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Sample records for inflammation produces functional

  1. Smoke producing and inflammable materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilms EB; van Xanten NHW; Meulenbelt J

    1990-01-01

    On behalf of the AMGB (Afdeling Militair Geneeskundig Beleid) toxicological reviews have been made about several smoke producing and inflammable materials. The reviews have been made after a literature search and are meant to complete or to replace the concerning chapters in the NATO handbook on

  2. Nutrition, inflammation, and cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wärnberg, Julia; Gomez-Martinez, Sonia; Romeo, Javier; Díaz, Ligia-Esperanza; Marcos, Ascensión

    2009-02-01

    Inflammation, particularly low-grade chronic inflammation, appears to affect several brain functions, from early brain development to the development of neurodegenerative disorders and perhaps some psychiatric diseases. On the other hand, nutrition and dietary components and patterns have a plethora of anti- and pro-inflammatory effects that could be linked to cognitive function. Even a modest effect of nutrition on cognitive decline could have significant implications for public health. This paper summarizes the available evidence regarding inflammation as a key mechanism in cognitive function and nutritional pro- or anti-inflammatory effects with the purpose of linking the apparent disparate disciplines of nutrition, immunity, and neurology.

  3. Lactate produced during labor modulates uterine inflammation via GPR81 (HCA1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaan, Ankush; Nadeau-Vallée, Mathieu; Rivera, Jose Carlos; Obari, Dima; Hou, Xin; Sierra, Estefania Marin; Girard, Sylvie; Olson, David M; Chemtob, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Uterine inflammatory processes trigger prolabor pathways and orchestrate on-time labor onset. Although essential for successful labor, inflammation needs to be regulated to avoid uncontrolled amplification and resolve postpartum. During labor, myometrial smooth muscle cells generate ATP mainly via anaerobic glycolysis, resulting in accumulation of lactate. Aside from its metabolic function, lactate has been shown to activate a G protein-coupled receptor, GPR81, reported to regulate inflammation. We therefore hypothesize that lactate produced during labor may act via GPR81 in the uterus to exert in a feedback manner antiinflammatory effects, to resolve or mitigate inflammation. We sought to investigate the role of lactate produced during labor and its receptor, GPR81, in regulating inflammation in the uterus. We investigated the expression of GPR81 in the uterus and the pharmacological role of lactate acting via GPR81 during labor, using shRNA-GPR81 and GPR81 -/- mice. (1) Uterine lactate levels increased substantially from 2 to 9 mmol/L during labor. (2) Immunohistological analysis revealed expression of GPR81 in the uterus with high expression in myometrium. (3) GPR81 expression increased during gestation, and peaked near labor. (4) In primary myometrial smooth muscle cell and ex vivo uteri from wild-type mice, lactate decreased interleukin-1β-induced transcription of key proinflammatory Il1b, Il6, Ccl2, and Pghs2; suppressive effects of lactate were not observed in cells and tissues from GPR81 -/- mice. (5) Conversely, proinflammatory gene expression was augmented in the uterus at term in GPR81 -/- mice and wild-type mice treated intrauterine with lentiviral-encoded shRNA-GPR81; GPR81 silencing also induced proinflammatory gene transcription in the uterus when labor was induced by endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide). (6) Importantly, administration to pregnant mice of a metabolically stable specific GPR81 agonist, 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, decreased endotoxin

  4. The NLRP3 Inflammasome Mediates Inflammation Produced by Bladder Outlet Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Francis M; Hill, Hayden M; Wood, Case M; Edmondson, Andrew T; Dumas, Aliya; Foo, Wen-Chi; Oelsen, James M; Rac, Goran; Purves, J Todd

    2016-05-01

    While bladder outlet obstruction is well established to elicit an inflammatory reaction in the bladder that leads to overactive bladder and fibrosis, little is known about the mechanism by which this is initiated. NLRs (NOD-like receptors) and the structures that they form (inflammasomes) have been identified as sensors of cellular damage, including pressure induced damage, and triggers of inflammation. Recently we identified these structures in the urothelium. In this study we assessed the role of the NLRP3 (NACHT, LRR and PYD domains-containing protein 3) inflammasome in bladder dysfunction resulting from bladder outlet obstruction. Bladder outlet obstruction was created in female rats by inserting a 1 mm outer diameter transurethral catheter, tying a silk ligature around the urethra and removing the catheter. Untreated and sham operated rats served as controls. Rats with bladder outlet obstruction were given vehicle (10% ethanol) or 10 mg/kg glyburide (a NLRP3 inhibitor) orally daily for 12 days. Inflammasome activity, bladder hypertrophy, inflammation and bladder function (urodynamics) were assessed. Bladder outlet obstruction increased urothelial inflammasome activity, bladder hypertrophy and inflammation, and decreased voided volume. Glyburide blocked inflammasome activation, reduced hypertrophy and prevented inflammation. The decrease in voided volume was also attenuated by glyburide mechanistically as an increase in detrusor contraction duration and voiding period. Results suggest the importance of the NLRP3 inflammasome in the induction of inflammation and bladder dysfunction secondary to bladder outlet obstruction. Arresting these processes with NLRP3 inhibitors may prove useful to treat the symptoms that they produce. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of blueberries on inflammation, motor performance and cognitive function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motor and cognitive function decrease with age, to include deficits in balance, coordination, gait, processing speed, executive function, memory, and spatial learning. These functional declines may be caused by long term increases in and susceptibility to oxidative stress and inflammation. Research ...

  6. Functions and Signaling Pathways of Amino Acids in Intestinal Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Fang He; Chenlu Wu; Pan Li; Nengzhang Li; Dong Zhang; Quoqiang Zhu; Wenkai Ren; Yuanyi Peng

    2018-01-01

    Intestine is always exposed to external environment and intestinal microorganism; thus it is more sensitive to dysfunction and dysbiosis, leading to intestinal inflammation, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and diarrhea. An increasing number of studies indicate that dietary amino acids play significant roles in preventing and treating intestinal inflammation. The review aims to summarize the functions and signaling mechanisms of amino acids in intestin...

  7. Systemic inflammation and lung function: A longitudinal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancox, Robert J; Gray, Andrew R; Sears, Malcolm R; Poulton, Richie

    2016-02-01

    Systemic inflammation is associated with impaired lung function in healthy adults as well as in patients with lung disease. The mechanism for this association is unknown and it is unclear if systemic inflammation leads to impaired lung function or if poor lung function leads to inflammation. We explored the temporal associations between blood C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, and white blood cells, and lung function in young adults. Spirometry, plethysmography, and diffusion capacity were measured in a population-based cohort at ages 32 and 38 years. High-sensitivity CRP, fibrinogen, and white blood cells were measured at the same ages. Higher levels of CRP and, to a lesser extent, fibrinogen were associated with lower lung volumes in cross-sectional analyses at both ages 32 and 38 years. Higher CRP and fibrinogen at age 32 were associated with higher FEV1 and FEV1/FVC at age 38, but not other measures of lung function. Lower lung volumes (total lung capacity, functional residual capacity, and residual volume) but not airflow obstruction (FEV1/FVC) at age 32 were associated with higher CRP at age 38. Associations between age 32 lung function and fibrinogen at follow-up were weaker, but consistent. There were no longitudinal associations between white blood cells and lung function. We found no evidence that systemic inflammation causes a decline in lung function. However, lower lung volumes were associated with higher CRP and fibrinogen at follow-up indicating that pulmonary restriction may be a risk factor for systemic inflammation. The mechanism for this association remains unclear. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of inflammation in bladder function and interstitial cystitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Sonal; Srivastava, Abhishek; Lee, Richard; Tewari, Ashutosh K.; Te, Alexis E.

    2011-01-01

    Cystitis, or inflammation of the bladder, has a direct effect on bladder function. Interstitial cystitis is a syndrome characterized by urinary bladder pain and irritative symptoms of more than 6 months duration. It commonly occurs in young to middle-aged women with no known cause and in fact represents a diagnosis of exclusion. Many factors have been suggested, including chronic or subclinical infection, autoimmunity and genetic susceptibility, which could be responsible for initiating the inflammatory response. However, a central role of inflammation has been confirmed in the pathogenesis of interstitial cystitis. Patients with interstitial cystitis are usually managed with multimodal therapy to break the vicious cycle of chronic inflammation at every step. Patients who develop irreversible pathologies such as fibrosis are managed surgically, which is usually reserved for refractory cases. PMID:21789096

  9. Functions and Signaling Pathways of Amino Acids in Intestinal Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang He

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestine is always exposed to external environment and intestinal microorganism; thus it is more sensitive to dysfunction and dysbiosis, leading to intestinal inflammation, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, and diarrhea. An increasing number of studies indicate that dietary amino acids play significant roles in preventing and treating intestinal inflammation. The review aims to summarize the functions and signaling mechanisms of amino acids in intestinal inflammation. Amino acids, including essential amino acids (EAAs, conditionally essential amino acids (CEAAs, and nonessential amino acids (NEAAs, improve the functions of intestinal barrier and expressions of anti-inflammatory cytokines and tight junction proteins but decrease oxidative stress and the apoptosis of enterocytes as well as the expressions of proinflammatory cytokines in the intestinal inflammation. The functions of amino acids are associated with various signaling pathways, including mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR, nuclear factor-kappa-B (NF-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, nuclear erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2, general controlled nonrepressed kinase 2 (GCN2, and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2.

  10. Targeting of histamine producing cells by EGCG: a green dart against inflammation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgarejo, Esther; Medina, Miguel Angel; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca; Urdiales, José Luis

    2010-09-01

    The human body is made of some 250 different cell types. From them, only a small subset of cell types is able to produce histamine. They include some neurons, enterochromaffin-like cells, gastrin-containing cells, mast cells, basophils, and monocytes/macrophages, among others. In spite of the reduced number of these histamine-producing cell types, they are involved in very different physiological processes. Their deregulation is related with many highly prevalent, as well as emergent and rare diseases, mainly those described as inflammation-dependent pathologies, including mastocytosis, basophilic leukemia, gastric ulcer, Crohn disease, and other inflammatory bowel diseases. Furthermore, oncogenic transformation switches some non-histamine-producing cells to a histamine producing phenotype. This is the case of melanoma, small cell lung carcinoma, and several types of neuroendocrine tumors. The bioactive compound epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major component of green tea, has been shown to target histamine-producing cells producing great alterations in their behavior, with relevant effects on their proliferative potential, as well as their adhesion, migration, and invasion potentials. In fact, EGCG has been shown to have potent anti-inflammatory, anti-tumoral, and anti-angiogenic effects and to be a potent inhibitor of the histamine-producing enzyme, histidine decarboxylase. Herein, we review the many specific effects of EGCG on concrete molecular targets of histamine-producing cells and discuss the relevance of these data to support the potential therapeutic interest of this compound to treat inflammation-dependent diseases.

  11. Diverse novel functions of neutrophils in immunity, inflammation, and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Mocsai, A.

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils have long been considered simple suicide killers at the bottom of the hierarchy of the immune response. That view began to change 10–20 yr ago, when the sophisticated mechanisms behind how neutrophils locate and eliminate pathogens and regulate immunity and inflammation were discovered. The last few years witnessed a new wave of discoveries about additional novel and unexpected functions of these cells. Neutrophils have been proposed to participate in protection against intracellu...

  12. Adiponectin, biomarkers of inflammation and changes in cardiac autonomic function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Stevns; Vistisen, Dorte; Jørgensen, Marit Eika

    2017-01-01

    changes in heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) in non-diabetic and diabetic individuals. METHODS: Data are based on up to 25,050 person-examinations for 8469 study participants of the Whitehall II cohort study. Measures of CAN included HR and several HRV indices. Associations between baseline......BACKGROUND: Biomarkers of inflammation and adiponectin are associated with cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in cross-sectional studies, but prospective data are scarce. This study aimed to assess the associations of biomarkers of subclinical inflammation and adiponectin with subsequent......: Higher IL-1Ra levels appeared as novel risk marker for increases in HR. Higher adiponectin levels were associated with a more favourable development of cardiovascular autonomic function in individuals with type 2 diabetes independently of multiple confounders....

  13. Acute chlorine gas exposure produces transient inflammation and a progressive alteration in surfactant composition with accompanying mechanical dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massa, Christopher B.; Scott, Pamela; Abramova, Elena; Gardner, Carol; Laskin, Debra L.; Gow, Andrew J., E-mail: Gow@rci.rutgers.edu

    2014-07-01

    Acute Cl{sub 2} exposure following industrial accidents or military/terrorist activity causes pulmonary injury and severe acute respiratory distress. Prior studies suggest that antioxidant depletion is important in producing dysfunction, however a pathophysiologic mechanism has not been elucidated. We propose that acute Cl{sub 2} inhalation leads to oxidative modification of lung lining fluid, producing surfactant inactivation, inflammation and mechanical respiratory dysfunction at the organ level. C57BL/6J mice underwent whole-body exposure to an effective 60 ppm-hour Cl{sub 2} dose, and were euthanized 3, 24 and 48 h later. Whereas pulmonary architecture and endothelial barrier function were preserved, transient neutrophilia, peaking at 24 h, was noted. Increased expression of ARG1, CCL2, RETLNA, IL-1b, and PTGS2 genes was observed in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells with peak change in all genes at 24 h. Cl{sub 2} exposure had no effect on NOS2 mRNA or iNOS protein expression, nor on BAL NO{sub 3}{sup −} or NO{sub 2}{sup −}. Expression of the alternative macrophage activation markers, Relm-α and mannose receptor was increased in alveolar macrophages and pulmonary epithelium. Capillary surfactometry demonstrated impaired surfactant function, and altered BAL phospholipid and surfactant protein content following exposure. Organ level respiratory function was assessed by forced oscillation technique at 5 end expiratory pressures. Cl{sub 2} exposure had no significant effect on either airway or tissue resistance. Pulmonary elastance was elevated with time following exposure and demonstrated PEEP refractory derecruitment at 48 h, despite waning inflammation. These data support a role for surfactant inactivation as a physiologic mechanism underlying respiratory dysfunction following Cl{sub 2} inhalation. - Highlights: • Effect of 60 ppm*hr Cl{sub 2} gas on lung inflammation and mechanical function examined. • Pulmonary inflammation is transient and minor.

  14. Oxidative stress induced inflammation initiates functional decline of tear production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Uchino

    Full Text Available Oxidative damage and inflammation are proposed to be involved in an age-related functional decline of exocrine glands. However, the molecular mechanism of how oxidative stress affects the secretory function of exocrine glands is unclear. We developed a novel mev-1 conditional transgenic mouse model (Tet-mev-1 using a modified tetracycline system (Tet-On/Off system. This mouse model demonstrated decreased tear production with morphological changes including leukocytic infiltration and fibrosis. We found that the mev-1 gene encodes Cyt-1, which is the cytochrome b(560 large subunit of succinate-ubiquinone oxidoreductase in complex II of mitochondria (homologous to succinate dehydrogenase C subunit (SDHC in humans. The mev-1 gene induced excessive oxidative stress associated with ocular surface epithelial damage and a decrease in protein and aqueous secretory function. This new model provides evidence that mitochondrial oxidative damage in the lacrimal gland induces lacrimal dysfunction resulting in dry eye disease. Tear volume in Tet-mev-1 mice was lower than in wild type mice and histopathological analyses showed the hallmarks of lacrimal gland inflammation by intense mononuclear leukocytic infiltration and fibrosis in the lacrimal gland of Tet-mev-1 mice. These findings strongly suggest that oxidative stress can be a causative factor for the development of dry eye disease.

  15. Functionally graded materials produced by laser cladding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y.T.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2000-01-01

    AlSi40 functionally graded materials (FGMs) were produced by a one-step laser cladding process on cast Al-alloy substrate as a possible solution for interfacial problems often present in laser coatings. The microstructure of the FGMs consists of a large amount of silicon primary particles surrounded

  16. [Functional iron deficiency, inflammation and fatigue after radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grellier, Noémie; Deray, Gilbert; Yousfi, Amani; Khodari, Wassim; Bouaita, Ryan; Belkacemi, Yazid

    2015-09-01

    Radiation therapy is associated with a fatigue in the majority of patients with a relative variability according to the type of the tumour, comorbidities, associated treatments and the extent of the irradiation. Its origin is multifactorial. One explanation described is that fatigue could be related to the inflammation caused by irradiation exposure. One of the suspected mechanisms is a functional iron deficiency following pro-inflammatory cytokines synthesis, particularly the interleukins 1 and 6. This phenomenon is accompanied by a reduced availability of iron, while iron reserves are normal or increased. Thus, iron inaccessibility induces lower coefficient of transferrin saturation, which can lead to a non-regenerative normocytic or microcytic anaemia. The availability of iron is controlled by hepcidin that is synthesized in the liver as a response to radiation-induced inflammatory. The presence of hepcidin blocks iron absorption in the intestine and decreases its recycling from senescent red blood cells. A direct relationship between elevated levels of hepcidin, inflammation markers and radiation-induced side effects have been reported. The aim of the article is to review the literature related to fatigue in radiotherapy and understand the mechanisms involved or worsening its occurrence to consider better care and improve patients' quality. Copyright © 2015 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Acute chlorine gas exposure produces transient inflammation and a progressive alteration in surfactant composition with accompanying mechanical dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Christopher B; Scott, Pamela; Abramova, Elena; Gardner, Carol; Laskin, Debra L; Gow, Andrew J

    2014-07-01

    Acute Cl2 exposure following industrial accidents or military/terrorist activity causes pulmonary injury and severe acute respiratory distress. Prior studies suggest that antioxidant depletion is important in producing dysfunction, however a pathophysiologic mechanism has not been elucidated. We propose that acute Cl2 inhalation leads to oxidative modification of lung lining fluid, producing surfactant inactivation, inflammation and mechanical respiratory dysfunction at the organ level. C57BL/6J mice underwent whole-body exposure to an effective 60ppm-hour Cl2 dose, and were euthanized 3, 24 and 48h later. Whereas pulmonary architecture and endothelial barrier function were preserved, transient neutrophilia, peaking at 24h, was noted. Increased expression of ARG1, CCL2, RETLNA, IL-1b, and PTGS2 genes was observed in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells with peak change in all genes at 24h. Cl2 exposure had no effect on NOS2 mRNA or iNOS protein expression, nor on BAL NO3(-) or NO2(-). Expression of the alternative macrophage activation markers, Relm-α and mannose receptor was increased in alveolar macrophages and pulmonary epithelium. Capillary surfactometry demonstrated impaired surfactant function, and altered BAL phospholipid and surfactant protein content following exposure. Organ level respiratory function was assessed by forced oscillation technique at 5 end expiratory pressures. Cl2 exposure had no significant effect on either airway or tissue resistance. Pulmonary elastance was elevated with time following exposure and demonstrated PEEP refractory derecruitment at 48h, despite waning inflammation. These data support a role for surfactant inactivation as a physiologic mechanism underlying respiratory dysfunction following Cl2 inhalation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Adipose Tissue Inflammation Induces B Cell Inflammation and Decreases B Cell Function in Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Frasca

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aging is the greatest risk factor for developing chronic diseases. Inflamm-aging, the age-related increase in low-grade chronic inflammation, may be a common link in age-related diseases. This review summarizes recent published data on potential cellular and molecular mechanisms of the age-related increase in inflammation, and how these contribute to decreased humoral immune responses in aged mice and humans. Briefly, we cover how aging and related inflammation decrease antibody responses in mice and humans, and how obesity contributes to the mechanisms for aging through increased inflammation. We also report data in the literature showing adipose tissue infiltration with immune cells and how these cells are recruited and contribute to local and systemic inflammation. We show that several types of immune cells infiltrate the adipose tissue and these include macrophages, neutrophils, NK cells, innate lymphoid cells, eosinophils, T cells, B1, and B2 cells. Our main focus is how the adipose tissue affects immune responses, in particular B cell responses and antibody production. The role of leptin in generating inflammation and decreased B cell responses is also discussed. We report data published by us and by other groups showing that the adipose tissue generates pro-inflammatory B cell subsets which induce pro-inflammatory T cells, promote insulin resistance, and secrete pathogenic autoimmune antibodies.

  19. Dietary fiber, kidney function, inflammation, and mortality risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong; Huang, Xiaoyan; Risérus, Ulf; Krishnamurthy, Vidya M; Cederholm, Tommy; Arnlöv, Johan; Lindholm, Bengt; Sjögren, Per; Carrero, Juan Jesús

    2014-12-05

    In the United States population, high dietary fiber intake has been associated with a lower risk of inflammation and mortality in individuals with kidney dysfunction. This study aimed to expand such findings to a Northern European population. Dietary fiber intake was calculated from 7-day dietary records in 1110 participants aged 70-71 years from the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (examinations performed during 1991-1995). Dietary fiber was adjusted for total energy intake by the residual method. Renal function was estimated from the concentration of serum cystatin C, and deaths were registered prospectively during a median follow-up of 10.0 years. Dietary fiber independently and directly associated with eGFR (adjusted difference, 2.6 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) per 10 g/d higher; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.3 to 4.9). The odds of C-reactive protein >3 mg/L were lower (linear trend, P=0.002) with higher fiber quartiles. During follow-up, 300 participants died (incidence rate of 2.87 per 100 person-years at risk). Multiplicative interactions were observed between dietary fiber intake and kidney dysfunction in the prediction of mortality. Higher dietary fiber was associated with lower mortality in unadjusted analysis. These associations were stronger in participants with kidney dysfunction (eGFRdietary fiber was associated with better kidney function and lower inflammation in community-dwelling elderly men from Sweden. High dietary fiber was also associated with lower (cancer) mortality risk, especially in individuals with kidney dysfunction. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  20. Diverse novel functions of neutrophils in immunity, inflammation, and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mócsai, Attila

    2013-07-01

    Neutrophils have long been considered simple suicide killers at the bottom of the hierarchy of the immune response. That view began to change 10-20 yr ago, when the sophisticated mechanisms behind how neutrophils locate and eliminate pathogens and regulate immunity and inflammation were discovered. The last few years witnessed a new wave of discoveries about additional novel and unexpected functions of these cells. Neutrophils have been proposed to participate in protection against intracellular pathogens such as viruses and mycobacteria. They have been shown to intimately shape the adaptive immune response at various levels, including marginal zone B cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells and T cell populations, and even to control NK cell homeostasis. Neutrophils have been shown to mediate an alternative pathway of systemic anaphylaxis and to participate in allergic skin reactions. Finally, neutrophils were found to be involved in physiological and pathological processes beyond the immune system, such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, and thrombus formation. Many of those functions appear to be related to their unique ability to release neutrophil extracellular traps even in the absence of pathogens. This review summarizes those novel findings on versatile functions of neutrophils and how they change our view of neutrophil biology in health and disease.

  1. Janus microgels produced from functional precursor polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiffert, Sebastian; Romanowsky, Mark B; Weitz, David A

    2010-09-21

    Micrometer-sized Janus particles of many kinds can be formed using droplet microfluidics, but in existing methods, the microfluidic templating is strongly coupled to the material synthesis, since droplet solidification occurs through rapid polymerization right after droplet formation. This circumstance limits independent control of the material properties and the morphology of the resultant particles. In this paper, we demonstrate a microfluidic technique to produce functional Janus microgels from prefabricated, cross-linkable precursor polymers. This approach separates the polymer synthesis from the particle gelation, thus allowing the microfluidic droplet templating and the functionalization of the matrix polymer to be performed and controlled in two independent steps. We use microfluidic devices to emulsify semidilute solutions of cross-linkable, chemically modified or unmodified poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) precursors and solidify the drops via polymer-analogous gelation. The resultant microgel particles exhibit two distinguishable halves which contain most of the modified precursors, and the unmodified matrix polymer separates these materials. The spatial distribution of the modified precursors across the particles can be controlled by the flow rates during the microfluidic experiments. We also form hollow microcapsules with two different sides (Janus shells) using double emulsion droplets as templates, and we produce Janus microgels that are loaded with a ferromagnetic additive which allows remote actuation of the microgels.

  2. Human primary adipocytes exhibit immune cell function: adipocytes prime inflammation independent of macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kees Meijer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity promotes inflammation in adipose tissue (AT and this is implicated in pathophysiological complications such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Although based on the classical hypothesis, necrotic AT adipocytes (ATA in obese state activate AT macrophages (ATM that then lead to a sustained chronic inflammation in AT, the link between human adipocytes and the source of inflammation in AT has not been in-depth and systematically studied. So we decided as a new hypothesis to investigate human primary adipocytes alone to see whether they are able to prime inflammation in AT. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using mRNA expression, human preadipocytes and adipocytes express the cytokines/chemokines and their receptors, MHC II molecule genes and 14 acute phase reactants including C-reactive protein. Using multiplex ELISA revealed the expression of 50 cytokine/chemokine proteins by human adipocytes. Upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation, most of these adipocyte-associated cytokines/chemokines and immune cell modulating receptors were up-regulated and a few down-regulated such as (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, MCP-1, IP-10, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and TNF-β highly up-regulated and IL-2, IL-7, IL-10, IL-13 and VEGF down-regulated. In migration assay, human adipocyte-derived chemokines attracted significantly more CD4+ T cells than controls and the number of migrated CD4+ cells was doubled after treating the adipocytes with LPS. Neutralizing MCP-1 effect produced by adipocytes reduced CD4+ migration by approximately 30%. CONCLUSION: Human adipocytes express many cytokines/chemokines that are biologically functional. They are able to induce inflammation and activate CD4+ cells independent of macrophages. This suggests that the primary event in the sequence leading to chronic inflammation in AT is metabolic dysfunction in adipocytes, followed by production of immunological mediators by these adipocytes, which is then exacerbated by

  3. Brain morphology links systemic inflammation to cognitive function in midlife adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsland, Anna L; Gianaros, Peter J; Kuan, Dora C-H; Sheu, Lei K; Krajina, Katarina; Manuck, Stephen B

    2015-08-01

    Inflammation is linked to cognitive decline in midlife, but the neural basis for this link is unclear. One possibility is that inflammation associates with adverse changes in brain morphology, which accelerates cognitive aging and later dementia risk. Clear evidence is lacking, however, regarding whether inflammation relates to cognition in midlife via changes in brain morphology. Accordingly, the current study examines whether associations of inflammation with cognitive function are mediated by variation in cortical gray matter volume among midlife adults. Plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP), relatively stable markers of peripheral systemic inflammation, were assessed in 408 community volunteers aged 30-54 years. All participants underwent structural neuroimaging to assess global and regional brain morphology and completed neuropsychological tests sensitive to early changes in cognitive function. Measurements of brain morphology (regional tissue volumes and cortical thickness and surface area) were derived using Freesurfer. Higher peripheral inflammation was associated with poorer spatial reasoning, short term memory, verbal proficiency, learning and memory, and executive function, as well as lower cortical gray and white matter volumes, hippocampal volume and cortical surface area. Mediation models with age, sex and intracranial volume as covariates showed cortical gray matter volume to partially mediate the association of inflammation with cognitive performance. Exploratory analyses of body mass suggested that adiposity may be a source of the inflammation linking brain morphology to cognition. Inflammation and adiposity might relate to cognitive decline via influences on brain morphology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Immunological Priming Requires Tregs and Interleukin-10-Producing Macrophages to Accelerate Resolution from Severe Lung Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eto, Yoshiki; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Mandke, Pooja; Mock, Jason R.; Garibaldi, Brian T.; Singer, Benjamin D.; Sidhaye, Venkataramana K.; Horton, Maureen R.; King, Landon S.; D'Alessio, Franco R.

    2014-01-01

    Overwhelming lung inflammation frequently occurs following exposure to both direct infectious and non-infectious agents, and is a leading cause of mortality world-wide. In that context, immunomodulatory strategies may be utilized to limit severity of impending organ damage. We sought to determine whether priming the lung by activating the immune system, or immunological priming, could accelerate resolution of severe lung inflammation. We assessed the importance of alveolar macrophages, regulatory T cells, and their potential interaction during immunological priming. We demonstrate that oropharyngeal delivery of low-dose lipopolysaccharide can immunologically prime the lung to augment alveolar macrophage production of interleukin-10 and enhance resolution of lung inflammation induced by a lethal dose of lipopolysaccharide or by pseudomonas bacterial pneumonia. Interleukin-10 deficient mice did not achieve priming and were unable to accelerate lung injury resolution. Depletion of lung macrophages or regulatory T cells during the priming response completely abrogated the positive effect of immunological priming on resolution of lung inflammation and significantly reduced alveolar macrophage interleukin-10 production. Finally, we demonstrated that oropharyngeal delivery of synthetic CpG-oligonucleotides elicited minimal lung inflammation compared to low-dose lipopolysaccharide, but nonetheless primed the lung to accelerate resolution of lung injury following subsequent lethal lipopolysaccharide exposure. Immunological priming is a viable immunomodulatory strategy used to enhance resolution in an experimental acute lung injury model with the potential for therapeutic benefit against a wide array of injurious exposures. PMID:24688024

  5. TRPA1 channels mediate acute neurogenic inflammation and pain produced by bacterial endotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseguer, Victor; Alpizar, Yeranddy A.; Luis, Enoch; Tajada, Sendoa; Denlinger, Bristol; Fajardo, Otto; Manenschijn, Jan-Albert; Fernández-Peña, Carlos; Talavera, Arturo; Kichko, Tatiana; Navia, Belén; Sánchez, Alicia; Señarís, Rosa; Reeh, Peter; Pérez-García, María Teresa; López-López, José Ramón; Voets, Thomas; Belmonte, Carlos; Talavera, Karel; Viana, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial infections are accompanied by inflammation and somatic or visceral pain. These symptoms are generally attributed to sensitization of nociceptors by inflammatory mediators released by immune cells. Nociceptor sensitization during inflammation occurs through activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signalling pathway by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a toxic by-product of bacterial lysis. Here we show that LPS exerts fast, membrane delimited, excitatory actions via TRPA1, a transient receptor potential cation channel that is critical for transducing environmental irritant stimuli into nociceptor activity. Moreover, we find that pain and acute vascular reactions, including neurogenic inflammation (CGRP release) caused by LPS are primarily dependent on TRPA1 channel activation in nociceptive sensory neurons, and develop independently of TLR4 activation. The identification of TRPA1 as a molecular determinant of direct LPS effects on nociceptors offers new insights into the pathogenesis of pain and neurovascular responses during bacterial infections and opens novel avenues for their treatment.

  6. Deficient dopamine D2 receptor function causes renal inflammation independently of high blood pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanrong Zhang

    Full Text Available Renal dopamine receptors participate in the regulation of blood pressure. Genetic factors, including polymorphisms of the dopamine D(2 receptor gene (DRD2 are associated with essential hypertension, but the mechanisms of their contribution are incompletely understood. Mice lacking Drd2 (D(2-/- have elevated blood pressure, increased renal expression of inflammatory factors, and renal injury. We tested the hypothesis that decreased dopamine D(2 receptor (D(2R function increases vulnerability to renal inflammation independently of blood pressure, is an immediate cause of renal injury, and contributes to the subsequent development of hypertension. In D(2-/- mice, treatment with apocynin normalized blood pressure and decreased oxidative stress, but did not affect the expression of inflammatory factors. In mouse RPTCs Drd2 silencing increased the expression of TNFα and MCP-1, while treatment with a D(2R agonist abolished the angiotensin II-induced increase in TNF-α and MCP-1. In uni-nephrectomized wild-type mice, selective Drd2 silencing by subcapsular infusion of Drd2 siRNA into the remaining kidney produced the same increase in renal cytokines/chemokines that occurs after Drd2 deletion, increased the expression of markers of renal injury, and increased blood pressure. Moreover, in mice with two intact kidneys, short-term Drd2 silencing in one kidney, leaving the other kidney undisturbed, induced inflammatory factors and markers of renal injury in the treated kidney without increasing blood pressure. Our results demonstrate that the impact of decreased D(2R function on renal inflammation is a primary effect, not necessarily associated with enhanced oxidant activity, or blood pressure; renal damage is the cause, not the result, of hypertension. Deficient renal D(2R function may be of clinical relevance since common polymorphisms of the human DRD2 gene result in decreased D(2R expression and function.

  7. Deficient dopamine D2 receptor function causes renal inflammation independently of high blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanrong; Cuevas, Santiago; Asico, Laureano D; Escano, Crisanto; Yang, Yu; Pascua, Annabelle M; Wang, Xiaoyan; Jones, John E; Grandy, David; Eisner, Gilbert; Jose, Pedro A; Armando, Ines

    2012-01-01

    Renal dopamine receptors participate in the regulation of blood pressure. Genetic factors, including polymorphisms of the dopamine D(2) receptor gene (DRD2) are associated with essential hypertension, but the mechanisms of their contribution are incompletely understood. Mice lacking Drd2 (D(2)-/-) have elevated blood pressure, increased renal expression of inflammatory factors, and renal injury. We tested the hypothesis that decreased dopamine D(2) receptor (D(2)R) function increases vulnerability to renal inflammation independently of blood pressure, is an immediate cause of renal injury, and contributes to the subsequent development of hypertension. In D(2)-/- mice, treatment with apocynin normalized blood pressure and decreased oxidative stress, but did not affect the expression of inflammatory factors. In mouse RPTCs Drd2 silencing increased the expression of TNFα and MCP-1, while treatment with a D(2)R agonist abolished the angiotensin II-induced increase in TNF-α and MCP-1. In uni-nephrectomized wild-type mice, selective Drd2 silencing by subcapsular infusion of Drd2 siRNA into the remaining kidney produced the same increase in renal cytokines/chemokines that occurs after Drd2 deletion, increased the expression of markers of renal injury, and increased blood pressure. Moreover, in mice with two intact kidneys, short-term Drd2 silencing in one kidney, leaving the other kidney undisturbed, induced inflammatory factors and markers of renal injury in the treated kidney without increasing blood pressure. Our results demonstrate that the impact of decreased D(2)R function on renal inflammation is a primary effect, not necessarily associated with enhanced oxidant activity, or blood pressure; renal damage is the cause, not the result, of hypertension. Deficient renal D(2)R function may be of clinical relevance since common polymorphisms of the human DRD2 gene result in decreased D(2)R expression and function.

  8. Functional Materials Produced On An Industrial Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barska Justyna

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a wide range of applications of functional materials and a scale of their current industrial production. These are the materials which have specific characteristics, thanks to which they became virtually indispensable in certain constructional solutions. Their basic characteristics, properties, methods of production and use as smart materials were described.

  9. Role of oxidants/inflammation in declining renal function in chronic kidney disease and normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlassara, Helen; Torreggiani, Massimo; Post, James B; Zheng, Feng; Uribarri, Jaime; Striker, Gary E

    2009-12-01

    Oxidant stress (OS) and inflammation increase in normal aging and in chronic kidney disease (CKD), as observed in human and animal studies. In cross-sectional studies of the US population, these changes are associated with a decrease in renal function, which is exhibited by a significant proportion of the population. However, since many normal adults have intact renal function, and longitudinal studies show that some persons maintain normal renal function with age, the link between OS, inflammation, and renal decline is not clear. In aging mice, greater oxidant intake is associated with increased age-related CKD and mortality, which suggests that interventions that reduce OS and inflammation may be beneficial for older individuals. Both OS and inflammation can be readily lowered in normal subjects and patients with CKD stage 3-4 by a simple dietary modification that lowers intake and results in reduced serum and tissue levels of advanced glycation end products. Diabetic patients, including those with microalbuminuria, have a decreased ability to metabolize and excrete oxidants prior to observable changes in serum creatinine. Thus, OS and inflammation may occur in the diabetic kidney at an early time. We review the evidence that oxidants in the diet directly lead to increased serum levels of OS and inflammatory mediators in normal aging and in CKD. We also discuss a simple dietary intervention that helps reduce OS and inflammation, an important and achievable therapeutic goal for patients with CKD and aging individuals with reduced renal function.

  10. Functional Interplay between Type I and II Interferons Is Essential to Limit Influenza A Virus-Induced Tissue Inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian A Stifter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Host control of influenza A virus (IAV is associated with exuberant pulmonary inflammation characterized by the influx of myeloid cells and production of proinflammatory cytokines including interferons (IFNs. It is unclear, however, how the immune system clears the virus without causing lethal immunopathology. Here, we demonstrate that in addition to its known anti-viral activity, STAT1 signaling coordinates host inflammation during IAV infection in mice. This regulatory mechanism is dependent on both type I IFN and IFN-γ receptor signaling and, importantly, requires the functional interplay between the two pathways. The protective function of type I IFNs is associated with not only the recruitment of classical inflammatory Ly6Chi monocytes into IAV-infected lungs, but also the prevention of excessive monocyte activation by IFN-γ. Unexpectedly, type I IFNs preferentially regulate IFN-γ signaling in Ly6Clo rather than inflammatory Ly6Chi mononuclear cell populations. In the absence of type I IFN signaling, Ly6Clo monocytes/macrophages, become phenotypically and functionally more proinflammatory than Ly6Chi cells, revealing an unanticipated function of the Ly6Clo mononuclear cell subset in tissue inflammation. In addition, we show that type I IFNs employ distinct mechanisms to regulate monocyte and neutrophil trafficking. Type I IFN signaling is necessary, but not sufficient, for preventing neutrophil recruitment into the lungs of IAV-infected mice. Instead, the cooperation of type I IFNs and lymphocyte-produced IFN-γ is required to regulate the tissue neutrophilic response to IAV. Our study demonstrates that IFN interplay links innate and adaptive anti-viral immunity to orchestrate tissue inflammation and reveals an additional level of complexity for IFN-dependent regulatory mechanisms that function to prevent excessive immunopathology while preserving anti-microbial functions.

  11. The Changes of Energy Interactions between Nucleus Function and Mitochondria Functions Causing Transmutation of Chronic Inflammation into Cancer Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponizovskiy, Michail R

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between nucleus and mitochondria functions induce the mechanism of maintenance stability of cellular internal energy according to the first law of thermodynamics in able-bodied cells and changes the mechanisms of maintenance stability of cellular internal energy creating a transition stationary state of ablebodied cells into quasi-stationary pathologic states of acute inflammation transiting then into chronic inflammation and then transmuting into cancer metabolism. The mechanisms' influences of intruding etiologic pathologic agents (microbe, virus, etc.) lead to these changes of energy interactions between nucleus and mitochondria functions causing general acute inflammation, then passing into local chronic inflammation, and reversing into cancer metabolism transmutation. Interactions between biochemical processes and biophysical processes of cellular capacitors' operations create a supplementary mechanism of maintenance stability of cellular internal energy in the norm and in pathology. Discussion of some scientific works eliminates doubts of the authors of these works.

  12. Systemic Inflammation in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Association with Muscle Function and Nutritional Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Guzmán, Oriana del Rocío; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Escobar Cedillo, Rosa Elena

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation described in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) may be related to loss of muscle function or to obesity. It is unknown if circulating proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-1, and TNF-α) levels are associated with muscle function. The purpose was to evaluate whether an association exists between systemic inflammation with muscle function and nutritional status in DMD patients. In 66 DMD patients without corticosteroid treatment, the following were evaluated in serum: cytokines (IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-α), C-reactive protein (CRP), leptin, adiponectin, and creatine kinase (CK). Muscle function was evaluated using Vignos Scale. Patients with better muscle function had the highest concentration of CK, IL-1, and TNF-α compared with less muscle function. No differences in IL-6 and adiponectin concentration were identified among groups with different levels of muscle function. Also, no differences were observed in the concentration of cytokines among groups with different nutritional status levels (underweight, normal weight, and overweight/obese). However, CRP and leptin were increased in the obese group compared with normal and underweight subjects. Systemic inflammation is increased in patients with better muscle function and decreases in DMD patients with poorer muscle function; nevertheless, systemic inflammation is similar among different levels of nutritional status in DMD patients. PMID:26380303

  13. Systemic Inflammation in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Association with Muscle Function and Nutritional Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriana del Rocío Cruz-Guzmán

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation described in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD may be related to loss of muscle function or to obesity. It is unknown if circulating proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-1, and TNF-α levels are associated with muscle function. The purpose was to evaluate whether an association exists between systemic inflammation with muscle function and nutritional status in DMD patients. In 66 DMD patients without corticosteroid treatment, the following were evaluated in serum: cytokines (IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-α, C-reactive protein (CRP, leptin, adiponectin, and creatine kinase (CK. Muscle function was evaluated using Vignos Scale. Patients with better muscle function had the highest concentration of CK, IL-1, and TNF-α compared with less muscle function. No differences in IL-6 and adiponectin concentration were identified among groups with different levels of muscle function. Also, no differences were observed in the concentration of cytokines among groups with different nutritional status levels (underweight, normal weight, and overweight/obese. However, CRP and leptin were increased in the obese group compared with normal and underweight subjects. Systemic inflammation is increased in patients with better muscle function and decreases in DMD patients with poorer muscle function; nevertheless, systemic inflammation is similar among different levels of nutritional status in DMD patients.

  14. A functional module-based exploration between inflammation and cancer in esophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nannan; Li, Chunhua; Huang, Yan; Yi, Ying; Bo, Wanlan; Li, Chunmiao; Li, Yue; Hu, Yongfei; Li, Kongning; Wang, Hong; Zhuang, Liwei; Fan, Huihui; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation contributing to the underlying progression of diverse human cancers has been generally appreciated, however, explorations into the molecular links between inflammation and cancer in esophagus are still at its early stage. In our study, we presented a functional module-based approach, in combination with multiple data resource (gene expression, protein-protein interactions (PPI), transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations) to decipher the underlying links. Via mapping differentially expressed disease genes, functional disease modules were identified. As indicated, those common genes and interactions tended to play important roles in linking inflammation and cancer. Based on crosstalk analysis, we demonstrated that, although most disease genes were not shared by both kinds of modules, they might act through participating in the same or similar functions to complete the molecular links. Additionally, we applied pivot analysis to extract significant regulators for per significant crosstalk module pair. As shown, pivot regulators might manipulate vital parts of the module subnetworks, and then work together to bridge inflammation and cancer in esophagus. Collectively, based on our functional module analysis, we demonstrated that shared genes or interactions, significant crosstalk modules, and those significant pivot regulators were served as different functional parts underlying the molecular links between inflammation and cancer in esophagus. PMID:26489668

  15. Effect of industrially produced trans fat on markers of systemic inflammation: evidence from a randomized trial in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendsen, Nathalie T.; Stender, Steen; Szecsi, Pal B.

    2011-01-01

    Consumption of industrially produced trans fatty acids (IP-TFA) has been positively associated with systemic markers of low-grade inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in cross-sectional studies, but results from intervention studies are inconclusive. Therefore, we conducted a 16 week double...... (15.7 g/day IP-TFA) or control oil without IP-TFA. After 16 weeks, IP-TFA intake increased baseline-adjusted serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α by 12% [95% confidence interval (CI): 5–20; P = 0.002] more in the IP-TFA group compared with controls. Plasma soluble TNF receptors 1 and 2 were also...

  16. The sweet side of a long pentraxin: how glycosylation affects PTX3 functions in innate immunity and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eInforzato

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Innate immunity represents the first line of defence against pathogens and plays key roles in activation and orientation of the adaptive immune response. The innate immune system comprises both a cellular and a humoral arm. Components of the humoral arm include soluble pattern recognition molecules (PRMs that recognise pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and initiate the immune response in coordination with the cellular arm, therefore acting as functional ancestors of antibodies. The long pentraxin PTX3 is a prototypic soluble PRM that is produced at sites of infection and inflammation by both somatic and immune cells. Gene targeting of this evolutionarily conserved protein has revealed a non-redundant role in resistance to selected pathogens. Moreover, PTX3 exerts important functions at the crossroad between innate immunity, inflammation and female fertility. The human PTX3 protein contains a single N-glycosylation site that is fully occupied by complex type oligosaccharides, mainly fucosylated and sialylated biantennary glycans. Glycosylation has been implicated in a number of PTX3 activities, including neutralization of influenza viruses, modulation of the complement system, and attenuation of leukocyte recruitment. Therefore, this post translational modification might act as a fine tuner of PTX3 functions in native immunity and inflammation.Here we review the studies on PTX3, with emphasis on the glycan-dependent mechanisms underlying pathogen recognition and crosstalk with other components of the innate immune system.

  17. Airway function, inflammation and regulatory T cell function in subjects in asthma remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Turcott, Hélène; Plante, Sophie; Chakir, Jamila

    2012-01-01

    Factors associated with asthma remission need to be determined, particularly when remission occurs in adulthood. To evaluate airway responsiveness and inflammation in adult patients in asthma remission compared with adults with mild, persistent symptomatic asthma. Adenosine monophosphate and methacholine responsiveness were evaluated in 26 patients in complete remission of asthma, 16 patients in symptomatic remission of asthma, 29 mild asthmatic patients and 15 healthy controls. Blood sampling and induced sputum were also obtained to measure inflammatory parameters. Perception of breathlessness at 20% fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s was similar among groups. In subjects with symptomatic remission of asthma, responsiveness to adenosine monophosphate and methacholine was intermediate between mild asthma and complete asthma remission, with the latter group similar to controls. Asthma remission was associated with a shorter duration of disease. Blood immunoglobulin E levels were significantly increased in the asthma group, and blood eosinophils were significantly elevated in the complete asthma remission, symptomatic remission and asthma groups compared with controls. The suppressive function of regulatory T cells was lower in asthma and remission groups compared with controls. A continuum of asthma remission was observed, with patients in complete asthma remission presenting features similar to controls, while patients in symptomatic asthma remission appeared to be in an intermediate state between complete asthma remission and symptomatic asthma. Remission was associated with a shorter disease duration. Despite remission of asthma, a decreased suppressor function of regulatory T cells was observed, which may predispose patients to future recurrence of the disease.

  18. The effects of electronic cigarette aerosol exposure on inflammation and lung function in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larcombe, Alexander N; Janka, Maxine A; Mullins, Benjamin J; Berry, Luke J; Bredin, Arne; Franklin, Peter J

    2017-07-01

    Electronic cigarette usage is increasing worldwide, yet there is a paucity of information on the respiratory health effects of electronic cigarette aerosol exposure. This study aimed to assess whether exposure to electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) aerosol would alter lung function and pulmonary inflammation in mice and to compare the severity of any alterations with mice exposed to mainstream tobacco smoke. Female BALB/c mice were exposed for 8 wk to tobacco smoke, medical air (control), or one of four different types of e-cigarette aerosol. E-cigarette aerosols varied depending on nicotine content (0 or 12 mg/ml) and the main excipient (propylene glycol or glycerin). Twenty-four hours after the final exposure, we measured pulmonary inflammation, lung volume, lung mechanics, and responsiveness to methacholine. Mice exposed to tobacco cigarette smoke had increased pulmonary inflammation and responsiveness to methacholine compared with air controls. Mice exposed to e-cigarette aerosol did not have increased inflammation but did display decrements in parenchymal lung function at both functional residual capacity and high transrespiratory pressures. Mice exposed to glycerin-based e-cigarette aerosols were also hyperresponsive to methacholine regardless of the presence or absence of nicotine. This study shows, for the first time, that exposure to e-cigarette aerosol during adolescence and early adulthood is not harmless to the lungs and can result in significant impairments in lung function. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Regulation and function of bone morphogenetic protein signaling in colonic injury and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Tuo; Takabayashi, Hidehiko; Mao, Maria; Han, Xu; Xue, Xiang; Brazil, Jennifer C; Eaton, Kathryn A; Shah, Yatrik M; Todisco, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    The bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) regulate gastrointestinal homeostasis. We investigated the expression of BMP-4 and the localization and function of BMP signaling during colonic injury and inflammation. Mice expressing the β-galactosidase (β-gal) gene under the control of a BMP-responsive element (BRE), BMP-4-β-gal/ mice, and animals generated by crossing villin-Cre mice to mice with floxed alleles of BMP receptor 1A (villin-Cre;Bmpr1a flox/flox ) were treated with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) to induce colonic injury and inflammation. Expression of BMP-4, β-gal, BMPR1A, IL-8, α-smooth muscle actin, and phosphorylated Smad1, -5, and -8 was assessed by X-Gal staining, quantitative RT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry. Morphology of the colonic mucosa was examined by staining with hematoxylin and eosin. The effect of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 on BMP-4 mRNA expression was investigated in human intestinal fibroblasts, whereas that of BMP-4 on IL-8 was assessed in human colonic organoids. BMP-4 was localized in α-smooth muscle actin-positive mesenchymal cells while the majority of BMP-generated signals targeted the epithelium. DSS caused injury and inflammation leading to reduced expression of BMP-4 and of BMPR1A mRNAs, and to decreased BMP signaling. Deletion of BMPR1A enhanced colonic inflammation and damage. Administration of anti-TNF-α antibodies to DSS-treated mice ameliorated colonic inflammation and increased the expression of BMP-4 and BMPR1A mRNAs. TNF-α and IL-1β inhibited both basal and IFN-γ-stimulated BMP-4 expression, whereas IL-6 had no effect. BMP-4 reduced TNF-α-stimulated IL-8 mRNA expressor IL-8 mRNA expression in the organoids. Inflammation and injury inhibit BMP-4 expression and signaling, leading to enhanced colonic damage and inflammation. These observations underscore the importance of BMP signaling in the regulation of intestinal inflammation and homeostasis. In this study we report a series of novel observations that

  20. Prostaglandin E2-EP3 Axis in Fine-Tuning Excessive Skin Inflammation by Restricting Dendritic Cell Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Noriko; Nomura, Takashi; Tanizaki, Hideaki; Nakajima, Saeko; Narumiya, Shuh; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Tokura, Yoshiki; Kabashima, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is produced in the skin and is suggested to play a role in the regulation of cutaneous immune homeostasis and responses. However, the multifaceted functions of PGE2 continue to elude our understanding, especially because of the multiplicity of PGE2 receptors—EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4. While cAMP-elevating EP4 is known to activate the functions of cutaneous dendritic cells (DCs), including Langerhans cells (LCs) and dermal DCs, the role of cAMP-suppressing EP3 in this process remains unknown. Here we demonstrated that an EP3 receptor selective agonist, ONO-AE-248, inhibited chemotaxis and co-stimulatory molecule expressions of DCs in vitro. A suboptimal dose of antigen was sufficient to induce contact hypersensitivity in EP3-deficient mice. Intriguingly, EP3 deficiency did not impair skin inflammation at all when the antigen dose was sufficiently high. EP3 limited the functions of cutaneous DCs only when the antigen dose was low. In contrast to EP4, the observed unappreciated function of EP3 may stabilize the cutaneous DCs to halt the impetuous response to a suboptimal dose of antigen. Taken together, PGE2-EP3 signaling is essential for fine-tuning excessive skin inflammation by restricting DC functions. PMID:23922752

  1. Prostaglandin E2-EP3 axis in fine-tuning excessive skin inflammation by restricting dendritic cell functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Shiraishi

    Full Text Available Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 is produced in the skin and is suggested to play a role in the regulation of cutaneous immune homeostasis and responses. However, the multifaceted functions of PGE2 continue to elude our understanding, especially because of the multiplicity of PGE2 receptors--EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4. While cAMP-elevating EP4 is known to activate the functions of cutaneous dendritic cells (DCs, including Langerhans cells (LCs and dermal DCs, the role of cAMP-suppressing EP3 in this process remains unknown. Here we demonstrated that an EP3 receptor selective agonist, ONO-AE-248, inhibited chemotaxis and co-stimulatory molecule expressions of DCs in vitro. A suboptimal dose of antigen was sufficient to induce contact hypersensitivity in EP3-deficient mice. Intriguingly, EP3 deficiency did not impair skin inflammation at all when the antigen dose was sufficiently high. EP3 limited the functions of cutaneous DCs only when the antigen dose was low. In contrast to EP4, the observed unappreciated function of EP3 may stabilize the cutaneous DCs to halt the impetuous response to a suboptimal dose of antigen. Taken together, PGE2-EP3 signaling is essential for fine-tuning excessive skin inflammation by restricting DC functions.

  2. Cannabidiol improves lung function and inflammation in mice submitted to LPS-induced acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, A; Almeida, V I; Costola-de-Souza, C; Ferraz-de-Paula, V; Pinheiro, M L; Vitoretti, L B; Gimenes-Junior, J A; Akamine, A T; Crippa, J A; Tavares-de-Lima, W; Palermo-Neto, J

    2015-02-01

    We have previously shown that the prophylactic treatment with cannabidiol (CBD) reduces inflammation in a model of acute lung injury (ALI). In this work we analyzed the effects of the therapeutic treatment with CBD in mice subjected to the model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI on pulmonary mechanics and inflammation. CBD (20 and 80 mg/kg) was administered (i.p.) to mice 6 h after LPS-induced lung inflammation. One day (24 h) after the induction of inflammation the assessment of pulmonary mechanics and inflammation were analyzed. The results show that CBD decreased total lung resistance and elastance, leukocyte migration into the lungs, myeloperoxidase activity in the lung tissue, protein concentration and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF and IL-6) and chemokines (MCP-1 and MIP-2) in the bronchoalveolar lavage supernatant. Thus, we conclude that CBD administered therapeutically, i.e. during an ongoing inflammatory process, has a potent anti-inflammatory effect and also improves the lung function in mice submitted to LPS-induced ALI. Therefore the present and previous data suggest that in the future cannabidiol might become a useful therapeutic tool for the attenuation and treatment of inflammatory lung diseases.

  3. Innate immune cell-produced IL-17 sustains inflammation in bullous pemphigoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Jan, S.; Plée, J.; Vallerand, D.; Dupont, A.; Delanez, E.; Durlach, A.; Jackson, P. L.; Blalock, J. E.; Bernard, P.; Antonicelli, F.

    2014-01-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune skin disease characterized by the binding of autoantibodies to components of the hemidesmosome structure resulting in an inflammatory response and subepidermal blister formation. To investigate the role of immune orientation in the inflammatory processes associated to disease progression, blister fluid, serum and biopsy specimens were collected from thirty one consecutive BP patients. Blister fluids displayed high level of IL-6, IL-17, IL-22, IL-23, whereas TGF-β was increased in BP sera. However neither immunocytochemistry on a trans-differentiation model of IL-17-producing PBMCs nor immunohistochemistry on BP biopsy specimens could demonstrate the presence of Th17 lymphocytes. Instead innate immune cells, especially neutrophils, produced IL-17 at the skin lesional site. Of note, superpotent topical corticosteroid application quickly and dramatically reduced both IL-17 expression and clinical signs of BP. Consistently, IL-17 upregulated MMP-9 and neutrophil elastase expression, two proteases involved in blister formation, thereof further demonstrating its role in the progress of BP. Finally IL-17-induced matrix degradation originated from neutrophil activation, initiated the formation of an amplification loop of the inflammatory response that could represent the underlying phenomenon leading to the maintenance and even disease extent. Thus, our results could open new therapeutic strategies for BP patients. PMID:24945093

  4. Saccharin induced liver inflammation in mice by altering the gut microbiota and its metabolic functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Xiaoming; Tu, Pengcheng; Chi, Liang; Gao, Bei; Ru, Hongyu; Lu, Kun

    2017-09-01

    Maintaining the balance of the gut microbiota and its metabolic functions is vital for human health, however, this balance can be disrupted by various external factors including food additives. A range of food and beverages are sweetened by saccharin, which is generally considered to be safe despite controversial debates. However, recent studies indicated that saccharin perturbed the gut microbiota. Inflammation is frequently associated with disruptions of the gut microbiota. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between host inflammation and perturbed gut microbiome by saccharin. C57BL/6J male mice were treated with saccharin in drinking water for six months. Q-PCR was used to detect inflammatory markers in mouse liver, while 16S rRNA gene sequencing and metabolomics were used to reveal changes of the gut microbiota and its metabolomic profiles. Elevated expression of pro-inflammatory iNOS and TNF-α in liver indicated that saccharin induced inflammation in mice. The altered gut bacterial genera, enriched orthologs of pathogen-associated molecular patterns, such as LPS and bacterial toxins, in concert with increased pro-inflammatory metabolites suggested that the saccharin-induced liver inflammation could be associated with the perturbation of the gut microbiota and its metabolic functions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Resistance training reduces inflammation and fatigue and improves physical function in older breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Monica C; Ryan, Alice S; Ortmeyer, Heidi K; Addison, Odessa; Goldberg, Andrew P

    2018-02-01

    Resistance training (RT) reduces fatigue and improves physical function and quality of life (QOL) in breast cancer survivors (BCS). This may be related to reductions in systemic and tissue-specific inflammation. This pilot study examines the hypothesis that RT induces changes in systemic and tissue-specific inflammation that contribute to improvements in physical and behavioral function in postmenopausal BCS. Eleven BCS (60 ± 2 years old, body mass index 30 ± 1 kg/m, mean ± SEM) underwent assessments of fatigue (Piper Fatigue Scale), physical function, QOL (SF-36), glucose and lipid metabolism, and systemic, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue inflammation (n = 9) before and after 16 weeks of moderate-intensity whole-body RT. Muscle strength improved by 25% to 30% (P fatigue decreased by 58% (P fatigue and QOL demonstrated the greatest improvements (absolute change vs baseline: fatigue: r = -0.95, P relative reduction in plasma and adipose tissue protein levels of proinflammatory interleukin (IL)-6sR, serum amyloid A, and tumor necrosis factor-α, and 75% relative increase in muscle pro-proliferative, angiogenic IL-8 protein content by 75% (all P fatigue and improved physical and behavioral function in postmenopausal BCS.

  6. Hypoxia and inflammation in children with sickle cell disease: implications for hippocampal functioning and episodic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iampietro, Mary; Giovannetti, Tania; Tarazi, Reem

    2014-06-01

    Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) suffer from systemic processes (e.g., chronic anemia, recurrent hypoxic-ischemic events, chronic inflammation) that have been associated with neurocognitive impairment in a range of clinical populations, but which have been largely understudied in relation to specific domains of cognitive functioning in children with SCD. This review focuses on episodic memory, as the hippocampus may be especially vulnerable to the systemic processes associated with SCD. The first part of the paper outlines the pathophysiology of SCD and briefly reviews the extant literature on academic and cognitive functioning in children with SCD, emphasizing the dearth of research on episodic memory. Next, the complex systemic processes of hypoxia and inflammation associated with SCD are reviewed, along with research that has associated these processes with hippocampal damage and memory impairment. The paper concludes with suggestions for future research that are informed, in part, by the literature on developmental amnesia.

  7. Functionally graded materials produced with high power lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Hosson, J. T. M.; Ocelik, V.; Chandra, T; Torralba, JM; Sakai, T

    2003-01-01

    In this keynote paper two examples will be present of functionally graded materials produced with high power Nd:YAG lasers. In particular the conditions for a successful Laser Melt Injection (LMI) of SiC and WC particles into the melt pool of A18Si and Ti6Al4V alloys are presented. The formation of

  8. Intradialytic protein supplementation reduces inflammation and improves physical function in maintenance hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomayko, Emily J; Kistler, Brandon M; Fitschen, Peter J; Wilund, Kenneth R

    2015-05-01

    Protein malnutrition is both a cause and consequence of inflammation and related comorbidities for maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients. This study sought to determine if oral supplementation with soy or whey protein during dialysis treatment reduces inflammation and improves physical function and body composition in MHD patients. The design used in the study was randomized controlled trial, and the setting used was hemodialysis clinics in Champaign and Chicago, Illinois. Patients who received treatment ≥3 days/week, were ages ≥30 years did not have congestive heart failure or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and were receiving dialysis treatment for ≥3 months were eligible for inclusion. Patients were randomized to oral supplementation with a whey protein, soy protein, or placebo beverage. Patients (WHEY, n = 11; SOY, n = 12; CON, n = 15) consumed their assigned beverage before every dialysis session for 6 months. Body composition was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, physical function by gait speed and shuttle walk test, and markers of inflammation (C-reactive protein and interleukin 6) using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits before and after the 6-month intervention. Dietary intake was assessed by 24-hour dietary recalls. Six months of whey or soy supplementation significantly reduced predialysis interleukin 6 levels (P protein when both protein groups were combined (P = .062). Gait speed and shuttle walk test performance also significantly improved in the protein groups (P protein groups. Intradialytic protein supplementation during a 6-month intervention reduced inflammation and improved physical function and represents an affordable intervention to improve the health of MHD patients. Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Plasma Zonulin and its Association with Kidney Function, Severity of Heart Failure, and Metabolic Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dschietzig, Thomas B; Boschann, Felix; Ruppert, Jana; Armbruster, Franz P; Meinitzer, Andreas; Bankovic, Dragic; Mitrovic, Veselin; Melzer, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    The tight junction regulator zonulin has attracted clinical attention as a biomarker of increased gastrointestinal permeability. Recent work also suggests zonulin to represent a general regulator of tissue barriers and a player in metabolic inflammation. Here, we investigated the associations of zonulin with chronic heart failure (CHF), kidney function, and metabolic inflammation. Using multiple linear regression (Generalized Linear Model), this study determined the association of plasma zonulin with different laboratory and clinical parameters in 225 patients carrying automatic implantable cardioverters/defibrillators (AICD) for primary or secondary prevention. In another 115 patients with diastolic or systolic CHF, we investigated a possible relationship between zonulin and CHF severity. In the AICD cohort, zonulin associated inversely with serum creatinine (p = 0.013), carboxymethyl-lysine calprotectin (p zonulin increased significantly with high-sensitivity CRP (p = 0.014). In the CHF cohort, we found a highly significant rise of NT-proBNP, but not of zonulin with NYHA functional classes I-IV or other parameters of CHF severity. The inverse associations of zonulin with creatinine and markers of cardio-vascular risk (high CMLcalprotectin and kynurenine, low homoarginine) are novel findings that need further experimental and clinical clarification. Our study indicates zonulin involvement in metabolic inflammation in T2D, but no association with disease status in CHF.

  10. Regulation and functions of the IL-10 family of cytokines in inflammation and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Wenjun; Rutz, Sascha; Crellin, Natasha K; Valdez, Patricia A; Hymowitz, Sarah G

    2011-01-01

    The IL-10 family of cytokines consists of nine members: IL-10, IL-19, IL-20, IL-22, IL-24, IL-26, and the more distantly related IL-28A, IL-28B, and IL-29. Evolutionarily, IL-10 family cytokines emerged before the adaptive immune response. These cytokines elicit diverse host defense mechanisms, especially from epithelial cells, during various infections. IL-10 family cytokines are essential for maintaining the integrity and homeostasis of tissue epithelial layers. Members of this family can promote innate immune responses from tissue epithelia to limit the damage caused by viral and bacterial infections. These cytokines can also facilitate the tissue-healing process in injuries caused by infection or inflammation. Finally, IL-10 itself can repress proinflammatory responses and limit unnecessary tissue disruptions caused by inflammation. Thus, IL-10 family cytokines have indispensable functions in many infectious and inflammatory diseases.

  11. B cells promote inflammation in obesity and type 2 diabetes through regulation of T-cell function and an inflammatory cytokine profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFuria, Jason; Belkina, Anna C; Jagannathan-Bogdan, Madhumita; Snyder-Cappione, Jennifer; Carr, Jordan David; Nersesova, Yanina R; Markham, Douglas; Strissel, Katherine J; Watkins, Amanda A; Zhu, Min; Allen, Jessica; Bouchard, Jacqueline; Toraldo, Gianluca; Jasuja, Ravi; Obin, Martin S; McDonnell, Marie E; Apovian, Caroline; Denis, Gerald V; Nikolajczyk, Barbara S

    2013-03-26

    Patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) have disease-associated changes in B-cell function, but the role these changes play in disease pathogenesis is not well established. Data herein show B cells from obese mice produce a proinflammatory cytokine profile compared with B cells from lean mice. Complementary in vivo studies show that obese B cell-null mice have decreased systemic inflammation, inflammatory B- and T-cell cytokines, adipose tissue inflammation, and insulin resistance (IR) compared with obese WT mice. Reduced inflammation in obese/insulin resistant B cell-null mice associates with an increased percentage of anti-inflammatory regulatory T cells (Tregs). This increase contrasts with the sharply decreased percentage of Tregs in obese compared with lean WT mice and suggests that B cells may be critical regulators of T-cell functions previously shown to play important roles in IR. We demonstrate that B cells from T2D (but not non-T2D) subjects support proinflammatory T-cell function in obesity/T2D through contact-dependent mechanisms. In contrast, human monocytes increase proinflammatory T-cell cytokines in both T2D and non-T2D analyses. These data support the conclusion that B cells are critical regulators of inflammation in T2D due to their direct ability to promote proinflammatory T-cell function and secrete a proinflammatory cytokine profile. Thus, B cells are potential therapeutic targets for T2D.

  12. Hydrophilic functionalized silicon nanoparticles produced by high energy ball milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallmann, Steffen

    The mechanochemical synthesis of functionalized silicon nanoparticles using High Energy Ball Milling (HEBM) is described. This method facilitates the fragmentation of mono crystalline silicon into the nanometer regime and the simultaneous surface functionalization of the formed particles. The surface functionalization is induced by the reaction of an organic liquid, such as alkynes and alkenes with reactive silicon sites. This method can be applied to form water soluble silicon nanoparticles by lipid mediated micelle formation and the milling in organic liquids containing molecules with bi-functional groups, such as allyl alcohol. Furthermore, nanometer sized, chloroalkyl functionalized particles can be synthesized by milling the silicon precursor in the presence of an o-chloroalkyne with either alkenes or alkynes as coreactants. This process allows tuning of the concentration of the exposed, alkyl linked chloro groups, simply by varying the relative amounts of the coreactant. The silicon nanoparticles that are formed serve as the starting point for a wide variety of chemical reactions, which may be used to alter the surface properties of the functionalized nanoparticles. Finally, the use of functionalized silicon particles for the production of superhydrophobic films is described. Here HEBM proves to be an efficient method to produce functionalized silicon particles, which can be deposited to form a stable coating exhibiting superhydrophobic properties. The hydrophobicity of the silicon film can be tuned by the milling time and thus the resulting surface roughness of the films.

  13. Functionalized sio2 microspheres for extracting oil from produced water

    KAUST Repository

    Mishra, Himanshu

    2017-03-16

    Functionalized material, methods of producing the functionalized material, and use thereof for separation processes such as but not limited to use for separating and extracting a dissolved organic foulant, charged contaminant or oily matter or any combination thereof from water, such as produced water, are provided. In an embodiment, the functionalized material is a mineral material, such as mica, silica (e.g. an SiO2 microsphere) or a metal oxide, and the outer surface of the material is functionalized with an alkyl chain or a perfluorinated species. In an embodiment, the method of making the functionalized material, includes: a) providing a mineral material; b) providing an alkyl chain and/or a perfluorinated species, the alkyl chain or perfluorinated species selected to dissolve organic foulants, charged contaminants or oily matter from water or any combination thereof; c) hydroxylating the material via a concentrated acid solution or a basic solution; and d) grafting the alkyl chain and/or the perfluorinated species onto the material via a silanation reaction.

  14. Effects of Salmeterol and Fluticasone Propionate Combination versus Fluticasone Propionate on Airway Function and Eosinophilic Inflammation in Mild Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Hoshino

    2009-01-01

    Conclusions: These findings suggest that SFC is more useful than FP in mild asthma cases. The clinical benefit of SFC provides evidence that IOS and induced sputum allows for the detection of changes in airway function and inflammation.

  15. Restoring Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Function Reduces Airway Bacteria and Inflammation in People with Cystic Fibrosis and Chronic Lung Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisert, Katherine B; Heltshe, Sonya L; Pope, Christopher; Jorth, Peter; Wu, Xia; Edwards, Rachael M; Radey, Matthew; Accurso, Frank J; Wolter, Daniel J; Cooke, Gordon; Adam, Ryan J; Carter, Suzanne; Grogan, Brenda; Launspach, Janice L; Donnelly, Seamas C; Gallagher, Charles G; Bruce, James E; Stoltz, David A; Welsh, Michael J; Hoffman, Lucas R; McKone, Edward F; Singh, Pradeep K

    2017-06-15

    Previous work indicates that ivacaftor improves cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) activity and lung function in people with cystic fibrosis and G551D-CFTR mutations but does not reduce density of bacteria or markers of inflammation in the airway. These findings raise the possibility that infection and inflammation may progress independently of CFTR activity once cystic fibrosis lung disease is established. To better understand the relationship between CFTR activity, airway microbiology and inflammation, and lung function in subjects with cystic fibrosis and chronic airway infections. We studied 12 subjects with G551D-CFTR mutations and chronic airway infections before and after ivacaftor. We measured lung function, sputum bacterial content, and inflammation, and obtained chest computed tomography scans. Ivacaftor produced rapid decreases in sputum Pseudomonas aeruginosa density that began within 48 hours and continued in the first year of treatment. However, no subject eradicated their infecting P. aeruginosa strain, and after the first year P. aeruginosa densities rebounded. Sputum total bacterial concentrations also decreased, but less than P. aeruginosa. Sputum inflammatory measures decreased significantly in the first week of treatment and continued to decline over 2 years. Computed tomography scans obtained before and 1 year after ivacaftor treatment revealed that ivacaftor decreased airway mucous plugging. Ivacaftor caused marked reductions in sputum P. aeruginosa density and airway inflammation and produced modest improvements in radiographic lung disease in subjects with G551D-CFTR mutations. However, P. aeruginosa airway infection persisted. Thus, measures that control infection may be required to realize the full benefits of CFTR-targeting treatments.

  16. Morphological and functional diversity of primary producers group in savannas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, E.

    1996-01-01

    The meaning of biological diversity for the operation and stability of natural ecosystems is matter of great theoretical and practical interest. The appearance and permanency of species in a given atmosphere indicates its capacity to compete with other species with similar habit and requirements, and to accumulate the resources that allow its reproduction. On the other hand, the coexistence of similar species in the same ecosystem allows to wonder if ever biological redundancy exists, that is to say, if several species coexist with the same function inside the ecosystem, so that the disappearance of one of them would not have biological significant consequences. A strategy to simplify the analysis of relationships between biodiversity and ecosystems operation is by grouping species with similar function, called functional groups. In this work the the primary producers functional group is analyzed, essentially superiors plants, in a savannas ecosystems. The analysis establishes that the gives the primary producers group is heterogeneous and complex, so much morphological as functionally: 1) the structural complexity and diversity forms of life in an savannas ecosystem are associated with the stratified exploitation of resources over (light) and under the floor (nourishment and water). Changes in diversity that affect the system structure will probably also affect its operations. 2 )Very similar morphological species can differ physiologically up to constitute production units with contrasting nutritional requirements. The echo-physiologic analysis of this differentiation can explain the habitat preferences that are naturally observed. 3) The long-time permanency of rare species, of low frequency, show the inability of dominant species to capture all the available resources. 4) The primary producers and the floor microorganisms have strong interactions. Changes in the community composition can generate significant changes in other community. These biotic interactions

  17. Systems and methods for producing low work function electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kippelen, Bernard; Fuentes-Hernandez, Canek; Zhou, Yinhua; Kahn, Antoine; Meyer, Jens; Shim, Jae Won; Marder, Seth R.

    2015-07-07

    According to an exemplary embodiment of the invention, systems and methods are provided for producing low work function electrodes. According to an exemplary embodiment, a method is provided for reducing a work function of an electrode. The method includes applying, to at least a portion of the electrode, a solution comprising a Lewis basic oligomer or polymer; and based at least in part on applying the solution, forming an ultra-thin layer on a surface of the electrode, wherein the ultra-thin layer reduces the work function associated with the electrode by greater than 0.5 eV. According to another exemplary embodiment of the invention, a device is provided. The device includes a semiconductor; at least one electrode disposed adjacent to the semiconductor and configured to transport electrons in or out of the semiconductor.

  18. Systemic Inflammation and Lung Function Impairment in Morbidly Obese Subjects with the Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid van Huisstede

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obesity and asthma are associated. There is a relationship between lung function impairment and the metabolic syndrome. Whether this relationship also exists in the morbidly obese patients is still unknown. Hypothesis. Low-grade systemic inflammation associated with the metabolic syndrome causes inflammation in the lungs and, hence, lung function impairment. Methods. This is cross-sectional study of morbidly obese patients undergoing preoperative screening for bariatric surgery. Metabolic syndrome was assessed according to the revised NCEP-ATP III criteria. Results. A total of 452 patients were included. Patients with the metabolic syndrome (n=293 had significantly higher blood monocyte (mean 5.3 versus 4.9, P=0.044 and eosinophil percentages (median 1.0 versus 0.8, P=0.002, while the total leukocyte count did not differ between the groups. The FEV1/FVC ratio was significantly lower in patients with the metabolic syndrome (76.7% versus 78.2%, P=0.032. Blood eosinophils were associated with FEV1/FVC ratio (adj. B −0.113, P=0.018. Conclusion. Although the difference in FEV1/FVC ratio between the groups is relatively small, in this cross-sectional study, and its clinical relevance may be limited, these data indicate that the presence of the metabolic syndrome may influence lung function impairment, through the induction of relative eosinophilia.

  19. Effect of brief secondhand smoke exposure on endothelial function and circulating markers of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Piero O; Lardi, Elena; Geissmann, Christa; Kuhn, Max U; Brüesch, Hermann; Reinhart, Walter H

    2011-03-01

    In contrast to the well defined detrimental consequences of long-term secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure, little is known about the acute effects of passive smoking on endothelial function and inflammation. The aim of the present study was to assess the acute effects of short-term SHS exposure on endothelial function and circulating markers of inflammation. Peripheral microvascular endothelial function assessed by reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry (RH-PAT) index, circulating markers of endothelial function (von Willebrand factor antigen, Thrombomodulin, E-selectin) and circulating inflammatory markers (high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), Interleukin-6 (IL-6)) were measured in eighteen male, non-smoking volunteers before and 12h after a 1-h SHS exposure. Twelve hours after passive smoking, average RH-PAT index was significantly lower than before SHS exposure (1.54±0.49 vs 2.01±0.55 (mean±SD), p=0.01) indicating deterioration of peripheral microvascular endothelial function. von Willebrand factor antigen as a marker of endothelial activation was significantly increased after SHS exposure (93.0±25.5% vs 78.4±17.9%, p=0.03). Levels of Thrombomodulin, E-selectin, hsCRP, and IL-6 were unaffected by SHS exposure. Short-term SHS exposure leads to a measurable disturbance of endothelial function. However, 1h of passive smoking appears to be too short to elicit a significant inflammatory response. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Transient oxidative stress and inflammation after intraperitoneal administration of multiwalled carbon nanotubes functionalized with single strand DNA in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clichici, Simona, E-mail: simonaclichici@yahoo.com [Department of Physiology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Biris, Alexandru Radu [National R and D Institute of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Tabaran, Flaviu [University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Filip, Adriana [Department of Physiology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2012-03-15

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are widely used for nanotechnology. Their impact on living organisms is, however, not entirely clarified. Oxidative stress and inflammation seem to be the key mechanisms involved in MWCNTs' cytotoxicity. Until present, pulmonary and skin models were the main tested experimental designs to assess carbon nanotubes' toxicity. The systemic administration of MWCNTs is essential, with respect for future medical applications. Our research is performed on Wistar rats and is focused on the dynamics of oxidative stress parameters in blood and liver and pro-inflammatory cytokines in liver, after single dose (270 mg l{sup −1}) ip administration of MWCNTs (exterior diameter 15–25 nm, interior diameter 10–15 nm, surface 88 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) functionalized with single strand DNA (ss-DNA). The presence of MWCNTs in blood was assessed by Raman spectroscopy, while in liver histological examination and confocal microscopy were used. It was found that ss-DNA-MWCNTs induce oxidative stress in plasma and liver, with the return of the tested parameters to normal values, 6 h after ip injection of nanotubes, with the exception of reduced glutathione in plasma. The inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β) had a similar pattern of evolution. We also assessed the level of ERK1/2 and the phosphorylation of p65 subunit of NF-kB in liver that had a transient increase and returned to normal at the end of the tested period. Our results demonstrate that ss-DNA-MWCNTs produce oxidative stress and inflammation, but with a transient pattern. Given the fact that antioxidants modify the profile not only for oxidative stress, but also of inflammation, the dynamics of these alterations may be of practical importance for future protective strategies. -- Highlights: ► ss-DNA-MWCNTs ip administration induce oxidative stress in plasma and liver. ► ss-DNA-MWCNTs ip administration determine liver inflammation. ► ERK1/2 and p65 phosphorylated NF

  1. KLF2 in Regulation of NF-κB-Mediated Immune Cell Function and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prerana Jha

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available KLF2 (Kruppel-like factor 2 is a member of the zinc finger transcription factor family, which critically regulates embryonic lung development, function of endothelial cells and maintenance of quiescence in T-cells and monocytes. It is expressed in naïve T-cells and monocytes, however its level of expression decreases during activation and differentiation. KLF2 also plays critical regulatory role in various inflammatory diseases and their pathogenesis. Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB is an important inducer of inflammation and the inflammation is mediated through the transcription of several proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules. So, both transcriptional factors KLF2 and NF-κB are being associated with the similar cellular functions and their maintenance. It was shown that KLF2 regulates most of the NF-κB-mediated activities. In this review, we focused on emphasizing the involvement of KLF2 in health and disease states and how they interact with transcriptional master regulator NF-κB.

  2. Selenium and Sulfur to Produce Allium Functional Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Morales, Susana; Pérez-Labrada, Fabián; García-Enciso, Ema Laura; Leija-Martínez, Paola; Medrano-Macías, Julia; Dávila-Rangel, Irma Esther; Juárez-Maldonado, Antonio; Rivas-Martínez, Erika Nohemí; Benavides-Mendoza, Adalberto

    2017-03-30

    Selenium is an element that must be considered in the nutrition of certain crops since its use allows the obtaining of biofortified crops with a positive impact on human health. The objective of this review is to present the information on the use of Se and S in the cultivation of plants of the genus Allium . The main proposal is to use Allium as specialist plants for biofortification with Se and S, considering the natural ability to accumulate both elements in different phytochemicals, which promotes the functional value of Allium . In spite of this, in the agricultural production of these species, the addition of sulfur is not realized to obtain functional foods and plants more resistant; it is only sought to cover the necessary requirements for growth. On the other hand, selenium does not appear in the agronomic management plans of most of the producers. Including S and Se fertilization as part of agronomic management can substantially improve Allium crop production. Allium species may be suitable to carry out biofortification with Se; this practice can be combined with the intensive use of S to obtain crops with higher production and sensory, nutritional, and functional quality.

  3. Plasma Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin Reflects Both Inflammation and Kidney Function in Patients with Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Søren; Jensen, Jan S; Hoffmann, Søren

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) has emerged as a marker for acute kidney injury and cardiovascular outcome. However, the relative importance of inflammation versus kidney function on plasma NGAL levels is uncertain, making the interpretation of plasma NGAL unclear....... Accordingly, we investigated the relationship between plasma NGAL, inflammation and kidney function in patients with myocardial infarction (MI). METHODS: We prospectively included 584 patients with acute ST-segment elevation MI (STEMI) treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) from 2006.......001). Leukocyte count and C-reactive protein were the main determinants of plasma NGAL in patients with normal eGFR, whereas eGFR was the main determinant at reduced kidney function. CONCLUSIONS: eGFR determines the association of NGAL with either inflammation or kidney function; in patients with normal e...

  4. Airway function and markers of airway inflammation in patients with treated hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birring, S S; Patel, R B; Parker, D; McKenna, S; Hargadon, B; Monteiro, W R; Falconer Smith, J F; Pavord, I D

    2005-03-01

    There is increasing evidence of an association between organ specific autoimmune diseases, particularly autoimmune thyroid disease and respiratory morbidity. A study was undertaken to determine whether patients with autoimmune thyroid disease have objective evidence of airway inflammation and dysfunction. Twenty six non-smoking women with treated hypothyroidism and 19 non-smoking controls completed a symptom questionnaire and underwent full lung function tests, capsaicin cough reflex sensitivity measurement, methacholine challenge test, and sputum induction over two visits. Symptoms of cough (p = 0.01), dyspnoea (p = 0.01), sputum production (p = 0.004), and wheeze (p = 0.04) were reported more commonly in patients than controls. Patients with hypothyroidism had heightened cough reflex sensitivity compared with controls (geometric mean concentration of capsaicin causing five coughs: 40 v 108 mmol/l; mean difference 1.4 doubling doses; 95% confidence interval of difference 0.4 to 2.5; p = 0.008) and a significantly higher proportion of patients had airway hyperresponsiveness (methacholine provocative concentration (PC(20)) <8 mg/ml: 38% v 0%; p = 0.016). Patients with hypothyroidism also had a significantly higher induced sputum total neutrophil cell count (p = 0.01), total lymphocyte count (p = 0.02), and sputum supernatant interleukin-8 concentrations (p = 0.048). Patients with treated hypothyroidism report more respiratory symptoms and have objective evidence of airway dysfunction and inflammation.

  5. Low-grade systemic inflammation: a partial mediator of the relationship between diabetes and lung function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannelli, Jonathan; Trouiller, Philippe; Hulo, Sébastien; Chérot-Kornobis, Natalie; Ciuchete, Alina; Edmé, Jean-Louis; Matran, Régis; Amouyel, Philippe; Meirhaeghe, Aline; Dauchet, Luc

    2018-01-01

    An association has been consistently found between diabetes mellitus and decreased lung function. We evaluated to what extent low-grade inflammation (as measured by the level of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hs-CRP]) could explain this relationship. A sample of 1878 middle-aged adults from the cross-sectional Enquête Littoral Souffle Air Biologie Environnement survey without self-reported pulmonary and atherosclerosis disease was included. A mediation analysis was performed to assess and quantify the hs-CRP level as a mediator of the relationship between diabetes and lung function. Diabetes was associated with higher hs-CRP level (+22.9%, 95% confidence interval = [5.1, 43.6]). The hs-CRP (>4 vs. ≤1 mg/L) was associated with lower percentage predicted values for the forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) (-4% [-6.1, -1.9]) and forced vital capacity (FVC) (-4.4% [-6.5, -2.3]). Diabetes was associated with FEV1 (-3.5% [-5.8, -1.3]) and FVC (-3.6% [-5.9, -1.3]). The proportion of the effect that is mediated by hs-CRP was 12% [2.4, 37] and 13% [3.7, 39.4] for FEV1 and FVC, respectively. Our results suggest that low-grade systemic inflammation could only explain a small part of the relationship between diabetes and lung function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Exercise protects from cancer through regulation of immune function and inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille

    2017-01-01

    are just starting to be elucidated. To this end, evasion of immune surveillance and tumor-associated inflammation are established as hallmarks of cancer, and exercise may target cancer incidence and progression through regulation of these mechanisms. Here, I review the role of exercise in protection from...... cancer through mobilization and activation of cytotoxic immune cells, restriction of inflammatory signaling pathways in myeloid immune cells, and regulation of acute and chronic systemic inflammatory responses. In conclusion, I propose that exercise has the potential to target tumor growth through...... regulation of immune and inflammatory functions, and exercise may be pursued as anticancer treatment through incorporation into standard oncological therapy to the benefit of the cancer patients....

  7. Role of IL-10 in Resolution of Inflammation and Functional Recovery after Peripheral Nerve Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira Mietto, Bruno; Kroner, Antje; Girolami, Elizabeth I; Santos-Nogueira, Eva; Zhang, Ji; David, Samuel

    2015-12-16

    A rapid proinflammatory response after peripheral nerve injury is required for clearance of tissue debris (Wallerian degeneration) and effective regeneration. Unlike the CNS, this response is rapidly terminated in peripheral nerves starting between 2 and 3 weeks after crush injury. We examined the expression and role of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in the resolution of inflammation and regeneration after sciatic nerve crush injury in mice. IL-10 mRNA increased over the first 7 d after injury, whereas at the protein level, immunofluorescence labeling showed IL-10(+) cells increased almost 3-fold in the first 3 weeks, with macrophages being the major cell type expressing IL-10. The role of IL-10 in nerve injury was assessed using IL-10-null mice. Increased numbers of macrophages were found in the distal segment of IL-10-null mice at early (3 d) and late (14 and 21 d) time points, suggesting that IL-10 may play a role in controlling the early influx and the later efflux of macrophages out of the nerve. A chemokine/cytokine PCR array of the nerve 24 h after crush showed a 2- to 4-fold increase in the expression of 10 proinflammatory mediators in IL-10(-/-) mice. In addition, myelin phagocytosis in vitro by LPS stimulated bone-marrow-derived macrophages from IL-10-null mice failed to downregulate expression of proinflammatory chemokines/cytokines, suggesting that IL-10 is required for the myelin-phagocytosis-induced shift of macrophages from proinflammatory to anti-inflammatory/pro-repair phenotype. The failure to switch off inflammation in IL-10-null mice was accompanied by impaired axon regeneration and poor recovery of motor and sensory function. An appropriately regulated inflammatory response after peripheral nerve injury is essential for axon regeneration and recovery. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression and role of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in terminating inflammation after sciatic nerve crush injury and promoting

  8. Functional significance of macrophage-derived exosomes in inflammation and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Marguerite K; Tian, Yuzhen; Qureshi, Rehman A; Gormley, Michael; Ertel, Adam; Gao, Ruby; Aradillas Lopez, Enrique; Alexander, Guillermo M; Sacan, Ahmet; Fortina, Paolo; Ajit, Seena K

    2014-08-01

    Exosomes, secreted microvesicles transporting microRNAs (miRNAs), mRNAs, and proteins through bodily fluids, facilitate intercellular communication and elicit immune responses. Exosomal contents vary, depending on the source and the physiological conditions of cells, and can provide insights into how cells and systems cope with physiological perturbations. Previous analysis of circulating miRNAs in patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), a debilitating chronic pain disorder, revealed a subset of miRNAs in whole blood that are altered in the disease. To determine functional consequences of alterations in exosomal biomolecules in inflammation and pain, we investigated exosome-mediated information transfer in vitro, in a rodent model of inflammatory pain, and in exosomes from patients with CRPS. Mouse macrophage cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharides secrete exosomes containing elevated levels of cytokines and miRNAs that mediate inflammation. Transcriptome sequencing of exosomal RNA revealed global alterations in both innate and adaptive immune pathways. Exosomes from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated cells were sufficient to cause nuclear factor-κB activation in naive cells, indicating functionality in recipient cells. A single injection of exosomes attenuated thermal hyperalgesia in a murine model of inflammatory pain, suggesting an immunoprotective role for macrophage-derived exosomes. Macrophage-derived exosomes carry a protective signature that is altered when secreting cells are exposed to an inflammatory stimulus. We also show that circulating miRNAs altered in patients with complex regional pain syndrome are trafficked by exosomes. With their systemic signaling capabilities, exosomes can induce pleiotropic effects potentially mediating the multifactorial pathology underlying chronic pain, and should be explored for their therapeutic utility. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  9. Activated NKT cells facilitated functional switch of myeloid-derived suppressor cells at inflammation sites in fulminant hepatitis mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Danxiao; Shi, Yu; Wang, Cheng; Chen, Hanwen; Liu, Qiaoyun; Liu, Jianhua; Zhang, Lihuang; Wu, Yihua; Xia, Dajing

    2017-02-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) confer immunosuppressive properties, but their roles in fulminant hepatitis have not been well defined. In this study, we systematically examined the distribution of MDSCs in bone marrow (BM), liver and spleen, and their functional and differentiation status in an acute fulminant hepatitis mouse model induced by lipopolysaccharide and D-galactosamine (LPS-GalN). Moreover, the interaction between NKT cells and MDSCs was determined. Our study revealed that BM contained the largest pool of MDSCs during pathogenesis of fulminant hepatitis compared with liver and spleen. MDSCs in liver/spleen expressed higher levels of chemokine receptors such as CCR2, CX3CR1 and CXCR2. At inflamed tissues such as liver or spleen, activated NKT cells induced differentiation of MDSCs through cell-cell interaction, which markedly dampened the immunosuppressive effects and promoted MDSCs to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines and activate inflammatory cells. Our findings thus demonstrated an unexpected pro-inflammatory state for MDSCs, which was mediated by the activated NKT cells that precipitated the differentiation and functional evolution of these MDSCs at sites of inflammation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  10. Cartilage damage and bone erosion are more prominent determinants of functional impairment in longstanding experimental arthritis than synovial inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Hayer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation of articular joints causing bone and cartilage destruction consequently leads to functional impairment or loss of mobility in affected joints from individuals affected by rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Even successful treatment with complete resolution of synovial inflammatory processes does not lead to full reversal of joint functionality, pointing to the crucial contribution of irreversibly damaged structural components, such as bone and cartilage, to restricted joint mobility. In this context, we investigated the impact of the distinct components, including synovial inflammation, bone erosion or cartilage damage, as well as the effect of blocking tumor necrosis factor (TNF on functional impairment in human-TNF transgenic (hTNFtg mice, a chronic inflammatory erosive animal model of RA. We determined CatWalk-assisted gait profiles as objective quantitative measurements of functional impairment. We first determined body-weight-independent gait parameters, including maximum intensity, print length, print width and print area in wild-type mice. We observed early changes in those gait parameters in hTNFtg mice at week 5 – the first clinical signs of arthritis. Moreover, we found further gait changes during chronic disease development, indicating progressive functional impairment in hTNFtg mice. By investigating the association of gait parameters with inflammation-mediated joint pathologies at different time points of the disease course, we found a relationship between gait parameters and the extent of cartilage damage and bone erosions, but not with the extent of synovitis in this chronic model. Next, we observed a significant improvement of functional impairment upon blocking TNF, even at progressed stages of disease. However, blocking TNF did not restore full functionality owing to remaining subclinical inflammation and structural microdamage. In conclusion, CatWalk gait analysis provides a useful tool for quantitative

  11. Physical activity, immune function and inflammation in kidney patients (the PINK study): a feasibility trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highton, Patrick James; Neale, Jill; Wilkinson, Thomas J; Bishop, Nicolette C; Smith, Alice C

    2017-05-29

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) display increased infection-related mortality and elevated cardiovascular risk only partly attributed to traditional risk factors. Patients with CKD also exhibit a pro-inflammatory environment and impaired immune function. Aerobic exercise has the potential to positively impact these detriments, but is under-researched in this patient population. This feasibility study will investigate the effects of acute aerobic exercise on inflammation and immune function in patients with CKD to inform the design of larger studies intended to ultimately influence current exercise recommendations. Patients with CKD, including renal transplant recipients, will visit the laboratory on two occasions, both preceded by appropriate exercise, alcohol and caffeine restrictions. On visit 1, baseline assessments will be completed, comprising anthropometrics, body composition, cardiovascular function and fatigue and leisure time exercise questionnaires. Participants will then undertake an incremental shuttle walk test to estimate predicted peak O 2 consumption (VO 2 peak). On visit 2, participants will complete a 20 min shuttle walk at a constant speed to achieve 85% estimated VO 2 peak. Blood and saliva samples will be taken before, immediately after and 1 hour after this exercise bout. Muscle O 2 saturation will be monitored throughout exercise and recovery. Age and sex-matched non-CKD 'healthy control' participants will complete an identical protocol. Blood and saliva samples will be analysed for markers of inflammation and immune function, using cytometric bead array and flow cytometry techniques. Appropriate statistical tests will be used to analyse the data. A favourable opinion was granted by the East Midlands-Derby Research Ethics Committee on 18 September 2015 (ref 15/EM/0391), and the study was approved and sponsored by University Hospitals of Leicester Research and Innovation (ref 11444). The study was registered with ISRCTN (ref

  12. Functional properties of proteins isolated from industrially produced sunflower meal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petia Ivanova

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein isolate 1 (PI1 and protein isolate 2 (PI2 were prepared from industrially produced sunflower meal by using isoelectric and ethanol precipitation respectively. The water absorption capacity of PI1 was 6 times higher than that of PI2 and was significantly reduced by the presence of 0.03 M and 0.25 M NaCl. Oil absorption capacity of both protein isolates was not influenced by NaCl supplementation. Foam capacity of PI1 and PI2 was pH-dependent. While the foam capacity of both isolates was improved by either 0.03 M or 0.25 M NaCl, the foam stability was negatively influenced by the addition of NaCl at all pH values with except for pH 4. Emulsifying activity of PI1 and PI2 was lowest at pH 4. The emulsions exhibited relatively high stability (> 90% under all studied conditions. Knowledge of the influence of pH and boundary concentrations of NaCl on the functionality of sunflower meal protein isolates could be beneficial for their future potential application in food industry.

  13. Inflammation, Immunity, and Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agita, Arisya; Alsagaff, M Thaha

    2017-04-01

    The immune system, inflammation and hypertension are related to each other. Innate and adaptive immunity system triggers an inflammatory process, in which blood pressure may increase, stimulating organ damage. Cells in innate immune system produce ROS, such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, which aimed at killing pathogens. Long-term inflammation process increases ROS production, causing oxidative stress which leads to endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial function is to regulate blood vessel tone and structure. When inflammation lasts, NO bioavailability decreases, disrupting its main function as vasodilator, so that blood vessels relaxation and vasodilatation are absent. Effector T cells and regulatory lymphocytes, part of the adaptive immune system, plays role in blood vessels constriction in hypertension. Signals from central nervous system and APC activates effector T lymphocyte differentiation and accelerate through Th-1 and Th-17 phenotypes. Th-1 and Th-17 effectors participate in inflammation which leads to increased blood pressure. One part of CD4+ is the regulatory T cells (Tregs) that suppress immune response activation as they produce immunosuppressive cytokines, such as TGF-β and IL-10. Adoptive transfer of Tregs cells can reduce oxidative stress in blood vessels, endothelial dysfunction, infiltration of aortic macrophages and T cells as well as proinflammatory cytokine levels in plasma circulation.

  14. Inflammation, Immunity, and Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arisya Agita

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The immune system, inflammation and hypertension are related to each other. Innate and adaptive immunity system triggers an inflammatory process, in which blood pressure may increase, stimulating organ damage. Cells in innate immune system produce ROS, such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, which aimed at killing pathogens. Long-term inflammation process increases ROS production, causing oxidative stress which leads to endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial function is to regulate blood vessel tone and structure. When inflammation lasts, NO bioavailability decreases, disrupting its main function as vasodilator, so that blood vessels relaxation and vasodilatation are absent. Effector T cells and regulatory lymphocytes, part of the adaptive immune system, plays role in blood vessels constriction in hypertension. Signals from central nervous system and APC activates effector T lymphocyte differentiation and accelerate through Th-1 and Th-17 phenotypes. Th-1 and Th-17 effectors participate in inflammation which leads to increased blood pressure. One part of CD4+ is the regulatory T cells (Tregs that suppress immune response activation as they produce immunosuppressive cytokines, such as TGF-β and IL-10. Adoptive transfer of Tregs cells can reduce oxidative stress in blood vessels, endothelial dysfunction, infiltration of aortic macrophages and T cells as well as proinflammatory cytokine levels in plasma circulation.

  15. Lung inflammation biomarkers and lung function in children chronically exposed to arsenic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivas-Calderón, Edgar, E-mail: edgar_olivascalderon@hotmail.com [Department of Environmental Health, Biomedical Research Center, School of Medicine, University of Coahuila, Torreon, Coahuila (Mexico); School of Medicine, University Juarez of Durango, Gomez Palacio, Durango (Mexico); Recio-Vega, Rogelio, E-mail: rrecio@yahoo.com [Department of Environmental Health, Biomedical Research Center, School of Medicine, University of Coahuila, Torreon, Coahuila (Mexico); Gandolfi, A. Jay, E-mail: gandolfi@pharmacy.arizona.edu [Southwest Environmental Health Science Center, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Lantz, R. Clark, E-mail: lantz@email.arizona.edu [Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); González-Cortes, Tania, E-mail: taniagc2201@hotmail.com [Department of Environmental Health, Biomedical Research Center, School of Medicine, University of Coahuila, Torreon, Coahuila (Mexico); Gonzalez-De Alba, Cesar, E-mail: cesargonzalezalba@hotmail.com [Department of Environmental Health, Biomedical Research Center, School of Medicine, University of Coahuila, Torreon, Coahuila (Mexico); Froines, John R., E-mail: jfroines@ucla.edu [Center for Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Espinosa-Fematt, Jorge A., E-mail: dr.jorge.espinosa@gmail.com [School of Medicine, University Juarez of Durango, Gomez Palacio, Durango (Mexico)

    2015-09-01

    Evidence suggests that exposure to arsenic in drinking water during early childhood or in utero has been associated with an increase in respiratory symptoms or diseases in the adulthood, however only a few studies have been carried out during those sensitive windows of exposure. Recently our group demonstrated that the exposure to arsenic during early childhood or in utero in children was associated with impairment in the lung function and suggested that this adverse effect could be due to a chronic inflammation response to the metalloid. Therefore, we designed this cross-sectional study in a cohort of children associating lung inflammatory biomarkers and lung function with urinary As levels. A total of 275 healthy children were partitioned into four study groups according with their arsenic urinary levels. Inflammation biomarkers were measured in sputum by ELISA and the lung function was evaluated by spirometry. Fifty eight percent of the studied children were found to have a restrictive spirometric pattern. In the two highest exposed groups, the soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products' (sRAGE) sputum level was significantly lower and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) concentration was higher. When the biomarkers were correlated to the urinary arsenic species, negative associations were found between dimethylarsinic (DMA), monomethylarsonic percentage (%MMA) and dimethylarsinic percentage (%DMA) with sRAGE and positive associations between %DMA with MMP-9 and with the MMP-9/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1) ratio. In conclusion, chronic arsenic exposure of children negatively correlates with sRAGE, and positively correlated with MMP-9 and MMP-9/TIMP-1 levels, and increases the frequency of an abnormal spirometric pattern. Arsenic-induced alterations in inflammatory biomarkers may contribute to the development of restrictive lung diseases. - Highlights: • First study in children evaluating lung inflammatory biomarkers and As levels

  16. Mast cell adenosine receptors function: a focus on the A3 adenosine receptor and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noam eRudich

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine is a metabolite, which has long been implicated in a variety of inflammatory processes. Inhaled adenosine provokes bronchoconstriction in asthmatics or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients, but not in non-asthmatics. This hyper responsiveness to adenosine appears to be mediated by mast cell activation. These observations have marked the receptor that mediates the bronchoconstrictor effect of adenosine on mast cells, as an attractive drug candidate. Four subtypes (A1, A2a, A2b and A3 of adenosine receptors have been cloned and shown to display distinct tissue distributions and functions. Animal models have firmly established the ultimate role of the A3 adenosine receptor (A3R in mediating hyper responsiveness to adenosine in mast cells, although the influence of the A2b adenosine receptor was confirmed as well. In contrast, studies of the A3R in humans have been controversial. In this review, we summarize data on the role of different adenosine receptors in mast cell regulation of inflammation and pathology, with a focus on the common and distinct functions of the A3R in rodent and human mast cells. The relevance of mouse studies to the human is discussed.

  17. Balanced Hydroxyethylstarch (HES 130/0.4 Impairs Kidney Function In-Vivo without Inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Alexander Schick

    Full Text Available Volume therapy is a standard procedure in daily perioperative care, and there is an ongoing discussion about the benefits of colloid resuscitation with hydroxyethylstarch (HES. In sepsis HES should be avoided due to a higher risk for acute kidney injury (AKI. Results of the usage of HES in patients without sepsis are controversial. Therefore we conducted an animal study to evaluate the impact of 6% HES 130/0.4 on kidney integrity with sepsis or under healthy conditions Sepsis was induced by standardized Colon Ascendens Stent Peritonitis (sCASP. sCASP-group as well as control group (C remained untreated for 24 h. After 18 h sCASP+HES group (sCASP+VOL and control+HES (C+VOL received 50 ml/KG balanced 6% HES (VOL 130/0.4 over 6 h. After 24 h kidney function was measured via Inulin- and PAH-Clearance in re-anesthetized rats, and serum urea, creatinine (crea, cystatin C and Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL as well as histopathology were analysed. In vitro human proximal tubule cells (PTC were cultured +/- lipopolysaccharid (LPS and with 0.1-4.0% VOL. Cell viability was measured with XTT-, cell toxicity with LDH-test. sCASP induced severe septic AKI demonstrated divergent results regarding renal function by clearance or creatinine measure focusing on VOL. Soleley HES (C+VOL deteriorated renal function without sCASP. Histopathology revealed significantly derangements in all HES groups compared to control. In vitro LPS did not worsen the HES induced reduction of cell viability in PTC cells. For the first time, we demonstrated, that application of 50 ml/KG 6% HES 130/0.4 over 6 hours induced AKI without inflammation in vivo. Severity of sCASP induced septic AKI might be no longer susceptible to the way of volume expansion.

  18. Grip strength in mice with joint inflammation: A rheumatology function test sensitive to pain and analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montilla-García, Ángeles; Tejada, Miguel Á; Perazzoli, Gloria; Entrena, José M; Portillo-Salido, Enrique; Fernández-Segura, Eduardo; Cañizares, Francisco J; Cobos, Enrique J

    2017-10-01

    Grip strength deficit is a measure of pain-induced functional disability in rheumatic disease. We tested whether this parameter and tactile allodynia, the standard pain measure in preclinical studies, show parallels in their response to analgesics and basic mechanisms. Mice with periarticular injections of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in the ankles showed periarticular immune infiltration and synovial membrane alterations, together with pronounced grip strength deficits and tactile allodynia measured with von Frey hairs. However, inflammation-induced tactile allodynia lasted longer than grip strength alterations, and therefore did not drive the functional deficits. Oral administration of the opioid drugs oxycodone (1-8 mg/kg) and tramadol (10-80 mg/kg) induced a better recovery of grip strength than acetaminophen (40-320 mg/kg) or the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs ibuprofen (10-80 mg/kg) or celecoxib (40-160 mg/kg); these results are consistent with their analgesic efficacy in humans. Functional impairment was generally a more sensitive indicator of drug-induced analgesia than tactile allodynia, as drug doses that attenuated grip strength deficits showed little or no effect on von Frey thresholds. Finally, ruthenium red (a nonselective TRP antagonist) or the in vivo ablation of TRPV1-expressing neurons with resiniferatoxin abolished tactile allodynia without altering grip strength deficits, indicating that the neurobiology of tactile allodynia and grip strength deficits differ. In conclusion, grip strength deficits are due to a distinct type of pain that reflects an important aspect of the human pain experience, and therefore merits further exploration in preclinical studies to improve the translation of new analgesics from bench to bedside. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of Statin Treatment on Inflammation and Cardiac Function in Heart Failure: An Adjusted Indirect Comparison Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsu, Kwadwo Osei; Reidpath, Daniel Diamond; Kadirvelu, Amudha

    2015-12-01

    Statins are known to prevent heart failure (HF). However, it is unclear whether statins as class or type (lipophilic or hydrophilic) improve outcomes of established HF. The current meta-analysis was performed to compare the treatment effects of lipophilic and hydrophilic statins on inflammation and cardiac function in HF. Outcomes were indicators of cardiac function [changes in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP)] and inflammation [changes in highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and interluekin-6 (IL-6)]. We conducted a search of PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane databases until December 31, 2014 for randomized control trials (RCTs) of statin versus placebo in patients with HF. RCTs with their respective extracted information were dichotomized into statin type evaluated and analyzed separately. Outcomes were pooled with random effect approach, producing standardized mean differences (SMD) for each statin type. Using these pooled estimates, we performed adjusted indirect comparisons for each outcome. Data from 6214 patients from 19 trials were analyzed. Lipophilic statin was superior to hydrophilic statin treatment regarding follow-up LVEF (SMD, 4.54; 95% CI, 4.16-4.91; P statin produces greater treatment effects on cardiac function and inflammation compared with hydrophilic statin in patients with HF. Until data from adequately powered head-to-head trial of the statin types are available, our meta-analysis brings clinicians and researchers a step closer to the quest on which statin--lipophilic or hydrophilic--is associated with better outcomes in HF. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Exercise protects from cancer through regulation of immune function and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojman, Pernille

    2017-08-15

    Exercise training has been extensively studied in cancer settings as part of prevention or rehabilitation strategies, yet emerging evidence suggests that exercise training can also directly affect tumor-specific outcomes. The underlying mechanisms for this exercise-dependent cancer protection are just starting to be elucidated. To this end, evasion of immune surveillance and tumor-associated inflammation are established as hallmarks of cancer, and exercise may target cancer incidence and progression through regulation of these mechanisms. Here, I review the role of exercise in protection from cancer through mobilization and activation of cytotoxic immune cells, restriction of inflammatory signaling pathways in myeloid immune cells, and regulation of acute and chronic systemic inflammatory responses. In conclusion, I propose that exercise has the potential to target tumor growth through regulation of immune and inflammatory functions, and exercise may be pursued as anticancer treatment through incorporation into standard oncological therapy to the benefit of the cancer patients. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  1. Chemokines: structure, receptors and functions. A new target for inflammation and asthma therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. A. van Acker

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Five to 10% of the human population have a disorder of the respiratory tract called ‘asthma’. It has been known as a potentially dangerous disease for over 2000 years, as it was already described by Hippocrates and recognized as a disease entity by Egyptian and Hebrew physicians. At the beginning of this decade, there has been a fundamental change in asthma management. The emphasis has shifted from symptom relief with bronchodilator therapies (e.g. β2-agonists to a much earlier introduction of anti-inflammatory treatment (e.g. corticosteroids. Asthma is now recognized to be a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways, involving various inflammatory cells and their mediators. Although asthma has been the subject of many investigations, the exact role of the different inflammatory cells has not been elucidated completely. Many suggestions have been made and several cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma, such as the eosinophils, the mast cells, the basophils and the lymphocytes. To date, however, the relative importance of these cells is not completely understood. The cell type predominantly found in the asthmatic lung is the eosinophil and the recruitment of these eosinophils can be seen as a characteristic of asthma. In recent years much attention is given to the role of the newly identified chemokines in asthma pathology. Chemokines are structurally and functionally related 8–10 kDa peptides that are the products of distinct genes clustered on human chromosomes 4 and 17 and can be found at sites of inflammation. They form a superfamily of proinflammatory mediators that promote the recruitment of various kinds of leukocytes and lymphocytes. The chemokine superfamily can be divided into three subgroups based on overall sequence homology. Although the chemokines have highly conserved amino acid sequences, each of the chemokines binds to and induces the chemotaxis of particular classes of white blood cells. Certain

  2. Persisting Inflammation and Chronic Immune Activation but Intact Cognitive Function in HIV-Infected Patients After Long-Term Treatment With Combination Antiretroviral Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karin K; Pedersen, Maria; Gaardbo, Julie C

    2013-01-01

    Impaired cognitive function in HIV-infected patients has been suggested. Treatment with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) restores CD4⁺ cell counts and suppresses viral replication, but immune activation and inflammation may persist. The aim of the study was to examine if cognitive function...... in HIV-infected patients was related to immune activation and inflammation....

  3. Airway function and markers of airway inflammation in patients with treated hypothyroidism

    OpenAIRE

    Birring, S; Patel, R; Parker, D; Mckenna, S; Hargadon, B; Monteiro, W; Falconer, S; Pavord, I

    2005-01-01

    Background: There is increasing evidence of an association between organ specific autoimmune diseases, particularly autoimmune thyroid disease and respiratory morbidity. A study was undertaken to determine whether patients with autoimmune thyroid disease have objective evidence of airway inflammation and dysfunction.

  4. Early sepsis does not stimulate reactive oxygen species production and does not reduce cardiac function despite an increased inflammation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, Thibault; Charrier, Alice; Moreau, Clarisse; Hininger-Favier, Isabelle; Mourmoura, Evangelia; Rigaudière, Jean-Paul; Pitois, Elodie; Bouvier, Damien; Sapin, Vincent; Pereira, Bruno; Azarnoush, Kasra; Demaison, Luc

    2017-07-01

    If it is sustained for several days, sepsis can trigger severe abnormalities of cardiac function which leads to death in 50% of cases. This probably occurs through activation of toll-like receptor-9 by bacterial lipopolysaccharides and overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF- α and IL-1 β In contrast, early sepsis is characterized by the development of tachycardia. This study aimed at determining the early changes in the cardiac function during sepsis and at finding the mechanism responsible for the observed changes. Sixty male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to two groups, the first one being made septic by cecal ligation and puncture (sepsis group) and the second one being subjected to the same surgery without cecal ligation and puncture (sham-operated group). The cardiac function was assessed in vivo and ex vivo in standard conditions. Several parameters involved in the oxidative stress and inflammation were determined in the plasma and heart. As evidenced by the plasma level of TNF- α and gene expression of IL-1 β and TNF- α in the heart, inflammation was developed in the sepsis group. The cardiac function was also slightly stimulated by sepsis in the in vivo and ex vivo situations. This was associated with unchanged levels of oxidative stress, but several parameters indicated a lower cardiac production of reactive oxygen species in the septic group. In conclusion, despite the development of inflammation, early sepsis did not increase reactive oxygen species production and did not reduce myocardial function. The depressant effect of TNF- α and IL-1 β on the cardiac function is known to occur at very high concentrations. The influence of low- to moderate-grade inflammation on the myocardial mechanical behavior must thus be revisited. © 2017 French National Institute of Agronomical Research (INRA). Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  5. Admixture mapping in lupus identifies multiple functional variants within IFIH1 associated with apoptosis, inflammation, and autoantibody production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio E Molineros

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an inflammatory autoimmune disease with a strong genetic component. African-Americans (AA are at increased risk of SLE, but the genetic basis of this risk is largely unknown. To identify causal variants in SLE loci in AA, we performed admixture mapping followed by fine mapping in AA and European-Americans (EA. Through genome-wide admixture mapping in AA, we identified a strong SLE susceptibility locus at 2q22-24 (LOD=6.28, and the admixture signal is associated with the European ancestry (ancestry risk ratio ~1.5. Large-scale genotypic analysis on 19,726 individuals of African and European ancestry revealed three independently associated variants in the IFIH1 gene: an intronic variant, rs13023380 [P(meta = 5.20×10(-14; odds ratio, 95% confidence interval = 0.82 (0.78-0.87], and two missense variants, rs1990760 (Ala946Thr [P(meta = 3.08×10(-7; 0.88 (0.84-0.93] and rs10930046 (Arg460His [P(dom = 1.16×10(-8; 0.70 (0.62-0.79]. Both missense variants produced dramatic phenotypic changes in apoptosis and inflammation-related gene expression. We experimentally validated function of the intronic SNP by DNA electrophoresis, protein identification, and in vitro protein binding assays. DNA carrying the intronic risk allele rs13023380 showed reduced binding efficiency to a cellular protein complex including nucleolin and lupus autoantigen Ku70/80, and showed reduced transcriptional activity in vivo. Thus, in SLE patients, genetic susceptibility could create a biochemical imbalance that dysregulates nucleolin, Ku70/80, or other nucleic acid regulatory proteins. This could promote antibody hypermutation and auto-antibody generation, further destabilizing the cellular network. Together with molecular modeling, our results establish a distinct role for IFIH1 in apoptosis, inflammation, and autoantibody production, and explain the molecular basis of these three risk alleles for SLE pathogenesis.

  6. Acute coronary syndrome and acute kidney injury: role of inflammation in worsening renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Hernández, Jorge; Springall, Rashidi; Sánchez-Muñoz, Fausto; Arana-Martinez, Julio-C; González-Pacheco, Héctor; Bojalil, Rafael

    2017-07-26

    , Na + , K + , WBC, age, body mass index, GRACE, SBP, mean-BP and Hb. Inflammation and its components play an important role in the worsening of renal function in ACS. IL-10, ET-1, IL-1β, TnI, RvD1 and LxA4 represent mediators that might be associated with ACS-AKI. IL-6, ET-1, NT-ProBNP might represent crossroads for several physiopathological pathways involved in "de novo cardiac injury leading to de novo kidney injury".

  7. Associations between the degree of early lactation inflammation and performance, metabolism, and immune function in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, M M; Yasui, T; Felippe, M J B; Overton, T R

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to determine associations between the severity of systemic inflammation during the early postpartum period and performance, energy metabolism, and immune function in dairy cows. Cows were assigned to categorical quartiles (Q; Q1=0.18-0.59, Q2=0.60-1.14, Q3=1.15-2.05, and Q4=2.06-2.50 g of haptoglobin/L) based on the highest plasma haptoglobin (Hp) concentration measured during wk 1 postpartum. Although cows were assigned to different categories of inflammation during the postpartum period, we detected a quadratic relationship of inflammation on prepartum dry matter intake (DMI) and body weight (BW) such that cows in Q2 had lower prepartum DMI and cows in Q2 and Q3 had lower prepartum BW compared with cows in the other quartiles. We also detected a quadratic association of inflammation with postpartum DMI and BW such that cows in Q2 and Q3 also had generally lower postpartum DMI and BW compared with cows in Q1. There was a tendency for a Q × time interaction for milk yield and Q × time interactions for 3.5% fat-corrected milk and energy-corrected milk yields; quadratic relationships suggested decreased milk yield for Q2 and Q3 cows. We also found Q × parity and Q × time interactions for plasma glucose and insulin concentrations, suggesting alterations with differing degrees of inflammation. There was also a Q × time interaction for plasma nonesterified fatty acids concentration. In addition, alterations in liver triglyceride and glycogen contents for cows with inflammation as well as alterations in [1-(14)C]propionate oxidation in vitro were observed. Although we observed limited effects of inflammation on neutrophil and monocyte phagocytosis at d 7 postpartum, inflammation appeared to alter neutrophil and monocyte oxidative burst. Overall, cows with any degree of elevated haptoglobin in the first week after calving had alterations in both pre- and postpartum intake and postpartum metabolism. Copyright © 2016 American

  8. Inflammation, insulin signaling and cognitive function in aged APP/PS1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denver, Paul; English, Andrew; McClean, Paula L

    2018-03-28

    Cognitive dysfunction and neuroinflammation are typical in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but are also associated with normal aging, albeit less severely. Insulin resistance in the brain has been demonstrated in AD patients and is thought to be involved in AD pathophysiology. Using 15-18 month-old APP/PS1 mice, this study measured peripheral and central insulin signaling and sensitivity, inflammatory markers in brain and plasma and oxidative stress and synapse density in the brain. Novel object recognition, Morris water maze and reversal water maze tasks were performed to assess cognitive function in aged APP/PS1 mice and wild type littermates. Glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were similar in APP/PS1 mice and wild type controls, however IRS-1 pSer 616 was increased in cortex and dentate gyrus of APP/PS1 mice. Recognition and spatial memory was impaired in both APP/PS1 and wild type mice, however learning impairments were apparent in APP/PS1 mice. Expression of GLP-1 receptor, ERK2, IKKβ, mTOR, PKCθ, NF-κB1 and TLR4 was similar between aged APP/PS1 mice and age-matched wild types. Compared to age-matched wild type mice, IFNγ and IL-4 were increased in brains of APP/PS1 mice. These results suggest that normal aging may be associated with enhanced neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and cognitive decline, however distinctions are apparent in the brain of APP/PS1 mice in terms of inflammation and insulin signaling and in certain cognitive domains. Demarcation of pathological events that distinguish AD from normal aging will allow for improvements in diagnostic tools and the development of more effective therapeutics. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Effects of personal air pollution exposure on asthma symptoms, lung function and airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, L; Finch, J; Edwards, K; Jeanjean, A; Leigh, R; Gonem, S

    2018-03-11

    There is evidence that air pollution increases the risk of asthma hospitalizations and healthcare utilization, but the effects on day-to-day asthma control are not fully understood. We undertook a prospective single-centre panel study to test the hypothesis that personal air pollution exposure is associated with asthma symptoms, lung function and airway inflammation. Thirty-two patients with a clinical diagnosis of asthma were provided with a personal air pollution monitor (Cairclip NO 2 /O 3 ) which was kept on or around their person throughout the 12-week follow-up period. Ambient levels of NO 2 and particulate matter were modelled based upon satellite imaging data. Directly measured ozone, NO 2 and particulate matter levels were obtained from a monitoring station in central Leicester. Participants made daily electronic records of asthma symptoms, peak expiratory flow and exhaled nitric oxide. Spirometry and asthma symptom questionnaires were completed at fortnightly study visits. Data were analysed using linear mixed effects models and cross-correlation. Cairclip exposure data were of good quality with clear evidence of diurnal variability and a missing data rate of approximately 20%. We were unable to detect consistent relationships between personal air pollution exposure and clinical outcomes in the group as a whole. In an exploratory subgroup analysis, total oxidant exposure was associated with increased daytime symptoms in women but not men. We did not find compelling evidence that air pollution exposure impacts on day-to-day clinical control in an unselected asthma population, but further studies are required in larger populations with higher exposure levels. Women may be more susceptible than men to the effects of air pollution, an observation which requires confirmation in future studies. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Local and Systemic Inflammation May Mediate Diesel Engine Exhaust-Induced Lung Function Impairment in a Chinese Occupational Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haitao; Duan, Huawei; Meng, Tao; Yang, Mo; Cui, Lianhua; Bin, Ping; Dai, Yufei; Niu, Yong; Shen, Meili; Zhang, Liping; Zheng, Yuxin; Leng, Shuguang

    2018-04-01

    Diesel exhaust (DE) as the major source of vehicle-emitted particle matter in ambient air impairs lung function. The objectives were to assess the contribution of local (eg, the fraction of exhaled nitric oxide [FeNO] and serum Club cell secretory protein [CC16]) and systemic (eg, serum C-reaction protein [CRP] and interleukin-6 [IL-6]) inflammation to DE-induced lung function impairment using a unique cohort of diesel engine testers (DETs, n = 137) and non-DETs (n = 127), made up of current and noncurrent smokers. Urinary metabolites, FeNO, serum markers, and spirometry were assessed. A 19% reduction in CC16 and a 94% increase in CRP were identified in DETs compared with non-DETs (all p values regulatory risk assessment. Local and systemic inflammation may be key processes that contribute to the subsequent development of obstructive lung disease in DE-exposed populations.

  11. Detrusor myocyte autophagy protects the bladder function via inhibiting the inflammation in cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Zhao

    Full Text Available Autophagy, a highly conserved homeostatic cellular process that removes and recycles damaged proteins and organelles in response to cellular stress, is believed to play a crucial role in the immune response and inflammation. The role of autophagy in bladder cystitis, however, has not well been clarified. Here we investigate the role of detrusor myocytes autophagy (DMA in cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis animal model. 164 female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into three experimental groups and compared to three control groups, respectively. The expressions of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3, p-p70s6k (the phosphorylated form of ribosomal protein S6, SOD2 (superoxide dismutase 2 in the bladder muscular layer were measured using western blot. The co-location of LC3, alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA, and autophagic vacuoles were investigated with double-labeled immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The expression of lL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, malondialdehyde (MDA, and glutathione (GSH in the detrusor layer were analyzed using ELISA. The bladder inflammation and the number of mast cells in the muscular layer were analyzed by histology. The bladder function was evaluated using cystometry. In cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis, autophagy was detected in detrusor myocytes by increased LC3, p-p70s6k expression, and autophagosomes. However, the presence of enhanced inflammation and oxidative stress in the cyclophosphamide-treated group suggest autophagy of detrusor myocytes may not be sufficiently activated. Inflammation and oxidative stress were significantly decreased and the bladder histology and micturition function were significantly improved with rapamycin (RAPA, autophagy agonist pre-treatment. In contrast, inflammation and oxidative stress were dramatically increased and the bladder histology and function were negatively affected with chloroquine (CQ, autophagy blocker pre-treated. These findings

  12. Effect of teriparatide treatment on endothelial function, glucose metabolism and inflammation markers in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celer, Ozgen; Akalın, Aysen; Oztunali, Cigdem

    2016-10-01

    Teriparatide, an anabolic agent used in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis, can induce effects similar to primary hyperparathyroidism. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of teriparatide on endothelial functions, glucose metabolism and inflammation markers in patients diagnosed with postmenopausal osteoporosis. This was a single-centre, single-arm, 6-month prospective study. Twenty-three postmenopausal women over 65 years old with a lumbar spine or femoral neck T-score of -4·0 or lower and having at least two compression fractures in thoracic or lumbar spine were studied. Low-dose intermittent teriparatide (20 μg/day) was supplemented with calcium carbonate (1000 mg elemental calcium) and 880 IU cholecalciferol for 6 months. The biochemical parameters for glucose metabolism, inflammation and atherosclerosis were determined. For the assessment of vascular endothelial function, carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), brachial artery intima-media thickness (BIMT), per cent change in flow-mediated dilation (FMD%) and nitroglycerine-induced dilations (NID%) were measured on ultrasonography. The fasting plasma glucose, homoeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, fibrinogen, homocysteine and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased significantly with teriparatide treatment (P teriparatide treatment (P > 0·05); however, FMD% and NID% showed significant decrease after treatment (P teriparatide treatment may adversely affect some parameters of glucose metabolism, inflammation and endothelial function. On the basis of our findings, further large-scale and controlled studies are needed to clarify the exact effect of teriparatide treatment on glucose metabolism, inflammation and endothelial function. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. How inflammation underlies physical and organ function in acutely admitted older medical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Henrik Hedegaard; Bodilsen, Ann Christine; Petersen, Janne

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether systemic inflammation in acutely admitted older medical patients (age >65 years) is associated with physical performance and organ dysfunction. Organ dysfunction´s association with physical performance, and whether these associations are mediated by systemic...... inflammation, was also investigated. METHODS: A cross-sectional study in an Emergency Department. Physical performance was assessed by handgrip strength and de Morton Mobility Index (DEMMI), and organ dysfunction by FI-OutRef, the number of standard blood tests outside the reference range. Systemic...... inflammation was assessed by suPAR, TNFα, and IL-6. Associations were investigated by regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, cognitive impairment, CRP, and VitalPAC Modified Early Warning Score. RESULTS: A total of 369 patients were evaluated. In adjusted analyses, suPAR and TNFα was associated with both...

  14. Systemic inflammation alters satellite glial cell function and structure. A possible contribution to pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, E; Procacci, P; Conte, V; Hanani, M

    2014-08-22

    Local peripheral injury activates satellite glial cells (SGCs) in sensory ganglia, which may contribute to chronic pain. We hypothesized that systemic inflammation affects sensory ganglia like local injury. We induced systemic inflammation in mice by injecting lipopolysaccharide (LPS) intraperitoneally, and characterized SGCs and neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG), using dye injection, calcium imaging, electron microscopy (EM), immunohistochemistry, and electrical recordings. Several days post-LPS, SGCs were activated, and dye coupling among SGCs increased 3-4.5-fold. EM showed abnormal growth of SGC processes and the formation of new gap junctions. Sensitivity of SGCs to ATP increased twofold, and neuronal excitability was augmented. Blocking gap junctions reduced pain behavior in LPS-treated mice. Thus, changes in DRG due to systemic inflammation are similar to those due to local injury, which may explain the pain in sickness behavior and in other systemic diseases. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of salbutamol combined with ulinastatin on respiratory function, inflammation and oxidative stress in COPD patients with laparoscopic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei He

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the effects salbutamol combined with ulinastatin on respiratory function, inflammation and oxidative stress in COPD patients with laparoscopic surgery. Methods: A total of 76 cases of COPD patients were brought into the study. They were randomly divided into observation group (n=38 who accepted salbutamol combined with ulinastatin treatment and the control group (n=38 who accepted single salbutamol treatment. All patients’ respiratory function and inflammation levels and different levels of oxidative stress were tested. Results: After the treatment, the observation group patients’ in-surgery SpO2 and Compl levels were higher than the control group’s, while PETCO2, Paw and Raw levels were lower than those of the control group. The in-surgery AAT, ESR, NPT, AAG and SAA levels of the observation group patients were significantly lower than those of the control group. After the treatment, the observation group patients’ in-surgery GR, CAT, GPX1 and TXNL1 levels were higher than the control group’s, while LOX-1 level was lower than that of the control group. Conclusions: COPD patients receiving salbutamol combined with ulinastatin treatment can significantly improve the respiratory function in surgery, and reduce systemic inflammation and oxidative stress.

  16. PTX3 in small-vessel vasculitides: an independent indicator of disease activity produced at sites of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzini, F; Peri, G; Doni, A; Dell'Antonio, G; Dal Cin, E; Bozzolo, E; D'Auria, F; Praderio, L; Ciboddo, G; Sabbadini, M G; Manfredi, A A; Mantovani, A; Querini, P R

    2001-12-01

    To verify whether the prototypical long pentraxin PTX3 represents an indicator of the activity of small-vessel vasculitis. Concentrations of PTX3, a pentraxin induced in endothelium by cytokines, were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in the sera of 43 patients with Churg-Strauss syndrome, Wegener's granulomatosis, and microscopic polyangiitis. PTX3 was also measured in the sera of 28 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 22 with rheumatoid arthritis, and 16 with CREST syndrome (calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, telangiectasias). Serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured by immunoturbidimetry. The cells involved in PTX3 production in vivo were identified in skin biopsy samples. Patients with active vasculitis had significantly higher concentrations of PTX3 than did those with quiescent disease (P < 0.001). PTX3 levels in the latter group were similar to those in healthy controls. PTX3 levels were higher in patients with untreated vasculitis and lower in patients who underwent immunosuppressive treatments (P < 0.005). In contrast, patients with active SLE had negligible levels of the pentraxin. PTX3 levels did not correlate with CRP levels in vasculitis patients. Endothelial cells produced PTX3 in active skin lesions. PTX3 represents a novel acute-phase reactant produced at sites of active vasculitis.

  17. Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes Produced by APCVD using Camphor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Mahdizadeh Moghaddam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple chemical vapor deposition technique at atmospheric pressure (APCVD is adopted to synthesize the aligned arrays of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (AMWCNTs without using any carrier gas, at 230◦C, 750◦C and 850 ◦C. Camphor (C10H16O is used as carbon source because this botanical hydrocarbon is chip and abundant which convert the CVD technique to a green method for production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs. The oxygen atoms in camphor oxidize the amorphous carbons and create hydroxyl functional groups in AMWCNTs. The molecular structure of camphor lead to form hexagonal and pentagonal carbon rings which increase the growth rate and alignment of MWCNTs. In this work, AMWCNTs are grown on silicon substrate, copper, and quartz. The synthesized AMWCNTs are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The SEM results show that the deposited CNTs are formed in vertical aligned arrays and each has a functional OH group which is seen in FTIR spectroscopy results.

  18. Producing Conditional Mutants for Studying Plant Microtubule Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Cyr

    2009-09-29

    The cytoskeleton, and in particular its microtubule component, participates in several processes that directly affect growth and development in higher plants. Normal cytoskeletal function requires the precise and orderly arrangement of microtubules into several cell cycle and developmentally specific arrays. One of these, the cortical array, is notable for its role in directing the deposition of cellulose (the most prominent polymer in the biosphere). An understanding of how these arrays form, and the molecular interactions that contribute to their function, is incomplete. To gain a better understanding of how microtubules work, we have been working to characterize mutants in critical cytoskeletal genes. This characterization is being carried out at the subcellular level using vital microtubule gene constructs. In the last year of funding colleagues have discovered that gamma-tubulin complexes form along the lengths of cortical microtubules where they act to spawn new microtubules at a characteristic 40 deg angle. This finding complements nicely the finding from our lab (which was funded by the DOE) showing that microtubule encounters are angle dependent; high angles encounters results in catastrophic collisions while low angle encounters result in favorable zippering. The finding of a 40 deg spawn of new microtubules from extant microtubule, together with aforementioned rules of encounters, insures favorable co-alignment in the array. I was invited to write a New and Views essay on this topic and a PDF is attached (News and Views policy does not permit funding acknowledgments and so I was not allowed to acknowledge support from the DOE).

  19. Bovine colostrum improves intestinal function following formula-induced gut inflammation in preterm pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støy, Ann Cathrine Findal; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Thymann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    , abundance and location of bacteria, and inflammation markers were investigated. Results NEC severity and interleukins (IL)-1β and -8 protein concentrations were lower, while villus height, galactose absorption, and brush-border enzyme activities were increased in the distal small intestine in COLOS...

  20. Tryptophan metabolism, its relation to inflammation and stress markers and association with psychological and cognitive functioning: Tasmanian Chronic Kidney Disease pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karu, Naama; McKercher, Charlotte; Nichols, David S; Davies, Noel; Shellie, Robert A; Hilder, Emily F; Jose, Matthew D

    2016-11-10

    Adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD) exhibit alterations in tryptophan metabolism, mainly via the kynurenine pathway, due to higher enzymatic activity induced mainly by inflammation. Indoles produced by gut-microflora are another group of tryptophan metabolites related to inflammation and conditions accompanying CKD. Disruptions in tryptophan metabolism have been associated with various neurological and psychological disorders. A high proportion of CKD patients self-report symptoms of depression and/or anxiety and decline in cognitive functioning. This pilot study examines tryptophan metabolism in CKD and explores associations with psychological and cognitive functioning. Twenty-seven adults with CKD were part of 49 patients recruited to participate in a prospective pilot study, initially with an eGFR of 15-29 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . Only participants with viable blood samples and complete psychological/cognitive data at a 2-year follow-up were included in the reported cross-sectional study. Serum samples were analysed by Liquid Chromatography coupled to Mass Spectrometry, for tryptophan, ten of its metabolites, the inflammation marker neopterin and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis marker cortisol. The tryptophan breakdown index (kynurenine / tryptophan) correlated with neopterin (Pearson R = 0.51 P = 0.006) but not with cortisol. Neopterin levels also correlated with indoxyl sulfate (R = 0.68, P tryptophan (R range 0.5-0.7, all P ≤ 0.01), which were all negatively related to eGFR (P tryptophan breakdown via the kynurenine pathway, yet without sparing tryptophan metabolism through the 5-HT (serotonin) pathway in CKD patients. The multiple moderate associations between indole-3 acetic acid and psychological measures were a novel finding. The presented pilot data necessitate further exploration of these associations within a large prospective cohort to assess the broader significance of these findings.

  1. Acute effects of different types of oil consumption on endothelial function, oxidative stress status and vascular inflammation in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tousoulis, Dimitris; Papageorgiou, Nikolaos; Antoniades, Charalambos; Giolis, Anastasios; Bouras, George; Gounari, Panagiota; Stefanadi, Elli; Miliou, Antigoni; Psaltopoulou, Theodora; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2010-01-01

    Consumption of different types of oil may have different effects on cardiovascular risk. The exact role of maize oil, cod liver oil, soya oil and extra virgin olive oil on endothelial function, oxidative stress and inflammation is unknown. We evaluated the effect of acute consumption of these types of oil on endothelial function, oxidative stress and inflammation in healthy adults. Thirty-seven healthy volunteers were randomised to receive an oral amount of each type of oil or water. Endothelial function was evaluated by gauge-strain plethysmography at baseline and 1, 2 and 3 h after consumption. Oxidative stress status was determined by total lipid peroxides (PEROX), while inflammatory process was estimated by measuring the soluble form of vascular adhesion molecule 1. Serum levels of the two previous markers were measured at baseline and 3 h after oil consumption. Reactive hyperaemia (RH) was significantly decreased after maize oil consumption compared with controls (P type of oil consumption on endothelium-independent dilatation, total lipid PEROX and vascular adhesion molecule 1 serum levels. Consumption of maize oil leads to impaired endothelial function, while soya oil and cod liver oil slightly improve endothelial function. However, all types of oils did not affect inflammatory process and systemic oxidative stress, suggesting that their effect on endothelial function may not be mediated by free radicals bioavailability.

  2. Hypoxia and Inactivity Related Physiological Changes (Constipation, Inflammation Are Not Reflected at the Level of Gut Metabolites and Butyrate Producing Microbial Community: The PlanHab Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Šket

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We explored the assembly of intestinal microbiota in healthy male participants during the run-in (5 day and experimental phases [21-day normoxic bed rest (NBR, hypoxic bedrest (HBR], and hypoxic ambulation (HAmb in a strictly controlled laboratory environment, balanced fluid, and dietary intakes, controlled circadian rhythm, microbial ambiental burden, and 24/7 medical surveillance. The fraction of inspired O2 (FiO2 and partial pressure of inspired O2 (PiO2 were 0.209 and 133.1 ± 0.3 mmHg for NBR and 0.141 ± 0.004 and 90.0 ± 0.4 mmHg for both hypoxic variants (HBR and HAmb; ~4,000 m simulated altitude, respectively. A number of parameters linked to intestinal transit spanning Bristol Stool Scale, defecation rates, zonulin, α1-antitrypsin, eosinophil derived neurotoxin, bile acids, reducing sugars, short chain fatty acids, total soluble organic carbon, water content, diet composition, and food intake were measured (167 variables. The abundance, structure, and diversity of butyrate producing microbial community were assessed using the two primary bacterial butyrate synthesis pathways, butyryl-CoA: acetate CoA-transferase (but and butyrate kinase (buk genes. Inactivity negatively affected fecal consistency and in combination with hypoxia aggravated the state of gut inflammation (p < 0.05. In contrast, gut permeability, various metabolic markers, the structure, diversity, and abundance of butyrate producing microbial community were not significantly affected. Rearrangements in the butyrate producing microbial community structure were explained by experimental setup (13.4%, experimentally structured metabolites (12.8%, and gut metabolite-immunological markers (11.9%, with 61.9% remaining unexplained. Many of the measured parameters were found to be correlated and were hence omitted from further analyses. The observed progressive increase in two immunological intestinal markers suggested that the transition from healthy physiological state toward

  3. [The reproductive function in experimentally-produced monozygotic twin bulls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, J; Schams, D; Brem, G

    1990-06-01

    Reproductive functions were evaluated in 12 experimentally derived monozygotic cattle twins (6 pairs). In 4 twin pairs GnRH (20 micrograms Receptal i.m.) was administered in monthly intervals from 6 through 12 months of age. LH-secretion was determined by radioimmunoassay up to 6 hours after the GnRH-challenge in hourly collected peripheral blood samples. In 5 twin pairs (age 14 to 20 months) semen was collected 5 times and processed for cryoconservation. In fresh and in frozen-thawed semen samples sperm motility was determined by means of a computerized system. Twins showed a remarkable uniform response to the GnRH-challenge. One set of twins (HF-breed) had a significantly reduced response compared to the other pairs (DFV-breed). Both individuals of this particular pair had a low percentage of progressively motile spermatozoa. In pairs with physiological sperm motility, variance of this parameter within pairs and between pairs was not different. In contrast, twin uniformity concerning the average velocity of motile spermatozoa was high; differences between set of twins explained most of the total variance. According to this study, reproductive parameters in monozygotic cattle twins are strongly influenced by twin uniformity.

  4. A FUNCTIONAL RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TRIGEMINAL ASTROGLIAL ACTIVATION AND NR1 EXPRESSION IN A RAT MODEL OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT INFLAMMATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuxing; Song, Li; Tan, Yonghui; Ma, Yuxin; Tian, Yinghong; Jin, Xu; Lim, Grewo; Zhang, Shuzhuo; Chen, Lucy; Mao, Jianren

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the hypothesis that glial activation would regulate the expression of the NR1 subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor in the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Sp5C) after temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation. Methods Inflammation of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was produced in rats by injecting 50μl complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into unilateral TMJ space. Sham control rats received incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) injection. Mechanical nociception in the affected and non-affected TMJ site was tested by using a digital algometer. Fractalkine, fluorocitrate, and/or MK801 were intracisternally administrated to examine the relationship between astroglial activation and NR1 upregulation. Results CFA TMJ injection resulted in persistent ipsilateral mechanical hyperalgesia 1, 3 and 5 days after CFA injection. The inflammation also induced significant upregulation of CX3CR1 and GFAP beginning on day 1, and of NR1 beginning on day 3, within the ipsilateral Sp5C. Intracisternal administration of fluorocitrate for 5 days blocked the development of mechanical hyperalgesia as well as the upregulation of GFAP and NR1 in the Sp5C. Conversely, intracisternal injection of fractalkine for 5 days exacerbated the expression of NR1 in Sp5C and mechanical hyperalgesia induced by TMJ inflammation. Moreover, once daily intracisternal fractalkine administration for five days in naïve rats induced the upregulation of NR1 and mechanical hyperalgesia. Conclusions These results suggest that astroglial activation contributes to the mechanism of TMJ pain through the regulation of NR1 expression in Sp5C. PMID:23110394

  5. Gene Expression Architecture of Mouse Dorsal and Tail Skin Reveals Functional Differences in Inflammation and Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    David A. Quigley; Eve Kandyba; Phillips Huang; Kyle D. Halliwill; Jonas Sjölund; Facundo Pelorosso; Christine E. Wong; Gillian L. Hirst; Di Wu; Reyno Delrosario; Atul Kumar; Allan Balmain

    2016-01-01

    Inherited germline polymorphisms can cause gene expression levels in normal tissues to differ substantially between individuals. We present an analysis of the genetic architecture of normal adult skin from 470 genetically unique mice, demonstrating the effect of germline variants, skin tissue location, and perturbation by exogenous inflammation or tumorigenesis on gene signaling pathways. Gene networks related to specific cell types and signaling pathways, including sonic hedgehog (Shh), Wnt,...

  6. Protease-Activated Receptor 2: Are Common Functions in Glial and Immune Cells Linked to Inflammation-Related CNS Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushell, Trevor J; Cunningham, Margaret R; McIntosh, Kathryn A; Moudio, Serge; Plevin, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are a novel family of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) whose activation requires the cleavage of the N-terminus by a serine protease. However, recent evidence reveals that alternative routes of activation also occur, that PARs signal via multiple pathways and that pathway activation is activator- dependent. Given our increased understanding of PAR function both under physiological and pathophysiological conditions, one aspect that has remained constant is the link between PAR2 and inflammation. PAR2 is expressed in immune cells of both the innate and adaptive immune system and has been shown to play a role in several peripheral inflammatory conditions. PAR2 is similarly expressed on astrocytes and microglia within the CNS and its activation is either protective or detrimental to CNS function depending on the conditions or disease state investigated. With a clear similarity between the function of PAR2 on both immune cells and CNS glial cells, here we have reviewed their roles in both these systems. We suggest that the recent development of novel PAR2 modulators, including those that show biased signalling, will further increase our understanding of PAR2 function and the development of potential therapeutics for CNS disorders in which inflammation is proposed to play a role.

  7. Bioenergetic Dysfunction and Inflammation in Alzheimer’s Disease: A Possible Connection

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkins, Heather M.; Carl, Steven M.; Greenlief, Alison C. S.; Festoff, Barry W.; Swerdlow, Russell H.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is observed in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) subject brains. Inflammation-relevant genes are increasingly implicated in AD genetic studies, and inflammatory cytokines to some extent even function as peripheral biomarkers. What underlies AD inflammation is unclear, but no “foreign” agent has been implicated. This suggests that internally produced damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMPs) molecules may drive inflammation in AD. A more complete characterization and understanding of AD-...

  8. Diabetic Polyneuropathy in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Mitochondrial Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Miguel Román-Pintos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN is defined as peripheral nerve dysfunction. There are three main alterations involved in the pathologic changes of DPN: inflammation, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Inflammation induces activation of nuclear factor kappa B, activator protein 1, and mitogen-activated protein kinases. Oxidative stress induced by hyperglycemia is mediated by several identified pathways: polyol, hexosamine, protein kinase C, advanced glycosylation end-products, and glycolysis. In addition, mitochondrial dysfunction accounts for most of the production of reactive oxygen and nitrosative species. These free radicals cause lipid peroxidation, protein modification, and nucleic acid damage, to finally induce axonal degeneration and segmental demyelination. The prevalence of DPN ranges from 2.4% to 78.8% worldwide, depending on the diagnostic method and the population assessed (hospital-based or outpatients. Risk factors include age, male gender, duration of diabetes, uncontrolled glycaemia, height, overweight and obesity, and insulin treatment. Several diagnostic methods have been developed, and composite scores combined with nerve conduction studies are the most reliable to identify early DPN. Treatment should be directed to improve etiologic factors besides reducing symptoms; several approaches have been evaluated to reduce neuropathic impairments and improve nerve conduction, such as oral antidiabetics, statins, and antioxidants (alpha-lipoic acid, ubiquinone, and flavonoids.

  9. Diabetic Polyneuropathy in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Mitochondrial Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román-Pintos, Luis Miguel; Villegas-Rivera, Geannyne; Rodríguez-Carrizalez, Adolfo Daniel; Miranda-Díaz, Alejandra Guillermina; Cardona-Muñoz, Ernesto Germán

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) is defined as peripheral nerve dysfunction. There are three main alterations involved in the pathologic changes of DPN: inflammation, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Inflammation induces activation of nuclear factor kappa B, activator protein 1, and mitogen-activated protein kinases. Oxidative stress induced by hyperglycemia is mediated by several identified pathways: polyol, hexosamine, protein kinase C, advanced glycosylation end-products, and glycolysis. In addition, mitochondrial dysfunction accounts for most of the production of reactive oxygen and nitrosative species. These free radicals cause lipid peroxidation, protein modification, and nucleic acid damage, to finally induce axonal degeneration and segmental demyelination. The prevalence of DPN ranges from 2.4% to 78.8% worldwide, depending on the diagnostic method and the population assessed (hospital-based or outpatients). Risk factors include age, male gender, duration of diabetes, uncontrolled glycaemia, height, overweight and obesity, and insulin treatment. Several diagnostic methods have been developed, and composite scores combined with nerve conduction studies are the most reliable to identify early DPN. Treatment should be directed to improve etiologic factors besides reducing symptoms; several approaches have been evaluated to reduce neuropathic impairments and improve nerve conduction, such as oral antidiabetics, statins, and antioxidants (alpha-lipoic acid, ubiquinone, and flavonoids).

  10. Gene Expression Architecture of Mouse Dorsal and Tail Skin Reveals Functional Differences in Inflammation and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Quigley

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Inherited germline polymorphisms can cause gene expression levels in normal tissues to differ substantially between individuals. We present an analysis of the genetic architecture of normal adult skin from 470 genetically unique mice, demonstrating the effect of germline variants, skin tissue location, and perturbation by exogenous inflammation or tumorigenesis on gene signaling pathways. Gene networks related to specific cell types and signaling pathways, including sonic hedgehog (Shh, Wnt, Lgr family stem cell markers, and keratins, differed at these tissue sites, suggesting mechanisms for the differential susceptibility of dorsal and tail skin to development of skin diseases and tumorigenesis. The Pten tumor suppressor gene network is rewired in premalignant tumors compared to normal tissue, but this response to perturbation is lost during malignant progression. We present a software package for expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL network analysis and demonstrate how network analysis of whole tissues provides insights into interactions between cell compartments and signaling molecules.

  11. A Novel Pregabalin Functionalized Salicylaldehyde Derivative Afforded Prospective Pain, Inflammation, and Pyrexia Alleviating Propensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nisar; Subhan, Fazal; Islam, Nazar Ul; Shahid, Muhammad; Rahman, Faiz Ur; Fawad, Khwaja

    2017-06-01

    A novel pregabalin derivative named as pregsal ((S,E)-3-(((2-hydroxybenzylidene)amino)methyl)-5-methylhexanoic acid) was synthesized by a simple imination reaction between pregabalin and salicylaldehyde and was evaluated in the in vivo testing paradigms. The compound was characterized by UV, IR, 1 H, 13 C NMR, HR ESI-MS, and elemental analysis. It was screened (30, 50, 75, and 100 mg/kg) for antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic activities in relation to pregabalin. The synthesized compound significantly attenuated the tonic acetic acid-induced nociceptive pain (30 mg/kg (P pain, inflammation, and pyrexia relieving propensities and therefore may serve as a potential drug candidate for the therapeutic management of chronic pain conditions. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Interaction of the endocrine system with inflammation: a function of energy and volume regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Rainer H

    2014-02-13

    During acute systemic infectious disease, precisely regulated release of energy-rich substrates (glucose, free fatty acids, and amino acids) and auxiliary elements such as calcium/phosphorus from storage sites (fat tissue, muscle, liver, and bone) are highly important because these factors are needed by an energy-consuming immune system in a situation with little or no food/water intake (sickness behavior). This positively selected program for short-lived infectious diseases is similarly applied during chronic inflammatory diseases. This review presents the interaction of hormones and inflammation by focusing on energy storage/expenditure and volume regulation. Energy storage hormones are represented by insulin (glucose/lipid storage and growth-related processes), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) (muscle and bone growth), androgens (muscle and bone growth), vitamin D (bone growth), and osteocalcin (bone growth, support of insulin, and testosterone). Energy expenditure hormones are represented by cortisol (breakdown of liver glycogen/adipose tissue triglycerides/muscle protein, and gluconeogenesis; water retention), noradrenaline/adrenaline (breakdown of liver glycogen/adipose tissue triglycerides, and gluconeogenesis; water retention), growth hormone (glucogenic, lipolytic; has also growth-related aspects; water retention), thyroid gland hormones (increase metabolic effects of adrenaline/noradrenaline), and angiotensin II (induce insulin resistance and retain water). In chronic inflammatory diseases, a preponderance of energy expenditure pathways is switched on, leading to typical hormonal changes such as insulin/IGF-1 resistance, hypoandrogenemia, hypovitaminosis D, mild hypercortisolemia, and increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Though necessary during acute inflammation in the context of systemic infection or trauma, these long-standing changes contribute to increased mortality in chronic

  13. The relationship between anthocyanins found in berry fruit, inflammation, and cognitive function in older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research in both human and animals has demonstrated that cognitive function decreases with age, to include deficits in processing speed, executive function, memory, and spatial learning. These functional declines may be caused by long-term increases in and susceptibility to oxidative stress and infl...

  14. Gene Expression Architecture of Mouse Dorsal and Tail Skin Reveals Functional Differences in Inflammation and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, David A; Kandyba, Eve; Huang, Phillips; Halliwill, Kyle D; Sjölund, Jonas; Pelorosso, Facundo; Wong, Christine E; Hirst, Gillian L; Wu, Di; Delrosario, Reyno; Kumar, Atul; Balmain, Allan

    2016-07-26

    Inherited germline polymorphisms can cause gene expression levels in normal tissues to differ substantially between individuals. We present an analysis of the genetic architecture of normal adult skin from 470 genetically unique mice, demonstrating the effect of germline variants, skin tissue location, and perturbation by exogenous inflammation or tumorigenesis on gene signaling pathways. Gene networks related to specific cell types and signaling pathways, including sonic hedgehog (Shh), Wnt, Lgr family stem cell markers, and keratins, differed at these tissue sites, suggesting mechanisms for the differential susceptibility of dorsal and tail skin to development of skin diseases and tumorigenesis. The Pten tumor suppressor gene network is rewired in premalignant tumors compared to normal tissue, but this response to perturbation is lost during malignant progression. We present a software package for expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) network analysis and demonstrate how network analysis of whole tissues provides insights into interactions between cell compartments and signaling molecules. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. In vitro oxidation of fibrinogen promotes functional alterations and formation of advanced oxidation protein products, an inflammation mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbitz, Vanessa Dorneles; Bochi, Guilherme Vargas; de Carvalho, José Antônio Mainardi; de Almeida Vaucher, Rodrigo; da Silva, José Edson Paz; Moresco, Rafael Noal

    2015-01-01

    Fibrinogen (FB) is a soluble blood plasma protein and is a key molecule involved in coagulation. Oxidative modification of proteins, such as the formation of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), a heterogeneous family of protein compounds structurally modified and derived from oxidative stress, may be associated with the pathophysiology of a number of chronic inflammatory diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether the formation of this mediator of inflammation occurs from FB and whether its generation is associated with structural changes. Results of the present study suggest that the oxidation of FB may provoke the formation of AOPP, which in turn, may promote functional alterations in FB, thus causing changes in its structural domains and increasing its procoagulant activity.

  16. Marine n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Psoriatic Arthritis – Inflammation and Cardiac Autonomic and Hemodynamic Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Salome

    with either 3 g of marine n-3 PUFA (6 capsules of fish oil) or 3 g of olive oil daily for 24 weeks. A total of 133 patients (92%) completed the study. The difference in the outcomes between baseline and 24 weeks was analysed within and between the two supplemented groups. In Study II, the effects of n-3 PUFA...... in the n-3 PUFA group compared with controls. The results indicate a beneficial effect of n-3 PUFA on joint inflammation and pain. In Study III, the aim was to investigate the effect of marine n-3 PUFA on cardiac autonomic function assessed by heart rate variability (HRV), blood pressure (BP), pulse wave...

  17. The effect of weight–loss program on lung function and systemic inflammation in obese men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    abas saremi

    2011-03-01

    Results: At baseline, obese individuals had higher serum C-reactive protein and poor pulmonary function than normal weight participants (p<0.05. After a 12 week aerobic training, body weight, waist circumference, visceral fat, total abdominal fat, and C- reactive protein were significantly decreased (p<0.05. In contrast, lung function parameters were improved after the aerobic training (p<0.05. Conclusion: Aerobic training resulted in an improvement in obesity indices and lung function in obese men, and this improvement was accompanied by decreased C- reactive protein levels.

  18. Deficiency of Interleukin-15 Confers Resistance to Obesity by Diminishing Inflammation and Enhancing the Thermogenic Function of Adipose Tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Lacraz

    Full Text Available IL-15 is an inflammatory cytokine secreted by many cell types. IL-15 is also produced during physical exercise by skeletal muscle and has been reported to reduce weight gain in mice. Contrarily, our findings on IL-15 knockout (KO mice indicate that IL-15 promotes obesity. The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanisms underlying the pro-obesity role of IL-15 in adipose tissues.Control and IL-15 KO mice were maintained on high fat diet (HFD or normal control diet. After 16 weeks, body weight, adipose tissue and skeletal mass, serum lipid levels and gene/protein expression in the adipose tissues were evaluated. The effect of IL-15 on thermogenesis and oxygen consumption was also studied in primary cultures of adipocytes differentiated from mouse preadipocyte and human stem cells.Our results show that IL-15 deficiency prevents diet-induced weight gain and accumulation of lipids in visceral and subcutaneous white and brown adipose tissues. Gene expression analysis also revealed elevated expression of genes associated with adaptive thermogenesis in the brown and subcutaneous adipose tissues of IL-15 KO mice. Accordingly, oxygen consumption was increased in the brown adipocytes from IL-15 KO mice. In addition, IL-15 KO mice showed decreased expression of pro-inflammatory mediators in their adipose tissues.Absence of IL-15 results in decreased accumulation of fat in the white adipose tissues and increased lipid utilization via adaptive thermogenesis. IL-15 also promotes inflammation in adipose tissues that could sustain chronic inflammation leading to obesity-associated metabolic syndrome.

  19. Influence of ethnic background on left atrial markers of inflammation, endothelial function and tissue remodelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlee D. Ruediger

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Caucasian and Indian populations demonstrate similar inflammatory, endothelial function or tissue remodelling profiles. This study suggests a lack of an impact of different ethnicity in these populations in terms of thrombogenic risk.

  20. Retroperitoneal inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001255.htm Retroperitoneal inflammation To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Retroperitoneal inflammation is swelling that occurs in the retroperitoneal space. ...

  1. Ultra-endurance exercise induces stress and inflammation and affects circulating hematopoietic progenitor cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzer, I; Kröpfl, J M; Fuchs, R; Pekovits, K; Mangge, H; Raggam, R B; Gruber, H-J; Prüller, F; Hofmann, P; Truschnig-Wilders, M; Obermayer-Pietsch, B; Haushofer, A C; Kessler, H H; Mächler, P

    2015-10-01

    Although amateur sports have become increasingly competitive within recent decades, there are as yet few studies on the possible health risks for athletes. This study aims to determine the impact of ultra-endurance exercise-induced stress on the number and function of circulating hematopoietic progenitor cells (CPCs) and hematological, inflammatory, clinical, metabolic, and stress parameters in moderately trained amateur athletes. Following ultra-endurance exercise, there were significant increases in leukocytes, platelets, interleukin-6, fibrinogen, tissue enzymes, blood lactate, serum cortisol, and matrix metalloproteinase-9. Ultra-endurance exercise did not influence the number of CPCs but resulted in a highly significant decline of CPC functionality after the competition. Furthermore, Epstein-Barr virus was seen to be reactivated in one of seven athletes. The link between exercise-induced stress and decline of CPC functionality is supported by a negative correlation between cortisol and CPC function. We conclude that ultra-endurance exercise induces metabolic stress and an inflammatory response that affects not only mature hematopoietic cells but also the function of the immature hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell fraction, which make up the immune system and provide for regeneration. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The association between depressive symptoms, cognitive function, and inflammation in major depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Jesper; Benros, Michael E; Jørgensen, Martin Balslev

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the association between IL-6 and CRP with depressive items and cognitive function. We included 112 outpatients with major depression from an exercise trial and 57 healthy controls. IL-6, high sensitive CRP (hsCRP), and cognitive function were assessed in all...... subjects. After baseline assessment, patients were randomised to either a 3months exercise intervention or an exercise control group. Post-intervention IL-6, hsCRP, depressive symptoms, and cognitive function were reassessed in the patient group. IL-6 and hsCRP were significantly increased in depressed...... patients compared to healthy controls (p=0.02 and 0.04). These differences were no longer significant after adjustment for lifestyle associated variables. We found no association between immune markers and specific depressive symptoms at baseline or as change over time. Regarding the cognitive tests, IL-6...

  3. Neonates with reduced neonatal lung function have systemic low-grade inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chawes, Bo L.K.; Stokholm, Jakob; Bønnelykke, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    , TNF-α, and CXCL8, confirmed a uniform upregulated inflammatory profile in children with reduced forced expiratory volume at 0.5 seconds (P = .02). Adjusting for body mass index at birth, maternal smoking, older children in the home, neonatal bacterial airway colonization, infections 14 days before...... of the Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood2000 birth cohort who had completed neonatal lung function testing at age 4 weeks. Associations between neonatal lung function indices and inflammatory biomarkers were investigated by conventional statistics and unsupervised principal component analysis...

  4. Extracellular vesicles regulate immune responses and cellular function in intestinal inflammation and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Triet M; Mascarenhas, Lorraine A; Sumagin, Ronen

    2018-02-02

    Tightly controlled communication among the various resident and recruited cells in the intestinal tissue is critical for maintaining tissue homeostasis, re-establishment of the barrier function and healing responses following injury. Emerging evidence convincingly implicates extracellular vesicles (EVs) in facilitating this important cell-to-cell crosstalk by transporting bioactive effectors and genetic information in healthy tissue and disease. While many aspects of EV biology, including release mechanisms, cargo packaging, and uptake by target cells are still not completely understood, EVs contribution to cellular signaling and function is apparent. Moreover, EV research has already sparked a clinical interest, as a potential diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic tool. The current review will discuss the function of EVs originating from innate immune cells, namely, neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages, as well as intestinal epithelial cells in healthy tissue and inflammatory disorders of the intestinal tract. Our discussion will specifically emphasize the contribution of EVs to the regulation of vascular and epithelial barrier function in inflamed intestines, wound healing, as well as trafficking and activity of resident and recruited immune cells.

  5. Dietary intake, lung function and airway inflammation in Mexico City school children exposed to air pollutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Díaz-Sánchez David

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Air pollutant exposure has been associated with an increase in inflammatory markers and a decline in lung function in asthmatic children. Several studies suggest that dietary intake of fruits and vegetables might modify the adverse effect of air pollutants. Methods A total of 158 asthmatic children recruited at the Children's Hospital of Mexico and 50 non-asthmatic children were followed for 22 weeks. Pulmonary function was measured and nasal lavage collected and analyzed every 2 weeks. Dietary intake was evaluated using a 108-item food frequency questionnaire and a fruit and vegetable index (FVI and a Mediterranean diet index (MDI were constructed. The impact of these indices on lung function and interleukin-8 (IL-8 and their interaction with air pollutants were determined using mixed regression models with random intercept and random slope. Results FVI was inversely related to IL-8 levels in nasal lavage (p 1 (test for trend p 1 and FVC as was with MDI and ozone for FVC. No effect of diet was observed among healthy children. Conclusion Our results suggest that fruit and vegetable intake and close adherence to the Mediterranean diet have a beneficial effect on inflammatory response and lung function in asthmatic children living in Mexico City.

  6. Dietary intake, lung function and airway inflammation in Mexico City school children exposed to air pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romieu, Isabelle; Barraza-Villarreal, Albino; Escamilla-Núñez, Consuelo; Texcalac-Sangrador, Jose L; Hernandez-Cadena, Leticia; Díaz-Sánchez, David; De Batlle, Jordi; Del Rio-Navarro, Blanca E

    2009-12-10

    Air pollutant exposure has been associated with an increase in inflammatory markers and a decline in lung function in asthmatic children. Several studies suggest that dietary intake of fruits and vegetables might modify the adverse effect of air pollutants. A total of 158 asthmatic children recruited at the Children's Hospital of Mexico and 50 non-asthmatic children were followed for 22 weeks. Pulmonary function was measured and nasal lavage collected and analyzed every 2 weeks. Dietary intake was evaluated using a 108-item food frequency questionnaire and a fruit and vegetable index (FVI) and a Mediterranean diet index (MDI) were constructed. The impact of these indices on lung function and interleukin-8 (IL-8) and their interaction with air pollutants were determined using mixed regression models with random intercept and random slope. FVI was inversely related to IL-8 levels in nasal lavage (p diet was observed among healthy children. Our results suggest that fruit and vegetable intake and close adherence to the Mediterranean diet have a beneficial effect on inflammatory response and lung function in asthmatic children living in Mexico City.

  7. Zonulin and its regulation of intestinal barrier function: the biological door to inflammation, autoimmunity, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Alessio

    2011-01-01

    The primary functions of the gastrointestinal tract have traditionally been perceived to be limited to the digestion and absorption of nutrients and to electrolytes and water homeostasis. A more attentive analysis of the anatomic and functional arrangement of the gastrointestinal tract, however, suggests that another extremely important function of this organ is its ability to regulate the trafficking of macromolecules between the environment and the host through a barrier mechanism. Together with the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and the neuroendocrine network, the intestinal epithelial barrier, with its intercellular tight junctions, controls the equilibrium between tolerance and immunity to non-self antigens. Zonulin is the only physiological modulator of intercellular tight junctions described so far that is involved in trafficking of macromolecules and, therefore, in tolerance/immune response balance. When the finely tuned zonulin pathway is deregulated in genetically susceptible individuals, both intestinal and extraintestinal autoimmune, inflammatory, and neoplastic disorders can occur. This new paradigm subverts traditional theories underlying the development of these diseases and suggests that these processes can be arrested if the interplay between genes and environmental triggers is prevented by reestablishing the zonulin-dependent intestinal barrier function. This review is timely given the increased interest in the role of a "leaky gut" in the pathogenesis of several pathological conditions targeting both the intestine and extraintestinal organs.

  8. An Agonist of the Protective Factor SIRT1 Improves Functional Recovery and Promotes Neuronal Survival by Attenuating Inflammation after Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haihong; Ji, Hao; Zhang, Ming; Liu, Zude; Lao, Lifeng; Deng, Chao; Chen, Jianwei; Zhong, Guibin

    2017-03-15

    Targeting posttraumatic inflammation is crucial for improving locomotor function. SIRT1 has been shown to play a critical role in disease processes such as hepatic inflammation, rheumatoid arthritis, and acute lung inflammation by regulating inflammation. However, the role of SIRT1 in spinal cord injury (SCI) is unknown. We hypothesized that SIRT1 plays an important role in improving locomotor function after SCI by regulating neuroinflammation. In this study, we investigate the effect of SIRT1 in SCI using pharmacological intervention (SRT1720) and the Mx1-Cre/loxP recombination system to knock out target genes. First, we found that SIRT1 expression at the injured lesion site of wild-type (WT) mice (C57BL/6) decreased 4 h after SCI and lasted for 3 d. Moreover, administration of SRT1720, an agonist of SIRT1, to WT mice significantly improved functional recovery for up to 28 d after injury by reducing the levels of proinflammatory cytokines, the number of M1 macrophages, the number of macrophages/microglia, and the accumulation of perivascular macrophages. In contrast, administration of SRT1720 to SIRT1 knock-out (KO) mice did not improve locomotor recovery or attenuate inflammation. Furthermore, SIRT1 KO mice exhibited worse locomotor recovery, increased levels of inflammatory cytokines, and more M1 macrophages and perivascular macrophages than those of WT mice after SCI. Together, these findings indicate that SRT1720, an SIRT1 agonist, can improve functional recovery by attenuating inflammation after SCI. Therefore, SIRT1 is not only a protective factor but also an anti-inflammatory molecule that exerts beneficial effects on locomotor function after SCI. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Posttraumatic inflammation plays a central role in regulating the pathogenesis of spinal cord injury (SCI). Here, new data show that administration of SRT1720, an SIRT1 agonist, to wild-type (WT) mice significantly improved outcomes after SCI, most likely by reducing the levels of

  9. Effect of erythropoietin combined with interventional therapy on cardiac function injury and inflammation in patients with STEMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Gen Zhou

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of erythropoietin combined with interventional therapy on cardiac function injury and inflammation in patients with STEMI. Methods: 58 patients with STEMI treated in our hospital between April 2012 and September 2015 were selected, the treatment methods and test results were reviewed, and then they were divided into the control group who accepted interventional therapy alone and the observation group who accepted erythropoietin combined with interventional therapy. Before and after treatment, color Doppler diasonograph was used to detect cardiac function parameters; immune scatter turbidimetry was used to determine myocardial injury marker levels in peripheral blood; ELISA was used to detect serum inflammatory factor levels. Results: Before treatment, differences in cardiac function parameter levels, myocardial injury marker contents and inflammatory factor contents were not statistically significant between two groups of patients (P>0.05. After treatment, cardiac function parameters LvEDD and LVESD levels of observation group were significantly lower than those of control group while EV and AV levels were significantly higher than those of control group (P<0.05; serum myocardial injury indexes ICTP and IMA contents of observation group were significantly lower than those of control group while CysC content was significantly higher than that of control group (P<0.05; serum inflammatory factors CRP, IL-18, IL-27 and MDC contents of observation group were significantly lower than those of control group while IL-10 content was significantly higher than that of control group (P<0.05. Conclusion: Erythropoietin combined with interventional therapy can play a positive role in myocardial protection, improve cardiac pump function, reduce myocardial cell injury and inhibit inflammatory response.

  10. Effect of Leisure Activities on Inflammation and Cognitive Function in an Aging Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Elliot; Quinn, Jill; Chen, Ding-Geng (Din); Mapstone, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease risk factors (CVDRFs) increase the risk of dementia. The purpose of this study was to examine whether leisure activities (mental, physical, and social activities) modified the effect of CVDRFs on inflammatory markers and cognitive function in middle and old age. A secondary-data analysis study was conducted using data from 405 middle-age participants (40 –59 years) and 342 old-age participants (60 – 84 years) who participated in the Survey of Midlife Development in the United States. CVDRFs were obtained from a combination of self-report medical history and blood-based biomarkers. Three CVDRF groups (≤1, 2, and ≥3 CVDRFs) were identified. More CVDRFs were significantly associated with higher levels of inflammatory markers in both age groups, and associated with lower levels of executive function in the old age group. CVDRFs were not related to the frequency of leisure activities in either age group. After controlling for covariates, higher levels of physical activities were significantly associated with lower levels of inflammatory markers, and higher levels of mental activities were associated with higher levels of cognitive function. In the old age group, physical activities also moderated the effect of CVDRFs on episodic memory, and mental activities moderated the effect of CVDRFs on interleukin-6. Multiple CVDRFs may be associated with poorer cognitive function and higher inflammatory markers, but middle-age and older adults with CVDRFs may not engage in frequent physical and cognitive activities that may be protective. It is important to develop strategies to facilitate engagement in these activities from midlife. PMID:22377120

  11. Periodontal inflammation in relation to cognitive function in an older adult danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamer, Angela R; Morse, Douglas E; Holm-Pedersen, Poul

    2012-01-01

    missing teeth. The effect of PI/tooth loss on cognitive function [measured by Digit Symbol (DST) and Block Design (BDT) tests] was assessed in 70-year old Danish subjects. We found: 1) subjects with PI obtained lower mean DST scores compared to subjects without PI (p ... teeth had lower mean DST and BDT scores compared to subjects with few missing teeth (p education and previous cognitive scores (age 50) were important...

  12. Regulation of type 17 helper T-cell function by nitric oxide during inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Niedbala, Wanda; Alves-Filho, Jose C.; Fukada, Sandra Y.; Vieira, Silvio Manfredo; Mitani, Akio; Sonego, Fabiane; Mirchandani, Ananda; Nascimento, Daniele C.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Liew, Foo Y.

    2011-01-01

    Type 17 helper T (Th17) cells are implicated in the pathogenesis many of human autoimmune diseases. Development of Th17 can be enhanced by the activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) whose ligands include the environmental pollutant dioxin, potentially linking environmental factors to the increased prevalence of autoimmune disease. We report here that nitric oxide (NO) can suppress the proliferation and function of polarized murine and human Th17 cells. NO also inhibits AHR expression i...

  13. Molecular regulation of dendritic cell development and function in homeostasis, inflammation, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrisikos, Taylor T; Zhou, Yifan; Slone, Natalie; Babcock, Rachel; Watowich, Stephanie S; Li, Haiyan S

    2018-03-14

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the principal antigen-presenting cells of the immune system and play key roles in controlling immune tolerance and activation. As such, DCs are chief mediators of tumor immunity. DCs can regulate tolerogenic immune responses that facilitate unchecked tumor growth. Importantly, however, DCs also mediate immune-stimulatory activity that restrains tumor progression. For instance, emerging evidence indicates the cDC1 subset has important functions in delivering tumor antigens to lymph nodes and inducing antigen-specific lymphocyte responses to tumors. Moreover, DCs control specific therapeutic responses in cancer including those resulting from immune checkpoint blockade. DC generation and function is influenced profoundly by cytokines, as well as their intracellular signaling proteins including STAT transcription factors. Regardless, our understanding of DC regulation in the cytokine-rich tumor microenvironment is still developing and must be better defined to advance cancer treatment. Here, we review literature focused on the molecular control of DCs, with a particular emphasis on cytokine- and STAT-mediated DC regulation. In addition, we highlight recent studies that delineate the importance of DCs in anti-tumor immunity and immune therapy, with the overall goal of improving knowledge of tumor-associated factors and intrinsic DC signaling cascades that influence DC function in cancer. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Differential expression and function of breast regression protein 39 (BRP-39 in murine models of subacute cigarette smoke exposure and allergic airway inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coyle Anthony J

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the presence of the chitinase-like molecule YKL40 has been reported in COPD and asthma, its relevance to inflammatory processes elicited by cigarette smoke and common environmental allergens, such as house dust mite (HDM, is not well understood. The objective of the current study was to assess expression and function of BRP-39, the murine equivalent of YKL40 in a murine model of cigarette smoke-induced inflammation and contrast expression and function to a model of HDM-induced allergic airway inflammation. Methods CD1, C57BL/6, and BALB/c mice were room air- or cigarette smoke-exposed for 4 days in a whole-body exposure system. In separate experiments, BALB/c mice were challenged with HDM extract once a day for 10 days. BRP-39 was assessed by ELISA and immunohistochemistry. IL-13, IL-1R1, IL-18, and BRP-39 knock out (KO mice were utilized to assess the mechanism and relevance of BRP-39 in cigarette smoke- and HDM-induced airway inflammation. Results Cigarette smoke exposure elicited a robust induction of BRP-39 but not the catalytically active chitinase, AMCase, in lung epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages of all mouse strains tested. Both BRP-39 and AMCase were increased in lung tissue after HDM exposure. Examining smoke-exposed IL-1R1, IL-18, and IL-13 deficient mice, BRP-39 induction was found to be IL-1 and not IL-18 or IL-13 dependent, while induction of BRP-39 by HDM was independent of IL-1 and IL-13. Despite the importance of BRP-39 in cellular inflammation in HDM-induced airway inflammation, BRP-39 was found to be redundant for cigarette smoke-induced airway inflammation and the adjuvant properties of cigarette smoke. Conclusions These data highlight the contrast between the importance of BRP-39 in HDM- and cigarette smoke-induced inflammation. While functionally important in HDM-induced inflammation, BRP-39 is a biomarker of cigarette smoke induced inflammation which is the byproduct of an IL-1

  15. Decreased serum hepcidin, inflammation, and improved functional iron status six-months post-restrictive bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excess adiposity is associated with low-grade inflammation and decreased iron status. Iron depletion (ID) in obesity is thought to be mediated by an inflammation-induced increase in the body’s main regulator of iron homeostasis, hepcidin. Elevated hepcidin can result in ID as it prevents the release...

  16. Neurological and behavioral abnormalities, ventricular dilatation, altered cellular functions, inflammation, and neuronal injury in brains of mice due to common, persistent, parasitic infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang Jong-Hee

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide, approximately two billion people are chronically infected with Toxoplasma gondii with largely unknown consequences. Methods To better understand long-term effects and pathogenesis of this common, persistent brain infection, mice were infected at a time in human years equivalent to early to mid adulthood and studied 5–12 months later. Appearance, behavior, neurologic function and brain MRIs were studied. Additional analyses of pathogenesis included: correlation of brain weight and neurologic findings; histopathology focusing on brain regions; full genome microarrays; immunohistochemistry characterizing inflammatory cells; determination of presence of tachyzoites and bradyzoites; electron microscopy; and study of markers of inflammation in serum. Histopathology in genetically resistant mice and cytokine and NRAMP knockout mice, effects of inoculation of isolated parasites, and treatment with sulfadiazine or αPD1 ligand were studied. Results Twelve months after infection, a time equivalent to middle to early elderly ages, mice had behavioral and neurological deficits, and brain MRIs showed mild to moderate ventricular dilatation. Lower brain weight correlated with greater magnitude of neurologic abnormalities and inflammation. Full genome microarrays of brains reflected inflammation causing neuronal damage (Gfap, effects on host cell protein processing (ubiquitin ligase, synapse remodeling (Complement 1q, and also increased expression of PD-1L (a ligand that allows persistent LCMV brain infection and CD 36 (a fatty acid translocase and oxidized LDL receptor that mediates innate immune response to beta amyloid which is associated with pro-inflammation in Alzheimer's disease. Immunostaining detected no inflammation around intra-neuronal cysts, practically no free tachyzoites, and only rare bradyzoites. Nonetheless, there were perivascular, leptomeningeal inflammatory cells, particularly contiguous to the aqueduct of

  17. Oxidative stress, inflammation, and pulmonary function assessment in rats exposed to laboratory-generated pollutant mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seagrave, J.; Campen, M.J.; McDonald, J.D.; Mauderly, J.L.; Rohr, A.C. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Oxidative stress may mediate adverse health effects of many inhaled pollutants. Cardiopulmonary responses of Sprague-Dawley rats to inhalation of whole or filtered gasoline engine exhaust (GEE, FGEE); simulated downwind coal emission atmospheres (SDCAs) from two types of coal, each tested at two concentrations; and two concentrations of re-aerosolized paved road dust (RD) were evaluated. In situ chemiluminescence and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) were used to evaluate oxidative reactions in the lungs, heart, and liver immediately following exposures. Pulmonary inflammatory responses were measured by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell counts. Respiratory function parameters during exposure were measured by plethysmography. Only GEE significantly enhanced in situ chemiluminescence (all three organs), but only exposure to the high RD concentration increased TBARS (hearts only). There was a weak trend toward increased macrophages recovered in lavage fluid from both SDCAs, and macrophages were significantly elevated by both FGEE and the lower concentration of RD. Respiratory function effects were small, though the effects of the Central Appalachian low-sulfur SDCA on enhanced pause and the effects of the Powder River Basin SCDA on tidal volume were significant. The discordance between the oxidative stress indicators may relate to the use of a single time point in the context of dynamic changes in compensatory mechanisms. These results further suggest that inflammatory responses measured by BAL cellularity may not always correlate with oxidative stress. Overall, the toxicological effects from exposure to these pollutant mixtures were subtle, but the results show differences in the effects of atmospheres having different physical/chemical characteristics.

  18. Short-Term High Fat Intake Does Not Significantly Alter Markers of Renal Function or Inflammation in Young Male Sprague-Dawley Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Crinigan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic high fat feeding is correlated with diabetes and kidney disease. However, the impact of short-term high fat diets (HFD is not well-understood. Six weeks of HFD result in indices of metabolic syndrome (increased adiposity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia, hyperleptinemia, and impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation compared to rats fed on standard chow. The hypothesis was that short-term HFD would induce early signs of renal disease. Young male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either HFD (60% fat or standard chow (5% fat for six weeks. Morphology was determined by measuring changes in renal mass and microstructure. Kidney function was measured by analyzing urinary protein, creatinine, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 concentrations, as well as plasma cystatin C concentrations. Renal damage was measured through assessment of urinary oxDNA/RNA concentrations as well as renal lipid peroxidation, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα, and interleukin 6 (IL-6. Despite HFD significantly increasing adiposity and renal mass, there was no evidence of early stage kidney disease as measured by changes in urinary and plasma biomarkers as well as histology. These findings suggest that moderate hyperglycemia and inflammation produced by short-term HFD are not sufficient to damage kidneys or that the ketogenic HFD may have protective effects within the kidneys.

  19. Diversity and natural functions of antibiotics produced by beneficial and plant pathogenic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, J.M.; Mazzola, M.

    2012-01-01

    Soil- and plant-associated environments harbor numerous bacteria that produce antibiotic metabolites with specific or broad-spectrum activities against coexisting microorganisms. The function and ecological importance of antibiotics have long been assumed to yield a survival advantage to the

  20. Curcuma as a functional food in the control of cancer and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Moshe; Schaffer, Pamela M; Zidan, Jamal; Bar Sela, Gil

    2011-11-01

    Several nutritional compounds are the focus of public attention because of their potential beneficial health effects. Turmeric is a spice that comes from the root Curcuma longa. Extensive research over the past half century and especially in recent years has revealed important functions of curcumin and a timely review of clinical state-of-the-art using curcumin. In-vitro and in-vivo research has shown various activities, such as anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antifungal, cytokines release, antioxidant, immunomodulatory, enhancing of the apoptotic process, and antiangiogenic properties. Curcumin also have been shown to be a mediator of chemo-resistance and radio-resistance. Various in-vitro and in-vivo and scarce number of clinical studies on curcumin were identified. The various effects and properties of curcumin are summarized in this review, including preclinical and especially clinical studies. This review concentrates on recent knowledge and research with curcumin clinical applications, and clinical studies, focusing on studies published between 2008 and 2011 demonstrating the gap between preclinical and clinical research.

  1. A robust and rapid method of producing soluble, stable, and functional G-protein coupled receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Corin

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins, particularly G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs, are notoriously difficult to express. Using commercial E. coli cell-free systems with the detergent Brij-35, we could rapidly produce milligram quantities of 13 unique GPCRs. Immunoaffinity purification yielded receptors at >90% purity. Secondary structure analysis using circular dichroism indicated that the purified receptors were properly folded. Microscale thermophoresis, a novel label-free and surface-free detection technique that uses thermal gradients, showed that these receptors bound their ligands. The secondary structure and ligand-binding results from cell-free produced proteins were comparable to those expressed and purified from HEK293 cells. Our study demonstrates that cell-free protein production using commercially available kits and optimal detergents is a robust technology that can be used to produce sufficient GPCRs for biochemical, structural, and functional analyses. This robust and simple method may further stimulate others to study the structure and function of membrane proteins.

  2. Long-term activation of TLR3 by Poly(I:C induces inflammation and impairs lung function in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexopoulou Lena

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The immune mechanisms associated with infection-induced disease exacerbations in asthma and COPD are not fully understood. Toll-like receptor (TLR 3 has an important role in recognition of double-stranded viral RNA, which leads to the production of various inflammatory mediators. Thus, an understanding of TLR3 activation should provide insight into the mechanisms underlying virus-induced exacerbations of pulmonary diseases. Methods TLR3 knock-out (KO mice and C57B6 (WT mice were intranasally administered repeated doses of the synthetic double stranded RNA analog poly(I:C. Results There was a significant increase in total cells, especially neutrophils, in BALF samples from poly(I:C-treated mice. In addition, IL-6, CXCL10, JE, KC, mGCSF, CCL3, CCL5, and TNFα were up regulated. Histological analyses of the lungs revealed a cellular infiltrate in the interstitium and epithelial cell hypertrophy in small bronchioles. Associated with the pro-inflammatory effects of poly(I:C, the mice exhibited significant impairment of lung function both at baseline and in response to methacholine challenge as measured by whole body plethysmography and an invasive measure of airway resistance. Importantly, TLR3 KO mice were protected from poly(I:C-induced changes in lung function at baseline, which correlated with milder inflammation in the lung, and significantly reduced epithelial cell hypertrophy. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that TLR3 activation by poly(I:C modulates the local inflammatory response in the lung and suggest a critical role of TLR3 activation in driving lung function impairment. Thus, TLR3 activation may be one mechanism through which viral infections contribute toward exacerbation of respiratory disease.

  3. Effects of noise on vascular function, oxidative stress, and inflammation: mechanistic insight from studies in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzel, Thomas; Daiber, Andreas; Steven, Sebastian; Tran, Lan P; Ullmann, Elisabeth; Kossmann, Sabine; Schmidt, Frank P; Oelze, Matthias; Xia, Ning; Li, Huige; Pinto, Antonio; Wild, Philipp; Pies, Kai; Schmidt, Erwin R; Rapp, Steffen; Kröller-Schön, Swenja

    2017-10-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that traffic noise increases the incidence of coronary artery disease, hypertension and stroke. The underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Field studies with nighttime noise exposure demonstrate that aircraft noise leads to vascular dysfunction, which is markedly improved by vitamin C, suggesting a key role of oxidative stress in causing this phenomenon. We developed a novel animal model to study the vascular consequences of aircraft noise exposure. Peak sound levels of 85 and mean sound level of 72 dBA applied by loudspeakers for 4 days caused an increase in systolic blood pressure, plasma noradrenaline and angiotensin II levels and induced endothelial dysfunction. Noise increased eNOS expression but reduced vascular NO levels because of eNOS uncoupling. Noise increased circulating levels of nitrotyrosine, interleukine-6 and vascular expression of the NADPH oxidase subunit Nox2, nitrotyrosine-positive proteins and of endothelin-1. FACS analysis demonstrated an increase in infiltrated natural killer-cells and neutrophils into the vasculature. Equal mean sound pressure levels of white noise for 4 days did not induce these changes. Comparative Illumina sequencing of transcriptomes of aortic tissues from aircraft noise-treated animals displayed significant changes of genes in part responsible for the regulation of vascular function, vascular remodelling, and cell death. We established a novel and unique aircraft noise stress model with increased blood pressure and vascular dysfunction associated with oxidative stress. This animal model enables future studies of molecular mechanisms, mitigation strategies, and pharmacological interventions to protect from noise-induced vascular damage. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  4. Effects of noise on vascular function, oxidative stress, and inflammation: mechanistic insight from studies in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzel, Thomas; Daiber, Andreas; Steven, Sebastian; Tran, Lan P.; Ullmann, Elisabeth; Kossmann, Sabine; Schmidt, Frank P.; Oelze, Matthias; Xia, Ning; Li, Huige; Pinto, Antonio; Wild, Philipp; Pies, Kai; Schmidt, Erwin R.; Rapp, Steffen; Kröller-Schön, Swenja

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aims Epidemiological studies indicate that traffic noise increases the incidence of coronary artery disease, hypertension and stroke. The underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Field studies with nighttime noise exposure demonstrate that aircraft noise leads to vascular dysfunction, which is markedly improved by vitamin C, suggesting a key role of oxidative stress in causing this phenomenon. Methods and results We developed a novel animal model to study the vascular consequences of aircraft noise exposure. Peak sound levels of 85 and mean sound level of 72 dBA applied by loudspeakers for 4 days caused an increase in systolic blood pressure, plasma noradrenaline and angiotensin II levels and induced endothelial dysfunction. Noise increased eNOS expression but reduced vascular NO levels because of eNOS uncoupling. Noise increased circulating levels of nitrotyrosine, interleukine-6 and vascular expression of the NADPH oxidase subunit Nox2, nitrotyrosine-positive proteins and of endothelin-1. FACS analysis demonstrated an increase in infiltrated natural killer-cells and neutrophils into the vasculature. Equal mean sound pressure levels of white noise for 4 days did not induce these changes. Comparative Illumina sequencing of transcriptomes of aortic tissues from aircraft noise-treated animals displayed significant changes of genes in part responsible for the regulation of vascular function, vascular remodelling, and cell death. Conclusion We established a novel and unique aircraft noise stress model with increased blood pressure and vascular dysfunction associated with oxidative stress. This animal model enables future studies of molecular mechanisms, mitigation strategies, and pharmacological interventions to protect from noise-induced vascular damage. PMID:28329261

  5. Hypoxia and Mucosal Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Sean P.; Campbell, Eric L.; Kominsky, Douglas J.

    2016-01-01

    Sites of inflammation are defined by significant changes in metabolic activity. Recent studies have suggested that O2 metabolism and hypoxia play a prominent role in inflammation so-called “inflammatory hypoxia,” which results from a combination of recruited inflammatory cells (e.g., neutrophils and monocytes), the local proliferation of multiple cell types, and the activation of multiple O2-consuming enzymes during inflammation. These shifts in energy supply and demand result in localized regions of hypoxia and have revealed the important function off the transcription factor HIF (hypoxia-inducible factor) in the regulation of key target genes that promote inflammatory resolution. Analysis of these pathways has provided multiple opportunities for understanding basic mechanisms of inflammation and has defined new targets for intervention. Here, we review recent work addressing tissue hypoxia and metabolic control of inflammation and immunity. PMID:27193451

  6. Epoetin administrated after cardiac surgery: effects on renal function and inflammation in a randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Seigneux Sophie

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimentally, erythropoietin (EPO has nephroprotective as well as immunomodulatory properties when administered after ischemic renal injury. We tested the hypothesis that different doses of recombinant human EPO administered to patients after cardiac surgery would minimize kidney lesions and the systemic inflammatory response, thereby decreasing acute kidney injury (AKI incidence. Methods In this double-blinded randomized control study, 80 patients admitted to the ICU post-cardiac surgery were randomized by computer to receive intravenously isotonic saline (n = 40 versus α-Epoetin (n = 40: either 40000 IU (n = 20 or 20000 IU (n = 20. The study lasted one year. The primary outcome was the change in urinary NGAL concentration from baseline and 48 h after EPO injection. Creatinine, cystatine C and urinary NGAL levels were measured on the day of randomization and 2–4 days after EPO injection. To assess acute inflammatory response, serum cytokines (IL6 and IL8 were measured at randomization and four days after r-HuEPO injection. Patients and care-takers were blinded for the assignment. Results No patient was excluded after randomization. Patient groups did not differ in terms of age, gender, comorbidities and renal function at randomization. The rate of AKI assessed by AKIN criteria was 22.5% in our population. EPO treatment did not significantly modify the difference in uNGAl between 48 hours and randomization compared to placebo [2.5 ng/ml (−17.3; 22.5 vs 0.7 ng/ml (−31.77; 25.15, p = 0.77] and the incidence of AKI was similar. Inflammatory cytokines levels were not influenced by EPO treatment. Mortality and hospital stays were similar between the groups and no adverse event was recorded. Conclusion In this randomized-controlled trial, α-Epoetin administrated after cardiac surgery, although safe, demonstrated neither nephroprotective nor anti-inflammatory properties. Trial registration number NCT

  7. Differential expression and function of breast regression protein 39 (BRP-39) in murine models of subacute cigarette smoke exposure and allergic airway inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Coyle Anthony J; Jordana Manel; Bauer Carla MT; Botelho Fernando M; Nikota Jake K; Humbles Alison A; Stampfli Martin R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background While the presence of the chitinase-like molecule YKL40 has been reported in COPD and asthma, its relevance to inflammatory processes elicited by cigarette smoke and common environmental allergens, such as house dust mite (HDM), is not well understood. The objective of the current study was to assess expression and function of BRP-39, the murine equivalent of YKL40 in a murine model of cigarette smoke-induced inflammation and contrast expression and function to a model of ...

  8. B cells present skewed profile and lose the function of supporting T cell inflammation after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaojiang; Zhao, Weiguo; Zhan, Junfang; Zeng, Songhua; Ran, Dongzhi; Zhang, Hongbin; Song, Zhigao; Song, Ken H; Wu, Liangping

    2017-02-01

    Bariatric surgeries, including Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) are currently the best treatment for obesity and obesity-related comorbidities, such as type 2 diabetes. However, the underlying mechanism of bariatric surgeries is not entirely understood. Further investigations are needed to improve the success rate and achieve sustained health benefits. Given that B cell dysregulation is a critical component of etiology in inflammatory diseases, whereas obesity and type 2 diabetes represent two major inflammatory disorders, we investigated the effect of RYGB on B cell inflammation. We found that B cells after RYGB presented significantly elevated frequency of interleukin (IL)-10-producing cells and reduced frequency of IL-6-producing cells compared to those before RYGB. When grouping B cell subsets into regulatory (secreting IL-10 and transforming growth factor beta [TGF-β]) and effector (secreting IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-12, interferon gamma [IFN-γ] and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) types, we found that after RYGB, the regulatory to effector B cell ratio was significantly increased. Function analyses showed that B cells before RYGB supported IL-17 secretion from T cells whereas these cells after RYGB lost such capacity. B cells after RYGB also gained the capacity to suppress T cell IFN-γ production through TGF-β-mediated effects, a feature not present in B cells before RYGB. Interestingly, the regulatory to effector B cell ratio was directly associated with the reductions in obesity markers following RYGB, such as BMI and fat mass percentage. Together, these results demonstrated a potential mechanism through which RYGB promoted amelioration of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [The biological reaction of inflammation, methylglyoxal of blood plasma, functional and structural alterations in elastic type arteries at the early stage of hypertension disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, V N; Dmitriev, V A; Oshchepkov, E V; Balakhonova, T V; Tripoten', M I; Shiriaeva, Iu K

    2012-08-01

    The article deals with studying of the relationship between biologic reaction of inflammation with glycosylation reaction and content of methylglyoxal in blood serum. The positive correlation between pulse wave velocity and content of methylglyoxal, C-reactive protein in intercellular medium and malleolar brachial index value was established. This data matches the experimental results concerning involvement of biological reaction of inflammation into structural changes of elastic type arteries under hypertension disease, formation of arteries' rigidity and increase of pulse wave velocity. The arterial blood pressure is a biological reaction of hydrodynamic pressure which is used in vivo by several biological functions: biological function of homeostasis, function of endoecology, biological function of adaptation and function of locomotion. The biological reaction of hydrodynamic (hydraulic) pressure is a mode of compensation of derangement of several biological functions which results in the very high rate of hypertension disease in population. As a matter of fact, hypertension disease is a syndrome of lingering pathological compensation by higher arterial blood pressure of the biological functions derangements occurring in the distal section at the level of paracrine cenoses of cells. The arterial blood pressure is a kind of in vivo integral indicator of deranged metabolism. The essential hypertension disease pathogenically is a result of the derangement of three biological functions: biological function of homeostasis, biological function of trophology - nutrition (biological reaction of external feeding - exotrophia) and biological function of endoecology. In case of "littering" of intercellular medium in vivo with nonspecific endogenic flogogens a phylogenetically earlier activation of biological reactions of excretion, inflammation and hydrodynamic arterial blood pressure occur. In case of derangement of biological function of homeostasis, decreasing of

  10. Systems and methods for producing metal clusters; functionalized surfaces; and droplets including solvated metal ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Li, Anyin; Luo, Qingjie

    2017-08-01

    The invention generally relates to systems and methods for producing metal clusters; functionalized surfaces; and droplets including solvated metal ions. In certain aspects, the invention provides methods that involve providing a metal and a solvent. The methods additionally involve applying voltage to the solvated metal to thereby produce solvent droplets including ions of the metal containing compound, and directing the solvent droplets including the metal ions to a target. In certain embodiments, once at the target, the metal ions can react directly or catalyze reactions.

  11. Redox regulation of cardiovascular inflammation - Immunomodulatory function of mitochondrial and Nox-derived reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Philip; Kossmann, Sabine; Münzel, Thomas; Daiber, Andreas

    2017-08-01

    Oxidative stress is a major hallmark of cardiovascular diseases although a causal link was so far not proven by large clinical trials. However, there is a close association between oxidative stress and inflammation and increasing evidence for a causal role of (low-grade) inflammation for the onset and progression of cardiovascular diseases, which may serve as the missing link between oxidative stress and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. With the present review we would like to highlight the multiple redox regulated pathways in inflammation, discuss the sources of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that are of interest for these processes and finally discuss the importance of angiotensin II (AT-II) as a trigger of cardiovascular inflammation and the initiation and progression of cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Bioenergetic dysfunction and inflammation in alzheimer's disease: a possible connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather M Wilkins

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is observed in Alzheimer’s disease (AD subject brains. Inflammation-relevant genes are increasingly implicated in AD genetic studies, and inflammatory cytokines to some extent even function as peripheral biomarkers. What underlies AD inflammation is unclear, but no foreign agent has been implicated. This suggests that internally produced damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs may drive inflammation in AD. A more complete characterization and understanding of AD-relevant DAMPs could advance our understanding of AD and suggest novel therapeutic strategies. In this review, we consider the possibility that mitochondria, intracellular organelles that resemble bacteria in many ways, trigger and maintain chronic inflammation in AD subjects. Data supporting the possible nexus between AD-associated bioenergetic dysfunction are discussed.

  13. Functionally graded Nylon-11/silica nanocomposites produced by selective laser sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Haseung; Das, Suman

    2008-01-01

    Selective laser sintering (SLS), a layered manufacturing-based freeform fabrication approach was explored for constructing three-dimensional structures in functionally graded polymer nanocomposites. Here, we report on the processing and properties of functionally graded polymer nanocomposites of Nylon-11 filled with 0-10% by volume of 15 nm fumed silica nanoparticles. SLS processing parameters for the different compositions were developed by design of experiments (DOE). The densities and micro/nanostructures of the nanocomposites were examined by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The tensile and compressive properties for each composition were then tested. These properties exhibit a nonlinear variation as a function of filler volume fraction. Finally, two component designs exhibiting a one-dimensional polymer nanocomposite material gradient were fabricated. The results indicate that particulate-filled functionally graded polymer nanocomposites exhibiting a one-dimensional composition gradient can be successfully processed by SLS to produce three-dimensional components with spatially varying mechanical properties

  14. Genomic and functional features of the biosurfactant producing Bacillus sp. AM13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaligram, Shraddha; Kumbhare, Shreyas V; Dhotre, Dhiraj P; Muddeshwar, Manohar G; Kapley, Atya; Joseph, Neetha; Purohit, Hemant P; Shouche, Yogesh S; Pawar, Shrikant P

    2016-09-01

    Genomic studies provide deeper insights into secondary metabolites produced by diverse bacterial communities, residing in various environmental niches. This study aims to understand the potential of a biosurfactant producing Bacillus sp. AM13, isolated from soil. An integrated approach of genomic and chemical analysis was employed to characterize the antibacterial lipopeptide produced by the strain AM13. Genome analysis revealed that strain AM13 harbors a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) cluster; highly similar with known biosynthetic gene clusters from surfactin family: lichenysin (85 %) and surfactin (78 %). These findings were substantiated with supplementary experiments of oil displacement assay and surface tension measurements, confirming the biosurfactant production. Further investigation using LCMS approach exhibited similarity of the biomolecule with biosurfactants of the surfactin family. Our consolidated effort of functional genomics provided chemical as well as genetic leads for understanding the biochemical characteristics of the bioactive compound.

  15. Microtopographic refuges shape consumer-producer dynamics by mediating consumer functional diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, Simon J; Bellwood, David R

    2016-09-01

    Consumer-producer dynamics are critical for ecosystem functioning. In marine environments, primary production is often subject to strong consumer control, and on coral reefs, the grazing pressure exerted by herbivorous fishes has been identified as a major determinant of benthic community structure. Using experimental surfaces, we demonstrate that on coral reefs, microtopographic refuges decrease the overall grazing pressure by more than one order of magnitude. Furthermore, by functionally characterizing consumer communities, we show that refuges also restrict grazer communities to only one functional group, algal croppers, which selectively remove the apical parts of algae. In contrast, detritivorous fishes, which intensively graze flat and exposed microhabitats and can remove both particulate matter and entire stands of algal filaments, are almost entirely excluded. This preclusion of an entire ecosystem process (the removal of particulates) results in two distinct coexisting benthic regimes: communities within refuges are diverse and characterized by numerous algal types and juvenile scleractinian corals, while communities outside refuges support only low-diversity assemblages dominated by simple, unbranched filamentous turf algal mats. Although limited to the scale of a few centimeters, microtopographic refuges can, therefore, mediate the biotic control of community development by affecting both overall grazing rates and the functional diversity of consumer communities. We suggest that the coexistence of two distinct benthic regimes at a small spatial scale may be an important factor for ecosystem functioning and highlight the need to consider the ecological complexity of consumer-producer dynamics when assessing the status of coral reef ecosystems.

  16. Quantitative culture of Chlamydia trachomatis: relationship of inclusion-forming units produced in culture to clinical manifestations and acute inflammation in urogenital disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, W M; Suchland, R J; Whittington, W L; Stamm, W E

    2001-11-15

    The relationship of Chlamydia trachomatis inclusion-forming units in quantitative culture to clinical manifestations and inflammation in urogenital disease was assessed in 1179 patients attending a sexually transmitted diseases clinic. In women, greater inclusion-forming unit counts were associated with cervical mucopus (3000 vs. 450 ifu), amount and character of cervical discharge, > or =30 polymorphonuclear cells (PMNL) per high-power field (hpf) on Gram stain (2050 vs. 320 ifu), and diagnoses of mucopurulent cervicitis (MPC; 2550 vs. 300 ifu) and pelvic inflammatory disease (PID; 3000 vs. 578 ifu). In men, greater inclusion-forming unit counts were associated with urethral discharge (85 vs. 44 ifu), amount and character of discharge, and > or =10 PMNL/hpf (95 vs. 50 ifu). These associations persisted on multivariate analysis. Thus, chlamydial replication is associated with MPC and PID in women, urethritis in men, and inflammation in both. Since infections with high inclusion counts may be the most transmissible, identification and treatment of patients with these chlamydia-associated syndromes is important in control programs.

  17. Comparative analysis of functional food producers' profitability in Serbia: A leader-follower relation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Draganac Dragana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The functional food market in Serbia is relatively young and insufficiently explored both from the aspects of producers and consumers, the qualitative aspect and especially from the quantitative aspect. The aim of this paper is to illustrate the results of the comprehensive quantitative financial analysis of profitability which focuses on the example of two companies. The main criterion applied in the selection of companies for the analysis represents the fact that one company is recognizable as a producer of foods with nutritive and health claims and is a leader within that market segment, whereas the other analyzed company mostly produces traditional products and has entered the aforementioned market segment at a later stage. The key idea is to do a comparative analysis of the profitability of these two companies for a four-year period. The profitability ratio analysis and the Du Pont analysis system are used in the paper as well as the analysis of solvency and financial leverage effect. The vertical analysis of income statement is also done in order to reveal the relation between some cost categories and operating revenues. The research results lead to a conclusion that the company that mostly produces functional foods has higher profit margins and rates of return and is therefore in a more favourable position since it can benefit from positive effects of financial leverage to a higher extent. The profitability of the second relevant company is mostly based on the better asset turnover.

  18. Increased recruitment but impaired function of leukocytes during inflammation in mouse models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrika Sofia Pettersson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients suffering from diabetes show defective bacterial clearance. This study investigates the effects of elevated plasma glucose levels during diabetes on leukocyte recruitment and function in established models of inflammation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Diabetes was induced in C57Bl/6 mice by intravenous alloxan (causing severe hyperglycemia, or by high fat diet (moderate hyperglycemia. Leukocyte recruitment was studied in anaesthetized mice using intravital microscopy of exposed cremaster muscles, where numbers of rolling, adherent and emigrated leukocytes were quantified before and during exposure to the inflammatory chemokine MIP-2 (0.5 nM. During basal conditions, prior to addition of chemokine, the adherent and emigrated leukocytes were increased in both alloxan- (62±18% and 85±21%, respectively and high fat diet-induced (77±25% and 86±17%, respectively diabetes compared to control mice. MIP-2 induced leukocyte emigration in all groups, albeit significantly more cells emigrated in alloxan-treated mice (15.3±1.0 compared to control (8.0±1.1 mice. Bacterial clearance was followed for 10 days after subcutaneous injection of bioluminescent S. aureus using non-invasive IVIS imaging, and the inflammatory response was assessed by Myeloperoxidase-ELISA and confocal imaging. The phagocytic ability of leukocytes was assessed using LPS-coated fluorescent beads and flow cytometry. Despite efficient leukocyte recruitment, alloxan-treated mice demonstrated an impaired ability to clear bacterial infection, which we found correlated to a 50% decreased phagocytic ability of leukocytes in diabetic mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that reduced ability to clear bacterial infections observed during experimentally induced diabetes is not due to reduced leukocyte recruitment since sustained hyperglycemia results in increased levels of adherent and emigrated leukocytes in mouse models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes

  19. Effects of N-acetyl-cysteine on endothelial function and inflammation in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Cohen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial dysfunction has been associated with premature vascular disease. There is increasing data that N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC may prevent or improve endothelial dysfunction. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of NAC on endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, a population at high risk for endothelial dysfunction. Twenty-four patients with diabetes mellitus were assigned randomly to initial therapy with either 900 mg NAC or placebo twice daily in a double-blind, cross-over study design. Flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD of the brachial artery was assessed at baseline, after four weeks of therapy, after a four-week wash-out period, and after another four weeks on the opposite treatment. Plasma and red blood cell glutathione levels and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP were measured at all four visits. At baseline, FMD was moderately impaired (3.7±2.9%. There was no significant change in FMD after four weeks of NAC therapy as compared to placebo (0.1±3.6% vs. 1.2±4.2%. Similarly, there was no significant change in glutathione levels. However, median CRP decreased from 2.35 to 2.14 mg/L during NAC therapy (p=0.04, while it increased from 2.24 to 2.65 mg/L with placebo. No side effects were noted during the treatment period. In this double-blind, randomized cross-over study, four weeks of oral NAC therapy failed to improve endothelial dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus. However, NAC therapy decreased CRP levels, suggesting that this compound may have some efficacy in reducing systemic inflammation.

  20. Wavefield iterative deconvolution to remove multiples and produce phase specific Ps receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainiwaer, A.; Gurrola, H.

    2018-03-01

    Common conversion point stacking or migration of receiver functions (RFs) and H-k (H is depth and k is Vp/Vs) stacking of RFs has become a common method to study the crust and upper mantle beneath broad-band three-component seismic stations. However, it can be difficult to interpret Pds RFs due to interference between the Pds, PPds and PSds phases, especially in the mantle portion of the lithosphere. We propose a phase separation method to isolate the prominent phases of the RFs and produce separate Pds, PPds and PSds `phase specific' receiver functions (referred to as PdsRFs, PPdsRFs and PSdsRFs, respectively) by deconvolution of the wavefield rather than single seismograms. One of the most important products of this deconvolution method is to produce Ps receiver functions (PdsRFs) that are free of crustal multiples. This is accomplished by using H-k analysis to identify specific phases in the wavefield from all seismograms recorded at a station which enables development of an iterative deconvolution procedure to produce the above-mentioned phase specific RFs. We refer to this method as wavefield iterative deconvolution (WID). The WID method differentiates and isolates different RF phases by exploiting their differences in moveout curves across the entire wave front. We tested the WID by applying it to synthetic seismograms produced using a modified version of the PREM velocity model. The WID effectively separates phases from each stacked RF in synthetic data. We also applied this technique to produce RFs from seismograms recorded at ARU (a broad-band station in Arti, Russia). The phase specific RFs produced using WID are easier to interpret than traditional RFs. The PdsRFs computed using WID are the most improved, owing to the distinct shape of its moveout curves as compared to the moveout curves for the PPds and PSds phases. The importance of this WID method is most significant in reducing interference between phases for depths of less than 300 km. Phases from

  1. Lactococcus lactis carrying the pValac eukaryotic expression vector coding for IL-4 reduces chemically-induced intestinal inflammation by increasing the levels of IL-10-producing regulatory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Bianca Mendes; Preisser, Tatiane Melo; Pereira, Vanessa Bastos; Zurita-Turk, Meritxell; de Castro, Camila Prósperi; da Cunha, Vanessa Pecini; de Oliveira, Rafael Pires; Gomes-Santos, Ana Cristina; de Faria, Ana Maria Caetano; Machado, Denise Carmona Cara; Chatel, Jean-Marc; Azevedo, Vasco Ariston de Carvalho; Langella, Philippe; Miyoshi, Anderson

    2016-08-30

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation that leads to severe destruction of the intestinal mucosa. Therefore, the understanding of their aetiology as well as the development of new medicines is an important step for the treatment of such diseases. Consequently, the development of Lactococcus lactis strains capable of delivering a eukaryotic expression vector encoding the interleukin 4 (IL-4) of Mus musculus would represent a new strategy for the elaboration of a more effective alternative therapy against Crohn's disease. The murine IL-4 ORF was cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pValac::dts. The resulting plasmid-pValac::dts::IL-4-was transfected into CHO cells so that its functionality could be evaluated in vitro. With fluorescent confocal microscopy, flow cytometry and ELISA, it was observed that pValac::dts::IL-4-transfected cells produced IL-4, while non-transfected cells and cells transfected with the empty vector did not. Then, pValac::dts::IL-4 was inserted into L. lactis MG1363 FnBPA(+) in order to evaluate the therapeutic potential of the recombinant strain against TNBS-induced colitis. Intragastric administration of L. lactis MG1363 FnBPA(+) (pValac::dts::IL-4) was able to decrease the severity of colitis, with animals showing decreased levels of IL-12, IL-6 and MPO activity; and increased levels of IL-4 and IL-10. Finally, LP-isolated cells from mice administered TNBS were immunophenotyped so that the main IL-4 and IL-10 producers were identified. Mice administered the recombinant strain presented significantly higher percentages of F4/80(+)MHCII(+)Ly6C(-)IL-4(+), F4/80(+)MHCII(+)Ly6C(-)IL-10(+), F4/80(+)MHCII(+)Ly6C(-)CD206(+)CD124(+)IL-10(+) and CD4(+)Foxp3(+)IL10(+) cells compared to the other groups. This study shows that L. lactis MG1363 FnBPA(+) (pValac::dts::IL-4) is a good candidate to maintain the anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory balance in the gastrointestinal tract, increasing the levels

  2. Microbial ecology of fermentative hydrogen producing bioprocesses: useful insights for driving the ecosystem function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrol, Lea; Marone, Antonella; Tapia-Venegas, Estela; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Ruiz-Filippi, Gonzalo; Trably, Eric

    2017-03-01

    One of the most important biotechnological challenges is to develop environment friendly technologies to produce new sources of energy. Microbial production of biohydrogen through dark fermentation, by conversion of residual biomass, is an attractive solution for short-term development of bioH2 producing processes. Efficient biohydrogen production relies on complex mixed communities working in tight interaction. Species composition and functional traits are of crucial importance to maintain the ecosystem service. The analysis of microbial community revealed a wide phylogenetic diversity that contributes in different-and still mostly unclear-ways to hydrogen production. Bridging this gap of knowledge between microbial ecology features and ecosystem functionality is essential to optimize the bioprocess and develop strategies toward a maximization of the efficiency and stability of substrate conversion. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of the most up-to-date biodata available and discuss the main microbial community features of biohydrogen engineered ecosystems, with a special emphasis on the crucial role of interactions and the relationships between species composition and ecosystem service. The elucidation of intricate relationships between community structure and ecosystem function would make possible to drive ecosystems toward an improved functionality on the basis of microbial ecology principles. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Consuming a balanced high fat diet for 16 weeks improves body composition, inflammation and vascular function parameters in obese premenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Heidi J; Kang, Hakmook; Keil, Charles D; Muldowney, James A; Kocalis, Heidi; Fazio, Sergio; Vaughan, Douglas E; Niswender, Kevin D

    2014-04-01

    Inflammation, insulin resistance and vascular dysfunction characterize obesity and predict development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although women experience CVD events at an older age, vascular dysfunction is evident 10years prior to coronary artery disease. Questions remain whether replacing SFA entirely with MUFA or PUFA is the optimal approach for cardiometabolic benefits. This study tested the hypotheses that: a) body composition, inflammation and vascular function would improve with a high fat diet (HFD) when type of fat is balanced as 1/3 SFA, 1/3 MUFA and 1/3 PUFA; and b) body composition, inflammation and vascular function would improve more when balanced HFD is supplemented with 18C fatty acids, in proportion to the degree of 18C unsaturation. Obese premenopausal women were stabilized on balanced HFD and randomized to consume 9g/d of encapsulated stearate (18:0), oleate (18:1), linoleate (18:2) or placebo. Significant improvements occurred in fat oxidation rate (↑6%), body composition (%fat: ↓2.5±2.1%; %lean: ↑2.5±2.1%), inflammation (↓ IL-1α, IL-1β, 1L-12, Il-17, IFNγ, TNFα, TNFβ) and vascular function (↓BP, ↓PAI-1, ↑tPA activity). When compared to HFD+placebo, HFD+stearate had the greatest effect on reducing IFNγ (↓74%) and HFD+linoleate had the greatest effect on reducing PAI-1 (↓31%). Balancing the type of dietary fat consumed (SFA/MUFA/PUFA) is a feasible strategy to positively affect markers of CVD risk. Moreover, reductions in inflammatory molecules involved in vascular function might be enhanced when intake of certain 18C fatty acids is supplemented. Long term effects need to be determined for this approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. CONSUMING A BALANCED HIGH FAT DIET FOR 16 WEEKS IMPROVES BODY COMPOSITION, INFLAMMATION AND VASCULAR FUNCTION PARAMETERS IN OBESE PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Heidi J.; Kang, Hakmook; Keil, Charles D.; Muldowney, James A.; Kocalis, Heidi; Fazio, Sergio; Vaughan, Douglas E.; Niswender, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Inflammation, insulin resistance and vascular dysfunction characterize obesity and predict development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although women experience CVD events at an older age, vascular dysfunction is evident 10 years prior to coronary artery disease. Questions remain whether replacing SFA entirely with MUFA or PUFA is the optimal approach for cardiometabolic benefits. This study tested the hypotheses that: a) body composition, inflammation and vascular function would improve with a high fat diet (HFD) when type of fat is balanced as 1/3 SFA, 1/3 MUFA and 1/3 PUFA; and b) body composition, inflammation and vascular function would improve more when balanced HFD is supplemented with 18C fatty acids, in proportion to the degree of 18C unsaturation. Methods Obese premenopausal women were stabilized on balanced HFD and randomized to consume 9 g/d of encapsulated stearate (18:0), oleate (18:1), linoleate (18:2) or placebo. Results Significant improvements occurred in fat oxidation rate (↑6%), body composition (%fat: ↓2.5 ± 2.1%; %lean: ↑2.5 ± 2.1%), inflammation (↓ IL-1α, IL-1β, 1L-12, Il-17, IFNγ, TNFα, TNFβ) and vascular function (↓BP, ↓PAI-1, ↑tPA activity). When compared to HFD+placebo, HFD+stearate had the greatest effect on reducing IFNγ (↓74%) and HFD+linoleate had the greatest effect on reducing PAI-1 (↓31%). Conclusions Balancing the type of dietary fat consumed (SFA/MUFA/PUFA) is a feasible strategy to positively affect markers of CVD risk. Moreover, reductions in inflammatory molecules involved in vascular function might be enhanced when intake of certain 18C fatty acids is supplemented. Long term effects need to be determined for this approach. PMID:24559846

  5. The association of dietary intake and supplementation of specific polyunsaturated fatty acids with inflammation and functional capacity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Atlantis, Evan; Cochrane, Belinda

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: This systematic review sought to identify the association of dietary intake and supplementation of specific polyunsaturated fatty acids with inflammation and function in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Data sources: We searched electronic databases including PubMed, CINAHL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, Scopus, Google Scholar, Trove, and WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform and reference l...

  6. The regulation of function, growth and survival of GLP-1-producing L-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhre, Rune Ehrenreich; Holst, Jens Juul; Kappe, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    that regulate the growth, survival and function of these cells are largely unknown. We recently showed that prolonged exposure to high concentrations of the fatty acid palmitate induced lipotoxic effects, similar to those operative in insulin-producing cells, in an in vitro model of GLP-1-producing cells......Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a peptide hormone, released from intestinal L-cells in response to hormonal, neural and nutrient stimuli. In addition to potentiation of meal-stimulated insulin secretion, GLP-1 signalling exerts numerous pleiotropic effects on various tissues, regulating energy....... The mechanisms inducing this lipototoxicity involved increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this review, regulation of GLP-1-secreting cells is discussed, with a focus on the mechanisms underlying GLP-1 secretion, long-term regulation of growth, differentiation and survival under normal...

  7. An intranasal selective antisense oligonucleotide impairs lung cyclooxygenase-2 production and improves inflammation, but worsens airway function, in house dust mite sensitive mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pujols Laura

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite its reported pro-inflammatory activity, cyclooxygenase (COX-2 has been proposed to play a protective role in asthma. Accordingly, COX-2 might be down-regulated in the airway cells of asthmatics. This, together with results of experiments to assess the impact of COX-2 blockade in ovalbumin (OVA-sensitized mice in vivo, led us to propose a novel experimental approach using house dust mite (HDM-sensitized mice in which we mimicked altered regulation of COX-2. Methods Allergic inflammation was induced in BALBc mice by intranasal exposure to HDM for 10 consecutive days. This model reproduces spontaneous exposure to aeroallergens by asthmatic patients. In order to impair, but not fully block, COX-2 production in the airways, some of the animals received an intranasal antisense oligonucleotide. Lung COX-2 expression and activity were measured along with bronchovascular inflammation, airway reactivity, and prostaglandin production. Results We observed impaired COX-2 mRNA and protein expression in the lung tissue of selective oligonucleotide-treated sensitized mice. This was accompanied by diminished production of mPGE synthase and PGE2 in the airways. In sensitized mice, the oligonucleotide induced increased airway hyperreactivity (AHR to methacholine, but a substantially reduced bronchovascular inflammation. Finally, mRNA levels of hPGD synthase remained unchanged. Conclusion Intranasal antisense therapy against COX-2 in vivo mimicked the reported impairment of COX-2 regulation in the airway cells of asthmatic patients. This strategy revealed an unexpected novel dual effect: inflammation was improved but AHR worsened. This approach will provide insights into the differential regulation of inflammation and lung function in asthma, and will help identify pharmacological targets within the COX-2/PG system.

  8. Post-ischemic inflammation regulates neural damage and protection

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    Takashi eShichita

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Post-ischemic inflammation is important in ischemic stroke pathology. However, details of the inflammation process, its resolution after stroke and its effect on pathology and neural damage have not been clarified. Brain swelling, which is often fatal in ischemic stroke patients, occurs at an early stage of stroke due to endothelial cell injury and severe inflammation by infiltrated mononuclear cells including macrophages, neutrophils, and lymphocytes. At early stage of inflammation, macrophages are activated by molecules released from necrotic cells (danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs, and inflammatory cytokines and mediators that increase ischemic brain damage by disruption of the blood-brain barrier are released. After post-ischemic inflammation, macrophages function as scavengers of necrotic cell and brain tissue debris. Such macrophages are also involved in tissue repair and neural cell regeneration by producing tropic factors. The mechanisms of inflammation resolution and conversion of inflammation to neuroprotection are largely unknown. In this review, we summarize information accumulated recently about DAMP-induced inflammation and the neuroprotective effects of inflammatory cells, and discuss next generation strategies to treat ischemic stroke.

  9. Siglec-7 restores β-cell function and survival and reduces inflammation in pancreatic islets from patients with diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dharmadhikari, Gitanjali; Stolz, Katharina; Hauke, Michael; Morgan, Noel G; Varki, Ajit; de Koning, Eelco; Kelm, Sørge; Maedler, Kathrin

    2017-01-01

    Chronic inflammation plays a key role in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Cytokine and chemokine production within the islets in a diabetic milieu results in β-cell failure and diabetes progression. Identification of targets, which both prevent macrophage activation and infiltration into islets and

  10. Gene Expression Architecture of Mouse Dorsal and Tail Skin Reveals Functional Differences in Inflammation and Cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inherited germline polymorphisms can cause gene expression levels in normal tissues to differ substantially between individuals. We present an analysis of the genetic architecture of normal adult skin from 470 genetically unique mice, demonstrating the effect of germline variants, skin tissue location, and perturbation by exogenous inflammation or tumorigenesis on gene signaling pathways.

  11. Functional contribution of elevated circulating and hepatic non-classical CD14CD16 monocytes to inflammation and human liver fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning W Zimmermann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Monocyte-derived macrophages critically perpetuate inflammatory responses after liver injury as a prerequisite for organ fibrosis. Experimental murine models identified an essential role for the CCR2-dependent infiltration of classical Gr1/Ly6C(+ monocytes in hepatic fibrosis. Moreover, the monocyte-related chemokine receptors CCR1 and CCR5 were recently recognized as important fibrosis modulators in mice. In humans, monocytes consist of classical CD14(+CD16(- and non-classical CD14(+CD16(+ cells. We aimed at investigating the relevance of monocyte subpopulations for human liver fibrosis, and hypothesized that 'non-classical' monocytes critically exert inflammatory as well as profibrogenic functions in patients during liver disease progression. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed circulating monocyte subsets from freshly drawn blood samples of 226 patients with chronic liver disease (CLD and 184 healthy controls by FACS analysis. Circulating monocytes were significantly expanded in CLD-patients compared to controls with a marked increase of the non-classical CD14(+CD16(+ subset that showed an activated phenotype in patients and correlated with proinflammatory cytokines and clinical progression. Correspondingly, CD14(+CD16(+ macrophages massively accumulated in fibrotic/cirrhotic livers, as evidenced by immunofluorescence and FACS. Ligands of monocyte-related chemokine receptors CCR2, CCR1 and CCR5 were expressed at higher levels in fibrotic and cirrhotic livers, while CCL3 and CCL4 were also systemically elevated in CLD-patients. Isolated monocyte/macrophage subpopulations were functionally characterized regarding cytokine/chemokine expression and interactions with primary human hepatic stellate cells (HSC in vitro. CD14(+CD16(+ monocytes released abundant proinflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, CD14(+CD16(+, but not CD14(+CD16(- monocytes could directly activate collagen-producing HSC. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data

  12. Aging and low-grade inflammation reduce renal function in middle-aged and older adults in Japan and the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello-White, Reagan; Ryff, Carol D; Coe, Christopher L

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of low-grade inflammation on age-related changes in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in middle-aged and older white Americans, African-Americans, and Japanese adults. Serum creatinine, C-reactive protein (CRP), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were determined for 1570 adult participants in two surveys of aging in the USA and Japan (N = 1188 and 382, respectively). Kidney function declined with age in both countries and was associated with IL-6 and CRP. IL-6 and CRP also influenced the extent of the arithmetic bias when calculating the GFR using the chronic kidney disease epidemiology (CKD-EPI) formula with just serum creatinine. Younger African-Americans initially had the highest GFR but showed a steep age-related decrement that was associated with elevated inflammation. Japanese adults had the lowest average GFR but evinced a large effect of increased inflammatory activity when over 70 years of age. Importantly, our results also indicate that low-grade inflammation is important to consider when evaluating kidney function solely from serum creatinine.

  13. Composition, Structure and Functional Properties of Protein Concentrates and Isolates Produced from Walnut (Juglans regia L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoying Mao

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, composition, structure and the functional properties of protein concentrate (WPC and protein isolate (WPI produced from defatted walnut flour (DFWF were investigated. The results showed that the composition and structure of walnut protein concentrate (WPC and walnut protein isolate (WPI were significantly different. The molecular weight distribution of WPI was uniform and the protein composition of DFWF and WPC was complex with the protein aggregation. H0 of WPC was significantly higher ( p < 0.05 than those of DFWF and WPI, whilst WPI had a higher H0 compared to DFWF. The secondary structure of WPI was similar to WPC. WPI showed big flaky plate like structures; whereas WPC appeared as a small flaky and more compact structure. The most functional properties of WPI were better than WPC. In comparing most functional properties of WPI and WPC with soybean protein concentrate and isolate, WPI and WPC showed higher fat absorption capacity (FAC. Emulsifying properties and foam properties of WPC and WPI in alkaline pH were comparable with that of soybean protein concentrate and isolate. Walnut protein concentrates and isolates can be considered as potential functional food ingredients.

  14. Composition, structure and functional properties of protein concentrates and isolates produced from walnut (Juglans regia L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiaoying; Hua, Yufei

    2012-01-01

    In this study, composition, structure and the functional properties of protein concentrate (WPC) and protein isolate (WPI) produced from defatted walnut flour (DFWF) were investigated. The results showed that the composition and structure of walnut protein concentrate (WPC) and walnut protein isolate (WPI) were significantly different. The molecular weight distribution of WPI was uniform and the protein composition of DFWF and WPC was complex with the protein aggregation. H(0) of WPC was significantly higher (p WPC. WPI showed big flaky plate like structures; whereas WPC appeared as a small flaky and more compact structure. The most functional properties of WPI were better than WPC. In comparing most functional properties of WPI and WPC with soybean protein concentrate and isolate, WPI and WPC showed higher fat absorption capacity (FAC). Emulsifying properties and foam properties of WPC and WPI in alkaline pH were comparable with that of soybean protein concentrate and isolate. Walnut protein concentrates and isolates can be considered as potential functional food ingredients.

  15. Evaluation and functional characterization of a biosurfactant produced by Lactobacillus plantarum CFR 2194.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhu, Arenahalli Ningegowda; Prapulla, Siddalingaiya Gurudutt

    2014-02-01

    The study details the investigations on the ability of Lactobacillus plantarum CFR 2194, an isolate from kanjika, a rice-based ayurvedic fermented product, to produce biosurfactant. Surfactant production, as a function of fermentation time, indicates that the maximum production occurred at 72 h under stationary conditions. Isolation, partial purification, and characterization of the biosurfactant produced have been carried out, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra demonstrated that biosurfactants were constituted by protein and polysaccharide fractions, i.e., possessed the structure typical of glycoprotein, which is affected by the medium composition and the phase of growth of the biosurfactant-synthesizing strain. Critical micelle concentration (cmc) of the biosurfactant was found to be 6 g l(-1). The emulsification index (EI), emulsification activity (EA), and emulsion stability (ES) values of the biosurfactant have confirmed its emulsification property. Aqueous fractions of the produced biosurfactant exhibited a significant antimicrobial activity against the food-borne pathogenic species: Escherichia coli ATCC 31705, E. coli MTCC 108, Salmonella typhi, Yersinia enterocolitica MTCC 859, and Staphylococcus aureus F 722. More importantly, the biosurfactant from L. plantarum showed antiadhesive property against above food-borne pathogens. The results thus indicate the potential for developing strategies to prevent microbial colonization of food contact surfaces and health-care prosthesis using these biosurfactants.

  16. Effects of bacteria-produced human alpha, beta, and gamma interferons on in vitro immune functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalaby, M R; Weck, P K; Rinderknecht, E; Harkins, R N; Frane, J W; Ross, M J

    1984-04-01

    The effects of bacteria-produced human interferons (HuIFN) alpha, beta, and gamma on in vitro immune functions of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were studied. Proliferative response to phytohemagglutinin was significantly inhibited by the addition of HuIFN-alpha 2 or HuIFN-beta at 10, 100, or 1000 U/ml. In contrast, HuIFN-gamma showed suppressive activities only when added at 1000 U/ml. HuIFN-alpha 2 or HuIFN-beta caused significant inhibition of human mixed-lymphocyte reaction (MLR) as measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation. Similar inhibition was caused by HuIFN-gamma when it was added only at very low concentrations (1 U/ml); 10, 100, or 1000 U/ml resulted in no or only a modest increase in MLR. All three interferons exhibited dose-related effects on PWM-induced immunoglobulin synthesis in cultures of PBMC. These data demonstrate that purified interferons produced by recombinant DNA technology can significantly alter in vitro immune functions and that HuIFN-gamma has properties which are different from those of HuIFN-alpha 2 or HuIFN-beta.

  17. Recent Progress in Producing Lignin-Based Carbon Fibers for Functional Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Ryan [GrafTech International Holdings Inc.; Burwell, Deanna [GrafTech International Holdings Inc.; Dai, Xuliang [GrafTech International Holdings Inc.; Naskar, Amit [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Gallego, Nidia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Akato, Kokouvi [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    2015-10-29

    Lignin, a biopolymer, has been investigated as a renewable and low-cost carbon fiber precursor since the 1960s. Although successful lab-scale production of lignin-based carbon fibers has been reported, there are currently not any commercial producers. This paper will highlight some of the known challenges with converting lignin-based precursors into carbon fiber, and the reported methods for purifying and modifying lignin to improve it as a precursor. Several of the challenges with lignin are related to its diversity in chemical structure and purity, depending on its biomass source (e.g. hardwood, softwood, grasses) and extraction method (e.g. organosolv, kraft). In order to make progress in this field, GrafTech and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are collaborating to develop lignin-based carbon fiber technology and to demonstrate it in functional applications, as part of a cooperative agreement with the DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office. The progress made to date with producing lignin-based carbon fiber for functional applications, as well as developing and qualifying a supply chain and value proposition, are also highlighted.

  18. Conformational and functional variants of CD44-targeted protein nanoparticles bio-produced in bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesarrodona, Mireia; Conchillo-Solé, Oscar; Unzueta, Ugutz; Xu, Zhikun; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Daura, Xavier; Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio; Fernández, Yolanda; Foradada, Laia; Schwartz, Simó Jr; Abasolo, Ibane; Sánchez-Chardi, Alejandro; Roldán, Mónica; Villegas, Sandra; Rinas, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Biofabrication is attracting interest as a means to produce nanostructured functional materials because of its operational versatility and full scalability. Materials based on proteins are especially appealing, as the structure and functionality of proteins can be adapted by genetic engineering. Furthermore, strategies and tools for protein production have been developed and refined steadily for more than 30 years. However, protein conformation and therefore activity might be sensitive to production conditions. Here, we have explored whether the downstream strategy influences the structure and biological activities, in vitro and in vivo, of a self-assembling, CD44-targeted protein-only nanoparticle produced in Escherichia coli. This has been performed through the comparative analysis of particles built from soluble protein species or protein versions obtained by in vitro protein extraction from inclusion bodies, through mild, non-denaturing procedures. These methods have been developed recently as a convenient alternative to the use of toxic chaotropic agents for protein resolubilization from protein aggregates. The results indicate that the resulting material shows substantial differences in its physicochemical properties and its biological performance at the systems level, and that its building blocks are sensitive to the particular protein source. (paper)

  19. Physicochemical, functional and pasting properties of flour produced from gamma irradiated tiger nut (Cyperus esculentus L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocloo, Fidelis C.K.; Okyere, Abenaa A.; Asare, Isaac K.

    2014-01-01

    Tiger nut (Cyperus esculentus L.) has been recognised as one of the best nutritional crops that can be used to augment the Ghanaian diet. The application of gamma irradiation as means of preserving tiger nut could modify the characteristics of resultant flour. The purpose of this study was to determine the physicochemical, functional and pasting characteristics of flour from gamma irradiated tiger nut. The yellow and black types of tiger nut were sorted, washed and dried in an air-oven at 60 o C for 24 h. The dried tiger nut samples were irradiated at 0.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 kGy and then flours produced from them. Moisture, ash, pH, titratable acidity, water and oil absorption capacities, swelling power, solubility, bulk density and pasting properties of the flours were determined using appropriate analytical methods. Results showed that irradiation did not significantly (P>0.05) affect the moisture and ash contents of the resultant flours. Gamma irradiation significantly (P≤0.05) increased titratable acidity with concomitant decrease in pH of the flours. No significant differences were observed for water and oil absorption capacities, swelling power as well as bulk density. Solubility significantly (P≤0.05) increased generally with irradiation dose. Peak viscosity, viscosities at 92 °C and 55 °C, breakdown and setback viscosities decreased significantly with irradiation dose. Flour produced from irradiated tiger nut has a potential in complementary food formulations due to its low viscosity and increased solubility values. - Highlights: • Physicochemical, functional and pasting characteristics of flour from gamma irradiated tiger nut were studied. • Irradiation did not affect the moisture and ash contents of the resultant flours. • Titratable acidity increased with decrease in pH of the flours from the irradiated tiger nut. • Solubility increased whereas peak viscosity decreased with irradiation dose. • Flour produced from irradiated tiger nut has a

  20. Endometriosis and possible inflammation markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Hsing Wu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. Infiltration of peritoneal macrophages and local proinflammatory mediators in the peritoneal microenvironment affect ovarian function and pelvic anatomy leading to the symptoms and signs of endometriosis. The identification of a noninvasive marker for endometriosis will facilitate early diagnosis and treatment of this disease. This review provides an overview of local microenvironmental inflammation and systemic inflammation biomarkers in endometriosis.

  1. Elevated plasma levels of pigment epithelium-derived factor correlated with inflammation and lung function in COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li X

    2015-03-01

    diagnose COPD patients and we also analyzed the correlation between PEDF and lung function.Results: First, we found that the expression of PEDF in cigarette smoke extract-treated cells increased 16.2-fold when compared with the control group. Next, we confirmed that 4 weeks’ exposure to cigarette smoke can upregulate PEDF levels in rat lung tissues. We also discovered that plasma PEDF in COPD patients was significantly increased when compared with either healthy nonsmoking or smoking subjects. Furthermore, circulating PEDF was correlated with inflammatory cytokine and blood neutrophil numbers, but it was reversely associated with a decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 second percent predicted.Conclusion: Our findings provide a novel link between PEDF and COPD. Elevated PEDF levels may be involved in promoting the development of COPD by performing proinflammatory functions. Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pigment epithelium-derived factor, cigarette smoke, inflammation

  2. Biocatalysis for the production of industrial products and functional foods from rice and other agricultural produce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoh, Casimir C; Chang, Shu-Wei; Lee, Guan-Chiun; Shaw, Jei-Fu

    2008-11-26

    Many industrial products and functional foods can be obtained from cheap and renewable raw agricultural materials. For example, starch can be converted to bioethanol as biofuel to reduce the current demand for petroleum or fossil fuel energy. On the other hand, starch can also be converted to useful functional ingredients, such as high fructose and high maltose syrups, wine, glucose, and trehalose. The conversion process involves fermentation by microorganisms and use of biocatalysts such as hydrolases of the amylase superfamily. Amylases catalyze the process of liquefaction and saccharification of starch. It is possible to perform complete hydrolysis of starch by using the fusion product of both linear and debranching thermostable enzymes. This will result in saving energy otherwise needed for cooling before the next enzyme can act on the substrate, if a sequential process is utilized. Recombinant enzyme technology, protein engineering, and enzyme immobilization are powerful tools available to enhance the activity of enzymes, lower the cost of enzyme through large scale production in a heterologous host, increase their thermostability, improve pH stability, enhance their productivity, and hence making it competitive with the chemical processes involved in starch hydrolysis and conversions. This review emphasizes the potential of using biocatalysis for the production of useful industrial products and functional foods from cheap agricultural produce and transgenic plants. Rice was selected as a typical example to illustrate many applications of biocatalysis in converting low-value agricultural produce to high-value commercial food and industrial products. The greatest advantages of using enzymes for food processing and for industrial production of biobased products are their environmental friendliness and consumer acceptance as being a natural process.

  3. Beneficial effects of an alternating high- fat dietary regimen on systemic insulin resistance, hepatic and renal inflammation and renal function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopala K Yakala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An Alternating high- cholesterol dietary regimen has proven to be beneficial when compared to daily high- cholesterol feeding. In the current study we explored whether the same strategy is applicable to a high- fat dietary regimen. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether an alternating high- fat dietary regimen can effectively diminish insulin resistance, hepatic and renal inflammation and renal dysfunction as compared to a continuous high- fat diet. DESIGN: Four groups of male ApoE*3Leiden mice (n=15 were exposed to different diet regimens for 20 weeks as follows: Group 1: low- fat diet (10 kcal% fat; Group 2: intermediate- fat diet (25 kcal% fat; Group 3: high- fat diet (45 kcal% fat and Group 4: alternating- fat diet (10 kcal% fat for 4 days and 45 kcal% fat for 3 days in a week. RESULTS: Compared to high fat diet feeding, the alternating and intermediate- fat diet groups had reduced body weight gain and did not develop insulin resistance or albuminuria. In addition, in the alternating and intermediate- fat diet groups, parameters of tissue inflammation were markedly reduced compared to high fat diet fed mice. CONCLUSION: Both alternating and intermediate- fat feeding were beneficial in terms of reducing body weight gain, insulin resistance, hepatic and renal inflammation and renal dysfunction. Thus beneficial effects of alternating feeding regimens on cardiometabolic risk factors are not only applicable for cholesterol containing diets but can be extended to diets high in fat content.

  4. Effect of tiotropium bromide combined with salmeterol fluticasone inhalation on airway function and airway inflammation in patients with moderate-severe stable COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Xiang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the effect of tiotropium bromide combined with salmeterol fluticasone inhalation on airway function and airway inflammation in patients with moderate-severe stable COPD. Methods: A total of 118 patients with moderate-severe stable COPD were randomly divided into observation group and control group (n=59, control group accepted routine treatment, observation group received tiotropium bromide combined with salmeterol fluticasone inhalation treatment, and then differences in the levels of small airway function and airway wall parameters, the content of inflammatory factors and chemokines in serum and so on were compared between two groups of patients after 2 weeks of treatment. Results: After 2 weeks of treatment, small airway function parameters FEF25, FEF25-75 and FEF75 levels of observation group were significantly higher than those of control group, airway wall parameters WT, WA and T/D levels were significantly lower than those of control group, and AI level was significantly higher than that of control group; MIP-1α, PCT, NF-κ B, IL-6, CRP, Eotaxin, CCL18, Lymphotactin, sFKN and MCP-1 content in serum of observation group were significantly lower than those of control group while sTNFR content was significantly higher than that of control group. Conclusions: Tiotropium bromide combined with salmeterol fluticasone inhalation therapy can optimize the overall condition in patients with moderatesevere stable COPD, which is specifically reflected on the control of the airway function and the degree of inflammation.

  5. Metrological Aspects of Surface Topographies Produced by Different Machining Operations Regarding Their Potential Functionality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żak Krzysztof

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive methodology for measuring and characterizing the surface topographies on machined steel parts produced by precision machining operations. The performed case studies concern a wide spectrum of topographic features of surfaces with different geometrical structures but the same values of the arithmetic mean height Sa. The tested machining operations included hard turning operations performed with CBN tools, grinding operations with Al2O3 ceramic and CBN wheels and superfinish using ceramic stones. As a result, several characteristic surface textures with the Sa roughness parameter value of about 0.2 μm were thoroughly characterized and compared regarding their potential functional capabilities. Apart from the standard 2D and 3D roughness parameters, the fractal, motif and frequency parameters were taken in the consideration.

  6. Ethyl-cellulose rumen-protected methionine alleviates inflammation and oxidative stress and improves neutrophil function during the periparturient period and early lactation in Holstein dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batistel, F; Arroyo, J M; Garces, C I M; Trevisi, E; Parys, C; Ballou, M A; Cardoso, F C; Loor, J J

    2018-01-01

    The periparturient period is the most critical phase in the productive cycle of dairy cows and is characterized by impairment of the immune system. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of feeding ethyl-cellulose rumen-protected methionine (RPM) starting at d -28 from expected parturition through 60 d in milk on biomarkers of inflammation, oxidative stress, and liver function as well as leukocyte function. Sixty multiparous Holstein cows were used in a block design and assigned to either a control or the control plus ethyl-cellulose RPM (Mepron, Evonik Nutrition & Care GmbH). Mepron was supplied from -28 to 60 d in milk at a rate of 0.09% and 0.10% dry matter during the prepartum and postpartum period. That rate ensured that the ratio of Lys to Met in the metabolizable protein was close to 2.8:1. Blood samples from 15 clinically healthy cows per treatment were collected at d -30, -14, 1, 7, 21, 30, and 60 and analyzed for biomarkers of liver function, inflammation, and oxidative stress. Neutrophil and monocyte function in whole blood was measured in vitro at -14, 1, 7, 21, and 30 d in milk. The statistical model included the random effect of block and fixed effect of treatment, time, and its interaction. Compared with control, ethyl-cellulose RPM increased plasma cholesterol and paraoxonase after parturition. Among the inflammation biomarkers measured, ethyl-cellulose RPM led to greater albumin (negative acute-phase protein) and lower haptoglobin than control cows. Although concentration of IL-1β was not affected by treatments, greater IL-6 concentration was detected in response to ethyl-cellulose RPM. Cows supplemented with ethyl-cellulose RPM had greater plasma concentration of ferric-reducing antioxidant power, β-carotene, tocopherol, and total and reduced glutathione, whereas reactive oxygen metabolites were lower compared with control cows. Compared with control, ethyl-cellulose RPM enhanced neutrophil phagocytosis and oxidative burst. Overall, the

  7. Lactic acid bacteria producing B-group vitamins: a great potential for functional cereals products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capozzi, Vittorio; Russo, Pasquale; Dueñas, María Teresa; López, Paloma; Spano, Giuseppe

    2012-12-01

    Wheat contains various essential nutrients including the B group of vitamins. However, B group vitamins, normally present in cereals-derived products, are easily removed or destroyed during milling, food processing or cooking. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are widely used as starter cultures for the fermentation of a large variety of foods and can improve the safety, shelf life, nutritional value, flavor and overall quality of the fermented products. In this regard, the identification and application of strains delivering health-promoting compounds is a fascinating field. Besides their key role in food fermentations, several LAB found in the gastrointestinal tract of humans and animals are commercially used as probiotics and possess generally recognized as safe status. LAB are usually auxotrophic for several vitamins although certain strains of LAB have the capability to synthesize water-soluble vitamins such as those included in the B group. In recent years, a number of biotechnological processes have been explored to perform a more economical and sustainable vitamin production than that obtained via chemical synthesis. This review article will briefly report the current knowledge on lactic acid bacteria synthesis of vitamins B2, B11 and B12 and the potential strategies to increase B-group vitamin content in cereals-based products, where vitamins-producing LAB have been leading to the elaboration of novel fermented functional foods. In addition, the use of genetic strategies to increase vitamin production or to create novel vitamin-producing strains will be also discussed.

  8. Functionality of exopolysaccharides produced by lactic acid bacteria in an in vitro gastric system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozzi, F; Gerbino, E; Font de Valdez, G; Torino, M I

    2009-07-01

    To evaluate whether slime-exopolysaccharides (EPS) or capsular-polysaccharide (CPS) production could protect the polymer-producing strains Streptococcus thermophilus CRL 1190 and Lactobacillus casei CRL 87 against the harsh conditions of an in vitro gastric system (GS). EPS stability on the GS was studied. An in vitro GS model containing human saliva and gastric juice was standardized. Polymer functionality on the cell viability and metabolic activity of the EPS-producing strains in the GS acidic conditions was evaluated. Two isogenic EPS/CPS deficient mutants were used for comparison. EPS or CPS conferred no significant protection on the cell viability of the studied strains after passage through the GS conditions. However, the phospho- and beta-galactosidase activities of the EPS(+) strains were higher than those of the EPS(-). Cytoplasmic alterations in the wild-type and mutant strains and partial degradation of both EPS were detected. The presence of EPS/CPS protected the metabolic activity of the assayed LAB strains, but had no effect on survival at low pH. The presence of EPS/CPS as well as polymer resistance to the harsh conditions of the human GS could impact positively in probiotic strains to exert their properties in the host.

  9. Functional Stability Of A Mixed Microbial Consortia Producing PHA From Waste Carbon Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David N. Thompson; Erik R. Coats; William A. Smith; Frank J. Loge; Michael P. Wolcott

    2006-04-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), naturally-occurring biological polyesters that are microbially synthesized from a myriad of carbon sources, can be utilized as biodegradable substitutes for petroleum-derived thermoplastics. However, current PHA commercialization schemes are limited by high feedstock costs, the requirement for aseptic reactors, and high separation and purification costs. Bacteria indigenous to municipal waste streams can accumulate large quantities of PHA under environmentally controlled conditions; hence, a potentially more environmentally-effective method of production would utilize these consortia to produce PHAs from inexpensive waste carbon sources. In this study, PHA production was accomplished in sequencing batch bioreactors utilizing mixed microbial consortia from municipal activated sludge as inoculum, in cultures grown on real wastewaters. PHA production averaged 85%, 53%, and 10% of the cell dry weight from methanol-enriched pulp-and-paper mill foul condensate, fermented municipal primary solids, and biodiesel wastewater, respectively. The PHA-producing microbial consortia were examined to explore the microbial community changes that occurred during reactor operations, employing denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S-rDNA from PCR-amplified DNA extracts. Distinctly different communities were observed both between and within wastewaters following enrichment. More importantly, stable functions were maintained despite the differing and contrasting microbial populations.

  10. Targeting Atp6v1c1 Prevents Inflammation and Bone Erosion Caused by Periodontitis and Reveals Its Critical Function in Osteoimmunology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Li

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease (Periodontitis is a serious disease that affects a majority of adult Americans and is associated with other systemic diseases, including diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and other inflammatory diseases. While great efforts have been devoted toward understanding the pathogenesis of periodontitis, there remains a pressing need for developing potent therapeutic strategies for targeting this pervasive and destructive disease. In this study, we utilized novel adeno-associated virus (AAV-mediated Atp6v1c1 knockdown gene therapy to treat bone erosion and inflammatory caused by periodontitis in mouse model. Atp6v1c1 is a subunit of the V-ATPase complex and regulator of the assembly of the V0 and V1 domains of the V-ATPase complex. We demonstrated previously that Atp6v1c1 has an essential function in osteoclast mediated bone resorption. We hypothesized that Atp6v1c1 may be an ideal target to prevent the bone erosion and inflammation caused by periodontitis. To test the hypothesis, we employed AAV RNAi knockdown of Atp6v1c1 gene expression to prevent bone erosion and gingival inflammation simultaneously. We found that lesion-specific injection of AAV-shRNA-Atp6v1c1 into the periodontal disease lesions protected against bone erosion (>85% and gingival inflammation caused by P. gingivalis W50 infection. AAV-mediated Atp6v1c1 knockdown dramatically reduced osteoclast numbers and inhibited the infiltration of dendritic cells and macrophages in the bacteria-induced inflammatory lesions in periodontitis. Silencing of Atp6v1c1 expression also prevented the expressions of osteoclast-related genes and pro-inflammatory cytokine genes. Our data suggests that AAV-shRNA-Atp6v1c1 treatment can significantly attenuate the bone erosion and inflammation caused by periodontitis, indicating the dual function of AAV-shRNA-Atp6v1c1 as an inhibitor of bone erosion mediated by osteoclasts, and as an inhibitor of inflammation through down-regulation of pro

  11. [The hyperiricosuria as an indicator of derangement of biologic functions of endoecology and adaptation, biologic reactions of excretion, inflammation and arterial tension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, V N; Oshchepkova, E V; Dmitriev, V A; Gushchina, O V; Shiriaeva, Iu K; Iashin, A Ia

    2012-04-01

    During millions years in all animals allantoine (oxidized by uricase uric acid) was catabolite of purines and ascorbic acid was an acceptor of active forms of oxygen. The proximal tubules of nephron reabsorbed the trace amounts of uric acid Then during phylogenesis the primates had a mutation of ascorbic acid gen minus. Later on occurred a second spontaneous mutation and uricase gen minus and uric acid became catabolites of purines. In absence of ascorbic acid synthesis ions of urates became a major capturers of active forms of oxygen and all uric acid as before underwent the reabsorption. Later the carriers were formed which began in epithelium of proximal tubules to secrete all uric acid into urine. At every incident of "littering" of intercellular medium with endogenic flogogens (impairment of biologic function of endoecology) under compensatory development of biologic reaction of inflammation the need in inactivation of active forms of oxygen increases. Hence later on in phylogenesis one more stage was formed--post secretory reabsorption of uric acid In the biologic reaction of inflammation epithelium of proximal tubules initiates retentional hyperiricosuria. The general antioxidant activity of human blood plasma in 60% is presented by urates' ions. The excretion of uric acid includes 4 stages: filtration, full reabsorption, secretion and post secretory reabsorption. In phylogenesis these stages formed in sequence. The mild hyperiricosuria is most frequently considered as a non-specific indicator of activation of biologic reaction of inflammation. The productive hyperiricosuria develops more infrequently under surplus of meat food and cytolysis syndrome (intensification of cell loss in vivo). Under concentration of uric acid more than 400 mkmol/l part of urates circulates in intercellular medium in the form of crystals. The microcrystals of uric acid (biologic "litter") initiate the syndrome of systemic inflammatory response as an endogenic flogogen

  12. The influence of consuming an egg or an egg-yolk buttermilk drink for 12 wk on serum lipids, inflammation, and liver function markers in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Sabine; Kelly, Elton R; van der Made, Sanne; Berendschot, Tos Tjm; Husche, Constanze; Lütjohann, Dieter; Plat, Jogchum

    2013-10-01

    Dietary cholesterol elevates serum total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations modestly. There are indications that the cholesterol-raising effect depends on the food matrix, that is, sphingolipids and lactic acid bacteria are suggested to influence cholesterol metabolism. Traditional buttermilk is rich in both sphingolipids and lactic acid bacteria. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether effects on cholesterol metabolism depend on food matrix (e.g., cholesterol provided as egg [yolk] or incorporated into traditionally prepared buttermilk drink). Participants (N = 97) took part in a 12-wk intervention study. The controls (n = 20) continued their regular egg consumption of one to two eggs a week. The other two groups consumed either one extra egg per day (n = 57) or a buttermilk drink containing one egg yolk (n = 20). Blood was sampled at day 1 and at the end of the experimental period (day 90) to analyze serum lipids, lipoproteins, and markers reflecting cholesterol metabolism, low-grade systemic inflammation, endothelial activity, and liver function. Serum TC and LDL-C concentrations increased significantly by respectively 0.63 mmol/L (P egg per day compared with controls. There were no effects on markers for inflammation, endothelial activity, or liver function. The increase in serum TC and LDL-C concentration was no longer significant in women consuming the same egg yolk incorporated in a buttermilk drink (0.33 mmol/L [P = 0.66] and 0.31 mmol/L [P = 0.55], respectively). Daily egg consumption for 12 wk increases serum TC and LDL-C concentrations in women but not markers for inflammation, endothelial activity, and liver function. Interestingly, the rise in serum LDL-C concentrations is less pronounced when egg yolk is incorporated into a buttermilk drink, indeed suggesting that fractions in the buttermilk might influence dietary cholesterol absorption. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Multi-functional electrospun antibacterial core-shell nanofibrous membranes for prolonged prevention of post-surgical tendon adhesion and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalumon, K T; Sheu, Chialin; Chen, Chih-Hao; Chen, Shih-Heng; Jose, Gils; Kuo, Chang-Yi; Chen, Jyh-Ping

    2018-04-05

    The possibility of endowing an electrospun anti-adhesive barrier membrane with multi-functionality, such as lubrication, prevention of fibroblast attachment and anti-infection and anti-inflammation properties, is highly desirable for the management of post-surgical tendon adhesion. To this end, we fabricated core-shell nanofibrous membranes (CSNMs) with embedded silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) in the poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)/poly(caprolactone) (PCL) shell and hyaluronic acid (HA)/ibuprofen in the core. HA imparted a lubrication effect for smooth tendon gliding and reduced fibroblast attachment, while Ag NPs and ibuprofen functioned as anti-infection and anti-inflammation agents, respectively. CSNMs with a PEG/PCL/Ag shell (PPA) and HA core containing 0% (H/PPA), 10% (HI10/PPA), 30% (HI30/PPA) and 50% (HI50/PPA) ibuprofen were fabricated through co-axial electrospinning and assessed through microscopic, spectroscopic, thermal, mechanical and drug release analyses. Considering nutrient passage through the barrier, the microporous CSNMs exerted the same barrier effect but drastically increased the mass transfer coefficients of bovine serum albumin compared with the commercial anti-adhesive membrane SurgiWrap®. Cell attachment/focal adhesion formation of fibroblasts revealed effective reduction of initial cell attachment on the CSNM surface with minimum cytotoxicity (except HI50/PPA). The anti-bacterial effect against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria was verified to be due to the Ag NPs in the membranes. In vivo studies using H/PPA and HI30/PPA CSNMs and SurgiWrap® in a rabbit flexor tendon rupture model demonstrated the improved efficacy of HI30/PPA CSNMs in reducing inflammation and tendon adhesion formation based on gross observation, histological analysis and functional assays. We conclude that HI30/PPA CSNMs can act as a multifunctional barrier membrane to prevent peritendinous adhesion after tendon surgery. A multi-functional anti-adhesion barrier

  14. Role of certain trace minerals in oxidative stress, inflammation, CD4/CD8 lymphocyte ratios and lung function in asthmatic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chih-Hung; Liu, Po-Jen; Hsia, Simon; Chuang, Chia-Ju; Chen, Pei-Chung

    2011-07-01

    Asthma is associated with increased inflammation, oxidative stress and abnormal immune system function. We determined the distributions of several essential trace minerals and assessed their relationships to factors that are associated with the pathophysiological status of patients with mild/moderate asthma. We enrolled 25 asthmatic patients and 25 healthy subjects. We measured: blood trace minerals, zinc (Zn), copper (Cu) and selenium (Se); oxidative stress markers thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS); antioxidant enzyme activities; percentages of CD4 and CD8 lymphocyte subsets; high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP); and a lung function index (FEV1/FVC%). Compared with healthy subjects, asthmatics had lower concentrations of Zn and Se; higher Cu concentrations, and Cu/Zn and Cu/Se ratios; and lower antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR) and catalase activities. Significantly increased concentrations of hs-CRP, TBARS and CD4/CD8 lymphocyte ratios were also observed. Furthermore, plasma TBARS or hs-CRP concentrations were negatively associated with Se concentrations, but were positively associated with Cu/Se ratios. CD4/CD8 lymphocyte ratios were inversely correlated with Se, while it was positively correlated with Cu/Se ratio. FEV1/FVC% was also significantly correlated with Se concentrations, and Cu/Se and Cu/Zn ratios. Abnormal distributions of these trace minerals may aggravate oxidative damage and inflammation, increased CD4/CD8 lymphocyte ratios and decreased lung function in asthma.

  15. Amine functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for removal of oil droplets from produced water and accelerated magnetic separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Saebom; Kim, Eun Song; Park, Siman; Daigle, Hugh; Milner, Thomas E.; Huh, Chun; Bennetzen, Martin V.; Geremia, Giuliano A.

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with surface coatings designed for water treatment, in particular for targeted removal of contaminants from produced water in oil fields, have drawn considerable attention due to their environmental merit. The goal of this study was to develop an efficient method of removing very stable, micron-scale oil droplets dispersed in oilfield produced water. We synthesized MNPs in the laboratory with a prescribed surface coating. The MNPs were superparamagnetic magnetite, and the hydrodynamic size of amine functionalized MNPs ranges from 21 to 255 nm with an average size of 66 nm. The initial oil content of 0.25 wt.% was reduced by as much as 99.9% in separated water. The electrostatic attraction between negatively charged oil-in-water emulsions and positively charged MNPs controls, the attachment of MNPs to the droplet surface, and the subsequent aggregation of the electrically neutral oil droplets with attached MNPs (MNPs-oils) play a critical role in accelerated and efficient magnetic separation. The total magnetic separation time was dramatically reduced to as short as 1 s after MNPs, and oil droplets were mixed, in contrast with the case of free, individual MNPs with which separation took about 36˜72 h, depending on the MNP concentrations. Model calculations of magnetic separation velocity, accounting for the MNP magnetization and viscous drag, show that the total magnetic separation time will be approximately 5 min or less, when the size of the MNPs-oils is greater than 360 nm, which can be used as an optimum operating condition.

  16. Amine functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for removal of oil droplets from produced water and accelerated magnetic separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Saebom, E-mail: saebomko@austin.utexas.edu [University of Texas, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (United States); Kim, Eun Song [University of Texas, Department of Biomedical Engineering (United States); Park, Siman [University of Texas, Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering (United States); Daigle, Hugh [University of Texas, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (United States); Milner, Thomas E. [University of Texas, Department of Biomedical Engineering (United States); Huh, Chun [University of Texas, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (United States); Bennetzen, Martin V. [Maersk Oil Corporate (Denmark); Geremia, Giuliano A. [Maersk Oil Research and Technology Centre (Qatar)

    2017-04-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with surface coatings designed for water treatment, in particular for targeted removal of contaminants from produced water in oil fields, have drawn considerable attention due to their environmental merit. The goal of this study was to develop an efficient method of removing very stable, micron-scale oil droplets dispersed in oilfield produced water. We synthesized MNPs in the laboratory with a prescribed surface coating. The MNPs were superparamagnetic magnetite, and the hydrodynamic size of amine functionalized MNPs ranges from 21 to 255 nm with an average size of 66 nm. The initial oil content of 0.25 wt.% was reduced by as much as 99.9% in separated water. The electrostatic attraction between negatively charged oil-in-water emulsions and positively charged MNPs controls, the attachment of MNPs to the droplet surface, and the subsequent aggregation of the electrically neutral oil droplets with attached MNPs (MNPs-oils) play a critical role in accelerated and efficient magnetic separation. The total magnetic separation time was dramatically reduced to as short as 1 s after MNPs, and oil droplets were mixed, in contrast with the case of free, individual MNPs with which separation took about 36∼72 h, depending on the MNP concentrations. Model calculations of magnetic separation velocity, accounting for the MNP magnetization and viscous drag, show that the total magnetic separation time will be approximately 5 min or less, when the size of the MNPs-oils is greater than 360 nm, which can be used as an optimum operating condition.

  17. A cross-sectional study of lung function and respiratory symptoms among chemical workers producing diacetyl for food flavourings.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooy, F.G.; Smit, L.A.; Houba, R.; Zaat, V.A.; Rooijackers, J.M.; Heederik, D.J.J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Four diacetyl workers were found to have bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. Exposures, respiratory symptoms, lung function and exposure-response relationships were investigated. METHODS: 175 workers from a plant producing diacetyl between 1960 and 2003 were investigated. Exposure data

  18. CrdR function in a curdlan-producing Agrobacterium sp. ATCC31749 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Chao; Yang, Liping; Zhao, Lamei; Lin, Chun; Liu, Zhengjie; Mao, Zichao

    2015-02-10

    Agrobacterium sp. ATCC31749 is an efficient curdlan producer at low pH and under nitrogen starvation. The helix-turn-helix transcriptional regulatory protein (crdR) essential for curdlan production has been analyzed, but whether crdR directly acts to cause expression of the curdlan biosynthesis operon (crdASC) is uncertain. To elucidate the molecular function of crdR in curdlan biosynthesis, we constructed a crdR knockout mutant along with pBQcrdR and pBQNcrdR vectors with crdR expression driven by a T5 promoter and crdR native promoter, respectively. Also, we constructed a pAG with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene driven by a curdlan biosynthetic operon promoter (crdP) to measure the effects of crdR expression on curdlan biosynthesis. Compared with wild-type (WT) strain biomass production, the biomass of the crdR knockout mutant was not significantly different in either exponential or stationary phases of growth. Mutant cells were non-capsulated and planktonic and produced significantly less curdlan. WT cells were curdlan-capsulated and aggregated in the stationery phase. pBQcrdR transformed to the WT strain had a 38% greater curdlan yield and pBQcrdR and pBQNcrdR transformed to the crdR mutant strain recovered 18% and 105% curdlan titers of the WT ATCC31749 strain, respectively. Consistent with its function of promoting curdlan biosynthesis, curdlan biosynthetic operon promoter (crdP) controlled GFP expression caused the transgenic strain to have higher GFP relative fluorescence in the WT strain, and no color change was observed with low GFP relative fluorescence in the crdR mutant strain as evidenced by fluorescent microscopy and spectrometric assay. q-RT-PCR revealed that crdR expression in the stationary phase was greater than in the exponential phase, and crdR overexpression in the WT strain increased crdA, crdS, and crdC expression. We also confirmed that purified crdR protein can specifically bind to the crd operon promoter region, and we inferred

  19. The B cell death function of obinutuzumab-HDEL produced in plant (Nicotiana benthamiana L.) is equivalent to obinutuzumab produced in CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Won; Heo, Woon; Lee, Jinu; Jin, Narae; Yoon, Sei Mee; Park, Ki Youl; Kim, Eun Yu; Kim, Woo Taek; Kim, Joo Young

    2018-01-01

    Plants have attracted attention as bio-drug production platforms because of their economical and safety benefits. The preliminary efficacy of ZMapp, a cocktail of antibodies produced in N. benthamiana (Nicotiana benthamiana L.), suggested plants may serve as a platform for antibody production. However, because the amino acid sequences of the Fab fragment are diverse and differences in post-transcriptional processes between animals and plants remain to be elucidated, it is necessary to confirm functional equivalence of plant-produced antibodies to the original antibody. In this study, Obinutuzumab, a third generation anti-CD20 antibody, was produced in N. benthamiana leaves (plant-obinutuzumab) and compared to the original antibody produced in glyco-engineered Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells (CHO-obinutuzumab). Two forms (with or without an HDEL tag) were generated and antibody yields were compared. The HDEL-tagged form was more highly expressed than the non-HDEL-tagged form which was cleaved in the N-terminus. To determine the equivalence in functions of the Fab region between the two forms, we compared the CD20 binding affinities and direct binding induced cell death of a CD20-positive B cells. Both forms showed similar CD20 binding affinities and direct cell death of B cell. The results suggested that plant-obinutuzumab was equivalent to CHO-obinutuzumab in CD20 binding, cell aggregation, and direct cell death via binding. Therefore, our findings suggest that Obinutuzumab is a promising biosimilar candidate that can be produced efficiently in plants.

  20. The B cell death function of obinutuzumab-HDEL produced in plant (Nicotiana benthamiana L. is equivalent to obinutuzumab produced in CHO cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Won Lee

    Full Text Available Plants have attracted attention as bio-drug production platforms because of their economical and safety benefits. The preliminary efficacy of ZMapp, a cocktail of antibodies produced in N. benthamiana (Nicotiana benthamiana L., suggested plants may serve as a platform for antibody production. However, because the amino acid sequences of the Fab fragment are diverse and differences in post-transcriptional processes between animals and plants remain to be elucidated, it is necessary to confirm functional equivalence of plant-produced antibodies to the original antibody. In this study, Obinutuzumab, a third generation anti-CD20 antibody, was produced in N. benthamiana leaves (plant-obinutuzumab and compared to the original antibody produced in glyco-engineered Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells (CHO-obinutuzumab. Two forms (with or without an HDEL tag were generated and antibody yields were compared. The HDEL-tagged form was more highly expressed than the non-HDEL-tagged form which was cleaved in the N-terminus. To determine the equivalence in functions of the Fab region between the two forms, we compared the CD20 binding affinities and direct binding induced cell death of a CD20-positive B cells. Both forms showed similar CD20 binding affinities and direct cell death of B cell. The results suggested that plant-obinutuzumab was equivalent to CHO-obinutuzumab in CD20 binding, cell aggregation, and direct cell death via binding. Therefore, our findings suggest that Obinutuzumab is a promising biosimilar candidate that can be produced efficiently in plants.

  1. Improvement of hypertension, endothelial function and systemic inflammation following short-term supplementation with red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) juice: a randomized crossover pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgary, S; Afshani, M R; Sahebkar, A; Keshvari, M; Taheri, M; Jahanian, E; Rafieian-Kopaei, M; Malekian, F; Sarrafzadegan, N

    2016-10-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and has a prevalence of about one billion people worldwide. It has been shown that adherence to a diet rich in fruits and vegetables helps in decreasing blood pressure (BP). This study aimed to investigate the effect of raw beet juice (RBJ) and cooked beet (CB) on BP of hypertensive subjects. In this randomized crossover study, 24 hypertensive subjects aged 25-68 years old were divided into two groups. One group took RBJ for 2 weeks and the other group took CB. After 2 weeks of treatment, both groups had a washout for 2 weeks then switched to the alternate treatment. Each participant consumed 250 ml day(-1) of RBJ or 250 g day(-1) of CB each for a period of 2 weeks. Body weight, BP, flow-mediated dilation (FMD), lipid profile and inflammatory parameters were measured at baseline and after each period. According to the results, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were significantly lower and FMD was significantly higher after treatment with RBJ compared with CB (Pbeetroot were effective in improving BP, endothelial function and systemic inflammation, the raw beetroot juice had greater antihypertensive effects. Also more improvement was observed in endothelial function and systemic inflammation with RBJ compared with CB.

  2. Sulfatide-activated type II NKT cells prevent allergic airway inflammation by inhibiting type I NKT cell function in a mouse model of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guqin; Nie, Hanxiang; Yang, Jiong; Ding, Xuhong; Huang, Yi; Yu, Hongying; Li, Ruyou; Yuan, Zhuqing; Hu, Suping

    2011-12-01

    Asthma is a common chronic inflammatory disease involving many different cell types. Recently, type I natural killer T (NKT) cells have been demonstrated to play a crucial role in the development of asthma. However, the roles of type II NKT cells in asthma have not been investigated before. Interestingly, type I and type II NKT cells have been shown to have opposing roles in antitumor immunity, antiparasite immunity, and autoimmunity. We hypothesized that sulfatide-activated type II NKT cells could prevent allergic airway inflammation by inhibiting type I NKT cell function in asthma. Strikingly, in our mouse model, activation of type II NKT cells by sulfatide administration and adoptive transfer of sulfatide-activated type II NKT cells result in reduced-inflammation cell infiltration in the lung and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, decreased levels of IL-4 and IL-5 in the BALF; and decreased serum levels of ovalbumin-specific IgE and IgG1. Furthermore, it is found that the activation of sulfatide-reactive type II NKT cells leads to the functional inactivation of type I NKT cells, including the proliferation and cytokine secretion. Our data reveal that type II NKT cells activated by glycolipids, such as sulfatide, may serve as a novel approach to treat allergic diseases and other disorders characterized by inappropriate type I NKT cell activation.

  3. Inflammation-related cancer or cancer-related inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    T.G, Shrihari

    2018-01-01

    Inflammationis the body’s defensive action against various stimuli such as physical orchemical or infectious agents. Acute inflammation and their mediators help intissue repair and healing. If the inflammation aggravates chronically,non-resolved, dysregulated immune system, results release of various inflammatorymediators such as free radicals (ROS and RNS), cytokines, chemokines, growthfactors and proteolytic enzymes produced by innate and adaptive immune cellsactivate transcriptional factor...

  4. Dietary fish oil modestly attenuates the effect of age on diastolic function but has no effect on memory or brain inflammation in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeant, Susan; McQuail, Joseph A; Riddle, David R; Chilton, Floyd H; Ortmeier, Steven B; Jessup, Jewell A; Groban, Leanne; Nicolle, Michelle M

    2011-05-01

    Fish oil (FO) mediates a number of cardioprotective benefits in patients with cardiovascular disease. In the absence of cardiovascular disease, however, the effects of FO on cardiac structure and function are not clear. In addition, it is not known if an effective dosing strategy for attenuating age-related cardiac dysfunction is also effective at limiting cognitive dysfunction. Therefore, we determined if 4 months of FO supplementation in aged rats would lessen age-related cardiac dysfunction while concomitantly preventing the cognitive decline that is normally observed in this population. The results indicate that FO initiated late in life modifies diastolic function in a small but positive way by attenuating the age-related increases in filling pressure, posterior wall thickness, and interstitial collagen without mitigating age-related deficits in memory or increases in brain inflammation. These data raise the possibility that FO supplementation for purposes of cardiac and brain protection may need to occur earlier in the life span.

  5. Studying allergic inflammation and spirometry over menstrual cycles in well-controlled asthmatic women: Changes in progesterone and estradiol affect neither FENO levels nor lung function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittner-Marszalska, Marita; Dor-Wojnarowska, Anna; Wolańczyk-Mędrala, Anna; Rosner-Tenerowicz, Anna; Zimmer, Mariusz; Dobek, Julia; Gomułka, Krzysztof; Parużyńska, Anna; Panaszek, Bernard

    2018-05-01

    It has been reported that female sex hormones influence on allergic inflammation and ventilation parameters in asthma but conclusions drawn by different researchers are divergent. The aim of our study was to assess the impact of progesterone (Pg) and estradiol (E) on the dynamics of allergic inflammation and spirometry test results in regularly menstruating women with stable allergic asthma. 13 women (28 days menstrual cycle), aged 18-45, taking no hormonal contraceptives, with mild and moderate asthma, without reported exacerbations at the near-ovulation and/or menstruation time, were monitored during two consecutive menstrual cycles. They had 4 visits per cycle (the first day of menstruation was assumed to be day 1 of the cycle; visits were carried out on days: 3-4, 10-11, 13-14 and 23-24). At each visit asthma symptoms, asthma control test (ACT) results, asthma treatment, fractioned nitric oxide (FENO) levels, spirometry test results, Pg and E, levels were analyzed. As a result of the study, no essential variability in FENO values and ventilation parameters' values in the course of menstruation cycle were observed. Negative correlation between FENO values and Pg concentrations was demonstrated (r = 0.27), but no correlation between FENO values and E levels was shown. No relationship between the ACT values and ventilation parameters and the levels of the sex hormones under investigation was detected. We conclude that changing levels of estradiol and progesterone (regardless of the negative correlation of progesterone and FENO values) affect neither the dynamics of allergic inflammation nor pulmonary function in women with stable allergic mild/moderate asthma. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of adjuvant recombinant EPO therapy on neural functional recovery, inflammation and erythrocyte glucose metabolism in patients with severe craniocerebral injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Lu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of adjuvant recombinant EPO therapy on neural functional recovery, inflammation and erythrocyte glucose metabolism in patients with severe craniocerebral injury. Methods: A total of 78 patients with severe craniocerebral injury treated in our hospital between May 2013 and March 2016 were selected and randomly divided into the EPO group and control group who received recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO combined with conventional therapy and conventional therapy respectively. Before treatment as well as 7 d and 14 d after treatment, the degree of brain tissue hypoxia, nerve injury and inflammation as well as erythrocyte glucose metabolism were evaluated respectively. Results: PbtO2 levels, serum NGB and HGB content as well as PFK activity of both groups 7 d and 14 d after treatment were significantly higher than those before treatment while serum NF-H, NF-L, NF-M, NSE, S100β, IL-2, P-selectin and sICAM-1 content as well as G-6PD and AR activity were significantly lower than those before treatment; PbtO2 levels, serum NGB and HGB content as well as PFK activity of EPO group 7 d and 14 d after treatment were significantly higher than those of control group while serum NF-H, NF-L, NF-M, NSE, S100 β, IL-2, P-selectin and sICAM-1 content as well as G-6PD and AR activity were significantly lower than those of control group. Conclusion: Adjuvant recombinant EPO therapy can inhibit inflammation and improve erythrocyte glucose metabolism to reduce the nerve injury degree in patients with severe craniocerebral injury.

  7. Brain functional integration: an epidemiologic study on stress-producing dissociative phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Giovanni; Carotenuto, Marco; Maldonato, Nelson Mauro; Moretto, Enrico; Leone, Elena; De Luca, Vincenzo; Monda, Marcellino; Messina, Antonietta

    2018-01-01

    Dissociative phenomena are common among psychiatric patients; the presence of these symptoms can worsen the prognosis, increasing the severity of their clinical conditions and exposing them to increased risk of suicidal behavior. Personality disorders as long duration stressful experiences may support the development of dissociative phenomena. In 933 psychiatric outpatients consecutively recruited, presence of dissociative phenomena was identified with the Dissociative Experience Scale (DES). Dissociative phenomena were significantly more severe in the group of people with mental disorders and/or personality disorders. All psychopathologic traits detected with the symptom checklist-90-revised had a significant correlation with the total score on the DES. Using total DES score as the dependent variable, a linear regression model was constructed. Mental and personality disorders which were associated with greater severity of dissociative phenomena on analysis of variance were included as predictors; scores from the nine scales of symptom checklist-90-revised, significantly correlated to total DES score, were used as covariates. The model consisted of seven explanatory variables (four factors and three covariates) explaining 82% of variance. The four significant factors were the presence of borderline and narcissistic personality disorder, substance abuse disorders and psychotic disorders. Significant covariates were psychopathologic traits of anger, psychoticism and obsessiveness. This study, confirming Janet’s theory, explains that, mental disorders and psychopathologic experiences of patients can configure the chronic stress condition that produces functional damage to the adaptive executive system. The symptoms of dissociative depersonalization/derealization and dissociative amnesia can be explained, in large part, through their current and previous psychopathologic experiences. PMID:29296086

  8. The morpho-functional parameters of rat pituitary hormone producing cells after genistein treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Trifunović

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Phytoestrogens are a diverse group of steroid–like compounds that occur naturally in many plants. There are various types of phytoestrogens, including the best-researched isoflavones which are commonly found in soy. The consumption of soy products has many health benefits, including protection against breast cancer, prostate cancer, menopausal symptoms, heart disease and osteoporosis. In contrast, use of hormonally active compounds-isoflavones may unfortunately interfere with the endocrine system and can have far-reaching consequences. Genistein, the most abundant soy-bean derived isoflavone, possesses a ring system similar to estrogens and acts through an estrogen receptor (ER-mediated mechanism, by increasing or decreasing the transcription of ER-dependent target genes. Also, genistein can act on cells through ER non-dependent mechanisms, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitor. The neuroendocrine systems are responsible for the control of homeostatic processes in the body, including reproduction, growth, metabolism and energy balance, and stress responsiveness. It is well known, that estrogen is important for development of the neuroendocrine system in both sexes. At the pituitary level, estrogen is known to affect the regulation of all hormone producing (HP cells, by direct and/or indirect mechanisms. Due to structural and functional resemblance to estrogen, the question may arise of whether and how genistein affects the morphofunctional features of pituitary HP cells. This review deals with the consequences of genistein’s effects on morphological, stereological and hormonal features of HP cells within the anterior pituitary gland. Transparency on this issue is needed because isoflavones are presently highly consumed. Inter alia, genistein as well as other isoflavones, are present in various dietary supplements and generally promoted as an accepted alternative to estrogen replacement therapy. Potential isoflavone biomedical exploitation is not

  9. Monocyte Conversion During Inflammation and Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratofil, Rachel M; Kubes, Paul; Deniset, Justin F

    2017-01-01

    Monocytes are circulating leukocytes important in both innate and adaptive immunity, primarily functioning in immune defense, inflammation, and tissue remodeling. There are 2 subsets of monocytes in mice (3 subsets in humans) that are mobilized from the bone marrow and recruited to sites of inflammation, where they carry out their respective functions in promoting inflammation or facilitating tissue repair. Our understanding of the fate of these monocyte subsets at the site of inflammation is constantly evolving. This brief review highlights the plasticity of monocyte subsets and their conversion during inflammation and injury. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Cold-Induced Thermogenesis and Inflammation-Associated Cold-Seeking Behavior Are Represented by Different Dorsomedial Hypothalamic Sites: A Three-Dimensional Functional Topography Study in Conscious Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimansky, Yury P.; Oliveira, Daniela L.; Eales, Justin R.; Coimbra, Cândido C.

    2017-01-01

    In the past, we showed that large electrolytic lesions of the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) promoted hypothermia in cold-exposed restrained rats, but attenuated hypothermia in rats challenged with a high dose of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in a thermogradient apparatus. The goal of this study was to identify the thermoeffector mechanisms and DMH representation of the two phenomena and thus to understand how the same lesion could produce two opposite effects on body temperature. We found that the permissive effect of large electrolytic DMH lesions on cold-induced hypothermia was due to suppressed thermogenesis. DMH-lesioned rats also could not develop fever autonomically: they did not increase thermogenesis in response to a low, pyrogenic dose of LPS (10 μg/kg, i.v.). In contrast, changes in thermogenesis were uninvolved in the attenuation of the hypothermic response to a high, shock-inducing dose of LPS (5000 μg/kg, i.v.); this attenuation was due to a blockade of cold-seeking behavior. To compile DMH maps for the autonomic cold defense and for the cold-seeking response to LPS, we studied rats with small thermal lesions in different parts of the DMH. Cold thermogenesis had the highest representation in the dorsal hypothalamic area. Cold seeking was represented by a site at the ventral border of the dorsomedial nucleus. Because LPS causes both fever and hypothermia, we originally thought that the DMH contained a single thermoregulatory site that worked as a fever–hypothermia switch. Instead, we have found two separate sites: one that drives thermogenesis and the other, previously unknown, that drives inflammation-associated cold seeking. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Cold-seeking behavior is a life-saving response that occurs in severe systemic inflammation. We studied this behavior in rats with lesions in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) challenged with a shock-inducing dose of bacterial endotoxin. We built functional maps of the DMH and found the strongest

  11. Diversity and natural functions of antibiotices produced by beneficial and pathogenic soil bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil and plant-associated environments harbor numerous bacterial species that produce antibiotic metabolites. Many of these bacteria have been exploited for the discovery of clinical antibiotics and other therapeutics. In the field of plant pathology, antibiotic-producing bacteria are used as a reso...

  12. Brain functional integration: an epidemiologic study on stress-producing dissociative phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sperandeo R

    2017-12-01

    , significantly correlated to total DES score, were used as covariates. The model consisted of seven explanatory variables (four factors and three covariates explaining 82% of variance. The four significant factors were the presence of borderline and narcissistic personality disorder, substance abuse disorders and psychotic disorders. Significant covariates were psychopathologic traits of anger, psychoticism and obsessiveness. This study, confirming Janet’s theory, explains that, mental disorders and psychopathologic experiences of patients can configure the chronic stress condition that produces functional damage to the adaptive executive system. The symptoms of dissociative depersonalization/derealization and dissociative amnesia can be explained, in large part, through their current and previous psychopathologic experiences. Keywords: mental disorders, personality disorders, amnesia, depersonalization/derealization 

  13. Air pollution and markers of coagulation, inflammation, and endothelial function: associations and epigene-environment interactions in an elderly cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bind, Marie-Abele; Baccarelli, Andrea; Zanobetti, Antonella; Tarantini, Letizia; Suh, Helen; Vokonas, Pantel; Schwartz, Joel

    2012-03-01

    Previous studies suggest that air pollution is related to thrombosis, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms and sources of susceptibility are still unclear. One possibility is that these associations can be modified by DNA methylation states. We conducted a cohort study with repeated measurements of fibrinogen, C-reactive protein, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in 704 elderly men participating in the Veterans Administration Normative Aging Study (2000-2009). We investigated short- and intermediate-term air pollution effects on these blood markers, and epigene-environment interactions by DNA methylation of Alu, LINE-1, tissue factor (F3), Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2), and ICAM-1. We found effects of particle number, black carbon, nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)), and carbon monoxide (CO) on fibrinogen. Ozone was a predictor of C-reactive protein and ICAM-1. Particle number, black carbon, NO(2), CO, PM(2.5), and sulfates were associated with ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. An interquartile range increase in 24-hour exposure for NO(2) was associated with a 1.7% (95% confidence interval = 0.2%-3.3%) increase in fibrinogen for ozone; a 10.8% (2.2%-20.0%) increase in C-reactive protein for particle number; a 5.9% (3.6%-8.3%) increase in ICAM-1; and for PM(2.5), a 3.7% (1.7%-5.8%) increase in VCAM-1. The air pollution effect was stronger among subjects having higher Alu, lower LINE-1, tissue factor, or TLR-2 methylation status. We observed associations of traffic-related pollutants on fibrinogen, and both traffic and secondary particles on C-reactive protein, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1. There was effect modification by DNA methylation status, indicating that epigenetic states can convey susceptibility to air pollution.

  14. Donor pretreatment with carbamylated erythropoietin in a brain death model reduces inflammation more effectively than erythropoietin while preserving renal function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, Willemijn N.; Ottens, Petra J.; van Dijk, Antony; van Goor, Harry; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.

    Objective: We hypothesized that donor treatment of deceased brain dead donors would lead to a decrease in inflammatory responses seen in brain death and lead to a restoration of kidney function. Design: A standardized slow-induction rat brain death model followed by evaluation of kidney function in

  15. Functional, genetic and chemical characterization of biosurfactants produced by plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas putida 267

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijt, M.; Tran, H.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: Plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas putida strain 267, originally isolated from the rhizosphere of black pepper, produces biosurfactants that cause lysis of zoospores of the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora capsici. The biosurfactants were characterized, the biosynthesis gene(s) partially

  16. Physicochemical and functional characterization of a biosurfactant produced by Lactococcus lactis 53

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, LR; Teixeira, JA; van der Mei, HC; Oliveira, R

    2006-01-01

    Isolation and identification of key components of the crude biosurfactant produced by Lactococcus lactis 53 was studied. Fractionation was achieved by hydrophobic interaction chromatography which allowed the isolation of a fraction rich in glycoproteins. Molecular (by Fourier transform infrared

  17. Elevated circulating PAI-1 levels are related to lung function decline, systemic inflammation, and small airway obstruction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Yang, Ting; Li, Diandian; Wu, Yanqiu; Zhang, Xue; Pang, Caishuang; Zhang, Junlong; Ying, Binwu; Wang, Tao; Wen, Fuqiang

    2016-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) participate in inflammation and tissue remolding in various diseases, but their roles in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are not yet clear. This study aimed to investigate if PAI-1 and suPAR were involved in systemic inflammation and small airway obstruction (SAO) in COPD. Demographic and clinical characteristics, spirometry examination, and blood samples were obtained from 84 COPD patients and 51 healthy volunteers. Serum concentrations of PAI-1, suPAR, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and C-reactive protein (CRP) were detected with Magnetic Luminex Screening Assay. Differences between groups were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance or chi-square test. Pearson's partial correlation test (adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, cigarette status, and passive smoke exposure) and multivariable linear analysis were used to explore the relationships between circulating PAI-1 and indicators of COPD. First, we found that serum PAI-1 levels but not suPAR levels were significantly increased in COPD patients compared with healthy volunteers (125.56±51.74 ng/mL versus 102.98±36.62 ng/mL, P =0.007). Then, the correlation analysis showed that circulating PAI-1 was inversely correlated with pulmonary function parameters including the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity (FEV 1 /FVC), FEV 1 /Pre (justified r =-0.308, P <0.001; justified r =-0.295, P =0.001, respectively) and SAO indicators such as FEV 3 /FVC, MMEF25-75/Pre (justified r =-0.289, P =0.001; justified r =-0.273, P =0.002, respectively), but positively related to the inflammatory marker CRP (justified r =0.351, P <0.001), the small airway remolding biomarker TIMP-1, and MMP-9 (justified r =0.498, P <0.001; justified r =0.267, P =0.002, respectively). Besides, multivariable linear analysis

  18. Functional characterization of a competitive peptide antagonist of p65 in human macrophage-like cells suggests therapeutic potential for chronic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mythily Srinivasan,1 Corinne Blackburn,1 Debomoy K Lahiri2,3 1Department of Oral Pathology, Medicine and Radiology, Indiana University School of Dentistry, 2Institute of Psychiatry Research, Department of Psychiatry, 3Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, School of Medicine, Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis, IN, USA Abstract: Glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ is a glucocorticoid responsive protein that links the nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB and the glucocorticoid signaling pathways. Functional and binding studies suggest that the proline-rich region at the carboxy terminus of GILZ binds the p65 subunit of NFκB and suppresses the immunoinflammatory response. A widely-used strategy in the discovery of peptide drugs involves exploitation of the complementary surfaces of naturally occurring binding partners. Previously, we observed that a synthetic peptide (GILZ-P derived from the proline-rich region of GILZ bound activated p65 and ameliorated experimental encephalomyelitis. Here we characterize the secondary structure of GILZ-P by circular dichroic analysis. GILZ-P adopts an extended polyproline type II helical conformation consistent with the structural conformation commonly observed in interfaces of transient intermolecular interactions. To determine the potential application of GILZ-P in humans, we evaluated the toxicity and efficacy of the peptide drug in mature human macrophage-like THP-1 cells. Treatment with GILZ-P at a wide range of concentrations commonly used for peptide drugs was nontoxic as determined by cell viability and apoptosis assays. Functionally, GILZ-P suppressed proliferation and glutamate secretion by activated macrophages by inhibiting nuclear translocation of p65. Collectively, our data suggest that the GILZ-P has therapeutic potential in chronic CNS diseases where persistent inflammation leads to neurodegeneration such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer’s disease. Keywords

  19. Restoration of CFTR Activity in Ducts Rescues Acinar Cell Function and Reduces Inflammation in Pancreatic and Salivary Glands of Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Mei; Szymczak, Mitchell; Ahuja, Malini; Zheng, Changyu; Yin, Hongen; Swaim, William; Chiorini, John A; Bridges, Robert J; Muallem, Shmuel

    2017-10-01

    Sjögren's syndrome and autoimmune pancreatitis are disorders with decreased function of salivary, lacrimal glands, and the exocrine pancreas. Nonobese diabetic/ShiLTJ mice and mice transduced with the cytokine BMP6 develop Sjögren's syndrome and chronic pancreatitis and MRL/Mp mice are models of autoimmune pancreatitis. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a ductal Cl -  channel essential for ductal fluid and HCO 3 - secretion. We used these models to ask the following questions: is CFTR expression altered in these diseases, does correction of CFTR correct gland function, and most notably, does correcting ductal function correct acinar function? We treated the mice models with the CFTR corrector C18 and the potentiator VX770. Glandular, ductal, and acinar cells damage, infiltration, immune cells and function were measured in vivo and in isolated duct/acini. In the disease models, CFTR expression is markedly reduced. The salivary glands and pancreas are inflamed with increased fibrosis and tissue damage. Treatment with VX770 and, in particular, C18 restored salivation, rescued CFTR expression and localization, and nearly eliminated the inflammation and tissue damage. Transgenic overexpression of CFTR exclusively in the duct had similar effects. Most notably, the markedly reduced acinar cell Ca 2+ signaling, Orai1, inositol triphosphate receptors, Aquaporin 5 expression, and fluid secretion were restored by rescuing ductal CFTR. Our findings reveal that correcting ductal function is sufficient to rescue acinar cell function and suggests that CFTR correctors are strong candidates for the treatment of Sjögren's syndrome and pancreatitis. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Systemic inflammation as a function of the individual and combined associations of sedentary behaviour, physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Meghan K; Loprinzi, Paul D

    2018-01-01

    Previous research demonstrates individual associations of sedentary behaviour, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and cardiorespiratory fitness on systemic inflammation, often assessed via C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Their potential additive association on CRP, however, has not been fully evaluated, which was the purpose of this study. Data from the 2003-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used (N = 627 adults 20-49 years). Sedentary behaviour and MVPA were objectively assessed (accelerometry) with cardiorespiratory fitness determined from a submaximal treadmill-based test. Participants were classified as above or below the median values for each of these three parameters, with a PACS (Physical Activity Cardiorespiratory Sedentary) score ranging from 0 to 3, indicating the participant number of these three positive characteristics. A blood sample was obtained from each participant to assess CRP via latex-enhanced nephelometry. Above median sedentary behaviour (OR = 1·04; 95% CI: 0·65-1·66) was not associated with elevated (>0·3 mg dl -1 ) CRP, but above median MVPA (OR = 0·62; 95% CI: 0·40-0·97) and above median VO 2max (OR = 0·61; 95% CI: 0·40-0·93) were associated with a reduced odds of having an elevated CRP. With regard to the additive model, and after adjustment, the odds ratios (95% CI) for the PACS score of 1 (versus 0), 2 (versus 0) and 3 (versus 0), respectively, were 0·59 (0·34-1·05; P = 0·07), 0·60 (0·31-1·15; P = 0·11) and 0·34 (0·12-0·97; P = 0·04). Cardiorespiratory fitness and MVPA, but not sedentary behaviour, were independently associated with reduced odds of elevated CRP. Adults with all three characteristics, however, had the lowest odds of elevated CRP. © 2016 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Lamin in inflammation and aging

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Joseph R.; Chen, Haiyang; Zheng, Xiaobin; Zheng, Yixian

    2016-01-01

    Aging is characterized by a progressive loss of tissue function and an increased susceptibility to injury and disease. Many age-associated pathologies manifest an inflammatory component, and this has led to the speculation that aging is at least in part caused by some form of inflammation. However, whether or not inflammation is truly a cause of aging, or is a consequence of the aging process is unknown. Recent work using Drosophila has uncovered a mechanism where the progressive loss of lami...

  2. Endometriosis and possible inflammation markers

    OpenAIRE

    Meng-Hsing Wu; Kuei-Yang Hsiao; Shaw-Jenq Tsai

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. Infiltration of peritoneal macrophages and local proinflammatory mediators in the peritoneal microenvironment affect ovarian function and pelvic anatomy leading to the symptoms and signs of endometriosis. The identification of a noninvasive marker for endometriosis will facilitate early diagnosis and treatment of this disease. This review provides an overview of local microenvironmental inflammation and systemic inflam...

  3. Undergraduate Mathematics Majors' Writing Performance Producing Proofs and Counterexamples about Continuous Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Yi-Yin; Knuth, Eric

    2009-01-01

    In advanced mathematical thinking, proving and refuting are crucial abilities to demonstrate whether and why a proposition is true or false. Learning proofs and counterexamples within the domain of continuous functions is important because students encounter continuous functions in many mathematics courses. Recently, a growing number of studies…

  4. The use of controlled microbial cenoses in producers' link to increase steady functioning of artificial ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somova, Lydia; Mikheeva, Galina; Somova, Lydia

    The life support systems (LSS) for long-term missions are to use cycling-recycling systems, including biological recycling. Simple ecosystems include 3 links: producers (plants), consumers (man, animals) and reducers (microorganisms). Microorganisms are substantial component of every link of LSS. Higher plants are the traditional regenerator of air and producer of food. They should be used in many successive generations of their reproduction in LSS. Controlled microbiocenoses can increase productivity of producer's link and protect plants from infections. The goal of this work was development of methodological bases of formation of stable, controlled microbiocenoses, intended for increase of productivity of plants and for obtaining ecologically pure production of plants. Main results of our investigations: 1. Experimental microbiocenoses, has been produced in view of the developed methodology on the basis of natural association of microorganisms by long cultivation on specially developed medium. Dominating groups are bacteria of genera: Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Leuconostoc, Bifidobacterium, Rhodopseudomonas and yeast of genera: Kluyveromyces, Saccharomyces, Torulopsis. 2. Optimal parameters of microbiocenosis cultivation (t, pH, light exposure, biogenic elements concentrations) were experimentally established. Conditions of cultivation on which domination of different groups of microbiocenosis have been found. 3. It was shown, that processing of seeds of wheat, oats, bulbs and plants Allium cepa L. (an onions) with microbial association raised energy of germination of seeds and bulbs and promoted the increase (on 20-30 %) of growth green biomass and root system of plants in comparison with the control. This work is supported by grant, Yenissey , 07-04-96806

  5. The hydroentanglement system of producing nonwoven fabrics of certain specific attributes and functionalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although the traditional technologies and processes of producing fabric structures, via yarn spinning, weaving, knitting, lacing, tufting, or the like, continue to be the ‘major league’ players in textile manufacturing today, the modern hydroentanglement system, commonly known as “spunlacing,” has a...

  6. Microstructure and thermal and functional properties of biodegradable films produced using zein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crislene Barbosa de Almeida

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Research is being conducted in an attempt to produce biodegradable packaging to replace plastic products, thereby reducing solid waste disposal. In this work, zein films were produced from vegetable oils (macadamia, olive and buriti and from pure oleic acid. The surface of zein-based films made using oleic acid has a good lipid distribution. The high content of oleic acid produced a film with the greatest elongation at break (8.08 ± 2.71% due to the greater homogeneity of the protein matrix. The different oils did not affect the glass transition temperature (Tg. Tg curves of films with fatty acids showed a reduction in mass at between 50 and 120 °C due to water evaporation. At 120 °C the weight loss was 3-5% and above this temperature further weight loss was observed with the highest loss being seen in the film made using pure oleic acid. In conclusion, although biodegradable films were produced using the four different oils, the film made from pure oleic acid has the best characteristics.

  7. Role of reactive nitrogen species generated via inducible nitric oxide synthase in vesicant-induced lung injury, inflammation and altered lung functioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunil, Vasanthi R., E-mail: sunilvr@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy Piscataway, NJ (United States); Shen, Jianliang; Patel-Vayas, Kinal; Gow, Andrew J. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Pulmonary toxicity induced by sulfur mustard and related vesicants is associated with oxidative stress. In the present studies we analyzed the role of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) generated via inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in lung injury and inflammation induced by vesicants using 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) as a model. C57Bl/6 (WT) and iNOS −/− mice were sacrificed 3 days or 14 days following intratracheal administration of CEES (6 mg/kg) or control. CEES intoxication resulted in transient (3 days) increases in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell and protein content in WT, but not iNOS −/− mice. This correlated with expression of Ym1, a marker of oxidative stress in alveolar macrophages and epithelial cells. In contrast, in iNOS −/− mice, Ym1 was only observed 14 days post-exposure in enlarged alveolar macrophages, suggesting that they are alternatively activated. This is supported by findings that lung tumor necrosis factor and lipocalin Lcn2 expression, mediators involved in tissue repair were also upregulated at this time in iNOS −/− mice. Conversely, CEES-induced increases in the proinflammatory genes, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and cyclooxygenase-2, were abrogated in iNOS −/− mice. In WT mice, CEES treatment also resulted in increases in total lung resistance and decreases in compliance in response to methacholine, effects blunted by loss of iNOS. These data demonstrate that RNS, generated via iNOS play a role in the pathogenic responses to CEES, augmenting oxidative stress and inflammation and suppressing tissue repair. Elucidating inflammatory mechanisms mediating vesicant-induced lung injury is key to the development of therapeutics to treat mustard poisoning. -- Highlights: ► Lung injury, inflammation and oxidative stress are induced by the model vesicant CEES ► RNS generated via iNOS are important in the CEES-induced pulmonary toxicity ► iNOS −/− mice are protected from CEES-induced lung toxicity and

  8. Role of reactive nitrogen species generated via inducible nitric oxide synthase in vesicant-induced lung injury, inflammation and altered lung functioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Shen, Jianliang; Patel-Vayas, Kinal; Gow, Andrew J.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary toxicity induced by sulfur mustard and related vesicants is associated with oxidative stress. In the present studies we analyzed the role of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) generated via inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in lung injury and inflammation induced by vesicants using 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) as a model. C57Bl/6 (WT) and iNOS −/− mice were sacrificed 3 days or 14 days following intratracheal administration of CEES (6 mg/kg) or control. CEES intoxication resulted in transient (3 days) increases in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell and protein content in WT, but not iNOS −/− mice. This correlated with expression of Ym1, a marker of oxidative stress in alveolar macrophages and epithelial cells. In contrast, in iNOS −/− mice, Ym1 was only observed 14 days post-exposure in enlarged alveolar macrophages, suggesting that they are alternatively activated. This is supported by findings that lung tumor necrosis factor and lipocalin Lcn2 expression, mediators involved in tissue repair were also upregulated at this time in iNOS −/− mice. Conversely, CEES-induced increases in the proinflammatory genes, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and cyclooxygenase-2, were abrogated in iNOS −/− mice. In WT mice, CEES treatment also resulted in increases in total lung resistance and decreases in compliance in response to methacholine, effects blunted by loss of iNOS. These data demonstrate that RNS, generated via iNOS play a role in the pathogenic responses to CEES, augmenting oxidative stress and inflammation and suppressing tissue repair. Elucidating inflammatory mechanisms mediating vesicant-induced lung injury is key to the development of therapeutics to treat mustard poisoning. -- Highlights: ► Lung injury, inflammation and oxidative stress are induced by the model vesicant CEES ► RNS generated via iNOS are important in the CEES-induced pulmonary toxicity ► iNOS −/− mice are protected from CEES-induced lung toxicity and

  9. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 13,2017 Understand the risks of inflammation. Although it is not proven that inflammation causes ...

  10. Association of sitting time and breaks in sitting with muscle mass, strength, function, and inflammation in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, N; Healy, G N; Gianoudis, J; Formica, M; Gardiner, P A; Eakin, E E; Nowson, C A; Daly, R M

    2018-02-26

    The mechanisms through which excessive sitting time impacts health are important to understand. This study found that each hour of sitting per day was not associated with physical function, although associations with poor body composition were observed. Reducing sitting time for improved weight management in older adults needs further exploration. To examine the association of sitting time and breaks in sitting time with muscle mass, strength, function, and inflammation in older Australians. Data from the thigh-worn activPAL3™ monitor (7-day continuous wear) was used to derive time spent sitting (hours) and total number of sit-stand transitions per day. Body composition (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), lower-body muscle strength, function (timed up-and-go [TUG], 4-m gait speed, four square step test, 30-second sit-to-stand), and serum inflammatory markers (interleukin-[IL-6], IL-8, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNF-α], and adiponectin) were measured. Multiple regression analyses, adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, education, employment status, marital status, number of prescription medications, smoking status, vitamin D, and stepping time, were used to assess the associations. Data from 123 community-dwelling older adults (aged 65-84 years, 63% female) were used. Total daily sitting time was associated with lower percentage lean mass (β [95%CI], - 1.70% [- 2.30, - 1.10]) and higher total body fat mass (2.92 kg [1.94, 3.30]). More frequent breaks in sitting time were associated with a 45% reduced risk of having pre-sarcopenia (OR = 0.55; 95% CI 0.34, 0.91; model 1), defined as appendicular lean mass divided by BMI. No significant associations were observed for sitting time or breaks in sitting with measures of muscle strength, function, or inflammation. In older community-dwelling adults, greater sitting time was associated with a lower percentage lean mass, while more frequent breaks in sitting time were associated with lower odds of having

  11. Distinct and nonredundant in vivo functions of TNF produced by T cells and macrophages/neutrophils: Protective and deleterious effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grivennikov, Sergei I.; Tumanov, Alexei V.; Liepinsh, Dmitry J.; Kruglov, Andrei A.; Marakusha, Boris I.; Shakhov, Alexander N.; Murakami, Takaya; Drutskaya, Ludmila N.; Förster, Irmgard; Clausen, Björn E.; Tessarollo, Lino; Ryffel, Bernhard; Kuprash, Dmitry V.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.

    2005-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF, TNFalpha) is implicated in various pathophysiological processes and can be either protective, as in host defense, or deleterious, as in autoimmunity or toxic shock. To uncover the in vivo functions of TNF produced by different cell types, we generated mice with TNF

  12. The Functional Quality of Soluble Recombinant Polypeptides Produced in Escherichia coli Is Defined by a Wide Conformational Spectrum▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Alonso, Mónica; González-Montalbán, Nuria; García-Fruitós, Elena; Villaverde, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    We have observed that a soluble recombinant green fluorescent protein produced in Escherichia coli occurs in a wide conformational spectrum. This results in differently fluorescent protein fractions in which morphologically diverse soluble aggregates abound. Therefore, the functional quality of soluble versions of aggregation-prone recombinant proteins is defined statistically rather than by the prevalence of a canonical native structure. PMID:18836021

  13. Elevated circulating PAI-1 levels are related to lung function decline, systemic inflammation, and small airway obstruction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang H

    2016-09-01

    correlation analysis showed that circulating PAI-1 was inversely correlated with pulmonary function parameters including the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC, FEV1/Pre (justified r=-0.308, P<0.001; justified r=-0.295, P=0.001, respectively and SAO indicators such as FEV3/FVC, MMEF25–75/Pre (justified r=-0.289, P=0.001; justified r=-0.273, P=0.002, respectively, but positively related to the inflammatory marker CRP (justified r=0.351, P<0.001, the small airway remolding biomarker TIMP-1, and MMP-9 (justified r=0.498, P<0.001; justified r=0.267, P=0.002, respectively. Besides, multivariable linear analysis showed that FEV1/FVC, CRP, and TIMP-1 were independent parameters associated with PAI-1. Conclusion: Our findings first illustrate that elevated serum PAI-1 levels are related to the lung function decline, systemic inflammation, and SAO in COPD, suggesting that PAI-1 may play critical roles in the pathogenesis of COPD. Keywords: plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, systemic inflammation, small airway obstruction (SAO

  14. Fermented food in the context of a healthy diet: how to produce novel functional foods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Frédéric; De Vuyst, Luc

    2014-11-01

    This review presents an overview of recent studies on the production of functional fermented foods, of both traditional and innovative natures, and the mapping of the functional compounds involved. The functional aspects of fermented foods are mostly related to the concept of probiotic bacteria or the targeted microbial generation of functional molecules, such as bioactive peptides, during food fermentation. Apart from conventional yoghurt and fermented milks, several fermented nondairy foods are globally gaining in interest, in particular from soy or cereal origin, sometimes novel but often originating from ethnic (Asian) diets. In addition, a range of functional nonmicrobial compounds may be added to the fermented food matrix. Overall, a wide variety of potential health benefits is being claimed, yet often poorly supported by mechanistic insights and rarely demonstrated with clinical trials or even animal models. Although functional foods offer considerable market potential, several issues still need to be addressed. As most of the studies on functional fermented foods are of a rather descriptive and preliminary nature, there is a clear need for mechanistic studies and well controlled in-vivo experiments.

  15. Liver inflammation during monocrotaline hepatotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copple, Bryan L.; Ganey, Patricia E.; Roth, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Monocrotaline (MCT) is a pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA) plant toxin that causes hepatotoxicity in humans and animals. Human exposure occurs from consumption of contaminated grains and herbal teas and medicines. Intraperitoneal injection (i.p.) of 300 mg/kg MCT in rats produced time-dependent hepatic parenchymal cell (HPC) injury beginning at 12 h. At this time, an inflammatory infiltrate consisting of neutrophils (PMNs) appeared in areas of hepatocellular injury, and activation of the coagulation system occurred. PMN accumulation was preceded by up-regulation of the PMN chemokines cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 (CINC-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) in the liver. The monocyte chemokine, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), was also upregulated. Inhibition of Kupffer cell function with gadolinium chloride (GdCl 3 ) significantly reduced CINC-1 protein in plasma after MCT treatment but had no effect on hepatic PMN accumulation. Since inflammation can contribute to either pathogenesis or resolution of tissue injury, we explored inflammatory factors as a contributor to MCT hepatotoxicity. To test the hypothesis that PMNs contribute to MCT-induced HPC injury, rats were depleted of PMNs with a rabbit anti-PMN serum prior to MCT treatment. Anti-PMN treatment reduced hepatic PMN accumulation by 80% but had no effect on MCT-induced HPC injury or activation of the coagulation system. To test the hypothesis that Kupffer cells and/or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) are required for MCT-induced HPC injury, rats were treated with either GdCl 3 to inhibit Kupffer cell function or pentoxifylline (PTX) to prevent synthesis of TNF-α. Neither treatment prevented MCT-induced HPC injury. Results from these studies suggest that PMNs, Kupffer cells and TNF-α are not critical mediators of MCT hepatotoxicity. Accordingly, although inflammation occurs in the liver after MCT treatment, it is not required for HPC injury and possibly occurs secondary to

  16. Effects of Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH Eating Plan on Inflammation and Liver Functional Tests among Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Azadbakht

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering that the new cardiovascular risk factors are important among type 2 diabetes. We evaluated the effects of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH eating pattern on inflammation and novel cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetic patients.Materials and Method: In this eight-weeks crossover randomized clinical trail, 31 type 2 diabetic patients were on a control diet or the DASH diet. Fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy products are consumed in high amounts in this diet. However, saturated fat, total fat, cholesterol, refined grains, and sweets are recommended in low amounts. DASH diet had a total of 2,400 mg sodium per day. There was a four week washout between two trial phases. C-reactive protein level, coagulation indices and hepatic function tests were measured at baseline and after each phase of trial.Results: The mean percent change for plasma C-reactive protein level was -26.9±3.5% after the DASH diet and-5.1±3.8% after the control diet (p=0.001. Both alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels were significantly reduced after consuming the DASH diet compared to the control diet (-14.8±3.0 % vs -6.6±3.4%; p=0.001, -29.4±3.7% vs -5.9±1.4%; p=0.001, respectively. The DASH diet reduced the plasma fibrinogen level compared to the control diet (-11.4±3.6% and 0.5±3.4%; p=0.03, respectively. Conclusion: Among diabetic patients, the DASH diet can play an important role in reducing inflammation, plasma levels of fibrinogen and liver aminotranferases. Future long-term studies are recommended.

  17. Characteristics and functionality of appetite-reducing thylakoid powders produced by three different drying processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Östbring, Karolina; Sjöholm, Ingegerd; Sörenson, Henrietta; Ekholm, Andrej; Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte; Rayner, Marilyn

    2018-03-01

    Thylakoids, a chloroplast membrane extracted from green leaves, are a promising functional ingredient with appetite-reducing properties via their lipase-inhibiting effect. Thylakoids in powder form have been evaluated in animal and human models, but no comprehensive study has been conducted on powder characteristics. The aim was to investigate the effects of different isolation methods and drying techniques (drum-drying, spray-drying, freeze-drying) on thylakoids' physicochemical and functional properties. Freeze-drying yielded thylakoid powders with the highest lipase-inhibiting capacity. We hypothesize that the specific macromolecular structures involved in lipase inhibition were degraded to different degrees by exposure to heat during spray-drying and drum-drying. We identified lightness (Hunter's L-value), greenness (Hunter's a-value), chlorophyll content and emulsifying capacity to be correlated to lipase-inhibiting capacity. Thus, to optimize the thylakoids functional properties, the internal membrane structure indicated by retained green colour should be preserved. This opens possibilities to use chlorophyll content as a marker for thylakoid functionality in screening processes during process optimization. Thylakoids are heat sensitive, and a mild drying technique should be used in industrial production. Strong links between physicochemical parameters and lipase inhibition capacity were found that can be used to predict functionality. The approach from this study can be applied towards production of standardized high-quality functional food ingredients. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Immunsystemet ved kronisk inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtzen, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immunity has evolved as a defence against infections and as an important repair mechanism after physical injury. If elimination of microbes and healing is not achieved, or if the immune system is dysregulated, chronic inflammation ensues. Immune cells become engaged in prolonged...... reactions with other cell types in vessels and organs, frequently with superimposed autoreactive T-cells and autoantibody-producing B-cells/plasma cells. The processes are distinguished on the basis of clinical manifestations in organ-specific and systemic inflammatory diseases. The underlying factors...

  19. Excitation functions of radionuclides produced by proton induced reactions on gadolinium targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Challana, M.B.; Comsana, M.N.H.; Moawadb, G.S.; Abou-Zeid, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Cross section study for proton induced reaction on natural Gadolinium targets were performed. Excitation functions for the reactions n atGd(p,x) 152m+g , 154m,154g Tb from threshold up to E p = 18 MeV have been measured employing the stacked foil activation technique, and using high resolution HPGe gamma spectrometry. Utilizing the simultaneous measurement of the excitation function of n atCu(p,x) 62 Zn, n atCu(p,x) 63 Zn, and n atCu(p,x) 65 Zn as monitor reactions. The theoretical analysis of the excitation functions has been done employing both ALICE-91 and EMPIRE-II codes. In general, theoretical calculations agree well with the experimental data. A significant contribution of pre-equilibrium component has been observed at these energies

  20. Antenatal insults modify newborn olfactory function by nitric oxide produced from neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobyshevsky, Alexander; Yu, Lei; Yang, Yirong; Khalid, Syed; Luo, Kehuan; Jiang, Rugang; Ji, Haitao; Derrick, Matthew; Kay, Leslie; Silverman, Richard B; Tan, Sidhartha

    2012-10-01

    Newborn feeding, maternal, bonding, growth and wellbeing depend upon intact odor recognition in the early postnatal period. Antenatal stress may affect postnatal odor recognition. We investigated the exact role of a neurotransmitter, nitric oxide (NO), in newborn olfactory function. We hypothesized that olfactory neuron activity depended on NO generated by neuronal NO synthase (NOS). Utilizing in vivo functional manganese enhanced MRI (MEMRI) in a rabbit model of cerebral palsy we had shown previously that in utero hypoxia-ischemia (H-I) at E22 (70% gestation) resulted in impaired postnatal response to odorants and poor feeding. With the same antenatal insult, we manipulated NO levels in the olfactory neuron in postnatal day 1 (P1) kits by administration of intranasal NO donors or a highly selective nNOS inhibitor. Olfactory function was quantitatively measured by the response to amyl acetate stimulation by MEMRI. The relevance of nNOS to normal olfactory development was confirmed by the increase of nNOS gene expression from fetal ages to P1 in olfactory epithelium and bulbs. In control kits, nNOS inhibition decreased NO production in the olfactory system and increased MEMRI slope enhancement. In H-I kits the MEMRI slope did not increase, implicating modification of endogenous NO-mediated olfactory function by the antenatal insult. NO donors as a source of exogenous NO did not significantly change function in either group. In conclusion, olfactory epithelium nNOS in newborn rabbits probably modulates olfactory signal transduction. Antenatal H-I injury remote from delivery may affect early functional development of the olfactory system by decreasing NO-dependent signal transduction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Altered Peripheral Blood Monocyte Phenotype and Function in Chronic Liver Disease: Implications for Hepatic Recruitment and Systemic Inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L Gadd

    Full Text Available Liver and systemic inflammatory factors influence monocyte phenotype and function, which has implications for hepatic recruitment and subsequent inflammatory and fibrogenic responses, as well as host defence.Peripheral blood monocyte surface marker (CD14, CD16, CD163, CSF1R, CCR2, CCR4, CCR5, CXCR3, CXCR4, CX3CR1, HLA-DR, CD62L, SIGLEC-1 expression and capacity for phagocytosis, oxidative burst and LPS-stimulated TNF production were assessed in patients with hepatitis C (HCV (n = 39 or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD (n = 34 (classified as non-advanced disease, compensated cirrhosis and decompensated cirrhosis and healthy controls (n = 11 by flow cytometry.The selected markers exhibited similar monocyte-subset-specific expression patterns between patients and controls. Monocyte phenotypic signatures differed between NAFLD and HCV patients, with an increased proportion of CD16+ non-classical monocytes in NAFLD, but increased expression of CXCR3 and CXCR4 in HCV. In both cohorts, monocyte CCR2 expression was reduced and CCR4 elevated over controls. CD62L expression was specifically elevated in patients with decompensated cirrhosis and positively correlated with the model-for-end-stage-liver-disease score. Functionally, monocytes from patients with decompensated cirrhosis had equal phagocytic capacity, but displayed features of dysfunction, characterised by lower HLA-DR expression and blunted oxidative responses. Lower monocyte TNF production in response to LPS stimulation correlated with time to death in 7 (46% of the decompensated patients who died within 8 months of recruitment.Chronic HCV and NAFLD differentially affect circulating monocyte phenotype, suggesting specific injury-induced signals may contribute to hepatic monocyte recruitment and systemic activation state. Monocyte function, however, was similarly impaired in patients with both HCV and NAFLD, particularly in advanced disease, which likely contributes to the increased

  2. The Consequences of Preterm Birth and Chorioamnionitis on Brainstem Respiratory Centers: Implications for Neurochemical Development and Altered Functions by Inflammation and Prostaglandins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesa Stojanovska

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Preterm birth is a major cause for neonatal morbidity and mortality, and is frequently associated with adverse neurological outcomes. The transition from intrauterine to extrauterine life at birth is particularly challenging for preterm infants. The main physiological driver for extrauterine transition is the establishment of spontaneous breathing. However, preterm infants have difficulty clearing lung liquid, have insufficient surfactant levels, and underdeveloped lungs. Further, preterm infants have an underdeveloped brainstem, resulting in reduced respiratory drive. These factors facilitate the increased requirement for respiratory support. A principal cause of preterm birth is intrauterine infection/inflammation (chorioamnionitis, and infants with chorioamnionitis have an increased risk and severity of neurological damage, but also demonstrate impaired autoresuscitation capacity and prevalent apnoeic episodes. The brainstem contains vital respiratory centers which provide the neural drive for breathing, but the impact of preterm birth and/or chorioamnionitis on this brain region is not well understood. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the role and function of the brainstem respiratory centers, and to highlight the proposed mechanisms of how preterm birth and chorioamnionitis may affect central respiratory functions.

  3. The Consequences of Preterm Birth and Chorioamnionitis on Brainstem Respiratory Centers: Implications for Neurochemical Development and Altered Functions by Inflammation and Prostaglandins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanovska, Vanesa; Miller, Suzanne L; Hooper, Stuart B; Polglase, Graeme R

    2018-01-01

    Preterm birth is a major cause for neonatal morbidity and mortality, and is frequently associated with adverse neurological outcomes. The transition from intrauterine to extrauterine life at birth is particularly challenging for preterm infants. The main physiological driver for extrauterine transition is the establishment of spontaneous breathing. However, preterm infants have difficulty clearing lung liquid, have insufficient surfactant levels, and underdeveloped lungs. Further, preterm infants have an underdeveloped brainstem, resulting in reduced respiratory drive. These factors facilitate the increased requirement for respiratory support. A principal cause of preterm birth is intrauterine infection/inflammation (chorioamnionitis), and infants with chorioamnionitis have an increased risk and severity of neurological damage, but also demonstrate impaired autoresuscitation capacity and prevalent apnoeic episodes. The brainstem contains vital respiratory centers which provide the neural drive for breathing, but the impact of preterm birth and/or chorioamnionitis on this brain region is not well understood. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the role and function of the brainstem respiratory centers, and to highlight the proposed mechanisms of how preterm birth and chorioamnionitis may affect central respiratory functions.

  4. Fatty acid esters produced by Lasiodiplodia theobromae function as growth regulators in tobacco seedlings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uranga, Carla C., E-mail: curanga@cicese.edu.mx [Centro de Investigación Científica y de Educación Superior de Ensenada (CICESE), Carretera Ensenada-Tijuana 3918, Zona Playitas, 22860 Ensenada, B.C. (Mexico); Beld, Joris, E-mail: joris.beld@drexelmed.edu [University of California, San Diego, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093-0358 (United States); Mrse, Anthony, E-mail: amrse@ucsd.edu [University of California, San Diego, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093-0358 (United States); Córdova-Guerrero, Iván, E-mail: icordova@uabc.edu.mx [Universidad Autónoma de Baja California (UABC), Calzada Universidad 14418 Parque Industrial Internacional Tijuana, Tijuana, B.C. 22390 (Mexico); Burkart, Michael D., E-mail: mburkart@ucsd.edu [University of California, San Diego, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093-0358 (United States); Hernández-Martínez, Rufina, E-mail: ruhernan@cicese.mx [Centro de Investigación Científica y de Educación Superior de Ensenada (CICESE), Carretera Ensenada-Tijuana 3918, Zona Playitas, 22860 Ensenada, B.C. (Mexico)

    2016-04-01

    The Botryosphaeriaceae are a family of trunk disease fungi that cause dieback and death of various plant hosts. This work sought to characterize fatty acid derivatives in a highly virulent member of this family, Lasiodiplodia theobromae. Nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of an isolated compound revealed (Z, Z)-9,12-ethyl octadecadienoate, (trivial name ethyl linoleate), as one of the most abundant fatty acid esters produced by L. theobromae. A variety of naturally produced esters of fatty acids were identified in Botryosphaeriaceae. In comparison, the production of fatty acid esters in the soil-borne tomato pathogen Fusarium oxysporum, and the non-phytopathogenic fungus Trichoderma asperellum was found to be limited. Ethyl linoleate, ethyl hexadecanoate (trivial name ethyl palmitate), and ethyl octadecanoate, (trivial name ethyl stearate), significantly inhibited tobacco seed germination and altered seedling leaf growth patterns and morphology at the highest concentration (0.2 mg/mL) tested, while ethyl linoleate and ethyl stearate significantly enhanced growth at low concentrations, with both still inducing growth at 98 ng/mL. This work provides new insights into the role of naturally esterified fatty acids from L. theobromae as plant growth regulators with similar activity to the well-known plant growth regulator gibberellic acid. - Highlights: • Lasiodiplodia theobromae produces a wide variety of fatty acid esters in natural substrates. • Ethyl stearate and ethyl linoleate inhibit tobacco germination at 0.2 mg/mL. • Ethyl stearate and ethyl linoleate induce tobacco germination at 98 ng/mL. • Tobacco growth increase in ethyl stearate and ethyl linoleate parallels gibberellic acid. • A role as plant growth regulators is proposed for fatty acid esters.

  5. Fatty acid esters produced by Lasiodiplodia theobromae function as growth regulators in tobacco seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranga, Carla C.; Beld, Joris; Mrse, Anthony; Córdova-Guerrero, Iván; Burkart, Michael D.; Hernández-Martínez, Rufina

    2016-01-01

    The Botryosphaeriaceae are a family of trunk disease fungi that cause dieback and death of various plant hosts. This work sought to characterize fatty acid derivatives in a highly virulent member of this family, Lasiodiplodia theobromae. Nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of an isolated compound revealed (Z, Z)-9,12-ethyl octadecadienoate, (trivial name ethyl linoleate), as one of the most abundant fatty acid esters produced by L. theobromae. A variety of naturally produced esters of fatty acids were identified in Botryosphaeriaceae. In comparison, the production of fatty acid esters in the soil-borne tomato pathogen Fusarium oxysporum, and the non-phytopathogenic fungus Trichoderma asperellum was found to be limited. Ethyl linoleate, ethyl hexadecanoate (trivial name ethyl palmitate), and ethyl octadecanoate, (trivial name ethyl stearate), significantly inhibited tobacco seed germination and altered seedling leaf growth patterns and morphology at the highest concentration (0.2 mg/mL) tested, while ethyl linoleate and ethyl stearate significantly enhanced growth at low concentrations, with both still inducing growth at 98 ng/mL. This work provides new insights into the role of naturally esterified fatty acids from L. theobromae as plant growth regulators with similar activity to the well-known plant growth regulator gibberellic acid. - Highlights: • Lasiodiplodia theobromae produces a wide variety of fatty acid esters in natural substrates. • Ethyl stearate and ethyl linoleate inhibit tobacco germination at 0.2 mg/mL. • Ethyl stearate and ethyl linoleate induce tobacco germination at 98 ng/mL. • Tobacco growth increase in ethyl stearate and ethyl linoleate parallels gibberellic acid. • A role as plant growth regulators is proposed for fatty acid esters.

  6. Isolation and functional characterization of a biosurfactant produced by Lactobacillus paracasei

    OpenAIRE

    Gudiña, Eduardo J.; Teixeira, J. A.; Rodrigues, L. R.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the crude biosurfactant produced by a Lactobacillus paracasei strain isolated in a Portuguese dairy industry was characterized. The minimum surface tension (41.8mN/m) and the critical micelle concentration (2.5 mg/ml) obtained were found to be similar to the values previously reported for biosurfactants isolated from other lactobacilli. The biosurfactant was found to be stable to pH changes over a range from 6 to 10, being more effective at pH 7, and showed no loss ...

  7. FUNCTIONAL STATUS AND INFLAMMATION AFTER PRESEASON TRAINING PROGRAM IN PROFESSIONAL AND RECREATIONAL SOCCER PLAYERS: A PROTEOMIC APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Martín-Sánchez

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to determine if an intensive pre- season training program modifies the inflammatory status in professional soccer players and if this inflammatory profile may be associated with the physical state. We compared plasma protein biomarkers, using proteomics, and the physiological state and cardiac function in 12 professional soccer players and 9 recreational soccer players. Reduced cardiac low frequency [LF] after the pre- season training program previous competition with respect to recreational soccer players was found. No differences were found in cardiac high frequency, cardiac high frequency/low frequency ratio, tension index and oxygen volume consumption. Alpha-1-antitrypsin isotype-3, fibrinogen-gamma isotypes-1, 2 and 3 and vitamin-D-binding protein isotype-1 were reduced in professionals players compared with those in recreational players. However, an increased content of alpha-1-antitrypsin isotype-6 and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin 1 and 4 were found in professional soccer players. Spearman´s analysis showed a positive correlation between LF and fibrinogen-gamma chain isotype 3; but LF was negatively correlated with alpha-antichymotrypsin isotype 4. Professional soccer players submitted to an intensive training showed differences in the content of plasma proteins associated with inflammatory/oxidative stress and thrombosis with respect to recreational soccer players. Proteomics analysis in combination with the analysis of cardiac function assessment may be useful to know more in depth molecular processes associated with sport and intensive exercise.

  8. Lamin in inflammation and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Joseph R; Chen, Haiyang; Zheng, Xiaobin; Zheng, Yixian

    2016-06-01

    Aging is characterized by a progressive loss of tissue function and an increased susceptibility to injury and disease. Many age-associated pathologies manifest an inflammatory component, and this has led to the speculation that aging is at least in part caused by some form of inflammation. However, whether or not inflammation is truly a cause of aging, or is a consequence of the aging process is unknown. Recent work using Drosophila has uncovered a mechanism where the progressive loss of lamin-B in the fat body upon aging triggers systemic inflammation. This inflammatory response perturbs the local immune response of the neighboring gut tissue and leads to hyperplasia. Here, we will discuss the literature connecting lamins to aging and inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Highly thermal-stable and functional cellulose nanocrystals and nanofibrils produced using fully recyclable organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liheng Chen; Junyong Zhu; Carlos Baez; Peter Kitin; Thomas Elder

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the production of highly thermal stable and functional cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) and nanofibrils (CNF) by hydrolysis using concentrated organic acids. Due to their low water solubility, these solid organic acids can be easily recovered after hydrolysis reactions through crystallization at a lower or ambient temperature. When dicarboxylic acids were...

  10. Xenon produces minimal haemodynamic effects in rabbits with chronically compromised left ventricular function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preckel, B.; Schlack, W.; Heibel, T.; Rütten, H.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Xenon has only minimal haemodynamic side-effects on normal myocardium and might be a preferable anaesthetic agent for patients with heart failure. We studied the haemodynamic changes caused by 70% xenon in rabbits with chronically compromised left ventricular (LV) function. METHODS:

  11. The composition and functional properties of whey protein concentrates produced from buttermilk are comparable with those of whey protein concentrates produced from skimmed milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svanborg, Sigrid; Johansen, Anne-Grethe; Abrahamsen, Roger K; Skeie, Siv B

    2015-09-01

    The demand for whey protein is increasing in the food industry. Traditionally, whey protein concentrates (WPC) and isolates are produced from cheese whey. At present, microfiltration (MF) enables the utilization of whey from skim milk (SM) through milk protein fractionation. This study demonstrates that buttermilk (BM) can be a potential source for the production of a WPC with a comparable composition and functional properties to a WPC obtained by MF of SM. Through the production of WPC powder and a casein- and phospholipid (PL)-rich fraction by the MF of BM, sweet BM may be used in a more optimal and economical way. Sweet cream BM from industrial churning was skimmed before MF with 0.2-µm ceramic membranes at 55 to 58°C. The fractionations of BM and SM were performed under the same conditions using the same process, and the whey protein fractions from BM and SM were concentrated by ultrafiltration and diafiltration. The ultrafiltration and diafiltration was performed at 50°C using pasteurized tap water and a membrane with a 20-kDa cut-off to retain as little lactose as possible in the final WPC powders. The ultrafiltrates were subsequently spray dried, and their functional properties and chemical compositions were compared. The amounts of whey protein and PL in the WPC powder from BM (BMWPC) were comparable to the amounts found in the WPC from SM (SMWPC); however, the composition of the PL classes differed. The BMWPC contained less total protein, casein, and lactose compared with SMWPC, as well as higher contents of fat and citric acid. No difference in protein solubility was observed at pH values of 4.6 and 7.0, and the overrun was the same for BMWPC and SMWPC; however, the BMWPC made less stable foam than SMWPC. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cytokines and intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamias, Giorgos; Cominelli, Fabio

    2016-11-01

    Cytokines of the intestinal microenvironment largely dictate immunological responses after mucosal insults and the dominance of homeostatic or proinflammatory pathways. This review presents important recent studies on the role of specific cytokines in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation. The particular mucosal effects of cytokines depend on their inherent properties but also the cellular origin, type of stimulatory antigens, intermolecular interactions, and the particular immunological milieu. Novel cytokines of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) family, including IL-33 and IL-36, have dominant roles in mucosal immunity, whereas more established ones such as IL-18 are constantly enriched with unique properties. Th17 cells are important mucosal constituents, although their profound plasticity, makes the specific set of cytokines they secrete more important than their mere numbers. Finally, various cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-like cytokine 1A, and death receptor, 3 demonstrate dichotomous roles with mucosa-protective function in acute injury but proinflammatory effects during chronic inflammation. The role of cytokines in mucosal health and disease is increasingly revealed. Such information not only will advance our understanding of the pathogenesis of gut inflammation, but also set the background for development of reliable diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and cytokine-specific therapies.

  13. Metabotypes with properly functioning mitochondria and anti-inflammation predict extended productive life span in dairy cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, K.; Dänicke, S.; Rehage, J.; Sauerwein, H.; Otto, W.; Rolle-Kampczyk, U.; von Bergen, M.

    2016-01-01

    The failure to adapt metabolism to the homeorhetic demands of lactation is considered as a main factor in reducing the productive life span of dairy cows. The so far defined markers of production performance and metabolic health in dairy cows do not predict the length of productive life span satisfyingly. This study aimed to identify novel pathways and biomarkers related to productive life in dairy cows by means of (targeted) metabolomics. In a longitudinal study from 42 days before up to 100 days after parturition, we identified metabolites such as long-chain acylcarnitines and biogenic amines associated with extended productive life spans. These metabolites are mainly secreted by the liver and depend on the functionality of hepatic mitochondria. The concentrations of biogenic amines and some acylcarnitines differed already before the onset of lactation thus indicating their predictive potential for continuation or early ending of productive life. PMID:27089826

  14. Systemic distribution of single-walled carbon nanotubes in a novel model: alteration of biochemical parameters, metabolic functions, liver accumulation, and inflammation in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Principi E

    2016-09-01

    microscopy methods. We observed a transient accumulation of SWCNTs in the lungs, spleen, and kidneys of CD1 mice exposed to SWCNTs. A dose- and time-dependent accumulation was found in the liver, associated with increases in levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and bilirubinemia, which are metabolic markers associated with liver damage. Our data suggest that hepatic accumulation of SWCNTs associated with liver damage results in an M1 macrophage-driven inflammation. Keywords: single-walled carbon nanotubes, nanotoxicity, metabolism, hepatic function, inflammation, Kupffer cells, mouse models

  15. Decentralised water and wastewater treatment technologies to produce functional water for irrigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Battilani, Adriano; Steiner, Michele; Andersen, Martin

    2010-01-01

    prototype version. In 2008, 100% of samples fulfilled WHO standards (1989) and Global Gap requirement for faecal contamination. MBR removed from inlet flow in the average 82% of arsenic, 82% of cadmium, 97% of chromium, 93% of copper and 99% of lead. Boron and manganese were not removed from permeate...... of wastewater produced by small communities/industries or the use of polluted surface water. Water treatment technologies were coupled with irrigation strategies and technologies to obtain a flexible, easy to use, integrated management of the system. The challenge is to apply new strategies and technologies...... filter can remove up to 60% of E. coli but the removal process was not stable nor predictable. FTS removed 76% of arsenic, 80% of cadmium and copper, 88% of chromium and lead, and up to 97% of zinc. Like the MBR, boron and manganese were not removed from the irrigation water. Gravel filter directly fed...

  16. Parton Distribution Function Studies and a Measurement of Drell-Yan Produced Muon Pairs at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    De Lorenzi, Francesco

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is going to probe our understanding of the theory which describes the subnuclear interaction. For the past few decades, physicists have been able to describe with increasing details the fundamental particles that constitute the Universe and the interactions between them. This understanding is encapsulated in the Standard Model of particle physics, but there are still important gaps in our knowledge. The upcoming experimental data from the LHC might produce unexpected results and unveil new scenarios in our understanding of the model of elementary particles. However, the correct identification of any signal of new physics requires a careful assessment of the Standard Model backgrounds. Given that the vast majority of events are due to strong interactions, a deep understanding of the phenomenology of strong interactions is fundamental in order to fully exploit the physics potential of modern colliders. This thesis describes the contribution of my research activity in the ...

  17. Functional, genetic and chemical characterization of biosurfactants produced by plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas putida 267.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijt, Marco; Tran, Ha; Raaijmakers, Jos M

    2009-08-01

    Plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas putida strain 267, originally isolated from the rhizosphere of black pepper, produces biosurfactants that cause lysis of zoospores of the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora capsici. The biosurfactants were characterized, the biosynthesis gene(s) partially identified, and their role in control of Phytophthora damping-off of cucumber evaluated. The biosurfactants were shown to lyse zoospores of Phy. capsici and inhibit growth of the fungal pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Rhizoctonia solani. In vitro assays further showed that the biosurfactants of strain 267 are essential in swarming motility and biofilm formation. In spite of the zoosporicidal activity, the biosurfactants did not play a significant role in control of Phytophthora damping-off of cucumber, since both wild type strain 267 and its biosurfactant-deficient mutant were equally effective, and addition of the biosurfactants did not provide control. Genetic characterization revealed that surfactant biosynthesis in strain 267 is governed by homologues of PsoA and PsoB, two nonribosomal peptide synthetases involved in production of the cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) putisolvin I and II. The structural relatedness of the biosurfactants of strain 267 to putisolvins I and II was supported by LC-MS and MS-MS analyses. The biosurfactants produced by Ps. putida 267 were identified as putisolvin-like CLPs; they are essential in swarming motility and biofilm formation, and have zoosporicidal and antifungal activities. Strain 267 provides excellent biocontrol activity against Phytophthora damping-off of cucumber, but the lipopeptide surfactants are not involved in disease suppression. Pseudomonas putida 267 suppresses Phy. capsici damping-off of cucumber and provides a potential supplementary strategy to control this economically important oomycete pathogen. The putisolvin-like biosurfactants exhibit zoosporicidal and antifungal activities, yet they do not contribute to biocontrol of Phy

  18. Functional-drink rich in antioxidant cardamom-rhizome (Amomum cardamomum willd) suppresses inflammation and improves lipid profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winarsi, H.; Susilowati, S. S.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this research was to know the effect of functional drink rich in antioxidant cardamom rhizome (Fd-Carrhi) on level of IL-6, C-RP, and lipid profile of atherosclerotic. A total of 30 women with atherosclerosis, age 40-65 years old, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, lived in Purwokerto, Banyumas, Central Java, Indonesia, and were willing to sign informed consent, recruited as research subjects. They consumed simvastatin from doctors, divided by 3 groups of 10 people each. Group I, given Fd-Carrhi; II, placebo; and III, only simvastatin, for 2 months. As many as 100 ml of Fd-Carrhi or placebo were given every morning. Blood samples were taken 3 times, 1 ml, at baseline, 1 and 2 months after intervention. Blood plasma was determined levels of IL-6, C-RP, as well as total cholesterol (total-c), triglycerides (TG), LDL-c, and HDL-c. Result showed Fd-Carrhi versus placebo significantly decreased plasma level of IL-6, C-RP, total-c, and LDL-c, and otherwise increased HDL-c, but no differences were seen in TG. The findings clearly support Fd-Carrhi inhibit the development of atherosclerosis towards cardiovascular heart diseases (CHD) by suppressing IL-6 and CRP levels, and improving lipid profile.

  19. Altered Cav1.2 function in the Timothy syndrome mouse model produces ascending serotonergic abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlinger, Daniel G; Commons, Kathryn G

    2017-10-01

    Polymorphism in the gene CACNA1C, encoding the pore-forming subunit of Cav1.2 L-type calcium channels, has one of the strongest genetic linkages to schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder: psychopathologies in which serotonin signaling has been implicated. Additionally, a gain-of-function mutation in CACNA1C is responsible for the neurodevelopmental disorder Timothy syndrome that presents with prominent behavioral features on the autism spectrum. Given an emerging role for serotonin in the etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), we investigate the relationship between Cav1.2 and the ascending serotonin system in the Timothy syndrome type 2 (TS2-neo) mouse, which displays behavioral features consistent with the core triad of ASD. We find that TS2-neo mice exhibit enhanced serotonin tissue content and axon innervation of the dorsal striatum, as well as decreased serotonin turnover in the amygdala. These regionally specific alterations are accompanied by an enhanced active coping response during acute stress (forced swim), serotonin neuron Fos activity in the caudal dorsal raphe, and serotonin type 1A receptor-dependent feedback inhibition of the rostral dorsal raphe nuclei. Collectively, these results suggest that the global gain-of-function Cav1.2 mutation associated with Timothy syndrome has pleiotropic effects on the ascending serotonin system including neuroanatomical changes, regional differences in forebrain serotonin metabolism and feedback regulatory control mechanisms within the dorsal raphe. Altered activity of the ascending serotonin system continues to emerge as a common neural signature across several ASD mouse models, and the capacity for Cav1.2 L-type calcium channels to impact both serotonin structure and function has important implications for several neuropsychiatric conditions. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Human endometrial stromal stem cells differentiate into megakaryocytes with the ability to produce functional platelets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinju Wang

    Full Text Available Human endometrium is a high dynamic tissue that contains endometrial stromal stem cells (hESSCs. The hESSCs have been differentiated into a number of cell lineages. However, differentiation of hESSCs into megakaryocytes (MKs has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of MK generation from hESSCs and subsequent production of functional platelets (PLTs. In our study, hESSCs were cultured from endometrial stromal cells as confirmed by positive stromal cell specific markers (CD90 and CD29 and negative hematopoietic stem cell markers (CD45 and CD34 expression. Then, hESSCs were differentiated in a medium supplemented with thrombopoietin (TPO for 18 days. The MK differentiation was analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The differentiation medium was collected for PLT production analysis by flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy and functional measurements. Our results show: 1 MKs were successfully generated from hESSCs as identified by expression of specific markers (CD41a: 1 ± 0.09% and 39 ± 3.0%; CD42b: 1.2 ± 0.06% and 28 ± 2.0%, control vs. differentiation accompanied with reduction of pluripotent transcription factors (Oct4 and Sox2 expression; 2 The level of PLTs in the differentiation medium was 16 ± 1 number/µl as determined by size (2-4 µm and CD41a expression (CD41a: 1 ± 0.4% and 90±2.0%, control vs. differentiation; 3 Generated PLTs were functional as evidenced by the up-regulation of CD62p expression and fibrinogen binding following thrombin stimulation; 4 Released PLTs showed similar ultra-structure characteristics (alpha granules, vacuoles and dense tubular system as PLTs from peripheral blood determined by electron microscopic analysis. Data demonstrate the feasibility of generating MKs from hESSCs, and that the generated MKs release functional PLTs. Therefore, hESSCs could be a potential new stem cell source for in vitro MK/PLT production.

  1. Human endometrial stromal stem cells differentiate into megakaryocytes with the ability to produce functional platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinju; Chen, Shuzhen; Zhang, Cheng; Stegeman, Samantha; Pfaff-Amesse, Teresa; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Wenfeng; Amesse, Lawrence; Chen, Yanfang

    2012-01-01

    Human endometrium is a high dynamic tissue that contains endometrial stromal stem cells (hESSCs). The hESSCs have been differentiated into a number of cell lineages. However, differentiation of hESSCs into megakaryocytes (MKs) has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of MK generation from hESSCs and subsequent production of functional platelets (PLTs). In our study, hESSCs were cultured from endometrial stromal cells as confirmed by positive stromal cell specific markers (CD90 and CD29) and negative hematopoietic stem cell markers (CD45 and CD34) expression. Then, hESSCs were differentiated in a medium supplemented with thrombopoietin (TPO) for 18 days. The MK differentiation was analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The differentiation medium was collected for PLT production analysis by flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy and functional measurements. Our results show: 1) MKs were successfully generated from hESSCs as identified by expression of specific markers (CD41a: 1 ± 0.09% and 39 ± 3.0%; CD42b: 1.2 ± 0.06% and 28 ± 2.0%, control vs. differentiation) accompanied with reduction of pluripotent transcription factors (Oct4 and Sox2) expression; 2) The level of PLTs in the differentiation medium was 16 ± 1 number/µl as determined by size (2-4 µm) and CD41a expression (CD41a: 1 ± 0.4% and 90±2.0%, control vs. differentiation); 3) Generated PLTs were functional as evidenced by the up-regulation of CD62p expression and fibrinogen binding following thrombin stimulation; 4) Released PLTs showed similar ultra-structure characteristics (alpha granules, vacuoles and dense tubular system) as PLTs from peripheral blood determined by electron microscopic analysis. Data demonstrate the feasibility of generating MKs from hESSCs, and that the generated MKs release functional PLTs. Therefore, hESSCs could be a potential new stem cell source for in vitro MK/PLT production.

  2. Functional Stability of a Mixed Microbial Consortium Producing PHA From Waste Carbon Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David N. Thompson; Erik R. Coats; William A. Smith; Frank J. Loge; Michael P. Wolcott

    2006-04-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) represent an environmentally-effective alternative to synthetic thermoplastics; however, current production practices are not sustainable. In this study, PHA production was accomplished in sequencing batch bioreactors utilizing real wastewaters and mixed microbial consortia from municipal activated sludge as inoculum. Polymer production reached 85%, 53%, and 10% of the cell dry weight from methanol-enriched pulp-and-paper mill foul condensate, fermented municipal primary solids, and biodiesel wastewater, respectively. Employing denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S-rDNA from PCR-amplified DNA extracts, distinctly different communities were observed between and within wastewaters following enrichment. Most importantly, functional stability was maintained despite differing and contrasting microbial populations.

  3. Physicochemical and functional properties of protein isolate produced from Australian chia seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timilsena, Yakindra Prasad; Adhikari, Raju; Barrow, Colin J; Adhikari, Benu

    2016-12-01

    Protein was isolated from Australian chia seeds and converted to powders using spray, freeze and vacuum drying methods, to investigate the effect of drying methods on physicochemical and functional attributes of chia-seed protein isolate (CPI). It was found that there was no significant difference in the proximate composition; however vacuum dried CPI (VDCPI) had the highest bulk density and oil absorption capacity, whereas spray dried powder (SDCPI) demonstrated the highest solubility, water absorption capacity and lowest surface hydrophobicity. Solubility of all powders was higher at elevated temperature and alkaline pH. Foaming capacity and foam stability of CPI were found to increase with increasing pH and protein concentration. SDCPI was the least denatured and VDCPI the most denatured, demonstrating the poorest solubility and foaming properties of the latter. These findings are expected to be useful in selection of a drying process to yield chia seed protein powders with more desirable functionality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Isolation and functional characterization of a biosurfactant produced by Lactobacillus paracasei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudiña, Eduardo J; Teixeira, José A; Rodrigues, Lígia R

    2010-03-01

    In this study, the crude biosurfactant produced by a Lactobacillus paracasei strain isolated in a Portuguese dairy industry was characterized. The minimum surface tension (41.8mN/m) and the critical micelle concentration (2.5mg/ml) obtained were found to be similar to the values previously reported for biosurfactants isolated from other lactobacilli. The biosurfactant was found to be stable to pH changes over a range from 6 to 10, being more effective at pH 7, and showed no loss of surface activity after incubation at 60 degrees C for 120h. Although the biosurfactant chemical composition has not been determined yet, a fraction was isolated through acidic precipitation, which exhibited higher surface activity as compared with the crude biosurfactant. Furthermore, this isolated biosurfactant showed antimicrobial and anti-adhesive activities against several pathogenic microorganisms. In addition, L. paracasei exhibited a strong autoaggregating phenotype, which was maintained after washing and resuspending the cells in PBS, meaning that this attribute must be related to cell surface components and not to excreted factors. The autoaggregation ability exhibited by this strain, together with the antimicrobial and anti-adhesive properties observed for this biosurfactant opens the possibility for its use as an effective probiotic strain.

  5. Influence of polyvinyl alcohol amount on producing in situ photo-crosslinked thioamide functionalized nanofiber membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeytuncu Bihter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(vinyl alcohol/maleic anhydride/acryloyl thioamide monomer (PVA/MA/ATM photo-cured nanofiber membranes and pure PVA nanofiber membranes were produced by electrospinning technique. In situ UV radiation was applied during the electrospinning in order to provide polymerization during the jet flight and promote crosslinking of ATM and MA with PVA. The cross-linking was examined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The morphology and thermal behavior of electrospun nanofiber were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, respectively. The surface area of nanofiber membranes was measured by Brunauer-Emmert-Teller (BET analysis. Furthermore, water durability test was examined. Water durability test demonstrated that in situ photo-cured PVA/MA/ATM nanofiber membrane had the least average mass loss. The surface areas of PVA/MA/ATM nanofiber membranes were 160-280 m2/g. The surface area and diameter of PVA/MA/ATM nanofibers decreased as the PVA content increased. The diameter of nanofibers was obtained less than 100 nm. The results showed that the water-insoluble nanofiber membranes with better chemical and thermal resistance were obtained. These nanofiber membranes may be a promising candidate for the usage of water treatment.

  6. Dysbiosis gut microbiota associated with inflammation and impaired mucosal immune function in intestine of humans with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Weiwei; Wu, Na; Wang, Xuemei; Chi, Yujing; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Qiu, Xinyun; Hu, Ying; Li, Jing; Liu, Yulan

    2015-02-03

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has recently been considered to be under the influence of the gut microbiota, which might exert toxic effects on the human host after intestinal absorption and delivery to the liver via the portal vein. In this study, the composition of the gut microbiota in NAFLD patients and healthy subjects was determined via 16S ribosomal RNA Illumina next-generation sequencing. Among those taxa displaying greater than 0.1% average abundance in all samples, five genera, including Alistipes and Prevotella, were significantly more abundant in the gut microbiota of healthy subjects compared to NAFLD patients. Alternatively, Escherichia, Anaerobacter, Lactobacillus and Streptococcus were increased in the gut microbiota of NAFLD patients compared to healthy subjects. In addition, decreased numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes and increased levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-γ were detected in the NAFLD group compared to the healthy group. Furthermore, irregularly arranged microvilli and widened tight junctions were observed in the gut mucosa of the NAFLD patients via transmission electron microscopy. We postulate that aside from dysbiosis of the gut microbiota, gut microbiota-mediated inflammation of the intestinal mucosa and the related impairment in mucosal immune function play an important role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD.

  7. Evidence of early alterations in adipose tissue biology and function and its association with obesity-related inflammation and insulin resistance in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgraf, Kathrin; Rockstroh, Denise; Wagner, Isabel V; Weise, Sebastian; Tauscher, Roy; Schwartze, Julian T; Löffler, Dennis; Bühligen, Ulf; Wojan, Magdalena; Till, Holger; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Kiess, Wieland; Blüher, Matthias; Körner, Antje

    2015-04-01

    Accumulation of fat mass in obesity may result from hypertrophy and/or hyperplasia and is frequently associated with adipose tissue (AT) dysfunction in adults. Here we assessed early alterations in AT biology and function by comprehensive experimental and clinical characterization of 171 AT samples from lean and obese children aged 0 to 18 years. We show an increase in adipocyte size and number in obese compared with lean children beginning in early childhood. These alterations in AT composition in obese children were accompanied by decreased basal lipolytic activity and significantly enhanced stromal vascular cell proliferation in vitro, potentially underlying the hypertrophy and hyperplasia seen in obese children, respectively. Furthermore, macrophage infiltration, including the formation of crown-like structures, was increased in AT of obese children from 6 years on and was associated with higher hs-CRP serum levels. Clinically, adipocyte hypertrophy was not only associated with leptin serum levels but was highly and independently correlated with HOMA-IR as a marker of insulin resistance in children. In summary, we show that adipocyte hypertrophy is linked to increased inflammation in AT in obese children, thereby providing evidence that obesity-associated AT dysfunction develops in early childhood and is related to insulin resistance. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  8. Micropatterned nanostructures: a bioengineered approach to mass-produce functional myocardial grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpooshan, Vahid; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2015-02-01

    Cell-based therapies are a recently established path for treating a wide range of human disease. Tissue engineering of contractile heart muscle for replacement therapy is among the most exciting and important of these efforts. However, current in vitro techniques of cultivating functional mature cardiac grafts have only been moderately successful due to the poor capability of traditional two-dimensional cell culture systems to recapitulate necessary in vivo conditions. In this issue, Kiefer et al [1] introduce a laser-patterned nanostructured substrate (Al/Al2O3 nanowires) for efficient maintenance of oriented human cardiomyocytes, with great potential to open new roads to mass-production of contractile myocardial grafts for cardiovascular tissue engineering.

  9. Simulating photoacoustic waves produced by individual biological particles with spheroidal wave functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Fang, Hui; Min, Changjun; Yuan, Xiaocong

    2015-10-01

    Under the usual approximation of treating a biological particle as a spheroidal droplet, we consider the analysis of its size and shape with the high frequency photoacoustics and develop a numerical method which can simulate its characteristic photoacoustic waves. This numerical method is based on the calculation of spheroidal wave functions, and when comparing to the finite element model (FEM) calculation, can reveal more physical information and can provide results independently at each spatial points. As the demonstration, red blood cells (RBCs) and MCF7 cell nuclei are studied, and their photoacoustic responses including field distribution, spectral amplitude, and pulse forming are calculated. We expect that integrating this numerical method with the high frequency photoacoustic measurement will form a new modality being extra to the light scattering method, for fast assessing the morphology of a biological particle.

  10. Functional and phylogenetic analysis of ureD in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyert, Susan R; Rasko, David A; Kaper, James B

    2011-02-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is a food-borne pathogen that can cause severe health complications and utilizes a much lower infectious dose than other E. coli pathotypes. Despite having an intact ure locus, ureDABCEFG, the majority of EHEC strains are phenotypically urease negative under tested conditions. Urease activity potentially assists with survival fitness by enhancing acid tolerance during passage through the stomach or by aiding with colonization in either human or animal reservoirs. Previously, in the EHEC O157:H7 Sakai strain, a point mutation in ureD, encoding a urease chaperone protein, was identified, resulting in a substitution of an amber stop codon for glutamine. This single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is observed in the majority of EHEC O157:H7 isolates and correlates with a negative urease phenotype in vitro. We demonstrate that the lack of urease activity in vitro is not solely due to the amber codon in ureD. Our analysis has identified two additional SNPs in ureD affecting amino acid positions 38 and 205, in both cases determining whether the encoded amino acid is leucine or proline. Phylogenetic analysis based on Ure protein sequences from a variety of urease-encoding bacteria demonstrates that the proline at position 38 is highly conserved among Gram-negative bacteria. Experiments reveal that the L38P substitution enhances urease enzyme activity; however, the L205P substitution does not. Multilocus sequence typing analysis for a variety of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli isolates combined with the ureD sequence reveals that except for a subset of the O157:H7 strains, neither the in vitro urease-positive phenotype nor the ureD sequence is phylogenetically restricted.

  11. Cloning, purification, and functional characterization of Carocin S2, a ribonuclease bacteriocin produced by Pectobacterium carotovorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yung-Chieh; Wu, Jian-Li; Wu, Huang-Pin; Tzeng, Kuo-Ching; Chuang, Duen-Yau

    2011-05-12

    Most isolates of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (Pcc) produce bacteriocins. In this study, we have determined that Pcc strain F-rif-18 has a chromosomal gene encoding the low-molecular-weight bacteriocin, Carocin S2, and that this bacteriocin inhibits the growth of a closely related strain. Carocin S2 is inducible by ultraviolet radiation but not by mutagenic agents such as mitomycin C. A carocin S2-defective mutant, TF1-2, was obtained by Tn5 insertional mutagenesis using F-rif-18. A 5706-bp DNA fragment was detected by Southern blotting, selected from a genomic DNA library, and cloned to the vector, pMS2KI. Two adjacent complete open reading frames within pMS2KI were sequenced, characterized, and identified as caroS2K and caroS2I, which respectively encode the killing protein and immunity protein. Notably, carocin S2 could be expressed not only in the mutant TF1-2 but also in Escherichia coli DH5α after entry of the plasmid pMS2KI. Furthermore, the C-terminal domain of CaroS2K was homologous to the nuclease domains of colicin D and klebicin D. Moreover, SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the relative mass of CaroS2K was 85 kDa and that of CaroS2I was 10 kDa. This study shown that another nuclease type of bacteriocin was found in Pectobacterium carotovorum. This new type of bacteriocin, Carocin S2, has the ribonuclease activity of CaroS2K and the immunity protein activity of CaroS2I.

  12. Cloning, purification, and functional characterization of Carocin S2, a ribonuclease bacteriocin produced by Pectobacterium carotovorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzeng Kuo-Ching

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most isolates of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (Pcc produce bacteriocins. In this study, we have determined that Pcc strain F-rif-18 has a chromosomal gene encoding the low-molecular-weight bacteriocin, Carocin S2, and that this bacteriocin inhibits the growth of a closely related strain. Carocin S2 is inducible by ultraviolet radiation but not by mutagenic agents such as mitomycin C. Results A carocin S2-defective mutant, TF1-2, was obtained by Tn5 insertional mutagenesis using F-rif-18. A 5706-bp DNA fragment was detected by Southern blotting, selected from a genomic DNA library, and cloned to the vector, pMS2KI. Two adjacent complete open reading frames within pMS2KI were sequenced, characterized, and identified as caroS2K and caroS2I, which respectively encode the killing protein and immunity protein. Notably, carocin S2 could be expressed not only in the mutant TF1-2 but also in Escherichia coli DH5α after entry of the plasmid pMS2KI. Furthermore, the C-terminal domain of CaroS2K was homologous to the nuclease domains of colicin D and klebicin D. Moreover, SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the relative mass of CaroS2K was 85 kDa and that of CaroS2I was 10 kDa. Conclusion This study shown that another nuclease type of bacteriocin was found in Pectobacterium carotovorum. This new type of bacteriocin, Carocin S2, has the ribonuclease activity of CaroS2K and the immunity protein activity of CaroS2I.

  13. Insulin-Producing Endocrine Cells Differentiated In Vitro From Human Embryonic Stem Cells Function in Macroencapsulation Devices In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agulnick, Alan D; Ambruzs, Dana M; Moorman, Mark A; Bhoumik, Anindita; Cesario, Rosemary M; Payne, Janice K; Kelly, Jonathan R; Haakmeester, Carl; Srijemac, Robert; Wilson, Alistair Z; Kerr, Justin; Frazier, Mauro A; Kroon, Evert J; D'Amour, Kevin A

    2015-10-01

    The PEC-01 cell population, differentiated from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), contains pancreatic progenitors (PPs) that, when loaded into macroencapsulation devices (to produce the VC-01 candidate product) and transplanted into mice, can mature into glucose-responsive insulin-secreting cells and other pancreatic endocrine cells involved in glucose metabolism. We modified the protocol for making PEC-01 cells such that 73%-80% of the cell population consisted of PDX1-positive (PDX1+) and NKX6.1+ PPs. The PPs were further differentiated to islet-like cells (ICs) that reproducibly contained 73%-89% endocrine cells, of which approximately 40%-50% expressed insulin. A large fraction of these insulin-positive cells were single hormone-positive and expressed the transcription factors PDX1 and NKX6.1. To preclude a significant contribution of progenitors to the in vivo function of ICs, we used a simple enrichment process to remove remaining PPs, yielding aggregates that contained 93%-98% endocrine cells and 1%-3% progenitors. Enriched ICs, when encapsulated and implanted into mice, functioned similarly to the VC-01 candidate product, demonstrating conclusively that in vitro-produced hESC-derived insulin-producing cells can mature and function in vivo in devices. A scaled version of our suspension culture was used, and the endocrine aggregates could be cryopreserved and retain functionality. Although ICs expressed multiple important β cell genes, the cells contained relatively low levels of several maturity-associated markers. Correlating with this, the time to function of ICs was similar to PEC-01 cells, indicating that ICs required cell-autonomous maturation after delivery in vivo, which would occur concurrently with graft integration into the host. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) affects approximately 1.25 million people in the U.S. alone and is deadly if not managed with insulin injections. This paper describes the production of insulin-producing cells in vitro and a new

  14. Gulf War Illness Inflammation Reduction Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    physical and mental functioning 2) pain, fatigue, and cognitive dysfunction 3) biomarkers of inflammation. All regulatory approvals for this...pilot study was to identify a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of GWI. Examination to the peripheral blood revealed the biomarker...reactive protein: using inflammation markers in cardiology . Circulation. 2003; 107:370-372. 7. Zhang JM. An J. Cytokines, Inflammation and Pain. Int

  15. Adaptive evolution in locomotor performance: How selective pressures and functional relationships produce diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales, Jeffrey A; Butler, Marguerite A

    2016-01-01

    Despite the complexity of nature, most comparative studies of phenotypic evolution consider selective pressures in isolation. When competing pressures operate on the same system, it is commonly expected that trade-offs will occur that will limit the evolution of phenotypic diversity, however, it is possible that interactions among selective pressures may promote diversity instead. We explored the evolution of locomotor performance in lizards in relation to possible selective pressures using the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. Here, we show that a combination of selection based on foraging mode and predator escape is required to explain variation in performance phenotypes. Surprisingly, habitat use contributed little explanatory power. We find that it is possible to evolve very different abilities in performance which were previously thought to be tightly correlated, supporting a growing literature that explores the many-to-one mapping of morphological design. Although we generally find the expected trade-off between maximal exertion and speed, this relationship surprisingly disappears when species experience selection for both performance types. We conclude that functional integration need not limit adaptive potential, and that an integrative approach considering multiple major influences on a phenotype allows a more complete understanding of adaptation and the evolution of diversity. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  16. Microstructured Polymer Blend Surfaces Produced by Spraying Functional Copolymers and Their Blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Alfredo, Nelson; Rodríguez Hernández, Juan

    2016-05-31

    We described the fabrication of functional and microstructured surfaces from polymer blends by spray deposition. This simple technique offers the possibility to simultaneously finely tune the microstructure as well as the surface chemical composition. Whereas at lower polymer concentration, randomly distributed surface micropatterns were observed, an increase of the concentration leads to significant changes on these structures. On the one hand, using pure homopolystyrene fiber-like structures were observed when the polymer concentration exceeded 30 mg/mL. Interestingly, the incorporation of 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorostyrene changed the morphology, and, instead of fibers, micrometer size particles were identified at the surface. These fluorinated microparticles provide superhydrophobic properties leading to surfaces with contact angles above 165°. Equally, in addition to the microstructures provided by the spray deposition, the use of thermoresponsive polymers to fabricate interfaces with responsive properties is also described. Contact angle measurements revealed variations on the surface wettability upon heating when blends of polystyrene and polystyrene- b -poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) are employed. Finally, the use of spraying techniques to fabricate gradient surfaces is proposed. Maintaining a constant orientation, the surface topography and thus the contact angle varies gradually from the center to the edge of the film depending on the spray angle.

  17. Statistical improvements in functional magnetic resonance imaging analyses produced by censoring high-motion data points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Joshua S; Power, Jonathan D; Dubis, Joseph W; Vogel, Alecia C; Church, Jessica A; Schlaggar, Bradley L; Petersen, Steven E

    2014-05-01

    Subject motion degrades the quality of task functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Here, we test two classes of methods to counteract the effects of motion in task fMRI data: (1) a variety of motion regressions and (2) motion censoring ("motion scrubbing"). In motion regression, various regressors based on realignment estimates were included as nuisance regressors in general linear model (GLM) estimation. In motion censoring, volumes in which head motion exceeded a threshold were withheld from GLM estimation. The effects of each method were explored in several task fMRI data sets and compared using indicators of data quality and signal-to-noise ratio. Motion censoring decreased variance in parameter estimates within- and across-subjects, reduced residual error in GLM estimation, and increased the magnitude of statistical effects. Motion censoring performed better than all forms of motion regression and also performed well across a variety of parameter spaces, in GLMs with assumed or unassumed response shapes. We conclude that motion censoring improves the quality of task fMRI data and can be a valuable processing step in studies involving populations with even mild amounts of head movement. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. High yield purification of full-length functional hERG K+ channels produced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molbaek, Karen; Scharff-Poulsen, Peter; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus

    2015-01-01

    The hERG potassium channel is essential for repolarization of the cardiac action potential. Due to this vital function, absence of unintended and potentially life-threatening interactions with hERG is required for approval of new drugs. The structure of hERG is therefore one of the most sought......-after. To provide purified hERG for structural studies and new hERG biomimetic platforms for detection of undesirable interactions, we have developed a hERG expression platform generating unprecedented amounts of purified and functional hERG channels. Full-length hERG, with or without a C-terminally fused green...... fluorescent protein (GFP) His(8)-tag was produced from a codon-optimized hERG cDNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both constructs complemented the high potassium requirement of a knock-out Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, indicating correct tetramer assembly in vivo. Functionality was further demonstrated...

  19. Purinergic Receptors in Ocular Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Guzman-Aranguez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a complex process that implies the interaction between cells and molecular mediators, which, when not properly “tuned,” can lead to disease. When inflammation affects the eye, it can produce severe disorders affecting the superficial and internal parts of the visual organ. The nucleoside adenosine and nucleotides including adenine mononucleotides like ADP and ATP and dinucleotides such as P1,P4-diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A, and P1,P5-diadenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A are present in different ocular locations and therefore they may contribute/modulate inflammatory processes. Adenosine receptors, in particular A2A adenosine receptors, present anti-inflammatory action in acute and chronic retinal inflammation. Regarding the A3 receptor, selective agonists like N6-(3-iodobenzyl-5′-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine (CF101 have been used for the treatment of inflammatory ophthalmic diseases such as dry eye and uveoretinitis. Sideways, diverse stimuli (sensory stimulation, large intraocular pressure increases can produce a release of ATP from ocular sensory innervation or after injury to ocular tissues. Then, ATP will activate purinergic P2 receptors present in sensory nerve endings, the iris, the ciliary body, or other tissues surrounding the anterior chamber of the eye to produce uveitis/endophthalmitis. In summary, adenosine and nucleotides can activate receptors in ocular structures susceptible to suffer from inflammatory processes. This involvement suggests the possible use of purinergic agonists and antagonists as therapeutic targets for ocular inflammation.

  20. Impact of aging on cardiac function in a female rat model of menopause: role of autonomic control, inflammation, and oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machi, Jacqueline Freire; Dias, Danielle da Silva; Freitas, Sarah Cristina; de Moraes, Oscar Albuquerque; da Silva, Maikon Barbosa; Cruz, Paula Lázara; Mostarda, Cristiano; Salemi, Vera M C; Morris, Mariana; De Angelis, Kátia; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of aging on metabolic, cardiovascular, autonomic, inflammatory, and oxidative stress parameters after ovarian hormone deprivation (OVX). Methods Female Wistar rats (3 or 22 months old) were divided into: young controls, young ovariectomized, old controls, and old ovariectomized (bilateral ovaries removal). After a 9-week follow-up, physical capacity, metabolic parameters, and morphometric and cardiac functions were assessed. Subsequently, arterial pressure was recorded and cardiac autonomic control was evaluated. Oxidative stress was measured on the cardiac tissue, while inflammatory profile was assessed in the plasma. Results Aging or OVX caused an increase in body and fat weight and triglyceride concentration and a decrease in both insulin sensitivity and aerobic exercise capacity. Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and increased cardiac overload (myocardial performance index) were reported in old groups when compared with young groups. Aging and OVX led to an increased sympathetic tonus, and vagal tonus was lower only for the old groups. Tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 were increased in old groups when compared with young groups. Glutathione redox balance (GSH/GSSG) was reduced in young ovariectomized, old controls, and old ovariectomized groups when compared with young controls, indicating an increased oxidative stress. A negative correlation was found between GSH/GSSG and tumor necrosis factor-α (r=−0.6, P<0.003). Correlations were found between interleukin-6 with adipose tissue (r=0.5, P<0.009) and vagal tonus (r=−0.7, P<0.0002); and among myocardial performance index with interleukin-6 (r=0.65, P<0.0002), sympathetic tonus (r=0.55, P<0.006), and physical capacity (r=−0.55, P<0.003). The findings in this trial showed that ovariectomy aggravated the impairment of cardiac and functional effects of aging in female rats, probably associated with exacerbated autonomic dysfunction

  1. High fat diet impairs the function of glucagon-like peptide-1 producing L-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Paul; Pais, Ramona; Habib, Abdella M; Brighton, Cheryl A; Yeo, Giles S H; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M

    2016-03-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) acts as a satiety signal and enhances insulin release. This study examined how GLP-1 production from intestinal L-cells is modified by dietary changes. Transgenic mouse models were utilized in which L-cells could be purified by cell specific expression of a yellow fluorescent protein, Venus. Mice were fed on chow or 60% high fat diet (HFD) for 2 or 16 weeks. L-cells were purified by flow cytometry and analysed by microarray and quantitative RT-PCR. Enteroendocrine cell populations were examined by FACS analysis, and GLP-1 secretion was assessed in primary intestinal cultures. Two weeks HFD reduced the numbers of GLP-1 positive cells in the colon, and of GIP positive cells in the small intestine. Purified small intestinal L-cells showed major shifts in their gene expression profiles. In mice on HFD for 16 weeks, significant reductions were observed in the expression of L-cell specific genes, including those encoding gut hormones (Gip, Cck, Sct, Nts), prohormone processing enzymes (Pcsk1, Cpe), granins (Chgb, Scg2), nutrient sensing machinery (Slc5a1, Slc15a1, Abcc8, Gpr120) and enteroendocrine-specific transcription factors (Etv1, Isl1, Mlxipl, Nkx2.2 and Rfx6). A corresponding reduction in the GLP-1 secretory responsiveness to nutrient stimuli was observed in primary small intestinal cultures. Mice fed on HFD exhibited reduced expression in L-cells of many L-cell specific genes, suggesting an impairment of enteroendocrine cell function. Our results suggest that a western style diet may detrimentally affect the secretion of gut hormones and normal post-prandial signaling, which could impact on insulin secretion and satiety. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Structure and functions of exopolysaccharide produced by gut commensal Lactobacillus reuteri 100-23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Ian M; Frese, Steven A; Walter, Jens; Loach, Diane; Wilson, Michelle; Appleyard, Kay; Eason, Jocelyn; Livingston, Megan; Baird, Margaret; Cook, Gregory; Tannock, Gerald W

    2011-07-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri strain 100-23 together with a Lactobacillus-free mouse model, provides a system with which the molecular traits underpinning bacterial commensalism in vertebrates can be studied. A polysaccharide was extracted from sucrose-containing liquid cultures of strain 100-23. Chemical analysis showed that this exopolysaccharide was a levan (β-2, 6-linked fructan). Mutation of the fructosyl transferase (ftf) gene resulted in loss of exopolysaccharide production. The ftf mutant was able to colonise the murine gastrointestinal tract in the absence of competition, but colonisation was impaired in competition with the wild type. Biofilm formation by the mutant on the forestomach epithelial surface was not impaired and the matrix between cells was indistinguishable from that of the wild type in electron micrographs. Colonisation of the mouse gut by the wild-type strain led to increased proportions of regulatory T cells (Foxp3+) in the spleen, whereas colonisation by the ftf mutant did not. Survival of the mutant in sucrose-containing medium was markedly reduced relative to the wild type. Comparison of the genomic ftf loci of strain 100-23 with other L. reuteri strains suggested that the ftf gene was acquired by lateral gene transfer early in the evolution of the species and subsequently diversified at accelerated rates. Levan production by L. reuteri 100-23 may represent a function acquired by the bacterial species for life in moderate to high-sucrose extra-gastrointestinal environments that has subsequently been diverted to novel uses, including immunomodulation, that aid in colonisation of the murine gut.

  3. Adsorption of surfactin produced from Bacillus subtilis using nonwoven PET (polyethylene terephthalate) fibrous membranes functionalized with chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behary, N; Perwuelz, A; Campagne, C; Lecouturier, D; Dhulster, P; Mamede, A S

    2012-02-01

    This article deals with an alternative method for bio-separation of surfactin produced by Bacillus subtilis using sorption method on nonwoven PET (polyethylene terephthalate) fibrous membranes functionalized with chitosan. In the first part of the study, surface functionalization of the PET nonwoven fibrous membranes is carried out with aqueous 65% deacetylated chitosan solution with or without a prior surface activation using air-atmospheric plasma treatment. Very small modification of the PET fibrous nonwoven air-permeability confirms the functionalization of PET fibre surface with little reduction of membrane porosity. The functionalized membranes are then characterized by physico-chemical methods: X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Wettability and zeta potential. Chitosan increases drastically the zeta potential of PET at all pH values though a prior plasma treatment of the PET membrane reduces slightly the increase in zeta potential values. Sorption of surfactin quantified by HPLC shows that the extent of surfactin sorption on PET nonwovens depends on the surface functionalization method. Surface functionalization with chitosan results in immediate sorption of the entire quantity of surfactin. A prior surface activation by air atmospheric plasma treatment of the PET membranes before chitosan application retards the sorption of entire surfactin which takes place after 1.5h, only. Increased zeta potential and increased hydrophobic behavior in the presence of chitosan without plasma activation would explain the interesting surfactin sorption results. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Functional and genetic characterization of hydrocarbon biodegrader and exopolymer-producing clones from a petroleum reservoir metagenomic library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcellos, Suzan P; Sierra-Garcia, Isabel N; Dellagnezze, Bruna M; Vicentini, Renato; Midgley, David; Silva, Cynthia C; Santos Neto, Eugenio V; Volk, Herbert; Hendry, Philip; Oliveira, Valéria M

    2017-05-01

    Microbial degradation of petroleum is a worldwide issue, which causes physico-chemical changes in its compounds, diminishing its commercial value. Biosurfactants are chemically diverse molecules that can be produced by several microorganisms and can enable microbial access to hydrocarbons. In order to investigate both microbial activities, function-driven screening assays for biosurfactant production and hydrocarbon biodegradation were carried out from a metagenomic fosmid library. It was constructed from the total DNA extracted from aerobic and anaerobic enrichments from a Brazilian biodegraded petroleum sample. A sum of 10 clones were selected in order to evaluate their ability to produce exopolymers (EPS) with emulsifying activity, as well as to characterize the gene sequences, harbored by the fosmid clones, through 454 pyrosequencing. Functional analyses confirmed the ability of some clones to produce surfactant compounds. Regarding hydrocarbon as microbial carbon sources, n-alkane (in mixture or not) and naphthalene were preferentially consumed as substrates. Analysis of sequence data set revealed the presence of genes related to xenobiotics biodegradation and carbohydrate metabolism. These data were corroborated by the results of hydrocarbon biodegradation and biosurfactant production detected in the evaluated clones.

  5. Dual Functions of Natural Killer Cells in Selection and Differentiation of Stem Cells; Role in Regulation of Inflammation and Regeneration of Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahid Jewett, Yan-Gao Man, Han-Ching Tseng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulated evidence from our laboratory indicates that conditioned or anergized NK cells have the ability to induce resistance of healthy stem cells and transformed cancer stem cells through both secreted factors and direct cell-cell contact by inducing differentiation. Cytotoxic function of NK cells is suppressed in the tumor microenvironment by a number of distinct effectors and their secreted factors. Furthermore, decreased peripheral blood NK cell function has been documented in many cancer patients. We have previously shown that NK cells mediate significant cytotoxicity against primary oral squamous carcinoma stem cells (OSCSCs as compared to their more differentiated oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCCs. In addition, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs, human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs and induced human pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs were all significantly more susceptible to NK cell mediated cytotoxicity than their differentiated counterparts or parental cells from which they were derived. We have also reported that inhibition of differentiation or reversion of cells to a less-differentiated phenotype by blocking NFκB or gene deletion of COX2 significantly augmented NK cell function. Furthermore, the induction of resistance of the stem cells to NK cell mediated cytotoxicity and their subsequent differentiation is amplified when either the stem cells or the NK cells were cultured in the presence of monocytes. Therefore, we propose that the two stages of NK cell maturation namely CD16+CD56dimCD69- NK cells are important for the lysis of stem cells or poorly differentiated cells whereas the CD16dim/-CD56dim/+CD69+NK cells are important for differentiation and eventual regeneration of the tissues and the resolution of inflammation, thus functionally serving as regulatory NK cells (NKreg. CD16 receptor on the NK cells were found to be the receptor with significant potential to induce NK cell anergy

  6. Structural and functional features of self-assembling protein nanoparticles produced in endotoxin-free Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, Fabián; Céspedes, María Virtudes; Sánchez-Chardi, Alejandro; Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Pesarrodona, Mireia; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Vázquez, Esther; Rinas, Ursula; Unzueta, Ugutz; Mamat, Uwe; Mangues, Ramón; García-Fruitós, Elena; Villaverde, Antonio

    2016-04-08

    Production of recombinant drugs in process-friendly endotoxin-free bacterial factories targets to a lessened complexity of the purification process combined with minimized biological hazards during product application. The development of nanostructured recombinant materials in innovative nanomedical activities expands such a need beyond plain functional polypeptides to complex protein assemblies. While Escherichia coli has been recently modified for the production of endotoxin-free proteins, no data has been so far recorded regarding how the system performs in the fabrication of smart nanostructured materials. We have here explored the nanoarchitecture and in vitro and in vivo functionalities of CXCR4-targeted, self-assembling protein nanoparticles intended for intracellular delivery of drugs and imaging agents in colorectal cancer. Interestingly, endotoxin-free materials exhibit a distinguishable architecture and altered size and target cell penetrability than counterparts produced in conventional E. coli strains. These variant nanoparticles show an eventual proper biodistribution and highly specific and exclusive accumulation in tumor upon administration in colorectal cancer mice models, indicating a convenient display and function of the tumor homing peptides and high particle stability under physiological conditions. The observations made here support the emerging endotoxin-free E. coli system as a robust protein material producer but are also indicative of a particular conformational status and organization of either building blocks or oligomers. This appears to be promoted by multifactorial stress-inducing conditions upon engineering of the E. coli cell envelope, which impacts on the protein quality control of the cell factory.

  7. Amino Acid Profile, Group of Functional and Molecular Weight Distribution of Goat Skin Gelatin That Produced Through Acid Process

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Irfan Said; Suharjono Triatmojo; Yuny Erwanto; Achmad Fudholi

    2012-01-01

    Gelatin is a product of hydrolysis of collagen protein from animals that are partially processed.  Gelatin used in food and non food industries.  Gelatin is produced when many import of raw skins and bones of pigs and cows.  Goat skins potential as a raw material substitution that still doubt its halal. Process production of gelatin determine the properties of gelatin. The objectives of this research were to determine amino acid profile, group of functional and molecular weight distribution o...

  8. Evaluation of the functional food potential of bamirad (a ginger-spiced) cheese produced in the western highlands of cameroon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dung, M.S.; Anyangwe, F.F.; Anselme, K.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, cheese was modified to enhance its functional characteristics thereby encouraging its consumption. Consequently, a ginger-spiced cheese (Ramirad) was produced and the effects of feed supplementation with cheese on blood lipid profile were evaluated using 36 male Wistar rats in four groups. Total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triacylglycerols were determined. There were significant (P<0.05) changes indicating: weekly increases of triacylglycerols for all treatments, higher total cholesterol for the 0.0 % ginger treatment, and a decline of low-density lipoprotein for 1.0 % ginger treatment. The LDL/HDL ratio was very low, indicating that this cheese is a functional food, a potential exploitable for the well-being of the consumer. (author)

  9. Inflammation of the Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Glaucoma (Video) Macular Degeneration Additional Content Medical News Inflammation of the Orbit (Inflammatory Orbital Pseudotumor) By James ... Introduction to Eye Socket Disorders Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis Inflammation of the Orbit Orbital Cellulitis Preseptal Cellulitis Tumors ...

  10. Inflammation and coagulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levi, Marcel; van der Poll, Tom

    2010-01-01

    In the pathogenesis of sepsis, inflammation and coagulation play a pivotal role. Increasing evidence points to an extensive cross-talk between these two systems, whereby inflammation leads to activation of coagulation, and coagulation also considerably affects inflammatory activity. Molecular

  11. Obesity, inflammation and endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iantorno, M; Campia, U; Di Daniele, N; Nistico, S; Forleo, G B; Cardillo, C; Tesauro, M

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in obese individuals. Obesity dramatically increases the risk of development of metabolic and cardiovascular disease. This risk appears to originate from disruption in adipose tissue function leading to a chronic inflammatory state and to dysregulation of the endocrine and paracrine actions of adipocyte-derived factors. These, in turn, impair vascular homeostasis and lead to endothelial dysfunction. An altered endothelial cell phenotype and endothelial dysfunction are common among all obesity-related complications. A crucial aspect of endothelial dysfunction is reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. A systemic pro-inflammatory state in combination with hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, oxidative stress and activation of the renin angiotensin system are systemic disturbances in obese individuals that contribute independently and synergistically to decreasing NO bioavailability. On the other hand, pro-inflammatory cytokines are locally produced by perivascular fat and act through a paracrine mechanism to independently contribute to endothelial dysfunction and smooth muscle cell dysfunction and to the pathogenesis of vascular disease in obese individuals. The promising discovery that obesity-induced vascular dysfunction is, at least in part, reversible, with weight loss strategies and drugs that promote vascular health, has not been sufficiently proved to prevent the cardiovascular complication of obesity on a large scale. In this review we discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying inflammation and vascular damage in obese patients.

  12. FTIR analysis of surface functionalities on particulate matter produced by off-road diesel engines operating on diesel and biofuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovicheva, Olga B; Kireeva, Elena D; Shonija, Natalia K; Vojtisek-Lom, Michal; Schwarz, Jaroslav

    2015-03-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is applied as a powerful analytic technique for the evaluation of the chemical composition of combustion aerosols emitted by off-road engines fuelled by diesel and biofuels. Particles produced by burning diesel, heated rapeseed oil (RO), RO with ethylhexylnitrate, and heated palm oil were sampled from exhausts of representative in-use diesel engines. Multicomponent composition of diesel and biofuel particles reveal the chemistry related to a variety of functional groups containing carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and nitrogen. The most intensive functionalities of diesel particles are saturated C-C-H and unsaturated C=C-H aliphatic groups in alkanes and alkenes, aromatic C=C and C=C-H groups in polyaromatics, as well as sulfates and nitrated ions. The distinguished features of biofuel particles were carbonyl C=O groups in carboxylic acids, ketones, aldehydes, esters, and lactones. NO2, C-N and -NH groups in nitrocompounds and amines are found to dominate biofuel particles. Group identification is confirmed by complementary measurements of organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon, and water-soluble ion species. The relationship between infrared bands of polar oxygenated and non-polar aliphatic functionalities indicates the higher extent of the surface oxidation of biofuel particles. Findings provide functional markers of organic surface structure of off-road diesel emission, allowing for a better evaluation of relation between engine, fuel, operation condition, and particle composition, thus improving the quantification of environmental impacts of alternative energy source emissions.

  13. A Rapid Culture Technique Produces Functional Dendritic-Like Cells from Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Ning

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Most anti-cancer immunotherapeutic strategies involving dendritic cells (DC as vaccines rely upon the adoptive transfer of DC loaded with exogenous tumour-peptides. This study utilized human acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells as progenitors from which functional dendritic-like antigen presenting cells (DLC were generated, that constitutively express tumour antigens for recognition by CD8+ T cells. DLC were generated from AML cell lines KG-1 and MUTZ-3 using rapid culture techniques and appropriate cytokines. DLC were evaluated for their cell-surface phenotype, antigen uptake and ability to stimulate allogeneic responder cell proliferation, and production of IFN-γ; compared with DC derived from normal human PBMC donors. KG-1 and MUTZ-3 DLC increased expression of CD80, CD83, CD86, and HLA-DR, and MUTZ-3 DLC downregulated CD14 and expressed CD1a. Importantly, both KG-1 and MUTZ-3-derived DLC promoted proliferation of allogeneic responder cells more efficiently than unmodified cells; neither cells incorporated FITC-labeled dextran, but both stimulated IFN-γ production from responding allogeneic CD8+ T cells. Control DC produced from PBMC using the FastDC culture also expressed high levels of critical cell surface ligands and demonstrated good APC function. This paper indicates that functional DLC can be cultured from the AML cell lines KG-1 and MUTZ-3, and FastDC culture generates functional KG-1 DLC.

  14. Structure-function relationships of bacterial and enzymatically produced reuterans and dextran in sourdough bread baking application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao Yan; Levy, Clemens; Gänzle, Michael G

    2016-12-19

    Exopolysaccharides from lactic acid bacteria may improve texture and shelf life of bread. The effect of exopolysaccharides on bread quality, however, depends on properties of the EPS and the EPS producing strain. This study investigated structure-function relationships of EPS in baking application. The dextransucrase DsrM and the reuteransucrase GtfA were cloned from Weissella cibaria 10M and Lactobacillus reuteri TMW1.656, respectively, and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. Site-directed mutagenesis of GtfA was generates reuterans with different glycosidic bonds. NMR spectrum indicated reuteranPI, reuteranNS and reuteranPINS produced by GtfA-V1024P:V1027I, GtfA-S1135N:A1137S and GtfA-V1024P:V1027I:S1135N:A1137S, respectively, had a higher proportion of α-(1→4) linkages when compared to reuteran. ReuteranNS has the lowest molecular weight as measured by asymmetric flow-field-flow fractionation. The reuteransucrase negative mutant L. reuteri TMW1.656ΔgtfA was generated as EPS-negative derivative of L. reuteri TMW1.656. Cell counts, pH, and organic acid levels of sourdough fermented with L. reuteri TMW1.656 and TMW1.656ΔgtfA were comparable. Reuteran produced by L. reuteri TMW1.656 during growth in sourdough and reuteran produced ex situ by GtfA-ΔN had comparable effects on bread volume and crumb hardness. Enzymatically produced dextran improved volume and texture of wheat bread, and of bread containing 20% rye flour. ReuteranNS but not reuteranPI or reuteran was as efficient as dextran in enhancing wheat bread volume and texture. Overall, reuteran linkage type and molecular weight are determinants of EPS effects on bread quality. This study established a valuable method to elucidate structure-function relationships of glucans in baking applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Producing chicken eggs containing isoflavone as functional food due to feeding effect of soy sauce by-product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfudz, L. D.; Sarjana, T. A.; Muryani, R.; Suthama, N.

    2018-01-01

    The present study was aimed to verify the impact of feeding soy sauce by-product in producing isoflavone-enriched chicken eggs as functional food. Experiment used 200 laying hens of 80-week old with average body weight of 1,932.75±189.50 g. Experimental diets were formulated using yellow corn, rice bran, soybean meal, fish meal, meat bone meal, poultry meal, premix, CaCO3, and soy sauce by-product (SSBP). A completely randomized design with 4 treatments and 5 replication (10 birds each), was assigned in this experiment. Inclusion levels of SSBP were the treatments, namely, none (T0), 10 (T1), 12.5 (T2), and 15.0% (T3). Parameters observed were colour, index, and weight of egg yolk, and isoflavone content. Analysis of variance was applied and continued to Duncan test at 5% probability. Results indicated that yolk colour index and weight were not affected by the treatments, but isoflavone content was significantly (P<0.05) increased by feeding SSBP. Egg yolk isoflavone in T2 (0.41 mg/g) and T3 (0.47 mg/g) were higher than those in T0 (0.31 mg/g) and T1 (0.35 mg/g). In conclusion, dietary inclusion of soy sauce by-product at higher level (12.5 and 15.0%) can produce isoflavone-enriched eggs as functional food.

  16. Bioactive Egg Components and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine J. Andersen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a normal acute response of the immune system to pathogens and tissue injury. However, chronic inflammation is known to play a significant role in the pathophysiology of numerous chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cancer. Thus, the impact of dietary factors on inflammation may provide key insight into mitigating chronic disease risk. Eggs are recognized as a functional food that contain a variety of bioactive compounds that can influence pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. Interestingly, the effects of egg consumption on inflammation varies across different populations, including those that are classified as healthy, overweight, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetic. The following review will discuss the pro- and anti-inflammatory properties of egg components, with a focus on egg phospholipids, cholesterol, the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, and bioactive proteins. The effects of egg consumption of inflammation across human populations will additionally be presented. Together, these findings have implications for population-specific dietary recommendations and chronic disease risk.

  17. Endogenous Receptor Agonists: Resolving Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Bannenberg

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlled resolution or the physiologic resolution of a well-orchestrated inflammatory response at the tissue level is essential to return to homeostasis. A comprehensive understanding of the cellular and molecular events that control the termination of acute inflammation is needed in molecular terms given the widely held view that aberrant inflammation underlies many common diseases. This review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the role of arachidonic acid and ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA–derived lipid mediators in regulating the resolution of inflammation. Using a functional lipidomic approach employing LC-MS-MS–based informatics, recent studies, reviewed herein, uncovered new families of local-acting chemical mediators actively biosynthesized during the resolution phase from the essential fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. These new families of local chemical mediators are generated endogenously in exudates collected during the resolution phase, and were coined resolvins and protectins because specific members of these novel chemical families control both the duration and magnitude of inflammation in animal models of complex diseases. Recent advances on the biosynthesis, receptors, and actions of these novel anti-inflammatory and proresolving lipid mediators are reviewed with the aim to bring to attention the important role of specific lipid mediators as endogenous agonists in inflammation resolution.

  18. Bioactive Egg Components and Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a normal acute response of the immune system to pathogens and tissue injury. However, chronic inflammation is known to play a significant role in the pathophysiology of numerous chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cancer. Thus, the impact of dietary factors on inflammation may provide key insight into mitigating chronic disease risk. Eggs are recognized as a functional food that contain a variety of bioactive compounds that can influence pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. Interestingly, the effects of egg consumption on inflammation varies across different populations, including those that are classified as healthy, overweight, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetic. The following review will discuss the pro- and anti-inflammatory properties of egg components, with a focus on egg phospholipids, cholesterol, the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, and bioactive proteins. The effects of egg consumption of inflammation across human populations will additionally be presented. Together, these findings have implications for population-specific dietary recommendations and chronic disease risk. PMID:26389951

  19. From inflammation to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korniluk, A; Koper, O; Kemona, H; Dymicka-Piekarska, V

    2017-02-01

    The participation of inflammation in the progression of cancer for many years have been the subject of research. In the 19th century, there was evidence that an acute inflammation may inhibit the development of cancer. However, chronic inflammation affects the progression of the disease. Today, it is known that inflammation and cancer use similar mechanisms of development such as severe cell proliferation or angiogenesis. It has been shown that prolonged presence of inflammatory cells and factors in the tumor microenvironment can accelerate its growth and inhibit apoptosis of transformed cells. In this article we present a brief history of the discovery mechanisms and potential links between acute and chronic inflammation and cancer.

  20. Diesel exposure suppresses natural killer cell function and resolution of eosinophil inflammation: a randmonized controlled trial of exposure in allergic rhinitics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to diesel exhaust (DE) is known to exacerbate allergic inflammation, including virus induced eosinophil activation in laboratory animals. We have previously shown that in human volunteers with allergic rhinitis a short-term exposure to DE prior to infection with the live...

  1. Inflammation in tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Addona, Alessio; Maffulli, Nicola; Formisano, Silvestro; Rosa, Donato

    2017-10-01

    Pain and functional limitation are frequent in symptomatic tendinopathy. The essential lesion of tendinopathy is a failed healing response. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in a failed healing response during the early stages of pathogenesis of tendinopathy would help to develop new and effective treatments. The role of inflammation in the development of tendon pathologies has been revived during the last few years, in particular during the first phases of tendinopathies, when "early tendinopathy" may not be clinically evident. This review outlines the possible molecular events that occur in the first phases of tendinopathy onset, stressing the role of pro-inflammatory cytokines, proteolytic enzymes, growth factors and healing genes in the development of tendon disorders. Copyright © 2017 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Enzyme-resistant isomalto-oligosaccharides produced from Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-1426 dextran hydrolysis for functional food application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Damini; Goyal, Arun

    2016-07-01

    The extracellular dextransucrase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-1426 was produced and purified using polyethylene glycol fractionation. In our earlier study, it was reported that L. mesenteroides dextransucrase synthesizes a high-molecular mass dextran (>2 × 10(6)  Da) with ∼85.5% α-(1→6) linear and ∼14.5% α-(1→3) branched linkages. Isomalto-oligosaccharides (IMOs) were synthesized through depolymerization of dextran by the action of dextranase. The degree of polymerization of IMOs was 2-10 as confirmed by mass spectrometry. The nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis revealed the presence of α-(1→3) linkages in the synthesized IMOs. The IMOs were resistant to dextranase, α-glucosidase, and α-amylase, and therefore can have potential application as food additives in the functional foods. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Physical, proximate, functional and pasting properties of flour produced from gamma irradiated cowpea (Vigna unguiculata, L. Walp)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darfour, B.; Wilson, D.D.; Ofosu, D.O.; Ocloo, F.C.K.

    2012-01-01

    Cowpeas are leguminous seeds widely produced and consumed in most developing countries of sub Saharan Africa. The aim of this study was to determine the physical, proximate, functional and pasting properties of flour obtained from gamma irradiated cowpea. Four cowpea cultivars were irradiated with gamma radiation at dose levels of 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 and 1.5 kGy with the unirradiated cultivars serving as controls. The samples were hammer milled, sieved and stored at 4 °C for analysis. Physical, proximate, functional, pasting properties were determined using appropriate methods. In general, the irradiation dose applied to cowpea for insect control did not significantly affect the physical and proximate properties of the flour. However, significant increase (p<0.05) was achieved in paste bulk density, water and oil absorption capacities, foam capacities and least gelation concentrations of flour in general, which may be attributed to the irradiation. The radiation reduced the swelling power and water solubility index significantly. The peak temperature, peak viscosity and setback viscosity of the pastes were significantly (p<0.05) reduced while breakdown viscosity was significantly (p<0.05) increased by the radiation. It was established that the doses used on cowpea affected both the functional and pasting properties of the flour. - Highlights: ► We investigated the effects of gamma irradiation of cowpea on quality characteristics of its resultant flour. ► Flour was prepared from four cowpea cultivars irradiated at 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 and 1.5 kGy. ► Proximate and physical properties of flour from irradiated cowpea were generally not affected by the radiation doses used. ► Functional properties of flour samples were affected by gamma irradiation of cowpea. ► Pasting parameters studied were also affected by the radiation at various radiation doses.

  4. Development and function of invariant natural killer T cells producing T(h2- and T(h17-cytokines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Watarai

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available There is heterogeneity in invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells based on the expression of CD4 and the IL-17 receptor B (IL-17RB, a receptor for IL-25 which is a key factor in T(H2 immunity. However, the development pathway and precise function of these iNKT cell subtypes remain unknown. IL-17RB⁺iNKT cells are present in the thymic CD44⁺/⁻ NK1.1⁻ population and develop normally even in the absence of IL-15, which is required for maturation and homeostasis of IL-17RB⁻iNKT cells producing IFN-γ. These results suggest that iNKT cells contain at least two subtypes, IL-17RB⁺ and IL-17RB⁻ subsets. The IL-17RB⁺iNKT subtypes can be further divided into two subtypes on the basis of CD4 expression both in the thymus and in the periphery. CD4⁺ IL-17RB⁺iNKT cells produce T(H2 (IL-13, T(H9 (IL-9 and IL-10, and T(H17 (IL-17A and IL-22 cytokines in response to IL-25 in an E4BP4-dependent fashion, whereas CD4⁻ IL-17RB⁺iNKT cells are a retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor (RORγt⁺ subset producing T(H17 cytokines upon stimulation with IL-23 in an E4BP4-independent fashion. These IL-17RB⁺iNKT cell subtypes are abundantly present in the lung in the steady state and mediate the pathogenesis in virus-induced airway hyperreactivity (AHR. In this study we demonstrated that the IL-17RB⁺iNKT cell subsets develop distinct from classical iNKT cell developmental stages in the thymus and play important roles in the pathogenesis of airway diseases.

  5. Recent advances in understanding the roles of vascular endothelial cells in allergic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoda, Tetsuo; Futamura, Kyoko; Orihara, Kanami; Emi-Sugie, Maiko; Saito, Hirohisa; Matsumoto, Kenji; Matsuda, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Allergic disorders commonly involve both chronic tissue inflammation and remodeling caused by immunological reactions to various antigens on tissue surfaces. Due to their anatomical location, vascular endothelial cells are the final responders to interact with various exogenous factors that come into contact with the epithelial surface, such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and antigens. Recent studies have shed light on the important roles of endothelial cells in the development and exacerbation of allergic disorders. For instance, endothelial cells have the greatest potential to produce several key molecules that are deeply involved in allergic inflammation, such as periostin and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17). Additionally, endothelial cells were recently shown to be important functional targets for IL-33--an essential regulator of allergic inflammation. Notably, almost all endothelial cell responses and functions involved in allergic inflammation are not suppressed by corticosteroids. These corticosteroid-refractory endothelial cell responses and functions include TNF-α-associated angiogenesis, leukocyte adhesion, IL-33-mediated responses and periostin and TARC production. Therefore, these unique responses and functions of endothelial cells may be critically involved in the pathogenesis of various allergic disorders, especially their refractory processes. Here, we review recent studies, including ours, which have elucidated previously unknown pathophysiological roles of vascular endothelial cells in allergic inflammation and discuss the possibility of endothelium-targeted therapy for allergic disorders. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. In vitro generation of functional insulin-producing cells from lipoaspirated human adipose tissue-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad Buang, Mohamad Lizan; Seng, Heng Kien; Chung, Lee Han; Saim, Aminuddin Bin; Idrus, Ruszymah Bt Hj

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering strategy has been considered as an alternative treatment for diabetes mellitus due to lack of permanent pharmaceutical treatment and islet donors for transplantation. Various cell lines have been used to generate functional insulin-producing cells (IPCs) including progenitor pancreatic cell lines, embryonic stem cells (ESCs), umbilical cord blood stem cells (UCB-SCs), adult bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs), and adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Human ADSCs from lipoaspirated abdominal fat tissue was differentiated into IPCs following a two-step induction protocol based on a combination of alternating high and low glucose, nicotinamide, activin A and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) for a duration of 3 weeks. During differentiation, histomorphological changes of the stem cells towards pancreatic β-islet characteristics were observed via light microscope and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Dithizone (DTZ) staining, which is selective towards IPCs, was used to stain the new islet-like cells. Production of insulin hormone by the cells was analyzed via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), whereas its hormonal regulation was tested via a glucose challenge test. Histomorphological changes of the differentiated cells were noted to resemble pancreatic β-cells, whereas DTZ staining positively stained the cells. The differentiated cells significantly produced human insulin as compared to the undifferentiated ADSCs, and its production was increased with an increase of glucose concentration in the culture medium. These initial data indicate that human lipoaspirated ADSCs have the potential to differentiate into functional IPCs, and could be used as a therapy to treat diabetes mellitus in the future. Copyright © 2012 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Stable and solid pellets of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes produced under high pressure and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Pâmela Andréa Mantey dos [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciência dos Materiais (Brazil); Gallas, Marcia Russman [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, Instituto de Física (Brazil); Radtke, Cláudio; Benvenutti, Edilson Valmir [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, Instituto de Química (Brazil); Elias, Ana Laura [The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Physics and Center for 2-D and Layered Materials (United States); Rajukumar, Lakshmy Pulickal [The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (United States); Terrones, Humberto [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy (United States); Endo, Morinobu [Shinshu University, Carbon Institute of Science and Technology (Japan); Terrones, Mauricio [The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Physics and Center for 2-D and Layered Materials (United States); Costa, Tania Maria Haas, E-mail: taniaha@iq.ufrgs.br, E-mail: taniahac@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciência dos Materiais (Brazil)

    2015-06-15

    High pressure/temperature was applied on samples of pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), functionalized nanotubes (f-MWCNT), and nanotubes doped with nitrogen (CN{sub x}MWNT). Cylindrical compact pellets of f-MWCNT with diameters of about 6 mm were obtained under pressure of 4.0 GPa at room temperature and at 400 °C, using graphite as pressure transmitting medium. The best pellet samples were produced using nitric and sulfuric acids for the functionalization of MWCNT. The effect of high pressure/temperature on CNT was investigated by several spectroscopy and characterization techniques, such as Raman spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption isotherms, and transmission electron microscopy. It was found that MWCNT maintain their main features in the compacted pellets, such as integrity, original morphology, and structure, demonstrating that high-pressure/temperature compaction can indeed be used to fabricate novel CNT self-supported materials. Additionally, the specific surface area and porosity are unchanged, which is important when using bulk CNT in adsorption processes. Raman analysis of the G’-band showed a shift to lower wavenumbers when f-MWCNT were processed under high pressure, suggesting that CNT are under tensile stress.

  8. A Variant of GJD2, Encoding for Connexin 36, Alters the Function of Insulin Producing β-Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Cigliola

    Full Text Available Signalling through gap junctions contributes to control insulin secretion and, thus, blood glucose levels. Gap junctions of the insulin-producing β-cells are made of connexin 36 (Cx36, which is encoded by the GJD2 gene. Cx36-null mice feature alterations mimicking those observed in type 2 diabetes (T2D. GJD2 is also expressed in neurons, which share a number of common features with pancreatic β-cells. Given that a synonymous exonic single nucleotide polymorphism of human Cx36 (SNP rs3743123 associates with altered function of central neurons in a subset of epileptic patients, we investigated whether this SNP also caused alterations of β-cell function. Transfection of rs3743123 cDNA in connexin-lacking HeLa cells resulted in altered formation of gap junction plaques and cell coupling, as compared to those induced by wild type (WT GJD2 cDNA. Transgenic mice expressing the very same cDNAs under an insulin promoter revealed that SNP rs3743123 expression consistently lead to a post-natal reduction of islet Cx36 levels and β-cell survival, resulting in hyperglycemia in selected lines. These changes were not observed in sex- and age-matched controls expressing WT hCx36. The variant GJD2 only marginally associated to heterogeneous populations of diabetic patients. The data document that a silent polymorphism of GJD2 is associated with altered β-cell function, presumably contributing to T2D pathogenesis.

  9. Impact of aging on cardiac function in a female rat model of menopause: role of autonomic control, inflammation, and oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machi JF

    2016-03-01

    groups when compared with young controls, indicating an increased oxidative stress. A negative correlation was found between GSH/GSSG and tumor necrosis factor-α (r=-0.6, P<0.003. Correlations were found between interleukin-6 with adipose tissue (r=0.5, P<0.009 and vagal tonus (r=-0.7, P<0.0002; and among myocardial performance index with interleukin-6 (r=0.65, P<0.0002, sympathetic tonus (r=0.55, P<0.006, and physical capacity (r=-0.55, P<0.003. The findings in this trial showed that ovariectomy aggravated the impairment of cardiac and functional effects of aging in female rats, probably associated with exacerbated autonomic dysfunction, inflammation, and oxidative stress. Keywords: autonomic nervous system, aging, aerobic exercise, female rats

  10. Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates airway inflammation in murine asthma model by inducing regulatory T cells and modulating dendritic cell functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Young-Il; Kim, Seung Hyun; Ju, Jung Won; Cho, Shin Hyeong; Lee, Won Ja; Park, Jin Wook; Park, Yeong-Min; Lee, Sang Eun

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Treatment with Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates OVA-induced airway inflammation and AHR to methacholine. → Induction of CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + T cells and IL-10 along with suppression of splenocyte proliferation by C. sinensis-derived total protein. → C. sinensis-derived total protein interferes with the expression of co-stimulatory molecules in DCs. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by Th2-mediated inflammation, resulting in airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) through airway remodeling. Recent epidemiological and experimental reports have suggested an inverse relationship between the development of allergy and helminth infections. Infection by Clonorchis sinensis, a liver fluke that resides in the bile duct of humans, is endemic predominantly in Asia including Korea and China. Using a murine model for asthma, we investigated the effects of C. sinensis-derived total protein (Cs-TP) on allergen-induced airway inflammation and the mechanism underlying the protective effects of Cs-TP administration on asthma. Treatment with Cs-TP attenuated OVA-induced airway inflammation and methacholine-induced AHR, as well as eosinophilia development, lymphocyte infiltration into the lung, and goblet cell metaplasia. This protective effect of Cs-TP is associated with markedly reduced OVA-specific IgE and Th1/Th2 cytokine production. Moreover, Cs-TP increased the number of CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + regulatory T (Treg) cells as well as their suppressive activity. In fact, proliferation of OVA-restimulated splenocytes was suppressed significantly. Cs-TP also inhibited the expression of such co-stimulatory molecules as CD80, CD86, and CD40 in LPS- or OVA-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs), suggesting that Cs-TP could interfere with the capacity of airway DCs to prime naive T cells. These data demonstrate the capacity of C. sinensis to ameliorate allergic asthma and broaden our understanding of the paradoxical relationship between the allergic immune

  11. Microbiota, inflammation and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Yolanda; Moya-Pérez, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between metabolism and immunity play a pivotal role in the development of obesity-associated chronic co-morbidities. Obesity involves impairment of immune function affecting both the innate and adaptive immune system. This leads to increased risk of infections as well as chronic low-grade inflammation, which in turn causes metabolic dysfunction (e.g. insulin resistance) and chronic disease (e.g. type-2 diabetes). Gut microbiota has emerged as one of the key factors regulating early events triggering inflammation associated with obesity and metabolic dysfunction. This effect seems to be related to diet- and obesity-associated changes in gut microbiota composition and to increased translocation of immunogenic bacterial products, which activate innate and adaptive immunity in the gut and beyond, contributing to an increase in inflammatory tone. Innate immune receptors, like Toll-like receptors (TLRs), are known to be up-regulated in the tissue affected by most inflammatory disorders and activated by both specific microbial components and dietary lipids. This triggers several signaling transduction pathways (e.g. JNK and IKKβ/NF-κB), leading to inflammatory cytokine and chemokine (TNF-α, IL-1, MCP1) production and to inflammatory cell recruitment, causing insulin resistance. T-cell differentiation into effector inflammatory or regulatory T cells also depends on the type of TLR activated and on cytokine production, which in turn depends upon gut microbiota-diet interactions. Here, we update and discuss our current understanding of how gut microbiota could contribute to defining whole-body metabolism by influencing diverse components of the innate and adaptive immune system, both locally and systemically.

  12. Food intolerance and mucosal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Most infants are immunologically active and are able to develop a tolerance to oligoclonal antigens by producing IgA, along with activation of regulatory T cells, in early infancy. Cytokines and their signaling molecules are important mediators in the intestine, regulating both oral tolerance and mucosal inflammation. This system works efficiently in most individuals, but for an as yet undefined reason, some people react to food and other proteins as though they were pathogens, with induction of chronic inflammation in the mucosa. The adverse reaction caused by ingested foods is defined as food intolerance. The clinical features of food intolerance include vomiting, diarrhea, bloody stool, eczema, failure to thrive, and a protean range of other symptoms. Intolerance can be divided into two categories depending on whether or not they are immunologically mediated. Food intolerance and mucosal inflammation are deeply related because tolerance cannot be established when there is an inflammation in the intestinal mucosa. Mast cells, eosinophils, mucosal lymphocytes, and epithelial cells are deeply involved and related to each other in the development of mucosal inflammation. Meanwhile, rectal bleeding in infancy is related to lymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophil infiltration into the colonic mucosa facilitated by C-C motif ligand 11 (CCL11, known as eotaxin-1) and C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 13 (CXCL13). Rectal bleeding in infancy may not be simply caused by allergic reactions against specific antigens, but may be due to migrated lymphocytes developing immunological tolerance; including IgA synthesizing, in the intestinal mucosa. © 2014 Japan Pediatric Society.

  13. The impact of inflammation on respiratory plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocker, Austin D; Stokes, Jennifer A; Powell, Frank L; Huxtable, Adrianne G

    2017-01-01

    Breathing is a vital homeostatic behavior and must be precisely regulated throughout life. Clinical conditions commonly associated with inflammation, undermine respiratory function may involve plasticity in respiratory control circuits to compensate and maintain adequate ventilation. Alternatively, other clinical conditions may evoke maladaptive plasticity. Yet, we have only recently begun to understand the effects of inflammation on respiratory plasticity. Here, we review some of common models used to investigate the effects of inflammation and discuss the impact of inflammation on nociception, chemosensory plasticity, medullary respiratory centers, motor plasticity in motor neurons and respiratory frequency, and adaptation to high altitude. We provide new data suggesting glial cells contribute to CNS inflammatory gene expression after 24h of sustained hypoxia and inflammation induced by 8h of intermittent hypoxia inhibits long-term facilitation of respiratory frequency. We also discuss how inflammation can have opposite effects on the capacity for plasticity, whereby it is necessary for increases in the hypoxic ventilatory response with sustained hypoxia, but inhibits phrenic long term facilitation after intermittent hypoxia. This review highlights gaps in our knowledge about the effects of inflammation on respiratory control (development, age, and sex differences). In summary, data to date suggest plasticity can be either adaptive or maladaptive and understanding how inflammation alters the respiratory system is crucial for development of better therapeutic interventions to promote breathing and for utilization of plasticity as a clinical treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Conditional Function of Autoaggregative Protein Cah and Common cah Mutations in Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Michelle Qiu; Brandl, Maria T; Kudva, Indira T; Katani, Robab; Moreau, Matthew R; Kapur, Vivek

    2018-01-01

    Cah is a calcium-binding autotransporter protein involved in autoaggregation and biofilm formation. Although cah is widespread in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), we detected mutations in cah at a frequency of 31.3% in this pathogen. In STEC O157:H7 supershedder strain SS17, a large deletion results in a smaller coding sequence, encoding a protein lacking the C-terminal 71 amino acids compared with Cah in STEC O157:H7 strain EDL933. We examined the function of Cah in biofilm formation and host colonization to better understand the selective pressures for cah mutations. EDL933-Cah played a conditional role in biofilm formation in vitro : it enhanced E. coli DH5α biofilm formation on glass surfaces under agitated culture conditions that prevented autoaggregation but inhibited biofilm formation under hydrostatic conditions that facilitated autoaggregation. This function appeared to be strain dependent since Cah-mediated biofilm formation was diminished when an EDL933 cah gene was expressed in SS17. Deletion of cah in EDL933 enhanced bacterial attachment to spinach leaves and altered the adherence pattern of EDL933 to bovine recto-anal junction squamous epithelial (RSE) cells. In contrast, in trans expression of EDL933 cah in SS17 increased its attachment to leaf surfaces, and in DH5α, it enhanced its adherence to RSE cells. Hence, the ecological function of Cah appears to be modulated by environmental conditions and other bacterial strain-specific properties. Considering the prevalence of cah in STEC and its role in attachment and biofilm formation, cah mutations might be selected in ecological niches in which inactivation of Cah would result in an increased fitness in STEC during colonization of plants or animal hosts. IMPORTANCE Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) harbors genes encoding diverse adhesins, and many of these are known to play an important role in bacterial attachment and host colonization. We demonstrated here that the

  15. Macrophages and bone inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoli Gu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bone metabolism is tightly regulated by the immune system. Accelerated bone destruction is observed in many bone diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, fracture, and particle-induced osteolysis. These pathological conditions are associated with inflammatory responses, suggesting the contribution of inflammation to bone destruction. Macrophages are heterogeneous immune cells and are polarized into the proinflammatory M1 and antiinflammatory M2 phenotypes in different microenvironments. The cytokines produced by macrophages depend on the macrophage activation and polarization. Macrophages and macrophage-derived cytokines are important to bone loss in inflammatory bone disease. Recent studies have shown that macrophages can be detected in bone tissue and interact with bone cells. The interplay between macrophages and bone cells is critical to bone formation and repair. In this article, we focus on the role of macrophages in inflammatory bone diseases, as well as discuss the latest studies about macrophages and bone formation, which will provide new insights into the therapeutic strategy for bone disease.

  16. Cholinergic Regulation of Airway Inflammation and Remodelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Kolahian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine is the predominant parasympathetic neurotransmitter in the airways that regulates bronchoconstriction and mucus secretion. Recent findings suggest that acetylcholine regulates additional functions in the airways, including inflammation and remodelling during inflammatory airway diseases. Moreover, it has become apparent that acetylcholine is synthesized by nonneuronal cells and tissues, including inflammatory cells and structural cells. In this paper, we will discuss the regulatory role of acetylcholine in inflammation and remodelling in which we will focus on the role of the airway smooth muscle cell as a target cell for acetylcholine that modulates inflammation and remodelling during respiratory diseases such as asthma and COPD.

  17. Airway bacteria measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and culture in patients with stable COPD: relationship with neutrophilic airway inflammation, exacerbation frequency, and lung function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bafadhel, Mona; Haldar, Koirobi; Barker, Bethan; Patel, Hemu; Mistry, Vijay; Barer, Michael R; Pavord, Ian D; Brightling, Christopher E

    2015-01-01

    Background Potentially pathogenic microorganisms can be detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in sputum from patients with COPD, although how this technique relates to culture and clinical measures of disease is unclear. We used cross-sectional and longitudinal data to test the hypotheses that qPCR is a more sensitive measure of bacterial presence and is associated with neutrophilic airway inflammation and adverse clinical outcomes. Methods Sputum was collected from 174 stable COPD subjects longitudinally over 12 months. Microbial sampling using culture and qPCR was performed. Spirometry and sputum measures of airway inflammation were assessed. Findings Sputum was qPCR-positive (>106 copies/mL) in 77/152 samples (Haemophilus influenzae [n=52], Moraxella catarrhalis [n=24], Streptococcus pneumoniae [n=19], and Staphylococcus aureus [n=7]). Sputum was culture-positive in 50/174 samples, with 49 out of 50 culture-positive samples having pathogen-specific qPCR bacterial loads >106 copies/mL. Samples that had qPCR copy numbers >106/mL, whether culture-positive or not, had increased sputum neutrophil counts. H. influenzae qPCR copy numbers correlated with sputum neutrophil counts (r=0.37, P106/mL three or more times in 19 patients, eight of whom were repeatedly sputum culture-positive. Persistence, whether defined by culture, qPCR, or both, was associated with a higher sputum neutrophil count, lower forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and worsened quality of life. Interpretation qPCR identifies a significant number of patients with potentially bacteria-associated neutrophilic airway inflammation and disease that are not identified by traditional culture-based methods. PMID:26089657

  18. Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates airway inflammation in murine asthma model by inducing regulatory T cells and modulating dendritic cell functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Young-Il [Div. of Malaria and Parasitic Diseases, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Osong (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung Hyun [Div. of AIDS, National Institute of Health, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Osong (Korea, Republic of); Ju, Jung Won; Cho, Shin Hyeong; Lee, Won Ja [Div. of Malaria and Parasitic Diseases, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Osong (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin Wook; Park, Yeong-Min [Dept. of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Yang-San (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Eun, E-mail: ondalgl@cdc.go.kr [Div. of Malaria and Parasitic Diseases, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Osong (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment with Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates OVA-induced airway inflammation and AHR to methacholine. {yields} Induction of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} T cells and IL-10 along with suppression of splenocyte proliferation by C. sinensis-derived total protein. {yields} C. sinensis-derived total protein interferes with the expression of co-stimulatory molecules in DCs. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by Th2-mediated inflammation, resulting in airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) through airway remodeling. Recent epidemiological and experimental reports have suggested an inverse relationship between the development of allergy and helminth infections. Infection by Clonorchis sinensis, a liver fluke that resides in the bile duct of humans, is endemic predominantly in Asia including Korea and China. Using a murine model for asthma, we investigated the effects of C. sinensis-derived total protein (Cs-TP) on allergen-induced airway inflammation and the mechanism underlying the protective effects of Cs-TP administration on asthma. Treatment with Cs-TP attenuated OVA-induced airway inflammation and methacholine-induced AHR, as well as eosinophilia development, lymphocyte infiltration into the lung, and goblet cell metaplasia. This protective effect of Cs-TP is associated with markedly reduced OVA-specific IgE and Th1/Th2 cytokine production. Moreover, Cs-TP increased the number of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T (Treg) cells as well as their suppressive activity. In fact, proliferation of OVA-restimulated splenocytes was suppressed significantly. Cs-TP also inhibited the expression of such co-stimulatory molecules as CD80, CD86, and CD40 in LPS- or OVA-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs), suggesting that Cs-TP could interfere with the capacity of airway DCs to prime naive T cells. These data demonstrate the capacity of C. sinensis to ameliorate allergic asthma and broaden our understanding of the paradoxical

  19. Fortunellin-Induced Modulation of Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog by MicroRNA-374a Decreases Inflammation and Maintains Intestinal Barrier Function in Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjian Xiong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN is known to induce cell apoptosis. MicroRNA-374a (miR-374a, which can suppress PTEN expression, has been found abnormally expressed in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Fortunellin is a citrus flavonoid that is a potential anti-inflammation agent in inflammatory diseases. The present study investigated the effects and mechanisms underlying fortunellin-induced inhibition of PTEN in IBD. Colitis was established in rats by the intracolonic administration of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid to mimic human ulcerative colitis, which is the main type of IBD. miR-374a expression was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and the regulation of PTEN by miR-374a was evaluated by dual luciferase reporter assay. Western blotting was used to measure the corresponding protein expression. Fortunellin ameliorated colitis symptoms, including excessive inflammation and oxidative stress. Fortunellin decreased epithelial cell apoptosis through inhibiting PTEN expression in colitis. Fortunellin-induced downregulation of PTEN could be counteracted by miR-374a depletion. Moreover, knockdown of miR-374a in vivo partly inhibited the effects of fortunellin on rat colitis. In conclusion, PTEN inhibition contributes to the amelioration effects of fortunellin on colitis. It was confirmed that fortunellin targets miR-374a, which is a negative regulator of PTEN. This study provides novel insights into the pathological mechanisms and treatment alternatives of colitis.

  20. Different mechanisms of intrinsic pain inhibition in early and late inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machelska, Halina; Schopohl, Julia K; Mousa, Shaaban A; Labuz, Dominika; Schäfer, Michael; Stein, Christoph

    2003-08-01

    Neuroimmune interactions control pain through activation of opioid receptors on sensory nerves by immune-derived opioid peptides. Here we evaluate mechanisms of intrinsic pain inhibition at different stages of Freund's adjuvant-induced inflammation of the rat paw. We use immunohistochemistry and paw pressure testing. Our data show that in early (6 h) inflammation leukocyte-derived beta-endorphin, met-enkephalin and dynorphin A activate peripheral mu-, delta- and kappa-receptors to inhibit nociception. In addition, central opioid mechanisms seem to contribute significantly to this effect. At later stages (4 days), antinociception is exclusively produced by leukocyte-derived beta-endorphin acting at peripheral mu and delta receptors. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is an endogenous trigger of these effects at both stages. These findings indicate that peripheral opioid mechanisms of pain inhibition gain functional relevance with the chronicity of inflammation.

  1. Influence of piers on functional groups of benthic primary producers and consumers in the channel of a subtropical coastal lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Pagliosa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Artificial habitats have become common in coastal areas worldwide and may influence the structure and functioning of benthic ecosystems. We analyze the influence of piers on the benthic morphofunctional groups of rocky seaweeds and of soft bottom macrofauna in the channel of Conceição Lagoon (southern Brazil. The main impact is a reduction in the luminosity available for photosynthetic activity which is directly related to a decrease in the biomasses of sediment microphytobenthos and of more highly structured macroalgae life-forms. Contrary to expectations, the morphotypes of potentially high biomass productivity, such as articulated coralline, corticated and leathery macroalgae, were in general less abundant and the low biomass foliose and filamentous macroalgae occurred in reference areas but not under the piers. The piers' effects on motile epifauna and infauna functional groups were site-specific and probably related to the general reduction in primary producer organisms in the new habitats. The discretely motile infauna was the only functional group able to thrive under the piers due to their reduced motility and fragile morphological structures, being benefited by the shelter provided by the artificial habitats. Our results showed that the piers might have a negative effect on the base-trophic level organisms responsible for bottom-up controls.Hábitats artificiais têm se tornado comum em áreas costeiras no mundo todo, podendo influenciar a estrutura e funcionamento de ecossistemas bênticos. Nós analisamos a influência de trapiches nos grupos morfofuncionais bênticos de algas associadas a substrato consolidado e de macrofauna em substrato inconsolidado, no canal da Lagoa da Conceição (sul do Brasil. O principal impacto da presença de trapiches é a redução da irradiação disponível para atividade fotossintética, o que está diretamente relacionado com o decréscimo na biomassa microfitobentônica no sedimento e de macroalga

  2. Fundamentals of inflammation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Serhan, Charles N; Ward, Peter A; Gilroy, Derek W

    2010-01-01

    .... Uncontrolled inflammation has emerged as a pathophysiologic basis for many widely occurring diseases in the general population that were not initially known to be linked to the inflammatory response...

  3. Rethinking periodontal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offenbacher, Steven; Barros, Silvana P; Beck, James D

    2008-08-01

    Clinical signs and symptoms, as well as medical and dental history, are all considered in the clinical determination of gingival inflammation and periodontal disease severity. However, the "biologic systems model" highlights that the clinical presentation of periodontal disease is closely tied to the underlying biologic phenotype. We propose that the determination and integration of subject-level factors, microbial composition, systemic immune response, and gingival tissue inflammatory mediator responses will better reflect the biology of the biofilm-gingival interface in a specific patient and may provide insights on clinical management. Disease classifications and multivariable models further refine the biologic basis for the increasing severity of periodontal disease expression. As such, new classifications may better identify disease-susceptible and treatment-non-responsive individuals than current classifications that are heavily influenced by probing and attachment level measurements alone. New data also suggest that the clinical characteristics of some complex diseases, such as periodontal disease, are influenced by the genetic and epigenetic contributions to clinical phenotype. Although the genetic basis for periodontal disease is considered imperative for setting an inflammatory capacity for an individual and, thus, a threshold for severity, there is evidence to suggest an epigenetic component is involved as well. Many factors long associated with periodontitis, including bacterial accumulations, smoking, and diabetes, are known to produce strong epigenetic changes in tissue behavior. We propose that we are now able to rethink periodontal disease in terms of a biologic systems model that may help to establish more homogeneous diagnostic categories and can provide insight into the expected response to treatment.

  4. Skeletal muscle regeneration is modulated by inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Yang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle regeneration is a complex process orchestrated by multiple steps. Recent findings indicate that inflammatory responses could play central roles in bridging initial muscle injury responses and timely muscle injury reparation. The various types of immune cells and cytokines have crucial roles in muscle regeneration process. In this review, we briefly summarise the functions of acute inflammation in muscle regeneration. The translational potential of this article: Immune system is closely relevant to the muscle regeneration. Understanding the mechanisms of inflammation in muscle regeneration is therefore critical for the development of effective regenerative, and therapeutic strategies in muscular disorders. This review provides information for muscle regeneration research regarding the effects of inflammation on muscle regeneration. Keywords: Chronic muscle disorders, Cytokines, Immune cells, Inflammation, Muscle regeneration, Muscle stem cells

  5. [The clinical characteristics of intra-acinar pulmonary artery inflammation and its effect on clinical parameters in smokers with normal lung function and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Qi-fang; Zhong, Xiao-ning; He, Zhi-yi; Liu, Guang-nan; Lü, Zi-li; Wan, Peng

    2011-10-01

    To study the pathological characteristics of intra-acinar pulmonary artery inflammation and its correlation with smoking index and disease progression in smokers with normal lung function and smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Patients requiring lung resection for peripheral lung cancer were divided into group A (nonsmokers with normal lung function, n = 10), group B (smokers with normal lung function, n = 13), and group C (smokers with stable COPD, n = 10). The lung tissue far away from tumor were resected to compare the pathological changes of intra-acinar pulmonary arteries and infiltration level of inflammatory cell in pulmonary non-muscularized arteries (NMA), pulmonary partially muscularized arteries (PMA) and muscularized arteries (MA) among the three groups. The correlation analysis was made among infiltration level, smoking index, percentage of predicted value of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)%Pred), six-minute-walk distance (6MWD) and BODE index. (1) Both group B and group C showed the intima and media thickness of MA was significantly higher, the lumen area of MA was narrower and the proportion of MA was higher, and collagenous fiber of MA adventitial proliferated and area increased in group C (P arteries that contained leukocytes, T lymphocytes, CD(8)(+)T lymphocytes and the number of these positive cells infiltrating the intra-acinar pulmonary arteries were increased, especially an increased number of CD(8)(+)T lymphocytes infiltrating in the arterial adventitia as compared with group A, moreover there were significant difference between group C and group B (P 0.05). (3) The number of leukocytes, T lymphocytes, CD(8)(+)T lymphocytes infiltrating MA showed a positive correlation with the thickness of MA (r = 0.563, 0.627, 0.589, P arterial inflammation appears in smokers with normal lung function and smokers with COPD patients. It involves in all types of intra-acinar pulmonary arteries especially NMA and

  6. Early diagnosis of asthma in young children by using non-invasive biomarkers of airway inflammation and early lung function measurements: study protocol of a case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Kant, Kim DG; Klaassen, Ester MM; Jöbsis, Quirijn; Nijhuis, Annedien J; van Schayck, Onno CP; Dompeling, Edward

    2009-01-01

    Background Asthma is the most common chronic disease in childhood, characterized by chronic airway inflammation. There are problems with the diagnosis of asthma in young children since the majority of the children with recurrent asthma-like symptoms is symptom free at 6 years, and does not have asthma. With the conventional diagnostic tools it is not possible to differentiate between preschool children with transient symptoms and children with asthma. The analysis of biomarkers of airway inflammation in exhaled breath is a non-invasive and promising technique to diagnose asthma and monitor inflammation in young children. Moreover, relatively new lung function tests (airway resistance using the interrupter technique) have become available for young children. The primary objective of the ADEM study (Asthma DEtection and Monitoring study), is to develop a non-invasive instrument for an early asthma diagnosis in young children, using exhaled inflammatory markers and early lung function measurements. In addition, aetiological factors, including gene polymorphisms and gene expression profiles, in relation to the development of asthma are studied. Methods/design A prospective case-control study is started in 200 children with recurrent respiratory symptoms and 50 control subjects without respiratory symptoms. At 6 years, a definite diagnosis of asthma is made (primary outcome measure) on basis of lung function assessments and current respiratory symptoms ('golden standard'). From inclusion until the definite asthma diagnosis, repeated measurements of lung function tests and inflammatory markers in exhaled breath (condensate), blood and faeces are performed. The study is registered and ethically approved. Discussion This article describes the study protocol of the ADEM study. The new diagnostic techniques applied in this study could make an early diagnosis of asthma possible. An early and reliable asthma diagnosis at 2–3 years will have consequences for the management of

  7. Study of the electron energy distribution function in plasma produced by a rf discharge in a mixture of inert gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagner, S.D.; Ignat'ev, B.K.

    1983-01-01

    Electron energy distribution functions (EEDF) are recorded in an rf discharge in a mixture of neon and argon. The rates of different ionization processes and the energy losses of the electrons in the bulk of the discharge are calculated. The experimentally recorded electron energy distribution functions are compared with distributions calculated using a nonlocal theory. The effect of an rf voltage in the probe circuit on the recorded electron energy distribution functions is investigated experimentally

  8. Impact of intensive school-based nutrition education and lifestyle interventions on insulin resistance, β-cell function, disposition index, and subclinical inflammation among Asian Indian adolescents: a controlled intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Neha; Misra, Anoop; Shah, Priyali; Gulati, Seema; Bhatt, Suryaprakash; Sharma, Suresh; Pandey, Ravindra Mohan

    2011-04-01

    The present study was designed to assess the impact of intensive and repetitive nutrition education and lifestyle interventions on insulin resistance, β-cell function, disposition index (DI), and subclinical inflammation in Asian Indian adolescents (15-17 years) residing in North India. In this prospective study, two matched schools were randomly allocated to the intervention (n = 56; 31 boys and 25 girls) or control group (n = 50; 30 boys and 20 girls). The intervention consisted of seven components: (1) Dissemination of health-related information through lectures and focused group discussions, (2) planning of activities such as quizzes, (3) individual counseling of students, (4) promotion of physical activity, (5) change in the canteen menu to healthier alternatives, (6) conducting health camps involving parents and teachers, and (7) training of student volunteers for sustainability of the program in school. Impact of intervention was studied on surrogate markers of insulin resistance, β-cell function, disposition index, and subclinical inflammation. At 6 months follow-up, significantly higher (P = 0.037) mean value of homeostasis model assessment denoting β-cell function (HOMA-βCF) was seen in the intervention group compared to the control group, whereas high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) was significantly lowered (P < 0.001). The increase (30.3 ± 73.4; P < 0.037) observed in the DI in adolescents in the intervention group was significantly higher compared to the control group. The Pearson's coefficient of correlation in the intervention group showed that the Δ-decrease in mean waist circumference was significantly correlated (r = 0.267, P < 0.05) with Δ-decrease in homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). The intervention model developed by us could be used for amelioration of insulin resistance with potential of preventing type 2 diabetes mellitus in Asian Indian adolescents.

  9. Early life socioeconomic adversity is associated in adult life with chronic inflammation, carotid atherosclerosis, poorer lung function and decreased cognitive performance: a cross-sectional, population-based study

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Packard, Chris J

    2011-01-17

    Abstract Background Socioeconomic gradients in health persist despite public health campaigns and improvements in healthcare. The Psychosocial and Biological Determinants of Ill-health (pSoBid) study was designed to uncover novel biomarkers of chronic disease that may help explain pathways between socioeconomic adversity and poorer physical and mental health. Methods We examined links between indicators of early life adversity, possible intermediary phenotypes, and markers of ill health in adult subjects (n = 666) recruited from affluent and deprived areas. Classical and novel risk factors for chronic disease (lung function and atherosclerosis) and for cognitive performance were assessed, and associations sought with early life variables including conditions in the parental home, family size and leg length. Results Associations were observed between father\\'s occupation, childhood home status (owner-occupier; overcrowding) and biomarkers of chronic inflammation and endothelial activation in adults (C reactive protein, interleukin 6, intercellular adhesion molecule; P < 0.0001) but not number of siblings and leg length. Lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second) and cognition (Choice Reaction Time, the Stroop test, Auditory Verbal Learning Test) were likewise related to early life conditions (P < 0.001). In multivariate models inclusion of inflammatory variables reduced the impact and independence of early life conditions on lung function and measures of cognitive ability. Including variables of adult socioeconomic status attenuated the early life associations with disease biomarkers. Conclusions Adverse levels of biomarkers of ill health in adults appear to be influenced by father\\'s occupation and childhood home conditions. Chronic inflammation and endothelial activation may in part act as intermediary phenotypes in this complex relationship. Reducing the \\'health divide\\' requires that these life course determinants are taken into account.

  10. Changes in Cardiopulmonary Reserve and Peripheral Arterial Function Concomitantly with Subclinical Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Patients with Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Vitiello

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Changes in cardiopulmonary reserve and biomarkers related to wall stress, inflammation, and oxidative stress concomitantly with the evaluation of peripheral arterial blood flow have not been investigated in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF compared with healthy subjects (CTL. Methods and Results. Eighteen HFpEF patients and 14 CTL were recruited. Plasma levels of inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers were measured at rest. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP was measured at rest and peak exercise. Cardiopulmonary reserve was assessed using an exercise protocol with gas exchange analyses. Peripheral arterial blood flow was determined by strain gauge plethysmography. Peak VO2 (12.0±0.4 versus 19.1±1.1 mL/min/kg, P<0.001 and oxygen uptake efficiency slope (1.55±0.12 versus 2.06±0.14, P<0.05 were significantly decreased in HFpEF patients compared with CTL. BNP at rest and following stress, C-reactive-protein, interleukin-6, and TBARS were significantly elevated in HFpEF. Both basal and posthyperemic arterial blood flow were not significantly different between the HFpEF patients and CTL. Conclusions. HFpEF exhibits a severe reduction in cardiopulmonary reserve and oxygen uptake efficiency concomitantly with an elevation in a broad spectrum of biomarkers confirming an inflammatory and prooxidative status in patients with HFpEF.

  11. The Immune System in Tissue Environments Regaining Homeostasis after Injury: Is "Inflammation" Always Inflammation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Onkar P; Lichtnekert, Julia; Anders, Hans-Joachim; Mulay, Shrikant R

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is a response to infections or tissue injuries. Inflammation was once defined by clinical signs, later by the presence of leukocytes, and nowadays by expression of "proinflammatory" cytokines and chemokines. But leukocytes and cytokines often have rather anti-inflammatory, proregenerative, and homeostatic effects. Is there a need to redefine "inflammation"? In this review, we discuss the functions of "inflammatory" mediators/regulators of the innate immune system that determine tissue environments to fulfill the need of the tissue while regaining homeostasis after injury.

  12. Inflammation-induced lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shan; von der Weid, Pierre-Yves

    2014-01-01

    The lymphatic system is intimately linked to tissue fluid homeostasis and immune cell trafficking. These functions are paramount in the establishment and development of an inflammatory response. In the past decade, an increasing number of reports has revealed that marked changes, such as lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic contractile dysfunction occur in both vascular and nodal parts of the lymphatic system during inflammation, as well as other disease processes. This review provides a critical update on the role of the lymphatic system in disease process such as chronic inflammation and cancer and examines the changes in lymphatic functions the diseases cause and the influence these changes have on the progression of the diseases. PMID:24449090

  13. Lysosomes, Lysosomal Storage Diseases, and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calogera M. Simonaro PhD

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomes were originally described in the early 1950s by de Duve who was also the first to recognize the importance of these organelles in human disease. We know now that lysosomes are involved in numerous biological processes, and abnormalities in lysosomal function may result in a broad range of diseases. This review will briefly discuss the role of lysosomes in inflammation and how disruption of normal lysosomal function in the lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs leads to abnormalities in inflammation and immunity.

  14. Functional redundancy ensures performance robustness in 3-stage PHA-producing mixed cultures under variable feed operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvalho, Gilda; Pedras, Inês; Karst, Søren Michael

    2018-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) are biopolymers that can be produced by mixed microbial cultures using wastes or industrial by-products, which represent an economical and environmental advantage over pure culture processes. The use of alternate feedstocks enables using seasonal by-products, providing...

  15. Conditional function of autoaggregative protien cah and common cah mutations in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cah is a calcium-binding autotransporter protein involved in autoaggregation and biofilm formation. Although cah is widespread in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), we detected mutations in cah at a frequency of 31.3% in this pathogen. In STEC O157:H7 super-shedder strain SS17, a large d...

  16. Characterization of curdlan produced by Agrobacterium sp. IFO 13140 cells immobilized in a loofa sponge matrix, and application of this biopolymer in the development of functional yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz Martinez, Camila; Pereira Ruiz, Suelen; Carvalho Fenelon, Vanderson; Rodrigues de Morais, Gutierrez; Luciano Baesso, Mauro; Matioli, Graciette

    2016-05-01

    Agrobacterium sp. IFO 13140 cells were immobilized on a loofa sponge and used to produce curdlan over five successive cycles. The interaction between microbial cells and the loofa sponge as well as the produced curdlan were characterized by Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectrometry. The purity of the curdlan was also evaluated. The storage stability of the immobilized cells was assessed and the produced curdlan was used in a functional yogurt formulation. The average curdlan production by immobilized cells was 17.84 g L(-1) . The presence of the microorganism in the sponge was confirmed and did not cause alterations in the matrix, and the chemical structure of the curdlan was the same as that of commercial curdlan. The purity of both was similar. The immobilized cells remained active after 300 days of storage at -18 °C. The use of the produced curdlan in a functional yogurt resulted in a product with lower syneresis. A large number of cells physically adhered to the surface of loofa sponge fibers, and its use as an immobilization matrix to produce curdlan was effective. The use of the produced curdlan in yogurt allowed the development of a more stable product. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Where Does Inflammation Fit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasucci, Luigi M; La Rosa, Giulio; Pedicino, Daniela; D'Aiello, Alessia; Galli, Mattia; Liuzzo, Giovanna

    2017-09-01

    This review focuses on the complex relationship between inflammation and the onset of acute coronary syndrome and heart failure. In the last few years, two important lines of research brought new and essential information to light in the pathogenesis of acute coronary syndrome: a) the understanding of the immune mediate mechanisms of inflammation in Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD) and b) evidence that the inflammatory mechanisms associated with atherosclerosis and its complications can be modulated by anti-inflammatory molecules. A large amount of data also suggests that inflammation is a major component in the development and exacerbation of heart failure (HF), in a symbiotic relationship. In particular, recent evidence underlies peculiar aspects of the phenomenon: oxidative stress and autophagy; DAMPS and TLR-4 signaling activation; different macrophages lineage and the contribution of NLRP-3 inflammasome; adaptive immune system. A possible explanation that could unify the pathogenic mechanism of these different conditions is the rising evidence that increased bowel permeability may allow translation of gut microbioma product into the circulation. These findings clearly establish the role of inflammation as the great trigger for two of the major cardiovascular causes of death and morbidity. Further studies are needed, to better clarify the issue and to define more targeted approaches to reduce pathological inflammation while preserving the physiological one.

  18. Electroless oxidation of diamond surfaces in ceric and ferricyanide solutions: An easy way to produce 'C-O' functional groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, N., E-mail: nathalie.simon@uvsq.f [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles, UMR 8180, Universite de Versailles-St-Quentin en Yvelines, 45 avenue des Etats Unis, 78000 Versailles (France); Charrier, G.; Etcheberry, A. [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles, UMR 8180, Universite de Versailles-St-Quentin en Yvelines, 45 avenue des Etats Unis, 78000 Versailles (France)

    2010-08-01

    Despite many works are devoted to oxidation of diamond surfaces, it is still a challenge, to successfully produce well defined 'C-O' functions, particularly for functionalization purposes. In this paper we describe and compare, for the first time, the 'electroless' oxidation of as-deposited polycrystalline boron-doped diamond (BDD) films in ceric and ferricyanide solutions at room temperature. Both reactions efficiently generate oxygen functionalities on BDD surface. While a higher amount of 'C-O' moieties is produced with Ce{sup 4+} as oxidizing agent, the use of ferricyanide specie seems the most interesting to specifically generate hydroxyl groups. Additionally, this easy to perform oxidative method appears not damaging for diamond surfaces and adapted to conductive or non-conductive materials. The resulting surfaces were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, contact angle and capacitance-voltage analysis.

  19. Sinonasal inflammation in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkansson, Kåre; Konge, Lars; Thomsen, Sf

    2013-01-01

    In this review we demonstrate that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) frequently report sinonasal symptoms. Furthermore, we present evidence that smoking on its own can cause nasal disease, and that in COPD patients, nasal inflammation mimics that of the bronchi. All...... this evidence suggests that COPD related sinonasal disease does exist and that smoking on its own rather than systemic inflammation triggers the condition. However, COPD related sinonasal disease remains to be characterized in terms of symptoms and endoscopic findings. In addition, more studies are needed...... to quantify the negative impact of sinonasal symptoms on the quality of life in COPD patients....

  20. Natural resolution of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Marcelo O; Van Dyke, Thomas E

    2013-10-01

    Inflammation is a protective response essential for maintaining human health and for fighting disease. As an active innate immune reaction to challenge, inflammation gives rise to clinical cardinal signs: rubor, calor, dolor, tumor and functio laesa. Termination of acute inflammation was previously recognized as a passive process; a natural decay of pro-inflammatory signals. We now understand that the natural resolution of inflammation involves well-integrated, active, biochemical programs that return tissues to homeostasis. This review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the role of endogenous lipid mediators that modulate cellular fate and inflammation. Biosynthesis of eicosanoids and other lipids in exudates coincides with changes in the types of inflammatory cells. Resolution of inflammation is initiated by an active class switch in lipid mediators, such as classic prostaglandins and leukotrienes, to the production of proresolution mediators. Endogenous pro-resolving lipid mediators, including arachidonic acid-derived lipoxins, aspirin-triggered lipoxins, ω3-eicosapentaenoic acid-derived resolvins of the E-series, docosahexaenoic acid-derived resolvins of the D-series, protectins and maresins, are biosynthesized during the resolution phase of acute inflammation. Depending on the type of injury and the type of tissue, the initial cells that respond are polymorphonuclear leukocytes, monocytes/macrophages, epithelial cells or endothelial cells. The selective interaction of specific lipid mediators with G protein-coupled receptors expressed on innate immune cells (e.g. G protein-coupled receptor 32, lipoxin A4 receptor/formyl peptide receptor2, chemokine-like receptor 1, leukotriene B4 receptor type 1 and cabannoid receptor 2) induces cessation of leukocyte infiltration; vascular permeability/edema returns to normal with polymorphonuclear neutrophil death (mostly via apoptosis), the nonphlogistic infiltration of monocyte/macrophages and the removal

  1. Cerebrospinal Fluid Cytokines Correlate With Aseptic Meningitis and Blood-Brain Barrier Function in Neonatal-Onset Multisystem Inflammatory Disease: Central Nervous System Biomarkers in Neonatal-Onset Multisystem Inflammatory Disease Correlate With Central Nervous System Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Smith, Jackeline; Lin, Yen-Chih; Tsai, Wanxia Li; Kim, Hanna; Montealegre-Sanchez, Gina; Chapelle, Dawn; Huang, Yan; Sibley, Cailin H; Gadina, Massimo; Wesley, Robert; Bielekova, Bibiana; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate proinflammatory cytokines and leukocyte subpopulations in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood of patients with neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID) after treatment, and to compare inflammatory cytokines in the CSF and blood in 6 patients treated with 2 interleukin-1 (IL-1) blockers-anakinra and canakinumab. During routine follow-up visits between December 2011 and October 2013, we immunophenotyped the CSF of 17 pediatric NOMID patients who were treated with anakinra, and analyzed CSF cytokine levels in samples obtained at baseline and at 3-5-year follow-up visits and compared them to samples from healthy controls. CSF levels of IL-6, interferon-γ-inducible 10-kd protein (IP-10/CXCL10), and IL-18 and monocyte and granulocyte counts significantly decreased with anakinra treatment but did not normalize to levels in the controls, even in patients fulfilling criteria for clinical remission. CSF IL-6 and IL-18 levels significantly correlated with measures of blood-brain barrier function, specifically CSF protein (r = 0.75 and r = 0.81, respectively) and albumin quotient (r = 0.79 and r = 0.68, respectively). When patients were treated with canakinumab versus anakinra, median CSF white blood cell counts and IL-6 levels were significantly higher with canakinumab treatment (10.2 cells/mm 3 versus 3.7 cells/mm 3 and 150.7 pg/ml versus 28.5 pg/ml, respectively) despite similar serum cytokine levels. CSF leukocyte subpopulations and cytokine levels significantly improve with optimized IL-1 blocking treatment, but do not normalize. The correlation of CSF IL-6, IP-10/CXCL10, and IL-18 levels with clinical laboratory measures of inflammation and blood-brain barrier function suggests that they may have a role as biomarkers in central nervous system (CNS) inflammation. The difference in inhibition of CSF biomarkers between 2 IL-1 blocking agents, anakinra and canakinumab, suggests differences in efficacy in the intrathecal

  2. A study of excitation functions for the radio-active isotopes produced by α-induced reactions in gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.P.; Prasad, R.; Bhardwaj, H.D.

    1992-04-01

    Excitation functions for the reactions 197 Au(α,xn) 201-x Tl(x=1-4) have been measured in the energy range approx. 30-60 MeV using stacked foil technique. Ge(Li) gamma ray spectroscopy has been used for the analysis of irradiated samples. Excitation functions have also been calculated theoretically using two different computer codes (ACT and ALICE) with and without the inclusion of pre-equilibrium emission. As expected inclusion of pre-equilibrium emission to the compound nucleon calculations agree well with the experimentally measured excitation functions. An interesting trend in pre-equilibrium fraction with energy has been observed. (author). 33 refs, 6 figs

  3. Virtual Agonist-antagonist Mechanisms Produce Biological Muscle-like Functions: An Application for Robot Joint Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiong, Xiaofeng; Wörgötter, Florentin; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – Biological muscles of animals have a surprising variety of functions, i.e., struts, springs, and brakes. According to this, the purpose of this paper is to apply virtual agonist-antagonist mechanisms to robot joint control allowing for muscle-like functions and variably compliant joint...... motions. Design/methodology/approach – Each joint is driven by a pair of virtual agonist-antagonist mechanism (VAAM, i.e., passive components). The muscle-like functions as well as the variable joint compliance are simply achieved by tuning the damping coefficient of the VAAM. Findings – With the VAAM...... or torque sensing systems; thereby capable of implementing the model on small legged robots driven by, e.g., standard servo motors. Thus, the VAAM minimizes hardware and reduces system complexity. From this point of view, the model opens up another way of simulating muscle behaviors on artificial machines...

  4. Mesenchymal stromal cells derived from cervical cancer produce high amounts of adenosine to suppress cytotoxic T lymphocyte functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María de Lourdes Mora-García

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, immunomodulatory mechanisms of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs from bone marrow and other “classic” sources have been described. However, the phenotypic and functional properties of tumor MSCs are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to analyze the immunosuppressive capacity of cervical cancer-derived MSCs (CeCa-MSCs on effector T lymphocytes through the purinergic pathway. Methods We determined the expression and functional activity of the membrane-associated ectonucleotidases CD39 and CD73 on CeCa-MSCs and normal cervical tissue-derived MSCs (NCx-MSCs. We also analyzed their immunosuppressive capacity to decrease proliferation, activation and effector cytotoxic T (CD8+ lymphocyte function through the generation of adenosine (Ado. Results We detected that CeCa-MSCs express higher levels of CD39 and CD73 ectonucleotidases in cell membranes compared to NCx-MSCs, and that this feature was associated with the ability to strongly suppress the proliferation, activation and effector functions of cytotoxic T-cells through the generation of large amounts of Ado from the hydrolysis of ATP, ADP and AMP nucleotides. Conclusions This study suggests that CeCa-MSCs play an important role in the suppression of the anti-tumor immune response in CeCa through the purinergic pathway.

  5. A novel cholesterol-producing Pichia pastoris strain is an ideal host for functional expression of human Na,K-ATPase α3β1 isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirz, Melanie; Richter, Gerald; Leitner, Erich; Wriessnegger, Tamara; Pichler, Harald

    2013-11-01

    The heterologous expression of mammalian membrane proteins in lower eukaryotes is often hampered by aberrant protein localization, structure, and function, leading to enhanced degradation and, thus, low expression levels. Substantial quantities of functional membrane proteins are necessary to elucidate their structure-function relationships. Na,K-ATPases are integral, human membrane proteins that specifically interact with cholesterol and phospholipids, ensuring protein stability and enhancing ion transport activity. In this study, we present a Pichia pastoris strain which was engineered in its sterol pathway towards the synthesis of cholesterol instead of ergosterol to foster the functional expression of human membrane proteins. Western blot analyses revealed that cholesterol-producing yeast formed enhanced and stable levels of human Na,K-ATPase α3β1 isoform. ATPase activity assays suggested that this Na,K-ATPase isoform was functionally expressed in the plasma membrane. Moreover, [(3)H]-ouabain cell surface-binding studies underscored that the Na,K-ATPase was present in high numbers at the cell surface, surpassing reported expression strains severalfold. This provides evidence that the humanized sterol composition positively influenced Na,K-ATPase α3β1 stability, activity, and localization to the yeast plasma membrane. Prospectively, cholesterol-producing yeast will have high potential for functional expression of many mammalian membrane proteins.

  6. The molecular imaging approach to image infections and inflammation by nuclear medicine techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Signore, Alberto; Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory and infectious diseases are a heterogeneous class of diseases that may be divided into infections, acute inflammation and chronic inflammation. Radiological imaging techniques have, with the exception of functional MRI, high sensitivity but lack in specificity. Nuclear medicine

  7. CNS and inflammation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    overproduction8. The most intense interest in inflammation in the. CNS has arisen from its potential role in diseases including acute brain injury, stroke, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, motor neurone disease, movement disorders, and more recently some psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety and schizophrenia.

  8. Inflammation and Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akiyama, H.; Barger, S.; Barnum, S.; Bradt, B.; Bauer, J.; Cole, G. M.; Cooper, N. R.; Eikelenboom, P.; Emmerling, M.; Fiebich, B. L.; Finch, C. E.; Frautschy, S.; Griffin, W. S.; Hampel, H.; Hull, M.; Landreth, G.; Lue, L.; Mrak, R.; Mackenzie, I. R.; McGeer, P. L.; O'Banion, M. K.; Pachter, J.; Pasinetti, G.; Plata-Salaman, C.; Rogers, J.; Rydel, R.; Shen, Y.; Streit, W.; Strohmeyer, R.; Tooyoma, I.; van Muiswinkel, F. L.; Veerhuis, R.; Walker, D.; Webster, S.; Wegrzyniak, B.; Wenk, G.; Wyss-Coray, T.

    2000-01-01

    Inflammation clearly occurs in pathologically vulnerable regions of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain, and it does so with the full complexity of local peripheral inflammatory responses. In the periphery, degenerating tissue and the deposition of highly insoluble abnormal materials are classical

  9. Glucocorticoids and chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Rainer H; Cutolo, Maurizio

    2016-12-01

    Glucocorticoids are steroid hormones that once bound to their receptor interact with the DNA binding domain. Almost 1000-2000 genes are sensitive to their effects, including immune/inflammatory response genes. However, their role in pathophysiology and therapy is still debated. We performed a literature survey using the key words glucocorticoids, inflammation, autoimmune disease, rheumatology and adrenal glands in order to define important targets for this review on glucocorticoids. Considering endogenous/exogenous glucocorticoids in chronic inflammatory diseases brought up five major points for discussion: inadequately low production of endogenous cortisol relative to systemic inflammation (the disproportion principle); changes of the systemic and local cortisol-to-cortisone shuttle (reactivation and degradation of cortisol); inflammation-induced glucocorticoid resistance; highlights of present glucocorticoid therapy; and the role of circadian rhythms in action of cortisol. Much of this information becomes understandable in the context of neurohormonal energy regulation as recently summarized. The optimization of long-term low-dose glucocorticoid therapy in chronic inflammatory diseases arises from the understanding of the above mentioned aspects. Since glucocorticoid resistance is a consequence of inflammation, adequate anti-inflammatory therapy is mandatory. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Immunsystemet ved kronisk inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtzen, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immunity has evolved as a defence against infections and as an important repair mechanism after physical injury. If elimination of microbes and healing is not achieved, or if the immune system is dysregulated, chronic inflammation ensues. Immune cells become engaged in prolonged...

  11. Idiopathic granulomatous orbital inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mombaerts, I.; Schlingemann, R. O.; Goldschmeding, R.; Koornneef, L.

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: Granulomatous orbital inflammation may occur as an isolated condition of unknown origin. These idiopathic granulomatous lesions are believed to belong to the orbital pseudotumor group by some authors, whereas others consider them sarcoidosis limited to the orbit. The aim of this study is to

  12. Cytokines and intraocular inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekzema, R.; Murray, P. I.; Kijlstra, A.

    1990-01-01

    Although new endogenous mediators of inflammatory and immune responses are reported almost on a monthly basis, the cytokines IL-1, TNF, and IL-6 have emerged as the primary regulators of local inflammation in man. In this paper, uveitogenic and other properties of these particular cytokines are

  13. Microstructure and kinetics of a functionally graded NiTi-TiC x composite produced by combustion synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Moore, John J.

    2007-01-01

    Production of a NiTi-TiC x functionally graded material (FGM) composite is possible through use of a combustion synthesis (CS) reaction employing the propagating mode (SHS). The NiTi-TiC x FGM combines the well-known and understood superelastic and shape memory capabilities of NiTi with the high hardness, wear and corrosion resistance of TiC x . The material layers were observed as functionally graded both in composition and porosity with distinct interfaces, while still maintaining good material interaction and bonding. XRD of the FGM composite revealed the presence of TiC x with equi-atomic NiTi and minor NiTi 2 and NiTi 3 phases. The TiC x particle size decreased with increasing NiTi content. Microindentation performed across the length of the FGM revealed a decrease in hardness as the NiTi content increased

  14. inflammation and iron metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Dzedzej

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Following acute physical activity, blood hepcidin concentration appears to increase in response to exercise-induced inflammation, but the long-term impact of exercise on hepcidin remains unclear. Here we investigated changes in hepcidin and the inflammation marker interleukin-6 to evaluate professional basketball players’ response to a season of training and games. The analysis also included vitamin D (25(OHD3 assessment, owing to its anti-inflammatory effects. Blood samples were collected for 14 players and 10 control non-athletes prior to and after the 8-month competitive season. Athletes’ performance was assessed with the NBA efficiency score. At the baseline hepcidin correlated with blood ferritin (r=0.61; 90% CL ±0.31, but at the end of the season this correlation was absent. Compared with the control subjects, athletes experienced clear large increases in hepcidin (50%; 90% CI 15-96% and interleukin-6 (77%; 90% CI 35-131% and a clear small decrease in vitamin D (-12%; 90% CI -20 to -3% at the season completion. Correlations between change scores of these variables were unclear (r = -0.21 to 0.24, 90% CL ±0.5, but their uncertainty generally excluded strong relationships. Athletes were hence concluded to have experienced acute inflammation at the beginning but chronic inflammation at the end of the competitive season. At the same time, the moderate correlation between changes in vitamin D and players’ performance (r=0.43 was suggestive of its beneficial influence. Maintaining the appropriative concentration of vitamin D is thus necessary for basketball players’ performance and efficiency. The assessment of hepcidin has proven to be useful in diagnosing inflammation in response to chronic exercise.

  15. [Inflammation and structural organ damage: chicken or egg?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeten, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    It is not inflammation but functional and/or anatomical loss of integrity of target organs that is the major determinant of morbidity in many immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs). This structural and often irreversible tissue damage is generally considered to be a direct or indirect consequence of inflammation (through failed repair mechanisms). However, recent clinical observations in rheumatic diseases, demonstrate clearly that the postulated causal relationship between inflammation and structural damage does certainly not hold true in all IMIDs. On the contrary, potent anti-inflammatory treatments suggest an uncoupling of inflammation and damage in diseases such as ankylosing spondylitis. The author proposes a third and intriguing alternative hypothesis: inflammation and stromal remodelling are causally linked but it is the latter that drives the former. If this hypothesis is correct, we should focus our therapeutic efforts on pathways of tissue remodelling rather than on inflammation in IMIDs such as ankylosing spondylitis, but potentially also scleroderma or asthma.

  16. Purification and functional characterization of nine human Aquaporins produced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the purpose of biophysical characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Per Amstrup; Gourdon, Pontus Emanuel; Gotfryd, Kamil

    2017-01-01

    The sparse number of high-resolution human membrane protein structures severely restricts our comprehension of molecular physiology and ability to exploit rational drug design. In the search for a standardized, cheap and easily handled human membrane protein production platform, we thoroughly...... investigated the capacity of S. cerevisiae to deliver high yields of prime quality human AQPs, focusing on poorly characterized members including some previously shown to be difficult to isolate. Exploiting GFP labeled forms we comprehensively optimized production and purification procedures resulting...... in satisfactory yields of all nine AQP targets. We applied the obtained knowledge to successfully upscale purification of histidine tagged human AQP10 produced in large bioreactors. Glycosylation analysis revealed that AQP7 and 12 were O-glycosylated, AQP10 was N-glycosylated while the other AQPs were...

  17. Inflammation and nutrition in renal insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Stenvinkel, Peter; Pillon, Luana; Kopple, Joel D

    2003-07-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) and inflammation are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and worsen as the CKD progresses toward the end-stage renal disease (ESRD). These conditions are major predictors of poor clinical outcome in kidney failure, as reflected by a strong association between hypoalbuminemia and cardiovascular disease (CVD). It has been suggested that inflammation is the cause of both PEM and CVD and, hence, the main link among these conditions, but these hypotheses are not well established. Increased release or activation of inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-6 or tumor necrosis factor alpha, may suppress appetite, cause muscle proteolysis and hypoalbuminemia, and may be involved in atherogenesis. Increasing serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines caused by reduced renal function, volume overload, oxidative or carbonyl stress, decreased levels of antioxidants, increased susceptibility to infection in uremia, and the presence of comorbid conditions may lead to inflammation in CKD patients. In hemodialysis patients, the exposure to dialysis tubing and dialysis membranes, poor quality of dialysis water, back-filtration or back-diffusion of contaminants, and foreign bodies in dialysis access maybe additional causes of inflammation. Similarly, episodes of overt or latent peritonitis, peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter and its related infections, and constant exposure to PD solution may contribute to inflammation in these patients. The degree to which PEM in dialysis patients is caused by inflammation is not clear. Because both PEM and inflammation are strongly associated with each other and can change many nutritional measures and outcome concurrently in the same direction, the terms malnutrition-inflammation complex syndrome (MICS) and/or malnutrition-inflammation-atherosclerosis (MIA) have been suggested to denote the important contribution of both of these conditions to poor clinical outcome. Maintenance dialysis patients

  18. Elevation of IL-6 in the allergic asthmatic airway is independent of inflammation but associates with loss of central airway function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunn Janice Y

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airway that is characterized by a Th2-type of immune response with increasing evidence for involvement of Th17 cells. The role of IL-6 in promoting effector T cell subsets suggest that IL-6 may play a functional role in asthma. Classically IL-6 has been viewed as an inflammatory marker, along with TNFα and IL-1β, rather than as regulatory cytokine. Objective To investigate the potential relationship between IL-6 and other proinflammatory cytokines, Th2/Th17 cytokines and lung function in allergic asthma, and thus evaluate the potential role of IL-6 in this disease. Methods Cytokine levels in induced sputum and lung function were measured in 16 healthy control and 18 mild-moderate allergic asthmatic subjects. Results The levels of the proinflammatory biomarkers TNFα and IL-1β were not different between the control and asthmatic group. In contrast, IL-6 levels were specifically elevated in asthmatic subjects compared with healthy controls (p S = 0.53, p Conclusions In mild-moderate asthma, IL-6 dissociates from other proinflammatory biomarkers, but correlates with IL-13 levels. Furthermore, IL-6 may contribute to impaired lung function in allergic asthma.

  19. Interferon-γ Promotes Inflammation and Development of T-Cell Lymphoma in HTLV-1 bZIP Factor Transgenic Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Mitagami

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is an etiological agent of several inflammatory diseases and a T-cell malignancy, adult T-cell leukemia (ATL. HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ is the only viral gene that is constitutively expressed in HTLV-1-infected cells, and it has multiple functions on T-cell signaling pathways. HBZ has important roles in HTLV-1-mediated pathogenesis, since HBZ transgenic (HBZ-Tg mice develop systemic inflammation and T-cell lymphomas, which are similar phenotypes to HTLV-1-associated diseases. We showed previously that in HBZ-Tg mice, HBZ causes unstable Foxp3 expression, leading to an increase in regulatory T cells (Tregs and the consequent induction of IFN-γ-producing cells, which in turn leads to the development of inflammation in the mice. In this study, we show that the severity of inflammation is correlated with the development of lymphomas in HBZ-Tg mice, suggesting that HBZ-mediated inflammation is closely linked to oncogenesis in CD4+ T cells. In addition, we found that IFN-γ-producing cells enhance HBZ-mediated inflammation, since knocking out IFN-γ significantly reduced the incidence of dermatitis as well as lymphoma. Recent studies show the critical roles of the intestinal microbiota in the development of Tregs in vivo. We found that even germ-free HBZ-Tg mice still had an increased number of Tregs and IFN-γ-producing cells, and developed dermatitis, indicating that an intrinsic activity of HBZ evokes aberrant T-cell differentiation and consequently causes inflammation. These results show that immunomodulation by HBZ is implicated in both inflammation and oncogenesis, and suggest a causal connection between HTLV-1-associated inflammation and ATL.

  20. Single Session of Functional Electrical Stimulation-Assisted Walking Produces Corticomotor Symmetry Changes Related to Changes in Poststroke Walking Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Jacqueline A; Hsiao, HaoYuan; Wright, Tamara; Binder-Macleod, Stuart A

    2017-05-01

    Recent research demonstrated that the symmetry of corticomotor drive with the paretic and nonparetic plantarflexor muscles was related to the biomechanical ankle moment strategy that people with chronic stroke used to achieve their greatest walking speeds. Rehabilitation strategies that promote corticomotor balance might improve poststroke walking mechanics and enhance functional ambulation. The study objectives were to test the effectiveness of a single session of gait training using functional electrical stimulation (FES) to improve plantarflexor corticomotor symmetry and plantarflexion ankle moment symmetry and to determine whether changes in corticomotor symmetry were related to changes in ankle moment symmetry within the session. This was a repeated-measures crossover study. On separate days, 20 people with chronic stroke completed a session of treadmill walking either with or without the use of FES of their ankle dorsi- and plantarflexor muscles. We calculated plantarflexor corticomotor symmetry using transcranial magnetic stimulation and plantarflexion ankle moment symmetry during walking between the paretic and the nonparetic limbs before and after each session. We compared changes and tested relationships between corticomotor symmetry and ankle moment symmetry following each session. Following the session with FES, there was an increase in plantarflexor corticomotor symmetry that was related to the observed increase in ankle moment symmetry. In contrast, following the session without FES, there were no changes in corticomotor symmetry or ankle moment symmetry. No stratification was made on the basis of lesion size, location, or clinical severity. These findings demonstrate, for the first time (to our knowledge), the ability of a single session of gait training with FES to induce positive corticomotor plasticity in people in the chronic stage of stroke recovery. They also provide insight into the neurophysiologic mechanisms underlying improvements in

  1. Evolution of CONSTANS Regulation and Function after Gene Duplication Produced a Photoperiodic Flowering Switch in the Brassicaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Samson; Rühl, Mark; de Montaigu, Amaury; Wötzel, Stefan; Coupland, George

    2015-09-01

    Environmental control of flowering allows plant reproduction to occur under optimal conditions and facilitates adaptation to different locations. At high latitude, flowering of many plants is controlled by seasonal changes in day length. The photoperiodic flowering pathway confers this response in the Brassicaceae, which colonized temperate latitudes after divergence from the Cleomaceae, their subtropical sister family. The CONSTANS (CO) transcription factor of Arabidopsis thaliana, a member of the Brassicaceae, is central to the photoperiodic flowering response and shows characteristic patterns of transcription required for day-length sensing. CO is believed to be widely conserved among flowering plants; however, we show that it arose after gene duplication at the root of the Brassicaceae followed by divergence of transcriptional regulation and protein function. CO has two close homologs, CONSTANS-LIKE1 (COL1) and COL2, which are related to CO by tandem duplication and whole-genome duplication, respectively. The single CO homolog present in the Cleomaceae shows transcriptional and functional features similar to those of COL1 and COL2, suggesting that these were ancestral. We detect cis-regulatory and codon changes characteristic of CO and use transgenic assays to demonstrate their significance in the day-length-dependent activation of the CO target gene FLOWERING LOCUS T. Thus, the function of CO as a potent photoperiodic flowering switch evolved in the Brassicaceae after gene duplication. The origin of CO may have contributed to the range expansion of the Brassicaceae and suggests that in other families CO genes involved in photoperiodic flowering arose by convergent evolution. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  2. Niche partitioning of feeding microhabitats produces a unique function for herbivorous rabbitfishes (Perciformes, Siganidae) on coral reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, R. J.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2013-03-01

    Niche theory predicts that coexisting species minimise competition by evolving morphological or behavioural specialisations that allow them to spread out along resource axes such as space, diet and temporal activity. These specialisations define how a species interacts with its environment and, by extension, determine its functional role. Here, we examine the feeding niche of three species of coral reef-dwelling rabbitfishes (Siganidae, Siganus). By comparing aspects of their feeding behaviour (bite location, bite rate, foraging distance) with that of representative species from two other abundant herbivorous fish families, the parrotfishes (Labridae, Scarus) and surgeonfishes (Acanthuridae, Acanthurus), we examine whether rabbitfishes have a feeding niche distinct from other members of the herbivore guild. Measurements of the penetration of the fishes' snouts and bodies into reef concavities when feeding revealed that rabbitfish fed to a greater degree from reef crevices and interstices than other herbivores. There was just a 40 % overlap in the penetration-depth niche between rabbitfish and surgeonfish and a 45 % overlap between rabbitfish and parrotfish, compared with the almost complete niche overlap (95 %) recorded for parrotfish and surgeonfish along this spatial niche axis. Aspects of the morphology of rabbitfish which may contribute to this niche segregation include a comparatively longer, narrower snout and narrower head. Our results suggest that sympatric coexistence of rabbitfish and other reef herbivores is facilitated by segregation along a spatial (and potentially dietary) axis. This segregation results in a unique functional role for rabbitfishes among roving herbivores that of "crevice-browser": a group that specifically feeds on crevice-dwelling algal or benthic organisms. This functional trait may have implications for reef ecosystem processes in terms of controlling the successional development of crevice-based algal communities, reducing their

  3. Evolution of CONSTANS Regulation and Function after Gene Duplication Produced a Photoperiodic Flowering Switch in the Brassicaceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Samson; Rühl, Mark; de Montaigu, Amaury; Wötzel, Stefan; Coupland, George

    2015-01-01

    Environmental control of flowering allows plant reproduction to occur under optimal conditions and facilitates adaptation to different locations. At high latitude, flowering of many plants is controlled by seasonal changes in day length. The photoperiodic flowering pathway confers this response in the Brassicaceae, which colonized temperate latitudes after divergence from the Cleomaceae, their subtropical sister family. The CONSTANS (CO) transcription factor of Arabidopsis thaliana, a member of the Brassicaceae, is central to the photoperiodic flowering response and shows characteristic patterns of transcription required for day-length sensing. CO is believed to be widely conserved among flowering plants; however, we show that it arose after gene duplication at the root of the Brassicaceae followed by divergence of transcriptional regulation and protein function. CO has two close homologs, CONSTANS-LIKE1 (COL1) and COL2, which are related to CO by tandem duplication and whole-genome duplication, respectively. The single CO homolog present in the Cleomaceae shows transcriptional and functional features similar to those of COL1 and COL2, suggesting that these were ancestral. We detect cis-regulatory and codon changes characteristic of CO and use transgenic assays to demonstrate their significance in the day-length-dependent activation of the CO target gene FLOWERING LOCUS T. Thus, the function of CO as a potent photoperiodic flowering switch evolved in the Brassicaceae after gene duplication. The origin of CO may have contributed to the range expansion of the Brassicaceae and suggests that in other families CO genes involved in photoperiodic flowering arose by convergent evolution. PMID:25972346

  4. Growth hormone binding to specific receptors stimulates growth and function of cloned insulin-producing rat insulinoma RIN-5AH cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, Nils; Martin, J M

    1985-01-01

    Binding of 125I-labeled human GH (hGH) to a cloned rat insulin-producing cell line RIN-5AH in monolayer culture was studied along with some physiological effects of the hormone on these cells. Binding was time and temperature dependent, and steady state binding was observed in 60 min at 37 C...... in the cell membrane, directly stimulates proliferation and function of pancreatic beta-cells....

  5. Genetically engineered mucin mouse models for inflammation and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Suhasini; Kumar, Sushil; Bafna, Sangeeta; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Wagner, Kay-Uwe; Jain, Maneesh; Batra, Surinder K

    2015-12-01

    Mucins are heavily O-glycosylated proteins primarily produced by glandular and ductal epithelial cells, either in membrane-tethered or secretory forms, for providing lubrication and protection from various exogenous and endogenous insults. However, recent studies have linked their aberrant overexpression with infection, inflammation, and cancer that underscores their importance in tissue homeostasis. In this review, we present current status of the existing mouse models that have been developed to gain insights into the functional role(s) of mucins under physiological and pathological conditions. Knockout mouse models for membrane-associated (Muc1 and Muc16) and secretory mucins (Muc2) have helped us to elucidate the role of mucins in providing effective and protective barrier functions against pathological threats, participation in disease progression, and improved our understanding of mucin interaction with biotic and abiotic environmental components. Emphasis is also given to available transgenic mouse models (MUC1 and MUC7), which has been exploited to understand the context-dependent regulation and therapeutic potential of human mucins during inflammation and cancer.

  6. Resveratrol Based Oral Nutritional Supplement Produces Long-Term Beneficial Effects on Structure and Visual Function in Human Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Richer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Longevinex® (L/RV is a low dose hormetic over-the-counter (OTC oral resveratrol (RV based matrix of red wine solids, vitamin D3 and inositol hexaphosphate (IP6 with established bioavailability, safety, and short-term efficacy against the earliest signs of human atherosclerosis, murine cardiac reperfusion injury, clinical retinal neovascularization, and stem cell survival. We previously reported our short-term findings for dry and wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD patients. Today we report long term (two to three year clinical efficacy. Methods: We treated three patients including a patient with an AMD treatment resistant variant (polypoidal retinal vasculature disease. We evaluated two clinical measures of ocular structure (fundus autofluorescent imaging and spectral domain optical coherence extended depth choroidal imaging and qualitatively appraised changes in macular pigment volume. We further evaluated three clinical measures of visual function (Snellen visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and glare recovery to a cone photo-stress stimulus. Results: We observed broad bilateral improvements in ocular structure and function over a long time period, opposite to what might be expected due to aging and the natural progression of the patient’s pathophysiology. No side effects were observed. Conclusions: These three cases demonstrate that application of epigenetics has long-term efficacy against AMD retinal disease, when the retinal specialist has exhausted other therapeutic modalities.

  7. Isolation and functional characterization of a biosurfactant produced by a new and promising strain of Oleomonas sagaranensis AT18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saimmai, Atipan; Rukadee, Onkamon; Onlamool, Theerawat; Sobhon, Vorasan; Maneerat, Suppasil

    2012-10-01

    Biosurfactant-producing bacteria were isolated from mangrove sediment in southern Thailand. Isolates were screened for biosurfactant production by using the surface tension test. The highest reduction of surface tension was achieved with a bacterial strain which was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Oleomonas sagaranensis AT18. It has also been investigated using different carbon and nitrogen sources. It showed that the strain was able to grow and reduce the surface tension of the culture supernatant to 25 mN/m. In all 5.30 g of biosurfactant yield was obtained after 54 h of cultivation by using molasses and NaNO₃ as carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. The biosurfactant recovery by chloroform:methanol extraction showed a small critical micelle concentration value (8 mg/l), thermal and pH stability with respect to surface tension reduction. It also showed emulsification activity and a high level of salt concentration. The biosurfactant obtained was confirmed as a glycolipid by using a biochemical test, FT-IR and mass spectra. The crude biosurfactant showed a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity and also had the ability to emulsify oil and enhance PAHs solubility.

  8. Use of γ-irradiation to produce films from whey, casein and soya proteins: structure and functionals characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacroix, M.; Le, T.C.; Ouattara, B.; Yu, H.; Letendre, M.; Sabato, S.F.; Mateescu, M.A.; Patterson, G.

    2002-01-01

    γ-irradiation and thermal treatments have been used to produce sterilized cross-linked films. Formulations containing variable concentrations of calcium caseinate and whey proteins (whey protein isolate (WPI) and commercial whey protein concentrate) or mixture of soya protein isolate (SPI) with WPI was investigated on the physico-chemical properties of these films. Results showed that the mechanical properties of cross-linked films improved significantly the puncture strength for all types of films. Size-exclusion chromatography showed for no cross-linked proteins, a molecular mass of around 40 kDa. The soluble fractions of the cross-linked proteins molecular distributions were between 600 and 3800 kDa. γ-irradiation seems to modify to a certain extent the conformation of proteins which will adopt structures more ordered and more stable, as suggested by X-ray diffraction analysis. Microstructure observations showed that the mechanical characteristics of these films are closely related to their microscopic structure. Water vapor permeability of films based on SPI was also significantly decreased when irradiated. Microbial resistance was also evaluated for cross-linked films. Results showed that the level of biodegradation of cross-linked films was 36% after 60 d of fermentation in the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

  9. Effect of producer cell line on functional activity of anti-D monoclonal antibodies destined for prevention of rhesus sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olovnikova, N I; Ershler, M A; Belkina, E V; Nikolaeva, T L; Miterev, G Yu

    2009-04-01

    The ability of anti-D antibodies to cause antigen-specific immunosuppression depends on their interaction with low-affinity Fcgamma-receptors. Human monoclonal antibodies to D antigen of the rhesus system were investigated by antibody-dependent cytotoxicity assay in order to estimate their ability to induce hemolysis mediated by low-affinity Fcgamma receptors. We demonstrate that affinity of monoclonal antibodies to receptors of this type does not depend on primary structure of Fc-fragment, but depends on the producer cell line which expresses the antibodies. Monoclonal IgG1 antibodies interacting with FcgammaRIIa and FcgammaRIII lost this property, if they were secreted by human-mouse heterohybridoma, but not by human B-cell line. On the opposite, monoclonal antibodies that could not activate low-affinity Fcgamma receptors were highly active after human cells fusion with rat myeloma YB2/0. Hemolytic activity of IgG3 remained unchanged after fusion of human cells with rodent cells.

  10. COPD exacerbations, inflammation and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bathoorn, Derk

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes investigations into the inflammation in COPD, and its treatment. Inflammation in COPD is a central factor in the onset of the disease and its progression. During acute deteriorations of the disease, exacerbations, the inflammation is more severe, and depending on the cause of

  11. Adipose Tissue Remodeling as Homeostatic Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiko Itoh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence has accumulated indicating that obesity is associated with a state of chronic, low-grade inflammation. Obese adipose tissue is characterized by dynamic changes in cellular composition and function, which may be referred to as “adipose tissue remodeling”. Among stromal cells in the adipose tissue, infiltrated macrophages play an important role in adipose tissue inflammation and systemic insulin resistance. We have demonstrated that a paracrine loop involving saturated fatty acids and tumor necrosis factor-α derived from adipocytes and macrophages, respectively, aggravates obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation. Notably, saturated fatty acids, which are released from hypertrophied adipocytes via the macrophage-induced lipolysis, serve as a naturally occurring ligand for Toll-like receptor 4 complex, thereby activating macrophages. Such a sustained interaction between endogenous ligands derived from parenchymal cells and pathogen sensors expressed in stromal immune cells should lead to chronic inflammatory responses ranging from the basal homeostatic state to diseased tissue remodeling, which may be referred to as “homeostatic inflammation”. We, therefore, postulate that adipose tissue remodeling may represent a prototypic example of homeostatic inflammation. Understanding the molecular mechanism underlying homeostatic inflammation may lead to the identification of novel therapeutic strategies to prevent or treat obesity-related complications.

  12. Microbiota, Immune Subversion, and Chronic Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Carolyn D; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2017-01-01

    Several host-adapted pathogens and commensals have evolved mechanisms to evade the host innate immune system inducing a state of low-grade inflammation. Epidemiological studies have also documented the association of a subset of these microorganisms with chronic inflammatory disorders. In this review, we summarize recent studies demonstrating the role of the microbiota in chronic inflammatory diseases and discuss how specific microorganisms subvert or inhibit protective signaling normally induced by toll-like receptors (TLRs). We highlight our work on the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis and discuss the role of microbial modulation of lipid A structures in evasion of TLR4 signaling and resulting systemic immunopathology associated with atherosclerosis. P. gingivalis intrinsically expresses underacylated lipid A moieties and can modify the phosphorylation of lipid A, leading to altered TLR4 signaling. Using P. gingivalis mutant strains expressing distinct lipid A moieties, we demonstrated that expression of antagonist lipid A was associated with P. gingivalis -mediated systemic inflammation and immunopathology, whereas strains expressing agonist lipid A exhibited modest systemic inflammation. Likewise, mice deficient in TLR4 were more susceptible to vascular inflammation after oral infection with P. gingivalis wild-type strain compared to mice possessing functional TLR4. Collectively, our studies support a role for P. gingivalis -mediated dysregulation of innate and adaptive responses resulting in immunopathology and systemic inflammation. We propose that anti-TLR4 interventions must be designed with caution, given the balance between the protective and destructive roles of TLR signaling in response to microbiota and associated immunopathologies.

  13. Non-Breeding Eusocial Mole-Rats Produce Viable Sperm--Spermiogram and Functional Testicular Morphology of Fukomys anselli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Garcia Montero

    Full Text Available Ansell's mole-rats (Fukomys anselli are subterranean rodents living in families composed of about 20 members with a single breeding pair and their non-breeding offspring. Most of them remain with their parents for their lifetime and help to maintain and defend the natal burrow system, forage, and care for younger siblings. Since incest avoidance is based on individual recognition (and not on social suppression we expect that non-breeders produce viable sperm spontaneously. We compared the sperm of breeding and non-breeding males, obtained by electroejaculation and found no significant differences in sperm parameters between both groups. Here, we used electroejaculation to obtain semen for the first time in a subterranean mammal. Spermiogram analysis revealed no significant differences in sperm parameters between breeders and non-breeders. We found significantly larger testes (measured on autopsies and on living animals per ultrasonography of breeders compared to non-breeders (with body mass having a significant effect. There were no marked histological differences between breeding and non-breeding males, and the relative area occupied by Leydig cells and seminiferous tubules on histological sections, respectively, was not significantly different between both groups. The seminiferous epithelium and to a lesser degree the interstitial testicular tissue are characterized by lesions (vacuolar degenerations, however, this feature does not hinder fertilization even in advanced stages of life. The continuous production of viable sperm also in sexually abstinent non-breeders might be best understood in light of the mating and social system of Fukomys anselli, and the potential to found a new family following an unpredictable and rare encounter with an unfamiliar female ("provoked or induced dispersal". Apparently, the non-breeders do not reproduce because they do not copulate but not because they would be physiologically infertile. The significantly

  14. Inflammation Effects on Motivation and Motor Activity: Role of Dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felger, Jennifer C; Treadway, Michael T

    2017-01-01

    Motivational and motor deficits are common in patients with depression and other psychiatric disorders, and are related to symptoms of anhedonia and motor retardation. These deficits in motivation and motor function are associated with alterations in corticostriatal neurocircuitry, which may reflect abnormalities in mesolimbic and mesostriatal dopamine (DA). One pathophysiologic pathway that may drive changes in DAergic corticostriatal circuitry is inflammation. Biomarkers of inflammation such as inflammatory cytokines and acute-phase proteins are reliably elevated in a significant proportion of psychiatric patients. A variety of inflammatory stimuli have been found to preferentially target basal ganglia function to lead to impaired motivation and motor activity. Findings have included inflammation-associated reductions in ventral striatal neural responses to reward anticipation, decreased DA and DA metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid, and decreased availability, and release of striatal DA, all of which correlated with symptoms of reduced motivation and/or motor retardation. Importantly, inflammation-associated symptoms are often difficult to treat, and evidence suggests that inflammation may decrease DA synthesis and availability, thus circumventing the efficacy of standard pharmacotherapies. This review will highlight the impact of administration of inflammatory stimuli on the brain in relation to motivation and motor function. Recent data demonstrating similar relationships between increased inflammation and altered DAergic corticostriatal circuitry and behavior in patients with major depressive disorder will also be presented. Finally, we will discuss the mechanisms by which inflammation affects DA neurotransmission and relevance to novel therapeutic strategies to treat reduced motivation and motor symptoms in patients with high inflammation.

  15. Midkine in Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludwig T. Weckbach

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The 13 kDa heparin-binding growth factor midkine (MK was originally identified as a molecule involved in the orchestration of embryonic development. Recent studies provided evidence for a new role of MK in acute and chronic inflammatory processes. Accordingly, several inflammatory diseases including nephritis, arthritis, atherosclerosis, colitis, and autoimmune encephalitis have been shown to be alleviated in the absence of MK in animal models. Reduced leukocyte recruitment to the sites of inflammation was found to be one important mechanism attenuating chronic inflammation when MK was absent. Furthermore, MK was found to modulate expression of proinflammatory cytokines and the expansion of regulatory T-cells. Here, we review the current understanding of the role of MK in different inflammatory disorders and summarize the knowledge of MK biology.

  16. Inflammation in Epileptic Encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandra, Oleksii; Moshé, Solomon L; Galanopoulou, Aristea S

    2017-01-01

    West syndrome (WS) is an infantile epileptic encephalopathy that manifests with infantile spasms (IS), hypsarrhythmia (in ~60% of infants), and poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. The etiologies of WS can be structural-metabolic pathologies (~60%), genetic (12%-15%), or of unknown origin. The current treatment options include hormonal treatment (adrenocorticotropic hormone and high-dose steroids) and the GABA aminotransferase inhibitor vigabatrin, while ketogenic diet can be given as add-on treatment in refractory IS. There is a need to identify new therapeutic targets and more effective treatments for WS. Theories about the role of inflammatory pathways in the pathogenesis and treatment of WS have emerged, being supported by both clinical and preclinical data from animal models of WS. Ongoing advances in genetics have revealed numerous genes involved in the pathogenesis of WS, including genes directly or indirectly involved in inflammation. Inflammatory pathways also interact with other signaling pathways implicated in WS, such as the neuroendocrine pathway. Furthermore, seizures may also activate proinflammatory pathways raising the possibility that inflammation can be a consequence of seizures and epileptogenic processes. With this targeted review, we plan to discuss the evidence pro and against the following key questions. Does activation of inflammatory pathways in the brain cause epilepsy in WS and does it contribute to the associated comorbidities and progression? Can activation of certain inflammatory pathways be a compensatory or protective event? Are there interactions between inflammation and the neuroendocrine system that contribute to the pathogenesis of WS? Does activation of brain inflammatory signaling pathways contribute to the transition of WS to Lennox-Gastaut syndrome? Are there any lead candidates or unexplored targets for future therapy development for WS targeting inflammation? © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Peritoneal dialysis and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velloso, Marina Souza Silva; Otoni, Alba; de Paula Sabino, Adriano; de Castro, Whocely Victor; Pinto, Sérgio Wyton Lima; Marinho, Maria Aparecida Silva; Rios, Danyelle Romana Alves

    2014-03-20

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a kidney replacement therapy for end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Despite being a lifesaving treatment, the rate of mortality in patients under PD is elevated, mainly due to the chronic peritoneal dysfunction which is characterized by inflammation, peritoneal fibrosis and neoangiogenesis. The inflammatory process is trigged and modulated by the type of the peritoneal dialysis solutions (PDSs) used during PD. Currently, different PDSs are commercially available: (i) the conventional solutions; (ii) solutions of neutral pH containing low concentration of glucose degradation products (GDPs); (iii) solutions with icodextrin; and (iv) solutions containing taurine. Therefore, the aim of this review is to describe the different types of peritoneal dialysis solutions used during PD and their relationship with systemic and intraperitoneal inflammation. Some studies suggested that solutions of neutral pH containing low concentration of GDPs, icodextrin and taurine have better biocompatibility and lower influence on the inflammatory process compared to the conventional one. On the other hand, the studies, in general, were performed with a small population and for a short period of time. Therefore, further well-designed and -controlled clinical trials with larger number of individuals are required in order to better understand the role of different peritoneal dialysis solution types in the development of inflammation in patients with chronic peritoneal dialysis. Accordingly, studies that are more well-designed, well-controlled and with a larger number of patients are needed to explain and define the role of different types of PDS in the inflammation development in patients with chronic peritoneal dialysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Inflammation in epileptic encephalopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandra, Oleksii; Moshé, Solomon L.; Galanopoulou, Aristea S.

    2017-01-01

    West syndrome (WS) is an infantile epileptic encephalopathy (EE) that manifests with infantile spasms, hypsarrhythmia (in ~60% of infants) and poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. The etiologies of WS can be structural-metabolic pathologies (~60%), genetic (12–15%) or of unknown origin. The current treatment options include hormonal treatment [adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and high dose steroids], the GABA aminotransferase inhibitor vigabatrin, while ketogenic diet can be given as add-on treatment in refractory IS. There is a need to identify new therapeutic targets and more effective treatments for WS. Theories about the role of inflammatory pathways in the pathogenesis and treatment of WS have emerged, being supported by both clinical and preclinical data from animal models of WS. Ongoing advances in genetics have revealed numerous genes involved in the pathogenesis of WS, including genes directly or indirectly involved in inflammation. Inflammatory pathways also interact with other signaling pathways implicated in WS, such as the neuroendocrine pathway. Furthermore, seizures may also activate pro-inflammatory pathways raising the possibility that inflammation can be a consequence of seizures and epileptogenic processes. With this targeted review we plan to discuss the evidence pro and against the following key questions. Does activation of inflammatory pathways in the brain cause epilepsy in WS and does it contribute to the associated comorbidities and progression? Can activation of certain inflammatory pathways be a compensatory or protective event? Are there interactions between inflammation and the neuroendocrine system that contribute to the pathogenesis of West syndrome? Does activation of brain inflammatory signaling pathways contribute to the transition of WS to Lennox-Gastaut syndrome? Are there any lead candidates or unexplored targets for future therapy development for WS targeting inflammation? PMID:28427564

  19. Structural and surface functionality changes in reticulated vitreous carbon produced from poly(furfuryl alcohol) with sodium hydroxide additions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oishi, Silvia Sizuka, E-mail: silviaoishi@uol.com.br [LAS, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Av. dos Astronautas 1758, São José dos Campos, SP 12227-010 (Brazil); Botelho, Edson Cocchieri [Departamento de Materiais e Tecnologia, Univ Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Av. Doutor Ariberto Pereira da Cunha 333, Guaratinguetá, SP 12516-410 (Brazil); Rezende, Mirabel Cerqueira [Instituto de Ciência e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), Rua Talim 330, São José dos Campos, SP 12231-280 (Brazil); Ferreira, Neidenêi Gomes [LAS, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Av. dos Astronautas 1758, São José dos Campos, SP 12227-010 (Brazil)

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • Reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) was processed from poly(furfuryl alcohol) with different amounts of NaOH. • A correlation between microstructure and surface functionalities was proposed. • The structural ordering was mainly influenced by the cured PFA polymerization degree and carboxylic acid content on RVC surface. - Abstract: The use of sodium hydroxide to neutralize the acid catalyst increases the storage life of poly(furfuryl alcohol) (PFA) resin avoiding its continuous polymerization. In this work, a concentrated sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH) was added directly to the PFA resin in order to minimize the production of wastes generated when PFA is washed with diluted basic solution. Thus, different amounts of this concentrated basic solution were added to the resin up to reaching pH values of around 3, 5, 7, and 9. From these four types of modified PFA two sample sets of reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) were processed and heat treated at two different temperatures (1000 and 1700 °C). A correlation among cross-link density of PFA and RVC morphology, structural ordering and surface functionalities was systematically studied using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques. The PFA neutralization (pH 7) led to its higher polymerization degree, promoting a crystallinity decrease on RVC treated at 1000 °C as well as its highest percentages of carboxylic groups on surface. A NaOH excess (pH 9) substantially increased the RVC oxygen content, but its crystallinity remained similar to those for samples from pH 3 and 5 treated at 1000 °C, probably due to the reduced presence of carboxylic group and the lower polymerization degree of its cured resin. Samples with pH 3 and 5 heat treated at 1000 and 1700 °C can be considered the most ordered which indicated that small quantities of NaOH may be advantageous to minimize continuous

  20. Crystals, inflammation, and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Ann K

    2011-03-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) and basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals are common components of osteoarthritic joint fluids and tissues. Why these crystals form and how they contribute to joint damage in osteoarthritis remain unclear. With renewed interest in inflammation as a key component of osteoarthritis the role of calcium-containing crystals in this common disease warrants re-examination. There is ample evidence supporting a pathogenic role for inflammation in osteoarthritis, and the innate immune system likely participates in this inflammatory process. Recent work reinforces the almost universal existence of calcium-containing crystals in tissues from patients with end-stage osteoarthritis. Calcium-containing crystals may contribute to inflammation in osteoarthritis tissues through their direct interactions with components of the innate immune system, as well as by inducing or amplifying other inflammatory signals. There is increasing evidence that calcium-containing crystals contribute to osteoarthritis and their inflammatory properties may mediate detrimental effects through innate immunity signals. Calcium-containing crystals may thus represent important therapeutic targets in osteoarthritis.

  1. Biochemical properties of L-arabinose isomerase from Clostridium hylemonae to produce D-tagatose as a functional sweetener.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tien-Kieu; Hong, Moon-Gi; Chang, Pahn-Shick; Lee, Byung-Hoo; Yoo, Sang-Ho

    2018-01-01

    d-Tagatose has gained substantial interest due to its potential functionalities as a sucrose substitute. In this study, the gene araA, encoding l-arabinose isomerase (l-AI) from Clostridium hylemonae (DSM 15053), was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). This gene consists of 1,506 nucleotides and encodes a protein of 501 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 56,554 Da. Since l-AI was expressed as an intracellular inclusion body, this enzyme was solubilized with guanidine hydrochloride, refolded, and activated with a descending concentration gradient of urea. The purified enzyme exhibited the greatest activity at 50°C, pH 7-7.5, and required 1 mM of Mg2+ as a cofactor. Notably, the catalytic efficiency (3.69 mM-1sec-1) of l-AI from C. hylemonae on galactose was significantly greater than that of other previously reported enzymes. The bioconversion yield of d-tagatose using the C. hylemonae l-arabinose isomerase at 60°C reached approximately 46% from 10 mM of d-galactose after 2 h. From these results, it is suggested that the l-arabinose isomerase from C. hylemonae could be utilized as a potential enzyme for d-tagatose production due to its high conversion yield at an industrially competitive temperature.

  2. Sulforaphane Protects against High Cholesterol-Induced Mitochondrial Bioenergetics Impairments, Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress and Preserves Pancreaticβ-Cells Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Pozo, Catalina; Tan, Kah Ni; Gotteland, Martin; Borges, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Cholesterol plays an important role in inducing pancreatic β -cell dysfunction, leading to an impaired insulin secretory response to glucose. This study aimed to determine the protective effects of sulforaphane, a natural isothiocyanate Nrf2-inducer, against cholesterol-induced pancreatic β -cells dysfunction, through molecular and cellular mechanisms involving mitochondrial bioenergetics. Sulforaphane prevented cholesterol-induced alterations in the coupling efficiency of mitochondrial respiration, improving ATP turnover and spare capacity, and averted the impairment of the electron flow at complexes I, II, and IV. Sulforaphane also attenuated the cholesterol-induced activation of the NF κ B pathway, normalizing the expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, it also inhibited the decrease in sirtuin 1 expression and greatly increased Pgc-1α expression in Min6 cells. Sulforaphane increased the expression of antioxidant enzymes downstream of the Nrf2 pathway and prevented lipid peroxidation induced by cholesterol. The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of sulforaphane and its ability to protect and improve mitochondrial bioenergetic function contribute to its protective action against cholesterol-induced pancreatic β -cell dysfunction. Our data provide a scientifically tested foundation upon which sulforaphane can be developed as nutraceutical to preserve β -cell function and eventually control hyperglycemia.

  3. Sulforaphane Protects against High Cholesterol-Induced Mitochondrial Bioenergetics Impairments, Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress and Preserves Pancreatic β-Cells Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Carrasco-Pozo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol plays an important role in inducing pancreatic β-cell dysfunction, leading to an impaired insulin secretory response to glucose. This study aimed to determine the protective effects of sulforaphane, a natural isothiocyanate Nrf2-inducer, against cholesterol-induced pancreatic β-cells dysfunction, through molecular and cellular mechanisms involving mitochondrial bioenergetics. Sulforaphane prevented cholesterol-induced alterations in the coupling efficiency of mitochondrial respiration, improving ATP turnover and spare capacity, and averted the impairment of the electron flow at complexes I, II, and IV. Sulforaphane also attenuated the cholesterol-induced activation of the NFκB pathway, normalizing the expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, it also inhibited the decrease in sirtuin 1 expression and greatly increased Pgc-1α expression in Min6 cells. Sulforaphane increased the expression of antioxidant enzymes downstream of the Nrf2 pathway and prevented lipid peroxidation induced by cholesterol. The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of sulforaphane and its ability to protect and improve mitochondrial bioenergetic function contribute to its protective action against cholesterol-induced pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. Our data provide a scientifically tested foundation upon which sulforaphane can be developed as nutraceutical to preserve β-cell function and eventually control hyperglycemia.

  4. Immunosuppression after Sepsis: Systemic Inflammation and Sepsis Induce a Loss of Naïve T-Cells but No Enduring Cell-Autonomous Defects in T-Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markwart, Robby; Condotta, Stephanie A.; Requardt, Robert P.; Borken, Farina; Schubert, Katja; Weigel, Cynthia; Bauer, Michael; Griffith, Thomas S.; Förster, Martin; Brunkhorst, Frank M.; Badovinac, Vladimir P.; Rubio, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis describes the life-threatening systemic inflammatory response (SIRS) of an organism to an infection and is the leading cause of mortality on intensive care units (ICU) worldwide. An acute episode of sepsis is characterized by the extensive release of cytokines and other mediators resulting in a dysregulated immune response leading to organ damage and/or death. This initial pro-inflammatory burst often transits into a state of immune suppression characterised by loss of immune cells and T-cell dysfunction at later disease stages in sepsis survivors. However, despite these appreciations, the precise nature of the evoked defect in T-cell immunity in post-acute phases of SIRS remains unknown. Here we present an in-depth functional analysis of T-cell function in post-acute SIRS/sepsis. We document that T-cell function is not compromised on a per cell basis in experimental rodent models of infection-free SIRS (LPS or CpG) or septic peritonitis. Transgenic antigen-specific T-cells feature an unaltered cytokine response if challenged in vivo and ex vivo with cognate antigens. Isolated CD4+/CD8+ T-cells from post-acute septic animals do not exhibit defects in T-cell receptor-mediated activation at the the level of receptor-proximal signalling, activation marker upregulation or expansion. However, SIRS/sepsis induced transient lymphopenia and gave rise to an environment of immune attenuation at post acute disease stages. Thus, systemic inflammation has an acute impact on T-cell numbers and adaptive immunity, but does not cause major cell-autonomous enduring functional defects in T-cells. PMID:25541945

  5. Lactobacillus rhamnosus NCDC17 ameliorates type-2 diabetes by improving gut function, oxidative stress and inflammation in high-fat-diet fed and streptozotocintreated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S; Sharma, R K; Malhotra, S; Pothuraju, R; Shandilya, U K

    2017-04-26

    Restoration of dysbiosed gut microbiota through probiotic may have profound effect on type 2 diabetes. In the present study, rats were fed high fat diet (HFD) for 3 weeks and injected with low dose streptozotocin to induce type 2 diabetes. Diabetic rats were then fed Lactobacillus rhamnosus NCDC 17 and L. rhamnosus GG with HFD for six weeks. L. rhamnosus NCDC 17 improved oral glucose tolerance test, biochemical parameters (fasting blood glucose, plasma insulin, glycosylated haemoglobin, free fatty acids, triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol), oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive substance and activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase in blood and liver), bifidobacteria and lactobacilli in cecum, expression of glucagon like peptide-1 producing genes in cecum, and adiponection in epididymal fat, while decreased propionate proportions (%) in caecum, and expression of tumour necrosis factor-α and interlukin-6 in epididymal fat of diabetic rats as compared to diabetes control group. These findings offered a base for the use of L. rhamnosus NCDC 17 for the improvement and early treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  6. Dietary phenethylisothiocyanate attenuates bowel inflammation in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premkumar VummidiGiridhar

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phenethylisothiocyanate (PEITC is produced by Brassica food plants. PEO is a PEITC Essential Oil containing >95% natural PEITC. PEITC is known to produce various health benefits but its effect in alleviation of ulcerative colitis signs is unknown. Results In two efficacy studies (acute and chronic oral administration of PEO was effective at remitting acute and chronic signs of ulcerative colitis (UC in mice. Disease activity, histology and biochemical characteristics were measured in the treated animals and were compared with appropriate controls. PEO treatment significantly improved body weights and stool consistency as well as decreased intestinal bleeding. PEO treatment also reduced mucosal inflammation, depletion of goblet cells and infiltration of inflammatory cells. Attenuation of proinflammatory interleukin1β production was observed in the colons of PEO-treated animals. Expression analyses were also carried out for immune function related genes, transcription factors and cytokines in lipopolysaccharide-activated mouse macrophage cells. PEO likely affects an intricate network of immune signaling genes including a novel concentration dependent reduction of total cellular Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1 (STAT1 as well as nuclear phosphorylated-STAT1 (activated form of STAT1. A PEO-concentration dependent decrease of mRNA of C-X-C motif ligand 10 (a STAT1 responsive chemokine and Interleukin 6 were also observed. Conclusions PEO might be a promising candidate to develop as a treatment for ulcerative colitis patients. The disease attenuation by PEO is likely associated with suppression of activation of STAT1 transcription and inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  7. Structural and surface functionality changes in reticulated vitreous carbon produced from poly(furfuryl alcohol) with sodium hydroxide additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Silvia Sizuka; Botelho, Edson Cocchieri; Rezende, Mirabel Cerqueira; Ferreira, Neidenêi Gomes

    2017-02-01

    The use of sodium hydroxide to neutralize the acid catalyst increases the storage life of poly(furfuryl alcohol) (PFA) resin avoiding its continuous polymerization. In this work, a concentrated sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH) was added directly to the PFA resin in order to minimize the production of wastes generated when PFA is washed with diluted basic solution. Thus, different amounts of this concentrated basic solution were added to the resin up to reaching pH values of around 3, 5, 7, and 9. From these four types of modified PFA two sample sets of reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) were processed and heat treated at two different temperatures (1000 and 1700 °C). A correlation among cross-link density of PFA and RVC morphology, structural ordering and surface functionalities was systematically studied using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques. The PFA neutralization (pH 7) led to its higher polymerization degree, promoting a crystallinity decrease on RVC treated at 1000 °C as well as its highest percentages of carboxylic groups on surface. A NaOH excess (pH 9) substantially increased the RVC oxygen content, but its crystallinity remained similar to those for samples from pH 3 and 5 treated at 1000 °C, probably due to the reduced presence of carboxylic group and the lower polymerization degree of its cured resin. Samples with pH 3 and 5 heat treated at 1000 and 1700 °C can be considered the most ordered which indicated that small quantities of NaOH may be advantageous to minimize continuous polymerization of PFA resin increasing its storage life and improving RVC microstructure.

  8. SGLT2-inhibitor and DPP-4 inhibitor improve brain function via attenuating mitochondrial dysfunction, insulin resistance, inflammation, and apoptosis in HFD-induced obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa-Nguanmoo, Piangkwan; Tanajak, Pongpan; Kerdphoo, Sasiwan; Jaiwongkam, Thidarat; Pratchayasakul, Wasana; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2017-10-15

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor (vildagliptin) has been shown to exert beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity and neuroprotection in obese-insulin resistance. Recent studies demonstrated the neuroprotection of the sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor (dapagliflozin) in diabetes. However, the comparative effects of both drugs and a combination of two drugs on metabolic dysfunction and brain dysfunction impaired by the obese-insulin resistance have never been investigated. Forty male Wistar rats were divided into two groups, and received either a normal-diet (ND, n=8) or a high-fat diet (HFD, n=32) for 16weeks. At week 13, the HFD-fed rats were divided into four subgroups (n=8/subgroup) to receive either a vehicle, vildagliptin (3mg/kg/day) dapagliflozin (1mg/kg/day) or combined drugs for four weeks. ND rats were given a vehicle for four weeks. Metabolic parameters and brain function were investigated. The results demonstrated that HFD rats developed obese-insulin resistance and cognitive decline. Dapagliflozin had greater efficacy on improved peripheral insulin sensitivity and reduced weight gain than vildagliptin. Single therapy resulted in equally improved brain mitochondrial function, insulin signaling, apoptosis and prevented cognitive decline. However, only dapagliflozin improved hippocampal synaptic plasticity. A combination of the drugs had greater efficacy in improving brain insulin sensitivity and reducing brain oxidative stress than the single drug therapy. These findings suggested that dapagliflozin and vildagliptin equally prevented cognitive decline in the obese-insulin resistance, possibly through some similar mechanisms. Dapagliflozin had greater efficacy than vildagliptin for preserving synaptic plasticity, thus combined drugs could be the best therapeutic approach for neuroprotection in the obese-insulin resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Development and application of a functional CE-SSCP fingerprinting method based on [Fe-Fe]-hydrogenase genes for monitoring hydrogen-producing Clostridium in mixed cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quemeneur, Marianne; Hamelin, Jerome; Latrille, Eric; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Trably, Eric [INRA, UR050, Laboratoire de Biotechnologie de l' Environnement, avenue des Etangs, Narbonne F-11100 (France)

    2010-12-15

    A Capillary Electrophoresis Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (CE-SSCP) method based on functional [Fe-Fe]-hydrogenase genes was developed for monitoring the hydrogen (H{sub 2})-producing clostridial population in mixed-culture bioprocesses. New non-degenerated primers were designed and then validated on their specific PCR detection of a broad range of clostridial hydA genes. The hydA-based CE-SSCP method gave a specific and discriminating profile for each of the Clostridium strains tested. This method was validated using H{sub 2}-producing mixed cultures incubated at temperatures ranging from 25 C to 45 C. The hydA CE-SSCP profiles clearly differed between temperatures tested. Hence, they varied according to variations of the H{sub 2} production performances. The HydA sequences amplified with the new primer set indicated that diverse Clostridium strains impacted the H{sub 2} production yields. The highest performances were related to the dominance of Clostridium sporogenes-like hydA sequences. This CE-SSCP tool offers highly reliable and throughput analysis of the functional diversity and structure of the hydA genes for better understanding of the H{sub 2}-producing clostridial population dynamics in H{sub 2} dark fermentation bioreactors. (author)

  10. Molecular and functional assessment of multicellular cancer spheroids produced in double emulsions enabled by efficient airway resistance based selective surface treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao; Leth Jepsen, Morten; Ivarsen, Anne Kathrine R.; Knudsen, Birgitta R.; Ho, Yi-Ping

    2017-09-01

    Multicellular spheroids have garnered significant attention as an in vitro three-dimensional cancer model which can mimick the in vivo microenvironmental features. While microfluidics generated double emulsions have become a potential method to generate spheroids, challenges remain on the tedious procedures. Enabled by a novel ‘airway resistance’ based selective surface treatment, this study presents an easy and facile generation of double emulsions for the initiation and cultivation of multicellular spheroids in a scaffold-free format. Combining with our previously developed DNA nanosensors, intestinal spheroids produced in the double emulsions have shown an elevated activities of an essential DNA modifying enzyme, the topoisomerase I. The observed molecular and functional characteristics of spheroids produced in double emulsions are similar to the counterparts produced by the commercially available ultra-low attachment plates. However, the double emulsions excel for their improved uniformity, and the consistency of the results obtained by subsequent analysis of the spheroids. The presented technique is expected to ease the burden of producing spheroids and to promote the spheroids model for cancer or stem cell study.

  11. Inflammation in Achromobacter xylosoxidans infected cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C. R.; Pressler, T.; Nielsen, K. G.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Achromobacter xylosoxidans infection may cause conspicuous chronic pulmonary inflammation in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients similar to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc). Evolution in lung function was compared in chronically infected patients. Cytokine...

  12. Ferulic Acid Induces Th1 Responses by Modulating the Function of Dendritic Cells and Ameliorates Th2-Mediated Allergic Airway Inflammation in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Chen Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the immunomodulatory effects of ferulic acid (FA on antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs in vitro and its antiallergic effects against ovalbumin- (OVA- induced Th2-mediated allergic asthma in mice. The activation of FA-treated bone marrow-derived DCs by lipopolysaccharide (LPS stimulation induced a high level of interleukin- (IL- 12 but reduced the expression levels of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF- α. Compared to control-treated DCs, FA significantly enhanced the expressions of Notch ligand Delta-like 4 (Dll4, MHC class II, and CD40 molecules by these DCs. Furthermore, these FA-treated DCs enhanced T-cell proliferation and Th1 cell polarization. In animal experiments, oral administration of FA reduced the levels of OVA-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE and IgG1 and enhanced IgG2a antibody production in serum. It also ameliorated airway hyperresponsiveness and attenuated eosinophilic pulmonary infiltration in dose-dependent manners. In addition, FA treatment inhibited the production of eotaxin, Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, and proinflammatory cytokines but promoted the Th1 cytokine interferon- (IFN- γ production in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and the culture supernatant of spleen cells. These findings suggest that FA exhibits an antiallergic effect via restoring Th1/Th2 imbalance by modulating DCs function in an asthmatic mouse model.

  13. New insights on the role of ceramide 1-phosphate in inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio; Gangoiti, Patricia; Arana, Lide; Ouro, Alberto; Rivera, Io-Guané; Ordoñez, Marta; Trueba, Miguel

    2013-06-01

    Inflammation is a complex biological process involving a variety of locally produced molecules, as well as different types of white blood cells. Some of the so-called inflammatory mediators include cytokines, chemokines, interleukins, prostaglandins, or bioactive lipids, all of which provide protection from infection and foreign substances, such as bacteria, yeast, viruses or some chemicals. Under some circumstances, however, the organism inappropriately activates the immune system triggering an inflammatory response in the absence of foreign insults thereby leading to the establishment of autoimmune diseases. Therefore, inflammation must be tightly regulated in order to ensure sufficient protection to the organism in the absence of unwanted, and at times dangerous, side effects. Increasing experimental evidence implicates sphingolipids as major inducers of inflammatory responses and regulators of immune cell functions. In particular, ceramides and sphingosine 1-phosphate have been extensively implicated in inflammation, and ceramide 1-phosphate has also been shown to participate in these processes. The present review highlights novel aspects on the regulation of inflammation by sphingolipids, with special emphasis to the role played by ceramide 1-phosphate and ceramide kinase, the enzyme responsible for its biosynthesis, in inflammatory responses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Infection, inflammation and exercise in cystic fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Regular exercise is positively associated with health. It has also been suggested to exert anti-inflammatory effects. In healthy subjects, a single exercise session results in immune cell activation, which is characterized by production of immune modulatory peptides (e.g. IL-6, IL-8), a leukocytosis and enhanced immune cell functions. Upon cessation of exercise, immune activation is followed by a tolerizing phase, characterized by a reduced responsiveness of immune cells. Regular exercise of moderate intensity and duration has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects and is associated with a reduced disease incidence and viral infection susceptibility. Specific exercise programs may therefore be used to modify the course of chronic inflammatory and infectious diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Patients with CF suffer from severe and chronic pulmonary infections and inflammation, leading to obstructive and restrictive pulmonary disease, exercise intolerance and muscle cachexia. Inflammation is characterized by a hyper-inflammatory phenotype. Patients are encouraged to engage in exercise programs to maintain physical fitness, quality of life, pulmonary function and health. In this review, we present an overview of available literature describing the association between regular exercise, inflammation and infection susceptibility and discuss the implications of these observations for prevention and treatment of inflammation and infection susceptibility in patients with CF. PMID:23497303

  15. Airway inflammation in mild cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckrich, Jonas; Zissler, Ulrich M; Serve, Friederike; Leutz, Patricia; Smaczny, Christina; Schmitt-Grohé, Sabina; Fussbroich, Daniela; Schubert, Ralf; Zielen, Stefan; Eickmeier, Olaf

    2017-01-01

    Airway infection and inflammation play major roles in the progression of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. In patients with mild disease, airway inflammation is a clinically relevant and often underdiagnosed feature. Lung function, sputum cell counts, and cytokine profiles in CF with mild disease might be different in patients with and without involvement of small airway disease (SAD). Patients with mild CF (n=32) and 22 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Patients with CF were assigned to two groups: (1) patients without SAD (n=19, median age 12.3years, MEF 25 >50% predicted), and (2) patients with SAD (n=13 median age, 13.2years, MEF 25 inflammation compared to controls as indicated by elevated levels of sputum biomarkers like total cells, neutrophils, and IL6. Our study demonstrated that patients with CF with mild disease defined by lung function might be further endotyped according to their involvement of SAD. In patients with CF and SAD, airway neutrophilic inflammation is more pronounced and is in part distinct from that seen in patients without SAD. Copyright © 2016 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Role of Smooth Muscle in Intestinal Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M Collins

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The notion that smooth muscle function is altered in inflammation is prompted by clinical observations of altered motility in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. While altered motility may reflect inflammation-induced changes in intrinsic or extrinsic nerves to the gut, changes in gut hormone release and changes in muscle function, recent studies have provided in vitro evidence of altered muscle contractility in muscle resected from patients with ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease. In addition, the observation that smooth muscle cells are more numerous and prominent in the strictured bowel of IBD patients compared with controls suggests that inflammation may alter the growth of intestinal smooth muscle. Thus, inflammation is associated with changes in smooth muscle growth and contractility that, in turn, contribute to important symptoms of IBD including diarrhea (from altered motility and pain (via either altered motility or stricture formation. The involvement of smooth muscle in this context may be as an innocent bystander, where cells and products of the inflammatory process induce alterations in muscle contractility and growth. However, it is likely that intestinal muscle cells play a more active role in the inflammatory process via the elaboration of mediators and trophic factors, including cytokines, and via the production of collagen. The concept of muscle cells as active participants in the intestinal inflammatory process is a new concept that is under intense study. This report summarizes current knowledge as it relates to these two aspects of altered muscle function (growth and contractility in the inflamed intestine, and will focus on mechanisms underlying these changes, based on data obtained from animal models of intestinal inflammation.

  17. Effects of short-term manipulation of serum FFA concentrations on left ventricular energy metabolism and function in patients with heart failure: no association with circulating bio-markers of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, A; Fragasso, G; Esposito, A; Canu, T; Lattuada, G; Manzoni, G; Del Maschio, A; Margonato, A; De Cobelli, F; Perseghin, G

    2015-08-01

    We wanted to assess the effects of short-term changes in serum free fatty acids (FFAs) on left ventricular (LV) energy metabolism and function in patients with heart failure and whether they correlated with circulating markers of inflammation. LV function and phosphocreatine (PCr)/ATP ratio were assessed using MR imaging (MRI) and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in 11 men with chronic heart failure in two experimental conditions 7 days apart. Study 1: MRI and 31P-MRS were performed before and 3-4 h after i.v. bolus + continuous heparin infusion titrated to achieve a serum FFA concentration of 1.20 mM. Study 2: The same protocol was performed before and after the oral administration of acipimox titrated to achieve a serum FFA concentration of 0.20 mM. Serum concentrations of IL6, TNF-α, PAI-1, resistin, visfatin and leptin were simultaneously assessed. Serum glucose and insulin concentrations were not different between studies. The PCr/ATP ratio (percent change from baseline: +6.0 ± 16.9 and -16.6 ± 16.1 % in Study 1 and Study 2, respectively; p = 0.005) and the LV ejection fraction (-1.5 ± 4.0 and -6.9 ± 6.3 % in Study 1 and Study 2, respectively; p = 0.044) were reduced during low FFA when compared to high FFA. Serum resistin was higher during Study 1 than in Study 2 (p < 0.05 repeated measures ANOVA); meanwhile, the other adipocytokines were not different. FFA deprivation, but not excess, impaired LV energy metabolism and function within hours. Cautions should be used when sudden iatrogenic modulation of energy substrates may take place in vulnerable patients.

  18. The concentration of iron in real-world geogenic PM₁₀ is associated with increased inflammation and deficits in lung function in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme R Zosky

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are many communities around the world that are exposed to high levels of particulate matter <10 µm (PM₁₀ of geogenic (earth derived origin. Mineral dusts in the occupational setting are associated with poor lung health, however very little is known about the impact of heterogeneous community derived particles. We have preliminary evidence to suggest that the concentration of iron (Fe may be associated with the lung inflammatory response to geogenic PM₁₀. We aimed to determine which physico-chemical characteristics of community sampled geogenic PM₁₀ are associated with adverse lung responses. METHODS: We collected geogenic PM₁₀ from four towns in the arid regions of Western Australia. Adult female BALB/c mice were exposed to 100 µg of particles and assessed for inflammatory and lung function responses 6 hours, 24 hours and 7 days post-exposure. We assessed the physico-chemical characteristics of the particles and correlated these with lung outcomes in the mice using principal components analysis and multivariate linear regression. RESULTS: Geogenic particles induced an acute inflammatory response that peaked 6 hours post-exposure and a deficit in lung mechanics 7 days post-exposure. This deficit in lung mechanics was positively associated with the concentration of Fe and particle size variability and inversely associated with the concentration of Si. CONCLUSIONS: The lung response to geogenic PM₁₀ is complex and highly dependent on the physico-chemical characteristics of the particles. In particular, the concentration of Fe in the particles may be a key indicator of the potential population health consequences for inhaling geogenic PM₁₀.

  19. SERUM MARKERS OF INFLAMMATION AND ENDOTHELIAL FUNCTION ARE ELEVATED BY HORMONAL CONTRACEPTIVE USE BUT NOT BY EXERCISE-ASSOCIATED MENSTRUAL DISORDERS IN PHYSICALLY ACTIVE YOUNG WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela S. Hinton

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of exercise-associated menstrual disorders and hormonal contraceptives (HC on systemic inflammatory markers and endothelial function in female athletes. Thirty-nine active women (>5 h of aerobic exercise per wk, aged 18-33 y, participated in this cross-sectional study comparing women with menstrual disorders (MD, n = 10; 0-9 cycles·y-1, eumenorrheic women (E, n = 13; 10-13 cycles·y-1, and HC users (HC, n = 16; 12 cycles·y-1. Fasting serum samples were collected during the early follicular phase (d2-5 for the menstruating women. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα, interleukin-6 (IL-6, C-reactive protein (CRP, soluble vascular adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1, total cholesterol (TC, high- and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C, LDL-C, triglycerides (TG, reproductive hormones, and cortisol were measured in serum. Estradiol, progesterone, and cortisol were not statistically different between MD and E groups; cortisol was significantly greater in the HC versus E group (p = 0.002. TC (p = 0.005, LDL-C (p = 0.03, and CRP (p = 0.05 were increased in the HC versus MD and E groups. TNF-α was significantly higher in the HC (p=0.001 compared with the E group. There were no significant group differences in the concentrations of sVCAM-1 or IL-6. TNF-α and cortisol were positively correlated (r=0.31, p = 0. 058, as were sVCAM-1 and estradiol (r = 0.41, p = 0.010. In conclusion, HC use, but not exercise- associated menstrual disorders, is associated with increased TNFα and LDL-C

  20. Gum Acacia Improves Renal Function and Ameliorates Systemic Inflammation, Oxidative and Nitrosative Stress in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes in Rats with Adenine-Induced Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Al Za’abi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The effect of treatment with gum acacia (GA, a prebiotic shown previously to ameliorate chronic kidney disease (CKD, in diabetic and non – diabetic rats with adenine – induced CKD has been investigated using several conventional and novel physiological, biochemical, and histopathological parameters. Methods: Diabetes mellitus was induced in rats by a single injection of streptozotocin (STZ. Diabetic and non – diabetic rats were randomly divided into several groups, and given either normal food or food mixed with adenine (0.25% w/w, for five weeks to induce CKD. Some of these groups were also concomitantly treated orally with GA in the drinking water (15% w/w. Results: Rats fed adenine alone exhibited physiological (decreased body weight, increased food and water intake and urine output, biochemical (increase in urinary albumin/creatinine ratio, plasma urea and, creatinine, indoxyl sulfate and phosphorus, inflammatory biomarkers (increased in neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, transforming growth factor beta -1, tumor necrosis factor alpha, adiponectin, cystatin C and interleukin-1β, oxidative biomarkers (8-isoprostane, 8 -hydroxy -2-deoxy guanosine, nitrosative stress biomarkers (nitrite and nitrate and histopathological (increase in tubular necrosis and fibrosis signs of CKD. STZ - induced diabetes alone worsened most of the renal function tests measured. Administration of adenine in STZ – diabetic rats further worsened the renal damage induced by adenine alone. GA significantly ameliorated the renal actions of adenine and STZ, given either singly or in combination, especially with regards to the histopathological damage. Conclusion: GA is a useful dietary agent in attenuating the progression of CKD in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

  1. Effects of underwater ultrasound therapy on pain, inflammation, hand function and quality of life in patients with rheumatoid arthritis - a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Király, Márta; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Szanyó, Ferenc; Kiss, Rita; Hodosi, Katalin; Bender, Tamás

    To investigate the effects of underwater ultrasound (US) therapy in 48 patients with moderately active rheumatoid arthritis (disease activity score in 28 joints [DAS28]>3.2 andtherapy to both wrists and hands for 7min per session with an intensity of 0.7W/cm 2 for 10 sessions. The control group (n=23) received sham treatment under the same conditions. At baseline, at the end of treatment (end of Week 2) and at the follow-up visit (Week 14), the following outcomes were evaluated: disease activity (erythrocyte sedimentation rate [ESR], C-reactive protein [CRP], tender and swollen joint counts, pain on a visual analog scale, DAS28, hand function (fist making, wrist extension and flexion, hand grip strength) and quality of life (Health Assessment Questionnaire [HAQ]). A significant decrease in C-reactive protein at the end of Week 2 and Week 14 compared to control group (mean between-group difference at 2 weeks=-5.77, 95% CI=-10.86 to -0.68, mean between-group difference at 14 weeks=-5.07, 95% CI=-10.13 to -0.01), and non-significant decrease in DAS28 was observed. By the end of treatments at the end of week 2, ultrasound alleviated pain significantly (mean between-group difference at two weeks=-8.35 95% CI=-16.12 to -0.58), as well as improved left wrist extension compared to the control group (mean between-group difference at 14 weeks=4.35, 95% CI=1.09-7.60). Underwater ultrasound therapy was better than sham treatment at the end of 2 weeks of treatment, but not at long term (14 weeks) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. NCT02706028 (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02706028). Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Inflammation, thrombosis, and atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Maat, M.P.M.; Bladbjerg, E.M.; Drivsholm, T.

    2003-01-01

    of inflammatory and hemostatic markers and the severity of atherosclerosis is not yet well studied. We have evaluated 325 men and 370 women of 60 years, participating in the Danish Glostrup study. We diagnosed atherosclerosis by ultrasonographic measurement of intima-media thickness (IMT) of the right carotid...... CRP and the other hemostatic variables and the number of plaques. Genetic variation in the t-PA and MTHFR gene was associated with IMT. In conclusion, in the Glostrup population study, thrombosis and inflammation are associated with the severity of atherosclerosis, as reflected by IMT and plaque...

  3. Podoplanin is a negative regulator of Th17 inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylander, Alyssa N; Ponath, Gerald D; Axisa, Pierre-Paul; Mubarak, Mayyan; Tomayko, Mary; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Pitt, David; Hafler, David A

    2017-09-07

    Recent data indicate that there are different subpopulations of Th17 cells that can express a regulatory as opposed to an inflammatory gene signature. The transmembrane glycoprotein PDPN is critical in the development of multiple organs including the lymphatic system and has been described on T cells in mouse models of autoimmune Th17 inflammation. Here, we demonstrate that unlike in mice, PDPN+ T cells induced under classic Th17-polarizing conditions express transcription factors associated with Th17 cells but do not produce IL-17. Moreover, these cells express a transcriptional profile enriched for immunosuppressive and regulatory pathways and express a distinct cytokine profile compared with potentially pathogenic PDPN- Th17 cells. Ligation of PDPN by its ligand CLEC-2 ameliorates the Th17 inflammatory response. IL-17 secretion is restored with shRNA gene silencing of PDPN. Furthermore, PDPN expression is reduced via an Sgk1-mediated pathway under proinflammatory, high sodium chloride conditions. Finally, CD3+PDPN+ T cells are devoid of IL-17 in skin biopsies from patients with candidiasis, a prototypical Th17-driven skin disease. Thus, our data support the hypothesis that PDPN may serve as a marker of a nonpathogenic Th17 cell subset and may also functionally regulate pathogenic Th17 inflammation.

  4. Elevated numbers of SCART1+ gammadelta T cells in skin inflammation and inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Dorte Rosenbek; Holm, Dorte; Schlosser, Anders

    2010-01-01

    models of human diseases: skin inflammation and inflammatory bowel disease. In the skin inflammation model, an 8.6-fold increase in SCART1(+) cells was observed. Finally, recombinant SCART1 protein was found not to bind to selected bacterial or fungal components or to whole bacteria. Our results show......The members of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) superfamily group B have diverse functions, including roles in the immune system. For years it has been known that the WC1 protein is expressed on the surface of bovine gammadelta T cells, and more recent studies indicate that WC1......(+) gammadelta T cells respond to stimulation with bacterial antigens by producing interferon-gamma. The SRCR proteins CD5, CD6, Sp alpha, CD163, and DMBT1/gp-340 are also involved in the immune response, since they are pattern recognition receptors capable of binding directly to bacterial and/or fungal...

  5. Innate Immunity and Inflammation Post-Stroke: An α7-Nicotinic Agonist Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Neumann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and long-term disability, with limited treatment options available. Inflammation contributes to damage tissue in the central nervous system across a broad range of neuropathologies, including Alzheimer’s disease, pain, Schizophrenia, and stroke. While the immune system plays an important role in contributing to brain damage produced by ischemia, the damaged brain, in turn, can exert a powerful immune-suppressive effect that promotes infections and threatens the survival of stroke patients. Recently the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, in particular its modulation using α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR ligands, has shown potential as a strategy to dampen the inflammatory response and facilitate functional recovery in stroke patients. Here we discuss the current literature on stroke-induced inflammation and the effects of α7-nAChR modulators on innate immune cells.

  6. B Cell-Activating Factor Regulates Different Aspects of B Cell Functionality and Is Produced by a Subset of Splenic B Cells in Teleost Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafalla, Carolina; González, Lucia; Castro, Rosario; Granja, Aitor G.

    2017-01-01

    In mammals, B cell functionality is greatly influenced by cytokines released by innate cells, such as macrophages or dendritic cells, upon the early recognition of common pathogen patterns through invariant receptors. B cell-activating factor (BAFF) is one of these innate B cell-helper signals and plays a key role in the survival and differentiation of B cells. Although, evolutionarily, teleost fish constitute the first animal group in which adaptive immunity based on Ig receptors is present, fish still rely greatly on innate responses. In this context, we hypothesized that BAFF would play a key role in the control of B cell responses in fish. Supporting this, our results show that teleost BAFF recapitulates mammalian BAFF stimulating actions on B cells, upregulating the expression of membrane MHC II, improving the survival of fish naïve B cells and antibody-secreting cells, and increasing the secretion of IgM. Surprisingly, we also demonstrate that BAFF is not only produced in fish by myeloid cells but is also produced by a subset of splenic B cells. Thus, if this B cell-produced BAFF proves to be actively regulating this same B cell subset, our findings point to an ancient mechanism to control B cell differentiation and survival in lower vertebrates, which has been silenced in mammals in physiological conditions, but reemerges under pathological conditions, such as B cell lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. PMID:28360916

  7. Role of inflammation in the aging bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmagid, Samir M; Barbe, Mary F; Safadi, Fayez F

    2015-02-15

    Chronic inflammation in aging is characterized by increased inflammatory cytokines, bone loss, decreased adaptation, and defective tissue repair in response to injury. Aging leads to inherent changes in mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation, resulting in impaired osteoblastogenesis. Also, the pro-inflammatory cytokines increase with aging, leading to enhanced myelopoiesis and osteoclastogenesis. Bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) play pivotal roles in osteoblast differentiation, the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), and subsequent bone repair. However, during aging, little is known about the role of macrophages in the differentiation and function of MSC and HSC. Aged mammals have higher circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines than young adults, supporting the hypothesis of increased inflammation with aging. This review will aid in the understanding of the potential role(s) of pro-inflammatory (M1) and anti-inflammatory (M2) macrophages in differentiation and function of osteoblasts and osteoclasts in relation to aging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Inter-assemblage facilitation: the functional diversity of cavity-producing beetles drives the size diversity of cavity-nesting bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydenham, Markus A K; Häusler, Lise D; Moe, Stein R; Eldegard, Katrine

    2016-01-01

    Inter-specific interactions are important drivers and maintainers of biodiversity. Compared to trophic and competitive interactions, the role of non-trophic facilitation among species has received less attention. Cavity-nesting bees nest in old beetle borings in dead wood, with restricted diameters corresponding to the body size of the bee species. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the functional diversity of cavity-producing wood boring beetles - in terms of cavity diameters - drives the size diversity of cavity-nesting bees. The invertebrate communities were sampled in 30 sites, located in forested landscapes along an elevational gradient. We regressed the species richness and abundance of cavity nesting bees against the species richness and abundance of wood boring beetles, non-wood boring beetles and elevation. The proportion of cavity nesting bees in bee species assemblage was regressed against the species richness and abundance of wood boring beetles. We also tested the relationships between the size diversity of cavity nesting bees and wood boring beetles. The species richness and abundance of cavity nesting bees increased with the species richness and abundance of wood boring beetles. No such relationship was found for non-wood boring beetles. The abundance of wood boring beetles was also related to an increased proportion of cavity nesting bee individuals. Moreover, the size diversity of cavity-nesting bees increased with the functional diversity of wood boring beetles. Specifically, the mean and dispersion of bee body sizes increased with the functional dispersion of large wood boring beetles. The positive relationships between cavity producing bees and cavity nesting bees suggest that non-trophic facilitative interactions between species assemblages play important roles in organizing bee species assemblages. Considering a community-wide approach may therefore be required if we are to successfully understand and conserve wild bee

  9. Redox regulation in metabolic programming and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen R. Griffiths

    2017-08-01

    Resolution of inflammation is triggered by encounter with apoptotic membranes exposing oxidised phosphatidylserine that interact with the scavenger receptor, CD36. Downstream of CD36, activation of AMPK and PPARγ elicits mitochondrial biogenesis, arginase expression and a switch towards oxidative phosphorylation in the M2 macrophage. Proinflammatory cytokine production by M2 cells decreases, but anti-inflammatory and wound healing growth factor production is maintained to support restoration of normal function.

  10. Exercise, inflammation, and fatigue in cancer survivors

    OpenAIRE

    LaVoy, Emily C.P.; Fagundes, Christopher P.; Dantzer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-related fatigue significantly disrupts normal functioning and quality of life for a substantial portion of cancer survivors, and may persist for years following cancer treatment. While the causes of persistent fatigue among cancer survivors are not yet fully understood, accumulating evidence suggests that several pathways, including chronic inflammation, autonomic imbalance, HPA-axis dysfunction, and/or mitochondrial damage, could contribute towards the disruption of normal neuronal fu...

  11. PET imaging of inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscombe, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory diseases are common place and often chronic. Most inflammatory cells have increased uptake of glucose which is enhanced in the presence of local cytokines. Therefore, imaging glucose metabolism by the means of 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) holds significant promise in imaging focal inflammation. Most of the work published involved small series of patients with either vasculitis, sarcoid or rheumatoid arthritis. It would appear that FDG PET is a simple and effective technique to identify inflammatory tissue in these conditions. There is even some work to suggest that by comparing baseline and early post therapy scans clinical outcome can be predicted. This would appear to be true with vasculitis as well as retroperitoneal fibrosis. The number of patients in each study is small but the evidence is compelling enough to recommend FDG PET imaging in the routine care of these patients.

  12. Inflammation in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Johnny; Kern, Timothy S.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes causes a number of metabolic and physiologic abnormalities in the retina, but which of these abnormalities contribute to recognized features of diabetic retinopathy (DR) is less clear. Many of the molecular and physiologic abnormalities that have been found to develop in the retina in diabetes are consistent with inflammation. Moreover, a number of anti-inflammatory therapies have been found to significantly inhibit development of different aspects of DR in animal models. Herein, we review the inflammatory mediators and their relationship to early and late DR, and discuss the potential of anti-inflammatory approaches to inhibit development of different stages of the retinopathy. We focus primarily on information derived from in vivo studies, supplementing with information from in vitro studies were important. PMID:21635964

  13. Functional Properties of Porous Ti-48.0 at.% Ni Shape Memory Alloy Produced by Self-Propagating High-Temperature Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnina, Natalia; Belyaev, Sergey; Voronkov, Andrew

    2018-03-01

    The functional behavior of the porous shape memory alloy produced by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis from the Ti-48.0 at.% Ni powder mixture was studied. It was found that a large unelastic strain recovered on unloading and it was not attributed to the pseudoelasticity effect. A decrease in deformation temperatures did not influence the value of strain that recovered on unloading, while the effective modulus decreased from 1.9 to 1.44 GPa. It was found that the porous Ti-48.0 at.% Ni alloy revealed the one-way shape memory effect, where the maximum recoverable strain was 5%. The porous Ti-48.0 at.% Ni alloy demonstrated the transformation plasticity and the shape memory effects on cooling and heating under a stress. An increase in stress did not influence the shape memory effect value, which was equal to 1%. It was shown that the functional properties of the porous alloy were determined by the TiNi phase consisted of the two volumes Ti49.3Ni50.7 and Ti50Ni50 where the martensitic transformation occurred at different temperatures. The results of the study showed that the existence of the Ti49.3Ni50.7 volumes in the porous Ti-48.0 at.% Ni alloy improved the functional properties of the alloy.

  14. Zinc in Infection and Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammoh, Nour Zahi; Rink, Lothar

    2017-06-17

    Micronutrient homeostasis is a key factor in maintaining a healthy immune system. Zinc is an essential micronutrient that is involved in the regulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses. The main cause of zinc deficiency is malnutrition. Zinc deficiency leads to cell-mediated immune dysfunctions among other manifestations. Consequently, such dysfunctions lead to a worse outcome in the response towards bacterial infection and sepsis. For instance, zinc is an essential component of the pathogen-eliminating signal transduction pathways leading to neutrophil extracellular traps (NET) formation, as well as inducing cell-mediated immunity over humoral immunity by regulating specific factors of differentiation. Additionally, zinc deficiency plays a role in inflammation, mainly elevating inflammatory response as well as damage to host tissue. Zinc is involved in the modulation of the proinflammatory response by targeting Nuclear Factor Kappa B (NF-κB), a transcription factor that is the master regulator of proinflammatory responses. It is also involved in controlling oxidative stress and regulating inflammatory cytokines. Zinc plays an intricate function during an immune response and its homeostasis is critical for sustaining proper immune function. This review will summarize the latest findings concerning the role of this micronutrient during the course of infections and inflammatory response and how the immune system modulates zinc depending on different stimuli.

  15. Platelets, inflammation and tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurden, Alan T

    2011-05-01

    Blood platelets have long been recognised to bring about primary haemostasis with deficiencies in platelet production and function manifesting in bleeding while upregulated function favourises arterial thrombosis. Yet increasing evidence indicates that platelets fulfil a much wider role in health and disease. First, they store and release a wide range of biologically active substances including the panoply of growth factors, chemokines and cytokines released from a-granules. Membrane budding gives rise to microparticles (MPs), another active participant within the blood stream. Platelets are essential for the innate immune response and combat infection (viruses, bacteria, micro-organisms). They help maintain and modulate inflammation and are a major source of pro-inflammatory molecules (e.g. P-selectin, tissue factor, CD40L, metalloproteinases). As well as promoting coagulation, they are active in fibrinolysis; wound healing, angiogenesis and bone formation as well as in maternal tissue and foetal vascular remodelling. Activated platelets and MPs intervene in the propagation of major diseases. They are major players in atherosclerosis and related diseases, pathologies of the central nervous system (Alzheimers disease, multiple sclerosis), cancer and tumour growth. They participate in other tissue-related acquired pathologies such as skin diseases and allergy, rheumatoid arthritis, liver disease; while, paradoxically, autologous platelet-rich plasma and platelet releasate are being used as an aid to promote tissue repair and cellular growth. The above mentioned roles of platelets are now discussed.

  16. Zinc in Infection and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour Zahi Gammoh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Micronutrient homeostasis is a key factor in maintaining a healthy immune system. Zinc is an essential micronutrient that is involved in the regulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses. The main cause of zinc deficiency is malnutrition. Zinc deficiency leads to cell-mediated immune dysfunctions among other manifestations. Consequently, such dysfunctions lead to a worse outcome in the response towards bacterial infection and sepsis. For instance, zinc is an essential component of the pathogen-eliminating signal transduction pathways leading to neutrophil extracellular traps (NET formation, as well as inducing cell-mediated immunity over humoral immunity by regulating specific factors of differentiation. Additionally, zinc deficiency plays a role in inflammation, mainly elevating inflammatory response as well as damage to host tissue. Zinc is involved in the modulation of the proinflammatory response by targeting Nuclear Factor Kappa B (NF-κB, a transcription factor that is the master regulator of proinflammatory responses. It is also involved in controlling oxidative stress and regulating inflammatory cytokines. Zinc plays an intricate function during an immune response and its homeostasis is critical for sustaining proper immune function. This review will summarize the latest findings concerning the role of this micronutrient during the course of infections and inflammatory response and how the immune system modulates zinc depending on different stimuli.

  17. Resolution of Sterile Inflammation: Role for Vitamin C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassem M. Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Macrophage reprogramming is vital for resolution of acute inflammation. Parenteral vitamin C (VitC attenuates proinflammatory states in murine and human sepsis. However information about the mechanism by which VitC regulates resolution of inflammation is limited. Methods. To examine whether physiological levels of VitC modulate resolution of inflammation, we used transgenic mice lacking L-gulono-γ-lactone oxidase. VitC sufficient/deficient mice were subjected to a thioglycollate-elicited peritonitis model of sterile inflammation. Some VitC deficient mice received daily parenteral VitC (200 mg/kg for 3 or 5 days following thioglycollate infusion. Peritoneal macrophages harvested on day 3 or day 5 were examined for intracellular VitC levels, pro- and anti-inflammatory protein and lipid mediators, mitochondrial function, and response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS. The THP-1 cell line was used to determine the modulatory activities of VitC in activated human macrophages. Results. VitC deficiency significantly delayed resolution of inflammation and generated an exaggerated proinflammatory response to in vitro LPS stimulation. VitC sufficiency and in vivo VitC supplementation restored macrophage phenotype and function in VitC deficient mice. VitC loading of THP-1 macrophages attenuated LPS-induced proinflammatory responses. Conclusion. VitC sufficiency favorably modulates macrophage function. In vivo or in vitro VitC supplementation restores macrophage phenotype and function leading to timely resolution of inflammation.

  18. A guiding map for inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netea, Mihai G; Balkwill, Frances; Chonchol, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Biologists, physicians and immunologists have contributed to the understanding of the cellular participants and biological pathways involved in inflammation. Here, we provide a general guide to the cellular and humoral contributors to inflammation as well as to the pathways that characterize infl...

  19. Interleukin-17B Antagonizes Interleukin-25-Mediated Mucosal Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Joseph M; Lee, Young-Hee; Shi, Yun; Wang, Xiaohu; Angkasekwinai, Pornpimon; Nallaparaju, Kalyan C; Flaherty, Stephanie; Chang, Seon Hee; Watarai, Hiroshi; Dong, Chen

    2015-04-21

    The interleukin-17 (IL-17) family of cytokines has emerged as a critical player in inflammatory diseases. Among them, IL-25 has been shown to be important in allergic inflammation and protection against parasitic infection. Here we have demonstrated that IL-17B, a poorly understood cytokine, functions to inhibit IL-25-driven inflammation. IL-17B and IL-25, both binding to the interleukin-17 receptor B (IL-17RB), were upregulated in their expression after acute colonic inflammation. Individual inhibition of these cytokines revealed opposing functions in colon inflammation: IL-25 was pathogenic but IL-17B was protective. Similarly opposing phenotypes were observed in Citrobacter rodentium infection and allergic asthma. Moreover, IL-25 was found to promote IL-6 production from colon epithelial cells, which was inhibited by IL-17B. Therefore, our data demonstrate that IL-17B is an anti-inflammatory cytokine in the IL-17 family. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Fibroblasts in myocardial infarction: a role in inflammation and repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Arti V.; Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G.

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblasts do not only serve as matrix-producing reparative cells, but exhibit a wide range of functions in inflammatory and immune responses, angiogenesis and neoplasia. The adult mammalian myocardium contains abundant fibroblasts enmeshed within the interstitial and perivascular extracellular matrix. The current review manuscript discusses the dynamic phenotypic and functional alterations of cardiac fibroblasts following myocardial infarction. Extensive necrosis of cardiomyocytes in the infarcted heart triggers an intense inflammatory reaction. In the early stages of infarct healing, fibroblasts become pro-inflammatory cells, activating the inflammasome and producing cytokines, chemokines and proteases. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (such as Interleukin-1) delay myofibroblast transformation, until the wound is cleared from dead cells and matrix debris. Resolution of the inflammatory infiltrate is associated with fibroblast migration, proliferation, matrix protein synthesis and myofibroblast conversion. Growth factors and matricellular proteins play an important role in myofibroblast activation during the proliferative phase of healing. Formation of a mature cross-linked scar is associated with clearance of fibroblasts, as poorly-understood inhibitory signals restrain the fibrotic response. However, in the non-infarcted remodeling myocardium, local fibroblasts may remain activated in response to volume and pressure overload and may promote interstitial fibrosis. Considering their abundance, their crucial role in cardiac inflammation and repair, and their involvement in myocardial dysfunction and arrhythmogenesis, cardiac fibroblasts may be key therapeutic targets in cardiac remodeling. PMID:24321195

  1. Long chain saturated and unsaturated fatty acids exert opposing effects on viability and function of GLP-1-producing cells: Mechanisms of lipotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thombare, Ketan; Ntika, Stelia; Wang, Xuan; Krizhanovskii, Camilla

    2017-01-01

    Fatty acids acutely stimulate GLP-1 secretion from L-cells in vivo. However, a high fat diet has been shown to reduce the density of L-cells in the mouse intestine and a positive correlation has been indicated between L-cell number and GLP-1 secretion. Thus, the mechanism of fatty acid-stimulated GLP-1 secretion, potential effects of long-term exposure to elevated levels of different fatty acid species, and underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In the present study, we sought to determine how long-term exposure to saturated (16:0) and unsaturated (18:1) fatty acids, by direct effects on GLP-1-producing cells, alter function and viability, and the underlying mechanisms. GLP-1-secreting GLUTag cells were cultured in the presence/absence of saturated (16:0) and unsaturated (18:1) fatty acids (0.125 mM for 48 h, followed by analyses of viability and apoptosis, as well as involvement of fatty acid oxidation, free fatty acid receptors (FFAR1) and ceramide synthesis. In addition, effects on the expression of proglucagon, prohormone convertase 1/3 (PC1/3), free fatty acid receptors (FFAR1, FFAR3), sodium glucose co-transporter (SGLT) and subsequent secretory response were determined. Saturated (16:0) and unsaturated (18:1) fatty acids exerted opposing effects on the induction of apoptosis (1.4-fold increase in DNA fragmentation by palmitate and a 0.5-fold reduction by oleate; punsaturated (18:1), fatty acids induce ceramide-mediated apoptosis of GLP-1-producing cells. Further, unsaturated fatty acids confer lipoprotection, enhancing viability and function of GLP-1-secreting cells. These data provide potential mechanistic insight contributing to reduced L-cell mass following a high fat diet and differential effects of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids on GLP-1 secretion in vivo.

  2. Nociceptive Sensory Neurons Drive Interleukin-23 Mediated Psoriasiform Skin Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riol-Blanco, Lorena; Ordovas-Montanes, Jose; Perro, Mario; Naval, Elena; Thiriot, Aude; Alvarez, David; Wood, John N.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    2014-01-01

    The skin has a dual function as a barrier and a sensory interface between the body and the environment. To protect against invading pathogens, the skin harbors specialized immune cells, including dermal dendritic cells (DDCs) and interleukin (IL)-17 producing γδ T cells (γδT17), whose aberrant activation by IL-23 can provoke psoriasis-like inflammation1–4. The skin is also innervated by a meshwork of peripheral nerves consisting of relatively sparse autonomic and abundant sensory fibers. Interactions between the autonomic nervous system and immune cells in lymphoid organs are known to contribute to systemic immunity, but how peripheral nerves regulate cutaneous immune responses remains unclear5,6. Here, we have exposed the skin of mice to imiquimod (IMQ), which induces IL-23 dependent psoriasis-like inflammation7,8. We show that a subset of sensory neurons expressing the ion channels TRPV1 and NaV1.8 is essential to drive this inflammatory response. Imaging of intact skin revealed that a large fraction of DDCs, the principal source of IL-23, is in close contact with these nociceptors. Upon selective pharmacological or genetic ablation of nociceptors9–11, DDCs failed to produce IL-23 in IMQ exposed skin. Consequently, the local production of IL-23 dependent inflammatory cytokines by dermal γδT17 cells and the subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells to the skin were dramatically reduced. Intradermal injection of IL-23 bypassed the requirement for nociceptor communication with DDCs and restored the inflammatory response12. These findings indicate that TRPV1+NaV1.8+ nociceptors, by interacting with DDCs, regulate the IL-23/IL-17 pathway and control cutaneous immune responses. PMID:24759321

  3. Nociceptive sensory neurons drive interleukin-23-mediated psoriasiform skin inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riol-Blanco, Lorena; Ordovas-Montanes, Jose; Perro, Mario; Naval, Elena; Thiriot, Aude; Alvarez, David; Paust, Silke; Wood, John N; von Andrian, Ulrich H

    2014-06-05

    The skin has a dual function as a barrier and a sensory interface between the body and the environment. To protect against invading pathogens, the skin harbours specialized immune cells, including dermal dendritic cells (DDCs) and interleukin (IL)-17-producing γδ T (γδT17) cells, the aberrant activation of which by IL-23 can provoke psoriasis-like inflammation. The skin is also innervated by a meshwork of peripheral nerves consisting of relatively sparse autonomic and abundant sensory fibres. Interactions between the autonomic nervous system and immune cells in lymphoid organs are known to contribute to systemic immunity, but how peripheral nerves regulate cutaneous immune responses remains unclear. We exposed the skin of mice to imiquimod, which induces IL-23-dependent psoriasis-like inflammation. Here we show that a subset of sensory neurons expressing the ion channels TRPV1 and Nav1.8 is essential to drive this inflammatory response. Imaging of intact skin revealed that a large fraction of DDCs, the principal source of IL-23, is in close contact with these nociceptors. Upon selective pharmacological or genetic ablation of nociceptors, DDCs failed to produce IL-23 in imiquimod-exposed skin. Consequently, the local production of IL-23-dependent inflammatory cytokines by dermal γδT17 cells and the subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells to the skin were markedly reduced. Intradermal injection of IL-23 bypassed the requirement for nociceptor communication with DDCs and restored the inflammatory response. These findings indicate that TRPV1(+)Nav1.8(+) nociceptors, by interacting with DDCs, regulate the IL-23/IL-17 pathway and control cutaneous immune responses.

  4. Caudalized human iPSC-derived neural progenitor cells produce neurons and glia but fail to restore function in an early chronic spinal cord injury model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, Samuel E.; Chang, Eun-Ah; Suhr, Steven T.; Schlosser, Laura O.; Mondello, Sarah E.; Moritz, Chet T.; Cibelli, Jose B.; Horner, Philip J.

    2014-01-01

    Neural progenitor cells (NPCs) have shown modest potential and some side effects (e.g. allodynia) for treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI). In only a few cases, however, have NPCs shown promise at the chronic stage. Given the 1.275 million people living with chronic paralysis, there is a significant need to rigorously evaluate the cell types and methods for safe and efficacious treatment of this devastating condition. For the first time, we examined the pre-clinical potential of NPCs derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) to repair chronic SCI. hiPSCs were differentiated into region-specific (i.e. caudal) NPCs, then transplanted into a new, clinically relevant model of early chronic cervical SCI. We established the conditions for successful transplantation of caudalized hiPSC-NPCs and demonstrate their remarkable ability to integrate and produce multiple neural lineages in the early chronic injury environment. In contrast to prior reports in acute and sub-acute injury models, survival and integration of hiPSC-derived neural cells in the early chronic cervical model did not lead to significant improvement in forelimb function or induce allodynia. These data indicate that while hiPSCs show promise, future work needs to focus on the specific hiPSC-derivatives or co-therapies that will restore function in the early chronic injury setting. PMID:23891888

  5. Telomere-mediated chromosomal instability triggers TLR4 induced inflammation and death in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabindra N Bhattacharjee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Telomeres are essential to maintain chromosomal stability. Cells derived from mice lacking telomerase RNA component (mTERC-/- mice display elevated telomere-mediated chromosome instability. Age-dependent telomere shortening and associated chromosome instability reduce the capacity to respond to cellular stress occurring during inflammation and cancer. Inflammation is one of the important risk factors in cancer progression. Controlled innate immune responses mediated by Toll-like receptors (TLR are required for host defense against infection. Our aim was to understand the role of chromosome/genome instability in the initiation and maintenance of inflammation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the function of TLR4 in telomerase deficient mTERC-/- mice harbouring chromosome instability which did not develop any overt immunological disorder in pathogen-free condition or any form of cancers at this stage. Chromosome instability was measured in metaphase spreads prepared from wildtype (mTERC+/+, mTERC+/- and mTERC-/- mouse splenocytes. Peritoneal and/or bone marrow-derived macrophages were used to examine the responses of TLR4 by their ability to produce inflammatory mediators TNFalpha and IL6. Our results demonstrate that TLR4 is highly up-regulated in the immune cells derived from telomerase-null (mTERC-/- mice and lipopolysaccharide, a natural ligand for TLR4 stabilises NF-kappaB binding to its promoter by down-regulating ATF-3 in mTERC-/- macrophages. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings implied that background chromosome instability in the cellular level stabilises the action of TLR4-induced NF-kappaB action and sensitises cells to produce excess pro-inflammatory mediators. Chromosome/genomic instability data raises optimism for controlling inflammation by non-toxic TLR antagonists among high-risk groups.

  6. Aging and inflammation in two epidemiological worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurven, Michael; Kaplan, Hillard; Winking, Jeffrey; Finch, Caleb; Crimmins, Eileen M

    2008-02-01

    Humans evolved in a world with high levels of infection resulting in high mortality across the life span and few survivors to advanced ages. Under such conditions, a strong acute-phase inflammatory response was required for survival; however, inflammatory responses can also promote chronic diseases of aging. We hypothesize that global historical increases in life span at older ages are partly explained by reduced lifetime exposure to infection and subsequent inflammation. To begin a test of this hypothesis, we compare C-reactive protein (CRP); levels in two populations with different epidemiological environments: the Tsimane of Bolivia and persons in the United States. High CRP is significantly more prevalent among the Tsimane up through middle age; by age 35, the Tsimane have spent more years with high CRP than have Americans at age 55. Further testing of the links among infection, inflammation, and chronic diseases of aging among the Tsimane requires collection of age-specific indicators of atherosclerosis and cardiac function.

  7. Extracellular vesicles as mediators of vascular inflammation in kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmke, Alexandra; von Vietinghoff, Sibylle

    2016-03-06

    Vascular inflammation is a common cause of renal impairment and a major cause of morbidity and mortality of patients with kidney disease. Current studies consistently show an increase of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in acute vasculitis and in patients with atherosclerosis. Recent research has elucidated mechanisms that mediate vascular wall leukocyte accumulation and differentiation. This review addresses the role of EVs in this process. Part one of this review addresses functional roles of EVs in renal vasculitis. Most published data address anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis and indicate that the number of EVs, mostly of platelet origin, is increased in active disease. EVs generated from neutrophils by activation by ANCA can contribute to vessel damage. While EVs are also elevated in other types of autoimmune vasculitis with renal involvement such as systemic lupus erythematodes, functional consequences beyond intravascular thrombosis remain to be established. In typical hemolytic uremic syndrome secondary to infection with shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli, EV numbers are elevated and contribute to toxin distribution into the vascular wall. Part two addresses mechanisms how EVs modulate vascular inflammation in atherosclerosis, a process that is aggravated in uremia. Elevated numbers of circulating endothelial EVs were associated with atherosclerotic complications in a number of studies in patients with and without kidney disease. Uremic endothelial EVs are defective in induction of vascular relaxation. Neutrophil adhesion and transmigration and intravascular thrombus formation are critically modulated by EVs, a process that is amenable to therapeutic interventions. EVs can enhance monocyte adhesion to the endothelium and modulate macrophage differentiation and cytokine production with major influence on the local inflammatory milieu in the plaque. They significantly influence lipid phagocytosis and antigen presentation by

  8. Silibinin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yun Ho [Department of Anatomy, Medical School, Institute for Medical Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Guang Yu [Department of Radiology, Yanbian University Hospital, YanJi 133002 (China); Guo, Hui Shu [Centralab, The First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116011 (China); Piao, Hong Mei [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Yanbian University Hospital, YanJi 133000 (China); Li, Liang chang; Li, Guang Zhao [Department of Anatomy and Histology and Embryology, Yanbian University School of Basic Medical Sciences, 977 Gongyuan Road, YanJi 133002, Jilin (China); Lin, Zhen Hua [Department of Pathology, Yanbian University School of Basic Medical Sciences, YanJi 133000 (China); Yan, Guang Hai, E-mail: ghyan@ybu.edu.cn [Department of Anatomy and Histology and Embryology, Yanbian University School of Basic Medical Sciences, 977 Gongyuan Road, YanJi 133002, Jilin (China)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin diminishes ovalbumin-induced inflammatory reactions in the mouse lung. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin reduces the levels of various cytokines into the lung of allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin prevents the development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin suppresses NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity. -- Abstract: Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease regulated by coordination of T-helper2 (Th2) type cytokines and inflammatory signal molecules. Silibinin is one of the main flavonoids produced by milk thistle, which is reported to inhibit the inflammatory response by suppressing the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. Because NF-{kappa}B activation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, we have investigated the effect of silibinin on a mouse ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Airway hyperresponsiveness, cytokines levels, and eosinophilic infiltration were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue. Pretreatment of silibinin significantly inhibited airway inflammatory cell recruitment and peribronchiolar inflammation and reduced the production of various cytokines in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, silibinin prevented the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and attenuated the OVA challenge-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. These findings indicate that silibinin protects against OVA-induced airway inflammation, at least in part via downregulation of NF-{kappa}B activity. Our data support the utility of silibinin as a potential medicine for the treatment of asthma.

  9. Estrogen aggravates inflammation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in cystic fibrosis mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagnon Stéphane

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among patients with cystic fibrosis (CF, females have worse pulmonary function and survival than males, primarily due to chronic lung inflammation and infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa. A role for gender hormones in the causation of the CF "gender gap" has been proposed. The female gender hormone 17β-estradiol (E2 plays a complex immunomodulatory role in humans and in animal models of disease, suppressing inflammation in some situations while enhancing it in others. Helper T-cells were long thought to belong exclusively to either T helper type 1 (Th1 or type 2 (Th2 lineages. However, a distinct lineage named Th17 is now recognized that is induced by interleukin (IL-23 to produce IL-17 and other pro-inflammatory Th17 effector molecules. Recent evidence suggests a central role for the IL-23/IL-17 pathway in the pathogenesis of CF lung inflammation. We used a mouse model to test the hypothesis that E2 aggravates the CF lung inflammation that occurs in response to airway infection with P. aeruginosa by a Th17-mediated mechanism. Results Exogenous E2 caused adult male CF mice with pneumonia due to a mucoid CF clinical isolate, the P. aeruginosa strain PA508 (PA508, to develop more severe manifestations of inflammation in both lung tissue and in bronchial alveolar lavage (BAL fluid, with increased total white blood cell counts and differential and absolute cell counts of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils. Inflammatory infiltrates and mucin production were increased on histology. Increased lung tissue mRNA levels for IL-23 and IL-17 were accompanied by elevated protein levels of Th17-associated pro-inflammatory mediators in BAL fluid. The burden of PA508 bacteria was increased in lung tissue homogenate and in BAL fluid, and there was a virtual elimination in lung tissue of mRNA for lactoferrin, an antimicrobial peptide active against P. aeruginosa in vitro. Conclusions Our data show that E2 increases the

  10. Resolution of inflammation: mechanisms and opportunity for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandri, Ana L; Sousa, Lirlândia P; Lucas, Christopher D; Rossi, Adriano G; Pinho, Vanessa; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2013-08-01

    Inflammation is a beneficial host reaction to tissue damage and has the essential primary purpose of restoring tissue homeostasis. Inflammation plays a major role in containing and resolving infection and may also occur under sterile conditions. The cardinal signs of inflammation dolor, calor, tumor and rubor are intrinsically associated with events including vasodilatation, edema and leukocyte trafficking into the site of inflammation. If uncontrolled or unresolved, inflammation itself can lead to further tissue damage and give rise to chronic inflammatory diseases and autoimmunity with eventual loss of organ function. It is now evident that the resolution of inflammation is an active continuous process that occurs during an acute inflammatory episode. Successful resolution requires activation of endogenous programs with switch from production of pro-inflammatory towards pro-resolving molecules, such as specific lipid mediators and annexin A1, and the non-phlogistic elimination of granulocytes by apoptosis with subsequent removal by surrounding macrophages. These processes ensure rapid restoration of tissue homeostasis. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of resolution of inflammation, highlighting the pharmacological strategies that may interfere with the molecular pathways which control leukocyte survival and clearance. Such strategies have proved beneficial in several pre-clinical models of inflammatory diseases, suggesting that pharmacological modulation of the resolution process may be useful for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Recombinant HA1 produced in E. coli forms functional oligomers and generates strain-specific SRID potency antibodies for pandemic influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Surender; Larkin, Christopher; Verma, Swati; Joshi, Manju B; Fontana, Juan; Steven, Alasdair C; King, Lisa R; Manischewitz, Jody; McCormick, William; Gupta, Rajesh K; Golding, Hana

    2011-08-05

    Vaccine production and initiation of mass vaccination is a key factor in rapid response to new influenza pandemic. During the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic, several bottlenecks were identified, including the delayed availability of vaccine potency reagents. Currently, antisera for the single-radial immunodiffusion (SRID) potency assay are generated in sheep immunized repeatedly with HA released and purified after bromelain-treatment of influenza virus grown in eggs. This approach was a major bottleneck for pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm09) potency reagent development in 2009. Alternative approaches are needed to make HA immunogens for generation of SRID reagents in the shortest possible time. In this study, we found that properly folded recombinant HA1 globular domain (rHA1) from several type A viruses including H1N1pdm09 and two H5N1 viruses could be produced efficiently using a bacterial expression system and subsequent purification. The rHA1 proteins were shown to form functional oligomers of trimers, similar to virus derived HA, and elicited high titer of neutralizing antibodies in rabbits and sheep. Importantly, the immune sera formed precipitation rings with reference antigens in the SRID assay in a dose-dependent manner. The HA contents in multiple H1N1 vaccine products from different manufacturers (and in several lots) as determined with the rHA1-generated sheep sera were similar to the values obtained with a traditionally generated sheep serum from NIBSC. We conclude that bacterially expressed recombinant HA1 proteins can be produced rapidly and used to generate SRID potency reagents shortly after new influenza strains with pandemic potential are identified. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Apoptosis and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Haanen

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last few decades it has been recognized that cell death is not the consequence of accidental injury, but is the expression of a cell suicide programme. Kerr et al. (1972 introduced the term apoptosis. This form of cell death is under the influence of hormones, growth factors and cytokines, which depending upon the receptors present on the target cells, may activate a genetically controlled cell elimination process. During apoptosis the cell membrane remains intact and the cell breaks into apoptotic bodies, which are phagocytosed. Apoptosis, in contrast to necrosis, is not harmful to the host and does not induce any inflammatory reaction. The principal event that leads to inflammatory disease is cell damage, induced by chemical/physical injury, anoxia or starvation. Cell damage means leakage of cell contents into the adjacent tissues, resulting in the capillary transmigration of granulocytes to the injured tissue. The accumulation of neutrophils and release of enzymes and oxygen radicals enhances the inflammatory reaction. Until now there has been little research into the factors controlling the accumulation and the tissue load of granulocytes and their histotoxic products in inflammatory processes. Neutrophil apoptosis may represent an important event in the control of intlamtnation. It has been assumed that granulocytes disintegrate to apoptotic bodies before their fragments are removed by local macrophages. Removal of neutrophils from the inflammatory site without release of granule contents is of paramount importance for cessation of inflammation. In conclusion, apoptotic cell death plays an important role in inflammatory processes and in the resolution of inflammatory reactions. The facts known at present should stimulate further research into the role of neutrophil, eosinophil and macrophage apoptosis in inflammatory diseases.

  13. Alveolar inflammation in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Martina; Worlitzsch, Dieter; Viglio, Simona

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In infected lungs of the cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, opportunistic pathogens and mutated cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR) contribute to chronic airway inflammation that is characterized by neutrophil/macrophage infiltration, cytokine release...

  14. 5-HT2A receptors control body temperature in mice during LPS-induced inflammation via regulation of NO production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronova, Irina P; Khramova, Galina M; Kulikova, Elizabeth A; Petrovskii, Dmitrii V; Bazovkina, Daria V; Kulikov, Alexander V

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled 5-HT2A receptors are involved in the regulation of numerous normal and pathological physiological functions. At the same time, its involvement in the regulation of body temperature (Tb) in normal conditions is obscure. Here we study the effect of the 5-HT2A receptor activation or blockade on Tb in sick animals. The experiments were carried out on adult C57BL/6 mouse males. Systemic inflammation and sickness were produced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.1mg/kg, ip), while the 5-HT2A receptor was stimulated or blocked through the administration of the receptor agonist DOI or antagonist ketanserin (1mg/kg), respectively. LPS, DOI or ketanserin alone produced no effect on Tb. However, administration of LPS together with a peripheral or central ketanserin injection reduced Tb (32.2°C). Ketanserin reversed the LPS-induced expression of inducible NO synthase in the brain. Consequently, an involvement of NO in the mechanism of the hypothermic effect of ketanserin in sick mice was hypothesized. Administration of LPS together with NO synthase inhibitor, l-nitro-arginine methyl ester (60mg/kg, ip) resulted in deep (28.5°C) and prolonged (8h) hypothermia, while administration of l-nitro-arginine methyl ester alone produced no effect on Tb. Thus, 5-HT2A receptors play a key role in Tb control in sick mice. Blockade of this GPCR produces hypothermia in mice with systemic inflammation via attenuation of LPS-induced NO production. These results indicate an unexpected role of 5-HT2A receptors in inflammation and NO production and have a considerable biological impact on understanding the mechanism of animal adaptation to pathogens and parasites. Moreover, adverse side effects of 5-HT2A receptor antagonists in patients with inflammation may be expected. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Impacto da inflamação na regulação do ferro e deficiência funcional de ferro Importance of inflammation on iron homeostasis and functional iron deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Stella Figueiredo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Deficiência funcional de ferro (Fe pode ser definida como o desbalanço entre a quantidade necessária de Fe para a síntese de hemoglobina e o seu suprimento. Ela ocorre na ausência de estoque de Fe, característica da anemia ferropênica (AF, e na presença de bloqueio da homeostasia do Fe, como na anemia da inflamação (AI. Na AI, citocinas e células do sistema retículo-endotelial induzem alterações que interferem em diferentes vias da eritropoese levando à anemia. O bloqueio na mobilização do Fe de estoque pela hepcidina, embora não único, é o mecanismo etiológico mais evidente da AI. A hepcidina, regulador negativo da entrada de Fe no plasma, atua ligando-se à ferroportina, induzindo sua internalização e degradação. Embora a diferenciação entre AF e AI seja relativamente tranquila, pacientes com AI podem cursar com deficiência de Fe associada. O diagnóstico diferencial entre AI e AI com deficiência de Fe tem evidente importância clínica, e novas técnicas laboratoriais têm sido sugeridas para auxiliar neste diagnóstico.Functional iron deficiency can be defined as an imbalance between the iron needs of the erythroid marrow and iron supply. Iron deficiency occurs in the absence of iron deposits, as in the case of iron deficiency anemia (IDA, or when there is an impaired iron mobilization, such as in anemia of inflammation (AI. Cytokines and cells of the reticuloendothelial system can induce changes in several pathways, interfering in erythropoiesis and causing anemia. The retention of iron within cells of the reticuloendothelial system is due to hepcidin. Although this is not the only mechanism evolved in AI, it is the most important. Hepcidin is a negative regulator of iron entry into the plasma. Hepcidin binds to ferroportin, inducing its internalization and degradation. Differentiation between IDA and AI is relatively easy, but patients with AI can have the association of true iron deficiency. The differential

  16. Allergic Respiratory Inflammation and Remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Amin, Kawa

    2015-01-01

    Asthma and rhinitis are inflammatory diseases of the respiratory tract. Respiratory inflammation of the adaptive and innate immune system is the focus of this review, and chronic inflammation is not limited to the respiratory tissue. The inflammatory response, which consists of phagocytes, eosinophils, mast cells, and lymphocytes, spreads along the respiratory tract, leading to tissue damage. Mast cells and eosinophils are commonly recognized for their detrimental role in allergic reactions o...

  17. Lamin-B in systemic inflammation, tissue homeostasis, and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiyang; Zheng, Xiaobin; Zheng, Yixian

    2015-01-01

    Gradual loss of tissue function (or homeostasis) is a natural process of aging and is believed to cause many age-associated diseases. In human epidemiology studies, the low-grade and chronic systemic inflammation in elderly has been correlated with the development of aging related pathologies. Although it is suspected that tissue decline is related to systemic inflammation, the cause and consequence of these aging phenomena are poorly understood. By studying the Drosophila fat body and gut, we have uncovered a mechanism by which lamin-B loss in the fat body upon aging induces age-associated systemic inflammation. This chronic inflammation results in the repression of gut local immune response, which in turn leads to the over-proliferation and mis-differentiation of the intestinal stem cells, thereby resulting in gut hyperplasia. Here we discuss the implications and remaining questions in light of our published findings and new observations.

  18. Islet inflammation in type 2 diabetes and physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Ryozo

    2017-01-01

    The finding of islet inflammation in type 2 diabetes (T2D) and its involvement in β cell dysfunction has further highlighted the significance of inflammation in metabolic diseases. The number of intra-islet macrophages is increased in T2D, and these cells are the main source of proinflammatory cytokines within islets. Multiple human studies of T2D have shown that targeting islet inflammation has the potential to be an effective therapeutic strategy. In this Review we provide an overview of the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which islet inflammation develops and causes β cell dysfunction. We also emphasize the regulation and roles of macrophage polarity shift within islets in the context of T2D pathology and β cell health, which may have broad translational implications for therapeutics aimed at improving islet function. PMID:28045399

  19. Inflammation-induced decrease in voluntary wheel running in mice: a nonreflexive test for evaluating inflammatory pain and analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobos, Enrique J; Ghasemlou, Nader; Araldi, Dionéia; Segal, David; Duong, Kelly; Woolf, Clifford J

    2012-04-01

    Inflammatory pain impacts adversely on the quality of life of patients, often resulting in motor disabilities. Therefore, we studied the effect of peripheral inflammation induced by intraplantar administration of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in mice on a particular form of voluntary locomotion, wheel running, as an index of mobility impairment produced by pain. The distance traveled over 1 hour of free access to activity wheels decreased significantly in response to hind paw inflammation, peaking 24 hours after CFA administration. Recovery of voluntary wheel running by day 3 correlated with the ability to support weight on the inflamed limb. Inflammation-induced mechanical hypersensitivity, measured with von Frey hairs, lasted considerably longer than the impaired voluntary wheel running and is not driving; therefore, the change in voluntary behavior. The CFA-induced decrease in voluntary wheel running was dose-dependently reversed by subcutaneous administration of antiinflammatory and analgesic drugs, including naproxen (10-80 mg/kg), ibuprofen (2.5-20mg/kg), diclofenac (1.25-10mg/kg), celecoxib (2.5-20mg/kg), prednisolone (0.62-5mg/kg), and morphine (0.06-0.5mg/kg), all at much lower doses than reported in most rodent models. Furthermore, the doses that induced recovery in voluntary wheel running did not reduce CFA-induced mechanical allodynia, indicating a greater sensitivity of the former as a surrogate measure of inflammatory pain. We conclude that monitoring changes in voluntary wheel running in mice during peripheral inflammation is a simple, observer-independent objective measure of functional changes produced by inflammation, likely more aligned to the global level of pain than reflexive measures, and much more sensitive to analgesic drug effects. Copyright © 2012 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of Inflammation in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Rübsam

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes and remains the leading cause of blindness among the working-age population. For decades, diabetic retinopathy was considered only a microvascular complication, but the retinal microvasculature is intimately associated with and governed by neurons and glia, which are affected even prior to clinically detectable vascular lesions. While progress has been made to improve the vascular alterations, there is still no treatment to counteract the early neuro-glial perturbations in diabetic retinopathy. Diabetes is a complex metabolic disorder, characterized by chronic hyperglycemia along with dyslipidemia, hypoinsulinemia and hypertension. Increasing evidence points to inflammation as one key player in diabetes-associated retinal perturbations, however, the exact underlying molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Interlinked molecular pathways, such as oxidative stress, formation of advanced glycation end-products and increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor have received a lot of attention as they all contribute to the inflammatory response. In the current review, we focus on the involvement of inflammation in the pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy with special emphasis on the functional relationships between glial cells and neurons. Finally, we summarize recent advances using novel targets to inhibit inflammation in diabetic retinopathy.

  1. GLYX-13, an NMDA receptor glycine site functional partial agonist enhances cognition and produces antidepressant effects without the psychotomimetic side effects of NMDA receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskal, Joseph R; Burch, Ronald; Burgdorf, Jeffrey S; Kroes, Roger A; Stanton, Patric K; Disterhoft, John F; Leander, J David

    2014-02-01

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-ionophore complex plays a key role in learning and memory and has efficacy in animals and humans with affective disorders. GLYX-13 is an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) glycine-site functional partial agonist and cognitive enhancer that also shows rapid antidepressant activity without psychotomimetic side effects. The authors review the mechanism of action of GLYX-13 that was investigated in preclinical studies and evaluated in clinical studies. Specifically, the authors review its pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, and drug safety that were demonstrated in clinical studies. NMDAR full antagonists can produce rapid antidepressant effects in treatment-resistant subjects; however, they are often accompanied by psychotomimetic effects that make chronic use outside of a clinical trial inpatient setting problematic. GLYX-13 appears to exert its antidepressant effects in the frontal cortex via NMDAR-triggered synaptic plasticity. Understanding the mechanistic underpinning of GLYX-13's antidepressant action should provide both novel insights into the role of the glutamatergic system in depression and identify new targets for therapeutic development.

  2. Suggestions to Reduce Clinical Fibromyalgia Pain and Experimentally Induced Pain Produce Parallel Effects on Perceived Pain but Divergent Functional MRI-Based Brain Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbyshire, Stuart W G; Whalley, Matthew G; Seah, Stanley T H; Oakley, David A

    Hypnotic suggestion is an empirically validated form of pain control; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Thirteen fibromyalgia patients received suggestions to alter their clinical pain, and 15 healthy controls received suggestions to alter experimental heat pain. Suggestions were delivered before and after hypnotic induction with blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) activity measured concurrently. Across groups, suggestion produced substantial changes in pain report (main effect of suggestion, F2, 312 = 585.8; p pain report in regions previously associated with pain, including thalamus and anterior cingulate cortex. In controls, BOLD response decreased with pain report. All changes were greater after induction. Region-of-interest analysis revealed largely linear patient responses with increasing pain report. Control responses, however, were higher after suggestion to increase or decrease pain from baseline. Based on behavioral report alone, the mechanism of suggestion could be interpreted as largely similar regardless of the induction or type of pain experience. The functional magnetic resonance imaging data, however, demonstrated larger changes in brain activity after induction and a radically different pattern of brain activity for clinical pain compared with experimental pain. These findings imply that induction has an important effect on underlying neural activity mediating the effects of suggestion, and the mechanism of suggestion in patients altering clinical pain differs from that in controls altering experimental pain. Patient responses imply that suggestions altered pain experience via corresponding changes in pain-related brain regions, whereas control responses imply suggestion engaged cognitive control.

  3. Electron beam produced in a transient hollow cathode discharge: beam electron distribution function, X-ray emission and solid target ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nistor, Magdalena

    2000-01-01

    This research thesis aims at a better knowledge of phenomena occurring during transient hollow cathode discharges. The author first recalls the characteristics of such a discharge which make it different from conventional pseudo-spark discharges. The objective is to characterise the electron beam produced within the discharge, and the phenomena associated with its interaction with a solid or gaseous target, leading to the production of an X ray or visible radiation. Thus, the author reports the measurement (by magnetic deflection) of the whole time-averaged electronic distribution function. Such a knowledge is essential for a better use of the electron beam in applications such as X-ray source or material ablation. As high repetition frequency pulse X ray sources are very interesting tools, he reports the development and characterisation of Bremsstrahlung X rays during a beam-target interaction. He finally addresses the implementation of a spectroscopic diagnosis for the filamentary plasma and the ablation of a solid target by the beam [fr

  4. Calcium-sensing receptor antagonists abrogate airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarova, Polina L; Stewart, Alecia L; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Britt, Rodney D; Thompson, Michael A; P Lowe, Alexander P; Freeman, Michelle; Aravamudan, Bharathi; Kita, Hirohito; Brennan, Sarah C; Schepelmann, Martin; Davies, Thomas; Yung, Sun; Cholisoh, Zakky; Kidd, Emma J; Ford, William R; Broadley, Kenneth J; Rietdorf, Katja; Chang, Wenhan; Bin Khayat, Mohd E; Ward, Donald T; Corrigan, Christopher J; T Ward, Jeremy P; Kemp, Paul J; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S; Riccardi, Daniela

    2015-04-22

    Airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation are fundamental hallmarks of allergic asthma that are accompanied by increases in certain polycations, such as eosinophil cationic protein. Levels of these cations in body fluids correlate with asthma severity. We show that polycations and elevated extracellular calcium activate the human recombinant and native calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), leading to intracellular calcium mobilization, cyclic adenosine monophosphate breakdown, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. These effects can be prevented by CaSR antagonists, termed calcilytics. Moreover, asthmatic patients and allergen-sensitized mice expressed more CaSR in ASMs than did their healthy counterparts. Indeed, polycations induced hyperreactivity in mouse bronchi, and this effect was prevented by calcilytics and absent in mice with CaSR ablation from ASM. Calcilytics also reduced airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in allergen-sensitized mice in vivo. These data show that a functional CaSR is up-regulated in asthmatic ASM and targeted by locally produced polycations to induce hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. Thus, calcilytics may represent effective asthma therapeutics. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Human Body Composition and Immunity: Visceral Adipose Tissue Produces IL-15 and Muscle Strength Inversely Correlates with NK Cell Function in Elderly Humans

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    Ahmad Al-Attar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion control infections and cancers, but these crucial activities decline with age. NK cell development, homeostasis, and function require IL-15 and its chaperone, IL-15 receptor alpha (IL-15Rα. Macrophages and dendritic cells (DC are major sources of these proteins. We had previously postulated that additional IL-15 and IL-15Rα is made by skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. These sources may be important in aging, when IL-15-producing immune cells decline. NK cells circulate through adipose tissue, where they may be exposed to local IL-15. The objectives of this work were to determine (1 if human muscle, subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT, and visceral adipose tissue (VAT are sources of IL-15 and IL-15 Rα, and (2 whether any of these tissues correlate with NK cell activity in elderly humans. We first investigated IL-15 and IL-15Rα RNA expression in paired muscle and SAT biopsies from healthy human subjects. Both tissues expressed these transcripts, but IL-15Rα RNA levels were higher in SAT than in skeletal muscle. We also investigated tissue obtained from surgeries and found that SAT and VAT expressed equivalent amounts of IL-15 and IL-15Rα RNA, respectively. Furthermore, stromal vascular fraction cells expressed more IL-15 RNA than did adipocytes. To test if these findings related to circulating IL-15 protein and NK cell function, we tested 50 healthy adults aged > 70 years old. Plasma IL-15 levels significantly correlated with abdominal VAT mass in the entire cohort and in non-obese subjects. However, plasma IL-15 levels did not correlate with skeletal muscle cross-sectional area and correlated inversely with muscle strength. Plasma IL-15 did correlate with NK cell cytotoxic granule exocytosis and with CCL4 (MIP-1β production in response to NKp46-crosslinking. Additionally, NK cell responses to K562 leukemia cells correlated inversely with muscle strength. With

  6. Human Body Composition and Immunity: Visceral Adipose Tissue Produces IL-15 and Muscle Strength Inversely Correlates with NK Cell Function in Elderly Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Attar, Ahmad; Presnell, Steven R; Clasey, Jody L; Long, Douglas E; Walton, R Grace; Sexton, Morgan; Starr, Marlene E; Kern, Philip A; Peterson, Charlotte A; Lutz, Charles T

    2018-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion control infections and cancers, but these crucial activities decline with age. NK cell development, homeostasis, and function require IL-15 and its chaperone, IL-15 receptor alpha (IL-15Rα). Macrophages and dendritic cells (DC) are major sources of these proteins. We had previously postulated that additional IL-15 and IL-15Rα is made by skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. These sources may be important in aging, when IL-15-producing immune cells decline. NK cells circulate through adipose tissue, where they may be exposed to local IL-15. The objectives of this work were to determine (1) if human muscle, subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) are sources of IL-15 and IL-15 Rα, and (2) whether any of these tissues correlate with NK cell activity in elderly humans. We first investigated IL-15 and IL-15Rα RNA expression in paired muscle and SAT biopsies from healthy human subjects. Both tissues expressed these transcripts, but IL-15Rα RNA levels were higher in SAT than in skeletal muscle. We also investigated tissue obtained from surgeries and found that SAT and VAT expressed equivalent amounts of IL-15 and IL-15Rα RNA, respectively. Furthermore, stromal vascular fraction cells expressed more IL-15 RNA than did adipocytes. To test if these findings related to circulating IL-15 protein and NK cell function, we tested 50 healthy adults aged > 70 years old. Plasma IL-15 levels significantly correlated with abdominal VAT mass in the entire cohort and in non-obese subjects. However, plasma IL-15 levels did not correlate with skeletal muscle cross-sectional area and correlated inversely with muscle strength. Plasma IL-15 did correlate with NK cell cytotoxic granule exocytosis and with CCL4 (MIP-1β) production in response to NKp46-crosslinking. Additionally, NK cell responses to K562 leukemia cells correlated inversely with muscle strength. With aging, immune

  7. Sarcopenia correlates with systemic inflammation in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Min Kwang; Cho, Eun Na; Chang, Joon; Ahn, Chul Min; Kim, Hyung Jung

    2017-01-01

    Muscle wasting and chronic inflammation are predominant features of patients with COPD. Systemic inflammation is associated with an accelerated decline in lung function. In this study, the prevalence of sarcopenia and the relationships between sarcopenia and systemic inflammations in patients with stable COPD were investigated. In a cross-sectional design, muscle strength and muscle mass were measured by handgrip strength (HGS) and bioelectrical impedance analysis in 80 patients with stable COPD. Patients (≥40 years old) diagnosed with COPD were recruited from outpatient clinics, and then COPD stages were classified. Sarcopenia was defined as the presence of both low muscle strength (by HGS) and low muscle mass (skeletal muscle mass index [SMMI]). Levels of circulating inflammatory biomarkers (IL-6 and high-sensitivity TNFα [hsTNFα]) were measured. Sarcopenia was prevalent in 20 (25%) patients. Patients with sarcopenia were older, had lower body mass index, and a higher percentage of cardiovascular diseases. In addition, they had significantly higher modified Medical Research Council scores and lower 6-minute walk distance than those without sarcopenia. HGS was significantly correlated with age, modified Medical Research Council score, and COPD Assessment Test scores. Both HGS and SMMI had associations with IL-6 and hsTNFα (HGS, r =-0.35, P =0.002; SMMI, r =-0.246, P =0.044) level. In multivariate analysis, old age, lower body mass index, presence of cardiovascular comorbidities, and higher hsTNFα levels were significant determinants for sarcopenia in patients with stable COPD. Sarcopenia is very common in patients with stable COPD, and is associated with more severe dyspnea-scale scores and lower exercise tolerance. Systemic inflammation could be an important contributor to sarcopenia in the stable COPD population.

  8. Ethylene, an early marker of systemic inflammation in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paardekooper, L.M.; Bogaart, G. van den; Kox, M.; Dingjan, I.; Neerincx, A.H.; Bendix, M.B.; Beest, M.T.; Harren, F.J.M; Risby, T.; Pickkers, P.; Marczin, N.; Cristescu, S.M.

    2017-01-01

    Ethylene is a major plant hormone mediating developmental processes and stress responses to stimuli such as infection. We show here that ethylene is also produced during systemic inflammation in humans and is released in exhaled breath. Traces of ethylene were detected by laser spectroscopy both in

  9. S100 Proteins As an Important Regulator of Macrophage Inflammation

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    Chang Xia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The S100 proteins, a family of calcium-binding cytosolic proteins, have a broad range of intracellular and extracellular functions through regulating calcium balance, cell apoptosis, migration, proliferation, differentiation, energy metabolism, and inflammation. The intracellular functions of S100 proteins involve interaction with intracellular receptors, membrane protein recruitment/transportation, transcriptional regulation and integrating with enzymes or nucleic acids, and DNA repair. The S100 proteins could also be released from the cytoplasm, induced by tissue/cell damage and cellular stress. The extracellular S100 proteins, serving as a danger signal, are crucial in regulating immune homeostasis, post-traumatic injury, and inflammation. Extracellular S100 proteins are also considered biomarkers for some specific diseases. In this review, we will discuss the multi-functional roles of S100 proteins, especially their potential roles associated with cell migration, differentiation, tissue repair, and inflammation.

  10. Molecular Cloning, Heterologous Expression, and Functional Characterization of an NADPH-Cytochrome P450 Reductase Gene from Camptotheca acuminata, a Camptothecin-Producing Plant.

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    Xixing Qu

    Full Text Available Camptothecin (CAM, a complex pentacyclic pyrroloqinoline alkaloid, is the starting material for CAM-type drugs that are well-known antitumor plant drugs. Although many chemical and biological research efforts have been performed to produce CAM, a few attempts have been made to uncover the enzymatic mechanism involved in the biosynthesis of CAM. Enzyme-catalyzed oxidoreduction reactions are ubiquitously presented in living organisms, especially in the biosynthetic pathway of most secondary metabolites such as CAM. Due to a lack of its reduction partner, most catalytic oxidation steps involved in the biosynthesis of CAM have not been established. In the present study, an NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR encoding gene CamCPR was cloned from Camptotheca acuminata, a CAM-producing plant. The full length of CamCPR cDNA contained an open reading frame of 2127-bp nucleotides, corresponding to 708-amino acid residues. CamCPR showed 70 ~ 85% identities to other characterized plant CPRs and it was categorized to the group II of CPRs on the basis of the results of multiple sequence alignment of the N-terminal hydrophobic regions. The intact and truncate CamCPRs with N- or C-terminal His6-tag were heterologously overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzymes showed NADPH-dependent reductase activity toward a chemical substrate ferricyanide and a protein substrate cytochrome c. The N-terminal His6-tagged CamCPR showed 18- ~ 30-fold reduction activity higher than the C-terminal His6-tagged CamCPR, which supported a reported conclusion, i.e., the last C-terminal tryptophan of CPRs plays an important role in the discrimination between NADPH and NADH. Co-expression of CamCPR and a P450 monooxygenase, CYP73A25, a cinnamate 4-hydroxylase from cotton, and the following catalytic formation of p-coumaric acid suggested that CamCPR transforms electrons from NADPH to the heme center of P450 to support its oxidation reaction. Quantitative real-time PCR

  11. Tec family kinases in inflammation and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwood, Nicole J; Urbaniak, Ania M; Danks, Lynett

    2012-04-01

    Over the last decade, the Tec family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (Btk, Tec, Bmx, Itk, and Rlk) have been shown to play a key role in inflammation and bone destruction. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) has been the most widely studied due to the critical role of this kinase in B-cell development and recent evidence showing that blocking Btk signaling is effective in ameliorating lymphoma progression and experimental arthritis. This review will examine the role of TFK in myeloid cell function and the potential of targeting these kinases as a therapeutic intervention in autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  12. Epilepsy and brain inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vezzani, Annamaria; Aronica, Eleonora; Mazarati, Andrey; Pittman, Quentin J.

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade, experimental research has demonstrated a prominent role of glial cells, activated in brain by various injuries, in the mechanisms of seizure precipitation and recurrence. In particular, alterations in the phenotype and function of activated astrocytes and microglial cells

  13. Open- and Closed-Skill Exercise Interventions Produce Different Neurocognitive Effects on Executive Functions in the Elderly: A 6-Month Randomized, Controlled Trial

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    Chia-Liang Tsai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to explore the effects of open- and closed-skill exercise interventions on the neurocognitive performance of executive functions in the elderly. Sixty-four healthy elderly males were randomly assigned to either a closed-skill (bike riding or brisk walking/jogging, n = 22, open-skill (table tennis, n = 21, or control (n = 21 group. Various neuropsychological [e.g., accuracy rates (AR and reaction time (RT] and electrophysiological [e.g., event-related potential (ERP P3 component] measures were assessed during a variant of the task-switching paradigm, as well as an N-back task at baseline and after either a 6-month exercise intervention or control period. The results showed that, when performing the task-switching paradigm, the two exercise groups relative to control group showed significantly faster RTs in the switch trials after the exercise intervention. However, the RT facilitation in the non-switch and switch trials post-exercise relative to pre-exercise only emerged in the open-skill group. In terms of the N-back task, the two exercise groups significantly increased ARs in the 1-back condition after the exercise intervention, and the beneficial AR effect on the 2-back condition only emerged in the closed-skill group. In addition, the two exercise groups exhibited significantly larger P3 amplitudes on the frontal-to-parietal cortex areas after the exercise intervention relative to the baseline when performing the two cognitive tasks. These neurocognitive results still remained unchanged even when the confounding factors (e.g., cardiorespiratory fitness, social participation, and BMI were controlled for. The present study concluded that, although 6-month open- and closed-skill exercise interventions facilitate overall electrophysiological effects (i.e., increased ERP P3 amplitudes on the frontal-to-parietal cortices in the elderly, the two exercise modes produced different levels of neuropsychologically beneficial effects on

  14. Is the association between optimistic cardiovascular risk perceptions and lower rates of cardiovascular disease mortality explained by biomarkers of systemic inflammation or endothelial function? A case-cohort study

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    Gramling Robert

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More optimistic perceptions of cardiovascular disease risk are associated with substantively lower rates of cardiovascular death among men. It remains unknown whether this association represents causality (i.e. perception leads to actions/conditions that influence cardiovascular disease occurrence or residual confounding by unmeasured factors that associate with risk perceptions and with physiological processes that promote cardiovascular disease (i.e. inflammation or endothelial dysfunction. Purpose To evaluate whether previously unmeasured biological markers of inflammation or endothelial dysregulation confound the observed association between cardiovascular disease risk perceptions and cardiovascular disease outcomes; Methods We conducted a nested case-cohort study among community-dwelling men from Southeastern New England (USA who were interviewed between 1989 and 1990 as part of the Pawtucket Heart Health Program. We measured C-reactive protein (CRP and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF levels from stored sera for a random sample of the parent cohort (control sample, n = 127 and all cases of cardiovascular death observed through 2005 (case sample, n = 44. We evaluated potential confounding using stratified analyses and logistic regression modeling. Results Optimistic ratings of risk associated with lower odds of dying from cardiovascular causes among men (OR = 0.39, 95% CI = 0.17, 0.91. Neither CRP nor VEGF confounded these findings. Conclusions The strong cardio-protective association between optimistic ratings of cardiovascular disease risk and lower rates of cardiovascular mortality among men is not confounded by baseline biomarkers of systemic inflammation or endothelial dysfunction.

  15. Inflammation and premature aging in advanced chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooman, Jeroen P; Dekker, Marijke J; Usvyat, Len A; Kotanko, Peter; van der Sande, Frank M; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Shiels, Paul G; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2017-10-01

    Systemic inflammation in end-stage renal disease is an established risk factor for mortality and a catalyst for other complications, which are related to a premature aging phenotype, including muscle wasting, vascular calcification, and other forms of premature vascular disease, depression, osteoporosis, and frailty. Uremic inflammation is also mechanistically related to mechanisms involved in the aging process, such as telomere shortening, mitochondrial dysfunction, and altered nutrient sensing, which can have a direct effect on cellular and tissue function. In addition to uremia-specific causes, such as abnormalities in the phosphate-Klotho axis, there are remarkable similarities between the pathophysiology of uremic inflammation and so-called "inflammaging" in the general population. Potentially relevant, but still somewhat unexplored in this respect, are abnormal or misplaced protein structures, as well as abnormalities in tissue homeostasis, which evoke danger signals through damage-associated molecular patterns, as well as the senescence-associated secretory phenotype. Systemic inflammation, in combination with the loss of kidney function, can impair the resilience of the body to external and internal stressors by reduced functional and structural tissue reserves, and by impairing normal organ crosstalk, thus providing an explanation for the greatly increased risk of homeostatic breakdown in this population. In this review, the relationship between uremic inflammation and a premature aging phenotype, as well as potential causes and consequences, are discussed. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Toll-Like Receptors, Inflammation, and Calcific Aortic Valve Disease

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    Carmen García-Rodríguez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation, the primary response of innate immunity, is essential to initiate the calcification process underlying calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD, the most prevalent valvulopathy in Western countries. The pathogenesis of CAVD is multifactorial and includes inflammation, hemodynamic factors, fibrosis, and active calcification. In the development of CAVD, both innate and adaptive immune responses are activated, and accumulating evidences show the central role of inflammation in the initiation and propagation phases of the disease, being the function of Toll-like receptors (TLR particularly relevant. These receptors act as sentinels of the innate immune system by recognizing pattern molecules from both pathogens and host-derived molecules released after tissue damage. TLR mediate inflammation via NF-κB routes within and beyond the immune system, and play a crucial role in the control of infection and the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. This review outlines the current notions about the association between TLR signaling and the ensuing development of inflammation and fibrocalcific remodeling in the pathogenesis of CAVD. Recent data provide new insights into the inflammatory and osteogenic responses underlying the disease and further support the hypothesis that inflammation plays a mechanistic role in the initiation and progression of CAVD. These findings make TLR signaling a potential target for therapeutic intervention in CAVD.

  17. Pannexin1 as mediator of inflammation and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo Yanguas, Sara; Willebrords, Joost; Johnstone, Scott R; Maes, Michaël; Decrock, Elke; De Bock, Marijke; Leybaert, Luc; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2017-01-01

    Pannexins form channels at the plasma membrane surface that establish a pathway for communication between the cytosol of individual cells and their extracellular environment. By doing so, pannexin signaling dictates several physiological functions, but equally underlies a number of pathological processes. Indeed, pannexin channels drive inflammation by assisting in the activation of inflammasomes, the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and the activation and migration of leukocytes. Furthermore, these cellular pores facilitate cell death, including apoptosis, pyroptosis and autophagy. The present paper reviews the roles of pannexin channels in inflammation and cell death. In a first part, a state-of-the-art overview of pannexin channel structure, regulation and function is provided. In a second part, the mechanisms behind their involvement in inflammation and cell death are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Biomimetic nanoparticles for inflammation targeting

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    Kai Jin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been many recent exciting developments in biomimetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications. Inflammation, a protective response involving immune cells, blood vessels, and molecular mediators directed against harmful stimuli, is closely associated with many human diseases. As a result, biomimetic nanoparticles mimicking immune cells can help achieve molecular imaging and precise drug delivery to these inflammatory sites. This review is focused on inflammation-targeting biomimetic nanoparticles and will provide an in-depth look at the design of these nanoparticles to maximize their benefits for disease diagnosis and treatment.

  19. Obesity-associated low-grade inflammation in type 2 diabetes mellitus: causes and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Greevenbroek, M M J; Schalkwijk, C G; Stehouwer, C D A

    2013-05-01

    The epidemic of overweight and obesity is a major problem because of the plethora of health and economic issues that it induces. Key among these is the sharply increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease. The development of T2D is characterised by two processes: 1) insulin resistance, resulting from impaired insulin signalling and leading to an increased demand for insulin, which must be met by increased insulin production by pancreatic β-cells (compensatory β-cell function); and 2) β-cell dysfunction, with T2D developing when the amount of insulin that is produced is insufficient to meet the demand. Overweight and obesity, especially in case of abdominal fat accumulation, are associated with systemic low-grade inf lammation. This low-grade inf lammation is characterised by, among other things, higher levels of circulating proinflammatory cytokines and fatty acids. These can interfere with normal insulin function and thereby induce insulin resistance, and have also been implicated in β-cell dysfunction. This review focuses on the known and emerging relations between inflammation and T2D. We first discuss current views on the effects of fat distribution on adipose tissue inflammation and adipose tissue dysfunction. Next we focus on the detrimental roles of proinflammatory cytokines and fatty acids on insulin signalling and β-cell function. In the last part of this review we provide some insight into novel players in (the initiation of) inflammation in overweight and obesity, and their effects on T2D and vascular dysfunction.

  20. Dysregulated Intrahepatic CD4+ T-Cell Activation Drives Liver Inflammation in Ileitis-Prone SAMP1/YitFc MiceSummary

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    Sara Omenetti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Liver inflammation is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, but whether liver involvement is a consequence of a primary intestinal defect or results from alternative pathogenic processes remains unclear. Therefore, we sought to determine the potential pathogenic mechanism(s of concomitant liver inflammation in an established murine model of IBD. Methods: Liver inflammation and immune cell subsets were characterized in ileitis-prone SAMP1/YitFc (SAMP and AKR/J (AKR control mice, lymphocyte-depleted SAMP (SAMPxRag-1−/−, and immunodeficient SCID recipient mice receiving SAMP or AKR donor CD4+ T cells. Proliferation and suppressive capacity of CD4+ T-effector (Teff and T-regulatory (Treg cells from gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT and livers of SAMP and AKR mice were measured. Results: Surprisingly, prominent inflammation was detected in 4-week-old SAMP livers before histologic evidence of ileitis, whereas both disease phenotypes were absent in age-matched AKR mice. SAMP liver disease was characterized by abundant infiltration of lymphocytes, required for hepatic inflammation to occur, a TH1-skewed environment, and phenotypically activated CD4+ T cells. SAMP intrahepatic CD4+ T cells also had the ability to induce liver and ileal inflammation when adoptively transferred into SCID recipients, whereas GALT-derived CD4+ T cells produced milder ileitis but not liver inflammation. Interestingly, SAMP intrahepatic CD4+ Teff cells showed increased proliferation compared with both SAMP GALT- and AKR liver-derived CD4+ Teff cells, and SAMP intrahepatic Tregs were decreased among CD4+ T cells and impaired in in vitro suppressive function compared with AKR. Conclusions: Activated intrahepatic CD4+ T cells induce liver inflammation