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Sample records for inflammation transferrin receptors

  1. Adjusting soluble transferrin receptor concentrations for inflammation: Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project.

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    Rohner, Fabian; Namaste, Sorrel Ml; Larson, Leila M; Addo, O Yaw; Mei, Zuguo; Suchdev, Parminder S; Williams, Anne M; Sakr Ashour, Fayrouz A; Rawat, Rahul; Raiten, Daniel J; Northrop-Clewes, Christine A

    2017-07-01

    Background: Iron deficiency is thought to be one of the most prevalent micronutrient deficiencies globally, but an accurate assessment in populations who are frequently exposed to infections is impeded by the inflammatory response, which causes iron-biomarker alterations.Objectives: We assessed the relation between soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) concentrations and inflammation and malaria in preschool children (PSC) (age range: 6-59 mo) and women of reproductive age (WRA) (age range: 15-49 y) and investigated adjustment algorithms to account for these effects.Design: Cross-sectional data from the Biomarkers Reflecting the Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project from 11,913 PSC in 11 surveys and from 11,173 WRA in 7 surveys were analyzed individually and combined with the use of a meta-analysis. The following 3 adjustment approaches were compared with estimated iron-deficient erythropoiesis (sTfR concentration >8.3 mg/L): 1) the exclusion of individuals with C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations >5 mg/L or α-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) concentrations >1 g/L, 2) the application of arithmetic correction factors, and 3) the use of regression approaches.Results: The prevalence of elevated sTfR concentrations incrementally decreased as CRP and AGP deciles decreased for PSC and WRA, but the effect was more pronounced for AGP than for CRP. Depending on the approach used to adjust for inflammation, the estimated prevalence of iron-deficient erythropoiesis decreased by 4.4-14.6 and 0.3-9.5 percentage points in PSC and WRA, respectively, compared with unadjusted values. The correction-factor approach yielded a more modest reduction in the estimated prevalence of iron-deficient erythropoiesis than did the regression approach. Mostly, adjustment for malaria in addition to AGP did not significantly change the estimated prevalence of iron-deficient erythropoiesis.Conclusions: sTfR may be useful to assess iron-deficient erythropoiesis, but

  2. The Homozygous Hemoglobin EE Genotype and Chronic Inflammation Are Associated with High Serum Ferritin and Soluble Transferrin Receptor Concentrations among Women in Rural Cambodia.

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    Karakochuk, Crystal D; Whitfield, Kyly C; Rappaport, Aviva I; Barr, Susan I; Vercauteren, Suzanne M; McLean, Judy; Prak, Sophonneary; Hou, Kroeun; Talukder, Aminuzzaman; Devenish, Robyn; Green, Timothy J

    2015-12-01

    Ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) concentrations are commonly used to assess iron deficiency (ID); however, they are influenced by multiple factors. We assessed associations between numerous variables and both ferritin and sTfR concentrations in Cambodian women and compared ID prevalence through the use of study-generated correction factors (CFs) for ferritin with those from a published meta-analysis. Venous blood from 450 women (aged 18-45 y) was assessed for hemoglobin (Hb), ferritin, sTfR, retinol binding protein, folate, vitamin B-12, C-reactive protein, α-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP), and genetic Hb disorders. Linear regression was used to calculate geometric mean ratios (95% CIs) for ferritin and sTfR concentrations. The variant Hb EE genotype was associated with 50% (14%, 96%) and 51% (37%, 66%) higher geometric mean ferritin and sTfR concentrations, respectively, than was the normal Hb AA genotype; a 1-g/L increase in AGP was associated with 99% (50%, 162%) and 48% (33%, 64%) higher concentrations in the same variables, respectively. ID prevalence in nonpregnant women (n = 420) was 2% (n = 9) with the use of ferritin 8.3 mg/L as criteria. ID prevalence with the use of sTfR was higher in women with the Hb EE genotype (n = 17; 55%) than in those with the Hb AA genotype (n = 20; 10%); and in women with the Hb AA genotype and chronic inflammation (n = 10; 18%) than in that group of women without chronic inflammation (n = 10; 7%) (P ferritin between women with Hb EE and AA genotypes (P = 1.0) or by chronic inflammation status (P = 0.32). There were no differences in mean ferritin concentrations among all 450 women when study-generated CFs were compared with those from the meta-analysis (P = 0.87). Compared with sTfR, ferritin concentrations appear to reflect more accurately true ID in rural Cambodian women. The CFs from a published meta-analysis were appropriate for use in this population with a high prevalence of Hb disorders and inflammation.

  3. Transferrin receptor expression and role in transendothelial transport of transferrin in cultured brain endothelial monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersom, Maria; Helms, Hans Christian; Pretzer, Natasia;

    2016-01-01

    across the endothelial cells by transcytosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate transferrin receptor expression and role in transendothelial transferrin transport in cultured bovine brain endothelial cell monolayers. Transferrin receptor mRNA and protein levels were investigated...... in endothelial mono-cultures and co-cultures with astrocytes, as well as in freshly isolated brain capillaries using qPCR, immunocytochemistry and Western blotting. Transendothelial transport and luminal association of holo-transferrin was investigated using [125I]holo-transferrin or [59Fe......]-transferrin. Transferrin receptor mRNA expression in all cell culture configurations was lower than in freshly isolated capillaries, but the expression slightly increased during six days of culture. The mRNA expression levels were similar in mono-cultures and co-cultures. Immunostaining demonstrated comparable transferrin...

  4. Roles of transferrin receptors in erythropoiesis.

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    Kawabata, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Soichiro; Masuda, Taro; Uchiyama, Tatsuki; Ohmori, Katsuyuki; Koeffler, H Phillip; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2016-07-01

    Erythropoiesis requires large amounts of iron for hemoglobin synthesis, which is mainly provided by macrophages and the intestines in a transferrin (Tf)-bound form. Bone marrow erythroblasts incorporate Tf through endocytosis, which is mediated by transferrin receptor 1 (TFR1). Recently, human TFR1, aside from its role as a Tf receptor, was also found to be a receptor for the H-subunit of ferritin (FTH). In humans, hematopoietic erythroid precursor cells express high levels of TFR1 and specifically take up the FTH homopolymer (H-ferritin). H-ferritin inhibits the formation of burst forming unit-erythroid colonies in vitro. TFR2, which is also a Tf receptor, is predominantly expressed in hepatocytes and erythroid precursor cells. In the liver, TFR2 forms a complex with HFE, a hereditary hemochromatosis-associated protein, and acts as an iron sensor. In mice, hepatocyte-specific knockout of the TFR2 gene has been shown to cause systemic iron-overload with decreased expression of hepcidin, the central regulator of iron homeostasis. In erythroid cells, TFR2 forms a complex with the erythropoietin receptor and facilitates its trafficking to the cell membrane. Moreover, hematopoietic cell-specific knockout of the TFR2 gene causes microcytic erythrocytosis in mice. This review focuses on the molecular evolution and functions of these TFRs and their ligands.

  5. Serum transferrin receptor concentration indicates increased erythropoiesis in Kenyan children with asymptomatic malaria.

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    Verhoef, H; West, C E; Ndeto, P; Burema, J; Beguin, Y; Kok, F J

    2001-12-01

    Serum transferrin receptor concentrations indicate both erythropoietic activity and the deficit of functional iron in the erythron. In contrast with serum ferritin concentrations, serum transferrin receptor concentrations are not or are only marginally influenced by the inflammatory response to infection. We assessed iron status and examined the relation between serum transferrin receptor concentrations and malaria in children aged 2-36 mo who were asymptomatic for malaria. This was a community-based cluster survey (n = 318). Prevalences of malaria, anemia (hemoglobin concentration serum ferritin concentration Malaria was associated with lower mean hemoglobin concentrations (92.7 compared with 104.1 g/L; P = 0.0001) and higher geometric mean serum concentrations of transferrin receptor (11.4 compared with 7.8 mg/L; P = 0.005), ferritin (21.6 compared with 11.9 microg/L; P = 0.05), and C-reactive protein (12.5 compared with 6.8 mg/L; P = 0.004). There was no evidence for an association between serum concentrations of C-reactive protein and transferrin receptor. Children with malaria had higher serum transferrin receptor concentrations than expected for the degree of anemia, even after adjustment for inflammation indicated by serum C-reactive protein concentration quartiles (P = 0.02). Our findings are consistent with the notion that malaria-induced hemolysis is accompanied by increased erythropoiesis. Serum transferrin receptor concentration is not useful for detecting iron deficiency in individuals with malaria. Individuals with high concentrations of serum C-reactive protein or similar acute phase reactants should be excluded from analysis if serum ferritin concentrations malaria-endemic areas.

  6. Comparison of the interactions of transferrin receptor and transferrin receptor 2 with transferrin and the hereditary hemochromatosis protein HFE.

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    West, A P; Bennett, M J; Sellers, V M; Andrews, N C; Enns, C A; Bjorkman, P J

    2000-12-08

    The transferrin receptor (TfR) interacts with two proteins important for iron metabolism, transferrin (Tf) and HFE, the protein mutated in hereditary hemochromatosis. A second receptor for Tf, TfR2, was recently identified and found to be functional for iron uptake in transfected cells (Kawabata, H., Germain, R. S., Vuong, P. T., Nakamaki, T., Said, J. W., and Koeffler, H. P. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 16618-16625). TfR2 has a pattern of expression and regulation that is distinct from TfR, and mutations in TfR2 have been recognized as the cause of a non-HFE linked form of hemochromatosis (Camaschella, C., Roetto, A., Cali, A., De Gobbi, M., Garozzo, G., Carella, M., Majorano, N., Totaro, A., and Gasparini, P. (2000) Nat. Genet. 25, 14-15). To investigate the relationship between TfR, TfR2, Tf, and HFE, we performed a series of binding experiments using soluble forms of these proteins. We find no detectable binding between TfR2 and HFE by co-immunoprecipitation or using a surface plasmon resonance-based assay. The affinity of TfR2 for iron-loaded Tf was determined to be 27 nm, 25-fold lower than the affinity of TfR for Tf. These results imply that HFE regulates Tf-mediated iron uptake only from the classical TfR and that TfR2 does not compete for HFE binding in cells expressing both forms of TfR.

  7. Serum transferrin receptors in detection of iron deficiency in pregnancy.

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    Rusia, U; Flowers, C; Madan, N; Agarwal, N; Sood, S K; Sikka, M

    1999-08-01

    A prospective hospital-based study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of serum transferrin receptors in the detection of iron deficiency in pregnant women. The iron status of 100 pregnant women with single uncomplicated term pregnancies in the first stage of labor was established using standard laboratory measures. These included complete hemogram, red cell indices, serum iron, percent transferrin saturation, and serum ferritin. In addition, serum transferrin receptor (STFR) was estimated. The results of 81 women with complete laboratory profiles were analyzed. Thirty-five (43.2%) women were anemic (hemoglobin <11 g/dl). Hemoglobin (Hb) showed a significant correlation with MCH, MCHC, serum iron, and percent transferrin saturation, suggesting that the anemia was likely to be due to iron deficiency. The mean STFR level was 18.05+/-9.9 mg/l in the anemic women and was significantly raised (p<0.001) compared with that of the nonanemic women. STFR correlated significantly with Hb (p<0.001), MCH (p<0.05), MCHC (p<0.01), serum iron (p<0.01), and percent transferrin saturation (p<0.01) and also showed a highly significant correlation with the degree of anemia. Serum ferritin in these women did not correlate with Hb, and only 54.4% of the women had levels <12 ng/ml, which does not reflect the true prevalence of iron deficiency. Serum transferrin receptor estimation is thus a useful measure for detecting iron deficiency in pregnancy.

  8. Serum transferrin receptor, serum ferritin and serum transferrin receptor-ferritin index in adults with iron deficiency anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Seema; Shah, Shahida; Iqbal, Touqueer; Iqbal, Zafar; Hanif, Ejaz

    2011-01-01

    Serum Ferritin (SF) and iron both show acute phase responses to inflammation, so iron may fall and ferritin rise independent of the marrow iron store. Bone marrow iron store has been considered the gold standard, but is invasive, painful and expensive and not suitable for everyone. Serum transferrin receptor (sTfR) which is the concentration of the soluble fragment of transferrin receptor in serum, is an important new haematological parameter. The ratio of sTfR to log SF is known as sTfR-SF index. This study was conducted to evaluate sTfR, Ferritin and sTfR-F Index in diagnosing and differentiating iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) from anaemia of chronic disease (ACD). One hundred and sixteen (116) adult subjects (80 anaemic and 36 controls) who already had their bone marrow examination done for various reasons were included in the study. sTfR, SF, and their index were measured and compared with bone marrow iron stores. Absence of iron stores denoted IDA whereas increased macrophage iron with decreased siderocytes and sideroblasts was diagnostic of ACD. Out of 80 anaemic patients, 47 were diagnosed as IDA while 33 were diagnosed as ACD. In case of IDA the diagnostic accuracy of index was 91.57%, sTfR had accuracy of 85.54% while SF had accuracy of 75.90%. In case of ACD, the diagnostic accuracy of sTfR was 91.30%, index 89.86%, while SF had accuracy of 79.71%. sTfR-SF index is a better parameter than sTfR or ferritin alone but should only be used when the results of these parameters seem altered or a bone marrow aspiration is mandatory for diagnosis of ACD. The estimation of sTfR or index may offer a simple non invasive method that may enable more accurate assessments of iron status in such patients.

  9. Serum transferrin receptor concentration indicates increased erythropoiesis in Kenyan children with asymptomatic malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, H.; West, C.E.; Ndeto, P.; Burema, J.; Benguin, Y.; Kok, F.J.

    2001-01-01

    Background: Serum transferrin receptor concentrations indicate both erythropoietic activity and the deficit of functional iron in the erythron. In contrast with serum ferritin concentrations, serum transferrin receptor concentrations are not or are only marginally influenced by the inflammatory

  10. Soluble transferrin receptor and transferrin receptor-ferritin index in iron deficiency anemia and anemia in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margetic, Sandra; Topic, Elizabeta; Ruzic, Dragica Ferenec; Kvaternik, Marina

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical efficiency of soluble transferrin receptor and transferrin receptor-ferritin index (sTfR/logF) in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia, as well as the differential diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia and anemia in rheumatoid arthritis. The study included 96 patients with anemia and 61 healthy volunteers as a control group. In healthy subjects there were no significant sex and age differences in the parameters tested. The study results showed these parameters to be reliable in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia, as well as in the differential diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease. The results indicate that sTfR/logF could be used to help differentiate coexisting iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed a higher discriminating power of transferrin receptor-ferritin index vs. soluble transferrin receptor in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia, as well as in the differential diagnosis between iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease. In patients with anemia in rheumatoid arthritis, the parameters tested showed no significant differences with respect to C-reactive protein concentration. These results suggested that the parameters tested are not affected by acute or chronic inflammatory disease.

  11. Kinetics of iron release from transferrin bound to the transferrin receptor at endosomal pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steere, Ashley N; Byrne, Shaina L; Chasteen, N Dennis; Mason, Anne B

    2012-03-01

    Human serum transferrin (hTF) is a bilobal glycoprotein that reversibly binds Fe(3+) and delivers it to cells by the process of receptor-mediated endocytosis. Despite decades of research, the precise events resulting in iron release from each lobe of hTF within the endosome have not been fully delineated. We provide an overview of the kinetics of iron release from hTF±the transferrin receptor (TFR) at endosomal pH (5.6). A critical evaluation of the array of biophysical techniques used to determine accurate rate constants is provided. Delivery of Fe(3+)to actively dividing cells by hTF is essential; too much or too little Fe(3+) directly impacts the well-being of an individual. Because the interaction of hTF with the TFR controls iron distribution in the body, an understanding of this process at the molecular level is essential. Not only does TFR direct the delivery of iron to the cell through the binding of hTF, kinetic data demonstrate that it also modulates iron release from the N- and C-lobes of hTF. Specifically, the TFR balances the rate of iron release from each lobe, resulting in efficient Fe(3+) release within a physiologically relevant time frame. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Molecular Mechanisms of Iron Transport and Disorders. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of different transferrin forms on transferrin receptor expression, iron uptake, and cellular proliferation of human leukemic HL60 cells. Mechanisms responsible for the specific cytotoxicity of transferrin-gallium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chitambar, C.R.; Seligman, P.A.

    1986-12-01

    We have previously shown that human leukemic cells proliferate normally in serum-free media containing various transferrin forms, but the addition of transferrin-gallium leads to inhibition of cellular proliferation. Because gallium has therapeutic potential, the effects of transferrin-gallium on leukemic cell proliferation, transferrin receptor expression, and cellular iron utilization were studied. The cytotoxicity of gallium is considerably enhanced by its binding to transferrin and cytotoxicity can be reversed by transferrin-iron but not by other transferrin forms. Exposure to transferrin-gallium leads to a marked increase in cell surface transferrin binding sites, but despite this, cellular /sup 59/Fe incorporation is inappropriately low. Although shunting of transferrin-gallium to another cellular compartment has not been ruled out, other studies suggest that transferrin-gallium impairs intracellular release of /sup 59/Fe from transferrin by interfering with processes responsible for intracellular acidification. These studies, taken together, demonstrate that inhibition of cellular iron incorporation by transferrin-gallium is a prerequisite for inhibition of cellular proliferation.

  13. Lethal Cardiomyopathy in Mice Lacking Transferrin Receptor in the Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenjing; Barrientos, Tomasa; Mao, Lan; Rockman, Howard A; Sauve, Anthony A; Andrews, Nancy C

    2015-10-20

    Both iron overload and iron deficiency have been associated with cardiomyopathy and heart failure, but cardiac iron utilization is incompletely understood. We hypothesized that the transferrin receptor (Tfr1) might play a role in cardiac iron uptake and used gene targeting to examine the role of Tfr1 in vivo. Surprisingly, we found that decreased iron, due to inactivation of Tfr1, was associated with severe cardiac consequences. Mice lacking Tfr1 in the heart died in the second week of life and had cardiomegaly, poor cardiac function, failure of mitochondrial respiration, and ineffective mitophagy. The phenotype could only be rescued by aggressive iron therapy, but it was ameliorated by administration of nicotinamide riboside, an NAD precursor. Our findings underscore the importance of both Tfr1 and iron in the heart, and may inform therapy for patients with heart failure.

  14. Metabolic Catastrophe in Mice Lacking Transferrin Receptor in Muscle.

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    Barrientos, Tomasa; Laothamatas, Indira; Koves, Timothy R; Soderblom, Erik J; Bryan, Miles; Moseley, M Arthur; Muoio, Deborah M; Andrews, Nancy C

    2015-11-01

    Transferrin receptor (Tfr1) is ubiquitously expressed, but its roles in non-hematopoietic cells are incompletely understood. We used a tissue-specific conditional knockout strategy to ask whether skeletal muscle required Tfr1 for iron uptake. We found that iron assimilation via Tfr1 was critical for skeletal muscle metabolism, and that iron deficiency in muscle led to dramatic changes, not only in muscle, but also in adipose tissue and liver. Inactivation of Tfr1 incapacitated normal energy production in muscle, leading to growth arrest and a muted attempt to switch to fatty acid β oxidation, using up fat stores. Starvation signals stimulated gluconeogenesis in the liver, but amino acid substrates became limiting and hypoglycemia ensued. Surprisingly, the liver was also iron deficient, and production of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin was depressed. Our observations reveal a complex interaction between iron homeostasis and metabolism that has implications for metabolic and iron disorders.

  15. Lethal Cardiomyopathy in Mice Lacking Transferrin Receptor in the Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Xu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Both iron overload and iron deficiency have been associated with cardiomyopathy and heart failure, but cardiac iron utilization is incompletely understood. We hypothesized that the transferrin receptor (Tfr1 might play a role in cardiac iron uptake and used gene targeting to examine the role of Tfr1 in vivo. Surprisingly, we found that decreased iron, due to inactivation of Tfr1, was associated with severe cardiac consequences. Mice lacking Tfr1 in the heart died in the second week of life and had cardiomegaly, poor cardiac function, failure of mitochondrial respiration, and ineffective mitophagy. The phenotype could only be rescued by aggressive iron therapy, but it was ameliorated by administration of nicotinamide riboside, an NAD precursor. Our findings underscore the importance of both Tfr1 and iron in the heart, and may inform therapy for patients with heart failure.

  16. Ionic residues of human serum transferrin affect binding to the transferrin receptor and iron release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steere, Ashley N; Miller, Brendan F; Roberts, Samantha E; Byrne, Shaina L; Chasteen, N Dennis; Smith, Valerie C; MacGillivray, Ross T A; Mason, Anne B

    2012-01-17

    Efficient delivery of iron is critically dependent on the binding of diferric human serum transferrin (hTF) to its specific receptor (TFR) on the surface of actively dividing cells. Internalization of the complex into an endosome precedes iron removal. The return of hTF to the blood to continue the iron delivery cycle relies on the maintenance of the interaction between apohTF and the TFR after exposure to endosomal pH (≤6.0). Identification of the specific residues accounting for the pH-sensitive nanomolar affinity with which hTF binds to TFR throughout the cycle is important to fully understand the iron delivery process. Alanine substitution of 11 charged hTF residues identified by available structures and modeling studies allowed evaluation of the role of each in (1) binding of hTF to the TFR and (2) TFR-mediated iron release. Six hTF mutants (R50A, R352A, D356A, E357A, E367A, and K511A) competed poorly with biotinylated diferric hTF for binding to TFR. In particular, we show that Asp356 in the C-lobe of hTF is essential to the formation of a stable hTF-TFR complex: mutation of Asp356 in the monoferric C-lobe hTF background prevented the formation of the stoichiometric 2:2 (hTF:TFR monomer) complex. Moreover, mutation of three residues (Asp356, Glu367, and Lys511), whether in the diferric or monoferric C-lobe hTF, significantly affected iron release when in complex with the TFR. Thus, mutagenesis of charged hTF residues has allowed identification of a number of residues that are critical to formation of and release of iron from the hTF-TFR complex.

  17. Diagnosis of Iron Deficiency in Inflammatory Bowel Disease by Transferrin Receptor-Ferritin Index.

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    Abitbol, Vered; Borderie, Didier; Polin, Vanessa; Maksimovic, Fanny; Sarfati, Gilles; Esch, Anouk; Tabouret, Tessa; Dhooge, Marion; Dreanic, Johann; Perkins, Geraldine; Coriat, Romain; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2015-07-01

    Iron deficiency is common in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but can be difficult to diagnose in the presence of inflammation because ferritin is an acute phase reactant. The transferrin receptor-ferritin index (TfR-F) has a high sensitivity and specificity for iron deficiency diagnosis in chronic diseases. The diagnostic efficacy of TfR-F is little known in patients with IBD. The aim of the study was to assess the added value of TfR-F to iron deficiency diagnosis in a prospective cohort of patients with IBD.Consecutive IBD patients were prospectively enrolled. Patients were excluded in case of blood transfusion, iron supplementation, or lack of consent. IBD activity was assessed on markers of inflammation (C-reactive protein, endoscopy, fecal calprotectin). Hemoglobin, ferritin, vitamin B9 and B12, Lactate dehydrogenase, haptoglobin, and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) were assayed. TfR-F was calculated as the ratio sTfR/log ferritin. Iron deficiency was defined by ferritin 2 in the presence of inflammation.One-hundred fifty patients with median age 38 years (16-78) and Crohn disease (n = 105), ulcerative colitis (n = 43), or unclassified colitis (n = 2) were included. Active disease was identified in 45.3%. Anemia was diagnosed in 28%. Thirty-six patients (24%) had ferritin deficiency excluding TfR-F analysis, 13 of 30 (43.3%) had TfR-F >2. Overall, iron deficiency was diagnosed in 32.7% of the patients.TfR-F in addition to ferritin iron deficiency. TfR-F appeared as a useful biomarker that could help physicians to diagnose true iron deficiency in patients with active IBD.

  18. The iron-chelating agent picolinic acid enhances transferrin receptors expression in human erythroleukaemic cell lines.

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    Testa, U; Louache, F; Titeux, M; Thomopoulos, P; Rochant, H

    1985-07-01

    Picolinic acid, a metal chelating molecule, was administered to human erythroleukaemic cell lines (K 562 and HEL) that were grown in serum-containing media. Picolinic acid inhibited both iron uptake and cell growth. Furthermore, picolinic acid was shown to markedly decrease the level of ferritin in the cells. In spite of the inhibition of cell growth, picolinic acid induced a marked increase in the transferrin-binding capacity of the cells. This phenomenon was due to a two-five-fold enhancement of the rate of transferrin receptor biosynthesis. Other iron-chelating compounds, capable of reducing the level of intracellular iron, also elicited a marked enhancement of the transferrin-binding capacity of the cells. However, the addition of iron, as ferric ammonium citrate, in the culture medium elicited a marked increase in the level of ferritin and a strong decrease in the transferrin-binding capacity of the cells. On the basis of these data we propose that a feed-back mechanism is involved in the regulation of transferrin receptors: when the cells accumulate iron they decrease the number of transferrin receptors in order to prevent further accumulation of iron; when no or low iron is available to the cells, the number of transferrin receptors markedly increases as a compensatory mechanism.

  19. Evidence for a sequential transfer of iron amongst ferritin,transferrin and transferrin receptor during duodenal absorption of iron in rat and human

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vasantha L Kolachala; B Sesikeran; K Madhavan Nair

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To elucidate the sequential transfer of iron amongst ferritin,transferrin and transferrin receptor under various iron status conditions.METHODS:Incorporation of 59Fe into mucosal and luminal proteins was carried out in control WKY rats.The sequential transfer of iron amongst ferritin,transferrin and transferrin receptor was carried out in iron deficient,control and iron overloaded rats.The duodenal proteins were subjected to immunoprecipitation and quantitation by specific ELISA and in situ localization by microautoradiography and immunohistochemistry in tandem duodenal sections.Human duodenal biopsy(n = 36)collected from subjects with differing iron status were also stained for these proteins.RESULTS:Ferritin was identified as the major protein that incorporated iron in a time-dependent manner in the duodenal mucosa.The concentration of mucosal ferritin was significantly higher in the iron excess group compared to control,iron deficient groups(731.5 ± 191.96 vs 308.3 ± 123.36,731.5 ± 191.96 vs 256.0 ± 1.19,P < 0.005),while that of luminal transferrin which was significantly higher than the mucosal did not differ among the groups(10.9 ± 7.6 vs 0.87 ± 0.79,11.1 ± 10.3 vs 0.80 ± 1.20,6.8 ± 4.7 vs 0.61 ± 0.63,P < 0.001).In situ grading of proteins and iron,and their superimposition,suggested the occurrence of a sequential transfer of iron.This was demonstrated to occur through the initial binding of iron to luminal transferrin then to absorptive cell surface transferrin receptors.The staining intensity of these proteins varied according to the iron nutrition in humans,with intense staining of transferrin receptor observed in iron deficient subjects.CONCLUSION:It is concluded that the intestine takes up iron through a sequential transfer involving interaction of luminal transferrin,transferrin-transferrin receptor and ferritin.

  20. The significance of soluble transferrin receptors in diagnosing iron deficiency anemia

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    Tijanić Ivan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In recent years, determination of soluble transferrin receptor levels has been emerging as a test that can reliably indicate iron deficiency in various states, and that is non-invasive and easy to use. The aim of this study was: to determine reference values of soluble transferrin receptor concentrations in serums in our population, to examine the reliability of this method in the diagnosis of anemia due to iron deficiency and associated iron deficiency in anemia accompanying malignant hemopathies, and to identify possible limitations of the test in certain conditions.

  1. How the binding of human transferrin primes the transferrin receptor potentiating iron release at endosomal pH.

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    Eckenroth, Brian E; Steere, Ashley N; Chasteen, N Dennis; Everse, Stephen J; Mason, Anne B

    2011-08-09

    Delivery of iron to cells requires binding of two iron-containing human transferrin (hTF) molecules to the specific homodimeric transferrin receptor (TFR) on the cell surface. Through receptor-mediated endocytosis involving lower pH, salt, and an unidentified chelator, iron is rapidly released from hTF within the endosome. The crystal structure of a monoferric N-lobe hTF/TFR complex (3.22-Å resolution) features two binding motifs in the N lobe and one in the C lobe of hTF. Binding of Fe(N)hTF induces global and site-specific conformational changes within the TFR ectodomain. Specifically, movements at the TFR dimer interface appear to prime the TFR to undergo pH-induced movements that alter the hTF/TFR interaction. Iron release from each lobe then occurs by distinctly different mechanisms: Binding of His349 to the TFR (strengthened by protonation at low pH) controls iron release from the C lobe, whereas displacement of one N-lobe binding motif, in concert with the action of the dilysine trigger, elicits iron release from the N lobe. One binding motif in each lobe remains attached to the same α-helix in the TFR throughout the endocytic cycle. Collectively, the structure elucidates how the TFR accelerates iron release from the C lobe, slows it from the N lobe, and stabilizes binding of apohTF for return to the cell surface. Importantly, this structure provides new targets for mutagenesis studies to further understand and define this system.

  2. An unusual case of iron deficiency anemia is associated with extremely low level of transferrin receptor

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    Hao, Shuangying; Li, Huihui; Sun, Xiaoyan; Li, Juan; Li, Kuanyu

    2015-01-01

    A case study of a female patient, diagnosed with iron deficiency anemia, was unresponsive to oral iron treatment and only partially responsive to parenteral iron therapy, a clinical profile resembling the iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) disorder. However, the patient failed to exhibit microcytic phenotype, one of the IRIDA hallmarks. Biochemical assays revealed that serum iron, hepcidin, interluekin 6, and transferrin saturation were within the normal range of references or were comparable to her non-anemic offspring. Iron contents in serum and red blood cells and hemoglobin levels were measured, which confirmed the partial improvement of anemia after parenteral iron therapy. Strikingly, serum transferrin receptor in patient was almost undetectable, reflecting the very low activity of bone-marrow erythropoiesis. Our data demonstrate that this is not a case of systemic iron deficiency, but rather cellular iron deficit due to the low level of transferrin receptor, particularly in erythroid tissue. PMID:26339443

  3. An unusual case of iron deficiency anemia is associated with extremely low level of transferrin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Shuangying; Li, Huihui; Sun, Xiaoyan; Li, Juan; Li, Kuanyu

    2015-01-01

    A case study of a female patient, diagnosed with iron deficiency anemia, was unresponsive to oral iron treatment and only partially responsive to parenteral iron therapy, a clinical profile resembling the iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) disorder. However, the patient failed to exhibit microcytic phenotype, one of the IRIDA hallmarks. Biochemical assays revealed that serum iron, hepcidin, interluekin 6, and transferrin saturation were within the normal range of references or were comparable to her non-anemic offspring. Iron contents in serum and red blood cells and hemoglobin levels were measured, which confirmed the partial improvement of anemia after parenteral iron therapy. Strikingly, serum transferrin receptor in patient was almost undetectable, reflecting the very low activity of bone-marrow erythropoiesis. Our data demonstrate that this is not a case of systemic iron deficiency, but rather cellular iron deficit due to the low level of transferrin receptor, particularly in erythroid tissue.

  4. The role of hepatic transferrin receptor 2 in the regulation of iron homeostasis in the body.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christal A Worthen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Fine tuning of body iron is required to prevent diseases such as iron-overload and anemia. The putative iron-sensor, transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2, is expressed in the liver and mutations in this protein result in the iron-overload disease Type III hereditary hemochromatosis (HH. With the loss of functional TfR2, the liver produces about two-fold less of the peptide hormone hepcidin, which is responsible for negatively regulating iron uptake from the diet. This reduction in hepcidin expression leads to the slow accumulation of iron in the liver, heart, joints, and pancreas and subsequent cirrhosis, heart disease, arthritis, and diabetes. TfR2 can bind iron-loaded transferrin in the bloodstream, and hepatocytes treated with transferrin respond with a two-fold increase in hepcidin expression through stimulation of the BMP-signaling pathway. Loss of functional TfR2 or its binding partner, the original HH protein (HFE, results in a loss of this transferrin-sensitivity. While much is known about the trafficking and regulation of TfR2, the mechanism of its transferrin-sensitivity through the BMP-signaling pathway is still not known.

  5. Mutation analysis of the transferrin receptor-2 gene in patients with iron overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, P L; Halloran, C; West, C; Beutler, E

    2001-01-01

    Three mutations in the transferrin receptor-2 gene have recently been identified in four Sicilian families with iron overload who had a normal hemochromatosis gene, HFE (C. Camaschella, personal communication). To determine the extent to which mutations in the transferrin receptor-2 gene occur in other populations with iron overload, we have completely sequenced this gene in 17 whites, 10 Asians, and 8 African Americans with iron overload and a C282C/C282C HFE genotype, as well as 4 subjects without iron overload and homozygous for the mutant HFE C282Y genotype, 5 patients with iron overload and homozygous for the mutant HFE C282Y genotype, and 5 normal individuals. None of the individuals exhibited the Sicilian mutations, Y250X in exon 6, M172K in exon 4, and E60X in exon 2. One iron-overloaded individual of Asian descent exhibited a I238M mutation which was subsequently found to be a polymorphism present in the Asian population at a frequency of 0.0192. The presence of the I238M mutation was not associated with an increase in ferritin or transferrin saturation levels. Three silent polymorphisms were also identified, nt 1770 (D590D) and nt 1851 (A617A) and a polymorphism at nt 2255 in the 3' UTR. Thus, mutations in the transferrin receptor-2 gene were not responsible for the iron overload seen in our subjects.

  6. Iron-independent neuronal expression of transferrin receptor mRNA in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moos, Torben; Oates, Phillip S.; Morgan, Evan H.

    1999-01-01

    Hemochromatosis, hippocampus, in situ hybridization, iron deficiency, neurodegeneration, transferrin......Hemochromatosis, hippocampus, in situ hybridization, iron deficiency, neurodegeneration, transferrin...

  7. Purinergic Receptors in Ocular Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Guzman-Aranguez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a complex process that implies the interaction between cells and molecular mediators, which, when not properly “tuned,” can lead to disease. When inflammation affects the eye, it can produce severe disorders affecting the superficial and internal parts of the visual organ. The nucleoside adenosine and nucleotides including adenine mononucleotides like ADP and ATP and dinucleotides such as P1,P4-diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A, and P1,P5-diadenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A are present in different ocular locations and therefore they may contribute/modulate inflammatory processes. Adenosine receptors, in particular A2A adenosine receptors, present anti-inflammatory action in acute and chronic retinal inflammation. Regarding the A3 receptor, selective agonists like N6-(3-iodobenzyl-5′-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine (CF101 have been used for the treatment of inflammatory ophthalmic diseases such as dry eye and uveoretinitis. Sideways, diverse stimuli (sensory stimulation, large intraocular pressure increases can produce a release of ATP from ocular sensory innervation or after injury to ocular tissues. Then, ATP will activate purinergic P2 receptors present in sensory nerve endings, the iris, the ciliary body, or other tissues surrounding the anterior chamber of the eye to produce uveitis/endophthalmitis. In summary, adenosine and nucleotides can activate receptors in ocular structures susceptible to suffer from inflammatory processes. This involvement suggests the possible use of purinergic agonists and antagonists as therapeutic targets for ocular inflammation.

  8. Snx3 regulates recycling of the transferrin receptor and iron assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Caiyong; Garcia-Santos, Daniel; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Seguin, Alexandra; Li, Liangtao; Fegan, Katherine H; Hildick-Smith, Gordon J; Shah, Dhvanit I; Cooney, Jeffrey D; Chen, Wen; King, Matthew J; Yien, Yvette Y; Schultz, Iman J; Anderson, Heidi; Dalton, Arthur J; Freedman, Matthew L; Kingsley, Paul D; Palis, James; Hattangadi, Shilpa M; Lodish, Harvey F; Ward, Diane M; Kaplan, Jerry; Maeda, Takahiro; Ponka, Prem; Paw, Barry H

    2013-03-01

    Sorting of endocytic ligands and receptors is critical for diverse cellular processes. The physiological significance of endosomal sorting proteins in vertebrates, however, remains largely unknown. Here we report that sorting nexin 3 (Snx3) facilitates the recycling of transferrin receptor (Tfrc) and thus is required for the proper delivery of iron to erythroid progenitors. Snx3 is highly expressed in vertebrate hematopoietic tissues. Silencing of Snx3 results in anemia and hemoglobin defects in vertebrates due to impaired transferrin (Tf)-mediated iron uptake and its accumulation in early endosomes. This impaired iron assimilation can be complemented with non-Tf iron chelates. We show that Snx3 and Vps35, a component of the retromer, interact with Tfrc to sort it to the recycling endosomes. Our findings uncover a role of Snx3 in regulating Tfrc recycling, iron homeostasis, and erythropoiesis. Thus, the identification of Snx3 provides a genetic tool for exploring erythropoiesis and disorders of iron metabolism.

  9. Serum Hepcidin and Soluble Transferrin Receptor in the Assessment of Iron Metabolism in Children on a Vegetarian Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambroszkiewicz, Jadwiga; Klemarczyk, Witold; Mazur, Joanna; Gajewska, Joanna; Rowicka, Grażyna; Strucińska, Małgorzata; Chełchowska, Magdalena

    2017-03-24

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of vegetarian diet on iron metabolism parameters paying special attention to serum hepcidin and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) concentrations in 43 prepubertal children (age range 4.5-9.0 years) on vegetarian and in 46 children on omnivorous diets. There were no significant differences according to age, weight, height, and body mass index (BMI) between vegetarian and omnivorous children. Vegetarians had similar intake of iron and vitamin B12 and a significantly higher intake of vitamin C (p vegetarians. Hematologic parameters and serum iron concentrations were within the reference range in both groups of children. Serum transferrin levels were similar in all subjects; however, ferritin concentrations were significantly (p vegetarians than in omnivores. In children on a vegetarian diet, median hepcidin levels were lower (p vegetarians. We did not find significant associations with concentration of sTfR and selected biochemical, anthropometric, and dietary parameters in any of the studied groups of children. As hematologic parameters and iron concentrations in vegetarians and omnivores were comparable and ferritin level was lower in vegetarians, we suggest that inclusion of novel markers, in particular sTfR (not cofounded by inflammation) and hepcidin, can better detect subclinical iron deficiency in children following vegetarian diets.

  10. The complex role of multivalency in nanoparticles targeting the transferrin receptor for cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Tian, Shaomin; Petros, Robby A; Napier, Mary E; Desimone, Joseph M

    2010-08-18

    Transferrin receptor (TfR, CD71) has long been a therapeutic target due to its overexpression in many malignant tissues. In this study, PRINT() nanoparticles were conjugated with TfR ligands for targeted drug delivery. Cylindrical poly(ethylene glycol)-based PRINT nanoparticles (diameter (d) = 200 nm, height (h) = 200 nm) labeled with transferrin receptor antibody (NP-OKT9) or human transferrin (NP-hTf) showed highly specific TfR-mediated uptake by all human tumor cell lines tested, relative to negative controls (IgG1 for OKT9 or bovine transferrin (bTf) for hTf). The targeting efficiency was dependent on particle concentration, ligand density, dosing time, and cell surface receptor expression level. Interestingly, NP-OKT9 or NP-hTf showed little cytotoxicity on all solid tumor cell lines tested but were very toxic to Ramos B-cell lymphoma, whereas free OKT9 or hTf was not toxic. There was a strong correlation between TfR ligand density on the particle surface and cell viability and particle uptake. NP-OKT9 and NP-hTf were internalized into acidic intracellular compartments but were not localized in EEA1-enriched early endosomes or lysosomes. Elevated caspase 3/7 activity indicates activation of apoptosis pathways upon particle treatment. Supplementation of iron suppressed the toxicity of NP-OKT9 but not NP-hTf, suggesting different mechanisms by which NP-hTf and NP-OKT9 exerts cytotoxicity on Ramos cells. On the basis of such an observation, the complex role of multivalency in nanoparticles is discussed. In addition, our data clearly reveal that one must be careful in making claims of "lack of toxicity" when a targeting molecule is used on nanoparticles and also raise concerns for unanticipated off-target effects when one is designing targeted chemotherapy nanodelivery agents.

  11. Serum transferrin receptor levels in the evaluation of iron deficiency in the neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusia, U; Flowers, C; Madan, N; Agarwal, N; Sood, S K; Sikka, M

    1996-10-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a major global problem. Early onset of iron deficiency in developing countries makes it imperative to identify iron deficiency in neonates. Most conventional laboratory parameters of iron status fail to distinguish neonates with iron deficient erythropoiesis. Serum transferrin receptor (STFR) levels are a recent sensitive measure of iron deficiency and the present study was carried out to evaluate the usefulness of cord serum transferrin receptors in identifying iron deficient erythropoiesis in neonates. A complete hemogram, red cell indices, iron profile: serum iron (SI), percent transferrin saturation (TS%) and serum ferritin (SF) was carried out in 100 full-term neonates and their mothers at parturition. Cord and maternal STFR levels were estimated using a sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. Anemic women had a significantly lower SI, their TS% and high STFR levels suggesting that iron deficiency was responsible for the anemia. In the neonates of iron deficient mothers, cord SI, TS% and cord ferritin were not significantly different from those of neonates born to non-anemic mothers. Cord STFR level correlated well with hemoglobin (Hb) and laboratory parameters of iron status, and its level was significantly higher in neonates born to anemic mothers than in those born to non-anemic mothers. It was the only laboratory parameter to differentiate between neonates born to anemic and non-anemic mothers. Therefore, STFR is a sensitive index of iron status in neonates and identifies neonates with iron deficient erythropoiesis.

  12. A missense mutation in TFRC, encoding transferrin receptor 1, causes combined immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabara, Haifa H; Boyden, Steven E; Chou, Janet; Ramesh, Narayanaswamy; Massaad, Michel J; Benson, Halli; Bainter, Wayne; Fraulino, David; Rahimov, Fedik; Sieff, Colin; Liu, Zhi-Jian; Alshemmari, Salem H; Al-Ramadi, Basel K; Al-Dhekri, Hasan; Arnaout, Rand; Abu-Shukair, Mohammad; Vatsayan, Anant; Silver, Eli; Ahuja, Sanjay; Davies, E Graham; Sola-Visner, Martha; Ohsumi, Toshiro K; Andrews, Nancy C; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Fleming, Mark D; Al-Herz, Waleed; Kunkel, Louis M; Geha, Raif S

    2016-01-01

    Patients with a combined immunodeficiency characterized by normal numbers but impaired function of T and B cells had a homozygous p.Tyr20His substitution in transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1), encoded by TFRC. The substitution disrupts the TfR1 internalization motif, resulting in defective receptor endocytosis and markedly increased TfR1 expression on the cell surface. Iron citrate rescued the lymphocyte defects, and expression of wild-type but not mutant TfR1 rescued impaired transferrin uptake in patient-derived fibroblasts. Tfrc(Y20H/Y20H) mice recapitulated the immunological defects of patients. Despite the critical role of TfR1 in erythrocyte development and function, patients had only mild anemia and only slightly increased TfR1 expression in erythroid precursors. We show that STEAP3, a metalloreductase expressed in erythroblasts, associates with TfR1 and partially rescues transferrin uptake in patient-derived fibroblasts, suggesting that STEAP3 may provide an accessory TfR1 endocytosis signal that spares patients from severe anemia. These findings demonstrate the importance of TfR1 in adaptive immunity.

  13. Ferristatin II promotes degradation of transferrin receptor-1 in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaina L Byrne

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that the small molecule iron transport inhibitor ferristatin (NSC30611 acts by down-regulating transferrin receptor-1 (TfR1 via receptor degradation. In this investigation, we show that another small molecule, ferristatin II (NSC8679, acts in a similar manner to degrade the receptor through a nystatin-sensitive lipid raft pathway. Structural domains of the receptor necessary for interactions with the clathrin pathway do not appear to be necessary for ferristatin II induced degradation of TfR1. While TfR1 constitutively traffics through clathrin-mediated endocytosis, with or without ligand, the presence of Tf blocked ferristatin II induced degradation of TfR1. This effect of Tf was lost in a ligand binding receptor mutant G647A TfR1, suggesting that Tf binding to its receptor interferes with the drug's activity. Rats treated with ferristatin II have lower TfR1 in liver. These effects are associated with reduced intestinal (59Fe uptake, lower serum iron and transferrin saturation, but no change in liver non-heme iron stores. The observed hypoferremia promoted by degradation of TfR1 by ferristatin II appears to be due to induced hepcidin gene expression.

  14. Endogenous Receptor Agonists: Resolving Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Bannenberg

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlled resolution or the physiologic resolution of a well-orchestrated inflammatory response at the tissue level is essential to return to homeostasis. A comprehensive understanding of the cellular and molecular events that control the termination of acute inflammation is needed in molecular terms given the widely held view that aberrant inflammation underlies many common diseases. This review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the role of arachidonic acid and ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA–derived lipid mediators in regulating the resolution of inflammation. Using a functional lipidomic approach employing LC-MS-MS–based informatics, recent studies, reviewed herein, uncovered new families of local-acting chemical mediators actively biosynthesized during the resolution phase from the essential fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. These new families of local chemical mediators are generated endogenously in exudates collected during the resolution phase, and were coined resolvins and protectins because specific members of these novel chemical families control both the duration and magnitude of inflammation in animal models of complex diseases. Recent advances on the biosynthesis, receptors, and actions of these novel anti-inflammatory and proresolving lipid mediators are reviewed with the aim to bring to attention the important role of specific lipid mediators as endogenous agonists in inflammation resolution.

  15. Transferrin receptor-targeted theranostic gold nanoparticles for photosensitizer delivery in brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Suraj; Novak, Thomas; Miller, Kayla; Zhu, Yun; Kenney, Malcolm E.; Broome, Ann-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is not only inefficient, but also nonspecific to brain stroma. These are major limitations in the effective treatment of brain cancer. Transferrin peptide (Tfpep) targeted gold nanoparticles (Tfpep-Au NPs) loaded with the photodynamic pro-drug, Pc 4, have been designed and compared with untargeted Au NPs for delivery of the photosensitizer to brain cancer cell lines. In vitro studies of human glioma cancer lines (LN229 and U87) overexpressing the transferrin receptor (TfR) show a significant increase in cellular uptake for targeted conjugates as compared to untargeted particles. Pc 4 delivered from Tfpep-Au NPs clusters within vesicles after targeting with the Tfpep. Pc 4 continues to accumulate over a 4 hour period. Our work suggests that TfR-targeted Au NPs may have important therapeutic implications for delivering brain tumor therapies and/or providing a platform for noninvasive imaging.

  16. Influence of endurance exercise (triathlon) on circulating transferrin receptors and other indicators of iron status in female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röcker, Lothar; Hinz, Katrin; Holland, Karsten; Gunga, Hanns-Christian; Vogelgesang, Jens; Kiesewetter, Holger

    2002-01-01

    Numerous reports have described a poor iron status in female endurance athletes. However, the traditionally applied indicators of iron status (hemoglobin, ferritin, transferrin) may not truly reflect the iron status. Therefore we studied the newly developed soluble transferrin receptor and other indicators of iron status in twelve female endurance athletes before and after a triathlon race. Resting values showed a poor iron status in the participants of the race. Serum TfR concentration increased slightly after the race. However, if the values are corrected for hemoconcentration no change could be found. Hemoglobin, serum ferritin and transferrin values were increased after the race.

  17. Bacterial receptors for host transferrin and lactoferrin: molecular mechanisms and role in host-microbe interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthau, Ari; Pogoutse, Anastassia; Adamiak, Paul; Moraes, Trevor F; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2013-12-01

    Iron homeostasis in the mammalian host limits the availability of iron to invading pathogens and is thought to restrict iron availability for microbes inhabiting mucosal surfaces. The presence of surface receptors for the host iron-binding glycoproteins transferrin (Tf) and lactoferrin (Lf) in globally important Gram-negative bacterial pathogens of humans and food production animals suggests that Tf and Lf are important sources of iron in the upper respiratory or genitourinary tracts, where they exclusively reside. Lf receptors have the additional function of protecting against host cationic antimicrobial peptides, suggesting that the bacteria expressing these receptors reside in a niche where exposure is likely. In this review we compare Tf and Lf receptors with respect to their structural and functional features, their role in colonization and infection, and their distribution among pathogenic and commensal bacteria.

  18. Regulation of endocytic trafficking of transferrin receptor by optineurin and its impairment by a glaucoma-associated mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangaraj Nandini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optineurin is a multifunctional protein involved in several functions such as vesicular trafficking from the Golgi to the plasma membrane, NF-κB regulation, signal transduction and gene expression. Mutations in optineurin are associated with glaucoma, a neurodegenerative eye disease that causes blindness. Genetic evidence suggests that the E50K (Glu50Lys is a dominant disease-causing mutation of optineurin. However, functional alterations caused by mutations in optineurin are not known. Here, we have analyzed the role of optineurin in endocytic recycling and the effect of E50K mutant on this process. Results We show that the knockdown of optineurin impairs trafficking of transferrin receptor to the juxtanuclear region. A point mutation (D474N in the ubiquitin-binding domain abrogates localization of optineurin to the recycling endosomes and interaction with transferrin receptor. The function of ubiquitin-binding domain of optineurin is also needed for trafficking of transferrin to the juxtanuclear region. A disease causing mutation, E50K, impairs endocytic recycling of transferrin receptor as shown by enlarged recycling endosomes, slower dynamics of E50K vesicles and decreased transferrin uptake by the E50K-expressing cells. This impaired trafficking by the E50K mutant requires the function of its ubiquitin-binding domain. Compared to wild type optineurin, the E50K optineurin shows enhanced interaction and colocalization with transferrin receptor and Rab8. The velocity of Rab8 vesicles is reduced by co-expression of the E50K mutant. These results suggest that the E50K mutant affects Rab8-mediated transferrin receptor trafficking. Conclusions Our results suggest that optineurin regulates endocytic trafficking of transferrin receptor to the juxtanuclear region. The E50K mutant impairs trafficking at the recycling endosomes due to altered interactions with Rab8 and transferrin receptor. These results also have implications for

  19. Endocytosis of a functionally enhanced GFP-tagged transferrin receptor in CHO cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi He

    Full Text Available The endocytosis of transferrin receptor (TfR has served as a model to study the receptor-targeted cargo delivery system for cancer therapy for many years. To accurately evaluate and optically measure this TfR targeting delivery in vitro, a CHO cell line with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP-tagged human TfR was established. A chimera of the hTfR and EGFP was engineered by fusing EGFP to the amino terminus of hTfR. Data were provided to demonstrate that hTfR-EGFP chimera was predominantly localized on the plasma membrane with some intracellular fluorescent structures on CHO cells and the EGFP moiety did not affect the endocytosis property of hTfR. Receptor internalization occurred similarly to that of HepG2 cells expressing wild-type hTfR. The internalization percentage of this chimeric receptor was about 81 ± 3% of wild type. Time-dependent co-localization of hTfR-EGFP and PE-conjugated anti-hTfR mAb in living cells demonstrated the trafficking of mAb-receptor complexes through the endosomes followed by segregation of part of the mAb and receptor at the late stages of endocytosis. The CHO-hTfR cells preferentially took up anti-hTfR mAb conjugated nanoparticles. This CHO-hTfR cell line makes it feasible for accurate evaluation and visualization of intracellular trafficking of therapeutic agents conjugated with transferrin or Abs targeting the hTfRs.

  20. Structure and dynamics of drug carriers and their interaction with cellular receptors: focus on serum transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Ashley N; Mason, Anne B

    2013-07-01

    Highly proliferative cells have a dramatically increased need for iron which results in the expression of an increased number of transferrin receptors (TFR). This insight makes the transferrin receptor on these cells an excellent candidate for targeted therapeutics. In this regard, it is critical to understand at a molecular level exactly how the TFR interacts with its ligand, hTF. Understanding of the hTF/TFR pathway could, in theory, maximize the use of this system for development of more effective small molecules or toxin-conjugates to specifically target cancer cells. Many strategies have been attempted with the objective of utilizing the hTF/TFR system to deliver drugs; these include conjugation of a toxin or drug to hTF or direct targeting of the TFR by antibodies. To date, in spite of all of the effort, there is a conspicuous absence of any successful candidate drugs reaching the clinic. We suggest that a lack of quantitative data to determine the basic biochemical properties of the drug carrier and the effects of drug-conjugation on the hTF-TFR interaction may have contributed to the failure to realize the full potential of this system. This review provides some guidelines for developing a more quantitative approach for evaluation of current and future hTF-drug conjugates. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Structure and Dynamics of Drug Carriers and Their Interaction with Cellular Receptors: Focus on Serum Transferrin#

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Ashley N.; Mason, Anne B.

    2012-01-01

    Highly proliferative cells have a dramatically increased need for iron which results in the expression of an increased number of transferrin receptors (TFR). This insight makes the transferrin receptor on these cells an excellent candidate for targeted therapeutics. In this regard, it is critical to understand at a molecular level exactly how the TFR interacts with its ligand, hTF. Understanding of the hTF/TFR pathway could, in theory, maximize the use of this system for development of more effective small molecules or toxin-conjugates to specifically target cancer cells. Many strategies have been attempted with the objective of utilizing the hTF/TFR system to deliver drugs; these include conjugation of a toxin or drug to hTF or direct targeting of the TFR by antibodies. To date, in spite of all of the effort, there is a conspicuous absence of any successful candidate drugs reaching the clinic. We suggest that a lack of quantitative data to determine the basic biochemical properties of the drug carrier and the effects of drug-conjugation on the hTF-TFR interaction may have contributed to the failure to realize the full potential of this system. This review provides some guidelines for developing a more quantitative approach for evaluation of current and future hTF-drug conjugates. PMID:23183585

  2. Transferrin receptor regulates pancreatic cancer growth by modulating mitochondrial respiration and ROS generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Seung Min, E-mail: smjeong@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Institute for Aging and Metabolic Diseases, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sunsook; Seong, Rho Hyun [School of Biological Sciences and Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-11

    The transferrin receptor (TfR1) is upregulated in malignant cells and its expression is associated with cancer progression. Because of its pre-eminent role in cell proliferation, TfR1 has been an important target for the development of cancer therapy. Although TfR1 is highly expressed in pancreatic cancers, what it carries out in these refractory cancers remains poorly understood. Here we report that TfR1 supports mitochondrial respiration and ROS production in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells, which is required for their tumorigenic growth. Elevated TfR1 expression in PDAC cells contributes to oxidative phosphorylation, which allows for the generation of ROS. Importantly, mitochondrial-derived ROS are essential for PDAC growth. However, exogenous iron supplement cannot rescue the defects caused by TfR1 knockdown. Moreover, we found that TfR1 expression determines PDAC cells sensitivity to oxidative stress. Together, our findings reveal that TfR1 can contribute to the mitochondrial respiration and ROS production, which have essential roles in growth and survival of pancreatic cancer. - Highlights: • Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) exhibits an elevated transferrin receptor (TfR1) expression in comparison with non-transformed pancreatic cells. • TfR1 is required for PDAC growth by regulating mitochondrial respiration and ROS production. • TfR1 functions as a determinant of cell viability to oxidative stress in PDAC cells.

  3. Coincident expression and distribution of melanotransferrin and transferrin receptor in human brain capillary endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberger, S; Food, M R; Gabathuler, R; Kennard, M L; Yamada, T; Yasuhara, O; McGeer, P L; Jefferies, W A

    1996-03-11

    One method of iron transport across the blood brain barrier (BBB) involves the transferrin receptor (TR), which is localized to the specialized brain capillary endothelium. The melanotransferrin (MTf) molecule, also called p97, has been widely described as a melanoma specific molecule, however, its expression in brain tissues has not been addressed. MTf has a high level of sequence homology to transferrin (Tf) and lactoferrin, but is unusual because it predominantly occurs as a membrane bound, glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored molecule, but can also occur as a soluble form. We have recently demonstrated that GPI-anchored MTf provides a novel route for cellular iron uptake which is independent of Tf and its receptor. Here we consider whether MTf may have a role in the transport of iron across the BBB. The distributions of MTf, Tf and the TR were studied immunohistochemically in human brain tissues. The distributions of MTf and TR were remarkably similar, and quite different from that of Tf. In all brain tissues examined, MTf and the TR were highly localized to capillary endothelium, while Tf itself was mainly localized to glial cells. These data suggest that MTf may play a role in iron transport within the human brain.

  4. H-Ferritin Is Preferentially Incorporated by Human Erythroid Cells through Transferrin Receptor 1 in a Threshold-Dependent Manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soichiro Sakamoto

    Full Text Available Ferritin is an iron-storage protein composed of different ratios of 24 light (L and heavy (H subunits. The serum level of ferritin is a clinical marker of the body's iron level. Transferrin receptor (TFR1 is the receptor not only for transferrin but also for H-ferritin, but how it binds two different ligands and the blood cell types that preferentially incorporate H-ferritin remain unknown. To address these questions, we investigated hematopoietic cell-specific ferritin uptake by flow cytometry. Alexa Fluor 488-labeled H-ferritin was preferentially incorporated by erythroid cells among various hematopoietic cell lines examined, and was almost exclusively incorporated by bone marrow erythroblasts among human primary hematopoietic cells of various lineages. H-ferritin uptake by erythroid cells was strongly inhibited by unlabeled H-ferritin but was only partially inhibited by a large excess of holo-transferrin. On the other hand, internalization of labeled holo-transferrin by these cells was not inhibited by H-ferritin. Chinese hamster ovary cells lacking functional endogenous TFR1 but expressing human TFR1 with a mutated RGD sequence, which is required for transferrin binding, efficiently incorporated H-ferritin, indicating that TFR1 has distinct binding sites for H-ferritin and holo-transferrin. H-ferritin uptake by these cells required a threshold level of cell surface TFR1 expression, whereas there was no threshold for holo-transferrin uptake. The requirement for a threshold level of TFR1 expression can explain why among primary human hematopoietic cells, only erythroblasts efficiently take up H-ferritin.

  5. H-Ferritin Is Preferentially Incorporated by Human Erythroid Cells through Transferrin Receptor 1 in a Threshold-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Soichiro; Kawabata, Hiroshi; Masuda, Taro; Uchiyama, Tatsuki; Mizumoto, Chisaki; Ohmori, Katsuyuki; Koeffler, H. Phillip; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin is an iron-storage protein composed of different ratios of 24 light (L) and heavy (H) subunits. The serum level of ferritin is a clinical marker of the body’s iron level. Transferrin receptor (TFR)1 is the receptor not only for transferrin but also for H-ferritin, but how it binds two different ligands and the blood cell types that preferentially incorporate H-ferritin remain unknown. To address these questions, we investigated hematopoietic cell-specific ferritin uptake by flow cytometry. Alexa Fluor 488-labeled H-ferritin was preferentially incorporated by erythroid cells among various hematopoietic cell lines examined, and was almost exclusively incorporated by bone marrow erythroblasts among human primary hematopoietic cells of various lineages. H-ferritin uptake by erythroid cells was strongly inhibited by unlabeled H-ferritin but was only partially inhibited by a large excess of holo-transferrin. On the other hand, internalization of labeled holo-transferrin by these cells was not inhibited by H-ferritin. Chinese hamster ovary cells lacking functional endogenous TFR1 but expressing human TFR1 with a mutated RGD sequence, which is required for transferrin binding, efficiently incorporated H-ferritin, indicating that TFR1 has distinct binding sites for H-ferritin and holo-transferrin. H-ferritin uptake by these cells required a threshold level of cell surface TFR1 expression, whereas there was no threshold for holo-transferrin uptake. The requirement for a threshold level of TFR1 expression can explain why among primary human hematopoietic cells, only erythroblasts efficiently take up H-ferritin. PMID:26441243

  6. Seasonal changes in haematology, lymphocyte transferrin receptors and intracellular iron in Ironman triathletes and untrained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    We investigated whether 12 months of chronic endurance training would affect haematology, CD4(+) lymphocyte transferrin receptor (CD71) expression, CD4(+) intracellular iron and the incidence of upper respiratory tract illnesses (URTI) in Ironman triathletes compared with untrained men. Resting venous blood samples were taken from 15 Ironman triathletes (TR 30 ± 5 year) and 12 untrained men (UT 30 ± 6 year) every 4 weeks for 12 months. Erythrocyte, leukocyte and platelet concentration, haematocrit, haemoglobin (Hb) and mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCHC) were measured with a full blood count. CD4(+) lymphocytes were analysed for changes in transferrin receptor (CD71) expression (CD4(+)CD71(+)), and intracellular iron (Fe(3+)), by flow cytometry. The TR group had significantly lower Hb, MCHC, and platelets for 10, 9 and 11 months, respectively; lower CD4(+)CD71(+) (3 months) and Fe(3+) (1 month), respectively; higher CD4(+)CD71(+) (1 month); a higher lymphocyte count for 4 months. There were no between-group differences in other variables. In both groups haematology and lymphocytes increased during spring, early summer and winter and decreased during late summer/late winter, with an inverse relationship between CD4(+)CD71(+) and Fe(3+). The TR group reported significantly fewer URTI than the UT. Low Hb and MCHC suggest an iron deficiency which may affect triathlete performance. Monthly changes in lymphocytes, CD4(+)CD71(+) and Fe(3+) suggested that spring, summer and late autumn are associated with CD4(+) proliferation. There may be seasonal relationships between haematology and lymphocyte function, independent of endurance training, possibly affecting performance but not the incidence of URTI.

  7. The Transferrin Receptor: A Potential Molecular Imaging Marker for Human Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Högemann-Savellano

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive imaging of differences between the molecular properties of cancer and normal tissue has the potential to enhance the detection of tumors. Because overexpression of endogenous transferrin receptor (TfR has been qualitatively described for various cancers and is presumably due to malignant transformation of cells, TfR may represent a suitable target for application of molecular imaging technologies to increase detection of smaller tumors. In the work reported here, investigation into the biology of this receptor using electron microscopy has demonstrated that iron oxide particles targeted to TfR are internalized and accumulate in lysosomal vesicles within cells. Biochemical analysis of the interaction of imaging probes with cells overexpressing the TfR demonstrated that the extent of accumulation, and therefore probe efficacy, is dependent on the nature of the chemical cross-link between transferrin and the iron oxide particle. These data were utilized to design and synthesize an improved imaging probe. Experiments demonstrate that the novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI probe is sensitive enough to detect small differences in endogenous TfR expression in human cancer cell lines. Quantitative measurement of TfR overexpression in a panel of 27 human breast cancer patients demonstrated that 74% of patient cancer tissues overexpressed the TfR and that the sensitivity of the new imaging agent was suitable to detect TfR overexpression in greater than 40% of these cases. Based on a biochemical and cell biological approach, these studies have resulted in the synthesis and development of an improved MRI probe with the best in vitro and in vivo imaging properties reported to date.

  8. Machupo virus glycoprotein determinants for human transferrin receptor 1 binding and cell entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheli R Radoshitzky

    Full Text Available Machupo virus (MACV is a highly pathogenic New World arenavirus that causes hemorrhagic fever in humans. MACV, as well as other pathogenic New World arenaviruses, enter cells after their GP1 attachment glycoprotein binds to their cellular receptor, transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1. TfR1 residues essential for this interaction have been described, and a co-crystal of MACV GP1 bound to TfR1 suggests GP1 residues important for this association. We created MACV GP1 variants and tested their effect on TfR1 binding and virus entry to evaluate the functional significance of some of these and additional residues in human and simian cells. We found residues R111, D123, Y122, and F226 to be essential, D155, and P160 important, and D114, S116, D140, and K169 expendable for the GP1-TfR1 interaction and MACV entry. Several MACV GP1 residues that are critical for the interaction with TfR1 are conserved among other New World arenaviruses, indicating a common basis of receptor interaction. Our findings also open avenues for the rational development of viral entry inhibitors.

  9. A straightforward route to the synthesis of a surface-enhanced Raman scattering probe for targeting transferrin receptor-overexpressed cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Jing; Wang Zhuyuan; Tan Xuebin; Li Jin; Song Chunyuan; Zhang Ruohu; Cui Yiping, E-mail: cyp@seu.edu.cn [Advanced Photonics Center, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2010-08-27

    A tumor cell targeting surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probe has been successfully synthesized by using p-mercaptobenzoic acid (pMBA) as both the SERS reporter and the conjugation agent for attaching transferrin molecules, which shows experimentally the targeting ability for transferrin receptor-overexpressed HeLa cells and exhibits strong SERS signals when being incubated inside cells. To prove that the uptake of such a SERS probe is through a Tf-receptor-mediated endocytosis process, two control experiments: (1) HeLa cells being incubated with the probe at 4 deg. C and (2) HeLa cells being pre-blocked with free transferrin at 37 deg. C, were employed. The difference of SERS intensity between the transferrin-overexpressed HeLa cells and transferrin-pre-blocked HeLa cells indicates that the probe has the potential to selectively target tumor cells.

  10. Soluble Form of Canine Transferrin Receptor Inhibits Canine Parvovirus Infection In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiexia Wen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Canine parvovirus (CPV disease is an acute, highly infectious disease threatening the dog-raising industry. So far there are no effective therapeutic strategies to control this disease. Although the canine transferrin receptor (TfR was identified as a receptor for CPV infection, whether extracellular domain of TfR (called soluble TfR (sTfR possesses anti-CPV activities remains elusive. Here, we used the recombinant sTfR prepared from HEK293T cells with codon-optimized gene structure to investigate its anti-CPV activity both in vitro and in vivo. Our results indicated that codon optimization could significantly improve sTfR expression in HEK293T cells. The prepared recombinant sTfR possessed a binding activity to both CPV and CPV VP2 capsid proteins and significantly inhibited CPV infection of cultured feline F81 cells and decreased the mortality of CPV-infected dogs, which indicates that the sTfR has the anti-CPV activity both in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Transferrin receptor 1 in the zoonosis and pathogenesis of New World hemorrhagic fever arenaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Hyeryun; Jemielity, Stephanie; Abraham, Jonathan; Radoshitzky, Sheli R; Farzan, Michael

    2011-08-01

    At least five New World arenaviruses cause severe human hemorrhagic fevers. These viruses are transmitted to humans through contact with their respective South American rodent hosts. Each uses human transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) as its obligate receptor. Accidental similarities between human TfR1 and TfR1 orthologs of arenaviral host species enable zoonoses, whereas mice and rats are not infectable because they lack these TfR1 determinants of infection. All pathogenic New World arenaviruses bind to a common region of the apical domain of TfR1. The ability of a New World arenavirus to use human TfR1 is absolutely predictive of its ability to cause hemorrhagic fevers in humans. Nonpathogenic arenaviruses, closely related to hemorrhagic fever arenaviruses, cannot utilize human TfR1 but efficiently enter cells through TfR1 orthologs of their native rodent hosts. Mutagenesis studies suggest that minor changes in the entry glycoproteins of these nonpathogenic viruses may allow human transmission. TfR1 is upregulated as a result of iron sequestration during the acute-phase response to infection, and the severity of disease may result from amplification of viral replication during this response.

  12. Soluble form of canine transferrin receptor inhibits canine parvovirus infection in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jiexia; Pan, Sumin; Liang, Shuang; Zhong, Zhenyu; He, Ying; Lin, Hongyu; Li, Wenyan; Wang, Liyue; Li, Xiujin; Zhong, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) disease is an acute, highly infectious disease threatening the dog-raising industry. So far there are no effective therapeutic strategies to control this disease. Although the canine transferrin receptor (TfR) was identified as a receptor for CPV infection, whether extracellular domain of TfR (called soluble TfR (sTfR)) possesses anti-CPV activities remains elusive. Here, we used the recombinant sTfR prepared from HEK293T cells with codon-optimized gene structure to investigate its anti-CPV activity both in vitro and in vivo. Our results indicated that codon optimization could significantly improve sTfR expression in HEK293T cells. The prepared recombinant sTfR possessed a binding activity to both CPV and CPV VP2 capsid proteins and significantly inhibited CPV infection of cultured feline F81 cells and decreased the mortality of CPV-infected dogs, which indicates that the sTfR has the anti-CPV activity both in vitro and in vivo.

  13. Aluminum access to the brain: A role for transferrin and its receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roskams, A.J.; Connor, J.R. (Pennsylvania State Univ., Hershey (United States))

    1990-11-01

    The toxicity of aluminum in plant and animal cell biology is well established, although poorly understood. Several recent studies have identified aluminum as a potential, although highly controversial, contributory factor in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and dialysis dementia. For example, aluminum has been found in high concentrations in senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, which occur in the brains of subjects with Alzheimer's disease. However, a mechanism for the entry of aluminum (Al{sup 3+}) into the cells of the central nervous system (CNS) has yet to be found. Here the authors describe a possible route of entry for aluminum into the cells of the CNS via the same high-affinity receptor-ligand system that has been postulated for iron (Fe{sup 3}) aluminum is able to gain access to the central nervous system under normal physiological conditions. Furthermore, these data suggest that the interaction between transferrin and its receptor may function as a general metal ion regulatory system in the CNS, extending beyond its postulated role in iron regulation.

  14. The Importance of Serum Transferrin Receptor and TfR-F Index in the Diagnosis of Iron Deficiency Accompanied by Acute and Chronic Infections

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koşan Çulha, Vildan; Uysal, Zümrüt

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluated the diagnostic superiority of serum transferrin receptor (sTfR) measurement to other laboratory tests performed for the determination of iron deficiency caused by chronic disease...

  15. Enhanced transferrin receptor expression by proinflammatory cytokines in enterocytes as a means for local delivery of drugs to inflamed gut mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrat Harel

    Full Text Available Therapeutic intervention in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs is often associated with adverse effects related to drug distribution into non-diseased tissues, a situation which attracts a rational design of a targeted treatment confined to the inflamed mucosa. Upon activation of immune cells, transferrin receptor (TfR expression increases at their surface. Because TfR is expressed in all cell types we hypothesized that its cell surface levels are regulated also in enterocytes. We, therefore, compared TfR expression in healthy and inflamed human colonic mucosa, as well as healthy and inflamed colonic mucosa of the DNBS-induced rat model. TfR expression was elevated in the colonic mucosa of IBD patients in both the basolateral and apical membranes of the enterocytes. Increased TfR expression was also observed in colonocytes of the induced colitis rats. To explore the underlying mechanism CaCo-2 cells were treated with various proinflammatory cytokines, which increased both TfR expression and transferrin cellular uptake in a mechanism that did not involve hyper proliferation. These findings were then exploited for the design of targetable carrier towards inflamed regions of the colon. Anti-TfR antibodies were conjugated to nano-liposomes. As expected, iron-starved Caco-2 cells internalized anti-TfR immunoliposomes better than controls. Ex vivo binding studies to inflamed mucosa showed that the anti-TfR immunoliposomes accumulated significantly better in the mucosa of DNBS-induced rats than the accumulation of non-specific immunoliposomes. It is concluded that targeting mucosal inflammation can be accomplished by nano-liposomes decorated with anti-TfR due to inflammation-dependent, apical, elevated expression of the receptor.

  16. Reference limits and behaviour of serum transferrin receptor in children 6-10 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danise, P; Maconi, M; Morelli, G; Di Palma, A; Rescigno, G; Esposito, C; Avino, D; Talento, B

    2008-08-01

    Serum transferrin receptor (sTfR) originates mostly from erythroblasts and lesser from reticulocytes. The usefulness of sTfR has been implicated in several clinical situations, mainly as a marker of accelerated erythropoiesis or iron deficiency. The assessment of sTfR may be useful in the period of rapid growth during infancy, childhood and adolescence. We evaluated sTfR and the other quantitative and qualitative parameters of the erythropoiesis (Hb, MCV, CHr, Ret-He) and of the iron storage (serum ferritin, sTfR/ferritin index) in a total of 916 children aged 6-10 years. Children were divided into three groups: (A) healthy children, (B) with storage iron deficiency (serum ferritin 3.3). We determined reference intervals by sex and by age in healthy children. sTfR showed a slight but statistically significant age related increase but did not show significant sex differences. We compared sTfR and the other parameters investigated in the three groups of children. sTfR is not a decisive parameter that can be utilized alone in discriminating the border-line situations between normal and pathologic ones but can help in completing the panel of tests in iron deficiency and in thalassaemia Beta trait carriers.

  17. The assessment of frequency of iron deficiency in athletes from the transferrin receptor-ferritin index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malczewska, J; Szczepańska, B; Stupnicki, R; Sendecki, W

    2001-03-01

    The transferrin receptor-ferritin index (sTfR/logFerr) was determined in 131 male and 121 female athletes in order to assess the frequency of iron deficiency (threshold value of that index taken as 1.8). Blood was drawn for determining morphological indices as well as sTfR, ferritin, iron, total iron binding capacity (TIBC), and haptoglobin. A significantly (p iron deficiency was observed in women (26%) than in men (11%). The iron deficiency was latent, since no subject was found to be anemic. The plasma iron was significantly lower and TIBC higher (p iron-deficient subgroups than in the non-deficient ones. This confirmed the latent character of iron deficiency. Some hematological indices (Hb, MCH, MCHC, MCV) were significantly lower in iron-deficient female athletes than in male athletes, which suggested a more profound iron deficiency in the former. The sTfR/logFerr index might thus be useful in detecting iron deficiency in athletes, especially in those with erythropoiesis disorders, since physical loads may affect the widely used ferritin levels.

  18. Human serum transferrin: a tale of two lobes. Urea gel and steady state fluorescence analysis of recombinant transferrins as a function of pH, time, and the soluble portion of the transferrin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Shaina L; Mason, Anne B

    2009-06-01

    Iron release from human serum transferrin (hTF) has been studied extensively; however, the molecular details of the mechanism(s) remain incomplete. This is in part due to the complexity of this process, which is influenced by lobe-lobe interactions, the transferrin receptor (TFR), the salt effect, the presence of a chelator, and acidification within the endosome, resulting in iron release. The present work brings together many of the concepts and assertions derived from previous studies in a methodical, uniform, and visual manner. Examination of earlier work reveals some uncertainty due to sample and technical limitations. We have used a combination of steady-state fluorescence and urea gels to evaluate the effect of conformation, pH, time, and the soluble portion of the TFR (sTFR) on iron release from each lobe of hTF. The use of authentic recombinant monoferric and locked species removes any possibility of cross-contamination by acquisition of iron. Elimination of detergent by use of the sTFR provides a further technical advantage. We find that iron release from the N-lobe is very sensitive to the conformation of the C-lobe, but is insensitive to the presence of the sTFR or to changes in pH (between 5.6 and 6.4). Specifically, when the cleft of the C-lobe is locked, the urea gels indicate that only about half of the iron is completely removed from the cleft of the N-lobe. Iron release from the C-lobe is most affected by the presence of the sTFR and changes in pH, but is unaffected by the conformation of the N-lobe. A model for iron release from diferric hTF is provided to delineate our findings.

  19. Host-species transferrin receptor 1 orthologs are cellular receptors for nonpathogenic new world clade B arenaviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Abraham

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability of a New World (NW clade B arenavirus to enter cells using human transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1 strictly correlates with its ability to cause hemorrhagic fever. Amapari (AMAV and Tacaribe (TCRV, two nonpathogenic NW clade B arenaviruses that do not use human TfR1, are closely related to the NW arenaviruses that cause hemorrhagic fevers. Here we show that pseudotyped viruses bearing the surface glycoprotein (GP of AMAV or TCRV can infect cells using the TfR1 orthologs of several mammalian species, including those of their respective natural hosts, the small rodent Neacomys spinosus and the fruit bat Artibeus jamaicensis. Mutation of one residue in human TfR1 makes it a functional receptor for TCRV, and mutation of four residues makes it a functional receptor for AMAV. Our data support an in vivo role for TfR1 in the replication of most, if not all, NW clade B arenaviruses, and suggest that with modest changes in their GPs the nonpathogenic arenaviruses could use human TfR1 and emerge as human pathogens.

  20. Structure-based mutagenesis reveals critical residues in the transferrin receptor participating in the mechanism of pH-induced release of iron from human serum transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steere, Ashley N; Chasteen, N Dennis; Miller, Brendan F; Smith, Valerie C; MacGillivray, Ross T A; Mason, Anne B

    2012-03-13

    The recent crystal structure of two monoferric human serum transferrin (Fe(N)hTF) molecules bound to the soluble portion of the homodimeric transferrin receptor (sTFR) has provided new details about this binding interaction that dictates the delivery of iron to cells. Specifically, substantial rearrangements in the homodimer interface of the sTFR occur as a result of the binding of the two Fe(N)hTF molecules. Mutagenesis of selected residues in the sTFR highlighted in the structure was undertaken to evaluate the effect on function. Elimination of Ca(2+) binding in the sTFR by mutating two of four coordinating residues ([E465A,E468A]) results in low production of an unstable and aggregated sTFR. Mutagenesis of two histidines ([H475A,H684A]) at the dimer interface had little effect on the kinetics of release of iron at pH 5.6 from either lobe, reflecting the inaccessibility of this cluster to solvent. Creation of an H318A sTFR mutant allows assignment of a small pH-dependent initial decrease in the magnitude of the fluorescence signal to His318. Removal of the four C-terminal residues of the sTFR, Asp757-Asn758-Glu759-Phe760, eliminates pH-stimulated release of iron from the C-lobe of the Fe(2)hTF/sTFR Δ757-760 complex. The inability of this sTFR mutant to bind and stabilize protonated hTF His349 (a pH-inducible switch) in the C-lobe of hTF accounts for the loss. Collectively, these studies support a model in which a series of pH-induced events involving both TFR residue His318 and hTF residue His349 occurs to promote receptor-stimulated release of iron from the C-lobe of hTF.

  1. Characterization of transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis and cellular iron delivery of recombinant human serum transferrin from rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Deshui; Lee, Hsin-Fang; Pettit, Steven C; Zaro, Jennica L; Huang, Ning; Shen, Wei-Chiang

    2012-11-30

    Transferrin (TF) plays a critical physiological role in cellular iron delivery via the transferrin receptor (TFR)-mediated endocytosis pathway in nearly all eukaryotic organisms. Human serum TF (hTF) is extensively used as an iron-delivery vehicle in various mammalian cell cultures for production of therapeutic proteins, and is also being explored for use as a drug carrier to treat a number of diseases by employing its unique TFR-mediated endocytosis pathway. With the increasing concerns over the risk of transmission of infectious pathogenic agents of human plasma-derived TF, recombinant hTF is preferred to use for these applications. Here, we carry out comparative studies of the TFR binding, TFR-mediated endocytosis and cellular iron delivery of recombinant hTF from rice (rhTF), and evaluate its suitability for biopharmaceutical applications. Through a TFR competition binding affinity assay with HeLa human cervic carcinoma cells (CCL-2) and Caco-2 human colon carcinoma cells (HTB-37), we show that rhTF competes similarly as hTF to bind TFR, and both the TFR binding capacity and dissociation constant of rhTF are comparable to that of hTF. The endocytosis assay confirms that rhTF behaves similarly as hTF in the slow accumulation in enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells and the rapid recycling pathway in HeLa cells. The pulse-chase assay of rhTF in Caco-2 and HeLa cells further illustrates that rice-derived rhTF possesses the similar endocytosis and intracellular processing compared to hTF. The cell culture assays show that rhTF is functionally similar to hTF in the delivery of iron to two diverse mammalian cell lines, HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells (CCL-240) and murine hybridoma cells derived from a Sp2/0-Ag14 myeloma fusion partner (HB-72), for supporting their proliferation, differentiation, and physiological function of antibody production. The functional similarity between rice derived rhTF and native hTF in their cellular iron delivery, TFR binding, and TFR

  2. Characterization of transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis and cellular iron delivery of recombinant human serum transferrin from rice (Oryza sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Deshui

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transferrin (TF plays a critical physiological role in cellular iron delivery via the transferrin receptor (TFR-mediated endocytosis pathway in nearly all eukaryotic organisms. Human serum TF (hTF is extensively used as an iron-delivery vehicle in various mammalian cell cultures for production of therapeutic proteins, and is also being explored for use as a drug carrier to treat a number of diseases by employing its unique TFR-mediated endocytosis pathway. With the increasing concerns over the risk of transmission of infectious pathogenic agents of human plasma-derived TF, recombinant hTF is preferred to use for these applications. Here, we carry out comparative studies of the TFR binding, TFR-mediated endocytosis and cellular iron delivery of recombinant hTF from rice (rhTF, and evaluate its suitability for biopharmaceutical applications. Result Through a TFR competition binding affinity assay with HeLa human cervic carcinoma cells (CCL-2 and Caco-2 human colon carcinoma cells (HTB-37, we show that rhTF competes similarly as hTF to bind TFR, and both the TFR binding capacity and dissociation constant of rhTF are comparable to that of hTF. The endocytosis assay confirms that rhTF behaves similarly as hTF in the slow accumulation in enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells and the rapid recycling pathway in HeLa cells. The pulse-chase assay of rhTF in Caco-2 and HeLa cells further illustrates that rice-derived rhTF possesses the similar endocytosis and intracellular processing compared to hTF. The cell culture assays show that rhTF is functionally similar to hTF in the delivery of iron to two diverse mammalian cell lines, HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells (CCL-240 and murine hybridoma cells derived from a Sp2/0-Ag14 myeloma fusion partner (HB-72, for supporting their proliferation, differentiation, and physiological function of antibody production. Conclusion The functional similarity between rice derived rhTF and native hTF in

  3. Erythropoietin, ferritin, haptoglobin, hemoglobin and transferrin receptor in metabolic syndrome: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hämäläinen Päivi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased ferritin concentrations are associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS. The association between ferritin as well as hemoglobin level and individual MetS components is unclear. Erythropoietin levels in subjects with MetS have not been determined previously. The aim of this study was to compare serum erythropoietin, ferritin, haptoglobin, hemoglobin, and transferrin receptor (sTFR levels between subjects with and without MetS and subjects with individual MetS components. Methods A population based cross-sectional study of 766 Caucasian, middle-aged subjects (341 men and 425 women from five age groups born in Pieksämäki, Finland who were invited to a health check-up in 2004 with no exclusion criteria. Laboratory analyzes of blood samples collected in 2004 were done during year 2010. MetS was defined by National Cholesterol Education Program criteria. Results 159 (53% men and 170 (40% women of study population met MetS criteria. Hemoglobin and ferritin levels as well as erythropoietin and haptoglobin levels were higher in subjects with MetS (p  Conclusion Subjects with MetS have elevated hemoglobin, ferritin, erythropoietin and haptoglobin concentrations. Higher hemoglobin levels are related to all components of MetS. Higher ferritin levels associate with TG, abdominal obesity, elevated glucose or low high density cholesterol. Haptoglobin levels associate with blood pressure or elevated glucose. However, erythropoietin levels are related only with abdominal obesity. Higher serum erythropoietin concentrations may suggest underlying adipose tissue hypoxemia in MetS.

  4. Targeted Delivery of siRNA to Transferrin Receptor Overexpressing Tumor Cells via Peptide Modified Polyethylenimine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuran Xie

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of small interference RNA (siRNA to target oncogenes is a promising treatment approach for cancer. However, siRNA cancer therapies are hindered by poor delivery of siRNA to cancer cells. Transferrin receptor (TfR is overexpressed in many types of tumor cells and therefore is a potential target for the selective delivery of siRNA to cancer cells. Here, we used the TfR binding peptide HAIYPRH (HAI peptide conjugated to cationic polymer branched polyethylenimine (bPEI, optimized the coupling strategy, and the TfR selective delivery of siRNA was evaluated in cells with high (H1299 and low TfR expression (A549 and H460. The HAI-bPEI conjugate exhibited chemico-physical properties in terms of size, zeta-potential, and siRNA condensation efficiency similar to unmodified bPEI. Confocal microscopy and flow cytometry results revealed that HAI-bPEI selectively delivered siRNA to H1299 cells compared with A549 or H460 cells. Moreover, HAI-bPEI achieved more efficient glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH gene knockdown in H1299 cells compared with bPEI alone. However, despite optimization of the targeting peptide and coupling strategy, HAI-bPEI can only silence reporter gene enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP at the protein level when chloroquine is present, indicating that further optimization of the conjugate is required. In conclusion, the HAI peptide may be useful to target TfR overexpressing tumors in targeted gene and siRNA delivery approaches.

  5. Construction of single chain Fv antibody against transferrin receptor and its protein fusion with alkaline phosphatase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dao-Feng Yang; Hui-Fen Zhu; Zhi-Hua Wang; Guan-Xin Shen; De-Ying Tian

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To construct fusion protein of a single-chain antibody(scFv) against transferrin receptor (TfR) with alkalinephosphatase (AP).METHODS: The VH-linker-VL, namely scFv gene, wasprepared by amplifying the VH and VL genes from plasmid pGEM-T-VH and pGEM-T-VL with splicing overlap extension polymerase chain reaction (SOE PCR). After the ScFv gene was modified by SfiⅠ and NotⅠ, it was subcloned into the secretory expression vector pUC19/119, and then was transformed into E. coli TG1. The positive colonies were screened by colony PCR and their expressions were induced by IPTG. ScFv gene was gained by digesting ScFv expression vector pUC19/119 with Sfi I and NotⅠ restriction enzymes, then subcloned into expression vector pDAP2, followed by transformation in E. coli TG1. The positive colonies were selected by bacterial colony PCR. The expression of fusion protein (scFv-AP) was induced by IPTG. Its activity was detected by enzyme immunoassay. The molecular weights of scFv and scFv-AP were measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE).RESULTS: The product of SOE PCR formed a band of 700 bp in agarose gel electrophoresis. SDS-PAGE demonstrated the molecular weight of scFv was 27 ku. Immunofluorescent assay (IFA) demonstrated its reactivity with TfR. The molecular weight of scFv-AP was 75 ku. Enzyme immunoassay showed that scFv-AP could specifically bind to human TfR and play AP activity.CONCLUSION: We have successfully prepared the antihuman TfR scFv and constructed the fusion protein of scFv and AP. It is promising for immunological experiments.

  6. [Value of soluble transferrin receptor in the diagnosis of iron deficiency in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Ping; Shao, Jie; Zhuang, Xue-Ling

    2011-07-01

    To study the prevalence of iron deficiency in children between 6 months and 7 years and to study the diagnostic value of soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) for iron deficiency in the children. A total of 502 healthy children between 6 months and 7 years from Hangzhou City of Zhejiang Province were enrolled. Serum sTfR, serum ferritin (SF), serum iron (SI), total iron blinding capacity (TIBC), zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP), Hb, MCV and CRP levels were measured. The prevalence rate of iron deficiency was 19.5% in children at ages of 6 months to 7 years. The prevalence rate of iron deficiency was the highest in infants (≤1 year old; 34.7%), followed by in toddlers (1-3 years old; 19.4%) and preschoolers (3-7 years old; 14.0%). The mean serum sTfR level in infants (2.02±0.73 mg/L) was significantly higher than that in toddlers (1.68±0.40 mg/L) and preschoolers (1.67±0.29 mg/L) (Piron deficiency was 2.02 mg/L in infants (sensitivity: 70.3%, specificity: 82.2%). The best cut-off value was 1.85 mg/L in toddlers (sensitivity: 71.7%; specificity: 86.4%), and that was 1.85 mg/L in preschoolers (sensitivity: 77.8%; specificity: 88.6%). Serum sTfR was correlated with SF (r=0.107, PIron deficiency is more prevalent in infants ≤1 year old. The mean serum level and the cut-off value of sTfR in infants are higher than in toddlers and preschoolers. Serum sTfR is an effective index for the diagnosis of iron deficiency in children, especially in infants≤ 1 year old.

  7. Serum transferrin receptors: Distribution and diagnostic performance in pre-school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouliaras, Giorgos L; Premetis, Evangelos; Tsiftis, George; Drosatou, Panayiota; Papassotiriou, Ioannis; Stamoulakatou, Alexandra; Lycopoulou, Lilia

    2009-01-01

    Soluble transferrin receptors have gained interest in the field of diagnosing anemias. Reference ranges differ according to the method used for the quantification of sTfR. We aim to explore the distributional properties and diagnostic performance of sTfR in pre-school healthy children as well as in children with beta-thalassemia carriers, iron deficiency with normal hematological phenotype (ID) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Circulating sTfR as well as biochemical and hematological indices were determined in 521 pre-school children and four groups (normal children, beta-thalassemia traits, ID and IDA) were formed. Diagnostic performance and distribution of sTfR according to age and in relation to several parameters were evaluated in every group. Three hundred eighty one children (261 normal, 60 beta-thalassemia traits, 44 ID and 16 IDA) aged 1-6 years were included. We found that distribution of sTfR differed significantly among the four groups (Kruskal Wallis pchildren in the normal group exhibiting lower concentrations compared to all other. A negative correlation between sTfR and age occurred in the normal (beta=-0.12, pchildren. Sensitivity and specificity were 70.5% and 50% respectively at a cut-off of 2.5 mg/l. Levels of sTfR are negatively correlated to age in pre-school children while dyserythropoietic procedures like beta-thal, ID, and IDA significantly affect them. These findings indicated that the accuracy of sTfR in diagnosing ID from normal children is limited. Standardization will allow the use of formulas that combine sTfR and ferritin which are of greater diagnostic value than sTfR alone.

  8. Purinergic Receptors in Thrombosis and Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechler, Béatrice; Gachet, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Under various pathological conditions, including thrombosis and inflammation, extracellular nucleotide levels may increase because of both active release and passive leakage from damaged or dying cells. Once in the extracellular compartment, nucleotides interact with plasma membrane receptors belonging to the P2 purinergic family, which are expressed by virtually all circulating blood cells and in most blood vessels. In this review, we focus on the specific role of the 3 platelet P2 receptors P2Y1, P2Y12, and P2X1 in hemostasis and arterial thrombosis. Beyond platelets, these 3 receptors, along with the P2Y2, P2Y6, and P2X7 receptors, constitute the main P2 receptors mediating the proinflammatory effects of nucleotides, which play important roles in various functions of circulating blood cells and cells of the vessel wall. Each of these P2 receptor subtypes specifically contributes to chronic or acute vascular inflammation and related diseases, such as atherosclerosis, restenosis, endotoxemia, and sepsis. The potential for therapeutic targeting of these P2 receptor subtypes is also discussed.

  9. Lethal iron deprivation induced by non-neutralizing antibodies targeting transferrin receptor 1 in malignant B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, José A; Luria-Pérez, Rosendo; López-Valdés, Héctor E; Casero, David; Daniels, Tracy R; Patel, Shabnum; Avila, David; Leuchter, Richard; So, Sokuntheavy; Ortiz-Sánchez, Elizabeth; Bonavida, Benjamin; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Charles, Andrew C; Pellegrini, Matteo; Helguera, Gustavo; Penichet, Manuel L

    2011-11-01

    A number of antibodies have been developed that induce lethal iron deprivation (LID) by targeting the transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1/CD71) and either neutralizing transferrin (Tf) binding, blocking internalization of the receptor and/or inducing its degradation. We have developed recombinant antibodies targeting human TfR1 (ch128.1 and ch128.1Av), which induce receptor degradation and are cytotoxic to certain malignant B-cells. We now show that internalization of TfR1 bound to these antibodies can lead to its sequestration and degradation, as well as reduced Tf uptake, and the induction of a transcriptional response consistent with iron deprivation, which is mediated in part by downstream targets of p53. Cells resistant to these antibodies do not sequester and degrade TfR1 after internalization of the antibody/receptor complex, and accordingly maintain their ability to internalize Tf. These findings are expected to facilitate the rational design and clinical use of therapeutic agents targeting iron import via TfR1 in hematopoietic malignancies.

  10. Mutational analysis of the cytoplasmic tail of the human transferrin receptor. Identification of a sub-domain that is required for rapid endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gironès, N; Alverez, E; Seth, A; Lin, I M; Latour, D A; Davis, R J

    1991-10-05

    It has been reported that the sequence Tyr20-X-Arg-Phe23 present within the cytoplasmic tail of the transferrin receptor may represent a tyrosine internalization signal (Collawn, J.F., Stangel, M., Kuhn, L.A., Esekogwu, V., Jing, S., Trowbridge, I.S., and Tainer, J. A. (1990) Cell 63, 1061-1072). However, as Tyr20 is not conserved between species (Alvarez, E., Gironès, N., and Davis, R. J. (1990) Biochem. J. 267, 31-35), the functional role of the putative tyrosine internalization signal is not clear. To address this question, we constructed a series of 32 deletions and point mutations within the cytoplasmic tail of the human transferrin receptor. The effect of these mutations on the apparent first order rate constant for receptor endocytosis was examined. It was found that the region of the cytoplasmic tail that is proximal to the transmembrane domain (residues 28-58) is dispensable for rapid endocytosis. In contrast, the distal region of the cytoplasmic tail (residues 1-27) was found to be both necessary and sufficient for the rapid internalization of the transferrin receptor. The region identified includes Tyr20-X-Arg-Phe23, but is significantly larger than this tetrapeptide. It is therefore likely that structural information in addition to the proposed tyrosine internalization signal is required for endocytosis. To test this hypothesis, we investigated whether a heterologous tyrosine internalization signal (from the low density lipoprotein receptor) could function to cause the rapid endocytosis of the transferrin receptor. It was observed that this heterologous tyrosine internalization signal did not allow rapid endocytosis. We conclude that the putative tyrosine internalization signal (Tyr20-Thr-Arg-Phe23) is not sufficient to determine rapid endocytosis of the transferrin receptor. The data reported here indicate that the transferrin receptor internalization signal is formed by a larger cytoplasmic tail structure located at the amino terminus of the receptor.

  11. Supernatant from a cloned helper T cell stimulates resting B cells to express transferrin and IL-2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diu, A; Leclercq, L; Dautry-Varsat, A; Theze, J

    1987-07-01

    We describe the properties of the supernatant from a murine cloned helper T cell (clone 52.3) which is able to polyclonally activate most resting B cells in the absence of any additional stimulus. We hypothesize that an activity which we call BCAF (B-cell-activating factor(s] exists in our supernatant which can activate resting B cells alone or in conjunction with other lymphokines. In the present report, we investigate changes in the surface antigen pattern induced on resting B cells by BCAF-containing supernatant. Analysis of the cells by flow cytometry shows that transferrin receptor and IL-2 receptor expression increase on a large fraction of B cells after 2 days of activation by the T-helper-cell clone supernatant. Monoclonal anti-transferrin receptor antibody inhibits cell division but does not affect blastogenesis, while IL-2 has no effect in our experimental system. Our present results confirm that BCAF-containing supernatants can act on most resting B cells and replace helper T cells in inducing B-cell activation and proliferation.

  12. α-Taxilin interacts with sorting nexin 4 and participates in the recycling pathway of transferrin receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Sakane

    Full Text Available Membrane traffic plays a crucial role in delivering proteins and lipids to their intracellular destinations. We previously identified α-taxilin as a binding partner of the syntaxin family, which is involved in intracellular vesicle traffic. α-Taxilin is overexpressed in tumor tissues and interacts with polymerized tubulin, but the precise function of α-taxilin remains unclear. Receptor proteins on the plasma membrane are internalized, delivered to early endosomes and then either sorted to the lysosome for degradation or recycled back to the plasma membrane. In this study, we found that knockdown of α-taxilin induced the lysosomal degradation of transferrin receptor (TfnR, a well-known receptor which is generally recycled back to the plasma membrane after internalization, and impeded the recycling of transferrin. α-Taxilin was immunoprecipitated with sorting nexin 4 (SNX4, which is involved in the recycling of TfnR. Furthermore, knockdown of α-taxilin decreased the number and length of SNX4-positive tubular structures. We report for the first time that α-taxilin interacts with SNX4 and plays a role in the recycling pathway of TfnR.

  13. The usefulness of soluble transferrin receptor in the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Se Hoon; Kim, Dong Sup; Yu, Seung Taek; Shin, Sae Ron

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) is a truncated extracellular form of the membrane transferrin receptor produced by proteolysis. Concentrations of serum sTfR are related to iron status and erythropoiesis in the body. We investigated whether serum sTfR levels can aid in diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in children. Methods Ninety-eight patients with IDA were enrolled and were classified according to age at diagnosis. Group 1 comprised 78 children, aged 6-59 months, and group 2 comprised 20 adolescents, aged 12-16 years. Results In group 1, patients' serum sTfR levels correlated negatively with mean corpuscular volume; hemoglobin (Hb), ferritin, and serum iron levels; and transferrin saturation and positively with total iron binding capacity (TIBC) and red cell distribution width. In group 2, patients' serum sTfR levels did not correlate with ferritin levels and TIBC, but had a significant relationship with other iron indices. Hb and serum sTfR levels had a significant inverse relationship in both groups; however, in group 1, there was no correlation between Hb and serum ferritin levels. In 30 patients of group 1, serum sTfR levels were significantly decreased with an increase in Hb levels after iron supplementation for 1 month. Conclusion Serum sTfR levels significantly correlated with other diagnostic iron parameters of IDA and inversely correlated with an increase in Hb levels following iron supplementation. Therefore, serum sTfR levels can be a useful marker for the diagnosis and treatment of IDA in children. PMID:25729394

  14. The receptor RAGE: Bridging inflammation and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hess Jochen

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE is a single transmembrane receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily that is mainly expressed on immune cells, neurons, activated endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells, bone forming cells, and a variety of cancer cells. RAGE is a multifunctional receptor that binds a broad repertoire of ligands and mediates responses to cell damage and stress conditions. It activates programs responsible for acute and chronic inflammation, and is implicated in a number of pathological diseases, including diabetic complications, stroke, atheriosclerosis, arthritis, and neurodegenerative disorders. The availability of Rage knockout mice has not only advanced our knowledge on signalling pathways within these pathophysiological conditions, but also on the functional importance of the receptor in processes of cancer. Here, we will summarize molecular mechanisms through which RAGE signalling contributes to the establishment of a pro-tumourigenic microenvironment. Moreover, we will review recent findings that provide genetic evidence for an important role of RAGE in bridging inflammation and cancer.

  15. Intracellular Delivery of a Planar DNA Origami Structure by the Transferrin-Receptor Internalization Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffert, David H; Okholm, Anders H; Sørensen, Rasmus S; Nielsen, Jesper S; Tørring, Thomas; Rosen, Christian B; Kodal, Anne Louise B; Mortensen, Michael R; Gothelf, Kurt V; Kjems, Jørgen

    2016-05-01

    DNA origami provides rapid access to easily functionalized, nanometer-sized structures making it an intriguing platform for the development of defined drug delivery and sensor systems. Low cellular uptake of DNA nanostructures is a major obstacle in the development of DNA-based delivery platforms. Herein, significant strong increase in cellular uptake in an established cancer cell line by modifying a planar DNA origami structure with the iron transport protein transferrin (Tf) is demonstrated. A variable number of Tf molecules are coupled to the origami structure using a DNA-directed, site-selective labeling technique to retain ligand functionality. A combination of confocal fluorescence microscopy and quantitative (qPCR) techniques shows up to 22-fold increased cytoplasmic uptake compared to unmodified structures and with an efficiency that correlates to the number of transferrin molecules on the origami surface.

  16. GLUT4 in cultured skeletal myotubes is segregated from the transferrin receptor and stored in vesicles associated with TGN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ralston, E; Ploug, Thorkil

    1996-01-01

    of the constitutive endosomal-lysosomal pathway. To address this question, we have investigated the localization of the endogenous GLUT4 in non-stimulated skeletal myotubes from the cell line C2, by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy. We have used a panel of antibodies to markers of the Golgi complex...... (alpha mannosidase II and giantin), of the trans-Golgi network (TGN38), of lysosomes (lgp110), and of early and late endosomes (transferrin receptor and mannose-6-phosphate receptor, respectively), to define the position of their subcellular compartments. By immunofluorescence, GLUT4 appears concentrated...... in the core of the myotubes. It is primarily found around the nuclei, in a pattern suggesting an association with the Golgi complex, which is further supported by colocalization with giantin and by immunogold electron microscopy. GLUT4 appears to be in the trans-most cisternae of the Golgi complex...

  17. Transferrin in ifshes:A review article

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Berhan Asmamaw

    2016-01-01

    Transferrin is a single monomeric glycoprotein of molecular weight of 80 kDa that transports iron involved in many metabolic processes amongst the sites of absorption, storage and utilization, hence considered as the major iron binding protein in the plasma of vertebrate species. In this study, transferrin structure, synthesis, receptor and the mechanism of cellular uptake of iron from transferrin have been reviewed. Besides, the major biological functions of transferrin and the different forms of it (polymorphisms) have been indicated.

  18. Intracellular Delivery of a Planar DNA Origami Structure by the Transferrin-Receptor Internalization Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaffert, David Henning; Okholm, Anders Hauge; Sørensen, Rasmus Schøler;

    2016-01-01

    DNA origami provides rapid access to easily functionalized, nanometer-sized structures making it an intriguing platform for the development of defined drug delivery and sensor systems. Low cellular uptake of DNA nanostructures is a major obstacle in the development of DNA-based delivery platforms....... Herein, significant strong increase in cellular uptake in an established cancer cell line by modifying a planar DNA origami structure with the iron transport protein transferrin (Tf) is demonstrated. A variable number of Tf molecules are coupled to the origami structure using a DNA-directed, site...... on the origami surface....

  19. Identification and purification of human erythroid progenitor cells by monoclonal antibody to the transferrin receptor (TU 67).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, F; Griffin, J D; Sabbath, K D; Oster, W; Wernet, P; Mertelsmann, R

    1988-04-01

    Anti-TU 67 is a murine monoclonal antibody that recognizes the transferrin receptor. With respect to hematopoietic cells TU 67 is expressed by human multipotent colony-forming cells (CFU-Mix), erythroid progenitor cells (BFU-E and CFU-E) and a fraction of granulocyte/monocyte colony forming cells, but is not expressed by mature hematopoietic cells including erythrocytes, platelets, lymphocytes, and peripheral blood myeloid cells. The TU 67-positive fraction of normal bone marrow, separated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) or immune rosettes, contained 87% of the erythroid progenitor cells. Erythroid progenitor cells were enriched up to 50-fold by using a combination of monoclonal antibodies to deplete mature hematopoietic cells, followed by positive selection of BFU-E and CFU-E by TU 67 antibody.

  20. Toll-Like Receptors and Myocardial Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Feng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs are a member of the innate immune system. TLRs detect invading pathogens through the pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs recognition and play an essential role in the host defense. TLRs can also sense a large number of endogenous molecules with the damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs that are produced under various injurious conditions. Animal studies of the last decade have demonstrated that TLR signaling contributes to the pathogenesis of the critical cardiac conditions, where myocardial inflammation plays a prominent role, such as ischemic myocardial injury, myocarditis, and septic cardiomyopathy. This paper reviews the animal data on (1 TLRs, TLR ligands, and the signal transduction system and (2 the important role of TLR signaling in these critical cardiac conditions.

  1. Quantitative assessment of erythropoiesis and functional classification of anemia based on measurements of serum transferrin receptor and erythropoietin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beguin, Y; Clemons, G K; Pootrakul, P; Fillet, G

    1993-01-01

    .... The RBC mass was quantitated by direct isotopic measurement (RCM), Epo production by serum Epo levels, and erythropoiesis by the ferrokinetic measurement of the erythron transferrin uptake (ETU...

  2. The structural basis of transferrin sequestration by transferrin-binding protein B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmettes, Charles; Alcantara, Joenel; Yu, Rong-Hua; Schryvers, Anthony B.; Moraes, Trevor F. (Toronto); (Calgary)

    2012-03-28

    Neisseria meningitidis, the causative agent of bacterial meningitis, acquires the essential element iron from the host glycoprotein transferrin during infection through a surface transferrin receptor system composed of proteins TbpA and TbpB. Here we present the crystal structures of TbpB from N. meningitidis in its apo form and in complex with human transferrin. The structure reveals how TbpB sequesters and initiates iron release from human transferrin.

  3. Engineering an Anti-Transferrin Receptor ScFv for pH-Sensitive Binding Leads to Increased Intracellular Accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J Tillotson

    Full Text Available The equilibrium binding affinity of receptor-ligand or antibody-antigen pairs may be modulated by protonation of histidine side-chains, and such pH-dependent mechanisms play important roles in biological systems, affecting molecular uptake and trafficking. Here, we aimed to manipulate cellular transport of single-chain antibodies (scFvs against the transferrin receptor (TfR by engineering pH-dependent antigen binding. An anti-TfR scFv was subjected to histidine saturation mutagenesis of a single CDR. By employing yeast surface display with a pH-dependent screening pressure, scFvs having markedly increased dissociation from TfR at pH 5.5 were identified. The pH-sensitivity generally resulted from a central cluster of histidine residues in CDRH1. When soluble, pH-sensitive, scFv clone M16 was dosed onto live cells, the internalized fraction was 2.6-fold greater than scFvs that lacked pH-sensitive binding and the increase was dependent on endosomal acidification. Differences in the intracellular distribution of M16 were also observed consistent with an intracellular decoupling of the scFv M16-TfR complex. Engineered pH-sensitive TfR binding could prove important for increasing the effectiveness of TfR-targeted antibodies seeking to exploit endocytosis or transcytosis for drug delivery purposes.

  4. Depleted iron stores and iron deficiency anemia associated with reduced ferritin and hepcidin and elevated soluble transferrin receptors in a multiethnic group of preschool-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Hope A; Jean-Philippe, Sonia; Cohen, Tamara R; Vanstone, Catherine A; Agellon, Sherry

    2015-09-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is prevalent in subgroups of the Canadian population. The objective of this study was to examine iron status and anemia in preschool-age children. Healthy children (n = 430, 2-5 years old, Montreal, Quebec, Canada) were sampled from randomly selected daycares. Anthropometry, demographics, and diet were assessed. Biochemistry included hemoglobin, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptors (sTfR), ferritin index, markers of inflammation (C-reactive protein, interleukin 6 (IL-6), and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)), and hepcidin. Iron deficiency and anemia cutoffs conformed to the World Health Organization criteria. Differences among categories were tested using mixed-model ANOVA or χ(2) tests. Children were 3.8 ± 1.0 years of age, with a body mass index z score of 0.48 ± 0.97, and 51% were white. Adjusted intakes of iron indicated deficiency. Hemoglobin was higher in white children, whereas ferritin was higher with greater age and female sex. Inflammatory markers and hepcidin did not vary with any demographic variable. The prevalence of iron deficiency was 16.5% (95% confidence interval (CI), 13.0-20.0). Three percent (95% CI, 1.4-4.6) of children had iron deficiency anemia and 12.8% (95% CI, 9.6-16.0) had unexplained anemia. Children with iron deficiency, with and without anemia, had lower plasma ferritin and hepcidin but higher sTfR, ferritin index, and IL-6, whereas those with unexplained anemia had elevated TNFα. We conclude that iron deficiency anemia is not very common in young children in Montreal. While iron deficiency without anemia is more common than iron deficiency with anemia, the correspondingly reduced circulating hepcidin would have enabled heightened absorption of dietary iron in support of erythropoiesis.

  5. The Use of Soluble Transferrin Receptor in the Detection of rHuEPO Abuse in Sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Gordon

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Erythropoietin (EPO increases the number of circulating erythrocytes and muscle oxygenation. The recombinant forms of EPO have indiscriminately been used by athletes, mainly in endurance sports to increase their erythrocytes concentration, thus generating a better delivery of oxygen to the muscle tissue. The administration of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO except for therapeutic use was prohibited by the International Olympic Committee (IOC and its unauthorized use considered as doping. In the last few years, a number of studies using parameters indicative of accelerated erythropoiesis have investigated a number of indirect methods for the detection of rHuEPO abuse. No single indirect marker has been found that can satisfactorily demonstrated rHuEPO misuse. Soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR is a new marker of iron status and erythropoietic activity. It has been included in multivariable blood testing models for the detection of performance enhancing EPO abuse in sports. Indirect markers of altered erythropoiesis give reliable evidence of current or discontinued rHuEPO usage. This review describes the physical, biological and pharmacokinetic properties of endogenous EPO and its recombinant form. It also discusses the available strategies for the detection of rHuEPO abuse in sports, involving the use of sTfR concentration directly or in mathematical multivariate models.

  6. Quantitative assessment of erythropoiesis and functional classification of anemia based on measurements of serum transferrin receptor and erythropoietin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beguin, Y; Clemons, G K; Pootrakul, P; Fillet, G

    1993-02-15

    We evaluated the quantitative value of a simple model of erythropoiesis, based on the basic assumptions that the red blood cell (RBC) mass determines erythropoietin (Epo) production, which in turn stimulates erythropoietic activity. The RBC mass was quantitated by direct isotopic measurement (RCM), Epo production by serum Epo levels, and erythropoiesis by the ferrokinetic measurement of the erythron transferrin uptake (ETU), the serum transferrin receptor (TfR) level, and the reticulocyte (retic) index, and was completed by an evaluation of overall marrow erythron cellularity. We studied a total of 195 subjects, including 31 normal individuals, 38 patients with polycythemia, and 126 patients with various forms of anemia. Instead of only quantitating Epo and erythropoiesis in absolute terms, we also evaluated them in relation to the degree of anemia or polycythemia, and expressed the results as a ratio of observed values to values predicted from the regression equations between hematocrit (Hct) on the one hand, and Epo, TfR, and ETU on the other, obtained in a carefully selected subpopulation. The slope of the regression of TfR (as well as ETU) versus Hct was very similar to the slope of the regression of Epo versus Hct. Average EPO and TfR (as well as ETU) values predicted from the regression equations were quite comparable to observed values in most groups of subjects, with exceptions predictable from knowledge of the pathophysiology of these hematologic disorders. We identified four major patterns of erythropoiesis, ie, normal, hyperdestruction (with variants of hemolysis or ineffective erythropoiesis), intrinsic marrow hypoproliferation, and defective Epo production. Dissecting out groups of patients showed much greater heterogeneity than when patients were analyzed by group. This was particularly true in the case of a hypoproliferative component being combined with hyperdestruction, giving what we called a "mixed disorder of erythropoiesis." We conclude that

  7. 21 CFR 866.5880 - Transferrin immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... transferrin levels aids in the diagnosis of malnutrition, acute inflammation, infection, and red blood cell disorders, such as iron deficiency anemia. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  8. Purinergic Receptors in Thrombosis and Inflammation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hechler, Béatrice; Gachet, Christian

    2015-01-01

    .... Beyond platelets, these 3 receptors, along with the P2Y2, P2Y6, and P2X7 receptors, constitute the main P2 receptors mediating the proinflammatory effects of nucleotides, which play important roles...

  9. Neurotrophins and their receptors in inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NellyFROSSARD; CharlesADVENIER

    2004-01-01

    The neurotrophin family has recently been in volved ininflammatory and remodelling processes occurring in chronic inflammatory diseases, in particular in asthma. Nerve growth fac-tor (NGF) is a high molecular weight peptide that belongs to the neurotrophin family. It is synthesized by various structural and inflammatory cells and activates two types of receptors, the TrkA (tropomyosin-receptor kinase A) receptor and the p75NTR receptor, in the death receptor family. NGF was first studied for

  10. Purinergic Receptors: Key Mediators of HIV-1 infection and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talia H Swartz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 causes a chronic infection that afflicts more than 38 million individuals worldwide. While the infection can be suppressed with potent anti-retroviral therapies, individuals infected with HIV have elevated levels of inflammation as indicated by increased T cell activation, soluble biomarkers, and associated morbidity and mortality. A single mechanism linking HIV pathogenesis to this inflammation has yet to be identified. Purinergic receptors are known to mediate inflammation and have been shown to be required for HIV-1 infection at the level of HIV-1 membrane fusion. Here we review the literature on the role of purinergic receptors in HIV-1 infection and associated inflammation and describe a role for these receptors as potential therapeutic targets.

  11. A novel transferrin receptor-targeted hybrid peptide disintegrates cancer cell membrane to induce rapid killing of cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawamoto Megumi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transferrin receptor (TfR is a cell membrane-associated glycoprotein involved in the cellular uptake of iron and the regulation of cell growth. Recent studies have shown the elevated expression levels of TfR on cancer cells compared with normal cells. The elevated expression levels of this receptor in malignancies, which is the accessible extracellular protein, can be a fascinating target for the treatment of cancer. We have recently designed novel type of immunotoxin, termed "hybrid peptide", which is chemically synthesized and is composed of target-binding peptide and lytic peptide containing cationic-rich amino acids components that disintegrates the cell membrane for the cancer cell killing. The lytic peptide is newly designed to induce rapid killing of cancer cells due to conformational change. In this study, we designed TfR binding peptide connected with this novel lytic peptide and assessed the cytotoxic activity in vitro and in vivo. Methods In vitro: We assessed the cytotoxicity of TfR-lytic hybrid peptide for 12 cancer and 2 normal cell lines. The specificity for TfR is demonstrated by competitive assay using TfR antibody and siRNA. In addition, we performed analysis of confocal fluorescence microscopy and apoptosis assay by Annexin-V binding, caspase activity, and JC-1 staining to assess the change in mitochondria membrane potential. In vivo: TfR-lytic was administered intravenously in an athymic mice model with MDA-MB-231 cells. After three weeks tumor sections were histologically analyzed. Results The TfR-lytic hybrid peptide showed cytotoxic activity in 12 cancer cell lines, with IC50 values as low as 4.0-9.3 μM. Normal cells were less sensitive to this molecule, with IC50 values > 50 μM. Competition assay using TfR antibody and knockdown of this receptor by siRNA confirmed the specificity of the TfR-lytic hybrid peptide. In addition, it was revealed that this molecule can disintegrate the cell membrane of T47

  12. SOD2 deficient erythroid cells up-regulate transferrin receptor and down-regulate mitochondrial biogenesis and metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent M Martin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mice irradiated and reconstituted with hematopoietic cells lacking manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2 show a persistent hemolytic anemia similar to human sideroblastic anemia (SA, including characteristic intra-mitochondrial iron deposition. SA is primarily an acquired, clonal marrow disorder occurring in individuals over 60 years of age with uncertain etiology. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To define early events in the pathogenesis of this murine model of SA, we compared erythroid differentiation of Sod2⁻/⁻ and normal bone marrow cells using flow cytometry and gene expression profiling of erythroblasts. The predominant transcriptional differences observed include widespread down-regulation of mitochondrial metabolic pathways and mitochondrial biogenesis. Multiple nuclear encoded subunits of complexes I-IV of the electron transport chain, ATP synthase (complex V, TCA cycle and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins were coordinately down-regulated in Sod2⁻/⁻ erythroblasts. Despite iron accumulation within mitochondria, we found increased expression of transferrin receptor, Tfrc, at both the transcript and protein level in SOD2 deficient cells, suggesting deregulation of iron delivery. Interestingly, there was decreased expression of ABCb7, the gene responsible for X-linked hereditary SA with ataxia, a component required for iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that in erythroblasts, mitochondrial oxidative stress reduces expression of multiple nuclear genes encoding components of the respiratory chain, TCA cycle and mitochondrial protein synthesis. An additional target of particular relevance for SA is iron:sulfur cluster biosynthesis. By decreasing transcription of components of cluster synthesis machinery, both iron utilization and regulation of iron uptake are impacted, contributing to the sideroblastic phenotype.

  13. Erythrocytic Iron Deficiency Enhances Susceptibility to Plasmodium chabaudi Infection in Mice Carrying a Missense Mutation in Transferrin Receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelliott, Patrick M; McMorran, Brendan J; Foote, Simon J; Burgio, Gaetan

    2015-11-01

    The treatment of iron deficiency in areas of high malaria transmission is complicated by evidence which suggests that iron deficiency anemia protects against malaria, while iron supplementation increases malaria risk. Iron deficiency anemia results in an array of pathologies, including reduced systemic iron bioavailability and abnormal erythrocyte physiology; however, the mechanisms by which these pathologies influence malaria infection are not well defined. In the present study, the response to malaria infection was examined in a mutant mouse line, Tfrc(MRI24910), identified during an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) screen. This line carries a missense mutation in the gene for transferrin receptor 1 (TFR1). Heterozygous mice exhibited reduced erythrocyte volume and density, a phenotype consistent with dietary iron deficiency anemia. However, unlike the case in dietary deficiency, the erythrocyte half-life, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and intraerythrocytic ferritin content were unchanged. Systemic iron bioavailability was also unchanged, indicating that this mutation results in erythrocytic iron deficiency without significantly altering overall iron homeostasis. When infected with the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi adami, mice displayed increased parasitemia and succumbed to infection more quickly than their wild-type littermates. Transfusion of fluorescently labeled erythrocytes into malaria parasite-infected mice demonstrated an erythrocyte-autonomous enhanced survival of parasites within mutant erythrocytes. Together, these results indicate that TFR1 deficiency alters erythrocyte physiology in a way that is similar to dietary iron deficiency anemia, albeit to a lesser degree, and that this promotes intraerythrocytic parasite survival and an increased susceptibility to malaria in mice. These findings may have implications for the management of iron deficiency in the context of malaria.

  14. Transferrin in fihes: A review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berhan Asmamaw

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Transferrin is a single monomeric glycoprotein of molecular weight of 80 kDa that transports iron involved in many metabolic processes amongst the sites of absorption, storage and utilization, hence considered as the major iron binding protein in the plasma of vertebrate species. In this study, transferrin structure, synthesis, receptor and the mechanism of cellular uptake of iron from transferrin have been reviewed. Besides, the major biological functions of transferrin and the different forms of it (polymorphisms have been indicated.

  15. The Content of Reticulocyte Hemoglobin and Serum Concentration of the Soluble Transferrin Receptor for Diagnostics of Anemia in Chronically Hemodialyzed Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzawa, Teresa; Owczarek, Aleksander; Strzelczyk, Joanna K; Gołąbek, Karolina; Wiczkowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Chronic renal disease constitutes a serious worldwide clinical problem. An important issue arising early during the treatment of renal failure is anemia. Patients in the end-stage of renal disease chronically treated with hemodialysis frequently suffer from anemia with iron deficiency. The aim of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of determining the reticulocyte hemoglobin content and serum concentration of soluble transferrin receptor in the detection of anemia caused by iron deficiency in comparison with the classic markers of iron circulation in serum in chronic dialysis patients with ESRD. 66 sets of hematologic results and iron turnover rates were analyzed, sampled from hemodialyzed patients (test group), as well as 34 sets of the same results taken from healthy people (control group). Statistically significant variables were found and a stepwise backward discriminant analysis was performed for them. The results showed that dialyzed patients have a significantly lower serum concentration of hemoglobin, CHr, HCT, TSAT, Fe and TIBC and significantly higher serum concentration of sTfR, ferritin and C-reactive protein compared to the control group. Based on the results of discriminant analysis, we proposed a scheme for assessing the risk of anemia. The concentrations of hemoglobin, soluble transferrin receptor, iron in the serum and C-reactive protein turned out to be the most useful for diagnostic purposes. Moreover, the concentration of soluble transferrin receptor confirmed its high diagnostic value in the detection of iron deficiency-based anemia in patients undergoing dialysis for chronic renal failure at the end-stage compared to conventional iron turnover ratios in the serum.

  16. Targeting immunoliposomes to transferrin receptors on brain capillary endothelial cells as a mean for cargo transport across the blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Kasper Bendix; Larsen, Annette Burkhart; Bruun, Jonas;

    2016-01-01

    transport further into the CNS. We studied transferrin receptor-targeted (OX26) immunoliposomes containing oxaliplatin with the aim of quantifying the uptake of OX26, liposomes and oxaliplatin in BCECs and the remaining CNS. The uptake of the immunoliposomes and their cargo was studied in 18-dayold rats...... higher both in vitro and in vivo when compared to isotypic IgG-conjugated liposomes. Quantitative analyses after capillary depletion revealed cargo transport from BCECs to the remaining CNS, but not differences could be detected between OX26- conjugated and isotype IgG control liposomes in vivo, whereas...

  17. Improved differential diagnosis of anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency anemia: a prospective multicenter evaluation of soluble transferrin receptor and the sTfR/log ferritin index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skikne, Barry S; Punnonen, Kari; Caldron, Paul H; Bennett, Michael T; Rehu, Mari; Gasior, Gail H; Chamberlin, Janna S; Sullivan, Linda A; Bray, Kurtis R; Southwick, Paula C

    2011-11-01

    Anemia of chronic disease (ACD) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) are the most prevalent forms of anemia and often occur concurrently. Standard tests of iron status used in differential diagnosis are affected by inflammation, hindering clinical interpretation. In contrast, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) indicates iron deficiency and is unaffected by inflammation. Objectives of this prospective multicenter clinical trial were to evaluate and compare the diagnostic accuracy of sTfR and the sTfR/log ferritin index (sTfR Index) for differential diagnosis using the automated Access(®) sTfR assay (Beckman Coulter) and sTfR Index. We consecutively enrolled 145 anemic patients with common disorders associated with IDA and ACD. Subjects with IDA or ACD + IDA had significantly higher sTfR and sTfR Index values than subjects with ACD (P Index: 14 (using nmol/L) (or 1.03 using mg/L). The sTfR Index was superior to sTfR (AUC 0.87 vs. 0.74, P Index). Use of sTfR and the sTfR Index improves detection of IDA, particularly in situations where routine markers provide equivocal results. Findings demonstrate a significant advantage in the simultaneous determination of ferritin, sTfR and sTfR Index. Obtaining a ferritin level alone may delay diagnosis of combined IDA and ACD.

  18. Ferritin and Soluble Transferrin Receptors in Type 2 Diabetic and Non-diabetic Post-menopausal Women in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Md Ruhul, A; Sharmin, H; Luthfor, A; Farzana, S; Liaquat, A

    2010-12-01

    This cross-sectional comparative study was aimed at investigating the iron status of a group of post-menopausal women with and without diabetes. Thirty-five post-menopausal women in each group were selected purposively from among patients attending the out-patient department of Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders (BIRDEM), a specialist hospital, and two of its satellite clinics, all in Dhaka. Patients were enrolled based on their existing records. The subjects were matched on age, menstrual status and fasting status at blood draw. Ferritin, serum soluble transferrin receptors (sTfR) and fasting plasma glucose were measured by standard methods. Dietary information was collected by a specific food frequency questionnaire. No significant difference in plasma ferritin [62.02 ng/ml, (range: 4.68-288.89) vs 54.25 ng/ml (range: 4.58-137.17); p=0.28] was observed between the groups. But a higher level of plasma sTfR was found in diabetic women [(21.12 nmol/l (range: 7.91-39.79) vs 17.63 nmol/l (range: 10.30-110.00); pdiabetic and control (p=0.25). Significantly a lower hemoglobin level [10.58±0.67 g/dl vs11.76±1.5 g/dl; pdiabetic women. Plasma sTfR (log) did not show any significant association with the dietary parameters and iron indices. No significant association between fasting glucose, ferritin and sTfR was seen except for haemoglobin (r=0.39, p=0.05). Total iron intake recorded was more than the requirement, and was significantly higher in control group [38.11mg/day (range: 19.83-105.63) vs 56.65 mg/day (range: 29.75-109.54); porigin. No differences in heme iron [0.85 mg/day (range: 0.09-4.07) vs. 0.96 mg/day (range: 0.04-4.34), p= 0.17] and vitamin C intake was observed between the groups. Iron indices of non-diabetic women were within the normal range. A higher level of sTfR and a lower level of hemoglobin in diabetic cases is suggestive of iron deficiency anaemia rather than iron overload.

  19. Prostaglandin E2-induced inflammation: Relevance of prostaglandin E receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Kohichi; Hohjoh, Hirofumi; Inazumi, Tomoaki; Tsuchiya, Soken; Sugimoto, Yukihiko

    2015-04-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is one of the most typical lipid mediators produced from arachidonic acid (AA) by cyclooxygenase (COX) as the rate-limiting enzyme, and acts on four kinds of receptor subtypes (EP1-EP4) to elicit its diverse actions including pyrexia, pain sensation, and inflammation. Recently, the molecular mechanisms underlying the PGE2 actions mediated by each EP subtype have been elucidated by studies using mice deficient in each EP subtype as well as several compounds highly selective to each EP subtype, and their findings now enable us to discuss how PGE2 initiates and exacerbates inflammation at the molecular level. Here, we review the recent advances in PGE2 receptor research by focusing on the activation of mast cells via the EP3 receptor and the control of helper T cells via the EP2/4 receptor, which are the molecular mechanisms involved in PGE2-induced inflammation that had been unknown for many years. We also discuss the roles of PGE2 in acute inflammation and inflammatory disorders, and the usefulness of anti-inflammatory therapies that target EP receptors. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Oxygenated metabolism of PUFA: analysis and biological relevance". Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Inflammation and peripheral 5-HT7 receptors: the role of 5-HT7 receptors in carrageenan induced inflammation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albayrak, Abdulmecit; Halici, Zekai; Cadirci, Elif; Polat, Beyzagul; Karakus, Emre; Bayir, Yasin; Unal, Deniz; Atasoy, Mustafa; Dogrul, Ahmet

    2013-09-05

    The aim of this study was: (1) to investigate possible role for 5-HT7 receptors in carrageenan induced inflammatory paw oedema in rats; (2) to determine the presence of 5-HT7 receptors in rat paw tissue; (3) to observe the effects of 5-HT7 receptor agonist and antagonist administration on inflammation; and (4) to determine a unique mechanism for inflammatory processes via 5-HT7 receptors. Effects of 5-HT7 receptor agonist, antagonist and indomethacin were investigated in carrageenan induced paw oedema in rats. Blood and tissue samples were collected and evaluated biochemically for serum cytokine levels, tissue oxidant-antioxidant balance and histopathologically for inflammatory cell accumulation. We performed Real Time PCR analyses for tissue 5-HT7 receptor and COX mRNA expressions. The 5-HT7 receptor agonist AS-19 exerted significant anti-inflammatory effect both alone and in combination with indomethacin. Antagonist, SB269970, did not affect inflammation alone but decreased the effects of agonist when co-administered. 5-HT7 mRNA levels were higher in the carrageenan group than healthy control. Carrageenan+indometacin group decreased the mRNA expression of 5-HT7 when compared to carrageenan group. While agonist administration decreased 5-HT7 mRNA expression when compared to carrageenan group. Agonist decreased paw COX expression. Agonist also decreased serum cytokine levels and tissue oxidative stress. In conclusion, this study demonstrated for the first time that 5-HT7 receptors are expressed in rat paw tissue and that this expression responds to inflammatory stimuli. The 5-HT7 receptor may be a promising new therapeutic target for prevention of inflammation and inflammatory disorders and may also provide a new glimpse into inflammation pathophysiology.

  1. Nuclear receptors : mediators and modifiers of inflammation-induced cholestasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Jaap; Karpen, Saul J.; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Kuipers, Folkert

    2009-01-01

    Inflammation-induced cholestasis (IIC) is a frequently occurring phenomenon. A central role in its pathogenesis is played by nuclear receptors (NRs). These ligand-activated transcription factors not only regulate basal expression of hepatobiliary transport systems, but also mediate adaptive response

  2. Role of G protein-coupled receptors in inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei SUN; Richard DYE

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play important roles in inflammation.Inflammatory cells such as polymorphonuclear leuko-cytes (PMN),monocytes and macrophages express a large number of GPCRs for classic chemoattractants and chemokines.These receptors are critical to the migration of phagocytes and their accumulation at sites of inflammation,where these cells can exacer-bate inflammation but also contribute to its resolution.Besides chemoattractant GPCRs,protease activated receptors (PARs) such as PAR1 are involved in the regulation of vascular endothelial permeability.Prostaglandin receptors play different roles in inflam-matory cell activation,and can mediate both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory functions.Many GPCRs present in inflammatory cells also mediate transcription factor activation,resulting in the synthesis and secretion of inflammatory factors and,in some cases,molecules that suppress inflammation.An understanding of the signaling paradigms of GPCRs in inflammatory cells is likely to facilitate translational research and development of improved anti-inflammatory therapies.

  3. Ghrelin receptor regulates adipose tissue inflammation in aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aging is commonly associated with low-grade adipose inflammation, which is closely linked to insulin resistance. Ghrelin is the only circulating orexigenic hormone which is known to increase obesity and insulin resistance. We previously reported that the expression of the ghrelin receptor, growth ho...

  4. The AT2 Receptor and Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esquitino, Veronica Valero; Danyel, Leon Alexander; Steckelings, Ulrike M.

    2015-01-01

    by a review of the existing literature addressing the role of the AT2 receptor in a wide range of disorders, in which acute or chronic inflammation is an essential contributor to the pathology. These disorders comprise cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, renal, and autoimmune diseases.Taken as a whole......, the vast majority of data support an anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory role of the AT2 receptor. In light of the current development of AT2 receptor agonists as future drugs for clinical use, diseases with a marked inflammatory component may become a major area of therapeutic use...... of this new drug class....

  5. Cancer, inflammation and the AT1 and AT2 receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Gary

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The critical role of inappropriate inflammation is becoming accepted in many diseases that affect man, including cardiovascular diseases, inflammatory and autoimmune disorders, neurodegenerative conditions, infection and cancer. This review proposes that cancer up-regulates the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1 receptor through systemic oxidative stress and hypoxia mechanisms, thereby triggering chronic inflammatory processes to remodel surrounding tissue and subdue the immune system. Based on current literature and clinical studies on angiotensin receptor inhibitors, the paper concludes that blockade of the AT1 receptor in synergy with cancer vaccines and anti-inflammatory agents should offer a therapy to regress most, if not all, solid tumours. With regard to cancer being a systemic disease, an examination of supporting evidence for a systemic role of AT1 in relationship to inflammation in disease and injury is presented as a logical progression. The evidence suggests that regulation of the mutually antagonistic angiotensin II receptors (AT1 and AT2 is an essential process in the management of inflammation and wound recovery, and that it is an imbalance in the expression of these receptors that leads to disease. In consideration of cancer induced immune suppression, it is further postulated that the inflammation associated with bacterial and viral infections, is also an evolved means of immune suppression by these pathogens and that the damage caused, although incidental, leads to the symptoms of disease and, in some cases, death. It is anticipated that manipulation of the angiotensin system with existing anti-hypertensive drugs could provide a new approach to the treatment of many of the diseases that afflict mankind.

  6. Ghrelin receptor regulates adipose tissue inflammation in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ligen; Lee, Jong Han; Buras, Eric D; Yu, Kaijiang; Wang, Ruitao; Smith, C Wayne; Wu, Huaizhu; Sheikh-Hamad, David; Sun, Yuxiang

    2016-01-01

    Aging is commonly associated with low-grade adipose inflammation, which is closely linked to insulin resistance. Ghrelin is the only circulating orexigenic hormone which is known to increase obesity and insulin resistance. We previously reported that the expression of the ghrelin receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), increases in adipose tissues during aging, and old Ghsr(-/-) mice exhibit a lean and insulin-sensitive phenotype. Macrophages are major mediators of adipose tissue inflammation, which consist of pro-inflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 subtypes. Here, we show that in aged mice, GHS-R ablation promotes macrophage phenotypical shift toward anti-inflammatory M2. Old Ghsrp(-/-) mice have reduced macrophage infiltration, M1/M2 ratio, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in white and brown adipose tissues. We also found that peritoneal macrophages of old Ghsrp(-/-) mice produce higher norepinephrine, which is in line with increased alternatively-activated M2 macrophages. Our data further reveal that GHS-R has cell-autonomous effects in macrophages, and GHS-R antagonist suppresses lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in macrophages. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that ghrelin signaling has an important role in macrophage polarization and adipose tissue inflammation during aging. GHS-R antagonists may serve as a novel and effective therapeutic option for age-associated adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance.

  7. Dual single-scission event analysis of constitutive transferrin receptor (TfR) endocytosis and ligand-triggered β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) or Mu-opioid receptor (MOR) endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, Marko; Pierre, Fabienne; Al-Sabah, Suleiman; Krasel, Cornelius; Merrifield, Christien J

    2014-10-01

    The dynamic relationship between constitutive and ligand-triggered clathrin-mediated endocytosis is only poorly characterized, and it remains controversial whether clathrin-coated pits specialize to internalize particular receptor cargo. Here we analyzed the ligand-triggered endocytosis of the model G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) and Mu-opioid receptor (MOR) at the level of individual endocytic events using a total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM)-based assay. Similar to the constitutive endocytosis of transferrin receptor (TfR), ligand- triggered endocytosis of β2AR occurs via quantized scission events hosted by clathrin spots and plaques of variable size and persistence. To address whether clathrin-coated structures (CCSs) specialize to internalize particular GPCRs, we adapted the TIRFM imaging assay to simultaneously quantify the internalization of TfR and the ligand- triggered endocytosis of the β2AR or MOR. Agonist-triggered β2AR or MOR endocytosis extended the maturation time of CCSs, as shown previously, but did not affect the rate of constitutive TfR endocytosis or loading of TfR into individual endocytic vesicles. Both the β2AR and the MOR receptors entered cells in the same vesicles as TfR, and the overall evidence for CCS specialization was weak. These data support a simple model in which different cargoes internalize through common CCSs.

  8. The unique kinetics of iron release from transferrin: the role of receptor, lobe-lobe interactions, and salt at endosomal pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Shaina L; Chasteen, N Dennis; Steere, Ashley N; Mason, Anne B

    2010-02-12

    Transferrins are a family of bilobal iron-binding proteins that play the crucial role of binding ferric iron and keeping it in solution, thereby controlling the levels of this important metal. Human serum transferrin (hTF) carries one iron in each of two similar lobes. Understanding the detailed mechanism of iron release from each lobe of hTF during receptor-mediated endocytosis has been extremely challenging because of the active participation of the transferrin receptor (TFR), salt, a chelator, lobe-lobe interactions, and the low pH within the endosome. Our use of authentic monoferric hTF (unable to bind iron in one lobe) or diferric hTF (with iron locked in one lobe) provided distinct kinetic end points, allowing us to bypass many of the previous difficulties. The capture and unambiguous assignment of all kinetic events associated with iron release by stopped-flow spectrofluorimetry, in the presence and in the absence of the TFR, unequivocally establish the decisive role of the TFR in promoting efficient and balanced iron release from both lobes of hTF during one endocytic cycle. For the first time, the four microscopic rate constants required to accurately describe the kinetics of iron removal are reported for hTF with and without the TFR. Specifically, at pH 5.6, the TFR enhances the rate of iron release from the C-lobe (7-fold to 11-fold) and slows the rate of iron release from the N-lobe (6-fold to 15-fold), making them more equivalent and producing an increase in the net rate of iron removal from Fe(2)hTF. Calculated cooperativity factors, in addition to plots of time-dependent species distributions in the absence and in the presence of the TFR, clearly illustrate the differences. Accurate rate constants for the pH and salt-induced conformational changes in each lobe precisely delineate how delivery of iron within the physiologically relevant time frame of 2 min might be accomplished. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Melanocortin receptors as novel effectors of macrophage responses in inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hetal B Patel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages have crucial functions in initiating the inflammatory reaction in a strict temporal and spatial manner to provide a ‘clear-up’ response required for resolution. Hormonal peptides such as melanocortins modulate macrophage reactivity and attenuate inflammation ranging from skin inflammation to joint disease and reperfusion injury. The melanocortins (e.g. ACTH and αMSH elicit regulatory properties through activation of a family of GPCRs, the MC receptors; MC1-MC5. Several studies have focused on MC1 and MC3 as anti-inflammatory receptors expressed on cells of the macrophage lineage. We review here elements of the melanocortin pathway with particular attention to macrophage function in anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving inflammatory settings. Evidence shows that ACTH, αMSH and other MC agonists can activate MC1 and MC3 on macrophage through cAMP and/or NFκB-dependent mechanisms to abrogate pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and NO and enhance anti-inflammatory mediators such as IL-10 and HO-1. Melanocortins and their receptors regulate inflammation by inhibiting leukocyte recruitment to and interaction with inflamed tissue. An intensely exciting addition to this field of research has been the ability of an αMSH analogue; AP214 to activate MC3 expressed on macrophage to enhance their clearance of both zymosan particles and apoptotic neutrophils thus putting melanocortins in line with other pro-resolving mediators. The use of mouse colonies mutated or nullified for MC1 or MC3, respectively as well as availability of selective MC receptor agonist/antagonists have been key to deciphering mechanisms by which elements of the melanocortin system play a role in these phenomena. We review here melanocortin pathway components with attention to the macrophage, reiterating receptor targets required for pro-resolving properties. The overall outcome will be identification of selective MC agonists as a strategy for innovative anti

  10. Radioprotective effect of transferrin targeted citicoline liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh Reddy, Jannapally; Venkateswarlu, Vobalaboina; Koning, Gerben A

    2006-01-01

    The high level of expression of transferrin receptors (Tf-R) on the surface of endothelial cells of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) had been widely utilized to deliver drugs to the brain. The primary aim of this study was to use transferrin receptor mediated endocytosis as a pathway for the rational development of holo-transferrin coupled liposomes for drug targeting to the brain. Citicoline is a neuroprotective agent used clinically to treat for instance Parkinson disease, stroke, Alzheimer's disease and brain ischemia. Citicoline does not readily cross the BBB because of its strong polar nature. Hence, citicoline was used as a model drug. (Citicoline liposomes have been prepared using dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) or distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC) by dry lipid film hydration-extrusion method). The effect of the use of liposomes composed of DPPC or DSPC on their citicoline encapsulation efficiency and their stability in vitro were studied. Transferrin was coupled to liposomes by a technique which involves the prevention of scavenging diferric iron atoms of transferrin. The coupling efficiency of transferrin to the liposomes was studied. In vitro evaluation of transferrin-coupled liposomes was performed for their radioprotective effect in radiation treated cell cultures. In this study, OVCAR-3 cells were used as a model cell type over-expressing the Tf-R and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) as BBB endothelial cell model. The average diameter of DPPC and DSPC liposomes were 138 +/- 6.3 and 79.0 +/- 3.2 nm, respectively. The citicoline encapsulation capacity of DPPC and DSPC liposomes was 81.8 +/- 12.8 and 54.9 +/- 0.04 microg/micromol of phospholipid, respectively. Liposomes prepared from DSPC showed relatively better stability than DPPC liposomes at 37 degrees C and in the presence of serum. Hence, DSPC liposomes were used for transferrin coupling and an average of 46-55 molecules of transferrin were present per liposome. Free citicoline

  11. The Role of Pattern Recognition Receptors in Intestinal Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukata, Masayuki; Arditi, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    Recognition of microorganisms by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) is the primary component of innate immunity that is responsible for the maintenance of host-microbial interactions in intestinal mucosa. Disregulation in host-commensal interactions has been implicated as the central pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which predisposes to developing colorectal cancer. Recent animal studies have begun to outline some unique physiology and pathology involving each PRR signaling in the intestine. The major roles played by PRRs in the gut appear to be regulation of the number and the composition of commensal bacteria, epithelial proliferation and mucosal permiability in response to epithelial injury. In addition, PRR signaling in lamina propria immune cells may be involved in induction of inflammation in response to invasion of pathogens. Because some PRR-deficient mice have shown variable susceptibility to colitis, the outcome of intestinal inflammation may be modified depending on PRR signaling in epithelial cells, immune cells, and the composition of commensal flora. Through recent findings in animal models of IBD, this review will discuss how abnormal PRR signaling may contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammation and inflammation-associated tumorigenesis in the intestine. PMID:23515136

  12. Uptake of 111In-labeled fully human monoclonal antibody TSP-A18 reflects transferrin receptor expression in normal organs and tissues of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugyo, Aya; Tsuji, Atsushi B; Sudo, Hitomi; Nomura, Fumiko; Satoh, Hirokazu; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Kurosawa, Gene; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu; Saga, Tsuneo

    2017-03-01

    Transferrin receptor (TfR) is an attractive molecule for targeted therapy of cancer. Various TfR-targeted therapeutic agents such as anti-TfR antibodies conjugated with anticancer agents have been developed. An antibody that recognizes both human and murine TfR is needed to predict the toxicity of antibody-based agents before clinical trials, there is no such antibody to date. In this study, a new fully human monoclonal antibody TSP-A18 that recognizes both human and murine TfR was developed and the correlation analysis of the radiolabeled antibody uptake and TfR expression in two murine strains was conducted. TSP-A18 was selected using extracellular portions of human and murine TfR from a human antibody library. The cross-reactivity of TSP-A18 with human and murine cells was confirmed by flow cytometry. Cell binding and competitive inhibition assays with [111In]TSP-A18 showed that TSP-A18 bound highly to TfR-expressing MIAPaCa-2 cells with high affinity. Biodistribution studies of [111In]TSP-A18 and [67Ga]citrate (a transferrin-mediated imaging probe) were conducted in C57BL/6J and BALB/c-nu/nu mice. [111In]TSP-A18 was accumulated highly in the spleen and bone containing marrow component of both strains, whereas high [67Ga]citrate uptake was only observed in bone containing marrow component and not in the spleen. Western blotting indicated the spleen showed the strongest TfR expression compared with other organs in both strains. There was significant correlation between [111In]TSP-A18 uptake and TfR protein expression in both strains, whereas there was significant correlation of [67Ga]citrate uptake with TfR expression only in C57BL/6J. These findings suggest that the difference in TfR expression between murine strains should be carefully considered when testing for the toxicity of anti-TfR antibody in mice and the uptake of anti-TfR antibody could reflect tissue TfR expression more accurately compared with that of transferrin-mediated imaging probe such as [67Ga]citrate.

  13. Incorporation of 5-hydroxytryptophan into transferrin and its receptor allows assignment of the pH induced changes in intrinsic fluorescence when iron is released.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Nicholas G; Byrne, Shaina L; Mason, Anne B

    2009-03-01

    Human serum transferrin (hTF) is a bilobal glycoprotein that transports iron to cells. At neutral pH, diferric hTF binds with nM affinity to the transferrin receptor (TFR) on the cell surface. The complex is taken into the cell where, at the acidic pH of the endosome ( approximately pH 5.6), iron is released. Since iron coordination strongly quenches the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of hTF, the increase in the fluorescent signal reports the rate constant(s) of iron release. At pH 5.6, the TFR considerably enhances iron release from the C-lobe (with little effect on iron release from the N-lobe). The recombinant soluble TFR is a dimer with 11 tryptophan residues per monomer. In the hTF/TFR complex these residues could contribute to and compromise the readout ascribed to iron release from hTF. We report that compared to Fe(C) hTF alone, the increase in the fluorescent signal from the preformed complex of Fe(C) hTF and the TFR at pH 5.6 is significantly quenched (75%). To dissect the contributions of hTF and the TFR to the change in fluorescence, 5-hydroxytryptophan was incorporated into each using our mammalian expression system. Selective excitation of the samples at 280 or 315 nm shows that the TFR contributes little or nothing to the increase in fluorescence when ferric iron is released from Fe(C) hTF. Quantum yield determinations of TFR, Fe(C) hTF and the Fe(C) hTF/TFR complex strongly support our interpretation of the kinetic data.

  14. Evolutionary reconstructions of the transferrin receptor of Caniforms supports canine parvovirus being a re-emerged and not a novel pathogen in dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason T Kaelber

    Full Text Available Parvoviruses exploit transferrin receptor type-1 (TfR for cellular entry in carnivores, and specific interactions are key to control of host range. We show that several key mutations acquired by TfR during the evolution of Caniforms (dogs and related species modified the interactions with parvovirus capsids by reducing the level of binding. These data, along with signatures of positive selection in the TFRC gene, are consistent with an evolutionary arms race between the TfR of the Caniform clade and parvoviruses. As well as the modifications of amino acid sequence which modify binding, we found that a glycosylation site mutation in the TfR of dogs which provided resistance to the carnivore parvoviruses which were in circulation prior to about 1975 predates the speciation of coyotes and dogs. Because the closely-related black-backed jackal has a TfR similar to their common ancestor and lacks the glycosylation site, reconstructing this mutation into the jackal TfR shows the potency of that site in blocking binding and infection and explains the resistance of dogs until recent times. This alters our understanding of this well-known example of viral emergence by indicating that canine parvovirus emergence likely resulted from the re-adaptation of a parvovirus to the resistant receptor of a former host.

  15. Evolutionary reconstructions of the transferrin receptor of Caniforms supports canine parvovirus being a re-emerged and not a novel pathogen in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaelber, Jason T; Demogines, Ann; Harbison, Carole E; Allison, Andrew B; Goodman, Laura B; Ortega, Alicia N; Sawyer, Sara L; Parrish, Colin R

    2012-01-01

    Parvoviruses exploit transferrin receptor type-1 (TfR) for cellular entry in carnivores, and specific interactions are key to control of host range. We show that several key mutations acquired by TfR during the evolution of Caniforms (dogs and related species) modified the interactions with parvovirus capsids by reducing the level of binding. These data, along with signatures of positive selection in the TFRC gene, are consistent with an evolutionary arms race between the TfR of the Caniform clade and parvoviruses. As well as the modifications of amino acid sequence which modify binding, we found that a glycosylation site mutation in the TfR of dogs which provided resistance to the carnivore parvoviruses which were in circulation prior to about 1975 predates the speciation of coyotes and dogs. Because the closely-related black-backed jackal has a TfR similar to their common ancestor and lacks the glycosylation site, reconstructing this mutation into the jackal TfR shows the potency of that site in blocking binding and infection and explains the resistance of dogs until recent times. This alters our understanding of this well-known example of viral emergence by indicating that canine parvovirus emergence likely resulted from the re-adaptation of a parvovirus to the resistant receptor of a former host.

  16. Nuclear receptors in inflammation control: repression by GR and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinenov, Yurii; Gupte, Rebecca; Rogatsky, Inez

    2013-11-05

    Inflammation is a protective response of organisms to pathogens, irritation or injury. Primary inflammatory sensors activate an array of signaling pathways that ultimately converge upon a few transcription factors such as AP1, NFκB and STATs that in turn stimulate expression of inflammatory genes to ultimately eradicate infection and repair the damage. A disturbed balance between activation and inhibition of inflammatory pathways can set the stage for chronic inflammation which is increasingly recognized as a key pathogenic component of autoimmune, metabolic, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders. Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a large family of transcription factors many of which are known for their potent anti-inflammatory actions. Activated by small lipophilic ligands, NRs interact with a wide range of transcription factors, cofactors and chromatin-modifying enzymes, assembling numerous cell- and tissue-specific DNA-protein transcriptional regulatory complexes with diverse activities. Here we discuss established and emerging roles and mechanisms by which NRs and, in particular, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) repress genes encoding cytokines, chemokines and other pro-inflammatory mediators.

  17. Insights into the mechanism of cell death induced by saporin delivered into cancer cells by an antibody fusion protein targeting the transferrin receptor 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels-Wells, Tracy R.; Helguera, Gustavo; Rodríguez, José A.; Leoh, Lai Sum; Erb, Michael A.; Diamante, Graciel; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Penichet, Manuel L.

    2012-01-01

    We previously developed an antibody-avidin fusion protein (ch128.1Av) that targets the human transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and exhibits direct cytotoxicity against malignant B cells in an iron-dependent manner. ch128.1Av is also a delivery system and its conjugation with biotinylated saporin (b-SO6), a plant ribosome-inactivating toxin, results in a dramatic iron-independent cytotoxicity, both in malignant cells that are sensitive or resistant to ch128.1Av alone, in which the toxin effectively inhibits protein synthesis and triggers caspase activation. We have now found that the ch128.1Av/b-SO6 complex induces a transcriptional response consistent with oxidative stress and DNA damage, a response that is not observed with ch128.1Av alone. Furthermore, we show that the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine partially blocks saporin-induced apoptosis suggesting that oxidative stress contributes to DNA damage and ultimately saporin-induced cell death. Interestingly, the toxin was detected in nuclear extracts by immunoblotting, suggesting the possibility that saporin might induce direct DNA damage. However, confocal microscopy did not show a clear and consistent pattern of intranuclear localization. Finally, using the long-term culture-initiating cell assay we found that ch128.1Av/b-SO6 is not toxic to normal human hematopoietic stem cells suggesting that this critical cell population would be preserved in therapeutic interventions using this immunotoxin. PMID:23085102

  18. Insights into the mechanism of cell death induced by saporin delivered into cancer cells by an antibody fusion protein targeting the transferrin receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels-Wells, Tracy R; Helguera, Gustavo; Rodríguez, José A; Leoh, Lai Sum; Erb, Michael A; Diamante, Graciel; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Penichet, Manuel L

    2013-02-01

    We previously developed an antibody-avidin fusion protein (ch128.1Av) that targets the human transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and exhibits direct cytotoxicity against malignant B cells in an iron-dependent manner. ch128.1Av is also a delivery system and its conjugation with biotinylated saporin (b-SO6), a plant ribosome-inactivating toxin, results in a dramatic iron-independent cytotoxicity, both in malignant cells that are sensitive or resistant to ch128.1Av alone, in which the toxin effectively inhibits protein synthesis and triggers caspase activation. We have now found that the ch128.1Av/b-SO6 complex induces a transcriptional response consistent with oxidative stress and DNA damage, a response that is not observed with ch128.1Av alone. Furthermore, we show that the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine partially blocks saporin-induced apoptosis suggesting that oxidative stress contributes to DNA damage and ultimately saporin-induced cell death. Interestingly, the toxin was detected in nuclear extracts by immunoblotting, suggesting the possibility that saporin might induce direct DNA damage. However, confocal microscopy did not show a clear and consistent pattern of intranuclear localization. Finally, using the long-term culture-initiating cell assay we found that ch128.1Av/b-SO6 is not toxic to normal human hematopoietic stem cells suggesting that this critical cell population would be preserved in therapeutic interventions using this immunotoxin.

  19. The Next Generation Non-competitive Active Polyester Nanosystems for Transferrin Receptor-mediated Peroral Transport Utilizing Gambogic Acid as a Ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, P; Ganugula, R; Arora, M; Kumar, M N V Ravi

    2016-01-01

    The current methods for targeted drug delivery utilize ligands that must out-compete endogenous ligands in order to bind to the active site facilitating the transport. To address this limitation, we present a non-competitive active transport strategy to overcome intestinal barriers in the form of tunable nanosystems (NS) for transferrin receptor (TfR) utilizing gambogic acid (GA), a xanthanoid, as its ligand. The NS made using GA conjugated poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) have shown non-competitive affinity to TfR evaluated in cell/cell-free systems. The fluorescent PLGA-GA NS exhibited significant intestinal transport and altered distribution profile compared to PLGA NS in vivo. The PLGA-GA NS loaded with cyclosporine A (CsA), a model peptide, upon peroral dosing to rodents led to maximum plasma concentration of CsA at 6 h as opposed to 24 h with PLGA-NS with at least 2-fold higher levels in brain at 72 h. The proposed approach offers new prospects for peroral drug delivery and beyond.

  20. Frequency of transferrin receptor positive reticulocytes (TF-Ret) in blood as an indicator of total-body radiation exposure: a pilot study in nuclear medicine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Klaus; Haenscheid, Heribert; Biko, Johannes; Hategan, Maria; Kaiser, Franz; Kreissl, Michael; Lorenz, Reinhard; Samnick, Samuel; Schirbel, Andreas; Varazashvili, Lali; Verchenya, Stanislav; Reiners, Christoph

    2012-11-01

    Approximately 3-20% of all reticulocytes in blood of healthy persons are immature and transferrin receptor positive (Tf-Ret). Tf-Ret were measured by flow cytometry in 27 patients treated with three different radiopharmaceuticals labeled with (131)I and in 25 healthy controls. Patients were chronically exposed within 6 days to blood doses from 0.18-1.89 Gy (D6). Typically, two-thirds of D6 was administered within the first day (D1). The study had to be confined to intra-subject investigations due to high biological variability of Tf-Ret counts. A significant radiation-induced decline was found in patients D1 doses that were ≥0.5 Gy. Tf-Ret frequency declined during the first 4 to 5 days of nuclear therapy to about 30-60% of its initial value, and increased in the following 3 days without reaching the initial value. At the time of nadir, the relative frequency of Tf-Ret was more depressed than that of reticulocytes and lymphocytes. The relative Tf-Ret frequency at nadir could be fitted to the equation: %-Tf-Ret=exp-(D1/D(o)). D(o) was found to be 1.0 ± 0.4 Gy (Mean ± SEM). The study shows that Tf-Ret frequency in blood might be a good parameter for estimation of the radiation dose to red marrow.

  1. Mutagenesis of the aspartic acid ligands in human serum transferrin: lobe-lobe interaction and conformation as revealed by antibody, receptor-binding and iron-release studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, A; He, Q Y; Tam, B; MacGillivray, R A; Woodworth, R

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant non-glycosylated human serum transferrin and mutants in which the liganding aspartic acid (D) in one or both lobes was changed to a serine residue (S) were produced in a mammalian cell system and purified from the tissue culture media. Significant downfield shifts of 20, 30, and 45 nm in the absorption maxima were found for the D63S-hTF, D392S-hTF and the double mutant, D63S/D392S-hTF when compared to wild-type hTF. A monoclonal antibody to a sequential epitope in the C-lobe of hTF reported affinity differences between the apo- and iron-forms of each mutant and the control. Cell-binding studies performed under the same buffer conditions used for the antibody work clearly showed that the mutated lobe(s) had an open cleft. It is not clear whether the receptor itself may play a role in promoting the open conformation or whether the iron remains in the cleft. PMID:9461487

  2. Fcγ receptor-mediated inflammation inhibits axon regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhang

    Full Text Available Anti-glycan/ganglioside antibodies are the most common immune effectors found in patients with Guillain-Barré Syndrome, which is a peripheral autoimmune neuropathy. We previously reported that disease-relevant anti-glycan autoantibodies inhibited axon regeneration, which echo the clinical association of these antibodies and poor recovery in Guillain-Barré Syndrome. However, the specific molecular and cellular elements involved in this antibody-mediated inhibition of axon regeneration are not previously defined. This study examined the role of Fcγ receptors and macrophages in the antibody-mediated inhibition of axon regeneration. A well characterized antibody passive transfer sciatic nerve crush and transplant models were used to study the anti-ganglioside antibody-mediated inhibition of axon regeneration in wild type and various mutant and transgenic mice with altered expression of specific Fcγ receptors and macrophage/microglia populations. Outcome measures included behavior, electrophysiology, morphometry, immunocytochemistry, quantitative real-time PCR, and western blotting. We demonstrate that the presence of autoantibodies, directed against neuronal/axonal cell surface gangliosides, in the injured mammalian peripheral nerves switch the proregenerative inflammatory environment to growth inhibitory milieu by engaging specific activating Fcγ receptors on recruited monocyte-derived macrophages to cause severe inhibition of axon regeneration. Our data demonstrate that the antibody orchestrated Fcγ receptor-mediated switch in inflammation is one mechanism underlying inhibition of axon regeneration. These findings have clinical implications for nerve repair and recovery in antibody-mediated immune neuropathies. Our results add to the complexity of axon regeneration in injured peripheral and central nervous systems as adverse effects of B cells and autoantibodies on neural injury and repair are increasingly recognized.

  3. DMPD: Nuclear receptors in macrophages: a link between metabolism and inflammation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18022390 Nuclear receptors in macrophages: a link between metabolism and inflammati...on. Szanto A, Roszer T. FEBS Lett. 2008 Jan 9;582(1):106-16. Epub 2007 Nov 20. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Nuclear... receptors in macrophages: a link between metabolism and inflammation. PubmedID 18022390 Title Nuclear

  4. Targeting urokinase and the transferrin receptor with novel, anti-mitotic N-alkylisatin cytotoxin conjugates causes selective cancer cell death and reduces tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vine, K L; Indira Chandran, V; Locke, J M; Matesic, L; Lee, J; Skropeta, D; Bremner, J B; Ranson, M

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-specific delivery of ligand-directed prodrugs can increase the therapeutic window of chemotherapeutics by maintaining efficacy whilst decreasing toxic side effects. We have previously described a series of synthetic N-alkylated isatin cytotoxins that destabilize microtubules and induce apoptosis with 10-fold greater potency than conventional anti-mitotics in vitro. Here, we report the characterization, in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo efficacy of a lead compound, 5,7-dibromo-N-(p-hydroxymethylbenzyl)isatin (N-AI) conjugated via an esterase-labile linker (N-AIE) to two proven targeting ligands, transferrin (Tf) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2 (PAI-2/serpinB2). N-AI was released from N-AIE and the targeting ligands Tf/PAI-2 in an esterase-dependent manner at 37 C and both Tf- and PAI-2-N-AIE conjugates were stable at physiological pH. Human cancer cell lines which vary in their expression levels of Tf receptor (TfR/CD71) and PAI-2 target, receptor bound urokinase (uPA) selectively internalized the conjugates. Tf-N-AIE was up to 24 times more active than the free drug and showed clear selectivity patterns based on TfR levels. PAI-2-N-AIE showed equivalent activity compared to the parent drug and strong selectivity patterns for uPA levels. In preliminary in vivo experiments, the PAI-2- and Tf-N-AIE conjugates were efficacious at 1/20(th) and 1/10(th) of the dose of the free N-AI, respectively, in a metastatic, orthotopic human breast tumor xenograft mouse model. Thus, this strategy specifically delivers and concentrates a novel class of isatin-based, tubulin destabilizing agents to tumors in vivo and warrants further detailed preclinical investigation.

  5. YTRF is the conserved internalization signal of the transferrin receptor, and a second YTRF signal at position 31-34 enhances endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collawn, J F; Lai, A; Domingo, D; Fitch, M; Hatton, S; Trowbridge, I S

    1993-10-15

    By functional analysis of mutant human transferrin receptors (TR) expressed in chicken embryo fibroblasts, we previously identified a tetrapeptide sequence, Y20TRF23, within the 61-residue cytoplasmic tail as the signal for high-efficiency endocytosis (Collawn, J. F., Stangel, M., Kuhn, L. A., Esekogwu, V., Jing, S., Trowbridge, I.S., and Tainer, J.A. (1990) Cell 63, 1061-1072). It has been inferred from other studies, however, that the TR internalization signal was localized to a much larger region, residues 7 through 26 (Girones, N., Alvarez, E., Seth, A., Lin, I-M., Latour, D.A., and Davis, R.J. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 19006-19012). Additionally, Tyr20 was reported to not be conserved in the Chinese hamster cytoplasmic tail sequence (Alvarez, E., Girones, N., and Davis, R.J. (1990) Biochem. J. 267, 31-35). In the studies reported here, we examined the effect of insertion of an extra copy of a YTRF sequence at three different locations within the human TR cytoplasmic domain and show that the insertion of another YTRF signal at position 31-34 in the wild-type TR, but not the other two locations, increases the rate of endocytosis 2-fold. Furthermore, introduction of YTRF at position 31-34 in an internalization-defective mutant receptor restores endocytosis to wild-type levels, indicating that YTRF signals at either positions 20-23 or 31-34 are necessary and sufficient to promote TR internalization and function in an independent and additive manner. We also report the complete primary structure of the Chinese hamster TR deduced from its cDNA sequence and show that the Tyr20 as well as the complete YTRF motif is conserved.

  6. NMDA receptor subunit expression and PAR2 receptor activation in colospinal afferent neurons (CANs during inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caudle Robert M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visceral hypersensitivity is a clinical observation made when diagnosing patients with functional bowel disorders. The cause of visceral hypersensitivity is unknown but is thought to be attributed to inflammation. Previously we demonstrated that a unique set of enteric neurons, colospinal afferent neurons (CANs, co-localize with the NR1 and NR2D subunits of the NMDA receptor as well as with the PAR2 receptor. The aim of this study was to determine if NMDA and PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs contribute to visceral hypersensitivity following inflammation. Recently, work has suggested that dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons expressing the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1 receptor mediate inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity. Therefore, in order to study CAN involvement in visceral hypersensitivity, DRG neurons expressing the TRPV1 receptor were lesioned with resiniferatoxin (RTX prior to inflammation and behavioural testing. Results CANs do not express the TRPV1 receptor; therefore, they survive following RTX injection. RTX treatment resulted in a significant decrease in TRPV1 expressing neurons in the colon and immunohistochemical analysis revealed no change in peptide or receptor expression in CANs following RTX lesioning as compared to control data. Behavioral studies determined that both inflamed non-RTX and RTX animals showed a decrease in balloon pressure threshold as compared to controls. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the NR1 cassettes, N1 and C1, of the NMDA receptor on CANs were up-regulated following inflammation. Furthermore, inflammation resulted in the activation of the PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs. Conclusion Our data show that inflammation causes an up-regulation of the NMDA receptor and the activation of the PAR2 receptor expressed on CANs. These changes are associated with a decrease in balloon pressure in response to colorectal distension in non-RTX and RTX lesioned

  7. Lysophospholipid Receptors, as Novel Conditional Danger Receptors and Homeostatic Receptors Modulate Inflammation-Novel Paradigm and Therapeutic Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Li, Ya-Feng; Nanayakkara, Gayani; Shao, Ying; Liang, Bin; Cole, Lauren; Yang, William Y; Li, Xinyuan; Cueto, Ramon; Yu, Jun; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2016-08-01

    There are limitations in the current classification of danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMP) receptors. To overcome these limitations, we propose a new paradigm by using endogenous metabolites lysophospholipids (LPLs) as a prototype. By utilizing a data mining method we pioneered, we made the following findings: (1) endogenous metabolites such as LPLs at basal level have physiological functions; (2) under sterile inflammation, expression of some LPLs is elevated. These LPLs act as conditional DAMPs or anti-inflammatory homeostasis-associated molecular pattern molecules (HAMPs) for regulating the progression of inflammation or inhibition of inflammation, respectively; (3) receptors for conditional DAMPs and HAMPs are differentially expressed in human and mouse tissues; and (4) complex signaling mechanism exists between pro-inflammatory mediators and classical DAMPs that regulate the expression of conditional DAMPs and HAMPs. This novel insight will facilitate identification of novel conditional DAMPs and HAMPs, thus promote development of new therapeutic targets to treat inflammatory disorders.

  8. Role of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors in Inflammation Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihan Youssef

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs were discovered over a decade ago, and were classified as orphan members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. To date, three PPAR subtypes have been discovered and characterized (PPARα, β/δ, γ. Different PPAR subtypes have been shown to play crucial roles in important diseases and conditions such as obesity, diabetes, atherosclerosis, cancer, and fertility. Among the most studied roles of PPARs is their involvement in inflammatory processes. Numerous studies have revealed that agonists of PPARα and PPARγ exert anti-inflammatory effects both in vitro and in vivo. Using the carrageenan-induced paw edema model of inflammation, a recent study in our laboratories showed that these agonists hinder the initiation phase, but not the late phase of the inflammatory process. Furthermore, in the same experimental model, we recently also observed that activation of PPARδ exerted an anti-inflammatory effect. Despite the fact that exclusive dependence of these effects on PPARs has been questioned, the bulk of evidence suggests that all three PPAR subtypes, PPARα,δ,γ, play a significant role in controlling inflammatory responses. Whether these subtypes act via a common mechanism or are independent of each other remains to be elucidated. However, due to the intensity of research efforts in this area, it is anticipated that these efforts will result in the development of PPAR ligands as therapeutic agents for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  9. Cross sectional, comparative study of serum erythropoietin, transferrin receptor, ferritin levels and other hematological indices in normal pregnancies and iron deficiency anemia during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Jai B; Bumma, Sirisha D; Saxena, Renu; Kumar, Sunesh; Roy, Kallol K; Singh, Neeta; Vanamail, P

    2016-08-01

    To test the correlation of the serum erythropoietin levels, serum transferrrin receptor levels and serum ferritin levels along with other hematological parameters in normal pregnant and anemic pregnant patients. In a prospective study, 120 pregnant women were recruited between 18 and 36 weeks of gestation; 53 normal pregnant patients, 67 anemic pregnant patients, in which, 17 had mild, 30 had moderate anemia, 20 had severe anemia. A blood sample was taken. The various hematological parameters, hemoglobin (Hb), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), total iron binding capacity (TIBC), serum ferritin, percentage saturation of iron, serum erythropoietin (SEPO) levels, serum transferrin receptors (STfRS) were performed. For statistics, Student's 't' test, Pearson's Chi test, Mann Whitney test and Bartlett test were used as per data. MCV was significantly reduced in anemic pregnancies as compared to non-anemic pregnancies (80.2±9.6 vs 94.12±9.8fl, p=0.001), MCHC was also reduced in them (30.2±3.38% vs 34.2±2.33%, p=0.176), TIBC was significantly increased in anemic pregnancies (343.31±28.54% vs 322.88±23.84%, p=0.001), serum ferritin was significantly reduced (24.9±10.48μg/L vs 31.03±9.98μg/L, p=0.001), percentage saturation of iron was also reduced (53.85±13.21% vs 62.04±15.79%, p=0.0024), serum erythropoietin levels were significantly higher in anemic women (26.24±26.61mU/ml vs 18.12±19.08mU/ml, p=0.064). The levels were significantly higher in severe anemia (46.5±46.8mU/ml than in moderate anemia 27.4±28.1mU/ml and mild anemia 22.8±22.8mU/ml. Serum transferrin receptors were significantly higher in anemic pregnancies than in non-anemic pregnancies (1.40±0.0802μg/ml vs 1.08±0.641μg/ml, p=0.019) with rise being higher in severe anemia (2.28±0.986μg/ml) than in moderate (1.4±0.816μg/ml) and mild anemia (1.16±0.702μg/ml). Various hematological parameters especially sTfR, serum erythropoietin, serum

  10. Generation and functional characterization of the anti-transferrin receptor single-chain antibody-GAL4 (TfRscFv-GAL4 fusion protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Qing

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of vectors for cell-specific gene delivery is a major goal of gene therapeutic strategies. Transferrin receptor (TfR is an endocytic receptor and identified as tumor relative specific due to its overexpression on most tumor cells or tissues, and TfR binds and intakes of transferrin-iron complex. We have previously generated an anti-TfR single-chain variable fragments of immunoglobulin (scFv which were cloned from hybridoma cell line producing antibody against TfR linked with a 20 aa-long linker sequence (G4S4. In the present study, the anti-TfR single-chain antibody (TfRscFv was fused to DNA-binding domain of the yeast transcription factor GAL4. The recombinant fusion protein, designated as TfRscFv-GAL4, is expected to mediate the entry of DNA-protein complex into targeted tumor cells. Results Fusion protein TfRscFv-GAL4 was expressed in an E. coli bacterial expression system and was recovered from inclusion bodies with subsequent purification by metal-chelate chromatography. The resulting proteins were predominantly monomeric and, upon refolding, became a soluble biologically active bifunctional protein. In biological assays, the antigen-binding activity of the re-natured protein, TfRscFv-GAL4, was confirmed by specific binding to different cancer cells and tumor tissues. The cell binding rates, as indicated by flow cytometry (FCM analysis, ranged from 54.11% to 8.23% in seven different human carcinoma cell lines. It showed similar affinity and binding potency as those of parent full-length mouse anti-TfR antibody. The positive binding rates to tumor tissues by tissue microarrays (TMA assays were 75.32% and 63.25%, but it showed weakly binding with hepatic tissue in 5 cases, and normal tissues such as heart, spleen, adrenal cortex blood vessel and stomach. In addition, the re-natured fusion protein TfRscFv-GAL4 was used in an ELISA with rabbit anti-GAL4 antibody. The GAL4-DNA functional assay through the GAL4

  11. Enhanced sandwich immunoassay using antibody-functionalized magnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles for extraction and detection of soluble transferrin receptor on a photonic crystal biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Ross D; Chen, Weili; Cunningham, Brian T; Andrade, Juan E

    2015-12-15

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) has detrimental effects on individuals and societies worldwide. A standard sandwich assay (SA) for the detection of soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), a biomarker of IDA, on a photonic crystal (PC) biosensor was established, but it was susceptible to non-specific signals from complex matrixes. In this study, iron-oxide nanoparticles (fAb-IONs) were used as magnetic immuno-probes to bind sTfR and minimize non-specific signals, while enhancing detection on the PC biosensor. This inverse sandwich assay (IA) method completely bound sTfR with low variability (detection in sera (Liquichek™ control sera) on the PC biosensor using two certified ELISAs as reference methods. A linear dose-response curve was elicited at the fAb-IONs concentration in which the theoretical binding ratio (sTfR:fAb-IONs) was calculated to be 0.05) at 14 and 21 μg/mL, respectively. The inherent imprecision of the IA and reference ELISAs was σ(δ)=0.45 µg/mL and the mean biases for Liquichek™ 1, 2 and 3 were 0.18, 0.19 and -0.04 µg/mL, respectively. Whereas the inherent imprecision of the SA and reference ELISAs was σ(δ)=0.52 µg/mL and the biases for Liquichek™ 1, 2 and 3 were 0.66, 0.14 and -0.67 µg/mL, respectively. Thus, unlike the SA, the IA method measures sTfR with the same bias as the reference ELISAs. Combined magnetic separation and detection of nutrition biomarkers on PC biosensors represents a facile method for their accurate and reliable quantification in complex matrixes.

  12. Brain tumor-targeted therapy by systemic delivery of siRNA with Transferrin receptor-mediated core-shell nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lin; Guo, Xi-Ying; Yang, Ting; Yu, Min-Zhi; Chen, Da-Wei; Wang, Jian-Cheng

    2016-08-20

    Treatment of brain tumor remains a great challenge worldwide. Development of a stable, safe, and effective siRNA delivery system which is able to cross the impermeable blood-brain barrier (BBB) and target glioma cells is necessary. This study aims to investigate the therapeutic effects of intravenous administration of T7 peptide modified core-shell nanoparticles (named T7-LPC/siRNA NPs) on brain tumors. Layer-by-layer assembling of protamine/chondroitin sulfate/siRNA/cationic liposomes followed by T7 peptide modification has been carried out in order to obtain a targeted siRNA delivery system. In vitro cellular uptake experiments demonstrated a higher intracellular fluorescence intensity of siRNA in brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVECs) and U87 glioma cells when treated with T7-LPC/siRNA NPs compared with PEG-LPC/siRNA NPs. In the co-culture model of BMVECs and U87 cells, a significant down-regulation of EGFR protein expression occurred in the U87 glioma cells after treatment with the T7-LPC/siEGFR NPs. Moreover, the T7-LPC/siRNA NPs had an advantage in penetrating into a deep region of the tumor spheroid compared with PEG-LPC/siRNA NPs. In vivo imaging revealed that T7-LPC/siRNA NPs accumulated more specifically in brain tumor tissues than the non-targeted NPs. Also, in vivo tumor therapy experiments demonstrated that the longest survival period along with the greatest downregulation of EGFR expression in tumor tissues was observed in mice with an intracranial U87 glioma treated with T7-LPC/siEGFR NPs compared with mice receiving other formulations. Therefore, we believe that these transferrin receptor-mediated core-shell nanoparticles are an important potential siRNA delivery system for brain tumor-targeted therapy.

  13. NOD-like Receptors: master regulators of inflammation and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansi eSaxena

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cytosolic NOD-like receptors (NLRs have been associated with human diseases including infections, cancer, and autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. These innate immune pattern recognition molecules are essential for controlling inflammatory mechanisms through induction of cytokines, chemokines and antimicrobial genes. Upon activation, some NLRs form multi-protein complexes called inflammasomes, while others orchestrate caspase-independent Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB and Mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling. Moreover, NLRs and their downstream signaling components engage in an intricate crosstalk with cell death and autophagy pathways, both critical processes for cancer development. Recently, increasing evidence has extended the concept that chronic inflammation caused by abberant NLR signaling is a powerful driver of carcinogenesis, where it abets genetic mutations, tumor growth and progression. In this review, we explore the rapidly expanding area of research regarding the expression and functions of NLRs in different types of cancers. Furthermore, we particularly focus on how maintaining tissue homeostasis and regulating tissue repair may provide a logical platform for understanding the liaisons between the NLR-driven inflammatory responses and cancer. Finally, we outline novel therapeutic approaches that target NLR signaling and speculate how these could be developed as potential pharmaceutical alternatives for cancer treatment.

  14. Regulatory network of inflammation downstream of proteinase-activated receptors

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    Hurst Robert E

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protease-activated receptors (PAR are present in the urinary bladder, and their expression is altered in response to inflammation. PARs are a unique class of G protein-coupled that carry their own ligands, which remain cryptic until unmasked by proteolytic cleavage. Although the canonical signal transduction pathway downstream of PAR activation and coupling with various G proteins is known and leads to the rapid transcription of genes involved in inflammation, the effect of PAR activation on the downstream transcriptome is unknown. We have shown that intravesical administration of PAR-activating peptides leads to an inflammatory reaction characterized by edema and granulocyte infiltration. Moreover, the inflammatory response to intravesical instillation of known pro-inflammatory stimuli such as E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, substance P (SP, and antigen was strongly attenuated by PAR1- and to a lesser extent by PAR2-deficiency. Results Here, cDNA array experiments determined inflammatory genes whose expression is dependent on PAR1 activation. For this purpose, we compared the alteration in gene expression in wild type and PAR1-/- mice induced by classical pro-inflammatory stimuli (LPS, SP, and antigen. 75 transcripts were considered to be dependent on PAR-1 activation and further annotated in silico by Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA and gene ontology (GO. Selected transcripts were target validated by quantitative PCR (Q-PCR. Among PAR1-dependent transcripts, the following have been implicated in the inflammatory process: b2m, ccl7, cd200, cd63, cdbpd, cfl1, dusp1, fkbp1a, fth1, hspb1, marcksl1, mmp2, myo5a, nfkbia, pax1, plaur, ppia, ptpn1, ptprcap, s100a10, sim2, and tnfaip2. However, a balanced response to signals of injury requires a transient cellular activation of a panel of genes together with inhibitory systems that temper the overwhelming inflammation. In this context, the activation of genes such as dusp1 and

  15. Ultraviolet-B induced expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α,transferrin receptor through EGFR/PI3K/AKT/DEC1 pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yanhua; BI Zhigang

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this research was to explore the effects and signaling pathway of ultraviolet-B (UVB) irradiation on the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and transferrin receptor (TfR).HIF-1α protein was measured by Western blot method.Expressions of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR),phosphor-EGF-R and TfR after UVB irradiation were determined with flow cytometry.After UVB irradiation,mRNA levels of HIF-1α and TfR were detected by real time-PCR.Results showed that compared with control groups,UVB was able to induce HIF1α and TfR protein expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner in HaCat cells (P < 0.05).TfR mRNA was expressed in a dose-dependent manner and reached a peak at the 8th hour in HaCat cells (P<0.05) whereas HIF-1α mRNA expression was not affected by UVB treatment (P>0.05).The EGFR/PI3K/AKT signaling pathway was required for the induction of HIF-lcx and TfR expression induced by UVB.UVB induced activation of EGFR in HaCat cells and EGFR regulated expression of TfR and HIF-1α.EGFR (-/-) MEF did not increase the HIF 1 expression following UVB irradiation (P>0.05).In contrast,EGFR (+/+) MEF strongly enhanced HIF 1α expression after UVB irradiation (P < 0.05).PD153035,a selective inhibitor of EGFR tyrosine kinase,inhibited the TfR protein expression in UVB-treated cells in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05).PI3K inhibitors,LY294002 and wortmannin,inhibited HIF-1α and TfR expressions induced by UVB (P < 0.05).The DEC1 (-/-) Ha-Cat cells did not increase their TfR and HIF-1α expressions following UVB irradiation (P>0.05).In contrast,DEC1 (+/+) HaCat cells strongly enhanced TfR and HIF-1α protein expression after UVB irradiation (P<0.05).We conclude that UVB induces TfR and HIF-1α expressions via EGFR/PI3K/AKT/DEC1 signaling pathway.

  16. Mast cell adenosine receptors function: a focus on the A3 adenosine receptor and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noam eRudich

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine is a metabolite, which has long been implicated in a variety of inflammatory processes. Inhaled adenosine provokes bronchoconstriction in asthmatics or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients, but not in non-asthmatics. This hyper responsiveness to adenosine appears to be mediated by mast cell activation. These observations have marked the receptor that mediates the bronchoconstrictor effect of adenosine on mast cells, as an attractive drug candidate. Four subtypes (A1, A2a, A2b and A3 of adenosine receptors have been cloned and shown to display distinct tissue distributions and functions. Animal models have firmly established the ultimate role of the A3 adenosine receptor (A3R in mediating hyper responsiveness to adenosine in mast cells, although the influence of the A2b adenosine receptor was confirmed as well. In contrast, studies of the A3R in humans have been controversial. In this review, we summarize data on the role of different adenosine receptors in mast cell regulation of inflammation and pathology, with a focus on the common and distinct functions of the A3R in rodent and human mast cells. The relevance of mouse studies to the human is discussed.

  17. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor : alpha Protects against Obesity-Induced Hepatic Inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stienstra, R.; Mandard, S.J.; Patsouris, D.A.; Maass, C.; Kersten, A.H.; Müller, M.R.

    2007-01-01

    Recently it has become evident that obesity is associated with low-grade chronic inflammation. The transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) has been shown to have a strong antiinflammatory action in liver. However, the role of PPAR in obesity-induced inflammation is

  18. Plasma ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor concentrations and body iron stores identify similar risk factors for iron deficiency but result in different estimates of the national prevalence of iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia among women and children in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle-Stone, Reina; Nankap, Martin; Ndjebayi, Alex O; Erhardt, Juergen G; Brown, Kenneth H

    2013-03-01

    Available iron status indicators reflect different aspects of metabolism. We compared the prevalence and distribution of iron deficiency (ID) and iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) among Cameroonian women and children, as measured by plasma ferritin, and soluble transferrin receptor concentrations, body iron stores (BIS), and hemoglobin, and evaluated the impact of adjustments for inflammation on these measures. In a nationally representative survey, we randomly selected 30 clusters in each of 3 zones (north, south, and large cities) and 10 households/ cluster, each with a child aged 12-59 mo and a woman 15-49 y. Ferritin and BIS were mathematically adjusted for inflammation, using plasma C-reactive protein and α(1)-acid glycoprotein both as continuous and categorical variables. Inflammation was present in 48.0% of children and 20.8% of women and anemia was diagnosed in 57.6% of children and 38.8% of women. Depending on the iron status indicator applied, the prevalence of ID ranged from 14.2 to 68.4% among children and 11.5 to 31.8% among women, and the prevalence of IDA ranged from 12.0 to 47.4% among children and 9.0 to 19.4% among women; the proportion of anemia associated with ID ranged from 20.8 to 82.3% among children and 23.2 to 50.0% among women. The different iron indicators generally identified similar groups at greatest risk of deficiency, using both conventional and derived cutoffs: younger children, pregnant women, and women and children in the north and rural areas. Research is needed to clarify the relationships between iron status indicators, particularly in the presence of inflammation, to harmonize global data on prevalence of ID.

  19. Reference values of serum transferrin receptor (sTfR) and sTfR/log ferritin index in healthy children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-López, María A; López-Ruzafa, Encarnación; Lendinez-Molinos, Francisco; Ortiz-Pérez, María; Ruiz-Tudela, Lucía; Martín-González, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    ABSTARCT The aims of this study were to determine appropriate reference ranges for serum transferrin receptor (sTfR) and sTfR/log ferritin (sTfR-F index) in healthy children and their relationship with iron parameters, erythropoiesis, and other conditions presented by the subject. A total of 902 children with normal iron status, aged 1-11 years, were included in a cross-sectional study. A physical examination was conducted and z-score of body mass index (zBMI) obtained. Complete blood count, iron biomarkers, erythropoietin, C-reactive protein, sTfR, and sTfR/log ferritin were determined. Linear multiple regression was applied to identify the factors that determined sTfR and sTfR-F index variability. Mean values for sTfR and sTfR-F index were 1.22 ± 0.28 mg/L (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2-1.23) and 0.87 ± 0.25 (95% CI: 0.85-0.88). The reference intervals (2.5th to 97.5th percentiles [P2.5-P97.5]) were 0.78-1.9 mg/L and 0.49-1.46, respectively. sTfR and sTfR-F values decreased with age (P <.03 and P <.0001, respectively). No changes were observed with sex. Changes in sTfR and sTfR-F index were consistent with ferritin and erythropoietin variations. Iron biomarkers, erythropoietin, and zBMI predicted 19% and 18.1% of the sTfR and sTfR-F index variability. The results provide reference ranges for sTfR and sTfR-F index in healthy children for clinical use in the assessment of body iron status. Both biomarkers are predicted by iron parameters, erythropoietin, and zBMI.

  20. Chemokines and chemokine receptors in inflammation of the nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, D; Han, Yong-Chang; Rani, M R

    2000-01-01

    This article focuses on the production of chemokines by resident glial cells of the nervous system. We describe studies in two distinct categories of inflammation within the nervous system: immune-mediated inflammation as seen in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) or multiple sclerosis...

  1. Annotating MYC oncogene status with 89Zr-transferrin imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Holland, Jason P.; Evans, Michael J.; Rice, Samuel L.; Wongvipat, John; Sawyers, Charles L.; Lewis, Jason S.

    2012-01-01

    A non-invasive technology that quantitatively measures the activity of oncogenic signaling pathways could broadly impact cancer diagnosis and treatment using targeted therapies. Here we describe the development of 89Zr-desferrioxamine transferrin (89Zr-Tf), a novel positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer that binds the transferrin receptor 1 (TFRC, CD71) with high avidity. 89Zr-Tf produces high contrast PET images that quantitatively reflect treatment-induced changes in MYC-regulated T...

  2. Inhibition of pattern recognition receptor-mediated inflammation by bioactive phytochemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerging evidence reveals that pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs), Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain proteins (NODs) mediate both infection-induced and sterile inflammation by recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and endogenous molecules...

  3. Role of chemokine receptors and intestinal epithelial cells in the mucosal inflammation and tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Neeraja; Pathak, Manisha; Lal, Girdhari

    2017-02-01

    The intestinal epithelial lining is a very dynamic interface, where multiple interactions occur with the external world. The intestinal epithelial barrier is continuously exposed to a huge load of commensal microorganisms, food-borne antigens, as well as invading enteropathogens. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and underlying immune cells are the main players in maintaining the delicate balance between gut tolerance and inflammation. IECs deferentially express the variety of chemokines and chemokine receptors, and these receptor-ligand interactions not only mediate the infiltration and activation of immune cells but also switch on the survival cascades in IECs. In this review, we discussed how chemokine-chemokine receptor-induced interactions play a central role to coordinate the interplay between IECs and gut immune cells to maintain homeostasis or elicit gut inflammation. Furthermore, we discussed how chemokines and chemokine receptors were used as a target for developing new drugs and therapies to control gut inflammation and autoimmunity. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  4. DMPD: Toll-like receptor (TLR)-based networks regulate neutrophilic inflammation inrespiratory disease. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18031251 Toll-like receptor (TLR)-based networks regulate neutrophilic inflammation...l) (.csml) Show Toll-like receptor (TLR)-based networks regulate neutrophilic inflammation inrespiratory dis...ease. PubmedID 18031251 Title Toll-like receptor (TLR)-based networks regulate ne

  5. Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst-Hansen, Thomas

    Inflammation is an intricate response relying on the activation and response of both the innate immune system and the infected tissue to remove a threat. The pro-inflammatory NF-kappaB pathway has been studied extensively, among others because of its key role in regulation of inflammation. However...

  6. Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst-Hansen, Thomas

    Inflammation is an intricate response relying on the activation and response of both the innate immune system and the infected tissue to remove a threat. The pro-inflammatory NF-kappaB pathway has been studied extensively, among others because of its key role in regulation of inflammation. However...

  7. CC chemokine receptors and chronic inflammation--therapeutic opportunities and pharmacological challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Gemma E; Iqbal, Asif J; Greaves, David R

    2013-01-01

    Chemokines are a family of low molecular weight proteins with an essential role in leukocyte trafficking during both homeostasis and inflammation. The CC class of chemokines consists of at least 28 members (CCL1-28) that signal through 10 known chemokine receptors (CCR1-10). CC chemokine receptors are expressed predominantly by T cells and monocyte-macrophages, cell types associated predominantly with chronic inflammation occurring over weeks or years. Chronic inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, and metabolic syndrome are characterized by continued leukocyte infiltration into the inflammatory site, driven in large part by excessive chemokine production. Over years or decades, persistent inflammation may lead to loss of tissue architecture and function, causing severe disability or, in the case of atherosclerosis, fatal outcomes such as myocardial infarction or stroke. Despite the existence of several clinical strategies for targeting chronic inflammation, these diseases remain significant causes of morbidity and mortality globally, with a concomitant economic impact. Thus, the development of novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of chronic inflammatory disease continues to be a priority. In this review we introduce CC chemokine receptors as critical mediators of chronic inflammatory responses and explore their potential role as pharmacological targets. We discuss functions of individual CC chemokine receptors based on in vitro pharmacological data as well as transgenic animal studies. Focusing on three key forms of chronic inflammation--rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, and metabolic syndrome--we describe the pathologic function of CC chemokine receptors and their possible relevance as therapeutic targets.

  8. Memory Deficits Induced by Inflammation Are Regulated by α5-Subunit-Containing GABAA Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dian-Shi Wang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Systemic inflammation causes learning and memory deficits through mechanisms that remain poorly understood. Here, we studied the pathogenesis of memory loss associated with inflammation and found that we could reverse memory deficits by pharmacologically inhibiting α5-subunit-containing γ-aminobutyric acid type A (α5GABAA receptors and deleting the gene associated with the α5 subunit. Acute inflammation reduces long-term potentiation, a synaptic correlate of memory, in hippocampal slices from wild-type mice, and this reduction was reversed by inhibition of α5GABAA receptor function. A tonic inhibitory current generated by α5GABAA receptors in hippocampal neurons was increased by the key proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β through a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. Interleukin-1β also increased the surface expression of α5GABAA receptors in the hippocampus. Collectively, these results show that α5GABAA receptor activity increases during inflammation and that this increase is critical for inflammation-induced memory deficits.

  9. Evaluation of Efficacy of Radioimmunotherapy with 90Y-Labeled Fully Human Anti-Transferrin Receptor Monoclonal Antibody in Pancreatic Cancer Mouse Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Sugyo

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive tumor and the prognosis remains poor. Therefore, development of more effective therapy is needed. We previously reported that 89Zr-labeled TSP-A01, an antibody against transferrin receptor (TfR, is highly accumulated in a pancreatic cancer xenograft, but not in major normal organs. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of radioimmunotherapy (RIT with 90Y-TSP-A01 in pancreatic cancer mouse models.TfR expression in pancreatic cancer cell lines (AsPC-1, BxPC-3, MIAPaCa-2 was evaluated by immunofluorescence staining. 111In-labeled anti-TfR antibodies (TSP-A01, TSP-A02 were evaluated in vitro by cell binding assay with the three cell lines and by competitive inhibition assay with MIAPaCa-2. In vivo biodistribution was evaluated in mice bearing BxPC-3 and MIAPaCa-2 xenografts. Tumor volumes of BxPC-3 and MIAPaCa-2 were sequentially measured after 90Y-TSP-A01 injection and histological analysis of tumors was conducted.MIAPaCa-2 cells showed the highest TfR expression, followed by AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cells. 111In-TSP-A01 and 111In-TSP-A02 bound specifically to the three cell lines according to TfR expression. The dissociation constants for TSP-A01, DOTA-TSP-A01, TSP-A02, and DOTA-TSP-A02 were 0.22, 0.28, 0.17, and 0.22 nM, respectively. 111In-TSP-A01 was highly accumulated in tumors, especially in MIAPaCa-2, but this was not true of 111In-TSP-A02. The absorbed dose for 90Y-TSP-A01 was estimated to be 8.3 Gy/MBq to BxPC-3 and 12.4 Gy/MBq to MIAPaCa-2. MIAPaCa-2 tumors treated with 3.7 MBq of 90Y-TSP-A01 had almost completely disappeared around 3 weeks after injection and regrowth was not observed. Growth of BxPC-3 tumors was inhibited by 3.7 MBq of 90Y-TSP-A01, but the tumor size was not reduced.90Y-TSP-A01 treatment achieved an almost complete response in MIAPaCa-2 tumors, whereas it merely inhibited the growth of BxPC-3 tumors. 90Y-TSP-A01 is a promising RIT agent for pancreatic cancer, although further

  10. Cannabinoid CB2 receptor potentiates obesity-associated inflammation, insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Deveaux

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity-associated inflammation is of critical importance in the development of insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Since the cannabinoid receptor CB2 regulates innate immunity, the aim of the present study was to investigate its role in obesity-induced inflammation, insulin resistance and fatty liver. METHODOLOGY: Murine obesity models included genetically leptin-deficient ob/ob mice and wild type (WT mice fed a high fat diet (HFD, that were compared to their lean counterparts. Animals were treated with pharmacological modulators of CB2 receptors. Experiments were also performed in mice knock-out for CB2 receptors (Cnr2 -/-. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In both HFD-fed WT mice and ob/ob mice, Cnr2 expression underwent a marked induction in the stromal vascular fraction of epididymal adipose tissue that correlated with increased fat inflammation. Treatment with the CB2 agonist JWH-133 potentiated adipose tissue inflammation in HFD-fed WT mice. Moreover, cultured fat pads isolated from ob/ob mice displayed increased Tnf and Ccl2 expression upon exposure to JWH-133. In keeping, genetic or pharmacological inactivation of CB2 receptors decreased adipose tissue macrophage infiltration associated with obesity, and reduced inductions of Tnf and Ccl2 expressions. In the liver of obese mice, Cnr2 mRNA was only weakly induced, and CB2 receptors moderately contributed to liver inflammation. HFD-induced insulin resistance increased in response to JWH-133 and reduced in Cnr2 -/- mice. Finally, HFD-induced hepatic steatosis was enhanced in WT mice treated with JWH-133 and blunted in Cnr2 -/- mice. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These data unravel a previously unrecognized contribution of CB2 receptors to obesity-associated inflammation, insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and suggest that CB2 receptor antagonists may open a new therapeutic approach for the management of obesity-associated metabolic disorders.

  11. Role of nuclear receptor Nur77 during inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamers, A.A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear Receptors play key roles in cell differentiation and development, homeostasis and in many diseases such as diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease, reproductive abnormalities and obesity; and are therefore major targets for drug discovery. Nur77 is, like most nuclear receptors, a transcript

  12. Transferrin-bearing maghemite nano-constructs for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piraux, H.; Hai, J.; Gaudisson, T.; Ammar, S.; Gazeau, F.; El Hage Chahine, J. M.; Hémadi, M.

    2015-05-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used in biomedicine for hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imagery. Targeting them to specific cancerous cells is, therefore, of a great value for therapy and diagnostic. Transferrin and its receptor constitute the major iron-acquisition system in human. The former crosses the plasma membrane within a few minutes by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Thus, transferrin can be a valuable vector for the delivery of NPs to specific cells and across the blood brain barrier. For such a purpose, three different sizes of maghemite NPs (5, 10, and 15 nm) were synthesized by the polyol method, coated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, and coupled to transferrin by amide bonds. The number of transferrins per nanoparticle was determined. Raw nanoparticles and the "transferrin-nanoparticle" constructs were characterized. The magnetic properties and the colloidal stability of raw NPs and transferrin-NP constructs were measured and analyzed in relation to their inorganic core size variation. They all proved to be good candidates for nanoparticle targeting for biomedical application.

  13. Systemic inflammation modulates Fc receptor expression on microglia during chronic neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunnon, Katie; Teeling, Jessica L; Tutt, Alison L; Cragg, Mark S; Glennie, Martin J; Perry, V Hugh

    2011-06-15

    Chronic neurodegeneration is a major worldwide health problem, and it has been suggested that systemic inflammation can accelerate the onset and progression of clinical symptoms. A possible explanation is that systemic inflammation "switches" the phenotype of microglia from a relatively benign to a highly aggressive and tissue-damaging phenotype. The current study investigated the molecular mechanism underlying this microglia phenotype "switching." We show in mice with chronic neurodegeneration (ME7 prion model) that there is increased expression of receptors that have a key role in macrophage activation and associated signaling pathways, including TREM-2, Siglec-F, CD200R, and FcγRs. Systemic inflammation induced by LPS further increased protein levels of the activating FcγRIII and FcγRIV, but not of other microglial receptors, including the inhibitory FcγRII. In addition to these changes in receptor expression, IgG levels in the brain parenchyma were increased during chronic neurodegeneration, and these IgG levels further increased after systemic inflammation. γ-Chain-deficient mice show modified proinflammatory cytokine expression in the brain after systemic inflammation. We conclude that systemic inflammation during chronic neurodegeneration increases the expression levels of activating FcγR on microglia and thereby lowers the signaling threshold for Ab-mediated cell activation. At the same time, IgG influx into the brain could provide a cross-linking ligand resulting in excessive microglia activation that is detrimental to neurons already under threat by misfolded protein.

  14. Utilidad en el post parto de la determinación de protoporfirina eritrocitaria y su relación con el receptor soluble de transferrina Usefulness of erythrocyte protoporphyrin test in the puerperium compared to the soluble transferrin receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia H. Langini

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió, en 77 puérperas, la relación entre la protoporfirina eritrocitaria (PE, la ferritina sérica (FS, el receptor soluble de transferrina (RsT y los indicadores hematológicos utilizados en la rutina clínica. En sangre venosa se determinó: Hematocrito (Hto, Hemoglobina (Hb, recuento de glóbulos rojos (GR y glóbulos blancos (GB (contador electrónico MEGA; PE (Piomelli; en suero: RsT (ELISA, Orion Diagnostica, FS (ELISA, IMx Ferritina, Abbott y Proteína C-Reactiva (PCR- Látex, Wiener lab. Se analizaron sensibilidad (S, especificidad (E y puntos de corte mediante el modelo ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristics, considerando como gold standard el RsT. Los resultados (media ± DE fueron: Hto (% 35 ± 5; Hb (g/l 113 ± 18; GRx10³/mm³ 3 893 ± 489; VCM (fL 90 ± 6; GB/mm³ 9 543 ± 2.669; PE (µg/dl GR 46 ± 39; RsT (mg/l 4.7 ± 2.8; FS (µg/l 26 ± 31; PCR (Pos/Neg 72/5. La PE no correlacionó con FS, pero sí con el RsT (r=0.323, p=0.007. La S y E de la FS fueron de 83% y 63%, respectivamente, para un punto de corte de 25 µg/l; para la PE la S fue de 38% y la E de 90% para un punto de corte de 53 µg/dl GR. Estos resultados sugieren que ese punto de corte en el puerperio, permitiría detectar con un bajo costo un mayor porcentaje de mujeres (16% en nuestro estudio que presentan deficiencia de Fe pese a sus valores normales de hemoglobina.Erythrocyte protoporphyrin (EP, serum ferritin (SF, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR and routine hematological laboratory tests were studied in 77 women 24 h post-partum, assisted at Paroissien Hospital (in Buenos Aires Province. Hematocrite (Hct, hemoglobin (Hb, red blood cells (RBC and white blood cells (WBC were determined using an electronic counter (Mega; EP by Piomelli’s; SF by ELISA (IMx Ferritina, Abbott; sTfR by ELISA (Orion Diagnostica and C-Reactive Protein (PCR-Latex, Wiener lab. All determinations were made in fasting blood samples. Statistical analysis (Receiver Operating

  15. Application of chemokine receptor antagonist with stents reduces local inflammation and suppresses cancer growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ai-Wu; Jiang, Ting-Hui; Sun, Xian-Jun; Peng, Jian

    2015-11-01

    Severe pain and obstructive jaundice resulting from invasive cholangiocarcinoma or pancreatic carcinoma can be alleviated by implantation of biliary and duodenal stents. However, stents may cause local inflammation to have an adverse effect on the patients' condition and survival. So far, no efficient approaches have been applied to prevent the occurrence of stents-related inflammation. Here, we reported significantly higher levels of serum stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) in the patients that developed stents-associated inflammation. A higher number of inflammatory cells have been detected in the cancer close to stent in the patients with high serum SDF-1. Since chemokine plays a pivotal role in the development of inflammation, we implanted an Alzet osmotic pump with the stents to gradually release AMD3100, a specific inhibitor binding of SDF-1 and its receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), at the site of stents in mice that had developed pancreatic cancer. We found that AMD3100 significantly reduced local inflammation and significantly inhibited cancer cell growth, resulting in improved survival of the mice that bore cancer. Moreover, the suppression of cancer growth may be conducted through modulation of CyclinD1, p21, and p27 in the cancer cells. Together, these data suggest that inhibition of chemokine signaling at the site of stents may substantially improve survival through suppression of stent-related inflammation and tumor growth.

  16. Inflammation enhances mu-opioid receptor transcription and expression in mice intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pol, O; Alameda, F; Puig, M M

    2001-11-01

    Opioid receptors (ORs) and their mRNA are present in the central and peripheral nervous systems of mammals and in different peripheral tissues, including the gut. Using a model of croton oil-induced (CO) intestinal inflammation in mice, we have shown a 6-fold increase in the potency of the antitransit and antisecretory effects of mu-OR agonists, mediated by peripheral ORs. We postulate that the enhanced effects are mediated by an increase in the expression of intestinal OR. We used jejunum (stripped of the mucosal layer) from mice with CO-induced intestinal inflammation and, as control subjects, saline-treated animals (SS). We evaluated the quantity of mu-OR mRNA determined by a competitive reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction; the levels of mu-OR protein by Western blot immunoassay, and the localization and number of cells expressing mu-OR using immunohistochemistry. The results show a significant increase of mu-OR mRNA (7.7-fold) and receptor protein (3-fold) during intestinal inflammation. Inflammation also induced a 64.3% increase in the number of neurons expressing mu-OR immunoreactivity in the myenteric plexus but not in the submucosal plexus. Our results show that intestinal inflammation enhances the transcription and translation of mu-OR mRNA, thus explaining the increased potency of mu-opioids during inflammation.

  17. Role of toll-like receptors and inflammation in adrenal gland insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanczkowski, Waldemar; Zacharowski, Kai; Bornstein, Stefan R

    2010-01-01

    Adrenal gland insufficiency - the clinical manifestation of deficient production or action of adrenal steroids - is a life-threatening disorder. Among many factors which can predispose to primary adrenal failure, an autoimmune adrenalitis and infectious agents play a major role. The initial host defense against bacterial infections is executed primarily by the pattern recognition receptors, e.g. Toll-like receptors (TLRs), expressed in cells from the innate immune system. Upon activation, TLRs have been found to regulate various levels of innate and adaptive immunity as well as control tissue inflammation. TLRs are implicated in adrenal cell turnover and steroidogenesis during inflammation. Therefore, TLRs play a crucial role in the activation of adrenal inflammation mediating adrenal gland dysfunction during septicemia.

  18. The Role of Toll-Like Receptor 2 in Inflammation and Fibrosis during Progressive Renal Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemans, J.C.; Butter, L.M.; Pulskens, W.P.C.; Teske, G.J.D.; Claessen, N.; van der Poll, T.; Florquin, S.

    2009-01-01

    Tissue fibrosis and chronic inflammation are common causes of progressive organ damage, including progressive renal disease, leading to loss of physiological functions. Recently, it was shown that Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) is expressed in the kidney and activated by endogenous danger signals. The

  19. Hepatocyte Toll-like receptor 4 regulates obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic low-grade inflammation is a hallmark of obesity and thought to contribute to the development of obesity-related insulin resistance. Toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4) is a key mediator of pro-inflammatory responses. Mice lacking Tlr4s are protected from diet-induced insulin resistance and inflammat...

  20. Toll-like receptors as targets for inflammation, development and repair in the central nervous system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, J.M. van

    2007-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) that play key roles in inflammation are also widely expressed in the CNS. While they are well known to activate inflammatory responses to microbial products, TLRs fulfill additional roles in the absence of infection. Emerging evidence suggests that several TLRs play a role

  1. The Role of Toll-Like Receptor 2 in Inflammation and Fibrosis during Progressive Renal Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemans, J.C.; Butter, L.M.; Pulskens, W.P.C.; Teske, G.J.D.; Claessen, N.; van der Poll, T.; Florquin, S.

    2009-01-01

    Tissue fibrosis and chronic inflammation are common causes of progressive organ damage, including progressive renal disease, leading to loss of physiological functions. Recently, it was shown that Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) is expressed in the kidney and activated by endogenous danger signals. The

  2. Insulin Dissociates the Effects of Liver X Receptor on Lipogenesis, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, and Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaowei; Haas, Mary E; Miao, Ji; Mehta, Abhiruchi; Graham, Mark J; Crooke, Rosanne M; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Wang, Jian-Guo; Aikawa, Masanori; Masson, David; Biddinger, Sudha B

    2016-01-15

    Diabetes is characterized by increased lipogenesis as well as increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and inflammation. The nuclear hormone receptor liver X receptor (LXR) is induced by insulin and is a key regulator of lipid metabolism. It promotes lipogenesis and cholesterol efflux, but suppresses endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammation. The goal of these studies was to dissect the effects of insulin on LXR action. We used antisense oligonucleotides to knock down Lxrα in mice with hepatocyte-specific deletion of the insulin receptor and their controls. We found, surprisingly, that knock-out of the insulin receptor and knockdown of Lxrα produced equivalent, non-additive effects on the lipogenic genes. Thus, insulin was unable to induce the lipogenic genes in the absence of Lxrα, and LXRα was unable to induce the lipogenic genes in the absence of insulin. However, insulin was not required for LXRα to modulate the phospholipid profile, or to suppress genes in the ER stress or inflammation pathways. These data show that insulin is required specifically for the lipogenic effects of LXRα and that manipulation of the insulin signaling pathway could dissociate the beneficial effects of LXR on cholesterol efflux, inflammation, and ER stress from the negative effects on lipogenesis.

  3. Iron piracy: acquisition of transferrin-bound iron by bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, C N; Sparling, P F

    1994-12-01

    The mechanism of iron utilization from transferrin has been most extensively characterized in the pathogenic Neisseria species and Haemophilus species. Two transferrin-binding proteins, Tbp1 and Tbp2, have been identified in these pathogens and are thought to be components of the transferrin receptor. Tbp1 appears to be an integral, TonB-dependent outer membrane protein while Tbp2, a lipoprotein, may be peripherally associated with the outer membrane. The relative contribution of each of these proteins to transferrin binding and utilization is discussed and a model of iron uptake from transferrin is presented. Sequence comparisons of the genes encoding neisserial transferrin-binding proteins suggest that they are probably under positive selection for variation and may have resulted from inter-species genetic exchange.

  4. Mandatory role of proteinase-activated receptor 1 in experimental bladder inflammation

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    Davis Carole A

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In general, inflammation plays a role in most bladder pathologies and represents a defense reaction to injury that often times is two edged. In particular, bladder neurogenic inflammation involves the participation of mast cells and sensory nerves. Increased mast cell numbers and tryptase release represent one of the prevalent etiologic theories for interstitial cystitis and other urinary bladder inflammatory conditions. The activity of mast cell-derived tryptase as well as thrombin is significantly increased during inflammation. Those enzymes activate specific G-protein coupled proteinase-activated receptors (PARs. Four PARs have been cloned so far, and not only are all four receptors highly expressed in different cell types of the mouse urinary bladder, but their expression is altered during experimental bladder inflammation. We hypothesize that PARs may link mast cell-derived proteases to bladder inflammation and, therefore, play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of cystitis. Results Here, we demonstrate that in addition to the mouse urinary bladder, all four PA receptors are also expressed in the J82 human urothelial cell line. Intravesical administration of PAR-activating peptides in mice leads to an inflammatory reaction characterized by edema and granulocyte infiltration. Moreover, the inflammatory response to intravesical instillation of known pro-inflammatory stimuli such as E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, substance P, and antigen was strongly attenuated by PAR1-, and to a lesser extent, by PAR2-deficiency. Conclusion Our results reveal an overriding participation of PAR1 in bladder inflammation, provide a working model for the involvement of downstream signaling, and evoke testable hypotheses regarding the role of PARs in bladder inflammation. It remains to be determined whether or not mechanisms targeting PAR1 gene silencing or PAR1 blockade will ameliorate the clinical manifestations of cystitis.

  5. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in chronic inflammation and colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dingzhi; DuBois, Raymond N.

    2010-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily and have been implicated in a variety of physiological and pathological processes, such as nutrient metabolism, energy homeostasis, inflammation and cancer. In this review, we highlight breakthroughs in our understanding of the potential roles of PPARs in inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer. These PPAR receptors might hold the key to some of the questions pertinent to the pathophysiology of inflammatory diseases and colorectal cancer and could possibly serve as drug targets for new anti-inflammatory therapeutic and anti-cancer agents. PMID:20951925

  6. Effects of Liver × receptor agonist treatment on signal transduction pathways in acute lung inflammation

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    Bramanti Placido

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liver × receptor α (LXRα and β (LXRβ are members of the nuclear receptor super family of ligand-activated transcription factors, a super family which includes the perhaps better known glucocorticoid receptor, estrogen receptor, thyroid receptor, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. There is limited evidence that LXL activation may reduces acute lung inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of T0901317, a potent LXR receptor ligand, in a mouse model of carrageenan-induced pleurisy. Methods Injection of carrageenan into the pleural cavity of mice elicited an acute inflammatory response characterized by: accumulation of fluid containing a large number of neutrophils (PMNs in the pleural cavity, infiltration of PMNs in lung tissues and subsequent lipid peroxidation, and increased production of nitrite/nitrate (NOx, tumor necrosis factor-α, (TNF-α and interleukin-1β (IL-1β. Furthermore, carrageenan induced the expression of iNOS, nitrotyrosine and PARP, as well as induced apoptosis (TUNEL staining and Bax and Bcl-2 expression in the lung tissues. Results Administration of T0901317, 30 min after the challenge with carrageenan, caused a significant reduction in a dose dependent manner of all the parameters of inflammation measured. Conclusions Thus, based on these findings we propose that LXR ligand such as T0901317, may be useful in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases.

  7. Biological interplay between proteoglycans and their innate immune receptors in inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Helena; Schroeder, Nina; Manon-Jensen, Tina; Iozzo, Renato V; Schaefer, Liliana

    2013-05-01

    An emerging body of evidence indicates that secreted proteoglycans act as signaling molecules, in addition to their canonical function in maintaining and regulating the architecture of various extracellular matrices. Proteoglycans interact with a number of receptors that regulate growth, motility and immune response. In part, as a consequence of their complex structure, proteoglycans can induce crosstalk among various families of receptors and can also interact with natural receptor ligands, often blocking and sequestering their bioactivity. In their soluble form, originating from either partial proteolytic processing or through de novo synthesis by activated cells, some proteoglycans can become potent danger signals, denoting tissue stress and injury. Recently, it has been shown that proteoglycans, especially those belonging to the small leucine-rich and hyaluronan-binding gene families as well as the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan, act as endogenous ligands of the toll-like receptors, a group of central receptors regulating innate immunity. Furthermore, proteoglycans can activate intracellular inflammasomes and trigger sterile inflammation. In this review, we critically assess the signaling events induced by the proteoglycans biglycan, decorin, lumican and versican as well as hyaluronan during inflammation. We discuss the intriguing emerging notion that, in spite of structural diversity of biglycan, decorin, versican and hyaluronan, all of them signal through the same toll-like receptors, albeit triggering differential responses and biological outcomes. Finally, we review the modes of action of these endogenous ligands of toll-like receptors and their ability to specifically modify the final signaling events and the inflammatory response.

  8. Influence of immune inflammation on androgen receptor expression in benign prostatic hyperplasia tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zong-Lin Wu; Ya Yuan; He Geng; Shu-Jie Xia

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the association between immune inflammation and androgen receptor (AR) expression in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).We retrospectively analyzed 105 prostatectomy specimens.An immune inflammation score for each specimen was defined by combining three immunohistochemical markers (CD4,CD8 and CD20).The immunohistochemical markers were CD4 and CD8 for T lymphocytes,CD20 for B lymphocytes and AR antibody for the AR in BPH samples.Rates of CD4,CD8,CD20 and AR expression in BPH were 20 (19.0%),21 (20.0%),101 (96.2%) and 48 (45.7%),respectively.Total prostate volume (TPV) was higher in the immune inflammation group than in the non-immune inflammation group (62.7 ml vs.49.2 ml,t=2.482,P<0.05).Patients in the immune inflammation group had a higher serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) than those in the non-inflammation group (7.5 ng ml-1 vs.5.4 ng ml-1,t=2.771,P<0.05).Specifically,the immune inflammation group showed a higher rate of AR expression than the non-inflammation group (56.1% vs.28.2%,x2=7.665,P<0.05).Our study revealed a strong association between immune inflammation and TPV,serum PSA and AR expression in BPH tissue.Prostate hyperplasia caused by an immune inflammatory process may contribute to BPH progression over time.Therefore,the inflammatory response involved in BPH may be a prime therapeutic target.

  9. Role of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 in Inflammation and Autoimmune Diseases

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    Fumio Tsuji

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1, a non-selective cation channel, is a receptor activated by high temperatures and chemical agonists such as the vanilloids and protons. Because of these properties, TRPV1 has emerged as a polymodal nocisensor of nociceptive afferent neurons. TRPV1 is thought to be a central transducer of hyperalgesia and a prime target for controlling pain pharmacologically because it is a point where many proalgesic pathways converge and it is upregulated and sensitized by inflammation and injury. However, whether TRPV1 agonists promote or inhibit inflammation remains unclear. We recently demonstrated that SA13353 (1-[2-(1-adamantylethyl]-1-pentyl-3-[3-(4-pyridylpropyl]urea, a novel TRPV1 agonist, inhibits tumor necrosis factor-a production by the activation of capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurons and reduces the severity of symptoms in kidney injury, lung inflammation, arthritis, and encephalomyelitis. These results suggest that TRPV1 agonists may act as anti-inflammatories in certain inflammatory and autoimmune conditions in vivo. Given the potential deleterious effects of inhibiting the population of channels with a protective function, caution should be taken in the use of potent TRPV1 antagonists as a general strategy to treat inflammation. Further studies are required to clarify the role of TRPV1 and neuropeptides, which are released because of TRPV1 activation in inflammation and autoimmune diseases.

  10. Keratinocyte-specific deletion of the receptor RAGE modulates the kinetics of skin inflammation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibold, Julia S; Riehl, Astrid; Hettinger, Jan; Durben, Michael; Hess, Jochen; Angel, Peter

    2013-10-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a pattern recognition receptor causally related to the pathogenesis of acute and chronic inflammation. In a mouse model of inflammation-driven skin carcinogenesis, RAGE deletion conferred protection from the development of skin tumors due to a severely impaired cutaneous inflammation. Although the impact of RAGE expression in immune cells was shown to be essential for the maintenance of a cutaneous inflammatory reaction, the role of RAGE in keratinocytes remained unsolved. Using mice harboring a keratinocyte-specific deletion of RAGE, we analyzed its role in the regulation of an acute inflammatory response that was induced by topical treatment of the back skin with the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA). We show that RAGE expression in cutaneous keratinocytes modulates the strength and kinetics of acute inflammation and supports the maintenance of epidermal keratinocyte activation. To address the underlying molecular mechanism, we isolated interfollicular epidermis by laser microdissection for gene expression analysis, and identified RAGE as a regulator in the temporal control of TPA-induced epidermal tumor necrosis factor alpha transcript levels. In summary, our data demonstrate that RAGE expression in keratinocytes is critically involved in the perpetuation of acute inflammation and support the central role of RAGE in paracrine communication between keratinocytes and stromal immune cells.

  11. Inhibition of the prostaglandin receptor EP2 following status epilepticus reduces delayed mortality and brain inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jianxiong; Quan, Yi; Ganesh, Thota; Pouliot, Wendy A; Dudek, F Edward; Dingledine, Raymond

    2013-02-26

    Prostaglandin E2 is now widely recognized to play critical roles in brain inflammation and injury, although the responsible prostaglandin receptors have not been fully identified. We developed a potent and selective antagonist for the prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype EP2, TG6-10-1, with a sufficient pharmacokinetic profile to be used in vivo. We found that in the mouse pilocarpine model of status epilepticus (SE), systemic administration of TG6-10-1 completely recapitulates the effects of conditional ablation of cyclooxygenase-2 from principal forebrain neurons, namely reduced delayed mortality, accelerated recovery from weight loss, reduced brain inflammation, prevention of blood-brain barrier opening, and neuroprotection in the hippocampus, without modifying seizures acutely. Prolonged SE in humans causes high mortality and morbidity that are associated with brain inflammation and injury, but currently the only effective treatment is to stop the seizures quickly enough with anticonvulsants to prevent brain damage. Our results suggest that the prostaglandin receptor EP2 is critically involved in neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration, and point to EP2 receptor antagonism as an adjunctive therapeutic strategy to treat SE.

  12. The Role of Neurokinin-1 Receptor in the Microenvironment of Inflammation and Cancer

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    Marisa Rosso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent years have witnessed an exponential increase in cancer research, leading to a considerable investment in the field. However, with few exceptions, this effort has not yet translated into a better overall prognosis for patients with cancer, and the search for new drug targets continues. After binding to the specific neurokinin-1 (NK-1 receptor, the peptide substance P (SP, which is widely distributed in both the central and peripheral nervous systems, triggers a wide variety of functions. Antagonists against the NK-1 receptor are safe clinical drugs that are known to have anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anxiolytic, antidepressant, and antiemetic effects. Recently, it has become apparent that SP can induce tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and migration via the NK-1 receptor, and that the SP/NK-1 receptor complex is an integral part of the microenvironment of inflammation and cancer. Therefore, the use of NK-1 receptor antagonists as a novel and promising approach for treating patients with cancer is currently under intense investigation. In this paper, we evaluate the recent scientific developments regarding this receptor system, its role in the microenvironment of inflammation and cancer, and its potentials and pitfalls for the usage as part of modern anticancer strategies.

  13. Montelukast modulates lung CysLT1 receptor expression and eosinophilic inflammation in asthmatic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-jun ZHANG; Lei ZHANG; Shao-bin WANG; Hua-hao SHEN; Er-qing WEI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the expressions of cysteinyl leukotriene receptors, CysLT1 and CysLT2, in airway eosinophilic inflammation of OVA-induced asthmatic mice and the modulation by montelukast, a CysLT1 receptor antagonist.METHODS: Asthma model was induced by chronic exposure to ovalbumin (OVA) in C57BL/6 mice. The eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were counted, IL-5 level in BAL fluid was measured,and CysLT1 and CysLT2 receptor mRNA expressions were detected by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. RESULTS:Montelukast (6 mg/kg, once per day for 20 d) significantly suppressed the increased eosinophils in BAL fluid and lung tissue, and increased IL-5 level in BAL fluid in OVA challenged mice. OVA challenge increased CysLT1 but decreased CysLT2 receptor mRNA expression. Montelukast inhibited the increased CysLT1 but not the reduced CysLT2 expression after OVA challenge. CONCLUSION: CysLT receptors are modulated immunologically, and montelukast inhibits up-regulation of CysLT1 receptor and airway eosinophilic inflammation in asthmatic mice.

  14. Muscarinic M3 receptors on structural cells regulate cigarette smoke-induced neutrophilic airway inflammation in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kistemaker, Loes E.M.; van Os, Ronald P.; Dethmers-Ausema, Albertina; Bos, I. Sophie T.; Hylkema, Machteld N.; van den Berge, Maarten; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Wess, Jürgen; Meurs, Herman; Kerstjens, Huib A.M.; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    Anticholinergics, blocking the muscarinic M-3 receptor, are effective bronchodilators for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Recent evidence from M-3 receptor-deficient mice (M3R-/-) indicates that M-3 receptors also regulate neutrophilic inflammation in response to cigarette smoke

  15. Multimodal formyl peptide receptor 1 targeted inflammation imaging probe: cFLFLF-MHI-DOTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Yi; Chordia, Mahendra D; Wu, Hua; Shao, Li; Pan, Dongfeng

    2016-02-01

    Formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) targeting multimodal probe cFLFLFK-MHI-DOTA for leukocyte based inflammation imaging is described. The compound consists of three domains, (a) cFLFLF peptide for FPR1 recognition and binding for activated leukocyte, (b) heptamethine cyanine dye (MHI) for near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) detection and imaging, and (c) metal chelator DOTA ligand that could form complex with a radiometal for nuclear (PET/SPECT) imaging or with a paramagnetic metal for MRI imaging. Detailed synthesis, characterization and in vitro evaluation are reported. The availability of dual mode inflammation imaging probe would allow in vivo gross level imaging of inflammation foci as well as ex vivo microscopic level cellular imaging for role played by innate immune cells in inflamed tissue. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Expression of eicosanoid receptors subtypes and eosinophilic inflammation: implication on chronic rhinosinusitis

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    Van Cauwenberge Paul

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eicosanoid receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors playing an important immunomodulatory role in airway diseases. However, there is little information on the expression of these receptors and their link with eosinophilic inflammation in paranasal sinus diseases. We aimed with this study to investigate the tissue expression of leukotrienes and prostaglandin E2 receptors in chronic rhinosinusitis patients and the link of this regulation with eosinophilic inflammation. Methods Samples were prepared from nasal tissue of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis without nasal polyps (CRS, n = 11, with nasal polyps (CRS-NP, n = 13 and healthy subjects (Controls, n = 6. mRNA expression of CysLT1, CysLT2, BLT1, BLT2, E-prostanoid receptors (EP1, EP2, EP3, EP4 and sol-IL-5Rα was determined by real-time PCR. Concentrations of PGE2, LTC4/D4/E4, LTB4 and sol-IL-5Rα were determined by ELISA and of ECP by ImmunoCap. Protein expression and tissue localization of eicosanoid receptors and activated eosinophils were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Results CysLT1 mRNA expression was significantly increased in CRS-NP compared to CRS and controls, and CRS compared to controls, whereas CysLT2 mRNA was enhanced in both CRS groups without differences between them. Levels of both receptors correlated to the number of activated eosinophils, sol-IL-5Rα, ECP and LTC4/D4/E4 concentrations in the disease groups. PGE2 protein concentrations and prostanoid receptors EP1 and EP3 were down-regulated in the CRS-NP tissue vs. CRS and controls, whereas EP2 and EP4 expression was enhanced in CRS and CRS-NP patients vs. controls. No differences in BLT receptors were observed between patients and controls. Conclusion CyLTs receptors are up-regulated in nasal polyp tissue and their expression correlate with eosinophilic inflammation supporting previous results. Eicosanoid receptors mRNA pattern observed suggests that down-regulation of EP1 and EP3 in CRS-NP and

  17. Transcription factor network downstream of protease activated receptors (PARs modulating mouse bladder inflammation

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    Hurst Robert E

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All four PARs are present in the urinary bladder, and their expression is altered during inflammation. In order to search for therapeutic targets other than the receptors themselves, we set forth to determine TFs downstream of PAR activation in the C57BL/6 urinary bladders. Methods For this purpose, we used a protein/DNA combo array containing 345 different TF consensus sequences. Next, the TF selected was validated by EMSA and IHC. As mast cells seem to play a fundamental role in bladder inflammation, we determined whether c-kit receptor deficient (Kitw/Kitw-v mice have an abrogated response to PAR stimulation. Finally, TFEB antibody was used for CHIP/Q-PCR assay and revealed up-regulation of genes known to be downstream of TFEB. Results TFEB, a member of the MiTF family of basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper, was the only TF commonly up-regulated by all PAR-APs. IHC results confirm a correlation between inflammation and TFEB expression in C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, Kitw/Kitw-v mice did not exhibit inflammation in response to PAR activation. EMSA results confirmed the increased TFEB binding activity in C57BL/6 but not in Kitw/Kitw-v mice. Conclusion This is the first report describing the increased expression of TFEB in bladder inflammation in response to PAR activation. As TFEB belongs to a family of TFs essential for mast cell survival, our findings suggest that this molecule may influence the participation of mast cells in PAR-mediated inflammation and that targeting TFEB/MiTF activity may be a novel approach for the treatment of bladder inflammatory disorders.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of human transferrin-stabilized gold nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guével, Xavier; Daum, Nicole; Schneider, Marc

    2011-07-01

    Human transferrin has been biolabelled with gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) using a simple, fast and non-toxic method. These nanocrystals (polyclonal antibody. Additionally, antibody-induced agglomeration demonstrates no alteration in the protein activity and the receptor target ability. MTT and Vialight® Plus tests show no cytotoxicity of these labelled proteins in cells (1 µg ml - 1-1 mg ml - 1). Cell line experiments (A549) indicate also an uptake of the iron loaded fluorescent proteins inside cells. These remarkable data highlight the potential of a new type of non-toxic fluorescent transferrin for imaging and targeting.

  19. Transferrin iron uptake is stimulated by ascorbate via an intracellular reductive mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Darius J R; Chikhani, Sherin; Richardson, Vera; Richardson, Des R

    2013-06-01

    Although ascorbate has long been known to stimulate dietary iron (Fe) absorption and non-transferrin Fe uptake, the role of ascorbate in transferrin Fe uptake is unknown. Transferrin is a serum Fe transport protein supplying almost all cellular Fe under physiological conditions. We sought to examine ascorbate's role in this process, particularly as cultured cells are typically ascorbate-deficient. At typical plasma concentrations, ascorbate significantly increased (59)Fe uptake from transferrin by 1.5-2-fold in a range of cells. Moreover, ascorbate enhanced ferritin expression and increased (59)Fe accumulation in ferritin. The lack of effect of cycloheximide or the cytosolic aconitase inhibitor, oxalomalate, on ascorbate-mediated (59)Fe uptake from transferrin indicate increased ferritin synthesis or cytosolic aconitase activity was not responsible for ascorbate's activity. Experiments with membrane-permeant and -impermeant ascorbate-oxidizing reagents indicate that while extracellular ascorbate is required for stimulation of (59)Fe uptake from (59)Fe-citrate, only intracellular ascorbate is needed for transferrin (59)Fe uptake. Additionally, experiments with l-ascorbate analogs indicate ascorbate's reducing ene-diol moiety is necessary for its stimulatory activity. Importantly, neither N-acetylcysteine nor buthionine sulfoximine, which increase or decrease intracellular glutathione, respectively, affected transferrin-dependent (59)Fe uptake. Thus, ascorbate's stimulatory effect is not due to a general increase in cellular reducing capacity. Ascorbate also did not affect expression of transferrin receptor 1 or (125)I-transferrin cellular flux. However, transferrin receptors, endocytosis, vacuolar-type ATPase activity and endosomal acidification were required for ascorbate's stimulatory activity. Therefore, ascorbate is a novel modulator of the classical transferrin Fe uptake pathway, acting via an intracellular reductive mechanism.

  20. Effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment on transferrin serum levels in patients with chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirmohamadi, Adileh; Chitsazi, Mohamad Taghi; Faramarzi, Masoumeh; Salari, Ashkan; Naser Alavi, Fereshteh; Pashazadeh, Nazila

    2016-01-01

    Background. Transferrin is a negative acute phase protein, which decreases during inflammation and infection. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate changes in the transferrin serum levels subsequent to non-surgical treatment of chronic periodontal disease. Methods. Twenty patients with chronic periodontitis and 20 systemically healthy subjects without periodontal disease, who had referred to Tabriz Faculty of Dentistry, were selected. Transferrin serum levels and clinical periodontal parameters (pocket depth, clinical attachment level, gingival index, bleeding index and plaque index) were measured at baseline and 3 months after non-surgical periodontal treatment. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistical methods (means ± standard deviations). Independent samples t-test was used to compare transferrin serum levels and clinical variables between the test and control groups. Paired samples t-test was used in the test group for comparisons before and after treatment. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results. The mean transferrin serum level in patients with chronic periodontitis (213.1 ± 9.2 mg/dL) was significantly less than that in periodontally healthy subjects (307.8 ± 11.7 mg/dL). Three months after periodontal treatment, the transferrin serum level increased significantly (298.3 ± 7.6 mg/dL) and approached the levels in periodontally healthy subjects (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The decrease and increase in transferrin serum levels with periodontal disease and periodontal treatment, respectively, indicated an inverse relationship between transferrin serum levels and chronic periodontitis.

  1. The CB2 receptor and its role as a regulator of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Caroline; Blanchet, Marie-Renée; Laviolette, Michel; Flamand, Nicolas

    2016-12-01

    The CB2 receptor is the peripheral receptor for cannabinoids. It is mainly expressed in immune tissues, highlighting the possibility that the endocannabinoid system has an immunomodulatory role. In this respect, the CB2 receptor was shown to modulate immune cell functions, both in cellulo and in animal models of inflammatory diseases. In this regard, numerous studies have reported that mice lacking the CB2 receptor have an exacerbated inflammatory phenotype. This suggests that therapeutic strategies aiming at modulating CB2 signaling could be promising for the treatment of various inflammatory conditions. Herein, we review the pharmacology of the CB2 receptor, its expression pattern, and the signaling pathways induced by its activation. We next examine the regulation of immune cell functions by the CB2 receptor and the evidence obtained from primary human cells, immortalized cell lines, and animal models of inflammation. Finally, we discuss the possible therapies targeting the CB2 receptor and the questions that remain to be addressed to determine whether this receptor could be a potential target to treat inflammatory disease.

  2. Complement receptor immunoglobulin: a control point in infection and immunity, inflammation and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Annabelle Grace; Al-Baghdadi, Marwah; Quach, Alex; Hii, Charles; Ferrante, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The B7 family-related protein, V-set and Ig domain (VSIG4) / Z39Ig / complement receptor immunoglobulin (CRIg), is a new player in the regulation of immunity to infection and inflammation. The unique features of this receptor as compared with classical complement receptors, CR3 and CR4, have heralded the emergence of new concepts in the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity. Its selective expression in tissue macrophages and dendritic cells has been considered of importance in host defence and in maintaining tolerance against self-antigens. Although a major receptor for phagocytosis of complement opsonised bacteria, its array of emerging functions which incorporates the immune suppressive and anti-inflammatory action of the receptor have now been realised. Accumulating evidence from mouse experimental models indicates a potential role for CRIg in protection against bacterial infection and inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes and systemic lupus erythematosus, and also in promotion of tumour growth. CRIg expression can be considered as a control point in these diseases, through which inflammatory mediators, including cytokines, act. The ability of CRIg to suppress cytotoxic T cell proliferation and function may underlie its promotion of cancer growth. Thus, the unique properties of this receptor open up new avenues for understanding of the pathways that regulate inflammation during infection, autoimmunity and cancer with the potential for new drug targets to be identified. While some complement receptors may be differently expressed in mice and humans, as well as displaying different properties, mouse CRIg has a structure and function similar to the human receptor, suggesting that extrapolation to human diseases is appropriate. Furthermore, there is emerging evidence in human conditions that CRIg may be a valuable biomarker in infection and immunity, inflammatory conditions and cancer prognosis.

  3. The A2B adenosine receptor protects against inflammation and excessive vascular adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dan; Zhang, Ying; Nguyen, Hao G.; Koupenova, Milka; Chauhan, Anil K.; Makitalo, Maria; Jones, Matthew R.; Hilaire, Cynthia St.; Seldin, David C.; Toselli, Paul; Lamperti, Edward; Schreiber, Barbara M.; Gavras, Haralambos; Wagner, Denisa D.; Ravid, Katya

    2006-01-01

    Adenosine has been described as playing a role in the control of inflammation, but it has not been certain which of its receptors mediate this effect. Here, we generated an A2B adenosine receptor–knockout/reporter gene–knock-in (A2BAR-knockout/reporter gene–knock-in) mouse model and showed receptor gene expression in the vasculature and macrophages, the ablation of which causes low-grade inflammation compared with age-, sex-, and strain-matched control mice. Augmentation of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, and a consequent downregulation of IκB-α are the underlying mechanisms for an observed upregulation of adhesion molecules in the vasculature of these A2BAR-null mice. Intriguingly, leukocyte adhesion to the vasculature is significantly increased in the A2BAR-knockout mice. Exposure to an endotoxin results in augmented proinflammatory cytokine levels in A2BAR-null mice compared with control mice. Bone marrow transplantations indicated that bone marrow (and to a lesser extent vascular) A2BARs regulate these processes. Hence, we identify the A2BAR as a new critical regulator of inflammation and vascular adhesion primarily via signals from hematopoietic cells to the vasculature, focusing attention on the receptor as a therapeutic target. PMID:16823489

  4. Expression of Hepcidin and Ferroportin in the Placenta, and Ferritin and Transferrin Receptor 1 Levels in Maternal and Umbilical Cord Blood in Pregnant Women with and without Gestational Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Anqiang; Zhao, Jun; Lu, Minhua; Gu, Ying; Zhu, Yunlong; Chen, Daozhen; Fu, Jinyan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Regulation of iron transfer from mother to fetus via the placenta is not fully understood and the relationship between stored iron status in the mothers’ serum and gestational diabetes (GDM) in case–control studies is controversial. The present study aimed to detect circulating soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) and ferritin levels in maternal and umbilical cord blood. We also examined the expression of hepcidin (Hep), transferrin receptor (TfR1), and ferroportin (FPN) in the placenta in pregnant women with and without GDM at full term. Methods: Eighty-two women participated (42 with GDM and 40 without GDM [controls]). Maternal samples were collected at 37–39 weeks’ gestation. Umbilical cord blood was collected at birth. Ferritin and sTfR levels in maternal serum and umbilical cord blood, and Hep, TfR1, and FPN protein expression in plac enta were compared between the GDM and non-GDM groups. Serum ferritin (SF) was measured by electrochemiluminescence assay and sTfR was measured by ELISA. Hep, TfR1, and FPN expression was measured by immunohistochemistry. Results: Maternal serum sTfR levels were significantly elevated in the GDM group compared with the non-GDM group (p = 0.003). SF levels in cord blood in the GDM group were significantly higher than those in the non-GDM group (p = 0.003). However, maternal hemoglobin and SF, and umbilical cord sTfR levels were not different between the groups. In placental tissue, FPN expression was higher and hepcidin expression was lower in the GDM group compared with the non-GDM group (p = 0.000 and p = 0.044, respectively). There was no significant difference in TfR1 between the groups (p = 0.898). Conclusions: Women with GDM transport iron more actively than those without GDM at term pregnancy. Maternal iron metabolism in GDM may play a role in fetal/placental iron demand and in the overall outcome of pregnancy. PMID:27483296

  5. Transferrin-mediated cellular iron delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Ashley N; Mason, Anne B

    2012-01-01

    Essential to iron homeostasis is the transport of iron by the bilobal protein human serum transferrin (hTF). Each lobe (N- and C-lobe) of hTF forms a deep cleft which binds a single Fe(3+). Iron-bearing hTF in the blood binds tightly to the specific transferrin receptor (TFR), a homodimeric transmembrane protein. After undergoing endocytosis, acidification of the endosome initiates the release of Fe(3+) from hTF in a TFR-mediated process. Iron-free hTF remains tightly bound to the TFR at acidic pH; following recycling back to the cell surface, it is released to sequester more iron. Efficient delivery of iron is critically dependent on hTF/TFR interactions. Therefore, identification of the pH-specific contacts between hTF and the TFR is crucial. Recombinant protein production has enabled deconvolution of this complex system. The studies reviewed herein support a model in which pH-induced interrelated events control receptor-stimulated iron release from each lobe of hTF. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of human transferrin-stabilized gold nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guevel, Xavier; Schneider, Marc [Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology, Saarland University, Saarbruecken (Germany); Daum, Nicole, E-mail: Marc.Schneider@mx.uni-saarland.de [Drug Delivery, Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS), Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2011-07-08

    Human transferrin has been biolabelled with gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) using a simple, fast and non-toxic method. These nanocrystals (<2 nm) are stabilized in the protein via sulfur groups and have a high fluorescence emission in the near infrared region (QY = 4.3%; {lambda}{sub em} = 695 nm). Structural investigation and photophysical measurements show a high population of clusters formed of 22-33 gold atoms covalently bound to the transferrin. In solutions with pH ranging from 5 to 10 and in buffer solutions (PBS, HEPES), those biolabelled proteins exhibit a good stability. No significant quenching effect of the fluorescent transferrin has been detected after iron loading of iron-free transferrin (apoTf) and in the presence of a specific polyclonal antibody. Additionally, antibody-induced agglomeration demonstrates no alteration in the protein activity and the receptor target ability. MTT and Vialight Plus tests show no cytotoxicity of these labelled proteins in cells (1 {mu}g ml{sup -1}-1 mg ml{sup -1}). Cell line experiments (A549) indicate also an uptake of the iron loaded fluorescent proteins inside cells. These remarkable data highlight the potential of a new type of non-toxic fluorescent transferrin for imaging and targeting.

  7. AGE and their receptor RAGE in systemic autoimmune diseases : An inflammation propagating factor contributing to accelerated atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienhuis, Hans L. A.; Westra, Johanna; Smit, Andries J.; Limburg, Pieter C.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.; Bijl, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are associated with inflammation, and oxidative stress favouring the formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGE), able to modulate cellular functions by activation of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE). As RAGE expression is increased in an

  8. AGE and their receptor RAGE in systemic autoimmune diseases : An inflammation propagating factor contributing to accelerated atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienhuis, Hans L. A.; Westra, Johanna; Smit, Andries J.; Limburg, Pieter C.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.; Bijl, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are associated with inflammation, and oxidative stress favouring the formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGE), able to modulate cellular functions by activation of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE). As RAGE expression is increased in an inflamma

  9. Chronic allergic pulmonary inflammation is aggravated in angiotensin-(1-7) Mas receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Giselle S; Rodrigues-Machado, Maria Glória; Motta-Santos, Daisy; Alenina, Natalia; Bader, Michael; Santos, Robson A; Barcelos, Lucíola S; Campagnole-Santos, Maria José

    2016-12-01

    The angiotensin-(1-7) [ANG-(1-7)]/Mas receptor pathway is currently recognized as a counterbalancing mechanism of the renin-angiotensin system in different pathophysiological conditions. We have previously described that treatment with ANG-(1-7) attenuates lung inflammation and remodeling in an experimental model of asthma. In the present study, we investigated whether lack of the Mas receptor could alter the inflammatory response in a model of chronic allergic lung inflammation induced by ovalbumin (OVA). Mas receptor wild-type (MasWT) and knockout (MasKO) mice were subjected to four doses of OVA (20 μg/mice ip) with a 14-day interval. At the 21st day, nebulization with OVA (1%) was started, three times per week until the 46th day. Control groups received saline (0.9% ip) and were nebulized with saline (0.9%). MasWT-OVA developed a modest inflammatory response and minor pulmonary remodeling to OVA challenge. Strikingly, MasKO-OVA presented a significant increase in inflammatory cell infiltrate, increase in extracellular matrix deposition, increase in thickening of the alveolar parenchyma, increase in thickening of the smooth muscle layer of the pulmonary arterioles, increase in proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels in the lungs, characteristic of chronic asthma. Additionally, MasKO-OVA presented an increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation compared with MasWT-OVA. Furthermore, MasKO-OVA showed a worse performance in a test of maximum physical exercise compared with MasWT-OVA. Our study shows that effects triggered by the Mas receptor are important to attenuate the inflammatory and remodeling processes in a model of allergic lung inflammation in mice. Our data indicate that impairment of the ANG-(1-7)/Mas receptor pathway may lead to worsening of the pathophysiological changes of asthma. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Toll-like receptor 2 regulates organic dust-induced airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Jill A; Wyatt, Todd A; Kielian, Tammy; Oldenburg, Peter; Gleason, Angela M; Bauer, Ashley; Golden, Gregory; West, William W; Sisson, Joseph H; Romberger, Debra J

    2011-10-01

    Organic dust exposure in agricultural environments results in significant airway inflammatory diseases. Gram-positive cell wall components are present in high concentrations in animal farming dusts, but their role in mediating dust-induced airway inflammation is not clear. This study investigated the role of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, a pattern recognition receptor for gram-positive cell wall products, in regulating swine facility organic dust extract (DE)-induced airway inflammation in mice. Isolated lung macrophages from TLR2 knockout mice demonstrated reduced TNF-α, IL-6, keratinocyte chemoattractant/CXCL1, but not macrophage inflammatory protein-2/CXCL2 expression, after DE stimulation ex vivo. Next, using an established mouse model of intranasal inhalation challenge, we analyzed bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue in TLR2-deficient and wild-type (WT) mice after single and repetitive DE challenge. Neutrophil influx and select cytokines/chemokines were significantly lower in TLR2-deficient mice at 5 and 24 hours after single DE challenge. After daily exposure to DE for 2 weeks, there were significant reductions in total cellularity, neutrophil influx, and TNF-α, IL-6, CXCL1, but not CXCL2 expression, in TLR2-deficient mice as compared with WT animals. Lung pathology revealed that bronchiolar inflammation, but not alveolar inflammation, was reduced in TLR2-deficient mice after repetitive exposure. Airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine after dust exposure was similar in both groups. Finally, airway inflammatory responses in WT mice after challenge with a TLR2 agonist, peptidoglycan, resembled DE-induced responses. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the TLR2 pathway is important in regulating swine facility organic dust-induced airway inflammation, which suggests the importance of TLR2 agonists in mediating large animal farming-induced airway inflammatory responses.

  11. A useful relationship between the presence of extramedullary erythropoeisis and the level of the soluble form of the transferrin receptor in a large cohort of adult patients with thalassemia intermedia: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricchi, Paolo; Ammirabile, Massimiliano; Costantini, Silvia; Di Matola, Tiziana; Verna, Roberto; Diano, Alvaro; Foglia, Maria Carmela; Spasiano, Anna; Cinque, Patrizia; Prossomariti, Luciano

    2012-06-01

    In thalassemia intermedia (TI), the increase in bone marrow hemopoietic activity frequently leads to extramedullary erythropoeisis (EMH), but its relationship with the soluble form of transferrin receptor (sTfR) which fully reflects the marrow erythropoietic activity, has not yet been explored. From January 2007 to December 2010, all TI patients attending at our center were prospectively enrolled to undergo sTfR assay and MRI or CT (if claustrophobic) scan evaluation for the presence of paraspinal EMH. A total of 59 patients with TI were studied; EMH involved 23 (39%) patients; overall, the concentration of sTfR varied from 2.6 to 20.6 (mean = 8.7) mg/L, but in splenectomized group and in unsplenectomized group, it varied from 4.2 to 17.8 (mean ± SD = 9.86 ± 3.33) mg/L and from 2.6 to 20.6 (mean ± SD = 7.25 ± 3.9) mg/L, respectively with a statistically significant intergroup difference (p < 0.01). The cutoff point at 8.6 mg/L using the ROC curve showed a sensitivity of 78.3% and a specificity of 72.2%, in predicting EMH but, in unsplenectomized subgroup, they raised to 100% and 90.9%, respectively. These data showed that in TI the level of sTfR could represent a predictive factor of EMH particularly in patients with spleen.

  12. Effects of transferrin on aromatase activity in porcine granulosa cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Duda

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Proliferating cells have an absolute requirement for iron, which is delivered by transferrin with subsequent intracellular transport via the transferrin receptor. Recent studies have reported that transferrin plays a crucial role in the local regulation of ovarian function, apart from its iron-binding characteristic. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to explore the possible role of transferrin in porcine granulosa cells function by examining its influence on aromatase activity, the most important indicator of follicular cell differentiation. In the first series of studies, pig granulosa cells isolated from small, immature follicles were cultured in the presence of transferrin alone (10 microg/ml or 100 microg/ml or with the addition of FSH (100ng/ml. The second series of studies was undertaken to determine transferrin-stimulated granulosa cells ability to aromatize exogenous testosterone (1x10(-7M. One hour after the establishment of cultures an aromatase inhibitor CGS16949A was added to test its influence on estradiol production. After 48 hours, cultures were terminated and cells were processed for immunocytochemical staining of aromatase. Media were frozen for further estradiol level analysis. Positive immunostaining for aromatase was found in all granulosa cell cultures. The intensity of immunostaining was always stronger in cultures supplemented with FSH whereas the addition of transferrin had no effect. Granulosa cells in vitro synthesized the highest amount of estradiol after the addition of FSH and exogenous testosterone as measured radioimmunologically. Concomitant treatment with FSH and transferrin caused an inhibition of FSH-stimulated aromatase activity. The production of estradiol also declined in the presence of FSH, testosterone and transferrin. This study demonstrates that transferrin had a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on FSH-stimulated aromatase activity, which was confirmed by radioimmunoassay. Our results indicate

  13. Mas receptor deficiency exacerbates lipopolysaccharide-induced cerebral and systemic inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Lima, Onésia C; Pinto, Mauro C X; Duchene, Johan; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Souza, Laura L; Alenina, Natalia; Bader, Michael; Santos, Robson A S; Carvalho-Tavares, Juliana

    2015-12-01

    Beyond the classical actions of the renin-angiotensin system on the regulation of cardiovascular homeostasis, several studies have shown its involvement in acute and chronic inflammation. The G protein-coupled receptor Mas is a functional binding site for the angiotensin-(1-7); however, its role in the immune system has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we evaluated the effect of genetic deletion of Mas receptor in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced systemic and cerebral inflammation in mice. Inflammatory response was triggered in Mas deficient (Mas(-/-)) and C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice (8-12 weeks-old) by intraperitoneal injection of LPS (5 mg/kg). Mas(-/-) mice presented more intense hypothermia compared to WT mice 24 h after LPS injection. Systemically, the bone marrow of Mas(-/-) mice contained a lower number of neutrophils and monocytes 3 h and 24 h after LPS injection, respectively. The plasma levels of inflammatory mediators KC, MCP-1 and IL-10 were higher in Mas(-/-) mice 24 h after LPS injection in comparison to WT. In the brain, Mas(-/-) animals had a significant increase in the number of adherent leukocytes to the brain microvasculature compared to WT mice, as well as, increased number of monocytes and neutrophils recruited to the pia-mater. The elevated number of adherent leukocytes on brain microvasculature in Mas(-/-) mice was associated with increased expression of CD11b - the alpha-subunit of the Mac-1 integrin - in bone marrow neutrophils 3h after LPS injection, and with increased brain levels of chemoattractants KC, MIP-2 and MCP-1, 24 h later. In conclusion, we demonstrated that Mas receptor deficiency results in exacerbated inflammation in LPS-challenged mice, which suggest a potential role for the Mas receptor as a regulator of systemic and brain inflammatory response induced by LPS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Minireview: nuclear receptor coregulators of the p160 family: insights into inflammation and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, David A; Coppo, Maddalena; Rogatsky, Inez

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear receptor coactivators (NCOAs) are multifunctional transcriptional coregulators for a growing number of signal-activated transcription factors. The members of the p160 family (NCOA1/2/3) are increasingly recognized as essential and nonredundant players in a number of physiological processes. In particular, accumulating evidence points to the pivotal roles that these coregulators play in inflammatory and metabolic pathways, both under homeostasis and in disease. Given that chronic inflammation of metabolic tissues ("metainflammation") is a driving force for the widespread epidemic of obesity, insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, and associated comorbidities, deciphering the role of NCOAs in "normal" vs "pathological" inflammation and in metabolic processes is indeed a subject of extreme biomedical importance. Here, we review the evolving and, at times, contradictory, literature on the pleiotropic functions of NCOA1/2/3 in inflammation and metabolism as related to nuclear receptor actions and beyond. We then briefly discuss the potential utility of NCOAs as predictive markers for disease and/or possible therapeutic targets once a better understanding of their molecular and physiological actions is achieved.

  15. Chemokine Receptor Ccr6 Deficiency Alters Hepatic Inflammatory Cell Recruitment and Promotes Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Affò

    Full Text Available Chronic liver diseases are characterized by a sustained inflammatory response in which chemokines and chemokine-receptors orchestrate inflammatory cell recruitment. In this study we investigated the role of the chemokine receptor CCR6 in acute and chronic liver injury. In the absence of liver injury Ccr6-/- mice presented a higher number of hepatic macrophages and increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and M1 markers Tnf-α, Il6 and Mcp1. Inflammation and cell recruitment were increased after carbon tetrachloride-induced acute liver injury in Ccr6-/- mice. Moreover, chronic liver injury by carbon tetrachloride in Ccr6-/- mice was associated with enhanced inflammation and fibrosis, altered macrophage recruitment, enhanced CD4+ cells and a reduction in Th17 (CD4+IL17+ and mature dendritic (MHCII+CD11c+ cells recruitment. Clodronate depletion of macrophages in Ccr6-/- mice resulted in a reduction of hepatic pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrogenic markers in the absence and after liver injury. Finally, increased CCR6 hepatic expression in patients with alcoholic hepatitis was found to correlate with liver expression of CCL20 and severity of liver disease. In conclusion, CCR6 deficiency affects hepatic inflammatory cell recruitment resulting in the promotion of hepatic inflammation and fibrosis.

  16. Chemokine Receptor Ccr6 Deficiency Alters Hepatic Inflammatory Cell Recruitment and Promotes Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affò, Silvia; Rodrigo-Torres, Daniel; Blaya, Delia; Morales-Ibanez, Oriol; Coll, Mar; Millán, Cristina; Altamirano, José; Arroyo, Vicente; Caballería, Joan; Bataller, Ramón; Ginès, Pere; Sancho-Bru, Pau

    2015-01-01

    Chronic liver diseases are characterized by a sustained inflammatory response in which chemokines and chemokine-receptors orchestrate inflammatory cell recruitment. In this study we investigated the role of the chemokine receptor CCR6 in acute and chronic liver injury. In the absence of liver injury Ccr6-/- mice presented a higher number of hepatic macrophages and increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and M1 markers Tnf-α, Il6 and Mcp1. Inflammation and cell recruitment were increased after carbon tetrachloride-induced acute liver injury in Ccr6-/- mice. Moreover, chronic liver injury by carbon tetrachloride in Ccr6-/- mice was associated with enhanced inflammation and fibrosis, altered macrophage recruitment, enhanced CD4+ cells and a reduction in Th17 (CD4+IL17+) and mature dendritic (MHCII+CD11c+) cells recruitment. Clodronate depletion of macrophages in Ccr6-/- mice resulted in a reduction of hepatic pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrogenic markers in the absence and after liver injury. Finally, increased CCR6 hepatic expression in patients with alcoholic hepatitis was found to correlate with liver expression of CCL20 and severity of liver disease. In conclusion, CCR6 deficiency affects hepatic inflammatory cell recruitment resulting in the promotion of hepatic inflammation and fibrosis.

  17. Chemokine Receptor Ccr6 Deficiency Alters Hepatic Inflammatory Cell Recruitment and Promotes Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaya, Delia; Morales-Ibanez, Oriol; Coll, Mar; Millán, Cristina; Altamirano, José; Arroyo, Vicente; Caballería, Joan; Bataller, Ramón; Ginès, Pere; Sancho-Bru, Pau

    2015-01-01

    Chronic liver diseases are characterized by a sustained inflammatory response in which chemokines and chemokine-receptors orchestrate inflammatory cell recruitment. In this study we investigated the role of the chemokine receptor CCR6 in acute and chronic liver injury. In the absence of liver injury Ccr6-/- mice presented a higher number of hepatic macrophages and increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and M1 markers Tnf-α, Il6 and Mcp1. Inflammation and cell recruitment were increased after carbon tetrachloride-induced acute liver injury in Ccr6-/- mice. Moreover, chronic liver injury by carbon tetrachloride in Ccr6-/- mice was associated with enhanced inflammation and fibrosis, altered macrophage recruitment, enhanced CD4+ cells and a reduction in Th17 (CD4+IL17+) and mature dendritic (MHCII+CD11c+) cells recruitment. Clodronate depletion of macrophages in Ccr6-/- mice resulted in a reduction of hepatic pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrogenic markers in the absence and after liver injury. Finally, increased CCR6 hepatic expression in patients with alcoholic hepatitis was found to correlate with liver expression of CCL20 and severity of liver disease. In conclusion, CCR6 deficiency affects hepatic inflammatory cell recruitment resulting in the promotion of hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:26691857

  18. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Promotes Cardiac Inflammation and Heart Failure during Polymicrobial Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Lohner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Aim was to elucidate the role of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9 in cardiac inflammation and septic heart failure in a murine model of polymicrobial sepsis. Methods. Sepsis was induced via colon ascendens stent peritonitis (CASP in C57BL/6 wild-type (WT and TLR9-deficient (TLR9-D mice. Bacterial load in the peritoneal cavity and cardiac expression of inflammatory mediators were determined at 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 h. Eighteen hours after CASP cardiac function was monitored in vivo. Sarcomere length of isolated cardiomyocytes was measured at 0.5 to 10 Hz after incubation with heat-inactivated bacteria. Results. CASP led to continuous release of bacteria into the peritoneal cavity, an increase of cytokines, and differential regulation of receptors of innate immunity in the heart. Eighteen hours after CASP WT mice developed septic heart failure characterised by reduction of end-systolic pressure, stroke volume, cardiac output, and parameters of contractility. This coincided with reduced cardiomyocyte sarcomere shortening. TLR9 deficiency resulted in significant reduction of cardiac inflammation and a sustained heart function. This was consistent with reduced mortality in TLR9-D compared to WT mice. Conclusions. In polymicrobial sepsis TLR9 signalling is pivotal to cardiac inflammation and septic heart failure.

  19. Potential of the cannabinoid CB(2) receptor as a pharmacological target against inflammation in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Gálvez, Yolanda; Palomo-Garo, Cristina; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; García, Concepción

    2016-01-04

    Inflammation is an important pathogenic factor in Parkinson's disease (PD), so that it can contribute to kill dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra and to enhance the dopaminergic denervation of the striatum. The cannabinoid type-2 (CB2) receptor has been investigated as a potential anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective target in different neurodegenerative disorders, but still limited evidence has been collected in PD. Here, we show for the first time that CB2 receptors are elevated in microglial cells recruited and activated at lesioned sites in the substantia nigra of PD patients compared to control subjects. Parkinsonian inflammation can be reproduced experimentally in rodents by intrastriatal injections of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) which, through an intense activation of glial elements and peripheral infiltration, provokes a rapid deterioration of the striatum that may extend to the substantia nigra too. Using this experimental model, we recently described a much more intense deterioration of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-containing nigral neurons in CB2 receptor-deficient mice compared to wild-type animals, supporting a potential neuroprotective role for this receptor. In the present study, we further explored this issue. First, we found elevated levels of the CB2 receptor measured by qRT-PCR in the striatum and substantia nigra of LPS-lesioned mice, as well as an increase in the immunostaining for this receptor in the LPS-lesioned striatum. Second, we found a significant increase in CD68 immunostaining, which serve to identify activated microglia and also infiltrated peripheral macrophages, in these brain structures in response to LPS insult, which was much more intense in CB2 receptor-deficient mice in the case of the substantia nigra. Next, we observed that the activation of CB2 receptors with a selective agonist (HU-308) reversed LPS-induced elevation of CD68 immunostaining in the striatum and the parallel reduction in TH immunostaining. Lastly, we

  20. In vitro inflammation inhibition model based on semi-continuous toll-like receptor biosensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Woo Jeon

    Full Text Available A chemical inhibition model of inflammation is proposed by semi-continuous monitoring the density of toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1 expressed on mammalian cells following bacterial infection to investigate an in vivo-mimicked drug screening system. The inflammation was induced by adding bacterial lysate (e.g., Pseudomonas aeruginosa to a mammalian cell culture (e.g., A549 cell line. The TLR1 density on the same cells was immunochemically monitored up to three cycles under optimized cyclic bacterial stimulation-and-restoration conditions. The assay was carried out by adopting a cell-compatible immunoanalytical procedure and signal generation method. Signal intensity relative to the background control obtained without stimulation was employed to plot the standard curve for inflammation. To suppress the inflammatory response, sodium salicylate, which inhibits nuclear factor-κB activity, was used to prepare the standard curve for anti-inflammation. Such measurement of differential TLR densities was used as a biosensing approach discriminating the anti-inflammatory substance from the non-effector, which was simulated by using caffeic acid phenethyl ester and acetaminophen as the two components, respectively. As the same cells exposed to repetitive bacterial stimulation were semi-continuously monitored, the efficacy and toxicity of the inhibitors may further be determined regarding persistency against time. Therefore, this semi-continuous biosensing model could be appropriate as a substitute for animal-based experimentation during drug screening prior to pre-clinical tests.

  1. The role of serotonin and its receptors in activation of immune responses and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shajib, M S; Khan, W I

    2015-03-01

    Serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is a neurotransmitter and hormone that contributes to the regulation of various physiological functions by its actions in the central nervous system (CNS) and in the respective organ systems. Peripheral 5-HT is predominantly produced by enterochromaffin (EC) cells of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. These gut-resident cells produce much more 5-HT than all neuronal and other sources combined, establishing EC cells as the main source of this biogenic amine in the human body. Peripheral 5-HT is also a potent immune modulator and affects various immune cells through its receptors and via the recently identified process of serotonylation. Alterations in 5-HT signalling have been described in inflammatory conditions of the gut, such as inflammatory bowel disease. The association between 5-HT and inflammation, however, is not limited to the gut, as changes in 5-HT levels have also been reported in patients with allergic airway inflammation and rheumatoid arthritis. Based on searches for terms such as '5-HT', 'EC cell', 'immune cells' and 'inflammation' in pubmed.gov as well as by utilizing pertinent reviews, the current review aims to provide an update on the role of 5-HT in biological functions with a particular focus on immune activation and inflammation.

  2. The role of Toll-like receptor 2 in inflammation and fibrosis during progressive renal injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaklien C Leemans

    Full Text Available Tissue fibrosis and chronic inflammation are common causes of progressive organ damage, including progressive renal disease, leading to loss of physiological functions. Recently, it was shown that Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 is expressed in the kidney and activated by endogenous danger signals. The expression and function of TLR2 during renal fibrosis and chronic inflammation has however not yet been elucidated. Therefore, we studied TLR2 expression in human and murine progressive renal diseases and explored its role by inducing obstructive nephropathy in TLR2(-/- or TLR2(+/+ mice. We found that TLR2 is markedly upregulated on tubular and tubulointerstitial cells in patients with chronic renal injury. In mice with obstructive nephropathy, renal injury was associated with a marked upregulation and change in distribution of TLR2 and upregulation of murine TLR2 danger ligands Gp96, biglycan, and HMGB1. Notably, TLR2 enhanced inflammation as reflected by a significantly reduced influx of neutrophils and production of chemokines and TGF-beta in kidneys of TLR2(-/- mice compared with TLR2(+/+ animals. Although, the obstructed kidneys of TLR2(-/- mice had less interstitial myofibroblasts in the later phase of obstructive nephropathy, tubular injury and renal matrix accumulation was similar in both mouse strains. Together, these data demonstrate that TLR2 can initiate renal inflammation during progressive renal injury and that the absence of TLR2 does not affect the development of chronic renal injury and fibrosis.

  3. Toll-like receptor signaling in neonatal sepsis and inflammation: a matter of orchestration and conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Kirsten; Speer, Christian P

    2013-12-01

    Altered neonatal Toll-like receptor (TLR) function is hypothesized to contribute to the heightened susceptibility to infection and perpetuated inflammation in term and preterm neonates, clinically evident in neonatal sepsis and increased rates of inflammatory disorders. Current data indicate that basal TLR expression in term neonates equals adult expression patterns, while expression in preterm infants seems to increase, depending on gestational age. Regarding TLR signaling, some studies suggest TLR incompetence in neonates associated with impaired pro-inflammatory responses, others describe neonatal TLR function well developed and allude to its hyper-inflammation tendency. We discuss the competing positions and considerable limitations of research approaches and conclude that neonatal innate immunity is not generally less able to respond to TLR stimulation. Moreover, we describe pre-conditioning factors other than immaturity having a comparable impact. In the long term, better understanding of the complex interplay of pre- and postnatal conditions and maturation-dependent neonatal TLR function may provide new therapeutic approaches.

  4. Ligustrazine attenuates inflammation and the associated chemokines and receptors in ovalbumine-induced mouse asthma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ying; Liu, Jiaqi; Zhang, Hongying; Du, Xin; Luo, Qingli; Sun, Jing; Liu, Feng; Li, Mihui; Xu, Fei; Wei, Kai; Dong, Jingcheng

    2016-09-01

    Ligustrazine which is isolated from Chinese herb ligusticum chuanxiong hort, has been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for asthma treatment. In this study, we aim to observe the effect of ligustrazine on inflammation and the associated chemokines and receptors in ovalbumin (OVA)-induced mouse asthma model. Our data demonstrates that ligustrazine suppresses airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine and lung inflammation in OVA-induced mouse asthma model. Ligustrazine also induces inhibition of inflammatory cells including neutrophils, lymphocytes and eosinophils. In addition, ligustrazine significantly reduces IL-4, IL-5, IL-17A, CCL3, CCL19 and CCL21 level in BALF of asthma mice. Furthermore, ligustrazine induces down-regulation of CCL19 receptor CCR7, STAT3 and p38 MAPK protein expression. Collectively, these results suggest that ligustrazine is effective in attenuation of allergic airway inflammatory changes and related chemokines and receptors in OVA-induced asthma model, and this action might be associated with inhibition of STAT3 and p38 MAPK pathway, which indicates that ligustrazine may be used as a potential therapeutic method to treat asthma.

  5. Antagonism of the prostaglandin D2 receptor CRTH2 attenuates asthma pathology in mouse eosinophilic airway inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uller, Lena; Mathiesen, Jesper Mosolff; Alenmyr, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mast cell-derived prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), may contribute to eosinophilic inflammation and mucus production in allergic asthma. Chemoattractant receptor homologous molecule expressed on TH2 cells (CRTH2), a high affinity receptor for prostaglandin D2, mediates trafficking of TH2-cells...

  6. The nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor antagonist UFP-101 reduces microvascular inflammation to lipopolysaccharide in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoë L S Brookes

    Full Text Available Microvascular inflammation occurs during sepsis and the endogenous opioid-like peptide nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ is known to regulate inflammation. This study aimed to determine the inflammatory role of N/OFQ and its receptor NOP (ORL1 within the microcirculation, along with anti-inflammatory effects of the NOP antagonist UFP-101 (University of Ferrara Peptide-101 in an animal model of sepsis (endotoxemia. Male Wistar rats (220 to 300 g were administered lipopolysaccharide (LPS for 24 h (-24 h, 1 mg kg(-1; -2 h, 1 mg kg(-1 i.v., tail vein. They were then either anesthetised for observation of the mesenteric microcirculation using fluorescent in vivo microscopy, or isolated arterioles (~200 µm were studied in vitro with pressure myography. 200 nM kg(-1 fluorescently labelled N/OFQ (FITC-N/OFQ, i.a., mesenteric artery bound to specific sites on the microvascular endothelium in vivo, indicating sparse distribution of NOP receptors. In vitro, arterioles (~200 µm dilated to intraluminal N/OFQ (10(-5M (32.6 + 8.4% and this response was exaggerated with LPS (62.0 +7.9%, p=0.031. In vivo, LPS induced macromolecular leak of FITC-BSA (0.02 g kg(-1 i.v. (LPS: 95.3 (86.7 to 97.9%, p=0.043 from post-capillary venules (<40 µm and increased leukocyte rolling as endotoxemia progressed (p=0.027, both being reduced by 150 nmol kg(-1 UFP-101 (i.v., jugular vein. Firstly, the rat mesenteric microcirculation expresses NOP receptors and secondly, NOP function (ability to induce dilation is enhanced with LPS. UFP-101 also reduced microvascular inflammation to endotoxemia in vivo. Hence inhibition of the microvascular N/OFQ-NOP pathway may have therapeutic potential during sepsis and warrants further investigation.

  7. Sleep deprivation and divergent toll-like receptor-4 activation of cellular inflammation in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Judith E; Carrillo, Carmen; Olmstead, Richard; Witarama, Tuff; Breen, Elizabeth C; Yokomizo, Megumi; Seeman, Teresa; Irwin, Michael R

    2015-02-01

    Sleep disturbance and aging are associated with increases in inflammation, as well as increased risk of infectious disease. However, there is limited understanding of the role of sleep loss on age-related differences in immune responses. This study examines the effects of sleep deprivation on toll-like receptor activation of monocytic inflammation in younger compared to older adults. Community-dwelling adults (n = 70) who were categorized as younger (25-39 y old, n = 21) and older (60-84 y old, n = 49) participants, underwent a sleep laboratory-based experimental partial sleep deprivation (PSD) protocol including adaptation, an uninterrupted night of sleep, sleep deprivation (sleep restricted to 03:00-07:00), and recovery. Blood samples were obtained each morning to measure toll-like receptor-4 activation of monocyte intracellular production of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Partial sleep deprivation induced a significant increase in the production of IL-6 and/or TNF-α that persisted after a night of recovery sleep (F(2,121.2) = 3.8, P sleep loss, such that younger adults had an increase in inflammatory cytokine production that was not present in older adults (F(2,121.2) = 4.0, P sleep loss. Whereas sleep loss increases cellular inflammation in younger adults and may contribute to inflammatory disorders, blunted toll-like receptor activation in older adults may increase the risk of infectious disease seen with aging. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  8. Prostaglandin receptor EP2 in the crosshairs of anti-inflammation, anti-cancer, and neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jianxiong; Dingledine, Ray

    2013-07-01

    Modulation of a specific prostanoid synthase or receptor provides therapeutic alternatives to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for treating pathological conditions governed by cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 or PTGS2). Among the COX-2 downstream signaling pathways, the prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) receptor EP2 subtype (PTGER2) is emerging as a crucial mediator of many physiological and pathological events. Genetic ablation strategies and recent advances in chemical biology provide tools for a better understanding of EP2 signaling. In the brain, the EP2 receptor modulates some beneficial effects, including neuroprotection, in acute models of excitotoxicity, neuroplasticity, and spatial learning via cAMP-PKA signaling. Conversely, EP2 activation accentuates chronic inflammation mainly through the cAMP-Epac pathway, likely contributing to delayed neurotoxicity. EP2 receptor activation also engages β-arrestin in a G-protein-independent pathway that promotes tumor cell growth and migration. Understanding the conditions under which multiple EP2 signaling pathways are engaged might suggest novel therapeutic strategies to target this key inflammatory prostaglandin receptor.

  9. Allosteric modulation of sigma-1 receptors by SKF83959 inhibits microglia-mediated inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhuang; Li, Linlang; Zheng, Long-Tai; Xu, Zhihong; Guo, Lin; Zhen, Xuechu

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that sigma-1 receptor orthodox agonists can inhibit neuroinflammation. SKF83959 (3-methyl-6-chloro-7,8-hydroxy-1-[3-methylphenyl]-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine), an atypical dopamine receptor-1 agonist, has been recently identified as a potent allosteric modulator of sigma-1 receptor. Here, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of SKF83959 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 microglia. Our results indicated that SKF83959 significantly suppressed the expression/release of the pro-inflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and inhibited the generation of reactive oxygen species. All of these responses were blocked by selective sigma-1 receptor antagonists (BD1047 or BD1063) and by ketoconazole (an inhibitor of enzyme cytochrome c17 to inhibit the synthesis of endogenous dehydroepiandrosterone, DHEA). Additionally, we found that SKF83959 promoted the binding activity of DHEA with sigma-1 receptors, and enhanced the inhibitory effects of DHEA on LPS-induced microglia activation in a synergic manner. Furthermore, in a microglia-conditioned media system, SKF83959 inhibited the cytotoxicity of conditioned medium generated by LPS-activated microglia toward HT-22 neuroblastoma cells. Taken together, our study provides the first evidence that allosteric modulation of sigma-1 receptors by SKF83959 inhibits microglia-mediated inflammation. SKF83959 is a potent allosteric modulator of sigma-1 receptor. Our results indicated that SKF83959 enhanced the activity of endogenous dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in a synergic manner, and inhibited the activation of BV2 microglia and the expression/release of the pro-inflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS).

  10. Monocyte and plasma expression of TAM ligand and receptor in renal failure: Links to unregulated immunity and chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Iris J; Hilliard, Brendan A; Ulas, Mehriban; Yu, Daohai; Vangala, Chandan; Rao, Swati; Lee, Jean; Gadegbeku, Crystal A; Cohen, Philip L

    2015-06-01

    Chronic inflammation is increased in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and contributes to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Specific immune mechanisms and pathways that drive and maintain chronic inflammation in CKD are not well described. The TAM ligands (Gas6 and protein S) and receptors (Axl and Mer) have been recently recognized as playing a prominent role in immune regulation. The receptors exist in both soluble and cell-bound forms; the soluble receptors (sAxl and sMer) are believed to compete with the bound receptors and thus inhibit their function. In this study, we determined the expression of cell-bound and soluble TAM proteins in patients with CKD. CKD patients had significantly lower expression of Mer in monocytes, yet increased expression of soluble TAM receptors sAxl and sMer in plasma compared to controls. The metalloproteinase ADAM 17, responsible for cleavage of Mer to its soluble form, was increased in patient monocytes. Elevated levels of soluble TAM receptors were more evident in patients with progressive renal failure. These observations suggest that functional deficiency of TAM receptor-mediated regulation of inflammation may contribute to chronic inflammation in patients with CKD.

  11. The Enteric Nervous System in Inflammation and Pain: The Role of Proteinase-Activated Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Vergnolle

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The enteric nervous system (ENS plays a pivotal role in inflammatory and nociceptive processes. Drugs that interact with the ENS have recently raised considerable interest because of their capacity to regulate numerous aspects of the gut physiology and pathophysiology. The present article summarizes recent research on proteinases and proteinase-activated receptors (PARs as signalling molecules in the ENS. In particular, experiments in animal models suggest that PAR2 is important to neurogenic inflammation in the intestine. Moreover, PAR2 agonists seem to induce intestinal hypersensitivity and hyperalgesic states, suggesting a role for this receptor in visceral pain perception. Thus, PARs, together with the proteinases that activate them, represent exciting new targets for therapeutic intervention on the ENS.

  12. AMPA receptor trafficking in inflammation-induced dorsal horn central sensitization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-Xiang Tao

    2012-01-01

    Activity-dependent postsynaptic receptor trafficking is critical for long-term synaptic plasticity in the brain,but it is unclear whether this mechanism actually mediates the spinal cord dorsal horn central sensitization (a specific form of synaptic plasticity) that is associated with persistent pain.Recent studies have shown that peripheral inflammation drives changes in α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methy1-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR) subunit trafficking in the dorsal horn and that such changes contribute to the hypersensitivity that underlies persistent pain.Here,we review current evidence to illustrate how spinal cord AMPARs participate in the dorsal horn central sensitization associated with persistent pain.Understanding these mechanisms may allow the development of novel therapeutic strategies for treating persistent pain.

  13. Studies on the mitogenic effect of transferrin by membrane signal transduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEUNGTM; PLLIM; 等

    1990-01-01

    One of the earliest events leading to cell activation and growth is the hydrolysis of inositol phospholipids producing various membrane signals induced by an interaction between growth factors or hormones with their respective receptors on the cell membrane [1].To demonstrate the mitogenic action of transferrin,our results show that an addition of transferrin to “serum-deprived” rat hepatoma cells produced a rapid but transient rise in inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate(IP3) level,and at the same time,an increased intracellular Ca2+ activity and a cytoplasmic alkalinization were observed.These signal transductions further lend support to the mitogenic nature of transferrin.In addition,a possible link between the receptor-mediated endocytosis of transferrin with the generation of intracellular signals is discussed herewith.

  14. Human C-C chemokine receptor 3 monoclonal antibody inhibits pulmonary inflammation in allergic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai WANG; Hua-hao SHEN; Wen LI; Hua-qiong HUANG

    2007-01-01

    Aim:To evaluate the effect of C-C chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) blockade on pulmonary inflammation and mucus production in allergic mice. Methods:We used the synthetic peptide of the CCR3 NH2-terminal as the immunizing antigen and generated murine monoclonal antibody against the human CCR3. In addition,the generated antibody was administered to mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. The inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage,cytokine levels,pulmonary histopathology,and mucus secretion were examined. Results:The Western blotting analysis indicated that the generated antibody bound to CCR3 specifically. The allergic mice treated with the antihuman CCR3 antibody exhibited a significant reduction of pulmonary inflammation accompanied with the alteration of cytokine. Conclusion:The antibody we generated was specific to CCR3. The inhibition of airway inflammation and mucus overproduction by the antibody suggested that the blockade of CCR3 is an appealing therapeutical target for asthma. The present research may provide an experimental basis for the further study of this agent.

  15. Therapeutic Elimination of the Type 1 Interferon Receptor for Treating Psoriatic Skin Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Jun; Gober, Michael; Yang, Xiaoping; Katlinski, Kanstantsin V; Marshall, Christine M; Sharma, Meena; Werth, Victoria P; Baker, Darren P; Rui, Hallgeir; Seykora, John T; Fuchs, Serge Y

    2016-10-01

    Phototherapy with UV light is a standard treatment for psoriasis, yet the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects are not well understood. Studies in human and mouse keratinocytes and in the skin tissues from human patients and mice showed that UV treatment triggers ubiquitination and downregulation of the type I IFN receptor chain IFNAR1, leading to suppression of IFN signaling and an ensuing decrease in the expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. The severity of imiquimod-induced psoriasiform inflammation was greatly exacerbated in skin of mice deficient in IFNAR1 ubiquitination (Ifnar1(SA)). Furthermore, these mice did not benefit from UV phototherapy. Pharmacologic induction of IFNAR1 ubiquitination and degradation by an antiprotozoal agent halofuginone also relieved psoriasiform inflammation in wild-type but not in Ifnar1(SA) mice. These data identify downregulation of IFNAR1 by UV as a major mechanism of the UV therapeutic effects against the psoriatic inflammation and provide a proof of principle for future development of agents capable of inducing IFNAR1 ubiquitination and downregulation for the treatment of psoriasis.

  16. Acanthamoeba protease activity promotes allergic airway inflammation via protease-activated receptor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi Kyung; Cho, Min Kyoung; Kang, Shin Ae; Park, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Dong-Hee; Yu, Hak Sun

    2014-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is a free-living amoeba commonly present in the environment and often found in human airway cavities. Acanthamoeba possesses strong proteases that can elicit allergic airway inflammation. To our knowledge, the aeroallergenicity of Acanthamoeba has not been reported. We repeatedly inoculated mice with Acanthamoeba trophozoites or excretory-secretory (ES) proteins intra-nasally and evaluated symptoms and airway immune responses. Acanthamoeba trophozoites or ES proteins elicited immune responses in mice that resembled allergic airway inflammation. ES proteins had strong protease activity and activated the expression of several chemokine genes (CCL11, CCL17, CCL22, TSLP, and IL-25) in mouse lung epithelial cells. The serine protease inhibitor phenyl-methane-sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) inhibited ES protein activity. ES proteins also stimulated dendritic cells and enhanced the differentiation of naive T cells into IL-4-secreting T cells. After repeated inoculation of the protease-activated receptor 2 knockout mouse with ES proteins, airway inflammation and Th2 immune responses were markedly reduced, but not to basal levels. Furthermore, asthma patients had higher Acanthamoeba-specific IgE titers than healthy controls and we found Acanthamoeba specific antigen from house dust in typical living room. Our findings suggest that Acanthamoeba elicits allergic airway symptoms in mice via a protease allergen. In addition, it is possible that Acanthamoeba may be one of the triggers human airway allergic disease.

  17. Acanthamoeba protease activity promotes allergic airway inflammation via protease-activated receptor 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Kyung Park

    Full Text Available Acanthamoeba is a free-living amoeba commonly present in the environment and often found in human airway cavities. Acanthamoeba possesses strong proteases that can elicit allergic airway inflammation. To our knowledge, the aeroallergenicity of Acanthamoeba has not been reported. We repeatedly inoculated mice with Acanthamoeba trophozoites or excretory-secretory (ES proteins intra-nasally and evaluated symptoms and airway immune responses. Acanthamoeba trophozoites or ES proteins elicited immune responses in mice that resembled allergic airway inflammation. ES proteins had strong protease activity and activated the expression of several chemokine genes (CCL11, CCL17, CCL22, TSLP, and IL-25 in mouse lung epithelial cells. The serine protease inhibitor phenyl-methane-sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF inhibited ES protein activity. ES proteins also stimulated dendritic cells and enhanced the differentiation of naive T cells into IL-4-secreting T cells. After repeated inoculation of the protease-activated receptor 2 knockout mouse with ES proteins, airway inflammation and Th2 immune responses were markedly reduced, but not to basal levels. Furthermore, asthma patients had higher Acanthamoeba-specific IgE titers than healthy controls and we found Acanthamoeba specific antigen from house dust in typical living room. Our findings suggest that Acanthamoeba elicits allergic airway symptoms in mice via a protease allergen. In addition, it is possible that Acanthamoeba may be one of the triggers human airway allergic disease.

  18. In Vivo Imaging of Peripheral Benzodiazepine Receptors in Mouse Lungs: A Biomarker of Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Hardwick

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The ability to visualize the immune response with radioligands targeted to immune cells will enhance our understanding of cellular responses in inflammatory diseases. Peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR are present in monocytes and neutrophils as well as in lung tissue. We used lipopolysaccharide (LPS as a model of inflammation to assess whether the PBR could be used as a noninvasive marker of inflammation in the lungs. Planar imaging of mice administrated 10 or 30 mg/kg LPS showed increased [123I]-(R-PK11195 radioactivity in the thorax 2 days after LPS treatment relative to control. Following imaging, lungs from control and LPS-treated mice were harvested for ex vivo gamma counting and showed significantly increased radioactivity above control levels. The specificity of the PBR response was determined using a blocking dose of nonradioactive PK11195 given 30 min prior to radiotracer injection. Static planar images of the thorax of nonradioactive PK11195 pretreated animals showed a significantly lower level of radiotracer accumulation in control and in LPS-treated animals (p < .05. These data show that LPS induces specific increases in PBR ligand binding in the lungs. We also used in vivo small-animal PET studies to demonstrate increased [11C]-(R-PK11195 accumulation in the lungs of LPS-treated mice. This study suggests that measuring PBR expression using in vivo imaging techniques may be a useful biomarker to image lung inflammation.

  19. Cannabinoids alleviate experimentally induced intestinal inflammation by acting at central and peripheral receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Fichna

    Full Text Available In an attempt to further investigate the role of cannabinoid (CB system in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases, we employed two recently developed ligands, AM841 (a covalently acting CB agonist and CB13 (a peripherally-restricted CB agonist to establish whether central and peripheral CB sites are involved in the anti-inflammatory action in the intestine.AM841 (0.01, 0.1 and 1 mg/kg, i.p. significantly decreased inflammation scores in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS- and 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS-treated mice when administered before induction of colitis or as a treatment of existing intestinal inflammation. The effect was absent in CB1, CB2 and CB(1/2-deficient mice. A peripherally-restricted agonist CB13 did not alleviate colitis when given i.p. (0.1 mg/kg, but significantly decreased inflammation score after central administration (0.1 µg/animal.This is the first evidence that central and peripheral CB receptors are responsible for the protective and therapeutic action of cannabinoids in mouse models of colitis. Our observations provide new insight to CB pharmacology and validate the use of novel ligands AM841 and CB13 as potent tools in CB-related research.

  20. 延边黄牛转铁蛋白受体2基因克隆与序列分析%Cloning and Sequence Analysis of the Transferrin Receptor 2 Gene from Yanbian Yellow Cattle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张立春; 金海国; 李赵志; 任春宇; 曹阳; 周国利; 金鑫

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2) gene was cloned from Yanbian Yellow cattle, the sequence was analyzed by bioinformatics software and the tissue expression distribution was tested by semi-quantitative reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (SqRT-PCR). [ Method ] The total RNA was extracted from Yanbian Yellow cattle liver. The TfR2 gene was cloned by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The TfR2 gene was analyzed by bioinformatic softwares and the TfR2 gene tissue distribution was tested by SqRT-PCR in the end. [Result] The complete CDs and 3' UTR region of TfR2 gene was cloned (GenBank accession: GU553087). The TfR2 gene was 2901 bp in length and contained a 2412 -nucleotides-long open reading frame (ORF) which encoded a protein of 803 amino acid residues. The sequence analysis result showed that Yanbian Yellow cattle TfR2 gene has over 80% homology with mammals in nucleotides, the amino acid sequences of TfR2 gene from different mammals were conserved, especially some amino acid sites which affect its function in human were highly conserved. The protein functional domain analysis showed that TfR2 gene from different mammals were highly conserved. The expression profiles analysis showed that the TfR2 gene was highly expressed in liver, constittitively expressed in spleen, heart, kidney and intestine (duodenum), [conclusion] The TfR2 gene from Yanbian Yellow cattle is highly homologous with other mammals, the functional domain and tissue distribution are highly conserved in different mammals.%[目的]克隆廷边黄牛转铁蛋白受体2 (transferrin receptor 2,TFR2)基因,并分析该基因在不同组织器官中的表达分布.[方法]通过提取肝脏组织总RNA,采用RT-PCR及RACE方法克隆延边黄牛TfR2基因,采用生物信息学软件进行序列分析,用半定量PCR( SqRT-PCR)方法分析TfR2基因在不同组织器官中的表达分布规律.[结果]①成

  1. Role of P2 Receptors as Modulators of Rat Eosinophil Recruitment in Allergic Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberto, Anael Viana Pinto; Faria, Robson Xavier; de Menezes, Joao Ricardo Lacerda; Surrage, Andrea; da Rocha, Natasha Cristina; Ferreira, Leonardo Gomes Braga; Frutuoso, Valber da Silva; Martins, Marco Aurélio; Alves, Luiz Anastácio

    2016-01-01

    ATP and other nucleotides are released from cells through regulated pathways or following the loss of plasma membrane integrity. Once outside the cell, these compounds can activate P2 receptors: P2X ionotropic receptors and G protein-coupled P2Y receptors. Eosinophils represent major effector cells in the allergic inflammatory response and they are, in fact, associated with several physiological and pathological processes. Here we investigate the expression of P2 receptors and roles of those receptors in murine eosinophils. In this context, our first step was to investigate the expression and functionality of the P2X receptors by patch clamping, our results showed a potency ranking order of ATP>ATPγS> 2meSATP> ADP> αβmeATP> βγmeATP>BzATP> UTP> UDP>cAMP. This data suggest the presence of P2X1, P2X2 and P2X7. Next we evaluate by microfluorimetry the expression of P2Y receptors, our results based in the ranking order of potency (UTP>ATPγS> ATP > UDP> ADP >2meSATP > αβmeATP) suggests the presence of P2Y2, P2Y4, P2Y6 and P2Y11. Moreover, we confirmed our findings by immunofluorescence assays. We also did chemotaxis assays to verify whether nucleotides could induce migration. After 1 or 2 hours of incubation, ATP increased migration of eosinophils, as well as ATPγS, a less hydrolysable analogue of ATP, while suramin a P2 blocker abolished migration. In keeping with this idea, we tested whether these receptors are implicated in the migration of eosinophils to an inflammation site in vivo, using a model of rat allergic pleurisy. In fact, migration of eosinophils has increased when ATP or ATPγS were applied in the pleural cavity, and once more suramin blocked this effect. We have demonstrated that rat eosinophils express P2X and P2Y receptors. In addition, the activation of P2 receptors can increase migration of eosinophils in vitro and in vivo, an effect blocked by suramin.

  2. Role of P2 Receptors as Modulators of Rat Eosinophil Recruitment in Allergic Inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anael Viana Pinto Alberto

    Full Text Available ATP and other nucleotides are released from cells through regulated pathways or following the loss of plasma membrane integrity. Once outside the cell, these compounds can activate P2 receptors: P2X ionotropic receptors and G protein-coupled P2Y receptors. Eosinophils represent major effector cells in the allergic inflammatory response and they are, in fact, associated with several physiological and pathological processes. Here we investigate the expression of P2 receptors and roles of those receptors in murine eosinophils. In this context, our first step was to investigate the expression and functionality of the P2X receptors by patch clamping, our results showed a potency ranking order of ATP>ATPγS> 2meSATP> ADP> αβmeATP> βγmeATP>BzATP> UTP> UDP>cAMP. This data suggest the presence of P2X1, P2X2 and P2X7. Next we evaluate by microfluorimetry the expression of P2Y receptors, our results based in the ranking order of potency (UTP>ATPγS> ATP > UDP> ADP >2meSATP > αβmeATP suggests the presence of P2Y2, P2Y4, P2Y6 and P2Y11. Moreover, we confirmed our findings by immunofluorescence assays. We also did chemotaxis assays to verify whether nucleotides could induce migration. After 1 or 2 hours of incubation, ATP increased migration of eosinophils, as well as ATPγS, a less hydrolysable analogue of ATP, while suramin a P2 blocker abolished migration. In keeping with this idea, we tested whether these receptors are implicated in the migration of eosinophils to an inflammation site in vivo, using a model of rat allergic pleurisy. In fact, migration of eosinophils has increased when ATP or ATPγS were applied in the pleural cavity, and once more suramin blocked this effect. We have demonstrated that rat eosinophils express P2X and P2Y receptors. In addition, the activation of P2 receptors can increase migration of eosinophils in vitro and in vivo, an effect blocked by suramin.

  3. Ionotropic and Metabotropic Proton-Sensing Receptors Involved in Airway Inflammation in Allergic Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Aoki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An acidic microenvironment has been shown to evoke a variety of airway responses, including cough, bronchoconstriction, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR, infiltration of inflammatory cells in the lung, and stimulation of mucus hyperproduction. Except for the participation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1 and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs in severe acidic pH (of less than 6.0-induced cough and bronchoconstriction through sensory neurons, the molecular mechanisms underlying extracellular acidic pH-induced actions in the airways have not been fully understood. Recent studies have revealed that ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1-family G protein-coupled receptors, which sense pH of more than 6.0, are expressed in structural cells, such as airway smooth muscle cells and epithelial cells, and in inflammatory and immune cells, such as eosinophils and dendritic cells. They function in a variety of airway responses related to the pathophysiology of inflammatory diseases, including allergic asthma. In the present review, we discuss the roles of ionotropic TRPV1 and ASICs and metabotropic OGR1-family G protein-coupled receptors in the airway inflammation and AHR in asthma and respiratory diseases.

  4. Probing molecular interaction between transferrin and anti-transferrin by atomic force microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The interaction between transferrin (Tf) and its antibody was investigated by atomic force microscope. Tf-antibody was immobilized on the Au-coated glass slide, and the specific combination between antibody and antigen was also characterized by AFM. The results showed that holo-transferrin was jogged with anti-transferrin, and binded anti-tran- sferrin more tightly than apo-transferrin. The force- distance curves revealed that the affinity of anti-trans- ferrin and holo-transferrin was much stronger than that of apo-transferrin.

  5. Bosentan, a mixed endothelin receptor antagonist, inhibits superoxide anion-induced pain and inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafim, Karla G G; Navarro, Suelen A; Zarpelon, Ana C; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Fattori, Victor; Cunha, Thiago M; Alves-Filho, Jose C; Cunha, Fernando Q; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2015-11-01

    Bosentan is a mixed endothelin receptor antagonist widely used to treat patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, and the emerging literature suggests bosentan as a potent anti-inflammatory drug. Superoxide anion is produced in large amounts during inflammation, stimulates cytokine production, and thus contributes to inflammation and pain. However, it remains to be determined whether endothelin contributes to the inflammatory response triggered by the superoxide anion. The present study investigated the effects of bosentan in a mouse model of inflammation and pain induced by potassium superoxide, a superoxide anion donor. Male Swiss mice were treated with bosentan (10-100 mg/kg) by oral gavage, 1 h before potassium superoxide injection, and the inflammatory response was evaluated locally and at spinal cord (L4-L6) levels. Bosentan (100 mg/kg) inhibited superoxide anion-induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia, overt pain-like behavior (abdominal writhings, paw flinching, and licking), paw edema, myeloperoxidase activity (neutrophil marker) in the paw skin, and leukocyte recruitment in the peritoneal cavity. Bosentan also inhibited superoxide anion-induced interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production, while it enhanced IL-10 production in the paw skin and spinal cord. Bosentan inhibited the reduction of antioxidant capacity (reduced glutathione, ferric reducing antioxidant power, and ABTS radical scavenging ability) induced by the superoxide anion. Finally, we demonstrated that intraplantar injection of potassium superoxide induces the mRNA expression of prepro-endothelin-1 in the paw skin and spinal cord. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that superoxide anion-induced inflammation, pain, cytokine production, and oxidative stress depend on endothelin; therefore, these responses are amenable to bosentan treatment.

  6. Deficiency of phospholipase A2 receptor exacerbates ovalbumin-induced lung inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaru, Shun; Mishina, Hideto; Watanabe, Yosuke; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Fujioka, Daisuke; Takahashi, Soichiro; Suzuki, Koji; Nakamura, Takamitsu; Obata, Jun-Ei; Kawabata, Kenichi; Yokota, Yasunori; Murakami, Makoto; Hanasaki, Kohji; Kugiyama, Kiyotaka

    2013-08-01

    Secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) plays a critical role in the genesis of lung inflammation through proinflammatory eicosanoids. A previous in vitro experiment showed a possible role of cell surface receptor for sPLA2 (PLA2R) in the clearance of extracellular sPLA2. PLA2R and groups IB and X sPLA2 are expressed in the lung. This study examined a pathogenic role of PLA2R in airway inflammation using PLA2R-deficient (PLA2R(-/-)) mice. Airway inflammation was induced by immunosensitization with OVA. Compared with wild-type (PLA2R(+/+)) mice, PLA2R(-/-) mice had a significantly greater infiltration of inflammatory cells around the airways, higher levels of groups IB and X sPLA2, eicosanoids, and Th2 cytokines, and higher numbers of eosinophils and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid after OVA treatment. In PLA2R(-/-) mice, intratracheally instilled [(125)I]-labeled sPLA2-IB was cleared much more slowly from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid compared with PLA2R(+/+) mice. The degradation of the instilled [(125)I]-labeled sPLA2-IB, as assessed by trichloroacetic acid-soluble radioactivity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid after instillation, was lower in PLA2R(-/-) mice than in PLA2R(+/+) mice. In conclusion, PLA2R deficiency increased sPLA2-IB and -X levels in the lung through their impaired clearance from the lung, leading to exaggeration of lung inflammation induced by OVA treatment in a murine model.

  7. An iron-dependent and transferrin-mediated cellular uptake pathway for plutonium.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. P.; Gorman-Lewis, D.; Aryal, B. P.; Paunesku, T.; Vogt, S.; Rickert, P. G.; Seifert, S.; Lai, B.; Woloschak, G. E.; Soderholm, L. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); ( XSD); (Univ. of Chicago); (Northwestern Univ.)

    2011-08-01

    Plutonium is a toxic synthetic element with no natural biological function, but it is strongly retained by humans when ingested. Using small-angle X-ray scattering, receptor binding assays and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy, we find that rat adrenal gland (PC12) cells can acquire plutonium in vitro through the major iron acquisition pathway -- receptor-mediated endocytosis of the iron transport protein serum transferrin; however, only one form of the plutonium-transferrin complex is active. Low-resolution solution models of plutonium-loaded transferrins derived from small-angle scattering show that only transferrin with plutonium bound in the protein's C-terminal lobe (C-lobe) and iron bound in the N-terminal lobe (N-lobe) (Pu{sub c}Fe{sub N}Tf) adopts the proper conformation for recognition by the transferrin receptor protein. Although the metal-binding site in each lobe contains the same donors in the same configuration and both lobes are similar, the differences between transferrin's two lobes act to restrict, but not eliminate, cellular Pu uptake.

  8. An iron-dependent and transferrin-mediated cellular uptake pathway for plutonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark P; Gorman-Lewis, Drew; Aryal, Baikuntha; Paunesku, Tatjana; Vogt, Stefan; Rickert, Paul G; Seifert, Soenke; Lai, Barry; Woloschak, Gayle E; Soderholm, L

    2011-06-26

    Plutonium is a toxic synthetic element with no natural biological function, but it is strongly retained by humans when ingested. Using small-angle X-ray scattering, receptor binding assays and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy, we find that rat adrenal gland (PC12) cells can acquire plutonium in vitro through the major iron acquisition pathway--receptor-mediated endocytosis of the iron transport protein serum transferrin; however, only one form of the plutonium-transferrin complex is active. Low-resolution solution models of plutonium-loaded transferrins derived from small-angle scattering show that only transferrin with plutonium bound in the protein's C-terminal lobe (C-lobe) and iron bound in the N-terminal lobe (N-lobe) (Pu(C)Fe(N)Tf) adopts the proper conformation for recognition by the transferrin receptor protein. Although the metal-binding site in each lobe contains the same donors in the same configuration and both lobes are similar, the differences between transferrin's two lobes act to restrict, but not eliminate, cellular Pu uptake.

  9. Deficient dopamine D2 receptor function causes renal inflammation independently of high blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanrong; Cuevas, Santiago; Asico, Laureano D; Escano, Crisanto; Yang, Yu; Pascua, Annabelle M; Wang, Xiaoyan; Jones, John E; Grandy, David; Eisner, Gilbert; Jose, Pedro A; Armando, Ines

    2012-01-01

    Renal dopamine receptors participate in the regulation of blood pressure. Genetic factors, including polymorphisms of the dopamine D(2) receptor gene (DRD2) are associated with essential hypertension, but the mechanisms of their contribution are incompletely understood. Mice lacking Drd2 (D(2)-/-) have elevated blood pressure, increased renal expression of inflammatory factors, and renal injury. We tested the hypothesis that decreased dopamine D(2) receptor (D(2)R) function increases vulnerability to renal inflammation independently of blood pressure, is an immediate cause of renal injury, and contributes to the subsequent development of hypertension. In D(2)-/- mice, treatment with apocynin normalized blood pressure and decreased oxidative stress, but did not affect the expression of inflammatory factors. In mouse RPTCs Drd2 silencing increased the expression of TNFα and MCP-1, while treatment with a D(2)R agonist abolished the angiotensin II-induced increase in TNF-α and MCP-1. In uni-nephrectomized wild-type mice, selective Drd2 silencing by subcapsular infusion of Drd2 siRNA into the remaining kidney produced the same increase in renal cytokines/chemokines that occurs after Drd2 deletion, increased the expression of markers of renal injury, and increased blood pressure. Moreover, in mice with two intact kidneys, short-term Drd2 silencing in one kidney, leaving the other kidney undisturbed, induced inflammatory factors and markers of renal injury in the treated kidney without increasing blood pressure. Our results demonstrate that the impact of decreased D(2)R function on renal inflammation is a primary effect, not necessarily associated with enhanced oxidant activity, or blood pressure; renal damage is the cause, not the result, of hypertension. Deficient renal D(2)R function may be of clinical relevance since common polymorphisms of the human DRD2 gene result in decreased D(2)R expression and function.

  10. Deficient dopamine D2 receptor function causes renal inflammation independently of high blood pressure.

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    Yanrong Zhang

    Full Text Available Renal dopamine receptors participate in the regulation of blood pressure. Genetic factors, including polymorphisms of the dopamine D(2 receptor gene (DRD2 are associated with essential hypertension, but the mechanisms of their contribution are incompletely understood. Mice lacking Drd2 (D(2-/- have elevated blood pressure, increased renal expression of inflammatory factors, and renal injury. We tested the hypothesis that decreased dopamine D(2 receptor (D(2R function increases vulnerability to renal inflammation independently of blood pressure, is an immediate cause of renal injury, and contributes to the subsequent development of hypertension. In D(2-/- mice, treatment with apocynin normalized blood pressure and decreased oxidative stress, but did not affect the expression of inflammatory factors. In mouse RPTCs Drd2 silencing increased the expression of TNFα and MCP-1, while treatment with a D(2R agonist abolished the angiotensin II-induced increase in TNF-α and MCP-1. In uni-nephrectomized wild-type mice, selective Drd2 silencing by subcapsular infusion of Drd2 siRNA into the remaining kidney produced the same increase in renal cytokines/chemokines that occurs after Drd2 deletion, increased the expression of markers of renal injury, and increased blood pressure. Moreover, in mice with two intact kidneys, short-term Drd2 silencing in one kidney, leaving the other kidney undisturbed, induced inflammatory factors and markers of renal injury in the treated kidney without increasing blood pressure. Our results demonstrate that the impact of decreased D(2R function on renal inflammation is a primary effect, not necessarily associated with enhanced oxidant activity, or blood pressure; renal damage is the cause, not the result, of hypertension. Deficient renal D(2R function may be of clinical relevance since common polymorphisms of the human DRD2 gene result in decreased D(2R expression and function.

  11. The role of toll-like receptor 4 in airway inflammation induced by diesel exhaust particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Ken-ichiro; Yanagisawa, Rie; Hirano, Seishiro [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Environmental Health Sciences Division, Tsukuba (Japan); Takano, Hirohisa; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Inflammation and Immunology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto (Japan); Ichinose, Takamichi [Oita University of Nursing and Health Science, Department of Health Science, Oita (Japan); Shimada, Akinori [Tottori University, Department of Veterinary Pathology, Faculty of Agriculture, Tottori (Japan)

    2006-05-15

    Although several studies have demonstrated that airway exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) induces lung inflammation, the signaling pathways involved in the pathogenesis remain unclear. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are generally accepted to be pathogen recognition receptors in mammalians. In the present study, we investigated the role of TLR-4 in DEP-induced lung inflammation and cytokine expression in the lung in TLR-4 point mutant (C3H/HeJ) mice and corresponding control (C3H/HeN) mice. Both the types of mice were randomized into four experimental groups that received vehicle or DEP (12 mg/kg body weight) by intratracheal instillation (n=8-10 in each group). Cellular profile of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, expressions of cytokines and chemokines in the lung, and circulatory fibrinogen levels were evaluated 24 h after the instillation.DEP challenge revealed a significant increase in the numbers of total cells and neutrophils in the BAL fluid as compared to vehicle challenge, however, the numbers were less in C3H/HeJ mice than in C3H/HeN mice. DEP exposure significantly induced the lung expression of interleukin (IL)-1{beta}, keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1{alpha} when compared to vehicle challenge in both genotypes of mice. In the presence of DEP, the level of MIP-1{alpha} was significantly lower in C3H/HeJ mice than in C3H/HeN mice, however, the levels of IL-1{beta}, KC, and fibrinogen showed opposite findings. These results suggest that TLR-4 is one of recognition receptors against DEP in the airways. (orig.)

  12. P2Y6 Receptor Activation Promotes Inflammation and Tissue Remodeling in Pulmonary Fibrosis

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    Tobias Müller

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is a disease with a poor prognosis and very few available treatment options. The involvement of the purinergic receptor subtypes P2Y2 and P2X7 in fibrotic lung disease has been demonstrated recently. In this study, we investigated the role of P2Y6 receptors in the pathogenesis of IPF in humans and in the animal model of bleomycin-induced lung injury. P2Y6R expression was upregulated in lung structural cells but not in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL cells derived from IPF patients as well as in animals following bleomycin administration. Furthermore, BAL fluid levels of the P2Y6R agonist uridine-5′-diphosphate were elevated in animals with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Inflammation and fibrosis following bleomycin administration were reduced in P2Y6R-deficient compared to wild-type animals confirming the pathophysiological relevance of P2Y6R subtypes for fibrotic lung diseases. Experiments with bone marrow chimeras revealed the importance of P2Y6R expression on lung structural cells for pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. Similar effects were obtained when animals were treated with the P2Y6R antagonist MRS2578. In vitro studies demonstrated that proliferation and secretion of the pro-inflammatory/pro-fibrotic cytokine IL-6 by lung fibroblasts are P2Y6R-mediated processes. In summary, our results clearly demonstrate the involvement of P2Y6R subtypes in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. Thus, blocking pulmonary P2Y6 receptors might be a new target for the treatment of IPF.

  13. Cannabinoid Receptor CB2 Is Involved in Tetrahydrocannabinol-Induced Anti-Inflammation against Lipopolysaccharide in MG-63 Cells

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    Lei Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoid Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC is effective in treating osteoarthritis (OA, and the mechanism, however, is still elusive. Activation of cannabinoid receptor CB2 reduces inflammation; whether the activation CB2 is involved in THC-induced therapeutic action for OA is still unknown. Cofilin-1 is a cytoskeleton protein, participating in the inflammation of OA. In this study, MG-63 cells, an osteosarcoma cell-line, were exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS to mimic the inflammation of OA. We hypothesized that the activation of CB2 is involved in THC-induced anti-inflammation in the MG-63 cells exposed to LPS, and the anti-inflammation is mediated by cofilin-1. We found that THC suppressed the release of proinflammatory factors, including tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, interleukin- (IL- 1β, IL-6, and IL-8, decreased nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB expression, and inhibited the upregulation of cofilin-1 protein in the LPS-stimulated MG-63 cells. However, administration of CB2 receptor antagonist or the CB2-siRNA, not CB1 antagonist AM251, partially abolished the THC-induced anti-inflammatory effects above. In addition, overexpression of cofilin-1 significantly reversed the THC-induced anti-inflammatory effects in MG-63 cells. These results suggested that CB2 is involved in the THC-induced anti-inflammation in LPS-stimulated MG-63 cells, and the anti-inflammation may be mediated by cofilin-1.

  14. Role of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 in inflammation and sepsis

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    Devesa I

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Isabel Devesa1, Rosa Planells-Cases2, Gregorio Fernández-Ballester1, José Manuel González-Ros1, Antonio Ferrer-Montiel1, Asia Fernández-Carvajal11Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular, Universidad Miguel Hernández, Alicante; 2Centro de Investigación Príncipe Felipe, Valencia, SpainAbstract: The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1 is a thermoreceptor that responds to noxious temperatures, as well as to chemical agonists, such as vanilloids and protons. In addition, its channel activity is notably potentiated by proinflammatory mediators released upon tissue damage. The TRPV1 contribution to sensory neuron sensitization by proalgesic agents has signaled this receptor as a prime target for analgesic and anti-inflammatory drug intervention. However, TRPV1 antagonists have notably failed in clinical and preclinical studies because of their unwanted side effects. Recent reports have unveiled previously unrecognized anti-inflammatory and protective functions of TRPV1 in several diseases. For instance, this channel has been suggested to play an anti-inflammatory role in sepsis. Therefore, the use of potent TRPV1 antagonists as a general strategy to treat inflammation must be cautiously considered, given the deleterious effects that may arise from inhibiting the population of channels that have a protective function. The use of TRPV1 antagonists may be limited to treating those pathologies where enhanced receptor activity contributes to the inflamed state. Alternatively, therapeutic paradigms, such as reduction of inflammatory-mediated increase of receptor expression in the cell surface, may be a better strategy to prevent abrogation of the TRPV1 subpopulation involved in anti-inflammatory and protective processes.Keywords: transient receptor potential, nociceptor, capsaicin, pain, ion channel, analgesia

  15. Increased leptin/leptin receptor pathway affects systemic and airway inflammation in COPD former smokers

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    Bruno A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Andreina Bruno1, Marinella Alessi2, Simona Soresi2, Anna Bonanno1, Loredana Riccobono1, Angela Marina Montalbano1, Giusy Daniela Albano1, Mark Gjomarkaj1, Mirella Profita11Institute of Biomedicine and Molecular Immunology, Italian National Research Council, Palermo, Italy; 2Dipartimento Biomedico di Biomedicina Interna e Specialistica, University Palermo, ItalyBackground: Leptin, a hormone produced mainly by adipose tissue, regulates food intake and energy expenditure. It is involved in inflammatory diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and its deficiency is associated with increased susceptibility to the infection. The leptin receptor is expressed in the lung and in the neutrophils.Methods: We measured the levels of leptin, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-a and soluble form of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1 in sputum and plasma from 27 smoker and former smoker patients with stable COPD using ELISA methods. Further we analyzed leptin and its receptor expression in sputum cells from 16 COPD patients using immunocytochemistry.Results: In plasma of COPD patients, leptin was inversely correlated with TNF-a and positively correlated with the patient weight, whereas the levels of sICAM-1 were positively correlated with TNF-a. In sputum of COPD patients leptin levels were correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vitality capacity. Additionally, increased levels of sputum leptin and TNF-a were observed in COPD former smokers rather than smokers. Further the expression of leptin receptor in sputum neutrophils was significantly higher in COPD former smokers than in smokers, and the expression of leptin and its receptor was positively correlated in neutrophils of COPD former smokers.Conclusion: Our findings suggest a role of leptin in the local and systemic inflammation of COPD and, taking into account the involvement of neutrophils in this inflammatory disease, describe a novel aspect of the leptin

  16. Involvement of spinal somatostatin receptor SST(2A) in inflammation-induced thermal hyperalgesia: ultrastructural and behavioral studies in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jun; Hu, Jiang-Yuan; Zhang, Yu-Qiu; Zhao, Zhi-Qi

    2008-10-01

    Our previous results have shown that somatostatin receptor subtype SST(2A) is responsible for thermal, but not mechanical nociceptive transmission in the rat spinal cord. The present study was undertaken to further examine the ultrastructural localization of SST(2A) receptor in lamina II of the spinal dorsal horn and the role of SST(2A) receptor in thermal hyperalgesia following Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammation. We found that SST(2A) receptors in lamina II are located primarily in postsynaptic dendrites and soma, but not in axons or synaptic terminals. CFA-induced inflammation markedly increased SST(2A) receptor-like immunoreactivity in lamina II. Paw withdrawal latency (PWL) evoked by noxious heating was obviously shortened 1 h after intraplantar injection of CFA, exhibiting thermal hyperalgesia. Pre-blocking SST(2A) activity by intrathecal pre-administration of CYN154806, a broad-spectrum antagonist of SST(2) receptor, or specific antiserum against SST(2A) receptor (anti-SST(2A)) significantly attenuated thermal hyperalgesia in a dose-dependent fashion in CFA-treated rats. But, administration of anti-SST(2A) or CYN154806 after CFA treatment had no effect upon thermal hyperalgesia. Intrathecal application of SST(2A) agonist SOM-14 at different doses prior to CFA treatment did not influence thermal hyperalgesia in inflamed rats, but at a low dose shortened PWL evoked by noxious heating in normal rats. These results suggest that spinal SST(2A) receptors play a key role in triggering the generation, but not maintenance, of thermal hyperalgesia evoked by CFA-induced inflammation. The up-regulation of SST(2A) receptors in the spinal cord may be one of the mechanisms underlying inflammation-induced thermal hyperalgesia.

  17. The Melanocortin 3 Receptor: A Novel Mediator of Exercise-Induced Inflammation Reduction in Postmenopausal Women?

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    Tara M. Henagan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether resistance exercise training-induced reductions in inflammation are mediated via melanocortin 3 receptor expression in obese (BMI 32.7±3.7 women (65.6±2.8 yrs randomized to either a control (=11 or resistance training group (=12. The resistance trained group performed resistance training 3 days/week for 12 weeks. Resting blood samples were collected before and after the training intervention in both resistance trained and control groups. Resistance training upregulated melanocortin 3 receptor mRNA by 16-fold (=.035 and decreased monocyte count, without changing leukocyte number, body composition, or body weight. Resistance trained individuals exhibited increased sensitivity to inflammatory stimuli, whereas control individuals exhibited no change. While there was no change in whole blood tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA between the groups, whole blood interleukin 10 mRNA was higher in the resistance trained group following the intervention period. In summary, it appears that resistance training may modulate melanocortin 3 receptor expression, providing a possible mechanism for the anti-inflammatory effects of exercise training.

  18. Toll-like receptors and cancer: MYD88 mutation and inflammation

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    James Q Wang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs expressed on immune cells are crucial for the early detection of invading pathogens, in initiating early innate immune response and in orchestrating the adaptive immune response. PRRs are activated by specific pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs that are present in pathogenic microbes or nucleic acids of viruses or bacteria. However, inappropriate activation of these PRRs, such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs, due to genetic lesions or chronic inflammation has been demonstrated to be a major cause of many haematological malignancies. Gain-of-function mutations in the TLR adaptor protein MYD88 found in 39% of the activated B cell type of diffuse large B cell lymphomas (ABC-DLBCL and almost 100% of Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia (WM further highlight the involvement of TLRs in these malignancies. MYD88 mutations result in the chronic activation of TLR signalling pathways, thus the constitutive activation of the transcription factor NFκB to promote cell survival and proliferation. These recent insights into TLR pathway driven malignancies warrant the need for a better understanding of TLRs in cancers and the development of novel anti-cancer therapies targeting TLRs. This review focuses on Toll-like receptors function and signalling in normal or inflammatory conditions, and how mutations can also hijack the TLR signalling pathways to give rise to cancer. Lastly, we discuss how potential therapeutic agents could be used to restore normal responses to TLRs and have long lasting anti-tumour effects.

  19. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma as modulator of inflammation in pulmonary sarcoidosis

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    Pejčić Tatjana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR includes the family of ligand-activated transcription factors which belong to the group of nuclear hormone receptors and are connected to retinoid, glucocorticoid and thyroid hormone receptors. There are three subtypes of PPARs: PPARα (also known as NR1C3, PPARγ (known as NR1C1 and PPARδ (known as PPARβ or NR1C2. All of them take part in the metabolism, cell proliferation and immune response. PPARγ and PPARα are identified as important immunomodulators and potentially represent an anti-inflammatory target for respiratory diseases. PPARγ deficiency in the lungs has been observed in the inflammatory diseases such as asthma, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, fibrosis and sarcoidosis, as well as in the animal models of the lung inflammation. A small number of papers concerned with PPARγ in sarcoidosis point to the lowered activity of this factor in the alveolar macrophages and a lowered gene expression for the PPARγ, while the activity is preserved in healthy individuals. At the same time, an increased activity of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB in the bronchoalveolar lavage has been recorded in patients with sarcoidosis. The reason for the decrease in the production of PPARγ in sarcoidosis remains unknown. Several possible mechanisms are mentioned: genetic defect with lowered production, down-regulation due to the increased values of IFN-γ or an increased decomposition of PPARγ. Further investigation will explain the mechanisms regarding the decreased production of PPARγ in sarcoidosis.

  20. Protease-activated receptor 2 activation of myeloid dendritic cells regulates allergic airway inflammation

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    Dienger Krista

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A common characteristic of allergens is that they contain proteases that can activate protease-activated receptor (PAR-2; however the mechanism by which PAR-2 regulates allergic airway inflammation is unclear. Methods Mice (wild type and PAR-2-deficient were sensitized using German cockroach (GC feces (frass, the isolated protease from GC frass, or through adoptive transfer of GC frass-treated bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC and measurements of airway inflammation (cellular infiltration, cytokine expression, and mucin production, serum IgE levels and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR were assessed. BMDC were cultured, treated with GC frass and assessed for cytokine production. PAR-2 expression on pulmonary mDCs was determined by flow cytometry. Results Exposure to GC frass induced AHR and airway inflammation in wild type mice; however PAR-2-deficient mice had significantly attenuated responses. To directly investigate the role of the protease, we isolated the protease from GC frass and administered the endotoxin-free protease into the airways of mice in the presence of OVA. GC frass proteases were sufficient to promote the development of AHR, serum IgE, and Th2 cytokine production. PAR-2 expression on mDC was upregulated following GC frass exposure, but the presence of a functional PAR-2 did not alter antigen uptake. To determine if PAR-2 activation led to differential cytokine production, we cultured BMDC in the presence of GM-CSF and treated these cells ex vivo with GC frass. PAR-2-deficient BMDC released significantly less IL-6, IL-23 and TNFα compared to BMDC from wild type mice, suggesting PAR-2 activation was important in Th2/Th17 skewing cytokine production. To determine the role for PAR-2 on mDCs on the initiation of allergic airway inflammation, BMDCs from wild type and PAR-2-deficient mice were treated in the presence or absence of GC frass and then adoptively transferred into the airway of wild type mice

  1. Toll-like receptors elicit different recruitment kinetics of monocytes and neutrophils in mouse acute inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, Beat A; Jemelin, Stephane; Emre, Yalin

    2017-03-16

    Leukocyte recruitment is an important process in combatting pathogens. The largest class of circulating leukocytes are neutrophils, which rapidly invade inflamed tissue, followed by inflammatory Ly6C(+) monocytes. Ly6C(low) monocytes patrol the endothelial wall routinely in the steady state. We recently reported early luminal recruitment of Ly6C(low) monocytes, which preceded and orchestrated neutrophil arrival and extravasation in response to TLR7/8-mediated vascular inflammation. Here we dissected the kinetics of recruitment of monocytes and neutrophils and examined the dynamics of Ly6C(low) monocytes in response to several other Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists, using intravital confocal microscopy. We observed two types of kinetics in mesenteric veins. TLR2, TLR5 and TLR9 agonists caused early monocyte and neutrophil influx whereas TLR3 and TLR4 agonists rapidly recruited neutrophils and caused Ly6C(low) monocytes to arrive at low levels later on. All TLR agonists, except TLR9, led Ly6C(low) monocytes to meticulously patrol the vascular wall. Finally, these monocytes released pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines implicated in neutrophil recruitment in response to TLR2, TLR4 and TLR9 stimulation but not to TLR3 and TLR5 agonists. These results refine our understanding of the early events in the leukocyte recruitment cascade, including the patrolling behaviour of Ly6C(low) monocytes, in TLR-mediated acute vascular inflammation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. VEGF receptor signaling links inflammation and tumorigenesis in colitis-associated cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldner, Maximilian J; Wirtz, Stefan; Jefremow, André; Warntjen, Moritz; Neufert, Clemens; Atreya, Raja; Becker, Christoph; Weigmann, Benno; Vieth, Michael; Rose-John, Stefan; Neurath, Markus F

    2010-12-20

    Whereas the inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has shown promising results in sporadic colon cancer, the role of VEGF signaling in colitis-associated cancer (CAC) has not been addressed. We found that, unlike sporadic colorectal cancer and control patients, patients with CAC show activated VEGFR2 on intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). We then explored the function of VEGFR2 in a murine model of colitis-associated colon cancer characterized by increased VEGFR2 expression. Epithelial cells in tumor tissue expressed VEGFR2 and responded to VEGF stimulation with augmented VEGFR2-mediated proliferation. Blockade of VEGF function via soluble decoy receptors suppressed tumor development, inhibited tumor angiogenesis, and blocked tumor cell proliferation. Functional studies revealed that chronic inflammation leads to an up-regulation of VEGFR2 on IECs. Studies in conditional STAT3 mutant mice showed that VEGFR signaling requires STAT3 to promote epithelial cell proliferation and tumor growth in vivo. Thus, VEGFR-signaling acts as a direct growth factor for tumor cells in CAC, providing a molecular link between inflammation and the development of colon cancer.

  3. The Role of Inflammation in Regulating Platelet Production and Function: Toll-like Receptors in Platelets and Megakaryocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Beaulieu, Lea M.; Freedman, Jane E.

    2009-01-01

    Platelets have been extensively studied as hemostatic regulators, stopping uncontrolled flow of blood from an injured vessel and allowing for repair. However, multiple studies have shown that platelets can interact with bacterial proteins, particularly seen during sepsis and inflammation. Immune cells recognize pathogens through Toll-like Receptors (TLRs). These same receptors allow platelets to recognize bacterial proteins and regulate platelet immunity and function. This review examines the...

  4. Nutritional immunity. Escape from bacterial iron piracy through rapid evolution of transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Matthew F; Elde, Nels C

    2014-12-12

    Iron sequestration provides an innate defense, termed nutritional immunity, leading pathogens to scavenge iron from hosts. Although the molecular basis of this battle for iron is established, its potential as a force for evolution at host-pathogen interfaces is unknown. We show that the iron transport protein transferrin is engaged in ancient and ongoing evolutionary conflicts with TbpA, a transferrin surface receptor from bacteria. Single substitutions in transferrin at rapidly evolving sites reverse TbpA binding, providing a mechanism to counteract bacterial iron piracy among great apes. Furthermore, the C2 transferrin polymorphism in humans evades TbpA variants from Haemophilus influenzae, revealing a functional basis for standing genetic variation. These findings identify a central role for nutritional immunity in the persistent evolutionary conflicts between primates and bacterial pathogens.

  5. Applying 89Zr-Transferrin To Study the Pharmacology of Inhibitors to BET Bromodomain Containing Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin modifying proteins are attractive drug targets in oncology, given the fundamental reliance of cancer on altered transcriptional activity. Multiple transcription factors can be impacted downstream of primary target inhibition, thus making it challenging to understand the driving mechanism of action of pharmacologic inhibition of chromatin modifying proteins. This in turn makes it difficult to identify biomarkers predictive of response and pharmacodynamic tools to optimize drug dosing. In this report, we show that 89Zr-transferrin, an imaging tool we developed to measure MYC activity in cancer, can be used to identify cancer models that respond to broad spectrum inhibitors of transcription primarily due to MYC inhibition. As a proof of concept, we studied inhibitors of BET bromodomain containing proteins, as they can impart antitumor effects in a MYC dependent or independent fashion. In vitro, we show that transferrin receptor biology is inhibited in multiple MYC positive models of prostate cancer and double hit lymphoma when MYC biology is impacted. Moreover, we show that bromodomain inhibition in one lymphoma model results in transferrin receptor expression changes large enough to be quantified with 89Zr-transferrin and positron emission tomography (PET) in vivo. Collectively, these data further underscore the diagnostic utility of the relationship between MYC and transferrin in oncology, and provide the rationale to incorporate transferrin-based PET into early clinical trials with bromodomain inhibitors for the treatment of solid tumors. PMID:26725682

  6. A PAF receptor antagonist inhibits acute airway inflammation and late-phase responses but not chronic airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in a primate model of asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. Gundel

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available We have examined the effects of a PAF receptor antagonist, WEB 2170, on several indices of acute and chronic airway inflammation and associated changes in lung function in a primate model of allergic asthma. A single oral administration WEB 2170 provided dose related inhibition of the release of leukotriene C4 (LTC4 and prostaglandin D2 (PGD2 recovered and quantified in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid obtained during the acute phase response to inhaled antigen. In addition, oral WEB 2170 treatment in dual responder primates blocked the acute influx of neutrophils into the airways as well as the associated late-phase airway obstruction occurring 6 h after antigen inhalation. In contrast, a multiple dosing regime with WEB 2170 (once a day for 7 consecutive days failed to reduce the chronic airway inflammation (eosinophilic and associated airway hyperresponsiveness to inhaled methacholine that is characteristic of dual responder monkeys. Thus, we conclude that the generation of PAF following antigen inhalation contributes to the development of lipid mediators, acute airway inflammation and associated late-phase airway obstruction in dual responder primates; however, PAF does not play a significant role in the maintenance of chronic airway inflammation and associated airway hyperresponsiveness in this primate model.

  7. The Prostaglandin E2 Receptor EP4 Regulates Obesity-Related Inflammation and Insulin Sensitivity.

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    Mika Yasui

    Full Text Available With increasing body weight, macrophages accumulate in adipose tissue. There, activated macrophages secrete numerous proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, giving rise to chronic inflammation and insulin resistance. Prostaglandin E2 suppresses macrophage activation via EP4; however, the role of EP4 signaling in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus remains unknown. In this study, we treated db/db mice with an EP4-selective agonist, ONO-AE1-329, for 4 weeks to explore the role of EP4 signaling in obesity-related inflammation in vivo. Administration of the EP4 agonist did not affect body weight gain or food intake; however, in the EP4 agonist-treated group, glucose tolerance and insulin resistance were significantly improved over that of the vehicle-treated group. Additionally, administration of the EP4 agonist inhibited the accumulation of F4/80-positive macrophages and the formation of crown-like structures in white adipose tissue, and the adipocytes were significantly smaller. The treatment of the EP4 agonist increased the number of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages, and in the stromal vascular fraction of white adipose tissue, which includes macrophages, it markedly decreased the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Further, EP4 activation increased the expression of adiponectin and peroxidase proliferator-activated receptors in white adipose tissue. Next, we examined in vitro M1/M2 polarization assay to investigate the impact of EP4 signaling on determining the functional phenotypes of macrophages. Treatment with EP4 agonist enhanced M2 polarization in wild-type peritoneal macrophages, whereas EP4-deficient macrophages were less susceptible to M2 polarization. Notably, antagonizing peroxidase proliferator-activated receptor δ activity suppressed EP4 signaling-mediated shift toward M2 macrophage polarization. Thus, our results demonstrate that EP4 signaling plays a critical role in obesity-related adipose tissue

  8. The Prostaglandin E2 Receptor EP4 Regulates Obesity-Related Inflammation and Insulin Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Mika; Tamura, Yukinori; Minami, Manabu; Higuchi, Sei; Fujikawa, Risako; Ikedo, Taichi; Nagata, Manabu; Arai, Hidenori; Murayama, Toshinori; Yokode, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    With increasing body weight, macrophages accumulate in adipose tissue. There, activated macrophages secrete numerous proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, giving rise to chronic inflammation and insulin resistance. Prostaglandin E2 suppresses macrophage activation via EP4; however, the role of EP4 signaling in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus remains unknown. In this study, we treated db/db mice with an EP4-selective agonist, ONO-AE1-329, for 4 weeks to explore the role of EP4 signaling in obesity-related inflammation in vivo. Administration of the EP4 agonist did not affect body weight gain or food intake; however, in the EP4 agonist-treated group, glucose tolerance and insulin resistance were significantly improved over that of the vehicle-treated group. Additionally, administration of the EP4 agonist inhibited the accumulation of F4/80-positive macrophages and the formation of crown-like structures in white adipose tissue, and the adipocytes were significantly smaller. The treatment of the EP4 agonist increased the number of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages, and in the stromal vascular fraction of white adipose tissue, which includes macrophages, it markedly decreased the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Further, EP4 activation increased the expression of adiponectin and peroxidase proliferator-activated receptors in white adipose tissue. Next, we examined in vitro M1/M2 polarization assay to investigate the impact of EP4 signaling on determining the functional phenotypes of macrophages. Treatment with EP4 agonist enhanced M2 polarization in wild-type peritoneal macrophages, whereas EP4-deficient macrophages were less susceptible to M2 polarization. Notably, antagonizing peroxidase proliferator-activated receptor δ activity suppressed EP4 signaling-mediated shift toward M2 macrophage polarization. Thus, our results demonstrate that EP4 signaling plays a critical role in obesity-related adipose tissue inflammation and

  9. Role of nuclear receptor NR4A2 in gastrointestinal inflammation and cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Fang Han; Guang-Wen Cao

    2012-01-01

    NR4A2 is a transcription factor belonging to the steroid orphan nuclear receptor superfamily.It was originally considered to be essential in the generation and maintenance of dopaminergic neurons,and associated with neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease.Recently,NR4A2 has been found to play a critical role in some inflammatory diseases and cancer.NR4A2 can be efficiently trans-activated by some proinflammatory cytokines,such as tumor necrosis factor-α,interleukin-1β,and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF).The nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway serves as a principal regulator of inducible NR4A expression in immune cells.NR4A2 can trans-activate Foxp3,a hallmark specifically expressed in regulatory T (Treg) cells,and plays a critical role in the differentiation,maintenance,and function of Treg cells.NR4A2 in T lymphocytes is pivotal for Treg cell induction and suppression of aberrant induction of Th1 under physiological and pathological conditions.High density of Foxp3+ Treg cells is significantly associated with gastrointestinal inflammation,tumor immune escape,and disease progression.NR4A2 is produced at high levels in CD133+ colorectal carcinoma (CRC) cells and significantly upregulated by cyclooxygenase-2-derived prostaglandin E2 in a cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent manner in CRC cells.The cAMP/PKA signaling pathway is the common pathway of NR4A2-related inflammation and cancer.NR4A2 trans-activates osteopontin,a direct target of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway associated with CRC invasion,metastasis,and poor prognosis.Knockdown of endogenous NR4A2 expression attenuates VEGF-induced endothelial cell proliferation,migration and in vivo angiogenesis.Taken together,NR4A2 emerges as an important nuclear factor linking gastrointestinal inflammation and cancer,especially CRC,and should serve as a candidate therapeutic target for inflammation-related gastrointestinal cancer.

  10. Novel Toll-like receptor-4 antagonist (+)-naloxone protects mice from inflammation-induced preterm birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Peck Yin; Dorian, Camilla L; Hutchinson, Mark R; Olson, David M; Rice, Kenner C; Moldenhauer, Lachlan M; Robertson, Sarah A

    2016-11-07

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation by bacterial infection, or by sterile inflammatory insult is a primary trigger of spontaneous preterm birth. Here we utilize mouse models to investigate the efficacy of a novel small molecule TLR4 antagonist, (+)-naloxone, the non-opioid isomer of the opioid receptor antagonist (-)-naloxone, in infection-associated preterm birth. Treatment with (+)-naloxone prevented preterm delivery and alleviated fetal demise in utero elicited by i.p. LPS administration in late gestation. A similar effect with protection from preterm birth and perinatal death, and partial correction of reduced birth weight and postnatal mortality, was conferred by (+)-naloxone administration after intrauterine administration of heat-killed E. coli. Local induction by E. coli of inflammatory cytokine genes Il1b, Il6, Tnf and Il10 in fetal membranes was suppressed by (+)-naloxone, and cytokine expression in the placenta, and uterine myometrium and decidua, was also attenuated. These data demonstrate that inhibition of TLR4 signaling with the novel TLR4 antagonist (+)-naloxone can suppress the inflammatory cascade of preterm parturition, to prevent preterm birth and perinatal death. Further studies are warranted to investigate the utility of small molecule inhibition of TLR-driven inflammation as a component of strategies for fetal protection and delaying preterm birth in the clinical setting.

  11. Novel Toll-like receptor-4 antagonist (+)-naloxone protects mice from inflammation-induced preterm birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Peck Yin; Dorian, Camilla L.; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Olson, David M.; Rice, Kenner C.; Moldenhauer, Lachlan M.; Robertson, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation by bacterial infection, or by sterile inflammatory insult is a primary trigger of spontaneous preterm birth. Here we utilize mouse models to investigate the efficacy of a novel small molecule TLR4 antagonist, (+)-naloxone, the non-opioid isomer of the opioid receptor antagonist (−)-naloxone, in infection-associated preterm birth. Treatment with (+)-naloxone prevented preterm delivery and alleviated fetal demise in utero elicited by i.p. LPS administration in late gestation. A similar effect with protection from preterm birth and perinatal death, and partial correction of reduced birth weight and postnatal mortality, was conferred by (+)-naloxone administration after intrauterine administration of heat-killed E. coli. Local induction by E. coli of inflammatory cytokine genes Il1b, Il6, Tnf and Il10 in fetal membranes was suppressed by (+)-naloxone, and cytokine expression in the placenta, and uterine myometrium and decidua, was also attenuated. These data demonstrate that inhibition of TLR4 signaling with the novel TLR4 antagonist (+)-naloxone can suppress the inflammatory cascade of preterm parturition, to prevent preterm birth and perinatal death. Further studies are warranted to investigate the utility of small molecule inhibition of TLR-driven inflammation as a component of strategies for fetal protection and delaying preterm birth in the clinical setting. PMID:27819333

  12. Role of G protein-coupled orphan receptors in intestinal inflammation: novel targets in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski, Andrzej; Storr, Martin; Zielińska, Marta; Fichna, Jakub

    2015-03-01

    A large number of proteins were classified into the family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Based on their characteristic serpentine domain, they are called 7 TM receptors. Presently, their ligands and physiological functions remain unknown. In this review, we summarize what is known on these receptors and discuss the potential use of these orphan GPCRs (GPRs) in the induction or maintenance of remission in inflammatory bowel diseases. We focus on GPRs 30, 41, 43, 55, 119, and 120, where scientific evidence supports a potential role in intestinal inflammation.

  13. Imaging Atherosclerotic Plaque Inflammation via Folate Receptor Targeting Using a Novel 18F-Folate Radiotracer

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    Adrienne Müller

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Folate receptor β (FR-β is overexpressed on activated, but not resting, macrophages involved in a variety of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. A pivotal step in atherogenesis is the subendothelial accumulation of macrophages. In nascent lesions, they coordinate the scavenging of lipids and cellular debris to define the likelihood of plaque inflammation and eventually rupture. In this study, we determined the presence of FR-β-expressing macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions by the use of a fluorine-18-labeled folate-based radiotracer. Human endarterectomized specimens were used to measure gene expression levels of FR-β and CD68. Increased FR-β and CD68 levels were found in atherosclerotic plaques compared to normal artery walls by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry demonstrated prominent FR-β protein levels in plaques. FR- β-positive cells colocalized with activated macrophages (CD68 in plaque tissue. Carotid sections incubated with 3′-aza-2′- [18F]fluorofolic acid displayed increased accumulation in atherosclerotic plaques through in vitro autoradiography. Specific binding of the radiotracer correlated with FR-β-expressing macrophages. These results demonstrate high FR-β expression in atherosclerotic lesions of human carotid tissue correlating with CD68-positive macrophages. Areas of high 3′-aza-2′-[18F]fluorofolic acid binding within the lesions represented FR-β-expressing macrophages. Selectively targeting FR-β-positive macrophages through folate-based radiopharmaceuticals may be useful for noninvasive imaging of plaque inflammation.

  14. A formyl peptide receptor agonist suppresses inflammation and bone damage in arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, W; Gu, R; Jia, Y; Wei, Xuemin; Fan, H; Harris, J; Zhang, Zhiyi; Quinn, J; Morand, E F; Yang, Y H

    2014-09-01

    Annexin A1 (AnxA1) is an endogenous anti-inflammatory protein and agonist of the formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2). However, the potential for therapeutic FPR ligands to modify immune-mediated disease has been little explored. We investigated the effects of a synthetic FPR agonist on joint disease in the K/BxN model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and RA fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS). Arthritis was induced by injection of K/BxN serum at day 0 and 2 in wild-type (WT) or AnxA1(-/-) mice and clinical and histopathological manifestations measured 8-11 days later. WT mice were given the FPR agonist compound 43 (Cpd43) (6 or 30 mg·kg(-1) i.p.) for 4 days. Effects of AnxA1 and Cpd43 on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis were assessed in RAW 264.7 cells and human RA FLS and macrophages. Treatment with Cpd43 before or after the onset of arthritis reduced clinical disease severity and attenuated synovial TNF-α and osteoclast-associated gene expression. Deletion of AnxA1 in mice exacerbated arthritis severity in the K/BxN model. In vitro, Cpd43 suppressed osteoclastogenesis and NFAT activity elicited by RANKL, and inhibited IL-6 secretion by mouse macrophages. In human RA joint-derived FLS and monocyte-derived macrophages, Cpd43 treatment inhibited IL-6 release, while blocking FPR2 or silencing AnxA1 increased this release. The FPR agonist Cpd43 reduced osteoclastogenesis and inflammation in a mouse model of RA and exhibited anti-inflammatory effects in relevant human cells. These data suggest that FPR ligands may represent novel therapeutic agents capable of ameliorating inflammation and bone damage in RA. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. EP4 Receptor-Associated Protein in Microglia Promotes Inflammation in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Risako; Higuchi, Sei; Nakatsuji, Masato; Yasui, Mika; Ikedo, Taichi; Nagata, Manabu; Yokode, Masayuki; Minami, Manabu

    2016-08-01

    Microglial cells play a key role in neuronal damage in neurodegenerative disorders. Overactivated microglia induce detrimental neurotoxic effects through the excess production of proinflammatory cytokines. However, the mechanisms of microglial activation are poorly understood. We focused on prostaglandin E2 type 4 receptor-associated protein (EPRAP), which suppresses macrophage activation. We demonstrated that EPRAP exists in microglia in the brain. Furthermore, EPRAP-deficient mice displayed less microglial accumulation, and intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) led to reduced expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 mRNA in the brains of EPRAP-deficient mice. Consistently, EPRAP-deficient microglia showed a marked decrease in the production of tumor necrosis factor-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 induced by LPS treatment compared with wild-type controls. In addition, EPRAP deficiency decreased microglial activation and neuronal cell death induced by intraventricular injection of kainic acid. EPRAP deficiency impaired the LPS-induced phosphorylation of c-jun N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in microglia. The phosphorylation levels of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4-which phosphorylates c-jun N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-were also decreased in EPRAP-deficient microglia after LPS stimulation. Although EPRAP in macrophages plays a role in the attenuation of inflammation, EPRAP promotes proinflammatory activation of microglia through mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4-mediated signaling and may be key to the deteriorating neuronal damage brought on by brain inflammation. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Activation and Regulation of the Pattern Recognition Receptors in Obesity-Induced Adipose Tissue Inflammation and Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Takatsu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity-associated chronic tissue inflammation is a key contributing factor to type 2 diabetes mellitus, and a number of studies have clearly demonstrated that the immune system and metabolism are highly integrated. Recent advances in deciphering the various immune cells and signaling networks that link the immune and metabolic systems have contributed to our understanding of the pathogenesis of obesity-associated inflammation. Other recent studies have suggested that pattern recognition receptors in the innate immune system recognize various kinds of endogenous and exogenous ligands, and have a crucial role in initiating or promoting obesity-associated chronic inflammation. Importantly, these mediators act on insulin target cells or on insulin-producing cells impairing insulin sensitivity and its secretion. Here, we discuss how various pattern recognition receptors in the immune system underlie the etiology of obesity-associated inflammation and insulin resistance, with a particular focus on the TLR (Toll-like receptor family protein Radioprotective 105 (RP105/myeloid differentiation protein-1 (MD-1.

  17. Angiotensin II receptor blocker ameliorates stress-induced adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoharu Hayashi

    Full Text Available A strong causal link exists between psychological stress and insulin resistance as well with hypertension. Meanwhile, stress-related responses play critical roles in glucose metabolism in hypertensive patients. As clinical trials suggest that angiotensin-receptor blocker delays the onset of diabetes in hypertensive patients, we investigated the effects of irbesartan on stress-induced adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance. C57BL/6J mice were subjected to 2-week intermittent restraint stress and orally treated with vehicle, 3 and 10 mg/kg/day irbesartan. The plasma concentrations of lipid and proinflammatory cytokines [Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6] were assessed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Monocyte/macrophage accumulation in inguinal white adipose tissue (WAT was observed with CD11b-positive cell counts and mRNA expressions of CD68 and F4/80 using immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR methods respectively. The mRNA levels of angiotensinogen, proinflammatory cytokines shown above, and adiponectin in WAT were also assessed with RT-PCR method. Glucose metabolism was assessed by glucose tolerance tests (GTTs and insulin tolerance tests, and mRNA expression of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1 and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4 in WAT. Restraint stress increased monocyte accumulation, plasma free fatty acids, expression of angiotensinogen and proinflammatory cytokines including MCP-1, and reduced adiponectin. Irbesartan reduced stress-induced monocyte accumulation in WAT in a dose dependent manner. Irbesartan treatment also suppressed induction of adipose angiotensinogen and proinflammatory cytokines in WAT and blood, and reversed changes in adiponectin expression. Notably, irbesartan suppressed stress-induced reduction in adipose tissue weight and free fatty acid release, and improved insulin tolerance with restoration of IRS-1 and GLUT4 mRNA expressions in WAT. The results

  18. Conjugation of transferrin to azide-modified CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots using cyclooctyne click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieber, Christine; Bestetti, Alessandra; Lim, Jet Phey; Ryan, Anneke D; Nguyen, Tich-Lam; Eldridge, Robert; White, Anthony R; Gleeson, Paul A; Donnelly, Paul S; Williams, Spencer J; Mulvaney, Paul

    2012-10-15

    Twinkle twinkle quantum dot: Conjugation of biomolecules to azide-modified quantum dots (QDs) through a bifunctional linker, using strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition with the QD and a squaramide linkage to the biomolecule (see scheme). Transferrin-conjugated QDs were internalized by transferrin-receptor expressing HeLa cells.

  19. Carbohydrate deficient transferrin and alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomons, Hilary Denis

    2012-06-01

    Alcohol abuse is an important public health problem, with major implications in patients with a pre-existing liver pathology of viral origin. Hepatitis C, for example, is one of the diseases in which alcohol consumption can lead to the transition from a fairly benign outline to a potentially life-threatening liver disease. Alcohol abuse is usually identified on the basis of clinical judgment, alcoholism related questionnaires, laboratory tests and, more recently, biomarkers. Also on this list of tests, carbohydrate deficient transferrin (CDT) is widely available and useful for determining recent alcohol consumption, particularly when corroborated with elevation of other liver-associated enzymes. Clinicians should be aware of the indications and limitations of this test in order to better evaluate alcohol consumption in their patients.

  20. Stimulation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors prevents nerve-mediated airway hyperreactivity in NGF-induced inflammation in mouse airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Turgut Emrah; Larsson, Olivia; Adner, Mikael

    2016-04-05

    Cannabinoids are known to inhibit neuronal activity and have significant immunomodulatory effects which suggest a role in inflammatory airway diseases. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that cannabinoids have both acute and chronic modulatory effects on nerve-mediated contractions in NGF-induced airway inflammation. Contractions induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS) were examined in tracheal segments isolated from male BALB/c mice. Tissues were both used fresh or after four days of culture with NGF to induce airway inflammation, and further exposed to cannabinoid receptor agonists. In order to evaluate nerve density, tracheal segments were also examined by immunohistochemistry after in vitro treatments. The CB1 receptor agonists ACEA and ACPA inhibited the constant train EFS-induced contractions in both fresh and NGF-exposed tracheas, an effect that could be blocked by the CB1 receptor antagonist AM251. Culturing the tissues with NGF up-regulated the frequency-dependent EFS-contractions in isolated tracheas. This up-regulation could be inhibited by concomitant treatment with ACEA or ACPA. The treatment with NGF and/or ACEA did not affect the potency or the maximum response to carbachol. In histological sections, it was recognized that the enhanced effect induced by NGF was associated with an increase in nerve density, which, similarly, could be prevented by ACEA treatment. This study shows that stimulation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors modifies the increase of neuronal activity and density in NGF-induced airway inflammation and directly inhibits cholinergic contractions in the airways by a presynaptic mechanism. These findings indicate a protective role of CB1 receptors in airway inflammation.

  1. Targeting Toll-like receptor 4 prevents cobalt-mediated inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Helen; Mawdesley, Amy Elizabeth; Holland, James Patrick; Kirby, John Andrew; Deehan, David John; Tyson-Capper, Alison Jane

    2016-02-16

    Cobalt-chrome alloy is a widely used biomaterial in joint replacements, dental implants and spinal rods. Although it is an effective and biocompatible material, adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD) have arisen in a minority of patients, particularly in those with metal-on-metal bearing hip replacements. There is currently no treatment for ARMD and once progressive, early revision surgery of the implant is necessary. Therapeutic agents to prevent, halt or reverse ARMD would therefore be advantageous. Cobalt ions activate Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), an innate immune receptor responsible for inflammatory responses to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) resulting in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We hypothesised that anti-TLR4 neutralising antibodies, reported to inhibit TLR4-mediated inflammation, could prevent the inflammatory response to cobalt ions in an in vitro macrophage cell culture model. This study shows that a monoclonal anti-TLR4 antibody inhibited cobalt-mediated increases in pro-inflammatory IL8, CCL20 and IL1A expression, as well as IL-8 secretion. In contrast, a polyclonal antibody did not prevent the effect of cobalt ions on either IL-8 or IL1A expression, although it did have a small effect on the CCL20 response. Interestingly, both antibodies inhibited cobalt-mediated neutrophil migration although the greater effect was observed with the monoclonal antibody. In summary our data shows that a monoclonal anti-TLR4 antibody can inhibit cobalt-mediated inflammatory responses while a polyclonal antibody only inhibits the effect of specific cytokines. Anti-TLR4 antibodies have therapeutic potential in ARMD although careful antibody design is required to ensure that the LPS response is preserved.

  2. Antagonism of the prostaglandin D2 receptor CRTH2 attenuates asthma pathology in mouse eosinophilic airway inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uller, Lena; Mathiesen, Jesper Mosolff; Alenmyr, Lisa; Korsgren, Magnus; Ulven, Trond; Högberg, Thomas; Andersson, Gunnar; Persson, Carl GA; Kostenis, Evi

    2007-01-01

    Background Mast cell-derived prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), may contribute to eosinophilic inflammation and mucus production in allergic asthma. Chemoattractant receptor homologous molecule expressed on TH2 cells (CRTH2), a high affinity receptor for prostaglandin D2, mediates trafficking of TH2-cells, mast cells, and eosinophils to inflammatory sites, and has recently attracted interest as target for treatment of allergic airway diseases. The present study involving mice explores the specificity of CRTH2 antagonism of TM30089, which is structurally closely related to the dual TP/CRTH2 antagonist ramatroban, and compares the ability of ramatroban and TM30089 to inhibit asthma-like pathology. Methods Affinity for and antagonistic potency of TM30089 on many mouse receptors including thromboxane A2 receptor mTP, CRTH2 receptor, and selected anaphylatoxin and chemokines receptors were determined in recombinant expression systems in vitro. In vivo effects of TM30089 and ramatroban on tissue eosinophilia and mucus cell histopathology were examined in a mouse asthma model. Results TM30089, displayed high selectivity for and antagonistic potency on mouse CRTH2 but lacked affinity to TP and many other receptors including the related anaphylatoxin C3a and C5a receptors, selected chemokine receptors and the cyclooxygenase isoforms 1 and 2 which are all recognized players in allergic diseases. Furthermore, TM30089 and ramatroban, the latter used as a reference herein, similarly inhibited asthma pathology in vivo by reducing peribronchial eosinophilia and mucus cell hyperplasia. Conclusion This is the first report to demonstrate anti-allergic efficacy in vivo of a highly selective small molecule CRTH2 antagonist. Our data suggest that CRTH2 antagonism alone is effective in mouse allergic airway inflammation even to the extent that this mechanism can explain the efficacy of ramatroban. PMID:17328802

  3. Antagonism of the prostaglandin D2 receptor CRTH2 attenuates asthma pathology in mouse eosinophilic airway inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Högberg Thomas

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mast cell-derived prostaglandin D2 (PGD2, may contribute to eosinophilic inflammation and mucus production in allergic asthma. Chemoattractant receptor homologous molecule expressed on TH2 cells (CRTH2, a high affinity receptor for prostaglandin D2, mediates trafficking of TH2-cells, mast cells, and eosinophils to inflammatory sites, and has recently attracted interest as target for treatment of allergic airway diseases. The present study involving mice explores the specificity of CRTH2 antagonism of TM30089, which is structurally closely related to the dual TP/CRTH2 antagonist ramatroban, and compares the ability of ramatroban and TM30089 to inhibit asthma-like pathology. Methods Affinity for and antagonistic potency of TM30089 on many mouse receptors including thromboxane A2 receptor mTP, CRTH2 receptor, and selected anaphylatoxin and chemokines receptors were determined in recombinant expression systems in vitro. In vivo effects of TM30089 and ramatroban on tissue eosinophilia and mucus cell histopathology were examined in a mouse asthma model. Results TM30089, displayed high selectivity for and antagonistic potency on mouse CRTH2 but lacked affinity to TP and many other receptors including the related anaphylatoxin C3a and C5a receptors, selected chemokine receptors and the cyclooxygenase isoforms 1 and 2 which are all recognized players in allergic diseases. Furthermore, TM30089 and ramatroban, the latter used as a reference herein, similarly inhibited asthma pathology in vivo by reducing peribronchial eosinophilia and mucus cell hyperplasia. Conclusion This is the first report to demonstrate anti-allergic efficacy in vivo of a highly selective small molecule CRTH2 antagonist. Our data suggest that CRTH2 antagonism alone is effective in mouse allergic airway inflammation even to the extent that this mechanism can explain the efficacy of ramatroban.

  4. Role of the receptor Mas in macrophage-mediated inflammation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Anna; Yang, Guang; Friedrich, Juliane; Kovacs, Agnes; Lee, De-Hyung; Grave, Katharina; Jörg, Stefanie; Alenina, Natalia; Grosch, Janina; Winkler, Jürgen; Gold, Ralf; Bader, Michael; Manzel, Arndt; Rump, Lars C; Müller, Dominik N; Linker, Ralf A; Stegbauer, Johannes

    2016-12-06

    Recently, an alternative renin-angiotensin system pathway has been described, which involves binding of angiotensin-(1-7) to its receptor Mas. The Mas axis may counterbalance angiotensin-II-mediated proinflammatory effects, likely by affecting macrophage function. Here we investigate the role of Mas in murine models of autoimmune neuroinflammation and atherosclerosis, which both involve macrophage-driven pathomechanisms. Mas signaling affected macrophage polarization, migration, and macrophage-mediated T-cell activation. Mas deficiency exacerbated the course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and increased macrophage infiltration as well as proinflammatory gene expression in the spleen and spinal cord. Furthermore, Mas deficiency promoted atherosclerosis by affecting macrophage infiltration and migration and led to increased oxidative stress as well as impaired endothelial function in ApoE-deficient mice. In summary, we identified the Mas axis as an important factor in macrophage function during inflammation of the central nervous and vascular system in vivo. Modulating the Mas axis may constitute an interesting therapeutic target in multiple sclerosis and/or atherosclerosis.

  5. Leukotriene Receptor Antagonists in the Treatment of Asthma: Implications for Eosinophilic Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redwan Moqbel

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the treatment and management of asthma have suggested that leukotriene (LT receptor antagonists may be very beneficial as a second generation therapy with steroid-sparing properties and negligible side effects. These agents have shown interesting effects on peripheral blood and sputum eosinophils. A major contributor to the damage in the airway of asthmatic patients is the eosinophil, which, upon activation, releases a battery of granule-associated cytotoxic, cationic proteins, including the major basic protein and eosinophil peroxidase, and membrane-derived de novo-synthesized bioactive lipid mediators, including LTC4, LTD4 and LTE4, as well as platelet activating factor. These products have deleterious effects on the airway tissue including mucosal and smooth muscle layers. Accumulating evidence suggests that these agents may also influence the accumulation and maintenance of eosinophilic responses at the site of inflammation. This article reviews the possible anti-inflammatory mode of action of these therapies. It also discusses where there may be a gap in the knowledge regarding the potential direct and indirect effects of LT modifiers on eosinophil function and recruitment.

  6. Natural Modulators of Endosomal Toll-Like Receptor-Mediated Psoriatic Skin Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Yang Lai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that can be initiated by excessive activation of endosomal toll-like receptors (TLRs, particularly TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9. Therefore, inhibitors of endosomal TLR activation are being investigated for their ability to treat this disease. The currently approved biological drugs adalimumab, etanercept, infliximab, ustekinumab, ixekizumab, and secukizumab are antibodies against effector cytokines that participate in the initiation and development of psoriasis. Several immune modulatory oligonucleotides and small molecular weight compounds, including IMO-3100, IMO-8400, and CPG-52364, that block the interaction between endosomal TLRs and their ligands are under clinical investigation for their effectiveness in the treatment of psoriasis. In addition, several chemical compounds, including AS-2444697, PF-05387252, PF-05388169, PF-06650833, ML120B, and PHA-408, can inhibit TLR signaling. Although these compounds have demonstrated anti-inflammatory activity in animal models, their therapeutic potential for the treatment of psoriasis has not yet been tested. Recent studies demonstrated that natural compounds derived from plants, fungi, and bacteria, including mustard seed, Antrodia cinnamomea extract, curcumin, resveratrol, thiostrepton, azithromycin, and andrographolide, inhibited psoriasis-like inflammation induced by the TLR7 agonist imiquimod in animal models. These natural modulators employ different mechanisms to inhibit endosomal TLR activation and are administered via different routes. Therefore, they represent candidate psoriasis drugs and might lead to the development of new treatment options.

  7. Vitamin D Receptor Agonists Target CXCL10: New Therapeutic Tools for Resolution of Inflammation

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    Sabino Scolletta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the many biological extraskeletal actions of vitamin D has increased in the past decades. Indeed, vitamin D and analogue molecules, besides the classical actions on bone metabolism, exert several beneficial effects on metabolic homeostasis, heart-cardiovascular, brain, and muscle physiological functions, throughout the interaction with the specific vitamin D receptor (VDR. In particular, VDR agonists powerfully control innate and adaptive immune system with favorable effects on human health. VDR ligands act as immunomodulators that are potent enough to retain anti-inflammatory effects, even though the mechanism underlying those effects is not yet fully elucidated. VDR agonists exert a significant suppression of inflammatory processes switching the immune response from T helper 1 (Th1 to T helper 2 (Th2 dominance and counteracting the self-enhancing inflammatory loop between immune and resident cells, especially by cytokine release impairment. Those molecules are able, indeed, to reduce the release of the interferon (IFN-induced 10 kDa protein IP-10/CXCL10, a powerful chemokine driving Th1-mediated inflammation. Based on their features, VDR ligands show the potentiality to be included in immunosuppressive regimens, aimed to control auto- and alloimmune Th1-driven overreactivity, occurring, for example, in autoimmune disease or graft rejection.

  8. DMPD: The involvement of the interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinases (IRAKs) incellular signaling networks controlling inflammation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18249132 The involvement of the interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinases (IRAKs) i...2008 Jan 30. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The involvement of the interleukin-1 receptor-associated kin...ases (IRAKs) incellular signaling networks controlling inflammation. PubmedID 18249132 Title The... involvement of the interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinases (IRAKs) incellular signaling ne

  9. Role of A1 and A2A adenosine receptor agonists in adipose tissue inflammation induced by obesity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeOliveira, Caroline Candida; Paiva Caria, Cintia Rabelo E; Ferreira Gotardo, Erica Martins; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima; Gambero, Alessandra

    2017-03-15

    Adenosine receptors are expressed in adipose tissue and control physiological and pathological events such as lipolysis and inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), a potent and selective A1 adenosine receptor agonist; 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxyamidoadenosine hydrochloride (CGS-21680), an A2A adenosine receptor agonist; and 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA), a potent non-selective adenosine receptor agonist on adipose tissue inflammatory alterations induced by obesity in mice. Swiss mice were fed with a high-fat diet for 12 weeks and agonists were administered in the last two weeks. Body weight, adiposity and glucose homeostasis were evaluated. Inflammation in adipose tissue was assessed by evaluation of adipokine production and macrophage infiltration. Adenosine receptor signaling in adipose tissue was also evaluated. Mice that received CGS21680 presented an improvement in glucose homeostasis in association with systemically reduced inflammatory markers (TNF-α, PAI-1) and in the visceral adipose tissue (TNF-α, MCP-1, macrophage infiltration). Activation of p38 signaling was found in adipose tissue of this group of mice. NECA-treated mice presented some improvements in glucose homeostasis associated with an observed weight loss. Mice that received CPA presented only a reduction in the ex vivo basal lipolysis rate measured within visceral adipose tissue. In conclusion, administration of the A2A receptor agonist to obese mice resulted in improvements in glucose homeostasis and adipose tissue inflammation, corroborating the idea that new therapeutics to treat obesity could emerge from these compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. 可溶性转铁蛋白受体在慢性病贫血中的应用%The clinical application of soluble transferrin receptor in chronic anemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建花; 裴景亮; 张淑英

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨可溶性转铁蛋白受体在慢性病贫血中的临床应用.方法:将63例慢性病贫血患者分为慢性病贫血缺铁组(30例)和慢性病贫血非缺铁组(33例),并选择同期23例健康体检者作为健康对照组.三组均采用生物素-亲和素-酶联免疫法定量检测可溶性转铁蛋白受体(sTFR)水平,并结合血清铁(SI)、铁蛋白(SF)、总铁结合力(TIBC)对结果进行分析比较.结果:慢性病贫血缺铁组sTFR为(46.1±29.4)nmol/L,慢性病贫血非缺铁组sTFR为(18.4±5.7)nmol/L,健康对照组sTFR为(15.5±6.2)nmol/L,慢性病贫血缺铁组与其他两组比较,差异有统计学意义(P0.05).结论:sTFR是一个灵敏、可靠的缺铁诊断的定量指标,在慢性病贫血人群的铁状况评估方面具有重要的临床价值.%Objective: To discuss the clinical application of soluble transferrin receptor in chronic anemia. Methods: 63 cases of patients with chronic anemia were divided into chronic anemia with iron deficiency group (30 cases) and chronic anemia without iron deficiency group (33 cases), 23 cases of healthy person were divided into healty group. The concentration of sTFR was detected by the method of biotin-affinity grain enzyme-lined immunosorbent, and the results were comparison analyzed combination the level of TIBC, SI, SF. Results: The sTFR level of chronic anemia with iron deficiency group was (46.1 ±29.4) nmol/L; the sTFR level of chronic anemia without iron deficiency group was (18.4 ±5.7) nmol/L; the sTFR level of healty group was (15.5±6.2) nmol/L; the sTFR level of chronic anemia with iron deficiency group were significantly higher than that of other groups (P0.05). Conclusion: sTFR is an sensitive and reliable quantitative index to diagnose iron deficiency.lt has great clinical value in evaluation iron's situation of chronic anemia population.

  11. Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channel localized to non-neuronal airway cells promotes non-neurogenic inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nassini, Romina; Pedretti, Pamela; Moretto, Nadia;

    2012-01-01

    The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel, localized to airway sensory nerves, has been proposed to mediate airway inflammation evoked by allergen and cigarette smoke (CS) in rodents, via a neurogenic mechanism. However the limited clinical evidence for the role of neurogenic...... and fibroblasts, acrolein and CS extract evoked IL-8 release, a response selectively reduced by TRPA1 antagonists. Capsaicin, agonist of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), a channel co-expressed with TRPA1 by airway sensory nerves, and acrolein or CS (TRPA1 agonists), or the neuropeptide...

  12. Adaptation of transferrin protein and glycan synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. de Jong (Gerard); W.L. van Noort (W.); R.A. Feelders (Richard); C.M.H. de Jeu-Jaspars (Nel); H.G. van Eijk (Henk)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractWe report the patterns of variability in transferrin structure in pregnancy, iron deficiency anemia, women using oral contraceptives, nonanaemic rheumatoid arthritis, iron deficient rheumatoid arthritis and anemia of the chronic diseases. Changes in microheterogeneity were assessed by cr

  13. Adaptation of transferrin protein and glycan synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. de Jong (Gerard); W.L. van Noort (W.); R.A. Feelders (Richard); C.M.H. de Jeu-Jaspars (Nel); H.G. van Eijk (Henk)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractWe report the patterns of variability in transferrin structure in pregnancy, iron deficiency anemia, women using oral contraceptives, nonanaemic rheumatoid arthritis, iron deficient rheumatoid arthritis and anemia of the chronic diseases. Changes in microheterogeneity were assessed by

  14. Transferrin Impacts Bacillus thuringiensis Biofilm Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Garner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the impact of transferrin on Bacillus thuringiensis biofilms. Three commercial strains, an environmental strain (33679, the type strain (10792, and an isolate from a diseased insect (700872, were cultured in iron restricted minimal medium. All strains produced biofilm when grown in vinyl plates at 30°C. B. thuringiensis 33679 had a biofilm biomass more than twice the concentration exhibited by the other strains. The addition of transferrin resulted in slightly increased growth yields for 2 of the 3 strains tested, including 33679. In contrast, the addition of 50 μg/mL of transferrin resulted in an 80% decrease in biofilm levels for strain 33679. When the growth temperature was increased to 37°C, the addition of 50 μg/mL of transferrin increased culture turbidity for only strain 33679. Biofilm levels were again decreased in strain 33679 at 37°C. Growth of B. thuringiensis cultures in polystyrene resulted in a decrease in overall growth yields at 30°C, with biofilm levels significantly decreased for 33679 in the presence of transferrin. These findings demonstrate that transferrin impacts biofilm formation in select strains of B. thuringiensis. Identification of these differences in biofilm regulation may be beneficial in elucidating potential virulence mechanisms among the differing strains.

  15. Pharmacological activation of cannabinoid 2 receptor attenuates inflammation, fibrogenesis, and promotes re-epithelialization during skin wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin-Lin; Zhao, Rui; Li, Jiao-Yong; Li, Shan-Shan; Liu, Min; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Meng-Zhou; Dong, Wen-Wen; Jiang, Shu-Kun; Zhang, Miao; Tian, Zhi-Ling; Liu, Chang-Sheng; Guan, Da-Wei

    2016-09-05

    Previous studies showed that cannabinoid 2 (CB2) receptor is expressed in multiple effector cells during skin wound healing. Meanwhile, its functional involvement in inflammation, fibrosis, and cell proliferation in other organs and skin diseases implied CB2 receptor might also regulate skin wound healing. To verify this hypothesis, mice excisional wounds were created and treated with highly selective CB2 receptor agonist GP1a (1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-6-methyl- N-piperidin-1-yl-4H-indeno[1,2-c]pyrazole-3-carboxamide) and antagonist AM630 ([6-iodo-2- methyl-1-(2-morpholin-4-ylethyl)indol-3-yl]-(4-methoxyphenyl)methanone) respectively. The inflammatory infiltration, cytokine expression, fibrogenesis, and wound re-epithelialization were analyzed. After CB2 receptor activation, neutrophil and macrophage infiltrations were reduced, and expressions of monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1, Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A were decreased. Keratinocyte proliferation and migration were enhanced. Wound re-epithelialization was accelerated. Fibroblast accumulation and fibroblast-to-myofibroblast transformation were attenuated, and expression of pro-collagen I was decreased. Furthermore, HaCaT cells in vitro were treated with GP1a or AM630, which revealed that CB2 receptor activation promoted keratinocyte migration by inducing the epithelial to mesenchymal transition. These results, taken together, indicate that activating CB2 receptor could ameliorate wound healing by reducing inflammation, accelerating re-epithelialization, and attenuating scar formation. Thus, CB2 receptor agonist might be a novel perspective for skin wound therapy.

  16. Targeting formyl peptide receptor 1 of activated macrophages to monitor inflammation of experimental osteoarthritis in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinlin; Chordia, Mahendra D; Du, Xuejun; Graves, John L; Zhang, Yi; Park, Yong-Sang; Guo, Yongfei; Pan, Dongfeng; Cui, Quanjun

    2016-09-01

    Macrophages play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). In this study, the feasibility of a formyl peptide receptor 1 (Fpr1)-targeting peptide probe cFLFLF-PEG-(64) Cu via positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was investigated for detection of macrophage activity during development of OA. Monoiodoacetate (MIA) was intraarticularly injected into the knee joint of Sprague-Dawley rats to induce OA. Five days later, cFLFLF-PEG-(64) Cu (∼7,400 kBq/rat) was injected into the tail vein and microPET/CT imaging was performed to assess the OA inflammation by detecting infiltration of macrophages by Fpr1 expression. In addition, a murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 and two fluorescent probes cFLFLF-PEG-cyanine 7 (cFLFLF-PEG-Cy7) and cFLFLF-PEG-cyanine 5 (cFLFLF-PEG-Cy5) were used to define the binding specificity of the peptide to macrophages. It was found with the MIA model that the maximal standard uptake values (SUVmax ) for right (MIA treated) and left (control) knees were 17.96 ± 5.45 and 3.00 ± 1.40, respectively. Histological evaluation of cryomicrotome sections showed that Fpr1 expression, cFLFLF-PEG-Cy5 binding, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity were elevated in the injured synovial membranes. The in vitro experiments demonstrated that both fluorescent peptide probes could bind specifically to RAW264.7 cells, which was blocked by cFLFLF but not by the scramble peptide. The findings highlighted the use of cFLFLF-PEG-(64) Cu/PET as an effective method potentially applied for detection and treatment evaluation of OA. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1529-1538, 2016. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channel localized to non-neuronal airway cells promotes non-neurogenic inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina Nassini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1 channel, localized to airway sensory nerves, has been proposed to mediate airway inflammation evoked by allergen and cigarette smoke (CS in rodents, via a neurogenic mechanism. However the limited clinical evidence for the role of neurogenic inflammation in asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease raises an alternative possibility that airway inflammation is promoted by non-neuronal TRPA1. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using Real-Time PCR and calcium imaging, we found that cultured human airway cells, including fibroblasts, epithelial and smooth muscle cells express functional TRPA1 channels. By using immunohistochemistry, TRPA1 staining was observed in airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells in sections taken from human airways and lung, and from airways and lung of wild-type, but not TRPA1-deficient mice. In cultured human airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts, acrolein and CS extract evoked IL-8 release, a response selectively reduced by TRPA1 antagonists. Capsaicin, agonist of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1, a channel co-expressed with TRPA1 by airway sensory nerves, and acrolein or CS (TRPA1 agonists, or the neuropeptide substance P (SP, which is released from sensory nerve terminals by capsaicin, acrolein or CS, produced neurogenic inflammation in mouse airways. However, only acrolein and CS, but not capsaicin or SP, released the keratinocyte chemoattractant (CXCL-1/KC, IL-8 analogue in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid of wild-type mice. This effect of TRPA1 agonists was attenuated by TRPA1 antagonism or in TRPA1-deficient mice, but not by pharmacological ablation of sensory nerves. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that, although either TRPV1 or TRPA1 activation causes airway neurogenic inflammation, solely TRPA1 activation orchestrates an additional inflammatory response which is not neurogenic. This finding suggests

  18. Effects of cysteinyl leukotrienes and leukotriene receptor antagonists on markers of inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sampson, Anthony P; Pizzichini, Emilio; Bisgaard, Hans

    2003-01-01

    The understanding that asthma pathophysiology includes an inflammatory component has spurred the more aggressive use of anti-inflammatory therapies and created a need for effective tools to measure inflammation. Biomarkers of airway inflammation proposed are obtained by methods that are direct bu...

  19. [Improvement of carbohydrate deficient transferrin measurement by capillary zone electrophoresis using immunosubtraction of immunoglobulins and transferrin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraud, J; Schellenberg, F; Pagès, J-C

    2009-01-01

    CDT (Carbohydrate Deficient Transferrin) is considered as the most efficient biomarker of alcohol abuse available for routine use. Among the various methods developed for its measurement, capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) on the multicapillary analyzer Capillarys2 provides high quality results at high throughput. However, the non CDT specific measurement of protein absorbance at 200 nm may bring abnormal profiles in samples from patients with high polyclonal immunoglobulin level or monoclonal component. We evaluated the automated immunosubtraction procedure developed by the manufacturer in 48 samples with abnormal electrophoretic profiles that potentially could interfere with CZE measurement of CDT. Elimination of the serum immunoglobulins raised the number of interpretable profiles from 19 (40%) to 37 (77%). The immunosubtraction procedure failed in samples with a monoclonal component present at a concentration > 60 g/L and in some samples harbouring a partially degraded C3 fraction. Six samples identified as genetic BC transferrin variants were also included in the study and submitted to an automated transferrin subtraction procedure to ascertain whether the additional peak were actually transferrin glycoforms. After treatment, two samples were classified as homozygote C for transferrin due to the persistence of one of the supposed transferrin peak. In conclusion, immunoglobulin and transferrin subtraction allow a better CDT measurement in most samples with interfering monoclonal components and avoid misclassification of suspected transferrin BC or CD variants.

  20. Role of lysophosphatidic acid receptor LPA2 in the development of allergic airway inflammation in a murine model of asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Jerold

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA plays a critical role in airway inflammation through G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA1-3. We have demonstrated that LPA induced cytokine and lipid mediator release in human bronchial epithelial cells. Here we provide evidence for the role of LPA and LPA receptors in Th2-dominant airway inflammation. Methods Wild type, LPA1 heterozygous knockout mice (LPA1+/-, and LPA2 heterozygous knockout mice (LPA2+/- were sensitized with inactivated Schistosoma mansoni eggs and local antigenic challenge with Schistosoma mansoni soluble egg Ag (SEA in the lungs. Bronchoalveolar larvage (BAL fluids and lung tissues were collected for analysis of inflammatory responses. Further, tracheal epithelial cells were isolated and challenged with LPA. Results BAL fluids from Schistosoma mansoni egg-sensitized and challenged wild type mice (4 days of challenge showed increase of LPA level (~2.8 fold, compared to control mice. LPA2+/- mice, but not LPA1+/- mice, exposed to Schistosoma mansoni egg revealed significantly reduced cell numbers and eosinophils in BAL fluids, compared to challenged wild type mice. Both LPA2+/- and LPA1+/- mice showed decreases in bronchial goblet cells. LPA2+/- mice, but not LPA1+/- mice showed the decreases in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and LPA levels in BAL fluids after SEA challenge. The PGE2 production by LPA was reduced in isolated tracheal epithelial cells from LPA2+/- mice. These results suggest that LPA and LPA receptors are involved in Schistosoma mansoni egg-mediated inflammation and further studies are proposed to understand the role of LPA and LPA receptors in the inflammatory process.

  1. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 antagonist ki16425 blunts abdominal and systemic inflammation in a mouse model of peritoneal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Wei, Jianxin; Weathington, Nathaniel; Jacko, Anastasia M; Huang, Hai; Tsung, Allan; Zhao, Yutong

    2015-07-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator of inflammation via the LPA receptors 1-6. We and others have previously described proinflammatory and profibrotic activities of LPA signaling in bleomycin- or lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pulmonary fibrosis or lung injury models. In this study, we investigated if LPA signaling plays a role in the pathogenesis of systemic sepsis from an abdominal source. We report here that antagonism of the LPA receptor LPA1 with the small molecule ki16425 reduces the severity of abdominal inflammation and organ damage in the setting of peritoneal endotoxin exposure. Pretreatment of mice with intraperitoneal ki16425 eliminates LPS-induced peritoneal neutrophil chemokine and cytokine production, liver oxidative stress, liver injury, and cellular apoptosis in visceral organs. Mice pretreated with ki16425 are also protected from LPS-induced mortality. Tissue myeloperoxidase activity is not affected by LPA1 antagonism. We have shown that LPA1 is associated with LPS coreceptor CD14 and the association is suppressed by ki16425. LPS-induced phosphorylation of protein kinase C δ (PKCδ) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) in liver cells and interleukin 6 production in Raw264 cells are likewise blunted by LPA1 antagonism. These studies indicate that the small molecule inhibitor of LPA1, ki16425, suppresses cytokine responses and inflammation in a peritoneal sepsis model by blunting downstream signaling through the LPA1-CD14-toll-like receptor 4 receptor complex. This anti-inflammatory effect may represent a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of systemic inflammatory responses to infection of the abdominal cavity.

  2. Structural consequences of binding of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} to apo-transferrin: Can this protein account for entry of uranium into human cells?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidaud, C [CEA Valrho, DSV, DIEP, Service de Biochimie Post Genomique and Toxicologie Nucleaire, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France); Vidaud, C.; Gourion-Arsiquaud, S; Rollin-Genetet, F; Torne-Celer, C; Plantevin, S; Pible, O; Quemeneur, E; Berthomieu, C. [CEA Cadarache, Laboratoire de Bioenergetique Cellulaire and Laboratoire des Interactions Proteine-Metal, DSV/DEVM, UMR 6191 CNRS-CEA-Universite Aix-Marseille II, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    2007-02-15

    It has been established that transferrin binds a variety of metals. These include toxic uranyl ions which form rather stable uranyl-transferrin derivatives. We determined the extent to which the iron binding sites might accommodate the peculiar topographic profile of the uranyl ion and the consequences of its binding on protein conformation. Indeed, metal intake via endocytosis of the transferrin/transferrin receptor depends on the adequate coordination of the metal in its site, which controls protein conformation and receptor binding. Using UV-vis and Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy coupled to a micro-dialysis system, we showed that at both metal binding sites two tyrosines are uranyl ligands, while histidine does not participate with its coordination sphere. Analysis by circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed major differences between structural changes associated with interactions of iron or uranyl with apo-transferrin. Uranyl coordination reduces the level of protein stabilization compared to iron, but this may be simply related to partial lobe closure. The lack of interaction between uranyl-TF and its receptor was shown by flow cytometry using Alexa 488-labeled holo-transferrin. We propose a structural model summarizing our conclusion that the uranyl-TF complex adopts an open conformation that is not appropriate for optimal binding to the transferrin receptor. (authors)

  3. 可溶性转铁蛋白受体在儿童铁缺乏症诊断中的价值%Value of soluble transferrin receptor in the diagnosis of iron deficiency in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王亚平; 邵洁; 庄学玲

    2011-01-01

    目的 调查6个月至7岁各年龄段儿童铁缺乏症的发生率;评价可溶性转铁蛋白受体(sTfR)在儿童铁缺乏症筛查中的应用价值.方法 采用诊断性试验方法,检测浙江省杭州市502例来我院体检的6个月至7岁儿童血清STM、铁蛋白(SF)、血清铁(SI)、总铁结合力(TIBC)以及C反应蛋白(CRP)水平,同时检测血常规和血锌原叶F#(ZPP).结果 铁缺乏症的检出率为19.5 %(98/502),其中婴儿组(≦岁)检出率为34.7%,幼儿组(大于1岁、小于或等于3岁)19.4%,学龄前组(大于3岁、小于或等于7岁)14.0% o婴儿组铁缺乏的检出率明显高于其他两个年龄组.婴儿组sTfR均值(2.02±0.73 mg/L)明显高于幼儿组((1.68±0.40 mg/L)和学龄前组(1.67 10.29 mg/L),差异有统计学意义(P < 0.05).sTM诊断铁缺乏的界值在婴儿组为2.02 mg/L(灵敏度70.3%,特异度82.2%),幼儿组为1.85 mg/L(灵敏度71.7%,特异度86.4%),学龄前组为1.85 mg/L(灵敏度77.8%,特异度88.6%).sTf与SF,TIBC,TS,ZPP及MCV具有相关性(r分别为0.107、0.276、-0.139、0.175、-0.140,P均<0.05).结论 7岁以下儿童中,婴儿组是铁缺乏发生率最高的;婴儿组sTfR均值及其诊断铁缺乏的界值均高于其他年龄组;STfR是诊断儿童尤其是婴儿铁缺乏症的一个较敏感指标.%Objective To study the prevalence of iron deficiency in children between 6 months and 7 years and to study the diagnostic value of soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) for iron deficiency in the children. Methods A total of 502 healthy children between 6 months and 7 years from Hangzhou City of Zhejiang Province were enrolled. Serum sTfR,serum ferritin (SF) , serum iron (SI) , total iron blinding capacity (TIBC), zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP), Hb, MCV and CRP levels were measured. Results The prevalence rate of iron deficiency was 19.5 % in children at ages of 6 months to 7 years. The prevalence rate of iron deficiency was the highest in infants ( ≤ 1 year old; 34.7% ) , followed by

  4. Orphan Nuclear Receptor ERRα Controls Macrophage Metabolic Signaling and A20 Expression to Negatively Regulate TLR-Induced Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuk, Jae-Min; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Soo Yeon; Lee, Hye-Mi; Han, Jeongsu; Dufour, Catherine Rosa; Kim, Jin Kyung; Jin, Hyo Sun; Yang, Chul-Su; Park, Ki-Sun; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kim, Jin-Man; Kweon, Gi Ryang; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Vanacker, Jean-Marc; Moore, David D; Giguère, Vincent; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2015-07-21

    The orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα; NR3B1) is a key metabolic regulator, but its function in regulating inflammation remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that ERRα negatively regulates Toll-like receptor (TLR)-induced inflammation by promoting Tnfaip3 transcription and fine-tuning of metabolic reprogramming in macrophages. ERRα-deficient (Esrra(-/-)) mice showed increased susceptibility to endotoxin-induced septic shock, leading to more severe pro-inflammatory responses than control mice. ERRα regulated macrophage inflammatory responses by directly binding the promoter region of Tnfaip3, a deubiquitinating enzyme in TLR signaling. In addition, Esrra(-/-) macrophages showed an increased glycolysis, but impaired mitochondrial respiratory function and biogenesis. Further, ERRα was required for the regulation of NF-κB signaling by controlling p65 acetylation via maintenance of NAD(+) levels and sirtuin 1 activation. These findings unravel a previously unappreciated role for ERRα as a negative regulator of TLR-induced inflammatory responses through inducing Tnfaip3 transcription and controlling the metabolic reprogramming.

  5. Toll-like receptor 4 regulates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation and lactation insufficiency in a mouse model of mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Danielle J; Hutchinson, Mark R; Ingman, Wendy V

    2014-05-01

    Lactation mastitis is a debilitating inflammatory breast disease in postpartum women. Disease severity is associated with markers of inflammation rather than bacterial load, suggesting that immune-signaling pathways activated in the host are important in the disease pathology. The role of the innate pattern recognition receptor toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in progression and resolution of mastitislike disease was investigated in a mouse model. Lipopolysaccharide in Matrigel (10 μg/10 μl) was administered into the teat canal of lactating Tlr4 null mutant and wild-type mice to induce a localized area of inflammation. Mastitis induction resulted in a marked influx of RB6-positive neutrophils and F4/80-positive macrophages, which was higher in Tlr4(-/-) mice compared to wild-type mice. Tlr4 null mutation resulted in an altered immune-signaling fingerprint following induction of mastitis, with attenuated serum cytokines, including CXCL1, CCL2, interleukin 1 beta, and tumor necrosis factor alpha compared to wild-type mice. In both genotypes, the localized area of inflammation had resolved after 7 days, and milk protein was evident. However, the mammary glands of wild-type mice exhibited reduced capacity for milk production, with decreased percent area populated with glandular epithelium and decreased abundance of nuclear phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 compared to Tlr4 null mice. This study demonstrates that inflammatory pathways activated in the host are critically important in mastitis disease progression and suggests that lactation insufficiency associated with mastitis may be a consequence of TLR4-mediated inflammation, rather than the bacterial infection itself.

  6. Modulation of airway inflammation and resistance in mice by a nicotinic receptor agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, M-R; Israël-Assayag, E; Cormier, Y

    2005-07-01

    Nicotinic agonists, including 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium (DMPP), have anti-inflammatory properties and in some instances smooth muscle relaxing effects. Since inflammation and airway smooth muscle contraction are two major components of asthma, the present authors investigated the effects of DMPP on airway inflammation and airway resistance in a mouse model of asthma. Mice were sensitised and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) and treated either intraperitoneally or intranasally with DMPP. The effect of DMPP was tested on airway inflammation, airway resistance and on the increase of intracellular calcium in bronchial smooth muscle cells. DMPP given either during sensitisation, OVA challenges or throughout the protocol prevented lung inflammation and decreased the serum level of OVA specific immunoglobulin E. DMPP administration reduced the number of total cells, lymphocytes and eosinophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. Intranasal DMPP administration was as effective as dexamethasone (DEXA) in reducing total cell count and eosinophil counts in BAL fluid. DMPP, but not DEXA, reduced tissue inflammation. Intranasal DMPP, given 10 min before the test, reduced airway responsiveness to metacholine. DMPP also reduced the increase in intracellular calcium in response to bradykinin. In conclusion, these results show that 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium reduces lung inflammation and prevents airway hyperresponsiveness in the mouse model of asthma.

  7. Bioadhesive micelles of d-α-tocopherol polyethylene glycol succinate 1000: Synergism of chitosan and transferrin in targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Poornima; Sonali; Singh, Rahul Pratap; Sharma, Gunjan; Mehata, Abhishesh K; Singh, Sanjay; Rajesh, Chellapa V; Pandey, Bajarangprasad L; Koch, Biplob; Muthu, Madaswamy S

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare targeted bioadhesive d-α- tocopheryl glycol succinate 1000 (TPGS) micelles containing docetaxel (DTX) for brain targeted cancer therapy. Considering the unique bioadhesive feature of chitosan, herein, we have developed a synergistic transferrin receptor targeted bioadhesive micelles using TPGS conjugated chitosan (TPGS-chitosan), which target the overexpressed transferrin receptors of glioma cells for brain cancer therapy. The micelles were prepared by the solvent casting method and characterized for their particle size, polydispersity, zeta-potential, surface morphology, drug encapsulation efficiency, and in-vitro release. The IC50 values demonstrated transferrin receptor targeted TPGS-chitosan micelles could be 248 folds more effective than Docel™ after 24h treatment with the C6 glioma cells. Further, time dependent bioadhesive cellular uptake study indicated that a synergistic effect was achieved with the chitosan and transferrin in targeted TPGS-chitosan micelles through the biodhesive property of chitosan as well as transferrin receptor mediated endocytosis. The in-vivo pharmacokinetic results demonstrated that relative bioavailability of non-targeted and targeted micelles were 2.89 and 4.08 times more effective than Docel™ after 48h of treatments, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. P2X7 receptor and caspase 1 activation are central to airway inflammation observed after exposure to tobacco smoke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suffwan Eltom

    Full Text Available Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD is a cigarette smoke (CS-driven inflammatory airway disease with an increasing global prevalence. Currently there is no effective medication to stop the relentless progression of this disease. It has recently been shown that an activator of the P2X7/inflammasome pathway, ATP, and the resultant products (IL-1β/IL-18 are increased in COPD patients. The aim of this study was to determine whether activation of the P2X7/caspase 1 pathway has a functional role in CS-induced airway inflammation. Mice were exposed to CS twice a day to induce COPD-like inflammation and the role of the P2X7 receptor was investigated. We have demonstrated that CS-induced neutrophilia in a pre-clinical model is temporally associated with markers of inflammasome activation, (increased caspase 1 activity and release of IL-1β/IL-18 in the lungs. A selective P2X7 receptor antagonist and mice genetically modified so that the P2X7 receptors were non-functional attenuated caspase 1 activation, IL-1β release and airway neutrophilia. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the role of this pathway was not restricted to early stages of disease development by showing increased caspase 1 activation in lungs from a more chronic exposure to CS and from patients with COPD. This translational data suggests the P2X7/Inflammasome pathway plays an ongoing role in disease pathogenesis. These results advocate the critical role of the P2X7/caspase 1 axis in CS-induced inflammation, highlighting this as a possible therapeutic target in combating COPD.

  9. 7-Ketocholesterol-induced inflammation signals mostly through the TLR4 receptor both in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiahn-Dar Huang

    Full Text Available The cholesterol oxide 7-ketocholesterol (7KCh has been implicated in numerous age-related diseases such as atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, cancer and age-related macular degeneration. It is formed by the autooxidation of cholesterol and especially cholesterol-fatty acid esters found in lipoprotein deposits. This molecule causes complex and potent inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. It is suspected of causing chronic inflammation in tissues exposed to oxidized lipoprotein deposits. In this study we have examined the inflammatory pathways activated by 7KCh both in cultured ARPE19 cells and in vivo using 7KCh-containing implants inserted into the anterior chamber of the rat eye. Our results indicate that 7KCh-induced inflammation is mediated mostly though the TLR4 receptor with some cross-activation of EGFR-related pathways. The majority of the cytokine inductions seem to signal via the TRIF/TRAM side of the TLR4 receptor. The MyD88/TIRAP side only significantly effects IL-1β inductions. The 7KCh-induced inflammation also seems to involve a robust ER stress response. However, this response does not seem to involve a calcium efflux-mediated UPR. Instead the ER stress response seems to be mediated by yet identified kinases activated through the TLR4 receptor. Some of the kinases identified are the RSKs which seem to mediate the cytokine inductions and the cell death pathway but do not seem to be involved in the ER stress response.

  10. The Role of Formylated Peptides and Formyl Peptide Receptor 1 in Governing Neutrophil Function during Acute Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorward, David A.; Lucas, Christopher D.; Chapman, Gavin B.; Haslett, Christopher; Dhaliwal, Kevin; Rossi, Adriano G.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil migration to sites of inflammation and the subsequent execution of multiple functions are designed to contain and kill invading pathogens. These highly regulated and orchestrated processes are controlled by interactions between numerous receptors and their cognate ligands. Unraveling and identifying those that are central to inflammatory processes may represent novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of neutrophil-dominant inflammatory disorders in which dysregulated neutrophil recruitment, function, and elimination serve to potentiate rather than resolve an initial inflammatory insult. The first G protein–coupled receptor to be described on human neutrophils, formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1), is one such receptor that plays a significant role in the execution of these functions through multiple intracellular signaling pathways. Recent work has highlighted important observations with regard to both receptor function and the importance and functional relevance of FPR1 in the pathogenesis of a range of both sterile and infective inflammatory conditions. In this review, we explore the multiple components of neutrophil migration and function in both health and disease, with a focus on the role of FPR1 in these processes. The current understanding of FPR1 structure, function, and signaling is examined, alongside discussion of the potential importance of FPR1 in inflammatory diseases suggesting that FPR1 is a key regulator of the inflammatory environment. PMID:25791526

  11. Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channel localized to non-neuronal airway cells promotes non-neurogenic inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nassini, Romina; Pedretti, Pamela; Moretto, Nadia

    2012-01-01

    and fibroblasts, acrolein and CS extract evoked IL-8 release, a response selectively reduced by TRPA1 antagonists. Capsaicin, agonist of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), a channel co-expressed with TRPA1 by airway sensory nerves, and acrolein or CS (TRPA1 agonists), or the neuropeptide...... substance P (SP), which is released from sensory nerve terminals by capsaicin, acrolein or CS), produced neurogenic inflammation in mouse airways. However, only acrolein and CS, but not capsaicin or SP, released the keratinocyte chemoattractant (CXCL-1/KC, IL-8 analogue) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL...

  12. Dysregulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 in keratinocytes causes skin inflammation mediated by interleukin-20 receptor-related cytokines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayako Uto-Konomi

    Full Text Available Homeostatic regulation of epidermal keratinocytes is controlled by the local cytokine milieu. However, a role for suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS, a negative feedback regulator of cytokine networks, in skin homeostasis remains unclear. Keratinocyte specific deletion of Socs3 (Socs3 cKO caused severe skin inflammation with hyper-production of IgE, epidermal hyperplasia, and S100A8/9 expression, although Socs1 deletion caused no inflammation. The inflamed skin showed constitutive STAT3 activation and up-regulation of IL-6 and IL-20 receptor (IL-20R related cytokines, IL-19, IL-20 and IL-24. Disease development was rescued by deletion of the Il6 gene, but not by the deletion of Il23, Il4r, or Rag1 genes. The expression of IL-6 in Socs3 cKO keratinocytes increased expression of IL-20R-related cytokines that further facilitated STAT3 hyperactivation, epidermal hyperplasia and neutrophilia. These results demonstrate that skin homeostasis is strictly regulated by the IL-6-STAT3-SOCS3 axis. Moreover, the SOCS3-mediated negative feedback loop in keratinocytes has a critical mechanistic role in the prevention of skin inflammation caused by hyperactivation of STAT3.

  13. Shockwave therapy differentially stimulates endothelial cells: implications on the control of inflammation via toll-Like receptor 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holfeld, Johannes; Tepeköylü, Can; Kozaryn, Radoslaw; Urbschat, Anja; Zacharowski, Kai; Grimm, Michael; Paulus, Patrick

    2014-02-01

    Shock wave therapy (SWT) reportedly improves ventricular function in ischemic heart failure. Angiogenesis and inflammation modulatory effects were described. However, the mechanism remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that SWT modulates inflammation via toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) through the release of cytosolic RNA. SWT was applied to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with 250 impulses, 0.08 mJ/mm(2) and 3 Hz. Gene expression of TLR3, inflammatory genes and signalling molecules was analysed at different time points by real-time polymerase chain reaction. SWT showed activation of HUVECs: enhanced expression of TLR3 and of the transporter protein for nucleic acids cyclophilin B, of pro-inflammatory cytokines cyclophilin A and interleukin-6 and of anti-inflammatory interleukin-10. No changes were found in the expression of vascular endothelial cell adhesion molecule. SWT modulates inflammation via the TLR3 pathway. The interaction between interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 in TLR3 stimulation can be schematically seen as a three-phase regulation over time.

  14. Deficient Dopamine D2 Receptor Function Causes Renal Inflammation Independently of High Blood Pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Yanrong Zhang; Santiago Cuevas; Asico, Laureano D.; Crisanto Escano; Yu Yang; Pascua, Annabelle M.; Xiaoyan Wang; Jones, John E.; David Grandy; Gilbert Eisner; Pedro A. Jose; Ines Armando

    2012-01-01

    Renal dopamine receptors participate in the regulation of blood pressure. Genetic factors, including polymorphisms of the dopamine D(2) receptor gene (DRD2) are associated with essential hypertension, but the mechanisms of their contribution are incompletely understood. Mice lacking Drd2 (D(2)-/-) have elevated blood pressure, increased renal expression of inflammatory factors, and renal injury. We tested the hypothesis that decreased dopamine D(2) receptor (D(2)R) function increases vulnerab...

  15. Neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 1 is a direct transcriptional and epigenetic target of IL-13 involved in allergic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochman, M; Kartashov, A V; Caldwell, J M; Collins, M H; Stucke, E M; Kc, K; Sherrill, J D; Herren, J; Barski, A; Rothenberg, M E

    2015-07-01

    Although interleukin (IL)-13 and neurotrophins are functionally important for the pathogenesis of immune responses, the interaction of these pathways has not been explored. Herein, by interrogating IL-13-induced responses in human epithelial cells we show that neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor, type 1 (NTRK1), a cognate, high-affinity receptor for nerve growth factor (NGF), is an early transcriptional IL-13 target. Induction of NTRK1 was accompanied by accumulation of activating epigenetic marks in the promoter; transcriptional and epigenetic changes were signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 dependent. Using eosinophilic esophagitis as a model for human allergic inflammation, we found that NTRK1 was increased in inflamed tissue and dynamically expressed as a function of disease activity and that the downstream mediator of NTRK1 signaling early growth response 1 protein was elevated in allergic inflammatory tissue compared with control tissue. Unlike NTRK1, its ligand NGF was constitutively expressed in control and disease states, indicating that IL-13-stimulated NTRK1 induction is a limiting factor in pathway activation. In epithelial cells, NGF and IL-13 synergistically induced several target genes, including chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 26 (eotaxin-3). In summary, we have demonstrated that IL-13 confers epithelial cell responsiveness to NGF by regulating NTRK1 levels by a transcriptional and epigenetic mechanism and that this process likely contributes to allergic inflammation.

  16. Perinatal hypoxia-ischemia reduces α 7 nicotinic receptor expression and selective α 7 nicotinic receptor stimulation suppresses inflammation and promotes microglial Mox phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Sansan; Ek, C Joakim; Mallard, Carina; Johansson, Maria E

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation plays a central role in neonatal brain injury. During brain inflammation the resident macrophages of the brain, the microglia cells, are rapidly activated. In the periphery, α 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors ( α 7R) present on macrophages can regulate inflammation by suppressing cytokine release. In the current study we investigated α 7R expression in neonatal mice after hypoxia-ischemia (HI). We further examined possible anti-inflammatory role of α 7R stimulation in vitro and microglia polarization after α 7R agonist treatment. Real-time PCR analysis showed a 33% reduction in α 7R expression 72 h after HI. Stimulation of primary microglial cells with LPS in combination with increasing doses of the selective α 7R agonist AR-R 17779 significantly attenuated TNF α release and increased α 7R transcript in microglial cells. Gene expression of M1 markers CD86 and iNOS, as well as M2 marker CD206 was not influenced by LPS and/or α 7R agonist treatment. Further, Mox markers heme oxygenase (Hmox1) and sulforedoxin-1 (Srx1) were significantly increased, suggesting a polarization towards the Mox phenotype after α 7R stimulation. Thus, our data suggest a role for the α 7R also in the neonatal brain and support the anti-inflammatory role of α 7R in microglia, suggesting that α 7R stimulation could enhance the polarization towards a reparative Mox phenotype.

  17. Perinatal Hypoxia-Ischemia Reduces α7 Nicotinic Receptor Expression and Selective α7 Nicotinic Receptor Stimulation Suppresses Inflammation and Promotes Microglial Mox Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sansan Hua

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation plays a central role in neonatal brain injury. During brain inflammation the resident macrophages of the brain, the microglia cells, are rapidly activated. In the periphery, α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7R present on macrophages can regulate inflammation by suppressing cytokine release. In the current study we investigated α7R expression in neonatal mice after hypoxia-ischemia (HI. We further examined possible anti-inflammatory role of α7R stimulation in vitro and microglia polarization after α7R agonist treatment. Real-time PCR analysis showed a 33% reduction in α7R expression 72 h after HI. Stimulation of primary microglial cells with LPS in combination with increasing doses of the selective α7R agonist AR-R 17779 significantly attenuated TNFα release and increased α7R transcript in microglial cells. Gene expression of M1 markers CD86 and iNOS, as well as M2 marker CD206 was not influenced by LPS and/or α7R agonist treatment. Further, Mox markers heme oxygenase (Hmox1 and sulforedoxin-1 (Srx1 were significantly increased, suggesting a polarization towards the Mox phenotype after α7R stimulation. Thus, our data suggest a role for the α7R also in the neonatal brain and support the anti-inflammatory role of α7R in microglia, suggesting that α7R stimulation could enhance the polarization towards a reparative Mox phenotype.

  18. Protective role of µ opioid receptor activation in intestinal inflammation induced by mesenteric ischemia/reperfusion in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francesca, Saccani; Laura, Anselmi; Jaramillo, Ingrid; Simona, Bertoni; Elisabetta, Barocelli; Sternini, Catia

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia is a clinical emergency with high morbidity and mortality. We investigated whether activation of µ opioid receptor (µOR) protects from the inflammation induced by intestinal ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) in mice. Ischemia was induced by occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (45 min) and followed by reperfusion (5 hours). Sham Operated (SO) and normal (N) mice served as controls. Each group received subcutaneously: (1) saline solution; (2) the µOR selective agonist, [D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) (0.01 mg.kg−1); (3) DAMGO and the selective µOR antagonist [H-D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2] (CTAP) (0.1 mg.kg−1) or (4) CTAP alone. I/R induced intestinal inflammation as indicated by histological damage and the significant increase in myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, index of tissue neutrophil accumulation. TNF-α and IL-10 mRNA levels were also increased in I/R mice compared to SO. DAMGO significantly reduced tissue damage, MPO activity and TNF-α mRNA levels in I/R and these effects were reversed by CTAP. By contrast, DAMGO did not modify IL-10 mRNA levels and gastrointestinal transit. DAMGO effects are receptor-mediated and are likely due to activation of peripheral µORs since it does not readily cross the blood brain barrier. These findings suggest that activation of peripheral µOR protects from the inflammatory response induced by I/R through a pathway involving the pro-inflammatory cytokine, TNF-α. Reduction of acute inflammation might prevent I/R complications, including motility impairment, which develop at a later stage of reperfusion and are likely due to inflammatory cell infiltrates. PMID:22806643

  19. Maintenance of transferrin polymorphism in pigeons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frelinger, J.A.

    1972-02-01

    Transferrin, a nonheme iron-binding protein, is polymorphic in most vertebrate species that have been examined. In pigeons, it is controlled by an autosomal gene, with two known codominant alleles, Tf/sup A/ and Tf/sup B/. The two alleles are found in nearly equal frequencies and the three genotypes are at Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in all populations studied. This report shows that ovotransferrins from heterozygous females inhibit microbial growth, by use of yeast as an assay organism, better than ovetransferrins from either of the homozygous types, or those from a mixture of homozygous types. Heterozygous females hatch a larger percentage of their eggs than homozygous females. This difference is probably accounted for by the transferrin effect. The failure of the mixture of the homozygous types to act like the heterozygous type calls into question the currently accepted structure of transferrin as a monomeric protein. The greater fecundity of heterozygous females can account for the maintenance of transferrin polymorphism in pigeons.

  20. Receptor targeting agents for imaging inflammation/infection : where are we now?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Signore, A.; Chianelli, M.; D'Alessandra, C.; Annovazzi, A.

    2006-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, radiopharmaceutical research has brought to market a wide variety of drugs that aid in the management of infection and inflammation. Finding the best clinical application for existing radiopharmaceuticals can be a challenging task, as clinicians now have to choose from an arr

  1. Inflammation and N-formyl peptide receptors mediate the angiogenic activity of human vitreous humour in proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezzola, Sara; Corsini, Michela; Chiodelli, Paola; Cancarini, Anna; Nawaz, Imtiaz M; Coltrini, Daniela; Mitola, Stefania; Ronca, Roberto; Belleri, Mirella; Lista, Liliana; Rusciano, Dario; De Rosa, Mario; Pavone, Vincenzo; Semeraro, Francesco; Presta, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Angiogenesis and inflammation characterise proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), a major complication of diabetes mellitus. However, the impact of inflammation on the pathogenesis of PDR neovascularisation has not been elucidated. Here, we assessed the capacity of PDR vitreous fluid to induce pro-angiogenic/proinflammatory responses in endothelium and the contribution of the inflammation-related pattern recognition N-formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) in mediating these responses. Pooled and individual pars plana vitrectomy-derived PDR vitreous fluid ('PDR vitreous') samples were assessed in endothelial cell proliferation, motility, sprouting and morphogenesis assays, and for the capacity to induce proinflammatory transcription factor activation, reactive oxygen species production, intercellular junction disruption and leucocyte-adhesion molecule upregulation in these cells. In vivo, the pro-angiogenic/proinflammatory activity of PDR vitreous was tested in murine Matrigel plug and chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays. Finally, the FPR inhibitors Boc-Phe-Leu-Phe-Leu-Phe (Boc-FLFLF) and Ac-L-Arg-Aib-L-Arg-L-Cα(Me)Phe-NH2 tetrapeptide (UPARANT) were evaluated for their capacity to affect the biological responses elicited by PDR vitreous. PDR vitreous activates a pro-angiogenic/proinflammatory phenotype in endothelial cells. Accordingly, PDR vitreous triggers a potent angiogenic/inflammatory response in vivo. Notably, the different capacity of individual PDR vitreous samples to induce neovessel formation in the CAM correlates with their ability to recruit infiltrating CD45(+) cells. Finally, the FPR inhibitor Boc-FLFLF and the novel FPR antagonist UPARANT inhibit neovessel formation and inflammatory responses triggered by PDR vitreous in the CAM assay. This study provides evidence that inflammation mediates the angiogenic activity of PDR vitreous and paves the way for the development of FPR-targeting anti-inflammatory/anti-angiogenic approaches for PDR

  2. Effect of wortmannin and phorbol ester on Paramecium fluid-phase uptake in the presence of transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiejak, J; Surmacz, L; Wyroba, E

    2001-01-01

    The kinetics of the uptake of the fluid phase marker Lucifer Yellow (LY), and its alteration by wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI-3K), and the PKC modulators: GF 109203 X, an inhibitor, and phorbol ester, an activator was studied in eukaryotic model Paramecium aurelia. Spectrophotometric quantification of LY accumulation was performed in the presence or absence of transferrin, a marker of receptor-mediated endocytosis. Internalization of LY showed a curvilinear kinetics: the high initial rate of LY uptake (575 ng LY/mg protein/hr) decreased almost 5-fold within 15 min, reaching plateau at 126 ng/mg protein/hr. Transferrin induced a small increase (7.5%) in the fluid phase uptake rate (after 5 min) followed by a small decrease at longer incubation times. Lucifer Yellow and transferrin (visualized by streptavidin-FITC) were localized in Paramecium by 3-D reconstruction by confocal microscopy. LY showed a scattered, diffuse fluorescence typical of fluid phase uptake whereas transferrin accumulated in membrane-surrounded endosomes. Wortmannin did not affect LY accumulation but decreased it when transferrin was present in the incubation medium. This suggests an effect on the transferrin uptake pathway, presumably on the stage of internalization in "mixing" endosomes to which transferrin and LY were targeted. Phorbol ester diminished LY accumulation by 22% and this effect persisted up to 25 min of incubation. PKC inhibitor did not affect LY uptake. However, in the presence of transferrin, the LY uptake increased within the first 15 minutes followed by a rapid 20% decrease in comparison to the control. Such an effect of PKC modulators suggests that PMA action on fluid phase uptake is not directly mediated by PKC.

  3. Effect of wortmannin and phorbol ester on Paramecium fluid-phase uptake in the presence of transferrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Wiejak

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of the uptake of the fluid phase marker Lucifer Yellow (LY, and its alteration by wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI-3K, and the PKC modulators: GF 109203 X, an inhibitor, and phorbol ester, an activator was studied in eukaryotic model Paramecium aurelia. Spectrophotometric quantification of LY accumulation was performed in the presence or absence of transferrin, a marker of receptor-mediated endocytosis. Internalization of LY showed a curvilinear kinetics: the high initial rate of LYuptake (575 ng LY/ mg protein /hr decreased almost 5-fold within 15 min, reaching plateau at 126 ng/ mg protein /hr. Transferrin induced a small increase (7.5% in the fluid phase uptake rate (after 5 min followed by a small decrease at longer incubation times. Lucifer Yellow and transferrin (visualized by streptavidin– FITC were localized in Paramecium by 3-D reconstruction by confocal microscopy. LY showed a scattered, diffuse fluorescence typical of fluid phase uptake whereas transferrin accumulated in membrane-surrounded endosomes. Wortmannin did not affect LY accumulation but decreased it when transferrin was present in the incubation medium. This suggests an effect on the transferrin uptake pathway, presumably on the stage of internalization in “mixing” endosomes to which transferrin and LY were targeted. Phorbol ester diminished LY accumulation by 22% and this effect persisted up to 25 min of incubation. PKC inhibitor did not affect LY uptake. However, in the presence of transferrin, the LY uptake increased within the first 15 minutes followed by a rapid 20% decrease in comparison to the control. Such an effect of PKC modulators suggests that PMA action on fluid phase uptake is not directly mediated by PKC.

  4. 益血生胶囊联合蔗糖铁注射液对妊娠贫血患者血清转铁蛋白受体及妊娠结局的影响%Effect of Yi Xuesheng Jiaonang combined with Iron Sucrose Injection on serum transferrin receptor and pregnancy outcome with anemia patients in pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章红英; 陈淑群

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of Yi Xuesheng Jiaonang combined with Iron Sucrose Injection on anemia in pregnancy on serum transferrin receptor and pregnancy outcome.Methods 78 patients with anemia in pregnancy form December 2014 to December 2015 of the third people’s Hospital of Cixi were collected and randomly divided into control group and treatment group,each had 39 cases.Control group was given 200 mg Iron Sucrose Injection with 100 mL 0.9%sodium chloride injection intravenous infusion,2 times a week; experiment group were treated on the base of control group with 4 pills of Yi Xuesheng Jiaonang,3 times daily.The course was 28d,and two groups all with a course treatment.After the end of treatment,clinical curative effect,serum transferrin receptor level,liver and renal function and the incidence of adverse pregnancy outcome were observed and compared. Results Serum transferrin receptor levels were increased in two groups after treatment (P<0.05),compared with control group,serum transferrin receptor level of treatment group was even higher (P<0.05), alanine aminotransferase (ALT),aspartate aminotransferase (AST),serum creatinine (Cr) and urea nitrogen ( BUN) and other indicators of liver and kidney function of experiment group had no statistical significance.Adverse pregnancy outcome rate betwen two groups was not statistically significant.Conclusion Yi Xuesheng Jiaonang combined with Sucrose Iron Injection therapy for patients with anemia of pregnancy can significantly increased serum transferrin receptor levels,has higher safety and low adverse pregnancy outcomes rate.%目的:探究益血生胶囊联合蔗糖铁注射液对妊娠贫血患者血清转铁蛋白受体及妊娠结局的影响。方法收集2014年12月~2015年12月慈溪市第三人民医院妇产科收治的妊娠贫血患者78例,根据治疗方法不同分为对照组和试验组,每组各39例。2组均实施常规治疗以及对症治疗,对照组给予蔗糖铁注射液200

  5. Interaction between Cannabinoid System and Toll-Like Receptors Controls Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen L. McCoy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of the endocannabinoid system consisting of cannabinoid receptors, endogenous ligands, and biosynthetic and metabolizing enzymes, interest has been renewed in investigating the promise of cannabinoids as therapeutic agents. Abundant evidence indicates that cannabinoids modulate immune responses. An inflammatory response is triggered when innate immune cells receive a danger signal provided by pathogen- or damage-associated molecular patterns engaging pattern-recognition receptors. Toll-like receptor family members are prominent pattern-recognition receptors expressed on innate immune cells. Cannabinoids suppress Toll-like receptor-mediated inflammatory responses. However, the relationship between the endocannabinoid system and innate immune system may not be one-sided. Innate immune cells express cannabinoid receptors and produce endogenous cannabinoids. Hence, innate immune cells may play a role in regulating endocannabinoid homeostasis, and, in turn, the endocannabinoid system modulates local inflammatory responses. Studies designed to probe the interaction between the innate immune system and the endocannabinoid system may identify new potential molecular targets in developing therapeutic strategies for chronic inflammatory diseases. This review discusses the endocannabinoid system and Toll-like receptor family and evaluates the interaction between them.

  6. Role of prostaglandin receptor EP2 in the regulations of cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jianxiong; Dingledine, Ray

    2013-02-01

    Population studies, preclinical, and clinical trials suggest a role for cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, PTGS2) in tumor formation and progression. The downstream prostanoid receptor signaling pathways involved in tumorigenesis are poorly understood, although prostaglandin E2 (PGE(2)), a major COX-2 metabolite which is usually upregulated in the involved tissues, presumably plays important roles in tumor biology. Taking advantage of our recently identified novel selective antagonist for the EP2 (PTGER2) subtype of PGE(2) receptor, we demonstrated that EP2 receptor activation could promote prostate cancer cell growth and invasion in vitro, accompanied by upregulation of the tumor-promoting inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β and IL-6. Our results suggest the involvement of prostaglandin receptor EP2 in cancer cell proliferation and invasion possibly via its inflammatory actions, and indicate that selective blockade of the PGE(2)-EP2 signaling pathway via small molecule antagonists might represent a novel therapy for tumorigenesis.

  7. Neurokinin-1 receptor: functional significance in the immune system in reference to selected infections and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Steven D; Leeman, Susan E

    2011-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R), and its preferred ligand, substance P (SP), are reviewed in relationship to the immune system and selected infections. NK1R and SP are ubiquitous throughout the animal kingdom. This important pathway has unique functions in numerous cells and tissues. The interaction of SP with its preferred receptor, NK1R, leads to the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and proinflammatory cytokines. NK1R has two isoforms, both a full-length and a truncated form. These isoforms have different functional significances and differ in cell signaling capability. The proinflammatory signals modulated by SP are important in bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic diseases, as well as in immune system function. The SP-NK1R system is a major class 1, rhodopsin-like GPCR ligand-receptor interaction.

  8. RAGE (Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts), RAGE ligands, and their role in cancer and inflammation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sparvero, Louis J; Asafu-Adjei, Denise; Kang, Rui; Tang, Daolin; Amin, Neilay; Im, Jaehyun; Rutledge, Ronnye; Lin, Brenda; Amoscato, Andrew A; Zeh, Herbert J; Lotze, Michael T

    2009-01-01

    The Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts [RAGE] is an evolutionarily recent member of the immunoglobulin super-family, encoded in the Class III region of the major histocompatability complex...

  9. Selective P2X7 receptor antagonists for chronic inflammation and pain

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll, William A; Donnelly-Roberts, Diana; Jarvis, Michael F.

    2008-01-01

    ATP, acting on P2X7 receptors, stimulates changes in intracellular calcium concentrations, maturation, and release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and following prolonged agonist exposure, cell death. The functional effects of P2X7 receptor activation facilitate several proinflammatory processes associated with arthritis. Within the nervous system, these proinflammatory processes may also contribute to the development and maintenance of chronic pain. Emerging data from genetic knockout studies hav...

  10. Beneficial effects of cannabinoids (CB) in a murine model of allergen-induced airway inflammation: role of CB1/CB2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Andrea; Engel, Tabea; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Zimmer, Andreas; Jakob, Thilo; Behrendt, Heidrun; Mempel, Martin

    2011-04-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) consists of two cannabinoid (CB) receptors, namely CB(1) and CB(2) receptor, and their endogenous (endocannabinoids) and exogenous (cannabinoids, e.g. delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)) ligands which bind to these receptors. Based on studies suggesting a role of THC and the ECS in inflammation, the objective of this study was to examine their involvement in type I hypersensitivity using a murine model of allergic airway inflammation. THC treatment of C57BL/6 wildtype mice dramatically reduced airway inflammation as determined by significantly reduced total cell counts in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). These effects were greatest when mice were treated during both, the sensitization and the challenge phase. Furthermore, systemic immune responses were significantly suppressed in mice which received THC during sensitization phase. To investigate a role of CB(1/2) receptors in this setting, we used pharmacological blockade of CB(1) and/or CB(2) receptors by the selective antagonists and moreover CB(1)/CB(2) receptor double-knockout mice (CB(1)(-/-)/CB(2)(-/-)) and found neither significant changes in the cell patterns in BAL nor in immunoglobulin levels as compared to wildtype mice. Our results indicate that the activation of the ECS by applying the agonist THC is involved in the development of type I allergies. However, CB(1)/CB(2) receptor-independent signalling seems likely in the observed results.

  11. Mineralocorticoid receptors, inflammation and sympathetic drive in a rat model of systolic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Robert B

    2010-01-01

    Appreciation for the role of aldosterone and mineralocorticoid receptors in cardiovascular disease is accelerating rapidly. Recent experimental work has unveiled a strong relationship between brain mineralocorticoid receptors and sympathetic drive, an important determinant of outcome in heart failure and hypertension. Two putative mechanisms are explored in this manuscript. First, brain mineralocorticoid receptors may influence sympathetic discharge by regulating the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines into the circulation. Blood-borne pro-inflammatory cytokines act upon receptors in the microvasculature of the brain to induce cyclooxygenase-2 activity and the production of prostaglandin E(2), which penetrates the blood-brain barrier to activate the sympathetic nervous system. Second, brain mineralocorticoid receptors may influence sympathetic drive by upregulating the activity of the brain renin-angiotensin system, resulting in NAD(P)H oxidase-dependent superoxide production. A potential role for superoxide-dependent mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathways in the regulation of sympathetic nerve activity is also considered. Other potential downstream signalling mechanisms contributing to mineralocorticoid receptor-mediated sympathetic excitation are under investigation.

  12. Transport and expression in human melanomas of a transferrin-like glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food, M R; Rothenberger, S; Gabathuler, R; Haidl, I D; Reid, G; Jefferies, W A

    1994-01-28

    Melanotransferrin, also called p97, is a cell surface glycoprotein which was first described as a marker antigen for human melanoma cells. Although p97 has a striking structural similarity to human serum transferrin and lactoferrin, its function has not yet been determined. One feature that distinguishes p97 from the other members of the transferrin family is the presence of a stretch of 24 hydrophobic amino acids at the C terminus, previously assumed to form a proteinacious transmembrane domain. In this study, sensitivity to bacterial phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, biosynthetic labeling with [3H]ethanolamine, and partitioning in Triton X-114 are used to establish that p97 is expressed at the cell surface as a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein. In addition, to gain insight into the intracellular transport of p97, biosynthetic transport studies were performed on a melanoma cell line. These studies resulted in the identification of an additional form of p97 which is found in the medium and which likely does not originate from an alternatively spliced form of the p97 mRNA. These findings, together with our recent observation of the co-localization of p97 and the transferrin receptor in brain capillary endothelium (W. A. Jefferies, M. R. Food, R. Gabathuler, S. Rothenberger, T. Yamada, and P. L. McGeer, manuscript submitted) raise important questions about the function of the two forms of p97 detected and the possible involvement of this protein in a cellular iron uptake mechanism that is independent from the transferrin/transferrin receptor system.

  13. Formyl-Peptide Receptor 2/3/Lipoxin A4 Receptor Regulates Neutrophil-Platelet Aggregation and Attenuates Cerebral Inflammation: Impact for Therapy in Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vital, Shantel A; Becker, Felix; Holloway, Paul M; Russell, Janice; Perretti, Mauro; Granger, D Neil; Gavins, Felicity N E

    2016-05-31

    Platelet activation at sites of vascular injury is essential for hemostasis, but it is also a major pathomechanism underlying ischemic injury. Because anti-inflammatory therapies limit thrombosis and antithrombotic therapies reduce vascular inflammation, we tested the therapeutic potential of 2 proresolving endogenous mediators, annexin A1 N-terminal derived peptide (AnxA1Ac2-26) and aspirin-triggered lipoxin A4 (15-epi-lipoxin A4), on the cerebral microcirculation after ischemia/reperfusion injury. Furthermore, we tested whether the lipoxin A4 receptor formyl-peptide receptor 2/3 (Fpr2/3; ortholog to human FPR2/lipoxin A4 receptor) evoked neuroprotective functions after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. Using intravital microscopy, we found that cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury was accompanied by neutrophil and platelet activation and neutrophil-platelet aggregate formation within cerebral microvessels. Moreover, aspirin-triggered lipoxin A4 activation of neutrophil Fpr2/3 regulated neutrophil-platelet aggregate formation in the brain and inhibited the reactivity of the cerebral microvasculature. The same results were obtained with AnxA1Ac2-26 administration. Blocking Fpr2/lipoxin A4 receptor with the antagonist Boc2 reversed this effect, and treatments were ineffective in Fpr2/3 knockout mice, which displayed an exacerbated disease severity, evidenced by increased infarct area, blood-brain barrier dysfunction, increased neurological score, and elevated levels of cytokines. Furthermore, aspirin treatment significantly reduced cerebral leukocyte recruitment and increased endogenous levels of aspirin-triggered lipoxin A4, effects again mediated by Fpr2/3. Fpr2/lipoxin A4 receptor is a therapeutic target for initiating endogenous proresolving, anti-inflammatory pathways after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Correlation of Ferritin and Transferrin Serum with hsCRP and F2-Isoprostane in Metabolic Syndrome

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    Waode Nurfina

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The low inflammatory state that accompanies the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS associates with the overexpression of oxidative stress. Ferritin and Transferrin serum are often used to measure iron status and their concentrations are altered in several metabolic conditions. We hypothesized that concentration of Ferritin and Transferrin serum increase in Metabolic Syndrome (MetS and correlate with the inflammation and oxidative stress. METHODS: We studied 65 male MetS patients, aged 43.26±7.16 years. Iron metabolism was measured by concentration of Ferritin and Transferrin serums, while inflammatory and oxidative stress by high sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hsCRP and F2-Isoprostane. RESULTS: Concentration of Ferritin 315.70±188.63 ng/L and Transferrin 2.36±0.31 g/L increased along with increasing components of MetS. Concentration of Ferritin serum had a positive correlation with hsCRP (r=0.220 and F2-Isoprostane (r=0.023. CONCLUSIONS: Serum concentration of Ferritin increased in the MetS and correlates with hsCRP and F2-Isoprostane. KEYWORDS: metabolic syndrome, ferritin, transferrin, hsCRP, F2-isoprostane.

  15. Neural and Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cells: Transferrin Effects on Cell Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Silvestroff

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available NSC (neural stem cells/NPC (neural progenitor cells are multipotent and self-renew throughout adulthood in the SVZ (subventricular zone of the mammalian CNS (central nervous system. These cells are considered interesting targets for CNS neurodegenerative disorder cell therapies, and understanding their behaviour in vitro is crucial if they are to be cultured prior to transplantation. We cultured the SVZ tissue belonging to newborn rats under the form of NS (neurospheres to evaluate the effects of Tf (transferrin on cell proliferation. The NS were heterogeneous in terms of the NSC/NPC markers GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein, Nestin and Sox2 and the OL (oligodendrocyte progenitor markers NG2 (nerve/glia antigen 2 and PDGFRα (platelet-derived growth factor receptor α. The results of this study indicate that aTf (apoTransferrin is able to increase cell proliferation of SVZ-derived cells in vitro, and that these effects were mediated at least in part by the TfRc1 (Tf receptor 1. Since OPCs (oligodendrocyte progenitor cells represent a significant proportion of the proliferating cells in the SVZ-derived primary cultures, we used the immature OL cell line N20.1 to show that Tf was able to augment the proliferation rate of OPC, either by adding aTf to the culture medium or by overexpressing rat Tf in situ. The culture medium supplemented with ferric iron, together with aTf, increased the DNA content, while ferrous iron did not. The present work provides data that could have a potential application in human cell replacement therapies for neurodegenerative disease and/or CNS injury that require the use of in vitro amplified NPCs.

  16. Lipids Derived from Virulent Francisella tularensis Broadly Inhibit Pulmonary Inflammation via Toll-Like Receptor 2 and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Deborah D.; Ireland, Robin; Alinger, Joshua B.; Small, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen that causes an acute lethal respiratory disease in humans. The heightened virulence of the pathogen is linked to its unique ability to inhibit Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated inflammatory responses. The bacterial component and mechanism of this inhibition are unknown. Here we show that lipids isolated from virulent but not attenuated strains of F. tularensis are not detected by host cells, inhibit production of proinflammatory cytokines by primary macrophages in response to known TLR ligands, and suppress neutrophil recruitment in vivo. We further show that lipid-mediated inhibition of inflammation is dependent on TLR2, MyD88, and the nuclear hormone and fatty acid receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). Pathogen lipid-mediated interference with inflammatory responses through the engagement of TLR2 and PPARα represents a novel manipulation of host signaling pathways consistent with the ability of highly virulent F. tularensis to efficiently evade host immune responses. PMID:23925884

  17. Iron uptake by melanoma cells from the soluble form of the transferrin homologue, melanotransferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food, Michael R; Des Richardson, R

    2002-01-01

    Melanotransferrin (MTf) is a membrane-bound transferrin (Tf) homologue that can also exist in a soluble form (sMTf). Considering the high homology of MTf to Tf, it is possible to suggest that sMTf could bind to the high affinity transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) or lower affinity TfR2. We have used sMTf labelled with 59Fe to examine its ability to donate Fe to cells. Our experiments demonstrate that sMTf is far less effective than Tf at donating Fe to cells and this does not occur via specific receptors. Indeed, the uptake of sMTf by cells occurred via a non-specific process (e.g. adsorptive pinocytosis).

  18. Crossing the blood-brain-barrier with transferrin conjugated carbon dots: A zebrafish model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shanghao; Peng, Zhili; Dallman, Julia; Baker, James; Othman, Abdelhameed M; Blackwelder, Patrica L; Leblanc, Roger M

    2016-09-01

    Drug delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) in biological systems remains a major medical challenge due to the tight junctions between endothelial cells known as the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). Here we use a zebrafish model to explore the possibility of using transferrin-conjugated carbon dots (C-Dots) to ferry compounds across the BBB. C-Dots have previously been reported to inhibit protein fibrillation, and they are also used to deliver drugs for disease treatment. In terms of the potential medical application of C-Dots for the treatment of CNS diseases, one of the most formidable challenges is how to deliver them inside the CNS. To achieve this in this study, human transferrin was covalently conjugated to C-Dots. The conjugates were then injected into the vasculature of zebrafish to examine the possibility of crossing the BBB in vivo via transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis. The experimental observations suggest that the transferrin-C-Dots can enter the CNS while C-Dots alone cannot.

  19. IL-1 Receptor-Associated Kinase Signaling and Its Role in Inflammation, Cancer Progression, and Therapy Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ajay; Kaczanowska, Sabina; Davila, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has long been associated with the development of cancer. Among the various signaling pathways within cancer cells that can incite the expression of inflammatory molecules are those that activate IL-1 receptor-associated kinases (IRAK). The IRAK family is comprised of four family members, IRAK-1, IRAK-2, IRAK-3 (also known as IRAK-M), and IRAK-4, which play important roles in both positively and negatively regulating the expression of inflammatory molecules. The wide array of inflammatory molecules that are expressed in response to IRAK signaling within the tumor microenvironment regulate the production of factors which promote tumor growth, metastasis, immune suppression, and chemotherapy resistance. Based on published reports we propose that dysregulated activation of the IRAK signaling pathway in cancer cells contributes to disease progression by creating a highly inflammatory tumor environment. In this article, we present both theoretical arguments and reference experimental data in support of this hypothesis.

  20. IL-1 Receptor-associated kinase signaling and its role in inflammation, cancer progression and therapy resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay eJain

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation has long been associated with the development of cancer. Amongst the various signaling pathways within cancer cells that can incite the expression of inflammatory molecules are those that activate IL-1 receptor associated kinases (IRAK. The IRAK family comprises of four family members, IRAK-1, IRAK-2, IRAK-3 (also known as IRAK-M, and IRAK-4, which play important roles in both positively and negatively regulating the expression of inflammatory molecules. The wide array of inflammatory molecules that are expressed in response to IRAK signaling within the tumor microenvironment regulate the production of factors that promote tumor growth, metastasis, immune suppression and chemotherapy resistance. Based on published reports and compelling preliminary data, we propose that the dysregulated activation of the IRAK signaling pathway in cancer cells contributes to disease progression by creating a highly inflammatory tumor environment. In this article, we present both theoretical arguments and experimental data in support of this hypothesis.

  1. Contribution of the spinal P2X7 receptors to bee venom-induced nociception and inflammation in conscious rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhong-He; Wang, Jian-Xiu; Liu, Bao-Jun; Li, Man; Lu, Yao; Chen, Hui-Sheng

    2012-12-07

    Recently, P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) has been found to contribute to the development of inflammatory pain, however, the role of spinal P2X7R is not clear. The present study was designed to determine the roles of spinal P2X7R in the bee venom (BV) model, characterized by multiple pain-related behaviors and obvious inflammatory edema. We determined the effects of P2X7R antagonist A438790 on BV-induced PSN, mechanical allodynia and inflammatory swelling. Pre-treatment with intrathecal administration of A438079 significantly inhibited BV-induced PSN and mechanical allodynia in a dose-dependent manner, but had no effect on BV-induced inflammatory swelling. These data suggest that the activation of spinal P2X7Rs may play a key role in BV-induced nociception, but not inflammation.

  2. Low-Cytotoxic Synthetic Bromorutaecarpine Exhibits Anti-Inflammation and Activation of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type 1 Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Ming Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rutaecarpine (RUT, the major bioactive ingredient isolated from the Chinese herb Evodia rutaecarpa, possesses a wide spectrum of biological activities, including anti-inflammation and preventing cardiovascular diseases. However, its high cytotoxicity hampers pharmaceutical development. We designed and synthesized a derivative of RUT, bromo-dimethoxyrutaecarpine (Br-RUT, which showed no cytotoxicity at 20 μM. Br-RUT suppressed nitric oxide (NO production and tumor necrosis factor-α release in concentration-dependent (0~20 μM manners in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages; protein levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2 induced by LPS were downregulated. Br-RUT inhibited cell migration and invasion of ovarian carcinoma A2780 cells with 0~48 h of treatment. Furthermore, Br-RUT enhanced the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 and activated endothelial NOS in human aortic endothelial cells. These results suggest that the synthetic Br-RUT possesses very low cytotoxicity but retains its activities against inflammation and vasodilation that could be beneficial for cardiovascular disease therapeutics.

  3. Doxorubicin-Induced Systemic Inflammation Is Driven by Upregulation of Toll-Like Receptor TLR4 and Endotoxin Leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lintao; Chen, Qian; Qi, Haixia; Wang, Chunming; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Junfeng; Dong, Lei

    2016-11-15

    Doxorubicin is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents used for cancer treatment, but it causes systemic inflammation and serious multiorgan side effects in many patients. In this study, we report that upregulation of the proinflammatory Toll-like receptor TLR4 in macrophages by doxorubicin is an important step in generating its toxic side effects. In patient serum, doxorubicin treatment resulted in leakage of endotoxin and inflammatory cytokines into circulation. In mice, doxorubicin damaged the intestinal epithelium, which also resulted in leakage of endotoxin from the gut flora into circulation. Concurrently, doxorubicin increased TLR4 expression in macrophages both in vitro and in vivo, which further enhanced the sensitivity of these cells to endotoxin. Either depletion of gut microorganisms or blockage of TLR4 signaling effectively decreased doxorubicin-induced toxicity. Taken together, our findings suggest that doxorubicin-triggered leakage of endotoxin into the circulation, in tandem with enhanced TLR4 signaling, is a candidate mechanism underlying doxorubicin-induced systemic inflammation. Our study provides new insights for devising relevant strategies to minimize the adverse effects of chemotherapeutic agents such as doxorubicin, which may extend its clinical uses to eradicate cancer cells. Cancer Res; 76(22); 6631-42. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Sympathetic nervous system promotes hepatocarcinogenesis by modulating inflammation through activation of alpha1-adrenergic receptors of Kupffer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, Hong-Bo; Wen, Xu-Dong; Chen, Xue-Jiao; Wu, Lin; Wu, Li-Li; Zhang, Liang; Yang, Da-Peng; Zhang, Xia; Bie, Ping; Qian, Cheng; Xia, Feng

    2017-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is known to play a significant role in tumor initiation and metastasis. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) frequently occurs in cirrhotic livers after chronic inflammation, and the SNS is hyperactive in advanced liver cirrhosis. However, it remains unclear whether the SNS promotes hepatocarcinogenesis by modulating chronic liver inflammation. In this study, a retrospective pathological analysis and quantification of sympathetic nerve fiber densities (tyrosine hydroxylase, TH(+)) in HCC patients, and diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in rats were performed. Our data showed that high density of sympathetic nerve fibers and α1-adrenergic receptors (ARs) of Kupffer cells (KCs) were associated with a poor prognosis of HCC. Sympathetic denervation or blocking of α1-ARs decreased DEN-induced HCC incidence and tumor development. In addition, synergistic effects of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) in hepatocarcinogenesis were observed. The suppression of the SNS reduced IL-6 and TGF-β expression, which suppressed hepatocarcinogenesis, and KCs play a key role in this process. After the ablation of KCs, IL-6 and TGF-β expression and the development of HCC were inhibited. This study demonstrates that sympathetic innervation is crucial for hepatocarcinogenesis and that the SNS promotes hepatocarcinogenesis by activating α1-ARs of KCs to boost the activation of KCs and to maintain the inflammatory microenvironment. These results indicate that sympathetic denervation or α1-ARs blockage may represent novel treatment approaches for HCC.

  5. Protective role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptors in chronic intestinal inflammation: TNFR1 ablation boosts systemic inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Han, Gencheng; Chen, Yu; Wang, Ke; Liu, Guijun; Wang, Renxi; Xiao, He; Li, Xinying; Hou, Chunmei; Shen, Beifen; Guo, Renfeng; Li, Yan; Chen, Guojiang

    2013-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) acts as a key factor for the development of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), whose function is known to be mediated by TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) or TNFR2. However, the precise role of the two receptors in IBD remains poorly understood. Herein, chronic colitis was established by oral administration of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in TNFR1 or TNFR2-/- mice. Unexpectedly, TNFR1 or TNFR2 deficiency led to exacerbation of signs of colitis compared with wild-type (WT) counterparts. Of note, TNFR1 ablation rendered significantly increased mortality compared with TNFR2 and WT mice after DSS. Aggravated pathology of colitis in TNFR1-/- or TNFR2-/- mice correlated with elevated colonic expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Importantly, ablation of TNFR1 or TNFR2 increased apoptosis of colonic epithelial cells, which might be due to the heightened ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and increased expression of caspase-8. Intriguingly, despite comparable intensity of intestinal inflammation in TNFR-deficient mice after DSS, systemic inflammatory response (including splenomegaly and myeloid expansion) was augmented dramatically in TNFR1-/- mice, instead of TNFR2-/- mice. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF) was identified as a key mediator in this process, as neutralization of GMCSF dampened peripheral inflammatory reaction and reduced mortality in TNFR1-/- mice. These data suggest that signaling via TNFR1 or TNFR2 has a protective role in chronic intestinal inflammation, and that lacking TNFR1 augments systemic inflammatory response in GMCSF-dependent manner.

  6. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms of the dopamine D2 receptor increase inflammation and fibrosis in human renal proximal tubule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaoliang; Konkalmatt, Prasad; Yang, Yu; Gildea, John; Jones, John E; Cuevas, Santiago; Felder, Robin A; Jose, Pedro A; Armando, Ines

    2014-03-01

    The dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) negatively regulates inflammation in mouse renal proximal tubule cells (RPTCs), and lack or downregulation of the receptor in mice increases the vulnerability to renal inflammation independent of blood pressure. Some common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs6276, rs6277, and rs1800497) in the human DRD2 gene are associated with decreased D2R expression and function, as well as high blood pressure. We tested the hypothesis that human RPTCs (hRPTCs) expressing these SNPs have increased expression of inflammatory and injury markers. We studied immortalized hRPTCs carrying D2R SNPs and compared them with cells carrying no D2R SNPs. RPTCs with D2R SNPs had decreased D2R expression and function. The expressions of the proinflammatory tumor necrosis factor-α and the profibrotic transforming growth factor-β1 and its signaling targets Smad3 and Snail1 were increased in hRPTC with D2R SNPs. These cells also showed induction of epithelial mesenchymal transition and production of extracellular matrix proteins, assessed by increased vimentin, fibronectin 1, and collagen I a1. To test the specificity of these D2R SNP effects, hRPTC with D2R SNPs were transfected with a plasmid encoding wild-type DRD2. The expression of D2R was increased and that of transforming growth factor-β1, Smad3, Snail1, vimentin, fibronectin 1, and collagen I a1 was decreased in hRPTC with D2R SNPs transfected with wild-type DRD2 compared with hRPTC-D2R SNP transfected with empty vector. These data support the hypothesis that D2R function has protective effects in hRPTCs and suggest that carriers of these SNPs may be prone to chronic renal disease and high blood pressure.

  7. Lung inflammation and thymic atrophy after bleomycin are controlled by the prostaglandin D2 receptor DP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brule, Sybille; Huaux, François; Uwambayinema, Francine; Ibouraadaten, Saloua; Yakoub, Yousof; Palmai-Pallag, Mihaly; Trottein, François; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Lison, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) can be accompanied by secondary systemic manifestations. In a model of ALI induced by bleomycin (bleo), we examined the response of D prostanoid receptor 1 (DP1)-deficient mice (DP1(-/-)) to better understand these processes. DP1 deficiency aggravated the toxicity of bleo as indicated by enhanced body weight loss, mortality, and lung inflammation including bronchoalveolar permeability and neutrophilia. Thymic atrophy was also observed after bleo and was strongly exacerbated in DP1(-/-) mice. This resulted from the enhanced depletion of immature T lymphocytes in the thymus of DP1(-/-) mice, a phenomenon usually related to increased glucocorticoid release in blood. Serum corticosterone was more elevated in DP1(-/-) mice after bleo than in wild-type (wt) mice. Thymocytes of DP1(-/-) mice were not more sensitive to dexamethasone in vitro, and systemic delivery of dexamethasone or peritoneal inflammation after LPS induced a similar thymic atrophy in wt and DP1(-/-) mice, indicating that pulmonary DP1 was critical to the control of thymic atrophy after bleo. DP1(-/-) mice showed increased lung and/or blood mediators involved in neutrophil recruitment and/or glucocorticoid production/thymic atrophy (osteopontin, leukemia inhibitory factor, and keratinocyte-derived chemokine) after bleo. Finally, local pulmonary DP1 activation or inhibition in wt mice abrogated or amplified thymic atrophy after bleo, respectively. Altogether, our data reveal that ALI can perturb the systemic T-cell pool by inducing thymic atrophy and that both pathological processes are controlled by the pulmonary DP1 receptor. This new pathway represents a potential therapeutic target in ALI.

  8. Suppression of inflammation with conditional deletion of the prostaglandin E2 EP2 receptor in macrophages and brain microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Jenny U; Pradhan, Suraj; Lokteva, Ludmila A; Woodling, Nathaniel S; Ko, Novie; Brown, Holden D; Wang, Qian; Loh, Christina; Cekanaviciute, Egle; Buckwalter, Marion; Manning-Bog, Amy B; Andreasson, Katrin I

    2013-10-02

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent lipid signaling molecule, modulates inflammatory responses through activation of downstream G-protein coupled EP(1-4) receptors. Here, we investigated the cell-specific in vivo function of PGE2 signaling through its E-prostanoid 2 (EP2) receptor in murine innate immune responses systemically and in the CNS. In vivo, systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) resulted in a broad induction of cytokines and chemokines in plasma that was significantly attenuated in EP2-deficient mice. Ex vivo stimulation of peritoneal macrophages with LPS elicited proinflammatory responses that were dependent on EP2 signaling and that overlapped with in vivo plasma findings, suggesting that myeloid-lineage EP2 signaling is a major effector of innate immune responses. Conditional deletion of the EP2 receptor in myeloid lineage cells in Cd11bCre;EP2(lox/lox) mice attenuated plasma inflammatory responses and transmission of systemic inflammation to the brain was inhibited, with decreased hippocampal inflammatory gene expression and cerebral cortical levels of IL-6. Conditional deletion of EP2 significantly blunted microglial and astrocytic inflammatory responses to the neurotoxin MPTP and reduced striatal dopamine turnover. Suppression of microglial EP2 signaling also increased numbers of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra independent of MPTP treatment, suggesting that microglial EP2 may influence development or survival of DA neurons. Unbiased microarray analysis of microglia isolated from adult Cd11bCre;EP2(lox/lox) and control mice demonstrated a broad downregulation of inflammatory pathways with ablation of microglial EP2 receptor. Together, these data identify a cell-specific proinflammatory role for macrophage/microglial EP2 signaling in innate immune responses systemically and in brain.

  9. Wheat amylase trypsin inhibitors drive intestinal inflammation via activation of toll-like receptor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, Yvonne; Zeissig, Sebastian; Kim, Seong-Jun; Barisani, Donatella; Wieser, Herbert; Leffler, Daniel A; Zevallos, Victor; Libermann, Towia A; Dillon, Simon; Freitag, Tobias L; Kelly, Ciaran P; Schuppan, Detlef

    2012-12-17

    Ingestion of wheat, barley, or rye triggers small intestinal inflammation in patients with celiac disease. Specifically, the storage proteins of these cereals (gluten) elicit an adaptive Th1-mediated immune response in individuals carrying HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 as major genetic predisposition. This well-defined role of adaptive immunity contrasts with an ill-defined component of innate immunity in celiac disease. We identify the α-amylase/trypsin inhibitors (ATIs) CM3 and 0.19, pest resistance molecules in wheat, as strong activators of innate immune responses in monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. ATIs engage the TLR4-MD2-CD14 complex and lead to up-regulation of maturation markers and elicit release of proinflammatory cytokines in cells from celiac and nonceliac patients and in celiac patients' biopsies. Mice deficient in TLR4 or TLR4 signaling are protected from intestinal and systemic immune responses upon oral challenge with ATIs. These findings define cereal ATIs as novel contributors to celiac disease. Moreover, ATIs may fuel inflammation and immune reactions in other intestinal and nonintestinal immune disorders.

  10. Lymphotoxin β receptor signalling executes Helicobacter pylori-driven gastric inflammation in a T4SS-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejías-Luque, Raquel; Zöller, Jessica; Anderl, Florian; Loew-Gil, Elena; Vieth, Michael; Adler, Thure; Engler, Daniela B; Urban, Sabine; Browning, Jeffrey L; Müller, Anne; Gerhard, Markus; Heikenwalder, Mathias

    2017-08-01

    Lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR) signalling has been implicated in inflammation-associated tumour development in different tissues. We have analysed the role of LTβR and alternative NF-κB signalling in Helicobacter pylori-mediated gastric inflammation and pathology. We analysed several ligands and receptors of the alternative NF-κB pathway, RelB, p52 nuclear translocation and target genes in tissue samples of H. pylori-infected patients with different degrees of gastritis or early gastric tumours by in situ hybridisation, immunohistochemistry, Western blot and real-time PCR analyses. Molecular mechanisms involved in LTβR activation by H. pylori were assessed in vitro using human gastric cancer cell lines and distinct H. pylori isolates. The effects of blocking or agonistically activating LTβR on gastric pathology during challenge with a human pathogenic H. pylori strain were studied in a mouse model. Among the tested candidates, LT was significantly increased and activated alternative NF-κB signalling was observed in the gastric mucosa of H. pylori-infected patients. H. pyloriinduced LTβR-ligand expression in a type IV secretion system-dependent but CagA-independent manner, resulting in activation of the alternative NF-κB pathway, which was further enhanced by blocking canonical NF-κB during infection. Blocking LTβR signalling in vivo suppressed H. pylori-driven gastritis, whereas LTβR activation in gastric epithelial cells of infected mice induced a broadened pro-inflammatory chemokine milieu, resulting in exacerbated pathology. LTβR-triggered activation of alternative NF-κB signalling in gastric epithelial cells executes H. pylori-induced chronic gastritis, representing a novel target to restrict gastric inflammation and pathology elicited by H. pylori, while exclusively targeting canonical NF-κB may aggravate pathology by enhancing the alternative pathway. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  11. Effect of gene modified mesenchymal stem cells overexpression human receptor activity modified protein 1 on inflammation and cardiac repair in a rabbit model of myocardial infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵然尊

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs) overexpressing human receptor activity modified protein 1(hRAMP1) by adenovirus vector on infarction related inflammation and cardiac repair in a rabbit model of myocardial infarction(MI)

  12. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-alpha Gene Level Differently Affects Lipid Metabolism and Inflammation in Apolipoprotein E2 Knock-In Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalloyer, Fanny; Wouters, Kristiaan; Baron, Morgane; Caron, Sandrine; Vallez, Emmanuelle; Vanhoutte, Jonathan; Bauge, Eric; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit; Hofker, Marten; Staels, Bart; Tailleux, Anne

    Objective-Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR alpha) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that controls lipid metabolism and inflammation. PPAR alpha is activated by fibrates, hypolipidemic drugs used in the treatment of dyslipidemia. Previous studies assessing the influence

  13. Lateral diffusion and signaling of receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE): a receptor involved in chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Aleem; Zhu, Qiaochu; Smith, Emily A

    2017-06-16

    Membrane diffusion is one of the key mechanisms in the cellular function of receptors. The signaling of receptors for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) has been extensively studied in the context of several pathological conditions, however, very little is known about RAGE diffusion. To fill this gap, RAGE lateral diffusion is probed in native, cholesterol-depleted, and cytoskeleton-altered cellular conditions. In native GM07373 cellular conditions, RAGE has a 90% mobile fraction and an average diffusion coefficient of 0.3 μm(2)/s. When depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton is inhibited with the small molecule jasplakinolide (Jsp), the RAGE mobile fraction and diffusion coefficient decrease by 22 and 37%, respectively. In contrast, depolymerizing the filamentous actin cytoskeleton using the small molecule cytochalasin D (CD) does not alter the RAGE diffusion properties. There is a 70 and 50% decrease in phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) when the actin cytoskeleton is disrupted by CD or Jsp, respectively, in RAGE-expressing GM07373 cells. Disrupting the actin cytoskeleton in GM07373 cells that do not express detectable amounts of RAGE results in no change in p-ERK. Cholesterol depletion results in no statistically significant change in the diffusion properties of RAGE or p-ERK. This work presents a strong link between the actin cytoskeleton and RAGE diffusion and downstream signaling, and serves to further our understanding of the factors influencing RAGE lateral diffusion.

  14. Macrophage sub-populations and the lipoxin A4 receptor implicate active inflammation during equine tendon repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Georgina Dakin

    Full Text Available Macrophages (Mφ orchestrate inflammatory and reparatory processes in injured connective tissues but their role during different phases of tendon healing is not known. We investigated the contribution of different Mφ subsets in an equine model of naturally occurring tendon injury. Post mortem tissues were harvested from normal (uninjured, sub-acute (3-6 weeks post injury and chronically injured (>3 months post injury superficial digital flexor tendons. To determine if inflammation was present in injured tendons, Mφ sub-populations were quantified based on surface antigen expression of CD172a (pan Mφ, CD14(highCD206(low (pro-inflammatory M1Mφ, and CD206(high (anti-inflammatory M2Mφ to assess potential polarised phenotypes. In addition, the Lipoxin A(4 receptor (FPR2/ALX was used as marker for resolving inflammation. Normal tendons were negative for both Mφ and FPR2/ALX. In contrast, M1Mφ predominated in sub-acute injury, whereas a potential phenotype-switch to M2Mφ polarity was seen in chronic injury. Furthermore, FPR2/ALX expression by tenocytes was significantly upregulated in sub-acute but not chronic injury. Expression of the FPR2/ALX ligand Annexin A1 was also significantly increased in sub-acute and chronic injuries in contrast to low level expression in normal tendons. The combination of reduced FPR2/ALX expression and persistence of the M2Mφ phenotype in chronic injury suggests a potential mechanism for incomplete resolution of inflammation after tendon injury. To investigate the effect of pro-inflammatory mediators on lipoxin A(4 (LXA(4 production and FPR2/ALX expression in vitro, normal tendon explants were stimulated with interleukin-1 beta and prostaglandin E(2. Stimulation with either mediator induced LXA(4 release and maximal upregulation of FPR2/ALX expression after 72 hours. Taken together, our data suggests that although tenocytes are capable of mounting a protective mechanism to counteract inflammatory stimuli, this

  15. Macrophage Sub-Populations and the Lipoxin A4 Receptor Implicate Active Inflammation during Equine Tendon Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakin, Stephanie Georgina; Werling, Dirk; Hibbert, Andrew; Abayasekara, Dilkush Robert Ephrem; Young, Natalie Jayne; Smith, Roger Kenneth Whealands; Dudhia, Jayesh

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages (Mϕ) orchestrate inflammatory and reparatory processes in injured connective tissues but their role during different phases of tendon healing is not known. We investigated the contribution of different Mϕ subsets in an equine model of naturally occurring tendon injury. Post mortem tissues were harvested from normal (uninjured), sub-acute (3–6 weeks post injury) and chronically injured (>3 months post injury) superficial digital flexor tendons. To determine if inflammation was present in injured tendons, Mϕ sub-populations were quantified based on surface antigen expression of CD172a (pan Mϕ), CD14highCD206low (pro-inflammatory M1Mϕ), and CD206high (anti-inflammatory M2Mϕ) to assess potential polarised phenotypes. In addition, the Lipoxin A4 receptor (FPR2/ALX) was used as marker for resolving inflammation. Normal tendons were negative for both Mϕ and FPR2/ALX. In contrast, M1Mϕ predominated in sub-acute injury, whereas a potential phenotype-switch to M2Mϕ polarity was seen in chronic injury. Furthermore, FPR2/ALX expression by tenocytes was significantly upregulated in sub-acute but not chronic injury. Expression of the FPR2/ALX ligand Annexin A1 was also significantly increased in sub-acute and chronic injuries in contrast to low level expression in normal tendons. The combination of reduced FPR2/ALX expression and persistence of the M2Mϕ phenotype in chronic injury suggests a potential mechanism for incomplete resolution of inflammation after tendon injury. To investigate the effect of pro-inflammatory mediators on lipoxin A4 (LXA4) production and FPR2/ALX expression in vitro, normal tendon explants were stimulated with interleukin-1 beta and prostaglandin E2. Stimulation with either mediator induced LXA4 release and maximal upregulation of FPR2/ALX expression after 72 hours. Taken together, our data suggests that although tenocytes are capable of mounting a protective mechanism to counteract inflammatory stimuli, this appears to be of

  16. Sulfonamide inhibitors of α2β1 integrin reveal the essential role of collagen receptors in in vivo models of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissinen, Liisa; Ojala, Marika; Langen, Barbara; Dost, Rita; Pihlavisto, Marjo; Käpylä, Jarmo; Marjamäki, Anne; Heino, Jyrki

    2015-06-01

    Small molecule inhibitors of α2β1 integrin, a major cellular collagen receptor, have been reported to inhibit platelet function, kidney injury, and angiogenesis. Since α2β1 integrin is abundantly expressed on various inflammation-associated cells, we tested whether recently developed α2β1 blocking sulfonamides have anti-inflammatory properties. Integrin α2β1 inhibitors were shown to reduce the signs of inflammation in arachidonic acid-induced ear edema, PAF stimulated air pouch, ovalbumin-induced skin hypersensitivity, adjuvant arthritis, and collagen-induced arthritis. Thus, these sulfonamides are potential drugs for acute and allergic inflammation, hypersensitivity, and arthritis. One sulfonamide with potent anti-inflammatory activity has previously been reported to be selective for activated integrins, but not to inhibit platelet function. Thus, the experiments also revealed fundamental differences in the action of nonactivated and activated α2β1 integrins in inflammation when compared to thrombosis.

  17. IL-1 receptor antagonist ameliorates inflammasome-dependent inflammation in murine and human cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannitti, Rossana G; Napolioni, Valerio; Oikonomou, Vasilis; De Luca, Antonella; Galosi, Claudia; Pariano, Marilena; Massi-Benedetti, Cristina; Borghi, Monica; Puccetti, Matteo; Lucidi, Vincenzina; Colombo, Carla; Fiscarelli, Ersilia; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Majo, Fabio; Cariani, Lisa; Russo, Maria; Porcaro, Luigi; Ricciotti, Gabriella; Ellemunter, Helmut; Ratclif, Luigi; De Benedictis, Fernando Maria; Talesa, Vincenzo Nicola; Dinarello, Charles A; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Romani, Luigina

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulated inflammasome activation contributes to respiratory infections and pathologic airway inflammation. Through basic and translational approaches involving murine models and human genetic epidemiology, we show here the importance of the different inflammasomes in regulating inflammatory responses in mice and humans with cystic fibrosis (CF), a life-threatening disorder of the lungs and digestive system. While both contributing to pathogen clearance, NLRP3 more than NLRC4 contributes to deleterious inflammatory responses in CF and correlates with defective NLRC4-dependent IL-1Ra production. Disease susceptibility in mice and microbial colonization in humans occurs in conditions of genetic deficiency of NLRC4 or IL-1Ra and can be rescued by administration of the recombinant IL-1Ra, anakinra. These results indicate that pathogenic NLRP3 activity in CF could be negatively regulated by IL-1Ra and provide a proof-of-concept evidence that inflammasomes are potential targets to limit the pathological consequences of microbial colonization in CF.

  18. Role of the p70 S6 kinase cascade in neutrophilic differentiation and proliferation of HL-60 cells-a study of transferrin receptor-positive and -negative cells obtained from dimethyl sulfoxide- or retinoic acid-treated HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanayasu-Toyoda, Toshie; Yamaguchi, Teruhide; Oshizawa, Tadashi; Kogi, Mieko; Uchida, Eriko; Hayakawa, Takao

    2002-09-01

    Previously, we suggested that p70 S6 kinase (p70 S6K) plays an important role in the regulation of neutrophilic differentiation of HL-60 cells; this conclusion was based on our analysis of transferrin receptor (Trf-R) positive (Trf-R(+)) and negative (Trf-R(-)) cells that appeared after treatment with dimethyl sulfoxide (Me(2)SO). In this study, we analyzed the upstream of p70 S6K in relation to the differentiation and proliferation of both cell types. The granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-induced enhancement of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity in Trf-R(+) cells was markedly higher than that in Trf-R(-) cells. Wortmannin, a specific inhibitor of PI3K, partially inhibited G-CSF-induced p70 S6K activity and G-CSF-dependent proliferation, whereas rapamycin, an inhibitor of p70 S6K, completely inhibited these activities. The wortmannin-dependent enhancement of neutrophilic differentiation was similar to that induced by rapamycin. From these results, we conclude that the PI3K/p70 S6K cascade may play an important role in negative regulation of neutrophilic differentiation in HL-60 cells. For the G-CSF-dependent proliferation, however, p70 S6K appears to be a highly important pathway through not only a PI3K-dependent but also possibly an independent cascade.

  19. The chemokine receptor CCR7 expressed by dendritic cells: a key player in corneal and ocular surface inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saban, Daniel R

    2014-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are highly potent stimulators of the immune system, and their contribution as such to the pathogenesis of corneal and ocular surface inflammatory disease has been well established. These vigorous antigen-presenting cells are reliant upon their effective migration from peripheral tissues (e.g., those of the ocular surface) to the lymphoid organs, where immune responses are triggered and can then cause disease. The chemokine receptor CCR7 expressed on DCs has emerged as the master mediator of this highly complex migratory process, and thus it is important in causing corneal and ocular surface inflammation. Furthermore, CCR7 has received considerable attention as a potential therapeutic target, as topically instilled antagonists of this receptor are quite effective therapeutically in a mouse model of ocular allergy. These findings and more are reviewed in the current article. In addition, the understanding regarding CCR7 function in mice and humans, and the biology of DCs that populate the ocular surface are also detailed herein. The involvement of DCs and their expression of CCR7 in corneal and ocular surface diseases such as in ocular allergy, dry eye disease, immune rejection and more, are also reviewed here.

  20. β Common Receptor Mediates Erythropoietin-Conferred Protection on OxLDL-Induced Lipid Accumulation and Inflammation in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzong-Shyuan Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Erythropoietin (EPO, the key factor for erythropoiesis, also protects macrophage foam cells from lipid accumulation, yet the definitive mechanisms are not fully understood. β common receptor (βCR plays a crucial role in the nonhematopoietic effects of EPO. In the current study, we investigated the role of βCR in EPO-mediated protection in macrophages against oxidized low-density lipoprotein- (oxLDL- induced deregulation of lipid metabolism and inflammation. Here, we show that βCR expression was mainly in foamy macrophages of atherosclerotic aortas from apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. Results of confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that βCR was colocalized and interacted with EPO receptor (EPOR in macrophages. Inhibition of βCR activation by neutralizing antibody or small interfering RNA (siRNA abolished the EPO-conferred protection in oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation. Furthermore, EPO-promoted cholesterol efflux and upregulation of ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1 were prevented by pretreatment with βCR neutralizing antibody or βCR siRNA. Additionally, blockage of βCR abrogated the EPO-conferred anti-inflammatory action on oxLDL-induced production of macrophage inflammatory protein-2. Collectively, our findings suggest that βCR may play an important role in the beneficial effects of EPO against oxLDL-elicited dysfunction of macrophage foam cells.

  1. Association of EGF Receptor and NLRs signaling with Cardiac Inflammation and Fibrosis in Mice Exposed to Fine Particulate Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yuefei; Wu, Zhaoke; Wang, Na; Duan, Shuyin; Wu, Yongjun; Wang, Jing; Wu, Weidong; Feng, Feifei

    2016-09-01

    ЄAmbient fine particulate matter (PM2.5 ) could induce cardiovascular diseases (CVD), but the mechanism remains unknown. To investigate the roles of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and NOD-like receptors (NLRs) in PM2.5 -induced cardiac injury, we set up a BALB/c mice model of PM2.5 -induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis with intratracheal instillation of PM2.5 suspension (4.0 mg/kg b.w.) for 5 consecutive days (once per day). After exposure, we found that mRNA levels of CXCL1, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-18 were elevated, but interestingly, mRNA level of NLRP12 was significant decreased in heart tissue from PM2.5 -induced mice compared with those of saline-treated mice using real-time PCR. Protein levels of phospho-EGFR (Tyr1068), phospho-Akt (Thr308), NLRP3, NF-κB-p52/p100, and NF-κB-p65 in heart tissue of PM2.5 -exposed mice were all significantly increased using immunohistochemistry or Western blotting. Therefore, PM2.5 exposure could induce cardiac inflammatory injury in mice, which may be involved with EGFR/Akt signaling, NLRP3, and NLRP12.

  2. The symbiotic bacterial surface factor polysaccharide A on Bacteroides fragilis inhibits IL-1β-induced inflammation in human fetal enterocytes via toll receptors 2 and 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fei; Meng, Di; Weng, Meiqian; Zhu, Weishu; Wu, Wenxue; Kasper, Dennis; Walker, W. Allan

    2017-01-01

    Colonizing bacteria interacting with the immature, unlike the mature, human intestine favors inflammation over immune homeostasis. As a result, ten percent of premature infants under 1500 grams weight develop an inflammatory necrosis of the intestine after birth, e.g., necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). NEC is a major health problem in this population causing extensive morbidity and mortality and an enormous expenditure of health care dollars. NEC can be prevented by giving preterm infants their mother’s expressed breast milk or ingesting selective probiotic organisms. Vaginally delivered, breast fed newborns develop health promoting bacteria (“pioneer” bacteria) which preferentially stimulate intestinal host defense and anti-inflammation. One such “pioneer” organism is Bacteroides fragilis with a polysaccharide (PSA) on its capsule. B. fragilis has been shown developmentally in intestinal lymphocytes and dendritic cells to produce a balanced T-helper cell (TH1/TH2) response and to reduce intestinal inflammation by activity through the TLR2 receptor stimulating IL-10 which inhibits IL-17 causing inflammation. No studies have been done on the role of B. fragilis PSA on fetal enterocytes and its increased inflammation. Accordingly, using human and mouse fetal intestinal models, we have shown that B. fragilis with PSA and PSA alone inhibits IL-1β-induced IL-8 inflammation in fetal and NEC intestine. We have also begun to define the mechanism for this unique inflammation noted in fetal intestine. We have shown that B. fragilis PSA anti-inflammation requires both the TLR2 and TLR4 receptor and is in part mediated by the AP1 transcription factor (TLR2) which is developmentally regulated. These observations may help to devise future preventative treatments of premature infants against NEC. PMID:28278201

  3. Nanoparticle-induced unfolding of fibrinogen promotes Mac-1 receptor activation and inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhou J.; Liang, Mingtao; Monteiro, Michael; Toth, Istvan; Minchin, Rodney F.

    2011-01-01

    The chemical composition, size, shape and surface characteristics of nanoparticles affect the way proteins bind to these particles, and this in turn influences the way in which nanoparticles interact with cells and tissues. Nanomaterials bound with proteins can result in physiological and pathological changes, including macrophage uptake, blood coagulation, protein aggregation and complement activation, but the mechanisms that lead to these changes remain poorly understood. Here, we show that negatively charged poly(acrylic acid)-conjugated gold nanoparticles bind to and induce unfolding of fibrinogen, which promotes interaction with the integrin receptor, Mac-1. Activation of this receptor increases the NF-κB signalling pathway, resulting in the release of inflammatory cytokines. However, not all nanoparticles that bind to fibrinogen demonstrated this effect. Our results show that the binding of certain nanoparticles to fibrinogen in plasma offers an alternative mechanism to the more commonly described role of oxidative stress in the inflammatory response to nanomaterials.

  4. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation by TCDD Reduces Inflammation Associated with Crohn's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Benson, Jenna M.; Shepherd, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Crohn's disease results from a combination of genetic and environmental factors that trigger an inappropriate immune response to commensal gut bacteria. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is well known for its involvement in the toxicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), an environmental contaminant that affects people primarily through the diet. Recently, TCDD was shown to suppress immune responses by generating regulatory T cells (Tregs). We hypothesized that AhR activation da...

  5. Polychlorinated Biphenyl-Xenobiotic Nuclear Receptor Interactions Regulate Energy Metabolism, Behavior, and Inflammation in Non-alcoholic-Steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlang, Banrida; Prough, Russell A; Falkner, K Cameron; Hardesty, Josiah E; Song, Ming; Clair, Heather B; Clark, Barbara J; States, J Christopher; Arteel, Gavin E; Cave, Matthew C

    2016-02-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are environmental pollutants associated with non-alcoholic-steatohepatitis (NASH), diabetes, and obesity. We previously demonstrated that the PCB mixture, Aroclor 1260, induced steatohepatitis and activated nuclear receptors in a diet-induced obesity mouse model. This study aims to evaluate PCB interactions with the pregnane-xenobiotic receptor (Pxr: Nr1i2) and constitutive androstane receptor (Car: Nr1i3) in NASH. Wild type C57Bl/6 (WT), Pxr(-/-) and Car(-/-) mice were fed the high fat diet (42% milk fat) and exposed to a single dose of Aroclor 1260 (20 mg/kg) in this 12-week study. Metabolic phenotyping and analysis of serum, liver, and adipose was performed. Steatohepatitis was pathologically similar in all Aroclor-exposed groups, while Pxr(-/-) mice displayed higher basal pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. Pxr repressed Car expression as evident by increased basal Car/Cyp2b10 expression in Pxr(-/-) mice. Both Pxr(-/-) and Car(-/-) mice showed decreased basal respiratory exchange rate (RER) consistent with preferential lipid metabolism. Aroclor increased RER and carbohydrate metabolism, associated with increased light cycle activity in both knockouts, and decreased food consumption in the Car(-/-) mice. Aroclor exposure improved insulin sensitivity in WT mice but not glucose tolerance. The Aroclor-exposed, Pxr(-/-) mice displayed increased gluconeogenic gene expression. Lipid-oxidative gene expression was higher in WT and Pxr(-/-) mice although RER was not changed, suggesting PCB-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Therefore, Pxr and Car regulated inflammation, behavior, and energy metabolism in PCB-mediated NASH. Future studies should address the 'off-target' effects of PCBs in steatohepatitis.

  6. Endothelin Receptors Expressed by Immune Cells Are Involved in Modulation of Inflammation and in Fibrosis: Relevance to the Pathogenesis of Systemic Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisa, Tinazzi; Antonio, Puccetti; Giuseppe, Patuzzo; Alessandro, Barbieri; Giuseppe, Argentino; Federico, Confente; Marzia, Dolcino; Ruggero, Beri; Giacomo, Marchi; Andrea, Ottria; Daniela, Righetti; Mariaelisa, Rampudda; Claudio, Lunardi

    2015-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) plays a pivotal role in vasoconstriction, fibrosis, and inflammation, the key features of systemic sclerosis (SSc). ET-1 receptors (ETA and ET(B)) are expressed on endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts, but their presence on immune cells has not been deeply investigated so far. Endothelin receptors antagonists such as bosentan have beneficial effects on vasoconstriction and fibrosis, but less is known about their potential anti-inflammatory effects. We studied the expression of ET-1 receptors on immune cells (T and B lymphocytes, monocytes, and neutrophils) and the link between ET-1 and inflammation in patients with SSc. We show here that ET-1 exerts a proinflammatory effect in CD4+ T cells, since it induces an increased IFN-γ production; preincubation with antagonists of both receptors reduces IFN-γ production. Moreover, following ET-1 stimulation, neutrophils produce proinflammatory mediators, thus amplifying the effects of activated CD4+ T cells. Our data indicate that ET-1 system is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammation and fibrosis typical of SSc, through the activation of T lymphocytes and neutrophils and the consequent release of proinflammatory and profibrotic cytokines. These findings suggest that dual ET-1 receptors antagonist therapy, besides its effect on vasculopathy, has a profound impact on the immune system favouring antiinflammatory and antifibrogenic effects.

  7. Chemokines: structure, receptors and functions. A new target for inflammation and asthma therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. A. van Acker

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Five to 10% of the human population have a disorder of the respiratory tract called ‘asthma’. It has been known as a potentially dangerous disease for over 2000 years, as it was already described by Hippocrates and recognized as a disease entity by Egyptian and Hebrew physicians. At the beginning of this decade, there has been a fundamental change in asthma management. The emphasis has shifted from symptom relief with bronchodilator therapies (e.g. β2-agonists to a much earlier introduction of anti-inflammatory treatment (e.g. corticosteroids. Asthma is now recognized to be a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways, involving various inflammatory cells and their mediators. Although asthma has been the subject of many investigations, the exact role of the different inflammatory cells has not been elucidated completely. Many suggestions have been made and several cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma, such as the eosinophils, the mast cells, the basophils and the lymphocytes. To date, however, the relative importance of these cells is not completely understood. The cell type predominantly found in the asthmatic lung is the eosinophil and the recruitment of these eosinophils can be seen as a characteristic of asthma. In recent years much attention is given to the role of the newly identified chemokines in asthma pathology. Chemokines are structurally and functionally related 8–10 kDa peptides that are the products of distinct genes clustered on human chromosomes 4 and 17 and can be found at sites of inflammation. They form a superfamily of proinflammatory mediators that promote the recruitment of various kinds of leukocytes and lymphocytes. The chemokine superfamily can be divided into three subgroups based on overall sequence homology. Although the chemokines have highly conserved amino acid sequences, each of the chemokines binds to and induces the chemotaxis of particular classes of white blood cells. Certain

  8. G-protein coupled receptor 30 (GPR30: a novel regulator of endothelial inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhadeep Chakrabarti

    Full Text Available Estrogen, the female sex hormone, is known to exert anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic effects. Traditionally, estrogen effects were believed to be largely mediated through the classical estrogen receptors (ERs. However, there is increasing evidence that G-protein coupled receptor 30 (GPR30, a novel estrogen receptor, can mediate many estrogenic effects on the vasculature. Despite this, the localization and functional significance of GPR30 in the human vascular endothelium remains poorly understood. Given this background, we examined the subcellular location and potential anti-inflammatory roles of GPR30 using human umbilical vein endothelial cells as a model system. Inflammatory changes were induced by treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF, a pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in atherogenesis and many other inflammatory conditions. We found that GPR30 was located predominantly in the endothelial cell nuclei. Treatment with the selective GPR30 agonist G-1 partially attenuated the TNF induced upregulation of pro-inflammatory proteins such as intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1. This effect was completely abolished by the selective GPR30 antagonist G-15, suggesting that it was indeed mediated in a GPR30 dependent manner. Interestingly, estrogen alone had no effects on TNF-treated endothelium. Concomitant activation of the classical ERs blocked the anti-inflammatory effects of G-1, indicating opposing effects of GPR30 and the classical ERs. Our findings demonstrate that endothelial GPR30 is a novel regulator of the inflammatory response which could be a potential therapeutic target against atherosclerosis and other inflammatory diseases.

  9. P2RX7: A receptor with a split personality in inflammation and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Virgilio, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    P2X7 (also known as P2RX7) is a plasma membrane receptor for extracellular ATP that is expressed at a high level by immune and tumor cells. Previous data showed that increased P2rx7 expression by tumor cells accelerates tumor progression. We have now looked at the other side of the relationship by investigating the effect of a lack of host P2rx7 expression on tumor growth. Our novel observations highlight a surprising role of host P2rx7 in restraining tumor progression.

  10. Neuronal nicotinic receptors as novel targets for inflammation and neuroprotection:mechanistic considerations and clinical relevance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Merouane BENGHEKIF

    2009-01-01

    A number of studies have confirmed the potential for neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (NNR)-mediated neuro- protection and, more recently, its anti-inflammatory effects. The mechanistic overlap between these pathways and the ubiquitous effects observed following diverse insults suggest that NNRs modulate fundamental pathways involved in cell survival. These results have wide-reaching implications for the design of experimental therapeutics that regulate inflamma- tory and anti-apoptotic responses through NNRs and represent an initial step toward understanding the benefits of novel therapeutic strategies for the management of central nervous system disorders that target neuronal survival and associated inflammatory processes.

  11. Protease-activated receptor-2 promotes kidney tubular epithelial inflammation by inhibiting autophagy via the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chunyang; Zhang, Tao; Xiao, Xia; Shi, Yonghong; Duan, Huijun; Ren, Yunzhuo

    2017-08-02

    Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2), which belongs to a specific class of the G-protein-coupled receptors, is central to several inflammation processes. However, the precise molecular mechanism involved remains undefined. Autophagy has been previously shown to affect inflammation. In the present study, we examine the effect of PAR2 on kidney tubular epithelial autophagy and on autophagy-related inflammation and reveal the underlying mechanism involved. Autophagic activity and levels of autophagic marker LC3 were examined in human kidney tubular epithelial cells with PAR2 knockdown or overexpression. We administered the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor (rapamycin) or activator (MHY1485) to investigate the function of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mTOR pathway. We also used transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced HK-2 cell inflammation models to investigate the role of PAR2-associated autophagy in kidney tubular epithelial inflammation. PAR2 antagonist and rapamycin were administered to mice after unilateral ureteral obstruction to detect the correlations between PAR2, autophagy, and inflammation. Our results show that PAR2 overexpression in HK-2 cells led to a greater reduction in autophagy via the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway activation and induces autophagy-related inflammation. Meanwhile, a knockdown of PAR2 via PAR2 RNAi transfection greatly increased autophagy and alleviated autophagy-associated inflammation. In unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) kidneys, PAR2 antagonist treatment greatly attenuated renal inflammation and interstitial injury by enhancing autophagy. Moreover, inhibition of mTOR, rapa, markedly increased autophagy and inhibited the UUO-induced inflammation. We conclude that PAR2 induces kidney tubular epithelial inflammation by inhibiting autophagy via the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signalling pathway. Our results are suggestive that PAR2 inhibition may play a role in the treatment of diseases with increased inflammatory

  12. Aging is Associated with Impaired Renal Function, INF-gamma Induced Inflammation and with Alterations in Iron Regulatory Proteins Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Elísio; Fernandes, João; Ribeiro, Sandra; Sereno, José; Garrido, Patrícia; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Coimbra, Susana; Catarino, Cristina; Belo, Luís; Bronze-da-Rocha, Elsa; Vala, Helena; Alves, Rui; Reis, Flávio; Santos-Silva, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to contribute to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of anemia in elderly, by studying how aging affects renal function, iron metabolism, erythropoiesis and the inflammatory response, using an experimental animal model. The study was performed in male Wistar, a group of young rats with 2 months age and an old one with 18 months age. Old rats presented a significant higher urea, creatinine, interferon (INF)-gamma, ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor serum levels, as well as increased counts of reticulocytes and RDW. In addition, these rats showed significant lower erythropoietin (EPO) and iron serum levels. Concerning gene expression of iron regulatory proteins, old rats presented significantly higher mRNA levels of hepcidin (Hamp), transferrin (TF), transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2) and hemojuvelin (HJV); divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) mRNA levels were significantly higher in duodenal tissue; EPO gene expression was significantly higher in liver and lower in kidney, and the expression of the EPOR was significantly higher in both liver and kidney. Our results showed that aging is associated with impaired renal function, which could be in turn related with the inflammatory process and with a decline in EPO renal production. Moreover, we also propose that aging may be associated with INF-gamma-induced inflammation and with alterations upon iron regulatory proteins gene expression. PMID:25489488

  13. The selective vitamin D receptor agonist, elocalcitol, reduces endometriosis development in a mouse model by inhibiting peritoneal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Margherita; Viganò, Paola; Gentilini, Davide; Camisa, Barbara; Caporizzo, Elvira; Di Lucia, Pietro; Monno, Antonella; Candiani, Massimo; Somigliana, Edgardo; Panina-Bordignon, Paola

    2012-07-01

    Endometriosis, which is characterized by the growth of endometrial tissue at ectopic locations as well as vascular development and inflammation, is still an unmet clinical need since an optimal drug that allows for both pain and infertility management does not exist. Since both the eutopic and the ectopic endometrium express the vitamin D receptor (VDR), and VDR agonists are endowed with anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory properties, we evaluated the effect of elocalcitol, a VDR agonist with low calcaemic liability, in a mouse model of experimentally induced endometriosis. Endometriosis was induced by injection of syngeneic endometrial tissue fragments into adult Balb/c female mice. After having confirmed by immunohistochemistry that endometriotic lesions developing in mice expressed VDR, the mice were administered with elocalcitol (100 μg/kg) or vehicle orally, once a day, for various durations of time. In this model, elocalcitol was able to reduce total lesion weight up to 70% upon treatment for 1 week before and 2 weeks after disease induction. Interestingly, a therapeutic effect was also observed on already established lesions. Elocalcitol was shown to reduce the capacity of mouse endometrial cells to adhere to collagen. In addition in treated mice, a decreased state of peritoneal inflammation was demonstrated by the inhibition of macrophage recruitment and inflammatory cytokine secretion. The VDR agonist elocalcitol inhibits lesion development in a validated mouse model of endometriosis, and exerts a protective effect on both the implantation and organization of transferred endometrial tissue. These preliminary data in mice provide a sound rationale for further testing in primate models and eventually in humans.

  14. Cardiac metabolism, inflammation, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors modulated by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ting-I; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Chen, Yao-Chang; Tsai, Wen-Chin; Chung, Cheng-Chih; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2014-09-01

    High free fatty acid with reduced glucose utilization in diabetes mellitus (DM) impairs cardiac function. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) modulate myocardial lipid and glucose homeostasis. The active 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) regulates oxidative stress and inflammation, which may play a key role in the modulation of PPARs. The aim of this study was to investigate whether 1,25(OH)2D3 can modulate the cardiac PPARs and fatty acid metabolism. Electrocardiogram, echocardiogram, and Western blot analysis were used to evaluate cardiac fatty acid metabolism, inflammation, and PPAR isoform expression in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, DM rats, and DM rats treated with 1,25(OH)2D3. Compared to healthy rats, DM and 1,25(OH)2D3-treated DM rats had lower body weight. DM rats had larger left ventricular end-diastolic diameter, and longer QT interval than healthy or 1,25(OH)2D3-treated DM rats. Moreover, compared to healthy or 1,25(OH)2D3-treated DM rats, DM rats had fewer cardiac PPAR-α and PPAR-δ protein expressions, but had increased cardiac PPAR-γ protein levels, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinaseα2, phosphorylated acetyl CoA carboxylase, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1, PPAR-γ coactivator 1-α, cluster of differentiation 36, and diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 protein expressions. 1,25(OH)2D3 significantly changed the cardiac function and fatty acid regulations in DM hearts, which may be caused by its regulations on cardiac PPARs and proinflammatory cytokines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Antigen-Specific IgG ameliorates allergic airway inflammation via Fcγ receptor IIB on dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karasuyama Hajime

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been few reports on the role of Fc receptors (FcRs and immunoglobulin G (IgG in asthma. The purpose of this study is to clarify the role of inhibitory FcRs and antigen presenting cells (APCs in pathogenesis of asthma and to evaluate antigen-transporting and presenting capacity by APCs in the tracheobronchial mucosa. Methods In FcγRIIB deficient (KO and C57BL/6 (WT mice, the effects of intratracheal instillation of antigen-specific IgG were analysed using the model with sensitization and airborne challenge with ovalbumin (OVA. Thoracic lymph nodes instilled with fluorescein-conjugated OVA were analysed by fluorescence microscopy. Moreover, we analysed the CD11c+ MHC class II+ cells which intaken fluorescein-conjugated OVA in thoracic lymph nodes by flow cytometry. Also, lung-derived CD11c+ APCs were analysed by flow cytometry. Effects of anti-OVA IgG1 on bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDCs in vitro were also analysed. Moreover, in FcγRIIB KO mice intravenously transplanted dendritic cells (DCs differentiated from BMDCs of WT mice, the effects of intratracheal instillation of anti-OVA IgG were evaluated by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL. Results In WT mice, total cells and eosinophils in BAL fluid reduced after instillation with anti-OVA IgG1. Anti-OVA IgG1 suppressed airway inflammation in hyperresponsiveness and histology. In addition, the number of the fluorescein-conjugated OVA in CD11c+ MHC class II+ cells of thoracic lymph nodes with anti-OVA IgG1 instillation decreased compared with PBS. Also, MHC class II expression on lung-derived CD11c+ APCs with anti-OVA IgG1 instillation reduced. Moreover, in vitro, we showed that BMDCs with anti-OVA IgG1 significantly decreased the T cell proliferation. Finally, we demonstrated that the lacking effects of anti-OVA IgG1 on airway inflammation on FcγRIIB KO mice were restored with WT-derived BMDCs transplanted intravenously. Conclusion Antigen-specific IgG ameliorates

  16. Anti-nociceptive role of neuropeptide Y in the nucleus accumbens in rats with inflammation, an effect modulated by mu- and kappa-opioid receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Recent study in our laboratory showed that neuropeptide Y (NPY) plays an antinociceptive role in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in intact rats. The present study was performed to further investigate the effect of NPY in nociceptive modulation in the NAc of rats with inflammation, and the possible interaction between NPY and the opioid systems. Experimental inflammation was induced by subcutaneous injection of carrageenan into the left hindpaw of rats. Intra-NAc administration of NPY induced a dose-dependent increase of hindpaw withdrawal latencies (HWLs) to thermal and mechanical stimulations in rats with inflammation. The anti-nociceptive effect of NPY was significantly blocked by subsequent intra-NAc injection of the Y1 receptor antagonist NPY28-36, suggesting an involvement of Y1 receptor in the NPY-induced anti-nociception. Furthermore, intra-NAc administration of the opioid antagonist naloxone significantly antagonized the increased HWLs induced by preceding intra-NAc injection of NPY, suggesting an involvement of the endogenous opioid system in the NPY-induced anti-nociception in the NAc during inflammation. Moreover, the NPY-induced anti-nociception was attenuated by following intra-NAc injection of the μ-opioid antagonist β-funaltrexamine (β-FNA), and κ-opioid antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (norBNI), but not by δ-opioid antagonist naltrindole, indicating that μ- and κ-opioid receptors, not δ-opioid receptor, are involved in the NPY-induced anti-nociception in the NAc in rats with inflammation.

  17. No association between rs6897932 in the gene encoding interleukin-7 receptor α and low-grade inflammation or self-reported health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartling, Hans J; Sørensen, Cecilie J; Rigas, Andreas S;

    2015-01-01

    and LGI, self-reported IM or HRQL were found in men or women. This suggests that rs6897932 is not associated with general inflammation, and the reported associations between the T-allele in rs6897932 with several autoimmune diseases may be mediated through effects on a restricted part of the immune system.......The T-allele in the single nucleotide polymorphism rs6897932 in the gene encoding the IL-7 receptor α (IL7RA) is associated with reduced risk of autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis and also affects the course of HIV infection. Low-grade inflammation (LGI) and self-reported, health...

  18. Elevated transferrin saturation and risk of diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellervik, Christina; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas; Andersen, Henrik Ullits;

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We tested the hypothesis that elevated transferrin saturation is associated with an increased risk of any form of diabetes, as well as type 1 or type 2 diabetes separately. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We used two general population studies, The Copenhagen City Heart Study (CCHS, N = 9......,121) and The Copenhagen General Population Study (CGPS, N = 24,195), as well as a 1:1 age- and sex-matched population-based case-control study with 6,129 patients with diabetes from the Steno Diabetes Centre and 6,129 control subjects, totaling 8,535 patients with diabetes and 37,039 control subjects. RESULTS...

  19. Natural Killer Receptor 1 Dampens the Development of Allergic Eosinophilic Airway Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhaik Goldman, Shirin; Moshkovits, Itay; Shemesh, Avishai; Filiba, Ayelet; Tsirulsky, Yevgeny; Vronov, Elena; Shagan, Marilou; Apte, Ron N.; Benharroch, D aniel; Karo-Atar, Danielle; Dagan, Ron; Munitz, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    The function of NCR1 was studied in a model of experimental asthma, classified as a type 1 hypersensitivity reaction, in mice. IgE levels were significantly increased in the serum of OVA immunized NCR1 deficient (NCR1gfp/gfp) mice in comparison to OVA immunized wild type (NCR1+/+) and adjuvant immunized mice. Histological analysis of OVA immunized NCR1gfp/gfp mice revealed no preservation of the lung structure and overwhelming peribronchial and perivascular granulocytes together with mononuclear cells infiltration. OVA immunized NCR+/+ mice demonstrated preserved lung structure and peribronchial and perivascular immune cell infiltration to a lower extent than that in NCR1gfp/gfp mice. Adjuvant immunized mice demonstrated lung structure preservation and no immune cell infiltration. OVA immunization caused an increase in PAS production independently of NCR1 presence. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) revealed NCR1 dependent decreased percentages of eosinophils and increased percentages of lymphocytes and macrophages following OVA immunization. In the OVA immunized NCR1gfp/gfp mice the protein levels of eosinophils’ (CCL24) and Th2 CD4+ T-cells’ chemoattractants (CCL17, and CCL24) in the BAL are increased in comparison with OVA immunized NCR+/+ mice. In the presence of NCR1, OVA immunization caused an increase in NK cells numbers and decreased NCR1 ligand expression on CD11c+GR1+ cells and decreased NCR1 mRNA expression in the BAL. OVA immunization resulted in significantly increased IL-13, IL-4 and CCL17 mRNA expression in NCR1+/+ and NCR1gfp/gfp mice. IL-17 and TNFα expression increased only in OVA-immunized NCR1+/+mice. IL-6 mRNA increased only in OVA immunized NCR1gfp/gfp mice. Collectively, it is demonstrated that NCR1 dampens allergic eosinophilic airway inflammation. PMID:27580126

  20. G Protein-Coupled Receptor 43 Modulates Neutrophil Recruitment during Acute Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Alyce J.; Oliveira, Ana Carolina; Mason, Linda J.; Binge, Lauren; Mackay, Charles R.; Wong, Connie H. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Fermentation of dietary fibre in the gut yields large amounts of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs). SCFAs can impart biological responses in cells through their engagement of ‘metabolite-sensing’ G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). One of the main SCFA receptors, GPR43, is highly expressed by neutrophils, which suggests that the actions of GPR43 and dietary fibre intake may affect neutrophil recruitment during inflammatory responses in vivo. Using intravital imaging of the small intestine, we found greater intravascular neutrophil rolling and adhesion in Gpr43−/−mice in response to LPS at 1 h. After 4 h of LPS challenge, the intravascular rolling velocity of GPR43-deficient neutrophils was reduced significantly and increased numbers of neutrophils were found in the lamina propria of Gpr43−/−mice. Additionally, GPR43-deficient leukocytes demonstrated exacerbated migration into the peritoneal cavity following fMLP challenge. The fMLP-induced neutrophil migration was significantly suppressed in wildtype mice that were treated with acetate, but not in Gpr43−/−mice, strongly suggesting a role for SCFAs in modulating neutrophil migration via GPR43. Indeed, neutrophils of no fibre-fed wildtype mice exhibited elevated migratory behaviour compared to normal chow-fed wildtype mice. Interestingly, this elevated migration could also be reproduced through simple transfer of a no fibre microbiota into germ-free mice, suggesting that the composition and function of microbiota stemming from a no fibre diet mediated the changes in neutrophil migration. Therefore, GPR43 and a microbiota composition that allows for SCFA production function to modulate neutrophil recruitment during inflammatory responses. PMID:27658303

  1. Oxidative stress and inflammation modulate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors with regional discrepancy in diabetic heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ting-I; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Chen, Yao-Chang; Pan, Nan-Hung; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2010-08-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) play a pivotal role in myocardial lipid and glucose homeostasis. We investigated the effects of diabetes on PPAR isoforms in different cardiac regions and explored whether proinflammatory cytokines or oxidative stress modulate PPARs in diabetic hearts. Male Wistar rats were separated into control, diabetes and ascorbate-treated diabetes groups. Real-time PCR and Western blot analysis were performed on PPAR isoforms, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-6, from left and right atria and ventricles. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate [NAD(P)H] oxidase activity was quantified through photometric measurements. In control hearts, PPAR-alpha was most expressed, and PPAR-gamma least expressed in mRNA and protein levels. Diabetes decreased the protein and mRNA levels of PPAR-alpha and PPAR-delta. Ascorbate attenuated the diabetes-induced down-regulations of PPAR-alpha and PPAR-delta proteins in all cardiac regions and down-regulation of PPAR-alpha mRNA in the left atrium. In PPAR-gamma, the protein and mRNA levels were increased in diabetic atria and ventricles, which were decreased by ascorbate. Moreover, diabetes increased the TNF-alpha and IL-6 protein levels, and NAD(P)H oxidase activities in atria and ventricles. Ascorbate attenuated the increase of TNF-alpha, IL-6 protein levels and NAD(P)H oxidase activity in the atria, but only attenuated the increase of NAD(P)H oxidase activities in the ventricles. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor isoforms are differentially expressed in the atria and ventricles. Diabetes can modulate PPARs through increased inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress, which are attenuated by ascorbate treatment.

  2. Intra-Articular Blockade of P2X7 Receptor Reduces the Articular Hyperalgesia and Inflammation in the Knee Joint Synovitis Especially in Female Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Juliana Maia; Dias, Elayne Vieira; Parada, Carlos Amílcar; Tambeli, Cláudia Herrera

    2017-02-01

    Synovitis is a key factor in joint disease pathophysiology, which affects a greater proportion of women than men. P2X7 receptor activation contributes to arthritis, but whether it plays a role in articular inflammatory pain in a sex-dependent manner is unknown. We investigated whether the P2X7 receptor blockade in the knee joint of male and female rats reduces the articular hyperalgesia and inflammation induced by a carrageenan knee joint synovitis model. Articular hyperalgesia was quantified using the rat knee joint incapacitation test and the knee joint inflammation, characterized by the concentration of cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1, and by neutrophil migration, was quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and by myeloperoxidase enzyme activity measurement, respectively. P2X7 receptor blockade by the articular coadministration of selective P2X7 receptor antagonist A740003 with carrageenan significantly reduced articular hyperalgesia, pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations, and myeloperoxidase activity induced by carrageenan injection into the knee joint of male and estrus female rats. However, a lower dose of P2X7 receptor antagonist was sufficient to significantly induce the antihyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory effects in estrus female but not in male rats. These results suggest that P2X7 receptor activation by endogenous adenosine 5'-triphosphate is essential to articular hyperalgesia and inflammation development in the knee joint of male and female rats. However, female rats are more responsive than male rats to the antihyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory effects induced by P2X7 receptor blockade.

  3. Involvement of AMPA/kainate and GABAA receptors in topiramate neuroprotective effects against methylphenidate abuse sequels involving oxidative stress and inflammation in rat isolated hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaghinejad, Majid; Motevalian, Manijeh

    2016-08-01

    Abuses of methylphenidate (MPH) as psychostimulant cause neural damage of brain cells. Neuroprotective properties of topiramate (TPM) have been indicated in several studies but its exact mechanism of action remains unclear. The current study evaluates protective role of various doses of TPM and its mechanism of action in MPH induced oxidative stress and inflammation. The neuroprotective effects of various doses of TPM against MPH induced oxidative stress and inflammation were evaluated and then the action of TPM was studied in presence of domoic acid (DOM), as AMPA/kainate receptor agonist and bicuculline (BIC) as GABAA receptor antagonist, in isolated rat hippocampus. Open Field Test (OFT) was used to investigate motor activity changes. Oxidative, antioxidant and inflammatory factors were measured in isolated hippocampus. TPM (70 and 100mg/kg) decreased MPH induced motor activity disturbances and inhibit MPH induced oxidative stress and inflammation. On the other hand pretreatment of animals with DOM or BIC, inhibit this effect of TPM and potentiate MPH induced motor activity disturbances and increased lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial oxidized form of glutathione (GSSG) level, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in isolated hippocampal cells and decreased reduced form of glutathione (GSH) level, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activity. It seems that TPM can protect cells of hippocampus from oxidative stress and neuroinflammation and it could be partly by activation of GABAA receptor and inhibition of AMPA/kainite receptor.

  4. Lipid synthesis in macrophages during inflammation in vivo: effect of agonists of peroxisome proliferator activated receptors alpha and gamma and of retinoid X receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posokhova, E N; Khoshchenko, O M; Chasovskikh, M I; Pivovarova, E N; Dushkin, M I

    2008-03-01

    The effects of peroxisome proliferator activated receptors alpha and gamma (PPAR-alpha and PPAR-gamma) and retinoid X receptor (RXR) agonists upon synthesis and accumulation of lipids in murine C57Bl macrophages during inflammation induced by injection of zymosan and Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) have been studied. It is significant that intraperitoneal injection of zymosan (50 mg/kg) or LPS (0.1 mg/kg) in mice led to a dramatic increase of [14C]oleate incorporation into cholesteryl esters and triglycerides and [14C]acetate incorporation into cholesterol and fatty acids in peritoneal macrophages. Lipid synthesis reached its maximum rate 18-24 h after injection and was decreased 5-7 days later to control level after LPS injection or was still heightened after zymosan injection. In macrophages obtained in acute phase of inflammation (24 h), degradation of 125I-labeled native low density lipoprotein (NLDL) was 4-fold increased and degradation of 125I-labeled acetylated LDL (AcLDL) was 2-3-fold decreased. Addition of NLDL (50 microg/ml) or AcLDL (25 microg/ml) into the incubation medium of activated macrophages induced 9-14- and 1.25-fold increase of cholesteryl ester synthesis, respectively, compared with control. Addition of NLDL and AcLDL into the incubation medium completely inhibited cholesterol synthesis in control macrophages but had only slightly effect on cholesterol synthesis in activated macrophages. Injection of RXR, PPAR-alpha, or PPAR-gamma agonists--9-cis-retinoic acid (5 mg/kg), bezafibrate (10 mg/kg), or rosiglitazone (10 mg/kg), respectively--30 min before zymosan or LPS injection led to significant decrease of lipid synthesis. Ten hour preincubation of activated in vivo macrophages with the abovementioned agonists (5 microM) decreased cholesteryl ester synthesis induced by NLDL and AcLDL addition into the cell cultivation medium. The data suggest that RXR, PPAR-alpha, or PPAR-gamma agonists inhibited lipid synthesis and induction of

  5. Modulation of Immunity and Inflammation by the Mineralocorticoid Receptor and Aldosterone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Muñoz-Durango

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR is a ligand dependent transcription factor. MR has been traditionally associated with the control of water and electrolyte homeostasis in order to keep blood pressure through aldosterone activation. However, there is growing evidence indicating that MR expression is not restricted to vascular and renal tissues, as it can be also expressed by cells of the immune system, where it responds to stimulation or antagonism, controlling immune cell function. On the other hand, aldosterone also has been associated with proinflammatory immune effects, such as the release of proinflammatory cytokines, generating oxidative stress and inducing fibrosis. The inflammatory participation of MR and aldosterone in the cardiovascular disease suggests an association with alterations in the immune system. Hypertensive patients show higher levels of proinflammatory mediators that can be modulated by MR antagonism. Although these proinflammatory properties have been observed in other autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that mediate these effects remain unknown. Here we review and discuss the scientific work aimed at determining the immunological role of MR and aldosterone in humans, as well as animal models.

  6. Blockade of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 1 Prevents Inflammation and Vascular Leakage in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbo He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy (DR is a leading cause of blindness in working age adults. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1 blockade on the complications of DR. Experimental models of diabetes were induced with streptozotocin (STZ treatment or Insulin2 gene mutation (Akita in mice. Protein expression and localization were examined by western blots (WB and immunofluorescence (IF. mRNA expression was quantified by PCR array and real-time PCR. The activity of VEGFR1 signaling was blocked by a neutralizing antibody called MF1. Vascular leakage was evaluated by measuring the leakage of [3H]-mannitol tracer into the retina and the IF staining of albumin. VEGFR1 blockade significantly inhibited diabetes-related vascular leakage, leukocytes-endothelial cell (EC adhesion (or retinal leukostasis, expression of intercellular adhesion molecule- (ICAM- 1 protein, abnormal localization and degeneration of the tight junction protein zonula occludens- (ZO- 1, and the cell adhesion protein vascular endothelial (VE cadherin. In addition, VEGFR1 blockade interfered with the gene expression of 10 new cytokines and chemokines: cxcl10, il10, ccl8, il1f6, cxcl15, ccl4, il13, ccl6, casp1, and ccr5. These results suggest that VEGFR1 mediates complications of DR and targeting this signaling pathway represents a potential therapeutic strategy for the prevention and treatment of DR.

  7. Labor and inflammation increase the expression of oxytocin receptor in human amnion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzidou, Vasso; Blanks, Andrew M; Kim, Sung Hye; Thornton, Steven; Bennett, Phillip R

    2011-03-01

    The oxytocin/oxytocin receptor (OXT/OXTR) system plays an important role in the regulation of parturition. The amnion is a major source of prostaglandins and inflammatory cytokine synthesis, which increase both before and during labor. Amnion is a noncontractile tissue; therefore, the role played by OXT/OXTR in this tissue will be fundamentally different from the role played in myometrial contractions. In the present study, we demonstrate increased OXTR mRNA and protein concentrations in human amnion epithelial cells associated with the onset of labor. We show that incubation of primary human amnion epithelial cells with IL1B results in a rapid, transient up-regulation of OXTR mRNA expression, which peaks in prelabor samples after 6 h. Incubation of prelabor amnion epithelial cells with OXT results in a marked increase of prostaglandin E(2) synthesis, and we demonstrate that OXT activates the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase signal transduction pathway to stimulate up-regulation of cyclo-oxygenase 2 in human amnion epithelial cells. The increased ability of human amnion to produce prostaglandins in response to OXT treatment suggests a complementary role for the OXT/OXTR system in the activation of human amnion and the onset of labor.

  8. Targeted inhibition of serotonin type 7 (5-HT7) receptor function modulates immune responses and reduces the severity of intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Janice J; Bridle, Byram W; Ghia, Jean-Eric; Wang, Huaqing; Syed, Shahzad N; Manocha, Marcus M; Rengasamy, Palanivel; Shajib, Mohammad Sharif; Wan, Yonghong; Hedlund, Peter B; Khan, Waliul I

    2013-05-01

    Mucosal inflammation in conditions ranging from infective acute enteritis or colitis to inflammatory bowel disease is accompanied by alteration in serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) content in the gut. Recently, we have identified an important role of 5-HT in the pathogenesis of experimental colitis. 5-HT type 7 (5-HT7) receptor is one of the most recently identified members of the 5-HT receptor family, and dendritic cells express this receptor. In this study, we investigated the effect of blocking 5-HT7 receptor signaling in experimental colitis with a view to develop an improved therapeutic strategy in intestinal inflammatory disorders. Colitis was induced with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) or dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS) in mice treated with selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist SB-269970, as well as in mice lacking 5-HT7 receptor (5-HT7(-/-)) and irradiated wild-type mice reconstituted with bone marrow cells harvested from 5-HT7(-/-) mice. Inhibition of 5-HT7 receptor signaling with SB-269970 ameliorated both acute and chronic colitis induced by DSS. Treatment with SB-269970 resulted in lower clinical disease, histological damage, and proinflammatory cytokine levels compared with vehicle-treated mice post-DSS. Colitis severity was significantly lower in 5-HT7(-/-) mice and in mice reconstituted with bone marrow cells from 5-HT7(-/-) mice compared with control mice after DSS colitis. 5-HT7(-/-) mice also had significantly reduced DNBS-induced colitis. These observations provide us with novel information on the critical role of the 5-HT7 receptor in immune response and inflammation in the gut, and highlight the potential benefit of targeting this receptor to alleviate the severity of intestinal inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease.

  9. The gastrin receptor antagonist netazepide (YF476) prevents oxyntic mucosal inflammation induced by Helicobacter pylori infection in Mongolian gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørdal, Øystein; Waldum, Helge; Nordrum, Ivar S; Boyce, Malcolm; Bergh, Kåre; Munkvold, Bjørn; Qvigstad, Gunnar

    2013-12-01

    Long-term Helicobacter pylori infection causes gastritis leading to hypergastrinemia and predisposes to gastric cancer. Our aim was to assess the role of gastrin in oxyntic mucosal inflammation in H. pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils by means of the gastrin receptor antagonist netazepide (YF476). We studied 60 gerbils for 18 months and left five animals uninfected (control group), inoculated 55 with H. pylori, and treated 28 of the infected animals with netazepide (Hp+YF476 group). Twenty-seven infected animals were given no treatment (Hp group). We measured plasma gastrin and intraluminal pH. H. pylori detection and histologic evaluations of the stomach were carried out. All 55 inoculated animals were H. pylori positive at termination. Eighteen animals in the Hp group had gastritis. There was a threefold increase in mucosal thickness in the Hp group compared to the Hp+YF476 group, and a threefold increase in oxyntic neuroendocrine cells in the Hp group compared to the Hp+YF476 group (p pylori-induced gastritis in Mongolian gerbils. Thus, gastrin has a key role in the inflammatory reaction of the gastric mucosa to H. pylori infection in this species. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Elevated expression of the toll like receptors 2 and 4 in obese individuals: its significance for obesity-induced inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Rasheed

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression profile of the toll like receptors (TLRs on PBMCs is central to the regulation of proinflammatory markers. An imbalance in the TLRs expression may lead to several types of inflammatory disorders. Furthermore, the dynamic regulation of inflammatory activity and associated impaired production of cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs in obese individulas remain poorly understood. Therefore, we determined the perturbation in TLRs (TLR2 and TLR4, their adaptor proteins (MyD88, IRAK1 and TRAF6 expression in PBMCs/subcutaneous adipose tissue (AT as well as inflammatory cytokines changes in obese individuals. Methods mRNA expression levels of TLR2, TLR4, IL-6, TNF-α and adaptor proteins were determined by RT-PCR. TLR2, TLR4 and adaptor proteins expression in AT was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results Obese and overweight individuals showed significantly increased expression of TLR2, TLR4 and MyD88 in both PBMCs and AT as compared with lean individuals (P  Conclusions TLRs and adapter proteins were overexpressed in PBMCs from obese subjects, which correlated with increased expression of TNF-α and IL-6. This association may explain a potential pathophysiological link between obesity and inflammation leading to insulin resistance.

  11. Identification of a selective glucocorticoid receptor ligand for the treatment of chronic inflammation in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Haifeng; Wang, Wei; Yin, Xiangang; Li, Yao; Yin, Rui

    2014-10-01

    The present study aimed to identify a new selective glucocorticoid receptor (GR) ligand for the treatment of chronic inflammation in type 2 diabetes mellitus. The IN Cell Analyzer 1000 platform was employed to screen for compounds that may promote GR nuclear translocation. A mammalian two-hybrid system and transactivation assay-were used to analyze the selected GR ligands and evaluate their activities for GR transcription and the recruitment of co-activators. A novel selective GR ligand, compound Q40, was identified that was able to promote GR nuclear translocation in a short period of time. It increased the ability of GR to recruit co-activators in a concentration-dependent manner, but had no positive effect on GR transcriptional activity. In conclusion, an increase in the expression levels of gluconeogeneic genes, induced by the transcriptional activation of GR, is the predisposing factor most commonly associated with the side-effects of glucocorticoids. The results suggest that compound Q40 is a ligand of the GR and exerts an agonistic action on the recruitment of co-activators without sugar dysmetabolism-related side-effects. Thus, compound Q40 has the potential to be used as an anti-inflammatory adjuvant therapy with minimal side-effects in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  12. Genetic variation in estrogen receptor, C-reactive protein and fibrinogen does not predict the plasma levels of inflammation markers after longterm hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Maat, Moniek P M; Madsen, Jonna Skov; Langdahl, Bente Lomholt;

    2007-01-01

    Markers of inflammation, such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen, are associated with the risk of atherothrombosis. Plasma levels of these markers of inflammation are affected by hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and modulated by smoking. We studied whether genetic variation in the estrogen...... receptor- 1 (ESR1), CRP and fibrinogen-beta genes influences the plasma levels of inflammation markers after HRT. Plasma CRP and fibrinogen were measured after five years follow-up in healthy postmenopausal women (per-protocol group) who were randomised to hormone therapy (n=187) or no treatment (n=249......). The effect of HRT, smoking and genetic variations in ESR1 (PvuII and XbaI), CRP (1444C/T) and fibrinogen-beta (FGB, -455G/A) were determined. The plasma concentration of CRP was higher in the HRT group than in the control group (2.03 mg/l and 1.41 mg/l, respectively; p

  13. Carbohydrate deficient transferrin (CDT) in alcoholic cirrhosis: a kinetic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Grønbaek, M; Møller, Søren

    1997-01-01

    concentration than controls with a low alcohol intake (detected between carbohydrate deficient transferrin in artery and liver vein or artery and renal vein, either in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis (n = 11) or in controls (n = 8......BACKGROUND/AIMS: Carbohydrate deficient transferrin has been introduced as a marker of excessive alcohol intake. The present study was undertaken in order to measure the circulating level of carbohydrate deficient transferrin in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and to assess arteriovenous kinetics...... of carbohydrate deficient transferrin in liver and kidney. METHODS/RESULTS: The median value of serum carbohydrate deficient transferrin was 16.0 U/l in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis (n = 41), and this value was not significantly different from that of a normal control group (median 17.4 U/l, n = 55, ns...

  14. Toll-like receptor 9 prevents cardiac rupture after myocardial infarction in mice independently of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omiya, Shigemiki; Omori, Yosuke; Taneike, Manabu; Protti, Andrea; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Akira, Shizuo; Shah, Ajay M; Nishida, Kazuhiko; Otsu, Kinya

    2016-12-01

    We have reported that the Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) signaling pathway plays an important role in the development of pressure overload-induced inflammatory responses and heart failure. However, its role in cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction has not been elucidated. TLR9-deficient and control C57Bl/6 wild-type mice were subjected to left coronary artery ligation. The survival rate 14 days postoperation was significantly lower in TLR9-deficient mice than that in wild-type mice with evidence of cardiac rupture in all dead mice. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging showed no difference in infarct size and left ventricular wall thickness and function between TLR9-deficient and wild-type mice. There were no differences in the number of infiltrating inflammatory cells and the levels of inflammatory cytokine mRNA in infarct hearts between TLR9-deficient and wild-type mice. The number of α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA)-positive myofibroblasts and αSMA/Ki67-double-positive proliferative myofibroblasts was increased in the infarct and border areas in infarct hearts compared with those in sham-operated hearts in wild-type mice, but not in TLR9-deficient mice. The class B CpG oligonucleotide increased the phosphorylation level of NF-κB and the number of αSMA-positive and αSMA/Ki67-double-positive cells and these increases were attenuated by BAY1-7082, an NF-κB inhibitor, in cardiac fibroblasts isolated from wild-type hearts. The CpG oligonucleotide showed no effect on NF-κB activation or the number of αSMA-positive and αSMA/Ki67-double-positive cells in cardiac fibroblasts from TLR9-deficient hearts. Although the TLR9 signaling pathway is not involved in the acute inflammatory response in infarct hearts, it ameliorates cardiac rupture possibly by promoting proliferation and differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  15. The EP1/EP3 receptor agonist 17-pt-PGE2 acts as an EP4 receptor agonist on endothelial barrier function and in a model of LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiler, Anna; Konya, Viktoria; Pasterk, Lisa; Maric, Jovana; Bärnthaler, Thomas; Lanz, Ilse; Platzer, Wolfgang; Schuligoi, Rufina; Heinemann, Akos

    2016-12-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a hallmark of inflammatory conditions. We recently demonstrated that prostaglandin (PG)E2 enhances the resistance of pulmonary endothelium in vitro and counteracts lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pulmonary inflammation in vivo via EP4 receptors. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the EP1/EP3 receptor agonist 17-phenyl-trinor-(pt)-PGE2 on acute lung inflammation in a mouse model. In LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation in mice, 17-pt-PGE2 reduced neutrophil infiltration and inhibited vascular leakage. These effects were unaltered by an EP1 antagonist, but reversed by EP4 receptor antagonists. 17-pt-PGE2 increased the resistance of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells and prevented thrombin-induced disruption of endothelial junctions. Again, these effects were not mediated via EP1 or EP3 but through activation of the EP4 receptor, as demonstrated by the lack of effect of more selective EP1 and EP3 receptor agonists, prevention of these effects by EP4 antagonists and EP4 receptor knock-down by siRNA. In contrast, the aggregation enhancing effect of 17-pt-PGE2 in human platelets was mediated via EP3 receptors. Our results demonstrate that 17-pt-PGE2 enhances the endothelial barrier in vitro on pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells, and accordingly ameliorates the recruitment of neutrophils, via EP4 receptors in vivo. This suggests a beneficial effect of 17-pt-PGE2 on pulmonary inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Targeting Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 and Protein Kinase D1 Related Pathways by a Multiple Kinase Inhibitor in Angiogenesis and Inflammation Related Processes In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Attila Varga; Pál Gyulavári; Zoltán Greff; Krisztina Futosi; Tamás Németh; Laura Simon-Szabó; Krisztina Kerekes; Csaba Szántai-Kis; Diána Brauswetter; Márton Kokas; Gábor Borbély; Anna Erdei; Attila Mócsai; György Kéri; Tibor Vántus

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and protein kinase D1 (PKD1) signaling axis plays a critical role in normal and pathological angiogenesis and inflammation related processes. Despite all efforts, the currently available therapeutic interventions are limited. Prior studies have also proved that a multiple target inhibitor can be more efficient compared to a single target one. Therefore, development of novel inflammatory pathway-specific...

  17. TCDD-Induced Activation of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Inhibits Th17 Polarization and Regulates Non-Eosinophilic Airway Inflammation in Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao-ming Li; Juan Peng; Wen Gu; Xue-jun Guo

    2016-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a transcription factor of the bHLH/PAS family, has recently been demonstrated to regulate T cell differentiation. Whether AhR activation participates in allergic airway inflammation remains unknown. In the current study, using a non-eosinophilic asthma model, we demonstrate that 2, 3, 7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-P-dioxin (TCDD), a potent AhR ligand, reduced the airway infiltration of neutrophils, airway hyperresponsiveness and Th17 cytokine expression. Further...

  18. Involvement of Nuclear Factor κB, not Pregnane X Receptor, in Inflammation-Mediated Regulation of Hepatic Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abualsunun, Walaa A; Piquette-Miller, Micheline

    2017-10-01

    Endotoxin-induced inflammation decreases the hepatic expression of several drug transporters, metabolizing enzymes, and nuclear transcription factors, including pregnane X receptor (PXR). As the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) is a major mediator of inflammation, and reciprocal repression between NF-κB and PXR signaling has been reported, the objective of this study was to examine whether NF-κB directly regulates the expression of transporters or exerts its effect indirectly via PXR. PXR-deficient (-/-) or wild-type (+/+) male mice were dosed with the selective NF-κB inhibitor PHA408 (40 mg/kg i.p.) or vehicle (n = 5-8/group), followed by endotoxin (5 mg/kg) or saline 30 minutes later. Animals were sacrificed at 6 hours; samples were analyzed using quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blots. Endotoxin induced tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, and inducible nitric oxide synthase in PXR (+/+) and (-/-) mice. As compared with saline controls, endotoxin administration imposed 30%-70% significant decreases in the expression of Abcb1a, Abcb11, Abcc2, Abcc3, Abcg2, Slc10a1, Slco2b1, and Slco1a4 in PXR (+/+) and (-/-) mice to a similar extent. Preadministration of PHA408 attenuated endotoxin-mediated changes in both PXR (+/+) and (-/-) mice (P < 0.05). Our findings demonstrate that endotoxin activates NF-κB and imposes a downregulation of numerous ATP-binding cassette and solute carrier transporters through NF-κB in liver and is independent of PXR. Moreover, inhibition of NF-κB attenuates the impact of endotoxin on transporter expression. As NF-κB activation is involved in many acute and chronic disease states, disease-induced changes in transporter function may be an important source of variability in drug response. This information may be useful in predicting potential drug-disease interactions. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  19. Receptor Interacting Protein 3-Mediated Necroptosis Promotes Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Wang

    Full Text Available Necrosis amplifies inflammation and plays important roles in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Necroptosis is a newly identified programmed necrosis that is mediated by receptor interacting protein 3 (RIP3. However, the potential involvement and impact of necroptosis in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced ARDS remains unknown. We therefore explored the role and mechanism of RIP3-mediated necroptosis in LPS-induced ARDS. Mice were instilled with increasing doses of LPS intratracheally to induce different degrees of ARDS. Lung tissues were harvested for histological and TUNEL staining and western blot for RIP3, p-RIP3, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP, mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL, total and cleaved caspases-3/8. Then, wild-type and RIP3 knock-out mice were induced ARDS with 30 mg/kg LPS. Pulmonary cellular necrosis was labeled by the propidium Iodide (PI staining. Levels of TNF-a, Interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-1α, IL-10 and HMGB1, tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO activity, neutrophil counts and total protein concentration were measured. Results showed that in high dose LPS (30mg/kg and 40mg/kg -induced severe ARDS, RIP3 protein was increased significantly, accompanied by increases of p-RIP3 and MLKL, while in low dose LPS (10mg/kg and 20mg/kg -induced mild ARDS, apoptosis was remarkably increased. In LPS-induced severe ARDS, RIP3 knock-out alleviated the hypothermia symptom, increased survival rate and ameliorated the lung tissue injury RIP3 depletion also attenuated LPS-induced increase in IL-1α/β, IL-6 and HMGB1 release, decreased tissue MPO activity, and reduced neutrophil influx and total protein concentration in BALF in severe ARDS. Further, RIP3 depletion reduced the necrotic cells in the lung and decreased the expression of MLKL, but had no impact on cleaved caspase-3 in LPS-induced ARDS. It is concluded that RIP3-mediated necroptosis is a major mechanism of enhanced inflammation and lung tissue injury in

  20. The G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor Gpbar1 (TGR5 inhibits gastric inflammation through antagonizing NF-kB signaling pathway

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    Cong eGuo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Gpbar1 (TGR5, a membrane-bound bile acid receptor, is well known for its roles in regulation of energy homeostasis and glucose metabolism. Here we show that mice lacking TGR5 were much more susceptible to lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced acute gastric inflammation than wild-type (WT mice and TGR5 is a negative regulator of gastric inflammation through antagonizing NF-κB signaling pathway. We found that the treatment of TGR5 ligands 23(S-mCDCA and GPBARA (3-(2-Chlorophenyl-N-(4-chlorophenyl-N,5-dimethylisoxazole-4-carboxamide suppressed gene and protein expression mediated by NF-κB signaling. TGR5 overexpression with ligand treatment inhibited gene expression of interferon-inducible protein 10 (IP-10, TNF-α, and chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 induced by LPS. Furthermore, we revealed that TGR5 activation antagonized NF-κB signaling pathway through suppressing its transcription activity, the phosphorylation of IκBα and p65 translocation, which suggests that TGR5 antagonizes gastric inflammation at least in part by inhibiting NF-κB signaling. These findings identify TGR5 as a negative mediator of gastric inflammation that may serve as an attractive therapeutic tool for human gastric inflammation and cancer.

  1. DEAE-Affi-Gel Blue chromatography of human serum: use for purification of native transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, P A; Galbraith, R M; Arnaud, P

    1983-10-01

    Human serum was subjected to chromatography on DEAE-Affi-Gel Blue which combines ion-exchange and pseudo-ligand-affinity chromatography in a 0.02 M phosphate buffer, pH 7.0. All serum proteins were bound with the exception of transferrin, IgG (immunoglobulin G) and trace amounts of IgA. After a second step of Sephadex G-100 gel chromatography, or affinity chromatography against goat anti-human IgG F(ab')2 coupled to AH-Sepharose 4B, IgG and IgA were removed. The transferrin obtained was homogeneous and of high yield (greater than 80%), and was unaltered as judged by analyses of molecular weight, isoelectric point, iron-binding capacity, antigenicity, and ability to bind to high-affinity specific cellular receptors. Thus, DEAE-Affi-Gel Blue chromatography may be used as the basis for a simple, rapid, two-step method for the purification of large amounts of native transferrin from serum.

  2. Monitoring pulmonary vascular permeability using radiolabeled transferrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basran, G.S.; Hardy, J.G.

    1988-07-01

    A simple, noninvasive technique for monitoring pulmonary vascular permeability in patients in critical care units is discussed. High vascular permeability is observed in patients with clinically defined adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) but not in patients with hydrostatic pulmonary edema or in patients with minor pulmonary insults who are considered to be at risk of developing ARDS. The technique has been used in the field of therapeutics and pharmacology to test the effects of the putative antipermeability agents methylprednisolone and terbutaline sulfate. There appears to be a good correlation between the acute inhibitory effect of either drug on transferrin exudation and patient prognosis. Thus, a byproduct of such drug studies may be an index of survival in patients with established ARDS.

  3. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor and its receptor signaling augment glycated albumin-induced retinal microglial inflammation in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Chun H

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microglial activation and the proinflammatory response are controlled by a complex regulatory network. Among the various candidates, macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF is considered an important cytokine. The up-regulation of M-CSF and its receptor CSF-1R has been reported in brain disease, as well as in diabetic complications; however, the mechanism is unclear. An elevated level of glycated albumin (GA is a characteristic of diabetes; thus, it may be involved in monocyte/macrophage-associated diabetic complications. Results The basal level of expression of M-CSF/CSF-1R was examined in retinal microglial cells in vitro. Immunofluorescence, real-time PCR, immunoprecipitation, and Western blot analyses revealed the up-regulation of CSF-1R in GA-treated microglial cells. We also detected increased expression and release of M-CSF, suggesting that the cytokine is produced by activated microglia via autocrine signaling. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we found that GA affects microglial activation by stimulating the release of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β. Furthermore, the neutralization of M-CSF or CSF-1R with antibodies suppressed the proinflammatory response. Conversely, this proinflammatory response was augmented by the administration of M-CSF. Conclusions We conclude that GA induces microglial activation via the release of proinflammatory cytokines, which may contribute to the inflammatory pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. The increased microglial expression of M-CSF/CSF-1R not only is a response to microglial activation in diabetic retinopathy but also augments the microglial inflammation responsible for the diabetic microenvironment.

  4. ROLE OF TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR 4 IN AIRWAY INFLAMMA-TION OF CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Min; RONG Xia-jun; WAN Huan-ying; HUANG Shao-guang; LI Biao; LI Min

    2008-01-01

    Objective To confirm if pulmonary epithelial cells express Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and investigate the role of TLR4 in airway inflammation of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). Methods The expressions of TLR4, IL-8 mRNA and NF-κB activation stimulated by differen factors [lipopolysacharides (LPS), interleukin-1β, cigarette smoking extract (CSE)] in pulmonary epithelial cells were investigated. Results LPS, CSE and IL-1β induced the production of IL-8 and activation of NF-κB. The levels of IL-8 mRNA and NF-κB protein in ElA+ cell were markedly higher than ElA-cell and A549 cell (P<0.05). The TLR4 mRNA of all the cells increased along with the increase of LPS' stimulated time. There was significant difference among different LPS' doses (12 h: P=0.039; 24 h: P=0.013). The TLR4 mRNA of ElA+ cell was higher than the other two groups (P<0.05). IL-1β induced all the cells expressing TLR4 mRNA. CSE had no effect on the expression of TLR4 mRNA. Conclusion Pulmonary epithelial cells express TLR4. LPS and IL-1β up-regulate IL-8 mediated via the activation of NF-κB induced by TLR4. But CSE up-regulates IL-8 mediated via the activation of NF-κB, which has no relation to TLR4 and may have another signal transduction pathway.

  5. Interleukin-6, A Cytokine Critical to Mediation of Inflammation, Autoimmunity and Allograft Rejection: Therapeutic Implications of IL-6 Receptor Blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Stanley C; Choi, Jua; Kim, Irene; Wu, Gordon; Toyoda, Mieko; Shin, Bonga; Vo, Ashley

    2017-01-01

    The success of kidney transplants is limited by the lack of robust improvements in long-term survival. It is now recognized that alloimmune responses are responsible for the majority of allograft failures. Development of novel therapies to decrease allosensitization is critical. The lack of new drug development in kidney transplantation necessitated repurposing drugs initially developed in oncology and autoimmunity. Among these is tocilizumab (anti-IL-6 receptor [IL-6R]) which holds promise for modulating multiple immune pathways responsible for allograft injury and loss. Interleukin-6 is a cytokine critical to proinflammatory and immune regulatory cascades. Emerging data have identified important roles for IL-6 in innate immune responses and adaptive immunity. Excessive IL-6 production is associated with activation of T-helper 17 cell and inhibition of regulatory T cell with attendant inflammation. Plasmablast production of IL-6 is critical for initiation of T follicular helper cells and production of high-affinity IgG. Tocilizumab is the first-in-class drug developed to treat diseases mediated by IL-6. Data are emerging from animal and human studies indicating a critical role for IL-6 in mediation of cell-mediated rejection, antibody-mediated rejection, and chronic allograft vasculopathy. This suggests that anti-IL-6/IL-6R blockade could be effective in modifying T- and B-cell responses to allografts. Initial data from our group suggest anti-IL-6R therapy is of value in desensitization and prevention and treatment of antibody-mediated rejection. In addition, human trials have shown benefits in treatment of graft versus host disease in matched or mismatched stem cell transplants. Here, we explore the biology of IL-6/IL-6R interactions and the evidence for an important role of IL-6 in mediating allograft rejection.

  6. Secreted APE1/Ref-1 inhibits TNF-α-stimulated endothelial inflammation via thiol-disulfide exchange in TNF receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Myoung Soo; Choi, Sunga; Lee, Yu Ran; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Kang, Gun; Kim, Cuk-Seong; Kim, Soo Jin; Lee, Sang Do; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2016-03-11

    Apurinic apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/Redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) is a multifunctional protein with redox activity and is proved to be secreted from stimulated cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functions of extracellular APE1/Ref-1 with respect to leading anti-inflammatory signaling in TNF-α-stimulated endothelial cells in response to acetylation. Treatment of TNF-α-stimulated endothelial cells with an inhibitor of deacetylase that causes intracellular acetylation, considerably suppressed vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). During TSA-mediated acetylation in culture, a time-dependent increase in secreted APE1/Ref-1 was confirmed. The acetyl moiety of acetylated-APE1/Ref-1 was rapidly removed based on the removal kinetics. Additionally, recombinant human (rh) APE1/Ref-1 with reducing activity induced a conformational change in rh TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) by thiol-disulfide exchange. Following treatment with the neutralizing anti-APE1/Ref-1 antibody, inflammatory signals via the binding of TNF-α to TNFR1 were remarkably recovered, leading to up-regulation of reactive oxygen species generation and VCAM-1, in accordance with the activation of p66(shc) and p38 MAPK. These results strongly indicate that anti-inflammatory effects in TNF-α-stimulated endothelial cells by acetylation are tightly linked to secreted APE1/Ref-1, which inhibits TNF-α binding to TNFR1 by reductive conformational change, with suggestion as an endogenous inhibitor of vascular inflammation.

  7. High levels of soluble VEGF receptor 1 early after trauma are associated with shock, sympathoadrenal activation, glycocalyx degradation and inflammation in severely injured patients: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostrowski Sisse R

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The level of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (sVEGFR1 is increased in sepsis and strongly associated with disease severity and mortality. Endothelial activation and damage contribute to both sepsis and trauma pathology. Therefore, this study measured sVEGFR1 levels in trauma patients upon hospital admission hypothesizing that sVEGFR1 would increase with higher injury severity and predict a poor outcome. Methods Prospective observational study of 80 trauma patients admitted to a Level I Trauma Centre. Data on demography, biochemistry, Injury Severity Score (ISS, transfusions and 30-day mortality were recorded and plasma/serum (sampled a median of 68 min (IQR 48-88 post-injury was analyzed for sVEGFR1 and biomarkers reflecting sympathoadrenal activation (adrenaline, noradrenaline, tissue injury (histone-complexed DNA fragments, hcDNA, endothelial activation and damage (von Willebrand Factor Antigen, Angiopoietin-2, soluble endothelial protein C receptor, syndecan-1, soluble thrombomodulin (sTM, coagulation activation/inhibition and fibrinolysis (prothrombinfragment 1 + 2, protein C, activated Protein C, tissue-type plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, D-dimer and inflammation (interleukin-6. Spearman correlations and regression analyses to identify variables associated with sVEGFR1 and its predictive value. Results Circulating sVEGFR1 correlated with injury severity (ISS, rho = 0.46, shock (SBE, rho = -0.38; adrenaline, rho = 0.47, tissue injury (hcDNA, rho = 0.44 and inflammation (IL-6, rho = 0.54 (all p Conclusions sVEGFR1 increased with increasing injury severity, shock and inflammation early after trauma but only sympathoadrenal activation, hypoperfusion, and inflammation were independent predictors of sVEGFR1 levels. sVEGFR1 correlated strongly with other biomarkers of endothelial activation and damage and with RBC transfusion requirements. Sympathoadrenal activation, shock and

  8. Knock out of S1P3 receptor signaling attenuates inflammation and fibrosis in bleomycin-induced lung injury mice model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Murakami

    Full Text Available Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P is a bioactive sphingolipid metabolite involved in many critical cellular processes, including proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis, through interaction with a family of five G protein-coupled receptors (S1P1-5. Some reports have implicated S1P as an important inflammatory mediator of the pathogenesis of airway inflammation, but the role of S1P3 in the pathogenesis of lung diseases is not completely understood. We used S1P3-deficient (knockout (KO mice to clarify the role of S1P3 receptor signaling in the pathogenesis of pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis using a bleomycin-induced model of lung injury. On the seventh day after bleomycin administration, S1P3 KO mice exhibited significantly less body weight loss and pulmonary inflammation than wild-type (WT mice. On the 28th day, there was less pulmonary fibrosis in S1P3 KO mice than in WT mice. S1P3 KO mice demonstrated a 56% reduction in total cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF collected on the seventh day compared with WT mice; however, the differential white blood cell profiles were similar. BALF analysis on the seventh day showed that connective tissue growth factor (CTGF levels were significantly decreased in S1P3 KO mice compared with WT mice, although no differences were observed in monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1 or transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1 levels. Finally, S1P levels in BALF collected on the 7th day after treatment were not significantly different between WT and S1P3 KO mice. Our results indicate that S1P3 receptor signaling plays an important role in pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis and that this signaling occurs via CTGF expression. This suggests that this pathway might be a therapeutic target for pulmonary fibrosis.

  9. Knock out of S1P3 receptor signaling attenuates inflammation and fibrosis in bleomycin-induced lung injury mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Ken; Kohno, Masataka; Kadoya, Masatoshi; Nagahara, Hidetake; Fujii, Wataru; Seno, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Aihiro; Oda, Ryo; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu; Morita, Satoshi; Nakada, Hiroshi; Hla, Timothy; Kawahito, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid metabolite involved in many critical cellular processes, including proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis, through interaction with a family of five G protein-coupled receptors (S1P1-5). Some reports have implicated S1P as an important inflammatory mediator of the pathogenesis of airway inflammation, but the role of S1P3 in the pathogenesis of lung diseases is not completely understood. We used S1P3-deficient (knockout (KO)) mice to clarify the role of S1P3 receptor signaling in the pathogenesis of pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis using a bleomycin-induced model of lung injury. On the seventh day after bleomycin administration, S1P3 KO mice exhibited significantly less body weight loss and pulmonary inflammation than wild-type (WT) mice. On the 28th day, there was less pulmonary fibrosis in S1P3 KO mice than in WT mice. S1P3 KO mice demonstrated a 56% reduction in total cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) collected on the seventh day compared with WT mice; however, the differential white blood cell profiles were similar. BALF analysis on the seventh day showed that connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) levels were significantly decreased in S1P3 KO mice compared with WT mice, although no differences were observed in monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) or transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) levels. Finally, S1P levels in BALF collected on the 7th day after treatment were not significantly different between WT and S1P3 KO mice. Our results indicate that S1P3 receptor signaling plays an important role in pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis and that this signaling occurs via CTGF expression. This suggests that this pathway might be a therapeutic target for pulmonary fibrosis.

  10. Functional N-Formyl Peptide Receptor 2 (FPR2) Antagonists Based on Ureidopropanamide Scaffold Have Potential to Protect Against Inflammation-associated Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stama, Madia Letizia; Lacivita, Enza; Kirpotina, Liliya N; Niso, Mauro; Perrone, Roberto; Schepetkin, Igor A; Quinn, Mark T; Leopoldo, Marcello

    2017-09-18

    Formyl peptide receptor-2 (FPR2) is a G protein-coupled receptor belonging to the N-formyl peptide receptor (FPR) family that plays critical roles in peripheral and brain inflammatory responses. FPR2 has been proposed as a target for the development of drugs that could facilitate the resolution of chronic inflammatory reactions by enhancing endogenous anti-inflammation systems. Starting from the structure of the FPR2 agonists (R)- and (S)-4 and 2, we designed a new series of ureidopropanamide derivatives with the goal of converting functional activity from agonism to antagonism and to develop new FPR2 antagonists. Although none of the compounds behaved as antagonist, some of the compounds were able to induce receptor desensitization, thus functionally behaving as antagonists. Evaluation of these compounds in an in vitro model of neuroinflammation showed that they reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in mouse microglial N9 cells after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). These FPR2 ligands may protect cells from damage due to inflammation-associated oxidative stress. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Cholesterol-induced hepatic inflammation does not contribute to the development of insulin resistance in male LDL receptor knockout mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Funke, A.; Schreurs, M.; Aparicio-Vergara, M.; Sheedfar, F.; Gruben, N.; Kloosterhuis, N.J.; Shiri-Sverdlov, R.; Groen, A.K.; Sluis, B. van de; Hofker, M.H.; Koonen, D.P.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: It is generally assumed that hepatic inflammation in obesity is linked to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Several recent studies have shed doubt on this view, which questions the causality of this association. This study focuses on Kupffer cell-mediated hepatic inflammation as a

  12. Cholesterol-induced hepatic inflammation does not contribute to the development of insulin resistance in male LDL receptor knockout mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Funke, Anouk; Schreurs, Marijke; Aparicio Vergara, Marcela; Sheedfar, Fareeba; Gruben, Nanda; Kloosterhuis, Niels J.; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit; Groen, Albert K.; van de Sluis, Bart; Hofker, Marten H.; Koonen, Debby P. Y.

    Objective: It is generally assumed that hepatic inflammation in obesity is linked to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Several recent studies have shed doubt on this view, which questions the causality of this association. This study focuses on Kupffer cell-mediated hepatic inflammation as a

  13. Delineating the role of histamine-1- and -4-receptors in a mouse model of Th2-dependent antigen-specific skin inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhashree Mahapatra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Histamine drives pruritus in allergic skin diseases which clinically constitutes a most disruptive symptom. Skin pathology in allergic skin diseases is crucially influenced by different T-helper subsets. However, the contribution of different histamine-receptors to T-helper cell dependent skin pathology has not been definitively answered. Models which can specifically address the functional role of T-helper subsets and the mediators involved are therefore valuable to gain further insights into molecular pathways which contribute to allergic skin disease. They might also be helpful to probe amendable therapeutic interventions such as histamine-receptor antagonism. OBJECTIVE: Establishing an adoptive transfer model for antigen-specific Th cells, we aimed to delineate the role of histamine H1- and H4-receptors in Th2-dependent skin inflammation. METHODS: In-vitro differentiated and OVA primed Th2 cells were adoptively transferred into congenic recipient mice. In vivo treatment with specific histamine H1- and H4-receptor antagonists was performed to analyze the contribution of these histamine-receptors to Th2-dependent skin pathology in our model. Analysis four days after epicutaneous challenge comprised skin histology, flow cytometric detection of transferred T-helper cells and analysis of antigen-cytokine profiles in skin-draining lymph nodes. RESULTS: Use of specific H1- and H4-receptor antagonists revealed a crucial role for H1- and H4-receptors for Th2 migration and cytokine secretion in a Th2-driven model of skin inflammation. While H1- and H4-receptor antagonists both reduced Th2 recruitment to the site of challenge, local cytokine responses in skin-draining lymph nodes were only reduced by the combined application of H1- and H4-receptor antagonists and mast cell counts remained altogether unchanged by either H1R-, H4R- or combined antagonism. CONCLUSION: Our model demonstrates a role for H1- and H4-receptors in Th2 cell

  14. Ceruloplasmin/Transferrin Ratio Changes in Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna Squitti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The link between iron and Alzheimer's disease (AD has been mainly investigated with a focus on the local accumulation of this metal in specific areas of the brain that are critical for AD. In the present study, we have instead looked at systemic variations of markers of iron metabolism. We measured serum levels of iron, ceruloplasmin, and transferrin and calculated the transferrin saturation and the ceruloplasmin to transferrin ratio (Cp/Tf. Cp/Tf and transferrin saturation increased in AD patients. Cp/Tf ratios also correlated positively with peroxide levels and negatively with serum iron concentrations. Elevated values of ceruloplasmin, peroxides, and Cp/Tf inversely correlated with MMSE scores. Isolated medial temporal lobe atrophy positively correlated with Cp/Tf and negatively with serum iron. All these findings indicate that the local iron accumulation found in brain areas critical for AD should be viewed in the frame of iron systemic alterations.

  15. Binding and endocytosis of monoterbium transferrin by K562 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Using isotopic labeling of human serum apotransferrin, the binding and the endocytosis of monoterbium transferrin (TbC-apotransferrin, TbC-apotransferrin- FeN) by K562 cells, a human leukemic cell line, have been investigated. There are about (8.58±2.41)×105 binding sites per cell surface at 0℃. The association constant for TbC-apo- transferrin binding is 4.1×107 mol-1@L, for TbC-apo- transferrin-FeN 2.7×107 mol-1@L at 0℃. At pH 7.4, upon warming cells to 37℃, endocytosis starts. The rate constants for the endocytosis are about 0.97 min-1 and 0.31 min-1 and the endocytosis ratio reaches 56% and 80% for TbC-apo- transferrin and TbC-apotransferrin-FeN, respectively.

  16. Assessing Iron Status: Beyond Serum Ferritin and Transferrin Saturation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jay B. Wish

    2006-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of multiple comorbidities among anemic patients with chronic kidney disease has made the use of serum ferritin and transferrin saturation more challenging in diagnosing iron deficiency...

  17. Megalin-dependent cubilin-mediated endocytosis is a major pathway for the apical uptake of transferrin in polarized epithelia

    OpenAIRE

    Kozyraki, Renata; Fyfe, John; Verroust, Pierre J.; Jacobsen, Christian; Dautry-Varsat, Alice; Gburek, Jakub; Willnow, Thomas E.; Christensen, Erik Ilsø; Søren K. Moestrup

    2001-01-01

    Cubilin is a 460-kDa protein functioning as an endocytic receptor for intrinsic factor vitamin B12 complex in the intestine and as a receptor for apolipoprotein A1 and albumin reabsorption in the kidney proximal tubules and the yolk sac. In the present study, we report the identification of cubilin as a novel transferrin (Tf) receptor involved in catabolism of Tf. Consistent with a cubilin-mediated endocytosis of Tf in the kidney, lysosomes of human, dog, and mouse renal proximal tubules stro...

  18. TCDD-Induced Activation of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Inhibits Th17 Polarization and Regulates Non-Eosinophilic Airway Inflammation in Asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-ming Li

    Full Text Available The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR, a transcription factor of the bHLH/PAS family, has recently been demonstrated to regulate T cell differentiation. Whether AhR activation participates in allergic airway inflammation remains unknown. In the current study, using a non-eosinophilic asthma model, we demonstrate that 2, 3, 7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-P-dioxin (TCDD, a potent AhR ligand, reduced the airway infiltration of neutrophils, airway hyperresponsiveness and Th17 cytokine expression. Furthermore, stimulation with TCDD promoted Treg differentiation and inhibited Th17 differentiation. However, the maturation of dendritic cells may not be inhibited by AhR activation. This study thus indicates a critical role of TCDD-induced AhR activation in the regulation of non-eosinophilic airway inflammation.

  19. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma-associated Proteobacteria, but not commensal Prevotella spp., promote Toll-like receptor 2-independent lung inflammation and pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jeppe Madura; Musavian, Hanieh Sadat; Butt, Tariq Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of healthy human airways have revealed colonization by a distinct commensal bacterial microbiota containing Gram-negative Prevotella spp. However, the immunological properties of these bacteria in the respiratory system remain unknown. Here we compare the innate respiratory immune......-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-independent COPD-like inflammation characterized by predominant airway neutrophilia, expression of a neutrophilic cytokine/chemokine profile in lung tissue, and lung immunopathology. In comparison, P.nanceiensis induced a diminished neutrophilic airway inflammation and no detectable lung...... pathology. Interestingly, the inflammatory airway response to the Gram-negative bacteria P.nanceiensis was completely TLR2-dependent. These findings demonstrate weak inflammatory properties of Gram-negative airway commensal Prevotella spp. that may make colonization by these bacteria tolerable...

  20. CD8+ T Cell Response to Gammaherpesvirus Infection Mediates Inflammation and Fibrosis in Interferon Gamma Receptor-Deficient Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigid M O'Flaherty

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, one of the most severe interstitial lung diseases, is a progressive fibrotic disorder of unknown etiology. However, there is growing appreciation for the role of viral infection in disease induction and/or progression. A small animal model of multi-organ fibrosis, which involves murine gammaherpesvirus (MHV68 infection of interferon gamma receptor deficient (IFNγR-/- mice, has been utilized to model the association of gammaherpesvirus infections and lung fibrosis. Notably, several MHV68 mutants which fail to induce fibrosis have been identified. Our current study aimed to better define the role of the unique MHV68 gene, M1, in development of pulmonary fibrosis. We have previously shown that the M1 gene encodes a secreted protein which possesses superantigen-like function to drive the expansion and activation of Vβ4+ CD8+ T cells. Here we show that M1-dependent fibrosis is correlated with heightened levels of inflammation in the lung. We observe an M1-dependent cellular infiltrate of innate immune cells with most striking differences at 28 days-post infection. Furthermore, in the absence of M1 protein expression we observed reduced CD8+ T cells and MHV68 epitope specific CD8+ T cells to the lungs-despite equivalent levels of viral replication between M1 null and wild type MHV68. Notably, backcrossing the IFNγR-/- onto the Balb/c background, which has previously been shown to exhibit weak MHV68-driven Vβ4+ CD8+ T cell expansion, eliminated MHV68-induced fibrosis-further implicating the activated Vβ4+ CD8+ T cell population in the induction of fibrosis. We further addressed the role that CD8+ T cells play in the induction of fibrosis by depleting CD8+ T cells, which protected the mice from fibrotic disease. Taken together these findings are consistent with the hypothesized role of Vβ4+ CD8+ T cells as mediators of fibrotic disease in IFNγR-/- mice.

  1. Lack of formyl peptide receptor 1 and 2 leads to more severe inflammation and higher mortality in mice with of pneumococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldekamp, Sandra; Pscheidl, Sebastian; Kress, Eugenia; Soehnlein, Oliver; Jansen, Sandra; Pufe, Thomas; Wang, Ji Ming; Tauber, Simone C; Brandenburg, Lars-Ove

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial meningitis is, despite progress in research and the development of new treatment strategies, still a cause of severe neuronal sequelae. The brain is protected from penetrating pathogens by both the blood-brain barrier and the innate immune system. The invading pathogens are recognized by pattern recognition receptors including the G-protein coupled formyl peptide receptors (FPRs), which are expressed by immune cells of the central nervous system. The expression of FPRs is up-regulated during bacterial meningitis, but the consequence on the progression of inflammation and impact on mortality are far from clear. Therefore, we used mFPR1 and mFPR2-deficient mice to investigate the effects on inflammation, bacterial growth and mortality in a mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis. Our results revealed increased bacterial burden, increased neutrophil infiltration and higher mortality in mFPR1/2-deficient mice in comparison to wild-type mice. The mFPR1- or mFPR2-deficient mice also showed significantly increased glial cell density, whereas the immune responses including the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines and antimicrobial peptides were decreased in bacterial meningitis. Taken together, the results suggest that FPR1 and FPR2 play an important role in the innate immune responses against Streptococcus pneumoniae within the central nervous system and the lack of the receptors leads to a dysregulation of the inflammatory response compared with wild-type mice. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. ALUMINUM STIMULATES UPTAKE OF NON-TRANSFERRIN BOUND IRON AND TRANSFERRIN BOUND IRON IN HUMAN GLIAL CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yongbae; Olivi, Luisa; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Maertens, Alex; Joseph P Bressler

    2007-01-01

    Aluminum and other trivalent metals were shown to stimulate uptake of transferrin bound iron and nontransferrin bound iron in erytholeukemia and hepatoma cells. Because of the association between aluminum and Alzheimer’s Disease, and findings of higher levels of iron in Alzheimer’s disease brains, the effects of aluminum on iron homeostasis were examined in a human glial cell line. Aluminum stimulated dose- and time-dependent uptake of nontransferrin bound iron and iron bound to transferrin. ...

  3. Topical application of a platelet activating factor receptor agonist suppresses phorbol ester-induced acute and chronic inflammation and has cancer chemopreventive activity in mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Ravi P; Rezania, Samin; Ocana, Jesus A; DaSilva-Arnold, Sonia C; Bradish, Joshua R; Richey, Justin D; Warren, Simon J; Rashid, Badri; Travers, Jeffrey B; Konger, Raymond L

    2014-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) has long been associated with acute edema and inflammatory responses. PAF acts by binding to a specific G-protein coupled receptor (PAF-R, Ptafr). However, the role of chronic PAF-R activation on sustained inflammatory responses has been largely ignored. We recently demonstrated that mice lacking the PAF-R (Ptafr-/- mice) exhibit increased cutaneous tumorigenesis in response to a two-stage chemical carcinogenesis protocol. Ptafr-/- mice also exhibited increased chronic inflammation in response to phorbol ester application. In this present study, we demonstrate that topical application of the non-hydrolysable PAF mimetic (carbamoyl-PAF (CPAF)), exerts a potent, dose-dependent, and short-lived edema response in WT mice, but not Ptafr -/- mice or mice deficient in c-Kit (c-KitW-sh/W-sh mice). Using an ear inflammation model, co-administration of topical CPAF treatment resulted in a paradoxical decrease in both acute ear thickness changes associated with a single PMA application, as well as the sustained inflammation associated with chronic repetitive PMA applications. Moreover, mice treated topically with CPAF also exhibited a significant reduction in chemical carcinogenesis. The ability of CPAF to suppress acute and chronic inflammatory changes in response to PMA application(s) was PAF-R dependent, as CPAF had no effect on basal or PMA-induced inflammation in Ptafr-/- mice. Moreover, c-Kit appears to be necessary for the anti-inflammatory effects of CPAF, as CPAF had no observable effect in c-KitW-sh/W-sh mice. These data provide additional evidence that PAF-R activation exerts complex immunomodulatory effects in a model of chronic inflammation that is relevant to neoplastic development.

  4. Expression of human transferrin can be regulated effectively by rabbit transferrin regulatory elements in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jingbin; Gong, Xiuli; Pan, Shubiao; Guo, Xinbing; Ren, Zhaorui; Zeng, Yitao

    2014-06-01

    Human transferrin (hTF) belongs to the iron-binding glycoprotein family. It plays an important role in iron transport throughout the body. Transgenic mice are a good model to study how to produce functional hTF on a large-scale. We have improved the expression of hTF and investigated its regulatory mechanism in transgenic mice. Three expression constructs were prepared in which hTF expression was controlled by different regulatory cassettes of rabbit transferrin (rTF). hTF was secreted into serum of transgenic mice when its expression was controlled by the rTF promoter and enhancer, whereas the rTF enhancer in tandem with the rTF promoter repressed hTF secretion into milk. A significant inverse relationship between methylation of the rTF promoter and hTF expression was observed in liver, heart, mammary gland, and muscle of transgenic mice. The highest concentration of hTF was 700 μg/ml in milk.

  5. TTP specifically regulates the internalization of the transferrin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosoni, Daniela; Puri, Claudia; Confalonieri, Stefano

    2005-01-01

    with endocytic proteins, including clathrin, dynamin, and the TfR, and localizes selectively to TfR-containing coated-pits (CCP) and -vesicles (CCV). Overexpression of TTP specifically inhibits TfR internalization, and causes the formation of morphologically aberrant CCP, which are probably fission impaired....... This effect is mediated by the SH3 of TTP, which can bind to dynamin, and it is rescued by overexpression of dynamin. Functional ablation of TTP causes a reduction in TfR internalization, and reduced cargo loading and size of TfR-CCV. Tyrosine phosphorylation of either TTP or dynamin prevents...

  6. Association between serum transferrin receptor levels and malaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    This study was conducted with financial support from the MRTP under the HRSA (US National. Institutes of ... American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 68: 121-127. Hopkins ... Cochrane Database Systematic Review 10:CD006589.

  7. Leukotriene D4 and prostaglandin E2 signals synergize and potentiate vascular inflammation in a mast cell-dependent manner through cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 and E-prostanoid receptor 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondeti, Vinay; Al-Azzam, Nosayba; Duah, Ernest; Thodeti, Charles K; Boyce, Joshua A; Paruchuri, Sailaja

    2016-01-01

    Although arachidonic acid metabolites, cysteinyl leukotrienes (cys-LTs; leukotriene [LT] C4, LTD4, and LTE4), and prostaglandin (PG) E2 are generated at the site of inflammation, it is not known whether crosstalk exists between these 2 classes of inflammatory mediators. We sought to determine the role of LTD4-PGE2 crosstalk in inducing vascular inflammation in vivo, identify effector cells, and ascertain specific receptors and pathways involved in vitro. Vascular (ear) inflammation was assessed by injecting agonists into mouse ears, followed by measuring ear thickness and histology, calcium influx with Fura-2, phosphorylation and expression of signaling molecules by means of immunoblotting, PGD2 and macrophage inflammatory protein 1β generation by using ELISA, and expression of transcripts by using RT-PCR. Candidate receptors and signaling molecules were identified by using antagonists and inhibitors and confirmed by using small interfering RNA. LTD4 plus PGE2 potentiated vascular permeability and edema, gearing the system toward proinflammation in wild-type mice but not in Kit(W-sh) mice. Furthermore, LTD4 plus PGE2, through cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 (CysLT1R) and E-prostanoid receptor (EP) 3, enhanced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) and c-fos phosphorylation, inflammatory gene expression, macrophage inflammatory protein 1β secretion, COX-2 upregulation, and PGD2 generation in mast cells. Additionally, we uncovered that this synergism is mediated through Gi, protein kinase G, and Erk signaling. LTD4 plus PGE2-potentiated effects are partially sensitive to CysLT1R or EP3 antagonists but completely abolished by simultaneous treatment both in vitro and in vivo. Our results unravel a unique LTD4-PGE2 interaction affecting mast cells through CysLT1R and EP3 involving Gi, protein kinase G, and Erk and contributing to vascular inflammation in vivo. Furthermore, current results also suggest an advantage of targeting both CysLT1R and EP3 in

  8. Manganese transport via the transferrin mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Thomas E; Gerstner, Brent; Gunter, Karlene K; Malecki, Jon; Gelein, Robert; Valentine, William M; Aschner, Michael; Yule, David I

    2013-01-01

    Excessive manganese (Mn) uptake by brain cells, particularly in regions like the basal ganglia, can lead to toxicity. Mn(2+) is transported into cells via a number of mechanisms, while Mn(3+) is believed to be transported similarly to iron (Fe) via the transferrin (Tf) mechanism. Cellular Mn uptake is therefore determined by the activity of the mechanisms transporting Mn into each type of cell and by the amounts of Mn(2+), Mn(3+) and their complexes to which these cells are exposed; this complicates understanding the contributions of each transporter to Mn toxicity. While uptake of Fe(3+) via the Tf mechanism is well understood, uptake of Mn(3+) via this mechanism has not been systematically studied. The stability of the Mn(3+)Tf complex allowed us to form and purify this complex and label it with a fluorescent (Alexa green) tag. Using purified and labeled Mn(3+)Tf and biophysical tools, we have developed a novel approach to study Mn(3+)Tf transport independently of other Mn transport mechanisms. This approach was used to compare the uptake of Mn(3+)Tf into neuronal cell lines with published descriptions of Fe(3+) uptake via the Tf mechanism, and to obtain quantitative information on Mn uptake via the Tf mechanism. Results confirm that in these cell lines significant Mn(3+) is transported by the Tf mechanism similarly to Fe(3+)Tf transport; although Mn(3+)Tf transport is markedly slower than other Mn transport mechanisms. This novel approach may prove useful for studying Mn toxicity in other systems and cell types.

  9. Cannabidiol provides long-lasting protection against the deleterious effects of inflammation in a viral model of multiple sclerosis: a role for A2A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecha, M; Feliú, A; Iñigo, P M; Mestre, L; Carrillo-Salinas, F J; Guaza, C

    2013-11-01

    Inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS) is a complex process that involves a multitude of molecules and effectors, and it requires the transmigration of blood leukocytes across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the activation of resident immune cells. Cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychotropic cannabinoid constituent of Cannabis sativa, has potent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties. Yet, how this compound modifies the deleterious effects of inflammation in TMEV-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) remains unknown. Using this viral model of multiple sclerosis (MS), we demonstrate that CBD decreases the transmigration of blood leukocytes by downregulating the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), chemokines (CCL2 and CCL5) and the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β, as well as by attenuating the activation of microglia. Moreover, CBD administration at the time of viral infection exerts long-lasting effects, ameliorating motor deficits in the chronic phase of the disease in conjunction with reduced microglial activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Adenosine A2A receptors participate in some of the anti-inflammatory effects of CBD, as the A2A antagonist ZM241385 partially blocks the protective effects of CBD in the initial stages of inflammation. Together, our findings highlight the anti-inflammatory effects of CBD in this viral model of MS and demonstrate the significant therapeutic potential of this compound for the treatment of pathologies with an inflammatory component.

  10. The protective role of transferrin in Müller glial cells after iron-induced toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Emilie; Fontaine, Isabelle; Jonet, Laurent; Guillou, Florian; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Courtois, Yves; Jeanny, Jean-Claude

    2008-05-20

    Transferrin (Tf) expression is enhanced by aging and inflammation in humans. We investigated the role of transferrin in glial protection. We generated transgenic mice (Tg) carrying the complete human transferrin gene on a C57Bl/6J genetic background. We studied human (hTf) and mouse (mTf) transferrin localization in Tg and wild-type (WT) C57Bl/6J mice using immunochemistry with specific antibodies. Müller glial (MG) cells were cultured from explants and characterized using cellular retinaldehyde binding protein (CRALBP) and vimentin antibodies. They were further subcultured for study. We incubated cells with FeCl(3)-nitrilotriacetate to test for the iron-induced stress response; viability was determined by direct counting and measurement of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity. Tf expression was determined by reverse transcriptase-quantitative PCR with human- or mouse-specific probes. hTf and mTf in the medium were assayed by ELISA or radioimmunoassay (RIA), respectively. mTf was mainly localized in retinal pigment epithelium and ganglion cell layers in retina sections of both mouse lines. hTf was abundant in MG cells. The distribution of mTf and hTf mRNA was consistent with these findings. mTf and hTf were secreted into the medium of MG cell primary cultures. Cells from Tg mice secreted hTf at a particularly high level. However, both WT and Tg cell cultures lose their ability to secrete Tf after a few passages. Tg MG cells secreting hTf were more resistant to iron-induced stress toxicity than those no longer secreted hTf. Similarly, exogenous human apo-Tf, but not human holo-Tf, conferred resistance to iron-induced stress on MG cells from WT mice. hTf localization in MG cells from Tg mice was reminiscent of that reported for aged human retina and age-related macular degeneration, both conditions associated with iron deposition. The role of hTf in protection against toxicity in Tg MG cells probably involves an adaptive mechanism developed in neural retina to

  11. Restraint stress differentially regulates inflammation and glutamate receptor gene expression in the hippocampus of C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyanesan, Monica; Haiar, Jacob M; Watt, Michael J; Newton, Samuel S

    2017-03-01

    The inbred mouse strains, C57BL/6 and BALB/c have been used widely in preclinical psychiatric research. The differences in stress susceptibility of available strains has provided a useful platform to test pharmacological agents and behavioral responses. Previous brain gene profiling efforts have indicated that the inflammation and immune response gene pathway is the predominant gene network in the differential stress response of BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. The implication is that a composite stress paradigm that includes a sequence of extended, varied and unpredictable stressors induces inflammation-related genes in the hippocampus. We hypothesized that the regulation of inflammation genes in the brain could constitute a primary stress response and tested this by employing a simple stress protocol, repeated exposure to the same stressor for 10 days, 2 h of restraint per day. We examined stress-induced regulation of 13 proinflammatory cytokine genes in male BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice using quantitative PCR. Elevated cytokine genes included tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukin 6 (IL6), interleukin 10 (IL10), tumor necrosis factor (TNF) super family members and interleukin 1 receptor 1 (IL1R1). In addition, we examined restraint stress-induced regulation of 12 glutamate receptor genes in both strains. Our results show that restraint stress is sufficient to elevate the expression of inflammation-related genes in the hippocampus of both BABLB/c and C57BL/6 mice, but they differ in the genes that are induced and the magnitude of change. Cell types that are involved in this response include endothelial cells and astrocytes. Lay summary Repeated exposure to a simple restraint stress altered the activities of genes involved in inflammation and the functions of the excitatory neurotransmitter, glutamate. These changes in the hippocampus of the mouse brain showed differences that were dependent on the strain of mice and the length of the stress exposure. The effects

  12. Regulation of Toll-like receptors-mediated inflammation by immunobiotics in bovine intestinal epitheliocytes: role of signalling pathways and negative regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio eVillena

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs detect bacterial and viral associated-molecular-patterns (MAMPs via germline-encoded pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs and are responsible for maintaining immunetolerance to the communities of resident commensal bacteria while being also capable to mount immune responses against pathogens. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are a major class of PRRs expressed on IECs and immune cells, which are involved in the induction of both tolerance and inflammation. In the last decade, experimental and clinical evidence was generated to support the application of probiotics with immunoregulatory capacities (immunobiotics for the prevention and treatment of several gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders in which TLRs exert a significant role. The majority of these studies were performed in mouse and human cell lines and, despite the growing interest in the bovine immune system due to the economic importance of cattle as livestock, only few studies have been conducted on cattle. In this regard, our group have established a bovine intestinal epithelial (BIE cell line originally derived from fetal bovine intestinal epitheliocytes and used this cell line to evaluate the impact of immunobiotics in TLR-mediated inflammation. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge of the beneficial effects of immunobiotics in the regulation of intestinal inflammation/infection in cattle. Especially we discuss the role of TLRs and their negative regulators in both the inflammatory response nd the beneficial effects of immunobiotics in bovine IECs. This review article emphasizes the cellular and molecular interactions of immunobiotics with BIE cells through TLRs and gives the scientific basis for the development of immunomodulatory feed for bovine healthy development.

  13. Diminished peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR regulation as a potential mechanism for the persistent inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Drost

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Persistent inflammation is the main pathological process that underlies COPD. Understanding this inflammatory response is a key focus of COPD research with the aim of discovering new therapeutic targets. The nuclear hormone receptor, PPAR is now a recognised modulator of inflammation in various chronic inflammatory conditions, but its role in the persistent airways inflammation in COPD has not been examined. Control of the inflammatory response by PPAR has been shown by antagonising inflammatory signalling pathways, such as NF-kappa B and AP-1. PPAR-alpha protein levels in lung tissue from patients with COPD were assessed by Western blot. In vitro assays using the human type II alveolar epithelial cell line were performed to assess the effect of PPAR-alpha agonist treatment on inflammatory cytokine generation. An increase in PPAR-alpha protein levels was seen for healthy smokers compared with non-smokers (Ratio to beta-actin loading control, non-smokers 0.61±0.1, n = 10; healthy smokers 0.97±0.3, n = 11, p>0.05. No increase was seen for current smoker or ex-smoker COPD patients (0.36±0.08, n = 12; 0.49±0.1, n = 8 respectively. In vitro experiments with a human type II alveolar epithelial cell line demonstrated a diminished inflammatory response to TNF-alpha, as measured by the generation of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-8, following pre-treatment with the PPAR-alpha agonist, WY-14643 (IL-8 generation, control 823±22 pg·ml–1, TNF-alpha 7491±530 pg·ml–1 p<0.001, WY-14643 2559±46 pg·ml–1 p<0.05, n = 3. We propose PPAR agonists as a potential therapy for reducing the NF-B-regulated inflammation in COPD airways.

  14. Potentiation of indomethacin-induced anti-inflammatory response by pioglitazone in carrageenan-induced acute inflammation in rats: Role of PPARγ receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houshmand, Gholamreza; Mansouri, Mohammad Taghi; Naghizadeh, Bahareh; Hemmati, Ali Asghar; Hashemitabar, Mahmoud

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to assess the interaction between anti-inflammatory effects of pioglitazone (peroxysome proliferator activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) agonist, PGL), and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, IND) and to evaluate the possible underlying mechanisms. Paw edema induced by carrageenan was used to induce inflammation. Different doses of IND (0.3-10mg/kg) and PGL (1-20mg/kg) alone or in combination were administered intraperitoneally to rats. Paw tissue levels of PPARγ, COX-2, and prostaglandin E2 and serum levels of TNF-α and IL-10 were also estimated. Doses of IND and PGL showed a statistically significant anti-inflammatory effect. Combination of a non-effective dose of IND (0.3mg/kg) with increasing doses of PGL (1-10mg/kg) resulted in potentiated anti-inflammation and vise versa. IND, PGL and the combination were able to reduce the COX-2, PGE2 contents and TNF-α level. Moreover, all these treatments caused elevation in PPARγ levels and IL-10 levels. However, when the rats were pre-treated with GW-9662 (a selective PPARγ antagonist), all the anti-inflammation and alterations in the biochemical factors were antagonized. These results showed that PGL markedly enhanced the anti-inflammatory activity of IND and this effect mediated partly at least, through PPARγ. Possible mechanisms of the interaction were that PGL stimulates the PPARγ and inhibits COX-2 by those cytokines that trigger the PPARγ and also inhibit COX-2. This study suggests that combination therapy with pioglitazone and indomethacin may provide an alternative for the clinical control of inflammation especially in patients with diabetes.

  15. Hypothalamic kappa opioid receptor mediates both diet‐induced and melanin concentrating hormone–induced liver damage through inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbernon, Monica; Sanchez‐Rebordelo, Estrella; Romero‐Picó, Amparo; Kalló, Imre; Chee, Melissa J.; Porteiro, Begoña; Al‐Massadi, Omar; Contreras, Cristina; Fernø, Johan; Senra, Ana; Gallego, Rosalia; Folgueira, Cintia; Seoane, Luisa M.; van Gestel, Margriet; Adan, Roger A.; Liposits, Zsolt; Dieguez, Carlos; López, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The opioid system is widely known to modulate the brain reward system and thus affect the behavior of humans and other animals, including feeding. We hypothesized that the hypothalamic opioid system might also control energy metabolism in peripheral tissues. Mice lacking the kappa opioid receptor (κOR) and adenoviral vectors overexpressing or silencing κOR were stereotaxically delivered in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) of rats. Vagal denervation was performed to assess its effect on liver metabolism. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was inhibited by pharmacological (tauroursodeoxycholic acid) and genetic (overexpression of the chaperone glucose‐regulated protein 78 kDa) approaches. The peripheral effects on lipid metabolism were assessed by histological techniques and western blot. We show that in the LHA κOR directly controls hepatic lipid metabolism through the parasympathetic nervous system, independent of changes in food intake and body weight. κOR colocalizes with melanin concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCH‐R1) in the LHA, and genetic disruption of κOR reduced melanin concentrating hormone–induced liver steatosis. The functional relevance of these findings was given by the fact that silencing of κOR in the LHA attenuated both methionine choline–deficient, diet‐induced and choline‐deficient, high‐fat diet–induced ER stress, inflammation, steatohepatitis, and fibrosis, whereas overexpression of κOR in this area promoted liver steatosis. Overexpression of glucose‐regulated protein 78 kDa in the liver abolished hypothalamic κOR‐induced steatosis by reducing hepatic ER stress. Conclusions: This study reveals a novel hypothalamic–parasympathetic circuit modulating hepatic function through inflammation and ER stress independent of changes in food intake or body weight; these findings might have implications for the clinical use of opioid receptor antagonists. (Hepatology 2016;64:1086‐1104) PMID:27387967

  16. Methodologic approach for the Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namaste, Sorrel Ml; Aaron, Grant J; Varadhan, Ravi; Peerson, Janet M; Suchdev, Parminder S

    2017-07-01

    Background: The Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project is a multiagency and multicountry collaboration that was formed to improve micronutrient assessment and to better characterize anemia.Objectives: The aims of the project were to 1) identify factors associated with inflammation, 2) assess the relations between inflammation, malaria infection, and biomarkers of iron and vitamin A status and compare adjustment approaches, and 3) assess risk factors for anemia in preschool children (PSC) and women of reproductive age (WRA).Design: The BRINDA database inclusion criteria included surveys that 1) were conducted after 2004, 2) had target groups of PSC, WRA, or both, and 3) used a similar laboratory methodology for the measurement of ≥1 biomarker of iron [ferritin or soluble transferrin receptor or vitamin A status (retinol-binding protein or retinol)] and ≥1 biomarker of inflammation (α-1-acid glycoprotein or C-reactive protein). Individual data sets were standardized and merged into a BRINDA database comprising 16 nationally and regionally representative surveys from 14 countries. Collectively, the database covered all 6 WHO geographic regions and contained ∼30,000 PSC and 27,000 WRA. Data were analyzed individually and combined with the use of a meta-analysis.Results: The methods that were used to standardize the BRINDA database and the analytic approaches used to address the project's research questions are presented in this article. Three approaches to adjust micronutrient biomarker concentrations in the presence of inflammation and malaria infection are presented, along with an anemia conceptual framework that guided the BRINDA project's anemia analyses.Conclusions: The BRINDA project refines approaches to interpret iron and vitamin A biomarker values in settings of inflammation and malaria infection and suggests the use of a new regression approach as well as proposes an anemia framework to which real

  17. Transferrin microheterogeneity in rheumatoid arthritis - Relation with disease activity and anemia of chronic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Feelders (Richard); G. Vreugdenhil (Gerard); G. de Jong (G.); A.J.G. Swaak (Antonius); H.G. van Eijk (Henk)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractWe studied the relation between disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the microheterogeneity of transferrin. Using crossed immuno isoelectric focusing, transferrin microheterogeneity patterns were analyzed in sera of healthy individuals, nonanemic RA patients, iron deficient

  18. Role of protease-activated receptor-2 in inflammation, and its possible implications as a putative mediator of periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Holzhausen

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR2 belongs to a novel subfamily of G-protein-coupled receptors with seven-transmembrane domains. This receptor is widely distributed throughout the body and seems to be importantly involved in inflammatory processes. PAR2 can be activated by serine proteases such as trypsin, mast cell tryptase, and bacterial proteases, such as gingipain produced by Porphyromonas gingivalis. This review describes the current stage of knowledge of the possible mechanisms that link PAR2 activation with periodontal disease, and proposes future therapeutic strategies to modulate the host response in the treatment of periodontitis.

  19. CD97 antibody depletes granulocytes in mice under conditions of acute inflammation via a Fc receptor-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veninga, Henrike; de Groot, Dorien M; McCloskey, Natalie; Owens, Bronwyn M; Dessing, Mark C; Verbeek, J Sjef; Nourshargh, Sussan; van Eenennaam, Hans; Boots, Annemieke M; Hamann, Jörg

    2011-03-01

    Antibodies to the pan-leukocyte adhesion-GPCR CD97 efficiently block neutrophil recruitment in mice, thereby reducing antibacterial host defense, inflammatory disease, and hematopoietic stem cell mobilization. Here, we investigated the working mechanism of the CD97 antibody 1B2. Applying sterile models of inflammation, intravital microscopy, and mice deficient for the CD97L CD55, the complement component C3, or the FcR common γ-chain, we show that 1B2 acts in vivo independent of ligand-binding interference by depleting PMN granulocytes in bone marrow and blood. Granulocyte depletion with 1B2 involved FcR but not complement activation and was associated with increased serum levels of TNF and other proinflammatory cytokines. Notably, depletion of granulocytes by CD97 antibody required acute inflammation, suggesting a mechanism of conditional, antibody-mediated granulocytopenia.

  20. Partial characterization of transferrins of catfish (Silurus glanis L.) and pike (Esox lucius L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratil, A; Tomásek, V; Clamp, J R; Williams, J

    1985-01-01

    Basic composition and properties of isolated transferrins of Silurus glanis and Esox lucius have been compared. In transferrin of S. glanis carbohydrate is absent, but it is present in transferrin of E. lucius (2.5%). The N-terminal amino acid is alanine in both species. Mol. wts are 68,400 (S. glanis) and 86,800 (E. lucius). Transferrins of the two species are heterogeneous, but genetic polymorphism was not observed.

  1. Study of the interaction of trivalent actinide and lanthanide ions with human serum transferrin by means of time-resolved laser-fluorescence spectroscopy; Untersuchung der Wechselwirkung trivalenter Actinid- und Lanthanidionen mit humanem Serumtransferrin mittels zeitaufgeloester Laserfluoreszenzspektroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Nicole

    2015-04-27

    In the present work the complexation of Cm(III), Eu(III) and Am(III) with human serum transferrin is studied. The aim of this work was the identification and the spectroscopic and thermodynamic characterization of An(III) and Ln(III) transferrin complex species. Different speciation methods, such as time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS), luminescence spectroscopy and EXAFS (Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure) spectroscopy were applied. Using TRLFS two unambiguously different Cm(III) transferrin species were identified for the first time. In the pH range from 3.5 to 9.7 the Cm(III) transferrin species I is formed revealing complexation of the metal ion at a nonspecific site of the protein surface. In case of the Cm(III) transferrin species II Cm(III) is bound at the Fe(III) binding site of the protein resulting in a 4-fold coordination via amino acid groups of the protein (His, Asp, 2 x Tyr) and coordination of two water molecules and three additional ligands, e.g. OH{sup -} or CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}. Due to the kinetic and thermodynamic differences of the binding sites of the N- and C-lobe, the experimental conditions ensure exclusive coordination of Cm(III) at the C-terminal binding site. In addition to the complexation studies of Cm(III) with transferrin, the interaction with the recombinant N-lobe of human serum transferrin (hTf/2N) as a model component for the transferrin N-lobe was investigated. At pH≥7.4 a Cm(III) hTf/2N species with Cm(III) bound at the Fe(III) binding site is formed which is comparable to the Cm(III) transferrin species II. An increase of the temperature from room temperature (T=296 K) to physiological temperature (T=310 K) favors the complexation of Cm(III) with both transferrin and hTf/2N. The complexation of Cm(III) with transferrin was investigated at three different carbonate concentrations (c(carbonate){sub tot}=0 mM, 0,23 mM und 25 mM (physiological carbonate concentration)). An increase of the total carbonate

  2. Chlamydial heat shock protein 60 induces acute pulmonary inflammation in mice via the Toll-like receptor 4- and MyD88-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Yonca; Shimada, Kenichi; Wong, Michelle H; Chen, Shuang; Gray, Pearl; Alsabeh, Randa; Doherty, Terence M; Crother, Timothy R; Arditi, Moshe

    2009-07-01

    Heat shock protein 60 derived from Chlamydia pneumoniae (cHSP60) activates Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling through the MyD88 pathway in vitro, but it is not known how cHSP60 contributes to C. pneumoniae-induced lung inflammation. We treated wild-type (WT), TLR2(-/-), TLR4(-/-), or MyD88(-/-) mice intratracheally (i.t.) with recombinant cHSP60 (50 microg), UV-killed C. pneumoniae (UVCP; 5 x 10(6) inclusion-forming units/mouse), lipopolysaccharide (2 microg), or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and sacrificed mice 24 h later. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was obtained to measure cell counts and cytokine levels, lungs were analyzed for histopathology, and lung homogenate chemokine concentrations were determined. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDDCs) were generated and stimulated with live C. pneumoniae (multiplicity of infection [MOI], 5), UVCP (MOI, 5), or cHSP60 for 24 h, and the expression of costimulatory molecules (CD80 and CD86) was measured by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. cHSP60 induced acute lung inflammation with the same intensity as that of UVCP-induced inflammation in WT mice but not in TLR4(-/-) or MyD88(-/-) mice. cHSP60- and UVCP-induced lung inflammation was associated with increased numbers of cells in BAL, increased neutrophil recruitment, and elevated BAL interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels. Both cHSP60 and UVCP induced IL-6 release and CD80 and CD86 expression in WT cells but not in MyD88(-/-) BMDDCs. cHSP60 stimulated DC activation in a TLR4- and MyD88-dependent manner with an intensity similar to that induced by UVCP. These data suggest that cHSP60 promotes lung inflammation and DC activation via TLR4 and MyD88 and therefore may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of C. pneumoniae-induced chronic inflammatory lung diseases.

  3. Total mortality by elevated transferrin saturation in patients with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellervik, Christina; Andersen, Henrik Ullits; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne;

    2013-01-01

    It is not known to what extent iron overload predicts prognosis in patients with diabetes after diagnosis or whether iron overload is a risk factor independent of the HFE genotype. We investigated total and cause-specific mortality according to increased transferrin saturation (≥ 50 vs....

  4. Isoforms of transferrin in psoriasis patients abusing alcohol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Hoefkens (Peter); E.M. Higgins; R.J. Ward (Roberta); H.G. van Eijk (Henk)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe different isoforms of transferrin have been quantified by isoelectric focusing in the sera of psoriasis patients with and without a history of abusing alcohol. In both male and female psoriasis subjects abusing alcohol, there were significant increases in the 2-sial

  5. Nonrandom distribution of iron in circulating human transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, O; Aisen, P

    1986-07-01

    By combining the urea gel electrophoresis technique of Makey and Seal with Western immunoblotting, a method has been developed for analyzing the distribution of iron between the two sites of circulating human transferrin. The new method avoids exposure of samples to a nonphysiologic pH that may promote removal or redistribution of iron from the protein; this facilitates examination of multiple samples at one time. Analysis of 21 freshly drawn specimens from normal human subjects confirms previous reports that iron is not randomly distributed in the specific sites of transferrin. Rather, there is a considerable range in the ratio of occupancies of N-terminal and C-terminal sites (N:C ratio), from 0.31 to 6.87 in the present study, with the N-terminal site predominantly occupied in most subjects. The N:C ratio correlates modestly with serum iron concentration (r = .54). Possible flaws in studies indicating a random occupancy of the specific sites of circulating transferrin may lie in the low pH to which samples may be exposed during procedures based on isoelectric focusing or in drawing inferences from data considering only total monoferric transferrin rather than the two distinguishable monoferric species.

  6. Disruption of 5-HT2A receptor-PDZ protein interactions alleviates mechanical hypersensitivity in carrageenan-induced inflammation in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Sophie Wattiez

    Full Text Available Despite common pathophysiological mechanisms, inflammatory and neuropathic pain do not respond equally to the analgesic effect of antidepressants, except for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs, which show a limited efficacy in both conditions. We previously demonstrated that an interfering peptide (TAT-2ASCV disrupting the interaction between 5-HT2A receptors and its associated PDZ proteins (e.g. PSD-95 reveals a 5-HT2A receptor-mediated anti-hyperalgesic effect and enhances the efficacy of fluoxetine (a SSRI in diabetic neuropathic pain conditions in rats. Here, we have examined whether the same strategy would be useful to treat inflammatory pain. Sub-chronic inflammatory pain was induced by injecting λ-carrageenan (100 µl, 2% into the left hind paw of the rat. Mechanical hyperalgesia was assessed after acute treatment with TAT-2ASCV or/and fluoxetine (SSRI 2.5 h after λ-carrageenan injection. Possible changes in the level of 5-HT2A receptors and its associated PDZ protein PSD-95 upon inflammation induction were quantified by Western blotting in dorsal horn spinal cord. Administration of TAT-2ASCV peptide (100 ng/rat, intrathecally but not fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneally relieves mechanical hyperalgesia (paw pressure test in inflamed rats. This anti-hyperalgesic effect involves spinal 5-HT2A receptors and GABAergic interneurons as it is abolished by a 5-HT2A antagonist (M100907, 150 ng/rat, intrathecally and a GABAA antagonist, (bicuculline, 3 µg/rat, intrathecally. We also found a decreased expression of 5-HT2A receptors in the dorsal spinal cord of inflamed animals which could not be rescued by TAT-2ASCV injection, while the amount of PSD-95 was not affected by inflammatory pain. Finally, the coadministration of fluoxetine does not further enhance the anti-hyperalgesic effect of TAT-2ASCV peptide. This study reveals a role of the interactions between 5-HT2A receptors and PDZ proteins in the pathophysiological pathways

  7. Dietary iron enhances colonic inflammation and IL-6/IL-11-Stat3 signaling promoting colonic tumor development in mice.

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    Anita C G Chua

    Full Text Available Chronic intestinal inflammation and high dietary iron are associated with colorectal cancer development. The role of Stat3 activation in iron-induced colonic inflammation and tumorigenesis was investigated in a mouse model of inflammation-associated colorectal cancer. Mice, fed either an iron-supplemented or control diet, were treated with azoxymethane and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS. Intestinal inflammation and tumor development were assessed by endoscopy and histology, gene expression by real-time PCR, Stat3 phosphorylation by immunoblot, cytokines by ELISA and apoptosis by TUNEL assay. Colonic inflammation was more severe in mice fed an iron-supplemented compared with a control diet one week post-DSS treatment, with enhanced colonic IL-6 and IL-11 release and Stat3 phosphorylation. Both IL-6 and ferritin, the iron storage protein, co-localized with macrophages suggesting iron may act directly on IL-6 producing-macrophages. Iron increased DSS-induced colonic epithelial cell proliferation and apoptosis consistent with enhanced mucosal damage. DSS-treated mice developed anemia that was not alleviated by dietary iron supplementation. Six weeks post-DSS treatment, iron-supplemented mice developed more and larger colonic tumors compared with control mice. Intratumoral IL-6 and IL-11 expression increased in DSS-treated mice and IL-6, and possibly IL-11, were enhanced by dietary iron. Gene expression of iron importers, divalent metal transporter 1 and transferrin receptor 1, increased and iron exporter, ferroportin, decreased in colonic tumors suggesting increased iron uptake. Dietary iron and colonic inflammation synergistically activated colonic IL-6/IL-11-Stat3 signaling promoting tumorigenesis. Oral iron therapy may be detrimental in inflammatory bowel disease since it may exacerbate colonic inflammation and increase colorectal cancer risk.

  8. Salmon and human thrombin differentially regulate radicular pain, glial-induced inflammation and spinal neuronal excitability through protease-activated receptor-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenell R Smith

    Full Text Available Chronic neck pain is a major problem with common causes including disc herniation and spondylosis that compress the spinal nerve roots. Cervical nerve root compression in the rat produces sustained behavioral hypersensitivity, due in part to the early upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, the sustained hyperexcitability of neurons in the spinal cord and degeneration in the injured nerve root. Through its activation of the protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1, mammalian thrombin can enhance pain and inflammation; yet at lower concentrations it is also capable of transiently attenuating pain which suggests that PAR1 activation rate may affect pain maintenance. Interestingly, salmon-derived fibrin, which contains salmon thrombin, attenuates nerve root-induced pain and inflammation, but the mechanisms of action leading to its analgesia are unknown. This study evaluates the effects of salmon thrombin on nerve root-mediated pain, axonal degeneration in the root, spinal neuronal hyperexcitability and inflammation compared to its human counterpart in the context of their enzymatic capabilities towards coagulation substrates and PAR1. Salmon thrombin significantly reduces behavioral sensitivity, preserves neuronal myelination, reduces macrophage infiltration in the injured nerve root and significantly decreases spinal neuronal hyperexcitability after painful root compression in the rat; whereas human thrombin has no effect. Unlike salmon thrombin, human thrombin upregulates the transcription of IL-1β and TNF-α and the secretion of IL-6 by cortical cultures. Salmon and human thrombins cleave human fibrinogen-derived peptides and form clots with fibrinogen with similar enzymatic activities, but salmon thrombin retains a higher enzymatic activity towards coagulation substrates in the presence of antithrombin III and hirudin compared to human thrombin. Conversely, salmon thrombin activates a PAR1-derived peptide more weakly than human thrombin. These

  9. Inflammation associated anemia and ferritin as disease markers in SLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction In a recent screening to detect biomarkers in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), expression of the iron storage protein, ferritin, was increased. Given that proteins that regulate the storage, transfer and release of iron play an important role in inflammation, this study aims to determine the serum and urine levels of ferritin and of the iron transfer protein, transferrin, in lupus patients and to correlate these levels with disease activity, inflammatory cytokine levels and markers of anemia. Methods A protein array was utilized to measure ferritin expression in the urine and serum of SLE patients and healthy controls. To confirm these results as well as the role of the iron transfer pathway in SLE, ELISAs were performed to measure ferritin and transferrin levels in inactive or active SLE patients and healthy controls. The relationship between ferritin/transferrin levels and inflammatory markers and anemia was next analyzed. Results Protein array results showed elevated ferritin levels in the serum and urine of lupus patients as compared to controls, which were further validated by ELISA. Increased ferritin levels correlated with measures of disease activity and anemia as well as inflammatory cytokine titers. Though active SLE patients had elevated urine transferrin, serum transferrin was reduced. Conclusion Urine ferritin and transferrin levels are elevated significantly in SLE patients and correlate with disease activity, bolstering previous reports. Most importantly, these changes correlated with the inflammatory state of the patients and anemia of chronic disease. Taken together, altered iron handling, inflammation and anemia of chronic disease constitute an ominous triad in SLE. PMID:22871034

  10. Trypanosoma cruzi-elicited CD8+ T cell-mediated myocarditis: chemokine receptors and adhesion molecules as potential therapeutic targets to control chronic inflammation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseli Lannes-Vieira

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available In Chagas disease, during the acute phase, the establishment of inflammatory processes is crucial for Trypanosoma cruzi control in target tissues and for the establishment of host/parasite equilibrium. However, in about 30% of the patients, inflammation becomes progressive, resulting in chronic disease, mainly characterized by myocarditis. Although several hypothesis have been raised to explain the pathogenesis of chagasic myocardiopathy, including the persistence of the parasite and/or participation of autoimmune processes, the molecular mechanisms underlying the establishment of the inflammatory process leading to parasitism control but also contributing to the maintenance of T. cruzi-elicited chronic myocarditis remain unsolved. Trying to shed light on these questions, we have for several years been working with murine models for Chagas disease that reproduce the acute self-resolving meningoencephalitis, the encephalitis resulting of reactivation described in immunodeficient individuals, and several aspects of the acute and chronic myocarditis. In the present review, our results are summarized and discussed under the light of the current literature. Furthermore, rational therapeutic intervention strategies based on integrin-mediated adhesion and chemokine receptor-driven recruitment of leukocytes are proposed to control T. cruzi-elicited unbalanced inflammation.

  11. Soluble Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Product Ameliorates Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia Induced Renal Injury, Inflammation, and Apoptosis via P38/JNK Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA associated chronic kidney disease is mainly caused by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH triggered tissue damage. Receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE and its ligand high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 are expressed on renal cells and mediate inflammatory responses in OSA-related diseases. To determine their roles in CIH-induced renal injury, soluble RAGE (sRAGE, the RAGE neutralizing antibody, was intravenously administered in a CIH model. We also evaluated the effect of sRAGE on inflammation and apoptosis. Rats were divided into four groups: (1 normal air (NA, (2 CIH, (3 CIH+sRAGE, and (4 NA+sRAGE. Our results showed that CIH accelerated renal histological injury and upregulated RAGE-HMGB1 levels involving inflammatory (NF-κB, TNF-α, and IL-6, apoptotic (Bcl-2/Bax, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (phosphorylation of P38, ERK, and JNK signal transduction pathways, which were abolished by sRAGE but p-ERK. Furthermore, sRAGE ameliorated renal dysfunction by attenuating tubular endothelial apoptosis determined by immunofluorescence staining of CD31 and TUNEL. These findings suggested that RAGE-HMGB1 activated chronic inflammatory transduction cascades that contributed to the pathogenesis of the CIH-induced renal injury. Inhibition of RAGE ligand interaction by sRAGE provided a therapeutic potential for CIH-induced renal injury, inflammation, and apoptosis through P38 and JNK pathways.

  12. C-C chemokine receptor 2 inhibitor ameliorates hepatic steatosis by improving ER stress and inflammation in a type 2 diabetic mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Min Kim

    Full Text Available Hepatic steatosis is the accumulation of excess fat in the liver. Recently, hepatic steatosis has become more important because it occurs in the patients with obesity, type 2 diabetes, and hyperlipidemia and is associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and insulin resistance. C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2 inhibitor has been reported to improve inflammation and glucose intolerance in diabetes, but its mechanisms remained unknown in hepatic steatosis. We examined whether CCR2 inhibitor improves ER stress-induced hepatic steatosis in type 2 diabetic mice. In this study, db/db and db/m (n = 9 mice were fed CCR2 inhibitor (2 mg/kg/day for 9 weeks. In diabetic mice, CCR2 inhibitor decreased plasma and hepatic triglycerides levels and improved insulin sensitivity. Moreover, CCR2 inhibitor treatment decreased ER stress markers (e.g., BiP, ATF4, CHOP, and XBP-1 and inflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNFα, IL-6, and MCP-1 while increasing markers of mitochondrial biogenesis (e.g., PGC-1α, Tfam, and COX1 in the liver. We suggest that CCR2 inhibitor may ameliorate hepatic steatosis by reducing ER stress and inflammation in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  13. Imaging brain inflammation with [(11)C]PK11195 by PET and induction of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor after transient focal ischemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Santiago; Martín, Abraham; Arranz, Maria J; Pareto, Deborah; Purroy, Jesús; Verdaguer, Esther; Llop, Jordi; Gómez, Vanessa; Gispert, Joan D; Millán, Olga; Chamorro, Angel; Planas, Anna M

    2007-12-01

    [(11)C]PK11195 is used in positron emission tomography (PET) studies for imaging brain inflammation in vivo as it binds to the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) expressed by reactive glia and macrophages. However, features of the cellular reaction required to induce a positive [(11)C]PK11195 signal are not well characterized. We performed [(11)C]PK11195 PET and autoradiography in rats after transient focal cerebral ischemia. We determined [(3)H]PK11195 binding and PBR expression in brain tissue and examined the lesion with several markers. [(11)C]PK11195 standard uptake value increased at day 4 and grew further at day 7 within the ischemic core. Accordingly, ex vivo [(3)H]PK11195 binding increased at day 4, and increases further at day 7. The PET signal also augmented in peripheral regions, but to a lesser extent than in the core. Binding in the region surrounding infarction was supported by [(11)C]PK11195 autoradiography at day 7 showing that the radioactive signal extended beyond the infarcted core. Enhanced binding was preceded by increases in PBR mRNA expression in the ipsilateral hemisphere, and a 18-kDa band corresponding to PBR protein was detected. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor immunohistochemistry showed subsets of ameboid microglia/macrophages within the infarcted core showing a distinctive strong PBR expression from day 4. These cells were often located surrounding microhemorrhages. Reactive astrocytes forming a rim surrounding infarction at day 7 also showed some PBR immunostaining. These results show cellular heterogeneity in the level of PBR expression, supporting that PBR is not a simple marker of inflammation, and that the extent of [(11)C]PK11195 binding depends on intrinsic features of the inflammatory cells.

  14. Mac-1 directly binds to the endothelial protein C-receptor: a link between the protein C anticoagulant pathway and inflammation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Katrin; Busch, Hans-Jörg; Bourgeois, Natascha; Schwarz, Meike; Wolf, Dennis; Zirlik, Andreas; Peter, Karlheinz; Bode, Christoph; von Zur Muhlen, Constantin

    2013-01-01

    The endothelial protein C-receptor (EPCR) is an endothelial transmembrane protein that binds protein C and activated protein C (APC) with equal affinity, thereby facilitating APC formation. APC has anticoagulant, antiapoptotic and antiinflammatory properties. Soluble EPCR, released by the endothelium, may bind activated neutrophils, thereby modulating cell adhesion. EPCR is therefore considered as a possible link between the anticoagulant properties of protein C and the inflammatory response of neutrophils. In the present study, we aimed to provide proof of concept for a direct binding of EPCR to the β2-integrin Mac-1 on monocytic cells under static and physiological flow conditions. Under static conditions, human monocytes bind soluble EPCR in a concentration dependent manner, as demonstrated by flow cytometry. Binding can be inhibited by specific antibodies (anti-EPCR and anti-Mac-1). Specific binding was confirmed by a static adhesion assay, where a transfected Mac-1 expressing CHO cell line (Mac-1+ cells) bound significantly more recombinant EPCR compared to Mac-1+ cells blocked by anti-Mac-1-antibody and native CHO cells. Under physiological flow conditions, monocyte binding to the endothelium could be significantly blocked by both, anti-EPCR and anti-Mac-1 antibodies in a dynamic adhesion assay at physiological flow conditions. Pre-treatment of endothelial cells with APC (drotrecogin alfa) diminished monocyte adhesion significantly in a comparable extent to anti-EPCR. In the present study, we demonstrate a direct binding of Mac-1 on monocytes to the endothelial protein C receptor under static and flow conditions. This binding suggests a link between the protein C anticoagulant pathway and inflammation at the endothelium side, such as in acute vascular inflammation or septicaemia.

  15. Iron and bismuth bound human serum transferrin reveals a partially-opened conformation in the N-lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nan; Zhang, Hongmin; Wang, Minji; Hao, Quan; Sun, Hongzhe

    2012-01-01

    Human serum transferrin (hTF) binds Fe(III) tightly but reversibly, and delivers it to cells via a receptor-mediated endocytosis process. The metal-binding and release result in significant conformational changes of the protein. Here, we report the crystal structures of diferric-hTF (Fe(N)Fe(C)-hTF) and bismuth-bound hTF (Bi(N)Fe(C)-hTF) at 2.8 and 2.4 Å resolutions respectively. Notably, the N-lobes of both structures exhibit unique "partially-opened" conformations between those of the apo-hTF and holo-hTF. Fe(III) and Bi(III) in the N-lobe coordinate to, besides anions, only two (Tyr95 and Tyr188) and one (Tyr188) tyrosine residues, respectively, in contrast to four residues in the holo-hTF. The C-lobe of both structures are fully closed with iron coordinating to four residues and a carbonate. The structures of hTF observed here represent key conformers captured in the dynamic nature of the transferrin family proteins and provide a structural basis for understanding the mechanism of metal uptake and release in transferrin families.

  16. The influence of Flightless I on Toll-like-receptor-mediated inflammation in a murine model of diabetic wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzehaji, Nadira; Mills, Stuart J; Melville, Elizabeth; Arkell, Ruth; Fitridge, Robert; Cowin, Allison J

    2013-01-01

    Impaired wound healing and ulceration represent a serious complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Cytoskeletal protein Flightless I (Flii) is an important inhibitor of wound repair, and reduced Flii gene expression in fibroblasts increased migration, proliferation, and adhesion. As such it has the ability to influence all phases of wound healing including inflammation, remodelling and angiogenesis. Flii has the potential to modulate inflammation through its interaction with MyD88 which it an adaptor protein for TLR4. To assess the effect of Flii on the inflammatory response of diabetic wounds, we used a murine model of streptozocin-induced diabetes and Flii genetic mice. Increased levels of Flii were detected in Flii transgenic murine wounds resulting in impaired healing which was exacerbated when diabetes was induced. When Flii levels were reduced in diabetic wounds of Flii-deficient mice, healing was improved and decreased levels of TLR4 were observed. In contrast, increasing the level of Flii in diabetic mouse wounds led to increased TLR4 and NF- κ B production. Treatment of murine diabetic wounds with neutralising antibodies to Flii led to an improvement in healing with decreased expression of TLR4. Decreasing the level of Flii in diabetic wounds may therefore reduce the inflammatory response and improve healing.

  17. The Influence of Flightless I on Toll-Like-Receptor-Mediated Inflammation in a Murine Model of Diabetic Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadira Ruzehaji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired wound healing and ulceration represent a serious complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Cytoskeletal protein Flightless I (Flii is an important inhibitor of wound repair, and reduced Flii gene expression in fibroblasts increased migration, proliferation, and adhesion. As such it has the ability to influence all phases of wound healing including inflammation, remodelling and angiogenesis. Flii has the potential to modulate inflammation through its interaction with MyD88 which it an adaptor protein for TLR4. To assess the effect of Flii on the inflammatory response of diabetic wounds, we used a murine model of streptozocin-induced diabetes and Flii genetic mice. Increased levels of Flii were detected in Flii transgenic murine wounds resulting in impaired healing which was exacerbated when diabetes was induced. When Flii levels were reduced in diabetic wounds of Flii-deficient mice, healing was improved and decreased levels of TLR4 were observed. In contrast, increasing the level of Flii in diabetic mouse wounds led to increased TLR4 and NF-κB production. Treatment of murine diabetic wounds with neutralising antibodies to Flii led to an improvement in healing with decreased expression of TLR4. Decreasing the level of Flii in diabetic wounds may therefore reduce the inflammatory response and improve healing.

  18. The Influence of Flightless I on Toll-Like-Receptor-Mediated Inflammation in a Murine Model of Diabetic Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzehaji, Nadira; Mills, Stuart J.; Melville, Elizabeth; Arkell, Ruth; Fitridge, Robert; Cowin, Allison J.

    2013-01-01

    Impaired wound healing and ulceration represent a serious complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Cytoskeletal protein Flightless I (Flii) is an important inhibitor of wound repair, and reduced Flii gene expression in fibroblasts increased migration, proliferation, and adhesion. As such it has the ability to influence all phases of wound healing including inflammation, remodelling and angiogenesis. Flii has the potential to modulate inflammation through its interaction with MyD88 which it an adaptor protein for TLR4. To assess the effect of Flii on the inflammatory response of diabetic wounds, we used a murine model of streptozocin-induced diabetes and Flii genetic mice. Increased levels of Flii were detected in Flii transgenic murine wounds resulting in impaired healing which was exacerbated when diabetes was induced. When Flii levels were reduced in diabetic wounds of Flii-deficient mice, healing was improved and decreased levels of TLR4 were observed. In contrast, increasing the level of Flii in diabetic mouse wounds led to increased TLR4 and NF-κB production. Treatment of murine diabetic wounds with neutralising antibodies to Flii led to an improvement in healing with decreased expression of TLR4. Decreasing the level of Flii in diabetic wounds may therefore reduce the inflammatory response and improve healing. PMID:23555084

  19. Phosphate inhibits in vitro Fe3+ loading into transferrin by forming a soluble Fe(III)-phosphate complex: a potential non-transferrin bound iron species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Robert J; Seare, Matthew C; Andros, N David; Kenealey, Zachary; Orozco, Catalina Matias; Webb, Michael; Watt, Richard K

    2012-05-01

    In chronic kidney diseases, NTBI can occur even when total iron levels in serum are low and transferrin is not saturated. We postulated that elevated serum phosphate concentrations, present in CKD patients, might disrupt Fe(3+) loading into apo-transferrin by forming Fe(III)-phosphate species. We report that phosphate competes with apo-transferrin for Fe(3+) by forming a soluble Fe(III)-phosphate complex. Once formed, the Fe(III)-phosphate complex is not a substrate for donating Fe(3+) to apo-transferrin. Phosphate (1-10mM) does not chelate Fe(III) from diferric transferrin under the conditions examined. Complexed forms of Fe(3+), such as iron nitrilotriacetic acid (Fe(3+)-NTA), and Fe(III)-citrate are not susceptible to this phosphate complexation reaction and efficiently deliver Fe(3+) to apo-transferrin in the presence of phosphate. This reaction suggests that citrate might play an important role in protecting against Fe(III), phosphate interactions in vivo. In contrast to the reactions of Fe(3+) and phosphate, the addition of Fe(2+) to a solution of apo-transferrin and phosphate lead to rapid oxidation and deposition of Fe(3+) into apo-transferrin. These in vitro data suggest that, in principle, elevated phosphate concentrations can influence the ability of apo-transferrin to bind iron, depending on the oxidation state of the iron.

  20. Effect of the cannabinoid receptor-1 antagonist rimonabant on inflammation in mice with diet-induced obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    We studied whether cannabinoid receptor (CB1) blockade with rimonabant has an anti-inflammatory effect in obese mice, and whether this effect depends on weight loss and/or diet consumption. High-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice were treated orally with rimonabant (HFD-R) or vehicle (HFD-V) for 4 we...

  1. Activation of the Prostaglandin E2 receptor EP2 prevents house dust mite-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation by restraining mast cells' activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Pages, M; Torres, R; Plaza, J; Herrerias, A; Costa-Farré, C; Marco, A; Jiménez, M; Maurer, M; Picado, C; de Mora, F

    2015-10-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) has been proposed to exert antiasthmatic effects in patients, to prevent antigen-induced airway pathology in murine models, and to inhibit mast cells (MC) activity in vitro. To assess in a murine model whether the protective effect of PGE2 may be a consequence of its ability to activate the E-prostanoid (EP)2 receptor on airway MC. Either BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice were exposed intranasally (i.n.) to house dust mite (HDM) aeroallergens. Both strains were given PGE2 locally (0.3 mg/kg), but only BALB/c mice were administered butaprost (EP2 agonist: 0.3 mg/kg), or AH6809 (EP2 antagonist; 2.5 mg/kg) combined with the MC stabilizer sodium cromoglycate (SCG: 25 mg/kg). Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and inflammation, along with lung MC activity, were evaluated. In addition, butaprost's effect was assessed in MC-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) in mice challenged with 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP). Selective EP2 agonism attenuated aeroallergen-caused AHR and inflammation in HDM-exposed BALB/c mice, and this correlated with a reduced lung MC activity. Accordingly, the blockade of endogenous PGE2 by means of AH6809 worsened airway responsiveness in sensitive BALB/c mice, and such worsening was reversed by SCG. The relevance of MC to PGE2 -EP2 driven protection was further highlighted in MC-dependent PCA, where butaprost fully prevented MC-induced ear swelling. Unlike in BALB/c mice, PGE2 did not protect the airways of HDM-sensitized C57BL/6 animals, a strain in which we showed MC to be irrelevant to aeroallergen-driven AHR and inflammation. The beneficial effect of both exogenous and endogenous PGE2 in aeroallergen-sensitized mice may be attributable to the activation of the EP2 receptor, which in turn acts as a restrainer of airway MC activity. This opens a path towards the identification of therapeutic targets against asthma along the 'EP2 -MC-airway' axis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Transcriptomic analysis of pathways regulated by toll-like receptor 4 in a murine model of chronic pulmonary inflammation and carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grissom Sherry F

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Therapeutic strategies exist for human pulmonary neoplasia, however due to the heterogeneity of the disease, most are not very effective. The innate immunity gene, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, protects against chronic pulmonary inflammation and tumorigenesis in mice, but the mechanism is unclear. This study was designed to identify TLR4-mediated gene expression pathways that may be used as prognostic indicators of susceptibility to lung tumorigenesis in mice and provide insight into the mechanism. Methods Whole lung mRNA was isolated from C.C3H-Tlr4Lps-d (BALBLps-d; Tlr4 mutant and BALB/c (Tlr4 normal mice following butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT-treatment (four weekly ip. injections; 150-200 mg/kg/each; "promotion". mRNA from micro-dissected tumors (adenomas and adjacent uninvolved tissue from both strains were also compared 27 wks after a single carcinogen injection (3-methylcholanthrene (MCA, 10 μg/g; "control" or followed by BHT (6 weekly ip. injections; 125-200 mg/kg/each; "progression". Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was analyzed for inflammatory cell content and total protein determination, a marker of lung hyperpermeability; inflammation was also assessed using immunohistochemical staining for macrophages (F4/80 and lymphocytes (CD3 in mice bearing tumors (progression. Results During promotion, the majority of genes identified in the BALBLps-d compared to BALB/c mice (P Ereg, secreted phosphoprotein 1(Spp1, which can lead to cell growth and eventual tumor development. Inflammation was significantly higher in BALBLps-d compared to BALB/c mice during progression, similar to the observed response during tumor promotion in these strains. Increases in genes involved in signaling through the EGFR pathway (e.g. Ereg, Spp1 were also observed during progression in addition to continued inflammation, chemotactic, and immune response gene expression in the BALBLps-d versus BALB/c mice (P Conclusion This transcriptomic study

  3. Low levels of serum ferritin and moderate transferrin saturation lead to adequate hemoglobin levels in hemodialysis patients, retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Chie; Tsuchiya, Ken; Tomosugi, Naohisa; Kanda, Fumiyoshi; Maeda, Kunimi; Maeda, Teiryo

    2017-01-01

    Optimal iron levels in patients on hemodialysis are currently unknown, and a higher level than that for the healthy population is usually set for such patients considering the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents or the occurrence of chronic inflammation. However, excessive iron causes oxidative stress and impairment of its utilization by cells. Therefore we investigated the relationship between hemoglobin (Hb) level and iron status in hemodialysis patients to identify the optimal iron levels for patients undergoing hemodialysis. A total of 208 outpatients on maintenance hemodialysis were followed up between July 2006 and June 2007. Men accounted for 64.9% cases [mean age, 59.3 ± 13.1 years and median dialysis history, 7.7 (3.6-13.2) years], and diabetic nephropathy accounted for 25.0% cases. Hemoglobin level was measured twice a month and serum ferritin, serum iron, and total iron-binding capacity were measured once a month. The doses of recombinant human erythropoietin and low-dose iron supplement were adjusted to maintain a hemoglobin level of 10-11 g/dL, according to the guidelines of the Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy. Hepcidin was measured at baseline. Using the mean values for 1-year period, the relationships among hemoglobin, serum ferritin levels, and transferrin saturation levels were investigated based on a receiver operating characteristic curve and a logistic regression model. In addition, the correlations among serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, and hepcidin levels were analyzed by Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient and linear regression model. By receiver operating characteristic curve, the cutoff point of serum ferritin and transferrin saturation levels with a hemoglobin ≥10 g/dL showed serum ferritin ≥90 ng/mL and transferrin saturation serum ferritin serum ferritin [r = 0.78 (95% confidence interval: 0.72-0.83, p serum ferritin [β-coefficient of 0.30 (95% confidence interval: 0.27-0.34, p serum ferritin <90 ng

  4. Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in trigeminal ganglion neurons contributes tongue-referred pain associated with tooth pulp inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Kinuyo; Shimizu, Kohei; Matsuura, Shingo; Ogiso, Bunnai; Omagari, Daisuke; Asano, Masatake; Tsuboi, Yoshiyuki; Shinoda, Masamichi; Iwata, Koichi

    2013-11-23

    The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the mechanisms underlying tongue-referred pain associated with tooth pulp inflammation. Using mechanical and temperature stimulation following dental surgery, we have demonstrated that dental inflammation and hyperalgesia correlates with increased immunohistochemical staining of neurons for TLR4 and HSP70. Mechanical or heat hyperalgesia significantly enhanced in the ipsilateral tongue at 1 to 9 days after complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) application to the left lower molar tooth pulp compared with that of sham-treated or vehicle-applied rats. The number of fluorogold (FG)-labeled TLR4-immunoreactive (IR) cells was significantly larger in CFA-applied rats compared with sham-treated or vehicle-applied rats to the molar tooth. The number of heat shock protein (Hsp) 70-IR neurons in trigeminal ganglion (TG) was significantly increased on day 3 after CFA application compared with sham-treated or vehicle-applied rats to the molar tooth. About 9.2% of TG neurons were labeled with DiI applied to the molar tooth and FG injected into the tongue, and 15.4% of TG neurons were labeled with FG injected into the tongue and Alexa-labeled Hsp70-IR applied to the tooth. Three days after Hsp70 or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) application to the tooth in naive rats, mechanical or heat hyperalgesia was significantly enhanced compared with that of saline-applied rats. Following successive LPS-RS, an antagonist of TLR4, administration to the TG for 3 days, the enhanced mechanical or heat hyperalgesia was significantly reversed compared with that of saline-injected rats. Noxious mechanical responses of TG neurons innervating the tongue were significantly higher in CFA-applied rats compare with sham rats to the tooth. Hsp70 mRNA levels of the tooth pulp and TG were not different between CFA-applied rats and sham rats. The present findings indicate that Hsp70 transported from the tooth pulp to TG neurons or expressed in TG neurons is released from

  5. Transferrin variation and genetic structure of reindeer populations in Scandinavia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut H. Røed

    1987-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to analyse transferrin variation in herds of semi-domestic reindeer from Scandinavia. The results are compared with previously reported values for other populations of both semi-domestic and wild reindeer using the same techniques as in the present study. In all populations the number of alleles was high, ranging from seven to eleven, and the heterozygosity was correspondingly high, with a mean of 0.749. This high genetic variation in all populations suggests that inbreeding is not widespread among Scandinavian reindeer. The pattern of allele frequency distribution indicates a high degree of genetic heterogeneity in the transferrin locus, both between the different semi-domestic herds and between the different wild populations. The mean value of genetic distance was 0.069 between semi-domestic herds and 0.091 between wild populations. Between semi-domestic and wild populations the genetic distance was particularly high, with a mean of 0.188. This high value was mainly due to a different pattern in the distribution of the two most common transferrin alleles: Tfu was most common among semi-domestic herds, while TfEI was most common among wild populations. These differences in transferrin allele distribution are discussed in relation to possible different origins of semi-domestic and wild reindeer in Scandinavia, or alternatively, to different selection forces acting on transferrin genotypes in semi-domestic and wild populations.Transferrin-variasjon og genetisk struktur hos rein i Skandinavia.Abstact in Norwegian / Sammendrag: Transferrin-variasjon i tamreinflokker ble analysert ved hjelp av polyacrylamid gel elektroforese. Resultatene er sammenlignet med verdier som tidligere er beskrevet for både tamrein og villrein hvor det ble benyttet samme metode som i denne undersøkelsen. I alle populasjonene ble det registrert et høyt antall alleler (7-11 og heterozygositeten var tilsvarende høy med en

  6. The CC chemokine receptor 5 is important in control of parasite replication and acute cardiac inflammation following infection with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardison, Jenny L; Wrightsman, Ruth A; Carpenter, Philip M; Kuziel, William A; Lane, Thomas E; Manning, Jerry E

    2006-01-01

    Infection of susceptible mice with the Colombiana strain of Trypanosoma cruzi results in an orchestrated expression of chemokines and chemokine receptors within the heart that coincides with parasite burden and cellular infiltration. CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is prominently expressed during both acute and chronic disease, suggesting a role in regulating leukocyte trafficking and accumulation within the heart following T. cruzi infection. To better understand the functional role of CCR5 and its ligands with regard to both host defense and/or disease, CCR5(-/-) mice were infected with T. cruzi, and the disease severity was evaluated. Infected CCR5(-/-) mice develop significantly higher levels of parasitemia (P < or = 0.05) and cardiac parasitism (P < or = 0.01) during acute infection that correlated with reduced survival. Further, we show that CCR5 is essential for directing the migration of macrophages and T cells to the heart early in acute infection with T. cruzi. In addition, data are provided demonstrating that CCR5 does not play an essential role in maintaining inflammation in the heart during chronic infection. Collectively, these studies clearly demonstrate that CCR5 contributes to the control of parasite replication and the development of a protective immune response during acute infection but does not ultimately participate in maintaining a chronic inflammatory response within the heart.

  7. Activation of mu opioid receptor inhibits the excitatory glutamatergic transmission in the anterior cingulate cortex of the rats with peripheral inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Weihong

    2010-02-25

    Emerging evidence recently indicates that the anterior cingulate cortex is critically involved in the central processing and modulation of noxious stimulus, although the neuroadaptation in the anterior cingulate cortex has not been well documented in the conditions of chronic pain. Meanwhile, the cellular mechanism underlying opiate analgesia in the anterior cingulate cortex remains unclear. To address these issues, the present study was undertaken to explore the adaptation of excitatory glutamatergic transmission and mu opioid receptor-mediated modulation of glutamatergic transmission in the anterior cingulate cortex slices from the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-inflamed rats. The results demonstrated that glutamatergic paired-pulse facilitation was decreased in the anterior cingulate cortex neurons from the CFA-inflamed rats, indicating an enhanced presynaptic glutamate release. In addition, activation of mu opioid receptor significantly inhibited the glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in the anterior cingulate cortex neurons, which was attained through the suppression of presynaptic glutamate release. Taken together, these findings provided the evidence for the functional adaptation of central glutamatergic transmission induced by peripheral inflammation, and elucidated the cellular mechanism underlying opiate analgesia in the anterior cingulate cortex.

  8. Natural resolution of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Marcelo O; Van Dyke, Thomas E

    2013-10-01

    Inflammation is a protective response essential for maintaining human health and for fighting disease. As an active innate immune reaction to challenge, inflammation gives rise to clinical cardinal signs: rubor, calor, dolor, tumor and functio laesa. Termination of acute inflammation was previously recognized as a passive process; a natural decay of pro-inflammatory signals. We now understand that the natural resolution of inflammation involves well-integrated, active, biochemical programs that return tissues to homeostasis. This review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the role of endogenous lipid mediators that modulate cellular fate and inflammation. Biosynthesis of eicosanoids and other lipids in exudates coincides with changes in the types of inflammatory cells. Resolution of inflammation is initiated by an active class switch in lipid mediators, such as classic prostaglandins and leukotrienes, to the production of proresolution mediators. Endogenous pro-resolving lipid mediators, including arachidonic acid-derived lipoxins, aspirin-triggered lipoxins, ω3-eicosapentaenoic acid-derived resolvins of the E-series, docosahexaenoic acid-derived resolvins of the D-series, protectins and maresins, are biosynthesized during the resolution phase of acute inflammation. Depending on the type of injury and the type of tissue, the initial cells that respond are polymorphonuclear leukocytes, monocytes/macrophages, epithelial cells or endothelial cells. The selective interaction of specific lipid mediators with G protein-coupled receptors expressed on innate immune cells (e.g. G protein-coupled receptor 32, lipoxin A4 receptor/formyl peptide receptor2, chemokine-like receptor 1, leukotriene B4 receptor type 1 and cabannoid receptor 2) induces cessation of leukocyte infiltration; vascular permeability/edema returns to normal with polymorphonuclear neutrophil death (mostly via apoptosis), the nonphlogistic infiltration of monocyte/macrophages and the removal

  9. Polyunsaturated fatty acid receptors, GPR40 and GPR120, are expressed in the hypothalamus and control energy homeostasis and inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragano, Nathalia R V; Solon, Carina; Ramalho, Albina F

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The consumption of large amounts of dietary fats is one of the most important environmental factors contributing to the development of obesity and metabolic disorders. GPR120 and GPR40 are polyunsaturated fatty acid receptors that exert a number of systemic effects that are beneficial...... surgery to place an indwelling cannula into the right lateral ventricle. intracerebroventricular (icv)-cannulated mice were treated twice a day for 6 days with 2.0 μL saline or GPR40 and GPR120 agonists: GW9508, TUG1197, or TUG905 (2.0 μL, 1.0 mM). Food intake and body mass were measured during......, a non-specific agonist for both receptors, reduced energy efficiency and the expression of inflammatory genes in the hypothalamus. Reducing GPR120 hypothalamic expression using a lentivirus-based approach resulted in the loss of the anti-inflammatory effect of GW9508 and increased energy efficiency...

  10. Role of P2X7 Receptors in Release of IL-1β: A Possible Mediator of Pulmonary Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortaz, Esmaeil; Adcock, Ian M; Shafei, Hamed; Masjedi, Mohammad Reza; Folkerts, Gert

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular ATP is a signaling molecule which plays an important role in alerting the immune system in case of any tissue damage. Recent studies show that binding of ATP to the ionotropic P2X7 receptor of inflammatory cells (macrophages and monocytes) will induce caspase 1 activation. Stimulation of caspase 1 activity results in maturation and release of IL-1β in the inflammasome in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) patients. COPD is an inflammatory disease characterized by emphysema and/or chronic bronchitis and is mostly associated with cigarette smoking. It is one of the leading causes of death in humans and there is currently no medication to stop the progression of disease. A deeper understanding of the mechanism by which the P2X7 receptor triggers IL-1β maturation and release, may open new opportunities for the treatment of inflammatory diseases such as COPD.

  11. Disruption of low-density lipoprotein receptor pathway induced by inflammation contributes to podocyte injury in diabetic nephropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张洋

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of low density lipoprotein receptor(LDLr)pathway on podocyte injury in diabetic nephropathy(DN)under inflammatory stress.Methods Male db/db mice and db/m mice were randomly divided into four groups(8 mice in each group):db/m group(control),casein injected db/m group(db/m+casein),db/db group(db/db),and casein injected

  12. ETB receptor activation as a mechanism of modulation of inflammatory pain and neurogenic inflammation in the temporomandibular joint of capsaicin-treated rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago E. V. Lemos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endothelin (ET, a peptide best known for its vascular effects, also evokes pain and hyperalgesia, independently of its vascular actions. Data suggest that ET can have nociceptive effects, acting directly on receptors expressed in sensory neurons. As such, the aim this study was to investigate the direct effect of ET on hyperalgesia and edema, induced by carrageenan, on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ of capsaicin-treated rats. Methods: Capsaicin was administered by subcutaneous injection to newborn, male Wistar rats. Inflammation was induced 60 days later by a single intra-articular injection of carrageenan into the left TMJ (control group received sterile saline. Inflammatory parameters, such as plasma extravasation, leukocyte influx and mechanical allodynia (measured as the head-withdrawal force threshold were evaluated 4 h after edematogenic stimulus. ET-1 and ET-3, and the ET-B receptor (ETBR antagonist were administered 3 min before edematogenic stimulus. ET and transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV1 mRNA expression was assessed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Edema formation was evaluated by measurement of the extravascular accumulation of injected 125I-human serum albumin into the TMJ soft tissues of anesthetized rats. Results: Capsaicin neonatal treatment significantly reduced edema formation, leukocyte influx and mechanical allodynia in TMJ, when compared to the control group, while the ETBR antagonist increased plasma extravasation and hyperalgesia in the capsaicin-treated group. ET-1 treatment reduced both plasma extravasation and myeloperoxidase activity. Capsular mRNA for ET-1 was significantly augmented in the TMJ of capsaicin-treated rats, when compared to controls. Conclusions: Our results suggest, for the first time, that ET-1, via ETBR activation, reduces plasma extravasation, leukocyte influx and inflammatory pain in the temporomandibular joint of capsaicin-treated rats. [J Exp

  13. Enhanced blood-brain barrier transmigration using a novel transferrin embedded fluorescent magneto-liposome nanoformulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hong; Sagar, Vidya; Agudelo, Marisela; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Subba Rao Atluri, Venkata; Raymond, Andrea; Samikkannu, Thangavel; Nair, Madhavan P.

    2014-02-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is considered as the primary impediment barrier for most drugs. Delivering therapeutic agents to the brain is still a big challenge to date. In our study, a dual mechanism, receptor mediation combined with external non-invasive magnetic force, was incorporated into ferrous magnet-based liposomes for BBB transmigration enhancement. The homogenous magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), with a size of ˜10 nm, were synthesized and confirmed by TEM and XRD respectively. The classical magnetism assay showed the presence of the characteristic superparamagnetic property. These MNPs encapsulated in PEGylated fluorescent liposomes as magneto-liposomes (MLs) showed mono-dispersion, ˜130 ± 10 nm diameter, by dynamic laser scattering (DLS) using the lipid-extrusion technique. Remarkably, a magnetite encapsulation efficiency of nearly 60% was achieved. Moreover, the luminescence and hydrodynamic size of the MLs was stable for over two months at 4 ° C. Additionally, the integrity of the ML structure remained unaffected through 120 rounds of circulation mimicking human blood fluid. After biocompatibility confirmation by cytotoxicity evaluation, these fluorescent MLs were further embedded with transferrin and applied to an in vitro BBB transmigration study in the presence or absence of external magnetic force. Comparing with magnetic force- or transferrin receptor-mediated transportation alone, their synergy resulted in 50-100% increased transmigration without affecting the BBB integrity. Consequently, confocal microscopy and iron concentration in BBB-composed cells further confirmed the higher cellular uptake of ML particles due to the synergic effect. Thus, our multifunctional liposomal magnetic nanocarriers possess great potential in particle transmigration across the BBB and may have a bright future in drug delivery to the brain.

  14. Retroperitoneal inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001255.htm Retroperitoneal inflammation To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Re