory, women's homes, and work settings. Extensive written field notes and tapes were transcribed verbatim immediately after the interviews by an experienced transcriptionist. The women's decisions about mammography screening were associated with five social processes: (a) acknowledging prior experiences with healthcare providers and systems; (b) reporting fears and fatalistic beliefs of breast cancer and related treatment; (c) valuing the opinions of significant others; (d) relying on religious beliefs and supports; and (e) caregiving responsibilities of significant others. The processes were further differentiated by three distinct decision-making styles: taking charge, enduring, and protesting. Each of the social processes was reported equally and emphasized by the diverse sample of AA women in decisions related to mammography screening. Mammography screening decisions were heavily influenced by caregiving responsibilities. Further research is needed to explain and understand this social process on the health and well-being of AA women over time.

  10. Factors influencing the participation of patients in optional vaccinations in primary health care

    ATHANASIADOU, ANGELIKI; KOBUSZYŃSKA, MAŁGORZATA; GAWLIK, MARTA; KURPAS, DONATA

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many factors determine the reasons for vaccination and nonvaccination among the public. Aim of the study: The purpose of the study was to identify the factors that influence the decision to receive additional vaccination. Material and methods: The study involved 135 people, the research tool being an original survey questionnaire consisting of 28 questions. Results: An overwhelming number of respondents (80.7%; 109) indicated that they accepted vaccinations for their heal...

  11. Online Behavior and Loyalty Program Participation-parameters Influencing the Acceptance of Contactless Payment Devices

    Martin Fiedler; Ali Öztüren

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the central perceptions of consumers influencing the decision to use contactless payment instruments. Aim is to define a customer core group narrowed down by several variables and to find a basis for a purposeful communication of advantages of the new payment process, as investment into this technology bears the risk of total loss if the customer group is declining acceptance and the image of a company might be excessively damaged. External variables in context with the us...

  12. Analysis of medical exposures in digital mammography

    Oliveira, Sergio R.; Mantuano, Natalia O.; Albrecht, Afonso S.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the use of digital mammography in the early diagnosis of breast cancer is increasingly common due to the production of high definition image that allows to detect subtle changes in breast images profiles. However it is necessary to be an improvement of the technique used since some devices offer minimization parameters of entrance dose to the skin. Thus, this study seeks to examine how the qualification of technical professionals in radiology interferes with the use of the techniques applied in mammography. For this, survey was carried out in a hospital in the city of Rio de Janeiro, which evaluated the scans of 1190 patients undergoing routine mammography (It is considered routinely the 4 basic exhibitions: with 2 flow skull and 2 medium oblique side, excluding repeats and supplements) in 2013. The medical exposures analyzed obtained from a single full digital equipment, model Senographe DS were compared with three different procedures performed by professionals in mammography techniques. The images were classified according to exposure techniques available in the equipment: Standard (STD), contrast (CNT) and dose (dose), and to be selected as breast density of the patient. Comparing the variation of the radiographic technique in relation to the professional who made the exhibition, what is observed is that the professional B presented the best conduct in relation to radiological protection, because she considered breast density in the choice of technical equipment parameter. The professional A, which is newly formed, and C, which has more service time, almost did not perform variations in the pattern of exposure, even for different breast densities. Thus, we can conclude that there is a need to update the professionals so that the tools available of dose limitation and mamas variability to digital mammography are efficiently employed in the service routine and thus meet the requirements of current legislation

  13. Computer-aided diagnosis in routine mammography

    Sittek, H.; Perlet, C.; Helmberger, R.; Linsmeier, E.; Kessler, M.; Reiser, M.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Computer-aided diagnosis in mammography is a topic many study groups have been concerned with since the first presentation of a system for computer-aided interpretation in 1967. Currently, there is only one system avilable for clinical use in mammography, the CAD-System Image Checker (R2 Technology). The purpose of our prospective study was to evaluate whether the integration of the CAD-system into the routine of a radiological breast diagnosis unit is feasible. Results: After the installation of the CAD-system, 300 patients with 1110 mammograms were included for evaluation in the present study. In 54 of these cases histological examination was indicated due to suspect criteria on conventional mammography. In 39 of 54 cases (72,2%) malignancy could be proven histologically. The CAD-system marked 82,1% of the histologically verified carcinomas correctly 94,3% of all 1797 marks made by the CAD-system indicated normal or benign structures. Routinely performed CAD analysis prolonged patients waiting time by about 15 min because the marks of the CAD system had to be interpreted in addition to the routine diagnostic investigations. Conclusion: Our experience with the use of the CAD-system in daily routine showed that CAD analysis can easily be integrated into a preexisting mammography unit. However, the diagnostic benefit is not yet clearly established. Since the rate of false negative marks by the CAD-system Image Checker is still high, the results of CAD analysis must be checked and corrected by an observer well experienced in mammography reading. (orig.) [de

  14. Radiology Residents' Performance in Screening Mammography Interpretation

    Lee, Eun Hye; Lyou, Chae Yeon

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate radiology residents' performance in screening mammography interpretation and to analyze the factors affecting performance. We enrolled 203 residents from 21 institutions and performed mammography interpretation tests. Between the trainee and non-trainee groups, we compared the interpretation score, recall rate, sensitivity, positive predictive value (PPV) and false-positive rate (FPR). We estimated the training effect using the score differences between trainee and non-trainee groups. We analyzed the factors affecting performance between training-effective and non-effective groups. Trainees were superior to non-trainees regarding interpretation score (43.1 vs. 37.1), recall rate (11.0 vs. 15.5%), sensitivity (83.6 vs. 72.0%), PPV (53.0 vs. 32.4%) and FPR (13.5 vs. 25.5). The longer the training period, the better were the interpretation score, recall rate, sensitivity, PPV and FPR (rho = 0.486, -0.375, 0.343, 0.504, -0.446, respectively). The training affected an increase by an average of 6 points; however, 31.6% of institutions showed no effect. A difference was noted in the volume of mammography interpretation during a month (594.0 vs. 476.9) and dedication of breast staff (61.5 vs. 0%) between training-effective and non-effective groups. Trainees showed better performance in mammography interpretation compared to non-trainees. Moreover, performance was correlated with the training period. The factors affecting performance were the volume of mammography interpretation and the dedication of the breast staff.

  15. Calibration procedures for mammography dosemeters in Poland

    Gwiazdowska, B.; Ulkowski, P.; Tolwinski, J.; Bulski, W.

    2002-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent tumour in women and the effectiveness of the treatment depends dramatically on the early detection of the disease. That is the reason why in Poland the mammography control examinations are strongly supported by the Centre of Oncology. In Poland there are over 400 mammography units which account for about 300,000 examinations per year. An investigation performed by the Medical Physics Department of the Centre of Oncology in Warsaw at about 100 mammography facilities proved that in most cases the doses absorbed by the patients could be reduced without decrease of image quality. This is one of the reasons why the Polish Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL) dealing mainly with calibration of radiotherapy dosemeters is extending its activities and therefore new facilities and equipment adapted for calibration of mammographic dosemeters have been installed. The mammography dosimetry calibration equipment is permanently installed in the same laboratory room where the radiotherapy dosemeters are calibrated. A base of a mammography unit no longer in clinical use, together with its movable system has been adapted to handle ionization chamber holders. An X-ray tube with a 50 kV high frequency generator was also installed. The tube, a Varian type OEG-50-2, (designed for laboratory applications) with molybdenum anode of an anode angle 23,7 deg. and with a large focus, effective size approximately 5 mm 2 , has an inherent filtration of 0,25 mm beryllium. It is installed in a housing with 2mm lead shielding; a cone shaped beam is formed by a system of three collimators

  16. Thermoluminescence dosimetry in quality imaging in CR mammography systems

    Gaona, E.; Franco E, J.G. [UAM-Xochimilco, 04960 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Azorin N, J. [UAM-Iztapalapa, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Diaz G, J.A.I. [CICATA, Unidad Legaria, Av. Legaria 694, 11599 mexico D.F. (Mexico); Arreola, M. [Department of Radiology, Shands Hospital at UF, PO Box 100374, Gainesville, FL 32610-0374 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this work is to estimate the average glandular dose with Thermoluminescence Dosimetry (TLD) and comparison with quality imaging in CR mammography. For measuring dose, FDA and ACR use a phantom, so that dose and image quality are assessed with the same test object. The mammography is a radiological image to visualize early biological manifestations of breast cancer. Digital systems have two types of image-capturing devices, Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) and CR mammography. In Mexico, there are several CR mammography systems in clinical use, but only one CR mammography system has been approved for use by the FDA. Mammography CR uses a photostimulable phosphor detector (PSP) system. Most CR plates are made of 85% BaFBr and 15% BaFI doped with europium (Eu) commonly called barium fluoro halide. We carry out an exploratory survey of six CR mammography units from three different manufacturers and six dedicated x-ray mammography units with fully automatic exposure. The results show three CR mammography units (50%) have a dose that overcomes 3.0 mGy and it doesn't improve the image quality and dose to the breast will be excessive. The differences between doses averages from TLD system and dosimeter with ionization chamber are less than 10%. TLD system is a good option for average glandular dose measurement. (Author)

  17. Thermoluminescence dosimetry in quality imaging in CR mammography systems

    Gaona, E.; Franco E, J.G.; Azorin N, J.; Diaz G, J.A.I.; Arreola, M.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work is to estimate the average glandular dose with Thermoluminescence Dosimetry (TLD) and comparison with quality imaging in CR mammography. For measuring dose, FDA and ACR use a phantom, so that dose and image quality are assessed with the same test object. The mammography is a radiological image to visualize early biological manifestations of breast cancer. Digital systems have two types of image-capturing devices, Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) and CR mammography. In Mexico, there are several CR mammography systems in clinical use, but only one CR mammography system has been approved for use by the FDA. Mammography CR uses a photostimulable phosphor detector (PSP) system. Most CR plates are made of 85% BaFBr and 15% BaFI doped with europium (Eu) commonly called barium fluoro halide. We carry out an exploratory survey of six CR mammography units from three different manufacturers and six dedicated x-ray mammography units with fully automatic exposure. The results show three CR mammography units (50%) have a dose that overcomes 3.0 mGy and it doesn't improve the image quality and dose to the breast will be excessive. The differences between doses averages from TLD system and dosimeter with ionization chamber are less than 10%. TLD system is a good option for average glandular dose measurement. (Author)

  18. The Impact of Advice Seekers' Need Salience and Doctors' Communication Style on Attitude and Decision Making: A Web-Based Mammography Consultation Role Play.

    Fissler, Tim; Bientzle, Martina; Cress, Ulrike; Kimmerle, Joachim

    2015-09-08

    Patients and advice seekers come to a medical consultation with typical needs, and physicians require adequate communication skills in order to address those needs effectively. It is largely unclear, however, to what extent advice seekers' attitudes toward a medical procedure or their resulting decisions are influenced by a physician's communication that ignores or explicitly takes these needs into account. This experimental study tested how advice seekers' salient needs and doctor's communication styles influenced advice seekers' attitudes toward mammography screening and their decision whether or not to participate in this procedure. One hundred women (age range 20-47 years, mean 25.22, SD 4.71) participated in an interactive role play of an online consultation. During the consultation, a fictitious, program-controlled physician provided information about advantages and disadvantages of mammography screening. The physician either merely communicated factual medical information or made additional comments using a communication style oriented toward advice seekers' typical needs for clarity and well-being. Orthogonal to this experimental treatment, participants' personal needs for clarity and for well-being were either made salient before or after the consultation with a needs questionnaire. We also measured all participants' attitudes toward mammography screening and their hypothetical decisions whether or not to participate before and after the experiment. As assumed, the participants expressed strong needs for clarity (mean 4.57, SD 0.42) and for well-being (mean 4.21, SD 0.54) on 5-point Likert scales. Making these needs salient or not revealed significant interaction effects with the physician's communication style regarding participants' attitude change (F 1,92 =7.23, P=.009, η 2 =.073) and decision making (F 1,92 =4.43, P=.038, η 2 =.046). Those participants whose needs were made salient before the consultation responded to the physician's communication

  19. Factors influencing participation in worksite wellness programs among minority and underserved populations.

    Thompson, Sharon E; Smith, Brenda A; Bybee, Ronald F

    2005-01-01

    In the United States, employers and employees are increasingly paying a larger portion of the nation's healthcare bill. Preventive measures are being employed by businesses in an effort to contain the escalating costs of employee healthcare. The work site is an ideal setting for health promotion because 130 million Americans are employed and spend one third of their time at work. However, unhealthy workers tend to be the least likely to participate in health promotion activities. Worksite Wellness Programs must be designed to engage segments of the work force with the greatest health needs. Culturally sensitive and appropriate programs must be developed to engage economically challenged minority and other underserved populations.

  20. [What roles can posters and television play to influence social participation of persons with mental disabilities?].

    El Shourbagi, Sahar

    2009-01-01

    For a long time, Québec has fostered the integration and social participation of people with an intellectual disability. However, few adaptations have been made in the context of integration. The current situation of these people is characterized by poverty, dependency, illiteracy and isolation. The "Processus de production du handicap" (Disability Creation Process) shows that this situation can be improved by adapting certain environmental elements, such as television and posters, to the characteristics of these people. These two modes of communication could respond to the needs of people with an intellectual disability by more directly fostering their social participation. This would contribute to increased acceptance of their differences on the part of the general population, encourage them to act on their own behalf, encourage them to feel they are capable of and will succeed at accomplishing a task, and better serve them in terms of accessing information. In addition, creators of media messages should assume the responsibility of adapting their messages to the characteristics and needs of people with an intellectual disability by such means as simplifying texts or adding pictograms.

  1. The Influence of Social Involvement, Neighborhood Aesthetics, and Community Garden Participation on Fruit and Vegetable Consumption

    Soobader, Mah-J.; Turbin, Mark S.; Hale, James W.; Buchenau, Michael; Marshall, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We considered the relationship between an urban adult population's fruit and vegetable consumption and several selected social and psychological processes, beneficial aesthetic experiences, and garden participation. Methods. We conducted a population-based survey representing 436 residents across 58 block groups in Denver, Colorado, from 2006 to 2007. We used multilevel statistical models to evaluate the survey data. Results. Neighborhood aesthetics, social involvement, and community garden participation were significantly associated with fruit and vegetable intake. Community gardeners consumed fruits and vegetables 5.7 times per day, compared with home gardeners (4.6 times per day) and nongardeners (3.9 times per day). Moreover, 56% of community gardeners met national recommendations to consume fruits and vegetables at least 5 times per day, compared with 37% of home gardeners and 25% of nongardeners. Conclusions. Our study results shed light on neighborhood processes that affect food-related behaviors and provides insights about the potential of community gardens to affect these behaviors. The qualities intrinsic to community gardens make them a unique intervention that can narrow the divide between people and the places where food is grown and increase local opportunities to eat better. PMID:21680931

  2. Do participant characteristics influence the effectiveness of behavioral interventions? Promoting condom use to women.

    Legardy, Jennifer K; Macaluso, Maurizio; Artz, Lynn; Brill, Ilene

    2005-11-01

    This study assessed whether participant baseline characteristics modified the effects of a skill-based intervention promoting condom use. The randomized, controlled trial enrolled 427 women from a sexually transmitted disease clinic in Birmingham, Alabama. The main outcome measures: consistent (100%) and problem-free (correct, no breakage or slippage) condom use were verified by sexual diary self-report and contraceptive product counts. The enhanced intervention group had a 60% higher consistent condom use rate compared to the basic group (risk ratio [RR], 1.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-1.8). There was no statistically significant difference between groups in relationship to problem-free, consistent use (RR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.9-1.1). A binomial regression analysis identified the following factors as significant modifiers of intervention effectiveness on consistent condom use: intention to use condoms next time, early-age sexual debut, marital status combined with place of intercourse, and substance use before sex. The results suggest that participant baseline characteristics can be modifiers of intervention effectiveness.

  3. The influence of social involvement, neighborhood aesthetics, and community garden participation on fruit and vegetable consumption.

    Litt, Jill S; Soobader, Mah-J; Turbin, Mark S; Hale, James W; Buchenau, Michael; Marshall, Julie A

    2011-08-01

    We considered the relationship between an urban adult population's fruit and vegetable consumption and several selected social and psychological processes, beneficial aesthetic experiences, and garden participation. We conducted a population-based survey representing 436 residents across 58 block groups in Denver, Colorado, from 2006 to 2007. We used multilevel statistical models to evaluate the survey data. Neighborhood aesthetics, social involvement, and community garden participation were significantly associated with fruit and vegetable intake. Community gardeners consumed fruits and vegetables 5.7 times per day, compared with home gardeners (4.6 times per day) and nongardeners (3.9 times per day). Moreover, 56% of community gardeners met national recommendations to consume fruits and vegetables at least 5 times per day, compared with 37% of home gardeners and 25% of nongardeners. Our study results shed light on neighborhood processes that affect food-related behaviors and provides insights about the potential of community gardens to affect these behaviors. The qualities intrinsic to community gardens make them a unique intervention that can narrow the divide between people and the places where food is grown and increase local opportunities to eat better.

  4. Does participation in art classes influence performance on two different cognitive tasks?

    Schindler, Manuel; Maihöfner, Christian; Bolwerk, Anne; Lang, Frieder R

    2017-04-01

    Effects of two mentally stimulating art interventions on processing speed and visuo-spatial cognition were compared in three samples. In a randomized 10-week art intervention study with a pre-post follow-up design, 113 adults (27 healthy older adults with subjective memory complaints, 50 healthy older adults and 36 healthy younger adults) were randomly assigned to one of two groups: visual art production or cognitive art evaluation, where the participants either produced or evaluated art. ANOVAs with repeated measures were computed to observe effects on the Symbol-Digit Test, and the Stick Test. Significant Time effects were found with regard to processing speed and visuo-spatial cognition. Additionally, there was found a significant Time × Sample interaction for processing speed. The effects proved robust after testing for education and adding sex as additional factor. Mental stimulation by participation in art classes leads to an improvement of processing speed and visuo-spatial cognition. Further investigation is required to improve understanding of the potential impact of art intervention on cognitive abilities across adulthood.

  5. Influence of Physical Activity Participation on the Associations between Eating Behaviour Traits and Body Mass Index in Healthy Postmenopausal Women

    Riou, Marie-Ève; Doucet, Éric; Provencher, Véronique; Weisnagel, S. John; Piché, Marie-Ève; Dubé, Marie-Christine; Bergeron, Jean; Lemieux, Simone

    2011-01-01

    Available data reveals inconsistent relationships between eating behaviour traits and markers of adiposity level. It is thus relevant to investigate whether other factors also need to be considered when interpreting the relationship between eating behaviour traits and adiposity. The objective of this cross-sectional study was thus to examine whether the associations between variables of the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ) and adiposity are influenced by the level of physical activity participation. Information from the TFEQ and physical activity was obtained from 113 postmenopausal women (56.7 ± 4.2 years; 28.5 ± 5.9 kg/m2). BMI was compared between four groups formed on the basis of the physical activity participation and eating behaviour traits medians. In groups of women with higher physical activity participation, BMI was significantly lower in women who presented higher dietary restraint when compared to women who had lower dietary restraint (25.5 ± 0.5 versus 30.3 ± 1.7 kg/m2, P < .05). In addition, among women with lower physical activity participation, BMI was significantly lower in women presenting a lower external hunger than in those with a higher external hunger (27.5 ± 0.8 versus 32.4 ± 1.1 kg/m2, P < .001). Our results suggest that physical activity participation should also be taken into account when interpreting the relationship between adiposity and eating behaviour traits. PMID:20871862

  6. The Influence of Participation in Sustainability Index (ISE in the Financial Performance of Business

    Juliana Tatiane Vital

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to compare the performance, through certain financial indicators, including companies in the guide of the 500 biggest and best companies of Exame Magazine, forming part of the Corporate Sustainability Index (ISE and companies who do not. The primary purpose of ISE is to see the return of a portfolio composed of shares of companies committed to social responsibility and corporate sustainability. This research is classified as being descriptive and largely qualitative. The financial indicators examined in this study were: sales (value and growth, Net Income, Profitability, Net Working Capital, Liquidity, General Debt, Long Term Debt, EBITA and Indicators of export. After the analysis we can conclude that the companies participating in the ISE have greater potential for sales and exports. Companies that are not part of the ISE have better financial performance.

  7. Labor force participation and the influence of having back problems on income poverty in Australia.

    Schofield, Deborah J; Callander, Emily J; Shrestha, Rupendra N; Percival, Richard; Kelly, Simon J; Passey, Megan E

    2012-06-01

    Cross-sectional study of 45- to 64-year-old Australians. To assess the relationship between chronic back problems and being in income poverty among the older working-aged population. Older workers who leave the labor force due to chronic back problems have fragile economic situations and as such are likely to have poorer living standards. Poverty is one way of comparing the living standards of different individuals within society. The 2003 Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers data were used, along with the 50% of the median equivalized income-unit income poverty line to identify those in poverty. Logistic regression models were used to look at the relationship between chronic back problems, labor force participation, and poverty. Regardless of labor force participation status (employed full-time, part-time, or not in the labor force at all), those with chronic back problems were significantly more likely to be in poverty. Those not in the labor force due to chronic back problems were significantly more likely to be in poverty than those in the labor force full-time with no chronic health condition (Odds ratio [OR]: 0.07, 95% CI: 0.07-0.07, P poverty (OR: 0.52, 95% CI: 0.51-0.53, P poverty than those employed part-time or full-time (OR: 0.44, 95% CI: 0.43-0.44, P < 0.0001; OR: 0.10, 95% CI: 0.10-0.10, P < 0.0001, respectively). This highlights the need to prevent and effectively treat chronic back problems, as these conditions are associated with reduced living standards.

  8. The Influence of Affirming Kindness and Community on Broadening Participation in STEM Career Pathways

    Estrada, Mica; Eroy-Reveles, Alegra; Matsui, John

    2018-01-01

    The United States’ inability to achieve equitable workforce development in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) career pathways is well-recognized and has been attributed to the poor retention of a diverse stream of students in academia. Social science theory and research provide evidence that social contextual variables—specifically kindness cues affirming social inclusion—influence chronic underrepresentation of some groups within STEM career pathways. Review of the literature suggests that the current STEM academic context does not consistently provide cues that affirm social inclusion to all members of the academic population, and that policies that address this disparity are essential to broadening STEM workforce development in the United States. PMID:29657577

  9. Planning Today for Tomorrow’s Research: Analysis of Factors Influencing Participation in a Pediatric Cancer Research Biorepository

    Rania M. Labib

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundBiobanks have become a powerful tool that fosters biomedical research. The success of biobanks depends upon people’s perception and willingness to donate their samples for research. This is the first biorepository in Egypt, hence, little is known about the beliefs and attitudes of parents toward participation.AimTo investigate the level of willingness of Egyptians to donate samples of their children and themselves for research and the different factors influencing participation.Materials and methodsA structured questionnaire was designed covering multiple items expected to affect the enrollment decision. This was conducted in-person, and data collected included demographic data, socioeconomic, and educational level. In addition, in the case of refusal, participants were asked about reasons behind their decision.ResultsOnly about 3.1% of patients have not been enrolled in the project, and 0.3% have withdrawn. Three demographic factors were found having disparate trends in the decision-making process to participate or not: father’s education (p = 0.0001, mother’s education (p = 0.0001, and father’s age (p = 0.034.ConclusionEgyptian parents were willing to donate their samples as well as their children’s samples in our research biorepository. The idea of participation was presented in an interview during which the consent form was explained in a comprehensive transparent way allowing participants the right to refuse or withdraw at any time. Still, different communication approaches are needed with older, more highly educated parents to encourage them to participate.

  10. Quality control of physician-performed mammography. Importance of original attempts to improve quality

    Nakayama, Takashi; Terada, Hiroshi; Kotsuma, Yoshikazu

    2006-01-01

    In order to perform effective breast cancer screening with mammography, family doctors should be encouraged to participate. At institutions without specific radiology technicians, physicians themselves are required to perform mammography and operate the equipment, otherwise it is difficult to consistently obtain good-quality mammograms. Our institutions have been given a grade ''A'' evaluation by the Central Committee for Quality Control of Mammographic Screening (CCQCMS), due largely to our own efforts and promotion. Here we report our experience in solving a number of problems that occurred during the establishment of our system. We used the SEPIO standard mammography apparatus with a MD-100/CM-H screen/filter system, and developed films using a TCX-202 automatic film processor. Problems due to asymmetry of the bilateral breasts and lack of retroglandular fat tissue space and inframammary folds seen on our initial mammograms were overcome by placing marks at the postion of the AEC sensor, and at both ends and the center of the film on a bucky table. We simplified the markers by removing several complicated ones. We tried to rectify areas of the image that were obscured due to the difference in size between the inside of the cassette and the screen. Physicians and a radiology technician attended a mammography study course once weekly, and attempted to improve the quality of mammograms and our reading ability by obtaining advice from members of the CCQCMS. Manufacturers responded with considerable delay to our attempt to overcome the troublesome appearance of numerous microcalfication-like artifact shadows caused by screens. In conclusion, in order to perform effective breast cancer screening with mammography, we must obtain mammograms of good quality, for which it is necessary to always try to seek new ways of improving. At the same time, manufacturers need to respond quickly to queries and problems related to quality control. (author)

  11. Health-related quality of life, anxiety and depression related to mammography screening in Norway.

    Hafslund, Bjorg; Espehaug, Birgitte; Nortvedt, Monica Wammen

    2012-11-01

    To measure health-related quality of life, anxiety and depression ahead of mammography screening and to assess any differences in health-related quality of life compared to reference population. The study of health-related quality of life among attendees prior to mammography screening has received little attention, and increased knowledge is needed to better understand the overall health benefits of participation. A two-group cross-sectional comparative study was performed. The samples comprised 4,249 attendees to mammography screening and a comparison group of 943 women. We used the SF-36 Health Survey to assess health-related quality of life. Linear regression was used to study any differences between the groups with adjustment for age, level of education, occupation, having children and smoking status. Other normative data were also used. Anxiety and depression were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Attendees scored statistically significant higher on the SF-36 than the comparison group but were in line with normative data. Attendees had anxiety mean 4·1 and depression mean 2·6. The majority of the attendees have a high health-related quality of life, low anxiety and depression ahead of screening. Anxiety and depression were less than shown in normative data from Norway. Despite a high health-related quality of life, low anxiety and depression among the majority, healthcare workers should pay special attention to the few women who are anxious and depressed, and have a lower health-related quality of life. Omitted from mammography screening may be women who are unemployed, have lower socioeconomic status, are anxious and are depressed. Further research should be performed with non-attendees and subgroups to improve the screening programme. It is important to identify which patients have the greatest need for support and caring in an organised mammography screening and who may be overlooked. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. How needs and preferences of employees influence participation in health promotion programs: a six-month follow-up study.

    Rongen, Anne; Robroek, Suzan J W; van Ginkel, Wouter; Lindeboom, Dennis; Pet, Martin; Burdorf, Alex

    2014-12-15

    Low participation in health promotion programs (HPPs) might hamper their effectiveness. A potential reason for low participation is disagreement between needs and preferences of potential participants and the actual HPPs offered. This study aimed to investigate employees' need and preferences for HPPs, whether these are matched by what their employers provide, and whether a higher agreement enhanced participation. Employees of two organizations participated in a six-month follow-up study (n = 738). At baseline, information was collected on employees' needs and preferences for the topic of the HPP (i.e. physical activity, healthy nutrition, smoking cessation, stress management, general health), whether they favored a HPP via their employer or at their own discretion, and their preferred HPP regarding three components with each two alternatives: mode of delivery (individual vs. group), intensity (single vs. multiple meetings), and content (assignments vs. information). Participation in HPPs was assessed at six-month follow-up. In consultation with occupational health managers (n = 2), information was gathered on the HPPs the employers provided. The level of agreement between preferred and provided HPPs was calculated (range: 0-1) and its influence on participation was studied using logistic regression analyses. Most employees reported needing a HPP addressing physical activity (55%) and most employees preferred HPPs organized via their employer. The mean level of agreement between the preferred and offered HPPs ranged from 0.71 for mode of delivery to 0.84 for intensity, and was 0.47 for all three HPP components within a topic combined. Employees with a higher agreement on mode of delivery (OR: 1.72, 95% CI: 0.87-3.39) and all HPP components combined (OR: 2.36, 95% CI: 0.68-8.17) seemed to be more likely to participate in HPPs, but due to low participation these associations were not statistically significant. HPPs aimed at physical activity were most needed by

  13. Women's experiences of mammography: A thematic evaluation of the literature

    Clark, Sarah; Reeves, Pauline J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to analyse relevant literature to understand women's experiences of mammography-both screening and symptomatic. Method: A structured literature search was performed to locate relevant research. Research articles published between 2002 and 2013 were identified in CINAHL, MEDLINE and Science Direct. The quality of the research was assessed using an appropriate critical appraisal tool to enable a systematic and consistent assessment. Results: Qualitative thematic analysis of the literature identified five themes: fear, pain and discomfort, waiting, the physical environment and staff interactions. Whilst it is accepted that women's experiences are unique and diverse, literature suggested that these themes do influence women's experiences. Conclusion: Women's experiences of mammography were not limited to the examinations alone but encompassed the entire encounter. The themes identified influenced women's experiences and their perception of care

  14. Patient dose in digital mammography

    Chevalier, Margarita; Moran, Pilar; Ten, Jose I.; Fernandez Soto, Jose M.; Cepeda, T.; Vano, Eliseo

    2004-01-01

    In the present investigation, we analyze the dose of 5034 patients (20 137 images) who underwent mammographic examinations with a full-field digital mammography system. Also, we evaluate the system calibration by analyzing the exposure factors as a function of breast thickness. The information relevant to this study has been extracted from the image DICOM header and stored in a database during a 3-year period (March 2001-October 2003). Patient data included age, breast thickness, kVp, mAs, target/filter combination, and nominal dose values. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) without backscatter was calculated from the tube output as measured for each voltage used under clinical conditions and from the tube loading (mAs) included in the DICOM header. Mean values for the patient age and compressed breast thickness were 56 years (SD: 11) and 52 mm (SD: 13), respectively. The majority of the images was acquired using the STD (for standard) automatic mode (98%). The most frequent target/filter combination automatically selected for breast smaller than 35 mm was Mo/Mo (75%); for intermediate thicknesses between 35 and 65 mm, the combinations were Mo/Rh (54%) and Rh/Rh (38.5%); Rh/Rh was the combination selected for 91% of the cases for breasts thicker than 65 mm. A wide kVp range was observed for each target/filter combination. The most frequent values were 28 kVp for Mo/Mo, 29 kVp for Mo/Rh, and 29 and 30 kV for Rh/Rh. Exposure times ranged from 0.2 to 4.2 s with a mean value of 1.1 s. Average glandular doses (AGD) per exposure were calculated by multiplying the ESAK values by the conversion factors tabulated by Dance for women in the age groups 50 to 64 and 40 to 49. This approach is based on the dependence of breast glandularity on breast thickness and age. The total mean average glandular dose (AGD T ) was calculated by summing the values associated with the pre-exposure and with the main exposure. Mean AGD T per exposure was 1.88 mGy (CI 0.01) and the mean AGD T per

  15. Mammography-oncogenecity at low doses

    Heyes, G J; Mill, A J; Charles, M W

    2009-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding the biological effectiveness of low energy x-rays used for mammography breast screening. Recent radiobiology studies have provided compelling evidence that these low energy x-rays may be 4.42 ± 2.02 times more effective in causing mutational damage than higher energy x-rays. These data include a study involving in vitro irradiation of a human cell line using a mammography x-ray source and a high energy source which matches the spectrum of radiation observed in survivors from the Hiroshima atomic bomb. Current radiation risk estimates rely heavily on data from the atomic bomb survivors, and a direct comparison between the diagnostic energies used in the UK breast screening programme and those used for risk estimates can now be made. Evidence highlighting the increase in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of mammography x-rays to a range of x-ray energies implies that the risks of radiation-induced breast cancers for mammography x-rays are potentially underestimated by a factor of four. A pooled analysis of three measurements gives a maximal RBE (for malignant transformation of human cells in vitro) of 4.02 ± 0.72 for 29 kVp (peak accelerating voltage) x-rays compared to high energy electrons and higher energy x-rays. For the majority of women in the UK NHS breast screening programme, it is shown that the benefit safely exceeds the risk of possible cancer induction even when this higher biological effectiveness factor is applied. The risk/benefit analysis, however, implies the need for caution for women screened under the age of 50, and particularly for those with a family history (and therefore a likely genetic susceptibility) of breast cancer. In vitro radiobiological data are generally acquired at high doses, and there are different extrapolation mechanisms to the low doses seen clinically. Recent low dose in vitro data have indicated a potential suppressive effect at very low dose rates and doses. Whilst mammography is a low

  16. Four Principles to Consider Before Advising Women on Screening Mammography

    Keen, John D; Juhl Jørgensen, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews four important screening principles applicable to screening mammography in order to facilitate informed choice. The first principle is that screening may help, hurt, or have no effect. In order to reduce mortality and mastectomy rates, screening must reduce the rate of advanced...... of a screening intervention. Disease-specific mortality is biased due to difficulties in attribution of cause of death and to increased mortality due to overdiagnosis and the resulting overtreatment with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. To enhance participation, the benefit from screening is often presented...... in relative instead of absolute terms. Third, some screening statistics must be interpreted with caution. Increased survival time and the percentage of early-stage tumors at detection sound plausible, but are affected by lead-time and length biases. In addition, analyses that only include women who attend...

  17. Cost-effectiveness of increasing access to mammography through mobile mammography for older women.

    Naeim, Arash; Keeler, Emmett; Bassett, Lawrence W; Parikh, Jay; Bastani, Roshan; Reuben, David B

    2009-02-01

    To compare the costs of mobile and stationary mammography and examine the incremental cost-effectiveness of using mobile mammography to increase screening rates. A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed using effectiveness data from a randomized clinical trial and modeling of costs associated with the mobile mammography intervention. The trial involved 60 community-based meal sites, senior centers, and clubs. Four hundred ninety-nine individuals were enrolled in the study, of whom 463 had outcome data available for analysis. Costs were calculated for stationary and mobile mammography, as well as costs due to differences in technology and film versus digital. Incremental cost-effectiveness (cost per additional screen) was modeled, and sensitivity analysis was performed by altering efficiency (throughput) and effectiveness based on subgroup data from the randomized trial. The estimated annual costs were $435,162 for a stationary unit, $539,052 for a mobile film unit, and $456, 392 for a mobile digital unit. Assuming mobile units are less efficient (50% annual volume), the cost per screen was $41 for a stationary unit, $86 for a mobile film unit, and $102 for a mobile digital unit. The incremental cost per additional screen were $207 for a mobile film unit and $264 for a mobile digital unit over a stationary unit. Although mobile mammography is a more effective way to screen older women, the absolute cost per screen of mobile units is higher, whereas the reimbursement is no different. Financial barriers may impede the widespread use of this approach.

  18. Radiation exposure of contrast-enhanced spectral mammography compared with full-field digital mammography.

    Jeukens, Cécile R L P N; Lalji, Ulrich C; Meijer, Eduard; Bakija, Betina; Theunissen, Robin; Wildberger, Joachim E; Lobbes, Marc B I

    2014-10-01

    Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) shows promising initial results but comes at the cost of increased dose as compared with full-field digital mammography (FFDM). We aimed to quantitatively assess the dose increase of CESM in comparison with FFDM. Radiation exposure-related data (such as kilovoltage, compressed breast thickness, glandularity, entrance skin air kerma (ESAK), and average glandular dose (AGD) were retrieved for 47 CESM and 715 FFDM patients. All examinations were performed on 1 mammography unit. Radiation dose values reported by the unit were validated by phantom measurements. Descriptive statistics of the patient data were generated using a statistical software package. Dose values reported by the mammography unit were in good qualitative agreement with those of phantom measurements. Mean ESAK was 10.5 mGy for a CESM exposure and 7.46 mGy for an FFDM exposure. Mean AGD for a CESM exposure was 2.80 mGy and 1.55 mGy for an FFDM exposure. Compared with our institutional FFDM, the AGD of a single CESM exposure is increased by 1.25 mGy (+81%), whereas ESAK is increased by 3.07 mGy (+41%). Dose values of both techniques meet the recommendations for maximum dose in mammography.

  19. Risks, radiation dose and image quality of mammography

    Menges, V.

    1979-01-01

    For some time to come, early detection of breast cancer will remain the only way to improve the therapeutical success. Mammography is an absolutely indispensible way to take advantage of this opportunity. Today, mammography is undoubtedly the most reliable method of examination for an early detection of breast cancer. Only mammography can detect carcinomas smaller than the critical tumour size of 1cm. If carried out properly and with present dose levels, it involves hardly any radiation risk. (orig.) [de

  20. Artificial Neural Networks for differential diagnosis of breast lesions in MR-Mammography: A systematic approach addressing the influence of network architecture on diagnostic performance using a large clinical database

    Dietzel, Matthias; Baltzer, Pascal A.T.; Dietzel, Andreas; Zoubi, Ramy; Gröschel, Tobias; Burmeister, Hartmut P.; Bogdan, Martin; Kaiser, Werner A.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale and objectives: Differential diagnosis of lesions in MR-Mammography (MRM) remains a complex task. The aim of this MRM study was to design and to test robustness of Artificial Neural Network architectures to predict malignancy using a large clinical database. Materials and methods: For this IRB-approved investigation standardized protocols and study design were applied (T1w-FLASH; 0.1 mmol/kgBW Gd-DTPA; T2w-TSE; histological verification after MRM). All lesions were evaluated by two experienced (>500 MRM) radiologists in consensus. In every lesion, 18 previously published descriptors were assessed and documented in the database. An Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was developed to process this database (The-MathWorks/Inc., feed-forward-architecture/resilient back-propagation-algorithm). All 18 descriptors were set as input variables, whereas histological results (malignant vs. benign) was defined as classification variable. Initially, the ANN was optimized in terms of “Training Epochs” (TE), “Hidden Layers” (HL), “Learning Rate” (LR) and “Neurons” (N). Robustness of the ANN was addressed by repeated evaluation cycles (n: 9) with receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis of the results applying 4-fold Cross Validation. The best network architecture was identified comparing the corresponding Area under the ROC curve (AUC). Results: Histopathology revealed 436 benign and 648 malignant lesions. Enhancing the level of complexity could not increase diagnostic accuracy of the network (P: n.s.). The optimized ANN architecture (TE: 20, HL: 1, N: 5, LR: 1.2) was accurate (mean-AUC 0.888; P: <0.001) and robust (CI: 0.885–0.892; range: 0.880–0.898). Conclusion: The optimized neural network showed robust performance and high diagnostic accuracy for prediction of malignancy on unknown data.

  1. Artificial Neural Networks for differential diagnosis of breast lesions in MR-Mammography: a systematic approach addressing the influence of network architecture on diagnostic performance using a large clinical database.

    Dietzel, Matthias; Baltzer, Pascal A T; Dietzel, Andreas; Zoubi, Ramy; Gröschel, Tobias; Burmeister, Hartmut P; Bogdan, Martin; Kaiser, Werner A

    2012-07-01

    Differential diagnosis of lesions in MR-Mammography (MRM) remains a complex task. The aim of this MRM study was to design and to test robustness of Artificial Neural Network architectures to predict malignancy using a large clinical database. For this IRB-approved investigation standardized protocols and study design were applied (T1w-FLASH; 0.1 mmol/kgBW Gd-DTPA; T2w-TSE; histological verification after MRM). All lesions were evaluated by two experienced (>500 MRM) radiologists in consensus. In every lesion, 18 previously published descriptors were assessed and documented in the database. An Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was developed to process this database (The-MathWorks/Inc., feed-forward-architecture/resilient back-propagation-algorithm). All 18 descriptors were set as input variables, whereas histological results (malignant vs. benign) was defined as classification variable. Initially, the ANN was optimized in terms of "Training Epochs" (TE), "Hidden Layers" (HL), "Learning Rate" (LR) and "Neurons" (N). Robustness of the ANN was addressed by repeated evaluation cycles (n: 9) with receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis of the results applying 4-fold Cross Validation. The best network architecture was identified comparing the corresponding Area under the ROC curve (AUC). Histopathology revealed 436 benign and 648 malignant lesions. Enhancing the level of complexity could not increase diagnostic accuracy of the network (P: n.s.). The optimized ANN architecture (TE: 20, HL: 1, N: 5, LR: 1.2) was accurate (mean-AUC 0.888; P: <0.001) and robust (CI: 0.885-0.892; range: 0.880-0.898). The optimized neural network showed robust performance and high diagnostic accuracy for prediction of malignancy on unknown data. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Mammography Screening Among African-American Women with a Family History of Breast Cancer

    Lipkus, Issac

    1997-01-01

    Comparisons were made between African-American women with and without a family history of breast cancer with respect to mammography screening, attitudes towards mammography screening and perceptions...

  3. Factors Influencing the Underreporting of Concussion in Sports: A Qualitative Study of Minor Hockey Participants.

    Cusimano, Michael D; Topolovec-Vranic, Jane; Zhang, Stanley; Mullen, Sarah J; Wong, Mattew; Ilie, Gabriela

    2017-07-01

    The present study is to identify factors contributing to underreporting of concussion in adolescent athletes. Qualitative interviews. Participants were interviewed in an office environment. Interviews were conducted with 31 minor hockey players, 10 parents, 6 coaches, 4 trainers, 2 managers, and one game official. Players were 13 to 15 year old. With selective sampling, an inductive approach of analyzing the interviews was undertaken and themes were identified and analyzed. Underreporting is a complex phenomenon. A number of risk factors related to hockey culture, players, reference others, and rules of play were assessed. Reasons not reporting concussion is accepted in minor hockey. Aspects of hockey culture such as an overemphasis on winning games and upheld misperceptions about the risks associated with concussion were identified as relevant to the underreporting of concussions. Various factors relevant to the underreporting of concussions include player's motivation to win, group membership dynamics such as a player's role as the team's "enforcer," coaches' own motivation to win to further their own opportunities in the sport, and parents' personal financial interest or alternative agenda in terms of time commitments and their child's future career prospects. Our findings indicate that underreporting of concussion among those players interviewed appears to be prevalent and associated with misconceptions about injury risk, and a culture that both reinforces and encourages underreporting with tacit or overt complicity of parents and coaches. Our findings support the need to alter the culture of violence and tough play in hockey by education, rule changes, economic measures, and changes in governance of the sport. Interviewing more stakeholders and policy makers would shed light on such potential interventions.

  4. Specialist participation in healthcare delivery transformation: influence of patient self-referral.

    Aliu, Oluseyi; Sun, Gordon; Burke, James; Chung, Kevin C; Davis, Matthew M

    2014-01-01

    Improving coordination of care and containing healthcare costs are prominent goals of healthcare reform. Specialist involvement in healthcare delivery transformation efforts like Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) is necessary to achieve these goals. However, patients’ self-referrals to specialists may undermine care coordination and incur unnecessary costs if patients frequently receive care from specialists not engaged in such healthcare delivery transformation efforts. Additionally, frequent self-referrals may also diminish the incentive for specialist participation in reform endeavors like ACOs to get access to a referral base. To examine recent national trends in self-referred new visits to specialists. A descriptive cross-sectional study of new ambulatory visits to specialists from 2000 to 2009 using data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. We calculated nationally representative estimates of the proportion of new specialist visits through self-referrals among Medicare and private insurance beneficiaries. We also estimated the nationally representative absolute number of self-referred new specialist visits among both groups of beneficiaries. Among Medicare and private insurance beneficiaries, self-referred visits declined from 32.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 24.0%-40.4%) to 19.6% (95% CI, 13.9%-23.3%) and from 32.4% (95% CI, 27.9%-36.8%) to 24.1% (95% CI,18.8%-29.4%), respectively. Hence, at least 1 in 5 and 1 in 4 new visits to specialists among Medicare and private insurance beneficiaries, respectively, are self-referred. The current considerable rate of self-referred new specialist visits among both Medicare and private insurance beneficiaries may have adverse implications for organizations attempting to transform healthcare delivery with improved care coordination.

  5. A qualitative study exploring health perceptions and factors influencing participation in health behaviors in colorectal cancer survivors.

    Hardcastle, Sarah J; Maxwell-Smith, Chloe; Zeps, Nik; Platell, Cameron; O'Connor, Moira; Hagger, Martin S

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore colorectal cancer survivors' health perceptions following cessation of active treatment for cancer and to explore the factors influencing participation in health-promoting behaviors that may help reduce cardiovascular disease risk. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with participants that had completed active treatment for cancer within the previous 2 years. Participants were colorectal cancer survivors (N = 24, men = 11, women = 13, M age = 69.38 years, SD = 4.19) recruited from a private hospital in Perth, Australia on the basis that they had existing morbidities that put them at increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Interview transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis. Five main themes emerged: back to normal; the pleasures in life: 'is it worth it?'; beliefs about health behavior; skepticism of eating guidelines; and lack of motivation. The majority of participants felt they were in good health and had made a full recovery. Participants questioned whether it was worth changing their lifestyle given their life stage and referred to the desire to enjoy life. Lay health beliefs, skepticism of eating guidelines, and a lack of motivation were barriers to change. Interventions should target lay beliefs and skepticism in relation to health behaviors in order to reinforce the importance and value of participating in health-related behavior. Findings may inform the development of effective, patient-centered interventions that target lay health beliefs and build motivation for health behavior change. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Image Quality and Patient Dose Optimisation in Mammography in Slovakia

    Horvathova, M.; Nikodemova, D.; Prikazska, M.

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer represents also in Slovakia the greatest cancer risk for women, with great incidence and mortality. Conventional film-screen mammography is still the primary breast imaging modality with increasing number of mammography units and mammography examinations. From the radiation protection point of view achievement of good practice in mammography department by implementation of quality assurance play an important role for reduction of patients doses. Introduction of QA needs trained and experienced staff and requires close collaboration between radiologists, medical physicist and radiographers. At the beginning of nineties at the Institute of Preventive and Clinical Medicine we started with a survey of mean glandular doses at 15 existing mammography units in the country. On the basis of a questionnaire in the year 1991 were performed 10 488 mammography examinations, where due to out of date mammography units the mean glandular dose reached more as 3 mGy. In the following years the claim to the modern mammography units kept growing and in the year 1999 the total number of 63 mammography units were operating in Slovakia providing about 101 471 mammography examinations. According to the alarming increase of the number of mammography examinations it is absolutely necessary to work out criteria and principles for Quality Control at mammography workplaces in our country and make it obligatory for the staff of all mammography units. Summarising the CRP results it can be stated that they: 1) Initiated the suggestion of unified QA/QC criteria in mammography and the urgent need to implement them into the national program of radiology image quality improvement; 2) Remitted on unhomogenity not only in the equipment outfit but also in the procedure of evaluation of the measured parameters and imaging quality; 3) Revealed the shortcomings in the everyday practice of mammography units which can be removed only by comprehensive by training of personal in imaging radiology

  7. A comparison of digital mammography detectors and emerging technology

    Diffey, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    The overall diagnostic accuracy of digital mammography in the context of screening has been shown to be similar or slightly better than screen-film mammography. However, digital mammography encompasses both Computed Radiography (CR) and integrated Digital Radiography (DR) and there is increasing evidence to suggest that differences in detector technology are associated with variations in cancer detection rate, dose and image quality. These differences are examined in detail. Although digital mammography offers many advantages compared to screen-film, there are still some limitations with its use as a screening tool and reduced cancer detection in dense breasts remains an issue. Digital mammography detectors have paved the way for emerging technologies which may offer improvements. Taking the definition of mammography to only include X-ray imaging of the breast, this article focuses on tomosynthesis, contrast-enhanced digital mammography, stereoscopic mammography and dedicated breast computed tomography. Advanced software applications such as Computed Aided Detection (CAD) and quantitative breast density assessment are also presented. The benefits and limitations of each technique are discussed. - Highlights: • Digital detector technology affects cancer detection rate, dose and image quality. • Digital detectors have facilitated new technologies such as tomosynthesis. • 3-D techniques reduce superimposition and increase cancer detection in dense breasts. • Contrast-enhanced mammography demonstrates improved sensitivity and specificity.

  8. Investigation of actual conditions of mammography in Kagoshima prefecture

    Baba, Natsuki; Tanimoto, Eriko; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Kuma, Kouji

    2009-01-01

    We surveyed the actual conditions of mammography with regard to image quality and radiation dose at 44 facilities in Kagoshima prefecture in 1999. In April 2004, guidelines for mammography newly included the standard of digital mammography. From September to October 2005, the survey was conducted at 48 facilities, and the results of the survey were compared with that in 1999. We visited 44 of the 48 facilities, and visually evaluated the image quality of mammograms for RMI156 and clinical mammograms. In addition, we measured average mammary gland dose at each facility. The number of the mammography device that satisfied the specified guideline criterion was larger than that in 1999. Image quality for the RMI156 mammograms improved. However, the results of the present survey revealed several problems. First, the number of facilities that had quality control instruments for mammography are few. Second, radiological technologists, medical doctors, and nurses did not share knowledge or information regarding mammography. Finally, there were differences in devices and image quality for mammography among the facilities. We achieved an understanding of the actual conditions of mammography in Kagoshima prefecture by visiting many facilities, evaluating image quality, and communicating with many staff members. Our results may be useful for the development of mammography examinations. (author)

  9. Trunk and hip biomechanics influence anterior cruciate loading mechanisms in physically active participants.

    Frank, Barnett; Bell, David R; Norcross, Marc F; Blackburn, J Troy; Goerger, Benjamin M; Padua, Darin A

    2013-11-01

    Excessive trunk motion and deficits in neuromuscular control (NMC) of the lumbopelvic hip complex are risk factors for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. However, the relationship between trunk motion, NMC of the lumbopelvic hip complex, and triplanar knee loads during a sidestep cutting task has not been examined. To determine if there is an association between multiplanar trunk motion, NMC of the lumbopelvic hip complex, and triplanar knee loads with ACL injury during a sidestep cutting task. Descriptive laboratory study. The hip and knee biomechanics and trunk motion of 30 participants (15 male, 15 female) were analyzed during a sidestep cutting task using an optoelectric camera system interfaced to a force plate. Trunk and lower extremity biomechanics were calculated from the kinematic and ground-reaction force data during the first 50% of the stance time during the cutting task. Pearson product moment correlation coefficients were calculated between trunk and lower extremity biomechanics. Multiple linear regression analyses were carried out to determine the amount of variance in triplanar knee loading explained by trunk motion and hip moments. A greater internal knee varus moment (mean, 0.11 ± 0.12 N·m/kg*m) was associated with less transverse-plane trunk rotation away from the stance limb (mean, 20.25° ± 4.42°; r = -0.46, P = .011) and a greater internal hip adduction moment (mean, 0.33 ± 0.25 N·m/kg*m; r = 0.83, P < .05). A greater internal knee external rotation moment (mean, 0.11 ± 0.08 N·m/kg*m) was associated with a greater forward trunk flexion (mean, 7.62° ± 5.28°; r = 0.42, P = .020) and a greater hip internal rotation moment (mean, 0.15 ± 0.16 N·m/kg*m; r = 0.59, P = .001). Trunk rotation and hip adduction moment explained 81% (P < .05) of the variance in knee varus moment. Trunk flexion and hip internal rotation moment explained 48% (P < .05) of the variance in knee external rotation moment. Limited trunk rotation displacement

  10. Influence of adapted sports on quality of life and life satisfaction in sport participants and non-sport participants with physical disabilities.

    Yazicioglu, Kamil; Yavuz, Ferdi; Goktepe, Ahmet Salim; Tan, Arif Kenan

    2012-10-01

    The lack of controlled trials in the relationship between participation in adapted sports, and quality of life (QoL) and life satisfaction in people with physical disabilities encouraged us to consider conducting this study. The aim of this study was to compare the QoL and life satisfaction scores between people with physical disabilities who participated in adapted sports and those who did not participate in any adapted sports. This cross-sectional controlled study included 60 individuals with physical disabilities (paraplegia and amputee). Participants were divided into two groups based on sports participation and non-sports participation. Group one included 30 disabled elite athletes who participated in adapted sports. The control group included 30 disabled individuals not involved in any adapted sports. We compared scores on the World Health Organization Quality-of-Life Scale (WHOQoL-BREF) and the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS) between the two groups. Participation in the community and QoL was examined as a reflection of participant's priority on sports participation. We found that WHOQoL-BREF physical, psychological, and social domain scores were significantly higher in group one than in the control group (p sports had significantly higher QoL and life satisfaction scores compared to people with physical disabilities not involved in any adapted sports. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Factors Influencing Participation of Rural Women in Zimbabwes 2013 Constitution Referendum A Case Study Of Ward 22 Gutu District

    Barbra Ncube

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Participation is the cornerstone of citizen engagement. In constitution making and other public policy formulation processes public participation typically involves preparing the public to participate through civic education and public information campaigns as well as consulting the public on issues such as how the process should take place and the contents of the constitution itself. This study sought to examine the factors that influence womens participation in constitution making processes specifically relating to voting in the constitution referendum in the case of rural women residing in ward 22 of Gutu district of Zimbabwe. Gutu District is the third largest district in Masvingo province. Ward 22 is located in the communal region of Gutu central. The people of ward 22 largely depend on subsistence farming and market gardening for their livelihoods. The objectives of the study were to ascertain to what extent media campaign and publicity efforts by womens civic groups and public interaction through public meetings and hearings were able to influence the participation of Zimbabwean women in the 2013 referendum in ward 22 Gutu district. Over and above these objectives the study sought to document the experiences and views of rural Zimbabwean women on the constitution making process. This study adopted a descriptive case study research design. Samples of 108 women from Ward 22 Gutu District were conveniently selected to participate in this study. Data was collected using a structured interview guide and questionnaires which were administered to the respondents. A focused group discussion was also carried out to verify the information gathered through these instruments. Findings and conclusions were derived by means of detailed comparative and inductive analysis of data. Descriptive statistics were employed in the presentation of the findings. Amongst the major findings are that rural women in ward 22 in Gutu district were in actual

  12. Motivational aspects that influence the elderly to enroll on and continue participating in physical exercise programs

    Carmen Freyre

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is a growing demand for physical exercise in programs promoting health; however, the elderly are still under-represented in such programs. This study aims to identify, classify and discuss social, cultural and educational factors relating to the health and quality of life of the elderly, establishing relationships with the motives for which they join and adhere to regular physical exercise programs in public areas. This was a field study employing descriptive quantitative and qualitative methodology and for which 120 participants from two physical exercise programs in Recife were interviewed. The results indicate that the most important motives for participation were as follows: to improve health (84.2%, to improve physical performance (70.8%, to adopt a healthy lifestyle (62.5%, to reduce stress (60.8%, to comply with doctor’s orders (56.7%, to recover from injury (55%, to improve self-image (50.8% and to enhance self-esteem and relax (47.5%. The most important motives for continuing to attend such programs were: to improve posture (75%; to promote a feeling of wellbeing (74.2%; to keep fi t (70.8%; to experience pleasure (66.7%; to become stronger and be motivated by the instructor (62.5%; to experience a feeling of well-being produced by the social environment (60%; and to experience self-realization and receive attention from the instructor (57.5%. For the men (35.1%, the habit of performing physical exercise in their youth had no bearing on their joining such programs. On the basis of these indicators, universities can make a valuable contribution by offering socio-educational health-related projects encouraging the elderly population to avoid a sedentary lifestyle. RESUMO Atualmente, a busca pela prática de exercícios físicos em programas para promoção de saúde vem crescendo; porém a procura pelos idosos é insuficiente. Esta investigação identifica, classifica e discute os aspectos socioculturais e educativos

  13. Contrast Enhanced Spectral Mammography: A Review.

    Patel, Bhavika K; Lobbes, M B I; Lewin, John

    2018-02-01

    Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) provides low-energy 2D mammographic images comparable to standard digital mammography and a post-contrast recombined image to assess tumor neovascularity similar to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The utilization of CESM in the United States is currently low but could increase rapidly given many potential indications for clinical use. This article discusses historical background and literature review of indications and diagnostic accuracy of CESM to date. CESM is a growing technique for breast cancer detection and diagnosis that has levels of sensitivity and specificity on par with contrast-enhanced breast MRI. Because of its similar performance and ease of implementation, CESM is being adopted for multiple indications previously reserved for MRI, such as problem-solving, disease extent in newly diagnosed patients, and evaluating the treatment response of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effectiveness of a Mobile Mammography Program.

    Stanley, Elizabeth; Lewis, Madelene C; Irshad, Abid; Ackerman, Susan; Collins, Heather; Pavic, Dag; Leddy, Rebecca J

    2017-12-01

    Mobile mammography units have increasingly been used to address patient health care disparities; however, there are limited data comparing mobile units to stationary sites. This study aims to evaluate the characteristics of women who underwent mammography screening in a mobile unit versus those who underwent mammography screening at a cancer center. In this retrospective study, we analyzed all screening mammography examinations performed in a mobile unit in 2014 (n = 1433 examinations). For comparison, we randomized and reviewed an equivalent number of screening mammography examinations performed at our cancer center in 2014 (n = 1434 examinations). BI-RADS assessment, adherence to follow-up, biopsies performed, cancer detection rate, and sociodemographic variables were recorded. An independent-samples t test was conducted to identify potential differences in age between cancer center patients and mobile unit patients. Chi-square analyses were used to test for associations between location and factors such as health insurance, race, marital status, geographic area, adherence to screening guidelines, recall rate, adherence to follow-up, and cancer detection rates. Patients visiting our cancer center (mean = 57.74 years; SD = 10.55) were significantly older than those visiting the mobile unit (mean = 52.58 years; SD = 8.19; p mobile van (cancer center = 3.70%, mobile unit = 38.73%). There was a significant association between screening location and patient race (χ 2 = 118.75, p mobile unit = 33.30%), more black patients being screened in the mobile van (cancer center = 49.30%, mobile unit = 54.15%), and more Hispanic patients being screened in the mobile van (cancer center = 1.05%, mobile unit = 6.77%). There was a significant association between location and patient marital status (χ 2 = 135.61, p mobile unit = 38.31%), more single patients screened in the mobile van (cancer center = 25.17%, mobile unit = 34.47%), and more widowed patients being screened at the

  15. A phantom for quality control in mammography

    Gambaccini, M.; Rimondi, O.; Marziani, M.; Toti, A.

    1989-01-01

    A phantom for evaluating image quality in mammography has been designed and will be used in the Italian national programme ''Dose and Quality in Mammography''. The characteristics of the phantom are (a) about the same X-ray transmission as a 5 cm 50% fat and 50% water breast for energies between 15 and 50 keV and (b) optimum energies for imaging of the test objects (included in the phantom) in very close agreement with the optimum energies for imaging of calcifications and tumours in a 5 cm 50% fat and 50% water breast. An experimental comparison between the prototype and some commercial phantoms was carried out. Measurements are in progress to test the phantom's ability to evaluate the performances of mammographic systems quantitatively. (author)

  16. Synthesized Mammography: Clinical Evidence, Appearance, and Implementation

    Melissa A. Durand

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT has improved conventional mammography by increasing cancer detection while reducing recall rates. However, these benefits come at the cost of increased radiation dose. Synthesized mammography (s2D has been developed to provide the advantages of DBT with nearly half the radiation dose. Since its F.D.A. approval, multiple studies have evaluated the clinical performance of s2D. In clinical practice, s2D images are not identical to conventional 2D images and are designed for interpretation with DBT as a complement. This article reviews the present literature to assess whether s2D is a practical alternative to conventional 2D, addresses the differences in mammographic appearance of findings, and provides suggestions for implementation into clinical practice.

  17. Synthesized Mammography: Clinical Evidence, Appearance, and Implementation.

    Durand, Melissa A

    2018-04-04

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has improved conventional mammography by increasing cancer detection while reducing recall rates. However, these benefits come at the cost of increased radiation dose. Synthesized mammography (s2D) has been developed to provide the advantages of DBT with nearly half the radiation dose. Since its F.D.A. approval, multiple studies have evaluated the clinical performance of s2D. In clinical practice, s2D images are not identical to conventional 2D images and are designed for interpretation with DBT as a complement. This article reviews the present literature to assess whether s2D is a practical alternative to conventional 2D, addresses the differences in mammographic appearance of findings, and provides suggestions for implementation into clinical practice.

  18. Screening mammography. A risk versus risk decision

    Ritenour, E.R.; Hendee, W.R.

    1989-01-01

    The potential risk of a radiologic procedure often is compared with the potential benefit of the procedure. While risk vs. benefit analysis has been useful as a step toward increased communication and understanding among radiologists, referring physicians, and the general public, it has the disadvantage that risk and benefit are fundamentally different quantities. Hence, their juxtaposition for purposes of comparison presents contextual difficulties. In this article, the concept is presented of comparing the risk of doing a procedure with the risk of choosing not to do the procedure. An example of risk vs. risk analysis of screening mammography for women over the age of 50 is given, with the conclusion that the risk of having yearly mammograms is less than 1/10 the risk of early death caused by failure to diagnose breast cancer by x-ray mammography. This approach to risk analysis would yield interesting data for examinations that are part of more complicated diagnostic pathways.19 references

  19. Breast Cancer Screening, Mammography, and Other Modalities.

    Fiorica, James V

    2016-12-01

    This article is an overview of the modalities available for breast cancer screening. The modalities discussed include digital mammography, digital breast tomosynthesis, breast ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, and clinical breast examination. There is a review of pertinent randomized controlled trials, studies and meta-analyses which contributed to the evolution of screening guidelines. Ultimately, 5 major medical organizations formulated the current screening guidelines in the United States. The lack of consensus in these guidelines represents an ongoing controversy about the optimal timing and method for breast cancer screening in women. For mammography screening, the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System lexicon is explained which corresponds with recommended clinical management. The presentation and discussion of the data in this article are designed to help the clinician individualize breast cancer screening for each patient.

  20. Evaluation of the mammography screening studies conducted in Europe and North America; Auswertung der bisherigen Mammographie-Screening-Studien in Europa und in Nordamerika

    Schreer, I. [Mammazentrum des Universitaetsklinikums Kiel (Germany)

    2001-04-01

    The ancient randomized-controlled trials of breast cancer screening have offered clear evidence that invitation to participate in mammography screening with/without clinical examination is effective in breast cancer mortality reduction and underline the detection sensitivity of mammography. Recently published criticism of both the effect and fundamental data handling could be shown to be untenable. Randomized studies underestimate the effect while well-designed observational studies do not systematically overestimate the magnitude of the effect. To transform high-quality study results in all-day's practice is a huge challenge, but affordable as has been demonstrated in Great Britain, the Netherlands and Sweden. (orig.) [German] Die alten randomisiert-kontrollierten Studien erbrachten den Nachweis, dass durch Einladung zur Teilnahme an einem Mammmographiescreening mit/ohne klinische Untersuchung der Effekt der Mortalitaetsreduktion erreicht wird und unterstreichen die Sensitivitaet der Mammographie als Detektionstest. Juengste Kritik hat sich in der wissenschaftlichen Auseinandersetzung als unbegruendet herausgestellt. Randomisierte Studien unterschaetzen den Effekt, Beobachtungsstudien spiegeln besser das Ausmass des individuellen Nutzens. Die Uebertragung von Studienergebnissen in den Versorgungsalltag ist aeusserst schwierig, stellt hoechste Anforderungen an ein umfassendes Qualitaetsmanagement, ist jedoch machbar, wie Laender wie Grossbritannien, die Niederlande und Schweden zeigen. (orig.)

  1. Personalized estimates of radiation dose from dedicated breast CT in a diagnostic population and comparison with diagnostic mammography

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Karellas, Andrew; O'Connell, Avice M; Conover, David L

    2013-01-01

    This study retrospectively analyzed the mean glandular dose (MGD) to 133 breasts from 132 subjects, all women, who participated in a clinical trial evaluating dedicated breast CT in a diagnostic population. The clinical trial was conducted in adherence to a protocol approved by institutional review boards and the study participants provided written informed consent. Individual estimates of MGD to each breast from dedicated breast CT was obtained by combining x-ray beam characteristics with estimates of breast dimensions and fibroglandular fraction from volumetric breast CT images, and using normalized glandular dose coefficients. For each study participant and for the breast corresponding to that imaged with breast CT, an estimate of the MGD from diagnostic mammography (including supplemental views) was obtained from the DICOM image headers for comparison. This estimate uses normalized glandular dose coefficients corresponding to a breast with 50% fibroglandular weight fraction. The median fibroglandular weight fraction for the study cohort determined from volumetric breast CT images was 15%. Hence, the MGD from diagnostic mammography was corrected to be representative of the study cohort. Individualized estimates of MGD from breast CT ranged from 5.7 to 27.8 mGy. Corresponding to the breasts imaged with breast CT, the MGD from diagnostic mammography ranged from 2.6 to 31.6 mGy. The mean (± inter-breast SD) and the median MGD (mGy) from dedicated breast CT exam were 13.9 ± 4.6 and 12.6, respectively. For the corresponding breasts, the mean (± inter-breast SD) and the median MGD (mGy) from diagnostic mammography were 12.4 ± 6.3 and 11.1, respectively. Statistical analysis indicated that at the 0.05 level, the distributions of MGD from dedicated breast CT and diagnostic mammography were significantly different (Wilcoxon signed ranks test, p = 0.007). While the interquartile range and the range (maximum–minimum) of MGD from dedicated breast CT was lower than

  2. Quality assurance programme for screen film mammography

    2009-01-01

    The application of radiation in human health, for both the diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. In the area of diagnostic radiology, this work is focused on quality assurance methods to both the promotion of the effective use of radiation for diagnostic outcome, through achieving and maintaining appropriate image quality, and also on dose determination to allow the monitoring and reduction of dose to the patient. In response to heightened awareness of the importance of patient dose contributed by radiology procedures, the IAEA published Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology: An International Code of Practice (Technical Reports Series No. 457) in 2007, to form a basis for patient dose determination for the Member States. Further to this, it is recognized that for complex diagnostic procedures, such as mammography, a detailed guidance document is required to give the professionals in the clinical centre the knowledge necessary to assess the patient dose, as well as to ensure that the procedure gives the maximal patient benefit possible. It is well documented that without the implementation of a quality culture and a systematic quality assurance programme with appropriate education, the detection of breast cancer cannot be made at an early enough stage to allow effective curative treatment to be undertaken. Currently there are a number of established quality assurance protocols in mammography from national and regional institutions, however, many of these protocols are distinctive and so a harmonized approach is required. This will allow the Member States to facilitate quality assurance in mammography in a standardized way which will also facilitate the introduction of national quality assurance programmes that are needed to underpin effective population screening programmes for breast cancer. Development of a quality assurance document for screen film mammography was started in 2005 with the appointment of a drafting

  3. Implementation of the qualities of radiodiagnostic: mammography

    Pacífico, Leonardo; Magalhães, Luís A.G.; Fernandes, Elisabeth; Peixoto, José Guilherme P.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the expanded uncertainty and present the result of the internal audit performed at the Laboratory of Radiological Sciences (LCR). The qualities of the mammographic bundles that are references in the LCR calibrations had their uncertainties and conformities with the standard evaluated. The expanded uncertainty was 1.40%, and the result of the internal audit was satisfactory. We conclude that LCR can perform calibrations on mammography qualities for end users. (author)

  4. Benefits, risks, and costs of mammography

    Richter, B.; Rausch, L.

    1977-01-01

    The risk seems to be acceptable if the age-dependency of the frequency of breast cancer is disregarded, i.e. if calculation is done with average values, as is being done frequently (15, 25, 32, 48). This procedure however veils the real circumstances in the examination of young women thus also veiling a risk which could otherwise be made precise and avoidable. The risk of radiation-induced cancerogenesis in the female breast was verified by similar statements made by several empiric investigations on man. The course of the dose-effect-relation in the region of few rad is still unexplained however, although the results do not contradict to the assumption of a linear dose-effect-relation. Thus it seems not advisable to ignore the induction of carcinomas by x-radiation for the sphere of mammography with the doses usually applied today. A reduction of radiation exposition by dose-saving measures to one tenth of the present value (or less) however would make the risk highly unimportant. Advantage/risk/cost-analyses should encourage the responsible persons to make reasonable proposals for the application of methods, in this case mammography. The discouraging of patients whom mammography is indicated for would be a side-effect which is not desired. Just as wrong would be the stimulation of an unjustified feeling of being sure and the demand for costly medical measures by uncritical reports of success. The indication of the considerably high costs of mammography should, together with the advantage expected, be a quantitative criterion for the optimal distribution of limited means the necessity of which cannot be denied. (orig.) [de

  5. Implementation of the qualities of radiodiagnostic: mammography

    Pacífico, Leonardo; Magalhães, Luís A.G.; Fernandes, Elisabeth, E-mail: leonardocpacifico@gmail.com [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil); Peixoto, José Guilherme P. [Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the expanded uncertainty and present the result of the internal audit performed at the Laboratory of Radiological Sciences (LCR). The qualities of the mammographic bundles that are references in the LCR calibrations had their uncertainties and conformities with the standard evaluated. The expanded uncertainty was 1.40%, and the result of the internal audit was satisfactory. We conclude that LCR can perform calibrations on mammography qualities for end users. (author)

  6. Mammography with rare earth intensifying screens

    Maurer, H.J.; Goos, F.

    1987-01-01

    Screens basing on rare earth phosphors with suitable films green or blue sensitive may be used in mammography with grids without diagnostic losses. Highest definition will be obtained with medium densities on film. High-speed screens may reduce dose, but definition is poor. Best compromise between speed and high definition may be reached with relative low thickness of phosphor layers. A system of high definition films (Medichrome) and special rare earth screens give best results. (orig.) [de

  7. Mammography. [Patent750AIX-08)293916

    1975-04-01

    This patent reveals a method and instrument for the detection and registration of breast cancer with the aid of X-radiation, i.e. mammography. The breast is irradiated with soft X-rays whereby the radiation beam is scanned with a moving 'stripform' screen and whereby the picture from the 'stripform' screen is recorded by a television camera that moves simultaneously with the strip. The image is then projected on a monitor.

  8. Mechanistic modeling for mammography screening risks

    Bijwaard, Harmen

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Western populations show a very high incidence of breast cancer and in many countries mammography screening programs have been set up for the early detection of these cancers. Through these programs large numbers of women (in the Netherlands, 700.000 per year) are exposed to low but not insignificant X-ray doses. ICRP based risk estimates indicate that the number of breast cancer casualties due to mammography screening can be as high as 50 in the Netherlands per year. The number of lives saved is estimated to be much higher, but for an accurate calculation of the benefits of screening a better estimate of these risks is indispensable. Here it is attempted to better quantify the radiological risks of mammography screening through the application of a biologically based model for breast tumor induction by X-rays. The model is applied to data obtained from the National Institutes of Health in the U.S. These concern epidemiological data of female TB patients who received high X-ray breast doses in the period 1930-1950 through frequent fluoroscopy of their lungs. The mechanistic model that is used to describe the increased breast cancer incidence is based on an earlier study by Moolgavkar et al. (1980), in which the natural background incidence of breast cancer was modeled. The model allows for a more sophisticated extrapolation of risks to the low dose X-ray exposures that are common in mammography screening and to the higher ages that are usually involved. Furthermore, it allows for risk transfer to other (non-western) populations. The results have implications for decisions on the frequency of screening, the number of mammograms taken at each screening, minimum and maximum ages for screening and the transfer to digital equipment. (author)

  9. Screening for breast cancer with mammography

    Sickles, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    Mammography is generally accepted as a useful problem-solving clinical tool in characterizing known breast lesions, so that appropriate and timely treatment can be given. However, it remains grossly underutilized at what it does best: screening. The major strengths of mammography are (a) its ability to detect breast cancer at a smaller, potentially more curable stage than any other examination, and (b) its proved efficacy in reducing breast cancer mortality in asymptomatic women aged 40-74. If, as has recently been estimated, screening with mammography and physical examination can be expected to lower breast cancer deaths by 40%-50% among those actually examined (13), then the lives of almost 20,000 U.S. women might be saved each year if screening were to become very widely used. The challenges of the next decade are clear, to mount much more effective campaigns to educate physicians and lay women about the life-saving benefits of breast cancer screening, to devise increasingly effective and lower cost screening strategies, to further improve the current high quality of mammographic imaging despite its increasing proliferation, and to train large numbers of breast imaging specialists to guarantee that the growing case load of screening and problem-solving mammograms is interpreted with a very high level of skill

  10. Breast cancer screening: the underuse of mammography

    Fox, S.; Baum, J.K.; Klos, D.S.; Tsou, C.V.

    1985-01-01

    The early detection of breast cancer is promoted by the American Cancer Society (ACS) and the American College of Radiology (ACR) by encouraging the regular use of three types of screening: breast self-examination (BSE), the clinical breast examination, and mammography. In August 1983, the ACS publicized seven recommendations pertaining to screening, including a revised statement about the routine use of mammography for women between the ages of 40 and 49 years. In response to the ACS statement, the present study assessed compliance with the updated recommendations for all three types of screening. The results show reasonable rates of compliance for the BSE (53%-69%) and clinical examination (70%-78%). In contrast, only 19% of the women between the ages of 35 and 49 and 25% of the women older than 50 reported complying with the recommendation to undergo one baseline screening mammogram. Some implications for health education by physicians and the professional education of physicians in the use of mammography are discussed

  11. Assessment of Mammography Experiences and Satisfaction among American Indian/Alaska Native Women

    Ndikum-Moffor, Florence M.; Braiuca, Stacy; Daley, Christine Makosky; Gajewski, Byron J.; Engelman, Kimberly K.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) women have lower breast cancer (BCA) screening and 5-year survival rates than non-Hispanic Whites. Understanding reasons for low screening rates is important to combat later stage diagnoses. The purpose of this study was to assess mammography experiences and satisfaction among AI/AN women. METHODS Nine focus groups were held with rural (N=15) and urban (N=38) AI/AN women 40 years and older in Kansas and Kansas City, Missouri, living both near and far from Indian Health Service (IHS) and tribal facilities, to examine experiences and satisfaction with mammography. Transcripts were coded and themes identified using a community-based participatory research approach. FINDINGS Themes were classified under knowledge, communication, and awareness of breast cancer, barriers to mammography, mammogram facility size, impressions of mammogram technologist, motivations to getting a mammogram, and how to improve the mammogram experience. Participants had knowledge of prevention, but described cultural reasons for not discussing it and described better experiences in smaller facilities. Participants indicated having a mammogram technologist who was friendly, knowledgeable, respectful, competent, and explained the test was a determining factor in satisfaction. Other factors included family history, physician recommendation, and financial incentives. Barriers included transportation, cost, perceptions of prejudice, and time constraints. Participants on reservations or near IHS facilities preferred IHS over mainstream providers. Suggestions for improvement included caring technologists, better machines with less discomfort, and education. CONCLUSIONS Interventions to enhance the professionalism, empathy, and cultural awareness of mammogram technologists, reduce barriers, and provide positive expectations and incentives could improve satisfaction and compliance with screening mammography. PMID:24183414

  12. Assessment of image quality and patient doses in mammography in Tanzania

    Muhogora, W.E.; Lema, U.S.; Lyimo, R.; Dharsee, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The objective of this work was to investigate on pilot scale the potential for optimization of screen-film based mammography practice in Tanzania. Two hospitals participated in the study and were Samaritan (with Siemens unit, model MAMMOMAT 5427901X059) and AgaKhan Medical Centre (with a Philips unit, model MD 4000). Image quality assessment was done by the radiologist at the hospital in two phases each of 2 weeks by scoring the images with assistance of image quality criteria supplied by IAEA. The causes for poor image quality were also identified. A quality assurance (QA) program was then implemented and corrective actions applied based on image quality assessment and equipment performance. In the second phase, image quality assessment was repeated followed by the estimation of entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) on 4.5 cm PMMA. The results show that the magnitude of poor image quality was up to 50% for Siemens in the first phase and decreased up to 30% after implementation of QA programme. With Philips unit, the magnitude of poor image quality was up to 70% and decreased up to 39% after implementation of QA programme. Generally, the main causes of poor images at all hospitals were over and under exposure, artefacts and breast misplacement. Others were unsharpness of skin structure (rosette from pores) along pectoral muscle, unsharpness of vascular structure (seen through most dense parenchyma), media breast tissue, and vessels and fibrous strands, pectoral muscle margin. Major image quality improvement in terms of percentage points were 10 (over or under exposure), 11 (artefacts) and 9 (skin structure (rosettes from pores-visually not sharp). However, the influence of some causes could not be reduced with QA program, presumably due to skill or equipment related reasons. The ESAK was determined to be 7.1 mGy (30 kVp, Mo/Mo) for Siemens and 3.1 mGy (28 kVp, Mo/Mo) for Philips unit. The ESAK values were well below the recommended diagnostic reference level

  13. The influence of 'significant others' on persistent back pain and work participation: A qualitative exploration of illness perceptions

    King Nigel

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individual illness perceptions have been highlighted as important influences on clinical outcomes for back pain. However, the illness perceptions of 'significant others' (spouse/partner/close family member are rarely explored, particularly in relation to persistent back pain and work participation. The aim of this study was to initiate qualitative research in this area in order to further understand these wider influences on outcome. Methods Semi-structured interviews based on the chronic pain version of the Illness Perceptions Questionnaire-Revised were conducted with a convenience sample of UK disability benefit claimants, along with their significant others (n = 5 dyads. Data were analysed using template analysis. Results Significant others shared, and perhaps further reinforced, claimants' unhelpful illness beliefs including fear of pain/re-injury associated with certain types of work and activity, and pessimism about the likelihood of return to work. In some cases, significant others appeared more resigned to the permanence and negative inevitable consequences of the claimant's back pain condition on work participation, and were more sceptical about the availability of suitable work and sympathy from employers. In their pursuit of authenticity, claimants were keen to stress their desire to work whilst emphasising how the severity and physical limitations of their condition prevented them from doing so. In this vein, and seemingly based on their perceptions of what makes a 'good' significant other, significant others acted as a 'witness to pain', supporting claimants' self-limiting behaviour and statements of incapacity, often responding with empathy and assistance. The beliefs and responses of significant others may also have been influenced by their own experience of chronic illness, thus participants lives were often intertwined and defined by illness. Conclusions The findings from this exploratory study reveal how

  14. Mammography screening in Nigeria – A critical comparison to other countries

    Lawal, O.; Murphy, F.J.; Hogg, P.; Irurhe, N.; Nightingale, J.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of death among women, and according to the World Health Organisation (WHO) there will be a significant increase in the incidence of breast cancer in developing countries such as Nigeria by 2030. However, mammography screening can significantly reduce the mortality and morbidity of women as a result of breast cancer. Therefore, the aim of this review is to evaluate the mammography screening program in Nigeria, compare it with four developed countries and then draw inferences. The Nigerian screening program was evaluated using the following factors: - mode of invitation, frequency of screening, age of the participants, image projections, imaging staff, quality assurance program, and availability. Similarities exist between Nigeria and four developed countries (the United States of America, United Kingdom, Australia and Canada), for instance trained Radiographers do the imaging and the image projections obtained are the same. However, important differences exist, these include mode of invitation, financial model, quality assurance program and availability. On comparison with the four developed countries, various issues have been identified within the Nigerian breast screening programmes. No one simple solution can be offered to address these as the challenges are multi-factorial. - Highlights: • The mammography screening program in Nigeria is compared to four structured screening programs. • There is poor participation of Nigerian women in the screening program. • The cost of mammogram is associated with poor attendance. • The Nigerian screening program lags behind with the age of women invited for screening and lack of quality assurance program.

  15. Mammography in Norway: Image quality and total performance

    Olsen, J.B.; Skretting, A.; Widmark, A.

    1997-04-01

    This report describes a method for assessing the total performance in mammography based on Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis. In the time period from December 1993 to March 1994 the method was applied to assess the total performance of all the 45 Norwegian mammography laboratories operative at that time. Image quality characteristics in each laboratory was established by use of well-known phantoms

  16. THE VALUE OF ULTRASOUND MAMMOGRAPHY IN PALPABLE BREAST MASSES

    VANOORD, JC; VANDERVLIET, AM; THYN, CJP; MAK, B; HOOGEBOOM, GJ

    Between January 1987 and May 1988 a prospective study was carried out on 232 women with a palpable breast mass. They underwent physical examination, x-ray mammography and ultrasound mammography. The results of each study were interpreted independently by separate observers, and consensus was

  17. Patterns and determinants of mammography screening in Lebanese women

    Nadia Elias

    2017-03-01

    Providing mammography free-of-charge may alleviate some obstacles among women with socio-economic disadvantage. Stressing that good results one year do not make the cancer less likely or repeating the test less important, as well as improving the comfort of mammography testing could ensure test repeating.

  18. Evaluation of breast symptoms with mammography and ultrasonography

    Emine Devolli Disha

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Aim of the study was to discern which are more frequent symptoms presented in malign and benign masses diagnosed by mammography and ultrasonography.Methods: Our study group consisted of 546 female patients, with breast symptoms such as palpable lumps (40.8%, pain in the breast (26%, localized lumpiness or nodularity (13.7%, nipple retraction (11.2%, nipplebloody discharge (5.1% and redness and swelling of the breast (3.1%. All 546 patients were examined by ultrasonography and mammography. Biopsy was performed according to the findings of mammography and ultrasonography.Results: In breast cancer detection ultrasonography showed an efficiency of 79.4% compared to 55.0% for mammography in detecting breast lump, in the case of nipple retraction mammography showed an efficiency of 89.1% compared to 80.4% for ultrasound, while the lowest efficiency for mammography was in the cases with localized lumpiness or nodularity 17.1% compared to 45.7% for ultrasound. In detecting fibrocystic changes where the most common symptoms was pain, ultrasonography showed an efficiency of 99.3 % compared to 84.2 % for mammography.Conclusions: Our study confirmed that breast lumps are detectable in the majority of patients with breast cancer. The most frequent symptoms in patient with benign lesions were pain or localized discomfort. The diagnostic accuracy for carcinomas of the breast and for benign lesions according to symptoms was higher for ultrasound than for mammography.

  19. Technical quality control - constancy controls for digital mammography systems

    Pedersen, K.; Landmark, I.D.; Bredholt, K.; Hauge, I.H.R.

    2009-04-01

    To ensure the quality of mammographic images, so-called constancy control tests are performed frequently. The report contains a programme for constancy control of digital mammography systems, encompassing the mammography unit, computed radiography (CR) systems, viewing conditions and displays, printers, and procedures for data collection for patient dose calculations. (Author)

  20. Breast cancer screening using tomosynthesis in combination with digital mammography.

    Friedewald, Sarah M; Rafferty, Elizabeth A; Rose, Stephen L; Durand, Melissa A; Plecha, Donna M; Greenberg, Julianne S; Hayes, Mary K; Copit, Debra S; Carlson, Kara L; Cink, Thomas M; Barke, Lora D; Greer, Linda N; Miller, Dave P; Conant, Emily F

    2014-06-25

    Mammography plays a key role in early breast cancer detection. Single-institution studies have shown that adding tomosynthesis to mammography increases cancer detection and reduces false-positive results. To determine if mammography combined with tomosynthesis is associated with better performance of breast screening programs in the United States. Retrospective analysis of screening performance metrics from 13 academic and nonacademic breast centers using mixed models adjusting for site as a random effect. Period 1: digital mammography screening examinations 1 year before tomosynthesis implementation (start dates ranged from March 2010 to October 2011 through the date of tomosynthesis implementation); period 2: digital mammography plus tomosynthesis examinations from initiation of tomosynthesis screening (March 2011 to October 2012) through December 31, 2012. Recall rate for additional imaging, cancer detection rate, and positive predictive values for recall and for biopsy. A total of 454,850 examinations (n=281,187 digital mammography; n=173,663 digital mammography + tomosynthesis) were evaluated. With digital mammography, 29,726 patients were recalled and 5056 biopsies resulted in cancer diagnosis in 1207 patients (n=815 invasive; n=392 in situ). With digital mammography + tomosynthesis, 15,541 patients were recalled and 3285 biopsies resulted in cancer diagnosis in 950 patients (n=707 invasive; n=243 in situ). Model-adjusted rates per 1000 screens were as follows: for recall rate, 107 (95% CI, 89-124) with digital mammography vs 91 (95% CI, 73-108) with digital mammography + tomosynthesis; difference, -16 (95% CI, -18 to -14; P tomosynthesis; difference, 1.3 (95% CI, 0.4-2.1; P = .004); for cancer detection, 4.2 (95% CI, 3.8-4.7) with digital mammography vs 5.4 (95% CI, 4.9-6.0) with digital mammography + tomosynthesis; difference, 1.2 (95% CI, 0.8-1.6; P tomosynthesis; difference, 1.2 (95% CI, 0.8-1.6; P tomosynthesis was associated with an increase

  1. Determining the spatial heterogeneity underlying racial and ethnic differences in timely mammography screening

    Joseph Gibbons

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The leading cause of cancer death for women worldwide continues to be breast cancer. Early detection through timely mammography has been recognized to increase the probability of survival. While mammography rates have risen for many women in recent years, disparities in screening along racial/ethnic lines persist across nations. In this paper, we argue that the role of local context, as identified through spatial heterogeneity, is an unexplored dynamic which explains some of the gaps in mammography utilization by race/ethnicity. Methods We apply geographically weighted regression methods to responses from the 2008 Public Health Corporations’ Southeastern Household Health Survey, to examine the spatial heterogeneity in mammograms in the Philadelphia metropolitan area. Results We find first aspatially that minority identity, in fact, increases the odds of a timely mammogram: 74% for non-Hispanic Blacks and 80% for Hispanic/Latinas. However, the geographically weighted regression confirms the relation of race/ethnicity to mammograms varies by space. Notably, the coefficients for Hispanic/Latinas are only significant in portions of the region. In other words, the increased odds of a timely mammography we found are not constant spatially. Other key variables that are known to influence timely screening, such as the source of healthcare and social capital, measured as community connection, also vary by space. Conclusions These results have ramifications globally, demonstrating that the influence of individual characteristics which motivate, or inhibit, cancer screening may not be constant across space. This inconsistency calls for healthcare practitioners and outreach services to be mindful of the local context in their planning and resource allocation efforts.

  2. An adaptive algorithm for the detection of microcalcifications in simulated low-dose mammography

    Treiber, O.; Wanninger, F.; Führ, H.; Panzer, W.; Regulla, D.; Winkler, G.

    2003-02-01

    This paper uses the task of microcalcification detection as a benchmark problem to assess the potential for dose reduction in x-ray mammography. We present the results of a newly developed algorithm for detection of microcalcifications as a case study for a typical commercial film-screen system (Kodak Min-R 2000/2190). The first part of the paper deals with the simulation of dose reduction for film-screen mammography based on a physical model of the imaging process. Use of a more sensitive film-screen system is expected to result in additional smoothing of the image. We introduce two different models of that behaviour, called moderate and strong smoothing. We then present an adaptive, model-based microcalcification detection algorithm. Comparing detection results with ground-truth images obtained under the supervision of an expert radiologist allows us to establish the soundness of the detection algorithm. We measure the performance on the dose-reduced images in order to assess the loss of information due to dose reduction. It turns out that the smoothing behaviour has a strong influence on detection rates. For moderate smoothing, a dose reduction by 25% has no serious influence on the detection results, whereas a dose reduction by 50% already entails a marked deterioration of the performance. Strong smoothing generally leads to an unacceptable loss of image quality. The test results emphasize the impact of the more sensitive film-screen system and its characteristics on the problem of assessing the potential for dose reduction in film-screen mammography. The general approach presented in the paper can be adapted to fully digital mammography.

  3. An adaptive algorithm for the detection of microcalcifications in simulated low-dose mammography

    Treiber, O; Wanninger, F; Fuehr, H; Panzer, W; Regulla, D; Winkler, G

    2003-01-01

    This paper uses the task of microcalcification detection as a benchmark problem to assess the potential for dose reduction in x-ray mammography. We present the results of a newly developed algorithm for detection of microcalcifications as a case study for a typical commercial film-screen system (Kodak Min-R 2000/2190). The first part of the paper deals with the simulation of dose reduction for film-screen mammography based on a physical model of the imaging process. Use of a more sensitive film-screen system is expected to result in additional smoothing of the image. We introduce two different models of that behaviour, called moderate and strong smoothing. We then present an adaptive, model-based microcalcification detection algorithm. Comparing detection results with ground-truth images obtained under the supervision of an expert radiologist allows us to establish the soundness of the detection algorithm. We measure the performance on the dose-reduced images in order to assess the loss of information due to dose reduction. It turns out that the smoothing behaviour has a strong influence on detection rates. For moderate smoothing, a dose reduction by 25% has no serious influence on the detection results, whereas a dose reduction by 50% already entails a marked deterioration of the performance. Strong smoothing generally leads to an unacceptable loss of image quality. The test results emphasize the impact of the more sensitive film-screen system and its characteristics on the problem of assessing the potential for dose reduction in film-screen mammography. The general approach presented in the paper can be adapted to fully digital mammography

  4. Average glandular dose in routine mammography screening using a Sectra Microdose Mammography unit

    Hemdal, B.; Herrnsdorf, L.; Andersson, I.; Bengtsson, G.; Heddson, B.; Olsson, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Sectra MicroDose Mammography system is based on direct photon counting (with a solid-state detector), and a substantially lower dose to the breast than when using conventional system can be expected. In this work absorbed dose measurements have been performed for the first unit used in routine mammography screening (at the Hospitals of Helsingborg (Sweden)). Two European protocols on dosimetry in mammography have been followed. Measurement of half value layer (HVL) cannot be performed as prescribed, but this study has demonstrated than non-invasive measurements of HVL can be performed accurately with a sensitive and well collimated solid-state detector with simultaneous correction for the energy dependence. The average glandular dose for a 50 mm standard breast with 50% glandularity, simulated by 45 mm polymethylmethacrylate, was found to be 0.21 and 0.28 mGy in March and December 2004, respectively. These values are much lower than for any other mammography system on the market today. It has to be stressed that the measurement were made using the current clinical settings and that no systematic optimisation of the relationship between absorbed dose and diagnostic image quality has been performed within the present study. In order to further increase the accuracy of absorbed dose measurements for this unit, the existing dose protocols should be revised to account also for the tungsten/aluminium anode/filter combination, the multi-slit pre-collimator device and the occurrence of a dose profile in the scanning direction. (authors)

  5. Mammography discomfort: a holistic perspective derived from women's experiences

    Poulos, Ann; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Mammography discomfort has the potential to deter women from attending for regular breast screening. Previous studies have focussed on the pain/discomfort of the mammography procedure itself. The purpose of this study was to consider discomfort from a holistic perspective of the mammography experience derived from the women themselves. Methods: Qualitative research methods were employed. Using theoretical sampling, 12 women who had recently experienced mammography were interviewed. The interview questions aimed to explore the experience of women attending for a mammogram from arrival to departure and beyond in order to identify aspects which potentially increase discomfort. Data analysis involved coding and categorisation and identification of key concepts and their relationships. Results: A conceptual framework was developed that demonstrates the contributors to mammography discomfort and the relationships between these as identified by the women. Conclusions: The conceptual framework has important implications for clinical practice and future research

  6. Reproducibility of Mammography Units, Film Processing and Quality Imaging

    Gaona, Enrique

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to carry out an exploratory survey of the problems of quality control in mammography and processors units as a diagnosis of the current situation of mammography facilities. Measurements of reproducibility, optical density, optical difference and gamma index are included. Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and is the second leading cause of cancer death among women in the Mexican Republic. Mammography is a radiographic examination specially designed for detecting breast pathology. We found that the problems of reproducibility of AEC are smaller than the problems of processors units because almost all processors fall outside of the acceptable variation limits and they can affect the mammography quality image and the dose to breast. Only four mammography units agree with the minimum score established by ACR and FDA for the phantom image

  7. Descriptive study of the quality control in mammography

    Gaona, E.; Perdigon C, G.M.; Casian C, G.A.; Azorin N, J.; Diaz G, J.A.I.; Arreola, M.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of mammography is to provide contrast between a lesion that is possible residing within the breast and normal surrounding tissue. Quality control is essential for maintaining the contrast imaging performance of a mammography system and incorporate tests that are relevant in that they are predictive of future degradation of contrast imaging performance. These tests will also be done at frequency that is high enough to intercept most drifts in quality imaging or performance before they become diagnostically significant. The quality control study has as objective to describe the results of the assessment of quality imaging elements (film optical density, contrast (density difference), uniformity, resolution and noise) of 62 mammography departments without quality control program and comparison these results with a mammography reference department with a quality control program. When comparing the results they allow seeing the clinical utility of to have a quality control program to reduce the errors of mammography interpretation. (Author)

  8. [Factors Influencing Participation in Financial Incentive Programmes of Health Insurance Funds. Results of the Study 'German Health Update'].

    Jordan, S; von der Lippe, E; Starker, A; Hoebel, J; Franke, A

    2015-11-01

    The statutory health insurance can offer their insured incentive programmes that will motivate for healthy behaviour through a financial or material reward. This study will show results about what factors influence financial incentive programme participation (BPT) including all sorts of statutory health insurance funds and taking into account gender differences. For the cross-sectional analysis, data were used from 15,858 participants in the study 'Germany Health Update' (GEDA) from 2009, who were insured in the statutory health insurance. The selection of potential influencing variables for a BPT is based on the "Behavioural Model for Health Service Use" of Andersen. Accordingly, various factors were included in logistic regression models, which were calculated separately by gender: predisposing factors (age, education, social support, and health awareness), enabling factors (income, statutory health insurance fund, and family physician), and need factors (smoking, fruit and vegetable consumption, sports, body mass index, and general health status). In consideration of all factors, for both sexes, BPT is associated with age, health awareness, education, use of a family physician, smoking, and sports activities. In addition, income, body mass index, and diet are significant in women and social support and kind of statutory health insurance fund in men. It is found that predisposing, enabling and need factors are relevant. Financial incentive programmes reach population groups with greatest need less than those groups who already have a health-conscious behaviour, who receive a reward for this. In longitudinal studies, further research on financial incentive programmes should investigate the existence of deadweight effects and whether incentive programmes can contribute to the reduction of the inequity in health. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography vs. mammography and MRI - clinical performance in a multi-reader evaluation

    Fallenberg, E.M.; Schmitzberger, F.F.; Amer, H.; Ingold-Heppner, B.; Balleyguier, C.; Diekmann, F.; Engelken, F.; Mann, R.M.; Renz, D.M.; Bick, U.; Hamm, B.; Dromain, C.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the diagnostic performance of contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) to digital mammography (MG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a prospective two-centre, multi-reader study. METHODS: One hundred seventy-eight women (mean age 53 years) with invasive breast

  10. TL dosimetry for quality control of CR mammography imaging systems

    Gaona, E.; Nieto, J. A.; Góngora, J. A. I. D.; Arreola, M.; Enríquez, J. G. F.

    The aim of this work is to estimate the average glandular dose with thermoluminescent (TL) dosimetry and comparison with quality imaging in computed radiography (CR) mammography. For a measuring dose, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the American College of Radiology (ACR) use a phantom, so that dose and image quality are assessed with the same test object. The mammography is a radiological image to visualize early biological manifestations of breast cancer. Digital systems have two types of image-capturing devices, full field digital mammography (FFDM) and CR mammography. In Mexico, there are several CR mammography systems in clinical use, but only one system has been approved for use by the FDA. Mammography CR uses a photostimulable phosphor detector (PSP) system. Most CR plates are made of 85% BaFBr and 15% BaFI doped with europium (Eu) commonly called barium flourohalideE We carry out an exploratory survey of six CR mammography units from three different manufacturers and six dedicated X-ray mammography units with fully automatic exposure. The results show three CR mammography units (50%) have a dose greater than 3.0 mGy without demonstrating improved image quality. The differences between doses averages from TLD system and dosimeter with ionization chamber are less than 10%. TLD system is a good option for average glandular dose measurement for X-rays with a HVL (0.35-0.38 mmAl) and kVp (24-26) used in quality control procedures with ACR Mammography Accreditation Phantom.

  11. What to Change – How to Have Influence? Children’s Ideas About Exercising Power and Participating

    Arja Virta

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Interest in children’s voice in society has been increasing gradually. This implies both the creation of new channels for participation, and also in the intensification of the research on children’s citizenship. This article asks what ideas twelve-year-old children have about using power and about their own opportunities of having influence in their schools. The study is based on qualitative questionnaires, in which the respondents were asked questions about how they would use power to make improvements in different spheres, starting from their classroom and ending up to the world.  The questionnaire also asked about their experience of agency in schools. According to the responses, the children’s suggestions for changes were focused on the physical environment. As to their class and school, it was the informal level of the school that was important. In the global level, the children wished that the world would be safe. As to their agency in school, they mainly depended on adults who organize students’ participation.

  12. Awareness of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study and the US presidential apology and their influence on minority participation in biomedical research.

    Katz, Ralph V; Kegeles, S Stephen; Kressin, Nancy R; Green, B Lee; James, Sherman A; Wang, Min Qi; Russell, Stefanie L; Claudio, Cristina

    2008-06-01

    We compared the influence of awareness of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study and the presidential apology for that study on the willingness of Blacks, non-Hispanic Whites, and Hispanics to participate in biomedical research. The Tuskegee Legacy Project Questionnaire was administered to 1133 adults in 4 US cities. This 60-item questionnaire addressed issues related to the recruitment of minorities into biomedical studies. Adjusted multivariate analysis showed that, compared with Whites, Blacks were nearly 4 times as likely to have heard of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study, more than twice as likely to have correctly named Clinton as the president who made the apology, and 2 to 3 times more likely to have been willing to participate in biomedical studies despite having heard about the Tuskegee Syphilis Study (odds ratio [OR]=2.9; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.4, 6.2) or the presidential apology (OR=2.3; 95% CI=1.4, 3.9). These marked differences likely reflect the cultural reality in the Black community, which has been accustomed to increased risks in many activities. For Whites, this type of information may have been more shocking and at odds with their expectations and, thus, led to a stronger negative impact.

  13. A Framework for Describing the Influence of Service Organisation and Delivery on Participation in Fetal Anomaly Screening in England

    Hyacinth O. Ukuhor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this research was to explore the influence of service organisation and delivery on providers and users’ interactions and decision-making in the context of Down’s syndrome screening. Methods. A qualitative descriptive study involving online interviews conducted with a purposive sample of 34 community midwives, 35 pregnant women, and 15 partners from two maternity services in different health districts in England. Data were analysed using a combination of grounded theory principles and content analysis and a framework was developed. Results. The main emerging concepts were organisational constraints, power, routinisation, and tensions. Providers were concerned about being time-limited that encouraged routine, minimal information-giving and lacked skills to check users’ understanding. Users reported their participation was influenced by providers’ attitudes, the ambience of the environment, asymmetric power relations, and the offer and perception of screening as a routine test. Discordance between the national programme’s policy of nondirective informed choice and providers’ actions of recommending and arranging screening appointments was unexpected. Additionally, providers and users differing perceptions of emotional effects of information, beliefs, and expectations created tensions within them, between them, and in the antenatal environment. Conclusions. A move towards a social model of care may be beneficial to empower service users and create less tension for providers and users.

  14. Influence of the Number of Predicted Words on Text Input Speed in Participants With Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    Pouplin, Samuel; Roche, Nicolas; Vaugier, Isabelle; Jacob, Antoine; Figere, Marjorie; Pottier, Sandra; Antoine, Jean-Yves; Bensmail, Djamel

    2016-02-01

    To determine whether the number of words displayed in the word prediction software (WPS) list affects text input speed (TIS) in people with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI), and whether any influence is dependent on the level of the lesion. A cross-sectional trial. A rehabilitation center. Persons with cervical SCI (N=45). Lesion level was high (C4 and C5, American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] grade A or B) for 15 participants (high-lesion group) and low (between C6 and C8, ASIA grade A or B) for 30 participants (low-lesion group). TIS was evaluated during four 10-minute copying tasks: (1) without WPS (Without); (2) with a display of 3 predicted words (3Words); (3) with a display of 6 predicted words (6Words); and (4) with a display of 8 predicted words (8Words). During the 4 copying tasks, TIS was measured objectively (characters per minute, number of errors) and subjectively through subject report (fatigue, perception of speed, cognitive load, satisfaction). For participants with low-cervical SCI, TIS without WPS was faster than with WPS, regardless of the number of words displayed (Pwords displayed in a word prediction list on TIS; however, perception of TIS differed according to lesion level. For persons with low-cervical SCI, a small number of words should be displayed, or WPS should not be used at all. For persons with high-cervical SCI, a larger number of words displayed increases the comfort of use of WPS. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Colour application on mammography image segmentation

    Embong, R.; Aziz, N. M. Nik Ab.; Karim, A. H. Abd; Ibrahim, M. R.

    2017-09-01

    The segmentation process is one of the most important steps in image processing and computer vision since it is vital in the initial stage of image analysis. Segmentation of medical images involves complex structures and it requires precise segmentation result which is necessary for clinical diagnosis such as the detection of tumour, oedema, and necrotic tissues. Since mammography images are grayscale, researchers are looking at the effect of colour in the segmentation process of medical images. Colour is known to play a significant role in the perception of object boundaries in non-medical colour images. Processing colour images require handling more data, hence providing a richer description of objects in the scene. Colour images contain ten percent (10%) additional edge information as compared to their grayscale counterparts. Nevertheless, edge detection in colour image is more challenging than grayscale image as colour space is considered as a vector space. In this study, we implemented red, green, yellow, and blue colour maps to grayscale mammography images with the purpose of testing the effect of colours on the segmentation of abnormality regions in the mammography images. We applied the segmentation process using the Fuzzy C-means algorithm and evaluated the percentage of average relative error of area for each colour type. The results showed that all segmentation with the colour map can be done successfully even for blurred and noisy images. Also the size of the area of the abnormality region is reduced when compare to the segmentation area without the colour map. The green colour map segmentation produced the smallest percentage of average relative error (10.009%) while yellow colour map segmentation gave the largest percentage of relative error (11.367%).

  16. Fun, influence and competence—a mixed methods study of prerequisites for high school students’ participation in physical education

    Eirik Abildsnes

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many adolescents do not reach the recommended levels of physical activity (PA, and students attending vocational studies are less committed to take part in physical education (PE than other students. The purpose of the present study was twofold: 1 to examine differences in physical activity, diet, smoking habits, sleep and screen time among Norwegian vocational high school students who selected either a PE model focusing on PA skills, technique and improvement of physical performance (“Sports enjoyment” or more on health, play and having fun when participating in PE lessons (“Motion enjoyment”, and 2 to explore the students’ experiences with PE programs. Methods In this mixed methods study 181 out of 220 invited students (82% comprising 141 (78% girls and 40 (22% boys attending vocational studies of Restaurant and Food Processing (24%, Design, Arts and Crafts (27% or Healthcare, Childhood and Youth Development (49% were recruited for participation in the new PE program. PA level, sedentary time and sleep were objectively recorded using the SenseWear Armband Mini. A self-report questionnaire was used to assess dietary habits, smoking and snuffing habits, use of alcohol, screen use and active transportation. Four focus group interviews with 23 students (12 boys were conducted to explore how the students experienced the new PE program. Results Students attending “Motion enjoyment” accrued less steps/day compared to the “Sports enjoyment” group (6661 (5514, 7808 vs.9167 (7945, 10390 steps/day and reported higher screen use (mean, 3.1; 95% CI, 2.8, 3.5 vs. 2.4 (2.0, 2.9 hours/day. Compared to those attending “Sports enjoyment”, a higher number of students attending “Motion enjoyment” reported an irregular meal pattern (adjusted odds ratio, 5.40; 95% confidence interval (CI, 2.28, 12.78, and being a current smoker (12.22 (1.62, 107.95. The students participating in the focus group interviews emphasized the

  17. Fun, influence and competence-a mixed methods study of prerequisites for high school students' participation in physical education.

    Abildsnes, Eirik; Rohde, Gudrun; Berntsen, Sveinung; Stea, Tonje H

    2017-03-10

    Many adolescents do not reach the recommended levels of physical activity (PA), and students attending vocational studies are less committed to take part in physical education (PE) than other students. The purpose of the present study was twofold: 1) to examine differences in physical activity, diet, smoking habits, sleep and screen time among Norwegian vocational high school students who selected either a PE model focusing on PA skills, technique and improvement of physical performance ("Sports enjoyment") or more on health, play and having fun when participating in PE lessons ("Motion enjoyment"), and 2) to explore the students' experiences with PE programs. In this mixed methods study 181 out of 220 invited students (82%) comprising 141 (78%) girls and 40 (22%) boys attending vocational studies of Restaurant and Food Processing (24%), Design, Arts and Crafts (27%) or Healthcare, Childhood and Youth Development (49%) were recruited for participation in the new PE program. PA level, sedentary time and sleep were objectively recorded using the SenseWear Armband Mini. A self-report questionnaire was used to assess dietary habits, smoking and snuffing habits, use of alcohol, screen use and active transportation. Four focus group interviews with 23 students (12 boys) were conducted to explore how the students experienced the new PE program. Students attending "Motion enjoyment" accrued less steps/day compared to the "Sports enjoyment" group (6661 (5514, 7808) vs.9167 (7945, 10390) steps/day) and reported higher screen use (mean, 3.1; 95% CI, 2.8, 3.5) vs. 2.4 (2.0, 2.9) hours/day). Compared to those attending "Sports enjoyment", a higher number of students attending "Motion enjoyment" reported an irregular meal pattern (adjusted odds ratio, 5.40; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.28, 12.78), and being a current smoker (12.22 (1.62, 107.95)). The students participating in the focus group interviews emphasized the importance of having competent and engaging teachers

  18. A PET imaging system dedicated to mammography

    Varela, J

    2007-01-01

    The imaging system Clear-PEM for positron emission mammography, under development within the framework of the Crystal Clear Collaboration at CERN, is presented. The detector is based on pixelized LYSO crystals optically coupled to avalanche photodiodes (APD) and readout by a fast low-noise electronic system. A dedicated digital trigger and data acquisition system is used for on-line selection of coincidence events with high efficiency, large bandwidth and negligible dead-time. The detector module performance was characterized in detail.

  19. Implementation of the qualities of radiodiagnostic: mammography

    Pacífico, L. C.; Magalhães, L. A. G.; Peixoto, J. G. P.; Fernandes, E.

    2018-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the expanded uncertainty of the mammographic calibration process and present the result of the internal audit performed at the Laboratory of Radiological Sciences (LCR). The qualities of the mammographic beans that are references in the LCR, comprises two irradiation conditions: no-attenuated beam and attenuated beam. Both had satisfactory results, with an expanded uncertainty equals 2,1%. The internal audit was performed, and the degree of accordance with the ISO/IEC 17025 was evaluated. The result of the internal audit was satisfactory. We conclude that LCR can perform calibrations on mammography qualities for end users.

  20. Mammography - recent technical developments and their clinical potential

    Hemdal, Bengt; Mattsson, Soeren [Malmoe Univ. Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics; Andersson, Ingvar [Malmoe Univ. Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Thilander Klang, Anne [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering; Bengtsson, Gert; Jarlman, O. [Lund Univ. Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Leitz, Wolfram [Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, Stockholm (Sweden); Bjurstam, Nils [Univ. of North Norway, Troms (Norway). Dept. of Radiology

    2002-05-01

    The recent technical developments in digital as well as screen-film X-ray mammography have been reviewed in order to evaluate their clinical potential and to analyse possible lines for future development. Material and methods: The scientific literature has been reviewed, conferences covered and contacts with colleagues developed. Companies in the field have been inquired and invited for presentations. Own experience has been gathered from different screen-film and digital mammography systems. Results and conclusions: Although there are important complementary techniques such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray mammography is still the golden standard for breast imaging. It is relatively simple and cost-effective, and it is presently the only realistic technique for screening in a large scale. It is still largely the only technique that can detect breast cancer in a pre invasive stage. Equipment for digital mammography is commercially available both with small area and full field technique (FFDM). The development of FFDM systems is now intense, as well as the development of dedicated workstations and computer-aided detection (CAD). In spite of this, the introduction of digital mammography has been very slow compared to most other X-ray examinations due to high costs and technical challenges to meet the high demands on image quality and dose in mammography as well as the demands on specialised workflow support for screening mammography and suitable display techniques. Film reading of digital mammograms has been the most common display mode so far, but to take full advantage of the digital concept, diagnostic as well as logistic, monitor reading must be applied. There is a potential of FFDM systems for significantly higher image quality or significantly lower dose than screen-film mammography (SFM), or both. Further research is necessary to fully use this potential. The investment costs are much higher for digital than screen-film mammography

  1. Mammography - recent technical developments and their clinical potential

    Hemdal, Bengt; Mattsson, Soeren; Bjurstam, Nils

    2002-05-01

    The recent technical developments in digital as well as screen-film X-ray mammography have been reviewed in order to evaluate their clinical potential and to analyse possible lines for future development. Material and methods: The scientific literature has been reviewed, conferences covered and contacts with colleagues developed. Companies in the field have been inquired and invited for presentations. Own experience has been gathered from different screen-film and digital mammography systems. Results and conclusions: Although there are important complementary techniques such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray mammography is still the golden standard for breast imaging. It is relatively simple and cost-effective, and it is presently the only realistic technique for screening in a large scale. It is still largely the only technique that can detect breast cancer in a pre invasive stage. Equipment for digital mammography is commercially available both with small area and full field technique (FFDM). The development of FFDM systems is now intense, as well as the development of dedicated workstations and computer-aided detection (CAD). In spite of this, the introduction of digital mammography has been very slow compared to most other X-ray examinations due to high costs and technical challenges to meet the high demands on image quality and dose in mammography as well as the demands on specialised workflow support for screening mammography and suitable display techniques. Film reading of digital mammograms has been the most common display mode so far, but to take full advantage of the digital concept, diagnostic as well as logistic, monitor reading must be applied. There is a potential of FFDM systems for significantly higher image quality or significantly lower dose than screen-film mammography (SFM), or both. Further research is necessary to fully use this potential. The investment costs are much higher for digital than screen-film mammography

  2. A scoping review protocol on social participation of indigenous elders, intergenerational solidarity and their influence on individual and community wellness.

    Viscogliosi, Chantal; Asselin, Hugo; Basile, Suzy; Couturier, Yves; Drolet, Marie-Josée; Gagnon, Dominique; Torrie, Jill; Levasseur, Mélanie

    2017-05-12

    Indigenous elders have traditionally played an important role in maintaining social cohesion within their communities. Today, part of this role has been taken over by government social and healthcare services, but they are having limited success in addressing social challenges. Increasing elders' social participation and intergenerational solidarity might foster community development and benefit young people, families, communities and the elders themselves. However, knowledge of the contribution of elders' social participation and intergenerational solidarity to wellness is scattered and needs to be synthesised. This protocol presents a scoping review on the social participation of indigenous elders, intergenerational solidarity and their influence on individual and community wellness. This scoping review protocol is based on an innovative methodological framework designed to gather information from the scientific and grey literature and from indigenous sources. It was developed by an interdisciplinary team including indigenous scholars/researchers, knowledge users and key informants. In addition to searching information databases in fields such as public health and indigenous studies, an advisory committee will ensure that information is gathered from grey literature and indigenous sources. The protocol was approved by the Ethics Review Board of the Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue and the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Health and Social Services Commission. The comprehensive synthesis of the scientific and grey literature and indigenous sources proposed in this protocol will not only raise awareness within indigenous communities and among healthcare professionals and community organisations, but will also enable decision-makers to better meet the needs of indigenous people. The innovative methodological framework proposed in this scoping review protocol will yield richer information on the contribution of elders to community wellness. This

  3. The participants' perspective: how biographic-narrative intervention influences identity negotiation and quality of life in aphasia.

    Corsten, Sabine; Schimpf, Erika J; Konradi, Jürgen; Keilmann, Annerose; Hardering, Friedericke

    2015-01-01

    -narrative intervention. The participants' sense of self changed through the approach. The findings provide foundations for future work using biographic narrative interventions to influence QoL and identity renegotiation in people with aphasia. © 2015 Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

  4. MO-E-217A-01: Contrast-Enhanced Spectral Mammography - Physical Aspects and QA.

    Yaffe, M; Hill, M

    2012-06-01

    To describe the current state of dual energy contrast-enhanced digital mammography, to discuss those aspects of its operation that require evaluation or monitoring and to propose elements of a program for quality assurance of such systems. The principles of dual-energy contrast imaging will be discussed and tools and techniques for assessment of performance will be described. Many of the elements affecting image quality and dose performance in digital mammography (eg noise, system linearity, consistency of x-ray output and detector performance, artifacts) remain important. In addition, the ability to register images can influence the resultant image quality. The maintenance of breast compression thickness during the imaging procedure and calibration of the system to allow quantification of iodine in the breast represent new challenges to quality assurance. CESM provides a means of acquiring new information regarding tumor angiogenesis and may reveal some cancers that will not be detectable on digital mammography. It may also better demonstrate the extent of disease. The medical physicist must understand the dependence of image quality on physical factors. Implementation of a relevant QA program will be required if the promise of this new modality is to be delivered. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  5. Study about diagnostic quality in a public-center of mammography of Santa Fe, Argentina

    Lescano, R.; Kiguen, J.; Gaitan, L.; Caspani, C.

    2001-01-01

    The objective is to apply a method that allows us to evaluate the diagnostic quality of a public-center of mammography and to validate it. The representative centers of a social class were grouped; this one is evaluated measuring the mechanics, electrics, dosimetrics and personal parameters of the process to get the mammography diagnostic. The original study and the respective report was submitted to the valuation of a panel of experts, who evaluated image, techniques and diagnostics. The equipment and techniques used are described in this case. The judgment of the ACR and the Argentine legislation are applied. The dosimetric results of the mammography practice serve to determine the local reference levels. The people who intervened in the diagnosis are evaluated, as well as the services that can influence it. Seeking the parametric sensibility in relationship with the succeeded and precocious diagnosis, the success of it is confirmed by the panel of experts. We conclude by indicating that the success percentage in the diagnosis is about 98,36%, that there is 100% of coincidence among the perception and the value of the study quality. The valuation of the image reaches 69,2% of the maximum score, and the placement technique, 73,9%. The parametric sensibilities of the principal variables are discussed. (author)

  6. How needs and preferences of employees influence participation in health promotion programs: A six-month follow-up study

    A. Rongen (Anne); S.J.W. Robroek (Suzan); W. van Ginkel (Wouter); D. Lindeboom; M. Pet (Martin); A. Burdorf (Alex)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Low participation in health promotion programs (HPPs) might hamper their effectiveness. A potential reason for low participation is disagreement between needs and preferences of potential participants and the actual HPPs offered. This study aimed to investigate employees'

  7. Quality control in digital mammography: the noise components

    Leyton, Fernando; Nogueira, Maria do Socorro; Duran, Maria Paz; Dantas, Marcelino; Ubeda, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    To measure the linearity of the detector and determine the noise components (quantum, electronic and structural noise) that contributed to losing image quality and to determine the signal noise ratio (SNR) and contrast noise ratio (CNR). This paper describes the results of the implementation of a protocol for quality control in digital mammography performed in two direct digital mammography equipment (Hologic, Selenia) in Santiago of Chile. Shows the results of linearity and noise analysis of the images which establishes the main cause of noise in the image of the mammogram to ensure the quality and optimize procedures. The study evaluated two digital mammography's Selenia, Hologic (DR) from Santiago, Chile. We conducted the assessment of linearity of the detector, the signal noise ratio, contrast noise ratio and was determined the contribution of different noise components (quantum, electronics and structural noise). Used different thicknesses used in clinical practice according to the protocol for quality control in digital mammography of Spanish society of medical physics and NHSBSP Equipment Report 0604 Version 3. The Selenia mammography software was used for the analysis of images and Unfors Xi detector for measuring doses. The mammography detector has a linear performance, the CNR and SNR did not comply with the Protocol for the thicknesses of 60 and 70 mm. The main contribution of the noise corresponds to the quantum noise, therefore it is necessary to adjust and optimize the mammography system. (author)

  8. Quality control in digital mammography: the noise components

    Leyton, Fernando [Universidade de Tarapaca, Arica (Chile). Centro de Estudios en Ciencias Radiologicas; Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Nogueira, Maria do Socorro, E-mail: mnogue@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Duran, Maria Paz [Clinica Alemana, Santiago (Chile). Dept. de Radiologia; Dantas, Marcelino, E-mail: marcelino@inb.gov.b [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Caldas, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Tratamento de Minerios; Ubeda, Carlos, E-mail: cubeda@uta.c [Universidade de Tarapaca, Arica (Chile). Fac. de Ciencias de la Salud

    2011-07-01

    To measure the linearity of the detector and determine the noise components (quantum, electronic and structural noise) that contributed to losing image quality and to determine the signal noise ratio (SNR) and contrast noise ratio (CNR). This paper describes the results of the implementation of a protocol for quality control in digital mammography performed in two direct digital mammography equipment (Hologic, Selenia) in Santiago of Chile. Shows the results of linearity and noise analysis of the images which establishes the main cause of noise in the image of the mammogram to ensure the quality and optimize procedures. The study evaluated two digital mammography's Selenia, Hologic (DR) from Santiago, Chile. We conducted the assessment of linearity of the detector, the signal noise ratio, contrast noise ratio and was determined the contribution of different noise components (quantum, electronics and structural noise). Used different thicknesses used in clinical practice according to the protocol for quality control in digital mammography of Spanish society of medical physics and NHSBSP Equipment Report 0604 Version 3. The Selenia mammography software was used for the analysis of images and Unfors Xi detector for measuring doses. The mammography detector has a linear performance, the CNR and SNR did not comply with the Protocol for the thicknesses of 60 and 70 mm. The main contribution of the noise corresponds to the quantum noise, therefore it is necessary to adjust and optimize the mammography system. (author)

  9. Mammography and ultrasound in the evaluation of male breast disease

    Munoz Carrasco, Rafaela; Alvarez Benito, Marina; Raya Povedano, Jose Luis [Hospital Universitario ' Reina Sofia' , Radiology Department, Cordoba (Spain); Munoz Gomariz, Elisa [Hospital Universitario ' Reina Sofia' , Support Unit for Research, Cordoba (Spain); Martinez Paredes, Maria [University of Cordoba, Radiology and Physical Medicine Area, Cordoba (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    To assess clinical variables that may be useful in differentiating gynaecomastia from carcinoma and to analyse the contribution of mammography and ultrasound to the evaluation of male breast disease. All men who underwent mammography and/or ultrasound between 1993 and 2006 in our hospital were retrospectively evaluated. Clinical characteristics in patients with gynaecomastia and those with carcinoma were compared. Radiological findings were classified according to the BI-RADS (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System) criteria. The diagnostic performance of physical examination, mammography and ultrasound was determined and compared. A total of 628 patients with 518 mammograms and 423 ultrasounds were reviewed. The final diagnoses were: 19 carcinomas, 526 gynaecomastias, 84 other benign conditions and 25 normal. There were statistically significant differences in age, bilateral involvement, clinical presentation and physical examination between patients with carcinoma and those with gynaecomastia. The diagnostic performance of physical examination was lower than that of mammography and ultrasound (p < 0.05 for specificity). Mammography was the most sensitive (94.7%) and ultrasound the most specific (95.3%) for detection of malignancy (p > 0.05). We propose an algorithm for the use of mammography and ultrasound in men. Mammography and ultrasound, with a negative predictive value close to 100%, make it possible to avoid very many unnecessary surgical procedures in men. (orig.)

  10. Traceability and quality control in mammography: measurements and models

    Peixoto, Jose Guilherme Pereira

    2002-10-01

    The success of a treatment or diagnosis using radiation, depends on the optimization of the dose determination to be administered for the patient and on the beam radiation quality. It is recognized by the international guidelines that it is necessary to improve calibration services for mammography beams in order to improve the quality of clinical diagnosis. Major efforts have been made by several laboratories in order to establish an appropriate and traceable calibration infrastructure and to provide the basis for a quality control program in mammography. The contribution of the radiation metrology network to the mammography services is reviewed in this work. Steps required for the implementation of a mammography calibration system using a constant potential x-ray and a clinical mammography x-ray machine are presented. The various qualities of mammography radiation discussed in this work are in accordance with the IEC 61674 and the AAPM recommendations. This work also presents the methodology and the procedures to maintain and to disseminate the traceability at the x-ray mammography range, describing the interlaboratory comparison performed at LNMRI/IRD/CNEN and at the IPEN/CNEN using the secondary standard ionization chambers traceable with the international standard. It assesses the inter-laboratory comparison consistency and decides whether a questionable value should or not be accepted, using the residual method. This thesis discusses the uncertainties involved in all steps of the calibration chain in accord once with the ISO recommendations. (author)

  11. Dynamic helical CT mammography of breast cancer

    Yamamoto, Akira; Fukushima, Hitoshi; Okamura, Ryuji; Nakamura, Yoshiaki; Morimoto, Taisuke; Urata, Yoji; Mukaihara, Sumio; Hayakawa, Katsumi

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether dynamic helical computed tomography (CT)-mammography could assist in selecting the most appropriate surgical method in women with breast cancer. Preoperative contrast-enhanced helical CT scanning of the breast was performed on 133 female patients with suspicion of breast cancer at the same time as clinical, mammographic, and/or ultrasonographic examinations. The patients were scanned in the prone position with a specially designed CT-compatible device. A helical scan was made with rapid intravenous bolus injection (3 ml/s) of 100 ml of iodine contrast material. Three-dimensional maximum intensity projection (MIP) images were reconstructed, and CT findings were correlated with surgical and histopathological findings. Histopathological analysis revealed 84 malignant lesions and seven benign lesions. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy levels of the CT scanning were 94.6%, 58.6%, and 78.9%. Helical scanning alone revealed additional contralateral carcinomas in three of four patients and additional ipsilateral carcinomas in three of five patients. However, the technique gave false-positive readings in 24 patients. The preoperative CT-mammogram altered the surgical method in six patients. Dynamic helical CT-mammography in the prone position may be one of the choices of adjunct imaging in patients with suspected breast cancer scheduled for surgery. (author)

  12. Classification of breast microcalcifications using spectral mammography

    Ghammraoui, B.; Glick, S. J.

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential of spectral mammography to distinguish between type I calcifications, consisting of calcium oxalate dihydrate or weddellite compounds that are more often associated with benign lesions, and type II calcifications containing hydroxyapatite which are predominantly associated with malignant tumors. Methods: Using a ray tracing algorithm, we simulated the total number of x-ray photons recorded by the detector at one pixel from a single pencil-beam projection through a breast of 50/50 (adipose/glandular) tissues with inserted microcalcifications of different types and sizes. Material decomposition using two energy bins was then applied to characterize the simulated calcifications into hydroxyapatite and weddellite using maximumlikelihood estimation, taking into account the polychromatic source, the detector response function and the energy dependent attenuation. Results: Simulation tests were carried out for different doses and calcification sizes for multiple realizations. The results were summarized using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis with the area under the curve (AUC) taken as an overall indicator of discrimination performance and showing high AUC values up to 0.99. Conclusion: Our simulation results obtained for a uniform breast imaging phantom indicate that spectral mammography using two energy bins has the potential to be used as a non-invasive method for discrimination between type I and type II microcalcifications to improve early breast cancer diagnosis and reduce the number of unnecessary breast biopsies.

  13. Predisposed to participate? The influence of family socio-economic background on children's sports participation and daily amount of physical activity

    Nielsen, Glen; Grønfeldt, Vivian; Støckel, Jan Toftegaard

    2012-01-01

    and the amounts of general physical activity in children. This reflected the tendencies for club-organized sport to contribute a relatively small amount to the overall amount of physical activity in children, and for children of low SEP to be equally active in other settings such as school-breaks, day care...... questionnaire data and accelerometer measures. Family socio-economic position (SEP) was found to be positively associated with children’s participation in organized sport, which could be explained by differences in family capitals. By contrast, this study found no relationship between families’ SEP...

  14. Validation of electrical impedance tomography qualitative and quantitative values and comparison of the numeric pain distress score against mammography.

    Juliana, Norsham; Shahar, Suzana; Chelliah, Kanaga Kumari; Ghazali, Ahmad Rohi; Osman, Fazilah; Sahar, Mohd Azmani

    2014-01-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a potential supplement for mammogram screening. This study aimed to evaluate and feasibility of EIT as opposed to mammography and to determine pain perception with both imaging methods. Women undergoing screening mammography at the Radiology Department of National University of Malaysia Medical Centre were randomly selected for EIT imaging. All women were requested to give a pain score after each imaging session. Two independent raters were chosen to define the image findings of EIT. A total of 164 women in the age range from 40 to 65-year-old participated and were divided into two groups; normal and abnormal. EIT sensitivity and specificity for rater 1 were 69.4% and 63.3, whereas for rater 2 they were 55.3% and 57.0% respectively. The reliability for each rater ranged between good to very good (p<0.05). Quantitative values of EIT showed there were significant differences in all values between groups (ANCOVA, p<0.05). Interestingly, EIT scored a median pain score of 1.51±0.75 whereas mammography scored 4.15±0.87 (Mann Whitney U test, p<0.05). From these quantitative values, EIT has the potential as a health discriminating index. Its ability to replace image findings from mammography needs further investigation.

  15. [Commentary on the planned restructuring of mammography screening in Austria].

    Vutuc, Christian; Haidinger, Gerald

    2011-08-01

    With regards to the planned reorganisation of screening mammography in Austria - from an opportunistic to an organised system - the problems related with such a change are depicted from an epidemiological point of view. We were able to demonstrate earlier that opportunistic screening mammography matches the results of controlled screening mammography in Finland and Sweden. Switching to a controlled system in Austria would - besides the need for a change in legislation - lead to enormous expenditures in terms of resources needed and moreover, it could be not evaluated for years.

  16. Digital mammography and their developments; Digitale Mammografie und ihre Weiterentwicklung

    Wienbeck, Susanne [Universitaetsmedizin Goettingen (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Fischer, Uwe [Diagnostisches Brustzentrum Goettingen (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    At the present time digital mammography is a satisfactory breast diagnostic imaging in clinical as well as screening mammography in defined age groups. Nevertheless it shows beside the application of ionizing radiation in women with dense breasts limitations in the detection of non calcification breast cancers. Tomosynthesis, digital contrast-enhanced mammography and breast-CT with or without contrast media lead to better results. Especially the application of contrast media for the visualisation of the tumor angiogenesis is invariably superior to all other non-contrast imaging modalities. However, the excellent results of breast MRI will be probably accessible with none of the new procedures.

  17. Pain during mammography: Implications for breast screening programmes

    Andrews, F.J.

    2001-01-01

    Pain experienced during mammography can deter women from attending for breast cancer screening. Review of the current literature on pain experienced during mammography reveals three main areas of interest: reports of the frequency of pain, identification of predictors of pain and strategies for responding to pain. Implications of this literature for breast screening programmes include the need for appropriate measurements of pain during mammography that are valid for screening populations, a further understanding of organizational factors involved in screening programmes that may be predictors of pain and for the development of valid strategies for responding to pain within breast screening programmes. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  18. Studies Comparing Screen-Film Mammography and Full-Field Digital Mammography in Breast Cancer Screening: Updated Review

    Skaane, P.

    2009-01-01

    Full-field digital mammography (FFDM) has several potential benefits as compared with screen-film mammography (SFM) in mammography screening. Digital technology also opens for implementation of advanced applications, including computer-aided detection (CAD) and tomosynthesis. Phantom studies and experimental clinical studies have shown that FFDM is equal or slightly superior to SFM for detection and characterization of mammographic abnormalities. Despite obvious advantages, the conversion to digital mammography has been slower than anticipated, and not only due to higher costs. Until very recently, some countries did not even permit the use of digital mammography in breast cancer screening. The reason for this reluctant attitude was concern about lower spatial resolution and about using soft-copy reading. Furthermore, there was a lack of data supporting improved diagnostic accuracy using FFDM in a screening setting, since two pioneer trials both showed nonsignificantly lower cancer detection rate at FFDM. The 10 studies comparing FFDM and SFM in mammography screening published so far have shown divergent and rather conflicting results. Nevertheless, there is a rapid conversion to digital mammography in breast cancer screening in many western countries. The aim of this article is to give an updated review of these studies, discuss the conflicting findings, and draw some conclusions from the results

  19. Breast imaging and reporting data system - Mammography. ACR BI-RADS registered -Mammography

    Fischer, U.; Helbrich, T.

    2006-01-01

    ACR BI-RADS registered mammography is an established technique in all German-speaking countries and has become a standard part of all mammographic findings. The first German-language edition three years ago made a significant contribution to this. This is the second, revised and edited edition. It is based on the fourth English-language edition of the ACR which was published in 2003. (orig.)

  20. The clinical use of mammography in the male; Klinische Relevanz der Mammographie beim Mann

    Merkle, E [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Abt. Radiologie; Mueller, M [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Abt. Radiologie; Vogel, J [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Abt. Radiologie; Klatt, S [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Abt. Innere Medizin I; Goerich, J [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Abt. Radiologie; Berger, H G [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Allgemeinchirurgische Abt.; Brambs, H J [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Abt. Radiologie

    1996-01-01

    During a period of four years 104 mammograms were performed in 89 men. Mastectomies were carried out on 23 men (group 1). 66 patients (group 2) were followed up clinically and in 15 patients serial mammograms were obtained. In group 1 there were 5 patients with bilateral gynaecomastia, 9 with unilateral gynaecomastia and two with pseudogynaecomastia and there were 7 patients with malignancies. In group 2 there were 46 patients with bilateral gynaecomastia and 10 patients with unilateral gynaecomastia. Pseudogynaecomastia was found in 25 patients. There were 7 malignancies, of which 5 had been suspected clinically and one had been diagnosed as gynaecomastia by mammography. Two carcinomas in situ were missed clinically and also by mammography. When malignancy is not suspected on clinical grounds the first examination should be sonography. Where, however, malignancy is suspected, and for follow-up, mammography retains its primary position. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] In einem 4-Jahres-Zeitraum wurden bei 89 Maennern insgesamt 104 Mammogramme angefertigt. 23 Maenner (=Gruppe 1) wurden mastektomiert. 66 Patienten (=Gruppe 2) wurden klinisch und zum Teil mammographisch kontrolliert. Alle Mammogramme wurden in Unkenntnis des klinischen Befundes retrospektiv ausgewertet und, wenn moeglich, dem histologischen Ergebnis gegenuebergestellt. In der Gruppe 1 fand sich eine beidseitige Gynaekomastie in 5/23 Faellen, eine einseitige Form in 9/23 Faellen, eine Pseudogynaekomastie in 2/23 Faellen und ein Malignom in 7/23 Faellen. In Gruppe 2 ergab sich eine beidseitige Gynaekomastie in 46/81 Faellen gegenueber einer einseitigen Form in 10/81 Faellen. Eine Pseudogynaekomastie fand sich in 25/81 Faellen. Von 7 Malignomen waren 5 klinisch suspekt, wobei eines mammographisch als Gynaekomastie imponierte. Zwei In-situ-Karzinome waren sowohl mammographisch als auch klinisch okkult. Klinisch nicht malignomsuspekte Befunde sollten primaer der Mammasonographie zugefuehrt werden. Bei

  1. 2-D or 3-D Mammography?: The Future of Breast Cancer Detection | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... Future of Breast Cancer Detection Follow us 2-D or 3-D Mammography?: The Future of Breast Cancer Detection NIH- ... will test two types of imaging tools—2-D and 3-D mammography. 2-D mammography takes ...

  2. Optimization in mammography - monthly monitoring of image quality at the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil; Otimizacao em mamografia - monitoramento mensal da qualidade da imagem no estado de Minas Gerais, Brasil

    Joana, Georgia S.; Andrade, Mauricio C. de; Silva, Sabrina D. da; Silva, Rafael R. da; Cesar, Adriana C.Z.; Oliveira, Mauricio de, E-mail: georgia.santos@saude.mg.gov.b, E-mail: mauricio.cavalcanti@saude.mg.gov.b, E-mail: adrianac@saude.mg.gov.b, E-mail: mauricio.oliveira@saude.mg.gov.b [Secretaria de Estado da Saude de Minas Gerais (SVS/SES-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Superintendencia de Vigilancia Sanitaria; Oliveira, Marcio A.; Nogueira, Maria do S., E-mail: marcio.alves@saude.mg.gov.b, E-mail: mnogue@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Peixoto, Joao E. [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The State Program of Quality Control in Mammography (PECQMamo) of the state of Minas Gerais was established in 2004 and consists of tests for evaluation of image quality and performance of equipment used in the diagnosis of breast cancer, and evaluation the infrastructure of mammography centers. The monthly monitoring of image quality in mammography is part of this program that has been executed since May 2009 with a character essentially educational. In the assessment of individual services that participate in the monthly monitoring, there was an increased percentage of average annual compliance from 2009 to 2010 in all 85 services with the exception of one service. Therefore, evolution of the performance of the services evaluated, since the program began, shows a positive impact on the numbers, confirming the relevance of this type of operation of Sanitary Surveillance in the area of quality in mammography. (author)

  3. Object characterization simulator for estimating compressed breast during mammography

    Pinheiro, Luciana de J.S.; Rio, Margarita Chevalier del

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of the thickness of a compressed breast during the mammography test is necessary in order to calculate the glandular dose in mammography procedures, in an analysis of risk/benefit, given that the target organ in these procedures is highly sensitive to ionising radiation. However, mammography is a test of utmost importance in diagnosis. In theory, it may be possible to calculate the thickness of the compressed breast through the measurements of the focus object distance by using projections of radio opaque objects fixed to the compression tray. The facilities of the Laboratory of Applied Radioprotection to Mammography - LARAM were used for this study, as well as breast simulators with well defined thickness, in the assembly of the techniques for the measurement of the thickness of the compressed breast. The results showed that it is possible to determine this thickness through calculations and simulators through this method which is susceptible to be adequate to the dosimetry. (author)

  4. Ultrasonography as a diagnostic method in addition to mammography

    Otto, H.; Roer, E.

    1988-05-01

    By using ultrasonography in addition to mammography, experienced diagnosticians essentially enhance the safety of their diagnosis of mammary gland diseases. The same applies to gynecomastia, the condition after plastic surgery, and mastitis.

  5. Establishment of Guidance Levels in General Radiography and Mammography

    2010-04-01

    Coordinated project report IAEA ARCAL LXXV-RLA/9/048 Pilot Exercise for Developing and Setting Levels Reference in General Radiography and Mammography as a Tool for Optimizing Radiation Protection and Reduce Patient Exposure in Latin America

  6. Illness perceptions in the context of differing work participation outcomes: exploring the influence of significant others in persistent back pain

    Brooks Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research has demonstrated that the significant others of individuals with persistent back pain may have important influences on work participation outcomes. The aim of this study was to extend previous research by including individuals who have remained in work despite persistent back pain in addition to those who had become incapacitated for work, along with their significant others. The purpose of this research was to explore whether the illness beliefs of significant others differed depending on their relative’s working status, and to make some preliminary identification of how significant others may facilitate or hinder work participation for those with persistent back pain. Methods Interviews structured around the Illness Perception Questionnaire (chronic pain version were conducted with back pain patients recruited from a hospital pain management clinic along with their significant others. Some patients had remained in work despite their back pain; others had ceased employment. Data were analysed using template analysis. Results There were clear differences between beliefs about, and reported responses to, back pain symptoms amongst the significant others of individuals who had remained in employment compared with the significant others of those who had ceased work. Three overarching themes emerged: perceived consequences of back pain, specific nature of employment and the impact of back pain on patient identity. Conclusions Significant others of employed individuals with back pain focused on the extent to which activity could still be undertaken despite back pain symptoms. Individuals out of work due to persistent back pain apparently self-limited their activity and were supported in their beliefs and behaviours by their significant others. To justify incapacity due to back pain, this group had seemingly become entrenched in a position whereby it was crucial that the individual with back pain was perceived

  7. How group education impacts female factory workers' behavior and readiness to receive mammography and Pap smear.

    Seven, Memnun; Bahar, Mine; Akyüz, Aygül; Erdoğan, Hatice

    2015-01-01

    The workplace has been deemed a suitable location for educating many women at once about cancer screening. To determine how group education about early diagnostic methods for breast and cervical cancer effects women's behavior and readiness to receive mammography and Pap smear. This semi-interventional study was conducted at a textile factory in Istanbul, Turkey. Female workers (n= 125) were included in the study. A participant identification form and knowledge evaluation form developed for this study, along with the transtheoretical model, were used to collect data. A 45-min interactive group education was given to the participants. Upon contacting participants 3 months after group education, 15.4% (n = 11) stated that they had since received a mammogram and 9.8% (n = 7) a Pap smear. As suggested by the transtheoretical model, group education increased participants' readiness to receive cancer screening, along with their knowledge of breast and cervical cancer. Group education positively impacted women's knowledge of cancer and their readiness to receive mammography and Pap smear. Group education can potentially create awareness of cancer screening tests among women and improve their readiness to receive such tests.

  8. Abnormality Detection in Mammography using Deep Convolutional Neural Networks

    Xi, Pengcheng; Shu, Chang; Goubran, Rafik

    2018-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. The most common screening technology is mammography. To reduce the cost and workload of radiologists, we propose a computer aided detection approach for classifying and localizing calcifications and masses in mammogram images. To improve on conventional approaches, we apply deep convolutional neural networks (CNN) for automatic feature learning and classifier building. In computer-aided mammography, deep CNN classifiers cannot be tra...

  9. Postmortem validation of breast density using dual-energy mammography

    Molloi, Sabee; Ducote, Justin L.; Ding, Huanjun; Feig, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Mammographic density has been shown to be an indicator of breast cancer risk and also reduces the sensitivity of screening mammography. Currently, there is no accepted standard for measuring breast density. Dual energy mammography has been proposed as a technique for accurate measurement of breast density. The purpose of this study is to validate its accuracy in postmortem breasts and compare it with other existing techniques. Methods: Forty postmortem breasts were imaged using a dua...

  10. Potential Cost Savings of Contrast-Enhanced Digital Mammography.

    Patel, Bhavika K; Gray, Richard J; Pockaj, Barbara A

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss whether the sensitivity and specificity of contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) render it a viable diagnostic alternative to breast MRI. That CEDM couples low-energy images (comparable to the diagnostic quality of standard mammography) and subtracted contrast-enhanced mammograms make it a cost-effective modality and a realistic substitute for the more costly breast MRI.

  11. Dual-energy contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM).

    Daniaux, Martin; De Zordo, Tobias; Santner, Wolfram; Amort, Birgit; Koppelstätter, Florian; Jaschke, Werner; Dromain, Clarisse; Oberaigner, Willi; Hubalek, Michael; Marth, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Dual-energy contrast-enhanced mammography is one of the latest developments in breast care. Imaging with contrast agents in breast cancer was already known from previous magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography studies. However, high costs, limited availability-or high radiation dose-led to the development of contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM). We reviewed the current literature, present our experience, discuss the advantages and drawbacks of CESM and look at the future of this innovative technique.

  12. Decision Making in the PICU: An Examination of Factors Influencing Participation Decisions in Phase III Randomized Clinical Trials

    Laura E. Slosky

    2014-01-01

    participate were not related to enrollment. Conclusion. Decisions to participate in research by surrogates of children in the PICU appear to relate to child demographics and subtleties in communication; however, no modifiable characteristics were related to increased participation, indicating that the informed consent process may not be compromised in this population.

  13. [Fine needle aspiration cytology of mammography screening

    Engvad, B.; Laenkholm, A.V.; Schwartz, Thue W.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In the year 2000 a quality assurance programme for the preoperative breast diagnostics was introduced in Denmark. The programme was based on the "European guidelines for quality assurance in breast cancer screening and diagnosis" where - among other measures - five cytological......-choice treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 767 women had FNAC performed from a total of 783 lesions at the Mammography Clinic, University Hospital Odense. All FNACs were compared with the final histology diagnosis. Nine statistical parameters were calculated according to the European guidelines. RESULTS: A total...... of 66% of the 783 FNACs had a malignant cytology diagnosis, which in 99% of the cases turned out to be the correct diagnosis. Four lesions were false positives all of which represented benign proliferative breast diseases. The surgical procedures in these cases were either excisional biopsy...

  14. Hexagonal wavelet processing of digital mammography

    Laine, Andrew F.; Schuler, Sergio; Huda, Walter; Honeyman-Buck, Janice C.; Steinbach, Barbara G.

    1993-09-01

    This paper introduces a novel approach for accomplishing mammographic feature analysis through overcomplete multiresolution representations. We show that efficient representations may be identified from digital mammograms and used to enhance features of importance to mammography within a continuum of scale-space. We present a method of contrast enhancement based on an overcomplete, non-separable multiscale representation: the hexagonal wavelet transform. Mammograms are reconstructed from transform coefficients modified at one or more levels by local and global non-linear operators. Multiscale edges identified within distinct levels of transform space provide local support for enhancement. We demonstrate that features extracted from multiresolution representations can provide an adaptive mechanism for accomplishing local contrast enhancement. We suggest that multiscale detection and local enhancement of singularities may be effectively employed for the visualization of breast pathology without excessive noise amplification.

  15. Instrumentation optimization for positron emission mammography

    Moses, William W.; Qi, Jinyi

    2003-01-01

    The past several years have seen designs for PET cameras optimized to image the breast, commonly known as Positron Emission Mammography or PEM cameras. The guiding principal behind PEM instrumentation is that a camera whose field of view is restricted to a single breast has higher performance and lower cost than a conventional PET camera. The most common geometry is a pair of parallel planes of detector modules, although geometries that encircle the breast have also been proposed. The ability of the detector modules to measure the depth of interaction (DOI) is also a relevant feature. This paper finds that while both the additional solid angle coverage afforded by encircling the breast and the decreased blurring afforded by the DOI measurement improve performance, the ability to measure DOI is more important than the ability to encircle the breast

  16. Patient dose and risk in mammography

    Law, J.

    1991-01-01

    Patient dose in mammography is estimated by two methods compared and giving agreement. A mean tissue dose of about 1 mGy per film is found for a breast of 4.5 cm compressed thickness. Variables affecting dose are then considered quantitatively, including compressed breast thickness, tube potential, grids, magnification and beam collimation. The variables having the greatest effect are breast thickness and magnification. The dose estimates are combined with existing data on breast cancer induction to predict the risk of carcinogenesis in a breast screening programme. For example, in a screening centre performing 15 000 examinations per year, only one induced cancer is predicted in about 7 years of screening under average UK conditions of age and breast thickness. (author)

  17. Fundamental limits of positron emission mammography

    Moses, William W.; Qi, Jinyi

    2001-01-01

    We explore the causes of performance limitation in positron emission mammography cameras. We compare two basic camera geometries containing the same volume of 511 keV photon detectors, one with a parallel plane geometry and another with a rectangular geometry. We find that both geometries have similar performance for the phantom imaged (in Monte Carlo simulation), even though the solid angle coverage of the rectangular camera is about 50 percent higher than the parallel plane camera. The reconstruction algorithm used significantly affects the resulting image; iterative methods significantly outperform the commonly used focal plane tomography. Finally, the characteristics of the tumor itself, specifically the absolute amount of radiotracer taken up by the tumor, will significantly affect the imaging performance

  18. Screening for breast cancer with mammography

    Gøtzsche, Peter C; Nielsen, Margrethe

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A variety of estimates of the benefits and harms of mammographic screening for breast cancer have been published and national policies vary. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effect of screening for breast cancer with mammography on mortality and morbidity. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched Pub...... excluded a biased trial and included 600,000 women in the analyses. Three trials with adequate randomisation did not show a significant reduction in breast cancer mortality at 13 years (relative risk (RR) 0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.79 to 1.02); four trials with suboptimal randomisation showed...... a significant reduction in breast cancer mortality with an RR of 0.75 (95% CI 0.67 to 0.83). The RR for all seven trials combined was 0.81 (95% CI 0.74 to 0.87). We found that breast cancer mortality was an unreliable outcome that was biased in favour of screening, mainly because of differential...

  19. The influence of participant characteristics on the relationship between cuff pressure and level of blood flow restriction.

    Hunt, Julie E A; Stodart, Clare; Ferguson, Richard A

    2016-07-01

    Previous investigations to establish factors influencing the blood flow restriction (BFR) stimulus have determined cuff pressures required for complete arterial occlusion, which does not reflect the partial restriction prescribed for this training technique. This study aimed to establish characteristics that should be accounted for when prescribing cuff pressures required for partial BFR. Fifty participants were subjected to incremental blood flow restriction of the upper and lower limbs by proximal pneumatic cuff inflation. Popliteal and brachial artery diameter, blood velocity and blood flow was assessed with Doppler ultrasound. Height, body mass, limb circumference, muscle-bone cross-sectional area, adipose thickness (AT) and arterial blood pressure were measured and used in different models of hierarchical linear regression to predict the pressure at which 60 % BFR (partial occlusion) occurred. Combined analysis revealed a difference in cuff pressures required to elicit 60 % BFR in the popliteal (111 ± 12 mmHg) and brachial arteries (101 ± 12 mmHg). MAP (r = 0.58) and AT (r = -0.45) were the largest independent determinants of lower and upper body partial occlusion pressures. However, greater variance was explained by upper and lower limb regression models composed of DBP and BMI (48 %), and arm AT and DBP (30 %), respectively. Limb circumference has limited impact on the cuff pressure required for partial blood flow restriction which is in contrast to its recognised relationship with complete arterial occlusion. The majority of the variance in partial occlusion pressure remains unexplained by the predictor variables assessed in the present study.

  20. A study of quality assurance in mammography

    Briquet, Claudia; Mota, Helvecio C.; Costa, Marcos R.

    1997-01-01

    Full text. Nowadays mammography has two definitive important roles: as a complementary tool to confirm clinical findings and for the detection of early breast cancer. To reach and maintain the standards of image quality within the frontiers of reasonable radiation doses, the facilities must follow a QA program. The objective of this study is to accomplish such a program in three school hospitals in Rio de Janeiro. We made assessment of clinical images using the Accreditation American Phantom and measured the patients skin entrance doses with TLD 100. In each facility we evaluated the technical parameters of the mammographic units using a Victoreen 4000 M+ and an evaluation of the compression devices. The 3 hospitals studied use film and screen Min R Kodak and have Kodak processors, none of them dedicated to mammograms. The tube voltage, measured was not significantly different from the indicated values, the variations were lesser than 5%. In one of the hospitals the kVp did not show reproducibility, the coefficient of variation was too high - 1,02. The same facility showed an exposure time with variation of 7% and we asked for corrective action. Measures of HVL showed the same value for the 3 hospitals the compression were adequate. The patients skin entrance doses were measured with TLD 100 and showed the range 3,25 a 10,26 mGy. This range is due to differences in density and thickness of the breast. The doses values were in accordance with the Quality Criteria for Mammography of the Commission of the European Communities

  1. Photographic and energy spectral evaluation of mammography

    Chiyasu, Shikibu; Ise, Toshihide; Kato, Isao; Asakawa, Yoshihisa; Nakamae, Haruo

    1980-01-01

    The combination of molybdenium anode X-ray tube (with a beryllium window and 0.03 mm molybdenium filter) and a single high resolution intensifying screen (rare earth phosphors) with a green-sensitive single emulsion film is regarded as a very useful and optimum system for mammography. In order to find the optimum exposure condition in this system that we investigated the transmission properties of the mammographic cassette, the intensifying screen and the specimen of breast. We examined four cassettes by the contrast (0.1/0.5 mm aluminium), the visibility of small particles (Mg 2 SiO 4 , 150 -- 600 mu m diameter) by five observers and dose measurements using mammographic phantom, Kodak Min-R screen and Fuji RX-M film. We measured the transmission photon spectra by using pure germanium detector through tumor and normal glandular tissue of breast cancer (3.5 kg weight, 6.5 cm, thickness and 1.0 cm tumor diameter) after surgery. We examined the relationship between the contrast and the transmission photon spectra of macro-specimen of breast cancer (fixation in 10% folmalin solution). Then we selected the phantom materials for mammography which have the same property as the specimen of cancer in the transmission spectra. From these results, the low tube voltage (25 kV) technique gives high contrast and good visibility of small particles in this system. Also in the system, the smaller X-ray absorption of cassette (or package) gives higher contrast, better visibility and lower dose. For the phantom materials, ABS resin has almost same transmission property as the measured normal glandular tissue and Lucite is almost same as the measured tumor and glandular from the point of transmission spectra. (author)

  2. Engaging diverse underserved communities to bridge the mammography divide

    Cully Angelia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer screening continues to be underutilized by the population in general, but is particularly underutilized by traditionally underserved minority populations. Two of the most at risk female minority groups are American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/AN and Latinas. American Indian women have the poorest recorded 5-year cancer survival rates of any ethnic group while breast cancer is the number one cause of cancer mortality among Latina women. Breast cancer screening rates for both minority groups are near or at the lowest among all racial/ethnic groups. As with other health screening behaviors, women may intend to get a mammogram but their intentions may not result in initiation or follow through of the examination process. An accumulating body of research, however, demonstrates the efficacy of developing 'implementation intentions' that define when, where, and how a specific behavior will be performed. The formulation of intended steps in addition to addressing potential barriers to test completion can increase a person's self-efficacy, operationalize and strengthen their intention to act, and close gaps between behavioral intention and completion. To date, an evaluation of the formulation of implementation intentions for breast cancer screening has not been conducted with minority populations. Methods/Design In the proposed program, community health workers will meet with rural-dwelling Latina and American Indian women one-on-one to educate them about breast cancer and screening and guide them through a computerized and culturally tailored "implementation intentions" program, called Healthy Living Kansas - Breast Health, to promote breast cancer screening utilization. We will target Latina and AI/AN women from two distinct rural Kansas communities. Women attending community events will be invited by CHWs to participate and be randomized to either a mammography "implementation intentions" (MI2 intervention or a

  3. The Influence of Organizational Commitment and Motivation in the Relationship between Budget Participation and Managerial Performance (Empirical Study on Provincial Government Agencies ( SKPA of Aceh Province, Indonesia

    Muslim A. Djalil

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of research is to empirically examine the influence of organizational commitment and motivation in the relationship between budget participation and managerialperformance of Provincial Government Agencies (SKPA of Aceh Province.Total samples used in this study were 92 respondents who were in the position of Echelon III and IV in SKPA of Aceh Province. The data source of this study was primary data obtained through the distribution of a questionnaire to the selected respondents. The collected data were analyzed by using Path Analysis Method.The result of the study indicated that the organizational commitment, motivation, and budget participation have a significant influence on the managerial performance both simultaneously and partially. However, the organizational commitment and motivation did not mediate the relationshipbetween budget participation and managerial performance.Keywords: Managerial Performance, Budget Participation, Organizational Commitment, Motivation

  4. Discount rates and the education gradient in mammography in the UK.

    Bíró, Anikó

    2013-09-01

    I analyse intertemporal decisions on undertaking breast cancer screening by women aged 50-64  years in the UK and provide estimates of the rate of discounting potential future benefits of screening. I also analyse education differences in mammography decisions and examine the underlying mechanisms by which education influences breast cancer screening attendance. I estimate a structural model, which reveals that although there are differences in the disutility of breast cancer screening between education groups, there is no difference in the estimated discount factor. These results suggest that the observed education gradient is mainly due to differences in health behaviours and healthcare attitudes. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Efficacy of storage phosphor-based digital mammography in diagnosis of breast cancer

    Kitahama, Hiroyuki

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present efficacy of storage phosphor-based digital mammography (CR-mammography) in diagnosis of breast cancer. Ninety-seven cases with breast cancer including 44 cases less than 2 cm in macroscopic size (t1 cases) were evaluated using storage phosphor-based digital mammography (2000 x 2510 pixels by 10 bits). Abnormal findings on CR-mammography were detected in 86 cases (88.7%) of 97 women with breast cancer. Sensitivity of CR-mammography was 88.7%. It was superior to that of film-screen mammography. On t1 breast cancer cases, sensitivity on CR-mammography was 88.6%. False negative rate in t1 breast cancer cases was reduced by image processing using CR-mammography. To evaluate microcalcifications, CR-mammograms and film-screen mammograms were investigated in 22 cases of breast cancer proven pathologically the existence of microcalcifications and 11 paraffin tissue blocks of breast cancer. CR-mammography was superior to film-screen mammography in recognizing of microcalcifications. As regards the detectability for the number and the shape of microcalcifications, CR-mammography was equivalent to film-screen mammography. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis by eight observers was performed for CR-mammography and film-screen mammography with 54 breast cancer patients and 54 normal cases. The detectability of abnormal findings of breast cancer on CR-mammography (ROC area=0.91) was better than that on film-screen mammography (ROC area=0.88) (p<0.05). Efficacy of storage phosphor-based digital mammography in diagnosis of breast cancer was discussed and demonstrated in this study. (author)

  6. Effects of a risk-based online mammography intervention on accuracy of perceived risk and mammography intentions.

    Seitz, Holli H; Gibson, Laura; Skubisz, Christine; Forquer, Heather; Mello, Susan; Schapira, Marilyn M; Armstrong, Katrina; Cappella, Joseph N

    2016-10-01

    This experiment tested the effects of an individualized risk-based online mammography decision intervention. The intervention employs exemplification theory and the Elaboration Likelihood Model of persuasion to improve the match between breast cancer risk and mammography intentions. 2918 women ages 35-49 were stratified into two levels of 10-year breast cancer risk (<1.5%; ≥1.5%) then randomly assigned to one of eight conditions: two comparison conditions and six risk-based intervention conditions that varied according to a 2 (amount of content: brief vs. extended) x 3 (format: expository vs. untailored exemplar [example case] vs. tailored exemplar) design. Outcomes included mammography intentions and accuracy of perceived breast cancer risk. Risk-based intervention conditions improved the match between objective risk estimates and perceived risk, especially for high-numeracy women with a 10-year breast cancer risk ≤1.5%. For women with a risk≤1.5%, exemplars improved accuracy of perceived risk and all risk-based interventions increased intentions to wait until age 50 to screen. A risk-based mammography intervention improved accuracy of perceived risk and the match between objective risk estimates and mammography intentions. Interventions could be applied in online or clinical settings to help women understand risk and make mammography decisions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Spectral analysis of full field digital mammography data

    Heine, John J.; Velthuizen, Robert P.

    2002-01-01

    The spectral content of mammograms acquired from using a full field digital mammography (FFDM) system are analyzed. Fourier methods are used to show that the FFDM image power spectra obey an inverse power law; in an average sense, the images may be considered as 1/f fields. Two data representations are analyzed and compared (1) the raw data, and (2) the logarithm of the raw data. Two methods are employed to analyze the power spectra (1) a technique based on integrating the Fourier plane with octave ring sectioning developed previously, and (2) an approach based on integrating the Fourier plane using rings of constant width developed for this work. Both methods allow theoretical modeling. Numerical analysis indicates that the effects due to the transformation influence the power spectra measurements in a statistically significant manner in the high frequency range. However, this effect has little influence on the inverse power law estimation for a given image regardless of the data representation or the theoretical analysis approach. The analysis is presented from two points of view (1) each image is treated independently with the results presented as distributions, and (2) for a given representation, the entire image collection is treated as an ensemble with the results presented as expected values. In general, the constant ring width analysis forms the foundation for a spectral comparison method for finding spectral differences, from an image distribution sense, after applying a nonlinear transformation to the data. The work also shows that power law estimation may be influenced due to the presence of noise in the higher frequency range, which is consistent with the known attributes of the detector efficiency. The spectral modeling and inverse power law determinations obtained here are in agreement with that obtained from the analysis of digitized film-screen images presented previously. The form of the power spectrum for a given image is approximately 1/f 2

  8. The Impact of the Summer Seminar Program on Midshipman Performance: Does Summer Seminar Participation Influence Success at the Naval Academy?

    Norton, Michael

    2004-01-01

    .... Based on this literature, it is theorized that Summer Seminar program participation will be positively correlated to increased graduation rates and increased academic cumulative quality point ratings...

  9. Multiple factors, including non-motor impairments, influence decision making with regard to exercise participation in Parkinson's disease: a qualitative enquiry.

    O'Brien, Christine; Clemson, Lindy; Canning, Colleen G

    2016-01-01

    To explore how the meaning of exercise and other factors interact and influence the exercise behaviour of individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) enrolled in a 6-month minimally supervised exercise program to prevent falls, regardless of whether they completed the prescribed exercise or not. This qualitative study utilised in-depth semi-structured interviews analysed using grounded theory methodology. Four main themes were constructed from the data: adapting to change and loss, the influence of others, making sense of the exercise experience and hope for a more active future. Participation in the PD-specific physiotherapy program involving group exercise provided an opportunity for participants to reframe their identity of their "active" self. Three new influences on exercise participation were identified and explored: non-motor impairments of apathy and fatigue, the belief in a finite energy quota, and the importance of feedback. A model was developed incorporating the themes and influences to explain decision-making for exercise participation in this group. Complex and interacting issues, including non-motor impairments, need to be considered in order to enhance the development and ongoing implementation of effective exercise programmes for people with PD. Exercise participation can assist individuals to reframe their identity as they are faced with losses associated with Parkinson's disease and ageing. Non-motor impairments of apathy and fatigue may influence exercise participation in people with Parkinson's disease. Particular attention needs to be paid to the provision of feedback in exercise programs for people with Parkinson's disease as it important for their decision-making about continuing exercise.

  10. The spanish participation in the European intercomparison of instruments used for dosimetry in diagnostic radiology

    Brosed, A.; Granados, C.E.; Delgado, A.

    1991-01-01

    Fifteen Spanish institutions took part in the European intercomparison of dosimeters promoted by DGXI of the EEC and steered by the German National Laboratory, PTB. The aim was to ascertain the measurement errors in the assessment of air kerma for the energy ranges corresponding to conventional diagnostic and mammography. Technical aspects are pointed out and the scheme proposed by PTB is described, together with the technical peculiarities of the Spanish branch, coordinated by the metrology division of CIEMAT. The results of the Spanish participation are presented and compared with the whole of the European participants. Some insight was also obtained on the performance of the measurement equipment and on the influence of some factors upon the air kerma measurements. (author) 27 fig. 2 ref

  11. Factors influencing childhood cancer patients to participate in a combined physical and psychosocial intervention program : Quality of Life in Motion

    Van Dijk-Lokkart, Elisabeth M.; Braam, Katja I.; Huisman, Jaap; Kaspers, Gertjan Jl; Takken, Tim; Veening, Margreet A.; Bierings, MB; Merks, Hans; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Eibrink, Marry; Streng, Isabelle C.; Van Dulmen-Den Broeder, Eline

    Background For a multi-center randomized trial investigating the effects of a 12-week physical and psychosocial intervention program for children with cancer, we invited 174 patients (8-18 years old) on treatment or within 1 year after treatment; about 40% participated. Reasons for non-participation

  12. "If You Let Me Play Sports": How Might Sport Participation Influence the Self-Esteem of Adolescent Females?

    Richman, Erin L.; Shaffer, David R.

    2000-01-01

    Investigated links between female precollege sport participation and college self-esteem. Students surveys indicated that participation in sports positively correlated with body image, perceived physical competencies, gender identity, global self-esteem, and other psychosocial variables, thus predicting college self-esteem. In the absence of such…

  13. Managed Care Penetration and the Use of Screening Mammography by Uninsured Women

    Garg, Pushkal

    2002-01-01

    ..., and increased waiting times for mammography. In this study we propose to examine whether there is an association between managed care penetration and rates of mammography among uninsured women between 50 and 64 years of age...

  14. Managed Care Penetration and the Use of Screening Mammography by Uninsured Women

    Garg, Pushkal

    2003-01-01

    ..., and increased waiting times for mammography. In this study, we examined whether there was an association between managed care penetration and rates of mammography among uninsured women between 50 and 64 years of age...

  15. The influence of environmental and personal factors on participation of lower-limb prosthetic users in low-income countries: prosthetists' perspectives.

    Kam, Season; Kent, Mallory; Khodaverdian, Alin; Daiter, Liane; Njelesani, Janet; Cameron, Debra; Andrysek, Jan

    2015-05-01

    To examine the environmental and personal factors in low-income countries (LICs) that influence prosthetic rehabilitation of adults with lower-limb (LL) amputations and their ability to participate in daily activities. In this qualitative descriptive study, 11 prosthetists participated in semi-structured interviews by telephone or Skype. Qualitative thematic analysis was guided by the International Classification of Function. Facilitating continuity of care, consideration of physical environments and usage, prosthetic quality including durability and socket fit, and minimizing the visibility of disability, were found to be important factors affecting the provision of prosthetic services in LICs. Environmental and personal factors must be considered when providing prosthetic rehabilitation for adults with LL amputations in LICs in order to optimize participation in activities. Results from this study provide new insights about some of the factors that influence the ability of individuals with LL amputations to rehabilitate to a level where they are able to participate in meaningful activities within their communities. There are unique environmental and personal components that can influence activity and participation of lower-limb (LL) prosthetic users in low-income countries (LICs). These components are often overlooked in the design of prosthetic devices and provision of prosthetic services. Continuity of care, condition of the post-surgical residuum, outdoor environments of common occupations, aesthetics and durability of prostheses, and user comfort should all be considered when providing prosthetic rehabilitation to adults with LL amputations in LICs to promote activity and participation. Results of our study can inform the practice of prosthetists in LICs by highlighting their contributions in enabling participation for LL prosthetic users. Our results can also inform the design of durable and comfortable prostheses and the provision of more appropriate

  16. Pulmonary rehabilitation referral and participation are commonly influenced by environment, knowledge, and beliefs about consequences: a systematic review using the Theoretical Domains Framework

    Narelle S Cox

    2017-04-01

    Trial registration: PROSPERO CRD42015015976. [Cox NS, Oliveira CC, Lahham A, Holland AE (2017 Pulmonary rehabilitation referral and participation are commonly influenced by environment, knowledge, and beliefs about consequences: a systematic review using the Theoretical Domains Framework. Journal of Physiotherapy 63: 84–93

  17. A Study of Factors that Influence First-Year Nonmusic Majors' Decisions to Participate in Music Ensembles at Small Liberal Arts Colleges in Indiana

    Faber, Ardis R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate factors that influence first-year nonmusic majors' decisions regarding participation in music ensembles at small liberal arts colleges in Indiana. A survey questionnaire was used to gather data. The data collected was analyzed to determine significant differences between the nonmusic majors who have…

  18. The Influences of Socio-Demographic Factors, and Non-Formal and Informal Learning Participation on Adult Environmental Behaviors

    Digby, Cynthia L. B.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple factors are likely to influence adult literacy regarding the natural environment and environmental issues, but very little research has been carried out in this area. The research presented in this article is intended to help address this information gap, by investigating influences on adult environmental literacy using data from a…

  19. Influence of a five-day vegetarian diet on urinary levels of antibiotics and phthalate metabolites: a pilot study with "Temple Stay" participants.

    Ji, Kyunghee; Lim Kho, Young; Park, Yoonsuk; Choi, Kyungho

    2010-05-01

    Diet is purported to be means of exposure to many environmental contaminants. The purpose of this study is to understand the influence of dietary change on the levels of exposure to several environmental chemicals - in particular, antibiotics and phthalates. For this purpose, we examined the extent to which short-term changes in diet influenced the inadvertent exposure levels to these chemicals in an adult population. We recruited participants (n=25) of a five-day 'Temple Stay' program in Korea and collected urine samples before and after the program. We also conducted a questionnaire survey on participants' dietary patterns prior to their participation. During the program, participants followed the daily routines of Buddhist monks and maintained a vegetarian diet. Urinary levels of three antibiotics and their major metabolites, metabolites of four major phthalates, and malondialdehyde (MDA) as an oxidative stress biomarker were analyzed. The frequency and levels of detection for antibiotics and phthalates noticeably decreased during the program. Urinary MDA levels were significantly lower than before program participation (0.16 versus 0.27mg/g creatinine). Although the exposure to target compounds might be influenced by other behavioral patterns, these results suggest that even short-term changes in dietary behavior may significantly decrease inadvertent exposure to antibiotics and phthalates and hence may reduce oxidative stress levels. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Influence of socio-demographic factors on physical activity participation in a sample of adults in Penang, Malaysia.

    Cheah, Y K

    2011-12-01

    Given the importance of physical activity to health, this study investigated the socio-demographic determinants of physical activity participation in a sample of adults in Penang. Through convenience sampling, a total of 398 adults agreed to answer a prepared questionnaire on their socio-demographic background and physical activity participation. The data were analysed using the binary logit model. Frequent physical activity participation is defined as taking part more than 11 times in leisure-time physical activity such as swimming and jogging, each time lasting more than 15 minutes in a typical month, whereas participation that is less than the frequency and time duration specified above is referred to as infrequent physical activity. Age, male, being Chinese, high educational attainment, self-rated excellent health status and presence of family illnesses are positively associated with the likelihood of frequent participation in physical activity. On the contrary, being married, having low income and residing in rural areas are inversely related with the propensity of frequent physical activity participation. The majority in this sample of adults do not participate in physical activity frequently, and the reasons given include lack of health awareness, limited leisure time, budget constraints, and lack of sports amenities.

  1. Mammography calibration qualities establishment in a Mo-Mo clinical system

    Correa, E.L.; Santos, L.R. dos; Vivolo, V.; Potiens, M.P.A.

    2015-01-01

    In this study the mammography calibration qualities were established in a clinical mammography system. The objective is to provide the IPEN instruments calibration laboratory with both mammography calibration methods (using a clinical and an industrial system). The results showed a good behavior of mammography equipment, in terms of kVp, PPV and exposure time. The additional filtration of molybdenum is adequate, air-kerma rates were determined and spectra were obtained. (author)

  2. Mammography calibration qualities establishment in a Mo-Mo clinical system

    Correa, E.L.; Santos, L.R. dos; Vivolo, V.; Potiens, M.P.A., E-mail: educorrea1905@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleres (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In this study the mammography calibration qualities were established in a clinical mammography system. The objective is to provide the IPEN instruments calibration laboratory with both mammography calibration methods (using a clinical and an industrial system). The results showed a good behavior of mammography equipment, in terms of kVp, PPV and exposure time. The additional filtration of molybdenum is adequate, air-kerma rates were determined and spectra were obtained. (author)

  3. Mammography: an update of the EUSOBI recommendations on information for women

    Sardanelli, Francesco; Fallenberg, Eva M.; Clauser, Paola; Trimboli, Rubina M.; Camps-Herrero, Julia; Helbich, Thomas H.; Forrai, Gabor

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This article summarises the information to be offered to women about mammography. After a delineation of the aim of early diagnosis of breast cancer, the difference between screening mammography and diagnostic mammography is explained. The need to bring images and reports from the previous mammogram (and from other recent breast imaging examinations) is highlighted. Mammography technique and procedure are described with particular attention to discomfort and pain experienced by a sma...

  4. Cancer of the breast: induction by radiation and role of mammography

    Simon, N

    1977-10-01

    Conflict in the management of cancer of the breast exists. Diagnosis by x-ray mammography provides early effective treatment, but x-ray exposure to the breast is cancerogenic. Prudence requires the use of low dose x-rays in mammography, and limits the use of x-ray mammography in the young. Guide lines for the indications for mammography are changing, and large scale population exposure to radiation should await results of demonstration projects in the United States.

  5. Satellite teleradiology test bed for digital mammography

    Barnett, Bruce G.; Dudding, Kathryn E.; Abdel-Malek, Aiman A.; Mitchell, Robert J.

    1996-05-01

    Teleradiology offers significant improvement in efficiency and patient compliance over current practices in traditional film/screen-based diagnosis. The increasing number of women who need to be screened for breast cancer, including those in remote rural regions, make the advantages of teleradiology especially attractive for digital mammography. At the same time, the size and resolution of digital mammograms are among the most challenging to support in a cost effective teleradiology system. This paper will describe a teleradiology architecture developed for use with digital mammography by GE Corporate Research and Development in collaboration with Massachusetts General Hospital under National Cancer Institute (NCI/NIH) grant number R01 CA60246-01. The testbed architecture is based on the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard, created by the American College of Radiology and National Electrical Manufacturers Association. The testbed uses several Sun workstations running SunOS, which emulate a rural examination facility connected to a central diagnostic facility, and uses a TCP-based DICOM application to transfer images over a satellite link. Network performance depends on the product of the bandwidth times the round- trip time. A satellite link has a round trip of 513 milliseconds, making the bandwidth-delay a significant problem. This type of high bandwidth, high delay network is called a Long Fat Network, or LFN. The goal of this project was to quantify the performance of the satellite link, and evaluate the effectiveness of TCP over an LFN. Four workstations have Sun's HSI/S (High Speed Interface) option. Two are connected by a cable, and two are connected through a satellite link. Both interfaces have the same T1 bandwidth (1.544 Megabits per second). The only difference was the round trip time. Even with large window buffers, the time to transfer a file over the satellite link was significantly longer, due to the bandwidth-delay. To

  6. Virtual Character Personality Influences Participant Attitudes and Behavior - An Interview with a Virtual Human Character about Her Social Anxiety

    Xueni ePan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a novel technique for the study of human-virtual character interaction in immersive virtual reality. The human participants verbally administered a standard questionnaire about social anxiety to a virtual female character, that responded to each question through speech and body movements. The purpose was to study the extent to which participants responded differently to characters that exhibited different personalities, even though the verbal content of their answers was always the same. A separate online study provided evidence that our intention to create two different personality types had been successful. In the main between-groups experiment that utilized a Cave system there were 24 male participants, where 12 interacted with a female virtual character portrayed to exhibit shyness and the remaining 12 with an identical but more confident virtual character. Our results indicate that although the content of the verbal responses of both virtual characters was the same, participants showed different subjective and behavioral responses to the two different personalities. In particular participants evaluated the shy character more positively, for example, expressing willingness to spend more time with her. Participants evaluated the confident character more negatively and waited for a significantly longer time to call her back after she had left the scene in order to answer a telephone call. The method whereby participants interviewed the virtual character allowed naturalistic conversation while avoiding the necessity of speech processing and generation, and natural language understanding. It is therefore a useful method for the study of the impact of virtual character personality on participant responses.

  7. Evidence on Synthesized Two-dimensional Mammography Versus Digital Mammography When Using Tomosynthesis (Three-dimensional Mammography) for Population Breast Cancer Screening.

    Houssami, Nehmat

    2017-09-28

    One limitation of using digital breast tomosynthesis (3-dimensional [3D] mammography) technology with conventional (2-dimensional [2D]) mammography for breast cancer (BC) screening is the increased radiation dose from dual acquisitions. To resolve this problem, synthesized 2D (s2D) reconstruction images similar to 2D mammography were developed using tomosynthesis acquisitions. The present review summarizes the evidence for s2D versus digital mammography (2D) when using tomosynthesis (3D) for BC screening to address whether using s2D instead of 2D (alongside 3D) will yield similar detection measures. Comparative population screening studies have provided consistent evidence that cancer detection rates do not differ between integrated 2D/3D (range, 5.45-8.5/1000 screens) and s2D/3D (range, 5.03-8.8/1000 screens). Also, although the recall measures were relatively heterogeneous across included studies, little difference was found between the 2 modalities. The mean glandular dose for s2D/3D was 55% to 58% of that for 2D/3D. In the context of BC screening, s2D/3D involves substantially less radiation than 2D/3D and provides similar detection measures. Thus, consideration of transitioning to tomosynthesis screening should aim to use s2D/3D to minimize harm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Digital breast tomosynthesis versus digital mammography: a clinical performance study

    Gennaro, Gisella; Baldan, Enrica; Bezzon, Elisabetta; Polico, Ilaria; Proietti, Alessandro; Toffoli, Aida; Toledano, Alicia; Di Maggio, Cosimo; La Grassa, Manuela; Pescarini, Luigi; Muzzio, Pier Carlo

    2010-01-01

    To compare the clinical performance of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) with that of full-field digital mammography (FFDM) in a diagnostic population. The study enrolled 200 consenting women who had at least one breast lesion discovered by mammography and/or ultrasound classified as doubtful or suspicious or probably malignant. They underwent tomosynthesis in one view [mediolateral oblique (MLO)] of both breasts at a dose comparable to that of standard screen-film mammography in two views [craniocaudal (CC) and MLO]. Images were rated by six breast radiologists using the BIRADS score. Ratings were compared with the truth established according to the standard of care and a multiple-reader multiple-case (MRMC) receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed. Clinical performance of DBT compared with that of FFDM was evaluated in terms of the difference between areas under ROC curves (AUCs) for BIRADS scores. Overall clinical performance with DBT and FFDM for malignant versus all other cases was not significantly different (AUCs 0.851 vs 0.836, p = 0.645). The lower limit of the 95% CI or the difference between DBT and FFDM AUCs was -4.9%. Clinical performance of tomosynthesis in one view at the same total dose as standard screen-film mammography is not inferior to digital mammography in two views. (orig.)

  9. Digital Mammography in Young Women: Is a Single View Sufficient?

    Gossner, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    Single view mammography may be a less time consuming, more comfortable and radiation reduced alternative for young women, but there are no studies examining this approach after the implementation of digital mammography into clinical practice. Retrospective analysis of all mammographies performed in women younger than 40 years during a 24 month period. The sample consisted of 109 women with 212 examined breasts. All patients initially received standard two- view mammography. In the study setting the MLO- views were read by a single viewer and compared to a composite reference standard. In this sample 7 malignant findings were present and the review of the MLO-view detected 6 of them (85%). In patients with dense breasts 4 out of 5 malignant findings were found on the single-view (sensitivity 80%) and all 2 malignant findings were detected in patients with low breast density (sensitivity 100%). There were 7 false positive findings (3.3%). i.e. in total 8 out of 212 examined breasts were therefore misinterpreted (3.8%). Single view digital mammography detects the vast majority of malignant findings, especially in low density breast tissue and the rate of false-positive findings is within acceptable limits. Therefore this approach may be used in different scenarios (for example in increasing patient throughout in resource poor settings, reducing radiation burden in the young or in combination with ultrasound to use the strengths of both methods). More research on this topic is needed to establish its potential role in breast imaging.

  10. Study of mammography in mass screening for breast cancer

    Kitada, Masahiro; Sakai, Hiroko; Kubo, Yoshihiko; Samejima, Natsuki; Kurowarabi, Kunio; Iwabuchi, Shuji.

    1995-01-01

    In order to examine the rate of correct diagnosis by mammography at initial mass screening for breast cancer, we carried out a retrospective study of mammography findings in 267 cases of breast cancer detected at Asahikawa Cancer Screening Center. The screening was performed by physical examination, and in cases where disease was suspected, mammography, ultrasonography, and needle biopsy were done. Mammographically, 172 cases (64.4%) were cancer-positive, 58 cases (21.7%) were suspicious for cancer, and 37 cases (13.9%) were cancer-negative. Patients below 50 years of age and those with tumors of small diameter (<20 mm) showed a significantly lower rate of cancer positivity than patients aged 50 years or more and those with tumors 20 mm or more in diameter. Mammographic abnormalities were not specific, since these changes were also found in normal subjects and patients with benign diseases. Therefore, we concluded that mammography without physical examination at initial mass screening has a high risk of missing breast cancer. Mass screening for breast cancer should be performed by physical examination involving inspection and palpation at the first instance. If any suspicious findings are obtained, mammography, ultrasonography, and needle biopsy should be done. (author)

  11. Relative and combined performance of mammography and ultrasonography for breast cancer screening in the general population. A pilot study in Tochigi prefecture, Japan

    Honjo, Satoshi; Ando, Jiro; Tsukioka, Takeo

    2007-01-01

    Breast cancer screening by mammography is thought to be effective in reducing breast cancer mortality while ultrasonography is not accepted as a population screening modality, although the latter has been suggested to be useful in detection of cancer in the dense breast, relatively more typical for a younger woman. Mammography with medio-lateral oblique view was offered on trial in 1999-2000 for 3453 female residents in Tochigi prefecture who also underwent clinical breast examination and ultrasonography. The municipalities that provided cancer screening were informed of the final diagnosis for women with positive findings in the screening trial by doctors who performed the diagnostic evaluation. Linkage was also made between the list of participants in the trial and registrations at Tochigi Cancer Registry for breast cancer cases diagnosed during 1999-2001. Thirteen cases with breast cancer were identified during a 2-year follow-up period: 10 were diagnosed subsequent to positive finding in the trial; two were negative in the trial and diagnosed 23 and 24 months after, respectively; and one had a positive finding at the trial but was undiagnosed at first and then diagnosed 18 months after the trial. Among the 11 cases judged as positive in the trial, four were judged only by mammography while three were judged only by ultrasonography. Those mammography alone-detected cases were relatively young, at 36, 40, 47 and 54 years of age, respectively, while the ultrasonography alone-detected cases were aged 50, 55 and 68, respectively. Combined screening with mammography and ultrasonography may be feasible. A larger study is required to evaluate relative performance of mammography and ultrasonography in detail by characteristics of examinees and their breasts. (author)

  12. Population-based mammography screening: comparison of screen-film and full-field digital mammography with soft-copy reading--Oslo I study.

    Skaane, Per; Young, Kari; Skjennald, Arnulf

    2003-12-01

    To compare screen-film and full-field digital mammography with soft-copy reading in a population-based screening program. Full-field digital and screen-film mammography were performed in 3,683 women aged 50-69 years. Two standard views of each breast were acquired with each modality. Images underwent independent double reading with use of a five-point rating scale for probability of cancer. Recall rates and positive predictive values were calculated. Cancer detection rates determined with both modalities were compared by using the McNemar test for paired proportions. Retrospective side-by-side analysis for conspicuity of cancers was performed by an external independent radiologist group with experience in both modalities. In 3,683 cases, 31 cancers were detected. Screen-film mammography depicted 28 (0.76%) malignancies, and full-field digital mammography depicted 23 (0.62%) malignancies. The difference between cancer detection rates was not significant (P =.23). The recall rate for full-field digital mammography (4.6%; 168 of 3,683 cases) was slightly higher than that for screen-film mammography (3.5%; 128 of 3,683 cases). The positive predictive value based on needle biopsy results was 46% for screen-film mammography and 39% for full-field digital mammography. Side-by-side image comparison for cancer conspicuity led to classification of 19 cancers as equal for probability of malignancy, six cancers as slightly better demonstrated at screen-film mammography, and six cancers as slightly better demonstrated at full-field digital mammography. There was no statistically significant difference in cancer detection rate between screen-film and full-field digital mammography. Cancer conspicuity was equal with both modalities. Full-field digital mammography with soft-copy reading is comparable to screen-film mammography in population-based screening.

  13. Assessment of mammography in Costa Rica

    Mora, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    An evaluation of national mammographic equipment was conducted, due to the increasing incidence of breast cancer in Costa Rican women. From June 2002 to October 2003, 2 of the 3 global indicators of image quality were evaluated, (mean glandular dose and phantom image) in 26 mammography machines facilitated by radiologists in charge of the same. The mean glandular dose found was 1.75 ± 0.60 mGy with a range of 0.8 a 2.56. Regarding quality image, 73% of the evaluated equipment was able to see 4 or more fibers, 53% saw 3 or more groups of microcalcifications and 82% saw 3 or more mass groups. All mean glandular doses were below the international reference dose value of 3 mGy. However, the analysis of phantom images showed that only 54% of all the equipment had a total score (sum of mass groups, fibers and microcalcifications) superior or equal to 10, as expected. A correct diagnosis that could eventually save the patient's life is the main objective of a mammogram; the factors that are degrading the images must be found and it might be necessary to increase the doses to achieve this. This study demonstrates the urgent necessity to introduce permanent quality control programs that will provide excellent images with the lowest internationally recommended doses.(author) [es

  14. Bavarian mammography screening program; Bayerisches Mammographiescreening (BMS)

    Willgeroth, F. [Lenkungsausschuss BMS (Germany); Universitaetsfrauenklinik Innenstadt, Muenchen (Germany); Baumann, M.; Blaser, D.; Froschauer, S.; Kaeaeb, V.; Stich, V.; Thomaschewski, S.; Walter, D. [Kassenaerztliche Vereinigung Bayern (Germany); Crispin, A. [Klinikum Grosshadern der LMU Muenchen, Institut fuer Medizinische Informationsverarbeitung (Germany); Waal, J. de; Heywang-Koebrunner, S.; Rothe, R. [Lenkungsausschuss BMS (Germany); Hoelzel, D. [Lenkungsausschuss BMS (Germany); Klinikum Grosshadern der LMU Muenchen, Institut fuer Medizinische Informationsverarbeitung (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    In Bavaria since the 1st April 2003 we have been conducting a high quality mammography-screening carried out in individual practises (BMS). We have used the European and the S 3 guidelines. The best diagnosis is an early diagnosis of the breast carcinoma to save human life. Because of this and the high mortality rate due to this disease it is essential to have a mammogram screening program. There is no single one ideal way of constructing a screening program, it is always based on compromise within the particular health care-systems. Arising problems cannot be avoided, it is only possible when all parties work closely together that the BMS works properly. (orig.) [German] In Bayern laeuft seit dem 01.04.2003 ein qualitaetsgesichertes, flaechendeckendes Mammographiescreening mit dezentralem Charakter (BMS). Zugrunde liegen die Empfehlungen der European Guidelines sowie der S-3-Leitlinie. Die Vorverlegung der Diagnostik ist beim Mammakarzinom bis heute die effektivste Moeglichkeit, um das Leben von Frauen zu retten, die an diesem Krebs erkrankt sind. Daraus und aufgrund der hohen Mortalitaetsrate dieser Erkrankung leitet sich die Notwendigkeit eines Screeningprogramms ab. Dessen Aufbau kann unterschiedlich sein, denbesten Weg gibt es nicht; es wird sich immer eine Kompromissloesung ergeben, die sehr stark vom jeweiligen Gesundheitssystem beeinflusst wird. Auftretende Probleme sind vielschichtig. Nur durch gemeinsame Anstrengungen aller Beteiligten liess sich das Bayerische Mammographiescreening installieren. (orig.)

  15. Film quality in film mammography. Pt. 2

    Friedrich, M.; Weskamp, P.; Freie Univ. Berlin

    1976-01-01

    During consideration of three film mammographic systems, the concept of signal/noise ratio is developed as a quantitative measure of film quality. The ability to recognise detail related to detail size, film blackening and exposure geometry was studied for various systems, and the quality profiles are discussed. There is a considerable difference in quality between industrial films without screens and film-screen combinations; however, exposure geometry during mammography has a considerable effect which tends to reduce the difference. Consequently, detail sizes of 200 μ to 1,000 μ (including the majority of mammographic micro-calcifications) are shown about equally well. Contrast for the lo-dose system is somewhat less than for adequately exposed industrial film. Over-exposure with the lo-dose system, contrary to industrial film, rapidly leads to unsatisfactory results. On the other hand it is often not possible to obtain an adequate exposure when using industrial film. For these reasons it is often an advantage to examine large breasts and the dense breasts of young women with a film-screen combination which requires approximately one eighth of the dose necessary for industrial film. For small or easily compressable breasts best results are obtained, using an adequate exposure by employing industril film; radiation dose it then acceptable. (orig./ORU) [de

  16. Multiparameter optimization of mammography: an update

    Jafroudi, Hamid; Muntz, E. P.; Jennings, Robert J.

    1994-05-01

    Previously in this forum we have reported the application of multiparameter optimization techniques to the design of a minimum dose mammography system. The approach used a reference system to define the physical imaging performance required and the dose to which the dose for the optimized system should be compared. During the course of implementing the resulting design in hardware suitable for laboratory testing, the state of the art in mammographic imaging changed, so that the original reference system, which did not have a grid, was no longer appropriate. A reference system with a grid was selected in response to this change, and at the same time the optimization procedure was modified, to make it more general and to facilitate study of the optimized design under a variety of conditions. We report the changes in the procedure, and the results obtained using the revised procedure and the up- to-date reference system. Our results, which are supported by laboratory measurements, indicate that the optimized design can image small objects as well as the reference system using only about 30% of the dose required by the reference system. Hardware meeting the specification produced by the optimization procedure and suitable for clinical use is currently under evaluation in the Diagnostic Radiology Department at the Clinical Center, NH.

  17. Optimization procedures in mammography: First results

    Espana Lopez, M. L.; Marcos de Paz, L.; Martin Rincon, C.; Jerez Sainz, I.; Lopez Franco, M. P.

    2001-01-01

    Optimization procedures in mammography using equipment with a unique target/filter combination can be carried out through such diverse factors as target optical density, technique factors for exposure, screen film combination or processing cycle, in order to obtain an image adequate for the diagnosis with an acceptable risk benefit balance. Diverse studies show an increase in the Standardised Detection Rate of invasive carcinomas with an increase in the optical density among others factors. In our hospital an optimisation process has been established, and as previous step, the target optical density has been increased up to 1,4 DO. The aim of this paper is to value the impact of optical density variation as much in the quality of image as in the entrance surface dose and the average dose to the glandular tissue, comparing them with the results obtained in a previous study. The study has been carried out in a sample of 106 patients, with an average age of 53,4 years, considering 212 clinical images corresponding to the two projections of a same breast with an average compressed thickness of 4,86 cm. An increase of 16,6% on the entrance surface dose and 18% on the average dose to the glandular tissue has been recorded. All the clinical images has been evaluated for the physician as adequate for diagnosis. (Author) 16 refs

  18. Wavelet processing techniques for digital mammography

    Laine, Andrew F.; Song, Shuwu

    1992-09-01

    This paper introduces a novel approach for accomplishing mammographic feature analysis through multiresolution representations. We show that efficient (nonredundant) representations may be identified from digital mammography and used to enhance specific mammographic features within a continuum of scale space. The multiresolution decomposition of wavelet transforms provides a natural hierarchy in which to embed an interactive paradigm for accomplishing scale space feature analysis. Similar to traditional coarse to fine matching strategies, the radiologist may first choose to look for coarse features (e.g., dominant mass) within low frequency levels of a wavelet transform and later examine finer features (e.g., microcalcifications) at higher frequency levels. In addition, features may be extracted by applying geometric constraints within each level of the transform. Choosing wavelets (or analyzing functions) that are simultaneously localized in both space and frequency, results in a powerful methodology for image analysis. Multiresolution and orientation selectivity, known biological mechanisms in primate vision, are ingrained in wavelet representations and inspire the techniques presented in this paper. Our approach includes local analysis of complete multiscale representations. Mammograms are reconstructed from wavelet representations, enhanced by linear, exponential and constant weight functions through scale space. By improving the visualization of breast pathology we can improve the chances of early detection of breast cancers (improve quality) while requiring less time to evaluate mammograms for most patients (lower costs).

  19. Teaching atlas of mammography. 2. rev. ed.

    Tabar, L.; Dean, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this Atlas is to teach radiologists how to analyze mammograms and arrive at the correct diagnosis through proper evaluation of the findings. The illustrated cases cover practically the entire spectrum of breast abnormalities. They are based upon referred patient material as well as 80000 mammographic screening examinations. There are two basic steps in the interpretation of mammograms: perception and analysis. Since the greatest benefit of mammography lies in the detection of breast carcinoma in its earliest possible stages, every mammogram must be systematically surveyed for the subtle hints of malignancy. Perception is taught in this Atlas by describing a method for systematic viewing. The reader is then provided with a series of mammograms with obscure lesions to encourage practice with this method. With the help of a coordinate system, the lesions can be precisely located. Practice in perception continues throughout the Atlas. After detecting an abnormality on the mammogram, the diagnosis can be reached through a careful analysis of the X-ray signs. Additional projections, coned-down compression and magnetification views provide further help in this analytic workup. Rather than starting with the diagnosis and demonstrating typical findings, the approach of this Atlas is to teach the reader how to analyze the image and reach the correct diagnosis through proper evaluation of the X-ray signs. Prerequisites for the perception and evaluation of the X-ray signs are optimum technique, knowledge of anatomy and understanding of the pathological processes leading to the mammographic appearances. (orig.)

  20. Speculation on improving personal dosimetry in mammography

    Nicoll, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    The increasing importance of radiation protection of the patient in diagnostic radiology has created an interest in the dose individuals receive from X-ray mammography, although this is an area where the most important aspect of protection is based on the inter comparison of machines using phantoms and standard conditions. In 1987 the ICRP established the critical quantity as being the average absorbed dose to the glandular tissue of the breast, and identified a composition of 50% adipose; 50% glandular tissue as a reference. Several authors have published experimental and monte carlo simulation resuluts to enable the determination of this quantity from output, beam quality and compressed breast thickness. Many centres, including ourselves, have studied the distribution of radiation dose on this basis. The result is however dependant on the assumption made about tissue composition. It is apparently common knowledge among pathologists and frequently mentioned in general anatomy texts, that the amount of glandular tissue is independent of breast size; that is larger breasts will have a higher adipose:glandular tissue ratio. Such a systematic variation would lead to an overestimate of the dose being received by women with larger breasts. I will review the availabe pathology and demonstrate the effect of applying the assumed breast composition on our own data. (author)